What does Medes mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
מָדָֽי a people descended from the son of Japheth and who inhabited the territory of Media. / land inhabited by the descendants of Japheth; located northwest of Persia proper 3
מָדָ֑י a people descended from the son of Japheth and who inhabited the territory of Media. / land inhabited by the descendants of Japheth; located northwest of Persia proper 2
מָדַ֔י a people descended from the son of Japheth and who inhabited the territory of Media. / land inhabited by the descendants of Japheth; located northwest of Persia proper 2
μῆδοι a Mede 1
וּמָדַ֖י a people descended from the son of Japheth and who inhabited the territory of Media. / land inhabited by the descendants of Japheth; located northwest of Persia proper 1

Definitions Related to Medes

H4074


   1 a people descended from the son of Japheth and who inhabited the territory of Media.
   2 land inhabited by the descendants of Japheth; located northwest of Persia proper, south and southwest of the Caspian Sea, east of Armenia and Assyria, and west and northwest of the great salt desert of Iram.
   Additional Information: Media or Medes or Madai = “middle land”.
   

G3370


   1 a Mede, a native or inhabitant of Media, a well known region of Asia whose chief city was Ecbatana.
   Additional Information: Mede or Media = “middle land”.
   

Frequency of Medes (original languages)

Frequency of Medes (English)

Dictionary

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Medes
Media. From Μadai , Japheth's son (Genesis 10:2). They called themselves Mada in the arrow headed inscriptions, Semitic Μadai Greek Μedoi . S.W. and S. of the Caspian, N.W. and N. of Persia, W. of Parthia and the salt desert of Iram, E. of Armenia and Assyria. Its length was 550 miles; its width was 300. Coming to Europe in small parties mingled with the Scythians they were the Sarmatians (Sauro-Matae) of the steppe country between the Euxine and Caspian. Berosus (in Eusebius Chron. i. 4) states that about 2450 B.C. eight Median kings reigned over Babylon for 224 years. Aryans (the name applied to Medes by their neighbors in Herodotus' time, vii. 62) existed very early with Cushites and Shemites in the Mesopotamian population. These Aryans probably became masters for a time, then were driven to the mountains from whence they spread E., N., and W. The early Vedic settlers in western Hindostan were Aryans. The Maeotae of the sea of Azov and the Medi of Thrace (see Herodotus, v. 9) attest their progress.
Rawlinson (Herodotus, i. 327; Es. iii. 3) thinks that the Medes of Berosus' statement were really Scyths; but Berosus' statements are generally confirmed by recent deciphering of the Babylonian monuments. A very early Aryan migration probably preceded the one in progress about 880 B.C. Then the Medes appear in the cuneiform inscriptions as Assyria's enemies, inhabiting part of Media. They then consisted of petty chieftains and tribes without central government. Assyria ravaged their lands and exacted tribute. The range of Zagros inhabited by hardy mountaineers intervened between them and Assyria. So, in spite of Sargon's attempt by military colonies to occupy Media permanently, the Medes maintained their nationality and outlived Assyria. Sennacherib and his successor Esarhaddon both profess to conquer Media, which shows it was still unconquered when they came to the throne. In Ahaz' reign, beginning 741 B.C., Kir a Median city was held by Tiglath Pileser (2 Kings 16:9).
In Sargon's reign the ten tribes were removed to the cities of the Medes (2 Kings 17:6). In the deciphered inscriptions he says he founded in Media cities which he planted with colonists from other parts of his dominions. As Assyria declined Media rose. Cyaxares subdued the Scythians (those of Zagros range and the kindred tribes invited by the former from the N.) who disputed with the Aryans the possession of the mountain region. Finally he captured Nineveh 625 B.C. Nabopolassar with the Babylonians helped him in its overthrow (Abydenus), and was therefore made independent king of Babylon. (See NINEVEH; ASSYRIA.) The Median empire then was separated from Babylonia either by the Tigris or by a line half way between the Tigris and Euphrates; Syria, Phoenicia, and Judaea falling to Babylon. Cyaxares' predecessors named by Herodotus, Deioces the first king (a title assumed by all Median kings, from dahak "biter" or "snake"), and Phraortes, are hardly historical persons.
Cyaxares after taking Nineveh tried to extend his empire even beyond Assyria's boundary, the Halys, to the Aegean Sea. But after a six years' war in which he had Babylon's help he failed to conquer Lydia, and the three great monarchies concluded a peace (ratified by engagements and intermarriages) which lasted throughout Cyaxares' and his son Astyages' reigns. Media probably left the native monarchs over the subject nations and required only tribute. Certainly Cambyses and his son Cyrus so held their throne under Media until Cyrus revolted. The latter introduced the system of satraps. Media only lasted as an empire the two reigns of Cyaxares and Astyages, 75 years, down to 558 B.C. (still that there were earlier kings appears from Jeremiah 25:25, "all the kings of the Medes".) Enervated by adopting Assyrian manners the Medes were defeated by the hardy Persian mountaineers under Cyrus, and their king Astyages taken. Both races being of the same Aryan or Iranic source, the same religion and language, naturally all but coalesced.
Together they conquered Babylon, as foreseen by Isaiah (Isaiah 13:17): "behold I will stir up the Medes against them, which shall not regard silver, and as for gold they shall not delight in it" (similarly Xenophon, Cyrop. 5:1, section 10, makes Cyrus attribute to the Medes disregard of riches, "and Babylon shall be ... as when God overthrew Sodom"); so Isaiah 21:2, "go up O Elam (Persia), besiege O Media." Both Medes and Persians were famous in using "bows" and as horsemen. Cyrus made Darius the Mede viceroy of Babylon until he assumed the government (Daniel 5; 6; Ezra 1). (See CYRUS; DARIUS; BABYLON.) The Median capital was a royal residence for part of the year, and Media claimed precedence among the provinces. Achmetha (Ecbatana) "the palace in the province of the Medes" (Ezra 6:2-5) is where Cyrus' decree is found, an undesigned coincidence of Scripture with the fact that the Median capital was the seat of government under Cyrus, but a royal residence only under Darius Hystaspes.
Discontent however led Media to seek to regain its old ascendancy and to elevate a Phraortes to the throne who claimed descent from Cyaxares. Darius Hystaspes crushed the rebellion with difficulty, and crucified and mutilated Phraortes. Again in vain the Medes rebelled under Darius Nothus. Afterward they made no further attempt. Herodotus divides the Medes into six tribes, of which the Arizanti (of Aryan descent) seem the first, then the Paretaceni, Struchates, Busae; lastly the Budii (the Putiya of the Persian inscriptions) and Magi (the priest caste, a Scythic tribe incorporated by the Medes with themselves, foreigners admitted into the nation). The two divisions latterly made were Media Magna (now Kurdistan, Luristan, Ardelan, and Irak Ajemi) and Media Atropatia (now Azerbijan, the tract between the Caspian and the mountains running N. front Zagros, N. and W. of Media Magna) or Atropatene. The phrases "the Medes and Persians" and "Media and Persia," even after the Persians got the supremacy (Esther 10:2), show the original supremacy of Media, which still in legal and religious formalities was retained.
