What does Millet mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
וְדֹ֣חַן millet. 1
וּפַנַּ֨ג Pannag—an edible food 1

Definitions Related to Millet

H6436


   1 Pannag—an edible food, perhaps pastry.
      1a meaning dubious.
      

H1764


   1 Millet.
   

Frequency of Millet (original languages)

Frequency of Millet (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Millet, Jean Francois
Painter, born Gruchy, near Cherbourg, France, October 4, 1814; died Barbizon, France January 20, 1875. He was the son of peasants, but was well educated at home. He studied art in Cherbourg and then entered the studio of Delaroche in Paris. After 1845 he devoted himself to the representation of peasant life, a field in which he is the acknowledged master. "The Sower" was one of his earliest important works. In 1849 he became one of the group of painters who made Barbizon famous. Unpopular at first, he went on in the midst of distressing want producing paintings great in themselves and preaching a new gospel of the dignity of labor. At fifty he was made a chevalier of the Legion of Honor. The "Angelus," now in the Louvre, was painted in 1859. By many "The Gleaners" (1857) is considered a greater painting. Among other well-known works are "The Haymakers," "The Man with the Hoe," and "The Vinedresser Resting."
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Millet
(Heb. dohan; only in Ezekiel 4:9 ), a small grain, the produce of the Panicum miliaceum of botanists. It is universally cultivated in the East as one of the smaller corn-grasses. This seed is the cenchros of the Greeks. It is called in India warree, and by the Arabs dukhan, and is extensively used for food, being often mixed with other grain. In this country it is only used for feeding birds.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jean Millet
Painter, born Gruchy, near Cherbourg, France, October 4, 1814; died Barbizon, France January 20, 1875. He was the son of peasants, but was well educated at home. He studied art in Cherbourg and then entered the studio of Delaroche in Paris. After 1845 he devoted himself to the representation of peasant life, a field in which he is the acknowledged master. "The Sower" was one of his earliest important works. In 1849 he became one of the group of painters who made Barbizon famous. Unpopular at first, he went on in the midst of distressing want producing paintings great in themselves and preaching a new gospel of the dignity of labor. At fifty he was made a chevalier of the Legion of Honor. The "Angelus," now in the Louvre, was painted in 1859. By many "The Gleaners" (1857) is considered a greater painting. Among other well-known works are "The Haymakers," "The Man with the Hoe," and "The Vinedresser Resting."
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Millet
Ezekiel 4:9, dochan , the Ρanicum miliaceum . Others say the Sorghum vulgare , or dourrha .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Millet
(Puhnicum milyacum L.) The smallest cereal grain. Millet makes a poor quality bread and is normally mixed with other grains (Ezekiel 4:9 ). Some identify the Hebrew term with sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers.).
King James Dictionary - Millet
MIL'LET, n. L. milium. A plant of the genus Milium, of several species, one of which is cultivated as an esculent grain.
The Indian millet is of the genus Holcus.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Millet
MILLET (probably Panicum miliaceum or perhaps Andropogon sorghum ) is mentioned in Ezekiel 4:9 (only) as an ingredient in bread. See Food, § 2.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Millet,
dochan. Small seeds used as an ingredient in coarse bread or in pottage. Ezekiel 4:9 . The Hebrew word is held to embrace at least two species of millet, the Sorghum vulgare and the Panicum miliaceum.
Webster's Dictionary - Millet
(n.) The name of several cereal and forage grasses which bear an abundance of small roundish grains. The common millets of Germany and Southern Europe are Panicum miliaceum, and Setaria Italica.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Millet
דחן , Ezekiel 4:9 , a kind of plant so called from its thrusting forth such a quantity of grains. Thus in Latin it is called millium, as if one stalk bore a thousand seeds. It has been supposed that the dochan means what is now called in the east durra; which, according to Niebuhr, is a sort of millet, and when made into bad bread with camel's milk, oil, butter, or grease, is almost the only food which is eaten by the common people in Arabia Felix. "I found it so disagreeable," says he, "that I should willingly have preferred plain barley bread to it." This illustrates the appointment of it to the Prophet Ezekiel as a part of his hard fare. Durra is also used in Palestine and Syria, and it is generally agreed that it yields much more than any other kind of grain. Hiller and Celsius insist that the dochan is the panic; but Forskal has expressly mentioned the dokn, holcus dochna, as a kind of maize, of considerable use in food; and Brown, in his Travels, describes the mode of cultivating it.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Millet
A kind of grain of which there are several species cultivated in Italy, Syria, Egypt, and India. It is used partly green as fodder, and partly in the ripe grain for bread, etc. Ezekiel 4:9 , received an order from the Lord to make himself bread with a mixture of wheat, barley, beans, lentiles, and millet. "Durra," says Niebuhr, "is a kind of millet, made into bread with camel's milk, oil, butter, etc, and is almost the only food eaten by the common people of Arabia Felix. I found it so disagreeable, that I would willingly have preferred plain barley bread." This illustrates the appointment of it to the prophet Ezekiel as a part of his hard fare.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Millet,
a kind of grain. A number os species are cultivated in the East. When green it is used as fodder, and for bread when ripe. (Ezekiel 4:9 ) It is probable that both the Sorghum vulgare and that Panicum miliaceum were used, and the Hebrew dochan may denote either of these plants.

