What does Minister mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
לְכַהֵֽן to act as a priest 4
לְשָׁרֵ֣ת (Piel) to minister 4
διάκονος one who executes the commands of another 3
מְשָׁרְתֵ֖י (Piel) to minister 3
לְכַהֲנוֹ־ to act as a priest 3
לְשָֽׁרְתֵ֑נִי (Piel) to minister 2
λειτουργὸν a public minister 2
לְכַהֵ֖ן to act as a priest 2
יְשָׁרְת֑וּנֶךְ (Piel) to minister 2
לְכַהֵ֥ן to act as a priest 2
לְשָׁרְתֵ֑נִי (Piel) to minister 1
διηκόνει to be a servant 1
לְשָֽׁרְתָֽם (Piel) to minister 1
יְשָׁרְת֥וּ (Piel) to minister 1
לְשָׁרְתֽוֹ (Piel) to minister 1
לְשָׁרֵ֕ת (Piel) to minister 1
בְּשָֽׁרְתָ֗ם (Piel) to minister 1
מְשָׁרְתֵ֣י (Piel) to minister 1
מְשָׁרְתֵ֥י (Piel) to minister 1
מְשָׁרֵ֥ת (Piel) to minister 1
הַמְשָׁרְתִ֖ים (Piel) to minister 1
הַמְשָׁ֣רְתִ֔ים (Piel) to minister 1
יְשָׁרְתוּ־ (Piel) to minister 1
יְשָֽׁרְתוּ־ (Piel) to minister 1
יְֽשָׁרְת֧וּ (Piel) to minister 1
לְשָׁרֵ֔ת (Piel) to minister 1
לְשָׁ֤רֶת (Piel) to minister 1
לְשָׁרֵ֥ת (Piel) to minister 1
כֹהֵ֖ן priest 1
λειτουργῆσαι to serve the state at one’s own cost. / to do a service 1
λειτουργὸς a public minister 1
ὑπηρετεῖν to act as a rower 1
וְכִהֲנ֥וּ to act as a priest 1
וְכִהֵ֥ן to act as a priest 1
וְכִהֲנ֖וּ to act as a priest 1
לְכַהֵ֣ן to act as a priest 1
וּֽלְשָׁרְת֖וֹ (Piel) to minister 1
לְשָׁ֣רְת֔וֹ (Piel) to minister 1
מְשָׁרְתִ֑ים (Piel) to minister 1
לְשָׁרֵ֞ת (Piel) to minister 1
לְשָׁרְת֛וֹ (Piel) to minister 1
מְשָׁרְתִ֤ים (Piel) to minister 1
מְשָׁרְתִ֥ים (Piel) to minister 1
לְשָֽׁרְתוֹ֙ (Piel) to minister 1
διηκονήσαμέν to be a servant 1
לְשָׁרֵ֧ת (Piel) to minister 1
וְשֵׁרֵ֨ת (Piel) to minister 1

Definitions Related to Minister

H8334


   1 (Piel) to Minister, serve, Minister to.
   

H3547


   1 to act as a priest, Minister in a priest’s office.
      1a (Piel).
         1a1 to Minister as a priest, serve as a priest.
         1a2 to be or become a priest.
         1a3 to play the priest.
         

G1249


   1 one who executes the commands of another, esp.
   of a master, a servant, attendant, Minister.
      1a the servant of a king.
      1b a deacon, one who, by virtue of the office assigned to him by the church, cares for the poor and has charge of and distributes the money collected for their use.
      1c a waiter, one who serves food and drink.
      Additional Information: For synonyms see entries 1402, douloo; 2324, therapon; and 5257, huperetes.
      See entry 5834 for comparison of synonyms.
      

G3011


   1 a public Minister, a servant of the state.
   2 a Minister, servant.
      2a so of military labourers.
      2b of the temple.
         2b1 of one busied with holy things.
         2b2 of a priest.
      2c of the servants of a king.
      

G5256


   1 to act as a rower, to row.
   2 to Minister, render services.
   

G1247


   1 to be a servant, attendant, domestic, to serve, wait upon.
      1a to Minister to one, render ministering offices to.
         1a1 to be served, ministered unto.
      1b to wait at a table and offer food and drink to the guests,.
         1b1 of women preparing food.
      1c to Minister i.e. supply food and necessities of life.
         1c1 to relieve one’s necessities (e.g. by collecting alms), to provide take care of, distribute, the things necessary to sustain life.
         1c2 to take care of the poor and the sick, who administer the office of a deacon.
         1c3 in Christian churches to serve as deacons.
      1d to Minister.
         1d1 to attend to anything, that may serve another’s interests.
         1d2 to Minister a thing to one, to serve one or by supplying any thing.
         

G3008


   1 to serve the state at one’s own cost.
      1a to assume an office which must be administered at one’s own expense.
      1b to discharge a public office at one’s own cost.
      1c to render public service to the state.
   2 to do a service, perform a work.
      2a of priests and Levites who were busied with the sacred rites in the tabernacle or the temple.
      2b of Christians serving Christ, whether by prayer, or by instructing others concerning the way of salvation, or in some other way.
      2c of those who aid others with their resources, and relieve their poverty.
      

H3548


   1 priest, principal officer or chief ruler.
      1a priest-king (Melchizedek, Messiah).
      1b pagan priests.
      1c priests of Jehovah.
      1d Levitical priests.
      1e Zadokite priests.
      1f Aaronic priests.
      1g the high priest.
      

Frequency of Minister (original languages)

