What does Miracle mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
τὸ this 1
מוֹפֵ֑ת wonder 1

Definitions Related to Miracle

H4159


   1 wonder, sign, Miracle, portent.
      1a wonder (as a special display of God’s power).
      1b sign, token (of future event).
      

Frequency of Miracle (original languages)

Frequency of Miracle (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Miracle
(Latin: mirari, to wonder)
An effect which causes admiration because it cannot be produced by any natural agency but only by the power of God. It is above the natural law, as when one dead is restored to life; contrary to this law, as when Moses caused water to gush from a rock; independent of the law, as when something that might be done by natural causes, e.g., the immediate cure of a dangerous malady, is effected without the aid of physician or medicine. Granted the existence of Almighty God, since He could create the universe and establish its laws, there is no reason why He cannot alter its course and interfere with its laws. There is every reason why He should do so if He wills to conflrm some truth or fact by miraculous manifestation of His power, as did Our Lord and His Apostles when it was hopeless to expect men and women, as they were at that time, to accept the teachings of Christianity without such evidence of their Divine origin as miracles.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Miracle of Grace
A conversion from ignorance to faith, from sinfulness to holiness, from doubt to certainty, due not to natural causes at least principally, but to the operation of God's particular and unmerited assistance. It is improperly called a miracle; it is rather a remarkable change in a soul's career wrought by a peculiar and special intervention of God, quite distinct from His general providence and liberality.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Miracle Plays
Terms designating the religious drama which developed among Christian nations at the end of the Middle Ages. The origin of the medieval drama was in religion. On solemn feasts such as Easter and Christmas, the office was interrupted and the priests represented the religious event being celebrated. At first the text was in prose and in Latin; by degrees versification crept in and soon pervaded the entire drama; prose became the exception and the vernacular was employed as well as Latin. When the vernacular had completely supplanted the Latin, and individual inventiveness had asserted itself, the drama left the precincts of the Church and ceased to be liturgical, without however losing its religious character. The mysteries may be grouped under three cycles:
that of the Old Testament
that of the New Testament
that of the saints
Sometimes they represented matters which were not religious.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Miracle
An event in the external world brought about by the immediate agency or the simple volition of God, operating without the use of means capable of being discerned by the senses, and designed to authenticate the divine commission of a religious teacher and the truth of his message (John 2:18 ; Matthew 12:38 ). It is an occurrence at once above nature and above man. It shows the intervention of a power that is not limited by the laws either of matter or of mind, a power interrupting the fixed laws which govern their movements, a supernatural power. "The suspension or violation of the laws of nature involved in miracles is nothing more than is constantly taking place around us. One force counteracts another: vital force keeps the chemical laws of matter in abeyance; and muscular force can control the action of physical force. When a man raises a weight from the ground, the law of gravity is neither suspended nor violated, but counteracted by a stronger force. The same is true as to the walking of Christ on the water and the swimming of iron at the command of the prophet. The simple and grand truth that the universe is not under the exclusive control of physical forces, but that everywhere and always there is above, separate from and superior to all else, an infinite personal will, not superseding, but directing and controlling all physical causes, acting with or without them." God ordinarily effects his purpose through the agency of second causes; but he has the power also of effecting his purpose immediately and without the intervention of second causes, i.e., of invading the fixed order, and thus of working miracles. Thus we affirm the possibility of miracles, the possibility of a higher hand intervening to control or reverse nature's ordinary movements.
In the New Testament these four Greek words are principally used to designate miracles:
Semeion, a "sign", i.e., an evidence of a divine commission; an attestation of a divine message (Matthew 12:38,39 ; 16:1,4 ; Mark 8:11 ; Luke 11:16 ; 23:8 ; John 2:11,18,23 ; Acts 6:8 , etc.); a token of the presence and working of God; the seal of a higher power.
Terata, "wonders;" wonder-causing events; portents; producing astonishment in the beholder (Acts 2:19 ).
Dunameis, "might works;" works of superhuman power (Acts 2:22 ; Romans 15:19 ; 2 th 2:9 ); of a new and higher power.
Erga, "works;" the works of Him who is "wonderful in working" (John 5:20,36 ). Miracles are seals of a divine mission. The sacred writers appealed to them as proofs that they were messengers of God. Our Lord also appealed to miracles as a conclusive proof of his divine mission (John 5:20,36 ; 10:25,38 ). Thus, being out of the common course of nature and beyond the power of man, they are fitted to convey the impression of the presence and power of God. Where miracles are there certainly God is. The man, therefore, who works a miracle affords thereby clear proof that he comes with the authority of God; they are his credentials that he is God's messenger. The teacher points to these credentials, and they are a proof that he speaks with the authority of God. He boldly says, "God bears me witness, both with signs and wonders, and with divers miracles."
The credibility of miracles is established by the evidence of the senses on the part of those who are witnesses of them, and to all others by the testimony of such witnesses. The witnesses were competent, and their testimony is trustworthy. Unbelievers, following Hume, deny that any testimony can prove a miracle, because they say miracles are impossible. We have shown that miracles are possible, and surely they can be borne witness to. Surely they are credible when we have abundant and trustworthy evidence of their occurrence. They are credible just as any facts of history well authenticated are credible. Miracles, it is said, are contrary to experience. Of course they are contrary to our experience, but that does not prove that they were contrary to the experience of those who witnessed them. We believe a thousand facts, both of history and of science, that are contrary to our experience, but we believe them on the ground of competent testimony. An atheist or a pantheist must, as a matter of course, deny the possibility of miracles; but to one who believes in a personal God, who in his wisdom may see fit to interfere with the ordinary processes of nature, miracles are not impossible, nor are they incredible. (See LIST OF MIRACLES, Appendix.)
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Miracle
Miracle, in the A. V., represents three Greek words: 1. Semeion, sign, by which a divine power is made known and a divine messenger attested. Matthew 12:38-39; Matthew 16:1; Matthew 16:6; Mark 8:11; Luke 11:16; Luke 23:8; John 2:11; John 2:18; John 2:23, etc.; Acts 6:8; 1 Corinthians 1:22. 2. Teras, wonder or portent, with regard to their astounding character. John 4:48; Acts 2:22; Acts 2:43; Acts 7:36; Romans 15:19; usually in connection with "signs." 3. Dunamis, power or powers, mighty deeds, with reference to their effect. Matthew 7:22; Matthew 11:20-21; Matthew 11:23; Luke 10:13; Romans 15:19. A miracle is not, philosophically speaking, a violation of the ordinary laws of nature, nor does it necessarily require a suspension of those laws, as some have imagined; but is either a manifestation of divine power, superior to natural causes, or an increase of the action of some existing law, accomplishing a new result. Such were the miracles which God wrought by the prophets; and those wrought by Christ and by the apostles and disciples in his name. Though miracles are supernatural facts, in one sense they are also natural facts. They belong to a superior order of things, to a superior world; and they are perfectly conformed with the supreme law which governs them. They belong to the vast plan of Jehovah, which contains at once both the natural course of events and these supernatural manifestations. And when, on remarkable occasions, his plans and purposes have required preternatural interposition of his power, it has always been exerted; but, with the unusual occasion, the unusual agency has ceased, and the extraordinary result has no longer occurred. Such interferences are not required in the established course and usual sequences of nature. The miracles of Christ as reported in the gospels present many noticeable features. They were numerous: a multitude more having been performed than are described in detail. John 20:30; John 21:25. They exhibit great variety; they were wrought almost always instantaneously, by a word of power, without the use or auxiliary means, sometimes taking their effect at a distance from the place in which Christ personally was. They were permanent in their results, were subjected at the time to keen investigation, and convinced a hostile people of the truth of them, to such an extent that, though there were persons who concealed or resisted their convictions, very many in consequence attached themselves, to the great detriment of their worldly interests, in several cases with the sacrifice of their lives, to the person and doctrine of this extraordinary Teacher. They were miracles, too, of mercy, intended to relieve human suffering, and to promote the well-being of those on whom or for whom they were wrought. And the power of working miracles was conveyed by our Lord to his followers, was repeatedly exercised by them, and was continued for a while in the church. Acts 19:11; 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 12:28-29. For list of miracles in the Bible, see Appendix.
King James Dictionary - Miracle
MIR'ACLE, n. L. miraculum, from miror, to wonder.
1. Literally, a wonder or wonderful thing but appropriately, 2. In theology, an event or effect contrary to the established constitution and course of things, or a deviation from the known laws of nature a supernatural event. Miracles can be wrought only by Almighty power, as when Christ healed lepers, saying, "I will, be thou clean," or calmed the tempest, "Peace, be still." They considered not the miracle of the loaves. Mark 6 .
A man approved of God by miracles and signs. Acts 2
3. Anciently, a spectacle or dramatic representation exhibiting the lives of the saints. MIR'ACLE, To make wonderful. Not used.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Miracle
Although English speakers regularly use "miracle" to refer to a broad range of wondrous events, the biblical concept is limited to those not explainable solely by natural processes but which require the direct causal agency of a supernatural being, usually God. These occur throughout all major eras of history but do appear with greater frequency at key periods of God's self-revelation.
Genesis . The Bible begins with one of God's greatest miracles—the creation of the universe out of nothing. However literally the various details are taken, Genesis 1-2 primarily describes not the "how" but the "who" of creation. Against somewhat similar stories in polytheistic religions, Genesis affirms the complete, cosmic sovereignty of the Lord God. All else is subordinate and never to be worshiped. Humanity is categorically distinct from the rest of creation by virtue of being created in the image of God ( Genesis 1:26-28 ). The fall, followed by an increase in evil, begins to thwart God's creative purposes. The next major miracle, the flood, thus affirms both God's judgment on extreme wickedness and his grace in promising never again to destroy humanity so completely (6:3; 9:15-16). The promise does not preclude judgments of a lesser nature, though, such as Babel (11:1-9) or Sodom and Gomorrah (19:1-29). Miracles throughout the rest of Genesis deal primarily with God's preservation of his chosen line, when his promises to Abraham (Genesis 12:1-3 ) seem about to be broken, most notably Sarah's conception of Isaac at an advanced age (21:1-7). A seemingly miraculous provision of water in the desert preserves Hagar and Ishmael (21:14-21), reminding us of God's care for other peoples as well.
Exodus-Deuteronomy . The first major cluster of biblical miracles surrounds the central Old Testament act of redemptionthe exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. Here too appear thirteen of the eighteen Old Testament uses of "signs and wonders, " an expression that focuses on the miracles' redemptive significance. In the burning bush, God reveals his name (Yahweh) to Moses as the eternally existing one and promises his presence with his servant who is terrified of what God is asking him to do (Exodus 3 ). Further signs are promised to encourage him that he can overcome Pharaoh and the Egyptians (4:1-17). Ten plagues ensue, from which the Israelites are miraculously protected (7:14-11:10). None of the plagues itself is necessarily supernatural; in fact, their sequence is often scientifically logical. But their timing and geographical limitations point to God's sovereign intervention on Israel's behalf. The climactic plague of the death of firstborn sons finally motivates Pharaoh to let Moses and his people go.
Pharaoh quickly changes his mind, though, and it seems that his armies will obliterate Israel. The miraculous crossing of the Sea of Reeds (14:21-31), therefore, becomes the prototypical Old Testament miracle of the deliverance of God's people and the destruction of his enemies (15:1-2). It also discloses God's merciful initiatives prior to his giving of the law (20:1-2); in the Old Testament as in the New Testament, salvation by grace precedes God's demands for good works. The Israelites' wandering in the wilderness is punctuated by various miracles of preservation and judgmentrescue when it seems they will perish (by the ongoing provision of manna and quail chap. 16 and special provisions at key moments, most notably water from the rock 17:1-7; Numbers 10:1-13 ) and destruction of those who disobey God and challenge his appointed leaders (most notably the sudden deaths of Nadab and Abihu Leviticus 10:1-7 ; and the earthquake that swallows Korah and his fellow rebels Numbers 16 ). Plagues, too, require divine intervention to be stopped and Aaron's rod buds to authenticate him as the legitimate priest (chap. 17). In short, God's mighty Acts intend to foster dependence of his people on him, that they might not trust in themselves or any other gods. And, as with Hagar, he occasionally reminds them that he can work to and through people outside the chosen line, even in humorous ways (Balaam's donkey Numbers 22:21-35 ).
Joshua-2Samuel . With Moses' death, Joshua becomes his appointed successor to lead the Israelites into the promised land. A water crossing (of the Jordan) similar to the exodus initiates this period and authenticates Joshua's privileged role (Joshua 3:7 ). Subsequent battles are often won or lost despite the relative strengths of the armies, to remind God's people that he alone is in charge (cf. esp. the conquest of Jericho versus the defeat at Aichaps. 6-7). Although no miracle, per se, occurs as Gideon fights the Midianites, the confusion that causes his enemies to slay each other, despite the small number of opposing forces, is equally attributed to the Lord's direct intervention (Judges 7 ). The report of sun and moon standing still while Joshua fights the Amorites comes in a poetic passage and is perhaps not meant to be taken as literal cosmic upheaval (Joshua 10:12-13 ). But it continues the theme of God's sovereign agency as the cause of victory. Subsequent miracles are also "borderline"Samson's superhuman strength when he is "filled with the Spirit" (Judges 13-16 ) and the ark's "power" over Dagon (1 Samuel 5 ) and the cattle that return it to Beth Shemesh (chap. 6). These and many other passages highlight how the biblical world's divisions between natural and supernatural were far more fluid than today and how most momentous events were attributed to various divinities.
First Kings-Nehemiah . The next major cluster of miracles involves the prophets Elijah and Elisha. The faithful remnant of Israel is locked in a mortal, spiritual battle with idolatry, especially Baal worship. The predominant purpose behind the miracles of these two prophets is to demonstrate Yahweh's superiority over Baal and to call God's people back to worship him. The classic expression of this combat comes at Carmel, as fire from heaven consumes Elijah's sacrifice and the prophets of Baal are destroyed (1 Kings 18:16-40 ). But other mighty deeds also demonstrate the Lord's supremacy over the pagan god of water, fertility, and life: Elijah alone can predict drought and rain (chaps. 17-18), and God will nourish his people (17:1-6) and others (vv. 7-16) during the former. Elisha purifies poisoned water and causes an axhead sunk in the river to float (2 Kings 2:19-22 ; 6:1-7 ). Both prophets, too, work Scripture's first miraculous resuscitations (1 Kings 17:17-24 ; 2 Kings 4:8-37 ). Elijah appropriately becomes the second person in history never to die but to be taken directly to heaven (2 Kings 2:1-18 ; cf. Enoch in Genesis 5:24 ).
Elijah's successor certifies his prophetic role with closely parallel miracles. In addition to those already noted, Elisha provides unfailing oil for a needy widow (2 Kings 4:1-7 ), purifies a pot of food, feeds a hundred men with twenty small loaves, and again demonstrates God's concern for foreigners in healing Naaman's leprosy (4:38- 5:27). The latter two miracles closely resemble Jesus' later feeding of the multitudes, cures of lepers, and concern for Gentiles. Indeed Jesus himself will liken parts of his ministry to God's choice in the days of Elijah and Elisha to favor those outside Israel (Luke 4:25-27 ). Although Elisha dies a normal death, even his bones cause a corpse thrown into his grave to be resuscitated (2 Kings 13:20-21 ). The two other major miracles that occur in the Old Testament historical books involve the leprosy with which faithless Uzziah is afflicted and the sundial shadow's retreat as a sign to portend Hezekiah's recovery from illness (2 Kings 15:1-8 ; 20:1-11 ).
Job-Malachi . Two books whose genre is disputed contain major miracles: Job with his remarkable collection of afflictions and subsequent recovery and Jonah with his preservation by and expulsion from the great fish. Both teach of God's judgment and salvation, and of how even affliction is under his sovereign control for ultimately good purposes. The psalms frequently recount and reflect on God's past signs and wonders. The prophets speak of present and future signs, some more supernatural than others, to corroborate their message. Most famous is the prophecy of the virginal conception in Isaiah 7:14 . The only other major cluster of Old Testament miracles centers on the life of Daniel and his friends in exile in Babylon. Once again Yahweh proves his supremacy over foreign gods and rulers. Thrown into the fiery furnace for refusing to worship Nebuchadnezzar's image, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego are miraculously spared, while the great heat burns up their captors (Daniel 3 ). Thrown into the lion's den for praying to the Lord, Daniel too escapes harm (chap. 6). Other miracles give Daniel the ability to interpret Nebuchadnezzar's dream (chap. 2), and the miraculous writing on Belshazzar's wall (chap. 5).
Matthew-John . The greatest of all biblical miracles is the incarnationGod becoming human (John 1:1-18 ). Foreshadowed by the birth of John the Baptist to the previously barren Elizabeth (Luke 1:5-25 ), the virginal conception of Jesus, the God-man, fulfills prophecy (Matthew 1-2 ) and demonstrates the Spirit's parentage (Luke 1:26-38 ). Jesus' adult ministry regularly features miracles for a variety of purposes. Sometimes they respond to individuals' faith in Christ (e.g., Jairus Matthew 9:18 ; and the hemorrhaging woman 9:22) or are hindered by their lack thereof (the disbelief in Nazareth Mark 6:4-6 a). On other occasions they seem more designed to instill faith where it has been lacking (e.g., the stilling of the storm Mark 4:40 ; or the healing of the nobleman's son Matthew 15:29-39 ).
Other important motifs include Jesus' compassion for the needy (e.g., in feeding the five thousand Mark 6:34 ; or in restoring the two blind men's sight Matthew 20:34 ) and breaking down social barriers in preparation for the universal offer of the gospel (e.g., in cleansing the ritually impure lepers Mark 1:40-45 ; Luke 17:11-19 ; [1] healing the Syrophoenician woman's daughter Mark 7:24-30 ; or feeding the four thousand in Gentile territory John 4:48 ). Frequently Jesus challenges the prevailing sabbath traditions (e.g., the man with the withered hand Mark 3:1-6 ; or the closely parallel healings of cripples in Luke 13:10-17 ; 14:1-6 ) and exposes Israel's predominant faithlessness (e.g., in praising the great faith of the centurion whose servant was sick Matthew 8:5-13 ), including the periodic lack of faith of his own disciples (e.g., with the epileptic they could not cure Matthew 17:14-21 ). In still other instances, Jesus wants to teach a lesson about sin. Sickness may be the result of one's own wickedness; its healing, therefore, an incentive to repent (John 5:1-15 ). In other cases, though, it is wrong to blame anyone; God's greater glory is what is involved (John 9:1-5 ).
But none of these themes proves as prominent as the most central one: Jesus works miracles to demonstrate that the kingdom of God has been inaugurated, the messianic age has arrived, and he is the Christ who will fulfill all of God's previous Scriptures. In explaining the significance of his exorcisms, Jesus makes this claim explicit (Matthew 12:28 ). In replying to John the Baptist about his identity, the claim is more implicit but equally clear (Matthew 11:4-5 ). Once he heals a paralytic to demonstrate his authority to forgive sins (Mark 2:9-10 ). His transfiguration is introduced as God's kingly reign come in power (Mark 9:1 ). Lazarus' revivification grounds Jesus' subsequent claim to be the resurrection and the life (John 11:25 ). And the evangelists' summaries regularly link his mighty deeds with his teachings so that the former legitimate the latter.
These direct statements give clues how to interpret some of the more unusual of Jesus' miracles that often have parabolic or symbolic elements. Turning water into wine probably demonstrates the joy attached to the arrival of the new age (John 2:1-11 ). Cursing the fig tree symbolizes the impending destruction of Israel just as much as the temple cleansing it sandwiches (Mark 11:12-25 ). Feeding the five thousand recalls the manna in the wilderness and sets up Jesus' bread of life discourse (John 6:1-15,25-59 ). Walking on the water is a theophany; Jesus' words of self-revelation echo Exodus 3:14 literally, "I am" (Mark 6:50 ). Healing the deaf-mute effects a rare miracle predicted to herald the messianic age (Mark 7:31-37 ; cf. Isaiah 35:6 ). Raising the son of the Nain widow closely resembles the reanimations by Elijah and Elisha (Luke 7:11-17 ) and occurs on virtually the identical site as one of them (Old Testament Shunem). The two great fish catches point to the disciples' call to be spiritual fishers of people and to Peter's reinstatement after his denial for this continued ministry (Luke 5:1-11 ; John 21:1-14 ).
The greatest miracle of Jesus' life, of course, is his resurrection. Immediately following his death, nature heralds its unusual significance with an earthquake, the rending of the temple veil, and the opening of tombs of certain Old Testament saints, who would then be raised following Jesus' resurrection (Matthew 27:51-54 ). God's resurrection of Jesus vindicates his claims, gives atoning meaning to his death, serves as a prelude to his ascension and exaltation, and makes eternal life and bodily resurrection available to all who trust in him. The best theological commentary on this event is 1 Corinthians 15 .
Each evangelist has his own thematic emphases concerning Jesus' miracles. Mark sharply contrasts the glory of Jesus' public ministry and its preponderance of wonders with the road to the cross and his teaching on suffering (1:1-8:30; 8:31-16:8). Mark, too, introduces the so-called messianic secret motif following several miracles (e.g., 1:34; 3:12; 5:43). Matthew's miracle-stories fit his overall narrative progression from Jesus' particularism to universalism (with chap. 13 as the hinge) and his stress on the fulfillment of Scripture (8:17; 11:4-5). Luke highlights Jesus' compassion for the outcasts of society (4:18; 17:11-19) and his role as a new Moses (9:28-36) and Elijah/Elisha (7:1-28). John's views prove the most distinctive. Whereas the Synoptics use "signs" in a negative sense as that which unbelieving skeptics demand but do not receive save for the resurrection as the "sign of Jonah" (Matthew 12:38-42 ), John consistently speaks of Jesus' miracles as "signs" meant to lead people to faith in Christ (2:11; 4:54; cf. 20:31). But he encourages a maturity that does not require dependence on miraculous proofs (4:48; 20:29). John also pairs seven signs with seven discourses to form the first major half of his Gospel (1:19-11:57). The signs require interpretive teaching even as they legitimate Jesus' claims.
Acts . Jesus' ascension ends his resurrection appearances, marks his return to the Father, and enables him to bestow the Spirit permanently on all believers (Acts 1:1-11 ). The Spirit comes with miraculous confirmation at Pentecost (2:1-3). Apostolic preaching picks up the Old Testament phrase "signs and wonders" to stress the redemptive significance of Christ's ministry (2:22) and to describe how the first Christians continued that work (4:30; 5:12), as commissioned earlier by Jesus himself. Many different believers perform miracles, not just the twelve (Stephen and Philip in Acts 6:8 and Acts 8:13 ), and they continue with about the same frequency throughout the book. Peter and Paul, as the two protagonists of the two halves of Acts (chaps. 1-12,13-28), each work a specially large number, several pairs of which are remarkably parallel (earthquakes to get out of jail 12:5-10; 16:22-34; healings of the lame 3:1-10; 14:8-10; raising the dead 9:36-43; 20:7-12). The apostolic miracles often closely parallel Jesus' mighty works, too (cf. 9:32-35; and Mark 2:1-12 ; 9:36-42 ; and Mark 5:35-42 ). Luke thus stresses that the disciples are the authorized successors of Jesus, and that Peter's Jewish-oriented ministry and Paul's Gentile-centered work equally fulfill Christ's commission. As in other periods, occasional miracles also reflect God's judgment on his enemies (13:6-12) or his rebellious children (5:1-11).
Romans-Revelation . For Paul, healings and miracles are spiritual gifts (1 Corinthians 12:9-10 ) God gives to those whom he chooses (vv. 29-30) throughout the entire period of history until Christ's return (1:7; 13:10-12). But he often withholds miraculous healing because of the remedial value of suffering (2 Corinthians 12:8-9 ). Miracles further certify apostolic credentials (12:12), characterize Paul's ministry (Romans 15:19 ), and attest the truth of Christian life in the Spirit (Galatians 3:5 ). Counterfeit miracles will proliferate in the end times (2 Thessalonians 2:9 ), as Jesus himself had prophesied (Matthew 24:24 ), and as Revelation will describe in greater detail (e.g., 13:13-14a). James attributes a ministry of anointing with oil and prayer for healing to the eldership of the local church (5:14-16).
Conclusion . Throughout the Bible, miracles consistently serve to point people to the one true God, ultimately revealed in Jesus Christ. Their primary purpose is not to meet human need, although that is an important spinoff blessing. But they are first of all theocentric and Christocentric, demonstrating the God of Israel and of Jesus to be supreme over all rivals. Contemporary experience suggests that this pattern continues; miracles today seem most frequent in regions where Satan has long held sway and where people require "power evangelism" to be converted. But God's sovereignty warns against trying to predict when they may occur and refutes the "name it and claim it" heresy that tries to force God to work miracles upon demand, if only one exercises adequate faith.
Craig L. Blomberg
Bibliography . B. Blackburn, Theios Aner and the Markan Miracle Traditions ; L. Bronner, The Stories of Elijah and Elisha ; C. Brown, Miracles and the Critical Mind ; R. T. Fortna, The Fourth Gospel and Its Predecessor ; B. Gerhardsson, The Mighty Acts of Jesus according to Matthew ; J. Green, S. McKnight, and I. H. Marshall, eds., Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels, pp. 299-307,549-60; M. J. Harris, From Grave to Glory ; C. Hyers, The Meaning of Creation ; R. Latourelle, The Miracles of Jesus and the Theology of Miracles; ISBE, 3:371-81; 4:505-8,1100-1101; H. Lockyer, All the Miracles of the Bible ; L. O'Reilly, Word and Sign in the Acts iof the Apostles ; L. Sabourin, The Divine Miracles Discussed and Defended ; G. Theissen, Miracle Stories of the Early Christian Tradition ; H. van der Loos, The Miracles of Jesus ; D. Wenham and C. Blomberg, eds., Gospel Perspectives, vol. 6.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Miracle
A miracle is an out-of-the-ordinary direct and divine intervention in the world. Examples would be the parting of the Red Sea, Jesus walking on water, the resurrection of Lazarus, etc. Some hold that it is a violation of the natural order of physical laws. Others maintain that there is no such violation upon God's part but only a natural manifestation of His work.
They are also known as powers and signs (Mark 9:39; Acts 2:22; Act 19:11) and mighty works (John 10:25-28). They are a manifestation of the power of God over nature (Joshua 10:121-14), animals (Numbers 22:28), people (Genesis 19:26), and illness (2 Kings 5:1014). They are produced by God's power (Acts 15:12), Christ's power (Matthew 10:1), and the Holy Spirit's power (Matthew 12:28).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Miracle
In its original sense, is a word of the same import with wonder; but, in its usual and more appropriate signification, it denotes "an effect contrary to the established constitution and course of things, or a sensible deviation from the known laws of nature." "That the visible world, " says Dr. Gleig, "is governed by stated general rules, or that there is an order of causes and effects established in every part of the system of nature which falls under our observation, is a fact which cannot be controverted. If the Supreme Being, as some have supposed, be the only real agent in the universe, we have the evidence of experience, that in the particular system to which we belong he acts by stated rules. If he employs inferior agents to conduct the various motions from which the phenomena result, we have the same evidence that he has subjected those agents to certain fixed laws, commonly called the laws of nature. On either hypothesis, effects which are produced by the regular operation of these laws, or which are conformable to the established course of events, are properly called natural; and every contradiction to this contitution of the natural system, and the correspondent course of events in it, is called a miracle.
"If this definition of a miracle be just, no event can be deemed miraculous merely because it is strange, or even to us unaccountable: since it may be nothing more than a regular effect of some unknown law of nature. In this country earthquakes are rare; and for monstrous births, perhaps, no particular and satisfactory account can be given: yet an earthquake is as regular an effect of the established laws of nature as any of those with which we are most intimately acquainted: and, under circumstances in which there would always be the same kind of production, the monster is nature's genuine issue. It is therefore necessary, before we can pronounce any effect to be a true miracle, that the circumstances under which it is produced be known, and that the common course of nature be in some degree understood; for in all those cases in which we are totally ignorant of nature, it is impossible to determine what is, or what is not, a deviation from its course. Miracles, therefore, are not, as some have represented them, appeals to our ignorance. They suppose some antecedent knowledge of the course of nature, without which no proper judgment can be formed concerning them; though with it their reality may be so apparent as to prevent all possibility of a dispute.
"Thus, were a physician to cure a blind man of a cataract, by anointing his eyes with a chemical preparation which we had never before seen, and to the nature and effects of which we are absolute strangers, the cure would undoubtedly be wonderful; but we could not pronounce it miraculous, because, for any thing known to us, it might be the natural effect of the operation of the unguent on the eye. But were he to recover his patient merely by commanding him to see, or by anointing his eyes with spittle, we should with the utmost confidence pronounce the cure to be a miracle; because we know perfectly that neither the human voice nor human spittle have, by the established constitution of things, any such power over the diseases of the eye. "If miracles be effects contrary to the established constitution of things, we are certain that they will never be performed on trivial occasions. The constitution of things was established by the Creator and Governor of the universe, and is undoubtedly the offspring of infinite wisdom, pursuing a plan for the best of purposes. From this plan no deviation can be made but by God himself, or by some powerful being acting with his permission. The proportion to their perfection, and the plans of infinite wisdom must be absolutely perfect. From this consideration, some men have ventured to conclude that no miracle was ever wrought, or can rationally be expected; but maturer reflection must soon satisfy us that all such conclusions are hasty.
"Man is unquestionably the principal creature in this world, and apparently the only one in it who is capable of being made acquainted with the relation in which he stands to his Creator. We cannot, therefore, doubt, but that such of the laws of nature as extend not their operation beyond the limits of this earth were established chiefly, if not solely, for the good of mankind; and if, in any particular circumstances, that good can be more effectually promoted by an occasional deviation from those laws, such a deviation may be reasonably expected. "We know from history, that almost all mankind were once sunk into the grossest ignorance of the most important truths; that they knew not the Being by whom they were created and supported; that they paid divine adoration to stocks, stones, and the vilest reptiles; and that they were slaves to the most impious, cruel, and degrading superstitions. : From this depraved state it was surely not unworthy of the Divine Being to rescue his helpless creatures, to enlighten their understandings that they might perceive what is right, and to present to them motives of sufficient force to engage them in the practice of it. But the understandings of ignorant barbarians cannot be enlightened by arguments; because of the force of such arguments as regard moral science they are not qualified to judge.
The philosophers of Athens and Rome inculcated, indeed, many excellent moral precepts, and they sometimes ventured to expose the absurdities of the reigning superstitions; but their lectures had no influence upon the multitude; and they had themselves imbibed such erroneous notions respecting the attributes of the Supreme Being, and the nature of the human soul, and converted those notions into first principles, of which they would not permit an examination, that even among them a thorough reformation was not to be expected from the powers of reasoning. It is likewise to be observed, that there are many truths of the utmost importance to mankind, which unassisted reason could never have discovered. Amongst these, we may confidently reckon the immortality of the soul, the terms upon which God will save sinners, and the manner in which that all perfect Being may be acceptably worshipped; about all of which philosophers were in such uncertainty, that, according to Plato, 'Whatever is set right, and as it should be, in the present evil state of the world, can be so only by the particular interposition of God. "an immediate revelation from heaven, therefore, was the only method by which infinite wisdom and perfect goodness could reform a bewildered and vicious race.
But this revelation, at whatever time we suppose it given, must have been made directly either to some chosen individuals commissioned to instruct others, or to every man and woman for whose benefit it was ultimately intended. Were every person instructed in the knowledge of his duty by immediate inspiration, and were the motives to practise it brought home to his mind by God himself, human nature would be wholly changed; men would not be moral agents, nor by consequence be capable either of reward or of punishment. It remains, therefore that, if God has been graciously pleased to enlighten and reform mankind, without destroying that moral nature which man possesses, he can have done it only by revealing his truth to certain chosen instruments, who were the immediate instructors of their contemporaries, and through them have been the instructors of succeeding ages. "Let us suppose this to have been actually the case, and consider how those inspired teachers could communicate to others every truth which had been revealed to themselves. They might easily, if it were part of their duty, to deliver a sublime divine system of natural and moral science, and establish it upon the common basis of experiment and demonstration: but what foundation could they lay for those truths which unassisted reason cannot discover, and which, when they are revealed, appear to have no necessary relation to any thing previously known? To a bare affirmation that they had been immediately received from God, no rational being could be expected to assent.
The teachers might be men of known veracity, whose simple assertion would be admitted as sufficient evidence for any fact in conformity with the laws of nature; but as every man has the evidence of his own consciousness and experience that revelations from heaven are deviations from these laws, an assertion so apparently extravagant would be rejected as false, unless supported by some better proof than the mere affirmation of the teacher. In this state of things we can conceive no evidence sufficient to make such doctrines be received as the truths of God, but the power of working miracles committed to him who taught them. This would, indeed, be fully adequate to the purpose: for if there were nothing in the doctrines themselves impious, immoral, or contrary to truths already known, the only thing which could render the teacher's assertion incredible, would be its implying such an intimate communion with God as is contrary to the established course of things, by which men are left to acquire all their knowledge by the exercise of their own faculties. Let us now suppose one of those inspired teachers to tell his countrymen, that he did not desire them, on his ipse dixit, to believe that he had any preternatural communion with the Deity, but that, for the truth of his assertion, he would give them the evidence of their own senses; and after this declaration, let us suppose him immediately to raise a person from the dead in their presence, merely by calling upon him to come out of his grave.
Would not the only possible objection to the man's veracity be removed by this miracle? and his assertion that he had received such and such doctrines from God be as fully credited as if it related to the most common occurrence? Undoubtedly it would; for when so much preternatural power was visibly communicated to this person, no one could have reason to question his having received an equal portion of preternatural knowledge. A palpable deviation from the known laws of nature in one instance, is a sensible proof that such a deviation is possible in another; and in such a case as this, it is the witness of God to the truth of a man. "Miracles, then, under which we include prophecy, are the only direct evidence which can be given of divine inspiration. When a religion, or any religious truth, is to be revealed from heaven, they appear to be absolutely necessary to enforce its reception among men; and this is the only case in which we can suppose them necessary, or believe for a moment that they ever have been or will be performed. "The history of almost every religion abounds with relations of prodigies and wonders, and of the intercourse of men with the gods; but we know of no religious system, those of the Jews and Christians excepted, which appealed to miracles as the sole evidence of its truth and divinity. The pretended miracles mentioned by Pagan historians and poets, are not said to have been publicly wrought to enforce the truth of a new religion, contrary to the reigning idolatry.