Sentence search

Moha - ) A kind of Millet (Setaria Italica); German Millet
Durra - ) A kind of Millet, cultivated throughout Asia, and introduced into the south of Europe; a variety of Sorghum vulgare; - called also Indian Millet, and Guinea corn
Johnson Grass - Called also Cuba grass, Means grass, Evergreen Millet, and Arabian Millet
Cenchrea - Millet; small pulse
Miliary - ) Accompanied with an eruption like Millet seeds; as, a miliary fever. ) Like Millet seeds; as, a miliary eruption
Dhurra - ) Indian Millet
Doura - ) A kind of Millet
Birdseed - ) Canary seed, hemp, Millet or other small seeds used for feeding caged birds
Pannag - Some kind of spice or Millet, or "perhaps a kind of confection," E
Miliaria - ) A fever accompanied by an eruption of small, isolated, red pimples, resembling a Millet seed in form or size; miliary fever
Millet - Millet (probably Panicum miliaceum or perhaps Andropogon sorghum ) is mentioned in Ezekiel 4:9 (only) as an ingredient in bread
Angelus, the - Millet (1859), showing a peasant man and woman standing in the fields at sunset, with heads bowed in prayer
Amber Seed - Seed of the Hibiscus abelmoschus, somewhat resembling Millet, brought from Egypt and the West Indies, and having a flavor like that of musk; musk seed
Couscous - ) A kind of food used by the natives of Western Africa, made of Millet flour with flesh, and leaves of the baobab; - called also lalo
Millet - ...
The Indian Millet is of the genus Holcus
Boza - ) An acidulated fermented drink of the Arabs and Egyptians, made from Millet seed and various astringent substances; also, an intoxicating beverage made from hemp seed, darnel meal, and water
Millet - Millet makes a poor quality bread and is normally mixed with other grains (Ezekiel 4:9 )
Pannag - It is variously understood to mean Millet, sweetmeats, a delicate spice, etc
Pannag - "Judah and Israel supplied thy market with wheat" The Septuagint translated "cassia," Syriac translated "millet
Millet, - The Hebrew word is held to embrace at least two species of Millet, the Sorghum vulgare and the Panicum miliaceum
Millet - Ezekiel 4:9 , received an order from the Lord to make himself bread with a mixture of wheat, barley, beans, lentiles, and Millet. "Durra," says Niebuhr, "is a kind of Millet, made into bread with camel's milk, oil, butter, etc, and is almost the only food eaten by the common people of Arabia Felix
Pulse - Daniel 1:12; Daniel 1:16, zeronim , edible "seeds" or grain of any kind, barley, wheat, Millet, vetches
Corn - This term may be taken to include (1) Barley, (2) Wheat, (3) Fitches, (4) Lentils, (5) Beans, (6) Millet, (7) Rye, wrong translation for ‘Vetches,’ (8) Pulse for most of which see separate articles
Pulse - Probably the term denotes uncooked grain of any kind, as barley wheat, Millet, vetches, etc
Grain - Common grains in the biblical world included wheat (Genesis 30:14 ), spelt or emmer (REB vetches) (Exodus 9:32 ), barley (Exodus 9:31 ), and Millet (Ezekiel 4:9 )
Institute of Bon Secours (Troyes) - Founded by Father Paul Jean Sebastien Millet at Arcis-sur-Aube, France, 1840, to nurse the sick in their own homes regardless of creed or financial position
Ensilage - ) The process of preserving fodder (such as cornstalks, rye, oats, Millet, etc
Pannag - ” REB, NRSV read “millet
Cen'Chrea, - (accurately Cenchre'ae ) ( Millet ), the eastern harbor of Corinth (i
Andropogon - halepensis, from which have been derived the Chinese sugar cane, the Johnson grass, the Aleppo grass, the broom corn, and the durra, or Indian Millet
Dove (2) - The seeds of Millet are called "doves' seed" by the Hebrews, which favors the bulb or seed of some plant
Dove's Dung - , the seeds of a kind of Millet, or a very inferior kind of pulse, or the root of the ornithogalum, i
Cenchrea - Millet, the eastern harbour of Corinth, from which it was distant about 9 miles east, and the outlet for its trade with the Asiatic shores of the Mediterranean
