What does Mill mean in the Bible?

Frequency of Mill (original languages)

Frequency of Mill (English)

Dictionary

Webster's Dictionary - Barker's Mill
A machine, invented in the 17th century, worked by a form of reaction wheel. The water flows into a vertical tube and gushes from apertures in hollow horizontal arms, causing the machine to revolve on its axis.
Webster's Dictionary - Craze-Mill
(n.) Alt. of Crazing-mill
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Mill
For grinding corn, mentioned as used in the time of Abraham (Genesis 18:6 ). That used by the Hebrews consisted of two circular stones, each 2 feet in diameter and half a foot thick, the lower of which was called the "nether millstone" (Job 41:24 ) and the upper the "rider." The upper stone was turned round by a stick fixed in it as a handle. There were then no public mills, and thus each family required to be provided with a hand-mill. The corn was ground daily, generally by the women of the house (Isaiah 47:1,2 ; Matthew 24:41 ). It was with the upper stone of a hand-mill that "a certain woman" at Thebez broke Abimelech's skull (Judges 9:53 , "a piece of a millstone;" literally, "a millstone rider", i.e., the "runner," the stone which revolves. Compare 2 Samuel 11:21 ). Millstones could not be pledged (Deuteronomy 24:6 ), as they were necessary in every family.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Mill
The use of the mill in the eastern world was very ancient, and peformed by the lowest of the people, So that when describing the different ranks whom the Lord would destroy in the general destruction of the firstborn in Egypt, the phrase is, "from the first-born of Pharoah that sitteth upon his throne, even unto the first born of the maid servant that is behind the mill." (Exodus 11:5) Hence when the Philistines had put out Samson's eyes, they bound him in fetters of brass, and compelled him "to grind in the prison-house." (See Judges 16:21)
There is a very gracious precept in the law of Moses on the subject of grinding, which serves to shew the Lord's tender compassion over his people. "No man shall take the nether or the upper millstone to pledge, for he taketh a man's life to pledge." (Deuteronomy 24:6) In what a very sweet and engaging point of view doth this represent the Lord! And when the precept is heightened in relation to spiritual bread, with what affection may the poor look unto Jesus, the bread of life, concerning it!
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Mill
In the East two "circular stones" (reechahim ), 2 ft. diameter, the lower fixed, and with the upper surface slightly convex, fitting into the upper stone's concavity. This stone has a hole through which the grain passes, above a pivot rising from the lower stone. About the pivot the "upper stone" (recheb , "the rider") is turned by a handle. Being moveable it could be thrown as a missile (Judges 9:53 Gesenius translated "a cut piece of millstone," not a fragment, but the whole with its carefully cut surface; Revelation 18:21).
Two women (Matthew 24:41) facing one another, seated on the ground, both turned it round by the handle, the one supplying the grain through the hole. It was hard servile labor (Exodus 11:5; Judges 16:21; Isaiah 47:1-2; Lamentations 5:18). The mill stones were so essential for preparing food that they were forbidden to be taken in pledge (Deuteronomy 24:6). The cessation of the sound of grinding was a sign of desolation (Jeremiah 25:10; Revelation 18:22; Ecclesiastes 12:3-4, "the grinders cease because they are few ... the sound of the grinding is low".) Larger millstones were turned by asses; Matthew 18:6 "a donkey millstone" (Greek).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Mill
Mill. Matthew 24:41. The Jewish hand-mill consisted of two circular stones, each about 18 inches or two feet in diameter, the lower of which is fixed, and has its upper surface slightly convex, fitting into a corresponding concavity in the upper stone. In the latter is a hole through which the grain passes, immediately above a pivot or shaft which rises from the centre of the lower stone, and about which the upper stone is turned by means of an upright handle fixed near the edge. It is worked by women, sometimes singly and sometimes two together, who are usually seated on the bare ground, Isaiah 47:1-2, facing each other; both have hold of the handle by which the upper is turned round on the "nether" millstone. The one whose right hand is disengaged throws in the grain as occasion requires through the hole in the upper stone. It is not correct to say that one pushes it half round and then the other seizes the handle. This would be slow work, and would give a spasmodic motion to the stone. Both retain their hold; and pull to or push from, as men do with the whip or cross-cut saw. The proverb of our Saviour, Matthew 24:41, is true to life, for women only grind. So essential were millstones for daily domestic use that they were forbidden to be taken in pledge. Deuteronomy 24:6. There were also larger mills driven by cattle or asses. Matthew 18:6. With the movable upper millstone of the hand-mill the woman of Thebez broke Abimelech's skull. Judges 9:53.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Mill, Millstone
MILL, MILLSTONE. 1. Three methods of preparing flour were in use in Palestine in Bible times, associated with the mortar and pestle (see Mortar And Pestle), the rubbing-stone , and the quern or handmill. The most primitive apparatus was the rubbing-stone or corn-rubber, which consisted really of two stones. The one on which the corn was ground was a substantial slab, often 2 1 / 2 feet long, and about a foot wide, slightly concave and curving upwards, like a saddle, at both ends (illust. in Macalister, Bible Sidelights , etc., fig. 28). The other, the “rubbing-stone proper, was a narrow stone from 12 to 18 inches long, pointed at both ends and also slightly curved, one side being plain and the other convex. In manipulating the rubber, the woman grasped it by both ends and ground the grains of wheat or barley with the convex side. Cf. Macalister’s description in PEFSt [1] , 1903, p. 118, with Schumacher’s photograph reproduced by Benzinger, Heb. Arch . 2 (1907) 63, and the Egyptian statuette in Erman’s Ancient Egypt , 190. Vincent in his Canaan d’après l’exptoration récente (405, fig. 282) shows a corn-rubber of flint from the palæolithic age!
2. The more familiar apparatus for the same purpose was the handmill or quern. As in so many instances (see, e.g ., Lamp), the recent excavations enable us to trace two distinct stages in the evolution of the Palestinian handmill. The Gezer specimens described in detail in PEFSt [1] , 1903, 119, belong to the earlier type, which is distinguished from the later form by the absence of a handle for rotating the upper stone. The quern-stones ‘are always small, rarely being as much as a foot across.’ The lower stone, the ‘nether millstone’ of Job 41:24 , was always more massive than the ‘upper millstone’ ( Deuteronomy 24:6 ), and was apparently fitted with ‘a narrow spindle’ sunk into the stone. The upper stone was pierced right through, and by this hole the mill was fed. According to Mr. Macalister, ‘the upper stone was grasped with both hands (the fingers clasping the edge, the thumbs being between the spindle and the stone), and worked through about one-third of a rotation, backward and forward.’ For varieties of this type, see PEFSt [1] , 1903, p. 119 f.
In the later and more effective type of handmill, which was that in use in NT times, the stones were larger, although the lower stone was still considerably wider than the upper ( Baba bathra , ii. 1). As in the querns of the present day, the latter was fitted with a wooden handle ( yâd in the Mishna) in the shape of an upright peg inserted near the outer edge. The mill was fed, as before, through a funnel-shaped cavity pierced through the upper stone, which was rotated by the handle through a complete circle. Sometimes, as appears from Matthew 24:41 , two women worked the mill, seated opposite each other, and each turning the upper stone through half a revolution, as may still be seen in the East.
By the first century of our era a larger and different form of mill had been introduced, apparently, to judge by the names of the various parts in the Mishna (see art. ‘Mill’ in EBi [4] iii. 3093), under Græco-Roman influence. In the larger specimens of this type, the upper millstone, in the shape of two hollow cones, as described in detail, loc. cit ., was turned by an ass, and is the ‘great millstone’ of Matthew 18:6 RV [5] (lit. as RVm [6] ‘a millstone turned by an ass’).
3. The work of the mill belonged at all times to the special province of the women of the household ( Matthew 24:41 ). In large establishments, it fell to the slaves, male ( Judges 16:21 ) and female ( Exodus 11:5 ), particularly the latter, hence the figure for the slavery of captivity in Isaiah 47:2 .
The finer varieties of meal, the ‘fine flour’ of OT, were got by repeated grinding, or by sifting with sieves, or by a combination of both processes.
How indispensable the handmill was considered for the daily life of the family may be seen from the provision of the Deuteronomic legislation forbidding the creditor to take in pledge the household mill (so rightly RV [5] ), or even the upper millstone, ‘for he taketh a man’s life to pledge’ (Deuteronomy 24:6 ).
