What does Micah mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
מִיכָ֔ה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 7
מִיכָ֑ה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 5
מִיכָ֖ה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 4
מִיכָה֙ the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 4
מִיכָֽה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 4
מִיכָ֜ה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 2
מִיכָ֗ה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 2
[מיכיה] crib 1
מִיכָ֣ה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 1
מִיכָ֥ה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 1
לְמִיכָ֔ה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 1
מִ֠יכָה the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 1
(מִיכָה֙) the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth 1

Definitions Related to Micah

H4318


   1 the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth, he prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah of Judah, and was contemporary with the prophets Hosea, Amos, and Isaiah.
   2 an Ephraimite during the period of the judges.
   3 a descendant of Joel the Reubenite.
   4 son of Meribbaal and grandson of Jonathan.
   5 a Kohathite Levite, the eldest son of Uzziel the brother of Amram.
   6 father of Abdon, a man of high station in the reign of Josiah.
   7 son of Imlah and a prophet of Samaria who predicted the defeat and death of king Ahab of Israel.
   Additional Information: Micah or Micaiah or Michah = “who is like God”.
   

H4320


   1 the 6th in order of the minor prophets; a native of Moresheth, he prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah of Judah, and was contemporary with the prophets Hosea, Amos, and Isaiah.
   2 father of Achbor, a man of high station in the reign of Josiah.
   3 one of the priests at the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem.
   Additional Information: Micah or Michaiah = “who is like God”.
   

Frequency of Micah (original languages)

Frequency of Micah (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Micah
(Hebrew: Mikhayahu, Who is like Jehovah?)
Sixth of the twelve minor prophets of the Old Testament; born Morasthi, near Eleutheropolis, c.35miles southwest of Jerusalem. He was therefore a subject of the southern kingdom. He calls Juda "my people" and here championed God's cause against religious ana social evils "in the days of Joathan, Achaz and Ezechias, kings of Juda" (Micheas 1), hence he was a contemporary of Isaias and Amos. His prophecy consists of seven chapters, which may be divided into three discourses; each beginning with a summons to "hear"; each running through a triple cycle of themes, sin, punishment, and the promise of Messianic Redemption. In the first discourse (1-2) God rises in majesty to punish idolatry and send distress over Juda, to punish injustice, and none can thwart Him, and the Redemption is introduced, "I will assemble and gather together all of thee, O Jacob: I will bring together the remnant of Israel. I will put them together as a flock in the fold." In the second discourse (3-5), the birthplace of the coming Saviour is named; God abominates the crimes of princes and judges and false prophets, "Therefore, because of you, Sion shall be ploughed as a field and Jerusalem shall be as a heap of stones and the mountain of the temple as the high places of the forests." After all this the mountain of the Lord shall be exalted; God's People will be renewed; suffering is the road to glory; the Lord of this glory will be born in Bethlehem and His kingdom will be blessed, triumphant, and peaceful. In the third discourse (6-7) God challenges His people to come into judgment against Him, and plead their case against His own; God's blessings are contrasted with their base ingratitude and sins, and the penalty is awarded; however, justice must yield to mercy, and the dawn of Messianic glory is once more foretold. Micheas is the prophet of the common folk and the villages, as Isaias was the oracle of the court and the capital. His ministry evoked the Reform of Ezechias and is publicly recalled in the times of Jeremias (Jeremias 26). The canonicity of his prophecy was never seriously questioned. It is used in the Breviary on the fifth Sunday of November, and in the Missal for the third lesson on Ember Saturday in September (7,14-16,18-20).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Micah
A shortened form of Micaiah, who is like Jehovah?
A man of Mount Ephraim, whose history so far is introduced in Judges 17 , apparently for the purpose of leading to an account of the settlement of the tribe of Dan in Northern Palestine, and for the purpose also of illustrating the lawlessness of the times in which he lived (Judges 18 ; 19:1-29 ; 21:25 ).
The son of Merib-baal (Mephibosheth), 1 Chronicles 8:34,35 .
The first in rank of the priests of the family of Kohathites (1 Chronicles 23:20 ).
A descendant of Joel the Reubenite (1 Chronicles 5:5 ).
"The Morasthite," so called to distinguish him from Micaiah, the son of Imlah (1 Kings 22:8 ). He was a prophet of Judah, a contemporary of Isaiah (Micah 1:1 ), a native of Moresheth of Gath (1:14,15). Very little is known of the circumstances of his life (Compare Jeremiah 26:18,19 ).
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Micah
the seventh in order of the twelve lesser prophets, is supposed to have prophesied about B.C. 750. He was commissioned to denounce the judgments of God against both the kingdoms of Judah and Israel, for their idolatry and wickedness. The principal predictions contained in this book are, the invasions of Shalmanezer and Sennecharib; the destruction of Samaria and of Jerusalem, mixed with consolatory promises of the deliverance of the Jews from the Babylonian captivity and of the downfall of the power of their Assyrian and Babylonian oppressors; the cessation of prophecy in consequence of their continued deceitfulness and hypocrisy; and a desolation in a then distant period, still greater than that which was declared to be impending. The birth of the Messiah at Bethlehem is also expressly foretold; and the Jews are directed to look to the establishment and extent of his kingdom, as an unfailing source of comfort amidst general distress. The style of Micah is nervous, concise, and elegant, often elevated, and poetical, but sometimes obscure from sudden transitions of subject; and the contrast of the neglected duties of justice, mercy, humility, and piety, with the punctilious observance of the ceremonial sacrifices, affords a beautiful example of the harmony which subsists between the Mosaic and Christian dispensations, and shows that the law partook of that spiritual nature which more immediately characterizes the religion of Jesus.
The prophecy of Micah, contained in the fifth chapter, is, perhaps, the most important single prophecy in all the Old Testament, and the most comprehensive respecting the personal character of the Messiah, and his successive manifestations to the world. It crowns the whole chain of predictions respecting the several limitations of the promised seed: to the line of Shem; to the family of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob; to the tribe of Judah; and to the royal house of David, terminating in his birth at Bethlehem, "the city of David." It carefully distinguishes his human nativity from his divine nature and eternal existence; foretels the casting off of the Israelites and Jews for a season; their ultimate restoration; and the universal peace which should prevail in the kingdom and under the government of the Messiah. This prophecy, therefore, forms the basis of the New Testament revelation which commences with the birth of the Messiah at Bethlehem, the miraculous circumstances of which are recorded by St. Matthew and St. Luke in the introduction to their respective histories; the eternal subsistence of Christ as "the Word," in the sublime introduction to St. John's Gospel; his prophetic character and second coming, illustrated in the four Gospels and in the apostolic epistles.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Micah, Book of
The sixth in order of the so-called minor prophets. The superscription to this book states that the prophet exercised his office in the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah. If we reckon from the beginning of Jotham's reign to the end of Hezekiah's (B.C. 759-698), then he ministered for about fifty-nine years; but if we reckon from the death of Jotham to the accession of Hezekiah (B.C. 743-726), his ministry lasted only sixteen years. It has been noticed as remarkable that this book commences with the last words of another prophet, "Micaiah the son of Imlah" (1 Kings 22:28 ): "Hearken, O people, every one of you." The book consists of three sections, each commencing with a rebuke, "Hear ye," etc., and closing with a promise, (1) ch. 1; 2; (2) ch. 3-5, especially addressed to the princes and heads of the people; (3) ch. 6-7, in which Jehovah is represented as holding a controversy with his people: the whole concluding with a song of triumph at the great deliverance which the Lord will achieve for his people. The closing verse is quoted in the song of Zacharias (Luke 1:72,73 ). The prediction regarding the place "where Christ should be born," one of the most remarkable Messianic prophecies (Micah 5:2 ), is quoted in Matthew 2:6 .
There are the following references to this book in the New Testament:
5:2, with Matthew 2:6 ; John 7:42 . 7:6, with Matthew 10:21,35,36 . 7:20, with Luke 1:72,73 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Micah, the Book of
(See MICAH.)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Micah
1. Of Mount Ephraim. (See JONATHAN.) The date of the event is implied as before Samson, for the origin of the name Mahaneh Dan occurs in this narrative (Judges 18:12) and it is mentioned as already so named in Samson's childhood (Judges 13:25, margin). Josephus places the synchronous narrative of the Levite and his concubine at the beginning of the judges. Phinehas, Aaron's grandson, is mentioned (Judges 20:28). The narrative was written after the monarchy had begun (Judges 18:1; Judges 19:1), while the tabernacle was still at Shiloh, not yet moved by David to Jerusalem (Judges 18:81).
2. MICAH THE PROPHET. The oldest form of the name was Μikaiahuw , "who is as Jah?" (compare MICHAEL.) In Micah 7:18 Micah alludes to the meaning of his name as embodying the most precious truth to a guilty people such as he had painted the Jews, "who is a God like unto Thee that pardon iniquity," etc. Sixth of the minor prophets in the Hebrew canon, third in the Septuagint. The Morasthite, i.e. of Moresheth, or Moresheth Gath (near Gath in S.W. of Judaea), where once was his tomb, but in Jerome's (Ep. Paulae 6) days a church, not far from Eleutheropolis. Micah prophesied in the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah somewhere between 756 and 697 B.C. Contemporary with Isaiah in Judah, with whose prophecies his have a close connection (compare Micah 4:1-3 with Isaiah 2:2-4, the latter stamping the former as inspired), and with Hosea and Amos during their later ministry in Israel.
His earlier prophecies under Jotham and Ahaz were collected and written out as one whole under Hezekiah. Probably the book was read before the assembled king and people on some fast or festival, as certain elders quoted to the princes and people assembled against Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26:18) Micah 3:12, "Micah the Morasthite in the days of Hezekiah, and spoke to all the people of Judah, Thus saith the Lord of hosts, Zion shall be plowed like a field, and Jerusalem shall become heaps, and the mountain of the house as the high places of a forest. Did Hezekiah put him ... to death? Did he not fear the Lord and besought the Lord, and the Lord repented Him of the evil which He had pronounced against them?" The idolatries of Ahaz' reign accord with Micah 's denunciations. He prophesies partly against Israel (Samaria), partly against Judah.
Shalmaneser and Sargon took Samaria in the sixth year of Hezekiah (722 B.C.). The section in which is (Micah 1:6) "I will make Samaria as an heap" was therefore earlier. The "high places" (Micah 1:5) probably allude to those in Jotham's and Ahaz' reigns (2 Kings 15:35; 2 Kings 16:4). The "horses and chariots" (Luke 1:72-73) accord with Jotham's time, when Uzziah's military establishments still flourished (2 Chronicles 26:11-15). Micah 5:12-14; Micah 6:16, "the statutes of Omri are kept and all the works of the house of Ahab," accord with the reign of Ahaz who "walked in the way of the kings of Israel" (2 Kings 16:3).
DIVISIONS. The thrice repeated phrase "Hear ye" (Micah 1:2; Micah 3:1; Micah 6:1) divides the whole into three parts. The middle division (Micah 3-5) has Messiah and His kingdom for its subject. The first division prepares for this by foretelling the overthrow of the world kingdoms. The third division is the appeal based on the foregoing, and the elect church's anticipation of God's finally forgiving His people's sin completely, and restoring Israel because of the covenant with Jacob and Abraham of old. The intimations concerning the birth of Messiah as a child and His reign in peace, and Jacob's remnant destroying adversaries as a "lion," but being "a dew from the Lord amidst many people" (Micah 4:9-5:5), correspond to Isaiah 7:14-16; Isaiah 9:6-7.
This middle section is the climax, failing into four strophes (Micah 4:1-8; Micah 4:9-5;Micah 4:2; Micah 5:8-9; Micah 5:10-15). Micah 6:7, form a vivid dialogue wherein Jehovah expostulates with Israel for their sinful and monstrous ingratitude, and they attempt to reply and are convicted (Micah 6:6-8). Then the chosen remnant amidst the surrounding gloom looks to the Lord and receives assurance of final deliverance. Zacharias (Micah 5:10) reproduces the closing anticipation (Micah 7:16-20), "Thou wilt perform the truth to Jacob and the mercy to Abraham which Thou hast sworn unto our fathers from the days of old." Sennacherib's invasion is foreseen, Micah 1:9-16; especially Micah 1:13-14, compare 2 Kings 18:14-17. Jerusalem's destruction in Micah 3:12; Micah 7:13.
The Babylonian captivity and deliverance in Micah 4:10; Micah 4:1-8; Micah 7:11, confirming the genuineness of the latter half of Isaiah his contemporary, with whom Micah has so much in common and who (Isaiah 39-66) similarly foretells the captivity and deliverance. The fall of Assyria and Babylon are referred to (Micah 5:5-6; Micah 7:8; Micah 7:10). Hengstenberg thinks that Micaiah's words (1 Kings 22:28), "hearken, O people, every one of you," were intentionally repeated by Micah to intimate that his own activity is a continuation of that of his predecessor who was so jealous for God, and that he had more in common with him than the mere name.
STYLE. His diction is pure and his parallelisms regular. His description of Jehovah (Micah 7:18-19), "who is a God like unto Thee, forgiving?" etc., alludes to the meaning of his own name and to Exodus 15:11; Exodus 34:6-7, and is a fine specimen of his power and pathos. He is dramatic in Micah 6; 7. His similarity to Isaiah in style is due to their theme being alike (Micah 4:8-52; Isaiah 1:2; Micah 2:2; Isaiah 5:8; Micah 2:6; Micah 2:11; Isaiah 30:10; Micah 2:12; Isaiah 10:20-22; Micah 6:6-8; Isaiah 1:11-17).
He is abrupt in transitions, and elliptical, and so obscure; the contrast between Babylon, which triumphs over carnal Israel, and humble Bethlehem out of which shall come forth Israel's Deliverer and Babylon's Destroyer, is a striking instance: 1618881337_78:7. Pastoral and rural imagery is common (Micah 1:6; Micah 1:8; Micah 2:12; Micah 3:12; Micah 4:3; Micah 4:12-13; Micah 5:4-8; Micah 6:15; Micah 7:1; Micah 7:4; Micah 7:14). Flays upon words abound (Micah 1:10-15). (See APHRAH; BETHEZEL; MAROTH; ACHZIB; MARESHAH.) New Testament quotations of Micah: Matthew 2:5-6 (Micah 5:2); Matthew 10:35-36 (Micah 7:6); Matthew 9:13 (Micah 6:6-8); Mark 13:12; Luke 12:53 (Micah 7:6); John 7:42 (Micah 5:2); Ephesians 2:14 (Micah 5:5).
3. The Reubenite Joel's descendant (1 Chronicles 5:5).
4. Mephibosheth's or Meribbaal's son (1 Chronicles 8:34; 2 Samuel 9:12), MICHA.
5. A Kohathite Levite, Uzziel's oldest son; nephew of Amram, and cousin to Moses (1 Chronicles 23:20; 1 Chronicles 24:24-25); the spelling varies in the two chapters.
6. Abdon's father (2 Chronicles 34:20); Achbor's, 2 Kings 22:12.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Micah, Book of
(mi' cuh) A prophetic book named after the eighth century B.C. prophet containing some of his messages. The prophet Micah's name means, “Who is like Yah?” People in the Ancient Near East commonly gave their children names that indicated devotion to their god, and Yahweh was the name by which the God of Israel and Judah was called. See Micah ; Micaiah ; Michaiah ; Micha .
Micah 1:1 gives the reader three pieces of information about the prophet. He came from Maresheth (NIV) which probably should be identified with Moresheth-gath. This village was located about 25 miles southwest of Jerusalem in the tribe of Judah. Micah, however, may have lived in Jerusalem during his ministry. He worked in the reigns of Jotham (750-732 B.C.), Ahaz (735-715 B.C.), and Hezekiah (715-686 B.C.) who were kings of Judah. The identification of these kings does not mean that he was active from 750-686, but that his ministry spanned parts of each reign. Jeremiah 26:17-18 refers to Micah as prophesying during the time of Hezekiah. Determining exact dates, however, for each of the prophecies contained in the book is difficult. Micah was a contemporary of Isaiah, Hosea, and possibly Amos.
Finally, His prophecies addressed Samaria and Jerusalem. Samaria was the capital of the Northern Kingdom (Israel) and Jerusalem, of the Southern Kingdom (Judah). Even though Micah ministered in Judah, some of his messages were directed toward Israel.
Historical Background In Micah's time, many political and national crises occurred. Micah addressed those issues.
The Assyrian Empire began to dominate the Ancient Near East about 740 B.C. Juhad and Israel became tribute-paying vassals of this new political power, and in 722 B.C. Israel felt the might of the Assyrian army. Shalmaneser V and Sargon II destroyed the Northern Kingdom and its capital, Samaria (2 Kings 16-17 ) because of an attempted rebellion. The records of Sargon II state that he “besieged and conquered Samaria, (and) led away as booty 27,290 inhabitants of it.” While Judah survived, they still were vassals. Micah 1:2-7 associates the imminent destruction of Samaria as God's judgment for the people's idolatry. Hezekiah, king of Judah, instituted many reforms that caused the Assyrian king, Sennacherib, to respond with force. Many cities of Judah were destroyed, and Jerusalem was unsuccessfully besieged ( 2 Kings 18-19 ). The annals of Sennacherib boast that he laid siege to 46 cities and countless small villages. He took 200,150 people as booty along with the livestock. As for Hezekiah, Sennacherib says, “Himself I made a prisoner in Jerusalem, his royal residence, like a bird in a cage.” Despite the failure to take Jerusalem, the citizens of the Southern Kingdom suffered greatly from the invasion.
The Prophet's Message The subjects of Micah's messages reveal much about the society of his day. He constantly renounced the oppression of the poor by the rich. He characterized the rich as devising ways in which to cheat the poor out of their land (Micah 2:1-5 ). People were evicted from their homes and had their possessions stolen. Those who committed such crimes were fellow Israelites (Micah 2:6-11 ). The marketplace was full of deception and injustice (Micah 6:9-16 ). The rulers of the country, who had the responsibility of upholding justice, did the opposite (Micah 3:1-4 ).
Micah also denounced the religious practices of the nation. He predicted the destruction of Judah as an act of God's judgment. Other prophets, however, led the people to believe that this could never happen because God was residing in the nation and would protect them. Micah contended that the other prophets' message was not from God. Instead, the message from God was the imminent devastation of Judah (Micah 3:5-12 ).
The people worshiped other gods. They did not quit believing in and worshiping the God of Judah, but they combined this worship with devotion to other details (Micah 5:10-15 ). The people believed all that religion required of them was to bring their sacrifices and offerings to the Temple. No relationship was acknowledged between their activity in the Temple and their activity in daily life. Micah attempted to correct this misconception by arguing that God is not just interested in the physical act of making a sacrifice but is supremely concerned with obedience that extends into daily life (Micah 6:6-8 ).
Micah warned of impending judgment on God's people for their disobedience. At the same time, he proclaimed messages of hope. Judgment would come, but afterwards, God would restore a remnant of the people devoted to Him (Micah 4:1-13 ; Micah 7:14-20 ). Unlike the unjust kings that the people were accustomed to, God would bring a ruler who would allow the people to live in peace (Micah 5:1-5 ). Ultimately, Judah was destroyed in 586 B.C. by the Babylonians, but a remnant returned. Matthew saw in Micah's hope for a new ruler a description of Christ (Matthew 2:6 ). See Ahaz ; Assyria; Israel ; Hezekiah ; Jerusalem ; Prophet; Samaria.
Outline
I. God's Word Witnesses Against All People (Micah 1:1-2 ).
II. God Judges His People for Their Sins (Micah 1:3-3:12 ).
A. God judges religious infidelity (Micah 1:3-16 ).
B. God judges economic injustice (Micah 2:1-5 ).
C. God judges false preaching (Micah 2:6-11 ).
D. God's judgment looks to the remnant's restoration (Micah 2:12-13 ).
E. God judges unjust leaders (Micah 3:1-4 ).
F. God judges those who preach peace and prosperity for sinners (Micah 3:5-7 ).
G. God judges through His Spirit-filled messenger (Micah 3:8 ).
H. God judges corrupt, greedy officials (Micah 3:9-12 ).
III. God Promises a Day of International Peace and Worship (Micah 4:1-5:15 ).
A. God plans for His people to teach His way to the nations (Micah 4:1-5 ).
B. God plans to redeem and rule His weakened remnant (Micah 4:6-11 ).
C. God plans to show the world His universal rule (Micah 4:12-13 ).
D. God plans to raise up a Shepherd from Bethlehem to bring peace and victory to His beleagured flock (Micah 5:1-9 ).
E. God plans to destroy weapons and idolatry from His people (Micah 5:10-15 ).
IV. God Has a Case Against His People (Micah 6:1-7:6 ).
A. God has done His part, redeeming His people (Micah 6:1-5 ).
B. God's expectations are clear: justice, mercy, piety (Micah 6:6-8 ).
C. God's people have not met His expectations (Micah 6:9-12 ).
D. God's punishment is sure for a corrupt people (Micah 6:13-7:6 ).
V. God in Righteousness, Love, and Faithfulness Will Forgive and Renew His People (Micah 7:7-20 ).
A. God's people can trust Him for salvation (Micah 7:7 ).
B. God's repentant people can expect better days ahead (Micah 7:8-14 ).
C. God's enemies face shameful judgment (Micah 7:15-17 ).
D. The incomparable God of patience, mercy, compassion, and faithfulness will forgive and renew His people (Micah 7:18-20 ).
Scott Langston
Holman Bible Dictionary - Micah
(mi' cuh) Abbreviated form of the personal name Micaiah, meaning, “Who is like Yahweh?”. 1. Ephramite whose home shrine was the source of Dan's idolotrous worship (Judges 17-18 ). 2 . Descendant of Reuben (1 Chronicles 5:5 ). 3 . Descendant of King Saul (1 Chronicles 8:34-35 ; 1 Chronicles 9:40-44 ); at 2 Samuel 9:12 , the KJV used the form Micha. 4. Leader of a family of Levites in David's time (1 Chronicles 23:20 ; 1 Chronicles 24:24-25 ). 5 . Father of Abdon, a contemporary of Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:20 ); at 2 Kings 22:12 , the form Micaiah is used.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Micah, Book of
Of the four eighth century prophets whose writings have been preserved in the Old Testament, Micah was the last. Amos and Hosea had brought God’s message mainly to the northern kingdom Israel, whereas Isaiah and Micah were more concerned with the southern kingdom Judah. The two men prophesied during the same period (Isaiah 1:1; Micah 1:1) and both were especially concerned with the sins of Jerusalem. The two books contain many similarities, and it has been suggested that Micah might have been one of Isaiah’s disciples (cf. Isaiah 8:16).
Social conditions
With the prosperity of the eighth century came the social evils of greed, corruption, injustice and immorality. Those who profited most from the economic development were the merchants, officials and other upper class city dwellers. Corruption in the law courts made it easy for these people to do as they wished, while poorer class people found it impossible to gain even the most basic justice (Micah 3:9-11; Micah 7:3).
Micah was particularly concerned with the injustice done to the poor farmers. He was from a farming village himself (Micah 1:1), and he saw that the corruption of Israel and Judah was centred in the capital cities, Samaria and Jerusalem (Micah 1:5; Micah 6:9).
Because of the injustice of the officials and merchants with whom they had to deal, the farmers were forced to borrow from the wealthy to keep themselves in business (Micah 3:1-3; Micah 6:10-12). The wealthy lent them money at interest rates so high that the farmers found it impossible to pay their debts. The wealthy then seized the farmers’ possessions as payment. First they seized their clothing and household items (Micah 2:8), then, when these were not sufficient, their houses and land (Micah 2:1-3; Micah 2:9). The farmers then had to rent back their land from their new masters, thereby increasing the farmers’ burden even more.
These practices showed no knowledge of the character of God or the nature of true religion. The people still followed the sacrifices and ceremonies of the Israelite religion, but Micah warned that formal religion was hateful to God if justice and love were absent (Micah 6:6-8). Unless they repented, God would send the people into captivity and leave their homeland desolate (Micah 3:12; Micah 6:16).
Religious leaders also were corrupt. Preachers had comforting words for the upper class people from whom they received their income, but they condemned the prophet Micah for his forthright speaking (Micah 2:6; Micah 2:11; Micah 3:5). Hezekiah the king, however, heeded Micah’s warnings. He managed to achieve some reformation in Judah, and as a result God postponed the day of judgment (Jeremiah 26:18-19; cf. Micah 3:12).
Eventually, in the reign of a later king, the judgment fell. Yet Micah saw that beyond the judgment lay the hope of a restored nation, a glorious kingdom and an ideal king (Micah 2:12-13; Micah 4:1-4; Micah 5:2; Micah 5:4).
Summary of the book
From his prophetic viewpoint, Micah gives a picture of the judgment about to fall on Israel and Judah (1:1-16). He goes on to point out that the reason for the judgment is the oppression of the poor by the corrupt leaders (2:1-3:12). But, looking further ahead, he sees that after captivity in a foreign land, Israel’s shame will be replaced by glory (4:1-5:1), and God’s chosen king will reign over his people in an ideal kingdom (5:2-15). Returning to the present, Micah announces God’s accusations against his people (6:1-16), then confesses their sin to God and pleads for God’s mercy (7:1-20).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Micah
The best known of several Micahs in the Bible story is the prophet whose book is part of the Old Testament (Micah 1:1; Jeremiah 26:18). (For details of this Micah see MICAH, BOOK OF).
Another prophet had a variation of the same name, Micaiah. He lived in the time of King Ahab of Israel, and Ahab hated him. Whereas the other court prophets said only those things that pleased Ahab, Micaiah spoke the truth, whether Ahab liked it or not (1 Kings 22:5-9). When he told Ahab that a coming battle would bring defeat, Ahab threw him into prison. The outcome proved (as Micaiah had asserted) that he spoke the truth and that the other prophets were liars (1 Kings 22:13-36).
An earlier Micah lived in the time covered by the book of Judges. He was a thief and an idol worshipper whom his mother made priest of her household shrine. But Micah did not come from the priestly tribe, so when a Levite happened to visit his house, Micah made him priest instead (Judges 17). After some time, representatives of the tribe of Dan stopped at Micah’s house while on a journey north in search of a new tribal homeland (Judges 18:1-6). When the Danites later moved north to settle, they again visited Micah. On this occasion they raided his shrine, robbed him of his images, and threatened him with death when he resisted (Judges 18:11-26). They then continued their journey and established Micah’s idolatrous religion in their new homeland (Judges 18:27; Judges 18:31).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Micah
Micah (mî'kah), who is like Jehovah? 1. An idolater in Mount Ephraim. Judges 17:1-13; Judges 18:2. The sixth of the minor prophets, is called the Morashite, from his birthplace Moresheh, in the territory of Gath, westward from Jerusalem, He prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, b.c. 750-698, and was a contemporary of Isaiah, whom he often resembles in style and expressions. Compare, for instance, Isaiah 2:2 with Micah 4:1, or Isaiah 41:15 with Micah 4:13.
The Book of Micah contains prophecies concerning Samaria and Jerusalem. In his prophecies concerning Messiah he is very precise. The prediction that Christ should be born in Bethlehem belongs to him. 5:2. His style is poetic throughout, pure, rich in images and plays upon words, old and lofty, but sometimes abrupt and obscure. There are seven persons of this name mentioned in the Bible.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Micah, Micaiah
MICAH, MICAIAH (‘Who is like Jahweh?’). This name, which occurs at least twelve times in the OT, and is a woman’s name as well as a man’s, is spelt in three different ways; the full name is Micajahu , a partially shortened form is Micaiah , while a still shorter form is Micah . The more important of those who bore this name are the following: 1. Micah , a dweller in the hill-country of Ephraim; he stole from his mother eleven hundred pieces of silver, which, however, he returned on hearing the curse which his mother pronounced against the thief. With part of the returned silver his mother causes an image to be made, which Micah sets up in his house; he then consecrates one of his sons a priest. But a Levite, named Jonathan, comes to the house of Micah while journeying; Micah induces him to be his priest instead of the son whom he had first consecrated. During this time the Danites send out five men to search for a suitable locality wherein to settle down; these five men come to the house of Micah, and while staying there they recognize the Levite. On their return they report that they have found a place for their tribe to dwell in. The whole ‘family’ of the Danites then set out, and come to take possession of the district they intend to make their home. On their coming into the neighbourhood of Micah’s dwelling-place, the five men who had already been there come and persuade Micah’s Levite to join them, and to bring with him Micah’s ephod, teraphim, and graven image. Micah follows after them; but protests in vain, for he is warned that if he attempts to regain his priest and lost treasures by force he will lose his goods and his life; he therefore returns home without them ( Judges 17:1-13 ; Judges 18:1-31 ). This very interesting narrative has undoubtedly a basis in fact: it records though later editors have somewhat altered its original form how the sanctuary in Dan first came to be established (see esp. Judges 18:29-31 ).
2 . Micaiah, the son of Imlah ; a prophet of Jahweh who is called by Ahab, at the request of Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, to prophesy concerning the result of a projected expedition against the Syrians. In reply to Abah’s inquiry Micaiah first prophesies smoothly; but Abah bids him speak nothing but the truth; thereupon he foretells the disaster that is to befall the allied armies of Israel and Judah if they go up to Ramoth-gilead to battle. The parable which the prophet then utters is a terrible indictment against the ‘lying prophets’ of Israel; the blow which one of them thereupon gives him is answered by a further prophecy, this time directed against the false prophet who gave the blow. Micaiah is then commanded to be imprisoned until the king returns in peace; but, undaunted, the prophet replies,’ If thou return at all in peace, Jahweh hath not spoken by me.’ The sequel showed Micaiah to have prophesied truly ( 1 Kings 22:1-53 ). 3. Micah , the son of Mephibosheth ( 1 Chronicles 8:34 f., 1 Chronicles 9:40 f. [1]). 4. Micaiah , one of the teachers sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the commandments of Jahweh in the cities of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 17:7 ). 5. Micaiah , the son of Gemariah, and a contemporary of Jeremiah, who heard Baruch reading out the prophecies of Jeremiah, and then spoke of them to the princes who were assembled in the scribe’s chamber ( Jeremiah 36:9-13 ), perhaps identical with the Micaiah of 2 Kings 22:12 and the Micah of 2 Chronicles 34:20 . 2 Chronicles 34:6 . One of the priests who took part in the dedication of the wall ( Nehemiah 12:41 ). Other less important bearers of the name are mentioned in 1 Chronicles 5:5 ; 1 Chronicles 23:20 (cf. 24:24f.), 2 Chronicles 13:2 (see Maacah, 4), Nehemiah 10:11 ; Nehemiah 12:35 [2] Nehemiah 12:41 , Jdt 6:15 . For the prophet Micah see the following article.