Many of them may be clearly shown to have been mere natural events; others of them are represented as having been performed in secret on the most trivial occasions, and in obscure and fabulous ages long prior to the era of the writers by whom they are recorded; and such of them as at first view appear to be best attested, are evidently tricks contrived for interested purposes, to flatter power, or to promote the prevailing superstitions. For these reasons, as well as on account of the immoral character of the divinities by whom they are said to have been wrought, they are altogether unworthy of examination, and carry in the very nature of them the completest proofs of falsehood and imposture. "But the miracles recorded of Moses and of Christ bear a very different character. None of them are represented as wrought on trivial occasions. The writers who mention them were eye-witnesses of the facts; which they affirm to have been performed publicly, in attestation of the truth of their respective systems. They are, indeed, so incorporated with these systems, that the miracles cannot be separated from the doctrines; and if the miracles be not really performed, the doctrines cannot possibly be true.
Besides all this, they were wrought in support of revelations which opposed all the religious systems, superstitions, and prejudices, of the age in which they were given; a circumstance which of itself sets them in point of authority, infinitely above the Pagan prodigies, as well as the lying wonders of the Romish church. "It is indeed, we believe, universally admitted that the miracles mentioned in the book of Exodus, and in the four Gospels, might, to those who saw them performed, be sufficient evidence of the divine inspiration of Moses and of Christ; but to us it may be thought that they are no evidence whatever, as we must believe in the miracles themselves, if we believe in them at all, upon the bare authority of human testimony. Why, it has been sometimes asked, are not miracles wrought in all ages and countries? If the religion of Christ was to be of perpetual duration, every generation of men ought to have complete evidence of its truth and divinity. "To the performance of miracles in every age and in every country, perhaps the same objections lie, as to the immediate inspiration of every individual. Were those miracles universally received as such, men would be so overwhelmed with the number rather than with the force of their authority, as hardly to remain masters of their own conduct; and in that case the very end of all miracles would be defeated by their frequency.
The truth, however, seems to be, that miracles so frequently repeated would not be received as such, and of course would have no authority; because it would be difficult, and in many cases impossible, to distinguish them from natural events. If they recurred regularly at certain intervals, we could not prove them to be deviations from the known laws of nature, because we should have the same experience for one series of events as for the other; for the regular succession of preternatural effects, as for the established constitution and course of things. "Be this, however, as it may, we shall take the liberty to affirm, that for the reality of the Gospel miracles, we have evidence as convincing to the reflecting mind, though not so striking to vulgar apprehension, as those had who were contemporary with Christ and his apostles, and actually saw the mighty works which he performed. Me. Hume, indeed, endeavoured to prove, that 'no testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle? and the reasoning employed for this purpose is, that 'a miracle being a violation of the laws of nature, which a firm and unalterable experience has established, the proof against a miracle, from the very nature of the fact, is as entire as any argument from experience' can be: whereas our experience of human veracity, which (according to him) is the sole foundation of the evidence of testimony, as far from being uniform, and can therefore never preponderate against that experience which admits of no exception.'
This boasted and plausible argument has with equal candour and acuteness been examined by Dr. Campbell, in his Dissertation on Miracles, who justly observes, that so far is experience from being the sole foundation of the evidence of testimony, that, on the contrary, testimony is the sole foundation of by far the greater part of what Mr. Hume calls firm and unalterable experience; and that it, in certain circumstances, we did not give an implicit faith to testimony, our knowledge of events would be confined to those which had fallen under the immediate observation of our own senses. "We need not waste time here in proving that the miracles, as they are presented in the writings of the New Testament, were of such a nature, and performed before so many witnesses, that no imposition could possibly be practised on the senses of those who affirm that they were present. From every page of the Gospel this is so evident, that the philosophical adversaries of the Christian faith never suppose the apostles to have been themselves deceived, but boldly accuse them of bearing false witness. But if this accusation be well founded, their testimony itself is as great a miracle as any which they record of themselves, or of their Master. For if they sat down to fabricate their pretended revelation, and to contrive a series of miracles to which they were unanimously to appeal for its truth, it is plain, since they proved successful in their daring enterprise, that they must have clearly foreseen every possible circumstance in which they could be placed, and have prepared consistent answers to every question that could be put to them by their most inveterate and most enlightened enemies; by the statesman, the lawyer, the philosopher, and the priest.
That such foreknowledge as this would have been miraculous, will not surely be denied: since it forms the very attribute which we find it the most difficult to allow even to God himself. It is not, however, the only miracle which this supposition would compel us to swallow. The very resolution of the apostles to propagate the belief of false miracles in support of such a religion as that which is taught in the New Testament, is as great a miracle as human imagination can easily conceive. "When they formed this design, either they must have hoped to succeed, or they must have foreseen that they should fail in their undertaking; and, in either case, they chose evil for its own sake. They could not, if they foresaw that they should fail, look for any thing but that contempt, disgrace, and persecution, which were then the inevitable consequences of an unsuccessful endeavour to overthrow the established religion. Nor could their prospects be brighter upon the supposition of their success. As they knew themselves to be false witnesses, and impious deceivers, they could have no hopes beyond the grave; and by determining to oppose all the religious systems, superstitions, and prejudices of the age in which they lived, they wilfully exposed themselves to inevitable misery in the present life, to insult and imprisonment, to stripes and death. Nor can it be said that they might look forward to power and affluence, when they should through sufferings have converted their countrymen; for so desirous were they of obtaining nothing but misery, as the end of their mission, that they made their own persecution a test of the truth of their doctrines.
They introduced the Master from whom they pretended to have received these doctrines as telling them, that 'they were sent forth as sheep in the midst of wolves: that they should be delivered up to councils, and scourged in synagogues; that they should be hated of all men for his name's sake; that the brother should deliver up the brother to death, and the father the child; and that he who took not up his cross, and followed after him, was not worthy of him.' The very system of religion, therefore, which they invented and resolved to impose upon mankind, was so contrived, that the worldly prosperity of its first preachers, and even their exemption from persecution, was incompatible with its success. Had these clear predictions of the Author of that religion, under whom the apostles acted only as ministers not been verified, all mankind must have instantly perceived that their pretence to inspiration was false, and that Christianity was a scandalous and impudent imposture. All this the apostles could not but foresee when they formed their plan for deluding the world. Whence it follows, that when they resolved to support their pretended revelation by an appeal to forged miracles, they wilfully, and with their eyes open, exposed themselves to inevitable misery, whether they should succeed or fail in their enterprise; and that they concerted their measures so as not to admit of a possibility of recompence to themselves, either in this life or in that which is to come.
But if there be a law of nature, for the reality of which we have better evidence than we have for others, it is, that 'no man can choose misery for its own sake, ' or make the acquisition of it the ultimate end of his pursuit. The existence of other laws of nature we know by testimony, and our own observation of the regularity of their effects. The existence of this law is made known to us not only by these means, but also by the still clearer and more conclusive evidence of our own consciousness. "Thus, then, do miracles force themselves upon our assent in every possible view which we can take of this interesting subject. If the testimony of the first preachers of Christianity were true, the miracles recorded in the Gospel were certainly performed, and the doctrines of our religion are derived from heaven. On the other hand, if that testimony were false, either God must have miraculously effaced from the minds of those by whom it was given, all the associations formed between their sensible ideas and the words of language, or he must have endowed those men with the gift of prescience, and have impelled them to fabricate a pretended revelation for the purpose of deceiving the world, and involving themselves in certain and foreseen destruction. "
The power necessary to perform the one series of these miracles may, for any thing known to us, be as great as that which would be requisite for the performance of the other; and, considered merely as exertions of preternatural power, they may seem to balance each other, and to hold the mind in a state of suspense; but when we take into consideration the different purposes for which these opposite and contending miracles were wrought, the balance is instantly destroyed. The miracles recorded in the Gospels, if real, were wrought in support of a revelation which, in the opinion of all by whom it is received, has brought to light many important truths which could not otherwise have been made known to men; and which, by the confession of its adversaries, contains the purest moral precepts by which the conduct of mankind was ever directed. The opposite series of miracles, if real, was performed to enable, and even to compel, a company of Jews, of the lowest rank and of the narrowest education, to fabricate, with the view of inevitable destruction to themselves, a consistent scheme of falsehood, and by an appeal to forged miracles to impose it upon the world as a revelation from heaven. The object of the former miracles is worthy of a God of infinite wisdom, goodness, and power; the object of the latter is absolutely inconsistent with wisdom and goodness, which are demonstrably attributes of that Being by whom alone it follows, that the supposition of the apostles bearing false testimony to the miracles of their Master, implies a series of deviations from the laws of nature infinitely less probable in themselves than those miracles: and therefore, by Mr. Hume's maxim, we must necessarily reject the supposition of falsehood in the testimony, and admit the reality of the miracles.
So true it is, that for the reality of the Gospel miracles we have evidence as convincing to the reflecting mind as those had who were contemporary with Christ and his apostles, and were actual witnesses to their mighty works." The power of working miracles is supposed by some to have been continued no longer than the apostles' days. Others think that it was continued long after. It seems pretty clear, however, that miracles universally ceased before Chrysostom's time. As for what Augustine says of those wrought at the tombs of the martyrs, and some other places, in his time, the evidence is not always so convincing as might be desired in facts of importance. the controversy concerning the time when miraculous powers ceased was carried on by Dr. Middleton, in his Free Enquiry into the Miraculous Powers, &c. by Mr. Yate, Mr. Toll, and others, who suppose that miracles ceased with the apostles. On the contrary side appeared Dr. Stebbing, Dr. Chapman, Mr. Parker, Mr. Brooke, and others. As to the miracles of the Romish church, it is evident, as Doddridge observes, that many of them were ridiculous tales, according to their own historians; others were performed without any credible witnesses, or in circumstances where the performer had the greatest opportunity of juggling; and it is particularly remarkable, that they were hardly ever wrought where they seem most necessary, 1: e. in countries where those doctrines are renounced which that church esteems of the highest importance.
See Fleetwood, Clarapede, Conybeare, Campbell, Lardner, Farmer, Adams, and Weston, on Miracles, article Miracle, Enc. Brit. Doddridge's Lect. lec. 101 and 135; Leland's View of Deistical Writers, letter 3, 4, 7; Hurrion on the Spirit, p. 299. &c.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Miracle
Miracles in Scripture are designed, for the most part, as so many, testimonies in proof of the doctrine delivered at the same time. Thus the Lord Jesus saith, "The works that I do in my Father's name, they bear witness of me." (John 10:25) And when in concurrence with miracles, the word of God, and the works of God are joined together, these establish and seal the truth as it is in Jesus. There were certain particularities in the miracles of the Lord Jesus, which marked his divine nature in the performance of them in a way and manner different from all his servants. They performed all the miracles they wrought by the appointment and in the name of the Lord Jesus wrought his in his own name. It is true indeed, in the instance of the resurrection of Lazarus from the dead, the Lord Jesus first addressed his Father: but then he assigned the special reason for so doing; because"of them, said Jesus, that stood by, that they might know and believe that the Father had sent me."At the same time proclaiming himself as the resurrection and the life, and giving proof of it by becoming so to Lazarus. (See John 11:23-44) In addition to this, it should be farther remarked, that the miracles of the Lord Jesus were many of them of a personal kind, and not unfrequeuuy wrought without any immediate cause in confirmation of his doctrine, but to set forth his gracious character of Redeemer. In those acts of Christ in which he manifested forth the sovereignty of his power, he might be said to act in common with the other persons of the GODHEAD: and the Father, and the Holy Ghost, had a joint interest in these things with himself. But in those actions of the Lord Jesus peculiar to the Mediator as Mediator, and where, from having as Son of God abased himself for the purposes of salvation, he manifested forth the miracles he wrought, here the glory of the work became personal, and belonged wholly to Jesus as Mediator, I need not particularize instances, else I might observe, that the healed paralytic, the cleansed leper, the centurion's son, the water turned into wine; these and the tike are all of the personal kind. And perhaps it is not among the smallest instances of Christ's personal glory and grace, from the actions of miracles, that the Lord Jesus in all he wrought testified his personal love and mercy to his people. The evangelist John is careful to inform the church, that "the beginning of miracles in Cana of Galilee" was shewn in converting water into wine; as if to say, such are the blessings of the gospel, Our common mercies will be made rich mercies; and the nether springs in Jesus, if for his personal glory, shall become upper springs in Jesus. And this is still the more striking, because under the law the first miracle of his servant Moses was manifested in converting water into blood; but Jesus's first miracle shall be converting water into wine. Sweet thought to the believer! Jesus's person, and Jesus's grace, give a softening and a I converting blessing to all our states and circumstances. And what an argument of the most persuasive nature ariseth therefrom to look unto him under every exercise, and to wait his grace in every dispensation. Here it is, as in Cana of Galilee, Jesus manifesteth forth his glory, and his disciples believe on him. (John 2:11)
Webster's Dictionary - Miracle
(1):
(v. t.) To make wonderful.
(2):
(n.) A wonder or wonderful thing.
(3):
(n.) Specifically: An event or effect contrary to the established constitution and course of things, or a deviation from the known laws of nature; a supernatural event, or one transcending the ordinary laws by which the universe is governed.
(4):
(n.) A miracle play.
(5):
(n.) A story or legend abounding in miracles.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Miracle
Also called a sign, wonder, or mighty work, Acts 2:32 ; a work so superseding in its higher forms the established laws of nature as to evince the special interposition of God. A miracle is to be distinguished from wonders wrought by designing men through artful deceptions, occult sciences, or laws of nature unknown except to adepts. The miracles wrought by Christ, for example, were such as God only could perform; were wrought in public, before numerous witnesses, both friends and foes; were open to the most perfect scrutiny; had an end in view worthy of divine sanction; were attested by witnesses whose character and conduct establish their claim to our belief; and are further confirmed by institutions still existing, intended to commemorate them, and dating from the period of the miracles. Christ appealed to his mighty works as undeniable proofs of his divinity and Messiahship, Matthew 9:6 11:4,5,23,24 John 10:24-27 20:29,31 . The deceptions of the magicians in Egypt, and of false prophets in ancient and in modern times, Deuteronomy 13:1 Matthew 24:24 2 Thessalonians 2:9 Revelation 13:13,14 , would not bear the above tests. By granting to any man the power to work a miracle, God gave the highest attestation to the truth he should teach and the message he should bring, 1 Kings 18:38,39 ; this is God's own seal, not to be affixed to false hoods; and though the lying wonders of Satan and his agents were so plausible as to "deceive if possible the very elect," no one who truly sought to know and do the will of God could be deluded by them.
The chief object of miracles having been to authenticate the revelation God has made of his will, these mighty words ceased when the Scripture canon was completed and settled, and Christianity was fairly established. Since the close of the first century from the ascension of Christ, few or no undoubted miracles have been wrought; and whether a sufficient occasion for new miracles will ever arise is known only to God.
The following list comprises most of the miracles on record in the Bible, not including the supernatural visions and revelations of himself which God vouch-safed to his ancient servants, nor those numerous wonders of his providence which manifest his hand almost as indisputable as miracles themselves. See also PROPHECY . Old Testament Miracles
The creation of all things, Genesis 1:1-31 .
The deluge, comprising many miracles, Genesis 6:1-22 .
The destruction of Sodom, etc., Genesis 19:1-38 .
The healing of Abimelech, Genesis 20:17,18 .
The burning bush, Exodus 3:2-4 .
Moses' rod made a serpent, and restored, Exodus 4:3-4 7:10 .
Moses' hand made leprous, and healed, Exodus 4.6-7 .
Water turned into blood, Exodus 4:9,30 .
The Nile turned to blood, Exodus 7:20 .
Frogs brought and removed, Exodus 8:6,13 .
Lice brought, Exodus 8:17 .
Flies brought, and removed, Exodus 8:21-31 .
Murrain of beasts, Exodus 9:3-6 .
Boils and blains brought, Matthew 8:5-133 .
Hail brought, and removed, Exodus 9:23,33 .
Locusts brought, and removed, Matthew 9:2-6 .
Darkness brought, Numbers 9:15-23 .
First-born destroyed, Exodus 10:29 .
The Red Sea divided, Exodus 14:21-22 .
Egyptians overwhelmed, Exodus 14:26-28 .
Waters of Marah sweetened, Exodus 15:27 .
Quails and manna sent, Exodus 16:1-36 .
Water from the rock, in Horeb, Exodus 17:6 .
Amalek vanquished, Exodus 17:11-13 .
Pillar of cloud and fire, Exodus 10:22 .
Leprosy of Miriam, Numbers 12:10 .
Destruction of Korah, etc., Numbers 16:28-35,46-50 .
Aaron's rod budding, Numbers 17:8 .
Water from the rock, in Kadesh, Numbers 20:11 .
Healing by the brazen serpent, Numbers 21:8,9 .
Balaam's ass speaks, Numbers 22:28 .
Plague in the desert, Numbers 25:1,9 .
Water of Jordan divided, Joshua 3:10-17 .
Jordan restored to its course, Joshua 4:18 .
Jericho taken, Joshua 6:6-20 .
Achan discovered, Joshua 7:14-21 .
Sun and moon stand still, Joshua 10:12-14 .
Gideon's fleece wet, Judges 6:36-40 .
Midianites destroyed, Judges 7:16-22 .
Exploits of Samson, Judges 14:1-16:31 .
House of Dagon destroyed, Judges 16:30 .
Dagon falls before the ark, etc., 1 Samuel 5:1-12 .
Return of the ark, 1 Samuel 6:12 .
Thunder and rain in harvest, 1 Samuel 12:18 .
Jeroboam's hand withered, etc., 1 Kings 13:4,6 .
The altar rent, 1 Kings 13:5 .
Drought caused, Matthew 10:1-8 .
Elijah fed by ravens, 1 Kings 17:6 .
Meal and oil supplied, 1 Kings 17:14-16 .
Child restored to life, 1 Kings 17:22-23 .
Sacrifice consumed by fire, 1 Kings 18:36,38 .
Rain brought, 1 Kings 18:41-45 .
Men destroyed by fire, 2 Kings 1:10-12 .
Waters of Jordan divided, 2 Kings 2:14 .
Oil supplied, 2 Kings 4:1-7 .
Child restored to life, 2 Kings 4:32-35 .
Naaman healed, 2 Kings 5:10,14 .
Gehazi's leprosy, 2 Kings 5:27 .
Iron caused to swim, 2 Kings 6:6 .
Syrians smitten blind, etc., Matthew 17:1-8 .
Hezekiah healed, 2 Kings 20:7 .
Shadow put back, 2 Kings 20:11 .
Pestilence in Israel, 1 Chronicles 21:14 .
Jonah preserved by a fish, Jonah 1:17 2:10 .
New Testament Miracles.
The star in the east, Matthew 2:3 .
The Spirit like a dove, Matthew 3:16 .
Christ's fast and temptations, Matthew 4:1-11 .
Many miracles of Christ, Matthew 4:23-24 8:16 14:14,36 15:30 Mark 1:34 Luke 6:17-19 .
Lepers cleansed, Matthew 8:3-4 Luke 17:14 .
Centurion's servant healed, 1618068031_78 .
Peter's wife's mother healed, Matthew 8:14 .
Tempests stilled, Matthew 8:23-26 14:32 .
Devils cast out, Matthew 8:28-32 9:32-33 15:22-28 17:14-18 .
Paralytics healed, Exodus 10:13,19 Mark 2:3-12 .
Issue of blood healed, Matthew 9:20-22 .
Jairus' daughter raised to life, Matthew 9:18,25 .
Sight given to the blind, Matthew 9:27-30 20:34 Mark 8:22-25 John 9:17 .
The dumb restored, Matthew 9:32-33 12:22 Mark 7:33-35 .
Miracles by the disciples, 1 Kings 17:6 .
Multitudes fed, Matthew 14:15-21 15:35-38 .
Christ walking on the sea, Matthew 14:25-27 .
Peter walking on the sea, Matthew 14:29 .
Christ's transfiguration, etc., 2 Kings 19:35 .
Tribute from a fish's mouth, Matthew 17:27 .
The fig tree withered, Matthew 21:19 .
Miracles at the crucifixion, Matthew 27:51-53 .
Miracles at the resurrection, Matthew 28:1-7 Luke 24:6 .
Draught of fishes, Luke 5:4-6 John 21:6 .
Widow's son raised to life, Luke 7:14,15 .
Miracles before John's messengers, Luke 7:21-22 .
Miracles by the seventy, Luke 10:9,17 .
Woman healed of infirmity, Luke 13:11-13 .
Dropsy cured, Luke 14:2-4 .
Malchus' ear restored, Luke 22:50-51 .
Water turned to wine, John 2:6-10 .
Nobleman's son healed, John 4:46-53 .
Impotent man healed, John 5:5-9 .
Sudden crossing of the sea, John 6:21 .
Lazarus raised from the dead, John 11:43-44 .
Christ's coming to his disciples, John 20:19,26 .
Wonders at the Pentecost, Acts 2:1-11 .
Miracles by the apostles, Acts 2:43 5:12 .
Lame man cured, Acts 3:7 .
Death of Ananias and Sapphira, Acts 5:5,10 .
Many sick healed,
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Miracle
1: δύναμις (Strong's #1411 — Noun Feminine — dunamis — doo'-nam-is ) "power, inherent ability," is used of works of a supernatural origin and character, such as could not be produced by natural agents and means. It is translated "miracles" in the RV and AV in Acts 8:13 (where variant readings give the words in different order); 19:11; 1 Corinthians 12:10,28,29 ; Galatians 3:5 ; AV only, in Acts 2:22 (RV, "mighty works"); Hebrews 2:4 (RV, "powers"). In Galatians 3:5 , the word may be taken in its widest sense, to include "miracles" both physical and moral. See MIGHT , A, No. 1, POWER, WORK.
2: σημεῖον (Strong's #4592 — Noun Neuter — semeion — say-mi'-on ) "a sign, mark, token" (akin to semaino, "to give a sign;" sema, "a sign"), is used of "miracles" and wonders as signs of Divine authority; it is translated "miracles" in the RV and AV of Luke 23:8 ; Acts 4:16,22 ; most usually it is given its more appropriate meaning "sign," "signs," e.g., Matthew 12:38,39 , and in every occurrence in the Synoptists, except Luke 23:8 ; in the following passages in John's Gospel the RV substitutes "sign" or "signs" for the AV, "miracle or miracles;" John 2:11,23 ; 3:2 ; 4:54 ; 6:2,14,26 ; 7:31 ; 9:16 ; 10:41 ; 11:47 ; 12:18,37 ; the AV also has "signs" elsewhere in this Gospel; in Acts, RV, "signs," AV, "miracles," in Acts 6:8 ; 8:6 ; 15:12 ; elsewhere only in Revelation 13:14 ; 16:14 ; 19:20 . See SIGN , TOKEN , WONDER.

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Wonder - See Miracle ...
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Sign - See Miracle ...
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Nisan - Standard; Miracle
Eliphal - A Miracle of God
Pelaiah - The Lord's secret or Miracle
Jealousy, Waters of - It could not injure the innocent or punish the guilty except by Miracle; contrary to pagan ordeals, wherein the innocent could scarcely escape except by Miracle
Wonderwork - ) A wonderful work or act; a prodigy; a Miracle
Miraculize - ) To cause to seem to be a Miracle
Firkin - The quantity of wine produced by the Miracle at Cana was large: but the assemblage was also large; the festivities continued, it may be, a whole week, Judges 14:12 ; and many would be drawn to the scene by hearing of the Miracle
Chanukah menorah - The eight-branched menorah (candelabra) kindled on Chanukah commemorating the Miracle of Chanukah
Chanukiah - The eight-branched menorah (candelabra) kindled on Chanukah commemorating the Miracle of Chanukah
Sannecherib - king of Assyria, who attempted to capture Jerusalem but was thwarted by a Miracle...
Thaumaturgus - ) A Miracle worker; - a title given by the Roman Catholics to some saints
Marvelous - ) Partaking of the character of Miracle, or supernatural power; incredible
Fast of esther - fast observed on the thirteenth of Adar in commemoration of Queen Esther�s fast at the time of the Miracle of Purim ...
Balaam - ) A paragraph describing something wonderful, used to fill out a newspaper column; - an allusion to the Miracle of Balaam's ass speaking
Adbeel - (Arabic "miracle of God"
Adbeel - Miracle of God, the third of the twelve sons of Ishmael, and head of an Arabian tribe (Genesis 25:13 ; 1 Chronicles 1:29 )
Hanina ben dosa, rabbi - (1century BCE) Mishnaic sage, resident of the Galilee, pupil of Johanan ben Zakkai, and renowned Miracle worker
Chanina ben dosa - (1century BCE) Mishnaic sage, resident of the Galilee, pupil of Johanan ben Zakkai, and renowned Miracle worker
Cana - City of Galilee, Palestine, near Nazareth, the scene of Our Lord's first Miracle (John 2) and His cure of the ruler's son (John 4) and the birthplace of Nathaniel or Saint Bartholomew (John 21). The Miracle of the marriage feast of Cana which has made the city forever famous, when Christ turned water into wine, was performed before His public life had fully begun, and is one of the best-authenticated of Our Lord's Miracles
Miraculous - ) Of the nature of a Miracle; performed by supernatural power; effected by the direct agency of almighty power, and not by natural causes
Talitha Cumi - " Peter, who was present when the Miracle was wrought, recalled the actual words used by our Lord, and told them to Mark
Zeal - " (Psalms 69:9) And when we behold in confirmation of it, such a Miracle as scourging from the temple the multitude of those who performed it—a Miracle, properly considered, almost as great as any Christ performed on earth; such a view of Jesus may, but nothing else can, give a lively idea of zeal! (John 2:13-17)...
Whale - In the case of Jonah the Hebrew word is dag, or dagah, a fish; it may not have been a whale: sharks have been known to swallow men entire, and whatever fish it was that swallowed him, it was a Miracle that preserved him alive, and caused him to be safely landed on shore again. It is only by denying the Miracle that any difficulty arises
Cana - A town noted as the scene of Christ's first Miracle, John 2:1-11, and of another Miracle, 4:46-54, and as the home of Feast of Asses - Scene in the medieval Miracle play, Processus prophetarum, in which Balaam and his ass figured prominently
Asses, Feast of - Scene in the medieval Miracle play, Processus prophetarum, in which Balaam and his ass figured prominently
Cana - and first Miracle that he wrought of turning water into wine
Marvel - ) That which causes wonder; a prodigy; a Miracle
Antiochus iv epiphanes - The Miracle 8634 of his defeat, and the subsequent rededication of the Temple, is commemorated on Chanukah
Mercurius, - When a Miracle had been wrought by Paul at Lystra the heathen inhabitants supposed this god was visiting them in the person of Paul, and the priest would have sacrificed to him
Daberath - Tradition has incorrectly made it the scene of the Miracle of the cure of the lunatic child (Matthew 17:14 )
en-Eglaim - ” A spring near the Dead Sea, where Ezekiel predicted a Miracle, the salt waters being made fresh and becoming a paradise for fishing (Ezekiel 47:10 )
Baal-Zephon - ” Place in Egypt near which Israel camped before Miracle of crossing the sea (Exodus 14:2 ,Exodus 14:2,14:9 )
Gergesenes - A place rendered memorable by our Lord's having visited it, and working a Miracle there upon a poor creature under possession of an evil spirit
Fleece - The Miracle of Gideon's fleece (Judges 6:37-40 ) consisted in the dew having fallen at one time on the fleece without any on the floor, and at another time in the fleece remaining dry while the ground was wet with dew
Miracle of Grace - It is improperly called a Miracle; it is rather a remarkable change in a soul's career wrought by a peculiar and special intervention of God, quite distinct from His general providence and liberality
Lazarus - This Miracle so excited the wrath of the Jews that they sought to put both Jesus and Lazarus to death
Malchus - This was the last Miracle of bodily cure wrought by our Lord
Ephphatha - Whenever we read this Miracle of the Lord Jesus, shall we not beg the Lord to say to us, as to this poor man, that all our spiritual faculties may be opened at his sovereign voice, and all unite in his praises?...
Miracle - ) A Miracle play. ) A story or legend abounding in Miracles
Gadara, Gadarenes - How the reading Γαδαρηνῶν crept in, or, if original, what exactly it meant, we may not be able to explain satisfactorily, but one thing is certain,—the Miracle cannot have taken place at the city of Gadara, the modern Umm Keis. 354), ‘If the Miracle was performed at Gadara, then the swine must have run down the mountain for an hour, forded the deep Jarmuk (Hieromax), ascended its northern bank, and raced across the level plain several miles before they could reach (the nearest margin of the lake—a feat which no herd of swine would be likely to achieve even though they were “possessed. ” ’ In short, no one who has seen the position of Gadara would ever dream of locating the Miracle there
Drama - See also: ...
Everyman
Miracle Plays
Moralities
Passion Play
Fishes, Loaves And - Gospel narrative of the miraculous multiplication of five loaves of bread and two fishes to feed the five thousand who had been attracted by the words and Miracles of Christ to follow Him into the desert, or mountain as Saint John styles it (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6). In John the Miracle is followed by the discourse of Christ on the Sacrament of the Eucharist which He was to establish
Loaves And Fishes - Gospel narrative of the miraculous multiplication of five loaves of bread and two fishes to feed the five thousand who had been attracted by the words and Miracles of Christ to follow Him into the desert, or mountain as Saint John styles it (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6). In John the Miracle is followed by the discourse of Christ on the Sacrament of the Eucharist which He was to establish
Dorcas - This was the first such Miracle performed through any of the apostles, and it resulted in many new believers
Agapitus, Saint - A youth of fifteen, he was thrown to the wild beasts in the arena, but was miraculously preserved; this Miracle converted many; the judge therefore ordered the saint to be beheaded
Oratorio - , to be sung with an orchestral accompaniment, but without action, scenery, or costume, although the oratorio grew out of the Mysteries and the Miracle and Passion plays, which were acted
Aijalon - a city of the Canaanites; the valley adjoining to which is memorable in sacred history from the Miracle of Joshua, in arresting the course of the sun and moon, that the Israelites might have sufficient light to pursue their enemies, Joshua 10:12-13
Sign - Also a supernatural portent, Luke 21:11 ; and a Miracle, regarded as a token of the divine agency, Exodus 4:7-9 Mark 8:11
Sign - circumcision as a sign of the covenant); (3) as an ‘indication’-Matthew 26:48 (Judas’ kiss), Luke 2:12 (to the Shepherds) Luke 2:34 (the child Jesus set for a sign); (4) hence for some wonderful indication-Matthew 24:3; Matthew 24:30, Mark 13:4 (of Christ’s Coming), Matthew 16:1; Matthew 16:4, Mark 8:11, Mark 16:17; Mark 16:20, Luke 11:15; Luke 11:29 (to show Christ’s power), Matthew 16:3 (signs of the times) Matthew 16:4 (sign of Jonah), 1 Corinthians 14:22 (tongues and prophesying as a sign of the power of Christianity); and therefore for a ‘miracle’ or wonderful deed which has instruction as its object. The usual sense of σημεῖον in the NT is a ‘miracle,’ especially in the plural (see article Miracle)
Sign - circumcision as a sign of the covenant); (3) as an ‘indication’-Matthew 26:48 (Judas’ kiss), Luke 2:12 (to the Shepherds) Luke 2:34 (the child Jesus set for a sign); (4) hence for some wonderful indication-Matthew 24:3; Matthew 24:30, Mark 13:4 (of Christ’s Coming), Matthew 16:1; Matthew 16:4, Mark 8:11, Mark 16:17; Mark 16:20, Luke 11:15; Luke 11:29 (to show Christ’s power), Matthew 16:3 (signs of the times) Matthew 16:4 (sign of Jonah), 1 Corinthians 14:22 (tongues and prophesying as a sign of the power of Christianity); and therefore for a ‘miracle’ or wonderful deed which has instruction as its object. The usual sense of σημεῖον in the NT is a ‘miracle,’ especially in the plural (see article Miracle)
Theurgy - ) A divine work; a Miracle; hence, magic; sorcery
Gergesenes - See Matthew 8:28 , and others Gerasenes; but Gerasa lay forty miles southeast of the scene of the Miracle
Cana - The birthplace of Nathanael, the city in which our Lord performed his first Miracle, and from which he soon after sent a miraculous healing to the nobleman's son at Capernaum, eighteen miles off, John 2:1-11 ; 4:46-54 ; 21:2
Chester Plays - One of the cycle of English Miracle plays, performed during Whitsuntide in Chester about the beginning of the 15th century
Bellini, Gentile - Gentile completed the work of his father in a series on The Miracle of the Cross
Meir, rabbi - (2century CE) Mishnaic sage, also known as Meir Baal Hanes (�Meir, the Master of the Miracle�), husband of Beruriah and son-in-law of Hananiah ben Teradion
Alexander, Saint - He converted by a Miracle the governor of Edessa, Saint Rabulas
Basket - In the distinct Miracles of feeding the 5,000 and the 4,000 the KJV uses the stone term "baskets" for distinct Greek words. Now kofinoi is always used by the evangelists when the Miracle of the 5,000 is spoken of, spurides when that of the 4,000 is spoken of. ...
Thus also in referring back to the Miracle (Matthew 16:9-10) Jesus says: "Do ye not . The accurate distinction in the use of the terms so invariably made in the record of the Miracles marks both events as real and distinct, not, as rationalists have guessed, different versions of one Miracle
Grass - "...
This delicate distinction disproves the notion that the two Miracles are really different versions of the same Miracle, as also that of the 12 (small) baskets (kofinoi ) in the Miracle of the 5,000, and the seven (larger) baskets (spurides ) in that of the 4,000. Compare Matthew 16:9-10 with Matthew 14:20; Luke 9:17; kofinoi) being uniformly applied to the former Miracle, spurides) to the latter (Blunt, Undesigned Coincidences)
Gadara - (Mark 5:1 ) and (Luke 8:26-39 ) describe the Miracle of the healing of the demoniac ([1] says two demoniacs) as having been wrought "in the country of the Gadarenes," thus describing the scene generally. The Miracle could not have been wrought at Gadara itself, for between the lake and this town there is the deep, almost impassable ravine of the Hieromax (Jarmuk)
Dial - ...
The dial was of such a size and so placed that Hezekiah, when convalescent, could witness the Miracle from his chamber; probably "in the middle court," the point where Isaiah turned back to announce to Hezekiah God's answer to his prayer (2 Kings 20:4; 2 Kings 20:9; Isaiah 38:21-22). Ahaz' intimacy with Tiglath Pileser would naturally lead the "princes of Babylon to inquire of the wonder done in the land," which shows that the Miracle of the recession of the shadow on the dial was local, perhaps produced by divinely ordered refraction, a cloud denser than the air being interposed between the gnomon and the "degrees" or "dial
Adultery - For the water which the accused drank was perfectly harmless, and only by a Miracle could it produce a bad effect; while in most ordeals the accused must suffer what naturally produces death, and be proved innocent only by a Miracle
Gergesa - This was probably the scene of the Miracle, Mark 5:1-20 , etc
Cana of Galilee - The scene of the Lord's first Miracle and of His second in Galilee: the native place of Nathanael
Salamis - Paul's visit was signalized by the Miracle wrought on Elymas, and by the conversion of the governor, Sergius Paulus, Acts 13:5-12
Lydda - A town in the tribe of Ephraim, mentioned only in the New Testament (Acts 9:32,35,38 ) as the scene of Peter's Miracle in healing the paralytic AEneas
Thomas - Thomas sought evidence of Jesus' resurrection (John 20:25 ), but when convinced of the Miracle made an historic confession of faith (John 20:28 )
Zarephath - ...