A. R. S. Kennedy.
King James Dictionary - Mill
MILL, n. L. mille, a thousand. A money of account of the United States, value the tenth of a cent, or the thousandth of a dollar.
MILL, n. L. mola, molo, mel, honey, mollis Eng. mellow, mild, mold, meal.
1. A complicated engine or machine for grinding and reducing to fine particles, grain, fruit or other substance, or for performing other operations by means of wheels and a circular motion as a grist-mill for grain a coffee-mill a cider-mill a bark-mill. The original purpose of mills was to comminute grain for food, but the word mill is now extended to engines or machines moved by water, wind or steam, for carrying on many other operations. We have oil-mills, saw-mills, slitting-mills, bark-mills, fulling-mills,&c. 2. The house or building that contains the machinery for grinding, &c. MILL, To grind to comminute to reduce to fine particles or to small pieces.
1. To beat up chocolate. 2. To stamp coin. 3. To full, as cloth.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Mill
Two circular stones used to grind grain. Usually, it was worked by two women facing each other. One woman fed the grain at the center, and the other guided the products into little piles. The grain to be ground is fed into the central hole in the upper stone and gradually works down between the stones. As the grain is reduced to flour, it flies out from between the stones onto a cloth or skin placed underneath the mill. To make fine flour, it is reground and sifted. The stone was made of basalt and was about a foot and a half in diameter and two to four inches thick.
It was forbidden to take millstones as a pledge because they were so important to sustaining life (Deuteronomy 24:6 ). The manna which fell in the wilderness was tough enough so that people ground it in mills before cooking it (Numbers 11:7-8 ).
In the New Testament, our Lord prophesied that at His coming, “two women shall be grinding at the mill, one shall be taken and one other is left” (Matthew 24:41 ). In Revelation 18:21 , the millstone was cast into the sea as a symbol of absolute destruction. See Manna .
Gary Bonner
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Mill
MILL (μυλών),
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Mill-Stone
MILL-STONE (μύλος, λίθος μυλικός).—The hand-mill used in Palestine consists of two stone discs, from a foot to a foot and a half in diameter, the upper being about 2 in., the lower 3 in. thick. A porous stone of black basalt is preferred, as being sufficiently hard and not so liable as ordinary limestone to become glazed by the friction of the two surfaces against each other (Job 41:24). The stones are usually flat, but not infrequently the concave face of the upper stone rests upon the corresponding convex of the lower one, so as to facilitate the passing out of the flour in the act of rotation. The lower stone is always the heavier of the two, because it is thicker and because it is often a little wider, with a rebate or raised rim; and the upper stone fits into the recess thus formed. The flour then escapes from an opening several inches long where the rim of the lower stone has been cut away. The upper stone has an opening through the centre for the reception of the upright wooden pin projecting from the centre of the lower stone. Into this hole the wheat is poured in the process of grinding. The upper stone has near the circumference a wooden peg a little over two handbreadths in height, and when the stone is being turned by two women (Matthew 24:41), sitting on opposite sides of it, each grasps the peg continuously with one hand and alternately draws it to herself and pushes it away. Partly on account of their position in sitting, and partly to keep the edge of the skirt away from the cloth spread for the flour, they usually draw up the dress to the knee (Isaiah 47:1-2). The sound of the hand-mill grinding the flour for the daily bread was suggestive of home life under conditions of peace and prosperity, and its cessation betokened turmoil and distress (Ecclesiastes 12:3-4, Jeremiah 25:10-11). The μύλος ὀνικός, or donkey stone of Luke 17:2, may simply mean the revolving upper stone of the common hand-mill, as having the more active share in the work of grinding. If the reference be to the larger kind of stone driven by animal or water power, the allusion would be a case of emphatic hyperbole, like the passage of a camel through the slit of a needle (Matthew 19:24). In Revelation 18:21 it is a strong angel that is described as casting such a stone. See, further, art. ‘Mill,’ with illustration, in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible .
G. M. Mackie.
Webster's Dictionary - Crazing-Mill
(n.) A mill for grinding tin ore.
Webster's Dictionary - Walk-Mill
(n.) A fulling mill.
Webster's Dictionary - Tilt-Mill
(n.) A mill where a tilt hammer is used, or where the process of tilting is carried on.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Mill, Millstone
In the East these are usually small, every family having its own mill. A woman, or sometimes two sit at the mill, turning the upper stone, casting in the grain occasionally through a hole in it Larger mills are also referred to, the stone being turned by an ass. Numbers 11:8 ; Matthew 18:6 ; Mark 9:42 ; Revelation 18:21,22 .
Webster's Dictionary - Mill-Sixpence
(n.) A milled sixpence; - the sixpence being one of the first English coins milled (1561).
Webster's Dictionary - Mill-Cake
(n.) The incorporated materials for gunpowder, in the form of a dense mass or cake, ready to be subjected to the process of granulation.
Webster's Dictionary - Mill
(1):
(v. i.) To swim under water; - said of air-breathing creatures.
(2):
(n.) To roll into bars, as steel.
(3):
(n.) To pass through a fulling mill; to full, as cloth.
(4):
(n.) A common name for various machines which produce a manufactured product, or change the form of a raw material by the continuous repetition of some simple action; as, a sawmill; a stamping mill, etc.
(5):
(n.) An excavation in rock, transverse to the workings, from which material for filling is obtained.
(6):
(v. t.) To fill (a winze or interior incline) with broken ore, to be drawn out at the bottom.
(7):
(n.) To reduce to fine particles, or to small pieces, in a mill; to grind; to comminute.
(8):
(n.) To shape, finish, or transform by passing through a machine; specifically, to shape or dress, as metal, by means of a rotary cutter.
(9):
(v. i.) To undergo hulling, as maize.
(10):
(v. i.) To move in a circle, as cattle upon a plain.
(11):
(v. i.) To swim suddenly in a new direction; - said of whales.
(12):
(v. i.) To take part in a mill; to box.
(13):
(n.) Short for Treadmill.
(14):
(n.) A passage underground through which ore is shot.
(15):
(n.) A milling cutter. See Illust. under Milling.
(16):
(n.) The raised or ridged edge or surface made in milling anything, as a coin or screw.
(17):
(n.) To make a raised border around the edges of, or to cut fine grooves or indentations across the edges of, as of a coin, or a screw head; also, to stamp in a coining press; to coin.
(18):
(n.) A pugilistic.
(19):
(v. t.) To cause to mill, or circle round, as cattle.
(20):
(n.) A money of account of the United States, having the value of the tenth of a cent, or the thousandth of a dollar.
(21):
(n.) To beat with the fists.
(22):
(n.) A building or collection of buildings with machinery by which the processes of manufacturing are carried on; as, a cotton mill; a powder mill; a rolling mill.
(23):
(n.) A hardened steel roller having a design in relief, used for imprinting a reversed copy of the design in a softer metal, as copper.
(24):
(n.) A machine for grinding and polishing; as, a lapidary mill.
(25):
(n.) A machine used for expelling the juice, sap, etc., from vegetable tissues by pressure, or by pressure in combination with a grinding, or cutting process; as, a cider mill; a cane mill.
