What does Marriage mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
γαμίζονται give in marriage. 3
γάμος a wedding or marriage festival 2
ἐγαμίζοντο give in marriage. 1
γαμίσκονται give in marriage. 1
γαμίζοντες give in marriage. 1
γάμου a wedding or marriage festival 1
κοίτη a place for laying down 1
παρθενίας virginity. 1
הוּלָּֽלוּ to shine. / to praise 1
וַיִּתְחַתֵּ֖ן to become a son-in-law 1
וּ֨לְהִתְחַתֵּ֔ן to become a son-in-law 1
וְעֹנָתָ֖הּ cohabitation 1
שִׁלַּ֣ח to send 1

Definitions Related to Marriage

G1062


   1 a wedding or Marriage festival, a wedding banquet, a wedding feast.
   2 Marriage, matrimony.
   

H2859


   1 to become a son-in-law, make oneself a daughter’s husband.
      1a (Qal) wife’s father, wife’s mother, father-in-law, mother-in- law (participle).
      1b (Hithpael) to make oneself a daughter’s husband.
      

H5772


   1 cohabitation, conjugal rights.
   

H7971


   1 to send, send away, let go, stretch out.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to send.
         1a2 to stretch out, extend, direct.
         1a3 to send away.
         1a4 to let loose.
      1b (Niphal) to be sent.
      1c (Piel).
         1c1 to send off or away or out or forth, dismiss, give over, cast out.
         1c2 to let go, set free.
         1c3 to shoot forth (of branches).
         1c4 to let down.
         1c5 to shoot.
      1d (Pual) to be sent off, be put away, be divorced, be impelled.
      1e (Hiphil) to send.
      

H1984


   1 to shine.
      1a (Qal) to shine (fig.
      of God’s favour).
      1b (Hiphil) to flash forth light.
   2 to praise, boast, be boastful.
      2a (Qal).
         2a1 to be boastful.
         2a2 boastful ones, boasters (participle).
      2b (Piel).
         2b1 to praise.
         2b2 to boast, make a boast.
      2c (Pual).
         2c1 to be praised, be made praiseworthy, be commended, be worthy of praise.
      2d (Hithpael) to boast, glory, make one’s boast.
      2e (Poel) to make a fool of, make into a fool.
      2f (Hithpoel) to act madly, act like a madman.
      

G3932


   1 virginity.
   

G1061


   1 give in Marriage.
   

G2845


   1 a place for laying down, resting, sleeping in.
      1a a bed, couch.
   2 the Marriage bed.
      2a of adultery.
   3 cohabitation, whether lawful or unlawful.
      3a sexual intercourse.
      

Frequency of Marriage (original languages)