During a famine in Israel, the prophet Elijah resided here, with a widow whose cruse of oil and barrel of flour were supplied and whose child was restored to life by Miracle
ca'na - (place of reeds ) of Galilee, once Cana in Galilee, a village or town not far from Capernaum, memorable as the scene of Christ's first Miracle, ( John 2:1,11 ; 4:46 ) as well as of a subsequent one, (John 4:46,54 ) and also as the native place of the apostle Nathanael
Nain - This was the first Miracle of raising the dead our Lord had wrought, and it excited great awe and astonishment among the people
Cana - A town where Jesus performed His first Miracle, turning the water into wine, and a second one, healing the nobleman's or courtier's son at Capernaum, by a word spoken at a distance (John 2; John 4:46; John 4:54)
Apostle, Philip the - The Fourth Gospel mentions him at the Miracle of the loaves and fishes (John 6), and again in conversation with Christ (John 14), portraying him as a shy, naive, sober-minded man
Wonder - ) A cause of wonder; that which excites surprise; a strange thing; a prodigy; a Miracle
Feast of the Epiphany - (Greek: epi, upon; phaino, show) ...
January 6, commemorates the manifestation of the glory of Christ to the Gentiles in the person of the Magi, as well as His Baptism and first Miracle at Cana
Mercurius - Hence the simple people of Lystra supposed, from the Miracle on the cripple, that Paul and Barnabas were Mercurius and Jupiter once more visiting the earth "in the likeness of men
Brimstone - It was the instrument used in destroying Sodom and Gomorrah, the adjoining cities of the plain (Genesis 19:24), for divine Miracle does not supersede the use of God's existing natural agents, but moves in connection with them
Miracle - Miracles can be wrought only by Almighty power, as when Christ healed lepers, saying, "I will, be thou clean," or calmed the tempest, "Peace, be still. " They considered not the Miracle of the loaves. ...
A man approved of God by Miracles and signs
Epiphany, Feast of the - (Greek: epi, upon; phaino, show) ...
January 6, commemorates the manifestation of the glory of Christ to the Gentiles in the person of the Magi, as well as His Baptism and first Miracle at Cana
Gadara - of the Sea of Galilee, but the town is too far from the sea to have been the scene of the Miracle; besides which there is a deep ravine between the ruins of the town and the sea
Migdol - (Exodus 14:2) Here it was Israel was commanded to encamp before the sea, where the Lord meant to display such a Miracle in opening a way through it for Israel's safety, and the Egyptians, overthrow
Quails - Yet the feeding of the Israelites for a month was a Miracle
Twelfth Night - (Greek: epi, upon; phaino, show) ...
January 6, commemorates the manifestation of the glory of Christ to the Gentiles in the person of the Magi, as well as His Baptism and first Miracle at Cana
Shunem - A Shunem is also the scene of Elisha’s Miracle in 2 Kings 4:8 ff. For the Miracle, cf
Betrothal - In a dream from God, the apparent unfaithfulness of Mary was explained to Joseph as a Miracle of the Holy Spirit. This Miracle gave emphasis to the unique human and divine nature of Jesus Christ
Draught of Fishes - —A twice repeated Miracle: (1) at the beginning of the Lord’s ministry, (2) after the Resurrection. ’...
The natural explanation of the Miracle, that from a distance Jesus saw what those in the boat failed to observe, is possible, but is not necessary. ‘The Miracle lies in the circumstances and not in the mere fact. The events came to men from the sphere of their daily labour, and were at once felt to be the manifestations of a present power of God’ (Westcott, Characteristics of the Gospel Miracles),—in the second case the manifestation of the power of the presence of the risen Lord. ‘The one Miracle was the symbol of the Church at present, the other of the Church perfected; in the one we have good and bad, in the other good only; there Christ also is on the water, here He is on the land; there the draught is left in the boats, here it is landed on the beach; there the nets are let down as it might be, here in a special part; there the nets are rending, here they are not broken; there the boats are on the point of sinking with their load, here they are not laden; there the fish are not numbered, here the number is exactly given’ (Westcott, St. and Lives of Christ on the two passages; Trench and Taylor on Miracles; Expositor, iv
Swaddle (And Forms) - He surrounded the entire ocean area with darkness, which shows what a Miracle-working GOD He is
Cana - Here our Lord wrought his first Miracle, the turning of water into wine (John 2:1-11 ; 4:46 )
Baldness (Natural or Artificial) - While they indicated by this epithet great contempt for him as a prophet of the Lord, they probably scoffed at the same time at the Miracle of Elijah's ascension
Stille Omgang - ...
The biggest takes place in March in Amsterdam, and commemorates the Miracle of the Host of March 12, 1345
Man - As Adam's incarnation was the crowning Miracle of nature, so Christ's incarnation is the crowning Miracle of grace; He represents man before God, as man represents nature, not by ordinary descent but by the extraordinary operation of the Holy Spirit
Miracles - A Miracle may be defined to be a plain and manifest exercise by a man, or by God at the call of a man, of those powers which belong only to the Creator and Lord of nature; and this for the declared object of attesting that a divine mission is given to that man. It is not, therefore, the wonder , the exception to common experience, that constitutes the Miracle , as is assumed both in the popular use of the word and by most objectors against Miracles. No phenomenon in nature, however unusual, no event in the course of God's providence, however unexpected, is a Miracle unless it can be traced to the agency of man (including prayer under the term agency), and unless it be put forth as a proof of divine mission. Prodigies and special providences are not Miracles. (A Miracle is not a violation of the laws of nature. " And yet men by firing cannon during battle can cause a shower: does that cause such a commotion among the laws of nature? The exertion of a will upon the laws does not make a disturbance of natural law; and a Miracle is simply the exertion of God's will upon nature. Again, when Miracles are described as "interferences with the law of nature," this description makes them appear improbable to many minds, from their not sufficiently considering that the laws of nature interfere with one another, and that we cannot get rid of "interferences" upon any hypothesis consistent with experience. The circumstances of the Christian Miracles are utterly unlike those of any pretended instances of magical wonders. This difference consists in -- (1) The greatness, number, completeness and publicity of the Miracles. (2) In the character of the Miracles
Magdala - of Tiberius, now represents Magdala, and is about the position where our Lord is thought to have been after the Miracle, it is near a beautiful plain and a hill rising about 400 ft
Meribali - This Miracle occurred near the close of the wanderings of the Hebrews in the desert
Judicium Dei - Or Judgment of God, was a term anciently applied to all extraordinary trials of secret crimes; as those by arms and single combat; and the ordeals, or those by fire, or red hot ploughshares, by plunging the arm in boiling water, or the whole body in cold water, in hopes that God would work a Miracle, rather than suffer truth and innocence to perish
Gadara - Thus the Miracle of our Lord performed here is represented by St
Cana - a town of Galilee, where Jesus performed his first Miracle, John 2:1-2 , &c
Brazen Serpent - The brazen serpent was long preserved, as a memorial of the gracious Miracle wrought in connection with it; but being regarded as an object of worship, it was broken to pieces by king Hezekiah, as Nehushtana mere piece of brass, 2 Kings 18:4
Lazarus - If people are so self-centred that they ignore the plain message of the Bible, even the Miracle of someone rising from the dead will not make them change their ways (Luke 16:27-31). They still resisted, even when they witnessed the Miracle of someone coming from death back to life (John 11:46-50; cf
Bath, Bathing - ’ Nay, proselyte baptism must be earlier than the NT, and it requires a bath, tĕbîlâh (tâbal is used in one unambiguous OT passage, the Miracle of Naaman’s cleansing, 2 Kings 5:14). John 5:2-7 gives us an example of such bathing, though Christ’s Miracle dispensed with the waters of Bethesda. In another passage (John 9:7) we have a partial washing (at the Pool of Siloam) as a stage towards completion of a Miracle
Gerasenes, Gergesenes - The neighbourhood of the town of Gadara must be pronounced absolutely impossible for the Miracle (see Gadara). How then account for the reading ‘Gadarenes’? Perhaps, as Thomson suggests, the place where the Miracle took place, ‘over against Galilee,’ was included within the district of Gadara. (It need scarcely be said that this latter town is out of the question as the scene of the Miracle, being some 30 miles from the Lake). ’ But this reading he objected to, inasmuch as he knew of only one Gerasa, the town of the Decapolis, which he rightly conceived could not have been the scene of the Miracle. ]'>[1] ? There can be here no certainty, but the probability is that Origen was right, and that the true name of the village or town where the Miracle occurred, ‘over against Galilee,’ was Gergesa. The modern name of the village which has been identified as the scene of the Miracle is Khersa or Chersa, which is nearer to ‘Gerasa’ than to ‘Gergesa
Bethesda - But had they attended to what the Holy Ghost hath recorded, by his servant John, in the history of the Bethesda, they would have observed, that the peculiar miraculous quality the pool possessed, was only at a certain season, and from the descent of an angel into the pool; and the Miracle expressly limited also to one person. But this, if admitted as an argument of doubt, would go farther than the objectors perhaps intend; since the same cause of objection would equally hold good against the pool of Siloam, the resurrection of Lazarus, several of the sweet and precious discourses of Christ, his Miracle of Cana, at Galilee, and very many other blessed relations concerning the Lord Jesus, which are mentioned by none of the other evangelists. But not to remark that Josephus was not born at the time the pool was in repute, the well-known hatred he bore to every thing that had respect to the person and glory of the Lord Jesus, might well account for his not even glancing at the Bethesda, which must have connected with it Christ's Miracle there; rendered so memorable as it was, from the cure he wrought, by speaking a word, on the poor man, of a disease of thirty-eight years standing. And I humbly conceive, that the pool itself was specially intended, by the mercy of the Lord, to be a standing Miracle among his people during their dark estate from the departure of the Spirit of prophecy, which ended with Malaichi to the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ; as is to shew, that the Lord "had not cast away his people whom he foreknew. So that when the Lord came and wrought the Miracle on the poor man of long infirmity, without the ministry of the pool, this might shew that the intention for which this pool had been appointed was now answered, and the substance being come, the shadow ceased for ever, We hear no more of the pool of Bethesda, after this Miracle of Christ in the cloisters of it; and, as is supposed, the efficacy of it was now no more
Danger: of the Christian - The Christian life is like that dove's anxious flight, as it threads its way between the death-bearing shafts of the enemy, and by constant Miracle escapes unhurt
Sin, Desert of - To perpetuate the memorial of "this bread from heaven" to future generations, a pot of manna, which was preserved fresh, by a standing Miracle, was ordered to be laid up beside the ark of the covenant, in the sanctuary, Exodus 16
Gadara - The country of the Gadarenes extended to the Jordan and the Sea of Galilee; and in the part of its bordering on the lake occurred the Miracle recorded in Matthew 8:28 9:1 Mark 5:1-20 Luke 8:26-39
Quails - The flocks of quails, therefore, which came up to the camp of Israel, are entirely credible; and the Miracle seems especially to have consisted in these immense flocks being directed to a particular spot, in the extreme emergency of the people by means of "a wind from the Lord," Exodus 16:13 ; Numbers 11:31 ; Psalm 78:27
Palms, Blessed - Their use originated in the "miracle plays" of the early Middle Ages, and they are mentioned by the Venerable Bede, c700 The most suitable palm is the Oriental date-palm, when procurable
Miracle - A Miracle is an out-of-the-ordinary direct and divine intervention in the world
Babel - By the confusion at Babel, in a diversity of tongues, and which ever since hath distinguished nations; the Lord rendered that Miracle at Pentecost, of his poor servants speaking in every language then under heaven in a moment, and with the greatest fluency, a full proof of "the Lord speaking in them, and by them. " But for this diversity of language the glory of this Miracle would have been wanting; since, had all nations, as before the confusion at the tower of Babel they did, spoken but one language; the disciples of Jesus would have needed the use of no other
Moralities - A development of the Miracle plays
Red Sea, Passage of - This position perfectly satisfies all the conditions of the stupendous Miracle as recorded in the sacred narrative
False Prophet, (the) - He will be a Miracle worker and during the Tribulation period will bring fire down from heaven and command that people worship the image of the Beast (Revelation 11:15)
Magdala - a city on the west side of the sea of Galilee, near Dalmanutha; Jesus, after the Miracle of the seven loaves, being said by St
Finger - Pharaoh's magicians discovered the finger of God in the Miracle which Moses wrought, Exodus 8:19
Feeding the Multitudes - Admitting the Miracle, some have thought to explain it as a miraculous satisfaction of hunger with a little, rather than as a multiplication of the loaves and fishes. (1) The question of Jesus, ‘How many loaves have ye?’ reminds one of the question of Elisha (2 Kings 4:2), ‘What hast thou in the house?’ and so suggests an imitation of Elisha’s Miracle, as in fact the whole process of multiplication suggests the Miracle of the meal in the jar and the cruse of oil of 1 Kings 17:11-16. (3) Usually, also, when such a Miracle was performed, the observers are said to have been profoundly impressed (see Mark 4:41; Mark 5:42; Mark 7:37), but here no comment follows. The fourth assumes that the Miracles of healing would not, but that a Miracle such as the feeding would convince the Jews, and so be just the kind of sign the Jews demanded. But, in fact, the sign the Jews required and Jesus refused to grant was some Miracle performed to order, and regardless of human need. Such a Miracle as the feeding lacked these two characteristics. In favour of the historicity of the Miracle is the further fact that it is recorded in all the Gospels. , according to his usual custom of emphasizing the teaching as primary, and of making the Miracles secondary, makes Jesus teach the shepherdless sheep out of sympathy, while Mt. —Trench and Taylor on Miracles; Edersheim, Life and Times, i
Flowers - In art they are associated with Saint Fiacre, in symbolism of his garden, possibly also as garden of souls, and with Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, in commemoration of the Miracle by which the food she was carrying to the poor was changed, in midwinter, to roses
Christ, Resurrection of - The Gospel Miracle, related by the four Evangelists, of Christ's return to life
Januarius And Companions, Saint - The relics of Saint Januarius are in a chapel of the cathedral of Naples, where they have wrought many Miracles, the greatest of which is the stopping of eruptions of Mount Vesuvius on several occasions. The famous "Miracle of Saint Januarius," the liquefaction of his blood (which is kept in a glass phial) seldom fails to occur 18 times during the year when the reliquary is exposed and placed near his head, and no natural explanation has been found for it
Timnath Heres - ) Joshua's city and burial place, previously Timnath Serah, "portion of abundance" (Judges 2:9), the consonants being transposed subsequently, to refer to Joshua's Miracle when the sun stood (Joshua 19:50)
Bar-Jesus - The pro-consul, who saw this Miracle, was converted
Resurrection of Christ - The Gospel Miracle, related by the four Evangelists, of Christ's return to life
Mag'Dala - Into the limits of Magadan Christ came by boat, over the Lake of Gennesareth after his Miracle of feeding the four thousand on the Mountain of the eastern side, (Matthew 15:39 ) and from thence he returned in the same boat to the opposite shore
Quail - God caused a wind to arise that drove them within and about the camp of the Israelites; and it is in this that the Miracle consists, that they were brought so seasonably to this place, and in so great number as to furnish food for above a million of persons for more than a month. And it should be recollected, that this Miracle was performed in compliance with the wish of the people that they might have flesh to eat
Lazarus - ...
It was an indubitable Miracle. ]'>[7] Had Jesus arrived within three days after Lazarus’ death, it might have been pronounced no Miracle; but He arrived on the fourth day, when decomposition would have already set in (John 11:39). ...
If anything could have conquered the unbelief of the rulers, this Miracle must have done it; but they hardened their hearts, and all the more that the people were profoundly impressed. The Triumphal Entry is a powerful evidence of the Miracle. What is the explanation? Enraged by the impression which the Miracle made and the support which it brought to Jesus, the high priests plotted the death of Lazarus (John 12:10-11); and it is probable that, ere the final crisis, he had been compelled to withdraw from the vicinity of Jerusalem. ...
It was a stupendous Miracle, the greatest which Jesus ever wrought; yet it is not the supreme Miracle of the Gospel-story. ’...
Naturalistic criticism, however, has assailed the Miracle. ...
It is no exaggeration to affirm that the desperateness of the assaults which have been directed against it constitute a powerful apologetic for the Miracle. Elijah and Elisha had wrought Miracles of resuscitation (1 Kings 17:17 ff. ...
(3) Renan regarded the Miracle as an imposture. ‘Tired of the cold reception which the Kingdom of God found in the capital, the friends of Jesus, wished for a great Miracle which should strike powerfully the incredulity of the Jerusalemites. Not only was the Miracle never wrought, but there was never such a man as Lazarus. The story is ‘non-historical, like the History of the Creation in Genesis, and like the records of the other Miracles in the Fourth Gospel; all of which are poetic developments. On the rationalistic objections to the Miracle see the chapter on ‘The Later Miracles’ in Fairbairn’s Studies in the Life of Christ (or in Expositor, 1st Ser
Conception of Christ - Had teaching, therefore, been the sole purpose of our Saviour's coming, a mere man might have done the whole business, and the supernatural conception had been an unnecessary Miracle
Bier - But the Miracle, prompted by that same intense sympathy with human sorrow which He so strikingly manifested on another occasion (John 11:35), pointed to a higher and more authoritative law—that Divine eternal law of compassion which received its freest and fullest expression for the first time in His own life, and which forms one of the most distinctive features of His Gospel
Dial - The inquiry from Babylon in regard to it would seem to imply that the Miracle was heard of, but not witnessed there
Supernatural - From this habit of mind come all those phrases by which Miracles are described as ‘suspensions of the order of nature,’ and the like. If a person under the influence of this habit of thought meets with the suggestion that Miracles are themselves orderly, and illustrate a higher law than that of ordinary experience, he is disquieted, because he thinks that in losing the character of disturbance, Miracles lose their ‘supernatural’ character. ...
Two things are clear in regard to this difficulty: (1) that the source of it lies in the (unverified) dualism between God and the world; (2) that there is a real point involved in the distress of the plain man at what he thinks is an attenuation of the meaning of Miracle. It is manifest that if the law which governs Miracle differed from that governing ordinary experience, merely in complexity, the distinction of natural and supernatural would disappear; so far the plain man is right. Some of the language used by critics of Miracles and the term ‘supernatural’ have a tendency to bring these events down to the level of tricks or deceptions. It is said, for instance, that a fuller knowledge of natural processes would lead us to see in the Miracle at the wedding-feast at Cana merely an acceleration of such processes, which would quite surrender itself to ordinary methods of interpretation. If this were true, the Miracle would cease to be in any sense ‘supernatural’; it would be merely a special, imperfectly analyzed case of an ordinary occurrence. But he is wrong if he objects to it on the ground, expressed or implied, that Divine action is necessarily explosive or disruptive; for this would mean that Divine action is irrational, and that a Miracle must be as great a marvel to God as to man. Miracles
Water of Jealousy - An ordeal which could not injure the innocent at all (for the ingredients were in themselves harmless), or punish the guilty except by Miracle; whereas in the ordeals by fire in the dark ages the innocent could scarcely escape except by Miracle
Miracles - In this article we may consider the meaning of the words used in the NT for ‘miracles,’ and the evidence for the apostolic belief in them; the evidence will then be compared with that for Miracles in the succeeding ages, and the evidential value of Miracles will be weighed. But the limits assigned preclude a general investigation of the a priori credibility of Miracles as such. -(a) The principal NT words for what we should now call a ‘miracle’ are σημεῖον, τέρας, δύναμις, ἔργον. ), shows it to denote a ‘miracle’ (so Matthew 11:2; but in John 17:4 the word includes the whole of Jesus’ deeds). A Christian Miracle is not a mere prodigy exciting astonishment, but is intended for instruction; and here we see at once the great difference between the NT Miracles and most of those of the apocryphal Gospels, which are mere exhibitions without any teaching purpose, and are often repulsive to the Christian sense of reverence. It must be added, also, that herein lies the difference between the NT Miracles and most of those commonly known as ‘ecclesiastical’ (see below, 4). It may be noticed that θαῦμα is not used in the NT of Miracles, but θαυμάσια (‘wonderful things’) is used in Matthew 21:15, παράδοξα (‘strange things’) in Luke 5:26, ἔνδοξα (‘glorious things’) in Luke 13:17. ...
(b) Turning to the English versions, we are struck by the confusion occasioned by the indiscriminate use of the word ‘miracle. ’ In Authorized Version it often represents σημεῖον (in the singular in Luke 23:8, John 4:54, Acts 4:16; Acts 4:22, and in the plural in John 2:11; John 2:23; John 3:2; John 6:2; John 6:26; John 7:31; John 9:16; John 11:47; John 12:37, Acts 6:8; Acts 8:6; Acts 15:12, Revelation 13:14; Revelation 16:14; Revelation 19:20); in these passages Revised Version rightly substitutes ‘sign’ except in the text of Luke 23:8, Acts 4:16; Acts 4:22, where ‘miracle’ is with some inconsistency retained. Again, in Authorized Version ‘miracle’ represents δύναμις in Mark 9:39, Acts 2:22; Acts 8:13; Acts 19:11, 1 Corinthians 12:10; 1 Corinthians 12:28 f. , Galatians 3:5, Hebrews 2:4, while in these passages there is an unfortunate confusion even in the Revised Version text (though Revised Version margin gives ‘power’), as we find ‘mighty work’ in the first two passages, ‘miracle’ in the next five, and ‘powers’ in the last; if ‘powers’ was thought somewhat unintelligible, ‘mighty works’ or ‘mighty deeds’ might with a little ingenuity have been used in all these places. The confusion in Authorized Version is increased by σημεῖα being translated ‘wonders’ in Revelation 13:13 and ‘miracles’ in v. 14, and by δυνάμεις being translated ‘mighty deeds’ in 2 Corinthians 12:12; in Mark 6:52, Authorized Version unnecessarily inserts ‘the Miracle,’ which is not in the Greek. It is a serious misfortune that ‘miracle’ should be so much used in the Authorized Version to represent σημεῖον, for the connotation of the English word is exactly what that of the Greek word is not, and it has given the English reader an erroneous idea of the purpose of the works of our Lord and the disciples; it was not so much to produce wonder as belief. Evidence for Miracles in the Apostolic Age. ), raising the dead (John 11:44), and several ‘miracles of nature’-water made wine (John 2:9), feeding the five thousand (John 6:11 f. It is to be noted that in all the Gospels the evidence for ‘miracles’ of nature is as strong as that for Miracles of healing, and that the evidence of Jn. Paul that he himself had the power of working Miracles (see below) indirectly gives good testimony to the fact that our Lord worked them, for we can hardly imagine that St. For a classification of the Gospel Miracles see Dict. Paul claimed that Christ worked Miracles through him (Romans 15:18 f
Manna - "...
The Miracle itself was designed to be a standing Miracle, for Israel to remember and record in their generations for ever; hence an omer of it was to be reserved in a pot, and laid up before the Lord for a memorial. Here was a double proof of the Miracle; for the manna itself was s perishable and delicate, that if only kept for day, it bred worms and stank; yet, to teach Israel to reverence the Sabbaths, that which we kept for the use of the Sabbath bred no worm nor stank; and the omer of it also which was laid up before the Lord, was preserved pure generation to generation
Tab'Itha - This great Miracle, as we are further told produced an extraordinary effect in Joppa, and was the occasion of many conversions there
Gadara - This would refer the Miracle not to Gadara, which, as noted above, was some distance from the Sea of Galilee, but to a more obscure place represented by the modern Kersa , on its Eastern shore
Wonder - ” Thus the word does not necessarily refer to a miraculous act, if “miracle” means something outside the realm of ordinary providence
Paschasinus - He relates in confirmation of his view a Miracle which used to occur in the baptistery of an outlying church on the property of his see on the true Paschal Eve every year, the water rising miraculously in the font (ib
Ark of Noah - Certain it is, that while the Bible eulogizes the faith and obedience of Noah, it shows that his salvation was a Miracle of Providence. It was by Miracle that he was forewarned, and directed to prepare for the flood; and the same miraculous power accomplished all that Noah was unable to so in designing, building, and filling the ark, and preserving and guiding it through the deluge
Jupiter - The Miracle of healing at once causes the barbarians to suppose that the gods had come to pay them a visit, and the impassive Barnabas is regarded as the chief. ...
Baur, Zeller, Overbeck, and Wendt regard the whole incident as unhistorical, since such people would rather have considered that the Miracle-workers were magicians or demons
Feel - Let us also consider every situation in life, and then look to GOD to work the necessary Miracle
Glory - They are equivalent to, "Confess that you are an impostor," "Give God the glory by speaking the truth;" for they denied that a Miracle had been wrought
Legion, Thundering - de Legione Fulminatrice, which is subjoined to his AEgyptiaca, in defense of this Miracle; as also, what is alleged against it by Dan Lauroque, in a discourse upon that subject subjoined to the Adversaria Sucra of Matt
Historical - First, there is the minor difficulty connected with physical Miracles. The question is more familiar in its less formidable shape, as regards Miracles. (1) It may be held that facts convince us of Miracle. (2) Secondly, there is the claim of dogmatic naturalism—‘miracles do not happen’; for history, the Miracle narrative is an interesting and instructive problem, the Miracle itself a hallucination a priori, be the alleged evidence what it may. (3) There is an attempt by Harnack to strike out a tertium quid: ‘The historian cannot regard a Miracle as a sure given historical event; for in doing so he destroys the mode of consideration on which all historical investigation rests. ’ Belief in Miracle is due to the ‘unique impression’ of Christ’s person, though ‘there has seldom been a strong religious faith which would not have drawn the conclusion’ that Christ wrought Miracles (Hist. This seems to mean that history is prevented from dealing with Miracles by limitations of its own,—limitations which do not necessarily imply the absence of Miracle from the world of real events. (4) Against the point of view which excludes Miracles a priori, we might set a point of view which welcomes them a priori as congruous to a Divine revelation and Divine redemption. Naturalism, which refuses Miracle out and out, is plainly pledged in logic to deny revelation. The same difficult decision is called for—not face to face with Miracle, but face to face with the Christ. And the logic of the third position—the logic which leads Harnack, while believing in revelation, to ban Miracle as a thing the historian must not touch—will inevitably be applied by others to Jesus Himself. They will describe the teacher of Nazareth, the martyr of Calvary; but the Christ of God will be a magnitude as inaccessible to them as physical Miracle is to Dr
Fish - In John 21:11 the 153 fish taken were all "great fish," whereas in the corresponding earlier Miracle (Luke 5:6) this is not said; the net broke in the earlier, not so in the Miracle after the resurrection, the latter typifying the eternal safety of the finally elect, all accounted "great" before God
Lice - To which may be added, that if they were winged and stinging insects, as Jerom, Origen, and others have supposed, the plague of flies is unduly anticipated; and the next Miracle will be only a repetition of the former. Bryant, in illustrating the aptness of this Miracle, has the following remarks: "The Egyptians affected great external purity, and were very nice both in their persons and clothing; bathing and making ablutions continually
Brazen Serpent - It had been kept from the days of Moses, in memory of a Miracle, in the same manner as the pot of manna was: and Asa and Jehoshaphat did not extirpate it when they rooted out idolatry, because in their reign they did not observe that the people worshipped this serpent, or burnt incense to it; and therefore they left it as a memorial. But Hezekiah thought fit to take it quite away, when he abolished other idolatry, because in the time of his father they adored it as an idol; and though pious people, among them accounted it only as a memorial of a wonderful work, yet he judged it better to abolish it, though the memory of the Miracle should happen to be lost, than suffer it to remain, and leave the Israelites in danger to commit idolatry hereafter with it
Miracles, Signs, Wonders - ...
Old Testament The two Hebrew words most frequently used for “miracle” are translated “sign” (oth ) and “wonder” (mopheth ). ...
“Sign” (semeion ) in the New Testament is used of Miracles taken as evidence of divine authority. Sometimes it is translated as “miracle” (Luke 23:8 NIV; Acts 4:16 ,Acts 4:16,4:22 NAS, NIV). ...
“Work” (ergon ) is also employed in the New Testament in the sense of “miracle. ...
Worldview Considerations Contemporary philosophical and theological arguments over the possibility and definition of Miracle reflect the altered worldview of the last several centuries—from a theistic to a nontheistic concept of the universe. ...
How do Miracles relate to the natural order? Christian thinkers have responded in different ways throughout the centuries. Some hold that Miracles are not contrary to nature (Augustine and C. Others (like Thomas Aquinas) have maintained Miracles stand outside the laws of nature. A mechanistic perspective believes the world is controlled by unalterable natural laws and cannot allow for the possibility of Miracles
Miracles - MiracleS...
1. Besides these Miracles of healing there are ascribed to Him other extraordinary acts, such as the Stilling of the Storm ( Matthew 8:26 ), the Feeding of Five Thousand ( Matthew 14:19 ) and Four Thousand ( Matthew 15:35 ), the Walking on the Sea ( Matthew 14:28 ), the Change of Water into Wine ( John 2:9 ). These Miracles are presented to us as the acts of a Person supernatural both in the moral character as sinless and perfect, and in the religious consciousness as alone knowing and revealing the Father. ...
Regarding the Miracles of Jesus the following general considerations should be kept in view. ( a ) It is impossible to remove the records of Miracles from the Gospels without tearing them to pieces, as these works of Jesus are so wrought into the very texture of His ministry. ( b ) The character of the Miracles is absolutely harmonious with the power of Jesus; with only two apparent exceptions they are beneficent. ( c ) The Miracles were not wrought for display, or to prove His claims. He did not highly esteem the faith that was produced by His Miracles ( John 4:48 ). The Miracles are not evidential accessories, but essential constituents of Jesus’ ministry of grace. ...
( b ) In the Acts the record of Miracles is continued. Miracles of which further details are given are the restoration of the lame man at the gate Beautiful ( Acts 3:7 ), and of the cripple at Lystra ( Acts 14:9 ), the cure of the palsied Æneas ( Acts 9:34 ), the expulsion of the spirit of divination at Philippi ( Acts 16:18 ), the healing of the father of Publius in Melita ( Acts 28:8 ), the restoration to life of Dorcas ( Acts 9:40 ) and Eutychus ( Acts 20:10 , the narrative does not distinctly affirm death). One may hesitate about accepting the statement about the Miracles wrought by Peter’s shadow ( Acts 5:15 ) or Paul’s aprons ( Acts 19:12 ). Paul’s escape from the viper ( Acts 28:3 ) does not necessarily involve a Miracle. These Miracles, which, taken by themselves as reported in Acts, there might be some hesitation in believing, become more credible when viewed as the continuation of the supernatural power of Christ in His Church for the confirmation of the faith of those to whom the gospel was entrusted, and also those to whom its appeal was first addressed. ...
( c ) We cannot claim to have contemporary evidence of the Miracles of the OT, as we have of those of the NT. The Miracles are almost entirely connected either with the Exodus from Egypt, or with the ministry of Elijah and of Elisha. The majority of the Miracles of the first group are not outside of the order of nature; what is extraordinary in them is their coincidence with the prophetic declaration, this constituting the events signs of the Divine revelation. While the Miracles ascribed to Elijah and Elisha might be considered as their credentials, yet they cannot be regarded as essential to their prophetic ministry; and the variations with which they are recorded represent popular traditions which the compiler of the Books of Kings has incorporated without any substantial alteration. The revelation of Jehovah to Israel is seen in the providential guidance and guardianship of His people by God, and in the authoritative interpretation of God’s works and ways by the prophets, and in it Miracle, in the strict sense of the word, has a small place. While the moral and religious worth of the OT, as the literature of the Divine revelation completed in Christ, demands a respectful treatment of the narratives of Miracles, we are bound to apply two tests: the sufficiency of the evidence, and the congruity of the Miracle in character with the Divine revelation. In dealing with the evidence for the Miracles the starting-point should be the Resurrection . His Miracles are not wonders , for it is no wonder that He should so act, but signs , proofs of what He is, and works , congrnous with His character as ‘ever doing good,’ and His purpose to reveal the grace of the Father. ’ The Miracles of healing are not all explicable, as he supposes, by what Matthew Arnold called moral therapeutics the influence of a strong personality over those suffering from nerve disorders, as they embrace diseases of which the cure by any such means is quite incredible; and the evidence for the cosmic Miracles, as the Miracles showing power over nature apart from man have been called, is quite as good as for the healing Miracles. 60 and 90, as is coming to be admitted by scholars generally, the evidence for the Miracles of Jesus is thoroughly satisfactory; the mythical theory of Strauss must assume a much longer interval. In his various writings he has endeavoured to show how careful a historian Luke is, and if Luke’s excellence in this respect is established, then we can place greater reliance on the evidence for Miracles in the early Church, as well as in the ministry of Jesus. The Miracles of the Gospels and the Acts are closely connected with the Person of Jesus, as the Word Incarnate and the risen Lord, and the credulity of the age does not come into consideration unless it can be shown that among either the Jews or the Gentiles there was a prejudice favourable to belief in the Incarnation and the Resurrection. The character of the Miracles, so harmonious with the Person, forbids our ascribing them to the wonder-loving, and therefore wonder-making, tendency of the times. ...
Some indications have already been given in regard to the evidence for the Miracles of the OT. Some of the Miracles ascribed to Elisha are not of a character congruous with the function of prophecy; but it may be that we should very cautiously apply our sense of fitness as a test of truth to these ancient narratives. Admitting that the evidence is satisfactory, and the Miracles are real, what explanations can be offered of them? ( a ) One suggestion has already been considered; it is favoured by Harnack and Matthew Arnold: it is that one person may exercise over another so strong an influence as to cure nervous disorders. It is certain that Jesus worked His Miracles relying on the Divine powers in Himself; whether in any cases this obscure psychic force was an unknown condition of His Miracles is a matter of secondary importance. This explanation recognizes that Miracles are not explicable by the laws of nature as known to man, and that it is of God’s free choice that for certain ends He uses means otherwise unknown. As these laws are quite hypothetical, and as this use of them only occasionally is not at all probable, this explanation does not appear to make Miracles any more credible. ...