(26):
(n.) A machine for grinding or comminuting any substance, as grain, by rubbing and crushing it between two hard, rough, or intented surfaces; as, a gristmill, a coffee mill; a bone mill.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Mill
In the first ages they parched or roasted their grain; a practice which the people of Israel, as we learn from the Scriptures, long continued: afterward they pounded it in a mortar, to which Solomon thus alludes: "Though thou shouldest bray a fool in a mortar among wheat with a pestle, yet will not his foolishness depart from him," Proverbs 27:22 . This was succeeded by mills, similar to the hand mills formerly used in this country, of which there were two sorts; the first were large, and turned by the strength of horses or asses; the second were smaller, and wrought by men, commonly by slaves condemned to this hard labour, as a punishment for their crimes. Chardin remarks, in his manuscript, that the persons employed are generally female slaves, who are least regarded, or are least fitted for any thing else; for the work is extremely laborious, and esteemed the lowest employment about the house. Most of their corn is ground by these little mills, although they sometimes make use of large mills, wrought by oxen or camels. Near Ispahan, and some of the other great cities of Persia, he saw water mills; but he did not meet with a single wind mill in the east. Almost every family grind their wheat and barley at home, having two portable mill stones for that purpose; of which the uppermost is turned round by a small handle of wood or iron that is placed in the rim. When this stone is large, or expedition is required, a second person is called in to assist; and as it is usual for the women only to be concerned in this employment, who seat themselves over against each other, with the mill stone between them, we may see the propriety of the expression in the declaration of Moses: "And all the first-born in the land of Egypt shall die, from the first-born of Pharaoh that sitteth upon his throne even unto the first-born of the maid-servant that is behind the mill," Exodus 11:5 . The manner in which the hand mills are worked is well described by Dr. E. D. Clarke, in his Travels: "Scarcely had we reached the apartment prepared for our reception, when, looking from the window into the court yard belonging to the house, we beheld two women grinding at the mill, in a manner most forcibly illustrating the saying of our Saviour: ‘Two women shall be grinding at the mill, the one shall be taken and the other left.' They were preparing flour to make our bread, as it is always customary in the country when strangers arrive. The two women, seated upon the ground opposite to each other, held between them two round flat stones, such as are seen in Lapland, and such as in Scotland are called querns. In the centre of the upper stone was a cavity for pouring in the corn, and by the side of this an upright wooden handle for moving the stone. As this operation began, one of the women opposite received it from her companion, who pushed it toward her, who again sent it to her companion; thus communicating a rotatory motion to the upper stone, their left hand being all the while employed in supplying fresh corn, as fast as the bran and flour escaped from the sides of the machine." When they are not impelled, as in this instance, to premature exertions by the arrival of strangers, they grind their corn in the morning at break of day: the noise of the mill is then to be heard every where, and is often so great as to rouse the inhabitants of the cities from their slumbers; for it is well known they bake their bread every day, and commonly grind their corn as it is wanted. The noise of the mill stone is therefore, with great propriety, selected by the prophet as one of the tokens of a populous and thriving country: "Moreover, I will take from them the voice of mirth, and the voice of gladness, the voice of the bridegroom and the voice of the bride, the sound of mill stones and the light of a candle, and their whole land shall be a desolation," Jeremiah 25:10 . The morning shall no more be cheered with the joyful sound of the mill, nor the shadows of evening by the light of a candle; the morning shall be silent, and the evening dark and melancholy, where desolation reigns. "At the earliest dawn of the morning," says Mr. Forbes, "in all the Hindoo towns and villages, the hand mills are at work, when the menials and widows grind meal for the daily consumption of the family: this work is always performed by women, who resume their task every morning, especially the forlorn Hindoo widows, divested of every ornament, and with their heads shaved, degraded to almost a state of servitude." How affecting, then, is the call to the daughter of Babylon!—"Come down, and sit in the dust, O daughter of Babylon, sit on the ground: there is no throne, O daughter of the Chaldeans; for thou shalt no more be called tender and delicate. Take the mill stones, and grind meal; uncover thy locks, make bare the leg, uncover the thigh, pass over the rivers,"
Isaiah 47:1-2 .
The custom of daily grinding their corn for the family, shows the propriety of the law: "No man shall take the nether or the upper mill stone to pledge, for he taketh a man's life to pledge;" because if he take either the upper or the nether mill stone, he deprives him of his daily provision, which cannot be prepared without them. That complete and perpetual desolation which, by the just allotment of Heaven, is ere long to overtake the mystical Babylon, is clearly signified by the same precept: "The sound of the mill stone shall be heard no more at all in thee," Revelation 18:22 . The means of subsistence being entirely destroyed, no human creature shall ever occupy the ruined habitations more. In the book of Judges, the sacred historian alludes, with characteristic accuracy, to several circumstances implied in that custom, where he describes the fall of Abimelech. A woman of Thebez, driven to desperation by his furious attack on the tower, started up from the mill at which she was grinding, seized the upper mill stone, פלה דכב , and, rushing to the top of the gate, cast it on his head, and fractured his skull. This was the feat of a woman, for the mill is worked only by females; it was not a piece of a mill stone, but the rider, the distinguishing name of the upper mill stone, which literally rides upon the other, and is a piece or division of the mill: it was a stone of two feet broad, and therefore fully sufficient, when thrown from such a height, to produce the effect mentioned in the narrative. It displays, also, the vindictive contempt which suggested the punishment of Samson, the captive ruler of Israel, that the Philistines, with barbarous contumely, compelled him to perform the meanest service of a female slave; they sent him to grind in the prison, Judges 16:21 , but not for himself alone; this, although extremely mortifying to the hero, had been more tolerable; they made him grinder for the prison, perhaps while the vilest malefactor was permitted to look on, and join in the mockery. Samson, the ruler and avenger of Israel, labours, as Isaiah foretold the virgin daughter of Babylon should labour: "Come down, and sit in the dust, O virgin daughter of Babylon: there is no throne," no seat for thee, "O daughter of the Chaldeans. Take the mill stones and grind meal," but not with the wonted song; "Sit thou silent, and get thee into darkness," there to conceal thy vexation and disgrace, Isaiah 47:1-2 ; Isaiah 47:5 . The females engaged in this operation, endeavoured to beguile the lingering hours of toilsome exertion with a song. We learn from an expression of Aristophanes, preserved by Athenaeus, that the Grecian maidens accompanied the sound of the mill stones with their voices. This circumstance imparts force to the description of the prophet, the light of a candle was no more to be seen in the evening; the sound of the mill stones, the indication of plenty, and the song of the grinders, the natural expression of joy and happiness, were no more to be heard at the dawn. The grinding of corn at so early an hour throws light on a passage of considerable obscurity: "And the sons of Rimmon the Beerothite, Rechab and Baanah, went, and came about the heat of the day to the house of Ishbosheth, who lay on a bed at noon; and they came thither into the midst of the house, as though they would have fetched wheat, and they smote him under the fifth rib; and Rechab and Baanah his brother escaped," 2 Samuel 4:5-7 . It is still a custom in the east, according to Dr. Perry, to allow their soldiers a certain quantity of corn, with other articles of provisions, together with some pay; and as it was the custom, also to carry their corn to the mill at break of day, these two captains very naturally went to the palace the day before to fetch wheat, in order to distribute it to the soldiers, that it might be sent to the mill at the accustomed hour in the morning. The princes of the east in those days, as the history of David shows, lounged in their divan, or reposed on their couch, till the cool of the evening began to advance. Rechab and Baanah, therefore, came in the heat of the day, when they knew that Ishbosheth, their master, would be resting on his bed; and as it was necessary, for the reason just given, to have the corn the day before it was needed, their coming at that time, though it might be a little earlier than usual, created no suspicion, and attracted no notice.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Mill
1: μύλων (Strong's #3459 — Noun Masculine — mulon — moo'-lone ) denotes "a mill house," where the millstone is, Matthew 24:41 ; some mss. have mulos (see next word). In the Sept., Jeremiah 52:11 , "grinding house" (lit., "house of a mill").
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Mill
See CORN .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Mill
The mills of the ancient Hebrews probably differed but little from those at present in use in the East. These consist of two circular stones, each about eighteen inches or two feet in diameter, the lower of which is fixed, and has its upper surface slightly convex, fitting into a corresponding concavity in the upper stone. In the latter is a hole thorough which the grain passes, immediately above a pivot or shaft which rises from the centre of the lower stone, and about which the upper stone is turned by means of an upright handle fixed near the edge. It is worked by women, sometimes singly and sometimes two together, who are usually seated on the bare ground. (Isaiah 47:1,2 ) "facing each other; both have hold of the handle by which the upper is turned round on the 'nether' millstone. The one whose right hand is disengaged throws in the grain as occasion requires through the hole in the upper stone. It is not correct to say that one pushes it half round and then the other seizes the handle. This would be slow work, and would give a spasmodic motion to the stone. Both retain their hold, and pull to or push from , as men do with the whip or cross-cut saw. The proverb of our Saviour, ( Matthew 24:41 ) is true to life, for women only grind. I cannot recall an instance in which men were at the mill." --Thomson, "The Land and the Book," c 34So essential were millstones for daily domestic use that they were forbidden to be taken in pledge. (24:6) There were also larger mills that could only be turned by cattle or asses. Allusion to one of these is made in ( Matthew 18:6 ) With the movable upper millstone of the hand-mill the woman of Thebez broke Abimelech's skull. (Judges 9:53 )

Sentence search

Ristmill - ) A Mill for grinding grain; especially, a Mill for grinding grists, or portions of grain brought by different customers; a custom Mill
Mill - Mill, n. Mille, a thousand. ...