Frequency of Marriage (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Indissolubility of Marriage
"What God hath joined together, let no man put asunder" (Matthew 19). When the sacrament of matrimony has been received by a man and a woman and ratified by their cohabitation as husband and wife, their union cannot be dissolved except by death. Protestants often quote those other words of Christ in the same chapter, "Whosoever shall put away his wife, except it be for fornication, and shall marry another, committeth adultery"; but it is plain that this permits not a divorce but a separation. It is not a dissolution of the marriage bond, but a putting away of the guilty party; for elsewhere our Lord declares that "He that marrieth her that is put away from her husband committeth adultery" (Luke 16). Saint Paul commands that the wife shall not depart from her husband, "and if she depart, that she remain unmarried, or be reconciled with her husband" (1 Corinthians 7). Here there is a distinction between the mere contract of marriage and the sacrament of matrimony. The Church, for grave reasons, can dissolve the contract of marriage when the sacrament has not been received, as explained in the article on the Pauline Privilege, but when the sacrament has been received and has been ratified by marital cohabitation, marriage cannot be and never has been dissolved. Because the Catholic Church enforced this law, schism and subsequent heresy invaded one of her choicest realms when a pope refused to grant a divorce to a licentious English king.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Levirate Marriage
(Latin: levir, a husband's brother)
A Hebrew ordinance, by which the brother of a man who died without male issue was obliged to marry the widow. As a religious ordinance the Levirate existed solely in Israel, though ethnologists claim that a similar custom, subject to various modifications, has been found in many tribes. The Hebrews express the law by the specific term Yibbem. A dispensation from the law was made possible by a rite, which they call halizah. Both the ordinance and the mode of being dispensed from the law are described in the New Testament (Deuteronomy 25). The custom existed before the Mosaic legislation, for Juda gave Thamar to Onan by this custom, and acknowledged that he should have given her to Sela (Genesis 38). The term brother signifies the nearest of kin in the collateral line, and the obligation passed down the line to a terminus not now discernible. The object of the law was to keep the inheritance in the same family, and prevent the extinction of heads of families. The son begotten of the levirate marriage inherited the name of the deceased man and his possessions. To be held by this law, the levir must be unmarried. God permitted, but never commanded, polygamy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Morganatic Marriage
(Latin: morganatica, a dowry given the morning after a wedding)
The valid and licit union of a prince or a member of a ruling house with a woman of greatly inferior rank, contracted with the understanding that the children have no right to succeed to the title of their father. They are usually provided for by a gift or dowry to their mother, whence the name.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mixed Marriage
A marriage between persons one of whom is a member of the Catholic Church and the other a member of some Protestant denomination. The phrase is the equivalent of the kitchen Latin, mixta religio (mixed, or mixture of, religion). It is sometimes used to mean the union in marriage of a Catholic with one who is not baptized but this is expressed better by the phrase disparitas cultus (difference, or inconsistency, of worship). Since differences of belief in religious matters very frequently occasion incompatibility in domestic relations, impediments to the proper religious observance of both partIes, and differences over the religious training of the children, the Church, to safeguard the religion of the Catholic party, requires that the marriage take place before a priest only, that the one who is not Catholic will not interfere with the religious observances of the other nor with the training of the children as Catholics. See als, disparity of worship.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Dissolution of a Marriage
If a valid Christian marriage has taken place and has been followed with marital intercourse, the union is lifelong; it cannot be dissolved except by death. But if, after a valid Christian marriage, there has been no intercourse (in Latin, matrimonium ratum sed non consummatum, a marriage made but not consummated), such a marriage may be entirely dissolved by a special act of the pope at the request of one or both of the parties, or because one or both intend to make a solemn vow of religious profession.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Marriage-Feasts
(John 2:1-11 ) "lasted usually for a whole week; but the cost of such prolonged rejoicing is very small in the East. The guests sit round the great bowl or bowls on the floor, the meal usually consisting of a lamb or kid stewed in rice or barley. The most honoured guests sit nearest, others behind; and all in eating dip their hand into the one smoking mound, pieces of the thin bread, bent together, serving for spoons when necessary. After the first circle have satisfied themselves, those lower in honour sit down to the rest, the whole company being men, for women are never seen at a feast. Water is poured on the hands before eating; and this is repeated when the meal closes, the fingers having first been wiped on pieces of bread, which, after serving the same purpose as table-napkins with us, are thrown on the ground to be eaten by any dog that may have stolen in from the streets through the ever-open door, or picked up by those outside when gathered and tossed out to them (Matthew 15:27 ; Mark 7:28 ). Rising from the ground and retiring to the seats round the walls, the guests then sit down cross-legged and gossip, or listen to recitals, or puzzle over riddles, light being scantily supplied by a small lamp or two, or if the night be chilly, by a smouldering fire of weeds kindled in the middle of the room, perhaps in a brazier, often in a hole in the floor. As to the smoke, it escapes as it best may; but indeed there is little of it, though enough to blacken the water or wine or milk skins hung up on pegs on the wall. (Compare Psalm 119:83 .) To some such marriage-feast Jesus and his five disciples were invited at Cana of Galilee." Geikie's Life of Christ. (See CANA .)
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Marriage
Was instituted in Paradise when man was in innocence (Genesis 2:18-24 ). Here we have its original charter, which was confirmed by our Lord, as the basis on which all regulations are to be framed (Matthew 19:4,5 ). It is evident that monogamy was the original law of marriage (Matthew 19:5 ; 1 Corinthians 6:16 ). This law was violated in after times, when corrupt usages began to be introduced (Genesis 4:19 ; 6:2 ). We meet with the prevalence of polygamy and concubinage in the patriarchal age (Genesis 16:1-4 ; 22:21-24 ; 28:8,9 ; 29:23-30 , etc.). Polygamy was acknowledged in the Mosaic law and made the basis of legislation, and continued to be practised all down through the period of Jewish histroy to the Captivity, after which there is no instance of it on record. It seems to have been the practice from the beginning for fathers to select wives for their sons (Genesis 24:3 ; 38:6 ). Sometimes also proposals were initiated by the father of the maiden (Exodus 2:21 ). The brothers of the maiden were also sometimes consulted (Genesis 24:51 ; 34:11 ), but her own consent was not required. The young man was bound to give a price to the father of the maiden (31:15; 34:12; Exodus 22:16,17 ; 1 Samuel 18:23,25 ; Ruth 4:10 ; Hosea 3:2 ) On these patriarchal customs the Mosaic law made no change.
In the pre-Mosaic times, when the proposals were accepted and the marriage price given, the bridegroom could come at once and take away his bride to his own house (Genesis 24:63-67 ). But in general the marriage was celebrated by a feast in the house of the bride's parents, to which all friends were invited (29:22,27); and on the day of the marriage the bride, concealed under a thick veil, was conducted to her future husband's home.
Our Lord corrected many false notions then existing on the subject of marriage (Matthew 22:23-30 ), and placed it as a divine institution on the highest grounds. The apostles state clearly and enforce the nuptial duties of husband and wife (Ephesians 5:22-33 ; Colossians 3:18,19 ; 1 Peter 3:1-7 ). Marriage is said to be "honourable" (Hebrews 13:4 ), and the prohibition of it is noted as one of the marks of degenerate times (1 Timothy 4:3 ).
The marriage relation is used to represent the union between God and his people (Isaiah 54:5 ; Jeremiah 3:1-14 ; Hosea 2:9,20 ). In the New Testament the same figure is employed in representing the love of Christ to his saints (Ephesians 5:25-27 ). The Church of the redeemed is the "Bride, the Lamb's wife" (Revelation 19:7-9 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Marriage
(See ADAM) The charter of marriage is Genesis 2:24, reproduced by our Lord with greater distinctness in Matthew 19:4-5; "He which made them at the beginning made them male and female, and said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife: and they twain, shall be one flesh." The Septuagint, and Samaritan Pentateuch reads "twain" or "two" in Genesis 2:24; compare as to this joining in one flesh of husband and wife, the archetype of which is the eternally designed union of Christ and the church, Ephesians 5:31; Mark 10:5-9; 1 Corinthians 6:16; 1 Corinthians 7:2. In marriage husband and wife combine to form one perfect human being; the one is the complement of the other. So Christ makes the church a necessary adjunct to Himself. He is the Archetype from whom, as the pattern, the church is formed (Romans 6:5). He is her Head, as the husband is of the wife (1 Corinthians 11:3; 1 Corinthians 15:45). Death severs bridegroom and bride, but cannot separate Christ and His bride (1 Timothy 2:13-15; John 10:28-29; John 13:1; Romans 8:35-39).
In Ephesians 5:32 translated "this mystery is great," i.e. this truth, hidden once but now revealed, namely, Christ's spiritual union with the church, mystically represented by marriage, is of deep import. Vulgate wrongly translated "this is a great sacrament," Rome's plea for making marriage a sacrament. Not marriage in general, but the marriage of Christ and the church, is the great mystery, as the following words prove, "I say it in regard to (eis ) Christ and in regard to (eis ) the church," whereas Genesis 2:24 refers to literal marriage. Transl. Ephesians 5:30, "we are members of His (glorified) body, being (formed) out of (ek ) His flesh and of His bones." Adam's deep sleep wherein Eve was formed out of His opened side, symbolizes Christ's death which was the birth of the spouse, the church (John 12:24; John 19:34-35). As Adam gave Eve a new name, 'ishah , "woman" or "wife" the counterpart of iysh , "man" or "husband," so Christ gives the church His new name; He, Solomon, she, the Shulamite (Song of Solomon 6:13; Revelation 2:17; Revelation 3:12).
The propagation of the church from Christ, as that of Eve from Adam, is the foundation of the spiritual marriage. Natural marriage rests on the spiritual marriage, whereby Christ left the Father's bosom to woo to Himself the church out of a lost world. His earthly mother as such He holds secondary to His spiritual bride (Luke 2:48-49; Luke 8:19-21; Luke 11:27-28). He shall again leave His Father's abode to consummate the union (Matthew 25:1-10; Revelation 19:7). Marriage is the general rule laid down for most men, as not having continency (1 Corinthians 7:2; 1 Corinthians 7:5, etc.). The existing "distress" (1 Corinthians 7:26) was Paul's reason then for recommending celibacy where there was the gift of continency. In all cases his counsel is true, "that they that have wives be as though they had none," namely, in permanent possession, not making idols of them.
Scripture teaches the unity of husband and wife; the indissolubleness of marriage save by death or fornication (Matthew 5:32; Matthew 19:9; Romans 7:3); monogamy; the equality of both (iysh ) and (ishah ) being correlative, and she a "help-meet for him," i.e. a helping one in whom as soon as he sees her he may recognize himself), along with the subordination of the wife, consequent on her formation subsequently and out of him, and her having been first to fall.(1 Corinthians 11:8-9; Matthew 19:6.) (See ADAM.) Love, honor, and cherishing are his duty; helpful, reverent subjection, a meek and quiet spirit, her part; both together being heirs of the grace of life (1 Peter 3:1-7; 1 Corinthians 14:34-35). Polygamy began with the Cainites. (See LAMECH; DIVORCE; CONCUBINE.) The jealousies of Abraham's (Ephesians 5:26-270) and Elkanah's wives illustrate the evils of polygamy. Scripture commends monogamy (Psalms 128:3; Proverbs 5:18; Proverbs 18:22; Proverbs 19:14; Proverbs 31:10-29; Ecclesiastes 9:9).
Monogamy superseded polygamy subsequently to the return from Babylon. Public opinion was unfavorable to presbyters and women who exercise holy functions marrying again; for conciliation and expediency sake, therefore, Paul recommended that a candidate should be married only once, not having remarried after a wife's death or divorce (1 Timothy 3:2; 1 Timothy 3:12; 1 Timothy 5:9; Luke 2:36-37; 1 Corinthians 7:40); the reverse in the case of young widows (1 Timothy 5:14). Marriage is honorable; but fornication, which among the Gentiles was considered indifferent, is stigmatized (Hebrews 13:4; Acts 15:20). Marriage of Israelites with Canaanites was forbidden, lest it should lead God's people into idolatry (Exodus 34:16; Deuteronomy 7:3-4). In Leviticus 18:18 the prohibition is only against taking a wife's sister "beside the other (namely, the wife) in her lifetime."
Our Christian reason for prohibiting such marriage after the wife's death is because man and wife are one, and the sister-in-law is to be regarded in the same light as the sister by blood. Marriage with a deceased brother's wife (the Levirate law) was favored in Old Testament times, in order to raise up seed to a brother (Genesis 38:8; Matthew 22:25). The high priest must marry only an Israelite virgin (Leviticus 21:13-14); heiresses must marry in their own tribe, that their property might not pass out of the tribe. The parents, or confidential friend, of the bridegroom chose the bride (Genesis 24; Genesis 21:21; Genesis 38:6). The parents' consent was asked first, then that of the bride (Genesis 24:58). The presents to the bride are called mohar , those to the relatives mattan . Between betrothal and marriage all communication between the betrothed ones was carried on through "the friend of the bridegroom" (John 3:29). She was regarded as his wife, so that faithlessness was punished with death (Deuteronomy 22:23-24); the bridegroom having the option of putting her away by a bill of divorcement (Deuteronomy 24:1; Matthew 1:19).
No formal religious ceremony attended the wedding; but a blessing was pronounced, and a "covenant of God" entered into (Ezekiel 16:8; Malachi 2:14; Proverbs 2:17; Genesis 24:60; Ruth 4:11-12). The essential part of the ceremony was the removal of the bride from her father's house to that of the bridegroom or his father. The bridegroom wore an ornamental turban; Isaiah 61:10, "ornaments," rather (peer ) "a magnificent headdress" like that of the high priest, appropriate to the "kingdom of priests" (Exodus 19:6); the bride wore "jewels" or "ornaments" in general, trousseau. He had a nuptial garland or crown (Song of Solomon 3:11, "the crown wherewith His mother (the human race; for He is the Son of man, not merely Son of Mary) crowned Him in the day of His espousals"); and was richly perfumed (Song of Solomon 3:6). The bride took a preparatory bath (Ezekiel 23:40). This is the allusion in 1619114480_23; "Christ loved ... gave Himself for the church, that He might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing of water by the word, that He might present it to Himself a glorious church not having spot."
The veil (tsaip ) was her distinctive dress, covering the whole person, so that the trick played on Jacob was very possible (Genesis 24:65; Genesis 29:23); the symbol of her subjection to her husband's power, therefore called "power on her head" (1 Corinthians 11:10). (See DRESS.) Our "nuptials" is derived from nubo , "to veil one's self." She also wore girdles for the breasts ("attire," kishurim ) which she would not readily forget (Jeremiah 2:32). Also a gilded or gold "crown" or chaplet (kullah ), a white robe sometimes embroidered with gold thread (Revelation 19:8; Psalms 45:13-14) and jewels (Isaiah 61:10). Late in the evening the bridegroom came with his groomsmen ("companions," Judges 14:11; "children of the bridechamber," Matthew 9:15), singers and torch or lamp bearers leading the way (Jeremiah 25:10); the bride meantime with her maidens eagerly awaited his coming.
Then he led the bride and her party in procession home with gladness to the marriage supper (Matthew 25:6; Matthew 22:1-11; John 2:2; Psalms 45:15). The women of the place flocked out to gaze. The nuptial song was sung; hence in Psalms 78:63 "their maidens were not praised" in nuptial song (Hebrew) is used for "were not given in marriage," margin. The bridegroom having now received the bride, his "friend's joy (namely, in bringing them together) was fulfilled" in hearing the bridegroom's voice (John 3:29). Song of Solomon 3:11; the feast lasted for seven or even 14 days, and was enlivened by riddles, etc. (Judges 14:12.) Wedding garments were provided by the host, not to wear which was an insult to him. Large waterpots for washing the hands and for "purifying" ablutions were provided (Mark 7:3).
These had to be "filled" before Jesus changed the water into wine; a nice propriety in the narrative, the minor circumstances being in keeping with one another; the feast being advanced, the water was previously all emptied out of the waterpots for the guests' ablutions (John 2:7). Light is thrown upon Egyptian marriages by a translation of an Egyptian contract of marriage, by Eugene Revillout. It is written in the demotic character upon a small sheet of papyrus, No. 2482, Cat. Egyptien, Musee du Louvre. It is dated in the month of Choiach , year 33 of Ptolemy Philadelphus, and the contracting parties are Patina, son of Pchelkhous, and the lady, Ta-outem, the daughter of Rehu. The terms of the deed are singular as to the dowry required on both sides, together with the clauses providing for repudiation.
After the actual dowry is recited, the sum being specified in shekels, the rights of the children which may hereafter come from the marriage, as well as the payment of the mother's pin-money, are secured by the following clause: "thy pocket money for one year is besides thy toilet money which I give thee each year, and it is your right to exact the payment of thy toilet money and thy pocket money, which are to be placed to my account, which I give thee. Thy oldest son, my oldest son, shall be the heir of all my property, present and future. I will establish thee as wife." Practicing in marriage law in Egypt was one of the priestly functions, for at the conclusion the contract states that "the writer of this act is ... the priest of Ammon Horpneter, son of Smin" (?). The bridegroom was exempted from military service for a year (Deuteronomy 20:7; Deuteronomy 24:5).
Women in Scripture times were not secluded as now, but went about married and single with faces unveiled (Genesis 12:14; Genesis 24:16; Genesis 24:65). Some were prophetesses, as Miriam, Deborah, Huldah, Anna, and took part in public concerns (Exodus 15:20; 1 Samuel 18:6-7; Abigail, 1 Samuel 25:14-25). The duties of husband and wife are laid down (Ephesians 5:22-33; Colossians 3:18-19; Titus 2:4-5; 1 Peter 3:1-7). Brawling wives stand in contrast to the model wife, God's gift (Proverbs 19:13; Proverbs 21:9; Proverbs 21:19; Proverbs 27:15; Proverbs 31:10-31). (On the spiritual harlot, see BEAST and ANTICHRIST.) Woman, harlot, bride, and ultimately wife, i.e. Christ's church in probation, the apostate church, and the glorified church, form the grand theme of the Bible from first to last. Israel had God for her "husband," she became a harlot when she left Him for idols (Isaiah 1:21; Jeremiah 2:20; Jeremiah 3:1; Jeremiah 3:6
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Marriage Customs
(See MARRIAGE.)
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marriage, Indissolubility of
"What God hath joined together, let no man put asunder" (Matthew 19). When the sacrament of matrimony has been received by a man and a woman and ratified by their cohabitation as husband and wife, their union cannot be dissolved except by death. Protestants often quote those other words of Christ in the same chapter, "Whosoever shall put away his wife, except it be for fornication, and shall marry another, committeth adultery"; but it is plain that this permits not a divorce but a separation. It is not a dissolution of the marriage bond, but a putting away of the guilty party; for elsewhere our Lord declares that "He that marrieth her that is put away from her husband committeth adultery" (Luke 16). Saint Paul commands that the wife shall not depart from her husband, "and if she depart, that she remain unmarried, or be reconciled with her husband" (1 Corinthians 7). Here there is a distinction between the mere contract of marriage and the sacrament of matrimony. The Church, for grave reasons, can dissolve the contract of marriage when the sacrament has not been received, as explained in the article on the Pauline Privilege, but when the sacrament has been received and has been ratified by marital cohabitation, marriage cannot be and never has been dissolved. Because the Catholic Church enforced this law, schism and subsequent heresy invaded one of her choicest realms when a pope refused to grant a divorce to a licentious English king.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marriage, Levirate
(Latin: levir, a husband's brother)
A Hebrew ordinance, by which the brother of a man who died without male issue was obliged to marry the widow. As a religious ordinance the Levirate existed solely in Israel, though ethnologists claim that a similar custom, subject to various modifications, has been found in many tribes. The Hebrews express the law by the specific term Yibbem. A dispensation from the law was made possible by a rite, which they call halizah. Both the ordinance and the mode of being dispensed from the law are described in the New Testament (Deuteronomy 25). The custom existed before the Mosaic legislation, for Juda gave Thamar to Onan by this custom, and acknowledged that he should have given her to Sela (Genesis 38). The term brother signifies the nearest of kin in the collateral line, and the obligation passed down the line to a terminus not now discernible. The object of the law was to keep the inheritance in the same family, and prevent the extinction of heads of families. The son begotten of the levirate marriage inherited the name of the deceased man and his possessions. To be held by this law, the levir must be unmarried. God permitted, but never commanded, polygamy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marriage, Morganatic
(Latin: morganatica, a dowry given the morning after a wedding)
The valid and licit union of a prince or a member of a ruling house with a woman of greatly inferior rank, contracted with the understanding that the children have no right to succeed to the title of their father. They are usually provided for by a gift or dowry to their mother, whence the name.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marriage, Putative
(Latin: putare, to think)
If a couple are not really married but are publicly reported to be man and wife, and at least one of them believes that they are lawfully married, the supposed marriage is called putative. As long as the good faith of at least one of them endures, such a marriage has the effects of lawful wedlock in regard to the legitimation of the offspring.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marriage, Mixed
A marriage between persons one of whom is a member of the Catholic Church and the other a member of some Protestant denomination. The phrase is the equivalent of the kitchen Latin, mixta religio (mixed, or mixture of, religion). It is sometimes used to mean the union in marriage of a Catholic with one who is not baptized but this is expressed better by the phrase disparitas cultus (difference, or inconsistency, of worship). Since differences of belief in religious matters very frequently occasion incompatibility in domestic relations, impediments to the proper religious observance of both partIes, and differences over the religious training of the children, the Church, to safeguard the religion of the Catholic party, requires that the marriage take place before a priest only, that the one who is not Catholic will not interfere with the religious observances of the other nor with the training of the children as Catholics. See als, disparity of worship.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marriage, Mystical
A permanent perception or consciousness of the presence of God in the soul, and His union with it. Taken in a wide sense it consists in a vision in which Christ tells the soul that He takes it for His bride; in a restricted sense, according to Saint Teresa and Saint John of the Cross it designates that mystical union with God which is the most exalted condition attainable by the soul in this life.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mystical Marriage
A permanent perception or consciousness of the presence of God in the soul, and His union with it. Taken in a wide sense it consists in a vision in which Christ tells the soul that He takes it for His bride; in a restricted sense, according to Saint Teresa and Saint John of the Cross it designates that mystical union with God which is the most exalted condition attainable by the soul in this life.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marriage, Dissolution of a
If a valid Christian marriage has taken place and has been followed with marital intercourse, the union is lifelong; it cannot be dissolved except by death. But if, after a valid Christian marriage, there has been no intercourse (in Latin, matrimonium ratum sed non consummatum, a marriage made but not consummated), such a marriage may be entirely dissolved by a special act of the pope at the request of one or both of the parties, or because one or both intend to make a solemn vow of religious profession.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marriage by Proxy
It is not necessary that in every case the contracting parties appear personally before the priest in order to receive matrimony. A proxy or agent may be used, representing an absent party, provided that he shows credentials in writing, signed by the absentee and by the parish priest or ordinary of the place where the commission was given, or at least by two reliable witnesses.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Marriage
MARRIAGE
1. Forms of Marriage . There are two forms of marriage among primitive races: (1) where the husband becomes part of his wife’s tribe, (2) where the wife becomes part of her husband’s tribe.
(1) W. R. Smith ( Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia ) gives to this form the name sadika , from the sadac or ‘gift’ given to the wife, ( a ) The union may be confined to an occasional visit to the wife in her home ( mota marriage). This is distinguished from mere prostitution, in that no disgrace is attached, and the children are recognized by the trine; cf. Samson’s marriage. ( b ) The husband may be definitely incorporated into his wife’s tribe ( beena marriage). The wife meets her husband on equal terms; children belong to her trine, and descent is reckoned on the mother’s side. Women could inherit in Arabia under this system ( op. cit . p. 94). Possible traces in OT are the marriages of Jacob (Laban claims wives and children as his own, Genesis 31:31 ; Genesis 31:42 ), Moses ( Exodus 2:21 ; Exodus 4:18 ), Samson ( Judges 14:1-20 ; Judges 15:1-20 , Judges 16:4 ; there is no hint that he meant to take his wife home; his kid seems to be the sadac or customary present). So the Shechemites must be circumcised ( Genesis 34:15 ); Joseph’s sons born in Egypt are adopted by Jacob ( Genesis 48:5 ); Abimelech, the son of Gideon’s Shechemite concubine ( Judges 8:31 ), is a Shechemite ( Judges 9:1-5 ). The words of Genesis 2:24 may have originally referred to this custom, though they are evidently not intended to do so by the narrator, since beena marriages were already out of date when they were written. Many of the instances quoted can be explained as due to special circumstances, but the admitted existence of such marriages in Arabia makes it probable that we should find traces of them among the Semites in general. They make it easier to understand the existence of the primitive custom of the ‘ matriarchate ,’ or reckoning of descent through females. In addition to the cases already quoted, we may add the closeness of maternal as compared with paternal relationships, evidenced in bars of marriage (see below, § 3), and the special responsibility of the maternal uncle or brother ( Genesis 24:29 ; Genesis 34:25 , 2 Samuel 13:22 ). It is evident that the influence of polygamy would be in the same direction, subdividing the family into smaller groups connected with each wife.
(2) The normal type is where the wife becomes the property of her husband, who is her ‘Baal’ or possessor (Hosea 2:16 ), she herself being ‘Beulah’ ( Isaiah 62:4 ). She and her children belong to his tribe, and he alone has right of divorce. ( a ) In unsettled times the wife will he acquired by war ( Judges 5:30 ). She is not merely a temporary means of pleasure, or even a future mother, but a slave and an addition to a man’s wealth. Deuteronomy 21:10-14 regulates the procedure in cases of capture; in Judges 19:1-30 ; Judges 20:1-48 ; Judges 21:1-25 we have an instance of the custom. Traces may remain in later marriage procedure, e.g . in the band of the bridegroom’s friends escorting, i.e . ‘capturing,’ the bride, and in her feigned resistance, as among the Bedouin (W. R. Smith, op. cit . p. 81). ( b ) Capture gives place to purchase and ultimately to contract . The daughter is valuable to the clan as a possible mother of warriors, and cannot be parted with except for a consideration. Hence the ‘dowry’ (see below, § 5) paid to the bride’s parents.
2. Polygamy among the Hebrews was confined to a plurality of wives (polygyny). There is no certain trace in OT of a plurality of husbands (polyandry), though the Levirate marriage is sometimes supposed to be a survival. The chief causes of polygyny were ( a ) the desire for a numerous offspring, or the barrenness of first wife (Abraham’s case is directly ascribed to this, and among many peoples it is permitted on this ground alone); ( b ) the position and importance offered by numerous alliances ( e.g . Solomon); ( c ) the existence of slavery, which almost implies it. It can obviously be prevalent only where there is a disproportionate number of females, and, except in a state of war, is possible only to those wealthy enough to provide the necessary ‘dowry.’ A further limitation is implied in the fact that in more advanced stages, when the harem is established, the wife when secured is a source, not of wealth, but of expense.
Polygamy meets us as a fact: e.g . Abraham, Jacob, the Judges, David, Solomon; 1 Chronicles 7:4 is evidence of its prevalence in Issachar; Elkanah ( 1 Samuel 1:1 f.) is significant as belonging to the middle class; Jehoiada ( 2 Chronicles 24:3 ) as a priest. But it is always treated with suspicion; it is incompatible with the ideal of Genesis 2:24 , and its origin is ascribed to Lamech, the Cainite ( Genesis 4:19 ). In Deuteronomy 17:17 the king is warned not to multiply wives; later regulations fixed the number at eighteen for a king and four for an ordinary man. The quarrels and jealousies of such a narrative as Genesis 29:21-30 are clearly intended to illustrate its evils, and it is in part the cause of the troubles of the reigns of David and Solomon. Legislation (see below, § 6) safeguarded the rights of various wives, slave or free; and according to the Rabbinic interpretation of Leviticus 21:13 the high priest was not allowed to be a bigamist. Noah, Isaac, and Joseph had only one wife, and domestic happiness in the Bible is always connected with monogamy ( 2 Kings 4:1-44 , Psalms 128:1-6 , Proverbs 31:1-31 , Sir 25:1 ; Sir 25:8 ; Sir 26:1 ; Sir 26:13 ). The marriage figure applied to the union of God and Israel (§ 10) implied monogamy as the ideal state. Polygamy is, in fact, always an unnatural development from the point of view both of religion and of anthropology; ‘monogamy is by far the most common form of human marriage; it was so also amongst the ancient peoples of whom we have any direct knowledge’ Westermarck, Hum. Marr . p. 459). Being, however, apparently legalized, and having the advantage of precedent, it was long before polygamy was formally forbidden in Hebrew society, though practically it fell into disuse; the feeling of the Rabbis was strongly against it. Herod had nine wives at once (Jos. [1] Ant . XVII. i. 3, cf. 2). Its possibility is implied by the technical continuance of the Levirate law, and is proved by the early interpretation of 1 Timothy 3:2 , whether correct or not (§ 8). Justin ( Dial . 134, 141) reproaches the Jews of his day with having ‘four or even five wives,’ and marrying ‘as they wish, or as many as they wish.’ The evidence of the Talmud shows that in this case at least the reproach had some foundation. Polygamy was not definitely forbidden among the Jews till the time of R. Gershom ( c [2] . a.d. 1000), and then at first only for France and Germany. In Spain, Italy, and the East it persisted for some time longer, as it does still among the Jews in Mohammedan countries.
3. Bars to Marriage
(1) Prohibited degrees . Their range varies extraordinarily among different peoples, but on the whole it is wider among uncivilized than among civilized races (Westermarck, op. cit . p. 297), often embracing the whole tribe. The instinctive impulse was not against marriage with a near relative qua relative, but against marriage where there was early familiarity. ‘Whatever is the origin of bars to marriage, they are certainly early associated with the feeling that it is indecent for housemates to intermarry’ (W. R. Smith, op. cit . p. 170). The origin of the instinct is natural selection, consanguineous marriages being on the whole unfavourable to the species, in man as among animals. This, of course, was not consciously realized; the instinct took the form of a repulsion to union with those among whom one had lived; as these would usually be blood relations, that which we recognize as horror of incest was naturally developed (Westermarck, p. 352). We find in OT no trace of dislike to marriage within the tribe ( i.e . endogamy), though, judging by Arab analogies, it may have originally existed; on the contrary, the Hebrews were strongly endogamous, marrying within the nation. The objection, however, to incestuous marriages was strong, though in early times there was laxity with regard to intermarriage with relatives on the father’s side, a natural result of the ‘matriarchate’ and of polygamy, where each wife with her family formed a separate group in her own tent. Abram married his half-sister ( Genesis 20:12 ); 2 Samuel 13:13 , Ezekiel 22:11 imply the continuance of the practice. Nahor married his niece ( Genesis 11:29 ), and Amram his paternal aunt ( Exodus 6:20 ). On marriage with a stepmother see below, § 6. Jacob married two sisters (cf. Judges 15:2 ). Legislation is found in Leviticus 18:7-17 ; Leviticus 20:11 (cf. Deuteronomy 27:20 ; Deuteronomy 27:22-23 ); for details see the commentaries. We note the omission of prohibition of marriage with a niece, and with widow of maternal uncle. Leviticus 18:13 forbids marriage not with a deceased but with a living wife’s sister, i.e . a special form of polygamy. The ‘bastard’ of Deuteronomy 23:2 is probably the offspring of an incestuous marriage. An heiress was not allowed to marry outside her tribe ( Numbers 36:6 ; cf. Numbers 27:4 , Tob 6:12 ; Tob 7:12 ). For restrictions on priests see Leviticus 21:7 ; Leviticus 21:14 . There were no caste restrictions, though difference in rank would naturally be an objection ( 1 Samuel 18:18 ; 1 Samuel 18:23 ). Outside the prohibited degrees consanguineous marriages were common ( Genesis 24:4 , Tob 4:12 ); in Judges 14:3 the best marriage is ‘from thy brethren.’ Jubilees 4 maintains that all the patriarchs from Adam to Noah married near relatives. Cousin marriages among the Jews are said to occur now three times more often than among other civilized peoples (Westermarck, p. 481).
(2) Racial bars arose from religious and historical causes. Genesis 24:1-67 ; Genesis 28:1-22 ; Genesis 34:1-31 , Numbers 12:1 , Judges 14:3 illustrate the objection to foreign marriages; Esau’s Hittite wives are a grief to his parents ( Genesis 26:34 ; Genesis 27:46 ); cf. Leviticus 24:10 . The marriage of Joseph ( Genesis 41:45 ) is due to stress of circumstances, but David ( 2 Samuel 3:3 ) and Solomon ( 1 Kings 3:1 ; 1 Kings 11:1 ) set a deliberate example which was readily Imitated ( 1 Kings 16:31 ). Among the common people there must have been other cases similar to Naomi’s ( Ruth 1:4 ): Bathsheba ( 2 Samuel 11:8 ), Hiram ( 1 Kings 7:14 ), Amasa ( 1 Chronicles 2:17 ), Jehozabad ( 2 Chronicles 24:26 ) are the children of mixed marriages. They are forbidden with the inhabitants of Canaan ( Exodus 34:16 , Deuteronomy 7:3 ), but tolerated with Moabites and Egyptians ( Deuteronomy 23:7 ). Their prevalence was a trouble to Ezra (9, 10) and to Nehemiah ( Nehemiah 10:30 ; Nehemiah 13:23 ). Tob 4:12 ; Tob 6:16 , 1Ma 1:15 renew the protest against them. In the Diaspora they were permitted on condition of proselytism, but Jubilees 30 forbids them absolutely; they are ‘fornication.’ Jewish strictness in this respect was notorious (Tac. Hist . v. 5; cf. Acts 10:28 ). The case of Timothy’s parents ( Acts 16:1-3 ) is an example of the greater laxity which prevailed in central Asia Minor. It is said that now the proportion of mixed to pure marriages among the Jews is about 1 to 500 (Westermarck, p. 375), though it varies greatly in different countries. 1 Corinthians 7:39 probably discourages marriage with a heathen (cf. 1 Corinthians 7:12 ff; 1 Corinthians 9:5 ), but the general teaching of the Epp. would remove any religious bar to intermarriage between Christians of different race, though it does not touch the social or physiological advisability.
4. Levirate Marriage (Lat. lçvir , ‘a brother-in-law’). In Deuteronomy 25:5-10 (no || in other codes of OT) it is enacted that if a man die leaving no son (‘child’ LXX [3] , Josephus, Matthew 22:24 ), his brother, if he lives on the same estate, is to take his widow, and the eldest child is to succeed to the name and inheritance of the deceased (cf. Genesis 38:9 ). If the survivor refuses, a formal declaration is to be made before the elders of the city, and the widow is to express her contempt by loosing his sandal and spitting in his face. The law is a codification, possibly a restriction, of an existing custom. ( a ) It is presupposed for the patriarchal age in Genesis 38:1-30 , the object of this narrative being to insist on the duty of the survivor; ( b ) Heb. has a special word = ‘to perform the duty of a husband’s brother’; ( c ) the custom is found with variations in different parts of the world India, Tibet, Madagascar, etc. In India it is confined to the case where there is no child, and lasts only till an heir is born; sometimes it is only permissive. In other cases it operates without restriction, and may be connected with the form of polyandry where the wife is the common property of all the brothers. But it does not necessarily imply polyandry, of which indeed there is no trace in OT. Among the Indians, Persians, and Afghans it is connected with ancestor worship, the object being to ensure that there shall be some one to perform the sacrificial rites; the supposed indications of this among the Hebrews are very doubtful. In OT it is more probably connected with the desire to preserve the family name (a man lived through his children), and to prevent a division or alienation of property. On the other hand, the story of Ruth 4:1-22 seems to belong to the circle of ideas according to which the wife is inherited as part of a man’s property. Boaz marries Ruth as goel , not as levir , and the marriage is legally only a subordinate element in the redemption of the property. There is no stigma attached to the refusal of the nearer kinsman, and the son ranks as belonging to Boaz. The prohibited degrees in Leviticus 18:1-30 (P [4] ) make no exception in favour of the Levirate marriage, whether repealing or presupposing it is uncertain. In later times we have the Sadducees’ question in Mark 12:19 ||. It does not imply the continuance of the practice. It had fallen into disuse, and the Mishna invents many limitations to avoid the necessity of compliance. It was agreed that the woman must have no child (Dt. ‘son’), and the school both of Shammai and of the Sadducees apparently confined the law to the case of a betrothed, not a wedded, wife. If so, the difficulty was twofold, striking at the Levirate custom as well as at the belief in the Resurrection (Edershelm, LT ii. 400).
5. Marriage Customs
(1) The arranging of a marriage was normally in the hands of the parents ( Genesis 21:21 ; Genesis 24:3 ; Genesis 28:1 ; Genesis 34:4 , Judges 14:2 , 2Es 9:47 ); there are, in fact, few nations or periods where the children have a free choice. But ( a ) infant or child marriages were unknown; ( b ) the consent of the parties was, sometimes at least, sought ( Genesis 24:8 ); ( c ) the rule was not absolute; it might be broken wilfully ( Genesis 26:34 ), or under stress of circumstances ( Exodus 2:21 ); ( d ) natural feeling will always make itself felt in spite of the restrictions of custom; the sexes met freely, and romantic attachments were not unknown ( Genesis 29:10 ; Genesis 34:3 , Judges 14:1 , 1 Samuel 18:20 ); in these cases the initiative was taken by the parties. One view of Canticles is that it is a drama celebrating the victory of a village maiden’s faithfulness to her shepherd lover, in face of the attractions of a royal rival. It was a disgrace if a daughter remained unmarried ( Sir 42:9 ); this fact is the key to 1 Corinthians 7:25 ff. (2) The betrothal was of a more formal and binding nature than our ‘engagement’; among the Arabs it is the only legal ceremony connected with a marriage. Genesis 24:58 ; Genesis 24:60 may preserve an ancient formula and blessing. Its central feature was the dowry ( mohar ) paid to the parents or representatives of the bride, the daughter being a valuable possession. Deuteronomy 22:29 (cf. Exodus 22:18 ) orders its payment in a case of seduction, and 50 shekels is named as the average. In Genesis 34:12 Hamor offers ‘never so much dowry’; cf. the presents of ch. 24. It might take the form of service ( Genesis 29:1-35 , Jacob; 1 Samuel 18:25 , David). Dowry, in our sense of provision for the wife, arose in two ways. ( a ) The parents provided for her, perhaps originally giving her a portion of the purchase money ( Genesis 24:61 ; Genesis 29:24 ). Caleb gives his daughter a field ( Joshua 15:19 = Judges 1:15 ); Solomon’s princess brings a dowry of a city ( 1 Kings 9:16 ); Raguel gives his daughter half his goods ( Tob 8:21 ; Tob 10:10 ). This dowry was retained by the wife if divorced, except in case of adultery. ( b ) The husband naturally signified his generosity and affection by gifts to his bride ( Genesis 24:53 ; Genesis 34:12 [5], Esther 2:9 ). According to the Mishna, the later ceremony of betrothal consisted in payment of a piece of money, or a gift, or the conveyance of a writing, in presence of two witnesses. A third method (by cohabitation) was strongly discountenanced. After betrothal the parties were legally in the position of a married couple. Unfaithfulness was adultery ( Deuteronomy 22:23 , Matthew 1:19 ). The bridegroom was exempt from military service ( Deuteronomy 20:7 ). Non-fulfilment of the marriage was a serious slight ( 1 Samuel 18:19 , Judges 14:19 ), but conceivable under certain circumstances ( Genesis 29:27 ).
(2) Wedding ceremonies . Great uncertainty attaches to the proceedings in Biblical times. We have to construct our picture from passing notices, combined with what we know of Arabic and later Jewish customs. In some cases there seems to have been nothing beyond the betrothal ( Genesis 24:63-67 ); or the wedding festivities followed it at once; but in later times there was a distinct interval, not exceeding a year in case of a virgin. Tobit ( Tob 7:14 ) mentions a ‘contract’ (cf. Malachi 2:14 ), which became a universal feature. The first ceremony was the wedding procession ( Psalms 45:15 , 1Ma 9:37 ), which may be a relic of ‘marriage by capture,’ the bridegroom’s friends ( Matthew 22:1-460 , John 3:29 ; cf. ‘60 mighty men’ of Song of Solomon 3:7 ) going, often by night, to fetch the bride and her attendants; in Judges 14:11 ; Judges 14:15 ; Judges 14:20 Samson’s comrades are necessarily taken from the bride’s people. The rejoicings are evidenced by the proverbial ‘voice of the bridegroom ,’ etc. ( Jeremiah 7:34 etc., Revelation 18:23 ). Genesis 24:53 , Psalms 45:13-15 , Jeremiah 2:32 , Revelation 19:8 ; Revelation 21:2 speak of the magnificence of the bridal attire; Isaiah 61:10 , of the garland of the bridegroom and jewels of the bride (cf. Isaiah 49:18 ); the veil is mentioned in Genesis 24:65 ; Genesis 29:23 ; the supposed allusions to the lustral bath of the Greeks ( Ruth 3:3 , Ezekiel 23:40 , Ephesians 5:25 ) are very doubtful. The situation in Matthew 25:1 is not clear. Are the ‘virgins’ friends of the bridegroom waiting for his return with his bride, or friends of the bride waiting with her for him? All that it is possible to say is that the general conception is that of the wedding procession by night in which lights and torches have always played a large part. Another feature was the scattering of flowers and nuts; all who met the procession were expected to join in it or to salute it.
The marriage supper followed, usually in the home of the bridegroom ( 2Es 9:47 ); Genesis 29:22 , Judges 14:10 , Tob 8:19 are easily explained exceptions. Hospitality was a sacred duty; ‘he who does not invite me to his marriage will not have me to his funeral.’ To refuse the invitation was a grave insult ( 1619114480_69 ). Nothing is known of the custom, apparently implied in this passage, of providing a wedding garment for guests. John 2:1-25 gives us a picture of the feast in a middle-class home, where the resources are strained to the uttermost. It is doubtful whether the ‘ruler of the feast’ (cf. Sir 32:1-2 ) is ‘the best man’ ( Sir 3:29 , Judges 14:20 ), the office being unusual in the simple life of Galilee (Edersheim, LT i. 355). There is nowhere any hint of a religious ceremony , though marriage was regarded with great reverence as symbolizing the union of God with Israel ( ib . 353). The feast was no doubt quasi -sacramental (cf. the Latin ‘confarreatio’), and the marriage was consummated by the entry into the ‘chamber’ ( huppah ). W. R. Smith ( op. cit . p. 168) finds in this a relic of ‘beena’ marriage (see above, § 1), the huppah or canopy ( Joel 2:16 ) being originally the wife’s tent ( Genesis 24:67 , Judges 4:17 ); cf. the tent pitched for Absalom ( 2 Samuel 16:22 ). In Arab. [6] , Syr., and Heb. the bridegroom is said to ‘go in’ to the bride. Psalms 19:5 speaks of his exultant ‘coming forth’ on the following morning; ‘the chamber’ can hardly refer there to the ‘canopy’ under which in modern weddings the pair stand during the ceremony, though this has no doubt been evolved from the old tent.
The wedding festivities were not confined to the ‘supper’ of the first night, at any rate in OT times. As now in Syria, the feast lasted for 7 days ( Genesis 29:27 , Tob 11:10 ; Tob 8:19 [7]). The best picture is in Judges 14:1-20 , with its eating and drinking and not very refined merriment. Canticles is generally supposed to contain songs sung during these festivities; those now sung in Syria show a remarkable similarity. Judges 7:1-7 in particular would seem to be the chorus in praise of the bride’s beauty, such as is now chanted, while she herself in a sword dance
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marriage Without a Priest
Under the present matrimonial laws the blessing of the union by a priest is not, in certain circumstances, essential to the contract and the sacrament. If a Catholic couple wish to marry in a place where for a month there will be no priest qualified to join them in matrimony, they may simply express their mutual consent before two witnesses, and thereby they are validly and lawfully married. In danger of death, this may also be done even when there is no such expected delay in the coming of the priest.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Marriage
