What does Miracles mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
δυνάμεις strength power 12
δυνάμεσιν strength power 2
δυνάμεσι strength power 1
δυνάμεων strength power 1
נִפְלְאֹתָ֡יו to be marvellous 1

Definitions Related to Miracles

G1411


   1 strength power, ability.
      1a inherent power, power residing in a thing by virtue of its nature, or which a person or thing exerts and puts forth.
      1b power for performing Miracles.
      1c moral power and excellence of soul.
      1d the power and influence which belong to riches and wealth.
      1e power and resources arising from numbers.
      1f power consisting in or resting upon armies, forces, hosts.
      Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 970, bia; 1753, energeia; 1849, exousia; 2479, ischus; and 2904, kratos.
      See entry 5820 for comparison of synonyms.
      

H6381


   1 to be marvellous, be wonderful, be surpassing, be extraordinary, separate by distinguishing action.
      1a (Niphal).
         1a1 to be beyond one’s power, be difficult to do.
         1a2 to be difficult to understand.
         1a3 to be wonderful, be extraordinary.
            1a3a marvellous (participle).
      1b (Piel) to separate (an offering).
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to do extraordinary or hard or difficult thing.
         1c2 to make wonderful, do wondrously.
      1d (Hithpael) to show oneself wonderful or marvellous.
      

Frequency of Miracles (original languages)

Frequency of Miracles (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Christ, Miracles of
They may be divided into five classes:
nature miracles
miracles of healing
deliverance of demoniacs
victories over hostile wills
cases of resurrection
NATURE MIRACLES
Under this head nine miracles may be enumerated.
Changing of the water into wine at Cans (John 2)
First miraculous draught of fishes (Luke 5)
Calming of the tempest (Matthew 8; Mark 4; Luke 8)
First multiplication of loaves (Matthew 14; Mark 6; Luke 9; John 6)
Jesus's walking on the Water (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Second multiplication of loaves (Matthew 15; Mark 8)
Stater in the fish's mouth (Matthew 17)
Cursing of the fig-tree (Matthew 21; Mark 11)
Second miraculous draught of fishes (John 21)
MIRACLES OF HEALING
These were numerous during the public life of Our Lord. There are references to a great many cures which are not related in detail (Matthew 4; Luke 4,6; Mark 6), and twenty special cases are recorded.
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life. Special cases related are,
Demoniac of Capharnaum (Mark 1; Luke 4)
Deaf and dumb demoniac (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Gerasene demoniacs (Matthew 8; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Dumb demoniac (Matt., 9).
Daughter of the Syro.Phenician woman (Matt., 15; Mark 7).
Lunatic child (Matt., 17; Mark 9; Luke 9).
Woman with the spirit of infirmity (Luke 13).
VICTORIES OVER HOSTILE WILLS
Under this heading Catholic scholars admit a greater or smaller number of miracles; it is not clear in certain cases whether the incidents in which Our Lord wielded extraordinary power over His enemies were cases of supernatural intervention of Divine power, or the natural effects of the ascendancy of His human will over that of other men. Such are the cases mentioned in John (7:30,44; 8:20 and 59), where the Jews failed to arrest Him, "because His hour was not yet come," or, in the fourth case, because He hid Himself from them. There are two cases which appear to most Catholic commentators to involve a supernatural display of power over wills: (1) the casting out of the vendors (John 2; Matthew 21; Mark 11; Luke 19); (2) the episode of the escape from the hostile crowd at Nazareth (Luke 4).
CASES OF RESURRECTION
Among the signs of His Messiasship which Our Lord gave to the delegates of John the Baptist, we read: "The dead rise again" (Matthew 11; Luke 7). This general statement has made some commentators think that there were cases of resurrection not described in the Gospels. This is possible, because the Gospels do not aim at completeness, but the expression quoted would be justified by the three following cases of resurrection which are related.
Raising of the daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Raising of the son of the widow of Naim (Luke 7)
Raising of Lazarus (John 11)
The subject of the miracles of Christ has been well dealt with, both from an apologetic and an exegetic point of view, by L. C. Fillion in Les Miracles de Notre Seigneur Jesus Christ (Paris, 1909), and more recently, from an apologetic point of view, by Loonce de Grandmaison in Jesus Christ, Sa Personne, Son Message, See Preuves.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Miracles of Christ
They may be divided into five classes:
nature miracles
miracles of healing
deliverance of demoniacs
victories over hostile wills
cases of resurrection
NATURE MIRACLES
Under this head nine miracles may be enumerated.
Changing of the water into wine at Cans (John 2)
First miraculous draught of fishes (Luke 5)
Calming of the tempest (Matthew 8; Mark 4; Luke 8)
First multiplication of loaves (Matthew 14; Mark 6; Luke 9; John 6)
Jesus's walking on the Water (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Second multiplication of loaves (Matthew 15; Mark 8)
Stater in the fish's mouth (Matthew 17)
Cursing of the fig-tree (Matthew 21; Mark 11)
Second miraculous draught of fishes (John 21)
MIRACLES OF HEALING
These were numerous during the public life of Our Lord. There are references to a great many cures which are not related in detail (Matthew 4; Luke 4,6; Mark 6), and twenty special cases are recorded.
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life. Special cases related are,
Demoniac of Capharnaum (Mark 1; Luke 4)
Deaf and dumb demoniac (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Gerasene demoniacs (Matthew 8; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Dumb demoniac (Matt., 9).
Daughter of the Syro.Phenician woman (Matt., 15; Mark 7).
Lunatic child (Matt., 17; Mark 9; Luke 9).
Woman with the spirit of infirmity (Luke 13).
VICTORIES OVER HOSTILE WILLS
Under this heading Catholic scholars admit a greater or smaller number of miracles; it is not clear in certain cases whether the incidents in which Our Lord wielded extraordinary power over His enemies were cases of supernatural intervention of Divine power, or the natural effects of the ascendancy of His human will over that of other men. Such are the cases mentioned in John (7:30,44; 8:20 and 59), where the Jews failed to arrest Him, "because His hour was not yet come," or, in the fourth case, because He hid Himself from them. There are two cases which appear to most Catholic commentators to involve a supernatural display of power over wills: (1) the casting out of the vendors (John 2; Matthew 21; Mark 11; Luke 19); (2) the episode of the escape from the hostile crowd at Nazareth (Luke 4).
CASES OF RESURRECTION
Among the signs of His Messiasship which Our Lord gave to the delegates of John the Baptist, we read: "The dead rise again" (Matthew 11; Luke 7). This general statement has made some commentators think that there were cases of resurrection not described in the Gospels. This is possible, because the Gospels do not aim at completeness, but the expression quoted would be justified by the three following cases of resurrection which are related.
Raising of the daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Raising of the son of the widow of Naim (Luke 7)
Raising of Lazarus (John 11)
The subject of the miracles of Christ has been well dealt with, both from an apologetic and an exegetic point of view, by L. C. Fillion in Les Miracles de Notre Seigneur Jesus Christ (Paris, 1909), and more recently, from an apologetic point of view, by Loonce de Grandmaison in Jesus Christ, Sa Personne, Son Message, See Preuves.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Miracles
Three distinct New Testament Greek words represent miracles: seemeion , "a sign"; teras , "a prodigy"; dunamis , "a mighty work." Septuagint uses seemeion and teras for Hebrew 'owt and mopheth (Exodus 7:9). Seemeion, "sign," views the miracle as evidence of a divine commission: John 3:2, "no man can do these signs (Greek) which Thou doest except God be with him" (John 9:30; John 9:33; John 15:24; Luke 7:19-22); teras , "prodigy" or "wonder," expresses the effect on the spectator; dunamis , "mighty work," marks its performance by a superhuman power (Acts 2:22; 2 Corinthians 12:12; 2 Thessalonians 2:9). The "sign" is God's seal, attestation, or proof of a revelation being genuine. Jesus' miracles were not merely wonders but signs; signs not merely of His power, but of the nature of His ministry and of His divine person.
A grand distinction peculiar to Christianity is, it won the world to it in an age of high civilization, through a few preachers of humble position, on the evidence of miracles. Basing its claim on miracles the creed of the slave became eventually the faith of the Caesars. Muhammed on the contrary, even in a half-enlightened age and country, pretended no miracle. Christ and His apostles still less than Mahomet among friends would have dared to allege miracles, in the midst of hostile Jews and skeptical Romans, unless they were true. This claim is the more striking, since John the Baptist, though coming "in the spirit and power of Elias," the great miracle worker of the Old Testament, never claimed miraculous power; so far is Scripture from indiscriminately gratifying men's love of the marvelous at the cost of truth.
Similarly, Abraham, David, and other Old Testament heroes never appear as miracle workers. Early Christian writers, Justin Martyr, Tertullian, and Origen, occasionally appeal to miracles in proof of Christianity; but state that their pagan opponents, admitting the facts, attributed them to magic; which accounts for the fewness of their references to miracles. The Jewish writings, as the Sepher Toldoth Jeshu, also the extant fragments of Celsus, Porphyry, and Julian, admit the fact of the miracles, though ascribing them to magic and evil spirits. In the case of the resurrection (Matthew 28:11-15) and the cure of the blind man (John 9) the Jews made a self confuted charge of fraud. The early Christian apologists allege in support of Christianity:
(1) the greatness, number, completeness, and publicity of the miracles;
(2) the beneficial tendency of the doctrine;
(3) the connection of the miracles with prophecy and the whole scheme of redemption from Adam to Christ. The miracles must have been altogether different from the wonders of exorcists, magicians, etc.; else they would not have gained for the gospel so wide and permanent an acceptance. The effect of Philip's ministry on the Samaritans, in opposition to Simon Magus (Acts 8), proves this. The holy character of Christ and His apostles, and the tendency of Christianity to promote truth and virtue, are against the origination of the miracles from evil spirits or jugglery. In the fourth century miracles had ceased (Chrysostom on 1 Corinthians 11-13); in the third, miracles are alleged, but are suspicious, as wrought among those already believing and predisposed to accept prodigies credulously. The ecclesiastical miracles are not attested by inspired writers. The apostles alone could transmit the power of working miracles to others. Cornelius was an exception, being the firstfruit of the Gentiles.
But Philip could not impart it; Peter and John must come to confer on his Samaritan converts miraculous gifts, by laying on of hands (Acts 8:15-20; Acts 10:44-46; Acts 19:6; Mark 16:17-18). Christianity being once proved and attested to us, the analogy of God's dealings leads us to expect He would leave it to make its way by ordinary means; the edifice being erected, the scaffolding is taken down; perpetual miracle is contrary to His ways. The ecclesiastical miracles alleged are ambiguous, or tentative, or legendary, i.e. resembling known products of human credulity and imposture. Many are childish, and palpably framed for superstitious believers, rather than as evidences capable of bearing critical scrutiny. Most of them are not told until long after their presumed occurrence. Herein the New Testament miracles wholly differ from them. The Christian miracles are:
(1) Recorded by contemporaries.
(2) In the same country.
(3) Not based on transient rumor, but confirmed by subsequent investigation, and recorded in independent accounts.
(4) Not naked history, but the history combined with the institution and with the religion of our day, as also with the time and place of the miracle recorded and of Christianity's origin.
(5) With particular specification of names, places, dates, and circumstances.
(6) Not requiring merely otiose assent, as the popular superstitions on which nothing depends, but claiming to regulate the opinions and acts of people.
(7) Not like popish miracles in Roman Catholic countries, in affirmation of opinions already formed, but performed amidst enemies, converting men from their most cherished prejudices; there was no anterior persuasion to lay hold of, Jesus' miracles gave birth to the sect; frauds might mix with the progress, but could not have place in the commencement of the religion.
(8) Not an imaginary perception, as Socrates' demon; the giving sight to the blind leaves a lasting effect; in those of a mixed nature the principal miracle is momentary, but some circumstance combined with it is permanent; Peter's vision might be a dream, but the message of Cornelius could not have been; the concurrence could only be supernatural.
(9) Not tentative, where out of many trials some succeed, as the ancient oracles, cures wrought by relics, etc.
(10) Not doubtful miracles, as the liquefaction of Januarius' blood, cures of nervous ailments.
(11) Not stories which can be resolved into exaggerations.
(12) Not gradual, but instantaneous for the most part (Luke 18:43); not incomplete; not merely temporary, but complete and lasting.
(13) Witnessed to at the cost of suffering and death. (Paley, Evidences of Christianity.)
A miracle is not a "violation of the laws of nature" (Hume), but the introduction of a new agent. Such introduction accords with human experience, for we see an intelligent agent often modifying the otherwise uniform laws of nature. "Experience" informs us of human free will counteracting the lower law of gravitation. Infinitely more can the divine will introduce a new element, counteracting, without destroying, lower physical law; the higher law for a time controls and suspends the action of the lower. Or, "law" being simply the expression of God's will, in miracles God's will intervenes, for certain moral ends, to suspend His ordinary mode of working. The wise men following the star, and then receiving further guidance from the Scripture word, illustrate the twofold revelation, God's works, and God's word, the highest guide. Both meet in the Incarnate Word (Matthew 2; 2 Peter 1:19-21). As disturbance has entered the world by sin, as nature visibly attests, God must needs miraculously interfere to nullify that disturbance.
Hume alleged against miracles their contrariety to "experience," and that experience shows testimony to be often false. But "experience" is not to be limited to our time and knowledge. The "experience" of the witnesses for Christianity attests the truth of miracles. However improbable miracles are under ordinary circumstances, they are probable, nay necessary, to attest a religious revelation and a divine commission. "In whatever degree it is probable that a revelation should be communicated to mankind at all, in the same degree is it probable that miracles should be wrought" (Paley, Evidences of Christianity). That they are out of the ordinary course of nature, so far from being an objection, is just what they need to be in order to be fit signs to attest a revelation. It is as easy to God to continue the ordinary course of the rest of nature, with the change of one part, as of all the phenomena without any change. It is objected, miracles "interrupt the course of nature."
But as that course really comprises the whole series of God's government of the universe, moral as well as physical, miracles are doubtless included in it. In this point of view Butler remarks, nothing less than another world, placed in circumstances similar to our own, can furnish an argument from analogy against the credibility of miracles. They have some known general laws, e.g. they are infrequent, they are signs attesting a revelation; and probably have other laws as yet unknown. The testimony to Christian miracles is that of concurrent and contemporaneous witnesses. The religion so attested specifically differs from the false religions which false miracles have been alleged to support. To draw from the latter a reason against the former is utterly illogical. The argument is the other way, namely, since palpably false religions were propped up by false miracles a pure religion like Christianity is not likely to rest on false miracles.
In estimating the value of the testimony to Christ's miracles it is to be remembered there is no counter testimony. The unbelieving Jews admitted them, but attributed them to Satan. Jesus replied, Satan would never help to overthrow his own kingdom. Besides the evidential value of miracles, they are intimately and internally connected with Christianity as a new creation springing from God manifest in the flesh. That the new creating powers brought into the world in Christ should manifest themselves in miraculous agencies was a necessary consequence of His own manifestation or epiphany. The redemption of mankind from sin was typified, and its earnest given, in the redemption of individuals from the ailments which are sin's consequences. Christ's "bearing our griefs and carrying our sorrows" in His own assumed manhood guaranteed His healing human sicknesses and infirmities.
The miracle of active compassion necessarily flowed from His divine power and human sympathy combined in His incarnation, of which the atonement is the crown (Matthew 8:17; Isaiah 53:4). The history and separate existence of the Israelite church (the sole instance of a pure theism in the ancient world) it is impossible to explain without accepting the miracles which the same Scripture records; so Christianity and Christendom can only be explained by accepting the miracles which introduced them. Both dispensations were inaugurated by miracles, and then mainly left to ordinary providence; only that the Old Testament church, at times when surrounding paganism, as in Elijah's times, threatened to swamp it, was vindicated by miracles. Its miracles are miracles of power, to impress a rude age; the New Testament miracles were miracles of love.
The Old Testament miracles were for the foe's destruction; Christ's were miracles of mercy, except the withering of the fig tree and the sending the demons into the swine to perish, both symbolical lessons of warning to man. Many miracles were typical; as the "tongues" manifested the universality of the Christian dispensation designed for every tongue, so counterworking the division of man from man through the confusion of tongues at Babel; the casting out of demons symbolizes Christ's coming "to destroy the works of the devil." Miracles thus were manifestations of the Holy Spirit's presence and operation in the church. The Old Testament miracles attested God's presence as King of the theocracy; though this involved a continual series of miracles, yet as the theocracy was temporary and local those miracles did not violate God's ordinary government of the world by the laws of nature. The Christian miracles on the contrary, as attesting a permanent and universal dispensation, were properly limited to its commencement.
Christ performed His miracles more for others' preservation than His own. Christ's mission, doctrine, and life, and Christ's miracles mutually depend on one another. Those were worthy objects for which to suspend the so-called (lower) laws of nature, and they illustrate the new spiritual and material creation which He introduces into our fallen world. Therefore that His miracles were false would be far harder to believe than that the testimony which supports them is true. Pritchard observes, Christ's miracles, as His parables, go on the principle of the law of continuity of the human with the divine. So the ten Egyptian plagues have a demonstrable connection with Egyptian phenomena, in most cases not reversing, but developing, nature's forces for a foretold particular end and at a defined time. (See EGYPT; EXODUS.)
Thus the first plague turning the Nile to blood answers to the natural phenomenon of the water becoming, before the rise, first green, then clear yellow about the 25th of June, and gradually ochre red through microscopic cryptogams and infusoria, at times smelling offensively (Exodus 7:17-21). The supernatural element was the sudden change at Moses' word and act, killing the fish and making the water unfit for use, results not following the ordinary discoloration. So the frogs, accordant with natural phenomena usual in September, but miraculous in extent, intensity, and connection with Moses' word and act. So the dust, or black fertile soil of the Nile basin, called "chemi ," from whence Egypt's ancient name was derived, producing "lice" or tick.
So the dogflies or else beetles; and the murrain, an epidemic often in December succeeding the inundation; and the boils, hail, locusts, and "darkness which might be felt," arising from masses of fine sand filling the atmosphere, the S.W. wind blowing it from the desert. That miracles harmonize with nature in some degree is what we might expect, since the God of revelation is the God of nature. The style of the same author in a new book will resemble his style in former books, only with such changes as the subject requires. The book of nature and the book of redemption are from the same God, written in different characters, but mutually analogous. Leslie (Short Method with the Deists) observes four notes of truth in the Mosaic miracles:
1. They were such as men's senses can clearly judge of.
2. Publicly wrought; two nations, Israel and Egypt, were affected by them, and above two million Israelites for 40 years witnessed them.
3. Public monuments and, what is more convincing, outward observances continually were retained in commemoration of the facts.
4. These monuments and observances were set up at the time the events took place, and continued without interruption afterward. (Compare Deuteronomy 8:4; Exodus 20:18; Matthew 14:35-36; Exodus 8:10; Exodus 8:23; Exodus 8:22; Exodus 9:5; Exodus 9:18; Exodus 9:25-26; Exodus 10:4-5; Exodus 10:14; Exodus 10:22-23; Exodus 12:29; Exodus 16:17, etc.; Exodus 19:10, etc.; Joshua 3:16; Numbers 16; Deuteronomy 5:22-23; Numbers 21; 2 Kings 18).
Graves (Pentat. 6) observes we have two histories of Moses and his miracles, one in his book, the other in Israel's laws and ceremonies which are a living witness, not only of the Pentateuch history in general, but also of the miracles it records (Daniel 7:9-13; compare Numbers 3:11; Numbers 3:46); its facts are inseparably connected with the miraculous. However indifferent nations become as to religion, they never are so as to property; now miracles were the foundation of the Hebrew polity and of the tenure and regulations of property, e.g. the Jubilee restoration. And the religion and government were so closely connected as to presuppose a peculiar providence rewarding or punishing temporally obedience or disobedience. The effect of the miracles under Joshua kept all his generation faithful to Jehovah, so real and convincing were they (Joshua 24:31; Judges 2:7).
Messiah's miracles were foretold (Isaiah 35:5-6; Isaiah 42:7), and so were asked for by John Baptist (Matthew 11:2-4), and made the ground by the people of calling Him "Son of David" (Matthew 12:23; John 7:45-461). Their aim was not merely to astonish, for many were wrought in behalf of and before obscure persons. When asked for a startling "sign from heaven" He refused (Luke 11:16). The 40 miracles of Christ recorded are but samples out of a greater number (John 2:23; John 20:30-31; Matthew 4:23; Matthew 8:16; Matthew 9:35; Matthew 12:15; Matthew 14:14; Exodus 40:38; Acts 4:10-126; Matthew 19:2; Matthew 21:14). Three He restored to life in an ascending gradation: Jairus' daughter just dead, the Nain widow's son being carried to burial, Lazarus four days dead and decomposing (Matthew 9:18; Luke 7:11-12; John 11).
Six demons He cast out, two of which witnessed He is "the Holy One ... the Son of the Most High God" (Mark 1:24; Mark 5:2; Matthew 9:32; Matthew 15:22; Matthew 17:15; Luke 11:15). Seventeen He cured of sicknesses, fever, leprosy, palsy, infirmity, withered hand, issue of blood, dropsy, blindness, deafness, muteness (John 9:39-41; John 5:5; John 9:1; Matthew 8:2; Matthew 8:5; Matthew 8:14; Matthew 9:2; Matthew 9:20; Matthew 9:27; Matthew 12:10; Mark 8:22; Luke 13:11; Luke 17:12; Luke 18:35; Luke 22:51); this class is that of miracles bringing in love relief to suffering man. Another class shows His control over nature: creating wine out of water (John 2); feeding 5,000 and 4,000 with bread multiplied manifold (Matthew 14:16; Matthew 15:36); passing unseen through a crowd, setting aside natural laws (Luke 4:30); giving draughts of fish when the fishermen had caught none (Luke 5:4; John 21:6); stilling the storm (Matthew 8:26); walking on the sea (Matthew 14:25), God's attribute, Job 9:8; transfiguring His countenance (Matthew 17:1); directing the fish with the tribute shekel to Peter, and Peter to the fish (Matthew 17:27).
Another class is: His overawing men; twice turning out of the temple the sellers and moneychangers (Matthew 21:12; John 2:13); alone dud unarmed striking fear into the officers sent to take Him twice (1618065298_95; John 18:6). He justified His healing on the Sabbath on the same ground as God is above the Sabbath law, working on it as on other days for the sustenance of all life and being (John 5:17), "My Father worketh hereto and I work," thus as the Jews truly alleged calling "God His own (in an exclusive sense, idion ) Father," and "making Himself equal with God." Love to man, unweariedly active, is as conspicuous in His miracles as power. The connection of His miracles with His redeeming work is the reason why faith was the needed preliminary on the part of the recipients of healing (Mark 6:5-6; Mark 7:29; Matthew 9:28-29). If miracles were mere wonders anyone would have been a fit witness of their performance.
But the miracles were designed to attract the witnesses to His kingdom. They were symbolical of spiritual needs met by the Redeemer; vehicles of instruction as well as signs of His divine commission. Performed in His own name and in the first person, "I say unto thee" (Luke 7:14); but the apostles' miracles were in His name (Acts 3:6; 1618065298_10). Faith in His power to heal the body prepared the way for faith in His power to heal the soul. Disbelief disqualified for appreciating miracles. To work miracles before hardened unbelievers would only aggravate their opposition, sin, and condemnation (John 15:24; John 4:47). They crowned their enmity by attributing His casting out of demons to Beelzebub. The "sign" of Jonah in his virtual burial and resurrection, and the sign of their destroying the temple of His body and His raising it in three days (John 2:18-21; Matthew 16:4), were the only sign which remained to convince them.
His resurrection is the central miracle toward which all the rest converge. He would give them no such sign as they craved, a startling phenomenon in the sky visible and indisputable to all. He would still give such signs of unobtrusive mercy as hereto; if they not only still reject them but also His resurrection, there only remains the last condemning sign, the Son of man coming with the clouds of heaven (Revelation 1:7; Exodus 13:1). His name is "Wonderful" or "miracle" (Isaiah 9:6; Judges 13:18-19). He is an embodied miracle, the Miracle of miracles. His incarnation and His resurrection include all between, and involve the wonders of Pentecost. Christ's charge that the eye witnesses should not report His miracles (Matthew 9:30; Mark 5:43; Mark 7:36) was in order that men should not dissociate the wonder from His redeeming work.
To John the Baptist on the contrary He sent a report of His miracles, because John was not likely to dissever His miracles from His person and His work. His gestures, laying hands on the patient, anointing the blind eyes with clay, putting His finger into the deaf ear and touching the dumb tongue, creating much bread out of little not out of nothing, condescending to use means though in themselves wholly inadequate, all are tokens of His identifying Himself with us men, signs of His person at once human and divine and of His redeeming and sympathizing work for us. If the incarnation be denied, Christianity's existence is an effect without an adequate cause; grant the incarnation, and miracles are its necessary concomitant and natural consequence. To deny testimony because of the improbability of the facts attested would involve the denial of the Napoleonic history and other facts notoriously true.
The truth of the miracles is confirmed incidentally by the fact that in no nation but Israel have the knowledge and worship of the one true God, the Creator, been maintained by the mere light of nature, and Israel was far from overtopping other nations in mental power and civilization. A divine power alone could have so elevated Israel by an extraordinary call, confirmed by miracles. The prophecies, the morality, the structure of the Bible, and Christianity's conquest of the Roman world and its public establishment about 300 years after the execution of its Founder as a malefactor, similarly confirm the miracles which attest to its divinity. The improbability of the Christian religion being established WITH miracles is not nearly so great as the improbability of its being established WITHOUT miracles. Strauss' mythic theory, namely, that the story of Jesus embodies the nation's cherished idea of what the Messiah was expected to do, and therefore was believed to have done, is counter to the fact that the Jews expected a reigning Messiah, who should not die but deliver them from their Roman masters.
The gravity, simplicity, and historical consistency of the New Testament incidents with the otherwise known circumstances of the times, and the internal marks of the date of writing being soon after the occurrence of the facts, are all against the mythic theory, especially in a non-legendary but historical age. How unlike they are to the really mythic apocryphal Gospels, e.g. that of Nicodemus, the Ebionites, etc. No miracles of Jesus' youth are mentioned; there is no description of His personal appearance, nor of His doings in the world of spirits; no miracles of the Virgin Mary: omissions sure to be supplied in a legendary story. The hostility of the Jewish nation to Christianity confirms the gospel miracles. Had the Jews been generally converted by them, the septic might argue with plausibility that the facts had been invented or exaggerated to gratify the national propensity, credited without examination or proof, and all inquiry checked at the only period when inquiry could have detected imposition.
But now we are certain that the gospel miracles were wrought in the presence of enemies, and so subjected to the severest scrutiny. Joel (Joel 2:28-29-31) apparently foretells a fuller outpouring of the Spirit accompanied with "prophesying," "dreams," and "wonders," in connection with and before "the great and terrible day of the Lord" (compare Zechariah 12:10). Also Matthew 24:24; Matthew 24:29, "false Christs and prophets shall show great signs and wonders, inasmuch that if it were possible they shall deceive the very elect ... immediately after ... the sun shall be darkened." So 2 Thessalonians 2:9, "the coining of that wicked one
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Miracles
God is shown in the Bible to be a God of miracles. But miracles do not feature consistently throughout the biblical record. Rather they are grouped largely around three main periods.
The first of these periods was the time of the Israelites’ bondage in Egypt, which challenged God’s purposes to establish his people as an independent nation. By mighty acts God saved his people and brought them into the land he had promised them (Deuteronomy 4:34-35; Joshua 4:23-24). The second period was that of Elijah and Elisha, when Israel’s religion was threatened with destruction. By some unusual miracles God preserved the minority who remained faithful to him, and acted in judgment against those who tried to wipe out the worship of Yahweh from Israel (1 Kings 19:15-18). The third period was that of the coming of the kingdom of God through Jesus Christ and the establishment of his church through those to whom he had given his special power (Acts 2:22; Acts 3:6; Acts 4:10; 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 12:28-29; 2 Corinthians 12:12).
Of all the miracles, the greatest are those that concern the birth and resurrection of Jesus. God’s act in becoming a human being is itself a miracle so great that it overshadows the means by which it happened, namely, the miraculous conception in the womb of a virgin (Matthew 1:18-23; John 1:14; see VIRGIN). The resurrection is a miracle so basic to the Christian faith that without it there can be no Christian faith (1 Corinthians 15:12-14; see RESURRECTION).
Miracles and nature
If we believe in a personal God who created and controls the world (Genesis 1:1; Colossians 1:16-17), we should have no trouble in believing the biblical record of the miracles he performed. The physical creation is not something self-sufficient or mechanical, as if it were like a huge clock that, once wound up, runs on automatically till finally God stops it. The God of creation is a living God who is active in his creation (John 5:17).
God deals with people as responsible beings whom he has placed in a world where everything is in a state of constant change. Being sensitive to the needs of his creatures, he may work in his creation in an extraordinary, even miraculous, way for their benefit (Exodus 17:6; Joshua 10:11-14; 2 Kings 4:42-44; Mark 6:47-51).
On the other hand, God does not work miracles every time someone wants him to. If he did there would be chaos. God’s control of the universe is designed to produce order (Job 38:4-41; Job 39; Psalms 147:8-9; Psalms 147:16-18; Matthew 5:45).
Since God is the controller of nature, he may have performed many of his miraculous works not by doing something ‘contrary to nature’, but by using the normal workings of nature in a special way. The miracle was in the timing, extent or intensity of the event.
Such divine activity may help to explain events such as the plagues of Egypt, the crossing of the Red Sea, the crossing of the Jordan River, the collapse of Jericho’s walls and some of the healings performed by Jesus. But even if these can be explained as having natural causes, they were still miracles to those who saw them. They happened as predicted, even though the chances of their so happening appeared to be almost nil (Exodus 7:17; Exodus 8:2; Joshua 3:8-13).
This still leaves unexplained the large number of miracles for which there seem to be no natural causes. Such supernatural interventions by God are not attacks on the so-called laws of nature. What we call the laws of nature are not forces that make things happen, but statements of what people have discovered concerning how nature works. It is God who makes things happens; the ‘laws of nature’ merely summarize the processes by which such things happen. When God acts supernaturally, his actions may be contrary to the way people has usually seen nature work, but his actions do not break any laws of nature. They merely provide new circumstances through which nature works.
God is always the creator of life, the healer of diseases, the calmer of storms and the provider of food, whether he does so through the normal processes of nature or through some miraculous intervention. Through the ages God has sent the rain to water the grapes to produce the wine, but he may choose to hasten the process by turning water into wine immediately (John 2:1-11). God has also at times withheld the rain and so caused trees gradually to dry up, but again he may choose to intervene and hasten the process (Matthew 21:18-19).
The purpose of miracles
Miracles were usually ‘signs’, that is, works of God that revealed his power and purposes (Exodus 7:3; Deuteronomy 4:34; Isaiah 7:11; Matthew 16:1; John 2:11; John 6:14; John 20:30; Acts 2:43; see SIGNS). However, messengers of God never used miracles just to impress people or to persuade people to believe them (Matthew 12:38-39; Luke 23:8). It was the false prophet who used apparent miracles to gain a following (Deuteronomy 13:1-3; Matthew 24:24; 2 Thessalonians 2:9-11; Revelation 13:13-14). God’s miracles were usually linked with faith (2 Kings 3:1-7; Daniel 3:16-18; Daniel 6:22; Hebrews 11:29-30).
This was clearly seen in the miracles of Jesus Christ. Jesus used miracles not to try to force people to believe in him, but to help those who already believed. He performed miracles in response to faith, not to try to create faith (Matthew 9:27-29; Mark 2:3-5; Mark 5:34; Mark 5:36; Mark 6:5-6). Frequently, Jesus told those whom he had healed not to spread the news of his miraculous work. He did not want to be bothered by people who wanted to see a wonder-worker but who felt no spiritual need themselves (Matthew 9:30; Mark 5:43; Mark 8:26).
Nevertheless, it is clear that many of those who saw Jesus’ miracles were filled with awe and glorified God (Matthew 9:8; Luke 5:26; Luke 7:16; Luke 9:43). To those who believed in Jesus as the Son of God and the Messiah, the miracles confirmed the truth of their beliefs and revealed to them something of God’s glory (John 2:11; John 11:40; Acts 14:3; Hebrews 2:3-4; see MESSIAH). There was a connection between the miracles of Jesus and the era of the Messiah. This may explain why miracles were common in the early church but almost died out once the original order of apostles died out (Matthew 10:5-8; Luke 9:1; Luke 10:9; Acts 4:16; Acts 4:29-30; Acts 5:12; Romans 15:19; 1 Corinthians 12:9-10; 2 Corinthians 12:12).
In the record of some of Jesus’ miracles, faith is not mentioned. On those occasions Jesus acted, it seems, purely out of compassion (Matthew 8:14-15; Matthew 14:13-14; Matthew 15:32; Luke 4:40; Luke 7:11-17; John 6:1-13); though, as always, he refused to satisfy people who wanted him to perform miracles for their own selfish purposes (John 6:14-15).
Jesus’ miracles demonstrated clearly that he was the Messiah, the Son of God (John 20:30-31), and that the power of the Spirit of God worked through him in a special way (Matthew 12:28; Luke 4:18). Being both divine and human, he had on the one hand authority and power to work miracles, but on the other he always acted in dependence upon his Father (John 5:19; John 14:10-11). His miracles were always in keeping with his mission as the Saviour of the world. They were never of the senseless or unbelievable kind such as we find in fairy stories. Jesus did not perform miracles as if they were acts of magic, and he never performed them for his own benefit (cf. Matthew 4:2-10).
Jesus’ miracles and the kingdom of God
In Jesus the kingdom of God had come into the world. The rule of God was seen in the miracles by which Jesus the Messiah delivered from the power of Satan people who were diseased and oppressed by evil spirits (Matthew 4:23-24; Matthew 11:2-6; Matthew 12:28; see KINGDOM OF GOD). This victory over Satan was a guarantee of the final conquest of Satan when the kingdom of God will reach its triumphant climax at the end of the world’s history (Matthew 14:15-214).
To Christians, Jesus’ miracles foreshadow the age to come. His raising of the dead prefigures the final conquest of death (Matthew 11:5; John 11:24-27; John 11:44; 1 Corinthians 15:24-26; Revelation 21:4). His healing miracles give hope for a day when there will be no more suffering (Matthew 9:27-29; Mark 1:40-42; Revelation 21:4). His calming of the storm foreshadows the final perfection of the natural creation (Matthew 8:24-27; Romans 8:19-21). His provisions of food and wine give a foretaste of the great banquet of God in the day of the kingdom’s triumph (John 2:1-11; 1618065298_10; Matthew 15:32-38; Matthew 26:29; Revelation 19:9).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Miracles, Signs, Wonders
Events which unmistakeably involve an immediate and powerful action of God designed to reveal His character or purposes. Words used in the Scriptures to describe the miraculous include sign, wonder, work, mighty work, portent, power. These point out the inspired authors' sense of God's pervasive activity in nature, history, and people.
Old Testament The two Hebrew words most frequently used for “miracle” are translated “sign” (oth ) and “wonder” (mopheth ). They are synonyms and often occur together in the same text (Exodus 7:3 ; Deuteronomy 4:34 ; Deuteronomy 6:22 ; Deuteronomy 7:19 ; Deuteronomy 13:1 ; Deuteronomy 26:8 ; Deuteronomy 28:46 ; Deuteronomy 34:11 ; Nehemiah 9:10 ; Psalm 105:27 ; Isaiah 8:18 ; Jeremiah 32:20 ; Daniel 6:27 ). “Sign” may be an object or daily activity as well as an unexpected divine action (Genesis 1:14 ; Exodus 12:13 , RSV; Joshua 4:6 Ezekiel 24:24 . The basic nature of a sign is that it points people to God. “Wonders” describe God's supernatural activity, a special manifestation of His power (Exodus 7:3 ), but false prophets can perform actions people perceive as signs and wonders. (Deuteronomy 13:1-3 ). Wonders can serve as a sign of a future event. Signs seek to bring belief (Exodus 4:5 ; compare Exodus 10:2 ), but they do not compel a person to believe (Exodus 4:9 ). At times God invites people to ask for signs (Isaiah 7:11 ). The signs He has done should make all peoples on earth stand in awe (Psalm 65:8 ). They should join the Psalmist in confessing that the God of Israel “alone works wonders” (Psalm 72:18 NAS).
New Testament The phrase “signs and wonders” is often used in the New Testament in the same sense as it is found in the Old Testament and also in Hellenistic literature. (Matthew 24:24 ; Mark 13:22 ; John 4:48 ; Acts 2:43 ; Acts 4:30 ; Acts 5:12 ; Acts 6:8 ; Acts 7:36 ; Acts 14:3 ; Acts 15:12 ; Romans 15:19 ; 2 Corinthians 12:12 ; Revelation 13:11-13 ; Hebrews 2:4 ).
“Sign” (semeion ) in the New Testament is used of miracles taken as evidence of divine authority. Sometimes it is translated as “miracle” (Luke 23:8 NIV; Acts 4:16 ,Acts 4:16,4:22 NAS, NIV). John was particularly fond of using “sign” to denote miraculous activity (see John 2:11 ,2 Thessalonians 2:9:18 ,John 2:18,2:23 ; John 3:2 ; John 4:54 ; John 6:2 ,John 6:2,6:14 ,John 6:14,6:26 ; John 7:31 ; John 9:16 ; John 10:41 ; John 11:47 ; John 12:18 ; John 37:1 ; John 20:30 ; Revelation 12:1 ,Revelation 12:1,12:3 ,; Revelation 13:13-14 ; Revelation 15:1 ; Revelation 16:14 ; Revelation 19:20 )
“Wonders” (teras ) translates a Greek word from which the word terror comes. It denotes something unusual that causes the beholder to marvel. Although it usually follows “signs,” it sometimes precedes it ( Acts 2:22 ,Acts 2:22,2:43 ; Acts 6:8 ) or occurs alone (as in Acts 2:19 ). Whereas a sign appeals to the understanding, a wonder appeals to the imagination. “Wonders” are usually presented as God's activity (Acts 2:19 ; Acts 4:30 ; Acts 5:12 ; Acts 6:8 ; Acts 7:36 ; Acts 14:3 ; Acts 15:12 ), though sometimes they refer to the work of Satan through human instruments (Matthew 24:24 ; Mark 13:22 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:9 ; John 2:11,2 ).
New Testament writers also used dunamis , power or inherent ability, to refer to activity of supernatural origin or character (Mark 6:2 ; Acts 8:13 ; Acts 19:11 ; Romans 15:19 ; 1Corinthians 12:10,1 Corinthians 12:28-29 ; Galatians 3:5 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:9 ; Hebrews 2:4 ).
“Work” (ergon ) is also employed in the New Testament in the sense of “miracle.” John the Baptist heard of the “works” of Jesus while he was in prison (Matthew 11:2 ). The apostle John used the term frequently (Matthew 5:20 ,Matthew 5:20,5:36 ; Matthew 7:3 ; Matthew 10:38 ; Matthew 14:11-12 ; Matthew 15:24 ).
Worldview Considerations Contemporary philosophical and theological arguments over the possibility and definition of miracle reflect the altered worldview of the last several centuries—from a theistic to a nontheistic concept of the universe. The perceived tension between the natural and the miraculous is a by-product of a naturalism that is intent on squeezing out the supernatural realm of reality.
The people of the bible did not face this problem. The biblical perspective on the universe is that it is created, sustained, and providentially governed by God. The Bible makes no clear-cut distinction between the natural and supernatural. In the “natural” event the Bible views God as working providentially; whereas, in the miraculous, God works in striking ways to call attention to Himself or His purposes.
How do miracles relate to the natural order? Christian thinkers have responded in different ways throughout the centuries. Some hold that miracles are not contrary to nature (Augustine and C. S. Lewis, for instance). This harmony view contends that human knowledge with limited perspective does not fully understand or comprehend the higher laws that God employs in working the miraculous. Others (like Thomas Aquinas) have maintained miracles stand outside the laws of nature. This approach is called the intervention view, based on their belief that God intervenes in the natural order to do the miraculous.
One's view of the miraculous is related to one's view of the universe. A mechanistic perspective believes the world is controlled by unalterable natural laws and cannot allow for the possibility of miracles. Christians in every century have refused to have their universe so limited. They have affirmed the continuing miraculous work of God in the universe He created, continues to care for, uses to reveal Himself, and has promised to redeem.
T. R. McNeal
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Miracles
MIRACLES
1. The narratives a ) In the Gospels Jesus is recorded to have cast out devils ( Matthew 8:28 ; Matthew 15:28 ; Matthew 17:18 , Mark 1:25 ), restored paralytics ( Matthew 8:13 ; Matthew 9:6 , John 5:8 ), revived the withered hand ( Matthew 12:13 ), released from the spirit of infirmity ( Luke 13:12 ), stanched an issue of blood ( Matthew 9:22 ), cured dropsy ( Luke 14:2 ), allayed fever with a touch ( Matthew 8:15 ), given speech to the dumb, hearing to the deaf, and sight to the blind ( Matthew 9:33 ; Matthew 12:22 , Mark 7:35 , Matthew 9:29 ; Matthew 20:34 , Mark 8:25 , John 9:7 ), cleansed leprosy ( Matthew 8:3 , Luke 17:18 ), and even raised from the dead ( Matthew 9:25 , Luke 7:15 , John 11:44 ). Besides these miracles of healing there are ascribed to Him other extraordinary acts, such as the Stilling of the Storm ( Matthew 8:26 ), the Feeding of Five Thousand ( Matthew 14:19 ) and Four Thousand ( Matthew 15:35 ), the Walking on the Sea ( Matthew 14:28 ), the Change of Water into Wine ( John 2:9 ). The blasting of the Fig Tree ( Matthew 21:19 ), and the finding of the Coin in the Fish’s Mouth ( Matthew 17:27 ), may possibly be figurative sayings misunderstood. The Two Draughts of Fishes ( Luke 5:6 and John 21:6 ) may be variant traditions of one occurrence, and, like the recovery of the Nohleman’s Son of Capernaum ( John 4:50 ), may be regarded as proof of superhuman wisdom, and not of supernatural power. These miracles are presented to us as the acts of a Person supernatural both in the moral character as sinless and perfect, and in the religious consciousness as alone knowing and revealing the Father. It was the universal conviction of the early Christian Church that after three days He rose from the dead ( 1 Corinthians 15:4 ), and was universally present in supreme power ( Matthew 28:18 ; 1 Corinthians 15:3-4 ).