Frequency of Minister (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Minister
A title given to the superiors of some religious orders or of a district of the same, such as the minister general and minister provincial of the Franciscans, of the Trinitarians; the second in authority in Jesuit communities; one authorized to administer the sacraments, e.g., the minister of baptism.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Experience: Necessary to a Minister
Buchsel says:: 'Orthodoxy can be learnt from others; living faith must be a matter of personal experience. The Lord sent out his disciples, saying, 'Ye shall testify of me, because ye have been with me from the beginning.' He only is a witness who speaks of what he has seen with his own eyes, heard with his own ears, and handled with his own hands. Orthodoxy is merely another form of rationalism, if it be learnt from without.'
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Florentius, a Chief Minister of State at Constantinople
Florentius (50) , a chief minister of state at Constantinople under Theodosius II. and Marcian, a man of the highest reputation for soundness of faith, purity of life, and statesmanlike wisdom (Labbe, Concil. iv. 220). He was consul in a.d. 429, patrician in 448, prefect of the praetorian guards, and the high dignity of prefect of the East was bestowed on him a seventh time by Marcian in 450.
In 448, when Flavian had resolved to put Eutyches on his trial for heretical doctrine, Theodosius demanded that Florentius should have a seat at the synod as his representative. Hitherto the ostensible reason for the presence of imperial officers at ecclesiastical synods was the preservation of order. The ground expressly assigned by the emperor for requiring the admission of Florentius, viz. that the matters under discussion concerned the faith, was a startling innovation which Flavian withstood as long as he dared (Acac. Hist. Brevicul. p. 112; Liberat. Breviar. c. xi.; Labbe, Concil. iv. 247). On the opening of the trial Florentius took his seat among the metropolitans, next to Seleucus, bp. of Amasea (Labbe, 238; Liberat. p. 60), and disclaimed all desire to dogmatize, or to forget his position as a layman; but he took a very leading and authoritative part in the discussion, and manifested a strong leaning towards the acquittal of Eutyches. But his efforts to induce Eutyches to acknowledge the two natures in Christ or to adopt language which might satisfy the council were fruitless, and the interests of orthodoxy compelled him to assent to his condemnation (Labbe, 507, 517). As Eutyches left the hall he lodged with Florentius an appeal against his condemnation to the churches of Rome, Alexandria, and Jerusalem. The bishop availed himself of the plea that the trial was closed to exclude the registration of the appeal ( ib. 244). When the council of Chalcedon met, Florentius was present with other high civil dignitaries; but there is no record of the part he took. We have letters to Florentius from Theodoret ( Ep. 89), Isidore of Pelusium ( Ep. lib. i. 486), and Firmus of Caesarea ( Ep. 29).
[1]
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Minister (2)
However learned, godly, and eloquent a minister may be, he is nothing without the Holy Spirit. The bell in the steeple may be well hung, fairly fashioned, and of soundest metal, but it is dumb until the ringer makes it speak; and in like manner the preacher has no voice of quickening for the dead in sin, or of comfort for living saints until the divine Spirit gives him a gracious pull, and bids him speak with power. Hence the need of prayer from both preacher and hearers.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Minister
Minister mesharet . As Joshua was to Moses (Exodus 24:13; Joshua 1:1), and Elisha's "servitor" (2 Kings 4:43). The king's subordinate attendants, as "servants" are higher officials (1 Kings 10:5). The angelic attendants of the heavenly King (Psalms 104:4). The priests and Levites, "ministers of our God" (Isaiah 61:6). In New Testament leitourgos is a "public administrator", civil as the magistrate (Romans 13:4; Romans 13:6), or sacerdotal as the Aaronic priests were (Hebrews 10:11) and as Christ was (Hebrews 8:2), and as Paul figuratively was, presenting as a sacrifice before God the Gentiles converted by his ministry of the gospel (Romans 15:16) and their faith (Philippians 2:17), and as Christians minister their alms (Romans 15:27; 2 Corinthians 9:12).
Liturgy at Athens meant public service rendered gratuitously to the state; hence the sense of public Divine service (not restricted to sacrifice, Luke 1:23): Acts 13:2. Ηufretes is a greater man's "personal attendant" (literally, the rower under the steersman) or subordinate in waiting, as Mark was to Saul and Barnabas (Acts 13:5); also (Luke 1:2; Acts 26:16) interchanged with diakonos (1 Corinthians 4:1; 1 Corinthians 3:5), both applied to Paul. diakonos is also applied especially to deacons as distinguished from presbyter bishops (Philippians 1:1; 1 Timothy 3:8-13).
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Minister: Need of Personal Tenderness
Speaking of the temper requisite to the right discharge of ministerial duty, Payson said, 'I never was fit to say a word to a sinner, except when I had a broken heart myself; when I was subdued and melted into penitency, and felt as though I had just received pardon to my own soul, and when my heart was full of tenderness and pity. No anger, no anger.'
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Minister
Christian ministry is a very broad subject and may be conveniently studied through looking at topics that deal with its various aspects. According to its most common biblical usage, ‘ministry’ means ‘service’. A person who ministers to others is one who serves others; a minister of God is a servant of God (Deuteronomy 10:8; Psalms 103:21; Joel 2:17; Matthew 8:15; Matthew 25:44; Matthew 27:55; 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 6:4; 2 Corinthians 11:15; 2 Corinthians 11:23; for details see SERVANT).
Different forms of the biblical word translated ‘minister’ denote a variety of people and the work they do in the church (Romans 12:7; Ephesians 6:21; Colossians 4:17; Hebrews 6:10; see GIFTS OF THE SPIRIT). The same word, transliterated ‘deacon’, refers to a recognized class of church helpers (Philippians 1:1; 1 Timothy 3:8; see DEACON). The pastoral leaders of the church, who are distinct from the deacons, are also ministers (Ephesians 4:11-12; Colossians 1:7; 1 Timothy 1:12; 2 Timothy 4:5; see APOSTLE; ELDER; TEACHER; PREACHING). The perfect minister, who is an example to all others, is Jesus Christ (Matthew 20:28; John 13:14-16; Romans 15:8).
King James Dictionary - Minister
MIN'ISTER, n. L.
1. Properly, a chief servant hence, an agent appointed to transact or manage business under the authority of another in which sense, it is a word of very extensive application. Moses rose up and his minister Joshua. Exodus 24
2. One to whom a king or prince entrusts the direction of affairs of state as minister of state the prime minister. In modern governments, the secretaries or heads of the several departments or branches of government are the ministers of the chief magistrate. 3. A magistrate an executive officer. For he is the minister of God to thee for good. Romans 13
4. A delegate an embassador the representative of a sovereign at a foreign court usually such as is resident at a foreign court, but not restricted to such. 5. One who serves at the altar one who performs sacerdotal duties the pastor of a church, duly authorized or licensed to preach the gospel and administer the sacraments. Ephesians 3 6. Christ is called a minister of the sanctuary. Hebrews 8 7. An angel a messenger of God. Who maketh his angels spirits, his ministers a flaming fire. Psalms 104
MIN'ISTER, L. ministro. To give to afford to supply.
He that ministereth seed to the sower--2 Corinthians 9
That it may minister grace to the hearers. Ephesians 4
MIN'ISTER, To attend and serve to perform service in any office, sacred or secular.
I will sanctify also both Aaron and his sons, to minister to me in the priest's office. Exodus 29
1. To afford supplies to give things needful to supply the means of relief to relieve. When saw we thee hungry, or thirsty, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not minister unto thee?
Matthew 25
2. To give medicines. Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased?
In this sense, we commonly use administer.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Minister
MINISTER. The word ‘minister’ comes from the Lat. minister = ‘ servant ,’ and generally it may be said that wherever it is found in the Bible, whether in OT or in NT, its original meaning is its primary one, service being the idea it is specially meant to convey.
1. In OT it is used (corresponding to the same Heb. word in each case) of Joshua as the personal attendant of Moses ( Exodus 24:13 , Joshua 1:1 ), of the servants in the court of Solomon ( 1 Kings 10:5 ), of angels and the elemental forces of nature as the messengers and agents of the Divine will ( Psalms 103:21 ; Psalms 104:4 ; cf. Hebrews 1:7 ; Hebrews 1:14 ), but, above all, of the priests and Levites as the servants of Jehovah in Tabernacle and Temple ( Exodus 28:35 , 1 Kings 8:11 , Ezra 8:17 , and constantly). The secular uses of the Heb. word, standing side by side with the sacred, show that it was not in itself a priestly term. Ministry was not necessarily a priestly thing, though priesthood was one form of ministry.
2. In NT several Gr. words are tr. [1] ‘minister,’ three of which call for notice. (1) hypçretçs is found in Luke 1:2 ; Luke 4:20 , Acts 13:5 ; Acts 26:15 , 1 Corinthians 4:1 . In two of these cases RV [2] has properly substituted ‘ attendant ’ for ‘minister’ to avoid misconception. The ‘minister’ ( Luke 4:20 ) to whom Jesus handed the roll in the synagogue at Nazareth was the hazzan , corresponding to the English verger or Scotch beadle. John Mark ( Acts 13:5 ) was the minister of Barnabas and Saul in the same sense as Joshua was of Moses, he was their attendant and assistant. In the other cases hypçretçs is used of the minister of Christ or of the word in a sense that is hardly distinguishable from that of diakonos as under.
(2) leitourgos . In classical Gr. this word with its cognates is applied to one who renders special services to the commonwealth, without any suggestion of a priestly ministry. But in the LXX [3] it was regularly applied, especially in its verbal form, to the ritual ministry of priests and Levites in the sanctuary, and so by NT times had come to connote the idea of a priestly function. What we have to notice, however, is that no NT writer uses it so as to suggest the discharge of special priestly functions on the part of an official Christian ministry. Either the reference is to the old Jewish ritual ( Luke 1:23 , Hebrews 9:21 ; Hebrews 10:11 ), or the word is employed in a sense that is purely figurative ( Romans 15:16 , Philippians 2:17 ); or, again, is applied to a ministration of Christian charity ( 2 Corinthians 9:12 , Philippians 2:25 ; Philippians 2:30 ) or of prayer ( Acts 13:2 ; cf. v. 3), from which all ideas of priestly ritual are clearly absent.
(3) diakonos . Even more significant than the uses to which leitourgos and its cognates are put in the NT is the fact that they are used so seldom, and that diakonos and diakonia are found instead when the ideas of minister and ministry are to be expressed. This corresponds with the other fact that the priesthood of a selected class has been superseded by a universal Christian priesthood, and that a ministry of lowliness and serviceableness (which diakonos specially implies) has taken the place of the old ministry of exclusive privilege and ritual performance, diakonia is the distinctive Christian word for ‘ministry,’ and diakonos for ‘minister.’ But these nouns and the related verb are used in the NT with a wide range of application. The personal services rendered to Jesus by Martha, Mary, and other women ( Luke 10:40 , John 12:2 , Matthew 27:55 ), and to St. Paul by Timothy, Erastus, and Onesimus ( Acts 19:22 , Philippians 1:13 ), are described as forms of ministry. The man who serves and follows Christ is His minister ( John 12:26 ; ‘my diakonos ’ is the expression in the original); and the minister of Christ will not fail to minister also to the brethren ( 1 Corinthians 12:5 , 1 Peter 4:10 ). But while every true Christian is a minister of Christ and of the brethren, there is a ministry of particular service out of which there gradually emerges the idea of a special Christian ministry. We may find the roots of the idea in our Lord’s words to His disciples, ‘Whosoever would become great among you shall be your minister, … even as the Son of man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’ ( Matthew 20:26 ff.). The minister at first was one who was distinguished from others by his larger services. He did not hold an office, but discharged a function. There were differences of function, indeed, and, above all, the distinction between those who were ministers of the word ( Act 6:4 , 2 Corinthians 3:6 , Ephesians 3:6-7 ) and those who ministered by gracious deed ( Acts 6:1 ff.). But whatever might be the ‘diversities of ministrations’ ( 1 Corinthians 12:5 ), the word diakonos covered them all. At a later stage, when differences of function have begun to harden into distinctions of office, the name diakonos is specially appropriated to the deacon (wh. see) as distinguished from the presbyter or bishop ( Philippians 1:1 , 1 Timothy 3:1-13 ). But diakonos still continues to be used in its wider sense, for Timothy, who was much more than a deacon, is exhorted to be ‘a good minister ( diakonos ) of Jesus Christ’ ( 1 Timothy 4:6 ). See following article.
J. C. Lambert.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Ministry, Minister
It is reasonably clear in Scripture that (1) ministry means the service of God and his creatures; (2) the one essential ministry is that of Jesus Christ; (3) the whole membership of the old and the new Israel is called to share in ministerial service, of which there are many forms; and (4) certain persons in both the old new Israel are set apart for special ministry, within the total ministry.
The Old Testament . There are three distinct ministries in the Old Testament: the prophetic, the priestly, and the kingly. All three are essential within the covenantal relation between Yahweh and Israel. However, more basic than these three is that the whole people, Israel, is the minister of God. The election and call of Israel is the foundation of the service of Israel to God. Nowhere is this mode more clear than in Isaiah 40-66 , where the missionary calling of the people of God is made explicitly clear. Much earlier the people had been told that they were "a kingdom of priests and a holy nation" (Exodus 19:6 ). Thus, in a basic sense every person, male and female, insofar as he or she is a member of Israel is a minister/servant of Yahweh; so the whole of life has a Godward dimension (as the Law makes very clear).
The service rendered by prophet, priest, and king was that of maintaining the personal relation between Israel (the bride) and Yahweh (the Bridegroom) required by the covenant. Within this relation of grace there was need of a minister of God who would speak for him to the people (thus the prophet Isaiah 6:8 ; 50:4 ); of a minister to stand before God to teach the people, lead in worship, and offer sacrifice on their behalf (on many occasions priests and Levites are called ministers — e.g., Exodus 30:20 ); and of a king to express the sovereignty and kingship of Yahweh unto and within Israel and to show that the sacred and secular realms belong together.
The New Testament . Each of these ministries comes to fulfillment in Jesus Christ, who is himself the Prophet, Priest, and King. At the same time, the corporate ministry of Israel as a people finds fulfillment first in Jesus Christ as the new Israel and then in his body, the church.
Christ in His Church . Jesus Christ came not to be ministered to but to minister (Matthew 20:28 ). In his life and particularly in his death, Jesus fulfilled the prophecy of the Messiah as the Suffering Servant of Yahweh (Isaiah 52:13-53:12 ). By washing the feet of his disciples he gave an example (John 13:15 ) of true service; and in the Upper Room he declared, "I am among you as one who serves" (Luke 22:27 ). The unique, ministerial servant example of Jesus is beautifully commended by Paul (Philippians 2:5-8 ) and Peter (1 Peter 2:21-25 ).
The Word Incarnate ministered to people in their deepest need. He entered fully into the pitiful and perverse condition of the human race as it exists before God, sharing its pain and estrangement. He did this in order, by meek and gracious service in doing good and bringing healing and liberation, to bring peace and reconciliation between man and God. The climax of his diaconal, servant ministry was to offer himself as an atonement for sin on the cross of Calvary.
This diaconal ministry of Jesus Christ continued after his exaltation into heaven. As the Head of the church, which is his body, he continually ministers to and through his members as their King, Priest, and Prophet. He rules and guides, prays and intercedes, proclaims and teaches, loves and rejoices for, in, and through them. The whole church is a holy priesthood and a chosen race, a royal priesthood, God's own people (1 Peter 2:5,9 ). In union with Christ, his body shares in his priestly, kingly, and prophetic work. The whole point of Paul's argument in both Romans 12,1 Corinthians 12 is that each and every member of the church has a part to play in the service of God.
By three basic wordsdoulos [1]) of Jesus Christ.
There exists within the church, by God's will, a universal duty and right of service; however, with this there also exists the greatest possible differentiation of forms and functions of service.
Ministries in the Church . The ways of serving the Lord in his church are many and varied. These types overlap and members of the body will partake of more than one type. There is ministry of the Word in evangelism, founding and guiding churches (apostles, prophets, evangelists, teachers, etc.); ministry of healing (workers of miracles, gifts of healing, etc.); ministry of leadership/administration (helpers, administrators, etc.); and ministry to the congregation (tongues, interpretation of tongues, etc.).
Apostles . While it is important to recognize the whole ministry of the whole body, the place of the original apostles is unique (Revelation 21:14 ). The Twelve were chosen, appointed, ordained, and sent by Jesus Christ himself. Matthias replaced Judas among the Twelve (Acts 1 ), and Paul became the apostle to the Gentiles through a gift of the Spirit given by the exalted Lord (Acts 9 ). So in a vital sense their ministry is that ministry which is necessary for the full ministry of the whole body. They are eyewitnesses of the resurrection and/or exaltion of Christ and they are the living foundations on which the church is built. It is their testimony that is the basis of the books of the New Testament. They were the gift of God to the church in its infancy and are irreplaceable.
Local Leadership . Apart from the apostles, prophets, and evangelists, we read of elders/presbyters, bishops, and deacons, who were settled in local congregations. They facilitated the ministry of the whole church by being servants of Jesus Christ.
Elder/presbyter (presbuteros [ Acts 15:2 ; 20:17 ; 21:18 ; 1 Timothy 3:1-7 ; 5:17 ; Titus 1:5-9 ; Hebrews 13:17 ). Therefore, in terms of what he did the elder was sometimes called the bishop or overseer (episcopos ). That the elder is the bishop seems to be the natural meaning of Acts 20:17,28 ; Philippians 1:1 ; 1 Timothy 3:4-5 ; 5:17-19 ; Titus 1:5-7 ; 1 Peter 5:2 (KJV). Apparently the elder was set in office by an act of ordination, but there are only minimal details of this in the New Testament (e.g., 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ; 5:22 ; 2 Timothy 1:6 ).
Within a short time of the apostolic age, when the church was separated from the synagogue, the distinction between the bishop and the presbyter (priest) developed. In the New Testament period the real distinction was among the itinerant apostles, evangelists, and prophets and the settled presbyters and deacons.
Diakonia [ Acts 6:1-6 ). Yet they are not called deacons. However, deacons are mentioned in Philippians 1:1 and in 1 Timothy 3:8-13 . Phoebe is called a deacon in Romans 16:1 .
While the presbyterate may be said to originate within the synagogue, this cannot be said of the diaconate. There is no parallel to it in Judaism. The main tasks of deacons, who were to be of sound character and with a firm hold on the faith, were administrative and financial.
Summary . Whether in the Old or New Testaments, ministry finds its meaning and expression in Jesus Christ. He is the Minister par excellence and the only source of ministry. The Old Testament looks forward to him while the New Testament looks both back, up, and forward to him. In relation to Christ every member of Israel or the church has a ministry of serving the Lord by proclaiming the Word of God by word and deed both inside and outside the people of God. In this sense all are royal priests. Further, in relation to Christ there are specific or particular forms of ministry within and for the sake of the church in its mission for God in his world. These are given only to a few and they include the callings of prophet, priest, and king in the Old Covenant and apostle, evangelist, presbyter, and deacon in the New Covenant. Though not a strictly biblical expression "ordained ministry" refers to persons who have received a gift of the Spirit and have been appointed by the church, through prayer and the laying on of hands, to specific offices within the church.
Peter Toon
Bibliography . R. E. Brown, The Churches the Apostles Left Behind ; J. D. G. Dunn, Unity and Diversity in the New Testament ; R. P. McBrien, Ministry ; L. Morris, Ministers of God ; E. Schweizer, Church Order in the New Testament .
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Minister: Should be a Nursing Father
In a church in Verona stands, or rather sits, a wooden image of St. Zeno, an ancient bishop, with knees so ludicrously short that there is no lap on which a babe could be dandled. He was not the first nor the last ecclesiastic who has been utterly incapable of being a nursing father to the church. It were well if all ministers had a heavenly instinct for the nourishing and bringing up of the Lord's little ones. Is there not much lack in this?
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Minister Ministry
In discussing these two terms we have to consider six groups of Greek words which occur in the Bible in connexion with ministering or serving. They run in triplets, each triplet consisting of a concrete noun, an abstract noun, and a verb-‘minister,’ ‘ministry,’ and ‘to minister.’ These six groups are-διάκονος, διακονία, διακονεῖν; δοῦλος, δουλεία, δουλεύειν; ὑπηρέτης, [1], ὑπηρετεῖν; [2], λατρεία, λατρεύειν; λειτουργός, λειτουργία, λειτουργεῖν; θεράπων, θεραπεία, θεραπεύειν. All these are found in the NT excepting ὑπηρεσία, which occurs in the Septuagint in Job and Wisdom, and λάτρις, which occurs only in the enlarged text of Job 2:9. With regard to nearly all of them it will be found that both the Authorized Version and the Revised Version use different English words to translate the same Greek word, while different Greek words are sometimes translated by the same English word. This could hardly be avoided without doing injustice to the meaning of various passages. In all languages words have different shades of meaning, and in some cases the same word has two or more very different meanings; there are very many instances of this in the Greek of the NT.
The fact that we have no less than six sets of words to express the idea of ‘minister’ and ‘ministry’ is strong evidence that there was as yet no regular organization of ministers with distinct titles indicating specific duties. This impression is confirmed when we find that English translators are unable to reserve a separate English word for each of the different Greek words. Evidently these different Greek terms do not each represent a class of officials; but individuals who undertake work of a similar character are called by the same name. On the other hand, the name varies, without there being in all cases a corresponding change of meaning. The same person, from somewhat different points of view, might bear four or five of the six names; and even from the same point of view might bear more than one of them. In the earliest congregations of Christians it was soon found that some individuals had certain gifts, and they exercised these gifts for the good of the congregation. Such useful persons were distinguished by words already in use for similar services. At a later time, when the Christian ministry became organized, some of these words acquired a technical meaning and designated Church officers with specific duties. It will be useful to exhibit the diversity of translation somewhat in detail.
διάκονος is found in Mt., Mk., and Jn., in all four groups of the Pauline Epistles, and nowhere else in the NT. In the Gospels it is rendered ‘servant,’ in the Epistles ‘minister,’ except Philippians 1:1 and 1 Timothy 3:8; 1 Timothy 3:12, where it is rendered ‘deacon.’ διακονία occurs in Ac. and in all groups of the Pauline Epistles, except 1 and 2 Th.; elsewhere thrice. The usual translation is ‘ministry’; but we have ‘ministration’ (2 Corinthians 3:7-9; 2 Corinthians 9:13), ‘ministering’ (2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:1), ‘relief’ (Acts 11:29), ‘serving’ (Luke 10:40), also ‘service’ and ‘administration.’ The Revised Version changes ‘ministry’ to ‘service’ (1 Timothy 1:12), ‘service’ to ‘ministry’ (Revelation 2:19), ‘ministry’ to ‘ministering’ (Ephesians 4:12, 2 Timothy 4:11), ‘ministry’ to ‘ministration’ (2 Corinthians 6:3), and ‘administration’ to ‘ministration’ (2 Corinthians 9:12). διακονεῖν is always ‘to minister’ in Mt. and Mk., always ‘to serve’ in Jn., and nearly always ‘to minister’ in the Epistles: in Lk. and Ac. both translations are used-‘to serve’ most frequently. The Revised Version changes ‘administer’ to ‘minister’ (2 Corinthians 8:19-20), and ‘use the office of a deacon’ to ‘serve as deacons’ (1 Timothy 3:10; 1 Timothy 3:13). λειτουργός is rendered ‘minister’ in nearly all places; λειτουργία is ‘ministration’ in Lk., ‘service’ in Ph., and ‘ministry’ in Heb.; λειτουργεῖν is always ‘to minister.’ The translations of ὑπηρέτης vary between ‘attendant,’ ‘minister,’ ‘officer,’ and ‘servant.’ The Revised Version changes ‘minister’ to ‘attendant’ (Luke 4:20, Acts 13:5), and ‘servant’ to ‘officer’ (Mark 14:54). ὑπηρετεῖν is ‘to serve’ (Acts 13:36) and ‘to minister’ (Acts 20:34; Acts 24:23). These instances of variations in rendering the same word may suffice. The different shades of meaning between the groups of Greek words are of more importance; but the fact that ‘minister’ and ‘servant,’ with their cognates, appear in the translations of so many of the groups is evidence that the meanings frequently overlap.
The triplets connected with δοῦλος and θεράπων are somewhat closely allied. The δοῦλος, ‘slave’ or ‘bondservant,’ is in a permanent condition of servitude to the person whom he serves, and he cannot free himself from it. The θεράπων renders temporary and voluntary service. Both words may be used of man’s relation to God: Moses is called the θεράπων (Hebrews 3:5, the only place in the NT in which the word occurs) and the δοῦλος (Revelation 15:3) of God; and in the Septuagint both words are used to translate the same Hebrew word (ebed): e.g. Numbers 12:7, Judges 2:8. θεραπεία is used (abstract for concrete) of a body of domestic servants (Luke 12:42), and of the special service of healing (Luke 9:11, Revelation 22:2). θεραπεύειν means ‘to serve’ in any way, and also ‘to treat medically’ and ‘to heal.’ The verb is very frequent in the writings of the beloved physician, and, except Acts 17:25, always in the medical sense. Except indirectly in the metaphor of the healing leaves (Revelation 22:2), this triplet is not used of spiritual ministry by man to man; and neither θεραπεία nor θεραπεύειν is found in any Epistle. Nor is the δοῦλος triplet used of man’s spiritual ministry to his fellows. Both δοῦλος and δουλεύειν are used of service to God or to Christ, but the nearest approach to spiritual service to man is Philippians 2:22, where Timothy is said to ‘serve’ with St. Paul ‘in furtherance of the gospel.’
It is probably correct to say much the same of ὑπηρέτης and ὑπηρετεῖν. They indicate a more dignified kind of service than that of the δοῦλος, but they are commonly used of attendance to physical needs or external duties rather than of ministration to souls. The ‘attendant’ in Luke 4:20 is one who looks after the fabric and the books, not one who preaches in the synagogue. Acts 13:5 probably means that John waited on Paul and Barnabas, attending to their bodily wants, so as to leave them free to preach. He had not been set apart for missionary work as they had been (Acts 13:2). The exceptions are Luke 1:2, Acts 26:16, and 1 Corinthians 4:1, where the idea of spiritual ministration is prominent. But in none of these three passages is there any allusion to the derivation of the word (‘under-rower’), as if it meant a rower in a ship of which Christ was captain.
The three remaining triplets are different, for all of them are frequently connected with the idea of religious service. In the article Deacon, Deaconess it has been pointed out that διάκονος, which in classical Greek commonly implies ignoble service, such as waiting at table, in Christian language has high associations. We find the nobler use of the term in the teaching of that anima naturaliter Christiana, Epictetus. ‘The philosopher should without distraction be employed only on the service of God.’ ‘I think that what God chooses is better than what I choose: I will attach myself as a servant to Him.’ ‘I obey, assenting to the words of the Commander and praising His acts; for I came into the world when it pleased Him, and I will also depart when it pleases Him.’ ‘I depart as Thy servant, as one who has known Thy commands and Thy prohibitions’ (Diss. III. xxii. 69, xxiv. 65, xxvi. 28, IV. vii. 20). In the Septuagint διάκονος and διακονία are rare (ten times in all), and διακονεῖν does not occur. St. Paul calls heathen magistrates ‘servants (διάκονοι) of God’ (Romans 13:4); and all idea of ignoble service is excluded when apostles are called διάκονοι (1 Corinthians 3:5, 2 Corinthians 3:6, Ephesians 3:7, Colossians 1:23). The whole triplet has for its root-idea the supplying of serviceable labour, whether to the body or the soul. διακονία is used often of the sending of money to help the poor brethren in Judaea (Acts 11:29; Acts 12:25, 2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:1; 2 Corinthians 9:12-13, Romans 15:31). Archippus is told to take heed to the ministry (διακονία) which he had received in the Lord (Colossians 4:17) for work in the Church of Colossae, but we are not told what kind of ministry it was.
There are several passages in which the διάκονος triplet seems to be used of personal service to St. Paul rather than of ministerial service in the Church: διάκονος (of Tychicus, Ephesians 6:21, Colossians 4:7), διακονία (of Mark, 2 Timothy 4:11), διακονεῖν (of Timothy and Erastus, Acts 19:22; of Onesimus, Philemon 1:13; and of Onesiphorus, 2 Timothy 1:18). διακονεῖν is clearly used of supplying bodily needs in Acts 6:2-3, where the Seven are elected ‘to serve tables.’ But the Seven are not called διάκονοι, and there is no evidence in the NT which can connect them with the ‘deacons’ at Philippi or Ephesus. To call the Seven the first deacons is a conjecture which can be neither proved nor disproved.
It may be mere accident that θεραπεία and θεραπεύειν are never used in the NT in the classical sense of Divine worship, although both are used in this sense in the Septuagint (Joel 1:14; Joel 2:15, Isaiah 54:17, Daniel 7:10, Judith 11:17). For Divine worship, the NT writers use either λατρεία and λατρεύειν or λειτουργία and λειτουργεῖν, words which may signify adoration of God in general and sometimes sacrifice in particular. λατρεία or λατρεύειν is used of heathen worship (Romans 1:25), of Jewish worship (Acts 7:7, Romans 9:4, Hebrews 8:5; Hebrews 9:1; Hebrews 13:10), of Christian worship (Romans 12:1, Philippians 3:3), and of worship in heaven (Revelation 7:15; Revelation 22:3). In Apost. Const. viii. 15, ad fin., ‘mystical λατρεία’ is used of the eucharist. But in the Septuagint , in connexion with religious worship, the group λειτουργός, λειτουργία, λειτουργεῖν is more common. The classical use of these words for the rendering of public services, or contributions to the State, at Athens, prepared the way for the religious use; and it is probable that the employment of these expressions by the writers of the NT in describing Christian worship is not entirely due to the influence of the Septuagint . Numerous papyri of about 160 b.c. or earlier show that λειτουργία and λειτουργεῖν were frequently used in Egypt in this ceremonial sense (Deissmann, Bible Studies, Eng. translation , 1901, p. 140). The different members of the triplet occur in the writings of St. Luke and St. Paul, and all three in Hebrews: e.g. Luke 1:23, Acts 13:2, Philippians 2:17, Hebrews 8:2; Hebrews 8:6; Hebrews 10:11 (see Westcott, Ep. to Hebrews, 1889, ad loc.). In his full notes on Philippians 2:17 (Philippians4, 1878) Lightfoot remarks: ‘The Philippians are the priests; their faith (or their good works springing from their faith) is the sacrifice: St. Paul’s life-blood the accompanying libation. Commentators have much confused the image, by representing St. Paul himself as the sacrificer.’ This passage is one of those which point to ‘the fundamental idea of the Christian Church, in which an universal priesthood has supplanted the exclusive ministrations of a select tribe or class.’ In the NT all Christians have in Christ that immediate access to God which is the special privilege of priests, and the sacrifices which they offer are spiritual-their wills, praises, and prayers. The priesthood belongs to Christians, not as individuals, but as members of the Church, in the ‘royal priesthood’ of which each has a share; and the sacrifice which each brings is service and self-consecration, made acceptable by union with the sacrifice offered by Christ. When certain selected individuals exercise priestly functions on behalf of the whole, they act as organs or representatives of the community. But we need to consider the point at which ‘sacrifice’ and ‘priesthood’ become metaphors.
Literature.-F. J. A. Hort, The Christian Ecclesia, 1897; T. M. Lindsay, The Church and the Ministry in the Early Centuries, 1902; A. W. F. Blunt, Studies in Apostolic Christianity, 1909; C. H. Turner, ‘The Organisation of the Church’ in The Cambridge Medieval History, i. [3] ch. vi., Studies in Early Church History, 1912; L. Duchesne, Early History of the Christian Church, ii., Eng. translation , 1912.
A. Plummer.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Minister, Ministration
MINISTER, MINISTRATION
1. ὑπηρέτης: Luke 1:2 ὑπηρέται τοῦ λόγου, Luke 4:20 ἀποδοὺς τῷ ὑπηρέτῃ.
ὑπηρέτης is originally ‘a rower’ (from ἐρέσσω,—the ὑτό pointing to his being under the direction of the κυβερνητης or steersman, who was the navigating officer: Encyc. Brit.9 [1] xxi. 808). It is commonly used in class. Gr. in the sense of ‘a doer of hard work,’ ‘an assistant’ or ‘apparitor’ or ‘inferior officer,’ but still retains the meaning of ‘one who is under the direction or control of another’ (e.g. ὑπηρέται is the term employed by Xenophon for the adjutants or orderlies of a general).
In Bibl. Greek ‘the word covers a wide range of offices,’ but still retains this meaning: e.g. Matthew 5:25 (the officer of a court of justice = πράκτωρ, Luke 12:58), Matthew 26:58, Mark 14:54; Mark 14:65, John 7:32; John 7:45-46; John 18:3; John 18:12; John 18:18; John 18:22; John 19:6, Acts 5:22; Acts 5:26 (the Temple police, or apparitors of the Sanhedrin; cf. Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv. 715b; Encyc. Bibl. iv. 4650; Swete, St. Mark, xii. 329, 335). In John 18:36 our Lord says, ‘If my kingdom were of this world, then would my ὑπηρέται (‘officers,’ (Revised Version margin) ) fight’; with which cf. (for a similar connexion of ὑπηρέται) LXX Septuagint Proverbs 14:35 δεκτὸς βασιλεῖ ὑπηρέτης νοἡμων, Wisdom of Solomon 6:5 (kings) ὑπηρέται ὄντες τῆς αὐτοῦ (i.e. God’s) βασιλείας. In Acts 26:16 ὑπηρέτην points to the service of complete subjection into which St. Paul was called to enter, when Jesus appeared to him as the Risen Lord. He and Apollos and Cephas are ὑπηρέται Χριστοῦ (1 Corinthians 4:1). Lk.’s ὑπηρέται τοῦ λόγου may be due to his having heard St. Paul use this and similar expressions, and describes the αὐτόπται τῶν πεπληροφορημένων πραγμάτων in their service of entire subjection to the gospel (here τοῦ λόγου = ‘the gospel’ as in other Lukan passages, Acts 6:2; Acts 6:4; Acts 8:4; Acts 10:44; Acts 11:19; Acts 14:25; Acts 16:6; Acts 17:11.) ‘ὑπηρέτης and διάκονος are often used interchangeably’ (Hort, Ecclesia, 210; cf. Trench, Synon. ix, (near end); Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iii. 378a).
In Luke 4:20 the ὑπηρέτης is the synagogue official called the hazzân, who during public worship ‘hands the copy of the Scriptures to the reader, and receives it back from the hands of the man who has read the final lesson.… The hazzân rolls up the Torah roll after the reading, and, after holding it up to view, deposits it in the press’ (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iv. 640b; cf. Edersheim, Life and Times of Jesus, i. 438). Chase conjectures that John Mark was originally a hazzân or synagogue attendant (Acts 13:5; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iii. 245b).
2. λειτουργία: Luke 1:23 αἱ ἡμέραι τῆς λειτουργίας αὐτοῦ, ‘the days of his ministration,’ i.e. the week during which he was on priestly duty in the Temple.
λειτουργία is of common occurrence in LXX Septuagint in the sense of ritual service (= עֲבֹדָה Numbers 8:22; Numbers 16:9; Numbers 18:4, 2 Chronicles 31:2; cf. Diod. Sic. i. 21 (of the Egyptian priesthood), τὰς τῶν θεῶν θερατείας τε καὶ λειτουργίας). At Athens the λειτουργίαι (from obsol. ἕργω = ἐργάζομαι, and λεῖτος, λήϊτος [2]) were State burdens of a peculiar kind laid on the citizens, e.g. defraying the cost of public choruses, or of the training of athletes, or of feasting one’s fellow-tribesmen (Xen. de Rep. Ath. i. 13; Becker, Charicles, sc. iv. n. [3] 23; Dict. Antiq. ii. 27). The use of λειτουργία in a ritual sense is not peculiar to LXX Septuagint , the Papyri having shown that it was common in Egypt, and in particular that the services in the Serapeum were designated by this title (Deissmann, Bible Studies, 138; cf. Moulton, Expositor, vi. vii. [4] 116).
Lk. speaks of the prophets and teachers at Antioch λειτουργούντων τῷ Κυρίῳ, by which prayers to Christ are probably meant (Acts 13:2). λειτουργεῖν and the group of words connected with it are used, as in LXX Septuagint , by the writer of Hebrews of the ministry of the tabernacle (Hebrews 9:21; Hebrews 10:11); metaphorically, of the more excellent ministry of Christ as High Priest in the heavenly sanctuary (Hebrews 8:2; Hebrews 8:6); they are also applied to the ministry of angels (Hebrews 1:7; Hebrews 1:14). St. Paul speaks of civil rulers as λειτουργοὶ θεοῦ, thus ascribing to them a sacred function (Romans 13:6). Evidently the ritual sense of this group of words is always present to the mind of the Apostle when he has occasion to use them (Romans 15:16 ‘Paul the ministering priest, the preaching of the gospel his priestly function, the believing Gentiles his offering’ [5], Romans 15:27, 2 Corinthians 9:12, Philippians 2:17 ‘the Philippians the priests, their faith the sacrifice, the apostle’s life-blood the accompanying libation’ [6], Philippians 2:25; Philippians 2:30; cf. Westcott on Hebrews 1 [1] , p. 231). Those passages also show that Christ’s ministers are sacrificing priests only in the same sense as the rest of the members of the Christian brotherhood, who render λειτουργίαι to God and to men by ‘the work of faith, and the labour of love’ (cf. Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iii. 377a; Lightfoot, Philip.2 [1] p. 182).—The application of λειτουργία to the prayers offered at the dispensation of the Lord’s Supper is a comparatively late ecclesiastical usage (Cheetham, Dict. Chris. Antiq. ii. 1018; Lightfoot, l.c. 261; Trench, Synon. xxxv).
3. διάκονος, διακονεῖν, -εῖσθαι (διηκόνουν, διηκόνησα, later impf. and aor. for ἐδιακόνουν, ἐδιακόνησα).—
The derivation of διάκονος is uncertain. If Buttmann’s conjecture is right (Lexil. i. 218), that the root of the word is an obsolete verb διακω = διώκω, it may have originally meant ‘a messenger.’ Prellwitz (Etymol. Wörterbuch, 74) connects it with = ἑγκονέω, ‘to he active,’ the long α being explained as arising from δια + α = a weak form of the ἐν in ἑγκονεω. The original meaning would then be ‘one who is quick and active in service.’ The Greek usage of the word is fully dealt with by Hort (Ecclesia, 202 ff.), who quotes, amongst other passages which bring out its menial associations, Plato, Gorg. i. 518 A, where it is said that, except gymnastics and medicine, ‘all other arts which have to do with the body are servile and menial (διακονικάς) and illiberal.’ Hort also shows that by later Greek writers it was sometimes used in a lofty figurative sense, e.g. by Epictetus, Dissertationes, iv. 7. 20, ‘For I think that what God chooses is better than what I choose. I will attach myself as a minister and follower (διάκονος καὶ ἀκόλουθος) to Him; I have the same movements as He has, I have the same desires; in a word, I have the same will (συνθελω).’ Long’s translation, 348.—‘The true proper Greek sense’ is ‘an attendant whose duty it is to wait on his master at table.’
In the Gospels, διάκονος and its derivatives are used in the sense of preparing or serving a meal, Mark 1:13 (|| Matthew 4:11), Mark 1:31 (|| Matthew 8:15, Luke 4:39), Luke 10:40; Luke 12:37; Luke 17:8, Matthew 22:13, John 2:5; John 2:9; John 12:2; in the same sense, figuratively, Mark 9:35 (not exactly || Matthew 23:11, Luke 22:26-27), Mark 10:43; Mark 10:45 (|| Matthew 20:26; Matthew 20:28), John 12:26; of ministering service generally, Luke 8:3, Mark 15:41, Matthew 27:55; Matthew 25:44. διάκονος does not occur in St. Luke, who uses ὁ διακονῶν (Luke 22:26-27).
The passages in which ‘minister,’ ‘to minister,’ are the renderings adopted in Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , are the following: (i.) Of the ministry of angels, Mark 1:13 (|| Matthew 4:11) οἱ ἄγγελοι διηκόνουν αὐτῷ, cf. Genesis 28:12, 1 Kings 19:5, Daniel 10:21, John 1:51, Luke 22:43, Hebrews 1:14, 1 Peter 1:12. Christ’s nativity. His temptation, His agony, His resurrection, His ascension, were all accompanied by their sympathetic ministrations.—(ii.) Of Peter’s wife’s mother, Mark 1:31 (|| Matthew 8:15, Luke 4:39) διηκόνει αὐτοῖς at the Sabbath meal immediately after the fever left her. ‘Et nos ministremus Jesu’ (Jerome, quoted by Swete, in loc.).—(iii.) Of the ministering women, Luke 8:3 (Mark 15:41, Matthew 27:55) αἵτινες διηκόνουν αὐτῷ [9] ἐκ τῶν ὑπαρχόντων αὐταῖς, and continued doing so till the close of Christ’s life on earth. αἵτινες (= tales quœ) may imply that they had the heart as well as the means to minister to Him. Lk. has much to tell us about the women friends of Jesus (e.g. Luke 10:38-42; Luke 11:27; Luke 23:27; Luke 24:22).—(iv.) The great sayings about service being the path to true greatness, Mark 9:35 πάντων διάκονος, ‘minister of all,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 (not exactly || Matthew 23:11, Luke 22:26-27), Mark 10:43; Mark 10:45 (Matthew 20:26; Matthew 20:28, which is followed by an extensive interpolation of a similar tenor in DΦ, Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , Ext. Vol. 345a) ἔσται ὑμῶν διάκονος … καὶ γὰρ ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου οὐκ ἦλθε διακονηθῆναι ἀλλὰ διακονῆσαι.—Promotion to true greatness is not effected by such methods as are adopted by ‘the princes of the Gentiles’ to gain or to retain supreme power; nor does it depend on an act of partiality, such as the sons of Zebedee imagined might be exercised in their favour if they applied for it in time. It is regulated by fixed spiritual laws, or by the general principle that honour comes in the Kingdom of God by disinterested love. As ‘to get pleasure you must forget it’ (Seth, Ethiopic Principles, 66; W. L. Davidson, Theism, 372), so to be great you must cease to think of greatness and humble yourself to serve others, which includes the being quick to discern and open-hearted to minister to their needs, even to the sacrificing of yourself for their good. They who shall have the highest place in God’s household are they who take the duties of its humblest member, the δοῦλος, upon themselves; and they who shall be qualified to sit down at the feast of salvation are they who fulfil the work of the διάκονος at table, who wait upon those whom God regards as His guests, and minister to their wants (cf. Menzies, Mark, 200). Jesus sets forth this principle in the most touching manner as that of His own life (cf. Acts 10:38). He is Himself the living embodiment of the truth which He teaches. In saying that He ‘came not to be ministered unto, but to minister,’ He does not mean that the ministrations He is receiving are not welcome, but He defines the main object of His sojourning in this world, and speaks of Himself not as the Guest whom the whole world will delight to honour, but as the humble attendant upon those who are in want; not as the Benefactor who is to be raised by men to the highest earthly glory, but as One who is come to serve them (seeing that on account of the state they are in there is no other way in which He can effectually and completely serve them) by the surrender of life itself (cf. Mark 15:31). This was Jesus’ path to the most exalted greatness. It led to there being given Him by God ‘the name which is above every name’ (Philippians 2:9, cf. Hebrews 2:9), and also to His receiving from man the undying homage of his heart, together with the confession of the tongue that his highest ideal of human goodness and service is now realized in Jesus. So, when we follow His example and are lifted out of ourselves by His Spirit of ministering love, everything that came to Him will come to us, according to the measure in which we, who are infinitely inferior to Him, will be found meet for it,—God’s approval of our life, increasing influence for good, that true greatness which consists in our becoming better able to elevate and bless our fellow-men (cf. Caird, Univ. Serm. 260), and to minister to them in the highest way by leading them to righteousness (Daniel 12:3), and which may also comprehend the power to minister to them in a higher state of being (cf. Matthew 25:21, Luke 19:17).* [10] —(v.) Matthew 25:44 πότε … οὐ διηκονήσαμέν σοι; those words supplement in a solemn way the sayings just commented upon. Ministering love is not only the path to true greatness, it is also the indispensable condition of future exaltation with Christ. He who ‘for our sakes became poor,’ who turned the light of His infinite pity upon the world of hunger, poverty, and misery, still calls the hungry and poor and miserable ‘His brethren,’ and accounts their cause His own. Not to have ministered to their needs is not to have ministered to His (cf. Lowell, ‘The Vision of Sir Launfal’; and ‘The Legend of St. Martin’s Cloak,’ Farrar, Lives of the Fathers, i. 630). At His coming in glory, Christ will declare His love to those who have loved, and will admit them as ‘joint-heirs with Himself’; but He will reject as unmeet for companionship with Him those who have not taken the position among their fellow-men which He showed them how to take when He said, Ἐγὼ δέ εἰμι ἐν μέσῳ ὑμῶν ὡς ὁ διακονῶν (Luke 22:27, cf. John 13:5).—These sayings of Jesus virtually create a new standard of social ethics. They give to the prophetic teaching of the OT on considerate and brotherly conduct (חֶסֶד, see W. R. Smith, Proph.1 [1] 160, 407; Driver, Sermons on OT, 221, 232) the breadth and completeness which it yet lacked. ‘If we wish to feel the contrast of the Pagan and the Christian ideals of greatness, we have only to compare the Aristotelian picture of the μεγαλόψυχος, the proud aristocrat who lives to prove his independence and superiority, with that other picture of a Life that poured itself out in the service of others’ (Seth, Ethiopic Principles, 264).
Later Stoicism ‘sometimes expressed with much warmth the recognition of the universal fellowship and natural mutual claims of human beings as such’ (Sidgwick, Hist. of Ethics, 120), but this was really inconsistent with the hard isolation of the individual that was the fundamental basis of Stoicism (Lightfoot on Philippians 2, ‘St. Paul and Seneca,’ 296), and the practical results of such teaching were small (Lecky, Europ. Morals12 [12] , ii. 78–79). Numerous coincidences are found between the teaching of Jesus and the humane sayings of Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius. But, as Lightfoot observes (l.c. 291), ‘an expression or a maxim, which detached from its context offers a striking resemblance to the ethics of the Gospel, is found to have a wholly different bearing when considered in its proper relations.’ Stoicism was wholly wanting in humility, which is the very foundation of ministering love as taught by Jesus (cf. Westcott in Smith’s DB [13] ii. 857b, iii. 1380). With Him, such love is not an occasional precept of benevolence, but, as Harnack says (What is Christianity? 98), it is ‘the religious-maxim.’
The following passages will show some of the results produced by our Lord’s teaching in Christian thought and life. There are differences of διακονίαι (1 Corinthians 12:5), but the manifold faculties for ‘the work of ministering’ are gifts from the Exalted Lord (Ephesians 4:12), and each disciple has received a gift of some kind to be laid out in Christian service (1 Peter 4:10-11). Some are called to the ministry of the word (Acts 6:4, 2 Corinthians 3:6; Acts 6:1-2, Colossians 4:17, 1 Thessalonians 3:2, 2 Timothy 4:5), to testify the gospel of the grace of God (Acts 20:24) and win men to faith (1 Corinthians 3:5); God has committed to such ‘the ministry of reconciliation’ (2 Corinthians 5:18). Some as attendants and comrades can strengthen the hands of those engaged in this work: St. Paul was thus helped by Timothy and Erastus (Acts 19:22), by Tychicus (Ephesians 6:21, Colossians 4:7), by Onesiphorus (2 Timothy 1:18), by Mark (2 Timothy 4:11), by Onesimus (Philemon 1:13). Some can render invaluable help in the local churches, as Stephanas and his household at Corinth (1 Corinthians 16:15), and Phœbe at Cenchreae (Romans 16:1). Ministering to the wants of the poor, the sick, the stranger, the prisoner, was constantly called for (2 Corinthians 6:4, Romans 12:7, Hebrews 6:10; cf. Hebrews 10:34, Revelation 2:19). A collection (two are mentioned) i
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Minister: Self-Dissatisfaction of
Swift of foot was Hiawatha, He could shoot an arrow from him, And run forward with such fleetness,
That the arrow fell behind him!'
The fable is even less than truth with the fervent preacher: he darts arrows of fire in flaming speech, but his eagerness to win souls far outruns his words. He projects himself far beyond his language. His heart outstrips his utterance. He embraces souls in his love, while his words as yet are but on the wing. Often and often will he weep when his sermon is over, because his words 'fell behind him;' yet has he cause for joy, that he should have received so divine a spirit from his Master's hand: his very dissatisfaction proves his zeal.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Minister
The sharp shrill cry of 'Acqua! Acqua!' constantly pierces the ear of the wanderer in Venice and other towns of sultry Italy. There is the man who thus invites your attention. Look at him. On his back he bears a burden of water, and in his hand a rack of bottles containing essences to flavour the draught if needed, and glasses to hold the cooling liquid. In the streets of London he would find but little patronage, but where fountains are few and the days are hot as an oven, he earns a livelihood and supplies a public need. The present specimen of water-dealers is a poor old man bent sideways, by the weight of his daily burden. He is worn out in all but his voice, which is truly startling in its sharpness and distinctness. At our call he stops immediately, glad to drop his burden on the ground, and smiling in prospect of a customer. He washes out a glass for us, fills it with sparkling water, offers us the tincture which we abhor, puts it back into the rack again when we shake our head, receives half-a-dozen soldi with manifest gratitude, and trudges away across the square, crying still, 'Acqua! Acqua!' That cry, shrill as it is, has sounded sweetly in the ears of many a thirsty soul, and will for ages yet to come, if throats and thirst survive so long. How forcibly it calls to our mind the Saviour's favourite imagery, in which he compares the grace which he bestows on all who diligently seek it, to 'living water;' and how much that old man is like the faithful preacher of the word, who, having filled his vessel at the well, wears himself out by continually bearing the burden of the Lord, and crying, 'Water! water!' amid crowds of sinners, who must drink or die. Instead of the poor Italian water-bearer, we see before us the man of God, whose voice is heard in the chief places of concourse, proclaiming the divine invitation, 'Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters!' until he grows grey in the service, ançl men say, 'Surely those aged limbs have need of rest ;' yet rest he courts not, but pursues his task of mercy; never laying down his charge till he lays down his body, and never ceasing to work until he ceases to live.
At the door of Saint Mark's Cathedral, we bought a glass of what should have been the pure element, but when we began to drink, a pungent flavour of something which had previously been in the cup, made us leave the rest of our purchase, thirsty though we were. The water was good enough, but the vessel which held it imparted an evil taste to it; the like has often happened in the ministry, the gospel preached has been true and divine, but the unhallowed savor of an inconsistent life, or a bitter disposition, has marred the sweetness of the Word. May all of us by whom the Lord hands out the water of life, see that we are clean and pure in conversation, vessels fit for the Master's use. Men who are very thirsty will drink out of any cup, however dirty; but no conceivable advantage can arise from filth, and hundreds will turn away from the water because of it, and thus a very faulty ministry may be useful because of the truth contained in it, but its sinfulness can do no good, and may serve as an excuse to the ungodly for refusing the gospel of Christ.
In the square of the Doge's palace are two wells, from which the sellers of water obtain their stock-in-trade, but we can hardly compare either of them with the overflowing spring from which the preacher of righteousness draws his supplies. One of the wells is filled artificially and is not much used for drinking, since the coldness and freshness of water springing naturally from earth's deep fountains is lacking. It is to be feared that many preachers depend for their matter upon theological systems, books, and mere learning, and hence their teaching is devoid of the living power and refreshing influence which is found in communion with 'the spring of all our joys.' The other well yields most delicious water, but its flow is scanty. In the morning it is full, but a crowd of eager persons drain it to the bottom, and during the day as it rises by driblets, every drop is contended for and borne away, long before there is enough below to fill a bucket. In its excellence, continuance and naturalness, this well might be a fair picture of the grace of our Lord Jesus, but it fails to set him forth from its poverty of supply, He has a redundance, an overflow, an infinite fulness, and there is no possibility-of his being exhausted by the draughts made upon him, even though ten thousand times ten thousand should come with a thirst as deep as the abyss. We could not help saying, 'Spring up, 0 well,' as we looked over the margin covered with copper, into which strings and ropes: continually used by the waiting many: had worn deep channels. Very little of the coveted liquid was brought up each time, but the people were patient, and their tin vessels went up and down as fast as there was a cupful to be had. 0 that men were half as diligent in securing the precious gifts of the Spirit, which are priceless beyond compare! Alas! how few have David's thirst for the well of Bethlehem. The cans sent down had very broad sides, so that they dropped down flat upon the bottom of the well, and were drawn up less than half full; larger vessels would have been useless, and so, indeed, would small ones if they had not been made to lie quite down upon their sides, along what we must call the floor of the well, and had they have been erect they would not have received a drop. Humility is always a profitable grace; pride is always as useless as it is foolish. Only by bowing our minds to the utmost before the Lord, can we expect to receive his mercy, for he promises grace unto the humble in that same verse which foretells his resistance of the proud. If there be grace anywhere, contrite hearts will get it. The lower we can fall, the sooner will the springing water of grace reach us, and the more completely shall we be filled with it.
It would be a great misfortune for those who buy their water in the streets, if the itinerant vendors should begin to fill their casks and bottles from muddy streams. At Botzen, in the Tyrol, we saw many fountains running with a liquid of a very brown colour, and a seller of such stuff might cry 'Acqua!' very long and very loudly before we should partake of his dainties. Sundry divines in our age have become weary of the old-fashioned well of which our fathers drank, and would fain have us go to their Abana and Pharpar, but we are still firm in the belief that the water from the rock has no rival, and we shall not, we hope, forsake it for any other. May the Lord send to our happy land more simple gospel, more Christ-exalting doctrine, more free-grace teaching, more distinct testimony to atoning blood and eternal love. In most of the Swiss villages there are streaming fountains by the dozen, and the pure liquid is to be had at every corner; may we yet see the Word of God as abundantly distributed in every town, village, and hamlet in England. Meanwhile, having recorded the prayer, we resolve, by divine grace, to cry more loudly than ever, 'Acqua! Acqua!'
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Paul's Blamelessness as a Minister
MOMUS himself could have found no fault with Paul. Momus found fault with everybody, with one exception. But had he lived in Paul's day Paul would surely have been a second exception to the universal fault-finding. For Paul so magnified his ministry; he so gave himself up to his ministry; he so laboured in season and out of season in his ministry; and above all he so pleased all men in all things for their good to edification; he so went about doing good and giving none offence that he lifted both his ministry and himself clear up above all the fault-finding of all fair-minded men. So much so that Paul stands next to our Divine Master Himself as a blameless model for all ministers, as well as for all other men of God. And both his own ministry and that of all his successors were so much on Paul's mind, that in every new Epistle of his he has given us something fresh and forcible as to how all ministers are to attain to a blameless ministry, till they shall be able to give a good account of their ministry, first to their people, and then to their Master.
Now immediately following the text and intended to illustrate and to enforce the text, Paul lays down a remarkable map; it is a whole atlas indeed of all his past ministry. A moral and spiritual atlas that is. It is not a chartographer's atlas of all the parishes and presbyteries and synods in which Paul has lived and laboured. It is far more interesting and far more profitable to us than that. For it is nothing less than a faithful and feeling panorama of all the outstanding states of mind and passions of heart that he and his successive congregations had come through while he lived and laboured among them. Mr. Ferrier has lately given us an excellently-scaled and a most eloquent map of the parish of Ettrick. On that impressive sheet we are shown the situation of the church and the manse; the farm-towns where all Thomas Boston's elders lived who had a brow for a good cause; the hamlets also where he held his district prayer-meetings, and so on. And every inch of that minute map is a study of the foremost importance and impressiveness for all the parish ministers of Scotland. But Paul's pastoral map bites far deeper, and with far sharper teeth, into every minister's conscience than even Boston's mordant map will bite, though it is warranted to draw ordained blood also. Paul does not engrave topographically indeed all the cities, and all the synagogues, and all the workships, in which he had lived and laboured. But he lays down with the greatest art the latitudes and the longitudes of all his trials, and temptations, and tumults as a minister. Instead of saying to us Here is Philippi, and here is Ephesus, and here is Corinth, and so on: Paul says to us Here were afflictions, and here were necessities, and here were troubles on every side. And just as in Thomas Boston's parish there are pillars and crosses set up to mark and to record to all time in Scotland his great victories won over himself, and his corresponding victories won over his people; so does Paul set up this and that great stone of ministerial remembrance and has had these instructive things engraved upon it: "by pureness, by knowledge, by long-suffering, by kindness, by the Holy Ghost, by love unfeigned, by the word of truth, by the power of God, by the armour of righteousness on the right hand and on the left." There are able and devoted divinity-students here tonight who look forward before very long to have a church and a manse and a pulpit and a people of their own. What would you say for a relaxation some day soon after the session is over to make a real geographical map of all the places where Paul was a preacher and a pastor; and then to distribute beside those sacred sites all the afflictions, the necessities, the distresses, the imprisonments, the tumults, and the labours of the text. And then on the other side of the sacred site, the pureness, the knowledge, the patience, and suchlike, by all of which your great forerunner and example-minister came out of it all having given offence in nothing, but with an everlastingly honoured name. Such an exercise, taken in time, and laid to heart in time, would surely help you to take in hand some hitherto unheard-of parish in Scotland, so as to make it an Anwoth, or an Ettrick, or suchlike. There are hundreds of parishes in Scotland up to this day absolutely nameless, but to some one of which some one of you may yet marry your name for ever, till your parish and you shall shine together for generations to come, like the brightness of the firmament, and as the stars for ever and ever. You still have it in your own hands tonight to do that. Bat in a short time it will be too late for you also. Go, my sons, in God's name and in God's strength, determined, as much as in you lies, to give your happy people disappointment in nothing, and offence in nothing, till their children shall bury your dust in your own churchyard, amid the lamentations of the whole country-side, and shall write it over your dust that you were absolutely another Apostle Paul to them, both in your preaching of Christ crucified, and in your adorning of that doctrine.
"In tumults," is Paul's own specially inserted expression; it is his own most feeling and most expressive description, for long periods and for wide spaces of his apostolic life. "In tumults," he says with special emphasis. Now we all know in what New Testament books, and in what painful chapters of those books, all those tumults are written. But it would be no profit to us to go back tonight on Paul's tumults, unless it were in order that we might the better lay our own tumults alongside of his, and lay ourselves in our tumults, alongside of Paul in his tumults. Well, then, come away, and let us do that. Come away, and let us speak plainly. What, then, have some of our tumults been, yours and mine, as minister and people, since we first knew one another? Was it Disestablishment? Was it Home Rule? Was it some heresy case? Was it the Declaratory Act? Was it the Union? Was it hymns, or organs, or standing at singing? or was it something else so utterly parochial, and petty, and paltry, that nobody, but you and I, could possibly have made a tumult out of it? Now whatever our tumult was, how did we behave ourselves in it? What are our calm thoughts about it, and about ourselves in it, now that it is all over? However it may be with you and me, it is certain that some men have gone to judgment, out of those very same tumults, with everlasting shame on their heads. How then do we stand in this matter of blame and shame? And blame and shame or no, are we any wiser men, and any better men today because of those tumults? Or after all our lessons are we just as ready for another tumult, and as ill-prepared for it as ever we were? Are we just as ill-read, and as ill-natured, and as prejudiced, and as hot-headed, and as full of pride and self-importance, as ever we were? What do you think? What do you feel? What do you say? You must surely see now, as you look back, what a splendid school for Christian character, and for Christian conduct, all those tumults were fitted, and intended of God, to be to you. Well then, how do you think you have come out of those great years in those great and costly schools? Has your temper and your character come out of those terrible furnaces like gold tried in the fire? For all those tumults whatever you may have made of them, and they of you, they were all intended to be but means to a far greater end than their own end. That is to say, they were all intended to test and try and prove you and me as both ministers and men of God, and that by the only proof we can give to God or man. The proof, that is, of patience, and purity of motive, and sufficient knowledge, and long-suffering, and love unfeigned, and the word of truth, and the power of God. And to show to all men, as Paul did, that we have not received the grace of God in vain; because, amid our greatest tumults, we have given offence in nothing, and in nothing has our ministry been to be blamed.
My brethren, you are not ministers, thank God for that. But you will let your ministers tell you what is in their hearts concerning you, and concerning themselves, as they read this too-proud chapter of Paul's. If you were all ministers I would go on to say in your name, and you would agree with me, as to what a cruel chapter this is. For once-what a heartless chapter! Was it not enough for Paul that he should enjoy his own good conscience as a minister, but he must make my conscience even more miserable than it was before? What delight can it give him to pour all this condemnation and contempt upon me and my ministry? And, did he not know, did he not take time to consider, that he was trampling upon multitudes of broken hearts? I wonder at Paul. In so scourging the proud-hearted and uplifted Corinthians he must have forgotten all us poor ministers, who, to all time, would read his blameless and boasted ministry, only to be utterly crushed by it. It was not like Paul to glory over us in that way. But let us recollect ourselves, and say that it is all right. It is not for such as we are to be puffed-up, or even to be easy-minded, or to be anything else but bruised, and broken, and full of the severest self-blame. And, therefore, we will go back upon the ruins of our ministry with this self-condemning chapter in our hands, and will recall the tumults that so wounded the Church of Christ, and so many hearts in her, and all the unpardonable part we took in those tumults, that would never have been what they were had we not been in them. Our offences without number also in our very pulpits. Oh, my brethren, the never-to-be-redeemed opportunities of our pulpits; and the lasting blame of God and our people, and our own consciences, for our misuse and neglect of our pulpits! Rock of Ages, cleft for ministers! The "unedifying converse" of our pastorate, and so on: till we take up this terrible chapter, and read it continually, deploring before God and man, to our dying day, all that Paul was, and that we were not: and all that he was not, and that we were. But, with all that is for ever lost, there is one thing left that we shall every day do; and a thing that Paul did not do, on that day at any rate, when he wrote this proud chapter. We shall every day walk about amid the ruins of our past ministry, and shall say over it-Out of the depths have I cried unto Thee, O Lord. If Thou, O Lord, shouldest mark iniquity, O Lord, who shall stand! Deliver me from blood-guiltiness, O God, Thou God of my salvation; then will I teach transgressors Thy ways; and sinners shall be converted unto Thee. There is always that left to us, and that is better for us, and far more becoming in us, than the most blameless ministry.
Thomas Goodwin, that great minister, tells us that always when he was tempted to be high-minded and to forget to fear, he was wont to go back and take a turn up and down in his unregenerate state. Now, your ministers do not need to go so far back as that. All that we need to do is to open a few pages of our Communion-rolls and visiting books, and a short turn up and down those painful pages, with some conscience, and some heart, and some imagination, will always make high-mindedness, and fearlessness, for ever impossible to us. You do not need to keep up our faults and failures and offences against us, for we never forget them for a single day. You may safely forgive us, for we shall never in this world forgive ourselves. How could we? No other man can possibly have such a retrospect of faults and failures and offences as a minister. It is impossible. The seventh of the Romans has been called the greatest tragedy that ever was written in Greek or in English. If that is so, some of our Communion-rolls and pastoral-visitation books are not far behind it. For the supreme tragedy of his own sad ministry is all written there by each remorseful minister's own hand. And such tragic things are written, or, rather, are secretly ciphered there, as to raise both pity, and fear, and terror, to all ministers, enough to suffice them for all their days on earth.
Now, you may well think that Paul has left nothing at all for you tonight, but for ministers only. Well, take this, as if Paul himself had said it. Find as little fault with your ministers as is possible. Blame them as little as you can, even when they are not wholly blameless. It is not good for yourself to do it, and it is not good for your children to hear you doing it. Be like Bacon's uncle with his family; reprehend them in private and praise them in public. That is to say, if you have a minister who will take reprehension, either in public or in private, at your hands. But, even when it must be done, do it with regret and with reverence. Be careful not to humiliate your minister overmuch. I am sure you will never intentionally insult him, however much you may have to remonstrate with him. I admit that this lesson is not literally within the four corners of the text, but it is not very far away from it.
And there is this also about offences, and faultfindings, and in a far wider field than the ministry merely. It is very humbling, when once we begin to discover it, that our very existence is an offence to so many men. We are like a stumbling-stone in their way: they fall on us and are broken, even when they could not explain or justify why that should be so; sometimes, again, our offensiveness will only be too easily explained both to them and to ourselves. But, at other times, they will need to go down into their own hearts for the real root of all this bitterness. And, then, when they do that, you will not be much more troubled with your offensiveness to them, or with their hostility to you. At the same time, walk you softly, as long as you are in this life. It is a dreadful thing to be the cause, guilty or innocent, of another man's stumbles and falls. "Love to be well out of sight," was the motto of more than one of the great saints. And, though that does not sound at first sight like great saintliness, yet it is. There are few better evidences of great and sure saintship, than just to "seek obscurity" for such reasons as the above. Keep out of people's eyes, and ears, and feet, and tongues then, as much as you can, and as long as you continue to cause so many men to stumble, and to fall, and to be broken over you.
And, then, both ministers, and all manner of men, never allow yourselves to answer again, when you are blamed. Never defend yourself. Let them reprehend you, in private or in public, as much as they please. Let the righteous smite you: it shall be a kindness: and let him reprove you: it shall be an excellent oil, which shall not break your head. Never so much as explain your meaning, under any invitation or demand whatsoever. They just wish to pick a quarrel with you, and you have something else to do. Now, I always like to seal down such a great lesson as this by some great name. A great name impresses the most hardened hearer. And I will seal down this great lesson by this out of a truly great name. "It is a mark of the deepest and truest humility," says a great saint, "to see ourselves condemned without cause, and to be silent under it. To be silent under insult and wrong is a very noble imitation of our Lord. O my Lord, when I remember in how many ways Thou didst suffer detraction and misrepresentation, who in no way deserved it, I know not where my senses are when I am in such a haste to defend and excuse myself. Is it possible I should desire any one to speak any good of me, or to think it, when so many ill things were thought and spoken of Thee! What is this, Lord what do we imagine to get by pleasing worms, or by being praised by creeping things! What about being blamed by all men, if only we stand at last blameless before Thee!"
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Minister
A name applied to those who are pastors of a congregation, or preachers of God's word. They are also called divines, and may be distinguished into polemic, or those who possess controversial talents; casuistic, or those who resolve cases of conscience; experimental, those who address themselves to the feelings, cases, and circumstances of their hearers; and, lastly, practical, those who insist upon the performance of all those duties which the word of God enjoins. An able minister will have something of all these united in him, though he may not excel in all; and it becomes every one who is a candidate for the ministry to get a clear idea of each, that he may not be deficient in the discharge of that work which is the most important that can be sustained by mortal beings. Many volumes have been written on this subject, but we must be content in this place to offer only a few remarks relative to it. In the first place, then, it must be observed, that ministers of the Gospel ought to be sound as to their principles. They must be men whose hearts are renovated by divine grace, and whose sentiments are derived from the sacred oracles of divine truth. A minister without principles will never do any good; and he who professes to believe in a system, should see to it that it accords with the word of God. His mind should clearly perceive the beauty, harmony, and utility of the doctrines, while his heart should be deeply impressed with a sense of their value and importance.
2. They should be mild and affable as to their dispositions and deportment.
A haught imperious spirit is a disgrace to the ministerial character, and generally brings contempt. They should learn to bear injuries with patience, and be ready to do good to every one; be courteous to all without cringing to any; be affable without levity, and humble without pusillanimity; conciliating the affections without violating the truth; connecting a suavity of manners with a dignity of character, obliging without flattery; and throwing off all reserve without running into the opposite extreme of volubility and trifling.
3. They should be superior as to their knowledge and talents. Though many have been useful without what is called learning, yet none have been so without some portion of knowledge and wisdom. Nor has God Almighty ever sanctified ignorance, or consecrated it to his service; since it is the effect of the fall, and the consequence of our departure from the Fountain of intelligence. Ministers, therefore, especially, should endeavour to break these shackles, get their minds enlarged, and stored with all useful knowledge. The Bible should be well studied, and that, if possible, in the original language. The scheme of salvation by Jesus Christ should be well understood, with all the various topics connected with it. Nor will some knowledge of history, natural philosophy, logic, mathematics, and rhetoric, be useless. A clear judgment, also, with a retentive memory, inventive faculty, and a facility of communication should be obtained.
4. They should be diligent as to their studies. Their time especially should be improved, and not lost by too much sleep, formal visits, indolence, reading useless books, studying useless subjects. Every day should have its work, and every subject its due attention. Some advise a chapter in the Hebrew Bible, and another in the Greek Testament, to be read every day. A well-chosen system of divinity should be accurately studied. The best definitions should be obtained, and a constant regard paid to all those studies which savour of religion, and have some tendency to public work.
5. Ministers should be extensive as to their benevolence and candour. A contracted bigoted spirit ill becomes those who preach a Gospel which breathes the purest benevolence to mankind. This spirit has done more harm among all parties than many imagine; and is, in my opinion, one of the most powerful engines the devil makes use of to oppose the best interests of mankind; and it is really shocking to observe how sects and parties have all, in their turns, anethematized each other. Now, while ministers ought to contend earnestly for the faith once delivered to the saints, they must remember that men always will think different from each other; that prejudice of education has great influence; that difference of opinion as to non-essential things is not of such importance as to be a ground of dislike. Let the ministers of Christ, then, pity the weak, forgive the ignorant, bear with the sincere though mistaken zealot, and love all who love the Lord Jesus Christ.
6. Ministers should be zealous and faithful in their public work. The sick must be visited; children must be catechised; the ordinances administered; and the word of God preached. These things must be taken up, not as a matter of duty only, but of pleasure, and executed with faithfulness; and, as they are of the utmost importance, ministers should attend to them with all that sincerity, earnestness, and zeal which that importance demands. An idle, frigid, indifferent minister is a pest to society, a disgrace to his profession, an injury to the church, and offensive to God himself.
7. Lastly, ministers should be uniform as to their conduct. No brightness of talent, no superiority of intellect, no extent of knowledge, will ever be a substitute for this. They should not only possess a luminous mind, but set a good example. This will procure dignity to themselves, give energy to what they say, and prove a blessing to the circle in which they move. In fine, they should be men of prudence and prayer, light and love, zeal and knowledge, courage and humility, humanity and religion.
See DECLAMATION. ELOQUENCE, PREACHING, and SERMONS, in this work; Dr. Smith's Lect. on the Sacred Office; Gerard's Pastoral Care; Macgill's Address to Young Clergymen; Chrysostom on the Priesthood; Baxter's Reformed Pastor; Burnett's Pastoral Care; Watt's Humble Attempt; Dr. Edwards's Preacher; Mason's Student and Pastor; Gibbon's Christian Minister; Mather's Student and Preacher; Osterwald's Lectures on the Sacred Ministry; Robinson's Claude; Doddridge's Lectures on Preaching and the Ministeral Office.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Minister, Serve
A. Verb.
Shârath (שָׁרַת, Strong's #8334), “to minister, serve, officiate.” This word is a common term in Hebrew usage, ancient and modern, in various verbal and noun forms. It occurs in ancient Phoenician, and some see it in ancient Ugaritic as well. Shârath is found just under 100 times in the Hebrew Old Testament. The first time it is used in the Hebrew Bible is in the story of Joseph as he becomes the slave of Potiphar: “And Joseph found grace in his sight, and he served [1] him …” (Gen. 39:4).
As a term for serving or ministering, shârath is to be distinguished from the term for more menial serving, ‘abad, from which the word meaning “slave” or “servant” is derived. Shârath is characteristically used of “serving” done by royal household workers (2 Sam. 13:17; 1 Kings 10:5). In the manner of the modern “public servant” idea, the word is used in reference to court officials and royal servants (1 Chron. 27:1; 28:1; Esth. 1:10).
Elisha “ministered” to Elijah (1 Kings 19:21). Foreign kings are “to minister” to God’s people (Isa. 60:10).
This term is used most frequently as the special term for service in worship. The Levitical priests “stand before the Lord to minister unto him” (Deut. 10:8). They also are “to stand before the congregation to minister unto them” (Num. 16:9). In the post-exilic temple, the Levites who had earlier “ministered” in idolatry will not be allowed “to serve” as priests but rather as maintenance workers in the temple (Ezek. 44:11-14).
B. Noun.
Shârath (שָׁרַת, Strong's #8334), “minister; servant.” The noun form of the verb appears several times meaning “minister” or “servant.” As Moses’ right-hand man Joshua is referred to as “minister” (KJV), “servant” (RSV, JB, NASB), “assistant” (NEB), or “aide” (NAB) in Exod. 24:13. Angels are God’s “ministers … that do his pleasure” (Ps. 103:21; cf. Ps. 104:4).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Minister
The word commonly occurring in the O.T. is sharath, 'to minister, serve.' Joshua was Moses' minister. All God's hosts are called 'ministers of his, that do his pleasure,' and He maketh 'his ministers a flaming fire.' The priests were the ministers of Jehovah. Joshua 1:1 ; Psalm 103:21 ; Psalm 104:4 ; Joel 2:17 . In the N.T. three words are used.
1. διάκονος. See DEACON.
2. λειτουργός, a public servant,' one holding an official position. It is applied to the Lord; to angels; to Paul; and to magistrates. Romans 13:6 ; Romans 15:16 ; Hebrews 1:7 . Hebrews 8:2 .
3. ὑπηρέτης, lit. 'under-rower,' and so an 'attendant' on, or 'assistant ' to a superior authority. Luke 1:2 ; Luke 4:20 ; Acts 13:5 ; Acts 26:16 ; 1 Corinthians 4:1 . It is also translated 'officer' and 'servant.'
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Minister
one who attends or waits on another; so we find Elisha was the minister of Elijah, and did him services of various kinds, 2 Kings 3:11 . So Joshua was the servant of Moses, Exodus 24:13 ; Exodus 33:11 . And these persons did not by any means feel themselves degraded by their stations, but in due time they succeeded to the offices of their masters. In like manner John Mark was minister to Paul and Barnabas, Acts 13:5 . Christ is called a minister of the true, that is, the heavenly, sanctuary. The minister of the synagogue was appointed to keep the book of the law, to observe that those who read it, read it correctly, &c, Luke 4:20 . The rabbins say he was the same as the angel of the church or overseer. Lightfoot says, Baal Aruch expounds the chazan, or minister of the congregation, by sheliach hatzibbor, or angel of the congregation; and from this common platform and constitution of the synagogue, we may observe the Apostle's expression of some elders ruling and labouring in word and doctrine, others in the general affairs of the synagogue. Ministers were servants, yet servants not menial, but honourable; those who explain the word, and conduct the service of God; those who dispense the laws and promote the welfare of the community; the holy angels who in obedience to the divine commands protect, preserve, succour, and benefit the godly, are all ministers, beneficial ministers, to those who are under their charge, Hebrews 8:2 ; Exodus 30:10 ; Leviticus 16:15 ; 1 Corinthians 4:1 ; Romans 13:6 ; Psalms 104:4 .
Webster's Dictionary - Minister
(1):
(v. i.) To act as a servant, attendant, or agent; to attend and serve; to perform service in any office, sacred or secular.
(2):
(v. i.) To supply or to things needful; esp., to supply consolation or remedies.
(3):
(n.) One who serves at the altar; one who performs sacerdotal duties; the pastor of a church duly authorized or licensed to preach the gospel and administer the sacraments.
(4):
(n.) To furnish or apply; to afford; to supply; to administer.
(5):
(n.) One to whom the sovereign or executive head of a government intrusts the management of affairs of state, or some department of such affairs.
(6):
(n.) An officer of justice.
(7):
(n.) A servant; a subordinate; an officer or assistant of inferior rank; hence, an agent, an instrument.
(8):
(n.) A representative of a government, sent to the court, or seat of government, of a foreign nation to transact diplomatic business.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Minister
One who attends or waits on another, Matthew 20:28 ; so Elisha was the minister of Elijah, 1 Kings 19:21 2 Kings 3:11 . These persons did not feel themselves degraded by their stations, and in due time they succeeded to the office of their masters. In like manner, John Mark was minister to Paul and Barnabas, Acts 13:5 . Angels are ministers of God and of his people, Psalm 103:21 Hebrews 1:14 . The term is applied to one who performs any function, or administers any office or agency: as to magistrates, Romans 15:16 1 Corinthians 4:1 5:5 ; and to teachers of error, 2 Corinthians 11:15 . Christ came to minister, not to be ministered unto; and is called in another sense a minister "of the circumcision," Romans 15:8 , and of the heavenly sanctuary, Hebrews 8:2 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Minister
This term is used in the Authorized Version to describe various officials of a religious and civil character. Its meaning, as distinguished from servant, is a voluntary attendant on another. In the Old Testament it is applied (1) to an attendance upon a person of high rank, (Exodus 24:13 ; Joshua 1:1 ; 2 Kings 4:43 ) (2) to the attaches of a royal court, ( 1 Kings 10:5 ; 2 Chronicles 22:8 ) comp. Psal 104:4 (3) To the priests and Levites. (Ezra 8:17 ; Nehemiah 10:36 ; Isaiah 61:6 ; Ezekiel 44:11 ; Joel 1:9,13 ) One term in the New Testament betokens a subordinate public administrator, (Romans 13:6 ; 15:16 ; Hebrews 8:2 ) one who performs certain gratuitous public services. A second term contains the idea of actual and personal attendance upon a superior, as in (Luke 4:20 ) The minister's duty was to open and close the building, to produce and replace the books employed in the service, and generally to wait on the officiating priest or teacher. A third term, diakonos (from which comes our word deacon), is the one usually employed in relation to the ministry of the gospel: its application is twofold, --in a general sense to indicate ministers of any order, whether superior or inferior, and in a special sense to indicate an order of inferiors ministers. [1]
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Minister
A — 1: διάκονος (Strong's #1249 — Noun — diakonos — dee-ak'-on-os ) "a servant, attendant, minister, deacon," is translated "minister" in Mark 10:43 ; Romans 13:4 (twice); 15;8; 1 Corinthians 3:5 ; 2 Corinthians 3:6 ; 6:4 ; 11:15 (twice); 15:8; 2:17; Ephesians 6:21 ; Colossians 1:7,23,25 ; 4:7 ; 1 Thessalonians 3:2 ; 1 Timothy 4:6 . See DEACON.
A — 2: λειτουργός (Strong's #3011 — Noun Masculine — leitourgos — li-toorg-os' ) denoted among the Greeks, firstly, "one who discharges a public office at his own expense," then, in general, "a public servant, minister." In the NT it is used (a) of Christ, as a "Minister of the sanctuary" (in the Heavens), Hebrews 8:2 ; (b) of angels, Hebrews 1:7 ( Psalm 104:4 ); (c) of the Apostle Paul, in his evangelical ministry, fulfilling it as a serving-priest, Romans 15:16 ; that he used it figuratively and not in an ecclesiastical sense, is obvious from the context; (d) of Epaphroditus, as ministering to Paul's needs on behalf of the church at Philippi, Philippians 2:25 ; here, representative service is in view; (e) of earthly rulers, who though they do not all act consciously as servants of God, yet discharge functions which are the ordinance of God, Romans 13:6 .
A — 3: ὑπηρέτης (Strong's #5257 — Noun Masculine — huperetes — hoop-ay-ret'-ace ) properly "an under rower" (hupo, "under," eretes, "a rower"), as distinguished from nautes, "a seaman" (a meaning which lapsed from the word), hence came to denote "any subordinate acting under another's direction;" in Luke 4:20 , RV, "attendant," AV, "minister" it signifies the attendant at the synagogue service; in Acts 13:5 , it is said of John Mark, RV, "attendant," AV, "minister," in Acts 26:16 , "a minister," it is said of Paul as a servant of Christ in the Gospel; so in 1 Corinthians 4:1 , where the Apostle associates others with himself, as Apollos and Cephas, as "ministers of Christ." See ATTEND , C, OFFICER.
Note: Other synonomous nouns are doulos, "a bondservant;" oiketes, "a household servent;" misthios, "a hired servant;" misthotos (ditto); pais, "a boy, a household servant." For all these see SERVANT. Speaking broadly, diakonos views a servant in relation to his work; doulos, in relation to his master; huperetes, in relation to his superior; leitourgos, in relation to public service.
B — 1: διακονέω (Strong's #1247 — Verb — diakoneo — dee-ak-on-eh'-o ) akin to A, No. 1, signifies "to be a servant, attendant, to serve, wait upon, minister." In the following it is translated "to minister," except where "to serve" is mentioned: it is used (a) with a general significance, e.g., Matthew 4:11 ; 20:28 ; Mark 1:13 ; 10:45 ; John 12:26 ("serve," twice); Acts 19:22 ; Philemon 1:13 ; (b) of waiting at table, "ministering" to the guests, Matthew 8:15 ; Luke 4:39 ; 8:3 ; 12:37 ; 17:8 , "serve;" Matthew 22:26 , "serve," Matthew 22:27 , "serveth," twice; the 2nd instance, concerning the Lord, may come under (a); so of women preparing food, etc., Mark 1:31 ; Luke 10:40 , "serve;" John 12:2 , "served;" (c) of relieving one's necessities, supplying the necessaries of life, Matthew 25:44 ; 27:55 ; Mark 15:41 ; Acts 6:2 , "serve;" Romans 15:25 ; Hebrews 6:10 ; more definitely in connection with such service in a local church, 1 Timothy 3:10,13 , [1]; (d) of attending, in a more general way, to anything that may serve another's interests, as of the work of an amanuensis, 2 Corinthians 3:3 (metaphorical): of the conveyance of materials gifts of assisting the needy, 2 Corinthians 8:19,20 , RV, "is ministered" (AV, "is administered"); of a variety of forms of service, 2 Timothy 1:18 ; of the testimony of the OTs prophets, 1 Peter 1:12 ; of the ministry of believers one to another in various ways, 1 Peter 4:10,11 (not here of discharging ecclesiastical functions).
Note: In Hebrews 1:14 , AV (2nd part), the phrase eis diakonian is translated "to minister," RV, "to do service," lit., "for service;" for the noun "ministering" in the 1st part, see MINISTERING , B.
B — 2: λειτουργέω (Strong's #3008 — Verb — leitourgeo — li-toorg-eh'-o ) (akin to A, No. 2), in classical Greek, signified at Athens "to supply public offices at one's own cost, to render public service to the State;" hence, generally, "to do service," said, e.g., of service to the gods. In the NT (see Note below) it is used (a) of the prophets and teachers in the church at Antioch, who "ministered to the Lord," Acts 13:2 ; (b) of the duty of churches of the Gentiles to "minister" in "carnal things" to the poor Jewish saints at Jerusalem, in view of the fact that the former had "been made partakers" of the "spiritual things" of the latter, Romans 15:27 ; (c) of the official service of priests and Levites under the Law, Hebrews 10:11 (in the Sept., e.g., Exodus 29:30 ; Numbers 16:9 ).
Note: The synonymous verb latreuo (properly, "to serve for hire"), which is used in the Sept. of the service of both priests and people (e.g., Exodus 4:3 ; Deuteronomy 10:12 , and in the NT, e.g., Hebrews 8:5 ), and, in the NT, of Christians in general, e.g., Revelation 22:3 , is to be distinguished from leitourgeo, which has to do with the fulfillment of an office, the discharge of a function, something of a representative character (Eng., "liturgy").
B — 3: ὑπηρετέω (Strong's #5256 — Verb — hupereteo — hoop-ay-ret-eh'-o ) "to do the service of a huperetes" (see A, No. 3), properly, "to serve as a rower on a ship," is used (a) of David, as serving the counsel of God in his own generation, Acts 13:36 , RV, expressive of the lowly character of his service for God; (b) of Paul's toil in working with his hands, and his readiness to avoid any pose of ecclesiastical superiority, Acts 20:34 ; (c) of the service permitted to Paul's friends to render to him, 24:23.
B — 4: ἱερουργέω (Strong's #2418 — Verb — hierourgeo — hee-er-oorg-eh'-o ) "to minister in priestly service" (akin to hierourgos, "a sacrificing priest," a word not found in the Sept. or NT: from hieros, "sacred," and ergon, "work"), is used by Paul metaphorically of his ministry of the Gospel, Romans 15:16 ; the offering connected with his priestly ministry is "the offering up of the Gentiles," i.e., the presentation by Gentile converts of themselves to God. The Apostle uses words proper to the priestly and Levitical ritual, to explain metaphorically his own priestly service. Cp. prosphora, "offering up," and leitourgos, in the same verse.
B — 5: παρέχω (Strong's #3930 — Verb — parecho — par-ekh'-o ) "to furnish, provide, supply," is translated "minister" in 1 Timothy 1:4 , of the effect of "fables and endless genealogies." See BRING , A, No. 21.
B — 6: ἐργάζομαι (Strong's #2038 — Verb — ergazomai — er-gad'-zom-ahee ) "to work, work out, perform," is translated "minister" in 1 Corinthians 9:13 ; the verb is frequently used of business, or employment, and here the phrase means "those employed in sacred things" or "those who are assiduous in priestly functions." See COMMIT , A, No. 1.
Notes: (1) The verb choregeo, rendered "minister" in the AV of 2 Corinthians 9:10 , and the strengthened form epichoregeo, rendered by the same verb in the AV of 2 Corinthians 9:10 ; Galatians 3:5 ; Colossians 2:19 ; 2 Peter 1:11 , in 2 Peter 1:5 , "add," are always translated "to supply" in the RV. Both verbs suggest an abundant supply, and are used of material or of spiritual provision. See SUPPLY. (2) In Ephesians 4:29 , AV, didomi, "to give," is translated "minister" (RV, "give").
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Assistant Minister
A Priest or Deacon appointed to assist or helpthe Rector of a Parish in his work is thus called. Lately theterm "Curate" has been employed to designate the Assistant Ministerof a Parish.