W. O. E. Oesterley.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Micah, Theology of
Although unlike Isaiah (6:1-9), Jeremiah (1:4-10), and Ezekiel (2:1-3:27) Micah gives his audience no autobiographical account of his call to prophetic ministry, the superscription to his book (1:1), "the word of the Lord that came to Micah, " affirms that the invisible God becomes audible in it. In 6:1b-8 Micah is pictured as the Lord's plenipotentiary from the heavenly court, who has come to Jerusalem to accuse Israel of having broken the Mosaic covenant. Unlike the false prophets, for whom money speaks louder than God (3:5,11), Micah, filled with the power of the Lord's Spirit, preaches justice (3:8).
Micah's theology represents both aspects of the Lord's covenant with Israel: the Lord will sentence his covenant people to exile out of the land of blessing if they fail to keep his righteous law, but he will always preserve from them a righteous remnant to whom he will give his sworn land after the exile (2:5) and through whom he will bless the nations (4:1-5).
Micah organizes the approximately twenty prophecies that comprise his book into three cycles—chapters 1-2,3-5, and 6-7each beginning with the command to either "Hear" (1:2) or "Listen" (3:1; 6:1). Each cycle begins with judgment-oracles against the nation for having failed to keep the Mosaic covenant, followed by salvation-oracles based on God's promises to Abraham and the patriarchs to be their god foreverso reflecting both aspects of the Lord's covenant with Israel. In the first two prophecies of the first cycle, Samaria (1:3-7) and Judah (1:8-16) are sentenced to destruction and exile because of their idolatry (vv. 5,7). In the third prophecy (2:1-5), Micah accuses rich land barons of exploiting Israel's middle class by taking their lands away from them in corrupt courts (vv. 1-3). It is often said that Micah is the champion of the poor; in truth, he champions the cause of Israel's middle classstalwart farmers whose wives live in luxurious homes and whose children enjoy the Lord's blessing (2:9). The Lord will take the lands away from the venal land barons and send them into exile (2:4-5). Israel possessed the promised land as a usufruct from the Lord. While he gave it to them to enjoy to its full measure, he reserved the right to take it away from them if they abused it (Leviticus 25:33 ).
Micah's fourth prophecy is against the false prophets who abet the rapacious racketeers with their half-baked theology. Their identifying badge is that they preach only God's love, never his wrath and judgment. Their half-truth distorted the covenant by emphasizing only Exodus 34:6 ("The Lord the compassionate and gracious God, slow to anger, abounding in love and faithfulness") and omitting Exodus 34:7 ("yet he does not leave the guilty unpunished"). Their false doctrine of eternal security helped lead the nation to its death (2:6-11). In these four oracles Micah predicts Israel's exile, but looking beyond the judgment, he concludes the first cycle with a prophecy that the Lord will preserve a remnant with him as their triumphant King (2:12-13).
In the second cycle (3:1-5:16), Micah delivers three oracles of judgment against Jerusalem's corrupt leaders: the avaricious magistrates, who cannibalize their subjects (3:1-4); the greedy prophets, who should be the nation's watchdogs but only wag their tails if fed a bone (3:5-7); and all the leaders, rulers, prophets, and priests (3:8-11), who are in cahoots to plunder their subjects. Micah concludes these oracles with the climactic prediction that Jerusalem will fall (3:12; cf. Jeremiah 26:18 ).
In a breathtaking turn, he shifts from these judicial sentences reducing Jerusalem to a heap of rubble and its temple to a forested height to seven visions pertaining to Israel's "last days" (4:1,6; 5:10), a future that paradoxically reverses the present situationthe "now" of distress (4:9,11; 5:1, not translated in NIV)and at the same time brings to a fitting outcome that toward which it is striving. In his first sermon Peter goes out of his way to identify the coming of the Spirit at Pentecost with the epoch labeled by Micah and his contemporary, Isaiah, as "in the last days" (Acts 2:17 ). Peter's primary text is Joel 2:28-32 . The inspired apostle, however, curiously and interpretively transforms Joel's text. Joel's prophecy begins, "and afterward "' (Joel 2:28 ), but instead of this introduction Peter substitutes the words of Micah 4:1 and the parallel passage in Isaiah 2:2 . Since that wording is found in no text or version of Joel, Peter seems deliberately to link Pentecost and the ensuing age until the return of Jesus Christ with Isaiah's and Michah's prophecies about Israel's golden age "in the last days." The author of the Letter to the Hebrews likewise speaks of the church as now living "in these last days" (1:2). However, the phrase has a temporal thickness embracing many events over an extended period of time. In Micah it embraces the remnant's restoration from Babylon (4:9-10), the birth of the Messiah (5:2), and his universal and everlasting peace (5:5-6). Moreover, while the church today fulfills these prophecies it awaits the new heaven and new earth when they will be consummated.
In the first of these visions with regard to the last days Micah sees Mount Zion established as the true religion over all false, pagan religions (4:1). He overhears the regenerate nations exhorting one another to come to Mount Zion to learn God's law, to hear God's word and to carry it back with them (v. 2). Reflecting upon what he saw and heard he predicts for these people a kingdom of peace: "they will beat their swords into plowshares" (v. 3); "every man will sit under his own fig tree" (v. 4). Until that happens, however, Micah and the remnant "will walk in the name of the Lord our God for ever and ever" (v. 5).
In the second vision of these last days, Micah sees the lame remnant regathered as a strong nation (4:6-7); and in the third, the kingdom's former glory is again restored to Jerusalem (4:8). It should be borne in mind that earthly Jerusalem was always a replica of the heavenly, that the church today has come to the reality (i.e., the heavenly Jerusalem [1]), and that the old earthly symbols of the kingdom, including the temple on Mount Zion, have been done away forever (Hebrews 8:13 ).
In the fourth vision, Micah transforms the cry of the exiles going into Babylon into the cry of a woman in labor. The remnant that survives the Babylonian exile will ultimately give birth to the new age (4:9-11); those who appeared defeated will become victorious (4:11-13).
In the fifth vision and at the center of these glorious prophecies (5:1-6), Micah now predicts that the remnant will give birth to the Messiah, who will be born in lowly Bethlehem, David's cradle (v. 2 cf. Matthew 2:1-6 ). He will shepherd his flock in the strength of the Lord (v. 4 cf. John 10:11 ; Hebrews 13:20 ; 1 Peter 2:25 ; 5:4 ), and they will live securely (cf. Matthew 16:18 ). He will be their peace, protecting them from all their enemies, including Assyria, the very symbol of oppression (vv. 5-6 cf. Luke 2:14 ; 24:36 ; Romans 5:1 ; 8:31-39 ; Ephesians 2:14 ).
In the sixth vision, Micah foresees that the restored remnant will become a savor of life and death among the nations (5:7-9) (cf. 2 Corinthians 2:14-15 ).
Finally, "in that day, " Micah says, the Lord will purge his people of all their former false confidences: military hardware, witchcraft, and idolatry (5:10-15). Having purged his imperium within, thereby protecting it from the divine anger against unholiness, the Lord promises to guard it from enemies without (v. 15).
In the third cycle (6:1-7:20), Micah begins with a covenant law suit (6:1-8). Here the Lord clearly profiles the covenant relationship. He dealt with his people in sovereign grace, saving them from Egypt and bringing them safely into the promised land (vv. 1-5). However, instead of responding to his grace with a total commitment of trust in him that leads to covenant fidelity and obedience, they reduced the covenant to a bargaining contract (vv. 6-7). Micah shows the reader how absurd it is to try to establish a relationship with God in this way. The false worshiper begins bargaining with holocausts; he then offers one-year calves (already more costly) (v. 6), then thousands of rams, then ten thousand torrents of oil. Finally, he even offers the cruel sacrifice of his own child (v. 7). "Ten thousand rivers of oil" suggests that this approach to God has no limit and establishes neither a covenant relationship with God nor assurance of salvation. Oil is measured by the pint or quart (Exodus 30:24 ; Numbers 15:9 ; 28:5 ). False worshipers think God's favor, like theirs, can be bought! Comparative religionists refer to Micah 6:8 as the quintessential expression of true religion. What the Lord actually requires is that the believer practice justice and faithful love, walking wisely with him. False worshipers offer the Lord everything but what he asks for: their loving and obedient hearts. Only those who comprehend his grace can and will offer him that.
The prophet follows this law suit with yet another oracle of judgment (6:9-16). For Judah's corrupt and deceptive commercial practices (vv. 9-12), the Lord will bring on it all the curses of the covenant: sickness, sword, and exile (vv. 13-16). In the final judgment oracle (7:1-7) the ship of state breaks apart. Not an upright official is left (vv. 1-4), and so the nation falls into anarchy (vv. 5-6). Micah, however, confident of God's covenant faithfulness to the patriarchs, hopes in his saving God (v. 7). He will not be disappointed. His final prophecy concludes with a victory song (vv. 8-20). Micah's name means, "Who is like Yah, " and in this concluding prophecy he asks, "Who is a God like you, who pardons sin and forgives the transgression of the remnant of his inheritance?" (v. 18). As at the beginning of Israel's history the Lord hurled Pharaoh into the sea, now at the end of their history he will hurl all their sins into the sea (v. 19). Although Israel has been unfaithful, the Lord will remain faithful to his covenant promises to Abraham and the fathers (v. 20); he cannot deny himself (2 Timothy 2:13 ).
As God's justice informs Micah's judgment-oracles and his righteousness the salvation-oracles, so God's other sublime attributes inform both. The omniscient God even knows what the greedy land barons are plotting on their beds (2:1). He predicts the Babylonian exile and the survival of the remnant, and the birth of his Messiah in Bethlehem and the triumph of his rule, and brings them to pass.
In his first prophecy, Micah pictures Israel's Ruler as a victorious conqueror. He rises from his heavenly throne, marches forth from his holy sanctuary, and strides upon the earth's heights (1:3). Under the heat of the Lord's glowing wrath and under his heavy tread, the eternal and majestic mountains melt and flow like hot wax, and the arable plains where humankind finds its immediate source of life split apart like waterfalls roaring down a rocky gorge (v. 4). When this majestic God suddenly erupts with awesome power, puny human walls and fortifications crumble and fall into ravines (vv. 6-7). Humans feel secure as long as the long-suffering God remains in heaven; but when he marches forth in judgment, they are gripped by the stark reality that they must meet the holy God in person.
Bruce K. Waltke
See also Israel ; Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy
Bibliography . D. W. Baker, T. D. Alexander, and B. K. Waltke, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; R. E. Clements, Canon and Authority ; E. Clowney, Dreams, Visions and Oracles ; K. H. Cuffey, "The Coherence of Micah: A Review of the Proposals and a New Interpretation"; G. Hasel, The History and Theology of the Remnant Idea from Genesis to Isaiah ; A. J. Heschel, The Prophets ; D. Hillers, Covenant: The History of a Biblical Idea ; idem, Micah ; B. K. Waltke, Continuity and Discontinuity, pp. 263-88; idem, Commentary on Micah .
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Micah
Poor; humble
Chabad Knowledge Base - Micah
the Book of: The book of Tanach containing Micah's prophecies, foretelling the Israelites' exile as well as the future redemption. Micah reproves the people for worshipping foreign gods and extorting the poor, and urges them to worship G-d wholeheartedly.
Micah the Prophet: (6th century BCE) Student of Elijah and a contemporary of Hosea, Isaiah and Amos.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Micah
There were many of this name in Scripture. (See 1 Chronicles 9:15; 2 Kings 22:12; 1 Chronicles 5:5; 1Ch 23:20) But the one of eminency to be particularly noticed in a work of this kind, is Micah the Morashite, that is, of Moresa, a village in the south of Judah. He is one of what is called the lesser prophets; and his prophecy forms a part of the sacred Canon of Scripture. His name is probably from Macac, poor, low, humble; though some read it Michaiha, and form it into a question, Who is like to JEHOVAH?
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Micah
1. A man of Mount Ephraim, whose history reveals the sad state of private life in Israel, as well as the mixture of idolatry with the name of Jehovah, early in the times of the Judges, Phinehas being still high priest. He had a house of gods, and made an ephod and teraphim, and consecrated one of his sons to act as priest. A wandering son of Levi finding his way to Micah's house was gladly received by him, treated as one of his sons, and became his priest. Then Micah said, "Now know I that the Lord will do me good, seeing I have a Levite to my priest." The Danites however, seeking a larger inheritance, sent spies to the north, who came near Micah's house, and knowing the voice of the Levite, asked him to inquire of God for them. He ventured to reply, "Go in peace: before the Lord is your way wherein ye go." A larger body of Danites afterwards came and carried away the gods of Micah, and the ephod and the teraphim, together with the Levite, and took them to the north, where they established themselves. Micah hastened after them, but could not recover his gods. There was no king in Israel, and every man did that which was right in his own eyes; and God, though nominally owned, was, alas, in reality ignored. Judges 17 , Judges 18 .
2. Son of Shimei, a descendant of Reuben. 1 Chronicles 5:5 .
3. Son of Merib-baal, or Mephibosheth, the grandson of Saul. 1 Chronicles 8:34,35 ; 1 Chronicles 9:40,41 . Called MICHA in 2 Samuel 9:12 .
4. Son of Zichri, or Zabdi, or Zaccur, a Levite. 1 Chronicles 9:15 . Apparently called MICHA in Nehemiah 11:17,22 ; and MICHAIAH in Nehemiah 12:35 .
5. Son of Uzziel, a Kohathite. 1 Chronicles 23:20 . Called MICHAH in 1 Chronicles 24:24,25 .
6. Father of Abdon. 2 Chronicles 34:20 . Called MICHAIAH in 2 Kings 22:12 .
7. The Morasthite, the prophet. Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 1:1 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Micah, Book of
Nothing is known of the prophet personally. He prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, and was thus contemporary with Isaiah and Hosea. His prophecy was concerning Samaria and Jerusalem. God spoke from His holy temple, and the prophet exclaimed, "Hear, all ye peoples." He spoke to all people saying "Hearken, O earth. " All the earth was involved in the judgements that God was going to bring upon His chosen people: a solemn consideration when the people of God, instead of being a testimony for Him, bring the judgements of God down on the world. The time has come that judgement must begin at the house of God. The prophecy seems to divide itself into three sections: the word 'hear' introducing each.
1. Micah 1,2 ;
2. Micah 3 - 5; and
3. Micah 6,7
Micah 1,2 may be regarded as introductory. Judgements should fall upon Samaria, her wound was incurable; but they should also approach Judah and Jerusalem. The Assyrian is the special instrument of the judgements.
Micah 2 . The prophet speaks of the moral state of the people that called for judgement. Schemes of violence were devised by them to gratify their covetousness. They had turned away from the testimony, and it should be taken from them. Micah 2:6 may be translated "Prophesy ye not, they prophesy. If they do not prophesy to these, the ignominy will not depart." Their wickedness spared neither women nor children. There was a call to arise and depart, for the land of promise was polluted. Nevertheless, God does not renounce His purpose concerning Israel, He will gather them together for blessing in the last days. There shall be a 'breaker' by whom He will remove all obstacles.
Micah 3 . The princes and prophets are denounced because of their iniquity; but the prophet himself was full of power to declare the sin of Israel, consequently Zion should be ploughed as a field, and Jerusalem should become heaps. This prophecy has been literally fulfilled.
Micah 4 turns to the blessing of the last days, when Mount Zion will have the first place, and many nations will approach the mountain of the Lord that they may learn His ways. The people will be judged in righteousness; and there will be peace, safety, and plenty. But before this there would be the loss of the royal power established in Zion, and their captivity in Babylon, but they should be redeemed. Eventually there would be many nations come against Zion, but the daughter of Zion should beat them to pieces, and consecrate their spoils to Jehovah, the Lord of the whole earth: comp. Psalm 83 ; Isaiah 17:12-14 ; Zechariah 14:2 .
Micah 5 Another subject and another Person are introduced before the final blessings of Israel can be brought to them, namely, the MESSIAH,'the judge of Israel,' whose goings forth had been from of old, from everlasting. Micah 5:2 tells where Christ would be born, and this prophecy was referred to by the religious rulers when Herod inquired of them respecting His birth. If this verse be read as a parenthesis it will make the context clearer. Because the Judge of Israel was smitten on the cheek with a rod, therefore He gave them up until the time of bringing forth, when the remnant of His brethren should return unto the children of Israel; that is, they will no longer be added to the church as in Acts 2:27 . "He shall stand and feed in the strength of Jehovah, in the majesty of the name of Jehovah his God; and they shall abide."
The Assyrian will appear at the close, but only to be destroyed; for Jehovah will have renewed His connection with Israel. The remnant of Jacob will then be in power as a lion: horses and chariots will be destroyed; and all graven images and symbols of idolatry. God will execute such vengeance as will not previously have been heard of.
Micah 6 returns to the moral condition of the people, and the judgements that must follow. Jehovah pathetically appeals to His people. He recounts what He has done for them, and asks wherein He had wearied them. Let them testify against Him. He rehearses their sins, and the punishments that must follow.
Micah 7 . The prophet takes the place of intercessor, and pleads with God for the people, lamenting their condition; but in faith he says, "I will look unto Jehovah; I will wait for the God of my salvation: my God will hear me." Those who rejoiced at their tribulation shall be trodden down as mire. The city will be rebuilt and the people brought from far, to the amazement of the nations, who will be confounded to see them in power again. The prophet closes with expressions of faith in and adoration of the God that pardons. He has confidence that God will perform the truth to Jacob, and the mercy to Abraham, which He had sworn to their fathers from the days of old.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Micah
1. The Morasthite, or of Maresheth, a village near Eleutheropolis, in the west of Judah; the seventh in order of the lesser prophets. He prophesied under Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, for about fifty years, if with some we reckon from near the beginning of the reign of Jotham, to the last year of Hezekiah B. C. 750-698. He was nearly contemporary with Isaiah, and has some expressions in common with him. Compare Isaiah 2:2 with Micah 4:1 , and Isaiah 41:15 with Micah 4:13 . His bold fidelity served as a shield to the prophet Jeremiah a century afterwards, Jeremiah 26:18,19 Micah 3:12 . He wrote in an elevated and vehement style, with frequent transitions. His prophecy relates to the sins and judgments of Israel and Judah, the destruction of Samaria and Jerusalem, the return of the Jews from captivity, and the punishment of their enemies. He proclaims the coming of the Messiah, "whose going forth have been from of old, from everlasting," as the foundation of all hope for the glorious and blessed future he describes; and specifies Bethlehem in Judah as the place where He should be born of woman, Micah 5:2,3 . The prediction was thus understood by the Jews, Matthew 2:6 John 7:41,42 .
2. An Ephraimite in the time of the Judges, soon after Joshua, who stole eleven hundred shekels of silver from his mother, but restored them, and with her consent employed them in establishing a private sanctuary, with an image to be used in the worship of Jehovah, and with a Levite for his priest. Providence frowned on his idolatrous service, and a troop of Danites robbed him of his priest and of all implements of worship, Judges 17:13 .

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Micah - The narrative was written after the monarchy had begun (Judges 18:1; Judges 19:1), while the tabernacle was still at Shiloh, not yet moved by David to Jerusalem (Micah 5:5-6). Micah THE PROPHET. ) In Luke 1:72-730 Micah alludes to the meaning of his name as embodying the most precious truth to a guilty people such as he had painted the Jews, "who is a God like unto Thee that pardon iniquity," etc. Micah prophesied in the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah somewhere between 756 and 697 B. Contemporary with Isaiah in Judah, with whose prophecies his have a close connection (compare Micah 4:1-3 with Isaiah 2:2-4, the latter stamping the former as inspired), and with Hosea and Amos during their later ministry in Israel. Probably the book was read before the assembled king and people on some fast or festival, as certain elders quoted to the princes and people assembled against Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26:18) Micah 3:12, "Micah the Morasthite in the days of Hezekiah, and spoke to all the people of Judah, Thus saith the Lord of hosts, Zion shall be plowed like a field, and Jerusalem shall become heaps, and the mountain of the house as the high places of a forest. to death? Did he not fear the Lord and besought the Lord, and the Lord repented Him of the evil which He had pronounced against them?" The idolatries of Ahaz' reign accord with Micah 's denunciations. The section in which is (Micah 1:6) "I will make Samaria as an heap" was therefore earlier. The "high places" (Micah 1:5) probably allude to those in Jotham's and Ahaz' reigns (2 Kings 15:35; 2 Kings 16:4). The "horses and chariots" (Micah 5:10) accord with Jotham's time, when Uzziah's military establishments still flourished (2 Chronicles 26:11-15). Micah 5:12-14; Micah 6:16, "the statutes of Omri are kept and all the works of the house of Ahab," accord with the reign of Ahaz who "walked in the way of the kings of Israel" (2 Kings 16:3). The thrice repeated phrase "Hear ye" (Micah 1:2; Micah 3:1; Micah 6:1) divides the whole into three parts. The middle division (Micah 3-5) has Messiah and His kingdom for its subject. The intimations concerning the birth of Messiah as a child and His reign in peace, and Jacob's remnant destroying adversaries as a "lion," but being "a dew from the Lord amidst many people" (Micah 4:9-5:5), correspond to Isaiah 7:14-16; Isaiah 9:6-7. ...
This middle section is the climax, failing into four strophes (Micah 4:1-8; Micah 4:9-5;Micah 4:2; Micah 5:8-9; Micah 5:10-15). Micah 6:7, form a vivid dialogue wherein Jehovah expostulates with Israel for their sinful and monstrous ingratitude, and they attempt to reply and are convicted (Micah 6:6-8). Zacharias (1618881337_98) reproduces the closing anticipation (Micah 7:16-20), "Thou wilt perform the truth to Jacob and the mercy to Abraham which Thou hast sworn unto our fathers from the days of old. " Sennacherib's invasion is foreseen, Micah 1:9-16; especially Micah 1:13-14, compare 2 Kings 18:14-17. Jerusalem's destruction in Micah 3:12; Micah 7:13. ...
The Babylonian captivity and deliverance in Micah 4:10; Micah 4:1-8; Micah 7:11, confirming the genuineness of the latter half of Isaiah his contemporary, with whom Micah has so much in common and who (Isaiah 39-66) similarly foretells the captivity and deliverance. The fall of Assyria and Babylon are referred to (Judges 18:81; Micah 7:8; Micah 7:10). Hengstenberg thinks that Micaiah's words (1 Kings 22:28), "hearken, O people, every one of you," were intentionally repeated by Micah to intimate that his own activity is a continuation of that of his predecessor who was so jealous for God, and that he had more in common with him than the mere name. His description of Jehovah (Micah 7:18-19), "who is a God like unto Thee, forgiving?" etc. He is dramatic in Micah 6; 7. His similarity to Isaiah in style is due to their theme being alike (Micah 1:2; Isaiah 1:2; Micah 2:2; Isaiah 5:8; Micah 2:6; Micah 2:11; Isaiah 30:10; Micah 2:12; Isaiah 10:20-22; Micah 6:6-8; Isaiah 1:11-17). ...
He is abrupt in transitions, and elliptical, and so obscure; the contrast between Babylon, which triumphs over carnal Israel, and humble Bethlehem out of which shall come forth Israel's Deliverer and Babylon's Destroyer, is a striking instance: Micah 4:8-5:7. Pastoral and rural imagery is common (Micah 1:6; Micah 1:8; Micah 2:12; Micah 3:12; Micah 4:3; Micah 4:12-13; Micah 5:4-8; Micah 6:15; Micah 7:1; Micah 7:4; Micah 7:14). Flays upon words abound (Micah 1:10-15). ) New Testament quotations of Micah: Matthew 2:5-6 (Micah 5:2); Matthew 10:35-36 (Micah 7:6); Matthew 9:13 (Micah 6:6-8); Mark 13:12; Luke 12:53 (Micah 7:6); John 7:42 (Micah 5:2); Ephesians 2:14 (Micah 5:5)
Micah, Book of - Of the four eighth century prophets whose writings have been preserved in the Old Testament, Micah was the last. Amos and Hosea had brought God’s message mainly to the northern kingdom Israel, whereas Isaiah and Micah were more concerned with the southern kingdom Judah. The two men prophesied during the same period (Isaiah 1:1; Micah 1:1) and both were especially concerned with the sins of Jerusalem. The two books contain many similarities, and it has been suggested that Micah might have been one of Isaiah’s disciples (cf. Corruption in the law courts made it easy for these people to do as they wished, while poorer class people found it impossible to gain even the most basic justice (Micah 3:9-11; Micah 7:3). ...
Micah was particularly concerned with the injustice done to the poor farmers. He was from a farming village himself (Micah 1:1), and he saw that the corruption of Israel and Judah was centred in the capital cities, Samaria and Jerusalem (Micah 1:5; Micah 6:9). ...
Because of the injustice of the officials and merchants with whom they had to deal, the farmers were forced to borrow from the wealthy to keep themselves in business (Micah 3:1-3; Micah 6:10-12). First they seized their clothing and household items (Micah 2:8), then, when these were not sufficient, their houses and land (Micah 2:1-3; Micah 2:9). The people still followed the sacrifices and ceremonies of the Israelite religion, but Micah warned that formal religion was hateful to God if justice and love were absent (Micah 6:6-8). Unless they repented, God would send the people into captivity and leave their homeland desolate (Micah 3:12; Micah 6:16). Preachers had comforting words for the upper class people from whom they received their income, but they condemned the prophet Micah for his forthright speaking (Micah 2:6; Micah 2:11; Micah 3:5). Hezekiah the king, however, heeded Micah’s warnings. Micah 3:12). Yet Micah saw that beyond the judgment lay the hope of a restored nation, a glorious kingdom and an ideal king (Micah 2:12-13; Micah 4:1-4; Micah 5:2; Micah 5:4). ...
Summary of the book...
From his prophetic viewpoint, Micah gives a picture of the judgment about to fall on Israel and Judah (1:1-16). Returning to the present, Micah announces God’s accusations against his people (6:1-16), then confesses their sin to God and pleads for God’s mercy (7:1-20)
Morashtite - A gentilic adjective used to designate the prophet Micah ( Micah 1:1 , Jeremiah 26:18 ), probably derived from Moresheth-gath (wh. Micah, p
Moresheth-Gath - Micah 1:14 only. It was probably the birth-place of the prophet Micah ( Micah 1:1 , Jeremiah 26:18 ), and must have been in the Shephçlah
Micah, Book of - The prophet Micah's name means, “Who is like Yah?” People in the Ancient Near East commonly gave their children names that indicated devotion to their god, and Yahweh was the name by which the God of Israel and Judah was called. See Micah ; Micaiah ; Michaiah ; Micha . ...
Micah 1:1 gives the reader three pieces of information about the prophet. Micah, however, may have lived in Jerusalem during his ministry. Jeremiah 26:17-18 refers to Micah as prophesying during the time of Hezekiah. Micah was a contemporary of Isaiah, Hosea, and possibly Amos. Even though Micah ministered in Judah, some of his messages were directed toward Israel. ...
Historical Background In Micah's time, many political and national crises occurred. Micah addressed those issues. Micah 1:2-7 associates the imminent destruction of Samaria as God's judgment for the people's idolatry. ...
The Prophet's Message The subjects of Micah's messages reveal much about the society of his day. He characterized the rich as devising ways in which to cheat the poor out of their land (Micah 2:1-5 ). Those who committed such crimes were fellow Israelites (Micah 2:6-11 ). The marketplace was full of deception and injustice (Micah 6:9-16 ). The rulers of the country, who had the responsibility of upholding justice, did the opposite (Micah 3:1-4 ). ...
Micah also denounced the religious practices of the nation. Micah contended that the other prophets' message was not from God. Instead, the message from God was the imminent devastation of Judah (Micah 3:5-12 ). They did not quit believing in and worshiping the God of Judah, but they combined this worship with devotion to other details (Micah 5:10-15 ). Micah attempted to correct this misconception by arguing that God is not just interested in the physical act of making a sacrifice but is supremely concerned with obedience that extends into daily life (Micah 6:6-8 ). ...
Micah warned of impending judgment on God's people for their disobedience. Judgment would come, but afterwards, God would restore a remnant of the people devoted to Him (Micah 4:1-13 ; Micah 7:14-20 ). Unlike the unjust kings that the people were accustomed to, God would bring a ruler who would allow the people to live in peace (Micah 5:1-5 ). Matthew saw in Micah's hope for a new ruler a description of Christ (Matthew 2:6 ). God's Word Witnesses Against All People (Micah 1:1-2 ). God Judges His People for Their Sins (Micah 1:3-3:12 ). God judges religious infidelity (Micah 1:3-16 ). God judges economic injustice (Micah 2:1-5 ). God judges false preaching (Micah 2:6-11 ). God's judgment looks to the remnant's restoration (Micah 2:12-13 ). God judges unjust leaders (Micah 3:1-4 ). God judges those who preach peace and prosperity for sinners (Micah 3:5-7 ). God judges through His Spirit-filled messenger (Micah 3:8 ). God judges corrupt, greedy officials (Micah 3:9-12 ). God Promises a Day of International Peace and Worship (Micah 4:1-5:15 ). God plans for His people to teach His way to the nations (Micah 4:1-5 ). God plans to redeem and rule His weakened remnant (Micah 4:6-11 ). God plans to show the world His universal rule (Micah 4:12-13 ). God plans to raise up a Shepherd from Bethlehem to bring peace and victory to His beleagured flock (Micah 5:1-9 ). God plans to destroy weapons and idolatry from His people (Micah 5:10-15 ). God Has a Case Against His People (Micah 6:1-7:6 ). God has done His part, redeeming His people (Micah 6:1-5 ). God's expectations are clear: justice, mercy, piety (Micah 6:6-8 ). God's people have not met His expectations (Micah 6:9-12 ). God's punishment is sure for a corrupt people (Micah 6:13-7:6 ). God in Righteousness, Love, and Faithfulness Will Forgive and Renew His People (Micah 7:7-20 ). God's people can trust Him for salvation (Micah 7:7 ). God's repentant people can expect better days ahead (Micah 7:8-14 ). God's enemies face shameful judgment (Micah 7:15-17 ). The incomparable God of patience, mercy, compassion, and faithfulness will forgive and renew His people (Micah 7:18-20 )
Morasthite - Designation of Micah the prophet. Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 1:1
Micha - (mi kuh) KJV alternate form for Micah and Micah 1:1 . Descendant of King Saul (2 Samuel 9:12 ; See Micah 3:1
Mor'Esheth-Gath - (possession of Gath ), a place named by the prophet Micah. ( Micah 1:14 ) The prophet was himself a native of a place called Moresheth
Mor'Asthite, the, - It occurs twice -- (Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 1:1 ) --each time as the description of the prophet Micah
Saphir - ” Town Micah lamented over (Micah 1:11 )
Maroth - " Micah (Micah 1:12) plays upon the meaning of Maroth
Micah, the Book of - (See Micah
Micaiah - See Micah
Michah - See Micah, No
Micheas - MICHEAS ( 2Es 1:39 ) = the prophet Micah
Micah - The best known of several Micahs in the Bible story is the prophet whose book is part of the Old Testament (Micah 1:1; Jeremiah 26:18). (For details of this Micah see Micah, BOOK OF). ...