Regarding the miracles of Jesus the following general considerations should be kept in view. ( a ) It is impossible to remove the records of miracles from the Gospels without tearing them to pieces, as these works of Jesus are so wrought into the very texture of His ministry. ( b ) The character of the miracles is absolutely harmonious with the power of Jesus; with only two apparent exceptions they are beneficent. The blasting of the fig tree ( Matthew 21:19 ), even if the record is taken literally, may be explained as a symbolic prophetic act, a solemn warning to His disciples of the doom of impenitent Israel. The finding of the coin in the fish’s mouth ( Matthew 17:27 ) would be an exception to the rule of Jesus never to use His supernatural power on His own behalf, and the narrative itself allows us to explain it as a misunderstanding of figurative language. ( c ) The miracles were not wrought for display, or to prove His claims. Jesus rejected such use as a temptation ( Matthew 4:6-7 ), and always refused to work a sign to meet the demands of unbelief ( Matthew 16:4 ). He did not highly esteem the faith that was produced by His miracles ( John 4:48 ). The cure of the paralytic, which He wrought to confirm His claim to forgive sins, was necessary to assure the sufferer of the reality of His forgiveness ( Matthew 9:6 ). The miracles are not evidential accessories, but essential constituents of Jesus’ ministry of grace. ( d ) While faith in the petitioner for, or recipient of, the act of healing was a condition Jesus seemingly required in all cases, while He was prevented doing His mighty works, as at Nazareth, by unbelief ( Matthew 13:58 ), while the exercise of His power was accompanied by prayer to God ( John 11:41-42 ), His healing acts were never tentative; there is in the records no trace of a failure. ( e ) In view of one of the explanations offered, attention must be called to the variety of the diseases cured; nervous disorders and their consequences did not limit the range of His activity.
( b ) In the Acts the record of miracles is continued. The promise of Jesus to His Apostles ( Matthew 10:8 , cf. Mark 16:17-18 ) is represented as abundantly fulfilled. In addition to the charisms of tongues and prophecy (wh. see), there were signs and wonders wrought by the Apostles and others ( Acts 2:43 ; Acts 5:12 ; Acts 5:18 ; Acts 6:8 ; Acts 8:13 ). Miracles of which further details are given are the restoration of the lame man at the gate Beautiful ( Acts 3:7 ), and of the cripple at Lystra ( Acts 14:9 ), the cure of the palsied Æneas ( Acts 9:34 ), the expulsion of the spirit of divination at Philippi ( Acts 16:18 ), the healing of the father of Publius in Melita ( Acts 28:8 ), the restoration to life of Dorcas ( Acts 9:40 ) and Eutychus ( Acts 20:10 , the narrative does not distinctly affirm death). This supernatural power is exercised in judgment on Ananias and Sapphira ( Acts 5:5 ; Acts 5:10 ), and on Elymas ( Acts 13:11 ) acts the moral justification of which must be sought in the estimate formed of the danger threatening the Church and the gospel, but which do present an undoubted difficulty. One may hesitate about accepting the statement about the miracles wrought by Peter’s shadow ( Acts 5:15 ) or Paul’s aprons ( Acts 19:12 ). What are represented as miraculous deliverances from imprisonment are reported both of Peter ( Acts 12:8 ) and of Paul ( Acts 16:26 ). Paul’s escape from the viper ( Acts 28:3 ) does not necessarily involve a miracle. These miracles, which, taken by themselves as reported in Acts, there might be some hesitation in believing, become more credible when viewed as the continuation of the supernatural power of Christ in His Church for the confirmation of the faith of those to whom the gospel was entrusted, and also those to whom its appeal was first addressed. In this matter the Epistles of Paul confirm the record of Acts ( 1 Corinthians 12:10 ; 1 Corinthians 12:28 , 2 Corinthians 12:12 ). Paul claims this supernatural power for himself, and recognizes its presence in the Church.
( c ) We cannot claim to have contemporary evidence of the miracles of the OT, as we have of those of the NT. The miracles are almost entirely connected either with the Exodus from Egypt, or with the ministry of Elijah and of Elisha. The majority of the miracles of the first group are not outside of the order of nature; what is extraordinary in them is their coincidence with the prophetic declaration, this constituting the events signs of the Divine revelation. While the miracles ascribed to Elijah and Elisha might be considered as their credentials, yet they cannot be regarded as essential to their prophetic ministry; and the variations with which they are recorded represent popular traditions which the compiler of the Books of Kings has incorporated without any substantial alteration. The record of the standing still of the sun in Gibeon is obviously a prosaic misinterpretation of a poetic phrase ( Joshua 10:12-14 ); behind the record of the bringing back of the shadow on the dial of Ahaz ( 2 Kings 20:11 ) we may assume some unusual atmospheric phenomenon, refracting the rays of the sun; the speech of Balaam’s ass ( Numbers 22:27 ) may be regarded as an objectifying by the seer of his own scruples, doubts, and fears; the Book of Jonah is now interpreted not literally, but figuratively; the Book of Daniel is not now generally taken as history, but rather as the embellishment of history for the purposes of edification. The revelation of Jehovah to Israel is seen in the providential guidance and guardianship of His people by God, and in the authoritative interpretation of God’s works and ways by the prophets, and in it miracle, in the strict sense of the word, has a small place. While the moral and religious worth of the OT, as the literature of the Divine revelation completed in Christ, demands a respectful treatment of the narratives of miracles, we are bound to apply two tests: the sufficiency of the evidence, and the congruity of the miracle in character with the Divine revelation.
2. The evidence . In dealing with the evidence for the miracles the starting-point should be the Resurrection . It is admitted that the belief that Jesus had risen prevailed in the Christian Church from the very beginning of its history; that without this belief the Church would never have come into existence. Harnack seeks to distinguish the Easter message about the empty grave and the appearances of Jesus from the Easter faith that Jesus lives: but he is not successful in showing how the former could have come to be, apart from the latter. No attempt to explain the conversion of Paul without admitting the objective manifestation of Christ as risen can be regarded as satisfactory. It may not be possible absolutely to harmonize in every detail the records of the appearances, but before these narratives were written it was the common belief of the Christian Church, as Paul testifies, ‘that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, and that he was buried, and that he hath been raised on the third day according to the Scriptures’ ( Matthew 28:20 ). If the Resurrection of Christ is proved, this fact, conjoined with His absolutely unique moral character and religious consciousness, in vests the Person of Jesus with a supernaturalness which forbids our limiting the actions possible to Him by the normal human tests. His miracles are not wonders , for it is no wonder that He should so act, but signs , proofs of what He is, and works , congrnous with His character as ‘ever doing good,’ and His purpose to reveal the grace of the Father. Harnack will not ‘reject peremptorily as illusion that lame walked, blind saw, and deaf heard,’ but he will not believe that ‘a stormy sea was stilled by a word.’ The miracles of healing are not all explicable, as he supposes, by what Matthew Arnold called moral therapeutics the influence of a strong personality over those suffering from nerve disorders, as they embrace diseases of which the cure by any such means is quite incredible; and the evidence for the cosmic miracles, as the miracles showing power over nature apart from man have been called, is quite as good as for the healing miracles. If the Synoptic Gospels can be dated between a.d. 60 and 90, as is coming to be admitted by scholars generally, the evidence for the miracles of Jesus is thoroughly satisfactory; the mythical theory of Strauss must assume a much longer interval. Harnack regards as ‘a demonstrated fact’ that ‘Luke, companion in travel and associate in evangelistic work of Paul,’ is the author of the Third Gospel and the Acts; nevertheless he does not consider Luke’s history as true; but Ramsay argues that the Lukan authorship carries with it substantial accuracy. In his various writings he has endeavoured to show how careful a historian Luke is, and if Luke’s excellence in this respect is established, then we can place greater reliance on the evidence for miracles in the early Church, as well as in the ministry of Jesus. Harnack lays great stress on the credulity of the age in which the Gospels were written; but this credulity was not universal. The educated classes were sceptical; and, to judge Luke from the preface to his Gospel, he appears as one who recognized the duty of careful inquiry, and of testing evidence. The miracles of the Gospels and the Acts are closely connected with the Person of Jesus, as the Word Incarnate and the risen Lord, and the credulity of the age does not come into consideration unless it can be shown that among either the Jews or the Gentiles there was a prejudice favourable to belief in the Incarnation and the Resurrection. The character of the miracles, so harmonious with the Person, forbids our ascribing them to the wonder-loving, and therefore wonder-making, tendency of the times.
Some indications have already been given in regard to the evidence for the miracles of the OT. The frequent references to the deliverance from Egypt made in the subsequent literature attest the historical reality of that series of events; and it cannot be said to be improbable that signs should have accompanied such a Divine intervention in human history. Some of the miracles ascribed to Elisha are not of a character congruous with the function of prophecy; but it may be that we should very cautiously apply our sense of fitness as a test of truth to these ancient narratives. In the OT history, Prophecy (wh. see) was the supernatural feature of deepest significance and highest value.
3. Explanations . Admitting that the evidence is satisfactory, and the miracles are real, what explanations can be offered of them? ( a ) One suggestion has already been considered; it is favoured by Harnack and Matthew Arnold: it is that one person may exercise over another so strong an influence as to cure nervous disorders. The inadequacy of this explanation has been shown; but even were it admissible, a reason would need to be given why Jesus used a means not known in His age, and thus anticipated modern developments of medical skill. It is certain that Jesus worked His miracles relying on the Divine powers in Himself; whether in any cases this obscure psychic force was an unknown condition of His miracles is a matter of secondary importance.
( b ) A second suggestion, made by the late Duke of Argyll ( Reign of Law , p. 16), is that God chooses and uses laws unknown to man, or laws which, even if he knew, he could not use. He thinks that this would meet the prejudice of scientific thought against effects without causes. This explanation recognizes that miracles are not explicable by the laws of nature as known to man, and that it is of God’s free choice that for certain ends He uses means otherwise unknown. As these laws are quite hypothetical, and as this use of them only occasionally is not at all probable, this explanation does not appear to make miracles any more credible.
( c ) We may now attempt to define more closely what we mean by a miracle. It does seem, on the whole, desirable to restrict the term ‘miracle’ to an external event of which there is sensible evidence. Inward changes, such as in the prophetic inspiration, or the religious conversion of an individual, however manifest the Divine presence and action may be for the person having the experience, should not be described as miracles, unless with some qualification such as spiritual or moral . The negative feature of the external event which justifies our describing it as a miracle is that it is inexplicable by the natural forces and laws as known to us. The will of man is a force in nature with which we are familiar, and therefore the movements of the body under the control of the will are not to be described as miraculous. We say more than we are justified in saying if we describe a miracle as an interference with the laws and forces of nature, or a breach in the order of nature; for just as the physical forces and laws allow the exercise of human will in the movements of the body, so the power that produces the miracle may, nay must, be conceived as so closely related to nature that its exercise results in no disturbance or disorder in nature. The miracle need not interfere with the continuity of nature at all. The modem theory of Evolution is not less, but more, favourable to the belief in miracle. It is not a finished machine, but a growing organism, that the world appears. Life transcends, and yet combines and controls physical forces (Lodge’s Life and Matter , p. 198). Mind is not explicable by the brain, and yet the will directs the movements of the body. There is a creative action of God in the stages of the evolution, which attaches itself to the conserving activity. Applying the argument from analogy, we may regard the Person of Christ and the miracles that cluster round His Person as such a creative action of God. If we adequately estimate the significance of the Exodus in the history of mankind, the providential events connected with it will assume greater credibility. But there is a final consideration. The purpose of God in Christ is not only perfective the completion of the world’s evolution; it is also redemptive the correction of the evil sin had brought on the human race. It was fitting that the redemption of man from sin should be accompanied by outward remedial signs, the relief of his need and removal of his sufferings. God is without variation and shadow that is cast by turning in His purpose, but His action is conditioned, and must necessarily be conditioned, by the results of man’s use of the freedom which for His wise and holy ends He bestowed. He may in His action transcend His normal activity by a more direct manifestation of Himself than the natural processes of the world afford. The consistency of character of a human personality is not disproved by an exceptional act when a crisis arises; and so, to deal effectively with sin for man’s salvation, God may use miracles as means to His ends without any break in the continuity of His wisdom, righteousness, and grace.
4. Objections . It seemed desirable to state the facts, the proofs for them, and the reasonableness of them, before taking up the objections that are made. These objections refer to two points, the possibility of miracle at all, and the sufficiency of the evidence for the miracles of the Bible. Each of these may be very briefly dealt with. ( a ) For materialism , which recognizes only physical forces; and pantheism , which so identifies God and man that the order of nature is fixed by the necessity of the nature of God; and even for deism , which confines the direct Divine activity to the beginning, and excludes it from the course of the world, miracles are impossible. Agnosticism , which regards the ultimate reality as an inscrutable mystery, is under no logical compulsion to deny the possibility of miracles; Huxley, for instance, pronounces such denial unjustifiable. Two reasons against the possibility of miracles may be advanced from a theistic standpoint. In the interests of science it may be maintained that the uniformity of nature excludes miracle ; but, as has just been shown, the theory of Evolution has so modified the conception of uniformity that this argument has lost its force. Life and mind, when first appearing in the process of evolution, were breaches in the uniformity. The uniformity of nature is consistent with fresh stages of development, inexplicable by their antecedents; and only when science has resolved life and mind into matter will the argument regain any validity. In the interests of philosophy, it may be argued that miracles interrupt the continuity of thought : the world as it is is so reasonable (idealism) or so good (optimism) that any change is unthinkable. But the affirmation ignores many of the problems the world as it is presents: sin, sorrow, death are real; would not the solution of these problems give both a more reasonable and a better world? and if miracles should be necessary to such a solution, they are thinkable. Again, is it not somewhat arrogant to make man’s estimate of what is reasonable and good the measure of God’s wisdom and grace?
( b ) The more usual objection is the insufficiency of the evidence . Hume laid down this criterion: ‘No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle unless the testimony be of such a kind that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavours to establish. Or briefly, it is contrary to experience that a miracle sho
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Miracles
In this article we may consider the meaning of the words used in the NT for ‘miracles,’ and the evidence for the apostolic belief in them; the evidence will then be compared with that for miracles in the succeeding ages, and the evidential value of miracles will be weighed. But the limits assigned preclude a general investigation of the a priori credibility of miracles as such. As, however, this has been done very fully by Bernard in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iii., it is scarcely necessary here to repeat what has there been well said.
1. Meaning of the words used.-(a) The principal NT words for what we should now call a ‘miracle’ are σημεῖον, τέρας, δύναμις, ἔργον. Of these, σημεῖον, ‘sign,’ denotes that which conveys spiritual and symbolic instruction; τέρας, ‘wonder’ or ‘prodigy,’ denotes a work above the ordinary working of nature; δύναμις denotes a work showing ‘power’; while ἔργον, ‘work,’ is in itself a neutral word, the context of which in many passages, especially in Jn. (John 5:36 etc.), shows it to denote a ‘miracle’ (so Matthew 11:2; but in John 17:4 the word includes the whole of Jesus’ deeds). It is noteworthy that the mighty deeds of our Lord and His disciples are never called ‘prodigies’ (τέρατα) alone; the only apparent exception to this rule is in Acts 2:19 (‘I will show wonders in heaven’), which, however, is a quotation from Joel 2:30, and ‘wonders in heaven’ are coupled with ‘signs on earth,’ and both are interpreted by St. Peter as ‘powers and wonders and signs’ in Joel 2:22. A Christian miracle is not a mere prodigy exciting astonishment, but is intended for instruction; and here we see at once the great difference between the NT miracles and most of those of the apocryphal Gospels, which are mere exhibitions without any teaching purpose, and are often repulsive to the Christian sense of reverence. It must be added, also, that herein lies the difference between the NT miracles and most of those commonly known as ‘ecclesiastical’ (see below, 4). The mighty deeds related in the NT did, indeed, excite wonder and fear (Mark 2:12; Mark 4:41; Mark 6:51; Mark 7:37, Luke 7:16, Acts 3:10 f.), but this was not their only or even their chief object. Hence, when τέρας is used it is always combined with σημεῖον (John 4:48, Acts 2:19; Acts 2:43; Acts 4:30; Acts 5:12; Acts 6:8; Acts 7:36; Acts 14:2; Acts 15:12, and 161806529827 Matthew 24:24, Mark 13:22, and 161806529879 Acts 2:22, Romans 15:19, 2 Corinthians 12:12, 2 Thessalonians 2:9, Hebrews 2:4); δύναμις and σημεῖον are joined in Acts 8:13. It may be noticed that θαῦμα is not used in the NT of miracles, but θαυμάσια (‘wonderful things’) is used in Matthew 21:15, παράδοξα (‘strange things’) in Luke 5:26, ἔνδοξα (‘glorious things’) in Luke 13:17.
(b) Turning to the English versions, we are struck by the confusion occasioned by the indiscriminate use of the word ‘miracle.’ In Authorized Version it often represents σημεῖον (in the singular in Luke 23:8, John 4:54, Acts 4:16; Acts 4:22, and in the plural in John 2:11; John 2:23; John 3:2; John 6:2; John 6:26; John 7:31; John 9:16; John 11:47; John 12:37, Acts 6:8; Acts 8:6; Acts 15:12, Revelation 13:14; Revelation 16:14; Revelation 19:20); in these passages Revised Version rightly substitutes ‘sign’ except in the text of Luke 23:8, Acts 4:16; Acts 4:22, where ‘miracle’ is with some inconsistency retained. Again, in Authorized Version ‘miracle’ represents δύναμις in Mark 9:39, Acts 2:22; Acts 8:13; Acts 19:11, 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 12:28 f., Galatians 3:5, Hebrews 2:4, while in these passages there is an unfortunate confusion even in the Revised Version text (though Revised Version margin gives ‘power’), as we find ‘mighty work’ in the first two passages, ‘miracle’ in the next five, and ‘powers’ in the last; if ‘powers’ was thought somewhat unintelligible, ‘mighty works’ or ‘mighty deeds’ might with a little ingenuity have been used in all these places. The confusion in Authorized Version is increased by σημεῖα being translated ‘wonders’ in Revelation 13:13 and ‘miracles’ in v. 14, and by δυνάμεις being translated ‘mighty deeds’ in 2 Corinthians 12:12; in Mark 6:52, Authorized Version unnecessarily inserts ‘the miracle,’ which is not in the Greek. It is a serious misfortune that ‘miracle’ should be so much used in the Authorized Version to represent σημεῖον, for the connotation of the English word is exactly what that of the Greek word is not, and it has given the English reader an erroneous idea of the purpose of the works of our Lord and the disciples; it was not so much to produce wonder as belief.
2. Evidence for miracles in the Apostolic Age.-(a) The Gospels are all full of the mighty deeds worked by our Lord, nor is it possible to separate the miraculous from the non-miraculous in these histories. The Synoptic Gospels do not profess to be written by eye-witnesses, but the Fourth Gospel does claim to give first-hand testimony (John 21:24, confirmed by many internal indications), though it was written more than half a century after the events which are recorded. It narrates healings (John 4:16 ff., John 5:8, John 6:2), giving sight to the blind (John 9:6 f.), raising the dead (John 11:44), and several ‘miracles of nature’-water made wine (John 2:9), feeding the five thousand (John 6:11 f.), walking on the sea (John 6:19), the miraculous draught of fishes (John 21:8); also the Resurrection (20, 21) and ‘many other signs’ (John 20:30). It is to be noted that in all the Gospels the evidence for ‘miracles’ of nature is as strong as that for miracles of healing, and that the evidence of Jn. does not differ in kind from that of the Synoptists. For the evidence of the Gospels, reference may be made to Sanday’s article ‘Jesus Christ’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ii. 625 f. Though the witness of the Synoptists is not in form at first hand, it still rests on very good authority, and there is excellent reason for believing that the evidence of Mk. is in effect that of St. Peter himself (see Dict. of Christ and the Gospels ii. 121 f., and, for the autoptic character of the Second Gospel, ib. 124). Also the first-hand evidence of St. Paul that he himself had the power of working miracles (see below) indirectly gives good testimony to the fact that our Lord worked them, for we can hardly imagine that St. Paul could have thought that he himself had the power from Christ unless his Master also had it. For a classification of the Gospel miracles see Dict. of Christ and the Gospels ii. 186 ff. (T. H. Wright).
Further, in the Gospels it is recorded that our Lord bade the disciples heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers, cast out devils (Matthew 10:8); and that they would have power to do so if only they had faith is implied in 17:20. So in the appendix to Mk. (16:17f.) the signs which would follow believers are said to be casting out devils in Christ’s name, speaking with new tongues, taking up serpents, drinking poison without hurt, and healing the sick by laying on of hands.
(b) We may proceed to consider how these predictions are borne out by the Acts and Epistles. It will be convenient to separate the evidence which is at first hand from that which is at second hand.
(i.) Under the former head will come those mighty deeds and outward charismata which are attested by those who claimed to see, or to do, or to possess them. In the ‘we’ sections of Acts (accounts of events in which the author took part) and in St. Paul’s Epistles we read of several mighty works, prophecies, and visions, attested at first hand. In Acts 16:18 the Python is cast out of the ventriloquist girl; in Acts 16:26 there is an earthquake, the doors of the prisons are opened, and the prisoners’ bonds are loosed; in Acts 20:12 we read of the raising of Eutychus (q.v. [3] ), though it is not said that he was dead (the reverse seems to be implied in Acts 20:10); in Acts 21:9 of the prophesying of Philip’s daughters; in Acts 21:11 of the prophecy of Agabus; in Acts 28:5 of St. Paul’s shaking off the viper without hurt (cf. ‘Mk’ Acts 16:18 as above); and in Acts 28:8 f. of the healing of Publius’ father by St. Paul by the laying on of hands; and of the healing of others, in which St. Luke himself seems to have taken part (see Acts 28:10 : ‘honoured us’). Further, the narratives in Acts 9:3 ff; Acts 22:6 ff; Acts 26:12 ff. of the appearances of our Lord to St. Paul at his conversion are brought almost to the level of first-hand evidence by the corroboration of Galatians 1:1-16. St. Paul claimed that Christ worked miracles through him (Romans 15:18 f., 2 Corinthians 12:12), and testifies to the fact that some (not all) of his converts also had the power (Galatians 3:5, 1 Corinthians 12:9 f., 1 Corinthians 12:28-30, 1 Corinthians 14:22). These works, which are instances of πνευματικά or spiritual [4], include healings and other ‘powers,’ speaking with tongues and interpretation of tongues, and prophecy. We have it at first hand that the Jews expected such signs of Christian preachers (1 Corinthians 1:22). The visions of St. Paul are attested by himself in 2 Corinthians 12:2-4.
(ii.) Of other works and charismata in the NT, we have not, outside the Gospels, first-hand evidence; yet even what we have must be pronounced exceptionally good when we remember the opportunities which St. Luke had of converse with those who actually saw the events. At the outset we note that St. Peter in his speeches attributes to our Lord ‘power and wonders and signs’ (Acts 2:22), and the healing of demoniacs (Acts 10:38). Then, signs and wonders, healings of the sick and of demoniacs, are attributed to the apostles generally (Acts 2:43, Acts 5:12; Acts 5:16). In Acts 3:7, Acts 9:34 St. Peter heals the lame man and aeneas; in Acts 5:5; Acts 5:10 he inflicts sudden death on Ananias and Sapphira; in Acts 9:40 he raises Dorcas from the dead; and in Acts 5:15 the sick are brought so that his shadow may fall on some of them, though it is not said that they were thereby cured. In Acts 6:8 Stephen works wonders and signs; in Acts 8:6; Acts 8:13 Philip works signs and powers at Samaria. In Acts 15:12 Barnabas and Paul relate to the Apostolic
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Miracles (2)
MIRACLES.—The process of thought and research, both theological and scientific, has led to a position where belief in the actuality, in the career of Jesus, of those remarkable activities and manifestations summed up under the comprehensive and popular term ‘miracle,’ is made possible if not inevitable. The prevailing negative attitude of science shows signs of being abandoned in view of enlarging understanding of the possibilities both in Matter and in Spirit, and theology is coming to see that the miraculous events recorded of Him who was the Son of God and the Regenerator of the Race must not be conceived of as in any sense or degree a violation of the order of Nature; and that viewed in this way they become, instead of difficulties and stumbling-blocks in the way of faith, some of its most convincing reinforcements. It is scarcely too much to affirm that a belief in these occurrences as vital parts of the Christian revelation is rising, compared with which all previous belief is feeble and superficial. Without being unduly optimistic, we may anticipate that the ‘ages of faith’ in every department of Christian truth, and not least in that of miracle, are yet to come. This consummation is being prepared for in modern conceptions of the Order of Nature, of Human Personality, and of the Divine Being.
1. Modern conceptions of the Order of Nature. Christian advocates are becoming thoroughly disposed to accept unreservedly the scientific teaching of the Unity of Nature, carefully guarding the admission from being read as the Uniformity of Nature. They recognize and take account of the inalienable connexion between cause and effect by which the Universe consists. They do not regard the miracles of the Gospels as in the least degree arbitrary interruptions of the Order of Nature, but rather as a revelation of the infinite extent of that order. The ancient antagonism between the Natural and the Supernatural has broken down, and the two spheres are seen to be one, regarded from opposite poles. Grave objections lie against the term ‘supernatural,’ which is entirely un-Scriptural, and many modern thinkers prefer the term ‘spiritual’ to express the animating and sustaining Power which pervades all things. Without the spiritual the physical universe has no ground of being, and nothing exists, not the least fraction of the material, still less anything of human affection and sympathy and personal life-force, apart from the Universal Life. If the term ‘supernatural’ be retained, it must be on the distinct understanding that while all things may be conceived of as super-naturally sustained, it may with equal propriety be asserted that the whole Universe, including not only the physical but the mental, moral, and spiritual in human personality, is a part of the Order of Nature. The powers and sympathies that work in man cannot be separated from that order, and it is most natural, most agreeable to the whole constitution of human nature, that it shall be animated, sustained, and governed by the Divine Power and Life. Men of science, moreover, are increasingly willing to admit the necessity of the spiritual and rational as the ultimate ground of the physical; and recent investigations into the make of the so-called ‘atom,’ and the vast potentialities of Matter, will further develop the distrust of all dogmatic assertion that nothing in the nature of the events recorded in the Gospels and called ‘miracles’ is possible or credible. Sir Oliver Lodge (Hibbert Journal, October 1902) writes:
‘The root question or outstanding controversy between science and faith rests upon two distinct conceptions of the universe: the one, that of a self-contained and self-sufficient universe, with no outlook into or links with anything beyond, uninfluenced by any life or mind except such as is connected with a visible and tangible material body; and the other conception, that of a universe lying open to all manner of spiritual influences, permeated through and through with a Divine spirit, guided and watched by living minds, acting through the medium of law indeed, but with intelligence and love behind the law; a universe by no means self-sufficient or self-contained, but with feelers at every pore groping into another supersensuous order of existence, where reign laws hitherto unimagined by science, but laws as real and as mighty as those by which the material universe is governed.’
2. The nature of Human Personality.—Researches, anthropological and psychological, into the nature and possibilities of man have greatly multiplied during the present generation, and something of the vast region of potentiality lying above and beneath and beyond all that is actually realized has been revealed. The conception of the ideal human personality has been immeasurably enlarged and exalted. Psychological investigation is only in its infancy, and yet enough has been arrived at to make it certain that the powers of humanity remain essentially unfathomed. Beneath or above the ordinary consciousness of man, and beyond the powers which at present his will controls and organizes, are other and larger powers at present uncontrolled and unorganized by the personal force, but manifest in exceptional phases of human life, such as dreams, hypnosis, clairvoyance, clairaudience, somnambulism, or unwonted excitement and spiritual exaltation. We may call man, as we are acquainted with him, a personality, a living centre of original will and action, made in the image of the Deity. But yet it is far truer to regard him as a personality which has not yet arrived, the mere rudiment of a personality whose powers, as he controls them, Teach out beyond his control to regions of potentiality as yet unrecognized, and showing that the true personality is vastly greater and mightier than the present actual. ‘Man partly is, and wholly hopes to be.’ The powers at present possessed and controlled by man are the veriest suggestion of the powers that are his by right of nature, made as he was for intimate alliance with the Divine Being. But the perfect Personality was realized in the Son of Man who was also Son of God. The perfect Personality cannot be conceived of apart from the Divine Personality, for it is of the very essence of the Ideal Man that his nature shall be possessed and controlled by the Divine. By the Divine power the human nature consists. And the Lord Jesus plainly marked it as the essential condition of His power that He was morally and spiritually one with God.
3. The Divine Nature.—A wholesome feature of modern conceptions of the Being of God is their sense of mystery. Holding fast, on the one hand, to the essential knowableness of the Deity and to His self-revelation as the centre of all Divine action, theologians, on the other hand, admit the impossibility of giving dogmatic expression to the mode of the Divine Being. ‘In mystery the soul abides,’ not only the Divine but even the human soul. But taking the teaching of the Lord Jesus, interpreted as it was by His life before God and man, and as it is by an increasing Christian experience, they conceive of God as the Infinite Will and Intelligence that animates while it transcends the whole creation, visible and invisible, a Divine Presence ever seeking self-realization and self-revelation in His creation, in some true measure expressing Himself in all the works of His hands, even in the non-human creation; but most really of all in human life with its manifold sympathies and powers, actual and potential, conscious and sub-conscious (or super-conscious). The conception is of a Living God present and active in all life, but supremely in the nobler impulses and humanities that glorify mankind. In the life of men as they are, in their poor actual, the Divine Mind finds a real though feeble and fragmentary expression, and as that nature is developed and its latent powers are evoked and made part of the conscious life, is destined to find a fuller channel for its living action. And the nature which was fitted to be a complete channel, and more than channel—an active co-operator with Himself—the Divine Being, revealing Himself as Father, finds in Him who was perfectly one with man and at the same time morally, spiritually, and essentially one with God.
In this fact, that the Divine Power dwelt in its fulness in the personality of Jesus, we find the unifying principle for all the miracles of the Gospels. The master-principle of them all is contained in our Lord’s own declaration, ‘If I by the finder of God cast out devils, then is the kingdom of God come upon you’ (Luke 11:20). This declaration is in complete harmony with His repeated affirmations that the ultimate power by which He wrought His beneficent and mighty works was the same as that by which He knew and taught the truth—the Divine power dwelling in Him (John 5:19; John 5:30; John 14:10).
The great deeds of healing and of revelation were due to the direct action of the Infinite Life and active Power by which all things consist (1) on the nature of Jesus, and (2) through Him, so empowered, upon the life of man and upon the world. Our Lord makes it perfectly plain that the miraculous deeds were morally conditioned, were therefore a moral achievement, and depended upon His living faith in and union with God. Of Himself He could do nothing (John 5:19). But He also has the feeling and knowledge that in His own nature there was a potentiality of superhuman working. And the chief point to emphasize is that the Personality of Jesus cannot be conceived of even momentarily as apart from the Divine Life. He perfectly lived in God. The purpose of all was to accomplish the Divine will by the establishment of His Kingdom among men. Here and elsewhere the miracles are represented, not as an arbitrary putting forth of a supernatural power altogether out of relation to any human capacity or possibility, but as arising spontaneously out of the unique relation He sustained to the Infinite Life; not as something given, while it could have been withheld, for the sake of commending the moral and spiritual and personal claims of Jesus, but as vital and essential parts of the Divine Revelation. The evidential value of the work was secondary, the need of man and the Divine impulse primary.
In order to get an intelligent faith in the Gospel miracles, it is of great consequence at what point we approach the problem. The important matter is to begin with the less obscure, with those works which are most closely and obviously related to what may be called the innate forces of human nature. This gives us as our starting-point the healing works of Jesus. Careful study must be given to the principles and methods employed in these cases of restoration from sickness, infirmity, and distress. A growing disposition is evident to receive these as genuinely historical, on the ground that they are not in themselves inconceivable, related as they are to the forces perceived to be at work in the complex nature of man. Psychical research has brought, and is more fully bringing, to light a vast wealth of resource in the depths and heights of human personality. And a close study of the method Of Jesus convinces us that He worked upon this complex nature (see art. Cures). His miracles were not simply the output of an alien force, but the living exercise of a Divine force, deeply akin to all human powers, already working in the capacities, sympathies, and life-ties of humanity, utilizing the known in all their unknown ramifications, and also the unknown and unsuspected. These works are no less Divine because they are not emphasized as supernatural, the Divine energy being more truly conceived of as the normal and natural. If these deepest principles which our Lord followed are duly recognized in our faith and conception, then the remaining miracles, most of which are rejected by many who receive the healings, become not only not incredible, but inevitable as the completion of a revelation otherwise essentially incomplete. One who has gained a rational and imaginative faith in the healing of body and mind, by the incarnate pity and power of God in Christ Jesus, will be prepared to believe that it is extremely unlikely that Christ should so freely reveal the power of God in this sphere, and not go beyond to give visible expression to the power that resides in and animates and at the same time controls all Nature. And those miracles which are associated with the life and career of Jesus, being wrought not so much by the power of our Lord, as by the Divine Power acting upon Him, have a strong presumption in their favour, congruous as they are with the whole method of His mighty works and with the one revelation given in Him.
A. Miracles of Jesus.
1. Our Lord’s own description of them.—A distinction must be made between what Jesus Himself said of the miracles and the description given by the people of the time, who were under the influence of low and vulgar ideas of a Divine revelation, and by the Evangelists, who were not altogether emancipated from current conceptions. (1) It must he borne in mind that the Synoptics give very few specific terms which our Lord applied to His own supernormal action. They are the record of His deeds, not of His speech concerning them. But the Evangelists’ description may be taken without much deduction as a faithful reflexion of the Master’s usage. Jesus does refer to His works, as in Matthew 16:9-10; He speaks of casting out demons by the Spirit of God (Matthew 12:28) or by the finger of God (Luke 11:20), and declares that ‘this kind’ (τοῦτο δὲ τὸ γένος) goeth not out except by prayer (Matthew 17:21 Textus Receptus ). He refers to the deed itself and its blessed result, without characterizing it by any specific term. (2) His favourite term for them, according to the Fourth Gospel, was ἕργα, ‘works’ (John 5:36; John 10:25; John 10:32; John 10:37-38). He uses the same word also of the good and beautiful acts of others (καλὸν ἒργον, Mark 14:6). He makes no great distinction between His ordinary works of mercy and the extraordinary, regarding them all alike as wrought simply and naturally in the way of His life and vocation. The miracles were not the highest works; they belong to a lower level of manifestation as compared with His moral and spiritual revelation of God (John 14:11). But He also qualifies ἔργα: ‘the works that none other man did’ (John 15:24), probably including under that category the healing and other mighty deeds. Utility was the chief element in His view of all His deeds and actions. (3) He also calls them δυνάμεις (‘powers’ or ‘mighty works’), emphasizing the striking manifestation of Divine Power overpassing all human capacity (Matthew 11:21). The Evangelists also commonly employ this term (Matthew 13:58, Mark 6:5). (4) He also speaks of His works as σημεῖα, ‘signs’ (John 6:26), carefully separating Himself from the popular estimate of what constituted a Divinely significant act (see art. Sign). The Fourth Gospel consistently applies this word to the works of Jesus. Probably we must see in the fact a feature due to prolonged reflexion on the events in the light of after-history. But the term is singularly fitting to describe the Divinely significant works of our Lord as signs of another and higher order of things, leading on the thought and imagination to higher spheres of being, fuller powers of soul, Diviner possibilities for humanity. (5) The word τέρατα (‘prodigies’) is never applied by Jesus to His own working. Only once He uses the word, and then to disavow the idea involved in it and to sever His action from it (John 4:48). In the Apocalyptic discourse these τέρατα are associated with false Christs and false prophets (Matthew 24:24, Mark 13:22). (6) The popular use of σημεῖον was most akin to the τέρας. With this the English word ‘miracle’ has most affinity. It is not the equivalent of any word used by Jesus. The Authorized Version uses it to translate σημεῖον and δύναμις. The Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 practically abandons it. The idea of the word ‘supernatural’ also is not found in the NT or in the whole Bible, and the term should be relegated to the region of the obsolete. The word ‘spiritual’ is an excellent substitute, conserving the idea expressed by it without committing the mind to any untenable and indefensible philosophy.
2. Characteristics of our Lord’s miracles.—Briefly, the features of the miracles which commend them to our judgment and affection may be stated as—(1) Spontaneity. They arise out of the occasion—are never deliberated, unless the raising of Lazarus be an exception (John 11:4), but spring from the present practical impulse of compassion and desire to help man, and the prompting of the Divine Spirit (John 2:4 ff., Luke 18:40-42 etc.). (2) High moral purpose. The miracles of Jesus ever sought the highest and Divinest ends, and were never ends in themselves. In all His works there were no signs of any ostentatious exercise of power. Sternly He forbade any public advertisement of His healings, etc., which might rouse the popular excitement. (3) Strong restraint in use of supernormal power. The Temptation of the wilderness witnesses to what was characteristic of all His life, His constant refusal to use His power for personal ease, gratification, or convenience. Nothing was done by extraordinary which could be done by ordinary means. (4) Moral dignity and congruity with the whole spirit and life of Jesus. His miracles spring out of His innermost nature, and reveal the moral harmony and winsomeness of His Person. Herein lies a most fruitful comparison with other alleged miracles, ecclesiastical and mediaeval and modern. The vast majority of these latter fail to commend themselves to us as worthy exercises of a Divine power. The criterion must not, however, be unduly pressed, for natures differ widely in what they regard as morally fitting and suitable for Divine action. But, employed broadly, it may help us to discriminate between alleged miraculous events as to how far they are worthy of credence. (5) Helpfulness to mankind was the abiding characteristic of our Lord’s miracles. In most cases they were wrought for the immediate succour of suffering humanity, and for the revelation, in and through this, of the Divine love and pity. In His works on the non-human world also the need of man was continually served, more especially his need for vision of the higher facts of existence. His action never issued in meaningless marvels or needless wonders and in those that seem farthest removed from the requirements of mankind a revelation was given of the kind of power which animated and sustained all nature, and ordered its course.
3. The whole texture of the Gospel narratives is complicated with the supernormal. They presuppose a unique relation to God in Jesus, and His possession of a miracle-working power. ‘In most of the reports the action of Jesus is so interwoven with unmistakably authentic words, that the two elements cannot he separated’ (A. B. Bruce, art. ‘Jesus’ in Encyc. Bibl.). If excision be made from the Evangelic records (1) of all that directly narrates His unique action as a healer and wonderworker, (2) of all that presupposes the possibility and actuality of such unique action, (3) of all that testifies to His authority and power due to a unique relation to God—the Gospels are left bald and bare and mutilated beyond description. The very warp and woof of the fabric is destroyed.
As an example, apply the process to Mark 1-3. As a residue we have—
1. The account of the Baptist’s preaching (without the reference to the prophetic witness).
2. The Baptism of John (robbed of the spiritual endowment of Jesus and its accompaniments).
3. The bare mention of a temptation in the wilderness (with angels excluded. The story cannot be filled up by reference to the other Evangelists, for their account presupposes a miracle-working power in Jesus).
4. John’s imprisonment, and announcement of the Kingdom by Jesus.
5. Call of Peter, Andrew, James, and John.
6. Teaching of Jesus in the synagogue, and spread of His fame (the latter left like a pyramid on its apex without the restoration of the demoniac).
7. Entrance to house of Peter (healing of wife’s mother excluded).
8. Account of solitary prayer (with no action of Jesus to account for such prolonged prayer).
9. Preaching in synagogue (mere repetition apart from healing of leper and casting out devil).
10. Account of sudden popularity (with no adequate reason given for it).
11. Another repetition of the statement that He taught the people (Mark 2:3-12 all being excised as entirely complicated with miracle).
12. Call of Matthew.
13. Conflict with scribes and Pharisees in regard to eating and drinking with publicans and sinners, and fasting, and His teaching consequent thereon.
14. Pharisees and Herodians take counsel to kill Him (but no reason given—the healing of withered hand being removed).
15. Withdrawal of Jesus (following by multitude being omitted because of motive given in Mark 2:8).
16. Call of disciples (commission reduced to preaching and teaching. Teaching in Mark 3:20-30 cut out as entirely dependent on His exorcism of demons).
17. Teaching of true relationship to Himself (strongly savouring of presumption, apart from reasons which have disappeared in process of excision).
The whole narrative is rendered colourless and dislocated, the only section which is left fairly unmutilated being Mark 2:13-28. ‘That the healing ministry was not only a fact, but a great outstanding fact, is attested by the popularity of Jesus and by the various theories which were invented to account for the remarkable phenomena’ (A. B. Bruce, l.c.). The above analysis forcibly illustrates this assertion.
4. Chronological list of miracles of Jesus.
(a) Preliminary Period, from Baptism to call of leading Apostles.
 