Sentence search

Charge d'Affaires - ) A diplomatic representative, or Minister of an inferior grade, accredited by the government of one state to the Minister of foreign affairs of another; also, a substitute, ad interim, for an ambassador or Minister plenipotentiary
Premier - ) The first Minister of state; the prime Minister. ) First; chief; principal; as, the premier place; premier Minister
Minister - A title given to the superiors of some religious orders or of a district of the same, such as the Minister general and Minister provincial of the Franciscans, of the Trinitarians; the second in authority in Jesuit communities; one authorized to administer the sacraments, e. , the Minister of baptism
Clergyman - ) An ordained Minister; a man regularly authorized to preach the gospel, and administer its ordinances; in England usually restricted to a Minister of the Established Church
Divine - It also signifies a Minister, or clergyman. ...
See Minister
Minister - Moses rose up and his Minister Joshua. One to whom a king or prince entrusts the direction of affairs of state as Minister of state the prime Minister. In modern governments, the secretaries or heads of the several departments or branches of government are the Ministers of the chief magistrate. For he is the Minister of God to thee for good. One who serves at the altar one who performs sacerdotal duties the pastor of a church, duly authorized or licensed to preach the gospel and administer the sacraments. Christ is called a Minister of the sanctuary. Who maketh his angels spirits, his Ministers a flaming fire. ...
He that Ministereth seed to the sower--2 Corinthians 9 ...
That it may Minister grace to the hearers. ...
I will sanctify also both Aaron and his sons, to Minister to me in the priest's office. When saw we thee hungry, or thirsty, or a stranger, or naked, or sick, or in prison, and did not Minister unto thee? ...
Matthew 25 ...
2. Canst thou not Minister to a mind diseased? ...
In this sense, we commonly use administer
Ministered - ) of Minister...
Ministryship - ) The office of a Minister
Ministering - ) of Minister...
Deacon - , a Minister or servant
Minister - One who attends or waits on another, Matthew 20:28 ; so Elisha was the Minister of Elijah, 1 Kings 19:21 2 Kings 3:11 . In like manner, John Mark was Minister to Paul and Barnabas, Acts 13:5 . Angels are Ministers of God and of his people, Psalm 103:21 Hebrews 1:14 . The term is applied to one who performs any function, or administers any office or agency: as to magistrates, Romans 15:16 1 Corinthians 4:1 5:5 ; and to teachers of error, 2 Corinthians 11:15 . Christ came to Minister, not to be Ministered unto; and is called in another sense a Minister "of the circumcision," Romans 15:8 , and of the heavenly sanctuary, Hebrews 8:2
Donatism - Donatism was the error taught by Donatus, bishop of Casae Nigrae that the effectiveness of the sacraments depends on the moral character of the Minister. In other words, if a Minister who was involved in a serious enough sin were to baptize a person, that baptism would be considered invalid
Underminister - ) To serve, or Minister to, in a subordinate relation
Administer, Administration - * For the AV ADMINISTER and ADMINISTRATION see Minister and MINISTRATION, SERVE , and SERVICE
Ministerially - ) In a Ministerial manner; in the character or capacity of a Minister
Preacher - ...
See articles DECLAMATION, ELOQUENCE, Minister, and SERMON
Assistant Priest - Minister highest in dignity who attends bishops and certain privileged prelates in pontifical functions
Form, Sacramental - The form is composed of words pronounced by the Minister over the matter, thereby determining the matter and raising it to the dignity of a sacramental sign, capable of giving grace from the institution of Christ; e. , "I baptize thee," pronounced as the Minister pours water on the head of a person
Sacramental Form - The form is composed of words pronounced by the Minister over the matter, thereby determining the matter and raising it to the dignity of a sacramental sign, capable of giving grace from the institution of Christ; e. , "I baptize thee," pronounced as the Minister pours water on the head of a person
Minister, Serve - ...
Shârath (שָׁרַת, Strong's #8334), “to Minister, serve, officiate. ...
As a term for serving or Ministering, shârath is to be distinguished from the term for more menial serving, ‘abad, from which the word meaning “slave” or “servant” is derived. ...
Elisha “ministered” to Elijah (1 Kings 19:21). Foreign kings are “to Minister” to God’s people ( Minister unto him” ( Minister unto them” (
Shârath (שָׁרַת, Strong's #8334), “minister; servant. ” The noun form of the verb appears several times meaning “minister” or “servant. ” As Moses’ right-hand man Joshua is referred to as “minister” (KJV), “servant” (RSV, JB, NASB), “assistant” (NEB), or “aide” (NAB) in
Administration of the Sacraments - The act of the Minister in conferring the sacraments on the individual faithful for the sanctification of souls. Since the whole efficacy of the sacraments is from Christ, the Minister administers them in His name and by authority. As the chief means of sanctification, they are to be administered to the faithful frequently, while the faithful on their part are to receive them with reverence and holy dispositions
Sacraments, Administration of the - The act of the Minister in conferring the sacraments on the individual faithful for the sanctification of souls. Since the whole efficacy of the sacraments is from Christ, the Minister administers them in His name and by authority. As the chief means of sanctification, they are to be administered to the faithful frequently, while the faithful on their part are to receive them with reverence and holy dispositions
Minister - Minister. The word ‘minister’ comes from the Lat. Minister = ‘ servant ,’ and generally it may be said that wherever it is found in the Bible, whether in OT or in NT, its original meaning is its primary one, service being the idea it is specially meant to convey. ]'>[1] ‘minister,’ three of which call for notice. ]'>[2] has properly substituted ‘ attendant ’ for ‘minister’ to avoid misconception. The ‘minister’ ( Luke 4:20 ) to whom Jesus handed the roll in the synagogue at Nazareth was the hazzan , corresponding to the English verger or Scotch beadle. John Mark ( Acts 13:5 ) was the Minister of Barnabas and Saul in the same sense as Joshua was of Moses, he was their attendant and assistant. In the other cases hypçretçs is used of the Minister of Christ or of the word in a sense that is hardly distinguishable from that of diakonos as under. Even more significant than the uses to which leitourgos and its cognates are put in the NT is the fact that they are used so seldom, and that diakonos and diakonia are found instead when the ideas of Minister and ministry are to be expressed. This corresponds with the other fact that the priesthood of a selected class has been superseded by a universal Christian priesthood, and that a ministry of lowliness and serviceableness (which diakonos specially implies) has taken the place of the old ministry of exclusive privilege and ritual performance, diakonia is the distinctive Christian word for ‘ministry,’ and diakonos for ‘minister. The man who serves and follows Christ is His Minister ( John 12:26 ; ‘my diakonos ’ is the expression in the original); and the Minister of Christ will not fail to Minister also to the brethren ( 1 Corinthians 12:5 , 1 Peter 4:10 ). But while every true Christian is a Minister of Christ and of the brethren, there is a ministry of particular service out of which there gradually emerges the idea of a special Christian ministry. We may find the roots of the idea in our Lord’s words to His disciples, ‘Whosoever would become great among you shall be your Minister, … even as the Son of man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’ ( Matthew 20:26 ff. The Minister at first was one who was distinguished from others by his larger services. There were differences of function, indeed, and, above all, the distinction between those who were Ministers of the word ( Act 6:4 , 2 Corinthians 3:6 , Ephesians 3:6-7 ) and those who Ministered by gracious deed ( Acts 6:1 ff. But diakonos still continues to be used in its wider sense, for Timothy, who was much more than a deacon, is exhorted to be ‘a good Minister ( diakonos ) of Jesus Christ’ ( 1 Timothy 4:6 )
Deacon - (Greek: diakonos, Minister) ...
The highest of those in major orders but the lowest in rank of the hierarchical orders instituted by Christ. The Roman Pontifical states his duties thus: to Minister to the altar, to baptize, to preach
Legation - ) A legate, or envoy, and the persons associated with him in his mission; an embassy; or, in stricter usage, a diplomatic Minister and his suite; a deputation. ) The place of business or official residence of a diplomatic Minister at a foreign court or seat of government
Holiness Church, the - Organized in California in 1896 under the leadership of Reverend Hardin Wallace, a Minister of the Free Methodist Church
Ministrant - ) Performing service as a Minister; attendant on service; acting under command; subordinate. ) One who Ministers
Epistoler - The Minister who reads the Epistle for the day and actsas sub-deacon at the Celebration of the Holy Eucharist
Seraskier - ) A general or commander of land forces in the Turkish empire; especially, the commander-in-chief of Minister of war
Mazarine - ) Of or pertaining to Cardinal Mazarin, prime Minister of France, 1643-1661
Officer - In New Testament used to translated hufretes "minister" (Matthew 5:25), and practor "exacter" or "officer of the court," only in Luke 12:58
Major-Domo - ) A man who has authority to act, within certain limits, as master of the house; a steward; also, a chief Minister or officer
Intention For the Sacraments - The Minister of a sacrament must determine the purpose of his action by an act of his will, called intention. Therefore for a valid sacrament, the Minister must have the intention of making and administering a sacrament, "at least of doing what the Church does"
Barber, Chloe - Virgil Barber (1782-1847), an Episcopalian Minister, son of Daniel Barber (1756-1834), likewise a Minister, became a Catholic in 1817, together with his wife and five children
Barber, Daniel - Virgil Barber (1782-1847), an Episcopalian Minister, son of Daniel Barber (1756-1834), likewise a Minister, became a Catholic in 1817, together with his wife and five children
Barber Family - Virgil Barber (1782-1847), an Episcopalian Minister, son of Daniel Barber (1756-1834), likewise a Minister, became a Catholic in 1817, together with his wife and five children
Barber, Virgil - Virgil Barber (1782-1847), an Episcopalian Minister, son of Daniel Barber (1756-1834), likewise a Minister, became a Catholic in 1817, together with his wife and five children
Sacraments, Intention For the - The Minister of a sacrament must determine the purpose of his action by an act of his will, called intention. Therefore for a valid sacrament, the Minister must have the intention of making and administering a sacrament, "at least of doing what the Church does"
Cuttystool - ) A seat in old Scottish churches, where offenders were made to sit, for public rebuke by the Minister
Minister - one who attends or waits on another; so we find Elisha was the Minister of Elijah, and did him services of various kinds, 2 Kings 3:11 . In like manner John Mark was Minister to Paul and Barnabas, Acts 13:5 . Christ is called a Minister of the true, that is, the heavenly, sanctuary. The Minister of the synagogue was appointed to keep the book of the law, to observe that those who read it, read it correctly, &c, Luke 4:20 . Lightfoot says, Baal Aruch expounds the chazan, or Minister of the congregation, by sheliach hatzibbor, or angel of the congregation; and from this common platform and constitution of the synagogue, we may observe the Apostle's expression of some elders ruling and labouring in word and doctrine, others in the general affairs of the synagogue. Ministers were servants, yet servants not menial, but honourable; those who explain the word, and conduct the service of God; those who dispense the laws and promote the welfare of the community; the holy angels who in obedience to the divine commands protect, preserve, succour, and benefit the godly, are all Ministers, beneficial Ministers, to those who are under their charge, Hebrews 8:2 ; Exodus 30:10 ; Leviticus 16:15 ; 1 Corinthians 4:1 ; Romans 13:6 ; Psalms 104:4
Diotrephes - An influential member, perhaps Minister, of some early church, censured by John for his jealous ambition, and his violent rejection of the best Christians, 3 John 1:9,10
Abarbanel, rabbi don isaac - 1437-1508; Portugal, Spain and Venice; leader of Spanish Jewry and Minister to the king of Spain, exiled in the expulsion of 1492; author of commentary on Torah...
Versicle - ) A little verse; especially, a short verse or text said or sung in public worship by the priest or Minister, and followed by a response from the people
Parmenas - He is one of the ‘Hellenist’ Seven ordained to Minister to the Hellenist widows (Acts 6:5)
Damien, Father - Member of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, he was sent to Hawaii where he became resident priest in the leper reserve at Molokai, and for years was the only person to Minister to their spiritual and medical wants. His name was attacked by a Presbyterian Minister named Hyde, and brilliantly vindicated by Robert Louis Stevenson in a philippic entitled "Father Damien" (Notre Dame, Indiana, 1911)
Father Damien - Member of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, he was sent to Hawaii where he became resident priest in the leper reserve at Molokai, and for years was the only person to Minister to their spiritual and medical wants. His name was attacked by a Presbyterian Minister named Hyde, and brilliantly vindicated by Robert Louis Stevenson in a philippic entitled "Father Damien" (Notre Dame, Indiana, 1911)
Joseph de Veuster, Blessed - Member of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, he was sent to Hawaii where he became resident priest in the leper reserve at Molokai, and for years was the only person to Minister to their spiritual and medical wants. His name was attacked by a Presbyterian Minister named Hyde, and brilliantly vindicated by Robert Louis Stevenson in a philippic entitled "Father Damien" (Notre Dame, Indiana, 1911)
Veuster, Joseph de, Blessed - Member of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, he was sent to Hawaii where he became resident priest in the leper reserve at Molokai, and for years was the only person to Minister to their spiritual and medical wants. His name was attacked by a Presbyterian Minister named Hyde, and brilliantly vindicated by Robert Louis Stevenson in a philippic entitled "Father Damien" (Notre Dame, Indiana, 1911)
Charge - Among the Dissenters, it is a sermon preached to a Minister at his ordination, generally by some aged or respectable preacher
Padre - ) In India (from the Portuguese), any Christian Minister; also, a priest of the native region
Embassador - ) A Minister of the highest rank sent to a foreign court to represent there his sovereign or country
Artemas - Apparently a faithful Minister, cooperating with Paul, Titus 3:12 , who thought him worthy to take the place of Titus at Crete, while the latter spent the winter with the apostle at Nicopolis
Phoebe - ” “Servant,” “minister” (REB), “deaconess” (NAS, NIV note), or “deacon” (NRSV) of church at Cenchrea whom Paul recommended to church at Rome (Romans 16:1-2 )
Obnoxious - ) Offensive; odious; hateful; as, an obnoxious statesman; a Minister obnoxious to the Whigs
Hieromnemon - ) The sacred secretary or recorder sent by each state belonging to the Amphictyonic Council, along with the deputy or Minister
Servitor - The Hebrew word there rendered "servitor" is elsewhere rendered "minister," "servant" (Exodus 24:13 ; 33:11 )
Alternation - In liturgy, the response of a congregation praying in turn with the officiating Minister, as in saying the Rosary or litanies; or the recitation of the Divine Office in choir, each side reciting a verse in turn
Disgrace - A state of being out of favor disfavor disesteem as, the Minister retired from court in disgrace. To put out of favor as, the Minister was disgraced
Nethaniah -
One of Asaph's sons, appointed by David to Minister in the temple (1 Chronicles 25:2,12 )
Diplomatic - ) A Minister, official agent, or envoy to a foreign court; a diplomatist
Portfolio - ) Hence: The office and functions of a Minister of state or member of the cabinet; as, to receive the portfolio of war; to resign the portfolio
Ministerial - ) Of or pertaining to the office of a Minister or to the ministry as a body, whether civil or sacerdotal
Extraterritoriality - ) A fiction by which a public Minister, though actually in a foreign country, is supposed still to remain within the territory of his own sovereign or nation
Manaen - A foster-brother of Herod Antipas, but unlike him in character and end: Manaen was a Minister of Christ at Antioch; Herod was guilty of the blood of both Christ and his forerunner, Acts 13:1
Epaphras - Supposed to have founded the church at Colosse, and denominated by Paul his "dear fellow-servant" and "a faithful Minister of Jesus Christ
Endowment, Ecclesiastical - A term used to denote the settlement of a pension upon a Minister, or the building of a church, or the severing a sufficient portion of tithes for a vicar, when the benefice is appropriated. Among the Dissenters, they are benefactions left to their place or congregation, for the support of their Ministers. Too often has it tended to relax the exertions of the people; and when such a fund has fallen into the hands of an unsuitable Minister, it has prevented his removal; when, had he derived no support from the people, necessity would have caused him to depart, and make room for one more worthy
Ministry - Ministerium. Ecclesiastical function agency or service of a Minister of the gospel or clergyman in the modern church, or of priests, apostles and evangelists in the ancient. Time of ministration duration of the office of a Minister, or ecclesiastical. Persons who compose the executive government or the council of a supreme magistrate the body of Ministers of state
Parish - ) An ecclesiastical society, usually not bounded by territorial limits, but composed of those persons who choose to unite under the charge of a particular priest, clergyman, or Minister; also, loosely, the territory in which the members of a congregation live. ) That circuit of ground committed to the charge of one parson or vicar, or other Minister having cure of souls therein
Minister - A person who Ministers to others is one who serves others; a Minister of God is a servant of God (Deuteronomy 10:8; Psalms 103:21; Joel 2:17; Matthew 8:15; Matthew 25:44; Matthew 27:55; 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 6:4; 2 Corinthians 11:15; 2 Corinthians 11:23; for details see SERVANT). ...
Different forms of the biblical word translated ‘minister’ denote a variety of people and the work they do in the church (Romans 12:7; Ephesians 6:21; Colossians 4:17; Hebrews 6:10; see GIFTS OF THE SPIRIT). The pastoral leaders of the church, who are distinct from the deacons, are also Ministers (Ephesians 4:11-12; Colossians 1:7; 1 Timothy 1:12; 2 Timothy 4:5; see APOSTLE; ELDER; TEACHER; PREACHING). The perfect Minister, who is an example to all others, is Jesus Christ (Matthew 20:28; John 13:14-16; Romans 15:8)
Matter, Sacramental - From the institution by Christ, the matter is an essential part of a sacrament, so that the use of valid matter by the Minister is necessary for a valid sacrament
Nicolas - A Jewish proselyte of Antioch, who afterwards embraced Christianity, and was among the most zealous of the first Christians, so that he was chosen one of the seven to Minister in the church at Jerusalem
Emigrant Aid Societies - Organizations which Minister to the material or spiritual needs of emigrants
Sacramental Matter - From the institution by Christ, the matter is an essential part of a sacrament, so that the use of valid matter by the Minister is necessary for a valid sacrament
Longstreet, James - He became a Catholic, 1877, and was later United States Minister to Turkey
James Longstreet - He became a Catholic, 1877, and was later United States Minister to Turkey
Epaphras - He is described as 'a faithful Minister of Christ,' and one who agonised in prayer for the Colossians, with zeal for their welfare
Elders - In the Presbyterian Church the term includes the clergy, called the "teaching elders" but in ordinary language it is restricted to the "lay" or "ruling elders" who are chosen in each congregation to assist the Minister in the management of church affairs. In the Methodist Church the term designates a Minister entitled to preach and administer the sacraments
Dorsey, Anne Hanson - She was the daughter of a Minister, was converted to the Catholic Faith, and thenceforth devoted herself to writing Catholic fiction
Responsibility - John Brown, of Haddington, said to a young Minister, who complained of the smallness of his congregation, 'It is as large a one as you will want to give account for in the day of judgment. ' The admonition is appropriate; not to Ministers alone, but to all teachers
Anne Hanson Dorsey - She was the daughter of a Minister, was converted to the Catholic Faith, and thenceforth devoted herself to writing Catholic fiction
Minister - A — 1: διάκονος (Strong's #1249 — Noun — diakonos — dee-ak'-on-os ) "a servant, attendant, Minister, deacon," is translated "minister" in Mark 10:43 ; Romans 13:4 (twice); 15;8; 1 Corinthians 3:5 ; 2 Corinthians 3:6 ; 6:4 ; 11:15 (twice); 15:8; 2:17; Ephesians 6:21 ; Colossians 1:7,23,25 ; 4:7 ; 1 Thessalonians 3:2 ; 1 Timothy 4:6 . ...
A — 2: λειτουργός (Strong's #3011 — Noun Masculine — leitourgos — li-toorg-os' ) denoted among the Greeks, firstly, "one who discharges a public office at his own expense," then, in general, "a public servant, Minister. " In the NT it is used (a) of Christ, as a "Minister of the sanctuary" (in the Heavens), Hebrews 8:2 ; (b) of angels, Hebrews 1:7 ( Psalm 104:4 ); (c) of the Apostle Paul, in his evangelical ministry, fulfilling it as a serving-priest, Romans 15:16 ; that he used it figuratively and not in an ecclesiastical sense, is obvious from the context; (d) of Epaphroditus, as Ministering to Paul's needs on behalf of the church at Philippi, Philippians 2:25 ; here, representative service is in view; (e) of earthly rulers, who though they do not all act consciously as servants of God, yet discharge functions which are the ordinance of God, Romans 13:6 . ...
A — 3: ὑπηρέτης (Strong's #5257 — Noun Masculine — huperetes — hoop-ay-ret'-ace ) properly "an under rower" (hupo, "under," eretes, "a rower"), as distinguished from nautes, "a seaman" (a meaning which lapsed from the word), hence came to denote "any subordinate acting under another's direction;" in Luke 4:20 , RV, "attendant," AV, "minister" it signifies the attendant at the synagogue service; in Acts 13:5 , it is said of John Mark, RV, "attendant," AV, "minister," in Acts 26:16 , "a Minister," it is said of Paul as a servant of Christ in the Gospel; so in 1 Corinthians 4:1 , where the Apostle associates others with himself, as Apollos and Cephas, as "ministers of Christ. 1, signifies "to be a servant, attendant, to serve, wait upon, Minister. " In the following it is translated "to Minister," except where "to serve" is mentioned: it is used (a) with a general significance, e. , Matthew 4:11 ; 20:28 ; Mark 1:13 ; 10:45 ; John 12:26 ("serve," twice); Acts 19:22 ; Philemon 1:13 ; (b) of waiting at table, "ministering" to the guests, Matthew 8:15 ; Luke 4:39 ; 8:3 ; 12:37 ; 17:8 , "serve;" Matthew 22:26 , "serve," Matthew 22:27 , "serveth," twice; the 2nd instance, concerning the Lord, may come under (a); so of women preparing food, etc. , Mark 1:31 ; Luke 10:40 , "serve;" John 12:2 , "served;" (c) of relieving one's necessities, supplying the necessaries of life, Matthew 25:44 ; 27:55 ; Mark 15:41 ; Acts 6:2 , "serve;" Romans 15:25 ; Hebrews 6:10 ; more definitely in connection with such service in a local church, 1 Timothy 3:10,13 , [1]; (d) of attending, in a more general way, to anything that may serve another's interests, as of the work of an amanuensis, 2 Corinthians 3:3 (metaphorical): of the conveyance of materials gifts of assisting the needy, 2 Corinthians 8:19,20 , RV, "is Ministered" (AV, "is administered"); of a variety of forms of service, 2 Timothy 1:18 ; of the testimony of the OTs prophets, 1 Peter 1:12 ; of the ministry of believers one to another in various ways, 1 Peter 4:10,11 (not here of discharging ecclesiastical functions). ...
Note: In Hebrews 1:14 , AV (2nd part), the phrase eis diakonian is translated "to Minister," RV, "to do service," lit. , "for service;" for the noun "ministering" in the 1st part, see MinisterING , B. In the NT (see Note below) it is used (a) of the prophets and teachers in the church at Antioch, who "ministered to the Lord," Acts 13:2 ; (b) of the duty of churches of the Gentiles to "minister" in "carnal things" to the poor Jewish saints at Jerusalem, in view of the fact that the former had "been made partakers" of the "spiritual things" of the latter, Romans 15:27 ; (c) of the official service of priests and Levites under the Law, Hebrews 10:11 (in the Sept. ...
B — 4: ἱερουργέω (Strong's #2418 — Verb — hierourgeo — hee-er-oorg-eh'-o ) "to Minister in priestly service" (akin to hierourgos, "a sacrificing priest," a word not found in the Sept. ...
B — 5: παρέχω (Strong's #3930 — Verb — parecho — par-ekh'-o ) "to furnish, provide, supply," is translated "minister" in 1 Timothy 1:4 , of the effect of "fables and endless genealogies. ...
B — 6: ἐργάζομαι (Strong's #2038 — Verb — ergazomai — er-gad'-zom-ahee ) "to work, work out, perform," is translated "minister" in 1 Corinthians 9:13 ; the verb is frequently used of business, or employment, and here the phrase means "those employed in sacred things" or "those who are assiduous in priestly functions. ...
Notes: (1) The verb choregeo, rendered "minister" in the AV of 2 Corinthians 9:10 , and the strengthened form epichoregeo, rendered by the same verb in the AV of 2 Corinthians 9:10 ; Galatians 3:5 ; Colossians 2:19 ; 2 Peter 1:11 , in 2 Peter 1:5 , "add," are always translated "to supply" in the RV. (2) In Ephesians 4:29 , AV, didomi, "to give," is translated "minister" (RV, "give")
Haman - Jew-hating descendant of Amalek, appointed by King Ahasuerus to be prime Minister of the Persian Empire
Ministration - Office of a Minister service ecclesiastical function
Instruction - The Minister received instructions from his sovereign to demand a categorical answer
Spiritual Relationship - It results from sponsorship at Baptism, or from being the Minister of a private Baptism. The marriage of a sponsor to his or her godchild, or the marriage of a person who has administered private Baptism to the one baptized, is invalid unless by dispensation
Penitential Office - It may be used on other days at the discretionof the Minister
Minister - is sharath, 'to Minister, serve. ' Joshua was Moses' Minister. All God's hosts are called 'ministers of his, that do his pleasure,' and He maketh 'his Ministers a flaming fire. ' The priests were the Ministers of Jehovah
Officer - 1: ὑπηρέτης (Strong's #5257 — Noun Masculine — huperetes — hoop-ay-ret'-ace ) for the original of which see Minister , A, No. See Minister , SERVANT
Fathers of a Good Death - A religious order founded at Rome in 1582 by Saint Camillus de Lellis to tend the plague-stricken and to Minister to the sick in their homes
Order of the Servants of the Sick - A religious order founded at Rome in 1582 by Saint Camillus de Lellis to tend the plague-stricken and to Minister to the sick in their homes
Camillians - A religious order founded at Rome in 1582 by Saint Camillus de Lellis to tend the plague-stricken and to Minister to the sick in their homes
Scalabrinians - Founded by Blessed John Baptist Scalabrini, at Piacenza, Italy, 1888, to Minister to the spiritual and temporal needs of Italian emigrants in America
Teacher - One who instructs others in religion a preacher a Minister of the gospel
Tedious - We say, a man is tedious in relating a story a Minister is tedious in his sermon
Mordecai - Between them, Mordecai and Esther saved the Jewish people from threatened destruction, and Mordecai later became the Emperor’s chief Minister (Esther 10:3)
Servant - In our sense, "a free, voluntary attendant", as Joshua of Moses (Exodus 33:11; so 2 Kings 4:12; 2 Kings 4:43; 2 Kings 5:20; 2 Kings 6:15 margin "minister"; 2 Samuel 13:17-18; 1 Kings 20:14-15)
Leger - ) A Minister or ambassador resident at a court or seat of government
Ethiopian Eunuch - The chief officer or prime Minister of state of Candace (q
Preacher: Should be Faithful Unto Death - The Minister of Christ should feel like the old keeper of Eddystone lighthouse
Alternation - ) The response of the congregation speaking alternately with the Minister
Ministry - ) The act of Ministering; ministration; service. ) The office, duties, or functions of a Minister, servant, or agent; ecclesiastical, executive, or ambassadorial function or profession. ) The body of Ministers of state; also, the clergy, as a body
Pastor - A Minister of the gospel who has the charge of a church and congregation, whose duty is to watch over the people of his charge, and instruct them in the sacred doctrines of the christian religion
ep'Aphras - (lovely ), a fellow laborer with the apostle Paul, mentioned ( Colossians 1:7 ) as having taught the Colossian church the grace of God in truth, and designated a faithful Minister of Christ on their behalf
Blessing - ...
Paul says, "the cup which WE bless," namely, the Minister and the congregation; not he alone by any priestly authority, but as representing the congregation who virtually through Him bless the cup. The Minister is the leader of the congregation
Institution, Office of - The service in the Prayer Book entitled,"An Office of Institution of Ministers into Parishes or Churches. "Canon 18, Title I of the Digest requires "that on the election of aMinister into any Church or Parish, the Vestry shall notify theBishop of such election, in writing; and if the Minister be a Priest,the Bishop may, if requested by the Vestry to do so, institute himaccording to the Office established by this Church. TheRector is then duly instituted according to the service set forth,either by the Bishop himself, or by a Priest appointed by him, inwhich the Letter of Institution is read; God's blessing invoked onthe newly appointed Rector and his work; the keys of the Church aregiven him by the Wardens; a sermon is preached on the duties ofPastor and People by some one appointed by the Bishop, and the HolyEucharist is celebrated by the newly instituted Minister. By thewording of the Canon this service is not obligatory and adds nothingto the contract or agreement already made between the Minister andVestry
Rabsaris - ("chief eunuch"), often a Minister of state or a commander in expeditions (margin, 2 Kings 25:19)
Church-Wardens - Officers chosen yearly, either by the consent of the Minister, or of the parishioners, or of both
Haman - Prime Minister of Ahasuerus, the Persian monarch
Overseer - Various translations use overseer for a variety of secular positions (household manager, Genesis 39:4-5 ; prime Minister, Genesis 41:34 ; foreman or supervisor, 2 Chronicles 2:18 ) and ecclesiastical (Acts 20:18 ) offices
Overseer - Various translations use overseer for a variety of secular positions (household manager, Genesis 39:4-5 ; prime Minister, Genesis 41:34 ; foreman or supervisor, 2 Chronicles 2:18 ) and ecclesiastical (Acts 20:18 ) offices
Ahasuerus - At the advice of his Minister Haman, he issued a decree that all Jews should be killed
Visitation of Prisoners - This is a very comprehensive andappropriate Office, proving of great value to the Clergy who arecalled to Minister to the spiritual wants of prisoners
Mcmahon, Martin Thomas - After the war he was corporation counsel of New York City, Minister to Paraguay, senator, and judge of the Court of General Sessions
Cartier, Georges Etienne - He was Attorney-General of Lower Canada in 1856,1857, 1858, and 1864, as well as Premier of Canada in 1858 and Minister of militia in 1867
Death: Peace in - 'Well, my friend,' said the Minister, 'how do you feel yourself to-day?' 'Very weel, sir,' was the calm and solemn answer, 'Very weel, but just a wee confused wi' the flittin'
Martin Mcmahon - After the war he was corporation counsel of New York City, Minister to Paraguay, senator, and judge of the Court of General Sessions
Sermons: Must be Full of Christ - ' 'I see a man cannot be a faithful Minister, until he preaches Christ for Christ's sake
Lassite - ) A member of a Scottish sect, founded in the 18th century by John Glass, a Minister of the Established Church of Scotland, who taught that justifying faith is "no more than a simple assent to the divine testimone passively recived by the understanding
Living - ) The benefice of a clergyman; an ecclesiastical charge which a Minister receives
Georges Cartier - He was Attorney-General of Lower Canada in 1856,1857, 1858, and 1864, as well as Premier of Canada in 1858 and Minister of militia in 1867
Orestes Augustus Brownson - He was ordained a Universalist Minister, but later denying all Divine revelation, left the ministry and adopted Robert Dale Owen's communistic theories of property and marriage. In 1831 sympathy for the working classes led him to preach as an independent Minister
Administration - ‘administer’ (Authorized Version ) has given place to ‘minister’ (Revised Version ; Gr διακονέω). Minister), who pours out wine to the guests individually
Deacon, - The Greek word is more often translated 'minister' and 'servant' than 'deacon. In 1 Timothy 3:8-13 the moral qualifications of the deacon or Minister are given, but what his work was is not specified; it is evident that they carried out their service officially
Pastor - Christ having calledHimself the Good Shepherd, or Good Pastor, the name has beenassumed for His Ministers. Pastorship includes many and varied offices,—Minister, Rector,Preacher, Priest, but all offices and all labors have referenceto men's spiritual interests. It is well to notethat a Minister is not a Pastor simply because he is ordained;besides the Divine call and Divine appointment in ordination, thereis also the call from the people to define that number of soulsover which the charge is to be exercised. This is brought out inthe "Office of Institution of Ministers into Parishes or Churches,"to be found in the Prayer-book
Envoy - , a person deputed by a sovereign or a government to negotiate a treaty, or transact other business, with a foreign sovereign or government; a Minister accredited to a foreign government
Flattering - The Minister gives a flattering account of his reception at court
Epaphras - Lovely, spoken of by Paul (Colossians 1:7 ; 4:12 ) as "his dear fellow-servant," and "a faithful Minister of Christ
Chancel - That part of the Church building set apart as the placeof the Clergy and others who Minister in the Church service
Ablutions - These ablutions are in conformitywith the Rubric which directs, "And if any of the consecrated Breadand Wine remain after the Communion, it shall not be carried outof the Church; but the Minister and other communicants shall,immediately after the Blessing, reverently eat and drink the same
Hood - The Church of England bycanon enjoins that every Minister, who is a graduate, shall wear hisproper hood during the time of divine service
Surplice - The outer garment, made of linen, worn over the cassockby the officiating Minister during the Church service
Tychicus - Chance, an Asiatic Christian, a "faithful Minister in the Lord" (Ephesians 6:21,22 ), who, with Trophimus, accompanied Paul on a part of his journey from Macedonia to Jerusalem (Acts 20:4 )
ha'Man - (magnificent ), the chief Minister or vizier of King Ahasuerus
Holy Orders - (See BISHOP,EPISCOPACY, DEACON, Minister, PRIEST
Orders, Holy - ...
MATTER AND FORM ...
For minor orders, the instruments whose use is commanded by the Roman Pontifical are the matter; the words pronounced by the Minister as the ordinandus touches the instruments, are the form. ,paten and chalice, and the book of the Epistles, are the matter; the words, pronounced by the Minister as he offers the instruments to the ordinandus, are the form. ,empowering priests to consecrate, to administer the sacraments, to preach, etc. , the bishop to be the ordinary Minister of Confirmation, to ordain, to consecrate, and the deacon to chant the Gospel, etc.
Minister AND SUBJECT ...
The ordinary Minister of a valid ordination is a consecrated bishop; the extraordinary Minister can be a priest who obtains the power to confer some orders, either from law or Apostolic indult, e. The Minister of episcopal consecration is a bishop, who is assisted by two other bishops; the Holy See can dispense from the need of co-consecrating bishops
Holy Orders - ...
MATTER AND FORM ...
For minor orders, the instruments whose use is commanded by the Roman Pontifical are the matter; the words pronounced by the Minister as the ordinandus touches the instruments, are the form. ,paten and chalice, and the book of the Epistles, are the matter; the words, pronounced by the Minister as he offers the instruments to the ordinandus, are the form. ,empowering priests to consecrate, to administer the sacraments, to preach, etc. , the bishop to be the ordinary Minister of Confirmation, to ordain, to consecrate, and the deacon to chant the Gospel, etc.
Minister AND SUBJECT ...
The ordinary Minister of a valid ordination is a consecrated bishop; the extraordinary Minister can be a priest who obtains the power to confer some orders, either from law or Apostolic indult, e. The Minister of episcopal consecration is a bishop, who is assisted by two other bishops; the Holy See can dispense from the need of co-consecrating bishops
Epaphras - Paul's "dear fellow servant, who is for you (the Colossian Christians, Colossians 1:7) a faithful Minister of Christ," perhaps implying Epaphras was the founder of the Colossian church. He had been sent by the Colossians to inquire after and Minister to Paul
Reward: of Benevolence Sometimes Immediate - The late John Andrew Jones, a poor Baptist Minister, whilst walking in Cheapside, was appealed to by some one he knew for help. I have had this sovereign in my waistcoat pocket this week past for some poor Minister, and you may as well have it
Abishag - She was chosen to Minister to David in his old age
Baker, Francis Asbury - He became an Episcopalian Minister, 1839; was converted as a result of the Oxford Movement, 1853; entered the Redemptorists; and was ordained priest, 1856
Haman - ” The Agagite who became prime Minister under the Persian king Ahasuerus (Esther 3:1 )
Salim - The second and third sites would have John leaving for the north, allowing Jesus to Minister near Jerusalem
Resident - ) A diplomatic representative who resides at a foreign court; - a term usualy applied to Ministers of a rank inferior to that of ambassadors. See the Note under Minister, 4
Bancroft, George - Minister to Great Britain, 1846-1849, and to Berlin, 1867-1874
Sacrament - Hence the sacramental rite, independent of the faith, merits, or worthiness of the Minister, confers grace when the recipient places no obstacle. For a valid sacrament the Minister must use valid matter and pronounce the essential words of the form; moreover as a rational and secondary Minister, he must determine the purpose of the rite and so have at least the intention of doing what the Church does. If the sacrament is made and administered for the purpose of mockery or mimicry, the sacrament is invalid due to defective intention. Some sacraments are more necessary for salvation than others, thus Baptism is necessary for all; Penance for those who fall into grave post-Baptismal sin; Holy Orders to give sacred Ministers to the Church. ...
Minister ...
The laity, i. ,the contracting parties, are the Ministers of Matrimony; a lay person can be the extraordinary Minister of Baptism in the case of danger from death; outside the above, the Minister must be ordained. Heretical and schismatical Ministers validly ordained, can administer valid sacraments, for the efficacy of the sacraments is solely from Divine institution and the merits of Christ, and so does not depend on the faith or worthiness of the Minister
Regium Donum Money - As the Dissenters approved themselves strong friends to the house of Brunswick, they enjoyed favour; and, being excluded all lucrative preferment in the church, the prime Minister wished to reward them for their loyalty, and, by a retaining fee, preserve them steadfast. A considerable sum, therefore, was annually lodged with the heads of the Presbyterians, Independents, and Baptists, to be distributed among the necessitous Ministers of their congregations
Embassador - A Minister of the highest rank employed by one prince or state, at the court of another, to manage the public concerns of his own prince or state, and representing the power and dignity of his sovereign. They are also called Ministers. Envoys are Ministers employed on special occasions, and are of less dignity
Adalard, Saint - Grandson of Charles Martel, he was prime Minister to Pepin the Short, and adviser to Louis le Debonnaire
Bacon, Nathaniel - Ordained, 1622, he entered the Society of Jesus two years later, and became procurator and Minister of the English College at Rome
Quinones, Francis Cardinal - In 1523 he was chosen Minister general but renounced the generalship in 1527, and was created cardinal the following year
Haman - , the prime Minister) of the Persian king Ahasuerus (Esther 3:1 , etc
Seraphim - They are represented as "standing" above the King as he sat upon his throne, ready at once to Minister unto him
Minister (2) - However learned, godly, and eloquent a Minister may be, he is nothing without the Holy Spirit
Erastians - The Minister might dissuade the vicious and unqualified from the communion; but might not refuse it, or inflict any kind of censure; the punishment of all offences, either of a civil or religious nature, being referred to the civil magistrate
Zaphnath-Paaneah - The name which Pharaoh gave to Joseph when he raised him to the rank of prime Minister or grand vizier of the kingdom (Genesis 41:45 )
Sub Deacon - An inferior Minister, who anciently attended at the altar, prepared the sacred vessels, delivered them to the deacons in time of divine service, attended the doors of the church during communion service, went on the bishop's embassies with his letters, or messages, to foreign churches, and was invested with the first of the holy orders
Sternness - It is said of that eminent saint and martyr, Bishop Hooper, that on one occasion a man in deep distress was allowed to go into his prison to tell his tale of conscience, but Bishop Hooper looked so sternly upon him, and addressed him so severely at first, that the poor soul ran away, and could not get comfort until he had sought out another Minister of a gentler aspect
Scripture: Versus System - The late William Jay, in his 'Practical Illustrations of Character,' says, 'What a difference must a Christian and a Minister feel, between the trammels of some systems of divinity and the advantage of Scripture freedom, the glorious liberty of the sons of God
Officer - It is also translated 'minister' and 'servant
Hewit, Augustine Francis - Ordained a Congregationalist Minister, after visiting England he embraced Anglicanism, and following Newman in the Oxford Movement became a Catholic
Augustine Hewit - Ordained a Congregationalist Minister, after visiting England he embraced Anglicanism, and following Newman in the Oxford Movement became a Catholic
Deacons - It comes from the Greek word diakonos and is translated as "servant" in John 6:25; Joh 12:26, "minister" in Romans 13:4
Tychicus - Paul describes him as a beloved brother, a faithful Minister and fellow-servant in the Lord
Alcala, University of - Madrid, Spain, established at Alcala de Henares as the College of San Ildefonso, 1508, by the Franciscan, Francisco Ximenes de Cisneros, prime Minister of Spain
Mortuary - ) A sort of ecclesiastical heriot, a customary gift claimed by, and due to, the Minister of a parish on the death of a parishioner
University of Alcala - Madrid, Spain, established at Alcala de Henares as the College of San Ildefonso, 1508, by the Franciscan, Francisco Ximenes de Cisneros, prime Minister of Spain
Ones'Imus - Whether Paul desired his presence as a personal attendant or as a Minister of the gospel is not certain from verse 13 of the epistle
Jules Mazarin - Cardinal, and prime Minister of France after Richelieu's death; born July 14, 1602 in Piscina, Italy; died May 9, 1661 in Vincennes, France. Anne of Austria, who favored him greatly, appointed him prime Minister, and in spite of fierce opposition he remained in power until death
Mazarin, Jules - Cardinal, and prime Minister of France after Richelieu's death; born July 14, 1602 in Piscina, Italy; died May 9, 1661 in Vincennes, France. Anne of Austria, who favored him greatly, appointed him prime Minister, and in spite of fierce opposition he remained in power until death
Minister - Minister mesharet . The priests and Levites, "ministers of our God" (Isaiah 61:6). In New Testament leitourgos is a "public administrator", civil as the magistrate (Romans 13:4; Romans 13:6), or sacerdotal as the Aaronic priests were (Hebrews 10:11) and as Christ was (Hebrews 8:2), and as Paul figuratively was, presenting as a sacrifice before God the Gentiles converted by his ministry of the gospel (Romans 15:16) and their faith (Philippians 2:17), and as Christians Minister their alms (Romans 15:27; 2 Corinthians 9:12)
Vestry - The purpose and duties of the Vestry as commonlyunderstood may be stated as follows: It is the duty of the Wardensand Vestry (it ought to be always with the advice of the Bishop) toconsider and determine upon the election of a Minister when theRectorship is vacant; to see that the Minister is well and properlysupported, sufficiently and punctually paid; to make and execute allcontracts for the erection of church edifices, rectories and otherchurch buildings; to provide for their furnishing and repair and duepreservation; to hold all Church property as Trustees of the Parish,and as such generally to transact all temporal and financialbusiness of the Parish
Sacrifice - ...
THE SACRIFICIAL INTENTION ...
This is the intention of the sacrificing Minister to offer to God a sacrifice in the true sense by means of a sacrificial act (forma metaphysica sacrificii). It has for its primary object the acknowledgment of God's Supreme Majesty and man's entire dependence on God (finis intrinsecus) but does not, on that account, exclude such secondary intentions (finis extrinsecus) as the sacrificing Minister may add of his own choice. ...
THE SACRIFICING Minister ...
Under the law of nature, there were private sacrifices (Abel; Abraham) for which no special authorization was needed on the part of the community. Under the same law, public sacrifices required a Minister duly authorized by family or tribe. They require an authorized Minister who is a priest in the proper sense of the term. ...
THE SACRIFICIAL ACT ...
This consists in the actual offering of the sacrificial gift to God, performed in such a way that it is the external expression of the internal intention of the Minister
Synzygus - It is more probably a way of describing the chief Minister of the church at Philippi
Derbe - Paul's fellow Minister Gaius was from Derbe (Acts 20:4 )
Nehemiah - (a) A Minister in the Persian King Artaxerxes' court, he returned to Israel in 335 BCE to strengthen the fledgling Jewish commonwealth
Priest - ) A presbyter elder; a Minister...
(2):...
(n. He is authorized to perform all Ministerial services except those of ordination and confirmation
Salvation Army - Religious organization which originated in England under William Booth, Minister of the "New Connexion Methodists," and was introduced into the United States in 1881
Mor'Deca-i - (little man , or worshipper or Mars ), the deliverer, under divine Providence, of the Jews from the destruction plotted against them by Haman the chief Minister of Xerxes; the institutor of the feast of Purim
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - No Minister all round about had less strength of some kinds than Daniel Cormick: but, then, like the angel of Philadelphia, by universal consent, he was by far the holiest man of them all and by far the most successful Minister of them all. Cormick used to say in his humility that had it not been for the liberality of Lady Fowlis he would never have got to College at all, and that had it not been for the leniency of some of his professors he would never have got the length of being a Minister, Be that as it may, it will be to the everlasting salvation of many that Daniel Cormick was ever sent to College, was carried through his studies, and was ordained a Minister. When I was a lad in Kirriemuir our Minister's name was wide-spread and dear to multitudes, not so much for his pulpit gifts, as for his personal and pastoral graces. Mill in his crowded pew, a much-honoured man, who largely shared in his Minister's saintliness. There never was a kirk-session in Kirriemuir or anywhere else like Daniel Cormick's kirk-session, and the pillars of it were almost all and almost wholly of their Minister's own quarrying and hewing and polishing and setting up. When David White of Airlie became awakened to see what he was, and what a Minister ought to be, he sought out Daniel Cormick for his counsellor. The two Ministers used to tryst to meet in the woods of Lindertis, where they strolled and knelt and spent hours and days together, till Mr. ...
If his Sovereign Master allowed to the Minister of Philadelphia but little strength of intellect, as James Durham in his profound commentary holds it was, and but little learning; then, what he lacked on the mere mental side was more than made up to him on the moral and spiritual side. And that wisest by far of all the seven Ministers in Asia soon found out where his true strength lay and threw himself with all his weakness upon his true strength. William Law complains with all his incomparable scorn that so many of the Ministers of his day spent so much of their time and strength in the pulpit on such subjects as the seasons and the directions of the wind called Euroclydon, and on the times when the Gospels were writ. "-And this Epistle pays the same praise to the Minister of Philadelphia for the way he preached his Master's name, and his Master's name only, in every sermon of his. But I am beginning now to number my days, and I am, as you must witness, turning my own attention and yours far more to the name of Jesus Christ, in imitation of the Minister of Philadelphia. Now, what is His name? and what is His Father's name? if you have begun to learn those great names from me and with me? For we Ministers should preach the name of the Father and the name of the Son far more than we do. Even with as little strength as there was in Philadelphia and Kirriemuir, a Minister will win great praise, both from God and from God's people, if he keeps close to God's word and more and more holds up God's name. ...
Tentatio, meditatio, oratio, were Luther's three indispensable qualifications for a Minister. Now we gather that the Minister of Philadelphia had quite a special training in the school of temptation. But the temptations that make a Minister after Luther's own heart are as far as the poles asunder from such temptations as these. The holier and the more heavenly-minded a Minister is, the more he lays himself open to a life of unspeakable temptation. With every new advance in holiness, with every new progress in the knowledge of God and of himself, with every deeper and deeper entrance of the exquisitely holy law and spirit of God into his heart and conscience, a Minister's temptations multiply upon him, till he feels himself to be the most beset, behind and before, of all beset men that dwell upon the earth. For if a Minister is to be a real Minister; if he is to know, as by the best and the latest science, all the diseases and all the pains in the souls of the saints who are in his ward, of necessity he must have been taken through all those spiritual experiences himself; of necessity they have all been made to meet in him. And that is the reason why He who was Himself made perfect through temptation has specially promised that He will keep His Ministers in the hour and power and crisis of their temptations, as He was kept in the hour and power and crisis of his own. All Ministers pray much and earnestly before preaching. The Minister of Sardis, who never prayed at any other time in all the week, to be called prayer, was always in real anxiety and earnestness before he entered the pulpit, because he had such a name for preaching to keep up. The "honest weak Ministers," that they all three were, as James Durham, that honest but not weak Minister, in his incomparable commentary calls them. ...
"Behold, I come quickly: hold fast that thou hast, that no man take thy crown," said He that is holy, He that is true, to this Minister of His. And as Ministers' crowns are dropping off their heads in every parish all round about for any ambitions man to pick them up and put them on. Hold fast, O all you Ministers and elders and nurses and doctors! Hold fast as Dr. If it took a man like Daniel Cormick all his might to keep his crown from being all stolen from him, what chance, think you, have the most of us Ministers?...
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But look up! Who is that glorified saint shining as the brightness of the firmament, and as the stars for ever and ever? That is the angel of the Church that once was in Philadelphia. What a comfort to the most of us Ministers! For the most of us Ministers must always be far more like the Minister of Philadelphia with his little strength than like the Minister of Sardis with his great name
the Angel of the Church in Thyatira - And, indeed, as if it were to forewarn us, and to prepare us for some impossible-to-be-believed disclosures in Thyatira, our Lord introduces Himself to the Minister of Thyatira and to us under a name that He has not taken to Himself in the case of any of the other seven Ministers of the Seven Churches. For our glorified Lord puts on His whole Godhead when He comes down to deal with this tragical Minister in Thyatira and with his tragical wife and children. That is to say, to search to the bottom the reins and the heart of the Minister of Thyatira, and the reins and the hearts of all his household, and of all his people. And then His feet are like fine brass wherewith to walk up and down in Thyatira, till He has given to the Minister of Thyatira and to his house and to all the rest in Thyatira according to their works. And so it was with the Minister of Thyatira. We might have heard that there was a certain Minister in that ancient city in the days of the Revelation, but this so terrible Epistle would never have been written to him or transmitted to us but for his household catastrophe-a catastrophe so awful that it cannot be so much as once named among us. The Minister of Ephesus had left his first love to God and to God's work because he was so happy in the love of his wife and children. Both the prophet Hosea in the Old Testament and this apostolical Minister in the New Testament had come to see that when any man is called of God to this work of God, all he is and all he has, all his talents, all his affections, all his possessions, all his enjoyments, his very wife and children, must all be held by him under this great covenant with God, that they are all to be possessed and enjoyed and used by him, in the most absolute subordination to his ministry. ...
Marriage or celibacy, an helpmeet or an hindrance, children or childlessness, good children or bad, health or sickness, congregational prosperity or congregational adversity, and all else; absolutely and without any reserve everything must come under that great law for all men, but a thousand times more for all Ministers; that great law which the greatest of Ministers has thus enunciated:-"For we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to His purpose. His antitype, the Minister of Thyatira, was a fairly good preacher before he had a household, but he became an immeasurably better preacher as his household life went on and went down to such depths as it did. As many as had ears to hear in Thyatira they could measure quite well by the increasing depth of his preaching and his prayers the increasing depths of Satan through which their Minister was wading all the week. We have never had deeper-wading preachers than Jonathan Edwards and Thomas Boston, and never since the garden of Eden has there been two Ministers happier at home than they were. And it is very happy for those of us who are Ministers to see also that the two happiest homes in all New England and in all old Scotland were also the homes of two such deep and holy and heavenly-minded and soul-winning preachers. And thus it is that with two such enviable households as were the households of Edwards and Boston, those two Ministers also in their own ways are another two outstanding illustrations of Luther's great pulpit principle-'Who are these so incomparable preachers, and from what divinity hall did they come up? These are they who climbed the Gospel pulpit out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. '...