Mill, n. A complicated engine or machine for grinding and reducing to fine particles, grain, fruit or other substance, or for performing other operations by means of wheels and a circular motion as a grist-mill for grain a coffee-mill a cider-mill a bark-mill. The original purpose of Mills was to comminute grain for food, but the word Mill is now extended to engines or machines moved by water, wind or steam, for carrying on many other operations. We have oil-mills, saw-mills, slitting-mills, bark-mills, fulling-mills,&c. Mill, To grind to comminute to reduce to fine particles or to small pieces
Milling - ) The act or employment of grinding or passing through a Mill; the process of fulling; the process of making a raised or intented edge upon coin, etc. See Mill. ) of Mill...
Mill - ) To pass through a fulling Mill; to full, as cloth. ) A common name for various machines which produce a manufactured product, or change the form of a raw material by the continuous repetition of some simple action; as, a sawmill; a stamping Mill, etc. ) To reduce to fine particles, or to small pieces, in a Mill; to grind; to comminute. ) To take part in a Mill; to box. ) Short for Treadmill. ) A Milling cutter. under Milling. ) The raised or ridged edge or surface made in Milling anything, as a coin or screw. ) To cause to Mill, or circle round, as cattle. ) A building or collection of buildings with machinery by which the processes of manufacturing are carried on; as, a cotton Mill; a powder Mill; a rolling Mill. ) A machine for grinding and polishing; as, a lapidary Mill. , from vegetable tissues by pressure, or by pressure in combination with a grinding, or cutting process; as, a cider Mill; a cane Mill. ) A machine for grinding or comminuting any substance, as grain, by rubbing and crushing it between two hard, rough, or intented surfaces; as, a gristmill, a coffee Mill; a bone Mill
Mill - MILL (μυλών),...
Grind - See Mill
Mill - 1: μύλων (Strong's #3459 — Noun Masculine — mulon — moo'-lone ) denotes "a Mill house," where the Millstone is, Matthew 24:41 ; some mss. , "house of a Mill")
Grinding - —See Mill
Melne - ) A Mill
Treadmill - ) A Mill worked by persons treading upon steps on the periphery of a wide wheel having a horizontal axis. Also, a Mill worked by horses, dogs, etc
Walk-Mill - ) A fulling Mill
Craze-Mill - of Crazing-mill...
Waygate - ) The tailrace of a Mill
Flour - See Bread, Food, § 2 , Mill
Crazing-Mill - ) A Mill for grinding tin ore
Powdermill - ) A Mill in which gunpowder is made
Buhrstone - ) A cellular, flinty rock, used for Mill stones
Sawmill - ) A Mill for sawing, especially one for sawing timber or lumber
Leat - one to or from a Mill
Mill, Millstone - In the East these are usually small, every family having its own Mill. A woman, or sometimes two sit at the Mill, turning the upper stone, casting in the grain occasionally through a hole in it Larger Mills are also referred to, the stone being turned by an ass
Agoing - ) In motion; in the act of going; as, to set a Mill agoing
Grind - The hand-mill was early used by the Hebrews (Numbers 11:8 ). (See Mill
Bridgetree - ) The beam which supports the spindle socket of the runner in a grinding Mill
Mell - ) A Mill
Slickens - ) The pulverized matter from a quartz Mill, or the lighter soil of hydraulic mines
Milled - ) of Mill...
(2):...
(a. ) Having been subjected to some process of Milling
Tilt-Mill - ) A Mill where a tilt hammer is used, or where the process of tilting is carried on
Cockhead - ) The rounded or pointed top of a grinding Mill spindle, forming a pivot on which the stone is balanced
Piecer - ) A child employed in spinning Mill to tie together broken threads
Milldam - ) A dam or mound to obstruct a water course, and raise the water to a height sufficient to turn a Mill wheel
Millwork - ) The business of setting up or of operating Mill machinery. ) The shafting, gearing, and other driving machinery of Mills
Naarah - (nay'uh rah) Name meaning, “girl” or “mill
Water Supply - A supply of water; specifically, water collected, as in reservoirs, and conveyed, as by pipes, for use in a city, Mill, or the like
Beaten Oil - (Exodus 27:20 ; 29:40 ), obtained by pounding olives in a mortar, not by crushing them in a Mill
Bagasse - ) Sugar cane, as it comes crushed from the Mill
Proprietor - ) One who has the legal right or exclusive title to anything, whether in possession or not; an owner; as, the proprietor of farm or of a Mill
Windmill - ) A Mill operated by the power of the wind, usually by the action of the wind upon oblique vanes or sails which radiate from a horizontal shaft
Overseer - ) One who oversees; a superintendent; a supervisor; as, an overseer of a Mill; specifically, one or certain public officers; as, an overseer of the poor; an overseer of highways
Fathers, Josephite - Congregation which began its labors in 1871 when four priests from Mill Hill were assigned to Saint Francis Xavier's Church at Baltimore. It became independent of Mill Hill in 1892, and under its present title established its headquarters at Baltimore
Josephite Fathers - Congregation which began its labors in 1871 when four priests from Mill Hill were assigned to Saint Francis Xavier's Church at Baltimore. It became independent of Mill Hill in 1892, and under its present title established its headquarters at Baltimore
Saint Joseph's Society of the Sacred Heart - Congregation which began its labors in 1871 when four priests from Mill Hill were assigned to Saint Francis Xavier's Church at Baltimore. It became independent of Mill Hill in 1892, and under its present title established its headquarters at Baltimore
Water Power - (1):...
A fall of water which may be used to drive machinery; a site for a water Mill; a water privilege
Millstone - A — 1: μύλος (Strong's #3458 — Noun Masculine — mulos — moo'-los ) denotes "a handmill," consisting of two circular stones, one above the other, the lower being fixed. Small stones could be turned by one woman (mill-grinding was a work deemed fit only for women and slaves; cp. Matthew 24:41 , under Mill), or more. ...
Still larger ones were turned by an ass (onikos), Matthew 18:6 , RV, "a great Millstone" (marg. , "a Millstone turned by an ass"), indicating the immediate and overwhelming drowning of one who causes one young believer to stumble; Mark 9:42 (where some mss. have lithos multikos, "a stone of a Mill," as in Luke 17:2 ); Revelation 18:22 (some mss. ...
B — 1: μυλικός (Strong's #3457 — Adjective — mulikos — moo-lee-kos' ) "of a Mill," occurs in Luke 17:2 (see above). ...
B — 2: μύλος (Strong's #3458 — Noun Masculine — mulinos — moo'-los ) "made of Millstone," is used with lithos, "a stone;" and with the adjective megas, "great," in the best mss
Mill - This was succeeded by Mills, similar to the hand Mills formerly used in this country, of which there were two sorts; the first were large, and turned by the strength of horses or asses; the second were smaller, and wrought by men, commonly by slaves condemned to this hard labour, as a punishment for their crimes. Most of their corn is ground by these little Mills, although they sometimes make use of large Mills, wrought by oxen or camels. Near Ispahan, and some of the other great cities of Persia, he saw water Mills; but he did not meet with a single wind Mill in the east. Almost every family grind their wheat and barley at home, having two portable Mill stones for that purpose; of which the uppermost is turned round by a small handle of wood or iron that is placed in the rim. When this stone is large, or expedition is required, a second person is called in to assist; and as it is usual for the women only to be concerned in this employment, who seat themselves over against each other, with the Mill stone between them, we may see the propriety of the expression in the declaration of Moses: "And all the first-born in the land of Egypt shall die, from the first-born of Pharaoh that sitteth upon his throne even unto the first-born of the maid-servant that is behind the Mill," Exodus 11:5 . The manner in which the hand Mills are worked is well described by Dr. Clarke, in his Travels: "Scarcely had we reached the apartment prepared for our reception, when, looking from the window into the court yard belonging to the house, we beheld two women grinding at the Mill, in a manner most forcibly illustrating the saying of our Saviour: ‘Two women shall be grinding at the Mill, the one shall be taken and the other left. " When they are not impelled, as in this instance, to premature exertions by the arrival of strangers, they grind their corn in the morning at break of day: the noise of the Mill is then to be heard every where, and is often so great as to rouse the inhabitants of the cities from their slumbers; for it is well known they bake their bread every day, and commonly grind their corn as it is wanted. The noise of the Mill stone is therefore, with great propriety, selected by the prophet as one of the tokens of a populous and thriving country: "Moreover, I will take from them the voice of mirth, and the voice of gladness, the voice of the bridegroom and the voice of the bride, the sound of Mill stones and the light of a candle, and their whole land shall be a desolation," Jeremiah 25:10 . The morning shall no more be cheered with the joyful sound of the Mill, nor the shadows of evening by the light of a candle; the morning shall be silent, and the evening dark and melancholy, where desolation reigns. Forbes, "in all the Hindoo towns and villages, the hand Mills are at work, when the menials and widows grind meal for the daily consumption of the family: this work is always performed by women, who resume their task every morning, especially the forlorn Hindoo widows, divested of every ornament, and with their heads shaved, degraded to almost a state of servitude. Take the Mill stones, and grind meal; uncover thy locks, make bare the leg, uncover the thigh, pass over the rivers,"...