found in
1. Water made wine
Jn.
2. Cleansing of the Temple
Jn.
3. Son of nobleman restored
Jn.
(b) First Period of Galilaean Ministry, to Death of John the Baptist.
 
 
found in
 
4. Escape from hostile crowd
 
 
Lk.
 
5. Draught of fishes
 
 
Lk.
 
6. Capernaum demoniac
 
Mk.
Lk.
 
7. Peter’s wife’s mother
Mt.
Mk.
Lk.
 
8. General healings and exorcisms.
Mt.
Mk.
Lk.
 
9. Leper
Mt.
Mk.
Lk.
 
10. Palsied man
Mt.
Mk.
Lk.
 
11. Impotent man of Bethesda
 
 
 
Jn.
12. Man with withered hand
Mt.
Mk.
Lk.
 
13. General healin
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Miracles
No sincere believer in the inspiration of scripture can have a doubt as to real miracles having been wrought by the power of God both in O.T. and N.T. times. It is philosophy so-called, or scepticism, that mystifies the subject. Much is said about 'the laws of nature;' and it is confidently affirmed that these are irrevocable and cannot be departed from. To which is added that laws of nature previously unknown are frequently being discovered, and if our forefathers could witness the application of some of the more recent discoveries, as the computer, mobile telephone, etc., they would judge that miracles were being performed. So, it is argued, the actions recorded in scripture as miracles, were merely the bringing into use some law of nature which had been hidden up to that time.
All this is based upon a fallacy. There are no laws of nature, as if nature made its own laws: there are laws in nature, which God in His wisdom as Creator was pleased to make; but He who made those laws has surely the same power to suspend them when He pleases. Though laws in nature hitherto unknown are being discovered from time to time, they in no way account for such things as dead persons being raised to life, the blind seeing, the deaf hearing, the lame walking, and demons being cast out of those who were possessed by them. Neither has natural philosophy discovered any law that will account for such a thing as an iron axe-head swimming in water. The simple truth is that God, for wise purposes, allowed some of the natural laws to be suspended, and at times He put forth His almighty power, as in supplying the Israelites with manna from heaven, and in feeding thousands from a few loaves and fishes, or by recalling life that had left the body.
The words translated 'miracle' in the O.T. are
1. oth , 'a sign,' as it is often translated, and in some places 'token.' Mark 5:25-34 ; Deuteronomy 11:3 .
2. mopheth, 'a wonder,' as it is mostly translated: it is something out of the ordinary course of events. Exodus 7:9 ; Deuteronomy 29:3 .
3. pala , 'wonderful, marvellous.' Judges 6:13 .
Moses was enabled to work miracles for two distinct objects. One was in order to convince the children of Israel that God had sent him. God gave him three signs to perform before them: his rod became a serpent, and was again a rod; his hand became leprous, and was then restored; and he could turn the water of the Nile into blood. Exodus 4:1-9 .
The other miracles, wrought by him in Egypt, were to show to Pharaoh the mighty power of God, who said, I will "multiply my signs and my wonders in the land of Egypt . . . . and the Egyptians shall know that I am Jehovah, when I stretch forth mine hand upon Egypt." Exodus 7:3-5 . The ten plagues followed, which were miracles or signs of the power of God — signs not only to the Egyptians, but also to the Israelites, as is shown by the reference to them afterwards. Numbers 14:22 ; Judges 6:13 .
By the following list it will be seen that there were many other miracles wrought in O.T. times — by Moses in the wilderness; by the prophets in the land; and some through the direct agency of God from heaven, as the deliverance of the three from the fiery furnace, Daniel from the lions, etc. All the miracles were indeed the acts of God, His servants being merely the means through which they were carried out.
PRINCIPAL MIRACLES IN THE OLD TESTAMENT.
In Egypt.
Aaron's rod becomes a serpent Exodus 7:10-12
The Ten Plagues.
Water made blood Exodus 7:20-25
Frogs Exodus 8:5-14
Lice Exodus 8:16-18
Flies Exodus 8:20-24
Murrain Exodus 9:3 - 6
Boils and blains Exodus 9:8-11
Thunder and hail Exodus 9:22-26
Locusts Exodus 10:12-19
Darkness Exodus 10:21-23
Death of the Firstborn Exodus 12:29-30
Parting of the Red Sea Exodus 14:21-31
In the Wilderness.
Curing the waters of Marah Exodus 15:23-25
Manna from heaven Exodus 16:14-35
Water from the rock at Rephidim Exodus 17:5-7
Death of Nadab and Abihu Leviticus 10:1 - 2
The earth swallows the murmurers, and
the death of Korah, Dathan and Abiram Numbers 16:31-40
Budding of Aaron's rod at Kadesh Numbers 17:8
Water from the rock at Meribah Numbers 20:7-11
The brazen serpent: Israel healed Numbers 21:8 - 9
Balaam's ass speaking Numbers 22:21-35
Parting the Jordan Joshua 3:14-17
In the Land.
Fall of Jericho's walls Joshua 6:6-25
Staying of the sun and moon Joshua 10:12-14
Withering and cure of Jeroboam's hand 1 Kings 13:4 - 6
Multiplying the widow's oil 1 Kings 17:14-16
Raising the widow's son 1 Kings 17:17-24
Burning of the captains and their companies 2 Kings 1 . 10-12
Dividing of Jordan by Elijah 2 Kings 2:7-8
Elijah carried to heaven 2 Kings 2:11
Dividing of Jordan by Elisha 2 Kings 2:14
Cure of the waters of Jericho 2 Kings 2:19-22
Supply of water to the army 2 Kings 3:16-20
Increase of the widow's oil 2 Kings 4:2-7
Raising the Shunammite's son 2 Kings 4:32-37
Healing of the deadly pottage 2 Kings 4:38-41
Feeding the 100 with 20 loaves 2 Kings 4:42-44
Cure of Naaman's leprosy 2 Kings 5:10-14
Swimming of the iron axe-head 2 Kings 6:5-7
Resurrection of the dead man on touching Elisha's bones 2 Kings 13:21
Return of the shadow on the dial 2 Kings 20:9-11
Among the Gentiles
Deliverance of the three in the fiery furnace Daniel 3:19-27
Deliverance of Daniel from the lions Daniel 6:16-23
Jonah saved by the great fish Jonah 2:1-10
In the N.T. three Greek words are used, similar to those in the O.T.
1. τέρας, 'a wonder,' which in the A.V. is always thus translated and often associated with the word 'signs:' 'signs and wonders.' People were generally amazed at the miracles performed.
2. σημεῖον, 'a sign.' This word is translated 'signs,' 'miracles,' 'wonder,' and in 2 Thessalonians 3:17 'token': it is the word invariably used in John's gospel.
3. δύναμις, 'power:' translated 'miracles,' 'mighty works,' 'powers.' These three divinely selected words explain the nature of miracles. They were 'wonders' that arrested the attention of the people; they were 'signs' that God had visited His people, and that the acts of the Lord Jesus identified Him with the promised Messiah; and they were 'powers,' for they were superhuman. These three words are applied to the miracles of the Lord Jesus in Acts 2:22 ; to those wrought by Paul, Mark 6:35-44 ; and to the work of Antichrist, the man of sin, in a future day. 2 Thessalonians 2:9 .
The miracles by the Lord and His apostles were nearly all wrought for the welfare of men, curing them from the diseases of mind and body, and dispossessing them of demons, thus spoiling the kingdom of Satan. The cursing of the fig-tree differs from the others: it was a sign of God's judgement on the Jews. From the wording of several passages it is conclusive that not nearly all the miracles of the Lord are recorded. Mark 6:55,56 ; John 21:25 .
It is stated in Mark 16:16-18 that those who should believe on the Lord Jesus, by the testimony of the apostles, would be able to work miracles; and there is ample testimony in early church history that this was the case, especially in casting out demons. Justin Martyr, Irenaeus, and Tertullian testified to the heathen persecutors that there was power in the name of Jesus to effect this, and the persecuting emperors were invited to witness it. While the Christians were being persecuted, such signs would be a visible evidence of the power of God and the value of the name of the Lord Jesus. By the time the emperors professed Christianity, followed by the masses (the 4th century), Christ had been well accredited on the earth: hence there was no further need of such signs. Satan in the days of the apostles had his counterfeits (cf. Acts 8:9 ; Acts 13:6-8 ; Acts 19:19 ), as he certainly has had since, and will have in the future, when he will be allowed to bring in his strong delusion: cf. Matthew 24:24 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:9,10 ; Revelation 13:13,14 .
Though not called a miracle, isnot the conversion of a sinner a miracle? It seems impossible for one who has been turned from darkness to light, and has been created in Christ Jesus, with the fruits and effects following, to doubt the reality of other miracles recorded by God in His sacred writings.
In the accompanying list of miracles in the N.T. it will be noticed that some are found in one gospel only — each of the gospels having miracles peculiar to itself — a few are in two gospels; many in three; and only one that is recorded in all four. None but God could have made these selections. Indeed the scriptures are themselves as clear a manifestation of the power and wisdom of God as are any of the miracles.
PRINCIPAL MIRACLES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT.
MIRACLES
Two blind men cured - Matthew 9:27-31 .
Dumb spirit cast out - Matthew 9:32,33 .
Tribute money in mouth of fish - Matthew 17:24-27 .
Deaf and dumb man cured - Mark 7:31-37 .
Blind man cured - Mark 8:22-26 .
Draught of fishes - Luke 5:1-11 .
Widow's son raised - Luke 7:11-17 .
Woman loosed from a spirit of infirmity - Luke 13:11-17 .
The dropsy cured - Luke 14 : l- 6.
Ten lepers cleansed - Luke 17:11-19 .
Malchus' ear healed - Luke 22:50,51 .
Water made wine - John 2:1-11
Nobleman's son cured - John 4:46-54 .
Impotent man cured - John 5 : l- 9
Man born blind cured - John 9 : l- 7.
Lazarus raised from the dead - John 11:38-44 .
Draught of 153 fishes - John 21:1-14 .
Syro-Phoenician's daughter cured - Matthew 15:21-28 ; Mark 7:24-30 .
Four thousand fed - Matthew 15:32-38 ; Mark 8 : l- 9.
Fig tree withered - Matthew 21:18-22 ; Mark 11:12-24 .
Centurion's servant cured - Matthew 8:5-13 ; Luke 7:1-10 .
Blind and dumb demoniac cured - Matthew 12:22 ; Luke 11:14 .
Demoniac in the synagogue cured - Mark 1:23-28 ; Luke 4:33-37 .
Peter's wife's mother cured - Matthew 8:14-15 ; Mark 1:30-31 ; Luke 4:38,39 .
Leper cured - Matthew 8:2 - 4 ; Mark 1:40-45 ; Luke 5:12-15 .
Paralytic cured - Matthew 9:2 - 7 ; Mark 2:3-12 ; Luke 5:18-26 .
Tempest stilled - Matthew 8:23-27 ; Mark 4:36-41 ; Luke 8:22-25 .
Demoniacs cured at Gadara - Matthew 8:28-34 ; Mark 5:1-20 ; Luke 8:26-39 .
Jairus' daughter raised - Matthew 9:18-26 ; Mark 5:22-43 ; Luke 8:41-56 .
Woman's issue of blood cured - Matthew 9:20-22 ; Numbers 14:22 ; Luke 8:43-48
Man's withered hand cured - Matthew 12:10-13 ; Mark 3 : l- 5; Luke 6:6-11 .
Demon cast out of boy - Matthew 17:14-18 ; Mark 9:14-27 ; Luke 9:37-42 .
Blind men cured - Matthew 20:30-34 ; Mark 10:46-52 ; Luke 18:35-43 .
Jesus walks on the sea - Matthew 14:24-33 ; Mark 6:47-51 ; John 6:16-21 .
Five thousand fed - Matthew 14:15-21 ; 2 Corinthians 12:12 ; Luke 9:12-17 ; John 6:5-14 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Miracles
A miracle, in the popular sense, is a prodigy, or an extraordinary event, which surprises us by its novelty. In a more accurate and philosophic sense, a miracle is an effect which does not follow from any of the regular laws of nature, or which is inconsistent with some known law of it, or contrary to the settled constitution and course of things. Accordingly, all miracles presuppose an established system of nature, within the limits of which they operate, and with the order of which they disagree. Of a miracle in the theological sense many definitions have been given. That of Dr. Samuel Clarke is: "A miracle is a work effected in a manner unusual, or different from the common and regular method of providence, by the interposition of God himself, or of some intelligent agent superior to man, for the proof or evidence of some particular doctrine, or in attestation of the authority of some particular person." Mr. Hume has insidiously or erroneously maintained that a miracle is contrary to experience; but in reality it is only different from experience. Experience informs us that one event has happened often; testimony informs us that another event has happened once or more. That diseases should be generally cured by the application of external causes, and sometimes at the mere word of a prophet, and without the visible application of causes, are facts not inconsistent with each other in the nature of things themselves, nor irreconcilable according to our ideas. Each fact may arise from its own proper cause; each may exist independently of the other; and each is known by its own proper proof, whether of sense or testimony. As secret causes often produce events contrary to those we do expect from experience, it is equally conceivable that events should sometimes be produced which we do not expect. To pronounce, therefore, a miracle to be false, because it is different from experience, is only to conclude against its general existence from the very circumstance which constitutes its particular nature; for if it were not different from experience, where would be its singularity? or what particular proof could be drawn from it, if it happened according to the ordinary train of human events, or was included in the operation of the general laws of nature? We grant that it does differ from experience; but we do not presume to make our experience the standard of the divine conduct. He that acknowledges a God must, at least, admit the possibility of a miracle. The atheist, that makes him inseparable from what is called nature, and binds him to its laws by an insurmountable necessity; that deprives him of will, and wisdom, and power, as a distinct and independent Being; may deny even the very possibility of a miraculous interposition, which can in any instance suspend or counteract those general laws by which the world is governed. But he who allows of a First Cause in itself perfect and intelligent, abstractedly from those effects which his wisdom and power have produced, must at the same time allow that this cause can be under no such restraints as to be debarred the liberty of controlling its laws as often as it sees fit. Surely, the Being that made the world can govern it, or any part of it, in such a manner as he pleases; and he that constituted the very laws by which it is in general conducted, may suspend the operation of those laws in any given instance, or impress new powers on matter, in order to produce new and extraordinary effects.
In judging of miracles there are certain criteria, peculiar to the subject, sufficient to conduct our inquiries, and warrant our determination. Assuredly they do not appeal to our ignorance, for they presuppose not only the existence of a general order of things, but our actual knowledge of the appearance which that order exhibits, and of the secondary material causes from which it, in most cases, proceeds. If a miraculous event were effected by the immediate hand of God, and yet bore no mark of distinction from the ordinary effects of his agency, it would impress no conviction, and probably awaken no attention. Our knowledge of the ordinary course of things, though limited, is real; and therefore it is essential to a miracle, both that it differ from that course, and be accompanied with peculiar and unequivocal signs of such difference. We have been told that the course of nature is fixed and unalterable, and therefore it is not consistent with the immutability of God to perform miracles. But, surely, they who reason in this manner beg the point in question. We have no right to assume that the Deity has ordained such general laws as will exclude his interposition; and we cannot suppose that he would forbear to interfere where any important end could be answered. This interposition, though it controls, in particular cases, the energy, does not diminish the utility, of those laws. It leaves them to fulfil their own proper purposes, and affects only a distinct purpose, for which they were not calculated. If the course of nature implies the general laws of matter and motion, into which the most opposite phenomena may be resolved, it is certain that we do not yet know them in their full extent; and, therefore, that events, which are related by judicious and disinterested persons, and at the same time imply no gross contradiction, are possible in themselves, and capable of a certain degree of proof. If the course of nature implies the whole order of events which God has ordained for the government of the world, it includes both his ordinary and extraordinary dispensations, and among them miracles may have their place, as a part of the universal plan. It is, indeed, consistent with sound philosophy, and not inconsistent with pure religion, to acknowledge that they might be disposed by the supreme Being at the same time with the more ordinary effects of his power; that their causes and occasions might be arranged with the same regularity; and that, in reference chiefly to their concomitant circumstances of persons and times, to the specific ends for which they were employed, and to our idea of the immediate necessity there is for a divine agent, miracles would differ from common events, in which the hand of God acts as efficaciously, though less visibly. On this consideration of the subject, miracles, instead of contradicting nature, might form a part of it. But what our limited reason and scanty experience may comprehend should never be represented as a full and exact view of the possible or actual varieties which exist in the works of God.
2. If we be asked whether miracles are credible, we reply, that, abstractedly considered, they are not incredible; that they are capable of indirect proof from analogy, and of direct, from testimony; that in the common and daily course of worldly affairs, events, the improbability of which, antecedently to all testimony, was very great, are proved to have happened, by the authority of competent and honest witnesses; that the Christian miracles were objects of real and proper experience to those who saw them; and that whatsoever the senses of mankind can perceive, their report may substantiate. Should it be asked whether miracles were necessary, and whether the end proposed to be effected by them could warrant so immediate and extraordinary an interference of the Almighty, as such extraordinary operations suppose; to this we might answer, that, if the fact be established, all reasonings a priori concerning their necessity must be frivolous, and may be false. We are not capable of deciding on a question which, however simple in appearance, is yet too complex in its parts, and too extensive in its object, to be fully comprehended by the human understanding. Whether God could or could not have effected all the ends designed to be promoted by the Gospel, without deviating from the common course of his providence, and interfering with its general laws, is a speculation that a modest inquirer would carefully avoid; for it carries on the very face of it a degree of presumption totally unbecoming the state of a mortal being. Infinitely safer is it for us to acquiesce in what the Almighty has done, than to embarrass our minds with speculations about what he might have done. Inquiries of this kind are generally inconclusive, and always useless. They rest on no solid principles, are conducted by no fixed rules, and lead to no clear conviction. They begin from curiosity or vanity, they are prosecuted amidst ignorance and error, and they frequently terminate in impious presumption or universal skepticism. God is the best and indeed the only judge how far miracles are proper to promote any particular design of his providence, and how far that design would have been left unaccomplished, if common and ordinary methods only had been pursued. So, from the absence of miracles, we may conclude, in any supposed case, that they were not necessary; from their existence, supported by fair testimony, in any given case, we may refer with confidence that they are proper. A view of the state of the world in general, and of the Jewish nation in particular, and an examination of the nature and tendency of the Christian religion, will point out very clearly the great expediency of a miraculous interposition; and when we reflect on the gracious and important ends that were to be effected by it, we shall be convinced that it was not an idle and useless display of divine power; but that while the means effected and confirmed the end, the end fully justified and illustrated the means. If we reflect on the almost irresistible force of prejudice, and the strong opposition it universally made to the establishment of a new religion on the demolition of rites and ceremonies, which authority had made sacred, and custom had familiarized; if we reflect on the extent and importance, as well as the singularity, of the Christian plan; what was its avowed purpose to effect, and what difficulties it was necessarily called to struggle with before that purpose could be effected; how much it was opposed by the opinions and the practice of the generality of mankind, by philosophy, by superstition, by corrupt passions and inveterate habits, by pride and sensuality, in short, by every engine of human influence, whether formed by craft, or aided by power;—if we seriously reflect on these things, and give them their due force, (and experience shows us that we can scarcely give them too much,) we shall be induced to admit even the necessity of a miraculous interposition, at a time when common means must inevitably, in our apprehensions, have failed of success.
The revelation of the divine will by inspired persons is, as such, miraculous; and therefore, before the adversaries of the Gospel can employ with propriety their objections to the particular miracles on which its credibility is based, they should show the impossibility of any revelation. In whatever age the revelation is given, succeeding ages can know it only from testimony; and, if they admit, on the report of their fellow creatures, that God had inspired any being with the preternatural knowledge of his will, why should they deny that he had enabled the same being to heal the sick, or to cleanse the leprous? How, may it be asked, should the divine Teacher give a more direct and consistent proof of his preternatural commission, than by displaying those signs and wonders which mark the finger of God? That the Apostles could not be deceived, and that they had no temptation to deceive, has been repeatedly demonstrated. So powerful, indeed, is the proof adduced in support of their testimony, that the infidels of these later days have been obliged to abandon the ground on which their predecessors stood; to disclaim all moral evidences arising from the character and relation of eye-witnesses; and to maintain, upon metaphysical, rather than historical, principles, that miracles are utterly incapable, in their own nature, of existing in any circumstances, or of being supported by any evidence.
Miracles may be classed under two heads: those which consist in a train or combination of events, which distinguish themselves from the ordinary arrangements of Providence; and those particular operations which are performed by instruments and agents incompetent to effect them without a preternatural power. In the conduct of Providence respecting the Jewish people, from the earliest periods of their existence, as a distinct class of society, to the present time, we behold a singularity of circumstance and procedure which we cannot account for on common principles. Comparing their condition and situation with that of other nations, we can meet with nothing similar to it in the history of mankind. So remarkable a difference, conspicuous in every revolution of their history, could not have subsisted through mere accident. There must have been a cause adequate to so extraordinary an effect. Now, what should this cause be, but an interposition of Providence in a manner different from the course of its general government? For the phenomenon cannot be explained by an application of those general causes and effects that operate in other cases. The original propagation of Christianity was likewise an event which clearly discovered a miraculous interposition. The circumstances which attended it were such as cannot rationally be accounted for on any other postulatum. ( See CHRISTIANITY. ) It may now be observed, that the institutions of the law and the Gospel may not only appeal for their confirmation to a train of events which, taken in a general and combined view, point out an extraordinary designation, and vindicate their claim to a divine authority; but also to a number of particular operations which, considered distinctly, or in a separate and detached light, evidently display a supernatural power, immediately exerted on the occasion.
Since Christ himself constantly appealed to these works as the evidences of his divine mission and character, we may briefly examine how far they justified and confirmed his pretensions. That our Lord laid the greatest stress on the evidence they afforded, nay, that he considered that evidence as sufficient to authenticate his claims to the office of the Messiah with all reasonable and well disposed inquirers, is manifest not only from his own words, John 10:25 , but also from a great variety of other passages in the evangelists. Thus, when the disciples of John were sent to Christ, to receive from his own lips the most satisfactory proofs of his divine mission, he referred them to his miracles. "Go," said he, "and show to John again those things which ye hear and see: the blind receive their sight, the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, and the dead are raised up,"
Matthew 11:4-5 . Again: "If I do not the works of my Father, believe me not: but if I do, though ye believe not me, believe the works," John 10:37 . This appeal to miracles was founded on the following just and obvious grounds:—
First: That they are visible proofs of divine approbation, as well as of divine power; for it would have been quite inconclusive to rest an appeal on the testimony of the latter, if it had not at the same time included an evidence of the former; and it was, indeed, a natural inference, that working of miracles, in defence of a particular cause, was the seal of Heaven to the truth of that cause. To suppose the contrary, would be to suppose that God not only permitted his creatures to be deceived, but that he deviated from the ordinary course of his providence, purposely with a view to deceive them. The conclusion which the man whom our Saviour restored to sight drew from this miracle was exceedingly just, and founded on the common sentiments and impressions of the human heart. "We know," says he, "that God heareth not sinners: but if any man be a worshipper of God, and doeth his will, him he heareth. Since the world began was it not heard that any man opened the eyes of one that was born blind. If this man were not of God, he could do nothing," John 9:31-33 . If the cause which our Saviour was engaged in had not been approved of by God, it would not have been honoured with the seal of miracles: for the divine power can never be supposed to counteract the divine will. This would be to set his nature at variance with itself; and, by destroying his simplicity, would destroy his happiness, and terminate in confusion and misery. Hence we may justly reject, as incredible, those miracles which have been ascribed to the interposition of wicked spirits. The possibility of their interference is a mere hypothesis, depending upon gratuitous assumption, and leading to very dangerous consequences; and the particular instances in which credulous superstition, or perverted philosophy, has supposed them to interfere, are, as facts, destitute of any clear and solid evidence; or, as effects, often resolvable into natural causes.
Secondly: When our Lord appealed to his miracles, as proofs of his divine mission, it presupposed that those miracles were of such a nature as would bear the strictest examination; that they had all those criteria which could possibly distinguish them from the delusions of enthusiasm, and the artifices of imposture; else the appeal would have been fallacious and equivocal. He appealed to them with all the confidence of an upright mind totally possessed with a consciousness of their truth and reality. This appeal was not drawn out into any laboured argument, nor adorned by any of the embellishments of language. It was short, simple, and decisive. He neither reasoned nor declaimed on their nature or their design: he barely pointed to them as plain and indubitable facts, such as spoke their own meaning, and carried with them their own authority. The miracles which our Lord performed were too public to be suspected of imposture; and, being objects of sense, they were secured against the charge of enthusiasm. An impostor would not have acted so absurdly as to have risked his credit on the performance of what, he must have known, it was not in his power to effect; and though an enthusiast, from the warmth of imagination, might have flattered himself with a full persuasion of his being able to perform some miraculous work; yet, when the trial was referred to an object of sense, the event must soon have exposed the delusion. The impostor would not have dared to say to the blind, Receive thy sight; to the deaf, Hear; to the dumb, Speak; to the dead, Arise; to the raging of the sea, Be still; lest he should injure the credit of his cause, by undertaking more than he could perform; and though the enthusiast, under the delusion of his passions, might have confidently commanded disease to fly, and the powers of nature to be subject to his control; yet their obedience would not have followed his command.
The miracles of Christ then were such as an impostor would not have attempted, and such as an enthusiast could not have effected. They had no disguise; and were in a variety of instances of such a nature as to preclude the very possibility of collusion. They were performed in the midst of his bitterest enemies; and were so palpable and certain, as to extort the following acknowledgment even from persons who were most eager to oppose his doctrines, and to discredit his pretensions: "This man doeth many miracles. If we let him thus alone, all men will believe on him,"
John 11:47-48 . The miracles Christ performed were indeed sufficient to alarm the fears of those whose downfall was involved in his success.
And it was impossible for them to deny the facts, which so many thousands were ready to attest on evidence too certain to admit even the possibility of mistake, delusion, or imposture. But his enemies, who admitted their reality and yet resisted their design, by not acknowledging the person who wrought them to be the Messiah, had recourse to the most impious and most absurd suppositions, in order to evade their evidence. The Heathen imputed them to some occult power of magic: and thus applied what has no existence in nature, in order to account for a phenomenon that existed out of its common course. The stories of the Jews, who confessed the miracles, but denied what they were intended to establish, are too ridiculous to be mentioned. We must not, however, omit to take notice of the wicked and blasphemous cavil of the Pharisees, and the noble reply which our Lord made to it. They could not deny the fact, but they imputed it to the agency of an infernal spirit: "This fellow," said they, "doth not cast out devils, but by Beelzebub, the prince of the devils. And Jesus knew their thoughts, and said unto them, Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand: and if Satan cast out Satan, he is divided against himself; how shall then his kingdom stand?" Matthew 12:24-26 . The purity of the doctrine which was taught by our blessed Lord was totally adverse to the kingdom of darkness. It tended to overthrow it, by the introduction of principles far different from those which Satan would inspire, and by prosecuting objects totally opposite to those which that wicked and malignant spirit would tempt us to pursue: so that in proportion to the prevalence of the kingdom of Christ, the kingdom of Satan would of course be diminished. Now, supposing miracles to be in the power of an infernal spirit, can it be imagined that he would communicate an ability of performing them to persons who were counteracting his designs? Would he by them give credit to a cause that tended to bring his own into disgrace? Thus, as our Saviour appealed to miracles as proofs of his power; so he appealed to the inherent worth and purity of the doctrines they were intended to bear witness to, as a proof that the power was of God. In this manner do the external and internal evidences give and receive mutual confirmation and mutual lustre.
The truth of the Christian religion does not, however, depend wholly on the miracles wrought by its divine Founder, though sufficient in themselves to establish his claims: but, in order to give the evidence of miracles the strongest force they could possibly acquire, that evidence was extended still farther; and the same power that our Lord possessed was communicated to his disciples, and their more immediate successors. While yet on earth he imparted to them this extraordinary gift, as the seal of their commission, when he sent them to preach the Gospel: and after his glorious resurrection and ascension into heaven, they were endowed with powers yet more stupendous. Sensible of the validity of this kind of evidence, the Apostles of our Lord, with the same artless simplicity, and the same boldness of conscious integrity, which distinguished their great Master, constantly insisted upon the miracles they wrought, as strong and undeniable proofs of the truth of their doctrines. Thus the miracles of our blessed Lord may be justly considered as the evidence of his divine mission and character. If we consider their nature, their greatness, and their number; and if to this consideration we add that which respects their end and design, we must acknowledge that no one could have performed them, unless God was with him. They were too public to be the artifices of imposture; too substantial and too numerous to afford the slightest suspicion of undesigned and fortuitous coincidence. In a word, supposing that the Most High should in any instance so far counteract the common laws of nature, as to produce a miracle; and should design that miracle as a monument to future times of the truth of any peculiar doctrine, we cannot conceive any mode of communicating it more effectual than that which he has chosen. Stronger proofs could not be afforded, consistently with the design of the Gospel, which is not to overpower our understandings by an irresistible and compulsory light, but to afford us such rational evidence as is sufficient to satisfy moral inquirers, who are endowed with faculties to perceive the truth; but at the same time who also have power totally to resist it, and finally to forfeit all its blessings. These miracles were of a nature too palpable to be mistaken. They were the objects of sense, and not the precarious speculations of reason concerning what God might do; or the chimerical suggestions of fancy concerning what he did. The facts were recorded by those who must have known whether they were true or false. The persons who recorded them were under no possible temptations to deceive the world. We can only account for their conduct on the supposition of their most perfect conviction and disinterested zeal. That they should assert what they knew to be false; that they should publish it with so much ardour; that they should risk every thing dear to humanity, in order to maintain it; and at last submit to death, in order to attest their persuasion of its truth in those moments when imposture usually drops its mask, and enthusiasm loses its confidence; that they should act thus in opposition to every dictate of common sense, and every principle of common honesty, every restraint of shame, and every impulse of selfishness, is a phenomenon not less irreconcilable to the moral state of things than miracles are to the natural constitution of the world. Falsehood naturally entangles men in contradiction, and confounds them with dismay: but the love of truth invigorates the mind; the consciousness of integrity anticipates the approbation of God; and conscience creates a fortitude, to which mere unsupported nature is often a stranger.
3. How long miracles were continued in the church, has been a matter of keen dispute, and has been investigated with as much anxiety as if the truth of the Gospel depended upon the manner in which it was decided. Assuming, as we are here warranted to do, that real miraculous power was conveyed in the way detailed by the inspired writers, it is plain, that it may have been exercised in different countries, and may have remained, without any new communication of it, throughout the first, and a considerable part of the second century. The Apostles, wherever they went to execute their commission, would avail themselves of the stupendous gift which had been imparted to them; and it is clear, not only that they were permitted and enabled to convey it to others, but that spiritual gifts, including the power of working miracles, were actually conferred on many of the primitive disciples. Allusions to this we find in the epistles of St. Paul; such allusions, too, as it is utterly inconceivable that any man of a sound judgment could have made, had he not known that he was referring to an obvious fact, about which there could be no hesitation. Of the time at which several of the Apostles died, we have no certain knowledge. St. Peter and St. Paul suffered at Rome about A.D. 66, or 67; and it is fully established, that the life of John was much longer protracted, he having died a natural death, A.D. 100, or 101. Supposing that the two former of these Apostles imparted spiritual gifts till the time of their suffering martyrdom, the persons to whom they were imparted might, in the course of nature, have lived through the earlier part of the second century; and if John did the same till the end of his life, such gifts as were derived from him might have remained till more than the half of that century had elapsed. That such was the fact, is asserted by ancient ecclesiastical writers. Whether, after the generation immediately succeeding the Apostles had passed away, the power of working miracles was anew communicated, is a question, the solution of which cannot be nearly so satisfactory. The probability is, that there was no such renewal; and this opinion rests upon the ground that natural causes were now sufficient to accomplish the end for which miracles were originally designed; and it does not appear to have been any part of the scheme of the blessed Author of our religion, that, solely for the purpose of hastening that conversion of the nations which might gradually be accomplished, miracles should be wrought, when these could be of no use in establishing after ages in the faith.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible
PARABLES IN OLD TESTAMENT
Trees choosing a king. Judges 9:7-15.
Samson's riddle. Judges 14:14.
Nathan and the eve lamb. 2 Samuel 12:1-6.
Woman of Tekoah. 2 Samuel 14:6-11.
Escaped prisoner. 1 Kings 20:35-40.
Thistle and cedar. 2 Kings 14:9.
The vine. Psalms 80:8-16.
Vineyard. Isaiah 6:1-7.
Eagle and vine. Ezekiel 17:3-10.
Lion's whelps. Ezekiel 19:2-9.
Boiling pot. Ezekiel 24:3-5.
Cedar in Lebanon. Ezekiel 31:3-18.
MIRACLES IN OLD TESTAMENT
Enoch translated. Genesis 5:24 : Hebrews 11:5.
The flood. Genesis 7:11-24.
Sodom and Gomorrah destroyed. Genesis 19:24.
Lot's wife made a salt pillar. Genesis 19:26.
Burning bush. Exodus 3:2-4.
Aaron's rod. Exodus 7:10-12.
Ten plagues of Egypt, Exodus 7:1 to Exodus 12:51 :
Waters turned to blood. Exodus 7:19-25.
Frogs. Exodus 8:6-14.
Lice. Exodus 8:17-18.
Flies. Exodus 8:24.
Murrain, (cattle plague). Exodus 9:3-6.
Boils. Exodus 9:8-11.
Thunder, hail, etc. Exodus 9:22-26.
Locusts. Exodus 10:12-19.
Darkness. Exodus 10:21-29.
Death of the firstborn. Exodus 12:29-30.
Crossing of the Red Sea. Exodus 14:21-31.
Marah's waters sweetened. Exodus 15:23-25.
Giving the manna. Exodus 16:14-35.
Water from the rock at Horeb. Exodus 17:5-7.
Nadab and Abihu. Leviticus 10:1-2.
Fart of Israel burned. Numbers 11:1-3.
Korah and his company. Matthew 20:1-1656.
Aaron's rod budding. Numbers 17:1, etc.
Water from the rock. Meribah. Numbers 20:7-11.
Brazen serpent. Numbers 21:8-9.
Balaam's ass speaks. Numbers 22:21-35.
River Jordan crossed. Joshua 3:14-17.
Walls of Jericho fall. Joshua 6:6-20.
Jeroboam's hand withered. 1 Kings 13:4; 1 Kings 13:6.
Widow's meal and oil increased. 1 Kings 17:14-16.
Widow's son raised. 1 Kings 17:17-24.
Elijah calls fire from heaven. 1 Kings 18:28.
Ahaziah's captains consumed by fire. 2 Kings 1:10-12.
Jordan divided by Elijah and Elisha. 2 Kings 2:7-8; 2 Kings 2:14.
Elijah carried to heaven, 2 Kings 2:11.
Waters of Jericho healed. 2 Kings 2:21-22
The widow's oil multiplied. 2 Kings 4:2-7.
Shunammite's son raised. 2 Kings 4:32-37.
Naaman and Gehazi. 2 Kings 5:10-27.
The iron axe-head swims. 2 Kings 6:5-7.
Syrian army's blindness. 2 Kings 6:18; 2 Kings 6:20.
Dead man raised. 2 Kings 13:21.
Sennacherib's army destroyed. 2 Kings 19:35.
Sun-dial of Ahaz. 2 Kings 20:9-11.
Uzziah struck with leprosy. 2 Chronicles 26:16-21.
Shadrach, Meshach, Abednego in the furnace. Daniel 3:19-27.
Daniel in the den of lions. Daniel 6:16-28.
Jonah and a great fish. Jonah 2:1-10.
PARABLES IN THE GOSPELS
1. Found in Matthew only (and not found in any other Gospel).—2.
The tares. Matthew 13:1-24.
Hid treasure. John 9:1-7.
Pearl of great price. Matthew 13:46.
Dragnet. Matthew 13:47-48.
Unmerciful servant. Matthew 18:23-34.
Laborers in the vineyard. 1618065298_2.
The two sons. Matthew 21:28-32.
Marriage of king's son. Matthew 22:1-14.
Ten virgins. Matthew 25:1-13.
Ten talents. Matthew 25:14-30.
Sheep and goats. Matthew 25:31-46.
2. Found in Mark only.—2.
The seed. Mark 4:26-29.
Householder. Mark 13:34-36.
3. Found in Luke only.—17.
Two debtors. Luke 7:41-43.
Good Samaritan. Luke 10:25-37.
Friend at midnight. Luke 11:5-8.
Rich fool. Luke 12:16-21.
Servants watching. Luke 12:35-40.
The servant on trial. Luke 12:42-48.
Barren fig tree. Luke 13:6-9.
Great supper. Luke 14:16-24.
Tower and warring king. Luke 14:28-33.
The lost silver. Luke 15:8-10.
Prodigal (lost) son. Luke 15:11-32.
The shrewd steward. Luke 16:1-8.
Rich man and Lazarus. Luke 16:19-31.
Unprofitable servants. Luke 17:7-10.
Unjust Judge. Luke 18:1-8.
Pharisee and publican. Luke 18:9-14.
Ten pounds. Luke 19:12-27.
4. In Matthew and Luke only.—3.
House on rock and sand. Matthew 7:24-27; Luke 6:48-49.
The leaven. Matthew 13:33; Luke 13:20.
Lost sheep. Matthew 18:12; Luke 15:3-7.
5. In Matthew, Mark and Luke only.—7.
Light under a bushel. Matthew 5:15 : Mark 4:21; Luke 8:16.
Cloth and garment. Matthew 9:16; Mark 2:21; Luke 5:36.
Wine and bottles. Matthew 9:17 : Mark 2:22; Luke 5:37.
The sower. Matthew 13:1-58; Mark 4:1-41; Luke 8:1-56.
Mustard seed. Matthew 13:1-58; Mark 4:1-41; Luke 13:1-35.
Wicked husbandmen. Matthew 21:1-46; Mark 12:1-44; Luke 20:1-47.
The fig tree and the trees. Matthew 24:1-51; Mark 13:1-37; Luke 21:1-38.
MIRACLES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT
A. In the Gospels.
1. Found in Matthew only (not in any other Gospel).—3.
Two blind men see. Matthew 9:27-31.
Dumb demoniac. Matthew 9:32-33.
Money (shekel) in the fish. Matthew 17:24-27.
2. Found in Mark only.—2.
Deaf and dumb cured. Mark 7:31-37.
Blind man made to see. Mark 8:22-26.
3. Found in Luke only.—6.
Draught of fishes. Luke 5:1-11.
Raising widow's son. Luke 7:11-15.
Infirm woman healed. Luke 13:11-15.
Dropsy cured. Luke 14:1-6.
Ten lepers cleansed. Luke 17:11-19.
Malchus' ear healed. Luke 22:50-51.
4. Found in John only.—6.
Water made wine at Cana. John 2:1-11.
Nobleman's son healed. John 4:46-54.
Impotent man at Bethesda. John 5:1-9.
Sight to man born blind. Matthew 13:44.
Lazarus raised to life. John 11:38-44.
Draught of 153 fishes. John 21:1-14.
5. In Matthew and Mark only.—3.
Syrophœnician's daughter. Matthew 15:1-39; Mark 7:1-37.
Four thousand fed. Matthew 15:1-39; Mark 8:1-38.
Withered fig tree. Matthew 21:1-46; Mark 11:1-33.
6. In Matthew and Luke only.—2.
Centurion's servant.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Miracles
A miracle may be defined to be a plain and manifest exercise by a man, or by God at the call of a man, of those powers which belong only to the Creator and Lord of nature; and this for the declared object of attesting that a divine mission is given to that man. It is not, therefore, the wonder , the exception to common experience, that constitutes the miracle , as is assumed both in the popular use of the word and by most objectors against miracles. No phenomenon in nature, however unusual, no event in the course of God's providence, however unexpected, is a miracle unless it can be traced to the agency of man (including prayer under the term agency), and unless it be put forth as a proof of divine mission. Prodigies and special providences are not miracles. (A miracle is not a violation of the laws of nature. It is God's acting upon nature in a degree far beyond our powers, but the same king of act as our wills are continually exerting upon nature. We do not in lifting a stone interfere with any law of nature, but exert a higher force among the laws. Prof. Tyndall says that "science does assert that without a disturbance of natural law quite as serious as the stoppage of an eclipse, or the rolling of the St. Lawrence up the falls of Niagara, no act of humiliation, individual or nation, could call one shower from heaven." And yet men by firing cannon during battle can cause a shower: does that cause such a commotion among the laws of nature? The exertion of a will upon the laws does not make a disturbance of natural law; and a miracle is simply the exertion of God's will upon nature. --ED.) Again, the term "nature" suggests to many persons the idea of a great system of things endowed with powers and forces of its own --a sort of machine, set a-going originally by a first cause, but continuing its motions of itself. Hence we are apt to imagine that a change in the motion or operation of any part of it by God would produce the same disturbance of the other parts as such a change would be likely to produce in them if made by us or by any other natural agent. But if the motions and operations of material things be produced really by the divine will, then his choosing to change, for a special purpose, the ordinary motion of one part does not necessarily or probably imply his choosing to change the ordinary motions of other parts in a way not at all requisite for the accomplishment of that special purpose. It is as easy for him to continue the ordinary course of the rest, with the change of one part, as of all the phenomena without any change at all. Thus, though the stoppage of the motion of the earth in the ordinary course of nature would be attended with terrible convulsions, the stoppage of the earth miraculously , for a special purpose to be served by that only , would not of itself be followed by any such consequences. (Indeed, by the action of gravitation it could be stopped, as a stone thrown up is stopped, in less than two minutes, and yet so gently as not to stir the smallest feather or mote on its surface. --ED.) From the same conception of nature as a machine, we are apt to think of interferences with the ordinary course of nature as implying some imperfection in it. But it is manifest that this is a false analogy; for the reason why machines are made is to save us trouble; and, therefore, they are more perfect in proportion as they answer this purpose. But no one can seriously imagine that the universe is a machine for the purpose of saving trouble to the Almighty. Again, when miracles are described as "interferences with the law of nature," this description makes them appear improbable to many minds, from their not sufficiently considering that the laws of nature interfere with one another, and that we cannot get rid of "interferences" upon any hypothesis consistent with experience. The circumstances of the Christian miracles are utterly unlike those of any pretended instances of magical wonders. This difference consists in -- (1) The greatness, number, completeness and publicity of the miracles. (2) In the character of the miracles. They were all beneficial, helpful, instructive, and worthy of God as their author. (3) The natural beneficial tendency of the doctrine they attested. (4) The connection of them with a whole scheme of revelation extending from the origin of the human race to the time of Christ.