An earlier Micah lived in the time covered by the book of Judges. But Micah did not come from the priestly tribe, so when a Levite happened to visit his house, Micah made him priest instead (Judges 17). After some time, representatives of the tribe of Dan stopped at Micah’s house while on a journey north in search of a new tribal homeland (Judges 18:1-6). When the Danites later moved north to settle, they again visited Micah. They then continued their journey and established Micah’s idolatrous religion in their new homeland (Judges 18:27; Judges 18:31)
Discover - Micah 1:6 , to uncover, or lay bare
Rod - He will either rule with the pastoral rod, or break with the rod (scepter) of iron (Revelation 2:27; Revelation 19:15; Micah 6:9; Micah 7:14; Psalms 110:2; Isaiah 9:4; Isaiah 11:4)
Beth-le-Aphrah - ” Town Micah used in a wordplay to announce judgment on Judah. The house of dust would roll in dust, a ritual expressing grief and mourning (Micah 1:10 )
Micah - the Book of: The book of Tanach containing Micah's prophecies, foretelling the Israelites' exile as well as the future redemption. Micah reproves the people for worshipping foreign gods and extorting the poor, and urges them to worship G-d wholeheartedly. ...
Micah the Prophet: (6th century BCE) Student of Elijah and a contemporary of Hosea, Isaiah and Amos
Reaia - Son of Micah, a descendant of Reuben
Moresheth, Moresheth-Gath - ” Home of the prophet Micah (Micah 1:1 ). The prophet pictured his home as a bride receiving a going away gift from Jerusalem, her father, a warning of exile for Jerusalem's leaders and thus separation from their neighbors (Micah 1:14 )
Micah - Micah (mî'kah), who is like Jehovah? 1. Compare, for instance, Isaiah 2:2 with Micah 4:1, or Isaiah 41:15 with Micah 4:13. ...
The Book of Micah contains prophecies concerning Samaria and Jerusalem
Tare'a, - the same as Tahreah, the son of Micah
Morasthite - (moh rass' thite) Resident of Moresheth (Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 1:1 )
Saphir - ) A village addressed by Micah (Micah 1:11)
Beth-Ezel - ” City Micah used in a wordplay to announce judgment on Judah about 701 B. All support would be taken away from the house of the leader or the house beside (Micah 1:11 )
Tah'Rea - (cunning ), son of Micah and grandson of Mephibosheth
Pithon - Son of Micah, a descendant of Saul
Melech - Son of Micah, a descendant of Saul
Aph'Rah - (dust ), The house of, a place mentioned in ( Micah 1:10 ) Its site is uncertain
Faith: the Summary of Virtue - Isaiah brings them to six, Isaiah 33:4; Micah to three, Micah 6:8; Isaiah, again, to two, Isaiah 46; Habakkuk to this one, 'The just shall live by faith
Moreshethgath - A name occurring only in Micah 1:14 ; mentioned along with towns in the lowlands of Judah
Saphir - Beautiful, a town of Judah (Micah 1:11 ), identified with es-Suafir, 5 miles south-east of Ashdod
Maroth - An unknown town ( Micah 1:12 only)
Tahrea - Son of Micah, a descendant of Jonathan
me'Lech, - the second son of Micah, the son of Merib-baal or Mephibosheth
Aphrah - (af' ruh) KJV interpretation of place name in Micah 1:10 , also called Beth Ophrah (NIV) or Beth-le-aphrah (RSV; NAS); or Beth Leaphrah (TEV). The longer name used in modern translations means “house of dust” and is used to make a wordplay by Micah, the meaning of the name being more important than the actual city
Micha -
2 Samuel 9:12 =MICAH (2)
Micha - (See Micah
Wax - Mentioned (Psalm 22:14 ; 68:2 ; 97:5 ; Micah 1:4 ) in illustration
pi'Thon - (harmless ), one of the four sons of Micah, the son of Mephibosheth
Zaanan - Micah 1:11 , supposed to be the same as Zenan, Joshua 15:37 , a town in the plain country of Judah
Zenan - Probably the same as (See ZAANAN (Micah 1:11)
ja'Rah - (honey ), a descendant of Saul; son of Micah and great-grandson of Mephibosheth
Bethe'Zel - (neighbor's house ), a place named only in ( Micah 1:11 ) From the context it was doubtless situated in the plain of Philistia
mi'Chah - (who is like God? ), eldest son of Uzziel the son of Kohath, ( 1 Chronicles 24:24,25 ) elsewhere, (1 Chronicles 23:20 ) called Micah
Maroth - , "perfect grief", a place not far from Jerusalem; mentioned in connection with the invasion of the Assyrian army (Micah 1:12 )
Chozeba - Probably the same as CHEZIB, Genesis 38:5 , and ACHZIB,Joshua 15:44 ; Micah 1:14
Zaanan - Place of flocks, mentioned only in Micah 1:11
Zaanan - ” Unidentified city in southermost Judah (Micah 1:11 ), probably identical with Zenan (Joshua 15:37 )
Thousands - (Micah 5:2 ), another name for "families" or "clans" (see Numbers 1:16 ; 10:4 ; Joshua 22:14,21 )
Crawling Things - NRSV translation of Hebrew term in Micah 7:17
Ephratah - (See Micah 5:2; Matthew 2:1) The word is derived from Pharah, fruitfulness
Micah, Micaiah - Micah, MICAIAH (‘Who is like Jahweh?’). This name, which occurs at least twelve times in the OT, and is a woman’s name as well as a man’s, is spelt in three different ways; the full name is Micajahu , a partially shortened form is Micaiah , while a still shorter form is Micah . Micah , a dweller in the hill-country of Ephraim; he stole from his mother eleven hundred pieces of silver, which, however, he returned on hearing the curse which his mother pronounced against the thief. With part of the returned silver his mother causes an image to be made, which Micah sets up in his house; he then consecrates one of his sons a priest. But a Levite, named Jonathan, comes to the house of Micah while journeying; Micah induces him to be his priest instead of the son whom he had first consecrated. During this time the Danites send out five men to search for a suitable locality wherein to settle down; these five men come to the house of Micah, and while staying there they recognize the Levite. On their coming into the neighbourhood of Micah’s dwelling-place, the five men who had already been there come and persuade Micah’s Levite to join them, and to bring with him Micah’s ephod, teraphim, and graven image. Micah follows after them; but protests in vain, for he is warned that if he attempts to regain his priest and lost treasures by force he will lose his goods and his life; he therefore returns home without them ( Judges 17:1-13 ; Judges 18:1-31 ). Micah , the son of Mephibosheth ( 1 Chronicles 8:34 f. Micaiah , the son of Gemariah, and a contemporary of Jeremiah, who heard Baruch reading out the prophecies of Jeremiah, and then spoke of them to the princes who were assembled in the scribe’s chamber ( Jeremiah 36:9-13 ), perhaps identical with the Micaiah of 2 Kings 22:12 and the Micah of 2 Chronicles 34:20 . For the prophet Micah see the following article
Moresheth-Gath - Possession of the wine-press, the birthplace of the prophet (Micah 1:14 ), who is called the "Morasthite" (Jeremiah 26:18 )
Moresheth Gath - ("possession of Gath"), named by Micah alone (Micah 1:14), himself a Morasthite, i
Eder - Micah referred to Jerusalem as the “tower of the flock,” the same Hebrew expression as in Genesis (Micah 4:8 )
Reaiah - (1 Chronicles 4:2) There was another of this name, the son of Micah
Coulter - (1 Samuel 13:20,21 ), an agricultural instrument, elsewhere called "ploughshare" (Isaiah 2:4 ; Micah 4:3 ; Joel 3:10 )
Zenan - Zenan is perhaps identical to Zaanan (Micah 1:11 )
Measure - that by which any thing is measured, or adjusted, or proportioned, Proverbs 20:10 ; Micah 6:10
Beth-le-Aphrah - (RSV Micah 1:10 ), house of dust
Micah, Book of - Micah 1,2 ;...
2. Micah 3 - 5; and...
3. Micah 6,7 ...
Micah 1,2 may be regarded as introductory. ...
Micah 2 . Micah 2:6 may be translated "Prophesy ye not, they prophesy. ...
Micah 3 . ...
Micah 4 turns to the blessing of the last days, when Mount Zion will have the first place, and many nations will approach the mountain of the Lord that they may learn His ways. ...
Micah 5 Another subject and another Person are introduced before the final blessings of Israel can be brought to them, namely, the MESSIAH,'the judge of Israel,' whose goings forth had been from of old, from everlasting. Micah 5:2 tells where Christ would be born, and this prophecy was referred to by the religious rulers when Herod inquired of them respecting His birth. ...
Micah 6 returns to the moral condition of the people, and the judgements that must follow. ...
Micah 7
Bribery - The danger of bribery is the opportunity it presents for the perversion of justice (see 1 Samuel 8:3 ; Proverbs 17:23 ; Isaiah 1:23 ; Micah 3:11 ; Micah 7:3 )
Maroth - ” Town in lowlands of Judah which would be attacked as invading armies approached Jerusalem (Micah 1:12 )
Michah - Modern translations prefer the form Micah
Wail - Micah 1
Micah, Theology of - Although unlike Isaiah (6:1-9), Jeremiah (1:4-10), and Ezekiel (2:1-3:27) Micah gives his audience no autobiographical account of his call to prophetic ministry, the superscription to his book (1:1), "the word of the Lord that came to Micah, " affirms that the invisible God becomes audible in it. In 6:1b-8 Micah is pictured as the Lord's plenipotentiary from the heavenly court, who has come to Jerusalem to accuse Israel of having broken the Mosaic covenant. Unlike the false prophets, for whom money speaks louder than God (3:5,11), Micah, filled with the power of the Lord's Spirit, preaches justice (3:8). ...
Micah's theology represents both aspects of the Lord's covenant with Israel: the Lord will sentence his covenant people to exile out of the land of blessing if they fail to keep his righteous law, but he will always preserve from them a righteous remnant to whom he will give his sworn land after the exile (2:5) and through whom he will bless the nations (4:1-5). ...
Micah organizes the approximately twenty prophecies that comprise his book into three cycles—chapters 1-2,3-5, and 6-7each beginning with the command to either "Hear" (1:2) or "Listen" (3:1; 6:1). In the third prophecy (2:1-5), Micah accuses rich land barons of exploiting Israel's middle class by taking their lands away from them in corrupt courts (vv. It is often said that Micah is the champion of the poor; in truth, he champions the cause of Israel's middle classstalwart farmers whose wives live in luxurious homes and whose children enjoy the Lord's blessing (2:9). ...
Micah's fourth prophecy is against the false prophets who abet the rapacious racketeers with their half-baked theology. In these four oracles Micah predicts Israel's exile, but looking beyond the judgment, he concludes the first cycle with a prophecy that the Lord will preserve a remnant with him as their triumphant King (2:12-13). ...
In the second cycle (3:1-5:16), Micah delivers three oracles of judgment against Jerusalem's corrupt leaders: the avaricious magistrates, who cannibalize their subjects (3:1-4); the greedy prophets, who should be the nation's watchdogs but only wag their tails if fed a bone (3:5-7); and all the leaders, rulers, prophets, and priests (3:8-11), who are in cahoots to plunder their subjects. Micah concludes these oracles with the climactic prediction that Jerusalem will fall (3:12; cf. In his first sermon Peter goes out of his way to identify the coming of the Spirit at Pentecost with the epoch labeled by Micah and his contemporary, Isaiah, as "in the last days" (Acts 2:17 ). Joel's prophecy begins, "and afterward "' (Joel 2:28 ), but instead of this introduction Peter substitutes the words of Micah 4:1 and the parallel passage in Isaiah 2:2 . In Micah it embraces the remnant's restoration from Babylon (4:9-10), the birth of the Messiah (5:2), and his universal and everlasting peace (5:5-6). ...
In the first of these visions with regard to the last days Micah sees Mount Zion established as the true religion over all false, pagan religions (4:1). Until that happens, however, Micah and the remnant "will walk in the name of the Lord our God for ever and ever" (v. ...
In the second vision of these last days, Micah sees the lame remnant regathered as a strong nation (4:6-7); and in the third, the kingdom's former glory is again restored to Jerusalem (4:8). ...
In the fourth vision, Micah transforms the cry of the exiles going into Babylon into the cry of a woman in labor. ...
In the fifth vision and at the center of these glorious prophecies (5:1-6), Micah now predicts that the remnant will give birth to the Messiah, who will be born in lowly Bethlehem, David's cradle (v. ...
In the sixth vision, Micah foresees that the restored remnant will become a savor of life and death among the nations (5:7-9) (cf. ...
Finally, "in that day, " Micah says, the Lord will purge his people of all their former false confidences: military hardware, witchcraft, and idolatry (5:10-15). ...
In the third cycle (6:1-7:20), Micah begins with a covenant law suit (6:1-8). Micah shows the reader how absurd it is to try to establish a relationship with God in this way. False worshipers think God's favor, like theirs, can be bought! Comparative religionists refer to Micah 6:8 as the quintessential expression of true religion. Micah, however, confident of God's covenant faithfulness to the patriarchs, hopes in his saving God (v. Micah's name means, "Who is like Yah, " and in this concluding prophecy he asks, "Who is a God like you, who pardons sin and forgives the transgression of the remnant of his inheritance?" (v. ...
As God's justice informs Micah's judgment-oracles and his righteousness the salvation-oracles, so God's other sublime attributes inform both. ...
In his first prophecy, Micah pictures Israel's Ruler as a victorious conqueror. Waltke, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; R. Cuffey, "The Coherence of Micah: A Review of the Proposals and a New Interpretation"; G. Hillers, Covenant: The History of a Biblical Idea ; idem, Micah ; B. 263-88; idem, Commentary on Micah
Meonenim, Plain of - (mih ahn' ih nihm) Meonenim is the Hebrew term for diviners or soothsayers (Deuteronomy 18:10 ,Deuteronomy 18:10,18:14 ; Micah 5:12 )
Brier - Used metaphorically of the enemies of Israel (Ezekiel 28:24 ) and of land which is worthless (Isaiah 5:6 ; Isaiah 7:23-25 ; Isaiah 55:13 ; compare Micah 7:4 )
Maarath - ” Name of a village in Judah's hill country (Joshua 15:59 ), possibly identical with Maroth (Micah 1:12 )
Mica - Variant spelling modern translations used for Micah reflecting Aramaic spelling in text of 2 Samuel 9:12 ; Nehemiah 10:11 ; Nehemiah 11:17 ,Nehemiah 11:17,11:22 ; 1 Chronicles 9:15
Shaphir - A city, probably on the Philistine plain ( Micah 1:11 )
Michaiah - Called Micah in 2 Chronicles 34:20 . Apparently called Micah in 1 Chronicles 9:15 ; and MICHA in Nehemiah 11:17,22
Jotham - The prophets Hosea, Isaiah and Micah denounced the social and religious evils of the self-satisfied people (Isaiah 1:1; Hosea 1:1; Micah 1:1). (For details of social conditions in Judah during the reign of Jotham see ISAIAH; Micah
Micah - Compare Isaiah 2:2 with Micah 4:1 , and Isaiah 41:15 with Micah 4:13 . His bold fidelity served as a shield to the prophet Jeremiah a century afterwards, Jeremiah 26:18,19 Micah 3:12 . He proclaims the coming of the Messiah, "whose going forth have been from of old, from everlasting," as the foundation of all hope for the glorious and blessed future he describes; and specifies Bethlehem in Judah as the place where He should be born of woman, Micah 5:2,3
Saph'ir - (fair ), one of the villages addressed by the prophet Micha, ( Micah 1:11 ) is described by Eusebius and jerome as "in the mountain district between Eleutheropolis and Ascalon," perhaps represented by the village es-Sawafir , seven or eight miles to the northeast of Ascalon
Bethlehem-Ephratah - (KJV) or BETHLEHEM-EPHRATHAH (NAS, NIV, NRSV) Place name used by Micah 5:2 to designate birthplace of new David who would come from Bethlehem, David's birthplace, and of the clan of Ephratah, that of Jesse, David's father ( 1 Samuel 17:12 )
Beth-Ezel - BETH-EZEL ( Micah 1:11 )
Achbor - 2 Kings 22:12,14 ; Jeremiah 26:22 ; Jeremiah 36:12 : called ABDON, the son of Micah, in 2 Chronicles 34:20
Meon'Enim - ( Judges 9:37 ) The meaning of Meonenim if interpreted as a Hebrew word, is enchanters or "observers of times," as it is elsewhere rendered (18:10,14) in (Micah 5:12 ) it is soothsayers
Meonenim - , "the plain of Meonenim;" RSV, "the oak of Meonenim") means properly "soothsayers" or "sorcerers," "wizards" (Deuteronomy 18:10,14 ; 2 Kings 21:6 ; Micah 5:12 )
Balances - Reference is also made in (Micah 6:11 ; Hosea 12:7 ) to the dishonest practice of buying by heavier and selling by lighter weights
Roll - (verb)...
Micah 1:10 (a) This is the picture of a voluntary humbling of these people
Mareshah - A town in Judah, Joshua 15:44 , fortified by Rehobaoam, 2 Chronicles 11:8 , and the birthplace of Micah
be'or - (Numbers 22:5 ; 24:3,15 ; 31:8 ; 23:4; Joshua 13:22 ; 24:9 ; Micah 6:5 ) He is called BOSOR in the New Testament
Micah - A wandering son of Levi finding his way to Micah's house was gladly received by him, treated as one of his sons, and became his priest. Then Micah said, "Now know I that the Lord will do me good, seeing I have a Levite to my priest. " The Danites however, seeking a larger inheritance, sent spies to the north, who came near Micah's house, and knowing the voice of the Levite, asked him to inquire of God for them. " A larger body of Danites afterwards came and carried away the gods of Micah, and the ephod and the teraphim, together with the Levite, and took them to the north, where they established themselves. Micah hastened after them, but could not recover his gods. Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 1:1
Yeshayahu - (a) (7th century BCE) One of the greatest prophets, a contemporary of Hosea, Amos and Micah
Balak, Balac - Numbers 22,23,24 ; Joshua 24:9 ; Judges 11:25 ; Micah 6:5
Zaanan - A place mentioned in Micah 1:11 , where there is a characteristic word-play: ‘The inhabitress of Za‘ăn ân went ( yâzĕah ) not out’ (for fear of the enemy)
Edar - In Micah 4:8 the word is rendered "tower of the flock" (marg
Isaiah - (a) (7th century BCE) One of the greatest prophets, a contemporary of Hosea, Amos and Micah
Drink, Strong - shekar'), an intoxicating liquor (Judges 13:4 ; Luke 1:15 ; Isaiah 5:11 ; Micah 2:11 ) distilled from corn, honey, or dates
Zaanan - " Playing on its meaning Micah (Micah 1:11) says, "though in name implying thou dost come forth (yatsa ), thou camest not forth
Eclipse of the Sun - (Joel 2:10,31 ; 3:15 ; Amos 8:9 ; Micah 3:6 ; Zechariah 14:6 ) Some of these notices probably refer to eclipses that occurred about the time of the respective compositions: thus the date of Amos coincides with a total eclipse which occurred Feb. 784, and was visible at Jerusalem shortly after noon; that of Micah with the eclipse of June 5, B
Nimrod - The "land of Nimrod" (Micah 5:6 ) is a designation of Assyria or of Shinar, which is a part of it
Bethezel - near Zaanan, it got no comfort from Zaanan's inhabitants in its mourning (Micah 1:11)
Ozias - The son of Micah ( Jdt 6:15 ; Jdt 7:23 ; Jdt 8:18 ; Jdt 8:28 ; Jdt 8:35 ; Jdt 10:6 )
Achbor - Called Abdon, the son of Micah, in 2 Chronicles 34:20-21
Saphir - City mentioned in Micah 1:11 , the inhabitants of which are thus addressed, "Pass ye away
Aphrah - The margin of Micah 1:10 explains the name as 'house of dust,' so that there is a play upon the word 'dust:' 'in the house of dust roll thyself in the dust
Bethlehem - It was beautifully significant of Christ, who was from everlasting appointed to be born there, (Micah 5:2) and was, and is, and ever will be, the bread of life, and the living bread to his people; of which whosoever eateth shall live for ever! Lord! I would say with the disciples, evermore give me this bread. (Genesis 35:19-20) I would have the reader compare what Micah saith concerning this Bethlehem, with an eye to Christ, and look at what Matthew hath observed also on the subject. (Micah 5:2; Matthew 2:1-6) The Holy Ghost evidently had Jesus in view in that sweet history of Ruth, when the certain man, Eli-melech, representing our whole nature, left Bethlehem the land of bread, for the Moab of the world; and when with his children Mahlon and Chillon, sickness and disease overtook him and all his posterity
Towers - , to defend wells, flocks, or commerce (2 Chronicles 26:10; 2 Chronicles 27:4; Genesis 35:21; Micah 4:8)
Beth-le-Aphrah - territory, whose site is quite unknown ( Micah 1:10 )
Edar, Tower of - The expression 'tower of the flock' occurs in Micah 4:8 (Edar in the margin ) as the stronghold of the daughter of Zion
Hosea - (a) (7th century BCE) A contemporary of Isaiah, Amos and Micah, he prophesied during the reign of King Jeroboam II
Beor - ]'>[1] , Joshua 24:9 , also Numbers 31:8 , Deuteronomy 23:4 , Joshua 13:22 , Micah 6:5 , 2 Peter 2:15 ( Bosor , AV Pruning Hook - ...
Micah 4:3 (b) By this we understand the opposite of the above in that the instruments of war will be changed into implements of agriculture and GOD will again give peace to the earth
Cheek - Smiting on the cheek was accounted a grievous injury and insult (Job 16:10 ; Lamentations 3:30 ; Micah 5:1 )
Achzib - Micah 1:14 makes a wordplay using Achzib, literally the houses of deceitfulness will be deceitful
Abel-Shittim - Meadow of the acacias, frequently called simply "Shittim" (Numbers 25:1 ; Joshua 2:1 ; Micah 6:5 ), a place on the east of Jordan, in the plain of Moab, nearly opposite Jericho
Ach'Zib - (Joshua 15:44 ; Micah 1:14 ) It is probably the same with CHEZIB and CHOZEBA , which see
Anathema - from ανατιθημι , signifies something set apart, separated, or devoted, Micah 4:13 , or the formula by which this is effected
Gath - It was a place of strength in the time of the prophets Amos and Micah, and is placed by Jerom on the road between Eleutheropolis and Gaza
Lachish - A city in the southwest part of Judah, Joshua 10:3,5,31 ; fortified by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:9 , and strong enough to resist for a time the whole army of Sennacherib, 2 Kings 18:17 19:8 2 Chronicles 32:1,9,21 Micah 1:13
Mareshah - ) Micah plays upon the meaning of Mareshah, "I will bring an heir (the Assyrian foe) unto thee, Mareshah" ("inheritance") (Micah 1:15)
Nazarene - Matthew plays on similar sounds, as Micah on Achzib (Micah 1:14) and Ekron (Micah 2:4). Had the prophets expressly foretold He should be of Nazareth, it would not have been so despised; nor would the Pharisees, who were able from Micah 5 to tell Herod where Messiah's birthplace was - Bethlehem (Matthew 2) - have been so ignorant of the prophecy of His connection with Nazareth as to say, "out of Galilee ariseth no prophet" (John 7:52)
Achzib - City of Judah, Joshua 15:44 ; Micah 1:14 : probably the same that is called elsewhere CHEZIB and perhaps CHOZEBA
Sha'Mir - ...
A Kohathite, son of Micah or Michal, the first-born of Uzziel
Joel - (a) (6th century BCE) A student of Micah and a contemporary of Nahum and Habakkuk, he prophesied during the reign of King Manasseh
Outcast - Outcast rather designates one banished from court (2 Samuel 14:14 RSV) or more often dispersed persons, exiles, or refugees ( Deuteronomy 30:4 ; Psalm 147:2 : Isaiah 11:12 ; Isaiah 56:8 ; Jeremiah 30:17 ; Micah 4:6-7 )
Eagle - The passage in Micah, ( Micah 1:16 ) "enlarge thy baldness as the eagle," may refer to the griffon vulture, Vultur fulvus , in which case the simile is peculiarly appropriate, for the whole head and neck of this bird are destitute of true feathers
Sheaf - The prophets used sheaves as figures of judgment (Jeremiah 9:22 ; Amos 2:13 ; Micah 4:12 ; Zechariah 12:6 )
Poll - KJV term for “to cut off” or “to trim” hair (2 Samuel 14:26 ; Ezekiel 44:20 ; Micah 1:16 )
Achzib - Micah 1:14 predicts that Achzib shall be to the kings of Judah achzab (‘deceptive’), a stream whose waters fail when most needed (cf
Naked - Being without clothes (Genesis 2:25 ; Job 1:21 ; Ecclesiastes 5:15 ; Amos 2:16 ; Micah 1:8 ) or else poorly clothed (Deuteronomy 28:48 ; Matthew 25:36-44 ; James 2:15 )
Caldron - ...
Micah 3:3 (a) This caldron is a picture of the terrible boiling, burning troubles that were to come upon the people because of the wrath of GOD
Lick - (See Micah 7:17)
Mattaniah - Son of Micah, a Levite
Omri - ” Micah accused Jerusalem of following Omri's actions and also his son Ahab's. That was grounds for God's destroying Jerusalem (Micah 6:16 )
Adullam - Micah, the prophet, used David's experience almost 300 years later to warn his people that again their glorious king would have to flee to the caves of Adullam to escape an enemy who would take possession of the country because of Judah's sin (Micah 1:15 )
Bowing - Bowing is also frequently mentioned as an act of adoration to idols (Joshua 23:7 ; 2 Kings 5:18 ; Judges 2:19 ; Isaiah 44:15 ), and to God (Joshua 5:14 ; Psalm 22:29 ; 72:9 ; Micah 6:6 ; Psalm 95:6 ; Ephesians 3:14 )
Pardon - Prayer for God's pardon for sin is based on the greatness of God's covenant love and on the long history of God's acts of forgiveness (Numbers 14:19 ; Micah 7:18 )
Breaker - Micah 2
Sheepshearers - The word for shearing sheep was also used for cutting human hair (Jeremiah 7:29 ; Micah 1:16 )
Bozrah - This place is mentioned by the prophets in later times (Isaiah 34:6 ; Jeremiah 49:13 ; Amos 1:12 ; Micah 2:12 )
Michaiah - (See Micah; MICHA
Augustus - His decree that "all the world should be taxed" was the divinely ordered occasion of Jesus' being born, according to prophecy (Micah 5:2 ), in Bethlehem
Shit'Tim - ( Numbers 25:1 ; 33:49 ; Joshua 2:1 ; 3:1 ; Micah 6:5 ) Its full name appears to be given in the first of these passage --Abel has-Shittim, "the meadow, or moist place, of the acacias
ab'Don - ...
Son of Micah, a contemporary of Josiah, (2 Chronicles 34:20 ) called Achbor in (2 Kings 22:12 ) (B
Enchantments - The words so translated have several signification: the practice of secret arts, (Exodus 7:11,22 ; 8:7 ); "muttered spells," (2 Kings 9:22 ; Micah 5:12 ) the charming of serpents, (Ecclesiastes 10:11 ) the enchantments sought by Balaam, (Numbers 24:1 ) the use of magic, (Isaiah 47:9,12 ) Any resort to these methods of imposture was strictly forbidden in Scripture, (Leviticus 19:26 ; Isaiah 47:9 ) etc
Lachish - It was conquered by Israel in the time of Joshua (Joshua 10:3-5; Joshua 10:32) and later became an important military outpost for the defence of Jerusalem and other highland towns (2 Kings 18:13-17; 2 Chronicles 11:5; 2 Chronicles 11:9; Jeremiah 34:7; Micah 1:13; see PALESTINE)
Hold - Occasionally other terms are used in place of hold: fortress (2 Samuel 24:7 NIV, NRSV); hill ( Micah 4:8 NRSV, perhaps in the sense of citadel); fortified cities ( Habakkuk 1:10 NIV); refuge ( Nahum 1:7 NIV)
Olive - There were also oil-presses, in which the oil was trodden out by the feet (Micah 6:15 )
Sceptre - It was thence specifically applied to the shepherd's crook, ( Leviticus 27:32 ; Micah 7:14 ) and to the wand or sceptre of a ruler
Micah - (See 1 Chronicles 9:15; 2 Kings 22:12; 1 Chronicles 5:5; 1Ch 23:20) But the one of eminency to be particularly noticed in a work of this kind, is Micah the Morashite, that is, of Moresa, a village in the south of Judah
Dragon - Thus in Deuteronomy 32:33 Jeremiah 51:34 Revelation 12:1-17 , it evidently implies a huge serpent; in Isaiah 27:1 51:9 Ezekiel 29:3 , it may mean the crocodile, or any large sea-monster; while in Job 30:29 Lamentations 4:3 Micah 1:8 , it seems to refer to some wild animal of the desert, most probably the jackal
Miriam - The sister of Moses and Aaron, probably the one who watched over Moses in the ark of bulrushes, Exodus 2:4,5 Numbers 26 59 Micah 6 4
Micha'Iah -
Same as Micah 6
Amos - A contemporary of Hosea, Isaiah and Micah, a wealthy man, he tended sheep and sycamore trees before G-d called upon him to prophesy in 621 BCE
Robbery, - (27:17; Isaiah 5:8 ; Micah 2:2 )
Reproaches, the - " This consisted ofcertain striking passages read from Micah 3:3 and 4, as well asother Scriptures, with the respond, "Holy God, Holy and Mighty,Holy and Immortal, have mercy upon us
Beard - ” The same word is also translated “lip” ( Leviticus 13:45 ; Ezekiel 24:17 ,Ezekiel 24:17,24:22 ; Micah 3:7 , KJV, NRSV), “[1] face” (NIV, TEV), “mouth” (Micah 3:7 , NAS, REB), “mustache” (Leviticus 13:45 ; Ezekiel 24:17 ,Ezekiel 24:17,24:22 , NAS), “upper lip” (Leviticus 13:45 , REB), and “beard” (Ezekiel 24:17 ,Ezekiel 24:17,24:22 , REB)
Remnant - But God would still preserve a remnant, so that after a time in captivity, some would return to Jerusalem to rebuild the temple, the city and the nation (Ezra 9:13-15; Isaiah 11:11-12; Isaiah 11:16; Micah 2:12). From this remnant the Messiah eventually came (Micah 5:2-3; Micah 5:7-8; Zechariah 8:11-12; Malachi 3:16-18; Matthew 1:18-21; Luke 1:5-7; Luke 2:25-38)
Counselor - Israelite kings seem to have employed counselors on a regular basis (see 2 Samuel 16:23 ; 1 Kings 12:6-14 ; 1 Chronicles 26:14 ; 1Chronicles 27:32,1 Chronicles 27:34 ; 2 Chronicles 25:16 ; Isaiah 1:26 ; Isaiah 3:3 ; Micah 4:9 )
Shrine - An Ephraimite, Micah, had a shrine in Israel during the days of the judges (Judges 17:5 )
Asshur - This is confirmed by Micah 5:6 , where Assyria and Nimrod are associated together
Purse, - (25:13; Micah 6:11 ) This bag is described in the New Testament by the terms balantion (bag) ( Luke 10:4 ; 12:33 ; 22:35,38 ) and glossokomon (originally the bag in which musicians carried the mouth-pieces of their Instruments)
Covet, Covetous - In defense of Judah's poor, Micah declared the Lord's judgment against the land-grabbers for coveting small farms and actually seizing them from their powerless owners (Micah 2:2 )
Vow - ) Vows were of three kinds:...