Isaiah 47:1-2 . ...
The custom of daily grinding their corn for the family, shows the propriety of the law: "No man shall take the nether or the upper Mill stone to pledge, for he taketh a man's life to pledge;" because if he take either the upper or the nether Mill stone, he deprives him of his daily provision, which cannot be prepared without them. That complete and perpetual desolation which, by the just allotment of Heaven, is ere long to overtake the mystical Babylon, is clearly signified by the same precept: "The sound of the Mill stone shall be heard no more at all in thee," Revelation 18:22 . A woman of Thebez, driven to desperation by his furious attack on the tower, started up from the Mill at which she was grinding, seized the upper Mill stone, פלה דכב , and, rushing to the top of the gate, cast it on his head, and fractured his skull. This was the feat of a woman, for the Mill is worked only by females; it was not a piece of a Mill stone, but the rider, the distinguishing name of the upper Mill stone, which literally rides upon the other, and is a piece or division of the Mill: it was a stone of two feet broad, and therefore fully sufficient, when thrown from such a height, to produce the effect mentioned in the narrative. Take the Mill stones and grind meal," but not with the wonted song; "Sit thou silent, and get thee into darkness," there to conceal thy vexation and disgrace, Isaiah 47:1-2 ; Isaiah 47:5 . We learn from an expression of Aristophanes, preserved by Athenaeus, that the Grecian maidens accompanied the sound of the Mill stones with their voices. This circumstance imparts force to the description of the prophet, the light of a candle was no more to be seen in the evening; the sound of the Mill stones, the indication of plenty, and the song of the grinders, the natural expression of joy and happiness, were no more to be heard at the dawn. Perry, to allow their soldiers a certain quantity of corn, with other articles of provisions, together with some pay; and as it was the custom, also to carry their corn to the Mill at break of day, these two captains very naturally went to the palace the day before to fetch wheat, in order to distribute it to the soldiers, that it might be sent to the Mill at the accustomed hour in the morning
Faller - ) A part which acts by falling, as a stamp in a fulling Mill, or the device in a spinning machine to arrest motion when a thread breaks
Woolen - ) Of or pertaining to wool or woolen cloths; as, woolen manufactures; a woolen Mill; a woolen draper
Flume - ) A stream; especially, a passage channel, or conduit for the water that drives a Mill wheel; or an artifical channel of water for hydraulic or placer mining; also, a chute for conveying logs or lumber down a declivity
Millstone - mola)...
The Mill of the ancients (as of many Syrians to-day) was a quern-two circular stones, of which the upper and smaller rotated upon the other. A great Millstone flung impetuously (ὁρμήματι, ‘with a rush,’ or ‘indignantly’; see Septuagint Hosea 5:10) into the sea, to rise no more, is his image of the overthrow of Imperial Rome (Revelation 18:21). So complete is the desolation he foresees, that the sound of the Mill (φωνὴ μύλου, the ᾠδὴ ἐπιμύλιος of the classics; cf. Carslaw, article ‘Mill, Millstone’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ; A. Kennedy, article ‘Mill, Millstones’ in Encyclopaedia Biblica ; C
Grinder - The ‘grinders’ of Ecclesiastes 12:3 are women grinding at the Mill
Knurl - ) To provide with ridges, to assist the grasp, as in the edge of a flat knob, or coin; to Mill
Crape - ) A thin, crimped stuff, made of raw silk gummed and twisted on the Mill
Nellore, India, Diocese of - Entrusted to the Foreign Missions of Mill Hill, it is a suffragan of the archdiocese of Visakhapatnam
Astriction - ) An obligation to have the grain growing on certain lands ground at a certain Mill, the owner paying a toll
Corn - The grain thus obtained was sometimes pounded in a mortar, Numbers 11:8 Revelation 18:22 , but was commonly reduced to meal by the hand-mill. This consisted of a lower Millstone, the upper side of which was slightly concave, and an upper Millstone, the lower surface of which was convex. These stones were each about two feet in diameter, and half a foot thick; and were called "the nether Millstone," and the rider, Job 41:24 Judges 9:53 2 Samuel 11:21 . The hole for receiving the corn was in the center of the upper Millstone; and in the operation of grinding, the lower was fixed, and the upper made to move round upon it with considerable velocity by means of a handle. The meal came out at the edges, and was received on a cloth spread under the Mill on the ground. Each family possessed a Mill, and the law forbade its being taken in pledge, Deuteronomy 24:6 ; one among innumerable examples of the humanity of the Mosaic legislation. These Mills are still in use in the East, and in some parts of Scotland. " These are the primeval Mills of the world; and they are still found in all corn countries where rude and ancient customs have not been liable to those changes introduced by refinement. The employment of grinding with these Mills is confined solely to females, who sit on the ground with the Mill before them, and thus may be said to be "behind the Mill," Exodus 11:5 ; and the practice illustrates the prophetic observation of our Savior concerning the day of Jerusalem's destruction: "Two women shall be grinding at the Mill; one shall be taken and the other left," Matthew 24:41 . As the grinding was usually performed in the morning at daybreak, the noise of the females at the hand-mill was heard all over the city, and often awoke their more indolent masters
Pounder - ) One who, or that which, pounds, as a stamp in an ore Mill
Miller - ) A moth or lepidopterous insect; - so called because the wings appear as if covered with white dust or powder, like a Miller's clothes. Called also moth Miller. ) A Milling machine. ) One who keeps or attends a flour Mill or gristmill
Mill - That used by the Hebrews consisted of two circular stones, each 2 feet in diameter and half a foot thick, the lower of which was called the "nether Millstone" (Job 41:24 ) and the upper the "rider. There were then no public Mills, and thus each family required to be provided with a hand-mill. It was with the upper stone of a hand-mill that "a certain woman" at Thebez broke Abimelech's skull (Judges 9:53 , "a piece of a Millstone;" literally, "a Millstone rider", i. Millstones could not be pledged (Deuteronomy 24:6 ), as they were necessary in every family
Saint Joseph's Society For Foreign Missions - Founded as a missionary college at Mill Hill, 10 miles north of London, by Herbert Cardinal Vaughan while still a priest in 1866. At Mill Hill a two years course in philosophy and four in theology prepares the students for evangelizing the natives of English colonies and protectorates, which is their proper field
Bulldog - ) A refractory material used as a furnace lining, obtained by calcining the cinder or slag from the puddling furnace of a rolling Mill
Rist - ) Ground corn; that which is ground at one time; as much grain as is carried to the Mill at one time, or the meal it produces
Rist - ) Ground corn; that which is ground at one time; as much grain as is carried to the Mill at one time, or the meal it produces
Reservoir - ) A place where anything is kept in store; especially, a place where water is collected and kept for use when wanted, as to supply a fountain, a canal, or a city by means of aqueducts, or to drive a Mill wheel, or the like
Mill-Stone - MILL-STONE (μύλος, λίθος μυλικός). —The hand-mill used in Palestine consists of two stone discs, from a foot to a foot and a half in diameter, the upper being about 2 in. The sound of the hand-mill grinding the flour for the daily bread was suggestive of home life under conditions of peace and prosperity, and its cessation betokened turmoil and distress (Ecclesiastes 12:3-4, Jeremiah 25:10-11). The μύλος ὀνικός, or donkey stone of Luke 17:2, may simply mean the revolving upper stone of the common hand-mill, as having the more active share in the work of grinding. ‘Mill,’ with illustration, in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible
Mill, Millstone - Mill, MillSTONE. Three methods of preparing flour were in use in Palestine in Bible times, associated with the mortar and pestle (see Mortar And Pestle), the rubbing-stone , and the quern or handmill. The more familiar apparatus for the same purpose was the handmill or quern. , Lamp), the recent excavations enable us to trace two distinct stages in the evolution of the Palestinian handmill. ’ The lower stone, the ‘nether Millstone’ of Job 41:24 , was always more massive than the ‘upper Millstone’ ( Deuteronomy 24:6 ), and was apparently fitted with ‘a narrow spindle’ sunk into the stone. The upper stone was pierced right through, and by this hole the Mill was fed. ...