( c ) We may now attempt to define more closely what we mean by a Miracle. It does seem, on the whole, desirable to restrict the term ‘miracle’ to an external event of which there is sensible evidence. Inward changes, such as in the prophetic inspiration, or the religious conversion of an individual, however manifest the Divine presence and action may be for the person having the experience, should not be described as Miracles, unless with some qualification such as spiritual or moral . The negative feature of the external event which justifies our describing it as a Miracle is that it is inexplicable by the natural forces and laws as known to us. We say more than we are justified in saying if we describe a Miracle as an interference with the laws and forces of nature, or a breach in the order of nature; for just as the physical forces and laws allow the exercise of human will in the movements of the body, so the power that produces the Miracle may, nay must, be conceived as so closely related to nature that its exercise results in no disturbance or disorder in nature. The Miracle need not interfere with the continuity of nature at all. The modem theory of Evolution is not less, but more, favourable to the belief in Miracle. Applying the argument from analogy, we may regard the Person of Christ and the Miracles that cluster round His Person as such a creative action of God. The consistency of character of a human personality is not disproved by an exceptional act when a crisis arises; and so, to deal effectively with sin for man’s salvation, God may use Miracles as means to His ends without any break in the continuity of His wisdom, righteousness, and grace. These objections refer to two points, the possibility of Miracle at all, and the sufficiency of the evidence for the Miracles of the Bible. ( a ) For materialism , which recognizes only physical forces; and pantheism , which so identifies God and man that the order of nature is fixed by the necessity of the nature of God; and even for deism , which confines the direct Divine activity to the beginning, and excludes it from the course of the world, Miracles are impossible. Agnosticism , which regards the ultimate reality as an inscrutable mystery, is under no logical compulsion to deny the possibility of Miracles; Huxley, for instance, pronounces such denial unjustifiable. Two reasons against the possibility of Miracles may be advanced from a theistic standpoint. In the interests of science it may be maintained that the uniformity of nature excludes Miracle ; but, as has just been shown, the theory of Evolution has so modified the conception of uniformity that this argument has lost its force. In the interests of philosophy, it may be argued that Miracles interrupt the continuity of thought : the world as it is is so reasonable (idealism) or so good (optimism) that any change is unthinkable. But the affirmation ignores many of the problems the world as it is presents: sin, sorrow, death are real; would not the solution of these problems give both a more reasonable and a better world? and if Miracles should be necessary to such a solution, they are thinkable. Hume laid down this criterion: ‘No testimony is sufficient to establish a Miracle unless the testimony be of such a kind that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavours to establish. Or briefly, it is contrary to experience that a Miracle sho
Water of Jealousy - " Josephus adds, if the suspicion was unfounded, she obtained conception; if true, she died infamously, (This was entirely different from most trials of this kind, for the bitter water the woman must drink was harmless in itself, and only by a direct act of God could it injure her it guilty while in most heathen trials the suspected party must take poison, or suffer that which only a Miracle would save them from if they were innocent
Almond - Israel was to learn from this Miracle that the family of Aaron was to be the fruit-bearing family in the service of the GOD of Israel
Notable, of Note - , Acts 1:19 ; 2:14 ; 4:10 ; or persons, John 18:15,16 ; it denotes "notable" in Acts 4:16 , of a Miracle; (b) as a noun, "acquaintance," Luke 2:44 ; 23:49
Bethsaida - Some writers urge that there were two Bethsaidas, since the desert place where the 5000 were fed belonged to "the city called Bethsaida," Luke 9:10, while after the Miracle the disciples were to go before him unto the other side to Bethsaida, Mark 6:45, which it is said could not refer to the same town
Blood And Water - The Fathers regarded it as a Miracle,† Basket - kophinos, small "wicker-basket") for the "fragments" in the Miracle recorded Mark 6:43 , and in that recorded Matthew 15:37 (Gr
Sarah - ’ She received strength for conception (εἰς καταβολὴν σπέρματος), believing, even when she was beyond the proper time of life (παρὰ καιρὸν ἡλικίας), that God could by a Miracle give her a child
Fragments - The Miracle was one of the very exceptional cases in which Christ provided for men’s ordinary wants, was wrought only in view of the urgent necessity that had arisen (Matthew 14:15), and, while it raised expectations of similar benefits in the future (John 6:26), was not designed to produce this result. The storing of the fragments for future use would tend to indicate that such Miracles were not to be everyday occurrences. As in all Christ’s Miracles, there is strict economy of supernatural resources, which are resorted to only when natural resources fail
Wine - ...
Wine was created by the Lord in His first recorded Miracle
Wonder - A Miracle
Waterpot - ) ‘It is unlikely that water taken from vessels of purification should have been employed for the purpose of the Miracle. ) It is suggested that this view is most in keeping with the symbolical and spiritual character of the Miracle. ’ Full justice, it may be argued, is thus done to the spiritual import of the Miracle, which was intended to represent that what the Law with its elaborate ceremonial could not do, Jesus could now do for those unto whom He had come—impart to them the true joy of salvation (cf. But apart from symbolism altogether, the Miracle taken by itself is comforting and edifying in the highest degree, as a proof that Christ’s hallowing presence is with us in our common interests and enjoyments, and that He blesses all life’s relationships. —It may be added that if it was the entire contents of the vessels that became wine, the magnitude of the gift is an example of our Lord’s abundant mercies, with which we may compare the Miracle of the loaves and the twelve baskets of fragments that were left. Miracles, and Com
Miracle - Miracle, in the A. A Miracle is not, philosophically speaking, a violation of the ordinary laws of nature, nor does it necessarily require a suspension of those laws, as some have imagined; but is either a manifestation of divine power, superior to natural causes, or an increase of the action of some existing law, accomplishing a new result. Such were the Miracles which God wrought by the prophets; and those wrought by Christ and by the apostles and disciples in his name. Though Miracles are supernatural facts, in one sense they are also natural facts. The Miracles of Christ as reported in the gospels present many noticeable features. They were Miracles, too, of mercy, intended to relieve human suffering, and to promote the well-being of those on whom or for whom they were wrought. And the power of working Miracles was conveyed by our Lord to his followers, was repeatedly exercised by them, and was continued for a while in the church. For list of Miracles in the Bible, see Appendix
Elijah - Thence he resorted to Zarephath, in Phoenicia; where one Miracle provided him with sustenance and another restored to life the child of his hostess. He bursts upon our view without previous notice; he disappears by a Miracle
Nobleman - To identify the healing of the nobleman’s son with the healing of the centurion’s servant is not only to manufacture discrepancies, but also to lose the light which the earlier Miracle casts upon the later one. ); the strong faith of the centurion (Matthew 8:10) ‘becomes intelligible, without ceasing to be admirable, when we reflect that he was evidently aware of the Miracle formerly wrought for another inhabitant of the same city, an eminent person, one of the court which his own sword protected
Blindness - Its cure is one of our Lord's most frequent Miracles (Luke 7:21; Matthew 9:27; Mark 8:23; Acts 9:8-97; John 9:1), as had been foretold (Isaiah 29:18; Isaiah 35:5). The dust and sand pulverized by the intense heat, the constant glare, and in the sandy districts the absence of the refreshing "green grass," (the presence of which Mark notices as noteworthy in the Miracle of the feeding the multitudes,) the cold sea air on the coasts, the night dews affecting those sleeping on the roofs, all tend to produce blindness
Snake - It seems that Egyptian magicians hypnotized snakes to stiffen them, and in this way could imitate Aaron’s Miracle of turning a stick into a snake. But Aaron showed that his actions were Miracles, not tricks, when his snake swallowed up those of the magicians (Exodus 7:8-12; cf
Mercury - The fact is that the Lycaonians were so wrought upon by the Miracle that had been performed, and so delighted at the eloquence of St
Wine - Thus when Jesus wrought his first Miracle in Cana of Galilee, in turning the water into wine; as this set forth the glories of his person and righteousness, it might be truly said the gospel then preached, compared to all former revelations, was keeping the best wine to the last; (John 2:10-12) and hence the gospel itself is called wine on the lees well refined
Spots - Only the Miracle-working power of GOD could remove the black from the Ethiopian, or remove the spots from the other
Firkin - Their character and contents prove the reality of the Miracle
Gadarenes - It forms a most interesting Miracle, in the account of Christ's ministry, (See Mark 5:1-30) Who can say, but that the Lord Jesus directed his steps to this very spot, purposely for the salvation of this poor man, and him only? For we are told, that while he sat at the feet of Jesus, (after that the Lord had dispossessed the evil spirit) clothed, and in his right mind: the Gadarenes began to pray Jesus to depart out of their coasts
pi-Hahiroth - The place where this Miracle is supposed to have happened, is still called Bahral- Kolsum, or the Sea of Destruction; and just opposite to the situation which answers to the opening called Pi-hahiroth, is a bay, where the north cape is called Ras Musa, or the Cape of Moses
Miracle - It is translated "miracles" in the RV and AV in Acts 8:13 (where variant readings give the words in different order); 19:11; 1 Corinthians 12:10,28,29 ; Galatians 3:5 ; AV only, in Acts 2:22 (RV, "mighty works"); Hebrews 2:4 (RV, "powers"). In Galatians 3:5 , the word may be taken in its widest sense, to include "miracles" both physical and moral. ...
2: σημεῖον (Strong's #4592 — Noun Neuter — semeion — say-mi'-on ) "a sign, mark, token" (akin to semaino, "to give a sign;" sema, "a sign"), is used of "miracles" and wonders as signs of Divine authority; it is translated "miracles" in the RV and AV of Luke 23:8 ; Acts 4:16,22 ; most usually it is given its more appropriate meaning "sign," "signs," e. , Matthew 12:38,39 , and in every occurrence in the Synoptists, except Luke 23:8 ; in the following passages in John's Gospel the RV substitutes "sign" or "signs" for the AV, "miracle or Miracles;" John 2:11,23 ; 3:2 ; 4:54 ; 6:2,14,26 ; 7:31 ; 9:16 ; 10:41 ; 11:47 ; 12:18,37 ; the AV also has "signs" elsewhere in this Gospel; in Acts, RV, "signs," AV, "miracles," in Acts 6:8 ; 8:6 ; 15:12 ; elsewhere only in Revelation 13:14 ; 16:14 ; 19:20
Token - See Miracle , SIGN
Miracle - Miracles in Scripture are designed, for the most part, as so many, testimonies in proof of the doctrine delivered at the same time. " (John 10:25) And when in concurrence with Miracles, the word of God, and the works of God are joined together, these establish and seal the truth as it is in Jesus. There were certain particularities in the Miracles of the Lord Jesus, which marked his divine nature in the performance of them in a way and manner different from all his servants. They performed all the Miracles they wrought by the appointment and in the name of the Lord Jesus wrought his in his own name. (See John 11:23-44) In addition to this, it should be farther remarked, that the Miracles of the Lord Jesus were many of them of a personal kind, and not unfrequeuuy wrought without any immediate cause in confirmation of his doctrine, but to set forth his gracious character of Redeemer. But in those actions of the Lord Jesus peculiar to the Mediator as Mediator, and where, from having as Son of God abased himself for the purposes of salvation, he manifested forth the Miracles he wrought, here the glory of the work became personal, and belonged wholly to Jesus as Mediator, I need not particularize instances, else I might observe, that the healed paralytic, the cleansed leper, the centurion's son, the water turned into wine; these and the tike are all of the personal kind. And perhaps it is not among the smallest instances of Christ's personal glory and grace, from the actions of Miracles, that the Lord Jesus in all he wrought testified his personal love and mercy to his people. The evangelist John is careful to inform the church, that "the beginning of Miracles in Cana of Galilee" was shewn in converting water into wine; as if to say, such are the blessings of the gospel, Our common mercies will be made rich mercies; and the nether springs in Jesus, if for his personal glory, shall become upper springs in Jesus. And this is still the more striking, because under the law the first Miracle of his servant Moses was manifested in converting water into blood; but Jesus's first Miracle shall be converting water into wine
Elijah - His life is best understood when considered from four historical perspectives which at times are interrelated: his Miracles, his struggle against Baalism, his prophetic role, and his eschatological relationship to Messiah. ...
Miracles His first Miracle was associated with his prophecy before King Ahab (2 Kings 9:25-377 ) in which he said there would be no rain or dew apart from his declaration. ...
His next refuge was Zarephath where he performed the Miracle of raising the widow's dead son (1 Kings 17:17-24 ). ”...
On Mount Carmel his greatest public Miracle involved his encounter with the 450 prophets of Baal and the 400 prophets of Asherah (1 Kings 18:19-40 )
Bethsaida - The Miracle was wrought in a lonely "desert place," on a rising ground at the back of the town, covered with much "green grass" (Mark 6:39)
Manna - —The Miracle of the loaves and fishes, by which Jesus fed five thousand men, stirred the multitudes to fanaticism (John 6:1-15)
Manna - —The Miracle of the loaves and fishes, by which Jesus fed five thousand men, stirred the multitudes to fanaticism (John 6:1-15)
Miracles - Three distinct New Testament Greek words represent Miracles: seemeion , "a sign"; teras , "a prodigy"; dunamis , "a mighty work. Seemeion, "sign," views the Miracle as evidence of a divine commission: John 3:2, "no man can do these signs (Greek) which Thou doest except God be with him" (John 9:30; John 9:33; John 15:24; Luke 7:19-22); teras , "prodigy" or "wonder," expresses the effect on the spectator; dunamis , "mighty work," marks its performance by a superhuman power (Acts 2:22; 2 Corinthians 12:12; 2 Thessalonians 2:9). Jesus' Miracles were not merely wonders but signs; signs not merely of His power, but of the nature of His ministry and of His divine person. ...
A grand distinction peculiar to Christianity is, it won the world to it in an age of high civilization, through a few preachers of humble position, on the evidence of Miracles. Basing its claim on Miracles the creed of the slave became eventually the faith of the Caesars. Muhammed on the contrary, even in a half-enlightened age and country, pretended no Miracle. Christ and His apostles still less than Mahomet among friends would have dared to allege Miracles, in the midst of hostile Jews and skeptical Romans, unless they were true. This claim is the more striking, since John the Baptist, though coming "in the spirit and power of Elias," the great Miracle worker of the Old Testament, never claimed miraculous power; so far is Scripture from indiscriminately gratifying men's love of the marvelous at the cost of truth. ...
Similarly, Abraham, David, and other Old Testament heroes never appear as Miracle workers. Early Christian writers, Justin Martyr, Tertullian, and Origen, occasionally appeal to Miracles in proof of Christianity; but state that their pagan opponents, admitting the facts, attributed them to magic; which accounts for the fewness of their references to Miracles. The Jewish writings, as the Sepher Toldoth Jeshu, also the extant fragments of Celsus, Porphyry, and Julian, admit the fact of the Miracles, though ascribing them to magic and evil spirits. The early Christian apologists allege in support of Christianity:...
(1) the greatness, number, completeness, and publicity of the Miracles;...
(2) the beneficial tendency of the doctrine;...
(3) the connection of the Miracles with prophecy and the whole scheme of redemption from Adam to Christ. The Miracles must have been altogether different from the wonders of exorcists, magicians, etc. The holy character of Christ and His apostles, and the tendency of Christianity to promote truth and virtue, are against the origination of the Miracles from evil spirits or jugglery. In the fourth century Miracles had ceased (Chrysostom on 1 Corinthians 11-13); in the third, Miracles are alleged, but are suspicious, as wrought among those already believing and predisposed to accept prodigies credulously. The ecclesiastical Miracles are not attested by inspired writers. The apostles alone could transmit the power of working Miracles to others. Christianity being once proved and attested to us, the analogy of God's dealings leads us to expect He would leave it to make its way by ordinary means; the edifice being erected, the scaffolding is taken down; perpetual Miracle is contrary to His ways. The ecclesiastical Miracles alleged are ambiguous, or tentative, or legendary, i. Herein the New Testament Miracles wholly differ from them. The Christian Miracles are:...
(1) Recorded by contemporaries. ...
(4) Not naked history, but the history combined with the institution and with the religion of our day, as also with the time and place of the Miracle recorded and of Christianity's origin. ...
(7) Not like popish Miracles in Roman Catholic countries, in affirmation of opinions already formed, but performed amidst enemies, converting men from their most cherished prejudices; there was no anterior persuasion to lay hold of, Jesus' Miracles gave birth to the sect; frauds might mix with the progress, but could not have place in the commencement of the religion. ...
(8) Not an imaginary perception, as Socrates' demon; the giving sight to the blind leaves a lasting effect; in those of a mixed nature the principal Miracle is momentary, but some circumstance combined with it is permanent; Peter's vision might be a dream, but the message of Cornelius could not have been; the concurrence could only be supernatural. ...
(10) Not doubtful Miracles, as the liquefaction of Januarius' blood, cures of nervous ailments. )...
A Miracle is not a "violation of the laws of nature" (Hume), but the introduction of a new agent. Or, "law" being simply the expression of God's will, in Miracles God's will intervenes, for certain moral ends, to suspend His ordinary mode of working. ...
Hume alleged against Miracles their contrariety to "experience," and that experience shows testimony to be often false. The "experience" of the witnesses for Christianity attests the truth of Miracles. However improbable Miracles are under ordinary circumstances, they are probable, nay necessary, to attest a religious revelation and a divine commission. "In whatever degree it is probable that a revelation should be communicated to mankind at all, in the same degree is it probable that Miracles should be wrought" (Paley, Evidences of Christianity). It is objected, Miracles "interrupt the course of nature. "...
But as that course really comprises the whole series of God's government of the universe, moral as well as physical, Miracles are doubtless included in it. In this point of view Butler remarks, nothing less than another world, placed in circumstances similar to our own, can furnish an argument from analogy against the credibility of Miracles. The testimony to Christian Miracles is that of concurrent and contemporaneous witnesses. The religion so attested specifically differs from the false religions which false Miracles have been alleged to support. The argument is the other way, namely, since palpably false religions were propped up by false Miracles a pure religion like Christianity is not likely to rest on false Miracles. ...
In estimating the value of the testimony to Christ's Miracles it is to be remembered there is no counter testimony. Besides the evidential value of Miracles, they are intimately and internally connected with Christianity as a new creation springing from God manifest in the flesh. ...
The Miracle of active compassion necessarily flowed from His divine power and human sympathy combined in His incarnation, of which the atonement is the crown (Matthew 8:17; Isaiah 53:4). The history and separate existence of the Israelite church (the sole instance of a pure theism in the ancient world) it is impossible to explain without accepting the Miracles which the same Scripture records; so Christianity and Christendom can only be explained by accepting the Miracles which introduced them. Both dispensations were inaugurated by Miracles, and then mainly left to ordinary providence; only that the Old Testament church, at times when surrounding paganism, as in Elijah's times, threatened to swamp it, was vindicated by Miracles. Its Miracles are Miracles of power, to impress a rude age; the New Testament Miracles were Miracles of love. ...
The Old Testament Miracles were for the foe's destruction; Christ's were Miracles of mercy, except the withering of the fig tree and the sending the demons into the swine to perish, both symbolical lessons of warning to man. Many Miracles were typical; as the "tongues" manifested the universality of the Christian dispensation designed for every tongue, so counterworking the division of man from man through the confusion of tongues at Babel; the casting out of demons symbolizes Christ's coming "to destroy the works of the devil. " Miracles thus were manifestations of the Holy Spirit's presence and operation in the church. The Old Testament Miracles attested God's presence as King of the theocracy; though this involved a continual series of Miracles, yet as the theocracy was temporary and local those Miracles did not violate God's ordinary government of the world by the laws of nature. The Christian Miracles on the contrary, as attesting a permanent and universal dispensation, were properly limited to its commencement. ...
Christ performed His Miracles more for others' preservation than His own. Christ's mission, doctrine, and life, and Christ's Miracles mutually depend on one another. Therefore that His Miracles were false would be far harder to believe than that the testimony which supports them is true. Pritchard observes, Christ's Miracles, as His parables, go on the principle of the law of continuity of the human with the divine. That Miracles harmonize with nature in some degree is what we might expect, since the God of revelation is the God of nature. Leslie (Short Method with the Deists) observes four notes of truth in the Mosaic Miracles:...
1. 6) observes we have two histories of Moses and his Miracles, one in his book, the other in Israel's laws and ceremonies which are a living witness, not only of the Pentateuch history in general, but also of the Miracles it records (Exodus 13:1; compare Numbers 3:11; Numbers 3:46); its facts are inseparably connected with the miraculous. However indifferent nations become as to religion, they never are so as to property; now Miracles were the foundation of the Hebrew polity and of the tenure and regulations of property, e. The effect of the Miracles under Joshua kept all his generation faithful to Jehovah, so real and convincing were they (Joshua 24:31; Judges 2:7). ...
Messiah's Miracles were foretold (Isaiah 35:5-6; Isaiah 42:7), and so were asked for by John Baptist (Matthew 11:2-4), and made the ground by the people of calling Him "Son of David" (Matthew 12:23; John 7:31). The 40 Miracles of Christ recorded are but samples out of a greater number (John 2:23; John 20:30-31; Matthew 4:23; Matthew 8:16; Matthew 9:35; Matthew 12:15; Matthew 14:14; Matthew 14:35-36; Matthew 15:30; Matthew 19:2; Matthew 21:14). Seventeen He cured of sicknesses, fever, leprosy, palsy, infirmity, withered hand, issue of blood, dropsy, blindness, deafness, muteness (John 4:47; John 5:5; John 9:1; Matthew 8:2; Matthew 8:5; Matthew 8:14; Matthew 9:2; Matthew 9:20; Matthew 9:27; Matthew 12:10; Mark 8:22; Luke 13:11; Luke 17:12; Luke 18:35; Luke 22:51); this class is that of Miracles bringing in love relief to suffering man. " Love to man, unweariedly active, is as conspicuous in His Miracles as power. The connection of His Miracles with His redeeming work is the reason why faith was the needed preliminary on the part of the recipients of healing (Mark 6:5-6; Mark 7:29; Matthew 9:28-29). If Miracles were mere wonders anyone would have been a fit witness of their performance. ...
But the Miracles were designed to attract the witnesses to His kingdom. Performed in His own name and in the first person, "I say unto thee" (Luke 7:14); but the apostles' Miracles were in His name (Acts 3:6; Acts 4:10-12). Disbelief disqualified for appreciating Miracles. To work Miracles before hardened unbelievers would only aggravate their opposition, sin, and condemnation (John 15:24; John 9:39-41). ...
His resurrection is the central Miracle toward which all the rest converge. His name is "Wonderful" or "miracle" (Isaiah 9:6; 1618068032_20). He is an embodied Miracle, the Miracle of Miracles. Christ's charge that the eye witnesses should not report His Miracles (Matthew 9:30; Mark 5:43; Mark 7:36) was in order that men should not dissociate the wonder from His redeeming work. ...
To John the Baptist on the contrary He sent a report of His Miracles, because John was not likely to dissever His Miracles from His person and His work. If the incarnation be denied, Christianity's existence is an effect without an adequate cause; grant the incarnation, and Miracles are its necessary concomitant and natural consequence. ...
The truth of the Miracles is confirmed incidentally by the fact that in no nation but Israel have the knowledge and worship of the one true God, the Creator, been maintained by the mere light of nature, and Israel was far from overtopping other nations in mental power and civilization. A divine power alone could have so elevated Israel by an extraordinary call, confirmed by Miracles. The prophecies, the morality, the structure of the Bible, and Christianity's conquest of the Roman world and its public establishment about 300 years after the execution of its Founder as a malefactor, similarly confirm the Miracles which attest to its divinity. The improbability of the Christian religion being established WITH Miracles is not nearly so great as the improbability of its being established WITHOUT Miracles. No Miracles of Jesus' youth are mentioned; there is no description of His personal appearance, nor of His doings in the world of spirits; no Miracles of the Virgin Mary: omissions sure to be supplied in a legendary story. The hostility of the Jewish nation to Christianity confirms the gospel Miracles. ...
But now we are certain that the gospel Miracles were wrought in the presence of enemies, and so subjected to the severest scrutiny
Lazarus - Lazarus was the subject of the greatest Miracle of the Gospel story ( John 11:1-44 ). He desired not only to manifest His power to His friends, but to make a signal appeal to impenitent Jerusalem, by working a Miracle which would attest His Messiahship beyond all question. Jesus arrived on the fourth day, and there was no doubt of the reality of Lazarus’ death and of the ensuing Miracle. It was a startling Miracle
Basket (2) - —All four Evangelists, in narrating the Miracle of the feeding of the five thousand, describe the baskets in which the fragments were placed as κόφινοι (Matthew 14:20 = Mark 6:43 = Luke 9:17 = John 6:13); while the two who report the other Miracle of feeding the four thousand, state that the fragments were placed in σπυρίδες (Matthew 15:37 = Mark 8:8). Hence Greswell thought that before Pentecost, the season of wheat harvest, when the second Miracle took place, the disciples were able to use corn-baskets, while the first Miracle happening before Passover time, they used another kind of basket! Besides the improbability of this, we may note that there is no proof that in either case the baskets belonged to or were carried about by the disciples, for they may have been borrowed when needed. Yet Trench (Miracles, p
Whole - They needed GOD to work a Miracle for them, and deliver them from their predicament
Gadarenes - The place of the Miracle of Matthew 8:28-33 has been in doubt, but it cannot be Gadara, which is too far from the lake for the herd of swine to rush into it precipitantly in one short run
Eton College - Since 1919 the acting of Miracle plays on Founder's Day has been revived
Jericho - This is the famous city before whose walls the Lord manifested such a Miracle of grace to Israel, in causing them to fall to the ground at the blasting of the rams' horns
Sign - Sign is also put for a Miracle: "Thou shalt do these signs and wonders in the midst of Egypt," Exodus 4:7-9 , &c
Lazarus - " This public and stupendous Miracle drew so many to Christ, that his enemies sought to put both him and Lazarus to death, John 11:1-57 12:1-11
Gadarenes', Girgesenes', Gerasenes' - The Miracle referred to took place, without doubt, near the town of Gergesa, the modern Kersa , close by the eastern shore of the Sea of Galilee, and hence in the country of Gergesenes
Porch - Peter’s Miracle at the Beautiful Gate (Acts 3:11), and which was a rendezvous of the early Church (5:12), was certainly modern
Elisha - We next read of his predicting a fall of rain when the army of Jehoram was faint from thirst (2 Kings 3:9-20 ); of the multiplying of the poor widow's cruse of oil (4:1-7); the Miracle of restoring to life the son of the woman of Shunem (4:18-37); the multiplication of the twenty loaves of new barley into a sufficient supply for an hundred men (4:42-44); of the cure of Naaman the Syrian of his leprosy (5:1-27); of the punishment of Gehazi for his falsehood and his covetousness; of the recovery of the axe lost in the waters of the Jordan (6:1-7); of the Miracle at Dothan, half-way on the road between Samaria and Jezreel; of the siege of Samaria by the king of Syria, and of the terrible sufferings of the people in connection with it, and Elisha's prophecy as to the relief that would come (2 Kings 6:24-7:2 )
Cana - It was the scene of our Lord’s first Miracle (John 2:1; John 2:11); the place to which ‘a certain king’s officer (βασιλικός), whose son was sick at Capernaum,’ came to find Jesus (John 4:46); and the native place of the disciple Nathanael (John 21:2). After the Miracle, Jesus ‘went down’ (κατέβη) to Capernaum; and the king’s officer besought him to ‘come down’ (καταβῇ) to heal his son
Demoniac - Farmer, upon the general question, is, that Miracles, or works surpassing the power of men, are never performed without a divine interposition; and by a divine interposition he means, either the immediate agency of the Deity himself, or of beings empowered and commissioned by him. And the proof of this asseveration, he tells us, may very easily be found, if we consider that, on any other supposition, it is impossible to show that a religion supported by Miracles is really from God. For the Miracles in question, or works surpassing the power of human beings, may have been performed by evil spirits, acting independently of the Divinity, thwarting his purposes, and marring the operation of his goodness. Should it be said that, from the tendency of the Miracle itself, and ...
a fortiori, from the tendency of the Miracle and religion when taken together, we may easily infer the character of the being from whom the whole scheme proceeds,— to this also Dr. And were the sanctity of the doctrine ever so apparent, it would not (on the principles of those with whom we are here arguing) certainly follow from hence, that the Miracles recommending it were wrought, by God; inasmuch as other beings, from motives unknown to us, might interest themselves in favour of such a doctrine. " In one word, according to this author, we do not know whether the tendency of the Miracle, or of the religion, be good or not; and therefore we can form no accurate idea of the character really belonging to the being from whom the revelation proceeds. According to the sense and discernment of men, the Miracle is useful in itself, but we cannot be sure whether it may not have been performed by one of the rebellious angels "who kept not their first estate. Farmer maintains that there is not an instance recorded in sacred Scripture, where a Miracle has been wrought, and where there is not sufficient reason to believe that the effect was produced either by the Deity himself, or by agents commissioned and empowered to act in his name. When a demon is said to enter into a man, the meaning is, that his madness is about to show itself in a violent paroxysm; when a demon is said to speak, it is only the unhappy victim of the disease himself that speaks; and when a demon or devil is expelled, the exact truth of the case, as well as the whole of the Miracle, is nothing more than that the disease is cured. Nor does this, say they, detract from the very high character which Christ undoubtedly sustains in the inspired writings, or diminish the value of his Miracles as the evidences of our religion; since it must be allowed, that to cure a disease with a word or a touch is an effort of power far beyond the reach of any human being. There is a Miracle in either case; and, in either case, it is a sufficient proof of our Saviour's mission, and an adequate support of the Christian faith. " The advocates of possessions contend still farther, that the revelation which is made to us in sacred Scripture is addressed to our understandings; that it is not only in our power, but that it is our indispensable duty, to examine it, and to judge of it; that the tendency of any Miracle, or system of doctrine, is a sufficient evidence of the character belonging to him who performs the Miracle, or publishes the doctrine; that good actions are demonstrative of the quality of goodness; and, in short, that a religion calculated to make us happy must have proceeded from a Being who has consulted and provided for our happiness, Nor is this a matter so abstruse and remote from human apprehension, that we can form no opinion about it. The very Miracles recorded in Scripture are proofs of goodness
Miracle - On either hypothesis, effects which are produced by the regular operation of these laws, or which are conformable to the established course of events, are properly called natural; and every contradiction to this contitution of the natural system, and the correspondent course of events in it, is called a Miracle. ...
"If this definition of a Miracle be just, no event can be deemed miraculous merely because it is strange, or even to us unaccountable: since it may be nothing more than a regular effect of some unknown law of nature. It is therefore necessary, before we can pronounce any effect to be a true Miracle, that the circumstances under which it is produced be known, and that the common course of nature be in some degree understood; for in all those cases in which we are totally ignorant of nature, it is impossible to determine what is, or what is not, a deviation from its course. Miracles, therefore, are not, as some have represented them, appeals to our ignorance. But were he to recover his patient merely by commanding him to see, or by anointing his eyes with spittle, we should with the utmost confidence pronounce the cure to be a Miracle; because we know perfectly that neither the human voice nor human spittle have, by the established constitution of things, any such power over the diseases of the eye. "If Miracles be effects contrary to the established constitution of things, we are certain that they will never be performed on trivial occasions. From this consideration, some men have ventured to conclude that no Miracle was ever wrought, or can rationally be expected; but maturer reflection must soon satisfy us that all such conclusions are hasty. In this state of things we can conceive no evidence sufficient to make such doctrines be received as the truths of God, but the power of working Miracles committed to him who taught them. ...
Would not the only possible objection to the man's veracity be removed by this Miracle? and his assertion that he had received such and such doctrines from God be as fully credited as if it related to the most common occurrence? Undoubtedly it would; for when so much preternatural power was visibly communicated to this person, no one could have reason to question his having received an equal portion of preternatural knowledge. "Miracles, then, under which we include prophecy, are the only direct evidence which can be given of divine inspiration. "The history of almost every religion abounds with relations of prodigies and wonders, and of the intercourse of men with the gods; but we know of no religious system, those of the Jews and Christians excepted, which appealed to Miracles as the sole evidence of its truth and divinity. The pretended Miracles mentioned by Pagan historians and poets, are not said to have been publicly wrought to enforce the truth of a new religion, contrary to the reigning idolatry. "But the Miracles recorded of Moses and of Christ bear a very different character. They are, indeed, so incorporated with these systems, that the Miracles cannot be separated from the doctrines; and if the Miracles be not really performed, the doctrines cannot possibly be true. "It is indeed, we believe, universally admitted that the Miracles mentioned in the book of Exodus, and in the four Gospels, might, to those who saw them performed, be sufficient evidence of the divine inspiration of Moses and of Christ; but to us it may be thought that they are no evidence whatever, as we must believe in the Miracles themselves, if we believe in them at all, upon the bare authority of human testimony. Why, it has been sometimes asked, are not Miracles wrought in all ages and countries? If the religion of Christ was to be of perpetual duration, every generation of men ought to have complete evidence of its truth and divinity. "To the performance of Miracles in every age and in every country, perhaps the same objections lie, as to the immediate inspiration of every individual. Were those Miracles universally received as such, men would be so overwhelmed with the number rather than with the force of their authority, as hardly to remain masters of their own conduct; and in that case the very end of all Miracles would be defeated by their frequency. ...
The truth, however, seems to be, that Miracles so frequently repeated would not be received as such, and of course would have no authority; because it would be difficult, and in many cases impossible, to distinguish them from natural events. "Be this, however, as it may, we shall take the liberty to affirm, that for the reality of the Gospel Miracles, we have evidence as convincing to the reflecting mind, though not so striking to vulgar apprehension, as those had who were contemporary with Christ and his apostles, and actually saw the mighty works which he performed. Hume, indeed, endeavoured to prove, that 'no testimony is sufficient to establish a Miracle? and the reasoning employed for this purpose is, that 'a Miracle being a violation of the laws of nature, which a firm and unalterable experience has established, the proof against a Miracle, from the very nature of the fact, is as entire as any argument from experience' can be: whereas our experience of human veracity, which (according to him) is the sole foundation of the evidence of testimony, as far from being uniform, and can therefore never preponderate against that experience which admits of no exception. Campbell, in his Dissertation on Miracles, who justly observes, that so far is experience from being the sole foundation of the evidence of testimony, that, on the contrary, testimony is the sole foundation of by far the greater part of what Mr. "We need not waste time here in proving that the Miracles, as they are presented in the writings of the New Testament, were of such a nature, and performed before so many witnesses, that no imposition could possibly be practised on the senses of those who affirm that they were present. But if this accusation be well founded, their testimony itself is as great a Miracle as any which they record of themselves, or of their Master. For if they sat down to fabricate their pretended revelation, and to contrive a series of Miracles to which they were unanimously to appeal for its truth, it is plain, since they proved successful in their daring enterprise, that they must have clearly foreseen every possible circumstance in which they could be placed, and have prepared consistent answers to every question that could be put to them by their most inveterate and most enlightened enemies; by the statesman, the lawyer, the philosopher, and the priest. It is not, however, the only Miracle which this supposition would compel us to swallow. The very resolution of the apostles to propagate the belief of false Miracles in support of such a religion as that which is taught in the New Testament, is as great a Miracle as human imagination can easily conceive. Whence it follows, that when they resolved to support their pretended revelation by an appeal to forged Miracles, they wilfully, and with their eyes open, exposed themselves to inevitable misery, whether they should succeed or fail in their enterprise; and that they concerted their measures so as not to admit of a possibility of recompence to themselves, either in this life or in that which is to come. "Thus, then, do Miracles force themselves upon our assent in every possible view which we can take of this interesting subject. If the testimony of the first preachers of Christianity were true, the Miracles recorded in the Gospel were certainly performed, and the doctrines of our religion are derived from heaven. "...