(1) vow of devotion, neder ;...
(2) of abstinence, 'esar (See CORBAN);...
(3) of destruction, cherem (Ezra 10:8; Micah 4:13) (See ANATHEMA. The wages of impurity was excluded from vows (Deuteronomy 23:17-18); "dog" means "Sodomite" (Micah 1:7)
Remnant - He corrected the tenet that everyone would live happily and prosper (Micah 2:12-133 ) with the doctrine that only a few would survive and rebuild the nation (Amos 9:8-9 ,Amos 9:8-9,9:11-15 ). ...
The Book of Micah has much the same emphasis. After announcements of judgment, the Lord proclaimed that people would be assembled like sheep and led by the Lord (1618881337_50 ) as their king (Micah 4:6-8 ). The Messiah would give special attention to them (Micah 5:2-5 ,Micah 5:2-5,5:7-9 ). The climax of the book is an exaltation of God as the one who pardons and removes sin from their lives after the judgment had passed (Micah 7:7-20 ). ...
Amos, Hosea, Micah, and Isaiah thus raised a chorus
Black - “Black” is also used figuratively to describe mourning (Job 30:28 ; Jeremiah 4:28 ; Jeremiah 8:21 ; Jeremiah 14:2 ), a visionless day (Micah 3:6 ), the abode of the dead (Job 3:5 ; Jude 1:13 ), and the treachery of Job's friends (Job 6:16 )
Eclipse - Of the sun alluded to in Amos 8:9 ; Micah 3:6 ; Zechariah 14:6 ; Joel 2:10
Plow - Plowing served as a picture of oppression (Psalm 129:3 ) and destruction (Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 3:12 ) but also of expectation of reward (1 Corinthians 9:10 )
mi'Cah, the Book of - (Micah 2:10 ) but is followed instantly by a promise of restoration and triumphant return. (Micah 2:12,13 ) The second section is addressed especially to the princes and heads of the people: their avarice and rapacity are rebuked in strong terms; but the threatening is again succeeded by a promise of restoration. (Luke 1:72,73 ) Micah's prophecies are distinct and clear
Dragon - The name of some unknown creature inhabiting desert places and ruins (Job 30:29 ; Psalm 44:19 ; Isaiah 13:22 ; 34:13 ; 43:20 ; Jeremiah 10:22 ; Micah 1:8 ; Malachi 1:3 ); probably, as translated in the Revised Version, the jackal (q
Adullam - It was one of the cities rebuilt and fortified by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:7 Micah 1:15 , and was reoccupied by the Jews after the captivity, Nehemiah 11:30
Baldness - It is often alluded to (Micah 1:16 ; Amos 8:10 ; Jeremiah 47:5 )
Bozrah - The reference in Isaiah 63:1 to ‘dyed garments’ of Bozrah, and in Micah 2:12 to ‘sheep of Bozrah,’ may indicate the industries for which it was noted
Abdon - A son of Micah
Steal - Covetousness and greed are usually the cause of stealing (Micah 2:2; James 1:14-15; James 4:1-2; see COVET), though some people steal because they are poor and in desperate need (Proverbs 30:8-9). Through deceit and cunning, they may be able to cheat the government, outclass their rivals and exploit the defenceless, but any dishonesty in such matters is still a form of stealing (1 Kings 21:1-15; Proverbs 21:6; Isaiah 1:23; Micah 6:10-13; John 12:4-6; Romans 13:6-7)
Ostrich - bath ya‘ănâh , Leviticus 11:15 , Deuteronomy 14:15 , Job 30:29 , Isaiah 13:21 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Isaiah 43:26 , Jeremiah 50:39 , and Micah 1:8 . The feathers ( Job 39:13 ), the swift pace ( Job 39:18 ), and the mournful cry ( Micah 1:8 ) of the ostrich are all referred to in Scripture, and in Job 30:28 its cry is associated with that other melancholy night-cry the ‘wailing’ of the jackals
Vision - The vision of prophets such as Isaiah, Amos, Hosea, Micah, Ezekiel, Daniel, and John are representative of this aspect of revelation. ...
Among the classical prophets (Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Micah, Obadiah, etc
Hezekiah - Hezekiah's sickness, humiliation, and prolongation of life 15 years in peace, and the prediction that Babylon, then feeble and friendly, would one day carry his descendants into captivity are noticed in Old Testament history, Isaiah 39:1-8; Micah 4:10. The prophecies of Hosea and Micah were delivered partly in his reign; compare Jeremiah 26:17-19; and Nahum was perhaps his contemporary
Bethlehem - This also gave it its ancient name Ephrath, fruitful, Genesis 48:7 Micah 5:2 . It was fortified by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:6 , but was comparatively an unimportant place, Micah 5:1 , and is not mentioned by Joshua or Nehemiah among the cities of Judah
mi'Cah - Micah is evidently a devout believers in Jehovah, and yet so completely ignorant is he of the law of Jehovah that the mode which he adopts of honoring him is to make a molten and graven image, teraphim or images of domestic gods, and to set up an unauthorized priesthood, first in his own family, (Judges 17:5 ) and then in the person of a Levite not of the priestly line. Micah exercised the prophetical office during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, giving thus a maximum limit of 59 years, B
Ephratah - In Ruth 1:2 it is called "Bethlehem-Judah," but the inhabitants are called "Ephrathites;" in Micah 5:2 , "Bethlehem-Ephratah;" in Matthew 2:6 , "Bethlehem in the land of Judah
Nativity of Christ - The birth of our Lord took place at the time and place predicted by the prophets (Genesis 49:10 ; Isaiah 7:14 ; Jeremiah 31:15 ; Micah 5:2 ; Haggai 2:6-9 ; Daniel 9:24,25 )
Nimrod - The prophet Micah called Assyria “the land of Nimrod” (1 Chronicles 5:6 )
Adullam - ...
Micah 1:15 (c) In this passage the results of coming alone with GOD are described as being the blessings which those saints enjoy who hide in that secret place, and under the wings of the Almighty
Abdon - ...
The son of Micah, one of those whom Josiah sent to the prophetess Huldah to ascertain from her the meaning of the recently discovered book of the law (2Chronicles 34:20)
Gath - One of the five cities of the Philistines, 1 Samuel 5:8; 1 Samuel 6:17; Amos 6:2; Micah 1:10; a stronghold of the Anakim, Joshua 11:22; home of Goliath, 1 Samuel 17:4; place whither the ark was carried, 1 Samuel 5:8; where David sought refuge, 1 Samuel 21:10-15; was strengthened by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:8; taken by Hazael of Syria, 2 Kings 12:17; probably recovered by Jehoash, 2 Kings 13:25; broken down by Uzziah, 2 Chronicles 26:6; was probably destroyed before the time of the later prophecies, as it is omitted from the list of royal cities
Nimrod - According to one interpretation of Genesis 10:11 , he also founded Nineveh and the Assyrian empire; though this is usually understood to have been done by Asshur, when expelled by Nimrod from the land of Shinar, Micah 5:6
Ophel - It appears to have been enclosed by a wall, and fortified by a strong tower, 2 Chronicles 27:3 33:14 ; and is thought to be meant by the Hebrew Micah 4:8
Worm - In Micah 7:17 , where it is said, "They shall move out of their holes like worms," perhaps serpents or "creeping things," or as in the Revised Version, "crawling things," are meant
Bullock - It is also translated "calf" (Leviticus 9:3 ; Micah 6:6 )
Brass - " (Micah 4:13)...
Dew - The dew furnishes the sacred penmen with many beautiful allusions, Deuteronomy 32:2 2 Samuel 17:12 Psalm 110:3 Proverbs 19:12 Hosea 14:5 Micah 5:7
Bethlehem - Ruth 4:11-17), and the birthplace of the great ‘son of David’, the promised Messiah, Jesus (Micah 5:2; Matthew 2:1-6; Luke 2:4; Luke 2:11; Luke 2:15; John 7:42)
Messiah - As in ancient times not only the king, but also the priest and the prophet, was consecrated to his calling by being anointed, the word "Messiah" often occurs in the Old Testament in its literal sense, signifying one who has been anointed, 1 Samuel 24:6; Lamentations 4:1-22 :' 20; Ezekiel 28:14; Psalms 105:15; hut generally it has a more specific application, signifying the One who was anointed, the supreme Deliverer who was promised from the beginning, Genesis 3:15, and about whom a long series of prophecies runs through the whole history of Israel from Abram, Genesis 12:3; Genesis 22:18; Jacob, Genesis 49:10; Balaam, Numbers 24:17; Moses, Deuteronomy 18:15; Deuteronomy 18:18; and Nathan, 2 Samuel 7:16; through the psalmists and prophets, Psalms 2:1-12; Psalms 16:1-11; Psalms 22:1-31; Psalms 40:1-17; Psalms 45:1-17; Psalms 110:1-7; Isaiah 7:10-16; Isaiah 9:1-7; Isaiah 11:1-16; Isaiah 13:1-22; Isaiah 53:1-12; Isaiah 61:1-11; Jeremiah 23:5-6; Micah 5:2; Malachi 3:1-4, to his immediate precursor, John the Baptist. The lineage from which Messiah should descend was foretold, Genesis 49:10; Isaiah 11:1, the place in which he should be born, Micah 5:2, the time of his appearance, Daniel 9:20; Daniel 9:25; Haggai 2:7; Malachi 3:1, etc
Tower - "The tower of the flock," or the tower of Ader, Micah 4:8 . Many interpreters assert, that the passage of Micah: in which mention is made of the tower of the flock: "And thou tower of the flock, the strong hold of the daughter of Zion," is to be understood of the city of Bethlehem, out of which our Saviour was to come
Hill, Hill Country - The KJV and REB understood the Hebew Ophel as a fortress or citadel (2 Kings 5:24 ; Isaiah 32:14 ; Micah 4:8 )
Brier -
Micah 7:4 , it denotes a species of thorn shrub used for hedges
Ephratah - " In Micah 5:2 it is called Bethlehem Ephraim
Ahaz - Notwithstanding the remonstrances and warnings of Isaiah, Hosea, and Micah, he appealed for help against Rezin, king of Damascus, and Pekah, king of Israel, who threatened Jerusalem, to Tiglath-pileser, the king of Assyria, to the great injury of his kingdom and his own humilating subjection to the Assyrians (2Kings 16:7,9; 15:29)
Religion - James as president of the Jerusalem council (Acts 15:13-21) had decided against ritualism; so he teaches, instead of Judaic ceremonialism, true religious service is (1) active, (2) passive (Micah 6:7-8; Matthew 23:23); compare Acts 26:5, "our religion"; Colossians 2:18, "worshipping," threeskeia
Shittim - While at Shittim, they were blessed by Balaam (whom Balak had hired to curse Israel; Numbers 22-24 ; compare Micah 6:5 ), committed sin with the Moabite and Midianite women (Numbers 25:1 ), and Joshua was announced as Moses' successor (Deuteronomy 34:9 )
Forest - ya‘ar (root meaning a ‘rugged’ place), Deuteronomy 19:5 , 2 Kings 2:24 , Jeremiah 46:23 , Micah 3:12 etc
Word of od - Below are given some of the types which are used to describe the Word of GOD, which is the Bible:...
Bow Habakkuk 3:9 (a)...
Judge John 12:48 (a)...
Buckler Psalm 18:30 (a)...
Lamp, Psalm 119:105 (a)...
Fire, Jeremiah 23:29 (a)...
Laver, Exodus 30:18 (c)...
Hammer, Jeremiah 23:29 (a)...
Light, Psalm 119:105 (a)...
Meat, 1 Corinthians 3:2 (b)...
Milk, 1 Peter 2:2 (a)...
Rain, Isaiah 55:10-11 (a)...
Seed, Luke 8:11 (a)...
Shield, Psalm 91:4 (a)...
Snow, Isaiah 55:10-11 (a)...
Spoil Psalm 119:162 (a)...
Sword Ephesians 6:17 (a)...
Truth John 17:17 (a)...
Water Ephesians 5:26 (a)...
Micah 7:3 (b) Here we see the care with which wicked men seek to cover up their evil actions, and to prevent the public from seeing what they are doing
Bozrah - Jeremiah 49:13; Amos 1:12; Micah 2:12; perhaps Buseireh, in the mountains of Petra, 20 miles southeast of the Dead Sea
Dragon - The same idea is in Micah 1:8
Towers - A slight tower or look-out was often erected for the keeper of a vineyard or flock, 2 Chronicles 26:10 Isaiah 5:2 Micah 4:8 Matthew 21:33 ; and travelers in Palestine see them in use at this day
Micah - He was a prophet of Judah, a contemporary of Isaiah (Micah 1:1 ), a native of Moresheth of Gath (1:14,15)
Herdsman - The herdsmen lived in tents (Isaiah 38:12 ; Jeremiah 6:3 ); and there were folds for the cattle (Numbers 32:16 ), and watch-towers for the herdsmen, that he might therefrom observe any coming danger (Micah 4:8 ; Nahum 3:8 )
Trust in God - With a lively expectation of his blessing, Micah 7:7
Naked - This word denotes (1) absolute nakedness (Genesis 2:25 ; Job 1:21 ; Ecclesiastes 5:15 ; Micah 1:8 ; Amos 2:16 ); (2) being poorly clad (Isaiah 58:7 ; James 2:15 )
Robbery - In Israel's disorganized state in the northern kingdom this evil was very prevalent (Hosea 4:2; Hosea 6:9; Micah 2:8)
Judges (2) - 17-21, an account, detached from the preceding and out of chronological order, of the invasion of Laish by the Danites, in connection with the story of Micah and his priest, Jonathan, chaps
Omri - In Micah 6:16 it is said "the statutes of Omri are kept:" they with "all the works of the house of Ahab," were kept in remembrance for punishment
Ahaz - The eleventh king of Judah; he was contemporary with the prophets Isaiah, Hosea, and Micah
Eder - Micah 4:8 ) would have been the appellation given to a tower occupied by shepherds for the protection of their flocks against robbers (cf
Balance - The moral necessity of a just balance and true weights and the iniquity of false ones are frequently emphasized by the prophets, moral teachers, and legislators of Israel; see Amos 8:5 , Micah 6:11 , Proverbs 11:1 ; Proverbs 16:11 (‘a just balance and scales are the Lord’s’) Proverbs 20:23 , Leviticus 19:36 , Deuteronomy 25:13 ff
Hook, Hooks - (Isaiah 2:4 ; 18:5 ; Micah 4:3 ; Joel 3:10 ) ...
A flesh-hook for getting up the joints of meat out of the boiling-pot
Fig - It was a sign of peace and prosperity (1 Kings 4:25 ; Micah 4:4 ; Zechariah 3:10 ). ...
The fig-tree of Palestine (Ficus carica) produces two and sometimes three crops of figs in a year, (1) the bikkurah, or "early-ripe fig" (Micah 7:1 ; Isaiah 28:4 ; Hosea 9:10 , RSV), which is ripe about the end of June, dropping off as soon as it is ripe (Nahum 3:12 ); (2) the kermus, or "summer fig," then begins to be formed, and is ripe about August; and (3) the pag (plural "green figs," Song of Solomon 2:13 ; Gr
Bag - ...
...
Another word (kees) so rendered means a bag for carrying weights (Deuteronomy 25:13 ; Proverbs 16:11 ; Micah 6:11 )
Deafness - The enemies of Israel would experience deafness in response to God's restoration of Israel (Micah 7:16 )
Daughter-in-Law - The breakdown of the relationship between mother-in-laws and daughters-in-law illustrated the collapse of moral society (Micah 7:6 )
Gath - After Micah 1:10 we hear no more of Gath among the cities of the Philistines: cf
Jackal - nighttime wailing (Job 30:28-31 ; Micah 1:8 )
Adullam - It was called "the glory of Israel" (Micah 1:15 )
Michal - (mi' kuhl) Personal name meaning, “who is like El (God)?,” a variant form of Micah, “who is like Yah?” and abbreviated form of Michael
Miriam - She was the eldest of three children who grew up to play a leading part in the establishment of Israel as a new and independent nation (1 Chronicles 6:3; Micah 6:4)
Miriam - Her story is referred to in Deuteronomy 24:8-9 in connexion with the ceremonial law of leprosy, and in Micah 6:4 she is spoken of along with Moses and Aaron as a leader of the people
Ripe - ...
Micah 7:1 (b) The prophet is describing his heart hunger
Ophel - Here was the "great tower" (Eder? Hebrew Micah 4:8) and the Levites' residence
Abel-Shittim - The last resting place of Israel before crossing Jordan (Numbers 33:49; Numbers 22:1; Numbers 26:3; Numbers 31:12; Numbers 25:1; Joshua 2:1; Joshua 3:1; Micah 6:5)
Interesting Facts About the Bible - ...
Micah and Nahum...
Middle chapter of...
Job 29:1-25
Ophel - Micah used the Hebrew term to name “the strong hold of the daughter of Zion” (Nehemiah 4:8 )
Teraphim - Micah also had them in his house, and regarded them as 'gods
Fig, Fig Tree - ( 1 Kings 4:25 ; Micah 4:4 ; Zechariah 3:10 ) The fig is a pear-shaped fruit, and is much used by the Orientals for food
Bethlehem - It was also called Beth-lehem Ephratah (Micah 5:2 ), Beth-lehem-judah (1 Samuel 17:12 ), and "the city of David" (Luke 2:4 ). But it was distinguished above every other city as the birth-place of "Him whose goings forth have been of old" (Matthew 2:6 ; Compare Micah 5:2 )
Dust - This act was sometimes accomplished by rolling in dust (Micah 1:10 ). To eat or lick dust (Genesis 3:14 ; Psalm 72:9 ; Isaiah 65:25 ; Lamentations 3:29 ; Micah 7:17 ) was to suffer humiliation and powerlessness before an enemy
Cattle - The districts most famous for their flocks of sheep were the plain of Sharon (Isaiah 65 :: 10 ), Mount Carmel (Micah 7:14 ), Bashan and Gilead (Micah 7:14 ). They were folded at night, and guarded by their keepers against the attacks of the lion (Micah 5:8 ), the bear (1 Samuel 17:34 ), and the wolf (Matthew 10:16 ; John 10:12 )
Apple - ) in Micah 7:4 , a thorny plant bearing fruit like the potato-apple
Augustus Caesar - His decree that all the world should be taxed, each going to his own city, was the divinely ordered (Micah 5:2) occasion of Jesus' birth taking place at Bethlehem
Mareshah - An important city in the Shephçlah of Judah ( Joshua 15:44 ), fortified by Rehoboam ( 2 Chronicles 11:8 ; see also 2Ch 14:9-10 ; 2 Chronicles 20:37 , Micah 1:15 )
Floor - (See also Micah 4:12; Luke 3:17)
Ahaz - His sixteen-year reign was contemporary with the prophets Isaiah and Micah
Baldness - See Micah 1:16 ; and instances of it occur, Isaiah 15:2 ; Jeremiah 47:5
Adoration - (Psalm 72:9 ; Micah 7:17 ) Similar adoration was paid to idols, (1 Kings 19:18 ) sometimes, however, the act consisted simply in kissing the hand to the object of reverence, (Job 31:27 ) and in kissing the statue itself
Ephod - Gideon's ephod became a snare to Israel; and Micah made one, that his idol might be duly worshipped, Judges 8:27 ; 17:5 ; 18:17
Eagle, - The vulture also agrees with Micah 1:16 which speaks of its baldness, for the vulture's head and neck are without feathers
Micah - The style of Micah is nervous, concise, and elegant, often elevated, and poetical, but sometimes obscure from sudden transitions of subject; and the contrast of the neglected duties of justice, mercy, humility, and piety, with the punctilious observance of the ceremonial sacrifices, affords a beautiful example of the harmony which subsists between the Mosaic and Christian dispensations, and shows that the law partook of that spiritual nature which more immediately characterizes the religion of Jesus. ...
The prophecy of Micah, contained in the fifth chapter, is, perhaps, the most important single prophecy in all the Old Testament, and the most comprehensive respecting the personal character of the Messiah, and his successive manifestations to the world
Innocents - They quoted to him the words of Micah (Micah 5:2), who speaks of the governor ruling Israel, who is to come out of Bethlehem in Judah, the city of David
Thorns, Thistles, Etc - chçdeq ( Proverbs 15:19 ‘thorn,’ Micah 7:4 ‘brier’ ; cf. mĕsûkâh , a thorn hedge ( Micah 7:4 ). , are commonly used as hedges; and tangled masses of dead thorny branches from the Zizyphus and similar trees are used, particularly in the Jordan Valley, as defences round fields, flocks, or tents ( Proverbs 15:11 , Micah 7:4 etc
Bible, Books of the - According to the Council of Trent, there are three groups in the Old Testament, embracing 46 books: ...
21 historical books:
Genesis
Exodus
Leviticus
Numbers
Deuteronomy
Josue
Judges
Ruth
1,2Kings (1,2Samuel)
3,4Kings (1,2Kings)
1,2Paralipomenon (1,2Chronicles)
Esdras
Nehemiah
Tobias
Judith
Esther
1,2Machabees
7 didactical books:
Job
Psalms
Proverbs
Ecclesiastes
Canticle of Canticles (Song of Solomon)
Wisdom and
Ecclesiasticus (Sirach)
18 prophetical books:
Isaias
Jeremias (with Lamentations)
the major prophets
Baruch
Ezechiel
Daniel
the minor prophets
Osee
Joel
Amos
Abdias or Obadiah
Jonas
Micah
Nahum
Habacuc
Sophonias or Zephaniah
Aggeus or Haggai
Zacharias
Malachias
The difference between the Jewish and Catholic counting is due to the fact that the Catholics accept also the so-called deuterocanonical books
Cord - In Micah 2:5, "cast a cord by lot" i
Mesha - " (See JEHORAM, JEHOSHAPHAT, ELISHA, ENGEDI, CHEMOSH, on the confederacy against Mesha and the superstitions indignation raised against Israel because of their reducing him to such desperation that he sacrificed his own son (Micah 6:7), so that the allies departed to their own land
Miriam - Later biblical writers remembered her as an example to Israel in cases of leprosy (Deuteronomy 24:9 ) and as a leader sent by God (Micah 6:4 )
Slothful - A same or related Hebrew root describes a loose tongue or mind as deceitful (Job 13:7 ; Job 27:4 ; Psalm 32:2 ; Psalm 52:4 ; Micah 6:12 )
Sore - Pressing, irritating (Micah 2:10 )
Jonathan - A Levite, son of Gershom, and grandson of Moses, who after the death of Joshua impiously served as a priest, first to Micah, and then to the Danites in Laish or Dan, where his posterity succeeded him until the captivity, Judges 17:1-18:31
Eagle - It is clear from Micah 1:16 ‘enlarge thy baldness as the eagle,’ that the vulture is referred to
Club - Shebet is a rod or staff used in agriculture (Isaiah 28:27 ), herding flocks (Psalm 23:4 ), in punishing people (Exodus 21:20 ; Proverbs 22:15 ; Micah 5:1 ), symbolizing authority of office (Numbers 24:17 ; Isaiah 14:5 )
Hoshe'a - (Micah 5:1 ) Of the subsequent fortunes of Hoshea nothing is known
Shittim - The reference to Shittim in Micah 6:5 ‘from Shittim to Gilgal’ is geographically unintelligible, and is rightly thought by many scholars to be a gloss
Bozrah - Burckhardt saw goats in large numbers there, just as Isaiah (Isaiah 34:6) describes; compare Isaiah 63:1; Amos 1:12; Micah 2:12
Mule - Rechesh is translated "mules," Esther 8:10; Esther 8:14; but in 1 Kings 4:28 "DROMEDARIES" Micah 1:13, "swift beasts
Divine - Micah 3
a'Haz - (2 Chronicles 28:27 )
Son of Micah
Lachish - Hence, Micah (Micah 1:13) warned the inhabitants of Lachish to flee on the swift beast (there's a play of like sounds between Lachish and rechesh ), Sennacherib being about to make it his head quarters, for "she is the beginning of the sin to the daughter of Zion, for the transgressions of Israel were found in thee
Brier - הרק , Proverbs 15:19 ; Micah 7:4 . In Micah, the unjust judge, taking bribes, is a brier, holding every thing that comes within his reach, hooking all that he can catch
Shepherd - ...
Towers were sometimes erected to spy a foe afar off, and to guard the flock (2 Chronicles 26:10; 2 Chronicles 27:4, compare "tower of Edar," Genesis 35:21; Micah 4:8). you shall be counted as Mine, and subjected to My chastening discipline with a view to My ultimate saving of the elect, Micah 7:14), checking each sheep as it passed; to act as porter, guarding the entrance to the fold by night (John 10:3). Princes, and even hostile leaders, are called shepherds: Isaiah 44:28; Jeremiah 2:8; Jeremiah 3:15; Jeremiah 6:3; Ezekiel 34:2; Micah 5:5
Rachel - In other places, however ( Ruth 1:2 ; Ruth 4:11 , Micah 5:2 ), Ephrath is another name for Bethlehem , as it is also explained in Genesis 35:19 ; Genesis 48:7
Sickle - ]'>[1] of Isaiah 2:4 , Micah 4:3 for ‘pruning hooks’)
Brass - It is a symbol of insensibility and obstinacy in sin (Isaiah 48:4 ; Jeremiah 6:28 ; Ezekiel 22:18 ), and of strength (Psalm 107:16 ; Micah 4:13 )
Plead - Micah 6 is a classic example of such a legal case against Judah, calling on the people “to plead” their case (6:1) and progressively showing how only God has a valid case (6:8)
Hedge - Isaiah (Isaiah 5:5) distinguishes the "hedge" (mesukah ) and the "wall" (geder ); the prickly tangled "hedge" being an additional fence (Micah 7:4)
Household - The words of ancient prophecy (Micah 7:6) then receive a fulfilment
Jonathan - A son of Gershom and a Levite, who impiously served as a priest, first to Micah, and then to the Danites in Laish or Dan
Thresh - ...
Micah 4:13 (a) By this type we understand that the nation of Israel was to whip her enemies and conquer the opposing nations
Hatred - People whose lives are under the power of sin hate what is good, hate those who are righteous, and hate God (1 Kings 22:8; Psalms 69:4; Micah 3:2; John 3:20; John 15:18; John 15:23-25; John 17:14)
Mount - " So proclaimed both Isaiah and Micah, Isaiah 2:2; Micah 4:1
False Prophets - It was principally in the later prophetic period of Micah, Jeremiah, and Zechariah that these prophets of smooth things, subject to no true and Divine revelation, came to be regarded as professional tricksters, making a living out of their false predictions (Micah 3:5, 1618881337_1). This is particularly shown in Jeremiah 6:13-15 and Micah 2:11, and is confirmed by instances, not a few, in which the apparently unpatriotic attitude of the true prophet, compared with that assumed by the false, resulted in disfavour and even in persecution (1 Kings 22:27, 2 Chronicles 16:10, Jeremiah 20:2)
Hezekiah - ...
Religious reforms...
The prophets of Hezekiah’s time (he reigned from 716 to 687 BC) were Hosea, Isaiah and Micah. Hosea 1:1), Isaiah was very influential around the palace (Isaiah 1:1; Isaiah 38:1) and Micah was preaching with such authority that the king was taking good notice of him (Micah 1:1; Jeremiah 26:17-19)
Micah, Book of - The prediction regarding the place "where Christ should be born," one of the most remarkable Messianic prophecies (Micah 5:2 ), is quoted in Matthew 2:6
Self-Seeking - Micah 2:1-2 ; that it is contrary to the example of all wise and good men: that the most awful examples of the punishment of this sin are recorded in Scripture; as Pharaoh, Achan, Haman, Gehazi, Absalom, Ananias and Sapphira, Judas, and many others
Covetousness - The Christian Church needs to study anew the Bible teaching concerning covetousness, as found in Jeremiah 22:17 , Micah 2:2 , Luke 12:15 , Romans 7:7 , Ephesians 5:3 ; Ephesians 5:6 , 1 Timothy 6:10 , Hebrews 13:5 , and other passages
Brier - ...
Micah 7:4 (a) The brier in this case represents a little, weak, frail man who thinks he is somebody, when he really is a cipher ( Galatians 6:3)
Oil - Before the invention of mills, this was obtained by pounding them in a mortar, Exodus 27:20 ; and sometimes by treading them with the feet in the same manner as were grapes, Deuteronomy 33:24 ; Micah 6:15
Thing - He sent after this manner ten asses laden with the good things of Egypt-- Genesis 42 ...