Though you are not Ministers you must know quite well how the same thing works out in yourselves. You are not Ministers, and therefore it is not necessary that you should be plunged into such depths of experience as your Ministers are plunged into continually if they are to be of any real use to you. ...
There is still left one more of those cruxes of interpretation that had almost turned me away from this Epistle to the Minister of Thyatira altogether. " What a strange promise to make to a Minister,-a rod of iron! Yes, this is just one more of those scripture-passages of which Paul once said that the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life. "He that overcometh" is just that Minister who meets all the temptations and trials of life, at home and abroad, with more and more charity, and with more and more faith, and with more and more patience, as long as there is a hard heart in his house at home or in his congregation abroad. It is just to the Minister who so overcomes his own passions in his own heart first, that his Master will give power to break in shivers the same passions in all other men's hearts, as with a rod of iron. By his charity and by his patience, by these two rods of iron, especially, any Minister will overcome as the angel of the Church in Thyatira at last overcame. That is to say, when many other Ministers that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt, they that be wise shall shine as the brightness of the firmament; and they that turn many to righteousness as the stars for ever and ever
Scoffer: Silenced - A Minister of the Presbyterian Church, in America, delivered a series of discourses against Infidelity, in a town in Louisiana, on the Red River, some of the citizens of which were known to be skeptical. So soon as he discovered the Minister, he commenced his horrid blasphemies; and when he perceived him reading at one of the tables, he proposed to his companions to go with him to the opposite side of the table and listen to some stories that he had to tell upon religion and religious men which he said would annoy the old preacher. Quite a number, prompted by curiosity, gathered around him to listen to his vulgar stories and anecdotes, all of which were pointed against the Bible and its Ministers. 'I made no allusion to you, sir,' said the Minister, very quietly
Dubois, Guillaume - Prime Minister of France in 1722
Character - Baptism marks the soul as a subject of Christ and His Church; Confirmation as a warrior of the Church militant; Holy Orders as a Minister of its Divine worship
Carnal - Enjoyments that Minister to the wants and desires of man's animal nature are so called (Romans 15:27 ; 1 Corinthians 9:11 )
Angel - ) A Minister or pastor of a church, as in the Seven Asiatic churches
Guillaume Dubois - Prime Minister of France in 1722
Ithamar - Youngest son of Aaron: he was anointed with Nadab, Abihu, and Eleazar to Minister in the priest's office
Antonelli, Giacomo - He held various offices under Gregory XVI, and became cardinal, Minister of finance, and prefect of the sacred palaces under Pius IX
Haman - as the enemy of the Jews, and the chief Minister of Ahasuerus
Matithi'ah - ...
One of the Levites appointed by David to Minister before the ark in the musical service, (1 Chronicles 16:5 ) "with harps upon Sheminith," comp
Mercy: Continual - Rowland Hill a hundred pounds to dispense to a poor Minister, and thinking it was too much to send him all at once, Mr. ' Till the whole sum had been received the astonished Minister was made familiar with the cheering words, 'And more to follow
Directory - The substance of it is as follows:...
It forbids all salutations and civil ceremony in the churches;...
the reading the scriptures in the congregation is declared to be part of the pastoral office;...
all the canonical books of the old and New Testament (but not of the Apocrypha) are to be publicly read in the vulgar tongue: how large a portion is to be read at once, is left to the Minister, who has likewise the liberty of expounding, when he judges it necessary. In dividing the text, the Minister is to regard the order of the matter more than that of the words: he is not to burden the memory of his audience with too many divisions, nor perplex their understanding with logical phrases and terms of arts: he is not to start unnecessary objections; and he is to be very sparing in citations from ecclesiastical or other human writers, ancient or modern, &c. ...
The Directory recommends the use of the Lord's Prayer, as the most perfect model of devotion; it forbids private or lay persons to administer baptism, and enjoins it to be performed in the face of the congregation; it orders the communion-table at the Lord's supper to be so placed, that the communicant may sit about it. It also orders, that the sabbath be kept with the greatest strictness, both publicly and privately; that marriage be solemnized by a lawful Minister of the word, who is to give counsel to, and pray for the parties; that the sick be visited by the Minister under whose charge they are; the dead to be buried without any prayers or religious ceremonies; that days of fasting are to be observed when the judgments of God are abroad, or when some important blessings are desired; that days of thanksgiving for mercies received be also observed; and, lastly, that singing of Psalms together in the congregation is the duty of Christians
Serve - ...
Shârath (שָׁרַת, Strong's #8334), “to serve, Minister. When the participle is translated as a verbal noun, such as “servant” or “minister,” it loses the connotation of duration or repetition. When Samuel was still a boy, he “… did Minister unto the Lord before Eli the priest” ( Ministered unto the Lord before Eli” ( Ministered unto them [1] before their idols …” were forbidden by the Lord to serve as priests ( Minister unto him, and to bless in his name …” ( Minister unto him forever,” acted as assistants to the priests, performing such physical tasks as keeping the gates, slaughtering the burnt offering, caring for the altars and the utensils of the sanctuary ( Minister unto thee” ( Minister [2] unto him” (1 Kings 19:21). Abishag is said to have “ministered” unto David (1 Kings 1:15). Various kinds of officials “ministered” to David ( Ministered unto him” ( Ministered unto him …” ( Minister. ” This word is most regularly translated “minister”; Minister [8]. 46:24 refers to a place in the temple complex which is reserved for “… the Ministers of the house. …” The privilege of serving the Lord is not restricted to human beings: “Bless ye the Lord, all ye his hosts [9]; ye Ministers of his, that do his pleasure” ( the Angel of the Church in Sardis - And the Ministers of the other six churches in Asia were like Themistocles in the matter of their sleep, so full were all their people's mouths of the name and the renown of the Minister of Sardis. His appearance, his voice, his delivery, his earnestness and impressiveness, and his memorable sayings, all contributed to make the name of the Minister of Sardis absolutely a household word up and down the whole presbytery. Now it was after some great success of that pulpit kind; it was immediately on the back of some extravagant outburst of his popularity as a preacher, that his Master could keep silence no longer toward the Minister of Sardis. And what is not already spiritually dead in thee is ready to die, and will soon be for ever dead, unless thou dost become a new manner of Minister, not before men, but before God. '...
"Of all men in the world," says James Durham, "ministers are most obnoxious to this tentation of vanity. For praise and popularity is the most dangerous of all drugs to a Minister. Dose a Minister sufficiently with praise, and you will soon drown his soul in perdition, if God does not interpose to save him. But then it is well known that God chooses the weakest of men to make them His Ministers. For many reasons He does that, some of which reasons of His all His Ministers know, and some of which reasons the wisest of them have not yet found out. "It were vain," says one of the wisest of Ministers, "to pretend that I do not feel in me that mean passion that can be elated by applause, and mortified by the contrary; but there is nothing under heaven that I more sincerely and totally despise, and nothing which ever makes me so emphatically despise myself. And it is not denied that this Minister paid for his popularity with very hard work. And so did the Minister of Sardis. None of his neighbour Ministers, not the most accepted of God and the most praised of God of them all, could preach half so well. '...
And his heart-searching Master still proceeds with His pastoral counsels to this Minister of His, very unwilling to give him over to the decay of soul into which he has fallen. " As if He were to say to some such Minister among ourselves-'Remember thy conversion, and the spirit of truth and love that was instilled into thee, and that made thee turn into this ministry of Mine. Remember thy ordination day, and the laying on of the hands of the presbytery, and the way thy heart swelled within thee as they pronounced and enrolled thee a Minister of Mine. ' Yes, even to call such things to remembrance, my brethren, will work together with the seven Spirits that are in Christ's right hand, and with many other things, to set a fallen-down Minister on his feet again, and to give him a new start even after he is as good as dead and deposed in the sight of God. Ay, such remembering and such repenting will yet save this all but lost Minister of Sardis, and it will save some Ministers among ourselves who are quite as far gone as he was. ...
The last thing of the nature of a threat that is addressed to the Minister of Sardis is this, "If therefore thou shalt not watch, I will come on thee as a thief, and thou shalt not know what hour I will come upon thee. " There is a certain note of terror in that warning which is here addressed to all Ministers, the most watchful, the most prayerful before God, and the best. And every night after he received and read this Epistle, the Minister of Sardis always slept in that chamber till the sun-rising. ...
And now that the tide is beginning to turn in this Epistle, and in this Minister's heart and life, this so unexpected word of encouragement and comfort is spoken to him, "Thou hast a few names even in Sardis which have not defiled their garments: and they shall walk with Me in white: for they are worthy. " It was with the Minister of Sardis somewhat as it was with Thomas Scott when he was first awaking to his proper work. Some of his people had somehow been kept in life all through their Minister's declension and death. Even in Sardis, their sons in constant peril, and a volume of some first-century Spurgeon, kept alive those few names all those years that their Minister was dead. ...
And then to put the copestone on this far-shining case of a Minister's recovery, and to send him back to his work till, like his much-tried neighbour in Thyatira, his last years should be far better than his first, this splendid seal was set on his second conversion-"to him that overcometh, the same shall be clothed in white raiment: and I will not blot his name out of the book of life, but I will confess his name before my Father and before His angels. " It will be on that day to the Minister of Sardis like that great day when Joshua stood before the angel of the Lord and Satan stood at his right hand to resist him
Flavian, Saint - His election was opposed by Chrysaphius, Minister to Emperor Theodosius
Mayne, Cuthbert, Blessed - He was ordained a Protestant Minister, 1562, and went to Saint John's College, Oxford (M
Irvingites - Popular designation of the followers of Edward Irving (1792-1834), a former Scottish Presbyterian Minister; their official title is "the Catholic Apostolic Church
Stole - It is one of theAltar vestments and should be worn when administering any Sacrament. It also signifies the yoke ofpatience which the Minister of Christ must bear as the servant ofGod
Kirk Sessions - A consistory of the Ministers, elders, and deacons of a parish form a kirk session. These meet once a week, the Minister being their moderator, but without a negative voice
Rash - Hasty in council or action precipitate resolving or entering on a project or measure without due deliberation and caution, and thus encountering unnecessary hazard applied to persons as a rash statesman or Minister a rash commander
Deacon - It is sometimes translated Minister, that is, servant, as in Matthew 20:26 2 Corinthians 6:4 Ephesians 3:7 . Deacons are first mentioned as officers in the Christian church in Acts 6:1-15 , where it appears that their duty was to collect the alms of the church, and distribute them to such as had a claim upon them, visiting the poor and sick, widows, orphans, and sufferers under persecution, and administering all necessary and proper relief
Supply - 2), RV, "supply" (AV "minister"); 1 Peter 4:11 , RV, "supplieth" (AV, "givetg"). See GIVE , Note (4), Minister , B, Note (1). 1), is rendered "to supply" in the RV of 2 Corinthians 9:10 (1st part) and Galatians 3:5 (for AV, "to Minister"), where the present continuous tense speaks of the work of the Holy Spirit in all His ministrations to believers individually and collectively; in Colossians 2:19 , RV, "being supplied" (AV, "having nourishment Ministered"), of the work of Christ as the Head of the church His body; in 2 Peter 1:5 , "supply" (AV, "add"); in 2 Peter 1:11 , "shall be . supplied" (AV, "shall be Ministered"), of the reward hereafter which those are to receive, in regard to positions in the kingdom of God, for their fulfillment here of the condition mentioned
Deacon, Deaconess - ) means one who serves or Ministers. In the NT it implies the noble service of doing work for God (2 Corinthians 6:4; 2 Corinthians 11:23, 1 Timothy 3:8-12 1 Thessalonians 3:2), or Ministering to the needs of others (Romans 16:1; cf. 1 Corinthians 16:15, 2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:1); and the meaning of the term, with its cognates ‘service’ or ‘ministry’ and ‘to serve’ or ‘to Minister’ (διακονία and διακονεῖν) is nearly everywhere quite general and does not indicate a special office. The special function of deacons, whether men or women, was to distribute the alms of the congregation and to Minister to the needs of the poor; they were the church’s relieving officers. See articles Church Government and Minister, Ministry
Ministering, Ministration, Ministry - A — 1: διακονία (Strong's #1248 — Noun Feminine — diakonia — dee-ak-on-ee'-ah ) "the office and work of a diakonos" (see Minister , A, No. , Acts 6:1 ; Romans 12:7 ; 1 Corinthians 12:5 , RV, "ministrations" (AV, "administrations"); 1 Corinthians 16:15 ; 2 Corinthians 8:4 ; 9:1,12 , RV, "ministration;" 2 Corinthians 9:13 ; Ephesians 4:12 , RV, "ministering" (AV, "the ministry," not in the sense of an ecclesiastical function); 2 Timothy 4:11 , RV, "(for) Ministering;" collectively of a local church, Acts 11:29 , "relief" (RV marg. "for ministry"); Revelation 2:19 , RV, "ministry" (AV, "service"); of Paul's service on behalf of poor saints, Romans 15:31 ; (3) of the "ministry" of the Holy Spirit in the Gospel, 2 Corinthians 3:8 ; (4) of the "ministry" of angels, Hebrews 1:14 , RV, "to do service" (AV, "to Minister"); (5) of the work of the Gospel, in general, e. ...
A — 2: λειτουργία (Strong's #3009 — Noun Feminine — leitourgia — li-toorg-ee'-ah ) akin to leitourgos (see Minister , A, No. ...
B — 1: λειτουργικός (Strong's #3010 — Adjective — leitourgikos — li-toorg-ik-os' ) "of or pertaining to service, Ministering," is used in Hebrews 1:14 , of angels as "ministering spirits" (for the word "do service" in the next clause, see A, No
the Angel of the Church of Ephesus - For the most far-shining angel in the seventh heaven itself desires to look down into the pulpit and the pastorate of the humblest and obscurest Minister in the Church of Christ. And that because he knows quite well that there is nothing for him to do in the whole of heaven for one moment to be compared with the daily round on this earth of a Minister, or an elder, or a deacon, or a collector, or a Sabbath-school teacher. And the heart of the old Minister of Ephesus was made so glad when he began to read this Epistle that he almost died with delight. No other language has produced so many painful Ministers as the English language, and no other language can so well describe them. It means all that tribulation through which every true Minister of His goes up. It means taking up some Ministerial cross every day. It means to me old Thomas Shepard more than any other Minister that I know. ...
His patience is another of the praises that his Master gives to this once happy Minister. Patience was one of the most outstanding and far-shining graces of our Lord Himself as long as He was by far the most sorely tried of all His Ministers. And He has all men and all things in His hands to this day that He may so order all men and all things as that all His Ministers shall be put to this school all their days, as He was put all His days by His Father. The whole of every Minister's lot and life is divinely ordained him so as to win for him his crown of patience, if he will only listen and believe it. Only, as one can see, the Minister of Ephesus would be swept into the deepest places, and into the most spiritual experiences, both of mysticism and of puritanism before their time, as often as he set himself, as he must surely have henceforth set himself every day of his life, to hate the deeds of the Nicolaitans, whoever they were, and at the same time to love the Nicolaitans themselves. To a neighbour Minister in the same Synod our Lord sends a special message about the sharp sword with the two edges. And it would need all the sharpness of that sword and all its edges to divide asunder the deeds of the Nicolaitans from the Nicolaitans themselves in their Minister's heart. What could be a more condemning charge against any Minister of Christ than to tell him in plain words that he had left his first love to his Master and to his Master's work? And yet, just by the peculiar way in which that charge is here worded, a far more sudden blow is dealt to this Minister's heart than if the charge had been made in the plainest and sternest terms. To say "nevertheless I have somewhat against thee" to say "somewhat," as if it were some very small matter, and scarcely worth mentioning, and then suddenly to say what it is, that, you may depend upon it, gave a shock of horror to that Minister's heart that he did not soon get over. You would have thought such a Minister impossible. Had you heard his praise so generously spread abroad at first both by God and man you would have felt absolutely sure of that Minister's spiritual prosperity and praise to the very end. But the Ministerial heart is deceitful above all other men's hearts. And these shocking revelations about this much-lauded Minister have been recorded and preserved in order that all Ministers may see themselves in them as in a glass. But the Minister of Ephesus knew quite well, both when and where his first love began to fail and he to fall away. For, not this Ephesus Minister only, but every Minister everywhere continues to love his Master and his Master's work, ay, and his Master's enemies, exactly in the measure of his secret reading of Holy Scripture and his secret prayerfulness. Yes, without being told it in as many words I am as sure of it as if I had been that metropolitan Minister myself. Thou hast given thy night watches to other things than a true Minister's meditation and prayer for himself and for his people. What profit is there in my blood? Shall the dead hold communion with Thee? Shall the grave of a castaway Minister redound honour to Thee? Restore Thou my soul
Catechism - The rubric at theend of the catechism provides that "The Minister of every Parishshall diligently, upon Sundays and Holy Days, or on some otherconvenient occasions, openly in the Church, instruct or examine somany children of his Parish sent unto him, as he shall thinkconvenient, in some part of this Catechism. " The object of thisrubric is that the Minister may have opportunity to prepare theyounger members of his flock for Confirmation. And on all the five points enumerated the children ofthe Parish may be duly instructed in their preparation for HolyConfirmation, if parents and guardians will be guided by the nextrubric which directs them to send their children to the Ministerfor instruction
Metz, Arnulf of, Saint - A chief Minister of Theodebert II, King of Austrasia, he married, and had two sons
Cassiodorus - He was quaestor, consul, and Minister under Theodoric and praetorian prefect under Amalaswintha, at whose death he withdrew to his estate where he erected the monastery of Vivarium
Counsellor - ]'>[1] is hesitatingly translated by Driver ‘minister’; RV Fidelity - We expect fidelity in a public Minister, in an agent or trustee, in a domestic servant, in a friend
Chains - God could loose His Minister from chains (Acts 12:7 )
Act - To behave, demean, or conduct, as in morals, private duties, or public offices as, we know not why a Minister has acted in this manner
Arnulf of Metz, Saint - A chief Minister of Theodebert II, King of Austrasia, he married, and had two sons
Ethiopia - A eunuch, Minister of Candace, Queen of Ethiopia, was converted to Christianity by the deacon Philip (Acts 8)
Hananiah - Indeed, it cannot be read too often, and especially by all that Minister in holy things
Bonds - The Apostle Paul was subjected to private bonds by Felix, the Roman governor, who "commanded a centurion to keep him, and to let him have liberty, and that he should forbid none of his acquaintance to Minister, or come unto him,"...
Acts 24:23
Demetrius - A disciple, and probably a Minister, of high repute, 3 John 1:12
Mission - And the Bishop has no authority to Minister in anyother Diocese, nor the Priest in any other Parish, save only asthey may be invited to do so by the ecclesiastical authority thereof
Heaven: to be Shut Out of at Last - Several years ago we heard an old Minister relate the following incident:: 'He had preached the Word for many a year in a wood hard by a beautiful village in the Inverness-shire Highlands, and it was his invariable custom, on dismissing his own congregation, to repair to the Baptist Chapel in this village to partake of the Lord's Supper with his people assembled there. He called to him, quickening his pace at the same time, but his cry was not heard, the attendant retreated inside and the Minister came up 'just in time' to see the door put to, and rear it fastened from within
Minister Ministry - In discussing these two terms we have to consider six groups of Greek words which occur in the Bible in connexion with Ministering or serving. They run in triplets, each triplet consisting of a concrete noun, an abstract noun, and a verb-‘minister,’ ‘ministry,’ and ‘to Minister. ...
The fact that we have no less than six sets of words to express the idea of ‘minister’ and ‘ministry’ is strong evidence that there was as yet no regular organization of Ministers with distinct titles indicating specific duties. In the Gospels it is rendered ‘servant,’ in the Epistles ‘minister,’ except Philippians 1:1 and 1 Timothy 3:8; 1 Timothy 3:12, where it is rendered ‘deacon. The usual translation is ‘ministry’; but we have ‘ministration’ (2 Corinthians 3:7-9; 2 Corinthians 9:13), ‘ministering’ (2 Corinthians 8:4; 2 Corinthians 9:1), ‘relief’ (Acts 11:29), ‘serving’ (Luke 10:40), also ‘service’ and ‘administration. ’ The Revised Version changes ‘ministry’ to ‘service’ (1 Timothy 1:12), ‘service’ to ‘ministry’ (Revelation 2:19), ‘ministry’ to ‘ministering’ (Ephesians 4:12, 2 Timothy 4:11), ‘ministry’ to ‘ministration’ (2 Corinthians 6:3), and ‘administration’ to ‘ministration’ (2 Corinthians 9:12). διακονεῖν is always ‘to Minister’ in Mt. , and nearly always ‘to Minister’ in the Epistles: in Lk. The Revised Version changes ‘administer’ to ‘minister’ (2 Corinthians 8:19-20), and ‘use the office of a deacon’ to ‘serve as deacons’ (1 Timothy 3:10; 1 Timothy 3:13). λειτουργός is rendered ‘minister’ in nearly all places; λειτουργία is ‘ministration’ in Lk. ; λειτουργεῖν is always ‘to Minister. ’ The translations of ὑπηρέτης vary between ‘attendant,’ ‘minister,’ ‘officer,’ and ‘servant. ’ The Revised Version changes ‘minister’ to ‘attendant’ (Luke 4:20, Acts 13:5), and ‘servant’ to ‘officer’ (Mark 14:54). ὑπηρετεῖν is ‘to serve’ (Acts 13:36) and ‘to Minister’ (Acts 20:34; Acts 24:23). The different shades of meaning between the groups of Greek words are of more importance; but the fact that ‘minister’ and ‘servant,’ with their cognates, appear in the translations of so many of the groups is evidence that the meanings frequently overlap. Paul rather than of Ministerial service in the Church: διάκονος (of Tychicus, Ephesians 6:21, Colossians 4:7), διακονία (of Mark, 2 Timothy 4:11), διακονεῖν (of Timothy and Erastus, Acts 19:22; of Onesimus, Philemon 1:13; and of Onesiphorus, 2 Timothy 1:18)
Ethiopian Eunuch - According to Acts 8:27 , an Ethiopian eunuch, Minister of Candace , queen of the Ethiopians, who was over all her treasure, was met shortly after the martyrdom of Stephen by the deacon Philip when returning from a religious journey to Jerusalem, and converted to Christianity
Gallio - The elder brother of Seneca the philosopher, who was tutor and for some time Minister of the emperor Nero
Angel - Hence angels are Ministers of God, and ministring spirits. A Minister of the gospel, who is an embassador of God
Candace - Irenaeus and Eusebius ascribe to Candace's Minister her own conversion to Christianity, and the promulgation of the gospel through her kingdom
Lord's Prayer, the - With regard to the second there is the followingrubric: "Then shall the Minister say the Lord's Prayer, the peoplerepeating after him every petition
Authors of Articles - , Minister at Methlick, Aberdeenshire. , Minister at Edinburgh. , Minister at Perth. , Minister at Foveran, Aberdeenshire. , Minister at Edinburgh. , Minister at Blairgowrie. , Minister at Elie. , Minister of St. , Minister at Glasgow
Church Wardens - It isthe special duties of the Wardens to see that the Church edifice iskept from unhallowed use; that it be kept clean and in good repair,duly lighted and warmed; to provide a sufficient supply of books andecclesiastical vestments to be used in the public ministrations bythe Minister, and to provide proper elements for the celebration ofthe Holy Communion and preserve due order during service
Administer - ) To dispense; to serve out; to supply; execute; as, to administer relief, to administer the sacrament. ) To contribute; to bring aid or supplies; to conduce; to Minister. ) To perform the office of administrator; to act officially; as, A administers upon the estate of B. ) To manage or conduct, as public affairs; to direct or superintend the execution, application, or conduct of; as, to administer the government or the state
Able - Having strong or unusual powers of mind, or intellectual qualifications as an able Minister
Hearing - I waited on the Minister, but could not obtain a hearing
Tychicus - Wherefore he calls him his dear brother, a faithful Minister of the Lord, and his companion in the service of God, Ephesians 6:21-22 ; Colossians 4:7-8
Sabaoth - JEHOVAH SABAOTH is the Lord of Hosts; and we are to understand the word hosts in the most comprehensive sense, as including the host of heaven, the angels and Minister of the Lord; the stars and planets, which, as an army ranged in battle array, perform the will of God; the armies of earth, whose conflicts his providence overrules to the accomplishment of his own wise designs; the hordes of inferior creatures, as the locusts that plagued Egypt, the quails that fed Israel, and "the canker-worm and the palmer-worm, his great army," Joel 2:15 ; and lastly, the people of the Lord, both of the old and new covenants, a truly great army, of which God is the general and commander, 2 Samuel 6:2 Psalm 24:10 Romans 9:29 James 5:4
Officer - The same word is elsewhere rendered ‘minister,’ either in the more general sense of ‘attendant’ (so Acts 13:6 RV [3] ), or in the special sense of the ‘minister’ (RV Donatists - A heretical and schismatical sect (311-411) who claimed that the validity of the sacraments depended on the moral character of the Minister, and that sinners could not be members of the Church, and could not be tolerated by a true Church unless their sins were secret
Levitical Priesthood - Institution founded by God when He chose Aaron and his sons to Minister to Him in the sanctuary (Exodus 28)
Deacon - In Presbyterian churches, he is subordinate to the Minister and elders, and has charge of certain duties connected with the communion service and the care of the poor
Silence - ) To restrain from the exercise of any function, privilege of instruction, or the like, especially from the act of preaching; as, to silence a Minister of the gospel
Schoolmaster - It is probable that elementary education was under the charge of the Minister of religion, as well as the instruction of those of riper years
Serve - 1: διακονέω (Strong's #1247 — Verb — diakoneo — dee-ak-on-eh'-o ) "to Minister" (akin to diakonos, No. , in Luke 10:40 ; 12:37 ; 17:8 ; 22:26,27 (twice); see Minister , B, No. " ...
4: ὑπηρετέω (Strong's #5256 — Verb — hupereteo — hoop-ay-ret-eh'-o ) for which see Minister
Pastor - Literally a shepherd; figuratively a stated Minister appointed to watch over and instruct a congregation. Of the qualifications of Ministers we have already made some remarks under that article; but the following, taken from the works of a spiritual and useful writer, we hope, will not be found superfluous. "If a Minister be faithful, he deceives not others; and if he be prudent, he is not apt to be deceived himself. "Ministerial faithfulness includes pure and spiritual aims and intentions for God, Philippians 2:20-21 . ...
The use of prudence to a Minister is unspeakably great: it not only gives clearness and perspicacity to the mind, by freeing it from passions and corporeal impressions, enabling it thereby to apprehend what is best to be done, but enables it in its deliberations about the means to make choice of the most apt and proper; and directs the application of them in the fittest season, without precipitation by too much haste, or hazard by too tedious delay. Ministerial prudence discovers itself in the choice of such subjects as the needs of our people's souls do most require and call for. It will excite us to seek a blessing from God upon our studies and labours, as knowing all our Ministerial success entirely depends thereupon
Neumann, John Nepomucene, Saint - Elevated to the See of Philadelphia, 1852, he worked indefatigably to promote education in his diocese, and to Minister to the spiritual and material welfare of his flock
John Neumann, Saint - Elevated to the See of Philadelphia, 1852, he worked indefatigably to promote education in his diocese, and to Minister to the spiritual and material welfare of his flock
Archippus - A Christian Minister at Colossae, whom Paul calls "our fellow soldier," namely, in the Christian warfare (2 Timothy 2:3)
Suffering: True Service - A good Minister went to see her, and asked, if after her active habits she did not find the change very hard to bear
Extreme Unction - Its Minister is a priest; the recipient must be illfrom sickness, and in a state of grace, though from its secondary end it can also act as a sacrament of the dead and remit mortal sin
Unction, Extreme - Its Minister is a priest; the recipient must be illfrom sickness, and in a state of grace, though from its secondary end it can also act as a sacrament of the dead and remit mortal sin
Ordain - Properly, to set to establish in a particular office or order hence, to invest with a Ministerial function or sacerdotal power to introduce and establish or settle in the pastoral office with the customary forms and solemnities as, to ordain a Minister of the gospel
Vicar - This officiating Minister was in reality no more than a curate,deputy or vicegerent of the appropriator, and therefore calledvicarius or vicar
the Angel of the Church in Pergamos - My irresistible attraction to these seven Epistles lies in this that they are so many looking-glasses, as James the Lord's brother would say, in which all Ministers of churches everywhere to the end of time may see themselves, and may judge themselves, as their Master sees them and judges them. Zeus, Athene, Apollo, Dionysus, Aphrodite, Æsculapius, were all among the gods of Pergamos, and all had magnificent shrines erected and administered to their honour. Whether the Minister of Pergamos found all that heathen environment as full of delight and edification to himself, and to his proselyte people, in his day as it is to us in our day, is another matter. But with all those intellectual and artistic attractions filling every part of his parish, after the Minister of Pergamos had this Epistle sent to him, all the rest of his days in Pergamos he would have neither time nor thought nor taste for anything else but for this, that Satan had his seat in Pergamos. ...
It was to bring home the discovery of this fearful fact to the Minister of Pergamos that was the sole object of this startling Epistle to him; just as his receiving of this Epistle was the supreme epoch and the decisive crisis of his whole Ministerial life. Pergamos is Satan's very capital, said this Epistle to the overwhelmed Minister of Pergamos. Political disputes, winds of doctrine, scandals of false professors, parties for and against particular Ministers, fashionable amusements, and so on. And what so greatly interests those three commentators in Pergamos is this, that they see from this Epistle to the Minister of Pergamos that Satan really had his seat in that Minister's own heart, just as that same seat is in their own heart. No other antiquity in Pergamos has any interest to James Durham at any rate, but that antique Minister's heart in Pergamos. Satan dwells not in temples made with hands, either in Pergamos, or in Olney, or in Edinburgh, but only in the spirits of men; and, most of all, in the spirits of Ministers, as this Epistle teaches us, and as all the best commentators tell us it teaches us. And the reason of that so perilous pre-eminence of Ministers is plain. Ministers, if they are real Ministers, hold a kind of vicarious and representative position both before heaven and hell, and the swordsmen and archers of both heaven and hell specially strike at and sorely wound and grieve all such Ministers. For let a Minister but succeed in his own battle against Satan, let a Minister but "overcome," as our Lord's word is in every one of these Ministerial Epistles, and his whole congregation will soon begin to share in the spoils of their Minister's victory. ...
Thus Satan trembles when he seesA Minister upon his knees. O poor and much-to-be-pitied Ministers! With Satan concentrating all his fiery darts upon you, with the deep-sunken pillars of his seat not yet dug out of your hearts, with all his thirty-two captains fighting day and night for the remnants of their master's power within you, and all the time, a far greater than Satan running you through and through with that terrible sword of His till there is not a sound spot in you-O most forlorn and afflicted of all men! O most bruised in your mind, and most broken in your heart, of all men! Pity your Ministers, my brethren, and put up with much that you cannot as yet understand or sympathise with in them. Do that, for your Ministers have a far harder-beset life than you have any idea of; with both heaven and hell setting on them continually and to the last drop of their blood. At the same time, let all intending Ministers count well the cost lest, haply, after they have laid the foundation and are not able to finish, both men and devils shall point at them and say, this Minister began to build for himself and for his congregation, for eternity, but come and see the ruin he has left! Count well, I say again, whether or no you are able to finish. Whether this Antipas was a martyred Minister or no, I cannot tell. Only there are many martyred Ministers in our own land and Church whose names are as little known as the bare name of Antipas. The silence and the ignorance and the indifference of earth will only make the surprise, both of those Ministers and of their persecutors, all the greater when the day of their recognition and reward comes. And Ministers especially. When they have overcome by the blood of the Lamb; when their long campaign of sanctification for themselves and for their people has been fought out and won; a new name will be given to every such Minister that he alone will know and understand, and that, as Adam said, by a sudden apprehension. He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches, and unto the Ministers of the churches
Seceders - In 1732, more than forty Ministers presented an address to the general assembly, specifying, in a variety of instances, what they considered to be great defections from the established constitution of the church, and craving a redress of these grievances. A petition to the same effect, subscribed by several hundreds of elders and private Christians, was offered at the same time; but the assembly refused a hearing to both, and enacted, that the election of Ministers to vacant charges, where an accepted presentation did not take place, should be competent only to a conjunct meeting of elders and heritors, being Protestants. To this act many objections were made by numbers of Ministers and private Christians. Ebenezer Erskine, Minister at Stirling, distinguished himself by a bold and determined opposition to the measures of the assembly in 1732. " In the course of his sermon, he remonstrated with no small degree of freedom against the act of the preceding assembly, with regard to the settlement of Ministers; and alleged that it was contrary to the word of God and the established constitution of the church. William Wilson, Minister at Perth, Alexander Moncrief, Minister at Abernethy, and James Fisher, Minister at Kinclaven, gave in a written adherence, under the form of instrument; and these four withdrew, intending to return to their respective charges, and act agreeably to their protest whenever they should have an opportunity. The commission met in August accordingly; and the four Ministers, still adhering to their protest, were suspended from the exercise of their office, and cited to the next meeting of the commission in November following. From this sentence several Ministers and elders, members of the commission, dissented. The commission met in November, and the suspended Ministers compeared. The synods of Galloway and Fife, as also the presbytery of Dornoch, addressed the commission for lenity, tenderness, and forbearance towards the suspended Ministers; and the presbytery of Aberdeen represented, that, in their judgment, the sentence of suspension inflicted on the aforesaid Ministers was too high, and that it was a stretch of ecclesiastical authority. Ebenezer Erskine, Minister at Stirling, Mr. William Wilson, Minister at Perth, Mr. Alexander Moncrief, Minister at Abernethy, and Mr. James Fisher, Minister at Kinclaven, to their respective charge, and declare them no longer Ministers of this church; and do hereby prohibit all Ministers of this church to employ them, or any of them, in any Ministerial function. And the commission do declare the churches of the said Ministers vacant from and after the date of this sentence. " This sentence being intimated to them, they protested that their Ministerial office and relation to their respective charges should be held as valid as if no such sentence had passed; and that they were now obliged to make a secession from the prevailing party in the ecclesiastical courts; and that it shall be lawful and warrantable for them to preach the Gospel, and discharge every branch of the pastoral office, according to the word of God, and the established principles of the church of Scotland. Ralph Erskine, Minister at Dunfermline, Mr. Thomas Mair, Minister at Orwel, Mr. John M'Laren, Minister at Edinburgh, Mr. John Currie, Minister at Kinglassie, Mr. James Wardlaw, Minister at Dunfermline, and Mr. Thomas Narin, Minister at Abbotshall, protested against the sentence of the commission, and that it should be lawful for them to complain of it to any subsequent general assembly of the church. ...
And accordingly the ejected Ministers declared in their protest, that they were laid under the disagreeable necessity of seceding, not from the principles and constitution of the church of Scotland, to which, they said, they steadfastly adhered, but from the present church-courts, which had thrown them out from Ministerial communion. The assembly, however, which met in May 1734, did so far modify the above snetence, that they empowered the synod of Perth and Stirling to receive the ejected Ministers into the communion of the church, and restore them to their respective charges; but with this express direction, "that the said synod should not take upon them to judge of the legality or formality of the former procedure of the church judicatories in relation to this affair, or either approve or censure the same. " As this appointment neither condemned the act of the preceding assembly, nor the conduct of the commission, the seceding Ministers considered it to be rather an act of grace than of justice; and therefore, they said, they could not return to the church-courts upon this ground; and they published to the world the reasons of their refusal, and the terms upon which they were willing to return to the communion of the established church. ...
Some time after this, several Ministers of the established church joined them, and the Associated Presbytery now consisted of eight Ministers. But the general assembly which met in 1738, finding that the number of Seceders was much increased, ordered the eight Ministers to be served with a libel, and to be cited to the next meeting of the assembly, in 1739. In 1745, the seceding Ministers were become so numerous, that they were erected into three different presbyteries under one synod, when a very unprofitable dispute divided them into two parties. As there were among them, from the commencement of their secessions, several students who had been educated at one or other of the universities, they appointed one of their Ministers to give lectures in theology, and train up candidates for the ministry. Where a congregation is very numerous, as in Stirling, Dunfermline, and Perth, it is formed into a collegiate charge, and provided with two Ministers. which, when divided among them, affords to each Minister about 20l. These have, besides, a presbytery in Nova Scotia; and, some years ago, it is said, that the Burgher and the Antiburgher Ministers residing in the United States formed a coalition, and joined in a general synod, which they call the Synod of New York and Pennsylvania. Believing that the people have a natural right to choose their own pastors, the settlement of their Ministers always proceeds upon a popular election; and the candidate, who is elected by the majority, is ordained among them. At the ordination of their Ministers, they use a formula of the same kind with that of the established church, which their Ministers are bound to subscribe when called to it; and if any of them teach doctrines contrary to the Scriptures, or the Westminster Confession of Faith, they are sure of being thrown out of their communion. ...
By this means, uniformity of sentiment is preserved among them; nor has any of their Ministers, excepting one, been prosecuted for error in doctrine since the commencement of their secession
Death: of a Believer - Lyford being desired, a little before his death, to let his friends know in what condition his soul was, and what his thoughts were about that eternity to which he seemed very near, he answered with a cheerfulness suitable to a believer and a Minister, 'I will let you know how it is with me;' and then, stretching out a hand that was withered and consumed with age and sickness: 'Here is,' said he 'the grave, the wrath of God, and devouring flames, the just punishment of sin, on the one side; and here am I, a poor sinful soul, on the other side; but this is my comfort, the covenant of grace which is established on so many sure promises, has saved me from all
Carlovingian Schools - A system of educational reform was inaugurated by Charlemagne under the advice of Alcuin who became his "prime Minister of education
Bidding Prayer - After which, all the people said their beads in a general silence, and the Minister kneeled down likewise, and said his: they were to say a paternoster, ave maria, &c
Service: the Road to Honour - Thou gracious King of kings, if thou hast made me a Minister or deacon in thy church, enable me to be foremost in every good word and work, shunning no sacrifice, and shrinking from no suffering ...
...
Flock - ) A Christian church or congregation; considered in their relation to the pastor, or Minister in charge
Heap - ...
2 Timothy 4:3 (a) We learn by this figure that a false leader will invite folk to follow him, and those who are in false doctrines will invite false leaders to Minister to them
Sanctuary - The word 'sanctuary' in Hebrews 8:2 is literally holy (places or things); of these Christ is Minister
Confide - The prince confides in his Ministers. The Minister confides in the strength and resources of the nation
Phoebe - Their duty was to Minister to their own sex (1 Timothy 3:11 translated "deaconesses" literally, "women")
Caprasius Presbyter at Lerins - They also built in the island a church, of which Honoratus became Minister
Violent - Vehement outrageous as a violent attack on the Minister
Baptism For the Dead - A practice formerly in use, when a person dying without baptism, another was baptized in his stead; thus supposing that God would accept the baptism of the proxy, as though it had been administered to the principal. Doddridge, who thinks it too early: he thus paraphrases the passage: "Such are our views and hopes as Christians; else, if it were not so, what should they do who are baptized in token of their embracing the Christian faith, in the room of the dead, who are just fallen in the cause of Christ, but are yet supported by a succession of new converts, who immediately offer themselves to fill up their places, as ranks of soldiers that advance to the combat in the rooms of their companions who have just been slain in their sight?" Lay baptism we find to have been permitted by both the common prayer books of king Edward and queen Elizabeth, when an infant was in immediate danger of death, and a lawful Minister could not be had. This was founded on a mistaken notion of the impossibility of salvation without the sacrament of baptism; but afterwards, when they came to have clearer notions of the sacraments, it was unanimously resolved in a convocation held in 1575, that even private baptism in a case of necessity was only to be administered by a lawful Minister
Christ: the Preacher's Great Theme - The best sermon is that which is fullest of Christ, A Welsh Minister, when preaching at the chapel of my dear brother Jonathan George, was saying that Christ was the sum and substance of the gospel, and he broke out into the following story:–A young man had been preaching in the presence of a venerable divine, and after he had done, he foolishly went to the old Minister and enquired, 'What do you think of my sermon, sir?' 'A very poor sermon indeed,' said he
Tychicus - Paul as a ‘beloved brother and faithful Minister in the Lord,’ and he is entrusted with the duty of telling the Ephesians of the writer’s welfare and of comforting their hearts (Ephesians 6:21). In the same way in the Epistle to the Colossians (Colossians 4:7) he is described as ‘a beloved brother and faithful Minister and fellow-servant,’ and the same duty is committed to him of telling the Colossians of the Apostle’s condition and comforting their hearts
Serve - To act as the Minister of to perform official duties to as, a Minister serves his prince
Shechinah - We have, however, no special reference to it till the consecration of the temple by Solomon, when it filled the whole house with its glory, so that the priests could not stand to Minister (1 Kings 8:10-13 ; 2 Chronicles 5:13,14 ; 7:1-3 )
Dimissory Letter - The General Canons provide that "before aclergyman shall be permitted to settle in any Church or Parish, orbe received into union with any Diocese of this Church as a Ministerthereof, he shall produce to the Bishop, or if there be no Bishop,to the Standing Committee thereof, a letter of dismission from underthe hand and seal of the Bishop with whose Diocese he has been lastconnected . "The effect of this law is that in the Episcopal Church there canbe no strolling, irresponsible evangelists or preachers, and thusthe people are protected from imposture, and may know, when theproper steps are taken, that their Ministers come to them fullyaccredited and duly authorized to Minister to them in Christ's Name
Relief - Thomas Gillespie being deposed for refusing to assist at the admission of a Minister to a parish who were unwilling to receive him. Being excluded from the communion of the church, he, with two or three other Ministers, constituted themselves into a presbytery, called the Presbytery of Relief; willing to afford relief to all "who adhered to the constitution of their church of Scotland, as exhibited in her creeds, canons, confessions, and forms of worship
Servants - The business of servants is to wait upon, Minister to, support and defend their masters; but there are three cases, as Dr
Decalogue - To the Commandments is added our Lord's Summaryof the Law, which may be read at the discretion of the Minister
Onesimus - The Apostle would gladly have kept him to Minister to him ( Philippians 1:13 ), but would not do so without the consent of Philemon, and therefore sends Onesimus back with the letter to obtain his master’s forgiveness and his permission to return to St
Deacon - A servant, a Minister. In the New Testament the word is used for any one that Ministers in the service of God: bishops and presbyters are also styled deacons; but more particularly and generally it is understood of the lowest order of Ministering servants in the church, 1 Corinthians 3:5 . 1 Timothy 3:1-16 : The office of deacon originally was to serve tables, the Lord's table, the Minister's table, and the poor's table
Epaphras - Paul in Colossians 1:7 ; Colossians 4:12 , Philippians 1:23 ; and described by him as his ‘fellow-servant,’ and also as a ‘servant’ and ‘faithful Minister’ of Christ
Divine - ) A Minister of the gospel; a priest; a clergyman
Dispatch - ) A message dispatched or sent with speed; especially, an important official letter sent from one public officer to another; - often used in the plural; as, a messenger has arrived with dispatches for the American Minister; naval or military dispatches
Keys - But every one must see that this is an absolute perversion of Scripture; for the keys of the kingdom of heaven most probably refer to the Gospel dispensation, and denote the power and authority of every faithful Minister to preach the Gospel, administer the sacraments, and exercise government, that men may be admitted to or excluded from the church, as is proper
Salome - John the evangelist, Matthew 27:56 ; and one of those holy women who used to attend upon our Saviour in his journeyings, and to Minister to him
Understanding - There is a good understanding between the Minister and his people
Trade - " See COMMIT , DO , LABOR , B, Note (1), Minister , WORK
Hannah - He was left at Shiloh to Minister "before the Lord. meil, a term used to denote the "robe" of the ephod worn by the high priest, Exodus 28:31 ), a priestly robe, a long upper tunic (1 Chronicles 15:27 ), in which to Minister in the tabernacle (1 Samuel 2:19 ; 15:27 ; Job 2:12 )
Messenger - "Whosoever will be great among you, (saith that humble Lord) let him be your Minister; and whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant; even as the Son of man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many
Officer (2) - Luke in his narrative of the Arrest and Trial and in Luke 12:58 avoids the term, but he uses it in Acts 5:22; Acts 5:26 as above (where, possibly, he is following a source), and four times of religious service—in Luke 4:20 of a Minister of the synagogue, in Luke 1:2 and Acts 26:16 (Paul) of Christian preachers, and in Acts 13:5 of John Mark, who was, in some sense, assistant to Barnabas and Paul. In all these cases the Authorized Version renders ‘minister’; in two (Luke 4:20, Acts 13:5) the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , without much lucidity, substitutes ‘attendant. The term ‘officer,’ owing to the secular and especially the military associations of the name, was manifestly unsuitable for the description of a Christian Minister of any rank
Idle - In the New Testament, Paul called attention to his own example as a bi-vocational Minister to encourage the Thessalonian Christians to be hard workers (2 Thessalonians 3:7-8 )
Eucharist - After this followed mutual salutations of the Minister and people; and then the bishop or presbyter, having sanctified the elements by a solemn benediction, broke the bread, and delivered it to the deacon, who distributed it to the communicants, and after that the cup
Marble - ‘The Emperor obtained this result, seconded by his friend and Minister, Agrippa, and succeeded in leaving behind him truly a city of marble, to which the Pantheon bears sufficient witness’ (Mary W
Eli - And though the Lord deferred the threatened punishment of his two sons for near twenty and seven years, yet he allowed them still to Minister in the service of the sanctuary
Ephesians - 62, while he was in prison at Rome, and forwarded by Tychicus, a beloved brother and faithful Minister
Become - Those who Minister the truth are to speak "the things which befit the sound doctrine," Titus 2:1
Romanum, Rituale - That book which contains the prayers and ceremonies to be used by the Minister in the administration of the sacraments and sacramentals, especially those included in the Gelasianum, Alcuin's Appendix to the Gregorianum and the Ordines
Ritual - That book which contains the prayers and ceremonies to be used by the Minister in the administration of the sacraments and sacramentals, especially those included in the Gelasianum, Alcuin's Appendix to the Gregorianum and the Ordines
Rituale Romanum - That book which contains the prayers and ceremonies to be used by the Minister in the administration of the sacraments and sacramentals, especially those included in the Gelasianum, Alcuin's Appendix to the Gregorianum and the Ordines
Music, Church - But I also feel thatif members of the choir accept from God and the Minister theprivilege of taking part in the services, the one thing theyowe to Almighty God, to the congregation and to themselves, isREVERENCE
Malchus - Malchus was Caiaphas the high priest's own servant, not a Minister or apparitor of the council. What a narrow escape Peter providentially had of a malefactor's and a murderer's end! The sheath is the place for the Christian's sword, except as the judicial Minister of God's wrath upon evil doers (Romans 13:4)
Esther - ...
Some time later a proud and ambitious man named Haman became chief Minister in the Persian government. ...
Mordecai then became chief Minister instead of Haman
Ministry, Minister - It is reasonably clear in Scripture that (1) ministry means the service of God and his creatures; (2) the one essential ministry is that of Jesus Christ; (3) the whole membership of the old and the new Israel is called to share in Ministerial service, of which there are many forms; and (4) certain persons in both the old new Israel are set apart for special ministry, within the total ministry. However, more basic than these three is that the whole people, Israel, is the Minister of God. Thus, in a basic sense every person, male and female, insofar as he or she is a member of Israel is a Minister/servant of Yahweh; so the whole of life has a Godward dimension (as the Law makes very clear). Within this relation of grace there was need of a Minister of God who would speak for him to the people (thus the prophet Isaiah 6:8 ; 50:4 ); of a Minister to stand before God to teach the people, lead in worship, and offer sacrifice on their behalf (on many occasions priests and Levites are called Ministers — e. Jesus Christ came not to be Ministered to but to Minister (Matthew 20:28 ). The unique, Ministerial servant example of Jesus is beautifully commended by Paul (Philippians 2:5-8 ) and Peter (1 Peter 2:21-25 ). ...
The Word Incarnate Ministered to people in their deepest need. As the Head of the church, which is his body, he continually Ministers to and through his members as their King, Priest, and Prophet. The Christian Ministers by being a bondservant (doulos [ δοῦλοσ , δοῦλοσ ]'>[1]) of Jesus Christ. He is the Minister par excellence and the only source of ministry. Morris, Ministers of God ; E
Lollards - The principal heresies of the Lollards were the denial of the authority of the Church, the repudiation of Transubstantiation, and the theory of "Dominium," viz: that the validity of the Sacraments depends upon the worthiness of the Minister
Matteo of Bascio - From the latter he obtained permission to wear the altered habit, to observe the Rule of Saint Francis to the letter, and to go about preaching, provided he would annually present himself to the Minister-provincial at the time of the Chapter
Luke - According to his own statement (Luke 1:2 ), he was not an "eye-witness and Minister of the word from the beginning