The power necessary to perform the one series of these Miracles may, for any thing known to us, be as great as that which would be requisite for the performance of the other; and, considered merely as exertions of preternatural power, they may seem to balance each other, and to hold the mind in a state of suspense; but when we take into consideration the different purposes for which these opposite and contending Miracles were wrought, the balance is instantly destroyed. The Miracles recorded in the Gospels, if real, were wrought in support of a revelation which, in the opinion of all by whom it is received, has brought to light many important truths which could not otherwise have been made known to men; and which, by the confession of its adversaries, contains the purest moral precepts by which the conduct of mankind was ever directed. The opposite series of Miracles, if real, was performed to enable, and even to compel, a company of Jews, of the lowest rank and of the narrowest education, to fabricate, with the view of inevitable destruction to themselves, a consistent scheme of falsehood, and by an appeal to forged Miracles to impose it upon the world as a revelation from heaven. The object of the former Miracles is worthy of a God of infinite wisdom, goodness, and power; the object of the latter is absolutely inconsistent with wisdom and goodness, which are demonstrably attributes of that Being by whom alone it follows, that the supposition of the apostles bearing false testimony to the Miracles of their Master, implies a series of deviations from the laws of nature infinitely less probable in themselves than those Miracles: and therefore, by Mr. Hume's maxim, we must necessarily reject the supposition of falsehood in the testimony, and admit the reality of the Miracles. ...
So true it is, that for the reality of the Gospel Miracles we have evidence as convincing to the reflecting mind as those had who were contemporary with Christ and his apostles, and were actual witnesses to their mighty works. " The power of working Miracles is supposed by some to have been continued no longer than the apostles' days. It seems pretty clear, however, that Miracles universally ceased before Chrysostom's time. Toll, and others, who suppose that Miracles ceased with the apostles. As to the Miracles of the Romish church, it is evident, as Doddridge observes, that many of them were ridiculous tales, according to their own historians; others were performed without any credible witnesses, or in circumstances where the performer had the greatest opportunity of juggling; and it is particularly remarkable, that they were hardly ever wrought where they seem most necessary, 1: e. ...
See Fleetwood, Clarapede, Conybeare, Campbell, Lardner, Farmer, Adams, and Weston, on Miracles, article Miracle, Enc
False Apostles - Such “apostles” were characterized as preaching a “rival Jesus” (likely a lordly, Miracle-working “success story”), possessing a different spirit (a self-seeking motivation evidenced by a different life-style than Paul's), and a different gospel which disregarded the cross (and its corollary of suffering for those who follow Christ)
Siloam, Pool of - Here a notable Miracle was wrought by our Lord in giving sight to the blind (John 9:7-11 )
Jasher - A book alluded to only in Joshua 10:13 as containing Joshua's, Miracle of commanding the sun and the moon to stand still; 2 Samuel 1:18 as containing David's elegy over Saul and Jonathan, entitled the "bow" song, celebrating Jonathan famous for the bow (compare 2 Samuel 1:22 and Psalm 60), a national song to be "taught'" to the people (not "he bade them teach the children of Judah (the use of) the bow"): Deuteronomy 31:19
Eutychus - Peter’s raising of Dorcas (Acts 9:36-43), But the narrative leaves little doubt of the intention of the historian to relate a Miracle. ’ There is no doubt that the incident is related as an instance of the power of the Apostle to work Miracles, and that the historian believed him to have done so on this occasion
Exorcists - ...
On one occasion the disciples met with a man who was casting out demons in the name of the Lord, whom they forbade because he followed not with them; but the Lord said that no one who did a Miracle in His name could lightly speak evil of Him
Eight - ...
ex8 - is the performing of a Miracle which had heretofore been unknown in the history of man
Government - Thirteen governments thus founded on the natural authority of the people alone, without the pretence of Miracle or mystery, are a great point gained in favor of the rights of mankind
Basket - Paul’s escape from Damascus, one, σφυρίς or σπυρίς (Acts 9:25), being the same as is found in the Miracle of feeding the 4000 (Matthew 15:37, Mark 8:8), the other, σαργάνη, being peculiar to the Apostle’s own version of the incident (2 Corinthians 11:33). The former kind of basket plays an important part in relation to the Miracles of feeding, and the argument for its larger size as compared with κόφινος is supported by a reference to its use in facilitating St
Darius - " Under him Daniel was advanced to the highest dignity, which exposed him to the malice of enemies and led to his being cast into the den of lions, but by a Miracle he escaped injury
Balaam - Here occurred the Miracle of Balaam's ass, Numbers 22:22,35
Blindness - In these cases there was a double Miracle; for not only was the organ of sight restored, but also the faculty of using it which is usually gained only by long experience, Mark 8:22-25
Miracle - Although English speakers regularly use "miracle" to refer to a broad range of wondrous events, the biblical concept is limited to those not explainable solely by natural processes but which require the direct causal agency of a supernatural being, usually God. The Bible begins with one of God's greatest Miracles—the creation of the universe out of nothing. The next major Miracle, the flood, thus affirms both God's judgment on extreme wickedness and his grace in promising never again to destroy humanity so completely (6:3; 9:15-16). Miracles throughout the rest of Genesis deal primarily with God's preservation of his chosen line, when his promises to Abraham (Genesis 12:1-3 ) seem about to be broken, most notably Sarah's conception of Isaac at an advanced age (21:1-7). The first major cluster of biblical Miracles surrounds the central Old Testament act of redemptionthe exodus of the Israelites from Egypt. Here too appear thirteen of the eighteen Old Testament uses of "signs and wonders, " an expression that focuses on the Miracles' redemptive significance. The miraculous crossing of the Sea of Reeds (14:21-31), therefore, becomes the prototypical Old Testament Miracle of the deliverance of God's people and the destruction of his enemies (15:1-2). The Israelites' wandering in the wilderness is punctuated by various Miracles of preservation and judgmentrescue when it seems they will perish (by the ongoing provision of manna and quail chap. Although no Miracle, per se, occurs as Gideon fights the Midianites, the confusion that causes his enemies to slay each other, despite the small number of opposing forces, is equally attributed to the Lord's direct intervention (Judges 7 ). Subsequent Miracles are also "borderline"Samson's superhuman strength when he is "filled with the Spirit" (Judges 13-16 ) and the ark's "power" over Dagon (1 Samuel 5 ) and the cattle that return it to Beth Shemesh (chap. The next major cluster of Miracles involves the prophets Elijah and Elisha. The predominant purpose behind the Miracles of these two prophets is to demonstrate Yahweh's superiority over Baal and to call God's people back to worship him. ...
Elijah's successor certifies his prophetic role with closely parallel Miracles. The latter two Miracles closely resemble Jesus' later feeding of the multitudes, cures of lepers, and concern for Gentiles. The two other major Miracles that occur in the Old Testament historical books involve the leprosy with which faithless Uzziah is afflicted and the sundial shadow's retreat as a sign to portend Hezekiah's recovery from illness (2 Kings 15:1-8 ; 20:1-11 ). Two books whose genre is disputed contain major Miracles: Job with his remarkable collection of afflictions and subsequent recovery and Jonah with his preservation by and expulsion from the great fish. The only other major cluster of Old Testament Miracles centers on the life of Daniel and his friends in exile in Babylon. Other Miracles give Daniel the ability to interpret Nebuchadnezzar's dream (chap. The greatest of all biblical Miracles is the incarnationGod becoming human (John 1:1-18 ). Jesus' adult ministry regularly features Miracles for a variety of purposes. ...
But none of these themes proves as prominent as the most central one: Jesus works Miracles to demonstrate that the kingdom of God has been inaugurated, the messianic age has arrived, and he is the Christ who will fulfill all of God's previous Scriptures. ...
These direct statements give clues how to interpret some of the more unusual of Jesus' Miracles that often have parabolic or symbolic elements. Healing the deaf-mute effects a rare Miracle predicted to herald the messianic age (Mark 7:31-37 ; cf. ...
The greatest Miracle of Jesus' life, of course, is his resurrection. ...
Each evangelist has his own thematic emphases concerning Jesus' Miracles. Mark, too, introduces the so-called messianic secret motif following several Miracles (e. Matthew's Miracle-stories fit his overall narrative progression from Jesus' particularism to universalism (with chap. Whereas the Synoptics use "signs" in a negative sense as that which unbelieving skeptics demand but do not receive save for the resurrection as the "sign of Jonah" (Matthew 12:38-42 ), John consistently speaks of Jesus' Miracles as "signs" meant to lead people to faith in Christ (2:11; 4:54; Miracles, not just the twelve (Stephen and Philip in Acts 6:8 and Acts 8:13 ), and they continue with about the same frequency throughout the book. The apostolic Miracles often closely parallel Jesus' mighty works, too ( Miracles also reflect God's judgment on his enemies (13:6-12) or his rebellious children (5:1-11). For Paul, healings and Miracles are spiritual gifts (1 Corinthians 12:9-10 ) God gives to those whom he chooses (vv. Miracles further certify apostolic credentials (12:12), characterize Paul's ministry (Romans 15:19 ), and attest the truth of Christian life in the Spirit (Galatians 3:5 ). Counterfeit Miracles will proliferate in the end times (2 Thessalonians 2:9 ), as Jesus himself had prophesied (Matthew 24:24 ), and as Revelation will describe in greater detail (e. Throughout the Bible, Miracles consistently serve to point people to the one true God, ultimately revealed in Jesus Christ. Contemporary experience suggests that this pattern continues; Miracles today seem most frequent in regions where Satan has long held sway and where people require "power evangelism" to be converted. But God's sovereignty warns against trying to predict when they may occur and refutes the "name it and claim it" heresy that tries to force God to work Miracles upon demand, if only one exercises adequate faith. Blackburn, Theios Aner and the Markan Miracle Traditions ; L. Brown, Miracles and the Critical Mind ; R. Latourelle, The Miracles of Jesus and the Theology of Miracles; ISBE, 3:371-81; 4:505-8,1100-1101; H. Lockyer, All the Miracles of the Bible ; L. Sabourin, The Divine Miracles Discussed and Defended ; G. Theissen, Miracle Stories of the Early Christian Tradition ; H. van der Loos, The Miracles of Jesus ; D
Conversion: a Radical Change - But suppose this man can be so changed, that just as freely as he was wont to curse he now delights to pray, and just as heartily as he hated religion he now finds pleasure in it, and just as earnestly as he sinned he now delights to be obedient to the Lord; ah! then, this is a wonder, a Miracle which mat cannot accomplish, a marvel which only the grace of God can work, and which gives to God his highest glory
Immanuel - The king, who is an idolater, does not deny Jehovah's power to work a Miracle, but is doubtless equally convinced of the power of the gods of Assyria; he hypocritically refuses to "tempt the Lord
Ben-Hadad - Sought to capture Elisha for telling his plans to king of Israel, but through God's Miracle had his troops blinded and led captive to Samaria (2 Kings 6:8-23 )
Emmanuel Title - The king, who is an idolater, does not deny Jehovah's power to work a Miracle, but is doubtless equally convinced of the power of the gods of Assyria; he hypocritically refuses to "tempt the Lord
Miracle - "The suspension or violation of the laws of nature involved in Miracles is nothing more than is constantly taking place around us. , of invading the fixed order, and thus of working Miracles. Thus we affirm the possibility of Miracles, the possibility of a higher hand intervening to control or reverse nature's ordinary movements. ...
In the New Testament these four Greek words are principally used to designate Miracles: ...
Semeion, a "sign", i. Miracles are seals of a divine mission. Our Lord also appealed to Miracles as a conclusive proof of his divine mission (John 5:20,36 ; 10:25,38 ). Where Miracles are there certainly God is. The man, therefore, who works a Miracle affords thereby clear proof that he comes with the authority of God; they are his credentials that he is God's messenger. He boldly says, "God bears me witness, both with signs and wonders, and with divers Miracles. " ...
The credibility of Miracles is established by the evidence of the senses on the part of those who are witnesses of them, and to all others by the testimony of such witnesses. Unbelievers, following Hume, deny that any testimony can prove a Miracle, because they say Miracles are impossible. We have shown that Miracles are possible, and surely they can be borne witness to. Miracles, it is said, are contrary to experience. An atheist or a pantheist must, as a matter of course, deny the possibility of Miracles; but to one who believes in a personal God, who in his wisdom may see fit to interfere with the ordinary processes of nature, Miracles are not impossible, nor are they incredible. (See LIST OF MiracleS, Appendix
Elisha - ...
His Miracles After Elijah insisted to his chosen successor that he, “Ask what I shall do for you, before I am taken from you,” Elisha answered, “Let me inherit a double portion of spirit” (2 Kings 2:9 NIV). Following this Miracle the prophetic order or “sons of the prophets” declared, “The spirit of Elijah is resting on Elisha” ( 2 Kings 2:15 ). ...
Some of the Miracles of Elisha are quite well known and loved. ...
In carrying out the second and third commands of the “still small voice” to Elijah (1 Kings 19:11-16 ), Elisha enhanced his legacy beyond the realm of Miracle worker. ...
Powerful enough to perform Miracles and appoint kings, yet sensitive enough to weep over the fate of Israel (2 Kings 8:11-12 ), Elisha, disciple and successor to Elijah, proved to be both prophet and statesman. See Miracles; Prophet-Prophecy; History of Israel; Baal Worship
Bartimaeus - But there can be little doubt that we have also accounts of the same Miracle in the closely parallel narratives Matthew 20:29-34, Luke 18:35-43. Mark that the Miracle took place on the Lord’s departure from Jericho, speaks of two blind men as having been healed; but St. There are few Miracles, indeed, in the Gospel story better vouched for than the one before us, authenticated as it is by the triple Synoptic tradition and by the preciseness of the details, while the very mention of the name of the healed man has been regarded as a proof that he must still have been known in the time of the Apostles (‘valde notus Apostolorum tempore Bartimaeus,’ Bengel). —In addition to the relative sections in the well-known works on our Lord’s Miracles by Trench, Laidlaw, and W. 155–167, and The Miracles of Jesus by Various Authors (J
Lazarus - Their unbelief, "could not this man which opened the eyes of the blind (John 9, they allude not to the raising of Jairus' daughter and the widow of Nain's son, which took place in Galilee, but to the Miracle which made such a stir in Jerusalem; they never thought of His raising the dead) have caused that even this man should not have died?" made Him "groan again. The same Miracle which converted some Jews to belief furnished others only with materials for informing the Pharisees against Him. This is the crucial Miracle of the truth of the Gospels. The Jews' consultation to kill Lazarus, and his own probable shrinking from publicity after such a mysterious experience, perhaps further influenced them in their omission of the Miracle. Such an impression was made by this Miracle that many Jews flocked to Bethany to see both Jesus and Lazarus
Nazareth - But because his countrymen had no faith in him, and were offended at the meanness of his original, he did not many Miracles here, Matthew 13:54 ; Matthew 13:58 , nor would he dwell in the city. In the church a Miracle is still exhibited to the faithful. "All the Christians of Nazareth," says Burckhardt, "with the friars, of course, at their head, affect to believe in this Miracle; though it is perfectly evident that the upper part of the column is connected with the roof. But the said precipice is shown as that which the Messiah leaped down to escape from the Jews; and as the monks could not pitch upon any other place frightful enough for the Miracle, they contend that Nazareth formerly stood eastward of its present situation, upon a more elevated spot
Refreshing, Times of - The stunned amazement of the people at the temple who saw a crippled beggar healed in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth (Acts 3:10-11 ) prompted Peter to deliver a two-part sermon in which he traced the source of the Miracle to the power of Jesus (vv
Birthright - This seems to have been the case in Egypt, in the time of Moses: and hence Jehovah's destroying their first- born, as it was the last Miracle wrought in that country before the Exodus, so was it the most dreadful, and most effectual in prevailing on Pharaoh and the Egyptians to dismiss the Israelites
Josh'ua - A Miracle made the fall of Jericho more terrible to the Canaanites
Nain - The Miracle was wrought near to the ‘gate,’ and in the presence of ‘much people
Possession (2) - But in John 2:6 where he gives an account of the Miracle at the marriage feast in Cana of Galilee, he tells of ‘six water-pots of stone’ (λίθιναι ὑδρίαι), which were clearly ‘pots’ of a very different kind—too large to use at table, or to be portable in the ordinary way
Amalekites - " The occasion of Amalek's attack was significant: at Rephidim, when there was no water for the people to drink, and God by Miracle made it gush from the rock...
Contentions for possession of a well were of common occurrence (Genesis 21:25; Genesis 26:22; Exodus 2:17); in Moses' message asking Edom and Sihon the Amorite for leave of passage, water is a prominent topic (Numbers 20:17; Numbers 21:22; compare Judges 5:11). They tried to deprive God's people of a necessary of life which God had just supplied by Miracle, thus fighting not so much with them as with God
Gervasius - Two distinct points demand attention: 1st, the finding of the bodies; 2nd, the reputed Miracles. The discovery of the bodies may have been neither a Miracle nor a trick. There remains the question of the Miracles to which St. We must observe, also, in favour of the Miracle that St. In the Criterion of Miracles , by bp. 1803), there are many acute observations on similar reputed Miracles in the 18th cent
Red Sea - ...
In the queries of Michaelis, sent to Niebuhr, when in Egypt, it was proposed to him to inquire upon the spot, whether there were not some ridges of rocks where the water was shallow, so that an army at particular times may pass over; secondly, whether the Etesian winds, which blow strongly all summer from the north-west could not blow so violently against the sea as to keep it back on a heap, so that the Israelites might have passed without a Miracle. It is no greater Miracle to divide the Red Sea than to divide the river Jordan. Whence came that cohesion of particles which hindered that wall to escape at the sides? This is as great a Miracle as that of Moses. ' The words of this author are of the most remarkable kind: we cannot think this Heathen is writing in favour of revelation: he knew not Moses, nor says a word about Pharaoh and his host; but records the Miracle of the division of the sea in words nearly as strong as those of Moses, from the mouths of unbiassed, undesigning Pagans. And the second query, about the Etesian or northerly wind, is refuted by the express mention of a strong easterly wind blowing across, and scooping out a dry passage; not that it was necessary for Omnipotence to employ it there as an instrument, any more than at Jordan; but it seems to be introduced in the sacred history by way of anticipation, to exclude the natural agency that might in after times be employed for solving the Miracle; and it is remarkable that the monsoon in the Red Sea blows the summer half of the year from the north, the winter half from the south, neither of which therefore, even if the wind could be supposed to operate so violently upon the waters, could produce the Miracle in question. ...
Wishing to diminish, though not to deny, the Miracle, Niebuhr adopts the opinion of those who contend for a higher passage near Suez. "For," says he, "the Miracle would be less if they crossed the sea there than near Bedea
Miracles - A Miracle, in the popular sense, is a prodigy, or an extraordinary event, which surprises us by its novelty. In a more accurate and philosophic sense, a Miracle is an effect which does not follow from any of the regular laws of nature, or which is inconsistent with some known law of it, or contrary to the settled constitution and course of things. Accordingly, all Miracles presuppose an established system of nature, within the limits of which they operate, and with the order of which they disagree. Of a Miracle in the theological sense many definitions have been given. Samuel Clarke is: "A Miracle is a work effected in a manner unusual, or different from the common and regular method of providence, by the interposition of God himself, or of some intelligent agent superior to man, for the proof or evidence of some particular doctrine, or in attestation of the authority of some particular person. Hume has insidiously or erroneously maintained that a Miracle is contrary to experience; but in reality it is only different from experience. To pronounce, therefore, a Miracle to be false, because it is different from experience, is only to conclude against its general existence from the very circumstance which constitutes its particular nature; for if it were not different from experience, where would be its singularity? or what particular proof could be drawn from it, if it happened according to the ordinary train of human events, or was included in the operation of the general laws of nature? We grant that it does differ from experience; but we do not presume to make our experience the standard of the divine conduct. He that acknowledges a God must, at least, admit the possibility of a Miracle. ...
In judging of Miracles there are certain criteria, peculiar to the subject, sufficient to conduct our inquiries, and warrant our determination. Our knowledge of the ordinary course of things, though limited, is real; and therefore it is essential to a Miracle, both that it differ from that course, and be accompanied with peculiar and unequivocal signs of such difference. We have been told that the course of nature is fixed and unalterable, and therefore it is not consistent with the immutability of God to perform Miracles. If the course of nature implies the whole order of events which God has ordained for the government of the world, it includes both his ordinary and extraordinary dispensations, and among them Miracles may have their place, as a part of the universal plan. It is, indeed, consistent with sound philosophy, and not inconsistent with pure religion, to acknowledge that they might be disposed by the supreme Being at the same time with the more ordinary effects of his power; that their causes and occasions might be arranged with the same regularity; and that, in reference chiefly to their concomitant circumstances of persons and times, to the specific ends for which they were employed, and to our idea of the immediate necessity there is for a divine agent, Miracles would differ from common events, in which the hand of God acts as efficaciously, though less visibly. On this consideration of the subject, Miracles, instead of contradicting nature, might form a part of it. If we be asked whether Miracles are credible, we reply, that, abstractedly considered, they are not incredible; that they are capable of indirect proof from analogy, and of direct, from testimony; that in the common and daily course of worldly affairs, events, the improbability of which, antecedently to all testimony, was very great, are proved to have happened, by the authority of competent and honest witnesses; that the Christian Miracles were objects of real and proper experience to those who saw them; and that whatsoever the senses of mankind can perceive, their report may substantiate. Should it be asked whether Miracles were necessary, and whether the end proposed to be effected by them could warrant so immediate and extraordinary an interference of the Almighty, as such extraordinary operations suppose; to this we might answer, that, if the fact be established, all reasonings a priori concerning their necessity must be frivolous, and may be false. God is the best and indeed the only judge how far Miracles are proper to promote any particular design of his providence, and how far that design would have been left unaccomplished, if common and ordinary methods only had been pursued. So, from the absence of Miracles, we may conclude, in any supposed case, that they were not necessary; from their existence, supported by fair testimony, in any given case, we may refer with confidence that they are proper. ...
The revelation of the divine will by inspired persons is, as such, miraculous; and therefore, before the adversaries of the Gospel can employ with propriety their objections to the particular Miracles on which its credibility is based, they should show the impossibility of any revelation. So powerful, indeed, is the proof adduced in support of their testimony, that the infidels of these later days have been obliged to abandon the ground on which their predecessors stood; to disclaim all moral evidences arising from the character and relation of eye-witnesses; and to maintain, upon metaphysical, rather than historical, principles, that Miracles are utterly incapable, in their own nature, of existing in any circumstances, or of being supported by any evidence. ...
Miracles may be classed under two heads: those which consist in a train or combination of events, which distinguish themselves from the ordinary arrangements of Providence; and those particular operations which are performed by instruments and agents incompetent to effect them without a preternatural power. Thus, when the disciples of John were sent to Christ, to receive from his own lips the most satisfactory proofs of his divine mission, he referred them to his Miracles. This appeal to Miracles was founded on the following just and obvious grounds:—...
First: That they are visible proofs of divine approbation, as well as of divine power; for it would have been quite inconclusive to rest an appeal on the testimony of the latter, if it had not at the same time included an evidence of the former; and it was, indeed, a natural inference, that working of Miracles, in defence of a particular cause, was the seal of Heaven to the truth of that cause. The conclusion which the man whom our Saviour restored to sight drew from this Miracle was exceedingly just, and founded on the common sentiments and impressions of the human heart. If the cause which our Saviour was engaged in had not been approved of by God, it would not have been honoured with the seal of Miracles: for the divine power can never be supposed to counteract the divine will. Hence we may justly reject, as incredible, those Miracles which have been ascribed to the interposition of wicked spirits. ...
Secondly: When our Lord appealed to his Miracles, as proofs of his divine mission, it presupposed that those Miracles were of such a nature as would bear the strictest examination; that they had all those criteria which could possibly distinguish them from the delusions of enthusiasm, and the artifices of imposture; else the appeal would have been fallacious and equivocal. The Miracles which our Lord performed were too public to be suspected of imposture; and, being objects of sense, they were secured against the charge of enthusiasm. ...
The Miracles of Christ then were such as an impostor would not have attempted, and such as an enthusiast could not have effected. They were performed in the midst of his bitterest enemies; and were so palpable and certain, as to extort the following acknowledgment even from persons who were most eager to oppose his doctrines, and to discredit his pretensions: "This man doeth many Miracles. The Miracles Christ performed were indeed sufficient to alarm the fears of those whose downfall was involved in his success. The stories of the Jews, who confessed the Miracles, but denied what they were intended to establish, are too ridiculous to be mentioned. Now, supposing Miracles to be in the power of an infernal spirit, can it be imagined that he would communicate an ability of performing them to persons who were counteracting his designs? Would he by them give credit to a cause that tended to bring his own into disgrace? Thus, as our Saviour appealed to Miracles as proofs of his power; so he appealed to the inherent worth and purity of the doctrines they were intended to bear witness to, as a proof that the power was of God. ...
The truth of the Christian religion does not, however, depend wholly on the Miracles wrought by its divine Founder, though sufficient in themselves to establish his claims: but, in order to give the evidence of Miracles the strongest force they could possibly acquire, that evidence was extended still farther; and the same power that our Lord possessed was communicated to his disciples, and their more immediate successors. Sensible of the validity of this kind of evidence, the Apostles of our Lord, with the same artless simplicity, and the same boldness of conscious integrity, which distinguished their great Master, constantly insisted upon the Miracles they wrought, as strong and undeniable proofs of the truth of their doctrines. Thus the Miracles of our blessed Lord may be justly considered as the evidence of his divine mission and character. In a word, supposing that the Most High should in any instance so far counteract the common laws of nature, as to produce a Miracle; and should design that Miracle as a monument to future times of the truth of any peculiar doctrine, we cannot conceive any mode of communicating it more effectual than that which he has chosen. These Miracles were of a nature too palpable to be mistaken. That they should assert what they knew to be false; that they should publish it with so much ardour; that they should risk every thing dear to humanity, in order to maintain it; and at last submit to death, in order to attest their persuasion of its truth in those moments when imposture usually drops its mask, and enthusiasm loses its confidence; that they should act thus in opposition to every dictate of common sense, and every principle of common honesty, every restraint of shame, and every impulse of selfishness, is a phenomenon not less irreconcilable to the moral state of things than Miracles are to the natural constitution of the world. How long Miracles were continued in the church, has been a matter of keen dispute, and has been investigated with as much anxiety as if the truth of the Gospel depended upon the manner in which it was decided. The Apostles, wherever they went to execute their commission, would avail themselves of the stupendous gift which had been imparted to them; and it is clear, not only that they were permitted and enabled to convey it to others, but that spiritual gifts, including the power of working Miracles, were actually conferred on many of the primitive disciples. Whether, after the generation immediately succeeding the Apostles had passed away, the power of working Miracles was anew communicated, is a question, the solution of which cannot be nearly so satisfactory. The probability is, that there was no such renewal; and this opinion rests upon the ground that natural causes were now sufficient to accomplish the end for which Miracles were originally designed; and it does not appear to have been any part of the scheme of the blessed Author of our religion, that, solely for the purpose of hastening that conversion of the nations which might gradually be accomplished, Miracles should be wrought, when these could be of no use in establishing after ages in the faith
Sight - compared with Luke 4:16-21) But the greatness of the Miracle hath not perhaps been considered but by few, equal to its importance, both in its relation to bodily and spiritual blindness. And in respect to the souls of his people, which those Miracles to the bodies were intended to set forth, surely here was exhibited the new creation in the most striking manner
Meribah - This repetition of the Miracle disproves the notion from 1 Corinthians 10:4 that the stream literally "followed" them from Rephidim (Exodus 17) to Canaan; all that is meant is a supply of water from time to time was provided naturally or miraculously, so that they never perished from thirst (so Exodus 15:24-25; Numbers 21:16). The Hebrew for "rock" in Exodus 17 at Rephidim is tsur , but in Numbers 20 cela' at Kadesh, marking undesignedly the distinctness of the Miracles
Senuti, an Anchorite - His career was now marked by Miracle
Bethany - This magnificent Miracle by Jesus demonstrated His authority, prepared for His resurrection, and was even magnified through the name of His friend, Lazarus (an abbreviation of Eleazar, “God has helped”)
Naaman - Through an Israelite slave-girl Naaman hears of the man of God who works Miracles, and in the hope of being cured of his leprosy he comes to Elisha; it is, however, noteworthy that he comes at Elisha’s request ( 2 Kings 2:8 ) in order that he may learn that ‘there is a prophet in Israel. ’ On his arrival Naaman receives a message to the effect that he is to wash in the river Jordan seven times; his objection that the prophet ought to work the Miracle ‘in the name of the Lord his God’ seems very justifiable; upon the advice, however, of his servants he dips himself seven times in the Jordan, and is healed
Temptations, the Lord's - The first temptation is remarkable, as showing that Satan knew whom he was addressing, or he would not have suggested so striking a Miracle as making stones into bread
Calvary - 335, by tradition and a pretended Miracle
Naaman - ’ His hearers apparently inferred from these words that He had determined to work no Miracle among them, and were irritated accordingly, although perhaps our Lord intended to imply no more than that He had little hope of being able to do so (cf. Then, to justify and to illustrate His action in Working Miracles outside the limits of His own city, He referred to the cases of the widow of Sarepta and of Naaman, which were instances of blessings bestowed through the instrumentality of two of Israel’s greatest prophets on persons who were not of the house of Israel at all
Narcissus, Bishop of Jerusalem - Eusebius records a Miracle traditionally ascribed to him, whereby water was converted into oil one Easter Eve, when the oil required for the great illumination had failed (Eus
Deluge - ...
If the waters had only overflowed the neighbourhood of the Euphrates and the Tigris, they could not be fifteen cubits above the highest mountains; there was no rising that height but they must spread themselves, by the laws of gravity, over the rest of the earth; unless perhaps they had been retained there by a Miracle; in that case, Moses, no doubt, would have related the Miracle, as he did that of the waters of the Red Sea, &c
Galilee - And it is no less remarkable that of his entire thirty-three great Miracles, twenty-five were wrought in this province. His first Miracle was wrought at the wedding in Cana of Galilee, and his last, after his resurrection, on the shore of Galilee's sea
Malchus - This was Jesus' last Miracle relieving human suffering
Manna - These Miracles were wrought in attestation of the sanctity of the Sabbath. To commemorate this wonderful Miracle a golden pot was provided, Exodus 16:33; Hebrews 9:4, and an omer (or one man's portion) of the manna put up for preservation and placed in or near the ark, that succeeding generations might see with their own eyes the very substance on which their fathers were miraculously fed in their long and perilous journeyings from Egypt to Canaan
Sign - ) An event considered by the Jews as indicating the divine will, or as manifesting an interposition of the divine power for some special end; a Miracle; a wonder
Gehazi - The mother immediately betakes herself to the prophet, who sends Gehazi with his own staff to work a Miracle
Elisha - The young persons mocked at the great Miracle just performed. an elder brother's—portion of Elijah's spirit, both to work Miracles and to give counsel for present and future emergencies
ma'ry the Virgin, - Mary was present, and witnessed the first Miracle performed by Christ, when he turned the water into wine
Philippians, Epistle to the, - Paul not only by the hospitality of Lydia, the deep sympathy of the converts, and the remarkable Miracle which set a seal on his preaching, but, also by the successful exercise of his missionary activity after a long suspense, and by the happy consequences of his undaunted endurance of ignominies which remained in his memory, (Philippians 1:30 ) after the long interval of eleven years
Seeing - ’ The most ordinary significance of the word ‘see’ is, of course, the natural one—to recognize by the act of vision ordinary external objects, as when the blind are described as seeing (Matthew 15:31, John 9:7), or men are promised that they shall see the Son of Man, or when the disciples think they see a vision, or the multitude see the Miracles of Jesus (Mark 14:62, Luke 24:23, John 6:2). Just as the idea of life arises out of the Miracle of the feeding of the multitude, so does that of light spring from the Miracle of the healing of the man blind from his birth. Thus the Miracles of giving sight to the blind become peculiarly significant; but we need not, therefore, assume that, though they are in this way acted parables, the narratives of such Miracles are not to be regarded as of any historical value, but as mere pictorial representations of the spiritual truths they are meant to convey
Leaven - And significantly, after Jesus performs a second remarkable process Miracle of Jesus' healing the blind man (vv. Matthew does not record either process Miracle, but immediately narrates the confession of Peter that Jesus is the Messiah. The meaning is essentially the same as in Mark, but Mark's sensitivity to the struggle of the disciples to perceive Jesus' identity as symbolized in the two process Miracles is not present in Matthew
Judas Iscariot - The astonishing Miracles he saw him perform left no room to doubt of the reality of his Master's pretensions, who had, indeed, himself in private actually accepted the title from his Apostles; and Judas must have been much disappointed when Jesus repeatedly refused the proffered royalty from the people in Galilee, after the Miracle of feeding the five thousand, and again after his public procession to Jerusalem. He might naturally have grown impatient under the delay, and dissatisfied also with Jesus for openly discouraging all ambitious views among his disciples; and, therefore, he might have devised the scheme of delivering him up to the sanhedrim, or great council of the nation, (composed of the chief priests, scribes, and elders,) in order to compel him to avow himself openly as the Messiah before them; and to work such Miracles, or to give them the sign which they so often required, as would convince and induce them to elect him in due form, and by that means enable him to reward his followers. But when Judas, who attended the whole trial, saw that it turned out quite contrary to his expectations, that Jesus was capitally convicted by the council, as a false Christ and false prophet, notwithstanding he had openly avowed himself; and that he wrought no Miracle, either for their conviction or for his own deliverance, as Judas well knew he could, even from the circumstance of healing Malchus, after he was apprehended; when he farther reflected, like Peter, on his Master's merciful forewarnings of his treachery, and mild and gentle rebuke at the commission of it; he was seized with remorse, and offered to return the paltry bribe of thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders instantly on the spot, saying, ‘I sinned in delivering up innocent blood;' and expected that on this they would have desisted from the prosecution
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - Presented to their spiritual intuition; but there are no grounds for believing that, contemporaneously with this Miracle, there was wrought another Miracle, enlarging the understanding of the prophet so as to grasp the whole of the divine counsels which he was gazing into, or which he was the instrument of enunciating. --So far as their predictive powers are concerned, the Old Testament prophets find their New Testament counterpart in the writer of the Apocalypse; but in their general character, as specially illumined revealers of God's will, their counterpart will rather be found, first in the great Prophet of the Church and his forerunner, John the Baptist, and next in all those persons who were endowed with the extraordinary gifts of the Spirit in the apostolic age, the speakers with tongues and the interpreters of tongues, the prophets and the discerners of spirits, the teachers and workers of Miracles
Pharaoh - ...