They took the things which Micah had made
Fig - On the other hand ‘to lay waste one’s vines and fig trees’ indicated devastation and ruin (1 Kings 4:25; 2 Kings 18:31; Hosea 2:12; Joel 1:7; Joel 1:12; Micah 4:4)
Bethlehem - Bethlehem appears in Judges 17:7-13 as the home of the Levite who became priest to Micah. Micah 5:2 was understood to indicate that the Messiah, like David, would be born in Bethlehem not Jerusalem
Thorn - hedek (Proverbs 15:19 ), rendered "brier" in Micah 7:4
Jotham - He was contemporary with the prophets Isaiah, Hosea, and Micah, by whose ministrations he profited
Ephod - The breast-plate, with its twelve precious stones, gave an importance to the ephod which led to its adoption in the idolatries of Gideon and Micah (Judges 8:27; Judges 17:5; Judges 18:14)
Balaam - In Micah 6:5 reference also is made to the relations between Balaam and Balak
Olive - ...
Mostly, however, people grew olive trees for their fruit, which could be crushed to produce oil (Exodus 27:20; Leviticus 2:4; 2 Kings 18:32; Micah 6:15; see OIL)
Lachish - Micah’s denunciation of Lachish as ‘the beginning of sin to the daughter of Zion’ ( Micah 1:13 ) doubtless refers to incidents of which we are quite ignorant
Heir - Jeremiah 49; Micah 1 4
Oil - This, however seems to have been practiced among the Hebrews, at least to some extent when the berries had become soft by keeping, Micah 6:15
Worm - zôch ăl ç‘ârets , ‘worms of the earth’ ( Micah 7:17 ), may possibly refer to true earthworms (which are comparatively rare in Palestine), but more probably to serpents
lo-Ammi - " Not only Judaea, but the whole earth shall be the seed plot wherein Gentile nations shall be the spiritual growth of the Jewish seed sown everywhere (Micah 5:7; Romans 11:12; Romans 11:15; Zechariah 10:9)
Ahab - Because of his idolatry, lust, and covetousness, Ahab is referred to as pre-eminently the type of a wicked king (2Kings 8:18; 2 Chronicles 22:3 ; Micah 6:16 )
Power - Here power approximates God's Spirit (compare Micah 3:8 ; Luke 1:35 )
Dew - Israel shall hereafter be "in the midst of many people as a dew from the Lord" (Micah 5:7); overwhelming their enemies "as the dew falleth on the ground" (2 Samuel 17:12), and as "life from the dead" to the millennial earth, as "the dew of herbs" causes them to revive after the deadness of winter (Isaiah 26:19)
Lion - , 1 Kings 20:35 , 2 Kings 17:25 ), and especially to shepherds’ flocks ( 1 Samuel 17:34 , Isaiah 31:4 , Amos 3:12 , Micah 5:8 )
Violence - Such violence was especially evidenced in the oppression of the poor by the rich (Psalm 55:9 ,Psalms 55:9,55:11 ; Psalm 73:6 ; Jeremiah 22:17 ; Micah 6:12 ; James 5:1-6 )
Bethlehem - Nearby was Rachel's burial-place (still marked by a white mosque near the town), and called Ephrath, Genesis 35:19; the home of Naomi, Boaz, and Ruth, Ruth 1:19; birthplace of David, 1 Samuel 17:12; burial-place of Joab's family, 2 Samuel 2:32; taken by the Philistines, and had a noted well, 2 Samuel 23:14-15; fortified by Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 11:6; foretold as the birthplace of Christ, Micah 5:2; the birthplace of Jesus, Matthew 2:1; was visited by the shepherds, Luke 2:15-17, and by the Magi, Matthew 2:1-23
Teach - Micah 3 ...
TEACH, n
Darkness - Believers need not fear this darkness, for God has become their light (Psalms 23:4; Psalms 27:1; Micah 7:8; Ephesians 5:14)
Bashan - It was well known for its forests, sheep, and particularly the fine cattle it produced (Deuteronomy 32:14; Psalms 22:12; Isaiah 2:13; Jeremiah 50:19; Ezekiel 27:6; Ezekiel 39:18; Amos 4:1; Micah 7:14)
Soothsaying - of קָסַם, which, with its kindred terms, is translated ‘divine’ in Numbers 22:7; Numbers 23:23, Deuteronomy 18:10; Deuteronomy 18:14, 1 Samuel 28:8, 2 Kings 17:17, Isaiah 44:25, Ezekiel 12:24; Ezekiel 13:6-7; Ezekiel 21:21-23, Micah 3:6-7, the Septuagint in all these cases employing μάντις and its cognates. ‘Soothsayers’ is the translation in Micah 5:12 of מְעוֹנְנִים (Authorized Version and Revised Version ), the Septuagint in this case rendering the word by ἀποφθεγγόμενοι
Idolatry - This species of idolatry is seen further developed in the case of Micah, who had a house of gods. See Micah
Jonathan - Jonathan was taken into the service of Micah as ‘father and priest’ ( Judges 17:10 ); but, not long after he had taken up his abode there, six hundred Danites came that way and induced Jonathan to leave Micah and join them as their priest ( Judges 18:11-31 )
Kingdom - And the Prophet Micah, speaking of the same era, represents it as a time when Jehovah, having removed all the afflictions of his people, would reign over them in Mount Zion thenceforth even forever, Micah 4:6-7
Exodus - Yahweh revealed his character, showing that he was a God who redeems (Deuteronomy 15:15; 2 Samuel 7:23; Nehemiah 1:8-10; Micah 6:4; cf. They prayed that as he had first brought them out of Egypt and into the promised land, so he would now bring them out of Babylon and back to their homeland (1618881337_3; Isaiah 43:14-21; Isaiah 48:20-21; Isaiah 49:25-26; Isaiah 51:9-11; Isaiah 52:11-12; Jeremiah 31:10-12; Micah 7:14-17)
Remnant - ...
Micah also announced the regathering of the Jewish people after the Exile. Thus Micah prophesied: “I will surely assemble them together, O Jacob, all of thee; I will surely gather the remnant of Israel …” (2:12). ” In 5:7-8 and 7:18, Micah announces a similar idea
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - --Of the sixteen prophets, four are usually called the great prophets, namely, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Daniel, and twelve the Minor prophets, namely, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakuk,Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi. They may be divided into four groups: the prophets of the northern kingdom --Hosea, Amos, Joel, Jonah; the prophets of the southern kingdom --Isaiah, Jeremiah, Obadiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah; the prophets of the captivity --Ezekiel and Daniel; the prophets of the return --Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi. They may be arranged in the following chronological order, namely, Joel, Jonah, Hoses, Amos, Isaiah, Micah, Nahum, Zephaniah, Habakkuk, Obadiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi
Prince (2) - The description of Bethlehem as ‘in no wise least among the princes of Judah’ is perplexing in view of Micah 5:2 [1]) from which the quotation is taken. there is a close correspondence between the ‘princes’ (ἡγεμόνες) of Micah 5:6 a and the ‘governor’ (ἡγούμενος) of Micah 5:6 b
Prophecy, Prophet - Because of their dishonesty and greed they were known as false prophets (1 Kings 22:5-8; 1 Kings 22:13-18; Jeremiah 6:13-14; Jeremiah 23:16-17; Micah 2:11; Micah 3:5-7; Micah 3:11). The truth was that the people were heading for judgment, and the corruption of the prophets was only adding to that judgment (Jeremiah 23:11-17; Ezekiel 13:8-16; Micah 6:6-85). ...
If prophets were truly God’s messengers, their chief concern was not with foretelling events, but with leading people to repentance and obedience (Micah 3:8; Micah 7:18; Zephaniah 2:1-3)
Justice - The forces which deprive people of what is basic for community life are condemned as oppression (Micah 2:2 ; Ecclesiastes 4:1 ). The needs which are met include land (Ezekiel 45:6-9 ; compare Micah 2:2 ; Micah 4:4 ) and the means to produce from the land, such as draft animals and millstones (Deuteronomy 22:1-4 ; Deuteronomy 24:6 ). Justice is required to be present with the sacrificial system (Amos 5:21-24 ; Micah 6:6-8 ; Isaiah 1:11-17 ; Matthew 5:23-24 ), fasting (Isaiah 58:1-10 ), tithing (Matthew 23:23 ), obedience to the other commandments (Matthew 19:16-21 ), or the presence of the Temple of God (Jeremiah 7:1-7 )
Rufus - ) Micah 5:2 (1 Heb. —Like his older contemporary Isaiah (Isaiah 9, 11), Micah looks forward to the end of the Assyrian invasion as the time when the Messianic hope shall be fulfilled. Once more, as in the days of David, guerilla bands gather together to avenge the wrongs of their nation (Micah 5:1). Micah says that the ideal king is to come out of Bethlehem, a town held in little estimation; and Mt. ...
(β) The words of Micah, ‘he that is to be ruler in Israel,’ are expanded by Mt. But in Micah 5:4 (3 Heb. To David, as His vicegerent, He commits the care of His flock (2 Samuel 5:2, Psalms 78:71), and He will yet set up one shepherd over them, who shall be pre-eminent in those qualities which David in a large measure manifested as a ruler (Micah 5:4, Ezekiel 34:23; Ezekiel 37:24, Psalms 2:9 Rufus - ) Micah 5:2 (1 Heb. —Like his older contemporary Isaiah (Isaiah 9, 11), Micah looks forward to the end of the Assyrian invasion as the time when the Messianic hope shall be fulfilled. Once more, as in the days of David, guerilla bands gather together to avenge the wrongs of their nation (Micah 5:1). Micah says that the ideal king is to come out of Bethlehem, a town held in little estimation; and Mt. ...
(β) The words of Micah, ‘he that is to be ruler in Israel,’ are expanded by Mt. But in Micah 5:4 (3 Heb. To David, as His vicegerent, He commits the care of His flock (2 Samuel 5:2, Psalms 78:71), and He will yet set up one shepherd over them, who shall be pre-eminent in those qualities which David in a large measure manifested as a ruler (Micah 5:4, Ezekiel 34:23; John 21:15-178 Psalms 2:9 Jonathan - It marks how prone to idolatry were the Israelites, that the priest to Micah's images and afterward to the Danites was a Levite, whose special duty it was to maintain pure Jehovah's worship, and he a descendant of Moses himself! Idolatry begins with the people, it being natural to our sensuous cravings; then it seeks the sanction of the church. Micah began with robbery of his own mother; her curses extorted restitution; she as a meritorious act consecrated the money for a "graven image" (pecel ) and the "molten pedestal" (massecah ) on which it stood like Aaron's calf (Exodus 32:4), to be a representation of Jehovah; it was the forerunner of Jeroboam's calves long after and idol. )...
Micah had a domestic sanctuary in which he consecrated his son as priest; here the image was set. Micah afterwards found a Levite for the service, who had sojourned in Bethlehem Judah and left it to seek maintenance where he could, in Mount Ephraim. With the self deceiving folly of idolaters Micah then said, "now I know that Jehovah will do me good seeing I have a Levite to my priest," as if a Levite's presence could bless where both priest and patron were apostates from the God of all blessing. Micah with self convicting folly expostulated in vain, "ye have taken away my gods which I made (!) and the priest, . The priesthood remained hereditary in the family of Jonathan "until the captivity of the ark" (the taking of the ark by the Philistines), and Micah's images of his own making remained set up "all the time that the house of God was in Shiloh
Grass - Humans depend on God to make grass grow (Psalm 104:14 ; Micah 5:7 ; Zechariah 10:1 )
Messiah - ...
His birthplace (Micah 5:2), His lineage (Isaiah 11:1), His time of coming (Daniel 9:25-26), while the second temple stood (Haggai 2:9), and His forerunner (Isaiah 40:3-5; Malachi 3:1) are foretold
Bochim - Compare the phrase, "O My people, remember now from Shittim unto Gilgal" (Micah 6:5): not so much a geographical notice as a reference to the people's spiritual and national obligations to God in connection with those places
Flock - John 10:11-18 ), who has made his people the objects of his saving grace and heirs of all the covenant promises (Micah 7:14 )
Sowing - Micah 6:15, Psalms 126:5-6) sayings upon sowing, in a figurative sense, are preserved in John 4:36-37
Carmel - It is well wooded with shrubberies and brushwood, Isaiah 33:9 ; Micah 7:14 , and is beautiful with the multitude of its flowers, in fact the spot is declared to be even now the fragrant lovely mountain as of old
Brass - nĕhôsheth is used in the OT (Psalms 107:16, Micah 4:13, Zechariah 6:1)
Tower - ...
Micah 4:8 (a) Mount Zion is a high, rocky fortress, quite difficult to ascend, very steep
Gilead - Jacob fled toward Gilead, Genesis 31:21; it was conquered by Israel, Numbers 21:24; Judges 10:18; Joshua 12:2; Deuteronomy 2:36; was given to Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh, Joshua 17:6; under Jephthah it defeated the Ammonites, Judges 10:18; was a refuge for Saul's son and for David, 2 Samuel 2:9; 2 Samuel 17:22; 2 Samuel 17:24; the home of Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1; taken in part by Syria, 2 Kings 10:33; by Assyria, 2 Kings 15:25-29; referred to in the minor prophets, Hosea 6:8; Hosea 12:11; Amos 1:3; Amos 1:13; Obadiah 1:19; Micah 7:14; Zechariah 10:10
Ahaz - Son of Micah
Teraphim - Micah had them in his house, and felt sure that Jehovah would bless him when he had a Levite to minister before them
Conversations - Promenading, so fashionable and so agreeable in colder latitudes, was wearisome and unpleasant in the warm climates of the east, and this is probably one reason why the inhabitants of those climates preferred holding intercourse with one another, while sitting near the gate of the city, or beneath the shade of the fig tree and the vine, 1 Samuel 22:6 ; Micah 4:4
Dan - Hence they had another portion granted them, near Mount Hermon, Judges 18:1-31, where they set up a graven image stolen from Micah 3:1-12
Kingdom of Heaven - The ancient prophets, when describing the character of the Messiah, Daniel 2:44 7:13,14 Micah 4:1-7 , and even when speaking of his humiliation and sufferings, were wont to intersperse hint of his power, his reign, and his divinity
Ostrich, - (Micah 1:8 ) In (Job 39:13-18 ) will be found a description of the bird's habits
Covet - Because covetousness drives people to get what they want, it produces all kinds of immoral and unlawful behaviour, such as stealing, oppression, deceit and violence (Exodus 20:17; Joshua 7:21; Micah 2:2; 1 Corinthians 5:9-11)
Malachi - Micah and Jeremiah had disputes with false prophets (Micah 2:6-11 ; Jeremiah 27-28 )
Ostrich - ...
The ostrich is described in Job 39:13-18 ; and in various places where our translation calls it the "owl," Job 30:29 Jeremiah 50:39 ; or "daughter of the owl," Isaiah 13:21 34:13 43:20 Micah 1:8 . " ...
When the ostrich is provoked, she sometimes makes a fierce, angry, and hissing noise, with her throat inflated, and her mouth open; at other times she has a moaning and plaintive cry; and in the night the male repels prowling enemies by a short roar which is sometimes taken for that of a lion, Micah 1:8
Government - At times they may decide to speak and act in support of the principle of justice that the government is supposed to administer (Isaiah 3:14; Isaiah 5:22-23; Micah 3:1-3; Acts 16:35-39; Acts 22:25; Acts 25:10-11). Amos 2:6-7; Micah 2:1-2; Zephaniah 3:3; see JUSTICE). In due course he will deal with them, in whatever way and with whatever means he chooses (1 Kings 11:29-37; Isaiah 1:23-26; Daniel 5:24-28; Amos 6:4-7; Micah 3:1-4; Revelation 18:1-2; Revelation 18:24)
Violence - Micah's use of the term in 6:12 connotes verbal violence when he links it to "speaking lies" and "deceitful tongues. ...
Several of the Latter Prophets inveigh against various leaders of Israel because they, through legal manipulation or in some situations physical abuse, "plunder" the poor (Isaiah 3:14 ; 10:2 ; Jeremiah 22:3 ; Micah 2:2 ; 3:2 ; Malachi 1:13 ). ...
Micah charges the officials of his day with coveting fields and "grasping" them (Micah 2:2 a); perhaps this violence was accomplished by means of "extortion" of the household (2:2b). Although none of the terms under examination is used by the narrator, the Ahab/Naboth incident appears to offer a classic narrative illustration of the Micah situation in the extreme
Magic - Magic—the attempt to exploit supernatural powers by formulaic recitations to achieve goals that were otherwise unrealizablewas seen in a negative light in the Old Testament (Leviticus 19:26,31 ; 20:6 ; 1 Samuel 28:9 ; Isaiah 8:19 ; 44:25 ; 57:3 ; Jeremiah 27:9 ; Ezekiel 22:28 ; Micah 5:12 ; Nahum 3:4 ; Malachi 3:5 ) and was banned under penalty of death (Exodus 22:18 ; Leviticus 20:27 ; Deuteronomy 18:10-11 ). However, many Canaanite magical practices were later widespread in the divided monarchy: Jezebel practiced sorcery (2 Kings 9:22 ); Manasseh encouraged divination (2 Kings 21:6 ; 2 Chronicles 33:6 ); Hebrew seers and diviners practiced the magic arts (Micah 3:7 ); and Isaiah condemned women who wore charms (Isaiah 3:18-23 ). However, many of the banned terms (primarily in Deuteronomy 18:10-11 ) have defied easy explanation, including child sacrifice (possibly used for divinatory purposes Deuteronomy 18:10 ; 2 Kings 21:6 ), types of divination (Numbers 23:23 ; Deuteronomy 18:10-11 ; 1 Samuel 15:23 ; 2 Kings 17:17 ; Mark 3:23-301 ), sorceries (Exodus 22:18 ; Deuteronomy 18:11 ; Jeremiah 27:9 ; Micah 5:12 ; Malachi 3:5 ), and necromancy (1 Samuel 28 )
Mourn - ); (2) by loud lamentation (Ruth 1:9 ; 1 Samuel 6:19 ; 2 Samuel 3:31 ); (3) by the disfigurement of the person, as rending the clothes (Genesis 37:29,34 ; Matthew 26:65 ), wearing sackcloth (Genesis 37:34 ; Psalm 35:13 ), sprinkling dust or ashes on the person (2 Samuel 13:19 ; Jeremiah 6:26 ; Job 2:12 ), shaving the head and plucking out the hair of the head or beard (Leviticus 10:6 ; Job 1:20 ), neglect of the person or the removal of ornaments (Exodus 33:4 ; Deuteronomy 21:12,13 ; 2 Samuel 14:2 ; 19:24 ; Matthew 6:16,17 ), fasting (2 Samuel 1:12 ), covering the upper lip (Leviticus 13:45 ; Micah 3:7 ), cutting the flesh (Jeremiah 16:6,7 ), and sitting in silence (Judges 20:26 ; 2 Samuel 12:16 ; 13:31 ; Job 1:20 )
Vows - ...
For vows of extermination ANATHEMA and (Ezra 10:8 ; Micah 4:13 ) It seems that the practice of shaving the head at the expiration of a votive period was not limited to the Nazaritic vow
Ephratah - Micah 5:2 also appears to equate Bethlehem and Ephrath(ah) as the home of the coming Messiah
Omri - Compare Micah 6:16
Before - Micah 6
Dew - " (Micah 5:7) No predisposing cause in men, no, not even the wants or miseries of men, prompting the infinite mind of God to bestow his blessings
Judges, Book of, - (Judges 19:1 ; 18:1 ) It records -- (a) The conquest of Laish by a portion of the tribe of Dan, and the establishment there of the idolatrous worship of Jehovah already instituted by Micah in Mount Ephraim
Fear - ...
Sinners have good reason to fear God; because God’s punishment will one day fall upon them (Micah 7:16-17; Matthew 10:28)
Judge - Despite these laws, in later times Israel’s administration became so corrupt that judges and priests favoured anyone who paid them well (Amos 2:6-7; Amos 5:12; Micah 3:11; Zephaniah 3:3)
Rod - ...
Micah 6:9 (b) Here we see a type of the whipping, the punishment and the chastisement which may come upon the child of GOD. ...
Micah 7:14 (b) Probably this refers to the power of GOD to bring rich blessings, both material and spiritual, to His people
Fig - It is possible the references in Micah 4:4 , Zechariah 3:10 may be to this, or to the not uncommon custom of having fig trees overhanging rural dwellings. These are then known as the dafûr or early figs, mentioned in Isaiah 28:4 , Jeremiah 24:2 , Hosea 9:10 , Micah 7:1 , as bikkûrâh , ‘the figs first ripe
Spiritual Gifts - Examples of this are: Bezaleel, who was given the gift of craftsmanship (Exodus 31:2-3 ); Othniel, who was equipped to be a judge (Judges 3:9-10 ); Gideon, who was given military skills (Judges 6:34 ); Samson, who was given physical strength (Judges 14:6 ,Judges 14:6,14:19 ); Saul, who was given political skills (1 Samuel 10:6 ); and Micah, who was given prophetic gifts (Micah 3:8 )
Fig - "To sit under one's own vine and figtree" was the proverb for peace and prosperity; so under Solomon (1 Kings 4:25); type of the true Solomon, Prince of peace, and of His coming millennial reign (Micah 4:4; Zechariah 3:10); men will be safe in the open field as in the house. ...
Esteemed a delicacy (Jeremiah 24:2; Hosea 9:10; Micah 7:1): "when he that looketh upon it seeth, while it is yet in his hand, he eateth it up"; it looks so tempting he instantly swallows it; so the Assyrian conqueror Shalmaneser shall not merely conquer, but with impatient avidity destroy Samaria
Idol - ...
Either of the former suggestions is the possible meaning of the word in the Micah incident recorded in Judg. 17:5: “… Micah had a house of gods, and made an ephod, and terâphı̂ym and consecrated one of his sons, who became his priest
Lending - They seized debtors’ food and clothing (Amos 2:6-8; Amos 5:11; Amos 8:6), farm animals (Job 24:3), and houses and land (Micah 2:2; Micah 2:9)
Remnant - Theologically, remnant language clusters in several Old Testament books, the authors of which lived at some hinge point in history: Isaiah (37:31-32) and Micah (4:7; 7:18) near the time of Israel's collapse; Jeremiah (11:23; 50:20) and Zephaniah (2:7-9) near the time of Judah's fall; and Paul near the time of the emergence of the church (Romans 11:5 ). What pros- pects has the remnant that becomes, as in the exile, the carrier of God's promise? The prospect was for the exiles to be gathered together and to return to the homeland (Jeremiah 23:3 ; 31:7-9 ; Micah 2:12-13 ; 4:6-7 ). ...
The remnant was the recipient of other promises: granting of pardon (Micah 7:18-20 ); God's everlasting love (Jeremiah 31:2 ); taking root (2 Kings 19:30 ; cf. Isaiah 37:31-32 ); removal of enemies and becoming established like a lion in the forest (Micah 4:7-9 ); the Lord's promise to be a garland of glory for the remnant (Isaiah 28:5-6 ); and a grant by God for the people to possess all things (Zechariah 8:6 )
Sin - are Amos, Hosea, Micah, and Isaiah. , Hosea 5:1 , Micah 3:5 ; Micah 3:11 etc. Both Isaiah and Micah mourn over the same moral deciension ( Isaiah 5:8 ; Isaiah 1:18 f. , Micah 2:2 etc. , Micah 3:1 ff. , Micah 7:18 , Hosea 6:1 , Amos 9:11 ff
Owl - " In the list of unclean birds (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ); also mentioned in Job 30:29 ; Isaiah 13:21 ; 34:13 ; 43:20 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ; Micah 1:8
Hunt - In Micah 7:2 the unfaithful are portrayed as hunting each other with nets
Forest - Thus all the great primeval forests of Syria (Ecclesiastes 2:6 ; Isaiah 44:14 ; Jeremiah 5:6 ; Micah 5:8 )
Prostitution - This unfaithfulness was likened to the behaviour of an unfaithful wife who leaves her husband to become a prostitute (Isaiah 1:21; Jeremiah 13:27; Ezekiel 16; Hosea 1:2; Hosea 2:13; Micah 1:7)
Darkness - ; the date of Micah 3:6 with the eclipse June 5th, 716 B
Mercy - In particular they should give help to those in society who are liable to be disadvantaged, such as orphans, widows, aliens, the persecuted, the afflicted and the poor (Deuteronomy 14:28-29; Deuteronomy 24:19; Proverbs 19:17; Micah 6:8; Zechariah 7:9-10; Luke 10:29-37; Romans 12:8; James 1:27)
Water of Jealousy - Dust is the emblem of condemnation (Genesis 3:14; Micah 7:17; compare John 8:6; John 8:8)
Zephaniah - So far as we know, Zephaniah was the first prophet to appear in Judah since Isaiah and Micah, whose work had come to an end seventy years earlier
Lip - sâphâm ( Ezekiel 24:17 ; Ezekiel 24:22 , Micah 3:7 , only in the phrase ‘cover the lips’), whose equivalent is ‘moustache,’ it being the Eastern custom to cover this as a sign of stricken sorrow
Captain - Kady , ( Isaiah 1:10 ; 3:6 ; Micah 3:1,9 )
Family (Jewish) - —Jewish family life, while having many points in common with that of the Gentiles, was marked by a higher standard of purity, the avoidance of infanticide, and the condemnation of the selfish cruelty that in human sacrifice gave the fruit of the body for the sin of the soul (Micah 6:7)
Vine - To dwell under the vine and fig tree is an emblem of domestic happiness and peace, 1 Kings 4:25; Psalms 128:3; Micah 4:4; the rebellious people of Israel are compared to "wild grapes," "an empty vine," "the degenerate plant of a strange vine," etc
Atonement - Whether in Old or New Testament times, forgiveness is solely by God’s grace and sinners receive it by faith (Psalms 32:5; Psalms 51:17; Micah 7:18; Ephesians 2:8)
Bethlehem - In Micah 5:2, "Thou Bethlehem Ephratah, (though) thou be little among the thousands of Judah, (yet) out of thee shall He come forth unto Me (that is) to be ruler in Israel" seems to contradict Matthew 2:6, "Thou art not the least among the princes of Juda. "...
Really, Matthew by independent inspiration unfolds further Micah's prophecy. The low state of David's line when Messiah was born is also implied in Micah (Isaiah 53:2)
Dan - On their way thither they induced the domestic priest of an Ephraimite, Micah, to accompany them with his sacred paraphernalia, an ephod, a graven and a molten image, and the teraphim . The story of the Danites stealing the shrine of Micah is told to account for its sanctity, which Jeroboam I
Prophecy, Prophets - furnished the focus of the ministries of Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, and Micah. The prophets' call to covenant faithfulness revealed an awareness of the law (Isaiah 58:6-9 ; Ezekiel 18:1 ; Micah 6:6-8 ; Hosea 6:6 ; Amos 2:4 ; Amos 5:21-24 ). There were often long lapses between predictions and fulfillment (Micah 3:12 ; Jeremiah 26:16-19 ). (1) Some prophecies seem to have a direct, literal fulfillment: the Messiah was to be born in Bethlehem (Matthew 2:5-6 ; Micah 5:2 ). They predict (Acts 11:28 ; Acts 20:23 ; Acts 27:22-26 ), announce judgments (Acts 13:11 ; Acts 28:25-28 ), act symbolically (Micah 3:11 ), and receive visions (Acts 9:10-11 ; 2 Corinthians 12:1 )
Darkness - God's deliverance (either from ignorance or hostile powers) is described as lighting the darkness (Isaiah 9:2 ; Isaiah 29:18 ; 1618881337_99 ; Micah 7:8 ; 1 Peter 2:9 )
Divination - Of false prophets (Deuteronomy 18:10,14 ; Micah 3:6,7,11 ), of necromancers (1 Samuel 28:8 ), of the Philistine priests and diviners (1 Samuel 6:2 ), of Balaam (Joshua 13:22 )
Prophecy - " (Compare Micah 5:2 ; Haggai 2:6-9 ; Isaiah 7:14 ; 9:6,7 ; 11:1,2 ; 53 ; 60:10,13 ; Psalm 16:11 ; 68:18
Proselyte - And the prophets speak of the time as coming when the strangers shall share in all the privileges of Israel (Ezekiel 47:22 ; Isaiah 2:2 ; 11:10 ; 56:3-6 ; Micah 4:1 )
Neighbor - Refusing to respect the rights of a neighbor constituted moral disintegration and provoked punishment on the nation (Isaiah 3:5 ; Jeremiah 9:4-9 ; Micah 7:5-6 )
Bethlehem - The birth of the Messiah there is prophesied in Micah 5:2 (quoted Matthew 2:6 , John 7:42 ), a prophecy fulfilled by the birth of Christ ( Matthew 2:1 ; Matthew 2:5 , Luke 2:4 ; Luke 2:15 )
Carmel - The fruitfulness of Carmel is alluded to ( Isaiah 33:9 ; Isaiah 35:2 , Amos 1:2 ); it was wooded ( Micah 7:14 ), a fact which made it a good hiding-place ( Amos 9:3 )
Mountain - ” Jerusalem (elevation 2,670 feet) often was called Mount Zion, the hill of the Lord (Psalm 2:6 ; Psalm 135:21 : Isaiah 8:18 ; Joel 3:21 ; Micah 4:2 )
Requirement - ...
What the Lord requires for reconciliation with wayward people is not exorbitantly expensive offerings, but repentance leading to decent behavior toward others, love of "mercy" (hesed [ Micah 6:6-8 )
Gentiles - " "The receiving of them shall be life from the dead" to the whole world (Micah 5:7; Isaiah 2:2-4; Revelation 11:2-15)
Serpent - be utterly and with perpetual shame laid low), of which their present eating dust in taking food off the ground is the pledge (Isaiah 65:25; Micah 7:17; Isaiah 49:23; Psalms 72:9)
Might - Also Micah, being filled with the Holy Spirit, said: “But truly I am full of power by the spirit of the Lord, and of judgment, and of might, to declare unto Jacob his transgression, and to Israel his sin” ( Anointing, - (28:40; Ruth 3:3 ; Micah 6:15 ) Anointing the head with oil or ointment seems also to have been a mark of respect sometimes paid by a host to his guests
Author - it is used of the chief of a tribe or family, Numbers 13:2 (RV, prince); of the "heads" of the children of Israel, Numbers 13:3 ; a captain of the whole people, Numbers 14:4 ; in Micah 1:13 , of Lachish as the leader of the sin of the daughter of Sion: there, as in Hebrews 2:10 , the word suggest a combination of the meaning of leader with that of the source from whence a thing proceeds
Head - The rulers of Israel were called the heads of Israel (Micah 3:1)
Baal (1) - Manasseh sought to bring Judah to the same state of Baal worship as Israel had been under Ahab (2 Kings 21:3; compare Micah 6:16). ...