Lentiles - In time of scarcity used with wheat, barley, beans, Millet, and fitches, as a substitute for pure flour (Ezekiel 4:9)
Corn - , Exodus 9:32 and Isaiah 28:25, "rye;" Ezekiel 4:9, "fitches" and Millet; oats are mentioned only, by rabbinical writers
Cenchrea - Now Kikries; from Greek Κenchri , "the Millet," a grain abounding there
Beans - In Ezekiel 4:9 we read of beans as being mixed with barley, lentils, Millet, and fitches to make bread
Corn - The most common kinds were wheat, barley, spelt, Authorized Version, (Exodus 9:32 ) and Isai 28:25 "Rye;" (Ezekiel 4:9 ) "fitches" and Millet; oats are mentioned only by rabbinical writers
Millet - It has been supposed that the dochan means what is now called in the east durra; which, according to Niebuhr, is a sort of Millet, and when made into bad bread with camel's milk, oil, butter, or grease, is almost the only food which is eaten by the common people in Arabia Felix
Drink, Strong - ...
Various other fruits and vegetables are enumerated by Pliny as supplying materials for factitious or home-made wine, such as figs, Millet, the carob fruit, etc
Chald a - Wheat, Millet, barley, dates and fruits of all kinds were abundant
Arabia - Of fruits and grains, dates, wheat, Millet, rice, beans, and pulse are common
Fitches - Onkelos and Targum have בונתיא , and Syriac, בונחא , which are supposed to be the Millet, or a species of it called panicum; Persian, בורבגדם , the spelt; and this seems to be the most probable meaning of the Hebrew word; at least it has the greatest number of interpreters from Jerom to Celsius
Ara'Bia - Agricultural products are coffee, wheat, barley, Millet, beans, pulse, dates and the common garden plants
Agriculture - --The cereal crops of constant mention are wheat and barley, and more rarely rye and Millet(?)
Husbandry - ...
The Hebrew word, דגן , which is translated variously by the English words, grain, corn, &c, is of general signification, and comprehends in itself different kinds of grain and pulse, such as wheat, Millet, spelt, wall-barley, barley, beans, lentils, meadow-cumin, pepper-wort, flax, cotton; to these may be added various species of the cucumber, and perhaps rice
Agriculture - ...
(c) The principal crops were wheat, barley, spelt, Millet, beans, and lentils (see articles on the first two of these). Millet was sown in summer, the land being prepared for it by irrigation
Agriculture - Wheat, barley, and rye (and Millet rarely) were their cereals
Agriculture - These were, in the first rank, wheat and barley; less important were the crops of Millet and spelt, and those of the pulse family lentils, beans, and the like
Judah - 61): a rugged limestone range, with sides covered with grass, shrubs, and trees; the valleys intersecting it yield plentifully grain, wheat, and Millet; orchards, olive yards, and vineyards rise in terraces up the sides
Canaan - Among the standing crops, we noticed Millet, cotton, linseed, and tobacco, and occasionally small fields of barley. ...
Delicious wine is still produced in some districts, and the valleys bear plentiful crops of tobacco, wheat, barley, and Millet
Food - Millet ( Ezekiel 4:9 ) and spelt (see Fitches, Rie) are only casually mentioned
Palestine - Wheat, barley, Millet, maize, peas, beans, lentils, olives, figs, mulberries, vines, and other fruit; cotton, nuts of various species; the ordinary vegetables, and some (such as solanum or ‘egg-plant’) that do not, as a rule, find their way to western markets; sesame, and tobacco which is grown in some districts are the most characteristic crops produced by the country
Palestine - ; out no gooseberry, strawberry, raspberry, currant, cherry, Besides our cereals and vegetables there are cotton, Millet, rice, sugar cane, maize, melons, cummin, sweet
Book - The countess of Anjou paid, for a copy of the homilies of Haimon, bishop of Halberstadt, two hundred sheep, five quarters of wheat, and the same quantity of rye and Millet