In Daniel 8:3, of the two horns on the ram the higher came up last, namely, Persia. Herodotus (1:131) makes their original religion the worship of the elements, tire, etc. Rawlinson however makes dualism (the worship of both a good and an evil principle eternally existing: Ormuzd the good object of trust, Ahriman the object of fear) to have been their original faith as described in the Zendavesta, and that the worship of the elements was subsequently taken from the Scythians (the fire worshippers of Armenia and Mount Zagros, among whom Magism existed from of old) and was Magian. Their language belongs to the great Indo Germanic family, which Japheth's sons starting from Armenia spread N., E., and W. In Persia the purer Aryan creed, dualism (Ormuzd however being supreme), prevailed; in Media Magism, the worship of water, air, earth, and above all fire, to which altars (but no temples) on mountain tops were dedicated, on which the fire was never allowed to go out.
The usurpation of the Pseudo Smerdis or the Magian Artaxerxes (Ezra 4) was probably a religious revolution, Median Magianism striving against the Persian creed. (See DARIUS HYSTASPES; ARTAXERXES.) The magi performed the sacred rites, and divined the future; from them "magic" takes its name. (See MAGI.) Fear of polluting the elements gave rise to the superstition of neither burying nor burning their dead, but exposing them to beasts and birds of prey (Herododus, i. 140), as do still the Parsees. The Persians copied their dress, the flowing robe seen on the Persepolitan sculptures. Their arms were bows, arrows, shields, short spears, poniards. They delighted in rich colors of dress, as scarlet, and chains and collars of gold.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Medes, Media
MEDES, MEDIA. A people and country called by the same word, Madai in Hebrew and Assyrian. The Medes were the first of the Iranian immigrants to form a settled government on the borders of the old Semitic realm. As early as the 9th cent. b.c. they began to occupy the mountainous country south and south-east of the Caspian Sea, and by the middle of the 7th cent. their territory extended southward to the borders of Elam. Their chief city was Ecbatana, the Achmetha of Ezra 6:2 and the modern Hamadân . The Assyrians opposed them, and finally subdued them under Tiglath-pileser iii. and Sargon, and the latter deported (b.c. 721) some of them as captives to Samaria ( 2 Kings 17:6 ; 2 Kings 18:11 ). In the later years of the Assyrian empire they regained their independence, and under their king, Cyaxares, who had formed an alliance with the rising Chaldæan power, they destroyed the city of Nineveh (b.c. 607), and therewith the Assyrian dominion itself. By agreement with the Chaldæans, who restricted themselves to the lowlands, they speedily occupied the northern highlands as far as Cappadocia. Meanwhile the southern immigration from eastern Iran had settled to the east of the Persian Gulf and founded the Persian community. The southern portion of Elam soon fell to them, but they became vassals of their Median kindred. Under Cyrus the Great, Astyages, king of the Medes, yielded his throne to the Persians (b.c. 550), who henceforth held the hegemony of the Iranian race.
Among the Semitic peoples, however, the name of the Medes continued long to be more familiar than that of the Persians, partly by reason of their greater antiquity, and partly because the Medes formed the principal portion of the Iranian population. Hence the word is more frequent than ‘Persia,’ except in the later books of the OT. Madai is mentioned in Genesis 10:2 among the sons of Japheth, with no allusion to the Persians. So the Medes and not the Persians are mentioned in prophecy as the prospective destroyers of Babylon ( Isaiah 13:17 ; Isaiah 21:2 , Jeremiah 25:25 ; Jeremiah 51:11 ; cf. Elam, p. 211 b ). in Acts 2:9 the Medes are vaguely mentioned, where the reference is to Jews or proselytes living in Media and using the language of the country. Media was of great importance in the history of religion, since it was there, probably in the early years of the 7th cent. b.c., that Zoroaster lived and taught.
J. F. M‘Curdy.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Medes
Medes and Media (mç'di-ah), name. The same as Madai, "middle land," one of Japheth's sons. Genesis 10:2. The Hebrew word thus translated "Madai" is also rendered "Medes," 2 Kings 17:6, etc., and "Media," Esther 1:3, etc., and also "Mede." Daniel 11:1. In the period of which Herodotus writes the people of Media were called Aryans. Its greatest length from north to south was 550 miles, its average breadth 250 to 300 miles, and its area 150,000 square miles. Media was divided originally into six provinces, which in Greek and Roman times were reduced to two. The early history of the Medes is very obscure. Their origin is given in Genesis 10:2, and they were connected with the captivity of Israel. 2 Kings 17:6; 2 Kings 18:11. Isaiah, in his prophecy against Babylon, reveals the agency and character of the Medes. Isaiah 13:17-18; Isaiah 21:2. But Media was not incorporated with Assyria, although Sargon, and afterward Sennacherib, subdued its people and exacted tribute. In b.c. 633 an independent kingdom was set up by Cyaxares, who in b.c. 625 took a leading part in the destruction of Nineveh. Media then became a great and powerful monarchy, comprising, besides Media proper, Persia, Assyria, Armenia, and other adjoining countries. The empire was 1500 miles long, 450 miles wide, and had an area of 600,000 square miles. Under Cyrus the two kingdoms of Babylonia and Media were united, b.c. 538. There are references in Scripture to this kingdom under the title of the "Medes and Persians." Daniel 5:28; Daniel 6:8; Daniel 6:12; Daniel 6:15; comp. Esther 1:19. The only city in Media alluded to in Scriptures is Achmetha, or Ecbatana. Ezra 6:2. This region was absorbed in the Macedonian empire of Alexander the Great Later an independent Median kingdom held sway until the Christian era, after which it became a part of the Parthian empire. Medes are mentioned in connection with Parthians, etc., in the New Testament, Acts 2:9.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Medes
We meet with the account of the Medes and Persians in the prophecy of Isaiah, and in the prophecy of Daniel. And as the Lord had appointed these nations for the destruction of Babylon when her time was come, so she was the Lord's scourge for Israel. The history of the Medes and Persians, forms a subject of importance in. Scripture. If the reader wishes to possess the Scriptural account of those kingdoms, he must consult what, Isaiah and Daniel have declared concerning them. Isaiah begins the relation at Isaiah 13:1-22 with the burden of Babylon, and the subject continues, in respect to Israel's deliverance from Babylon, through that add the following chapter Isaiah 14:1-32. The prophet resumes the subject of Babylon's destruction at Isaiah 21:1-17; but the chief prophecy concerning the final ruin of Babylon, is in Isaiah 45:1-25 and following chapters, where Cyrus the Persian, as the destroyer of Babylon, is called by his name, although this was near two hundred years before the events there predicted were intended to be fulfilled. Daniel takes up the subject at the period where the prophecy of Isaiah came to be accomplished, and in Daniel 5:1-31 relates to the church the downfall of Babylon, and the death of the impious gang Belshazzar. It may be proper to add under this article, that Darius the Mede, who conquered the kingdom with Cyrus the Persian, governed the Chaldean empire, and at his death Cyrus, who was his nephew, united the kingdom of the Medes and Persians into one. From this time Bablyon sunk to rise no more, and the Persian empire succeeded: so that from the close of Daniel's prophecy, if we prosecute the history of the church as an history, we must begin with the book of Ezra, the date of whose first chapter (Ezra 1:1-11) nearly corresponds with the close of Daniel's prophecy.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Medes, Media
The Hebrew is the same for the two words. This powerful race is traced back to Madai the son of Japheth. Genesis 10:2 . They occupied a large district, having the Caspian Sea on the north-east; Armenia on the north-west; Parthia on the east; Persia on the south; and Assyria on the west. The boundaries no doubt varied at different times owing to the conflicts of the Medes with their neighbours.