From the beginning God’s ideal for marriage has been that one man and one woman live together, independent of parents, in lifelong union (Genesis 2:18-24; Matthew 19:4-6). This ideal union is broken only by death, in which case the surviving partner is free to remarry (Romans 7:2-3; 1 Corinthians 7:39; 1 Timothy 5:14).
Polygamy in the Old Testament
The early history of the human race is one of almost total departure from God, so that only a very small minority of people retained any real understanding of God (Genesis 6:1-8; Romans 1:20-27). Polygamy, the practice of having several wives at the same time, became so widespread that even God’s people did not always regard it as wrong (Genesis 25:6; Judges 9:1-6; 1 Kings 11:1-3). Inevitably, jealousy and conflict resulted, leading them eventually to recognize that God’s ideal of monogamy was best (Genesis 21:8-10; Genesis 29:21-35; Genesis 30:1-24; Deuteronomy 21:15-17; Judges 8:30-35; Leviticus 18:6-185; 1 Samuel 1:4-8; 2 Samuel 3:2-5; 1 Kings 11:1-8).
In ancient Israel it was considered a matter of social shame if a wife did not have children (Genesis 16:1; Genesis 30:1; 1 Samuel 1:10-11; Luke 1:7). According to one custom, if a wife was not able to have children, she may have allowed her husband to produce a child by her maidservant. All legal rights over the child belonged to the wife, not the maid (Genesis 16:2; Genesis 30:1-8). (Concerning the case where a married man died without leaving children see WIDOW.)
Marriage customs
Among the ancient Israelites, engagement to marry was almost as binding as marriage. Unfaithfulness within an engagement was considered as bad as adultery (Deuteronomy 22:23-27; Matthew 1:18-20). Parents usually chose the marriage partners for their sons and daughters (Genesis 21:21; Genesis 24:1-4; 1 Corinthians 7:32-348; Ruth 3:1-5), though they may have taken into consideration any preference that a son or daughter indicated (Genesis 24:58-61; Genesis 34:4; Genesis 34:8; Judges 14:2; 1 Samuel 18:20-21).
The custom was for the bridegroom to give some payment or service to the parents of the bride as the price for the daughter he had taken from them (Genesis 29:18; Song of Solomon 8:1-3; Genesis 34:12; 1 Samuel 18:25). The bride’s parents usually gave a gift to the married couple which, in wealthy families, often consisted of servants or land (Genesis 29:24; 1 Corinthians 7:12-16; Judges 1:15; 1 Kings 9:16).
Both the bridegroom and the bride wore special clothes for the wedding ceremony and the associated festivities (Isaiah 61:10; Jeremiah 2:32; Revelation 19:7-8; Revelation 21:2). The bridegroom had his best man, and the bride her bridesmaids (Psalms 45:14; John 3:29). The bridegroom and his friends went and brought the bride from her father’s house to his own house, where the feast was held (Psalms 45:14-15; Matthew 25:1-13). The wedding feast was a time of great celebration, and all who were invited as guests were given special clothes for the occasion (Matthew 22:1-4; Matthew 22:11-12; John 2:1-11). Festivities sometimes went on for a week (Genesis 29:27; Matthew 9:14-15).
Total union
Whatever the traditions or procedures, marriage is more than a social custom or a legal arrangement. It is also more than a sexual relationship. It is an unselfish giving of each partner to the other in a union that excludes all others. God intends people to have and to enjoy sexual relations, but only as part of a total relationship where a man and a woman commit themselves to each other for life (Matthew 19:5-6; Hebrews 13:4). Divorce is not part of God’s plan for human society (Malachi 2:16; Matthew 5:32; Matthew 19:8-9; see DIVORCE).
Human sexuality is one of God’s gifts to humankind and, like all God’s gifts, it can be properly enjoyed or shamefully abused (1 Thessalonians 4:4-5; 1 Timothy 4:3-4). The Bible encourages a healthy enjoyment of sex within marriage (Proverbs 5:18-19; Ecclesiastes 9:9; Song of Song of Solomon 1:12-13; Song of Solomon 7:6-13; Genesis 29:30), but it forbids sexual relations before marriage or with any person other than one’s marriage partner (1619114480_60; Leviticus 20:10; Deuteronomy 22:20-22; Malachi 2:14; Mark 6:18; Romans 7:2; cf. Matthew 5:27-28; see ADULTERY; FORNICATION). It condemns prostitution, incest, bestiality and homosexual practices as perversions. They are sins against one’s own body (Leviticus 18:22-23; Leviticus 19:29; Leviticus 20:14-17; Romans 1:26-27; 1 Corinthians 6:9-10; 1 Corinthians 6:13-18; Revelation 22:15).
In marriage as God intended it, there is an equality between the man and the woman (Genesis 2:23-24). Though there may be physical, emotional and psychological differences between the male and the female, the two complement each other so that each is equipped to do what the other cannot. Together they form a unit, with each dependent on the other (1 Corinthians 7:3-4; 1 Corinthians 11:11-12).
God holds the man ultimately responsible for the household that comes into being through the marriage (Genesis 3:9-12; 1 Corinthians 11:3; cf. Romans 5:12). Husbands have at times thought this responsibility gives them special privileges that allow them to treat their wives as inferiors instead of as equals (Genesis 3:16), but such a state of affairs was not God’s original intention. Sin has spoiled the marriage relationship as it has spoiled everything else in human society. However, because of the exercise of Christian love, Christian marriage ought to achieve marital harmony, even in circumstances where other marriages do not.
Christian love is the sort of self-sacrificing love that Christ exercised – serving others rather than pleasing self. Husband and wife must exercise such love towards each other (Ephesians 5:1-2), though the husband in particular is required to make sacrifices (Ephesians 5:25-29).
Likewise husband and wife must exercise submission to each other (Ephesians 5:21), though the wife in particular is required to recognize the husband’s headship of the family (Ephesians 5:22-24). Where each is prepared to sacrifice self-interest for the sake of the other, the marriage will be enriched (Ephesians 5:33; see HUSBAND; WIFE). It will also be a fitting picture of the relationship between Christ and his church (Ephesians 5:29-32).
Special considerations
Since their relationship with Christ governs all their other relationships, Christians should not marry those who do not share their faith in Jesus Christ (2 Corinthians 6:14-16; cf. 1 Corinthians 7:39). However, where one partner of a non-Christian marriage later becomes a Christian, the marriage should be maintained. God understands the circumstances, and the Christian should do everything possible to make the marriage work harmoniously (Genesis 29:29).
In certain circumstances it may be God’s will for a person not to marry, and this may at times require much self-discipline (Genesis 38:64; Matthew 19:121 Corinthians 1:7-8,17,32-35). Even among those who intend to marry, self-discipline is necessary. They must take into consideration the added responsibilities that marriage brings (1619114480_2), and must not marry hastily, particularly when there is the possibility of increased social and economic hardship (1 Corinthians 7:25-31). But if an unmarried person is constantly aflame with sexual passion, it may be better to marry, lest the temptations prove to be too great (1 Corinthians 7:9; 1 Corinthians 7:36-38; cf. 1 Corinthians 7:5).
While the Christian teaching on marriage is based on principles that the Creator set out for his creatures, it also acknowledges the weaknesses of human nature and the need to deal with them sensibly. Christian morality requires God’s people to uphold his standards when others want to destroy them. At the same time Christian love requires them to give support to those who, having ignored God’s law, are sorry for their sin and need help in rebuilding their lives (John 8:1-11; 1 Corinthians 6:9-11; Galatians 6:1-2).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Marriage
Marriage. The institution of marriage dates from the time of man's original creation. Genesis 2:18-25. The marriage bond is not to be dissolved except on the strongest grounds. Comp. Matthew 19:9. On the relation of the wife to the husband, see 1 Corinthians 11:8-9; 1 Timothy 2:13. In the patriarchal age polygamy prevailed. Genesis 16:4; Genesis 25:1; Genesis 25:6; Genesis 28:9; Genesis 29:23; Genesis 29:28; Matthew 22:1-107. Divorce also prevailed in the patriarchal age, though but one instance of it is recorded. Genesis 21:14. The Mosaic law discouraged polygamy, restricted divorce, and aimed to enforce purity of life. It was the best civil law possible at the time, and sought to bring the people up to the pure standard of the moral law. Our Lord and his apostles re-established the integrity and sanctity of marriage, Matthew 19:4-5; Matthew 5:32; Matthew 19:9; Romans 7:3; 1 Corinthians 7:10-11, and enforced moral purity, Hebrews 13:1-25; Hebrews 4:1-16, etc., especially by the formal condemnation of fornication. Acts 15:20. In the Hebrew commonwealth an Israelite and a non-Israelite were not allowed to marry, except in a few special cases, and Israelites closely related could not marry. See Leviticus 18:6-18, and for exceptions, Deuteronomy 25:5-9. The law which regulates this exception has been named the "levirate" law, from the Latin levir, "brother-in-law." The choice of the bride devolved not on the bridegroom himself, but on his relations or on a mend deputed for this purpose. The consent of the maiden was sometimes asked, Genesis 24:58; but this appears to have been subordinate to the previous consent of the father and the adult brothers. Genesis 24:51; Genesis 34:11. The act of betrothal was celebrated by a feast, and among the more modern Jews it is the custom in some parts for the bridegroom to place a ring on the bride's finger. The ring was regarded among the Hebrews as a token of fidelity, Genesis 41:42, and of adoption into a family. Luke 15:22. During the interval between betrothal and marriage, the bride lived with her friends; her communications with her future husband were carried on through a friend deputed for the purpose, termed the "friend of the bridegroom." John 3:29. She was regarded as the wife of her future husband; hence faithlessness on her part was punishable with death, Deuteronomy 22:23-24, the husband having, however, the option of "putting her away." Deuteronomy 24:1; Matthew 1:19. At the marriage ceremony the bride removed from her father's house to that of the bridegroom or bis father. The bridegroom prepared himself for the occasion by putting on a festival dress, and especially by placing on his head a handsome nuptial turban. Psalms 45:8; Song of Solomon 4:10-11. The bride was veiled. Her robes were white, Revelation 19:8, and sometimes embroidered with gold thread, Psalms 45:13-14, and covered with perfumes, Psalms 45:8; she was further decked out with jewels. Isaiah 49:18; Isaiah 61:10; Revelation 21:2. When the fixed hour arrived, which was generally late in the evening, the bridegroom set forth from his house attended by his groomsmen (A. V." companions," Judges 14:11; "children of the bride-chamber," Matthew 9:15), preceded by a band of musicians or singers, Genesis 31:27; Jeremiah 7:34; Jeremiah 16:9, and accompanied by persons bearing flambeaux, Jeremiah 25:10; 2 Esdras 10:2; Matthew 25:7; Revelation 18:23, and took the bride with the friends to his own house. At the house a feast was prepared, to which all the friends and neighbors were invited, Genesis 29:22; Exodus 21:10,6; Luke 14:8; John 2:2, and the festivities were protracted for seven or even fourteen days. Judges 14:12; Tobit 8:19. The guests were sometimes furnished with fitting robes, Matthew 22:11, and the feast was enlivened with riddles, Judges 14:12, and other amusements. The last act in the ceremonial was the conducting of the bride to the bridal chamber, Judges 15:1; Joel 2:16, where a canopy was prepared. Psalms 19:5; Joel 2:16. The bride was still completely veiled, so that the deception practiced on Jacob, Genesis 29:23, was not difficult. A newly married man was exempt from military service, or from any public business which might draw him away from his home, for the space of a year, Deuteronomy 24:5; a similar privilege was granted to him who was betrothed. Deuteronomy 20:7.The conditions of married life.—The wife appears to have taken her part in family affairs, and even to have enjoyed a considerable amount of independence. Judges 4:18; 1 Samuel 25:14; 2 Kings 4:8, etc. In the New Testament the mutual relations of husband and wife are a subject of frequent exhortation. Ephesians 5:22; Ephesians 5:33; Colossians 3:18-19; Titus 2:4-5; 1 Peter 3:1-7. The duties of the wife in the Hebrew household were multifarious, Genesis 18:6; 2 Samuel 13:8, the distribution of food, Proverbs 31:15, the manufacture of the clothing, Proverbs 31:13; Proverbs 31:21-22; and the legal rights of the wife are noticed in 1619114480_8 under the three heads of food, raiment, and duty of marriage or conjugal right. Marriage is used to illustrate the spiritual relationship between God and his people. Isaiah 54:6; Jeremiah 3:14; Hosea 2:19. In the New Testament the image of the bridegroom is transferred from Jehovah to Christ, Matthew 9:15; John 3:29, and that of the bride to the church. 2 Corinthians 11:2; Revelation 19:7; Revelation 21:2. 9. For full account, see Bissell's Biblical Antiquities.
King James Dictionary - Marriage
MAR'RIAGE, n. L.mas, maris. The act of uniting a man and woman for life wedlock the legal union of a man and woman for life. Marriage is a contract both and religious, by which the parties engage to live together in mutual affection and fidelity, till death shall separate them. Marriage was instituted by God himself for the purpose of preventing the promiscuous intercourse of the sexes, for promoting domestic felicity,and for securing the maintenance and education of children.
Marriage is honorable in all and the bed undefiled. Hebrews 13
1. A feast made on the occasion of a marriage. The kingdom of heaven is like a certain king, who made a marriage for his son. Matthew 22
2. In a scriptural sense, the union between Christ and his church by the covenant of grace. Revelation 19
Holman Bible Dictionary - Marriage
The biblical standard for marriage is a monogamous relationship in which a man and a woman share a lifetime commitment to each other, second only to their commitment to God. It is an unconditional, lifetime commitment. Jesus emphasized God's intention that marriage be a lifetime commitment (Mark 10:5-9 ; Matthew 19:4-9 ). He affirmed this as the principle of marriage inherent in divine creation (Genesis 2:24 ). Paul cited this key principle to show the sinfulness of sexual relations outside marriage (1 Corinthians 6:12-20 ) and to emphasize the importance of self-giving love in marriage (Ephesians 5:28 ). Genesis 2:24 emphasizes the oneness of the marriage relationship and the priority of the relationship over all others, including the relationship of the couple to their parents. Marriage is also for companionship ( Genesis 2:18-23 ). Paul described the kind of mutual submission that should characterize the marriage relationship (Ephesians 5:21-33 ). Although the husband is head of the home, his role is modeled after the role of Christ as Head of the church, who “loved the church and gave Himself for it” (Ephesians 5:25 ).
Sex is one of God's good Gifts God's intention is for sexual union to be expressed exclusively within the unique monogamous relationship of marriage. Human sexuality (Genesis 1:27 ) and sexual union within marriage (Genesis 2:24 ) were part of God's good creation. Sexual union is for procreation (Genesis 1:28 ) and also for expressing love within the oneness of marriage (Genesis 2:24 ; Proverbs 5:15-19 ; 1 Corinthians 7:2-5 ). Although polygamy was practiced by some Old Testament personalities, monogamy was always God's ideal for humanity (Matthew 19:4-5 ). The New Testament clearly teaches monogamy (1 Corinthians 7:2 ). Adultery is a violation of the commitment inherent in marriage (Exodus 20:14 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:2-3 ; Hebrews 13:4 ). So is any sexual intercourse that does not express the oneness of marriage (1 Corinthians 6:12-20 ). The biblical condemnation of adultery covers such things as communal marriage, mate swapping, and the so-called open marriage. Likewise, homosexuality violates the intended purpose of sex (1 Corinthians 7:8-9 ; Leviticus 20:13 ; Romans 1:26-27 ). Incest also is a violation of the biblical view of sex (1 Corinthians 5:1-5 ).
Marriage and singleness are valid options for Christians. Jesus taught that marriage demands faithfulness within a relationship based on a lifetime commitment (Matthew 19:3-9 ). When the disciples said that this concept made marriage too demanding, Jesus replied that singleness—whether involuntary or voluntary—has its own demand, abstinence from sexual union (Matthew 19:10-12 ). Paul acknowledged that marriage is best for many; but, based on his own experience, he recommended singleness to those who wanted to devote all of their energies to Christian work and could forego sexual relationships (1Corinthians 7:7-9,1 Corinthians 7:32-35 ). Neither Jesus nor Paul presented marriage or singleness as a second-class or less holy state than the other.
Christians condemn sexual immorality in all its forms. Sexual sins are serious because they undermine the foundation of family life, the oneness of the marriage relationship; however, such sins are not unforgivable. Jesus sought out and offered forgiveness to persons guilty of sexual sins (Matthew 21:31-32 ; Luke 7:36-50 ; John 4:1-42 ; John 8:2-11 ). Forgiveness does not condone such sins, but does offer a new start with God's help. David's experience shows that even when sexual sins are forgiven, the destructive consequences continue (2 Samuel 12-19 ). Love demands that followers of Christ seek to help persons caught in the grip of sin, being careful not to become involved in the sin themselves (Galatians 6:1 ). Persistent immorality is unacceptable behavior for Christians (1 Corinthians 5:1-13 ; 1 Corinthians 6:12-20 ).
Christians should marry Christians, but Christians are to strive for a godly home even when this is not the case. The expectation for a Christian to marry another Christian is implicit in Paul's instructions about marrying “only in the Lord” (Matthew 5:31-32 ), and in his words about not being mismated with unbelievers (2 Corinthians 6:14 ). As important as family relations are, a person's commitment to God takes precedence in those unfortunate situations when the two commitments are in conflict (Matthew 10:37 ; Luke 9:59-62 ). A Christian who is married to a non-Christian should seek to maintain the relationship, to raise any children as believers, and to win the unbelieving spouse (1 Corinthians 7:12-16 ; 1 Peter 3:1-12 ). There is no evidence that Timothy's father was a believer (Acts 16:1 ), but his mother passed her faith along to her son (Proverbs 31:16-20 ; 2 Timothy 3:14-15 ).
The biblical ideal is marriage that lasts a lifetime. Christians sometimes must cope with the breakup of a marriage. Because humans do not live up to the high ideals and standards of God, marriages do fail. With the strong biblical emphasis on marriage as a lifetime commitment, divorce poses a real dilemma for Christians. The dilemma of their proper attitude and response is most real for the persons directly involved and for those closest to them, but the dilemma also exists for the larger circle of friends and fellow church members. The Mosaic law allowed a man to divorce his wife but required a bill of divorce for her (Deuteronomy 24:1 ). This was an advance over a time when a man simply sent his wife away. The writ of divorce was evidence of her release from the marriage and thus her freedom to be married to someone else (Deuteronomy 24:2 ). Jesus explained Deuteronomy 24:1 as a concession to the hardness of human hearts; but He emphasized God's original intention as reflected in Genesis 1:27 and Genesis 2:24 ( Mark 10:2-9 ; Matthew 19:3-9 ). Two verses in Matthew (Matthew 5:32 ; Ephesians 5:21-22,57 ) state that fornication can be grounds for divorce. Some interpreters believe that these and other relevant passages in the Gospels (Mark 10:11-12 ; Luke 16:18 ) suggest that Jesus especially had in mind persons who divorce a spouse and marry someone else in an attempt to legitimize an adulterous relationship. The case of Herod and Herodias, who had divorced their spouses to satisfy their lust for each other, was notorious in that day. John the Baptist had been in prison for daring to rebuke Herod, and spiteful Herodias successfully plotted John's execution because of this (Mark 6:14-29 ; Matthew 14:1-12 ). Paul followed Jesus in emphasizing the permanence of marriage (1 Corinthians 7:10-11 ), but he taught that a Christian was not bound to an unbelieving spouse if the unbeliever insisted on a separation (1 Corinthians 7:12-16 ). Clearly, therefore, the Bible teaches permanence as the ideal; but unfortunately, human hearts are still hard; and divorce for various reasons still happens. The Gospels are filled with examples of how Jesus delt with persons who were struggling with guilt and failure (Luke 19:1-10 ; John 8:2-11 ), including one woman who had been married five times and who was living with a man who was not her husband (John 4:1-42 ). Where guilt was involved, Jesus did not minimize it; but in every case He acted redemptively. That is, His goal was not to condemn people but to help them begin anew with God's grace and strength.
Marriage after the death of a spouse usually is not questioned; marriage again after a divorce is a difficult issue. Marriage after widowhood is clearly permissible in the New Testament (Romans 7:2-3 ). Paul advised single persons and widows to remain unmarried if they could, but he counseled marriage for others (Leviticus 18:22 ). For example, he advised younger widows to remarry (1 Timothy 5:10-14 ). Widows are free to remarry, but “only in the Lord” (1 Corinthians 7:39 ). Those who oppose marriage again of divorced persons cite Mark 10:11-12 ; Luke 16:18 ; Romans 7:3 ; and 1 Corinthians 7:10-11 . They interpret the statement by Jesus as teaching that divorced persons who marry again are living in adultery. They cite Paul as evidence that the apostle interpreted Jesus in this way. Based on these verses, some pastors refuse to perform a wedding involving a divorced person. Another group emphasizes Jesus' exception clause in 1 Corinthians 7:39 and Matthew 19:9 . This clause, “Except it be for fornication,” implies that when a married person commits fornication, the spouse is free to secure divorce and to marry another person. Others believe principles inherent in the gospel make marriage again a valid option for divorced persons. They cite the biblical principles of forgiveness and renewal. Those who advocate this position do not believe Jesus intended to establish a legalistic approach to marriage that would condemn every specific remarriage as an adulterous relationship.
Jesus was not a legalist. His interpretation of adultery in Matthew 5:27-28 should warn against being too heavy-handed about similar idealistic sayings. His hard sayings on divorce were intended to emphasize the biblical ideal of marriage as a lifetime commitment and to rebuke those men whose casual attitude towards divorce make a mockery of this ideal. The emphasis in Mark 10:11 ; Matthew 19:9 ; and Luke 16:18 is on the husband who divorces his wife and remarries again. This strongly implies that Jesus was talking about a man who divorces his wife to marry someone else. According to this point of view, Paul affirmed Jesus' ideal and cited Jesus as his authority ( 1 Corinthians 7:10-11 ); however, he acknowledged certain exceptions in trying to apply this ideal (1 Corinthians 7:12-16 ): “But if the unbelieving depart, let him depart, a brother or a sister is not under bondage in such cases” (1 Corinthians 7:15 ).
Persons who hold this view believe Paul's words imply the possibility of divorce and remarriage. This approach also would leave to each divorced person the choice about marriage again. Such a decision would be based on the same biblical principles that apply to any persons considering marriage, plus the biblical principles of forgiveness and renewal. The former principles include these: companionship (Genesis 2:18 ), sexual fulfillment (Genesis 2:24 ; 1 Corinthians 7:8-9 ), distinctive expectations of marriage or singleness (Matthew 19:3-12 ), parenting goals (Genesis 1:27-28 ; 1 Timothy 5:14 ), finding the right kind of person (1 Corinthians 7:39 ).
Difference of interpretation exists about authority and submission in marriage. On the one hand are those who believe that the husband as head of the house has a delegated authority from God over his wife. In this view, the wife's response is submission. On the other side are those whose model is the modern democratic marriage in which the partners are equals in all things. In between are many Christians who advocate a mutual submission in love as the ideal (Ephesians 5:21 ), but also believe the husband has special leadership responsibilities. The key biblical passages in this debate are Ephesians 5:21-32 ; Colossians 3:18-19 ; 1 Peter 3:1-7 . Advocates of strong male authority interpret these passages in light of the various biblical passages reflecting the husband's authority (1 Corinthians 14:34-35 ; 1 Timothy 2:11-14 ). Those who take a more moderate view make the following points: Jesus' actions gave women higher status than was accorded by the society of His day (Luke 8:1-3 ; Luke 10:38-42 ; John 4:7-30 ). Paul's more idealistic statements (Galatians 3:28 ) and actual practice (Acts 16:14-15 ; Acts 17:4 ; Acts 18:2-3 ,Acts 18:2-3,18:18 ,Acts 18:18,18:26 ; Romans 16:3-6 ) indicate that his harder teachings may have been conditioned by specific situations in some first century churches. The admonition to mutual submission in Ephesians 5:21 applies to all the relationships within the church ( Ephesians 5:25-6:10 ) and in a Christian marriage (Ephesians 5:21-33 ). Both Paul and Peter's use of submission refers to voluntary submission in a loving relationship, not the forced subjection to authority in a military organization. The biblical references say submit yourself to one another, not subject the other person to yourself ( Ephesians 5:21-22 ,1619114480_41:24 ; Colossians 3:18 ; 1 Peter 3:1 ). In such a relationship, the husband's role as head is modeled after the self-giving of Christ (Ephesians 5:23 ,Ephesians 5:23,5:25 ,Ephesians 5:25,5:28-30 ); Philippians 2:1-11 ; Colossians 3:19 ; 1 Peter 3:7 ).
Differences of interpretation exist about the role of husbands and wives in marriage. The Bible presents a tension between two truths: the primacy of persons as persons whether they are male or female (Galatians 3:28 ) and human sexuality (maleness or femaleness) as an important aspect of human personality (Genesis 1:27 ). The Bible provides considerable support for traditional roles of husbands and wives; however, the Bible provides examples of a variety of masculine-feminine roles. Martha performed the traditional role of preparing a meal for guests, but Mary played the non-traditional role of learner (Luke 10:38-42 ). Esau was a hunter, but Jacob liked to cook (Genesis 25:27-29 ). In the Bible the leaders in home and in society were generally men; but there were exceptions: Deborah was a judge (Judges 4-5 ); Lydia was a merchant (Acts 16:14 ); Priscilla and Aquila seemed to have acted as a team in teaching Apollos (Acts 18:26 ) and in providing a meeting place for the church (Romans 16:3-5 ; 1 Corinthians 16:19 ). Even the ideal wife of Proverbs 31:1 exercised considerable creativity and initiative in far-ranging projects ( 2 Timothy 1:5 ).
Douglas Anderson
Holman Bible Dictionary - Levirate Law, Levirate Marriage
The legal provision requiring a dead man's brother (levirate) to marry his childless widow and father a son who would assume the dead man's name and inherit his portion of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ). The practice is an important element in the story of Ruth (Ruth 2:20 ; Ruth 3:2 ,Ruth 3:2,3:9-13 ; Ruth 4:1-11 ). The Sadduccees appealed to levirate law in asking Jesus a question about the resurrection (Matthew 22:23-33 ).
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Marriage
An intimate and complementing union between a man and a woman in which the two become one physically, in the whole of life. The purpose of marriage is to reflect the relationship of the Godhead and to serve him. Although the fall has marred the divine purpose and function of marriage, this definition reflects the God-ordained ideal for marriage from the beginning.
The Image of God . Genesis 1:26-27 declares that mankind ( adam [ Genesis 5:1-3 ; 9:6 ; 1 Corinthians 11:7 ; Colossians 3:10 ; James 3:9 ). Although the image of God is never defined in Scripture, contexts in which God's image are discussed must define the concept (cf. 2 Corinthians 3:18 ; and Colossians 3:10 ). God's image in Genesis 1 includes ruling, creativity (procreation), reasoning power, decision-making, and relationship.
The relational aspect of God's image is reflected in the bringing together of male and female in "one flesh" (Genesis 1:27 ; 2:21-24 ). This oneness with sexual differences portrays various aspects of God's image: same nature and essence, equal members, intimate relationship, common purpose, and distinct personalities with different roles, including authority and submission. In the Trinity the Father leads, the Son submits to the Father, and the Holy Spirit submits to both the Father and the Son. However, all three are fully and equally deity. Likewise, male and female in the marriage relationship are of the same nature and essence, equal as persons (cf. Galatians 3:28 ), intimate in relationship, common in purpose, but distinct personalities with different roles: the husband leads and the wife submits to his leadership (cf. Ephesians 5:31 ). Marriage appears designed to reflect the same relational unity-in-plurality as the Godhead. Marriage, the most intimate human relationship, was appropriately chosen to reflect this relational aspect of the divine image. Each sex alone incompletely exhibits this part of the divine image. This open intimate relational aspect of God's image, reflected in marriage, was marred by the fall (cf. Genesis 3:7,10 ), causing each mate to hide (cover oneself) from each other and from God.
Marriage is the most basic and significant social relationship to humankind. This relationship must be nurtured and maintained for the welfare of all. Without marriage, society will fail.
God's design for marital relationship is heterosexual, not homosexual, and monogamous, not polygamous. This relational aspect of God's image in marriage has analogues portrayed in Yahweh's relation with Israel (Isaiah 54:5 ; Jeremiah 31:32 ; Ezekiel 16:8-14 ; Hosea 2:14-20 ) as well as in Christ's relation with the church (Ephesians 5:21-33 ; cf. 1 Corinthians 11:1-3 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-755 ; Revelation 19:7-9 ). Israel is portrayed as Yahweh's wife (Isaiah 54:5 ; Jeremiah 31:32 ; Ezekiel 16:8-14 ; Hosea 2:14-20 ). Her idolatrous unfaithfulness and disobedience to Yahweh are frequently depicted as spiritual "adultery" (Numbers 25:1-4 ; Judges 2:17 ; Jeremiah 3:20 ; Ezekiel 16:15-59 ; 23:1-48 ; Hosea 1:2 ; 2:2-13 ; 3:3 ) for which she was punished by captivity. Yahweh "divorced" his "unfaithful wife" (Isaiah 50:1 ; Jeremiah 3:8 ; Hosea 2:2 ), but ultimately will have compassion and delightfully restore her to faithfulness and holiness (Isaiah 54 ; 62:4-5 ; Ezekiel 16:53-63 ; Hosea 2:14-3:1 ).
New Testament marriage imagery describes the relationship between Christ and his church (cf. 2 Corinthians 11:2 ; Ephesians 5:21-33 ; Revelation 19:7-9 ). The church, Christ's bride, is sacrificially loved by Christ, just as a husband should love his wife (Ephesians 5:25,28-30,33 ). The husband's responsibility is leadership, even as Christ is the head of the church, his body (Ephesians 5:23 ). The wife responds submissively to her husband's sacrificial love like the church submits to Christ's (1 Corinthians 7:32-36 ). The husband's love assists her in becoming holy and blameless before God, even as Christ presents the church without blemish to the Father (Ephesians 5:26-28 ). Christ's relationship with the church becomes the functional model for a marriage relationship.
God commanded the male and female to perform two specific functions: procreation ("fruitful and multiply") and ruling over the earth ("subdue" and "rule") (Genesis 1:28 ). These are functions that reflect God's image. Humankind (male and female) receive God-ordained authority to rule over the rest of creation, but not over each other.
Human reproduction comes through intimate sexual union designed only for the marriage relationship. Cohabitation abuses the procreative nature of the marriage relationship. While reproduction is a divine purpose of marriage, some couples are unable to have children for various physical reasons. This does not make their marriage second-rate or inferior. However, a married couple should desire to obey the divine injunction of procreation if possible. Children are one manifestation of the "one flesh" of marriage. The procreative injunction obviously precludes homosexual "marriages."
The Marriage Union as God's Work . God brings a man and a woman together in marriage (Matthew 19:6 ; cf. Eve to Adam, Rebecca to Isaac ). It is not humankind's prerogative to separate what God has chosen to put together (Matthew 19:6 ).
As creator of the marriage relationship, God becomes the essential supporting party to a marriage, giving wisdom, discretion, understanding, and love to protect the union and to enable it to honor God (Proverbs 2:6-16 ; 1 Corinthians 13 ). A marriage can glorify God and function properly only when both partners are believers in the Messiah, Jesus. Then the Holy Spirit guides and enables them in their roles and functions. Continued reliance upon God is imperative for believing spouses.
Marriage as God's Norm for Humankind . God made man a relational being in his own image. Therefore, there is the need for intimate relationship within humankind (Genesis 2:18 ). Such a relationship is also necessary for the reproduction and multiplication of humankind. Without the fall, probably no one would have ever been single. Perfect people would have yielded perfect marriages. Sin brought flaws in humans that sometimes make it difficult to find or sustain a suitable marriage relationship. Being single for life is an exception and, therefore, is declared to be a gift from God (1 Corinthians 7:7 ). The single person is normally less encumbered in God's work. So, although marriage appears to be God's norm, singleness is neither more nor less spiritual than marriage (Ephesians 5:22,24,33 ).
The Nature of Marriage. Complementarity . The woman was created as "a helper suitable" for the man (ezer kenegdo ) (Genesis 2:18 ). The English "complement" best conveys the meaning of neged . A wife is a "helper" who "complements" her husband in every way. A helper always subordinates self-interests when helping another, just as Paul reminds us in Philippians 2:1-11 . A helping role is a worthy one, not implying inferiority. The wife, therefore, helps the husband to lead their family to serve and glorify God. The husband also complements his wife so that together they become a new balanced entity that God uses in an enhanced way.
A new permanent union ( Genesis 2:24 ). "Cleaving" in Genesis 2:24 pictures a strong bond between the members of this union. The marriage bond was to be permanent. Separation or termination of the marriage union was not an option before sin entered the world and death with it ( Genesis 3 ). All later revelation shows that separation/divorce was because of sin (Deuteronomy 24:1-4 ; Ezra 9-10 ; Malachi 2:14 ; Matthew 5:31-32 ; 19:1-12 ; Mark 10:1-12 ; Luke 16:18 ; 1 Corinthians 7:1-16,39 ). God's ideal was for marriage to be permanent and exclusive.
One flesh ( Genesis 2:24 ). "One flesh" involves the unity of the whole person: purpose, physical, and life—a unity whereby the two become a new, God-designed, balanced life. They counterbalance each other's strengths and weaknesses. Sexually the two become "one flesh" physically as reflected in their offspring. God's ideal exclusiveness of the "one flesh" relationship disallows any other relationship: homosexuality, polygamy, adultery, premarital sex, concubinage, incest, bestiality, cultic prostitution. These and other sexual perversions violate the "oneness" of the marriage relationship and were often punishable by death (Leviticus 20:1-19 ; Deuteronomy 22:13-27 ; cf. Romans 1:26-32 ). Becoming "one flesh" is used in Scripture for the consummating sexual act of marriage.
These aspects of "one flesh" argue against premarital sex, promiscuity, and perversion of the sexual act. The body is the temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19 ), so believers should be holy in their sexual conduct (Leviticus 19:2 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-6 ; 1 Peter 1:15-16 ), keeping marriage pure.
Intimacy . Commitment to exclusive sexual intimacy is treated with dignity, considered honorable and undefiled (Hebrews 13:4 ). Mutual consent is required for any temporal abstinence from sexual relations (1 Corinthians 7:1-5 ). Neither spouse is to exploit the other sexually nor use sex to gratify passionate lust (1619114480_8 ). One is to delight always in the wife of his youth (cf. Proverbs 5:15-19 ; Ecclesiastes 9:9 ). This intimate relationship is encouraged by God's portrayal of its beauty and dignity in the Song of Songs.
Covenant commitment . The covenant analogy attests the commitment between two married partners (Proverbs 2:17 ; Malachi 2:14 ). Emphasis is upon an agreement, a commitment, not upon an analogy of conditionality and unconditionality of some biblical covenants that would extend the marriage covenant analogy beyond its expected scope. This marriage commitment, and faithfulness to it, preclude sexual relations with anyone except one's spouse (Exodus 20:14 ; Leviticus 18,20 ; Romans 1:24-27 ). Although kings frequently employed marriages to seal foreign treaties in the ancient Near East, such commitments were spiritual as well as physical adultery.
Roles . Although male and female are equal in relationship to Christ, the Scriptures give specific roles to each in marriage. Paul, in continually emphasizing the terms "head" and "submit, " summarizes the basic role of husbands and wives respectively.
The husband is to assume headship/leadership (1 Corinthians 11:3 ; Ephesians 5:23 ). The normal meaning of biblical headship is leadership with authority, as exemplified in Christ (cf. 1 Corinthians 11:1-10 ; Ephesians 1:22 ; 4:15 ; 5:23 ). Headship is a benevolent responsibility without disdaining condescension and patronizing of the woman (cf. Matthew 7:12 ; Luke 22:26 ; 1 Peter 3:7 ). Although the husband leads as Christ leads the church, the husband does not have all the rights and authority of Christ. He leads his wife toward dependence upon Christ, not upon himself, for all human leaders are fallible. The husband leads like Christ, being considerate of his wife with respect and knowledge. He considers the ideas of those he leads, because they may be better than his own. Leadership's goal is not to show the leader's superiority, but to elicit all the strengths of people for the desired objective. Headship is not male domination, harshness, oppression, and reactionary negativism (cf. 2 Corinthians 1:24 ; Ephesians 5:29 ; Colossians 3:19 ), for "no one ever hated his own body."
Leadership assumes the responsibility to initiate and implement spiritual and moral planning for a family. Others, however, should also think, plan, initiate, and give input. The husband, however, must accept the burden of making the final choice in times of disagreement, although seldom should this be needed.
The husband's leadership and its authority is a God-given responsibility to be carried out in humility. Inappropriate use of leadership should be curbed by the unique intimacy and union implied in the phrases "one flesh, " "no one ever hated his own body, but he feeds and cares for it, " and "joint heirs of the grace of life" (Ephesians 5:29-31 ; 1 Peter 3:7 ).
The husband leads with an attitude of love. Christ's love for the church provides the model (Ephesians 5:25-33 ; Colossians 3:19 ). The husband loves his wife as he would his own body (Ephesians 5:25 ), nourishing and cherishing her (v. 29). He gives himself sacrificially for her benefit as Christ sacrificially loved the church. Such love rules out treating his wife like a child or servant; rather he assists her to be a "fellow-heir."
Biblical love thinks first of the other person (cf. 1 Corinthians 13 ). It is a mental decision and commitment. God also gave emotions of love that should follow the mental act of love else the emotional aspect becomes infatuation or lust. Love protects, cares, trusts, and delights in the best for the other. The husband initiates love (Ephesians 5:25 ; 1 Peter 3:7 ). He who loves his wife surely loves himself.
The husband is to treat his wife with respect and considerateness (1 Peter 3:7 ). The husband bestows honor upon his wife. He always shows respect for her privately and in public.
The husband appropriately provides for and protects his wife. This does not mean that the wife cannot assist in supporting the family, for Proverbs 31 demonstrates that a godly wife may surely do so. The husband should always be willing to suffer for her safety.
The wife submits to her husband's headship (Ephesians 5:21-24 ; Colossians 3:18 ; 1 Peter 3:1-6 ). Submission's basic meaning is "to submit or subordinate to a higher authority." It is a predisposition to yield to the husband's leadership and a willingness to follow his authority. The husband does not command the wife to do this. The verb implies that she does this voluntarily. Submission does not imply that the wife is inferior, less intelligent, or less competent. Christ submitted to the Father but was not inferior or less God than the Father (1 Corinthians 11:3 ; 15:28 ). Submission does not indicate that the wife puts her husband in the place of Christ. Christ is supreme in all things! The submissive wife does not give up independent thought. Believing wives with unbelieving husbands think independently, while still submitting to their husbands (1 Corinthians 7:13-14 ). She might seek to influence her husband for right and to guide him in righteousness (1 Peter 3:1-2 ). Submission never signifies that a wife gives in to her husband's every demand. If demands are unrighteous, she submits to her higher authority, Jesus.
A wife submits to her own husband. Relationships with other men are different in areas of submission and leadership.
Some feel that Ephesians 5:21 argues that the husband and wife are equally submissive. In its context the best understanding sees this verse as an introduction to three particular areas where people are submissive to one another: wives to husbands (vv. 22-33); children to parents (6:1-4); and servants to masters (6:5-9). Mutual submissiveness does not fit the latter two categories.
A wife should submit with an attitude of honor, reverence, and respect (Psalm 45:11 ; Ephesians 5:33 ). A wife affirms and nurtures her husband's leadership. She submits in the same manner that she and the church submit to Christ ( 1 Peter 3:6 ). This analogy provides a good gauge. The wife demonstrates a gentle and quiet spirit (1 Peter 3:4 ), not demanding her own way or insisting on her rights. A wife's respect is primarily for the role of leadership that her husband occupies, not necessarily for his merits, though that would be the ideal. She recognizes the God-given leadership with regard and deference.
Effect of the Fall on Marriage . The fall made human hearts hard toward God and toward each other. The relational aspect of God's image became marred. Rebellion against submission to male leadership was Satan's initial temptation (Genesis 3:1-6,17 ; contra. Ephesians 5:33 ; 1 Peter 3:1 ). Male domination and harshness crept into leadership (cf. Colossians 3:19 ; 1 Peter 3:7 ). Sin caused polygamy, concubinage, incest, adultery, rape, prostitution, and all kinds of immorality (cf. Leviticus 18,20 ; Romans 1:26-32 ) to damage or destroy the marriage relationship. Marriage commitments are violated. Divorce, premarital sex, and couples living together out of wedlock would never have occurred had not sin entered the world. The fall severely damaged the marriage relationship.
For marriage to function now according to God's ideal, believers in Christ need to marry only believers. Whenever God directly brought a man and woman together in marriage, both were believers. Although pagan customs encouraged marriage with anyone (cf. Genesis 16 ), Israel was given explicit commands not to marry foreigners who would lead them to worship foreign deities (Deuteronomy 7:1-4 ; 13:6-11 ; 17:1-7 ; 20:17 ; 23:2 ). New Testament believers are also not to be "unequally yoked" with unbelievers (2 Corinthians 6:14 ), meaning any action causing the union of believer with nonbeliever, or nonbelieving ways, must be avoided.
Ralph H. Alexander
See also Divorce ; Family Life and Relations ; Sexuality, Human
Bibliography . G. W. Bromily, God and Marriage ; L. J. Crabb, The Marriage Builder: A Blueprint for Couples and Counselors ; J. Piper and W. Grudem, eds., Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood: A Response to Evangelical Feminism ; E. Wheat and G. Perkins, Love Life for Every Married Couple .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Marriage
1. Christian conception of marriage.-During the Apostolic Age the Church was both Jewish and Gentile, and its ideas on marriage had a double background in those of the OT and the heathen. The gravest danger was that the laxity of heathenism with regard to marriage should remain among the Gentile converts. In the heathen world, though the marriage ceremony was in some sort a sacred act, the marriage itself was looked on as an easily-broken contract which either party might dissolve at will. It is not surprising, therefore, that one of the earliest questions which the Corinthians put to St. Paul should be on the subject of marriage (1 Corinthians 7:1). The Apostle, writing as he does to Gentiles, dwells on the fact that marriage is a remedy against sin (1 Corinthians 7:2; cf. also 1 Thessalonians 4:3 f., whether with most modern commentators we interpret τὸ ἑαυτοῦ σκεῦος in that passage of a man’s wife, or, with G. Milligan, of the human body, for the context implies marriage), and gives many warnings against heathen impurities (Romans 1:24; Romans 1:28 16191144806 Romans 6:12 f., Romans 13:14, 1 Corinthians 5:1; 1 Corinthians 5:9-11; 1 Corinthians 6:13-20, 2 Corinthians 12:21, Galatians 5:16-24, Ephesians 2:2 f., Ephesians 4:17-19 16191144808 Ephesians 5:3, Colossians 3:5-8, 2 Timothy 2:22). Other NT writers give like warnings (1 Peter 1:14; 1 Peter 2:11; Luke 14:16-24 f., 2 Peter 2:18, Judges 1:16; Judges 1:18).
The Jews had a much higher conception of marriage than the heathen. Almost all of them were married, as is the case at the present day with practically the whole of the Christian, Jewish, and Muslim populations of the Near East-the exceptions are very few. They looked on the saying ‘Be ye fruitful and multiply’ (Genesis 1:28) as a universal command. Marriage was a sacred duty and was considered most holy. ‘The pious fasted before it, confessing their sins. It was regarded almost as a Sacrament. Entrance into the married state was thought to carry the forgiveness of sins’ (Edersheim, LT [3] 9 i. 352f.). Yet the Jews had not escaped from heathen contamination; not only was divorce extremely common (below, 7), but, as frequent passages in the OT show, impurities of all kinds had to be strongly repressed. In Ephesians 2:2 f. St. Paul does not acquit his own nation in this respect, contrasting the pronouns ‘ye’ (Gentiles) and ‘we also’ (Jews).
Our Lord greatly raised the conception of marriage, even as compared with that of the Jews of the time. It was a Divine institution, which made man and one wife to become one flesh, for God had joined them together (Mark 10:6-9, Matthew 19:4-6, quoting Genesis 2:24). The primeval marriage, the idea of which was obscured by the hardness of man’s heart, was revived, and the teaching about divorce (below, 7) was revolutionized. Nevertheless, marriage was intended only for this life, for there are no marriages in heaven (Matthew 22:30, Mark 12:25, Judges 14:2-10 -these passages, it is needless to say, do not teach that loved ones will be parted hereafter). Jesus chose a marriage feast for His first miracle (John 2:1 ff.). Following the Master’s teaching, St. Paul insists on the holiness of marriage in Ephesians 5:22-33 (cf. Hebrews 13:4); the quotation from Genesis is repeated (Ephesians 5:31), and marriage is said to symbolize the union between Christ and His Church (Ephesians 5:23-28)-a metaphor drawn out in the ancient homily known as 2 Clement (§ 14: ‘the male is Christ, and the female is the Church’). Hence St. Paul dwells on the love that ought to exist between husband and wife, even as Christ loved the Church (Ephesians 5:25; Ephesians 5:28; Ephesians 5:33; cf. Colossians 3:19). St. Peter in a corresponding passage (1 Peter 3:7) dwells rather on the honour due by the husband to his wife; and both apostles, speaking of the duty of wives to husbands in these passages, rather dwell on their subjection to their consorts [4], though in Titus 2:4 f. the love of the wife to the husband is mentioned as well as her subjection. In Luke 20:35 ff. St. Paul reminds married persons that they no longer are mere individuals, but belong to one another, and must not refuse cohabitation with one another except by consent for a season.