In the later and more effective type of handmill, which was that in use in NT times, the stones were larger, although the lower stone was still considerably wider than the upper ( Baba bathra , ii. The Mill was fed, as before, through a funnel-shaped cavity pierced through the upper stone, which was rotated by the handle through a complete circle. Sometimes, as appears from Matthew 24:41 , two women worked the Mill, seated opposite each other, and each turning the upper stone through half a revolution, as may still be seen in the East. ...
By the first century of our era a larger and different form of Mill had been introduced, apparently, to judge by the names of the various parts in the Mishna (see art. ‘Mill’ in EBi [3] ‘a Millstone turned by an ass’). The work of the Mill belonged at all times to the special province of the women of the household ( Matthew 24:41 ). ...
How indispensable the handmill was considered for the daily life of the family may be seen from the provision of the Deuteronomic legislation forbidding the creditor to take in pledge the household Mill (so rightly RV [5] ), or even the upper Millstone, ‘for he taketh a man’s life to pledge’ (Deuteronomy 24:6 )
Mash - To bruise to crush by beating or pressure as, to mash apples in a Mill
Mill - Mill. The Jewish hand-mill consisted of two circular stones, each about 18 inches or two feet in diameter, the lower of which is fixed, and has its upper surface slightly convex, fitting into a corresponding concavity in the upper stone. It is worked by women, sometimes singly and sometimes two together, who are usually seated on the bare ground, Isaiah 47:1-2, facing each other; both have hold of the handle by which the upper is turned round on the "nether" Millstone. So essential were Millstones for daily domestic use that they were forbidden to be taken in pledge. There were also larger Mills driven by cattle or asses. With the movable upper Millstone of the hand-mill the woman of Thebez broke Abimelech's skull
Madras And Mylapore, India, Archdiocese of - Established September 1, 1886 as the archdiocese of Madras, entrusted to Saint Joseph's Society, Mill Hill, and secular clergy
Operative - , one who operates a machine in a Mill or manufactory
Afghanistan - In 1879 a vicariate Apostolic was founded for Afghanistan and Baluchistan and entrusted to the Missionaries of Mill Hili, London
Mill - The use of the Mill in the eastern world was very ancient, and peformed by the lowest of the people, So that when describing the different ranks whom the Lord would destroy in the general destruction of the firstborn in Egypt, the phrase is, "from the first-born of Pharoah that sitteth upon his throne, even unto the first born of the maid servant that is behind the Mill. "No man shall take the nether or the upper Millstone to pledge, for he taketh a man's life to pledge
Kisumu, Kenya, Archdiocese of - Erected as the Prefecture Apostolic of Kavirondo on July 15, 1925, Kenya Colony, British East Africa, entrusted to the Foreign Missionaries of Mill Hill
Trough - ) A long, hollow vessel, generally for holding water or other liquid, especially one formed by excavating a log longitudinally on one side; a long tray; also, a wooden channel for conveying water, as to a Mill wheel
Mill - As the grain is reduced to flour, it flies out from between the stones onto a cloth or skin placed underneath the Mill. ...
It was forbidden to take Millstones as a pledge because they were so important to sustaining life (Deuteronomy 24:6 ). The manna which fell in the wilderness was tough enough so that people ground it in Mills before cooking it (Numbers 11:7-8 ). ...
In the New Testament, our Lord prophesied that at His coming, “two women shall be grinding at the Mill, one shall be taken and one other is left” (Matthew 24:41 ). In Revelation 18:21 , the Millstone was cast into the sea as a symbol of absolute destruction
Islamabad-Rawalpindi, Pakistan, Diocese of - Established July 6, 1887 as the apostolic prefecture of Kafiristan and Kashmir, British India, entrusted to Saint Joseph's Society of Mill Hill
Aherne, Cornelius - He was ordained in 1889, and was immediately appointed professor of science and natural philosophy at the Mill Hill College
Debtor - ...
...
A Mill, or Millstone, or upper garment, when given as a pledge, could not be kept over night (Exodus 22:26,27 )
Mortar - Mortar for pulverizing (Proverbs 27:22 ) grain or other substances by means of a pestle instead of a Mill
Abandonment - ) The relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege, as to Mill site, etc
Fuller - " To full is to press or scour cloth in a Mill
Full - ) To thicken by moistening, heating, and pressing, as cloth; to Mill; to make compact; to scour, cleanse, and thicken in a Mill
Chose - A chose local is annexed to a place, as a Mill or the like a chose transitory is a thing which is movable
Mend - To repair, as a breach to supply a part broken or defective as, to mend a garment, a road, a Mill-dam, a fence, &c
Kern - ) A hand Mill
Sluice - ) An artifical passage for water, fitted with a valve or gate, as in a Mill stream, for stopping or regulating the flow; also, a water gate or flood gate
Saw - To cut with a saw as, the Mill saws fast or well
Mash - ) To convert into a mash; to reduce to a soft pulpy state by beating or pressure; to bruise; to crush; as, to mash apples in a Mill, or potatoes with a pestle
Mill - The Mills of the ancient Hebrews probably differed but little from those at present in use in the East. (Isaiah 47:1,2 ) "facing each other; both have hold of the handle by which the upper is turned round on the 'nether' Millstone. I cannot recall an instance in which men were at the Mill. " --Thomson, "The Land and the Book," c 34So essential were Millstones for daily domestic use that they were forbidden to be taken in pledge. (24:6) There were also larger Mills that could only be turned by cattle or asses. Allusion to one of these is made in ( Matthew 18:6 ) With the movable upper Millstone of the hand-mill the woman of Thebez broke Abimelech's skull
Pug - ) A pug Mill
Pledge - It was forbidden also to take the Mill or the upper Millstone as a pledge ( Deuteronomy 24:6 )
Driver - ) A crossbar on a grinding Mill spindle to drive the upper stone
Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, Diocese of - In 1881 the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples put the mission of North Borneo and Labuan under the jurisdiction of the Society for Foreign Missions of Mill Hill, England
Tan - ) The bark of the oak, and some other trees, bruised and broken by a Mill, for tanning hides; - so called both before and after it has been used
Saw - ) To cut, as a saw; as, the saw or Mill saws fast
Dothan - The situation is, too, a choice one on account of its abundant fountain, now used to work a Mill and irrigate fruit gardens; two ancient wells and a number of empty cisterns ( Genesis 37:24 ) are also found near the foot of the tell
Ignorance: of Oneìs Own Heart - A fearful torrent swept down the valley, and threatened destruction to this man's large flour Mill
Forge - ) The works where wrought iron is produced directly from the ore, or where iron is rendered malleable by puddling and shingling; a shingling Mill
Rind - ) To perform the operation of grinding something; to turn the Millstones. ) To reduce to powder by friction, as in a Mill, or with the teeth; to crush into small fragments; to produce as by the action of Millstones
Rind - ) To perform the operation of grinding something; to turn the Millstones. ) To reduce to powder by friction, as in a Mill, or with the teeth; to crush into small fragments; to produce as by the action of Millstones
Mill - Being moveable it could be thrown as a missile (Judges 9:53 Gesenius translated "a cut piece of Millstone," not a fragment, but the whole with its carefully cut surface; Revelation 18:21). The Mill stones were so essential for preparing food that they were forbidden to be taken in pledge (Deuteronomy 24:6). ) Larger Millstones were turned by asses; Matthew 18:6 "a donkey Millstone" (Greek)
Custom - A Mill or a manufacturer has extensive custom, or little custom