The first mention of them is when Shalmaneser took Samaria and carried away the Israelites, placing some of them 'in the cities of the Medes.' 2 Kings 17:6 ; 2 Kings 18:11 . Under Cyaxares (about B.C. 634) a Median empire was founded. He is called Ahasuerus in Daniel 9:1 . He pushed his conquests westward, and was able to overthrow the Assyrian empire. Astyages succeeded Cyaxares, but Cyrus the Persian was rising in power and subdued Astyages, but allowed him to reign as king, and he was probably Darius the Mede of Daniel. The kingdom was called at first that of the 'Medes and Persians,' as in Daniel 5:28 ; Daniel 6:8,12,15 ; but, at a later period, the Persians had the pre-eminence (cf. Daniel 8:3 ), and are mentioned first. Esther 1:3,14,18 . They conquered Babylon and Asia Minor. On the death of Astyages, Cyrus reigned alone. It became the second great empire of the Gentiles. See DANIEL.There were some bearing the name of Medes present at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost. The Medes and Persians are considered to have been branches of the Aryan race and were one in origin, language, religion, etc. Esther 10:2 ; Isaiah 13:17 ; Isaiah 21:2 ; Jeremiah 25:25 ; Jeremiah 51:11,28 ; Daniel 8:20 ; Acts 2:9 . Darius in Daniel 5:31 is called the MEDIAN.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Medes, me'Dia
(middle land ). Media lay northwest of Persia proper, south and southwest of the Caspian Sea, east of Armenia and Assyria, west and northwest of the great salt desert of Iran. Its greatest length was from north to south, and in this direction it extended from the 32d to the 40th parallel, a distance of 550 miles. In width it reached front about long. 45 degrees to 53 degrees; but its average breadth was not more than from 250 to 300 miles. The division of Media commonly recognized by the Greeks and Romans was that into Media Magna and Media Atropatene.
Media Atropatene corresponded nearly to the modern Azerbijan , being the tract situated between the Caspian and the mountains which run north from Zagros.
Media Magna lay south and east of Atropatene. It contained great part of Kurdistan and Luristan , with all Ardelan and Arak Ajemi . It is indicative of the division that there were two Ecbatanas, respectively the capitals of the two districts. The Medes were a nation of very high antiquity; we find a notice of them in the primitive Babylonian history of Berosus, who says that the Medes conquered Babylon at a very remote period (cir. B.C. 2458), and that eight Median monarchs reigned there consecutively, over a space of 224 years. The deepest obscurity hangs, however, over the whole history of the Medes from the time of their bearing sway in Babylonia, B.C. 2458-2234, to their first appearance in the cuneiform inscriptions among the enemies of Assyria, about B.C. 880. Near the middle of the seventh century B.C. the Median kingdom was consolidated, and became formidable to its neighbors; but previous to this time it was not under the dominion of a single powerful monarch, but was ruled by a vast number of petty chieftains. Cyaxares, the third Median monarch, took Nineveh and conquered Assyria B.C. 625. The limits of the Median empire cannot be definitely fixed. From north to south it was certainly confined between the Persian Gulf and the Euphrates on the one side, the Black and Caspian Seas on the other. From east to west it had, however, a wide expansion, since it reached from the Halys at least as far as the Caspian Gates, and possible farther. It was separated from Babylonia either by the Tigris or more probably by a line running about halfway between that river and the Euphrates. Its greatest length may be reckoned at 1500 miles from northwest to southeast, and its average breadth at 400 or 450 miles. Its area would thus be about 600,000 square miles, or somewhat greater than that of modern Persia. Of all the ancient Oriental monarchies the Median was the shortest in duration. It was overthrown by the Persians under Cyrus, B.C. 558, who captured its king, Astyages. The treatment of the Medes by the victorious Persians was not that of an ordinary conquered nation. Medes were appointed to stations of high honor and importance under Cyrus and his successors. The two nations seem blended into one, and we often find reference to this kingdom as that of the "Medes and Persians." ( Daniel 5:28 ; 6:8,12,15 ) The references to the Medes in the canonical Scriptures are not very numerous, but they are striking. We first hear of certain "cities of the Medes," in which the captive Israelites were placed by "the king of Assyria" on the destruction of Samaria, B.C. 721 (2 Kings 17:6 ; 18:12 ) Soon afterward Isaiah prophesies the part which the Medes shall take in the destruction of Babylon, (Isaiah 13:17 ; 21:2 ) which is again still more distinctly declared by Jeremiah, (Jeremiah 51:11,28 ) who sufficiently indicates the independence of Media in his day. ch. (Jeremiah 25:25 ) Daniel relates the fact of the Medo-Persia conquest, (Daniel 5:25,31 ) giving an account of the reign of Darius the Mede, who appears to have been made viceroy by Cyrus. (Daniel 6:1-58 ) In Ezra we have a mention of Achmetha (Ecbatana), "the palace in the province of the Medes," where the decree of Cyrus was found, ( Ezra 6:2-5 ) --a notice which accords with the known facts that the Median capital was the seat of government under Cyrus, but a royal residence only, and not the seat of government, under Darius Hystaspis. Finally, in Esther the high rank of Media under the Persian kings, yet at the same time its subordinate position, is marked by the frequent composition of the two names in phrases of honor, the precedence being in every ease assigned to the Persians.

Sentence search

Madai - Son of Japheth and progenitor of the Medes, q. The Hebrew for Madai and Medes is the same
Mad'a-i - (middle land ), ( Genesis 10:2 ) is usually called the third son of Japhet, and the progenitor of the Medes; but probably all that is intended is that the Medes, as well as the Gomerites, Greeks, Tabareni, Moschi, etc
Madai - See Medes
Madai - The Medes, who called themselves Made, S. Modern ethnology has found that in physical type and language the Medes belong to the Indo Germanic family of mankind, comprising the Celts, Greeks, Romans, etc
Madai - The third son of Japheth, ancestor of the Medes, etc
Madai - Middle land, the third "son" of Japheth (Genesis 10:2 ), the name by which the Medes are known on the Assyrian monuments
Medes - Medes and Media (mç'di-ah), name. The Hebrew word thus translated "Madai" is also rendered "Medes," 2 Kings 17:6, etc. The early history of the Medes is very obscure. Isaiah, in his prophecy against Babylon, reveals the agency and character of the Medes. There are references in Scripture to this kingdom under the title of the "Medes and Persians. Medes are mentioned in connection with Parthians, etc
me'Dian, the - Darius, "the son of Ahasuerus, of the seed of the Medes," (Daniel 9:1 ) or "the Mede," ch
Medes, Media - The boundaries no doubt varied at different times owing to the conflicts of the Medes with their neighbours. ...
The first mention of them is when Shalmaneser took Samaria and carried away the Israelites, placing some of them 'in the cities of the Medes. The kingdom was called at first that of the 'Medes and Persians,' as in Daniel 5:28 ; Daniel 6:8,12,15 ; but, at a later period, the Persians had the pre-eminence (cf. There were some bearing the name of Medes present at Jerusalem on the day of Pentecost. The Medes and Persians are considered to have been branches of the Aryan race and were one in origin, language, religion, etc
Medes, Media - Medes, MEDIA. The Medes were the first of the Iranian immigrants to form a settled government on the borders of the old Semitic realm. Under Cyrus the Great, Astyages, king of the Medes, yielded his throne to the Persians (b. ...
Among the Semitic peoples, however, the name of the Medes continued long to be more familiar than that of the Persians, partly by reason of their greater antiquity, and partly because the Medes formed the principal portion of the Iranian population. So the Medes and not the Persians are mentioned in prophecy as the prospective destroyers of Babylon ( Isaiah 13:17 ; Isaiah 21:2 , Jeremiah 25:25 ; Jeremiah 51:11 ; cf. in Acts 2:9 the Medes are vaguely mentioned, where the reference is to Jews or proselytes living in Media and using the language of the country
Media - Madai, which is rendered in the Authorized Version (1) "Madai," Genesis 10:2 ; (2) "Medes," 2 Kings 17:6 ; 18:11 ; (3) "Media," Esther 1:3 ; 10:2 ; Isaiah 21:2 ; Daniel 8:20 ; (4) "Mede," only in Daniel 11:1 . It rose with Cyaxares, its first king, and it passed away with him; for during the reign of his son and successor Astyages, the Persians waged war against the Medes and conquered them, the two nations being united under one monarch, Cyrus the Persian (B. ...
The "cities of the Medes" are first mentioned in connection with the deportation of the Israelites on the destruction of Samaria (2 Kings 17:6 ; 18:11 ). Soon afterwards (Isaiah 13:17 ; 21:2 ) speaks of the part taken by the Medes in the destruction of Babylon (Compare Jeremiah 51:11,28 ). The decree of Cyrus, Ezra informs us (6:2-5), was found in "the palace that is in the province of the Medes," Achmetha or Ecbatana of the Greeks, which is the only Median city mentioned in Scripture
Medes, me'Dia - The Medes were a nation of very high antiquity; we find a notice of them in the primitive Babylonian history of Berosus, who says that the Medes conquered Babylon at a very remote period (cir. The deepest obscurity hangs, however, over the whole history of the Medes from the time of their bearing sway in Babylonia, B. The treatment of the Medes by the victorious Persians was not that of an ordinary conquered nation. Medes were appointed to stations of high honor and importance under Cyrus and his successors. The two nations seem blended into one, and we often find reference to this kingdom as that of the "Medes and Persians. " ( Daniel 5:28 ; 6:8,12,15 ) The references to the Medes in the canonical Scriptures are not very numerous, but they are striking. We first hear of certain "cities of the Medes," in which the captive Israelites were placed by "the king of Assyria" on the destruction of Samaria, B. 721 (2 Kings 17:6 ; 18:12 ) Soon afterward Isaiah prophesies the part which the Medes shall take in the destruction of Babylon, (Isaiah 13:17 ; 21:2 ) which is again still more distinctly declared by Jeremiah, (Jeremiah 51:11,28 ) who sufficiently indicates the independence of Media in his day. (Daniel 6:1-58 ) In Ezra we have a mention of Achmetha (Ecbatana), "the palace in the province of the Medes," where the decree of Cyrus was found, ( Ezra 6:2-5 ) --a notice which accords with the known facts that the Median capital was the seat of government under Cyrus, but a royal residence only, and not the seat of government, under Darius Hystaspis
Medes - Aryans (the name applied to Medes by their neighbors in Herodotus' time, vii. 3) thinks that the Medes of Berosus' statement were really Scyths; but Berosus' statements are generally confirmed by recent deciphering of the Babylonian monuments. Then the Medes appear in the cuneiform inscriptions as Assyria's enemies, inhabiting part of Media. So, in spite of Sargon's attempt by military colonies to occupy Media permanently, the Medes maintained their nationality and outlived Assyria. ...
In Sargon's reign the ten tribes were removed to the cities of the Medes (2 Kings 17:6). (still that there were earlier kings appears from Jeremiah 25:25, "all the kings of the Medes". ) Enervated by adopting Assyrian manners the Medes were defeated by the hardy Persian mountaineers under Cyrus, and their king Astyages taken. ...
Together they conquered Babylon, as foreseen by Isaiah (Isaiah 13:17): "behold I will stir up the Medes against them, which shall not regard silver, and as for gold they shall not delight in it" (similarly Xenophon, Medes disregard of riches, "and Babylon shall be . " Both Medes and Persians were famous in using "bows" and as horsemen. Achmetha (Ecbatana) "the palace in the province of the Medes" (Ezra 6:2-5) is where Cyrus' decree is found, an undesigned coincidence of Scripture with the fact that the Median capital was the seat of government under Cyrus, but a royal residence only under Darius Hystaspes. Again in vain the Medes rebelled under Darius Nothus. Herodotus divides the Medes into six tribes, of which the Arizanti (of Aryan descent) seem the first, then the Paretaceni, Struchates, Busae; lastly the Budii (the Putiya of the Persian inscriptions) and Magi (the priest caste, a Scythic tribe incorporated by the Medes with themselves, foreigners admitted into the nation). The phrases "the Medes and Persians" and "Media and Persia," even after the Persians got the supremacy (Esther 10:2), show the original supremacy of Media, which still in legal and religious formalities was retained
Mede - But probably this is an ethnic and not a personal name, and denotes simply the Medes as descended from Japheth
Arphax'ad - (Genesis 10:22,24 ; 11:10 ) ...
Arphaxad, a king "who reigned over the Medes in Ecbatana," Judith 1:1-4 ; perhaps the same as Phraortes, who fell in a battle with the Assyrians, 633 B
Arphaxad - A king of the Medes ( Jdt 1:1 ff
Cuthites - They came from the land of Cush, or Cutha, in the East; their first settlement being in the cities of the Medes, subdued by Shalmaneser and his predecessors
Media - After several centuries of subjugation under Assyria, the Medes rebelled under Arbaces in the time of Sardanapalus, and again in the time of Sennacherib, about 700 B. In this way arose the Medro-Persian kingdom; and the "laws of the Medes and Persians" are always mentioned by the sacred writers together, Esther 1:19 , etc. So also the "Chronicles" of the Medes and Persians are mentioned together, Esther 10:2 . Indeed, from this time inward, the manners, customs, religion, and civilization of the Medes and Persians seem ever to have become more and more amalgamated. And in general it would seem, as we may gather from the ancient Zend writings, that the Medes, Persians, and Bactraians were originally the same people, having in common one language, the Zend, and one religion, the worship of Ormuzd, the highest being, under the symbol of fire
Medes - We meet with the account of the Medes and Persians in the prophecy of Isaiah, and in the prophecy of Daniel. The history of the Medes and Persians, forms a subject of importance in. It may be proper to add under this article, that Darius the Mede, who conquered the kingdom with Cyrus the Persian, governed the Chaldean empire, and at his death Cyrus, who was his nephew, united the kingdom of the Medes and Persians into one
Side - One side of the bear is the Kingdom of the Medes, and the other side is the Kingdom of the Persians. These two kingdoms were united against Babylon, but the side of the Medes was uppermost
Carmonians - They are said to have resembled the Medes and Persians in customs and language
Baltasar - While he was giving a banquet a mysterious hand wrote on the wall the words, Mane, Thecel, Phares, interpreted by Daniel as: ...
God hath numbered thy kingdom and hath finished it; thou art weighed in the balance and art found wanting; thy kingdom is divided and is given to the Medes and Persians
Black - The kingdom of the Medes and Persians is described as a chariot with 'black' horses, Zechariah 6:2,6 ; and in the Revelation, in the third seal a rider on a 'black' horse betokens scarcity
Scythians - ...
According to the Greek historian Herodotus, a Scythian attack forced the Medes to withdraw from an assault against Nineveh (apparently 626-620 B. They were eventually driven back northward into southern Russia by the Medes
Ararat - A kingdom which was called upon by God, in conjunction with Medes, Persians, and others, under one captain, Cyrus, to punish Babylon in revenge of Israel
Thomas - It is added, that he preached to the Medes, Persians, Carmanians, Hircanians, Bactrians, &c
Kuyunjik - Ninive fell under the combined attacks of the Medes under Cyaxares and the Babylonians under Nabopolassar in 606 B
Ninive - Ninive fell under the combined attacks of the Medes under Cyaxares and the Babylonians under Nabopolassar in 606 B
Zimri - ‘All the kings of Zimri’ are mentioned in the same verse, Jeremiah 25:25 , with those of Elam and the Medes as among those who were to drink the cup of the fury of the Lord
Mesopotamia - Mesopotamia became absorbed in the great nations, belonging successively to the Assyrians, Medes and Persians, Greeks, and Romans, and then the Turks, it is now Iraq
Japheth - ’ The peoples connected with Japheth ( Genesis 10:1-4 ) occupy the northern portion of the known world, and include the Madai (Medes) on the E
Nergal-Sharezer - From the Babylonian Chronicle it is known that Nergal-sharezer mounted a military campaign across the Taurus Mountains to fight the Medes
Magi or Wise Men - An appellation given among the Medes and Persians to a class of priests, wise men, philosophers, etc
Rages - In Judith ( Jdt 1:5 ; Jdt 1:15 ) it is said that in Ragau (evidently the same place) Nebuchadnezzar slew in battle ‘Arphaxad’ prince of the Medes
Hara - The name may be akin to Aria and Aryans, the Greek for Media and the Medes
Nahum - They relate solely to the destruction of Nineveh by the Babylonians and Medes, and are introduced by an animated display of the attributes of God
Astyages - otherwise Cyaxares, king of the Medes, and successor to Phraortes
Axe - " The "battle-axe" (army of Medes and Persians) mentioned in Jeremiah 51:20 was probably, as noted in the margin of the Revised Version, a "maul" or heavy mace
Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin - The kingdom would be divided and given to his enemies, the Medes and Persians
Belshazzar - He interpreted the message for the king, explaining that it meant the kingdom would be taken from Belshazzar and given to the Medes and Persians (Daniel 5:28 )
Generation - Genesis, in accordance with modern ethnology, classifies together the Cymry or Celts (Gomer), the Medes (Madai), and the Ionians or Greeks (Javan); thus anticipating the Indo-European theory, which makes the European races (represented by the Celts and the Ionians) akin to the Aryans (represented by the Asiatic Madai or Medes)
Races - Medes (Madai)
Hard - ’...
Hardiness is used in Jdt 16:10 for courage: ‘the Medes were daunted at her hardiness’ (RV Assyria - However, Newton thus reasons; and observes, that "Pul and his successors afflicted Israel, and conquered the nations round about them; and upon the ruin of many small and ancient kingdoms erected their empire; conquering the Medes, as well as other nations. 721, carried the ten tribes into captivity, placing them in Chalach and Chabor, by the river Gazon, and in the cities of the Medes, ...
2 Kings 17:6 . 711 the Medes revolted from the Assyrians; Sennacherib was slain, and he was succeeded by his son Esar-Haddon, Asser-haddon, Asordan, Assaradin, or Sarchedon, by which names he is called by different writers. Newton, "the Assyrian empire seems arrived at its greatness; being united under one monarch, and containing Assyria, Media, Apolloniatis, Susiana, Chaldea, Mesopotamia, Cilicia, Syria, Phoenicia, Egypt, Ethiopia, and part of Arabia; and reaching eastward into Elymais, and Paraetaecene, a province of the Medes, and if Chalach and Chabor be Colchis and Iberia, as some think, and as may seem probable from the circumcision used by those nations till the days of Herodotus, we are also to add these two provinces, with the two Armenias, Pontus, and Cappadocia, as far as to the river Halys: for Herodotus tells us that the people of Cappadocia, as far as to that river, were called Syrians by the Greeks, both before and after the days of Cyrus; and that the Assyrians were also called Syrians by the Greeks. This Chyniladon is supposed by Newton to be the Nebuchadonosor mentioned in the book of Judith, Judges 1:1-15 , who made war upon Arphaxad, king of the Medes; and, though deserted by his auxiliaries of Cilicia, Damascus, Syria, Phoenicia, Moab, Ammon, and Egypt, routed the army of the Medes, and slew Arphaxad. 635, the Scythians invaded the Medes and Persians; and in 625, Nabopolassar, the commander of the forces of Chyniladon in Chaldea, revolted from him, and became king of Babylon. At length Nebuchadnezzar, the son of Nabopolassar, married Amyit, the daughter of Astyages, king of the Medes, and sister of Cyaxares and by this marriage, the two families having contracted affinity, they conspired against the Assyrians. This victory the Jews refer to the Chaldeans; the Greeks, to the Medes; Tobit, Tob_14:15 , Polyhistor, and Ctesias, to both. With this victory commenced the great successes of Nebuchadnezzar and Cyaxares, and it laid the foundation of the two collateral empires of the Babylonians and Medes, which were branches of the Assyrian empire; and hence the time of the fall of the Assyrian empire is determined, the conquerors being then in their youth
Mene, Mene, Tekel, Upharsin - The kingdom was 'divided,' and given to the Medes and Persians (Peres)
Mat'Thew - There is reason to believe that he remained for fifteen years at Jerusalem, after which he went as missionary to the Persians, Parthians and Medes
Dari'us - This Darius is probably the same as "Astyages," the last king of the Medes
Per'Sia - The Persians were of the same race as the Medes, both being branches of the great Aryan stock. In the times anterior to Cyrus they were noted for the simplicity of their habits, which offered a strong contrast to the luxuriousness of the Medes; but from the late of the Median overthrow this simplicity began to decline. --The history of Persia begins with the revolt from the Medes and the accession of Cyrus the Great, B
Magog - Mixed with the Medes they became the Sarmatians, from whence sprang the Russians
Thomas (st.) the Apostle - Thomas issaid to have carried the Gospel to the Parthians, Medes, Persiansand Chaldeans, among whom he founded the Church
Magog - The name of a people, enumerated in Genesis 10:2 among the ‘sons’ of Japheth, between Gomer (the Cimmerians) and Madai (the Medes), and mentioned in Ezekiel 38:2 (cf
Assyria - Nineveh was destroyed by the Medes and Babylonians, and Assyria became a province of these countries
Elam - As Assyria weakened, Elam and Anshan became part of the kingdom of the Medes. Elam had little subsequent independent history, but it continued to be part of the Medes' and the Persians' empires
Persia - From this period, both sacred and profane writers distinguish the kingdom of the Medes from that of the Persians. Previously to their union under Cyrus, Daniel speaks of the law of the Medes and Persians as being the same
ma'gi - (Jeremiah 29:3,13 ) "Originally they were a class of priests among the Persians and Medes who formed the king's privy council, and cultivated as trology, medicine and occult natural science. 120; but as they appear in Jeremiah among the retinue of the Chaldean king, we must suppose Nebuchadnezzar's conquests led him to gather round him the wise men and religious teachers of the nations which he subdued, and that thus the sacred tribe of the Medes rose under his rule to favor and power
Darius - Rawlinson, which may be favored by Daniel 9:1; "Darius, the son of Ahasuerus, of the seed of the Medes, which was made king over the realm of the Chaldaeans. a prince who had ruled over the Medes and Assyrians. Thus Astyages (the last king of the Medes, and having no issue, according to Herodotus, 1:73, 109,127) will be this Darius, and Ahasuerus (Achashverosh) = Cyaxares (Huwakshatra), father of Astyages
Persia - "The law of the Persians and Medes which alters not" (Esther 1:19) also controlled him in some measure. Originally simple in habits, upon overthrowing the Medes they adopted their luxury. In Lucian's (De Longaevis) day his religion was that of most Persians, Parthians, Bactrians, Aryans, Sacans, Medes, and Chowaresmians. After 80 years' subjection to the Medes the Persians revolted and became supreme, 558 B. (See DANIEL; CYRUS; Medes; PARTHIA; AHASUERUS; ARTAXERXES
Persia - The founder of the Persian dynasty was Achæmes, and it was tributary to the Medes until a revolt under Cyrus about b
Ashurbanipal - Babylon, under Nabopolassar, threw off Assyrian domination and Nineveh, the capital city, fell to the Medes in 612
Darius - ‘Darius the Mede’ ( Daniel 11:1 ), son of Ahasuerus of the seed of the Medes ( Daniel 9:1 ), is said ( Daniel 5:31 ) to have succeeded to the kingdom of Babylon after Belshazzar’s death, and to have been sixty-two years old when he received the kingdom
Darius - DARIUS THE MEDE ...
Daniel 5:31 9:1 11:1 , was son of Astyages king of the Medes, and brother of Mandane mother of Cyrus, and of Amyit the mother of Evil-merodach and grandmother of Belshazzar: thus he was uncle, by the mother's side, to Evil-merodach and to Cyrus
Persia, Persians - They were for long subject to the more numerous and powerful northern branch (see Medes), from whom, however, they were separated by the country of Elam, through their settlement in the district later called Persis, east of the Persian Gulf
na'Hum - It is, however, certain that the prophecy was written before the final downfall of Nineveh and its capture by the Medes and Chaldeans, cir
Japheth - ...
Japheth signifies enlargement; and how wonderfully did Providence enlarge the boundaries of Japheth! His posterity diverged eastward and westward; from the original settlement in Armenia, through the whole extent of Asia, north of the great range of Taurus, distinguished by the general names of Tartary and Siberia, as far as the Eastern Ocean: and in process of time, by an easy passage across Behring's straits, the entire continent of America; and they spread in the opposite direction, throughout the whole of Europe, to the Atlantic Ocean; thus literally encompassing the earth, within the precincts of the northern temperate zone, while the enterprising and warlike genius of this hardy hunter race frequently led them to encroach on the settlements, and to dwell in "the tents of Shem," whose pastoral occupations rendered them more inactive, peaceable, and unwarlike; as when the Scythians invaded Media, and overran western Asia southwards, as far as Egypt, in the days of Cyaxares; and when the Greeks, and afterward the Romans, subdued the Assyrians, Medes, and Persians, in the east, and the Scythians and Jews in the south, as foretold by the Assyrian Prophet Balaam:...
"And ships shall come from the coast of Chittim, And shall afflict the Assyrians, and afflict the Hebrews; ...
But he [1] shall perish himself at last. It is supposed that Gomer peopled Galatia, and that from him the Cimmerians, or Cimbrians, and also the Phrygians, derived their origin; that Magog was the father of the Scythians, and Tartars, or Tatars; that Madai was the progenitor of the Medes, though some make him the founder of a people in Macedonia, called Macdi; that from Javan sprung the Ionians and Greeks; that Tubal was the father of the Iberians, and that at least a part of Spain was peopled by him and his descendants; that Meshech was the founder of the Cappadocians, from whom proceeded the Muscovites, or Russians; and that from Tiras the Thracians derived their origin
Horse - ...
The horse was used for war by Syrians (1 Kings 20:20 ), the Philistines (2 Samuel 1:6 ), the Medes and Persians (Jeremiah 50:42 ), and the Romans (Acts 23:23 ,Acts 23:23,23:32 )
Jael - Besides the commendation of her real faith, though not of the treachery with which her act was alloyed, we should remember that the agents who execute God's righteous purposes are regarded in Scripture as God's "sanctified ones," not in respect to their own character and purposes, but in respect to God's work; so the Medes who executed His vengeance on Babylon (Isaiah 13:3; Psalms 137:9)
Media - His successor carried away the remaining seven tribes and a half, to the same places, which are said to be "cities of the Medes, by the river of Gozan," 1 Chronicles 5:26 ; 2 Kings 17:6
Sabeans - ...
Ahasuerus - ...
Ahasuerus is also a name given in Scripture, Ezra 4:6 , to Cambyses, the son of Cyrus; and to Astyages, king of the Medes, Daniel 9:1
Persia, Persians - Media ruled them in early times, but under Cyrus the yoke was shaken off, and, together with the Medes, they formed the second Gentile empire, succeeding that of Babylon. The Persians are mentioned before the Medes in Esther 1:19
Ham - Arabia were at a very early date overcome by the Joktanites, and the Babylonians yielded to the Medes
Governor - (2 Chronicles 28:7 ) It is applied in (1 Kings 10:15 ) to the petty chieftains who were tributary to Solomon, (2 Chronicles 9:14 ) to the military commander of the Syrians, (1 Kings 20:24 ) the Assyrians, (2 Kings 18:24 ; 23:8 ) the Chaldeans, (Jeremiah 51:23 ) and the Medes
Japheth - "Setting aside the cases where the ethnic names employed are of doubtful application, it cannot reasonably be questioned that the author [1] has in his account of the sons of Japheth classed together the Cymry or Celts (Gomer), the Medes (Madai), and the Ionians or Greeks (Javan), thereby anticipating what has become known in modern times as the 'Indo-European Theory,' or the essential unity of the Aryan (Asiatic) race with the principal races of Europe, indicated by the Celts and the Ionians
Damascus - The kingdom of Syria remained a province of Assyria till the capture of Nineveh by the Medes (B
Persia - So closely were the Medes and the Persians associated that people sometimes used their names interchangeably
Japheth - the Cymri or Celts;...
(2) Magog, the Scythians and Sarmatians (Slavonians);...
(3) Madai, the Medes or Aryans;...
(4) Javan, the Ionians (Greeks);...
(5) Tubal, the Tibareni;...
(6) Meshech, the Moschi (these two declined between 1100 and 400 B
Nineveh - He then attempted to reduce the city by blockade, but was unsuccessful for two years, till his efforts were unexpectedly assisted by an extraordinary rise of the Tigris, which swept away a part of the walls and allowed the Medes to enter. 606, by the Medes and Babylonians, and the fall of this city was the end of the kingdom of Assyria
Darius -
Darius the Mede (Daniel 11:1 ), "the son of Ahasuerus, of the seed of the Medes" (9:1)
Gog - Magog was second son of Japhet, connected with Gomer (the Cimmerians) and Madai (Medes)
Euphrates - We have here an allusion to the Nero-legend which told that Nero had fled to the East, to the Medes and Persians, beyond the river Euphrates, and would again cross the river accompanied by myriads of soldiers and make war on Rome (Sib
Media - Medes shared as equals with Persians in the military and civil administration of the Persian Empire, and sometimes the names Medes and Persians were used interchangeably (Ezra 6:1-3; Esther 1:3; Esther 1:14; Esther 1:19; Isaiah 13:17; Isaiah 21:2; Jeremiah 51:11; Jeremiah 51:28; Daniel 5:30-31; Daniel 6:8; Daniel 6:28; Daniel 8:20; Daniel 9:1; Daniel 11:1)
Scythian - 103-105) of a great victory of the Scythians over Cyaxares and the Medes which compelled the latter to raise the siege of Nineveh. , till the Medes again under Cyaxares destroyed most of them after making them drunk at a banquet (i
Assyria - But the kingdom fell at length into the hands of the Medes, the monarchy was divided between them and the Babylonians, and the very name of Assyria was thenceforth forgotten
Dispersion - The following table shows how the different families were dispersed: ...
| - Japheth | - Gomer | Cimmerians, Armenians | - Magog | Caucasians, Scythians | - Madal | Medes and Persian tribes | - Javan | - Elishah | Greeks | - Tarshish | Etruscans, Romans | - Chittim | Cyprians, Macedonians | - Dodanim | Rhodians | - Tubal | Tibareni, Tartars | - Mechech | Moschi, Muscovites | - Tiras | Thracians | | - Shem | - Elam | Persian tribes | - Asshur | Assyrian | - Arphaxad | - Abraham | - Isaac | - Jacob | Hebrews | - Esau | Edomites | - Ishmael | Mingled with Arab tribes | - Lud | Lydians | - Aram | Syrians | | - Ham | - Cush | Ethiopans | - Mizrain | Egyptians | - Phut | Lybians, Mauritanians | - Canaan | Canaanites, Phoenicians ...
Ararat - The greatest nations, the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the Medes, and the Colchians, lay along these routes
Sargon - They also remarkably illustrate 2 Kings 17:6, that he placed the deported Israelites (in Halah, Habor, the river of Gozan, and at a later time) "in the cities of the Medes"; for Sargon in them states he overran Media and "annexed many Median towns to Assyria
Captivity - These places are supposed to be in the north of Assyria; but in the above passage in Kings the words are added "and in the cities of the Medes
Daniel - ...
After the capture of Babylon by the Medes and Persians, under Cyaxares and Cyrus, Daniel was continued in all his high employments, and enjoyed the favor of these princes until his death, except at one short interval, when the envy of the other officers prevailed on the king of the other officers prevailed on the king to cast him into the lion's den, an act which recoiled on his foes to their own destruction
Nineveh - 633 the Assyrian empire began to show signs of weakness, and Nineveh was attacked by the Medes, who subsequently, about B. The Assyrian empire then came to an end, the Medes and Babylonians dividing its provinces between them
Belshazzar - UΡΗΑRSΙΝ , or ΡΕRΕS , alluding to the similar word "Persians," thy kingdom is divided among the Medes and Persians
Esarhaddon - Saracus his son was attacked by the Scythians, then by the Medes and Cyaxares, and Nabopolassar his own general
Nineveh - ...
The final biblical references are from Nahum, who prophesied the overthrow of the “bloody city” by the attack of the allied Medes and Chaldeans in 612 B
Alexander the Great - It is first spoken of as a part of the great image seen in a dream by Nebuchadnezzar; it is foreshadowed by the belly and thighs, which are of brass, a depreciation in the character of the kingdom in comparison with the empires of Babylon and of the Medes and Persians, though it was larger in extent: it "shall bear rule over all the earth
Nahum - The Medes and the Scythians were beginning to threaten the empire, but its most serious difficulties arose from dynastic rivalries and the revolt of Ashurbanipal’s brother. After the death of Ashurbanipal the Medes rapidly grew in strength, and laid siege to Nineveh, but were called away by an invasion of their own country; and the city was spared for nearly twenty years. About 623 or 624 Nahum would need no great discernment to see the approaching fall of Assyria, and in the equipment and quick movements of the Medes and Scythians he would find the imagery which he uses to such good effect in his oracles
Ezekiel - The boldness with which he censured the idolatry and wickedness of his countrymen is said to have cost him his life; but his memory was greatly revered, not only by the Jews, but also by the Medes and Persians
Elam - Shortly thereafter, when Assyria itself declined and fell, Elam was occupied by the rising Aryan tribes, the Medes from the north and the Persians from the south
Josiah - the Medes attacked Nineveh. , the Medes, Babylonians, and Susianians destroyed Nineveh and divided the empire
Nineveh - It was besieged for two years by the combined forces of the Medes and Babylonians, was captured, and finally destroyed b
Nahum - A coalition of Medes, Babylonians, and Scythians attacked Assyrians and in 612 B
Assyria - But on his death the smouldering flames of rebellion again burst forth, and the Babylonians and Medes successfully asserted their independence (B
Daniel - ...
It is an accordance with Medo-Persian ideas which flows from the truth of Scripture, that the mode of capital punishment under the Babylonian rule is represented as burning (Daniel 3), but under the Medes and Persians' exposure to wild beasts, for they would have regarded fire as polluted by contact with a corpse, while they approved the devouring of bodies by animals. (On Daniel's representation of the relation of the Medes to the Persians and Darius the Mede (possibly equating to Astyages, or his son, the former of whom Cyrus deposed and treated kindly) to Cyrus
Israel - ...
Israel when carried away were placed in Halah and in Habor by the river of Gozan (in the neighbourhood of the river Khabour, an affluent of the river Euphrates), and in the cities of the Medes
Captivity - 721), placing them in Halah and in Habor, and in the cities of the Medes (2 Kings 17:3,5 )
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - The fall of Assyria, long previously prophesied by Isaiah, (Isaiah 10:5-19 ) was effected by the growing strength and boldness of the Medes, about 625 B
Daniel, Book of - Vision of ram, he goat, and four horns points to passing of Persians, Medes, and of proud Greeks, one of whom will interrupt daily sacrifices of Temple for a while (Daniel 8:1-27 ). He used biblical traditions and other knowledge of his day to review the history of Babylon, the Medes, Persia, Greece, the Ptolemies of Egypt, and the Seleuccids of Syria
Babylon - 2458 to 625 various dynasties of Medes, Chaldaeans, Arabs, and Assyrians; and lastly Babylonians from B. On the occasion of the gathering at Jerusalem in Acts 2:9-11 mention is made of the Parthians, Medes and Elamites; and when Peter commences his epistle, supposing he was in the district of Babylon, he naturally puts Pontus first and then passes on to Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia
Nineveh - Nineveh at first seems only to have been a small city, and less than Resen, in its neighbourhood; which is conjectured by Bochart, and not without reason, to have been the same as Larissa, which Xenophon describes as "the ruins of a great city, formerly inhabited by the Medes," and which the natives might have described as belonging la Resen, "to Resen. ...
The threatened overthrow of Nineveh within three days, was, by the general repentance and humiliation of the inhabitants, from the highest to the lowest, suspended for near two hundred years, until "their iniquity came to the full;" and then the prophecy was literally accomplished, in the third year of the siege of the city, by the combined Medes and Babylonians; the king, Sardanapalus, being encouraged to hold out in consequence of an ancient prophecy, that Nineveh should never be taken by assault, till the river became its enemy; when a mighty inundation of the river, swollen by continual rains, came up against a part of the city, and threw down twenty stadia of the wall in length; upon which, the king, conceiving that the oracle was accomplished, burned himself, his concubines, eunuchs, and treasures; and the enemy, entering by the breach, sacked and rased the city, about B
Tiglath-Pileser - 737 his objective was the Medes, in many of whose cities he set up bas-reliefs with the royal image
Nineveh - , the period of the foundation of Rome, it was taken by the Medes under Arbaces; and nearly a century and a half later, according to the predictions of Nahum, Nahum 1:1-3:19 , and Zephaniah 2:13 , it was a second time taken by Cyaraxes and Nabopolassar; after which it no more recovered its former splendor
Chronology - The Medes and Persians
Mesopotamia - The whole country was afterward seized by the Assyrians; to whom it pertained till the dissolution of their empire, when it was divided between the Medes and the Babylonians
Belshazzar - "This is the interpretation of the thing, Mene, ‘God hath numbered thy kingdom and finished it;' Tekel, ‘thou art weighed in the balances and art found wanting:' Peres, ‘thy kingdom is divided, and given to the Medes and Persians
Darius - DARIUS the Mede, spoken of in Daniel 5:31 ; Daniel 9:1 ; Daniel 11:1 , &c, was the son of Astyages, king of the Medes, and brother to Mandane, the mother of Cyrus, and to Amyit, the mother of Evil-merodach, and grandmother of Belshazzar
Babylon, History And Religion of - In 612, with the help of the Medes, the Babylonians sacked the Assyrian capital Nineveh. Nabonidus returned to a divided capital amid a threat from the united Medes and Persians
Magi - The Magi were a sacerdotal caste among the Medes, in connection with the Zoroastrian religion
Persia - The Medes controlled the territory northeast and east of the Babylonians
Babel - A new era begins with Nabopolassar, appointed ruler of Babylon by the last Assyrian king just when the Medes were making their final assault on Nineveh. Babylon's capture by surprise during a festival was foretold in Jeremiah 51:31; Jeremiah 51:39, and that the capture should be by the Medes and Persians, 170 years earlier in Isaiah 21:1-9. The phrase (Daniel 9:1), "Darius, son of Ahasuerus (Cyaxares), of the seed of the Medes, which was made king over the realm of the Chaldaeans," implies that Darius owed the kingdom to another, i. ...
Herodotus makes Astyages the last king of the Medes, and that he was conquered by Cyrus and left no issue
Assyria, History And Religion of - , the old Assyrian capital Asshur was sacked by the Medes. The combined armies of the Babylonians and the Medes laid siege to Nineveh
Assur - , 520 years before its decay through the revolt of subject nations, the Medes, etc. The growing power of the Medes gave the final blow (foretold long ago, Isaiah 10:5-19) to Assyria, already enervated by luxury and having lost in prosperous ease its military spirit
Magi - ...
Herodotus tells us that the Magi formed one of six tribes or castes of the Medes
Sorcery - 101) uses this word to indicate the Magi, one of the six tribes of the Medes, who were probably a sacred priestly class, devoted to astrology, divination by dreams, and the practice of magic generally
Esther, Book of - Xerxes, king of the Medes and Persians, gives a great feast to the nobles and princes of the 127 provinces over which he rules; the description of the decorations in the palace garden on this occasion recalls the language of the Arabian Nights
Nahum, Theology of - , the year Nineveh fell to the invading army made up of Babylonians and Medes
Samaria - After Shalmaneser's capture of Samaria and carrying away of Israel to Halah and Habor, and in the cities of the Medes (2 Kings 17:5-6; 2 Kings 17:23-24), Esarhaddon or Asnapper planted "instead" men of Babylon (where Esarhaddon resided in part: 2 Chronicles 33:11), Cuthah, Ava, and Sepharvaim (Ezra 4:2-3; Ezra 4:10)
Ecbatana - a city of Media, which, according to Herodotus, was built by Dejoces, king of the Medes
Assyria - The work of destruction seems to have been effected by the Medes and Babylonians
Captivity - ) took it, and "carried Israel away to Halah and Habor by the river Gozan, and to the cities of the Medes" (2 Kings 17:1-6)
Babylon - Later, Babylonian kings aligned themselves with the Medes to conquer Assyria in 612 B
Tongues, Confusion of - The Aryan Medes appear in the Assyrian annals 900 B
Babylon - The Lord hath raised up the spirit of the kings of the Medes, for his device is against Babylon, to destroy it. "The king of Babylon heard the report of them; anguish took hold of him;" he and all who were about him perished; God had "numbered" his kingdom and finished it; it was "divided," and given to the Medes and Persians; the lives of the Babylonian princes, and lords, and rulers, and captains, closed with that night's festival; the drunken slept "a perpetual sleep, and did not wake
Ezra, the Book of - "...
Daniel would necessarily, as just made "third ruler in the kingdom," and having foretold its transfer to "the Medes and Persians" (Daniel 5:28-29), come under Cyrus' notice immediately on the capture of Babylon; moreover, it is stated "he prospered in the reign of Cyrus the Persian" (Daniel 6:28), he would therefore be sure to mention to Cyrus Isaiah's prophecy
Zechariah, Prophecy of - ...
Zechariah 6:1-8 introduce the administrative spirits of God's providential government connected with the four Gentile empires as horses: the red (Babylon), the black (Medes and Persians), the white (Greek), and the grisled and bay (Roman), the latter probably having two horses because of the double character of its government, relics of which exist in various forms until revived again before the Lord comes to reign
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - God's immediate agent will be the Medes whom he will stir up against Babylon; their action will be decisive
Division of the Earth - ) Madai was the father of the Medes, who are repeatedly so denominated in Scripture, 2 Kings 17:6 ; Isaiah 13:17 ; Jeremiah 51:11 ; Daniel 5:28 , &c
Hezekiah - Sargon moreover removed some of the Israelites to "the cities of the Medes"; the Scripture herein being confirmed by Assyrian monuments which mention his seizing and annexing several Median cities, to which Assyrian policy would of course transplant distant colonists
Jeremiah - Nineveh avoided capture by the Medes in 625 only at the expense of seeing her lands wasted and her dependencies stripped from her
Pentecost - It does not seem clear that he had any principle to go on in this enumeration, save that roughly he begins in what must have been to him the Far East (‘Parthians and Medes’) and ends with the West (‘sojourners from Rome’), and then adds, a little inconsequently, ‘Cretans and Arabians
Pentecost - It does not seem clear that he had any principle to go on in this enumeration, save that roughly he begins in what must have been to him the Far East (‘Parthians and Medes’) and ends with the West (‘sojourners from Rome’), and then adds, a little inconsequently, ‘Cretans and Arabians
Enoch Book of - -The angels are to stir up the Parthians and Medes to tread upon the land of God’s elect, but ‘the city of my righteous’ shall hinder their horses; they shall slay one another, and Sheol shall devour them in presence of the elect