Sentence search

Al hanissim - �and for the Miracles�); the opening phrase of a passage included in the daily prayers and the grace after meals on Chanukah and Purim, thankfully acknowledging the Miracles G-d wrought on those days...
Wonder - See Miracles, Sign
Wonders - See Miracles; SIGNS
Tarpelites - Ravishers; succession of Miracles
Wonder-Worker - ) One who performs wonders, or Miracles
Miracles - Three distinct New Testament Greek words represent Miracles: seemeion , "a sign"; teras , "a prodigy"; dunamis , "a mighty work. Jesus' Miracles were not merely wonders but signs; signs not merely of His power, but of the nature of His ministry and of His divine person. ...
A grand distinction peculiar to Christianity is, it won the world to it in an age of high civilization, through a few preachers of humble position, on the evidence of Miracles. Basing its claim on Miracles the creed of the slave became eventually the faith of the Caesars. Christ and His apostles still less than Mahomet among friends would have dared to allege Miracles, in the midst of hostile Jews and skeptical Romans, unless they were true. Early Christian writers, Justin Martyr, Tertullian, and Origen, occasionally appeal to Miracles in proof of Christianity; but state that their pagan opponents, admitting the facts, attributed them to magic; which accounts for the fewness of their references to Miracles. The Jewish writings, as the Sepher Toldoth Jeshu, also the extant fragments of Celsus, Porphyry, and Julian, admit the fact of the Miracles, though ascribing them to magic and evil spirits. The early Christian apologists allege in support of Christianity:...
(1) the greatness, number, completeness, and publicity of the Miracles;...
(2) the beneficial tendency of the doctrine;...
(3) the connection of the Miracles with prophecy and the whole scheme of redemption from Adam to Christ. The Miracles must have been altogether different from the wonders of exorcists, magicians, etc. The holy character of Christ and His apostles, and the tendency of Christianity to promote truth and virtue, are against the origination of the Miracles from evil spirits or jugglery. In the fourth century Miracles had ceased (Chrysostom on 1 Corinthians 11-13); in the third, Miracles are alleged, but are suspicious, as wrought among those already believing and predisposed to accept prodigies credulously. The ecclesiastical Miracles are not attested by inspired writers. The apostles alone could transmit the power of working Miracles to others. The ecclesiastical Miracles alleged are ambiguous, or tentative, or legendary, i. Herein the New Testament Miracles wholly differ from them. The Christian Miracles are:...
(1) Recorded by contemporaries. ...
(7) Not like popish Miracles in Roman Catholic countries, in affirmation of opinions already formed, but performed amidst enemies, converting men from their most cherished prejudices; there was no anterior persuasion to lay hold of, Jesus' Miracles gave birth to the sect; frauds might mix with the progress, but could not have place in the commencement of the religion. ...
(10) Not doubtful Miracles, as the liquefaction of Januarius' blood, cures of nervous ailments. Or, "law" being simply the expression of God's will, in Miracles God's will intervenes, for certain moral ends, to suspend His ordinary mode of working. ...
Hume alleged against Miracles their contrariety to "experience," and that experience shows testimony to be often false. The "experience" of the witnesses for Christianity attests the truth of Miracles. However improbable Miracles are under ordinary circumstances, they are probable, nay necessary, to attest a religious revelation and a divine commission. "In whatever degree it is probable that a revelation should be communicated to mankind at all, in the same degree is it probable that Miracles should be wrought" (Paley, Evidences of Christianity). It is objected, Miracles "interrupt the course of nature. "...
But as that course really comprises the whole series of God's government of the universe, moral as well as physical, Miracles are doubtless included in it. In this point of view Butler remarks, nothing less than another world, placed in circumstances similar to our own, can furnish an argument from analogy against the credibility of Miracles. The testimony to Christian Miracles is that of concurrent and contemporaneous witnesses. The religion so attested specifically differs from the false religions which false Miracles have been alleged to support. The argument is the other way, namely, since palpably false religions were propped up by false Miracles a pure religion like Christianity is not likely to rest on false Miracles. ...
In estimating the value of the testimony to Christ's Miracles it is to be remembered there is no counter testimony. Besides the evidential value of Miracles, they are intimately and internally connected with Christianity as a new creation springing from God manifest in the flesh. The history and separate existence of the Israelite church (the sole instance of a pure theism in the ancient world) it is impossible to explain without accepting the Miracles which the same Scripture records; so Christianity and Christendom can only be explained by accepting the Miracles which introduced them. Both dispensations were inaugurated by Miracles, and then mainly left to ordinary providence; only that the Old Testament church, at times when surrounding paganism, as in Elijah's times, threatened to swamp it, was vindicated by Miracles. Its Miracles are Miracles of power, to impress a rude age; the New Testament Miracles were Miracles of love. ...
The Old Testament Miracles were for the foe's destruction; Christ's were Miracles of mercy, except the withering of the fig tree and the sending the demons into the swine to perish, both symbolical lessons of warning to man. Many Miracles were typical; as the "tongues" manifested the universality of the Christian dispensation designed for every tongue, so counterworking the division of man from man through the confusion of tongues at Babel; the casting out of demons symbolizes Christ's coming "to destroy the works of the devil. " Miracles thus were manifestations of the Holy Spirit's presence and operation in the church. The Old Testament Miracles attested God's presence as King of the theocracy; though this involved a continual series of Miracles, yet as the theocracy was temporary and local those Miracles did not violate God's ordinary government of the world by the laws of nature. The Christian Miracles on the contrary, as attesting a permanent and universal dispensation, were properly limited to its commencement. ...
Christ performed His Miracles more for others' preservation than His own. Christ's mission, doctrine, and life, and Christ's Miracles mutually depend on one another. Therefore that His Miracles were false would be far harder to believe than that the testimony which supports them is true. Pritchard observes, Christ's Miracles, as His parables, go on the principle of the law of continuity of the human with the divine. That Miracles harmonize with nature in some degree is what we might expect, since the God of revelation is the God of nature. Leslie (Short Method with the Deists) observes four notes of truth in the Mosaic Miracles:...
1. 6) observes we have two histories of Moses and his Miracles, one in his book, the other in Israel's laws and ceremonies which are a living witness, not only of the Pentateuch history in general, but also of the Miracles it records (Exodus 13:1; compare Numbers 3:11; Numbers 3:46); its facts are inseparably connected with the miraculous. However indifferent nations become as to religion, they never are so as to property; now Miracles were the foundation of the Hebrew polity and of the tenure and regulations of property, e. The effect of the Miracles under Joshua kept all his generation faithful to Jehovah, so real and convincing were they (Joshua 24:31; Judges 2:7). ...
Messiah's Miracles were foretold (Isaiah 35:5-6; Isaiah 42:7), and so were asked for by John Baptist (Matthew 11:2-4), and made the ground by the people of calling Him "Son of David" (Matthew 12:23; John 7:31). The 40 Miracles of Christ recorded are but samples out of a greater number (John 2:23; John 20:30-31; Matthew 4:23; Matthew 8:16; Matthew 9:35; Matthew 12:15; Matthew 14:14; Exodus 16:17,; Matthew 15:30; Matthew 19:2; Matthew 21:14). Seventeen He cured of sicknesses, fever, leprosy, palsy, infirmity, withered hand, issue of blood, dropsy, blindness, deafness, muteness (John 4:47; John 5:5; John 9:1; Matthew 8:2; Matthew 8:5; Matthew 8:14; Matthew 9:2; Matthew 9:20; Matthew 9:27; Matthew 12:10; Mark 8:22; Luke 13:11; Luke 17:12; Luke 18:35; Luke 22:51); this class is that of Miracles bringing in love relief to suffering man. " Love to man, unweariedly active, is as conspicuous in His Miracles as power. The connection of His Miracles with His redeeming work is the reason why faith was the needed preliminary on the part of the recipients of healing (1618065298_7; Mark 7:29; Matthew 9:28-29). If Miracles were mere wonders anyone would have been a fit witness of their performance. ...
But the Miracles were designed to attract the witnesses to His kingdom. Performed in His own name and in the first person, "I say unto thee" (Luke 7:14); but the apostles' Miracles were in His name (Acts 3:6; Acts 4:10-12). Disbelief disqualified for appreciating Miracles. To work Miracles before hardened unbelievers would only aggravate their opposition, sin, and condemnation (John 15:24; John 9:39-41). He is an embodied miracle, the Miracle of Miracles. Christ's charge that the eye witnesses should not report His Miracles (Matthew 9:30; Mark 5:43; Mark 7:36) was in order that men should not dissociate the wonder from His redeeming work. ...
To John the Baptist on the contrary He sent a report of His Miracles, because John was not likely to dissever His Miracles from His person and His work. If the incarnation be denied, Christianity's existence is an effect without an adequate cause; grant the incarnation, and Miracles are its necessary concomitant and natural consequence. ...
The truth of the Miracles is confirmed incidentally by the fact that in no nation but Israel have the knowledge and worship of the one true God, the Creator, been maintained by the mere light of nature, and Israel was far from overtopping other nations in mental power and civilization. A divine power alone could have so elevated Israel by an extraordinary call, confirmed by Miracles. The prophecies, the morality, the structure of the Bible, and Christianity's conquest of the Roman world and its public establishment about 300 years after the execution of its Founder as a malefactor, similarly confirm the Miracles which attest to its divinity. The improbability of the Christian religion being established WITH Miracles is not nearly so great as the improbability of its being established WITHOUT Miracles. No Miracles of Jesus' youth are mentioned; there is no description of His personal appearance, nor of His doings in the world of spirits; no Miracles of the Virgin Mary: omissions sure to be supplied in a legendary story. The hostility of the Jewish nation to Christianity confirms the gospel Miracles. ...
But now we are certain that the gospel Miracles were wrought in the presence of enemies, and so subjected to the severest scrutiny
Miracle - It is translated "miracles" in the RV and AV in Acts 8:13 (where variant readings give the words in different order); 19:11; 1 Corinthians 12:10,28,29 ; Galatians 3:5 ; AV only, in Acts 2:22 (RV, "mighty works"); Hebrews 2:4 (RV, "powers"). In Galatians 3:5 , the word may be taken in its widest sense, to include "miracles" both physical and moral. ...
2: σημεῖον (Strong's #4592 — Noun Neuter — semeion — say-mi'-on ) "a sign, mark, token" (akin to semaino, "to give a sign;" sema, "a sign"), is used of "miracles" and wonders as signs of Divine authority; it is translated "miracles" in the RV and AV of Luke 23:8 ; Acts 4:16,22 ; most usually it is given its more appropriate meaning "sign," "signs," e. , Matthew 12:38,39 , and in every occurrence in the Synoptists, except Luke 23:8 ; in the following passages in John's Gospel the RV substitutes "sign" or "signs" for the AV, "miracle or Miracles;" John 2:11,23 ; 3:2 ; 4:54 ; 6:2,14,26 ; 7:31 ; 9:16 ; 10:41 ; 11:47 ; 12:18,37 ; the AV also has "signs" elsewhere in this Gospel; in Acts, RV, "signs," AV, "miracles," in Acts 6:8 ; 8:6 ; 15:12 ; elsewhere only in Revelation 13:14 ; 16:14 ; 19:20
Carpenter's Son - Designation of Our Lord by Jews when scandalized by His wisdom and Miracles (Matthew 13:55)
Son, Carpenter's - Designation of Our Lord by Jews when scandalized by His wisdom and Miracles (Matthew 13:55)
Miracle - "The suspension or violation of the laws of nature involved in Miracles is nothing more than is constantly taking place around us. , of invading the fixed order, and thus of working Miracles. Thus we affirm the possibility of Miracles, the possibility of a higher hand intervening to control or reverse nature's ordinary movements. ...
In the New Testament these four Greek words are principally used to designate Miracles: ...
Semeion, a "sign", i. Miracles are seals of a divine mission. Our Lord also appealed to Miracles as a conclusive proof of his divine mission (John 5:20,36 ; 10:25,38 ). Where Miracles are there certainly God is. He boldly says, "God bears me witness, both with signs and wonders, and with divers Miracles. " ...
The credibility of Miracles is established by the evidence of the senses on the part of those who are witnesses of them, and to all others by the testimony of such witnesses. Unbelievers, following Hume, deny that any testimony can prove a miracle, because they say Miracles are impossible. We have shown that Miracles are possible, and surely they can be borne witness to. Miracles, it is said, are contrary to experience. An atheist or a pantheist must, as a matter of course, deny the possibility of Miracles; but to one who believes in a personal God, who in his wisdom may see fit to interfere with the ordinary processes of nature, Miracles are not impossible, nor are they incredible. (See LIST OF Miracles, Appendix
Miracles - God is shown in the Bible to be a God of Miracles. But Miracles do not feature consistently throughout the biblical record. By some unusual Miracles God preserved the minority who remained faithful to him, and acted in judgment against those who tried to wipe out the worship of Yahweh from Israel (1 Kings 19:15-18). ...
Of all the Miracles, the greatest are those that concern the birth and resurrection of Jesus. ...
Miracles and nature...
If we believe in a personal God who created and controls the world (Genesis 1:1; Colossians 1:16-17), we should have no trouble in believing the biblical record of the Miracles he performed. ...
On the other hand, God does not work Miracles every time someone wants him to. But even if these can be explained as having natural causes, they were still Miracles to those who saw them. ...
This still leaves unexplained the large number of Miracles for which there seem to be no natural causes. ...
The purpose of Miracles...
Miracles were usually ‘signs’, that is, works of God that revealed his power and purposes (Exodus 7:3; Deuteronomy 4:34; Isaiah 7:11; Matthew 16:1; John 2:11; John 6:14; John 20:30; Acts 2:43; see SIGNS). However, messengers of God never used Miracles just to impress people or to persuade people to believe them (1 Corinthians 12:10; Luke 23:8). It was the false prophet who used apparent Miracles to gain a following (Deuteronomy 13:1-3; Matthew 24:24; 2 Thessalonians 2:9-11; Revelation 13:13-14). God’s Miracles were usually linked with faith (2 Kings 3:1-7; Daniel 3:16-18; Daniel 6:22; Hebrews 11:29-30). ...
This was clearly seen in the Miracles of Jesus Christ. Jesus used Miracles not to try to force people to believe in him, but to help those who already believed. He performed Miracles in response to faith, not to try to create faith (Matthew 9:27-29; Mark 2:3-5; Mark 5:34; Mark 5:36; Mark 6:5-6). ...
Nevertheless, it is clear that many of those who saw Jesus’ Miracles were filled with awe and glorified God (Matthew 9:8; Luke 5:26; Luke 7:16; Luke 9:43). To those who believed in Jesus as the Son of God and the Messiah, the Miracles confirmed the truth of their beliefs and revealed to them something of God’s glory (John 2:11; John 11:40; Acts 14:3; Hebrews 2:3-4; see MESSIAH). There was a connection between the Miracles of Jesus and the era of the Messiah. This may explain why Miracles were common in the early church but almost died out once the original order of apostles died out (Matthew 10:5-8; Luke 9:1; Luke 10:9; Acts 4:16; Acts 4:29-30; Acts 5:12; Romans 15:19; 1 Corinthians 12:9-10; 2 Corinthians 12:12). ...
In the record of some of Jesus’ Miracles, faith is not mentioned. On those occasions Jesus acted, it seems, purely out of compassion (Matthew 8:14-15; Matthew 14:13-14; Matthew 15:32; Luke 4:40; Luke 7:11-17; John 6:1-13); though, as always, he refused to satisfy people who wanted him to perform Miracles for their own selfish purposes (John 6:14-15). ...
Jesus’ Miracles demonstrated clearly that he was the Messiah, the Son of God (John 20:30-31), and that the power of the Spirit of God worked through him in a special way (Matthew 12:28; Luke 4:18). Being both divine and human, he had on the one hand authority and power to work Miracles, but on the other he always acted in dependence upon his Father (John 5:19; John 14:10-11). His Miracles were always in keeping with his mission as the Saviour of the world. Jesus did not perform Miracles as if they were acts of magic, and he never performed them for his own benefit (cf. ...
Jesus’ Miracles and the kingdom of God...
In Jesus the kingdom of God had come into the world. The rule of God was seen in the Miracles by which Jesus the Messiah delivered from the power of Satan people who were diseased and oppressed by evil spirits (Matthew 4:23-24; Matthew 11:2-6; Matthew 12:28; see KINGDOM OF GOD). ...
To Christians, Jesus’ Miracles foreshadow the age to come. His healing Miracles give hope for a day when there will be no more suffering (Matthew 9:27-29; Mark 1:40-42; Revelation 21:4)
Frequency - ) The condition of returning frequently; occurrence often repeated; common occurence; as, the frequency of crimes; the frequency of Miracles
Job - Ezekiel 14:14 (a) An example of one who can and did pray the prayer of faith which moved GOD to perform Miracles
Signs - In the Bible mighty works, Miracles, wonders and signs are often linked together. This is because God’s Miracles are not merely extraordinary events, but extraordinary events with a meaning. ...
Jesus’ Miracles of raising the dead, healing the sick and casting out demons were clear evidence that the kingdom of God had come (Matthew 11:2-6; Matthew 12:28; see KINGDOM OF GOD), and that Jesus was the Messiah, the Son of God (John 2:11; John 4:54; John 20:30-31). The only sign to be given them would be the sign of Jesus’ resurrection, by which the Father would show clearly that Jesus was his Son (Matthew 12:38-40; Matthew 16:1-4; John 2:18-25; see MESSIAH; Miracles). ...
After Jesus’ resurrection and ascension, his apostles did the same sorts of signs and Miracles as Jesus himself had done previously
Miracle - Miracles can be wrought only by Almighty power, as when Christ healed lepers, saying, "I will, be thou clean," or calmed the tempest, "Peace, be still. ...
A man approved of God by Miracles and signs
Miracle - The Miracles wrought by Christ, for example, were such as God only could perform; were wrought in public, before numerous witnesses, both friends and foes; were open to the most perfect scrutiny; had an end in view worthy of divine sanction; were attested by witnesses whose character and conduct establish their claim to our belief; and are further confirmed by institutions still existing, intended to commemorate them, and dating from the period of the Miracles. ...
The chief object of Miracles having been to authenticate the revelation God has made of his will, these mighty words ceased when the Scripture canon was completed and settled, and Christianity was fairly established. Since the close of the first century from the ascension of Christ, few or no undoubted Miracles have been wrought; and whether a sufficient occasion for new Miracles will ever arise is known only to God. ...
The following list comprises most of the Miracles on record in the Bible, not including the supernatural visions and revelations of himself which God vouch-safed to his ancient servants, nor those numerous wonders of his providence which manifest his hand almost as indisputable as Miracles themselves. Old Testament Miracles ...
The creation of all things, Genesis 1:1-31 . ...
The deluge, comprising many Miracles, Genesis 6:1-22 . ...
New Testament Miracles. ...
Many Miracles of Christ, Matthew 4:23-24 8:16 14:14,36 15:30 Mark 1:34 Luke 6:17-19 . ...
Miracles by the disciples, Matthew 10:1-8 . ...
Miracles at the crucifixion, Matthew 27:51-53 . ...
Miracles at the resurrection, Matthew 28:1-7 Luke 24:6 . ...
Miracles before John's messengers, Luke 7:21-22 . ...
Miracles by the seventy, Luke 10:9,17 . ...
Miracles by the apostles, Acts 2:43 5:12
Miracle - Miracles in Scripture are designed, for the most part, as so many, testimonies in proof of the doctrine delivered at the same time. " (John 10:25) And when in concurrence with Miracles, the word of God, and the works of God are joined together, these establish and seal the truth as it is in Jesus. There were certain particularities in the Miracles of the Lord Jesus, which marked his divine nature in the performance of them in a way and manner different from all his servants. They performed all the Miracles they wrought by the appointment and in the name of the Lord Jesus wrought his in his own name. (See John 11:23-44) In addition to this, it should be farther remarked, that the Miracles of the Lord Jesus were many of them of a personal kind, and not unfrequeuuy wrought without any immediate cause in confirmation of his doctrine, but to set forth his gracious character of Redeemer. But in those actions of the Lord Jesus peculiar to the Mediator as Mediator, and where, from having as Son of God abased himself for the purposes of salvation, he manifested forth the Miracles he wrought, here the glory of the work became personal, and belonged wholly to Jesus as Mediator, I need not particularize instances, else I might observe, that the healed paralytic, the cleansed leper, the centurion's son, the water turned into wine; these and the tike are all of the personal kind. And perhaps it is not among the smallest instances of Christ's personal glory and grace, from the actions of Miracles, that the Lord Jesus in all he wrought testified his personal love and mercy to his people. The evangelist John is careful to inform the church, that "the beginning of Miracles in Cana of Galilee" was shewn in converting water into wine; as if to say, such are the blessings of the gospel, Our common mercies will be made rich mercies; and the nether springs in Jesus, if for his personal glory, shall become upper springs in Jesus
Nain - Where Christ performed one of his chief Miracles, in raising to life a widow's only son, Luke 7:11-17 , was a small village in Galilee, three miles south by west of Mount Tabor: It is now a petty hamlet, called Nein
Miracles - Miracles...
1. Besides these Miracles of healing there are ascribed to Him other extraordinary acts, such as the Stilling of the Storm ( Matthew 8:26 ), the Feeding of Five Thousand ( Matthew 14:19 ) and Four Thousand ( Matthew 15:35 ), the Walking on the Sea ( Matthew 14:28 ), the Change of Water into Wine ( John 2:9 ). These Miracles are presented to us as the acts of a Person supernatural both in the moral character as sinless and perfect, and in the religious consciousness as alone knowing and revealing the Father. ...
Regarding the Miracles of Jesus the following general considerations should be kept in view. ( a ) It is impossible to remove the records of Miracles from the Gospels without tearing them to pieces, as these works of Jesus are so wrought into the very texture of His ministry. ( b ) The character of the Miracles is absolutely harmonious with the power of Jesus; with only two apparent exceptions they are beneficent. ( c ) The Miracles were not wrought for display, or to prove His claims. He did not highly esteem the faith that was produced by His Miracles ( John 4:48 ). The Miracles are not evidential accessories, but essential constituents of Jesus’ ministry of grace. ...
( b ) In the Acts the record of Miracles is continued. Miracles of which further details are given are the restoration of the lame man at the gate Beautiful ( Acts 3:7 ), and of the cripple at Lystra ( Acts 14:9 ), the cure of the palsied Æneas ( Acts 9:34 ), the expulsion of the spirit of divination at Philippi ( Acts 16:18 ), the healing of the father of Publius in Melita ( Acts 28:8 ), the restoration to life of Dorcas ( Acts 9:40 ) and Eutychus ( Acts 20:10 , the narrative does not distinctly affirm death). One may hesitate about accepting the statement about the Miracles wrought by Peter’s shadow ( Acts 5:15 ) or Paul’s aprons ( Acts 19:12 ). These Miracles, which, taken by themselves as reported in Acts, there might be some hesitation in believing, become more credible when viewed as the continuation of the supernatural power of Christ in His Church for the confirmation of the faith of those to whom the gospel was entrusted, and also those to whom its appeal was first addressed. ...
( c ) We cannot claim to have contemporary evidence of the Miracles of the OT, as we have of those of the NT. The Miracles are almost entirely connected either with the Exodus from Egypt, or with the ministry of Elijah and of Elisha. The majority of the Miracles of the first group are not outside of the order of nature; what is extraordinary in them is their coincidence with the prophetic declaration, this constituting the events signs of the Divine revelation. While the Miracles ascribed to Elijah and Elisha might be considered as their credentials, yet they cannot be regarded as essential to their prophetic ministry; and the variations with which they are recorded represent popular traditions which the compiler of the Books of Kings has incorporated without any substantial alteration. While the moral and religious worth of the OT, as the literature of the Divine revelation completed in Christ, demands a respectful treatment of the narratives of Miracles, we are bound to apply two tests: the sufficiency of the evidence, and the congruity of the miracle in character with the Divine revelation. In dealing with the evidence for the Miracles the starting-point should be the Resurrection . His Miracles are not wonders , for it is no wonder that He should so act, but signs , proofs of what He is, and works , congrnous with His character as ‘ever doing good,’ and His purpose to reveal the grace of the Father. ’ The Miracles of healing are not all explicable, as he supposes, by what Matthew Arnold called moral therapeutics the influence of a strong personality over those suffering from nerve disorders, as they embrace diseases of which the cure by any such means is quite incredible; and the evidence for the cosmic Miracles, as the Miracles showing power over nature apart from man have been called, is quite as good as for the healing Miracles. 60 and 90, as is coming to be admitted by scholars generally, the evidence for the Miracles of Jesus is thoroughly satisfactory; the mythical theory of Strauss must assume a much longer interval. In his various writings he has endeavoured to show how careful a historian Luke is, and if Luke’s excellence in this respect is established, then we can place greater reliance on the evidence for Miracles in the early Church, as well as in the ministry of Jesus. The Miracles of the Gospels and the Acts are closely connected with the Person of Jesus, as the Word Incarnate and the risen Lord, and the credulity of the age does not come into consideration unless it can be shown that among either the Jews or the Gentiles there was a prejudice favourable to belief in the Incarnation and the Resurrection. The character of the Miracles, so harmonious with the Person, forbids our ascribing them to the wonder-loving, and therefore wonder-making, tendency of the times. ...
Some indications have already been given in regard to the evidence for the Miracles of the OT. Some of the Miracles ascribed to Elisha are not of a character congruous with the function of prophecy; but it may be that we should very cautiously apply our sense of fitness as a test of truth to these ancient narratives. Admitting that the evidence is satisfactory, and the Miracles are real, what explanations can be offered of them? ( a ) One suggestion has already been considered; it is favoured by Harnack and Matthew Arnold: it is that one person may exercise over another so strong an influence as to cure nervous disorders. It is certain that Jesus worked His Miracles relying on the Divine powers in Himself; whether in any cases this obscure psychic force was an unknown condition of His Miracles is a matter of secondary importance. This explanation recognizes that Miracles are not explicable by the laws of nature as known to man, and that it is of God’s free choice that for certain ends He uses means otherwise unknown. As these laws are quite hypothetical, and as this use of them only occasionally is not at all probable, this explanation does not appear to make Miracles any more credible. Inward changes, such as in the prophetic inspiration, or the religious conversion of an individual, however manifest the Divine presence and action may be for the person having the experience, should not be described as Miracles, unless with some qualification such as spiritual or moral . Applying the argument from analogy, we may regard the Person of Christ and the Miracles that cluster round His Person as such a creative action of God. The consistency of character of a human personality is not disproved by an exceptional act when a crisis arises; and so, to deal effectively with sin for man’s salvation, God may use Miracles as means to His ends without any break in the continuity of His wisdom, righteousness, and grace. These objections refer to two points, the possibility of miracle at all, and the sufficiency of the evidence for the Miracles of the Bible. ( a ) For materialism , which recognizes only physical forces; and pantheism , which so identifies God and man that the order of nature is fixed by the necessity of the nature of God; and even for deism , which confines the direct Divine activity to the beginning, and excludes it from the course of the world, Miracles are impossible. Agnosticism , which regards the ultimate reality as an inscrutable mystery, is under no logical compulsion to deny the possibility of Miracles; Huxley, for instance, pronounces such denial unjustifiable. Two reasons against the possibility of Miracles may be advanced from a theistic standpoint. In the interests of philosophy, it may be argued that Miracles interrupt the continuity of thought : the world as it is is so reasonable (idealism) or so good (optimism) that any change is unthinkable. But the affirmation ignores many of the problems the world as it is presents: sin, sorrow, death are real; would not the solution of these problems give both a more reasonable and a better world? and if Miracles should be necessary to such a solution, they are thinkable
Sarabaites - Wandering fanatics, or rather impostors, of the fourth century, who, instead of procuring a subsistence by honest industry, travelled through various cities and provinces, and gained a maintenance by fictitious Miracles, by selling relics to the multitude, and other frauds of a like nature
Darerca, Saint - Her Miracles and prophecies are renowned
Majella, Gerard, Saint - He was endowed with extraordinary supernatural gifts, and many Miracles are now attributed to him
Gerard Majella, Saint - He was endowed with extraordinary supernatural gifts, and many Miracles are now attributed to him
Pamiers, Antoninus of, Saint - Having embraced Christianity he visited Rome, was ordained, and returned to Gaul to preach the Gospel in Aquitania, and especially on the frontier of the Rouergue where he is credited with many Miracles
Monchua, Cronan, Saint - Numerous Miracles are attributed to him
Antoninus of Pamiers, Saint - Having embraced Christianity he visited Rome, was ordained, and returned to Gaul to preach the Gospel in Aquitania, and especially on the frontier of the Rouergue where he is credited with many Miracles
Miracles - No sincere believer in the inspiration of scripture can have a doubt as to real Miracles having been wrought by the power of God both in O. , they would judge that Miracles were being performed. So, it is argued, the actions recorded in scripture as Miracles, were merely the bringing into use some law of nature which had been hidden up to that time. ...
Moses was enabled to work Miracles for two distinct objects. ...
The other Miracles, wrought by him in Egypt, were to show to Pharaoh the mighty power of God, who said, I will "multiply my signs and my wonders in the land of Egypt . The ten plagues followed, which were Miracles or signs of the power of God — signs not only to the Egyptians, but also to the Israelites, as is shown by the reference to them afterwards. ...
By the following list it will be seen that there were many other Miracles wrought in O. All the Miracles were indeed the acts of God, His servants being merely the means through which they were carried out. ...
PRINCIPAL Miracles IN THE OLD TESTAMENT. ' People were generally amazed at the Miracles performed. ' This word is translated 'signs,' 'miracles,' 'wonder,' and in 2 Thessalonians 3:17 'token': it is the word invariably used in John's gospel. δύναμις, 'power:' translated 'miracles,' 'mighty works,' 'powers. ' These three divinely selected words explain the nature of Miracles. These three words are applied to the Miracles of the Lord Jesus in Matthew 14:15-217 ; to those wrought by Paul, 2 Corinthians 12:12 ; and to the work of Antichrist, the man of sin, in a future day. ...
The Miracles by the Lord and His apostles were nearly all wrought for the welfare of men, curing them from the diseases of mind and body, and dispossessing them of demons, thus spoiling the kingdom of Satan. From the wording of several passages it is conclusive that not nearly all the Miracles of the Lord are recorded. ...
It is stated in Mark 16:16-18 that those who should believe on the Lord Jesus, by the testimony of the apostles, would be able to work Miracles; and there is ample testimony in early church history that this was the case, especially in casting out demons. ...
Though not called a miracle, isnot the conversion of a sinner a miracle? It seems impossible for one who has been turned from darkness to light, and has been created in Christ Jesus, with the fruits and effects following, to doubt the reality of other Miracles recorded by God in His sacred writings. ...
In the accompanying list of Miracles in the N. it will be noticed that some are found in one gospel only — each of the gospels having Miracles peculiar to itself — a few are in two gospels; many in three; and only one that is recorded in all four. Indeed the scriptures are themselves as clear a manifestation of the power and wisdom of God as are any of the Miracles. ...
PRINCIPAL Miracles IN THE NEW TESTAMENT. ...
...
Miracles...
Two blind men cured - Matthew 9:27-31
Mark, Gospel of Saint - To this end he demonstrates the power of Jesus which extended over all nature and which was manifested in His many Miracles. The Gospel is characterized by its vivid descriptions of Our Lord's Miracles, which occupy so prominent a place in the narrative that it is often called the "Gospel of Miracles. " The sixteen chapters are written in the chronological order, with some exceptions, and follow these general divisions: ...
preparation through the preaching of Saint John, the baptism, and temptation (1,2-13)
the preaching and Miracles of Jesus in Galilee (1,14, to 9,50)
the journey to Jerusalem for the feast of the Pasch, and the last days of Our Lord's teaching (10-13)
the Passion, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension (14-16)
The Biblical Commission, June 26, 1912, declared that all reasonable doubt that Saint Mark is the author of the second Gospel as now contained in our Bibles, and that the Gospel was written before the year 70 and according to the preaching of Saint Peter, has been removed by the clear evidence of tradition from the earliest ages, as found in the testimony of the Fathers, in the use of the Gospel by early Christians, and its place in ancient codices and versions
Charismatic Gifts - They are mentioned in Romans 12:1-21; 1 Corinthians 12:1-31, and 1 Corinthians 14:1-40: Word of wisdom, word of knowledge, faith, healing, Miracles, prophecy, distinguishing of spirits, tongues, interpretation of tongues
Evidences of Religion - External evidences are: holy teachers, preeminently Christ, the Incarnate Word of God; prophecies and Miracles attesting to the truth of their teachings
Religion, Evidences of - External evidences are: holy teachers, preeminently Christ, the Incarnate Word of God; prophecies and Miracles attesting to the truth of their teachings
Miracle - The Bible begins with one of God's greatest Miracles—the creation of the universe out of nothing. Miracles throughout the rest of Genesis deal primarily with God's preservation of his chosen line, when his promises to Abraham (Genesis 12:1-3 ) seem about to be broken, most notably Sarah's conception of Isaac at an advanced age (21:1-7). The first major cluster of biblical Miracles surrounds the central Old Testament act of redemptionthe exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. Here too appear thirteen of the eighteen Old Testament uses of "signs and wonders, " an expression that focuses on the Miracles' redemptive significance. The Israelites' wandering in the wilderness is punctuated by various Miracles of preservation and judgmentrescue when it seems they will perish (by the ongoing provision of manna and quail chap. Subsequent Miracles are also "borderline"Samson's superhuman strength when he is "filled with the Spirit" (Judges 13-16 ) and the ark's "power" over Dagon (1 Samuel 5 ) and the cattle that return it to Beth Shemesh (chap. The next major cluster of Miracles involves the prophets Elijah and Elisha. The predominant purpose behind the Miracles of these two prophets is to demonstrate Yahweh's superiority over Baal and to call God's people back to worship him. ...
Elijah's successor certifies his prophetic role with closely parallel Miracles. The latter two Miracles closely resemble Jesus' later feeding of the multitudes, cures of lepers, and concern for Gentiles. The two other major Miracles that occur in the Old Testament historical books involve the leprosy with which faithless Uzziah is afflicted and the sundial shadow's retreat as a sign to portend Hezekiah's recovery from illness (2 Kings 15:1-8 ; 20:1-11 ). Two books whose genre is disputed contain major Miracles: Job with his remarkable collection of afflictions and subsequent recovery and Jonah with his preservation by and expulsion from the great fish. The only other major cluster of Old Testament Miracles centers on the life of Daniel and his friends in exile in Babylon. Other Miracles give Daniel the ability to interpret Nebuchadnezzar's dream (chap. The greatest of all biblical Miracles is the incarnationGod becoming human (John 1:1-18 ). Jesus' adult ministry regularly features Miracles for a variety of purposes. ...
But none of these themes proves as prominent as the most central one: Jesus works Miracles to demonstrate that the kingdom of God has been inaugurated, the messianic age has arrived, and he is the Christ who will fulfill all of God's previous Scriptures. ...
These direct statements give clues how to interpret some of the more unusual of Jesus' Miracles that often have parabolic or symbolic elements. ...
Each evangelist has his own thematic emphases concerning Jesus' Miracles. Mark, too, introduces the so-called messianic secret motif following several Miracles (e. Whereas the Synoptics use "signs" in a negative sense as that which unbelieving skeptics demand but do not receive save for the resurrection as the "sign of Jonah" (Matthew 12:38-42 ), John consistently speaks of Jesus' Miracles as "signs" meant to lead people to faith in Christ (2:11; 4:54; Miracles, not just the twelve (Stephen and Philip in Acts 6:8 and Acts 8:13 ), and they continue with about the same frequency throughout the book. The apostolic Miracles often closely parallel Jesus' mighty works, too ( Miracles also reflect God's judgment on his enemies (13:6-12) or his rebellious children (5:1-11). For Paul, healings and Miracles are spiritual gifts (1 Corinthians 12:9-10 ) God gives to those whom he chooses (vv. Miracles further certify apostolic credentials (12:12), characterize Paul's ministry (Romans 15:19 ), and attest the truth of Christian life in the Spirit (Galatians 3:5 ). Counterfeit Miracles will proliferate in the end times (2 Thessalonians 2:9 ), as Jesus himself had prophesied (Matthew 24:24 ), and as Revelation will describe in greater detail (e. Throughout the Bible, Miracles consistently serve to point people to the one true God, ultimately revealed in Jesus Christ. Contemporary experience suggests that this pattern continues; Miracles today seem most frequent in regions where Satan has long held sway and where people require "power evangelism" to be converted. But God's sovereignty warns against trying to predict when they may occur and refutes the "name it and claim it" heresy that tries to force God to work Miracles upon demand, if only one exercises adequate faith. Brown, Miracles and the Critical Mind ; R. Latourelle, The Miracles of Jesus and the Theology of Miracles; ISBE, 3:371-81; 4:505-8,1100-1101; H. Lockyer, All the Miracles of the Bible ; L. Sabourin, The Divine Miracles Discussed and Defended ; G. van der Loos, The Miracles of Jesus ; D
Miracle - Such were the Miracles which God wrought by the prophets; and those wrought by Christ and by the apostles and disciples in his name. Though Miracles are supernatural facts, in one sense they are also natural facts. The Miracles of Christ as reported in the gospels present many noticeable features. They were Miracles, too, of mercy, intended to relieve human suffering, and to promote the well-being of those on whom or for whom they were wrought. And the power of working Miracles was conveyed by our Lord to his followers, was repeatedly exercised by them, and was continued for a while in the church. For list of Miracles in the Bible, see Appendix
Dotti, Andrew, Blessed - His zeal manifested itself principally in preaching and penance, visions were vouchsafed to him, and he worked many duly authenticared Miracles
Eliseus - He accompanied Elias until the latter was translated and his prophetical power was confirmed by many Miracles, among them the raising of a child to life and the cure of the Syrian general Naaman of leprosy
Elisha - He accompanied Elias until the latter was translated and his prophetical power was confirmed by many Miracles, among them the raising of a child to life and the cure of the Syrian general Naaman of leprosy
Canonization - The decree is issued only after the Congregation of Rites has accepted proof of two Miracles through the intercession of the Blessed who had been formally beatified, occurring after the beatification and of three Miracles for one whose beatification had taken place without the ordinary process
Seekers - They taught that the Scriptures were uncertain; that present Miracles were necessary to faith; that our ministry is without authority; and that our worship and ordinances are unnecessary or vain
Christ, Miracles of - They may be divided into five classes: ...
nature Miracles
miracles of healing
deliverance of demoniacs
victories over hostile wills
cases of resurrection
NATURE Miracles ...
Under this head nine Miracles may be enumerated. ...
Changing of the water into wine at Cans (John 2)
First miraculous draught of fishes (Luke 5)
Calming of the tempest (Matthew 8; Mark 4; Luke 8)
First multiplication of loaves (Matthew 14; Mark 6; Luke 9; John 6)
Jesus's walking on the Water (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Second multiplication of loaves (Matthew 15; Mark 8)
Stater in the fish's mouth (Matthew 17)
Cursing of the fig-tree (Matthew 21; Mark 11)
Second miraculous draught of fishes (John 21)
Miracles OF HEALING ...
These were numerous during the public life of Our Lord.
VICTORIES OVER HOSTILE WILLS ...
Under this heading Catholic scholars admit a greater or smaller number of Miracles; it is not clear in certain cases whether the incidents in which Our Lord wielded extraordinary power over His enemies were cases of supernatural intervention of Divine power, or the natural effects of the ascendancy of His human will over that of other men. ...
Raising of the daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Raising of the son of the widow of Naim (Luke 7)
Raising of Lazarus (John 11)
The subject of the Miracles of Christ has been well dealt with, both from an apologetic and an exegetic point of view, by L. Fillion in Les Miracles de Notre Seigneur Jesus Christ (Paris, 1909), and more recently, from an apologetic point of view, by Loonce de Grandmaison in Jesus Christ, Sa Personne, Son Message, See Preuves
Miracles of Christ - They may be divided into five classes: ...
nature Miracles
miracles of healing
deliverance of demoniacs
victories over hostile wills
cases of resurrection
NATURE Miracles ...
Under this head nine Miracles may be enumerated. ...
Changing of the water into wine at Cans (John 2)
First miraculous draught of fishes (Luke 5)
Calming of the tempest (Matthew 8; Mark 4; Luke 8)
First multiplication of loaves (Matthew 14; Mark 6; Luke 9; John 6)
Jesus's walking on the Water (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Second multiplication of loaves (Matthew 15; Mark 8)
Stater in the fish's mouth (Matthew 17)
Cursing of the fig-tree (Matthew 21; Mark 11)
Second miraculous draught of fishes (John 21)
Miracles OF HEALING ...
These were numerous during the public life of Our Lord.
VICTORIES OVER HOSTILE WILLS ...
Under this heading Catholic scholars admit a greater or smaller number of Miracles; it is not clear in certain cases whether the incidents in which Our Lord wielded extraordinary power over His enemies were cases of supernatural intervention of Divine power, or the natural effects of the ascendancy of His human will over that of other men. ...
Raising of the daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Raising of the son of the widow of Naim (Luke 7)
Raising of Lazarus (John 11)
The subject of the Miracles of Christ has been well dealt with, both from an apologetic and an exegetic point of view, by L. Fillion in Les Miracles de Notre Seigneur Jesus Christ (Paris, 1909), and more recently, from an apologetic point of view, by Loonce de Grandmaison in Jesus Christ, Sa Personne, Son Message, See Preuves
Elisha - The Tanach records many of the Miracles he preformed
Birinus, Saint - Relics at Winchester, where numerous Miracles have taken place
Miracle - ) A story or legend abounding in Miracles
Galenus, Physician - An Arabic writer has preserved a fragment of Galen's lost work, de Republicâ Platonis , which reads: "We know that the people called Christians have founded a religion in parables and Miracles. In the practice of virtue they surpass philosophers; in probity, in continence, in the genuine performance of Miracles (verâ miraculorum patratione—does he mean the Scripture Miracles, on which their religion was based?) they infinitely excel them" (Casiri, Biblioth
Beatification - In the case of a martyr no Miracles are required in this first process, but they are required for others. To go further and obtain canonization, Miracles are required for both martyrs and confessors
Francis de Geronimo, Saint - One of the most eloquent preachers of his time, he confirmed his work by striking Miracles
Fishes, Loaves And - Gospel narrative of the miraculous multiplication of five loaves of bread and two fishes to feed the five thousand who had been attracted by the words and Miracles of Christ to follow Him into the desert, or mountain as Saint John styles it (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Loaves And Fishes - Gospel narrative of the miraculous multiplication of five loaves of bread and two fishes to feed the five thousand who had been attracted by the words and Miracles of Christ to follow Him into the desert, or mountain as Saint John styles it (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Geronimo, Francis de, Saint - One of the most eloquent preachers of his time, he confirmed his work by striking Miracles
Miracle - Miracles, therefore, are not, as some have represented them, appeals to our ignorance. "If Miracles be effects contrary to the established constitution of things, we are certain that they will never be performed on trivial occasions. In this state of things we can conceive no evidence sufficient to make such doctrines be received as the truths of God, but the power of working Miracles committed to him who taught them. "Miracles, then, under which we include prophecy, are the only direct evidence which can be given of divine inspiration. "The history of almost every religion abounds with relations of prodigies and wonders, and of the intercourse of men with the gods; but we know of no religious system, those of the Jews and Christians excepted, which appealed to Miracles as the sole evidence of its truth and divinity. The pretended Miracles mentioned by Pagan historians and poets, are not said to have been publicly wrought to enforce the truth of a new religion, contrary to the reigning idolatry. "But the Miracles recorded of Moses and of Christ bear a very different character. They are, indeed, so incorporated with these systems, that the Miracles cannot be separated from the doctrines; and if the Miracles be not really performed, the doctrines cannot possibly be true. "It is indeed, we believe, universally admitted that the Miracles mentioned in the book of Exodus, and in the four Gospels, might, to those who saw them performed, be sufficient evidence of the divine inspiration of Moses and of Christ; but to us it may be thought that they are no evidence whatever, as we must believe in the Miracles themselves, if we believe in them at all, upon the bare authority of human testimony. Why, it has been sometimes asked, are not Miracles wrought in all ages and countries? If the religion of Christ was to be of perpetual duration, every generation of men ought to have complete evidence of its truth and divinity. "To the performance of Miracles in every age and in every country, perhaps the same objections lie, as to the immediate inspiration of every individual. Were those Miracles universally received as such, men would be so overwhelmed with the number rather than with the force of their authority, as hardly to remain masters of their own conduct; and in that case the very end of all Miracles would be defeated by their frequency. ...
The truth, however, seems to be, that Miracles so frequently repeated would not be received as such, and of course would have no authority; because it would be difficult, and in many cases impossible, to distinguish them from natural events. "Be this, however, as it may, we shall take the liberty to affirm, that for the reality of the Gospel Miracles, we have evidence as convincing to the reflecting mind, though not so striking to vulgar apprehension, as those had who were contemporary with Christ and his apostles, and actually saw the mighty works which he performed. Campbell, in his Dissertation on Miracles, who justly observes, that so far is experience from being the sole foundation of the evidence of testimony, that, on the contrary, testimony is the sole foundation of by far the greater part of what Mr. "We need not waste time here in proving that the Miracles, as they are presented in the writings of the New Testament, were of such a nature, and performed before so many witnesses, that no imposition could possibly be practised on the senses of those who affirm that they were present. For if they sat down to fabricate their pretended revelation, and to contrive a series of Miracles to which they were unanimously to appeal for its truth, it is plain, since they proved successful in their daring enterprise, that they must have clearly foreseen every possible circumstance in which they could be placed, and have prepared consistent answers to every question that could be put to them by their most inveterate and most enlightened enemies; by the statesman, the lawyer, the philosopher, and the priest. The very resolution of the apostles to propagate the belief of false Miracles in support of such a religion as that which is taught in the New Testament, is as great a miracle as human imagination can easily conceive. Whence it follows, that when they resolved to support their pretended revelation by an appeal to forged Miracles, they wilfully, and with their eyes open, exposed themselves to inevitable misery, whether they should succeed or fail in their enterprise; and that they concerted their measures so as not to admit of a possibility of recompence to themselves, either in this life or in that which is to come. "Thus, then, do Miracles force themselves upon our assent in every possible view which we can take of this interesting subject. If the testimony of the first preachers of Christianity were true, the Miracles recorded in the Gospel were certainly performed, and the doctrines of our religion are derived from heaven. "...