"Standing images," or possibly pillars or obelisks (matsebah ) were his symbols (1 Kings 14:23; 2 Kings 18:4; 2 Kings 23:14; Micah 5:13)
Justice - Kings are warned about injustice (Matthew 12:18-21 ; Jeremiah 21:12 ; 22:2-3 ; Micah 3:1-3,9-11 ). Pursuing justice in life is of greater worth than religious ritual (Proverbs 21:3 ; Micah 6:8 ; cf
Asherah - It was made of wood ( Judges 6:26 ), and could be planted in the ground ( Deuteronomy 16:21 ), plucked up or cut down ( Micah 5:14 , Exodus 34:13 ), and burned with fire ( Deuteronomy 12:3 ). The disastrous results of this incorporation of heathen elements led to the denunciation of the asherahs by the prophetic exponents of Israel’s religion ( Exodus 34:13 , Jeremiah 17:2 , Micah 5:13 f
Cornelius - Now "whosoever hath to him shall be given" (Matthew 13:12; Isaiah 64:5; Micah 2:7; John 7:17)
Fig - Thus it was a symbol of peace and plenty, 1 Kings 4:25 Micah 4:4 Zechariah 3:10 John 1:49-51
Messi'ah - ( Isaiah 2,66 ) The passage of (Micah 5:2 ) (comp
Perfect - Because on earth sin remains a possibility for all, believers (1 John 1:8 ), need to become perfect even while attaining a relative perfection (Micah 6:6-8 ; Philippians 3:16 ,Philippians 3:16,3:12-14 )
Travail - ...
In Revelation 12:2 the woman is figurative of Israel; the circumstances of her birth pangs are mentioned in Isaiah 66:7 (see also Micah 5:2,3 )
Humility - ...
What God desires most is not outward sacrifices but a humble spirit (Psalm 51:17 ; Micah 6:8 )
Judge (Office) - Judges are accused of showing partiality (Proverbs 24:23 ); of taking bribes (Isaiah 61:8 ; Micah 7:3 ; compare Exodus 23:2-9 ); of failing to defend the interest of the powerless (Isaiah 10:2 ; Jeremiah 5:28 )
Prophecy, Prophesy, Prophesying - ...
"Though much of OT prophecy was purely predictive, see Micah 5:2 , e
Oil - Sometimes the oil was trodden out in a press, other times squeezed out from a sack by twisting it with sticks (Exodus 27:20; Deuteronomy 33:24; Micah 6:15)
Wealth - ...
People who use their wealth to gain power are also condemned, particularly when they oppress people who have no way of resisting them (Jeremiah 22:13-17; Amos 4:1; Amos 5:11-12; Micah 2:1-2; James 2:6; James 5:1-6; see POOR)
Eagle - ...
Micah 1:16 (a) This peculiar figure probably describes an Oriental custom of magnifying the grief of those who sorrow
Iron - ...
Micah 4:13 (b) By this figure is described the victorious power of the conquering armies of Israel
Chief - Qatsin is the last one, the one who has to decide and thus the leader ( Joshua 10:24 ; Judges 11:6 ; Proverbs 6:7 ; Isaiah 1:10 ; Micah 3:1 )
Money - " This may serve to illustrate the phrase, "current money with the merchant," Genesis 23:16 ; and the references to "divers weights" a large one to weigh the money received, and a small one for that paid out; and to "wicked balances," Deuteronomy 25:13 Amos 8:5 Micah 6:11
Coins - Merchants were sometimes dishonest and used extra heavy weights when weighing the buyer’s money (Leviticus 19:36; Proverbs 11:1; Amos 8:5; Micah 6:11; see WEIGHTS)
Peace - ...
The Old Testament anticipated, and the New Testament confirmed, that God's peace would be mediated through a messiah (see Isaiah 9:6-7 ; Micah 5:4-5 ). ...
The nations of the world will come under the dominion of the "Prince of Peace" and in so doing, "will beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks" (Isaiah 2:4 ; Micah 4:3 )
Eagle - The prophet Micah, (Micah 1:16) speaks of the boldness of the eagle
Love - Genesis 32:10; Genesis 39:21; Psalms 100:5; Psalms 118:1-3; Isaiah 54:10; Hosea 2:19; Micah 7:18). God exercised loyal love and covenant faithfulness to his people, and this was to be the basis of their trust in him (1 Kings 8:23; Psalms 13:5; Psalms 25:7; Psalms 103:17; Psalms 136:25; Hosea 2:19; Micah 7:20). It also shows the quality of love that God requires his people to exercise towards others (Proverbs 3:3-4; Hosea 12:6; Micah 6:8)
Prophecy - ...
Jonah...
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Amos...
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Hosea...
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Isaiah...
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Joel...
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Micah...
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Nahum...
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Zephaniah...
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Jeremiah...
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Habakkuk...
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Daniel...
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Obadiah...
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Ezekiel...
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Haggai...
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Zechariah...
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Malachi...
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Color, Symbolic Meaning of - ...
Black signifies gloom, mourning, evil, judgment, and death (Lamentations 4:8 ; Micah 3:6 ; Zechariah 6:2,6 ; Revelation 6:5,12 )
Power - Micah 3:8; Zechariah 4:6; see HOLY SPIRIT)
Divine Freedom - Some of the characteristics of God's nature that influence His actions toward His creation are grace (2 Corinthians 8:9 ), justice (Zephaniah 3:5 ), love (John 3:16 ), and mercy (Micah 7:18 ; Titus 3:5 )
Mouth - Micah 7 ...
To set the mouth against the heavens, to speak arrogantly and blasphemously
Bag - A small bag (purse) used to carry a merchant's weights (Deuteronomy 25:13 ; Proverbs 16:11 ; Micah 6:11 ) or smaller sums of money (Proverbs 1:14 ; Isaiah 46:6 )
Year of Jubilee - This made it difficult to accumulate vast permanent holdings of wealth (compare Isaiah 5:8 ; Micah 2:2 )
Hate, Hatred - " Some people hate anything that is good (Micah 3:2 )
Body - Although the Bible may speak of the body as being distinct from a person’s spirit, soul, or mind (Micah 6:7; Matthew 10:28; Romans 7:23-25), it also speaks of the body as representing the person (Nehemiah 9:37; Romans 12:1; 1 Corinthians 13:3)
Balaam - ...
The people of Old Testament Israel never forgot the evil of Balaam (Deuteronomy 23:5; Joshua 24:9; Nehemiah 13:2; Micah 6:5)
Fasting - The cry of the heart in that sinner the prophet Micah speaks of, is the cry of every man's heart, more or less, however differently expressed in the various languages of the earth. "Wherewith shall I come before the Lord, and bow myself before the High God? shall I come before him with burnt offerings, with calves of a year old? Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams, or with ten thousands of rivers of oil? Shall I give my first-born for my transgression; the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?" (Micah 6:6-7) But the grand question in relation to fasts is, What saith the word of God concerning them? We certainly do not read any thing in the divine appointment of fasts before the days of Moses, and in the patriarchal age
Magi - Herod discovered the foretold birthplace of Messiah from the scribes' quotation of Micah (Micah 5:2) in answer to his query where He should be born
Atonement - That an atonement for sin, or an effectual method to answer the demands of an offended God, is the first great blessing guilty man stood in need of, Micah 6:6 ; Micah 7:1-20 :...
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Justice - Civil power gives no one the right to do as he likes, and religious exercises are no substitute for common justice (Isaiah 1:14-17; Isaiah 1:23; Isaiah 59:14-15; Amos 5:11-12; Amos 5:21-23; Micah 7:3; Mark 11:15-17; Mark 12:40; Luke 6:25; Luke 16:19-25; James 5:1-6). This involves not merely condemning evil, but positively doing good (Isaiah 1:17; Amos 5:15; Amos 5:24; Micah 6:8; Matthew 23:23; Luke 3:10-14; Colossians 4:1; James 1:27)
Israel, History of - The Divided Monarchy (1–2Kings; Amos; Hosea; Isaiah 1–39 ; Micah; Jeremiah) The north was contextually tied into international politics more than was the south, in part because the primary east-west trade route traversed Israel at the Valley of Jezreel. During an approximate fifty-year period, two primary prophets spoke in the south—Isaiah (742-701) and Micah (724-701)—while two prophets spoke in the north—Amos (about 750) and Hosea (about 745). ...
Micah of Moresheth (724-701) was the other eighth-century prophet in Judah. In many ways, Micah seemed to lack the original spirit of the other eighth century prophets. Micah 6:1-8 , however, is an excellent description of a courtroom scene where Yahweh's people are brought to trial for their constant rejection and transgression of the covenant. The climax to that passage, Micah 6:8 , is perhaps the best definition of eighth century prophetic religion available to the modern interpreter
Governor - Used of many classes of rulers (Genesis 3:16 ; 24:2 ; 45:8 ; Psalm 105:20 ); of the Messiah (Micah 5:2 ); of God (1 Chronicles 29:12 ; Psalm 103:19 )
Darkness - Third, God uses the darkness for his own purposes: to hide himself from the sight of men (Psalm 18:11 ; 1 Kings 8:12 ) and to bring his judgment on evildoers (Deuteronomy 28:28-29 ; Matthew 8:12 ; 22:13 ), evil nations (Ezekiel 30:18-19 ), and false prophets (Jeremiah 23:12 ; Micah 3:6 ; Revelation 16:10 )
Vengeance - God does not completely destroy Israel but forgives them, preserving a remnant in spite of their transgressions (Micah 7:18-20 )
Divination - The Bible alludes to the use of omens (Isaiah 44:25 ), arrows (Hosea 4:12 ), animal actions (1 Samuel 6:7-12 ), the reading of livers (Ezekiel 21:21-22 ), budding plants (Numbers 17:1-11 ), necromancy (1 Samuel 28 ), and prophetic utterances, called false (Micah 3:7,11 ) or "lying divinations" (Isaiah 44:25 ; Jeremiah 14:14 ; 27:9-10 ; Ezekiel 12:24 ; Zechariah 10:2 )
Compassion - It is said that compassion follows wrath (Jeremiah 12:15 ; Lamentations 3:32 ), is new each morning (Lamentations 3:22-23 ), and overcomes sin (Psalm 51:1 ; Micah 7:19 ) rather than ignoring it
Jonathan - A Levite who served as priest of Micah in Ephraim and later with tribe of Dan (Judges 17-18 )
Nazareth - The Jews believed that, according to Micah 5:2 , the birth of the Messiah would take place at Bethlehem, and nowhere else
Miriam - In Micah 6:4 God mentions among benefits conferred on Israel, "I sent before thee Moses, Aaron, and Miriam," Miriam as the leader of and pattern to Israel's women
War - (2 Samuel 2:28 ; 18:16 ; 20:22 ) The siege of a town or fortress was conducted in the following manner: A line of circumvallation was drawn round the place, (Ezekiel 4:2 ; Micah 5:1 ) constructed out of the trees found in the neighborhood, (20:20) together with earth and any other materials at hand
Vine, - To dwell under the vine and tree is an emblem of domestic happiness and peace, (1 Kings 4:25 ; Psalm 128:3 ; Micah 4:4 ) the rebellious people of Israel are compared to "wild grapes," "an empty vine," "the degenerate plant of a strange vine," etc
Kindness - Thus, we are to love kindness (Micah 6:8 ) and to be children of the Most High, exhibiting his kindness and mercy (Luke 6:35-36 )
Lion - They are, among other things, strong (Proverbs 30:30 ), especially in their teeth (Job 4:10 ) and paws (1 Samuel 17:37 ), fearless (Proverbs 28:1 ; 30:30 ), stealthy (Psalm 17:12 ), frightening (Ezra 19:7 ; Hosea 11:10 ; Amos 3:8 ), destructive (1 Samuel 17:34 ; Micah 5:8 ), and territorially protective (Isaiah 31:4 )
Adullam - Fortified by Rehoboam (2 Chronicles 11:7) Called for its beauty "the glory of Israel" (Micah 1:15)
Oil - The olives were sometimes "trodden" (Micah 6:15), or "pressed" in a "press," making the fats overflow (Joel 2:24; Joel 3:13; Haggai 2:16)
Door - ...
Micah 7:5 (a) This indicates a comparison of one's lips to a pair of doors which should be closed on certain occasions
Benjamin - Type of Christ both as exalted at God's right hand (Benjamin), and, as rejected, the occasion of Israel's tribulation in the last days (Ben-oni), Rachel being a type of Israel (Micah 5
Acceptance - Micah summed up the terms of acceptance in Amos 6:6-8 , “What doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?” The proper attitude of humility is as important as right action (Psalm 51:16-17 ; 1 Peter 5:5-6 )
Sion - ‘Therefore shall Zion for your sakes be ploughed as a field, and Jerusalem shall become heaps,' Micah 3:12
Mount Zion - ) Reader! what are your views, in contemplating this mountain of the Lord's house, which he hath established "in the top of the mountains, and of which he hath said all nations shall flow unto it?" (Isaiah 2:2; Micah 4:1 etc
Benjamin - Type of Christ both as exalted at God's right hand (Benjamin), and, as rejected, the occasion of Israel's tribulation in the last days (Ben-oni), Rachel being a type of Israel (Micah 5
Zion or Sion - It was finely adapted for the purposes of military defense, and so strongly was it fortified at the time of its capture by the Romans, that the emperor exclaimed, "Surely we have had God for our aid in the war; for what could human hands or machines do against these towers?" ...
Great changes have occurred on this surface, and a considerable portion of it lies outside of the modern wall on the south, and is occupied by cemeteries, or "ploughed as a field," according to Jeremiah 26:18 Micah 3:12
Jonathan - Though only a Levite he acted as priest in the house of Micah, who had a graven image, an ephod, and teraphim
Amos - The others were Hosea, Isaiah and Micah
Inheritance - The inheritance was tied up with the family’s portion of land originally allotted to it in Canaan (1 Kings 21:3-4; Micah 2:2)
Humility - Its opposite, pride, is one of the evils most hateful to him (Numbers 12:3; Proverbs 6:16-17; Daniel 5:22-23; Micah 6:8; James 4:6; 1 Peter 5:5; see PRIDE)
Wealth - If in the times of Isaiah the land was ‘full of silver and gold,’ it was also ‘full of idols’ ( Isaiah 2:7-8 ): the ruling classes oppressed the poor ( Isaiah 5:3 , Micah 2:2 ), drunkenness ( Isaiah 5:11 , Micah 2:11 ) and audacity of sin ( Isaiah 5:13 ) were rampant
Earth, Land - Micah pronounced woes upon those who “covet fields, and take them by violence; and houses, and take them away” (Micah 2:2 )
Eternity - ’ עוֹלָם is frequently used of the fast-days (Isaiah 63:9; Isaiah 63:11, Micah 5:1; Micah 7:14 etc
Temple, the - Other passages speak of the temple, Zion, and Jerusalem as associated together, as Psalm 68:29 ; Psalm 122 ; Isaiah 2:2,3 ; Micah 3:12Micah 4:2
Prophets - Micah, under Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah. Thus Micah was contemporary with Isaiah ...
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Farming - ...
Reapers cut the standing grain with a sickle (Deuteronomy 16:9; Mark 4:29), tied the stalks into sheaves (Genesis 37:7; Deuteronomy 24:19), and then transported the sheaves either on animals or in carts to the threshing floor (Nehemiah 13:15; Amos 2:13; Micah 4:12). Some of the best regions for their animals were the grassy plains of Bashan and Gilead on the eastern side of the Jordan (Numbers 32:1; Numbers 32:26; Numbers 32:36; Deuteronomy 32:14; Psalms 22:12; Micah 7:14)
Doubt, Doubtful, Doubting - , in Micah 4:1 , of the "exaltation" of the Lord's house; in Ezekiel 10:16 , of the "lifting" up of the wings of the cherubim; in Obadiah 1:4 , of the "mounting" up of the eagle; in the NT metaphorically, of "being anxious," through a "distracted" state of mind, of "wavering" between hope and fear, Luke 12:29 , "neither be ye of doubtful mind" (AV, marg
Please, Pleasing, Well-Pleasing, Pleasure - Micah 6:8 ; Hebrews 11:5 ); 2 Timothy 2:4 ; (b) "to endeavor to please," and so, "to render service," doing so evilly in one's own interests, Romans 15:1 , which Christ did not, Romans 15:3 ; or unselfishly, 1 Corinthians 10:33 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:4
Shepherd - ...
At night the shepherd usually kept his sheep in a walled enclosure called a fold, as an added protection against dangers (Numbers 32:36; Micah 2:12; Habakkuk 3:17; Luke 2:8; John 10:1)
Pardon - An act that never will be repealed, Micah 7:19
Eagle - In Micah 1:16, "make thee bald (shaving the head betokening mourning)
Name - Micah 1:8 (b) The prophet thus describes the utter desolation of Israel
Power - Power is always a derived characteristic for people, who receive power from God (Deuteronomy 8:18 ; Isaiah 40:29 ; Micah 3:8 ; Matthew 22:29 ; 1 Corinthians 2:4 ; Ephesians 3:7 ), from political position (Esther 1:3 ; Luke 20:20 ), from armies (1 Chronicles 20:1 ), and from other structures that provide advantage over others
Hezekiah, King of Judah - 2 Kings 18 - 2 Kings 20 ; 2 Chronicles 29 - 2 Chronicles 32 ; Isaiah 36 — Isaiah 39 ; Jeremiah 26:18,19 ; Hosea 1:1 ; Micah 1:1
Ahab - He became a prime example of evil (Micah 6:16 )
Ephod - Still worse was the case of Micah who, having a house of gods, made an ephod, and consecrated one of his sons to bepriest
Kingdom of Christ of Heaven - The prophets foretold its restoration, Daniel 12:7-13; Psalms 2:1-12; Isaiah 2:1-22; Micah 4:1-13; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23; John the Baptist came to announce it
Kingdom of God - The prophets foretold its restoration, Daniel 12:7-13; Psalms 2:1-12; Isaiah 2:1-22; Micah 4:1-13; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23; John the Baptist came to announce it
Kingdom of Heaven - The prophets foretold its restoration, Daniel 12:7-13; Psalms 2:1-12; Isaiah 2:1-22; Micah 4:1-13; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23; John the Baptist came to announce it
Judges - The affair of Micah and the Levite, and the crime at Gibeah which led to the ruinous war against the Benjamites, though recorded at the close of the book of Judges 17:1-21:25 , occurred not long after the death of Joshua, and show how soon Israel began to depart from God
Ephod - Still worse was the case of Micah who, having a house of gods, made an ephod, and consecrated one of his sons to bepriest
Forgiveness - ...
God wants to forgive (Nehemiah 9:17; Micah 7:18) but he requires repentance and faith in those who seek his forgiveness (Psalms 32:5; Psalms 51:17; Luke 7:36-50; Acts 3:19; Acts 10:43; Acts 20:21; 1 John 1:9)
Hosea - The main subject of the prophecy of Amos is the Northern Kingdom, but Amos himself was a native of the South; so also were Isaiah and Micah, and these two prophets, though they included the Northern Kingdom in their denunciations, devoted themselves mainly to Judah. At the same time, it is important not to exaggerate the difference between Amos and Hosea, of to lose sight of the fact that Hosea not less than Amos or Isaiah or Micah insisted on the worthlessness of religion or of devotion to Jahweh which was not ethical ( Jezreel , Hosea 1:4 ; Hosea 6:6 )
Tools - It is probably incorrectly translated as “plowshares” in the famous prophetic passages about the tools of war and peace (Isaiah 2:4 ; Micah 4:3 ; Joel 3:10 ). A tool which resembled the sickle, but with a broader and shorter blade, was the “pruning hook” (Isaiah 2:4 ; Micah 4:3 ; Joel 3:10 )
Good, Goodness - God's appeal to his people to return to the covenant relationship finds expression in a call to simple goodness (Micah 6:6-8 )
Moloch - In this respect Moloch answered to Baal the Phoenician sun god, to whom also human burnt offerings were sacrificed; also to Chemosh, to whom Mesha sacrificed his son (2 Kings 3:27; Micah 6:7; Ezekiel 16:20; Ezekiel 23:39)
Samaria - (Compare Micah 1:6
Prophet - , Isaiah, Jeremiah, Obadiah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah
Thorn - he sees difficulties where all is plain to the willing and resolute (Proverbs 20:4; Proverbs 22:13); Micah 7:4, "the best of them is as a brier (thorn)
Lie, Lying - According to these teachers, it is at the foundation of all human depravity ( Hosea 7:13 ; Hosea 12:1 , Micah 6:11 f
Horn - ...
Micah 4:13 (b) By this type GOD indicates that He will make Israel again a great and strong nation
Anger (Wrath) of God - God is ‘slow to anger’ ( Psalms 103:8 ; Psalms 145:8 , Joel 2:13 , Jonah 4:2 , Nahum 1:3 ), and His anger passes away ( Psalms 30:6 , Isaiah 12:1 , Jeremiah 3:12 , Micah 7:18 )
Fig, Fig-Tree - The bark is smooth, and the size and thickness of the leaves readily explain the point of the Jewish proverb-‘to sit under one’s own vine and one’s own fig-tree’ (1 Kings 4:25, Micah 4:4, Zechariah 3:10)
Isaiah - Isaiah’s prophetic career apparently began before, but closed after, that of Micah. Unlike his contemporary Micah, his life, so far as we can trace it, was spent in Jerusalem. And again, had Isaiah prophesied exclusively of judgment and destruction, we might have expected to find his name coupled with Micah’s in Jeremiah 26:18 f
Friend, Friendship - The disappearance of true loyalty to friends is one of the symptoms of social and moral breakdown addressed by the prophet Micah in eighth-century Judah (Micah 7:5-6 )
Nahum, Theology of - In the first place, it is among the shortest of the Minor Prophets and is overshadowed by Micah, which precedes it and contains some well-known messianic prophecies. Smith, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Books of Micah, Zephaniah, and Nahum
Vine, Vineyard - As in the case of the olive, the culture of the vine needs a peaceful, settled population, as the plants require several years’ care before bearing fruit ( Zephaniah 1:13 ), and constant attention if they are to maintain their excellence; hence to sit under one’s ‘own vine and fig tree’ was a favourite image of peace ( 1 Kings 4:25 , Micah 4:4 , Zechariah 3:10 )
Wages - The first definite engagement disregarding the special case of Jacob and Laban with stipulated wages is that of the Levite whom Micah hired as his domestic chaplain for 10 shekels a year, with ‘a suit of apparel’ and his ‘victuals’ ( Judges 17:10 )
Preaching - By contrast true messengers of God say what needs to be said, whether or not it is what people want to hear (Jeremiah 1:17; Micah 3:8; Mark 12:14; 2 Timothy 4:2)
Shepherd - (Isaiah 38:12 ) In certain localities, moreover, towers were erected for the double purpose of spying an enemy at a distance and of protecting the flock; such towers were erected by Uzziah and Jotham, (2 Chronicles 26:10 ; 27:4 ) while their existence in earlier times is testified by the name Migdal-edar (Genesis 35:21 ) Authorized Version "a tower of Edar;" (Micah 4:8 ) Authorized Version "tower of the flock
Horse - " In 1 Kings 4:28; Esther 8:14; Micah 1:13, rekesh "dromedary"; rather "a courser," a "racehorse," for such purposes as the royal post
Teeth - ...
Micah 3:5 (a) By this type we understand that the false prophets were hypocrites
Anoint, Anointing - of Ruth 3:3 ; 2 Samuel 12:20 ; Daniel 10:3 ; Micah 6:15 ; in the NT, Matthew 6:17 ; Luke 7:38,46 ; John 11:2 ; 12:3 ; or of the sick, Mark 6:13 ; James 5:14 ; or a dead body, Mark 16:1
Justice - Frequent complaints are on record in the sacred books of the maladministration of judges, of bribery and perjury, 1 Samuel 8:3 1 Kings 21:8-14 Isaiah 1:23 10:1 Micah 3:11 7:3
Ethics - Wizardry, sorcery, witchcraft, necromancy, and soothsaying flourished under the patronage of such religion, and eventually even the Jerusalem temple housed similar rights, together with sun-worship, astrology, and altars to foreign gods (1 Kings 12:28-32 ; 14:23-24 ; 2 Kings 17:7-18 ; 21:1-7 ; Isaiah 8:19 ; Jeremiah 2:20-25 ; 3:1-13,23 ; 5:1 ; 6:15 ; Hosea 2:5-8 ; 4:12,18 ; 5:3-4 ; 8:4-6 ; 13:1-2 ; Amos 2:7-8 ; 6:4-6 ; Micah 5:10-15 ; 6:6-7 ). Micah says that only a prophet preaching drink will be welcomed! Isaiah calls Jerusalem "Sodom, " and declares God's utter rejection of her worship. Malachi pleads for someone to slam the temple doors and let the sacred fire go out (Isaiah 1:10-15 ; 29:13-14 ; Jeremiah 7:1-15 ; Amos 4:4 ; 5:21-24 ; Micah 2:11 ; Malachi 1:10 ). ...
Micah appeals briefly to nature and history to testify what God is like, but rests his argument chiefly on his own indignation at injustice, his inner sense of the kind of world God wants and will achieve if only people listen to their own hearts (6:1-5,8)
Jesus Christ - He was to be born in Bethlehem, a small village, Micah 5:2; he was to be a king with a universal and perpetual empire, Psalms 2:6; Psalms 45:2-7; Psalms 72:1-20; Isaiah 9:6-7; yet would be despised and rejected. Mary, a virgin, betrothed to Joseph of Nazareth, gave birth to Jesus at Bethlehem according to Micah's prophecy. Micah 5:2
Hand - ...
The Hebrew phrase “high hand” indicated willful rebellion against God (Numbers 15:30 ; see Deuteronomy 32:27 ) but also military power (Exodus 14:8 ; Micah 5:9 )
Serpent - zôch ăl ç ’âphâr , Deuteronomy 32:24 ; zôch ăl ç’ erets , Micah 7:17 ; some creature that glides on or into the earth, probably therefore a serpent
Delight - God delights in showing mercy (Micah 7:18 ), and kindness, justice, and righteousness bring him pleasure and cause him delight (Jeremiah 9:23 )
Colour - The word is applied to a mourner's robes ( Jeremiah 8:21 ; 14:2 ), to a clouded sky (1 Kings 18:45 ), to night (Micah 3:6 ; Jeremiah 4:28 ), and to a brook rendered turbid by melted snow (Job 6:16 )
Immanuel - " Micah 5:3; Israel's and Judah's deliverance is ensured by the birth of Immanuel, "He will give them up, until
Micaiah - " Micaiah replied: "if thou return at all in peace Jehovah hath not spoken by me; hearken, O nations, every one of you"; appealing not only to Israel but to the Gentile world, to which Ahab had conformed, and which may heed, since Israel will not, so as when the event should come to pass to discern the truth of Jehovah (Micah 1:2)
Serpent - Serpents are said in Scripture to "eat dust," see ( Genesis 3:14 ; Isaiah 65:25 ; Micah 7:17 ) these animals which for the most part take their food on the ground, do consequently swallow with it large portions of sand and dust
Foreknowledge - And Isaiah's contemporary, Micah, prophesied that the Messiah would be born in Bethlehem (5:2)
Godly, Godliness - So it is disastrous when a nation loses the leavening influence of persons who know God: "Help, Lord, for the godly are no more; the faithful have vanished from among men" (Psalm 12:1 ); "The godly have been swept from the land; not one upright man remains" (Micah 7:2 )
Fruit - "the fruit of my body, " Micah 6:7 )
Ostrich - " (Micah 1:8), Job 30:29 - "I am a companion to ostriches" (not "owls"), living among solitudes
War - ...
As the influence of Christianity diffuses itself in the world, war is becoming less excusable and less practicable; and a great advance may be observed from the customs and spirit of ancient barbarism towards the promised universal supremacy of the Prince of peace, Psalm 46:9 Isaiah 2:4 Micah 4:3
Lie - Micah 1
Evil - Firstly, it speaks of evil in a moral sense similar to that considered above, where evil is the opposite of moral goodness (Proverbs 8:13; Jeremiah 7:24; Micah 2:1; Matthew 5:45; Matthew 15:19; Romans 7:19; Romans 7:21; 2 Thessalonians 3:2; for details see SIN)
Habakkuk - a derisive song (compare Isaiah 14:4; Micah 2:4), whom Habakkuk copies, against their oppressor
Dan (1) - Danites of Laish (named by them Dan) carried with them Micah the Ephraimite's Levitical family priest (Judges 17; 18) and graven image, which they worshipped" until the day of the captivity of the land" (Judges 18:30-31), i
Propitiation - God’s wrath and God’s love, far from being in conflict with each other, operated in harmony (Isaiah 53:4-5; Isaiah 53:10-11; Isaiah 54:8; Micah 7:18; John 3:16-21; John 3:36; Romans 6:23)
Hosea, Book of - , and entitled ‘The Twelve Prophets’ (see Micah [1])
Nimrod - His going to Assyria (Genesis 10:10-11-12) accords with Micah's designating Assyria "the hind of Nimrod" (Micah 5:6)
Firstborn - 2 Kings 3:27 , Micah 6:7 ), but the practice would soon grow up of ‘redeeming’ them by money or payments in kind
Mercy, Merciful - ]'>[5] ‘lovingkindness (mercy) and truth’ being the regnant qualities of His dealings with Israel and with ‘covenant’ ( Deuteronomy 7:9 , 1 Kings 8:23 , Nehemiah 1:6 ; Nehemiah 9:32 , Psalms 89:28 , Isaiah 55:8 , Daniel 9:4 ), as well as with ‘goodness’ and ‘compassion’ (above); while it is contrasted with ‘anger,’ ‘judgment,’ and ‘sacrifice’ ( Micah 7:18 , Psalms 101:1 , Hosea 6:6 )
Obadiah, Theology of - Allen, The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; D
Lily - " (Micah 7:2; Mic 7:4) How truly blessed is it thus to prove the doctrine of Christ by testimony, and yet more when a child of God discovers, through the Holy Ghost, his own personal interest in it
Heritage - " (Psalms 94:5) See some other sweet Scriptures to this amount: (Joel 2:17; Micah 7:14-18; Isaiah 58:14)...