Seventy - How truly blessed is it to Minister in the Lord's service, in any and in every employment; yea, how truly honourable! A great and powerful King declared that he would rather be a doorkeeper in the house, of God, than to dwell in the richest tents of wickedness
North Dakota - The first missionary within the limits of North Dakota was the Reverend Joseph Severe Dumoulin, sent by Bishop Plessis of Quebec to Minister to a colony of Canadians who had been driven south from
Divine - A Minister of the gospel a priest a clergyman
Haiti - Haiti is represented at the Holy See by an envoy extraordinary and Minister plenipotentiary, and an internuncio resides in Port-au-Prince
James, Son of Zebedee - This raised the indignation of the other disciples; but the Lord taught them all a lesson of humility: He Himself had come to Minister and to give His life a ransom for many
Bascio, Matteo of - From the latter he obtained permission to wear the altered habit, to observe the Rule of Saint Francis to the letter, and to go about preaching, provided he would annually present himself to the Minister-provincial at the time of the Chapter
Thessalonica - Paul desired to revisit the church there, and sent Timothy to Minister to them
Rechabites - The Rabbis interpret this to signify that they should Minister in the sanctuary, and say they became united to the Levites; but we find nothing of this in scripture
Attend, Attendance, Attendant - See Minister , OFFICER , SERVANT
Ritual. Ritualism - Loyalty to the Prayer-book demands obedience tothe rubrics on the part of both Minister and people
Justinus i - He was a man of no education, and the affairs of the state were managed chiefly by his prudent Minister Proclus the quaestor and afterwards by his nephew and eventual successor Justinian
Servant - He speaks also of a future day when He will gird Himself, make His servants sit down, and will come forth and serve them, thus being a Minister to servants! Luke 12:37 . Also translated 'minister' and officer
Ministerial Call - But here the Episcopalian and the Dissenter differ; the former believing that the choice and call of a Minister rest with the superior clergy, or those who have the gift of an ecclesiastical benefice; the latter supposes that it should rest on the suffrage of the people to whom he is to Minister. The introduction of Ministers into their office by patronage, of whatever form, hath its origin from popery, tends to establish a tyranny over men's conscience, which and whom Christ hath made free, and to fill pulpits with wicked and indolent clergymen
Add - Its meaning is "to supply, to Minister" (epi, "to," choregeo, "to Minister"); RV, "supply. " See Minister
Minister - An able Minister will have something of all these united in him, though he may not excel in all; and it becomes every one who is a candidate for the ministry to get a clear idea of each, that he may not be deficient in the discharge of that work which is the most important that can be sustained by mortal beings. In the first place, then, it must be observed, that Ministers of the Gospel ought to be sound as to their principles. A Minister without principles will never do any good; and he who professes to believe in a system, should see to it that it accords with the word of God. ...
A haught imperious spirit is a disgrace to the Ministerial character, and generally brings contempt. Ministers, therefore, especially, should endeavour to break these shackles, get their minds enlarged, and stored with all useful knowledge. Ministers should be extensive as to their benevolence and candour. Now, while Ministers ought to contend earnestly for the faith once delivered to the saints, they must remember that men always will think different from each other; that prejudice of education has great influence; that difference of opinion as to non-essential things is not of such importance as to be a ground of dislike. Let the Ministers of Christ, then, pity the weak, forgive the ignorant, bear with the sincere though mistaken zealot, and love all who love the Lord Jesus Christ. Ministers should be zealous and faithful in their public work. The sick must be visited; children must be catechised; the ordinances administered; and the word of God preached. These things must be taken up, not as a matter of duty only, but of pleasure, and executed with faithfulness; and, as they are of the utmost importance, Ministers should attend to them with all that sincerity, earnestness, and zeal which that importance demands. An idle, frigid, indifferent Minister is a pest to society, a disgrace to his profession, an injury to the church, and offensive to God himself. Lastly, Ministers should be uniform as to their conduct. Edwards's Preacher; Mason's Student and Pastor; Gibbon's Christian Minister; Mather's Student and Preacher; Osterwald's Lectures on the Sacred Ministry; Robinson's Claude; Doddridge's Lectures on Preaching and the Ministeral Office
Minister, Ministration - MINISTER, MINISTRATION...
1. Evidently the ritual sense of this group of words is always present to the mind of the Apostle when he has occasion to use them (Romans 15:16 ‘Paul the Ministering priest, the preaching of the gospel his priestly function, the believing Gentiles his offering’ [5], Romans 15:27, 2 Corinthians 9:12, Philippians 2:17 ‘the Philippians the priests, their faith the sacrifice, the apostle’s life-blood the accompanying libation’ [6], Philippians 2:25; Philippians 2:30; cf. Those passages also show that Christ’s Ministers are sacrificing priests only in the same sense as the rest of the members of the Christian brotherhood, who render λειτουργίαι to God and to men by ‘the work of faith, and the labour of love’ (cf. I will attach myself as a Minister and follower (διάκονος καὶ ἀκόλουθος) to Him; I have the same movements as He has, I have the same desires; in a word, I have the same will (συνθελω). ’...
In the Gospels, διάκονος and its derivatives are used in the sense of preparing or serving a meal, Mark 1:13 (|| Matthew 4:11), Mark 1:31 (|| Matthew 8:15, Luke 4:39), Luke 10:40; Luke 12:37; Luke 17:8, Matthew 22:13, John 2:5; John 2:9; John 12:2; in the same sense, figuratively, Mark 9:35 (not exactly || Matthew 23:11, Luke 22:26-27), Mark 10:43; Mark 10:45 (|| Matthew 20:26; Matthew 20:28), John 12:26; of Ministering service generally, Luke 8:3, Mark 15:41, Matthew 27:55; Matthew 25:44. ...
The passages in which ‘minister,’ ‘to Minister,’ are the renderings adopted in Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , are the following: (i. ) Of the Ministering women, Luke 8:3 (Mark 15:41, Matthew 27:55) αἵτινες διηκόνουν αὐτῷ [9] ἐκ τῶν ὑπαρχόντων αὐταῖς, and continued doing so till the close of Christ’s life on earth. αἵτινες (= tales quœ) may imply that they had the heart as well as the means to Minister to Him. ) The great sayings about service being the path to true greatness, Mark 9:35 πάντων διάκονος, ‘minister of all,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 (not exactly || Matthew 23:11, Luke 22:26-27), Mark 10:43; Mark 10:45 (Matthew 20:26; Matthew 20:28, which is followed by an extensive interpolation of a similar tenor in DΦ, Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible , Ext. Davidson, Theism, 372), so to be great you must cease to think of greatness and humble yourself to serve others, which includes the being quick to discern and open-hearted to Minister to their needs, even to the sacrificing of yourself for their good. They who shall have the highest place in God’s household are they who take the duties of its humblest member, the δοῦλος, upon themselves; and they who shall be qualified to sit down at the feast of salvation are they who fulfil the work of the διάκονος at table, who wait upon those whom God regards as His guests, and Minister to their wants (cf. In saying that He ‘came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister,’ He does not mean that the ministrations He is receiving are not welcome, but He defines the main object of His sojourning in this world, and speaks of Himself not as the Guest whom the whole world will delight to honour, but as the humble attendant upon those who are in want; not as the Benefactor who is to be raised by men to the highest earthly glory, but as One who is come to serve them (seeing that on account of the state they are in there is no other way in which He can effectually and completely serve them) by the surrender of life itself (cf. So, when we follow His example and are lifted out of ourselves by His Spirit of Ministering love, everything that came to Him will come to us, according to the measure in which we, who are infinitely inferior to Him, will be found meet for it,—God’s approval of our life, increasing influence for good, that true greatness which consists in our becoming better able to elevate and bless our fellow-men (cf. 260), and to Minister to them in the highest way by leading them to righteousness (Daniel 12:3), and which may also comprehend the power to Minister to them in a higher state of being (cf. Ministering love is not only the path to true greatness, it is also the indispensable condition of future exaltation with Christ. Not to have Ministered to their needs is not to have Ministered to His (cf. ’ Stoicism was wholly wanting in humility, which is the very foundation of Ministering love as taught by Jesus (cf. There are differences of διακονίαι (1 Corinthians 12:5), but the manifold faculties for ‘the work of Ministering’ are gifts from the Exalted Lord (Ephesians 4:12), and each disciple has received a gift of some kind to be laid out in Christian service (1 Peter 4:10-11). Ministering to the wants of the poor, the sick, the stranger, the prisoner, was constantly called for (Acts 6:1-2, Romans 12:7, Hebrews 6:10; cf
the Unprofitable Servant - Every single syllable of this scripture is a study for us who are Ministers. Whatever other men may make or may not make of this fine scripture, no Minister can possibly miss or mistake its meaning for him, or get away from Christ's all-seeing eye as he reads it. Christ sets every Minister before this Ministerial looking-glass, in order that in it he may see what manner of Minister he now is, and may forecast what his place is likely to be when his Master sets His supper, and Himself serves it, for all His ploughmen and for all His vine-dressers. Only, far better have ten ploughmen's work to do than one Minister's work. "...
Our Lord tells all His true Ministers to say every night that they are unprofitable servants, and they all say it. But at the same time He solemnly warns all His so-called Ministers that He will irrevocably pronounce this very sentence at the last day against some of them. " I was told about such a threatened Minister of Christ and of His Church in Scotland only last night. But at the present moment he has neither Sabbath School, nor Prayer Meeting, nor Bible Class, nor Endeavour Society, nor Band of Hope, and as for his pastoral work, an old man died the other day, not many stonecasts from the manse, who had not seen his Minister for two years. John Mark's whole story is told first in the Acts, and then in the Epistles, just to guide and encourage the Church in all her dealings with all such unprofitable Ministers as Mark once was. And by far the best way of dealing with all our unprofitable Ministers would be to induce and enable them to visit Bridge-of-Allan, or Dunblane, or Perth, or Keswick, or Mildmay. "We've gotten a Minister noo!" said an old elder to me after his hitherto unprofitable Minister had been induced and enabled to make such a visit. ...
But all the time, though this character-sketch is intended by our Lord for us Ministers in the first place, it is not intended for us only. Our Lord's true people are all Ministers in their own measure, as Moses prayed they might all be. And, Minister or people, a ploughman or a feeder of cattle, putting up pailings, digging ditches, gathering out stones, or hewing up thorns, when you have done all, end all, as Bartholomew's ploughman ended his long and arduous day's work
Ordination - Among the dissenters, ordination is the public setting apart of a Minister to his work, or over the people whose call he has accepted. A person must be twenty-three years of age, or near it, before he can be ordained deacon, or have any share in the ministry; and full twenty-four before he can be ordained priest, and by that means be permitted to administer the holy communion. A bishop, on the ordination of clergymen, is to examine them in the presence of the Ministers, who in the ordination of priests, but not of deacons, assist him at the imposition of hands; but this is only done as a mark of assent, not because it is thought necessary. Among the Calvinistic Methodists, ordination is performed by the sanction and assistance of their own Ministers. After which trial, the church proceeds to give him a call to be their Minister; which he accepting, the public acknowledgment thereof is signified by ordination, the mode of which is so well known, as not to need recital here. Some, however, on this side of the question, do not go so far as to say, that the essence of ordination lies in the choice of the people, but in the solemn and public separation to office by prayer: still, however, they think that ordination by either bishops, presbyters, or any superior character, cannot be necessary to make a Minister or ordain a pastor in any particular church; for Jesus Christ, say they, would never leave the subsistence of his churches, or the efficacy of his word and sacraments, to depend on the uninterrupted succession of any office or officer: for then it would be impossible for any church to know whether they ever have had any authentic Minister; for we could never be assured that such ordinations had been rightly transmitted through 1700 years. Scripture represents ordination to be the setting apart of a person to the holy ministry, by the authority of Jesus himself acting by the medium of men in office; and this solemn investing act is necessary to his being lawfully accounted a Minister of Christ. Now did this power lodge in the people, how happens it that in all the epistles, not a single word is to be found giving them any directions about constituting Ministers? On the other hand, in the epistles to timothy and Titus, who were persons in office, we find particular instructions given them to lay hands suddenly on no man, to examine his qualifications before they ordain him, and to take care that they commit the office only to faithful men, who shall be able to teach others also, Titus 1:5 . On the one side it is said, that there is no Scripture authority whatever for a person being ordained without being chosen or nominated to the office of a Minister by a church. Allowing that they have all those talents, gifts, and grace, that constitute a Minister in the sight of God, who will dare say they should not be designated by their brethren for the administration of those ordinances Christ has appointed in the church?...
Without allowing this, how many thousands would be destitute of these ordinances? Besides, these are the very men whom God in general honours as the first instruments in raising churches, over which stated pastors are afterwards fixed. Watts, "that since there are some texts in the New Testament, wherein single persons, either apostles, as Paul and Barnabas, ordained Ministers in the churches; or evangelists, as Timothy and Titus; and since other missions or ordinations are intimated to be performed by several persons, viz. and 1 Timothy 4:14 ; since there is sometimes mention made of the imposition of hands in the mission of a Minister, and sometimes no mention of it; and since it is evident that in some cases popular ordinations are and must be valid without any bishop or elder; I think none of these differences should be made a matter of violent contest among Christians; nor ought any words to be pronounced against each other by those of the episcopal, presbyterian, or independent way. ...
Surely, all may agree thus far, that various forms or modes, seeming to be used in the mission or ordination of Ministers in primitive times, may give a reasonable occasion or colour for sincere and honest searchers after truth to follow different opinions on this head, and do therefore demand our candid and charitable sentiments concerning those who differ from us. " ...
See articles EPISCOPACY, IMPOSITION OF HANDS, INDEPENDENTS, and MinisterIAL CALL, in this work; James Owen's Plea for Scripture Ordination; Doddridge's Tracts, 5: 2: p
the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans - Archippus was still to all intents and purposes a young Minister when this message was sent to him from the aged Apostle, "Say to Archippus, take heed to the ministry which thou hast received in the Lord, that thou fulfil it. " But instead of taking that timeous reproof to heart, Archippus had gone steadily down in his declension and decay till he had this last reproof addressed to him, and which has been a last reproof to so many Ministers and their people since his day and down to our own day. ...
The English language has inherited one of its most contemptuous and denunciatory epithets from this Epistle to this lukewarm Minister and his lukewarm church. And this Epistle now open before us is a divinely fashioned looking-glass, as James the Lord's brother would have called it, in which all Laodicean Ministers and people are intended to see themselves. No Minister ever, out of Bedlam, said that in so many words. "...
Among all the terrible things here threatened against this miserable Minister of Laodicea, his "nakedness," and "the shame of his nakedness," is surely the most terrible. Indeed his case is far worse than yours; unless, indeed, like him you are a Minister. For he will have all the shame that you will have, and, over and above all that, being a Minister he will have the special shame and the special contempt and the special revenge both of God and man to bear, and that, if the prophet is right, to everlasting. " It was this same salvation offered to all such Ministers as Archippus in the Old Testament, that made Micah exclaim at the end of his ministry. These words: "If any man hear My voice, and open the door,"-communicants, He means, or non-communicants; members or adherents; young or old; Minister or elder; especially any Minister. For as He stood that night at Archippus's door in Laodicea, so will He stand at all Ministers' doors in Edinburgh this night
Distraction - Distraction and mind-wandering, on the part of the Minister of a sacrament, do not invalidate the sacrament
Nethaneel - A Levite and father of Shemaiah who recorded the names and order of the people who would Minister in the Temple (1 Chronicles 24:6 )
Dispatch - A vessel or a messenger has arrived with dispatches for the American Minister
Titus - A distinguished Christian Minister of Greek origin, Galatians 2:3 ; converted under the preaching of Paul, Titus 1:4 , whose companion and fellow-labor he became, 2 Corinthians 8:23
Elias Bonibarone - Minister general of the Friars Minor, born probably Bevilia, near Assisi, Italy, c
Elias Bonusbaro - Minister general of the Friars Minor, born probably Bevilia, near Assisi, Italy, c
Elias of Cortona - Minister general of the Friars Minor, born probably Bevilia, near Assisi, Italy, c
Bartholomew - " "Because I said unto thee, I saw thee under the fig tree, believest thou? thou shalt see greater things than these: hereafter (from this time forth, Greek) ye (not merely thou alone, but all My disciples) shall see heaven open, and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of man," the true ladder between earth and heaven, of which that in Jacob's dream was the type (Genesis 28:12), and upon which angels delight to Minister. His miracles and His teaching and His divine manifestation, of which Bartholomew had just a taste, were a sample and installment of a continually progressing opening of heaven to earth and earth to heaven (Revelation 4:1; Acts 7:56; Hebrews 9:8; Hebrews 10:19-20) wherein angels Minister to and for Him (Luke 2:9; Luke 2:13; Luke 22:43; Acts 1:10); to be consummated when "the tabernacle of God shall be with men," and "the holy Jerusalem shall descend out of heaven from God" (Revelation 21; 1 Corinthians 13:12)
Mordecai - But this scarcely seems to be a sufficient account of Mordecai's refusing civil respect to Haman, who was first Minister of state; especially when by so doing he exposed his whole nation to imminent danger. Beside, if nothing but civil respect had been intended to Haman, the king need not have enjoined it on his servants after he had made him his first Minister and chief favourite, Esther 3:1-2 ; they would have been ready enough to show it on all occasions
Martha - The church cannot Minister without “Marthas” who are willing to serve alone
High Priest - He ever lives to make intercession for us, He is also the Minister of the sanctuary — He appears in the presence of God for us, and is the great Priest over the house of God
Pleiades - But what a refreshing thought it is to the true believer in Jesus, the sinner's Saviour is the Maker of them all; and to whatsoever purpose else they are formed to Minister, their alt by his appointment serve to his glory, and his people's welfare!...
Mitre - The mitre was emblematical of the upholding of purity, righteousness and holiness by the Lord Jesus as the Minister of the sanctuary, or holy place
Abihu - They were consecrated to Minister to the Lord as priests, yet on the first occasion of their exercising the priesthood for Israel they offered strange fire, which the Lord had not commanded, and were smitten by fire from God
Jehoshaphat - Others think the office maintained public records, while others speak of a foreign Minister
Nereus - possible the ‘household of Stephanas’ in Corinth, who were ‘the firstfruits of Achaia’ and who ‘set themselves to Minister unto the saints’ (1 Corinthians 16:15)
Luke, Festival of Saint - Luke himself testifies that he was not from thebeginning an eye-witness and Minister of the Word
Pastor - ’ This exceptional translation is justified, because here only is ποιμήν used of some kind of Christian Minister
Jean de Gerson - He was hailed as a great and learned doctor, an ardent lover of souls, and a model Minister of the Gospel
Ambassador - , ambasciare, to go on mission) ...
Minister of high rank sent by head of a sovereign state as personal representative. Nations represented by Ministers plenipotentiary are: Austria, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Czechoslovakia, Great Britain, Haiti, Hungary, Irish Free State, Latvia, Liberia, Lithuania, Monaco, Nicaragua, Portugal, Rumania Salvador, San Marino, Venezuela, Yugoslavia
Lectures, Morning - most of the citizens having some near relation or friend in the army of the earl of Essex, so many bills were sent up to the pulpit every Lord's Day for their preservation, that the Minister had neither time to read them, nor to recommend their cases to God in prayer; it was, therefore, agreed by some London divines to separate an hour for this purpose every morning, one half to be spent in prayer, and the other in a suitable exhortation to the people
Haman - The chief Minister of Ahasuerus in the time of Esther
Gerson, Jean Charlier de - He was hailed as a great and learned doctor, an ardent lover of souls, and a model Minister of the Gospel
Imposition of Hands - Moses laid his hands on Joshua, by expresscommand from God, and as supreme Minister over his people; and thusour Blessed Lord laid His Hands upon little children and blessedthem, and upon those that were sick and healed them
Litany, the - By reason of its responsivecharacter the Litany is a very soul stirring and heart searchingsupplication, is designed to keep the attention constantly on thealert and to enliven devotion by calling upon the congregation tomake their petitions for those deliverances and blessings recitedby the Minister
Paul as a Pastor - Paul had been the Minister and the moderator of the kirk-session of Ephesus for three never-to-be-forgotten years. This sederunt, and this extract-minute of it, is a very glass in which every Minister and every elder may to this day see themselves, and what manner of Minister and what manner of elder they are, and are not. If Paul had both forgiven and forgotten those unfortunate misunderstandings and self-assertions that will come up among the very best Ministers and elders, they had not forgiven or forgotten themselves for those days, or for their part in them. Yea, ye yourselves know that these hands-and as he held them up, the assembled elders saw a tongue of truth in every seam and scar that covered them-these hands have Ministered to all my own necessities, and to them that were with me. In that also there is a glass held up for all Ministers and all congregations in which to see and to examine both themselves, and all their past and fast-passing relations to one another, both in the pulpit and in the pew. And not his defeats and disappointments among his people only; but still more, the things in a Minister himself that account for and justify all those defeats and disappointments-all that makes his whole ministry to collapse, and to fall in on his heart continually, like a house that has been built on the sand. Till, whatever other gifts and graces a Minister may be lacking in, it is impossible for him to lack humility. Till, both for a garment of office, and for a grace of character, a Minister is clothed from head to foot with spiritual and evangelical humility. Paul, I suppose, is the only Minister that ever lived who could have read Richard Baxter's Reformed Pastor without going mad with remorse, and with a fearful looking for of judgment. A Minister is not only for public preaching. " There are few things in Ministerial history that makes my heart bleed like the tragedy of Jonathan Edwards' breach with his congregation, and then his banishment from his congregation. The only thing that ever I heard to come near that was when a Highland Minister was leaving his parish, and said from the pulpit in his farewell sermon, that he took all his people to witness that he had spoken, not only from the pulpit, but personally, and in private, to every single one of his people about the state of their souls. Paul would often drop in, as we say, not indeed to curse the weather, and to canvass the approaching marriages, like William Law's Minister, but, all the same, to rejoice with the bridegroom and the bride, and to set down their exact date in his diary, so as to be sure to be on the spot in good time, and in his best attire
Otto Eduard Leopold Von Bismarck - In 1862 he became Minister of foreign affairs and head of the cabinet
Cancellarius - The chancellor of the exchequer is the British Minister of finance
Chancellor - The chancellor of the exchequer is the British Minister of finance
Cardinal - Their duties according to the statutes of the cathedral of 1396 are "continually to visit the sick and Minister unto them as often as shall be needful"; the poet Richard Harris Barham ("Thomas Ingoldsby") held one of these offices
Mark - 47) as their "minister," but from some cause turned back when they reached Perga in Pamphylia (Acts 12:25 ; 13:13 )
Hattemists - In ecclesiastical history, the name of a modern Dutch sect, so called from Pontian Van Hattem, a Minister in the province of Zealand, towards the close of the last century, who, being addicted to the sentiments of Spinosa, was on that account degraded from his pastoral office
Attendance at Public Worship: Invitations to - ' 'Oh,' said the father, 'nobody ever asked us to come!' 'Well,' said the visitor, 'I'll ask you now,' and she directed him to a church where he would hear the glad tidings from a faithful Minister
Test Act - 2, which directs all officers, civil and military, to take the oaths, and make the declaration against transubstantiation, in the Court of King's Bench or chancery, the next term, or at the next quarter sessions, or (by subsequent statutes) within six months after their admission; and also within the same time to receive the sacrament of the Lord's supper, according to the usage of the church of England, in some public church, immediately after divine service or sermon, and to deliver into court a certificate thereof, signed by the Minister and church-warden: and also to prove the same by two credible witnesses, upon forfeiture of five hundred pounds, and disability to hold the said office
Hungary - Hungary is represented at the Holy See by an envoy extraordinary and Minister plenipotentiary, and a nuncio resides in Budapest
Louis Xiv - Later (1679-85) they were excluded from office and the liberal professions, and at times very cruelly treated by Louvois, his Minister
Chain - Was the badge of a judge, and a prime Minister, in Egypt
Holy Communion - The priest alone is the ordinary Minister, the deacon, the extraordinary
Avenger, Avenger of Blood - the magistrate bears not the sword in vain, for he is the Minister of God for the punishment of evil-doers
Cloud - At the dedication of the temple 'the cloud' filled the house so that the priests could not Minister because of the cloud: "for the glory of Jehovah had filled the house of Jehovah
Hear - To be a hearer of to sit under the preaching of as, what Minister do you hear? A colloquial use of the word
Henry iv, King - With the aid of his Minister, Sully, he centralized public authority, and developed industry, commerce, and agriculture
Hophni - The infamy of these men while Ministering before the Lord, the Holy Ghost hath faithfully recorded; and their history presents itself as a monument in the church, to be read by all that Minister in holy things
Aaronic Priesthood - The first thought in priesthood is that those appointed might Minister to the Lord in the priests' office, that they might be a company in nearness to and in communion with the Lord
Grief And Mourning - From this and other statements we can learn ways in which we can Minister to grief-stricken people:...
1) Realize the gift of presence. ...
4) Be ready to Minister to the griever for a long time
Matrimony - Each sacrament of the Church requires a Minister, but the officiating clergyman is not the Minister of matrimony; in nearly every case, indeed, his presence is necessary, but he is merely the official who receives the mutual consent of the parties and gives the Church's blessing to their union. The contracting parties are the real Ministers of this sacrament; its "matter" is the mutual giving of each to the other, and its "form" consists in the words or outward signs by which the man and the woman express their agreement and intention to be husband and wife
Presbytery - the Letters of Ignatius, passim ), corresponding not to the modern presbytery of the Presbyterian Churches, which is a district court composed of Ministers and elders drawn from a number of separate congregations, but to the kirk-session or body of elders by which in those churches a single congregation is ruled. in the Presbyterian and Congregational Churches the precedence of the Minister over the elders and deacons respectively, although, properly speaking, a ‘minister’ is simply a diakonos or deacon)
Christian Church, General Convention - A similar movement began among the Baptists of New England under Dr Abner Jones who organized a church at Lyndon, Vermont, 1800; he was joined by Elias Smith, Baptist Minister of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and many others. Two Ministers, Richard McNemar and John Thompson, with John Dunlavy, Robert Marshall, and Barton W
Esther - Soon after this he gave Haman the Agagite, his prime Minister, power and authority to kill and extirpate all the Jews throughout the Persian empire
Carnal - Paul said that Gentiles had received the spiritual gospel through the Jews and should thus Minister to the fleshly or material needs of the Jews (Romans 15:27 )
Benefactor - And this after the example of the Lord Himself, who, being the true Εὐεργέτης, ‘came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’ (see the parallel passage Matthew 20:25-28, and cf
Teraphim - Micah had them in his house, and felt sure that Jehovah would bless him when he had a Levite to Minister before them
Synagogue - The "minister," answering nearly to the modern sexton of the synagogue, was the attendant who handed the books to the reader, and opened and closed the synagogue
jo'Nah - [1] After his deliverance, Jonah executed his commission; and the king, "believing him to be a Minister form the supreme deity of the nation," and having heard of his miraculous deliverance, ordered a general fast, and averted the threatened judgment
Jonathan - He knew that David would be the next king, and he would be happy to serve under him as chief Minister (1 Samuel 23:16-18)
Servant - , "ministers"); 23:11 (RV marg. , ditto); Mark 9:35 , AV (RV, "minister"); John 2:5,9 ; 12:26 ; Romans 16:1 . " ...
A — 5: ὑπηρέτης (Strong's #5257 — Noun Masculine — huperetes — hoop-ay-ret'-ace ) for which see Minister , No
Mennonites - They teach that infants are not the proper subjects of baptism; that Ministers of the Gospel ought to receive no salary. The Mennonites in Pennsylvania do not baptize by immersion, though they administer the ordinance to none but adult persons. Their common method is this: The person to be baptized kneels, the Minister holds his hands over him, into which the deacon pours water, so that it runs on the head of the baptized; after which follow imposition of hands and prayer. They have a Mennonite college at Amsterdam, and the Ministers are chosen in some places by the congregation, and in others by the elders only. As they reject infant baptism, they refuse to commune at the Lord's table with any who administer the ordinance to children, unless resprinkled. They train up catechumens under their Ministers, and, about the age of sixteen, baptize them, taking from the candidate, before the Minister and elders, an account of his repentance and faith. ...
With respect to their confession of faith, as it is stated by one of their Ministers, Mr
the Bidden to the Reat Marriage Supper And Some of Their Excuses - And the Holy Ghost stands beside the Son ready, and book in hand like the Minister, to pronounce you the Lamb's wife. Your Ministers are almost as much involved as you are. For God lays this same awful order on all His Ministers,-Go, He says, and compel them to come in. That is your Minister's ordination oath, and if you are lost: if you go on to the end making excuses and refusals, your lost eternity will be at your Minister's door, as well as at your own. Your Minister must compel you therefore, if he is not to be involved in your ruin. But if you did not do all that, and that continually, you are no Minister of mine. ' O men and women! Be not so inhuman as to drag down your Minister with yourselves. Say, at any rate, to God's angel that your Minister is not to blame. Say to him that your Minister did all that mortal man could do. Say to him that your Minister's hands are pure of your blood, and that you alone are without excuse. But when the two days of special preparation are come, what will we see here? We will see the church on the Thursday evening, and on the Saturday afternoon, not one-fourth full: till your Ministers will be ashamed to have brought two of God's servants to preach to your empty pews. And then the Ministers and the elders will get such a refreshment and such a preparation from those two services that they will look round and will say to themselves:-Oh, why were so and so not here? What a blessing they have lost
Paul's Blamelessness as a Minister - So much so that Paul stands next to our Divine Master Himself as a blameless model for all Ministers, as well as for all other men of God. And both his own ministry and that of all his successors were so much on Paul's mind, that in every new Epistle of his he has given us something fresh and forcible as to how all Ministers are to attain to a blameless ministry, till they shall be able to give a good account of their ministry, first to their people, and then to their Master. And every inch of that minute map is a study of the foremost importance and impressiveness for all the parish Ministers of Scotland. But Paul's pastoral map bites far deeper, and with far sharper teeth, into every Minister's conscience than even Boston's mordant map will bite, though it is warranted to draw ordained blood also. But he lays down with the greatest art the latitudes and the longitudes of all his trials, and temptations, and tumults as a Minister. And just as in Thomas Boston's parish there are pillars and crosses set up to mark and to record to all time in Scotland his great victories won over himself, and his corresponding victories won over his people; so does Paul set up this and that great stone of Ministerial remembrance and has had these instructive things engraved upon it: "by pureness, by knowledge, by long-suffering, by kindness, by the Holy Ghost, by love unfeigned, by the word of truth, by the power of God, by the armour of righteousness on the right hand and on the left. And then on the other side of the sacred site, the pureness, the knowledge, the patience, and suchlike, by all of which your great forerunner and example-minister came out of it all having given offence in nothing, but with an everlastingly honoured name. What, then, have some of our tumults been, yours and mine, as Minister and people, since we first knew one another? Was it Disestablishment? Was it Home Rule? Was it some heresy case? Was it the Declaratory Act? Was it the Union? Was it hymns, or organs, or standing at singing? or was it something else so utterly parochial, and petty, and paltry, that nobody, but you and I, could possibly have made a tumult out of it? Now whatever our tumult was, how did we behave ourselves in it? What are our calm thoughts about it, and about ourselves in it, now that it is all over? However it may be with you and me, it is certain that some men have gone to judgment, out of those very same tumults, with everlasting shame on their heads. That is to say, they were all intended to test and try and prove you and me as both Ministers and men of God, and that by the only proof we can give to God or man. ...
My brethren, you are not Ministers, thank God for that. But you will let your Ministers tell you what is in their hearts concerning you, and concerning themselves, as they read this too-proud chapter of Paul's. If you were all Ministers I would go on to say in your name, and you would agree with me, as to what a cruel chapter this is. For once-what a heartless chapter! Was it not enough for Paul that he should enjoy his own good conscience as a Minister, but he must make my conscience even more miserable than it was before? What delight can it give him to pour all this condemnation and contempt upon me and my ministry? And, did he not know, did he not take time to consider, that he was trampling upon multitudes of broken hearts? I wonder at Paul. In so scourging the proud-hearted and uplifted Corinthians he must have forgotten all us poor Ministers, who, to all time, would read his blameless and boasted ministry, only to be utterly crushed by it. Oh, my brethren, the never-to-be-redeemed opportunities of our pulpits; and the lasting blame of God and our people, and our own consciences, for our misuse and neglect of our pulpits! Rock of Ages, cleft for Ministers! The "unedifying converse" of our pastorate, and so on: till we take up this terrible chapter, and read it continually, deploring before God and man, to our dying day, all that Paul was, and that we were not: and all that he was not, and that we were. ...
Thomas Goodwin, that great Minister, tells us that always when he was tempted to be high-minded and to forget to fear, he was wont to go back and take a turn up and down in his unregenerate state. Now, your Ministers do not need to go so far back as that. How could we? No other man can possibly have such a retrospect of faults and failures and offences as a Minister. For the supreme tragedy of his own sad ministry is all written there by each remorseful Minister's own hand. And such tragic things are written, or, rather, are secretly ciphered there, as to raise both pity, and fear, and terror, to all Ministers, enough to suffice them for all their days on earth. ...
Now, you may well think that Paul has left nothing at all for you tonight, but for Ministers only. Find as little fault with your Ministers as is possible. That is to say, if you have a Minister who will take reprehension, either in public or in private, at your hands. Be careful not to humiliate your Minister overmuch. ...
And, then, both Ministers, and all manner of men, never allow yourselves to answer again, when you are blamed
Catholic Emancipation - Similar minor concessions were granted until 1792, when the Catholic party, supported by the United Irishmen, sent to London delegates who were favorably received by the king upon the advice of the prime Minister, Pitt. ...
After its suppression Pitt's plan for a legislative union received the support of many Catholics, but upon the opening of the United Parliament in 1801 they were betrayed by the resignation of Pitt, who in 1804 returned to the office of prime Minister as their enemy. In 1828 the Duke of Wellington became prime Minister, with Peel as leader in the House of Commons, both enemies of reform and emancipation but unable to suppress the association
Emancipation, Catholic - Similar minor concessions were granted until 1792, when the Catholic party, supported by the United Irishmen, sent to London delegates who were favorably received by the king upon the advice of the prime Minister, Pitt. ...
After its suppression Pitt's plan for a legislative union received the support of many Catholics, but upon the opening of the United Parliament in 1801 they were betrayed by the resignation of Pitt, who in 1804 returned to the office of prime Minister as their enemy. In 1828 the Duke of Wellington became prime Minister, with Peel as leader in the House of Commons, both enemies of reform and emancipation but unable to suppress the association
Roman Catholic Relief Bill - Similar minor concessions were granted until 1792, when the Catholic party, supported by the United Irishmen, sent to London delegates who were favorably received by the king upon the advice of the prime Minister, Pitt. ...
After its suppression Pitt's plan for a legislative union received the support of many Catholics, but upon the opening of the United Parliament in 1801 they were betrayed by the resignation of Pitt, who in 1804 returned to the office of prime Minister as their enemy. In 1828 the Duke of Wellington became prime Minister, with Peel as leader in the House of Commons, both enemies of reform and emancipation but unable to suppress the association
Sermon - As to this, we may observe, that, although it is acknowledged that a Minister should flame most towards the end, perhaps it would be well to guard against a too low and feeble manner in the exordium. It has been frequently the practice of making apologies, by way of introduction: though this may be admitted in some singular cases, as on the sudden death of a Minister, or disappointment of the preacher through unforeseen circumstances; yet I think it is often made use of where it is entirely unnecessary, and carries with it an air of affectation and pride. Here the Minister must reason, expostulate, invite, warn, and exhort; and all without harshness and an insulting air. Flavel says, "The devil is very busy with Ministers in their studies, tempting them to lofty language, and terms of art, above their hearers capacities. ...
See also Minister and PREACHING
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - ...
Now, it is sometimes not very unlike that when you yourselves meet to call a Minister. All you really know about your future Minister you have to take sometimes on the best testimony you can get. As one of our own elders once said when we were calling our young Minister: "I would rather trust to those two capable men who know him and have heard him preach, than I would trust to my own ears. Like the hundred-and-twenty, little as you know about your future Minister, you know this much, that when all the other young men at school and college were choosing learning, and philosophy, and medicine, and law, and the army, and the navy, and trade, and manufactures, and so on; this youth now in your offer was led to choose the word of God, and the pulpit, and the pastorate, for his life-work. For He knows your heart better than you know it yourself: and He knows just what kind of a Minister your heart needs: your own heart and your children's hearts. As also what motive it was that made them Ministers at first, and with what motive and with what intention they are laying out their future work among you. ' So have I myself seen heaven-born and highly-gifted Ministers of Christ passed over in the day when this and that vacant charge met to cast their lots. Let any of our students company with Christ all the time He went in and out in that manner, and he may depend upon it that the beautiful benediction which our Lord addressed in reproof to Thomas will be richly fulfilled to that wise-hearted student all his happy Ministerial days, and through him to his happy people. Give me for my Minister, not Gabriel himself, but a fellow-sinner who has been quickened together with Christ, and who can describe the process and the experience till my death-cold heart burns within me with the resurrection-life of Christ. Give me a Minister whom God has raised from the dead, and you may have all the sounding brasses and tinkling cymbals in heaven and earth for me
Leprosy - The Church which from very early times has promoted the spiritual and temporal welfare of the leper continues the work in various leper colonies, including Carville, Louisiana, where the Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul Minister to them, and Molokai, scene of the heroic labors of Father Damien and "Brother" Joseph Dutton
Baruch - " How striking, that Jeremiah (Jeremiah 12:1-5; Jeremiah 15:10-18; Jeremiah 15:45), who once was so desponding himself, is enabled to Minister counsel to Baruch falling into the same error
Deacon - " See Minister , SERVANT
Florentius, a Chief Minister of State at Constantinople - Florentius (50) , a chief Minister of state at Constantinople under Theodosius II
Nicolas - Among the Seven chosen in Acts 6:1-15 to Minister to the Hellenists or Greek-speaking Jews, was Nicolas, a ‘proselyte of Antioch
Eliakim - As Joseph over Pharaoh's palace, Azrikam "governor of Ahaz' house" (2 Chronicles 28:7); chamberlain, treasurer, prefect of the palace (Genesis 41:40), chief Minister
Sanctuary - Whether the earthly sanctuary, which he at once magnifies and depreciates, was the creation of Moses or of Ezekiel and Ezra, it has now had its day and must cease to be, since the true high priest has passed into the heavenly sanctuary, and become the Minister of the true tabernacle, which the Lord pitched, not man (Hebrews 9:1-2)
Note - A diplomatic communication in writing an official paper sent from one Minister or envoy to another
Stephanas - These ‘first-fruits’ proved themselves valuable helpers: ‘Ye know … that they have set themselves to Minister unto the saints
Attend - To go with, or accompany, as a companion, Minister or servant
Alsace-Lorraine - This caused an animated debate in the French Chamber and led the foreign Minister to explain that the policy of France was to uphold the Concordat
Measure - ...
Luke 6:38 (a) Here we learn of the abundant reward that is given in large quantities to those who themselves Minister blessings to others
Cherubim - In the NT the word is found in Hebrews 9:5 , where the reference is to the Ark in the Tabernacle, and the thought is suggested of those who Minister to the manifestation of the glory of God
Corinth - Apollos followed him in his labors at Corinth, and Aquila and Sosthenes were also among its early Minister, Acts 18:1 1 Corinthians 1:1 16:19
Brownists - As the vote of the brethren made a man a Minister, so the same power could discharge him from his office, and reduce him to a mere layman again; and as they maintained the bounds of a church to be no greater than what could meet together in one place, and join in one communion, so the power of these officers was prescribed within the same limits. ...
The Minister of one church could not administer the Lord's supper to another, nor baptize the children of any but those of his own society
Mark (John) - ]'>[3] Minister). ’ It has been suggested that Mark was a Levite (see below), and that the designation here used means ‘a synagogue Minister,’ as in Luke 4:20 (Chase). Paul, and was his ‘fellow-worker’ and a ‘comfort’ to him ( Colossians 4:11 , Philippians 1:24 ), and useful to him ‘for Ministering’ ( 2 Timothy 4:11 ) this was Mark’s special office, not to be an original organizer but a useful assistant (Swete)
Onesimus - And as we find the Epistle to the church of the Colossians was sent from Rome by Onesimus, there is reason to conclude that Philemon sent him back to Paul to Minister to him in the prison. Was it thought an object of everlasting moment thus to preserve in the book of God the history of a poor fugitive, and to let the church know that, in the instance of this slave, the Lord's grace outruns even all our undeservings? Was it indeed meant to shew in this, as well as in a thousand and ten thousand other instances, that "where sin aboundeth grace doth much more abound?"...
What a precious example is held forth in this epistle to Ministers of the word of God, to parents, masters of families, and all that are interested in the care and government of incautious youth, to feel what Paul felt, and to take an earnest concern in the recovery of transgression of every description and character! Did Paul count this runaway servant a brother, yea, his son, and speak of him as his own bowels, with what affection ought the ties of the Minister and his people, the parent and his children, the master and his servant, to be felt and acknowledged in all the circumstances of life! How tenderly the same great apostle elsewhere recommends those gracious principles as the common actions of the christian! "Put on therefore (saith the apostle) as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of mercies, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, long-suffering, forbearing one another, and forgiving one another; if any man have a quarrel against any, even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye
Absolution - Evangelical religious newspapers have found that they supply a demand by setting apart a column, often largely used, for the answers of some Minister of reputation to men who open their minds to him, confess their chief sins, doubts, or temptations, and seck comfort through him. —In the NT age there is no trace of the practice of private confession to Ministers of the Church for private absolution (James 5:16 cannot be so interpreted). And he justifies the word of absolution spoken by the Minister, ‘I absolve thee,’ etc. The exhortation before the Communion contains this invitation, to be pronounced by the curate: ‘If there be any of you who … cannot quiet his own conscience, let him come to me, or to some other discreet and learned Minister of God’s word, and open his grief, that by the ministry of God’s holy word he may receive the benefit of absolution, together with ghostly counsel and advice to the quieting of his conscience, and avoiding of all scruple and doubtfulness. ...
In the service for the visitation of the sick, the Minister is enjoined ‘to move the sick person to make a special confession of his sins if he feel his conscience troubled with any weighty matter. ” ’...
In the Presbyterian Churches the words ‘absolve’ and absolution’ are used only of the restoration to Communion by the Minister and elders—i. These are usually dealt with first by the Minister in private: then they appear before the Session, or before a delegation of it, to make acknowledgment, and profess repentance. The value, however, of this discipline depends wholly on the measure in which those who administer it are Christian, not legal, in their spirit, and on the support which the discipline receives from the spiritual level of the general body of the Church. Men in spiritual trouble do not betake themselves to a priest or Minister unless they feel him to have the spiritual authority that belongs to Christ-like character. A Christian Minister, in converse with a dying man in whom he discerns a true repentance, may be able to say with great power, ‘Brother, be assured thy sins are forgiven thee,’ and great blessing of comfort to the man may follow, may indeed be looked for. Only in a high moment of spiritual impulse and assurance could the Minister venture to say, ‘In the name of the Lord Jesus I absolve thee from thy sins
Collection - ...
The collection detailed in 2 Chronicles 31 was part of Hezekiah's reforms to make sure that God's Ministers, the priests, received adequate provision as the law had commanded ( Exodus 35:21,24 ; Leviticus 7:14,32 ; Deuteronomy 12:6,17-19 ). The collection was administered with care. ...
The right of the New Testament Minister to donated material support is affirmed by Jesus (Luke 10:7 ) and the early church (1 Corinthians 9:1-14 ; 1 Timothy 5:18 ), but how this support is to be collected is not discussed anywhere in detail. Here the collection extends beyond Ministers to any believer in need
Messiah - 30:30: “And thou shalt anoint Aaron and his sons, and consecrate them, that they may Minister unto me in the priest’s office
Tychicus - With Paul again in his first Roman imprisonment: Colossians 4:7-8, "a (Greek the, the article marks that Tychicus was well known to them) beloved (in relation to the Christian community) brother and a faithful Minister (in missionary services) and fellow servant in the Lord (in serving the same Master)
Onesimus - Paul would gladly have kept him to Minister to him, but delicate regard to Philemon's rights, and self denying love, made him waive his claims on Philemon and Onesimus (Philemon 1:13-14; Philemon 1:19)
Prime - ) First in rank, degree, dignity, authority, or importance; as, prime Minister
Heal - ...
Jeremiah 17:14 (a) In this way Jeremiah expressed his great desire for the Lord to Minister comfort to his heart; his spirit was sore broken by the way he had been treated by the people whom he came to help
Stephen - One of theseven chosen in the church at Jerusalem to Minister the alms of the saints
Circumcision - It evidently appears, from the first moment of its institution, that the ordination was with an eye to Christ, for the covenant of redemption by Jesus had this token or seal, and it is expressly said, "that Jesus Christ was a Minister of the circumcision for the truth of God, to confirm the promise made unto the fathers
Deacon - The Greek word for deacon often is used to indicate any person Ministering in God's service. Thus it designates our Lord himself, Romans 15:8; and Paul describes by it his own position, 2 Corinthians 6:4; Ephesians 3:7; Colossians 1:23; in all which places it is translated "minister
Sponsors - In the case of Baptism ofInfants, the significance of Sponsors is very great, in thatBaptism is a covenant, in which God on the one hand is representedby His Minister, and the child is represented by his Sponsors,who answer for him and agree to see to it that this child shallbe virtuously brought up and so trained that it shall lead therest of his life according to this beginning
Sacrament of Penance - The fact that Our Lord empowered His earthly representatives with authority not only to forgive but also to retain sins proves, in the first place, that He willed the exercise of this power to be a judicial process, in which the Minister is to judge who are worthy, and who are unworthy, of forgiveness. Besides the power of the priesthood, the Minister of Penance must possess sacramental jurisdiction over the penitent, for in every judicial process the judge must be invested with authority over the culprit. Jurisdiction is ordinary if it is annexed by law to the Minister's office, delegated if it is deputed to his person by a superior
the Man Who Found Treasure Hid in a Field - You are not Ministers. Only, here again, that Minister who would possess himself of the hid treasure of his pulpit and his pastorate must sell all he has in order to buy up those two gold-filled fields. Kinchin," says George Whitefield, "was Minister of Dummer in Hampshire, and being likely to be chosen Dean of Corpus Christi College, he desired me to take his place and officiate for him till that affair should be decided. "...
As I was saying, a Minister who would dig up the hidden treasure out of his pulpit and pastoral fields must sell all his time and all his tastes; all his thoughts by day and all his dreams by night. But then, by that time, he will begin to have a people about him of whom he will be able to say-"What is my hope, or joy, or crown of rejoicing? Are not even ye in the presence of our Lord Jesus Christ at His coming?" And then that all-surrendered Minister will be summoned forward at the coming of his Lord, not any more to shame and everlasting contempt, but his Lord will say to him on that day when He makes up His jewels-'That jewel is yours,' his Lord will say: 'for that soul and that would have been lost to Me, but for your self-denying ministry. ...