2. Christian conception of celibacy.-We must remember that celibacy was extremely uncommon both among the Jews and among the heathen in the first ages of the Church. It was not part of the Nazirite’s vow (Numbers 6:3-5), though no doubt many Nazirites, like John Baptist (if indeed he was one of them), were celibates. And there were some, but not all, of the Essenes who preached the duty of abstinence from marriage, and admitted members to their body only after a probation of three years to test their continency (Josephus, Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) II. viii. 2, 7). In them we see the germ of Gnostic dualism, which taught the inherent evil of matter (Lightfoot, Colossians, ed. 1900, p. 85; see also his essay on this sect, p. 375 ff.). In this respect the Essenes were in direct antagonism with the Pharisees, who strongly supported marriage; but they had some influence in promoting Christian celibacy in the post-Apostolic Age. Among the heathen celibacy can hardly be said to have existed.
Our Lord, while teaching, as we have seen, the holiness of marriage, nevertheless commended celibacy for those ‘to whom it is given’ and who are ‘able to receive it’; for so we must interpret the phrase ‘which made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven’s sake’ (Matthew 19:11 f.). As St. Paul says (1 Corinthians 7:7), ‘each man hath his own gift from God, one after this manner, and another after that.’ Nowhere in the NT is marriage referred to as a state inferior to that of celibacy, however much the latter may be commended under certain circumstances to certain persons. And so, probably, we are to interpret our Lord’s words about leaving ‘house, or wife, or brethren, or parents, or children, for the kingdom of God’s sake’ (Luke 18:29; in || Matthew 19:29, Mark 10:29 the best Manuscripts omit ‘or wife’). He could not have counselled a man to desert his wife or children if he had them. J. Wordsworth suggests (Ministry of Grace, London, 1901, p. 207) that the words may also include leaving an unbelieving and unfaithful wife, or a temporary separation by agreement, when the husband has to go to a part of the world where he cannot take a family (1 Corinthians 7:5 is somewhat analogous).
In the teaching of St. Paul we notice a certain change of view between the earlier and later Epistles. (a) In the earlier Epistles the Apostle plainly expected that the Parousia was imminent (cf. 1 Thessalonians 4:17 : ‘we that are alive, that are left’; 1 Corinthians 16:22 and perhaps 1 Corinthians 15:51). If that were the case, the increase of the race would not be of primary importance; and therefore, while marriage was entirely lawful (1 Corinthians 7:28), and indeed imperative for those who had not the gift of continency (1 Corinthians 7:2; 1 Corinthians 7:9), celibacy was encouraged. ‘It is good for a man not to touch a woman’; ‘I would that all men were even as I myself’; ‘it is good for them if they abide even as I’ (1 Corinthians 7:1; 1 Corinthians 7:7 f.); ‘it is good for a man to be as he is’-whether married or single (1 Corinthians 7:26). Yet St. Paul does not say that celibacy is a higher state, but only that it is expedient by reason of the present distress (1 Corinthians 7:26), because the time is shortened (1 Corinthians 7:25), and he would have Christians free from cares (1 Corinthians 7:32). The lawfulness of marriage is further emphasized by the assertion of the right to marry by St. Paul himself, ‘even as the rest of the apostles, and the brethren of the Lord, and Cephas’ (1 Corinthians 9:5). The meaning of these words is not quite plain; Cephas certainly was married (Matthew 8:14, Luke 4:38), but were all the other apostles and all our Lord’s four brethren in like case? If so, why is Cephas mentioned separately? To the last question there is no clear answer, but the whole verse seems to show, especially in view of Jewish customs (see above), that at least a majority of the apostles and of our Lord’s brethren were married, and that the married state was not inconsistent with the work of a travelling missionary. As a comment on this we have the fact that Aquila, a great Christian worker, travelled about with his wife Prisca (Acts 18:2; Acts 18:26, Romans 16:3, 1 Corinthians 16:19, 2 Timothy 4:19). (b) In the Epistles of the Captivity marriage is mentioned as the normal state, and nothing is said in favour of celibacy (Ephesians 5:31 ff., Colossians 3:18 f.; cf. 1 Peter 3:1-7), while we notice also that in these Epistles little is said of the nearness of Christ’s coming (Philippians 4:5 stands alone). (c) In the Pastoral Epistles marriage is recommended, or as some think required, for the local clergy (1 Timothy 3:2; 1 Timothy 3:4 f., Titus 1:5; see Home), and is also advised for young women (1 Timothy 5:14 Authorized Version , Revised Version margin) or for young widows (Revised Version ). Whatever may be the force of the phrase ‘husband of one wife’ (μιᾶς γυναικὸς ἄνδρα) as excluding certain persons from the ministry (see below, § 5), the whole context would appear to show that St. Paul desired his local officials, the presbyters (‘bishops’) and deacons, to be, at least as a rule, married men, just as the Orthodox Eastern Church demands at the present day that her parish priests should be married, and that their wives should be alive. This does not depend on the untenable exegesis which makes μιᾶς the indefinite article (‘husband of a wife’), but on the word ‘husband’ and the context. There might perhaps be exceptions, of which the Apostle does not stop to speak. We must always bear in mind has it is a mistake to interpret a biblical passage with reference to the bearing that it has on later Christian practice; a disciplinary rule, by its nature, is not intended to be for all time, however suitable it may have been for the First Age. Another passage in these Epistles may also be noticed. St. Paul denounces as a heresy the prohibition of marriage (1 Timothy 4:3); though this does not involve any change of view as compared with the earlier Epistles. In what has been here said, the Pauline authorship of the Pastoral Epistles is assumed; if this be not allowed, the alteration of the Christian view as to the expediency of celibacy between the earlier and the later periods still holds good. But no argument against the Pauline authorship must be deduced from it, for a change of view is very natural in the course of a decade or more, during which a longer experience showed that the early expectation of Jesus’ immediate return was founded on a too hasty assumption; and, moreover, the Epistles of the Captivity serve as a bridge between the earlier and the later views.
In the apostolic period we read of a few persons who led the celibate life. St. Paul himself was unmarried (1 Corinthians 7:7 f., 1 Corinthians 9:5); so were the four daughters of Philip the Evangelist who ‘prophesied’ (Acts 21:9); St. John Evangelist was frequently known in the early Church as ὁ παρθένος, as in the 3rd cent. Gnostic work Pistis Sophia; Tertullian had already called him a ‘celibate (spado) of Christ’ (de Monogam. 17). It is not quite easy to say who are meant by the ‘virgins’ (masc.) of Revelation 14:4. The word is interpreted by Tertullian (de Res. Carn. 27, referring to Matthew 19:12) of celibates; but Swete (Com. in loc.) gives good reasons for thinking that it must apply to married as well as unmarried chastity, and ‘be taken metaphorically, as the symbolical character of the Book suggests.… No exclusion of the married from the highest blessings of the Christian life finds a place in the NT.’
In interpreting the NT it is of some importance to note the comments of those writers who immediately followed the apostles. Ignatius’ idea of celibacy (Polyc. 5) does not go further than our Lord’s teaching. ‘My sisters’ (he says) are to love the Lord and be content with their spouses (συμβίοις) in flesh and spirit; ‘my brothers’ are to love their spouses as the Lord loved the Church (cf. Ephesians 5:29). If anyone can abide in purity (ἁγνείᾳ, i.e. ‘virginity’) to the honour of the flesh of the Lord (cf. 1 Corinthians 6:15), let him abide without boasting. If he boast, he is lost; and if it be known beyond the bishop (πλέον τοῦ ἐπισκόπου: not ‘if he be more famous than the bishop’), he is corrupted. All who marry should do so with the consent of the bishop, that the marriage may be after the Lord (cf. 1 Corinthians 7:39). Thus, in Ignatius’ opinion, the bishop is to be taken into the confidence both of those who marry and of those who wish to remain celibates; in the latter case the intention must not be noised abroad. Similarly Clement of Rome (ad Cor. i. 38) says: ‘He that is pure (ἁγνός) in the flesh, let him be so, and not boast, knowing that it is Another who bestows his continence (ἐγκράτειαν) upon him.’ We note that both Ignatius and Clement use ἁγνός or ἁγνεία of celibacy, though they do not say that celibacy is the higher state. Hermas, on the other hand, in his Shepherd (Mand. iv. 4), describes the chastity both of the married and of the unmarried as ἁγνεία. The phrase of Ignatius, ‘virgins who are called widows’ (Smyrn. 13), has been much discussed. It can hardly mean unmarried women included in the order of widows, for Ignatius in that case would have omitted in his salutation all those who were literally widows, and such a custom is treated as unheard of by Tertullian (Virg. Vel. 9); and ‘virgins’ is therefore probably to be interpreted symbolically as in Revelation 14:4 (above), of women who are pure in heart (see Lightfoot, Apostolic Fathers2, pt. ii.: ‘S. Ignatius and S. Polycarp,’ London, 1889, ii. 323f.).
3. Marriage ceremonies.-The betrothal preceded the actual marriage by several months, but not by more than a year (Edersheim, op. cit. i. 354). It is referred to in 2 Corinthians 11:2, where St. Paul says that he betrothed (ἡρμοσάμην, here only in the NT) the Corinthians to Christ; cf. Deuteronomy 28:30, Proverbs 19:14. In arranging for the betrothal, the intended bridegroom took no part, and matters were settled, as they still are in the East, by the respective parents, or, if they were not alive, by the brother or nearest relative. In the parable the father is said to make a marriage, or a marriage feast (ποιεῖν γάμον), for his son (Matthew 22:2); so in the OT, Genesis 24:3 (Abraham and his steward for Isaac) Genesis 34:4; Genesis 34:8 (Hamor for Shechem) Genesis 38:6 (Judah for Er), 1 Corinthians 7:3 (Manoah for Samson). When the father was not available, the mother sometimes acted, as when Hagar acted for Ishmael (Genesis 21:21) or the mother for her son (2 Esdras 9:47). It is instructive to see how marriage customs, as well as others, persistently survive in the East from biblical times, and we find that among the Oriental Christians of to-day the same practice obtains (Maclean-Browne, Catholicos of the East, p. 144); courtship in the Western sense of the term is little known, and the courting is done by the parents. The betrothal, having been accomplished by crowning with garlands and with some ceremony (Edersheim, loc. cit.), was, and is, absolutely binding, and a breach of it is treated as adultery in Deuteronomy 22:23 f. (ct. 161911448032 Deuteronomy 22:28, Leviticus 19:20); this is illustrated by the position of Joseph as a betrothed husband in Matthew 1:19. It is suggested by Plummer (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) i. 326) that the woman taken in adultery (John 8:4) was betrothed, not married, as she was to be stoned, not strangled. This may be so, since stoning is mentioned in Deuteronomy 22:24, but not in Leviticus 20:10, which gives the death-penalty for the adultery of married persons. Yet in Ezekiel 16:38-40 married adulteresses seem to be meant, and there stoning is mentioned. Strangling was a later form of execution.
The night procession is perhaps the principal feature of the marriage. The bridegroom goes to fetch the bride at night, as in the parable of the Ten Virgins, and brings her to his house at midnight (Matthew 25:6), with lamps-not, according to Edersheim (ii. 455) and Trench (Parables, 248), with torches, as the Roman custom was. These lamps were placed in a hollow cup, affixed to a long pole. A relic of this custom is seen in the present day among the East Syrians (Nestorians), who have the procession in the daytime, but carry two unlighted candles before the bride (Catholicos of the East, p. 153); in their case the bridegroom does not fetch his bride himself, but sends his father or friends, whence the usual expression for ‘to marry a son’ is ‘to bring a bride for him’ (ib.). A reference to these lamps has been seen in 2 Ezra 10:2, but this seems to refer to the lights in the guest-room. Before the bridegroom comes, the bride makes herself ready (Revelation 19:7) with the bath; this was the custom, and seems to be referred to in Ephesians 5:25-27. The herald going before the bridegroom and crying, ‘Behold the bridegroom, come ye forth to meet him’ (Matthew 25:6), is a common feature of Eastern life, in which an expected magnate is usually preceded by such an announcement. But in the parable was the bridegroom returning with his bride to his own house, or going to fetch her? The latter view is taken by Edersheim (ii. 454 ff.), who thinks that the bridegroom was coming from a distance to the wedding in the bride’s house; but the other view, held by most commentators, is much more probable. Normally the wedding is in the bridegroom’s house, and in the absence of any requirement of the parable to the contrary the usual custom must be assumed. And there is an early interpretation of the meaning; the words ‘and the bride’ are added to Matthew 25:1 by DXΣ, Syr-sin, Syr-psh, Vulg. [6] , Arm., some Fathers, and some cursives. There is no doubt that these words are an interpolation, but their addition shows that the authorities named understood the bridegroom to be returning with his bride. It is true that in the best text she is not mentioned; but that is because she is not needed for the purpose of the parable. In a village it would be natural for some of the virgin friends of either party to await the couple outside the place of marriage; and, indeed, our own custom, by which the bridesmaids go to the door of the church to await the bride, is exactly parallel.
No benediction of the marriage is mentioned in the NT, though it will be remembered that the feast itself was a religious act, as was the Agape (Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics i. 166, 173f.). According to Edersheim (i. 355) it was customary among the Jews for the benediction to take place immediately before the supper; a blessing was said over a cup, and presumably the bride and bridegroom drank of it. A benediction seems to be implied in Ignatius, Polyc. 5, where the ‘consent’ of the bishop is required (above, § 2); and it, with a nuptial Eucharist, is expressly mentioned in Tertullian, ad Uxor. ii. 8. For the present custom among Eastern Christians see Catholicos of the East, p. 151. The benediction, which is much overshadowed by the marriage feast, should take place among the E. Syrians in church, but in practice is usually in the house; a little consecrated earth from the martyrs’ tombs and the ring are put into a cup of wine and water, and both parties drink of it. They are crowned with threads of red, blue, and white, and many prayers are said.
The marriage supper follows the benediction, when the bridegroom has returned with his bride; γάμος and γάμοι properly mean this (Matthew 22:8 f.), and then come to mean marriage in general, as in Hebrews 13:4. The feast is given by the bridegroom’s father (Matthew 22:2) or by himself; Samson provided it, though he came from a distance, and this is said to have been the custom of the time (Judges 14:10). The supper was prolonged till late in the night (Luke 12:36; Luke 12:38). The parable of the marriage of the king’s son (Matthew 22:2-14, apparently quite a different incident from that of 1 Peter 4:2) gives an account of it. To refuse an invitation to it without good cause was counted a great insult (Matthew 22:7), for to be bidden at all was an honour: the bidding to the marriage of the Lamb conveys a blessing (Revelation 19:9; cf. Luke 14:15). Before the supper a servant goes to summon the invited guests (Matthew 22:3 f.; cf. Esther 6:14); and this continues to this day in the East, where the absence of clocks makes the custom necessary. At the feast the guests are arranged in order according to their rank (Luke 14:7 ff.). Not only is the bride arrayed in ‘fine linen, bright and pure’ (Revelation 19:8), but each guest wears a wedding garment (ἔνδυμα γάμου, Matthew 22:11); the lack of it is an insult, whether or not we are to suppose a reference to the custom of giving garments as presents by kings and great men in the East (so Edersheim, Trench)-and refusing a gift is ever a sign of contempt (cf. the story of Esau and Jacob’s presents, Genesis 33); in the parable no excuse is offered. The feast lasts for seven or fourteen days (Genesis 29:27, Judges 14:12, Tobit 8:19), and during this time all fasting is superseded (Mark 2:19; cf. Edersheim, i. 663). The bride and bridegroom are treated as king and queen, and are crowned (cf. above), and the bride veiled (Genesis 29:23; Genesis 29:25 : this is why Jacob did not discover Laban’s fraud).
The friend of the bridegroom
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Marriage (i.)
MARRIAGE (I.)
1. Oriental estimate of marriage.—Of the three great events in family life—birth, marriage and death—that of marriage was rendered important by the amount of consideration devoted to the choice of son-in-law or daughter-in-law, to the settlement of the customary financial conditions, and to the arrangements connected with the wedding festivities. It was recognized as a step leading to grave consequences, for, in the case of a daughter, if the marriage should prove unsatisfactory, she would likely return to her former home discredited and unhappy, and there would be a feeling of irritation and injustice between the families concerned. An almost equal anxiety attended the arrival of the young wife to live with her husband’s parents, and to perform her duties under the often exacting superintendence of her mother-in-law. In a decision thus affecting the whole circle of relatives, it was considered natural and inevitable that both the selection of the individual and the settlement of all financial matters should be decided by the parents and guardians of those about to be married. The impulsive self-will of Esau which showed itself in the contempt of his birthright, led him to set aside the above tradition by marrying two of the daughters of Heth (Genesis 26:34; Genesis 26:33; Genesis 27:46). Woman was not thought of as having a personal existence at her own disposal, but as a unit in the family, and under the protection and authority of her male relatives. In marriage she was practically the purchased possession of her husband, becoming bèûlah to him as her ba‘al, or owner and master.
2. Betrothal.—This was a binding transaction declaring the fact of prospective marriage, and specifying the terms agreed upon by the contracting parties, that is, by those acting on their behalf. Although in both families the intention of marriage might have been decided upon by the parents from the infancy of their children, yet the formality of betrothal was not proceeded with until marriage could be regarded as a possibility in the near future. On the one hand, it was undesirable to make gifts or pay an instalment in a compact that might never be implemented by marriage, and, on the other hand, it was equally undesirable to dedicate a daughter to one who might not live to undertake her support, and thus cause her to be regarded as a widow. During a prolonged interval the man might move to another part of the land or fail to carry out the betrothal stipulations, and then the intended bride would require to get a writing of divorce or separation before she could be betrothed or married to another. While the act of betrothal by the presence of witnesses and the assemblage of friends had the importance of a ceremonial function, yet the spirit of bargaining was generally so keenly aroused, and the process of compromise so protracted and complex, that the situation scarcely admitted of immediate marriage rejoicings. Besides, it frequently happened that an interval of time was needed in order that the bridegroom might render the stipulated service, or acquire the sum of money agreed upon as the present to be given to the father and brothers of the bride. Thus there was usually an interval of a year or two, or it might be of several years, between the betrothal and the celebration of marriage.
3. Ceremony of marriage.—As a welcome sequel following in due time upon the discussion and settlement of the marriage portion and similar matters, the wedding itself was always an occasion of joyful festivity and congratulation.
(a) Place.—While in ancient times the marriage doubtless took place occasionally in the home of the bride, yet the fact that the bridegroom came to claim one who had become his by the fulfilment of assigned conditions, and further, the widespread tradition of forcible opposition to her removal from her people, point to the greater frequency of marriage in the house of the bridegroom’s parents. Thither the bride was conducted by a company of friends, carrying also her personal outfit and household belongings. If her people were of the peasant class, and she was merely passing to a neighbouring village, she would be already in her bridal dress and seated upon a led horse or mule, while in front of the procession young men and maidens individually engaged in sword-play and dancing. In the larger villages, such as Bethlehem and Nazareth, the robing of the bride was more elaborate, and was carried out by the help of women after her arrival at the new home. On that day, the bridegroom, instead of following the primitive custom of going to claim his bride or to meet her procession on the way, remained absent from the house with his relatives or friends until all preparations had been fully made.
(b) Time.—The marriage generally took place in the evening, so that those coming from a distance might not fail to arrive, and those who were occupied during the day might have liberty to attend. During the evening, as he sat among his friends, the bridegroom, in the exercise of his prerogative as the chief person concerned, signified his desire to move homewards. Upon this the wedding procession was formed. Lanterns and torches were lit to guide him and his companions through the dark, silent streets. Those who were waiting to see the procession pass raised the peculiar Oriental cry of marriage festivity, and thus, as the cry was taken up, the fact of his approach was known along the path in front of him up to the house in which the bride and her attendants were waiting. Owing to the stillness of the air and the slow pace of the illuminated procession, the cry might be heard half an hour before the arrival of the bridegroom. Then those who had merely come to do honour by joining in the procession returned to their houses, and the relatives and invited guests passed in to the wedding ceremony and festivity. These rejoicings were maintained for several days or even a week, according to the worldly circumstances of the family.
Many of these marriage customs are alluded to by Christ in His teaching, as the subject was familiar to His hearers, and any parabolic lessons deduced from it would be easily understood. Thus the bridegroom could excuse himself for not attending the wedding of another, seeing that his own invited guests were returning to pay visits of congratulation and good-will, and would feel offended if they found him absent (Luke 14:20). It was a privilege and honour to the guest to be invited to the wedding feast, and an affront to those who invited him if he failed to attend (Matthew 22:3; Matthew 22:9). It was late when the wedding guest returned to his own house (Luke 12:36). It was for the bridegroom to tarry until he was pleased to appoint the hour of his coming (Matthew 24:42; Matthew 25:6; Matthew 25:13). The reference to marrying and giving in marriage, with the Flood at the door, exemplified that pre-occupation of the mind with worldly interests and ambitions by which men forget the transitoriness of life and the precariousness of its possessions. One of the marks of the new Kingdom was to be its power of carrying disruption into the closest and strongest family relationships at the call of loyalty to its larger and higher citizenship (Matthew 10:35-37; Matthew 12:46-49). With such a background of tradition and custom Christ gave to marriage the support of His own presence, and spoke of its Divine origin and temporary nature (John 2:2, Matthew 19:4-6; Matthew 22:30). In the Epistles it is evident that the higher conception of marriage prevalent among the Jews was gravely endangered by the inherited views still familiar to the mind, though condemned by the conscience, in the Gentile membership of the Church (1 Corinthians 7). The marriage relationship was used to typify the intimate vital affinity between Christ and the Church (Ephesians 5:22-33). In Revelation 21:2 the comparison of the New Jerusalem to an Oriental bride adorned for her husband, appropriately sets forth the protracted development and perfected beauty of the Kingdom of God.
The bridegroom’s friend (John 3:29) must be distinguished from ‘the children of the bride-chamber’ (Matthew 9:15), who were simply the invited guests. In Judaea there were two such ‘friends,’ one acting for the bridegroom, the other for the bride. They conducted all the preliminary inquiries, made the bargains as to dowry, etc., arranged the betrothal, and finally led the betrothed couple to the bride-chamber. They were responsible for the legality of the whole proceedings, and were guarantors of the bride’s virgin chastity. The bridegroom’s voice, in converse with the bride, assured them pleasantly that their work had been successful. The discharge of the ‘friend’s’ functions was liable to gross abuses (see Mishnic tractate Middoth). There was no corresponding functionary in Galilee, and so there is no allusion to him in the account of the marriage at Cana. Similar offices are discharged by the friends of would-be bridegrooms in Palestine to-day. An ardent suitor once sent to the present writer a sum of £40, with the request that it be given to a friend, on condition that he should secure the goodwill of a certain maiden, and the consent of her parents to his suit.
The bride-chamber is probably = Heb. heder, ‘the nuptial chamber’ (Judges 15:1), in which stood the huppah, the bridal ‘bed with a canopy’ (Joel 2:16; Gesenius, s.v.). In all the lands of their dispersion the Jews still apply this name, huppah, to the richly embroidered canopy under which the contracting parties stand during the marriage ceremony.
G. M. Mackie and W. Ewing.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Marriage (ii.)
MARRIAGE (II.).—Jesus does not treat of the family from the point of view of the sociologist, but from that of the teacher of religion and morals. The high estimate which He places upon it is to be seen, not alone in His regard for His mother, but more particularly from His use of the institution as His most characteristic analogy for the Kingdom of God. As far as the condition of its future members in the present evil age is concerned, He describes the Kingdom as a social order in which the relationship of men to God is analogous to that of sons to a father; and their relation to each other, therefore, is like that existing between brothers. Jesus also frequently uses figures drawn from marriage customs to illustrate His teaching concerning the coming of the Kingdom. It would be a mistake to see in this use of the paternal and filial relations a survival of that primitive religious concept which made members of a clan the sons of its gods. The usage of Jesus contains no reflexion of such a primitive thought, but rather springs from His high appreciation of marriage as it existed in the conventionalized civilization of the Jews of His day.
1. As an institution Jesus regards marriage as essentially physical, and intended only for the present age. Those who were to share in the blessings of the eschatological Kingdom would neither marry nor be given in marriage, but would be possessed of the non-physical body in the resurrection (Matthew 22:23-30, Mark 12:18-25, Luke 20:27-36). His teaching at this point is not an endorsement of the view that immortality is to be without personal relations, but is rather a relegation of physical relations to physical conditions.
The Sadducees, in their query which gave rise to this teaching of Jesus, raised the question of the levirate marriage. Jesus’ answer does not touch upon that peculiar institution, but deals rather with the nature of marriage itself. He was no social reformer. In all the records of His teaching there is nothing to indicate that He gave to marriage any new social content or custom. Like His Apostles after Him, Jesus accepted marriage as an existing institution which gave rise to practical moral questions. His use of the customs of the time (cf. Matthew 22:2 ff., John 2:1 ff.) was for the purpose of illustration rather than in the way of either approval or disapproval. It follows that Jesus did not look upon marriage as psychical or spiritual. Such transcendental teaching is foreign to the practical temper of Christianity. In its place is the assumption that the family, like all other members of social life, comes within the region of the great commandment of love. Jesus assumes that the father loves the child, and that brothers love each other. Farther than this His discussions do not go, but the inference is imperative that the relations between husband and wife fall within the great teaching of Matthew 5:44-48 quite as truly as other social relations of individuals. If quarrelsome brothers are to be reconciled, most assuredly should there be reconciliation between husband and wife.
2. Marriage as a social institution Jesus regards as of Divine origin. It is one of the primal facts of humanity, established by God before the giving of the Law (Matthew 19:5-6, Mark 10:6-8). Jesus grants that because of the exigencies of social development Moses modified the institution to the extent of permitting and regulating divorce; but such modification Jesus evidently regarded as out of harmony with the institution. According to the original Divine purpose, man and wife were no longer two persons but one flesh. That is, marriage was to be monogamous. Any form of polygamy is thus excluded from His ideal.
It is noteworthy that Jesus in His quotation of Genesis 2:24 does not follow the Heb. reading, in which οἱ δύο of the LXX Septuagint has no equivalent. Polygamy is not excluded by the Hebrew, but is obviously inconsistent with the LXX Septuagint statement, and even more so with the inference drawn from the passage by Jesus. It is from this point of view that one must approach the subject of divorce. (See Divorce).
3. Jesus, however, does not make marriage a supreme good. Rather is it one of those great goods of an imperfect age which are to be subordinated to the supreme good of sharing in the Kingdom of God, i.e. eternal life. Yet at no point is the sanity of His teaching more in evidence than here. He Himself was unmarried, but He never counsels celibacy. He does not even take the mediating position of St. Paul (1 Corinthians 7:7; 1 Corinthians 7:29; 1 Corinthians 7:32-40). In this particular, as in so many others, He is in such opposition to the Essenes of His day as quite to overbalance any of those superficial resemblances which have been discovered between His teaching and the ascetic doctrines of that sect. At the same time, just because marriage, though a good, is one which must pass with the present age, He teaches that in some cases it must be avoided. Matthew 19:12 speaks of those who have made themselves eunuchs for the sake of the Kingdom of heaven, i.e. who, because of exceptional circumstances, have become celibates. In certain other expressions He distinctly recognizes the necessity for some among His followers to leave their families in the interests of a devotion to His cause (Matthew 18:25, Luke 14:26). These sayings, however, are not to be interpreted as in any way a prohibition of marriage, or as an elevation of the unmarried state to a plane superior to that of marriage. To draw such an inference is to misinterpret the entire tendency of His teaching, and to elevate into a controlling position His recognition of exceptional and particularly difficult situations in which one is compelled to practise a supreme self-sacrifice in order to remain loyal to a supreme ideal. The sayings are to be interpreted in accordance with those others in which Jesus concedes the fact that the family circle is not proof against evil influences—sayings which aroused hostility against His followers (Matthew 10:34 ff., Luke 12:49-53).
The Early Church under the influence of extra-Christian ideals moved along the line suggested by St. Paul towards the approval of the highest state of celibacy. Revelation 14:4 gives the highest honours to those men who have not been married. Clement of Alexandria (Strom. iii. 9. 63) refers to the unauthentic saying of Jesus preserved in the Gospel of the Egyptians, ‘I came to destroy the works of the female.’ Similarly Clement (ib. 16) reports Jesus as having said, ‘Eat every herb, but that which hath bitterness (i.e. maternity) eat not.’
A consideration of this teaching of Jesus leads naturally, therefore, to the genuinely Christian conception of marriage as a relationship which, though in the very nature of the case limited to the physical mode of existence, is yet sacred. The ascetic ideal is thus utterly lacking here as in all the teaching of Jesus, and in its place is to be found all that is normal in the so-called Greek ideal of life, together with the ennobling Christian ideal of love. See, further, Adultery, Celibacy, Divorce.
Literature.—Westcott, Social Aspects of Christianity; Mathews, Social Teaching of Jesus, ch. iv.; Peabody, Jesus Christ and the Social Question, ch. iii.; M. J. Savage, Jesus and Mod. Life, p. 162; W. Cunningham, The Path towards Knowledge, p. 1; cf. also the standard treatises on the teaching of Jesus.
Shailer Mathews.
Webster's Dictionary - Frank-Marriage
(n.) A certain tenure in tail special; an estate of inheritance given to a man his wife (the wife being of the blood of the donor), and descendible to the heirs of their two bodies begotten.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Marriage
Isaiah 54:1 (a) This situation is described more particularly in Galatians 4:27. The Lord is telling us that Israel is married to GOD, and is "the wife" of GOD. GOD calls Himself "her husband." The ungodly are those who have no relationship to GOD. Their number far exceeds the number of those who belong to GOD. Those on the broad road are many, while those on the narrow road are few. This is also the story of the difference between Israel and the Church. The laws of Sinai produced a few followers, but the love of Calvary has produced a multitude of followers. The Jewish nation has remained few in number, while among the Gentiles the Gospel has brought multitudes into the family of GOD.
Isaiah 62:4 (a) The time is coming when Israel, GOD's people, will again own all their own land to the east of the sea, they will walk with GOD, they will live godly lives, they will love the GOD of their land, and He will again be able to shower upon them the blessings of Heaven, hath spiritual and physical.
Jeremiah 3:14 (a) In this place GOD is calling His people Israel to return to Him in sweet fellowship and confiding trust so that He may again be to them all that a husband should be.
Malachi 2:11 (a) The affection of Judah for idols is compared to a marriage wherein the heart that should have been joined to the Lord turned away from Him to be joined to idols.
Romans 7:4 (a) This is a beautiful type of the blessed relationship which is brought about when the sinner trusts the Lord JESUS and is born again. It is the act of being saved wherein the sinner gives himself to CHRIST and CHRIST gives Himself to the sinner in a very sweet, eternal and devoted union.
Revelation 19:7 (a) In this way is described that precious, mysterious union which will take place some day in the sky between the Lord JESUS and His bride, the Church. Individually, we are married to CHRIST at the moment we are saved. Collectively, we will enjoy this precious mutual event some day above the clouds when all the Church of GOD is united together, differences are forgotten, sectarian lines are eliminated, and the saints go marching in to the marriage supper of the Lamb.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Marriage
The Scriptures, both of the Old Testament and the New, have in a great variety of circumstances shew in what high esteem the holy estate of marriage was considered by holy men of old. And though in the Old Testament we read of many wives being joined to one husband, yet our Lord Jesus expressly said, that it was not so from the beginning. (Matthew 19:3-9) And there is reason to believe, that in numberless instances where we read of a man having more wives than one, all but one were rather as concubines than wives. Such, for example, as Abraham's Hagar and Ke-turah. And I think it very plain, from the New Testament doctrine upon this subject, that from the very first order of things, even from the creation, the spiritual marriage and unity between Christ and his church was all along respected by the marriage-state, and uniformly intended to be shadowed forth. In confirmation of this opinion, I beg the reader to consult ‘the following Scriptures: Genesis 2:18-25; Ephesians 5:22-33; Hebrews 13:4. And when the readers hath fully considered the force of these Scriptures: let him turn to John's gospel, second chapter and there read how the Lord Jesus honouered the marriage both with his presence and first miracle that he wrought; than let him turn to the fifth chapter of Mathew's Gospel, and Luke the sixteenth and eighteenth, and mark how strongly the Lord attacheth adultery to the separation of men and their wives. From the whole of which taken together, I think it is very plain, not only of the original design from the beginning, that every woman should have her own husband, and, every husband his own wife, but also that the married state was intended, in the most dear and tender manner, to set forth and display Christ's union with his church. Perhaps it may not be improper under this article, to make another observation in the allusion to the customs of the East on the celebration of their marriages, and which may serve to illustrate and explain, in some measure, that circumstance respecting the man without a wedding garment, which our Lord speaks of in the marriage-feast the king made for his son. (See Matthew 22:1-14)
We cannot need to be informed how splendid and costly the entertainments made for marriage feasts always were in the East, Their ordinary entertainments were great, and no expense was spared in them; but even the poorest of the people on bridal occasions exerted themselves to make the festivity as rich as possible. In the marriage therefore of the king's son, we may well suppose the display of magnificence must have been proportionably great. The circumstance of the wedding garment provided for the guests, was in exact conformity to the oriential custom. Certain rich vests, or caffans, were provided for every one, therefore, when the king came in to see the guests, and found a man without the wedding garment, the contempt he had shewn in refusing to put on what must have been provided for him, excited the king's displeasure, and rendered him a just object of the king's wrath. This explains the sense of the parable. But the spiritual meaning of the parable is still infinitely more important. The invitation of the gospel to the marriage of the Lord Jesus with our nature, runs in the same charter of grace. "Go ye into the highways, and as many as ye shall and bid to the marriage." So that wheresoever the sound of the gospel comes, it may be truly said, in the language of the parable, the invitation goeth forth, and there will be gathered together, all, as many as the servants find, both bad and good; and the wedding will be furnished with guests. The man therefore whom the king finds at his table without the wedding garment, is a type or repre%sentation of every one of the same description and character, who contumaciously refuses to be clothed with the robe of Christ's righteousness, but comes before the king with the filthy rags of his own righteousness; and as at the sight and remonstrance of the king that man was speechless, unable to speak a word by way of softening his guilt, so at the last day, when the Lord Jesus shall come to be glorified m his saints, and admired in all that believe, all that are found without the justifying garment of Jesus's salvation will be struck dumb, and overwhelmed with guilt and shame. The soul that is Christless now, will be speechless then. Such seems to be the evident scope and tendency of this beautiful parable of our Lord.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - the Bidden to the Reat Marriage Supper And Some of Their Excuses
YOU are all bidden to this great marriage supper. The invitations sent out to our marriage suppers have to be limited to the more intimate friends of the bride and the bridegroom. Our largest houses would not hold the half of the friends we would like to see with us on such happy occasions. But there is no such limitation here. You are all bidden to this marriage. And the only limitation tonight lies entirely with yourselves. What, then, is your answer to be tonight?
This is a most extraordinary marriage and marriage supper. And therefore you must not measure what is now to be said about this marriage by what you have seen or heard of the marriages of this world. For there are far better worlds than this world, and there are far better marriages than this world has ever seen. Indeed, this marriage that is in your offer tonight is the only real and true and perfect marriage that has ever been made in this or in any other world, or that ever will be made. You have been dreaming about marriages all your days, but a marriage like this has never entered your most extravagant imaginations. For this is nothing less than the marriage of the Eternal Son of God with your own immortal soul. You, sitting there, are the bride, and Jesus Christ is the Bridegroom. And the Father of the Bridegroom has His heart so much set upon this marriage that he has sent His servant tonight to say to you that all things are now ready. Some of our marriages take a long time to get all things ready. And this great marriage has not by any means been made ready in a day. This marriage was actually proposed and planned for and the preparations began to be made for it before the foundations of this world were laid. You like to read and hear about marriages, and the arranging of marriages, and how the course of true love did, or did not, run smooth. Well, I, like you, have read many love romances in my day, and have delighted in them in my day; but this great love, and the sometimes smooth, and sometimes stormy, course it has had to run, quite out of sight eclipses all other romances to me now. So much so, that I have for long wholly given up reading anything else except about this everlasting love. But this is the immediate and the main point that all things are ready now. All things that the bride needs to make herself ready are ready now. And all things that the Bridegroom needs are ready now. The Father is ready to receive you. The Son stands ready to be for ever united to you, and to have you united to Him. And the Holy Ghost stands beside the Son ready, and book in hand like the minister, to pronounce you the Lamb's wife. And it only remains for you to say yes, or no. It only remains for you to say that your heart within you is as the chariots of Amminadib in the Song of Solomon, and your marriage is consummated, or will be consummated immediately.
This very same message and invitation was once sent to a congregation of people just like yourselves; and they all, with one consent, began to make excuse. We can scarcely believe it about them, but it must be true, else it would not be recorded against them to all time, as it is here recorded. Come, said the servant to those that were bidden: Come, for all things are now ready. But they all, with one consent, began to make excuse. The first said unto the servant, I have bought a piece of ground, and I must needs go to see it; I pray thee have me excused. And another said, I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to prove them; I pray thee have me excused. And another said, I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come. You are sometimes like that yourselves among the dinner and supper invitations of our own city. You hear with apprehension sometimes of certain dinners and suppers that are soon to come on. Your hearts are not in those intended entertainments, and you would give anything not to be invited to them. And when you are invited you are at your wits' end how to answer so as not to give an unpardonable offence. You sit at your desk and you bite your pen over your excessively difficult answer. You try one form of answer and you tear it up; the lie is too transparent. 'Thank you,' you at last answer, 'but I have an engagement already on my hands for that very evening. I have done my best to get out of it, but it is impossible.' Or you try this-A friend of yours, that you have not seen for many years, has offered you a visit on that evening on his way through the city and you cannot put him off; or, you have a most important meeting down for that evening and for that hour, at which, indeed, you are already advertised to take the chair. 'Accept my most sincere apology,' you add, 'and convey my best respects to your honoured guest.' The dinner belongs to another political, or ecclesiastical, or civic, party than that to which you belong. There are old sores in your mind against your proposed host as well as against some of the guests who are sure to be there. In short, you cannot and you will not go. Even at the risk of your absence being misunderstood, and taken in ill part, you will not go. 'We will not trouble him again,' say the host and the hostess to one another over your transparent subterfuge; 'he will come the next time he is asked to any dinner of ours.'
Those were clever enough excuses that your predecessors in Israel made. Indeed, they were entirely true excuses, rather than merely clever. For the real truth was they had no heart for that invitation. All their treasure, and consequently all their heart, was elsewhere. The first man's treasure was his newly-bought piece of ground. The second man's treasure was his five yoke of oxen. While the third man had the best treasure and the best excuse of all. For he had a young wife at home, and the dinner was never dressed that would draw him away from her side so soon. Now what is your excuse tonight? You have an excuse that you have sent up as your answer before now; often before now. Is it to be the same excuse and answer tonight again? It is as if an angel had come straight from heaven to you with an invitation addressed to you in his hand. There he is, standing in the passage at the end of your pew. Yes, there he is. It is not the first time I have seen him standing impatiently there. But tonight it may be the last time. When he goes home tonight empty again his Master may well be so angry this time that He may swear that your invitations shall be no longer. 'He is joined to his ground, and to his oxen, and to his wife-let him alone.' And, then, what will all these things do for you against the anger of Almighty God, and against the wrath of the Lamb? Whereas, say Yes! and all things are yours, and you are His, and He is God's. Wait one moment, then, O impatient angel: wait, just wait one moment! And then speed up with your answer to your Lord.
But even that sufficient danger and disaster is not all. There are more men involved in your salvation or damnation than yourselves. Your ministers are almost as much involved as you are. O light-hearted students, go and make your piece of bread in some much safer calling. For God lays this same awful order on all His ministers,-Go, He says, and compel them to come in. Compel is His very word. That is your minister's ordination oath, and if you are lost: if you go on to the end making excuses and refusals, your lost eternity will be at your minister's door, as well as at your own. Your minister must compel you therefore, if he is not to be involved in your ruin. 'Did you do all that it was commanded you to do?'-it will be demanded of him on that day! 'You knew quite well that that man there, and that woman there, were no more saved than were the seats they sat on, and what did you do? Did you let them fall asleep while you delivered my message to them? Did you tell them plainly how it would end with them? Or were you afraid to offend them, and lose their approval and their patronage? Did you demand of them every Sabbath day what provision they had made against death and judgment? Did you preach every sermon of yours as if it were your last and their last? And as if you and they might be summoned before the great white throne at the end of your sermon? Did you compel them to see that there were only two things possible before them-the right hand or the left: heaven or hell: the wrath of the Lamb, or His everlasting love? If you did all that, then you are clear of their blood. But if you did not do all that, and that continually, you are no minister of mine.' O men and women! Be not so inhuman as to drag down your minister with yourselves. Say, at any rate, to God's angel that your minister is not to blame. Say to him that your minister did all that mortal man could do. Say to him that your minister's hands are pure of your blood, and that you alone are without excuse.