Apostolic Schools - There are well-known apostolic schools at Mungret, Ireland, under the Jesuits; Wernhoutsburg, Holland, under the Vincentians; Tournai, Belgium, under the Salesians; and Freshfield, England, under the Missionaries of Saint Joseph's, Mill Hill
Levy - ) To erect, build, or set up; to make or construct; to raise or cast up; as, to levy a Mill, dike, ditch, a nuisance, etc
Schools, Apostolic - There are well-known apostolic schools at Mungret, Ireland, under the Jesuits; Wernhoutsburg, Holland, under the Vincentians; Tournai, Belgium, under the Salesians; and Freshfield, England, under the Missionaries of Saint Joseph's, Mill Hill
Simeon (1) - Mill however follows Burton (H. 290) in regarding Simeon as a brother of James and also of Jude though perhaps by another mother (Mill Pantheistic Principles pp
Sabbatarians - There are two congregations of the Sabbatarians in London; one among the general Baptists, meeting in Mill Yard; the other among the particular Baptists, in Cripplegate
Use - Use is of two kinds that which employs a thing, without destroying it or its form, as the use of a book or of a farm or it is the employment of a thing which destroys or wastes it, as the use of bread for provision the use of water for turning a Mill. To waste, consume or exhaust by employment as, to use flour for food to use beer for drink to use water for irrigation, or for turning the wheel of a Mill
New Zealand - The work of the Marists, and the Mill Hill Fathers, who are gradually restoring the missions, is most promising
Grind - Take the Millstones and grind meal. GRIND, To perform the operation of grinding to move a Mill
Theories of Population - Malthus's theory was adopted by later writers, notably Owen, Mill, and Besant, who urged the use of contraconceptives and other immoral practises in order to restrict the population
Oil - The crushed mass is then subjected to pressure in the oil-mill, Hebrew, gath-shemen
Wheel - ) A circular frame turning about an axis; a rotating disk, whether solid, or a frame composed of an outer rim, spokes or radii, and a central hub or nave, in which is inserted the axle, - used for supporting and conveying vehicles, in machinery, and for various purposes; as, the wheel of a wagon, of a locomotive, of a Mill, of a watch, etc
Oil - --In order to make oil the fruit, was either bruised in a mortar crushed in a press loaded with wood or stones, ground in a Mill, or trodden with the feet
Shoe - ) The trough or spout for conveying the grain from the hopper to the eye of the Millstone. ) An inclined trough in an ore-crushing Mill
Plant - ) The whole machinery and apparatus employed in carrying on a trade or mechanical business; also, sometimes including real estate, and whatever represents investment of capital in the means of carrying on a business, but not including material worked upon or finished products; as, the plant of a foundry, a Mill, or a railroad
Hack - ) A frame or grating of various kinds; as, a frame for drying bricks, fish, or cheese; a rack for feeding cattle; a grating in a Mill race, etc
Trunk - ) A long, large box, pipe, or conductor, made of plank or metal plates, for various uses, as for conveying air to a mine or to a furnace, water to a Mill, grain to an elevator, etc
Shechem - Thomson describes the situation thus: "Nothing in Palestine surpasses (the vale) in fertility and natural beauty; and this is mainly due to the fine Mill-stream which flows through it
Race - A strong or rapid current of water, or the channel or passage for such a current as a Mill-race
Wear - A dam in a river to stop and raise the water, for conducting it to a Mill, or for taking fish
Happiness - John Stuart Mill and others, departing somewhat from these hedonistic principles, adopted a theory of utilitarianism which teaches altruism and the happiness of the community
Feed - ) To fill the wants of; to supply with that which is used or wasted; as, springs feed ponds; the hopper feeds the Mill; to feed a furnace with coal
Wear - ) A dam in a river to stop and raise the water, for the purpose of conducting it to a Mill, forming a fish pond, or the like
Head - Altitude of water in ponds, as applicable to the driving of Mill-wheels. The Mill has a good head of water
Oil - 14) we learn that the processes commonly employed were bruising in a mortar, find crushing in the oil-press and the oil-mill, these processes being consecutive, not alternative. A second and a third quality were obtained by further crushing of the pulp in the oil-press, and then in the oil-mill
Cooking And Heating - Then it was ground either in a pestle and mortar or in a hand Mill. The hand Mill was made of two disks of stone about twelve inches in diameter. Any woman could manage a hand Mill, but it was much easier if two women shared in the task, sitting with the Mill between them and alternately turning the handle (Matthew 24:41 )
Abimelech - When engaged in reducing the town of Thebez, which had revolted, he was struck mortally on his head by a Mill-stone, thrown by the hand of a woman from the wall above
Euthalius (5), Deacon of Alexandria - ) Of these, 53 were for Sundays, which seem alone to have been provided for in the Alexandrian Synaxes, and Mill supposes that the other 4 were for Christmas, Good Friday, Easter, and Epiphany (Proleg. of Wetstein and Mill, and in Scrivener's Intro
Fill - A Mill pond fills during the night
Peace: of a Believer - With bum of pleasant music the brook turns the village Mill
Chorazin - ]'>[1] of the NT spell Χοραζ(ε)ίν, others, especially in Luke, Χωραζίν; so Stephen in Luke, but not Elzevir, Mill; D Oil - At a later period, as we learn from the Mishna, a stone in the shape of the modern Millstone was used. ...
From the oil-mill, as this apparatus may be termed, the product of which naturally, after purification, produced the finer sort of oil, the pulp was transferred to the oil-press properly so called. ...
The expressed liquid, both from the oil-mill and from the oil-press, was collected either in a rock-cut vat or in separate jars
Work - In a general sense, to move, or to move one way and the other to perform as in popular language it is said, a Mill or machine works well
Stone - John 2:6 ), a Mill ( Deuteronomy 24:8 )
Head - ) The source, fountain, spring, or beginning, as of a stream or river; as, the head of the Nile; hence, the altitude of the source, or the height of the surface, as of water, above a given place, as above an orifice at which it issues, and the pressure resulting from the height or from motion; sometimes also, the quantity in reserve; as, a Mill or reservoir has a good head of water, or ten feet head; also, that part of a gulf or bay most remote from the outlet or the sea
Roll - ) One of a set of revolving cylinders, or rollers, between which metal is pressed, formed, or smoothed, as in a rolling Mill; as, to pass rails through the rolls
Baltimore, Maryland, City of - Saint Francis Xavier's church for colored Catholics was dedicated in 1864 and placed in charge of the Josephites brought from Mill Hill, England (1871)
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - Mill in his crowded pew, a much-honoured man, who largely shared in his minister's saintliness. Mill, influenced and edified the whole town and country round about. Mill held fast at so many deathbeds in and around Kirriemuir, till he stole some shining gems even out of Mr
Music - The grape-gatherers sang at their work, and the women sang as they toiled at the Mill, and on every occasion the land of the Hebrews during their national prosperity was a land of music and melody
Bread - For the other two processes see Mortar and Mill respectively
Desire - Berkeley, Hume, Hartley, Tucker, Stuart Mill, and Spencer are in the succession, and all of them attack the problem of the will from the point of view of pleasure and desire. Nor is much added to the solution of the problem from the time of Locke to that of Stuart Mill. Hume had tried to prove the utilitarian doctrine of the particular virtues, and Stuart Mill, using the same argument, sought to prove the general principle of Utility. ’ Thus Mill would find it necessary to show that people never do desire anything save pleasure or happiness. ...
In truth, the Hedonistic account of Desire, from Locke to Mill, and including Sidgwick in some measure, is inadequate, because it is too exclusively psychological
Manna - ...