What sign showest Thou, said the unbelieving Jews to our Lord, that we may see, and believe Thee? What dost Thou work? Let me see a Miracle, said Pharaoh to Moses and Aaron, and then I will let Israel go. And Miracle succeeded Miracle; Miracles of judgment were wrought and Miracles of mercy; but they all ended in the same way-Pharaoh's heart was only the more hardened. If no Miracle had followed his request, then Pharaoh would have felt fully justified in holding to his refusal. And, as it was, when his magicians did something sufficiently like Aaron's rod, then Pharaoh fell back and took his stand upon that, till the Miracle upon which he had suspended his obedience was wrought in vain. Pharaoh's first step to his salvation, had he but taken it, was not to see a Miracle, but to do what he knew to be right. Burn your books about Miracles. If I had not bargained for Miracles I would not have been here. A voice comes from the depth below, as well as from the height above, saying to us all, He among you that doetb the will of God, eveu he shall know of the doctrine, and shall not need to seek after a Miracle. Do the will of God in the thing that lies nearest you, and in the thing that God has been so long asking of you; do it; resolve to do it; begin to do it tonight and before tomorrow; and then all past Miracles in Egypt and in Israel, and all present providences and all coming experiences, will all work together to soften your heart and thus to strengthen and assure your faith
Tongues, Gift of - Some interpreters have seen their way to another solution of the difficulty by changing the character of the Miracle. " ...
It at once multiplies the Miracle and degrades its character. The Miracle, on this view, was wrought to make men believe what was not actually the fact
John, Gospel of - ...
Upon leaving Judea, Jesus met and taught various people in Samaria (4:1-42) and performed a healing Miracle in Galilee (4:43-54). Back in Jerusalem a further healing Miracle resulted in a dispute with the Jews about Jesus’ divine sonship (5:1-47). After a Miracle in Galilee that provided food for a multitude, people wanted to make Jesus king (6:1-21)
Sea - Exodus 14:2 (c) It may be used to represent extremely difficult problems and situations which arise in the Christian's path and are impossible to conquer unless the Lord performs a Miracle
Kibroth Hattaavah - The prodigious quantity and the supply of them at that time, in connection with Jehovah's moral dealings with Israel, constitute the Miracle, which is in consonance with God's natural law though then intensified
Joram, Jehoram - A Miracle was wrought and there was abundance of water
Flood, the - It was a Miracle, and it would require as great a Miracle to cover all the highhills in one district only, without the water flowing to other parts, as to submerge the whole earth
Rock - " And then tracing the sad effects of their being brought into captivity by their enemies, to the cause of having forsaken their confidence in the Lord, Moses adds, "how should one chase a thousand, and two put ten thousand to flight, except their rock had sold them, and the Lord had shut them up? For their rock is not as our rock, even our enemies themselves being judges;" (Deuteronomy 32:4; Deu 32:15; Deu 32:18; Deu 32:30-31)...
But the most striking and particular use of the term rock, as a figure applied to Christ, is that we read in the eventful history of Israel, beginning at Horeb, (Exodus 17:6) where we find the Lord speaking unto Moses in those remarkable words; "Behold, I will stand before thee upon the rock in Horeb, and thou shalt smite the rock and there shall come water out of it, that the people may drink" Now it never would have been known to any farther extent concerning this Miracle of grace, but that the Lord did here, as upon many other occasions, work a Miracle to supply the pressing occasions and wants of his people, had not the Holy Ghost in his love and condescension to the church, thought fit to explain this transaction, and not only declared that it was Christ which wrought this mi racle, but that this rock was Christ himself, If the reader will turn to the tenth chapter of Paul's First Epistle to the Corinthians, (1 Corinthians 10:1-33) and first and following verses, he will behold the gracious comment of the Holy Ghost upon it
Balaam - But how absurd is it to subject a miraculous event to the ordinary rules of reasoning! "Say what you will of the formation of the tongue and jaws being unfit for speaking," says Bishop Newton, "yet an adequate cause is assigned for this wonderful event; for it is expressly said that ‘the Lord opened the mouth of the ass;' and who that believes a God, can doubt his power to do this and much more? The Miracle was by no means needless or superfluous; it was well adapted to convince Balaam that the mouth and tongue were under God's direction, and that the same divine power which caused the dumb ass to speak contrary to its nature, could, in like manner, make him utter blessings contrary to his inclination. And, accordingly, he was overruled to bless the people, though he came prepared and disposed to curse them; which was the greater Miracle of the two; for the ass was merely passive, but Balaam resisted the good motions of God
Miracles - God is shown in the Bible to be a God of Miracles. But Miracles do not feature consistently throughout the biblical record. By some unusual Miracles God preserved the minority who remained faithful to him, and acted in judgment against those who tried to wipe out the worship of Yahweh from Israel (1 Kings 19:15-18). ...
Of all the Miracles, the greatest are those that concern the birth and resurrection of Jesus. God’s act in becoming a human being is itself a Miracle so great that it overshadows the means by which it happened, namely, the miraculous conception in the womb of a virgin (Matthew 1:18-23; John 1:14; see VIRGIN). The resurrection is a Miracle so basic to the Christian faith that without it there can be no Christian faith (1 Corinthians 15:12-14; see RESURRECTION). ...
Miracles and nature...
If we believe in a personal God who created and controls the world (Genesis 1:1; Colossians 1:16-17), we should have no trouble in believing the biblical record of the Miracles he performed. ...
On the other hand, God does not work Miracles every time someone wants him to. The Miracle was in the timing, extent or intensity of the event. But even if these can be explained as having natural causes, they were still Miracles to those who saw them. ...
This still leaves unexplained the large number of Miracles for which there seem to be no natural causes. ...
The purpose of Miracles...
Miracles were usually ‘signs’, that is, works of God that revealed his power and purposes (Exodus 7:3; Deuteronomy 4:34; Isaiah 7:11; Matthew 16:1; John 2:11; John 6:14; John 20:30; Acts 2:43; see SIGNS). However, messengers of God never used Miracles just to impress people or to persuade people to believe them (Matthew 12:38-39; Luke 23:8). It was the false prophet who used apparent Miracles to gain a following (Deuteronomy 13:1-3; Matthew 24:24; 2 Thessalonians 2:9-11; Revelation 13:13-14). God’s Miracles were usually linked with faith (2 Kings 3:1-7; Daniel 3:16-18; Daniel 6:22; Hebrews 11:29-30). ...
This was clearly seen in the Miracles of Jesus Christ. Jesus used Miracles not to try to force people to believe in him, but to help those who already believed. He performed Miracles in response to faith, not to try to create faith (Matthew 9:27-29; Mark 2:3-5; Mark 5:34; Mark 5:36; Mark 6:5-6). ...
Nevertheless, it is clear that many of those who saw Jesus’ Miracles were filled with awe and glorified God (Matthew 9:8; Luke 5:26; Luke 7:16; Luke 9:43). To those who believed in Jesus as the Son of God and the Messiah, the Miracles confirmed the truth of their beliefs and revealed to them something of God’s glory (John 2:11; John 11:40; Acts 14:3; Hebrews 2:3-4; see MESSIAH). There was a connection between the Miracles of Jesus and the era of the Messiah. This may explain why Miracles were common in the early church but almost died out once the original order of apostles died out (Matthew 10:5-8; Luke 9:1; Luke 10:9; Acts 4:16; Acts 4:29-30; Acts 5:12; Romans 15:19; 1 Corinthians 12:9-10; 2 Corinthians 12:12). ...
In the record of some of Jesus’ Miracles, faith is not mentioned. On those occasions Jesus acted, it seems, purely out of compassion (Matthew 8:14-15; Matthew 14:13-14; Matthew 15:32; Luke 4:40; Luke 7:11-17; John 6:1-13); though, as always, he refused to satisfy people who wanted him to perform Miracles for their own selfish purposes (John 6:14-15). ...
Jesus’ Miracles demonstrated clearly that he was the Messiah, the Son of God (John 20:30-31), and that the power of the Spirit of God worked through him in a special way (Matthew 12:28; Luke 4:18). Being both divine and human, he had on the one hand authority and power to work Miracles, but on the other he always acted in dependence upon his Father (John 5:19; John 14:10-11). His Miracles were always in keeping with his mission as the Saviour of the world. Jesus did not perform Miracles as if they were acts of magic, and he never performed them for his own benefit (cf. ...
Jesus’ Miracles and the kingdom of God...
In Jesus the kingdom of God had come into the world. The rule of God was seen in the Miracles by which Jesus the Messiah delivered from the power of Satan people who were diseased and oppressed by evil spirits (Matthew 4:23-24; Matthew 11:2-6; Matthew 12:28; see KINGDOM OF GOD). ...
To Christians, Jesus’ Miracles foreshadow the age to come. His healing Miracles give hope for a day when there will be no more suffering (Matthew 9:27-29; Mark 1:40-42; Revelation 21:4)
Elisha - ...
Elisha's first Miracle was healing the waters at Jericho, the cursed city, by means of salt in a new cruse: type of the purifying power of grace. ...
Two more Miracles followed. The other Miracle was the increase of the bread so that a hundred men were supplied from twenty loaves, or cakes, and there was some left: similar to the Lord feeding the multitudes when He was on earth. ...
The next Miracle was healing Naaman the Syrian of leprosy
Jericho - It was Elisha's first Miracle, he cast in salt and the water was healed
Travail - In contrast with this, Isaac was the child of Sarah by promise and by Miracle
Sepulchres - Matthew to come out of the tombs, Light observes, "I trod the ground celebrated for the Miracle of the unclean spirit, driven by our Saviour among the swine
Elisha - ...
A Miracle at the Jordan River quickly proved that God’s power had now passed from Elijah to Elisha (2 Kings 2:13-14). Many more Miracles would follow, showing what a serious threat Jezebel’s Baalism was to Israel’s national life. His first two Miracles symbolized these characteristics of blessing and cursing. In one place Elisha worked a Miracle to save the day’s food from being lost, and in another he miraculously recovered a borrowed tool that had fallen into the river (2 Kings 4:38-41; 2 Kings 6:1-7)
Jericho - The Miracle wrought independently of all conflict on their part at the outset marked that the occupation of the whole Holy Land was to be by His gift, and that it was a, fief held under God at His pleasure. The distinction between the new and the old towns may solve the seeming discrepancy between Matthew (Matthew 20:30), who makes the Miracle on the blind to be when Jesus was leaving Jericho, and Luke, who says it was when Jesus was come nigh unto Jericho (Luke 18:35)
Living (2) - —Two things—the manna and the bread of the Miracle which He had just wrought—were present to our Lord’s mind when He preached at Capernaum, and also to the minds of His hearers. But the earthly and material good which they expected to follow not being immediately forthcoming, and the first favourable impression produced by the Miracle having worn off, they began to criticise and find fault. Jesus also showed that His hearers had failed to perceive the true purpose of the Miracle He had wrought. The bread of the Miracle was intended for ‘a sign’ (John 6:26), which they had not had faith to discern (John 6:36), that He could supply them with the true bread of the soul. Accordingly, Jesus spoke of the bread of the Miracle as ‘the meat which perisheth,’ and contrasted it with ‘the meat which endureth unto eternal life’ (John 6:27). These distinctions of the bread of the Miracle as well as the manna from the true bread of the soul are important and vital, and they assist us to lay hold of our Lord’s meaning when He said, ‘I am the living bread
Bed - A quilt to wrap one's self in is the bed meant in the Miracle of Jesus when He said "Take up thy bed and walk" (John 5:8-11)
Rephidim - The repetition of the Miracle (Numbers 20:11) at Kadesh shows that the rabbinical tradition is incorrect, that the rock or the stream followed them literally in all their journeys
Tiberias, Sea of - The undesigned harmony of details, incidentally and separately noticed by the two evangelists, confirms their truthfulness, and therefore the Miracle of Jesus' walking on the sea
Herodians - After Christ's Miracle on the sabbath "the Pharisees went forth and straightway took counsel with the H
Manna - They longed for a physical Miracle, like the manna, which would prove to them that Jesus' words were true (John 6:31 )
Considerateness - Among the many rays of ‘his own glory’ (John 2:11) manifested forth in His first Miracle, we must not omit His considerateness for the mortification which the falling short of their wine would cause to His peasant hosts, and His taking care that none save His mother and the servants knew whence the new and better supply was drawn (John 2:9)
Agnoetae - His inquiry concerning Lazarus was explained from reference to the Jews and the intention to increase the effect of the Miracle
Sing - …” One might wonder if it took the Miracle of the Exodus from Egypt to give the Israelites something “to sing” about!...
Over one quarter of the instances of shı̂yr are found in the Book of Psalms, often in the imperative form, calling the people to express their praise to God in singing
Elijah - That most renowned prophet of Israel who, with no introduction as to his birth or parentage, or even account of the divine commission given to him, bursts forth in sacred story as the stern denouncer of judgment on apostate Israel, and who, after his marvelous course of Miracle and bold vindication of God's authority, is translated without tasting death
Daniel - He confessed the name of God before idolatrous princes; and would have been a martyr, but for the Miracle which rescued him from death
Jeroboam - At his urgent entreaty his "hand was restored him again" (1 Kings 13:1-6,9 ; Compare 2 Kings 23:15 ); but the Miracle made no abiding impression on him
Jezebel - When Elijah under God wrought the Miracle at Carmel, and killed her favorite prophets, Jezebel still unsubdued swore by her gods to do to Elijah as he had done to them (1 Kings 19:1-3)
Montanus, Bishop of Toledo - We are told that Montanus was the successor of Celsus in the "prima sedes" of the province of Carthaginensis; that he defended and maintained his office; that he wrote two letters on points of church discipline, one to the inhabitants of Palencia, the other to a certain Turibius, a "religious"; and that he rebutted a scandalous accusation by the help of a Miracle wrought in his favour
Blindness (2) - The first Miracle of this nature in the life of Jesus is recorded by St. ) another Miracle of restoring sight to the blind is recorded which has features of its own. Is it not enough for all practical purposes to hold the substantial accuracy of the Evangelic narrative without troubling ourselves about those minute divergences which occur in different versions of the same event narrated by the most trustworthy witnesses?...
The Miracles recorded in Matthew 12:22 and John 9 stand by themselves as having a very close relation to the teaching of Jesus which follows
Miracle - A Miracle is to be distinguished from wonders wrought by designing men through artful deceptions, occult sciences, or laws of nature unknown except to adepts. The Miracles wrought by Christ, for example, were such as God only could perform; were wrought in public, before numerous witnesses, both friends and foes; were open to the most perfect scrutiny; had an end in view worthy of divine sanction; were attested by witnesses whose character and conduct establish their claim to our belief; and are further confirmed by institutions still existing, intended to commemorate them, and dating from the period of the Miracles. By granting to any man the power to work a Miracle, God gave the highest attestation to the truth he should teach and the message he should bring, 1 Kings 18:38,39 ; this is God's own seal, not to be affixed to false hoods; and though the lying wonders of Satan and his agents were so plausible as to "deceive if possible the very elect," no one who truly sought to know and do the will of God could be deluded by them. ...
The chief object of Miracles having been to authenticate the revelation God has made of his will, these mighty words ceased when the Scripture canon was completed and settled, and Christianity was fairly established. Since the close of the first century from the ascension of Christ, few or no undoubted Miracles have been wrought; and whether a sufficient occasion for new Miracles will ever arise is known only to God. ...
The following list comprises most of the Miracles on record in the Bible, not including the supernatural visions and revelations of himself which God vouch-safed to his ancient servants, nor those numerous wonders of his providence which manifest his hand almost as indisputable as Miracles themselves. Old Testament Miracles ...
The creation of all things, Genesis 1:1-31 . ...
The deluge, comprising many Miracles, Genesis 6:1-22 . ...
New Testament Miracles. ...
Many Miracles of Christ, Deuteronomy 13:1 8:16 14:14,36 15:30 Mark 1:34 Luke 6:17-19 . ...
Miracles by the disciples, Matthew 10:1-8 . ...
Miracles at the crucifixion, Matthew 27:51-53 . ...
Miracles at the resurrection, Matthew 28:1-7 Luke 24:6 . ...
Miracles before John's messengers, Luke 7:21-22 . ...
Miracles by the seventy, Luke 10:9,17 . ...
Miracles by the apostles, Acts 2:43 5:12
Miracles (2) - MIRACLES. —The process of thought and research, both theological and scientific, has led to a position where belief in the actuality, in the career of Jesus, of those remarkable activities and manifestations summed up under the comprehensive and popular term ‘miracle,’ is made possible if not inevitable. Without being unduly optimistic, we may anticipate that the ‘ages of faith’ in every department of Christian truth, and not least in that of Miracle, are yet to come. They do not regard the Miracles of the Gospels as in the least degree arbitrary interruptions of the Order of Nature, but rather as a revelation of the infinite extent of that order. Men of science, moreover, are increasingly willing to admit the necessity of the spiritual and rational as the ultimate ground of the physical; and recent investigations into the make of the so-called ‘atom,’ and the vast potentialities of Matter, will further develop the distrust of all dogmatic assertion that nothing in the nature of the events recorded in the Gospels and called ‘miracles’ is possible or credible. ...
In this fact, that the Divine Power dwelt in its fulness in the personality of Jesus, we find the unifying principle for all the Miracles of the Gospels. Here and elsewhere the Miracles are represented, not as an arbitrary putting forth of a supernatural power altogether out of relation to any human capacity or possibility, but as arising spontaneously out of the unique relation He sustained to the Infinite Life; not as something given, while it could have been withheld, for the sake of commending the moral and spiritual and personal claims of Jesus, but as vital and essential parts of the Divine Revelation. ...
In order to get an intelligent faith in the Gospel Miracles, it is of great consequence at what point we approach the problem. His Miracles were not simply the output of an alien force, but the living exercise of a Divine force, deeply akin to all human powers, already working in the capacities, sympathies, and life-ties of humanity, utilizing the known in all their unknown ramifications, and also the unknown and unsuspected. If these deepest principles which our Lord followed are duly recognized in our faith and conception, then the remaining Miracles, most of which are rejected by many who receive the healings, become not only not incredible, but inevitable as the completion of a revelation otherwise essentially incomplete. And those Miracles which are associated with the life and career of Jesus, being wrought not so much by the power of our Lord, as by the Divine Power acting upon Him, have a strong presumption in their favour, congruous as they are with the whole method of His mighty works and with the one revelation given in Him. Miracles of Jesus. —A distinction must be made between what Jesus Himself said of the Miracles and the description given by the people of the time, who were under the influence of low and vulgar ideas of a Divine revelation, and by the Evangelists, who were not altogether emancipated from current conceptions. The Miracles were not the highest works; they belong to a lower level of manifestation as compared with His moral and spiritual revelation of God (John 14:11). With this the English word ‘miracle’ has most affinity. Characteristics of our Lord’s Miracles. —Briefly, the features of the Miracles which commend them to our judgment and affection may be stated as—(1) Spontaneity. The Miracles of Jesus ever sought the highest and Divinest ends, and were never ends in themselves. His Miracles spring out of His innermost nature, and reveal the moral harmony and winsomeness of His Person. Herein lies a most fruitful comparison with other alleged Miracles, ecclesiastical and mediaeval and modern. (5) Helpfulness to mankind was the abiding characteristic of our Lord’s Miracles. They presuppose a unique relation to God in Jesus, and His possession of a Miracle-working power. The story cannot be filled up by reference to the other Evangelists, for their account presupposes a Miracle-working power in Jesus). Another repetition of the statement that He taught the people (Mark 2:3-12 all being excised as entirely complicated with Miracle). Chronological list of Miracles of Jesus
Arrest - ’ It is, however, unnecessary to assume a Miracle. ¶ [9] The Miracle occasioned a diversion; and, while his mates were crowding about Malchus, Jesus reasoned with His excited followers
Command, Commandment - One must not allow even a Miracle-working prophet to lead one away from them (Deuteronomy 13:4 )
Power - , Mark 6:5 , "mighty work;" so Mark 9:39 , RV (AV, "miracle"); Acts 2:22 (ditto); 8:13, "miracles;" 2 Corinthians 12:12 , RV, "mighty works" (AV, "mighty deeds")
Hardness of the Heart - Hardening the heart was also seen as evidence of skepticism, “They considered not the Miracle of the loaves: for their heart was hardened” (Mark 6:52 )
Fear - ...
Fear of God or of his manifestations appears in the Bible either in the abstract, in which just the idea of God alone generates this response, or in particular situations such as theophany or Miracle, the occurrence or performance of which produces fear
Widow - The people who witnessed the Miracle exclaimed that a great prophet had risen up among them, probably with reference to Elijah or Elisha, the former of whom, like Christ, had raised a widow’s son
Epaphroditus - Paul, whose power of working Miracles is frequently referred to (Acts 14:10; Acts 28:8, 2 Corinthians 12:12), did not exercise it in the case of Epaphroditus. Some inner voice doubtless enabled apostles to know when the time for working a Miracle had come
John the Apostle - The public labors of Jesus in doctrine and Miracle, chaps
Debt - Isaiah 50:1 , Matthew 18:23 ), and Elisha helps her not by invoking the law, but by a Miracle
Corn - And these lessons from the corn in the records of the Lord’s ministry may be greatly extended as we recall what He said about the sowing of the corn (parable of the Sower) and its reaping (the Tares and the Wheat); how He saw in the white fields a vision of a great spiritual harvest only waiting to be gathered (John 4:35); how at Capernaum He turned the people’s minds from the barley bread of the previous day’s Miracle to think of Himself as the Bread of Life (John 6); and said of the broken loaf at the Last Supper, ‘Take, eat, this is my body
Be - ...
In Miracle accounts, hâyâh often appears at the climax of the story to confirm the occurrence of the event itself
Dorcas - Their motive for so doing is not apparent, but it is unlikely that they expected him to work a Miracle
Rephidim - " And "they tempted the Lord, saying, Is the Lord among us or not?" Moses, therefore, to convince them that he was, by a more obvious Miracle than at Marah, smote the rock with his rod, by the divine command, and brought water out of it for the people to drink: wherefore, he called the place Meribah, "chiding," and the rock Massah, "temptation
Exodus, the, - Here Pharaoh overtook them, and the great Miracle occurred by which they were saved, while the pursuer and his army were destroyed
Miracles - No sincere believer in the inspiration of scripture can have a doubt as to real Miracles having been wrought by the power of God both in O. , they would judge that Miracles were being performed. So, it is argued, the actions recorded in scripture as Miracles, were merely the bringing into use some law of nature which had been hidden up to that time. ...
The words translated 'miracle' in the O. ...
Moses was enabled to work Miracles for two distinct objects. ...
The other Miracles, wrought by him in Egypt, were to show to Pharaoh the mighty power of God, who said, I will "multiply my signs and my wonders in the land of Egypt . The ten plagues followed, which were Miracles or signs of the power of God — signs not only to the Egyptians, but also to the Israelites, as is shown by the reference to them afterwards. ...
By the following list it will be seen that there were many other Miracles wrought in O. All the Miracles were indeed the acts of God, His servants being merely the means through which they were carried out. ...
PRINCIPAL MiracleS IN THE OLD TESTAMENT. ' People were generally amazed at the Miracles performed. ' This word is translated 'signs,' 'miracles,' 'wonder,' and in 2 Thessalonians 3:17 'token': it is the word invariably used in John's gospel. δύναμις, 'power:' translated 'miracles,' 'mighty works,' 'powers. ' These three divinely selected words explain the nature of Miracles. These three words are applied to the Miracles of the Lord Jesus in Acts 2:22 ; to those wrought by Paul, 2 Corinthians 12:12 ; and to the work of Antichrist, the man of sin, in a future day. ...
The Miracles by the Lord and His apostles were nearly all wrought for the welfare of men, curing them from the diseases of mind and body, and dispossessing them of demons, thus spoiling the kingdom of Satan. From the wording of several passages it is conclusive that not nearly all the Miracles of the Lord are recorded. ...
It is stated in Mark 16:16-18 that those who should believe on the Lord Jesus, by the testimony of the apostles, would be able to work Miracles; and there is ample testimony in early church history that this was the case, especially in casting out demons. ...
Though not called a Miracle, isnot the conversion of a sinner a Miracle? It seems impossible for one who has been turned from darkness to light, and has been created in Christ Jesus, with the fruits and effects following, to doubt the reality of other Miracles recorded by God in His sacred writings. ...
In the accompanying list of Miracles in the N. it will be noticed that some are found in one gospel only — each of the gospels having Miracles peculiar to itself — a few are in two gospels; many in three; and only one that is recorded in all four. Indeed the scriptures are themselves as clear a manifestation of the power and wisdom of God as are any of the Miracles. ...
PRINCIPAL MiracleS IN THE NEW TESTAMENT. ...
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MiracleS...
Two blind men cured - Matthew 9:27-31
Understanding - Even his own disciples did not understand the Miracle of loaves and fishes (Mark 6:52 )
Exodus, the - Attempts have been made to fix upon a part of the Red Sea where the water is shallow, so that the east wind spoken of could have driven back the waters; but these are only efforts to get rid of the Miracle, and of the God who wrought it for His people
Apparition - 184–191) critically reviews the various explanations offered of the Miracle of Jesus walking over the billows, but says nothing of the word φάντασμα, merely remarking (p
Nebuchadnezzar, or Nebuchadrezzar - He called the three out of the furnace, addressing them as 'servants of the most high God'; he blessed their God, and said that no one must speak anything against Him; but the Miracle had no practical moral effect upon him
Peter - " The Miracle was no doubt intended for a sign to the four disciples of what success should afterward follow their ministry in preaching the doctrine of his kingdom; and therefore Jesus said unto them, "Follow me, and I will make you fishers of men;" on which they quitted their boats and nets, and thenceforth became the constant associates of the Saviour, during the whole of his public ministry, Luke 18:28 . Peter, rising up, spake with a loud voice, in the name of the Apostles, as he had done on various occasions in his Master's lifetime, and gave the multitude an account of that great Miracle, Acts 2:14 . Peter and John were brought before the council to be examined concerning the Miracle wrought on the impotent man, St
Golgotha - The Emperor, too, in his letter to Macarius, regards the discovery of “the token of the Saviour’s most sacred passion, which for so long a time had been hidden under ground,” as “a Miracle beyond the capacity of man sufficiently to celebrate or even to comprehend. ” The mere removal of obstructions from a well-known spot could hardly have been described as a Miracle so stupendous. At the suggestion of Bishop Macarius, the cross to which the inscription belonged was ascertained by a Miracle of healing. But whether we accept the account of Eusebius or that of the writers of the 5th century, the traditional site of Calvary rests on a Miracle, and, in the case of the latter, on a double Miracle
Egypt - ’ The name recalls the memories of a glorious past, when Israel’s youth was guided and sustained by the Miracles of Divine interposition. ), where they see the Pharaoh, and remain three years, during which period Jesus works many Miracles; returning at the end of the three years to Palestine, and by direction of an angel making their home at Nazareth. He and His parents found hospitality in the house of a widow, where they remained for a year, at the close of which they were expelled because of a Miracle wrought by Jesus in bringing a dry and salted fish to life. The simple reticence of the Gospel narrative is in striking contrast to the luxuriance and prodigality of Miracle of the Apocryphal story
Manifestation - There were no Miracles, no strange exhibitions of unseen powers, no external signs that led the men of Nazareth to mark out that home as being specially remarkable. And in that secret Miracle, apparently unperceived at the time, and discovered only when there was an opportunity to ask the servants, He manifested forth His glory. He never would work a Miracle for the sake of astonishing men, though He was often asked to do so (Matthew 12:38 ff; Matthew 16:1 ff
Egypt - ’ The name recalls the memories of a glorious past, when Israel’s youth was guided and sustained by the Miracles of Divine interposition. ), where they see the Pharaoh, and remain three years, during which period Jesus works many Miracles; returning at the end of the three years to Palestine, and by direction of an angel making their home at Nazareth. He and His parents found hospitality in the house of a widow, where they remained for a year, at the close of which they were expelled because of a Miracle wrought by Jesus in bringing a dry and salted fish to life. The simple reticence of the Gospel narrative is in striking contrast to the luxuriance and prodigality of Miracle of the Apocryphal story
Kadesh Barnea - Here water failed, and Moses by impatient striking of the rock, attribution of the Miracle to himself and Aaron ("must we fetch," etc
Transfiguration, the - Significance of the Miracle
Fig - ...
In the much-discussed Miracle of our Lord (Matthew 21:18-20 , Mark 11:12-13 ; Mark 11:20-21 ) we may dismiss at once the theory that He came looking for figs from the previous season, as He would certainly not have found any such survivors, and such fruit would not have been eatable
Marriage - being an institution of God, and that in Paradise, Genesis 2:1-25 : Christ honoured marriage by his presence, and at such a solemnity wrought his first Miracle, John 2:1-25 : Moreover, it is honourable, as families are formed and built up, the world peopled with inhabitants; it prevents incontinence and fornication, and, where the various duties of it are attended to, renders life a blessing
Ability, Able - , when put forth in performing Miracles. It is sometimes used of the Miracle or sign itself, the effect being put for the cause, e
Ark - It was by Miracle that he was forewarned and directed to prepare for the flood; and the same miraculous power accomplished all that Noah was unable to do in designing, building, and filling the ark, and preserving and guiding it through the deluge
Force - ...
(5) It was, finally, in the exercise of the Divine power here referred to that our Lord performed those extraordinary works of His to which the name ‘miracle’ has been given. He wrought His Miracles by the same power that enabled Him perfectly to overcome all the temptations of His life, and to accomplish all those other things in which He fulfilled His Father’s will and purpose. Are the forces inherent and operative in the physical or moral order of the world of such a nature as to render it impossible for the Miracles ascribed to Christ’s power to have happened? That is the real point at issue as between the testimony of the Gospels and Science. It is also argued in favour of the possibility and the historical truth of the Miracles in question, that His perfect personal sinlessness and holiness was a moral Miracle as great as, if not greater than, any of the mighty works reported by the Evangelists as performed by Him. That was a Miracle indeed; and, to say the least, there is no mightier work on record in the Gospels and represented there as wrought by Him in the exercise of the Divine power of which He was a personal organ. See, further, Miracle. This is the greatest, mightiest of all His Miracles; and whosoever understands the momentousness of the moral task it implies will not stumble at any of the mighty works on record in the Gospels. ‘Miracles’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible; Mozley, Bampton Lectures, esp
Jonah - a real Miracle typifying the like event in His own history, and assumes the prophet's execution of his commission to Nineveh; "the men of Nineveh repented at the preaching of Jonah, and behold a greater than Jonah is here. " The Miracle is justified by the crisis then in the development of the kingdom of God, when Israel by impenitence was about to fall before Assyria, and God's principle of righteous government needed to be exhibited in sparing Nineveh through the preaching of Jonah, spared himself after living entombment. He sank to the "bottom" of the sea first, and felt "the seaweed wrapped about his head" (Jonah 2:5-6), then the God-prepared great fish (the dog fish, Bochart; in any view a Miracle is needed, the rest is conjecture)
Wine - ...
Jesus' Miracle (John 2) justifies the use; still love justifies abstinence for the sake of taking away any stumbling-block from a brother; Romans 14:21, "it is good neither to drink wine . 67) shows that Kefr Kana, not; Kana el Jelil, answers to the Cana of Galilee (so called to distinguish it from the better known Cana of Judaea, John 2), the scene of our Lord's first Miracle at the marriage
Deaf And Dumb - ...
Two Miracles recorded by St. ...
The other Miracle, also recorded by St. The narrative of the Miracle is not out of line with the experience of the medical faculty. ...
It is to be observed that none of our Lord’s Miracles excited such interest or won such admiration as those wrought upon the deaf and dumb
Virgin - Usually he begins the process of human life in the womb of a woman through using a human father, but when he himself entered the stream of human life he began the process miraculously, by the work of his Spirit in the womb of the virgin Mary (Matthew 1:18; Matthew 1:20; Luke 1:26-35; see Miracle)
Joy - This is accentuated by this pericope's proximity to the Cana wedding Miracle where the water changed to a superior wine relieves an embarrassed host (John 2:1-11 )
Sergius Paulus - ’ His astonishment is said to have been due not to the Miracle but to the teaching (C
Ear - ’ The baptismal practice of a later age protected the ear of the candidate by the Effeta (Ephphatha), a rite based on the Miracle recorded in Mark 7:33
Marriage - And when the readers hath fully considered the force of these Scriptures: let him turn to John's gospel, second chapter and there read how the Lord Jesus honouered the marriage both with his presence and first Miracle that he wrought; than let him turn to the fifth chapter of Mathew's Gospel, and Luke the sixteenth and eighteenth, and mark how strongly the Lord attacheth adultery to the separation of men and their wives
Apolinaris, or Apolinarius Claudius - 174, since it is likely that it contained the reference to the Miracle of the Thundering Legion elsewhere quoted by Eusebius from Apolinaris ( H
New Testament - The Temptation...
Miracle of the water made wine at Cana. - 7 ; Luke 6:17-49 ...
Miracles in the land of the Gadarenes. Mark 6:35-44 ...
Miracles in Gennesaret
Exodus - ) The narration of various Miracles wrought in behalf of the people during their journeyings towards Sinai, Exodus 15:1-17:16 . They were constantly led by Jehovah, and the whole series of events is a constant succession of Miracles. The Miracle here wrought was an amazing one, and revealed the hand of God more signally than any of the ten plagues had done. It should here be stated also, that some geographers think this Miracle took place below Mount Atakah, ten or twelve miles south of Suez, where the sea is about twelve miles wide
Enoch - Suppose you had exhorted Cain to begin to walk with God from the day that he murdered Abel-it would have taken nothing short of a Miracle to make the murderer do it. A Miracle could have made him do it, but it would have been a Miracle
Joshua, the Book of - ...
There are two difficulties connected with this book which have given rise to much discussion, ...
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The Miracle of the standing still of the sun and moon on Gibeon
Faith - The faith of Miracles, is the persuasion a person has of his being able, by the divine power, to effect a Miracle on another, Matthew 17:20
Struggles of Soul - His dread of encouraging curiosity or wrong belief by His Miracles (John 4:48) came in conflict with His desire to help and comfort; and when the Evangelists call attention to compassion as the motive of His performing a Miracle, we may conclude that there had been such a struggle of soul (Matthew 14:14; Matthew 15:32; Matthew 20:34, Mark 1:41, Luke 7:13)
Issue of Blood - ...
The chief feature of the Miracle was the fact that the healing was gained surreptitiously, apart from the will and initiative of Jesus. , and standard works on the Miracles; Ker, Serm
Heart - ...