This parable, it is much to be feared, will have a very visible fulfilment in this house during the next fortnight. For this day fortnight the marriage supper of the Lamb is to be made ready here. And from tonight onward this call will go forth to all this congregation,-The Lord's Supper is again made ready. Come and partake of it. Prepare yourselves in the ways appointed you, and then come to the Lord's Table. But when the two days of special preparation are come, what will we see here? We will see the church on the Thursday evening, and on the Saturday afternoon, not one-fourth full: till your ministers will be ashamed to have brought two of God's servants to preach to your empty pews. So many intending communicants will, with one consent, begin to make excuse. One will say, The hour is so late. Another will say, The weather is still so unsettled. Another will say, Those services are getting antiquated and out of date and so few people attend them. Another will say, To tell the truth I had wholly forgotten about the communion, and my wife and I have a dinner-party in our house that evening. Another will say, The young people are at their lessons on Thursday night, and they need fresh air on Saturday afternoon, and are away out of the town on their bicycles. And then the ministers and the elders will get such a refreshment and such a preparation from those two services that they will look round and will say to themselves:-Oh, why were so and so not here? What a blessing they have lost. What can they have got elsewhere to make up to them for the loss of such a preparation-service as this has been? And then those who so excused themselves on the Thursday and the Saturday will come up so unprepared on the Sabbath that when the King comes in to see the guests it will be impossible for Him to wink at the state of matters between Him and many who will intrude themselves that day. Till in very faithfulness He will say to them, Friend, how camest thou in hither not having a wedding garment? But be not speechless tonight. Come tonight. Say yes tonight. For all things are now ready, wedding garment and all.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Marriage
A convenant between a man and a woman, in which they mutually promise cohabitation, and a continual care to promote the comfort and happiness of each other. By Grove thus: "A society formed between two persons of different sexes, chiefly for the procreation and education of children." this union is very near and strict, and indeed indissoluble but by death, excepting in one case; unfaithfulness in the one or the other by adultery or fornication, Romans 7:2 . Matthew 5:32 . It is to be entered into with deliberation at a proper age, and with mutual consent, as well as with the consent of parents and guardians, under whose care single persons may be. It is a very honourable state, Hebrews 13:4 . being an institution of God, and that in Paradise, Genesis 2:1-25 : Christ honoured marriage by his presence, and at such a solemnity wrought his first miracle, John 2:1-25 : Moreover, it is honourable, as families are formed and built up, the world peopled with inhabitants; it prevents incontinence and fornication, and, where the various duties of it are attended to, renders life a blessing. The laws of revelation, as well as most civilized countries, have made several exceptions of persons marrying who are nearly related by blood. The marriage of parents and children appears, at first view, contrary to nature, not merely on account of the disparity of age, but of the confusion which it introduces into natural relations, and its obliging to inconsistent duties; such as reverence to a son, and the daughter to be equal with the father.
Nor can the son or daughter acquit themselves of such inconsistent duties as would arise from this unnatural union. The marriage of brothers and sisters, and of some other near relations, is likewise disapproved by reason on various accounts. It frustrates one design of marriage, which is to enlarge benevolence and friendship, by cementing various families in a close alliance. And, farther, were it allowed, young persons instead of entering into marriage upon mature consideration, with a settled esteem and friendship, and a proper concern and provision for the support and education of children, would be in danger (through the intimacy and affection produced by their near relation, and being bred together) of sliding in their inconsiderate years into those criminal familiarities which are most destructive of the great ends of marriage. Most nations have agreed to brand such marriages as highly criminal, who cannot be supposed to have derived their judgment from Moses and the Israelites. It is probable God expressly prohibited these marriages in the beginning of mankind, and from the first heads of families the prohibition might be transmitted as a most sacred law to their descendants.
See INCEST. Some have supposed from those passages, 1 Timothy 3:2 . Titus 1:6 . that bishops or pastors ought never to marry a second wife.
But such a prohibition would be contrary to natural right, and the design of the law itself; neither of which was ever intended to be set aside by the Gospel dispensation. It is more probably designed to guard against polygamy, and against divorce on frivolous occasions; both of which were frequent among the Jews, but condemned by our Lord, Matthew 19:3-9 . The duties of this state are on the part of the husband, love, superior to any shown to any other person; a love of complacency and delight, Proverbs 5:18-19 . Chaste and single. Provision for the temporal good of the wife and family, 1 Timothy 5:3 . Protection from abuse and injuries, Ruth 3:9 . 1 Sam 35: 5, 18. Doing every thing that may contribute to the pleasure, peace, and comfort of the wife, 1 Corinthians 7:33 .
Seeking her spiritual welfare, and every thing that shall promote her edification and felicity. the duties on the part of the wife are, reverence, subjection, obedience, assistance, sympathy, assuming no authority, and continuance with him, Ephesians 5:32-33 . Titus 2:5 . 1 Timothy 5:11-12 . Ruth 1:16 .
See articles DIVORCE, PARENT. Grove's Mor. Phil. vol. 2: p. 470; Paley's Mor. Phil. ch. 8: vol. 1: p. 339; Bean's Christian Minister's Advice to a New-married Couple; Guide to Domestic Happiness; Advantages and Disadvantages of the Marriage State; Stennett on Domestic Duties; Jay's Essay on Marriage; Doddridge's Lect. 225, 234, 265, . vol. 1: oct. ed.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Marriage
This is God's institution: He said it was not good that man should be alone, and He provided a suitable help for Adam in the person of Eve. Adam said, "This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman (isha ), because she was taken out of Man (ish ). Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh." Genesis 2:23,24 . This declaration of union was confirmed by the Lord, who, in quoting the above, added, "Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh. What therefore God hath joined together, let not man put asunder." Matthew 19:5,6 ; Mark 10:7-9 . It is confirmed also by being taken as a type of the sacred union of the Lord with the church: "We are members of his body, of his flesh and of his bones. For this cause shall a man leave his father and mother, and shall be joined unto his wife, and they two shall be one flesh. This is a great mystery: but I speak concerning Christ and the church." Ephesians 5:30-32 .
All this shows that God's institution of marriage was the union of one man and one woman, the two and only two, becoming one. What is more than this is not of God, but is of human lust. This order was first broken through by Lamech, the sixth from Adam, who had two wives. Long after this instances are recorded of wives, on account of their great desire for children, giving their maid servants to their husbands: an act that would now be judged as most unnatural in a wife. Sarai gave her Egyptian handmaid to Abram 'to be his wife' (the same word for 'wife' being used for both Sarai and Hagar), and God said He would make of Ishmael a great nation. Jacob's two wives gave their handmaids to their husband, and thus he had four wives. God reckoned the twelve sons of these four women equally as sons of Jacob, and they became the heads of the twelve tribes. It might have been thought that God would not have blessed the issue of these unions, but He did: there is no record of any law having been given on this subject.
In early times marriages were also contracted between near relatives. This was altered by the law of Moses as well as restrictions introduced as to divorce, though even under the law, because of the hardness of their hearts, Moses allowed them to put away their wives for any cause, "but from the beginning it was not so," and from the time the Lord was on earth it was not to be so any longer. Matthew 19:5-9 . The choice of persons to be appointed as bishops and deacons in the church, was restricted to those who were the husbands of 'one wife.' 1 Timothy 3:2,12 ; Titus 1:6 . God has providentially so ordered it in all countries called christian that a man is allowed to have but one wife; and in the best of those countries a man cannot divorce his wife except when she herself has already broken the marriage bond. Instruction is given in the Epistles to both: the wives are to be in subjection to their husbands, and the husbands are to love and cherish their wives, even as Christ the church. Ephesians 5:28,29 .
It is not now known how the negotiations were conducted that led to a man and woman being betrothed, or espoused, or what were the ceremonies usually attending it. The betrothed couple were at once looked upon as husband and wife, as seen in the case of Joseph, who thought of divorcing his espoused wife Mary. Matthew 1:18,19 . In the East a man does not usually see his espoused wife until they are married (as Isaac did not see Rebecca and had no choice in the matter), the engagement, and the amount of dowry to be paid by the husband to the bride's father, being arranged by the relatives.
Of the ancient marriage ceremonies very little is known. On the night of a marriage the young women went forth with lamps or torches to meet the bridegroom and to escort him to the house of the bride, as in Matthew 25 . Such processions have been seen in modern times, and the same cry has been heard, "Behold the bridegroom." They had marriage feasts, as in the parable of Matthew 22 (when a special garment was provided for each of the guests), and as the one to which the Lord, His mother, and His disciples were invited at Cana, where the Lord made the water into wine. John 2:1-11 .
The assembly has been espoused as a chaste virgin to Christ, 2 Corinthians 11:2 ; and it waits for that glorious time when it will be said, "Let us be glad and rejoice, and give honour to him: for the marriage of the Lamb is come, and his wife hath made herself ready . . . . arrayed in fine linen, clean and white; for the fine linen is the righteousnesses of saints . . . . Blessed are they which are called unto the marriage supper of the Lamb." Revelation 19:7-9 . The Lord will also have an earthly bride during the kingdom. Hosea 2:7 . See also the Canticles.
Webster's Dictionary - Marriage
(1):
(v. t.) The marriage vow or contract.
(2):
(v. t.) A feast made on the occasion of a marriage.
(3):
(v. t.) Any intimate or close union.
(4):
(v. t.) The act of marrying, or the state of being married; legal union of a man and a woman for life, as husband and wife; wedlock; matrimony.
(5):
(n.) In bezique, penuchle, and similar games at cards, the combination of a king and queen of the same suit. If of the trump suit, it is called a royal marriage.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Marriage
a civil and religious contract, by which a man is joined and united to a woman, for the ends of procreation. The essence of marriage consists in the mutual consent of the parties. Marriage is a part of the law of nations, and is in use among all people. The public use of marriage institutions consists, according to Archdeacon Paley, in their promoting the following beneficial effects:
1. The private comfort of individuals.
2. The production of the greatest number of healthy children, their better education, and the making of due provision for their settlement in life.
3. The peace of human society, in cutting off a principal source of contention, by assigning one or more women to one man, and protecting his exclusive right by sanctions of morality and law.
4. The better government of society, by distributing the community into separate families, and appointing over each the authority of a master of a family, which has more actual influence than all civil authority put together.
5. The additional security which the state receives for the good behaviour of its citizens, from the solicitude they feel for the welfare of their children, and from their being confined to permanent habitations.
6. The encouragement, of industry.
Whether marriage be a civil or a religious contract, has been a subject of dispute. The truth seems to be that it is both. It has its engagements to men, and its vows to God. A Christian state recognizes marriage as a branch of public morality, and a source of civil peace and strength. It is connected with the peace of society by assigning one woman to one man, and the state protects him, therefore, in her exclusive possession. Christianity, by allowing divorce in the event of adultery, supposes, also, that the crime must be proved by proper evidence before the civil magistrate; and lest divorce should be the result of unfounded suspicion, or be made a cover for license, the decision of the case could safely be lodged no where else. Marriage, too, as placing one human being more completely under the power of another than any other relation, requires laws for the protection of those who are thus so exposed to injury. The distribution of society into families, also, can only be an instrument for promoting the order of the community, by the cognizance which the law takes of the head of a family, and by making him responsible, to a certain extent, for the conduct of those under his influence. Questions of property are also involved in marriage and its issue. The law must, therefore, for these and many other weighty reasons, be cognizant of marriage; must prescribe various regulations respecting it; require publicity of the contract; and guard some of the great injunctions of religion in the matter by penalties. In every well ordered society marriage must be placed under the cognizance and control of the state. But then those who would have the whole matter to lie between the parties themselves, and the civil magistrate, appear wholly to forget that marriage is also a solemn religious act, in which vows are made to God by both persons, who, when the rite is properly understood, engage to abide by all those laws with which he has guarded the institution; to love and cherish each other; and to remain faithful to each other until death. For if, at least, they profess belief in Christianity, whatever duties are laid upon husbands and wives in Holy Scripture, they engage to obey by the very act of their contracting marriage. The question, then, is whether such vows to God as are necessarily involved in marriage, are to be left between the parties and God privately, or whether they ought to be publicly made before his ministers and the church. On this the Scriptures are silent; but though Michaelis has shown that the priests under the law were not appointed to celebrate marriage; yet in the practice of the modern Jews it is a religious ceremony, the chief rabbi of the synagogue being present, and prayers being appointed for the occasion. This renders it probable that the character of the ceremony under the law, from the most ancient times, was a religious one. The more direct connection of marriage with religion in Christian states, by assigning its celebration to the ministers of religion, appears to be a very beneficial custom, and one which the state has a right to enjoin. For since the welfare and morals of society are so much interested in the performance of the mutual duties of the married state; and since those duties have a religious as well as a civil character, it is most proper that some provision should be made for explaining those duties; and for this a standing form of marriage is best adapted. By acts of religion, also, they are more solemnly impressed upon the parties. When this is prescribed in any state, it becomes a Christian cheerfully, and even thankfully, to comply with a custom of so important a tendency, as matter of conscientious subjection to lawful authority, although no Scriptural precept can be pleaded for it. That the ceremony should be confined to the clergy of an established church, is a different consideration. We think that the religious effect would be greater, were the ministers of each religious body to be authorized by the state to celebrate marriages among their own people, due provision being previously made by the civil magistrate for the regular and secure registry of them, and to prevent the laws respecting marriage from being evaded; which is indeed his business. The offices of religion would then come in by way of sanction and moral enforcement.
When this important contract is once made, then certain rights are acquired by the parties mutually, who are also bound by reciprocal duties, in the fulfilment of which the practical virtue of each consists. And here the superior character of the morals of the New Testament, as well as their higher authority, is illustrated. It may, indeed, be within the scope of mere moralists to show that fidelity, and affection, and all the courtesies necessary to maintain affection, are rationally obligatory upon those who are connected by the nuptial bond; but in Christianity nuptial fidelity is guarded by the express law, "Thou shalt not commit adultery;" and by our Lord's exposition of the spirit of that law which forbids the indulgence of loose thoughts and desires, and places the purity of the heart under the guardianship of that hallowed fear which his authority tends to inspire. Affection, too, is made a matter of diligent cultivation upon considerations, and by a standard, peculiar to our religion. Husbands are placed in a relation to their wives, similar to that which Christ bears to his church, and his example is thus made their rule. As Christ loved the church, so husbands are to love their wives; as Christ "gave himself," his life, "for the church," Ephesians 5:25 , so are they to hazard life for their wives; as Christ saves his church, so is it the bounden duty of husbands to endeavour, by ever possible means, to promote the religious edification and salvation of their wives. The connection is thus exalted into a religious one; and when love which knows no abatement, protection at the hazard of life, and a tender and constant solicitude for the salvation of a wife, are thus enjoined, the greatest possible security is established for the exercise of kindness and fidelity. The oneness of this union is also more forcibly stated in Scripture than any where beside. "They twain shall be one flesh." "So ought men to love their wives as their own bodies; he that loveth his wife loveth himself. For no man ever yet hated his own flesh, but nourisheth and cherisheth it, even as the Lord the church." Precept and illustration can go no higher than this; and nothing evidently is wanting either of direction or authority to raise the state of marriage into the highest, most endearing, and sanctified relation in which two human beings can stand to each other.
2. We find but few laws in the books of Moses concerning the institution of marriage. Though the Mosaic law no where obliges men to marry, the Jews have always looked upon it as an indispensable duty implied in the words, "Increase and multiply," Genesis 1:28 ; so that a man who did not marry his daughter before she was twenty years of age, was looked upon as accessary to any irregularities the young woman might be guilty of for want of being timely married. Moses restrained the Israelites from marrying within certain degrees of consanguinity; which had till then been permitted, to prevent their taking wives from among the idolatrous nations among whom they lived. Abraham gave this as a reason for choosing a wife for Isaac from among his own kindred, Genesis 34:3 , &c. But when his descendants became so exceedingly multiplied, this reason ceased; and the great lawgiver prohibited, under pain of death, certain degrees of kindred as incestuous. Polygamy, though not expressly allowed, is however tacitly implied in the laws of Moses, Genesis 31; Exodus 21:10 . This practice likewise was authorized by the example of the patriarchs. Thus Jacob married both the daughters of Laban. In respect to which custom, Moses enjoins that, upon the marriage of a second wife, a man shall be bound to continue to the first her food, raiment, and the duty of marriage. The Jews did not always content themselves with the allowance of two wives, as may be seen in the examples of David, Solomon, and many others. However, they made a distinction between the wives of the first rank, and those of the second. The first they called nashim, and the other pilgashim; which last, though most versions render it by the words "concubines," "harlots," and "prostitutes," yet it has no where in Scripture any such bad sense. There is a particular law called the Levirate, which obliged a man, whose brother died without issue, to marry his widow, and raise up seed to his brother, Deuteronomy 25:5 , &c. But Moses in some measure left it to a man's choice, whether he would comply with this law or not; for in case of a refusal the widow could only summon him before the judges of the place, when, if he persisted, she untied his shoe, and spit in his face, and said, "Thus shall it be done unto the man who refuses to build up his brother's house." A man was at liberty to marry not only in the twelve tribes, but even out of them, provided it was among such nations as used circumcision; such were the Midianites, Ishmaelites, Edomites, Moabites, and Egyptians. Accordingly, we find Moses himself married to a Midianite, and Boaz to a Moabite. Amasa was the son of Jether, an Ishmaelite, by Abigail, David's sister; and Solomon, in the beginning of his reign, married Pharaoh's daughter. Whenever we find him and other kings blamed for marrying strange women, we must understand it of those nations which were idolatrous and uncircumcised.
It appears almost impossible to Europeans, says Mr. Hartley, that a deception like that of Laban's could be practised. But the following extract, from a journal which I kept at Smyrna, presents a parallel case: "The Armenian brides are veiled during the marriage ceremony; and hence deceptions have occurred, in regard to the person chosen for wife. I am informed that, on one occasion, a young Armenian at Smyrna solicited in marriage a younger daughter, whom he admired. The parents of the girl consented to the request, and every previous arrangement was made. When the time for solemnizing the marriage arrived, the elder daughter, who was not so beautiful, was conducted by the parents to the altar, and the young man was unconsciously married to her. And ‘it came to pass, that in the morning, behold, it was the elder daughter.' The deceit was not discovered, till it could not be rectified; and the manner in which the parents justified themselves was precisely that of Laban: ‘It must not be so done in our country, to give the younger before the first-born.' It is really the rule among the Armenians, that neither a younger son nor daughter be married, till their elder brother or sister have preceded them." I was once present at the solemnization of matrimony among the Armenians; and some recollections of it may tend to throw light on this and other passages of Scripture. The various festivities attendant on these occasions continue for three days and during the last night the marriage is celebrated. I was conducted to the house of the bride, where I found a very large assemblage of persons. The company was dispersed through various rooms; reminding me of the directions of our Saviour, in regard to the choice of the lowermost rooms at feasts. On the ground floor I actually observed that the persons convened were of an inferior order of the community, while in the upper rooms were assembled those of higher rank. The large number of young females who were present, naturally reminded me of the wise and foolish virgins in our Saviour's parable. These being friends of the bride, the virgins, her companions, had come to meet the bridegroom, Psalms 45:14 . It is usual for the bridegroom to come at midnight; so that, literally, at midnight the cry is made, "Behold, the bridegroom cometh! go ye out to meet him," Matthew 25:6 . But, on this occasion the bridegroom tarried: it was two o'clock before he arrived. The whole party then proceeded to the Armenian church, where the bishop was waiting to receive them; and there the ceremony was completed. See DIVORCE and See BRIDE .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Marriage
Its origin and history . --The institution of marriage dates from the time of man's original creation. ( Genesis 2:18-25 ) From (Genesis 2:24 ) we may evolve the following principles: (1) The unity of man and wife, as implied in her being formed out of man. (2) The indissolubleness of the marriage bond, except on; the strongest grounds, Comp. (Matthew 19:9 ) (3) Monogamy, as the original law of marriage (4) The social equality of man and wife. (5) The subordination of the wife to the husband. (1 Corinthians 11:8,9 ; 1 Timothy 2:13 ) (6) The respective duties of man and wife. In the patriarchal age polygamy prevailed, (Genesis 16:4 ; 25:1,8 ; 28:9 ; 29:23,26 ; 1 Chronicles 7:14 ) but to a great extent divested of the degradation which in modern times attaches to that practice. Divorce also prevailed in the patriarchal age, though but one instance of it is recorded. (Genesis 21:14 ) The Mosaic law discouraged polygamy, restricted divorce, and aimed to enforce purity of life. It was the best civil law possible at the time, and sought to bring the people up to the pure standard of the moral law. In the Post-Babylonian period monogamy appears to have become more prevalent than at any previous time. The practice of polygamy nevertheless still existed; Herod the Great had no less than nine wives at one time. The abuse of divorce continued unabated. Our Lord and his apostles re-established the integrity and sanctity of the marriage bond by the following measures: (a) By the confirmation of the original charter of marriage as the basis on which all regulations were to be framed. (Matthew 19:4,5 ) (b) By the restriction of divorce to the case of fornication, and the prohibition of remarriage in all persons divorced on improper grounds. (Matthew 5:32 ; 19:9 ; Romans 7:3 ; 1 Corinthians 7:10,11 ) (c) By the enforcement of moral purity generally (Hebrews 13:4 ) etc., and especial formal condemnation of fornication. (Acts 15:20 )
The conditions of legal marriage . --In the Hebrew commonwealth marriage was prohibited (a) between an Israelite and a non-Israelite. There were three grades of prohibition: total in regard to the Canaanites on either side; total on the side of the males in regard to the Ammonites and Moabites; and temporary on the side of the males in regard to the Edomites and Egyptians, marriages with females in the two latter instances being regarded as legal. The progeny of illegal marriages between Israelites and non-Israelites was described as "bastard." (23:2) (b) between an Israelite and one of his own community. The regulations relative to marriage between Israelites and Israelites were based on considerations of relationship. The most important passage relating to these is contained in ( Leviticus 18:6-18 ) wherein we have in the first place a general prohibition against marriage between a man and the "flesh of his flesh," and in the second place special prohibitions against marriage with a mother, stepmother, sister or half-sister, whether "born at home or abroad," granddaughter, aunt, whether by consanguinity on either side or by marriage on the father's side, daughter in-law, brother's wife, stepdaughter, wife's mother, stepgranddaughter, or wife's sister during the lifetime of the wife. An exception is subsequently made, (26:5-9) in favor of marriage with a brother's wife in the event of his having died childless. The law which regulates this has been named the "levirate," from the Latin levir , "brother-in-law."
The modes by which marriage was effected . --The choice of the bride devolved not on the bridegroom himself, but on his relations or on a friend deputed by the bridegroom for this purpose. The consent of the maiden was sometimes asked ( Genesis 24:58 ) but this appears to have been subordinate to the previous consent of the father and the adult brothers. (Genesis 24:51 ; 34:11 ) Occasionally the whole business of selecting the wife was left in the hands of a friend. The selection of the bride was followed by the espousal, which was a formal proceeding undertaken by a friend or legal representative on the part of the bridegroom and by the parents on the part of the bride; it was confirmed by oaths, and accompanied with presents to the bride. The act of betrothal was celebrated by a feast, and among the more modern Jews it is the custom in some parts for the bride. groom to place a ring on the bride's finger. The ring was regarded among the Hebrews as a token of fidelity (Genesis 41:42 ) and of adoption into a family. (Luke 15:25 ) Between the betrothal sad the marriage so interval elapsed, varying from a few days in the patriarchal age, (Genesis 24:55 ) to a full year for virgins and a month for widows in later times. During this period the bride-elect lived with her friends, and all communication between herself and her future husband was carried on through the medium of a friend deputed for the purpose, termed the "friend of the bridegroom." (John 3:29 ) She was now virtually regarded as the wife of her future husband; hence faithlessness on her part was punishable with death, (22:23,24) the husband having, however, the option of "putting her away." (24:1; Matthew 1:19 ) The essence of the marriage ceremony consisted in the removal of the bride from her father's house to that of the bridegroom or his father. The bridegroom prepared himself for the occasion by putting on a festive dress, and especially by placing on his head a handsome nuptial turban. (Psalm 45:8 ; Song of Solomon 4:10,11 ) The bride was veiled. Her robes were white, (Revelation 19:8 ) and sometimes embroidered with gold thread, (Psalm 45:13,14 ) and covered with perfumes! (Psalm 45:8 ) she was further decked out with jewels. (Isaiah 49:18 ; 61:10 ; Revelation 21:2 ) When the fixed hour arrived, which was, generally late in the evening, the bridegroom set forth from his house, attended by his groomsmen (Authorized Version "companions," (Judges 14:11 ) "children of the bride-chamber," (Matthew 9:15 ) preceded by a band of musicians or singers, (Genesis 31:27 ; Jeremiah 7:34 ; 16:9 ) and accompanied by persons hearing flambeaux, (Jeremiah 25:10 ) 2Esdr. 10:2; (Matthew 25:7 ; Revelation 18:23 ) and took the bride with the friends to his own house. At the house a feast was prepared, to which all the friends and neighbors were invited, (Genesis 29:22 ; Matthew 22:1-10 ; Luke 14:8 ; John 2:2 ) and the festivities were protracted for seven or even fourteen days. (Judges 14:12 ; Job 8:19 ) The guests were provided by the host with fitting robes, (Matthew 22:11 ) and the feast was enlivened with riddles, (Judges 14:12 ) and other amusements. The last act in the ceremonial was the conducting of the bride to the bridal chamber, (Judges 15:1 ; Joel 2:16 ) where a canopy was prepared. (Psalm 19:5 ; Joel 2:16 ) The bride was still completely veiled, so that the deception practiced on Jacob, (Genesis 29:23 ) was not difficult. A newly married man was exempt from military service, or from any public business which might draw him away from his home, for the space of a year, (24:5) a similar privilege was granted to him who was 'betrothed. (20:7)
The social and domestic conditions of married life . --The wife must have exercised an important influence in her own home. She appears to have taken her part in family affairs, and even to have enjoyed a considerable amount of independence. ( Judges 4:18 ; 1 Samuel 25:14 ; 2 Kings 4:8 ) etc. In the New Testament the mutual relations of husband and wife are a subject of frequent exhortation. (Ephesians 5:22,33 ; Colossians 3:18,19 ; Titus 2:4,5 ; 1 Peter 3:1-7 ) The duties of the wife in the Hebrew household were multifarious; in addition to the general superintendence of the domestic arrangements, such as cooking, from which even women of rank were not exempt. (Genesis 18:8 ; 2 Samuel 13:5 ) and the distribution of food at meal times, (Proverbs 31:13 ) the manufacture of the clothing and of the various fabrics required in her home devolved upon her, (Proverbs 31:13,21,22 ) and if she were a model of activity and skill, she produced a surplus of fine linen shirts and girdles, which she sold and so, like a well-freighted merchant ship, brought in wealth to her husband from afar. (Proverbs 31:14,24 ) The legal rights of the wife are noticed in (Exodus 21:10 ) under the three heads of food, raiment, and duty of marriage or conjugal right.
The allegorical and typical allusions to marriage have exclusive reference to one object, viz., to exhibit the spiritual relationship between God and his people. In the Old Testament ( Isaiah 54:5 ; Jeremiah 3:14 ; Hosea 2:19 ) In the New Testament the image of the bridegroom is transferred from Jehovah to Christ, (Matthew 9:15 ; John 3:29 ) and that of the bride to the Church, (2 Corinthians 11:2 ; Revelation 19:7 ; 21:2,9 )
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Marriage
The union for life of one man and one woman, is an ordinance of the Creator for the perpetuity and happiness of the human race; instituted in Paradise, Genesis 1:27-28 2:18-24 , and the foundation of no small part of all that is valuable to human society. By promoting parental love and the sense of responsibility, marriage most effectually promotes the health and happiness of children, and their careful education to virtue, industry, and honor, to right habits and ends, and to all that is included in the idea of home. God made originally but one man and one woman. The first polygamists were Lamech and those degenerate "sons of God," or worshippers of Jehovah, who "took them wives of all that they chose," Genesis 4:17 6:2 . On the other hand, Noah and his three sons had each but one wife; and the same appears to be true of all his direct ancestors' back to Adam. So also was it with Job, Nahor, Lot, and at first with Abraham. See Genesis 16:16 Judges 8:30 2 Samuel 3:3-5 1 Kings 11:18 2 Chronicles 11:18-21 13:21 . In the time of Christ there is no mention of polygamy as prevalent among the Jews.
The Israelites were forbidden to marry within certain specified degrees, Leviticus 18:1-30,1-27 Deuteronomy 27:1-26 . Marriage with Canaanites and idolaters was strictly forbidden, Exodus 34:16 ; and afterwards with any of the heathen nations around them, especially such as were uncircumcised, Nehemiah 13:1-31 . By the Levirate law, as it is termed, if a Jew died without children, his nearest brother or kinsman was bound to marry the widow, that her firstborn son after this marriage might be reckoned the son and heir of the first husband, Genesis 38:1-30 Deuteronomy 25:5-10 Matthew 22:23-26 . The Savior set his seal to marriage as a divine and permanent institution, aside from all the civil laws which guard and regulate, or seek to alter or annul it; forbidding divorce except for one cause, Matthew 5:32 19:3-6,9 ; and denouncing all breaches of marriage vows, even in thought, Matthew 5:28 . Compare Hebrews 13:4 Revelation 21:8 .
Jewish parents were wont to arrange with other parents as to the marriage of their children, sometimes according to the previous choice of the son, and not without some regard to the consent of the daughter, Genesis 21:21 24:1-67 34:4-6 Judges 14:2-3 . The parties were often betrothed to each other long before the marriage took place. See Exodus 22:13 Deuteronomy 22:29 2 Samuel 13:11 . The nuptials were often celebrated with great pomp and ceremony, and with protracted feasting and rejoicing. It was customary for the bridegroom to appoint a Paranymphus, or groomsman, called by our Savior "the friend of the bridegroom," John 3.29 . A number of other young men also kept him company during the days of the wedding, to do him honor; as also young women kept company with the bride all this time. The companions of the bridegrooms are expressly mentioned in the history of Samson, Judges 14:11,20 Song of Song of Solomon 5:1 8:13 Matthew 9:14 ; also the companions of the bride, Psalm 45:9,14 Song of Song of Solomon 1:5 2:7 3:5 8:4 . The office of the groomsman was to direct in the ceremonies of he wedding. The friends and companions of the bride sang the epithalamium, or wedding song, at the door of the bride the evening before the wedding. The festivities of the wedding were conducted with great decorum, the young people of each sex being in distinct apartments and at different tables. The young men at Samson's wedding diverted themselves in proposing riddles, and the bridegroom appointed the prize to those should could explain them, Judges 14:14 .
The Jews affirm, that before Jerusalem was laid in ruins, the bridegroom and bride wore crowns at their marriage. Compare Isaiah 61:10 Song of Song of Solomon 3:11 , "Go forth, O ye daughters of Zion, and behold King Solomon with the crown wherewith his mother, crowned him in the day of his espousals, and in the day of the gladness of his heart." The modern Jews, in some places, throw handfuls of wheat on the newly married couple, particularly on the bride, saying "Increase and multiply." In other places they mingle pieces of money with the wheat, which are gathered up by the poor. The actual ceremony of marriage was very simple, consisting of little more than the reading of the marriage contract, Proverbs 2:17 Malachi 2:14 , and the nuptial blessing invoked by the friends, Genesis 24:60 Ruth 4:11,12 .
The wedding festivities commonly lasted seven days for a maid, and three days for a widow. So Laban says to Jacob, respecting Leah, "Fulfill her week," Genesis 29:27 . The ceremonies of Samson's wedding continued seven whole days, Judges 14:17,18 . These seven days of rejoicing were commonly spent in the house of the woman's father, after which they conducted the bride to her husband's home.
The procession accompanying the bride from the house of her father to that of the bridegroom, was generally one of more or less pomp, according to the circumstances of the married couple; and for this they often chose the night, as is tell the custom in Syria. Hence the parable of the ten virgins that went at midnight to meet the bride and bridegroom, Matthew 25:1-46 . "At a Hindoo marriage, the procession of which I saw some years ago," says Mr. Ward, "the bridegroom came from a distance, and the bride lived at Serampre, to which place the bridegroom was to come by water. After waiting two or three hours, at length, near midnight, it was announced, as if in the very words of Scripture, Behold, the bridegroom cometh; go ye out to meet him.' All the persons employed now lighted their lamps, and ran with them in their hands to fill up their stations in the procession; some of them had lost their lights, and were unprepared; but it was then too late to seek them, and the cavalcade moved forward to the house of the bride, at which place the company entered a large and splendidly illuminated area, before the house, covered with an awning, where a great multitude of friends, dressed in their best apparel, were seated upon mats. The bridegroom was carried in the arms of a friend, and placed in a superb seat in the midst of the company, where he sat a short time, and them went into the house, the door of which was immediately shut, and guarded by sepoys. Others and I expostulated with the doorkeepers, but in vain. Never was I so struck with our Lord's beautiful parable as at this moment; and the door was shut.'"
Christianity invests the family institution with peculiar sacredness; makes true love its basis, and mutual preference of each others' happiness its rule; and even likens it to the ineffable union between Christ and his church, Ephesians 5:22-33 . Nowhere in the world is woman so honored, happy, and useful as in a Christian land and a Christian home. Believers are directed to marry "in the Lord," 1 Corinthians 7:39 . No doubt the restrictions laid upon the ancient people of God contain a lesson for all periods, and the recorded ill results of forbidden marriages among the Jews, if heeded, would prevent the serious evils which often result form union between a Christian and a worldling. As to the mutual duties of husband and wife, see Ephesians 5:22-23 1 Timothy 2:11,12 1 Peter 3:1-7 .
The Romish church puts dishonor on what the Holy Spirit describes as "honorable in all." It not only extols celibacy and virginity in the laity, but also strictly refuses marriage to all its priests, bishops, etc., and in thus "forbidding to marry," fixes upon itself the name of anti-Christ, 1 Timothy 4:3 . See BETROTHING , CONCUBINE , DIVORCE , GARMENTS , etc.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Marriage, Marry
A — 1: γάμος (Strong's #1062 — Noun Masculine — gamos — gam'-os ) "a marriage, wedding," or "wedding feast," is used to denote (a) the ceremony and its proceedings, including the "marriage feast," John 2:1,2 ; of the "marriage ceremony" only, figuratively, Revelation 19:7 , as distinct from the "marriage feast" (v. 9); (b) "the marriage feast," RV in Matthew 22:2-4,9 ; in Matthew 22:8,10 , "wedding;" in Matthew 25:10 , RV "marriage feast;" so Luke 12:36 ; 14:8 ; in Matthew 22:11,12 , the "wedding garment" is, lit., "a garment of a wedding." In Revelation 19 , where, under the figure of a "marriage," the union of Christ, as the Lamb of God, with His heavenly bride is so described, the marriage itself takes place in heaven during the Parousia, Revelation 19:7 (the aorist or point tense indicating an accomplished fact; the bride is called "His wife"); the "marriage feast" or supper is to take place on earth, after the Second Advent, Revelation 19:9 . That Christ is spoken of as the Lamb points to His atoning sacrifice as the ground upon which the spiritual union takes place. The background of the phraseology lies in the OT description of the relation of God to Israel, e.g., Isaiah 54:4 ,ff.; Ezekiel 16:7 ,ff; Hosea 2:19 ; (c) "marriage" in general, including the "married" state, which is to be "had in honor," Hebrews 13:4 , RV.
Note: Among the Jews the "marriage supper" took place in the husband's house and was the great social event in the family life. Large hospitality, and resentment at the refusal of an invitation, are indicated in Matthew 22:1-14 . The "marriage" in Cana exhibits the way in which a "marriage feast" was conducted in humbler homes. Special honor attached to the male friends of the bridegroom, "the sons of the bridechamber," Matthew 9:15 , RV (see BRIDECHAMBER). At the close the parents conducted the bride to the nuptial chamber (cp. Judges 15:1 )
B — 1: γαμέω (Strong's #1060 — Verb — gameo — gam-eh'-o ) "to marry" (akin to A), is used (a) of "the man," Matthew 5:32 ; 19:9,10 ; 22:25 (RV; AV, "married a wife"); Matthew 22:30 ; 24:38 ; Mark 6:17 ; 10:11 ; 12:25 ; Luke 14:20 ; 16:18 ; 17:27 , RV, "married" (AV, "married wives"); Luke 20:34,35 ; 1 Corinthians 7:28 (1st part); 1 Corinthians 7:33 ; (b) of "the woman," in the Active Voice, Mark 10:12 ; 1 Corinthians 7:28 (last part); 1 Corinthians 7:34 ; 1 Timothy 5:11,14 ; in the Passive Voice, 1 Corinthians 7:39 ; (c) of "both sexes," 1 Corinthians 7:9,10,36 ; 1 Timothy 4:3 .
B — 2: γαμίσκω (Strong's #1061 — Verb — gamizo — gam-is'-ko ) "to give in marriage," is used in the Passive Voice in Matthew 22:30 (2nd clause), some mss. have No. 5 here; Mark 12:25 (No. 3 in some mss.); Luke 17:27 (No. 5 in some mss.); 20:35 (last word), Passive (Nos. 3 and 4 in some mss.); in the Active Voice Matthew 24:38 (Nos. 3 and 5 in some mss.); further, of giving a daughter in "marriage," 1Cor. on the whole, may be taken as the meaning. In this part of the Epistle, the Apostle was answering a number of questions on matters about which the church at Corinth had written to him, and in this particular matter the formal transition from "marriage" in general to the subject of giving a daughter in "marriage," is simple. Eastern customs naturally would involve the inclusion of the latter in the inquiry and the reply.
B — 3: γαμίσκω (Strong's #1061 — Verb — gamisko — gam-is'-ko ) an alternative for No. 2, Luke 20:34 (some mss. have No. 4); in some mss. in Mark 12:25 ; Luke 20:35 .
B — 4: ἐκγαμίσκω (Strong's #1548 — Verb — ekgamisko — ek-gam-is'-ko ) "to give out in marriage" (ek, "out," and No. 3): see Nos. 2 and 3.
B — 5: ἐκγαμίζω (Strong's #1547 — Verb — ekgamizo — ek-gam-id'-zo ) an alternative for No. 4: see Nos. 2 and 3.
B — 6: ἐπιγαμβρεύω (Strong's #1918 — Verb — epigambreuo — ep-ee-gam-bryoo'-o ) "to take to wife after" (epi, "upon," gambros, "a connection by marriage"), signifies "to marry" (of a deceased husband's next of kin, Matthew 22:24 ). Cp. Genesis 38:8 .
Note: In Romans 7:3 (twice) and Romans 7:4 , AV, ginomai, "to become" (here, "to become another man's"), is translated "be married" (RV, "be joined").
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Marriage
The sad prevalence of divorce in the United States mightnot have come to pass if people had clear ideas of what Marriagereally is. Marriage is a great deal more than simply a civilcontract. It is a divine institution, "an honorable estate,instituted by God in the time of man's innocency." It is areligious ceremony and is sacramental in character. It ought,therefore, to be clearly understood that marriage simply by a"squire" or other legal officer, detracts from the sacredness anddignity of "this holy estate," and belittles the binding characterof the "marriage tie." Even a secular paper could declare, "We donot believe there should be any civil marriages of any kind. Everyceremony should be solemnized by the Church and lifted above thelevel of a real estate transaction." In this custom of civil orlegal marriages may be found at least one cause, perhaps theprincipal cause of divorce, for it encourages such a low view ofthe sacredness of the Marriage Rite.
Taught by our Lord and His Apostles, the Church emphasizes thereligious and sacramental character of Holy Matrimony and hasalways enjoined its solemnization with ecclesiastical ceremoniesand by ecclesiastical persons. This is clearly set forth by theearliest Christian writers. Thus St. Ignatius in one of his Epistlessays: "It is fitting for those who purpose matrimony to accomplishtheir union with the sanction of the Bishop, that their marriagemay be in the Lord." Tertullian speaks of marriages being "ratifiedbefore God," and adds, "How can we find words to describe thehappiness of that Marriage in which the Church joins together,which the Oblation confirms, the Benediction seals, the Angelsproclaim when sealed, and the Father ratifies." St. Ambrose callsMarriage a Sacrament, and says, "Marriage must be sanctified by thePriest's sanction and blessing."
These utterances unfold the mind of the Church in the times nearestthe days of our Lord and His Apostles, and in all ages ever sincethe Church has never abandoned this position in her practice andformularies. A careful study of the Marriage Service in the PrayerBook will show it to be a very clear setting forth of the nature ofMarriage. It will also be seen how fully this Service has retainedthe belief concerning Marriage which the Church has always heldsince the time of our Lord and His Apostles. (See BETROTHAL, alsoESPOUSAL.)
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Banns of Marriage
The word "Bann" is derived from the Saxon wordbannen, meaning, to proclaim. The term "Banns of Marriage,"means, therefore, the publication of intended marriages, and arepublished for three Sundays before the event, in the Church wherethe ceremony is to take place. The publishing of the Banns in theChurch of England is required by law. In the American Prayer Book,provision is made for the publishing of the Banns of Marriage, butas it is not required by law the custom has fallen into disuse.

Sentence search

Ligamen - (Latin: ligare, to bind) ...
Signifies an existing Marriage bond, and is a diriment impediment to another Marriage. It is often known as the impediment of previous Marriage. But in the case of a valid Marriage dissolved by the Church under the Pauline Privilege or of a non-consummated Christian Marriage dissolved by the pope, the previous Marriage, although it was valid, no longer exists, and consequently is no longer an impediment
Wife - Female Marriage partner. See Family ; Marriage ; Woman
Husband - The male partner in a Marriage. See Family ; Household ; Marriage
Connubial - ) Of or pertaining to Marriage, or the Marriage state; conjugal; nuptial
Monogamy - ) Single Marriage; Marriage with but one person, husband or wife, at the same time; - opposed to polygamy. Also, one Marriage only during life; - opposed to deuterogamy
Schatchen - ) A person whose business is Marriage brokage; a Marriage broker, esp
Marriageable - ) Fit for, or capable of, Marriage; of an age at which Marriage is allowable
Matrimonium Non Consummatum - A Marriage properly performed but not consummated by marital intercourse. See also, dissolution of a Marriage
Affiance - ) To betroth; to pledge one's faith to for Marriage, or solemnly promise (one's self or another) in Marriage. ) Plighted faith; Marriage contract or promise
Adultery - It is a diriment impediment to Marriage between two who, during the time of a legitimate Marriage, commit the crime pledging themselves to Marriage later; or, who commit it during the time of a legitimate Marriage and one or the other brings about the death of one of the married parties
Conjugal - ) Belonging to Marriage; suitable or appropriate to the Marriage state or to married persons; matrimonial; connubial
Matrimonial - ) Of or pertaining to Marriage; derived from Marriage; connubial; nuptial; hymeneal; as, matrimonial rights or duties
Nullity, Decree of - A judgment by a competent court that a certain Marriage was and is invalid, i. ,never a Marriage
Nisu'in - Second and final stage of Marriage (see kiddushin), which is effected by the chupah (marriage canopy) and the recitation of Seven Benedictions
Exogamy - ) The custom, or tribal law, which prohibits Marriage between members of the same tribe; Marriage outside of the tribe; - opposed to endogamy
Disparage - ) Inequality in Marriage; Marriage with an inferior. ) To match unequally; to degrade or dishonor by an unequal Marriage
Dissolution of a Marriage - If a valid Christian Marriage has taken place and has been followed with marital intercourse, the union is lifelong; it cannot be dissolved except by death. But if, after a valid Christian Marriage, there has been no intercourse (in Latin, matrimonium ratum sed non consummatum, a Marriage made but not consummated), such a Marriage may be entirely dissolved by a special act of the pope at the request of one or both of the parties, or because one or both intend to make a solemn vow of religious profession
Marriage, Dissolution of a - If a valid Christian Marriage has taken place and has been followed with marital intercourse, the union is lifelong; it cannot be dissolved except by death. But if, after a valid Christian Marriage, there has been no intercourse (in Latin, matrimonium ratum sed non consummatum, a Marriage made but not consummated), such a Marriage may be entirely dissolved by a special act of the pope at the request of one or both of the parties, or because one or both intend to make a solemn vow of religious profession
Bigamy - In criminal law, formally contracting a Marriage while a former one remains undissolved; in ecclesiastical law, the contracting of a valid Marriage after the death of a first spouse
Divorce - It is of three kinds: from the bond of matrimony, which is called an absolute divorce; from the bed, which makes lawful the denial of the Marriage debt; from bed and board, which denies the rights of cohabitation. The last two do not cause the cessation of the bond of Marriage, and are self-explanatory. For a release from the bond of matrimony in the case of a non-consummated Christian Marriage, see dissolution of a Marriage and for the dissolving of the bond of a Marriage contracted validly by unbaptized persons, one of whom afterwards was baptized in the Catholic Church, see Pauline privilege. It has the power to regulate Marriages by license, registration, etc. , but it has no authority to annul a valid Marriage
Marriage - Marriage is a contract both and religious, by which the parties engage to live together in mutual affection and fidelity, till death shall separate them. Marriage was instituted by God himself for the purpose of preventing the promiscuous intercourse of the sexes, for promoting domestic felicity,and for securing the maintenance and education of children. ...
Marriage is honorable in all and the bed undefiled. A feast made on the occasion of a Marriage. The kingdom of heaven is like a certain king, who made a Marriage for his son
Mixed Religion - A hindering impediment to matrimony, consisting in the Marriage of a Catholic to a baptized non-Catholic. Such a Marriage is valid if performed by proper authority, but it requires a dispensation, which is given only after the signing of promises by the non-Catholic party, pledging non-interference with the religion of the Catholic, rearing the children in the Catholic faith, and only one ceremony of Marriage, before a priest
Religion, Mixed - A hindering impediment to matrimony, consisting in the Marriage of a Catholic to a baptized non-Catholic. Such a Marriage is valid if performed by proper authority, but it requires a dispensation, which is given only after the signing of promises by the non-Catholic party, pledging non-interference with the religion of the Catholic, rearing the children in the Catholic faith, and only one ceremony of Marriage, before a priest
Wife - [1]
Banns - ) Notice of a proposed Marriage, proclaimed in a church, or other place prescribed by law, in order that any person may object, if he knows of just cause why the Marriage should not take place
Sanatio in Radice - (Latin: a healing at the root) ...
A secret validation of an invalid Marriage without securing a renewal of consent. This sanatio can be granted only by the Holy See; and there is no validation of this kind for a Marriage which has an impediment of the natural or Divine law, but only for a Marriage which was null because of some ccciesiastical obstacle. In other words, the Church can undo what it has done; and this action may retroact, so that, by a sort of legal fiction, the Marriage will then be considered to have been legal from the beginning; it is especially useful in the legitimation of children already born of such a union
Marriage Customs - (See Marriage
Bridegroom - See Marriage ...
...
Monogamy - See Marriage
Celibacy - See Marriage
Espousal - See Marriage
Ketubah - Marriage contract ...
Wife - See Marriage ...
...
Digamy - See Marriage
Divorce - See Marriage
Bigamy - See Marriage
Wedding - See Marriage
Adultery - See Marriage
Wedding - See Marriage
Betrothing - Matrimony, Holy - (See Marriage
Polygamy - See Marriage
Adultery - See Marriage
Wedding - See Marriage
Wife - See Family, Marriage
Betrothing - See Marriage
Husband - See Family, Marriage
Dowry - See Marriage
Betroth - See Marriage
Divorce - See Marriage
Dowry - See Marriage
Espousals - See BETROTHING , Marriage
Wife - See Family, Marriage
Husband - See Family, Marriage
Legal Relationship - Resulting from adoption, may be a matrimonial impediment, either impedient or diriment, depending on the nature of the civillaw on the subject in the region where the Marriage takes place. If, according to that law, the Marriage is valid although unlawful, the Church regards it in like manner, and the impediment is merely of the impedient or hindering class. If the civillaw holds that such a Marriage is invalid, the Church makes the impediment a diriment one
Times, Closed - Seasons of the year during which there are certain restrictions concerning Marriage. Formerly a Marriage at Mass was not allowed from the beginning of Advent until after Epiphany, and during Lent and the octave of Easter. The present code of law does not forbid a Marriage Mass at any time; it prohibits the nuptial blessing during Advent and on Christmas Day, and during Lent and on Easter Sunday, but with the bishop's permission the blessing may be given even during those times
Relationship, Legal - Resulting from adoption, may be a matrimonial impediment, either impedient or diriment, depending on the nature of the civillaw on the subject in the region where the Marriage takes place. If, according to that law, the Marriage is valid although unlawful, the Church regards it in like manner, and the impediment is merely of the impedient or hindering class. If the civillaw holds that such a Marriage is invalid, the Church makes the impediment a diriment one
Espousal - ) The act of espousing or betrothing; especially, in the plural, betrothal; plighting of the troths; a contract of Marriage; sometimes, the Marriage ceremony
Bridebed - ) The Marriage bed
Bride - See Church, the ; Marriage ...
...
Bride, Bridegroom - See Marriage
Pronubial - ) Presiding over Marriage
Adultery - See Crimes, Marriage
Conjugium - ) The Marriage tie
Misogamy - ) Hatre/ of Marriage
Polygamy - See Family, Marriage
Wedding - * For WEDDING see Marriage ...
Dowry - ) The money, goods, or estate, which a woman brings to her husband in Marriage; a bride's portion on her Marriage
Kindred - ) Relatives by blood or Marriage, more properly the former; relations; persons related to each other. ) Relationship by birth or Marriage; consanguinity; affinity; kin
Unchastity - See Marriage, 7
Wife - See Family, 2 ; Marriage
Husband - ...
See Marriage STATE
Shidduch - a match, especially for Marriage...
Levirate Law - See Marriage, § 4
Bride, Bridegroom - See articles Family and Marriage
Consorted - United in Marriage
Misogamist - ) A hater of Marriage
Leviration - ) Levirate Marriage or Marriages
Marriage, Marry - A — 1: γάμος (Strong's #1062 — Noun Masculine — gamos — gam'-os ) "a Marriage, wedding," or "wedding feast," is used to denote (a) the ceremony and its proceedings, including the "marriage feast," John 2:1,2 ; of the "marriage ceremony" only, figuratively, Revelation 19:7 , as distinct from the "marriage feast" (v. 9); (b) "the Marriage feast," RV in Matthew 22:2-4,9 ; in Matthew 22:8,10 , "wedding;" in Matthew 25:10 , RV "marriage feast;" so Luke 12:36 ; 14:8 ; in Matthew 22:11,12 , the "wedding garment" is, lit. " In Revelation 19 , where, under the figure of a "marriage," the union of Christ, as the Lamb of God, with His heavenly bride is so described, the Marriage itself takes place in heaven during the Parousia, Revelation 19:7 (the aorist or point tense indicating an accomplished fact; the bride is called "His wife"); the "marriage feast" or supper is to take place on earth, after the Second Advent, Revelation 19:9 . ; Ezekiel 16:7 ,ff; Hosea 2:19 ; (c) "marriage" in general, including the "married" state, which is to be "had in honor," Hebrews 13:4 , RV. ...
Note: Among the Jews the "marriage supper" took place in the husband's house and was the great social event in the family life. The "marriage" in Cana exhibits the way in which a "marriage feast" was conducted in humbler homes. ...
B — 2: γαμίσκω (Strong's #1061 — Verb — gamizo — gam-is'-ko ) "to give in Marriage," is used in the Passive Voice in Matthew 22:30 (2nd clause), some mss. ); further, of giving a daughter in "marriage," 1Cor. In this part of the Epistle, the Apostle was answering a number of questions on matters about which the church at Corinth had written to him, and in this particular matter the formal transition from "marriage" in general to the subject of giving a daughter in "marriage," is simple. ...
B — 4: ἐκγαμίσκω (Strong's #1548 — Verb — ekgamisko — ek-gam-is'-ko ) "to give out in Marriage" (ek, "out," and No. ...
B — 6: ἐπιγαμβρεύω (Strong's #1918 — Verb — epigambreuo — ep-ee-gam-bryoo'-o ) "to take to wife after" (epi, "upon," gambros, "a connection by Marriage"), signifies "to marry" (of a deceased husband's next of kin, Matthew 22:24 )
Precontract - ) a contract of Marriage which, according to the ancient law, rendered void a subsequent Marriage solemnized in violation of it
Shadchonus - ) Marriage broker�s fee...
Concubine - See Family, Marriage, § 6
Desponsory - ) A written pledge of Marriage
Betrothed - Contracted for future Marriage
Remarriage - ) A second or repeated Marriage
Honeymoon - ) The first month after Marriage
Marriage - ) The Marriage vow or contract. ) A feast made on the occasion of a Marriage. If of the trump suit, it is called a royal Marriage
Betrothment - a mutual promise or compact between two parties for a future Marriage. After the Marriage was contracted, the young people had the liberty of seeing each other, which was not allowed them before. See Marriage
Chastity - See Crimes and Punishments, and Marriage
Antenuptial - ) Preceding Marriage; as, an antenuptial agreement
Mother - See Family Life and Relations ; Marriage ; Woman ...
...
Spiritual Relationship - The Marriage of a sponsor to his or her godchild, or the Marriage of a person who has administered private Baptism to the one baptized, is invalid unless by dispensation
Divorcement - ) Dissolution of the Marriage tie; divorce; separation
Dowerless - ) Destitute of dower; having no Marriage portion
Bride - See Marriage
Wedding - See Marriage
Morganatic - ) Pertaining to, in the manner of, or designating, a kind of Marriage, called also left-handed Marriage, between a man of superior rank and a woman of inferior, in which it is stipulated that neither the latter nor her children shall enjoy the rank or inherit the possessions of her husband
Betrothal - That portion of the Marriage Service in which the manand the woman join hands and give their troth (i. This is the Marriage Vowand is usually said at the foot of the chancel steps, the Marriageproper (with the ring) taking place at the Altar Rail
Cana - The miracle of the Marriage feast of Cana which has made the city forever famous, when Christ turned water into wine, was performed before His public life had fully begun, and is one of the best-authenticated of Our Lord's miracles. His attendance at the Marriage feast has always been taken as setting His seal on the sanctity of Marriage
Bedright Bedrite - ) The duty or privilege of the Marriage bed
Unmarry - ) To annul the Marriage of; to divorce
Agamist - ) An unmarried person; also, one opposed to Marriage
Wedlock - Marriage matrimony
Betroth - ) To contract to any one for a Marriage; to engage or promise in order to Marriage; to affiance; - used esp
Betroth - 1: μνηστεύω (Strong's #3423 — Verb — mnesteuo — mnace-tyoo'-o ) in the Active Voice, signifies "to woo a woman and ask for her in Marriage;" in the NT, only in the Passive Voice, "to be promised in Marriage, to be betrothed," Matthew 1:18 ; Luke 1:27 ; 2:5 , RV, "betrothed," (AV, "espoused")
Allied - Connected by Marriage, treaty or similitude
Bigamous - ) Guilty of bigamy; involving bigamy; as, a bigamous Marriage
Dismarry - ) To free from the bonds of Marriage; to divorce
Affiancer - ) One who makes a contract of Marriage between two persons
Divorce - ) A legal dissolution of the Marriage contract by a court or other body having competent authority. ) To dissolve the Marriage contract of, either wholly or partially; to separate by divorce. ) The decree or writing by which Marriage is dissolved
Bedswerver - ) One who swerves from and is unfaithful to the Marriage vow
Dowered - ) Furnished with, or as with, dower or a Marriage portion
Mesalliance - ) A Marriage with a person of inferior social position; a misalliance
Adultery - is the act of unfaithfulness in Marriage that occurs when one of the Marriage partners voluntarily engages in sexual intercourse with a person of the opposite sex other than the Marriage partner. ...
Old Testament Israel's covenant law prohibited adultery (Exodus 20:14 ) and thereby made faithfulness to the Marriage relationship central in the divine will for human relationships. The severity of the punishment indicates the serious consequences adultery has for the divine-human relationship (Psalm 51:4 ) as well as for Marriage, family, and community relationships. ...
The New Testament associates remarriage after divorce and adultery. Marriage is a lifelong covenant between a man and a woman. Divorce does not break the bond, so remarriage is viewed as adultery except in cases where unfaithfulness was the reason for the divorce (Matthew 5:32 ; 1619114480_6 ). The Marriage bond is broken by death (Romans 7:3 ; 1 Corinthians 7:39 ). See Divorce , Marriage
Marriage - The sad prevalence of divorce in the United States mightnot have come to pass if people had clear ideas of what Marriagereally is. Marriage is a great deal more than simply a civilcontract. It ought,therefore, to be clearly understood that Marriage simply by a"squire" or other legal officer, detracts from the sacredness anddignity of "this holy estate," and belittles the binding characterof the "marriage tie. " Even a secular paper could declare, "We donot believe there should be any civil Marriages of any kind. " In this custom of civil orlegal Marriages may be found at least one cause, perhaps theprincipal cause of divorce, for it encourages such a low view ofthe sacredness of the Marriage Rite. Ignatius in one of his Epistlessays: "It is fitting for those who purpose matrimony to accomplishtheir union with the sanction of the Bishop, that their Marriagemay be in the Lord. " Tertullian speaks of Marriages being "ratifiedbefore God," and adds, "How can we find words to describe thehappiness of that Marriage in which the Church joins together,which the Oblation confirms, the Benediction seals, the Angelsproclaim when sealed, and the Father ratifies. Ambrose callsMarriage a Sacrament, and says, "Marriage must be sanctified by thePriest's sanction and blessing. A careful study of the Marriage Service in the PrayerBook will show it to be a very clear setting forth of the nature ofMarriage. It will also be seen how fully this Service has retainedthe belief concerning Marriage which the Church has always heldsince the time of our Lord and His Apostles
Chaste - Applied to persons before Marriage, it signifies pure from all sexual commerce, undefiled applied to married persons, true to the Marriage bed
Encratites - A sect in the second century, who abstained from Marriage, wine, and animals
Postnuptial - ) Being or happening after Marriage; as, a postnuptial settlement on a wife
Espoused - Betrothed affianced promised in Marriage by contract married united intimately embraced
Monandric - ) Of or pertaining to monandry; practicing monandry as a system of Marriage
Espousal - That portion of the Marriage Service in which thecontracting parties answer "I will" to the questions, "N. " This seems to be the remains ofthe old form of espousals, which was different and distinct fromthe Office of Marriage, and which was often performed some weeksor months or perhaps years before. : the one of espousals and theother of Marriage, which are now performed on the same day, althoughformerly on different days
Concubinage - It is also used for a Marriage with a woman of inferior condition (performed with less solemnity than the formal Marriage, ) and to whom the husband does not convey his rank. 2 Chronicles 11:21 ; but ever since the abrogation of polygamy by Jesus Christ, and the reduction of Marriage to its primitive institution, concubinage has been forbidden and condemned among Christians
Celibacy - Abstention by vow from Marriage. The practice of abstaining from Marriage may be alluded to twice in the New Testament. One New Testament passage goes so far as to characterize the prohibition of Marriage as demonic (1 Timothy 4:1-3 )
Espouse - The espousal was a ceremony of betrothing, a formal agreement between the parties then coming under obligation for the purpose of Marriage. Espousals are in the East frequently contracted years before the Marriage is celebrated
Onan - After the decease of his elder brother, Er, he was instructed by his father to contract a levirate Marriage with Tamar. The device by which he evaded the object of this Marriage ‘was evil in the sight of the Lord, and he slew him’ ( Genesis 38:8-10 )
Abishag - Adonijab persuaded Bathsheba to entreat Solomon to give her to him in Marriage. This Solomon construed into virtual treason: as regal rights followed the possession in Marriage of a deceased king's wife, and caused him to be killed (1 Kings 1:1-4; 1 Kings 2:13-25)...
...
Onan - Onan repeatedly failed to complete the responsibilities of the Marriage and thus God killed him (Genesis 38:8-10 ). (See Levirate Law; Marriage)
Kindred - Relation by Marriage affinity. Relatives by blood or Marriage, more properly the former
Dotal - ) Pertaining to dower, or a woman's Marriage portion; constituting dower, or comprised in it
Jarha - Egyptian servant to Sheshan, who gave him his daughter in Marriage
Free-Love - ) The doctrine or practice of consorting with the opposite sex, at pleasure, without Marriage
Wedding - ) Nuptial ceremony; nuptial festivities; Marriage; nuptials
Marriage, Putative - (Latin: putare, to think) ...
If a couple are not really married but are publicly reported to be man and wife, and at least one of them believes that they are lawfully married, the supposed Marriage is called putative. As long as the good faith of at least one of them endures, such a Marriage has the effects of lawful wedlock in regard to the legitimation of the offspring
Legitimation - In canon law all children of Marriage are presumed to be legitimate even though the Marriage be invalid but reputed valid, or declared null after the birth of the children. Illegitimacy is removed if the parents marry, provided they were entitled to Marriage at the time of the conception or birth or at some intermediate time, and this removal extends to children already deceased, and to their descendants
Mamzer - ) A person born of relations between whom Marriage was forbidden by the Mosaic law; a bastard
Bridesman - ) A male friend who attends upon a bridegroom and bride at their Marriage; the "best man
Polygyny - ) The state or practice of having several wives at the same time; Marriage to several wives
Misalliance - ) A Marriage with a person of inferior rank or social station; an improper alliance; a mesalliance
Monogyny - ) Marriage with the one woman only
Tahpenes - The wife of Pharaoh, who gave her sister in Marriage to Hadad the Edomite (1 Kings 11:19,20 )
Divorced - Separated by a dissolution of the Marriage contract separated from bed and board parted forced asunder
Divorcement - Divorce dissolution of the Marriage tie
Yokefellow - ) An associate or companion in, or as in; a mate; a fellow; especially, a partner in Marriage
Peeress - ) The wife of a peer; a woman ennobled in her own right, or by right of Marriage
ne Temere - It does not affect the Marriages of non-Catholics who have never been Catholics, but does affect Catholics who have fallen away from their faith. " Its principal features are as follows: ...
It extends to the whole Church the impediment of clandestinity, which previously had been in force only in certain parts; it makes a Marriage invalid unless performed by a parish priest in his own parish, or by a bishop in his own diocese, or by a delegate of either, in the presence of at least two witnesses.
No pastor and no bishop can validly perform a Marriage outside the limits of his own territory without the permission of the parish priest or bishop of the place.
If a pastor or a bishop, within the limits of his territory, should join a couple, neither of whom resides therein, the Marriage is valid but unlawful, being an infringement on the rights of the pastor of the parties.
Under certain circumstances a valid and licit Catholic Marriage may take place without a priest. See also, Marriage without a priest.
Marriages must be registered in the place or places where the contracting parties were baptized
Wed - ) To join in Marriage; to give in wedlock. : To unite as if by the affections or the bond of Marriage; to attach firmly or indissolubly
Courter - ) One who courts; one who plays the lover, or who solicits in Marriage; one who flatters and cajoles
Affinity - A diriment matrimonial impediment preventing a valid Marriage with certain blood-relatives of a previous wife or husband, unless a dispensation be granted. No Marriage can be contracted with any relative of the deceased wife or husband in the direct line, that is, with any of her or his ancestors or descendants; and no dispensation can be given. Under the older laws there was an impediment of illicit affinity, resulting from sexual relations with certain near relatives of the party with whom Marriage was desired; this has been abolished by the new Code of Canon Law
Eligibility - ) The quality of being eligible; eligibleness; as, the eligibility of a candidate; the eligibility of an offer of Marriage
Digamous - ) Pertaining to a second Marriage, that is, one after the death of the first wife or the first husband
Encratite - ) One of a sect in the 2d century who abstained from Marriage, wine, and animal food; - called also Continent
Espousals - (Latin: spondere, to promise) ...
A formal contract of future Marriage between two persons who are thereby affianced
Ahlai - Sheshan's daughter given to the Egyptian servant Jarha in Marriage (1 Chronicles 2:31-35)
Divorce - Perversion of the Marriage institution. Marriage was ordained by God as an intimate and complementing union between a man and a woman in which the two become one physically, in the whole of life, in its purpose to reflect the relationship of the Godhead, and to serve God. With the fall of humankind the divine purpose and function of Marriage were damaged by sin, and the Marriage relationship often destroyed. ...
Effect of the Fall on Marriage . The relational aspect of God's image, reflected in Marriage, became marred. Leviticus 18,20 ; Romans 1:26-32 ) that have damaged or destroyed the Marriage relationship. Marriage covenants have been violated (cf. ...
Termination of the Marriage relationship is caused by sin that entered the world after Genesis 2:21-24 . Death itself, which terminates Marriage (Romans 7:1-3 ), came by Adam's sin. Divorce is not instituted or ordained by God; rather it is generated by sin and is contrary to God's ideal for Marriage (cf. It was not permitted (1) when false accusations were made about a bride's virginity; and (2) when Marriage occurred because a man had forcibly violated a woman sexually. Deuteronomy 24:1-4 prohibited remarriage of a woman to her first husband after the death or divorce of her second husband. ...
This text also recognizes and allows, without condemnation, the remarriage of the wife. In that culture remarriage would be expected since it was difficult for a woman to survive in life unless she was married or remained single in her father's house. This does not necessarily mean that God approves of the remarriage in this text. The text prohibits remarriage to the first husband since the woman has already been defiled. The second Marriage is not condemned, nor is a third Marriage forbidden. It does not approve of or encourage divorce or remarriage, although it allows for both, except for remarriage of a woman to her first husband. ...
In Ezra 9-10 intermarriage with foreigners is viewed as a defilement of the holy race and as unfaithfulness to God (9:2; 10:2,10). Although Deuteronomy 7:1-4 commands Israelites not to make covenants or to intermarry with the people in Canaan when they enter that land, this principle is not normative since the Old Testament permits Marriage to believing foreigners (cf. ...
The dissolving of the Marriages is problematic. One example is the breaking of the Marriage covenant by divorcing ("breaking faith with") the wives "of their youth" (v. ...
Therefore, although the Old Testament presents God's ideal for Marriage as monogamous, permanent, and exclusive, the Old Testament likewise recognizes that divorce and remarriage are present because of sin and must be regulated. Divorce is wrong because it produces adultery in the remarriage, except in the case of fornication ( porneia [ Matthew 19:9 ) is the meaning of "fornication" (porneia [ Deuteronomy 24:1 ). Therefore, adultery severs the Marriage relationship in the New Testament as did the adulterer's death in the Old Testament. However, if illegitimate extramarital sexual intercourse is practiced by one spouse, adultery has already transpired, and this breaks the oneness of the Marriage relationship. Jesus reminds them of God's original ideal for Marriage in Genesis 2:24 : a male and a female were created to become a permanent "one flesh" union. Jesus states that Deuteronomy 24:1-4 permitted divorce solely because of man's hard (sinful) heart, but this was not God's original plan for Marriage ( Matthew 19:8 ). ...
Jesus' teaching confirms and elaborates the Old Testament concepts of Marriage and divorce. God's ideal for Marriage is a monogamous, permanent, and exclusive union. The only exception to this rule is when one of the Marriage partners has committed fornication (porneia [2]), which itself is adultery. First, spouses should not leave/divorce (chorizo [3]) their Marriage partners (v. If a spouse should leave/divorce a Marriage partner, he or she has only two options: (1) remain unmarried or (2) be reconciled. Remarriage is not an option. However, if the unbeliever leaves, the believing partner is not bound to the principle about maintaining the Marriage. The Marriage is thereby dissolved. Paul says nothing about the issue of remarriage. God-ordained Marriage is a monogamous, permanent, and exclusive union. Jesus upheld the ideal of permanent Marriage, making clear that divorce is equivalent to adultery in breaking the oneness of Marriage. It is also permissible to dissolve a Marriage if an unbelieving spouse departs/deserts the believer. Alexander...
See also Family Life and Relations ; Marriage ...
Bibliography . , Divorce and Remarriage: Four Christian Views ; W. Luck, Divorce and Remarriage: Recovering the Biblical View ; J
Clandestine - ) Conducted with secrecy; withdrawn from public notice, usually for an evil purpose; kept secret; hidden; private; underhand; as, a clandestine Marriage
Consanguinity - ) The relation of persons by blood, in distinction from affinity or relation by Marriage; blood relationship; as, lineal consanguinity; collateral consanguinity
Altar Boys - Servers at the altar, not in minor orders, at Mass, Vespers, Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, Marriage, Holy Communion, etc
a Mensa et Thoro - A kind of divorce which does not dissolve the Marriage bond, but merely authorizes a separate life of the husband and wife
Wedding - Marriage nuptials nuptial ceremony nuptial festivities
Diriment Impediment - (Latin: dirimere, take apart; impedire, impede) ...
One that renders a Marriage altogether invalid unless a dispensation be granted by the Church, which is possible only in certain cases. Under the present Code of Canon Law these impediments are: defect of age, impotence, difference of worship (baptized and unbaptized), Sacred Orders, solemn vows, abduction, crime (adultery, homicide, or both), relationship, or affinity, within proscribed degrees, spiritual relationship, legal relationship (adoption when State forbids Marriage between adopter and adopted), clandestinity, public decency
Impediment, Diriment - (Latin: dirimere, take apart; impedire, impede) ...
One that renders a Marriage altogether invalid unless a dispensation be granted by the Church, which is possible only in certain cases. Under the present Code of Canon Law these impediments are: defect of age, impotence, difference of worship (baptized and unbaptized), Sacred Orders, solemn vows, abduction, crime (adultery, homicide, or both), relationship, or affinity, within proscribed degrees, spiritual relationship, legal relationship (adoption when State forbids Marriage between adopter and adopted), clandestinity, public decency
Banns of Marriage - The term "Banns of Marriage,"means, therefore, the publication of intended Marriages, and arepublished for three Sundays before the event, in the Church wherethe ceremony is to take place. In the American Prayer Book,provision is made for the publishing of the Banns of Marriage, butas it is not required by law the custom has fallen into disuse
Marriage - The biblical standard for Marriage is a monogamous relationship in which a man and a woman share a lifetime commitment to each other, second only to their commitment to God. Jesus emphasized God's intention that Marriage be a lifetime commitment (Mark 10:5-9 ; Matthew 19:4-9 ). He affirmed this as the principle of Marriage inherent in divine creation (Genesis 2:24 ). Paul cited this key principle to show the sinfulness of sexual relations outside Marriage (1 Corinthians 6:12-20 ) and to emphasize the importance of self-giving love in Marriage (Ephesians 5:28 ). Genesis 2:24 emphasizes the oneness of the Marriage relationship and the priority of the relationship over all others, including the relationship of the couple to their parents. Marriage is also for companionship ( Genesis 2:18-23 ). Paul described the kind of mutual submission that should characterize the Marriage relationship (Ephesians 5:21-33 ). ...
Sex is one of God's good Gifts God's intention is for sexual union to be expressed exclusively within the unique monogamous relationship of Marriage. Human sexuality (Genesis 1:27 ) and sexual union within Marriage (Genesis 2:24 ) were part of God's good creation. Sexual union is for procreation (Genesis 1:28 ) and also for expressing love within the oneness of Marriage (Genesis 2:24 ; Proverbs 5:15-19 ; 1 Corinthians 7:2-5 ). Adultery is a violation of the commitment inherent in Marriage (Exodus 20:14 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:2-3 ; Hebrews 13:4 ). So is any sexual intercourse that does not express the oneness of Marriage (1 Corinthians 6:12-20 ). The biblical condemnation of adultery covers such things as communal Marriage, mate swapping, and the so-called open Marriage. ...
Marriage and singleness are valid options for Christians. Jesus taught that Marriage demands faithfulness within a relationship based on a lifetime commitment (Matthew 19:3-9 ). When the disciples said that this concept made Marriage too demanding, Jesus replied that singleness—whether involuntary or voluntary—has its own demand, abstinence from sexual union (Matthew 19:10-12 ). Paul acknowledged that Marriage is best for many; but, based on his own experience, he recommended singleness to those who wanted to devote all of their energies to Christian work and could forego sexual relationships (1Corinthians 7:7-9,1 Corinthians 7:32-35 ). Neither Jesus nor Paul presented Marriage or singleness as a second-class or less holy state than the other. Sexual sins are serious because they undermine the foundation of family life, the oneness of the Marriage relationship; however, such sins are not unforgivable. ...
The biblical ideal is Marriage that lasts a lifetime. Christians sometimes must cope with the breakup of a Marriage. Because humans do not live up to the high ideals and standards of God, Marriages do fail. With the strong biblical emphasis on Marriage as a lifetime commitment, divorce poses a real dilemma for Christians. The writ of divorce was evidence of her release from the Marriage and thus her freedom to be married to someone else (Deuteronomy 24:2 ). Paul followed Jesus in emphasizing the permanence of Marriage (1 Corinthians 7:10-11 ), but he taught that a Christian was not bound to an unbelieving spouse if the unbeliever insisted on a separation (1 Corinthians 7:12-16 ). ...
Marriage after the death of a spouse usually is not questioned; Marriage again after a divorce is a difficult issue. Marriage after widowhood is clearly permissible in the New Testament (Romans 7:2-3 ). Paul advised single persons and widows to remain unmarried if they could, but he counseled Marriage for others (1 Corinthians 7:8-9 ). Those who oppose Marriage again of divorced persons cite Mark 10:11-12 ; Luke 16:18 ; Romans 7:3 ; and 1 Corinthians 7:10-11 . Others believe principles inherent in the gospel make Marriage again a valid option for divorced persons. Those who advocate this position do not believe Jesus intended to establish a legalistic approach to Marriage that would condemn every specific remarriage as an adulterous relationship. His hard sayings on divorce were intended to emphasize the biblical ideal of Marriage as a lifetime commitment and to rebuke those men whose casual attitude towards divorce make a mockery of this ideal. ...
Persons who hold this view believe Paul's words imply the possibility of divorce and remarriage. This approach also would leave to each divorced person the choice about Marriage again. Such a decision would be based on the same biblical principles that apply to any persons considering Marriage, plus the biblical principles of forgiveness and renewal. The former principles include these: companionship (Genesis 2:18 ), sexual fulfillment (Genesis 2:24 ; 1 Corinthians 7:8-9 ), distinctive expectations of Marriage or singleness (Matthew 19:3-12 ), parenting goals (Genesis 1:27-28 ; 1 Timothy 5:14 ), finding the right kind of person (1 Corinthians 7:39 ). ...
Difference of interpretation exists about authority and submission in Marriage. On the other side are those whose model is the modern democratic Marriage in which the partners are equals in all things. The admonition to mutual submission in Ephesians 5:21 applies to all the relationships within the church ( Ephesians 5:25-6:10 ) and in a Christian Marriage (Ephesians 5:21-33 ). ...
Differences of interpretation exist about the role of husbands and wives in Marriage
Forbidden Degrees - Degrees of relationship, whether by blood or by Marriage, within which it is not permitted to marry, as explained under affinity and consanguinity
Degrees, Forbidden - Degrees of relationship, whether by blood or by Marriage, within which it is not permitted to marry, as explained under affinity and consanguinity
Diana - ) The daughter of Jupiter and Latona; a virgin goddess who presided over hunting, chastity, and Marriage; - identified with the Greek goddess Artemis
Sheshan - A chief of Judah, whose family was sustained in the tribe by his daughter's Marriage to his Egyptian servant
Parapherna - ) The property of a woman which, on her Marriage, was not made a part of her dower, but remained her own
Jugal - ) Relating to a yoke, or to Marriage
Divorce - Is the dissolution of Marriage, or separation of man and wife. Sentences which release the parties a vinculo matrimonii, on account of impuberty, frigidity, consanquinity within the prohibited degrees, prior Marriage, or want of the requisite consent of parents or guardians, are not properly dissolutions of the Marriage contract, but judicial declarations that there never was any Marriage; such impediment subsisting at the time as rendered the celebration of the Marriage rite a mere nullity. Inferior causes may justify the separation of husband and wife, although they will not authorize such a dissolution of the Marriage contract as would leave either at liberty to marry again; for it is that liberty in which the danger and mischief of divorces principally consist. The law of this country, in conformity to our Saviour's injunction, confines the dissolution of the Marriage contract to the single case of adultery in the wife; and a divorce even in that case can only be brought about by an act of parliament, founded upon a previous sentiment in the spiritual court, and a verdict against the adulterer at common law; which proceedings taken together, compose as complete an investigation of the complaint as a cause can receive
Incest - Sexual intercourse between persons too closely related for normal Marriage. Leviticus 18:6-16 prohibited unions between a man and his mother, stepmother, sister, half-sister, daughter-in-law, granddaughter, aunt (by blood or Marriage), or sister-in-law. In patriarchal times Marriage to a half sister (Genesis 20:12 ) and Marriage to rival sisters (Genesis 29:21-30 ) were permissible, though such Marriages proved troublesome to both Abraham and Jacob
Revivor - ) Revival of a suit which is abated by the death or Marriage of any of the parties, - done by a bill of revivor
Wedded - ) Of or pertaining to wedlock, or Marriage
Edward Powell, Blessed - He was one of the four theologians selected to defend the legality of the Marriage of Catherine of Aragon, and fell into great disfavor for denouncing Henry's Marriage with Anne Boleyn
Eliezer (abraham's servant) - His most prominent role was facilitating the Marriage of Isaac and Rebecca
Mamzer - A child born from an incestuous or adulterous relationship--specifically, a relationship between a man and a woman who halachically cannot be bonded in Marriage
Wedding Garment - The custom of the East at their Marriage feasts, can only explain that expression of our Lord in his parable, (Matthew 22:11) of the man that had not on a wedding garment. The uniform custom at all Marriages, even among the poorer sort, was to make presents of clothing to the persons invited. And for the king's son in his Marriage, which the parable represents, the presents must have been splendid indeed. Therefore for the king on coming in to see his guests, to find there a man without the wedding garment, implied such a contempt to his person, and to his son's Marriage, as might well justify the anger shewn. And as the parable of Jesus on this subject was wholly figurative, and with an eye to the gracious Marriage of the Son of God with our nature, nothing could have been more happily chosen to have shewn the awful consequence of the unbeliever, in his appearing now at ordinances, and finally at the last day, at judgment; unclothed with the righteousness of Christ, and standing naked and defenceless in his own sinful nature, when the King shall come in to the Marriage supper of the Lamb in heaven! It would be well if every man who is looking for acceptance, either wholly or in part from any garment of his own, would pause over the awful subject of such contumacy and self-righteousness!...
Publishment - ) A public notice of intended Marriage, required by the laws of some States
Deuterogamy - ) A second Marriage, after the death of the first husband of wife; - in distinction from bigamy, as defined in the old canon law
Cases of Conscience - Thus, one has injured another, how far and in what way is he obliged to make reparation; one has taken what belongs to another, to what extent and in what manner is he obliged to make restitution; persons living as husband and wife begin to doubt about the validity of their Marriage, what impediments may there have been that would render the Marriage null and void
Confarreation - ) A form of Marriage among the Romans, in which an offering of bread was made, in presence of the high priest and at least ten witnesses
Betrothal - ) The act of betrothing, or the fact of being betrothed; a mutual promise, engagement, or contract for a future Marriage between the persons betrothed; betrothment; affiance
Endogamy - ) Marriage only within the tribe; a custom restricting a man in his choice of a wife to the tribe to which he belongs; - opposed to exogamy
Agyniani - They condemned all use of flesh and Marriage as not instituted by God, but introduced at the instigation of the devil
Marrried - ) Of or pertaining to Marriage; connubial; as, the married state
Mixed Marriage - A Marriage between persons one of whom is a member of the Catholic Church and the other a member of some Protestant denomination. It is sometimes used to mean the union in Marriage of a Catholic with one who is not baptized but this is expressed better by the phrase disparitas cultus (difference, or inconsistency, of worship). Since differences of belief in religious matters very frequently occasion incompatibility in domestic relations, impediments to the proper religious observance of both partIes, and differences over the religious training of the children, the Church, to safeguard the religion of the Catholic party, requires that the Marriage take place before a priest only, that the one who is not Catholic will not interfere with the religious observances of the other nor with the training of the children as Catholics
Marriage, Mixed - A Marriage between persons one of whom is a member of the Catholic Church and the other a member of some Protestant denomination. It is sometimes used to mean the union in Marriage of a Catholic with one who is not baptized but this is expressed better by the phrase disparitas cultus (difference, or inconsistency, of worship). Since differences of belief in religious matters very frequently occasion incompatibility in domestic relations, impediments to the proper religious observance of both partIes, and differences over the religious training of the children, the Church, to safeguard the religion of the Catholic party, requires that the Marriage take place before a priest only, that the one who is not Catholic will not interfere with the religious observances of the other nor with the training of the children as Catholics
Hephzibah - " As the prophets naturally mould their prophecies in a form suggested by the facts of the day, Hezekiah's Marriage to Hephzibah, Manasseh's mother (2 Kings 21:1), would obviously suggest itself. " The Marriage of Hezekiah moreover was at a late period of his reign, after his sickness and recovery described in Isaiah 38. 62, concerning Hephzibah would be just at the time of Hezekiah's Marriage to her; his reign in all being 29 years, the Marriage was after the 14th year and before the 12th year preceding Hezekiah's death, i
Elopement - ) The act of eloping; secret departure; - said of a woman and a man, one or both, who run away from their homes for Marriage or for cohabitation
Elisheba - She was of the tribe of Judah, and her Marriage with Aaron united the priestly and royal tribes
Merchet - ) In old English and in Scots law, a fine paid to the lord of the soil by a tenant upon the Marriage of one the tenant's daughters
Jar'ha, - the Egyptian servant of Sheshan, about the time of Eli, to whom his master gave his daughter and heir in Marriage; (1 Chronicles 2:34,35 ) (B
Tah'Penes, - an Egyptian queen, was wife of the Pharaoh who received Hadad the Edomite, and who gave him her sister in Marriage
Hieracites - Heretics in the third century; so called from their leader Hierax, a philosopher, of Egypt, who taught that Melchisedec was the Holy Ghost; denied the resurrection and condemned Marriage
Merab - The eldest daughter of Saul, 1 Samuel 14:49, promised to David, but given to Adriel in Marriage
Dotation - ) The act of endowing, or bestowing a Marriage portion on a woman
Matrimony - ) The union of man and woman as husband and wife; the nuptial state; Marriage; wedlock
Marriage (i.) - MARRIAGE (I. Oriental estimate of Marriage. —Of the three great events in family life—birth, Marriage and death—that of Marriage was rendered important by the amount of consideration devoted to the choice of son-in-law or daughter-in-law, to the settlement of the customary financial conditions, and to the arrangements connected with the wedding festivities. It was recognized as a step leading to grave consequences, for, in the case of a daughter, if the Marriage should prove unsatisfactory, she would likely return to her former home discredited and unhappy, and there would be a feeling of irritation and injustice between the families concerned. In Marriage she was practically the purchased possession of her husband, becoming bèûlah to him as her ba‘al, or owner and master. —This was a binding transaction declaring the fact of prospective Marriage, and specifying the terms agreed upon by the contracting parties, that is, by those acting on their behalf. Although in both families the intention of Marriage might have been decided upon by the parents from the infancy of their children, yet the formality of betrothal was not proceeded with until Marriage could be regarded as a possibility in the near future. On the one hand, it was undesirable to make gifts or pay an instalment in a compact that might never be implemented by Marriage, and, on the other hand, it was equally undesirable to dedicate a daughter to one who might not live to undertake her support, and thus cause her to be regarded as a widow. While the act of betrothal by the presence of witnesses and the assemblage of friends had the importance of a ceremonial function, yet the spirit of bargaining was generally so keenly aroused, and the process of compromise so protracted and complex, that the situation scarcely admitted of immediate Marriage rejoicings. Thus there was usually an interval of a year or two, or it might be of several years, between the betrothal and the celebration of Marriage. Ceremony of Marriage. —As a welcome sequel following in due time upon the discussion and settlement of the Marriage portion and similar matters, the wedding itself was always an occasion of joyful festivity and congratulation. —While in ancient times the Marriage doubtless took place occasionally in the home of the bride, yet the fact that the bridegroom came to claim one who had become his by the fulfilment of assigned conditions, and further, the widespread tradition of forcible opposition to her removal from her people, point to the greater frequency of Marriage in the house of the bridegroom’s parents. —The Marriage generally took place in the evening, so that those coming from a distance might not fail to arrive, and those who were occupied during the day might have liberty to attend. Those who were waiting to see the procession pass raised the peculiar Oriental cry of Marriage festivity, and thus, as the cry was taken up, the fact of his approach was known along the path in front of him up to the house in which the bride and her attendants were waiting. ...
Many of these Marriage customs are alluded to by Christ in His teaching, as the subject was familiar to His hearers, and any parabolic lessons deduced from it would be easily understood. The reference to marrying and giving in Marriage, with the Flood at the door, exemplified that pre-occupation of the mind with worldly interests and ambitions by which men forget the transitoriness of life and the precariousness of its possessions. With such a background of tradition and custom Christ gave to Marriage the support of His own presence, and spoke of its Divine origin and temporary nature (John 2:2, Matthew 19:4-6; Matthew 22:30). In the Epistles it is evident that the higher conception of Marriage prevalent among the Jews was gravely endangered by the inherited views still familiar to the mind, though condemned by the conscience, in the Gentile membership of the Church (1 Corinthians 7). The Marriage relationship was used to typify the intimate vital affinity between Christ and the Church (Ephesians 5:22-33). There was no corresponding functionary in Galilee, and so there is no allusion to him in the account of the Marriage at Cana. In all the lands of their dispersion the Jews still apply this name, huppah, to the richly embroidered canopy under which the contracting parties stand during the Marriage ceremony
Marriage - The purpose of Marriage is to reflect the relationship of the Godhead and to serve him. Although the fall has marred the divine purpose and function of Marriage, this definition reflects the God-ordained ideal for Marriage from the beginning. Likewise, male and female in the Marriage relationship are of the same nature and essence, equal as persons (cf. Marriage appears designed to reflect the same relational unity-in-plurality as the Godhead. Marriage, the most intimate human relationship, was appropriately chosen to reflect this relational aspect of the divine image. This open intimate relational aspect of God's image, reflected in Marriage, was marred by the fall (cf. ...
Marriage is the most basic and significant social relationship to humankind. Without Marriage, society will fail. This relational aspect of God's image in Marriage has analogues portrayed in Yahweh's relation with Israel (Isaiah 54:5 ; Jeremiah 31:32 ; Ezekiel 16:8-14 ; Hosea 2:14-20 ) as well as in Christ's relation with the church (Ephesians 5:21-33 ; cf. ...
New Testament Marriage imagery describes the relationship between Christ and his church (cf. Christ's relationship with the church becomes the functional model for a Marriage relationship. ...
Human reproduction comes through intimate sexual union designed only for the Marriage relationship. Cohabitation abuses the procreative nature of the Marriage relationship. While reproduction is a divine purpose of Marriage, some couples are unable to have children for various physical reasons. This does not make their Marriage second-rate or inferior. Children are one manifestation of the "one flesh" of Marriage. The procreative injunction obviously precludes homosexual "marriages. "...
The Marriage Union as God's Work . God brings a man and a woman together in Marriage (Matthew 19:6 ; cf. ...
As creator of the Marriage relationship, God becomes the essential supporting party to a Marriage, giving wisdom, discretion, understanding, and love to protect the union and to enable it to honor God (Proverbs 2:6-16 ; 1 Corinthians 13 ). A Marriage can glorify God and function properly only when both partners are believers in the Messiah, Jesus. ...
Marriage as God's Norm for Humankind . Perfect people would have yielded perfect Marriages. Sin brought flaws in humans that sometimes make it difficult to find or sustain a suitable Marriage relationship. So, although Marriage appears to be God's norm, singleness is neither more nor less spiritual than Marriage (1 Corinthians 7:32-36 ). ...
The Nature of Marriage. The Marriage bond was to be permanent. Separation or termination of the Marriage union was not an option before sin entered the world and death with it ( Genesis 3 ). God's ideal was for Marriage to be permanent and exclusive. These and other sexual perversions violate the "oneness" of the Marriage relationship and were often punishable by death (Leviticus 20:1-19 ; Deuteronomy 22:13-27 ; cf. Becoming "one flesh" is used in Scripture for the consummating sexual act of Marriage. The body is the temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19 ), so believers should be holy in their sexual conduct (Leviticus 19:2 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-6 ; 1 Peter 1:15-16 ), keeping Marriage pure. Emphasis is upon an agreement, a commitment, not upon an analogy of conditionality and unconditionality of some biblical covenants that would extend the Marriage covenant analogy beyond its expected scope. This Marriage commitment, and faithfulness to it, preclude sexual relations with anyone except one's spouse (Exodus 20:14 ; Leviticus 18,20 ; Romans 1:24-27 ). Although kings frequently employed Marriages to seal foreign treaties in the ancient Near East, such commitments were spiritual as well as physical adultery. Although male and female are equal in relationship to Christ, the Scriptures give specific roles to each in Marriage. ...
Effect of the Fall on Marriage . Leviticus 18,20 ; Romans 1:26-32 ) to damage or destroy the Marriage relationship. Marriage commitments are violated. The fall severely damaged the Marriage relationship. ...
For Marriage to function now according to God's ideal, believers in Christ need to marry only believers. Whenever God directly brought a man and woman together in Marriage, both were believers. Although pagan customs encouraged Marriage with anyone (cf. Bromily, God and Marriage ; L. Crabb, The Marriage Builder: A Blueprint for Couples and Counselors ; J
Achsah - The daughter of Caleb, given in Marriage with a large dowry to his nephew Othniel, as a prize for taking the city Debir, Joshua 15:15 - 17 ; Judges 1:12,13
Bridal - ) A nuptial festival or ceremony; a Marriage
Indissolubility of Marriage - It is not a dissolution of the Marriage bond, but a putting away of the guilty party; for elsewhere our Lord declares that "He that marrieth her that is put away from her husband committeth adultery" (Luke 16). Here there is a distinction between the mere contract of Marriage and the sacrament of matrimony. The Church, for grave reasons, can dissolve the contract of Marriage when the sacrament has not been received, as explained in the article on the Pauline Privilege, but when the sacrament has been received and has been ratified by marital cohabitation, Marriage cannot be and never has been dissolved
Marriage, Indissolubility of - It is not a dissolution of the Marriage bond, but a putting away of the guilty party; for elsewhere our Lord declares that "He that marrieth her that is put away from her husband committeth adultery" (Luke 16). Here there is a distinction between the mere contract of Marriage and the sacrament of matrimony. The Church, for grave reasons, can dissolve the contract of Marriage when the sacrament has not been received, as explained in the article on the Pauline Privilege, but when the sacrament has been received and has been ratified by marital cohabitation, Marriage cannot be and never has been dissolved
Dowry - A Marriage present that ensured the new wife's financial security against the possibility her husband might forsake her or might die. Payment of the dowry made the Marriage a legal fact even before the official wedding ceremonies or consumation of the Marriage. See Marriage ; Family
Ruth, Book of - The Marriage was not strictly a levirate Marriage, such as is legislated about in Deuteronomy 25. The purpose of the book was doubtless to preserve an edifying story relating to the origins of the great king, David, not to recommend levirate Marriage nor to combat the rigor of Esdras and Nehemias in regard to Marriage with foreigners
Anancial - ) Designating, pertaining to, or held under, the Spanish system of law (called ganancial system) which controls the title and disposition of the property acquired during Marriage by the husband or wife
Affinity - Relationship by alliance (2 Chronicles 18:1 ) or by Marriage (1 Kings 3:1 ). Marriages are prohibited within certain degrees of affinity, enumerated Leviticus 18:6-17
Jugale - Parti-colored yoke of ribbon binding together the newly married pair, mentioned by Saint Isidore of Seville (560-636) and probably identified with the velum or flammeum of the bride in Roman Marriage
Marriage - It is evident that monogamy was the original law of Marriage (Matthew 19:5 ; 1 Corinthians 6:16 ). ...
In the pre-Mosaic times, when the proposals were accepted and the Marriage price given, the bridegroom could come at once and take away his bride to his own house (Genesis 24:63-67 ). But in general the Marriage was celebrated by a feast in the house of the bride's parents, to which all friends were invited (29:22,27); and on the day of the Marriage the bride, concealed under a thick veil, was conducted to her future husband's home. ...
Our Lord corrected many false notions then existing on the subject of Marriage (Matthew 22:23-30 ), and placed it as a divine institution on the highest grounds. Marriage is said to be "honourable" (Hebrews 13:4 ), and the prohibition of it is noted as one of the marks of degenerate times (1 Timothy 4:3 ). ...
The Marriage relation is used to represent the union between God and his people (Isaiah 54:5 ; Jeremiah 3:1-14 ; Hosea 2:9,20 )
Chambering - 1: κοίτη (Strong's #2845 — Noun Feminine — koite — koy'-tay ) primarily a place in which to lie down, hence, "a bed, especially the Marriage bed," denotes, in Romans 13:13 , "illicit intercourse
Ethiopian Woman - His Marriage of this "woman" descended from Ham gave offence to Aaron and Miriam
Tahpenes - Her sister was given in Marriage to Hadad the Edomite, an enemy of David, and later of Solomon
Sheshan - Having no male issue, he gave his daughter in Marriage to Jarha his Egyptian slave (1 Chronicles 2:31; 1 Chronicles 2:34-35)
Condone - , to forgive for a violation of the Marriage law; - said of either the husband or the wife
Khond - ) A Dravidian of a group of tribes of Orissa, India, a section of whom were formerly noted for their cruel human sacrifices to the earth goddess, murder of female infants, and Marriage by capture
Betrothal - was the act of engagement for Marriage in Bible times and was as binding as Marriage. ...
Old Testament The biblical terms, betrothal and espousal, are almost synonymous with Marriage, and as binding. Betrothal and Marriage comprised a moral and spiritual principle for the home and society
Espoused - ESPOUSED, ESPOUSALS...
This term is well known among the Hebrews, in the ceremony of their Marriages. The espousing each other, and the betrothing by promise to each other, from the time that this was done, was considered as sacred, though the Marriage was not consummated sometimes for a considerable space after. This espousal, in the Jewish church, is frequently made use of, by way of figure, to represent the spiritual union and Marriage of Christ with his people. " (Hosea 3:3) At length, when the Lord brings home his spouse, then it is called the Marriage-supper of the Lamb in heaven. (Revelation 19:9)...
See Betrothed and Marriage
Impotency - Physical unfitness for connubial union, a diriment impediment to matrimony, provided that it is incurable, and that it existed before the attempted Marriage
Espousals - The act of contracting or affiancing a man and woman to each other a contract or mutual promise of Marriage
Mulier - ) Lawful issue born in wedlock, in distinction from an elder brother born of the same parents before their Marriage; a lawful son
Marriage (ii.) - MARRIAGE (II. Jesus also frequently uses figures drawn from Marriage customs to illustrate His teaching concerning the coming of the Kingdom. The usage of Jesus contains no reflexion of such a primitive thought, but rather springs from His high appreciation of Marriage as it existed in the conventionalized civilization of the Jews of His day. As an institution Jesus regards Marriage as essentially physical, and intended only for the present age. Those who were to share in the blessings of the eschatological Kingdom would neither marry nor be given in Marriage, but would be possessed of the non-physical body in the resurrection (Matthew 22:23-30, Mark 12:18-25, Luke 20:27-36). ...
The Sadducees, in their query which gave rise to this teaching of Jesus, raised the question of the levirate Marriage. Jesus’ answer does not touch upon that peculiar institution, but deals rather with the nature of Marriage itself. In all the records of His teaching there is nothing to indicate that He gave to Marriage any new social content or custom. Like His Apostles after Him, Jesus accepted Marriage as an existing institution which gave rise to practical moral questions. It follows that Jesus did not look upon Marriage as psychical or spiritual. Marriage as a social institution Jesus regards as of Divine origin. That is, Marriage was to be monogamous. Jesus, however, does not make Marriage a supreme good. At the same time, just because Marriage, though a good, is one which must pass with the present age, He teaches that in some cases it must be avoided. These sayings, however, are not to be interpreted as in any way a prohibition of Marriage, or as an elevation of the unmarried state to a plane superior to that of Marriage. ’...
A consideration of this teaching of Jesus leads naturally, therefore, to the genuinely Christian conception of Marriage as a relationship which, though in the very nature of the case limited to the physical mode of existence, is yet sacred
Asenath - Daughter of Potipherag, priest or prince of On; given in Marriage by Pharaoh to Joseph, as adding honor and strength to his high office
Boaz - The story of his Marriage to Ruth is recorded in the Book of Ruth, which is read on Shavuot in many communities
Cana - This place is rendered memorable in the gospel, being honoured with our Lord's presence at a Marriage
Liturgical Use of Rings - ...
(3) Conferring the ring is part of the Marriage ceremony, symbolizing union
Fruitless - ) Lacking, or not bearing, fruit; barren; destitute of offspring; as, a fruitless tree or shrub; a fruitless Marriage
Matchmaking - ) Busy in making or contriving Marriages; as, a matchmaking woman. ) The act or process of trying to bring about a Marriage for others
Calixtus i, Saint, Pope - As pope he regulated the Marriage laws and granted communion to the adulterous after due penance had been undergone
Callistus i, Saint, Pope - As pope he regulated the Marriage laws and granted communion to the adulterous after due penance had been undergone
Bridegroom - It anticipates the joy of Christ, the Marriage-day when He will take to Himself all that for which He suffered so much
Ethiopian Woman - ]'>[1] ), when the children of Israel were at Hazeroth, Miriam and Aaron ‘spake against’ Moses on account of his Marriage with an Ethiopian (RV Banns - (Old English: bannan, to summon) Public proclamations of an intended Marriage, as a help in discovering matrimonial impediments, if any exist. Three publications, on different Sundays or holy days, are required unless a dispensation be granted, and ordinarily the Marriage should not be celebrated until at least three days after the last announcement. The publications are made in the church or churches of the parties; and if either of them, after arriving at a Marriageable age, has lived in any other locality for six months or more, the publishing of banns may be required in that place
Fidelity - ) Adherence to the Marriage contract
Praetexta - ) A white robe with a purple border, worn by a Roman boy before he was entitled to wear the toga virilis, or until about the completion of his fourteenth year, and by girls until their Marriage
Prorogue - ) To defer; to delay; to postpone; as, to proroguedeath; to prorogue a Marriage
Abishag - After David’s death, Abishag was asked in Marriage by Adonijah; the request cost him his life ( 1 Kings 2:13-25 )
June - ) The sister and wife of Jupiter, the queen of heaven, and the goddess who presided over Marriage
Thomas Sanchez - Author of an exhaustive treatise on Marriage and of works on moral theology, he was unjustly accused of immoral teachings, especially concerning "mental reservation
Sanchez, Thomas - Author of an exhaustive treatise on Marriage and of works on moral theology, he was unjustly accused of immoral teachings, especially concerning "mental reservation
Christ, Bride of - ...
(2) A woman who vows her chastity to God, foregoing Marriage in order to be more united with Christ
Christ, Spouse of - ...
(2) A woman who vows her chastity to God, foregoing Marriage in order to be more united with Christ
Impediment, Hindering - One that renders a Marriage unlawful unless a dispensation be obtained, but does not affect its validity
Impediment, Impedient - One that renders a Marriage unlawful unless a dispensation be obtained, but does not affect its validity
Dunstable, England - Here Cranmer held the court which in 1533 pronounced the Marriage of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon invalid
Impedient Impediment - One that renders a Marriage unlawful unless a dispensation be obtained, but does not affect its validity
Ben-Ammi - ” Son of Lot and his younger daughter after his two daughters despaired of Marriage and tricked their father after getting him drunk (Genesis 19:38 )
Hindering Impediment - One that renders a Marriage unlawful unless a dispensation be obtained, but does not affect its validity
Spouse of Christ - ...
(2) A woman who vows her chastity to God, foregoing Marriage in order to be more united with Christ
Bath'-Sheba, - ) The child which was the fruit of her adulterous intercourse with David died; but after Marriage she became the mother of four sons, Solomon, (Matthew 1:6 ) Shimea, Shobab and Nathan. (1 Kings 1:11,15,23 ) After the accession of Solomon, she, as queen-mother, requested permission of her son for Adonijah to take in Marriage Abishag the Shunammite
Marriage - From the beginning God’s ideal for Marriage has been that one man and one woman live together, independent of parents, in lifelong union (Genesis 2:18-24; Matthew 19:4-6). )...
Marriage customs...
Among the ancient Israelites, engagement to marry was almost as binding as Marriage. Parents usually chose the Marriage partners for their sons and daughters (Genesis 21:21; Genesis 24:1-4; Genesis 38:6; Ruth 3:1-5), though they may have taken into consideration any preference that a son or daughter indicated (Genesis 24:58-61; Genesis 34:4; Genesis 34:8; Judges 14:2; 1 Samuel 18:20-21). ...
Total union...
Whatever the traditions or procedures, Marriage is more than a social custom or a legal arrangement. The Bible encourages a healthy enjoyment of sex within Marriage (Proverbs 5:18-19; Ecclesiastes 9:9; Song of Song of Solomon 1:12-13; Song of Solomon 7:6-13; Song of Solomon 8:1-3), but it forbids sexual relations before Marriage or with any person other than one’s Marriage partner (Leviticus 18:6-18; Leviticus 20:10; Deuteronomy 22:20-22; Malachi 2:14; Mark 6:18; Romans 7:2; cf. ...
In Marriage as God intended it, there is an equality between the man and the woman (Genesis 2:23-24). ...
God holds the man ultimately responsible for the household that comes into being through the Marriage (Genesis 3:9-12; 1 Corinthians 11:3; cf. Sin has spoiled the Marriage relationship as it has spoiled everything else in human society. However, because of the exercise of Christian love, Christian Marriage ought to achieve marital harmony, even in circumstances where other Marriages do not. Where each is prepared to sacrifice self-interest for the sake of the other, the Marriage will be enriched (Ephesians 5:33; see HUSBAND; WIFE). However, where one partner of a non-Christian Marriage later becomes a Christian, the Marriage should be maintained. God understands the circumstances, and the Christian should do everything possible to make the Marriage work harmoniously (1 Corinthians 7:12-16). They must take into consideration the added responsibilities that Marriage brings (1 Corinthians 7:32-34), and must not marry hastily, particularly when there is the possibility of increased social and economic hardship (1 Corinthians 7:25-31). ...
While the Christian teaching on Marriage is based on principles that the Creator set out for his creatures, it also acknowledges the weaknesses of human nature and the need to deal with them sensibly
Middlemore, Humphrey, Blessed - Refusing to recognize the validity of Henry VIII's Marriage with Anne Boleyn, he was arrested, imprisoned, and put to death
Humphrey Middlemore, Blessed - Refusing to recognize the validity of Henry VIII's Marriage with Anne Boleyn, he was arrested, imprisoned, and put to death
Engaged - ) Pledged; promised; especially, having the affections pledged; promised in Marriage; affianced; betrothed
Annulment - (Latin: ad, to; nullus, none: to nothing) ...
A declaration by the ecclesiastical or civilauthorities that a reputed Marriage never was valid because owing to some known or hidden invalidating impediment it was not contracted validly and is therefore null and void
Handfast - ) To pledge; to bind; to betroth by joining hands, in order to cohabitation, before the celebration of Marriage
Raskolnik - " the Judaizers; the Molokane, who refuse to recognize civil authority or to take oaths; the Dukhobortsy, or Dukhobors, who are communistic, marry without ceremony, and believe that Christ was human, but that his soul reappears at intervals in living men; the Khlysty, who countenance anthropolatory, are ascetics, practice continual self-flagellation, and reject Marriage; the Skoptsy, who practice castration; and a section of the Bezpopovtsy, or priestless sect, which disbelieve in prayers for the Czar and in Marriage. "Obnoxious:" the Bezpopovtsy, who pray for the Czar and recognize Marriage
Adultery - Violation of the Marriage bed a crime, or a injury, which introduces, or may introduce, into a family, a spurious offspring. ...
In common usage, adultery means the unfaithfulness of any married person to the Marriage bed. In England, Parliament grant absolute divorces for infidelity to the Marriage bed in either party and the spiritual courts divorce a mensa et thoro
Courtship - ) The act of wooing in love; solicitation of woman to Marriage
Defender of the Tie - (Latin: Defensor Vinculi) ...
Member of a diocesan matrimonial court whose duty is to uphold the validity of a disputed Marriage until sufficient evidence has been adduced to show its nullity
Canonical Hours - In England the canonical hours are from eight to twelve in the forenoon; before or after which Marriage cannot be legally performed in any church
Disparagement - ) Matching any one in Marriage under his or her degree; injurious union with something of inferior excellence; a lowering in rank or estimation
Consummation - Consummation of Marriage, the most intimate union of the sexes, which completes the connubial relation
Abduction - It consists in the forcible carrying off or detention of a woman against her will, and it renders a Marriage with her invalid so long as she remains in the power of the abductor
Tie, Defender of the - (Latin: Defensor Vinculi) ...
Member of a diocesan matrimonial court whose duty is to uphold the validity of a disputed Marriage until sufficient evidence has been adduced to show its nullity
Hymenae'us - (belonging to Marriage ), the name of a person occurring twice in the correspondence between St
Mass, Nuptial - There is a special, Mass assigned for Marriages. If the woman has received it at a previous Marriage it is not repeated. It is directed rather to the woman than to the man, that "her Marriage may be to her a yoke of peace, and that they may see their children's children, even to the third and fourth generation
Nuptial Mass And Blessing - There is a special, Mass assigned for Marriages. If the woman has received it at a previous Marriage it is not repeated. It is directed rather to the woman than to the man, that "her Marriage may be to her a yoke of peace, and that they may see their children's children, even to the third and fourth generation
Divorce - The sentence or writing by which Marriage is dissolved. To dissolve the Marriage contract, and thus to separate husband and wife
Wedding - When the individual comes to the Lord JESUS, falls in love with Him and trusts Him, it is described as a Marriage, as in Romans 7:4. When the church is caught up to meet the Lord in the air to be actually, personally and physically in His presence forever, that also is described as a Marriage, as in Revelation 19:7
Michal - The younger of Saul's two daughters, in love with David, and whom Saul reluctantly gave to him in Marriage, 1 Samuel 14:49 18:20-29 . Her father then gave her in Marriage to Phalti, 1 Samuel 25:44 , from whom David some years after recovered her, 2 Samuel 3:12-21
Marriage - --The institution of Marriage dates from the time of man's original creation. (2) The indissolubleness of the Marriage bond, except on; the strongest grounds, Comp. (Matthew 19:9 ) (3) Monogamy, as the original law of Marriage (4) The social equality of man and wife. Our Lord and his apostles re-established the integrity and sanctity of the Marriage bond by the following measures: (a) By the confirmation of the original charter of Marriage as the basis on which all regulations were to be framed. (Matthew 19:4,5 ) (b) By the restriction of divorce to the case of fornication, and the prohibition of remarriage in all persons divorced on improper grounds. (Acts 15:20 ) ...
The conditions of legal Marriage . --In the Hebrew commonwealth Marriage was prohibited (a) between an Israelite and a non-Israelite. There were three grades of prohibition: total in regard to the Canaanites on either side; total on the side of the males in regard to the Ammonites and Moabites; and temporary on the side of the males in regard to the Edomites and Egyptians, Marriages with females in the two latter instances being regarded as legal. The progeny of illegal Marriages between Israelites and non-Israelites was described as "bastard. The regulations relative to Marriage between Israelites and Israelites were based on considerations of relationship. The most important passage relating to these is contained in ( Leviticus 18:6-18 ) wherein we have in the first place a general prohibition against Marriage between a man and the "flesh of his flesh," and in the second place special prohibitions against Marriage with a mother, stepmother, sister or half-sister, whether "born at home or abroad," granddaughter, aunt, whether by consanguinity on either side or by Marriage on the father's side, daughter in-law, brother's wife, stepdaughter, wife's mother, stepgranddaughter, or wife's sister during the lifetime of the wife. An exception is subsequently made, (26:5-9) in favor of Marriage with a brother's wife in the event of his having died childless. " ...
The modes by which Marriage was effected . (Luke 15:25 ) Between the betrothal sad the Marriage so interval elapsed, varying from a few days in the patriarchal age, (Genesis 24:55 ) to a full year for virgins and a month for widows in later times. " (24:1; Matthew 1:19 ) The essence of the Marriage ceremony consisted in the removal of the bride from her father's house to that of the bridegroom or his father. (Proverbs 31:14,24 ) The legal rights of the wife are noticed in (Exodus 21:10 ) under the three heads of food, raiment, and duty of Marriage or conjugal right. ...
The allegorical and typical allusions to Marriage have exclusive reference to one object, viz
Bridegroom - ...
As are those dulcet sounds in break of day, ...
That creep into the dreaming bridegroom's ear, ...
And summon him to Marriage
Espouse - ) To betroth; to promise in Marriage; to give as spouse
Michal - (David's wife): (a) (9th century BCE) Daughter of King Saul, her hand in Marriage was given to David after he killed Goliath
Abstinents - They are supposed to have borrowed part of their opinions from the Gnostics and Manichaeans, because they opposed Marriage, condemned the use of flesh meat, and placed the Holy Ghost in the class of created beings
Ahla'i - (ornamental ) daughter of Sheshan, whom, having no issue, he gave in Marriage to his Egyptian slave Jarha
Marriage - The essence of Marriage consists in the mutual consent of the parties. Marriage is a part of the law of nations, and is in use among all people. The public use of Marriage institutions consists, according to Archdeacon Paley, in their promoting the following beneficial effects:...
1. ...
Whether Marriage be a civil or a religious contract, has been a subject of dispute. A Christian state recognizes Marriage as a branch of public morality, and a source of civil peace and strength. Marriage, too, as placing one human being more completely under the power of another than any other relation, requires laws for the protection of those who are thus so exposed to injury. Questions of property are also involved in Marriage and its issue. The law must, therefore, for these and many other weighty reasons, be cognizant of Marriage; must prescribe various regulations respecting it; require publicity of the contract; and guard some of the great injunctions of religion in the matter by penalties. In every well ordered society Marriage must be placed under the cognizance and control of the state. But then those who would have the whole matter to lie between the parties themselves, and the civil magistrate, appear wholly to forget that Marriage is also a solemn religious act, in which vows are made to God by both persons, who, when the rite is properly understood, engage to abide by all those laws with which he has guarded the institution; to love and cherish each other; and to remain faithful to each other until death. For if, at least, they profess belief in Christianity, whatever duties are laid upon husbands and wives in Holy Scripture, they engage to obey by the very act of their contracting Marriage. The question, then, is whether such vows to God as are necessarily involved in Marriage, are to be left between the parties and God privately, or whether they ought to be publicly made before his ministers and the church. On this the Scriptures are silent; but though Michaelis has shown that the priests under the law were not appointed to celebrate Marriage; yet in the practice of the modern Jews it is a religious ceremony, the chief rabbi of the synagogue being present, and prayers being appointed for the occasion. The more direct connection of Marriage with religion in Christian states, by assigning its celebration to the ministers of religion, appears to be a very beneficial custom, and one which the state has a right to enjoin. For since the welfare and morals of society are so much interested in the performance of the mutual duties of the married state; and since those duties have a religious as well as a civil character, it is most proper that some provision should be made for explaining those duties; and for this a standing form of Marriage is best adapted. We think that the religious effect would be greater, were the ministers of each religious body to be authorized by the state to celebrate Marriages among their own people, due provision being previously made by the civil magistrate for the regular and secure registry of them, and to prevent the laws respecting Marriage from being evaded; which is indeed his business. " Precept and illustration can go no higher than this; and nothing evidently is wanting either of direction or authority to raise the state of Marriage into the highest, most endearing, and sanctified relation in which two human beings can stand to each other. We find but few laws in the books of Moses concerning the institution of Marriage. In respect to which custom, Moses enjoins that, upon the Marriage of a second wife, a man shall be bound to continue to the first her food, raiment, and the duty of Marriage. But the following extract, from a journal which I kept at Smyrna, presents a parallel case: "The Armenian brides are veiled during the Marriage ceremony; and hence deceptions have occurred, in regard to the person chosen for wife. I am informed that, on one occasion, a young Armenian at Smyrna solicited in Marriage a younger daughter, whom he admired. When the time for solemnizing the Marriage arrived, the elder daughter, who was not so beautiful, was conducted by the parents to the altar, and the young man was unconsciously married to her. The various festivities attendant on these occasions continue for three days and during the last night the Marriage is celebrated
Essenes - In general they renounced Marriage, and recruited their ranks by adopting very young children. There is no evidence that they rejected the ethics of Marriage. In fact a few of them entered Marriage with a view to preserving the race
Betrothed - They considered it a breach of the divine command not to marry; and hence, the betrothing, or being betrothed, was a ceremony long used before the Marriage was intended to be consummated: and, indeed, sometimes there was a great lapse of time between the one and the other. ...
I have thought it worth noticing, in a work of this kind, purposely to observe, upon the act itself, the gracious condescension of our God and Saviour in adopting the term with respect to his Marriage with our nature. But the Marriage was only consummated when, in the fulness of time, he took our nature upon him, and became the Husband and Head of his church
Espoused - ), is used in the Middle Voice, of marrying or giving in Marriage; in 2 Corinthians 11:2 it is rendered "espoused," metaphorically of the relationship established between Christ and the local church, through the Apostle's instrumentality. ...
2: μνηστεύω (Strong's #3423 — Verb — mnesteuo — mnace-tyoo'-o ) "to woo and win, to espouse or promise in Marriage," is used in the Passive Voice in Matthew 1:18 ; Luke 1:27 ; 2:5 , all with reference to the Virgin Mary, RV, "betrothed," for AV, "espoused," in each case
Marriage - (See ADAM) The charter of Marriage is Genesis 2:24, reproduced by our Lord with greater distinctness in Matthew 19:4-5; "He which made them at the beginning made them male and female, and said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife: and they twain, shall be one flesh. In Marriage husband and wife combine to form one perfect human being; the one is the complement of the other. this truth, hidden once but now revealed, namely, Christ's spiritual union with the church, mystically represented by Marriage, is of deep import. Vulgate wrongly translated "this is a great sacrament," Rome's plea for making Marriage a sacrament. Not Marriage in general, but the Marriage of Christ and the church, is the great mystery, as the following words prove, "I say it in regard to (eis ) Christ and in regard to (eis ) the church," whereas Genesis 2:24 refers to literal Marriage. ...
The propagation of the church from Christ, as that of Eve from Adam, is the foundation of the spiritual Marriage. Natural Marriage rests on the spiritual Marriage, whereby Christ left the Father's bosom to woo to Himself the church out of a lost world. Marriage is the general rule laid down for most men, as not having continency (1 Corinthians 7:2; 1 Corinthians 7:5, etc. ...
Scripture teaches the unity of husband and wife; the indissolubleness of Marriage save by death or fornication (Matthew 5:32; Matthew 19:9; Romans 7:3); monogamy; the equality of both (iysh ) and (ishah ) being correlative, and she a "help-meet for him," i. Marriage is honorable; but fornication, which among the Gentiles was considered indifferent, is stigmatized (Hebrews 13:4; Acts 15:20). Marriage of Israelites with Canaanites was forbidden, lest it should lead God's people into idolatry (Exodus 34:16; Deuteronomy 7:3-4). "...
Our Christian reason for prohibiting such Marriage after the wife's death is because man and wife are one, and the sister-in-law is to be regarded in the same light as the sister by blood. Marriage with a deceased brother's wife (the Levirate law) was favored in Old Testament times, in order to raise up seed to a brother (Genesis 38:8; Matthew 22:25). Between betrothal and Marriage all communication between the betrothed ones was carried on through "the friend of the bridegroom" (John 3:29). ...
Then he led the bride and her party in procession home with gladness to the Marriage supper (Matthew 25:6; Matthew 22:1-11; John 2:2; Psalms 45:15). The nuptial song was sung; hence in Psalms 78:63 "their maidens were not praised" in nuptial song (Hebrew) is used for "were not given in Marriage," margin. Light is thrown upon Egyptian Marriages by a translation of an Egyptian contract of Marriage, by Eugene Revillout. ...
After the actual dowry is recited, the sum being specified in shekels, the rights of the children which may hereafter come from the Marriage, as well as the payment of the mother's pin-money, are secured by the following clause: "thy pocket money for one year is besides thy toilet money which I give thee each year, and it is your right to exact the payment of thy toilet money and thy pocket money, which are to be placed to my account, which I give thee. " Practicing in Marriage law in Egypt was one of the priestly functions, for at the conclusion the contract states that "the writer of this act is
Honestas Publica - If a party has contracted an invalid Marriage with another, or if they have lived in public and notorious concubinage, the impediment exists between each of them and the ancestors and descendants of the other to the second degree in the direct line, i
Dowry - The money, goods or estate which a woman brings to her husband in Marriage the portion given with a wife
Amalberga, Saint - As a youth Charlemagne sought her in Marriage, and attempted to abduct her, but was unable to move her from the altar where she had taken refuge
Amalia, Saint - As a youth Charlemagne sought her in Marriage, and attempted to abduct her, but was unable to move her from the altar where she had taken refuge
Ach'Sah - Her father promised her in Marriage to whoever should take Debir
Achsa Achsah - Caleb promised her in Marriage to any one who should take Kirjath-sepher, or Debir