And on the other hand, such a Minister's ministry is the all-enriching field of his understanding and discerning people. A scholarly, studious, able, evangelical, experimental, preacher every Sabbath day; and then all the week an assiduous, unwearied, ever-mindful, all-loving, pastor,-what a field, and full of what treasure to his people, is such a Minister and such a ministry! What treasures of grace and truth lie hid there for the proper people. For how can any one know, or even guess at, what God has done so as to enrich them and their children in His fitting up and furnishing of their Minister's whole life and experience? Ten thousand personal and Ministerial providences and experiences have all befallen him for their sake. Only, sometimes you will hear of one man in a thousand; sometimes you will meet with one rare and remarkable man who has sold not a little, in order to become possessed of that Minister and his ministry. ...
And, then, all the more because you are not Ministers, you have the gold-filled field of your Bible always before you. If you had been Ministers you would have had a constant temptation in connection with your Bible that, as it is, you have clean escaped
Order of Friars Minor Capuchins - In 1619 they were made independent of the Conventuals, having the power to elect their own Minister-general
Capuchin Friars Minor - In 1619 they were made independent of the Conventuals, having the power to elect their own Minister-general
Keilah - ) Saul too looked to God, as if His providence had "delivered" David to him by David's entering a town with "gates and bars," Saul's hope was presumption, for God would never be the Minister to gratuitous and murderous malice
Cup - This is called "the cup of blessing which WE bless," the celebrants being the whole church, whose leader and representative the Minister is; answering to the passover "cup of blessing," over which "blessing" was offered to God
Priest - From thence they went up by turns to Minister in the temple at Jerusalem
Helps - ...
We have an instance of the gift of ‘helping’ in Stephanas and his household (1 Corinthians 16:15-18), and it is expressly stated that they ‘appointed themselves to Minister to the saints
Feed - ) To satisfy; grafity or Minister to, as any sense, talent, taste, or desire
Theology, Pastoral - As Minister of the sacraments, besides the requisite dogmatic and moral theology, he should possess other knowledge such as "pastoral medicine," which treats of the relations of bodily conditions to religion and morality
Servant - A person who voluntarily serves another or acts as his Minister as joshua was the servant of Moses, and the apostles the apostles the servants of Christ
Joshua - He is afterwards called the 'minister' of Moses, and as such he went up with him into the mount of God
Justinus - The principal part is played by the third paternal angel, Baruch, the chief Minister of good, and the third maternal, Naas, or the serpent, the chief author of evil
Genealogies - ...
In 1 Timothy 1:14 the warning is given, μηδὲ προσέχειν μύθοις καὶ γενεαλογίαις ἀπεράντοις, αἵτινες ἐκζητήσεις παρέχουσι, ‘neither to give heed to fables and endless genealogies, the which Minister questionings. ‘They Minister questionings’-that was their end
Ordination - A person must be twenty-three years of age, or near it, before he can be ordained deacon, or have any share in the ministry; and full twenty-four before he can be ordained priest, and by that means be permitted to administer the holy communion. A bishop, on the ordination of clergymen, is to examine them in the presence of the Ministers, who in the ordination of priests, but not of deacons, assist him at the imposition of hands; but this is only done as a mark of assent, not because it is thought necessary. For Luther, Calvin, Bucer, Melancthon, &c, and all the first reformers and founders of these churches, who ordained Ministers among them, were themselves presbyters, and no other. And though in some of these churches there are Ministers called superintendents, or bishops, yet these are only primi inter pares, the first among equals; not pretending to any superiority of orders. On this ground the Protestant Dissenters plead that their ordination, though not episcopal, is the same with that of all the illustrious Protestant churches abroad; and object, that a priest ordained by a popish bishop should be received into the church of England as a valid Minister, rightfully ordained; while the orders of another, ordained by the most learned religious presbyter, which any foreign country can boast, are pronounced not valid, and he is required to submit to be ordained afresh. Beside, the Protestant Dissenters allege, that if episcopal ordination be really necessary to constitute a valid Minister, it does not seem to be enjoined by the constitution of the church of England; because the power of ordination which the bishops exercise in this kingdom, is derived entirely and only from the civil magistrate; and he authoritatively prescribes how, and to whom ordination is to be given: that if an ordination should be conducted in other manner and form than that prescribed by him, such ordination would be illegal and of no authority in the church. Watts, that since there are some texts in the New Testament, wherein single persons, either Apostles, as Paul and Barnabas, ordained Ministers in the churches, or evangelists, as Timothy and Titus; and since other missions or ordinations are intimated to be performed by several persons, namely, prophets, teachers, elders, or a presbytery, Acts 13:1 ; 1 Timothy 4:14 ; since there is sometimes mention made of the imposition of hands in the mission of a Minister, and sometimes no mention is made of it; and since it is evident that in some cases popular ordinations are and must be valid without any bishop or elder,—I think none of these differences should be made a matter of violent contest among Christians; nor ought any words to be pronounced against each other by those of the episcopal, presbyterian, or independent way. Surely all may agree thus far, that various forms or modes, seeming to be used in the mission or ordination of Ministers in primitive times, may give a reasonable occasion or colour for sincere and honest searchers after truth to follow different opinions on this head, and do therefore demand our candid and charitable sentiments concerning those who differ from us. Among the Wesleyan Methodists, the ordination of their Ministers is in the annual conference, with a president at its head, and is by prayer without imposition of hands. The missionaries sent out by that body, if not previously ordained by the conference, are set apart by a few senior Ministers; and ordinarily in this case, the service of the church of England, with some alterations, is used, with imposition of the hands of the Ministers present
Angels - Secondarily, God's created messengers; as Israel (Isaiah 42:19), Haggai (Haggai 1:13), John (Malachi 3:1; Malachi 2:7), the priesthood, Ministers (Ecclesiastes 5:6), the rulers or angels of the Christian churches (Revelation 1:20), as Εlohim , "gods" is applied to judges (Psalms 82:6); compare Jesus' application, John 10:34-37. Bad angels are permitted to try believers now, as Job; good angels are God's Ministers of vengeance on the bad (Revelation 12:8-9; Revelation 20:1-2). Such shall the saints be at last, "equal to the angels," holy, made perfect, judges of angels and the world, Ministering mediators of blessing to subject creatures (Hebrews 12:23; 1 Corinthians 6:2-3; Revelation 5:10). ...
In the natural world angels Minister, as in directing wind and flame (according to one translation of Psalms 104:4; Hebrews 1:7): "the angel of Jehovah" wrought in the plague on the Egyptian firstborn (Exodus 12:23; Hebrews 11:28), and on the rebels in the wilderness (1 Corinthians 10:10), on Israel under David (2 Samuel 24:16; 1 Chronicles 21:16), on Sennacherib's army (2 Kings 19:35), on Herod (Acts 12:23). When man fell by evil angels, with beautiful propriety it was ordered that other angels, holy and unfallen, should Minister for God in His reparation of the evil caused to man by their fallen fellow spirits. They appear, like the prophets and kings in subsequent times, in the character of God's Ministers, carrying out God's purposes in relation to Israel and the pagan world powers (Zechariah 1; 2; 3; 4, etc. ...
When the Lord of angels became flesh, they Ministered before and at His birth (Luke 1; 2; Matthew 1:20), after the temptation (Matthew 4:11), in the agony of Gethsemane (Luke 22:43), at His resurrection and ascension (Matthew 28:2; Luke 24:4; John 20:12; Acts 1:10-11). Their previous and subsequent ministrations to men (Acts 5:19; Acts 8:26; Acts 10:3; Acts 12:7, Peter's deliverance, Acts 27:23) all hinge on their intimate connection with and ministry to Him, redeemed man's divine Head (Psalms 91:11; Matthew 4:6), Hence they are the guardians of Christ's little ones, not thinking it beneath their dignity to Minister to them (Matthew 18:10); not attached singly to single individuals, but all or one ready at God's bidding to Minister to each. Ministers of grace now, and at the dying hour carrying the believer's soul to paradise (Luke 16:22), but Ministers of judgment, and gathering the elect, in the great day (Matthew 13:39; Matthew 13:41; Matthew 13:49; Matthew 16:27; Matthew 24:31)
the Angel of the Church in Smyrna - And then we are very thankful to possess a circular-letter which the elders of the Church of Smyrna sent round to the Seven Churches telling the brethren everywhere how well their old Minister had played the man in the fire. Every iota of this Epistle shows us that it was addressed to a Minister who was at that time of a timid heart and one whose continual temptation it was to flinch and flee. But after this Epistle, and especially after that opening Name of His Master, Polycarp became another man and another Minister. Polycarp's poverty was one of his many trials and temptations as the Minister of Smyrna. But a well-educated and a well-read Minister has entrance not only into the very best society of his own day, but of every day, and he will deign to enter no society of any day but the very best. But sure I am, there is no class of men among us who are so rich in all these respects as just our well-educated, well-read, hard-working, absolutely-devoted, Ministers. But had he written in our day he would certainly have extended his arms to embrace a poor Minister's few but fit books, and his select friendships, as well as many other things that go to alleviate and even to make affluent his remote and arduous life
Ethiopia - The Ethiopian eunuch to whom Philip explained the gospel was a Minister of “the Candace, queen of the Ethiopians” (Acts 8:27 RSV)
Mordecai - Xerxes' prime Minister, or vizier
Flavianus (8), Bishop of Constantinople - Chrysaphius his Minister immediately plotted against the new patriarch
Romans, Epistle to the - The precise time at which it was written is not mentioned in the epistle, but it was obviously written when the apostle was about to "go unto Jerusalem to Minister unto the saints", i
Work - The special charismata of some are bestowed in order that they may be used for ‘the perfecting of the saints, unto the work of Ministering’ (Ephesians 4:12). It is therefore natural to speak of the Christian Minister as the ἐργάτης whose ideal is to produce nothing which will shame him (2 Timothy 2:15)
Ascension - It concluded the earthly ministry of Jesus, allowing eyewitnesses to see both the risen Christ on earth and the victorious, eternal Christ returning to heaven to Minister at the right hand of the Father
Offering - But they might make presents of common bread to the priests and Ministers of the temple. The priest in waiting received the offerings from the hand of him who brought them, laid a part on the altar, and reserved the rest for his own subsistence as a Minister of the Lord
Deacon - At first the apostles administered this daily welfare, but as the church numbers increased, new arrangements became necessary. The words used to denote these men and their work were all related to diakonos, the common Greek word for servant or Minister
Vestments - It has been pointed out that "The clergy and all who actministerially in divine service are clad in surplices and othervestments, not that they may have a decent and uniform appearancein sight of the congregation, but as wearing robes distinctive oftheir office in Ministering before Him whom they worship. It is emblematic of purity and innocenceand also of the Ministerial office. ...
THE GIRDLE, used to confine the Alb at the waist, is emblematic ofthe work of the Lord, to perform which the sacred Ministers girdup, as it were, their loins. And as touching the Minister, itsignifieth charity, a virtue excellent above all others
Kulturkampf - The principal leaders in the Kulturkampf were Bismarck, the Chancellor, and Falk, Minister of worship, both of whom were supported by the enemies of the Church within and without Parliament. Shortly after 1860 the Liberals of Prussia and of other states gained the asceridency in Parliament, and under Otto von Bismarck, the Minister, began more and more to encroach on the rights of the Church
Angel - It is used of an ordinary messenger (Job 1:14 : 1 Samuel 11:3 ; Luke 7:24 ; 9:52 ), of prophets (Isaiah 42:19 ; Haggai 1:13 ), of priests (Malachi 2:7 ), and Ministers of the New Testament (Revelation 1:20 ). They predict his advent (Matthew 1:20 ; Luke 1:26-38 ), Minister to him after his temptation and agony (Matthew 4:11 ; Luke 22:43 ), and declare his resurrection and ascension (Matthew 28:2-8 ; John 20:12,13 ; Acts 1:10,11 ). They are now Ministering spirits to the people of God (Hebrews 1:14 ; Psalm 34:7 ; 91:11 ; Matthew 18:10 ; Acts 5:19 ; 8:26 ; 10:3 ; 12:7 ; 27:23 ). They bear the souls of the redeemed to paradise (Luke 16:22 ); and they will be the Ministers of judgement hereafter on the great day (Matthew 13:39,41,49 ; 16:27 ; 24:31 ). They merely indicate that God employs the ministry of angels to deliver his people from affliction and danger, and that the angels do not think it below their dignity to Minister even to children and to the least among Christ's disciples
Priest; Priesthood - ...
A “priest” is an authorized Minister of deity who officiates at the altar and in other cultic rites. 28:1: “And take thou unto thee Aaron thy brother, and his sons with him, from among the children of Israel, that he may Minister unto me in the priest’s office
Balaam - ' A thing terrible to any man to think about; but terrible to a Minister above all men to read and to think, and to take home to his heart. One of their points should be that official excellence often consists in a preacher with much secret corruption, and that a Minister may have a great name, and may make a great income, who has no name at all, and no reward at all with God. What we Ministers are in our closets, says John Owen, and not in our pulpits, just that we are in the scales of God: just that, and no more. Let us, then, who are Ministers, or who are looking to be Ministers, so live, lest, by any means, when we have preached to others, we ourselves should be cast away as reprobate Balaam was cast away. Do you remember how James Stuart dragged Robert Bruce about, seeking a place and a point of view from which that great preacher and great patriot might be got to preach and to pray to the king's dictation? If our young Ministers would have a life-long lesson and illustration in fearlessness, in fidelity, and in a good conscience to the end of a life of bribes on the one hand, and of persecution and banishment on the other, let them read themselves deeply into those two narratives so unsurpassable in effectiveness for a Minister, the Life of Balaam in the history of Israel, and the Life of Bruce in the history of Scotland and of England. That church member also who changes his Minister in the interests of his business, he is of the offspring of Balaam. And that other who changes his Minister for the peace of his conscience, he also is Balak and Balaam seeking a spot where they can get at their sin without that restraint. You can live a life of uttermost selfishness, and worldliness, and wicked tempers, and idleness, and vanity, and vice, and total and absolute neglect of prayer in one church, and under one Minister, that you could not long live under another. And some of you may be strongly tempted sometimes to try a change of church or a change of Minister for liberty of action and for peace of mind
Deacon - " They were probably commissioners to superintend the deacons in distributing the alms, so that the Grecian (Hellenist, Greek-speaking Jewish) widows should not be neglected, and at the same time to Minister in spiritual things, as their solemn ordination by laying on of hands implies. The synagogue had its "pastors" (paruasim ) and its subordinate "deacons" (chazzanim ) or Ministers (Luke 4:20)
Cyprus - With John Mark as their Minister they preached in the Jews' synagogue at Salamis; and then passing by the Roman road to Paphos, the proconsular residence in the W
Concordance - by Alexander Cruden, which no Minister or student should be without, except he have such a prodigious memory as to supersede the necessity of it
Confession - Notwithstanding, however, private auricular confession is not of divine authority, yet, as one observes, "there are many cases wherein men under the guilt and trouble of their sins can neither appease their own minds, nor sufficiently direct themselves without recourse to some pious and prudent guide: in these cases men certainly do very well, and many times prevent a great deal of trouble and perplexity to themselves by a timely discovery of their condition to some faithful Minister; and to this purpose a general confession is for the most part sufficient: and where there is occasion for a more particular discovery, there is no need of raking into the particular circumstances of men's sins to give that advice which is necessary for the ease and comfort of the penitent
Joshua - 1 Chronicles 7:27, and Minister of Moses
Felix - " This accounts for Felix "letting Paul have liberty and forbidding none of his acquaintance to Minister or come unto him
Serve - ) To be subordinate to; to act a secondary part under; to appear as the inferior of; to Minister to
Countenance - The design was made known to the Minister, but he said nothing to countenance it
Bells - Moses adds, "And it shall be upon Aaron to Minister; and his sound shall be heard when he goeth in unto the holy place before the Lord, and when he cometh out; that he die not
Cameronists - After having discharged the office of a Minister at Bourdeaux, which he assumed in 1608, for ten years, he accepted the professorship of divinity at Saumur. His opinion was maintained and propagated by Moses Amyraut, and several others of the most learned among the reformed Ministers, who thought Calvin's doctrine too harsh
Casuistry - The Minister of the sacrament in Baptism must use the proper water and pronounce the correct form
Quartus - ), and indeed we may say that in the Apostolic Church the terms ‘brother’ or ‘sister’ and ‘minister’ (διάκονος) were practically synonymous
Evangelist - But this passage seems to show that there is room for the evangelist at home as well as abroad, and that the faithful Minister of Christ, in order to ‘make full proof of his ministry,’ will not only watch over the morals of his flock and attend to their upbuilding in sound doctrine, but seek to win outsiders to Christ by proclaiming the gospel of His grace
Stealing - ‘Stealing is the typical form of using the labour of another to supply our wishes, while it is our duty to make our own labour Minister to the needs of others’ (Westcott, Ephesians, p
Call - ) To summon to the discharge of a particular duty; to designate for an office, or employment, especially of a religious character; - often used of a divine summons; as, to be called to the ministry; sometimes, to invite; as, to call a Minister to be the pastor of a church
Feasts - ...
Haman, Persia’s chief Minister, had gained the king’s approval for a plan to destroy the Jewish people. In the end, however, Haman was executed and Mordecai made chief Minister in his place
Pharaoh - And as the reading went on King Ahasuerus would stop them and would ask them, What honour and what reward have been done to Mordecai for all this? And then when the king's Ministers answered him that nothing had been done, the first orders that the king gave in the morning were that Mordecai and all his descendants should be set straightway among the men whom the king delighted to honour. But Moses and Aaron! Why, they should have been at their tasks! Who are they, to come like ambassadors to me? No; to your bricks and to your burdens, you Moses and Aaron! And if only your Minister were some great one, it would go so much better with him and with you. If your Minister were only Dr. It would be weak, it would be an impossible humiliation in you, to make any alteration in your heart or in your life for what your present Minister says. With such a Minister, you never had fair play and a proper chance. The Minister is henceforth his Minister
Liturgy - It comprises then, all those prayers, ceremonies, and functions prescribed by the Church for use in all services performed by an official Minister in her name
Joshua - He became Moses' Minister or servant, and accompanied him part of the way when he ascended Mount Sinai to receive the two tables (Exodus 32:17 )
Joseph - That the tradition of a Hebrew Minister in Egypt, who saved the country in time of famine, ‘should be true in essentials is by no means improbable’ (J
Jude, the Book of - Minister to erring Christians (22-23)
Schoolmaster - The παιδαγωγός is ‘God in the form of man undefiled, Minister to the Father’s will, the unsullied image of God’ (i
Lamp - We know that this almighty Minister in the church of Jesus, acts as "a spirit of judgment, and a spirit of burning
Temple - When Jesus entered the temple, his presence became the sum and substance which all these signs did but faintly resemble and Minister unto; and therefore confirmed JEHOVAH'S promise of the greater glory of the second, than of the first temple
Rams Horns - Moses, as a type of the law he was the Minister of, could not bring the children of God into Canaan
Liturgy - passim; A Letter to a Dissenting Minister on the Expediency of Forms, and Brekell's Answer; Rogers's Lectures on the Liturgy of the Church of England; Biddulph's Essays on the Liturgy: Orton's Letters, vol
Settle - ) To establish in the pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish; as, to settle a Minister
Cloud - ”...
When the ark of the covenant was brought into the holy place, “The cloud filled the house of the Lord, so that the priests could not stand to Minister because of the cloud: for the glory of the Lord had filled the house of the Lord” (1 Kings 8:10-11)
Eusebius, Bishop of Pelusium - The greediness of those who administered the church property was insatiable (v. 52), and to remember that the unworthiness of the Minister hindered not the effect of the sacraments (ii. Such things induced many to leave Pelusium in disgust; "the altar lacked Ministers" (i
Commit, Commission - See DO , LABOR , Minister , TRADE , WORK
Admonition, Admonish - , "a putting in mind" (nous, "mind," tithemi, "to put"), is used in 1 Corinthians 10:11 , of the purpose of the Scriptures; in Ephesians 6:4 , of that which is Ministered by the Lord; and in Titus 3:10 , of that which is to be administered for the correction of one who creates trouble in the church. , instructed and warned, by the Scriptures, 1 Corinthians 10:11 , so to Minister the Word of God to the saints, that, naming the Name of the Lord, they shall depart from unrighteousness, 2 Timothy 2:19
Pharaoh - Some suppose that the Pharaoh to whom Joseph became Prime Minister was the son of the one mentioned in Genesis 37:36
Watch - He gave signal to the Minister that watchd. Flaming Ministers watch and tend their charge
Mark, - 48, when he joined them as their "minister
Synagogue - ...
The synagogue required no priest to Minister; this and the reading of the Old Testament prepared the way for the gospel. The officiating Minister was delegate (sheliach , answering to the term apostle, "sent") of the congregation, the forerunner of "the angel (messenger sent) of the church" (Revelation 1:20; Revelation 2:1). The chazzan or "minister" (Luke 4:16-20, where Christ by rising indicated that as a member of the synagogue at Nazareth
Euric, King of Toulouse - By the influence of Euric's Minister, Leo, he was released after a year's imprisonment, and appeared at the Gothic court at Bordeaux, where, during a stay of two months, he succeeded in obtaining only one audience of the king, so great was the crowd of ambassadors, and the pressure of important business awaiting the decision of Euric and his Minister. His Minister Leo (Sid
Synagogue - " (Luke 8:41,49 ; 13:14 ; Acts 18:8,17 ) The most prominent functionary in a large synagogue was known as the sheliach (= legatus ), the officiating Minister who acted as the delegate of the congregation and was therefore the chief reader of prayers, etc. The chazzan or "minister" of the synagogue, ( Luke 4:20 ) had duties of a lower kind, resembling those of the Christian deacon or sub-deacon
Servant - " (Job 12:16) Wicked men, and devils, as well as the faithful servants of JEHOVAH, may be said to Minister to the Lord's will and pleasure; and though not by their intentions, yet by the overruling and sovereign power of God, do carry on his administrations in his almighty government. "The son of man came not to be Ministered, unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many
Cassiodorus (or Rather, Cassiodorius) Magnus Aurelius - Cassiodorus (or rather, Cassiodorius ) Magnus Aurelius, senator, and chief Minister to the Ostrogothic princes of Italy, born at Scylacium (Squillace) in Bruttium, 469–470, of a noble, wealthy, and patriotic family. Illiterate himself, Theodoric employed the eloquent pen of his Minister in all public communications, and spent his leisure time in acquiring from him erudition of various kinds ( Var
May Laws - The May Laws had the fullest support of Bismarck, though their actual author was Falk, the Prussian Minister of public worship
Laws, May - The May Laws had the fullest support of Bismarck, though their actual author was Falk, the Prussian Minister of public worship
Huguenots - God grant the fatal bandage that hides the truth from thine eyes may fall off! May God forget the rivers of blood with which thou hast deluged the earth, and which thy reign hath caused to be shed!...
May God blot out of his book the injuries which thou hast done us; and while he rewards the sufferers, may he pardon those who exposed us to suffer! O, may God, who hath made thee to us, and to the whole church, a Minister of his judgments, make thee a dispenser of his favours an administrator of his mercy!"...
Toleration, Tolerance - The great parables of Luke 15, besides being a rebuke of the leaders in religion for neglecting to Minister to publicans and sinners, are a gracious appeal to share in the delight of seeing men saved,—an appeal to the benevolence latent in the hearts of Christ’s unscrupulous critics
Mass - The Mass is a true proper sacrifice, namely, "the external offering up of a sensible gift, which is destroyed or transformed by an authorized Minister in recognition of God's supreme dominion. On the Cross He offered Himself in person and in a bloody manner; in the Mass, through His Ministers, in an unbloody manner
Rechab - to Minister in the sanctuary before Jehovah so long as Israel's sanctuary and polity stand: so Levi (Deuteronomy 10:8; Deuteronomy 18:5-7; Genesis 18:22; Judges 20:28; Psalms 134:1; Jeremiah 15:19); so the targum of Jonathan translated "ministers before Me. Judah that the Rechabites married Levites, and their children Ministered in the temple
Torch - ...
The other custom, the use of torches fed with oil, is said by the German writer, Ludwig Schneller, who was born in Jerusalem, and was for a time a Minister in Bethlehem, to be in force in the Holy Land at the present day
Fable - These fables are connected with ‘endless genealogies which Minister questionings’ ( 1 Timothy 1:4 ); they are described as ‘profane and old wives’ fables’ ( 1 Timothy 4:7 ), and contrasted with ‘sound doctrine’ ( 2 Timothy 4:4 )
First-Fruit - Thus 1 Corinthians 16:15 : ‘Ye know the house of Stephanas, that it is the firstfruits of Achaia, and that they have set themselves to Minister unto the saints
Elders - a name given to certain laymen in the Presbyterian discipline, who are ecclesiastical officers, and in conjunction with the Ministers and deacons compose the kirk sessions in Scotland. But their peculiar business is expressed by the name ruling elders; for in every jurisdiction within the parish they are the spiritual court, of which the Minister is officially moderator; and in the presbytery, of which the pastors of all the parishes within its bounds are officially members, lay elders sit as the representatives of the several sessions or consistories. He established over Israel heads of thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, that justice might be readily administered to applicants; only difficult eases were referred to himself, Exodus 18:24-25 , &c
Angel - The angels are represented as Ministering spirits sent forth to do service to the heirs or salvation. There is also an order of evil spirits Ministering to the will of the prince of darkness, and both active and powerful in their opposition to God. Though Scripture does not warrant us to affirm that each individual has his particular guardian angel, it teaches very explicitly that angels Minister to every Christian
Service - The position of a Minister was that which He accepted for Himself; ‘He came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister’ (Matthew 20:28), and He looked to those who would follow Him to accept a similar rule of life for themselves (Luke 22:26, John 13:16; cf
Altar - (1) In vindicating the right of Ministers of the gospel to live at the charge of the Christian community, he instances the well-known Levitical practice: ‘those who wait upon the altar have their portion with (συμμερίζονται) the altar’ (1 Corinthians 9:13), part of the offering being burnt in the altar fire, and part reserved for the priests, to whom the law gives the privilege ‘altaris esse socios in dividenda victima’ (Beza). (1) Reasoning somewhat in the manner of Philo, he notes the emergence of a mysterious priest from a tribe which has given none of its sons to Minister at the altar, and on this circumstance bases an ingenious argument for the imperfection of the Levitical priesthood, and so of the whole Mosaic system (Hebrews 7:13). Whether the writer actually visualized the Cross of Christ as the altar at which all His followers Minister, like λειτουργοί in the Tabernacle,-as many have supposed-is doubtful
Altar - (1) In vindicating the right of Ministers of the gospel to live at the charge of the Christian community, he instances the well-known Levitical practice: ‘those who wait upon the altar have their portion with (συμμερίζονται) the altar’ (1 Corinthians 9:13), part of the offering being burnt in the altar fire, and part reserved for the priests, to whom the law gives the privilege ‘altaris esse socios in dividenda victima’ (Beza). (1) Reasoning somewhat in the manner of Philo, he notes the emergence of a mysterious priest from a tribe which has given none of its sons to Minister at the altar, and on this circumstance bases an ingenious argument for the imperfection of the Levitical priesthood, and so of the whole Mosaic system (Hebrews 7:13). Whether the writer actually visualized the Cross of Christ as the altar at which all His followers Minister, like λειτουργοί in the Tabernacle,-as many have supposed-is doubtful
Office, Divine - "It is the common prayer which is offered to God by the Minister of the Church in the person of all the faithful" (Saint Thomas)
Divine Office - "It is the common prayer which is offered to God by the Minister of the Church in the person of all the faithful" (Saint Thomas)
Humility - He came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister
Titus, Epistle to - This letter from the apostle would strengthen Titus' ability to Minister because it would be received with the authority of Paul (2 Timothy 3:1-89 )
Shame - A believer's shame for past sin is a spur to forsake sinning (Romans 6:21 ), to renounce disobedience (2 Thessalonians 3:14 ), and to Minister the gospel (2 Corinthians 4:2 )
Hierapolis - Paul’s delegate in the Lycus valley (Colossians 1:7 [1]), Epaphras knew that the Apostle regarded its churches as in a manner his own, and after some years of strenuous labour the ‘faithful Minister of Christ’ made a journey from Asia to Home to seek counsel and help in dealing with errors of doctrine and practice which threatened to undo his work
Universalists - Nathan Strong, Minister of Hartford, in Connecticut, in which he endeavours to reconcile the doctrine of eternal misery with the infinite benevolence of God
Sennacherib - ...
I have introduced this observation of the Lord's judgment on Sennacherib's army by way of introducing another; namely, what safety are the people of the Lord brought into when all the creation of God waits as Ministering servants to execute the divine judgments on their enemies! "Winds and storms fulfilling his word," sickness and the word, angels and messengers, all wait to execute the Lord's commands. "Are they not all (saith the Scripture) Ministering spirits, seat forth to Minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation?" (Hebrews 1:14) Hence with an eye to Christ, and to his people secured in him, the Lord's promise runs—"He shall cover thee with his feathers, and under his wings shalt thou trust his truth shall be thy shield and buckler
Babblings - (1 Timothy 6:20, 2 Timothy 2:16 βεβήλους κενοφωνίας)...
The ‘profane babblings, and the oppositions of the knowledge which is falsely so called’ are all profitless speculation and empty religious talk which only Minister questions, but have no value in the equipment of a man of God, or in the building up of the Church
Fable - This is seen in the references: 1 Timothy 1:4 ‘Neither to give heed to fables … the which Minister questionings rather than a dispensation of God’ [1]; 1 Timothy 4:7 ‘profane and old wives’ fables’; 2 Timothy 4:4 ‘turn aside unto fables’; Titus 1:14 ‘not giving heed to Jewish fables’; 2 Peter 1:16 ‘We did not follow cunningly devised fables
Philippi - Paul, being allowed to Minister to his needs more than once
Help, Holpen - 1); it is mentioned in 1 Corinthians 12:28 , as one of the ministrations in the local church, by way of rendering assistance, perhaps especially of "help" Ministered to the weak and needy. Acts 20:35 ; not official functionaries are in view in the term "helps," but rather the functioning of those who, like the household of Stephanas, devote themselves to Minister to the saints
Presbyterians - The title Presbyterian comes from the Greek word which signifies senior or elder, intimating that the government of the church in the New Testament was by presbyteries, that is, by association by presbyteries, that is, by association of Ministers and ruling elders, possessed all of equal powers, without any superiority among them, either in office or order. The Presbyterians believe, that the Gospel, to administer the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's supper, and to feed the flock of Christ, is derived from the Holy Ghost by the imposition of the hands of the presbytery; and they oppose the independent scheme of the common rights of Christians by the same arguments which are used for that purpose by the Episcopalians. ...
They observe, That the apostles planted churches by ordaining bishops and deacons in every city; that the Ministers which in one verse are called bishops, are in the next perhaps denominated presbyters; that we no where read in the New Testament of bishops, presbyters, and deacons, in any one church; and that, therefore, we are under the necessity of concluding bishop and presbyter to be two names for the same church officer. "It appears, therefore, that the apostle Paul, left in the church of Ephesus, which he had planted, no other successors to himself than presbyter-bishops, or Presbyterian Ministers, and that he did not devolve his power upon any prelate. These powers and privileges could not be conveyed by imposition of hands to any successors, whether called presbyters or bishops; but as rulers or office-bearers in particular churches, we have the confession of 'the very chiefest apostles, ' Peter and John, that they were nothing more than presbyters, or parish Ministers. Being solemnly engaged to use their utmost endeavours for the suppression of vice and the cherishing of piety and virtue, and to exercise discipline faithfully and diligently, the Minister, in the presence of the congregation, sets them apart to their office by solemn prayer; and concludes the ceremony, which is sometimes called ordination, with exhorting both elders and people to their respective duties. The kirk session, which is the lowest ecclesiastical judicatory, consists of the Minister and those elders of the congregation. The Minister is ex officio moderator, but has no negative voice over the decision of the session; nor, indeed, has he a right to vote at all, unless when the voice of the elders are equal and opposite. ...
The deacons, whose proper office it is to take care of the poor, may be present in every session, and offer their counsel on all questions that come before it; but, except in what relates to the distribution of alms, they have no decisive vote with the Minister and elders. The next judicatory is the presbytery, which consist of all the pastors within a certain district, and one ruling elder from each parish, commissioned by his brethren to represent, in conjunction with the Minister, the session of that parish. The presbytery treats of such matters as concern the particular churches within its limits; as the examination, admission, ordination, and censuring of Ministers; the licensing of probationers, rebuking the gross or contumacious sinners, the directing the sentence of excommunication, the deciding upon references and appeals from kirk sessions, resolving cases of conscience, explaining difficulties in doctrine or discipline; and censuring, according to the word of God, any heresy or erroneous doctrine which hath either been publicly or privately maintained within the bounds of its jurisdiction. The highest authority in the church of Scotland is the general assembly, which consists of a certain number of Ministers and ruling elders delegated from each presbytery, and of commissioners from the universities and royal boroughs. A presbytery in which there are fewer than twelve parishes sends to the general assembly two Ministers and one ruling elder; if it contain between twelve and eighteen Ministers, it sends three of these, and one ruling elder; if it contain between eighteen and twenty-four Ministers, it sends four Ministers, and two ruling elders; and of twenty-four Ministers, when it contains so many, it sends five, with two ruling elders. The order of their proceedings is regular, though sometimes the number of members creates a confusion; which the moderator, who is chosen from among the Ministers to be, as it were, the speaker of the house, has not sufficient authority to prevent
Presbyterians - The title Presbyterian comes from the Greek word which signifies senior or elder, intimating that the government of the church in the New Testament was by presbyteries, that is, by association by presbyteries, that is, by association of Ministers and ruling elders, possessed all of equal powers, without any superiority among them, either in office or order. The Presbyterians believe, that the Gospel, to administer the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's supper, and to feed the flock of Christ, is derived from the Holy Ghost by the imposition of the hands of the presbytery; and they oppose the independent scheme of the common rights of Christians by the same arguments which are used for that purpose by the Episcopalians. ...
They observe, That the apostles planted churches by ordaining bishops and deacons in every city; that the Ministers which in one verse are called bishops, are in the next perhaps denominated presbyters; that we no where read in the New Testament of bishops, presbyters, and deacons, in any one church; and that, therefore, we are under the necessity of concluding bishop and presbyter to be two names for the same church officer. "It appears, therefore, that the apostle Paul, left in the church of Ephesus, which he had planted, no other successors to himself than presbyter-bishops, or Presbyterian Ministers, and that he did not devolve his power upon any prelate. These powers and privileges could not be conveyed by imposition of hands to any successors, whether called presbyters or bishops; but as rulers or office-bearers in particular churches, we have the confession of 'the very chiefest apostles, ' Peter and John, that they were nothing more than presbyters, or parish Ministers. Being solemnly engaged to use their utmost endeavours for the suppression of vice and the cherishing of piety and virtue, and to exercise discipline faithfully and diligently, the Minister, in the presence of the congregation, sets them apart to their office by solemn prayer; and concludes the ceremony, which is sometimes called ordination, with exhorting both elders and people to their respective duties. The kirk session, which is the lowest ecclesiastical judicatory, consists of the Minister and those elders of the congregation. The Minister is ex officio moderator, but has no negative voice over the decision of the session; nor, indeed, has he a right to vote at all, unless when the voice of the elders are equal and opposite. ...
The deacons, whose proper office it is to take care of the poor, may be present in every session, and offer their counsel on all questions that come before it; but, except in what relates to the distribution of alms, they have no decisive vote with the Minister and elders. The next judicatory is the presbytery, which consist of all the pastors within a certain district, and one ruling elder from each parish, commissioned by his brethren to represent, in conjunction with the Minister, the session of that parish. The presbytery treats of such matters as concern the particular churches within its limits; as the examination, admission, ordination, and censuring of Ministers; the licensing of probationers, rebuking the gross or contumacious sinners, the directing the sentence of excommunication, the deciding upon references and appeals from kirk sessions, resolving cases of conscience, explaining difficulties in doctrine or discipline; and censuring, according to the word of God, any heresy or erroneous doctrine which hath either been publicly or privately maintained within the bounds of its jurisdiction. The highest authority in the church of Scotland is the general assembly, which consists of a certain number of Ministers and ruling elders delegated from each presbytery, and of commissioners from the universities and royal boroughs. A presbytery in which there are fewer than twelve parishes sends to the general assembly two Ministers and one ruling elder; if it contain between twelve and eighteen Ministers, it sends three of these, and one ruling elder; if it contain between eighteen and twenty-four Ministers, it sends four Ministers, and two ruling elders; and of twenty-four Ministers, when it contains so many, it sends five, with two ruling elders. The order of their proceedings is regular, though sometimes the number of members creates a confusion; which the moderator, who is chosen from among the Ministers to be, as it were, the speaker of the house, has not sufficient authority to prevent
Faithfulness - He who was called to be a Minister of God was reminded that a steward must be found faithful (1 Corinthians 4:2). Paul speaks in the Epistle to the Colossians of Tychicus his messenger as ‘the beloved brother and faithful Minister and fellow-servant in the Lord’ (Colossians 4:7), and of Onesimus as ‘the faithful and beloved brother’ (Colossians 4:9), he has before his mind chiefly the fidelity of these two brethren to himself the apostle and prisoner of the Lord, In 2 Tim
New Orleans, Louisiana, City of - , the founder of the Jesuit mission in New Orleans, brought over a congregation of Ursulines to Minister in a hospital and school
New York, State of - His companion, Rene Goupil, a devoted lay volunteer, or donné, had then been put to death, but Father Jogues, taken prisoner, had finally escaped, and been befriended and returned to France by way of New York through the Dutch Minister of Fort Orange, Johannes Mega polensis, and Gov
Priesthood of the Believer - This means that the “priesthood of the believer” has become a strong Christian doctrine which developed in two directions: (1) believers can respond directly to the personal activity of God in their lives, through the Holy Spirit and through the written word of Scripture, and do not require a human priest to mediate authoritative communication with God; (2) Christians have become a “holy priesthood” (1 Peter 2:5 ) and can Minister to one another and to the world
Lord of Hosts - So the sun is God’s Minister ( Psalms 19:4-5 ), and even so early as the Song of Deborah the stars are represented as joining by God’s behest in the battle against the invader ( Judges 5:20 )
Clergy - ...
See article Minister
Shepherd - 26), and later on in Protestant Christianity of the Minister of the Church in general
Deacon - ]'>[1] is always translated ‘servant’ or ‘minister’ except in Philippians 1:1 , 1 Timothy 3:8-13 , where it is rendered ‘deacon,’ these being the only two passages where it is evidently used in a technical sense
Colossians, Epistle to the - ...
Colossians 2 : Paul was deeply anxious for the welfare of the saints, that they might be rooted, built up, and established in the faith, lest they should be led astray by the philosophy of the world and the deceitful teaching of men, which would in no way Minister Christ to them
Firstborn - The tribe of Levi was substituted for all Israel's firstborn to Minister to the Lord (Numbers 3:12; Numbers 3:45; Numbers 3:50)
Philemon, the Epistle to - Paul addresses this epistle also to Apphia, who, from its domestic subject, is supposed to have been Philemon's wife, and to Archippus, a Minister of the Colossian (Colossians 4:17) church, and supposed to be Philemon's relative and inmate of his house
Judge - (Genesis 18:25; Deuteronomy 32:36; Daniel 7:9-14; Matthew 25:31-46; Acts 10:42; Revelation 20:11-15)...
And while we thus contemplate Jesus as our Judge, and the judgment seat his, wee find another sweet consolation arising out of it, in that when he comes to "judge the world in righteousness, and to Minister true judgment unto the people," he comes to confirm what hath already passed respecting his redeemed, and not to try, but to declare his justification of their persons and state before God
Fill - So God commands concerning Aaron and his sons: “And thou … shalt anoint them, and consecrate them, and sanctify them, that they may Minister unto me in the priest’s office” ( Of - "If any man Minister, let him do it as of the ability which God giveth " that is, as from the ability, as the source of action
Jeshua - " Jeshua represents Jerusalem (and so the church) before Jehovah; accused by Satan, but justified by Jehovah, of His own will and choice, through Messiah his Advocate, who strips off his rags (compare Isaiah 64:6), and "clothes him with change of raiment (the filthy garments were worn by those on trial; the white robe or caftan is put on an Eastern Minister of state when acquitted; compare Isaiah 61:10), and sets a fair (symbolizing purity) mitre (the priestly turban, the pledge of the reestablished priesthood) upon his head," in answer to Zechariah's prayer Zechariah 3:1-9)
Porphyrius, Bishop of Gaza - At the same time he despatched his deacon Mark and his Minister Borocas to Constantinople, who, through the powerful advocacy of Chrysostom, obtained the emperor's order to destroy the idols and close the temples
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - ...
This servant who hid his talent in the earth was the father of that young Highland Minister also who hid his sermon in the snow. A city congregation was looking out for a colleague and successor to their old Minister. The ambitious and not unfaithful young Minister had his sermon all ready, but as there would be a small congregation that snowy morning he would not throw away his whole week's work on such a handful, and so he left his sermon at home. ...
This servant who hid his lord's money was the father also of all those Ministers among us who will not do their ordained work because they have so little to do
Philippians - The church has sent him to take a gift to Paul (see Philippians 4:10-20 ) and Minister to him in his imprisonment. Pastoral concern for a distressed Minister (Philippians 2:25-30 )...
V
Priest - It is a noteworthy fact that the NT never describes the Christian ministry as a priesthood, or the individual Minister as a priest, except in the general sense in which these terms are applicable to all believers a fact which is all the more significant when we consider how frequently both the Minister and the ministry are referred to
Deacon - , DEACONESS The term “deacon” is derived from the Greek word diakonos , which is usually translated “servant” or “minister. In the New Testament, the noun is used to refer to Ministers of the gospel (Colossians 1:23 ), Ministers of Christ (1 Timothy 4:6 ), servants of God (2 Corinthians 6:4 ), those who follow Jesus (John 12:26 ), and in many other similar ways. Deacons continued to fill an important role in the ministry of the early church, serving the needs of the poor, assisting in baptism and the Lord's Supper, and performing other practical Ministerial tasks. The exclusion of those who are “doubletongued” (1 Timothy 3:8 ) may be evidence that the work of the deacons brought them into close contact with the everyday lives of the church members, as would occur in visiting the sick and Ministering to the other physical needs of fellow Christians
Mark, John - Mark readily accompanied him as "minister" (hufretes , "subordinate") to the country of his kindred; but had not the spiritual strength to overcome his Jewish prejudices which he probably imbibed from his spiritual father Peter (Galatians 2:11-14), so as to accompany Paul the apostle of the Gentiles further than Perga of Pamphylia, in his first missionary tour to the pagan
Foreknowledge - Jeremiah was set apart in the womb to be a prophet, chosen to Minister to the nations (Jeremiah 1:5 )
Solitude - No human being was within call, and only after the victory was won did angels come to Minister to Him
Pillar - For if Jesus be the pillar of cloud, and the pillar of fire; and if, as it is said, "the Lord will create upon every dwelling place of mount Zion, and upon her assemblies, a cloud and smoke by day, and the shining of a flaming fire by night," (Isaiah 4:5) —surely there is a great propriety that his church should be called after the name of her Lord, He is the pillar of cloud and of fire; and she by him is made the pillar and ground of truth; and hence his servants who Minister in his name shall be called pillars in his temple
Ceremony - Applied to religious services, it signifies the external rites and manner in which the Ministers of religion perform their sacred functions, and direct or lead the worship of the people. The reason is obvious: ceremonial observances can be performed without any great sacrifice of propensities and vices; they are palpable; when they are observed by men who, in the tenor of public life, do not act immorally, they are regarded by others as indicating high attainments in virtue; and through that self-deceit which so wonderfully misleads the reason, and inclines it to Minister to the passions which it should restrain, men have themselves become persuaded that their acknowledgment of divine authority, implied in their respect to the ritual which that authority is conceived to have sanctioned, may be taken as a proof that they have nothing to apprehend from the violation of the law under which they are placed
Mary - She believed early on Jesus Christ, and accompanied him in some of his journeys, to Minister to him, followed him to Calvary, and was with his mother at the foot of his cross. She was foremost among the honorable women of substance who Ministered unto Christ and his disciples, Matthew 28:1-10 Mark 15:47 16:1-10 Luke 24:1-12 John 20:1,2,10-18
Toleration Act - whereby all persons are required to resort to their parish church or chapel, upon pain of punishment by the censures of the church; and also upon pain that every person so offending, shall forfeit for every such offence twelve pence; nor the statute made in the 3d year of the late King James, inituled "An act for the better discovering and repressing Popish Recusants;" nor that other statute, intituled ...
"An act to prevent and avoid dangers which may grow by Popish Recussants;" nor any other law or statute of this realm made against Papists or Popish Recusants, shall be construed to extend to any person or persons dissenting from the Church of England, that shall take the oaths (of allegiance and supremacy) and shall make and subscribe the declaration (against Popery;) which oaths and declaration the justices of the peace at the general sessions of the peace for the county, or place where such persons shall live, are hereby required to administer to such persons as shall offer themselves to make and subscribe the same, and thereof to keep a register; and likewise, none of the persons aforesaid shall give or pay, as any fee or reward, to any officer belonging to the court, above the sum of sixpence, for his entry of his taking the said oaths, &c. That no person dissenting from the church of England in holy orders, or pretended holy orders, or pretending to holy orders, nor any preacher or teacher of any congregation of Dissenting Protestants, that shall make and subscribe the declaration aforsaid, and take the said oaths at the General or Quarter Sessions of the Peace, to be held for the county, town, parts, or division where such person lives, which court is hereby empowered to administer the same, and shall also declare his approbation of and subscribe the Articles of Religion mentioned in the statute made in the 13th of Q. shall enjoy all the privileges, benefits, and advantages which any other Dissenting Minister might enjoy. That every teacher or preacher in holy orders, or pretended holy orders, that is, a Minister, preacher, or teacher of a congregation, that shall take the oaths herein required, and make and subscribe the declaration aforesaid, &c
Church - The Church of England's definition of the church is truly scriptural (Article xix): "a congregation of faithful men in the which the pure word of God is preached, and the sacraments be duly Ministered according to Christ's ordinance in all those things that of necessity are requisite to the same. That the Christian ministry is not sacerdotal, as the Old Testament ministry, is proved by the title hiereus , the Greek of the Latin sacerdos, never once being used of Christian Ministers. ...
When used at all as to the Christian church it is used of the whole body of Christians; since not merely Ministers, as the Aaronic priests, but all equally, have near access to the heavenly holy place, through the torn veil of Christ's flesh (Hebrews 10:19-22; Hebrews 13:15-16; 1 Peter 2:19; Revelation 1:6). " For a Minister to pretend to offer a literal sacrifice in the Lord's supper, or to have the sacerdotal priesthood (which pertains to Christ alone), would be the sin which Moses charged on Korah: "Seemeth it but a small thing unto you that the God of Israel hath separated you from the congregation to bring you near to Himself, . to stand before the congregation to Minister to them; and seek ye the priesthood also?" The temple then not being the model to the Christian church, the synagogue alone remained to be copied. The synagogue officers consisted of a "ruler of the synagogue," the "legate of the church" (sheliach tsibbur ), corresponding to the angel of the church (Revelation 1-3), a college of elders or presbyters, and subordinate Ministers (chazzan ), answering to our deacons, to take care of the sacred books
Pentecost - " (John 7:39) But now that the Son of God hath finished the whole of his ministry upon earth, and is returned to glory, the Holy Ghost comes down in a fulness of blessings, and to him is committed the whole efficiency of the work, as the Almighty Minister in the church, to render the whole effectual; and to this agree the words of the prophets: Isaiah 44:3-5; Joel 2:28, etc. When we know him as Jesus described him, the Spirit of truth to guide into all truth; the Witness to our spirits that we are the children of God; the Glorifier of Jesus; the Comforter of the soul; the Spirit of grace, of supplication, and prayer; the Helper of our infirmities; the Spirit of wisdom and knowledge in the revelation of Christ Jesus in a word, the great and sovereign Minister in the church and heart of all his people, from the first quickenings of grace, until grace be consummated in eternal glory
Scribes - Rich widows they induced to Minister to them, depriving their dependent relatives of a share (Matthew 23:14; contrast Luke 8:2-3). Christ's Minister must be a cf6 "scribe instructed which is unto the kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 13:52); such were "Zenas the lawyer" and "Apollos mighty in the Scriptures" (Titus 3:13)