One Miracle of GOD's grace is found in the expression "the multitude was of one heart
Manna - Salmasius thinks this of the same kind which fed the children of Israel; and that the Miracle lay, not in creating any new substance, but in making it fall duly at a set time every day throughout the whole year, and that in such plenty as to suffice so great a multitude
Peter - This was plainly a Miracle wrought before Simon's eyes. " ...
After the Miracle at the temple gate (Acts 3 ) persecution arose against the Christians, and Peter was cast into prison
Twelve - Adbeel: Miracle of GOD. It is indeed a Miracle of GOD that He supplies the needs of the ungodly and particularly that He has preserved the Ishmaelites through all the centuries until this present day
Moses - ...
To vouch his divine commission to the Israelites, God enabled Moses to work three signal Miracles:...
1. ...
At their second interview with Pharaoh, in obedience to the divine command, again requiring him to let the children of Israel go out of his land; Pharaoh, as foretold, demanded of them to show a Miracle for themselves, in proof of their commission, when Aaron cast down his rod, and it became a serpent before Pharaoh and before his servants, or officers of his court. And, indeed, the original term, להטיהם , rendered "their enchantments," as derived from the root לאט , or לוט , to hide or cover, fitly expresses the secret deceptions of legerdemain, or sleight-of-hand, to impose on spectators: and the remark of the magicians, when unable to imitate the production of lice, which was beyond their skill and dexterity, on account of their minuteness,— "This is the finger of a God!"—seems to strengthen the supposition; especially as the Egyptians were famous for legerdemain and for charming serpents: and the magicians, having had notice of the Miracle they were expected to imitate, might make provision accordingly, and bring live serpents, which they might have substituted for their rods. And though Aaron's serpent swallowed up their serpents, showing the superiority of the true Miracle over the false, 2 Thessalonians 2:9 , it might only lead the king to conclude, that Moses and Aaron were more expert jugglers than Jannes and Jambres, who opposed them, 2 Timothy 3:8 . This prophet like unto Moses was our Lord Jesus Christ, who was by birth a Jew, of the middle class of the people, and resembled his predecessor, in personal intercourse with God, Miracles, and legislation, which no other prophet did, Deuteronomy 34:10-12 ; and to whom God, at his transfiguration, required the world to hearken, Matthew 17:5 . " He powerfully appealed to the long-tried mercies and forgivenesses they had experienced ever since their departure from Egypt; and his energetic supplication prevailed; for the Lord graciously said, "I have pardoned, according to thy word: but verily, as I live, all the earth shall be filled with the glory of the Lord;" or shall adore him for his righteous judgments; "for all these men which, have seen my glory and my Miracles which I did in Egypt, and in the wilderness, and have tempted me these ten times, and have not hearkened to my voice, surely shall not see the land which I sware unto their fathers: neither shall any of them that provoked me see it. He distrusted or disbelieved that water could be produced from the rock only by speaking to it; which was a higher Miracle than he had performed before at Rephidim, Exodus 17:6 . He did not, at least in the phrase he used, ascribe the glory of the Miracle wholly to God, but rather to himself and his brother: "Must we fetch you water out of this rock?" And he denominated them "rebels" against his and his brother's authority, which although an implied act of rebellion against God, ought to have been stated, as on a former occasion, "Ye have been rebels against the Lord, from the day that I knew you," Deuteronomy 9:24 , which he spake without blame
Mary - In John 2:1-11 , Mary's presence at Jesus' first public Miracle of changing water to wine at the marriage at Cana underscores, in a profound manner, that Jesus' destiny challenges all norms, including that of immediate family relationships
Guest-Chamber - ; and the Miracle and sayings of Jesus recorded in Luke 14:1 ff
Walk (2) - No passage in the Gospels is more significant of the character, or more persuasive of the credibility, of our Lord’s Miracles of healing than this. The Miracle is thus an outward and visible sign of something greater than bodily healing; it points to an inward and spiritual power, destructive of evil, now present among men. So of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5:8-9; John 5:11-12—a Sabbath Miracle: the others being Mark 1:23; Mark 1:31; Mark 3:1 and ||, Luke 13:14; Luke 14:3, John 9:14); the lame who walk (Matthew 11:5; Matthew 15:31, Luke 7:22; cf. Immanence; Westcott, Characteristics of the Gospel Miracles; Hatch and Redpath, Concordance to the LXX Septuagint
Red Sea - The term "wall" does not appear to oblige us to suppose, as many have done, that the sea stood up like a cliff on either side, but should rather be considered to mean a barrier, as the former idea implies a seemingly needless addition to the Miracle, while the latter seems to be not discordant with the language of the narrative. But an army of 600,000 could of course never have crossed it without a Miracle
Plagues, the Ten, - When Moses and Aaron came before Pharaoh, a Miracle was required of them. (Exodus 7:3-12 ) This passage, taken alone would appear to indicate that the magicians succeeded in working wonders, but, if it is compared with the others which relate their opposition on the occasions of the first three plagues, a contrary inference seems more reasonable for the very first time that Moses wrought his Miracle without giving previous notice, the magicians "did so with their enchantments," but failed. The magicians, who had imitated by their enchantments the two previous Miracles, were now foiled
Nathanael - In any case, Nathanael’s question confirms the statement that the Miracle at Cana was the first of Christ’s signs. If Jesus had worked Miracles at Nazareth, Nathanael at Cana must have heard of them. Nathanael has believed because of a Miracle of knowledge which could be appreciated by himself alone: he is hereafter to witness Miracles of power which can be appreciated by all. This private sign to Nathanael was a prelude to those public Miracles in which Christ ‘manifested His glory’ to the Jewish nation and through it to all the world
Trial of Jesus - Herod wanted Jesus to entertain him with a Miracle
Understanding - Similarly, Mark 6:52 (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , ‘considered’ Authorized Version ) of the Miracle of the loaves and the walking on the sea; ‘debuerant a pane ad mare concludere’ (Bengel)
Branch - The Holy Spirit accomplishes this Miracle
Serpent - And of the two examples of the kind, surely, the great event of man's apostacy became a much more important occasion for such a Miracle than the condemnation of a single character like Balaam
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - ‘The Jews’ demanded Miracles, ‘the Greeks’ a philosophy; this Gospel, like St. He never makes the slightest attempt to rationalize a Miracle. —on the contrary, the Miracles which he records are more startling than anything in the Synoptics,—but no stress is laid on any physical portent as momentous in and for itself, or as evidence, apart from its symbolical value as a type of the Person, work, and office of Christ. ), following the Miracle of the 5000, and does not wish the truth of the mystical union to be bound up too closely with the participation in an ecclesiastical rite; he omits the Agony in the Garden of Gethsemane, and the cry, ‘Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani,’ because the impression which he wishes to convey of the complete voluntariness of Christ’s sufferings and death, and of the ‘glory’ which was manifested by His humiliation as well as by His triumph over death, might be impaired by incidents which seem to indicate human weakness and hesitation; and, lastly, he omits the Ascension and the descent of the Paraclete, because he does not wish the withdrawal of Christ’s bodily presence, and the continuation of the Incarnation in another more spiritual form, to be associated with physical portents, or to be assigned to particular days. The institution of Baptism is represented by the discourses with Nicodemus and the Samaritan woman; that of the Eucharist by the Miracle in ch. ...
The number of Miracles is much reduced; but those which are given are representative, and in some cases are more tremendous than those of the Synoptics. ) is the only Miracle which has the true Synoptic ring; in the others no ‘faith’ is required in those who are to benefit by the sign, and the object seems to be to manifest some aspect of Christ’s Person and work. In the marriage at Cana, the feeding of the multitude, the healing of the blind man, and the raising of Lazarus, the Evangelist himself tells us the spiritual meaning of the Miracle, in words spoken either by the Lord Himself or by some one else. The number 7 recurs in the number of the Miracles (omitting ch
Moses - "The field of Zoan" was the scene of God's Miracles in Israel's behalf (Psalms 78:43). No patriarch before wrought a Miracle. ...
Nothing but the Miracle recorded can account for the issue; Egypt's king and splendid host perish in the waters, Israel passes through in triumph (Exodus 13:17; Exodus 14:3; Exodus 14:5; Exodus 14:9; Exodus 14:11-12; Exodus 14:14). Only a divine direction, manifested with Miracle, can account for such an unparalleled command and for its being obeyed by so disobedient a people. The sustenance of 600,000 men besides women and children, 40 years, in a comparative desert could only be by Miracle; as the Pentateuch records, they were fed with manna from heaven until they ate the grain of Canaan, on the morrow after which the manna ceased (Exodus 16; Joshua 5:12)
Influence - In all these cases it is to be noted that the impression is made not by any Miracle or sign, but by what Christ was and what He said. And the Jews were always seeking this (Matthew 12:38); always hoping that He would either show that His claims were invalid and that He was unable to give a sign, or satisfy their curiosity by some Miracle. It may be asked—But what about His Miracles? In the first place, they were never done as a proof of His claims. He never proclaimed a great truth and then worked a Miracle to show it was true
Balaam - ...
The Miracle, the object of the infidel's scoff, has a moral fitness which stamps its truth. The Miracle wrought on him, whereby he belied his whole nature, is greater than that wrought on the ass
Dominicans - The deluded simpleton obeyed, and was admired as a saint by the multitudes that crowded about the convent; while the four friars that managed the imposture magnified, in the most pompous manner, the Miracle of this apparition in their sermons, and in their discourses. Had his life been taken away before he had found an opportunity of making the discovery already mentioned, this execrable and horrid plot, which in many of its circumstances was conducted with art, would have been handed down to posterity as a stupendous Miracle
Plagues of Egypt - It is worthy remark that the first Miracle wrought by Moses was this of turning water into blood; but the first Miracle of the Lord Jesus Christ was that of turning water into wine
Manna - The Miracle has all the conditions and characteristics of divine interpositions
Nicodemus - " Many of Nicodemus' fellow rulers attributed Jesus' Miracles to Beelzebub; Nicodemus on the contrary avows " we (including others besides himself) know Thou art a teacher come from God, for no man can do these Miracles which Thou doest, except God be with him. " Nicodemus was probably one of the many who had "seen His Miracles on the Passover feast day, and believed (in a superficial way, but in Nicodemus it ultimately became a deep and lasting faith) when they saw" (John 2:23-24); but "Jesus did not commit Himself unto them . Recognition of the divine Miracle
Look - This uplifted glance is recorded on four occasions—during the Miracle of the feeding of the 5000, while giving thanks and blessing the loaves (Matthew 14:19); in the healing of a man deaf and dumb, when Christ looked up to heaven and sighed (Mark 7:34 [1]); in the raising of Lazarus (John 11:41 ἦρεν τοὺς ὀφθαλμοῦς ἄνω); and during the great High-Priestly prayer (John 17:1 ἐπάρας τοὺς ὀφθαλμοὺς αὐτοῦ εἰς τὸν οὐρανόν)
Colossae - ’ The Byzantine historian Nicetas Choniates-Chonae, on a spur of Cadmus, took the place of decaying Colossae-mentions τὸν ἀρχαγγελικὸν ναόν as Standing, μεγέθει μέγιστον καὶ κάλλει κάλλιστον, in or near the ancient city; and the fantastic legend of ‘the Miracle of Chonae’ (Ramsay, The Church in the Rom
Gideon - ...
Gideon’s victory , Judges 7:23 Judges 7:23 , Judges 8:4-14 : Allegiance to Jahweh being thus publicly acknowledged, the Israelites are once more in a position to assert their political independence; so that when the Midianites again invade their land, Gideon raises an army against them, being moreover assured by the Miracle of the dew on the fleece that he will be victorious
Conflagration - Divines ordinarily account for it metaphysically: and will have it take its rise from a Miracle, as a fire from heaven
Might, Mighty, Mightily, Mightier - See Miracle , especially POWER
Revelation (2) - The answer was found in the word Miracle. Miracles were the appropriate credentials of revelation, which could not be guaranteed as objectively valid without them. Mozley put forward the same view in a well-known passage in his Bampton Lectures (On Miracles, p. ’ Taking this view of Miracles and of revelation, it has been sought to distinguish natural from revealed religion by the circumstance that miraculous signs are not needed to guarantee the truth of the former, which commends itself at once to man’s reason, while they are necessary to confirm our belief in the doctrines of the latter, which are not discoverable by our unassisted faculties, and which may be surprising and even unwelcome to faith. ‘Sign’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ), although it may have this character (see ‘Miracle,’ ib. Their interpretation leads to new thoughts of God and man, undiscoverable, or at any rate undiscovered, without them; and thus it is that ‘signs’such as the resurrection of Christ (which would be classed as miraculous) or the moral beauty of His life (which some would not regard as necessarily a Miracle) form the premises of Christian theology (cf. ...
Thus the question, What is the ultimate test of revelation? is not to be answered merely by pointing to Miracle as its guarantee
Name (2) - ...
(2) Working of Miracles in the name. —In the Gospels references to the working of Miracles (esp. certain vagabond Jews, exorcists, take upon themselves to call over those possessed by evil spirits the name of the Lord Jesus, and the sons of Sceva in particular do this to their own confusion; but the implication of the narrative evidently is that the ‘special Miracles’ which had just been wrought by St. ’...
The view has been taken that this use of the name of Christ for the working of Miracles was nothing more than the employment of a theurgic formula, which finds its analogue in the invocations and incantations of ancient magic (so esp. And as for the Apostolic Church, while it is clear that the name of Jesus was invoked by both Peter and Paul before the performance of a Miracle, Peter’s prayer, after the Miracle at the Temple gate, that God would accompany the use of the name by stretching forth His hand to heal (1618068032_76), points to the conclusion that the name of Jesus was invoked by the Apostles in these cases simply because every appeal to God was made through the Person of the Mediator
Tongues, Gift of - Relying chiefly on the passages of Acts, most of the Fathers (as Origen, Chrysostom, Theodoret, Gregory of Nyssa, Gregory of Nazianzus) understand the gift as being for purposes of evangelization, as if the disciples received a miraculous endowment of foreign languages to enable them to preach; Gregory of Nyssa and others take the gift as a Miracle of hearing , the disciples speaking in their own language, but the people understanding their speech each in his own tongue
Prophesy - The “prophet” or dreamer of dreams might perform Miracles to demonstrate that he was God’s man, but the people were to look to the message rather than the Miracle before they heeded his message ( Conflagration - ...
Divines ordinarily account for the conflagration metaphysically, and will have it take its rise from a Miracle, as a fire from heaven
Language - ...
The Miracle performed at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost was the reverse of that at Babel, Acts 2:1-18 , and beautifully illustrated the tendency of the gospel to introduce peace and harmony where sin has brought discord, and to reunite all the tribes of mankind in one great brotherhood
Linus (1) - The emperor's attention is called to the matter by a Miracle worked by Paul on his favourite cupbearer, Patroclus, of whom a story is told exactly reproducing that told of Eutychus in Acts
Sedulius, 5th-Cent. Poet - describe in full detail the Miracles of the Gospel and the Lord's Prayer. John and Luke; then adds a succession of Miracles from SS. A–G in Lauds for Christmas week; and H, I, L, N, which celebrate the adoration of the Magi, the baptism, and the Miracle at Cana, on the feast of Epiphany
Peter - "Fear not, henceforth thou shalt catch to save alive (zoogroon ) men," was Jesus' explanation of the typical meaning of the Miracle. Peter and Andrew were first called; then Christ entered Peter's boat, then wrought the Miracle, then called James and John; Jesus next healed of fever Simon's mother-in-law. Peter's Miracle of healing (Acts 3) was followed by one of judgment (Acts 5) (See ANANIAS
Acts of the Apostles (2) - ), and accredited by God through an unprecedented Miracle—this is the cardinal and significant message of the Apostles. Thus the Exalted Christ, working Miracles from heaven by His name (Acts 9:34), accredited by the Miracle of the resurrection, and destined to come again with judgment and salvation, occupies the central point of the faith of our author. Jesus, in short, actually returned again to earth in complete corporeality; hence the necessity, at the end of the forty days, of yet another special Miracle, that of the Ascension (Luke 1:8). Through this Spirit the exalted Lord is ever present with His own; He imparts power and success to the words of the Apostles (Acts 2:37, Acts 5:33, Acts 6:5); and Miracles are wrought by the power of God (Acts 6:8). It is noteworthy, however, that it is only rarely that the Spirit of God is introduced in this connexion; far more frequently it is the Name of Christ that, like a present representative of the Lord, works Miracles (Acts 3:16, Acts 4:30)
Gennesaret, Land of - This Miracle probably took place on the N. (γ) ‘Ain et-Tabigha, or ‘Fountain of the Ruined Mill,’ formerly supposed to be the scene of the Miracle of the feeding of the 5000 (Mark 6:30-44), is another large spring of water—according to Tristram, the largest in Galilee, and about one-half as large as the fountain at Caesarea Philippi
Common Life - His presence and first Miracle at the wedding at Cana of Galilee (John 2:1-11)—a Miracle which shows His deep sympathy with even trivial human needs—is in itself a consecration of marriage
Joshua - " God kept His promise, working mighty Miracles in his behalf, and giving Israel all the land and rest round about; no good thing failed which the Lord had spoken (Joshua 21:43-45). Jericho fell by Miracle. ...
The Miracle was local, not universal, if we are to judge from the language, "stand
Exodus - The Miracle at the sea was never treated merely as a natural event or as Israel's victory alone
Fig Tree - So that here was no real injury; but Jesus was pleased to make use of this innocent Miracle to prefigure the speedy ruin of the Jewish nation on account of its unfruitfulness under greater advantages than any other people enjoyed at that day; and, like all the rest of his Miracles, it was done with a gracious intention, namely, to alarm his countrymen, and induce them to repent
Elisha - His Miracles are deeds of mercy, and, like that of the Prophet of Nazareth, his ministry breathes a spirit ‘of gracious, soothing, holy beneficence. In the restoration of her son to life, Elisha performs one of his greatest Miracles ( 2 Kings 4:8 ff. Even after his burial his bones had the power to perform a beneficent Miracle ( 2 Kings 13:20-21 ). But some of his deeds are not Miracles in the modern sense ( 2 Kings 2:19 ff
Bible, History of Interpretation - Thus, by definition, Miracles could not be explained on the basis of an act of God who reaches into history; some natural explanation had to be found for what appears in the Scripture record as a Miracle. ...
What is at fault here is not the method of interpretation as such, but the presupposition that Miracles are impossible
Hour - This may simply mean that the time for giving such relief was not opportune, or that the opportunity for Miracle-working, or the moment for self-manifestation, had not arrived
Elisha - " This is the last prediction of Elisha of which we read in Scripture, for soon after he died; but it was not his last Miracle: for, some time after his interment, a company of Israelites, as they were going to bury a dead person, perceiving a band of Moabites making toward them, put the corpse for haste into Elisha's tomb, and, as soon as it had touched the prophet's body, it immediately revived; so that the man stood upon his feet: a striking emblem of the life-giving effect of the labours of the servants of God, after they themselves are gathered to their fathers
Elisha - there shall not be dew nor rain these years": the first Miracle of the former is, "thus saith Jehovah, I have healed these waters (by casting in salt, the symbol of grace and incorruption), there shall not be from thence any more death or barren land. for thus saith Jehovah, They shall eat, and leave thereof": a forerunner of Christ's Miracle of feeding more men with fewer loaves, preceded by like want of faith on the disciples' part (Luke 9:18-17; 1618068032_98), and followed by a like leaving of abundance, after the multitude were fed. In this Miracle too Elisha foreran the Lord Jesus, the cure of leprosy being exclusively God's work. He at the very time, by God's providence, had been inquiring from Gehazi (long before his leprosy, 2 Kings 5; 2 Kings 8, a proof that the incidents of Elisha's life are not recorded in chronological sequence, but in their spiritual connection) concerning Elisha's Miracles, and was hearing of her son's resuscitation when she herself appeared
Lord's Supper (ii) - In connexion with this Miracle it is important to observe that (a) it is recorded in all four Gospels; (b) the record contains the following significant phrases, which it is well to compare with the phraseology in the accounts of the institution: λαβών (Mk. This Miracle, like others, is called σημεῖον in the Fourth Gospel (John 6:14; John 6:26), i. By this conversation, the idea of a sacred meal is carried further than it had been in the Miracle itself
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - 3 a Miracle is also referred to—...
‘ “How have I come,” he will say, “to you with a sign from your Lord; out of clay will I make for you, as it were, the figure of a bird; and I will breathe into it, and it shall become, by God’s leave, a bird. The Miracle was repeated for forty days. Having witnessed the Miracle, the Jews gave up their suspicion and reproach, and said that this was the prophet of whose birth the preceding prophets had spoken. ...
Then Mary went to Jerusalem, where, seeing the Miracles done by the child, people sought to destroy him. ’ Then they asked for a Miracle. Thomas replied that Jesus worked Miracles, for the blind and lame and sick were healed. Jesus asked what Miracles were called for
Inspiration - A perpetual Miracle alone could have prevented such very exceptional and palpable copyists' mistakes. "...
When once it is admitted that the New Testament writers were neither fanatics nor enthusiasts, (and infidelity has never yet produced a satisfactory theory to show them to have been either,) their Miracles and their divine commission must also be admitted, for they expressly claim these. His appeal on the ground of Miracles (1 Corinthians 2:4) which are taken for granted as notorious rather than asserted, (the incidental mention being a clear mark of truth because it excludes suspicion of design,) and to persons whose miraculous discernment of spirits enabled them to test such claims, is the strongest proof of the divine authority of his writings. Exemption from all transcriptional errors would have needed a perpetual Miracle, which is not God's mode of dealing with us
Gifts - Paul mentions, first, charisms of the intellectual order, ‘the word of wisdom’ and ‘the word of knowledge’; second, miraculous gifts: (a) ‘faith,’ (b) ‘gifts of healing,’ (c) ‘workings of Miracles’; third, ‘prophecy, or the gift of spiritual instruction; fourth, ‘discerning of spirits,’ or the gift of discrimination, the discerning between the true and the false; and finally, ‘tongues’ and ‘the interpretation of tongues’ (see Tongues), or ecstatic powers and the power of interpreting them. Then in 1 Corinthians 12:28 we have the following classification: ‘God hath set some in the church, first apostles, secondly prophets, thirdly teachers, then Miracles, then gifts of healings, helps (ἀντιλήμψεις), governments (κυβερνήσεις, literally ‘pilotings’), divers kinds of tongues’; this is a classification of charisms in order of spiritual rank and dignity. ...
As to the meaning and nature of the charisms, guidance must be sought in the particular articles which deal specifically with them; nor can we enter into a detailed examination of the problems which such a classification as ‘faith,’ ‘gifts of healing,’ ‘workings of Miracles’ creates. It is a charism out of which spring others described in 1 Corinthians 12:9 as ‘charisms of healing,’ where the plural appears to indicate different powers for healing different forms of disease, and ‘workings of powers or Miracles. ’ The relation of faith and its offspring prayer to healing and Miracles generally is clearly seen in the Gospels which record our Lord’s cures and in His declaration that faith is the sole condition of Miracle-working (cf. The charisms of Miracle-working lasted down to the 2nd cent
Magic - Yahweh's name was invoked by the Miracle worker (Exodus 7:8-9 ; 15:25 ; 1 Kings 17:21 ; 2 Kings 2:14 ). Miracles were merely signs validating the mission of the prophet, who did not work by his skill but by the power of Yahweh (Exodus 3:14-17 ; Deuteronomy 13:2-3 ; Judges 6:17,36 ; 1 Kings 18:36 ; Isaiah 7:10-11 ). The Gentiles saw Miracles as magical in nature, and thus confused those of the apostles with their own magic (Acts 8:9-11 )
Arabia, Arabs - By the ‘Arabians’ mentioned in Acts 2:11 , in connexion with the Miracle of Pentecost, the author probably meant Jews from the same kingdom, which, it is true, had in his time (?) become the Roman province of Arabia (a
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - The effect of the Miracle was so great that Nebuchadnezzar gave glory to the God of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego; and he exalted the three Hebrews to great dignity in the province of Babylon, Daniel 4
Ministry - ...
Baptism to First Miracle. ...
First Miracle to Beginning of Work in Galilee
Exodus - ), where the "bitter" water was by a Miracle made drinkable
Tongues, Gift of - When the age of Miracle passed (1 Corinthians 13:8) the tongues ceased with it; the scaffolding was removed, when the building was complete as regards its first stage; hymns and spiritual snugs took the place of tongues, as preaching took the place of prophesying
Jesus Christ - He then went to Cana of Galilee, where he worked his first Miracle at a wedding. " Here he called Peter and Andrew and James and John, and made his first tour through Galilee, performing many Miracles. He appointed the twelve apostles and delivered the Sermon on the Mount, and commenced a second tour in Galilee, during which he delivered the series of parables in Matthew 13:1-58, stilled the storm on Galilee, healed the demoniacs of Gadara, raised the daughter of Jairus, and after other Miracles came again to Nazareth, where he was again rejected. Early in the third year of his ministry, Jesus disputed with the Pharisees about eating with unwashed hands, and went toward the northwest, healed the daughter of the Syrophœnician woman, and then passed around to Decapolis, where he wrought many Miracles and fed 4000
Blasphemy - This cannot have been the case of all who disbelieved the mission of Jesus, and even decried his Miracles; many of whom, we have reason to think, were afterward converted by the Apostles. If we consider the Scripture account of this sin, nothing can be plainer than that it is to be understood of the Pharisees' imputing the Miracles wrought by the power of the Holy Ghost to the power of the devil; for our Lord had just healed one possessed of a devil, and upon this the Pharisees gave this malicious turn to the Miracle. The Pharisees were the persons charged with the crime: the sin itself manifestly consisted in ascribing what was done by the finger of God to the agency of the devil; and the reason, therefore, why our Lord pronounced it unpardonable, is plain; because, by withstanding the evidence of Miracles, they resisted the strongest means of conviction, and that wilfully and malignantly; and, giving way to their passions, opprobriously treated that Holy Spirit whom they ought to have adored
Hunneric, King of the Vandals. - 293), and has generally been considered not only a Miracle, but the most remarkable one on record after apostolic times
Pilate - But when Herod failed to get either reply or Miracle from Jesus, he sent Him back to Pilate ( Luke 23:6-12 )
Hebrews - ...
The long abode of the Hebrews in Egypt had cherished in them a strong propensity to idolatry; and neither the Miracles of Moses, nor his precautions to withdraw them from the worship of idols, nor the rigor of his laws, nor the splendid marks of God's presence in the Israelitish camp, were able to conquer this unhappy perversity. ...
The existence of the Hebrews as a people distinct from all others, to this day, is a Miracle of the indisputable king, which may well justify a few remarks
Pity - Here is a Miracle performed for those who knew more of Christ than merely that ‘He pitied them
Neology - They affect to allow a revealing operation of God, but establish on internal proofs rather than on Miracles the divine nature of Christianity. The notion of a Miracle cannot well be separated from such a revelation, whether it happens out of, on, or in men. What is revealed may belong to the order of nature, but an order higher and unknown to us, which we could never have known without Miracles, and cannot bring under the laws of nature. They all proceeded from the determination that whatever was not intelligible was incredible, that only what was of familiar and easy explanation deserved belief, and that all which was miraculous and mysterious in Scripture must be rejected; and they rested perpetually on notions and reasonings which were in themselves Miracles of incredibility. Professor Paulus gravely explains the Miracle of the tribute money thus: That Christ only meant to give a moral lesson, that is, that we are not, if we can avoid it by trifling sacrifices, to give offence to our brethren; that he probably reasoned thus with St. "And this from a professor's chair!" In like manner the Miracle of feeding the five thousand in the desert is resolved into the opportune passing by of a caravan with provisions, of which the hungry multitude were allowed to partake, according to eastern hospitality; and the Apostles were merely employed in conveying it out in baskets. The Miracles of healing were the effect of fancy operating favourably upon the disorders; and Ananias and Sapphira died of a fright; with many other absurdities, half dreams and half blasphemies; and of which the above are given but as a specimen. Undisguised infidelity has in no country treated the grand evidences of the truth of Christianity with greater contumely, or been more offensive in its attacks upon the prophets, or more ridiculous in its attempts to account, on natural principles, for the Miracles. Tittman of Dresden, on the neological interpreters: "What is the interpretation of the Scriptures, if it relies not on words, but things, not on the assistance of languages, but on the decrees of reason, that is, of modern philosophy? What is all religion, what the knowledge of divine things, what are faith and hope placed in Christ, what is all Christianity, if human reason and philosophy is the only fountain of divine wisdom, and the supreme judge in the matter of religion? What is the doctrine of Christ and the Apostles more than some philosophical system? But what, then, I pray you, is, to deny, to blaspheme Jesus the Lord, to render his divine mission doubtful, nay, vain and useless, to impugn his doctrine, to disfigure it shamefully, to attack it, to expose it to ridicule, and, if possible, to suppress it, to remove all Christianity out of religion, and to bound religion within the narrow limits of reason alone, to deride Miracles, and hold them up to derision, to accuse them as vain, to bring them into disrepute, to torture sacred Scripture into seeming agreement with the fancies of human wisdom, to alloy it with human conjectures, to bring it into contempt, and to break down its divine authority, to undermine, to shake, to overthrow utterly the foundations of Christian faith? What else can be the event than this, as all history, a most weighty witness in this matter, informs us, namely, that when sacred Scripture, its grammatical interpretation and a sound knowledge of languages are, as it were, despised and banished, all religion should be contemned, shaken, corrupted, troubled, undermined, utterly overturned, and should be entirely removed and reduced to natural religion; or that it should end in a mystical theology, than which nothing was ever more pernicious to the Christian doctrine, and be converted into an empty μυχιλαγε , or even into a poetical system, hiding every thing in figures and fictions, to which latter system not a few of the sacred orators and theologians of our time seem chiefly inclined
Prayer - So it was said of Saul of Tarsus, "Behold, he prayeth!" He prayed in fact then for the first time; but that was in consequence of the illumination of his mind as to his spiritual danger, effected by the Miracle on the way to Damascus, and the grace of God which accompanied the Miracle
Leucius, Author of n.t. Apocryphal Additions - He adds that these heretics had also Acts of Peter, John, and Paul, containing stories of Miracles in which beasts were made to speak; for that these heretics counted the souls of men and of beasts alike (see Epiph. 604), who acknowledges the truth of apostolic Miracles related by Leucius, but argues against his doctrine of two principles. There is a story of a Miracle performed on one Drusiana, who had submitted to die rather than have intercourse with her husband. But though Tertullian names Rome as the scene of the Miracle it may be doubted whether this was so in the Greek Leucius
Regeneration - The Miracle is wrought by the Spirit of God, whose action is sovereign ( John 3:8 )
Stone - ...
(c) At Cana of Galilee Jesus ‘manifested his glory’; and there, we might say, He was again beholden to the stones; for the six waterpots by whose aid He wrought His first Miracle were waterpots of stone (John 2:6)
Death (2) - ...
The three recorded Miracles of raising from the dead are, in the last resort, concrete illustrations of this side of our Lord’s teaching. The Johannine account of the raising of Lazarus is indeed bound up with a more complex theological doctrine; but the Synoptic Miracles, in so far as they are more than works of compassion or exhibitions of Divine power, are indicative of the transient nature of death. ...
Attempts have been made to connect these Miracles and the whole conception of death as sleep, with the contemporary Jewish belief that for three days the soul still lingered in the neighbourhood of the dead body. The Miracle by which he is ‘awakened out of sleep’ is meant to show forth, under the forms of sense, the inward and spiritual work of Jesus
Adultery - In the one case, (and herein consists their great distinction,) innocence can only be preserved by a Miracle; while on the other, guilt only is revealed and punished by the hand of God himself
Proselyte - (2) There were proselytes among the multitude who witnessed the Miracle of Pentecost (Acts 2:10), some of whom may have been added to the Church; the selection of ‘Nicolas a proselyte of Antioch’ (Acts 6:5) as one of the seven deacons indicates that there was a certain proportion of men of his class in the primitive Christian community
Omnipotence - It is a further extension of this power of doing Miracles that He can bestow it also upon His disciples (Mark 3:15, Luke 9:1, Matthew 10:1), to be used within the same limits and under the same inward conditions of faith and prayer—the channels of the Divine omnipotence. Thus His Miracles are manifestations of Divine glory, and are painted in the most striking colours, as the Miracle at Cana and the story of Lazarus
Immortality - Here our Lord, after the Miracle of the loaves, and evidently, in the mind of the author of the Gospel, explaining the significance of the Miracle, claims that He is the living bread come down from heaven
Consciousness - Peter was impressed not merely by the Miracle, but by the moral glory of Christ. The Miracle was but the occasion when there came to him a sudden insight into the character of Jesus
Novatianus And Novatianism - The monk Eutychian, one of their number, was a celebrated Miracle-worker, reverenced by Constantine himself, who also endeavoured to lead one of their bishops, ACESIUS, to unite with the Catholics (Socr. Paul enjoyed the reputation of a Miracle-worker, and died in the odour of universal sanctity, all sects and parties uniting in singing psalms at his funeral (Socr
Happiness - ’ His first Miracle contributed to the innocent pleasure of social intercourse (John 2:1-11)
the Publican - It takes a long lifetime, in most cases, to sanctify a sinner; and at the end it is the Miracle of all Miracles to the old sinner himself that he is ever sanctified. Both are Miracles. Samuel Rutherford used to pose the saints of his day with this dilemma, which of the two Miracles they will wonder most at to all eternity, their justification or their sanctification? For what is justification? Justification is an act of God's free grace, wherein He pardoneth all our sins, and accepteth us as righteous in His sight, only for the righteousness of Christ imputed to us, and received by faith alone
Abram - But we shall discover, that in this instance of danger respecting his beloved Sarah, humanly speaking, there was no possibility of her escaping with her chastity, unless the Lord accomplished her deliverance by a Miracle
Balaam - Austin, and accept the fact simply as it is related, and believe it to have been a Miracle of the Lord's. What conviction was frequently wrought upon the minds of the Jews, when beholding the Miracles of Christ. But yet, what lasting effect did that conviction ultimately produce! He who well knew the human heart, void of sovereign grace, hath left it upon record as an unerring conclusion, that where the word of God is despised and set at nought, no higher evidences, even of Miracles, will succeed: "If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither would they be persuaded, though one should rise from the dead
Anointing (2) - In John 9:6; John 9:11 Jesus, before working the Miracle upon the blind man, anoints (ἐπιχρίω) his eyes with clay which He had made by spitting on the ground
Turning - ‘This my son was dead, and is alive again,’ exclaimed the father of the Prodigal, for he recognized a Miracle of Divine grace in his son’s return. But that heavenly mystery had its human counterpart, that Miracle of grace its moral coefficient; for the Prodigal had turned away from the swine-trough, ‘and he arose and came to his father
Magi - 2) commemorated originally Christ’s manifestation to the Magi, together with His baptism, His Miracle at Cana (Max. 4), and the Miracle of feeding the 5000 ( Pentecost - ), the gift of prophecy ‘finds expression, though in a peculiar form, in the narrative of the Pentecost Miracle, which he has placed in the forefront of his history. What could symbolize that ‘Breath of God’ more fittingly than the wind? What could more appropriately suggest the penetrative purifying power and grace than tongues ‘like as of fire’ (ὡσεὶ πυρός)? The Miracle of Pentecost was that the little community should be transformed by the enduement of energy, illumination, and power, which is simply spoken of in the words: ‘And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit
Pentecost - ), the gift of prophecy ‘finds expression, though in a peculiar form, in the narrative of the Pentecost Miracle, which he has placed in the forefront of his history. What could symbolize that ‘Breath of God’ more fittingly than the wind? What could more appropriately suggest the penetrative purifying power and grace than tongues ‘like as of fire’ (ὡσεὶ πυρός)? The Miracle of Pentecost was that the little community should be transformed by the enduement of energy, illumination, and power, which is simply spoken of in the words: ‘And they were all filled with the Holy Spirit
Exodus, Book of - The Miracle of the Red Sea (or perhaps more literally, the Sea of Reeds) became the greatest moment in Israel's history, the moment God created a nation for Himself by delivering hem from the strongest military power on earth as He led them through the divided waters of the sea and then flooded the sea again as the Egyptians tried to follow (Exodus 12:14-28 ). Miracles do not bring belief (Exodus 7:14-25 )
Prophecy, Prophets - (5) The prophets also performed Miracles which confirmed their message. While some prophets like Moses (Exodus 4:1-9 ) and Elijah (1 Kings 17:1 ) worked many Miracles, virtually all prophets occasionally saw a miraculous fulfillment of God's word (Isaiah 38:8 ). This Miracle-working capacity also included healing (1 Kings 17:17-22 ; 2 Kings 5:1 ; Matthew 12:22-29 ). His Miracles and discernment were rightly understood as prophetic (John 4:19 )
Zebedee - It was in it too that Christ publicly declared His office in the gracious words He spoke (Luke 4:21), that He performed His first Miracle, and ‘manifested forth his glory’ so that ‘his disciples believed on him’ (John 2:11)
Census - The objection of rationalists that the peninsula of Sinai could not have sustained such a number is answered by the consideration (1) that Israel was sustained by a Miracle, (2) the peninsula yielded much more anciently than at present
Mark, the Gospel of - He ordered those who witnessed Miracles not to tell anyone what they saw, although silence was only a remote possibility (Mark 7:36 ). Mark depicted their partial spiritual vision by recording the unique Miracle of Jesus healing the blind man in two stages (Mark 8:22-25 )
Heal, Health - ...