But when the reader hath duly pondered the blessed thought of beholding the Lord and his fulness as the heritage of his people, and his people as his heritage of delight, both in nature, providence, and grace, there is one thought more the subject of heritage proposeth to the meditation that ought not to be forgotten, The customs and manners of the eastern world differ so widely in many points from ours, that unless due attention be had to them we lose much of the sense and spirit of the things spoken of
Ostrich - יענח ; in Arabic neamah; in Greek στρουθοκαμηλος , the camel bird; and still in the east, says Niebuhr, it is called thar edsjammel, "the camel bird," Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ; Job 30:29 ; Isaiah 13:21 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Isaiah 43:20 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ; Lamentations 4:3 ; Micah 1:8 ; רננים , Job 39:13
Pre-Existence - The most remarkable of these are the titles ‘Mighty God’ and ‘Father of Eternity’ in Isaiah 9:6; the statement of Micah 5:2, that the Ruler who is to come forth from Bethlehem will be one ‘whose goings forth are from of old, from ancient days
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - In this manner classes of professional diviners and magicians arose, as in Egypt ( Genesis 41:8 , Exodus 7:11 ), in Babylon ( Daniel 2:2 ), in connexion with Baal ( 1 Kings 18:19 ), and even among the Israelites in the lower rank of professed prophets ( Micah 3:5-11 ; see G. It also appears as a method of the lower rank of prophets in Israel ( Micah 3:8-11 , Ezekiel 13:6 ; Ezekiel 13:9 ; Ezekiel 22:28 ). Instances of its highest signification occur in Isaiah 1:1 ; Isaiah 2:1 , Amos 1:1 , Micah 1:1 . ’ This form of augury was forbidden ( Leviticus 19:26 , Deuteronomy 18:10 ), and those practising it were denounced ( Micah 5:12 , Jeremiah 27:9 )
Bethlehem - ...
Bethlehem, notwithstanding its royal associations and its renown as the birthplace of the world’s Redeemer, has never been, and is never likely to be, more in the eye of the world than ‘little among the thousands of Judah’ (Micah 5:2). ’ Even so, it can never be deprived of its associations with the Messianic King of Israel, ‘whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting’ (Micah 5:2), associations which exalt it to the loftiest eminence, and surround it with a glory that cannot fade. So the hope of a great Deliverer from spiritual misery and death flows onward in the story of God’s ancient people, throwing up its pools in the days of Abraham, Moses, David, Isaiah and the prophets; and Micah indicates the direction of its flow with more explicitness than any who went before when he says: ‘But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, though thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be Ruler in Israel; whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting’ (Micah 5:2). 51) says: ‘If any one desires certainty as to the birth of Jesus at Bethlehem apart from the Gospels and Micah’s prophecy, let him know that in conformity with the narrative in the Gospel regarding His birth there is shown at Bethlehem the cave where He was born and the manger in the cave where He was wrapped in swaddling clothes
Immanuel - Strong support is given to this view by Micah 5:3 (‘until the time when she that beareth hath brought forth’); whether the passage belong to Micah himself, a contemporary of Isaiah, or be of later date, it is clearly a reference to Isaiah 7 , and is of great importance as an indication of the ideas current at the time
Weights And Measures - The prophets spoke against merchants who used deceitful weights (Micah 6:11 ). Variations in the weights of the shekel may be attributed to several factors other than the dishonesty condemned in the law (Deuteronomy 25:13-16 ) and the prophets (Amos 8:5 ; Micah 6:11 )
Agriculture - The corn when cut was generally put up in sheaves (Genesis 37:7 ; Leviticus 23:10-15 ; Ruth 2:7,15 ; Job 24:10 ; Jeremiah 9:22 ; Micah 4:12 ), which were afterwards gathered to the threshing-floor or stored in barns (Matthew 6:26 )
Repentance - For the prophets, such a turning or conversion was not just simply a change within a person; it was openly manifested in justice, kindness, and humility ( Micah 6:8 ; Amos 5:24 ; Hosea 2:19-20 )
Ebal - Why should the crown, both our and their glory, be our stumbling-block? See Micah 5:7; Zechariah 8:13; Zephaniah 3:20; Romans 11:12; Romans 11:15
Levi - Then the altar did not call for a consecrated servitor; but, as we see in the case of Micah, who had a private sanctuary in Ephraim, there existed apparently a preference for a Levite (Judges 17:1-13 )
Gilgal - In Micah 6:5, "O My people, remember
Proverbs - Eliakim, Shebna, Josh, Isaiah, Hosea, and Micah, personages of eminence and worth, were contemporary with Hezekiah; but whether these or others executed the compilation, it is now impossible to determine
Oil - The earliest method of expression seems to have been that of treading the olives with the feet, to which allusion is made in Micah 6:15, and perhaps also in Deuteronomy 33:24 This process is unknown in modern times (Thomson, LB Zechariah, Theology of - Isaiah and Micah also looked to a day when the nations would seek God in Zion (Isaiah 2:2-3 ; Micah 4:1-2 ). Smith, Micah-Malachi
Mercy, Merciful - On the other hand, He is a forgiving God and shows mercy to a penitent people (Psalm 25:4-7 ; Psalm 40:11-12 ; Psalm 51:1-4 ; Proverbs 28:13-14 ; Isaiah 54:7 ; Isaiah 55:7 ; Lamentations 3:31-33 ; Daniel 9:9 ; Micah 7:19 ; Habakkuk 3:2 ). This was often coupled with a command for justice ( Micah 6:8 ; compare Hosea 12:6 ; Zechariah 7:9 )
Decrees - The decree of Caesar Augustus for a census (Luke 2:1 ) is providentially used to ensure the fulfillment of the prophecy that the Messiah would be born in Bethlehem (Micah 5:2 ; cf
Devote, Devoted - ...
Prophets applied the herem [ 1 Kings 20:41 ), Babylon (Jeremiah 50:21,26 ; 51:3 ), Egypt (Isaiah 11:15 , ; unless the word should be translated "split" here ), Edom (Isaiah 34:2,5 ), and other nations (Micah 4:13 )
Manasseh - Amid this wide-spread idolatry there were not wanting, however, faithful prophets (Isaiah, Micah) who lifted up their voice in reproof and in warning
Samaria, Samaritans - This destruction came after many prophecies concerning its sins and many warnings about its doom (Isaiah 8:4 ; Isaiah 9:8-14 ; Isaiah 10:9 ; Isaiah 28:1-13 ; Isaiah 36:19 ; Jeremiah 23:13 ; Ezekiel 23:1-4 ; Hosea 7:1 ; Hosea 13:16 ; Amos 3:12 ; Micah 1:6 )
Foreigner - The prophets predicted that all nations would go up to Jerusalem to learn the Torah and depart changed people, no longer alienated from each other (Isaiah 2:1-4 ; Micah 4:1-5 )
Oil - As a sign of judgment Micah predicted that the nation of Israel "will press olives" but not have the opportunity to "use the oil" (6:15)
Prophecy - Hence we read concerning the acts of Manasseh, that they were written among the sayings of the Seers, (2 Chronicles 33:19)...
It were unnecessary to remark, what every reader of the Bible is supposed to know, that we have recorded, from the grace of God the Holy Spirit, the writings of four of what, by way of distinction, are called the greater prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel; and the Writings of the twelve of lesser prophets, as they are named, Hoses, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi
Come - , Micah 5
Set On, Set Up - So Micah speaks of “setting up” a siege, a wall, around a city: “… He hath laid siege against us …” ( Balaam - This artifice succeeded; for as the Israelites lay encamped at Shittim, many of them were deluded by these strange women, not only to commit whoredom with them, but to assist at their sacrifices, and worship their god Baal-Peor, Numbers 25:1-3 ; Numbers 31:16 ; ...
Micah 6:5 ; 2 Peter 2:15 ; Judges 1:11 ; Revelation 2:14 ; Deuteronomy 23:4-5 ; Joshua 24:9-10 ; Nehemiah 13:2
Judges, Book of - See Micah No
Isaiah - Son of Amoz (not Amos), a younger contemporary of Jonah, Amos, and Hosea in Israel, and of Micah in Judah. The contemporary Micah (Micah 4:8-10) foretells the same exile in Babylon and the return from it, so that it is no objection to the genuineness of Isaiah 40-66, that herein Isaiah passes from Assyria to the restoration from Babylon much more than a century later
Jerusalem - Both Micah (Jeremiah 3:12 ) and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 7:14 ) prophesied the destruction of Jerusalem for her unfaithfulness to God's covenant. The glorious vision of the exaltation of Zion (Micah 4:1-8 ) and the transformation of Jerusalem (Ezekiel 40-48 ) had not yet been fulfilled
Sacrifice - Therefore, when people carried out the rituals mechanically, without corresponding faith and uprightness, the prophets condemned their sacrifices as worthless (Isaiah 1:13-20; Amos 5:21-24; Micah 6:6-8). The sacrifices pointed beyond themselves to something higher, the merciful love of God (Micah 7:18-20)
Census - God's providence overruled Augustus' order for the provincial enrollment of all persons and estates under Roman sway, to effect His foretold purpose that Bethlehem should be the scene of Jesus' nativity (Micah 5:2) Micah 5:4 B
Joel, Book of - The place of the book in the Canon is not conclusive, for the Book of Jonah, which was manifestly written after the fall of Nineveh, is also found in the former part of the collection of the Twelve, and comes before Micah, the earliest portions of which are beyond doubt much older. Joel 2:28 answers to Ezekiel 39:29 , but the latter has ‘on the house of Israel,’ the former ‘on all flesh,’ and Joel 3:10 is the reverse of Isaiah 2:4 and Micah 4:3
Body - (Luke 1:26-53) And I would farther beg him to turn to the Scriptures of the prophets, who, with one voice, pointed to this great event in all their ministrations, (Isaiah 7:14; Isa 9:6; Micah 5:2) And when the reader hath gone over all these Scriptures of the Old Testament, I request him to finish the enquiry in reading the history of the facts themselves, as they are recorded in the New, and bless God for his grace and condescension in bringing the church acquainted with such an event, in the interest of which our present and everlasting happiness is so intimately concerned
False Worship - ...
The subjects of false and true worship are best presented in Micah 6:8 , “What doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God” and in the words of Jesus to the Samaritan woman in John 4:23-24 : “true worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth: for the Father seeketh such to worship him
Manna - ) as the dew (Psalms 110:3; Micah 5:7) round the camp, i
Poetry - ...
Poetry in the Old Testament...
Genesis 2:23 ; Genesis 3:14-19 ; Genesis 3:23-24 ; Genesis 8:22 ; Genesis 9:25-27 ; Genesis 14:19-20 ; Genesis 16:11-12 ; Genesis 25:23 ; Genesis 27:27-29 ,Genesis 27:27-29,27:39-40 ; Genesis 48:15-16 ; Genesis 49:2-27 ...
Exodus 15:1-18 ,Exodus 15:1-18,15:21 ...
Leviticus 10:3 ...
Numbers 6:24-27 ; Numbers 10:35-36 ; Numbers 12:6-8 ; Numbers 21:14-15 ; Numbers 21:17-18 ,Numbers 21:17-18,21:27-30 ; Numbers 23:7-10 ; Numbers 23:18-24 ; Numbers 24:3-9 ,Numbers 24:3-9,24:15-24 ...
Deuteronomy 32:1-43 ; Deuteronomy 33:2-29 ...
Joshua 10:12-13 ...
Judges 5:2-31 ; Judges 14:14 ,Judges 14:14,14:18 ; Judges 15:16 ...
Ruth 1:16-17 ,Ruth 1:16-17,1:20-21 ...
1 Samuel 2:1-10 ; 1Samuel 15:22-23,1 Samuel 15:33 ; 1 Samuel 18:7 ; 1 Samuel 21:11 ; 1 Samuel 29:5 ...
2 Samuel 1:19-27 ; 2 Samuel 3:33-34 ; 2 Samuel 22:2-51 ; 2 Samuel 23:1-7 ...
1 Kings 8:12-13 ; 1 Kings 12:16 ...
2 Kings 19:21-28 ...
1 Chronicles 16:8-36 ...
2 Chronicles 5:13 ; 2 Chronicles 6:41-42 ; 2 Chronicles 7:3 ; 2 Chronicles 10:16 ; 2 Chronicles 20:21 ...
Ezra 3:11 ...
Job 3:2-42:6 ...
Psalm 1-150 ...
Proverbs 1-31 ...
Ecclesiastes 1:2-11 ,Ecclesiastes 1:2-11,1:15 ,Ecclesiastes 1:15,1:18 ; Ecclesiastes 3:2-9 ; Ecclesiastes 7:1-13 ; Ecclesiastes 8:1 ; Ecclesiastes 10:1-4 ,Ecclesiastes 10:1-4,10:8-20 ; Ecclesiastes 11:1-4 ...
Song of Song of Solomon 1-8 ...
Isaiah—largely poetry...
Jeremiah—poetic selections throughout except for 32–45...
Lamentations 1-5 ...
Ezekiel 19:2-14 ; Ezekiel 23:32-34 ; Ezekiel 24:3-5 ; Ezekiel 26:17-18 ; Ezekiel 27:3-9 ; Ezekiel 27:25-36 ; Ezekiel 28:1-10 ; Ezekiel 28:12-19 ; Ezekiel 28:22-23 ; Ezekiel 29:3-5 ; Ezekiel 30:2-4 ; Ezekiel 30:6-8 ; Ezekiel 30:10-19 ; Ezekiel 31:2-9 ; Ezekiel 32:2-8 ; Ezekiel 32:12-15 ; Ezekiel 32:19 ...
Daniel 2:20-23 ; Daniel 4:3 ; Daniel 4:34-35 ; Daniel 6:26-27 ; Daniel 7:9-10 ; Daniel 7:13-14 ; 7:23-27 Hosea—all poetry except for 1; Daniel 2:16-20 ; Daniel 3:1-5 ...
Joel—all poetry except for Daniel 2:30-3:8 ...
Amos—largely poetry...
Obadiah 1:1 ...
Jonah 2:2-9 ...
Micah 1-7 ...
Nahum 1-3 ...
Habakkuk 1-3 ...
Zephaniah 1-3 ...
Zechariah 9-11:3 ; Zechariah 11:17 ; Zechariah 13:7-9 ...
Parallelism The predominant feature of Hebrew poetry is parallelism
Mourning Customs - There is the same announcement by wailing (Micah 1:8 , Mark 5:38 )
Worship - The rituals themselves were of no use if people did not worship God in their hearts and lives (Psalms 15:1; Psalms 50:7-15; Isaiah 29:13; Micah 6:6-8)
New Jerusalem - Isaiah 2:1-5 ; 49:14-18 ; 52 ; 54 ; 60-62 ; 65:17-25 ; Jeremiah 31:38-40 ; Micah 4:1-4 ; Zechariah 14 )
Haggai, Theology of - Smith, Micah-Malachi ; H
Husbandry - These regulations having been made in respect to the tenure, incumbrances, &c, of landed property, Joshua divided the whole country which he had occupied, first among the respective tribes, and then among individual Hebrews, running it out with the aid of a measuring line, Joshua 17:5 ; Joshua 17:14 ; Amos 7:17 ; Micah 2:5 ; Psalms 78:55 ; Ezekiel 40:3
Egypt - Throughout their history, the people of Israel celebrated their deliverance from Egypt, reminding themselves that God’s grace and power alone had saved them (Leviticus 23:43; Deuteronomy 16:1-3; 1 Samuel 10:17-18; Nehemiah 9:16-17; Psalms 106:7-12; Daniel 9:15; Amos 2:10; Micah 7:15; Acts 7:17-19; Acts 7:36; see PASSOVER)
Justice - It is an ever-recurring burden in the Prophetical writings that justice is thwarted through bribery: ‘Every one loveth gifts and followeth after rewards’ ( Isaiah 1:23 ; see, further, Isaiah 5:7 ; Isaiah 5:20 ; Isaiah 5:23 , Micah 3:11 ; Micah 7:3 , Ezekiel 18:8 ; Ezekiel 22:12 etc
Sacrifice And Offering - Micah reflected the same sentiments when he proclaimed that God was not interested in the physical act of sacrifice by itself but in the life and heart of the one making the sacrifice (Micah 6:4-6 )
Wages - Children, who were regarded as God's reward to his people (Psalm 127:3 ), could be offered up as sacrifices to a nature god (Micah 6:7 ). Micah laments that Judah's "leaders judge for a bribe, her priests teach for a price, and her prophets tell fortunes for money" (3:11)
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - This happens in a wonderful passage in both Isaiah and Micah in which these prophets look forward to the Lord's house as being established above the hills and of many nations as coming to it to find God's teaching so that they may walk in his ways (Isaiah 2:2-4 ; Micah 4:1-5 )
God (2) - It is like the language of Micah when he said, ‘I am full of power by the Spirit of Jehovah’ (Micah 3:8)
Crimes And Punishments - ...
The offenses that make one liable to being “cut off” are: the men of Israel who are uncircumcised (Genesis 17:14 ; compare Exodus 4:24 ; Joshua 5:2-9 ), eating leavened bread during the feast of unleavened bread (Exodus 12:15 ,Exodus 12:15,12:19 ), trying to copy or using the holy anointing oil on outsiders (Exodus 30:33 ), profaning the Sabbath (Exodus 31:14 ), partaking of sacrifices in an unclean state (Leviticus 7:20-21 ,Deuteronomy 17:7,17:25 ; Leviticus 19:8 ; compare 1 Samuel 2:33 ), eating blood (Leviticus 7:27 ; Leviticus 17:10 ,Leviticus 17:10,17:14 ), offering sacrifices in a place other than the tabernacle (Leviticus 17:3-4 ,Leviticus 17:3-4,17:8-9 ), certain sexual offenses (Leviticus 18:29 ; Leviticus 20:17-18 ), child sacrifices to Molech (Leviticus 20:1 ,Leviticus 20:1,3:1 ,Leviticus 3:1,5:1 ), consulting wizards or mediums (Leviticus 20:6 ; Micah 5:12 ), approaching holy things in an unclean state (Leviticus 22:3 ; Numbers 19:13 ,Numbers 19:13,19:20 ), improperly observing the Day of Atonement (Leviticus 23:29<
Building - Israel's prophets looked forward to a day when God's sanctuary would be forever among his people (Ezekiel 37:26-28 ; 43:1-7 ; Micah 4:1-2 ; Haggai 2:7 ; Zechariah 2 6:11-15 ; 8:3,23 ; 14:4 )
Mary - Soon after this the decree of Augustus (Luke 2:1 ) required that they should proceed to Bethlehem (Micah 5:2 ), some 80 or 90 miles from Nazareth; and while they were there they found shelter in the inn or khan provided for strangers (Luke 2:6,7 )
Abstain, Abstinence - The destruction of wine is noted as a calamity in the life of Israel (Deuteronomy 28:30-39 ; Isaiah 62:8 ; 65:21 ; Micah 6:15 ; Zephaniah 1:13 )
Know, Knowledge - ...
Thus, biblically to know God is not to know about him in an abstract and impersonal manner, but rather to enter into his saving actions (Micah 6:5 )
Legalism - The prophets in particular denounce preoccupation with the niceties of sacrificial ritual while inward obedience expressed in justice, compassion, and humility is lacking (1 Samuel 15:22-23 ; Isaiah 1:10-20 ; Amos 2:6-8 ; 4:4-5 ; 5:21-24 ; Micah 6:6-8 )
Aaron - Outside the Hexateuch, two early passages ( Deuteronomy 18:6-8 ; 1 Samuel 12:8 , Micah 6:4 ) refer to Aaron merely as taking a leading part in the Exodus
Vine - Thus growing, the vine became a beautiful emblem of domestic love, peace, and plenty, Psalm 128:3 Micah 4:4
Light - Micah 7
Jacob - In Micah 1:5 the name is a poetic synonym for Israel, the kingdom of the ten tribes
Joel - Joel's style is pure, smooth, rhythmical, periodic, and regular in its parallelisms; strong as Micah, tender as Jeremiah, vivid as Nathan, and sublime as Isaiah
Election - Rather the opposite, for God requires a higher standard of conduct in those who are his chosen people (Amos 3:2; Micah 3:9-12; 1 Peter 4:17)
Testimony - As accuser, God testifies against Israel because of their sin (Psalm 50:7,21 ; Isaiah 57:16 ; Hosea 4:1 ; Micah 1:2 ; 6:2 ; Malachi 2:14 ); as judge, he reaches a just verdict on the basis of his own testimony (Hosea 12:2 ; Micah 6:2,9-16 ; Zephaniah 3:7-8 ; Malachi 3:5 )
Wealth - Although Judah and Israel should know better, however, they too selfishly amass property while ignoring God's moral standards (Isaiah 5:8-9 ); they trust in ritual worship rather than true repentance (Jeremiah 7:5-8 ); and they extort, rob, and oppress the poor to gain more land (Ezekiel 22:29 ; Micah 2:2 ). Their leaders' motives for ministry are largely financial (Micah 3:11 )! Instead, they should "Seek justice, encourage the oppressed
Fig-Tree - Its welcome shade and refreshing fruit make it the emblem of peace and prosperity (Deuteronomy 8:8, Judges 9:10-11, 1 Kings 4:25, Micah 4:4, Zechariah 3:10, 1 Maccabees 14:12). בִּכּוּרָה bikkûrâh, Isaiah 28:4, Jeremiah 24:2, Hosea 9:10, Micah 7:1) is produced upon the old wood of the preceding year, the buds which remained undeveloped through the winter swelling into the little green îm already described, towards the end of the season of spring rains (March–April), and coming to maturity in June
Righteousness - ‘balances of wickedness’ ( Micah 6:11 ) or ‘balances of deceit’ ( Amos 8:5 )
Teach, Teacher - The prophets foresee days when all nations will be taught God's ways (Isaiah 2:3 ; 54:13 ; Micah 4:2 )
Expiation, Propitiation - When this happened, the prophets of the Old Testament frequently protested against the externalism of the priestly cult of sacrifice, saying much more effect came through a humble heart, the sacrifice of repentance (Psalm 51:17 ; Isaiah 1:10-20 ; Jeremiah 6:20 ; Hosea 6:6 ; Joel 2:13 ; Micah 6:6-8 )
Exodus - The prophets constantly reminded Israel that election and covenant were closely related to the Exodus (Isaiah 11:16 ; Jeremiah 2:6 ; Jeremiah 7:22-25 ; Ezekiel 20:6 ,Ezekiel 20:6,20:10 ; Hosea 2:15 ; Hosea 11:1 ; Amos 2:10 ; Amos 3:1 ; Micah 6:4 ; Haggai 2:5 )
Judges, Book of - The first is the setting up of an illegitimate priesthood by an individual Ephraimite named Micah, followed by the theft of Micah's priest and his “gods” by a part of the tribe of Dan who were migrating from their territory (on the west of Judah) to the northern part of the Hula Valley in the extreme north of Israel
Fig Tree - Accordingly, we read, in the Old Testament, of Juda and Israel dwelling, or sitting securely, every man under his fig tree, 1 Kings 4:25 ; Micah 4:4 ; Zechariah 3:10 ; 1Ma_14:12
Oil - In early times it appears as if a preliminary pressing was made with the feet alone ( Micah 6:15 )
Jehoiakim - "He built his house by unrighteousness and wrong, using his neighbour's service without wages," using his people's forced labour to build himself a splendid palace, in violation of Leviticus 19:13; Deuteronomy 24:14-15; compare Micah 3:10; Habakkuk 2:9; James 5:4
Cattle - Year-old calves were viewed as the best animals for sacrifice (Micah 6:6 )
Perseverance - ...
In the Septuagint the word refers to either confidence in or tense expectation of ("waiting on") the power or the faithfulness of God, who delivers his people (Psalm 37:9 ; Isaiah 51:5 ; Micah 7:7 ; Zephaniah 3:8 )
Lie, Lying - , those who prophesy false visions, divinations, and delusions of their own minds) are frequently condemned (Isaiah 9:15 ; Jeremiah 14:14 ; 23:25-26 ; 28:15 ; Ezekiel 13:6-7 ; 21:29 ; 22:28 ; Micah 2:11 ; Zechariah 10:2 ; 13:3 )
Sorcery - The noun בָּשָׁף in Isaiah 47:9; Isaiah 47:12 is translated by ‘sorceries (Authorized Version and Revised Version ), and by φαρμακεία in the Septuagint ; but in 2 Kings 9:22, Micah 5:11 (12), Nahum 3:4 it is translated by ‘witchcrafts,’ Septuagint φάρμακον, where clearly the right translation is ‘magic arts
Son of God - the mighty God, the Everlasting Father"; (Isaiah 7:4) Immanuel "God with us"; (Micah 5:2) "whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting
Gardens - In the days of Micah, the magistrates of Judah had become exceedingly corrupt: "The best of them is a brier; the most upright is sharper than a thorn hedge;" to appear before their tribunal, or to have any dealings with them, was to involve one's self in endless perplexities, and to be exposed to galling disappointments, if not to certain destruction
Economic Life - In later periods, however, the prophets spoke of rich men who add “house to house, that lay field to field” (Isaiah 5:8 ), taking advantage of the poor farmer whose land has been devastated by invading armies (Micah 2:2 ) or drought. The fact that the law did not prevent fraud in every case is seen in the prophets' cries against deceitful weights (Micah 6:11 ) and false balances (Amos 8:5 )
False Prophet - Typically, their prophecies promised peace when there was no peace to be had (Jeremiah 6:14 ; 8:11 ; 14:3 ; 23:17 ; 28:2,11 ; Ezekiel 13:10 ; Micah 3:5 ), for their visions were drawn out of their own hearts (Jeremiah 14:14 ; 23:16 ; Ezekiel 13:2-3 ; 22:28 )
Jonah, Theology of - Allen, The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; J
Habakkuk, Theology of - Smith, Micah-Malachi ; M
Joel - Emphasis on ethical living, so characteristic of preexilic prophets such as Amos and Micah, was lacking
War - He preferred to work for peace (Isaiah 9:6-7; Micah 4:3-4; Zechariah 9:9-10)
Salvation - Salvation would extend to all nations who would stream to Zion for instruction in God's ways (Isaiah 2:2-4 ; Micah 4:1-4 ; Zechariah 8:20-23 )
Malachi, Theology of - Smith, Micah-Malachi ; P
Samaria - )...
Its present state accords with prophecy: (Hosea 13:16) "Samaria shall become desolate"; (Micah 1:6) "I will make Samaria as an heap of the field, and as plantings of a vineyard, and I will pour down the stones thereof into the valley (a graphic picture of its present state which is 'as though the buildings of the ancient city had been thrown down from the brow of a hill': Scottish Mission Enquiry, 295), and I will discover the foundations thereof
Proselytes - ...
All the prophets anticipate the future sharing of proselytes in the kingdom of God, and even in the Holy Land as "sojourners" (Ezekiel 47:22; Isaiah 2:2; Isaiah 11:10; Isaiah 56:3-6; Micah 4:1), and meantime plead their cause (Jeremiah 7:6; Ezekiel 22:7; Ezekiel 22:29; Zechariah 7:10; Malachi 3:5)
Judgment, Last - subdued and cast into the depths of the sea, Micah 7:19
Acceptance - Proverbs 21:3, Micah 6:8, Deuteronomy 10:4); in the latter the ceremonial association has entirely vanished except in a metaphorical sense, and become purely ethico-spiritual, as the above references prove
Lion - ארי , or ארה , Genesis 49:9 ; Deuteronomy 33:22 ; Psalms 7:2 ; Psalms 22:13 ; Hosea 13:8 ; Micah 5:8 ; a large beast of prey, for his courage and strength called the king of beasts
Messiah - In a similar spirit Micah localizes the new Kingdom established through Divine guidance in Zion ( Micah 4:1-5 ), and declares that the King is to come from Bethlehem, that is to say, shall be Davidic ( Micah 5:2-5 )
Prophet - Isaiah felt that, in order to hold intercourse with God, personal holiness was requisite (Isaiah 6:5); and indeed so fully was this felt that the prophetic state was looked upon as closely related to communion with God in prayer; and the expression which was generally used in the OT for the answering of prayer was frequently applied to prophetic revelation (עָנָה Micah 3:7, Habakkuk 2:1 ff. They, as Micah (Micah 3:8), could say, ‘I am full of power to declare unto Jacob his transgressions and to Israel his sins
Matthew, the Gospel According to - ...
QUOTATIONS IN MATTHEW Matthew 1:23 "Behold, a virgin" Isaiah 7:14 Matthew 2:6 "Thou Bethlehem" Micah 5:2 Matthew 2:15 "Out of Egypt" Hosea 11:1 Matthew 2:18 "In Rama a voice" Jeremiah 31:15 Matthew 3:3 "The voice of one crying" Isaiah 40:3 Matthew 4:4 "Man shall not live by bread" Deuteronomy 8:3 Matthew 4:6 "He shall give His angels charge" Psalms 91:11-12 Matthew 4:7 "Thou shalt not tempt " Deuteronomy 6:16 Matthew 4:10 "Thou shalt worship the Lord" Deuteronomy 6:13 Matthew 4:15-16 "The land of Zabulon" Isaiah 9:1-2 Matthew 5:5 "Blessed are the meek: they shall Psalms 37:11 inherit the earth" Matthew 5:21 "Thou shalt not kill" Exodus 20:13 Matthew 5:27 "Thou shalt not commit adultery" Exodus 20:14 Matthew 5:31 "Give her a writing of divorcement" Deuteronomy 24:1 Matthew 5:33 "Thou shalt not forswear"...
Deuteronomy 23:23; Leviticus 19:12 Matthew 5:38 "An eye for an eye" Exodus 21:24 Matthew 5:43 "Love thy neighbor . of his own household" Micah 7:5-6 Matthew 11:5 "Blind receive sight" Isaiah 35:5 Matthew 11:10 "Behold, I send My messenger" Malachi 3:1 Matthew 11:14 "Elias, which was for to come " Malachi 4:5 Matthew 12:3 "Have ye not read what David did?" 1 Samuel 21:1-6 Matthew 12:5 "Priests profane sabbath" Numbers 28:9 Matthew 12:7 "Mercy, not sacrifice" Hosea 6:6 Matthew 12:18-21 "Behold My Servant" Isaiah 42:1-4 Matthew 12:40 "Jonas three days in whale's belly"...