Mary - She was an early believer in Jesus Christ, and attended him on his journeys, to Minister to him. Mary Magdalene, is mentioned by the evangelists as being one of those women that followed our Saviour to Minister to him according to the custom of the Jews
Sacrifice - An offering made to God on his altar, by the hand of a lawful Minister. Every one was priest and Minister of his own sacrifice; at least, he was at liberty to choose what priest he pleased in offering his victim
Baptism - John's baptism began and ended with himself; he alone, too, administered it. But Christ's baptism was performed by His disciples, not Himself, that He might mark His exclusive dignity as baptizer, with the Holy Spirit (John 4:2), and that the validity of baptism might not depend on the worth of the Minister but on God's appointment. At the same time that the outward Minister set Him apart, the Holy Spirit from heaven gave Him inwardly the unction of His fullness without measure; and the Father declared His acceptance of Him as the sinners' savior, the anointed prophet, priest, and king (John 3:34; John 1:16): "This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. In Colossians 2:11-12, baptism is represented as our Christian "circumcision made without hands," implying that not the Minister, but God Himself, confers it; spiritual circumcision ("putting off the body of the sins of the flesh") is realized in union with Christ, whose "circumcision" implies His having undertaken for us to keep the whole law (Luke 2:21)
the Disobedient Prophet - And the man of God cried against the altar of the Lord, and said, O altar, altar! And then he foretold the fall of the altar, and with it the fall of him who stood in his royal robes that day Ministering to his unclean gods at that altar. 'At any rate, you will come to the manse,' said the Minister, who was on the crofters' side. ...
As a rule let Ministers sup at home on Sabbath nights; and let them sup alone. Think it out well, and count the cost, before you become a Minister. Suppose that you were buried on the same awful principle,-in whose grave would your bones lie waiting together with his till the last trump to stand forth before God and man together? And what would your epitaph and his be? Would it be this: 'Here lie the liar and his victim'? Or would it be this: 'Here lie the seducer and the seduced'? Or would it be this: 'Here lie the hater and him he hated down to death'? Or would it be this: 'Here lie the tempting host and his too willing to be tempted guest'? Or, if you are a Minister, would it be this: 'Here lies a dumb dog, and beside him one who was a crowded preacher in the morning of his days, but a castaway before night'? Alas, my brother!...
Paul as a Controversialist - And I suppose every old Minister who has learned anything in the school of life would say the same thing, to every young Minister especially. All that was noble, all that was grand and stately, all that was truly Christian, met in that Minister of the Crown
Josiah - But may we not be allowed to believe that her heart also was made tender within her by all that she had come through, till she bore and brought up her son Josiah to be the most tender-hearted man in all Israel, till Mary bore and brought up her child to be the most tender-hearted man in all the world?...
If a boy has a good mother and a good Minister he is all but independent of his father. And with Jedidah for his mother, and with Jeremiah for his Minister, both Manasseh his grandfather and Amon his father taken together did not succeed in corrupting and destroying young Josiah. That is to say,-however well a boy may have been brought up; however good a mother he may have had, and however efficient and faithful a Minister, the time soon comes when every young man must seek his own God for himself. And so it has been, and so it will be, with thousands of the sons of mothers like Jedidah, and with thousands of the scholars and young communicants of Ministers like Jeremiah and Zephaniah
Tabernacle - His philosophical presupposition, or view of the world, is the Platonic and Philonic one, that heaven is the place of realities, while earth is the place of shadows; and his central doctrine is that Christ, having, as a ‘minister of the true tabernacle (ἡ σκηνὴ ἡ ἀληθινή), which the Lord pitched, not man’ (Hebrews 8:2), entered within the veil, has won for every Christian the right of personal access to God
do, Done - " See COMMIT , LABOR , Minister , TRADE , WORK
Passion - They gave birth to poetry, science, painting, music, and all the polite arts, which Minister to pleasure; nor are they less serviceable in the cause of religion and truth
Levi - Yet the Lord was graciously pleased to choose this tribe for his own more immediate service, and placed this, highly honourable and distinguished mark upon it: At that time the Lord separated the tribe of Levi, to bear the ark of the covenant of the Lord to stand before the Lord to Minister unto him, and to bless in his name unto this day: wherefore Levi hath no part nor inheritance with his brethren; the Lord is his inheritance, according as the Lord thy God promised him
Slave - , the king's prime Minister, a rich man's steward, as Eliezer (Genesis 15:2; Genesis 24:2), God's servant (Daniel 9:17)
Glorify - ...
But beside this glorifying God actively, there is another method by which the Lord is said to be glorified by his creatures passively; namely, when under suited impressions of his goodness the soul lies passive, and comes to receive, and not to give; and from the Lord's grace thereby to Minister to the Lord's glory
Offer - 45:4: “The holy portion of the land shall be for the priests the Ministers of the sanctuary, which shall come near to Minister unto the Lord
Hand - ...
“To fill someone’s hand” may be a technical term for “installing him” in office: “And thou shalt put them upon Aaron thy brother, and his sons with him; and shalt anoint them, and consecrate them [3], and sanctify them, that they may Minister unto me in the priest’s office” ( Optatus, Bishop of Milevis - Three elements are requisite: (1) the Trinity (2) the Minister (3) the faithful receiver; but of these the Donatists exalt the second above the other two. As it is not the dyer who changes the colour of his wool so neither does the Minister of himself change the operation of baptism
Veil of the Temple - "From the top," not from the bottom; for it is God who from above rends the veil of separation between us and Him, and opens heaven to man, as the hymn of Ambrose says, "when Thou hadst overcome the sharpness of death Thou didst open the kingdom of heaven to all believers"; therefore not only Ministers but we all alike "have boldness (parresia , literally, freedom of speech, grounded on the consciousness that our sins are forgiven) to enter the holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way which He hath consecrated for us through the veil, that is to say, His flesh" (Hebrews 10:19-21); rather, "which (entering) He has newly consecrated (enekainisen , 'inaugurated'; it is a new thing, unheard of before) for us as a new (recently opened) and living way" (not the lifeless way of dead sacrificial victims under the law, but the living and lifegiving Saviour being the way). No priestly caste therefore now mediates between the sinner and his Judge; the Minister is no nearer God than the layman
Honour - Eadie’s translation and interpretation seem to us the best: ‘Which things, having indeed a show of wisdom in superstition, humility, and corporeal austerity, not in anything of value, are for, or Minister to, the gratification of the flesh
Exclusiveness - (1) His vocation as ‘a Minister of the circumcision’ (Romans 15:8) led Him to avoid as far as possible work among Samaritans and Gentiles
Host - This heavenly “host” not only worships God but serves to do all His will: “Bless ye the Lord, all ye his hosts; ye Ministers of his, that do his pleasure” ( Minister unto me” ( Joshua - You will sometimes see stranger young men crowding around a Minister in his classes and in his congregational work, and saving their own souls by so doing, while those young men that have been born in the family are never so much as seen or heard of. ...
It is stated again and again in the sacred history that Joshua stood before Moses and was his Minister. And Joshua, the son of Nun, was the first figure and far-off forerunner of all such young men as he stood before Moses, and was his Minister, and went up with him to the mount, and never departed out of the tabernacle. And she had already her full wages paid her when she saw her son Joshua standing of his own accord before Moses and serving him as his Minister
Esther - Fervidus, again, is only sorry he is not a Minister. What a reformation he would have worked in his own life by this time, and in his whole parish, if only God had made him a Minister! He would have saved his own soul, and the souls of his people, in season and out of season. It is not asked of you, Fervidus, to live and die a martyr; but just to visit your cabman's wife and children, and have family worship with them on a Sabbath night as you would have done if you had been a Minister. I do not wonder that Fervidus never forgave his father for not having made him a Minister
Priest - The nearest is probably Romans 15:16 RVm_: ‘a Minister of Jesus Christ unto the Gentiles, Ministering in sacrifice the gospel of God. In such a sense priests may be said to Minister in the house of God (2 Es 20:36), or the ‘ministers’ may be distinguished from the priests (2 Es 20:39). Paul accordingly applies the term to himself as a Minister of Christ to the Gentiles, and by a familiar figure compares his functions with those of a sacrificing priest, the offering which he presents being that of converted men. ...
(c) It is the non-sacrificial term ‘presbyter’ that is consistently used in the NT as the chief and technical designation of a Christian Minister. The Ministers of a congregation, whether engaged in teaching or administration (1 Timothy 5:17), were called elders or presbyters, probably in imitation of the practice of the synagogue (Acts 11:30; Acts 14:23; Acts 15:2)
Government - The elders still had a role after the Exile in administering Ezra's reforms (Ezra 10:8 ). Surrounding the royal court were such officials as “the one who is over the house” a sort of Secretary of State or Prime Minister; the recorder who was a herald, press secretary, and chief of protocol combined; the chief scribe; counselors; priests; and prophets ( 1 Kings 4:1 ). In addition, many attendants would Minister to the king
Timothy, Epistles to - ...
After the benediction Paul states that Timothy had been besought to remain at Ephesus to enjoin some not to teach strange doctrine, nor give heed to fables and useless genealogies, which Ministered questions rather than the dispensation of God, which was in faith. The qualification of a bishop, or overseer, and of a deacon, or Minister, are shown to be, not so much those of specific gift as of piety and good moral character. Timothy was to be a good Minister of Jesus Christ in teaching the right use of things which God in His beneficence has given to man
Abel - ...
There are no Ministers here, but there are a good many divinity students who will too soon be Ministers. If any Minister would be shut up and determined to preach nothing else and nothing ever but the peace-speaking blood of Christ, let him read every night in his communion-roll, in his young communicants' class list, and in his pastoral visitation-book. No, I know no reading so humbling, so condemning, so killing to us Ministers as our communion-roll. We Ministers must always appear before our people, and before God, clothed from head to foot with humility, with a rope upon our heads, and with nothing in our bands or in our mouths but the cross of Christ and the blood of Christ, that speaketh better things than that of Abel. For the Holy Ghost also is the purchase of Christ's blood, a new heart also, and a whole lifetime of the means of grace The Bible also, the Sabbath day, the Lord's table, a Minister after God's own heart, deep, divine, unsearchable providences, a peaceful death-bed, a happy resurrection morning, a place at the right hand of the Judge, an open acknowledgment and acquittal on the day of judgment, 'Come, ye blessed of My Father,' and then a mansion with our own name in blood upon its door-post and its lintel to all eternity! Yes; precious blood indeed! What blood that must be that can so outery and drown silent in its depths all the accusing cries that are even now going up to God all behind me and all around me! I feel that I would need a whole Redeemer and all His redeeming blood to myself
Angel - Paul represents angels, Hebrews 1:14 , where he calls them "ministering spirits;" and yet custom has prevailed so much, that angel is now commonly taken for the denomination of a particular order of spiritual beings, of great understanding and power, superior to the souls or spirits of men. Paul in his Epistle to the Hebrews, in the last verse of the first chapter; and this is the only passage in the whole Bible in which we have any thing explicit upon the office and employment of angels: ‘Are they not all,' saith he, ‘ministering spirits, sent forth to Minister for them that shall be heirs of salvation?' They are all, however high in rank and order, nothing more than ‘ministering spirits,' or, literally, ‘serving spirits;' not invested with authority of their own, but ‘sent forth,' occasionally sent forth, to do such service as may be required of them, ‘for them that shall be heirs of salvation. Daniel 7:10 , says of the Ancient of Days, "A fiery stream came from before him; thousand thousands Ministered unto him, and ten thousand times ten thousand stood before him. Prideaux observes, that the Minister of the synagogue, who officiated in offering the public prayers, being the mouth of the congregation, delegated by them, as their representative, messenger, or angel, to address God in prayer for them, was in Hebrew called sheliack-zibbor, that is, the angel of the church; and that from hence the chief Ministers of the seven churches of Asia are in the Revelation, by a name borrowed from the synagogue, called angels of those churches
Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - Here he is seen as God's agent and Minister, who tested human fidelity
Letter - Even the letters addressed to individuals were designed to Minister to churches
Tithe, Tithing - ...
Nowhere does the New Testament require Christians to tithe in the sense of giving 10 percent, but it does reiterate many things associated with tithing: those who Minister are entitled to receive support (1 Corinthians 9:14 ); the poor and needy should be cared for (1 Corinthians 16:1 ; Galatians 2:10 ); those who give can trust God, as the source of all that is given (2 Corinthians 9:10 ), to supply their needs (2 Corinthians 9:8 ; Philippians 4:19 ); and giving should be done joyously (2 Corinthians 9:7 )
Oil - ...
Second, Moses was to use this oil to anoint the priests and thereby consecrate them to Minister in the consecrated tabernacle (v
Holy Ghost - " (John 16:8-11) In short, so many, so diversified, so constant, and so unremitting are the operations of the Holy Ghost on the hearts and minds of the Lord's people, that it must with truth be said, that he, and he only, is the almighty Minister in the church of Christ, and to him alone the who efficiency of the gospel, both in work and blessing, is committed
Stand - Such standing is not just a standing still doing nothing but includes all that one does in Ministering before God ( Minister) priests in Bethel (1 Kings 12:32)
Love-Feasts - " Ignatius, in his epistle to the church of Smyrna, in the first century, affords us the additional information, "that it was not lawful to baptize, or celebrate the love-feasts, without the bishop, or Minister
Bring, Bringing, Brought - See DO , GIVE , KEEP , Minister , OFFER , SHEW , TROUBLE
Popularity - The truest popularity, the truest greatness, is to belong to the humble heart that ever preferreth other to itself, that rejoiceth to Minister and to serve, to give itself freely to all even as Christ did (Matthew 20:28 || Mark 10:45)
Work, Wrought - See COMMIT , DO , LABOR , Minister , TRADE
Popularity - The truest popularity, the truest greatness, is to belong to the humble heart that ever preferreth other to itself, that rejoiceth to Minister and to serve, to give itself freely to all even as Christ did (Matthew 20:28 || Mark 10:45)
Methodists - On his return to England, he was more fully instructed in these views by Bohler, a Moravian Minister; and having proved their truth in his own experience, he began to preach in the churches of the metropolis, and other places, and then in rooms, fields, and streets, the doctrine of salvation by faith. To meet the Minister and the stewards of the society once a week, to inform the Minister of any that are sick, or of any that walk disorderly and will not be reproved; to pay to the stewards what they have received of their several classes in the week preceding; and to show their account of what each person has contributed. By doing no harm; by avoiding evil in every kind, especially that which is most generally practised, such as taking the name of God in vain; profaning the day of the Lord, either by doing ordinary work thereon, or by buying or selling; drunkenness; buying and selling spirituous liquors, or drinking them, unless in cases of extreme necessity; fighting, quarrelling, brawling; brother going to law with brother: returning evil for evil, or railing for railing; the using many words in buying or selling; the buying or selling uncustomed goods; the giving or taking things on usury, that is, unlawful interest; uncharitable or unprofitable conversation, particularly speaking evil of magistrates or of Ministers; doing to others as we would not they should do unto us; doing what we know is not for the glory of God, as the putting on of gold or costly apparel; the taking such diversions as cannot be used in the name of the Lord Jesus; singing those songs, or reading those books, which do not term to the knowledge or love of God; softness, or needless self-indulgence; laying up treasure upon earth; borrowing without a probability of paying; or taking up goods, without a probability of paying for them. The association of preachers with themselves in the work led to an annual meeting of the Ministers, then and since called the conference. The Minister or preacher first named of those appointed to each circuit or station, is thereby invested with the pastoral charge thereof, and is usually denominated the preacher in charge. The number of itinerant Ministers was two thousand and ten, of whom one hundred and thirty-four were superannuated, or worn out. In addition to these, there are also several thousand local Ministers and preachers, many of whom were once itinerant; and who, though not statedly devoted to the work of the Ministerial office, as the itinerant Ministers are, yet, by their valuable services on the Sabbath, or at other times occasionally in their respective vicinities, constitute an important auxiliary branch of the system, and contribute much to its compactness and efficiency. This branch of the American Wesleyan Methodists, agreeably to their minutes for the year 1831, consisted of sixty-five itinerant Ministers, and twelve thousand five hundred and sixty-three members; of whom one thousand two hundred and thirty- three were Indians
Esau - I have not lived to grey hairs in a city, and been a Minister of city families, and city young men, without learning things about birthrights and their sale and their redemption too-things that cannot be told on the housetop. No Minister in Edinburgh knows more or can speak better about these things than I can do. If you have no Minister who can and will tell you about Esau, and about himself, and about yourself, and about Jesus Christ, ring my bell! It will be late that I do not open the door! I will be busy that we do not have another hour over Esau-you and I
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - Friends, come up higher! the Minister pled with his people. And all the assisting Minister could do, with all his fresh promises and pleas and encouragements, it was long before the Lord's Table was even half filled that day
the Widow With the Two Mites - For all the coals in the bowels of all the earth would not warm her heart and mine; and, shall I not say it, her Master's heart, as her love for these causes of His warms His heart, and hers, and her Minister's heart. And then out of our great central fund an equal dividend is made every May to every Minister of the Free Church, from John O'Groats to Maidenkirk. So much so, that wherever you see a Free Church door open on a Sabbath morning, in town or country, and the people flocking up to it, you have had a hand in opening that door, and in sustaining that Minister, and in preaching the unsearchable riches of Christ to that congregation
Elijah - You know the story of the play-actor who scouted the Minister because he dawdled over his prayers and his sermons as if he was ashamed of his message. O why do we Ministers not preach more about prayer, and about the employment of our own and our people's passions in prayer! But if your Ministers do not so preach, and do not know the way-you are independent of them. But Ministers far more than all other men. What have I been spending all my life for? an old Minister asks himself
Barnabas - ...
His not claiming maintenance as a Minister (1 Corinthians 9:6), but preferring to work for his livelihood, flowed from the same sincere disinterestedness as led him at the first to sell his land and give the price to the church. He was probably soon removed by death after parting with Paul; for Mark is mentioned subsequently as in Paul's favor and Ministering to Paul (Colossians 4:10; 2 Timothy 4:11), which he would not be likely to be, but rather with Barnabas his uncle, if Barnabas were alive
Esther - Haman was made prime Minister and began to plot against Mordecai and the Jews because they would not pay homage to him
Temptation, Test - Both trials (as revealing and stimulating character and progress) and temptations (understood as allurements to evil) may Minister to the divine purpose, provided the outcome is positive (James 1:12 )
Greatness - The servant’s life, indeed, may be a life of greatness, inasmuch as Christ has placed the very essence of greatness no longer in power to command, but in willingness to Minister
Angel - He is called a Minister of righteousness
Angel - Officers of the churches, whether prophets or ordinary Ministers, Haggai 1:13 . It is our happiness to know that they are all Ministering spirits, sent forth to Minister to them who are heirs of salvation
Synagogue - 'servant, Minister, officer,' only once mentioned in connection with the synagogue as the 'attendant' to whom the Lord gave the book when He had done reading
Angels - We know little of their nature: "of the angels he saith, Who maketh his angels spirits, and his Ministers a flame of fire," Hebrews 1:7 ; and man is described as being a little inferior to the angels. ...
Though we are unconscious of the presence of angels we know that they are Ministering spirits sent forth to Minister for them who shall inherit salvation, Hebrews 1:14 : cf. Psalm 34:7 ; and we read also that they Ministered to the Lord when He was here
Acts of the Apostles - The title, 'Acts of the Apostles,' might have led us to expect a more general account of the labours of all the Twelve; but their mission in the ways of God is superseded by that of Paul, both as Minister of the gospel of the glory of Christ, and of the church
American Church, the - John Baptist's Day, June 24th, 1579, theofficiating Minister having been the Rev
Timothy And Titus Epistles to - Timothy must overcome his diffidence, which arises partly from his youth, and in the constant exercise of his Divinely inspired gift of teaching become an example in life and doctrine of what the Christian Minister should be. -The Christian Minister must pursue those virtues the possession of which brings life, and Timothy must give a pure testimony to the gospel, even if through suffering. He urges Timothy to hasten and bring Mark to Minister to him, also to bring his cloak and parchments from Troas
Jesuits - They aimed, in the next place, to become the spiritual directors of the higher ranks; and soon established themselves in most of the courts which were attached to the papal faith, not only as the confessors, but frequently also as the guides and Ministers, of superstitious princes. They were favoured by Louis XIII, and his Minister Richelieu, on account of their literary exertions; but it was in the succeeding reign of Louis XIV, that they reached the summit of their prosperity. ...
In the mean time the king of Portugal was assassinated; and Carvalho, the Minister, who detested the Jesuits, found means to load them with the odium of the crime. The necessary measures were concerted under the direction of De Choiseul, by the Marquis D'Ossun, the French ambassador at Madrid, with Charles III, king of Spain, and his prime Minister, the Count D'Aranda
Elijah - In "standing before the Lord" he assumed the position of a Levitical priest (Deuteronomy 10:8), for in Israel the Levitical priesthood retained in Judah had been set aside, and the prophets were raised up to Minister in their stead, and witness by word and deed before Jehovah against the prevailing apostasy. )...
Carnivorous birds themselves, they lose their ravenous nature to Minister to God's servant, for God can make the most unlikely instruments Minister to His saints. Casting his mantle on him as the sign of a call, he was followed by Elisha, who thenceforth became his Minister, and who executed subsequently the former two commands
Synagogue - It had no special priest or ‘ Minister ,’ as will appear presently. ]'>[2] (A V ‘ Minister ’ in the same, but now obsolete, sense; cf
Luke, the Gospel According to - In the preface to his Gospel Luke refers to "many" who before him had written accounts of what the "eye witnesses" and "ministers of the word" transmitted. This implies the "many" were not themselves eye witnesses or Ministers of the word. " But as the phrase "they delivered them to us" (paredosan ) includes both written and oral transmission (2 Thessalonians 2:15) Luke's words do not oppose, as Alford thinks, but favor the opinion that those two Gospels were among the sources of Luke's information, especially as Matthew was an "eye-witness," and Mark a "minister of the word. " Luke himself applies" Minister" (Acts 20:4-676 hufretees ) to John Mark. Thus Paul's allusion to Luke's being a "physician" is appropriate in writing to the Colossians as they were in Phrygia, the quarter wherein Luke Ministered to his sickness
Thousand Years - These elections are for the good of those to whom they Minister respectively; compare, as to Israel's mediating blessedness to the nations, Romans 11:12; Romans 11:15; Micah 5:7. )...
As "kings" the transfigured saints shall have subjects; as "priests" they shall have people to whom they shall mediatorially Minister blessings from God, namely, the men on earth
Wages - When Jesus commissions the twelve disciples to preach throughout Israel, they are urged not to take money with them; it is expected that they will be paid by those to whom they Minister, for "the worker is worth his keep" (Matthew 10:10 ). Practically, he argues that those who Minister the gospel are entitled to a monetary payment, just as people are paid for work done in the secular sphere (1 Corinthians 9:7 )
the Samaritan Who Shewed Mercy - This principle the author believed with all his heart, it was often an anchor to his soul, and every Minister of the Church of Scotland is bound, by his subscription and ordination vows, to maintain it. When a beggar at one of our road-sides sees a Minister coming along with his black clothes and his white neckcloth, the poor wretch feels sure that he will not be passed by this time without a kind word at any rate
Ananias And Sapphira - It was like those country congregations where the Minister has to do everything himself, till he has neither time nor strength nor spirit left to give himself continually to prayer, and to the ministry of the word. He was a Minister of immense capacity, gigantic energy, endless resource, and overpowering authority. And thus it was that the Ministers and deacons' courts of the Free Church were then, and are still, all of one mind and spirit, and have all things in common
Korah - Ringleader of the rebellion against Moses and Aaron (Numbers 16; Numbers 26:9-11); the one solitary anecdote recorded of the 38 years' wandering, uncircumcision, and shame, Not content with his honourable post as a Levite "minister" to the sanctuary, Korah "sought the priesthood also. ...
Korah's sin answers to that of sacerdotalist Ministers who, not content with the honour of the ministry (nowhere in the New Testament are Christian Ministers called "sacrificing" or "sacerdotal priests," hiereis, a term belonging in the strict and highest sense to Jesus alone; restricted to Him and the Aaronic and pagan priests, and spiritually applied to all Christians: Matthew 8:4; Acts 14:13; Hebrews 5:6; Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10; Revelation 20:6; 1 Peter 2:5; 1 Peter 2:9), usurp Christ's sacrificing and mediatorial priesthood; also to that of all men who think to be saved by their own doings instead of by His mediatorial work for us (Acts 4:12). The Reubenites' sin answers to that of those who would set aside all Ministers on the ground that all Christians are priests unto God
Sandemanians - John Glass, who was a Minister of the established church in that kingdom; but being charged with a design of subverting the national covenant, and sapping the foundation of all national establishments, by maintaining that the kingdom of Christ is not of this world, was expelled from the synod by the church of Scotland. " There have not been wanting writers, however, who have vindicated these Ministers from his invectives, and have endeavoured to show that Mr
Sacrifice - An offering made to God on an altar, by means of a regular Minister: as an acknowledgment of his power, and a payment of homage. Sacrifices (though the term is sometimes used to comprehend all the offerings made to God, or in any way devoted to his service and honour) differ from mere oblations in this, that in a sacrifice there is a real destruction or change of the thing offered; whereas an oblation is only a simple offering or gift, without any such change at all: thus, all sorts of tithes, and first fruits, and whatever of men's worldly substance in consecrated to God for the support of his worship and the maintenance of his Ministers, are offerings, or oblations; and these, under the Jewish law, were either of living creatures, or other things; but sacrifices, in the more peculiar sense of the term, were either wholly or in part consumed by fire
Roman Empire - Hyrcanus was titular sovereign and high priest, subject to his Minister Antipater, the partisan of Rome
Manaen (2) - In his old age he was a Christian Minister; in youth he was foster-brother of Herod the tetrarch, i
Angels of the Seven Churches - The passages adduced from the OT in support of this view are certainly irrelevant; for, while it is conceivable that the chief Minister of a Church should be styled ἄγγελος Κυρίου (cf
Antioch - The temple stood in the midst of a grove of laurels and cypresses, where every thing was assembled which could Minister to the senses; and in whose recesses the juvenile devotee wanted not the countenance of a libertine god to abandon himself to voluptuousness
Sacrament - On the part of those who receive the sacrament, it is required that they be free from any of those sins, called in the church of Rome mortal; but it is not required of them to exercise any good disposition, to possess faith, or to resolve that they shall amend their lives; for such is conceived to be the physical virtue of a sacrament administered by a priest with a good intention, that, unless when it is opposed by the obstacle of a mortal sin, the very act of receiving it is sufficient. This act was called, in the language of the schools, opus operatum, the work done independently of any disposition of mind attending the deed; and the superiority of the sacraments of the New Testament over the sacraments of the Old was thus expressed, that the sacraments of the Old Testament were effectual ex opere operantis, from the piety and faith of the persons to whom they were administered; while the sacraments of the New Testament convey grace, ex opere operato, from their own intrinsic virtue, and an immediate physical influence upon the mind of him who receives them. It is admitted, indeed, by the Socinians, that the sacraments are of farther advantage to the whole society of Christians, as being the solemn badges by which the disciples of Jesus are discriminated from other men, and the appointed method of declaring that faith in Christ, by the public profession of which Christians Minister to the improvement of one another
Compassion - An Old Testament or human Minister realizes personal weaknesses and thus moderates personal anger at another's weaknesses ( Hebrews 5:2 )
Procurator - Antonius Felix was brother of Claudius’ great Minister of finance (a rationibus), Pallas, and, probably on account of his marriage into a higher class, was raised to the equestrian order before his appointment to Judaea
Deuteronomy, the Book of - ...
The different way in which the priests and Levites respectively are regarded in Deuteronomy and in the preceding books (in these "the Levites" Ministering to the priests "the sons of Aaron," as the priests Minister to God (Numbers 3:5, etc. ), and not mentioned as "blessing" the people, the prerogative of the priests (Numbers 6:23-27, compare Deuteronomy 10:8-9); but in Deuteronomy (Deuteronomy 18:7; Deuteronomy 11:6) the Levites and Aaronite priests not being mutually distinguished, and Korah not being mentioned with Dathan and Abiram in their rebellion) is accounted for by the consideration that Moses in Deuteronomy is addressing the people, and for the time takes no notice of the distinction of orders among Ministers, and, similarly referring to the rebellions of the people against God, takes no notice of the Minister Korah's share in the rebellion, as not suiting his present purpose
Satan (2) - He is recognized as a Minister of the Divine justice, although God does tax him with overdoing his part. Matthew tells us that when the devil left Him, angels came and Ministered unto Him. Paul accepts the current doctrine; but though in his Epistles to the Ephesians and Colossians he seems to add to the teaching of Christ in the Gospels other elements from the demonology of the Pharisaic schools and from other sources (Ephesians 2:2; Ephesians 6:11, Colossians 2:15), and in his Epistles to the Corinthians and to Timothy (1 Corinthians 5:5, 1 Timothy 1:20) ascribes to Satan a certain power of discipline as a Minister of Divine judgment, really contributes to this branch of Christian doctrine no essential element additional to that which is furnished in the Gospels
the Sower Who Went Forth to Sow - And all His Ministers, to this day, who are to be of any real and abiding benefit to their people, must labour first to make themselves men of understanding, and then to make their people the same. And if the people are void of understanding their Ministers are largely to blame for that. There are people, indeed, in every congregation that our Lord Himself could not make men of understanding: at the same time, it is the Ministers who are mostly at fault if their people remain stupid in their intellects and dark in their hearts. And the first duty of every Minister is to make his pulpit like that chariot of Ethiopia. Davidson of Aberdeen was the best at that one single word of explanation and direction of any Minister I ever sat under. ' And, then, to keep His Ministers from being puffed up with such idle praise as yours, God says to them-"Thou son of man, the children of thy people are still talking of thee by the walls and in the doors of their houses
Episcopalians - Paul appear, from the book of Acts and the Epistles, to have been teachers, pastors, overseers, of the flock of Christ; and to Timothy, who was a Minister of the word, the Apostle speaks of "the gift which is in thee by the putting on of my hands," 2 Timothy 1:6 . He not only directs Timothy, whom he had besought to abide at Ephesus, how to behave himself in the house of God as a Minister, but he sets him over other Ministers. But there is also mention of the elders of the church, who, according to the Scripture representation of elders, must have discharged the Ministerial office, but over whom the Apostle James presided. They were his council in matters relating to the church, and they were qualified to preach, to baptize, and to administer the Lord's Supper; but they could do nothing without his permission and authority. Upon the principles which have now been stated, it is understood, according to the episcopal form of government, that there is in the church a superior order of office-bearers, the successors of the Apostles, who possess in their own persons the right of ordination and jurisdiction, and who are called επισκοποι , as being the overseers not only of the people, but also of the clergy; and an inferior order of Ministers, called presbyters, the literal translation of the word πρεσβυτεροι , which is rendered in our English Bibles elders, persons who receive from the ordination of the bishop, power to preach and to administer the sacraments, who are set over the people, but are themselves under the government of the bishop, and have no right to convey to others the sacred office, which he gives them authority to exercise under him. The truth seems to have been, that such offices were at first erected in the Christian church as the good order, the instruction, and the exigencies of the society at that time required; without any intention, at least without any declared design, of regulating the appointment, authority, or the distinction, of Christian Ministers under future circumstances. I have thought it right to take this general view of the Ministerial office, and to make these observations upon the clerical orders subsisting in this kingdom far the purpose of pointing out the foundation and principles of church authority, and of showing that our ecclesiastical establishment is as nearly conformable, as change of circumstances will permit, to the practice of the primitive church. No church can exist without some government; but though there must be rules and orders for the proper discharge of the offices of public worship, though there must be fixed regulations concerning the appointment of Ministers, and though a subordination among them is expedient in the highest degree, yet it does not follow that all these things must be precisely the same in every Christian country; they may vary with the other varying circumstances of human society, with the extent of a country, the manners of its inhabitants, the nature of its civil government, and many other peculiarities which might be specified. The bishops have no salaries as such, but are allowed to hold parishes as other Ministers; but it has lately been found more convenient in many states to raise a fund for the support of the bishop, that his time may be more at liberty for visiting the clergy. Their incomes, too, though doubtless extremely small compared with those of the bishops of the establishment in England, are not so, compared with those of other Ministers generally in the United States
Joshua - Next as Moses' "minister" Joshua accompanied him along with Aaron, Nadab, Abihu, and 70 elders up the mountain of God; but Moses went alone into the cloud (Exodus 24:9; Exodus 24:13-15). Jesus is the Minister of the true circumcision (Joshua 5:2-9; compare Romans 15:8; Romans 2:29; Colossians 2:11; Colossians 2:13)
New York, City of - The few remaining were Ministered to by Father Ferdinand Steinmayer (or "Father Farmer") who celebrated Mass in such places as a loft in Water Street. On June 10, 1785, largely through the instrumentality of the Spanish Minister, Don Diego de Gardoqui, an act of incorporation was secured for the "Trustees of the Roman Catholic church of the City of New York," and November 4, 1786, Saint Peter's Church at Barclay and Church Streets, the first permanent structure for a Catholic Church erected in New York, was opened
Cross, Crucifixion - The central focus now, though, is not Christ but Paul himself who, as a Minister of Christ, must come only in weakness and foolishness
Capital Punishment - ...
What about Paul's instruction regarding the role of the state in preserving order? The political ruler is a “minister of God to thee for good”; the ruler “beareth not the sword in vain: for he is a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil” (Romans 13:4 )
Comfort - ); that afflictions were the signs of God’s sonship (Hebrews 12:5-9); and that the worthy bearing of them resulted in ripened character (Hebrews 12:11), demonstrated the strength of God in human weakness (2 Corinthians 12:10), qualified one to Minister to others (2 Corinthians 1:4), and worked an eternal weight of glory in comparison with which the passing affliction was light (2 Corinthians 4:17; cf. παράκλησις is described as part of a Christian Minister’s equipment (1 Timothy 4:13, Titus 1:9, 1 Thessalonians 3:2), and that the term is not confined to mere exhortation is suggested by 2 Corinthians 1:4
Tabernacle, the - ...
Between the brazen altar and the holy (place) stood the laver , at which the priests washed their hands and feet whenever they drew near to Minister. Here the priests Ministered daily, burning sweet incense: type of Christ's intercession, and of the perfections of His Person and work, not seen here as meeting man's need, but as for the delight of God, His Father. Twelve loaves were constantly on the table, typical of Israel in association with Christ before God, and of God's bounty which will be administered through Israel (twelve loaves) to the earth in the kingdom
Joseph - He is called" son of Jacob's old age," as the comfort of his father's declining years, when his elder brothers by misconduct grieved their father, and Benjamin as yet was too young to Minister to him. Pharaoh doubtless ordered the marriage, to link his prime Minister with the noblest in the land. " If he be Joseph's Pharaoh Joseph was just the Minister to carry out his grand measures
Nehemiah - He was a kind of prime Minister, and master of the ceremonies, both in one. ...
And if any young Minister should be ordained, like Nehemiah, over such a congregation as Jerusalem was in that day; if he finds the gates thereof burned with fire, and the walls laid waste, and the whole house of God in reproach round about; let him read the Book of Nehemiah till he has it by heart
Heman - ...
And to close with, there is a singular use in Heman for Ministers. When God is to make a very sinful man into a very able, and skilful, and experimental Minister, He sends that man to the same school to which He sent Heman. ' His own troubles and distractions give a Minister 'a lady's hand,' as an old writer has it, in dealing with troubled and distracted souls
Go - The Minister is going to France
Leper - The Minister of God was publicly to witness to the leper's cure by performing certain prescribed rites and so admitting him to communion again with his fellows (Leviticus 14:9-20)
Timothy - During Paul's long stay at Ephesus Timothy "ministered to him" (Acts 19:22), and was sent before him to Macedonia and to Corinth "to bring the Corinthians into remembrance of the apostle's ways in Christ" (1 Corinthians 4:17; 1 Corinthians 16:10). "...
Paul bears testimony to his disinterested and sympathizing affection for both his spiritual father, the apostle, and those to whom he was sent to Minister; with him Christian love was become "natural," not forced, nor "with dissimulation" (Philippians 2:19-23): "I trust to send Timothy shortly
Hand - ...
pour water on the hands, in the phraseology of the Scriptures, is to serve or Minister to
Wise, Skilled - 28:3: “And thou shalt speak unto all that are wisehearted, whom I have filled with the spirit of wisdom, that they may make Aaron’s garments to consecrate him, that he may Minister unto me in the priest’s office
Parents (2) - It was certainly expected that children should Minister to the necessities of aged parents
Severus, Aurelius Alexander - Their chief Minister or regent was the famous jurist Ulpian, whose appointment appears to have been due to Maesa's influence, though Mammaea afterwards acquiesced in it (Lamp. 15); separate committees of this council administering different departments of the state
Simplicius, Bishop of Rome - Peter, the unworthy Minister of whose see he is, not to allow impunity to the enemies of the ancient faith, and especially urges him to prevent, if possible, the assembling a council to review the decisions of Chalcedon
Ministry - The word comes from the Latin Minister, properly an adjective, but in its substantive use signifying an ‘attendant’ or ‘servant’ who usually performed services of a personal and more or less menial nature. In Greek there are three words which more or less nearly correspond to the Latin Minister, namely, διάκονος, λειτουργός, ὑπηρέτης
Paul as a Man of Prayer - At your work, at your family worship, in your pew on Sabbath, at the Lord's table itself; and, if you were a Minister, in your very pulpit. After a sermon to make a prayer and desire a blessing, and to pray for the Minister
Jeremiah - He who has-I will not say a full sensibility of the evil of sin, for he would go mad if he had-but a true beginning of such sensibility, he has the making of a true Minister of Jesus Christ in him; otherwise he has not, and should at once go to make his bread in some more lawful calling. Men, and especially Ministers, of much sensibility, and spiritualtiy, and sympathy, and melancholy are not made to be married. ' And thus it was that what a sensitive and melancholy Minister takes home and tells only to his wife, when he has a wife who is his friend, and not merely his familiar, all that Jeremiah took and told to God
Obsolete or Obscure Words in the English av Bible - ...
Minister, Luke 4:20—attendant; helper
Lord's Supper - ...
The consecration is not by priestly authority but is the corporate act of the church represented by the Minister, "the cup which we (I and you, the whole congregation) bless
Typology - Jesus became a high priest and a Minister of the holy places and true tent, which the Lord pitched (Hebrews 8:2 )
Devil - In Zechariah and Job 1–2 the satan appears as God's agent and Minister who seeks to bring charges against individual people before God and the heavenly court
Galatians, Epistle to the - Had Christ become the Minister of sin in their doing this? If not, in going back to the law they built anew what they had destroyed, and were confessedly transgressors; for if right in leaving it for Christ, they were wrong in returning to it. They were to care for one another — to think nothing of themselves — to care for those who Ministered to them in the word
Mennonites - In all these places his Ministerial labours were attended with remarkable success, and added to his sect a prodigious number of followers. Herman Schyn, a Mennonite Minister, who has published their history and apology, maintains, that they are not anabaptists either by principle or origin
Persia - A favorite Minister usually had the government mainly delegated to him by the king (Esther 3:1-10; Esther 8:8; Esther 10:2-3)
Evil - ...
This teaching is for the most part experimental and practical, and can still Minister comfort and encouragement to the Christian believer
Anthropology - The relationship of God and humanity in the Old Testament vision points directly to the relationships of human beings within Christ's church, a community of human beings called out to Minister to all of God's creation. As a result, the church is called to Minister and to proclaim the message of Jesus Christ to the total person
Philanthropy - Christ instructed His disciples to heal the sick, and generally to Minister to the physically distressed. The relief of the poor seems to have been another marked form of Christian philanthropy from the first, and they were in addition to Minister in spiritual things, and to seek to admit men into the Kingdom of God
Daniel - Daniel, like Moses, was trained in all the learning of the world; his political experience moreover, as a Minister of state under successive dynasties of the great world powers, gave the natural qualifications to which God added supernatural spiritual insight, enabling him to characterize to the life the several world monarchies which bore or were to bear sway until Messiah's kingdom shall come with power
Uniqueness - ‘No man cometh unto the Father but by me’ (John 14:6)—that is the strong declaration which the Fourth Gospel places upon His lips; and a full equivalent is supplied by the other Gospels in such sentences as these: ‘The Son of Man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’ (Matthew 20:28). ‘While He came not to be Ministered unto, He still made it evident that in the depths of His spirit there was an unhesitating affirmation of a pre-eminent royalty. He Ministered to bodily needs as well as to the needs of the spirit
God, Name of - People call on, pronounce blessings, Minister, preach, speak, pray, believe, take oaths, and wage war in his Name
Priest - )...
Now from the earliest ages of the church, and before the law, the patriarchs and holy men of God Ministered as priests in their families. All other priests, whether Aaron or his sons, Levitical or Christian, are no otherwise priests than as they act in the Lord Jesus's name, are ordained by his authority, and Minister for his glory
Stephen - The first of the seven appointed to Minister as a deacon in distributing alms, so that the Grecian widows should not be neglected while the Hebrew widows were served (Acts 6; 7). ...
(2) That in their past history from the first the same failure to recognize their true friends appeared as in their present rejection of the great Antitype Messiah and His Ministers: "ye stiffnecked and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye do always resist the Holy Spirit, as your fathers did so do ye"; so the brethren toward Joseph, the Israelites towards Moses (Acts 7:9; Acts 7:35; Acts 7:40), and worst of all toward God, whom they forsook for a calf and for Moloch
Begotten - ...
Before I depart from the contemplation of this sublime subject as it refers to the person of God's dear Son, I would beg to drop a short observation on what I humbly conceive to be a misapplication of the term begotten, as is sometimes made in reference to man, I mean, when Ministers themselves, or others for them, are said to have begotten souls to Christ by the instrumentality of their preaching. But even admitting the contrary, supposing it be granted, that this inspired apostle used the term in relation to himself, what warrant would this be for the use of it among ordinary Ministers? If it be said, that it is only meant to imply their instrumentality, I answer, that the term spiritual father is still unsuitable and unbecoming. And when it is farther considered, how much it tends to Minister to spiritual pride, it is a very plain proof it cometh not of the Lord
Honor - 3:6, where God is describing the people to whom Ezekiel is to Minister: “… not to many people of a strange speech and of a hard language, whose words thou canst not understand
Timotheus - Timothy was regularly appointed to the Ministerial office by the laying on of hands, not only by St. From this time Timothy acted as a Minister of the Gospel; he generally attended St. Paul, after his usual salutation, assures Timothy of his most affectionate remembrance; he speaks of his own apostleship and of his sufferings; exhorts Timothy to be steadfast in the true faith, to be constant and diligent in the discharge of his Ministerial office, to avoid foolish and unlearned questions, and to practise and inculcate the great duties of the Gospel; he describes the apostasy and general wickedness of the last days, and highly commends the Holy Scriptures; he again solemnly exhorts Timothy to diligence: speaks of his own danger, and of his hope of future reward; and concludes with several private directions, and with salutations
Dead - Thus did the king of Persia testify his sorrow for the decree, into which his wily courtiers had betrayed him, and which, without the miraculous interposition of Heaven, had proved fatal to his favourite Minister; "Then the king went to his palace, and spent the night, fasting; neither were instruments of music brought before him," Daniel 6:18
Poverty (2) - The same thing may be gathered of the household at Bethany (Luke 10:38; and still more John 11:3; John 11:45; John 12:3); certain women, including the wife of Herod’s steward, ‘minister’ to Him (Mark 15:40, Luke 8:3)
Basilides, Gnostic Sect Founder - ) on the descent of the Minister (διάκονος ), i. Above all, we hear of the amazement of the Archon on receiving "the utterance of the Ministering Spirit" or "Minister" (διάκονος , cf. 972) that the Basilidians interpreted the dove to be "the Minister," i
Philippians Epistle to the - Paul with a monetary gift (Philippians 4:18), and his experience is described in the letter: ‘I think it needful to send to you Epaphroditus, my brother, fellow-worker and fellow-soldier, your messenger and Minister of my need. Paul and Minister to him, and his return home so soon needed explanation, perhaps apology, and the Apostle does this in graceful and affectionate language
Galatians, Letter to the - The Minister of the true gospel pleases God, not people (Galatians 1:10 )
Apostles - ...
The twelve led in the selection of the first deacons to Minister to the needy (Acts 6:2 , the only use of “the twelve” in Acts). Rather, he tenderly Ministered among the churches (1 Thessalonians 2:5-8 )
King - ’ His functions are nowhere defined, but he seems to have held an influential position, and was probably the chief Minister, the Grand Vizier of modern times (cf
Corinthians, Epistles to the - Paul was a competent new covenant Minister, as Moses had been of the old covenant. The one Ministered death and condemnation, the other the Spirit (which quickens) and righteousness. ...
2 Corinthians 6 : He shows how he and his fellow-labourers commended themselves in everything as God's Ministers
Dominion (2) - ‘The Son of Man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’ (Matthew 20:28 || Mark 10:45). The angels are thus represented as being subject to the dominion of Christ in His exaltation, as His servants, obeying His behests; as even during His life on earth they appeared as Ministering spirits obedient to His command, and waiting upon Him as courtiers upon their Sovereign (Matthew 4:11; Matthew 26:53, Luke 22:43)
Amen - Curiously enough, among Presbyterians it is said by the Minister only
Pride (2) - They had Him as an example, who came not to receive service, but to Minister to the needs of others, even to the point of giving up His life for them (Matthew 20:28)
Preaching - ...
Several of these are valuable treatises, full of edifying instructions; but all are on a scale too large, and, by affecting to treat of the whole office of a Minister, leave that capital branch, public preaching, unfinished and vague. 2: preface; and books recommended under article Minister
Adam - Among the heavenly bodies the earth, and above all the various productions of its surface, vegetable and animal, however perfect in their kinds, and beautiful and excellent in their respective natures, not one being was found to whom the rest could Minister instruction; inspire with moral delight; or lead up to the Creator himself. There was, properly speaking, no intellectual being; none to whom the whole frame and furniture of material nature could Minister knowledge; no one who could employ upon them the generalizing faculty, and make them the basis of inductive knowledge
Ransom (2) - λύτρον: ‘the Son of Man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’; and (2) in 1 Timothy 2:6, where it stands for ἀντίλυτρον: ‘For there is one God, one mediator also between God and men, himself man, Christ Jesus (1 Timothy 2:5), who gave himself a ransom for all
Salt - It not only Ministers to give a taste to the several articles of meat, but to preserve animal life from leprosy, and similar diseases. There is indeed a process of art now used for refining salt, and making it Minister to various ways of usefulness; but the rock salt in its own pure nature is not of human production nor contrivance; like the earth itself, it is of JEHOVAH'S forming
Benediction - —Benedictions on the assembled people pronounced by an officiating priest or Minister were a regular part of the liturgies of the temple and the synagogue, but no direct mention is made of these in the Gospel narratives
Abram - Certainly, truth at all times, and upon all occasions, is most closely and faithfully to be followed up, leaving it with the Lord to make all things Minister to his own glory, and to his people's welfare
Elisha - There is blessing in store for Israel, from such young Ministers. Those fifty students must have had good tutors and governors in Ministerial morals and in pastoral theology. Elisha was a gentle, homely, kindly lowland Minister; as unlike Elijah as the green meadows of Abel-Meholah were unlike the savage solitudes of mountainous Gilead. Let us be specially jealous of our best Ministers, lest our children pass us by, and claim any other man whatsoever as their spiritual father
Propitiation - The concession is important; and the comment cannot weaken it, because of its absurdity; for, in that interpretation of propitiation, Moses, or any of the Apostles, or any Minister of the Gospel now, who succeeds in bringing sinners to repentance, is as truly a propitiation for sin as Christ himself
Benediction - —Benedictions on the assembled people pronounced by an officiating priest or Minister were a regular part of the liturgies of the temple and the synagogue, but no direct mention is made of these in the Gospel narratives
Elisha - ...
So bidding farewell to father and mother (contrast Matthew 8:21-22; "suffer me first to go and (tend my father until his death, and then) bury my father"; and Luke 9:61-62, where the "bidding farewell" involved in that particular case a division of heart between home relations and Christ, Luke 14:26; Matthew 10:37; Philippians 3:13), and slaying a yoke of oxen and boiling the flesh with the wooden instruments (compare 2 Samuel 24:22), a token of giving up all for the Lord's sake, he Ministered to Elijah henceforth as Joshua did to Moses. Elisha, not in personal revenge but as Jehovah's Minister, by God's inspiration, pronounced their doom. Elisha by refusing his presents shows that the Minister of God is not influenced by filthy lucre (1 Timothy 3:3), as Naaman's master had supposed (2 Kings 5:5, compare Genesis 14:28). " Benhadad suspecting treachery was informed (probably by one who had witnessed Elisha's cure of Naaman)," the prophet in Israel telleth the king of Israel the words that thou speakest in thy bedchamber" (2 Kings 6:12); compare Christ's Ministers, Luke 12:3. Elisha's Ministering servant (not Gehazi) rising early was terrified at the sight; "alas, my master! how shall we do?" Elisha replies, "they that be with us are more than they with him" (2 Chronicles 32:7; Psalms 55:18; Romans 8:31), and prays, "Lord, open his eyes"; then he saw "the mountain full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha" (Psalms 34:7; Zechariah 9:8. Acts 13:41; and on lucre-loving Gehazi-like Ministers, as Judas; giving up to judicial blindness the willfully blind, John 9:39-41; and to seeing without tasting bliss those who disbelieve the gospel promise of the heavenly feast; so the rich man in hell saw Lazarus afar off in Abraham's bosom, an impassable gulf excluding himself (Luke 16:23-26)
Grace - So in Romans 15:16 , Paul speaks of "the grace God gave me to be a Minister of Christ Jesus to the Gentiles, with the priestly duty of proclaiming the gospel of God. In one of Paul's passages about the suffering that a Minister of Christ undergoes, he speaks of faith and continuing in ministry "because we know that the one who raised the Lord Jesus from the dead will also raise us with Jesus and present us with you in his presence" (2 Corinthians 4:14 )
Gospels (2) - Those who had been privileged to be ‘eye-witnesses and Ministers of the word’ ‘delivered’ (παρέδοσαν) to others what they deemed essential in what they had seen and heard in the course of their attendance on their Master, and ‘many’ of their hearers ‘took in hand to draw up narratives’ (ἀνατάξασθαι διήγησιν). The number of those who could be reckoned as ‘eye-witnesses and Ministers of the word’ cannot have been very great. Paul had in mind recorded sentiments of Christ similar to, or identical with, ‘The Son of Man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister’ (Matthew 20:28); ‘The Son of Man hath not where to lay his head’ (Matthew 8:20, Luke 9:58); ‘I am meek (πραΰς) and lowly in heart’ (Matthew 11:29). Paul as it is in the Gospels: Romans 15:8 ‘Christ hath been made a Minister of the circumcision for the truth of God, that he might confirm the promises given unto the fathers’; words which echo those of Zacharias (Luke 1:72-73); Romans 1:3 ‘Born of the seed of David according to the flesh’; 2 Timothy 2:8 ‘Of the seed of David, according to my gospel
Ordination - as to the manner in which Christian Ministers were admitted to office. (a) There is no technical word used in the NT to express admission to Ministerial office, for though χειροτονεῖν is found (Acts 14:23), there is no indication that it is there used in a technical sense (see below, 3). -The normal method of choosing men for the Christian ministry in the Apostolic Age, as certainly in those which succeeded it, was election by those to whom the ordained was to Minister. God working through His Ministers in ordaining. ), all the forms of ordination in the Church Orders recognize the Holy Spirit as the source of Ministerial power, though the invocation of the Third Person in the Eucharist was not quite so universal. But the gifts of the Spirit are many and various; and the charisma which Timothy was not to neglect but to kindle was that special gift which would enable him to be a good Christian Minister. ‘As they Ministered (λειτουργούντων) to the Lord, and fasted, the Holy Ghost said, Separate me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them
Seventy (2) - (2) The Twelve were not only to Minister, but to administer—to exercise discipline and government (John 20:23, Acts 1:20-26)
Prophecy, Prophets - (7) Prophets were to Minister to their people
Kindness (2) - The key to this perfect life of kindness and love is found in His own words—‘The Son of Man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give His life a ransom for many’ (Mark 10:45)
Epicureans - ...
Epicureanism does not indulge in high moral ideals or insist upon any code of duties, whether public or private, save as these may Minister to one’s own pleasure, but neither does it inculcate (in theory) low, sensual delights
the Unmerciful Servant - IF you had been destined by your parents to be a Minister, and if at twelve years old you had come to the same decision yourself, from that day you would have begun to think continually about your future office, and you would every day have done something to prepare yourself for your future office
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - You would apply to those Ministers, or other highly honoured men, who had dined or supped with the late Queen, his Majesty's mother, and you would beseech them to tell you all about the palace and its royal rules and regulations. But if there is any divinity student here who hopes one day to be a good Minister of Jesus Christ, let him get his hands somehow or other on Bruce before tomorrow night, and master one of "that stately Presbyterian divine's" sermons on the Sacrament every night all the week
Presentation - He ‘came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’ (Matthew 20:28); and ‘thus it became him to fulfil all righteousness’ (Matthew 3:15)
Monophysitism - One of their number became prime Minister—the first Coptic prime Minister for a very long period—but was unfortunately murdered in an outburst of political and religious fanaticism early in 1910
Tatianus - 60) speak directly of His share in the creation; he rather leads up to His work and office as "the Minister of the suffering God" (c. ), and speaks of the Holy Spirit as the Minister of the God Who hath suffered (τὸν διάκονον τοῦ πεπονθότος θεοῦ , c
Corinth - Even those who declared themselves Paul's followers did so in a party spirit, glorying in the Minister instead of in Christ
Scripture - When they are faithfully opened by his Ministers, and powerfully applied by his Spirit, they wound and heal, they kill and make alive; they alarm the careless, direct the lost, support the tempted, strengthen the weak, comfort mourners, and nourish pious souls. It is strange that this has not long ago struck every person of the least reflection in all our churches, and especially the Ministers, as a most conclusive and irresistible argument for the adoption of this practice. "The apostle Paul, in pointing out to Timothy his Ministerial duties, particularly mentions reading, 1 Timothy 4:13 . If the public reading of the Scriptures was so necessary and important in those religious assemblies which had Timothy for their Minister, how much more must it be in our assemblies, and even in those which enjoy the labours of our most able and eminent Ministers!" ...
On the subject of the Scriptures, we must refer the reader to the articles BIBLE, CANON, INSPIRATION, PROPHECY, and REVELATION
Herod - ’ He enjoyed the life-long favour of Augustus and his Minister Agrippa
Tabernacle - The church having passed through the outer court, where atonement has been once for all made, Ministers in the holy place, as consisting of king priests (1 Peter 2:5; 1 Peter 2:9; Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10) without earthly mediator, with prayer, praise, and the light of good works; and has access in spirit already (Hebrews 10:19), and in body finally, into the heavenly holiest. ...
Moses' own "tent" (not mishkam , "tabernacle") in this transition stage was pitched far off from the camp (to mark God's withdrawal from apostate Israel) as "the tent of meeting" provisionally, to which only Moses the mediator and his faithful Minister Joshua were admitted (Exodus 33:3-11)
Rufus - ’ With them, greatness is to come through Ministering love (cf. Minister, 3)
Mission - They Minister to believers, even to the extent of the miraculous intervention so that the mission may go forward (Acts 12:11 ; Hebrews 1:14 )
the Blind Leaders of the Blind - " And Robert Hall, in an ordination charge addressed to a young Minister, says, "Be not afraid of devoting whole sermons to particular parts of moral conduct and religious duty. Tragedies like that will occur sometimes even with the best physicians, but such tragical cases are of every day occurrence with us Ministers
Church Government - All Christians are priests alike; but, inasmuch as it is by the Spirit that the whole Church is consecrated to the priesthood, so the special Ministers need a special consecration by the Spirit. To administer these there was the Sanhedrin. They are Ministers of the word, proclaiming and explaining the gospel, and their business is to convert and instruct rather than to rule. When this symbolical action was used by a Minister in connexion with an appointment to the ministry, the idea of transmission naturally arose. He gives no directions as to special Ministers, but he recognizes them where they exist (Philippians 1:1). When Christians were told not to take their disputes into Roman civil courts (1 Corinthians 6), that involved the growth of Christian civil law, which the permanent officials had to administer; and here the influence of Roman legislation came in to develop what was derived from Christ’s teaching and that of the OT. Moberly, Ministerial Priesthood, do
the Children of Capernaum Playing at Marriages And Funerals in the Market-Place - Say that you will undertake to see the registrar and the Minister
Paul in Arabia - A few of those simple instruments that tentmakers use when they have to Minister to their own necessities, was all that Paul encumbered himself with as he started from Ananias's door on his long and solitary journey to Arabia
Thomas - ...
At the same time, Thomas in his melancholy candour and saddened plainness of speech was but Ministering an opportunity to his Master to utter one of His most golden oracles. "All His disciples Minister to Him," says Newman; "and as in other ways, so also in giving occasion for the words of grace which proceed from His mouth
the Much Forgiven Debtor And His Much Love - " Your Minister may preach to you till he is old and grey-headed, but he will be to you as one that plays on an instrument; you will not take him seriously
Independents - He affirmed that all communion was to be broken off with those religious societies that were founded upon a different plan from his; and treated more especially the church of England as a spurious church, whose Ministers were unlawfully ordained; whose discipline was popish and anti- christian; and whose sacraments and institutions were destitute of all efficacy and virtue. They were also much more attentive than the Brownists in keeping on foot a regular ministry in their communities; for, while the latter allowed promisquously all ranks and orders of men to teach in public, the Independents had, and still have, a certain number of Ministers, chosen respectively by the congregations where they are fixed; nor is it common for any person among them to speak in public before he has submitted to a proper examination of his capacity and talents, and been approved of by the heads of the congregation. ) that they could not so much as endure ordinary Ministers in the church, &c. ...
According to them, the qualifications which constitute a regular Minister of the New Testament are, a firm belief in the Gospel, a principle of sincere and unaffected piety, a competent stock of knowledge, a capacity for leading devotion and communicating, instruction, a serious inclination to engage in the important employment of promoting the everlasting salvation of mankind, and ordinarily an invitation to the pastoral office from some particular society of Christians. Where these things concur, they consider a person as fitted and authorised for the discharge of every duty which belongs to the Ministerial function; and they believe that the imposition of hands of bishops or presbyters would convey to him no powers or prerogatives of which he was not before possessed. Many of them, indeed, suppose that the essence of ordination does not lie in the act of the Ministers who assist, but in the choice and call of the people, and the candidate's acceptance of that call; so that their ordination may be considered only as a public declaration of that agreement. They consider it as their right to choose their own Ministers and deacons
John the Baptist - ...
...
"I was to preach in Clackmannan, where the most of the people were already for me to be their Minister, but some that had the greatest power were against me, as it ordinarily fared with me in the places where I used to preach
Sanctify - Thus, God directed Moses to have the artisans make special clothing for Aaron: “… And they shall make holy garments for Aaron thy brother, … that he may Minister unto me in the priest’s office” ( Priest - a general name for the Minister of religion. But it is likewise improperly applied to Christian Ministers, who have no sacrifices to offer; unless, indeed, when it is considered as contracted from presbyter, which signifies an elder, and is the name given in the New Testament to those who were appointed to the office of teaching and ruling in the church of God
Simon Maccabaeus - He gave himself out as "the great power of God," that is, a person in whom divine power resided: and, after he had heard the Apostles, he seems to have so far enlarged his doctrine, as to have said, that the God whose Minister he was, and who had always been worshipped in Samaria, had revealed himself to the Jews by his Son, and to the rest of the world by the Holy Ghost
Rufus - ’ With them, greatness is to come through Ministering love (cf. Minister, 3)
Methodists, Protestant - To meet the Minister and the stewards of the society once a week, in order to inform the Minister of any that are sick, or of any that walk disorderly, and will not be reproved; to pay to the stewards what they have received of their several classes in the week preceding; and to show their account of what each person has contributed. "Uncharitable, or unprofitable conversation; particularly speaking evil of magistrates, or of Ministers. Wesley's design in calling the preachers together annually, was not merely for the regulation of the circuits, but also for the review of their doctrines and discipline, and for the examination of their moral conduct; that those who were to administer with him in holy things might be thoroughly furnished for every good work. During his life, some of the societies petitioned to have preaching in their own chapels in church hours, and the Lord's supper administered by the travelling preachers. In order to favour this cause, so agreeable to the spirit of Christianity and the rights of Englishmen, several respectable preachers came forward; and by the writings which they circulated through the connection, paved the way for a plan of pacification; by which it was stipulated, that in every society where a threefold majority of class- leaders, stewards, and trustees desired it, the people should have preaching in church hours, and the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's supper administered to them
Donatus And Donatism - As I understand that these men have destroyed a church in Constantinople, I have ordered my finance-minister to build you a new one. "...
It was probably soon after the cessation of the persecution that Gratus, Caecilian's successor, summoned a synod at Carthage, which established (1) the non-iteration of baptism, when duly administered in the name of the Trinity; (2) the necessary restrictions on reverence for martyrs, and on the assignment of that title. "A church," said the Donatist, "in which traditors both existed and dispensed the sacraments was no church, and baptism administered by traditors was no baptism. Augustine wrote letters to the chief Minister Olympius; and fresh edicts, enforcing previous laws, fines, and punishments, were sent to Africa
Law - Thus, Israel was to be "a kingdom of priests," each subject a priest (though their exercise of the sacrificial functions was delegated to one family as their representative), and God was at once civil and spiritual king; therefore all the theocratic ordinances of the Sinaitic legislation were designed to Minister toward holiness, which is His supreme law. Legation), is the fact established on independent proofs, namely, that Israel's government was administered by an extraordinary providence, distributing reward and punishment according to obedience or disobedience severally
Elect, Election - In the New Testament, God chose special individuals as witnesses to Christ's resurrection (Acts 10:41 ), Paul to be an apostle to the Gentiles (Acts 9:15 ; 22:13-14 ), Peter to be the first to Minister to the Gentiles (Acts 15:7 ), and Barnabas to accompany Paul on his first missionary journey (Acts 13:2-3 )
Woe - He then condemned them for omitting ‘the weightier matters of the law, judgment, mercy, and fidelity,’ while they were so exact in tithing their smaller garden herbs, thus ‘straining out a gnat and swallowing a camel’ (Matthew 23:23-24); and for so carefully observing, ‘in preparing their food, the ceremonial rules for preserving their Levitical purity,’ while they were not careful ‘to avoid the moral defilement caused by the unlawful acquisition of that food, and by using it to Minister to intemperance’ (Matthew 23:25-26, Wendt, i
the Rich Man And Lazarus - But there is one lesson specially intended, as I think, for us who are Ministers. This lost soul seems to have had no hope for his five brothers if they were left alone with the Minister he had been wont to meet with at his father's table, and had been wont to hear preaching on Sabbath
Simon Magus - There is still a certain residuum of Simon left in order to his last sanctification in every Minister. But the most Simon Maguslike of all sanctified Ministers I know is Thomas Shepard, and that just because he is the most self-discerning, the most honest, and the most outspoken about himself of us all. " These things will help to do it, but above all these things a completely broken heart will alone cast Simon Magus out of us Ministers. Nothing will root the mountebank out of us Ministers but constant self-detection, constant self-contempt, constant self-denunciation, and constant self-destruction. Oh, my friends, you do not know, and you are not fit to be told, the tremendous price of a Minister's salvation. It is this that makes our crucified Master say to us Ministers continually, "Few of you there be that find it
Commission - … The command is to the Universal Church, to be performed in the nature of things by her Ministers and teachers, the manner of appointing whom is not here prescribed, but to be learnt in the unfoldings of Providence recorded in, the Acts of the Apostles, who by His special ordinance were the founders and first builders of that Church, but whose office, on that very account, precluded the idea of succession or renewal. It portrays the Minister of the gospel in the character of a teaching prophet rather than in that of a sacrificing priest
the Man Who Cast Seed Into the Round And it Grew up he Knew Not How - ...
And, then, what a heart-upholding parable this is for all over-anxious Ministers. Our Lord is so bent upon consoling and comforting His Ministers that He almost staggers us with what He here says about the unbroken peace of mind that every Minister of His ought to possess. At all hazards, our Lord will, once for all, pluck up all over-anxiety, and all impatience with their people, out of the hearts of His Ministers. So much so, that He startles us with the state of security, and almost of absolute obliviousness in sleep, that He would have all His Ministers to enjoy. What a courageous comforter of His over-anxious Ministers is Jesus Christ! Cast in the seed, He says, and take no more trouble about it. It is as if the Ministers should preach, and hold their prayer-meetings, and teach their classes, and visit their sick, and should then wait in confidence till the seed should spring up, they know not how. Comfort My Ministers, saith your God. Speak ye comfortably to My Ministers, and say to them that the earth bringeth forth her fruit of herself, first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear. And then He spake it of parents and their children, and then of Ministers and their people
the Queen of Sheba - The sacred writer knew far more about the Queen of Sheba than the Minister of Chester did; and what he says about her questions is this, that they were hard to Solomon to answer; especially when she went deep down into her heart for her questions
Apostolic Constitutions And Canons - 14, 18: ‘We now assembled, Peter and Andrew, James and John, Philip and Bartholomew, Thomas and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, and Lebbaeus who is surnamed Thaddaeus, and Simon the Canaanite, and Matthias who instead of Judas was numbered with us, and James the brother of our Lord and bishop of Jerusalem, and Paul … and have written to you this catholic doctrine [1] we have sent by our fellow-minister Clement
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - " The council wrote to Celestine as their "fellow-minister" (Ep
Absalom - Our doctors, our lawyers, our Ministers, and many of ourselves, will all subscribe to Newman's strong words in one of his sermons-'The inconceivable evil of sensuality. Let us collect into a secret and solemn book all such instances; and let us, husband and wife, Minister and people, and one anxious parent with another, let us meet together, and confer together, and pray together, saying, This one thing will we do
Providence - Providence also implies a particular interposition of God in administering the affairs of individuals and nations, and wholly distinct from that general and incessant exertion of his power, by which he sustains the universe in existence. " No other principle than this, embraced with a steady faith, and attended with a suitable practice, can ever be able to give repose and tranquillity to the mind; to animate our hopes, or extinguish our fears; to give us any true satisfaction in the enjoyments of life, or to Minister consolation under its adversities
Obedience (2) - In Mark 10:45 Jesus Himself says that He has come, ‘not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many
Inspiration - unto whom it was revealed, that not unto themselves but unto us they did Minister," etc
Sin - Nor ought we to be surprised at this, for the problem is one which was sure to present itself very early to the minds of thoughtful men; while the numerous instances where the commission of a sin seemed to have been made subservient by God to the exhibiting of His power and love afforded presumptive prima facie evidence that He Himself willed the act as the Minister of His glory (see the history of Joseph with the writer’s comments thereon, Genesis 45:5 ; Genesis 50:20 , Psalms 105:17 ; cf
Ephesians, Theology of - He functioned somewhat as a priestly servant sent "to be a Minister of Christ Jesus to the Gentiles with the priestly duty of proclaiming the gospel of God, so that the Gentiles might become an offering acceptable to God, sanctified by the Holy Spirit" (Romans 15:16 )
Confession (of Christ) - In 1 Timothy he commends the young Minister of the Church in Ephesus because be had ‘confessed the good confession in the sight of many witnesses’ (1 Timothy 6:12), and finds in this matter the perfect example for Christian imitation in the ‘good confession’ which Christ Jesus Himself witnessed before Pontius Pilate (1 Timothy 6:13); while in 2 Timothy we have an evident re-echo of the Lord’s own language in the warning, ‘If we shall deny him, he also will deny us’ (2 Timothy 2:12)
Samson - You work hard for God at your books and your visiting as a Minister or as a Sabbath-school teacher, but you restrain prayer
Expediency - not anti-Christian, are lawful, still it must be remembered that this liberty is the Minister of love
Jesuits - they had become the confessors of almost all its monarchs' a function of no small importance in and reign, but, under a weak prince, superior to that of Minister
Angels - OT]'>[11] for יְשַׁמְּשׁוּנֵהּ, ‘ministered unto him’; the Chigi Septuagint has ἐθεράπευον αὐτόν); their ministry is an ordered one, before the throne of God: ‘the whole host of His angels … Minister (λειτουργοῦσιν) unto His will, standing by Him’ (Clem. They Ministered to our Lord on earth, in His human nature, after the Temptation in the wilderness (Matthew 4:11, Mark 1:13, not in || Lk. In Matthew 26:53 Jesus says that angels would have Ministered to Him, had He so willed, when Judas betrayed Him
Amen (2) - ) the custom grew for the officiating Minister to say it sotto vocc
Mephibosheth - Shall I forbear to hear that honest Minister, James Urquhart, for a time, seeing the stone is like to fall on me if I do so?' And then our modern Mephibosheth has the grace to add in his diary, 'A grain of sound faith would easily answer all these questions
Michal, Saul's Daughter - David that day was like one of our own Ministers coming home from the communion table. It takes a night and a day and more than that till the agitation and the emotion of a communion day subsides and settles in a Minister's heart. There is no fear of any Minister's wife speaking on that day as Michal spoke. But there are other times with Ministers and with all men. A Minister once told me that he preached best and prayed best when his wife was at home
Joseph - Those who know Joseph's after-history will flash forward their minds, and will contrast the Prime Minister of Pharaoh with that slave lad sold for that paltry price at the mouth of that pit that day
Paul - he should go to college and become a rabbi, that is, a Minister, a teacher, and a lawyer all in one
Ham - But what a bitter mockery it must be, especially to a Minister, to hear his books called good on every hand and bought by the thousand, and then, soon after, to see his sons and his daughters neglected, grown up, and gone astray! To me there is one specially awful word in Bishop Andrewes' Devotions. But we, your Ministers, above all other men, neglect God, and that in nothing more than in the way we neglect our children
Matthew, Theology of - Thus, the foundation of the tension the church had with Israel over the symbolic value of the nation of Israel may have been rooted in Jesus' teaching to love and Minister to all nations
Gentiles - A great concession in the direction of equality is made in Isaiah 66:21, if it be Gentiles whom God is to take to Minister in His sanctuary; but the promise may relate to Jews of the Dispersion
Merit - Our salvation follows from His work; since the Christ, who lived to Minister to men, to make known to them the words which the Father had given Him, and to keep them from the evil, and persevered in His work to the death in perfect obedience to the will of His Father, thus offering up His life as a sacrifice to God, by this very work and the Personality achieved through it, exercises a saving authority and influence over men (John 12:32; cf
Hebrews, Epistle to the - ...
In Hebrews 8 a summary is given, setting forth again the glory of our HighPriest, where He is set, and what He is Minister of; all is contrast to what, as Jews, they had in the old order
Zechariah, the Book of - " Like Ezekiel and Daniel, Zechariah delights in symbols, allegories, and visions of angels Ministering before Jehovah and executing His commands on earth. ) Joshua's filthy garments (Zechariah 3) were those assumed by the accused in Persian courts; the white robe substituted was the caftan, to this day put upon a state Minister in the East when acquitted. Four chariots, symbolizing the fourfold dispensations of Providence as regards the contact of the four great world powers with Judaea, come out from between the two mountains Zion and Moriah (the seat of the temple, representing the theocracy) where the Lord is (Zechariah 2:10), and from whence He sends His Ministers of judgments on the pagan; the red horses in one represent carnage; the black, sorrow and famine (Revelation 6:5-6); the white, joy and victory; the grisled or piebald, a mixed dispensation, partly prosperity, partly adversity; all alike working together for good to Israel
Priest - The Aaronic priesthood became the temporary depository of all Israel's priesthood, until Christ the antitypical High Priest came; and they shall hereafter resume it when they turn to the Lord and shall be "the priests of Jehovah, the Ministers of our God" to the Gentile nations in Christ's millennial kingdom (Isaiah 61:6; Isaiah 66:21). All the elect saints (not Ministers as such) from Jews and Gentiles are meantime called to be priests unto God (1 Peter 2:5; 1 Peter 2:9), and being transfigured shall reign with Christ as king priests (Revelation 1:6; Revelation 5:10; Revelation 20:6). The notion is contrary to Scripture that Christ is High Priest, and Christian Ministers priests. Christian Ministers are never in the New Testament called by the name "priests" (hiereis ), which is applied only to the Aaronic priests, and to Christ, and to all Christians; though it would have been the natural word for the sacred writers as Jews to have used; but the Holy Spirit restrained them from using it. ...
They call Ministers diakonoi , hufretai , presbuteroi ("presbyters"), and leitourgoi ("public Ministers"), but never "sacerdotal, sacrificing priests" (hiereis ). The typical teaching of Korah's punishment is the same; not satisfied with the Levitical ministry, he usurped the sacerdotal priesthood (Numbers 16:9-10); his doom warns all Christian Ministers who, not content with the ministry, usurp Christ's intransmissible priesthood (Hebrews 7:24). Unfortunately "priest" is now an ambiguous term, representing presbyter (which the Christian Minister is) and sacerdotal priest (which he is not). live of the gospel," proving that as sacrificing was the temple priest's duty, so gospel preaching is the Christian Minister's duty. In the New Testament on the contrary the separating veil is rent, and the human priesthood superseded, and we have all alike, Ministers and laymen, boldness of access by the new and living way, consecrated through Christ's once torn flesh (Hebrews 10:19-22; Romans 5:2). They drank no wine in Ministering (Leviticus 10:9), that they might be free from all undue artificial excitement. ...
The priest administered the water of jealousy to the suspected wife and pronounced the curse (1618529504_31)
Jacob - ...
Still more typifying Messiah, through whom heaven is opened and also joined to earth, and angels Minister with ceaseless activity to Him first, then to His people (John 14:6; Revelation 4:1; Acts 7:56; Hebrews 9:8; Hebrews 10:19-20)
Versions - ...
The sabbath is "to Minister the fodder of the word to simple souls" and to be "pitiful over the weariness of such neighbours as laboured sore all the week
Humility - ’ Henceforth, greatness lies in conformity to a higher than the heathen or Jewish type: ‘but whosoever would become great among you shall be your Minister,’ etc. It is inspired by Love; Ministering love appears always in the guise of humility
Aaron - A Minister, for instance
Parable - The point of distinction between Him and the Pharisees was that in His hands the Law was no longer an end in itself, but became a Minister to what was beyond and greater than itself
Church - To this agrees the definition given by the compilers of the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England: "A congregation of faithful men, in which the true word of God is preached, and the sacraments duly administered according to Christ's ordinances, in all those things that of necessity are requisite to the same," Acts 9:31 ; Acts 20:17 ; Galatians 1:2 ; Galatians 1:22 ; 1 Corinthians 14:34 ; Colossians 4:15 . The Popish doctrine is certainly not found in their writings; and so far were they from making provision for the government of this one supposed church, by the appointment of one visible and exclusive head, that they provide for the future government of the respective churches raised up by them in a totally different manner, that is, by the ordination of Ministers for each church, who are indifferently called bishops, and presbyters, and pastors. Of this number were Timothy and Titus; and as the Apostle Paul directed them to ordain bishops or presbyters in the several churches, but gave them no authority to ordain successors to themselves in their particular office as Evangelists, it is clear that the Evangelists must also be reckoned among the number of extraordinary and temporary Ministers suited to the first age of Christianity. Paul as to their appointment, there can be no doubt but that these are the "pastors" spoken of in the Epistle to the Ephesians, and that they were designed to be the permanent Ministers of the church; and that with them both the government of the church and the performance of its leading religious services were deposited. Deacons had the charge of the gifts and offerings for charitable purposes, although, it appears from Justin Martyr, not in every instance; for he speaks of the weekly oblations as being deposited with the chief Minister, and distributed by him. It was this which created a natural and competent check upon the Ministers of the church; for being only sustained by the opinion of the churches, they could not but have respect to it; and it was this which gave to the sound part of a fallen church the advantage of renouncing, upon sufficient and well-weighed grounds, their communion with it, and of kindling up the light of a pure ministry and a holy discipline, by forming a separate association, bearing its testimony against errors in doctrine, and failures in practice
Teaching - Paul early utters a warning to the Romans against departing from ‘the doctrine which ye learned’ (Romans 16:17), and later Timothy is called a good Minister because he had been ‘nourished in the words of the faith, and of the good doctrine’ (1 Timothy 4:6), and in which he had continued
Sacraments - The same may be said regarding the reference to the Eucharist in 1 Corinthians 10:16-17; while the one example afforded of direct instruction upon the subject of the Lord’s Supper (1 Corinthians 11:17-34) expressly adverts to instruction previously given (1 Corinthians 11:23) as well as to supplementary instruction to be administered on a future occasion (1 Corinthians 11:34). He thanks God that he baptized few of the Corinthians himself, just because he knows the supreme incorporating significance of that ordinance, and perceives the misinterpretation which party-spirit might have put upon any special diligence shown by him as a Minister of the actual rite of Baptism-‘lest any man should say that ye were baptized into my name’ (1 Corinthians 1:15)
Assumption of Moses - In the 2500th year from the Creation, after the Exodus, Moses calls Joshua and appoints him his successor as Minister of the people and of the tabernacle of the testimony, at the same time committing to his charge certain books which were to be preserved in the place which God had made from the beginning of the world (Jerusalem)
Asceticism (2) - Neither wealth nor poverty is in itself meritorious: only the disposition which makes either Minister to the coming of the Kingdom
Anger - ); and, according to Romans 13:4, the temporal ruler punishing evil-doers is ‘a Minister of God, an avenger for (Divine) wrath,’ i
Government of the Hebrews - But, although in many things each tribe existed by itself, and acted separately, yet in others they were united, and formed but one community: for all the tribes were bound together, so as to form one church and one civil community, not only by their common ancestors, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; not only by the common promises which they had received from those ancestors; not only by the need in which they stood of mutual counsel and assistance; but also by the circumstance that God was their common King, and that they had a common tabernacle for his palace, and a common sacerdotal and Levitical order for his Ministers. God, it is true, was the King, and the high priest, if we may be allowed so to speak, was his Minister of state; but still the political affairs were in a great measure under the disposal of the elders, princes, &c. This illustrious house, whose princes united the regal and pontifical dignity in their own persons, administered the affairs of the Jews during a period of one hundred and twenty-six years; until, disputes arising between Hyrcanus II, and his brother Aristobulus, the latter was defeated by the Romans under Pompey, who captured Jerusalem, and reduced Judea to dependence, B
Jeremiah - , the 13th of Josiah's reign, while a mere youth at Anathoth, three miles from Jerusalem (Jeremiah 1:2), "the word of Jehovah came to him" just as manhood was opening out to him, calling him to lay aside his natural sensitiveness and timid self distrust, and as Jehovah's Minister, by the might of Jehovah's efficacious word, to "root out
Leucius, Author of n.t. Apocryphal Additions - It taught the existence of two gods—an evil one, the God of the Jews, having Simon Magus as his Minister, and a good one, from Whom Christ came
Creation - Possibly the order of Creation of the whole world in six vast periods, called "days," was repeated in six literal days in preparing the earth for man, its noblest occupant, "the Minister and interpreter of nature" (Bacon)
Wisdom - Those foolish Corinthians have many successors among ourselves, who fancy that the pulpit would gain greatly in power if Ministers would only discourse more about science and philosophy, nature and history, political and social reform, and the various so-called questions of the day. … The power of the pulpit will most certainly not be increased by Ministers forsaking their own glorious work, the direct preaching of Christ, for the lecturing on lower themes. The persuasions to depart from the centre which Flint, himself a great preacher, so energetically repudiates meet every Minister on the very threshold of his office, and are echoed again and again in the more or less strident voices of the world
Herod - " But Herod when reproved for his sin by John preferred keeping his sin to gaining God's favor and the approval of God's Minister
Atonement - There is first the well-known announcement to the disciples, called forth by their disputes about pre-eminence: ‘The Son of Man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’ ( Matthew 20:28 ||)
Paul - He possessed the Roman citizenship from birth (Acts 22:28), and hence, when he commenced Ministering among Gentiles, he preferred to be known by his Roman name Paul rather than by his Hebrew name Saul. ...
The Lord might act directly, but He chooses to employ Ministerial instruments; such was Ananias whom He sent to Saul, after he had been three days without sight and neither eating nor drinking, in the house of Judas (probably a Christian to whose house he had himself led, rather than to his former co-religionists). In Acts 26:16-18 Paul condenses in one account, and connects with Christ's first appearing, subsequent revelations of Jesus to him as to the purpose of his call;" to make thee a Minister and witness of these things . Here (Acts 13) while their minds were dwelling on the extraordinary accession of Gentile converts, "as they Ministered to the Lord and fasted, the Holy Spirit said, "Separate Me Barnabas and Saul for the work whereunto I have called them," namely, to labors among the Gentiles, such as was the specimen already given at Antioch, in which these two had taken such an efficient part
Baptism - The practice of the western churches is, to sprinkle the water on the head or face of the person to be baptized, except in the church of Milan, in whose ritual it is ordered, that the head of the infant be plunged three times into the water; the Minister at the same time pronouncing the words, "I baptize thee in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost;" importing that by this ceremony the person baptized is received among the professors of that religion which God, the Father of all, revealed to mankind by the ministry of his Son, and confirmed by the miracles of his Spirit. That it was administered to all the Gentile converts, and not confined to the Jews appears from Matthew 28:19-20 , compared with Acts 10:47 ; and that the baptism of the Spirit did not supersede water baptism appears to have been the judgment of Peter and of those that were with him; so that the one baptism spoken of seems to have been that of water; the communication of the Holy Spirit being only called baptism in a figurative sense. Baptism, in early times, was only administered at Easter and Whitsuntide, except in cases of necessity. Cyprian, and a council of Ministers, held about the year 254, no less than sixty-six in number, unanimously agreed that children might be baptized as soon as they were born
Humility - ’ Henceforth, greatness lies in conformity to a higher than the heathen or Jewish type: ‘but whosoever would become great among you shall be your Minister,’ etc. It is inspired by Love; Ministering love appears always in the guise of humility
Moses - Aaron and Hur supported Moses in the battle with Amalek (Exodus 17:12); Joshua was his Minister
Quakers - so his baptism is one, in nature and operation; that nothing short of it can make us living members of his mystical body; and that the baptism with water; administered by his forerunner John, belonged, as the latter confessed, to an inferior dispensation, John 3:30 . "In this place it is proper to add, that, as we believe women may be rightly called to the work of the ministry, we also think that to them belongs a share in the support of our Christian discipline; and that some parts of it, wherein their own sex is concerned, devolve on them with peculiar propriety; accordingly they have monthly, quarterly, and yearly meetings of their own sex, held at the same time and in the same place with those of the men; but separately, and without the power of making rules; and it may be remarked, that, during the persecutions which in the last century occasioned the imprisonment of so many of the men, the care of the poor often fell on the women, and was by them satisfactorily administered. "...
In order that those who are in the situation of Ministers may have the tender sympathy and counsel of those of either sex, who by their experience in the work of religion, are qualified for that service, the monthly meetings are advised to select such, under the denomination of elders. These, and Ministers approved by their monthly meetings, have meetings peculiar to themselves, called meetings of Ministers and elders; in which they have an opportunity of exciting each other to a discharge of their several duties, and of extending advice to those who may appear to be weak, without any needless exposure. "It is to a meeting of this kind in London, called the second-day's morning meeting, that the revisal of manuscripts concerning our principles, previously to publication, is intrusted by the yearly meeting held in London; and also the granting, in the intervals of the yearly meeting, of certificates of approbation to such Ministers as are concerned to travel in the work of the ministry in foreign parts, in addition to those granted by their monthly and quarterly meetings. When a visit of this kind doth not extend beyond Great Britain, a certificate from the monthly meeting of which the Minister is a member is sufficient; if to Ireland, the concurrence of the quarterly meeting is also required. Those of the men who are approved Ministers are also members of this meeting, which is called the meeting for sufferings; a name arising from its original purpose, which is not yet become entirely obsolete
Biblical Theology - The Israelites in Moses' wake at first uphold God's honor, crossing the Jordan under divine leadership as administered by Joshua. Nathan rebukes David; Ahijah and Iddo speak to Solomon's times; Elijah and Elisha Minister to the northern kingdom of Israel after its split from Judah to the south following Solomon's reign
Redemption - ...
The basis of this apostolic conception is laid in our Lord’s own declaration, ‘For verily the Son of man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’ (Mark 10:45, Matthew 20:28), a declaration elucidated and enforced in those others, preserved by John, in which He speaks of laying down His life for the sheep (John 10:11), or His friends (John 15:13), or of giving His flesh for the life of the world (John 6:51)
Regeneration (2) - He speaks of the new covenant of which he is a Minister (2 Corinthians 3:6), of the new creature (καινὴ κτίσις, 2 Corinthians 5:17, Galatians 6:15) which he has become, of the new world in which he lives (2 Corinthians 5:17), of the new man who has been created according to God in righteousness and holiness of truth (Ephesians 4:24), and who is being renewed unto knowledge after the image of Him that created him (Colossians 3:10); he speaks also of being transformed by renewal of the mind (Romans 12:2), and (if Titus 3:5 be his) of a renewal wrought by the Holy Spirit at baptism; of walking in newness of life (Romans 6:4), and serving God in newness of spirit (Romans 7:6); but he never speaks formally of being born again. He could think of it only as he knew it, that is, as an ordinance administered to people confessing their sins and accepting the love of God in Christ,—an ordinance that gathered into it the whole meaning of Christianity, and in a high and solemn hour raised to its height the Christian’s sense of what it is to be a Christian
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - In this Epistle the regular Ministers are perhaps not explicitly mentioned, because they were the very persons who were most responsible for the disorders (Goudge, Westminster Com . Paul announces his position as an Apostle, and the right of the Christian Minister to live of the gospel, but he will not use his rights to the full ( 1 Corinthians 9:18 RV Gospel (2) - ‘The Son of man came to Minister’; and all through His ministry He was giving Himself up for others
Mediator - Moses was a person coming between two contracting parties, God and Israel, with the consequence that the law administered by Moses is apparently in opposition to the promises of God which depend upon God only. For verily the Son of Man came not to be Ministered unto, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many’ (Mark 10:45)
Hermas Shepherd of - These are the first and the second generation of righteous men, the prophets and Ministers, and the apostles and teachers. 5), also prophets and Ministers (διάκονοι; Sim. Hence his standard of Christian duty is put in the most practical shape: ‘faith, fear of the Lord, love, concord, words of righteousness, truth, patience, … to Minister to widows, to visit the orphans and the needy, to ransom the servants, of God from their afflictions, to be hospitable, … to resist no man, to be tranquil, to show yourself more submissive than all men,’ etc
Colossians, Epistle to the - Paul then passes on to emphasize his own position as a Minister of this, the one true gospel, a gospel which does not merely save a few elect, but which is valid for every man who will receive it (Colossians 1:24-29)
Ascension of Isaiah - the departed) will come with the Lord (1 Thessalonians 3:13; 1 Thessalonians 4:14) and descend and be present in this world (4:16), and the Lord will Minister to those who have kept watch in this world (cf
Personality - God has chosen that they should Minister only when personality has achieved its proper work (Mark 1:13), or before personality is permitted to begin it (Matthew 18:10)
Prayer - Special prayer- meetings are such as are held at the meeting and parting of intimate friends, especially churches and Ministers; when the church is in a state of unusual deadness and barrenness; when Ministers are sick, or taken away by death; in times of public calamity and distress, &c. Stated meetings for social prayer are such as are held weekly in some places which have a special regard to the state of the nation and churches: missionary prayer-meetings for the spread of the Gospel: weekly meetings held in most of the congregations which have a more particular reference to their own churches, Ministers, the sick, feeble, and weak of the flock. We now come, lastly, to take notice of public prayer, or that in which the whole congregation is engaged, either in repeating a set form, or acquiescing with the prayer of the Minister who leads their devotions. The imitation of those Christians and Ministers that have the best gifts, will be an excellent direction in this as well as in the former cases
Atonement - ‘The Son of Man came … to Minister, and to give his fife a ransom (λύτρον) for many’ (Mark 10:45)
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - Levi is to be freed from iniquity, and to become to God ‘a son, and a servant, and a Minister of His presence,’ and light up in Jacob the light of knowledge [1] (iv
Moravians - But a civil war, which, in 1612, broke out in Bohemia, and a violent persecution which followed it in 1621, occasioned the dispersion of their Ministers, and brought great distress upon the Brethren in general. In the first sitting a president is chosen, and these elders lay down their office; but they do not withdraw from the assembly; for they, together with all bishops, seniores civiles, or lay elders, and those Ministers who have the general care or inspection of several congregations in one province, have seats in the synod without any particular election. The other members are, one or more deputies sent by each congregation, and such Ministers or missionaries as are particularly called to attend. Women, approved by the congregations are also admitted as hearers, and are called upon to give their advice in what relates to the Ministerial labour among their sex; but they have no decisive vote in the synod. Besides this general Conference of Elders, which superintends the affairs of the whole Unity, there is another Conference of elders belonging to each congregation, which directs its affairs, and to which the bishops and all other Ministers, as well as the lay members of the congregation are subject. Of the Minister, as president, to whom the ordinary care of the congregation is committed, except when it is very numerous, and then the general inspection of it is intrusted to a separate person, called the Congregation Helper. Deacons are assistants to the Presbyters, much in the same way as in the Church of England; and in the Brethren's churches, deaconesses are retained for the purpose of privately admonishing their own sex, and visiting them in their sickness; but though they are solemnly blessed to this office, they are not permitted to teach in public, and far less to administer the sacraments. The Brethren, however, have been visited by the German colonists living on the Wolga; and, through God's blessing, societies have been formed, and Ministers of the Gospel provided for most of the colonies by their instrumentality
Egypt - Moreover, Joseph being naturalized would hardly be looked on as such, especially as being the king's prime Minister
Vicarious Sacrifice - Are ye able to drink the cup which I drink, or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?’ Then follows in an address to the disciples, who are indignant at James’ and John’s request, the notable words, ‘For the Son of Man also came not to be Ministered to, but to Minister, and to give his life a ransom for many
Messiah - He also elected princes to govern the Jews in their march towards the Holy Land, and to Minister justice to them when they should be possessed of it. ...
Nehemiah, being disappointed, goes to Adrianople, and informs the great Ministers of state against Sabatai, as a lewd and dangerous person to the government, and that it was necessary to take him out of the way
Paul - As a Minister of the Gospel, he displayed the most unwearied perseverance and undaunted courage
New Jerusalem - : ‘And strangers shall build up thy walls, and their kings shall Minister unto thee: for in my wrath I smote thee, but in my favour have I had mercy on thee’; Haggai 2:7-9 : ‘I will fill this house with glory
Christ in Modern Thought - The conviction has grown, in a degree unknown to earlier times, that such intercourse, realized in a true brotherhood of mutual service, may Minister untold blessing to men
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - The nomination rested with the emperor Arcadius, but virtually with the prime Minister Eutropius. 400 Gainas, the haughty Goth who had had a large share in the downfall of Eutropius, demanded the surrender of three leading Ministers, Aurelianus the consul, Saturninus, and count John the empress's chief favourite
Eutyches And Eutychianism - ...
The monks rallied round Eutyches, and the influence of the Minister Chrysaphius, his godson, was exerted in his behalf
Babylon - " In the rear of the palace, and attached to it, are mounds two miles in circumference, indicating the utter desolation of buildings, formed to Minister to luxury
Confession - In the Jewish ceremony of annual expiation, the high priest confessed in general his own sins, the sins of other Ministers of the temple, and those of all the people. In these cases, men certainly do very well, and many times prevent a great deal of trouble and perplexity to themselves, by a timely discovery of their condition to some faithful Minister, in order to their direction and satisfaction
Inspiration - And I have appeared unto thee for this purpose, to make thee a Minister and a witness both of these things which thou hast seen, and of those things in the which I will appear unto thee; and now I send thee to the Gentiles to open their eyes," Acts 26:12-18 . Read the second and third verses in connection: Καθως παρεδοσαν ημιν οι απ ' αρχης αυτοπται και υπηρεται γενομενοι του λογου ‘Εδοξε καιμοι , παρακολουθηκοτι ανωθεν πασιν ακριβως καθεξης σοι...
γραψαι , κρατιστε Θεοφιλε , "Even as they who were eye-witnesses and Ministers of the word from the beginning delivered them to us, it seemed good to me also, having accurately traced," &c. By ημιν is understood the Christian world, who had received information, both oral and written, from those that had been αυτοπται και υπιρεται , "eye-witnesses and Ministers. Luke will be understood to give in the second verse an account of that ground upon which the knowledge of the Christian world with regard to these things rested, the reports of the "eye-witnesses and Ministers," having collected and collated these reports, and employed the most careful and minute investigation, he had resolved to write an account of the life of Jesus. They instantly exercised the authority derived to them from Jesus, by planting Ministers in the cities where they had preached the Gospel, by setting every thing pertaining to these Christian societies in order, by controlling the exercise of those miraculous gifts which they had imparted, and by correcting the abuses which happened even in their time
Synods - The first Christian teachers among them were Lutherans; but in process of time, the celebrity of Geneva as a place of public instruction for Ministers of religion induced the majority of the candidates for the ministry to repair to that university; and, as might naturally be expected, they imported into the Low Countries the peculiar views of Calvin and Beza on the subject of predestination. It is justly observed by Le Vassor, "Some learned Hollanders had boldly defended this doctrine, before Arminius became a Minister at Amsterdam and a professor at Leyden, and likewise before Gomarus had risen up against him. Their writings are still extant; although it is true that certain Ministers, who were too hasty, exerted themselves to bring those authors and their productions into disrepute; but the states of Holland uniformly checked this impetuous zeal
Perfection (of Jesus) - The zealot and the publican met in the inner circle of His disciples: Mary of Magdala, out of whom went seven devils, and Joanna, the wife of Herod’s steward, united to Minister to Him of their substance
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - Hence all things Minister to him, and even angelic beings superintend the movements of the physical world for his benefit