What does Metempsychosis mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Metempsychosis
(Greek: meta, over; en, in; psyche, soul)
The doctrine of the transmigration or transition of souls, i.e.,that the same soul inhabits in succession the bodies of different beings, both men and brute animals. Taught by Pythagoreans, Plato, and many Oriental religions.
Webster's Dictionary - Metempsychosis
(n.) The passage of the soul, as an immortal essence, at the death of the animal body it had inhabited, into another living body, whether of a brute or a human being; transmigration of souls.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Metempsychosis
the doctrine of the transmigration of souls into other bodies. This tenet has been attributed to the sect of the Pharisees. Josephus, who was himself a Pharisee, gives this account of their doctrine in these points: "Every soul is immortal; those of the good only enter into another body, but those of the bad are tormented with everlasting punishment." From whence it has been pretty generally concluded, that the resurrection they held was only a Pythagorean one, namely, the transmigration of the soul into another body; from which they excluded all that were notoriously wicked, who were doomed at once to eternal punishment; but their opinion was, that those who were guilty only of lesser crimes were punished for them in the bodies into which their souls were next sent. It is also supposed, that it was upon this notion the disciples asked our Lord, "Did this man sin, or his parents, that he was born blind?" John 9:2 ; and that some said, Christ was "John the Baptist, some Elias, others Jeremias, or one of the prophets," Matthew 16:14 . The transmigration of souls into other bodies was undoubtedly the opinion of the Pythagoreans and Platonists, and was embraced by some among the Jews; as by the author of the Book of Wisdom, who says, that "being good, he came into a body undefiled," Matthew 8:20 . Nevertheless, it is questioned by some persons, whether the words of Josephus, before quoted, are a sufficient evidence of this doctrine of the metempsychosis being received by the whole sect of the Pharisees; for "passing into another or different body," may only denote its receiving a body at the resurrection; which will be another, not in substance, but in quality; as it is said of Christ at his transfiguration, το ειδος του προσωπου αυτου ετερον , "the fashion of his countenance was" another, or, as we render it, was "altered,"
Luke 9:29 . As to the opinion which some entertained concerning our Saviour, that he was either John the Baptist, or Elias, or Jeremias, or one of the prophets, Matthew 16:14 , it is not ascribed to the Pharisees in particular, and if it were, one cannot see how it could be founded on the doctrine of the metempsychosis; since the soul of Elias, now inhabiting the body of Jesus, would no more make him to be Elias, than several others had been, in whose bodies the soul of Elias, according to this doctrine, is supposed to have dwelt since the death of that ancient prophet, near a thousand years before. Beside, how was it possible any person that saw Christ, who did not appear to be less than thirty years old, should, according to the notion of the metempsychosis, conceive him to be John the Baptist, who had been so lately beheaded? Surely this apprehension must be grounded on the supposition of a proper resurrection. It was probably, therefore, upon the same account, that others took him to be Elias, and others Jeremias. Accordingly, St. Luke expresses it thus: "Others say, that one of the old prophets is risen from the dead," Luke 9:19 . It may farther be observed, that the doctrine of the resurrection, which St. Paul preached, was not a present metempsychosis, but a real future resurrection, which he calls the "hope and resurrection of the dead,"
Acts 23:6 . This he professed as a Pharisee, and for this profession the partisans of the sect vindicated him against the Sadducees, Acts 23:7-9 . Upon the whole, therefore, it appears most reasonable to adopt the opinion of Reland, though in opposition to the sentiments of many other learned men, that the Pharisees held the doctrine of the resurrection in a proper sense.

Sentence search

Transmigration - ) The passing of the soul at death into another mortal body; Metempsychosis
Banians - A religious sect in the empire of the Mogul, who believe a Metempsychosis; and will therefore eat no living creature, nor kill even noxious animals, but endeavour to release them when in the hands of others
Metempsychosis - Nevertheless, it is questioned by some persons, whether the words of Josephus, before quoted, are a sufficient evidence of this doctrine of the Metempsychosis being received by the whole sect of the Pharisees; for "passing into another or different body," may only denote its receiving a body at the resurrection; which will be another, not in substance, but in quality; as it is said of Christ at his transfiguration, το ειδος του προσωπου αυτου ετερον , "the fashion of his countenance was" another, or, as we render it, was "altered,"...
Luke 9:29 . As to the opinion which some entertained concerning our Saviour, that he was either John the Baptist, or Elias, or Jeremias, or one of the prophets, Matthew 16:14 , it is not ascribed to the Pharisees in particular, and if it were, one cannot see how it could be founded on the doctrine of the Metempsychosis; since the soul of Elias, now inhabiting the body of Jesus, would no more make him to be Elias, than several others had been, in whose bodies the soul of Elias, according to this doctrine, is supposed to have dwelt since the death of that ancient prophet, near a thousand years before. Beside, how was it possible any person that saw Christ, who did not appear to be less than thirty years old, should, according to the notion of the Metempsychosis, conceive him to be John the Baptist, who had been so lately beheaded? Surely this apprehension must be grounded on the supposition of a proper resurrection. Paul preached, was not a present Metempsychosis, but a real future resurrection, which he calls the "hope and resurrection of the dead,"...
Acts 23:6
Regeneration - ,repair of living tissue; with the metaphorical notion of efforescence; with the non-Christian idea of aspiration to new life, or release through Metempsychosis; with the Pietistic idea of experience of conversion and of moral righteousness; with the old Protestant notion of Divine dissulation upon our sinfulness; with the Ritschlian notion of reconciliation following forgiveness
Transmigration - Broadly speaking, these may be reduced to two, the cruder and the more refined Metempsychosis. The ethical idea associated with this form of Metempsychosis is in the belief that the kind of body taken by the soul depends on its realizing or failing to realize ethical ideals. ...
Outside of the Gospels, the traces that a belief in Metempsychosis was held in Palestine at the time of Jesus are very scanty. —On the general subject of Metempsychosis, cf
Pharisees - It is also supposed by some that they admitted the doctrine of Metempsychosis or the transmigration of souls; but no allusion is made to this in the New Testament, nor does Josephus assert it
Lama, Grand - Almost all nations of the east, except the Mahometans, believe the Metempsychosis as the most important article of their faith; especially the inhabitants of Thibet and Ava, the Peguans, Siamese, the greatest part of the Chinese and Japanese, and the Monguls and Kalmucks, who changed the religion of Schamanism for the worship of the grand lama. According to the doctrine of this Metempsychosis, the soul is always in action, and never at rest; for no sooner does she leave her old habitation, than she enters a new one
Lamaism - Almost all the nations of the east, except the Mohammedans, believe the Metempsychosis, or transmigration of the soul, as the most important article of their faith; especially the inhabitants of Thibet and Ava, the Peguans, the Siamese, the greater part of the Chinese and Japanese, and the Monguls and Kalmucks
Soul - A few supported the Platonic speculation of Metempsychosis (so apparently Josephus; see BJ iii
Soul - A few supported the Platonic speculation of Metempsychosis (so apparently Josephus; see BJ iii
Manicheans - The most striking points of contact are Metempsychosis (Baur, l
Tatianus - There was nothing of Metempsychosis or transmigration of souls in his conception
Egypt - No hint of the Pythagorean doctrine of Metempsychosis, attributed by Herodotus to the Egyptians, has yet been found in their writings; but spells were given to the dead man by which he could voluntarily assume the form of a lotus, of an ibis or a heron or a serpent, or of the god Ptah, or ‘anything that he wished