Jonah 1:17 Matthew 12:42 "Queen of the south came" 1 Kings 10:1 Matthew 13:14-15 "Hearing ye shall hear" 1618881337_41 Matthew 13:35 "I will open my mouth in parables" Psalms 78:2-3 Matthew 15:8 "This people draweth nigh
Jerusalem - Micah, Isaiah's contemporary, held similar views (3:12; 5:1-4). When Jeremiah denied this and predicted the destruction of the temple, a century-old echo of Micah, it nearly cost him his life
Word - In the Old Testament God's word is creative (Psalm 33:6 ), good (Micah 2:7 ), holy (Jeremiah 23:9 ), complete (John 8:51-5959 ), flawless (2 Samuel 22:31 ; Psalm 12:6 ; 18:30 ; Proverbs 30:5 ), all-sufficient (Deuteronomy 8:3 ; Isaiah 50:4 ; Jeremiah 15:16 ), sure (Isaiah 31:2 ; 45:23 ; Jeremiah 44:28 ), right and true (Judges 13:12,17 ; 1 Samuel 3:19 ; Psalm 33:4 ; Isaiah 55:11 ), understandable (Deuteronomy 4:10,12 , 36 ; Nehemiah 8:12 ), active (Hosea 6:5 ), all-powerful (Psalm 68:11-14 ; 147:15-18 ), indestructible (Jeremiah 23:29 ), supreme (Psalm 17:4 ), eternal (Psalm 119:89 ; Isaiah 40:8 ), life-giving (Deuteronomy 32:46-47 ), wise (Psalm 119:130 ), and trustworthy (2 Samuel 7:28 ; 1 Kings 17:16 ). In times of judgment, God frequently refrained from communicating his word to his people (1 Samuel 3:1 ; Amos 8:11 ; also 1 Samuel 28:6 ; Micah 3:4,7 )
Prophet - The prophets so commissioned were the national poets (so David the psalmist was also a prophet, Acts 2:30), annalists (2 Chronicles 32:32), theocratic patriots (Psalm 48; 2 Chronicles 20:14-17), promoters of spiritual religion (Isaiah 1), extraordinarily authorized expounders of the spirit of the law (Isaiah 58:3-7; Ezekiel 18; Micah 6:6-8; Hosea 6:6; Amos 5:21) which so many sacrificed to the letter, official pastors, and a religious counterpoise to kingly despotism and idolatry, as Elijah was to Ahab. So also Jeremiah, Matthew 2:18; Hebrews 8:8; Daniel, Matthew 24:15; Hosea, Matthew 2:15; Romans 9:25; Joel, Acts 2:17; Amos, Acts 7:42; Acts 15:16; Jonah, Matthew 12:40; Micah, Matthew 12:7; Habakkuk, Acts 13:41; Haggai, Hebrews 12:26; Zechariah, Matthew 21:5; Mark 14:27; John 19:37; Malachi, Matthew 11:10; Mark 1:2; Luke 7:27
Court Systems - The prophets condemned corrupt judges (Isaiah 1:21-26 ; Amos 5:12 ,Amos 5:12,5:15 ; Micah 7:3 ) and those who supported them (Amos 5:10 )
Exile - In addition, the prophets Micah, Zephaniah, Jeremiah, Habakkuk, and Ezekiel agreed that Judah would fall
Election - The birth of the Messiah is seen to mark the dawn of the age of salvation for the remnant (Ezekiel 34:12-13 , 1618881337_74 ; Micah 5:1-2 )
Nativity of Christ - The place of his birth was Bethlehem, Micah 5:2
Wine - " In Micah 6:15, "thou shalt tread
Septuagint - ...
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Matthew 3:3...
Mark 1:3...
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Luke 4:10 f
Prophets, the - ...
Others follow closely, as Micah, who prophesies concerning Samaria and Jerusalem, though no personal reference is made to a king of Israel; and, either before or contemporary with the captivity of Judah, Jeremiah and Zephaniah
Armour, Arms - It is appropriately the symbol of war, as the plough-share is of peace ( Isaiah 2:4 , Micah 4:3 , Joel 3:10 )
Proverbs, the Book of - "Hezekiah" directed his pious "men" (perhaps Isaiah, Micah, Shebna, and Joah: 2 Kings 18:18) to supplement the collection with a series of proverbs of Solomon, not included in the collection by the royal author (Proverbs 25:1; compare Sirach 47:14; Sirach 47:17)
Samaria - The Prophet Hosea, Hosea 10:4 ; Hosea 10:8-9 , speaks of the cruelties exercised by Shalmaneser against the besieged; and Micah 1:6 , says that the city was reduced to a heap of stones
Obadiah, Book of - Micah Proverbs, Book of - The Hebrew word for proverb (mashal ), found in the book's title, can refer to a variety of literary forms beside the proverb: prophetic “discourse” (Numbers 23:7 ,Numbers 23:7,23:18 ), “allegory” (Ezekiel 17:2 ; Ezekiel 24:3 ), “taunt song” (Micah 2:4 )
James, the General Epistle of - The object is:...
(1) To warn against prevalent Jewish sins: formalism as contrasted with true religious "service" (threskeia , cult); the very ritual "services" of the gospel consist in mercy and holiness (compare James 1:27 with Matthew 23:23; Micah 6:7-8); in undesigned coincidence with James's own decision against mere ritualism at the council, as recorded in the independent history (Matthew 5:48); against fanaticism which, under the garb of religious zeal, was rending Jerusalem (James 1:20); fatalism (James 1:13); mean crouching to the rich (James 2:2); evil speaking (James 3:3-12; James 4:11); partisanship (James 3:14); boasting (James 2:5; James 4:16); oppression (James 5:4)
Messiah - They constantly looked for the one who would be the great ‘David’ of the future, the great descendant of David the son of Jesse (Psalms 89:3-4; Isaiah 9:2-7; Isaiah 11:1-10; Jeremiah 23:5; Ezekiel 34:23-24; Micah 5:2)
Sacrifice - They were taught that without repentance, faith, and reformation, all sacrifices were an abomination to God, Proverbs 21:27 Jeremiah 6:20 Amos 5:22 Micah 6:6-8 ; that He desires mercy and not sacrifice, Hosea 6:6 Matthew 9:13 , and supreme love to him, Mark 12:33
Ten Commandments - Thus in Judges 17:3 we find Micah making an image of Jahweh, without any disapproval by the writer
Captivity - ...
Their return under Messiah (then to be manifested) and their spiritual glory shall be the appointed instrumentality of the conversion of all nations (Isaiah 2; Isaiah 60; Micah 5:7; Zechariah 8:13)
Flesh - The Old Testament employs two terms to denote flesh: basar [ Genesis 2:21 ; Leviticus 13:10-11 ; Ezekiel 37:6 ; 1 Corinthians 15:42-44,501 ; Micah 3:3 ) and animals alike (Exodus 21:28 ), including animal flesh used for food (Genesis 9:2-4 ) and in sacrifice (1 Samuel 2:13 ; Isaiah 65:4 ; Hosea 8:13 )
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - The key terms for "poor" are used almost exclusively by Isaiah, Amos, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Zechariah while Hosea and Micah, who also showed great sensitivity to the needs of their people, do not use the terms at all
Jeremiah, Book of - The princes however protected him, and the elders reminded the people that Hezekiah did not put Micah to death
Guilt - , Micah 3:4 ff
Bethlehem - a city in the tribe of Judah, Judges 17:7 ; and likewise called Ephrath, Genesis 48:7 ; or Ephratah, Micah 5:2 ; and the inhabitants of it, Ephrathites, Ruth 1:2 ; 1 Samuel 17:12
David - After this, when obliged, by the command of God, to give up some of Saul's family to justice, for the murder of the Gibeonites, he spared Mephibosheth, Micah, and his family, the male descendants of Saul and Jonathan, who alone could have any pretence to dispute the crown with him, and surrendered only Saul's bastard children, and those of his daughter by Adriel, who had no right or possible claim to the throne, and could never give him any uneasiness in the possession of it; and thus showed his inviolable regard for his oaths, his tenderness to Saul, and the warmth of his gratitude and friendship to Jonathan
Nin'Eveh - (Micah 5:6 ) and was believed to have been first peopled by a colony from Babylon
Holy Spirit - Always it was on the side of right and opposed to wrong (Psalms 51:10-12; Isaiah 32:15-16; Isaiah 63:10; Micah 3:8)
Jesus Christ - the anointed of the Father to be king of the earth (Psalms 2:6-12; Revelation 11:15; Revelation 12:10), rests:...
(1) On His fulfilling all the prophecies concerning Messiah, so far as His work has been completed, the earnest of the full completion; take as instances Isaiah 53; Psalm 22; Micah 5; Hosea 6:2-3; Genesis 49:10, compare Luke 2; "the testimony of Jesus is the Spirit of prophecy" (Revelation 19:10; Luke 24:26; Luke 24:44-46; Acts 3:22-25). The census of the Roman empire ordered by Augustus led Joseph and Mary from Nazareth to Bethlehem, the city of David their ancestor, in fulfillment of Micah's prophecy (Micah 5)
Moab - At Kirhareseth or Kerak his immolation of his own son struck superstitious fear into the besiegers so that they retired (2 Kings 3:27; compare Micah 6:5-8); and then followed all the conquests which Mesha records on the Moabite stone
Atonement - In Leviticus 1:4; Leviticus 4:26; Leviticus 5:1; Leviticus 5:16-18; Leviticus 5:16; Leviticus 17:11, the truth is established that the guilt is transferred from the sinful upon the innocent substitute, in order to make amends to violated justice, and to cover (atone: kipper' al ) or put out of sight the guilt (compare Micah 7:19 end), and to save the sinner from the wages of sin which is death
Holy Spirit - Numbers 11:25 ) to the finished literature of Isaiah and Jeremiah, revelation is essentially a direct and living communication of the Spirit to the individual prophet ( Deuteronomy 34:10 , Amos 3:8 , Micah 3:8 )
Nahum - Yet if Nahum is not a religious teacher like Micah or Isaiah, he focuses the truth of God’s moral government of the world, concentrating the light upon a single typical instance; and he does not fail to defend confidence in God as the eventual Avenger of wrong and the perpetual defence of those who love Him
Walk (2) - LXX Septuagint Proverbs 10:9 (with Barrow’s Sermon) 14:2, Micah 6:8 πορεύεσθαι μετὰ κυρίου θεοῦ σου, ‘to walk humbly with thy God,’ Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885
King, Christ as - Isaiah's contemporary, Micah, likewise prophesied that he would be born in Bethlehem, but his origins were "from of old, from ancient times" (5:2-5)
Light And Darkness - There ‘light’ (אוֹר = Septuagint φῶς) often denotes a state of happiness and well-being (Job 33:28; Job 33:30, Psalms 56:13), but more particularly the salvation which comes from God, and God Himself as the giver of salvation and blessing to His people (Psalms 4:6; Psalms 27:1; Psalms 36:9; Psalms 43:3, Isaiah 10:17, Micah 7:8)
Pharisees - ...
Contrast Micah 6:8
Isaiah - Isaiah was contemporary with the Prophets Amos, Hosea, Joel, and Micah
Judges (1) - 17, 18 tell the story of the Ephraimite Micah, who made an ephod and teraphim for himself, and got a Levite to be a ‘father and a priest’ to him; but he is persuaded by 600 Danites to go with them and be their priest; they then conquer Laish and found a sanctuary there, in which a graven image (which had been taken from Micah) is set up
Work - Micah (2:2) characterizes the rich as seizing fields and homes whenever they want. Instruments one used for destructive purposes such as war will be changed into ones used for productive purposes like agriculture (Isaiah 2:1-4 ; Micah 4:1-6 )
Canticles; the Song of Solomon - The "return, return, O Shulamite" answers to "when the Lord shall bring again Zion" through the instrumentality of the nations who shall then long to "look upon" her as the source of spiritual blessing to them (Micah 5:7; Zechariah 8:13)
Balaam - ...
In Micah 6:5 ("O My people, remember now what Balak king of Moab consulted, and what Balaam the son of Beer answered him from Shittim)," the sense is, Remember the fatal effects at Shittim of Israel's joining Baal Peer and committing whoredom with the daughters of Moab, and how but for God's sparing mercy Israel would have been given to utter destruction
Mary, the Virgin - ) Augustus' decree (Luke 2) obliged them to go to Bethlehem, God thereby causing His prophecy (Micah 5:2) to be fulfilled, Mary there giving birth to the Savior
Lord - ...
In the Old Testament, Lord usually describes the essence of Yahweh: His power over His people (Mark 12:35-3743 ; Isaiah 1:24 ), over the entire earth (Joshua 3:13 ; Micah 4:13 ), and over all gods (Deuteronomy 10:17 ; Psalm 135:5 )
Messiah - Micah prophesied that the Messiah was to come through the royal Davidic seedline to shepherd his people and bring them security (5:1-4)
Gideon - Afterward Israel in its turn shall be the dew to the Gentile world (Micah 5:7)
Magnificat - ...
(9) Micah 7:20 δώδει … ἔλεον τῷ Ἁβραάμ, καθότι ὤμοσας τοῖς πατράσιν ἡμῶν; 2 Samuel 22:51 καὶ ποεῶν ἕλεος … τῷ Δαυεὶδ καὶ τῷ σπίρματι αὐτοῦ ἕως κἰῶνος
the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans - " It was this same salvation offered to all such ministers as Archippus in the Old Testament, that made Micah exclaim at the end of his ministry
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - The prophet Micah went about naked as a sign that Samaria would go into captivity (Micah 1:8 )
Salvation Save Saviour - , Micah 7:7, Habakkuk 3:18, Psalms 24:5; Psalms 25:5; Psalms 51:12, though possibly Psalms 51:12 may refer to spiritual deliverance simply
Thousand Years - These elections are for the good of those to whom they minister respectively; compare, as to Israel's mediating blessedness to the nations, Romans 11:12; Romans 11:15; Micah 5:7
Mission - 26; Micah 6:4 )
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - Cultic features included the following: small clay figurines (Judges 3:7 ; Micah 5:13 ); "sacred pillars" (1 Kings 14:23 ); an "incense altar" (2 Chronicles 30:14 ); an altar for offering the whole burnt offering (2 Kings 21:5 ) and "priests" and "priestesses
Righteousness - Micah declared the righteousness of God as his faithfulness to keep and act within the covenant and thus to save Israel from her enemies, as well as to vindicate the penitent
Joel, Theology of - Allen, Joel, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah ; T
Tabernacle - But the altar raises its own questions: How can a bull or a sheep or a goat die in the place of a person who has been made just a little lower than God himself (Micah 6:6-8 )? For the Old Testament believer, the solution to this enigma was, in many ways, a mystery
Star (2) - here does not cite any proof-passages from the OT (in Matthew 2:5-6 the quotation from Micah is placed in the mouth of the Sanhedrin)
Prayer - The answer is to be "looked for," otherwise we do not believe in the efficacy of prayer (Habakkuk 2:1; Micah 7:7)
Assyria - The kingdoms of Assyria and Babylon were originally distinct and separate, Micah 5:6 ; and in this state they remained until Ninus conquered Babylon, and made it tributary to the Assyrian empire
Parables - A mashal can be a proverb ( 1 Samuel 10:12 ), a taunt (Micah 2:4 ), a dark riddle (Psalm 78:2 ), an allegory (Ezekiel 24:3-4 ), or a parable
Jesus Christ - " Daniel terms him the "Ancient of Days," or "The Immortal;" and Micah declares, in a passage which the council of the Jews, assembled by Herod, applied to the Messiah, that he who was to be born in Bethlehem was "even he whose comings forth are from eternity, from the days of the everlasting period. " Thus the prophetic testimony describes him, as entitled to the appellation of "Wonderful," since he should be, in a sense peculiar to himself, the Son of God, Psalms 2:7 ; Isaiah 9:6 ; as existing and acting during the patriarchal and the Jewish ages, and even from eternity, Psalms 40:7-9 ; Micah 5:2 ; as the guardian and protector of his people, Isaiah 40:9-11 ; as the proper object of the various affections of piety, of devotional confidence for obtaining the most important blessings, and of religious homage from angels and men, Psalms 2:12 ; Psalms 97:7 ; and, finally, declares him to be the eternal and immutable Being, the Creator, God, the Mighty God, Adonai, Elohim, Jehovah
Meals - Micah’s telling metaphor Micah 3:8 ), and put into the cooking-pot with water
Birds - Among the birds specifically named in the RSV translation of the Bible are: cock (Proverbs 30:31 ; Matthew 26:34 ,Matthew 26:34,26:74-75 ; Mark 14:30 ,Mark 14:30,14:72 ; Luke 22:34 ,Luke 22:34,22:60-61 ; John 13:38 ; John 18:27 ), carrion vulture (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ), crane (Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), dove/turtledove (Genesis 8:8-12 ; Isaiah 38:14 ; Isaiah 59:11 ; Matthew 3:16 ; Matthew 10:16 ; Luke 2:24 ; John 1:32 ), eagle (Exodus 19:4 ; Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ; Deuteronomy 32:11 ; Job 9:26 ; Job 39:27-30 ; Psalm 103:5 ; Proverbs 30:19 ; Jeremiah 4:13 ; Jeremiah 49:16 ,Jeremiah 49:16,49:22 ), falcon (Leviticus 11:14 ; Job 28:7 ), hawk (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ; Job 39:26 ), hen (Matthew 23:37 ; Luke 13:34 ), heron (Leviticus 11:19 ; Deuteronomy 14:18 ), kite (Leviticus 11:14 ; Deuteronomy 14:13 ), osprey (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ), ostrich (Leviticus 11:16 ; Revelation 19:17-217 ; Job 30:29 ; Job 39:13-18 ; Isaiah 13:21 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Isaiah 43:20 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ; Lamentations 4:3 ; Micah 1:8 ), owl (Leviticus 11:17 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ), partridge (1 Samuel 26:20 ; Jeremiah 17:11 ), peacock (1 Kings 10:22 ; 2 Chronicles 9:21 ), pelican (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:17 ), pigeon (Genesis 15:9 ; Leviticus 1:14 ; Leviticus 5:7 ; Leviticus 12:8 ; Leviticus 14:22 ; Luke 2:24 ; John 2:14 ), quail (Exodus 16:13 ; Numbers 11:31-32 ; Psalm 105:40 ), raven (Genesis 8:7 ; Leviticus 11:15 ; Deuteronomy 14:14 ; 1 Kings 17:4-6 ; Proverbs 30:17 ; Luke 12:24 ), sea gull (Leviticus 11:16 ; Deuteronomy 14:15 ), sparrow (Psalm 84:3 ; Matthew 10:29 ,Matthew 10:29,10:31 ; Luke 12:6-7 ), stork (Leviticus 11:19 ; Psalm 104:17 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), swallow (Psalm 84:3 ; Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), vulture (Leviticus 11:13 ; Deuteronomy 14:12 ), and water hen (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 )
Woe - Like them, He was ‘full of power by the spirit of the Lord, and of judgment, and of might, to declare unto Jacob his transgression, and to Israel his sin’ (Micah 3:8)
Temple - What responses do we find in Scripture to the building of the temple beyond those found in the immediate context of it being built?...
Rather than "going up" to the mountain of the house of the Lord to hear the word of the Lord, as in the eschatological visions of Isaiah and Micah (4:1-2), the Babylonians "descend" upon the temple to break down its wall and carry off the temple treasures
the Rich Man And Lazarus - " And then, since he had been brought up to read and remember his Bible, he would call this out of Micah to mind
Advent (2) - ...
The promise, as thus transformed, was that of a king, or line of kings, sprung from David’s house who, endowed with transcendent gifts, and acting by special authority as the Anointed of the Lord, should reign in righteousness, introduce an era of Divine salvation for Israel, and draw all other nations round them in loyalty to Jehovah’s law (Isaiah 2:2; Isaiah 11:5-9; Isaiah 27:1, Micah 4:1-4)
Ethics - “The Lord looketh on the heart” ( 1 Samuel 16:7 ) was the cry repeatedly announced by the prophets (Isaiah 1:11-18 ; Jeremiah 7:21-23 ; Hosea 6:6 ; Micah 6:6-8 )
Isaiah, Book of - Like the book of ‘The Twelve Prophets’ another of these great collections (see Micah [1]) it was formed by incorporating with one another smaller and earlier collections, and contains prophecies of many prophets living at different periods; with the exception of Isaiah’s, the prophecies contained in the collection are anonymous, the term ‘Deutero-Isaiah,’ applied to the author of chs
Jacob - , Jeremiah 31:15 ); and therefore the gloss ‘the same is Bethlehem’ must be due to a confusion with the other Ephrath ( Ruth 4:11 , Micah 5:2 ), which was south of Jerusalem
Paul the Apostle - Such criticism of legalism is not a Pauline innovation; it was already a prominent feature of the Old Testament itself (1 Samuel 15:22 ; Psalm 40:6-8 ; 51:16-17 ; Isaiah 1:11-15 ; Micah 6:6-8 ) and figures prominently in Jesus' teaching (Matthew 23 ; 1618881337_97 ; Luke 11:37-54 )
Paul the Aged - It could not possibly have been Moses, or David, or Isaiah, or Micah
Agriculture - The Golden Age will be a time when men ‘shall beat their swords into ploughshares, and their spears into pruning-hooks,’ and ‘they shall sit every man under his vine and under his fig-tree’ (Isaiah 2:4, Micah 4:3-4)
Trade And Commerce - In Amos 9:4-8 the reference is more distinct, and implies both the offence mentioned above and the use of deceitful measures, a wrong also condemned by Micah in a similar context ( Amos 6:10 )
Bible - And His revealing His will "in many portions" (polumeros ; Hebrews 1:1, one prophet or inspired person or writer receiving one portion of revelation, another another: to Noah the quarter of the world where Messiah should appear, to Abraham the nation, to Jacob the tribe, to David and Isaiah the family, to Micah the town, to Daniel the time), and "in divers manners," corresponds to tits sending from time to time a Bacon, Newton, Shakespeare, etc
Church - It was to realize the hopes of that congregation of Israel which had been purchased and redeemed of old ( Psalms 74:2 ), and of which the Davidic monarchy had been the pledge ( Micah 4:8 , Isaiah 55:3 etc
War, Holy War - The land of Nimrod is destined to be ruled by the sword (Micah 5:6 )
Leadership - God sent prophets to sound a warning before the northern kingdom fell to Assyria (Amos, Hosea, Isaiah, Micah) and before Babylon took Judah (Zephaniah, Habakkuk, Jeremiah, Ezekiel)
Gentiles - In the magnificent prophecy of Isaiah 2:2-4, Micah 4:1-4 the Temple-mountain is still the centre from which the laws of God go forth to the subjects of a kingdom of universal peace
Messiah - ...
Probably Micah 5:1-8, like Jeremiah 23:5-8, may be assigned to the earlier years of the reign of Josiah, when the religious and political outlook of Judah appeared more hopeful, and the overthrow of Assyria seemed as probable as it did to Isaiah after b
Sarah - Say this; say it with Micah when he was in some such distress, say, 'I will bear the indignation of the Lord, because I have sinned against Him, until He plead my cause and execute judgment for me
Priest - They were far from wealthy, and were to be the objects of the people's liberality (Deuteronomy 12:12; Deuteronomy 12:19; Deuteronomy 14:27-29; 1 Samuel 2:36), and were therefore tempted to "teach for hire" (Micah 3:11). Micah's history shows the tendency to relapse to the household priests (Judges 17; 18)
Dead Sea Scrolls - One approach to such interpretation was the production of continuous commentaries on the following Old Testament books: Habakkuk, Micah, Psalms, Isaiah, Hosea, Nahum, and Zephaniah
Temple of Jerusalem - The great prophets preached that, in their Temple worship, Israel was not able to avoid syncretism with pagan religious impulses or the hypocritical irrelevance of meaningless overemphasis upon ritual without righteous obedience to their sovereign Overlord (Isaiah 1:10-17 ; Micah 6:6-8 ; Jeremiah 7:1-26 )
Canon of the Old Testament - , Amos, and Micah, had delivered their message a century ago, and their words were in the possession of their disciples
Forgiveness - So, in spite of Israel's disobedience, after he has punished the nation, God is committed to dealing mercifully with it because of the covenant made with the fathers and his love for them (Leviticus 26:42 ; Deuteronomy 4:31 ; 9:26-27 ; 2 Kings 13:23 ; Psalm 106:40-46 ; Jeremiah 33:25-26 ; Micah 7:20 )
Humility - —This virtue or grace distinguished the leaders of OT history like Abraham and Moses (Matthew 18:1-4,39 Mark 10:35-45,47), and was inculcated by the prophets as a chief duty (Micah 6:8)
Old Testament - " But the "commandment" which Ephraim "walked after" is Jeroboam's (1 Kings 12:28-33; 2 Kings 10:28-33; Micah 6:16)
Sacrifice - The prophets take for granted sacrificial propitiation, and add that self-dedicating obedience which the Bunt offering taught is what the worshippers must spiritually aim at, else their sacrifice is vain (1 Samuel 15:22; 1618881337_28; Jeremiah 7:22-23; Ezekiel 20:39-44; Hosea 6:6; Leviticus 4:25,; Micah 6:6-8; Psalms 40:8-11; Psalms 50:13-14; Psalms 51:16-17)
Solomon - ...
From thence Messiah is to reign to the ends of the earth (Deuteronomy 11:8; Isaiah 9:5-6; Isaiah 11; Zechariah 9:10; see Micah 5:4; Ecclesiastes 8:12-1335)
Parable - ]'>[6] ], Micah 2:4 , Habakkuk 2:3 ); in Job 27:1 ; Job 29:1 of Job’s sentences of ethical wisdom, differing little from the ‘ proverbs ’ of 1 Kings 4:32 , Proverbs 1:1 ; Proverbs 10:1 (the same word mâshâl )
Evil - Indeed, he hates evil (Psalm 5:6 ) and is the avenging judge who punishes those who practice it (Isaiah 31:2 ; Micah 2:1 )
Holy Spirit - Micah 3:8 affirms the prophecy's origination in the Spirit
Conscience - Micah 6:8), they furnished no doctrine of conscience
Passover - Sincerity of spirit in seeking the Lord is acceptable to Him, even where the strict letter of the law has been unavoidably unfulfilled (Hosea 6:6; Micah 6:8; Matthew 9:13)
Anger - The prophets of that period ‘do not recognize the need of any means of reconciliation with God after estrangement by sin other than repentance’ (Hosea 14:2, Amos 5:22-24, Isaiah 1:13; Isaiah 1:17, Micah 6:6-8)
Sin - ”...
'Âven may be a general term for a crime or offense, as in Micah 2:1: “Woe to them that devise iniquity …” (cf
Priests And Levites - The ‘Levite’ who is priest to Micah is actually of the tribe of Judah ( Judges 17:7 )
Education in Bible Times - Like the legal tradition associated with the covenants, both wisdom and prophecy were rooted in the behavioral outcomes of loving God and doing righteousness and justice (Proverbs 1:3,2:9 ; Hosea 6:6 ; Micah 6:8 )
Amos, Theology of - King, Amos, Hosea, MicahAn Archaeological Commentary ; J. Marsh, Amos and Micah: Introduction and Commentary ; J
Atonement - also allusions to sin- and guilt-offerings, and to propitiatory rites in so old a stratum of laws as the ‘Law of Holiness’ ( Leviticus 19:21-22 ; Leviticus 23:19 ), and in Hosea 4:8 , Micah 6:6-7 , Ezekiel 40:39 ; Ezekiel 42:13 etc
Animals - ) In Micah 1:8 and Isaiah 34:13 another Hebrew word is translated as “jackals” (KJV, dragon; NEB, wolf)
Humility - —This virtue or grace distinguished the leaders of OT history like Abraham and Moses (Genesis 18:27, Numbers 12:3), and was inculcated by the prophets as a chief duty (Micah 6:8)
Biblical Theology - ...
The drift that God's prophets decry is documented by writing prophets like Isaiah, Hosea, Micah, and Amos
Sacrifice - Righteousness is fundamental religion (Micah 6:6-8); without it sacrifice was an insult to God; He was weary of it; it provoked Him
Bible - we come to Hosea, Isaiah, and Micah
God - The old name Micah (= ‘Who is like Jahweh?’, Judges 17:1 ) is one indication of this line of thought
Sexuality, Human - (5) Redemption attempts to remove or rectify the alienation introduced by the fall, restoring humankind to fellowship with God (Romans 5:12-21 ; Ephesians 2:1-22 ) and with itself (Isaiah 2:1-5 ; Micah 4:1-7 )
God - The prophet Micah (6:8) articulated it most clearly: "He has showed you, O man, what is good
Eschatology (2) - Isaiah and Micah), but its history within the OT period shows that it sometimes either disappeared altogether or retired into the background, its place being taken by such a view as that expressed in Jeremiah 31:31 ff
Matthew, Gospel According to - Thus Isaiah had foretold the circumstances (Matthew 1:22), and Micah the place, of His birth (Matthew 2:5)
Prophecy - That many of the prophecies in the Old Testament were direct, and singly and exclusively applicable to, and accomplished in, our Saviour, is certain, Genesis 49:10 ; Psalms 42, 45; Isaiah 52, 53; Daniel 7:13-14 ; Micah 5:2 ; Zechariah 9:9 ; Malachi 3:1
Canaan - And the mountains shall be molten under him, and the valleys shall be cleft as wax before the fire, and as the waters that are poured down a steep place," Micah 1:3-4
Ethics (2) - In harmony with Micah 6:8 He enunciates the principle that the primary imperatives of morality surpass all ceremonial prescriptions in importance and urgency—a truth which, though ancient, needs ever to be emphasized anew
Jews - Micah and the Danites introduced it not long after Joshua's death
Forgiveness (2) - Hence sin when forgiven is said to be ‘cast into the depth of the sea’ (Micah 7:19), ‘cast behind thy back’ (Isaiah 38:17), removed ‘as far as the east is from the west’ (Psalms 103:12), ‘remembered no more’ (Jeremiah 31:34) against the sinner
Messiah - The place where Messiah should be born, and where he should principally impart his doctrine is determined; Micah 5:2 ; Is
Persecution - For Jahweh requires of His worshippers that they do justly (Micah 6:8)
Bible - the Pentateuch or five books of Moses, called Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy, the books of Joshua, Judges, Ruth , 1 & 2 Samuel , 1 & 2 Kings , 1 & 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, the Song of Solomon, the prophecies of Isaiah, Jeremiah with his Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi