What does Matthew mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
μαθθαῖον son of Alphaeus 3
μαθθαῖος son of Alphaeus 2

Definitions Related to Matthew

G3156


   1 son of Alphaeus, one of the 12 disciples.
   Additional Information: Matthew = “gift of Jehovah”.
   

Frequency of Matthew (original languages)

Frequency of Matthew (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Matthew, Saint
(Hebrew: Mattija, "gift of Iahveh")
Apostle and Evangelist. The Matthew mentioned in the New Testament (Matthew 9), as called by Christ, is identical with Levi (Mark 2; Luke 5); hence it is concluded that he was known originally as Levi and that the name Matthew was given to him by Christ when he began his apostolate. A Galilean Jew by birth, the son of Alpheus, he was a publican by trade, and therefore despised by the Pharisees; he possessed some education and a knowledge of Greek. His name occurs several times in the New Testament (Luke 6; Mark 3; Acts 1); he witnessed the Resurrection; was present at the Ascension, and in the upper chamber in Jerusalem with Mary, the Mother of Jesus, and his brethren (Acts 1). The accounts of the career of Matthew subsequent to the Ascension are legendary; he is said to have evangelized Asiatic Ethiopia, Persia, Macedonia, Syria, and the kingdom of the Parthians. There has been some disagreement over the place and manner of his death, but it is generally conceded that he was martyred. His relics were translated to the west and, according to a letter of Gregory VII addressed to the Bishop of Salerno, 1080, they were placed in the church of his name in that city, where they still remain. Matthew is usually symbolized as a winged man, probably beeause he begins his Gospel with the human genealogy of Christ. Patron of tax-gatherers and bankers. Emblems: purse and lance. Feast, September 21,. See also, patron saints index.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Matthew, Gospel According to
As to the time of its composition, there is little in the Gospel itself to indicate. It was evidently written before the destruction of Jerusalem (Matthew 24 ), and some time after the events it records. The probability is that it was written between the years A.D. 60,65.
The cast of thought and the forms of expression employed by the writer show that this Gospel was written for Jewish Christians of Palestine. His great object is to prove that Jesus of Nazareth was the promised Messiah, and that in him the ancient prophecies had their fulfilment. The Gospel is full of allusions to those passages of the Old Testament in which Christ is predicted and foreshadowed. The one aim prevading the whole book is to show that Jesus is he "of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write." This Gospel contains no fewer than sixty-five references to the Old Testament, forty-three of these being direct verbal citations, thus greatly outnumbering those found in the other Gospels. The main feature of this Gospel may be expressed in the motto, "I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil."
As to the language in which this Gospel was written there is much controversy. Many hold, in accordance with old tradition, that it was originally written in Hebrew (i.e., the Aramaic or Syro-Chaldee dialect, then the vernacular of the inhabitants of Palestine), and afterwards translated into Greek, either by Matthew himself or by some person unknown. This theory, though earnestly maintained by able critics, we cannot see any ground for adopting. From the first this Gospel in Greek was received as of authority in the Church. There is nothing in it to show that it is a translation. Though Matthew wrote mainly for the Jews, yet they were everywhere familiar with the Greek language. The same reasons which would have suggested the necessity of a translation into Greek would have led the evangelist to write in Greek at first. It is confessed that this Gospel has never been found in any other form than that in which we now possess it.
The leading characteristic of this Gospel is that it sets forth the kingly glory of Christ, and shows him to be the true heir to David's throne. It is the Gospel of the kingdom. Matthew uses the expression "kingdom of heaven" (thirty-two times), while Luke uses the expression "kingdom of God" (thirty-three times). Some Latinized forms occur in this Gospel, as kodrantes (Matthew 5:26 ), for the Latin quadrans, and phragello (27:26), for the Latin flagello. It must be remembered that Matthew was a tax-gatherer for the Roman government, and hence in contact with those using the Latin language.
As to the relation of the Gospels to each other, we must maintain that each writer of the synoptics (the first three) wrote independently of the other two, Matthew being probably first in point of time.
"Out of a total of 1071 verses, Matthew has 387 in common with Mark and Luke, 130 with Mark, 184 with Luke; only 387 being peculiar to itself." (See MARK; LUKE; GOSPELS .)
The book is fitly divided into these four parts:
Containing the genealogy, the birth, and the infancy of Jesus (1; 2).
The discourses and actions of John the Baptist preparatory to Christ's public ministry (3; 4:11).
The discourses and actions of Christ in Galilee ((4:12-20:16).).
The sufferings, death and resurrection of our Lord (20:17-28).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Matthew Parker
Second Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury; born Norwich, England, 1504; died London, England, 1575. Having studied at Cambridge, he was ordained and elected to a fellowship. In 1535 he was appointed chaplain to Anne Boleyn. Vice-chancellor of Cambridge, at the accession of Mary Tudor he resigned. Deprived of his preferments he retired until he was recalled by Queen Elizabeth, to be consecrated Archbishop of Canterbury in 1559. Elizabeth decided to retain an episcopacy; hence it became necessary to devise some means of finding a bishop to consecrate the newly selected prelates. The circumstances of Parker's consecration, shrouded in secrecy, were unknown to the Catholic party who believed a rumor, since proved false, called "The Nag's Head Story". The "Register" at Lambeth, thought by some a forgery, has been proved a regal document testifying that Parker was consecrated according to the ordinal of Edward VI by Bishop Barlow. The Elizabethians were reticent about the consecration of their metropolitan, probably because of the reputation of the consecrators. Archbishop Parker strove, during fifteen years primacy, to define the limits of the doctrines of the Reformers. He revised the Edwardian Articles in convocation, 1562. In 1566 he drew up a series of enactments concerning ecclesiastical matters, known as the "Advertisements." He also made a revised translation of the Scriptures called the "Bishop's Bible."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Matthew of Westminster
Supposed author of the English chronicle "Flores Historiarum." The misunderstanding regarding this imaginary personage originated with a copyist who, perceiving that part of the chronicle was written at Westminster, while another portion followed the history of Matthew Paris, concluded that Matthew was himself a monk of Westminster.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Matthew, Gospel of Saint
The first book of the New Testament. Its author is the Apostle Saint Matthew, who wrote an account of Our Lord's life in the Hebrew dialect then in use by the Palestinian Jews (Aramaic), about 40 or 50. He wrote the Gospel in Palestine for converts from Judaism, to confirm them in their faith in Jesus as the promised Messias, and to convince the unbelievers that they had rejected the Redeemer. The characteristic which especially distinguishes this Gospel from the others is the frequent citations of and allusions to the Old Testament prophecies. The fulfillment of these prophecies in Jesus proves Him to be the Messias. The 28 chapters of the Gospel may be divided according to the following topics Jesus is proven the Messias in His ancestry, birth, and infancy (1-2); He is shown to be the Messias in the preparation for the public ministry (3-4); He manifests Himself as the Messias in public life, being teacher and legislator (5-7), wonder-worker (8-9), founder of the Kingdom of Goa (10-25); He is shown to be the Messias in the humility of His sufferings and the glory of His Resurreetion (26-28). The Biblical Commission, June 19, 1911, declared that the universal and constant tradition dating from the first centuries and expressed in early writings, ancient codices, versions and catalogues of the Bible, proves beyond doubt that Saint Matthew wrote the first Gospel, as we now have it in our Bibles, before the year 70, and that the Gospel is in conformity with historical truth. Chapters specially commendable for reading: 1-2, the hidden life; 5,6, 7, Sermon on the Mount; 13,16, 18,19, parables, and instructions on the Kingdom of God; 15, last judgment; 26-28, Passion, Death and Resurrection.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Matthew
Gift of God, a common Jewish name after the Exile. He was the son of Alphaeus, and was a publican or tax-gatherer at Capernaum. On one occasion Jesus, coming up from the side of the lake, passed the custom-house where Matthew was seated, and said to him, "Follow me." Matthew arose and followed him, and became his disciple (Matthew 9:9 ). Formerly the name by which he was known was Levi (Mark 2:14 ; Luke 5:27 ); he now changed it, possibly in grateful memory of his call, to Matthew. The same day on which Jesus called him he made a "great feast" (Luke 5:29 ), a farewell feast, to which he invited Jesus and his disciples, and probably also many of old associates. He was afterwards selected as one of the twelve (6:15). His name does not occur again in the Gospel history except in the lists of the apostles. The last notice of him is in Acts 1:13 . The time and manner of his death are unknown.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Matthew
The apostle and evangelist, or, as he himself in great humility writes, Matthew the publican, than, Matthew 10:3. His history we have in the gospel.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Matthew
("the gift of Jehovah"), contracted from Mattathias. The evangelist and apostle. Son of Alphaeus (not the father of James the Less, for Matthew and James are never coupled as brothers). Mark (Mark 2:14, compare Mark 3:18) and Luke (Luke 5:27, compare with Luke 6:15) veil his former less honorable occupation of a publican under his original name Levi; but Matthew himself gives it, and humbly puts himself after Thomas, an undesigned mark of genuineness; whereas Mark (Mark 3:18) and Luke (Luke 6:15) put Matthew before Thomas in the list of apostles. (See PUBLICAN.) As subordinate to the head farmers of the Roman revenues he collected dues at Capernaum on the sea of Galilee, the route by which traffic passed between Damascus and the Phoenician seaports. But Matthew is not ashamed to own his identity with "the publican" in order to magnify Christ's grace (Matthew 9:9), and in his catalogue of the apostles (Matthew 10:3).
Christ called him at "the receipt of custom," and he immediately obeyed the call. Desiring to draw others of his occupation with him to the Savior he made in His honor a great feast (Matthew 9:9-13; Luke 5:29; Mark 2:14). "Many publicans and sinners" thus had the opportunity of hearing the word; and the murmuring of the Pharisee, and the reply of our Lord "they that be whole need not a physician but they that are sick ... I am not come to call the righteous but sinners to repentance," imply that his effort was crowned with success. With the undesigned propriety which marks genuineness Matthew talks of Jesus' sitting down in "the house" without telling whose house it was, whereas Mark mentions it as Levi's. He was among those who met in the upper room at Jerusalem after our Lord's ascension (Acts 1:13). Eustathius (H. E. iii. 24) says that after our Lord's ascension Matthew preached in Judaea and then in foreign nations (Ethiopia, according to Socrates Scholasticus, H. E. i. 19).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Matthew, the Gospel According to
(See GOSPELS for its aspect of Christ compared with the other evangelists.)
Time of writing. As our Lord's words divide Acts (Acts 1:8) into its three parts, "ye shall be witnesses unto Me in Jerusalem, and all Judea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth":
(1) the period in which the church was Jewish, Acts 1-11;
(2) the period when it was Gentile with strong Jewish admixture;
(3) the period when the Gentiles preponderated, Matthew's Gospel answers to the first or Jewish period, ending about A.D. 41, and was written probably in and for Jerusalem and Judea.
The expression (Matthew 27:7-8; Matthew 28:15) "unto this day" implies some interval after Christ's crucifixion. Language. Ancient testimony is unanimous that Matthew wrote in Hebrew Papias, a disciple of John (the Presbyter) and companion of Polycarp (Eusebius, H. E. 3:3), says, "Matthew wrote his oracles (logia ) in Hebrew, and each interpreted them in Greek as he could." Perhaps the Greek for "oracles," logia , expresses that the Hebrew Gospel of Matthew was a collection of discourses (as logoi means) rather than a full narrative. Matthew's Gospel is the one of the four which gives most fully the discourses of our Lord. Papias' use of the past tense (aorist) implies that "each interpreting" Matthew's Hebrew was in Papias' time a thing of the past, so that as early as the end of the first century or the beginning of the second the need for each to translate the Hebrew had ceased, for an authoritative Greek translation existed.
The Hellenists (Greek-speaking) Jews would from the first need a Greek version, and Matthew and the church would hardly leave this want unsupplied in his lifetime. Origen, Pantaenus, Eusebius (H. E. 6:25; 5:10; 5:8), and Irenaeus (adv. Haer. 3:1) state the same. Jerome (de Vir. Illustr. 3) adds, "who translated the Hebrew into Greek is uncertain." He identifies Matthew's Hebrew Gospel with "the Gospel of the Nazarenes," which he saw in Pamphilus' library at Caesarea. Epiphanius (Haer. 29, sec. 9) mentions this Nazarene Gospel as written in Hebrew. (Ηebruikois grammasin ) Probably this Nazarene was the original Hebrew Gospel of Matthew interpolated and modified, yet not so much so as the Ebionite Gospel. This view will account for the strange fact that nothing of the Hebrew Matthew has been preserved. Our Greek Gospel superseded the Hebrew, and was designed by the Holy Spirit (as its early acceptance, universal use, and sole preservation prove) to be the more universal canonical Gospel.
The Judaizing Nazarenes still clung to the Hebrew one; but their heresies and their corruptions of the text brought it into disrepute with the orthodox. Origen (on Prayer, 161:150) argues that epiousion , the Greek word for "daily" in the Lord's prayer, was formed by Matthew himself; Luke adopts the word. Eusebius (Lardher, Cred. 8 note p. 180) remarks that Matthew in quotations of the Old Testament does not follow the Septuagint, but makes his own translation. Quotations in his own narrative (1) pointing out the fulfillment of prophecy Matthew translates from the Hebrew. Quotations (2) of persons introduced, as Christ, are from the Greek Septuagint, even where differing from the Hebrew, e.g. Matthew 3:3; Matthew 13:14. A mere translator would not have done so. An independent writer would do just what Matthew does, namely, in speeches of persons introduced would conform to the apostolic tradition which used the Septuagint, but in his own narrative would translate the Hebrew as he judged best under the Spirit.
These are arguments for Matthew's authorship of the Greek Gospel. Mark apparently alters or explains many passages found in our Matthew, for greater clearness, as if he had the Greek of Matthew before him (Matthew 18:9; Matthew 19:1 with Mark 10:1; Mark 9:47); and if the Greek existed so early it must have come from Matthew himself, not a transistor. The Latinisms (fragellosas , Matthew 27:26; kodranteen , Matthew 5:26) are unlike a translation from Hebrew into Greek, for why not use the Greek terms as Luke (Luke 12:59) does, rather than Graecised Latinisms? The Latinisms are natural to Matthew, as a portitor or gatherer of port dues, familiar with the Roman coin quadrans, and likely to quote the Latin for "scourging" (fragellosas from flagellum ) used by the Roman governor in sentencing Jesus. Josephus' writing his history both in Greek and Hebrew (B. J. Preface 1) is parallel.
The great proof of Matthew's authorship of the Greek is that the Hebrew has left no trace of it except that which may exist in the Nazarene Gospel, whereas our Greek Matthew is quoted as authentic by the apostolic fathers (Polycarp, Ep. ii. 7; Ignatius, ad Smyr. 6; Clemens Romans i. 46; Barnabas, Ep. 4) and earliest Christians. Paul in writing to the Hebrew, Peter to the Jews of the dispersion, and James to the twelve tribes, write in Greek not Hebrew. How unlikely that Matthew's name should be substituted for the lost name of the unknown translator, and this in apostolic times; for John lived to see the completion of the canon; he never would have sanctioned as the authentic Gospel of Matthew a fragmentary compilation "in arrangement and selection of events not such as would have proceeded from an apostle and eye witness" (Alford). The Hebraisms accord with the Jewish character of Matthew's Gospel, and suit the earliest period of the church. At a later date it would have been less applicable to the existing state.
Early Christian writers quote the Greek, not the Hebrew, with implicit confidence in its authority as Matthew's work. The original Hebrew of which Papias, etc., speak none of them ever saw. If it had not been so, heretics would have gladly used such a handle against it, which they do not. The Syriac version of the second century is demonstrably made, not from its kindred tongue the Hebrew, but from the Greek Matthew; this to too in the country next Judea where Matthew wrote, and with which there was the freest communication. The Hebrew Matthew having served its local and temporary use was laid aside, just as Paul's temporary epistles (Colossians 4:16; 1 Corinthians 5:9) have not been transmitted to us, the Holy Spirit designing them to serve but for a time. Our Greek Matthew has few, if any, traces of being a translation; it has the general marks of being an independent work.
A translator would not have presumed to alter Matthew's original so as to have the air of originality which it has; if he had, his compilation would never have been accepted as the authentic Gospel of the inspired apostle Matthew by the churches which had within them men possessing the gift of "discerning spirits" (1 Corinthians 12:10). As Mark's name designates his Gospel, not that of Peter his apostolic guide, and Luke's name his Gospel not Paul's name, so if a translator had modified Matthew's Hebrew, his name not Matthew's would have designated it. All is clear if we suppose that, after inaccurate translations of his Hebrew by others such as Papias (above) notices, Matthew himself at a later date wrote, or dictated, in Greek for Greek speaking Jews the Gospel in fuller form than the Hebrew. His omission of the ascension (as included in the resurrection of which it is the complement) was just what we should expect if he wrote while the event was fresh in men's memory and the witnesses still at Jerusalem. If he had written at a later date he would have surely recorded it.
AIM. There is a lack in it of the vivid details found in the others, his aim being to give prominence to the Lord's discourses. Jesus' human aspect as the ROYAL. Son of David is mainly dwelt, on; but His divine aspect as Lord of David is also presented in Matthew 22:45; Matthew 16:16; proving that Matthew's view accords with that of John, who makes prominent Jesus' divine claims. From the beginning Matthew introduces Jesus as "Son of David," but Mark 1:1 as "the Son of God," Luke as "the Son of Adam, the son of God" (Luke 3:38), John as "the Word" who "was God" (John 1:4). In the earlier part, down to the Baptist's death, he groups facts and discourses according to the subjects, not according to the times, whereas Mark arranges according to the times, in the places where they differ. Papias' description of the Hebrew Matthew as a studied arrangement (suntaxis ) of our Lord's "discourses" accords with this view.
STYLE. The Greek of Matthew is the most Hebraic of the New Testament Hellenistic writers (Hellenistic is Hebrew in idiom and thoughts, Greek in words): for instance matheteuein , tafos sumboulion lambanein , distazein , katapontizesthai , metairein , proskunein with the dative (not the accusative as in Mark and Luke), sunairein logon , omnuoo eis or en of the thing or person sworn by; akousoo for akousomai ; pas hostis (but Luke pas hos ); brechein to rain (but in Luke to moisten); sunteleia tou aionos (elsewhere only in Hebrews 9:26, both Scriptures being for Jews); basileta ton ouranon (in the rest of the New Testament basileia tou ΤΗeou ); the phrase "that it might be fulfilled" (Matthew 2:15; Matthew 1:22) implies that the prophetic word necessitated the fulfillment (Matthew 24:35); "that which was spoken" (to rethen , errethee ) is the form of quotation 20 times, suitable to the Hebrew mode (Mark 13:14, the only other instance, is omitted in the two oldest manuscripts, Sinaiticus and Vaticanus), compare Hebrews 2:2.
Three peculiar terms are common to Matthew and Mark, angareusei , fragelloosas , and koloboosai . So also ΗΙerosoluma (but ΗΙerousaleem in Luke mostly). If Mark adopted them from Matthew the Greek Matthew must be authentic for it must then have been written in Matthew's lifetime, when none durst have brought out a free translation of the Hebrew as Matthew's Gospel. The independence in the mode of Old Testament quotations is inconsistent with the notion of a mere translated "The Son of David" is eight times in Matthew, three times each in Mark and Luke. Jerusalem is "the holy city" (Matthew 4:5; Matthew 27:53), which it ceased to be regarded as by the time that subsequent New Testament writers wrote, when the Jews had continued to harden themselves against the truth.
CANONICAL AUTHORITY. Justin Martyr, the epistle to Diognetus, Irenaeus, Tartan, Origen, etc., quote Matthew as of undisputed authority. The genuineness of the first two chapters, disputed by some, is established by their presence in the oldest manuscripts and versions. The genealogy was necessary in a Gospel for Jews, to show that Jesus' claim to Messiahship accorded with His descent through king David from Abraham, to both of whom the promise of Messiah was given; while its insertion is proof of early date.
DESIGN. For the Jews; to show Jewish, readers (to whom were committed the Old Testament "oracles of God") that Jesus is the Messiah of the Old Testament, fulfilling Old Testament prophecies, as born of a virgin in Bethlehem (Matthew 2:6); fleeing to Egypt and called out of it; heralded by John Baptist (Matthew 3:3); laboring in Galilee of the Gentiles (Matthew 4:14-16); healing (Matthew 8:17); teaching in parables (Matthew 13:14 ff). Matthew has 65 Old Testament quotations, of which 43 are verbal; Luke has 43, of which only 19 are verbal. Matthew takes for granted that his readers, as Jews, know Jewish customs and places; Mark for Gentile readers describes these (Matthew 15:1-2 with Mark 7:1-4, "with defiled, that is, unwashed hands," Matthew 27:62 with Mark 15:42, "the preparation, that is the day before the sabbath," Luke 23:54; John 19:14; John 19:31; John 19:42).
The interpretations of Ιmmanueel , Εloi , lama sabachthani , Αkeldama (Matthew 1:23; Matthew 27:8; Matthew 27:46) were designed for Greek speakers. In contrast with Judaic traditions and servility to the dead letter, the law is unfolded in its spirit (Matthew 5; 23). The epistle of James answers closely to the Sermon on the Mount (which Matthew alone gives fully) in its spiritual development of the law (James 5:12; James 1:25; James 1:2); the relation of the gospel to the law is the aspect which Matthew, like James, presents. (See JAMES.) What James is among the apostolic epistles that Matthew is among the evangelists. It is the Gospel of Judaeo-Christianity, setting forth the law in its deep spirituality brought to view by Jesus its fulfiller.
Mere Judaic privileges will not avail, for unbelief shall cast the children of the kingdom into outer darkness, while the saved shall come from every quarter to sit down with Abraham through faith (Matthew 8:10-12). Records found only in Matthew.
Christ's genealogy from Abraham to Joseph through the male line; the succession to the throne, from Abraham through king David to Joseph, 42 generations, with omissions. (See GENEALOGY.) Matthew 1: Joseph's dreams. Matthew 2: Christ worshipped by the wise men, Herod's massacre of the children at Bethlehem, Herod's death, and Christ's return to Nazareth. Matthew 5-7: the Sermon on the Mount in full. Matthew 9: healing of two blind men. Matthew 11: call to the heavy laden. Matthew 13: parables of the hidden treasure, the pearl, and the drag-net. Matthew 16: Peter's confession of Christ, and Christ's confirmation of Peter's name (compare at an early time John 1:42). Matthew 17: Christ's paying the tribute with money from a fish. Matthew 20: cures two blind men while going from Jericho. Matthew 22: parable of the wedding garment. Matthew 25: parables of the ten virgins, talents, and sheep and goats at the judgment. Matthew 27: dream of Pilate's wife, appearance of many saints after the crucifixion. Matthew 28: soldiers bribed to say that Christ's disciples had stolen His body.
QUOTATIONS IN MATTHEW Matthew 1:23 "Behold, a virgin" Isaiah 7:14 Matthew 2:6 "Thou Bethlehem" Micah 5:2 Matthew 2:15 "Out of Egypt" Hosea 11:1 Matthew 2:18 "In Rama a voice" Jeremiah 31:15 Matthew 3:3 "The voice of one crying" Isaiah 40:3 Matthew 4:4 "Man shall not live by bread" Deuteronomy 8:3 Matthew 4:6 "He shall give His angels charge" Psalms 91:11-12 Matthew 4:7 "Thou shalt not tempt " Deuteronomy 6:16 Matthew 4:10 "Thou shalt worship the Lord" Deuteronomy 6:13 Matthew 4:15-16 "The land of Zabulon" Isaiah 9:1-2 Matthew 5:5 "Blessed are the meek: they shall Psalms 37:11 inherit the earth" Matthew 5:21 "Thou shalt not kill" Exodus 20:13 Matthew 5:27 "Thou shalt not commit adultery" Exodus 20:14 Matthew 5:31 "Give her a writing of divorcement" Deuteronomy 24:1 Matthew 5:33 "Thou shalt not forswear"
Deuteronomy 23:23; Leviticus 19:12 Matthew 5:38 "An eye for an eye" Exodus 21:24 Matthew 5:43 "Love thy neighbor ... hate thine enemy" Leviticus 19:18; Micah 7:5-6 Matthew 8:4 "Offer the gift ... Moses commanded" Leviticus 14:2 Matthew 8:17 "Himself took our infirmities" Isaiah 53:4 Matthew 9:13 "I will have mercy" Hosea 6:6 Matthew 10:35-36 "A man's foes ... of his own household" Deuteronomy 23:6 Matthew 11:5 "Blind receive sight" Isaiah 35:5 Matthew 11:10 "Behold, I send My messenger" Malachi 3:1 Matthew 11:14 "Elias, which was for to come " Malachi 4:5 Matthew 12:3 "Have ye not read what David did?" 1 Samuel 21:1-6 Matthew 12:5 "Priests profane sabbath" Numbers 28:9 Matthew 12:7 "Mercy, not sacrifice" Hosea 6:6 Matthew 12:18-21 "Behold My Servant" Isaiah 42:1-4 Matthew 12:40 "Jonas three days in whale's belly"
Jonah 1:17 Matthew 12:42 "Queen of the south came" 1 Kings 10:1 Matthew 13:14-15 "Hearing ye shall hear" Isaiah 6:9-10 Matthew 13:35 "I will open my mouth in parables" Psalms 78:2-3 Matthew 15:8 "This people draweth nigh ... with ... lips" Isaiah 29:13 Matthew 15:34 "Honor thy father" Exodus 20:12 Matthew 17:2 "Transfigured" Exodus 34:29 Matthew 17:11 "Elias shall first come" Malachi 3:1; Malachi 4:5 Matthew 18:15 "If thy brother trespass ... Leviticus 19:17 tell him his fault" Matthew 19:4 "He which made them at the beginning Genesis 1:27 made male and female" Matthew 19:5 "For this cause shall a man leave his father" Genesis 2:24 Matthew 19:7 "Divorcement" Deuteronomy 24:1 Matthew 19:18 "Do no murder" Exodus 20:13 Matthew 21:5 "Behold, thy King cometh" Zechariah 9:9 Matthew 21:9 "Blessed is he that cometh in the Psalms 118:25-26 name of the Lord, Hosanna"
Matthew 21:13 "My house the house of prayer" Isaiah 56:7 Matthew 21:16 "Out of the mouth of babes" Psalms 8:2 Matthew 21:42 "The stone which the builders rejected" Psalms 118:22-23 Matthew 21:44 "Whosoever shall fall on this stone Isaiah 8:14 shall be broken" Matthew 22:24 "Moses said, If a man die" Deuteronomy 25:5 Matthew 22:32 "I am the God of Abraham" Exodus 3:6 Matthew 22:37 "Thou shalt love the Lord" Deuteronomy 6:5 Matthew 22:39 "Thou shalt love thy neighbor" Leviticus 19:18 Matthew 22:45 "Sit thou on My right hand" Psalms 110:1 Matthew 23:35 "Blood of Abel" Genesis 4:8 Matthew 23:38 "Your house is left desolate" Psalms 69:25 Matthew 23:39 "Blessed is he that cometh in the Psalms 118:26 name of the Lord"
Matthew 24:15 "The abomination of desolation" Daniel 9:27 Matthew 24:29 "Sun ... darkened" Isaiah 13:10 Matthew 24:37 "The days of Noe" Genesis 6:11 Matthew 26:31 "I will smite the shepherd" Zechariah 13:7 Matthew 26:52 "They that take the sword shall Genesis 9:6 perish with the sword" Matthew 26:64 "Son of man ... in the clouds" Daniel 7:13 Matthew 27:9 "The thirty pieces of silver ... Zechariah 11:13 potter's field" Matthew 27:35 "They parted my garments" Psalms 22:18 Matthew 27:43 "He trusted in God" Psalms 22:8 Matthew 27:46 "My God, My God, why" Psalms 22:1.
DIVISIONS. Introduction; Christ's genealogy, birth; visit of the wise men; flight to Egypt; return to Nazareth; John the Baptist's preparatory ministry; Christ's baptism and consecration to His office by the Holy Spirit, with the Father's declared approval (Matthew 1-3). Temptation; ministry in Galilee; call of disciples (Matthew 4). Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7). Events in order, proving His claim to Messiahship by miracles (Matthew 8-9). Appointment of apostles; doubts of John's disciples; cavils of the Pharisees; on the other hand His loving invitations, miracles, series of parables on the kingdom; effects of His ministry on Herod and various classes; prophecy to His disciples of His coming death (Matthew 10 - 18:35). Ministry in Judea and Jerusalem (Matthew 19-20). Passion week: entry into Jerusalem; opposition to Him by Herodians, Sadducees, Pharisees; silences them all; denunciation of the Pharisees (Matthew 21-23_. Last discourses: His coming as Lord and Judge (Matthew 24-25). Passion and resurrection (Matthew 26-28).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Matthew
When the Gospel writers Mark and Luke give the list of the twelve apostles, they name Matthew but do not record his occupation (Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15). When they mention the tax collector who responded to Jesus’ call and invited his fellow tax collectors to a feast to meet Jesus, they call him not Matthew, but Levi, which was his other name (Mark 2:14-17; Luke 5:27-32). It seems as if, to be kind to Matthew, they deliberately avoid mentioning that he was once a tax collector. Jews in general despised those of their people who collected taxes on behalf of Rome. They regarded them as dishonest and unpatriotic people who had lost their self-respect (see TAX COLLECTOR).
Matthew’s response to the call of Jesus changed his attitude to life completely. This is seen in the Gospel traditionally associated with Matthew. The book itself does not state whether Matthew was the person who actually wrote it, but there is good evidence to suggest that, no matter who wrote it, it came from material that Matthew had prepared. And far from hiding the fact that he was once a tax collector, Matthew states it clearly. He uses the name Matthew, not Levi, in his account of Jesus’ call (Matthew 9:9-13), and in his list of the twelve apostles he states his previous occupation (Matthew 10:3). The book reflects a tax collector’s gratitude to Jesus for calling such a person to be an apostle. (See also MATTHEW, GOSPEL OF.)
At the time he first met Jesus, Matthew lived and worked in Capernaum on the shore of the Sea of Galilee (Mark 2:1; Mark 2:13-14). He had a good income (Matthew 9:9) and owned a house large enough to accommodate a good number of people (Luke 5:29). But he left all this to join Jesus in the urgent and risky business of spreading the good news of the kingdom of God (Matthew 10:5-23). Though the Bible gives no details of Matthew’s later activities, he was involved in the establishment of the church after Jesus’ resurrection (Acts 1:13).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew (Apostle)
MATTHEW (APOSTLE). Two sets of parallel passages, both from the Petrine tradition, tell us of this chosen companion of our Lord. The first ( Matthew 9:9 , Mark 2:14 , Luke 5:27 ) narrates his call. He was named both ‘Matthew’ (Mt.) and ‘ Levi ’ (Mk. [1] and Lk.), and was the son of Alphæus (Mk.). He was a publican (Lk.), and was ‘sitting at the place of toll’ (Mt., Mk., Lk.) near Capernaum, which lay on the road from Damascus to the Mediterranean; here he collected dues for Herod the tetrarch. No doubt he was only an agent, not one of the wealthy farmers of the taxes. Nevertheless he must have been fairly rich, and had much to give up in following Jesus. The call is followed by a meal (Mt., Mk.), a great feast given to Jesus by Matthew himself (Lk.), which roused the anger of the ‘scribes of the Pharisees.’ The name ‘Matthew’ probably means ‘Gift of Jahweh’ (cf. ‘Theodore’), and is another form of ‘Matthias’; though some take it as meaning ‘strong.’ ‘manly.’ It was doubtless given to Levi as an additional name, perhaps (like ‘Peter’) by our Lord Himself.
The second set of passages gives the list of the Twelve (Matthew 10:3 , Mark 3:16 , Luke 6:15 , Acts 1:15 ). In all these the surname ‘Matthew’ is given, not ‘Levi,’ just as ‘Bartholomew’ and ‘Thomas’ are surnames; and in all four Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, and James the (son) of Alphæus are mentioned together, though not always in the same order. In two lists (Mt., Ac.) Matthew comes next to James (though they are not joined together as a pair); in the other two, next but one. If then we take the view that this James is neither the brother of our Lord, nor yet the same as James the Little ( Mark 15:40 ), and if we negative the idea that ‘Alpæeus’ (Aram. [2] Khalphai ) and ‘Clopas’ are one name, there is perhaps something to be said for the opinion that Matthew and James were brothers. But they are not mentioned together elsewhere. Only in the Mt. list is the designation ‘the publican’ added. For Matthew’s connexion with the First Gospel, see the next article. We have no trustworthy information as to his later career.
A. J. Maclean.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew, Gospel According to
MATTHEW, GOSPEL ACCORDING TO.
1. The First Gospel in the Early Church . Papias ( c [1] . a.d. 140 or earlier), as quoted by Eusebius ( HE iii. 39), says: ‘Matthew, however, composed the logia in the Hebrew dialect, but each one interpreted them as he was able.’ This remark occurs in his work The Exposition of the Lord’s logia , and is practically all the external information that we have about the Matthæan Gospel, except that Irenæus says: ‘Matthew among the Hebrews published a Gospel in their own dialect, when Peter and Paul were preaching in Rome and founding the Church’ ( Hær . iii. 1). Irenæus is probably quoting from Papias. In the 4th cent., Eusebius tells a story of Pantænus finding in the 2nd cent. the original Aramaic Mt. in India, but the story is very uncertain; Epiphanius says that the Aramaic Gospel of Matthew existed in his day, in the possession of an Ebionite sect (distinguished in modern times as Elkesaites), and describes it; and Jerome describes what he alleges to be the original of Mt. as in use among the Nazarenes, and says that he translated it into Greek. We have therefore first to interpret Papias, and then to deal with the later testimonies.
( a ) What does Papias mean by the ‘logia’? The word may be translated ‘oracles’ or ‘discourses,’ and it is much disputed which sense we should take here. The interpretation of many (Westcott, Lightfoot, etc., who choose the translation ‘oracles’) is that it is an early word for the Gospels. The ‘Lord’s logia’ which Papias expounded would be the story of our Lord’s life and teaching, and Papias would mean that Matthew wrote his Gospel in Hebrew (cf. Romans 3:2 where ‘oracles’ may mean only God’s sayings, but more naturally may be taken to mean the whole of the OT). Certainly the word in the 1st cent. was used of any sacred writing, whether discourse or narrative. Others deny that at so early a date a NT writing as such could be called ‘the Lord’s oracles,’ and take logia to mean ‘discourses.’ But from this point critics have diverged. Many understand Papias to mean that Matthew wrote our Lord’s sayings only ; but this does not appear from his words. The argument against the translation ‘oracles’ is deprived of force if we understand the reference to be, not necessarily to a written record, but to the Gospel story pure and simple, whether written or oral. Papias would then mean that Matthew wrote down the Gospel story in Hebrew. Even if we take the translation ‘discourses’ or ‘sayings,’ it is extremely unlikely that Papias meant that Matthew’s Gospel contained no narrative, though it is quite likely that discourse predominated in it. (For Renan’s theory, see art. Mark [2]).
( b ) What does Papias mean about the original language of Matthew? All the testimony as to its being Aramaic [3] probably reduces itself to this one sentence. One interpretation is that Matthew wrote down Jesus’ sayings in Aramaic, but did not expound them, and that Papias’ own book had this object. But most writers understand Papias to mean that individuals translated Matthew’s work into their own language for themselves. If so, this period must have been over in Papias’ time, for he uses the past tense ‘interpreted’; he must have had a Greek Matthew before him. And our Mt. is clearly an original composition, derived from Greek sources, such as Mk. and other documents, at any rate for the most part (see art. Gospels), and is not a translation from Aramaic. There is no reason for thinking that the Matthæan Gospel actually used by Papias was other than ours. We have then to ask, Did Papias make a mistake about the original language? We know that there was a ‘Gospel of the Hebrews’ current early in the 2nd cent., known to Hegesippus, probably to the writer of the Clementine Homilies , perhaps to Ignatius. Jerome knew of it and gives us extracts from it; and Epiphanius knew of a derived or kindred Gospel, used by the sect of the Nazarenes and containing several episodes different from our canonical narrative, e.g . in connexion with our Lord’s baptism, and His appearance to James after the Resurrection (cf. 1 Corinthians 15:7 ). In this Gospel the Holy Spirit is called the ‘Mother’ of Christ, the word ‘Spirit’ being feminine in Aramaic. Most critics (but Hilgenfeld and Harnack are exceptions) agree that this Gospel is later than our canonical four; Zahn gives good reasons for thinking that it is derived directly from our Mt.; and it is possible that Papias made the mistake fallen into later by Jerome, and, knowing that there was an Aramaic Gospel in existence purporting to be by Matthew (though he had apparently never seen it), thought that it was St. Matthew’s in reality. Eusebius says that he was a man of not much understanding. He may, then, have erroneously thought that St. Matthew, writing in Palestine for Jewish Christians, must have written in Aramaic (Salmon). Another solution, however, is more commonly received. Papias is our only authority before Irenæus for attributing a Gospel to St. Matthew. Possibly then the Apostle Matthew may have written in Aramaic a document incorporated in, or largely drawn upon by, our First Gospel e.g . the original of the Greek ‘non-Markan document’ (see art. Gospels); and this fact may account for his name being attached even early in the 2nd cent. to the First Gospel. Both these solutions seem to be quite possible; but it is not possible to suppose that our First Gospel was originally written in Aramaic.
Quotations from Mt. are found in the Epistle of ‘Barnabas’ ( c [1] . a.d. 100?), one with the formula ‘as it is written.’
2. Contents, sources, and characteristics of the Gospel. The Birth narrative (chs. 1, 2) rests on an unknown source (see Luke [2], § 3), and is independent of the other Synoptics. The Baptist’s preaching, Jesus’ baptism and temptation, the early ministry, and the calling of Simon, Andrew, James, and John (chs. 3, 4) follow the ‘Petrine tradition’ with additions from the non-Markan source (esp. in the Baptism and Temptation), from which also the Sermon on the Mount (chs. 5 7) comes. The narrative of the Galilæan ministry (which extends from Matthew 4:12 to Matthew 16:20 ) is taken mainly from these two sources, but the order of neither is strictly adhered to. It includes the Charge to the Twelve (ch. 10), a large number of parables (ch. 13), and many miracles, some peculiar to Mt. From Matthew 16:21 to the end of the book is the story of the Passion with the preparation for it, including the Transfiguration ( Matthew 17:1-8 ), the Discourse on the End (ch. 24), the parables which specially speak of the Passion and of the End of the World ( Matthew 20:1 ff., Matthew 21:33 ff., Matthew 22:1 ff., Matthew 25:1 ff., Matthew 25:14 ff.), and warnings against Pharisaism (esp. ch. 23). In the story of the Passion itself Mt. follows Mk. very closely, but has some additions.
We may now consider the manner in which the First Evangelist has treated his sources. We are at once struck with a great difference of order. Incidents are grouped together according to subject rather than to chronology. The Sermon on the Mount is a collection of sayings which were uttered at different times, as we see from Lk., where they occur in various contexts (Luke 6:20-34 ; Luke 11:2-4 ; Luke 12:22 ff., Luke 12:58 ff. etc.). It contains a passage ( Luke 5:20 ) which would suggest (if Mt. were a chronological work) that the breach with the Pharisees had already, at that early stage, taken place; whereas Mk. shows how gradual the breach was (see the various stages in Mark 2:18 ff., Mark 2:24 ; Mark 3:22 ; Mark 7:5 ). At first Jesus treats the Pharisees gently, and gives them explanations of difficulties; only when they are obstinate does He denounce them. This shows that Luke 5:20 is not in its chronological order. Then, again, many of the parables in Mt. are grouped together (see ch. 13), but they would not have been spokes all at one time. The Charge to the Twelve (ch. 10) includes much of the Charge to the Seventy and other sayings to the disciples in Luke 6:1-49 ; Luke 12:1-59 ; Luke 13:1-35 ; Luke 14:1-35 ; Luke 17:1-37 . The Discourse on the End in Mt. is grouped (see § 5). The groups in Mt. are often closed with a formula taken from Deuteronomy 31:1 [6] ]; thus Matthew 7:28 (Sermon on the Mount), Matthew 11:1 (Charge to the Twelve), Matthew 13:58 (group of parables), Matthew 19:1 , Matthew 26:1 (groups of warnings). In fact, the First Evangelist aims at a synoptic view of Christ’s teaching as a whole rather than at a chronological statement. In one or two particulars only, Mt. seems to borrow the grouping tendency from Mk., as in the case of the anointing at Bethany ( Matthew 26:6 ff., Mark 14:3 ff.), which is related in close connexion with Judas’ compact with the chief priests (the Evangelists seem to mean that the ‘waste’ of the ointment greatly influenced the traitor’s action), whereas Jn. ( Matthew 12:1 ) gives the more chronologically correct position of the incident, ‘six days before the passover.’
Another feature of Mt. is the frequency of quotations from the OT, and the mystical interpretations given. The interests of the First Evangelist lie largely in the fulfilment of prophecy (Matthew 5:17 ). The principles of interpretation common among the Jews are applied; a text, for example, which in its literal sense applies to the Exodus, is taken to refer to the departure of the Child Jesus from Egypt ( Matthew 2:15 , Hosea 11:1 ), and the Evangelist conceives of events as coming to pass that prophecy might be fulfilled ( Matthew 1:22 f.; cf. Matthew 2:15 ; Matthew 2:17 f., Matthew 2:23 , Matthew 4:14 ff., Matthew 8:17 , Matthew 12:17 ff., Matthew 13:35 , Matthew 21:4 f., Matthew 27:9 f.). It is thought that the second ass, which is found only in the Matthæan narrative of the Triumphal Entry ( Matthew 21:1 ff., the ass and ‘a colt the foal of an ass’), is due to the influence of the words of the prophecy, Zechariah 9:9 ; for the narrative is taken closely from the Petrine tradition, but the second ass of Mt. is an addition to it. So the ‘wine mingled with gall’ ( Matthew 27:34 ) for the ‘wine mingled with myrrh’ (lit. ‘myrrhed wine’) of the Petrine tradition ( Mark 15:23 ) seems to be due to Psalms 69:21 . The treatment of the non-Markan source is similar. In Luke 11:29 f. Jesus refers to the sign of Jonah and to the repentance of the Ninevites, to whom, by his preaching, Jonah was a sign; but the First Evangelist sees (with justice) a type of our Lord’s Resurrection in the story of Jonah in the belly of the whale ( Matthew 12:39 ff.; see, further, Robinson, Study of the Gospels , p. 96f.). The matter peculiar to Mt. is large in amount. Besides the Birth narratives we have the healing of the two blind men ( Matthew 9:27 ff.), and of the blind and dumb demoniacs ( Matthew 9:32 f., Matthew 12:22 f., thought by some to be one incident), the walking of St. Peter on the water ( Matthew 14:28 ff.), the coin in the fish’s mouth ( Matthew 17:24 ), Pilate’s wife’s dream and Pilate’s washing of his hands ( Matthew 27:19 ; Matthew 27:24 f.), and some other incidents, especially in the Passion; also many sayings, and part of the Sermon on the Mount.
3. Purpose of the Gospel . That it was written for Jewish Christians appears from the frequency of OT quotations, from the mystical interpretations, and from the absence of explanations of Jewish customs. Yet the author was no Judaizer. He alone tells us of the visit of the Gentile Magi; with Lk, he relates the healing of the Gentile centurion’s servant ( Matthew 8:5 f.); and the admission of the Gentiles to the Kingdom and the rejection of some of the Jews is announced in Matthew 8:11 f. (cf. Matthew 21:43 ). The Gospel is to be preached, and baptism and discipleship are to be given, to all nations ( Matthew 28:19 ).
4. Author . The question of authorship has partly been anticipated in § 1. The earliest MSS give the title simply as ‘According to Matthew,’ and similar titles to the other Gospels. The titles need not be, indeed almost certainly are not, those of the original authors, but they must have been applied at a very early date. What do they imply? It has been thought that they meant merely that the Gospels reflected the preaching of the persons named (so Bartlet in Hastings’ DB [7] iii. 297). But in that case the Second Gospel would be entitled ‘According to Peter,’ a title very close to Justin Martyr’s ‘Memoirs of Peter,’ which probably refers to Mk. (see art. Mark [2], § 1). There can be little doubt that those who used the title in the second half of the 2nd cent. meant it to imply authorship. It is a question, however, whether at the first the phrase actually meant that the Gospel in its latest form was the work of the author named. For lack of external information as to the First Gospel, we are driven to internal evidence. But this would not lead us to think of the author or (if the phrase be preferred) the editor who brought the Gospel into its present form as an Apostle and eye-witness. Unlike Jn., which claims to be written by an eye-witness ( John 1:14 ; John 19:35 ), a claim fully borne out by internal evidence, and unlike Mk., which abounds in autoptic characteristics, though in that case we have reason to think that they come not from the writer, but from the writer’s teacher, the First Gospel has none of the marks of an eye-witness. The autoptic characteristics of the Petrine tradition have in many cases been taken away by the alterations introduced by the First Evangelist (see art. Mark [2], § 4). The conclusion is that it was not the Apostle Matthew who gave us the Gospel in its present form. The name comes simply from ecclesiastical testimony of the 2nd cent., and not from the sacred writings themselves. Yet the Matthæan tradition is strong. Even Papias, apparently, thought that the Greek Matthæan Gospel which he used was a translation of the Apostle’s work. And there is no rival claimant to the authorship. On the other hand, Matthew, as an Apostle, was a sufficiently prominent person for an anonymous work to be assigned to him, especially if he had written a work which was one of its sources. These considerations may lead us to prefer the second solution mentioned above, in § 1 ( b ) that Matthew the Apostle composed the Aramaic original of the Greek ‘non-Markan document,’ the ‘Logia’ (not consisting of sayings only, but of sayings and narrative combined), and that in this way his name became attached to the First Gospel. The real author must remain unknown. That the work of an Apostle should have entirely disappeared is not a very serious difficulty when we reflect on the number of St. Paul’s Epistles that have perished.
5. Date . Irenæus ( Hær . iii. 1. 1) explicitly states that Matthew wrote first, ‘while Peter and Paul were preaching the gospel in Rome,’ but that Mark wrote ‘after their departure.’ In the Muratorian Fragment ( c [1] . 180 200?), a list of NT books, Mt. seems to have come before the rest, though, as it is incomplete at the beginning, this is not certain. This probably was also the general opinion of the succeeding ages, and finds an echo in Augustine’s dictum that Mk. is an abbreviation of Mt. But internal evidence strongly negatives the idea of the priority of Mt. (see Mark [2]). Though it is possible to make some reservations as to editorial touches, Mk. is seen to have been in the hands of the Matthæan writer; and whatever date we fix for it must be the earliest limit for Mt. We can get a further indication from the Discourse on the End ( Matthew 24:1 ff.). Both in Mt. and Mk. (whatever be thought of Lk.) the discourse is reported as if the fulfilment were only in prospect, and in a manner that would be unlikely if the siege of Titus had already taken place. This conclusion becomes still more likely when we compare the three Synoptics together. They all three begin with the destruction of the Temple ( Mark 13:1-2 and || Mt. Lk.). In Mk. and Lk. there follows a discourse which apparently speaks of the destruction of Jerusalem ( Mark 13:5-20 ), and then there comes in Mk. and partly in Lk. a passage which seems to refer to the end of the world ( Mark 13:21-37 ). But the First Evangelist, as so often, weaves together the sayings of Jesus which in Mk. are distinct, and makes the two events apparently one. (Cf. Matthew 24:3 with Mark 13:4 , Luke 21:7 ). Thus the writer must have thought that both events would be synchronous, and therefore must have written his account of the prophecy before the Fall of Jerusalem. That this is so we may see by a contrast. The Fourth Evangelist gives a prophecy of our Lord which had been fulfilled when he wrote; but he refers to the fulfilment ( John 21:18 f., the death of St. Peter). It is, of course, possible that the Discourse was written down as we have it in Mt. before a.d. 70, and that a later writer incorporated it unchanged. But would not the later writer have betrayed some consciousness of the fulfilment of the prophecy? For these reasons a date before a.d. 70 is probable. But this conclusion is much disputed, and in any case we must acknowledge that the authorship and date of the First Gospel are among the most perplexing of all NT problems.
A. J. Maclean.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Matthew, Gospel of
Nowhere does this Gospel say who wrote it, though the title given to it in the second century reflects the traditional belief that Matthew was the author. Whether or not Matthew actually produced the finished product, it seems clear that his writings (referred to in second century documents) must have at least provided a major source of material for the book.
Origin of Matthew’s Gospel
It appears that Mark’s Gospel, written during the first half of the decade of the sixties, was the first of the Gospels. Its purpose was to preserve Peter’s account of Jesus’ ministry for the Christians in Rome. Other people had also prepared written accounts of the life and teachings of Jesus, and from these Luke began to write an account of Jesus’ life to present to a high ranking government official (Luke 1:1-4). A few years later, probably in the decade of the seventies, Matthew’s Gospel appeared. It was written mainly for Greek-speaking Jewish Christians, probably those of the churches of Syria and neighbouring regions to the north of Palestine (see GOSPELS).
Matthew had a clear purpose in writing. He therefore chose and arranged his material carefully, to fit in with his overall plan. He saved himself the work of writing fresh narratives of the ministry of Jesus by using most of the material from Mark’s Gospel, along with material from some of the same sources as Luke had used. But Matthew used this material differently from Mark and Luke, by making it serve his central purpose. He added a lot of material not contained in the other Gospels, and the characteristic flavour of his Gospel comes from this additional material.
A teaching purpose
Included in the material found solely in Matthew are many quotations from the Old Testament. He introduces most of these by a statement showing how the Old Testament was fulfilled in Jesus (Matthew 1:22; Matthew 2:15; Matthew 2:17; Matthew 23:1-367; Matthew 4:14; Matthew 8:17; Matthew 12:17; Matthew 13:35; Matthew 21:4; Matthew 27:9).
Matthew was particularly concerned to show that Jesus was the promised Messiah, the son of David, the fulfilment of God’s purposes in choosing Israel (Matthew 1:1; Matthew 1:17; Matthew 2:6; Matthew 9:27; Matthew 11:2-6; Matthew 15:22; Matthew 16:16; Matthew 21:9; Matthew 26:63-64). In Jesus the kingdom of God had come (Matthew 4:17; Matthew 4:23; Matthew 5:3; Matthew 12:28; Matthew 18:1-4; Matthew 24:14; see KINGDOM OF GOD), though Jesus the king was not the sort of king most people had expected (Matthew 2:6; Matthew 4:8-10; Matthew 21:5; Matthew 25:31; Matthew 25:34; Matthew 26:52-53; Matthew 27:11).
Unbelieving Jews often attacked those of their fellow Jews who were Christians. Matthew’s Gospel gave reassurance to these Christians that they were not people who had wandered away from the teaching of the Jewish religion, but people who had found the true fulfilment of it. Jesus did not contradict the Jewish law; rather he brought out its full meaning (Matthew 5:17).
The Gospel of Matthew therefore showed the Jewish Christians the nature of the kingdom into which they had come, and the requirements it laid upon them. They were to have high standards of behaviour (Matthew 5:3-12; Matthew 5:22; Matthew 5:28; Matthew 5:42; Matthew 5:44; Matthew 20:21-27) and were to be energetic in spreading the good news of the kingdom to others (Matthew 5:13-16; Matthew 10:5-8; Matthew 24:14; Matthew 28:19-20). The unbelieving Jewish traditionalists, on the other hand, were consistently condemned (Matthew 3:9; 1618385389_45). They missed out on the kingdom, with the result that the gospel was sent to the Gentiles, and many believed (Matthew 8:11-12; Matthew 11:21-24; Matthew 12:21; Matthew 12:38-42; Matthew 21:43). Jesus had laid the foundation of his church, and no opposition could overpower it (Matthew 16:18).
Because of its basic purpose of instruction, Matthew’s account of the life of Jesus records more teaching and less action than the accounts of Mark and Luke. His material is not in chronological order. It is arranged according to subject matter around five main teaching sections, each of which concludes with a statement such as ‘When Jesus had finished these sayings . . .’ (Matthew 7:28; Matthew 11:1; Matthew 13:53; Matthew 19:1; Matthew 26:1). The first of these sections concerns behaviour (Chapters 5-7), the second deals with spreading the message of the kingdom (Chapter 10), the third consists of parables of the kingdom (Chapter 13), the fourth concerns attitudes to others (Chapter 18), and the fifth discusses the coming of the end (Chapters 24-25).
Summary of contents
The opening section of Matthew begins with a genealogy of Jesus (1:1-17), the story of his birth (1:18-25), the escape from Herod (2:1-18) and the subsequent move to Nazareth (2:19-23). Many years later, Jesus was baptized by John (3:1-17), after which he suffered temptations by Satan (4:1-11). He then returned to Galilee, where he began his public ministry and gathered together his first disciples (4:12-25). The section concludes with the Sermon on the Mount (5:1-7:29).
As Jesus continued to cast out demons, heal the sick, calm storms and welcome sinners, people saw that he was different from other Jewish teachers (8:1-9:17). Some saw that he was the Messiah (9:18-34). Jesus then appointed twelve apostles and sent them out as his assistants in spreading the news of his kingdom. First, however, he reminded them of the cost of being his disciples (9:35-10:42).
After commending John who had prepared the way for his kingdom (11:1-19), and urging others to enter the kingdom (11:20-30), Jesus showed that his kingdom was concerned with more than legal correctness (12:1-21). This stirred up the Jewish traditionalists against him, causing Jesus to warn them that they were only preparing a more severe judgment for themselves (12:22-50). A number of parables emphasized that Christ’s kingdom was the only way to life. To reject it meant eternal destruction (13:1-52).
Though rejected by some and feared by others (13:53-14:12), Jesus continued to bring help and healing to many (14:13-36). He emphasized the need for inner cleansing (15:1-20) and showed that faith is the way to blessing (15:21-16:12). The disciples knew that Jesus was the Messiah (16:13-20), but Jesus warned that death lay ahead for him and perhaps for them (16:21-28). After his transfiguration (17:1-8), he repeated that the Messiah would be cruelly treated and killed (17:9-27). Those in the Messiah’s kingdom therefore needed to be characterized by a humble and forgiving spirit (18:1-35).
After dealing with questions concerning family responsibilities (19:1-15), Jesus showed how wealth hindered entrance into God’s kingdom (19:16-30). The blessings of that kingdom came by God’s grace (20:1-16), and therefore there was no room for selfish ambition (20:17-34).
Jesus then entered Jerusalem as the messianic king (21:1-11), cleansed the temple (21:12-17), and in a series of disputes with the Jews showed how their rejection of the Messiah was leading them to national catastrophe (21:18-22:46). In particular he condemned the religious leaders (23:1-39), and privately he told his disciples to be prepared both for the coming destruction of Jerusalem and for the climax of history when he returns (24:1-51). Three stories illustrated the need for constant readiness (25:1-46).
While the Jews plotted to capture him, Jesus prepared for the crucifixion that he knew awaited him (26:1-19). After the Last Supper in Jerusalem and a time of prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane (26:20-46), he was arrested, condemned by the Jewish Council, handed over to the Roman governor and crucified (26:47-27:66). But he rose from death (28:1-15) and, before finally leaving his disciples a few weeks later, entrusted to them the task of spreading his gospel worldwide (28:16-20).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Matthew
Matthew (măth'thu). Derived from the same word as Matthias, Acts 1:23; Acts 1:26 (gift of God), apostle, and author of the first gospel. His original name was Levi, Mark 2:14; Luke 5:27; Luke 5:29, which, like that of Simon and of Saul, was changed on his being called to the apostleship. He first appears in the gospels as a publican or tax-gatherer near the Sea of Galilee, and the last mention of him is in the list of those who met in the upper room at Jerusalem after the ascension of our Lord. Acts 1:13. The tradition of his martyrdom in Ethiopia is not very trustworthy.
The Gospel according to Matthew was probably written in Palestine, and for Jewish Christians. It was probably first composed in Hebrew—i.e., Syro-Chaldaic, or Western Aramaic, the dialect spoken in Palestine by the Jewish Christians, and then later in Greek, as we now possess it. The date of its composition was clearly before the destruction of Jerusalem, Matthew 24:1-51, and yet some time after the crucifixion of Christ. Matthew 27:7-8; Matthew 28:15. Some of the ancients give the eighth year after the ascension as the date, others the fifteenth. We would place it between 60 and 66 a.d.—a period during which both Mark and Luke probably wrote their gospels.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Matthew
(mat' thew) Personal name meaning “the gift of Yahweh.” A tax collector Jesus called to be an apostle (Matthew 9:9 ; Matthew 10:3 ). See Apostle; Disciples . Matthew's office was located on the main highway that ran from Damascus, down the Jordan Valley to Capernaum, then westward to Acre to join the coastal road to Egypt or southward to Jerusalem. His duty was to collect “toll” or “transport” taxes from both local merchants and farmers carrying their goods to market as well as distant caravans passing through Galilee. He was an employee of Herod Antipas. See Tax Collector . Matthew knew the value of goods of all description: wool, flax, linen, pottery, brass, silver, gold, barley, wheat, olives, figs, wheat. He knew the value of local and foreign monetary systems. He spoke the local Aramaic language as well as Greek. Because Matthew had leased his “toll” collecting privileges by paying the annual fee in advance, he was subjected to the criticism of collecting more than enough, growing wealthy on his “profit.” Thus he was hated by his fellow Jews.
Matthew is the same person as Levi, a tax collector (Mark 2:14 ; Luke 5:27 ), and thus the son of Alphaeus. James the son of Alphaeus is also listed among the Apostles (Mark 3:18 ; Matthew 10:3 ; Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 ). This indicates that both Matthew and his (half) brother were in close association with Jesus. Mary, the mother of James, keeps the vigil at the foot of the cross with Mary, the mother of Jesus (Matthew 27:55-56 ; Mark 15:40 ). If the James mentioned here is the same as the son of Alphaeus, then we have a larger family closely associated with the family of Jesus.
Later legendary accounts tell of Matthew's travel to Ethiopia where he became associated with Candace, identified with the eunuch of Acts 8:27 . The legends tell us of Matthew's martydom in that country.
Why did Jesus call Matthew? Because Matthew had the gifts to be trained as a disciple to share with others, could keep meticulous records, and was a potential recorder/author of the Gospel. From earliest times Christians affirmed that Matthew wrote the Gospel that bears his name. See Matthew, the Gospel of .
Oscar Brooks
Holman Bible Dictionary - Matthew, the Gospel of
The opening book of the New Testament which appropriately begins with the declaration, “the book of Jesus Christ.” When we begin reading this book today, we should, however, have in mind its ending (Matthew 28:18-20 ). Matthew's purpose was to show that Jesus had the power to command His disciples to spread His gospel throughout all the world.
Matthew 28:16-20 is the scene of the resurrected Jesus meeting His disciples on a hill in Galilee. Jesus immediately declared his absolute authority: “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me” (NIV). The disciples would be reminded of many experiences during Jesus' ministry that proved His authority. Now with this knowledge of the resurrection, it was evident to them that He had received His authority from God. Jesus then gave the disciples a Commission to “make disciples of all nations” (NIV). A disciple is (1) one who willingly becomes a learner of the Master's teaching and seeks to follow His example by implementing His teaching, and (2) who passes on to others what one has learned. Hearing Jesus' command, the disciples recalled His teaching and fellowship. Now they were called on to carry forward His mission. Jesus said they would make disciples as they went away from their meeting with Him. Their activities would include baptizing new disciples into the lordship of Jesus. This is the original commitment. The disciples would pass on to others all that Jesus taught them. In telling this story, Matthew emphasized that Jesus (1) has total authority, (2) His teachings must be transmitted, (3) and His message is for all people. If we, the modern readers, will keep these three themes in mind as we read the Gospel from the beginning, we will discover that the author shows us how Jesus demonstrated His authority, the teachings He employed, and His concern for all nations.
The Gospel is easily divided into seven sections: a beginning and an end with five teaching sections between. Because of this, Matthew has been recognized for its emphasis on the teachings of Jesus.
Matthew 1:1-4:25 opens the Gospel with the royal genealogy and builds to the proclamation of God in Matthew 3:17 : “This is my beloved Son.” The genealogies confirm Jesus' authoritative, kingly lineage and remind the reader of His relation to all nations by mentioning Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and the wife of a Hittite. The wise men (Gentiles) came seeking the King of the Jews (Matthew 2:2 ). The angel affirmed Jesus' divine nature to Joseph. The child received a messianic name (Matthew 1:18-23 ). Joseph took the holy family to Gentile territory (Egypt) to escape the threats of Herod. When Jesus came to John for baptism, the voice from heaven proclaimed Him as God's Son. As God's Son, Jesus had the authority and power to confront Satan and overcome. Jesus then went to Galilee of the Gentiles (Matthew 4:15 ) to begin His public ministry. This opening section makes it obvious that Jesus is designated by God to be the Messiah with authority—for all nations.
Matthew 5:1-7:29 is commonly called the Sermon on the Mount. It should be called the Teaching from the Mount since that is what the text calls it ( Matthew 5:2 ). While teaching and preaching overlap, teaching emphasizes the essential principles which must be passed on to maintain the discipline or movement at hand. Jesus gave His essential doctrine in this teaching. He stressed the importance of His commandments in Matthew 5:19 ; emphasized the authoritative nature of His teachings by declaring: “But I say unto you” (Matthew 11:1-1285 ,Matthew 5:22,5:28 ,Matthew 10:40-42:32 ,Matthew 5:32,5:39 ,Matthew 5:39,5:44 ); and was recognized by the crowds as a Teacher with authority (Matthew 7:28-29 ). Matthew presented Jesus as an authoritative Teacher. When the disciples went out to teach, they knew what to teach. When a believer goes out to teach today, he can refer to Matthew's Gospel.
Matthew 8:1-10:42 opens with a series of ten miracles demonstrating Jesus' authority over disease, natural catastrophes, demons, and death. What He had demonstrated verbally in the teachings on the Mount, Jesus acted in displays of power. His disciples wondered “that even the winds and sea obey him!” ( Matthew 8:27 ), and the crowds stood amazed that He had the authority to forgive sins (Matthew 9:8 ). Ministry to a Gentile centurion is in this section also. After demonstrating His power, Jesus gave authority to His disciples to go out and heal and teach as He had done (Matthew 10:1 ), thus preparing them for their final Commission in Matthew 28:18-20 . By continuing the emphasis on authority, teaching, and Gentiles, Jesus prepared His immediate disciples for their task after His death. Matthew continues to teach later generations of believers about Jesus' power and concern for all mankind.
Matthew 11:1-13:52 shows various people reacting to Jesus' authority. Various responses are noted in Matthew 11:1 , including Jesus' thanksgiving that the “babes” understand (Matthew 11:25-30 ). When the leaders rejected Jesus' authority in Matthew 12:1 , Matthew implied that Jesus would go to the Gentiles by quoting Isaiah the prophet (Matthew 12:18-21 ). Jesus continued His teaching in parables to those who were willing to listen (Matthew 13:10-13 ). So when Jesus commissioned His disciples to go into all the world and teach, they were aware that he had already begun the movement by His example in His earthly ministry.
Matthew 13:53-18:35 opens with the story of Jesus' teaching in the synagogue in Nazareth. The people had the same response to Jesus' teaching as the crowds did at the end of the Sermon on the mount. They were astonished (compare Matthew 13:54 ; Matthew 7:28 ). Although Jesus presented His authoritative teaching, His hometown people rejected it (Matthew 13:57 ). His disciples accepted Him (Matthew 14:33 ), and so did the Gentile woman (Matthew 15:22 ). Again, Jesus taught authoritatively and related to Gentiles.
Matthew 19:1-25:46 makes the transition from Galilee to Jerusalem. Jesus dramatically presented His kingly authority by His triumphal entry into Jerusalem ( Matthew 21:1-9 ) and by cleansing the Temple (Matthew 21:10-17 ). Then, while He was teaching, the chief priests and elders challenged Him saying, “By what authority doest thou these things?” (Matthew 21:23 ). Jesus answered with parables and other teachings (Matthew 21:28-22:46 ). Jesus warned the people about the examples of the Pharisees and Sadducees (Matthew 23:1-38 ). He then concentrated His teaching only on His disciples (Matthew 24:1-25:46 ). They could recall this when He commanded them to teach what He taught. The modern believer must also hear what Jesus taught and teach it to others.
Matthew 26:1-28:20 has no teaching situations, but it tells of the conspiracy ending in Jesus' execution. In the midst of the trial scene Jesus was asked if He was the Messiah. Jesus responded by affirming His authority: “Thou hast said” ( Matthew 26:64 ). by Pilate, a Gentile, recognized, Jesus' kingly authority, placarding over the cross: “THIS IS JESUS THE KING OF THE JEWS” (Matthew 27:37 ). The Gentile centurion proclaimed: “Truly this was the Son of God” (Matthew 27:54 ). As in the birth story, so in the end, the author stressed Jesus' divine, kingly authority and emphasized the inclusion of the Gentiles.
When the resurrected Lord declared His authority to His disciples in Matthew 28:18 , they understood because they had seen His authority displayed as they lived with Jesus. When modern readers come to Matthew 28:18 , they understand because Matthew has shown us Jesus' authority from the beginning. When Jesus commanded His disciples to make other disciples by teaching all that He taught them, they knew what to teach; and we modern believers know what Jesus intended because we know Matthew's record of His teaching. When Jesus included baptizing, they realized it was the sign of commitment to discipleship, and so do we. When Jesus assured His disciples that He would be with them even to the ends of the earth, the disciples understood because already Jesus had included all people in His ministry.
As we read through the seven sections summarized above, we should also note that Matthew presented Jesus as the “Son of God,” a term that appears twenty-three times in the Gospel of Matthew. While the virgin birth story affirms Jesus' sonship, the quotation from Hosea 11:1 ( Matthew 2:15 ) confirms it. Twice God proclaimed Jesus' sonship: at His baptism (Matthew 3:17 ) and at the transfiguration (Matthew 17:5 ). Peter confessed it (Matthew 16:16 ). Jesus attested to His sonship in the Lord's prayer (Matthew 6:9 ), His thanksgiving to God (Matthew 11:25-26 ), and the Garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 26:39 ). The author wanted the reader to be aware that Jesus, the Son of God, is the One crucified on the cross; so Jesus called out to “my God” from the cross (Matthew 27:46 ), and a Gentile centurion confessed that the dying One is “truly the Son of God” (Matthew 27:54 ).
Matthew wanted the reader to be aware that forgiveness of sins comes through the death of the divine Son of God. The angel had told Joseph that Jesus would “save his people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21 ). Jesus Himself had assured His disciples that His destiny was “to give his life a ransom for many” (Matthew 20:28 ). Jesus left behind a continuing reminder of His role in the forgiveness of sins when He instituted the Lord's Supper. “This is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins” (Matthew 26:28 ).
It is impossible to know the exact date when the Gospel of Matthew was written. Some contemporary writers date it as early as A.D. 60; some, as late as A.D. 95. The place of writing was probably some place along the coast of Phoenicia or Syria such as Antioch. This is because of Matthew's several references to Gentiles, a reference to Phoenicia and Syria, and the terms (in the Greek text) used for coins (Matthew 17:24 ,Matthew 13:47-52:27 ). Although the Gospel nowhere identifies the author and many modern Bible students point to a complex history of editing and collecting sources, Matthew, the tax collector, the son of Alphaeus has been identified as the author since the second century. See Matthew .
Outline
I. Jesus' Birth Fulfilled Prophecy (Matthew 1:1-2:23 ).
A. Jesus was born of the line of David (Matthew 1:1-17 ).
B. God directed the circumstances of Jesus' birth (Matthew 1:18-25 ).
C. Even Gentile foreigners worshiped the newborn Jewish king (Matthew 2:1-12 ).
D. God provided for His Son's survival (Matthew 2:13-23 ).
II. The Obedient Jesus Invites People to Kingdom Service (Matthew 3:1-4:25 ).
A. Jesus carried out God's will by being baptized by John the Baptist (Matthew 3:1-15 ).
B. God approved His Son (Matthew 3:16-17 ).
C. Jesus obeyed God's Word and defeated Satan (Matthew 4:1-11 ).
D. Jesus called people to God's kingdom through repentance (Matthew 4:12-22 ).
E. Jesus demonstrated the power of the kingdom (Matthew 4:23-25 ).
III. Jesus Taught God's Way to Live (Matthew 5:1-7:29 ).
A. Real happiness comes from a right relationship to God (Matthew 5:1-12 ).
B. Christians must be like salt and light (Matthew 5:13-16 ).
C. Love, not legalism, is the rule of the kingdom (Matthew 5:17-48 ).
D. The desire to be seen by others is the wrong motive for good works (Matthew 6:1-4 ).
E. Prayer is private seeking of forgiveness, not public search for praise (Matthew 6:5-15 ).
F. Fasting is of value only if the motive behind it is right (Matthew 6:16-18 ).
G. Only spiritual wealth really lasts (Matthew 6:19-21 ).
H. Each person must choose whether to give God first place (Matthew 6:22-34 ).
I. To judge others is wrong; to show discernment is necessary (Matthew 7:1-6 ).
J. The kingdom requires persistence in prayer and faith in God's goodness (Matthew 7:7-11 ).
K. The Golden Rule summarizes the law and the prophets (Matthew 7:12 ).
L. Only the narrow path of submission to God's will leads to life in His kingdom (Matthew 7:13-23 ).
M. Jesus and His teachings form the only lasting foundation for life (Matthew 7:24-29 ).
IV. Jesus' Power and Call Reveal His Authority (Matthew 8:1-10:42 )
A. Jesus' healing power is available to all persons of faith (Matthew 8:1-17 ).
B. Discipleship is first priority (Matthew 8:18-22 ).
C. Jesus has authority over nature, demons, and sin (Matthew 8:23-9:8 ).
D. Jesus calls sinners to share His authority (Matthew 9:9-13 ).
E. Jesus' gospel requires new forms of piety (Matthew 9:14-17 ).
F. Jesus' authority responds to faith, conquers demons, and does not come from Satan (Matthew 9:18-34 ).
G. The compassionate Lord prays for compassionate helpers (Matthew 9:35-38 ).
H. Jesus entrusts His disciples with His authority in word and deed (Matthew 10:1-20 ).
I. To exercise His authority, disciples must face the dangers Jesus faced (Matthew 10:21-25 ).
J. Jesus' authority removes cause for fear (Matthew 10:26-31 ).
K. Disciples confess Jesus in all situations (Matthew 10:32-39 ).
L. Those who welcome Christian messengers will receive rewards (Matthew 5:28,5 ).
V. Jesus' Work Led to Controversy (1618385389_1:50 ).
A. Jesus fulfilled messianic prophecy (Matthew 11:1-6 ).
B. John marked the end of the prophetic era (Matthew 11:7-15 ).
C. Blind religion seeks controversy rather than truth (Matthew 11:16-19 ).
D. Repentance is the proper response to Jesus (Matthew 11:20-24 ).
E. Discipleship requires faith in God's Son, not great human wisdom or works (Matthew 11:25-30 ).
F. Mercy, not legalism, is the key to interpreting God's Word (Matthew 12:1-14 ).
G. Jesus fulfilled Isaiah's servant prophecies (Matthew 12:15-21 ).
H. Faith sees Jesus as Messiah, but blindness calls Him satanic (Matthew 12:22-37 ).
I. Resurrection faith is the criterion for eternal judgment (Matthew 12:38-45 ).
J. Obedient believers form Cod's family (Matthew 12:46-50 ).
VI. Jesus Taught About the Kingdom (Matthew 13:1-52 ).
A. Response to the kingdom depends on the “soil” (Matthew 13:1-23 ).
B. God delays separating the true from the false (Matthew 13:24-30 ).
C. God's kingdom, small at first, will finally transform the world (Matthew 13:31-33 ).
D. Jesus' use of parables fulfills Scripture (Matthew 13:34-35 ).
E. The Son of Man controls final judgment and will send those who reject Him to eternal punishment (Matthew 13:36-43 ).
F. The kingdom is worth any sacrifice (Matthew 13:44-46 ).
G. The kingdom involves both traditional and new understandings of Scripture (Matthew 17:24,17 ).
VII. Jesus Confronts Conflict and Critical Events (Matthew 13:53-17:27 ).
A. Jesus faced rejection and sorrow (Matthew 13:53-14:12 ).
B. Jesus placed compassion for others over personal needs (Matthew 14:13-21 ).
C. Jesus' power over nature and disease shows He is God's Son (Matthew 14:22-36 ).
D. Thoughts and motives, not ritual acts, determine spiritual purity (Matthew 15:1-20 ).
E. Faith overcomes all obstacles that would separate us from Jesus (Matthew 15:21-28 ).

Matthew, Theology of

In writing his work, the author of the first Gospel sought to make the life, teachings, and work of Jesus relevant to his own Christian community. Because his portrayal of Jesus is so complete, we are able to speak of the "theology of Matthew, " meaning "the teachings of Jesus as presented in the first Gospel." But, in light of his purpose, that of setting out the ministry of Jesus, we are not able to speak with a great deal of certainty about the "theology" of Matthew in the finest sense of the "theology." We would like to know a lot more about what Matthew (the author) believed, but we have no access to such ideas apart from the contours Matthew leaves as he presents the ministry of Jesus.
General Overview . According to Wright, Matthew is a revision of the story of Israel as understood in contemporary Judaism. The story of Israel is well known: God, the Creator of heaven and earth, chose Abraham, formed a covenant with him, and promised to remain faithful to his covenantal relationship with both Abraham and his descendants for all time (Genesis 12:1-3 ; 13:14-17 ; 15:1-6 , ; etc. ). To clarify this covenantal relationship, the Creator-God gave to Moses and his generation the Law, with its specific details for obedience, sacrifice, and regulations for social life (Exodus 20-40 ). Israel, the descendants of Abraham, however, did not always live in covenantal faithfulness; thus, God developed a system of punishment or reward, depending on Israel's faithfulness (cf. Leviticus 26 ). Over centuries of this pattern of sin and obedience, it became known in Israel that a greater Day was coming, a Day that would begin with a potent judgment on sin and that would climax in a glorious reign of Israel's God in Jerusalem. Attached to this expectation of God's intervention was the hope of a personal Messiah who would lead Israel (e.g., Isaiah 9:1-6 ; 11:1-9 ; Jeremiah 23:1-4 ; Ezekiel 34 ; Micah 5:1-3 ; Zechariah 9:9-10 ). The hope of restoration for Israel, of vindication of Israel, and of salvation for Israel were all intertwined in second temple Judaism and out of this hope grew Matthew's conviction that the story of Israel acquired its conclusive chapter in the birth, life, death, and resurrection of Jesus, son of Mary and Joseph. Such is the implication of Matthew's genealogy (Matthew 1:1-17 ).
In short, Matthew presents the story of Israel from a radically new angle: from the beginning (cf. the citations of the Old Testament in Matthew 1:18-2:23 ) it was God's purpose to bring the Messiah to Israel for the deliverance of Israel (1:21). This Messiah is Jesus, son of Mary and Joseph (1:18-25). The story is now different: those who follow Jesus are the true descendants of Abraham and they alone will enjoy the covenantal faithfulness of Israel's God. This covenant with Abraham, however, has been renewed in the new covenantal arrangement established by Jesus (26:26-30).
Thus, the theology of Matthew is salvation-historical and christological in orientation. Who is this Jesus, according to Matthew? Jesus is the one who, as Messiah (1:1), fulfills the messianic expectations of the Old Testament, and who, as Son of God, brings the salvation of God (cf. 3:17; 11:27; 17:5; 27:54). As the Son of God, Jesus teaches the will of God (5:17-20) and inaugurates the kingdom by obeying God's will (cf. 3:15; 4:17; 8:16-17; 20:28). In Matthew's Gospel the kingdom of heaven (a Jewish expression for kingdom of God) is understood as the rule of God, through Jesus, in power and righteousness, in love and forgiveness.
Matthew's Theology . There are at least four questions that Matthew's theology answers. Who are we? Where are we in history and location? What is the problem we face? What is the solution of God to our problem?
Who Are We? Matthew's Gospel presents the answer to this complex question in the simplest of terms: we, the readers of Matthew and the followers of Jesus (4:18-22; 28:16-20), are the church (16:18; 18:17), the true and New Israel. We are the true successors of Abraham's physical descendants (3:7-10) who are now bringing forth the fruits God wants from his people (21:33-44).
The presupposition of this answer is that Israel has persisted too long in sin but God, in his grace, has brought the Messiah to his people to reveal his grace and truth. This Messiah, through his life, teachings, death, and resurrection, has inaugurated the kingdom of heaven. All those who respond to Jesus in faith and covenantal faithfulness enjoy that kingdom (4:17; 8:14-17; 16:21; 20:28; 26:29).
Where Are We? Matthew presents the new people of God as a people inhabiting a world that is the preliminary life to a fuller, more glorious life that will come when the Son of Man appears in his glory (16:28; 25:1-46). Thus, the church is the people of God, participating in Israel's long story, and is living just beyond the fork in the road that separated physical Israel from eschatological Israel (the church). Put differently, the exile of Israel ends its awful time in the birth of the Messiah (cf. 1:11-12,1:16-17). Thus, the church is in the world, living in the era of the Messiah who inaugurates the restoration of Israel, but still awaiting (with the rest of Israel's history) the final age that comes when the Son of Man appears to bring God's promises to Israel to their consummation.
What Is Our Problem? The problem of Israel, and therefore of the new people of God, is the disobedience of Israel, which is related to the rule of Rome as God's punishment for disobedience, and, for the church especially, the presence of "weeds" among the wheat (i.e., the dawn of the kingdom of God but the remaining presence of unbelievers and sin 13:24-30,36-43). Matthew's Gospel, it must be inferred, also addresses the moral lethargy that seems to be facing the church—hence, Matthew's extreme emphasis on righteous living and the final judgment (5-7; 23; 25:31-46). Thus, the Gospel addresses the problem of an Israel still led by the Pharisees even though it is clear that God's Messiah, Jesus, has appointed the apostles as the new shepherds for the new Israel (9:35-11:1; 23).
What Is the Solution? The words of Jesus, quoted early in Matthew's Gospel, spell out the solution: "Repent, for the Kingdom of heaven has come near" (4:17, NRSV). All of Israel must now turn to Jesus, the Messiah, at this crucial juncture in history, and in so doing must turn from sin to follow Jesus, the way the disciples of Jesus did (4:18-22). The implications of repentance and following Jesus are explicated in the Sermon on the Mount (chaps. 5-7), a sermon that is designed by Matthew to present to the church the covenantal demand of God for the new people of God. Furthermore, the church is to live patiently in a suffering world and wait for God's judgment on the unfaithful leaders of Israel and those who follow them (23:1-24:36). At that time, the apostles of Jesus will reign (19:28). Once again, however, this solution presupposes the life and ministry of Jesus: through Jesus God's salvation, the kingdom of God, has come to the people of God (1:21).
Symbols of Matthew . Every religious movement has its own symbols, whether liturgical or ideological. Matthew's symbols include the Messiah, the Torah (as understood by Jesus), the church as the new people of God, baptism, and the Lord's Supper.
Symbols function to mark off one's community and, through use and remembrance, to reinforce one's perception of the world and the story one writes to understand that world. Those out of whom the church grew were Jews, and Jews had a rich heritage of symbols. Those symbols were the temple, the land of Israel, the physical heritage from Abraham, and the Torah, God's covenantal arrangement with Israel. Any reading of Matthew highlights the tension the followers of Jesus encountered with these symbols. The temple, according to Jesus, was defiled and needed to be cleansed (21:12-17). Physical heritage from Abraham no longer mattered because what mattered was following Jesus (3:7-10; 8:5-13; 15:21-28; 21:33-44; 28:16-20). While the Torah may well have had continuing guiding force in the church of Matthew, it is abundantly clear that the Torah of Moses was now fulfilled in Jesus' teaching and life (5:17-20,21-48). Thus, apart from the symbol of the land, Matthew's theology is at odds with the standard symbols of Judaism. Such tension over symbols leads to, and probably already reflects, the formation of a new people, the church.
In the place of temple, Israel, and Torah, the church seems to have developed new symbols. Replacing Torah as the central symbol of the church was Jesus, the fulfillment of God's revelation to Israel. Furthermore, Jesus also taught a new ethic; this ethic, what Paul called the "law of Christ" (Galatians 6:2 ), formed a replacement of the Torah symbol in Judaism. The foundation of Israel's faith was the covenant God made with Abraham to multiply the descendants of Abraham, forming a massive nation for God (Genesis 12:1-3 ). The faithfulness of Israel's God to the nation of Israel was the bedrock of Israel's confidence in God. What Matthew's Gospel presents is the formation of the church, the New Israel, which is the replacement of Israel in the age of the kingdom of heaven (21:33-44). This new people, then, forms a new symbol: the followers of Jesus, while they may have seen themselves as true Jews, saw themselves as the church, the new Israel of God. Just as important is the consciousness that this new Israel of God is transnational in its essence; the new people of God is not just comprised of those who are physical descendants of Abraham but of all who follow Jesus (2:1-12; 8:5-13; 15:21-28; 27:54; 28:16-20). It was this conviction, the denationalization of the people of God, which created a great deal of social disturbance in the mission of Paul in the diaspora; we can only assume that Matthew's bold convictions led to as much, if not more, disturbance.
As for the land symbol, we have almost no evidence in Matthew, apart from the possibility that the third beatitude may have been understood as promising the inheritance of the "land" (the Greek word is ge and could be understood as "land") for those who are meek followers of Jesus (5:5). If this is the case (and it is far from clear), it would suggest that Matthew believed that the land would be inherited by the meek followers of Jesus, not by Israel per se. On the other hand, the depictions of the future in Matthew are not tied into promises of the land. Thus, the grand visions of Matthew 24:37-25:46 are more otherworldly and less this-worldly. If these formed the essence of the hope for the community of Matthew, then we are bound to conclude that land simply did not figure in Matthew's theology of the future. This would again form a distinct tension with the land symbol of Judaism.
Symbols that did seem to function sociologically and theologically in Matthew are baptism and the Lord's Supper. Jesus was baptized (3:13-17) and so were his followers; he commands his apostles to baptize those who commit themselves to Jesus (28:16-20). In fact, this baptism is in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, demonstrating the theological convictions inherent to such a commitment. And this baptism was the prelude to a life of obedience to all the commandments of Jesus (28:20), surely an allusion in part to the Sermon on the Mount.
The Lord's Supper, as we have become accustomed to naming it, was the last Passover meal Jesus shared with his disciples. As such, it was a reenactment of the story of Israel's deliverance from the bondage of Egypt; the reformation of this meal into Jesus' last supper as a meal of remembrance, not of Egypt but of his death, demonstrates that Jesus saw his role in Israel's history as the antitype of the deliverance of Israel from slavery. In the same way, the death of Jesus is a ransom price paid for the salvation of the new people of God (cf. 20:28). Jesus, then, by swallowing up the Passover meal into a remembrance-of-him meal, forms the covenantal basis of the new covenant (26:28) that brings the forgiveness of sins.
Praxis . If orthopraxy was more central to Israel's perception of its faith than orthodoxy, then (with little adjustment) the same can apparently be said of Matthew. Matthew's Gospel is synonymous with the demand of God for righteousness. To become a Christian, or more particular a part of Matthew's church, meant to follow Jesus and following Jesus involved a whole-hearted commitment to a life of righteousness and love.
Righteousness . This term was used in Judaism for a life of obedience to the will of God, expressed most clearly and finally in the Law of Moses. Matthew's Gospel uses the same term as the crucial term for those who are pleasing to God but it now has an added dimension that shifts the meaning dramatically. Whereas righteousness in Judaism described those who lived according to the Law faithfully (Matthew 1:19 , of Joseph ), now it describes those who live faithfully according to the teachings of Jesus, who brought the fulfillment of the Law (5:17). Thus, Jesus expects his followers to live in a way that is superior ("exceeds") to the way of the scribes and Pharisees (5:20). Thus, those who are righteous are blessed by Jesus (5:6,10); however, the "piety" (in Greek the word is "righteous Acts") of those who follow Jesus is not to be done in such a way that it attracts attention to the doer of such deeds (6:1). The whole of life is to be directed by a pursuit of righteousness (6:33). In fact, the entirety of the Sermon on the Mount can be understood as the exposition of Jesus of the "way of righteousness."
Love . If Jesus demanded that his followers obey him, and those who were obedient to his will would be called "righteous, " it is also the case that he called his followers to a life of love: for God and for others. As Jesus showed his compassion for others by healing them and helping them (9:32-34), so the followers of Jesus were to do the same (10:5-8). As Jesus was willing to reach out to help people of all nations (15:21-28), so the disciples were charged to make their love transnational (5:44-45; 28:16-20). Thus, the foundation of the tension the church had with Israel over the symbolic value of the nation of Israel may have been rooted in Jesus' teaching to love and minister to all nations. This universal love will be a fundamental factor in the final judgment of God (25:31-46). Thus, according to Jesus, love of God and others is the greatest commandment (22:37-40).
Mission . While righteousness and love may have been the key ingredients to a life that is pleasing to God, another feature of praxis in Matthew's Gospel is mission. As Jesus was "sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel" (10:5-6; 15:24), so Jesus sends the disciples out to carry on and extend this very mission of saving the people of God (1:21; 10:5-8). Thus, the disciples' efforts are rooted in prayer (9:37-38); they go as a result of the choice of Jesus (10:2-4); they are to extend Jesus' mission (vv. 5-8); they are to expect opposition (vv. 17-25); and they are to remain faithful and fearless in their proclamation (vv. 26-39). One could speculate that this short discourse quickly became a manual for Christian missionary work. In fact, the structure of the Gospel itself is the constant interchange Jesus has with others as he continually evangelizes Israel with the message and ministry of the kingdom of heaven. The climax of the Gospel itself is the sending out of the apostles to bring the message of Jesus to "all nations" (28:16-20). Typifying the movement from a national Israel to a transnational church, we can compare the coming of the Gentile magi to Jerusalem (2:1-12) to the departure of the apostles from Jerusalem to Galilee of the Gentiles to carry out the mission of Jesus to "all nations" (28:16-20).
Summary . What we find in Matthew's Gospel is a retelling of the story of Israel in such a way that the story itself is both new and old. Clearly, the author of Matthew saw the fulfillment of God's promises to Israel in Jesus and in the new people of God he formed, the church. In retelling the story, Matthew picks up the central themes of Israel's message and recasts them in light of an overall christological orientation. God is one, but now is flanked by the Son and the Spirit. Israel is the people of God, elected by God and chosen to be his faithful heritage; however, this people of God is now fulfilled in the church, the body of those who trust and obey Jesus, the Messiah. Put differently, it might be said that the church is the true remnant. And this new people of God is united by a new covenant, in fulfillment of Jeremiah 31 , the remembrance meal that recalls for the church the saving death of Jesus. The eschatological hopes of Israel, looked forward to throughout the history of Israel, are now presented by Matthew as having been partially fulfilled in Jesus and the church. What remains from that hope is the glorious climax, when the Son of Man will return with his holy angels to reward each person according to that person's life (16:28).
Scot McKnight
Bibliography . J. D. G. Dunn, The Partings of the Ways ; R. T. France, Matthew: Evangelist and Teacher ; J. D. Kingsbury, Matthew: Structure, Christology, Kingdom ; S. McKnight, Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels, pp. 411-16,526-41; B. Przybylski, Righteousness in Matthew and His World of Thought ; N. T. Wright, The New Testament and the People of God .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Matthew
(Ματθαῖος Textus Receptus , Μαθθαῖος Lach., Tisch., WH [1] )
The person bearing this name in the NT is represented as one of the twelve apostles who before his call by Christ had been engaged as a publican or custom-house officer in Capernaum. He is also called Levi (Mark 2:14, Luke 5:29), and many have supposed that he received the name Matthew after his call by Jesus, just as Simon became Peter. On the other hand, it seems to have been common in Galilee for a man to possess two names-a Greek and an Aramaic (cf. Edersheim, LT [2] 4, 1887, i. 514). In the various lists of the apostles, Matthew’s name occurs seventh in Mark 3:18 and Luke 6:15 and eighth in Matthew 10:3 and Acts 1:13. All the Synoptists narrate the story of the call of Matthew from his tax-gatherer’s booth and the subsequent feast in his house which aroused the wrath of the Pharisees and led Jesus to defend Himself by the declaration: ‘They that are whole have no need of a physician, but they that are sick. I came not to call the righteous but sinners’ (Matthew 9:9-13, Mark 2:14-17, Luke 5:27-32). As a publican Matthew was employed collecting the toll at Capernaum on the highway between Damascus and the Mediterranean, and was no doubt in the service of Herod the Tetrarch.
Matthew is called the ‘son of Alphaeus’ (Mark 2:14), and the question has arisen whether he is to be regarded as the brother of James the son of Alphaeus (Matthew 10:3, Mark 3:18, Luke 6:15, Acts 1:13). In the four lists of apostles, while Matthew and James occur in the same group of four, the two are not placed alongside one another as is usual with the other pairs of brothers in the apostolic band. Again, if we identify Clopas of John 19:25 with Alphaeus of the Synoptists (Aram. Chalphai; cf. 1 Maccabees 11:30), and consequently assume that James the Less of Mark 15:40 is the son of Alphaeus, it is extremely unlikely that Matthew’s name would be omitted in Mark 15:40 if he were one of the sons of Mary and the brother of James, Joses, and Salome. On the whole, it is almost certain that the two apostles were not related.
In the story of the Apostolic Church as we find it in the NT the name of Matthew occurs only once, viz. in the list of apostles in Acts 1:13. Probably he became a preacher to the lost sheep of the house of Israel and for the most part confined his labours to the land of Palestine. His name became associated with the First Gospel either because he was supposed to be the author or because he was the author of one of the sources on which the work was based. Eusebius makes three interesting statements regarding Matthew. He says (Historia Ecclesiastica (Eusebius, etc.) iii. 24): ‘Matthew and John are the only two apostles who have left us recorded comments, and even they, tradition says, undertook it from necessity. Matthew, having first proclaimed the gospel in Hebrew, when on the point of going also to other nations, committed it to writing in his native tongue, and thus supplied the want of his presence to them by his writings.’ Again we find in Historia Ecclesiastica (Eusebius, etc.) iii. 39 the famous statement of Papias quoted by Eusebius, ‘Matthew composed his logia in the Hebrew tongue, and everyone translated as he was able.’ We also find in Eusebius’ review of the canon of Scripture the statement: ‘The first (Gospel) is written according to Matthew, the same that was once a publican but afterwards an apostle of Jesus Christ, who, having published it for the Jewish converts, wrote it in the Hebrew’ (Historia Ecclesiastica (Eusebius, etc.) vi. 25). These varied quotations associate Matthew with a Hebrew Gospel or collection of the Sayings of Jesus which in some way or other is connected with or incorporated in our First Gospel. Probably Matthew the ex-publican and apostle did form such a collection of the Sayings of our Lord which were wrought into a connected narrative of the Life of Christ by the First Evangelist, a Palestinian Jew of the 1st century. But for full discussion see article ‘Matthew, Gospel of,’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) and Dict. of Christ and the Gospels . Unfortunately, Eusebius does not tell us what the ‘other nations’ were to whom Matthew proclaimed the gospel, and we have no certain knowledge of his subsequent missionary labours.
W. F. Boyd.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Matthew (2)
MATTHEW (Μαθθαῖος, Lachm., Tisch., WH [1] ; Ματθαῖος, Textus Receptus ) is to be identified with Levi, son of Alphaeus, since the Synoptists agree in their description of the feast associated with the publican who is named Levi in Mk. (Mark 2:14) and Lk. (Luke 5:29), and Matthew in Mt. (Matthew 9:9).* [2] Levi, according to the analogy of Simon and Peter, may have been the original name and Matthew the acquired; though, according to Edersheim (Life and Times, i. 514), it was common in Galilee for a man to have two names, one strictly Jewish and the other Galilaean. Matthew was chosen one of the Twelve, and is placed seventh in the lists in Mk. and Lk., and eighth in those in Mt. and Acts. When called to be a disciple, he was sitting at a toll-house, his place of business. Along the north end of the Sea of Galilee there was a road leading from Damascus to Acre on the Mediterranean, and on that road a customs-office marked the boundary between the territories of Philip the tetrarch and Herod Antipas. Matthew’s occupation was the examination of goods which passed along the road, and the levying of the toll (cf. Hausrath, NT Times, ii. 179). The work of a publican excited the scorn so often shown beyond the limits of Israel to fiscal officers; and when he was a Jew, as was Matthew, he was condemned for impurity by the Pharisees. A Jew serving on a great highway was prevented from fulfilling requirements of the Law, and was compelled to violate the Sabbath law, which the Gentiles, who conveyed their goods, did not observe. Schürer makes the statement that the customs raised in Capernaum in the time of Christ went into the treasury of Herod Antipas, while in Judaea they were taken for the Imperial fiscus (HJP [3] i. ii. 68). Matthew was thus not a collector under one of the companies that farmed the taxes in the Empire, but was in the service of Herod. Yet the fact that he belonged to the publican class, among whom were Jews who outraged patriotism by gathering tribute for Caesar, subjected him to the scorn of the Pharisees and their party (cf. Edersheim, Life and Times, i. 515); and his occupation itself associated him with men who, everywhere in the Empire, were despised for extortion and fraud, and were execrated (cf. Cic. de Offic. i. 42; Lucian, Menipp. 11). Even Jesus Himself named the publicans with harlots (Matthew 21:31). See Publican, and Sea of Galilee, § vi.
Before the call of Matthew, Jesus had resided at Capernaum, had left it, and had gone back to it (Mark 1:21; Mark 1:38; Mark 2:1); and it is safe to conclude that Matthew, a dweller in or near the city, had heard the fame of Jesus, and perhaps he may have been among those who sought Him (Mark 1:37). Jesus, too, may have noticed the publican, and the fact may have led to the call. According to the narrative of that call, which is almost identical in the Synoptics, Jesus said to him, ‘Follow me,’ and he arose and followed Him (Matthew 9:9). After the call and the answer there was a feast, probably to celebrate the new departure in the life of the publican, at which Jesus met him and his friends.
Certain critics (cf. Keim, Jesus of Nazara, iii. 268 n. [4] ) take the words καὶ ἑγένετο αὐτοῦ ἀνακειμένου ἐν τῇ οἰκία (Matthew 9:10) as indicating that the house was that of Jesus; but they can bear this interpretation only if taken in connexion with the preceding words, καὶ ἀναστὰς ἠκολούθησεν αὐτῷ. It is, however, not necessary to establish this connexion, as the writer may simply have made a sudden transition to a paragraph beginning καὶ ἐγένετο. If, on the other hand, the connexion must be made, then it is possible to take the narrative as recording that Matthew rose and followed Jesus to the house which belonged to Jesus. Mk. does not indicate the ownership of the house, while Lk. says distinctly that it was Levi’s. If we accept the description of Mk. or Lk., we need not conclude that the feast followed immediately after the call, since it may have taken place just before the assembling of the Twelve (Mark 3:14, Luke 6:13), in the period between that event and the calling of the individual disciples.
At the feast were Jesus and His disciples, and at the table with them were many publicans and sinners. These disciples were also many in number (Mark 2:15), and they must therefore have included others beyond the individuals who had been specially called. The sinners mentioned along with the publicans at the feast were those who violated the Law, or did not try to keep its innumerable commands as set forth by the scribes or interpreted by the Pharisees. Certain scribes and Pharisees had been spectators of the feast, and they asked the disciples concerning Jesus’ eating and drinking with sinners; and Jesus Himself, answering them, declared that He had not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance. The call of Matthew and the feast with publicans and sinners were the comment of Jesus on Pharisaic separatism; but the action itself did not prevent the separatism which showed itself in the primitive Church, and which involved the rebuke of Peter by Paul.
Beyond the call and the inclusion of the name in the list of the Twelve, there is no mention of Matthew in the NT. On the question of the authorship of the First Gospel, see following article.
Literature.—Expos. Times, viii. [5] 529; Expos. i. i. [1] 36, iii. ix. [7] 445, v. viii. [8] 37; Keble, Chr. Year, ‘S. Matthew the Apostle’; W. B. Carpenter, The Son of Man, p. 141; J. D. Jones, The Glorious Company of the Apostles, p. 150.
John Herkless.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Matthew, Gospel According to
MATTHEW, GOSPEL ACCORDING TO.—‘The power of God unto salvation—to the Jew first, and also to the Greek.’—The Gospels of St. Matthew and St. Luke may be characterized respectively as the Gospel of the Jew and the Gospel of the Greek. St. Luke gives us the conception of the Christ as His Person presented itself to the Greek Churches of the West. To them Christ was the Saviour of the world, the Divine Redeemer, whose Good News was equally available for all the children of men, regardless of distinctions of race, or class, or sex. St. Matthew, on the other hand, presents to us the Christ as He was conceived by the Jewish Christians of Palestine. To them Christ was the King of Israel; and the glad tidings of His coming Kingdom were intended first for the Chosen People. It was true that He had foretold the coming of many from the east and the west to sit down in the Kingdom of God (Matthew 8:11), and had bidden His Apostles baptize all nations (Matthew 28:19); but then it had always been a part of the Divine plan to suffer aliens to enter as proselytes into the fold of Israel, and to partake of the blessings promised to the Chosen People. So it was to be with the new Israel. In the period of preparation for the Kingdom, the gospel was to be preached to all nations for a testimony (Matthew 24:14), and those who entered by baptism into the Christian Church would become members of that new Israel, which in the days of the Kingdom should be judged and governed by the twelve Apostles as viceroys of the King Messiah (Matthew 19:28).
Of course the distinction here drawn makes itself felt in two respects. First, in the selection of material by the two writers. Each Evangelist has a certain amount of matter peculiar to himself; and it will be found that whilst in the First Gospel this is very largely matter which lends itself to the Christianity of one who was glad to emphasize the prior claim of the Jew to the blessings of the Kingdom, that in St. Luke is predominantly material capable of a more universalistic interpretation. Secondly, in the treatment of the large amount of material which is common to the two Gospels. A good example is to be found in the discourse on the Last Things. Whilst St. Matthew emphasizes the close connexion between the fall of Jerusalem and the Coming of the Son of Man (Matthew 24:29), thus limiting the period during which the gospel could be preached to the Gentiles, St. Luke expands this period to an indefinite length, during which Jerusalem was to be trodden under foot (Luke 21:24), thus making space for a long and protracted preaching to the Gentiles.
In the present article we propose to discuss the chief features in the picture of the Person of Christ drawn for us by the First Evangelist, and to consider the bearing of this upon the questions of the author, the sources, the date, and the historical value of the Gospel.
1. Theology of the Gospel.
(1) The Messiah.—Jesus the Messiah was legally descended from David, and through him from Abraham, the father of the Israelite people (Matthew 1:1). He was the culminating point in the history of His family. In David it had risen to monarchical power (Matthew 1:6), but at the period of the Captivity it had lost this dignity. But now again in Jesus the anointed King it had regained it (Matthew 1:16). He was therefore born ‘king of the Jews’ (Matthew 2:2). As King He entered Jerusalem (Matthew 21:5). As King He suffered the death of crucifixion (Matthew 27:38; Matthew 27:42), and as King He would sit to judge all nations at the Last Day (Matthew 25:31 ff.). But He was no mere scion of the Davidic stock. Though legally descended from David through Joseph ben-Jacob, He was also in a unique sense Son of God. As such He was born of the Holy Spirit from a virgin (Matthew 1:18-25). Hence He was ‘God with us’ (Matthew 5:21-481), and this Divine Sonship placed Him in a unique relationship to God. He could speak of God and of Himself as ‘the Father’ and ‘the Son,’ as though these terms could only be applied to this relationship (Matthew 11:27); and David himself had recognized by the Divine inspiration this Divine Sonship of his promised descendant, when he applied to Him the Divine name ‘Lord’ (Matthew 22:44). The history of the supernatural birth was, of course, an easy mark for Jewish calumny, but nevertheless it was a fact which had been Divinely foreordained (Matthew 1:22); and in the history of the Davidic family there had been women of old time (Rahab, Bathsheba, Tamar, Ruth) whose lives should have taught the calumniators of the Virgin that God overrules and uses circumstances for His own Divine ends. Moreover, if in Jesus the prophecies of a Coming Davidic king, supernaturally born, had found at last their fulfilment, so also in Him were summed up all the many strands in the web of Jewish anticipation. He was ‘the Beloved’ (Matthew 3:17, Matthew 17:5) whom God had eternally chosen (Matthew 3:16, Matthew 12:18), and to whom God had eternally given all things (Matthew 11:27) and all power (Matthew 28:18). He was the supernatural Son of Man, who was to come upon the clouds of heaven (Matthew 16:28, Matthew 26:64, Matthew 24:30), and to sit upon the throne of His glory to judge all men (Matthew 16:28, Matthew 19:28, Matthew 25:31). And the events of His life down to the minutest details had been foretold in the OT. Thus Isaiah had foretold the circumstances (Matthew 1:22), and Micah the place, of His birth (Matthew 2:5). Hosea had foreseen the flight into Egypt, Jeremiah the massacre of the infants at Bethlehem (Matthew 2:17); and the settlement of His parents at the ill-famed village of Nazareth had been the subject of prophecy (Matthew 2:23). His herald John had been fore-announced by Isaiah (Matthew 3:3), and the same prophet had foreseen the Christ’s ministry in Galilee, with Capernaum as His headquarters (Matthew 4:14). That He healed the sick was in accordance with a prophecy of Isaiah, and the contrast between His gracious and gentle work and the noisy clamour of His opponents, found anticipation in another passage of the same prophet (Matthew 12:17-21). Zechariah had foreseen His entry as King into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:5), His betrayal (Matthew 26:24), and the desertion of His disciples (Matthew 26:31); and the whole course of His tragic end had been Divinely fore-ordained, and foretold in Scripture (Matthew 16:23 161838538916 Matthew 26:54; Matthew 26:56).
Such was the Person of Jesus. He was the Divinely foreordained Messiah, the supernaturally-born King of Israel, the unique Son of God. What then had been His work? It is clear that the editor of the Gospel is much more concerned with Christ’s doctrine than with His work, with what He had said than with what He had done. He is interested in the events of the life chiefly in so far as they proved Jesus to be the Messiah of the OT, and with His actions either as proofs of His supernatural power over all the known forces of life, or as illustrative of His attitude towards the orthodox Pharisaism of the day. He could, e.g., heal disease, even leprosy, without use of drugs or medical appliances, by the simple exercise of His will (Matthew 8:8 ‘Speak the word only,’ Matthew 8:16 ‘with a word’), the cure being immediate and complete (Matthew 8:13, Matthew 9:22, Matthew 15:28, Matthew 17:18). He could control the forces of nature (Matthew 8:26-27), and could drive out demons from the unhappy beings of whom they had taken possession (Matthew 8:28-34). He exercised upon earth the Divine prerogative of forgiving sin (Matthew 9:1-8), and raised the dead to life (Matthew 25:1-13). He could feed multitudes with a few loaves and fishes (Matthew 14:13-21, Matthew 15:32-39). On the other hand, He associated with people who were regarded by the leaders of religion as ill friends for a devout man (Matthew 9:11), and seemed negligent of the rules which the Pharisees had framed as the guides of a pious life. His disciples did not fast (Matthew 9:14), and broke Sabbath regulations (Matthew 12:2). He Himself performed acts of healing on the Sabbath day (Matthew 16:27-28,), and His disciples neglected the regulations about purification of the hands before meals (Matthew 15:2). After a ministry marked by acts like these, He had been put to death by the Romans at the instigation of the Pharisees and Sadducees. He had expected this fate, and had foretold it to His disciples as being ordained of God and prophesied in Scripture (Matthew 16:21 δεῖ, Matthew 16:23 τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, Matthew 17:12; Matthew 17:22-23, Matthew 20:18-19). He had promised that on the third day He should be raised again, and this was fulfilled; and He had ascended into heaven.
Now it is clear that the details thus sketched furnish a very small part of the significance of the Gospel to the editor. The miracles proved Christ’s power, or illustrated His attitude towards Pharisaism, or showed Him to be the Messiah of the OT. But to what end was He powerful, and, if the Messiah, where was His Kingdom? We might have expected to find a good deal more emphasis laid on the significance of Christ’s death, but such emphasis is strikingly absent. The death is rather regarded as without significance in itself, but as a necessary stage in the revelation of the Messiah. He had come to found a Kingdom, but in accordance with the Divine plan had been put to death. Clearly then the Kingdom remained yet to come, and the death was a necessary prelude to glorification. The insistence on the fact that the death had to take place, because it had been foretold in the Scriptures, suggests the inference that to the editor it was a fact which required explanation, a difficult phase in the history of the Messiah rather than the central fact which itself explained everything else in His life. In two passages only is the death referred to as having any purpose or effect, rather than as being simply a thing which had happened as a necessary transition stage from the earthly life to the heavenly monarchy of the Messiah. In one of these Christ is represented as saying that He came to give His life as a ransom for many (λύτρον ἀντὶ πολλῶν, Matthew 20:28); in the other He speaks of His blood as shed for many for the remission of sins (Matthew 26:28). It is easy to see how sayings like these could be made the foundation of a theology which would explain the whole of Christ’s life from the significance of His death. But it is equally clear that the editor of the First Gospel has recorded them because they formed part of the tradition which had come to him, without seeing in them an explanation of the entire earthly life of the Messiah. They are incidental rather than fundamental to his Gospel.
Thus the facts of Christ’s life as here recorded would have been meaningless to the editor without the teaching which he records. It is in that that he finds the explanation of Christ’s life. The facts alone were obscure and difficult. Jesus was the Davidic Messiah and also the Son of God. He had entered into human history through the Virgin’s womb. He had evinced His supernatural power in all that He did. But then He had allowed Himself to be put to death, because, as He said, the Scriptures had foretold it; and rising from the dead, He had gone into heaven again. But how then was He the Messiah, and where was the Kingdom? The main object of the Gospel is to explain this, and the explanation is given in the great discourses which the editor has formed by massing sayings or groups of sayings.
(2) The Kingdom.—The central subject of Christ’s doctrine had been the near approach of the ‘kingdom of the heavens.’ With this He began His ministry (Matthew 4:17), and wherever He went He taught this as a good news (Matthew 4:23). The Kingdom, He taught, was coming, but not in His lifetime. After His ascension He would come as Son of Man upon the clouds of heaven (Matthew 21:42-43, Matthew 19:28, Matthew 24:30), would send His angels to gather together the elect (Matthew 24:31, Matthew 13:41), and would sit on the throne of His glory (Matthew 16:28, Matthew 19:28, Matthew 25:31). This would happen in the lifetime of the generation to whom He spoke (Matthew 16:28, Matthew 24:34, Matthew 10:23), immediately after the great tribulation accompanying the destruction of Jerusalem (Matthew 24:29); but God alone knew the exact day and hour (Matthew 24:30). Then the twelve Apostles should sit on twelve thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel (Matthew 19:28). In the meantime He Himself must suffer and die, and be raised from the dead. How else could He come upon the clouds of heaven? And His disciples were to preach the good news of the coming Kingdom (Matthew 10:7, Matthew 24:14) among all nations, making disciples by baptism (Matthew 28:19). The body of disciples thus gained would naturally form a society bound by common aims (Matthew 16:18, Matthew 18:17). They would be distinct from the existing Jewish polity, because the Jews as a people, the ‘sons of the kingdom,’ i.e. those who should have inherited it (Matthew 8:12), would definitely reject the good news (Matthew 21:32; Matthew 12:10 Matthew 22:7). Hence the disciples of the Kingdom would form a new spiritual Israel (Matthew 21:43 ‘a nation’) which would include many who came from east and west (Matthew 8:12).
In view of the needs of this new Israel of Christ’s disciples, i.e. of the true sons of the Kingdom (Matthew 13:38), who were to await His coming on the clouds of heaven, it is natural that a large part of the teaching recorded in the Gospel should concern the qualifications required in those who hoped to enter the Kingdom when it came. They were still to live in allegiance to the revelation of God made in the OT, which was permanently valid. Not a letter was to pass away from it (Matthew 5:18). Its permission of divorce still held good (Matthew 5:32, Matthew 19:3 ff.). Christ had not abolished the Mosaic distinctions between clean and unclean meats (see notes on Matthew 15:20). His disciples were still to take two or three witnesses (Matthew 18:16); and the Sabbath was still to be held sacred (Matthew 24:20). But they were to search beneath the letter of the OT for its spiritual meaning. Their ‘righteousness’ was to exceed that of the scribes and Pharisees, because they were to interpret the Law of Moses in a sense which would make it more far-reaching in its effect upon conduet than ever before (1618385389_95). In particular, their ‘righteousness’ was to be less a matter of something done that men might see it, and more a right relation to God, taking effect in action known only to God Himself (Matthew 6:1-34). In relation to their fellow-men they were to cultivate humility, and to suppress self-assertiveness (Matthew 18:1-14); to exercise forgiveness (Matthew 18:15; Matthew 18:21-35); to be slow to judge their fellows (Matthew 7:1-5); to do to others what they would have done to themselves (Matthew 7:12). In relation to wealth, they were not to hoard up treasure upon earth, but to trust in God’s care for them (Matthew 6:19-34, Matthew 19:28), seeking first His righteousness and Kingdom. In relation to sexual morality, they were to be chaste in thought (Matthew 5:28); marriage was an indissoluble bond, broken only by adultery (Matthew 19:9). But some were called to live single lives for the Kingdom of the heavens (Matthew 19:12). In relation to God, they were to pray to Him for their daily needs, for His forgiveness, and for deliverance from the evil that is in the world (Matthew 6:9-13, Matthew 7:7-11).
In the above sketch of the picture drawn for us in the First Gospel of the Person and teaching of the Messiah, we have purposely omitted the parables. Most of the parables in this Gospel are parables of the Kingdom. With the exception of Matthew 18:21-35, they do not, as in the case of many of St. Luke’s parables, inculcate some Christian virtue or practice, such as love of one’s neighbour, or earnestness in prayer, but convey some lesson about the nature of the Kingdom and the period of preparation for it. Their interpretation will often depend largely upon the conception of the Kingdom with which the reader approaches them. We are not now concerned with the meaning which they were intended to convey when they were originally spoken. But it should be sufficiently obvious that if we ask what meaning they had for the editor of the First Gospel, and why he selected them for insertion in his Gospel, the answer must be that he chose them because he believed that they taught lessons about the Kingdom of the heavens in the sense in which that phrase is used everywhere else in his Gospel, of the Kingdom which was to come when the Son of Man came upon the clouds of heaven. Thus the parable of the Sower illustrates the varying reception met with by the good news of the Kingdom as it is preached amongst men. That of the Tares also deals not with the Kingdom itself, but with the period of preparation for it. At the end of the age the Son of Man will come to inaugurate His Kingdom. A phrase here, ‘shall gather out of his kingdom,’ has been pressed to support the interpretation that the Kingdom is thought of as present now. But it need convey no such meaning. The ‘good seed’ is interpreted as equivalent to the ‘sons of the kingdom,’ i.e. according to Jewish usage, not they who already live in or possess the Kingdom, but those who are destined to inherit it when it comes. It is not inaugurated until the ‘end of the age.’ Then when the ‘Son of Man’ comes, the ‘Kingdom’ comes; and the method of its foundation is not a gathering of the elect out of the mass of mankind, but a gathering of the wicked from amongst the elect, a gathering of them out of the Kingdom that the righteous may inherit it and shine forth in it. There is nothing here or elsewhere in this Gospel to suggest that the scene of the Kingdom is other than the present world renewed, restored, and purified (cf. παλινγενεσία, Matthew 19:28).
The parables of the Mustard Seed and of the Leaven describe the way in which the good news of the Kingdom spreads rapidly and penetrates deeply into human society. Those of the Hid Treasure and of the Goodly Pearl emphasize its value, and teach the lesson that a man must give up all else to enter into it. That of the Drag-Net has much the same application as the parable of the Tares. The doctrine of the Kingdom attracts good and bad alike. But at the end of the age, when the Kingdom is inaugurated, there will be a separation.
In Matthew 20:1-16 occurs the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard. In its present context this seems to be intended to teach the lesson that in discipleship of the Kingdom priority, whether in date of entrance upon discipleship or of position now, will not carry with it special privilege within the Kingdom when it comes. All shall receive the same reward—eternal life.
Of the other parables in the Gospel, Matthew 18:21-35 does not bear directly upon the doctrine of the Kingdom, but emphasizes forgiveness as a qualification in all who wish to enter it. Matthew 21:28-32 illustrates the perverse attitude of the Pharisees towards the Baptist’s preaching. Matthew 21:33-46 and Matthew 22:1-10 are historical forecasts of the fate of the Jewish nation. Matthew 22:11-14 emphasizes the necessity for all who hope to enter the Kingdom of possessing the necessary qualifications. Matthew 9:25 and Matthew 25:14-30 teach the suddenness of its appearance and the necessity of watching for its coming. Matthew 25:31-46 describes the test by which the King when He comes will admit the righteous into His Kingdom.
Of several of these parables it will rightly be felt that, as originally spoken, they had a wider meaning and scope than that here given, and one which is inconsistent with the narrow limits of the Kingdom to be inaugurated immediately after the fall of Jerusalem. That is quite true. But the question is not, What did these parables mean when they were originally spoken? but, What interpretation did the editor put upon them when he incorporated them into his Gospel? He everywhere seems to use the phrase ‘kingdom of the heavens’ in its eschatological sense. In four or five passages he has, instead, the ‘kingdom of God.’ In Matthew 6:33 τοῦ θεοῦ is probably not genuine (omit אBg1 [2] k). As regards Matthew 19:24, a passage borrowed from Mk., the fact that Mt. in 13 other places where ‘kingdom of God’ occurs in Mk., substitutes ‘kingdom of the heavens,’ or omits or paraphrases the passage, makes it very probable that ‘kingdom of the heavens’ should be read here also. In Matthew 12:28, Matthew 21:31; Matthew 21:43 the editor has retained ‘kingdom of God,’ not because he regarded it as equivalent to ‘kingdom of the heavens,’ but because he felt that in these passages the idea conveyed was different from that which his phrase ‘kingdom of the heavens’ everywhere carries with it; and he therefore retained ‘kingdom of God’ to mark the difference.
Thus the conception of Christianity as expressed in this Gospel may be summarized as follows. Jesus was the King-Messiah of the OT. He was also the Son of Man of apocalyptic anticipation. But how could the functions ascribed to these two ideals be combined? Only if the King passed through death that He might come again on the clouds to inaugurate His Kingdom. And to those who could read the OT aright, all this had been foretold. Hence the Crucifixion. When Jerusalem fell, the end of the age would come, and the Son of Man would appear. In the meantime the good news was to be preached, and men were to be gathered into the society of disciples of the Messiah.
2. Date and place of composition.—If the dominant conception of the book has been rightly sketched, very important conclusions can be drawn as to its provenance and date. It must have been written by a Jewish-Christian, probably by a Jewish-Christian of Palestine, and it cannot date from long after the fall of Jerusalem. For it is inconceivable that any one should so arrange the words of Christ as to convey the impression that He had taught that He would return as Son of Man immediately after the fall of Jerusalem, if many years had elapsed since that event. And this conclusion as to the early date and Palestinian origin of the Gospel is supported by other features of the book. It is markedly anti-Pharisaic, and strongly Jewish-Christian in outlook.
(1) Its anti-Pharisaism.—This already underlies the stories of the first two chapters, which are most easily explained as a narrative of facts written to rebut Pharisaic calumnies. Christ was born of a virgin, but He was legally of Davidic descent, and the Virgin Mary’s marvellous history already found prototypes by contrast in the history of women connected with the ancestors of the Christ. If He went into Egypt, it was in the days of His infancy, and He brought no magical arts thence. If His parents settled at Nazareth, it was that the tenor of prophecy might be fulfilled.
So far the anti-Pharisaic polemic of the writer has been defensive and implicit. In the third chapter it becomes manifest and open. The sayings of the Baptist are so arranged as to form a sermon of denunciation of the Pharisees and Sadducees. They are a ‘brood of vipers,’ who pride themselves on their descent from Abraham. But right action based on repentance is the only ground for hope of God’s favour. The Messiah is at hand, and will sweep away all such false claims with the fire of judgment. In the Sermon on the Mount the same anti-Pharisaic polemic is found. Their ‘righteousness’ will not admit them into the Kingdom (Matthew 5:20). They are ‘hypocrites’ whose religious observances are based on desire for personal eredit (
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Matthew
Given; a rewardMatthias
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gospel of Saint Matthew
The first book of the New Testament. Its author is the Apostle Saint Matthew, who wrote an account of Our Lord's life in the Hebrew dialect then in use by the Palestinian Jews (Aramaic), about 40 or 50. He wrote the Gospel in Palestine for converts from Judaism, to confirm them in their faith in Jesus as the promised Messias, and to convince the unbelievers that they had rejected the Redeemer. The characteristic which especially distinguishes this Gospel from the others is the frequent citations of and allusions to the Old Testament prophecies. The fulfillment of these prophecies in Jesus proves Him to be the Messias. The 28 chapters of the Gospel may be divided according to the following topics Jesus is proven the Messias in His ancestry, birth, and infancy (1-2); He is shown to be the Messias in the preparation for the public ministry (3-4); He manifests Himself as the Messias in public life, being teacher and legislator (5-7), wonder-worker (8-9), founder of the Kingdom of Goa (10-25); He is shown to be the Messias in the humility of His sufferings and the glory of His Resurreetion (26-28). The Biblical Commission, June 19, 1911, declared that the universal and constant tradition dating from the first centuries and expressed in early writings, ancient codices, versions and catalogues of the Bible, proves beyond doubt that Saint Matthew wrote the first Gospel, as we now have it in our Bibles, before the year 70, and that the Gospel is in conformity with historical truth. Chapters specially commendable for reading: 1-2, the hidden life; 5,6, 7, Sermon on the Mount; 13,16, 18,19, parables, and instructions on the Kingdom of God; 15, last judgment; 26-28, Passion, Death and Resurrection.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Matthew, Gospel by
In this gospel Christ is more especially presented as the Messiah, the son of Abraham, and son of David. See GOSPELS. The genealogy here starts with Abraham, in contrast with that in Luke, which goes back to Adam because in that gospel the Lord is viewed as connected with man, i.e., the seed of the woman. Here we read, He "shall save his people from their sins," and in this gospel only is quoted the prophetic name IMMANUEL, 'God with us.' Here only is the account given of the Magi inquiring for the 'King of the Jews,' with the flight into Egypt, and the massacre of the infants. (The Magi did not come 'when Jesus was born' [1] but several months afterwards. It is better translated 'Jesus having been born.') Christ is called out of Egypt, taking part thus in the history of Israel, God's first-born son. Exodus 4:22 . The Messiah being rejected, the remnant comes into weeping. Matthew 2:17,18 .
Matthew 3 , Matthew 4 . The remnant are separated by the preaching of John. Messiah takes His place with them in Jordan according to divine order. His Person is attested by a voice from heaven, and the full revelation of God in connection with the Son upon earth. Led of the Spirit, He overcomes Satan, and then calls the remnant around Himself.
In Matthew 5 — Matthew 7 the principles of Christ's doctrine are unfolded largely, in contrast with that of 'them of old time.' It goes to the springs of evil, and condemns the principles of violence and corruption; and the character of God Himself becomes the standard of practice for man here. The gate was strait and the way narrow which led to life, and there were but few (the remnant) who found it.
Matthew 8 : and Matthew 9 present Jehovah's servant, verifying Isaiah 53:1 and Psalm 103:3 , and His service, ending with the typical raising up of Israel in the ruler's daughter.
Christ goes on with His patient work of preaching the gospel of the kingdom, teaching in the synagogues, healing the sick, casting out demons, and exposing all the false pretensions that were in the leaders of the Jews.
In Matthew 10 Jesus takes the place of administrator, as Lord of the harvest, and sends out the twelve with a commission limited to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.
In Matthew 11 Christ shows the superiority of the kingdom of heaven to the prophetic ministry, ending in John the Baptist; and of the revelation of the Father to His own mighty works, which had not produced repentance; and
In Matthew 12 He breaks the special links which had been formed in His coming after the flesh.
In Matthew 13 Christ reveals Himself as the Sower, in which character He had all along been acting. He gives a series of parables showing the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven. First, how 'the word of the kingdom' was received, and the various obstacles in the world calculated to oppose and hinder its growth. Then, how, through the work of the enemy, false professors would spring up in the kingdom, and how evil principles would be introduced into it, which would work insidiously. The first four parables were spoken to the people — that of the Tares being peculiar to this gospel. The Lord in explaining (in the house) the parable of the Tares, speaks of the completion of the age, and of the judgement by which the Son of man by angelic agency shall purge "out of his kingdom all things that offend, and them which do iniquity." The last three parables were spoken to the disciples in private, and are peculiar to this gospel. They speak of the secret purpose of the kingdom. Christ buys the field in view of the treasure hidden there, and also buys the pearl of great price for its value in His eye. The gospel net gathers good and bad, but at the completion of the age a discriminating judgement will sever the "wicked from among the just," See PARABLES.
Christ continues His work of grace notwithstanding His rejection by the rulers of Israel, and
In Matthew 16 the truth of His person as Son of the living God having been confessed by Peter as the result of the Father's revelation, He announces this as the foundation of the church which He will build, and against which the power of Hades shall not prevail. He gives to Peter the keys of 'the kingdom of heaven' (an expression peculiar to Matthew, turning the eyes of the disciples to heaven as the source of light and authority, in contrast to a kingdom as from an earthly centre, Zion, Romans 11:26 ), and speaks of His own coming again in the glory of His Father to give to every man his reward. The parables had dealt with the kingdom in mystery , but some who stood there should at once have a glimpse of the kingdom in glory, which was vouchsafed to them in seeing Jesus transfigured before them on the mount.
In Matthew 18 the Lord furnishes instruction as to the order and ways of the kingdom, including the dealing with an offending brother, and again speaks of 'the church,' and of its voice of authority, though it was then future; and adds the marvellous declaration as to where His presence would be vouchsafed, a place morally distant from the then existing temple and its priesthood: "Where two or three are gathered together unto my name, there am I in the midst of them." The Lord proceeded in the parable of the King that would take account of His servants, to enforce the necessity of His disciples forgiving one another, as otherwise they would come under His Father's hand. Farther on, the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard maintains the sovereignty of the Lord in dispensing His own things: both of these parables being peculiar to Matthew. The Lord forewarns His disciples of what awaited Him, and gives them instruction to follow His example. Matthew 20:27,28 .
In Matthew 21 the Lord rode triumphantly as Zion's king into Jerusalem, claiming His inheritance, accompanied by a great crowd, which cried, "Hosanna to the Son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest." He cleansed the temple a second time, and put to silence the chief priests, the elders, and all who sought to entangle Him in His talk, enforcing, too, the responsibility of the husbandmen. Notwithstanding their opposition, He spoke of the certainty of the establishment of God's purpose in the parable of the marriage of the King's Son. He foretold the judgements that should fall upon Jerusalem. He would often have gathered them, but they would not. He left them with the solemn words, "Behold, your house is left unto you desolate. For I say unto you, Ye shall not see me henceforth, till ye shall say, Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord." Matthew 23:38,39 .
In Matthew 24 the disciples asked three questions, Matthew 24:3 . The Lord did not answer the question as to when the events predicted should take place, and His reply is a further prophecy. Matthew 24:4 to end of Matthew 24:44 are concerning Israel. Matthew 24:4-14 coincide with the first half of Daniel's 70th week; and Matthew 24:15-28 with the last half of that week. Matthew 24:45-51 refer to Christians. This and the following chapter show the whole range and extent of what comes under the judgement of the Son of man, both in His coming and sitting on His throne.
Matthew 25 is peculiar to Matthew; Matthew 25:1-30 , the parables of the Ten Virgins and of the Talents, apply to professing Christians. Matthew 25:31-46 refer to the living Gentile nations who will be judged according to how they have treated the Jewish messengers, the brethren of Christ. See JUDGEMENT, SESSIONAL.
The events of the trial, judgement, crucifixion, and resurrection of the Lord Jesus follow. The last scene with the apostles in this gospel is in Galilee, where Jesus had appointed to meet them, thus resuming connection with them as a Jewish remnant. He commissions them to teach all nations, adding, "Lo, I am with you alway, even unto the end of the age." Compare "God with us" in Matthew 1:23 . In a sense He remains with His own: hence the ascension is not here mentioned. Christ will be found again with Israel on earth, and then bless them and the Gentiles through them. The fact that Matthew was present at the ascension, and yet does not mention so important an event, is sufficient evidence that the evangelist had divine guidance as to what he should record: all such differences in the gospels are really by the inspiration of God, and are a profitable study.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Matthew
MATTHEW loved money. Matthew, like Judas, must have money. With clean hands if he could; but, clean hands or unclean, Matthew must have money. Now, the surest way and the shortest way for Matthew to make money in the Galilee of that day was to take sides with Cæsar and to become one of Cæsar's tax-gatherers. This, to be sure, would be for Matthew to sell himself to the service of the oppressors of his people; but Matthew made up his mind and determined to do it. Matthew will set his face like a flint for a few years and then he will retire from his toll-booth to spend his rich old age in peace and quietness. He will furnish a country-house for himself up among the hills of Galilee, and he will devote his last days to deeds of devotion and charity. And thus it was that Matthew, a son of Abraham, was found in the unpatriotic and ostracised position of a publican in Capernaum. The publicans were hard-hearted, extortionate, and utterly demoralised men. Their peculiar employment either already found them all that, or else it soon made them all that. "Publicans and sinners"; "publicans and harlots"-we continually come on language like that in the pages of the four Gospels. Well, Matthew had now for a long time been a publican in Capernaum, and he was fast becoming a rich man. But, over against that, he had to content himself with a publican's companionships, and with a publican's inevitable evil conscience. Matthew could not help grinding the faces of the poor. He could not help squeezing the last drop of blood out of this and that helpless debtor. His business would not let Matthew stop to think who was a widow, and who was an orphan, and who was being cruelly treated. The debt was due, it was too long overdue, and it must be paid, if both the debtor and his children have to be sold in the slave-market to pay the debt.
Jesus of Nazareth, the carpenter's son, knew Matthew the publican quite well. Perhaps, only too well. Jesus and His mother had by this time migrated from Nazareth to Capernaum. He had often been in Matthew's toll-booth with His mother's taxes, and with other poor people's taxes. Even if not for Himself and for his widowed mother, the carpenter would often leave His bench to go to Matthew's toll-booth to expostulate with him, and to negotiate with him, and to become surety to him for this and that poor neighbour of His who had fallen into sickness, and into a debt that he was not able to pay. The sweat of Jesus' own brow had oftener than once gone to settle Matthew's extortionate charges. 'If he hath wronged thee, or oweth thee aught, put that to mine account. I, Jesus, the son of Joseph, have written it with mine own hand, I will repay it'-that would stand in Matthew's books over and over again, till Matthew was almost ready to sell the surety Himself. But by this time Jesus, first of Nazareth and now of Capernaum, who had been every poor widow's cautioner for her rent and for her taxes, had left His father's inherited workshop, and had been baptized by John into a still larger Suretyship. And thus it is that He is back again in Capernaum, no longer a hard-working carpenter, mortgaging all His week's wages and more for all His poor neighbours. But he is now the Messiah Himself! And Matthew in his toll-booth has a thousand thoughts about all that, till he cannot get his columns to come right all he can count. And till one day, just as He was passing Matthew's well-worn doorstep, a widow woman of the city, with her child in her arms, rushed up against our Lord, and exclaimed to Him: "Avenge me of mine adversary!" till she could not tell Him her heart-breaking tale for sobs and tears. And then, with that never-to-be-forgotten look and accent of mingled anger and mercy, our Lord went immediately into the publican's office and said to him: 'Matthew, thou must leave all this life of thine and come and follow Me.' Matthew had always tried to stand well out of eyeshot of our Lord when He was preaching. He felt sure that the Preacher was not well disposed toward him, and his conscience would continually say to his face, How could He be? But at that so commanding gesture, and at those so commanding words, the chains of a lifetime of cruelty and extortion fell on the floor of the receipt of custom; till, scarcely taking time to clasp up his books and to lock up his presses, Matthew the publican of Capernaum rose up and followed our Lord.
Matthew does not say so himself, but Luke is careful to tell us that Matthew made a great feast that very night, and gathered into it a supper-party of his former friends and acquaintances that they might see with their own eyes the Master that he is henceforth to confess, and to follow, and to obey. What a sight to our eyes, far more than to theirs, is Matthew's supper-table tonight! There sits the publican himself at the head of the table, and the erewhile carpenter of Capernaum in the seat of honour beside him. And then the whole house is full of what we may quite correctly describe as a company of social and religious outcasts. An outcast with us usually means some one who has impoverished, and demoralised, and debauched himself with indolence and with vice till he is both penniless in purse and reprobate in character. We have few, if any, rich outcasts in our city and society. But the outcast publicans of that night were well-to-do, if not absolutely wealthy men. They were men who had made themselves rich, and had at the same time made themselves outcasts, by siding with the oppressors of their people and by exacting of the people more than was their due. And they were, as a consequence, excommunicated from the Church, and ostracised from all patriotic and social and family life. What, then, must the more thoughtful of them have felt as they entered Matthew's supper-room that night and sat down at the same table with a very prophet, and some said-Matthew himself had said it in his letter of invitation-more than a prophet. And, then, all through the supper, if He was a prophet He was so unlike a prophet; and, especially, so unlike the last of the prophets. He was so affable, so humble, so kind, so gentle, with absolutely nothing at all in His words or in His manner to upbraid any of them, or in any way to make any of them in anything uneasy. They had all supped with Matthew before, but that was the first night for many years that any man with any good name to lose had broken bread at the publican's table. He had given suppers on occasion before, but Jesus had never been invited, nor Peter, nor James, nor John. And it was the presence of Jesus and His disciples that night that led to the scene which so shines on this page of the New Testament. For there were Pharisees in Capernaum in those days, just as there were publicans and sinners. And just as the publicans were ever on the outlook for more money; and just as the sinners were ever on the outlook for another supper and another dance; so the Pharisees were ever on the outlook for a fresh scandal, and for something to find fault with in their neighbours. "Why eateth your Master with publicans and sinners?" the Pharisees of Capernaum demanded of Jesus' disciples. And the disciples were still too much Pharisees themselves to be able to give a very easy answer to that question. But Jesus had his answer ready. Grace was poured into His lips at that opportune moment till He replied: "They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance." Long years afterwards, when Matthew was writing this autobiographic passage in his Gospel, the whole scene of that supper-party rose up before him like yesternight. 'Jesus, now in glory,' he said to himself, 'was sitting here, as it were. James and John there. Myself at the door, divided between welcoming my old companions and warning them off. Some Pharisees from the synagogue are coming up with their lamps. Then their loud and angry voices; and then His voice with more pity in it than anger, calling sinners to repentance.' It was a night to be remembered by Matthew.
When Matthew rose up and left all and followed our Lord, the only thing he took with him out of his old occupation was his pen and ink. And it is well for us that he did take that pen and ink with him, since he took it with him to such good purpose. For, never once did our Lord sit down on a mountain side or on a sea-shore to teach His disciples; never once did He enter a synagogue and take up the Prophets or the Psalmists to preach; never once did He talk at any length by the way, that Matthew was not instantly at His side. Till Matthew came to be known not so much as Matthew the disciple, or as the former publican of Capernaum, but rather as that silent man with the sleepless pen and ink-horn. It needed a practised, and an assiduous, and an understanding pen to take down the Sermon on the Mount, and to report and arrange the parables, and to seize with such correctness and with such insight the terrible sermons of his Master's last week of preaching. But Matthew did all that, and we have all that to this day in his Gospel. The bag would have been safe, and it would have been kept well filled, in Matthew's money-managing hands, but Matthew had far more important matters than the most sacred money matters to attend to. What a service, above all price, were Matthew's hands ordained to do as soon as his hands were washed from sin and uncleanness in the Fountain opened in that day! What a service it was to build that golden bridge by which so many of his kinsmen according to the flesh at once passed over into the better covenant, the Surety of which covenant is Christ! "The Gospel according to St. Matthew: the Book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham." "Saintliness not forfeited by the penitent," is the title of one of our finest English sermons, and, it may here be added, neither is service.
"And Matthew the publican." Now, we would never have known that but for Matthew himself. Neither Mark, nor Luke, nor John, nor Paul ever calls Matthew by that bad name. It is Matthew himself alone who in as many words says to us, "Come, all ye that fear God, and I will tell what He has done for my soul." It is Matthew himself alone who publishes and perpetuates to all time his own infamy. Ashamed of himself, both as a publican and an apostle, till he cannot look up, the text is the only footprint of himself that St. Matthew leaves behind him on the sands of Scripture. Our first Gospel is his holy workmanship, and this text, so deeply imbedded into it, is the sure seal of its author's Christian temper and Apostolic character. "Position and epithet are indicative both of natural humility and modesty, as well as of evangelical self-abasement."
"They that be whole need not a physician, but they that are sick." Happy intrusion, and fortunate fault-finding of the Pharisees which ended in these ever-blessed words of our Saviour! And then, these words also: "I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance." Sick and sinful men, do you hear that? Are you truly and sincerely sick with sin? Then He who has made you sick will keep you sick till you come to Him to heal you. Are you a sinner with an evil life holding you like a chain in a cruel, an unclean, a hopeless bondage? Then-
He comes! the prisoners to relieve,In Satan's bondage held;The gates of brass before Him burst,The iron fetters yield.He comes! from darkening scales of viceTo clear the inward sight;And on the eyeballs of the blindTo pour celestial light.He comes! the broken hearts to bind,The bleeding souls to cure:And with the treasures of His graceT' enrich the humble poor.Are you that prisoner? Are you held in Satan's bondage? Is your inward sight clogged up with the scales of vice? Is your heart broken? And is your very soul within you bleeding? Are you a publican? Are you a sinner? Are you a harlot? Look at Matthew with his Gospel in his hand! Look at Zacchæus restoring fourfold! Look at Mary Magdalene, first at the sepulchre. Look unto Me, their Saviour says to thee also: Look unto Me, and be thou saved also. And so I will!
Thy promise is my only plea,With this I venture nigh:Thou callest burden'd souls to Thee,And such, O Lord, am I.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Matthew
The son of Alphaeus and one of the twelve apostles. He was a tax-collector for the Romans, called 'publican' in the A.V. He left his office immediately he was called by the Lord and entertained Him at a feast. No other incidents are recorded of him apart from the other apostles. He is universally believed to have written the gospel bearing his name. Matthew 9:9 ; Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ; Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 . He is called LEVI in Mark 2:14 ; Luke 5:27,29 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Matthew
called also Levi, was the son of Alpheus, but probably not of that Alpheus who was the father of the Apostle James the less. He was a native of Galilee; but it is not known in what city of that country he was born, or to what tribe of the people of Israel he belonged. Though a Jew, he was a publican or tax-gatherer under the Romans; and his office seems to have consisted in collecting the customs due upon commodities which were carried, and from persons who passed, over the lake of Gennesareth. Our Saviour commanded him, as he was sitting at the place where he received these customs, to follow him. He immediately obeyed; and from that time he became a constant attendant upon our Saviour, and was appointed one of the twelve Apostles. St. Matthew, soon after his call, made an entertainment at his house, at which were present Christ and some of his disciples, and also several publicans. After the ascension of our Saviour, he continued, with the other Apostles, to preach the Gospel for some time in Judea; but as there is no farther account of him in any writer of the first four centuries, we must consider it as uncertain into what country he afterward went, and likewise in what manner and at what time he died.
In the few writings which remain of the apostolical fathers, Barnabas, Clement of Rome, Hermas, Ignatius, and Polycarp, there are manifest allusions to several passages in St. Matthew's Gospel; but the Gospel itself is not mentioned in any one of them. Papias, the companion of Polycarp, is the earliest author on record who has expressly named St. Matthew as the writer of a Gospel; and we are indebted to Eusebius for transmitting to us this valuable testimony. The work itself of Papias is lost; but the quotation in Eusebius is such as to convince us that in the time of Papias no doubt was entertained of the genuineness of St. Matthew's Gospel. This Gospel is repeatedly quoted by Justin Martyr, but without mentioning the name of St. Matthew. It is both frequently quoted, and St. Matthew mentioned as its author, by Irenaeus, Origen, Athanasius, Cyril, Epiphanius, Jerom, Chrysostom, and a long train of subsequent writers. It was, indeed, universally received by the Christian church; and we do not find that its genuineness was controverted by any early profane writer. We may therefore conclude, upon the concurrent testimony of antiquity, that this Gospel is rightly ascribed to St. Matthew. It is generally agreed, upon the most satisfactory evidence, that St. Matthew's Gospel was the first which was written; but though this is asserted by many ancient authors, none of them, except Irenaeus and Eusebius, have said any thing concerning the exact time at which it was written. The only passage in which the former of these fathers mentions this subject, is so obscure, that no positive conclusion can be drawn from it; Dr. Lardner, and Dr. Townson, understand it in very different senses; and Eusebius, who lived a hundred and fifty years after Irenaeus, barely says, that Matthew wrote his Gospel just before he left Judea to preach the religion of Christ in other countries; but when that was, neither he nor any other ancient author informs us with certainty. The impossibility of settling this point upon ancient authority has given rise to a variety of opinions among moderns. Of the several dates assigned to this Gospel, which deserve any attention, the earliest is A.D. 38, and the latest, A.D. 64.
It appears very improbable that the Christians should be left any considerable number of years without a written history of our Saviour's ministry. It is certain that the Apostles, immediately after the descent of the Holy Ghost, which took place only ten days after the ascension of our Saviour into heaven, preached the Gospel to the Jews with great success; and surely it is reasonable to suppose, that an authentic account of our Saviour's doctrines and miracles would very soon be committed to writing, for the confirmation of those who believed in his divine mission, and for the conversion of others; and, more particularly, to enable the Jews to compare the circumstances of the birth, death, and resurrection of Jesus with their ancient prophecies relative to the Messiah; and we may conceive that the Apostles would be desirous of losing no time in writing an account of the miracles which Jesus performed, and of the discourses which he delivered, because the sooner such an account was published, the easier it would be to inquire into its truth and accuracy; and, consequently, when these points were satisfactorily ascertained, the greater would be its weight and authority. We must own that these arguments are so strong in favour of an early publication of some history of our Saviour's ministry, that we cannot but accede to the opinion of Jones, Wetstein, and Dr. Owen, that St. Matthew's Gospel was written A.D. 38. There has also of late been great difference of opinion concerning the language in which this Gospel was originally written. Among the ancient fathers, Papias, as quoted by Eusebius, Irenaeus, Origen, Cyril, Epiphanius, Chrysostom, and Jerom, positively assert that it was written by St. Matthew in Hebrew, that is, in the language then spoken in Palestine; and indeed Dr. Campbell says, that this point was not controverted by any author for fourteen hundred years. Erasmus was one of the first who contended that the present Greek is the original; and he has been followed by Le Clerc, Wetstein, Basnage, Whitby, Jortin, Hug, and many other learned men. On the other hand, Grotius, Du Pin, Simon, Walton, Cave, Hammond, Mill, Michaelis, Owen, and Campbell have supported the opinion of the ancients. In a question of this sort, which is a question of fact, the concurrent voice of antiquity is decisive. Though the fathers are unanimous in declaring that St. Matthew wrote his Gospel in Hebrew, yet they have not informed us by whom it was translated into Greek. No writer of the first three centuries makes any mention whatever of the translator; nor does Eusebius; and Jerom tells us, that in his time it was not known who was the translator. It is, however, universally allowed, that the Greek translation was made very early, and that it was more used than the original. This last circumstance is easily accounted for. After the destruction of Jerusalem, the language of the Jews, and every thing which belonged to them, fell into great contempt; and the early fathers, writing in Greek, would naturally quote and refer to the Greek copy of St. Matthew's Gospel, in the same manner as they constantly used the Septuagint version of the Old Testament. There being no longer any country in which the language of St. Matthew's original Gospel was commonly spoken, that original would soon be forgotten; and the translation into Greek, the language then generally understood, would be substituted in its room. This early and exclusive use of the Greek translation is a strong proof of its correctness, and leaves us but little reason to lament the loss of the original.
"As the sacred writers," says Dr. Campbell, "especially the evangelists, have many qualities in common, so there is something in every one of them, which, if attended to, will be found to distinguish him from the rest. That which principally distinguishes St. Matthew, is the distinctness and particularity with which he has related many of our Lord's discourses and moral instructions. Of these, his sermon on the mount, his charge to the Apostles, his illustrations of the nature of his kingdom, and his prophecy on Mount Olivet, are examples. He has also wonderfully united simplicity and energy in relating the replies of his Master to the cavils of his adversaries. Being early called to the apostleship, he was an eye-witness and an ear- witness of most of the things which he relates; and though I do not think it was the scope of any of these historians to adjust their narratives to the precise order of time wherein the events happened, there are some circumstances which incline me to think, that St. Matthew has approached at least as near that order as any of them." And this, we may observe, would naturally be the distinguishing characteristic of a narrative, written very soon after the events had taken place. The most remarkable things recorded in St. Matthew's Gospel, and not found in any other, are the following: the visit of the eastern magi; our Saviour's flight into Egypt; the slaughter of the infants at Bethlehem; the parable of the ten virgins; the dream of Pilate's wife; the resurrection of many saints at our Saviour's crucifixion; and the bribing of the Roman guard appointed to watch at the holy sepulchre by the chief priests and elders.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Matthew
An apostle and evangelist, was son of Alpheus, a Galilean by birth, a Jew by religion, and a publican by profession, Matthew 9:9 10:3 Luke 6:15 . The other evangelists call him only Mark 2:14 Luke 5:27 ; but he always calls himself Matthew, which was probably his name as a publican, or officer for gathering taxes. He does not dissemble his former profession; thus exalting the grace of Christ which raised him to the apostleship. His ordinary abode was at Capernaum, and his office probably on the main road, near the Sea of Tiberias; here, in the midst of his business, he was called by Jesus to follow him, Matthew 9:9 Mark 2:14 . It is probable that he had a previous knowledge of the miracles and doctrine of Christ.
For the GOSPEL OF MATTHEW, see GOSPEL .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Westminster, Matthew of
Supposed author of the English chronicle "Flores Historiarum." The misunderstanding regarding this imaginary personage originated with a copyist who, perceiving that part of the chronicle was written at Westminster, while another portion followed the history of Matthew Paris, concluded that Matthew was himself a monk of Westminster.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Matthew, Feast of Saint
Observed September 21. A Feast in honor ofSt. Matthew has been observed since A.D. 703, and he is known in theChurch as both Apostle and Evangelist. St. Matthew had beena Publican or tax-gatherer, and while in his office at Capernaum,receiving the customs from those who passed over the Sea of Galileehe was called by our Lord and, we read, "he at once arose andfollowed Him." He is called Levi by St. Mark and St. Luke. Thiswas probably his former name and he was named Matthew when he becamea disciple. Being one of the Twelve, he himself saw and heard mostof what he relates in the Gospel which he wrote. It was firstwritten in Hebrew, especially for the Jews, but was afterwards,probably by St. Matthew himself, written in Greek. This Gospeltells us more than the others of our Lord's human life, and it isfor this reason that in ecclesiastical art the symbol assigned toSt. Matthew is "the likeness of a Man" with wings.

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Matthew, the Gospel of - ” When we begin reading this book today, we should, however, have in mind its ending (Matthew 28:18-20 ). Matthew's purpose was to show that Jesus had the power to command His disciples to spread His gospel throughout all the world. ...
Matthew 28:16-20 is the scene of the resurrected Jesus meeting His disciples on a hill in Galilee. In telling this story, Matthew emphasized that Jesus (1) has total authority, (2) His teachings must be transmitted, (3) and His message is for all people. Because of this, Matthew has been recognized for its emphasis on the teachings of Jesus. ...
Matthew 1:1-4:25 opens the Gospel with the royal genealogy and builds to the proclamation of God in Matthew 3:17 : “This is my beloved Son. The wise men (Gentiles) came seeking the King of the Jews (Matthew 2:2 ). The child received a messianic name (Matthew 1:18-23 ). Jesus then went to Galilee of the Gentiles (Matthew 4:15 ) to begin His public ministry. ...
Matthew 5:1-7:29 is commonly called the Sermon on the Mount. It should be called the Teaching from the Mount since that is what the text calls it ( Matthew 5:2 ). He stressed the importance of His commandments in Matthew 5:19 ; emphasized the authoritative nature of His teachings by declaring: “But I say unto you” (Matthew 12:46-50 ,Matthew 5:22,5:28 ,Matthew 9:18-34:32 ,Matthew 5:32,5:39 ,Matthew 5:39,5:44 ); and was recognized by the crowds as a Teacher with authority (Matthew 7:28-29 ). Matthew presented Jesus as an authoritative Teacher. When a believer goes out to teach today, he can refer to Matthew's Gospel. ...
Matthew 8:1-10:42 opens with a series of ten miracles demonstrating Jesus' authority over disease, natural catastrophes, demons, and death. His disciples wondered “that even the winds and sea obey him!” ( Matthew 8:27 ), and the crowds stood amazed that He had the authority to forgive sins (Matthew 9:8 ). After demonstrating His power, Jesus gave authority to His disciples to go out and heal and teach as He had done (Matthew 7:13-232 ), thus preparing them for their final Commission in Matthew 28:18-20 . Matthew continues to teach later generations of believers about Jesus' power and concern for all mankind. ...
Matthew 11:1-13:52 shows various people reacting to Jesus' authority. Various responses are noted in Matthew 11:1 , including Jesus' thanksgiving that the “babes” understand (Matthew 11:25-30 ). When the leaders rejected Jesus' authority in Matthew 11:25-266 , Matthew implied that Jesus would go to the Gentiles by quoting Isaiah the prophet (Matthew 12:18-21 ). Jesus continued His teaching in parables to those who were willing to listen (Matthew 13:10-13 ). ...
Matthew 13:53-18:35 opens with the story of Jesus' teaching in the synagogue in Nazareth. They were astonished (compare Matthew 13:54 ; Matthew 7:28 ). Although Jesus presented His authoritative teaching, His hometown people rejected it (Matthew 13:57 ). His disciples accepted Him (Matthew 14:33 ), and so did the Gentile woman (Matthew 15:22 ). ...
Matthew 19:1-25:46 makes the transition from Galilee to Jerusalem. Jesus dramatically presented His kingly authority by His triumphal entry into Jerusalem ( Matthew 21:1-9 ) and by cleansing the Temple (Matthew 21:10-17 ). Then, while He was teaching, the chief priests and elders challenged Him saying, “By what authority doest thou these things?” (Matthew 21:23 ). Jesus answered with parables and other teachings (Matthew 21:28-22:46 ). Jesus warned the people about the examples of the Pharisees and Sadducees (Matthew 23:1-38 ). He then concentrated His teaching only on His disciples (Matthew 24:1-25:46 ). ...
Matthew 26:1-28:20 has no teaching situations, but it tells of the conspiracy ending in Jesus' execution. Jesus responded by affirming His authority: “Thou hast said” ( Matthew 26:64 ). by Pilate, a Gentile, recognized, Jesus' kingly authority, placarding over the cross: “THIS IS JESUS THE KING OF THE JEWS” (Matthew 27:37 ). The Gentile centurion proclaimed: “Truly this was the Son of God” (Matthew 13:44-461 ). ...
When the resurrected Lord declared His authority to His disciples in Matthew 28:18 , they understood because they had seen His authority displayed as they lived with Jesus. When modern readers come to Matthew 28:18 , they understand because Matthew has shown us Jesus' authority from the beginning. When Jesus commanded His disciples to make other disciples by teaching all that He taught them, they knew what to teach; and we modern believers know what Jesus intended because we know Matthew's record of His teaching. ...
As we read through the seven sections summarized above, we should also note that Matthew presented Jesus as the “Son of God,” a term that appears twenty-three times in the Gospel of Matthew. While the virgin birth story affirms Jesus' sonship, the quotation from Matthew 10:32-39 ( Matthew 2:15 ) confirms it. Twice God proclaimed Jesus' sonship: at His baptism (Matthew 3:17 ) and at the transfiguration (Matthew 17:5 ). Peter confessed it (Matthew 16:16 ). Jesus attested to His sonship in the Lord's prayer (Matthew 6:9 ), His thanksgiving to God (1618385389_30 ), and the Garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 26:39 ). The author wanted the reader to be aware that Jesus, the Son of God, is the One crucified on the cross; so Jesus called out to “my God” from the cross (Matthew 27:46 ), and a Gentile centurion confessed that the dying One is “truly the Son of God” (Matthew 27:54 ). ...
Matthew wanted the reader to be aware that forgiveness of sins comes through the death of the divine Son of God. The angel had told Joseph that Jesus would “save his people from their sins” (Matthew 1:21 ). Jesus Himself had assured His disciples that His destiny was “to give his life a ransom for many” (Matthew 20:28 ). “This is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins” (Matthew 26:28 ). ...
It is impossible to know the exact date when the Gospel of Matthew was written. This is because of Matthew's several references to Gentiles, a reference to Phoenicia and Syria, and the terms (in the Greek text) used for coins (Matthew 17:24 ,Matthew 17:24,17:27 ). Although the Gospel nowhere identifies the author and many modern Bible students point to a complex history of editing and collecting sources, Matthew, the tax collector, the son of Alphaeus has been identified as the author since the second century. See Matthew . Jesus' Birth Fulfilled Prophecy (Matthew 1:1-2:23 ). Jesus was born of the line of David (Matthew 1:1-17 ). God directed the circumstances of Jesus' birth (Matthew 1:18-25 ). Even Gentile foreigners worshiped the newborn Jewish king (Matthew 2:1-12 ). God provided for His Son's survival (Matthew 2:13-23 ). The Obedient Jesus Invites People to Kingdom Service (Matthew 3:1-4:25 ). Jesus carried out God's will by being baptized by John the Baptist (Matthew 3:1-15 ). God approved His Son (Matthew 3:16-17 ). Jesus obeyed God's Word and defeated Satan (Matthew 4:1-11 ). Jesus called people to God's kingdom through repentance (Matthew 4:12-22 ). Jesus demonstrated the power of the kingdom (Matthew 4:23-25 ). Jesus Taught God's Way to Live (Matthew 5:1-7:29 ). Real happiness comes from a right relationship to God (Matthew 5:1-12 ). Christians must be like salt and light (Matthew 5:13-16 ). Love, not legalism, is the rule of the kingdom (Matthew 5:17-48 ). The desire to be seen by others is the wrong motive for good works (Matthew 6:1-4 ). Prayer is private seeking of forgiveness, not public search for praise (Matthew 6:5-15 ). Fasting is of value only if the motive behind it is right (Matthew 6:16-18 ). Only spiritual wealth really lasts (Matthew 6:19-21 ). Each person must choose whether to give God first place (Matthew 6:22-34 ). To judge others is wrong; to show discernment is necessary (Matthew 7:1-6 ). The kingdom requires persistence in prayer and faith in God's goodness (Matthew 7:7-11 ). The Golden Rule summarizes the law and the prophets (Matthew 13:53-17 ). Jesus and His teachings form the only lasting foundation for life (Matthew 7:24-29 ). Jesus' Power and Call Reveal His Authority (Matthew 8:1-10:42 )...
A. Jesus' healing power is available to all persons of faith (Matthew 8:1-17 ). Discipleship is first priority (Matthew 8:18-22 ). Jesus has authority over nature, demons, and sin (Matthew 8:23-9:8 ). Jesus calls sinners to share His authority (Matthew 9:9-13 ). Jesus' gospel requires new forms of piety (Matthew 9:14-17 ). Jesus' authority responds to faith, conquers demons, and does not come from Satan (Matthew 5:28,5 ). The compassionate Lord prays for compassionate helpers (Matthew 9:35-38 ). Jesus entrusts His disciples with His authority in word and deed (Matthew 10:1-20 ). To exercise His authority, disciples must face the dangers Jesus faced (Matthew 10:21-25 ). Jesus' authority removes cause for fear (Matthew 10:26-31 ). Those who welcome Christian messengers will receive rewards (Matthew 10:40-42 ). Jesus' Work Led to Controversy (Matthew 11:1-12:50 ). Jesus fulfilled messianic prophecy (Matthew 11:1-6 ). John marked the end of the prophetic era (Matthew 11:7-15 ). Blind religion seeks controversy rather than truth (Matthew 11:16-19 ). Repentance is the proper response to Jesus (Matthew 11:20-24 ). Discipleship requires faith in God's Son, not great human wisdom or works (Matthew 11:25-30 ). Mercy, not legalism, is the key to interpreting God's Word (Matthew 12:1-14 ). Jesus fulfilled Isaiah's servant prophecies (Matthew 12:15-21 ). Faith sees Jesus as Messiah, but blindness calls Him satanic (Matthew 12:22-37 ). Resurrection faith is the criterion for eternal judgment (Matthew 12:38-45 ). Obedient believers form Cod's family (Matthew 5:22 ). Jesus Taught About the Kingdom (Matthew 13:1-52 ). Response to the kingdom depends on the “soil” (Matthew 13:1-23 ). God delays separating the true from the false (Matthew 13:24-30 ). God's kingdom, small at first, will finally transform the world (Matthew 13:31-33 ). Jesus' use of parables fulfills Scripture (Matthew 13:34-35 ). The Son of Man controls final judgment and will send those who reject Him to eternal punishment (Matthew 13:36-43 ). The kingdom involves both traditional and new understandings of Scripture (Matthew 13:47-52 ). Jesus Confronts Conflict and Critical Events (Matthew 7:12:27 ). Jesus faced rejection and sorrow (Matthew 13:53-14:12 ). Jesus placed compassion for others over personal needs (Matthew 14:13-21 ). Jesus' power over nature and disease shows He is God's Son (Matthew 14:22-36 ). Thoughts and motives, not ritual acts, determine spiritual purity (Matthew 15:1-20 ). Faith overcomes all obstacles that would separate us from Jesus (Matthew 15:21-28 )
Hour - It may refer to a measured length of time or to an occasion or period (Matthew 20:9; Matthew 20:12; Matthew 24:44; Matthew 26:40; Matthew 26:45; Luke 22:53; John 4:21; John 5:28; John 7:30; John 12:27; for details see DAY; TIME)
Matthew, the Gospel According to - As our Lord's words divide Acts (Acts 1:8) into its three parts, "ye shall be witnesses unto Me in Jerusalem, and all Judea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth":...
(1) the period in which the church was Jewish, Acts 1-11;...
(2) the period when it was Gentile with strong Jewish admixture;...
(3) the period when the Gentiles preponderated, Matthew's Gospel answers to the first or Jewish period, ending about A. ...
The expression (Matthew 27:7-8; Matthew 28:15) "unto this day" implies some interval after Christ's crucifixion. Ancient testimony is unanimous that Matthew wrote in Hebrew Papias, a disciple of John (the Presbyter) and companion of Polycarp (Eusebius, H. 3:3), says, "Matthew wrote his oracles (logia ) in Hebrew, and each interpreted them in Greek as he could. " Perhaps the Greek for "oracles," logia , expresses that the Hebrew Gospel of Matthew was a collection of discourses (as logoi means) rather than a full narrative. Matthew's Gospel is the one of the four which gives most fully the discourses of our Lord. Papias' use of the past tense (aorist) implies that "each interpreting" Matthew's Hebrew was in Papias' time a thing of the past, so that as early as the end of the first century or the beginning of the second the need for each to translate the Hebrew had ceased, for an authoritative Greek translation existed. ...
The Hellenists (Greek-speaking) Jews would from the first need a Greek version, and Matthew and the church would hardly leave this want unsupplied in his lifetime. " He identifies Matthew's Hebrew Gospel with "the Gospel of the Nazarenes," which he saw in Pamphilus' library at Caesarea. (Ηebruikois grammasin ) Probably this Nazarene was the original Hebrew Gospel of Matthew interpolated and modified, yet not so much so as the Ebionite Gospel. This view will account for the strange fact that nothing of the Hebrew Matthew has been preserved. Origen (on Prayer, 161:150) argues that epiousion , the Greek word for "daily" in the Lord's prayer, was formed by Matthew himself; Luke adopts the word. 180) remarks that Matthew in quotations of the Old Testament does not follow the Septuagint, but makes his own translation. Quotations in his own narrative (1) pointing out the fulfillment of prophecy Matthew translates from the Hebrew. Matthew 3:3; Matthew 13:14. An independent writer would do just what Matthew does, namely, in speeches of persons introduced would conform to the apostolic tradition which used the Septuagint, but in his own narrative would translate the Hebrew as he judged best under the Spirit. ...
These are arguments for Matthew's authorship of the Greek Gospel. Mark apparently alters or explains many passages found in our Matthew, for greater clearness, as if he had the Greek of Matthew before him (Matthew 18:9; Matthew 19:1 with Mark 10:1; Mark 9:47); and if the Greek existed so early it must have come from Matthew himself, not a transistor. The Latinisms (fragellosas , Matthew 27:26; kodranteen , Matthew 5:26) are unlike a translation from Hebrew into Greek, for why not use the Greek terms as Luke (Luke 12:59) does, rather than Graecised Latinisms? The Latinisms are natural to Matthew, as a portitor or gatherer of port dues, familiar with the Roman coin quadrans, and likely to quote the Latin for "scourging" (fragellosas from flagellum ) used by the Roman governor in sentencing Jesus. ...
The great proof of Matthew's authorship of the Greek is that the Hebrew has left no trace of it except that which may exist in the Nazarene Gospel, whereas our Greek Matthew is quoted as authentic by the apostolic fathers (Polycarp, Ep. How unlikely that Matthew's name should be substituted for the lost name of the unknown translator, and this in apostolic times; for John lived to see the completion of the canon; he never would have sanctioned as the authentic Gospel of Matthew a fragmentary compilation "in arrangement and selection of events not such as would have proceeded from an apostle and eye witness" (Alford). The Hebraisms accord with the Jewish character of Matthew's Gospel, and suit the earliest period of the church. ...
Early Christian writers quote the Greek, not the Hebrew, with implicit confidence in its authority as Matthew's work. The Syriac version of the second century is demonstrably made, not from its kindred tongue the Hebrew, but from the Greek Matthew; this to too in the country next Judea where Matthew wrote, and with which there was the freest communication. The Hebrew Matthew having served its local and temporary use was laid aside, just as Paul's temporary epistles (Colossians 4:16; 1 Corinthians 5:9) have not been transmitted to us, the Holy Spirit designing them to serve but for a time. Our Greek Matthew has few, if any, traces of being a translation; it has the general marks of being an independent work. ...
A translator would not have presumed to alter Matthew's original so as to have the air of originality which it has; if he had, his compilation would never have been accepted as the authentic Gospel of the inspired apostle Matthew by the churches which had within them men possessing the gift of "discerning spirits" (1 Corinthians 12:10). As Mark's name designates his Gospel, not that of Peter his apostolic guide, and Luke's name his Gospel not Paul's name, so if a translator had modified Matthew's Hebrew, his name not Matthew's would have designated it. All is clear if we suppose that, after inaccurate translations of his Hebrew by others such as Papias (above) notices, Matthew himself at a later date wrote, or dictated, in Greek for Greek speaking Jews the Gospel in fuller form than the Hebrew. Son of David is mainly dwelt, on; but His divine aspect as Lord of David is also presented in Matthew 22:45; Matthew 16:16; proving that Matthew's view accords with that of John, who makes prominent Jesus' divine claims. From the beginning Matthew introduces Jesus as "Son of David," but Mark 1:1 as "the Son of God," Luke as "the Son of Adam, the son of God" (Luke 3:38), John as "the Word" who "was God" (John 1:4). Papias' description of the Hebrew Matthew as a studied arrangement (suntaxis ) of our Lord's "discourses" accords with this view. The Greek of Matthew is the most Hebraic of the New Testament Hellenistic writers (Hellenistic is Hebrew in idiom and thoughts, Greek in words): for instance matheteuein , tafos sumboulion lambanein , distazein , katapontizesthai , metairein , proskunein with the dative (not the accusative as in Mark and Luke), sunairein logon , omnuoo eis or en of the thing or person sworn by; akousoo for akousomai ; pas hostis (but Luke pas hos ); brechein to rain (but in Luke to moisten); sunteleia tou aionos (elsewhere only in Hebrews 9:26, both Scriptures being for Jews); basileta ton ouranon (in the rest of the New Testament basileia tou ΤΗeou ); the phrase "that it might be fulfilled" (Matthew 2:15; Matthew 1:22) implies that the prophetic word necessitated the fulfillment (Matthew 24:35); "that which was spoken" (to rethen , errethee ) is the form of quotation 20 times, suitable to the Hebrew mode (Mark 13:14, the only other instance, is omitted in the two oldest manuscripts, Sinaiticus and Vaticanus), compare Hebrews 2:2. ...
Three peculiar terms are common to Matthew and Mark, angareusei , fragelloosas , and koloboosai . If Mark adopted them from Matthew the Greek Matthew must be authentic for it must then have been written in Matthew's lifetime, when none durst have brought out a free translation of the Hebrew as Matthew's Gospel. The independence in the mode of Old Testament quotations is inconsistent with the notion of a mere translated "The Son of David" is eight times in Matthew, three times each in Mark and Luke. Jerusalem is "the holy city" (Matthew 4:5; Matthew 27:53), which it ceased to be regarded as by the time that subsequent New Testament writers wrote, when the Jews had continued to harden themselves against the truth. , quote Matthew as of undisputed authority. For the Jews; to show Jewish, readers (to whom were committed the Old Testament "oracles of God") that Jesus is the Messiah of the Old Testament, fulfilling Old Testament prophecies, as born of a virgin in Bethlehem (Matthew 2:6); fleeing to Egypt and called out of it; heralded by John Baptist (Matthew 3:3); laboring in Galilee of the Gentiles (Matthew 4:14-16); healing (Matthew 8:17); teaching in parables (Matthew 13:14 ff). Matthew has 65 Old Testament quotations, of which 43 are verbal; Luke has 43, of which only 19 are verbal. Matthew takes for granted that his readers, as Jews, know Jewish customs and places; Mark for Gentile readers describes these (Matthew 15:1-2 with Mark 7:1-4, "with defiled, that is, unwashed hands," Matthew 27:62 with Mark 15:42, "the preparation, that is the day before the sabbath," Luke 23:54; John 19:14; John 19:31; John 19:42). ...
The interpretations of Ιmmanueel , Εloi , lama sabachthani , Αkeldama (Matthew 1:23; Matthew 27:8; Matthew 27:46) were designed for Greek speakers. In contrast with Judaic traditions and servility to the dead letter, the law is unfolded in its spirit (Matthew 5; 23). The epistle of James answers closely to the Sermon on the Mount (which Matthew alone gives fully) in its spiritual development of the law (James 5:12; James 1:25; James 1:2); the relation of the gospel to the law is the aspect which Matthew, like James, presents. ) What James is among the apostolic epistles that Matthew is among the evangelists. ...
Mere Judaic privileges will not avail, for unbelief shall cast the children of the kingdom into outer darkness, while the saved shall come from every quarter to sit down with Abraham through faith (Matthew 8:10-12). Records found only in Matthew. ) Matthew 1: Joseph's dreams. Matthew 2: Christ worshipped by the wise men, Herod's massacre of the children at Bethlehem, Herod's death, and Christ's return to Nazareth. Matthew 5-7: the Sermon on the Mount in full. Matthew 9: healing of two blind men. Matthew 11: call to the heavy laden. Matthew 13: parables of the hidden treasure, the pearl, and the drag-net. Matthew 16: Peter's confession of Christ, and Christ's confirmation of Peter's name (compare at an early time John 1:42). Matthew 17: Christ's paying the tribute with money from a fish. Matthew 20: cures two blind men while going from Jericho. Matthew 22: parable of the wedding garment. Matthew 25: parables of the ten virgins, talents, and sheep and goats at the judgment. Matthew 27: dream of Pilate's wife, appearance of many saints after the crucifixion. Matthew 28: soldiers bribed to say that Christ's disciples had stolen His body. ...
QUOTATIONS IN Matthew Matthew 1:23 "Behold, a virgin" Isaiah 7:14 Matthew 2:6 "Thou Bethlehem" Micah 5:2 Matthew 2:15 "Out of Egypt" Hosea 11:1 Matthew 2:18 "In Rama a voice" Jeremiah 31:15 Matthew 3:3 "The voice of one crying" Isaiah 40:3 Matthew 4:4 "Man shall not live by bread" Deuteronomy 8:3 Matthew 4:6 "He shall give His angels charge" Psalms 91:11-12 Matthew 4:7 "Thou shalt not tempt " Deuteronomy 6:16 Matthew 4:10 "Thou shalt worship the Lord" Deuteronomy 6:13 Matthew 4:15-16 "The land of Zabulon" Isaiah 9:1-2 Matthew 5:5 "Blessed are the meek: they shall Psalms 37:11 inherit the earth" Matthew 5:21 "Thou shalt not kill" Exodus 20:13 Matthew 5:27 "Thou shalt not commit adultery" Exodus 20:14 Matthew 5:31 "Give her a writing of divorcement" Deuteronomy 24:1 Matthew 5:33 "Thou shalt not forswear"...
Deuteronomy 23:23; Leviticus 19:12 Matthew 5:38 "An eye for an eye" Exodus 21:24 Matthew 5:43 "Love thy neighbor . hate thine enemy" Leviticus 19:18; Deuteronomy 23:6 Matthew 8:4 "Offer the gift . Moses commanded" Leviticus 14:2 Matthew 8:17 "Himself took our infirmities" Matthew 13:14-151 Matthew 9:13 "I will have mercy" Hosea 6:6 Matthew 10:35-36 "A man's foes . of his own household" Micah 7:5-6 Matthew 11:5 "Blind receive sight" Isaiah 35:5 Matthew 11:10 "Behold, I send My messenger" Malachi 3:1 Matthew 11:14 "Elias, which was for to come " Malachi 4:5 Matthew 12:3 "Have ye not read what David did?" 1 Samuel 21:1-6 Matthew 12:5 "Priests profane sabbath" Numbers 28:9 Matthew 12:7 "Mercy, not sacrifice" Hosea 6:6 Matthew 12:18-21 "Behold My Servant" Isaiah 42:1-4 Matthew 12:40 "Jonas three days in whale's belly"...
Jonah 1:17 Matthew 12:42 "Queen of the south came" 1 Kings 10:1 1618385389_72 "Hearing ye shall hear" Isaiah 6:9-10 Matthew 13:35 "I will open my mouth in parables" Psalms 78:2-3 Matthew 15:8 "This people draweth nigh . lips" Isaiah 29:13 Matthew 15:34 "Honor thy father" Exodus 20:12 Matthew 17:2 "Transfigured" Exodus 34:29 Matthew 17:11 "Elias shall first come" Malachi 3:1; Malachi 4:5 Matthew 18:15 "If thy brother trespass . Leviticus 19:17 tell him his fault" Matthew 19:4 "He which made them at the beginning Genesis 1:27 made male and female" Matthew 19:5 "For this cause shall a man leave his father" Genesis 2:24 Matthew 19:7 "Divorcement" Deuteronomy 24:1 Matthew 19:18 "Do no murder" Exodus 20:13 Matthew 21:5 "Behold, thy King cometh" Zechariah 9:9 Matthew 21:9 "Blessed is he that cometh in the Psalms 118:25-26 name of the Lord, Hosanna"...
Matthew 21:13 "My house the house of prayer" Isaiah 56:7 Matthew 21:16 "Out of the mouth of babes" Psalms 8:2 Matthew 21:42 "The stone which the builders rejected" Psalms 118:22-23 Matthew 21:44 "Whosoever shall fall on this stone Isaiah 8:14 shall be broken" Matthew 22:24 "Moses said, If a man die" Deuteronomy 25:5 Matthew 22:32 "I am the God of Abraham" Exodus 3:6 Matthew 22:37 "Thou shalt love the Lord" Deuteronomy 6:5 Matthew 22:39 "Thou shalt love thy neighbor" Leviticus 19:18 Matthew 22:45 "Sit thou on My right hand" Psalms 110:1 Matthew 23:35 "Blood of Abel" Genesis 4:8 Matthew 23:38 "Your house is left desolate" Psalms 69:25 Matthew 23:39 "Blessed is he that cometh in the Psalms 118:26 name of the Lord"...
Matthew 24:15 "The abomination of desolation" Daniel 9:27 Matthew 24:29 "Sun . darkened" Isaiah 13:10 Matthew 24:37 "The days of Noe" Genesis 6:11 Matthew 26:31 "I will smite the shepherd" Zechariah 13:7 Matthew 26:52 "They that take the sword shall Genesis 9:6 perish with the sword" Matthew 26:64 "Son of man . in the clouds" Daniel 7:13 Matthew 27:9 "The thirty pieces of silver . Zechariah 11:13 potter's field" Matthew 27:35 "They parted my garments" Psalms 22:18 Matthew 27:43 "He trusted in God" Psalms 22:8 Matthew 27:46 "My God, My God, why" Psalms 22:1. Introduction; Christ's genealogy, birth; visit of the wise men; flight to Egypt; return to Nazareth; John the Baptist's preparatory ministry; Christ's baptism and consecration to His office by the Holy Spirit, with the Father's declared approval (Matthew 1-3). Temptation; ministry in Galilee; call of disciples (Matthew 4). Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7). Events in order, proving His claim to Messiahship by miracles (Matthew 8-9). Appointment of apostles; doubts of John's disciples; cavils of the Pharisees; on the other hand His loving invitations, miracles, series of parables on the kingdom; effects of His ministry on Herod and various classes; prophecy to His disciples of His coming death (Matthew 10 - 18:35). Ministry in Judea and Jerusalem (Matthew 19-20). Passion week: entry into Jerusalem; opposition to Him by Herodians, Sadducees, Pharisees; silences them all; denunciation of the Pharisees (Matthew 21-23_. Last discourses: His coming as Lord and Judge (Matthew 24-25). Passion and resurrection (Matthew 26-28)
Viper - Symbol of hypocrisy and malignity (Matthew 3:7; Matthew 12:34; Matthew 23:33)
Matthew, Gospel of - Nowhere does this Gospel say who wrote it, though the title given to it in the second century reflects the traditional belief that Matthew was the author. Whether or not Matthew actually produced the finished product, it seems clear that his writings (referred to in second century documents) must have at least provided a major source of material for the book. ...
Origin of Matthew’s Gospel...
It appears that Mark’s Gospel, written during the first half of the decade of the sixties, was the first of the Gospels. A few years later, probably in the decade of the seventies, Matthew’s Gospel appeared. ...
Matthew had a clear purpose in writing. But Matthew used this material differently from Mark and Luke, by making it serve his central purpose. ...
A teaching purpose...
Included in the material found solely in Matthew are many quotations from the Old Testament. He introduces most of these by a statement showing how the Old Testament was fulfilled in Jesus (Matthew 1:22; Matthew 2:15; Matthew 2:17; Matthew 2:23; Matthew 4:14; Matthew 8:17; Matthew 12:17; Matthew 13:35; Matthew 21:4; Matthew 27:9). ...
Matthew was particularly concerned to show that Jesus was the promised Messiah, the son of David, the fulfilment of God’s purposes in choosing Israel (Matthew 1:1; Matthew 1:17; Matthew 2:6; Matthew 9:27; Matthew 11:2-6; Matthew 15:22; Matthew 16:16; Matthew 21:9; Matthew 26:63-64). In Jesus the kingdom of God had come (Matthew 4:17; Matthew 4:23; Matthew 5:3; Matthew 12:28; Matthew 18:1-4; Matthew 24:14; see KINGDOM OF GOD), though Jesus the king was not the sort of king most people had expected (Matthew 2:6; Matthew 4:8-10; Matthew 21:5; Matthew 25:31; Matthew 25:34; Matthew 26:52-53; Matthew 27:11). Matthew’s Gospel gave reassurance to these Christians that they were not people who had wandered away from the teaching of the Jewish religion, but people who had found the true fulfilment of it. Jesus did not contradict the Jewish law; rather he brought out its full meaning (Matthew 5:17). ...
The Gospel of Matthew therefore showed the Jewish Christians the nature of the kingdom into which they had come, and the requirements it laid upon them. They were to have high standards of behaviour (Matthew 5:3-12; Matthew 5:22; Matthew 5:28; Matthew 5:42; Matthew 5:44; Matthew 20:21-27) and were to be energetic in spreading the good news of the kingdom to others (Matthew 5:13-16; Matthew 10:5-8; Matthew 24:14; Matthew 28:19-20). The unbelieving Jewish traditionalists, on the other hand, were consistently condemned (Matthew 3:9; Matthew 23:1-36). They missed out on the kingdom, with the result that the gospel was sent to the Gentiles, and many believed (Matthew 8:11-12; Matthew 11:21-24; Matthew 12:21; Matthew 12:38-42; Matthew 21:43). Jesus had laid the foundation of his church, and no opposition could overpower it (Matthew 16:18). ...
Because of its basic purpose of instruction, Matthew’s account of the life of Jesus records more teaching and less action than the accounts of Mark and Luke. ’ (Matthew 7:28; Matthew 11:1; Matthew 13:53; Matthew 19:1; Matthew 26:1). ...
Summary of contents...
The opening section of Matthew begins with a genealogy of Jesus (1:1-17), the story of his birth (1:18-25), the escape from Herod (2:1-18) and the subsequent move to Nazareth (2:19-23)
Persecution (2) - Repeatedly He foretold the main incidents of His Passion (Matthew 16:21; Matthew 17:22-23; Matthew 20:18-19; Matthew 26:2, Matthew 8:31; Matthew 9:31; Matthew 10:32-34). (2) Christ also forewarned His disciples that they too must suffer persecution (Matthew 24:9, Mark 4:17; Mark 10:30, Luke 11:49; Luke 21:12; Luke 21:16, John 16:2-4; John 16:33). It was mentioned in the parable of the Sower as the cause of defection among superficial believers (Mark 4:17, Matthew 13:21). (4) It was the sure means of gaining a blessing, and as such is particularly referred to in the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:10-12). ...
The methods of persecution adopted against Christ and His immediate followers were such as contempt and disparagement (John 8:48); ascription of Christ’s miracles to the power of the Evil One (Matthew 12:24); expulsion of those believing on Him from the synagogue (John 9:22; John 9:34); attempts to entrap Him in His words (Matthew 22:15, John 8:6); questioning His authority (Mark 11:28, Matthew 21:23); (after the failure of the former) illegal arrest and the heaping of every kind of insult upon the Prisoner, who was entitled to protection from the authorities until the authorized penalty was laid upon Him (Matthew 26:67 ff. ...
It was the fear of persecution that drove the disciples to forsake their Master at the hour of His arrest (Matthew 26:56 and parallels)
Lunatic - KJV term for epilepsy or insanity (Matthew 4:24 ; Matthew 17:15 ). The Greek terms underlying Matthew 4:24 and Matthew 17:15 are likewise related to the Greek term for moon. Lunacy was not clearly distinguished from demon possession ( Matthew 17:18 ; compare Mark 9:17 ; Luke 9:39 )
Brother - A brother by the same mother, a uterine brother, Matthew 4:21 ; Matthew 20:20 . A brother, though not by the same mother, Matthew 1:2 . A near kinsman, a cousin, Matthew 13:55 ; Mark 6:3 . Observe, that in Matthew 13:55 , James, and Joses, and Judas, are called the αδελφοι , brethren, of Christ, but were most probably only his cousins by his mother's side; for James and Joses were the sons of Mary, Matthew 27:56 ; and James and Judas, the sons of Alpheus, Luke 6:15-16 ; which Alpheus is therefore probably the same with Cleopas, the husband of Mary, sister to our Lord's mother, John 19:25
Judgment - is pre-eminently the Gospel of judgment, for, throughout, Jesus appears as the Judge of men, and is always discriminating and separating the good from the bad, the sheep from the goats, the wheat from the tares, the grain from the chaff, the sincere man from the hypocrite (Matthew 13:38; Matthew 25:33; Matthew 13:25-30; Matthew 3:12; Matthew 6:5-6). The predominance of this special aspect of Jesus’ teaching, selected from among His varied utterances, in this Gospel, may arise from Matthew’s Hebrew predisposition to consider Israel as a people separated from the Gentile world. The judgment which eventuates in blessedness, as in the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:3-10), or as ‘Come, ye blessed of my Father’ (Matthew 25:34), is as notable as that which leads to separation from Christ and to eternal wretchedness (Matthew 25:46). He separates men under moral tests (Matthew 25:31-46; cf. Matthew 7:23). He pronounces judgment on the Pharisees (Matthew 22:15-46). He judges Satan (Matthew 16:23). He imparts the authority for judgment to men (Matthew 16:19). His judgment-seat is at the same time the throne of His glory (Matthew 25:31), as it marks the culmination of the work which He has mediated in creation and in redemption. It is to be noted that He associates with Himself the twelve disciples (like the Roman assessors of judgment) who are to judge the twelve tribes of Israel (Matthew 19:28, Luke 22:30; cf. Their ‘works’ or ‘deeds’ are reviewed (Matthew 16:27; Matthew 25:31; cf. Every kindness to a disciple will be rewarded (Mark 9:41, Matthew 10:42). These are some of the tests:...
Following Him (Matthew 4:18-22; Matthew 10:38; Matthew 19:28, Mark 8:34); confessing Him (Matthew 10:32, Luke 12:8); failure to appreciate His presence and work (Matthew 11:21); failure to come to Him (John 5:40); failure to believe Him (John 3:18); failure to obey Him (John 3:36); failure to honour Him (John 5:23); failure to stand with Him (Matthew 12:30); failure of right fruitage (Matthew 21:31-42; Matthew 7:16, Luke 6:44); failure in outward conduct (Matthew 22:11-13); failure to help men (Matthew 25:31-46); failure to repent (John 5:40); failure to use the gifts of God (Matthew 25:14-30); making light of His personal invitations (Matthew 22:1-7); unwillingness to hear His words (Matthew 12:41-42); unwillingness to forgive an injury (Matthew 6:15; Matthew 18:28-30); being ashamed of Him (Mark 8:38); breaking a commandment (Matthew 5:19); the spirit of our judgment on others (Matthew 7:2); faith or lack of it (Matthew 8:10; Matthew 9:22; Matthew 9:29; Matthew 15:28, Mark 5:34); heart unreceptive to His words (Matthew 10:14-15); hypocrisy (Matthew 23:13-36); idle words (Matthew 12:36); lip service without the heart (Matthew 15:7); selfish conceit (Matthew 6:2); wicked pride (Mark 12:38); love of darkness (John 3:19); rejection of His disciples (Luke 10:10); adultery (Matthew 19:9); commercialism in worship (Matthew 21:13); blasphemy against the Spirit (Matthew 12:31-32); loving others more than God (Matthew 10:37); hearing, seeing the Son, with belief or with failure to believe (Matthew 7:24; Matthew 13:23, John 5:24; John 6:40); the cup of cold water given to a disciple (Matthew 10:42); mercifulness (Luke 6:36); love to Christ (Luke 7:47, John 21:16); love to enemies (Luke 6:27); humble-mindedness as a child (Matthew 18:4); fidelity of service (Matthew 20:14; Matthew 24:45-51); endurance in well-doing (Matthew 24:13); doing will of God (Matthew 12:50); deeds in general (Matthew 16:27); inward thoughts and motives (Mark 7:21, Luke 5:22-23). The great first and second commandments in the law which our Lord enunciated to the lawyer (Matthew 22:37-39) are in the nature of a judgment, for men know whether or not they have been kept. The time of this Final Judgment is set forth in the Synoptics as at ‘the end of the world’ (Matthew 13:39). The words ‘the time’ (Matthew 8:29), and ‘then’ (Matthew 16:27, Matthew 25:1), point to a time which follows the Lord’s appearing in glory with His angels after the resurrection from the dead. ‘That day and hour’ (Matthew 24:36), ‘the resurrection of life’ and ‘the resurrection of judgment’ (John 5:29), are the antithetical statements of what takes place after the resurrection, which to one class of men is entrance into life, and to the other entrance into judgment followed by spiritual death. —‘All nations’ (Matthew 25:32) and all men (Matthew 12:36, John 5:29) shall be judged (cf. It is implied in Matthew 8:29 that evil spirits also are to stand in the judgment. But it is clear that the holy angels do not come into judgment, for they accompany and serve the holy Judge (Matthew 16:27; Matthew 25:31). —Jesus Christ the Judge in His glory (Matthew 16:27; Matthew 19:28, Mark 8:38, Luke 9:26) [1]; ‘the throne of his glory’ (Matthew 25:31); the surrounding holy angels as His servitors (cf. Matthew 13:41); mankind gathered before Him; evil spirits awaiting their final doom; the sharp separations; the openness of the facts upon which judgment proceeds; the uncovered moral life of every man; the irrevocableness of the decision (Matthew 25:46),—all these, together with the manifestly diverse feelings of the righteous and the wicked, present a scene of surpassing grandeur, extent, and interest
Hindrance - The world is an environment of hindrances and causes of stumbling (Matthew 18:7). Such is the pressure of opposing influences that the entrance into life has to be by a narrow gate (Matthew 7:13). Instances of these outward and inward difficulties are given in the parable of the Sower (Matthew 13:18-23), and in that of the Tares their final elimination is predicted (Matthew 13:41). The following hindrances are specially emphasized: (1) prosperity and power (Matthew 4:8; Matthew 19:24, Luke 16:31; Luke 18:23); (2) self-righteousness and the arresting effect of an inferior standard (Matthew 5:20; Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:16; Matthew 23:5-7, Luke 18:14); (3) family claims and their displacing power (Matthew 8:21; Matthew 10:37); (4) want of faith (Matthew 14:31; Matthew 17:20; Matthew 25:25, Luke 22:32); (5) blindness of heart in its progressive stages of (a) ignorance (Matthew 13:15, Luke 18:18; Luke 23:34, John 17:25, repeated in Acts 3:17, 1 Corinthians 2:8), (b) indifference (Luke 7:32),—being the interval of apathy and discouragement that succeeds when ideals once regarded as final cease to fill the imagination and satisfy the heart, and institutions once held to be sacred fail to yield the expected results,—(c) inability to discern and feel (Matthew 16:3; Matthew 23:37), and lastly (d) conscious malignity towards the Kingdom of God (Matthew 23:13; Matthew 27:18, Mark 7:8, Luke 11:15; Luke 11:52, cf. Comparative moral values are attached to these hindrances (Matthew 8:10; Matthew 11:21-24; Matthew 12:41-42, Mark 12:41-44, Luke 7:47; Luke 17:16). Prayer may be offered for their removal (Matthew 26:39, similarly 2 Corinthians 12:8). The victory that can be obtained over all hindrances makes a sanctified cross the emblem of the Christian life (Matthew 16:24, Mark 8:34, Luke 9:23). ...
Stumbling-block, stumbling-stone (πρὀσκομμα, προσκοπή, also σκάνδαλον, ‘trap’ or ‘snare’ [1], and frequently translation ‘offence,’ ‘offend’ [2]). sense the offence is most blameworthy where the trust is most implicit and unreserved, as in the confidence of children (Matthew 18:6)
Palsy - KJV term for paralysis (Matthew 4:24 ; Matthew 9:2 ; Luke 5:18 ; Acts 8:7 ). The Gospel writers were rather concerned to present Jesus as the One to whom God had entrusted the authority to forgive sins (Matthew 9:6 ) and whose healing ministry was a cause for glorifying God (Matthew 9:8 )
Sermon on the Mount - Matthew’s Gospel is built around five main sermons or collections of teachings from Jesus. The first of these, Chapters 5-7, is known as the Sermon on the Mount, after the place where Jesus was teaching at the time (Matthew 5:1). Very likely, in view of Matthew’s style of presentation, the section contains more than the contents of a single sermon (see Matthew, GOSPEL OF). Jesus gave the teaching primarily to his disciples (Matthew 5:1-2; Matthew 5:13-14), though, as often happened, many others gathered to listen (Matthew 7:28). Unlike life in human society in general, it has no place for pride, hatred, cruelty, aggression, hypocrisy and self-sufficiency (Matthew 5:3-10; Matthew 5:48; see KINGDOM OF GOD). It does not lay down a legal code of ethics, but aims to work within people to produce a standard of behaviour that no law-code can produce, no matter how good it might be (Matthew 5:17-18). The righteousness Jesus wants in his followers is more than outward conformity to certain laws (Matthew 5:20). It is not enough, for instance, just to refrain from murder; people must remove the spirit of hate and revenge from their hearts, for it is that spirit that produces murder (Matthew 5:21-22; cf. Their concern for outward correctness failed to deal with inward attitudes (Matthew 5:27-30). They took civil laws relating to penalties for crimes and applied them to personal relationships (Matthew 5:38-42). They so twisted the meaning of the law that they could claim the law’s authority for actions that were clearly contrary to the law (Matthew 5:31-37). They even gave their own sayings equal authority with the law (Matthew 5:43-47). He was also opposed to the pride it produced through its concern for outward show (Matthew 6:1-6; Matthew 6:16-18). He taught his disciples how to pray (Matthew 6:7-15; Matthew 7:7-12), how to have new attitudes of trust in God for all life’s material needs (Matthew 6:19-34), how to examine their attitudes (Matthew 7:1-5) and how to be wise in deciding what is wholesome and what is not (Matthew 7:6; Matthew 7:15-23). Jesus’ teaching, being from God, had an authority that was lacking in the traditional teaching of the scribes (Matthew 7:28-29). But if people are to benefit from it, they must not only understand it but also act upon it (Matthew 7:24-27)
Indolence - —The spirit of Christ’s religion is inimical to indolence in the sphere of business (Luke 16:11, Matthew 24:48; Matthew 23:26), but more especially indolent Christianity is salt without savour (Matthew 5:13). Not only is a state of salvation hard to maintain (Matthew 7:14), but perfection is to be aimed at (Matthew 5:48). An enemy sows tares while we sleep (Matthew 13:25). The oil in our lamps consumes as we rest (Matthew 25:5). Watchfulness is the very opposite of indolence (Matthew 26:41). The hid talent will reproach the indolent in the day of reckoning (Matthew 25:18). The conscience must be kept awake and intelligent (Matthew 5:23-24). The ears must be open to learn, and the heart ready to believe (Matthew 11:15). The rock foundation to build the house upon may need much toil to reach it (Matthew 7:24). —Love is not indolent in seeking the lost sheep (Matthew 18:12)
Goodman - KJV on occasion translates the Greek term oikodehyspotes (rendered “goodman” at Matthew 20:11 ; Matthew 24:43 ; Mark 14:14 ; Luke 22:11 ) as master of the house (Matthew 10:25 ) or householder (Matthew 13:27 )
Matthew - When the Gospel writers Mark and Luke give the list of the twelve apostles, they name Matthew but do not record his occupation (Mark 3:18; Luke 6:15). When they mention the tax collector who responded to Jesus’ call and invited his fellow tax collectors to a feast to meet Jesus, they call him not Matthew, but Levi, which was his other name (Mark 2:14-17; Luke 5:27-32). It seems as if, to be kind to Matthew, they deliberately avoid mentioning that he was once a tax collector. ...
Matthew’s response to the call of Jesus changed his attitude to life completely. This is seen in the Gospel traditionally associated with Matthew. The book itself does not state whether Matthew was the person who actually wrote it, but there is good evidence to suggest that, no matter who wrote it, it came from material that Matthew had prepared. And far from hiding the fact that he was once a tax collector, Matthew states it clearly. He uses the name Matthew, not Levi, in his account of Jesus’ call (Matthew 9:9-13), and in his list of the twelve apostles he states his previous occupation (Matthew 10:3). (See also Matthew, GOSPEL OF. )...
At the time he first met Jesus, Matthew lived and worked in Capernaum on the shore of the Sea of Galilee (Mark 2:1; Mark 2:13-14). He had a good income (Matthew 9:9) and owned a house large enough to accommodate a good number of people (Luke 5:29). But he left all this to join Jesus in the urgent and risky business of spreading the good news of the kingdom of God (Matthew 10:5-23). Though the Bible gives no details of Matthew’s later activities, he was involved in the establishment of the church after Jesus’ resurrection (Acts 1:13)
Herod, Family of - 1 is mentioned as 'Herod the king' in Matthew 2:1-22 ; Luke 1:5 ...
No. Philip, Matthew 14:3 ; Mark 6:17 ; Luke 3:19 . Herod the Tetrarch, Matthew 14:1-6 ; Luke 3:1-19 ; Luke 9:7 ; Acts 13:1 ; the king, ...
Matthew 14:9 ; King Herod, Mark 6:14-22 ; Herod, Luke 13:31 ; Luke 23:7-15 . Matthew 2:22 . Matthew 14:3-6 ; Mark 6:17-22 ; Luke 3:19
Physician (2) - —Priests were inspectors of leprosy (Matthew 8:4, Luke 17:14), but they were not the regular physicians. Elsewhere physicians are mentioned in proverbial sayings only (Matthew 9:12 || Mark 2:17, Luke 5:31; Luke 4:23): there is no censure of them in Christ’s words, on the contrary He implies that the sick should resort to the physician; but Mark 5:26 probably gives a fair impression of their general value. ; castration, Matthew 19:12). The language of Matthew 18:8 f. Matthew 23:27), i. Indeed, the word ‘Saviour’ implies it (Matthew 9:21 f. The following points are observable in Christ’s healings:—(a) Variety: blindness (Matthew 9:27 ff; Matthew 20:29 ff. ), palsy (Matthew 9:1 ff. ||), withered hand (Matthew 12:9 ff. ||), issue (Matthew 9:20 ||), dropsy (Luke 14:1 ff. ), fever (Matthew 8:14 ff. ||), leprosy (Matthew 8:1 ff. ), possession (Matthew 8:28 ff. , John 9:25; John 9:39); (c) universality: without price (Matthew 10:8, ct. ]'>[1] Mark 5:26), without exception (Matthew 11:5, Mark 1:27; Mark 7:37, John 9:32), without fail (ct. ) on Christ’s part,—the (Divine) will (Matthew 8:3); in some cases is added the (human) prayer (Mark 9:29, John 11:41); (ii. ) on the sick one’s or the petitioner’s part,—faith (Matthew 8:13; Matthew 9:2; Matthew 9:22; Matthew 9:28; Matthew 15:28 etc. ) ordinarily an application, either personal (Luke 5:12; Luke 17:13; Luke 18:38) or intercessory—with (Mark 2:3; Mark 7:32; Mark 9:17) or without (Matthew 8:6, Mark 7:29 f. [5]); (f) performance: usually immediate (Matthew 8:3 f. ); (g) accompaniments: a word (Matthew 8:8; Matthew 8:13; Matthew 12:13), never otherwise in the case of possession (Matthew 8:16; Matthew 8:31), a touch (Matthew 8:3, Matthew 9:18; Matthew 9:25; Matthew 9:29, Mark 5:28; Mark 6:56), a symbolic action (Mark 7:33, John 9:6 f. ); (h) sequel: an assurance (Mark 5:34, Luke 17:19; Luke 18:42), a command (Matthew 8:4; Matthew 9:6, Mark 5:19; Mark 5:43), a warning (John 5:14)
Jeremy - (jehr' eh mee) KJV transliteration for Greek spelling of Jeremiah, the prophet (Matthew 2:17 ; Matthew 27:9 )
Goodman - word is translated ‘householder’ in Matthew 13:27 ; Matthew 13:52 ; Matthew 20:1 ; Matthew 21:33 , and ‘master of the house’ in Matthew 10:25 , Luke 13:25
District - In the New Testament district often refers to the area around a city (Matthew 15:21 ; Matthew 16:13 ; Mark 8:10 ). At Acts 16:21 the reference is to an administrative area (perhaps Matthew 2:22 also). At times district means no more than the general area ( Matthew 9:26 ,Matthew 9:26,9:31 )
Householder - It is rendered ‘householder’ in the parables of the Tares and the Wheat (Matthew 13:27), of the Owner bringing forth his treasures new and old (Matthew 13:52), of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1), of the Vineyard let out to husbandmen (Matthew 21:33), with special application to Christ as Head of the Church. The translation ‘master of the house’ is found in Luke 12:39 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 (Authorized Version ‘goodman’), Matthew 24:43, of the owner or overseer whose duty it is to protect his property against the thief in the night. It occurs also in the parable of the Great Supper, Luke 14:21 (corresponding to the king of Matthew 22:2; Matthew 22:7), also as denoting the head of the house whose persecution involves that of his subordinates, Matthew 10:25 (see Household); and once more in the parable of the Unfaithful, against whom the door was shut, Luke 13:25 (cf. parable of the Ten Virgins, Matthew 25)
Nephthalim - (nehf' thuh lihm) Greek form of Naphtali used by the KJV (Matthew 4:13 ,Matthew 4:13,4:15 ; Revelation 7:6 )
Lunatics - Healed by Christ (Matthew 4:24; Matthew 17:25)
Sir - It is the salutation of servants (slaves) to their masters (‘Sir, didst thou not sow good seed?’ Matthew 13:27); of a son to a father (‘I go, sir,’ Matthew 21:30); of the priests and Pharisees to Pilate (‘Sir, we remember that that deceiver said,’ Matthew 27:63); of the Greeks to Philip (‘Sir, we would see Jesus,’ John 12:21). In the English versions ‘lord’ (κύριε) is frequently used in the same sense (‘Lord, thou deliveredst unto me live talents,’ Matthew 25:20; Matthew 25:22; Matthew 25:24; ‘Lord, let it alone this year also,’ Luke 13:8; Luke 14:22; Luke 19:16; Luke 19:18; Luke 19:20). It is also a term frequently employed in addressing Jesus, both by disciples and others (‘Lord, if thou wilt thou canst make me clean,’ Matthew 8:2, John 11:12); so the woman of Samaria says to Jesus, ‘Sir, thou hast nothing to draw with’ (John 4:11)
Capernaum - Jesus seems to have made it the base for his ministry in Galilee, and it became known as his home town (Matthew 4:13; Matthew 9:1; Mark 2:1; Mark 9:33; John 6:24). One of these was Matthew, who later became a disciple of Jesus (Mark 2:1; Mark 2:13-15; cf. Matthew 17:24). Among the town’s more important citizens were government officials and at least one Roman centurion (Matthew 8:5; Matthew 17:24; John 4:46). Jesus often taught in these synagogues, but the people’s stubborn refusal to believe in him as the Messiah would one day bring God’s judgment upon them (Matthew 11:23; Luke 4:31; John 6:59)
Publican - 1: τελώνης (Strong's #5057 — Noun Masculine — telones — tel-o'-nace ) primarily denoted "a farmer of the tax" (from telos, "toll, custom, tax"), then, as in the NT, a subsequent subordinate of such, who collected taxes in some district, "a tax gatherer;" such were naturally hated intensely by the people; they are classed with "sinners," Matthew 9:10,11 ; 11:9 ; Mark 2:15,16 ; Luke 5:30 ; 7:34 ; 15:1 ; with harlots, Matthew 21:31,32 ; with "the Gentile," Matthew 18:17 ; some mss. have it in Matthew 5:47 , the best have ethnikoi, "Gentiles. " See also Matthew 5:46 ; 10:3 ; Luke 3;12 ; 5:27,29 ; 7:29 ; 18:10,11,13
Tax Collector - These taxes included both direct personal taxes and taxes on goods that people transported from one district to another (Matthew 9:9). As a result tax collectors had a bad reputation, and were usually associated with the most despised people in society (Matthew 5:46; Matthew 9:10; Matthew 11:19; Matthew 18:17; Mark 2:15-17). Yet many tax collectors turned from their sin to believe in Jesus, and one even became a member of Jesus’ chosen group of twelve apostles (Matthew 9:9; Matthew 10:3; Matthew 21:31-32; Luke 18:13; Luke 19:2; Luke 19:9; see Matthew)
Hire - In the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:8) it is spoken of the day’s wage, the denarius, owing by agreement to the workers. In Matthew 10:10 τροφή, ‘food,’ is substituted for μισθός. It is used in a good sense as the reward of devotion and service to God (Matthew 5:12; Matthew 6:1; Matthew 10:41, Mark 9:41, Luke 6:23), as well as to describe the ‘empty popularity’ attaching to the religious ostentation of the hypocrites (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:16). The verb ‘to hire’ (μισθόω) occurs (Matthew 20:1) of the householder who engaged the labourers for his vineyard
Disciples - John 1:35 , Matthew 14:12 ). Luke 22:28 ), but that they might aid Him in His ministry ( Matthew 9:37 ; Matthew 10:1 ; Matthew 10:5 ), and, above all, that they might be trained by dally intercourse and discipline to carry forward the work after He was gone. These were ‘the disciples’ par excellence ( Matthew 10:1 ; Matthew 12:1 ; Matthew 12:49 ; Matthew 15:23 ; Matthew 15:32 , Mark 8:27 , Luke 8:9 , John 11:7 ; John 12:4 ; John 16:17 ; John 16:29 )
Yonder - 1: ἐκεῖ (Strong's #1563 — Adverb — ekei — ek-i' ) "there," is rendered "yonder" in Matthew 26:36 ; "to yonder place," Matthew 17:20
Matthew - The apostle and evangelist, or, as he himself in great humility writes, Matthew the publican, than, Matthew 10:3
Potter's Field - the land that was bought with the money for which Judas sold our Saviour, Matthew 27:7 ; Matthew 27:10 , and which he returned
Hosanna - "Save, I beseech thee," or, "Give salvation," a well known form of blessing, Matthew 21:9 ; Matthew 21:15 ; Mark 11:9-10 ; John 12:13
Parable - In the New Testament the word parable denotes sometimes a true history, or an illustrative sketch from nature; sometimes a proverb or adage, Matthew 13:24-30,369 ; a truth darkly or figuratively expressed, Matthew 15:15 ; a type, Hebrews 9:9 ; or a similitude, Matthew 24:32 . ...
Wise and foolish builders, Matthew 7:24-27 . ...
Children of the bride-chamber, Matthew 9:15 . ...
New cloth and old garment, Matthew 9:16 . ...
New wine and old bottles, Matthew 9:17 . ...
Unclean spirit, Matthew 12:43 . ...
Sower, Matthew 13:3,18 Luke 8:5,11 . ...
Mustard-seed, Matthew 13:31-32 Luke 13:19 . ...
Leaven, Matthew 13:33 . ...
Treasure hid in a field, Matthew 13:44 . ...
Pearl of great price, Matthew 13:45-46 . ...
Net cast into the sea, Matthew 13:47-50 . ...
Meats defiling not, Matthew 15:10-15 . ...
Unmerciful servant, Matthew 18:23-35 . ...
Laborers hired, Matthew 20:1-16 . ...
Two sons, Matthew 21:28-32 . ...
Wicked husbandmen, Matthew 21:33-45 . ...
Marriage-feast, Matthew 22:2-14 . ...
Fig tree leafing, Matthew 24:32-34 . ...
Man of the house watching, Matthew 24:43 . ...
Faithful and evil servants, Matthew 24:45-51 . ...
Ten virgins, Matthew 25:1-13 . ...
Talents, Matthew 25:14-30
Matthew, Gospel According to - MATTHEW, GOSPEL ACCORDING TO. Matthew and St. Matthew, on the other hand, presents to us the Christ as He was conceived by the Jewish Christians of Palestine. It was true that He had foretold the coming of many from the east and the west to sit down in the Kingdom of God (Matthew 8:11), and had bidden His Apostles baptize all nations (Matthew 28:19); but then it had always been a part of the Divine plan to suffer aliens to enter as proselytes into the fold of Israel, and to partake of the blessings promised to the Chosen People. In the period of preparation for the Kingdom, the gospel was to be preached to all nations for a testimony (Matthew 24:14), and those who entered by baptism into the Christian Church would become members of that new Israel, which in the days of the Kingdom should be judged and governed by the twelve Apostles as viceroys of the King Messiah (Matthew 19:28). Matthew emphasizes the close connexion between the fall of Jerusalem and the Coming of the Son of Man (Matthew 24:29), thus limiting the period during which the gospel could be preached to the Gentiles, St. —Jesus the Messiah was legally descended from David, and through him from Abraham, the father of the Israelite people (Matthew 1:1). In David it had risen to monarchical power (Matthew 1:6), but at the period of the Captivity it had lost this dignity. But now again in Jesus the anointed King it had regained it (Matthew 1:16). He was therefore born ‘king of the Jews’ (Matthew 2:2). As King He entered Jerusalem (Matthew 21:5). As King He suffered the death of crucifixion (Matthew 27:38; Matthew 27:42), and as King He would sit to judge all nations at the Last Day (Matthew 25:31 ff. As such He was born of the Holy Spirit from a virgin (Matthew 1:18-25). Hence He was ‘God with us’ (Matthew 1:23), and this Divine Sonship placed Him in a unique relationship to God. He could speak of God and of Himself as ‘the Father’ and ‘the Son,’ as though these terms could only be applied to this relationship (Matthew 11:27); and David himself had recognized by the Divine inspiration this Divine Sonship of his promised descendant, when he applied to Him the Divine name ‘Lord’ (Matthew 22:44). The history of the supernatural birth was, of course, an easy mark for Jewish calumny, but nevertheless it was a fact which had been Divinely foreordained (Matthew 1:22); and in the history of the Davidic family there had been women of old time (Rahab, Bathsheba, Tamar, Ruth) whose lives should have taught the calumniators of the Virgin that God overrules and uses circumstances for His own Divine ends. He was ‘the Beloved’ (Matthew 3:17, Matthew 17:5) whom God had eternally chosen (Matthew 3:16, Matthew 7:1-597), and to whom God had eternally given all things (Matthew 11:27) and all power (Matthew 28:18). He was the supernatural Son of Man, who was to come upon the clouds of heaven (Matthew 16:28, Matthew 26:64, Matthew 24:30), and to sit upon the throne of His glory to judge all men (Matthew 16:28, Matthew 19:28, Matthew 25:31). Thus Isaiah had foretold the circumstances (Matthew 14:13-21,), and Micah the place, of His birth (Matthew 2:5). Hosea had foreseen the flight into Egypt, Jeremiah the massacre of the infants at Bethlehem (Matthew 2:17); and the settlement of His parents at the ill-famed village of Nazareth had been the subject of prophecy (Matthew 2:23). His herald John had been fore-announced by Isaiah (Matthew 22:1-10), and the same prophet had foreseen the Christ’s ministry in Galilee, with Capernaum as His headquarters (Matthew 4:14). That He healed the sick was in accordance with a prophecy of Isaiah, and the contrast between His gracious and gentle work and the noisy clamour of His opponents, found anticipation in another passage of the same prophet (Matthew 12:17-21). Zechariah had foreseen His entry as King into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:5), His betrayal (Matthew 26:24), and the desertion of His disciples (Matthew 26:31); and the whole course of His tragic end had been Divinely fore-ordained, and foretold in Scripture (Matthew 16:23 161838538989 Matthew 26:54; Matthew 26:56). , heal disease, even leprosy, without use of drugs or medical appliances, by the simple exercise of His will (Matthew 8:8 ‘Speak the word only,’ Matthew 8:16 ‘with a word’), the cure being immediate and complete (Matthew 8:13, Matthew 9:22, Matthew 15:28, Matthew 17:18). He could control the forces of nature (Matthew 8:26-27), and could drive out demons from the unhappy beings of whom they had taken possession (Matthew 8:28-34). He exercised upon earth the Divine prerogative of forgiving sin (Matthew 9:1-8), and raised the dead to life (Matthew 9:25). He could feed multitudes with a few loaves and fishes (Matthew 1:22 Matthew 15:32-39). On the other hand, He associated with people who were regarded by the leaders of religion as ill friends for a devout man (Matthew 9:11), and seemed negligent of the rules which the Pharisees had framed as the guides of a pious life. His disciples did not fast (Matthew 9:14), and broke Sabbath regulations (Matthew 12:2). He Himself performed acts of healing on the Sabbath day (Matthew 18:21-35), and His disciples neglected the regulations about purification of the hands before meals (Matthew 15:2). He had expected this fate, and had foretold it to His disciples as being ordained of God and prophesied in Scripture (Matthew 16:21 δεῖ, Matthew 16:23 τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ, Matthew 17:12; Matthew 17:22-23, Matthew 20:18-19). In one of these Christ is represented as saying that He came to give His life as a ransom for many (λύτρον ἀντὶ πολλῶν, Matthew 20:28); in the other He speaks of His blood as shed for many for the remission of sins (Matthew 26:28). ’ With this He began His ministry (Matthew 4:17), and wherever He went He taught this as a good news (Matthew 4:23). After His ascension He would come as Son of Man upon the clouds of heaven (Matthew 16:27-28, Matthew 19:28, Matthew 24:30), would send His angels to gather together the elect (Matthew 24:31, Matthew 13:41), and would sit on the throne of His glory (Matthew 16:28, Matthew 19:28, Matthew 25:31). This would happen in the lifetime of the generation to whom He spoke (Matthew 16:28, Matthew 24:34, Matthew 10:23), immediately after the great tribulation accompanying the destruction of Jerusalem (Matthew 24:29); but God alone knew the exact day and hour (Matthew 24:30). Then the twelve Apostles should sit on twelve thrones judging the twelve tribes of Israel (Matthew 19:28). How else could He come upon the clouds of heaven? And His disciples were to preach the good news of the coming Kingdom (Matthew 10:7, Matthew 24:14) among all nations, making disciples by baptism (Matthew 28:19). The body of disciples thus gained would naturally form a society bound by common aims (Matthew 16:18, Matthew 18:17). those who should have inherited it (Matthew 8:12), would definitely reject the good news (Matthew 21:32; Matthew 21:42-43, Matthew 22:7). Hence the disciples of the Kingdom would form a new spiritual Israel (Matthew 21:43 ‘a nation’) which would include many who came from east and west (Matthew 21:33-467). of the true sons of the Kingdom (Matthew 13:38), who were to await His coming on the clouds of heaven, it is natural that a large part of the teaching recorded in the Gospel should concern the qualifications required in those who hoped to enter the Kingdom when it came. Not a letter was to pass away from it (Matthew 5:18). Its permission of divorce still held good (Matthew 5:32, Matthew 19:3 ff. Christ had not abolished the Mosaic distinctions between clean and unclean meats (see notes on Matthew 15:20). His disciples were still to take two or three witnesses (Matthew 18:16); and the Sabbath was still to be held sacred (Matthew 24:20). Their ‘righteousness’ was to exceed that of the scribes and Pharisees, because they were to interpret the Law of Moses in a sense which would make it more far-reaching in its effect upon conduet than ever before (Matthew 5:21-48). In particular, their ‘righteousness’ was to be less a matter of something done that men might see it, and more a right relation to God, taking effect in action known only to God Himself (Matthew 6:1-34). In relation to their fellow-men they were to cultivate humility, and to suppress self-assertiveness (Matthew 18:1-14); to exercise forgiveness (Matthew 18:15; Matthew 18:21-35); to be slow to judge their fellows (1618385389_5); to do to others what they would have done to themselves (Matthew 7:12). In relation to wealth, they were not to hoard up treasure upon earth, but to trust in God’s care for them (Matthew 6:19-34, Matthew 19:28), seeking first His righteousness and Kingdom. In relation to sexual morality, they were to be chaste in thought (Matthew 7:7-114); marriage was an indissoluble bond, broken only by adultery (Matthew 19:9). But some were called to live single lives for the Kingdom of the heavens (Matthew 19:12). In relation to God, they were to pray to Him for their daily needs, for His forgiveness, and for deliverance from the evil that is in the world (Matthew 6:9-13, 1618385389_52). With the exception of Matthew 18:21-35, they do not, as in the case of many of St. παλινγενεσία, Matthew 19:28). ...
In Matthew 20:1-16 occurs the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard. ...
Of the other parables in the Gospel, Matthew 12:10 does not bear directly upon the doctrine of the Kingdom, but emphasizes forgiveness as a qualification in all who wish to enter it. Matthew 21:28-32 illustrates the perverse attitude of the Pharisees towards the Baptist’s preaching. 1618385389_89 and Matthew 3:3 are historical forecasts of the fate of the Jewish nation. Matthew 22:11-14 emphasizes the necessity for all who hope to enter the Kingdom of possessing the necessary qualifications. Matthew 25:1-13 and Matthew 25:14-30 teach the suddenness of its appearance and the necessity of watching for its coming. Matthew 25:31-46 describes the test by which the King when He comes will admit the righteous into His Kingdom. ’ In Matthew 6:33 τοῦ θεοῦ is probably not genuine (omit אBg1 [2] k). As regards Matthew 19:24, a passage borrowed from Mk. In Matthew 12:28, Matthew 21:31; Matthew 21:43 the editor has retained ‘kingdom of God,’ not because he regarded it as equivalent to ‘kingdom of the heavens,’ but because he felt that in these passages the idea conveyed was different from that which his phrase ‘kingdom of the heavens’ everywhere carries with it; and he therefore retained ‘kingdom of God’ to mark the difference. Their ‘righteousness’ will not admit them into the Kingdom (Matthew 5:20)
Kingdom of God - (Matthew 6:33 ; Mark 1:14,15 ; Luke 4:43 ) = "kingdom of Christ" (Matthew 13:41 ; 20:21 ) = "kingdom of Christ and of God" (Ephesians 5:5 ) = "kingdom of David" (Mark 11:10 ) = "the kingdom" (Matthew 8:12 ; 13:19 ) = "kingdom of heaven" (Matthew 3:2 ; 4:17 ; 13:41 ), all denote the same thing under different aspects, viz
Endurance - —Of (a) supernatural causes (1) the first, an all-inclusive cause, was the Divine will (John 10:18), recorded beforehand in OT Scriptures (Matthew 26:54, Mark 14:21, Luke 22:37; Luke 24:25 f. ), and referred to constantly by Christ in words of resignation (Matthew 26:42, Luke 10:21), often under the figure of a ‘cup’ (Matthew 20:22; Matthew 26:39, John 18:11). (2) A second supernatural cause (under Divine permission) appears in the agency of Satan, acting both directly, in temptation and opposition (Matthew 4:3 ff; Matthew 13:39, Luke 10:18), and also oftener indirectly, through the weakness (Matthew 16:23, Luke 22:31) and wickedness (Luke 22:3; Luke 22:53, John 6:70; John 8:44; John 13:2) of men. ) and prerogatives (Matthew 9:2, Luke 7:48 f. ) was bound to provoke deadly hostility in unbelieving Jews (Matthew 26:65, John 19:7). It is at the same time clear, from Christ’s anxiety to avoid publicity (Matthew 12:16, Mark 7:36; Mark 8:26 etc. ) and needless offence (Matthew 17:27), that persecution and death were not courted by Him. (1) Many trials arose from the imperfections of His disciples; their dulness (Mark 8:15 ff; Mark 9:32, Luke 24:25), spiritual powerlessness (Matthew 17:16 f. ), false zeal (Matthew 15:23; Matthew 16:23, Mark 9:38, Luke 9:54), mistaken aims (Mark 9:5; Mark 10:35 ff. , Luke 22:24), and discreditable falls (Matthew 26:56, Mark 14:66 ff. But (2) most arose from Christ’s rejection by ‘His own’ (John 1:11, Matthew 23:37, Mark 12:6 ff. , John 5:43; John 19:15) from motives (which He well perceived, Matthew 9:4; Matthew 12:25, Mark 9:33 f. , Luke 6:8, John 2:25) of fear (Matthew 8:34, John Joh_12:42 f. , Mark 15:15), gain (Matthew 26:14 f. , Mark 10:22, Luke 16:14), envy (Matthew 21:38; Matthew 27:18, John 12:10), and hate (Luke 19:14, John 7:7; John 15:18; John 15:24); a rejection characterized in its display by indifference (Luke 14:18 ff. , John 5:15), contradiction (John 8:13), insult (Matthew 10:25; Matthew 12:24, Mark 15:32, Luke 7:34; Luke 22:63; Luke 23:11, John 8:48; John 9:24), treachery (Luke 11:53; Luke 20:20; Luke 22:48), injustice (Mark 14:55 f. , Matthew 5:39), retaliation (Luke 6:35; Luke 22:51), and love to enemies (Matthew 5:44 f. (b) Under temptation: otherwise it would be inexplicable that Christ should have urged repentance as a first essential for others (Matthew 4:17; Matthew 11:20 f, Matthew 21:38 ff. An intuitive perception of His sinlessness appears in the self-abasing awe of a few good men (Matthew 3:14, Luke 5:8) more convincingly than in the ambiguous testimony of many other observers (Matthew 27:3; Matthew 27:19, Luke 23:47, John 19:4 etc. No mention, indeed, is made of sickness in the ordinary sense; perhaps it is excluded; but all other bodily needs and infirmities were shared by Him (Matthew 4:2; Matthew 8:20; Matthew 8:24; Matthew 21:18, John 4:6 f. The emotions of His mind (Mark 3:5; Mark 7:34; Mark 10:14, Luke 19:41, John 11:35) and spirit (Luke 10:21, John 11:33; John 13:21) were evident from their outward traces, as well as from His own statements (Matthew 15:32, Luke 22:15, John 11:15). ), by the shrinking of His human will (Matthew 26:39; Matthew 26:42, Luke 12:50, John 12:27), by His refusal to allay His own hunger miraculously (Matthew 4:3 f. As man He met temptation (Matthew 4:4), and overcame by faith (see John 11:41 f. , Matthew 27:43, and also the important expression ‘my God,’ Matthew 27:46, John 20:17). Predictions of suffering are numerous and detailed (Matthew 17:22 f. , Matthew 20:18 f. , Matthew 26:2, Mark 14:18; Mark 14:30, Luke 9:22; Luke 9:44; Luke 12:50; Luke 13:33; Luke 17:25; Luke 22:37 etc. In the trials and temptations of (a) His life, two such purposes are prominently visible: (1) the fulfilment of all righteousness (Matthew 3:15; Matthew 5:17), described as a progressive course through service and suffering (Luke 22:27 f. , John 13:14; John 19:30), in which Christ met continually the Father’s approval (Luke 2:40; Luke 2:52, Matthew 3:17; Matthew 17:5, John 12:28), being declared to be the ‘Son of God’ ideally as well as actually. (2) The acquirement of sympathy; through experimental acquaintance with the weakness of the flesh (John 1:14, Matthew 26:41). , John 21:17), weakness (Matthew 12:15 ff. ), weariness (Matthew 11:28, Mark 6:31), misery (Matthew 8:3), and shame (Matthew 11:19, Luke 15:1 f. It may be summed up in the words ‘forgiveness’ (Matthew 26:28), ‘redemption’ (Mark 10:45), and ‘removal of sin’ (John 1:29); to which, in John 11:50 ff. It need be no cause of surprise that these purposes are not more frequently enlarged upon in the Gospels, for they were incomprehensible to the disciples (and are remarked as such, Matthew 16:22, Luke 9:45; Luke 18:34, John 13:7) until after the Crucifixion had taken place. It may be added that Christ warned His disciples in all ages to expect trials comparable in some measure to His own (Matthew 5:11 f. , Matthew 10:24 f. ), and accompanied in many cases by decline and apostasy (Matthew 24:12; Matthew 24:48 ff. Hence He marked endurance as a continual test of genuineness (Luke 8:13; Luke 8:15) and an indispensable requisite for final salvation (Matthew 24:13. is largely parallel to that in Matthew 16:18, except that the latter, the indestructibility of the Church, is more clearly collective in form. The practical inference is intended to lie in a direction quite the opposite of false security and presumption (Matthew 7:22 f
Brother - Signifies in Scripture the son of the same parent or parents, Matthew 1:2 Luke 6:14 ; a cousin or near kinsman, Genesis 13:8 14:16 John 7:3 Acts 1:14 ; one of the same stock or country, Matthew 5:47 Acts 3:22 Hebrews 7:5 ; a fellow-man, and equal, Matthew 5:23 7:3 ; one beloved, 2 Samuel 1:26 ; Christians, as sons of God, Acts 9:30 11:29 . In Matthew 12:46-50 13:55,56 Mark 3:31-35 , the brothers of Christ are so mentioned, in connection with his mother and sisters, as almost to require us to believe they were children of Joseph and Mary, younger than Jesus. Yet this is not quite certain, as it may be that the James, Joses, and Judas in Matthew 13:55 , are the nephews of Christ alluded to in Matthew 27:56 Luke 6:15,16 John 19:25 ; Cleophas and Alphaeus being probably the same
Fishing, the Art of - It was from the fishing-nets that Jesus called his disciples (Mark 1:16-20 ), and it was in a fishing-boat he rebuked the winds and the waves (Matthew 8:26 ) and delivered that remarkable series of prophecies recorded in Matthew 13 . He twice miraculously fed multitudes with fish and bread (Matthew 14:19 ; 15:36 ). It was in the mouth of a fish that the tribute-money was found (Matthew 17:27 ). " Two kinds of fishing-nets are mentioned in the New Testament: ...
...
The casting-net (Matthew 4:18 ; Mark 1:16 ). ...
...
The drag-net or seine (Matthew 13:48 ). Fish were also caught by the fishing-hook (Matthew 17:27 )
Punishment (2) - —This fact is involved in certain explicit statements of our Lord Himself (Matthew 13:41-42; Matthew 25:46, John 15:2; John 15:6), and clearly suggested in more than one of His parables (Mark 12:9, Matthew 13:30; Matthew 22:13-14, Luke 13:9; Luke 13:22 ff. It is further implied both in the recognition of God’s wrath upon men (John 3:36) and of a consequent difference in their destinies (Matthew 13:41; Matthew 13:43; Matthew 25:46, John 5:29), and in frequent references to Gehenna (Matthew 5:29; Matthew 10:28, Mark 9:43-48, Luke 12:5) or to the place of outer darkness (Matthew 8:12; Matthew 27:4-5,; Matthew 25:30). So serious may this punishment be, that death would be a preferable alternative (Mark 9:42); and, unrestricted to individual transgressors, it may fall also both upon cities (Matthew 10:15; Matthew 11:21; Matthew 23:38) and upon nations (Matthew 21:43-44; Matthew 23:35; Matthew 23:38). (On the contrary, sorrow even becomes, in His esteem, a ground for rejoicing [1]). And not only is this true in that his sin involves remorse (Matthew 26:75; Matthew 22:13 Mark 6:16), but also because his very attitude to Christ automatically enriches his personality or issues in its impoverishment (John 3:18-19; John 9:1; John 9:11-12, Matthew 25:28-29, cf. (γ) There is a second sense in which a man’s judgment lies in the future (Matthew 13:41-43; Matthew 25:31 ff. Here it will suffice to observe that, whatever be its accidents, the essence of punishment will consist in banishment from the presence of Christ (Matthew 7:23; Matthew 25:41); and that it will be marked by varying degrees of severity (Mark 12:40, Matthew 10:15; Matthew 11:22; Matthew 11:24, Luke 12:48), each of us by his own use of opportunity providing his own criterion (Matthew 5:7; Matthew 7:1-2; Matthew 10:33, Mark 4:24). ); yet we are specifically taught that not judgment but salvation is God’s deepest thought for mankind (John 3:17; so Matthew 18:14, John 6:39; John 8:11, Luke 15, cf. ), it is the former that is preserved in the report of Christ’s teaching (Matthew 25:46). Matthew 18:35, Luke 20:47 etc. the striking sequence of verses in Matthew 10:28-29; Matthew 21:13-14); for if sin is more than a fiction, the measure of God’s love for the sinner will determine the severity of His anger against his sin. In one place our Lord appears to hint that it may be beyond the grave (Matthew 12:32), but, as we have already seen, He gave no clear guidance in the matter. Such are decapitation (Mark 6:27, Matthew 14:10), drowning (Mark 9:42, Matthew 18:6), incarceration (Mark 6:17, Matthew 5:25; Matthew 18:30, Luke 23:19), and hanging (Matthew 27:5), inflicted, according to Jewish custom, only for idolatry or blasphemy, and then only after the victim had already been put to death in some other way (Edersheim, LT [2]. With these, too, may be classed the less familiar penalties of precipitation (attempted in the case of our Lord, Luke 4:29) and of mutilation (διχοτομεῖν, Matthew 24:51, Luke 12:46). Matthew 21:44 || and Matthew 23:35 ||) was imposed for many offences, including the unchastity of a betrothed maiden, idolatry, and blasphemy. Scourging, used among the Jews as a penalty for debt (Matthew 18:34) or for offences of a religious character (Matthew 10:17; Matthew 23:34), was also the customary precursor to Roman crucifixion. According to His own prophecy (Mark 10:34, Matthew 20:19, Luke 18:33), our Lord was subjected to this cruel instrument of torture (Mark 15:15, Matthew 27:26, John 19:1). Christ foretold this form of death for other witnesses to truth (Matthew 23:34, and probably John 21:18) as well as for Himself (Matthew 20:19; Matthew 26:2, Luke 24:7, John 12:32-33)
Wolf - 1: λύκος (Strong's #3074 — Noun Masculine — lukos — loo'-kos ) occurs in Matthew 10:16 ; Luke 10:3 ; John 10:12 (twice); metaphorically, Matthew 7:15 ; Acts 20:29
Hem of Garment - —This is the Authorized Version translation of κράσπεδον in Matthew 9:20; Matthew 14:36 (of touching the hem of Jesus’ garment with a view to healing). In these places, as on its occurrence elsewhere (Matthew 23:5, Mark 6:56, Luke 8:44), Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 adopts the rendering ‘horder
Wherefore - Matthew 7 . Wherefore didst thou doubt? Matthew 14
Evil Speaking - Warnings against it are frequent; it is forbidden in the legislation of the OT (Ninth Commandment; Deuteronomy 19:16-19 ) and of the NT ( Matthew 5:22 ; Matthew 12:32 ; Matthew 15:19 ). Christians must expect this form of persecution ( Matthew 5:11 ), but must be careful to give no handle to it ( Romans 14:16 , Titus 2:8 , 1 Peter 2:12 ; 1 Peter 3:16 )
Christ, Miracles of - ...
Changing of the water into wine at Cans (John 2)
First miraculous draught of fishes (Luke 5)
Calming of the tempest (Matthew 8; Mark 4; Luke 8)
First multiplication of loaves (Matthew 14; Mark 6; Luke 9; John 6)
Jesus's walking on the Water (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Second multiplication of loaves (Matthew 15; Mark 8)
Stater in the fish's mouth (Matthew 17)
Cursing of the fig-tree (Matthew 21; Mark 11)
Second miraculous draught of fishes (John 21)
MIRACLES OF HEALING ...
These were numerous during the public life of Our Lord. There are references to a great many cures which are not related in detail (Matthew 4; Luke 4,6; Mark 6), and twenty special cases are recorded. ...
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS ...
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life. Special cases related are, ...
Demoniac of Capharnaum (Mark 1; Luke 4)
Deaf and dumb demoniac (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Gerasene demoniacs (Matthew 8; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Dumb demoniac (Matt. There are two cases which appear to most Catholic commentators to involve a supernatural display of power over wills: (1) the casting out of the vendors (John 2; Matthew 21; Mark 11; Luke 19); (2) the episode of the escape from the hostile crowd at Nazareth (Luke 4). ...
CASES OF RESURRECTION ...
Among the signs of His Messiasship which Our Lord gave to the delegates of John the Baptist, we read: "The dead rise again" (Matthew 11; Luke 7). ...
Raising of the daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Raising of the son of the widow of Naim (Luke 7)
Raising of Lazarus (John 11)
The subject of the miracles of Christ has been well dealt with, both from an apologetic and an exegetic point of view, by L
Miracles of Christ - ...
Changing of the water into wine at Cans (John 2)
First miraculous draught of fishes (Luke 5)
Calming of the tempest (Matthew 8; Mark 4; Luke 8)
First multiplication of loaves (Matthew 14; Mark 6; Luke 9; John 6)
Jesus's walking on the Water (Matthew 14; Mark 6; John 6)
Second multiplication of loaves (Matthew 15; Mark 8)
Stater in the fish's mouth (Matthew 17)
Cursing of the fig-tree (Matthew 21; Mark 11)
Second miraculous draught of fishes (John 21)
MIRACLES OF HEALING ...
These were numerous during the public life of Our Lord. There are references to a great many cures which are not related in detail (Matthew 4; Luke 4,6; Mark 6), and twenty special cases are recorded. ...
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS ...
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life. Special cases related are, ...
Demoniac of Capharnaum (Mark 1; Luke 4)
Deaf and dumb demoniac (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Gerasene demoniacs (Matthew 8; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Dumb demoniac (Matt. There are two cases which appear to most Catholic commentators to involve a supernatural display of power over wills: (1) the casting out of the vendors (John 2; Matthew 21; Mark 11; Luke 19); (2) the episode of the escape from the hostile crowd at Nazareth (Luke 4). ...
CASES OF RESURRECTION ...
Among the signs of His Messiasship which Our Lord gave to the delegates of John the Baptist, we read: "The dead rise again" (Matthew 11; Luke 7). ...
Raising of the daughter of Jairus (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Raising of the son of the widow of Naim (Luke 7)
Raising of Lazarus (John 11)
The subject of the miracles of Christ has been well dealt with, both from an apologetic and an exegetic point of view, by L
Wicked (2) - Luke 16:5, Acts 28:5, Revelation 16:2), and then ‘failing to answer expectation or fulfil the apparent reason for existence,’ the word comes to mean ‘morally bad’ as opposed to ἀγαθός, morally good (Matthew 21:41; Matthew 24:48, Colossians 3:5 etc. ’ A vivid picture of the thought involved is found in Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:36-43, where the tares are the fruit of the ‘wicked one,’ ὁ πονηρός. —(a) The wicked one (Matthew 13:19; Matthew 13:38, Ephesians 6:16, 1 John 2:13-14; 1 John 3:12, perh. Matthew 6:13, etc. He is the great mischief-maker who disarranges God’s orderly world (κόσμος, Matthew 4:8; Matthew 13:35, etc. ), and is ever found in antagonism to Christ’s dominion (Matthew 13:37; Matthew 13:39, 1 John 5:18-20 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ). Scripture reveals to us not only a general, but also an army of wicked spirits who are ever ready to do his work (see Matthew 12:45, Acts 19:12-13, etc. Matthew 7:11) is traitor to Christ (Matthew 15:19, Mark 7:22, Luke 11:39, Romans 1:29). —The tree of wickedness has many kinds of fruit, by which we detect its character (Matthew 7:17-18): e. violence (Matthew 5:39, Acts 17:5, 2 Thessalonians 3:2), hypocrisy (Matthew 22:18), an unforgiving spirit (Matthew 18:32), idleness (Matthew 25:26), unbelief (Hebrews 3:12), self-sufficiency (James 4:16), spite (3 John 1:10); everything, in fact, that is unlike Christ, flourishes in the devil’s Eden—the lost world. —The ‘children of the wicked one,’ if unredeemed from his service, will share his doom (Matthew 13:49-50; Matthew 25:26; Matthew 25:30, Romans 1:29; Romans 1:32; cf. And further, he may not only be completely ransomed from the slavery in which he was formerly held (Matthew 6:13, John 17:15, 2 Thessalonians 3:3, 1 John 5:18 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ), but may become actually victorious, through the imparted power of Christ, over the evil one, who is now bitterly antagonistic to his former subject (1 John 2:13-14, Ephesians 6:11-13)
Beatitudes - The Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7 ) sets forth the spiritual principles of the kingdom of God. “The poor in spirit” denotes the fact of sin (Matthew 5:3 ). “They that mourn” means to repent of sin (Matthew 5:4 ). “The meek” describes not the weak, but rather strength that is surrendered to God in a new birth experience (Matthew 5:5 ). To “hunger and thirst after righteousness” signifies the strong desire to become more Christ-like (Matthew 5:6 ). “The merciful” show an attitude of forgiveness (Matthew 5:7 ). “The pure in heart” strive daily for clean living (Matthew 5:8 ). “The peacemakers” exert a calming influence in the storms of life (Matthew 5:9 ). “They which are persecuted” denotes faithfulness under stress (Matthew 5:10-12 )
Affliction (2) - ’ In Matthew 24:9 AV translates εἰς θλῖψιν ‘to be afflicted’ (RV ‘unto tribulation’). In all remaining cases it renders θλῖψις by ‘tribulation’ (Matthew 13:21; Matthew 24:21; Matthew 24:29, Mark 13:24, John 16:33). ὁδὸς τεθλιμμένη in Matthew 7:14 of the ‘straitened way’; ἵνα μὴ θλίβωσιν αὐτόν, ‘lest they should throng him,’ in Mark 3:9). It denotes the persecution to which His followers will be subjected, and by which their loyalty will be tested (Mark 4:17 = Matthew 13:21; Matthew 24:9, John 16:33). It describes the privations and sufferings (not, as above, necessarily induced by His service) attendant upon a great national or universal crisis (Mark 13:19; Mark 13:24 = Matthew 24:21; Matthew 24:29)
Kingdom of Christ of Heaven - These terms describe: 1, a life of righteous allegiance to Christ, entered by faith, lived by love, and crowned with glory, Matthew 6:33, etc. ; 2, the condition of things Christ came to explain, Luke 1:33; Acts 1:3, and to bring on earth, Matthew 4:17; Matthew 3:1-17, Christ's rule over Israel, Matthew 21:13; Matthew 4:1-25, the rule that God offered or committed to Israel, Matthew 21:43; 1 Chronicles 17:14; 1 Chronicles 5:1-26, the state of things in the history of the church during the conflict on earth of the so-called kingdom of grace, preparatory to the kingdom of glory, Matthew 13:1-58; Matthew 6:1-34, Christ's rule in spiritual and eternal righteousness over the redeemed earth, Revelation 12:10, in contrast with the world-powers, Daniel 7:18; then the kingdom will destroy and take the place of the four monarchies, Daniel 7:1-28, and have its glorious manifestation; 7, the visible glory of Christ, Matthew 16:28; Matthew 8:1-34, the rule of God the Father over earth and heaven, Matthew 6:10; Matthew 9:1-38, the heavenly state. Matthew 8:11. Matthew 6:10. Matthew 3:2. Jesus Christ preached it, Matthew 4:17; explained its character and demands, as, for instance, that its citizens must be holy, meek, Christlike, etc. , that when established it will be a condition of peace, purity, and glory, Matthew 25:34; Mark 9:47; Acts 14:22; Christ came as the King to Jerusalem. Matthew 21:43. 2 Timothy 4:1; Daniel 7:13; Matthew 13:43; Luke 22:29
Kingdom of God - These terms describe: 1, a life of righteous allegiance to Christ, entered by faith, lived by love, and crowned with glory, Matthew 6:33, etc. ; 2, the condition of things Christ came to explain, Luke 1:33; Acts 1:3, and to bring on earth, Matthew 4:17; Matthew 3:1-17, Christ's rule over Israel, Matthew 21:13; Matthew 4:1-25, the rule that God offered or committed to Israel, Matthew 21:43; 1 Chronicles 17:14; 1 Chronicles 5:1-26, the state of things in the history of the church during the conflict on earth of the so-called kingdom of grace, preparatory to the kingdom of glory, Matthew 13:1-58; Matthew 6:1-34, Christ's rule in spiritual and eternal righteousness over the redeemed earth, Revelation 12:10, in contrast with the world-powers, Daniel 7:18; then the kingdom will destroy and take the place of the four monarchies, Daniel 7:1-28, and have its glorious manifestation; 7, the visible glory of Christ, Matthew 16:28; Matthew 8:1-34, the rule of God the Father over earth and heaven, Matthew 6:10; Matthew 9:1-38, the heavenly state. Matthew 8:11. Matthew 6:10. Matthew 3:2. Jesus Christ preached it, Matthew 4:17; explained its character and demands, as, for instance, that its citizens must be holy, meek, Christlike, etc. , that when established it will be a condition of peace, purity, and glory, Matthew 25:34; Mark 9:47; Acts 14:22; Christ came as the King to Jerusalem. Matthew 21:43. 2 Timothy 4:1; Daniel 7:13; Matthew 13:43; Luke 22:29
Kingdom of Heaven - These terms describe: 1, a life of righteous allegiance to Christ, entered by faith, lived by love, and crowned with glory, Matthew 6:33, etc. ; 2, the condition of things Christ came to explain, Luke 1:33; Acts 1:3, and to bring on earth, Matthew 4:17; Matthew 3:1-17, Christ's rule over Israel, Matthew 21:13; Matthew 4:1-25, the rule that God offered or committed to Israel, Matthew 21:43; 1 Chronicles 17:14; 1 Chronicles 5:1-26, the state of things in the history of the church during the conflict on earth of the so-called kingdom of grace, preparatory to the kingdom of glory, Matthew 13:1-58; Matthew 6:1-34, Christ's rule in spiritual and eternal righteousness over the redeemed earth, Revelation 12:10, in contrast with the world-powers, Daniel 7:18; then the kingdom will destroy and take the place of the four monarchies, Daniel 7:1-28, and have its glorious manifestation; 7, the visible glory of Christ, Matthew 16:28; Matthew 8:1-34, the rule of God the Father over earth and heaven, Matthew 6:10; Matthew 9:1-38, the heavenly state. Matthew 8:11. Matthew 6:10. Matthew 3:2. Jesus Christ preached it, Matthew 4:17; explained its character and demands, as, for instance, that its citizens must be holy, meek, Christlike, etc. , that when established it will be a condition of peace, purity, and glory, Matthew 25:34; Mark 9:47; Acts 14:22; Christ came as the King to Jerusalem. Matthew 21:43. 2 Timothy 4:1; Daniel 7:13; Matthew 13:43; Luke 22:29
Master - KJV regularly translated the Greek didaskalos (teacher) as master in the Gospels (as in Matthew 8:19 ; Matthew 9:11 ). KJV twice rendered kathegetse (guide, teacher) as master (Matthew 23:8 ,Matthew 23:8,23:10 ). KJV sometimes also translated rabbi (rabbi, teacher) and rabboni (my rabbi, my teacher) as master (Matthew 26:25 ; Mark 9:5 ; John 4:31 ). Luke often uses epistates (manager, chief) where Matthew and Mark have teacher (didaskalos), rabbi, or Lord (for example, Luke 5:5 ; Luke 8:24 ,Luke 8:24,8:45 ; Luke 9:33 ,Luke 9:33,9:49 ; Luke 17:13 )
Alphaeus - Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ; Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 . Father of Levi (or Matthew) the apostle
Matthew - ” A tax collector Jesus called to be an apostle (Matthew 9:9 ; Matthew 10:3 ). Matthew's office was located on the main highway that ran from Damascus, down the Jordan Valley to Capernaum, then westward to Acre to join the coastal road to Egypt or southward to Jerusalem. Matthew knew the value of goods of all description: wool, flax, linen, pottery, brass, silver, gold, barley, wheat, olives, figs, wheat. Because Matthew had leased his “toll” collecting privileges by paying the annual fee in advance, he was subjected to the criticism of collecting more than enough, growing wealthy on his “profit. ...
Matthew is the same person as Levi, a tax collector (Mark 2:14 ; Luke 5:27 ), and thus the son of Alphaeus. James the son of Alphaeus is also listed among the Apostles (Mark 3:18 ; Matthew 10:3 ; Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 ). This indicates that both Matthew and his (half) brother were in close association with Jesus. Mary, the mother of James, keeps the vigil at the foot of the cross with Mary, the mother of Jesus (Matthew 27:55-56 ; Mark 15:40 ). ...
Later legendary accounts tell of Matthew's travel to Ethiopia where he became associated with Candace, identified with the eunuch of Acts 8:27 . The legends tell us of Matthew's martydom in that country. ...
Why did Jesus call Matthew? Because Matthew had the gifts to be trained as a disciple to share with others, could keep meticulous records, and was a potential recorder/author of the Gospel. From earliest times Christians affirmed that Matthew wrote the Gospel that bears his name. See Matthew, the Gospel of
Food - —While this word does not occur in Authorized Version in the Gospels, the Greek words βρῶμα (Matthew 14:15, Mark 7:19, Luke 3:11; Luke 9:13, and John 4:34) and βρῶσις (John 4:32; John 6:27; John 6:55), rendered ‘meat,’ would be in each case better rendered ‘food. Of flesh, that of sheep, oxen, kids, birds (Matthew 12:12; Matthew 25:32, Luke 13:15, Matthew 10:29), as well as fish (Matthew 7:10, Luke 24:42, John 6:9; John 21:13) was in common use. Of cereals, wheat and barley were favourite food-stuffs (Matthew 3:12, Mark 2:23-25, Luke 3:17, John 6:9; John 21:13); of herbs there is mention of mint, anise, and cummin (Matthew 23:23, Luke 11:42); of fruits, we hear of figs (Luke 13:7, Matthew 21:18-19) and grapes (Matthew 7:16, Mark 12:2). ...
John the Baptist, like some others of his day, lived nearer to nature, as a rebuke of prevalent luxury, and chose the native food of the wilderness, ‘locusts and wild-honey’ (Matthew 3:4, Mark 1:6). Jesus came ‘eating and drinking’ the ordinary food of His time, rebuking the artificial abstemiousness of the Pharisees (Matthew 11:18 f. ), as well as the too great anxiety of many as to what they should eat or drink (Matthew 6:25 f
Reap - Reaping is used as a symbol of recompense for good (Hosea 10:12 ; Galatians 6:7-10 ) and evil (Job 4:8 ; Proverbs 22:8 ; Hosea 8:7 ; Hosea 10:13 ), of evangelism (Matthew 9:37-38 ; Luke 10:2 ; John 4:35-38 ), and of final judgment (Matthew 13:30 ,Matthew 13:30,13:39 ; Revelation 14:14-16 )
Wolf - Fierce (Genesis 49:27; Ezekiel 22:27; Habakkuk 1:8; Matthew 7:15); prowling in the night (Jeremiah 5:6; Zephaniah 3:3); devouring lambs and sheep (John 10:12); typifying persecutors and heretical leaders (Matthew 10:16; Matthew 7:15; Acts 20:29); hereafter about to associate peacefully with the lamb under Messiah's reign (Isaiah 11:6; Isaiah 65:25)
Neighbor - In the fundamental text (Matthew 5:43), Christ rejects the distinction between neighbor and enemy, and teaches that the enemy who hates, persecutes, and calumniates His disciple, is to be loved, to be prayed for, and done good to. The precept of love of the neighbor is one of supreme importance; it is the Law and the Prophets (Matthew 7). The measure of that love is the love which we have naturally for our own selves (Matthew 19). We should do to our neighbor, therefore, all the good we would wish done to ourselves (Matthew 7). In love of the neighbor there can be no room for hatred, or any kindred feeling, in the heart of the disciple; hence one will always be ready and willing to forgive (Matthew 18). An unforgiving attitude on our part would move God to refuse us the forgiveness of our debts to Him (Matthew 6). Love of the neighbor will prevent us from judging him, bearing in mind our own shortcomings and weaknesses (Matthew 7), make us willing to do everything possible to save him (Matthew 18). Even when the neighbor shows bad will and persecutes us (Matthew 5), or remains impenitent, and for the sake of the general good, has to be cut off from the communion of the Church (Matthew 18), he remains our neighbor with the claims upon us involved in that term (Matthew 5)
Meekness - He never made a show to attract praise for himself, and never damaged the faith of even the weakest believer (Matthew 12:19-20; Matthew 18:5-6; Matthew 21:5). Yet he never hesitated to denounce cruelty, pride, injustice and hypocrisy, even when it made him unpopular (Matthew 15:7-14; Matthew 21:12-13; Matthew 23:13; Matthew 23:33). He submitted to his Father and willingly served the needy around him (Matthew 20:28; John 5:30), and he expected others to do likewise. At the same time he demanded that they accept his lordship in their daily lives (Matthew 11:28-30; cf. ...
Meekness is a characteristic of life in Christ’s kingdom (Matthew 5:5); therefore, those who enter that kingdom must exercise meekness (Matthew 20:25-26)
Ear (2) - —Of the Greek words translated ‘ear’ in Authorized and Revised Versions, two (ὠτάριον, ὠτίον) refer exclusively to the bodily organ, and occur only in connexion with the case of Malchus (Mark 14:47, John 18:10; John 18:26, Matthew 26:51, Luke 22:51). In Matthew 28:14 the rendering is simply a paraphrase. In all other instances the word οὗς occurs, and is used: (1) literally, to denote ‘the ear’ (Matthew 10:27, Mark 7:33; Mark 8:18, Luke 1:44; Luke 12:3; Luke 22:50), or (by transference) ‘the range of hearing’ (Luke 4:21); but more frequently (2) figuratively, to denote a spiritual faculty symbolized by the natural ear (Matthew 11:15; Matthew 13:9; Matthew 13:15 (bis), Matthew 13:16; Matthew 13:43, Mark 4:9; Mark 4:23, Luke 8:8; Luke 9:44; Luke 14:35). The definitive passages for this use are Matthew 13:3-23, Mark 4:2-20, Luke 8:5-15, where it forms the underlying subject of Christ’s first parable, ‘the Sower,’ a parable concluded in each account by the phrase, ‘He that hath ears (to hear) let him hear. ’ Indeed, the general principle of speaking in parables is in these passages connected with ‘ears dull of hearing’ (Matthew 13:13-15). Christ is speaking in reference to ‘mysteries’ (Matthew 13:11, Mark 4:11, Luke 8:10), that is, Divine truths not necessarily puzzling in themselves, but undiscoverable by man apart from a revelation of them (see Moule on Ephesians 1:9; Ephesians 3:3-6, cf
Capharnaum - When repelled by the Nazarenes, Jesus went there to live, and it was called "His city" (Matthew 9). In Capharnaum He chose His first disciples (Matthew 4) and performed many miracles; He cured the paralytic (Matthew 9), the centurion's servant (Matthew 8); cast out the unclean spirit (Mark 1); and brought to life Jairus's daughter
Alphaeus - Father of James the Less, Matthew 10:3 Luke 6:15 , and husband of the Mary usually regarded as sister to the mother of Christ, John 19:25 . See John 19:25 with Luke 24:18 and Matthew 10:3 , it is evident that Alphaeus is the same as Cleophas; Alphaeus being his Greek name, and Cleophas his Hebrew or Syriac name. Father of Matthew, or Levi, the evangelist, Mark 2:14
Zebedee - In easy circumstances, for he owned a boat and hired servants (Matthew 4:21; Mark 1:20). Salome his wife ministered to Jesus (Matthew 27:55-56; Mark 15:40-41). ...
In Matthew 4:21, at the call of James and John, Zebedee was alive; at Matthew 20:20 the peculiar phrase "the mother of Zebedee's children" implies Zebedee was no longer alive, for otherwise she would be called the wife of Zebedee or the mother of James and John. In Matthew 8:21 the disciple's request, "Lord, suffer me first to go (home) and (wait until the death of, and) bury my father," may possibly refer to Zebedee; for the name "disciple" was given to but few, and a boat contained all the disciples Matthew 9:37; Matthew 8:23)
Paradox - ...
Each of these three kinds of paradox may be abundantly illustrated from the Gospels; and some of the most remarkable of the sayings of Jesus exemplify all three (Matthew 5:39, John 12:24-25). Moreover, Jesus was setting forth fundamental principles which could not be demonstrated, but appealed directly to the moral intuition for acceptance (Matthew 5:3 ff; Matthew 3:9 ff. Further, He often suggested spiritual truths through analogies or metaphors, which, however suggestive, cannot be pressed in detail (Matthew 11:12; Matthew 17:20, Luke 18:25, John 13:3-17). Again we find contrasts that were clearly intended to enforce reflexion (Matthew 7:1-6; Matthew 10:34-39, Luke 14:26, John 15:12; John 15:17). In short, Jesus would naturally avoid expressions which could be taken quite literally (Matthew 5:38-41; Matthew 18:21-22; Matthew 6:34; Matthew 25:1-13). The moral and religious teaching of Jesus, though foreshadowed by the Law and the Prophets, came into sharp conflict with the formalism that petrified Jewish life in His day (Matthew 15:10-20, Mark 2:18-28; Mark 3:1-6). More paradoxical still must have appeared His condemnation of the Pharisees (Matthew 23:1-36), His friendship with publicans and sinners (Matthew 9:9-13, Mark 2:15-16, Luke 19:1-10), His conception of the Messiah (Mark 10:45; Mark 8:27-38). In the teaching of Jesus we have unworldly simplicity united with worldly shrewdness (Matthew 7:15; Matthew 10:16-17; Matthew 16:6; Matthew 18:2-3, Luke 16:1-12), the universal beneficence and compassion of God bound up with severe and inexorable justice (Matthew 5:45; Matthew 11:20-30; Matthew 18:15-35; Matthew 20:1-16; Matthew 25:14-30); we have the great and deep conceptions of life through death, joy through suffering, love through severance, peace through conflict, victory through surrender, self-realization through self-renunciation, the conquest of the world through the cross of shame (Luke 14:25-33, John 12:24-26; John 16:20; John 16:33; John 12:32)
Thirty, Thirtyfold - , Matthew 13:23 ; "thirtyfold," in Matthew 13:8 , AV only; in Mark 4:8 , RV only; in Mark 4:20 , AV and RV
Amen - ‘Verily’ or ‘Truly’), guaranteed that those statements were true, certain, reliable and authoritative (Matthew 8:10; Matthew 10:15; Matthew 10:23; Matthew 10:42; Matthew 11:11; Matthew 13:17; etc
Zebedee - A fisherman of Galilee, the father of the apostles James and John, Matthew 4:21, and the husband of Salome. Matthew 27:56; Mark 15:40. John 19:27; Matthew 4:21. He appears only twice in the Gospel narrative, namely, in Matthew 4:21-22; Mark 1:19-20, where he is seen in his boat with his two sons mending their nets
Platter - The platter bearing the head of John the Baptist was likely of gold or silver (Matthew 14:8 ,Matthew 14:8,14:11 and parallels)
Old Time - Matthew 5:21,33 . (The words are omitted from Matthew 5:27 by the editors
Farthing - Two different Roman brass coins are translated by this word: one of these, the assarion, Matthew 10:29 Luke 12:6 , was worth less than a cent; the other, the kodrantes, Matthew 5:26 , was probably nearly four mills
Jude - Among the apostles there were two who bore this name, (1) Judas (Jude 1:1 ; Matthew 13:55 ; John 14:22 ; Acts 1:13 ), called also Lebbaeus or Thaddaeus (Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ); and (2) Judas Iscariot (Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:19 )
Bar - ” Bar is often used in the New Testament as a prefix for names of men telling whose son they were: Barabbas (Matthew 27:16-26 ), Bar-Jesus (Acts 13:6 ), Bar-Jona (Matthew 16:17 ), Barnabas (Acts 4:36 ; Acts 9:27 ; etc. ), Barsabas (Acts 1:23 ; Acts 15:22 ), Bartholomew (Matthew 10:3 ; Acts 1:13 ), and Bartimaeus (Mark 10:46 )
Disciple - A scholar, Matthew 10:24 . In the New Testament it is applied principally to the followers of Christ; sometimes to those of John the Baptist, Matthew 22:16 . It is used in a special manner to point out the twelve, Matthew 10:1 11:1 20:17
Fish - Fish were plentiful in the Mediterranean Sea and in the Sea of Galilee, but there were none in the Dead Sea, as the water was too salty (Nehemiah 13:16; Matthew 4:18; Luke 5:1-7). According to the food laws set out by Moses, Israelites were allowed to eat fish (Deuteronomy 14:9-10; Luke 24:42-43; John 6:11; John 21:9) and several of Jesus’ apostles were fishermen (Matthew 4:18; Matthew 4:21; John 21:1-3). The Bible records one story of a fish so large that it swallowed a man whole (Jonah 1:17; Jonah 2:1; Matthew 12:40). Some fished with a hook (Isaiah 19:8; Habakkuk 1:15; Matthew 17:27) but commercial fishermen usually used a drag-net. This was a net that they threw into the sea and dragged towards either the shore or the boat from which they were fishing (Habakkuk 1:15; Matthew 13:47-48; Luke 5:4-7; John 21:6-8). Another kind of net was the smaller cast-net, which the fishermen, standing on the shore or in shallow water, cast around him and then drew in (Isaiah 19:8; Matthew 4:18-20). ...
After bringing their fish to land, the fishermen sorted them, putting the larger ones into baskets for sale and throwing the useless ones away (Matthew 13:47-48). When the men were finished with their nets, they washed them (Luke 5:2), dried them (Ezekiel 26:5) and sometimes mended them (Matthew 4:21). As fishermen go looking for fish, so Jesus’ disciples are to go looking for people to bring into his kingdom (Matthew 4:19). And as the good fish are separated from the bad, so the true and the false will be separated in the day of final judgment (Matthew 13:47-50)
Simon - ...
Descendant of Juda (1Paralipomenon 4)
Simon, surnamed Thasi, brother of Judas Machabeus (1Machabees 2)
Simon of the tribe of Benjamin; governor of the Temple (2Machabees 3)
Simon who is called Peter, the Apostle (Matthew 4)
Simon the Cananean, the Apostle (Matthew 10)
one of the relatives of Our Lord, identified erroneously with the preceding (Matthew 13)
Simon the leper, a resident of Bethany (Matthew 26)
a Pharisee at whose house the penitent woman washed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7)
Simon the Cyrenean, who helped Our Lord carry the Cross (Matthew 27)
the father of Judas (John 6)
Simon Magus, a magician in the time of the Apostles (Acts 8)
Simon the tanner, a Christian of Joppe, in whose house Peter had the vision commanding him to receive the Gentiles into the faith (Acts 10)
Simon called Niger, a Christian living at Antioch in the time of the Apostles (Acts 13)
Thy, Thine, Thine Own, Thyself - , Matthew 7:3 (1st part); it is used as a noun with the article, in the phrases to son, "that which is thine," Matthew 20:14 ; 25:25 , "thine own;" hoi soi, "thy friends," Mark 5:19 ; ta sa, "thy goods," Luke 6:30 , lit. , Matthew 1:20 ; 7:3 (2nd part), "thine own;" soi, "to thee," e. , "remain to thee;" in Matthew 26:18 , pros se, "at they house," lit. , Matthew 4:6 ; seauto, "to thyself," Acts 16:28 ; (4) heautou (with apo, "from"), John 18:34 , "of thyself," lit
Matthew, Feast of Saint - Matthew has been observed since A. Matthew had beena Publican or tax-gatherer, and while in his office at Capernaum,receiving the customs from those who passed over the Sea of Galileehe was called by our Lord and, we read, "he at once arose andfollowed Him. Thiswas probably his former name and he was named Matthew when he becamea disciple. Matthew himself, written in Greek. Matthew is "the likeness of a Man" with wings
Imman'Uel, - that is, God with us , the title applied by the apostle Matthew to the Messiah, born of the Virgin, ( Matthew 1:23 ; Isaiah 7:14 ) because Jesus was God united with man, and showed that God was dwelling with men
Mammon - (riches ) ( Matthew 6:24 ; Luke 16:9 ) a word which often occurs in the Chaldee Terguma of Onkelos and later writers, and in the Syriac version, and which signifies "riches. Matthew as a personification of riches
Separation - —In discourses descriptive of the present condition and future prospects of the Kingdom of God, Christ taught that the Kingdom in its ideal state of purity would not be realized till the end of the world, when the object in view is to be attained by means of a judicial separation between real members and those who are members only in outward appearance or profession (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:36-43; Matthew 13:47-50). But the evil element referred to in the parables is not that which has always existed in the world, and must be expected to continue, but that which has entered the Kingdom in the course of, and as the result of, its own operations, which tend to gather within its pale spurious adherents as well as genuine (Matthew 13:47). A separation, moreover, from the Jewish Church, as Christ must have foreseen, was imminent and inevitable, if for no other reason, because the spirit and aims of the society founded by Him were so widely different (Matthew 9:16 f. It could by no possibility give rise to the painful reflexion and inquiry described in the parable (Matthew 13:27, which are in reality due to the circumstance that the sin which exists in the world ‘is always forcing its way anew into the circle in which the Kingdom of God is being realized. It is almost needless to remark that if the Son of Man at the end of the world is to ‘gather out of his kingdom all things that offend (πάντα τὰ σκάνδαλα), and them which do iniquity,’ they must have existed previously within it (Matthew 13:41). ...
The contrast is obviously between the mixed state of affairs now prevailing, and the Kingdom as it shall be, when, freed from all admixture, it shines forth in its pure native lustre (Matthew 13:43). Meanwhile the disciples are directed to exercise a wise patience, and to refrain from drastic measures of reform which might result in injuries still more serious to the cause they have at heart (Matthew 13:29). Christ freely admitted that the presence and conduct of unworthy members were inconsistent with the Divine ideal of the Kingdom, and could not but prove injurious to its best interests (Matthew 13:28; Matthew 13:39). The wide and sweeping character of its operations exposed it to the risk of gathering into its bosom some who might do it serious discredit in the eyes of those who had its purity and welfare at heart, as well as of the world at large (Matthew 13:47). What our Lord deprecates is any attempt to forestall the Final Judgment by the absolute separation of offenders from religious fellowship, a separation issuing only in destruction (Matthew 13:40). Having regard to the imperfections that cleave to human nature while still in a state of probation, it is evidently His intention that lenity rather than severity should characterize the treatment of offenders, lest good and evil be rashly included in one common condemnation, and the remedy prove so violent as to be worse than the disease (Matthew 13:29). Even strong presumptive proof of moral unworthiness would not, in the case of mere human judgment, afford sufficient guarantee against the risk of mistake (Matthew 13:29). ...
While the disciples are enjoined to preserve an attitude of patient endurance toward evil within the Kingdom, Christ held out to them the prospect of a day of final sifting in which it would be completely eliminated (Matthew 13:30; Matthew Mat_13:48). Hitherto they have existed as an obscuring medium, but with the removal of the scandals and their authors (Matthew 13:41) the character of the righteous at last appears, without shadow of eclipse, in all its unsullied purity and splendour (Matthew 13:43). The sifting out of unworthy members results in irreparable loss, at the same time leading, as it does, to their permanent exclusion from heavenly privileges (Matthew 24:50, Matthew 25:11 f. , Matthew 25:30). The grounds of separation are quite general, consisting in broad fundamental distinctions of moral character, not clearly apparent at the outset, but becoming increasingly manifest as time goes on (Matthew 13:26), so that at last a division into two classes, the righteous and the wicked, becomes inevitable (Matthew 13:41; Matthew 13:43; Matthew 13:49). Elsewhere the twofold classification is made to turn on characteristics of a more specific kind, such as confession or denial of Christ in times of peril (Matthew 10:32 f. ), faithful or unfaithful exercise of stewardship (Matthew 24:45; Matthew 24:48), diligence and fidelity in the use of entrusted gifts, or failure to improve them due to unbelief and indolence (Matthew 25:20; Matthew 25:22; Matthew 25:24 f. Profession without practice (Matthew 7:21-23), selfish ambition (Matthew 18:1-3), an unforgiving disposition (Matthew 18:34 f. ), mark men out for exclusion from the perfected Kingdom; while childlike humility (Matthew 18:3), lowly acts of service (Luke 22:24-30), preparedness for all kinds of sacrifice up to that of life itself (Matthew 16:25; Matthew 16:27; Matthew 19:27-29), are sure passports to participation in its benefits
Questions And Answers - (Matthew 14:16 f. ...
Mark 8:5, Matthew 15:34 ‘How many loaves have ye?’
(a) Matters of common knowledge: Matthew 10:29 = Luke 12:6 (price of sparrows), Matthew 17:25 (tribute collected of strangers). ...
(b) Appeals to common sense: Matthew 5:46 f. , Matthew 7:3 f. (the mote and the beam—almost parabolic), Matthew 7:9 ff. , Matthew 7:16 (question-form dropped in Luke 6:44), Mark 7:18 f. = Matthew 15:17, Mark 12:16 = Matthew 22:20 = Luke 20:24 (‘Whose is this image and superscription?’), Luke 11:40; Luke 22:27. ...
(c) Appeals to the conscience of the hearers: Matthew 23:17 ff. , Mark 3:4 = Matthew 12:11 = Luke 6:9, Luke 13:15; Luke 14:3; Luke 14:5 (cf. Matthew 12:10 f. = Matthew 12:3 f. , Mark 11:17 (question-form dropped in Matthew 21:13 and Luke 19:46), Mark 12:10 f. = Matthew 21:42 = Luke 20:17, Mark 12:26 = Matthew 22:31 f. ), Matthew 21:16, John 10:34. Again, Jesus often asked questions to lead men to an exact understanding of the circumstances connected with a question addressed to Himself, or with a request asked of Him: Mark 10:3 (contrast Matthew 19:7) leads to a clear statement of the position of the Mosaic Law in regard to divorce, and enables Christ to contrast with it the higher law of God; Mark 10:38 = Matthew 20:22 corrects the false notions of the sons of Zebedee in regard to the Messianic Kingdom; cf. also Mark 10:18 = Matthew 19:17 = Luke 18:19 (‘Why callest thou me good?’), Matthew 11:7 ff. Mark 10:51 = Matthew 20:32 =
Gnashing of Teeth - GNASHING OF TEETH (ὁ βρυγμὸς τῶν δδὁντων, Matthew 8:12; Matthew 13:42; Matthew 13:50; Matthew 22:13; Matthew 24:51; Matthew 25:30, Luke 13:28). ]'>[2] The expression occurs in every case but one in parables of the Last Judgment, and even that exception (Matthew 8:12) may be called a parabolic representation
Household - —In Matthew 24:45 (οἰκετεία), Luke 12:42 (θεραπεία) = servants, i. The same English word translates οἰκιακοί in Matthew 10:25; Matthew 10:36, i. In Matthew 10:25 there is a contrast and comparison between the οἰκιακοί (Christ’s disciples) and the οἰκοδεσπότης (the Lord Himself), and Christ warns the Twelve that if He has been called Beelzebul (or Beelzebub) by His enemies (cf. Matthew 9:34; Matthew 12:24, John 8:48), those who belong to His household cannot expect to be free from this ‘reproach of Christ. ’ In Matthew 10:36 the contrast is between some members of a household and the rest
This, These - , Matthew 3:17 ; translated in Luke 2:34 , "this child;" in 1 Corinthians 5:3 , RV, "this thing. , Matthew 9:3 ; John 6:52 ; "of this sort," 2 Timothy 3:6 , AV (RV, "of these"); (b) as an adjective with a noun, either with the article and before it, e. , Matthew 12:32 , or after the noun (which is preceded by the article), e. , Matthew 3:9 ; 4:3 , "these stones;" or without the article often forming a predicate, e. , John 2:11 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1 ; (2) ekeinos, "that one," rendered "this" in Matthew 24:43 ; (3) autos; "he," rendered "this" in Matthew 11:14 , lit. , "he;" in John 12:7 , AV (RV, "it"); in the feminine, Luke 13:16 ; (4) the article ho, Matthew 21:21 (to, the neuter), AV (RV, "what"); in Romans 13:9 (1st part); Galatians 5:14 ; Hebrews 12:27 , the article to is virtually equivalent to "the following
Beneath - 1: κατωτέρω (Strong's #2736 — — kato — kat'-o, kat-o-ter'-o ) signifies (a) "down, downwards," Matthew 4:6 ; Luke 4:9 ; John 8:6,8 ; Acts 20:9 ; (b) "below, beneath," of place, Mark 14:66 ; the realms that lie below in contrast to heaven, John 8:23 ; the earth, as contrasted with the heavens, Acts 2:19 ; with heos, "unto," Matthew 27:51 ; Mark 15:38 . The comparative degree, katotero, "under," is used in Matthew 2:16
Dumb - Christ repeatedly restored the dumb (Matthew 9:32,33 ; Luke 11:14 ; Matthew 12:22 ) to the use of speech
Potter's Field, the, - Matthew, (Matthew 27:7 ) was purchased by the Priests with the thirty pieces of silver rejected by Judas, and converted into a burial-place for Jews not belonging to the city
Wages - ’ The labourers in the parable hire themselves for a denarius a day (Matthew 20:8). honour, consideration, power, wealth, and not from God, whom nominally he serves (Matthew 6:2; Matthew 6:5; Matthew 6:18). But those persecuted for righteousness’ sake (Matthew 5:11), those whose religious obedience is unobtrusive and self-forgetting (Matthew 6:4; Matthew 6:6; Matthew 6:18), those who help any of God’s servants and do them a kindness for His sake (Matthew 10:41-42, Mark 9:41), those who go beyond the world’s self-regarding way, and love their enemies, and do good and lend, hoping for nothing again (Luke 6:35, Matthew 5:45-46), are servants of the unseen Father. Their wages are not counted out to them in the world’s coin; they receive the Father’s open acknowledgment and gather fruit unto life eternal (Matthew 6:4; Matthew 6:6; Matthew 6:18, John 4:36). Matthew 10:10), probably a quotation of a common proverb, is of a different order
Matthew - Son of Alphaeus (not the father of James the Less, for Matthew and James are never coupled as brothers). Mark (Mark 2:14, compare Mark 3:18) and Luke (Luke 5:27, compare with Luke 6:15) veil his former less honorable occupation of a publican under his original name Levi; but Matthew himself gives it, and humbly puts himself after Thomas, an undesigned mark of genuineness; whereas Mark (Mark 3:18) and Luke (Luke 6:15) put Matthew before Thomas in the list of apostles. But Matthew is not ashamed to own his identity with "the publican" in order to magnify Christ's grace (Matthew 9:9), and in his catalogue of the apostles (Matthew 10:3). Desiring to draw others of his occupation with him to the Savior he made in His honor a great feast (Matthew 9:9-13; Luke 5:29; Mark 2:14). With the undesigned propriety which marks genuineness Matthew talks of Jesus' sitting down in "the house" without telling whose house it was, whereas Mark mentions it as Levi's. 24) says that after our Lord's ascension Matthew preached in Judaea and then in foreign nations (Ethiopia, according to Socrates Scholasticus, H
Readiness - READINESS—The expression γίνεσθε ἕτοιμοι, ‘Be ye ready,’ is employed by Christ to denote the necessity for constant readiness to receive Him at His Second Coming (Matthew 24:44, Luke 12:40). Closely akin to it in meaning is the more frequently used γρηγορείτε, ‘Watch ye,’ the word with which Christ demands constant watchfulness for the day of His Parousia (Matthew 24:42; Matthew 25:13, Mark 13:34 f. The two terms are used almost interchangeably in Matthew 24:42; Matthew 24:44, as is evident from the fact that the illustration of the necessity for watchfulness by the case of the negligent householder who suffers his house to be broken through (Matthew 24:43), is followed by the exhortation to readiness in the next verse; further evidence being found in the parable of the Ten Virgins, where the proper performance of the duty enjoined in Matthew 25:13 (‘Watch, therefore’) is exhibited in the careful preparation made by the wise virgins, who are described as αἱ ἕτοιμοι, for the coming of the bridegroom. It is the ignorance of the disciples as to the day and the hour of the final Advent which lends point and emphasis to Christ’s exhortations in prospect of it (Matthew 24:42; Matthew 24:44; Matthew 25:13, Mark 13:33; Mark 13:35, Luke 12:40). ...
If, as some (Weiss, Charles) maintain, He foretold that the fall of Jerusalem would be the immediate prelude to the end of the world, thus furnishing the disciples with a certain clue to the date of the latter event (Matthew 24:32 f. ‘There are distinct hints in some passages (Matthew 24:48; Matthew 25:19, Mark 13:35) that the end may be delayed beyond all human anticipation, and that “an indefinitely long night of history” may intervene before the return of the Lord’ (Forrest, The Authority of Christ, p. ...
The parables and parabolic sayings in the Synoptics (Matthew 24:42 to Matthew 25:30, Mark 13:32-37, Luke 12:35-48; Luke 19:11-27), intended to enforce the lesson of constant readiness for the Second Coming, may be described as parting counsels and admonitions to the disciples for the guidance of their conduct during the period, indefinitely prolonged, which must elapse between Christ’s departure from the world, then impending, and His return at the close of the present dispensation. ‘Every man’ has his own proper sphere and work assigned him (Matthew 25:14 f. , Mark 13:34, Luke 19:13), and the lack of personal preparedness cannot be made up for by connexion with the believing community, animated by the common hope of the Lord’s appearing (Matthew 25:1-2; Matthew 25:9). Their spiritual resources are to be developed to the utmost without the consciousness of being constantly overshadowed by His visible authority and supervision, but always in view of the day of reckoning (Matthew 24:45-51; Matthew 25:14-30, Mark 13:34-36, Luke 12:42-48; Luke 19:12-26). The proof of readiness for His return is thoroughgoing devotion to the interests of the absent Lord, which are identical with the interests of His Kingdom, displayed in steadfast fidelity and unflagging diligence in the use of the gifts held in trust, under the severe test of indefinitely prolonged absence (Matthew 24:45; Matthew 25:20 f. ), yielding to unbridled self-indulgence and the tyrannical abuse of authority (Matthew 24:48 f. ), faithless and inexcusable failure to improve one’s trust (Matthew 25:26 f). The frequent admonition to watch sounds a note of alarm, pointing to the danger of being taken unawares and found in a state of unpreparedness, due to the abrupt and startling manner in which the Parousia breaks in upon and breaks up the established order of things (Matthew 24:50; Matthew 25:6, Mark 13:36, Luke 12:36; Luke 21:34). Being of a catastrophic character, it leaves no time for the making or completing of preparations previously neglected (Matthew 24:38 f. , Matthew 24:43; Mat_25:10). ...
As the Parousia immediately heralds the Last Judgment (Matthew 25:19; Matthew 25:31), the manner in which the disciples have acquitted themselves during the period of Christ’s absence is then passed under review, and appropriate destiny assigned them. Those who have proved their capacity in humbler spheres of service by fidelity to Christ’s Person and interests are promoted to loftier spheres of service (Matthew 24:47; Matthew 25:20-23), raised to equality with Himself (Luke 12:37), and participate in the eternal blessedness of the consummated Kingdom (Matthew 25:10; Matthew 25:21; Matthew 25:23). Those who have failed to reach the required standard are excluded, so far as appears, irrevocably, from such high fellowship (Matthew 25:11 f. , Matthew 25:30), and incur penalties varying in degree in proportion to their unfaithfulness (Matthew 24:51, Luke 12:47 f
Zeb'Edee - (my gift ) (Greek form of Zabdi ) a fisherman of Galilee, the father of the apostles James the Great and John ( Matthew 4:21 ) and the husband of Salome. (Matthew 27:56 ; Mark 15:40 ) He probably lived either at Bethsaida or in its immediate neighborhood. (Matthew 4:21 ) He appears only twice in the Gospel narrative, namely, in (Matthew 4:21,22 ; Mark 1:19,20 ) where he is seen in his boat with his two sons mending their nets
Reverence - It is used in the parable of the Wicked Husbandmen (Matthew 21:37, Mark 12:6, Luke 20:13), where the idea is that even those who had ill-treated the servants might show proper respect and honour to the Son. ...
The word τιμή and its derivatives are used to express high reverential regard and profound respect (Luke 2:9-208; Matthew 15:4-6, Mark 7:10, John 5:23; John 5:41; John 8:49; John 8:54). The term προσκυνεῖν, which means ‘to kiss the hand to,’ and then ‘to bow down before,’ is often used in the Gospels to signify the sentiment of reverential regard, and even of worship (Matthew 2:2; Matthew 2:8-11; Matthew 4:9; Matthew 14:33; Matthew 15:25; John 17:1-47; Matthew 28:17, Mark 5:6; Mark 15:19). In several places certain physical acts are significant of reverence, such as προσπίπτειν, ‘to fall down before’ (Mark 3:11; Mark 5:33, Luke 8:28); γονυπετεῖν, ‘to bend the knee’ (Matthew 17:14, Mark 1:40); πίπτειν ἐπὶ πρόσωπον, ‘to fall upon the face. In some passages δοξάζειν, ‘to glorify,’ is used in a rather suggestive way to set forth the idea of giving reverence to (as in Matthew 6:2; Matthew 9:8, Mark 2:12, Luke 5:25-26; Luke 7:16, John 8:54; 1618385389_19), where hypocrites seeking glory of men, people of different sorts giving glory to God, the Father glorifying the Son, and the Son giving glory to the Father, are alluded to. In the Lord’s Prayer, ἁγιάζειν, ‘to hallow’ or ‘hold sacred’ (Matthew 6:9) the name of God, implies the sentiment of reverence in its highest form. ...
Some additional passages may be merely noted, wherein words and phrases denote reverence in different aspects: Matthew 7:29; Matthew 8:8; Matthew 9:27; Matthew 12:23; Matthew 16:16; Matthew 21:9-15; Matthew 22:21; Matthew 23:12; Matthew 26:12, Mark 1:7; Mark 9:1-10, 1618385389_8; Luke 7:16; Luke 7:44-45; Luke 8:35-37; Luke 19:35; Luke 23:11, John 12:3; John 12:14; John 13:13; John 21:15; John 21:17
Right (2) - —In the Authorized Version the word ‘right’ is the equivalent of two distinct Greek words, δίκαιος, ‘righteous’ (Matthew 20:4; Matthew 20:7, Luke 12:57), and ὀρθῶς, ‘correctly’ (Luke 7:43; Luke 10:28; Luke 20:21). Not only actions and words, but also thoughts, desires, and motives, are always included in its scope (Matthew 5:22; Matthew 5:28). Our Lord contrasts the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees with that which He demanded from His followers (Matthew 5:20). They measured by means of an imperfect standard, while our Lord laid down an absolute law (Matthew 5:48). (b) Then obedience to the will of God, because it is God’s will, is emphasized (Matthew 5:33, Matthew 7:21). (c) A secondary and yet important motive is found in the spiritual blessings associated with the performance of right (Matthew 5:1-11, Matthew 6:1; Matthew 6:4; Matthew 6:6; Matthew 6:18). (d) Yet again we have the spiritual influences and effects of right as no inconsiderable motive for righteousness of thought, word, and deed (Matthew 5:13-14). The encouragements to right are found in (a) the joy of satisfaction in obedience to God; (b) the approving testimony of conscience as the result of rignteousness; (c) the blessing of God manifestly resting upon the life (Matthew 10:28-31); (d) fellowship with Christ in faithful and true living (Matthew 10:25, Matthew 12:50). These points concerning right are only a bare summary of what is both implicit and expressed in the whole of our Lord’s teaching, especially in the five great sections of teaching found in Matthew
Brother -
In the natural and common sense (Matthew 1:2 ; Luke 3:1,19 ). ...
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A near relation, a cousin (Genesis 13:8 ; 14:16 ; Matthew 12:46 ; John 7:3 ; Acts 1:14 ; Galatians 1:19 ). ...
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Simply a fellow-countryman (Matthew 5:47 ; Acts 3:22 ; Hebrews 7:5 ). ...
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A disciple or follower (Matthew 25:40 ; Hebrews 2:11,12 ). ...
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A fellow-man (Genesis 9:5 ; 19:7 ; Matthew 5:22,23,24 ; 7:5 ; Hebrews 2:17 ). Brethren of Jesus (Matthew 1:25 ; 12:46,50 : Mark 3:31,32 ; Galatians 1:19 ; 1 Corinthians 9:5 , etc
Transfiguration - Jesus’ transfiguration took place on a high mountain, possibly Mt Hermon, not far from Caesarea Philippi in northern Palestine (Matthew 16:13; Matthew 17:1). It was also a foretaste of the glory that Christ would receive after he had completed the work that he had come to do (Matthew 17:2; John 17:4-5). ...
Moses and Elijah, the two people of the Old Testament era who appeared with Jesus, possibly symbolized the law and the prophets (Matthew 17:3). Matthew 16:16; Matthew 16:21). His statement of approval of his Son combined words from one of David’s messianic psalms with words from one of the servant songs of Isaiah (Matthew 17:5; cf. ...
The Father’s final words, ‘Hear him’, indicated that this one, besides being the kingly Messiah and the suffering servant, was the great prophet who announced God’s message to the world (Matthew 17:5; cf
Reflectiveness - The parable of the Sower should help to restore the reflective habit to its high place among the duties and privileges of life (Matthew 13:19; Matthew 13:22). The good scribe has thoughts new and old to reflect upon and dilate upon (Matthew 13:52). It is the reflective mind that appreciates the absolute truth and varied applicability of the reciprocal principle involved in Matthew 7:12 or even Matthew 7:4. Nature and experience are full of suggestive facts to reflect upon (Matthew 6:26-30; Matthew 12:12), God’s care for men being greater than for flowers, and His loving-kindness to men exceeding any shepherd’s anxiety for his sheep. John the Baptist is told to reflect upon the beneficence of his successor’s ministry (Matthew 11:4-5)
Herodians - Partisans of Herod Antipas, Matthew 22:16 ; Mark 3:6 . This explains Matthew 22:16
Weather - 1: εὐδία (Strong's #2105 — Noun Feminine — eudia — yoo-dee'-ah ) akin to eudios, "calm," denotes "fair weather," Matthew 16:2 . ...
2: χειμών (Strong's #5494 — Noun Masculine — cheimon — khi-mone' ) "winter," also "a winter storm," is translated "foul weather" in Matthew 16:3
Immanuel - This passage has been cited by Matthew, and specially applied to the birth of Christ, Matthew 1:22-23, who is rightly regarded as "God with us" and as ever present in his church and with his people through the ages of the world. Matthew 28:20
Thirst, Thirsty, Athrist - , Matthew 25:35,37,42 ; in Matthew 25:44 , "athirst" (lit. , "thirsting"); John 4:13,15 ; 19:28 ; Romans 12:20 ; 1 Corinthians 4:11 ; Revelation 7:16 ; (b) figuratively, of spiritual "thirst," Matthew 5:6 ; John 4:14 ; 6:35 ; 7:37 ; in Revelation 21:6 ; 22:17 , "that is athirst
Saying And Doing - ’ ‘Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven’ (Matthew 7:21). Not that Jesus by any means underrated the importance of ‘saying’; He made confession of His name one of the most solemn obligations of discipleship (Matthew 10:32-33, cf. The recurrence, in various forms, of the phrase ‘to do the will of God,’ and the prominent place given to this conception, is a marked feature of Christ’s teaching; see Matthew 12:50; cf. Matthew 7:24-27; Matthew 16:27; Matthew 25:40; Matthew 25:45, Luke 10:30-37; Luke 11:28; Luke 13:6-9 etc. ‘Doing’ is the testing quality of the Christian life (Matthew 5:19; Matthew 5:47), and the sure and only way to spiritual enlightenment (John 7:17). ’ Even when sincerely meant, He checked the impulsiveness of a hasty and ill-considered profession (Matthew 8:19-20; cf. Matthew 26:33-34, Luke 14:28); but His severest rebukes were reserved for those who substituted a hollow and obtrusive pretension for the realities of moral and spiritual character. It was the great sin of the religious leaders of the time that they were so strong in profession and precept, and so neglectful of practical righteousness; ‘they say, and do not’ (Matthew 23:3); and many too readily followed their example of easy formalism,—‘This people honoureth me with their lips’ (Matthew 15:8). The same contrast is boldly presented in the parable of the Two Sons (Matthew 21:28-32), with special reference on the one hand to the Pharisees and scribes, and on the other to the outwardly unpromising ‘publicans and sinners’ who welcomed the message of the Kingdom of heaven. In this, as in other ways, ‘many shall be last that are first; and first that are last’ (Matthew 19:30). The ‘acted parable’ of the withering of the barren fig-tree with its deceptive show of premature leaves, was a solemn warning against the danger and sin of ‘saying’ without ‘doing’ (Matthew 21:18-19, Mark 11:12-14)
Matthew of Westminster - " The misunderstanding regarding this imaginary personage originated with a copyist who, perceiving that part of the chronicle was written at Westminster, while another portion followed the history of Matthew Paris, concluded that Matthew was himself a monk of Westminster
Baptism Metaphorical - In Scripture the term Baptism is used as referring to the work of the Spirit on the heart, Matthew 3:11 ; also to the sufferings of Christ, Matthew 20:22 ; and to so much of the Gospel as John the Baptist taught his disciples, Acts 18:25
Demon - Demons are evil (Luke 10:17-18), powerful (Luke 8:29), and under the power of Satan (Matthew 12:24-30). They recognized Christ (Mark 1:23-24) and can possess non-Christians (Matthew 8:29)
Dalmanutha - Matthew calls it Magdala, Matthew 15:39
Westminster, Matthew of - " The misunderstanding regarding this imaginary personage originated with a copyist who, perceiving that part of the chronicle was written at Westminster, while another portion followed the history of Matthew Paris, concluded that Matthew was himself a monk of Westminster
Sheep - , Matthew 12:11,12 ; (b) metaphorically, of those who belong to the Lord, the lost ones of the house of Israel, Matthew 10:6 ; of those who are under the care of the Good Shepherd, e. , Matthew 26:31 ; John 10:1 , lit. , "the fold of the sheep," and John 10:2-27 ; 21:16,17 in some texts; Hebrews 13:20 ; of those who in a future day, at the introduction of the millennial kingdom, have shown kindness to His persecuted earthly people in their great tribulation, Matthew 25:33 ; of the clothing of false shepherds, Matthew 7:15 ; (c) figuratively, by way of simile, of Christ, Acts 8:32 ; of the disciples, e. , Matthew 10:16 ; of true followers of Christ in general, Romans 8:36 ; of the former wayward condition of those who had come under His Shepherd care, 1 Peter 2:25 ; of the multitudes who sought the help of Christ in the days of His flesh, Matthew 9:36 ; Mark 6:34
Humiliation of Christ - (Philippians 2:8 ), seen in (1) his birth (Galatians 4:4 ; Luke 2:7 ; John 1:46 ; Hebrews 2:9 ), (2) his circumstances, (3) his reputation (Isaiah 53 ; Matthew 26:59,67 ; Psalm 22:6 ; Matthew 26:68 ), (4) his soul (Psalm 22:1 ; Matthew 4:1-11 ; Luke 22:44 ; Hebrews 2:17,18 ; 4:15 ), (5) his death (Luke 23 ; John 19 ; Mark 15:24,25 ), (6) and his burial (Isaiah 53:9 ; Matthew 27:57,58,60 )
Sun - , Matthew 5:45 , and power, Revelation 1:16 ; (b) of its qualities of brightness and glory, e. , Matthew 13:43 ; 17:2 ; Acts 26:13 ; 1 Corinthians 15:41 ; Revelation 10:1 ; 12:1 ; (c) as a means of destruction, e. , Matthew 13:6 ; James 1:11 ; of physical misery, Revelation 7:16 ; (d) as a means of judgment, e. , Matthew 24:29 ; Mark 13:24 ; Luke 21:25 ; 23:45 ; Acts 2:20 ; Revelation 6:12 ; 8:12 ; 9:2 ; 16:8
Uriah - —The Hittite (Matthew 1:6)
a'Chaz - king of Judah, (Matthew 1:9 )
Omniscience - God knows us intimately (Psalm 139:1-6 ; Matthew 6:4 ,Matthew 6:4,6:6 ,Matthew 6:6,6:8 )
Bartim us - If this narrative be compared with Matthew 20:29-34; Luke 18:35-43, some differences appear. For Matthew speaks of two blind men. According to some writers, our Lord healed one of these (as in Luke) on entering Jericho, and another (Bartimeus, as in Mark) on leaving it; and Matthew has, with characteristic brevity in recording miracles, combined both these in one
Salome - The wife of Zebedee, and the mother of James the elder and John the Evangelist, and was one of the followers of Christ, Matthew 27:56; Mark 15:40; Mark 16:1, though she seems, like many others, to have at first mistaken the true nature of his kingdom. Matthew 20:21. Matthew 14:6; Mark 6:22
Halt - 1: χωλός (Strong's #5560 — Adjective — cholos — kho-los' ) "lame," is translated "halt" in Matthew 18:8 ; Mark 9:45 ; John 5:3 ; in Acts 14:8 , "cripple;" in Luke 14:21 , AV, "halt," RV, "lame;" elsewhere, "lame," Matthew 11:5 ; 15:30,31 ; 21:14 : Luke 7:22 ; 14:13 ; Acts 3:2 ; 8:7 ; Hebrews 12:13 ; some mss. ...
Note: For kullos, Matthew 18:8 , RV, "halt, see MAIMED , No
Gethsemane - Jesus went there frequently with his disciples (Luke 22:39; John 18:1-2) and prayed there in great agony the night before his crucifixion (Matthew 26:30; Matthew 26:36-45). The victory he won through that time of prayer enabled him to meet with confidence those who had come to the garden to arrest him (Matthew 26:46-56; John 18:3-12)
Matthew (Apostle) - Matthew (APOSTLE). The first ( Matthew 9:9 , Mark 2:14 , Luke 5:27 ) narrates his call. He was named both ‘Matthew’ (Mt. ), a great feast given to Jesus by Matthew himself (Lk. ’ The name ‘Matthew’ probably means ‘Gift of Jahweh’ (cf. ...
The second set of passages gives the list of the Twelve (Matthew 10:3 , Mark 3:16 , Luke 6:15 , Acts 1:15 ). In all these the surname ‘Matthew’ is given, not ‘Levi,’ just as ‘Bartholomew’ and ‘Thomas’ are surnames; and in all four Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, and James the (son) of Alphæus are mentioned together, though not always in the same order. ) Matthew comes next to James (though they are not joined together as a pair); in the other two, next but one. ]'>[2] Khalphai ) and ‘Clopas’ are one name, there is perhaps something to be said for the opinion that Matthew and James were brothers. For Matthew’s connexion with the First Gospel, see the next article
Tribulation - Trouble or affiction of any kind (Deuteronomy 4:30 ; Matthew 13:21 ; 2 co 7:4 ). In Matthew 24:21,29 , the word denotes the calamities that were to attend the destruction of Jerusalem
Hem - Matthew 9:20 (c) This may be taken as a picture of implicit faith in CHRIST, even though it be just to came near and to touch that which belonged to Him. (See also Matthew 14:36)
Whatsoever - , with hos, Matthew 10:11 ; with hosos, Matthew 17:12 ; with hostis, neuter form, Luke 10:35
Ezekias - Grecized form of Hezekiah (Matthew 1:9,10 )
Issue of Blood - KJV phrase meaning hemorrhage (Matthew 9:20 )
Bridechamber - Matthew 9 ...
Cosmopolitanism - The presence of foreigners, however, is seldom mentioned in the Gospels, save for a few references to centurions (Matthew 8:5, Luke 7:2; Luke 23:47), strangers from Tyre and Sidon (Mark 3:8), a short journey to Decapolis (Mark 7:31, where, strangely enough, the Aramaic word ‘Ephphatha’ finds special place in the text), and the notice of the Greeks who sought for Jesus at the feast—though no account of His interview with them is given (John 12:20). ...
Jewish exclusiveness was apparently endorsed by Christ Himself (Matthew 5:47 ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885) 6:7, 32); the Twelve are forbidden to go into any way of the Gentiles (Matthew 10:5); and the Syrophœnician woman is at first addressed in thoroughly Jewish language (Matthew 15:21, Mark 7:24). ); commends the faith of a Roman centurion as greater than any faith He had found in Israel (Matthew 8:10, Luke 7:9); and, notwithstanding His first words to the Syrophœnician woman, recognizes and rewards the greatness of her faith (Matthew 15:21 ff. Matthew is the narrator of the visit of Wise Men from the East (Matthew 2:1); and if he traces the genealogy of Christ to Abraham (Matthew 1:2) St. ...
It is true that the Gospels are full of protests against Jewish exclusiveness (Matthew 3:9 ‘Think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father’; cf. , where the claim founded on descent from Abraham is contemptuously dismissed; also Matthew 12:41 f. ‘the men of Nineveh … the queen of Sheba shall rise up in the judgment with this generation and shall condemn it’; Matthew 8:11 f. , Luke 13:29 ‘many shall come from the east and the west … but the sons of the kingdom shall be cast forth’; and Matthew 11:21, Luke 10:13, where the unrepentant Bethsaida and Chorazin are contrasted with Tyre and Sidon). the references to publicans and sinners, Matthew 9:11; Matthew 11:19, Mark 2:15, Luke 5:30; Luke 7:37; Luke 15:1, and the fragment in John 7:53 to John 8:11; (b) the universalism of the gospel, Matthew 24:14, Mark 14:9 (‘what she hath done shall be preached in all the world’), Matthew 28:19, Mark 16:15, Luke 24:49 (‘make disciples of all the nations’); so John 3:16; John 12:33 (‘I, if I be lifted up, will draw all men unto myself’); the same thing would result from Matthew 20:28, Mark 10:45 (‘to give his life a ransom for many’), if carried out to its logical conclusion; (c) anti-legalism in regard to the Sabbath (Matthew 12:1, Mark 2:23, Luke 6:1; Luke 13:14), ceremonial ablutions (Matthew 15:1, Mark 7:19), the provisions of the Law (Matthew 5:21; Matthew 5:33; Matthew 5:38; Matthew 5:43), and the inadequacy of the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees (Matthew 5:20). It is noteworthy that the ground of marriage fidelity is carried back from Moses to the Creation (Matthew 19:4, Mark 10:6), and the Sadducees are referred, on the subject of the resurrection, to God’s language to the pre-Mosaic patriarchs (Mark 12:18, Luke 20:37); still Christ regards as final a combination of Deuteronomy 6:4 and Leviticus 19:18 (Mark 12:28 ff. ), and He asserts that His purpose is not to destroy the Law but to fulfil it (Matthew 5:17, cf. Matthew 3:15). 40–48, especially the statement that, omitting what is probably unauthentic, ‘Mark and Matthew have almost consistently withstood the temptation to introduce the Gentile mission into the words and deeds of Jesus,’ p
Sun - Its light is one of the gifts which the Creator bestows on all men without distinction (Matthew 5:45). By ‘signs in the sun’ (Luke 21:25) we are to understand the phenomena of eclipse, as described more clearly in the parallel passages, Matthew 24:29, Mark 13:24. The sun’s scorching heat, so destructive to vegetation, is an emblem of tribulation or persecution (Matthew 13:6; Matthew 13:21, Mark 4:6; Mark 4:17). The appearance of the face of Christ at the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:2) and in the opening vision of the Apocalypse (Revelation 1:16) is compared to the brightness of the sun. The same thing is said of the glory in which the righteous shall appear after the final judgment (Matthew 13:43)
Treasure - 1: θησαυρός (Strong's #2344 — Noun Masculine — thesauros — thay-sow-ros' ) denotes (1) "a place of safe keeping" (possibly akin to tithemi, "to put"), (a) "a casket," Matthew 2:11 ; (b) "a storehouse," Matthew 13:52 ; used metaphorically of the heart, Matthew 12:35 , twice (RV, "out of his treasure"); Luke 6:45 ; (2) "a treasure," Matthew 6:19-21 ; 13:44 ; Luke 12:33,34 ; Hebrews 11:26 ; "treasure" (in heaven or the heavens), Matthew 19:21 ; Mark 10:21 ; Luke 18:22 ; in these expressions (which are virtually equivalent to that in Matthew 6:1 , "with your Father which is in Heaven") the promise does not simply refer to the present life, but looks likewise to the hereafter; in 2 Corinthians 4:7 it is used of "the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ," descriptive of the Gospel, as deposited in the earthen vessels of the persons who proclaim it (cp
Hypocrisy - Jesus repeatedly condemned the Jewish religious leaders of his time as hypocrites, because though they were outwardly religious, inwardly they were ungodly (Matthew 22:18; Matthew 23:25; Mark 7:6-8; Mark 12:15). They thought that their show of religion would impress people and please God, but it brought instead condemnation from Jesus (Matthew 6:2-5; Matthew 23:13-36; Luke 12:56). Mark 12:15 with Matthew 22:18; see MALICE). It shows itself in many ways, as, for example, when people accuse others of what they are guilty of themselves (Matthew 7:5; Luke 13:15; Romans 2:1-3; Romans 2:19-24)
Leading - —‘Lead’ is used in the Gospels in its ordinary senses: intransitively in the description of the ways that lead to life or destruction (Matthew 7:13-14), and transitively often. The general conception of God’s leading His people, so frequent in the Psalms and in Deutero-Isaiah and elsewhere, is assumed in the petition ‘Lead us not into temptation’ (Matthew 6:13, Luke 11:4); for the true life is along a right path wherein God leads His children. ...
The leadership of religious authorities is referred to in the description of scribes and Pharisees as ‘blind guides’ or ‘blind leaders of the blind’ (Matthew 23:16; Matthew 15:14); the metaphor being based on the sight, familiar in Eastern cities, of rows or files of blind persons each holding by the one in front. The imperative ‘Follow me’ is addressed to individuals, as Peter and Andrew, James and John (Matthew 4:19; Matthew 4:21), Matthew (Matthew 9:9), and Philip (John 1:43); and to unnamed disciples or listeners (Matthew 8:22; Matthew 19:21). It is repeated in the fundamental law of the Kingdom, where self-denial or cross-bearing is enjoined (Matthew 16:24, Mark 8:34, Luke 9:23, John 12:25); but here the reference is to Jesus as a supreme example rather than a present guide, and the instruction is primarily spiritual. It may be said that during His whole public ministry Jesus was leading and training disciples to carry on His work; while the risen Christ is the Head of the Church and the Leader of the Christian army (Matthew 28:18-20)
Righteous, Righteousness - Jesus Christ tells His followers that their righteousness is to be based on the eternal character of God (Matthew 5:44-45), as uniquely revealed in human life by Himself (Matthew 11:27 ||). —The Synoptic writers all use δίκαιος and δικαιοσύνη generally, of the man who tries to do his duty in the sight of God, whether Christian or not (Matthew 1:19; Matthew 5:45, Matthew 7:1-5, Luke 1:6; Mark 9:23-2481). Matthew also uses the words especially of believers in Christ, to denote the character which He requires in citizens of the Kingdom of heaven (Matthew 5:10; Matthew 6:1 etc. Matthew 5:17). [2]. Pilate’s wife in Matthew 27:19), and in the cases mentioned above from the Acts, where St. Matthew (Matthew 27:54) and St. Matthew 16:15-17). In Matthew 5:45-48 Christ tells us that God loves both good and evil, both righteous and unrighteous; and His followers are to do the same ‘in order that ye may be (γένησθε = ‘show yourselves to be’; or else ‘become’) sons of your Father which is in heaven. It will suffice to quote one which shows the unity of the Divine love in its two aspects of mercifulness and sternness—the parable of the king that took account of his servants and punished him who showed no mercy to his fellow (Matthew 18:23-35). In Matthew 5:10 He pronounces a blessing on those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake; and in the next verse He goes on, ‘Blessed are ye when men shall … persecute you … for my sake. Matthew makes δικαιοσύνη the character of the citizens of the Kingdom of heaven. But Jesus Christ is the inaugurator of that kingdom (Matthew 25:31-461; Matthew 12:28). It is He, as the Son of Man, who sows the good seed of the Kingdom (Matthew 13:37); He, again, who can give ‘the keys of the kingdom’ (Matthew 16:19). He has authority over the angels in His kingdom, which is the kingdom of the Father (Matthew 13:41; Matthew 13:43). He not only gives to men a unique revelation—the only revelation—of the Father (Matthew 11:27 ||—a passage which implies His sinlessness), but He is the giver of the Holy Ghost (Matthew 3:11 ||). This teaching is confirmed by the order of words in Matthew 24:36 and Mark 13:32 (men—the angels—the Son—the Father). So He claims to be the Son of God (Luke 22:70 ||), and suffers condemnation for blasphemy; as such, He is transfigured, before three of His Apostles, with the Divine glory (Matthew 17:1-8 ||). And so again He assents to the statement that He is quite different from one of the prophets (Matthew 16:14-18); they were righteous, but He is the righteous Man, and more also. Therefore He is to be the judge of mankind, in the consummation of God’s kingdom (Matthew 7:22 f. , Matthew 13:41, Matthew 16:27, Matthew 25:31 ff. Matthew has collected for us, in the Sermon on the Mount, much of our Lord’s teaching on the Kingdom of heaven and the δικαιοσύνη which marks its citizens. They are to seek above all else ‘the kingdom of God and his righteousness’ (Matthew 6:33); they are to ‘hunger and thirst’ after it (Matthew 5:6). The Kingdom only reflects the eternal character of the King (Matthew 5:45). Matthew 6 opens with a warning against ostentation in δικαιοσύνη (if, indeed, that is the right reading); and the examples given are those of almsgiving (Matthew 6:2), prayer (Matthew 6:5), and fasting (Matthew 6:16)—the second of which, at least, is often treated by us as outside morality. Matthew (Matthew 22:40), Christ adds the words, ‘on these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets’ (words almost repeated in Matthew 7:12 and presupposed in Galatians 5:14 and Romans 13:8). God judges men by what they are rather than by what they do; we, being human, and unable to read the heart, are to judge by their deeds what men are (Matthew 7:16), though with much caution against rash and censorious judgments (Matthew 7:1). He who nurses wrath against a brother, or treats him with bitter contempt, is guilty before God as well as the man who proceeds to murder (Matthew 5:21-22); and ‘every one that looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart’ (Matthew 5:28). The hard sayings of Matthew 5:39-42 must clearly be interpreted on the same principle of love towards our neighbour, resting on love towards God; they do not forbid all resistance of evil (such as resistance to a thief or one of overbearing temper), but they prohibit resistance which springs from personal resentment; they do not inculcate indiscriminate charity, but command us to do, without thought of self, whatever is best for those in need. In prayer we are not to ‘use vain repetitions,’ as if we should be heard for our ‘much speaking’ (Matthew 6:7); yet it is to be observed that Christ Himself sometimes spent the whole or the major part of the night in prayer (Luke 6:12, Mark 6:46-48). Men may ‘cast out devils’ and do ‘many mighty works’ in Christ’s name, and yet be no true followers of His (Matthew 7:22-23). The motive which makes the service of men righteous in the highest sense is that it should be done for Christ’s sake (Mark 9:41, Matthew 10:42; Matthew 18:5), or, in other words, in order that men ‘may glorify your Father which is in heaven’ (Matthew 5:16). We must really lose ourselves before we can find our true selves (Matthew 16:25 etc. Without love it is void and empty (Matthew 7:22 f. But how, it may be asked, are we to win such faith as this? Partly by contemplation of God’s love in Nature (Matthew 5:45; Matthew 6:26-30, Luke 12:24-32); partly by the evidence of Christ’s life, death, and resurrection (Matthew 16:8-10; Matthew 28:19-20 etc. Matthew 17:27); and partly by loving service of our brother men in all humility (see Luke 17:5-10). ‘Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven’ (Matthew 7:21). For the ‘Golden Rule,’ which sums up ‘the Law and the Prophets,’ is, ‘All things whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, even so do ye also to them’ (Matthew 7:12, Luke 6:31). And His last words on earth lay before His Apostles their duty of teaching all nations (Matthew 28:19, Luke 24:47, cf. He uses also the term ‘brother’ in a no less catholic sense, in all probability, though He never explicitly tells His disciples that they are to consider all men as brethren (see Matthew 7:3; Matthew 18:15; Matthew 18:21, Luke 17:3-4). ...
It was the simplicity and the ‘inwardness’ of this supreme test of righteousness by love that were to make Christ’s ‘yoke easy’ (Matthew 11:30), in contrast with the ‘heavy burdens’ imposed on men’s shoulders by the externalism and endless rules of the Pharisees (Matthew 23:4). Whosoever therefore shall humble himself as this little child, the same is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 18:3-4, cf. Mark 9:35); and He called the scribes and Pharisees ‘children of hell’ (Matthew 23:15)—a term which he never applies even to the publican or the harlot—because He found in their self-exaltation and censoriousness (cf. Luke 18:11, Matthew 23:5-10) the very antithesis of the meekness and humility which were to Him the essence of righteousness (Matthew 11:29; Mark 6:20, Luke 17:7-10). His mission, He says, is not to the self-righteous, but to the man conscious of his sin (Matthew 9:13 ||, cf. To the Pharisee ceremonial was everything, the spirit of action nothing (Matthew 23:25-26); to Him the ceremonial was useless unless carried out in the spirit of love (Matthew 5:23-25), and the rule of law must always give way to the rule of love (cf. His treatment of Sabbath-observance, Mark 2:23 to Matthew 5:17-20). Therefore He said, ‘Except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no wise enter into the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 5:20). except when doing so meant the violation of a higher law (see Matthew 23:3). Not ‘a jot or tittle’ of its underlying principles was to perish; and the man who should ‘break’ (λύσῃ in Matthew 5:19 picks up καταλῦσαι in Matthew 5:17; cf. ’]'>[3] ...
On the other hand, He gives new and deeper applications to the laws of Moses, as in the case of the law of murder (Matthew 5:21 ff. He does not hesitate to add new restrictions to it, as in the case of the laws of adultery, false swearing, and retaliation (Matthew 5:27; Matthew 5:33; Matthew 5:38); and He definitely abrogates a law of Moses when He declares all meats clean (
Ditch - 1: βόθυνος (Strong's #999 — Noun Masculine — bothunos — both'-oo-nos ) any kind of "deep hole or pit" (probably connected with bathos, "deep"), is translated "ditch" in the AV of Matthew 15:14 ; Luke 6:39 , RV, "pit" in each place, as in both versions of Matthew 12:11
Parables - Their sins therefore remained unforgiven (Matthew 13:10-17; Mark 4:10-12). He announced the kingdom, and people’s response to his message determined whether they entered the kingdom (Matthew 13:18-23; Matthew 21:28-33; Matthew 21:42-43; Matthew 22:1-14; see KINGDOM OF GOD). Only those who wholeheartedly accepted it were God’s people (Matthew 13:1-9; Matthew 13:18-23). When the Jews, for whom the kingdom was prepared, rejected Jesus, Gentiles were invited and there was a great response (Matthew 22:1-10). Thus Gentiles, who in Old Testament times had not received the preparation for God’s kingdom that the Jews had received, entered into its full blessings along with believing Jews (Matthew 20:1-16). When the final judgment comes, however, only the genuine believers will share in the triumphs of the kingdom (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:34-43; Matthew 13:47-50; Matthew 25). From its insignificant beginnings among the ordinary people of Palestine it spreads throughout the world (Matthew 13:31-33). It is of such value that to enter it is worth any sacrifice (Matthew 13:44-46). In some cases he mentioned these points (Matthew 21:43; Luke 12:21; Luke 15:7; Luke 15:10), but in others he left the hearers to find out for themselves (Mark 12:12-13; Luke 7:40-43; Luke 19:11-27). ...
For example, in the parable of Matthew 20:1-15 Jesus was not teaching that an employer should give his workers equal pay for unequal work. Rather he was showing that even the most unlikely people enter God’s kingdom and, by God’s grace, they receive its full blessings (Matthew 20:16). He wanted people to listen and think (Matthew 18:12; Matthew 21:28; Luke 10:36), but more than that he wanted them to decide and act (Matthew 18:35; Matthew 21:45; Luke 10:37). And the challenge that Jesus brought through his parables is still relevant today (Matthew 13:9; Matthew 13:43)
Loneliness - The outstanding instances are—the Temptation in the Wilderness (Matthew 4:1, Mark 1:12, Luke 4:2), the retirement after the excitement consequent on the feeding of the five thousand (Matthew 14:22, Mark 6:45; cf. It should be noted that at times of peculiar spiritual intensity Jesus withdrew from the other disciples, but kept by Him Peter and the sons of Zebedee, as at the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:1, Mark 9:2, Luke 9:28), at the raising of Jairus’ daughter (Mark 5:37), and at Gethsemane (Matthew 26:37—‘watch with me,’—Mark 14:35, Luke 22:43). after the death of John the Baptist (Matthew 14:13; in Mark 6:11 this retirement immediately follows the return of the Twelve); from the opposition of the Pharisees (Matthew 16:13, Mark 8:27, Luke 9:18; also Matthew 15:21, Mark 7:24). Similarly, He was extremely anxious that His miracles should not become known (Luke 5:13, Matthew 8:4, Mark 8:26; Mark 9:9; the chief exception, where there were special reasons, is in Mark 5:19). On the other hand, it must be remembered that (a) Jesus was constantly accompanied, at least in Galilee and at the end in Jerusalem, by twelve friends and disciples specially appointed (Matthew 10:2, Mark 3:16, Luke 10:1 imply a larger circle from which to draw); to these we must add a number of women (Luke 8:3; cf. Matthew 27:55, Mark 15:40, Luke 23:49). Matthew 4:23; Matthew 8:18; Matthew 9:35, Mark 1:37, Luke 4:42; Luke 12:1; see Swete, St. lxxx); in the last visit to Jerusalem He sought retirement at night by leaving the city either for Bethany or the Mount of Olives (Matthew 21:17, Mark 11:19, Luke 21:37). (c) His conduct was social enough—as distinet from that of John and of the Essenes—to give rise to the slanders about ‘a gluttonous man and a winebibber’ (Matthew 11:19, Luke 7:34); He went to the marriage at Cana (John 2:1); He was found at the feast in Simon’s house (Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:3, also Luke 7:36); with Matthew (Matthew 9:10, Luke 5:29), and Zacehaeus (Luke 19:6); and contrasted Himself with John as one who ‘comes eating and drinking’ (Matthew 11:19, Luke 7:34). The question in Matthew 12:48 seems to be that of one who wilfully cuts himself off from human ties; as He faced death more nearly, isolation could not but grow on Him (Matthew 17:12, Mark 9:30, Luke 9:22; Luke 9:44, cf. The disciples remained with Him till the end, when the arrest proved too much for their loyalty, although we find John, with the women, at the foot of the cross (John 19:25-26, Matthew 27:55, Mark 15:40). This is emphasized chiefly in the Fourth Gospel; though that it was soon felt is shown in Luke 5:8 (‘Depart from me; for I am a sinful man, O Lord’; compare the timidity of the disciples in John 21:12); and easily gathered from the manner in which the disciples misunderstood Him and His purposes for themselves (Matthew 20:21, Mark 10:37; cf. The extreme of loneliness, as it is heard in the cry upon the cross (Matthew 27:46, Mark 15:34, cf
Alphaeus - The father of James the Apostle ( Matthew 10:3 = Mark 3:18 = Luke 6:15 = Acts 1:13 ), commonly identified with James the Little, son of Mary and brother of Joses or Joseph ( Mark 15:40 = Matthew 27:56 ). The father of Levi the tax-gatherer ( Mark 2:14 ), afterwards Matthew the Apostle and Evangelist ( Matthew 9:9 ; Matthew 10:3 ). ) that the Apostles Matthew and James had both been tax-gatherers. He was evidently himself a believer; his son Joses, though undistinguished, was evidently a believer also; his son James was an Apostle; his son Matthew was an Apostle and an Evangelist; and his wife Mary was one of the faithful women who stood by the Cross and visited the Sepulchre ( Mark 16:1 )
Matthew - An apostle and evangelist, was son of Alpheus, a Galilean by birth, a Jew by religion, and a publican by profession, Matthew 9:9 10:3 Luke 6:15 . The other evangelists call him only Mark 2:14 Luke 5:27 ; but he always calls himself Matthew, which was probably his name as a publican, or officer for gathering taxes. His ordinary abode was at Capernaum, and his office probably on the main road, near the Sea of Tiberias; here, in the midst of his business, he was called by Jesus to follow him, Matthew 9:9 Mark 2:14 . ...
For the GOSPEL OF Matthew, see GOSPEL
Herod Archelaus - (Matthew 2:22 ), the brother of Antipas (q
Emmanuel - God with us, Matthew 1:23 )
Eleazar - —An ancestor of Jesus, Matthew 1:15
Eliud - An ancestor of Jesus ( Matthew 1:15 )
Box - Matthew 26:7 (See full description under "ALABASTER")
Jer'Emy, - (Matthew 2:17 ; 27:9 )
Profit - words are so rendered: (1) ὠφελέω, to further, help, profit: Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘profit,’ Matthew 15:5 (= Mark 7:11) 16:26 (= Mark 8:36, Luke 9:25 Authorized Version ‘advantage’), John 6:63; ‘prevail,’ Matthew 27:24, John 12:19; ‘be bettered,’ Mark 5:26; (2) συμφἐρω, to bear or bring together; ‘be profitable,’ Matthew 5:29-30; Matthew 18:6; ‘be expedient,’ Matthew 19:10 (Authorized Version ‘good’), John 11:50; John 18:14; John 16:7. The analogy of profitable trading gives force to the parables of the Talents and the Pounds (Matthew 25:14 ff. ), but in one great saying the appeal to what may be termed the business instincts is direct: ‘What shall a man be profited, if he shall gain the whole world, and forfeit his life? or what shall a man give in exchange for his life?’ Matthew 16:26 (= Mark 8:36, Luke 9:25). ...
This weighing of advantages and gain finds its full force in Christ’s doctrine of the supreme good of the Kingdom of God, the one secure treasure of unspeakable value, for the possession of which all other treasures may well be given in exchange (Matthew 13:44-46)
Alphaeus -
The father of James the Less, the apostle and writer of the epistle (Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ; Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 ), and the husband of Mary (John 19:25 ). ...
...
The father of Levi, or Matthew (Mark 2:14 )
Holy City - Designation for Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:1 ,Nehemiah 11:1,11:18 ; Isaiah 48:2 ; Isaiah 52:1 ; Daniel 9:24 ; Matthew 4:5 ; Matthew 27:53 ; Revelation 11:2 ) and for the new, heavenly Jerusalem (Revelation 21:2 ,Revelation 21:2,21:10 ; Revelation 22:19 ) because the holy God lived there
Finger - : (Strong's # — — — ) Matthew 23:4 ; Mark 7:33 ; Luke 11:46 ; 16:24 ; John 8:6 ; 20:25,27 , is used metaphorically in Luke 11:20 , for the power of God, the effects of which are made visible to men (cp. Matthew 12:28 , "by the Spirit of God;" cp
Wages - Rate of (mention only in Matthew 20:2 ); to be punctually paid (Leviticus 19:13 ; Deuteronomy 24:14,15 ); judgements threatened against the withholding of (Jeremiah 22:13 ; Malachi 3:5 ; Compare James 5:4 ); paid in money (Matthew 20:1-14 ); to Jacob in kind (Genesis 29:15,20 ; 30:28 ; 31:7,8,41 )
Charger(s) - A large flat serving dish (Numbers 7:13-85 ; Matthew 14:8 ,Matthew 14:8,14:11 KJV)
Hall - In Matthew 26:69 and Mark 14:66 this word is incorrectly rendered "palace" in the Authorized Version, but correctly "court" in the Revised Version. " In Matthew 27:27 and Mark 15:16 (A. The "porch" in Matthew 26:71 is the entrance-hall or passage leading into the central court, which is open to the sky
Raiment - * Notes: (1) For himation, rendered "raiment" in Matthew 17:2 , AV (RV, "garments"), so Matthew 27:31 ; Mark 9:3 ; Luke 23:34 ; John 19:24 ; Acts 22:20 ; Revelation 3:5,18 ; 4:4 ; AV and RV, Acts 18:6 , see CLOTHING , No. Himatismos is rendered "raiment" in Luke 9:29 ; enduma in Matthew 3:4 ; 6:25,28 ; 28:3 ; Luke 12:23
lo! - , Matthew 25:20,22,25 ; John 1:29,36,47 ; Galatians 5:2 , the only occurrence outside Matthew, Mark and John. , Matthew 1:20,23 ; very frequent in the Synoptists and Acts and the Apocalypse
Hire, Hired - A — 1: μισθός (Strong's #3408 — Noun Masculine — misthos — mis-thos' ) denotes (a) "wages, hire," Matthew 20:8 ; Luke 10:7 ; James 5:4 ; in 1 Timothy 5:18 ; 2 Peter 2:13 ; Jude 1:11 , RV, "hire" (AV,"reward"); in 2 Peter 2:15 , RV, "hire" (AV, "wages"). ...
B — 1: μισθόω (Strong's #3409 — Verb — misthoo — mis-tho'-o ) "to let out for hire," is used in the Middle Voice, signifying "to hire, to engage the services of anyone by contract," Matthew 20:1,7 . ...
Note: In Matthew 20:9 there is no word for "hired" in the original
Scribes - They were also known as teachers of the law, lawyers and rabbis (Matthew 22:35; Matthew 23:2-7). The scribes developed the structure for synagogue meetings, and controlled the synagogue teaching Matthew 23:2; Matthew 23:6; Luke 6:6-7; Luke 20:46). The scribes then forced the Jewish people to obey these laws, till the whole lawkeeping system became a heavy burden (Matthew 15:1-9; Matthew 23:2-4; see TRADITION). ...
As leaders in the synagogue and teachers of the people, the scribes enjoyed a respected status in the Jewish community (Matthew 23:6-7). Some were members of the Sanhedrin, the supreme Jewish Council (Matthew 26:57; see SANHEDRIN). They then sent these disciples to spread their teaching, till it became the chief force in the religious life of Israel (Matthew 23:15). ...
Most of the scribes belonged to the party of the Pharisees (one of two major groups within Judaism; see PHARISEES; SADDUCEES), and are often linked with them in the biblical narratives (Matthew 5:20; Matthew 12:38; Matthew 15:1; Matthew 23:2; Acts 5:34; Acts 22:3). They opposed Jesus throughout his ministry, helped to crucify him, and later persecuted his followers (Matthew 16:21; Matthew 21:15; Matthew 26:57; Acts 4:5-7; Acts 6:12)
Matthan - (mat' tan) An ancestor of Christ (Matthew 1:15 )
Matthan - Gift, one of our Lord's ancestry (Matthew 1:15 )
by And by - Immediately (Matthew 13:21 ; RSV, "straightway;" Luke 21:9 )
Strain at - Simply a misprint for "strain out" (Matthew 23:24 )
Eliud - —An ancestor of Jesus, Matthew 1:14 f
Achaz - KJV spelling of AHAZ (Matthew 1:9 )
Amminadab - —An ancestor of our Lord, Matthew 1:4
Mammon - a Syriac word which signifies riches, Matthew 6:24
Azor - An ancestor of Jesus ( Matthew 1:13 f
Tetrarch - Strictly the ruler over the fourth part of a province; but the word denotes a ruler of a province generally (Matthew 14:1 ; Luke 3:1,19 ; 9:7 ; Acts 13:1 ). Herod the tetrarch had the title of king (Matthew 14:9 )
Suck, Suckling - 1: θηλάζω (Strong's #2337 — Verb — thelazo — thay-lad'-zo ) from thele, "a breast," is used (a) of the mother, "to suckle," Matthew 24:19 ; Mark 13:17 ; Luke 21:23 ; in some texts in Luke 23:29 (the best have trepho); (b) of the young, "to suck," Matthew 21:16 , "sucklings;" Luke 11:27
Broad - ...
Matthew 7:13 (a) Here is indicated the widespread popularity of the path that leads to hell. ...
Matthew 23:5 (a) This indicates the desire of the hypocrite to advertise his pious character
Farthing - Two names of coins in the New Testament are rendered in the Authorized Version by this word:
Quadrans , ( Matthew 5:26 ; Mark 12:42 ) a coin current in the time of our Lord, equivalent to three-eights of a cent; ...
The assarion , equal to one cent and a half, ( Matthew 10:29 ; Luke 12:6 )
Faithfulness (2) - There is, however, allusion to those in whom the quality (πιστότης) is conspicuous; they are the ‘faithful’ (πιστοί) of Matthew 24:45; Matthew 25:21; Matthew 25:23, Luke 12:42; Luke 16:10-12—where the word πιστός has the meaning of being trustworthy in the discharge of duty. At the same time it should be remarked that the πιστότης implied (certainly in Matthew 24:45; Matthew 25:21; Matthew 25:23, Luke 12:42) is closely bound up with an allegiance owned and recognized
Bread - 1: ἄρτος (Strong's #740 — Noun Masculine — artos — ar'-tos ) "bread" (perhaps derived from aro, "to fit together," or from a root ar---, "the earth"), signifies (a) "a small loaf or cake," composed of flour and water, and baked, in shape either oblong or round, and about as thick as the thumb; these were not cut, but broken and were consecrated to the Lord every Sabbath and called the "shewbread" (loaves of presentation), Matthew 12:4 ; when the "shewbread" was reinstituted by Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:32 ) a poll-tax of 1/3 shekel was laid on the Jews, Matthew 17:24 ; (b) "the loaf at the Lord's Supper," e. , Matthew 26:26 ("Jesus took a loaf," RV, marg. ); the breaking of "bread" became the name for this institution, Acts 2:42 ; 20:7 ; 1 Corinthians 10:16 ; 11:23 ; (c) "bread of any kind," Matthew 16:11 ; (d) metaphorically, "of Christ as the Bread of God, and of Life," John 6:33,35 ; (e) "food in general," the necessities for the sustenance of life, Matthew 6:11 ; 2 Corinthians 9:10 , etc. With the article it signifies the feast of unleavened bread, Matthew 26:17 ; Mark 14:1,12 ; Luke 22:1,7 ; Acts 12:3 ; 20:6
Bewail - ...
2: κόπτω (Strong's #2875 — Verb — kopto — kop'-to ) primarily, "to beat, smite;" then, "to cut off," Matthew 21:8 ; Mark 11:8 , is used in the Middle Voice, of beating oneself, beating the breast, as a token of grief; hence, "to bewail," Matthew 11:17 (RV, "mourn," for AV, "lament"); Matthew 24:30 , "mourn;" Revelation 1:7 (RV, "mourn;" AV, "wail"); in Luke 8:52 ; 23:27 "bewail;" in Revelation 18:9 , "wail" (for AV, "lament"). ...
Notes: (1) Threneo, "to sing a dirge, to lament," is rendered "wail" in Matthew 11:17 , RV; "mourned" in Luke 7:32 ; "to lament" in Luke 23:27 ; John 16:20 . Threnos, "lamentation," occurs in Matthew 2:18 . ...
(2) Odurmos from oduromai, "to wail" (a verb not found in the NT), denotes "mourning," Matthew 2:18 ; 2 Corinthians 7:7
Tares - TARES (ζιζάνια, Matthew 13:25 ff. ...
The parable of the Tares and its explanation are found only in Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:36-43. In Matthew 13:24 the aorist ὡμοιώθη is significant (as also the aorists in Matthew 18:23 and Matthew 22:2, and the future in Matthew 25:1) if the use of this tense means that the Kingdom of heaven has ‘been made like,’ etc. Matthew 13:37) excludes all reference to the origin of evil in the world. The time of the parable is the time of the question of the servants (Matthew 13:27), when the tares had been already recognized as such (ἐφάνη, Matthew 13:26). As to Matthew 13:25, it is not at all necessary to think that this was a common method of revenge in Jesus’ day and country. In Matthew 13:26 χόρτος means the grassy crop, including all that grew in the field, and was chosen just in order to embrace both tares and wheat. Matthew 13:27 and the following verse show that the idea of wheat degenerating into darnel is foreign to the parable; the servants think of mixed seed, the master of an independent sowing of darnel. Weeding wheat (Matthew 13:28-29) is common to-day in Palestine as in America, and has been observed there by Stanley, Thomson, and Robertson Smith; but it must be done either before the milk stage of the wheat, i. The darnel has already appeared as darnel, and just on that account comes the servants’ question (Matthew 13:27). The harvesters of Matthew 13:30 (cf. Matthew 13:39) are different from the servants, although this is merely implied here, and is first made perfectly clear only in the explanation. Matthew 3:10-120; Matthew 13:28 συλλέξατε, συλλέξωμεν), or (c) by sifting (after threshing) with a sieve so constructed as to allow the smaller darnel seeds to fall through, while retaining the larger wheat. It is probable that τὰ σκάνδαλα in Matthew 13:41 is to be taken personally as in Matthew 16:23. The πάντα, not repeated before τοὺς ποιοῦντας, seems to include both under one vinculum; up to this time all, both tares and wheat, have been interpreted as persons (Matthew 13:38); and, finally, only persons are subject to the final judgment (Matthew 13:42). But Jesus had not shown any indication of being such a judge, nay He had taken quite another course (Matthew 12:15-21), so that doubt came into the mind even of John the Baptist (Matthew 11:2 ff. ‘On that day’ (Matthew 13:1) of the parables, or at least a short time before it, the Pharisees had shown their true colours by charging that Jesus cast out demons by Beelzebub, the prince of the demons (Matthew 12:22-32). Jesus had indeed given them a solemn warning (Matthew 12:32), but no lightning stroke had destroyed them, and the disciples were disappointed. Their spirit, described in the question of Matthew 12:28, was later expressed by James and John (Luke 9:54 f. τὰ σκάνδαλα, Matthew 13:41), till the consummation of the age. (1) The field is not the Church, but the world of men (Matthew 13:38), the Messiah’s world which He is sowing, just as it is in the Sower, the Mustard Seed, and the Leaven. It is only at Caesarea Philippi (Matthew 16:18) and afterwards (only Matthew 18:17), that Jesus begins to introduce that idea in a very rudimentary way, by what Aramaic word we know not. (5) All men are to appear at the Judgment, not merely professing Christians (Matthew 25:31-32). Matthew 18:15-20). Matthew 25:28-30 a. with Matthew 25:37-43). (1) In Matthew 25:41, Jesus says that the angels shall gather out of His Kingdom all offences and them that do iniquity, whence it is inferred that the tares were in the Kingdom and not in the world. The Kingdom of Matthew 25:24, which the course of events has already made like the field of the following narrative, is a most intangible and indefinable entity, a congeries of truths and principles characteristic of the coming age, which take shape in the world as they embody themselves in the lives of men. The sons of the Kingdom (Matthew 25:38) are those who receive these truths and embody them in their lives and conduct. These are sown in the wide field of the world of men, which the Messiah claims as rightfully His—His Kingdom (Matthew 25:41), or, if preferred, which He calls His Kingdom at His coming to claim it as such (cf. Matthew 16:28, 2 Timothy 4:1, Revelation 11:15; cf. Matthew 13:49). Finally, the Kingdom of their Father (Matthew 13:43, cf. Matthew 26:29; Matthew 13:49-50; Matthew 25:46) is the consummated Kingdom of glory. (2) The related parable of the Net (Matthew 13:47-50) is supposed to refer to the discipline of the Church. (b) The explanation of Matthew 25:34 lays not the slightest emphasis on anything except the consummation. (c) Those who draw the net and those who separate the good and the bad are the very same persons (Matthew 13:48), i. the angels (Matthew 13:49). (e) Its position at the end of the sermon of Matthew 13, whether due to Jesus or Mt
Shekel, Half Shekel - 1: στατήρ (Strong's #4715 — Noun Masculine — stater — stat-air' ) a teradrachmon or four drachmae, originally 224 grains, in Tyrian currency, but reduced in weight somewhat by the time recorded in Matthew 17:24 ; the value was about three shillings, and would pay the Temple tax for two persons, Matthew 17:27 , RV, "shekel" (AV, "a piece of money"); in some mss. , Matthew 26:16 ; see MONEY , Note. , due from every adult Jew for the maintenance of the Temple services, Matthew 17:24 (twice)
Value - A — 1: διαφέρω (Strong's #1308 — — diaphero — dee-af-er'-o ) used intransitively, means "to differ, to excel," hence "to be of more value," Matthew 6:26 , RV, "are (not) ye of (much) more value," (AV, "better"); Matthew 12:12 ; Luke 12:24 , ditto; Matthew 10:31 ; Luke 12:7 . ...
Note: For timao, rendered "to value" in Matthew 27:9 (twice), AV, see PRICE
Thamar - (thay' mahr) KJV alternate form of Tamar (Matthew 1:3 )
Sadoc - —A link in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:14)
Rama - (ray maw) KJV alternate form of Ramah (Matthew 2:18 )
Rachab - (ray' kab) KJV variant form of Rahab (Matthew 1:5 )
Zerah - —A link in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:3)
Zara - (zay' ruh) KJV alternate form of Zerah (Matthew 1:3 )
Abiud - An ancestor of Jesus ( Matthew 1:13
Charger - A large, shallow dish, Numbers 7:13 ; Matthew 14:8
Unwashen - Matthew 15
Violence - The Wisdom Literature often warns that those who live lives of violence will meet violent ends (Psalm 7:16 ; Proverbs 1:18-19 ; Proverbs 21:7 ; compare Matthew 26:52 ). ...
Matthew 11:12 is one of the most difficult texts in the New Testament. Does the kingdom of heaven suffer violence (KJV, NAS, REB, NRSV), or does the kingdom come “forcefully” (NIV)? The violence which John the Baptist ( Matthew 14:3-10 ) and believers (Matthew 5:10-11 ; Matthew 10:17 ; Matthew 23:34 ) suffer argues for the former. Other “violent” images of the kingdom's coming (Matthew 10:34-36 ; Luke 14:26-27 ) support the latter. Likewise, do violent men lay siege to the kingdom, or do “forceful men lay hold of it” (NIV)? Though the NIV interpretation fits well with Luke's parallel (Luke 16:16 ), it appears too much like an effort to tone down the real harshness of Matthew's language
Sign - circumcision as a sign of the covenant); (3) as an ‘indication’-Matthew 26:48 (Judas’ kiss), Luke 2:12 (to the Shepherds) Luke 2:34 (the child Jesus set for a sign); (4) hence for some wonderful indication-Matthew 24:3; Matthew 24:30, Mark 13:4 (of Christ’s Coming), Matthew 16:1; Matthew 16:4, Mark 8:11, Mark 16:17; Mark 16:20, Luke 11:15; Luke 11:29 (to show Christ’s power), Matthew 16:3 (signs of the times) Matthew 16:4 (sign of Jonah), 1 Corinthians 14:22 (tongues and prophesying as a sign of the power of Christianity); and therefore for a ‘miracle’ or wonderful deed which has instruction as its object
Likewise - 1), is rendered "likewise" in the AV of Matthew 22:26 ; 27:41 , Luke 10:32 ; 16:25 ; John 5:19 ; James 2:25 ; 1 Peter 3:1,7 ; Jude 1:8 ; Revelation 8:12 (in all these the RV has "in like manner"); in the following, AV and RV have "likewise;" Matthew 26:35 ; Luke 5:33 ; 6:31 ; 10:37 ; 17:28,31 ; 22:36 ; John 6:11 ; 21:13 ; Romans 1:27 ; 1 Peter 5:5 . , Matthew 20:5 ; 21:30 . ...
3: καί (Strong's #2532 — Conjunction — kai — kahee ) "and, even," is translated "likewise" in the AV and RV of Matthew 20:10 (last kai in the verse), more lit. , "even they;" elsewhere the RV has "also," for the AV, "likewise," Matthew 18:35 ; 24:33 ; Luke 3:14 ; 17:10 ; 19:19 ; 21:31 ; Acts 3:24 ; 1 Corinthians 14:9 ; Colossians 4:16 ; 1 Peter 4:1 ; in Matthew 21:24 , the AV has "in like wise" (RV, "likewise"). ...
Notes: (1) In Matthew 17:12 ; Romans 6:11 , AV, the adverb houtos, "thus, so," is translated "likewise," (RV, "so"); in Luke 15:7 ; 10 , AV, "likewise," RV, "even so;" in Luke 14:33 , AV, followed by oun, "therefore," it is rendered "so likewise" (RV, "so therefore")
Sign - circumcision as a sign of the covenant); (3) as an ‘indication’-Matthew 26:48 (Judas’ kiss), Luke 2:12 (to the Shepherds) Luke 2:34 (the child Jesus set for a sign); (4) hence for some wonderful indication-Matthew 24:3; Matthew 24:30, Mark 13:4 (of Christ’s Coming), Matthew 16:1; Matthew 16:4, Mark 8:11, Mark 16:17; Mark 16:20, Luke 11:15; Luke 11:29 (to show Christ’s power), Matthew 16:3 (signs of the times) Matthew 16:4 (sign of Jonah), 1 Corinthians 14:22 (tongues and prophesying as a sign of the power of Christianity); and therefore for a ‘miracle’ or wonderful deed which has instruction as its object
Tetrarch, - (Matthew 14:1 ; Luke 3:1 ; 9:7 ; Acts 13:1 ) The title was, however, often applied to any one who governed a Roman province, of whatever size. (Matthew 14:9 ; Mark 6:14,22 )
Disfigure - 1: ἀφανίζω (Strong's #853 — Verb — aphanizo — af-an-id'-zo ) primarily means "to cause to disappear," hence (a) "to make unsightly, to disfigure," as of the face, Matthew 6:16 ; (b) "to cause to vanish away, consume," Matthew 6:19,20 ; (c) in the Passive Voice, "to perish," Acts 13:41 , or "to vanish away," James 4:14
Deaf - 1: κωφός (Strong's #2974 — Adjective — kophos — ko-fos' ) akin to kopto, "to beat," and kopiao, "to be tired" (from a root kop---, "to cut"), signifies "blunted, dull," as of a weapon; hence, "blunted in tongue, dumb," Matthew 9:32 etc. ; "in hearing, deaf," Matthew 11:5 ; Mark 7:32,37 ; 9:25 ; Luke 7:22
Staff, Staves - 1: ῥάβδος (Strong's #4464 — Noun Feminine — rhabdos — hrab'-dos ) rendered "staff" or "staves" in Matthew 10:10 , parallel passages, and Hebrews 11:21 : see ROD. , "a cudgel" or "staff," is rendered "staves" in Matthew 26:47,55 and parallel passages
Mustard - Jesus used the mustard plant in a parable to symbolize the rapid growth of the kingdom of God (Matthew 13:31-32 ), and its seed as a simile for faith (Matthew 17:20 )
Borrow - 1: δανείζω (Strong's #1155 — Verb — daneizo — dan-ide'-zo ) in the Active Voice, signifies "to lend money," as in Luke 6:34,35 ; in the Middle Voice, "to have money lent to oneself, to borrow," Matthew 5:42 . dan(e)ion, "a debt," Matthew 18:27 , and dan(e)istes, "a creditor," Luke 7:41
Matthew, Gospel According to - Matthew, GOSPEL ACCORDING TO. 39), says: ‘Matthew, however, composed the logia in the Hebrew dialect, but each one interpreted them as he was able. ’ This remark occurs in his work The Exposition of the Lord’s logia , and is practically all the external information that we have about the Matthæan Gospel, except that Irenæus says: ‘Matthew among the Hebrews published a Gospel in their own dialect, when Peter and Paul were preaching in Rome and founding the Church’ ( Hær . in India, but the story is very uncertain; Epiphanius says that the Aramaic Gospel of Matthew existed in his day, in the possession of an Ebionite sect (distinguished in modern times as Elkesaites), and describes it; and Jerome describes what he alleges to be the original of Mt. The ‘Lord’s logia’ which Papias expounded would be the story of our Lord’s life and teaching, and Papias would mean that Matthew wrote his Gospel in Hebrew (cf. Many understand Papias to mean that Matthew wrote our Lord’s sayings only ; but this does not appear from his words. Papias would then mean that Matthew wrote down the Gospel story in Hebrew. Even if we take the translation ‘discourses’ or ‘sayings,’ it is extremely unlikely that Papias meant that Matthew’s Gospel contained no narrative, though it is quite likely that discourse predominated in it. ...
( b ) What does Papias mean about the original language of Matthew? All the testimony as to its being Aramaic [6] ]; thus Matthew 7:28 (Sermon on the Mount), Matthew 11:1 (Charge to the Twelve), Matthew 13:58 (group of parables), Matthew 19:1 , Matthew 26:1 (groups of warnings). , as in the case of the anointing at Bethany ( Matthew 26:6 ff. ( Matthew 12:1 ) gives the more chronologically correct position of the incident, ‘six days before the passover. The interests of the First Evangelist lie largely in the fulfilment of prophecy (Matthew 5:17 ). The principles of interpretation common among the Jews are applied; a text, for example, which in its literal sense applies to the Exodus, is taken to refer to the departure of the Child Jesus from Egypt ( Matthew 2:15 , Hosea 11:1 ), and the Evangelist conceives of events as coming to pass that prophecy might be fulfilled ( Matthew 1:22 f. Matthew 2:15 ; Matthew 2:17 f. , Matthew 2:23 , Matthew 4:14 ff. , Matthew 8:17 , Matthew 12:17 ff. , Matthew 13:35 , Matthew 21:4 f. , Matthew 27:9 f. It is thought that the second ass, which is found only in the Matthæan narrative of the Triumphal Entry ( Matthew 21:1 ff. So the ‘wine mingled with gall’ ( Matthew 27:34 ) for the ‘wine mingled with myrrh’ (lit. Jesus refers to the sign of Jonah and to the repentance of the Ninevites, to whom, by his preaching, Jonah was a sign; but the First Evangelist sees (with justice) a type of our Lord’s Resurrection in the story of Jonah in the belly of the whale ( Matthew 12:39 ff. Besides the Birth narratives we have the healing of the two blind men ( Matthew 9:27 ff. ), and of the blind and dumb demoniacs ( Matthew 9:32 f. , Matthew 12:22 f. Peter on the water ( Matthew 14:28 ff. ), the coin in the fish’s mouth ( Matthew 17:24 ), Pilate’s wife’s dream and Pilate’s washing of his hands ( Matthew 27:19 ; Matthew 27:24 f. He alone tells us of the visit of the Gentile Magi; with Lk, he relates the healing of the Gentile centurion’s servant ( Matthew 8:5 f. ); and the admission of the Gentiles to the Kingdom and the rejection of some of the Jews is announced in Matthew 8:11 f. Matthew 21:43 ). The Gospel is to be preached, and baptism and discipleship are to be given, to all nations ( Matthew 28:19 ). The earliest MSS give the title simply as ‘According to Matthew,’ and similar titles to the other Gospels. The conclusion is that it was not the Apostle Matthew who gave us the Gospel in its present form. On the other hand, Matthew, as an Apostle, was a sufficiently prominent person for an anonymous work to be assigned to him, especially if he had written a work which was one of its sources. These considerations may lead us to prefer the second solution mentioned above, in § 1 ( b ) that Matthew the Apostle composed the Aramaic original of the Greek ‘non-Markan document,’ the ‘Logia’ (not consisting of sayings only, but of sayings and narrative combined), and that in this way his name became attached to the First Gospel. 1) explicitly states that Matthew wrote first, ‘while Peter and Paul were preaching the gospel in Rome,’ but that Mark wrote ‘after their departure. We can get a further indication from the Discourse on the End ( Matthew 24:1 ff. there follows a discourse which apparently speaks of the destruction of Jerusalem ( Matthew 16:20 ), and then there comes in Mk. Matthew 24:3 with Mark 13:4 , Luke 21:7 )
Honour (2) - —The codes of technical ‘honour’ are largely opposed to the teaching of Christ (Matthew 5, Luke 6:29). Therefore such conceptions of ‘honour’ must be regarded as briers choking the word (Mark 4:19); for whatever justification codes of ‘honour’ may claim (as from Matthew 7:12), they are impatient of the spirit of meekness inculcated by Christ in precept (Matthew 5:39) and in example (Matthew 27). Worldly honour may be a source of severest temptation (Luke 4:7), for the disciple is not greater than his Master whose sinlessness was thus brought to view (Matthew 10:24). And to be invited to the marriage-supper of the King’s Son is a greater honour than any this world affords (Matthew 22). Honour is included in the all-things left to follow Christ (Matthew 19:27), and it is worth while to abandon all worldly things in exchange for the true life (Matthew 16:26). Dishonour now will give place to eternal and Divine honour in due season (Matthew 19:28)
Joseph the Husband of Mary - The royal line through Solomon and the kings of Judah came through Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, giving grounds for Jesus’ right to the throne of David (Matthew 1:1-16). ...
Both Matthew 1:16 and Luke 3:23 emphasize that Joseph was not the natural father of Jesus. When he thought of breaking the engagement with Mary secretly (for he did not want to embarrass her), God told him that Mary was morally blameless and her pregnancy was miraculous (Matthew 1:18-25; cf. ...
After the birth, Joseph showed a loving concern for both Mary and Jesus, and a readiness to act promptly when God directed him (Matthew 2:13-15; Matthew 2:19-23). Later they settled in Nazareth in the north (Matthew 2:23), but they went each year to Jerusalem for the Passover (Luke 2:41). ...
Joseph was a well known carpenter in Nazareth (Matthew 13:55) and he taught his carpentry skills to Jesus (Mark 6:3). Apparently he was no longer alive when Jesus engaged in his public ministry, as the Gospel writers do not mention him in references to current members of Jesus’ family (Matthew 13:55-56; Mark 6:3; John 19:26-27). The brothers and sisters of Jesus were probably children of Mary and Joseph, born to them once they began sexual relations after the birth of Jesus (Matthew 1:25)
Sadoc - Just, mentioned in the genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:14 )
Tamar - —An ancestress of Jesus (Matthew 1:5)
Roboam - (roh boh' uhm) KJV alternate form of Rehoboam (Matthew 1:7 )
Tormentors - basanistai , "examiners by torture" (Matthew 18:34; compare Acts 22:24)
Sadoc - (ssay' dahr) KJV spelling of Zadok (Matthew 1:14 ) following Greek
Matthan - —Grandfather of Joseph the husband of Mary, Matthew 1:15
Barjona - (Matthew 16:17) Sometimes Jonah means pigeon
Omitted - * For OMITTED (Matthew 23:23 , AV) see LEAVE (undone), No
Nahshon - —An ancestor of Jesus, Matthew 1:4, Luke 3:32
Matthew, Gospel by - (The Magi did not come 'when Jesus was born' [1] but several months afterwards. Matthew 2:17,18 . ...
Matthew 3 , Matthew 4 . ...
In Matthew 5 — Matthew 7 the principles of Christ's doctrine are unfolded largely, in contrast with that of 'them of old time. ...
Matthew 8 : and Matthew 9 present Jehovah's servant, verifying Isaiah 53:1 and Psalm 103:3 , and His service, ending with the typical raising up of Israel in the ruler's daughter. ...
In Matthew 10 Jesus takes the place of administrator, as Lord of the harvest, and sends out the twelve with a commission limited to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. ...
In Matthew 11 Christ shows the superiority of the kingdom of heaven to the prophetic ministry, ending in John the Baptist; and of the revelation of the Father to His own mighty works, which had not produced repentance; and...
In Matthew 12 He breaks the special links which had been formed in His coming after the flesh. ...
In Matthew 13 Christ reveals Himself as the Sower, in which character He had all along been acting. ...
Christ continues His work of grace notwithstanding His rejection by the rulers of Israel, and...
In Matthew 16 the truth of His person as Son of the living God having been confessed by Peter as the result of the Father's revelation, He announces this as the foundation of the church which He will build, and against which the power of Hades shall not prevail. He gives to Peter the keys of 'the kingdom of heaven' (an expression peculiar to Matthew, turning the eyes of the disciples to heaven as the source of light and authority, in contrast to a kingdom as from an earthly centre, Zion, Romans 11:26 ), and speaks of His own coming again in the glory of His Father to give to every man his reward. ...
In Matthew 18 the Lord furnishes instruction as to the order and ways of the kingdom, including the dealing with an offending brother, and again speaks of 'the church,' and of its voice of authority, though it was then future; and adds the marvellous declaration as to where His presence would be vouchsafed, a place morally distant from the then existing temple and its priesthood: "Where two or three are gathered together unto my name, there am I in the midst of them. Farther on, the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard maintains the sovereignty of the Lord in dispensing His own things: both of these parables being peculiar to Matthew. Matthew 20:27,28 . ...
In Matthew 21 the Lord rode triumphantly as Zion's king into Jerusalem, claiming His inheritance, accompanied by a great crowd, which cried, "Hosanna to the Son of David: Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest. " Matthew 23:38,39 . ...
In Matthew 24 the disciples asked three questions, Matthew 24:3 . Matthew 24:4 to end of Matthew 24:44 are concerning Israel. Matthew 24:4-14 coincide with the first half of Daniel's 70th week; and Matthew 24:15-28 with the last half of that week. Matthew 24:45-51 refer to Christians. ...
Matthew 25 is peculiar to Matthew; Matthew 25:1-30 , the parables of the Ten Virgins and of the Talents, apply to professing Christians. Matthew 25:31-46 refer to the living Gentile nations who will be judged according to how they have treated the Jewish messengers, the brethren of Christ. " Compare "God with us" in Matthew 1:23 . The fact that Matthew was present at the ascension, and yet does not mention so important an event, is sufficient evidence that the evangelist had divine guidance as to what he should record: all such differences in the gospels are really by the inspiration of God, and are a profitable study
Matthew - He is also called Levi (Mark 2:14, Luke 5:29), and many have supposed that he received the name Matthew after his call by Jesus, just as Simon became Peter. In the various lists of the apostles, Matthew’s name occurs seventh in Mark 3:18 and Luke 6:15 and eighth in Matthew 10:3 and Acts 1:13. All the Synoptists narrate the story of the call of Matthew from his tax-gatherer’s booth and the subsequent feast in his house which aroused the wrath of the Pharisees and led Jesus to defend Himself by the declaration: ‘They that are whole have no need of a physician, but they that are sick. I came not to call the righteous but sinners’ (Matthew 9:9-13, Mark 2:14-17, Luke 5:27-32). As a publican Matthew was employed collecting the toll at Capernaum on the highway between Damascus and the Mediterranean, and was no doubt in the service of Herod the Tetrarch. ...
Matthew is called the ‘son of Alphaeus’ (Mark 2:14), and the question has arisen whether he is to be regarded as the brother of James the son of Alphaeus (Matthew 10:3, Mark 3:18, Luke 6:15, Acts 1:13). In the four lists of apostles, while Matthew and James occur in the same group of four, the two are not placed alongside one another as is usual with the other pairs of brothers in the apostolic band. 1 Maccabees 11:30), and consequently assume that James the Less of Mark 15:40 is the son of Alphaeus, it is extremely unlikely that Matthew’s name would be omitted in Mark 15:40 if he were one of the sons of Mary and the brother of James, Joses, and Salome. ...