Luke, especially, emphasizes that Christ's healing ministry was far wider than the few Miracles described (4:40; 5:15; 6:17-19; 9:11; cf. ...
Besides demonstrating the nature of God's kingdom as health-giving, down-to-earth, and relevant to the daily problems of the whole person, and the compassion of Jesus toward ordinary, undervalued individuals, the healing Miracles left no doubt that a new power was at work in the world, and available through Christ (Luke 4:36 ; 5:17 ; 6:19 ). To those who watched, the Miracles declared that "God was with him" (Luke 7:16 ; Acts 2:22 ; 10:38 ). The resurrection of Jesus makes all lesser Miracles crediblebut not every Christian credulous: quality, motive, evidence, still demand consideration. ...
And Jesus set limits to his Miracle-ministry. Even with Jesus himself visibly present, no healing was possible except "according to your faith" (Matthew 9:29 ); without faith, even Jesus "could not do any Miracles" (Mark 6:5-6 ). We read of "extraordinary Miracles" at Ephesus (19:11), the restoration of Eutychus at Troas (20:9-12), and the healing of Publius's father on Malta. But so does the expectation that, when God so wills, Miracles will sometimes occur
Majesty (2) - the ἐποίει which critical editors substitute for ἐποίησεν of Textus Receptus , seems to show that the Miracles of Christ generally are to be thought of as producing this impression that the Divine μεγαλειότης was manifesting itself through Him. ...
With this idea of Christ’s Miracles, or of His miraculous being, as an effulgence of the Divine splendour or magnificence, compare the statement of John 2:11 that by the Miracle of Cana Jesus ‘manifested his glory’ (ἐφανέρωσε τὴν δόξαν αὐτοῦ)
the Angel of the Church in Pergamos - My own soul is kept alive, as it were, by Miracle
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - A Miracle to yourself, and a wonder to many
Family (Jesus) - In the teaching of Christ, although the word ‘family’ does not occur, yet the institution is everywhere presupposed and its laws emphasized, as it is also connected with the first Miracle recorded in the Fourth Gospel
Aaron - " This rod therefore was laid up by the ark, to perpetuate the remembrance of the Miracle, and to be a token of Aaron's right to his office
Prayer - The third hour was marked by the gift of the Spirit (Acts 2:15), the ninth by the Miracle of the healing of a lame man by Peter and John on their way to prayer (Acts 3:1), the sixth by the vision which taught Peter to receive Gentile converts
Gospels - of set parables, allegories taking their place; and the character of the Miracles, there being no casting out of devils in Jn. , and, on the other hand, the Miracle at Cana being unlike anything in the Synoptics. The only Miracle common to the four Gospels is the feeding of the five thousand, which in Jn
Messiah - The kind of Miracles that Messiah should perform is specified; Is. He actually performed the Miracles there predicted, his enemies themselves being judges. In the same year an Arabian set up there for the Messiah, and pretended to work Miracles. The people were now pressing to see some Miracle to confirm their faith, and to convince the Gentiles. The Grand Seignior requires a Miracle, and chooses one himself; and it was this: that Sabatai should be stripped naked, and set as a mark for his archers to shoot at; and, if the arrows did not pierce his flesh, he would own him to be the Messias. He added, that Nathan, his forerunner, who had wrought many Miracles, would soon be at Smyrna; that he would reveal hidden things to them, and confirm them
Arabia - Gibbon, unwilling to pass by an opportunity of cavilling at revelation, says, "The perpetual independence of the Arabs has been the theme of praise among strangers and natives; and the arts of controversy transform this singular event into a prophecy and a Miracle in favour of the posterity of Ishmael. ' And that an acute and active people, surrounded for ages by polished and luxurious nations, should from their earliest to their latest times, be still found a wild people, dwelling in the presence of all their brethren, (as we may call these nations,) unsubdued and unchangeable, is, indeed, a standing Miracle: one of those mysterious facts which establish the truth of prophecy
Scripture - But even while they lived, they confirmed their testimony by a variety of Miracles wrought in divers places, and for a number of years, sometimes before thousands of their enemies, as the Miracles of Christ and his disciples; sometimes before hundreds of thousands, as those of Moses. (...
See Miracle. Nothing but the clearest evidence arising from undoubted truth could make multitudes of lawless, luxurious heathens receive, follow, and transmit to posterity, the doctrine and writings of the apostles; expecially at a time when the vanity of their pretensions to Miracles and the gift of tongues, could be so easily discovered, had they been impostors; and when the profession of Christianity exposed persons of all ranks to the greatest contempt and most imminent danger. When the authenticity of the Miracles was attested by thousands of living witnesses, religious rites were instituted and performed by hundreds of thousands, agreeable to Scripture injunctions, in order to perpetuate that authenticity: and these solemn ceremonies have ever since been kept up in all parts of the world; the Passover by the Jews, in remembrance of Moses's Miracles in Egypt; and the Eucharist by Christians, as a memorial of Christ's death, and the Miracles that accompanied it, some of which are recorded by Phlegon the Trallian, an heathen historian. The Scriptures have not only the external sanction of Miracles, but the eternal stamp of the omniscient God by a variety of prophecies, some of which have already been most exactly confirmed by the event predicted
Numbers, the Book of - But independent of natural supplies Israel was fed by Miracle
Genesis, Theology of - They owed their very existence to the divine promise of the birth of a son, a promise that was fulfilled by Miracle long after any natural hope for a son was dead
Boethius, Anicus Manlius Severinus - 15), and the worker of a Miracle at his death (Martianus Rota, vid
Lazarus - Our Lord knew what He was on His way to do, and He took to heart what He was on His way to do, and it repented Him to a groaning that could not be uttered, to work His last Miracle for the awakening of Jerusalem at such a cost to Lazarus. "...
"This last and greatest of His Miracles was to raise our Lord much estimation," says the distinguished John Donne, "but (for they always accompany one another) it was to raise both Him and Lazarus much envy also
Passion Week - For, granting the Miracle of judgment upon the ill-starred tree, it is much more in harmony with popular views that the blight should instantly follow the curse (Matthew 21:18 f. * Ships And Boats - Among the most picturesque incidents of His life as recorded in the Gospels are the Miracle of stilling the tempest and the miraculous draughts of fishes
Virgin Birth - Douglas Buckwalter...
See also Isaiah, Theology of ; Jesus Christ ; Miracle ...
Bibliography
Sympathy - The Miracles as expressive of sympathy...
(a) Miracles of healing. —The Miracles of healing are truer expressions of the sympathy of Christ to us to-day than they were in the earlier days when Miracles were regarded more as a proof of His Divinity than an incident connected, with it. Yet this way of regarding the Miracles adds greatly to the significance they possess as expressive of human sympathy. The power to perform such acts of healing presupposes a combination of the tenderest sympathy with commanding authority, and it is interesting to consider that some, at least, of these Miracles are instances of sympathy according to its etymological meaning (σύν, παθεῖν), and that Christ Himself shared the suffering in the act of relieving it. This idea is suggested by His remark with regard to the healing of certain demoniacs (Mark 9:29), that the performance of the Miracle must be preceded by prayer, and is illustrated in the healing of the woman with the issue of blood (Mark 5:30), when Christ perceived ‘that virtue had gone out of him. ...
(b) Nature Miracles. —The sympathy of Christ, as revealed in His Miracles, was not confined to the relief of physical sufferings occasioned by disease. Standing in a class by itself among the Miracles is the turning of the water into wine (John 2), and yet this is an act of especial interest as revealing an aspect of the sympathy of Christ which must be borne in mind
James - Astonished at the Miracle, yet encouraged by His further promise to Simon, "henceforth thou shalt catch men," the three forsook not merely their "nets" as before, but "all," and followed Him. What Miracles in renewing the heart does the gospel work! Salome the mother of Zebedee's children, impressed by Christ's promise that the twelve should sit on thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel, begged, and her two sons joined in the prayer, that they might sit one on His right the other on His left hand in His glory (Mark 10:35-37). They looked for a reigning Messiah, and thought Jesus' Miracles were wrought with a view to this end: "depart hence (from obscure Galilee) and go into Judea, that Thy disciples also may see the works that Thou doest, for there is no man that doeth anything in secret and (yet) he himself seeketh to be known openly (which they take for granted He seeks); if Thou do these things, show Thyself to the world
Old Testament in the New Testament, the - John 6 presents the feeding of the five thousand as a glorious repetition of the manna Miracle, signaling a greater exodus from sin and death
Gestures - Jesus looked up to heaven at the Miracle of the feeding of the five thousand (Mark 6:41 and || Mt
Lord (2) - In most cases, the title as used by others than disciples is found in narratives of Miracle
Aaron - ...
On the way to Sinai, in the battle with Amalek, Aaron, in company with Hur, supported Moses' weary hands, which uplifted the Miracle-working rod of God (Exodus 17:9-13); and so Israel prevailed
Simon Magus - Then Simon himself believed also; and when he was baptized, he continued with Philip and wondered, beholding the Miracles and signs which were done. For the people with one accord gave heed unto those things that Philip spake, hearing and seeing the Miracles which he did. ...
The circumstances were these: It was part of the Pentecostal equipment of the apostles to possess for a time some of the Miracle-working powers that their Divine Master had exercised in order to arrest attention to His advent, and to secure a hearing to His ministry. And thus it is that we find the apostles speaking with tongues, healing the sick, opening the eyes of the blind, casting out devils, and many suchlike Miracles and signs. Now, Peter had never liked the look of Philip's great convert, and it completely justified Peter's incurable suspicions when Simon Magus came one night into Peter's lodgings, and, setting down a bag of money on the table, said, 'What will you take for the Holy Ghost? If you will show me the secret of your apostleship so that I may work your Miracles like you, I have plenty of money, and I know where there is plenty more
Call, Calling - Jesus may simply ‘call to’ (φωνεῖν) Bartimaeus (Mark 10:49); but the result of the conversation (and Miracle) is that be who had been blind ‘follows Jesus in the way’ (Mark 10:52)
Capernaum - Political boundaries were so shifting, and the adjustments of territory in these little principalities were so constantly changed, that a loose use of terms grew up, and the more familiar names were apt to displace the less familiar, (b) The phrase εἱς τὸ πέραν cannot be pressed; it might be used of an oblique course from any one point on the shore of the Lake to any other: Josephus (Vita, § 59) uses διεπεραιώθην of taking ship from Tiberias to Taricheae, which are on the same side of the Lake, and very little farther from each other than Bethsaida from the scene of the Miracle
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - "When I look at my sinfulness," says Rutherford, "my salvation is to me my Saviour's greatest Miracle
Fig-Tree - The symbolism of the cursing is lost in the mere wonder of withering a tree, a needless Miracle of display
Josiah - We all profess to believe in special providences and in divine interpositions; but, surely, the extraordinary providence that brought to the light of day and put into Josiah's hands the long-lost law of Moses concerning the worship and morals of Israel was an incomparable Miracle of the Divine grace and goodness
Revelation - ( b ) Historically , the Christian revelation comes to us commended by its witnesses in (1) Miracle, (2) prophecy, and (3) spiritual adaptation to human nature, ( c ) Behind all these are the presuppositions of natural religion as seen in nature, man, and history, ( d ) But ultimately the credibility of Christianity as a revelation rests on the Person of its Founder , and all evidences converge towards and centre in Him
Witness (2) - ’ It would, doubtless, be a grave mistake to regard Christ’s word, ‘The works which the Father hath given me to accomplish, the very works that I do, bear witness of me, that the Father hath sent me,’ as meaning only His Miracles. His whole lifework was a manifestation of God, and as such was, in the larger sense, truly a Miracle. Miracles, Resurrection of Christ, and Sign
Incarnation - Two special Miracles, the Resurrection and the Virgin-birth, are noticed separately below. ...
(6) One Miracle recorded in the Gospels, the Virgin-birth , naturally did not form part of the first cycle of Apostolic teaching
Beda, Historian - The wonders he relates on his own account are easily referred to natural causes; and scarcely ever is a reputed Miracle recounted without an authority
Paul as an Evangelical Mystic - ...
But how, asks some one honestly and anxiously,-how shall I ever become such a Miracle of Divine grace as to be actually, myself, a member of Christ's mystical body? Just begin at once to be one of His members, and the thing is done
Michal, Saul's Daughter - It was impossible they could ever be happy as man and wife, short of a Miracle
Magi - A Miracle was there wrought in favour of three Hebrew confessors of the existence of one only God, and that under circumstances to put shame upon a popular idol in the presence of the king and "all the rulers of the provinces," that the issue of this controversy between Jehovah and idolatry might be made known throughout that vast empire
Prayer - ]'>[13] 1 Kings 8:63 ) sacrifice is not mentioned! The Temple is a house of prayer); (4) Elijah’s intercession ( 1 Kings 18:36-37 ), colloquy ( 1 Kings 19:9-11 ), prayer before Miracle ( 1 Kings 17:20-21 ), so also Elisha ( Acts 21:5 ; 2 Kings 6:17 ); (5) Hezekiah prays in national crisis ( 2 Kings 19:15 ) and in illness ( 2 Kings 20:3 ); note his assertion of righteousness
Peter (2) - Many words specially uttered by him or spoken by our Lord to him are preserved in the Gospels, and in several of the Miracles of our Lord he has a unique place. He performs the first Christian Miracle (Acts 3:6 f
Faith - Faith was our Lord’s chief and incessant demand from men; He preaches, He works ‘powers,’ to elicit and direct it the ‘miracle-faith’ attracted by ‘signs and wonders’ being a stepping-stone to faith in the Person and doctrine of God’s Messenger
Hypocrisy - They believed in Miracles, they looked for signs. The Miracle could no longer be questioned, but they could call it a sign of Beelzebub
Individual - The only Miracle He ever wrought for the multitude He used for sifting them and for gathering individuals from among them (John 6:27)
Sorrow, Man of Sorrows - His work moved on a higher plane, and the weapons of His warfare must be more mysterious and spiritual than any outward Miracle
Sarah - And thus it was that what looked like a perfect Miracle of humility in Sarah, was really an act of exasperated pride
David - in His Races - In his pure, courageous, noble youth; all through his hunted-down days; fallen and broken and full of the pains of hell; filling up his dreary gift of years,-David is always the same unconquered Miracle of faith in God
Persecution - When urged by the proconsul to renounce Christ, he replied, "Fourscore and six years have I served him, and he has never done me an injury: can I blaspheme my King and my Saviour?" Several Miracles are reported to have happened at his death. It is obvious that the arching of the flames might be an accidental effect, which the enthusiastic veneration of his disciples might convert into a Miracle; and as to the story of the dove, &c, Eusebius himself apparently did not credit it; since he has omitted it in his narrative of the transaction
Hypocrisy - They believed in Miracles, they looked for signs. The Miracle could no longer be questioned, but they could call it a sign of Beelzebub
Israel, History of - Moving from Goshen in Egypt through God's leadership in the Miracle at the sea to the Sinai peninsula under Moses' leadership, the Hebrews at Sinai ratified a covenant with the God Yahweh (Exodus 24:1 ), and thus Israel as a landless people came into being
Ebionism (2) - 33), Jesus was nothing more than a naturally-begotten man—the son of Joseph and Mary—upon whom at His baptism the Christ came down from the absolute power (αὐθεντία) of God, thus making him the revealer of the Father and the Miracle-working Messiah; but from whom this Christ-Spirit departed before the Passion, so that it was only the man Jesus who endured the cross, while the spiritual Christ remained untouched by suffering
Leprosy - This was, no doubt, appropriate on account of the very evident restoration of cleanness of skin, but primarily because the Miracle enabled the leper to become ceremonially clean
Lord's Supper. (i.) - He states that the Miracle of the feeding of the 5000 took place at Passover time (John 6:4, so true reading), probably seeing in it a figure of the Christian Passover
Cures - Abbott discusses the third instance (Kernel and Husk, Letter 18), and, excluding any ‘bonâ fide Miracle,’ he inclines to regard the story as due to an exaggeration or to the influence of the knowledge of his friend’s intercession with Jesus, ‘with a sentimental reserve in favour of brain-wave sympathy. In this way are explained the Miracles of which some genuine cases undoubtedly happened around the tomb of Becket, the healings that are associated with Lourdes, and many of the similar results that we may believe were gathered round famous saints like St. ) says of our Lord’s Miracles: ‘It is only permissible to regard as historical that class of healings which present-day physicians are able to effect by psychical methods. Commentary; Trench, Miracles; Laidlaw, Miracles of our Lord; Belcher, Miracles
Dependence - And here it is significant to note that, although always willing to exercise the prerogatives of His Divine Sonship in favour of the distressed, yet He never works a Miracle on His own behalf
Abraham - If any of you is a father, and has a son of your old age; a son of much faith and of much prayer on your part, and of much pure Miracle on God's part; then add to that, that your only son is the one and only instrument and chosen vessel of all God's remaining promises to you: and then, that he lies at the point of death
Property (2) - In the Miracle of the miraculous draught of fishes (Luke 5:1; Luke 5:6, John 21:6) He set His seal of approval upon the industry of the disciples
Gospels - If He had (like Muhammed) recorded His own Miracles and teachings, internal consistency would have been nothing marvelous. ...
There would be lost the powerful proof we now have, from the mutual coherency of writings not composed by the Founder of Christianity nor in His lifetime, but by Jews, unlearned mostly, giving independent yet marvelously agreeing accounts of miraculous works, and a spiritual system of doctrine unheard before, themselves willing to lay down their lives for the truths they witnessed to; these writings received and accepted too by numerous congregations, living at the time and in the very places where the Miracles alleged in proof of their inspiration were wrought, and producing worldwide effects now for ages. John 21:6-7 supplements Luke 5:6; Luke 5:8, the corresponding Miracle before His resurrection
Fall (2) - , is so fully in harmony with His unique personality and character, that, though we cannot fully understand, we may at least be satisfied that all form parts of one Divine plan, and thus the moral Miracle and the physical mutually support one another
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - On his journey he rescued the people of Samosata from the influence of false teaching by a Miracle and on reaching home sought to counteract heresy by teaching orthodoxy in hymns
Government of the Hebrews - In order to confirm them in the duties which devolved upon them, and to throw at the greatest distance the mean and lurking principle just mentioned, God, after the sedition of Korah, Dathan, and Abiram, sanctioned the separation of the whole tribe, which had been previously made to the service of religion and the state, by a most evident and striking Miracle, Numbers 16:1-7
Herod - Yet "he desired to see Him" (Isaiah 62:6-71), for he had "heard of the fame of Jesus" (Matthew 14:1); and so in Christ's last hours "when he saw Him he was exceeding glad, for he was desirous to see Him of a long season, because he had heard many things of Him (doubtless through Joanna, wife of Chuza, Herod's steward, and through Manaen his foster brother: Luke 8:1-3; Acts 13:1), and he hoped to have seen some Miracle done by Him
Marriage - Jesus chose a marriage feast for His first Miracle (John 2:1 ff
Prophecy - Prophecy (with the power of working Miracles) may be considered as the highest evidence that can be given of a supernatural communion with the Deity. "As God is invisible and spiritual, there was cause to fear, that, in the first and ruder ages of the world, when men were busier in cultivating the earth than in cultivating arts and sciences, and in seeking the necessaries of life than in the study of morality, they might forget their Creator and Governor; and, therefore, God maintained amongst them the great article of faith in him, by manifestations of himself; by sending angels to declare his will; by Miracles, and by prophecies. " As it respects us, prophecy connected with Miracles affords a considerable evidence of the truth of revelation, as well as of a superintending Providence. ' We see the Jews 'led away captive into all nations, and Jerusalem trodden down of the Gentiles, ' and likely to continue so 'until the times of the Gentiles be fulfilled, ' as the Jews are by a constant Miracle preserved a distinct people for the completion of other prophecies relating to them
Holiness - Paul declares that it was in complete accord (κατά) with the transcendent holiness which was the characterizing quality of the spirit of Christ that His Divine Sonship should be visibly manifested in the Miracle of His resurrection
Esther - All the more a Miracle of grace are thy endless opportunities
Jesus Christ - ...
(2) On His Miracles (John 7:31; Psalms 91:11-12,86; John 10:25; John 10:38). Miracles alleged in opposition, or addition, to Scripture cannot prove a divine mission (2 Thessalonians 2:9; Deuteronomy 13:1-3; Matthew 24:24), but when confirmed by Scripture they prove it indisputably. (On His Miracles, see MiracleS and on His parables, see PARABLES. ) God saved His Son by commanding the mother and Joseph to flee to Egypt, the land of the type Israel's sojourn, when fleeing from famine, and the land from whence God called His Son Israel (Hosea 11:1; Matthew 2:15); not by Miracle, but by ordinary escaping from persecution, as sharing His people's trials (Matthew 10:23)
Regeneration - He may be so carried out of himself by the supernatural enthusiasm that he appears to onlookers as drunk (Acts 2:13); more generally he has the miraculous power of uttering ecstatic sounds (speaking with tongues, Acts 2:4, Acts 10:46, Acts 19:6), and declaring his faith in exuberant public speech (prophesying, Acts 11:28, Acts 19:6, Ephesians 2:8); while those especially endowed may work Miracles (Acts 2:43, Acts 4:30, Ephesians 2:5-67 Acts 8:13, Acts 14:3). Paul a Divine Miracle of grace (Romans 7:25)
Judges (1) - 15: Samson’s burning of the Philistines’ fields by sending into them foxes with burning torches tied to their tails ( Judges 15:1-8 ); the Philistines attack Judah in consequence, but the men of Judah bind Samson with the purpose of delivering him up; he, however, breaks his bonds, and kills a thousand Philistines with the jawhone of an ass ( Judges 15:1-9 ); the remaining verses describe the Miracle of the origin of the spring in En-hakkore ( Judges 15:18-20 )
Jesus Christ - 14-37) somewhere in Palestine; that he was a religious leader who worked Miracles and exorcised demons and was later regarded as a deity by his followers; that he was executed by crucifixion by the Jewish and Roman authorities during a Passover season; that reports circulated about his resurrection from the dead. They also believed that none of the supernatural elements of the Gospels, such as the virgin birth, the Miracles of Jesus, or his bodily resurrection was true, anyway, but only an ancient way of describing an existential experience of the present day. He spent some time in Bethany, where another notable Miracle took place (the raising of Lazarus from the dead)
John, Theology of - 1-12) Jesus' Miracles are aimed to show glimpses of God's glory (2:11) and those who believed could see it (11:40). First, this is done with signs and works (John does not use the synoptic word, "miracle")
Logos - (1) Peculiar stress is laid on His Miracles as the ‘signs’ by which He ‘manifested forth his glory. ’ The motive of compassion, to which the Miracles are for the most part ascribed by the Synoptic writers, falls into the background. (2) Apart from direct works of Miracle, certain attributes are assigned to Jesus which witness to His possession of the Logos nature
Son of God - If they were, they anticipated, in a remarkable manner, the subsequent confession at Caesarea Philippi; and this raises a doubt which may incline us to understand their language rather as an involuntary recognition of the Divine in Jesus, occasioned by the sight of a remarkable Miracle
Faith - Peter had healed the lame man, he explained that the Miracle had been wrought by the power of God by faith in the name of the ‘Prince of life, whom God raised from the dead’; ‘yea, the faith which is through him (ἡ διʼ αὐτοῦ) hath given him this perfect soundness in the presence of you all’ (Acts 3:16)
Acts of the Apostles (Apocryphal) - When Nero heard of this Miracle, Patroclus acknowledged that he was the soldier of the βασιλεὺς Ιησοῦς Χριστός
John, the Gospel by - * This Miracle being performed on the Sabbath served to bring out His glory
Faith - Peter had healed the lame man, he explained that the Miracle had been wrought by the power of God by faith in the name of the ‘Prince of life, whom God raised from the dead’; ‘yea, the faith which is through him (ἡ διʼ αὐτοῦ) hath given him this perfect soundness in the presence of you all’ (Acts 3:16)
New Testament - God has not seen fit (by a perpetual Miracle) to preserve the text from transcriptional errors
Sinlessness - Peter, when, after the Miracle wrought before his eyes in his own boat, he shrank away, exclaiming, ‘Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord!’ (Luke Luk_5:8)
Vicarious Sacrifice - 17, John 6:50-51 is not an allusion to the Lord’s Supper, but is connected with the Miracle of the loaves, the feeding of the multitude suggesting the idea of spiritual feeding, of Jesus’ mission to bring to men spiritual manna by the partaking of which they would have life
Law - Miracle is not the essence of God’s revelation to us, though it may accompany and authenticate His message
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - The Miracle of the parting of the waters of the Jordan River, with the use of the mantle that had dropped from the ascending Elijah, was God's further attestation to both the validity and reality of that call of God
Gospels (Apocryphal) - Where the details are not entirely imaginative, they have their origin in the transformation of utterances of Christ into deeds, or in the literal interpretation of OT prophecies and Jewish expectations about the Messiah, or in the ascription to Jesus of Miracles similar to those recorded in the OT (Hofmann, PRE
When, for example, one reads in the Childhood Gospel of Thomas the account of the Miracles wrought by the child Christ, and marks the spirit of diablerie so frequently exhibited, one is conscious of nothing but a painful feeling of wonder, that fables so bizarre and so revolting could ever have been tolerated in a community of Christians. The child Jesus is a boy among boys, taking His part in the usual games and occupations of childhood; and yet the belief in His supernatural dignity is evidenced by the extraordinary Miracles attributed to Him, and by His astonishing knowledge, which drew the confession from His teacher: ‘This child is not earthborn; assuredly he was born before the creation of the world’ (ch. onwards, the Apocryphal Gospels afforded an inexhaustible mine for poets and minstrels in Germany, France, and England; and numerous Miracle-plays represented incidents drawn from the same source
Holy Spirit (2) - It must be spiritual (in the complete Christian sense) in its nature—not based on bread; spiritual in its methods—not appealing to Miracles which only dazzle the senses or confound the mind; and spiritual in its resources—not deriving any of its strength from alliance with Satan, from borrowing the help of the evil which wields such vast power among men, or from recognizing that it has a relative or temporary right to exist. But all His Miracles are to be understood in this connexion. Without going so far as to say that in the Temptation narratives He is represented as tempted to put to selfish uses the power just conferred through the Spirit in baptism for the ends of God’s kingdom, it is a mark of historicity in the canonical Gospels that until He is baptized with the Spirit, Jesus works no Miracle. ...
If, then, we try to sum up the oldest Evangelic representation, we can hardly say more than that the Holy Spirit is the Divine power which from His baptism onward wrought in Jesus, making Him mighty in word and deed—a power the character of which is shown by the teaching and by the saving Miracles of Jesus—a power to which the sanctity of God attached, so that it is Divine also in the ethical sense, and to blaspheme it is the last degree of sin—a power in which Jesus enabled His disciples to some extent to sha
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - In this they followed the example of Moses, who appointed a succession of priests, and to prevent all future dispute, confirmed the appointment of Aaron’s line by the Miracle of the budding rod (xliii
Arius the Heresiarch - Whether his death can be described as a Miracle or not may be disputed
Christ in Art - In this deeply interesting picture of the Eucharist we see a further reason why the Fish symbol was felt to be appropriate; it carried the mind to the Miracle of the loaves and fishes, which was an early type of the Eucharist because of John 6:9-59
Koran - The author of the "View of Christianity and Mahometanism" observes, that, "by the advocates of Mahometanism, the Koran has always been held forth as the greatest of Miracles, and equally stupendous with the act of raising the dead. The Miracles of Moses and Jesus, they say, were transient and temporary: but that of the Koran is permanent and perpetual, and therefore far surpassed all the miraculous events of preceding ages. It is, therefore, abundantly apparent, that no Miracle was either externally performed for the support, or is internally involved in the composition of the Mahometan revelation
Paul - Paul is not mentioned in the Gospels; nor is it known whether he ever heard our Saviour preach, or saw him perform any Miracle. " He also performed many Miracles at Ephesus; and not only great numbers of people were converted to Christianity, but many also of those who in this superstitious city used incantations and magical arts, professed their belief in the Gospel, and renounced their former practices by publicly burning their books. Did ever enthusiast prefer that universal benevolence, meant by charity here, (which, we may add, is attainable by every man,) to faith, and to Miracles, to those religious opinions which he had embraced, and to those supernatural graces and gifts which he imagined he had acquired, nay, even to the merit of martyrdom? Is it not the genius of enthusiasm to set moral virtues infinitely below the merit of faith; and of all moral virtues to value that least which is most particularly enforced by St
Ambrosius of Milan - ...
We must take into account the state of mind brought about in the bishop and his flock by that protracted vigil in the basilica, when we read of the Miracles into which their triumph over heresy blazed forth. Miracles crowded thick upon one another. Ambrose himself, for once, eagerly and positively affirms the reality of the cure; and Augustine, who generally held that the age of Miracles was past, also bears witness to the common acceptance of the fact at Milan. Gibbon has some excuse for his note, "I should recommend this Miracle to our divines, if it did not prove the worship of relics, as well as the Nicene Creed. Unhappily this biographer spoils with his childish Miracles what is still a touching account of the good bishop's death
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - Again Basil's exile was determined on, but the pens with which Valens was preparing to sign the decree refused to write, and split in his agitated hand, and the supposed Miracle arrested the execution of the sentence
Christ in Jewish Literature - The former is a coarse interpretation of the Christian assertion that Jesus was not the son of Joseph, while the latter is due to His reputation as a worker of Miracles, and to the undoubted fact that He had created a serious dissension amongst the adherents of the Jewish religion. By the help of this he worked Miracles, and proclaimed himself the Son of God, born of a virgin. The queen of Jerusalem, Helena, believed in him, by reason of the Miracles. He learned the Name, worked Miracles; and, having thus gained the confidence of the followers of Jesus, proclaimed to them, in his name, new laws of religion. The new teacher, however, in trying to perform a Miracle, was killed by a stone falling upon his head
Christ in Reformation Theology - The legends of meaningless Miracles and supernatural claims attributed to the infant Jesus, he characterizes as ‘pure foolishness. This is the distinctive mark of the way in which the Reformers regarded Christ; all theology is Christology; they knew no other God than the God who had manifested Himself in the historical Christ, and made us see in the Miracle of faith that He is our salvation
Christ in the Early Church - If the latter is true, the appearance of Christ and its subsequent effect on the world must remain an insoluble enigma,—a Miracle even more difficult of credence than the stupendous statement of the Nicene formula
Christianity - ...
Further, if the Miracles of Christ, and especially the great Miracle of His Resurrection, be accepted, the whole point of view is changed
Gregorius (14) Nazianzenus, Bishop of Sasima And of Constantinople - The son thought it prudent to remain at home, but sent by his father's hands a letter to Eusebius, expressing his esteem and excusing his absence, and referring to the Miracle of his father's restored health ( Ep
Apostles - How many of these disciples accompanied Jesus to Cana and witnessed His first Miracle (John 2:1 ff. We do not know who witnessed the expulsion of the traffickers from the temple, heard the mysterious words spoken regarding the destruction of the temple, or saw the many Miracles which He performed in the capital (John 2:13 ff
Fact And Theory - Here an anti-supernaturalistic bias governs the whole discussion, though Schmiedel asserts that he does not presuppose the impossibility of a Miracle
Clementine Literature - of Chersonesus, of a Miracle performed at the tomb of Clement
Donatus And Donatism - Augustine were justified in comparing with the proud "prince of Tyre" (Eze_28:2) the man who in his lifetime permitted his followers to swear by his name and by his grey hairs and could ask of the menial bishops "What do you say to my party?" and who after his death was described by Donatists at the conference of Carthage as the Miracle-worker "the pride of the church of Carthage the man with the reputation of a martyr
Eusebius of Caesarea - The appeal to the Caesareans in recounting the Miracle is left out (c
Jerusalem - So stubborn, indeed, is the proof of this Miracle, that even Gibbon, who strives to invalidate it, is obliged to acknowledge the general fact
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - Maximus had introduced him to the hierophant there, a great Miracle-worker who was in league with the heathen party in Asia Minor (Eunapius, Vita Maximi , pp
Palestine - The belief in Miracle is nowhere so difficult as on the spot, where every detail of the scene seems so uncompromisingly earthly
Perfection (of Jesus) - And His Miracles of healing were never demonstrations, seals of His Messiahship; personal sympathy was their source and regulator. Francis might offer to pass through the fire, but Jesus expected no guarding or attesting Miracle