The power necessary to perform the one series of these Miracles may, for any thing known to us, be as great as that which would be requisite for the performance of the other; and, considered merely as exertions of preternatural power, they may seem to balance each other, and to hold the mind in a state of suspense; but when we take into consideration the different purposes for which these opposite and contending Miracles were wrought, the balance is instantly destroyed. The Miracles recorded in the Gospels, if real, were wrought in support of a revelation which, in the opinion of all by whom it is received, has brought to light many important truths which could not otherwise have been made known to men; and which, by the confession of its adversaries, contains the purest moral precepts by which the conduct of mankind was ever directed. The opposite series of Miracles, if real, was performed to enable, and even to compel, a company of Jews, of the lowest rank and of the narrowest education, to fabricate, with the view of inevitable destruction to themselves, a consistent scheme of falsehood, and by an appeal to forged Miracles to impose it upon the world as a revelation from heaven. The object of the former Miracles is worthy of a God of infinite wisdom, goodness, and power; the object of the latter is absolutely inconsistent with wisdom and goodness, which are demonstrably attributes of that Being by whom alone it follows, that the supposition of the apostles bearing false testimony to the Miracles of their Master, implies a series of deviations from the laws of nature infinitely less probable in themselves than those Miracles: and therefore, by Mr. Hume's maxim, we must necessarily reject the supposition of falsehood in the testimony, and admit the reality of the Miracles. ...
So true it is, that for the reality of the Gospel Miracles we have evidence as convincing to the reflecting mind as those had who were contemporary with Christ and his apostles, and were actual witnesses to their mighty works. " The power of working Miracles is supposed by some to have been continued no longer than the apostles' days. It seems pretty clear, however, that Miracles universally ceased before Chrysostom's time. Toll, and others, who suppose that Miracles ceased with the apostles. As to the Miracles of the Romish church, it is evident, as Doddridge observes, that many of them were ridiculous tales, according to their own historians; others were performed without any credible witnesses, or in circumstances where the performer had the greatest opportunity of juggling; and it is particularly remarkable, that they were hardly ever wrought where they seem most necessary, 1: e. ...
See Fleetwood, Clarapede, Conybeare, Campbell, Lardner, Farmer, Adams, and Weston, on Miracles, article Miracle, Enc
Demoniac - Among the many Miracles mentioned in the Gospels, special prominence is given to the casting-out of devils, or demons (Mark 5; 7; 9; Matthew 15; 17; Luke 11), which gave such a striking proof of a power above nature that the disciples seem to have been more impressed by this than by the other powers given them (Luke 10)
Dustan, Saint - He accompanied Saint Columba to Aberdeen, was appointed by him first abbot of the monastery founded at Deir, succeeded to the abbacy of Dalquhongal (Holywood), and finally became a hermit at Glenesk, where many Miracles were attributed to him
Drostan, Saint - He accompanied Saint Columba to Aberdeen, was appointed by him first abbot of the monastery founded at Deir, succeeded to the abbacy of Dalquhongal (Holywood), and finally became a hermit at Glenesk, where many Miracles were attributed to him
Little Saint Hugh of Lincoln - Miracles were said to have been wrought at Saint Hugh's tomb
Hugh, Saint - Miracles were said to have been wrought at Saint Hugh's tomb
Cornarists - He maintained that every religious communion needed reformation; but he added, that no person had a right to engage in accomplishing it without a mission supported by Miracles
Auxentius, Saint - Celebrated for austerity and Miracles he was called to the Council of Chalcedon to influence the bishops to acknowledge its decrees
Unpardonable Sin - This term is commonly applied to blasphemy against the Holy Spirit, in attributing the Miracles wrought by Christ to the power of Satan
Throstan, Saint - He accompanied Saint Columba to Aberdeen, was appointed by him first abbot of the monastery founded at Deir, succeeded to the abbacy of Dalquhongal (Holywood), and finally became a hermit at Glenesk, where many Miracles were attributed to him
Gregory of Neocaesarea, Saint - 240,he converted the inhabitants by his preaching and Miracles. Because of the great number of Miracles he performed, Gregory is called the "Wonder Worker
Gregory Thaumaturgus, Saint - 240,he converted the inhabitants by his preaching and Miracles. Because of the great number of Miracles he performed, Gregory is called the "Wonder Worker
Thaumaturgus, Gregory, Saint - 240,he converted the inhabitants by his preaching and Miracles. Because of the great number of Miracles he performed, Gregory is called the "Wonder Worker
Gabriel Possenti, Saint - Of a modest and retiring nature, his life was without any miraculous event and his great sanctity was not fully appreciated until after his death, when many Miracles occurred at his tomb at Isola di Gran Sasso
Blasphemy - Blasphemy of the Holy Spirit is stating that Jesus did his Miracles by the power of the devil (Matthew 12:22-32) and is an unforgivable sin (Mark 3:28-30)
Bethsaida - Nearby occurred the Miracles of the loaves and fishes (Luke 9) and the restoration of sight to the blind man (Mark 8)
Nicholas of Bari, Saint - The numerous Miracles Saint Nicholas is said to have wrought before and after his death are outgrowths of a long tradition. His representations in art are as various as his Miracles
Nicholas of Myra, Saint - The numerous Miracles Saint Nicholas is said to have wrought before and after his death are outgrowths of a long tradition. His representations in art are as various as his Miracles
Myra, Nicholas of, Saint - The numerous Miracles Saint Nicholas is said to have wrought before and after his death are outgrowths of a long tradition. His representations in art are as various as his Miracles
Bari, Nicholas of, Saint - The numerous Miracles Saint Nicholas is said to have wrought before and after his death are outgrowths of a long tradition. His representations in art are as various as his Miracles
Nicholas of Tolentino, Saint - He practised austere mortification; was favored with visions and effected many Miracles
Tolentino, Nicholas of, Saint - He practised austere mortification; was favored with visions and effected many Miracles
Wonders - Elsewhere in the NT it is found once in a quotation from Joel to represent the marvels wrought by Jehovah in the heaven (Acts 2:19), and twelve times in reference to Miracles wrought by Moses (Acts 7:36), by Jesus (Acts 2:22), by the man of sin (2 Thessalonians 2:9), and by the Apostles and early missionaries (Acts 2:43; Acts 4:30; Acts 5:12; Acts 6:8; Acts 14:3; Acts 15:12, Romans 15:19, 2 Corinthians 12:12, Hebrews 2:4). Then he adds:...
‘How should not He, who by the Miracles which He did induced those who beheld the excellent results to undertake the reformation of their characters, manifest Himself not only to His genuine disciples, but also to others, as a pattern of most virtuous life, in order that His disciples might devote themselves to the work of instructing men in the will of God, and that the others, after being more fully instructed by His word and character than by His Miracles as to how they were to direct their lives, might in all their conduct have a constant reference to the good pleasure of the universal God?’ (i. Jesus made use of signs and wonders to authenticate His mission, but His chief emphasis was always upon His ‘word and character’ rather than upon His Miracles. Origen calls attention to the fact that Jesus, as indeed the entire NT, never calls Miracles by the name τέρατα alone, but always joins this to some other term suggesting higher things (in Joan, xviii. Jesus could not be content to allow this name to stand alone for any of His Miracles. For the discussion of the nature and credibility of Miracles in general, see art. Miracles
Miracles - Accordingly, all Miracles presuppose an established system of nature, within the limits of which they operate, and with the order of which they disagree. ...
In judging of Miracles there are certain criteria, peculiar to the subject, sufficient to conduct our inquiries, and warrant our determination. We have been told that the course of nature is fixed and unalterable, and therefore it is not consistent with the immutability of God to perform Miracles. If the course of nature implies the whole order of events which God has ordained for the government of the world, it includes both his ordinary and extraordinary dispensations, and among them Miracles may have their place, as a part of the universal plan. It is, indeed, consistent with sound philosophy, and not inconsistent with pure religion, to acknowledge that they might be disposed by the supreme Being at the same time with the more ordinary effects of his power; that their causes and occasions might be arranged with the same regularity; and that, in reference chiefly to their concomitant circumstances of persons and times, to the specific ends for which they were employed, and to our idea of the immediate necessity there is for a divine agent, Miracles would differ from common events, in which the hand of God acts as efficaciously, though less visibly. On this consideration of the subject, Miracles, instead of contradicting nature, might form a part of it. If we be asked whether Miracles are credible, we reply, that, abstractedly considered, they are not incredible; that they are capable of indirect proof from analogy, and of direct, from testimony; that in the common and daily course of worldly affairs, events, the improbability of which, antecedently to all testimony, was very great, are proved to have happened, by the authority of competent and honest witnesses; that the Christian Miracles were objects of real and proper experience to those who saw them; and that whatsoever the senses of mankind can perceive, their report may substantiate. Should it be asked whether Miracles were necessary, and whether the end proposed to be effected by them could warrant so immediate and extraordinary an interference of the Almighty, as such extraordinary operations suppose; to this we might answer, that, if the fact be established, all reasonings a priori concerning their necessity must be frivolous, and may be false. God is the best and indeed the only judge how far Miracles are proper to promote any particular design of his providence, and how far that design would have been left unaccomplished, if common and ordinary methods only had been pursued. So, from the absence of Miracles, we may conclude, in any supposed case, that they were not necessary; from their existence, supported by fair testimony, in any given case, we may refer with confidence that they are proper. ...
The revelation of the divine will by inspired persons is, as such, miraculous; and therefore, before the adversaries of the Gospel can employ with propriety their objections to the particular Miracles on which its credibility is based, they should show the impossibility of any revelation. So powerful, indeed, is the proof adduced in support of their testimony, that the infidels of these later days have been obliged to abandon the ground on which their predecessors stood; to disclaim all moral evidences arising from the character and relation of eye-witnesses; and to maintain, upon metaphysical, rather than historical, principles, that Miracles are utterly incapable, in their own nature, of existing in any circumstances, or of being supported by any evidence. ...
Miracles may be classed under two heads: those which consist in a train or combination of events, which distinguish themselves from the ordinary arrangements of Providence; and those particular operations which are performed by instruments and agents incompetent to effect them without a preternatural power. Thus, when the disciples of John were sent to Christ, to receive from his own lips the most satisfactory proofs of his divine mission, he referred them to his Miracles. This appeal to Miracles was founded on the following just and obvious grounds:—...
First: That they are visible proofs of divine approbation, as well as of divine power; for it would have been quite inconclusive to rest an appeal on the testimony of the latter, if it had not at the same time included an evidence of the former; and it was, indeed, a natural inference, that working of Miracles, in defence of a particular cause, was the seal of Heaven to the truth of that cause. If the cause which our Saviour was engaged in had not been approved of by God, it would not have been honoured with the seal of Miracles: for the divine power can never be supposed to counteract the divine will. Hence we may justly reject, as incredible, those Miracles which have been ascribed to the interposition of wicked spirits. ...
Secondly: When our Lord appealed to his Miracles, as proofs of his divine mission, it presupposed that those Miracles were of such a nature as would bear the strictest examination; that they had all those criteria which could possibly distinguish them from the delusions of enthusiasm, and the artifices of imposture; else the appeal would have been fallacious and equivocal. The Miracles which our Lord performed were too public to be suspected of imposture; and, being objects of sense, they were secured against the charge of enthusiasm. ...
The Miracles of Christ then were such as an impostor would not have attempted, and such as an enthusiast could not have effected. They were performed in the midst of his bitterest enemies; and were so palpable and certain, as to extort the following acknowledgment even from persons who were most eager to oppose his doctrines, and to discredit his pretensions: "This man doeth many Miracles. The Miracles Christ performed were indeed sufficient to alarm the fears of those whose downfall was involved in his success. The stories of the Jews, who confessed the Miracles, but denied what they were intended to establish, are too ridiculous to be mentioned. Now, supposing Miracles to be in the power of an infernal spirit, can it be imagined that he would communicate an ability of performing them to persons who were counteracting his designs? Would he by them give credit to a cause that tended to bring his own into disgrace? Thus, as our Saviour appealed to Miracles as proofs of his power; so he appealed to the inherent worth and purity of the doctrines they were intended to bear witness to, as a proof that the power was of God. ...
The truth of the Christian religion does not, however, depend wholly on the Miracles wrought by its divine Founder, though sufficient in themselves to establish his claims: but, in order to give the evidence of Miracles the strongest force they could possibly acquire, that evidence was extended still farther; and the same power that our Lord possessed was communicated to his disciples, and their more immediate successors. Sensible of the validity of this kind of evidence, the Apostles of our Lord, with the same artless simplicity, and the same boldness of conscious integrity, which distinguished their great Master, constantly insisted upon the Miracles they wrought, as strong and undeniable proofs of the truth of their doctrines. Thus the Miracles of our blessed Lord may be justly considered as the evidence of his divine mission and character. These Miracles were of a nature too palpable to be mistaken. That they should assert what they knew to be false; that they should publish it with so much ardour; that they should risk every thing dear to humanity, in order to maintain it; and at last submit to death, in order to attest their persuasion of its truth in those moments when imposture usually drops its mask, and enthusiasm loses its confidence; that they should act thus in opposition to every dictate of common sense, and every principle of common honesty, every restraint of shame, and every impulse of selfishness, is a phenomenon not less irreconcilable to the moral state of things than Miracles are to the natural constitution of the world. How long Miracles were continued in the church, has been a matter of keen dispute, and has been investigated with as much anxiety as if the truth of the Gospel depended upon the manner in which it was decided. The Apostles, wherever they went to execute their commission, would avail themselves of the stupendous gift which had been imparted to them; and it is clear, not only that they were permitted and enabled to convey it to others, but that spiritual gifts, including the power of working Miracles, were actually conferred on many of the primitive disciples. Whether, after the generation immediately succeeding the Apostles had passed away, the power of working Miracles was anew communicated, is a question, the solution of which cannot be nearly so satisfactory. The probability is, that there was no such renewal; and this opinion rests upon the ground that natural causes were now sufficient to accomplish the end for which Miracles were originally designed; and it does not appear to have been any part of the scheme of the blessed Author of our religion, that, solely for the purpose of hastening that conversion of the nations which might gradually be accomplished, Miracles should be wrought, when these could be of no use in establishing after ages in the faith
Grace - ...
Gifts freely bestowed by God; as Miracles, prophecy, tongues (Romans 15:15 ; 1 Corinthians 15:10 ; Ephesians 3:8 )
Menthon, Bernard of, Saint - Having become archdeacon of Aosta, 966, he spent 42 years laboring among the ignorant and idolatrous people of the Alps, making many conversions and performing Miracles
Bernard of Menthon, Saint - Having become archdeacon of Aosta, 966, he spent 42 years laboring among the ignorant and idolatrous people of the Alps, making many conversions and performing Miracles
John Cantius, Saint - Renowned for his humility and charity, and the practise of mortification, many Miracles are ascribed to him
Laborer, Isidore the, Saint - Many Miracles followed after his death
Isidore the Laborer, Saint - Many Miracles followed after his death
Joseph of Cupertino, Saint - Many Miracles were effected through him
Cantius, John, Saint - Renowned for his humility and charity, and the practise of mortification, many Miracles are ascribed to him
Anchieta, Jose de - Surnamed "Thaumaturgus," on account of Miracles and prophecies, it is said that he had a remarkable attraction for birds and even wild beasts
Bartim us - According to some writers, our Lord healed one of these (as in Luke) on entering Jericho, and another (Bartimeus, as in Mark) on leaving it; and Matthew has, with characteristic brevity in recording Miracles, combined both these in one
Miracles - In this article we may consider the meaning of the words used in the NT for ‘miracles,’ and the evidence for the apostolic belief in them; the evidence will then be compared with that for Miracles in the succeeding ages, and the evidential value of Miracles will be weighed. But the limits assigned preclude a general investigation of the a priori credibility of Miracles as such. A Christian miracle is not a mere prodigy exciting astonishment, but is intended for instruction; and here we see at once the great difference between the NT Miracles and most of those of the apocryphal Gospels, which are mere exhibitions without any teaching purpose, and are often repulsive to the Christian sense of reverence. It must be added, also, that herein lies the difference between the NT Miracles and most of those commonly known as ‘ecclesiastical’ (see below, 4). It may be noticed that θαῦμα is not used in the NT of Miracles, but θαυμάσια (‘wonderful things’) is used in Matthew 21:15, παράδοξα (‘strange things’) in Luke 5:26, ἔνδοξα (‘glorious things’) in Luke 13:17. The confusion in Authorized Version is increased by σημεῖα being translated ‘wonders’ in Revelation 13:13 and ‘miracles’ in v. Evidence for Miracles in the Apostolic Age. ), raising the dead (John 11:44), and several ‘miracles of nature’-water made wine (John 2:9), feeding the five thousand (John 6:11 f. It is to be noted that in all the Gospels the evidence for ‘miracles’ of nature is as strong as that for Miracles of healing, and that the evidence of Jn. Paul that he himself had the power of working Miracles (see below) indirectly gives good testimony to the fact that our Lord worked them, for we can hardly imagine that St. For a classification of the Gospel Miracles see Dict. Paul claimed that Christ worked Miracles through him (Romans 15:18 f
Miracles - It is not, therefore, the wonder , the exception to common experience, that constitutes the miracle , as is assumed both in the popular use of the word and by most objectors against Miracles. Prodigies and special providences are not Miracles. Again, when Miracles are described as "interferences with the law of nature," this description makes them appear improbable to many minds, from their not sufficiently considering that the laws of nature interfere with one another, and that we cannot get rid of "interferences" upon any hypothesis consistent with experience. The circumstances of the Christian Miracles are utterly unlike those of any pretended instances of magical wonders. This difference consists in -- (1) The greatness, number, completeness and publicity of the Miracles. (2) In the character of the Miracles
Beuno, Saint - According to tradition he restored his niece Saint Winefride to life at Holywell where many Miracles have since then taken place
Jordan River - It was the scene of several Miracles: the passage of the Israelites under Josue (Jos
Imposition of Hands - Christ used it in working Miracles; the Apostles, in conferring the sacraments of Confirmation and Holy Orders
Lily of Quito - She possessed the gift of ecstatic prayer, was endowed with supernatural powers, frequently working Miracles and foretelling the future, and was divinely sustained by the daily reception of the Holy Eucharist, as she took no other food save an ounce of bread weekly
Cana - The miracle of the marriage feast of Cana which has made the city forever famous, when Christ turned water into wine, was performed before His public life had fully begun, and is one of the best-authenticated of Our Lord's Miracles
Jannes And Jambres - Though the names do not appear in the Old Testament, rabbinic tradition identified Jannes and Jambres as being among those Egyptian magicians who sought to duplicate for Pharaoh the Miracles performed by Moses (Exodus 7:11 )
Mary Anne de Paredes, Blessed - She possessed the gift of ecstatic prayer, was endowed with supernatural powers, frequently working Miracles and foretelling the future, and was divinely sustained by the daily reception of the Holy Eucharist, as she took no other food save an ounce of bread weekly
Moses - Led the Israelites for forty years while they traveled in the desert, all the while performing astonishing Miracles and wonders
Hands, Imposition of - Christ used it in working Miracles; the Apostles, in conferring the sacraments of Confirmation and Holy Orders
Zoan - The psalmist praised God for Exodus Miracles near there (Psalm 78:12 ,Psalms 78:12,78:43 )
Gennesaret, Land of - Being close to Capernaum it was doubtless often traversed by the Lord, and was where many of His Miracles were wrought
Ethelbert of East Anglia, Saint - His ignominious burial place was revealed by a heavenly light, and the body having been translated to Hereford Cathedral, his sanctity was attested by the many Miracles at his tomb
River, Jordan - It was the scene of several Miracles: the passage of the Israelites under Josue (Jos
Fragments - The storing of the fragments for future use would tend to indicate that such Miracles were not to be everyday occurrences. As in all Christ’s Miracles, there is strict economy of supernatural resources, which are resorted to only when natural resources fail
Apollinaris, Saint And Mart - On his way he healed the son of Irenaeus who was blind, and did other Miracles. After three years he returned, suffered new persecutions, and did new Miracles, destroying a statue and temple of Apollo by his prayers. ...
Other lives, such as that in the Acta Sanctorum , are more full of Miracles, but do not add anything else of importance
Judas Iscariot - ' He was sent out with the others to preach, and no exception is made in his case as to the working of Miracles in the name of the Lord Jesus. ' It was a trial of man under new circumstances: to be a 'familiar friend' (Psalm 41:9 ) of the Lord Jesus, to hear His gracious words, see His Miracles, and probably be allowed to work Miracles himself in His name; and yet, as in every other trial of man, he fell
Labre, Benedict Joseph, Saint - His death was followed by a multitude of Miracles
Lidwina, Saint - Her fortitude and patience in the excruciating suffering which lagged for 38 years was rewarded by an extraordinary gift of prayer, and many Miracles were wrought at her bedside
Lijdwine, Saint - Her fortitude and patience in the excruciating suffering which lagged for 38 years was rewarded by an extraordinary gift of prayer, and many Miracles were wrought at her bedside
Capharnaum - In Capharnaum He chose His first disciples (Matthew 4) and performed many Miracles; He cured the paralytic (Matthew 9), the centurion's servant (Matthew 8); cast out the unclean spirit (Mark 1); and brought to life Jairus's daughter
Benedict Joseph Labre, Saint - His death was followed by a multitude of Miracles
Menas, Saint - Fame of his Miracles spread rapidly, and his tomb became the object of frequent pilgrimages
Mennas, Saint - Fame of his Miracles spread rapidly, and his tomb became the object of frequent pilgrimages
Lydwid, Saint - Her fortitude and patience in the excruciating suffering which lagged for 38 years was rewarded by an extraordinary gift of prayer, and many Miracles were wrought at her bedside
Galilee - It was the native land of Jesus Christ, the cradle of the Christian Faith, where He began His ministry and performed many of His Miracles, and from whence came His Apostles
Antichrist - He actively opposes Christ (2 Thessalonians 2:4) and when he arrives, he will be able to perform Miracles (2 Thessalonians 2:9)
World to Come - ' The Lord declared that the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost of attributing His Miracles to the power of Satan, should not be forgiven in the present age, nor in the age to come. In Hebrews 6:5 Paul speaks of some who had tasted of the powers of the age to come, doubtless alluding to Miracles
John Baptist Mary Vianney, Saint - He led a life of extreme mortification and performed numerous Miracles
Baalzebub - ) to whom the Miracles of the Lord in casting out demons were blasphemously attributed
Vianney, John Baptist Mary, Saint - He led a life of extreme mortification and performed numerous Miracles
Nicodemus - (1) At the outset of His ministry Jesus went up to Jerusalem to keep the Feast of the Passover, and His Miracles made a deep impression on Nicodemus, half persuading him that He was the Messiah; insomuch that he interviewed Him secretly under cover of the darkness ( John 3:1-21 ). He began by raising the question of the Miracles, which, he allowed, proved Jesus at the least a God-commissioned teacher; but Jesus interrupted him and set him face to face with the urgent and personal matter of regeneration
Deacon, Philip the, Saint - One of the seven deacons (Acts 6), he first preached in Samaria with great success, and confirmed his preaching with Miracles (Acts 8)
Charismata - Saint Paul enumerates most of them in 1 Corinthians 12: the word of wisdom, the word of knowledge, faith, the grace of healing, the working of Miracles, prophecy, the discerning of spirits, the gift of tongues, interpretation of speeches, and the charismata of apostles, prophets, doctors, helps, governments
Hyacinth, Saint 17 Aug - Many Miracles are credited to him
Gehazi - He had seen Elisha's Miracles, even to the raising of the dead, and yet was tempted to deceive him and fraudulently gain a present from Naaman
Apostle - Some were empowered by the Holy Spirit to perform Miracles (Matthew 10:1; Mat 10:8) and they were to preach the gospel (Matthew 28:19-20)
Evangelist, Philip the, Saint - One of the seven deacons (Acts 6), he first preached in Samaria with great success, and confirmed his preaching with Miracles (Acts 8)
Gifts in the Church - ' They are endowments of the one Spirit given to various persons, such as wisdom, knowledge, faith, healing, working of Miracles, prophecy, discerning of spirits, kinds of tongues, interpreting of tongues: "all these worketh that one and the selfsame Spirit, dividing to every man severally as he will. Other gifts are added: Miracles, gifts of healing, helps, governments, diversities of tongues
Exorcist - It would seem that it was an opinion among the Jews that Miracles might be wrought by invoking the divine name
Nicoletta, Saint - Endowed with great spiritual gifts, many Miracles were wrought through her, and she exerted remarkable moral influence over her associates
Holy Ghost, Gifts of the - , the gifts of Miracles, of prophecy, of tongues, etc
Countenance - ...
Isaiah 3:9 (a) This remarkable statement reveals one of the Miracles which may be seen constantly
Gifts of the Holy Ghost - , the gifts of Miracles, of prophecy, of tongues, etc
Martha, Saint 29 Jul - Many Miracles are credited to her intercession
Matthew - It is probable that he had a previous knowledge of the Miracles and doctrine of Christ
Basket - In the distinct Miracles of feeding the 5,000 and the 4,000 the KJV uses the stone term "baskets" for distinct Greek words. The accurate distinction in the use of the terms so invariably made in the record of the Miracles marks both events as real and distinct, not, as rationalists have guessed, different versions of one miracle
Signs - When Christ was on earth He wrought Miracles, wonders, and signs, but the Pharisees and Sadducees demanded of Him 'a sign from heaven,' Matthew 16:1 , and it is added that they did this 'tempting Him. See Miracles
Inchantments - Respecting the inchantments practised by Pharaoh's magicians, (see Exodus 8:18-19 ,) in order to imitate the Miracles which were wrought by Moses, it must be said either that they were mere illusions, whereby they imposed on the spectators; or that, if they performed such Miracles, and produced real changes of their rods, and the other things said to be performed by them, it must have been by a supernatural power which God had permitted Satan to give them, but the farther operation of which he afterward thought proper to prevent
John Capistran, Saint - In 1416 he became a Franciscan and traveled through Italy after his ordination, preaching and performing Miracles of healing, and assisting Saint Bernardine of Siena in reforming the Order
John Colombini, Blessed - Many Miracles occurred at his tomb
Capistran, John, Saint - In 1416 he became a Franciscan and traveled through Italy after his ordination, preaching and performing Miracles of healing, and assisting Saint Bernardine of Siena in reforming the Order
Lake of Genesareth - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform Miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13)
Dominic de Guzman, Saint - He is credited with numerous extraordinary Miracles
Camillus de Lellis, Saint - The gift of Miracles and prophecy has been attributed to him
Januarius And Companions, Saint - The relics of Saint Januarius are in a chapel of the cathedral of Naples, where they have wrought many Miracles, the greatest of which is the stopping of eruptions of Mount Vesuvius on several occasions
Cerinthians - They believed that he was a mere man, the son of Joseph and Mary; but that in his baptism a celestial virtue descended on him in the form of a dove; by means whereof he was consecrated by the Holy Spirit, made Christ, and wrought so many Miracles; that, as he received it from heaven, it quitted him after his passion, and returned to the place whence it came; so that Jesus, whom they called a pure man, really died, and rose again; but that Christ, who was distinguished from Jesus, did not suffer at all
Galilee, Sea of - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform Miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13)
Mustard (Tree) - He is telling us that though one may be obscure, unknown, uneducated and unimportant in life, yet if that person is full of faith as the seed is full of mustard, then he may see Miracles performed in his life
Genesareth, Lake of - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform Miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13)
Sea of Galilee - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform Miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13)
Blasphemy - The blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, (Matthew 12:32 ; Mark 3:28 ) consisted in attributing to the power of Satan those unquestionable Miracles which Jesus performed by "the finger of God" and the power of the Holy Spirit
Elisha - ...
His Miracles After Elijah insisted to his chosen successor that he, “Ask what I shall do for you, before I am taken from you,” Elisha answered, “Let me inherit a double portion of spirit” (2 Kings 2:9 NIV). ...
Some of the Miracles of Elisha are quite well known and loved. ...
Powerful enough to perform Miracles and appoint kings, yet sensitive enough to weep over the fate of Israel (2 Kings 8:11-12 ), Elisha, disciple and successor to Elijah, proved to be both prophet and statesman. See Miracles; Prophet-Prophecy; History of Israel; Baal Worship
Miracles, Signs, Wonders - ...
“Sign” (semeion ) in the New Testament is used of Miracles taken as evidence of divine authority. ...
How do Miracles relate to the natural order? Christian thinkers have responded in different ways throughout the centuries. Some hold that Miracles are not contrary to nature (Augustine and C. Others (like Thomas Aquinas) have maintained Miracles stand outside the laws of nature. A mechanistic perspective believes the world is controlled by unalterable natural laws and cannot allow for the possibility of Miracles
Miracles (2) - MIRACLES. They do not regard the Miracles of the Gospels as in the least degree arbitrary interruptions of the Order of Nature, but rather as a revelation of the infinite extent of that order. Men of science, moreover, are increasingly willing to admit the necessity of the spiritual and rational as the ultimate ground of the physical; and recent investigations into the make of the so-called ‘atom,’ and the vast potentialities of Matter, will further develop the distrust of all dogmatic assertion that nothing in the nature of the events recorded in the Gospels and called ‘miracles’ is possible or credible. ...
In this fact, that the Divine Power dwelt in its fulness in the personality of Jesus, we find the unifying principle for all the Miracles of the Gospels. Here and elsewhere the Miracles are represented, not as an arbitrary putting forth of a supernatural power altogether out of relation to any human capacity or possibility, but as arising spontaneously out of the unique relation He sustained to the Infinite Life; not as something given, while it could have been withheld, for the sake of commending the moral and spiritual and personal claims of Jesus, but as vital and essential parts of the Divine Revelation. ...
In order to get an intelligent faith in the Gospel Miracles, it is of great consequence at what point we approach the problem. His Miracles were not simply the output of an alien force, but the living exercise of a Divine force, deeply akin to all human powers, already working in the capacities, sympathies, and life-ties of humanity, utilizing the known in all their unknown ramifications, and also the unknown and unsuspected. If these deepest principles which our Lord followed are duly recognized in our faith and conception, then the remaining Miracles, most of which are rejected by many who receive the healings, become not only not incredible, but inevitable as the completion of a revelation otherwise essentially incomplete. And those Miracles which are associated with the life and career of Jesus, being wrought not so much by the power of our Lord, as by the Divine Power acting upon Him, have a strong presumption in their favour, congruous as they are with the whole method of His mighty works and with the one revelation given in Him. Miracles of Jesus. —A distinction must be made between what Jesus Himself said of the Miracles and the description given by the people of the time, who were under the influence of low and vulgar ideas of a Divine revelation, and by the Evangelists, who were not altogether emancipated from current conceptions. The Miracles were not the highest works; they belong to a lower level of manifestation as compared with His moral and spiritual revelation of God (John 14:11). Characteristics of our Lord’s Miracles. —Briefly, the features of the Miracles which commend them to our judgment and affection may be stated as—(1) Spontaneity. The Miracles of Jesus ever sought the highest and Divinest ends, and were never ends in themselves. His Miracles spring out of His innermost nature, and reveal the moral harmony and winsomeness of His Person. Herein lies a most fruitful comparison with other alleged Miracles, ecclesiastical and mediaeval and modern. (5) Helpfulness to mankind was the abiding characteristic of our Lord’s Miracles. Chronological list of Miracles of Jesus
Miracle - There is every reason why He should do so if He wills to conflrm some truth or fact by miraculous manifestation of His power, as did Our Lord and His Apostles when it was hopeless to expect men and women, as they were at that time, to accept the teachings of Christianity without such evidence of their Divine origin as Miracles
Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe - As a sign she imprinted her image on the peasant's mantle, which is preserved in the shrine and to the intercession of which many Miracles have been attributed
Lima, Rose of, Saint - The cruel martyrdom which she inflicted upon her body was rewarded by extraordinary mystical gifts, visions, and revelations; many Miracles followed her death
Blasphemy - Others regard the expression as designating the sin of attributing to the power of Satan those Miracles which Christ performed, or generally those works which are the result of the Spirit's agency
Jannes And Jambres - They could "proceed no further," though for a time they simulated Moses' Miracles (Exodus 7:11)
Galilean - This surprising statement is modified by the following story showing the welcome apparently depended on an expectation of Miracles not on appreciation for who Jesus was or from faith in Him (John 4:43-54 )
Nicodemus - He was a respected Pharisee and a member of the Jewish Council, or Sanhedrin (John 3:1; John 7:50), but he was also willing to admit that Jesus’ Miracles showed that God was with him (John 3:2; cf
Guadalupe, Feast of Our Lady of - As a sign she imprinted her image on the peasant's mantle, which is preserved in the shrine and to the intercession of which many Miracles have been attributed
Legend - Jortin observes, we have false legends concerning the Miracles of Christ, of his apostles, and of ancient Christians; and the writers of these fables had, in all probability, as good natural abilities as the disciples of Christ, and some of them wanted neither learning nor craft; and yet they betray themselves by faults against chronology, against history, against manners and customs, against morality, and against probability
Genevieve, Saint - The Miracles wrought there caused her name to be given to the church
Supernatural - From this habit of mind come all those phrases by which Miracles are described as ‘suspensions of the order of nature,’ and the like. If a person under the influence of this habit of thought meets with the suggestion that Miracles are themselves orderly, and illustrate a higher law than that of ordinary experience, he is disquieted, because he thinks that in losing the character of disturbance, Miracles lose their ‘supernatural’ character. Some of the language used by critics of Miracles and the term ‘supernatural’ have a tendency to bring these events down to the level of tricks or deceptions. Miracles
Pontius Pilate - Like Judas, it had been well for him if he had never been born, though alas, the Jewish rulers, who delivered up the Lord after having seen His Miracles and heard His words, had the greater sin. ...
There is extant a report of Pilate to the Emperor as to the Miracles and death of Christ, laying all blame upon the Jews, also an account of the 'ACTS OF PILATE,' but they are now accounted to be spurious
Gervasius - Two distinct points demand attention: 1st, the finding of the bodies; 2nd, the reputed Miracles. There remains the question of the Miracles to which St. In the Criterion of Miracles , by bp. 1803), there are many acute observations on similar reputed Miracles in the 18th cent
Sin - The unpardonable sin is, according to some, the ascribing to the devil the Miracles which Christ wrought by the power of the Holy Ghost. This sin, or blasphemy, as it should rather be called, many scribes and Pharisees were guilty of, who, beholding our Lord do his Miracles, affirmed that he wrought them by Beelzebub, the prince of devils, which was, in effect, calling the Holy Ghost Satan, a most horrible blasphemy; and, as on this ground they rejected Christ, and salvation by him, their sin could certainly have no forgiveness. No one therefore could be guilty of this blasphemy, except those who were spectators of Christ's Miracles. A few days after that great event, the descent of the Holy Ghost enabled the Apostles to work Miracles, and communicated to them a variety of other supernatural gifts. Hence it appears that the sin against the Holy Ghost consisted in finally rejecting the Gospel as preached by the Apostles, who confirmed the truth of the doctrine which they taught "by signs and wonders, and divers Miracles and gifts of the Holy Ghost," Hebrews 2:4
Evidence - That is called internal evidence which is drawn from the consideration of those declarations and doctrines which are contained in it; and that is called external, which arises from some other circumstances referring to it, such as predictions concerning it, Miracles wrought by those who teach it, its success in the world, &c
Red Sea - The passage of the Red Sea with the destruction of Pharaoh’s army was one of the great Miracles of Jewish history which the people loved to recall
Bethsaida - Jesus pronounced judgment upon Bethsaida for its lack of response to His message and Miracles (Matthew 11:21 ; Luke 10:13 )
Stars - It is one of many Miracles that attest to the power of our God and is similar to the pillar of fire used to demonstrate God's presence and might to the children of Israel as they made their way to the land of Canaan
Maimed - The word is not employed in connexion with our Lord’s Miracles, but only in His invitation to the blessings of the Kingdom, to which all outcast sufferers were with Divine compassion called
Ammon (or Amon), Saint - Several Miracles are related of Ammon (Socr
Anthony of Padua, Saint - He later won a reputation as a preacher and teacher of theology and received the praise of Saint Francis; made numerous converts and performed many Miracles; and was made provincial of the monastery at Limousin, France, 1226
Jambres - Some have supposed, that they were the magicians who for a while confronted Moses, when, at the command and in the name of the Lord, he wrought Miracles before Pharaoh and his court
Blasphemy Against the Holy Ghost - Matthew 12:31,32 Mark 3:28 Luke 12:10 This sin was committed by the Pharisees when they, in violation of their own convictions, willfully and maliciously ascribed the Miracles of the Son of God and the work of the Holy Spirit to the evil one
Elisha - Many Miracles also were wrought at his word; some of these were, healing the waters of Jericho; supplying the widow's cruse with oil, and the allied armies of Judah, Israel, and Edom with water; gaining a son for the woman of Shunem, and restoring him to life; healing the leprosy of Naaman; detecting and punishing Ghazi
Philip (st.) And st. James' Day - Philip is said to have carried the Gospel toNorthern Asia, where by his preaching and Miracles he mademany converts; his name has also been connected with the Church inRussia
Sign - The sign need not be supernatural ( 1 Samuel 2:34 , Isaiah 8:18 ; Isaiah 20:3 ); but the Jews in the time of Christ desired Miracles as proofs of Divine power ( Matthew 12:38 ; Matthew 16:1 , John 4:48 , 1 Corinthians 1:22 ), a request which Jesus refused and condemned. The Fourth Gospel frequently describes the Miracles of Jesus as signs ( Luke 3:2 , Luke 4:44 ), and attributes to them an evidential value which is not prominent in Jesus’ own intention
Holy Ghost - (3) Creation is ascribed to him (Genesis 1:2 ; Job 26:13 ; Psalm 104:30 ), and the working of Miracles (Matthew 12:28 ; 1 Corinthians 12:9-11 )
Josue, Book of - No Catholic exegete will regard the Miracles recorded in Josue as an objection to its historical veracity
Joshua, Book of - No Catholic exegete will regard the Miracles recorded in Josue as an objection to its historical veracity
Healing - ...
Jesus’ Miracles of healing showed his power over all the evil consequences of sin, and indicated that the kingdom of God had come (Matthew 4:23; Revelation 22:1-492; James 5:14-154; see Miracles)
Bernard of Clairvaux, Saint - Many Miracles are ascribed to him
Flagellants - The leaders began to cast doubts on the necessity and desirability of the sacraments and pretended to absolve one another, to cast out evil spirits, and to work Miracles
Authority - Testimony witness or the person who testifies as, the Gospels or the evangelists are our authorities for the Miracles of Christ
Barsumas, Syrian Archimandrite - He is regarded among the Jacobites as a saint and worker of Miracles (Assemani, Bibl
Melita - He remained here three months, and wrought many Miracles
Senochus, Saint - He had redeemed many from captivity or healed or fed them, and Miracles were attributed to his corpse
Bartimaeus - There are few Miracles, indeed, in the Gospel story better vouched for than the one before us, authenticated as it is by the triple Synoptic tradition and by the preciseness of the details, while the very mention of the name of the healed man has been regarded as a proof that he must still have been known in the time of the Apostles (‘valde notus Apostolorum tempore Bartimaeus,’ Bengel). —In addition to the relative sections in the well-known works on our Lord’s Miracles by Trench, Laidlaw, and W. 155–167, and The Miracles of Jesus by Various Authors (J
Plagues of Egypt - The ten plagues narrated in Exodus 7:1-25; Exodus 8:1-32; Exodus 9:1-35; Exodus 10:1-29; Exodus 11:1-10; Exodus 12:1-51 stand in close connection with the natural phenomena of Egypt, still they maintain their character as Miracles
Baal-Zebub - It doth not appear that was worshipped at that time; but it is evident so generally known and acknowledged by this name, that the Pharisees made use of it as a well known, and in a daring blasphemy, the Miracles of the Lord Jesus to his power (See Matthew 12:24)...
Naaman - God's sovereign grace, going beyond Israel and its many lepers to heal the Gentile Naaman, Jesus makes to be His justification for His not doing as many Miracles in His own country as He had done in Capernaum, an earnest of the kingdom of God passing from Israel to the Gentiles; Luke the physician (Luke 4:23-27) appropriately is the evangelist who alone records it
Transubstantiation - It must be evident to every one who is not blinded by ignorance and prejudice, that our Lord's words, "This is my body, " are mere figurative expressions: besides, such a transubstantiation is so opposite to the testimony of our senses, as completely to undermine the whole proof of all the Miracles by which God hath confirmed relation
Hungary, Elizabeth of, Saint - Many Miracles occurred at her grave
Baptism of the Holy Spirit - The ministry for which empowerment comes included witnessing (Acts 1:8 ; see John 15:26-27 ) and working Miracles (John 14:12 ; Acts 3:4-10 ; Acts 5:12 )
Elizabeth of Hungary, Saint - Many Miracles occurred at her grave
Blasphemy - In regard to blasphemy against the Holy Ghost, the essence of this fearful sin seems to have been that the Jews, shutting their eyes to the proof of Miracles which Christ gave, daringly attributed those good works to an unclean spirit
Stephen, Festival of Saint - Stephen before his selection for ordination as a Deacon, butin the 6th and 7th chapters of the Book of the Acts of the Apostlesis given a very full account of his being made a Deacon; of hisdoing "great wonders and Miracles among the people," because hewas "full of faith and power"; of his accusation and eloquentdefense, and finally of his martyrdom by stoning, in the midst ofwhich, like his Divine Master, he prayed for his murderers
Blasphemy - ...
When the Jewish rulers, who had such numerous proofs of Jesus' Messiahship, shut their hearts against conviction, and at last stifled conscience and the light so utterly as to attribute His Miracles of love, as the casting out of unclean spirits, to the help of the prince of demons, Christ pronounced that they were either committing or on the verge of committing the sin against the Holy Spirit which is forgiven neither in this world nor in the world to come, though all sin against the Son of man can be forgiven (Matthew 12:31, etc. ...
None can now commit formally the same sin of attributing Jesus' Miracles against Satan's kingdom to Satan's help, so evident a self contradiction that nothing short of a seared conscience, and a hardened determination to resist every spiritual impression and even malign the Spirit's work before other men, could have given birth to such a sin
Blindness - Its cure is one of our Lord's most frequent Miracles (Luke 7:21; Matthew 9:27; Mark 8:23; John 5:3; John 9:1), as had been foretold (Isaiah 29:18; Isaiah 35:5)
Snake - But Aaron showed that his actions were Miracles, not tricks, when his snake swallowed up those of the magicians (Exodus 7:8-12; cf
Paulianists - His doctrine seems to have amounted to this: that the Son and the Holy Ghost exist in God in the same manner as the faculties of reason and activity do in man; that Christ was born a mere man; but that the reason or wisdom of the Father descended into him, and by him wrought Miracles upon earth, and instructed the nations, and, finally, that on account of this union of the divine Word with the man Jesus, Christ might though improperly, be called God
Caper'Naum - (Matthew 9:9 ; 17:24 ; Mark 2:14 ; Luke 5:27 ) The only interest attaching to Capernaum is as the residence of our Lord and his apostles, the scene of so many Miracles and "gracious words
Draught of Fishes - The events came to men from the sphere of their daily labour, and were at once felt to be the manifestations of a present power of God’ (Westcott, Characteristics of the Gospel Miracles),—in the second case the manifestation of the power of the presence of the risen Lord. and Lives of Christ on the two passages; Trench and Taylor on Miracles; Expositor, iv
Sympathy - The Miracles as expressive of sympathy...
(a) Miracles of healing. —The Miracles of healing are truer expressions of the sympathy of Christ to us to-day than they were in the earlier days when Miracles were regarded more as a proof of His Divinity than an incident connected, with it. Yet this way of regarding the Miracles adds greatly to the significance they possess as expressive of human sympathy. The power to perform such acts of healing presupposes a combination of the tenderest sympathy with commanding authority, and it is interesting to consider that some, at least, of these Miracles are instances of sympathy according to its etymological meaning (σύν, παθεῖν), and that Christ Himself shared the suffering in the act of relieving it. ...
(b) Nature Miracles. —The sympathy of Christ, as revealed in His Miracles, was not confined to the relief of physical sufferings occasioned by disease. Standing in a class by itself among the Miracles is the turning of the water into wine (John 2), and yet this is an act of especial interest as revealing an aspect of the sympathy of Christ which must be borne in mind
Jubilee - The very existence of this law is a standing monument that when it was given the Mosaic Miracles were fully believed; moreover this law, in the Pentateuch which the Jews always have received as written by Moses, is coeval with the witnesses of the Miracles: therefore the reality of the Mosaic Miracles is undeniable (Graves, Pentateuch, 6)
Superstition - It may be extended to those, who, without any evidence, believe that prophecies are still uttered, or Miracles are performed
Capernaum - Here he healed the centurion’s palsied servant ( Matthew 8:5-13 , Luke 7:2-10 ), provided the half-shekel for the Temple tribute ( Matthew 17:24 ), taught in the synagogue ( Mark 1:21 , Luke 4:31 , John 6:59 ), performed many Miracles ( Mark 1:23 to Mark 2:12 , Luke 4:33-41 ), taught humility to the disciples ( Mark 9:33 ), healed a nobleman’s son by a word from Cana ( John 4:46 )
Capernaum - Capernaum is of interest as the residence of our Lord and his apostles, the scene of many Miracles and teachings
Heal, Health - ...
Luke, especially, emphasizes that Christ's healing ministry was far wider than the few Miracles described (4:40; 5:15; 6:17-19; 9:11; cf. ...
Besides demonstrating the nature of God's kingdom as health-giving, down-to-earth, and relevant to the daily problems of the whole person, and the compassion of Jesus toward ordinary, undervalued individuals, the healing Miracles left no doubt that a new power was at work in the world, and available through Christ (Luke 4:36 ; 5:17 ; 6:19 ). To those who watched, the Miracles declared that "God was with him" (Luke 7:16 ; Acts 2:22 ; 10:38 ). The resurrection of Jesus makes all lesser Miracles crediblebut not every Christian credulous: quality, motive, evidence, still demand consideration. Even with Jesus himself visibly present, no healing was possible except "according to your faith" (Matthew 9:29 ); without faith, even Jesus "could not do any Miracles" (Mark 6:5-6 ). We read of "extraordinary Miracles" at Ephesus (19:11), the restoration of Eutychus at Troas (20:9-12), and the healing of Publius's father on Malta. But so does the expectation that, when God so wills, Miracles will sometimes occur
Apostle - After his resurrection, he sent them into all the world, commissioned to preach, to baptize, to work Miracles, etc
Fish - ...
John 21:6 (c) Some say that these fish represent the Miracles performed by our Lord JESUS CHRIST while He was on the earth
Abednego - A great temporary effect was produced by this and other Miracles related in the book of Daniel; but the people relapsed again into idolatry, and justly brought upon themselves all those wasting judgments which in succession swept over the mightiest and most ancient states
Canonization - Before a beatified person is canonized, the qualifications of the candidate are strictly examined into, in some consistories held for that purpose; after which one of the consistorial advocates, in the presence of the pope and cardinals, makes the panegvric of the person who is to be proclaimed a saint, and gives a particular detail of his life and Miracles; which being done, the holy father decrees his canonization, and appoints the day
Power - ...
Christ's Miracles evidenced the power of God at work in His ministry (Matthew 14:2 ; Mark 5:30 ; Mark 9:1 ; Luke 4:36 ; Luke 5:17 )
Luke, Gospel of Saint - The Gospel contains 24 chapters and maybe divided into: ...
the hidden life (1-2)
preaching of Saint John, baptism, and temptation (3:1 to 4:13)
teaching, Miracles, and works of mercy in Galilee and the founding of the Church (4:14 to 9:50)
the "Perean Ministry," work of Jesus outside of Galilee (9:51 to 19:28)
ministry in Jerusalem (19:29 to 21:38)
Passion, Death, Resurrection and Ascension (22-24)
The Biblical Commission, June 26, 1912, declared that the harmonious tradition from the earliest ages, the testimony of ancient writers, the use of the Gospel by the early Church, constitute certain proof that Saint Luke wrote the entire Gospel as contained in our Bibles before the year 70, and that it is a true historical document
Spitting, Spittle - Trench (Miracles, on John 9) adduces Pliny (Hist
Gospel of Saint Luke - The Gospel contains 24 chapters and maybe divided into: ...
the hidden life (1-2)
preaching of Saint John, baptism, and temptation (3:1 to 4:13)
teaching, Miracles, and works of mercy in Galilee and the founding of the Church (4:14 to 9:50)
the "Perean Ministry," work of Jesus outside of Galilee (9:51 to 19:28)
ministry in Jerusalem (19:29 to 21:38)
Passion, Death, Resurrection and Ascension (22-24)
The Biblical Commission, June 26, 1912, declared that the harmonious tradition from the earliest ages, the testimony of ancient writers, the use of the Gospel by the early Church, constitute certain proof that Saint Luke wrote the entire Gospel as contained in our Bibles before the year 70, and that it is a true historical document
Chrysologus, Petrus, Archbishop of Ravenna - His sermons are almost all on subjects from the gospels, usually the parables and Miracles, commencing with a course of six on the prodigal son
Philip - After the death of Stephen all the Christians, except the Apostles, having left Jerusalem, and being dispersed in several places, Philip went to preach at Sebaste or Samaria, where he performed several Miracles, and converted many persons, Acts 8:1-3 , &c
Luke (2) - 23-38: his temptation, 4:1-13; his discourses, Miracles, and transactions in Joram or Jehoram - Not long after he was involved in war with Ben-hadad king of Syria, and Hazael his successor; and in this time occurred the miraculous deliverance of Samaria from siege and famine, and also various Miracles of Elisha, including the healing of Naaman
Joshua - No man witnessed more or greater Miracles than he; and in his life may be found many points of resemblance to that of the greater "Captain of the Lord's host," who establishes his people in the true promised land
Philip - After the death of Stephen when the Christians were driven from Jerusalem, except the apostles, he preached the gospel in Samaria with great success, and wrought many Miracles
Nicolaus, Bishop of Myra - His Acts, which may embody some historical elements, are filled with well-known legends and Miracles
Paulinus of Perigueux - of Tours of the Miracles wrought at his predecessor's tomb
Persecution (2) - ...
The methods of persecution adopted against Christ and His immediate followers were such as contempt and disparagement (John 8:48); ascription of Christ’s Miracles to the power of the Evil One (Matthew 12:24); expulsion of those believing on Him from the synagogue (John 9:22; John 9:34); attempts to entrap Him in His words (Matthew 22:15, John 8:6); questioning His authority (Mark 11:28, Matthew 21:23); (after the failure of the former) illegal arrest and the heaping of every kind of insult upon the Prisoner, who was entitled to protection from the authorities until the authorized penalty was laid upon Him (Matthew 26:67 ff
Blasphemy - They are too well convinced that the Lord Jesus wrought all his Miracles by his own almighty power, even to call it in question; so that in this sense, it is impossible for them to commit this unpardonable sin. They had charged Christ with having an evil spirit, by whose influence he wrought Miracles, and hence Jesus declared the sin, and shewed, at the same time, that it was totally unpardonable
Seeing - ’ The most ordinary significance of the word ‘see’ is, of course, the natural one—to recognize by the act of vision ordinary external objects, as when the blind are described as seeing (Matthew 15:31, John 9:7), or men are promised that they shall see the Son of Man, or when the disciples think they see a vision, or the multitude see the Miracles of Jesus (Mark 14:62, Luke 24:23, John 6:2). Thus the Miracles of giving sight to the blind become peculiarly significant; but we need not, therefore, assume that, though they are in this way acted parables, the narratives of such Miracles are not to be regarded as of any historical value, but as mere pictorial representations of the spiritual truths they are meant to convey
Spiritual Gifts - The gifts may be divided into the apparently miraculous and the non-miraculous, ( a ) The miraculous include speaking with tongues (probably ecstatic utterances, usually unintelligible to the speaker; see Tongues [1]), and their interpretation; gifts of healing, and the working of Miracles or ‘powers’; of these we may instance the power of exorcism ([2] Mark 16:17 , Acts 16:18 ; 1 Corinthians 14:1-407 ), and the punishment of offenders ( Acts 5:1-11 ; Act 13:9 , 1 Corinthians 4:21 ; 1 Corinthians 5:5 ). Without going at length into the question of Miracles, we may note that the evidence of their reality in this connexion is very strong; they are referred to in the Epistles (contemporary documents) as matters of common knowledge; St. ...
‘What we read about Miracles especially about the charismata in the Epistles of St. Indeed, in an age when exorcisms and Miracles were associated with magic, and the heathen mantis , or frenzied prophet, was a familiar phenomenon, it was impossible to ascribe all ‘powers’ and ecstasy to the Holy Spirit
Relics - The honouring the relics of saints, on which the church of Rome afterwards founded her superstitious and lucrative use of them, as objects of devotion, as a kind of charms, or amulets, and as instruments of pretended Miracles, appears to have originated in a very ancient custom that prevailed among Christians, of assembling at the cemeteries or burying places of the martyrs, for the purpose of commemorating them, and of performing divine worship. Such was the origin of that respect for sacred relics, which afterwards was perverted into a formal worship of them, and became the occasion of innumerable processions, pilgrimages, and Miracles, from which the church of Rome hath derived incredible advantage. In the end of the ninth century it was not sufficient to reverence departed saints, and to confide in their intercessions and succours; to clothe them with an imaginary power of healing diseases, working Miracles, and delivering from all sorts of calamities and dangers; their bones, their clothes, the apparel and furniture they had possessed during their lives, the very ground which they had touched, or in which their putrefied carcasses were laid, were treated with a stupid veneration, and supposed to retain the marvellous virtue of healing all disorders, both of body and mind, and of defending such as possessed them against all the assaults and devices of the devil. The Roman Catholics in Great Britain do not acknowledge any worship to be due to relics, but merely a high veneration and respect, by which means they think they honour God, who, they say, has often wrought very extraordinary Miracles by them
Scripture - But even while they lived, they confirmed their testimony by a variety of Miracles wrought in divers places, and for a number of years, sometimes before thousands of their enemies, as the Miracles of Christ and his disciples; sometimes before hundreds of thousands, as those of Moses. Nothing but the clearest evidence arising from undoubted truth could make multitudes of lawless, luxurious heathens receive, follow, and transmit to posterity, the doctrine and writings of the apostles; expecially at a time when the vanity of their pretensions to Miracles and the gift of tongues, could be so easily discovered, had they been impostors; and when the profession of Christianity exposed persons of all ranks to the greatest contempt and most imminent danger. When the authenticity of the Miracles was attested by thousands of living witnesses, religious rites were instituted and performed by hundreds of thousands, agreeable to Scripture injunctions, in order to perpetuate that authenticity: and these solemn ceremonies have ever since been kept up in all parts of the world; the Passover by the Jews, in remembrance of Moses's Miracles in Egypt; and the Eucharist by Christians, as a memorial of Christ's death, and the Miracles that accompanied it, some of which are recorded by Phlegon the Trallian, an heathen historian. The Scriptures have not only the external sanction of Miracles, but the eternal stamp of the omniscient God by a variety of prophecies, some of which have already been most exactly confirmed by the event predicted
Amen - We ought to consider Jesus' use of the term "amen" alongside his other implicit claims to deity, such as his claim of the right to forgive sins and to judge humankind, and his custom of performing Miracles on his own authority. God's agets ascribe the will and the glory to God when they perform Miracles, yet Jesus performed Miracles on his own authority
Stephen - He was a man full of the Holy Spirit, strong in faith, gifted in the working of Miracles and brilliant in debating with the opponents of Christianity (Acts 6:1-10)
Eutychus - ’ There is no doubt that the incident is related as an instance of the power of the Apostle to work Miracles, and that the historian believed him to have done so on this occasion
Grass - "...
This delicate distinction disproves the notion that the two Miracles are really different versions of the same miracle, as also that of the 12 (small) baskets (kofinoi ) in the miracle of the 5,000, and the seven (larger) baskets (spurides ) in that of the 4,000
Finger - Only His finger was needed in order to do great things, and to perform marvelous Miracles
Power - 'ability, might, mighty, mighty deeds, Miracles, power, strength, violence, mighty works, wonderful works,' etc
Abyssinian Church - ...
They have, at least, as many Miracles and legends of saints as the Romish church
Basket - The former kind of basket plays an important part in relation to the Miracles of feeding, and the argument for its larger size as compared with κόφινος is supported by a reference to its use in facilitating St
Galilee - Many of his most remarkable Miracles, teachings, and labors were within this province of Galilee
Rationalism - In this sense rationalism denies the supernatural character of Revelation, and affirms that all religious truths are derived from human reason alone; that human reason is the sole medium by which man can arrive at any truth; that the faith of Christ is unalterably opposed to reason; that Divine Revelation is a hindrance rather than a help to man's perfection; and that the Miracles and prophecies narrated in Sacred Scripture are poetic fancies
Jeroboam - Neither Miracles nor warnings, nor the premature death of Abijah his son could dissuade him
Luke, Gospel According to - ) Luke also records seven of our Lord's Miracles which are omitted by Matthew and Mark. (See List of Miracles in Appendix
Jordan River - The Jordan River is also featured in the Miracles of Elijah and Elisha. There He performed new Miracles, and spoke to the multitudes in parables, especially those of the collection in Luke 12-18
Apostle - (2) They were chosen by Christ himself (3) They had the power of working Miracles. Early in our Lord's ministry he sent them out two and two to preach repentance and to perform Miracles in his name Matthew 10 ; Luke 9
Nicodemus - " Many of Nicodemus' fellow rulers attributed Jesus' Miracles to Beelzebub; Nicodemus on the contrary avows " we (including others besides himself) know Thou art a teacher come from God, for no man can do these Miracles which Thou doest, except God be with him. " Nicodemus was probably one of the many who had "seen His Miracles on the Passover feast day, and believed (in a superficial way, but in Nicodemus it ultimately became a deep and lasting faith) when they saw" (John 2:23-24); but "Jesus did not commit Himself unto them
Publishing - ...
The same principle is observable with regard to Christ’s Miracles. Thus it was that after the performance of so many of our Lord’s Miracles the recipients of healing grace were told not to publish the news abroad. The Pharisees were not influenced favourably by the Miracles which they saw (Matthew 12:14, Mark 3:5 f
Fig - Its fault, if one may use the word, lay in its pretensions, in its making a show to run before the rest when it did not so indeed" (Trench, Miracles)
Plagues - See Exodus ; Miracles
Philip - ' When the church was scattered from Jerusalem by persecution, Philip went to Samaria and preached Christ and wrought Miracles, and men and women believed and were baptised
Stephen - As he was full of the Holy Ghost, and of zeal, Acts 6:5-6 , &c, he performed many wonderful Miracles: and those of the synagogue of the Libertines, of the Cyrenians, of the Alexandrians, and others, disputing with him, could not withstand the wisdom and the power with which the spoke
Dan'Iel, the Book of, - The New Testament incidentally acknowledges each of the characteristic elements of the book, its Miracles, ( Hebrews 11:33,34 ) its predictions, (Matthew 24:15 ) and its doctrine of angels
Perpetuus, Saint, Archbaptist of Tours - The one built by Briccius had become too small for the fame and Miracles of the saint
Phocas, of Sinope - His relics were so fruitful in Miracles that he obtained the name of Thaumaturgus
Hilarion (1), a Hermit of Palestine - ...
The fame of his sanctity spread rapidly and he was reputed to be a worker of Miracles and an exorcist. He again set forth in search of solitude; but wherever he went his Miracles betrayed him
Historical - First, there is the minor difficulty connected with physical Miracles. The question is more familiar in its less formidable shape, as regards Miracles. (2) Secondly, there is the claim of dogmatic naturalism—‘miracles do not happen’; for history, the miracle narrative is an interesting and instructive problem, the miracle itself a hallucination a priori, be the alleged evidence what it may. ’ Belief in miracle is due to the ‘unique impression’ of Christ’s person, though ‘there has seldom been a strong religious faith which would not have drawn the conclusion’ that Christ wrought Miracles (Hist. This seems to mean that history is prevented from dealing with Miracles by limitations of its own,—limitations which do not necessarily imply the absence of miracle from the world of real events. (4) Against the point of view which excludes Miracles a priori, we might set a point of view which welcomes them a priori as congruous to a Divine revelation and Divine redemption
Faith - These latter are the signs, and among them the surest are Miracles and prophecies, by which we can conclude with full certitude that God has revealed and that therefore there is a strict obligation to accept the truths He has made known
Naphtali, Tribe of - Here most of his parables were spoken and his Miracles wrought
Trance - As in many Miracles, there is a natural form of trance analogous to the supernatural, namely, in ecstatic epilepsy the patient is lost to outward impressions and wrapped in a world of imagination; Frank, who studied catalepsy especially, stated he never knew the case of a Jew so affected
Daniel (2) - The New Testament incidentally acknowledges each of the characteristic elements of the book, its Miracles, Hebrews 11:33-34, its predictions, Matthew 24:15, and its appearance of the angel Gabriel, Luke 1:19; Luke 1:26
New Testament - - 7 ; Luke 6:17-49 ...
Miracles in the land of the Gadarenes. Mark 6:35-44 ...
Miracles in Gennesaret
Daniel, the Book of - Thus, the New Testament attests (Daniel 2-3; 6-7; 11) expressly on the three points to which rationalists object, namely, the predictions, the Miracles narrated, and the manifestations of angels. The Miracles, like those of Moses in Egypt, were designed to show to the seemingly victorious world power the really superior might of the seemingly prostrate kingdom of God, and so to encourage the captive Jews to patient trustfulness in God. Hence arose the need for Miracles to mark the new era. National Miracles in Egypt, the wilderness, and Canaan marked the beginning of the theocracy or outwardly manifested kingdom of God. Personal Miracles mark the beginning of the church, the spiritual kingdom of God, coming not with outward observation in "the times of the Gentiles," which began from the captivity
Stephen - Their duties were not eleemosynary only; Stephen at once undertook evangelistic work and won great success, persuading many, and working Miracles
Sight - And in respect to the souls of his people, which those Miracles to the bodies were intended to set forth, surely here was exhibited the new creation in the most striking manner
Meribah - The Hebrew for "rock" in Exodus 17 at Rephidim is tsur , but in Numbers 20 cela' at Kadesh, marking undesignedly the distinctness of the Miracles
Providence - All things and all people are in the hands of the living God who is responsive to their needs (Genesis 50:20; Jeremiah 17:7-10; Jonah 4:11; Matthew 8:26; Matthew 15:32; James 5:17-18; see Miracles; PRAYER)
Moses - By a succession of Miracles, which God wrought by his hand, Moses brought the Hebrews out of Egypt, and through the wilderness, unto the borders of Canaan
Naaman - Through an Israelite slave-girl Naaman hears of the man of God who works Miracles, and in the hope of being cured of his leprosy he comes to Elisha; it is, however, noteworthy that he comes at Elisha’s request ( 2 Kings 2:8 ) in order that he may learn that ‘there is a prophet in Israel
Christianity - Its Miracles, its fulfillment of all prophecy, and its complete adaptation to meet man's deep spiritual needs, pardon, peace, holiness, life, immortality for soul and body, are the only reasonable account to be given of its success
Nazareth - They were also angry that he would not perform Miracles to please them
Mount (And Forms) - Spirit-filled men see Miracles happen in their lives
Basilius, Bishop of Seleucia - A prose work on The Life and Miracles of St
Aaron - ) He was a Levite, and is first mentioned in (Exodus 4:14 ) He was appointed by Jehovah to be the interpreter, (Exodus 4:16 ) of his brother Moses, who was "slow of speech;" and accordingly he was not only the organ of communication with the Israelites and with Pharaoh, (Exodus 4:30 ; 7:2 ) but also the actual instrument of working most of the Miracles of the Exodus
Demoniacs - ...
It has been argued that the persons said to be possessed were really lunatics, who imagined they were possessed; and to meet that fancy the Lord spoke to the supposed spirit and told it to come out! But this is simply an effort to deny the power of Satan and his emissaries over man, and also God's power in the Miracles
Tradition - Had any of them come down to our times, the only means of endorsing them must be by showing their agreement with the word of God, since inspiration and Miracles have ceased
Naaman - Then, to justify and to illustrate His action in Working Miracles outside the limits of His own city, He referred to the cases of the widow of Sarepta and of Naaman, which were instances of blessings bestowed through the instrumentality of two of Israel’s greatest prophets on persons who were not of the house of Israel at all
Nicetius, Archbaptist of Treves - Even in Gregory's time it was famous for its Miracles ( de Glor
Elijah - His life is best understood when considered from four historical perspectives which at times are interrelated: his Miracles, his struggle against Baalism, his prophetic role, and his eschatological relationship to Messiah. ...
Miracles His first miracle was associated with his prophecy before King Ahab (1 Kings 17:1 ) in which he said there would be no rain or dew apart from his declaration
Revelation - As to its external evidence, it is easily seen by the characters of the men who composed it, the Miracles wrought, its success, the fulfillment of its predictions, &c. The matter, the manner, the scope, the predictions, Miracles, preservation, &c
Tradition - The apostles' and evangelists' inspiration is attested by their Miracles; their New Testament Scriptures had the additional test without which even Miracles would be inconclusive (Deuteronomy 13:1-6), accordance with the existing Old Testament revelation (Acts 17:11)
False Christs - ’ The false prophets, of course, are the heralds of the false Messiahs; they guarantee the movement in question by means of Miracles. Finally, there is the thought that Miracles of themselves are no guarantee of Divine authority
Elisha - His Miracles are deeds of mercy, and, like that of the Prophet of Nazareth, his ministry breathes a spirit ‘of gracious, soothing, holy beneficence. In the restoration of her son to life, Elisha performs one of his greatest Miracles ( 2 Kings 4:8 ff. But some of his deeds are not Miracles in the modern sense ( 2 Kings 2:19 ff
Francis of Assisi, Saint - Francis journeyed through Italy, southern France, and Spain, preaching and performing Miracles
Faith, Science And - Admitting, as one must, that the Miracles, prophecies, and wonderful effects of the Christian religion prove sufficiently the truth of Christian Revelation, one is bound also to admit that faith and science cannot contradict each other
Christ, Divinity of - Secondly, Christ claims for Himself an authority and power which in the Old Testament belonged to Yahweh (God) alone: He performs Miracles in His own name and confers the same power upon His Apostles; He teaches in His own name and as one having supreme authority; He forgives sin as if committed against Himself; He requires faith and love of Himself as conditions of salvation; He promises to His disciples His perpetual presence and assistance; He promises eternal beatitude for works done on account of Himself; and represents Himself as the final Judge of the living and the dead
Divinity of Christ - Secondly, Christ claims for Himself an authority and power which in the Old Testament belonged to Yahweh (God) alone: He performs Miracles in His own name and confers the same power upon His Apostles; He teaches in His own name and as one having supreme authority; He forgives sin as if committed against Himself; He requires faith and love of Himself as conditions of salvation; He promises to His disciples His perpetual presence and assistance; He promises eternal beatitude for works done on account of Himself; and represents Himself as the final Judge of the living and the dead
Galilee - And it is no less remarkable that of his entire thirty-three great Miracles, twenty-five were wrought in this province
Jesuits - What shall I render unto him for all his revelations and gifts to me? Were there no historical evidence of the truth of Christianity, were there no well-established Miracles, still I should believe that the religion propagated by the fishermen of Galilee is divine
Manna - These Miracles were wrought in attestation of the sanctity of the Sabbath
Canaanitish - ; Trench, Miracles, ad loc
Germanus, Bishop of Paris - Germanus's Life was written by Venantius Fortunatus, his contemporary and friend, but the work is little else than a string of Miracles
Assisi, Francis of, Saint - Francis journeyed through Italy, southern France, and Spain, preaching and performing Miracles
Finger - Our blessed Lord, in the days of his flesh, speaking of his Miracles, made use of the same phrase
Elisha - an elder brother's—portion of Elijah's spirit, both to work Miracles and to give counsel for present and future emergencies
Grace - For certain gifts of God, which he bestows freely, when, where, and on whom, he pleases; such are the gifts of Miracles, prophecy, languages, &c, Romans 15:15 ; 1 Corinthians 15:10 ; Ephesians 3:8 , &c
Judas - Being one of the twelve apostles of our Lord, Judas seems to have possessed the full confidence of his fellow apostles, and was entrusted by them with all the presents which were made them, and all their means of subsistence; and when the twelve were sent out to preach and to work Miracles, Judas appears to have been among them, and to have received the same powers
Judgment - it being imagined that God would work Miracles to vindicate innocence
Science And Faith - Admitting, as one must, that the Miracles, prophecies, and wonderful effects of the Christian religion prove sufficiently the truth of Christian Revelation, one is bound also to admit that faith and science cannot contradict each other
Judas Iscariot - The astonishing Miracles he saw him perform left no room to doubt of the reality of his Master's pretensions, who had, indeed, himself in private actually accepted the title from his Apostles; and Judas must have been much disappointed when Jesus repeatedly refused the proffered royalty from the people in Galilee, after the miracle of feeding the five thousand, and again after his public procession to Jerusalem. He might naturally have grown impatient under the delay, and dissatisfied also with Jesus for openly discouraging all ambitious views among his disciples; and, therefore, he might have devised the scheme of delivering him up to the sanhedrim, or great council of the nation, (composed of the chief priests, scribes, and elders,) in order to compel him to avow himself openly as the Messiah before them; and to work such Miracles, or to give them the sign which they so often required, as would convince and induce them to elect him in due form, and by that means enable him to reward his followers
Gifts of the Spirit - Acts 3:6-8; Acts 8:7; see HEALING), the ability to perform Miracles (1 Corinthians 12:10; cf. Acts 9:36-41; Acts 16:1-3; Galatians 5:22-23; see Miracles), special faith that achieves what normally seems unlikely (1 Corinthians 12:9; cf
Physician (2) - —It is a fact of special importance, in reference to Christ’s Miracles of healing, that one of the four Evangelists was himself a physician (Colossians 4:14). , Stuttgart, 1903; Bennett, Diseases of the Bible; Trench, Miracles
Demoniac - Farmer, upon the general question, is, that Miracles, or works surpassing the power of men, are never performed without a divine interposition; and by a divine interposition he means, either the immediate agency of the Deity himself, or of beings empowered and commissioned by him. And the proof of this asseveration, he tells us, may very easily be found, if we consider that, on any other supposition, it is impossible to show that a religion supported by Miracles is really from God. For the Miracles in question, or works surpassing the power of human beings, may have been performed by evil spirits, acting independently of the Divinity, thwarting his purposes, and marring the operation of his goodness. And were the sanctity of the doctrine ever so apparent, it would not (on the principles of those with whom we are here arguing) certainly follow from hence, that the Miracles recommending it were wrought, by God; inasmuch as other beings, from motives unknown to us, might interest themselves in favour of such a doctrine. Nor does this, say they, detract from the very high character which Christ undoubtedly sustains in the inspired writings, or diminish the value of his Miracles as the evidences of our religion; since it must be allowed, that to cure a disease with a word or a touch is an effort of power far beyond the reach of any human being. The very Miracles recorded in Scripture are proofs of goodness
Feeding the Multitudes - The fourth assumes that the Miracles of healing would not, but that a miracle such as the feeding would convince the Jews, and so be just the kind of sign the Jews demanded. , according to his usual custom of emphasizing the teaching as primary, and of making the Miracles secondary, makes Jesus teach the shepherdless sheep out of sympathy, while Mt. —Trench and Taylor on Miracles; Edersheim, Life and Times, i
Apostle - ...
...
Another qualification was the power of working Miracles (Mark 16:20 ; Acts 2:43 ; 1 Corinthians 12:8-11 )
Deacon - " The result was, "the word of God increased, and the number of the disciples multiplied in Jerusalem greatly, and a great company of the priests were obedient to the faith; and Stephen (one of the seven), full of faith and power, did great wonders and Miracles among the people
Sin Unto Death - Another view connects 1 John 5:16-17 with the blasphemy against the Holy Spirit ( Matthew 12:31-32 ; Mark 3:28-30 ), but 1John says nothing about attributing the Miracles of Jesus to Satan's power
Hermenigild, a Saint - After the execution, Miracles were not wanting to substantiate his claim to veneration
Hierocles (1), Neoplatonic Philosopher - He wrote a book against Christianity, entitled Λόγος φιλαλήθης πρὸς τοὺς Χριστιανούς , in which he brought forward various scriptural difficulties and alleged contradictions and instituted comparisons between the life and Miracles of Jesus Christ and of Apollonius of Tyana
Full - Every one is full of the Miracles done by cold baths on decayed and weak constitutions
Plague - A special reason why in this case the natural background of the Miracles should appear was in order to show that Jehovah was God of Egypt as much as of Israel, and rules "in the midst of the earth" (Exodus 8:22)...
By exhibiting Jehovah through Moses at will bringing on with unusual intensity, and withdrawing in answer to intercession at once and completely, the well known Egyptian periodical scourges which their superstition attributed to false gods, Jehovah was proved more effectively to be supreme than He could have been by inflicting some new and strange visitation
Choose - 7:7-8), sent Moses and Aaron to work Miracles in Egypt ( Canon of the New Testament - The cessation of Miracles and personal inspiration was about the same time as the written inspired word was completed. , only make general assertions of Miracles still continuing, being loath to see what seemingly weakened their cause, the cessation of Miracles; but they give no specific instance. Thus Miracles would cease early in the 2nd century, shortly after John's death and the completion of the canon
Silence - The silence of Jesus regarding His Miracles is significant of His own attitude towards them (Mark 3:12, Luke 5:14). Silence here cannot have been from prudential considerations, for Miracles must undoubtedly have enhanced His reputation among the people, and it was His refusal to work Miracles to gratify the Pharisees that formed the ground of their offence against Him (Matthew 16:1 ff. But Jesus knew how little Miracles really proved
Jesus Christ - " Here he called Peter and Andrew and James and John, and made his first tour through Galilee, performing many Miracles. He appointed the twelve apostles and delivered the Sermon on the Mount, and commenced a second tour in Galilee, during which he delivered the series of parables in Matthew 13:1-58, stilled the storm on Galilee, healed the demoniacs of Gadara, raised the daughter of Jairus, and after other Miracles came again to Nazareth, where he was again rejected. Early in the third year of his ministry, Jesus disputed with the Pharisees about eating with unwashed hands, and went toward the northwest, healed the daughter of the Syrophœnician woman, and then passed around to Decapolis, where he wrought many Miracles and fed 4000
Blasphemy - This cannot have been the case of all who disbelieved the mission of Jesus, and even decried his Miracles; many of whom, we have reason to think, were afterward converted by the Apostles. If we consider the Scripture account of this sin, nothing can be plainer than that it is to be understood of the Pharisees' imputing the Miracles wrought by the power of the Holy Ghost to the power of the devil; for our Lord had just healed one possessed of a devil, and upon this the Pharisees gave this malicious turn to the miracle. The Pharisees were the persons charged with the crime: the sin itself manifestly consisted in ascribing what was done by the finger of God to the agency of the devil; and the reason, therefore, why our Lord pronounced it unpardonable, is plain; because, by withstanding the evidence of Miracles, they resisted the strongest means of conviction, and that wilfully and malignantly; and, giving way to their passions, opprobriously treated that Holy Spirit whom they ought to have adored
Bartholomew - His Miracles and His teaching and His divine manifestation, of which Bartholomew had just a taste, were a sample and installment of a continually progressing opening of heaven to earth and earth to heaven (Revelation 4:1; Acts 7:56; Hebrews 9:8; Hebrews 10:19-20) wherein angels minister to and for Him (Luke 2:9; Luke 2:13; Luke 22:43; Acts 1:10); to be consummated when "the tabernacle of God shall be with men," and "the holy Jerusalem shall descend out of heaven from God" (Revelation 21; 1 Corinthians 13:12)
Power - The life and ministry of Jesus Christ provide particularly clear evidence of God’s power (Luke 4:14; Luke 4:36; Luke 5:17; Luke 9:1; see Miracles; KINGDOM OF GOD)
Divine Freedom - While God sometimes acts in Miracles beyond the natural potentials of His creation to accomplish His purposes, He does not act inconsistently with the order He established within creation
Isdigerdes i, King of Persia - He overcame and exposed the impostures of the magi, with the assistance of Maruthas and other Christians, and Miracles are said to have been wrought before him for the confirmation of the gospel
Jude - It is not unreasonable to suppose that, after having received, in common with other Apostles, extraordinary gifts at the pentecost, he preached the Gospel for some time in several parts of the land of Israel, and wrought Miracles in the name of Christ
Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible - ...
MIRACLES IN OLD TESTAMENT...
Enoch translated. ...
MIRACLES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT...
A
Elisha - Many more Miracles would follow, showing what a serious threat Jezebel’s Baalism was to Israel’s national life. His first two Miracles symbolized these characteristics of blessing and cursing
Holy Spirit, Gifts of - , prophecy, healings, Miracles, tongues and their interpretation) from other less "supernatural" gifts, although one suspects that first-century Christians may have considered all of them supernatural to some extent. , Miracles, tongues, or administration). ...
Healings and Miracles are the other two more "supernatural" charisms. The terminology (iamata and dunameis, respectively) harks back to the various Miracles worked by Jesus in the four Gospels and by his followers in Acts, Miracles that were by no means limited to the apostles (cf. "Healings" would involve the restoration of physical health to the sick or injured while "miracles" would embrace a wider variety of supernatural phenomena
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh of the Exodus, Exodus 5:1, before whom Moses wrought his Miracles, was Menephtha, son of Rameses II
Water - Water was also involved in several of Jesus' Miracles (Matthew 14:25 ; Luke 8:24-25 ; John 2:1-11 )
Exorcism - See Miracles; Magic; Healing; Demon
Manna - Manna would thus come under the category of ‘special providences,’ not ‘miracles
Jansenists - Some of them even pretended to work Miracles, by which their cause was greatly injured
Apostle - Some time after their appointment the apostles were sent forth to preach and perform Miracles, a special charge being given them
Mamertus, Claudianus Ecdicius - two short hexameter poems entitled "Laus Christi" and "Carmen Paschale," some short epigrammatic praises of the paradox of the Incarnation, an elegiac account of Christ's Miracles, an elegiac appeal to a friend not to criticize his verses too severely, and two short Greek hexameter addresses to Christ, Εἰς τὸν σωτῆρα and Εἰς τὸν δεσπότην Χριστόν
Paralysis - Miracles)
Theodotus of Byzantium - He taught that at the baptism of Jesus, Christ descended on Him in the form of a dove, and that He was then able to work Miracles, though He had never exhibited any before: but even so He was not God; though some of the sect were willing to acknowledge His right to the title after His resurrection
Gifts - Paul mentions, first, charisms of the intellectual order, ‘the word of wisdom’ and ‘the word of knowledge’; second, miraculous gifts: (a) ‘faith,’ (b) ‘gifts of healing,’ (c) ‘workings of Miracles’; third, ‘prophecy, or the gift of spiritual instruction; fourth, ‘discerning of spirits,’ or the gift of discrimination, the discerning between the true and the false; and finally, ‘tongues’ and ‘the interpretation of tongues’ (see Tongues), or ecstatic powers and the power of interpreting them. Then in 1 Corinthians 12:28 we have the following classification: ‘God hath set some in the church, first apostles, secondly prophets, thirdly teachers, then Miracles, then gifts of healings, helps (ἀντιλήμψεις), governments (κυβερνήσεις, literally ‘pilotings’), divers kinds of tongues’; this is a classification of charisms in order of spiritual rank and dignity. ...
As to the meaning and nature of the charisms, guidance must be sought in the particular articles which deal specifically with them; nor can we enter into a detailed examination of the problems which such a classification as ‘faith,’ ‘gifts of healing,’ ‘workings of Miracles’ creates. It is a charism out of which spring others described in 1 Corinthians 12:9 as ‘charisms of healing,’ where the plural appears to indicate different powers for healing different forms of disease, and ‘workings of powers or Miracles. ’ The relation of faith and its offspring prayer to healing and Miracles generally is clearly seen in the Gospels which record our Lord’s cures and in His declaration that faith is the sole condition of miracle-working (cf
Name (2) - ...
(2) Working of Miracles in the name. —In the Gospels references to the working of Miracles (esp. certain vagabond Jews, exorcists, take upon themselves to call over those possessed by evil spirits the name of the Lord Jesus, and the sons of Sceva in particular do this to their own confusion; but the implication of the narrative evidently is that the ‘special Miracles’ which had just been wrought by St. ’...
The view has been taken that this use of the name of Christ for the working of Miracles was nothing more than the employment of a theurgic formula, which finds its analogue in the invocations and incantations of ancient magic (so esp
Apollonius of Tyana - , both in France and England, used them thus; but whereas Hierocles would admit the Miracles both of Christ and of Apollonius, Voltaire and Lord Herbert had an equal disbelief in both. His Miracles, again, do not result from his being in possession of any secret communicable to other men, but arise from his own nature and wisdom
Sedulius, 5th-Cent. Poet - describe in full detail the Miracles of the Gospel and the Lord's Prayer. John and Luke; then adds a succession of Miracles from SS
Severus Sulpicius, an Historian - He tells us that, having long heard of the sanctity and Miracles of Martin, he went to Tours to see him, asked him all the questions he could, and got information from eyewitnesses and those who knew (c. The credulity and superstition of the narrative had, as regards Martin's Miracles, evidently excited scepticism even among the Christians in Sulpicius's own time (see Dial
Kings, Books of - He performed a number of Miracles to help preserve the faithful minority in Israel who still trusted in God (4:1-6:7). He performed other Miracles to warn the unfaithful in Israel of God’s judgment (6:8-8:15)
Death (2) - ...
The three recorded Miracles of raising from the dead are, in the last resort, concrete illustrations of this side of our Lord’s teaching. The Johannine account of the raising of Lazarus is indeed bound up with a more complex theological doctrine; but the Synoptic Miracles, in so far as they are more than works of compassion or exhibitions of Divine power, are indicative of the transient nature of death. ...
Attempts have been made to connect these Miracles and the whole conception of death as sleep, with the contemporary Jewish belief that for three days the soul still lingered in the neighbourhood of the dead body
Gospel - ...
The four Gospels contain each of them the history of our Saviour's life and ministry; but we must remember, that no one of the evangelists undertook to give an account of all the Miracles which Christ performed, or of all the instructions which he delivered. And again: if Jesus really performed the Miracles as related in the Gospels, and was perfectly acquainted with the thoughts and designs of men, his divine mission cannot be doubted. The sacred narratives then represent to us the high character that he assumed; the claim he made to a divine original; the wonderful Miracles he wrought in proof of his divinity; the various prophecies which plainly marked him out as the Messiah, the great Deliverer of the Jews; the declarations he made that he came to offer himself a sacrifice for the sins of all mankind; the cruel indignities, sufferings, and persecutions to which, in consequence of this great design, he was exposed; the accomplishment or it, by the painful and ignominious death to which he submitted, by his resurrection after three days from the grave, by his ascension into heaven, by his sitting there at the right hand of God, and performing the office of a Mediator and Intercessor for the sinful sons of men, till he shall come a second time in his glory to sit in judgment on all mankind, and decide their final doom of happiness or misery for ever
Force - He wrought His Miracles by the same power that enabled Him perfectly to overcome all the temptations of His life, and to accomplish all those other things in which He fulfilled His Father’s will and purpose. Are the forces inherent and operative in the physical or moral order of the world of such a nature as to render it impossible for the Miracles ascribed to Christ’s power to have happened? That is the real point at issue as between the testimony of the Gospels and Science. It is also argued in favour of the possibility and the historical truth of the Miracles in question, that His perfect personal sinlessness and holiness was a moral miracle as great as, if not greater than, any of the mighty works reported by the Evangelists as performed by Him. This is the greatest, mightiest of all His Miracles; and whosoever understands the momentousness of the moral task it implies will not stumble at any of the mighty works on record in the Gospels. ‘Miracles’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible; Mozley, Bampton Lectures, esp
Fundamental Theology - In the course of this demonstration the four Gospels are used merely as historical documents, in which we read what Jesus Christ explicitly claimed to be, what doctrines He taught, what Divine credentials (working of Miracles, uttering and fulfilling of prophecies) He presented in proof of His claim
Power - , Mark 6:5 , "mighty work;" so Mark 9:39 , RV (AV, "miracle"); Acts 2:22 (ditto); 8:13, "miracles;" 2 Corinthians 12:12 , RV, "mighty works" (AV, "mighty deeds")
Capernaum - Teaching in the synagogue (Mark 1:21 ) and private homes (Mark 2:1 ) was basic to His work there, but the Miracles performed there appear to have precipitated the controversy and opposition
Laying on of Hands - Even in the context of formal blessings and astonishing Miracles, the imposition of hands signifies the separation of a person, a people, or even a bodily part (Mark 8:25 ) as the recipient of an unusual manifestation of God's grace
Immanuel - Christ's glory was revealed through the Miracles he performed (John 2:11 )
Epaphroditus - Paul, whose power of working Miracles is frequently referred to (Acts 14:10; Acts 28:8, 2 Corinthians 12:12), did not exercise it in the case of Epaphroditus
Serpent - So unpleasantly common were they, that it was regarded as one of the perpetual Miracles of Jerusalem that no one was ever bitten by a serpent there
Genovefa, Patron Saint of Paris And of France - Henceforth Miracles marked her out as the spouse of Christ
Gilgal - A place connected with the closing scene of Elijah's life and where Elisha wrought one of his Miracles
Darkness - (Job 10:21-22; Matthew 22:13) The darkness which took place at the death of Christ, and which lasted from the sixth to the ninth hour, differed from all these, and was among the Miracles which marked that momentous event
Naaman - How doth the faith of this man, and so immediately wrought as it was in the mind of this poor idolater, reproach the supposed followers of the Lord Jesus Christ, who, after all the Miracles, and evidences, and testimonies, with which the truth, as it is in Jesus, is brought home and confirmed to the heart, can hardly keep alive, from day to day, a suitable dependence upon Him! May we not take up the words of the Lord Jesus upon this occasion, and say, as he did: "Nevertheless, when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth?" (Luke 18:8)...
Acts of the Apostles - The principal facts recorded in it are, the choice of Matthias to be an Apostle in the room of the traitor Judas; the descent of the Holy Ghost on the day of pentecost; the preaching, Miracles, and sufferings of the Apostles at Jerusalem; the death of Stephen, the first martyr; the persecution and dispersion of the Christians; the preaching of the Gospel in different parts of Palestine, especially in Samaria; the conversion of St
Calf - Nevertheless, the inspired Psalmist speaks of Aaron's calf with the utmost abhorrence, and declares that, by worshipping it, they forgat God their Saviour, (see 1 Corinthians 10:9 ,) who had wrought so many Miracles for them, and that for this crime God threatened to destroy them, Psalms 106:19-24 ; Exodus 32:10 ; and St
Nazareth - He visited it during his public ministry, but did not perform many Miracles there because of the unbelief of the people, Matthew 13:54-58
Power - (1) In Matthew 7:22 , Luke 10:13 , Acts 2:22 ; Acts 8:13 , ‘powers,’ or ‘mighty works,’ along with ‘signs and wonders,’ are to be understood as Miracles, and were concrete manifestations of supernatural power
Theology, Fundamental - In the course of this demonstration the four Gospels are used merely as historical documents, in which we read what Jesus Christ explicitly claimed to be, what doctrines He taught, what Divine credentials (working of Miracles, uttering and fulfilling of prophecies) He presented in proof of His claim
Joannes ii, Mercurius, Bishop of Rome - Its words are, "The sufferings, as well as Miracles, which Christ of His own accord endured in the flesh are of one and the same
Maximus of Ephesus - Julian had never seen Miracles like those with which Maximus was credited; so he bade Eusebius stick to his learning and hurried off to Maximus
Serpent - So unpleasantly common were they, that it was regarded as one of the perpetual Miracles of Jerusalem that no one was ever bitten by a serpent there
Mark, Theology of - ...
The meaning of the many Miracles of Jesus is summarized in Mark 7:37 , which reflects the hopes of the redeemed in Isaiah 35:5-6 when God is present. Whatever else Miracles mean in the Gospel of Mark they too are proof of Jesus' Messiahship. 1:32-34; 3:7-12; 6:53-56; 7:37) in contrast to the false messiahs who perform signs and Miracles (13:22). Salvation is defined by the responses of Jesus' audiences to his Miracles, sayings, and parables within a variety of settings between these two events, and Jesus' interpretation of his actions
Simon Magus - Then Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip and wondered, beholding the Miracles and signs which were done. For the people with one accord gave heed unto those things that Philip spake, hearing and seeing the Miracles which he did. And thus it is that we find the apostles speaking with tongues, healing the sick, opening the eyes of the blind, casting out devils, and many suchlike Miracles and signs. Now, Peter had never liked the look of Philip's great convert, and it completely justified Peter's incurable suspicions when Simon Magus came one night into Peter's lodgings, and, setting down a bag of money on the table, said, 'What will you take for the Holy Ghost? If you will show me the secret of your apostleship so that I may work your Miracles like you, I have plenty of money, and I know where there is plenty more
Demon - ...
Demons are able to work Miracles or signs (σημεῖα, Revelation 16:14), as Antichrist can (2 Thessalonians 2:9); they attract worship from men (Revelation 9:20; cf. Paul’s Miracles the evil spirits were expelled (Acts 19:12). Trench, Notes on the Miracles of our Lord9, London, 1870, § 5 (‘The Demoniacs in the Country of the Gadarenes’)
the Publican - It takes a long lifetime, in most cases, to sanctify a sinner; and at the end it is the miracle of all Miracles to the old sinner himself that he is ever sanctified. Both are Miracles. Samuel Rutherford used to pose the saints of his day with this dilemma, which of the two Miracles they will wonder most at to all eternity, their justification or their sanctification? For what is justification? Justification is an act of God's free grace, wherein He pardoneth all our sins, and accepteth us as righteous in His sight, only for the righteousness of Christ imputed to us, and received by faith alone
Nathanael - If Jesus had worked Miracles at Nazareth, Nathanael at Cana must have heard of them. Nathanael has believed because of a miracle of knowledge which could be appreciated by himself alone: he is hereafter to witness Miracles of power which can be appreciated by all. This private sign to Nathanael was a prelude to those public Miracles in which Christ ‘manifested His glory’ to the Jewish nation and through it to all the world
Elijah - " There by the grand voice of nature, the strong wind rending the rocks, the earthquake, and the fire, (in none of which, though emanating from God, did He reveal Himself to Elijah,) and lastly by "a still small voice," God taught the impatient and desponding prophet that it is not by astounding Miracles such as the fire that consumed the sacrifice, nor by the wind and earthquake wherewith God might have swept away the guilty nation, but by the still small voice of God's Spirit in the conscience, that Jehovah savingly reveals Himself, and a revival of true religion is to be expected. Miracles sound the great bell of nature to call attention; but the Spirit is God's voice to the soul. Double, literally, "a mouth of two," is probably used generally for the spirit in large or increased measure, the spirit of prophecy and of Miracles. Elisha performed double as many Miracles, namely, 16 as compared with Elijah's eight; and the Miracles of a like kind to Elijah's; compare 1 Kings 17:17-24 with 2 Kings 4:29-37; 1 Kings 17:16 with 2 Kings 4:1-7. "...
Elijah is called by Malachi "the prophet," not the Tishbite, as he here represents the whole series of prophets culminating in the greatest, John (though he performed no Miracles as Elijah). The Miracles foretold of the two witnesses (Revelation 11:4-5, "fire out of their mouth," i
Apostle - Their early mission in Jesus' lifetime, to preach repentance and perform Miracles in Jesus' name, was restricted to Israel, to prepare the way for the subsequent gospel preaching to the Jews first, on and after Pentecost (Acts 3:25). Their infallibility, of which their Miracles were the credentials, marked them as extraordinary, not permanent, ministers
Work - In particular, it speaks of God’s works with reference to his Miracles (Deuteronomy 11:3-7; Judges 2:7; Genesis 2:15; see Miracles)
Bible, History of Interpretation - Thus, by definition, Miracles could not be explained on the basis of an act of God who reaches into history; some natural explanation had to be found for what appears in the Scripture record as a miracle. ...
What is at fault here is not the method of interpretation as such, but the presupposition that Miracles are impossible
Son of God - But the Jews from 1618065299_49 (some thought Jesus specially meant, "if the son of thy mother entice thee," for He had a human mother, He said, but not a human father) inferred that His Miracles, which they could not deny, did not substantiate His claim, and that their duty was to kill with holy zeal One who sought to draw them to worship as divine another beside God. His Miracles they attributed to Satan's help (Matthew 12:24; Matthew 12:27; Mark 3:22; Luke 11:15; John 7:20; John 8:48; Matthew 10:25)
Pharaoh - And miracle succeeded miracle; Miracles of judgment were wrought and Miracles of mercy; but they all ended in the same way-Pharaoh's heart was only the more hardened. Burn your books about Miracles. If I had not bargained for Miracles I would not have been here. Do the will of God in the thing that lies nearest you, and in the thing that God has been so long asking of you; do it; resolve to do it; begin to do it tonight and before tomorrow; and then all past Miracles in Egypt and in Israel, and all present providences and all coming experiences, will all work together to soften your heart and thus to strengthen and assure your faith
Cures - In this way are explained the Miracles of which some genuine cases undoubtedly happened around the tomb of Becket, the healings that are associated with Lourdes, and many of the similar results that we may believe were gathered round famous saints like St. ) says of our Lord’s Miracles: ‘It is only permissible to regard as historical that class of healings which present-day physicians are able to effect by psychical methods. Commentary; Trench, Miracles; Laidlaw, Miracles of our Lord; Belcher, Miracles
Ceremony - In fact, the altars, images, crosses, processions, Miracles, and legends, nay, even the very hierarchy, pontificate, religious orders, &c
Aaron - ...
Third, like Moses he was moved by the Spirit of God and was used to effect Miracles a number of times on the way to Sinai
Brass (Brazen) - ...
Psalm 107:16 (a) GOD is affirming to His people that He had performed many wonderful Miracles for them, and had delivered them from many embarrassing situations
Exorcism - Peter and the Apostles generally in other Miracles ( Acts 3:6 ; Acts 4:10 , James 5:14 )
Philip the Evangelist - Even Simon Magus believed and was baptized, and continued with Philip wondering at the Miracles and signs which were done
Prophecy, Prophets - (5) The prophets also performed Miracles which confirmed their message. While some prophets like Moses (Exodus 4:1-9 ) and Elijah (1 Kings 17:1 ) worked many Miracles, virtually all prophets occasionally saw a miraculous fulfillment of God's word (Isaiah 38:8 ). His Miracles and discernment were rightly understood as prophetic (John 4:19 )
Gregorius (32) Turonensis, Bishop of Tours - 1836–1838), and Les Livres des Miracles et autres opuscules , including the Vita , extracts from Fortunatus, etc. ...
Gregory began to write first as bishop, his subject being the Miracles of St. ...
The History appears to have been written contemporaneously with the Miracles of the Saints , most probably in several divisions and at different times. As in the case of the books of the Miracles, Gregory appears to have revised his History, and we find m the earlier books insertions and references to Gregory's other works and to events of later date
False Prophet - These texts teach five tests for a true prophet: (1) he must be Jewish (Deuteronomy 18:18 ); (2) he must speak in the name of the Lord (1 Kings 13:20-226 ); (3) what he says must come to pass, the most proximate fulfillments being the validators of the more distant predictions (Deuteronomy 18:21-22 ); (4) he must perform signs, wonders, or Miracles that accompany his words (Deuteronomy 13:1-2 a); and (5) his message must conform to what God had revealed previously (Deuteronomy 13:2b-5 ). ...
In the endtimes, false prophets will attempt to deceive the world's populace into following the false prophet, the beast, and Satan himself (Matthew 24:1,24 ; Revelation 16:13-14 ; 19:20 ; 20:10 )even by performing Miracles and signs
Magic - Miracles were merely signs validating the mission of the prophet, who did not work by his skill but by the power of Yahweh (Exodus 3:14-17 ; Deuteronomy 13:2-3 ; Judges 6:17,36 ; 1 Kings 18:36 ; Isaiah 7:10-11 ). The Gentiles saw Miracles as magical in nature, and thus confused those of the apostles with their own magic (Acts 8:9-11 )
Egypt - ’ The name recalls the memories of a glorious past, when Israel’s youth was guided and sustained by the Miracles of Divine interposition. ), where they see the Pharaoh, and remain three years, during which period Jesus works many Miracles; returning at the end of the three years to Palestine, and by direction of an angel making their home at Nazareth
Matthew - It is certain that the Apostles, immediately after the descent of the Holy Ghost, which took place only ten days after the ascension of our Saviour into heaven, preached the Gospel to the Jews with great success; and surely it is reasonable to suppose, that an authentic account of our Saviour's doctrines and Miracles would very soon be committed to writing, for the confirmation of those who believed in his divine mission, and for the conversion of others; and, more particularly, to enable the Jews to compare the circumstances of the birth, death, and resurrection of Jesus with their ancient prophecies relative to the Messiah; and we may conceive that the Apostles would be desirous of losing no time in writing an account of the Miracles which Jesus performed, and of the discourses which he delivered, because the sooner such an account was published, the easier it would be to inquire into its truth and accuracy; and, consequently, when these points were satisfactorily ascertained, the greater would be its weight and authority
Egypt - ’ The name recalls the memories of a glorious past, when Israel’s youth was guided and sustained by the Miracles of Divine interposition. ), where they see the Pharaoh, and remain three years, during which period Jesus works many Miracles; returning at the end of the three years to Palestine, and by direction of an angel making their home at Nazareth
John the Baptist - and power" of preaching, though not in Miracles (John 10:41), he should turn the degenerate "children to the Lord and to" their righteous "fathers, and the heart of the fathers to the children," their past mutual alienation being due to the children's apostasy; fulfilling Malachi 4:4-6; bringing "Moses' law" to their remembrance, "lest Jehovah at His coming should smite the earth with a curse. ) Jesus at once confirmed them and comforted John himself (who probably had expected to see Jesus more openly vindicating righteousness, as foretold Malachi 3:2-5; Malachi 4:1-3), by an appeal to His Miracles and preaching, the very credentials promised in Isaiah 35:5; Isaiah 61:1
si'Mon - " ( Acts 8:10 ) The preaching and Miracles of Philip having excited his observation, he became one of his disciples, and received baptism at his hands, A
Gideon - " Thus addressed, the true though weak faith that was in Gideon was manifested, and he said to the Lord, "If the Lord be with us, why is all this befallen us? And where be all his Miracles which our fathers told us of ?" Jehovah added, "Go in this thy might, and thou shalt save Israel from the hand of the Midianites: have not I sent thee?" Gideon pleaded that his family was poor, and that he was the least in his father's house
Demon - The spirits of demons also, by working Miracles, will gather the kings of the earth together to the battle of that great day of Almighty God
Ability, Able - , when put forth in performing Miracles
Nineveh, Ninevites - Christ’s preaching and Miracles were not enough for them
Divination - He himself could masquerade as ἄγγελος φωτός (2 Corinthians 11:14), and could equip his servants with full powers, the Miracles and portents of falsehood, and the full deceitfulness of evil (2 Thessalonians 2:9-10). … The whole ancient world is full of Miracles’ (Deissmann, Light from the Ancient East2, 1911, pp. ) to distrust any one teaching beyond what is commanded, even ‘though he work Miracles,’ κἄν σημεῖα ποιῆ
Elijah - By these fearful Miracles he was accredited to this successor of Ahab as a prophet of the true God, and the destruction of these companies of armed men, was a demonstration of God's anger against the people at large. Double may signify like; or the gift of prophecy, and of Miracles, in a degree double to what thou dost possess, or to what I now possess. His boldness in reproof; his lofty zeal for the honour of God; his superiority to softness, ease, and suffering, are the characters of a man filled with the Holy Spirit; and he was admitted to great intimacy with God, and enabled to work Miracles of a very extraordinary and unequivocal character
Deaf And Dumb - ...
Two Miracles recorded by St. ...
It is to be observed that none of our Lord’s Miracles excited such interest or won such admiration as those wrought upon the deaf and dumb
Healing, Divine - Nearly one-fifth of the Gospels report Jesus' Miracles and the discussions they occasioned
Nazareth - The absence of "good" in Nazareth appears from the people's willful unbelief in spite of Jesus' Miracles, and their attempt on His life (Matthew 13:54-58), so that He left them, to settle in Capernaum (Matthew 4:13)
Temptation of Jesus - When Jesus came to the Temple, it was not to perform Miracles but to cleanse it (Matthew 21:12-17 )
Powers - ...
The New Testament references to miraculous works occur in relation to Jesus' Miracles and the presence of such works in the life of the early church
John the Baptist - The Lord wrought various Miracles while John's disciples were there, and bade them tell him what they had seen and heard, adding, "Blessed is he, whosoever shall not be offended in me
Masona, Bishop of Merida - Sunna joined with two Gothic Comes , Segga and Witteric, in a plot for murdering Masona which was miraculously frustrated, and Witteric, afterwards the Gothic king of that name, confessed all to Masona, who was not only protected by Miracles, but by the strong arm of the Catholic Claudius Dux of Lusitania (known to us from other sources as are Sunna and Segga, cf
Prochorus, a Deacon - The greater part of the subsequent narrative is occupied with the wondrous deeds of the apostle in his banishment, his victorious encounters with demons and sorcerers, his refutation of a learned Jew in a public dispute, numerous Miracles of healing and raising from the dead, and triumphant issues out of every conflict in which his persecuting enemies involve him
Messiah - If Jesus had announced himself publicly as the Messiah before showing what his messiahship involved, he would have attracted a following of the wrong kind (see KINGDOM OF GOD; Miracles). He was the Messiah, and his Miracles of healing were proof of this (Isaiah 35:5-6; Isaiah 61:1; Matthew 11:4-5; Luke 4:18; Luke 18:35-43)
Exodus - ) The narration of various Miracles wrought in behalf of the people during their journeyings towards Sinai, Exodus 15:1-17:16 . They were constantly led by Jehovah, and the whole series of events is a constant succession of Miracles
Neology - They affect to allow a revealing operation of God, but establish on internal proofs rather than on Miracles the divine nature of Christianity. What is revealed may belong to the order of nature, but an order higher and unknown to us, which we could never have known without Miracles, and cannot bring under the laws of nature. They all proceeded from the determination that whatever was not intelligible was incredible, that only what was of familiar and easy explanation deserved belief, and that all which was miraculous and mysterious in Scripture must be rejected; and they rested perpetually on notions and reasonings which were in themselves Miracles of incredibility. The Miracles of healing were the effect of fancy operating favourably upon the disorders; and Ananias and Sapphira died of a fright; with many other absurdities, half dreams and half blasphemies; and of which the above are given but as a specimen. Undisguised infidelity has in no country treated the grand evidences of the truth of Christianity with greater contumely, or been more offensive in its attacks upon the prophets, or more ridiculous in its attempts to account, on natural principles, for the Miracles. Tittman of Dresden, on the neological interpreters: "What is the interpretation of the Scriptures, if it relies not on words, but things, not on the assistance of languages, but on the decrees of reason, that is, of modern philosophy? What is all religion, what the knowledge of divine things, what are faith and hope placed in Christ, what is all Christianity, if human reason and philosophy is the only fountain of divine wisdom, and the supreme judge in the matter of religion? What is the doctrine of Christ and the Apostles more than some philosophical system? But what, then, I pray you, is, to deny, to blaspheme Jesus the Lord, to render his divine mission doubtful, nay, vain and useless, to impugn his doctrine, to disfigure it shamefully, to attack it, to expose it to ridicule, and, if possible, to suppress it, to remove all Christianity out of religion, and to bound religion within the narrow limits of reason alone, to deride Miracles, and hold them up to derision, to accuse them as vain, to bring them into disrepute, to torture sacred Scripture into seeming agreement with the fancies of human wisdom, to alloy it with human conjectures, to bring it into contempt, and to break down its divine authority, to undermine, to shake, to overthrow utterly the foundations of Christian faith? What else can be the event than this, as all history, a most weighty witness in this matter, informs us, namely, that when sacred Scripture, its grammatical interpretation and a sound knowledge of languages are, as it were, despised and banished, all religion should be contemned, shaken, corrupted, troubled, undermined, utterly overturned, and should be entirely removed and reduced to natural religion; or that it should end in a mystical theology, than which nothing was ever more pernicious to the Christian doctrine, and be converted into an empty μυχιλαγε , or even into a poetical system, hiding every thing in figures and fictions, to which latter system not a few of the sacred orators and theologians of our time seem chiefly inclined
Salvation - ...
This is further continued by the general interpretation Jesus puts upon His healing Miracles as prophecies and pledges of the approaching Kingdom, in which all sin and death shall be done away with. But it applies equally well to the other Miracles of healing. While the latter was one of the purposes for which they were intended—and this is brought out prominently in the Fourth Gospel—in the Synoptics, where Jesus’ teaching is centred in the Kingdom-idea, the Miracles are before all else signs of the actual approach of the Kingdom,—proofs that the saving power of God, which calls the Kingdom into being, is already in motion, and therefore so many instances of σώζειν
Lazarus - Elijah and Elisha had wrought Miracles of resuscitation (1 Kings 17:17 ff. The story is ‘non-historical, like the History of the Creation in Genesis, and like the records of the other Miracles in the Fourth Gospel; all of which are poetic developments. On the rationalistic objections to the miracle see the chapter on ‘The Later Miracles’ in Fairbairn’s Studies in the Life of Christ (or in Expositor, 1st Ser
Faith - The faith of Miracles, is the persuasion a person has of his being able, by the divine power, to effect a miracle on another, Matthew 17:20
Struggles of Soul - His dread of encouraging curiosity or wrong belief by His Miracles (John 4:48) came in conflict with His desire to help and comfort; and when the Evangelists call attention to compassion as the motive of His performing a miracle, we may conclude that there had been such a struggle of soul (Matthew 14:14; Matthew 15:32; Matthew 20:34, Mark 1:41, Luke 7:13)
Issue of Blood - , and standard works on the Miracles; Ker, Serm
Zacchaeus - " Evidently, Zacchaeus had not seen Jesus in person before, but had heard of His teachings and Miracles
Anabaptists - ...
The most pernicious faction of all those which composed this motley multitude, was that which pretended that the founders of this new and perfect church were under a divine impulse, and were armed against all opposition by the power of working Miracles
Gospel - ...
The writings which contain the recital of our Savior's life, Miracles, death, resurrection, and doctrine, are called GOSPELS, because they include the best news that could be published to mankind
Georgius (43), Patron Saint of England - After many Miracles and various tortures, St. Wallis Budge, The Martyrdom and Miracles of St
Reason - Hume, in the spirit of this pamphlet, concludes his Essay on Miracles with calling those dangerous friends or disguised enemies to the Christian religion who have undertaken to defend it by the principles of human reason: "Our most. The Christian doctrine has been vindicated by their masterly exposition from various misrepresentations; the arguments for its divine original have been placed in their true light; and the attempts to confound the Miracles and prophecies upon which Christianity rests its claim, with the delusions of imposture, have been effectually repelled
Omnipotence - It is a further extension of this power of doing Miracles that He can bestow it also upon His disciples (Mark 3:15, Luke 9:1, Matthew 10:1), to be used within the same limits and under the same inward conditions of faith and prayer—the channels of the Divine omnipotence. Thus His Miracles are manifestations of Divine glory, and are painted in the most striking colours, as the miracle at Cana and the story of Lazarus
Gospels (Apocryphal) - Where the details are not entirely imaginative, they have their origin in the transformation of utterances of Christ into deeds, or in the literal interpretation of OT prophecies and Jewish expectations about the Messiah, or in the ascription to Jesus of Miracles similar to those recorded in the OT (Hofmann, PRE
When, for example, one reads in the Childhood Gospel of Thomas the account of the Miracles wrought by the child Christ, and marks the spirit of diablerie so frequently exhibited, one is conscious of nothing but a painful feeling of wonder, that fables so bizarre and so revolting could ever have been tolerated in a community of Christians. The child Jesus is a boy among boys, taking His part in the usual games and occupations of childhood; and yet the belief in His supernatural dignity is evidenced by the extraordinary Miracles attributed to Him, and by His astonishing knowledge, which drew the confession from His teacher: ‘This child is not earthborn; assuredly he was born before the creation of the world’ (ch
Christianity - " Such evidence it has afforded in its splendid train of Miracles; in its numerous appeals to the fulfilment of ancient PROPHECIES; in its own powerful INTERNAL evidence; in the INFLUENCE which it has always exercised, and continues to exert, upon the happiness of mankind; and in various collateral circumstances. Under the heads of Miracles and Prophecy, those important branches of evidence will be discussed, and to them the reader is referred. ...
It is only necessary here to say, that the Miracles to which Christianity appeals as proofs of its divine authority, are not only those which were wrought by Christ and his Apostles, but also those which took place among the patriarchs, under the law of Moses, and by the ministry of the Prophets; for the religion of those ancient times was but Christianity in its antecedent revelations. All these Miracles, therefore, must be taken collectively, and present attestations of the loftiest kind, as being manifestly the work of the "finger of God," wrought under circumstances which precluded mistake, and exhibiting an immense variety, from the staying of the very wheels of the planetary system,—as when the sun and moon paused in their course, and the shadow on the dial of Ahaz went backward,—to the supernatural changes wrought upon the elements of matter, the healing of incurable diseases, the expulsion of tormenting demons, and the raising of the dead. Magnificent as this array of Miracles is, it is equalled by the prophetic evidence, founded upon the acknowledged principle, that future and distant contingencies can only be known to that Being, one of whose attributes is an absolute prescience
Rock - Besides this natural marvel, we have the Miracles of Exodus 17:6 , Numbers 20:8 etc
Ste'Phen, - First, he arrests attention by the "great wonders and Miracles that he did
Thomas - The case of Thomas does not sanction but condemns skepticism, for if others were to demand the same tangible visible proofs as Thomas demanded Miracles would have to be so continual as to cease to be miraculous, and sight would supersede faith
Cross - 326, is: Helena the empress, mother of Constantine, then nearly 80 years old, made a pilgrimage to the holy places, and there, by help of a Jew who understood her superstitious tastes, found three crosses, among which Christ's cross was recognized by its power of working Miracles, at the suggestion of Macarius, bishop of Jerusalem
Inspiration - The Christian life as such is an inspired life, but the operation of the Spirit is represented in the NT in two forms; there are the extraordinary gifts (charisms) speaking with tongues, interpreting tongues, prophecy, Miracles ( Psalms 104:30 ), all of which St
Leaven - The meaning is essentially the same as in Mark, but Mark's sensitivity to the struggle of the disciples to perceive Jesus' identity as symbolized in the two process Miracles is not present in Matthew
Glory - Thus, God's glory is seen in the plagues and other Miracles (Numbers 14:22 ), in the cloudy pillar (Exodus 16:10 ), in the theophany at Mount Sinai (Exodus 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 5:24 ), in the tabernacle (Exodus 29:43 ; 40:34-35 ; Numbers 14:10 ; 16:19,42 ; 20:6 ), in the fire initiating the sacrificial system (Leviticus 9:23 ), and in the ark of the covenant (1 Samuel 4:21-22 ) and the temple of Solomon (1 Kings 8:11 ; 2 Chronicles 7:1-3 )
Elijah (2) - Here Jesus justifies His performance of Miracles in Capernaum, while refraining from working them in Nazareth, by citing the well-known story of Elijah’s going away from Israel in time of famine to relieve the distress of a Sidonian widow (1 Kings 17:8-9)
Germanus, Saint, Bishop of Auxerre - A metrical Life and a prose account of his "miracles," both by a monk named Hereric, are in Acta Sanctorum , July 31
Antichrist - Here again we read that he will do great wonders, making fire come down from heaven, with other signs or Miracles
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - --So far as their predictive powers are concerned, the Old Testament prophets find their New Testament counterpart in the writer of the Apocalypse; but in their general character, as specially illumined revealers of God's will, their counterpart will rather be found, first in the great Prophet of the Church and his forerunner, John the Baptist, and next in all those persons who were endowed with the extraordinary gifts of the Spirit in the apostolic age, the speakers with tongues and the interpreters of tongues, the prophets and the discerners of spirits, the teachers and workers of Miracles
Jacobus, Bishop of Nisibis - His episcopate, according to Theodoret, was signalized by fresh Miracles
Jesus Christ - ...
(2) On His Miracles (John 7:31; John 5:36; John 10:25; John 10:38). Miracles alleged in opposition, or addition, to Scripture cannot prove a divine mission (2 Thessalonians 2:9; Deuteronomy 13:1-3; Matthew 24:24), but when confirmed by Scripture they prove it indisputably. (On His Miracles, see Miracles and on His parables, see PARABLES
Apocrypha - The Infancy Gospel of Thomas narrates Jesus' childhood from age five to age twelve, with the child Jesus performing numerous Miracles, sometimes to the point of absurdity (e. First, they are filled with supernatural deeds: Miracles abound, especially the raising of the dead, and even a talking lion gets baptized
Walk (2) - No passage in the Gospels is more significant of the character, or more persuasive of the credibility, of our Lord’s Miracles of healing than this. Immanence; Westcott, Characteristics of the Gospel Miracles; Hatch and Redpath, Concordance to the LXX Septuagint
Evil (2) - Three of His most striking recorded Miracles were victories over death (Mark 5:41, Luke 7:14, John 11:43); and His own resurrection, according to the energetie expression of the Apostle, ‘abolished death, and brought life and incorruption to light’ (2 Timothy 1:10). ’ The preaching of the Kingdom of God and the emancipation of mankind from the devil’s thraldom were consequently accompanied by an extensive ministry of healing, and Christ appealed to His Miracles as evidence that ‘the kingdom of God is come upon you’ (Luke 11:20)
Balaam - What conviction was frequently wrought upon the minds of the Jews, when beholding the Miracles of Christ. But yet, what lasting effect did that conviction ultimately produce! He who well knew the human heart, void of sovereign grace, hath left it upon record as an unerring conclusion, that where the word of God is despised and set at nought, no higher evidences, even of Miracles, will succeed: "If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither would they be persuaded, though one should rise from the dead
Black People And Biblical Perspectives - Black sermonic themes from those days until the 1950's emphasized God's deliverance as illustrated in Daniel and “the Hebrew Boys”; Ezekiel and the Valley of Dry Bones; the messianic passages of the prophets; the Miracles of Jesus; His death, burial, and power over death
Forgiveness - The Pharisees refused to see the merciful hand of God in the work of Jesus, and rather attributed His Miracles to the power of Satan
Resurrection of Christ - It must be supposed that ten thousand Miracles were wrought in favour of falsehood, or all these facts must be denied; and then it must be supposed that the apostles were idiots; that the enemies of Christianity were idiots; and that all the primitive Christians were idiots
Parables - The crowds that followed Jesus were often a hindrance, as many of the people were more interested in seeing him perform Miracles than in making a spiritual response to his ministry
Witness - In Acts 14:3; Acts 15:8 Miracles are taken to be the means by which the preaching of Christ among the Gentiles is so attested (cf
Rahab (1) - Hebrews 11:31; "by faith the harlot Rahab perished not with them that disobeyed not (apeitheesasin , God's will manifested by Miracles in Israel's behalf) when she had received the spies in peace," i
Servant of the Lord, the - This led the early church to pray that as God's servants they would speak with boldness and perform Miracles through the name of “your holy servant Jesus” ( Acts 4:29-30 NIV)
Loneliness - Similarly, He was extremely anxious that His Miracles should not become known (Luke 5:13, Matthew 8:4, Mark 8:26; Mark 9:9; the chief exception, where there were special reasons, is in Mark 5:19)
Work, Wrought - (6) In Matthew 14:2 ; Mark 6:14 , AV, dunameis, "powers," RV, is translated "mighty works;" in Acts 2:22 , RV, "mighty works," AV, "miracles
Simon Magus - And Simon also himself believed: and being baptized, he continued with Philip; and beholding signs and great Miracles wrought, he was amazed. (a) The Gnostic Acts (Actus Petri cum Simone) tell that after Paul left Rome, a stir arose in the city about a Simon who worked Miracles and called himself the Great Power of God. By the aid of further Miracles Peter silenced Simon till a public controversy was arranged before all Rome. Peter raised the dead, and exposed Simon’s attempts to work similar Miracles. ’ And Simon is said to have been specially struck with the ‘signs and great Miracles’ wrought by Philip (Acts 8:13)
Criticism - But it is not too much to say that an explanation of the miraculous which is often akin to the crude exegesis of Paulus, meets us not infrequently in Strauss himself and in much more recent attempts to prove that Miracles did not happen. ]'>[16] He blames Renan for passing so lightly over the inquiries of a man like Baur as to the origin of our Gospels; and he points out that Renan’s half-and-half treatment of these same Gospels, especially of the Gospel of John, avenges itself upon him, in that it leads him on from half-rationalistic explanations of the Miracles to explanations which are adopted even at the cost of the moral perfection of Jesus. Of course the earlier Renan placed the Gospels, the more difficult it was for him to account for the Miracles which gathered around Jesus; and it is not too much to say that the earliest Gospel, St. Thus he is prepared to admit that the Miracles of healing may have happened in response to the faith evoked by the peraonality of Jesus, or he is thrown back in his treatment of the miraculous upon the old rationalistic methods; the atory, e. But whatever may have been the case with Ritschl himself, it can scarcely be said that his method has prevented those who claim in some measure to be his followers from dealing very loosely with the Gospel Miracles, or with such events as the Virgin-birth and the Resurrection of the Lord
Mission - —While the regeneration of men was His first concern, His numerous Miracles evince His care for man’s physical needs. Messengers came from the Machaerus prison, saying, ‘John the Baptist hath sent us unto thee, saying, Art thou he that cometh, or look we for another?’ In that hour Jesus wrought Miracles which He adduced, together with His habit of announcing good tidings to the poor, as proofs of His Messiahship (Luke 7:18-22). While the Miracles were wrought in pure kindness, they afforded evidences to the thoughtful of the validity of Christ’s claims (John 3:2; John 7:31; John 10:37-38; John 14:11; John 15:24), and they were intended by the Lord to give assurance to men of His redeeming grace (Mark 2:10-11)
Gospel - The second crisis involved the passing away of the generation of people who had actually seen Jesus in the flesh, heard His teachings, and witnessed His Miracles. The exorcisms and other Miracles were evidence to Roman Christians being victimized by evil that Jesus could deliver them just as He delivered the demoniac or healed the blind man at Bethsaida (Mark 5:1-20 ; Mark 8:22-26 ). The constant reference to Miracles as “signs,” the “I am” speeches, and the total exclusion of story-like parables also set John apart from the other three
Diseases - A large number of the Miracles described in the Bible are Miracles of healing. There can be no doubt that the ability of Jesus to perform Miracles is seen most vividly in His healing ministry
Word - The Fourth Gospel recounts seven sign Miracles of Jesus (2:1-11; 4:46-54; 5:1-9; 6:5-14; 6:19-21; 9:1-7; 11:1-44). As "signs" these Miracles indicate the importance of what Jesus did in conjunction with understanding him as the preincarnate word of God. Jesus performed these Miracles through his spoken word
Inspiration - The matter of them, the spirituality and elevation of their design, the majesty and simplicity of their style, the agreement of their various parts; their wonderful efficacy on mankind; the candour, disinterestedness, and uprightness of the penmen; their astonishing preservation; the multitude of Miracles wrought in confirmation of the doctrines they contain, and the exact fulfillment of their predictions, prove this. At the close of this period, or rather several years after it, when they wrote their Gospels, we may be certain that they had forgotten many of his discourses and Miracles; that they recollected others indistinctly; and that they would have been in danger or producing an inaccurate and unfair account, by confounding one thing with another. A divine influence, therefore, must have been exerted on their minds, by which their memories and judgments were strengthened, and they were enabled to relate the doctrines and Miracles of their Master in a manner the best fitted to impress the readers of their histories
Jesus Christ - his teachings, healings, Miracles and other recorded activities) and the third centres on the events of his death and resurrection. ...
Likewise Jesus’ Miracles were directed towards revealing who he was, though in a way designed to lead people to saving faith (John 5:19; Luke 4:18; John 9:16-17; John 20:30-31; see Miracles)
Majesty (2) - the ἐποίει which critical editors substitute for ἐποίησεν of Textus Receptus , seems to show that the Miracles of Christ generally are to be thought of as producing this impression that the Divine μεγαλειότης was manifesting itself through Him. ...
With this idea of Christ’s Miracles, or of His miraculous being, as an effulgence of the Divine splendour or magnificence, compare the statement of John 2:11 that by the miracle of Cana Jesus ‘manifested his glory’ (ἐφανέρωσε τὴν δόξαν αὐτοῦ)
Evangelist (2) - Teaching and specific teaching regarding the addresses delivered by Jesus and the Miracles He performed was a characteristic of the evangelist from the first, hence there is little difficulty in realizing how the title passed from those who related to those who wrote our Lord’s life, the latter meaning being only the natural development of the former. Beyond all doubt most of the addresses delivered by the evangelists were largely occupied by an account of the career of Jesus, and especially of His sayings and His Miracles; but this was true of every person who sought to propagate Christianity, and not distinctive of the evangelist as such
Plagues of Egypt - And therefore to point out a connexion between some of the ‘miracles’ of Scripture and ‘natural phenomena’ does not eliminate from them the Divine element; it rather transfigures an unreasoning ‘faith in the impossible’ into a faith which recognizes the ‘finger of God’ in everything. Considered from the point of view of natural phenomena, the narratives teach the all-important truth that God’s providential care of men is not confined to ‘miracles’ in the commonly accepted sense of the term, else were God’s providential actions unknown to-day
Martinus, Saint, Bishop of Tours - Gregory of Tours devotes 3 books out of his 7 on Miracles to those wrought by the relics of St. Martin believed that his power of working Miracles and of relieving the oppressed was diminished ever after this unfortunate event
Providence - Sometimes God effects His will directly through Miracles or other supernatural happenings
Goodness - The same spirit marks the greater number of the Miracles
Antonius - ...
Beyond these encounters and powers of exorcism it is not clear how far and in what manner Anthony believed himself able to work Miracles
Antichrist - He is also by the early Church writers sometimes identified with the false Jewish Messiah, who was to work Miracles, rebuild the Temple, and establish a great empire with demons as his agents
Synagogue - ...
It was the custom of the Lord to visit the synagogues, and in them He wrought some of His Miracles and taught the people
Praise - ” This meaning is in the word’s first biblical appearance: “Who is like unto thee, O Lord, among the gods? Who is like thee, glorious in holiness, fearful in praises [1]8, doing wonders [4]?” ( Pilate - It appears by what Justin says of these acts, that the Miracles of Christ were mentioned there, and even that the soldiers had divided his garments among them
Apostle - These Miracles were evidence that they were truly Christ’s apostles (Acts 3:12; Acts 3:16; Acts 4:10; Acts 5:12; cf
Faith - ...
Sometimes the Bible speaks of faith in the special sense of trust in God to do something unusual or supernatural (Matthew 9:22; Matthew 9:28; Matthew 17:19-20; Mark 2:5; Mark 9:23; Luke 7:9; Luke 8:25; James 5:14-15; see DISEASE; Miracles; PRAYER)
Macrina, the Younger - After her death many Miracles said to have been performed by her were reported to Gregory ( ib
Emperor-Worship - Stories of portents and Miracles at his birth grew with the years. Verses 13-15 add to our knowledge the fact that pseudo-miracles were practised by the priests of Caesarism. The Miracles in question were the familiar accomplishments of the priests of many faiths-fire-producing and ventriloquism; and, as Ramsay shows (op
Gospels, Apocryphal - They abound in accounts of alleged Miracles, the purpose of which is often trivial, and sometimes even malicious. It includes also an account of the Annunciation and the visit of Mary to Elisabeth, of the trial by ordeal of Joseph and Mary on the charge of having been secretly married, of the birth of Jesus in a cave, and accompanying Miracles of the most extravagant sort. ’ The Miracles which it narrates are probably the most fantastic of all in the Gospels of the infancy of Jesus. The account abounds in Miracles of the most irrational sort, and it finally culminates in the removal of Mary’s ‘spotless and precious body’ to Paradise
Messiah - The kind of Miracles that Messiah should perform is specified; Is. He actually performed the Miracles there predicted, his enemies themselves being judges. In the same year an Arabian set up there for the Messiah, and pretended to work Miracles. He added, that Nathan, his forerunner, who had wrought many Miracles, would soon be at Smyrna; that he would reveal hidden things to them, and confirm them
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - Actions are not strictly determined by a deus ex machina through the medium of Miracles or charismatic leaders as before, but by human designs. In fact, one of the great theological contributions of Kings is to emphasize the working of God in the Solomonic succession, not through direct divine intervention, Miracles, prophets, or sacred institutions, but through ordinary personalities and individuals working in the secular sphere
Kenosis - His Miracles do not prove omnipotence, as they were wrought in dependence on, with prayer to, God (Mark 9:29, Hebrews 4:15), were restrained by unbelief (Matthew 13:58), seemingly involved physical strain (Mark 5:30), and sometimes were accompanied by means of cure (Mark 7:33-34; see The Expositor, 6th series, vol. , ‘The Function of the Miracles’)
Multitude - The people never became so familiar with His Miracles as to take them as a matter of course. At other times we read that, attracted by His teaching and His Miracles, ‘all the city was gathered together at the door’ (Mark 1:33); ‘they came from every quarter’ (Mark 1:45); their attendance was so persistent that Jesus and the disciples ‘could not so much as eat bread’ (Mark 3:20); it was necessary to address them from the boat (Matthew 13:2); they brought their sick and maimed to Him (Matthew 15:31, Mark 1:32); they pressed upon Him and heard the word of God (Luke 5:1); and their rapt attention to His preaching, even during the last days at Jerusalem, is described by St
Providence - It is in this confidence that He turns to His Father for power to work His Miracles—miracles which in turn become signs that His trust in God’s providence was not misplaced
John, the Gospel According to - Well called "the Gospel of the incarnate God," "the Gospel of witness," that of the Father, that of Scripture, that of Miracles, that of Jesus Himself. His disciples' vacillation arose from the conflict between faith resulting from His Miracles and disappointment at His not openly setting up His Messianic kingdom
Prophesy - The “prophet” or dreamer of dreams might perform Miracles to demonstrate that he was God’s man, but the people were to look to the message rather than the miracle before they heeded his message ( Transmigration - All that is necessary to assume is that the remorse-stricken Herod saw in the Miracles reported of Jesus that John the Baptist had risen from the dead
Mark, Gospel of - He illustrated the nature of that kingdom by dealing with critics (3:20-35), telling parables (4:1-34), overcoming storms, evil spirits, sickness, hunger and death (4:35-6:56), demanding moral rather than ceremonial cleanliness (7:1-23), and demonstrating by teachings and Miracles the importance of faith (7:24-8:26)
Satan - Paul spoke of his being sent to turn people "from the power of Satan to God" (Acts 26:18 ), and that the works of the "lawless one (were) in accordance with the work of Satan, " in doing sham Miracles, signs, and wonders (2 Thessalonians 2:9 )
Sight - Taylor on Miracles
Dereliction - He had a unique acquaintance with the Father’s purposes, but He had this because the Father showed Him all things which He did (John 5:20); He had marvellous wisdom, but it was the Father’s gift (John 7:16-17): ‘the word which ye hear is not mine, but the Father’s that sent me’ (John 14:24); He wrought Miracles, but of Himself He could do nothing (John 5:30): ‘the Father abiding in me doeth his works’ (John 14:10)
Basket (2) - Yet Trench (Miracles, p
Blindness (2) - Is it not enough for all practical purposes to hold the substantial accuracy of the Evangelic narrative without troubling ourselves about those minute divergences which occur in different versions of the same event narrated by the most trustworthy witnesses?...
The Miracles recorded in Matthew 12:22 and John 9 stand by themselves as having a very close relation to the teaching of Jesus which follows
Nazareth - But because his countrymen had no faith in him, and were offended at the meanness of his original, he did not many Miracles here, Matthew 13:54 ; Matthew 13:58 , nor would he dwell in the city
Messiah - In the same year, an Arabian professed to be the messiah, and pretended to work Miracles
Jericho - Our Saviour wrought Miracles at Jericho
Prophets - Their messages were delivered to the kings, princes, and priests whom they most concerned, or to the people at large, in writing, or by word of mouth and in public places; often with Miracles, or with symbolic actions designed to explain and enforce them, Isaiah 20:1-6 Jeremiah 7:2 19:1-15 Ezekiel 3:10
pe'Ter - Peter did not live, as a mere laboring man, in a hut by the seaside, but first at Bethsaida, and afterward in a house at Capernaum belonging to himself or his mother-in-law, which must have been rather a large one, since he received in it not only our Lord and his fellow disciples, but multitudes who were attracted by the Miracles and preaching of Jesus
Luke, Gospel of - After the appointment of twelve apostles (6:12-19), there are further teachings (6:20-49), Miracles of compassion (7:1-17), explanations to John’s disciples (7:18-35) and demonstrations of forgiveness and devotion (7:36-50)
Rabbulas, Bishop of Edessa - The panegyrist attributes it to his intercourse with Eusebius of Chalcis and Acacius of Beroea, and to two remarkable Miracles witnessed by him
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - ‘The Jews’ demanded Miracles, ‘the Greeks’ a philosophy; this Gospel, like St. —on the contrary, the Miracles which he records are more startling than anything in the Synoptics,—but no stress is laid on any physical portent as momentous in and for itself, or as evidence, apart from its symbolical value as a type of the Person, work, and office of Christ. ...
The number of Miracles is much reduced; but those which are given are representative, and in some cases are more tremendous than those of the Synoptics. The number 7 recurs in the number of the Miracles (omitting ch
Ambrosius of Milan - ...
We must take into account the state of mind brought about in the bishop and his flock by that protracted vigil in the basilica, when we read of the Miracles into which their triumph over heresy blazed forth. Miracles crowded thick upon one another. Ambrose himself, for once, eagerly and positively affirms the reality of the cure; and Augustine, who generally held that the age of Miracles was past, also bears witness to the common acceptance of the fact at Milan. Unhappily this biographer spoils with his childish Miracles what is still a touching account of the good bishop's death
Christ in Jewish Literature - The former is a coarse interpretation of the Christian assertion that Jesus was not the son of Joseph, while the latter is due to His reputation as a worker of Miracles, and to the undoubted fact that He had created a serious dissension amongst the adherents of the Jewish religion. By the help of this he worked Miracles, and proclaimed himself the Son of God, born of a virgin. The queen of Jerusalem, Helena, believed in him, by reason of the Miracles. He learned the Name, worked Miracles; and, having thus gained the confidence of the followers of Jesus, proclaimed to them, in his name, new laws of religion
Prophecy - Prophecy (with the power of working Miracles) may be considered as the highest evidence that can be given of a supernatural communion with the Deity. "As God is invisible and spiritual, there was cause to fear, that, in the first and ruder ages of the world, when men were busier in cultivating the earth than in cultivating arts and sciences, and in seeking the necessaries of life than in the study of morality, they might forget their Creator and Governor; and, therefore, God maintained amongst them the great article of faith in him, by manifestations of himself; by sending angels to declare his will; by Miracles, and by prophecies. " As it respects us, prophecy connected with Miracles affords a considerable evidence of the truth of revelation, as well as of a superintending Providence
Acts of the Apostles (2) - Thus the Exalted Christ, working Miracles from heaven by His name (Acts 2:33-366), accredited by the miracle of the resurrection, and destined to come again with judgment and salvation, occupies the central point of the faith of our author. Through this Spirit the exalted Lord is ever present with His own; He imparts power and success to the words of the Apostles (Acts 2:37, Acts 5:33, Acts 6:5); and Miracles are wrought by the power of God (Acts 6:8). It is noteworthy, however, that it is only rarely that the Spirit of God is introduced in this connexion; far more frequently it is the Name of Christ that, like a present representative of the Lord, works Miracles (Acts 3:16, Acts 4:30)
Demon - God performed extraordinary Miracles through Paul in Ephesus, including the expulsion of demons (19:11-12). Demons seek to influence Christians through false doctrines and teachings (1 Timothy 4:1 ; 1 John 4:1-4 ) as well as false Miracles and wonders (2 Thessalonians 2:7-11 ; Revelation 16:14 )
James - What Miracles in renewing the heart does the gospel work! Salome the mother of Zebedee's children, impressed by Christ's promise that the twelve should sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel, begged, and her two sons joined in the prayer, that they might sit one on His right the other on His left hand in His glory (Mark 10:35-37). They looked for a reigning Messiah, and thought Jesus' Miracles were wrought with a view to this end: "depart hence (from obscure Galilee) and go into Judea, that Thy disciples also may see the works that Thou doest, for there is no man that doeth anything in secret and (yet) he himself seeketh to be known openly (which they take for granted He seeks); if Thou do these things, show Thyself to the world
Croisade, or Crusade - The foundation of them was a superstitious veneration for those places where our Saviour performed his Miracles, and accomplished the work of man's redemption. they soon found themselves obliged to obtain by plunder what they vainly expected from Miracles: and the enraged inhabitants of the countries through which they passed attacked the disorderly multitude, and slaughtered them without resistance
Disease - The attempt, however, to show (1) that our Lord’s healings may be all reduced to cases of hysteria and of temporary nervous disorder, such as readily yield to treatment by known therapeutic remedies, and (2) that these are the best attested of the Miracles, signally fails (see art. Miracles); and yet it may be freely recognized that many of the ailments cured by Jesus belonged to the nervous category
Kingdom of God - ...
To reassure John, Jesus pointed out that the Miracles of healing he performed were in keeping with the Old Testament prophecies concerning the Messiah’s mission. His kingdom had begun (Mark 4:26-297; see MESSIAH; Miracles)
Fig Tree - So that here was no real injury; but Jesus was pleased to make use of this innocent miracle to prefigure the speedy ruin of the Jewish nation on account of its unfruitfulness under greater advantages than any other people enjoyed at that day; and, like all the rest of his Miracles, it was done with a gracious intention, namely, to alarm his countrymen, and induce them to repent
Prayer - God worked Miracles through the prayers of Elijah and Elisha (1 Kings 17:19-22 ; 1 Kings 18:20-40 )
Reserve - And for that end the appeal of all His activities, Miracles of help and healing and words of teaching, was single
Waterpot - Miracles, and Com
Wisdom of Christ - Colossians 4:5); probably also His power of working Miracles (Mark 6:2, cf
Zacharias - Thus, on the threshold of the Gospel, at the very outset of its great series of Miracles, is unbelief chastised
Offices in the New Testament - Performing Miracles, healing, helping, and speaking in tongues (1 Corinthians 12:28 ) are among the other tasks mentioned for which God has supplied spiritual gifts
Perseverance - As apostle, in both the synagogues and to Gentile audiences, he persisted, God working through him signs, wonders, and Miracles
Prophet, Christ as - ...
When Jesus began to perform his Miracles, the crowds of that first Christian century exclaimed, "Surely this is the Prophet who is to come into the world" (John 6:14 )
Thankfulness, Thanksgiving - Yet the crowds that surrounded Jesus often repeated Israel's sin at the exodus, by gobbling up the bread Jesus multiplied and enjoying his Miracles without expressing gratitude (John 6:22-24 )
Dropsy - 328; Trench and Taylor on Miracles; Encyc
Sign - Only CHRIST JESUS can do either or both of these blessed Miracles in our lives today
Pharisees - Of this number was Saul of Tarsus; but as a body, their attachment to traditions, their passionate expectation of deliverance from the Roman yoke by the Messiah, and the splendour of his civil reign, their pride, and above all their vices, sufficiently account for that unconquerable unbelief which had possessed their minds as to the claims of Christ, and their resistance to the evidence of his Miracles
Judaizing Christians - When, accordingly, Christ appeared in the humblest condition of life, and when, after the commencement of his ministry, he declared, that the hopes of empire which his countrymen had long cherished were fallacious, the predictions on which they had been rested suggesting, when combined with other predictions, a very different view of the designs of the Almighty, they were filled with indignation, and the greater part of them, although they saw the Miracles which Jesus wrought, and heard those appeals to their own Scriptures which, however eager to do so, they found themselves unable to confute, rejected his pretensions on account of the meanness of his situation, and reprobated him as a deceiver of the people
Scribes - But when he converses with Nicodemus, John 3, who appears to have been convinced by his Miracles that he was "a teacher sent from God," when he came to Jesus by night," anxious to obtain farther information concerning his nature and his doctrine, our Lord, after intimating the necessity of laying aside all prejudices against the spiritual nature of his kingdom, asks, "Art thou a master in Israel, and knowest not these things?" that is, knowest not that Moses and the prophets describe the Messiah as the Son of God? and he then proceeds to explain in very clear language the dignity of his person and office, and the purpose for which he came into the world, referring to the predictions of the ancient Scriptures
Galilee - A storm of this description is plainly denoted by the language of the evangelist, in recounting one of our Lord's Miracles: "There came down a storm of wind on the lake, and they were filled with water, and were in jeopardy
Paul - When we review the many regions he traversed and evangelized, the converts he gathered, and the churches he founded, the toils, perils, and trials he endured, the Miracles he wrought, and the revelations he received, the discourses, orations, and letters in which he so ably defends and unfolds Christianity, the immeasurable good which God by him accomplished, his heroic life, and his martyr death, he appears to us the most extraordinary of men
Inspiration - "...
When once it is admitted that the New Testament writers were neither fanatics nor enthusiasts, (and infidelity has never yet produced a satisfactory theory to show them to have been either,) their Miracles and their divine commission must also be admitted, for they expressly claim these. His appeal on the ground of Miracles (1 Corinthians 2:4) which are taken for granted as notorious rather than asserted, (the incidental mention being a clear mark of truth because it excludes suspicion of design,) and to persons whose miraculous discernment of spirits enabled them to test such claims, is the strongest proof of the divine authority of his writings
Unbelief - Christ could not do many mighty works in his own country, because of their unbelief, Matthew 6:5-6 ; their mean opinion of him, and contempt of his Miracles, rendered them unfit objects to have Miracles wrought upon or among them
Exodus, the Book of - Then his unbelieving hesitancy at the divine call and pertinacious allegation of personal incapacity in spite of the Miracles which might have convinced him of God's power to qualify him (Exodus 3:10-13). The Miracles severally suit the place, the time, and the circumstances under which they are stated to have been wrought; the plagues are essentially Egyptian; the supply of Israel's wants in the wilderness is in harmony with the national characteristics of the country
Witness (2) - ’ It would, doubtless, be a grave mistake to regard Christ’s word, ‘The works which the Father hath given me to accomplish, the very works that I do, bear witness of me, that the Father hath sent me,’ as meaning only His Miracles. Miracles, Resurrection of Christ, and Sign
Entry Into Jerusalem - The Messiah was not to come from Galilee but from Bethlehem (Matthew 2:5), was king of the Jews (Matthew 2:2), was to perform Miracles (John 7:31), to be a prophet (John 4:29), to appear mysteriously (John 7:27), to be a descendant of David (Matthew 9:27), and to restore again the kingdom to Israel (Acts 1:6). , and by their testimony to His Miracles, generally connected with a prophet
Ministry, Minister - ); ministry of healing (workers of Miracles, gifts of healing, etc
Manifestation - There were no Miracles, no strange exhibitions of unseen powers, no external signs that led the men of Nazareth to mark out that home as being specially remarkable
Abgar - 13) relates, without any suggestion of scepticism, that ‘king Abgar, who ruled with great glory the nations beyond the Euphrates, being afflicted with a terrible disease which it was beyond the power of human skill to cure, when he heard of the name of Jesus and His Miracles, … sent a message to Him by a courier and begged Him to heal the disease
Arnobius - He records apocryphal Miracles as evangelical (i
Elijah - It may be noted however that the Miracles had a judicial character
Almsgiving - again exhibits all Christ’s Miracles as so many charities (e
Elijah - It may be noted however that the Miracles had a judicial character
Pity Compassion - It is perhaps different, as regards the latter element, in the Miracles of the Gospels
Vigilantius - ...
The points against which he argues are four: (1) The superstitious reverence paid to the remains of holy men, which were carried round in the church assemblies in gold vessels or silken wrappings to be kissed, and the prayers in which their intercession was asked; (2) the late and frequent watchings at the basilicas of the martyrs, from which scandals constantly arose, the burning of numerous tapers, which was a heathen practice, the stress laid on the Miracles performed at the shrines, which, Vigilantius maintained, were of use only to unbelievers; (3) the sending of alms to Jerusalem, which might better have been given to the poor in each diocese, and generally the monkish habit of divesting oneself of possessions which should be administered as a trust by the possessor; and (4) the special virtue attributed to the unmarried state
Revelation (2) - Miracles were the appropriate credentials of revelation, which could not be guaranteed as objectively valid without them. Mozley put forward the same view in a well-known passage in his Bampton Lectures (On Miracles, p. ’ Taking this view of Miracles and of revelation, it has been sought to distinguish natural from revealed religion by the circumstance that miraculous signs are not needed to guarantee the truth of the former, which commends itself at once to man’s reason, while they are necessary to confirm our belief in the doctrines of the latter, which are not discoverable by our unassisted faculties, and which may be surprising and even unwelcome to faith
Holy Spirit (2) - It must be spiritual (in the complete Christian sense) in its nature—not based on bread; spiritual in its methods—not appealing to Miracles which only dazzle the senses or confound the mind; and spiritual in its resources—not deriving any of its strength from alliance with Satan, from borrowing the help of the evil which wields such vast power among men, or from recognizing that it has a relative or temporary right to exist. But all His Miracles are to be understood in this connexion. ...
If, then, we try to sum up the oldest Evangelic representation, we can hardly say more than that the Holy Spirit is the Divine power which from His baptism onward wrought in Jesus, making Him mighty in word and deed—a power the character of which is shown by the teaching and by the saving Miracles of Jesus—a power to which the sanctity of God attached, so that it is Divine also in the ethical sense, and to blaspheme it is the last degree of sin—a power in which Jesus enabled His disciples to some extent to sha
Moses - ...
To vouch his divine commission to the Israelites, God enabled Moses to work three signal Miracles:...
1. This prophet like unto Moses was our Lord Jesus Christ, who was by birth a Jew, of the middle class of the people, and resembled his predecessor, in personal intercourse with God, Miracles, and legislation, which no other prophet did, Deuteronomy 34:10-12 ; and to whom God, at his transfiguration, required the world to hearken, Matthew 17:5 . " He powerfully appealed to the long-tried mercies and forgivenesses they had experienced ever since their departure from Egypt; and his energetic supplication prevailed; for the Lord graciously said, "I have pardoned, according to thy word: but verily, as I live, all the earth shall be filled with the glory of the Lord;" or shall adore him for his righteous judgments; "for all these men which, have seen my glory and my Miracles which I did in Egypt, and in the wilderness, and have tempted me these ten times, and have not hearkened to my voice, surely shall not see the land which I sware unto their fathers: neither shall any of them that provoked me see it
Matthew, the Gospel According to - Events in order, proving His claim to Messiahship by Miracles (Matthew 8-9). Appointment of apostles; doubts of John's disciples; cavils of the Pharisees; on the other hand His loving invitations, Miracles, series of parables on the kingdom; effects of His ministry on Herod and various classes; prophecy to His disciples of His coming death (Matthew 10 - 18:35)
Leadership - Their purpose was to be with him and then to go out to preach (Mark 3:14 ) and to do Miracles (Matthew 10:7 ). They continued to do Miracles of healing and exorcism of demons (Acts 5:12 ; 2 Corinthians 12:12 )
Helena, Saint, Mother of Constantine the Great - He mentions two Miracles: the healing of a woman with an incurable disease and the raising of a corpse, combining the other accounts; and adds that the greater part of the cross was still preserved at Jerusalem (H. 595) adds that discovery was made on May 3, 326; that, during a great storm which occurred soon after, Helena put one of the nails into the sea, which was at once calmed; that two more were used for the emperor's bridle, and the fourth placed on the head of his statue; that the lance, crown of thorns, and pillar of scourging were preserved and worked Miracles (Lib
Prophet - Miracles without these criteria are not infallible proof (Deuteronomy 13). The details as to Messiah scattered through so many prophets, yet all converging in Him, the race, nation, tribe, family, birthplace, Miracles, humiliation, death, crucifixion with the wicked yet association with the rich at death, resurrection, extension of His seed the church, are so numerous that their minute conformity with the subsequent fact can only be explained by believing that the prophets were moved by the Holy Spirit to foretell the event
Devil - There is nothing wrong in our using the word "lunacy" for madness; but if we described its cure as the moon's ceasing to afflict, or if the doctor addressed the moon commanding it to leave the patient alone, it would be a lie (Trench, Miracles, 153)
Remnant - The exodus from the exile, like the exodus from Egypt, was accompanied with Miracles (Isaiah 11:11-16 )
Moses - In his long life he also acted on behalf of God to bring into being an enduring nation, while functioning as a prophet, judge, recorder of God's pronouncements, intercessor, military leader, worker of Miracles, and tireless shepherd of the unruly Israelite tribes
Elisha - ...
Two more Miracles followed
Mennonites - He expressed his abhorrence of the licentious tenets which several of the Anabaptists had maintained with respect to the lawfulness of polygamy and divorce; and, finally, considered as unworthy of toleration those fanatics who were of opinion, that the holy Ghost continued to descend into the minds of many chosen believers, in as extraordinary a manner as he did at the first establishment of the Christian church, and that he testified his peculiar presence to several of the faithful, by Miracles, predictions, dreams, and visions of various kinds
Thessalonians, Epistles to the - When He is gone and the church with Him, the lawless one will be fully revealed as after the working of Satan, with Miracles and wonders and unrighteous deceit in them that perish, who would not receive the love of the truth that they might be saved
Samaria - Here those holy men of God, Elijah and Elisha, spoke their tremendous warnings in the ears of their incorrigible rulers, and wrought their Miracles in the sight of all the people
Sinai - But what had the beauty and softness of nature to do here? Mount Sinai required an approach like this, where all seemed to proclaim the land of Miracles, and to have been visited by the terrors of the Lord
Children - ...
A number of His Miracles, worked for the benefit of the young, illustrate His compassion for their sufferings and ills. Thus is rounded out a series of Miracles in which our Lord shows His pity to the growing youth of every stage of development
Christ, Christology - It was in the name of ‘Jesus’ that they taught (Acts 4:18), and in the same name that they wrought Miracles. The Miracles of Jesus Himself were not ascribed to His independent initiative; they were wonders which ‘God did by him’ (Acts 2:22); and the explanation of His power which is given elsewhere (Acts 10:38) is that God had anointed Him with the Holy Ghost, and that God ‘was with him’ (Acts 10:38)
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - ; the latter being often from our Lord's parables, Miracles, etc. It discourses also upon the world, the origin of evil, angels, man, the soul, and senses of the flesh, Christ and the Holy Spirit, the church and heresies, the heathen nations, the law, seven rules or principles for the understanding of Scripture, the difference between the two Testaments, symbol and prayer, baptism and communion, martyrdom, the Miracles wrought by the saints, Antichrist and his works, the resurrection and judgment, hell, the punishment of the wicked, and the glory of the just
Benedictus of Nursia, Abbott of Monte Cassino - Several of the Miracles ascribed to Benedict are connected with Subiaco
Monastery - There were other causes that concurred to bring on their ruin: many of the religious were loose and vicious; the monks were generally thought to be in their hearts attached to the pope's supremacy; their revenues were not employed according to the intent of the donors; many cheats in images, feigned Miracles, and counterfeit relics, had been discovered, which brought the monks into disgrace; the observant friars had opposed the king's divorce from queen Catharine; and these circumstances operated, in concurrence with the king's want of a supply and the people's desire to save their money, to forward a motion in parliament, that, in order to support the king's state, and supply his wants, all the religious houses might be conferred upon the crown, which were not able to spend above 200 50: a year; and an act was passed for that purpose, 27 Hen
Church - ' But those who ruled the church after the apostles' death had not the testimony of Miracles, and were in many respects inferior, therefore they thought it unbecoming to assume the name of apostles; but dividing the names, they left to 'presbyters' that name, and themselves were called 'bishops'" (Ambrose, in Bingham Ecclesiastes Ant
Image - This sacerdotal land-monster is plausible and seductive, and his inducements to Christians to show themselves good citizens are backed up by Miracles
Vengeance (2) - Matthew 23), that He upbraided for their unbelief the cities where He had wrought His great Miracles (Matthew 11:20 ff
Stephen - ) "He did great Miracles and wonders among the people," in confirmation of the gospel
Cerinthus, Opponent of Saint John - This Power enables Jesus to perform Miracles, but forsakes Him at His Passion, "flying heavenwards
Columbanus, Abbat of Luxeuil And Bobbio - 219–239), who appends the account of Miracles omitted by Jonas, and other additions ( ib
Hebrews - ...
The long abode of the Hebrews in Egypt had cherished in them a strong propensity to idolatry; and neither the Miracles of Moses, nor his precautions to withdraw them from the worship of idols, nor the rigor of his laws, nor the splendid marks of God's presence in the Israelitish camp, were able to conquer this unhappy perversity
Person of Christ - So far from being manifestations of omnipotence, His Miracles are done through faith in the power of God, the gift of which is sought in prayer and acknowledged with thankfulness ( Mark 7:34 , Matthew 14:19 ). Nor does the source of the impression thus produced lie in His Miracles; it lies in the feeling of His supreme authority. The words ‘Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by Miracles and wonders and signs’ ( Preaching Christ - Broadly speaking, these arguments were two—one from prophecy and one from Miracles. And so with the argument from Miracles, which, though not formally put, is perhaps as characteristic of the Second Gospel as the argument from prophecy is of the First. The arguments from prophecy and from Miracles are formal ways of expressing truths which really contain much more than these forms can carry; and our impression of the truths is too direct, immediate, and complex to have justice done it by such arguments
Woman - In another episode, the woman healed was Jewish but still illustrates Jesus' ministry of compassion to the outcasts of society (Simon's mother-in-law [3]), as the third in a series of such Miracles (cf. " This means that Paul envisioned women not only as apostles, prophets, and teachers but speaking in tongues, working Miracles, ministering as evangelists, and pastors/shepherds (11:5; 12:8-10; Ephesians 4:11 ), indeed, exercising every other spiritual gift that God may choose to give them
Church - " Of these, the office of Apostle is allowed by all to have been confined to those immediately commissioned by Christ to witness the fact of his Miracles, and of his resurrection from the dead, and to reveal the complete system of Christian doctrine and duty; confirming their extraordinary mission by Miracles wrought by themselves
Gospels - If He had (like Muhammed) recorded His own Miracles and teachings, internal consistency would have been nothing marvelous. ...
There would be lost the powerful proof we now have, from the mutual coherency of writings not composed by the Founder of Christianity nor in His lifetime, but by Jews, unlearned mostly, giving independent yet marvelously agreeing accounts of miraculous works, and a spiritual system of doctrine unheard before, themselves willing to lay down their lives for the truths they witnessed to; these writings received and accepted too by numerous congregations, living at the time and in the very places where the Miracles alleged in proof of their inspiration were wrought, and producing worldwide effects now for ages
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - Newman, Essays on Miracles , p. Miracles, both in character and motive, that they form an instructive hint as to the ethnic and imaginative source of the whole cycle
Leucius, Author of n.t. Apocryphal Additions - He adds that these heretics had also Acts of Peter, John, and Paul, containing stories of Miracles in which beasts were made to speak; for that these heretics counted the souls of men and of beasts alike (see Epiph. 604), who acknowledges the truth of apostolic Miracles related by Leucius, but argues against his doctrine of two principles
Apostles - Paul had performed the signs and Miracles which were “the signs of a true apostle” (2 Corinthians 12:12 ), along with his life of patient endurance, preaching, and suffering for Christ
Eusebius, Bishop of Samosata - The bedridden had sprung from their couches, and all kinds of moral Miracles had been wrought by his presence
Divination - The three frog-like demons out of the mouths of the anti-trinity, the dragon, the beast, and the false prophet, shall "work Miracles" to tempt the ten kings under Antichrist to the last battle for the kingship of the world, against Christ, in "the great day of God Almighty" (1 Timothy 4:1; compare Zechariah 13:2; Matthew 24:24; Revelation 13:14-15)
Angels - Compare John 1:51, Greek (aparti ), "from this time forth ye shall see heaven open" (heretofore shut, against man by sin: Hebrews 9:8; Hebrews 10:19-20) "and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of man," as the antitypical Jacob's ladder, the center of communication between men and God, the redeemed and the angelic world; Jesus' Miracles, of which mention immediately follows (John 2), are firstfruit of this newly opened communion of earth and heaven (Genesis 28:12-17)
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - Take back Paul with you, and all the prophecies and all the types of the Old Testament, and all the wonderful works of God in the New Testament,-His Son's sinless conception, His Miracles, His teaching and preaching, His agony in the garden, His death on the Cross, and His resurrection and ascension,-will all fall into their natural and necessary places
Ave Maria - All the Miracles of Christ, while expressing His pity and love, accentuated this Divine power, and His teaching bore the distinguishing mark of authority (Matthew 7:29)
Dominion (2) - ...
As Son of Man, He was invested with special power (ἐξουσία) to work Miracles
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - ...
Then Mary went to Jerusalem, where, seeing the Miracles done by the child, people sought to destroy him. Thomas replied that Jesus worked Miracles, for the blind and lame and sick were healed. Jesus asked what Miracles were called for
Mahometanism - Prideaux thinks he invented it either to answer the expectations of those who demanded some Miracles as a proof of his mission; or else, by pretending to have conversed with God, to establish the authority of whatever he should think fit to leave behind by way of oral tradition, and make his sayings to serve the same purpose as the oral law of the Jews. But it does not appear that Mahomet himself ever expected so great a regard should be paid to his sayings as his followers have since done; and, seeing he all along disclaimed any power of performing Miracles, it seems rather to have been a fetch of policy to raise his reputation, by pretending to have actually conversed with God in heaven, as Moses had heretofore done in the Mount, and to have received several institutions immediately from him, whereas, before, he contented himself with persuading them that he had all by the ministry of Gabriel. In this cave they lay hid three days, to avoid the search of their enemies, which they very narrowly escaped, and not without the assistance of more Miracles than one; for some say that the Koreish were struck with blindness, so that they could not find the cave; others, that, after Mahomet and his companions were got in, two pigeons laid their eggs at the entrance, and a spider covered the mouth of the cave with her web, which made them look no farther
Childhood - Strangest thing of all, a whole series of vindictive and destructive Miracles are given which offer the most flagrant contrast to all that we know of our Lord, and which, if true, would have made Him a veritable terror to all with whom He came into contact. The Thomas Gospel is mainly answerable for the stories of vindictive Miracles referred to above
Jesus Christ - ...
Jesus as Doer of God's Mighty Works This One who was raised, the same One who died, had performed the Miracles of God's kingdom in our time and space
Elijah - According to the Rabbis, Elijah was to precede the Messiah, to restore families to purity, to settle controversies and legal disputes, and perform seven Miracles (cf
King, Christ as - ...
The kingdom is present in the person, ministry, and Miracles of Jesus (Matthew 12:28 ; 1618065299_54 )
Antichrist - ...
Antichrist's characteristics (2 Thessalonians 2; 1 John 2:18-22; 1 John 4:3) shall be open opposition to God and religion, a claim to God's exclusive prerogatives, lawlessness, power of lying Miracles and of beguiling souls under Satan's energizing, having a lamb's horns, i
Benediction - The occasions are the Miracles of the feeding of the 5000 and of the 4000, the institution of the Lord’s Supper, and the evening meal at Emmaus
Carpocrates, Philospher - 32) how very unlike these transient wonders were to be permanent Miracles of healing effected by our Lord, and which, as he claimed, continued in the church
Docetism - 24) Christ or Nous is not distinguished from Jesus but is said to be an incorporeal power who transfigured Himself as He willed; that He appeared on earth as man and worked Miracles but that He did not suffer; that it was Simon of Cyrene who being transfigured into the form of Jesus was crucified while Jesus Himself in the form of Simon standing by laughed at His persecutors and then incapable of being held by them ascended up to Him Who had sent Him invisible to them all
Peter - He wrought Miracles in the name of Jesus ( Acts 5:15 , Acts 9:32-42 ); he fearlessly confessed Jesus, setting the rulers at naught ( Acts 4:1-18 ); as head of the Church, he exposed and punished sin ( Acts 5:1-11 , Acts 8:14-24 ); he suffered imprisonment and scourging ( Acts 5:17-42 , Acts 12:1-19 )
Plagues, the Ten, - The magicians, who had imitated by their enchantments the two previous Miracles, were now foiled
Benediction - The occasions are the Miracles of the feeding of the 5000 and of the 4000, the institution of the Lord’s Supper, and the evening meal at Emmaus
Jacobus Baradaeus, Bishop of Edessa - 364–383), must be consulted for the extent and variety of his missionary labours and for the Miracles which illustrated them
Jesus Christ - 14-37) somewhere in Palestine; that he was a religious leader who worked Miracles and exorcised demons and was later regarded as a deity by his followers; that he was executed by crucifixion by the Jewish and Roman authorities during a Passover season; that reports circulated about his resurrection from the dead. They also believed that none of the supernatural elements of the Gospels, such as the virgin birth, the Miracles of Jesus, or his bodily resurrection was true, anyway, but only an ancient way of describing an existential experience of the present day
Lord's Day - Thompson, Miracles in the NT, London, 1911, p. Between the 11th and the 15th centuries we meet with a wide-spread fiction of a ‘Letter from Heaven’ inculcating Sunday observance, wherein the largest claims are made for the day: how that on it the angels were created, the ark rested on Ararat, the Exodus took place, also the Baptism of Jesus, His great Miracles
Logos - (1) Peculiar stress is laid on His Miracles as the ‘signs’ by which He ‘manifested forth his glory. ’ The motive of compassion, to which the Miracles are for the most part ascribed by the Synoptic writers, falls into the background
History - Jesus' Miracles and exorcisms are the delivering works of God which show that history is the place of spiritual warfare
Seven Words, the - Perhaps this was not the first time that this man had seen the Christ; he may have been among those who listened to His words on some previous occasion, he may have seen some of His Miracles; now, however, he is brought face to face with the power of His love, conviction dawns within him, he sees himself in his true light; turning to his fellow, he says, ‘Dost not thou fear God, seeing thou art in the same condemnation? And we indeed justly, for we receive the due reward of our deeds; but this man hath done nothing amiss’ (Luke 23:40-41)
Exodus, Book of - Miracles do not bring belief (Exodus 7:14-25 )
Revelation of God - Through calling people, Miracles, the Exodus, covenant making, and ultimately through Jesus Christ, God has revealed Himself in history
Jehoram - Similarly Herod was curious about our Lord's Miracles, and heard John Baptist gladly (Luke 9:9; Luke 23:8; Mark 6:14; Mark 6:20)
Touch - ‘Another would have defiled himself by touching the leper: but He, Himself remaining undefiled, cleansed him whom He touched; for in Him health overcame sickness, and purity defilement, and life death’ (Trench, Miracles, 233)
Unbelief (2) - Of similar import are the comments of the Evangelist in John 12:37-40; the Miracles wrought by Jesus had not indeed been denied, at the same time they had made but a transient impression, and had sometimes been attributed to the powers of darkness; of unreserved confidence in and full acceptance of Himself there had been none whatever
Mark, the Gospel of - He ordered those who witnessed Miracles not to tell anyone what they saw, although silence was only a remote possibility (Mark 7:36 )
Lord's Supper, the - Further, the feeding Miracles of Jesus (Mark 6:31-44 ; 8:1-11 ) point not only to shared fellowship but also to the future "messianic banquet" (see Isaiah 25:6-12 )
Impotence - —The single instance of our Lord’s Miracles specifically classified under this head is recorded in John 5:2-9, where the sufferer is described as ὁ ἀσθενῶν (Authorized Version ‘the impotent man,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘the sick man’)
Sea - The Saviour of mankind often looked upon its quiet beauty and crossed it in his journeys; he stilled its waves by a word, and hallowed its shores by his Miracles and teachings
History - Jesus' Miracles and exorcisms are the delivering works of God which show that history is the place of spiritual warfare
Koran - The author of the "View of Christianity and Mahometanism" observes, that, "by the advocates of Mahometanism, the Koran has always been held forth as the greatest of Miracles, and equally stupendous with the act of raising the dead. The Miracles of Moses and Jesus, they say, were transient and temporary: but that of the Koran is permanent and perpetual, and therefore far surpassed all the miraculous events of preceding ages
Paul - " He also performed many Miracles at Ephesus; and not only great numbers of people were converted to Christianity, but many also of those who in this superstitious city used incantations and magical arts, professed their belief in the Gospel, and renounced their former practices by publicly burning their books. Did ever enthusiast prefer that universal benevolence, meant by charity here, (which, we may add, is attainable by every man,) to faith, and to Miracles, to those religious opinions which he had embraced, and to those supernatural graces and gifts which he imagined he had acquired, nay, even to the merit of martyrdom? Is it not the genius of enthusiasm to set moral virtues infinitely below the merit of faith; and of all moral virtues to value that least which is most particularly enforced by St
Prophet - Indeed, only those who were biassed by ecclesiastical bigotry could have concluded otherwise, for His Miracles of mercy were external credentials recalling the powers of Moses and Elijah; and the authoritative tone of His teaching showed that He claimed for Himself at least the position of a God-sent teacher. His every act was a message, and His Miracles, not less than His parables, were revelations to teach men of His Father
Chronology of the New Testament - 160) speaks of Jesus working Miracles for three years after His baptism ( Ante-Nic
Jonah - ...
Certain of the scribes and Pharisees, not content with our Lord’s many Miracles or signs (cf
Exorcism - Thompson, Miracles in the NT, 1911, p
Apocrypha, New Testament - It contains Miracles and sermons by John of Asia Minor and has a distinct Gnostic orientation
Judas - " (Luke 13:26-27) Indeed, may we not go farther, and suppose, that from this very appointment the Lord intended special good to his people? Was it not in effect saying, that if in the instance of the Lord Jesus himself a Judas is permitted, yea, appointed to attend his person, can it be wondered at in the minglings up of life, that his people should be so exercised? If in the college of apostles, out of twelve persons one should be a devil, can his people complain that they are sometimes called "to dwell with Mesech, and to have their habitation among the tents of Kedar?" Did Jesus, the Lord of life and glory, who might have commanded twelve legions of angels to attend him, permit, yea, even appoint a known devil to be his servant, to be with him in his Miracles and his ministry, yea, to be one of the party at his farewell super-and what doth the meek and gentle Saviour teach thereby all his tried ones upon earth but this, that in their intercourse with the graceless they are to call to mind the unequalled humblings of Jesus in such instances
Lazarus - "...
"This last and greatest of His Miracles was to raise our Lord much estimation," says the distinguished John Donne, "but (for they always accompany one another) it was to raise both Him and Lazarus much envy also
Simon Maccabaeus - We are then told that "Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip, and wondered, beholding the Miracles and signs which were done," Acts 8:13
Passion Week - * Patricius, or Saint Patrick - Patrick and king Laoghaire and his priests is marked by a series of Miracles and legends, terminating, however, with the defeat of paganism and the baptism of great numbers of the Irish, including Laoghaire himself, who yielded a nominal adhesion to the truth
Back to Christ - The difficulty begins when we raise the question whether such facts as the Virgin-birth, the Miracles (in the strict sense of the word), and the Resurrection are to be included in our conception of the historical Christ as resting upon historical evidence, or whether they are not rather to be transferred from the domain of history to that of faith. Similarly His outer life receives its character from the Virgin-birth, the Miracles (interpreted in the strict sense), and, above all, from the bodily Resurrection
Bible - His personal ministry was confined to the land of Judea; and, by means of his Miracles and discourses, together with those of his disciples, the attention of men, in that country, was sufficiently directed to his doctrine. " The fifth was the Apostle Paul, who, as he expresses it, was "one born out of due time," but who had likewise seen Jesus Christ, and had been empowered by him to work Miracles, which were "the signs of an Apostle
Jesus Christ - From the books of the Old Testament we learn that the Messiah was to authenticate his claim by Miracles; and in those predictions respecting him, so many circumstances are recorded, that they could meet only in one person; and so, if they are accomplished in him, they leave no room for doubt, as far as the evidence of prophecy is deemed conclusive. As to Miracles, we refer to that article; here only observing, that if the miraculous works wrought by Christ were really done, they prove his mission, because, from their nature, and having been wrought to confirm his claim to be the Messiah, they necessarily imply a divine attestation
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - It was an obvious argument against the Docetic theory that if our Lord's body were not real we could have no faith that His Miracles were real nor in the reality of His sufferings and death which Marcion was willing to regard as an exhibition of redeeming love; nor in the reality of His resurrection. Heal their wounds, give sight to their blind, bring their dead to life, perform without reward the greatest Miracles of healing; then will the God of the Law be jealous, and will instigate his servants to crucify thee
Judges, Theology of - ...
Gideon the farmer (6:1-8:35) is slow to recognize and respond to God's call for him to lead Israel; three Miracles are required to convince this reluctant champion
Deuteronomy, the Book of - A forger would magnify the Miracles in referring to them; Moses alludes to them as notorious, and uses them only as an incentive to enforce obedience
Matthew, the Gospel of - ...
Matthew 8:1-10:42 opens with a series of ten Miracles demonstrating Jesus' authority over disease, natural catastrophes, demons, and death
Testimony - Outwardly, "the signs, wonders and various Miracles, and gifts of the Holy Spirit" appear as God's testimony to the salvation first announced by Jesus and then confirmed by eyewitnesses (Hebrews 2:3-4 )
Commission - He argues that the power of working Miracles was essential to the establishment of the disciples themselves, as well as necessary for proving the doctrine of the gospel at its commencement, that the power was possessed by only a very few persons Devotion - Not only were His Miracles wrought in the power of the Spirit (Matthew 12:28, Luke 4:14; Luke 4:18), but His oneness with the Spirit made His life uninterrupted devotion, and ‘through the eternal Spirit’ He ‘offered himself without blemish unto God’ (Hebrews 9:14)
Henoticon, the - " That "it was this one and the same Son of God Who wrought Miracles, and endured the sufferings which He underwent voluntarily in His flesh
Judgments of God - ...
Felix, the superintendent, signalized himself also by another impiety; for as he was in viewing the rich and magnificent vessels which the emperors Constantine and Constantius had given to the church, "Behold" said he, "with what plate the son of Mary is served!" It is said, too, that count Julian and he made it the subject of banter, that God should let them thus profane his temple, without interposing by visible Miracles
Hormisdas, Bishop of Rome - For in 533 the emperor Justinian issued an edict asserting that "the sufferings and Miracles are of one and the same—for we do not acknowledge God the Word to be one and Christ another, but one and the same: for the Trinity remained even after the Incarnation of the One Word of God, Who was of the Trinity; for the Holy Trinity does not admit of the addition of a fourth person
Job - The Usserian or Bible chronology dates the trial of Job about the year 1520 before the Christian era, twenty-nine years before the departure of the Israelites from Egypt; and that the book was composed before that event, is evident from its total silence respecting the Miracles which accompanied the exode; such as the passage of the Red Sea, the destruction of the Egyptians, the manna in the desert, &c; all of which happened in the vicinity of Job's country, and were so apposite in the debate concerning the ways of Providence that some notice could not but have been taken of them, if they had been coeval with the poem of Job
Christianity (History Sketch) - The open manner in which it was announced, the length of time during which its Author publicly addressed his countrymen, the innumerable Miracles which he performed, and, above all, the report of the resurrection under circumstances which must have been communicated to the imperial government at Rome, excited the deep attention of the numerous Jews and proselytes who, from surrounding nations, regularly went up to Jerusalem, and of whom vast numbers were actually in that city when the resurrection must have been the subject of universal discussion
Apostle - Having chosen and constituted twelve persons, under the name of Apostles, our blessed Lord determined that for some time they should be continually with him, not only to attend upon his public ministry, but to enjoy the benefit of his private conversation, that he might furnish them the better for the great work in which they were to be employed; and that, at length, after suitable preparation, he might, with greater advantage, send them abroad to preach his Gospel, and thus make way for his own visits to some more distant parts, where he had not yet been; and to enable them more effectually to do this, he endowed them with the power of working Miracles, of curing diseases, and casting out demons
Joshua - " God kept His promise, working mighty Miracles in his behalf, and giving Israel all the land and rest round about; no good thing failed which the Lord had spoken (Joshua 21:43-45)
Minucius Felix, Marcus - He traces the source of all idolatry to the operation of the demons who, having lost their first estate, desired to draw others into the same ruin as themselves, who inspired oracles, wrought fictitious cures and other pretended Miracles to deceive men, and were also the inventors and instigators of the calumnies against Christianity
Simon Magus - " We are further told that he was so impressed by the Miracles wrought by Philip that he asked and obtained admission to Christian baptism; but that he subsequently betrayed the hollowness of his conversion by offering money to Peter to obtain the power of conferring the gift of the Holy Ghost
Matthew, Gospel According to - 13), and many Miracles, some peculiar to Mt
Evangelize, Evangelism - Jesus' conduct of his earthly itinerant ministry of proclaiming the good news is accompanied by healing Miracles and combined with teaching (4:43; 7:22; 8:1; 20:1)
Exodus, Theology of - Moses participates as the messenger because he has witnessed some Miracles to affirm God's call (4:1-9)
Incarnation - Two special Miracles, the Resurrection and the Virgin-birth, are noticed separately below
Humiliation of Christ - Herod was delighted to come face to face with Jesus, and now at last he was to have the long-coveted opportunity of having Him show off with a few Miracles in his presence
Antichrist - To the early Church, Simon with his magic arts and false Miracles was the arch-heretic and the father of all heresy, and suggestions of his legendary figure loom out from the description of the second beast (Revelation 13:13-15), even while the author attributes to it functions and powers that belong more properly to the ministers of the Emperor-worship (Revelation 13:12)
Word - They say, for example, that it was the Memra, or the Word, which created the world, which appeared to Moses on Mount Sinai, which gave him the law, which spoke to him face to face, which brought Israel out of Egypt, which marched before the people, and which wrought all those Miracles that are recorded in Exodus
Nature And Natural Phenomena - Jesus being who and what He was, it was as natural for Him to work Miracles’ and to exercise an exceptional control over the ‘forces’ of nature, as it was for Napoleon to do extraordinary things through his gift of control over men, or for a great scientist to initiate fresh changes in the forms and conditions of matter
Peter (2) - Many words specially uttered by him or spoken by our Lord to him are preserved in the Gospels, and in several of the Miracles of our Lord he has a unique place
Pilate - 21) speaks of the report of Pilate to Tiberius as containing an account of the Miracles, condemnation, crucifixion, and resurrection of Jesus, with the story of the guard at the grave
Bible - Finally, the Miracles wrought in connection with the Bible, and attested on infallible proofs, and the prophecies of the Old Testament (proved to have been given when they profess to be, by the fact that the Jews who oppose Christianity attest their age, and fulfilled minutely in the New Testament) establish the inspired truth of the Bible
Ethics - Christ’s Miracles are illustrations of His gospel of pardon, regeneration, and added faculties ( Matthew 9:5-6 )
Kingdom of God - A one-sided emphasis on the "already now, " which emphasizes Miracles, healing, victory over sin, and gifts God has given his church, and ignores the "not yet" may lead to an optimistic triumphalism that will result in disillusionment
Revelation, Theology of - From the time of the emperor Gaius they had the technology to produce convincing fire and speech Miracles of the sort described in 13:13-15
Hypocrisy - They believed in Miracles, they looked for signs
Influence - It may be asked—But what about His Miracles? In the first place, they were never done as a proof of His claims
Persecution - When urged by the proconsul to renounce Christ, he replied, "Fourscore and six years have I served him, and he has never done me an injury: can I blaspheme my King and my Saviour?" Several Miracles are reported to have happened at his death
Hypocrisy - They believed in Miracles, they looked for signs
Christ, Christology - Jesus presents as evidence his works of Miracles and preaching and remarks, "I tell you the truth: Among those born of women there has not arisen anyone greater than John the Baptist; yet he who is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he
Christianity - ...
(2) On the other hand, we must avoid the error of those who, when they insist on going ‘back to Christ,’ and demand the substitution of the Christ of history for the Christ of dogma, assume that nothing that is supernatural can he historical, and that the Christ whom we find in the NT the Christ of the Incarnation and the Resurrection and the Atonement, the Christ who wrought Miracles and claimed to be the Son of God, and was so accepted by those who had known Him in the flesh and subsequently knew Him in the Spirit is not the Jesus of history at all
Faith - The Gospels make the faith response explicit in particular Miracles
Holy, Holiness - Jesus' Miracles attest his nature (Mark 4:35-5:43 )
Guilt (2) - The analogy between disease and sin, which the Miracles of healing suggest, might appear to show the contrary
Organization (2) - He will learn to see brothers in all workers for good, whatever name they bear, for ‘he that is not against us is for us’ (Mark 9:38, Luke 9:50), and the ‘false prophets’ he will easily discern by their spiritual unfruitfulness, though they call on the Name and work Miracles (Matthew 7:22)
Teaching - Teaching was therefore numbered among the charismata (χαρίσματα) which resulted from the bestowal of the Holy Spirit, and which included such gifts as prophesying, healing, working of Miracles, and ‘tongues’ (Romans 12:6, 1 Corinthians 12:10 f
Sacraments - The relation between faith and sacrament remains exactly analogous to that which the Gospels represent as existing between faith and the instrumentality used by our Lord in the performance of His Miracles
Transfiguration (2) - George Macdonald, Miracles of our Lord, xii
Food - The fishes of our Lord’s two Miracles of feeding were almost certainly of this kind, fish cleaned, split open, salted, and finally dried in the sun, having been at all times a favourite form of provision for a journey
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - The Jews looked for him and expected him to perform great Miracles (John 7:31 )
Holy Spirit - Jesus' whole ministry is therefore Spirit-led, but particularly significant manifestations include the fulfillment of prophecy (Matthew 12:18 , ; citing Galatians 3:1-5 ; Acts 8:1-7 , ; citing Isaiah 61:1 ), exorcisms (Matthew 12:28 ), and Miracles more generally (Acts 10:38 ; Romans 15:19 )
Christ in the Seventeenth Century - Only occasionally (miracles, transfiguration) did rays from the Divine majesty shine through; in general the Logos remained quiescent, and the human nature, though Divinely endowed, did not advance to the actuality of exercise (κένωσις τῆς χρήσεως)
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - The gifts of faith (1 Corinthians 12:9 ; 13:2 ), Miracles (1 Corinthians 12:10,28 ), and healings (1 Corinthians 12:9,28 ) continued the powerful ministry of Jesus through his church, and signaled the invasion of the earth by the messianic kingdom
Individualism - Whatever may be said of His Miracles of raising the dead, they show that the death of a young person was a monstrous, disorderly thing to Him
Lunatic - Miracles, c
Paul - " At Jerusalem "they declared all things that God had done with them," the facts and Miracles of their mission among the Gentiles in general to the Christian multitude there; "but privately" to the apostles the details of his doctrine, in order to compare it with their teaching, to let them see that he was not "running in vain," in not requiring circumcision of Gentile converts
Baptism - The practice of the western churches is, to sprinkle the water on the head or face of the person to be baptized, except in the church of Milan, in whose ritual it is ordered, that the head of the infant be plunged three times into the water; the minister at the same time pronouncing the words, "I baptize thee in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost;" importing that by this ceremony the person baptized is received among the professors of that religion which God, the Father of all, revealed to mankind by the ministry of his Son, and confirmed by the Miracles of his Spirit
Parousia - ...
(e) The Antichrist is revealed and manifests his power by Miracles
Proverbs - (3) Moreover, as Origen remarks, the Evangelist’s explanation of the enthusiasm wherewith the Galilaeans received Him on His arrival (John 4:45), implies that His Miracles in the capital during the Passover season were fresh in their memories
Hebrews - To obviate the impression which any reasoning of this sort might make upon the converts to Christianity, the writer of this epistle begins with declaring to the Hebrews, that the same God who had formerly, upon a variety of occasions, spoken to their fathers by means of his prophets, had now sent his only Son for the purpose of revealing his will; he then describes, in most sublime language, the dignity of the person of Christ, Hebrews 1; and thence refers the duty of obeying his commands, the divine authority of which was established by the performance of Miracles, and by the gifts of the Holy Ghost; he points out the necessity of Christ's incarnation and passion, Hebrews 2; he shows the superiority of Christ to Moses, and warns the Hebrews against the sin of unbelief, Hebrews 3; he exhorts to steadfastness in the profession of the Gospel, and gives an animated description of Christ as our high priest, Hebrews 4-7; he shows that the Levitical priesthood and the old covenant were abolished by the priesthood of Christ, and by the new covenant, Hebrews 8; he points out the efficacy of the ceremonies and sacrifices of the law, and the sufficiency of the atonement made by the sacrifice of Christ, Hebrews 9, 10; he fully explains the nature, merit, and effects of faith, Hebrews 11; and in the last two chapters he gives a variety of exhortations and admonitions, all calculated to encourage the Hebrews to bear with patience and constancy any trials to which they might be exposed
Elisha - He at the very time, by God's providence, had been inquiring from Gehazi (long before his leprosy, 2 Kings 5; 2 Kings 8, a proof that the incidents of Elisha's life are not recorded in chronological sequence, but in their spiritual connection) concerning Elisha's Miracles, and was hearing of her son's resuscitation when she herself appeared
Moses - "The field of Zoan" was the scene of God's Miracles in Israel's behalf (Psalms 78:43)
Quakers - "When we speak of the gracious display of the love of God to mankind, in the miraculous conception, birth, life, Miracles, death, resurrection, and ascension of our Saviour, we prefer the use of such terms as we find in Scripture; and contented with that knowledge which divine wisdom hath seen meet to reveal, we attempt not to explain those mysteries which remain under the veil; nevertheless we acknowledge and assert the divinity of Christ, who is the wisdom and power of God unto salvation, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Biblical Theology - The four Gospels concur in presenting the climax of Jesus' coming, not in his Miracles, wisdom, or ethics, great as these are, but in his atoning death and vindicating resurrection
Regeneration - He may be so carried out of himself by the supernatural enthusiasm that he appears to onlookers as drunk (Acts 2:13); more generally he has the miraculous power of uttering ecstatic sounds (speaking with tongues, Acts 2:4, Acts 10:46, Acts 19:6), and declaring his faith in exuberant public speech (prophesying, Acts 11:28, Acts 19:6, Acts 21:9-10); while those especially endowed may work Miracles (Acts 2:43, Acts 4:30, Acts 5:12, Acts 8:13, Acts 14:3)
John, Theology of - 1-12) Jesus' Miracles are aimed to show glimpses of God's glory (2:11) and those who believed could see it (11:40)
Gospels - the following:- Mark 1:22 : ‘He was teaching as having authority’; Mark 1:27 : ‘a new teaching, with authority he commands’; Mark 2:10 : ‘the Son of Man hath authority’; Mark 5:30 : ‘knowing the power which had gone forth from him’; Mark 6:2 : ‘the powers (miracles) done by him
Matthew, Gospel According to - The Miracles proved Christ’s power, or illustrated His attitude towards Pharisaism, or showed Him to be the Messiah of the OT
Mediator - Miracles are regarded as His work, though He is no longer visibly present
John, Gospel of - But it is in the same record that the characteristic ‘glory’ of His Miracles is most fully brought out; in it the loftiest claims are made not only for the Master by a disciple, but by the Lord for Himself as the Light of the World, the Bread from Heaven, the only true Shepherd of men, Himself the Resurrection and the Life
Barnabas, Epistle of - from incidental notices one gathers that Jesus had performed wonders and Miracles (v
Ascension of Isaiah - There Isaiah beholds His wonderful birth, Miracles, and crucifixion, resurrection, mission of the Twelve, ascension, and session on the right hand of the Great Glory
Mahometanism - Had Mohammed, indeed, rested his doctrine upon Miracles, it might have happened that the imposture by some would have been detected; but, with his usual policy, he avoided what he knew was so hazardous; and, with the exception of his reference to the Koran, as surpassing the capacity of man, he explicitly disclaimed having been authorized to do such mighty works as had been wrought to establish the previous dispensations of the Almighty
Prophecy - Boyle justly observes, "are supernatural things, and may properly be ranked among Miracles
Peter - Then we are told of missionary enterprises conducted by Peter himself ‘throughout all parts’ (Acts 9:32), and particularly of his wonderful Miracles performed at Joppa (Acts 9:33-41)
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - There ought to be many parables and Miracles of which we should be uncertain whether they were common to all the evangelists or special to one and what place in that one they should occupy
Personality - And behind Christ’s teaching were His Miracles of mercy, which were sacramental of this rescue of personality from its fetters (Mark 2:5 ff
Revelation, the - It deceives all the earth and assists the Roman power, working Miracles in order that the image of the revived beast may be worshipped: cf
Gospels - of set parables, allegories taking their place; and the character of the Miracles, there being no casting out of devils in Jn
John (the Apostle) - The record of events which shows Jesus performing Miracles and preaching in the towns and villages of Galilee is the record of John’s training (see Mark 1:21 to Mark 2:22)
Socialism - His Miracles were in the main works of mercy, designed to reduce the misery, or, as at Cana, to increase the happiness, of everyday life
Dates (2) - So that we have another indication of the early season of the year, which supports the hypothesis of a baptism at the Passover preceding the Passover of John 2:13, a period of time required for the preparation and selection of the disciples, and for the nursing of their nascent faith by Miracles, of which one, a typical sign, as are all the seven signs in the Fourth Gospel, is narrated in John 2:1-12
Polycarp - Irenaeus remembers Polycarp very clearly; he can describe the very place in which the blessed Polycarp used to sit when he discoursed, how he came in and went out, his personal appearance, the speeches that he addressed to the Christian community, how he would describe his intercourse with John and with the rest who had seen the Lord (τὴν μετὰ Ἰωάννου συναναστροφὴν … καὶ μετὰ τῶν ἑορακότων τὸν κύριον), how he recalled their words and the things that he had heard them relate concerning the Lord, His Miracles, and His teaching, how Polycarp had received all that from eye-witnesses of the Word of life
Possession - Further, it explains how these wonders, while attracting the crowd, did not impress the majority of the people with the fact that He was a Divine Being, any more than the Miracles of Moses led the Egyptians to think of him as a messenger from Jahweh
Pharisees (2) - 87); and on the ground of such consciousness forgave sins, wrought Miracles, and answered prayers
Polycarpus, Bishop of Smyrna - Irenaeus, writing in advanced life, tells how vivid his recollections still were of having been a hearer of Polycarp, then an old man; how well he remembered where the aged bishop used to sit, his personal appearance, his ways of going out and coming in, and how frequently he used to relate his intercourse with John and others who had seen our Lord, and to repeat stories of our Lord's Miracles and teaching, all in complete accord with the written record
Incarnation (2) - Worker of Miracles
Christ in Reformation Theology - The legends of meaningless Miracles and supernatural claims attributed to the infant Jesus, he characterizes as ‘pure foolishness
Christianity - ...
Further, if the Miracles of Christ, and especially the great miracle of His Resurrection, be accepted, the whole point of view is changed
Apostles - We do not know who witnessed the expulsion of the traffickers from the temple, heard the mysterious words spoken regarding the destruction of the temple, or saw the many Miracles which He performed in the capital (John 2:13 ff
Clemens Romanus of Rome - tells how Clement was first banished to the Crimea worked there such Miracles as converted the whole district and was thereupon by Trajan's order cast into the sea with an anchor round his neck an event followed by new prodigies
Perfection (of Jesus) - And His Miracles of healing were never demonstrations, seals of His Messiahship; personal sympathy was their source and regulator
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - Newman, "made him drink in with such relish what we reject with such disgust? Was it that, at least, some Miracles were brought home so absolutely to his sensible experience that he had no reason for doubting the others which came to him second-hand? This certainly will explain what to most of us is sure to seem the stupid credulity of so well-read, so intellectual an author " (Hist