In the story of the Apostolic Church as we find it in the NT the name of Matthew occurs only once, viz. Eusebius makes three interesting statements regarding Matthew. 24): ‘Matthew and John are the only two apostles who have left us recorded comments, and even they, tradition says, undertook it from necessity. Matthew, having first proclaimed the gospel in Hebrew, when on the point of going also to other nations, committed it to writing in his native tongue, and thus supplied the want of his presence to them by his writings. 39 the famous statement of Papias quoted by Eusebius, ‘Matthew composed his logia in the Hebrew tongue, and everyone translated as he was able. ’ We also find in Eusebius’ review of the canon of Scripture the statement: ‘The first (Gospel) is written according to Matthew, the same that was once a publican but afterwards an apostle of Jesus Christ, who, having published it for the Jewish converts, wrote it in the Hebrew’ (Historia Ecclesiastica (Eusebius, etc. These varied quotations associate Matthew with a Hebrew Gospel or collection of the Sayings of Jesus which in some way or other is connected with or incorporated in our First Gospel. Probably Matthew the ex-publican and apostle did form such a collection of the Sayings of our Lord which were wrought into a connected narrative of the Life of Christ by the First Evangelist, a Palestinian Jew of the 1st century. But for full discussion see article ‘Matthew, Gospel of,’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) and Dict. Unfortunately, Eusebius does not tell us what the ‘other nations’ were to whom Matthew proclaimed the gospel, and we have no certain knowledge of his subsequent missionary labours
Gnashing of Teeth - In the New Testament, gnashing of teeth is associated with the place of future punishment (for example, Matthew 8:12 ; Matthew 13:42 ,Matthew 13:42,13:50 )
Salome - who danced before Herod and received as a reward the head of John the Baptist ( Matthew 14:3-11 , Mark 6:17-20 ). By comparing Mark 15:40 and Matthew 27:66 it has been almost certainly concluded that Salome was the wife of Zebedee, who also figures in the Incident Matthew 20:20-23
Thomas - Twin, one of the twelve (Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 , etc. From the circumstance that in the lists of the apostles he is always mentioned along with Matthew, who was the son of Alphaeus (Mark 3:18 ), and that these two are always followed by James, who was also the son of Alphaeus, it has been supposed that these three, Matthew, Thomas, and James, were brothers
Reed - 1: κάλαμος (Strong's #2563 — Noun Masculine — kalamos — kal'-am-os ) denotes (a) "the reed" mentioned in Matthew 11:7 ; 12:20 ; Luke 7:24 , the same as the Heb. , Isaiah 42:3 , from which Matthew 12:20 is quoted (cp. Job 40:21 ; Ezekiel 29:6 , "a reed with jointed, hollow stalk"); (b) "a reed staff, staff," Matthew 27:29,30,48 ; Mark 15:19,36 (cp
Daemon - Daemons are spoken of as spiritual beings (Matthew 8:16 ; 10:1 ; 12:43-45 ) at enmity with God, and as having a certain power over man (James 2:19 ; Revelation 16:14 ). They recognize our Lord as the Son of God (Matthew 8:20 ; Luke 4:41 ). They belong to the number of those angels that "kept not their first estate," "unclean spirits," "fallen angels," the angels of the devil (Matthew 25:41 ; Revelation 12:7-9 )
Tribute - The tribute (money) mentioned in (Matthew 17:24,25 ) was the half shekel (worth from 25 to 27 cents) applied to defray the general expenses of the temple. This "tribute" of (Matthew 17:24 ) must not be confounded with the tribute paid to the Roman emperor. (Matthew 22:17 ) The temple rate, though resting on an ancient precedent-- (Exodus 30:13 ) --was as above a fixed annual tribute of comparatively late origin
Isaac - —Named (1) in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34; (2) in such collocations as ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Matthew 8:11), ‘see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Luke 13:28), ‘the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob’ (Matthew 22:32, Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37)
Council - Matthew 26:59. Matthew 10:17; Mark 13:9. The "judgment," Matthew 5:21, probably applies to them
Them, Themselves - , Matthew 3:7 ; (2) heatou [2], e. , Matthew 15:30 ; (3) houtos (toutous) [3], e. , Matthew 13:11
Isaac - —Named (1) in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34; (2) in such collocations as ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Matthew 8:11), ‘see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Luke 13:28), ‘the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob’ (Matthew 22:32, Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37)
Claims (of Christ) - It was the men who knew Jesus only in an external fashion that took Him to be John the Baptist, or Elijah, or Jeremiah, or one of the prophets (Matthew 16:14). It was one who had come into the closest contact with the mind of the Master, and had learned to judge Him, not by outward signs merely, but by His implicit and explicit claims, that broke into the great confession, ‘Thou art the Christ, the Son of the living God’ (Matthew 16:16). ‘Follow me,’ Jesus said to men (Matthew 4:19; Matthew 4:21 || Matthew 8:22; Matthew 9:9 || Matthew 19:21 ||, John 1:43); and they either rose up straightway and followed Him (Matthew 4:20; Matthew 4:22 || Matthew 9:9 ||), or if they failed to do so, ‘went away sorrowful,’ feeling in their inmost hearts that they had made ‘the grand refusal’ (Matthew 19:22 ||). If His immediate followers were first impressed by His claim to be obeyed, it was the authority of His teaching that first struck the multitude and filled them with astonishment (Matthew 7:28-29). He claimed the right either to abrogate altogether or to reinterpret in His own way laws which were regarded as clothed with Divine sanctions—the law of retaliation (Matthew 5:38 ff. ), the law of divorce (Matthew 5:31 f. ), and even the thrice-holy law of the Sabbath (Matthew 12:1 ff. , Matthew 12:10 ff. Publicans and sinners drew near to Him (Matthew 9:10, Luke 15:1), not, as His enemies insinuated (Matthew 11:19 ||), because He was a sinner like themselves, but because they saw in Him One who, with all His human sympathy, was so high above sin that He could stretch out a saving hand to those who were its slaves (Matthew 9:12 ||, Luke 7:36-50; Luke 19:2-10). He claimed it by calling Himself the Physician of the sinful (Matthew 9:12 ||), by assuming the power to forgive sins (Matthew 9:6 ||, Luke 7:47 f. ), by never making confession of sin in His own prayers, though enjoining it upon His disciples (Matthew 6:12 ||), by never even joining with His disciples in common prayers, of which confession would necessarily form an element (on this point see Forrest, Christ of History and of Experience, p. We see the presence of this consciousness in the Temptation narratives (Matthew 4:1-11 ||), in the sermon in the synagogue of Nazareth (Luke 4:17 ff. ), in the claim of the preacher on the Mount that He came to fulfil the Law and the Prophets (Matthew 5:17). At a later stage He welcomes and blesses Peter’s express declaration, ‘Thou art the Christ’ (Matthew 16:16 f. see), who came in the name of the Lord (Matthew 21:9 ||), and dies upon the cross for claiming to be the King of the Jews (Matthew 27:11, cf. Matthew 27:37). And if until the end of His ministry He did not call Himself or allow Himself to be called the Messiah (Matthew 16:20), this was clearly because the false ideals of the Jews regarding the Messianic kingdom made it impossible for Him to do so without creating all kinds of misunderstandings, and so precipitating the inevitable crisis before His work on earth was accomplished. ), and that by so describing Himself He was claiming to bring in personally and establish upon earth that very kingdom of God which formed the constant theme of His preaching (see Matthew 26:64). Matthew 11:27; Matthew 12:50; Matthew 18:10). Luke 2:49, Matthew 7:21; Matthew 10:32; Matthew 16:17; Matthew 22:2 f. , Mark 12:6), and it finds full expression in that great saying, ‘All things have been delivered unto me of my Father; and no one knoweth the Son save the Father; neither doth any know the Father save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son willeth to reveal him’ (Matthew 11:27, Luke 10:22), which serves in St. Matthew’s account as the ground of the Saviour’s universal invitation and of His promise of rest for the soul (Luke 10:28 ff. This claim to be the arbiter of human destinies is distinctly announced again and again (Matthew 7:22-23; Matthew 16:27, Mark 8:38). It is further implied in the parables of the Wise and Foolish Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13) and the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), and is set forth in detail in that solemn picture of the Last Judgment by which these parables are immediately followed (Matthew 25:31-46). John 5:22), and is confirmed by the fact that throughout the rest of the NT the office of the final Judge is constantly assigned to Jesus (Acts 10:42; Acts 17:31, Romans 2:16; Romans 14:10, 2 Corinthians 5:10, 2 Timothy 4:1; 2 Timothy 4:8; 1 Peter 4:5, Matthew 8:29,), an office, be it noted, which was never ascribed to the Messiah either in the OT revelation or in the popular Jewish belief (see Salmond, Christian Doct. But it was something greater still to claim that with His Return there would arrive the grand consummation of the world’s history (Matthew 25:31), that before Him all nations should be gathered (Matthew 25:32) and all hearts laid bare (Matthew 25:35-36; Matthew 25:42-43), that the principle of the Judgment should be the attitude of men to Himself as He is spiritually present in the world (Matthew 25:40; Matthew 25:45), and that of this attitude Christ Himself should be the Supreme Judge (Matthew 25:32-33)
Fame - ...
We are told that early in the ministry of Jesus a fame of Him went through Galilee and the surrounding country, including Syria (Matthew 4:24, Luke 4:14). The First Gospel uses the term also in connexion with the restoring of Jairus’ daughter and the giving of sight to two blind men (Matthew 9:26; Matthew 9:31). And, finally, this Gospel tells us that the fame of Jesus affected Herod (Matthew 14:1 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘report,’ cf. The term of the first two Gospels (except in Matthew 9:26) is ἀκοή (lit. ‘hearing’; Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘report’), used also for ‘rumours’ in the eschatological discourse (Matthew 24:6, Mark 13:7). ‘speech’; Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘fame,’ Luke 4:14, so Matthew 9); ἦχος (lit. ...
These passages, taken along with others that more directly express admiration or astonishment (Matthew 7:28; Matthew 12:23; Matthew 15:31), or that relate the concourse and following of multitudes (Mark 3:7-9; Mark 6:34; Mark 6:55; Mark 10:46), show that during His whole public ministry the acts of Jesus arrested the gaze of men. A few who cherished sacred tradition believed that the Messiah had come (John 1:41; John 1:49; John 7:40, Matthew 16:4; Matthew 21:9). Others less instructed talked wildly as if Elijah had descended, or the Baptist had risen (Mark 6:14-15, Matthew 16:13-14), or some prophet of local tradition or expectation had appeared (John 7:40, Matthew 21:11). Yet He acknowledged the true instinct of the untutored worshipper (Matthew 21:16)
Fierceness - —The word ‘fierce’ occurs twice in Authorized Version (Matthew 8:28 of the two demoniacs [1], Luke 23:5 of our Lord’s accusers [2]). His ‘judge not’ (Matthew 7:1), or His parable of patience that has its part in the ‘wheat and tares’ being allowed to grow together (Matthew 13:30), or His doctrine of unlimited forgiveness (Luke 17:1-4),—these are thought to be entirely representative. ...
Of recorded deeds the incident of the driving out of the vendors and money-changers from the temple precincts (Matthew 21:12, Mark 11:15, John 2:15) is the most notable: but it is in the vigour of His language that the possibilities of fierceness in Him are most revealed. It is present in the Nazareth sermon in His OT illustrations of prophets not honoured in their own country (Luke 4); in His declaration of war with evil,—‘I am come to send fire on the earth’ (Luke 12:49), and ‘I came not to send peace but a sword’ (Matthew 10:34); it even finds expression in the very phrase γεννἠματα ἐχιδνῶν used by the Baptist (Matthew 12:34). To trouble about them is to ‘throw pearls before swine’ (Matthew 7:6). They are a ‘faithless and perverse generation,’ or ‘a wicked and adulterous generation’ seeking after a visible and tangible sign of spiritual things (Matthew 16:4); they shall lose the Kingdom of God (Matthew 21:43); the heathen of Nineveh shall show themselves better judges of eternal realities (Luke 11:32); there is more hope for Tyre and Sidon (Luke 10:14) or for Sodom and Gomorrah than for the spiritually blind (Matthew 10:15); ‘Ye are of your father the devil’ (John 8:44). The fierceness which marks His rejection of the third temptation (Matthew 4:10) is paralleled in the ‘Get thee behind me, Satan’ with which Peter’s proffered intervention is repelled (Mark 8:33). The perverter of the simplicity of childhood is told that he had better have been drowned with a millstone about his neck (Matthew 18:6). They are ‘false prophets … ravening wolves’ (Matthew 7:15); ‘hypocrites’ is hurled at them in every phrase of Matthew 23, in the close of Luke 11, and in Mark 7:6, where Isaiah’s bitterest words against lip-service are quoted against them. ’ They ‘say, and do not,’ so that ‘the publicans and the harlots go into the kingdom’ before them (Matthew 21:31)
Lake of Genesareth - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13). On another occasion a tax was paid through a miraculous catch (Matthew 17)
Fuel - Numerous types of fuel are mentioned in Scripture: wood (Isaiah 44:14-16 ); charcoal (Jeremiah 36:22 ; John 18:18 ); shrubs (Psalm 120:4 ); thorn bushes (Ecclesiastes 7:6 ; Nahum 1:10 ); grass (Matthew 6:30 ); weeds (Matthew 13:40 ); vines (Ezekiel 15:4 ,Ezekiel 15:4,15:6 ); branch trimmings (John 15:6 ); animal or even human dung (Ezekiel 4:12 ); and the blood-stained clothing of fallen warriors (Isaiah 9:5 ). Oil was used as a fuel for lamps (Matthew 25:3 ). For Jesus, God's extravagant love evidenced in clothing grass destined to be burned as fuel with beautiful flowers illustrated even greater care for human beings (Matthew 6:30 )
Galilee, Sea of - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13). On another occasion a tax was paid through a miraculous catch (Matthew 17)
Genesareth, Lake of - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13). On another occasion a tax was paid through a miraculous catch (Matthew 17)
Householder - A — 1: οἰκοδεσπότης (Strong's #3617 — Noun Masculine — oikodespotes — oy-kod-es-pot'-ace ) "a master of a house" (oikos, "a house," despotes, "a master"), is rendered "master of the house" in Matthew 10:25 ; Luke 13:25 ; 14:21 , where the context shows that the authority of the "householder" is stressed; in Matthew 24:43 ; Luke 12:39 , the RV "master of the house" (AV, "goodman of the house," does not give the exact meaning); "householder" is the rendering in both versions in Matthew 13:27,52 ; 20:1 ; 21:33 ; so the RV in Matthew 20:11 (for AV, "goodman of the house"); both have "goodman of the house" in Mark 14:14 ; in Luke 22:11 , "goodman
Sea of Galilee - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13). On another occasion a tax was paid through a miraculous catch (Matthew 17)
Enemy - The enemies of Christians become the enemies of God, and the enemies of God become the enemies of Christians (Exodus 23:22; Psalms 37:20; Psalms 55:2-3; Matthew 10:22; Matthew 10:36). In spite of this, Christians are to love their enemies and do good to those who hate them (Matthew 5:44; Luke 6:27; Romans 12:20; see HATRED). But Christ has conquered all these through his death and resurrection, and in the day of his final victory he will destroy them for ever (Matthew 13:39; Luke 10:18; 1 Corinthians 15:25-28; Colossians 2:15; Hebrews 10:12-13)
Levi - ...
One of Jesus’ chosen twelve apostles had the name Levi, though he had an alternative name, Matthew (Matthew 9:9; Matthew 10:3; Mark 2:14; Luke 6:15; see Matthew)
James the Apostle - The lesser known was James the son of Alphaeus (Matthew 10:3). If this is so, his father must have had two names, Alphaeus and Clopas (Matthew 27:56; Mark 15:40; John 19:25). ...
The other apostle named James was the elder brother of the apostle John (Matthew 10:2). For James this came true a few years later when Herod Agrippa beheaded him (Matthew 20:20-23; Acts 12:1-2)
Josaphat - (jahss' uh fat) KJV spelling of Jehoshaphat (Matthew 1:8 )
Hezron - —A Judahite ancestor of Jesus (Matthew 1:3, Luke 3:33)
Abia - ABIA (Authorized Version of Matthew 1:7, Luke 1:5)
Mat'Than - Matthew 15
Septuagint - And His disciples afterwards followed His example both in their speeches and in their writings (Matthew 12:18-216). ...
OT...
Matthew 1:23...
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Isaiah 7:14*...
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Luke 2:23...
Exodus 13:12...
Matthew 2:6...
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Micah 5:2*...
Matthew 2; Matthew 15...
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Hosea 11:1*...
Matthew 2:18...
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Jeremiah 38:15...
Matthew 3:3...
Mark 1:3...
Luke 3:4-6...
Isaiah 40:3-5*...
Matthew 4:4...
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Luke 4:4...
Deuteronomy 8:3...
Matthew 4:6...
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Luke 4:10 f. ...
Matthew 4:7...
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Luke 4:12...
Deuteronomy 6:16...
Matthew 4:10...
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Luke 4:8 ...
13...
Matthew 4:15 f. *...
Matthew 5:21...
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Exodus 20:13...
Matthew 5:27...
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14...
Matthew 5:31...
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Deuteronomy 24:1...
Matthew 5:31...
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Numbers 30:3 (cf. Deuteronomy 23:21)...
Matthew 5:38...
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Exodus 21:24...
Matthew 5:43...
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Leviticus 19:18...
Matthew 8:17...
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Isaiah 53:4*...
Matthew 9:13 (Matthew 12:7)...
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Hosea 6:6...
Matthew 11:10...
Mark 1:2...
Luke 7:27...
Malachi 3:1*...
Matthew 12:7...
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Hosea 6:6...
1618385389_31...
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Isaiah 42:1*...
Matthew 13:14 f. ...
Matthew 13:35...
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Psalms 77:2*...
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Luke 4:18 f. + Isaiah 58:6*...
Matthew 15:4...
Mark 7:10...
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Exodus 20:12; Exodus 21:17...
Matthew 15:8 f. ...
Mark 7:6...
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Isaiah 29:13...
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Mark 9:48...
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Isaiah 66:24...
Matthew 19:5 f. ...
Mark 10:6-8...
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Genesis 1:27 + Genesis 2:24...
Matthew 19:18 f. ...
Exodus 20:12-17...
Matthew 21:5...
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Zechariah 9:9 + Isaiah 62:11*...
Matthew 21:13...
Mark 11:17...
Luke 19:46...
Isaiah 56:7 + Jeremiah 7:11...
Matthew 21:16...
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Psalms 8:2...
Matthew 21:42...
Mark 12:10...
Luke 20:17...
Psalms 118:22 f. ...
Matthew 22:24...
Mark 12:19...
Luke 20:28...
Deuteronomy 25:5 (cf
Insult - The Synoptic Gospels relate these insults (Matthew 26:68 ; Matthew 27:29 ,Matthew 27:29,27:40-44 ; Mark 14:65 ; Mark 15:16-20 ,Mark 15:16-20,15:29-32 ; Luke 22:63-65 ; Luke 23:11 ,Luke 23:11,23:35-39 ). Jesus blessed those who suffered insult for His sake (Matthew 5:11 ). Jesus warned that one insulting a brother was in danger of standing before the Sanhedrin, the Jewish supreme court (Matthew 5:22 )
Q - Abbreviation of the German Quelle , meaning “source,” used to designate the hypothetical common source of over 200 verses found in Matthew and Luke but not in Mark. According to the two-document hypothesis, Matthew and Luke inserted sayings material stemming from Q into Mark's narrative framework of the Jesus story (cp. Verbatim agreements in the double tradition (material shared by Matthew and Luke but not Mark), common sequence of sayings within blocks of materials, and doublets (repetition) of sayings found but once in Mark point to the common source. Luke is held to have preserved the overall order of the Q sayings better, while Matthew felt free to rearrange much of the shared material to form his five major discourses. Still others remove any need for a common source for the double tradition by arguing for the priority of Matthew
Wailing - —The expression of sorrow by loud cries is several times alluded to in the Gospels: Matthew 2:18 ‘In Rama was there a voice heard’; Matthew 11:17 ‘We have mourned unto you’ (cf. On both of these occasions mourning with loud cries is indicated (Matthew 9:23 ‘flute-players,’ ‘tumult’; Mark 5:38 ‘wailing’; Luke 23:27 ‘lamented,’ ἐθρήνουν). The phrase ὁ κλαυθμὸς καὶ ὁ βρυγὸς τῶν ὀδόντων was formerly translation ‘wailing and gnashing of teeth’ only in Matthew 13:42; Matthew 13:50; but now the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 has brought these passages into line with the others where the same words occur, and correctly renders ‘weeping
Simon - One of Jesus' disciples; a son of Jonah (Matthew 16:17 ) and brother of Andrew. After he confessed Jesus as the Christ, the Lord changed his name to Peter (Matthew 16:18 ). Jesus' disciple also called “the Canaanite” (Matthew 10:4 ) or the Zealot (Luke 6:15 ). Brother of Jesus (Matthew 13:55 ). A leper who hosted Jesus and saw a woman anoint Jesus with costly ointment (Matthew 26:6-13 ; compare 3
Mount, Mountain - 3); John 4:20 ; (b) of "the Mount of Transfiguration," Matthew 17:1,9 ; Mark 9:2,9 ; Luke 9:28,37 (AV, "hill"); 2 Peter 1:18 ; (c) of "Zion," Hebrews 12:22 ; Revelation 14:1 ; (d) of "Sinai," Acts 7:30,38 ; Galatians 4:24,25 ; Hebrews 8:5 ; 12:20 ; (e) of "the Mount of Olives," Matthew 21:1 ; 24:3 ; Mark 11:1 ; 13:3 ; Luke 19:29,37 ; 22:39 ; John 8:1 ; Acts 1:12 ; (f) of "the hill districts as distinct from the lowlands," especially of the hills above the Sea of Galilee, e. , Matthew 5:1 ; 8:1 ; 18:12 ; Mark 5:5 ; (g) of "the mountains on the east of Jordan" and "those in the land of Ammon" and "the region of Petra," etc. , Matthew 24:16 ; Mark 13:14 ; Luke 21:21 ; (h) proverbially, "of overcoming difficulties, or accomplishing great things," 1 Corinthians 13:2 ; cp. Matthew 17:20 ; 21:21 ; Mark 11:23 ; (i) symbolically, of "a series of the imperial potentates of the Roman dominion, past and future," Revelation 17:9
Sermon on the Mount - The name given to the material found in Matthew 5-7 . The theme of the sermon is found in Matthew 5:20 , “For I say unto you, That except your righteousness shall exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no case enter into the kingdom of heaven. Indeed, it shocks many to read that Jesus expects us to be perfect as God is perfect (Matthew 5:48 ). ...
One obvious question that arises for those holding to a literal interpretation is: What do you do about a passage like Matthew 5:29-30 which talks about plucking out the eye and cutting off the hand that is offensive? Some in the history of the church have interpreted this literally. Other figurative or poetic elements as well do not lend themselves to a literal interpretation (for example Matthew 5:13-16 ; Matthew 6:20 ; Matthew 7:6 ,Matthew 7:6,7:13-27 ). What about Matthew 5:48 ? Did Jesus literally mean that His disciples must be perfect as God is perfect?...
The approach that attempts to interpret the entire sermon literally, then, is insufficient by itself. ...
Some interpreters of the Sermon on the Mount have emphasized the poetic and metaphoric nature of Jesus' language (for example, calling His disciples salt and light, Matthew 5:13-16 ) and His use of hyperbole or consciously exaggerated speech designed to make His point vivid and memorable (for example, plucking out the eye and cutting off the hand that offends, Matthew 5:29-30 ). ...
Some interpreters feel it is impossible for us to fulfill the standards of the Sermon on the Mount (especially Matthew 5:48 ). ...
There may be some truth in all these approaches to the Sermon on the Mount, but it appears that the best approach is to take the sermon at face value (with some obvious exceptions such as Matthew 5:29-30 ) and to do our best to live the life Jesus outlined for us. ...
Contents of the Sermon on the Mount The Sermon on the Mount opens with the beatitudes (Matthew 5:3-12 ) and moves on to describe the function of Jesus' disciples (Matthew 5:13-16 ). From there Jesus explained His interpretation of the law (Matthew 5:17-48 ) and certain acts of righteousness (Matthew 6:1-18 ), described the attitudes required of His disciples (Matthew 6:19-7:12 ), and invited the listeners to become and continue as His disciples (Matthew 7:13-27 ). ...
Jesus spoke these words directly to His disciples (Matthew 5:1-2 ) within the hearing of the crowds who were amazed at both Jesus' teaching and the authority with which Jesus taught (Matthew 7:28-29 ). Jesus spoke to His disciples as “the Christ, the Son of the living God” (Matthew 16:16 ). The people “saw” Jesus' good works and gave glory to God (see Matthew 5:16 )
Reed (2) - The stem is tall and straight, and the head bends gracefully with a great feathery brush, sensitive to the slightest breath of air (Matthew 11:7, Luke 7:24). When bruised, it is not only useless but dangerous; because, giving way when one leans upon it, the splinters are apt to pierce the hand (Matthew 12:20). As a mock-sceptre, a reed was put into Christ’s hand (Matthew 27:29), and with this He was smitten (Matthew 27:30). On a reed the sponge with vinegar was raised to His lips on the cross (Matthew 27:48). The flute and pipes played on all occasions of festivity are made from the reed (Matthew 11:17, Luke 7:32)
Trades - It was quite usual, though by no means universal, for a son to follow the trade of his father, as Jesus did that of Joseph, who was a carpenter (Matthew 13:55, Mark 6:3). These occupations are seldom directly mentioned in the Gospels, but the implements or wares connected with many of them are referred to, or are used as illustrations in parables of our Lord = ploughs and yokes, work of the carpenter, Luke 9:62, Matthew 11:29; of the mason, Luke 23:53, Matthew 21:42; of the weaver, Matthew 3:4, John 19:23; of the tailor, Mark 2:21; the fuller, Mark 9:3; of digging, Luke 16:3; of spinning, Matthew 6:28. Sewing, weaving (John 19:23), spinning (Luke 12:27), grinding (Matthew 24:41), baking (Matthew 13:33), and the like, were largely occupations of women. Fish) was a most important one, more particularly about the Sea of Galilee; Jesus called several of His disciples from this occupation, Matthew 4:18, Mark 16
Hall - In Matthew 27:27 Authorized Version has ‘the soldiers of the governor took Jesus into the common hall’ (a circumlocution for πραιτώριον). The Authorized Version renders αὐλή by ‘palace’ in Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:58; Matthew 26:69, Mark 14:54; Mark 14:66, Luke 11:21, John 18:15, when the reference is to the place where the governor dispensed justice; by ‘fold’ in John 10:1; John 10:16 of the place where the sheep were kept at night; and by ‘court’ in Revelation 11:2, as designating the court of the temple. Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:58; Matthew 26:69, where the inner court of the high priest’s official residence seems to be meant; in Matthew 26:69 ‘Peter sat without in the palace’ (Authorized Version); ‘without’ stands in contrast with the audience-room in which Jesus was appearing before the authorities, i
Arimathea - A "city of the Jews" (Luke 23:51 ), the birth-place of Joseph in whose sepulchre our Lord was laid (Matthew 27:57,60 ; John 19:38 ). ) in Benjamin (Matthew 2:18 )
Disciple - A scholar, sometimes applied to the followers of John the Baptist (Matthew 9:14 ), and of the Pharisees (22:16), but principally to the followers of Christ. A disciple of Christ is one who (1) believes his doctrine, (2) rests on his sacrifice, (3) imbibes his spirit, and (4) imitates his example (Matthew 10:24 ; Luke 14:26,27,33 ; John 6:69 )
Leper - 1: λεπρός (Strong's #3015 — Adjective — lepros — lep-ros' ) an adjective, primarily used of "psoriasis," characterized by an eruption of rough, scaly patches; later, "leprous," but chiefly used as a noun, "a leper," Matthew 8:2 ; 10:8 ; 11:5 ; Mark 1:40 ; Luke 4:27 ; 7:22 ; 17:12 ; especially of Simon, mentioned in Matthew 26:6 ; Mark 14:3
Joses - One of the brethren of our Lord, Matthew 13:55 Mark 6:3 . A son of Cleophas and Mary, identified by some with the above, Matthew 27:56
Offence - This word answers to two different terms in the original, the one signifying a breach of the law, Romans 5:15,17 , the other a stumbling-block or cause of sin to others, Matthew 5:29 ; 18:6-9 ; or whatever is perverted into an occasion or excuse for sin, Matthew 15:12 ; John 6:61 ; Romans 9:33 ; Galatians 5:11
Camel - 1: κάμηλος (Strong's #2574 — Noun — kamelos — kam'-ay-los ) from a Hebrew word signifying "a bearer, carrier," is used in proverbs to indicate (a) "something almost or altogether impossible," Matthew 19:24 , and parallel passages, (b) "the acts of a person who is careful not to sin in trivial details, but pays no heed to more important matters," Matthew 23:24
Condemnation (2) - Condemnation at the last may indeed fall like a thunderbolt upon the rejected (Matthew 21:19). At the Day of Judgment the universal benevolence of God experienced here (Matthew 5:45, Luke 6:35) will give place to His righteous wrath against the persistently rebellious. Condemnation is the irrevocable sentence then passed upon the abusers of this life (Matthew 25:41-46). The state of the condemned will be a veritable Gehenna (Matthew 23:33). Weeping and gnashing of teeth picture the dreadful condition of condemned souls (Matthew 22:13; Matthew 24:51; Matthew 25:30). They will feel the shame of having their secret thoughts of evil exposed to a light broader than that of day (Matthew 23:28). This will be the condemnation to perpetual darkness for those who have loved darkness more than the light (Matthew 8:12; Matthew 22:13; Matthew 25:30). The guest may already feel the lack of a wedding-garment (Matthew 2:11), and so, warned by the present workings of condemnation, escape the last dread sentence
Jews, King of the - Title of Christ used by the Magi (Matthew 2); by Pilate (John 19)
Lama - (Matthew 27:46 ), a Hebrew word meaning why, quoted from Psalm 22:1
Rachab - Rahab, a name found in the genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:5 )
Azor - (ay' zawr) Personal name of an ancestor of Jesus (Matthew 1:13-14 )
Jehoshaphat - —A king of Judah, named in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:8)
Jotham - —A king of Judah, named in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:9)
Consciousness - Matthew’s account. Matthew and St. Matthew) on a point like this is superior, as evidence, to any amount of psychological speculation. Matthew (Matthew 11:25 ff. He addresses God as ‘Father, Lord of heaven and earth,’ a great expression which foreshadows the truth which follows: ‘All things have been delivered unto me of my Father; and no one knoweth the Son, save the Father; neither doth any know the Father, save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son willeth to reveal him’ (Matthew 11:27). ...
Among the many important passages which agree with those which have been discussed, may be mentioned the following: (1) The account of our Lord’s reception of the disciples of John the Baptist who brought their master’s doubts to Him for solution (Matthew 11:2-7 and Luke 7:19-24). Peter and the teaching which followed it (Matthew 16:13 ff. All the circumstances of His public entry into Jerusalem are notable in this respect (Matthew 21:1-16, Mark 11:1-11, Luke 19:29-47, John 12:12-19; see especially Luke 19:39-45 in St. (4) His answers to those who questioned His authority (Matthew 21:23–end, Mark 11:27 to Mark 12:12, Luke 20:1-19) are equally impressive. (5) The description of the Future Judgment (Matthew 25:31-46, cf. Matthew among the Synoptists), contains as lofty a conception of the dignity of the Son as any passage in the Fourth Gospel: ‘Then shall the king say’ (Matthew 25:34; Mat_25:40). What a depth of consciousness is involved in the words, ‘ye did it unto me’ and ‘ye did it not to me’ (Matthew 25:40; Mat_25:45). ’ Sometimes, with clear reference to His own unique relationship, our Lord calls God ‘my Father’ (Matthew 7:21; Matthew 10:32-33; Matthew 11:27; Matthew 16:17; Matthew 18:19; Matthew 18:35, Mark 8:38; Matthew 12:6-8 Luke 10:22; Luke 22:29, John 5:17; John 6:32; John 8:19, and throughout chs. He knew God as none else knew Him (Matthew 11:27). In the introduction (Matthew 5:3-13), the promises all reveal a deep insight into the purposes and nature of God: they view the world with its many kinds of people from the Divine point of view (see also Matthew 5:16; Matthew 5:20; Matthew 5:45; Matthew 5:48; Matthew 6:1; Matthew 6:4; Matthew 6:6; Matthew 6:8-9; Matthew 6:14-15; Matthew 6:18; Matthew 6:20; Matthew 6:24; Matthew 6:26 ff. , Matthew 7:11; Matthew 7:21), All through, human things are viewed in the light of God’s character. The following passages are a selection: Matthew 5:11; Matthew 5:22; Matthew 5:28; Matthew 5:34; Matthew 5:39; Matthew 5:44; Matthew 7:21-22; Matthew 7:28-29 (the former verses show this ‘authority’ which astonished the multitude) Matthew 8:6; Matthew 8:10; Matthew 8:22; Matthew 10:15; Matthew 10:32-33; Matthew 10:37-39; Matthew 11:27-29 (in these passages we have the self-assertion and the humility side by side: ‘I am meek and lowly in heart’ follows the illimitable claim of Matthew 11:27-28) Mark 13:32,; Matthew 12:41-42; Matthew 16:24 ff; Matthew 22:45; Matthew 25:31 ff. It was not His usual method to say exactly who He was, but rather to lead His hearers on until they were able to make that discovery for themselves (Matthew 16:13-20). The case of the Centurion (Matthew 8:5-13, Luke 7:1-10), though perhaps the most striking instance, is yet only typical. The principle involved in it may be found everywhere; see Matthew 8:2-3; Matthew 8:22; Matthew 9:22; Matthew 9:28; Matthew 10:22; Matthew 12:30; Matthew 13:58; Matthew 15:22-28; Matthew 19:29, Mark 1:40-41; Mark 2:5-11; Mark 5:34; Mark 9:23-24; Mark 9:37; Mark 10:29; Mark 10:52; Mark 13:9; Mark 14:3-9, Luke 7:37-50; Luke 9:23-26; Luke 10:13-16; Luke 10:42; Luke 13:34; Luke 14:25-33; Luke 17:17-19; Luke 18:22; Luke 19:40, John 5:24; John 6:29; John 6:35; John 7:37-38; John 8:12 etc. Just as He was greater than the temple and Lord of the Sabbath, so is He above the Law and able to take the position of One who has the right to modify it or deepen it on His sole authority (see Matthew 5:17; Matthew 5:21-22; Matthew 5:28 etc. Matthew 7:28-29; Matthew 12:6, Mark 2:28). Perhaps the most remarkable example is His proof of the future life from the revelation at the Bush (Matthew 22:32, Mark 12:26-27, Luke 20:37-38). See for other instances of argument of this kind from Scripture, from reason, or from nature, Matthew 5:45; Matthew 6:8; Matthew 6:24; Matthew 6:26 ff. , Matthew 7:11; Matthew 7:16; Matthew 12:3 ff
Miracle - Christ appealed to his mighty works as undeniable proofs of his divinity and Messiahship, Matthew 9:6 11:4,5,23,24 John 10:24-27 20:29,31 . The deceptions of the magicians in Egypt, and of false prophets in ancient and in modern times, Deuteronomy 13:1 Matthew 24:24 Acts 2:1-111 Revelation 13:13,14 , would not bear the above tests. ...
Lice brought, Matthew 4:23-24 . ...
Waters of Marah sweetened, Matthew 9:2-63 . ...
The star in the east, Matthew 2:3 . ...
The Spirit like a dove, Matthew 3:16 . ...
Christ's fast and temptations, Matthew 4:1-11 . ...
Many miracles of Christ, Matthew 8:28-32 8:16 14:14,36 15:30 Mark 1:34 Luke 6:17-19 . ...
Lepers cleansed, Matthew 8:3-4 Luke 17:14 . ...
Centurion's servant healed, Matthew 8:5-13 . ...
Peter's wife's mother healed, Matthew 8:14 . ...
Tempests stilled, Matthew 8:23-26 14:32 . ...
Issue of blood healed, Matthew 9:20-22 . ...
Jairus' daughter raised to life, Matthew 9:18,25 . ...
Sight given to the blind, Matthew 9:27-30 20:34 Mark 8:22-25 John 9:17 . ...
The dumb restored, Matthew 9:32-33 12:22 Mark 7:33-35 . ...
Miracles by the disciples, Matthew 10:1-8 . ...
Multitudes fed, Matthew 14:15-21 15:35-38 . ...
Christ walking on the sea, Matthew 14:25-27 . ...
Peter walking on the sea, Matthew 14:29 . , Matthew 17:1-8 . ...
Tribute from a fish's mouth, Matthew 17:27 . ...
The fig tree withered, Matthew 21:19 . ...
Miracles at the crucifixion, Matthew 27:51-53 . ...
Miracles at the resurrection, Matthew 28:1-7 Luke 24:6
Naason - (nay ass' uhn) KJV alternate form of Nahshon (Matthew 1:4 ; Luke 3:32 )
Ozias - (oh zi' uhss) Greek form of Uzziah used by KJV (Matthew 1:8-9 )
Cananae'an - (Matthew 10:4 ) Used in the Revised Version in place of "Canaanite
Sister - , Matthew 19:29 ; of the "sisters" of Christ, the children of Joseph and Mary after the virgin birth of Christ, e. , Matthew 13:56 ; (b) of "spiritual kinship" with Christ, an affinity marked by the fulfillment of the will of the Father, Matthew 12:50 ; Mark 3:35 ; of spiritual relationship based upon faith in Christ, Romans 16:1 ; 1 Corinthians 7:15 ; 9:5 , AV and RV marg
Seat - , "cathedral"), "a chair," Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; of teachers, Matthew 23:2 . ...
A — 2: πρωτοκαθεδρία (Strong's #4410 — Noun Feminine — protokathedria — pro-tok-ath-ed-ree'-ah ) "the first seat," Matthew 23:6 ; Mark 12:39 ; Luke 11:43 ; 20:46 ; see CHIEF , No
Ordinances of the Gospel - Are institutions of divine authority relating to the worship of God; such as baptism, Matthew 28:19 . Matthew 6:6 . Matthew 9:15
Maimed - Mutilated, disfigured, or seriously injured, especially by loss of a limb (Matthew 18:8 ; Mark 9:43 ). Christ, the Good Shepherd, cared for the maimed in His healing ministry ( Matthew 15:30-31 ). Cautioning His disciples to avoid what causes sin, Jesus taught it is preferable to enter (eternal) life maimed than to go into eternal fire with whatever causes one to sin (Matthew 18:8 )
Penny - ) The Greek silver coin, (Latin denarius , from whence the French denier ,) bearing the head of the reigning Roman emperor, the date of his tribunitian power or consulate, or the number of times he was saluted emperor (Matthew 22:19-21). A labourer's day's wages (Matthew 20:2; Matthew 20:13)
Leprosy - 1: λέπρα (Strong's #3014 — Noun Feminine — lepra — lep'-rah ) akin to lepros (above), is mentioned in Matthew 8:3 ; Mark 1:42 ; Luke 5:12,13 . " Matthew 10:8 ; Luke 4:27 indicate that the disease was common in the nation. For the Lord's commands to the leper mentioned in Matthew 8 and to the ten in Luke 17 , see Leviticus 14:2-32
Bank, Bankers - , Matthew 15:27 ; (b) food, etc. placed on "a table," Acts 6:2 ; 16:34 ; (c) "a feast, a banquet," 1 Corinthians 10:21 ; (d) "the table or stand" of a money-changer, where he exchanged money for a fee, or dealt with loans and deposits, Matthew 21:12 ; Mark 11:15 ; Luke 19:23 ; John 2:15 . ...
2: τραπεζίτης (Strong's #5133 — Noun Masculine — trapezites — trap-ed-zee'-tace ) a "money-changer, broker, banker;" translated "bankers" in Matthew 25:27 , RV (AV, "exchangers")
Fool (2) - —This word occurs 6 times in the AV of the Gospels as the translation of ἀνόητος (Luke 24:25), ἄφρων (Luke 11:40, Luke 12:20), and μωρός (Matthew 5:22; Matthew 23:17; Matthew 23:19). In the RV it occurs only twice (Matthew 5:22; Matthew 23:17), being in Matthew 23:19 omitted from the text, and in the three remaining places the rendering given is ‘foolish. ’ Further, μωρός occurs in Matthew 7:26; Matthew 25:2-3; Matthew 25:8, and in these places, both in AV and RV, it is translated ‘foolish. μωραίνεσθαι, Matthew 5:13 ‘to become insipid’) the predominant meaning is ‘dull,’ ‘witless,’ ‘stupid. ’...
The meaning of μωρέ in Matthew 5:22 has been much discussed
Reward - ...
If Christians look for their reward in the form of praise from fellow believers, they will miss out on the eternal reward from God (Matthew 6:1; Matthew 6:5; 1 Corinthians 4:5). God rewards those who are diligent in their Christian service, who persevere amid trials, who endure sufferings patiently and who make sacrifices for the sake of others (Matthew 5:12; Matthew 6:4; Matthew 10:40-42; Galatians 6:9-10; 1 Thessalonians 2:19-20; 1 Peter 5:1-4; 2 John 1:8). They are out of all proportion to the good that people do (Matthew 24:45-47; Matthew 25:21). Rather they represent the greater capacity that people have to enjoy those lasting realities of the kingdom of God around which true Christians have built their lives (Matthew 5:3; Matthew 25:21; 2 Timothy 4:8)
Providence - He directs all affairs, small and great, according to his purposes and brings them to their appointed goal (Psalms 147:8-9; Ecclesiastes 3:11; Isaiah 10:5-7; Matthew 10:29; Ephesians 1:11; Philippians 2:13; 1 Timothy 6:15). ...
God’s providence is evident everywhere – in the physical creation (Psalms 29:3-6; Psalms 78:13-16; Psalms 104:27-28; Matthew 6:26; Matthew 6:28; Acts 14:17), in the events of world history (Proverbs 21:1; Amos 9:7; Luke 1:52; Acts 17:26; Romans 9:17) and in the lives of individuals (Genesis 30:1-2; Job 1:21; Proverbs 16:33; Matthew 6:25; Matthew 6:30; Matthew 10:30; Luke 1:53). ...
Christians see not only God’s love in his preservation of nature, but also his purpose in directing it towards its final glory (Matthew 5:44-45; Romans 8:19-23; Colossians 1:17). All things and all people are in the hands of the living God who is responsive to their needs (Genesis 50:20; Jeremiah 17:7-10; Jonah 4:11; Matthew 8:26; Matthew 15:32; James 5:17-18; see MIRACLES; PRAYER)
Hell - Because of this association with judgment and burning, ‘gehenna’ became a fitting word to indicate the place or state of eternal punishment (Matthew 10:28; Matthew 18:9; Matthew 23:33; Mark 9:43-48; cf. It is likened to eternal burning (Matthew 13:42; Matthew 18:8-9; Revelation 20:10), eternal darkness (Matthew 8:12; Matthew 22:13; 2 Peter 2:4; 2 Peter 2:17), eternal destruction (Matthew 7:13; Philippians 1:28; 2 Peter 3:7; 2 Peter 3:10) and eternal separation from God and his blessings (2 Thessalonians 1:9). Matthew 25:41)
Sabachtha'ni, - ( Matthew 27:46 ; Mark 15:34 ) This, with the other words uttered with it, as given in Mark, is Aramaic (Syro-Chaldaic), the common dialect of the people of palestine in Christ's time and the whole is a translation of the Hebrew (given in Matthew) of the first words of the 22d Psalm
Eleven, Eleventh - , undecim), is used only of the eleven Apostles remaining after the death of Judas Iscariot, Matthew 28:16 ; Mark 16:14 ; Luke 24:9,33 ; Acts 1:26 ; 2:14 . ...
2: ἑνδέκατος (Strong's #1734 — Adjective — hendekatos — hen-dek'-at-os ) an adjective derived from the above, is found in Matthew 20:6,9 ; Revelation 21:20
Shepherd - 1: ποιμήν (Strong's #4166 — Noun Masculine — poimen — poy-mane' ) is used (a) in its natural significance, Matthew 9:36 ; 25:32 ; Mark 6:34 ; Luke 2:8,15,18,20 ; John 10:2,12 ; (b) metaphorically of Christ, Matthew 26:31 ; Mark 14:27 ; John 10:11,14,16 ; Hebrews 13:20 ; 1 Peter 2:25 ; (c) metaphorically of those who act as pastors in the churches, Ephesians 4:11
Poll-Tax - NAS used poll-tax sometimes when other translations read either taxes or tribute (Matthew 17:25 ; Matthew 22:17 ; Mark 12:14 )
Night Watch - An ancient division of time (Psalm 90:4 ; Psalm 119:148 ; Lamentations 2:19 ; Matthew 14:25 ). The fourth watch (Matthew 14:25 ; Mark 6:48 ) designates the time just before dawn
Barn - , "apothecary"), hence denoted a garner, granary, barn, Matthew 3:12 ; 6:26 ; 13:30 ; Luke 3:17 ; 12:18,24 . ...
Note: For tameion, "a storehouse, store-chamber," more especially "an inner chamber" or "secret room," Matthew 6:6 ; 24:26 ; Luke 12:3,24 , see CHAMBER
Maimed - ...
2: κυλλός (Strong's #2948 — Adjective — kullos — kool-los' ) denotes "crooked, crippled" (akin to kulio, "to roll"); in Matthew 15:30,31 , translated "maimed;" so in Matthew 18:8 , AV (RV, "halt"); Mark 9:43 (AV and RV)
Tomorrow - , Matthew 6:30 ; 1 Corinthians 15:32 ; James 4:13 ; or with the article in the feminine form, to agree with hemera, "day," e. , Matthew 6:34 ; Acts 4:3 , RV, "the morrow" (AV, "next day"); James 4:14 ; preceded by epi, "on," e
Parousia (2) - This was to be the supreme manifestation of His glory; and to it the term Parousia (παρουσία) is distinctively applied (Matthew 24:3; Matthew 24:27; Matthew 24:37). ...
It was at Caesarea Philippi, after His first announcement of the tragic end awaiting Him at the hands of men, that Jesus made also the first announcement of His future glorious return (Matthew 16:27, Mark 8:38, Luke 9:26). The existing generation was to witness it (Matthew 24:34). On one occasion He told those standing by that some of them should not taste of death till they saw the Son of Man coming in His Kingdom (Matthew 16:28; cf. Mark 9:1, Luke 9:27), and the same idea of nearness is expressed in Matthew 10:23 and Mark 14:62. Such are the parables of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-12) and the Tyrannical Upper Servant (Luke 12:42-46 and Mark 13:35). Jesus did not Himself profess to define the time; indeed, in one memorable saying He disclaimed with the utmost distinctness all positive knowledge of the day and hour of the supreme consummation (Matthew 24:36 || Mark 13:32). In the great Eschatological Discourse recorded in Matthew 24 and Mark 13 (cf. It is at least clear that certain passages in the discourse point to the judgment on Israel as a nation and the impending fall of Jerusalem and its Temple-worship, whilst it is equally clear that other passages refer to a crisis, certainly to be looked for, but still lying in the distance (Matthew 24:43-50, Mark 13:34-37). , the two parables already mentioned (Matthew 25:1-12 and Luke 12:42-46), and also the parable of the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:1-7). We find, besides, that in a particular group of parables—the Mustard Seed, the Leaven (Matthew 13:31-33), and the Growing Grain of Corn (Mark 4:26-29)—the Kingdom He came to establish is represented as subject to the law of growth. Moreover, He spoke also of the evangelization of the Gentile races as a work to be undertaken ere the end should come (Matthew 24:14; Matthew 26:13, Mark 13:10). ), or as the arrival of an absent master at an hour when his servants are not looking for him (Luke 12:42-46), or as the return of the bride-groom in the night-time, leading his bride and the marriage party to the wedding-feast (Matthew 25:1-13). On the other hand, there are passages in the Eschatological Discourse in Matthew 24 and Mark 13 which seem to represent the final coming as preceded by certain manifest signs which shall give evidence of its nearness—the appearance of false Christs (Matthew 24:5, Mark 13:6; Mark 13:22), wars, earthquakes, and famines (Matthew 24:7, Mark 13:7-10), persecutions and tribulations (Matthew 24:9, Mark 13:11-13), the darkened sun and falling stars (Matthew 24:29, Mark 13:24-25). The heralds of the great climax, He declares, must not be taken as the climax itself; ‘All these things must come to pass, but the end is not yet’ (Matthew 24:6). After all, apparently, whatever may be the catastrophic social or other upheavals by which it is preluded, the signal event is to come suddenly and unexpectedly, at such an hour as men think not (Matthew 24:44, Luke 12:40; Luke 12:46). Yet, when it does come, there shall be no dubiety; the splendour shall be dazzlingly patent, like the lightning-flash illumining all the heavens (Matthew 24:27). He will appear in heavenly majesty, attended by His holy angels, and His glory and power shall be fully revealed (Matthew 24:30; Matthew 25:31; Matthew 26:64, Mark 8:38). Entrusted by the Father with supreme judicial functions (John 5:22-23), He will gather all nations before Him to receive a reward according to their works (Matthew 16:27; Matthew 25:32); the secrets of all hearts shall be unveiled (Luke 12:2); there shall be a sifting and separation of the good from the bad, the spurious from the true (Matthew 7:22-23; Matthew 13:41; Matthew 13:49; Matthew 25:32); and the sentence of approval or of condemnation passed shall depend on the attitude and spirit towards Himself by which the life has been swayed (Matthew 25:34-46). The day shall at last have arrived—‘that day’ (Matthew 7:22, Luke 10:12) so momentous to every soul—when there can be no more self-deception, and the results of the law of recompense shall have to be faced, the righteous and pure-hearted being raised to eternal life and blessedness in the presence of the Father, and the unworthy and insincere cast into the outer darkness (Matthew 13:41-43; Matthew 22:13; Matthew 25:34-46, Mark 8:38). It shall be cleansed of all things that offend, and them that do iniquity (Matthew 13:41); the supremacy of righteousness shall be vindicated by the elevation of the godly to salvation, the ingathering of all elect souls (Matthew 24:13), and the exclusion of the wicked from the eternal inheritance
Struggles of Soul - ἑνεβριμήσατο and ἐμβριμώμενος, from ἐμβριμάομαι to snort in, to be very angry, to be moved with indignation, Mark 14:5; sternly to charge, Matthew 9:30, Mark 1:43); He was disturbed inwardly by pity for the mourners, by grief at their hopeless view of death, and by disappointment at their lack of trust in Him. Matthew 13:58). the second temptation, Matthew 4:6). This experience was not confined to one occasion, for, as Luke (Luke 4:13) states, the tempter ‘departed from him for a season,’ and it is not improbable even that the narratives of the Temptation (Matthew 4:1-11, Mark 1:12-13, Luke 4:1-13) bring together a series of trials, separated by intervals of time. The language He used shows that He felt as temptations to turn from His Divinely appointed path, His mother’s appeal at Cana (John 2:4), and Peter’s remonstrance at Caesarea Philippi (Matthew 16:23); and even the request of the Greeks for an interview (John 12:27). Gethsemane must also be regarded as a time of temptation (Matthew 26:41, Mark 14:38; cf. His dread of encouraging curiosity or wrong belief by His miracles (John 4:48) came in conflict with His desire to help and comfort; and when the Evangelists call attention to compassion as the motive of His performing a miracle, we may conclude that there had been such a struggle of soul (Matthew 14:14; Matthew 15:32; Matthew 20:34, Mark 1:41, Luke 7:13). So also this feeling of sympathy came in conflict with His desire for rest and privacy (Matthew 9:30, Mark 1:44; Mark 6:31). His conflict with the scribes and Pharisees regarding Sabbath observance, fasting, ceremonial washing, and intercourse with sinners must have distressed His spirit; for He too would need to face the issue—would He follow custom or conscience? We have more distinct evidence of the inward strain felt by Him, because His regard for Jewish prejudice and exclusiveness in relation to the Gentiles, in order that He might not estrange His countrymen, compelled Him to assume an attitude of aloofness to the Gentiles (the Roman centurion, Matthew 8:10; the Syrophœnician mother, Matthew 15:26; the Greeks, John 12:23). ...
What struggles of soul must have resulted from the thwarting of His love and grace by the misunderstanding or unbelief of His relatives (Mark 3:31-35), His disciples (Matthew 15:17; Matthew 16:9; Matthew 26:31, Mark 14:27), His fellow-townsmen (Mark 6:6), and the Jerusalem which He so loved that He wept over it (Luke 13:34; Luke 19:41)! He strove to turn Judas from his betrayal (John 6:70, Matthew 17:22; Matthew 26:23, John 13:27, Luke 22:48), and to save Peter from his denial (Luke 22:32). His struggle of soul culminated, severe and grievous as it had often been, in the agony and desolation of the Cross, when the beloved Son of God was so made sin (2 Corinthians 5:21) and a curse (Galatians 3:13) for mankind, that in His darkness and loneliness He felt Himself forsaken of God (Matthew 27:46)
Disease, Diseased - , "lacking strength" (a negative, sthenos, "strength"), "weakness, infirmity," is translated "diseases" in Matthew 8:17 , RV, for AV, "sicknesses," and in Acts 28:9 . malakos, "soft," Matthew 11:8 , etc. " It is found in Matthew only, Matthew 4:23 ; 9:35 ; 10:1 . , "nosology"), is the regular word for "disease, sickness," Matthew 4:23 ; 8:17 ; 9:35 ; 10:1 , RV, "disease," AV, "sickness;" in Matthew 4:24 ; Mark 1:34 ; Luke 4:40 ; 6:17 ; 9:1 ; Acts 19:12 , AV and RV render it "diseases. e, "to be ill or in an evil case," is used in Matthew 14:35 (AV, "were diseased," RV, "were sick"); so in Mark 1:32 ; Luke 7:2
Demoniacs - It is concluded that, since the symptoms of the affliction were frequently those of bodily disease (as dumbness, (Matthew 9:32 ) blindness, (Matthew 12:22 ) epilepsy, (Mark 9:17-27 ) ), or those seen in cases of ordinary insanity (as ill) (Matthew 8:28 ; Mark 5:1-5 ) the demoniacs were merely persons suffering under unusual diseases of body and mind. (Matthew 4:24 ) with Matthew 17:15 ; (Matthew 12:22 ) with Mark 7:32 etc. ( Matthew 8:29 ; Mark 1:24 ; 5:7 ; Luke 4:41 ) etc
Offerings - words are represented by ‘offer,’ ‘offering,’ in the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 : (1) προσφίρω, to bring to or near, the general term for the act of worshipper or priest, Matthew 5:23-24; Matthew 8:4 (= Mark 1:44, Luke 5:14), John 16:2; (2) ἀνάθημα, a votive offering set up in a temple (Luke 21:5); (3) δίδωμι, to give (Luke 2:24, cf. Forgiveness of injuries (Matthew 5:23 f. ), filial piety (Matthew 15:5 f. ), and mercy (Matthew 9:13, Matthew 12:7) condition all acceptable service of God. The command to the leper, now cleansed, ‘show thyself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded,’ Matthew 8:4 (= Mark 1:44, Luke 5:14), ought not to be pressed beyond this
Band - KJV translation in Matthew 27:27 ; Mark 15:16
Jeremias - (jehr ih mi' uhss) KJV transliteration of Greek for Jeremiah (Matthew 16:14 )
Joatham - (joh' uh tham) KJV transliteration of Greek for Jotham (Matthew 1:9 )
Phares - (fay' reez) KJV, NAS New Testament form of Perez (Matthew 1:3 ; Luke 3:33 )
Gergesenes - (guhr' geh sseeness) KJV reading in Matthew 8:28
Rehoboam - —Son of Solomon, mentioned as a link in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:7)
Despitefully - Matthew 5
Achim - ACHIM (perhaps a shortened form of Jehoiachim ), an ancestor of our Lord ( Matthew 1:14 )
Manas'Ses - (Matthew 1:10 ) ...
Manasseh the son of Joseph
Jechoniah - (jehc oh ni' uh) NRSV spelling of Jeconiah in Matthew 1:11-12
ra'ma, - (Matthew 2:15 ) referring to (Jeremiah 31:15 ) It is the Greek form of Ramah
Capernaum - A city on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, Matthew 4:13; comp. " Matthew 14:34; comp. It was of sufficient size to be called a "city," Matthew 9:1; Mark 1:33 : had its own synagogue, in which our Lord frequently taught, Mark 1:21; Luke 4:33; Luke 4:38; John 6:69; and it had also a station where the taxes or customs were gathered both by stationary and by itinerant officers. Matthew 9:9; Matthew 17:24; Mark 2:14; Luke 5:27. See Matthew 11:21-23
Weaving - Flax and wool made ‘soft clothing’ for the royal and the rich (Matthew 11:8, Luke 16:19), the rest were wrought into the coarser garments of the more austere, like John the Baptist (Matthew 3:4), into the sackcloth of the mourner (Matthew 11:21, Luke 10:13), or into tents or sails. , Matthew 27:55); and when He was buried, the cloth in which His body was wrapped was of linen (Mark 15:46, Matthew 27:59, Luke 24:12, John 19:40)
Matthew - Matthew (măth'thu). ...
The Gospel according to Matthew was probably written in Palestine, and for Jewish Christians. The date of its composition was clearly before the destruction of Jerusalem, Matthew 24:1-51, and yet some time after the crucifixion of Christ. Matthew 27:7-8; Matthew 28:15
Tamar - " (Isaiah 55:8) It is a very remarkable circumstance also, that in the genealogy given by the Evangelist Matthew, under the inspiration of the Holy Ghost, of our Lord Jesus Christ, in the first chapter of his gospel, no mention is made of any women but of this Thamar, Matthew 1:3; of Rachab or Rahab the harlot, Matthew 1:5; Ruth the poor Moabitess, Matthew 1:5; and Bathsheba the wife of Uriah, Matthew 1:6
Simon - Matthew 4:18. Simon the Canaanite, Matthew 10:4, or Simon Zelotes, or the zealous, one of the twelve apostles; was one of the party called Zealots, hence his name. The brother of our Lord, Matthew 13:55; Mark 6:5; not to be confounded with the preceding, nor with Symeon, who succeeded James as bishop of the church in Jerusalem. Matthew 26:6. Matthew 27:32; Mark 15:21; Luke 23:26
Lawlessness - The love of God and the love of man constitute the essence of the Law’s demands and the Prophets’ promises (Matthew 22:40). These traditional excrescences gave opportunities for hypocrisy, a condition detested by the Lord (Matthew 15:7-9). The scribes and Pharisees were losing all sense of proportion in the duties of the religious life (Matthew 23:24, Luke 11:42). The exponents of the Law were erring, yet the Law itself stood as a Divine ordinance (Matthew 23:3, Luke 16:17). Nay, not one tittle can pass away from the Law (Matthew 5:18). Perfect and complete obedience will be demanded of men (Matthew 5:19). Not less but more will be expected of the disciples of Christ (Matthew 5). And yet Christ’s yoke is to be easy (Matthew 11:30). Nevertheless, He came fulfilling all righteousness (Matthew 3:15), and appealing to the Law in the face of temptation (Matthew 4:4-10)
Hell - He who says to his brother, Thou fool (see under FOOL), will be in danger of "the hell of fire," Matthew 5:22 ; it is better to pluck out (a metaphorical description of irrevocable law) an eye that causes its possessor to stumble, than that his "whole body be cast into hell," Matthew 5:29 ; similarly with the hand, Matthew 5:30 ; in Matthew 18:8,9 , the admonitions are repeated, with an additional mention of the foot; here, too, the warning concerns the person himself (for which obviously the "body" stands in chapt. To the passage in Matthew 18 , that in Mark 9:43-47 , is parallel; here to the word "hell" are applied the extended descriptions "the unquenchable fire" and "where their worm dieth not and the fire is not quenched. " ...
That God, "after He hath killed, hath power to cast into hell," is assigned as a reason why He should be feared with the fear that keeps from evil doing, Luke 12:5 ; the parallel passage to this in Matthew 10:28 declares, not the casting in, but the doom which follows, namely, the destruction (not the loss of being, but of well-being) of "both soul and body. " ...
In Matthew 23 the Lord denounces the scribes and Pharisees, who in proselytizing a person "make him two-fold more a son of hell" than themselves ( Matthew 23:15 ), the phrase here being expressive of moral characteristics, and declares the impossibility of their escaping "the judgment of hell," Matthew 23:33 . , Matthew 13:42 ; 25:46 ; Philippians 3:19 ; 2 Thessalonians 1:9 ; Hebrews 10:39 ; 2 Peter 2:17 ; Jude 1:13 ; Revelation 2:11 ; 19:20 ; 20:6,10,14 ; 21:8
Matthew - On one occasion Jesus, coming up from the side of the lake, passed the custom-house where Matthew was seated, and said to him, "Follow me. " Matthew arose and followed him, and became his disciple (Matthew 9:9 ). Formerly the name by which he was known was Levi (Mark 2:14 ; Luke 5:27 ); he now changed it, possibly in grateful memory of his call, to Matthew
Right, Right Hand, Right Side - , Matthew 5:29,30 ; Revelation 10:5 , RV, "right hand;" in connection with armor (figuratively), 2 Corinthians 6:7 ; with en, followed by the dative plural, Mark 16:5 ; with ek, and the genitive plural, e. , Matthew 25:33,34 ; Luke 1:11 ; (b) of giving the "right hand" of fellowship, Galatians 2:9 , betokening the public expression of approval by leaders at Jerusalem of the course pursued by Paul and Barnabas among the Gentiles; the act was often the sign of a pledge, e. ; Ezra 10:19 ; Ezekiel 17:18 ; figuratively, Lamentations 5:6 ; it is often so used in the papyri; (c) metaphorically of "power" or "authority," Acts 2:33 ; with ek, signifying "on," followed by the genitive plural, Matthew 26:64 ; Mark 14:62 ; Hebrews 1:13 ; (d) similarly of "a place of honor in the messianic kingdom," Matthew 20:21 ; Mark 10:37
Debt - 1: ὀφειλή (Strong's #3782 — Noun Feminine — opheile — of-i-lay' ) "that which is owned" (see Note, below), is translated "debt" in Matthew 18:32 ; in the plural, "dues," Romans 13:7 ; "(her) due," 1 Corinthians 7:3 , of conjugal duty: some texts here have opheilomenen (eunoian) "due (benevolence)," AV; the context confirms the RV. 1, expressing a "debt" more concretely, is used (a) literally, of that which is legally due, Romans 4:4 ; (b) metaphorically, of sin as a "debt," because it demands expiation, and thus payment by way of punishment, Matthew 6:12 . ...
3: δάνειον (Strong's #1156 — Noun Neuter — daneion — dan'-i-on ) "a loan" (akin to danos, "a gift"), is translated "debt" in Matthew 18:27 (RV, marg. " ...
Note: In Matthew 18:30 , opheilo, "to owe," is translated "debt" in the AV (RV, "that which was due
Desert - A — 1: ἐρημία (Strong's #2047 — Noun Feminine — eremia — er-ay-mee'-ah ) primarily "a solitude, an uninhabited place," in contrast to a town or village, is translated "deserts" in Hebrews 11:38 ; "the wilderness" in Matthew 15:33 , AV, "a desert place," RV; so in Mark 8:4 ; "wilderness" in 2 Corinthians 11:26 . ...
B — 1: ἔρημος (Strong's #2048 — — eremos — er'-ay-mos ) used as a noun, has the same meaning as eremia; in Luke 5:16 ; 8:29 , RV, "deserts," for AV, "wilderness;" in Matthew 24:26 ; John 6:31 , RV, "wilderness," for AV, "desert. , of a woman deserted by a husband, Galatians 4:27 ; (b) so of a city, as Jerusalem, Matthew 23:38 ; or uninhabited places, "desert," e. , Matthew 14:13,15 ; Acts 8:26 ; in Mark 1:35 , RV, "desert," for AV, "solitary
Reward - A — 1: μισθός (Strong's #3408 — Noun Masculine — misthos — mis-thos' ) primarily "wages, hire," and then, generally, "reward," (a) received in this life, Matthew 5:46 ; 6:2,5,16 ; Romans 4:4 ; 1 Corinthians 9:17,18 ; of evil "rewards," Acts 1:18 ; see also HIRE; (b) to be received hereafter, Matthew 5:12 ; 10:41 (twice),42; Mark 9:41 ; Luke 6:23,35 ; 1 Corinthians 3:8,14 ; 2 John 1:8 ; Revelation 11:18 ; 22:12 . ...
B — 1: ἀποδίδωμι (Strong's #591 — Verb — apodidomi — ap-od-eed'-o-mee ) "to give back," is nowhere translated "to reward" in the RV; AV, Matthew 6:4,6,18 (see RECOMPENSE , B. 2); Matthew 16:27 ; 2 Timothy 4:14 ; Revelation 18:6 (see RENDER)
Taxes - " This enactment was faithfully observed for many generations (2 Chronicles 24:6 ; Matthew 17:24 ). Mention is made of the tax (telos) on merchandise and travellers (Matthew 17:25 ); the annual tax (phoros) on property (Luke 20:22 ; 23:2 ); the poll-tax (kensos, "tribute," Matthew 17:25 ; 22:17 ; Mark 12:14 ); and the temple-tax ("tribute money" = two drachmas = half shekel, Matthew 17:24-27 ; Compare Exodus 30:13 )
Root - —The ‘root’ is that part essential to the life of a plant (Matthew 13:6, Mark 4:6), which penetrates the earth, and draws sap and nourishment from the soil. ‘Root’ is, therefore, taken to signify that condition of heart without which religious life is impossible (Matthew 13:21, Luke 8:13). Utter destruction is signified by plucking up by the root (Matthew 13:29, Judges 1:12). The Baptist’s vivid ‘the axe is laid unto the root’ (Matthew 3:10, Luke 3:9) points to the complete overthrow he desired for the rampant growth of evils in his day
Moon (2) - So when Christ prophesies the end of the world, ‘The moon shall not give her light’ (Matthew 24:29, Mark 13:24). Twice in the Gospel of Matthew (Matthew 4:24; Matthew 17:15) σεληνιάζεσθαι (literally to be moonstruck) is used to describe mental derangement, as in our ‘lunacy,’ ‘lunatic,’ from Lat
Divorce - The Pharisees wished perhaps to entangle our Saviour with these questions in their rival schools, Matthew 19:3; but by his answer to them, as well as by his previous maxim. Matthew 5:31-32, he declares that he regarded all the lesser causes than "fornication" as standing on too weak ground, and set forth adultery as the proper ground of divorce, Matthew 5:32; Matthew 19:9; Mark 10:11-12; Luke 16:18
Talent - It is mentioned in Matthew only, Matthew 18:24 ; 25:15,16,20 (twice in the best texts),22 (thrice),24,25,28 (twice). In Matthew 18:24 the vastness of the sum, 10,000 talents (f2,400,000), indicates the impossibility of man's clearing himself, by his own efforts, of the guilt which lies upon him before God. word as "a gift or ability," especially under the influence of the parable of the talents (Matthew 25:14-30 )
Carpenter's Son - Designation of Our Lord by Jews when scandalized by His wisdom and miracles (Matthew 13:55)
Josias - (joh ssi' awss) KJV transliteration of Greek form of Josiah (Matthew 1:10-11 )
Berakiah - (bihr uh ki' uh) NIV New Testament spelling of Berechiah in Matthew 23:35
Josiah - —The well-known king of Judah, named in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:10 f
Abiud - (uh bi' uhd) Greek spelling of Abihud for ancestor of Jesus (Matthew 1:13 )
Zorobabel - (zoh rahb' uh behl) KJV alternate form of Zerubbabel (Matthew 1:12-13 ; Luke 3:27 )
Raca - Matthew 5
Son, Carpenter's - Designation of Our Lord by Jews when scandalized by His wisdom and miracles (Matthew 13:55)
Unquenchable - Matthew 3
Courage - With unsparing hand He lifted the curtain of the future, and disclosed to all who would follow Him the hostility and peril which discipleship must involve (Matthew 5:11; Matthew 10:16-39; Matthew 24:9 ff. It is of this sustained heroism that Jesus says, ‘In your patience (ὑπομονή, ‘patient endurance’) ye shall win your souls’ (Luke 21:19), ‘He that endureth to the end shall be saved’ (Matthew 10:22; Matthew 24:13); and those who, in spite of pain and persecution, confess Him before men, He declares He will confess before His Father and the holy angels (Luke 12:8, cf. Matthew 10:32). They bore witness to His fearlessness and fidelity to truth (John 7:26, Matthew 22:16). His fearless exposure of hypocrisy (Matthew 15:1-14, Mark 7:1-13, Matthew 23:1-39 et al. ), His disregard of, or opposition to, religious practices which had been invested with the sanctity of Divine law, and the performance of which was the hall-mark of righteousness (Matthew 9:14; Matthew 12:1; Matthew 12:9, Mark 2:18-22; Mark 7:1, Luke 3:33; Luke 6:1-6), His defiance of social and religious caste in receiving sinners and eating with them were the moral utterances of a courageous righteousness and love (Matthew 9:10, Luke 15:2). In circumstances of danger He is calm and self-possessed (Matthew 8:26). His courage was inspired by faith in God (Matthew 8:26), and was controlled by obedience to the Divine will
Tell - , Matthew 2:13 , RV, "I tell," AV, "I bring (thee) word;" Matthew 10:27 . , Matthew 26:13 ; Luke 1:45 ; 2:17,18,20 ; Acts 11:14 ; 27:25 ; but RV and AV, "to tell" in John 8:40 ; Acts 9:6 ; 22:10 . 4, is rendered "to tell" in Matthew 21:24 ; Mark 11:29 ; John 14:29 ; Revelation 17:7 . , Matthew 8:33 ; 14:12 . ...
9: διασαφέω (Strong's #1285 — Verb — diasapheo — dee-as-af-eh'-o ) "to make clear" (dia, "throughout," saphes, "clear"), explain fully, is translated "told" in Matthew 18:31 . ...
11: προερέω (Strong's #4280 — Verb — proeiro — pro-er-eh'-o ) (prolego) "to tell before," is so rendered in Matthew 24:25 : see FORETELL , FOREWARN. ...
Note: In the following, oida, "to know," is translated "tell" in the AV (RV, "know"), Matthew 21:27 ; Mark 11:33 ; Luke 20:7 ; John 3:8 ; 8:14 ; 16:18 ; 2 Corinthians 12:2
Providence - The confidence of the Evangelists in the fulfilment of Messianic prophecy in the Person of Jesus is a testimony to their belief in the far-sighted operation of the Divine counsels (Matthew 1:22; Matthew 2:5; Matthew 2:15; Matthew 2:23; Matthew 3:3, and passim). Their statements as to the incarnation of the Son of God furnish a supreme proof of a Providence that overrules the laws of nature by an indwelling governance, and moves down the long paths of history to the accomplishment of its own ends (Matthew 1:18 ff. It is in the same confidence that He goes to God in prayer (Luke 12:22-34; Matthew 26:39 ff. , John 14:16-17), and teaches His disciples to do likewise (Matthew 6:6; Matthew 6:9 ff. , Matthew 7:7 ff. , Matthew 9:38 etc. Such petitions as ‘Give us this day our daily bread’ (Matthew 6:11), and ‘Lead us not into temptation’ (Matthew 6:13), would be mere hypocrisies apart from an assured trust in the loving providence of our Father in heaven. Jesus told His disciples that God rules in nature, making the sun to shine and the rain to fall (Matthew 5:45), feeding the birds of the air (Matthew 6:26), and clothing the lilies of the field (Matthew 6:28 ff. He taught them that God also rules in human lives, bestowing His blessings on the evil and the good (Matthew 5:45), supplying the bodily wants of those upon whom He has conferred the gift of rational life (Matthew 6:25), devoting a peculiar care to such as seek His Kingdom and His righteousness (Matthew 6:33). 66), He affirmed that there is ‘a special providence in the fall of a sparrow’ (Matthew 10:29, cf. ), and that even the very hairs of our head are all numbered (Matthew 10:30). As against a doctrine of providence which would turn it into a blind fate, and make the strivings of the human will as meaningless as the motions of a puppet, we have to set His constant emphasis on the momentousness of choice and effort and decision (Matthew 7:13; Matthew 7:21, Matthew 13:45 f. , Matthew 16:24 ff. , Matthew 18:3, etc. As against a narrow philosophy of providence, according to which good men are openly rewarded in this life and wicked men openly punished, He taught that God governs the world by general laws (Matthew 5:45), that persecution is often the earthly portion of the righteous (Matthew 5:10 ff. ), that disasters falling on the individual are not to be taken as Divine retributions upon special guiltiness (Luke 13:1-5), and that our views of Divine providence must be extended so as to include a coming day of judgment for nations as well as individuals (Matthew 25:31 ff. ...
(5) But besides the underlying implications of His teaching and its broad lines of treatment, our Lord brings forward in one well-known passage some special views and arguments bearing on faith in the providence of God as a means of deliverance from anxious care (Matthew 6:25-34 = Matthew 11:25). (a) The first thing that strikes us here is the emphasis He lays on the Divine Fatherhood (Matthew 6:26; Matthew 6:32). Matthew 7:11 = Luke 11:13). He, therefore, who breathed into the body the breath of life will assuredly sustain the life He has inspired, and clothe the body He has framed (Matthew 6:25). If God feeds the birds of the air, shall He not much more feed His spiritual offspring? If He clothes the flowers of the field in their radiant beauty, how can He fail to clothe His own sons and daughters? (Matthew 6:26; Matthew 6:28-30). (d) Again, He argues generally that the fact of our Father’s knowledge of our needs carries with it the certainty that all our needs shall be supplied—an argument based directly on the thought of Fatherhood, and the love that Fatherhood implies (Matthew 6:31-32). The language of the Authorized Version no doubt lends itself to this; for in modern English ‘Take no thought’ is a very misleading rendering of μὴ μεριμνᾶτε (Matthew 6:25; Matthew 6:31; Matthew 6:34; cf. Matthew 6:27-28). Matthew 3:13 ff. ), and the Talents (Matthew 25:14 ff. ), of the Wise and the Foolish Virgins (Matthew 25:1 ff. ‘Seek ye first the kingdom of God and His righteousness’ (Matthew 6:33) is the counsel with which He concludes His special teaching on the relation of His disciples to the providence of the heavenly Father
Christian Perfection - " (Matthew 19) ...
"Be you therefore perfect, as also your heavenly Father is perfect. " (Matthew 5) ...
Desolation - Matthew 12 . Matthew 24
Explain - 1: διασαφέω (Strong's #1285 — Verb — diasapheo — dee-as-af-eh'-o ) "to make clear, explain fully" (dia "through," intensive, and saphes, "clear"), is translated "explain" in Matthew 13:36 RV (AV, "declare") translates phrazo; in Matthew 18:31 , "told," of the account of the unforgiving debtor's doings given by his fellow-servants
Infirmity - Matthew saw in Jesus healings the fulfillment of the servant of the Lord who took our diseases (Matthew 8:17 ; Isaiah 53:4 )
Ax - Tool or weapon generally with wooden handle and edged metal head, in art associated with ...
Saint Bartholomew, Apostle, probably by analogy for knife with which he was slain; ...
Saint Boniface, who used it to cut down a tree dedicated to Thor; ...
Saint Matthew, Apostle, by analogy for sword with which possibly he was killed; ...
Saint Matthew of Beauvais, beheaded; ...
Saint Olaf of Norway, who carried an ax in battle
Beth-Phage - A well-known village, mentioned in the gospel, (see Matthew 21:1) It should seem to be derived from Pep, opening; and Geeah, valley: the house of the valley. (Zechariah 9:9 with Matthew 21:4-5; Mark 11:1; Luke 19:28; John 12:14)...
Lunatics - These are clearly distinguished in Matthew 4:24 from those possessed by demons. The lad in Matthew 17:15 is called a lunatic, but he was also possessed by a demon: in Mark 9:25 it is called a 'dumb and deaf spirit
Religious Perfection - " (Matthew 19) ...
"Be you therefore perfect, as also your heavenly Father is perfect. " (Matthew 5) ...
Highway, Highwayside - 1: ὁδός (Strong's #3598 — Noun Feminine — hodos — hod-os' ) "a way, path, road," is rendered "highways" in Matthew 22:10 ; Luke 14:23 ; in Mark 10:46 , RV, "way side," AV, "highway side;" in Matthew 22:9 , the word is used with diexodoi ("ways out through"), and the phrase is rightly rendered in the RV, "the partings of the highways" (i
Tooth, Teeth - in Matthew 5:38 (twice); elsewhere in the plural, of "the gnashing of teeth," the gnashing being expressive of anguish and indignation, Matthew 8:12 ; 13:42,50 ; 22:13 ; 24:51 ; 25:30 ; Mark 9:18 ; Luke 13:28 ; Acts 7:54 ; in Revelation 9:8 , of the beings seen in a vision and described as locusts
Juda - Son of Joanna or Hananiah (Luke 3:26) = Abiud (Ab being prefixed), Matthew 1:13. Their times agree, omitting Rhesa of Luke, and allowing for Matthew's omission of generations, = Hodaiah (1 Chronicles 3:24). ) (Mark 6:3; Matthew 13:55; Luke 6:16; Acts 1:13)
Discourse - To this class belong: the discourse on Forgiveness, with the parable of the Two Debtors, given at the house of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36-50); the beginning of the discourse on Tradition (eating with unwashen hands), though later ‘he called the multitudes,’ ‘and the disciples came unto him’ (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-20); the Denunciation of the Pharisees and Lawyers at the house of a chief Pharisee (Luke 11:37-54); the discourse at another Pharisee’s house, where He discussed Modesty, Giving Feasts, and spoke the parable of the Great Feast and Excuses (Luke 14:1-24); finally, the discourse at the house of Zaccbaeus, with the parable of the Pounds (Luke 19:1-27). To this class belong: the discourse on Fasting (Matthew 9:14-17, Mark 2:18-22, Luke 5:33-39); the response to objectors on Sabbath Observance (Matthew 12:1-8, Mark 2:23-28, Luke 6:1-5); responses about Following Him (Matthew 8:19-22, Luke 9:57-62); response to the lawyer about Eternal Life, and parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37, cf. Luke 10:23); on Divorce (Matthew 19:3-12, Mark 10:2-12); response to the Rich Young Ruler, with discourse on the Perils of Wealth and on Forsaking All and Following Him (Matthew 19:6-30, Mark 10:17-31, Luke 18:18-30); the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1-18); response to the request of certain Greeks, with remarks on His Death and Glory (John 12:30-36). (a) Short occasional discourses: the explanation of the Parable of the Tares, with the short parables that follow (Matthew 13:36-52); the caution against Pharisaic Leaven (Matthew 16:4-12, Mark 8:13-21); remarks about His Church upon Peter’s confession (Matthew 16:13-20, Mark 8:27-30, Luke 9:18-21); the immediately following discourse on His Death and on Self-Denial (Matthew 16:21-28, Mark 8:31 to Mark 9:1, Luke 9:22-27); talk after the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:9-13, Mark 9:9-13); a second foretelling of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 17:22-23, Mark 9:30-32, Luke 9:43-45); discourses at the Mission and Return of the Seventy (Luke 10:1-24); teaching as to Prayer, with parable of the Friend at Midnight (Luke 11:1-13); parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-13); teaching as to Offences, Faith, Service (Luke 17:1-10); third prediction of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 20:17-19, Mark 10:32-34, Luke 18:31-34); talk about Faith suggested by the Withered Fig-tree (Matthew 21:20-22, Mark 11:20-26); talk following the Washing of the Disciples’ Feet (John 13:12-20); institution of the Lord’s Supper (Matthew 26:26-29, Mark 14:22-25, Luke 22:19-20); after the resurrection, talk with the Two Disciples on the way to Emmaus (Luke 24:17-27); with the Apostles, Thomas absent (Luke 24:36-49, John 20:19-25); talk with some of the Apostles at the Sea of Galilee (John 21:4-23); the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-19). But of the longer discourses with the chosen few we have the following: the Mission and Instruction of the Twelve (Matthew 10:1-42, Mark 6:7-13, Luke 9:1-6); on Humility, Offences, Forgiveness (Matthew 18:1-35, Mark 9:33-50, Luke 9:46-50); discourse on the Mount of Olives on His Second Coming and the Final Judgment (Matthew 24, 25, Mark 13, Luke 21:7-36); the Farewell Discourse and Prayer (John 14-17). Here we have: the beginning of His ministry (Matthew 4:17, Mark 1:14-15, Luke 4:14-15); the sermon at Nazareth (Luke 4:16-28); the first preaching tour in Galilee (Matthew 4:23-24, John 10:1-186 Luke 4:44); at Capernaum (Mark 2:1-2; Mark 2:13); the second preaching tour in Galilee (Luke 8:1-3); at Nazareth again (Matthew 13:54-58, Mark 6:1-6); the third preaching tour in Galilee (Matthew 9:35-38, Mark 6:6); a tour alone after sending out the Twelve (Matthew 11:1); teaching and journeying (Luke 13:10; Luke 13:22, cf. Matthew 19:1, Mark 10:1); teaching in the Temple (Mark 11:17 f. Of these there are a great number and variety, spoken sometimes to great multitudes, sometimes to groups, but publicly: on Blasphemy (Matthew 12:22-37, Mark 3:19-30); on Signs (Matthew 12:38-45); latter part of discourse on Eating with Unwashen Hands, and Traditions (Matthew 15:1-20, Mark 7:1-23); on Signs again (Matthew 16:1-4, Mark 8:11-12); on Demons and Signs again (Luke 11:14-36); on Confession, Worldliness, Watchfulness (Luke 12); on Repentance, with parable of the Barren Fig-tree (Luke 13:1-9); on the Good Shepherd (1618385389_41); on His Messiahship and Relations with the Father (John 10:22-38); Sabbath Healing, parables of Mustard Seed and Leaven (Luke 13:10-21); on the Salvation of the Elect (Luke 13:23-30); Lament over Jerusalem (Luke 13:34-35); on Counting the Cost of Following Him (Luke 14:25-35); reproof of the Pharisees, with parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus (Luke 16:14-31); on the Coming of the Kingdom (Luke 17:20-37); on Prayer, with parables of the Importunate Widow, and of the Pharisee and Publican (Luke 18:1-14); the colloquies with His critics in the Temple, on His Authority, on the Tribute to Caesar, on the Resurrection, on the Great Commandment, on the Son of David (Matthew 21:23 to Matthew 22:46, Mark 11:27 to Mark 12:37, Luke 20); remarks on Belief and Unbelief (John 12:44-50). Only a few of the great discourses of our Lord are reported in extenso: the Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5-7, Luke 6:17-49)—in a sense public, though addressed primarily to the disciples; discourse at the feast in Jerusalem on His Relations with the Father (John 5:19-47); on John the Baptist and suggested topics (Matthew 11:7-30, Luke 7:24-35); the first great group of parables, the Sower, etc. (Matthew 13:1-53, Mark 4:1-34, Luke 8:4-16); discourse in the synagogue at Capernaum on the Bread of Life (John 6:22-65); colloquy in the Temple on His Mission (John 7, 8); second great group of parables, the Lost Sheep, etc. (Luke 15:1 to Luke 17:10); last public discourse, Denunciation of the Pharisees (Matthew 23:1-39, Mark 12:38-40, Luke 20:45-47)
Salo'me -
The wife of Zebedee, (Matthew 27:56 ; Mark 15:40 ) and probably sister of Mary the mother of Jesus, to whom reference is made in (John 19:25 ) The only events recorded of Salome are that she preferred a request on behalf of her two sons for seats of honor in the kingdom of heaven, (Matthew 20:20 ) that she attended at the crucifixion of Jesus, (Mark 15:40 ) and that she visited his sepulchre. (Matthew 14:6 ) She married in the first the tetrarch of Trachonitis her paternal uncle, sad secondly Aristobulus, the king of Chalcis
Rabbi - Pupils used the word when addressing their teachers (Matthew 23:7; Mark 9:5; John 1:38; John 3:25-26), and it was a common title that Jesus’ disciples used in addressing him (Matthew 26:25; John 6:25; John 9:2; John 13:13-14; John 20:16). Luke 2:46; Matthew 23:7; Acts 5:34; Acts 22:3; see SCRIBES)
Seed - Matthew 13:24 (a) It is the Word of GOD which, in all of its multitudinous aspects and forms, produces a variety of results. (See Matthew 13:19). ...
Matthew 13:38 (a) The people of GOD are the seed in this parable
Apostle - The twelve apostles of Jesus were Simon Peter, Andrew, James the son of Zebedee, John, Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, Thaddaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot. Some were empowered by the Holy Spirit to perform Miracles (Matthew 10:1; Mat 10:8) and they were to preach the gospel (Matthew 28:19-20)
Thou - , Matthew 2:6 ; Luke 1:76 ; John 17:5 ; perhaps also in the phrase su eipas, "thou hast said," e. , Matthew 26:64 (sometimes without emphasis, e. , Matthew 17:25 , "what thinkest thou?" (lit
Herod Antipas - Herod's son by Malthace (Matthew 14:1 ; Luke 3:1,19 ; 9:7 ; Acts 13:1 )
Prevent - * For PREVENT, 1 Thessalonians 4:15 , AV, see PRECEDE: Matthew 17:25 , AV, see SPEAK No
Barachias, Berechiah - ), whom Jehovah hath blessed, father of the prophet Zechariah (Zechariah 1:1,7 ; Matthew 23:35 )
Gadara - (gad' uh ruh) Place name for home of Gadarenes used in TEV (Matthew 8:28 )
Bar-Jona - (bahr-joh' nuh) The surname of Simon Peter (Matthew 16:17 )
Mammon - Matthew 6 ...
Eliakim - —Two ancestors of Jesus bore this name, according to Matthew 1:13 and Luke 3:30
Evangelists, the Four - A term often used to designate the four writers of the Gospels — Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John
Zara - Son of Judah by Tamar (Genesis 38:30; Genesis 46:12; Matthew 1:3)
Achim - Son or descendant of Sadoc, and father of Eliud: the name occurs only in Matthew 1:14
Anon - * Note: This is the AV rendering of euthus, in Matthew 13:20 ; Mark 1:30 , RV, "straightway
Obed - —Father of Jesse, mentioned in both genealogies of our Lord (Matthew 1:5, Luke 3:32)
Crucifixion - ...
Jesus’ trial, before both the Jewish Council and the Roman governor, ignored many of the normal procedures, and was contrary to all accepted standards of justice (Matthew 26:57-68; Matthew 27:11-31; see SANHEDRIN; PILATE). )...
Crucifixion was carried out in a public place outside the city (Matthew 27:31; Matthew 27:33; Matthew 27:39; John 19:20; Hebrews 13:12), though the trial took place inside the city, usually at the governor’s headquarters (Matthew 27:27; see PRAETORIUM). The condemned person was first of all flogged (Matthew 27:26), and then led off through the city to be crucified (Matthew 27:31; Luke 23:27). If he was so weak from the flogging that he collapsed under the load, another person was forced to carry it for him (Matthew 27:32). People could also give him drugged wine to deaden the pain, though when it was offered to Jesus he refused it (Matthew 27:34). To prevent any attempted rescue, soldiers remained at the cross till the victim was dead (Matthew 27:54)
Kingdom of God - The prayer for God’s kingdom to come is a prayer that his rule be accepted, so that his will is done on earth as it is in heaven (Matthew 6:10). Those who enter the kingdom of God enter the realm where they accept God’s rule (Matthew 21:31). As Jesus proclaimed the kingdom, he healed those who were diseased and oppressed by evil spirits, and in so doing he gave evidence of his power over Satan (Matthew 4:23-24). His deliverance of people from the bondage of Satan was proof that God’s kingdom (his authority, power, rule) had come among them (Matthew 12:28; Mark 1:27; Luke 10:9; Luke 10:17-18). ...
There is a sense, therefore, in which all people experience the kingdom; for all people experience (or one day will experience) the sovereign authority of God, either in blessing or in judgment (Matthew 12:28; Revelation 11:15; Revelation 11:18; 1618385389_2). The Bible uses the expressions interchangeably (Matthew 19:23-24). Matthew, who wrote his Gospel for the Jews, usually (but not always) speaks of God’s kingdom as the kingdom of heaven, whereas the other Gospel writers call it the kingdom of God (Matthew 19:14; Mark 10:14; Luke 18:16). And by entering the kingdom they received forgiveness of sins and eternal life (Matthew 21:31; Mark 10:14-15; John 3:3). ...
But Jesus spoke also of the kingdom as something belonging to the future (Mark 10:23-27), whose establishment could take place only after he had suffered and died (Luke 18:31-33; Luke 22:15-16; Luke 24:26; Revelation 5:6-12; Matthew 7:21-235). Even for those who were already believers, Jesus spoke of his kingdom as something yet future, which they would enter at his return (1618385389_31; Matthew 13:41-43; Matthew 25:31-34). Believers enter the kingdom as soon as they believe, but they will experience the full blessings of the kingdom only when Christ returns to punish evil and reign in righteousness (Matthew 11:11; see DAY OF THE LORD; RESURRECTION). The Bible uses these expressions interchangeably (Matthew 19:16; Matthew 19:23-25). Likewise they have salvation now, but they will experience the fulness of their salvation at the return of Christ (Ephesians 2:8; Matthew 10:16-22). Eternal life is the life of the kingdom of God, the life of the age to come; but because the kingdom of God has come among them now, people have eternal life now (Matthew 25:34; Matthew 25:46; John 3:3; 1 Corinthians 15:24-28; John 3:15; John 5:24). That may have been why he became worried when Jesus did not immediately set up a world-conquering kingdom (Matthew 3:11-12; Matthew 11:2-3; cf. His kingdom had begun (Matthew 11:4-6; see MESSIAH; MIRACLES). ...
Parables of the kingdom...
Jesus emphasized this mystery of the kingdom in the parables recorded in Matthew 13 (Matthew 13:11; see PARABLE). But those who accept it experience great spiritual growth in their lives (Matthew 13:18-23; cf. Matthew 23:13). The parable of the wheat and the weeds teaches that in the present world those who are in God’s kingdom live alongside those who are not; but in the day of judgment, when God’s kingdom will be established openly, believers will be saved and the rest punished (Matthew 13:24-30; Matthew 13:34-43). ...
The parables of the mustard seed and the yeast illustrate that although the kingdom may appear to have insignificant beginnings, it will one day have worldwide power and authority (Matthew 13:31-33). The parables of the hidden treasure and the valuable pearl illustrate that when people are convinced of the priceless and lasting value of the kingdom of God, they will make any sacrifice to enter it (Matthew 13:44-46). The parable of the fishing net shows that these will be separated in God’s decisive judgment at the close of the age (Matthew 13:47-50). ...
Practical demands of the kingdom...
Although people may desire the kingdom of God above all else (Matthew 6:33; Matthew 13:44-46), they cannot buy their way into it. What God demands is repentance – a total change that gives up all self-sufficiency for the sake of following Christ as king (Matthew 4:17; Matthew 5:20; Matthew 19:23; Luke 9:62). Yet they look upon his commands not as laws that they are forced to obey, but as expressions of his will that they find true happiness in doing (Matthew 5:3; Matthew 5:10; 1 John 5:3-4). They learn that the principles that operate in the kingdom of God are different from those that operate in the kingdoms of the world (Matthew 20:20-28; John 18:36). Having come into the enjoyment of the rule of Christ themselves, they then spread the good news of his kingdom throughout the world (Matthew 10:7; Matthew 24:14; Acts 8:12; Acts 19:8; Acts 28:23; Acts 28:31). ...
Those who serve the kingdom of God may bring persecution and suffering upon themselves (Matthew 10:7; Hebrews 9:28; Acts 14:22; 2 Thessalonians 1:5). God, however, will preserve them through their troubles and bring them into the full enjoyment of his kingdom in the day of its final triumph (Matthew 3:2; 2 Timothy 4:18; 2 Peter 1:11). Upon accepting the Messiah, they would enter God’s kingdom and then spread the good news to all nations (Isaiah 49:5-6; Matthew 10:6-7; Matthew 15:24). Gentiles who believed entered the kingdom, but Jews for whom the kingdom had been prepared were excluded (Matthew 8:10-12; Matthew 20:1-16; Matthew 21:33-43; Acts 13:46-47; Acts 28:23-31). They knew that he was indeed the Messiah of God who brought them the kingdom of God and eternal life (Matthew 16:13-16; John 6:66-69). They carried God’s authority with them, so that when they acted in obedience to his word, their work on earth was confirmed in heaven (Matthew 16:18-19; Acts 8:12; Acts 20:24-25; Acts 28:31)
Gehenna - Jesus warned that those who called another, “Thou fool,” faced the danger of the fire of Gehenna (Matthew 5:22 ). He taught it is better to destroy a part of one's body than to have one's whole body thrown into Gehenna (Matthew 5:29 ; Matthew 18:9 ; Mark 9:43 ,Mark 9:43,9:45 ,Mark 9:45,9:47 ). Only God can commit people to Gehenna and so is the only One worthy of human fear (Matthew 10:28 ; Luke 12:5 ). Jesus condemned the Pharisees for making converts but then turning them into sons of Gehenna, that is, people destined for hell (Matthew 23:15 ). He scolded the Pharisees, warning they had no chance to escape Gehenna through their present practices (Matthew 23:33 )
Dream - The revelation of God's will in dreams is characteristic of the early and less perfect patriarchal times (Genesis 28:12; Genesis 31:24; Genesis 37:5-10); to Solomon, 1 Kings 3:5, in commencing his reign; the beginnings of the New Testament dispensation (Matthew 1:20; Matthew 2:13; Matthew 2:19; Matthew 2:22); and the communications from God to the rulers of the pagan world powers, Philistia, Egypt, Babylon (Genesis 20:3; Genesis 40:5; Genesis 41:1); Elihu, Job 33:15; Daniel 2; Daniel 4:5, etc. So the Midianite (Judges 7:13), Pilate's wife (Matthew 27:19). , God's service becomes by "dreams" (foolish fancies as to what God requires of worshippers); and random "words," positive vanity of manifold kinds; compare Matthew 6:7, "they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking
Lest - , in Matthew 17:27 ; in some instances the RV renders the phrase "that . , Matthew 4:6 ; "lest haply," Matthew 7:6 , RV (AV, "lest"), and in Matthew 13:15 (AV, "lest at any time"); in Matthew 25:9 , RV, "peradventure" (AV, "lest"). , in Matthew 27:64 ; Mark 14:2 ; Luke 12:58 ; the addition of pote requires the fuller rendering
Seven Times - 1: ἑπτάκις (Strong's #2034 — Adverb — heptakis — hep-tak-is' ) occurs in Matthew 18:21,22 ; Luke 17:4 (twice)
Sidon - , Tzidon; RSV, Zidon); Matthew 11:21,22 ; Luke 6:17
Human Figure, Winged - Emblem in art associated with Saint Matthew as typifying the human descent of Our Lord in His Incarnation
Money Belt - Modern rendering of the term the KJV translated as purse (Matthew 10:9 ; Mark 6:8 )
Jesse - —The father of king David, named in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:5 f
Manasseh (2) - —The well-known king of Judah, mentioned as a link in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:10
Shealtiel - —A link in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:12, Luke 3:27, Authorized Version both times Salathiel)
Boaz - —The husband of Ruth, named in the genealogies of our Lord (Matthew 1:5, Luke 3:32)
Achim - Ancestor of Jesus of whom nothing but his name is known (Matthew 1:14 )
Lebbaeus - One of the twelve apostles, who was surnamed THADDAEUS, Matthew 10:3 ; apparently the apostle Jude
Thereat - , "by (dia) it," is rendered "thereat" in Matthew 7:13 , AV (RV, "thereby")
Winged Human Figure - Emblem in art associated with Saint Matthew as typifying the human descent of Our Lord in His Incarnation
jo'Nas - (Matthew 12:39,40,41 ; 16:4 ) ...
Father of Peter
Gnat, - a species of mosquito mentioned only in the proverbial expression used by our Saviour in (Matthew 23:21 )
Jesse - —The father of king David, named in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:5 f
Perez - —Mentioned as a link in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:3, Luke 3:33, Authorized Version Phares)
Sanctify, Sanctification - ἅγιος is used as follows: He addresses God as ‘Holy Father’ (John 17:11); He speaks of ‘the holy angels’ (Mark 8:38 ||); He uses the name ‘Holy Spirit’ (Matthew 12:32 || Matthew 28:19, Mark 12:36; Mark 13:11, Luke 12:12, John 14:26; John 20:22); He warns against giving ‘that which is holy’ unto the dogs (Matthew 7:6); and He refers to the abomination that stands ‘in the holy place’ (Matthew 24:15). ἁγιάζω is used of ‘the temple that sanctifieth the gift’ (Matthew 23:17; Matthew 23:19); and there are three very important usages in Matthew 11:28-3048; John 17:17; John 17:19. It occurs also in the Lord’s Prayer in the sentence, ‘Hallowed be thy name’ (Matthew 6:9). One long chapter in Matthew’s Gospel gathers up seathing rebukes of those who put the emphasis of religion upon what is external (Matthew 23:1-36; cf. In the Sermon on the Mount He said: ‘Except your righteousness exceed the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, ye shall in no wise enter the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 5:20). His teaching was ‘new,’ and was ‘with authority’ (Mark 1:22; Matthew 25:14-30,1). He summed up many exhortations in the words, ‘Be ye therefore perfect, even as your heavenly Father is perfect’ (Matthew 5:48). As the Son, He revealed the Father (Matthew 11:27, John 14:9-10); therefore the children of God are those who resemble Him (Matthew 11:29). To ‘love the Lord’ is the greatest commandment (Matthew 22:37 ||). But Jesus bracketed the commandment to ‘love thy neighbour as thyself’ with this ‘first and greatest’ (Matthew 22:39 ||); and the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) has been interpreted as teaching that ‘charity is the true sanctity’ (Bruce). Likeness to the heavenly Father is impossible without the cultivation of a loving spirit (Matthew 5:43-48, Luke 15:25-32). It must forgive freely and unweariedly (Matthew 18:21-22). It must not judge (Matthew 7:1-2). Jesus also inculcated the supreme importance of love by His rebukes of its opposites: of lack of compassion (Matthew 18:23-35, Luke 10); of selfishness (Luke 16:19-31); of inhumanity (Matthew 25:41-45). Equally terrible were His denunciations of Pharisaic injustice to the weak (Matthew 23:4-14 ||). Jesus came into the world from the Father to save from sins (Matthew 11:19, Luke 15:7; Luke 15:10; Luke 15:18, Matthew 26:28, John 3:16-17). Likeness to the Father involves complete consecration to His holy purpose, and readiness to be separated from every evil thing (Matthew 5:6; Matthew 13:43; Matthew 18:8 ||). The Christian must seek first the righteousness of the Heavenly Father (Matthew 6:33). His goodness must be manifest in deeds as well as words (Matthew 7:21). He must be pure in heart (Matthew 5:8). His righteousness must be inward and real, not outward and ceremonial (Matthew 5:20, Matthew 23:25-28). Moral perfection is conceived as the true self-development (Matthew 25:46, Mark 10:30). God has made us for Himself; unfailing obedience to the will of God leads to fulness of life (Matthew 19:17, John 17:3). Matthew 5:9; Matthew 5:13-16; Matthew 5:19). Such a recognition of other lives will keep men meek (Matthew 5:5, Matthew 11:29), and will fill their hearts with humility (Matthew 18:1-6 ||). We note the striking saying about His forerunner: ‘Among them that are born of women there hath not arisen a greater than John the Baptist: yet he that is but little in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he’ (Matthew 11:11). This necessity is further hinted at in the teaching about defilement proceeding from the heart (Matthew 15:11). It is not enough to adorn a life with kind actions, to hang bunches of grapes on a thorn bush (Matthew 7:16). Good actions must be the fruit that grows on a good tree (Matthew 7:16-18, John 15:4). The hidden principle must be made secure if the life is to be saved (Matthew 7:24-27). These hints prepare us for the demand, ‘Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall in no wise enter into the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 18:3 ||). This is suggested in the parable of the Sower (Matthew 13:3, Mark 4:3); the parable of the Seed as growing up—‘first the blade, then the ear, then the full corn in the ear’ (Mark 4:28); and in all the figures of fruit-bearing, because fruit-bearing is the late result of a long process (cf. Another set of parables represents men as servants of a long-absent Lord, who have to show diligence in trading with the pounds, fidelity in the use of talents, and patience in watching (Matthew 25:14, John 6:47-580 Matthew 24:42). John 17:3, Matthew 11:27). A pure heart is the organ of such a vision of God (Matthew 5:8). It is specially noteworthy that He betook Himself to prayer when any fierce temptation assailed Him (Luke 5:16; Luke 9:28, John 12:27, Matthew 26:36 ||), when any work of critical importance had to be undertaken (Luke 6:12, John 11:41; John 11:17), or when He was exhausted with toil (Mark 1:35, Matthew 14:23); and that it was while He was praying that He was anointed with the Holy Spirit (Luke 3:21), and that He was transfigured (Luke 9:29). It is instructive, therefore, that He urged men to pray (John 12:35-367; Matthew 6:6; Matthew 26:41 ||, Luke 11:2; Luke 18:1; Luke 21:36). He encouraged prayer by promising large blessing (Matthew 7:7-11, Mark 11:24). He summarized it thus: ‘Enter ye in by the narrow gate: … for narrow is the gate, and straitened the way, that leadeth unto life’ (Matthew 7:13-14 ||). Self-denial is thus taught not for its own sake, but as the only way to reach self-perfection (Matthew 16:24 ||). The blessed of the Father, who inherit the Kingdom, have qualified by good works (Matthew 25:31-40). The young ruler could be perfect if he would keep the commandments (Matthew 19:21), and the lawyer could inherit eternal life in the same way (Luke 10:28). Matthew 25:10; 1618385389_39 Luke 19:12-27, Mark 10:29-30 ||); and if heavenly rewards are granted to those morally fit, as is taught clearly by the parable of the Pounds (Luke 19), these passages imply that sanctification is advanced by a life of obedience to God’s will. It is also taught by His claim to be the one Master whom all are to obey (Matthew 23:10). The wise man is one who builds on the words of Jesus (Matthew 7:24). Eternity will put the strain of judgment upon the characters we are building; and only those characters resting on the rock of His words will stand the strain (Matthew 7:25-27). The same truth is taught in the impressive words of Matthew 10:32-33. And a very solemn claim made by Jesus is that ‘none knoweth the Father save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son willeth to reveal him’ (Matthew 11:27). John 1:4-5; Matthew 5:45,; John 3:19); to be the living water (John 7:37-38, John 4:14); to be the bread of God come down from heaven to feed the world (John 6:32-35; 1618385389_27). Matthew 26:26-28 ||), it is plain that our Lord was thinking of a spiritual union between Himself and His followers, maintained by their faith
Names Titles And Offices of Christ - ...
Beloved Son, Matthew 17:6. ...
Bridegroom, Matthew 9:15. ...
Emmanuel, Isaiah 7:14; Matthew 1:23. ...
Governor, Matthew 2:6. ...
Jesus, Matthew 1:21; 1 Thessalonians 1:10. ...
Lord, Matthew 3:3 : Mark 11:3. ...
Nazarene, Matthew 2:23. ...
Son of David, Matthew 9:27; Matthew 21:9. ...
Son of God, Luke 1:35; Matthew 3:17; Matthew 8:29. ...
Son of man, Matthew 8:20; John 1:51
Interest - The “harsh” master who expects interest and reaps what he did not sow (Matthew 25:24 ,Matthew 25:24,25:26-27 ; Luke 19:21-23 ) is hardly to be taken as a model for Christian business practice. Luke's parable in particular contains reminiscences of the hated Archelaus (Luke 19:12 ,Luke 19:12,19:14 ; compare Matthew 2:22 ). See Matthew 5:42 ; Matthew 10:8 )
Borrow - ...
In Matthew 5:42 , Jesus cites generosity “from him that would borrow of thee” as one example of an unexpected, loving response (instead of the typical self-protective response) to others' demands and abuses. In each example (Matthew 5:38-42 ) the disciple's primary concern is the other person, not protecting one's own vested interests. The second person singular in Matthew 5:42 makes clear the personal nature of this response to the would-be borrower. This passage is part of Jesus' consistent emphasis on absolute loyalty to the way of God's kingdom, which necessitates a carefree regard for one's possessions ( Matthew 6:24-34 ) and personal security (Matthew 5:43-48 ) as one unselfishly loves the neighbor
Crown of Thorns - The crown made by the Roman soldiers to mock Jesus, the “King of the Jews” (Matthew 27:29 ; Mark 15:18 ; John 19:3 ; not mentioned in Luke). Jesus used the imagery of “thorns” in his teaching in a negative sense (Matthew 7:16 ; Mark 4:7 ,Mark 4:7,4:18 ; see Hebrews 6:8 )
Meekness - Peculiar promises are made to the meek (Matthew 5:5 ; Isaiah 66:2 ). The cultivation of this spirit is enjoined (Colossians 3:12 ; 1 Timothy 6:11 ; Zephaniah 2:3 ), and is exemplified in Christ (Matthew 11:29 ), Abraham (Genesis 13 ; 16:5,6 ) Moses (Numbers 12:3 ), David (Zechariah 12:8 ; 2 Samuel 16:10,12 ), and Paul (1 Corinthians 9:19 )
Farthing - , about three farthings, Matthew 10:29 ; Luke 12:6 . 1), about two thirds of a farthing, Matthew 5:26 ; Mark 12:42
Sparrow - Two sparrows were sold for a farthing (Matthew 10:29 ), and five for two farthings (Luke 12:6 ). The Greek word of the New Testament is Strouthion ( Matthew 10:29-31 ), which is thus correctly rendered
Dalmanutha - " Matthew (Matthew 15:39) calls "the borders of Magdala
Region Round About - In Matthew 3:5 and Luke 3:3; Luke 7:17, the populous region containing Jericho, etc. Compare as to the similar region of Gennesaret (Matthew 14:35)
Custom - CUSTOM(S) ( Matthew 17:25 , Romans 13:7 ): ‘receipt of custom’ ( Matthew 9:9 , Mark 2:14 , Luke 5:27 )
Disciple - As disciples we are to bear our cross daily (Matthew 16:24). This means to live and die for Him if necessary (Matthew 16:25)
Thence - , Matthew 4:21 , "from thence;" Matthew 5:26 ; in Acts 20:13 , "there;" often preceded by kai, written kakeithen, e
Damnation - ' Matthew 23:14 ; Romans 3:8 ; Romans 13:2 ; 1 Corinthians 11:29 ; 1 Timothy 5:12 . κρίσις, 'judgement,' associated with eternity: judgement of hell,' Matthew 23:33 ; 'eternal judgement,' Mark 3:29 (where some Editors read 'guilty of eternal sin'); and 'resurrection of judgement
Gergesenes - Matthew 8:28 , in the parallel passages in Mark and Luke, Gadarenes. See Matthew 8:28 , and others Gerasenes; but Gerasa lay forty miles southeast of the scene of the miracle
Wonderful - * Notes: (1) In Matthew 7:22 , AV, dunamis (in the plural) is rendered "wonderful works" (RV, is rendered "wonderful works" (RV, "mighty works," marg. (3) In Matthew 21:15 , the neuter plural of the adjective thaumasios, "wonderful," is used as a noun, "wonderful things," lit
Eternal Punishment - — Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 of Matthew 25:46 (εἰς κὁλασιν αἰώνιον). Matthew 19:16-17 with Matthew 19:23, Mark 9:45 with Mark 9:47, Matthew 25:34 ‘inherit the kingdom,’ and Matthew 25:46 ‘unto eternal life’). The Father who ‘seeth in secret’ and rewards unobtrusive righteousness (Matthew 6:1 ff. ) will render to the unrighteous the due reward of their deeds (Matthew 7:19; Matthew 10:28; Matthew 12:36; Matthew 15:13; Matthew 18:6; Matthew 18:35, Luke 18:7 [1]). Hence the urgency of the call to repentance (Matthew 4:17), and to the obedience of righteousness as in the Sermon on the Mount, and, at any cost, to ‘crucify the flesh’ which prompts to sin (Matthew 5:29-30; Matthew 18:8; Matthew 18:8). —The incomparable worth of the Kingdom, as the richest ‘treasure,’ and ‘pearl of great price’ (Matthew 13:44-45), and the supreme quest of it as the first duty and sovereign wisdom of life (Matthew 6:33), have, as their converse, the incomparable loss which the rejection of the gospel must inevitably entail. This is the supreme penalty—exclusion from the Kingdom, to be cast into the ‘outer darkness’ (Matthew 8:12; Matthew 22:13; Matthew 25:30), denied by the Lord (Matthew 7:23; Matthew 10:33; Matthew 25:12, Luke 13:25-27), shut out from the glad presence of the King (Matthew 25:41). It is the apostate disciple who, as salt which has lost its savour, is cast out (Matthew 5:13). To His disciples Jesus gives the warnings of God’s searching judgment (Matthew 5:22 ff. To those who call Him ‘Lord, Lord,’ and in His name have done ‘many mighty works,’ He utters the dread ‘Depart’ (Matthew 7:21-23, cf. It is the disobedient hearers of His word who are compared to a foolish builder whose house, built upon sand, is ruined by the storm (Matthew 7:26-27). Those who deny Him, He also will deny (Matthew 10:33); those who are ashamed of Him, of them will He be ashamed (Mark 8:38). It is the unfaithfnl servant (Matthew 24:48-51), the unwatchful (Matthew 25:1-13), the unprofitable (Matthew 25:30), who are cast out of the Kingdom. And in the larger issues the severity of judgment falls upon cities and generations ‘exalted to heaven’ in privilege and opportunity, but doomed because of neglect (Matthew 11:20-24; Matthew 12:41-42). The mention of the Cities of the Plain (Matthew 10:15) and that of the men of Nineveh (Matthew 12:41) are too incidental and indirect to yield any determining principle. Even the great Judgment passage (Matthew 25:31 ff. In the parables of the Tares (Matthew 13:24 ff. ) and the Drag-net (Matthew 13:47 ff. The Kingdom is to be all righteousness, out of it is to be gathered ‘all things that cause stumbling, and them that do iniquity’ (Matthew 13:41). Every plant not planted by the Father is to be uprooted (Matthew 15:13), and every tree which beareth not good fruit is to be cut down and destroyed (Matthew 7:19). ’ The exact award of penalty, the few and many stripes according to the measure of disobedience (Luke 12:47-48), the completed sentence implied in ‘till thou have paid the last farthing’ (Matthew 5:26; cf. Matthew 18:34-35), the startling symbolism of the phrase ‘salted with fire’ (Mark 9:49), which is said to teach ‘that the destructive element performs a purifying part’ (see Internat. on Matthew 25:46), and the use of αἰώνιος as suggesting ‘age-long,’ have all been singled out as leaving room for the hope of final salvation through the fires of judgment. ...
The exact balance of the awards ‘eternal life’ and ‘eternal punishment’ (Matthew 25:46) has often been insisted upon as teaching finality. Two sayings of Jesus are indeed terrible in their severity, and ought not to be minimized: ‘Be not afraid of them which kill the body, but are not able to kill the soul; but rather fear him which is able to destroy both soul and body in hell’ (Matthew 10:28). The same thought is suggested by the figure used in the saying, ‘He that falleth on this stone shall be broken to pieces; but on whomsoever it shall fall, it will scatter him as dust’ (Matthew 21:44)
Metaphors - So the ‘eye’ which was to be plucked out (Matthew 5:29) and the ‘beam’ which was not plucked out (Matthew 7:3) evidently were the man’s pet sins. ...
A simple metaphor expresses the resemblance (or identity) between two dissimilar objects or ideas by applying to one a term which can literally designate only the other, as ‘This is my body (Matthew 26:26). Other expressions, such as ‘Get thee behind me, Satan’ (Matthew 16:23), ‘Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up’ (John 2:19), may be taken at random as examples of veiled metaphors, the connexion between the literal and spiritual meanings being mentally supplied. This metaphorical method of speech was habitual with Jesus (Matthew 13:34, Mark 4:11, where παραβολή does not mean ‘parable’ in the modern sense, but metaphorical comparison), and was used, so His disciples thought, to hide the meaning of His words from all except the inner circle of believers. ]'>[1] Sometimes, as in the references to ‘meat’ and ‘leaven’ (John 4:32; John 4:34; John 6:27; John 6:55, Matthew 16:12, Mark 8:17, Luke 12:1), the deeper meaning of our Lord’s words was understood before the Gospels came into existence. ‡
‘Let the dead bury their dead’ (Matthew 8:22); ‘Cast not your pearls before swine’ (Matthew 7:6); ‘Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?’ (Matthew 7:16), are some of the striking expressions found in Mt. alone, as also the declaration that no man should be called ‘father’ (Matthew 23:9); cf. the acted metaphor (Matthew 17:26), no where else recorded, by which Jesus metaphorically claims that the God of the Temple is His Father, when He declares His legal exemption from the Temple tax. There are a number of peculiarly picturesque and humorous metaphors for which we are indebted to Matthew. The Pharisees are ‘white-washed tombs’ full of putridity (Matthew 23:27); ‘blind guides of the blind’ (Matthew 15:14, Matthew 23:16; Matthew 23:24); ‘wolves in sheep’s clothing’ (Matthew 7:15). One who truly exhibits the law of righteousness (which is unselfishness and love) does not let his left hand know what his right hand doeth (Matthew 6:3); but these men blow a trumpet before them, not only when they give alms, but when they pray (cf. They make long prayers and ‘devour windows’ houses (Matthew 23:14 or 13?). These hair-splitting theologians, so particular in their eating, strain out the gnat but swallow the camel (Matthew 23:24). (Mark 10:25, Matthew 19:24, Luke 18:25). ]'>[10] Christ’s yoke does not gall (Matthew 11:30), but these men lay upon the shoulders of others burdens which they will not move even with the finger (Matthew 23:4). For such is the ‘weeping and the gnashing of teeth’ (Matthew 8:12, Matthew 13:42; Matthew 13:50, Matthew 22:13, Matthew 24:51, Matthew 25:30, elsewhere only Luke 13:28). These satiric pictures of the theologians of the day are peculiar to Matthew. Forgetting their own infirmity and need of immediate surgical assistance, they use the other eye, which must also have been sympathetically afflicted, in spying out and ridiculing the speck of dust in the eye of their neighbour (Matthew 7:3-5 = Luke 6:41 f. (Matthew 5:3; Matthew 5:6); the words ‘poor’ and ‘hungry’ (Matthew 6:20; Matthew 6:23) having perhaps obtained a settled ecclesiastical, non-literal meaning. (Matthew 11:12), is explained in Lk. (Matthew 13:19),—sometimes similes and sometimes metaphors,—representing men in one breath as both soil and seed, disappear in Lk. He, too, is responsible for the injunction ‘Make for yourselves purses which wax not old’ (Luke 12:33), and for the attractive Orientalism ‘son of peace’ (Luke 10:6) added to Matthew 10:13, and for the less commendable addition that the descent of the Spirit at the baptism of Jesus, which Mk
Subtilty - * Note: For dolos, Matthew 26:4 ; Acts 13:10 , see GUILE
Tunic - Loose-fitting, knee length garment worn next to the skin (Matthew 10:10 ; Mark 6:9 )
Hezekiah - ’s (Matthew 1:9 f
Adulterous - Matthew 12,16
Abia - (uh bi' uh) KJV for Abijah in 1 Chronicles 3:10 ; Matthew 1:7 ; Luke 1:5
Householder - Matthew 13 ...
Asa - ), named in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:7 f
Abiud - Son of Zorobabel, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus, Matthew 1:13 : not mentioned in the Old Testament
Usury - * Note: The RV, "interest," Matthew 25:27 ; Luke 19:23 , is the preferable rendering of tokos here
Ninety - 1: ἐννέα (Strong's #1767 — Noun — enenekonta | ennen — en-neh'-ah ) is found in Matthew 18:12,13 ; Luke 15:4,7
Poverty (2) - In accordance with this distinction, the contact of Jesus with the poor as described in the Gospels is almost confined to Judaea and Jerusalem (Matthew 19:16, Mark 10:21 the rich young ruler; Mark 12:42, Luke 21:1 the poor widow; Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:5 ‘this ointment might have been sold for much and given to the poor’; Matthew 20:30, Mark 10:46, Luke 18:35 the blind beggars outside Jericho; cf. Matthew 25:35). Matthew 13:55), and the movements of His family (John 2:12, where His mother and His brethren are staying at Capernaum; John 2:2, where His mother and His disciples are guests at Cana) imply a certain position of independence (cf. —Christ and His disciples, certainly did not subsist on charity; true, the Son of Man had not where to lay his head (Matthew 8:20, Luke 9:58); but this shows only that Christ was content not to have a home of His own, not that He could not have had one. Matthew 16:5, Mark 8:14) and gave to the poor (John 13:29; cf. Matthew 26:9). It would seem that Jesus was in the habit of paying the Temple tax (Matthew 17:24). He is able to secure an ass on which to enter into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:3, Mark 11:3, Luke 19:31), a lodging at night through the last week (Matthew 21:7, Mark 11:19, Luke 21:37), and the use of an upper room for the Passover (Matthew 26:18, Mark 14:15); nor is there anything to suggest that Christ’s hunger when He was passing the barren fig-tree was the result of inability to procure food (Matthew 21:18, Mark 11:12). In the same discourse occur the prohibitions against taking anxious thought (Matthew 6:25) and laying up treasures (Matthew 6:19). Prayer for temporal wants is to be for ‘daily bread’ (‘bread of the coming day’ or ‘bread of sufficiency,’ ἄρτος ἐπιούσιος; see Lord’s Prayer) alone (Matthew 6:11, Luke 11:3). Christ bids the disciples of John observe that the poor have the gospel preached unto them (Matthew 11:5, cf. The danger of wealth is constantly pointed out (Matthew 19:23, Mark 10:23, Luke 18:24 ‘How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of heaven’; Matthew 18:8 ‘If thy hand or thy foot cause thee to stumble, cut it off’; Luke 16:19 the parable of Lazarus and Dives; Luke 12:16 the parable of the Rich Fool, following on Christ’s peremptory refusal to divide the inheritance between the two brothers). the command to the rich young ruler, ‘Sell all that thou hast,’ Matthew 19:21, Mark 10:21, Luke 18:22, in which there was evidently some personal appropriateness; the demand was not universally made. According to our accounts, the Temple was cleansed of buyers and sellers both at the beginning and the end of the ministry (John 2:14, and Matthew 21:12, Mark 11:15). That Christ had the true Israelite contempt for money and commercial prosperity is at least hinted in the story of the Temptation (Matthew 4:10, Luke 4:8), and shown quite plainly in the parable of the Labourers in the Vineyard: ‘It is my will to give unto this last even as unto thee,’ Matthew 20:15,—a principle which, as Ruskin saw (Unto this Last), is a defiance of political economy as ordinarily understood. Matthew 6:12, Luke 11:4). Peabody (Jesus Christ and the Social Question) points out the further opposition to current Socialism implied in the parable of the Talents (Matthew 25:29, Luke 12:48; cf. Matthew 13:12). ’ To take Matthew 26:11, ‘Ye have the poor always with you,’ to mean that the existence of poverty must be acquiesced in, is to forget all that was said about mercifulness and liberality by Him who, when He saw the multitudes, ‘had compassion on them’ (Matthew 9:36; Matthew 14:14). Christ demanded the surrender not of money in itself, but of everything that could interfere with the interests of the Kingdom of heaven; in this sense the verb ἀφίημι, ‘to give up, leave’ (Matthew 19:29, Mark 10:28, Matthew 4:20, Mark 1:18; cf. ’ The ideal is not poverty but service (Matthew 20:27, ‘Whosoever would become first among you shall be your servant’)
Searching - In Matthew 2:8 ἐξετάζω is appropriately used for the identifying of the child of Messianic promise: ‘Search out carefully concerning the young child’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ; whereas Authorized Version translation as if it were ἐκζητέω). In Matthew 10:11 it means ‘get to know exactly who is genuinely worthy,’ rather than settle down with the first man who is spoken of for his piety. ’ It may well be believed that it connoted more on the lips of Jesus (John 5:39), who knew how to distinguish the spirit from the letter (Matthew 7:12, Luke 7:27; Luke 10:26 ff. , John 6:33), and to bring forth treasures new as well as old (Matthew 13:52; cf. Matthew 5:21 f. , Matthew 5:43 f. , Matthew 9:13; Matthew 12:40 ff. ), and the Pharisees ‘searched’ for what would maintain their burdensome traditions (Mark 2:7; Mark 2:24, Luke 13:14, John 9:28), or even enable them to evade a moral issue (Matthew 19:7). The former falls into line with the general tenor of Christ’s teaching, that the Jews had only to use the means at their disposal in order to see in Himself the fulfilment of the Law and the Prophets (Matthew 5:17, Luke 16:31; Luke 24:27, John 7:38)
Son of God - Elsewhere, He frequently referred to God as “my Father” ( John 5:17 ; John 6:32 ; John 8:54 ; John 10:18 ; John 15:15 ; Matthew 7:21 ; Matthew 10:32-33 ; Matthew 20:23 ; Matthew 26:29 ,Matthew 26:29,26:53 ; Mark 8:38 ; Luke 2:49 ; Luke 10:21-22 ). He was identified as Son of God by an angel prior to His birth (Luke 1:32 ,Luke 1:32,1:35 ); by Satan at His temptation (Matthew 4:3 ,Matthew 4:3,4:6 ); by John the Baptist (John 1:34 ); by the centurion at the crucifixion (Matthew 27:54 ). Several of His followers ascribed to Him this title in various contexts (Matthew 14:33 ; Matthew 16:16 ; John 1:49 ; John 11:27 )
Eye - , Matthew 5:38 ; of restoring sight, e. , Matthew 20:33 ; of God's power of vision, Hebrews 4:13 ; 1 Peter 3:12 ; of Christ in vision, Revelation 1:14 ; 2:18 ; 19:12 ; of the Holy Spirit in the unity of Godhood with Christ, Revelation 5:6 ; (b) metaphorically, of ethical qualities, evil, Matthew 6:23 ; Mark 7:22 (by metonymy, for envy); singleness of motive, Matthew 6:22 ; Luke 11:34 ; as the instrument of evil desire, "the principal avenue of temptation," 1 John 2:16 ; of adultery, 2 Peter 2:14 ; (c) metaphorically, of mental vision, Matthew 13:15 ; John 12:40 ; Romans 11:8 ; Galatians 3:1 , where the metaphor of the "evil eye" is altered to a different sense from that of bewitching (the posting up or placarding of an "eye" was used as a charm, to prevent mischief); by Gospel-preaching Christ had been, so to speak, placarded before their "eyes;" the question may be paraphrased, "What evil teachers have been malignly fascinating you?;" Ephesians 1:18 , of the "eyes of the heart," as a means of knowledge. ...
2: ὄμμα (Strong's #3659 — Noun Neuter — omma — om'-mah ) "sight," is used in the plural in Matthew 20:34 (No. trema, "a hole, perforation," Matthew 19:24 (some texts have trupema, "a hole," from trupao, "to bore a hole"); Luke 18:25 , as in the most authentic mss
Gospels - The central fact of Christian preaching was the intelligence that the Saviour had come into the world (Matthew 4:23 ; Romans 10:15 ); and the first Christian preachers who called their account of the person and mission of Christ by the term Evangelion_ (= good message) were called _evangelistai (= Evangelists) ( Ephesians 4:11 ; Acts 21:8 ). There are four historical accounts of the person and work of Christ: "the first by Matthew, announcing the Redeemer as the promised King of the kingdom of God; the second by Mark, declaring him 'a prophet, mighty in deed and word'; the third by Luke, of whom it might be said that he represents Christ in the special character of the Saviour of sinners (Luke 7:36 ; 15:18 ); the fourth by John, who represents Christ as the Son of God, in whom deity and humanity become one. The ancient Church gave to Matthew the symbol of the lion, to Mark that of a man, to Luke that of the ox, and to John that of the eagle: these were the four faces of the cherubim" (Ezekiel 1:10 ). "If the extent of all the coincidences be represented by 100, their proportionate distribution will be: Matthew, Mark, and Luke, 53; Matthew and Luke, 21; Matthew and Mark, 20; Mark and Luke, 6. (See Matthew, GOSPEL OF
Watch - custodia) in Matthew 27:65-66; Matthew 28:11 Authorized Version (‘guard’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ). just before dawn (Matthew 14:25, Mark 6:48); (b) in His remarks upon the uncertainty and unexpectedness of the Presence (παρουσία) of the Son of Man (Matthew 24:43, Luke 12:38). —The duty of constant watchfulness (γρηγορεῖν) and vigilance (ἀγρυπνεῖν) is insisted upon by our Lord in two main connexions: (a) in regard to the particular, immediate need for it on the night of the Betrayal (Matthew 26:38; Matthew 26:40-41, Mark 14:34; Mark 14:38) and (b) in regard to the general attitude of disciples who await their Lord’s Return (Matthew 24:42-43, Mark 13:33-34; Mark 13:37, Luke 12:37; Luke 12:39; Luke 21:36)
Eye - , Matthew 5:38 ; of restoring sight, e. , Matthew 20:33 ; of God's power of vision, Hebrews 4:13 ; 1 Peter 3:12 ; of Christ in vision, Revelation 1:14 ; 2:18 ; 19:12 ; of the Holy Spirit in the unity of Godhood with Christ, Revelation 5:6 ; (b) metaphorically, of ethical qualities, evil, Matthew 6:23 ; Mark 7:22 (by metonymy, for envy); singleness of motive, Matthew 6:22 ; Luke 11:34 ; as the instrument of evil desire, "the principal avenue of temptation," 1 John 2:16 ; of adultery, 2 Peter 2:14 ; (c) metaphorically, of mental vision, Matthew 13:15 ; John 12:40 ; Romans 11:8 ; Galatians 3:1 , where the metaphor of the "evil eye" is altered to a different sense from that of bewitching (the posting up or placarding of an "eye" was used as a charm, to prevent mischief); by Gospel-preaching Christ had been, so to speak, placarded before their "eyes;" the question may be paraphrased, "What evil teachers have been malignly fascinating you?;" Ephesians 1:18 , of the "eyes of the heart," as a means of knowledge. ...
2: ὄμμα (Strong's #3659 — Noun Neuter — omma — om'-mah ) "sight," is used in the plural in Matthew 20:34 (No. trema, "a hole, perforation," Matthew 19:24 (some texts have trupema, "a hole," from trupao, "to bore a hole"); Luke 18:25 , as in the most authentic mss
Robber - 1: λῃστής (Strong's #3027 — Noun Masculine — lestes — lace-tace' ) "a robber, brigand" (akin to leia, "booty"), "one who plunders openly and by violence" (in contrast to kleptes, "a thief," see below), is always translated "robber" or "robbers" in the RV , as the AV in John 10:1,8 ; 18:40 ; 2 Corinthians 11:26 ; the AV has "thief" or "thieves" in Matthew 21:13 , and parallel passages; Matthew 26:55 , and parallel passages; Matthew 27:38,44 ; Mark 15:27 ; Luke 10:30,36 ; but "thief" is the meaning of kleptes
Daemoniac - " In the days of our Lord and his apostles, evil spirits, "daemons," were mysteriously permitted by God to exercise an influence both over the souls and bodies of men, inflicting dumbness (Matthew 9:32 ), blindness (12:22), epilepsy (Mark 9:17-27 ), insanity (Matthew 8:28 ; Mark 5:1-5 ). The daemons speak in their own persons (Matthew 8:29 ; Mark 1:23,24 ; 5:7 )
Hunger, Hungered, Hungry - , Matthew 4:2 ; 12:1 ; 21:18 ; Romans 12:20 ; 1 Corinthians 11:21,34 ; Philippians 4:12 ; Revelation 7:16 ; Christ identifies Himself with His saints in speaking of Himself as suffering in their sufferings in this and other respects, Matthew 25:35,42 ; (b) metaphorically, Matthew 5:6 ; Luke 6:21,25 ; John 6:35
Nationality - —The expectations aroused at the birth of Jesus were by no means of a cosmopolitan character (Matthew 1:21; Matthew 2:6, Luke 2:10—‘all the people,’ not ‘all people’), even as they appear in the perspective of St. Matthew especially represents Him throughout with a glow of nationalist pride, as son of Abraham and of David (Matthew 1:1; Matthew 9:27; Matthew 21:15), and the heir of the prophets (Matthew 2:15; Matthew 2:23; Matthew 4:14; Matthew 8:17). We may even venture to say that He counted it a temptation to make His ministry succeed on popular lines (Matthew 4:5 f. ), and from the popular desire to make Him king (John 6:15), refused to give a ‘sign’ (Mark 8:12), and seemed to repudiate any claim that rested on succession from David (Matthew 22:43-45). ’ He spoke of His disciples sitting on twelve thrones judging the twelve tribes (Matthew 19:28). And though He baffled their material hopes over and over again, and left them dumb, He quickened enthusiasm to the highest pitch by His entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21:5 ff. He forbade the disciples to address themselves to others than the lost sheep of the house of Israel (Matthew 10:5 f. He was loth to discount the value of nationality by admitting a Syrophœnician woman, an alien both in race and in religion, to an equal claim on His brief ministry with the elect people (Matthew 15:24; Matthew 15:26). Although He allowed the rights of Caesar (Matthew 22:21), and authorized His disciples to pay the tribute-money that was due, He reserved the right to consider it an unrighteous infliction (Matthew 17:26). Though rejected by those who had formulated their own material notions of the Messianic Hope (Matthew 16:20 f. Matthew 26:55). He thought of Israel as the Chosen People, and spoke of them as the children’ (Matthew 8:12; Matthew 15:26). Indeed His reverence for the Scriptures (Luke 4:4; Luke 4:8; Luke 4:12; Luke 16:31; Luke 24:25-27), for the Law (Matthew 5:19; Luke 10:26-28, John 5:45), and for the Temple (Matthew 23:17; Matthew 23:21, John 2:16-17), went far deeper than was appreciated by worldly-minded ecclesiastics (John 2:18; John 7:46-49). He withdrew Himself more and more from the passion of nationality as embodied in the religious pedantry and exclusiveness of the Pharisees, until at last it was almost wholly arrayed against Him and He against it (Matthew 23:15 etc. The disparagement of Gentiles with which He began (Matthew 6:32; cf. Matthew 20:25, turned to denunciation of the false children and unfaithful servants (Matthew 21:28-44, cf. Matthew 8:12; Matthew 11:21). He distressed His disciples by sending away sorrowful a young devotee of the Law (Mark 10:17-22), and offended religious sentiment when He kept company with publicans and sinners (Matthew 9:11, Luke 15:2; Luke 19:7). ...
Thus at length the devoted Student of the Scriptures and whole-hearted Champion of the Law was ejected from the national party as a deceiver (John 7:12; 1618385389_73 Matthew 27:63), and delivered up to the priests and the Romans
Prison, Prison-House - 1: δεσμωτήριον (Strong's #1201 — Noun Neuter — desmoterion — des-mo-tay'-ree-on ) "a place of bonds" (from desmos, "a bond," deo, "to bind"), "a prison," occurs in Matthew 11:2 ; in Acts 5:21,23 ; 16:26 , RV, "prison house" (AV, "prison"). , Matthew 14:10 ; Mark 6:17 ; Acts 5:19 ; 2 Corinthians 11:23 ; in 2 Corinthians 6:5 ; Hebrews 11:36 it stands for the condition of imprisonment; in Revelation 2:10 ; 18:2 , "hold" (twice, RV, marg. (2) In Matthew 4:12 , AV, paradidomi, "to betray, deliver up," is translated "was cast into prison" (RV, "was delivered up"); see BETRAY. In Mark 1:14 , AV, "was put in prison," RV, as in Matthew 4:12 ; see PUT , No
Fame - , "fame"), is rendered "fame" in Matthew 9:26 ; Luke 4:14 . (2) Akoe, "a hearing," is translated "report" in the RV of Matthew 4:24 ; 14:1 ; Mark 1:28 , for AV, "fame. ...
B — 1: διαφημίζω (Strong's #1310 — Verb — diaphemizo — dee-af-ay-mid'-zo ) signifies "to spread abroad a matter," Matthew 28:15 , RV; Mark 1:45 , RV (from dia, "throughout," and phemi, "to say"); hence, "to spread abroad one's fame," Matthew 9:31
Enemies - In the quotation from Psalms 110:1 which occurs in Matthew 22:44, Mark 12:38, Luke 20:43, Hebrews 1:13; Hebrews 10:13, the same word denotes all the world forces opposing Christ. Of private enemies, in the correction of the old maxim enjoining hatred, ‘Love your enemies,’ Matthew 5:43-44, Luke 6:27; Luke 6:35. Of the devil and the powers of evil, in the parable of the Wheat and the Tares, Matthew 13:25; Matthew 13:39
Gall - Matthew 27:34. The draught offered to our Lord at his crucifixion is said by Matthew to be mingled with gall, by Mark with myrrh. Matthew 27:34; Mark 15:23. If the two refer to the same act, Mark specifies the ingredient, while Matthew shows that the effect was to render the mixture bitter: as we say, "bitter as gall
Bid, Bidden, Bade, Bid Again - , Matthew 22:3,4,8,9 ; Luke 14:7-10,13 , RV; Revelation 19:9 , RV. ...
2: κελεύω (Strong's #2753 — Verb — keleuo — kel-yoo'-o ) "to command," is translated "bid" in Matthew 14:28 , only. , in Matthew 16:22 ; 23:3 ; Luke 10:40 ; 9:54 , AV, "command," RV, "bid;" Acts 11:12 ; "bidding," Acts 22:24 , RV. ...
(2) In Matthew 1:24 , prostasso, "to command," is translated "had bidden," AV; RV, "commanded
Burial, Bury, Burying - , "epitaph"), is found in Matthew 27:7 , with eis, "unto," lit. 1, "to prepare a body for burial," is used of any provision for this purpose, Matthew 26:12 ; John 19:40 . ...
B — 2: θάπτω (Strong's #2290 — Verb — thapto — thap'-to ) occurs in Matthew 8:21,22 , and parallels in Luke; Matthew 14:12 ; Luke 16:22 ; Acts 2:29 ; 5:6,9,10 ; of Christ's "burial," 1 Corinthians 15:4
Sadoc - An ancestor of Jesus ( Matthew 1:14 )
Lebbaeus - Matthew 10:3, Sinaiticus and Vaticanus manuscripts omit
my God, my God, Why Hast Thou Forsaken me - One of the last words of Our Lord dying on the Cross, as narrated by Matthew 27, and Mark 15
Hands - * For LAY HANDS ON (krateo in Matthew 18:28 ; 21:46 ; piazo in John 8:20 ), see HOLD and APPREHEND
Eli Lama Sabacthani - One of the last words of Our Lord dying on the Cross, as narrated by Matthew 27, and Mark 15
Hands - * For LAY HANDS ON (krateo in Matthew 18:28 ; 21:46 ; piazo in John 8:20 ), see HOLD and APPREHEND
Isaiah - More general is the application of Isaiah 6:9-10 to the people of His own time (Matthew 13:14-15, Mark 4:12, Luke 8:10); and also His use of Isaiah 29:13 of the Pharisees and scribes (Matthew 15:7-9, Mark 7:6-7). All three Synoptists record the quotation from Isaiah 56:7 with which He rebuked the temple-traders (Matthew 21:13 ||). In Matthew 5:34-35 we perceive a reminiscence of Isaiah 66:1; Matthew 21:33 ff. Other less obvious instances are probably to be found in Matthew 11:23 (cf. Isaiah 14:13; Isaiah 14:15) Matthew 16:19 (Isaiah 22:22) Matthew 6:6 (Isaiah 26:20); and various expressions in the eschatological discourses of Matthew 24 and Luke 21. All four quote Isaiah 40:3 with regard to the mission of John the Baptist (Matthew 3:3 and ||); while Mt. , who uses the OT so largely in connexion with the ministry of Jesus, applies to His coming and mission the passages Isaiah 7:14 (Matthew 1:23) Isaiah 9:1-2 (Matthew 4:14-16) Isaiah 53:4 (Matthew 8:17) Isaiah 42:1-4 (Matthew 12:18-21). Though it might in some cases be without historical or critical exactitude (as in Matthew 4:15-16 from 1618385389_90), it was quite legitimate to find unexpected correspondences between the earlier and the later stages of Providence and Revelation, based on the deep underlying unity and consistency of the Divine purpose and methods
Isaiah - More general is the application of Isaiah 6:9-10 to the people of His own time (Matthew 13:14-15, Mark 4:12, Matthew 15:7-9,); and also His use of Isaiah 29:13 of the Pharisees and scribes (Luke 8:10 Mark 7:6-7). All three Synoptists record the quotation from Isaiah 56:7 with which He rebuked the temple-traders (Matthew 21:13 ||). In Matthew 5:34-35 we perceive a reminiscence of Isaiah 66:1; Matthew 21:33 ff. Other less obvious instances are probably to be found in Matthew 11:23 (cf. Isaiah 14:13; Isaiah 14:15) Matthew 16:19 (Isaiah 22:22) Matthew 6:6 (Isaiah 26:20); and various expressions in the eschatological discourses of Matthew 24 and Luke 21. All four quote Isaiah 40:3 with regard to the mission of John the Baptist (Matthew 3:3 and ||); while Mt. , who uses the OT so largely in connexion with the ministry of Jesus, applies to His coming and mission the passages Isaiah 7:14 (Matthew 1:23) Isaiah 9:1-2 (Matthew 4:14-16) Isaiah 53:4 (Matthew 8:17) Isaiah 42:1-4 (Matthew 12:18-21). Though it might in some cases be without historical or critical exactitude (as in Matthew 4:15-16 from Isaiah 9:1-2), it was quite legitimate to find unexpected correspondences between the earlier and the later stages of Providence and Revelation, based on the deep underlying unity and consistency of the Divine purpose and methods
Hell - ἅδης, hades, which occurs where this last passage is quoted in Acts 2:27,31 ; and has the same meaning in other passages: Matthew 11:23 ; Matthew 16:18 ; Luke 16:23 ; Revelation 1:18 ; Revelation 6:8 ; Revelation 20:13,14 . Matthew 5:22,29,30 ; Matthew 10:28 ; Matthew 18:9 ; Matthew 23:15,33 ; Mark 9:43,45,47 ; Luke 12:5 ; James 3:6 . Matthew 13:40,42 ; Matthew 25:41 ; 2 Peter 2:4 ; Jude 6 , etc
Wherefore - , Matthew 12:31 ; Romans 5:12 ; Ephesians 1:15 ; 3 John 1:10 ; dia hen (the accusative feminine of hos, "who"), "on account of which" (aitia, "a cause," being understood), e. , Matthew 27:8 ; Acts 15:19 ; 20:31 ; 24:26 ; 25:26 ; 27:25,34 ; Romans 1:24 ; 15:7 ; 1 Corinthians 12:3 ; 2 Corinthians 2:8 ; 5:9 ; 6:17 ; Ephesians 2:11 ; 3:13 ; 4:8,25 ; 5:14 ; Philippians 2:9 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:11 ; Philemon 1:8 ; Hebrews 3:7,10 ; 10:5 ; 11:16 ; 12:12,28 ; 13:12 ; James 1:21 ; 4:6 ; 1 Peter 1:13 ; 2 Peter 1:10,12 ; 3:14 ; (3) dioper, "for which very reason" (a strengthened form of the preceding), 1 Corinthians 8:13 ; 10:14 (14:13 in some mss. , Matthew 12:44 ), used of cause and denoting "wherefore" in Hebrews 2:17 ; 3:1 ; 7:25 ; 8:3 ; (5) ti, "what, why," John 9:27 ; Acts 22:30 ; Galatians 3:19 , AV (RV, "what"); (6) heneka with tinos (the genitive case of ti), "because of what," Acts 19:32 ; (7) charin with hou, the genitive case, neuter of hos, "for the sake of what," Luke 7:47 ; (8) eis, "unto," with ti, "what," Matthew 14:31 ; with ho, "which" (the accusative neuter of hos), 2 Thessalonians 1:11 , AV (RV, "to which end"); (9) ara, "so," 2 Corinthians 7:12 , AV (RV, "so"); with ge, "at least," Matthew 7:20 , AV (RV, "therefore"); (10) hina, "in order that," with ti, "what," Matthew 9:4 ; (11) toigaroun, "therefore," rendered "wherefore" in Hebrews 12:1 , AV; (12) in Matthew 26:50 , epi, "unto," with ho, as in No. , Matthew 24:26 ; Acts 6:3 ; (14) hoste, "so that," "wherefore," e
Salmon - The father of Boaz ( Ruth 4:20-21 ), and therefore in the direct line of the ancestry of our Lord ( Matthew 1:4 ; Matthew 1:6 , Luke 3:32 )
Dawn - Dawn is used in the literal sense of the beginning of the day ( Joshua 6:15 ; Judges 19:26 ; Matthew 28:1 ; Acts 27:33 ). Matthew 4:16 uses the picture of the dawn in Isaiah 9:2-3 as a figure for the new age of hope and promise which Jesus brought
Half-Shekel Tax - At Matthew 17:24 this tax is called the didrachma (“the two drachma”) tax. The coin in the fish's mouth was a stater , a coin worth four drachmas or the Temple tax for two (Matthew 17:27 )
Earthquake - , "seismic," "seismology," "seismometry"), is used (a) of a "tempest" in the sea, Matthew 8:24 ; (b) of "earthquakes," Matthew 24:7 ; 27:54 ; 28:2 ; Mark 13:8 ; Luke 21:11 ; Acts 16:26 ; Revelation 6:12 ; 8:5 ; 11:13 (twice) ,19; 16:18 (twice)
Revelation of Christ - (1 Corinthians 2 th 1:7 ; 1 Peter 1:7,13 ); (2) parousia (Matthew 24:3,27 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:19 ; James 5:7,8 ); (3) epiphaneia (1 Timothy 6:14 ; 2 Timothy 1:10 ; 4:1-8 ; Titus 2:13 ). There existed among Christians a wide expectation, founded on Matthew 24:29,30,34 , of the speedy return of Christ
Lunatics - This word is used twice in the New Testament—Matthew 4:24; Matthew 17:15; but rendered epileptic in the R
Friend - It is a different word, however, in Greek, by which he addressed Judas, Matthew 26:50 ; the word there translated friend, means simply companion, and appears to have been used as a conversational term not implying friendship. The same word occurs in Matthew 20:13 22:12
Alms, Almsdeeds - 1: ἐλεημοσύνη (Strong's #1654 — Noun Feminine — eleemosune — el-eh-ay-mos-oo'-nay ) connected with eleemon, "merciful," signifies (a) "mercy, pity, particularly in giving alms," Matthew 6:1-4 ; Acts 10:2 ; 24:17 ; (b) the benefaction itself, the "alms" (the effect for the cause), Luke 11:41 ; 12:33 ; Acts 3:2,3,10 ; 9:36 , "almsdeeds;" Acts 10:2,4,31 . ...
Note: In Matthew 6:1 , the RV, translating dikaiosune, according to the most authentic texts, has "righteousness," for AV, "alms
Tribute - , "census," denotes "a poll tax," Matthew 17:25 ; 22:17,19 ; Mark 12:14 . ...
3: δίδραχμον (Strong's #1323 — Noun Neuter — didrachmon — did'-rakh-mon ) "the half-shekel," is rendered "tribute" in Matthew 17:24 (twice): see SHEKEL , No
Promise (2) - How could the ‘dogs’ share equally with the ‘children’ (Matthew 15:26 = Mark 7:27)? How could the uncovenanted and un-circumcised be ‘heirs according to the promise’ (Galatians 3:29)? Whole passages, therefore, in some of the Epistles (esp. , John the Baptist definitely inquired ‘Art thou he that cometh?’ (Matthew 11:2-19, Luke 7:19-23), Jesus deliberately appealed not to the correspondence between Himself and the expectations formed of the promised Messiah, but to the effect being at the moment produced by His ministry. When the same question was being discussed between Himself and His disciples (Matthew 16:13-16 = Mark 8:27-29 = Luke 9:18-20), Jesus was not concerned so much about their identifying Him with the One who was to come, by means of signs and tokens which were expected to accompany His coming, as that the conviction should come in an inward and secret way (‘Flesh and blood hath not revealed it to thee, but my Father which is in heaven,’ Matthew 16:17). He had a sublime contempt for the petty and pedantic way in which the scribes took upon themselves to say how the anticipations of Scripture were, or were not, to be verified, and held their pretensions up to scorn (Matthew 22:41-46 = Mark 12:35-37 = Luke 20:41-44). But whatever critical view be held of the records, and leaving undecided the question whether Matthew 24 and other similar passages which contain a considerable eschatological element are to be taken as representing a part of the actual teaching of Jesus, or rather His teaching as coloured by passing through minds steeped in the ideas of Jewish eschatology, it is sufficiently evident that Jesus habitually used the expression ‘Kingdom of heaven’ in a different sense from the ordinary and popular one, and preferred to divest it of the usual patriotic and eschatological associations. ‘Thy Father which seeth in secret shall recompense thee’ (Matthew 6:4 also vv. 6, 8); ‘He that loseth his life for my sake shall find it’ (Matthew 10:39; Matthew 16:25); ‘I will give you rest,’ and ‘Ye shall find rest to your souls’ (Matthew 11:28-29); ‘I will make you fishers of men’ (Mark 1:17, cf. ) shall be added unto you’ (Matthew 6:33); the reply to Peter that those who for Christ’s sake have forsaken earthly advantage ‘shall receive a hundredfold, now in this time, houses,’ etc. (Mark 10:30 = Luke 18:29 = Matthew 19:29); but the very connexion in which such passages occur shows in each case that Jesus attaches importance only to the spiritual blessing; better forego all earthly profit whatever than miss this (Matthew 10:39; Matthew 16:25-26, 1618385389_20). Anything like requests for a promise of personal advantage He sternly discourages (Matthew 20:20-23 = Mark 10:35-45). ...
Generally the promises of Jesus to His disciples may be classified as follows: (a) particular assurances to individuals: to the thief on the cross (Luke 23:43), to the woman in the house of Simon the Leper (Matthew 26:13 = Mark 14:9), to Nathanael (John 1:51), to Peter (Matthew 16:18 = Mark 9:1 = Luke 9:27, cf. Matthew 18:18), to Peter again (John 13:7 and John 13:36), also Mark 9:1 = Luke 9:27; (b) assurances about the prevailing nature of prayer and the power of faith (Matthew 7:7; Matthew 18:19, 1618385389_81 Matthew 17:26; Matthew 21:21-22, Mark 11:23-24, Matthew 18:18); (c) assurances of His continued presence and of their support and ultimate triumph (Matthew 10:19 = Luke 12:12, Matthew 28:20 [3], Matthew 10:32; Matthew 10:39; Matthew 10:42; Matthew 13:43; Matthew 16:25; Matthew 19:28, Luke 6:38, John 6:40; John 6:44; John 6:54; John 8:51; John 11:25; John 14:22; John 16:20)
Salmon - Garment, the son of Nashon (Ruth 4:20 ; Matthew 1:4,5 ), possibly the same as Salma in 1 Chronicles 2:51
Salmon - Garment, the son of Nashon (Ruth 4:20 ; Matthew 1:4,5 ), possibly the same as Salma in 1 Chronicles 2:51
Bar-Jona - Son of Jonah, the patronymic of Peter (Matthew 16:17 ; John 1:42 ), because his father's name was Jonas
Jechoniah - —Also called in OT Jehoiachin and Coniah; mentioned in Matthew 1:11 f
Also - Matthew 16
Bushel - Matthew 5:15 (b) A type of business affairs under which some Christians bury their testimony
Idle - In Matthew 12:36 , means empty and fruitless
Benevolence - The sons of the Father which is in heaven are to be kindly disposed and actively beneficent both to the just and to the unjust (Matthew 5:45). ’ A simple rule is given to the follower of Christ for securing and testing this attitude of benevolence: ‘All things whatsoever ye would that men should do unto you, even so do ye also unto them’ (Matthew 7:12). The Divine image is not so marred in any man as to destroy the intention and desire to do good to relations and friends (Matthew 5:46; Matthew 7:11, Luke 6:33; Luke 11:13), but the benevolence of the Christian heart is to be a kindly feeling towards all without exception (Matthew 5:44, Luke 6:27; Luke 6:35). There is to be no single blot on the escutcheon; Christians are to be perfect, as their Heavenly Father is perfect (Matthew 5:48). Christian benevolence meets us in the story of the arrest in Gethsemane, when the Lord addressed His betrayer as ‘comrade’ (ἑταῖρε, Matthew 26:50). ...
Such being the intensive character, the extensive character of benevolence may be observed in Christ’s compassion on the multitudes (Mark 8:2, Matthew 14:14), namely, on each individual; and, again, in His healing every one of those around Him on a well-known occasion at Capernaum (Luke 4:40). By precept as well as by example benevolence is enjoined upon the ministry in the first commission to the Twelve: ‘Freely ye have received, freely give’ (Matthew 10:8)
Matthew, Saint - The Matthew mentioned in the New Testament (Matthew 9), as called by Christ, is identical with Levi (Mark 2; Luke 5); hence it is concluded that he was known originally as Levi and that the name Matthew was given to him by Christ when he began his apostolate. The accounts of the career of Matthew subsequent to the Ascension are legendary; he is said to have evangelized Asiatic Ethiopia, Persia, Macedonia, Syria, and the kingdom of the Parthians. Matthew is usually symbolized as a winged man, probably beeause he begins his Gospel with the human genealogy of Christ
Pharisees - They were extremely accurate and minute in all matters appertaining to the law of Moses (Matthew 9:14 ; 23:15 ; Luke 11:39 ; 18:12 ). Theirs was a very lax morality (Matthew 5:20 ; 15:4,8 ; 23:3,14,23,25 ; John 8:7 ). On the first notice of them in the New Testament (Matthew 3:7 ), they are ranked by our Lord with the Sadducees as a "generation of vipers. " They were noted for their self-righteousness and their pride (Matthew 9:11 ; Luke 7:39 ; 18:11,12 ). They were frequently rebuked by our Lord (Matthew 12:39 ; 16:1-4 )
Torment (2) - In the natural sense of pain caused by disease the words βάσανος and βασανἰζειν are used (Matthew 4:24; Matthew 8:6); also, of evil spirits anticipating Christ’s displeasure (Matthew 8:29 ||). Similarly, the use of the word ‘tormentors’ (βασανισταί) by Christ (Matthew 18:34) must be taken as a reflexion of well-known severities of the time; cf. ‘cut him asunder’ (with scourging) in Matthew 24:51
Third, Thirdly - , John 21:14 ; 2 Corinthians 12:14 ; 13:1 ; in enumerations, in Matthew 26:44 , with ek, "from," lit. 1 (c), PARADISE]'>[1]; in the phrase "the third hour," Matthew 20:3 ; Mark 15:25 ; Acts 2:15 (". , Matthew 16:21 ; Luke 24:46 ; Acts 10:40 ; in this connection the idiom "three days and three nights," Matthew 12:40 , is explained by ref. to 1 Samuel 30:12,13 , and Esther 4:16 ; 5:1 ; in Mark 9:31 ; 10:34 , the RV, "after three days," follows the texts which have this phrase, the AV, "the third day," those which have the same phrase as in Matthew 16:21 , etc
Holy Spirit, Sin Against the - Attributing the work of the Holy Spirit to the devil (Matthew 12:32 ; Mark 3:29 ; Luke 12:10 )
Sabachthani - Thou hast forsaken me, one of the Aramaic words uttered by our Lord on the cross (Matthew 27:46 ; Mark 15:34 )
Matthan - Grandfather of Joseph ( Matthew 1:15 ); perhaps to be identified with Matthat , who occupies the same place in Luke 3:24
Zelotes - "Zealot" applied to Simon (Luke 6:15; Matthew 10:4)
Centurion - an officer in the Roman army, who, as the term indicates, had the command of a hundred men, Matthew 8:5 , &c
Bewray - * Note: The word "bewrayeth," Matthew 26:73 , is a translation of poieo, "to make," with delos, "manifest, evident;" lit
Anise - 1: ἄνηθον (Strong's #432 — Noun Neuter — anethon — an'-ay-thon ) "dill, anise," was used for food and for pickling, Matthew 23:23
Anger - A violent emotion of a painful nature, sometimes arising spontaneously upon just occasion, but usually characterized in the Bible as a great sin, Matthew 5:22 Ephesians 4:31 Colossians 3:8 . Even when just, our anger should be mitigated by a due consideration of the circumstances of the offence and the state of mind of the offender; of the folly and ill-results of this passion; of the claims of the gospel, and of our own need of forgiveness from others, but especially from God, Matthew 6:15 . Anger is in Scripture frequently attributed to God, Matthew 7:11 28:20 ; not that he is liable to those violent emotions which this passion produces, but figuratively speaking, that is, after the manner of men; and because he punishes the wicked with severity of a superior provoked to anger
Rabbi - In Matthew 23:7 it is referred to as ‘the usual form of address with which the learned were greeted’ (Dalman, Words of Jesus , p. Elsewhere in the Gospels it is our Lord who is thus addressed: by His disciples ( Matthew 26:25 ; Matthew 26:49 , Mark 9:5 ; Mark 11:21 ; Mark 14:45 , John 1:38 ; John 1:49 ; John 4:31 ; John 9:2 ; John 11:8 ), by others ( John 3:2 ; John 6:25 )
Price - A — 1: τιμή (Strong's #5092 — Noun Feminine — time — tee-may' ) denotes "a valuing," hence, objectively, (a) "price paid or received," Matthew 27:6,9 ; Acts 4:34 (plural); 5:2,3; 7:16, RV, "price (in silver)," AV, "sum (of money);" Acts 19:19 (plural); 1 Corinthians 6:20 ; 7:23 ; (b) "value, honor, preciousness. ...
B — 1: τιμάω (Strong's #5091 — Verb — timao — tim-ah'-o ) "to fix the value, to price," is translated "was priced" and "did price" in the RV of Matthew 27:9 (AV, "was valued" and "did value"). ...
C — 2: πολύτιμος (Strong's #4186 — Adjective — polutimos — pol-oot'-ee-mos ) "of great price," Matthew 13:46 : see COST , B, No
Key - , the opener ( Judges 3:25 ); and in the Greek New Testament Kleis , From its use in shutting ( Matthew 16:19 ; Luke 11:52 ; Revelation 1:18 , etc. The word is used figuratively of power or authority or office (Isaiah 22:22 ; Revelation 3:7 ; Revelation 1:8 ; comp 9:1; 20:1; Compare also Matthew 16:19 ; 18:18 ). The "key of knowledge" (Luke 11:52 ; Compare Matthew 23:13 ) is the means of attaining the knowledge regarding the kingdom of God
Adorn, Adorning - , "cosmetic"), is used of furnishing a room, Matthew 12:44 ; Luke 11:25 , and of trimming lamps, Matthew 25:7 . Hence, "to adorn, to ornament," as of garnishing tombs, Matthew 23:29 ; buildings, Luke 21:5 ; Revelation 21:19 ; one's person, 1 Timothy 2:9 ; 1 Peter 3:5 ; Revelation 21:2 ; metaphorically, of "adorning a doctrine," Titus 2:10
Judah, Son of Jacob - Out of it came the great king David and finally the Messiah Jesus (Matthew 1:3; Matthew 1:6; Matthew 1:16)
Foresight - Matthew 10:40, Mark 9:37, Luke 9:48; Luke 10:16; Matthew 15:24; Matthew 21:37, Mark 12:6, Luke 20:13, cf. Luke 9:51) was His particular task, under the government of this ‘Divine necessity’ (Matthew 16:21; Matthew 26:54, Mark 8:31, Luke 9:22; Luke 17:25; Luke 22:22; Luke 22:37; Luke 24:7; Luke 24:44, John 3:14; John 20:9, cf. His final journey to Jerusalem (Matthew 16:21), His rejection by the rulers (Mark 8:31, Luke 9:22; Luke 17:25), His betrayal (Luke 24:7), arrest (Matthew 26:54), sufferings (Matthew 26:54, Mark 8:31, Luke 9:22; Luke 17:25), and death (Matthew 16:21, Mark 8:31, Luke 9:22) by crucifixion (Luke 24:7, John 3:14), His rising again (John 20:9) on the third day (Matthew 16:21, Mark 8:31, Luke 9:22; Luke 24:7; Luke 24:44)—each item alike is declared to have been ‘a matter of necessity in pursuance of the Divine purpose’ (Meyer, Matthew 24:6), ‘a necessary part of the destiny assigned our Lord’ (Meyer, Matthew 26:56). Whatever stood written of Him in the Law or the Prophets or the Psalms (Luke 24:44) must needs (δεῖ) be accomplished (Matthew 26:54, Luke 22:37; Luke 24:26, John 20:9). (Matthew 1:22; Matthew 2:15; Matthew 2:23; Matthew 4:14; Matthew 8:17; Matthew 12:17; Matthew 13:35; Matthew 21:4; Matthew 26:56) and Jn. Matthew 2:17; Matthew 26:54; Matthew 27:9, Luke 24:44; in John 18:9; John 18:32, Acts 3:22-23 declarations of Jesus are treated precisely similarly). The Divine decree expressed in the latter must be accomplished, and to that end this … came to pass, and that, according to the whole of its contents’ (Meyer, Matthew 1:22). The ‘Divine δεῖ’ which governed His life is represented as fully recognized by Himself (Matthew 16:21, Mark 8:31, Luke 4:43; Luke 9:22; Luke 17:25; Luke 24:7, John 3:14; John 12:34), and the fulfilment of the intimations of prophecy in His life as accepted by Him as a rule for His voluntary action (Matthew 26:54, Luke 22:37; Luke 24:26; Luke 24:44, John 20:9, Mark 14:49, Luke 4:21, John 13:18; John 15:25; John 17:12; cf. Matthew 13:14; Matthew 15:7; Matthew 24:15; Matthew 26:56, Mark 7:6). They record with evident sympathy the impression made by Him at the outset of His ministry, that God had at last in Him visited His people (Mark 6:15, Luke 7:16, John 4:19; John 9:17); they trace the ripening of this impression into a well-settled belief in His prophetic character (Matthew 21:11, Luke 24:19, Matthew 21:46, Luke 7:39, John 7:40); and they remark upon the widespread suspicion which accompanied this belief, that He was something more than a prophet—possibly one of the old prophets returned, certainly a very special prophet charged with a very special mission for the introduction of the Messianic times (Matthew 16:14, Mark 6:15; Mark 8:28, Luke 9:8; Luke 9:19, John 6:14; John 7:40). They represent Jesus as not only calling out and accepting this estimate of Him, but frankly assuming a prophet’s place and title (Matthew 13:57, Mark 6:4, Luke 4:24, John 4:44, Luke 13:33), exercising a prophet’s functions, and delivering prophetic discourses, in which He unveils the future (Matthew 24:21, Mark 13:23, John 14:29; cf. Matthew 28:6, Luke 24:44, and such passages as Matthew 26:32; Matthew 26:34, Mark 16:7). The specific difference between Jesus and a prophet, in their view, was that while a prophet’s human knowledge is increased by many things revealed to him by God (Amos 3:7), Jesus participated in all the fulness of the Divine knowledge (Matthew 11:27, Luke 10:22, John 16:15; John 18:4; John 16:30; John 21:17), so that all that is knowable lay open before Him (John 17:10). John, represent Him as Himself claiming to be the depository and distributer of the Father’s knowledge (Matthew 11:21-30, Luke 10:22-24). John in attributing to Jesus the Divine prerogative of reading the heart (Matthew 9:4, Meyer; Mark 2:5; Mark 2:8; Mark 8:17; Mark 12:15; Mark 12:44, Swete, p. lxxxviii; Luke 5:22; Luke 7:39) or the manifestation, in other forms, of God-like omniscience (Matthew 17:27; Matthew 21:2, Mark 11:2; Mark 14:13, Luke 5:4; Luke 19:30; Luke 22:10; cf. John in insisting upon the perfection of the foresight of Jesus in all matters connected with His own life and death (Matthew 9:15; Matthew 12:40; Matthew 16:21; Matthew 20:18; Matthew 20:22; Matthew 20:28; Matthew 26:2; Matthew 26:21; Matthew 26:34; Matthew 26:50,
Wealth (2) - ’s version of them: Matthew 5:3, cf. Luke 6:20; Matthew 6:19-21, cf. Luke 12:33; Matthew 5:42, cf. Luke 6:30; Matthew 19:21, cf. Matthew 22:5-69; in the parable of the Marriage Feast (Matthew 22:1-14) it is the ‘good and bad’ who are gathered in from the highways, in the parable of the Great Supper (Luke 14:16-24) it is the ‘poor and maimed and blind and lame. (Matthew 19:24) and Mk. So also are the incidents of Peter and Andrew, of James and John, and of Matthew or Levi leaving all to follow Jesus (Matthew 4:18-22; Matthew 9:9, Mark 1:16-20; Mark 2:14, Luke 5:11; Luke 5:27-28) Mt. tell of the Baptist’s ascetic manner of life (Matthew 3:4, Mark 1:6). that we are indebted for the record of the sayings, ‘Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon the earth’ (Matthew 6:19), and ‘The poor have good tidings preached to them’ (Matthew 11:5). In Matthew 13:22 and Mark 4:19 Jesus is represented as using the phrase ‘the deceitfulness of riches,’—words not recorded by Lk. , who have preserved the saying of our Lord in which He speaks of the blessedness of leaving lands (ἀγρούς) for His sake (Matthew 19:29, Mark 10:29). This is implied in such parables as those of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), and the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-8), all of which deal with the uses of money, without any disapprobation of its possession being indicated. It is implied even in the demand which He made of the Rich Young Ruler and others to part with wealth (Matthew 19:21, Luke 18:22; Luke 12:33; Luke 14:33), and in the exhortation, ‘Lay not up for yourselves treasures upon the earth’ (Matthew 6:19). And it is accepted by Jesus and illustrated in the parables of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), and the Foolish Rich Man (Luke 12:16-21). The same truth is implied in the petition, ‘Give us this day our daily bread’ (Matthew 6:11, Luke 11:3), and in the sayings: ‘If God so clothe the grass of the field, which to-day is and to-morrow is cast into the oven, shall he not much more clothe you, O ye of little faith?’ (Matthew 6:30, Matthew 26:6-13,); ‘Your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of all these things. ’ (Matthew 6:32-33, Luke 12:30-31). It is too uncertain to be the goal of life (Matthew 6:19-20). Nor will the possession of wealth compensate for the loss of the true life (Matthew 16:26, Mark 8:36-37, Luke 9:25). Life, in fact, in the highest sense of the term, is a larger and richer thing than mere possession of wealth (Luke 12:15; Luke 12:23, Matthew 6:20; Matthew 6:25; Matthew 6:33); and it is, to a considerable degree, independent of wealth (Matthew 6:25; Matthew 6:33-34, Luke 12:22-23; Luke 12:29-34). This view of wealth is presented in the parables of the Talents (Matthew 25:14-30), the Pounds (Luke 19:12-27), the Foolish Rich Man (Luke 12:16-21), the Unjust Steward and Christ’s comments on it (Luke 16:1-13), Dives and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31), and in the picture of the Judgment of Men (Matthew 25:31-46). In acquiring wealth he will have regard to the rights and claims of his fellowmen as much as to his own (Matthew 22:39; Matthew 7:12, Mark 12:31, Luke 6:31). Such a one will also relieve the needs of his fellow-men, either by almsgiving or by personal ministration, or in some other way suggested by circumstances (Matthew 6:2-4; Matthew 19:21; Matthew 25:31-46, Mark 10:21, Luke 6:30; Luke 10:30-37; Luke 12:33
Matthew - MATTHEW loved money. Matthew, like Judas, must have money. With clean hands if he could; but, clean hands or unclean, Matthew must have money. Now, the surest way and the shortest way for Matthew to make money in the Galilee of that day was to take sides with Cæsar and to become one of Cæsar's tax-gatherers. This, to be sure, would be for Matthew to sell himself to the service of the oppressors of his people; but Matthew made up his mind and determined to do it. Matthew will set his face like a flint for a few years and then he will retire from his toll-booth to spend his rich old age in peace and quietness. And thus it was that Matthew, a son of Abraham, was found in the unpatriotic and ostracised position of a publican in Capernaum. Well, Matthew had now for a long time been a publican in Capernaum, and he was fast becoming a rich man. Matthew could not help grinding the faces of the poor. His business would not let Matthew stop to think who was a widow, and who was an orphan, and who was being cruelly treated. ...
Jesus of Nazareth, the carpenter's son, knew Matthew the publican quite well. He had often been in Matthew's toll-booth with His mother's taxes, and with other poor people's taxes. Even if not for Himself and for his widowed mother, the carpenter would often leave His bench to go to Matthew's toll-booth to expostulate with him, and to negotiate with him, and to become surety to him for this and that poor neighbour of His who had fallen into sickness, and into a debt that he was not able to pay. The sweat of Jesus' own brow had oftener than once gone to settle Matthew's extortionate charges. I, Jesus, the son of Joseph, have written it with mine own hand, I will repay it'-that would stand in Matthew's books over and over again, till Matthew was almost ready to sell the surety Himself. But he is now the Messiah Himself! And Matthew in his toll-booth has a thousand thoughts about all that, till he cannot get his columns to come right all he can count. And till one day, just as He was passing Matthew's well-worn doorstep, a widow woman of the city, with her child in her arms, rushed up against our Lord, and exclaimed to Him: "Avenge me of mine adversary!" till she could not tell Him her heart-breaking tale for sobs and tears. And then, with that never-to-be-forgotten look and accent of mingled anger and mercy, our Lord went immediately into the publican's office and said to him: 'Matthew, thou must leave all this life of thine and come and follow Me. ' Matthew had always tried to stand well out of eyeshot of our Lord when He was preaching. He felt sure that the Preacher was not well disposed toward him, and his conscience would continually say to his face, How could He be? But at that so commanding gesture, and at those so commanding words, the chains of a lifetime of cruelty and extortion fell on the floor of the receipt of custom; till, scarcely taking time to clasp up his books and to lock up his presses, Matthew the publican of Capernaum rose up and followed our Lord. ...
Matthew does not say so himself, but Luke is careful to tell us that Matthew made a great feast that very night, and gathered into it a supper-party of his former friends and acquaintances that they might see with their own eyes the Master that he is henceforth to confess, and to follow, and to obey. What a sight to our eyes, far more than to theirs, is Matthew's supper-table tonight! There sits the publican himself at the head of the table, and the erewhile carpenter of Capernaum in the seat of honour beside him. What, then, must the more thoughtful of them have felt as they entered Matthew's supper-room that night and sat down at the same table with a very prophet, and some said-Matthew himself had said it in his letter of invitation-more than a prophet. They had all supped with Matthew before, but that was the first night for many years that any man with any good name to lose had broken bread at the publican's table. " Long years afterwards, when Matthew was writing this autobiographic passage in his Gospel, the whole scene of that supper-party rose up before him like yesternight. ' It was a night to be remembered by Matthew. ...
When Matthew rose up and left all and followed our Lord, the only thing he took with him out of his old occupation was his pen and ink. For, never once did our Lord sit down on a mountain side or on a sea-shore to teach His disciples; never once did He enter a synagogue and take up the Prophets or the Psalmists to preach; never once did He talk at any length by the way, that Matthew was not instantly at His side. Till Matthew came to be known not so much as Matthew the disciple, or as the former publican of Capernaum, but rather as that silent man with the sleepless pen and ink-horn. But Matthew did all that, and we have all that to this day in his Gospel. The bag would have been safe, and it would have been kept well filled, in Matthew's money-managing hands, but Matthew had far more important matters than the most sacred money matters to attend to. What a service, above all price, were Matthew's hands ordained to do as soon as his hands were washed from sin and uncleanness in the Fountain opened in that day! What a service it was to build that golden bridge by which so many of his kinsmen according to the flesh at once passed over into the better covenant, the Surety of which covenant is Christ! "The Gospel according to St. Matthew: the Book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham. ...
"And Matthew the publican. " Now, we would never have known that but for Matthew himself. Neither Mark, nor Luke, nor John, nor Paul ever calls Matthew by that bad name. It is Matthew himself alone who in as many words says to us, "Come, all ye that fear God, and I will tell what He has done for my soul. " It is Matthew himself alone who publishes and perpetuates to all time his own infamy. Matthew leaves behind him on the sands of Scripture. Are you that prisoner? Are you held in Satan's bondage? Is your inward sight clogged up with the scales of vice? Is your heart broken? And is your very soul within you bleeding? Are you a publican? Are you a sinner? Are you a harlot? Look at Matthew with his Gospel in his hand! Look at Zacchæus restoring fourfold! Look at Mary Magdalene, first at the sepulchre
Publican - Only mentioned in Matthew, Mark and Luke. Matthew leaves the parable of the publican to Luke (Luke 18:9), because he is the publican from whom it is drawn. Under them were "chiefs of publicans," having supervision of a district, as Zacchaeus (Luke 19), in the provinces; and under these again the ordinary "publicans" (in the New Testament sense) who, like Levi or Matthew, gathered the customs on exports and imports and taxes (Matthew 9:9-11; Mark 2:14, etc. Publican became synonymous with "sinner" and "pagan" (Luke 15:1-2; Matthew 18:17; Matthew 5:46; Matthew 21:31; Mark 2:15-16). Hence we see what a breach of Jewish notions was the Lord's eating with them (Matthew 9:11), and His choice of Matthew as an apostle, and His parable in which He justified the penitent self condemned publican and condemned the self satisfied Pharisee. Abhorred by all others, it was a new thing to them to find a Holy One "a friend of publicans" (Matthew 11:19)
Fishhook - A curved or bent device of bone or iron in biblical times used for catching or holding fish (Job 41:1-2 ; Isaiah 19:8 —KJV, “angle”; Matthew 17:27 ). Habakkuk described God's people as helpless fish who would be captured by hooks (Matthew 1:15 ) and nets
Nazarene - An epithet applied to Christ, and usually translated "of Nazareth," as in Matthew 21:11 Acts 2:22 4:10 . It was foretold in prophecy, Psalm 22:7,8 Isaiah 53:2 , that the Messiah should be despised and rejected of men; and this epithet, which came to be used as a term of reproach, showed the truth of these predictions, Matthew 2:23 Acts 24:5
Trespass - Christ repeatedly declares, that in order to be forgiven of God, we must be forgiving to men, Matthew 6:14,15 , and that no brother must have aught against us, Matthew 5:23,24
Denarius - (containing ten ), Authorized Version "penny," ( Matthew 18:28 ; 20:2,9,13 ) a Roman silver coin in the time of our Saviour and the Apostles, worth about 15 cents. (Matthew 20:2,4,7,9,10,13 )
Idle - the verb katargeo, "to reduce to inactivity:" See ABOLISH); it is used (a) literally, Matthew 20:3,6 ; 1 Timothy 5:13 (twice); Titus 1:12 , RV , "idle (gluttons);" 2 Peter 1:8 , RV , "idle," AV, "barren;" (b) metaphorically in the sense of "ineffective, worthless," as of a word, Matthew 12:36 ; of faith unaccompanied by works, James 2:20 (some mss
Centurion - Some even became believers in Jesus Christ (Matthew 8:5-13; Matthew 27:54; Acts 10:1-2; Acts 23:17-18; Acts 27:43)
Pleasure - He sanctioned and sanctified social festivity in due season (John 2:1-11), and said of Himself, in contrast with the ascetic John the Baptist, ‘The Son of Man came eating and drinking’ (Matthew 11:19). In return, the Lord has unfailing promises of blessedness here and hereafter (Luke 18:29-30, 1618385389_2); but the true disciple must renounce everything this world offers, to be counted worthy of the eternal joy (Matthew 16:24, Mark 8:34, Luke 9:23). The sensuous or sensual life of the soul (ψυχή) must not be striven after (Matthew 16:25; Matthew 10:39, Mark 8:35, Luke 9:24; Luke 17:33, John 12:25). All the pleasure the world can afford will never compensate for what is lost in such a pursuit (Matthew 16:26, Mark 8:36, Luke 9:25). Thus the rich are terribly handicapped in their heavenly course (Matthew 19:24). No, the disciple must be as his Master (Matthew 10:25). The pleasures of popularity (John 12:43) and of ostentation (Matthew 6:1-18, Luke 20:46) are to be avoided. Hand or eye may well be sacrificed for the sake of faithfulness to Christ in the hope of eternal salvation (Matthew 5:29-30, Mark 9:43; Mark 9:47). The blessed are those who ‘hunger and thirst after righteousness,’ not after pleasure (Matthew 5:6). The faithful disciple shall find tribulation rather than pleasure (John 16:33), inward peace but an outward sword (Matthew 10:34), joy rather than enjoyment (John 15:11; John 16:20-22; John 17:13)
Strain at - (So translated in the Authorized Version, but in the Revised Version "strain out," (Matthew 23:24 ) which is undoubtedly the true reading
Quarantania - A mountain some 1,200 feet high, about 7 miles north-west of Jericho, the traditional scene of our Lord's temptation (Matthew 4:8 )
Demand - * Note: For DEMAND (Matthew 2:4 ; Acts 21:33 ), see INQUIRE; for its use in Luke 3:14 ; 17:20 , see under ASK
Rain - —A link in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:3 f
Bewray - Matthew 23 ...
This word is nearly antiquated
Ahaz - Matthew’s genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:9)
Amon - ) mentioned in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:10 (Gr
Trim - 1: κοσμέω (Strong's #2885 — Verb — kosmeo — kos-meh'-o ) "to arrange, adorn," is used of "trimming" lamps, Matthew 25:7
Disciple - , "a learner" (from manthano, "to learn," from a root math---, indicating thought accompanied by endeavor), in contrast to didaskalos, "a teacher;" hence it denotes "one who follows one's teaching," as the "disciples" of John, Matthew 9:14 ; of the Pharisees, Matthew 22:16 ; of Moses, John 9:28 ; it is used of the "disciples" of Jesus (a) in a wide sense, of Jews who became His adherents, John 6:66 ; Luke 6:17 , some being secretly so, John 19:38 ; (b) especially of the twelve Apostles, Matthew 10:1 ; Luke 22:11 , e. , in Matthew 27:57 , in the sense of being the "disciple" of a person; here, however, the best mss. , "had been made a disciple," as in Matthew 13:52 , RV, "who hath been made a disciple. " It is used in this transitive sense in the Active Voice in Matthew 28:19 ; Acts 14:21
Keys - ...
In Matthew 16:18-19 , Jesus delegated the power of the keys to His disciples, combining the imagery of keys with that of binding and loosing. Matthew 16:18-19 , pp. ]'>[1]...
With the other apostles, Peter also received the power of binding and loosing (Matthew 16:19 ; Matthew 18:18 ), a phrase used to describe the work of scribes who sought God's will through a study of Scripture and declared it through teaching and judging. The scribes could also exclude persons from the community (compare Matthew 18:15-17 ), but Christ denounced them for misusing their key (Luke 11:52 ) and blocking the entrance to the kingdom (Matthew 23:13 )
Great Commission, the - Mandate to "make disciples of all nations" given by Christ to his disciples following his death and resurrection (Matthew 28:16-20 ; Mark 16:15-18 ; Luke 24:46-49 ; John 20:21-23 ; Acts 1:8 ). Because Christ has been given all authority in heaven and on earth (Matthew 28:19 ), the Great Commission is to be taken with the utmost seriousness by all of his disciples, "to the very end of the age" (Matthew 28:20 ). ...
The Great Commission is accomplished through witnessing (Acts 1:8 ), preaching (Mark 16:15 ), baptizing, and teaching (Matthew 28:20 ). The disciples will have success because Jesus, the Lord of heaven and earth, will be with them as they undertake their assignment (Matthew 28:20 ). ...
The Great Commission necessitates taking the gospel message to "the ends of the earth" (Acts 1:8 ), to "all nations" (Matthew 28:19 )
Grass - ...
It is a coincidence undesigned, and therefore a mark of genuineness, that by three evangelists the "grass" is noticed in the miraculous feeding of the 5,000; John (John 6:10) saying, "there was much grass in the place" (a notable circumstance in Palestine, where grass is neither perennial nor universal; the latter rain and sunshine stimulate its rapid growth, but the scorching summer soon withers it and leaves the hills bare); Mark (Mark 6:39), with his usual graphic vividness, mentioning "the green grass"; Matthew (Matthew 14:19) simply stating Christ's command to "sit down on the grass. " But in the feeding of the 4,000 the multitude in both Gospels (Matthew 15:35; Mark 8:6) are commanded to "sit down on the ground. Compare Matthew 16:9-10 with Matthew 14:20; Luke 9:17; kofinoi) being uniformly applied to the former miracle, spurides) to the latter (Blunt, Undesigned Coincidences). In Matthew 6:30 "the lily" is classed with "the grass of the field
Bad - , of thoughts, Matthew 15:19 (cp. kakos, in Mark 7:21 ); of speech, Matthew 5:11 (cp. , Matthew 5:37 and five times in 1John ( 1 John 2:13-14 ; 3:12 ; 5:18,19 , RV); of demons, e. Once it is translated "bad," Matthew 22:10 . It is said of a tree and its fruit, Matthew 7:17,18 ; 12:33 ; Luke 6:43 ; of certain fish, Matthew 13:48 (here translated "bad"); of defiling speech, Ephesians 4:29
Mouth - , Matthew 15:11 ; of animals, e. , Matthew 17:27 ; 2 Timothy 4:17 (figurative); Hebrews 11:33 ; James 3:3 ; Revelation 13:2 (2nd occurrence); (b) figuratively of "inanimate things," of the "edge" of a sword, Luke 21:24 ; Hebrews 11:34 ; of the earth, Revelation 12:16 ; (c) figuratively, of the "mouth," as the organ of speech, (1) of Christ's words, e. , Matthew 13:35 ; Luke 11:54 ; Acts 8:32 ; 22:14 ; 1 Peter 2:22 ; (2) of human, e. , Matthew 18:16 ; 21:16 ; Luke 1:64 ; Revelation 14:5 ; as emanating from the heart, Matthew 12:34 ; Romans 10:8,9 ; of prophetic ministry through the Holy Spirit, Luke 1:70 ; Acts 1:16 ; 3:18 ; 4:25 ; of the destructive policy of two world potentates at the end of this age, Revelation 13:2,5,6 ; 16:13 (twice); of shameful speaking, Ephesians 4:29 ; Colossians 3:8 ; (3) of the Devil speaking as a dragon or serpent, Revelation 12:15,16 ; 16:13 ; (d) figuratively, in the phrase "face to face" (lit. , "mouth to mouth"), 2 John 1:12 ; 3 John 1:14 ; (e) metaphorically, of "the utterances of the Lord, in judgment," 2 Thessalonians 2:8 ; Revelation 1:16 ; 2:16 ; 19:15,21 ; of His judgment upon a local church for its lukewarmness, Revelation 3:16 ; (f) by metonymy, for "speech," Matthew 18:16 ; Luke 19:22 ; 21:15 ; 2 Corinthians 13:1
Murder (2) - —The observance of the Sixth Commandment, as of the rest, is taken for granted in the Christian system (Matthew 19:18, Mark 10:19, Luke 18:20). Thus the guilt of murder is predicated of Barabbas (Mark 15:7, Luke 23:19; Luke 23:25, John 18:40 ‘robber’), and of the unwilling guests (Matthew 22:7), and Satan is designated the original ἀνθρωποκτόνος (John 8:44). In the doctrine of Jesus, the crimes of the Mosaic codes are traced to their source in the heart (Matthew 15:19, Mark 7:21), and murder to the passion of anger. He who is angry with his brother, or who says to him ‘Raca,’ or ‘Thou fool,’ is accounted guilty of murder (Matthew 5:22). Matthew 5:38), a free man dying for a free, a slave for a slave; or the relatives of the slain may accept a money payment, which in practice does not exceed £500 (Koran, ii. Self-murder is rare among Semitic peoples, though cases do occur (Matthew 27:5, Acts 1:18; Josephus BJ iii
Covet - Selfish ambition, sexual lusts and common greed are all forms of covetousness (Deuteronomy 5:21; Psalms 78:18; Proverbs 6:25; Matthew 5:28; 1 Timothy 6:9-10; James 4:2-3; 1 John 2:16). A person may not be guilty of sinful actions that are obvious to all, but still be guilty of the hidden sin of covetousness (Matthew 5:21-30). They may even mistake it for a virtue (Matthew 19:16-22; Luke 12:15; see also WEALTH). They will then be devoted to God rather than idolatrous, and generous to others rather than selfish (Matthew 22:36-39; cf. Matthew 6:24; cf. Matthew 6:33; Ephesians 4:28; see also GIVING)
Israel, Israelite - The following expressions are found: ‘Israel,’ with or without the article (Matthew 8:10; Matthew 9:33, Luke 1:54; Luke 1:80; Luke 2:25; Luke 2:34; Luke 4:25; Luke 4:27; Luke 7:9; Luke 24:21, John 1:31; Exodus 34:10-284; also Mark 12:29 vocative); ‘people (λαός) Israel’ (Matthew 2:6, Luke 2:32); ‘house of Israel’ (Matthew 10:6; Matthew 15:24); ‘sons of Israel’ (Matthew 27:9, Luke 1:16); ‘tribes of Israel’ (Matthew 19:28, Matthew 12:1-12,); ‘land of Israel’ (Matthew 2:20 f. ); ‘God of Israel’ (Matthew 15:31, Luke 1:68); ‘King of Israel’ (Matthew 27:42, Mark 15:32, John 1:49; John 12:13). Matthew 2:6, Luke 1:54; Luke 1:68; Luke 2:25; Luke 2:32; Luke 24:21, Acts 1:6, all of which reveal the national conviction that the Messiah would come for the benefit of Israel, and that to Israel were God’s attention and love especially given. But in marked contrast to such passages are those which imply that the theocratic nation has failed to fulfil the Divine purposes for it:—a Roman centurion exhibits greater faith than was to be found in the holy nation (Matthew 8:10 || Luke 7:9); the house of Israel are as a whole ‘lost sheep’ (Matthew 10:6; Matthew 15:24); they need someone to turn them to the Lord their God (Luke 1:16); an honoured and official teacher of Israel is shown to be ignorant of the fundamental principles of the spiritual life (John 3:10); incidents in the OT prove that some Gentiles received God’s care and blessing, and were preferred to Israelites (Luke 4:25-27); and a mysterious intimation is given of the supremacy of the Church of Christ hereafter (Matthew 19:28 || Luke 22:30); it is character, and not theocratic privileges, that makes a man ‘truly an Israelite’ (John 1:47). ’ But the truth is definitely implied in the discourses in the Upper Room (John 14-17), and in the baptismal formula (Matthew 28:19). In the Gospels, with the exception of Luke 1:72, where the Abrahamic covenant is referred to, the only occurrence of the word is at the Last Supper (Matthew 26:28 || Mark 14:24, Luke 22:20); our Lord uses Jeremiah’s term, ‘the new covenant,’ but at the same time the words ‘This is my blood’ refer to the covenant at Sinai (Exodus 24:4-8). Matthew 22:44), the priesthood (7–10), and, closely connected with the latter, the spiritual covenant of the forgiveness of sins (Hebrews 10:15-18). On the one hand, He recognized the Divine authority of the Law, in its true meaning and spirit, and not as interpreted and embodied in the ‘deformed righteousness’ of the scribes and Pharisees (Matthew 5:17-20; Matthew 12:5; Matthew 19:17; Matthew 23:3, Luke 16:17). ‘The Law and the Prophets,’ as a dispensation, have had their day, and have given place to ‘the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 11:12 f. , || Luke 16:16), and to ‘grace and truth’ (John 1:17; and see Matthew 9:17 || Mark 2:21 f. Even the Law and the Prophets meant something deeper than they had hitherto been understood to mean (Matthew 7:12; Matthew 22:34-40); and this deeper meaning is contained in a ‘new commandment’ which Jesus gives to the disciples (John 13:34). The Law had generally been considered as a compendium of positive commands bearing on the details of life; but the only parts of it that mattered were ‘the weightier things,’ judgment, mercy and faith (Matthew 23:23 || Luke 11:42). Other criticisms of the Law are found in Matthew 5:21-48; Luke 14:1-6,9 (divorce) Luke 22:30 Luke 13:10-17; 1618385389_19 John 5:9-17; John 5:9 (Sabbath). Our Lord took care to avoid causing offence (Matthew 18:6 f. in the payment of the Temple tax (Matthew 17:24-27); in touching the leper, but at the same time telling him to offer the requisite sacrifices (Matthew 8:1-4). cgi?q1=Matthew+15:1-20&t1=en_nas" id="123" class="stL" target="_b
Earthquake - σείω, ‘to shake’) is used of an earthquake (Matthew 24:7; Matthew 27:54; Matthew 28:2, Mark 13:8, Luke 21:11), and once (Matthew 27:51) the idea is expressed by the phrase ἡ γῆ ἐσεισθη (Authorized and Revised Versions ‘the earth did quake’). Though specifically applied to an earthquake, σεισμός properly has a wider connotation: thus in Matthew 8:24 it is used of a tempest (σεισμὸς μέγας ἑγένετο ἑν τῆ θαλασσκ). Hence Alford thinks that in Matthew 28:2 it denotes not an earthquake, but the ‘shock’ produced by the rolling away of the stone from the sepulchre. —Of these there are two, namely, the earthquakes at the Crucifixion and the Resurrection (Matthew 27:51; Matthew 27:54; Matthew 28:2). Matthew alone mentions them; St. Matthew in regard to the darkness and the rending of the veil, apparently know nothing of an earthquake at the Crucifixion [1], and they are equally silent in the case of the Resurrection. —Matthew 24:7, Mark 13:8, Luke 21:11
Elder (2) - The few cases of unofficial meaning of the term are: Luke 15:25, where it describes the ‘elder brother’ in the parable of the Prodigal; and Matthew 15:2, Mark 7:3; Mark 7:5, where it means ‘the elders’ of a former age, the men of old from whom customs and maxims are handed down. In all the other passages (Matthew 16:21; Matthew 21:28; Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:47; Matthew 26:57; Matthew 26:59; Matthew 27:1; Matthew 27:3; Matthew 27:12; Matthew 27:20; Matthew 27:41, Mark 8:31; Mark 11:27; Mark 14:43; Mark 14:53, Luke 9:22; Luke 20:1; Luke 22:52) the term ‘elders’—invariably plural—bears the official meaning current among the Jews of our Lord’s time
Earthquake - σείω, ‘to shake’) is used of an earthquake (Matthew 24:7; Matthew 27:54; Matthew 28:2, Mark 13:8, Luke 21:11), and once (Matthew 27:51) the idea is expressed by the phrase ἡ γῆ ἐσεισθη (Authorized and Revised Versions ‘the earth did quake’). Though specifically applied to an earthquake, σεισμός properly has a wider connotation: thus in Matthew 8:24 it is used of a tempest (σεισμὸς μέγας ἑγένετο ἑν τῆ θαλασσκ). Hence Alford thinks that in Matthew 28:2 it denotes not an earthquake, but the ‘shock’ produced by the rolling away of the stone from the sepulchre. —Of these there are two, namely, the earthquakes at the Crucifixion and the Resurrection (Matthew 27:51; Matthew 27:54; Matthew 28:2). Matthew alone mentions them; St. Matthew in regard to the darkness and the rending of the veil, apparently know nothing of an earthquake at the Crucifixion [1], and they are equally silent in the case of the Resurrection. —Matthew 24:7, Mark 13:8, Luke 21:11
Pharisees - The scribes had expanded the law of Moses into a system that consisted of countless laws dealing with such matters as sabbath-keeping (Matthew 12:1-2; Mark 3:1-6; Luke 13:10-14), ritual cleanliness (Matthew 12:10-147; Mark 7:1-9), fasting (Luke 18:11-12), tithing (Matthew 23:23) and the taking of oaths (Matthew 23:16-22; see also SCRIBES). ...
The Pharisees criticized Jesus for not keeping their laws (1618385389_73; Matthew 15:1-2; John 9:16), but Jesus condemned the Pharisees for not keeping God’s law. They were more concerned with maintaining their traditions than with producing the kind of character and behaviour that God’s law aimed at (Matthew 5:20; Matthew 15:1-10; Matthew 23:23-26). They wanted to impress people more than please God (Matthew 23:2; Matthew 23:5; Matthew 23:27-28). The Pharisees, for example, believed in the continued existence of the soul after death, the resurrection of the body and the existence of angelic beings, whereas the Sadducees did not (Matthew 22:23; Acts 23:8)
Fowl - Quite arbitrarily Authorized Version renders πετεινά by ‘birds’ in Matthew 8:20; Matthew 13:32, Luke 9:58; and by ‘fowls’ in Matthew 6:26; Matthew 13:4, Mark 4:4; Mark 4:32, Luke 8:5; Luke 12:24; Luke 13:19. Their nests are contrasted with His own pillowless conch (Matthew 8:20). In the parable of the Sower they devour the seed that falls by the wayside (Matthew 13:4); in that of the Mustard Seed they lodge under the shadow of the huge plant which grew out of such a tiny germ (Mark 4:32). They neither sow, reap, nor gather into barns, yet the heavenly Father feeds them (Matthew 6:26), i
Reed - " It is used to illustrate weakness (2 Kings 18:21 ; Ezekiel 29:6 ), also fickleness or instability (Matthew 11:7 ; Compare Ephesians 4:14 ). ...
A "bruised reed" (Isaiah 42:3 ; Matthew 12:20 ) is an emblem of a believer weak in grace. A reed was put into our Lord's hands in derision (Matthew 27:29 ); and "they took the reed and smote him on the head" (30). The "reed" on which they put the sponge filled with vinegar (Matthew 27:48 ) was, according to (John 19:29 ), a hyssop stalk, which must have been of some length, or perhaps a bunch of hyssop twigs fastened to a rod with the sponge
Hell - (See Matthew 11:23; Mat 16:18; Acts 11:27; 1 Corinthians 15:55; Revelation 1:18; Rev 6:8). Jesus used the word to designate the place of eternal torment (Matthew 5:22; Mat 5:29-30; Mark 9:43; Luke 12:5). Hell is a place of eternal fire (Matthew 25:41; Revelation 19:20). It was prepared for the devil and his angels (Matthew 25:41) and will be the abode of the wicked (Revelation 22:8) and the fallen angels (2 Peter 2:4)
Innocence, Innocency - The first means unmixed or pure (Matthew 10:16 ; Philippians 2:15 ); the second, free from (Matthew 27:4 ,Matthew 27:4,27:24 ); the third, just, righteous, or upright (Matthew 23:35 ; Luke 23:47 ); and the fourth, clean or pure (Acts 18:6 ; Acts 20:26 )
Rabbi - In Matthew 23:7-8 scribes generally are addressed. They were forbidden to call each other “rabbi” (Matthew 23:8 ), and in Matthew, particularly, Jesus' disciples call Him “Lord” (Kurie ). For Matthew, Jesus was not just a teacher to His followers; He was their Lord
Minister - A person who ministers to others is one who serves others; a minister of God is a servant of God (Deuteronomy 10:8; Psalms 103:21; Joel 2:17; Matthew 8:15; Matthew 25:44; Matthew 27:55; 2 Corinthians 3:6; 2 Corinthians 6:4; 2 Corinthians 11:15; 2 Corinthians 11:23; for details see SERVANT). The perfect minister, who is an example to all others, is Jesus Christ (Matthew 20:28; John 13:14-16; Romans 15:8)
Tribe - Galilee comprised the territories allotted in OT times to the tribes of Zebulun and Naphtali (Matthew 4:13; Matthew 4:15). The promise to the Twelve Apostles that they should judge the twelve tribes of Israel (Matthew 19:28 || Luke 22:30) may be regarded as an instance of the way in which Jesus sometimes expressed His teaching in the language of popular apocalyptic conceptions of the Kingdom of God (cf. In Matthew 24:30 (quoted from Zechariah 12:12) ‘tribe’ has the wider sense of a branch of the human race
Disciple, - Matthew 22:16 ; Mark 2:18 . Matthew 9:14 ; Luke 5:33 ; John 3:25 . The Lord Jesus had His disciples: the apostles whom He chose to be with Him are called His 'twelve disciples,' Matthew 11:1 ; but in other places the term is applied to all who followed the Lord, many of whom 'went back and walked no more with him. Matthew 10:24,25 ; John 15:8
Border - This is the meaning in Matthew 23:5 . In Matthew 9:20 ; 14:36 ; Mark 6:56 ; Luke 8:44 , it is used of the border of Christ's garment (AV "hem," in the first two places). The AV has "coasts," but "borders" in Matthew 4:13 ; the RV always "borders," Matthew 2:16 ; 4:13 ; 8:34 ; 15:22,39 ; 19:1 ; Mark 5:17 ; 7:31 (twice); 10:1; Acts 13:50
Elias - The Greek form of Elijah (Matthew 11:14 ; 16:14 , etc
Bewray - To reveal or disclose; an old English word equivalent to "betray" (Proverbs 27:16 ; 29:24 , RSV, "uttereth;" Isaiah 16:3 ; Matthew 26:73 )
Fish-Hooks - Were used for catching fish (Amos 4:2 ; Compare Isaiah 37:29 ; Jeremiah 16:16 ; Ezekiel 29:4 ; Job 41:1,2 ; Matthew 17:27 )
Sparrow - 1: στρουθίον (Strong's #4765 — Noun Neuter — strouthion — stroo-thee'-on ) a diminutive of strouthos, "a sparrow," occurs in Matthew 10:29,31 ; Luke 12:6,7
Torment - basanos (Matthew 4:24 ), the "touch-stone" of justice; hence inquisition by torture, and then any disease which racks and tortures the limbs
Matthew's Bible - The Thomas Matthew Bible was a revision of Tyndale's and Coverdale's versions likely prepared by John Rogers in 1537 in Antwerp
Officer - In New Testament used to translated hufretes "minister" (Matthew 5:25), and practor "exacter" or "officer of the court," only in Luke 12:58
Levi (2) - See Matthew
Gnat - Matthew 23:24 translated, "ye strain out a gnat," namely, in filtering liquors
Den - Matthew 21:13 (a) Here is a type of the desperate condition of the temple, filled with cheating, lying, deceitful merchants bartering their wares
Obed - See also the genealogies of Christ, Matthew 1:5 Luke 3:32
Wailing - Matthew 13
Jakim - ...
...
Margin in Matthew 1:11 means Jehoiakim
Cummin - 1: κύμινον (Strong's #2951 — Noun Neuter — kuminon — koo'-min-on ) is an umbelliferous plant with aromatic seeds, used as a condiment, Matthew 23:23
Boy - In Matthew 8:5-13 = Luke 7:2-10, the centurion’s servant is sometimes described as a δοῦλος ((Revised Version margin), ‘bond-servant’) and sometimes as a παῖς ((Revised Version margin), ‘boy’). A comparison of Matthew 8:13 with Luke 7:10 shows that the two words apply to the same person. It is in the centurion’s own speech (Matthew 8:6-8 = Luke 7:7) that he refers to the slave who was ‘precious unto him’ (Luke 7:2 (Revised Version margin)) by the milder word. The narrative (except Matthew 8:13) uses δοῦλος, as the centurion himself does in Matthew 8:9, Luke 7:8. ...
As in the above instance παῖς = δοῦλος, so in the narrative of the healing of the epileptic child (Matthew 17:14-18, Mark 9:14-27, Luke 9:37-43) we find in St. Matthew and St. Here Matthew 17:18, Luke 9:42 Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 have ‘boy’ in the text, for the Authorized Version ‘child
House - , Matthew 9:6,7 ; 11:8 ; it is used of the Tabernacle, as the House of God, Matthew 12:4 , and the Temple similarly, e. , Matthew 21:13 ; Luke 11:51 , AV, "temple," RV, "sanctuary;" John 2:16,17 ; called by the Lord "your house" in Matthew 23:38 ; Luke 13:35 (some take this as the city of Jerusalem); metaphorically of Israel as God's house, Hebrews 3:2,5 , where "his house" is not Moses', but God's; of believers, similarly, ver. 6, where Christ is spoken of as "over God's House" (the word "own" is rightly omitted in the RV); Hebrews 10:21 ; 1 Peter 2:5 ; 4:17 ; of the body, Matthew 12:44 ; Luke 11:24 ; (b) by metonymy, of the members of a household or family, e. , Matthew 10:6 ; Luke 1:27,33 ; Acts 2:36 ; 7:42 . , Matthew 2:11 ; 5:15 ; 7:24-27 ; 2 Timothy 2:20 ; 2 John 1:10 ; it is not used of the Tabernacle or the Temple, as in the case of No. , Matthew 12:25 ; John 4:53 ; 1 Corinthians 16:15
House - , Matthew 9:6,7 ; 11:8 ; it is used of the Tabernacle, as the House of God, Matthew 12:4 , and the Temple similarly, e. , Matthew 21:13 ; Luke 11:51 , AV, "temple," RV, "sanctuary;" John 2:16,17 ; called by the Lord "your house" in Matthew 23:38 ; Luke 13:35 (some take this as the city of Jerusalem); metaphorically of Israel as God's house, Hebrews 3:2,5 , where "his house" is not Moses', but God's; of believers, similarly, ver. 6, where Christ is spoken of as "over God's House" (the word "own" is rightly omitted in the RV); Hebrews 10:21 ; 1 Peter 2:5 ; 4:17 ; of the body, Matthew 12:44 ; Luke 11:24 ; (b) by metonymy, of the members of a household or family, e. , Matthew 10:6 ; Luke 1:27,33 ; Acts 2:36 ; 7:42 . , Matthew 2:11 ; 5:15 ; 7:24-27 ; 2 Timothy 2:20 ; 2 John 1:10 ; it is not used of the Tabernacle or the Temple, as in the case of No. , Matthew 12:25 ; John 4:53 ; 1 Corinthians 16:15
Healing - ...
Jesus’ miracles of healing showed his power over all the evil consequences of sin, and indicated that the kingdom of God had come (Matthew 4:23; Matthew 8:17; Matthew 9:35; see MIRACLES). ...
God may choose to heal people miraculously (Numbers 12:1-15; 2 Kings 5:8-14; Matthew 8:2-3; John 4:46-54; John 5:8-9), or by normal processes (2 Kings 20:1-7; Philippians 2:27-30; 2 Timothy 4:20), or not at all, depending on his sovereign will (2 Corinthians 12:7-10). On some occasions God may heal out of his love and compassion, without a request from the afflicted (Matthew 14:14; Luke 4:40); on other occasions he may heal in response to the faith of the afflicted (Matthew 9:27-30; Mark 5:34; Mark 10:52; James 5:14-15). He heals those who have ordinary diseases and those who are demon possessed (Matthew 8:16; Luke 4:41; see DISEASE; UNCLEAN SPIRITS). ...
Jesus gave his disciples a share in his healing powers, so that they could help him spread the message of the kingdom of God throughout Israel (Matthew 10:5-8)
Fool in Scripture - ...
A penalty: "And whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hellfire" (Matthew 5). Those who hear the word of God and do not keep it are like "the fool that built his house upon the sand" (Matthew 7)
Scripture, Fool in - ...
A penalty: "And whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hellfire" (Matthew 5). Those who hear the word of God and do not keep it are like "the fool that built his house upon the sand" (Matthew 7)
Wail, Wailing - (4) For klauthmos, rendered "wailing" in Matthew 13:42,50 , AV, see WEEP. (5) In Matthew 11:17 ; Luke 7:32 , AV, threneo, "to wail" (RV), is rendered "to mourn
Hemorrhage - The KJV translates the underlying Hebrew and Greek terms as “issue of blood” (Leviticus 12:7 ; Matthew 9:20 ) or “fountain of blood” (Mark 5:29 ). Mosaic law said any discharge of blood, whether associated with the birthing process (Leviticus 12:7 ), with menstruation (Leviticus 15:19 ), or continued bleeding (Leviticus 15:25 ; Matthew 9:20 ), rendered a woman unclean. The woman suffering from a hemorrhage (Matthew 9:20 ; Mark 5:29 ; Luke 8:43-44 ) was thus a religious and social outcast who only dared approach Jesus from behind
Salutation - In crowded streets only men of age, rank, and dignity need be saluted ( Matthew 23:7 etc. Common forms of salutation are, ‘Peace he upon you’; response, ‘And upon you’: ‘May your day be happy’; response, ‘May your day be happy and blessed’: and, in the highway, ‘Blessed be he that cometh’ ( Judges 18:15 , Matthew 10:12 , Luke 24:36 , Psalms 118:26 , Matthew 21:9 etc
Father - A name applied (1) to any ancestor (Deuteronomy 1:11 ; 1 Kings 15:11 ; Matthew 3:9 ; 23:30 , etc. (Judges 17:10 ; 18:19 ; 1 Samuel 10:12 ; 2 Kings 2:12 ; Matthew 23:9 , etc. ...
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Believers are called God's "sons" (John 1:12 ; Romans 8:16 ; Matthew 6:4,8,15,18 ; 10:20,29 )
Door - , Matthew 6:6 ; 27:60 ; (b) metaphorically, of Christ, John 10:7,9 ; of faith, by acceptance of the Gospel, Acts 14:27 ; of "openings" for preaching and teaching the Word of God, 1 Corinthians 16:9 ; 2 Corinthians 2:12 ; Colossians 4:3 ; Revelation 3:8 ; of "entrance" into the Kingdom of God, Matthew 25:10 ; Luke 13:24,25 ; of Christ's "entrance" into a repentant believer's heart, Revelation 3:20 ; of the nearness of Christ's second advent, Matthew 24:33 ; Mark 13:29 ; cp
Divorce, Divorcement - A — 1: ἀπολύω (Strong's #630 — Verb — apoluo — ap-ol-oo'-o ) "to let loose from, let go free" (apo, "from," luo, "to loose"), is translated "is divorced" in the AV of Matthew 5:32 (RV, "is put away"); it is further used of "divorce" in Matthew 1:19 ; 19:3,7-9 ; Mark 10:2,4,11 ; Luke 16:18 . aphistemi, "to cause to withdraw"), denotes, in the NT, "a writing or bill of divorcement," Matthew 5:31 ; 19:7 ; Mark 10:4
Simon - Simon the brother of our Lord (Matthew 13:55, Mark 6:3). Simon of Cyrene, who was impressed to bear our Lord’s cross (Matthew 27:32 ||). Simon ‘the leper,’ in whose house the anointing of our Lord by Mary of Bethany took place (Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:3)
Alphaeus - Father of apostle called James the Less to distinguish him from James, the son of Zebedee and brother of John (Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ; Luke 6:15 ; Acts 1:13 ). Comparison of Matthew 9:9 and Luke 5:27 would indicate Levi was also called Matthew
Generation - As from a father to his son, or from a king to his successor, γενεά, as in the three series of 'fourteen generations' in Matthew 1:17 , though the same term is applied where names have been omitted. " Matthew 24:34 ; Luke 21:32 : cf. " Matthew 3:7 , etc
Choke - 1: πνίγω (Strong's #4155 — Verb — pnigo — pnee'-go ) is used, in the Passive Voice, of "perishing by drowning," Mark 5:13 ; in the Active, "to seize a person's throat, to throttle," Matthew 18:28 . , "to choke off"), is used metaphorically, of "thorns crowding out seed sown and preventing its growth," Matthew 13:7 ; Luke 8:7 . , by crowding, Matthew 13:22 ; Mark 4:7,19 ; Luke 8:14
Pit - —In the Gospels βόθυνος is used only of a place into which animals or men might stumble by accident (Matthew 12:11), or in consequence of blindness (Matthew 15:14, Luke 6:39, Authorized Version ‘ditch,’ but Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘pit’). In Luke 14:5 || Matthew 12:11, however, φρέαρ is used, so that here we should, perhaps, understand ‘pit’ as an empty cistern, or artificial well
Hosanna - Save now! or Save, we beseech, (Matthew 21:9 )
Reaper - 1: θεριστής (Strong's #2327 — Noun Masculine — theristes — ther-is-tace' ) "a reaper" (akin to therizo, see above), is used of angels in Matthew 13:30,39
Mile - A Roman measure, 1,618 yards, only in Matthew 5:41
Gadarenes - In Matthew 8:28 they are called Gergesenes, Revised Version "Gadarenes
Eliud - ” Great, great grandfather of Joseph, the earthly father of Jesus (Matthew 1:14-15 )
Judah (2) - —The eponymous ancestor of the tribe to which our Lord belonged (Matthew 1:2 f
Gnat - Matthew 23:24 should read 'strain out' in contrast to 'swallowing
Cheek - 1: σιαγών (Strong's #4600 — Noun Feminine — siagon — see-ag-one' ) primarily denotes "the jaw, the jaw-bone;" hence "cheek," Matthew 5:39 ; Luke 6:29
Scrip - A bag or wallet, in which travellers carried a portion of food, or some small articles of convenience, 1 Samuel 17:40 ; Matthew 10:10
Hell - Matthew 16:27. Matthew 5:29; Matthew 10:28; Matthew 23:15; James 3:6, etc. Matthew 25:46. Matthew 5:22; Matthew 5:29-30; Matthew 10:28; Mark 9:43-48; Luke 12:5, and with such accompaniments as indicate everlasting and remediless ruin. Retribution will have degrees, Matthew 10:15, in character, but none in duration
Arise, Arose, Arouse, Raise, Rise, Rouse - , of "rising" from sleep, Mark 1:35 ; from a meeting in a synagogue, Luke 4:29 ; of the illegal "rising" of the high priest in the tribunal in Matthew 26:62 ; of an invalid "rising" from his couch, Luke 5:25 ; the "rising" up of a disciple from his vocation to follow Christ, Luke 5:28 ; cp. , of Christ as a prophet, Acts 3:22 ; 7:37 ; as God's servant in the midst of the nation of Israel, Acts 3:26 ; as the Son of God in the midst of the nation, 13:33 (not here of resurrection, but with reference to the Incarnation: the AV "again" has nothing corresponding to it in the original, it was added as a misinterpretation: the mention of His resurrection is in the next verse, in which it is stressed by way of contrast and by the addition, "from the dead"); as a priest, Hebrews 7:11,15 ; as king over the nations, Romans 15:12 ; (d) of a spiritual awakening from lethargy, Ephesians 5:14 ; (e) of resurrection from the dead: (1) of the resurrection of Christ, Matthew 17:9 ; 20:19 ; Mark 8:31 ; 9:9,10,31 ; 10:34 ; Luke 18:33 ; 24:7,46 ; John 20:9 ; Acts 2:24,32 ; 10:41 ; 13:34 ; 17:3,31 : 1 Thessalonians 4:14 ; (2) of believers, John 6:39,40,44,54 ; 11:24 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:16 ; of unbelievers, Matthew 12:41 . , Matthew 2:14 ; 9:5,7,19 ; James 5:15 ; Revelation 11:1 ; (b) of causing to appear, or, in the Passive, appearing, or raising up so as to occupy a place in the midst of people, Matthew 3:9 ; 11:11 ; Mark 13:22 ; Acts 13:22 . 1, (c); (c) of rousing, stirring up, or "rising" against, Matthew 24:7 ; Mark 13:8 ; (d) of "raising buildings," John 2:19,20 ; (e) of "raising or rising" from the dead; (1) of Christ, Matthew 16:21 ; and frequently elsewhere (but not in Phil. , 1,2, 3John, and Jude); (2) of Christ's "raising" the dead, Matthew 11:5 ; Mark 5:41 ; Luke 7:14 ; John 12:1,9,17 ; (3) of the act of the disciples, Matthew 10:8 ; (4) of the resurrection of believers, Matthew 27:52 ; John 5:21 ; 1 Corinthians 15:15,16,29,32,35,42-44,52 ; 2 Corinthians 1:9 ; 4:14 ; of unbelievers, Matthew 12:42 (cp. Matthew 12:41 , No. In Matthew 1:24 , RV, "Joseph arose from his sleep," the Passive participle is, lit. , Matthew 8:24 ; Mark 4:37 , "there arose a great tempest. " So of the arising of persection, Matthew 13:21 ; Mark 4:17 ; this might be translated "taketh place;" of a tumult, Matthew 27:24 , RV, "arising," for AV, "made;" of a flood, Luke 6:48 ; a famine, Luke 15:14 ; a questioning, John 3:25 ; a murmuring, Acts 6:1 ; a tribulation, Acts 11:19 (RV); a stir in the city, Acts 19:23 ; a dissension, Acts 23:7 ; a great clamor, Acts 23:9 . , "the rising" of the sun, moon and stars; metaphorically, of light, in Matthew 4:16 , "did spring up;" of the sun, Matthew 5:45 ; 13:6 (RV); Mark 4:6 ; James 1:11 ; in Mark 16:2 the RV has "when the sun was risen