(4) It was ground in the Mill, as Christ was "bruised" for us to become our "bread of life
New Testament - The extends from the labors of the Complutensian errors to those of Mill; the second from Mill to Scholz; the third from Lachmann to the present time
Furniture - Wide-mouth jars for food and water were essential, as were also some sort of stone and clay oven, and a grinding Mill for preparing grain
For - The oak for nothing the osier good for twigs, the poplar for the Mill
Samson - What a past Samson looked back upon as he sat at the Mill! What he might have been! What he might have done! How he might have departed to his fathers and left Israel! Three thousand years dissolve, and this is Gaza. This is the Mill with slaves
Go - A Mill goes by water or by steam a ship goes at the rate of five knots an hour a clock goes fast or slow a horse goes lame a fowl or a ball goes with velocity through the air
Zedekiah - " Zedekiah was put "in prison," literally, "the house of visitations" or "punishments," where there was penal work enforced on the prisoners, as grinding, from whence Septuagint reads "in the house of the Mill
Callistus, Pope - The slave threw himself overboard in despair, but was picked up, and delivered to his master, who brought him back and put him to the pistrinum, or Mill worked by the lowest slaves, for a punishment. Miller, pp
Matthew - On the other hand, Grotius, Du Pin, Simon, Walton, Cave, Hammond, Mill, Michaelis, Owen, and Campbell have supported the opinion of the ancients
Run - ) A pair or set of Millstones. ) To continue in operation; to be kept in action or motion; as, this engine runs night and day; the Mill runs six days in the week
Africanus, Julius - ), see Mill, On the Mythical Interpretation of the Gospels, p
Renunciation - of Christ; George Eliot, Mill on the Floss, bk
Food - Millet ( Ezekiel 4:9 ) and spelt (see Fitches, Rie) are only casually mentioned. ]'>[2] ) were prepared in early times by means of the primitive rubbing-stones, which the excavations show to have long survived the introduction of the quern or hand-mill (for references to illustrations of both, see Mill)
Samson - ]'>[5] monuments; to be put to the Mill was a frequent punishment of slaves
Conscience - Mill, though his general theory was not helped by the opinion
Versions of the Scripture, Ancient - Not having, however, any Latin interpretation, it was not readily available to Editors of the Greek Testament, though some of its readings were furnished to Mill, Griesbach, and Scholz
Plagues, the Ten, - --Before the tenth plague Moses went to warn Pharaoh: "Thus saith the Lord, about midnight will I go out into the midst of Egypt; and all the first-born in the land of Egypt shall die, from the first-born of Pharaoh that sitteth upon his throne even to the first-born of the maidservant that is behind the Mill; and all the first-born of beasts
Trial of Jesus - Against the sentimental, unhistorical rhetoric of the latter class, John Stuart Mill’s protest may stand. Mill forgets, too, that some of the blackest crimes of history have been connived at, if not started, by men of quite respectable character. But the spirit which Mill properly desiderates in an estimate of such men is wonderfully preserved in the Gospels
Wine And Strong Drink - Like the dates, these fruits were first crushed in the oil-mill, after which the juice was allowed to ferment
Plagues of Egypt - ...
The tenth and last plague which the Lord inflicted upon Egypt, preparatory to Israel's departure, was that of the destruction of the first-born both of man and beast; and so universal was it, that it reached from the first-born of Pharaoh that sat upon his throne, to the first-born of the maid servant which ground at the Mill
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - But a load of anger and hatred and wickedness that had lain like a Mill-stone on both their hearts was from that moment removed
New Testament - Mill (1707) has established Stephens' as the Received Text in England; on the continent the Elzevir is generally recognized. Whitby attacked Mill for presenting in his edition 30,000 various readings found in manuscripts
John, the Epistles of - Mill believes Gains, bishop of Pergamos (Apost
John, the Gospel According to - Mill New Testament) says John did attest it
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - A related, and daily, chore of grinding grain fell to the grinder ( Matthew 24:41 ) or Miller , another trade which later entered the market place. See Mill
Gennesaret, Land of - (γ) ‘Ain et-Tabigha, or ‘Fountain of the Ruined Mill,’ formerly supposed to be the scene of the miracle of the feeding of the 5000 (Mark 6:30-44), is another large spring of water—according to Tristram, the largest in Galilee, and about one-half as large as the fountain at Caesarea Philippi
Golden Rule - ...
In the Golden Rule, John Stuart Mill found a fitting expression of the essential principle of his ethical system
Individuality - Mill, On Liberty; Lüdemann, Personlichkeit und Individualität, 1900; Lemme, Christliche Ethik, § 56, 1905; Schian, ‘Glaube und Individualität’ (Zeitschr
Individuality - Mill, On Liberty; Lüdemann, Personlichkeit und Individualität, 1900; Lemme, Christliche Ethik, § 56, 1905; Schian, ‘Glaube und Individualität’ (Zeitschr
Lot - Your stumble, your fall, your misfortune, your approaching age, your illness, your death-all is grist to the Mill of the mean-minded man
Scripture - Chief among these scholars were Beza, Mill, Bengel, and Bentley in the centuries that followed the Reformation
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - Accordingly Mill (Praef
Paul as a Student - Rabbi Joseph turned the Mill
Necessity - Mill, Hamilton’s Philosophy Examined (xxvi
Plagues of Egypt - ...
The tenth plague was announced to Pharaoh with much solemnity: "Thus saith the Lord, About midnight will I go out into the midst of Egypt, and all the first-born in the land of Egypt shall die, from the first-born of Pharaoh that sitteth upon his throne, even to the first-born of the maid- servant that is behind the Mill; and all the first-born of cattle
Leucius, Author of n.t. Apocryphal Additions - In the passage last cited, the writer, supposed to be Evodius of Uzala, a contemporary of Augustine, quotes from the Acts of Andrew a story of Maximilla, the wife of the proconsul Egeas under whom St. We find still the names of Maximilla and Egeas; but Maximilla does not refuse intercourse with her husband, and only excites his displeasure because, on account of her eagerness to hear the apostle, she can be with him less frequently; and, without any angelic deception, providential means are devised to prevent Egeas from surprising his wife at the Christian meeting. , and several of them speak of Leucius as a Manichean; but Grabe, Cave, Mill, Beausobre, Lardner, and others consider that he lived in the 2nd cent. This agrees with that of Maximilla and Egeas in revealing the violently Encratite principles of the author; cf
Individualism - Mill’s principle, ‘that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection. Individualism is as little satisfied as Socialism with twelve Millionaires dining at one end of London and finding the cultivated globe too small to please their palates, and at the other a Million and a half of their fellow-creatures not knowing whether they will have any dinner at all. Mill, On Liberty: Herhert Spencer, Man versus the State, and Sociology; Tolstoi, Essays, and many smaller works
Inspiration And Revelation - Mill, Three Essays on Religion, London, 1874, pp
Second Coming of Christ - Thus of two men working in a field and of two women grinding at a hand Mill at that time in each case "one will be taken and the other left" (Matthew 24:37-41 ). ...
The Millennium . Pre-millennialists hold that Christ will come before the thousand years, post-millennialists that the return of Christ will follow the thousand years, and amillennialists that the thousand years are to be understood symbolically; this period refers to the whole time before the second coming
Slave, Slavery - Mill that what most injures and dishonours a country is ‘the personal slavery of human beings’; but it has taken the world many centuries to realize this
Gnosticism - Mill took, and argued that either the Creator was not all-good or He was not all-powerful
Text of the Gospels - According to Burgon and his close follower Miller, these recensions are purely imaginary creations; they believe the Church of Antioch (in company, no doubt, with practically all the Greek-speaking Churches) to have preserved the pure text from the first. Miller, 1894), vol. ...
It is an unfortunate thing that Burgon and Miller’s writings seem to imply (we believe, indeed, that the Dean stated it in so many words) that of necessity God must have provided for the accurate preservation of the text of the book which He had given to man. But though the writings of Burgon and Miller force one to the conclusion that for them personally their theory rested on a priori grounds, yet they have with great labour, assiduity, and learning collected a vast amount of evidence in support of the ‘Traditional Text. Miller, who edited and completed many of Burgon’s papers after his death, adopted a more temperate tone; but so much of Burgon’s language is incorporated, that the subject is still treated rather after the fashion of a polemical controversy than of a critical investigation, Moreover, Burgon’s contention was that the ‘Traditional Text’ is the only one that has any claim to be regarded as the true text; all documents that differ from it are treated as of practically no value. Mill suggested with much probability that D
Miller (The Traditional Text, p. , as is shown by Miller; and the real question at issue is, What weight is to be attached to the evidence of these texts?...
(iii
Bible - Mill observes, that this version was made from a Latin copy of the old Vulgate