Marriage - The Scriptures, both of the Old Testament and the New, have in a great variety of circumstances shew in what high esteem the holy estate of Marriage was considered by holy men of old. And I think it very plain, from the New Testament doctrine upon this subject, that from the very first order of things, even from the creation, the spiritual Marriage and unity between Christ and his church was all along respected by the Marriage-state, and uniformly intended to be shadowed forth. And when the readers hath fully considered the force of these Scriptures: let him turn to John's gospel, second chapter and there read how the Lord Jesus honouered the Marriage both with his presence and first miracle that he wrought; than let him turn to the fifth chapter of Mathew's Gospel, and Luke the sixteenth and eighteenth, and mark how strongly the Lord attacheth adultery to the separation of men and their wives. Perhaps it may not be improper under this article, to make another observation in the allusion to the customs of the East on the celebration of their Marriages, and which may serve to illustrate and explain, in some measure, that circumstance respecting the man without a wedding garment, which our Lord speaks of in the Marriage-feast the king made for his son. (See Matthew 22:1-14)...
We cannot need to be informed how splendid and costly the entertainments made for Marriage feasts always were in the East, Their ordinary entertainments were great, and no expense was spared in them; but even the poorest of the people on bridal occasions exerted themselves to make the festivity as rich as possible. In the Marriage therefore of the king's son, we may well suppose the display of magnificence must have been proportionably great. The invitation of the gospel to the Marriage of the Lord Jesus with our nature, runs in the same charter of grace. "Go ye into the highways, and as many as ye shall and bid to the Marriage
le'ah - Her father took advantage of the opportunity which the local Marriage rite afforded to pass her off in her sister's stead on the unconscious bridegroom, and excused himself to Jacob by alleging that the custom of the country forbade the younger sister to be given first in Marriage
Celibacy - , the prohibition to marry or to use Marriage rights if already married, for those who come under the law of celibacy. Minor clerics are not obliged by the law of celibacy but if they attempt Marriage they are thereby reduced to the lay state. If they have been married before that time they may use Marriage rights
Birth Control - While the Catholic Church does not urge married persons to beget the largest possible number of children, and does not sanction the intemperate use of Marriage, she does condemn each deliberate act of birth control as intrinsically evil (S. As birth control defeats the primary purpose of the Marriage relation, it is opposed to the Divine Will, which the Church must sustain. The essential evil of birth control, however, consists in frustrating the primary purpose of Marriage, the propagation of the species
Mormons - Brigham Young, 1852, published the doctrine of celestial Marriage (marriage for eternity as well as for time), including plural Marriage; however, because of great discussion throughout the country various acts of Congress forbade plural Marriages. Since 1890, such Marriages have been prohibited by the church although there have been cases where those contracted have not been annulled. The Reorganized Church repudiates the revelation of plural Marriage and maintains that the law of God provides for but one companion in wedlock for either man or woman
Latter Day Saints - Brigham Young, 1852, published the doctrine of celestial Marriage (marriage for eternity as well as for time), including plural Marriage; however, because of great discussion throughout the country various acts of Congress forbade plural Marriages. Since 1890, such Marriages have been prohibited by the church although there have been cases where those contracted have not been annulled. The Reorganized Church repudiates the revelation of plural Marriage and maintains that the law of God provides for but one companion in wedlock for either man or woman
Celibacy - Celibate, or celibacy, is a word chiefly used in speaking of the single life of the popish clergy, or the obligation they are under to abstain from Marriage. ...
The fathers, without making any distinction between clergy and laity, asserted the lawfulness of the Marriage of all Christians. Marriage was not forbidden to bishops in the Eastern church till the close of the seventh century. ...
See Marriage
Honorable, Without Honor - ) of degrees of honor attached to persons invited to a feast, a Marriage feast, Luke 14:8 , "a more honorable man. 2), is used of Marriage in Hebrews 13:4 , AV, as a statement, "(marriage) is honorable (in all)," RV, as an exhortation, "let (marriage) be had in honor (among all)
Bride - But the name is applied to a woman at the Marriage festival, before she is married, as well as after the ceremony
Matrimonial Unworthiness - If one party has publicly rejected the Catholic faith without joining a heretical sect, or has become a member of a society condemned by the Church, or has been guilty of public crime, or has incurred censure and shows no repentance, the approval of the bishop must be obtained in order to assist at the Marriage
Didon, Henri - He was at his best when dealing with social problems, and, 1879, was bitterly attacked by the secular press for his defense of the indissolubility of Marriage
Talmai - Son of Ammihur (or Ammihud), king of Geshur, and a contemporary of David, to whom he gave his daughter Maacah in Marriage ( 2 Samuel 3:3 ; 2 Samuel 13:37 , 1 Chronicles 3:2 )
Ally - To unite, or form a relation, as between families by Marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league or confederacy
Almedha, Saint - Rejecting Marriage with a mortal prince, she espoused herself to God, and was martyred
Ellyw, Saint - Rejecting Marriage with a mortal prince, she espoused herself to God, and was martyred
Eloi Lamma Sabacthani - Rejecting Marriage with a mortal prince, she espoused herself to God, and was martyred
Kin - ) Relationship, consanguinity, or affinity; connection by birth or Marriage; kindred; near connection or alliance, as of those having common descent
Kin - ) Relationship, consanguinity, or affinity; connection by birth or Marriage; kindred; near connection or alliance, as of those having common descent
Electra, Saint - Rejecting Marriage with a mortal prince, she espoused herself to God, and was martyred
Elined, Saint - Rejecting Marriage with a mortal prince, she espoused herself to God, and was martyred
Undefiled - 1: ἀμίαντος (Strong's #283 — Adjective — amiantos — am-ee'-an-tos ) "undefiled, free from contamination" (a, negative, miaino, "to defile"), is used (a) of Christ, Hebrews 7:26 ; (b) of pure religion, James 1:27 ; (c) of the eternal inheritance of believers, 1 Peter 1:4 ; (d) of the Marriage bed as requiring to be free from unlawful sexual intercourse, Hebrews 13:4
Marriage - being an institution of God, and that in Paradise, Genesis 2:1-25 : Christ honoured Marriage by his presence, and at such a solemnity wrought his first miracle, John 2:1-25 : Moreover, it is honourable, as families are formed and built up, the world peopled with inhabitants; it prevents incontinence and fornication, and, where the various duties of it are attended to, renders life a blessing. The Marriage of parents and children appears, at first view, contrary to nature, not merely on account of the disparity of age, but of the confusion which it introduces into natural relations, and its obliging to inconsistent duties; such as reverence to a son, and the daughter to be equal with the father. The Marriage of brothers and sisters, and of some other near relations, is likewise disapproved by reason on various accounts. It frustrates one design of Marriage, which is to enlarge benevolence and friendship, by cementing various families in a close alliance. And, farther, were it allowed, young persons instead of entering into Marriage upon mature consideration, with a settled esteem and friendship, and a proper concern and provision for the support and education of children, would be in danger (through the intimacy and affection produced by their near relation, and being bred together) of sliding in their inconsiderate years into those criminal familiarities which are most destructive of the great ends of Marriage. Most nations have agreed to brand such Marriages as highly criminal, who cannot be supposed to have derived their judgment from Moses and the Israelites. It is probable God expressly prohibited these Marriages in the beginning of mankind, and from the first heads of families the prohibition might be transmitted as a most sacred law to their descendants. 339; Bean's Christian Minister's Advice to a New-married Couple; Guide to Domestic Happiness; Advantages and Disadvantages of the Marriage State; Stennett on Domestic Duties; Jay's Essay on Marriage; Doddridge's Lect
Marriage - Marriage...
1. Forms of Marriage . There are two forms of Marriage among primitive races: (1) where the husband becomes part of his wife’s tribe, (2) where the wife becomes part of her husband’s tribe. Smith ( Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia ) gives to this form the name sadika , from the sadac or ‘gift’ given to the wife, ( a ) The union may be confined to an occasional visit to the wife in her home ( mota Marriage). Samson’s Marriage. ( b ) The husband may be definitely incorporated into his wife’s tribe ( beena Marriage). Possible traces in OT are the Marriages of Jacob (Laban claims wives and children as his own, Genesis 31:31 ; Genesis 31:42 ), Moses ( Exodus 2:21 ; Exodus 4:18 ), Samson ( Judges 14:1-20 ; Judges 15:1-20 , Judges 16:4 ; there is no hint that he meant to take his wife home; his kid seems to be the sadac or customary present). The words of Genesis 2:24 may have originally referred to this custom, though they are evidently not intended to do so by the narrator, since beena Marriages were already out of date when they were written. Many of the instances quoted can be explained as due to special circumstances, but the admitted existence of such Marriages in Arabia makes it probable that we should find traces of them among the Semites in general. In addition to the cases already quoted, we may add the closeness of maternal as compared with paternal relationships, evidenced in bars of Marriage (see below, § 3), and the special responsibility of the maternal uncle or brother ( Genesis 24:29 ; Genesis 34:25 , 2 Samuel 13:22 ). Traces may remain in later Marriage procedure, e. There is no certain trace in OT of a plurality of husbands (polyandry), though the Levirate Marriage is sometimes supposed to be a survival. The Marriage figure applied to the union of God and Israel (§ 10) implied monogamy as the ideal state. Polygamy is, in fact, always an unnatural development from the point of view both of religion and of anthropology; ‘monogamy is by far the most common form of human Marriage; it was so also amongst the ancient peoples of whom we have any direct knowledge’ Westermarck, Hum. Bars to Marriage...
(1) Prohibited degrees . The instinctive impulse was not against Marriage with a near relative qua relative, but against Marriage where there was early familiarity. ‘Whatever is the origin of bars to Marriage, they are certainly early associated with the feeling that it is indecent for housemates to intermarry’ (W. The origin of the instinct is natural selection, consanguineous Marriages being on the whole unfavourable to the species, in man as among animals. We find in OT no trace of dislike to Marriage within the tribe ( i. The objection, however, to incestuous Marriages was strong, though in early times there was laxity with regard to intermarriage with relatives on the father’s side, a natural result of the ‘matriarchate’ and of polygamy, where each wife with her family formed a separate group in her own tent. On Marriage with a stepmother see below, § 6. We note the omission of prohibition of Marriage with a niece, and with widow of maternal uncle. Leviticus 18:13 forbids Marriage not with a deceased but with a living wife’s sister, i. The ‘bastard’ of Deuteronomy 23:2 is probably the offspring of an incestuous Marriage. Outside the prohibited degrees consanguineous Marriages were common ( Genesis 24:4 , Tob 4:12 ); in Judges 14:3 the best Marriage is ‘from thy brethren. Cousin Marriages among the Jews are said to occur now three times more often than among other civilized peoples (Westermarck, p. Genesis 24:1-67 ; Genesis 28:1-22 ; Genesis 34:1-31 , Numbers 12:1 , Judges 14:3 illustrate the objection to foreign Marriages; Esau’s Hittite wives are a grief to his parents ( 1619114480_81 ; Genesis 27:46 ); cf. The Marriage of Joseph ( Genesis 41:45 ) is due to stress of circumstances, but David ( 2 Samuel 3:3 ) and Solomon ( 1 Kings 3:1 ; 1 Kings 11:1 ) set a deliberate example which was readily Imitated ( 1 Kings 16:31 ). Among the common people there must have been other cases similar to Naomi’s ( Ruth 1:4 ): Bathsheba ( 2 Samuel 11:8 ), Hiram ( 1 Kings 7:14 ), Amasa ( 1 Chronicles 2:17 ), Jehozabad ( 2 Chronicles 24:26 ) are the children of mixed Marriages. It is said that now the proportion of mixed to pure Marriages among the Jews is about 1 to 500 (Westermarck, p. 1 Corinthians 7:39 probably discourages Marriage with a heathen (cf. would remove any religious bar to intermarriage between Christians of different race, though it does not touch the social or physiological advisability. Levirate Marriage (Lat. Boaz marries Ruth as goel , not as levir , and the Marriage is legally only a subordinate element in the redemption of the property. ]'>[4] ) make no exception in favour of the Levirate Marriage, whether repealing or presupposing it is uncertain. Marriage Customs...
(1) The arranging of a Marriage was normally in the hands of the parents ( Genesis 21:21 ; Genesis 24:3 ; Genesis 28:1 ; Genesis 34:4 , Judges 14:2 , 2Es 9:47 ); there are, in fact, few nations or periods where the children have a free choice. But ( a ) infant or child Marriages were unknown; ( b ) the consent of the parties was, sometimes at least, sought ( Genesis 24:8 ); ( c ) the rule was not absolute; it might be broken wilfully ( Genesis 26:34 ), or under stress of circumstances ( Exodus 2:21 ); ( d ) natural feeling will always make itself felt in spite of the restrictions of custom; the sexes met freely, and romantic attachments were not unknown ( Genesis 29:10 ; Genesis 34:3 , Judges 14:1 , 1 Samuel 18:20 ); in these cases the initiative was taken by the parties. (2) The betrothal was of a more formal and binding nature than our ‘engagement’; among the Arabs it is the only legal ceremony connected with a Marriage. Non-fulfilment of the Marriage was a serious slight ( 1 Samuel 18:19 , Judges 14:19 ), but conceivable under certain circumstances ( Genesis 29:27 ). The first ceremony was the wedding procession ( Psalms 45:15 , 1Ma 9:37 ), which may be a relic of ‘marriage by capture,’ the bridegroom’s friends ( Matthew 9:15 , John 3:29 ; cf. ...
The Marriage supper followed, usually in the home of the bridegroom ( 2Es 9:47 ); Genesis 29:22 , Judges 14:10 , Tob 8:19 are easily explained exceptions. Hospitality was a sacred duty; ‘he who does not invite me to his Marriage will not have me to his funeral. There is nowhere any hint of a religious ceremony , though Marriage was regarded with great reverence as symbolizing the union of God with Israel ( ib . the Latin ‘confarreatio’), and the Marriage was consummated by the entry into the ‘chamber’ ( huppah ). 168) finds in this a relic of ‘beena’ Marriage (see above, § 1), the huppah or canopy ( Joel 2:16 ) being originally the wife’s tent ( Genesis 24:67 , Judges 4:17 ); cf
Beeri - ) In the narrative where stress is laid on Esau's wife being a Canaanite, her father is called a Hittite; in the genealogy, where the stress is on Esau's Marriage connection with the former holders of mount Seir, he is properly termed a Horite
Ibzan - e gave away in Marriage) his 30 daughters, which is an additional reason for Phoenicians not Philistines having been his neighbours
Prior - ) Preceding in the order of time; former; antecedent; anterior; previous; as, a prior discovery; prior obligation; - used elliptically in cases like the following: he lived alone [1] prior to his Marriage
Proposal - ) That which is proposed, or propounded for consideration or acceptance; a scheme or design; terms or conditions proposed; offer; as, to make proposals for a treaty of peace; to offer proposals for erecting a building; to make proposals of Marriage
Achsah - Her father promised her in Marriage to the man who should capture Debir or Kiriath-sepher a feat accomplished by Othniel, the brother of Caleb
Dower - ) That which a woman brings to a husband in Marriage; dowry
Potipherah - His daughter Pharaoh gave in Marriage to Joseph
Sergius Iii, Pope - During his pontificate he declared the ordinations conferred by Formosus null in 904, opposed the errors of the Greeks on the question of the Descent of the Holy Ghost, and declared the fourth Marriage of the Greek emperor Leo VI valid
Resurrection - ...
In the resurrection, they neither marry, nor are given in Marriage
Canonical Adoption - Under Roman law legal relationship was established, based on the natural relationship, and it was a bar to Marriage. The Church, receiving this law as her own, recognized adoption as a diriment impediment of Marriage. Hence, in the United States, adoption is not generally a diriment impediment of Marriage, nor in the eyes of the Church in any way preventive of it
Adoption, Canonical - Under Roman law legal relationship was established, based on the natural relationship, and it was a bar to Marriage. The Church, receiving this law as her own, recognized adoption as a diriment impediment of Marriage. Hence, in the United States, adoption is not generally a diriment impediment of Marriage, nor in the eyes of the Church in any way preventive of it
Marriage - Christian conception of Marriage. -During the Apostolic Age the Church was both Jewish and Gentile, and its ideas on Marriage had a double background in those of the OT and the heathen. The gravest danger was that the laxity of heathenism with regard to Marriage should remain among the Gentile converts. In the heathen world, though the Marriage ceremony was in some sort a sacred act, the Marriage itself was looked on as an easily-broken contract which either party might dissolve at will. Paul should be on the subject of Marriage (1 Corinthians 7:1). The Apostle, writing as he does to Gentiles, dwells on the fact that Marriage is a remedy against sin (1 Corinthians 7:2; cf. Milligan, of the human body, for the context implies Marriage), and gives many warnings against heathen impurities (Romans 1:24; Romans 1:28 161911448021 Romans 6:12 f. ...
The Jews had a much higher conception of Marriage than the heathen. Marriage was a sacred duty and was considered most holy. ...
Our Lord greatly raised the conception of Marriage, even as compared with that of the Jews of the time. The primeval Marriage, the idea of which was obscured by the hardness of man’s heart, was revived, and the teaching about divorce (below, 7) was revolutionized. Nevertheless, Marriage was intended only for this life, for there are no Marriages in heaven (Matthew 22:30, Mark 12:25, Luke 20:35 -these passages, it is needless to say, do not teach that loved ones will be parted hereafter). Jesus chose a Marriage feast for His first miracle (John 2:1 ff. Paul insists on the holiness of Marriage in Ephesians 5:22-33 (cf. Hebrews 13:4); the quotation from Genesis is repeated (Ephesians 5:31), and Marriage is said to symbolize the union between Christ and His Church (Ephesians 5:23-28)-a metaphor drawn out in the ancient homily known as 2 Clement (§ 14: ‘the male is Christ, and the female is the Church’). And there were some, but not all, of the Essenes who preached the duty of abstinence from Marriage, and admitted members to their body only after a probation of three years to test their continency (Josephus, Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) II. In this respect the Essenes were in direct antagonism with the Pharisees, who strongly supported Marriage; but they had some influence in promoting Christian celibacy in the post-Apostolic Age. ...
Our Lord, while teaching, as we have seen, the holiness of Marriage, nevertheless commended celibacy for those ‘to whom it is given’ and who are ‘able to receive it’; for so we must interpret the phrase ‘which made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven’s sake’ (Matthew 19:11 f. ’ Nowhere in the NT is Marriage referred to as a state inferior to that of celibacy, however much the latter may be commended under certain circumstances to certain persons. If that were the case, the increase of the race would not be of primary importance; and therefore, while Marriage was entirely lawful (1 Corinthians 7:28), and indeed imperative for those who had not the gift of continency (1 Corinthians 7:2; 1 Corinthians 7:9), celibacy was encouraged. The lawfulness of Marriage is further emphasized by the assertion of the right to marry by St. (b) In the Epistles of the Captivity Marriage is mentioned as the normal state, and nothing is said in favour of celibacy (Ephesians 5:31 ff. (c) In the Pastoral Epistles Marriage is recommended, or as some think required, for the local clergy (1 Timothy 3:2; 1 Timothy 3:4 f. Paul denounces as a heresy the prohibition of Marriage (1 Timothy 4:3); though this does not involve any change of view as compared with the earlier Epistles. All who marry should do so with the consent of the bishop, that the Marriage may be after the Lord (cf. Marriage ceremonies. -The betrothal preceded the actual Marriage by several months, but not by more than a year (Edersheim, op. In the parable the father is said to make a Marriage, or a Marriage feast (ποιεῖν γάμον), for his son (Matthew 22:2); so in the OT, Genesis 24:3 (Abraham and his steward for Isaac) Genesis 34:4; Genesis 34:8 (Hamor for Shechem) Genesis 38:6 (Judah for Er), Judges 14:2-10 (Manoah for Samson). It is instructive to see how Marriage customs, as well as others, persistently survive in the East from biblical times, and we find that among the Oriental Christians of to-day the same practice obtains (Maclean-Browne, Catholicos of the East, p. ...
The night procession is perhaps the principal feature of the Marriage. In a village it would be natural for some of the virgin friends of either party to await the couple outside the place of Marriage; and, indeed, our own custom, by which the bridesmaids go to the door of the church to await the bride, is exactly parallel. ...
No benediction of the Marriage is mentioned in the NT, though it will be remembered that the feast itself was a religious act, as was the Agape (Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics i. The benediction, which is much overshadowed by the Marriage feast, should take place among the E. ...
The Marriage supper follows the benediction, when the bridegroom has returned with his bride; γάμος and γάμοι properly mean this (Matthew 22:8 f. ), and then come to mean Marriage in general, as in Hebrews 13:4. The parable of the Marriage of the king’s son (Matthew 22:2-14, apparently quite a different incident from that of Luke 14:16-24) gives an account of it. To refuse an invitation to it without good cause was counted a great insult (Matthew 22:7), for to be bidden at all was an honour: the bidding to the Marriage of the Lamb conveys a blessing (Revelation 19:9; cf
Divorce - The low standard of Marriage prevalent at the close of the Old Testament appears in Malachi 2:14-16. Rome makes Marriage a sacrament, and indissoluble except by her lucrative ecclesiastical dispensations. ...
But this would make the Marriage between one pagan man and one pagan woman a "sacrament," which in the Christian sense would be absurd; for Ephesians 5:23-32, which Rome quotes, and Mark 10:5-12 where even fornication is not made an exception to the indissolubility of Marriage, make no distinction between Marriages of parties within and parties outside of the Christian church. What Marriage is to the Christian, it was, in the view of Scripture, to man before and since the fall and God's promise of redemption. The divorced woman who married again, though the law sanctions her remarriage (Deuteronomy 24:1-4), is treated as "defiled" and not to be taken back by the former husband
Matrimonial Court - Disputed cases concerning Marriage are usually brought before the matrimonial court of a diocese. The cases which occur most frequently are those in which a "decree of nullity" is sought, a judgment that a certain Marriage was and is invalid
Yoke - A chain a link a bond of connection as the yoke of Marriage. Libertines like not to be yoked in Marriage
Match - ) To marry; to give in Marriage. ) A candidate for matrimony; one to be gained in Marriage. ) To be united in Marriage; to mate. ) A matrimonial union; a Marriage
Match - ) To marry; to give in Marriage. ) A candidate for matrimony; one to be gained in Marriage. ) To be united in Marriage; to mate. ) A matrimonial union; a Marriage
Connection - a person connected with another by Marriage rather than by blood; - used in a loose and indefinite, and sometimes a comprehensive, sense
Shealtiel - This could involve the practice of Levirate Marriage ( Deuteronomy 25:5-10 )
Essenes - They were ascetics who practiced community of goods, generally shunned Marriage, refrained from attending worship in the Temple, and attached great importance to the study of the Scriptures
Perez - After she was widowed and her brother-in-law, Onan, refused to fulfill his duties in levirate Marriage (designed to carry on the name of the deceased through a son), she tricked her father-in-law, Judah, into an affair (Genesis 38:13-30 )
Zipporah - When Moses fled from Egypt into Midian, and there stood up in defense of the daughters of Jethro, priest or prince of Midian, against shepherds who would have hindered them form watering their flocks, Jethro took him into his house, and gave him his daughter Zipporah in Marriage, Exodus 2:15-22 ; 4:25 ; 18:2-4
Phal'ti - (my deliverance ), the son of Laish of Gallim, to whom Saul gave Michal in Marriage after his mad jealousy had driven David forth as an outlaw
Fornication - It regards as immoral any sexual relations outside Marriage or with any person other than one’s Marriage partner (Genesis 39:7-109; 1 Corinthians 5:1; 1 Corinthians 6:13; 1 Corinthians 6:18; 1 Corinthians 7:2; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-4). ...
Sexual relations without Marriage...
In ancient Israel it was of greatest importance to maintain one’s virginity up till the time of Marriage (Deuteronomy 22:13-21). No matter how strong a person’s sexual urges may be, the only satisfaction God allows for those urges is within the exclusive commitment of one person to another in lifelong Marriage (1 Corinthians 7:2; 1 Corinthians 7:9; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-4; Hebrews 13:4; see Marriage)
Levirate Law - From Latin levir, "a husband's brother," the name of an ancient custom ordained by Moses, by which, when an Israelite died without issue, his surviving brother was required to marry the widow, so as to continue his brother's family through the son that might be born of that Marriage (Genesis 38:8 ; Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ; Compare Ruth 3 ; 4:10 )
Celestine Iii, Pope - Although lenient with Henry, he was firm with Alfonso IX of Leon and Philip Augustus of France in defense of the ecclesiastical Marriage laws
Betroth - This usually took place a year or more before Marriage
Laban - Jacob, one of the sons of this Marriage, fled to the house of Laban, whose daughters Leah and Rachel (ch
Eth-Baal - This Marriage of Ahab was most fatal to both Israel and Judah
Dowager - ) A widow endowed, or having a jointure; a widow who either enjoys a dower from her deceased husband, or has property of her own brought by her to her husband on Marriage, and settled on her after his decease
Betroth - To contract to any one, in order to a future Marriage to promise or pledge one to be the future spouse of another to affiance used of either sex
Concubine - A woman who cohabits with a man, without the authority of a legal Marriage a woman kept for lewd purposes a kept mistress
Faithless - Not true to the Marriage covenant false as a faithless husband or wife
Anna - After seven years of Marriage, she was widowed and became an attendant of the Temple
Bernice - This Marriage was soon dissolved; and she returned to Agrippa, and was subsequently the mistress first of Vespasian, then of Titus
Palti - Second husband of Michal, King Saul's daughter who had previously been given in Marriage to David (1 Samuel 25:44 ; KJV, Phalti)
Separatists - Marriage was permitted, but celibacy was recommended
Giacinto Bobone - Although lenient with Henry, he was firm with Alfonso IX of Leon and Philip Augustus of France in defense of the ecclesiastical Marriage laws
Merab - The eldest daughter of king Saul, was promised to David in Marriage, in reward for his victory over Goliath; but was given to Adriel, son of Barzillai the Meholathite, 1 Samuel 14:49 18:17,19
Levirate Law - levir, ‘a husband’s brother’) regulated the Marriage of a man with his dead brother’s widow. In the story of Tamar and Judah (Genesis 38) there is record of a Marriage of this type, and at certain stages of civilization the Levirate Marriage was a widespread custom. † [3] The object of the Levirate Marriage (Deuteronomy 25:6) was to secure that the firstborn of the new union should succeed in the name of the dead brother, whose name thereby might not be blotted out from Israel. In the resurrection, since they all had her, whose wife shall she be of the seven? Jesus in His answer to the Sadducees did not discuss the justice or injustice of the Levirate law, or examine the purpose of Moses in decreeing it; but, asserting that they had erred, not knowing the Scriptures or the power of God, He showed them that in the resurrection men neither marry nor are given in Marriage, but are as the angels of God in heaven; and then He proceeded to declare that belief in immortality is involved in our consciousness of the being of God
Diocesan Court - It consists of: ...
a vicar-general with general vicarious power in spiritual and temporal matters, who is one tribunal with his bishop and can be removed from office at will;
an official, who corresponds to a chief justice in the civilcourts, having ordinary power;
a chancellor, to keep the records a promoter of justice, like a district attorney;
a defender of the bond of Marriage and Sacred Orders, whose duty it is to defend the existence of a true Marriage or valid Orders when either is attacked;
synodal judges, who may be called associate justices and who are generally named in the diocesan synod;
examiners, who preside at examinations of the clergy and intervene in certain cases of removal of parish priests;
parish priest consultors, who also are called in sometimes in the removal of irremovable pastors or in the transfer of ordinary pastors; auditors, who assist the judges in ecclesiastical trials by citing witnesses, etc
Virgin - 1: παρθένος (Strong's #3933 — Noun Feminine — parthenos — par-then'-os ) is used (a) of "the Virgin Mary," Matthew 1:23 ; Luke 1:27 ; (b) of the ten "virgins" in the parable, Matthew 25:1,7,11 ; (c) of the "daughters" of Philip the evangelist, Acts 21:9 ; (d) those concerning whom the Apostle Paul gives instructions regarding Marriage, 1 Corinthians 7:25,28,34 ; in 1 Corinthians 7:36-38 , the subject passes to that of "virgin daughters" (RV), which almost certainly formed one of the subjects upon which the church at Corinth sent for instructions from the Apostle; one difficulty was relative to the discredit which might be brought upon a father (or guardian), if he allowed his daughter or ward to grow old unmarried. The interpretation that this passage refers to a man and woman already in some kind of relation by way of a spiritual Marriage and living together in a vow of virginity and celibacy, is untenable if only in view of the phraseology of the passage; (e) figuratively, of "a local church" in its relation to Christ, 2 Corinthians 11:2 ; (f) metaphorically of "chaste persons," Revelation 14:4
Disparity of Worship - Unless by dispensation, such a Marriage is null; and for the granting of the said dispensation the signing of certain promises is required, pledging non-interference with the religion of the Catholic party and with the Catholic baptism and training of the children, and also that no ceremony will take place except that before a Catholic priest
Jules Lemaitre - He wrote several successful plays, as "Revoltes," "Le Depute Leveau," "Marriage Blanc," and is recognized as one of the masters of lucid, witty French
Canonical Acts - , for Marriage), fiscal promotor and promotor of faith (for beatification and canonization) , courier, beadle, lawyer, proxy; sponsors at Baptism and Confirmation; voting at ecclesiastical elections, including those held by chapters of religious communities; actual exercise of advowson
Er - Firstborn of Judah, by Bathshua, a Canaanite; the Marriage with this daughter of a corrupt race producing sin and sorrow
Celebrate - ) To perform or participate in, as a sacrament or solemn rite; to solemnize; to perform with appropriate rites; as, to celebrate a Marriage
Valid - ) Having legal strength or force; executed with the proper formalities; incapable of being rightfully overthrown or set aside; as, a valid deed; a valid covenant; a valid instrument of any kind; a valid claim or title; a valid Marriage
Bestow - ) To give in Marriage
Angustia Loci - (Latin: smallness of a place) A basis for dispensation from a diriment impediment of matrimony, when, in the place of birth or domicile of a woman, her relationship is so widely spread that she is unable to meet anyone of a position equal to her own whom she can marry, except a relative by blood or by Marriage, so that if no dispensation were granted she would be obliged to leave her country in order to marry
Amram - A son of Bani who had contracted a foreign Marriage ( Ezra 10:34 )
Acts, Canonical - , for Marriage), fiscal promotor and promotor of faith (for beatification and canonization) , courier, beadle, lawyer, proxy; sponsors at Baptism and Confirmation; voting at ecclesiastical elections, including those held by chapters of religious communities; actual exercise of advowson
Espousals, Spiritual - During the prayer of rapture God reveals His greatness to these particular spouses, adorns them with graces and gifts, and unites Himself to them as a sign or pledge of future spiritual Marriage
Spiritual Espousals - During the prayer of rapture God reveals His greatness to these particular spouses, adorns them with graces and gifts, and unites Himself to them as a sign or pledge of future spiritual Marriage
Marriage - By promoting parental love and the sense of responsibility, Marriage most effectually promotes the health and happiness of children, and their careful education to virtue, industry, and honor, to right habits and ends, and to all that is included in the idea of home. Marriage with Canaanites and idolaters was strictly forbidden, Exodus 34:16 ; and afterwards with any of the heathen nations around them, especially such as were uncircumcised, Nehemiah 13:1-31 . By the Levirate law, as it is termed, if a Jew died without children, his nearest brother or kinsman was bound to marry the widow, that her firstborn son after this Marriage might be reckoned the son and heir of the first husband, Genesis 38:1-30 Deuteronomy 25:5-10 Matthew 22:23-26 . The Savior set his seal to Marriage as a divine and permanent institution, aside from all the civil laws which guard and regulate, or seek to alter or annul it; forbidding divorce except for one cause, Matthew 5:32 19:3-6,9 ; and denouncing all breaches of Marriage vows, even in thought, Matthew 5:28 . ...
Jewish parents were wont to arrange with other parents as to the Marriage of their children, sometimes according to the previous choice of the son, and not without some regard to the consent of the daughter, Genesis 21:21 24:1-67 34:4-6 Judges 14:2-3 . The parties were often betrothed to each other long before the Marriage took place. ...
The Jews affirm, that before Jerusalem was laid in ruins, the bridegroom and bride wore crowns at their Marriage. The actual ceremony of Marriage was very simple, consisting of little more than the reading of the Marriage contract, Proverbs 2:17 Malachi 2:14 , and the nuptial blessing invoked by the friends, Genesis 24:60 Ruth 4:11,12 . "At a Hindoo Marriage, the procession of which I saw some years ago," says Mr. No doubt the restrictions laid upon the ancient people of God contain a lesson for all periods, and the recorded ill results of forbidden Marriages among the Jews, if heeded, would prevent the serious evils which often result form union between a Christian and a worldling. " It not only extols celibacy and virginity in the laity, but also strictly refuses Marriage to all its priests, bishops, etc
Celibacy (2) - —According to the ordinary Jewish view, Marriage was of universal obligation (cf. In the time of Christ the Essenes in general eschewed Marriage, though one section of them practised it (Josephus, Ant. His teaching about divorce and His reassertion of the primitive law of Marriage (Matthew 5:31-32; Matthew 19:3-9, Mark 10:1-12, Luke 16:18) imply not only that He was dealing with Marriage as an existing Jewish institution, but also that He contemplated it as a permanent element in Christian life. It is not unnatural to draw a similar inference from His presence at the Marriage at Cana (John 2:1-11). those whose physical constitution unfitted them for Marriage; (2) ‘eunuchs which were made eunuchs by men,’ i. those who by voluntary self-sacrifice abstained from Marriage in order that they might be (a) more faithful citizens of the kingdom of heaven in their own personal life, or (b) more effective instruments for the strengthening or expansion of the kingdom of heaven. ...
It is a mistake to interpret Matthew 5:28 (‘Every one that looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart’) as a condemnation of Marriage; the context shows the meaning to be that to cherish the desire for fornication or adultery is the same thing as committing those sins in the heart. Nor is there any disparagement of Marriage in the words, ‘They that are accounted worthy to attain to that world and the resurrection from the dead neither marry nor are given in Marriage’ (Luke 20:35); the meaning is shown by the context to be that the physical accompaniments of Marriage belong to the present world, not to the future life, which, as it has not death, has not birth. ...
On the whole, then, the teaching of Christ may be summarized to the effect that (1) Marriage is a good state, contemplated as the usual lot, in ordinary Christian life, of those who have not received some special call; (2) celibacy is the subject of a distinct vocation involving dangers and having attached to it high promises. ’ In interpreting these savings, notice must be taken of Clement of Alexandria’s comment that our Lord spoke in condemnation not of Marriage, but of sins of the flesh and the mind, and to show the natural connexion between death and birth; and of the further words of Salome, ‘Theo I did well in not bearing children,’ with our Lord’s reply, ‘Eat every herb, but that which hath bitterness do not eat
Adultery - A sexual relation between two people who are not married is usually called fornication; a sexual relation between a married person and someone other than that person’s Marriage partner is usually called adultery (Exodus 20:14; Romans 12:9; Romans 12:20; Galatians 5:19; 1 Thessalonians 4:3-4; see also FORNICATION). ...
Adultery was a sin against one’s own Marriage partner (Malachi 2:11; Malachi 2:14; cf. Hosea 2:2), as well as against the Marriage partner of the new lover (Exodus 20:14; Exodus 20:17; 2 Samuel 12:9; Proverbs 6:32-35). ...
New Testament teachings...
Like the Old Testament, the New Testament looks upon Marriage as a permanent union. The exception that Jesus allowed concerned the case where persistent adulterous behaviour by one partner had already virtually destroyed the Marriage (Matthew 5:32; Matthew 19:7-9; see also DIVORCE)
Catastrophe - ) The final event in a romance or a dramatic piece; a denouement, as a death in a tragedy, or a Marriage in a comedy
Single - , of a Marriage dowry, to be repaid pure and simple by a husband (Moulton and Milligan)
Adriel - Flock of God, the son of Barzillai, the Meholathite, to whom Saul gave in Marriage his daughter Merab (1 Samuel 18:19 )
Jecamiah - , sprang from this Marriage
Alliance - , especially between families by Marriage and states by compact, treaty, or league; as, matrimonial alliances; an alliance between church and state; an alliance between France and England
Bastard - The term could refer to offspring of an incestuous union or of a Marriage that was prohibited (Leviticus 18:6-20 ; Leviticus 20:11-20 )
Dower - The property which a woman brings to her husband in Marriage
Dote - ) A Marriage portion
Abelians - They condemned Marriage, considering it a means of perpetuating original sin, but each couple adopted a boy and a girl who inherited the property of their foster-parents on condition of living together in like manner in mature life
Abelites - They condemned Marriage, considering it a means of perpetuating original sin, but each couple adopted a boy and a girl who inherited the property of their foster-parents on condition of living together in like manner in mature life
Abelonians - They condemned Marriage, considering it a means of perpetuating original sin, but each couple adopted a boy and a girl who inherited the property of their foster-parents on condition of living together in like manner in mature life
Dinner - Used for a Marriage feast in Matthew 22:2,4 , perhaps as late as noon: it is distinguished from 'supper' in Luke 14:12
Jehosh'Eba - She is the only recorded instance of the Marriage of a princess of the royal house with a high priest
Samson - The first recorded event of his life was his Marriage with a Philistine woman of Timnath (Judges 14:1-5 ). Such a Marriage was not forbidden by the law of Moses, as the Philistines did not form one of the seven doomed Canaanite nations (Exodus 34:11-16 ; Deuteronomy 7:1-4 ). It was, however, an ill-assorted and unblessed Marriage
Habsburgs - In 1477 Maximilian acquired by Marriage with the heiress Mary, the domain of the ducal house of Burgundy, and in 1490 by the abdication of Count Sigismund all the Habsburg domains were united. By her Marriage with Francis I of Lorraine the house of Habsburg-Lorraine was founded, which ruled as emperors of the Holy Roman Empire until its abolition in 1806, and as emperors of Austria until 1918
Husband - A man contracted or joined to a woman by Marriage. A man to whom a woman is betrothed, as well as one actually united by Marriage, is called a husband
Betrothal - As a matrimonial impediment it was practically done away with by the legislation of Pius X, who ruled that such a compact, to have any effect on a proposed Marriage to another, must have been made in a written and dated document, signed by both parties and by the pastor or bishop of the place, or at least by two witnesses; and even this formal pledge does not oblige one party to marry the other
Leslie, John - He spent several years in prison at Ely and the Tower for having favored the projected Marriage of Mary with Norfolk, but in 1573 was exiled to the continent
Fra Bartolommeo - Among his masterpieces are a Pieta; The Marriage of Saint Catherine, and The Virgin Enthroned with Saints
Hobab - In Judges 4:11 , the word rendered "father-in-law" means properly any male relative by Marriage (Compare Genesis 19:14 , "son-in-law," A
John Leslie - He spent several years in prison at Ely and the Tower for having favored the projected Marriage of Mary with Norfolk, but in 1573 was exiled to the continent
Dot - ) A Marriage portion; dowry
Polygamy - ) The having of a plurality of wives or husbands at the same time; usually, the Marriage of a man to more than one woman, or the practice of having several wives, at the same time; - opposed to monogamy; as, the nations of the East practiced polygamy
Bartolommeo di Pagholo Del Fattorino - Among his masterpieces are a Pieta; The Marriage of Saint Catherine, and The Virgin Enthroned with Saints
Bartolommeo, Fra - Among his masterpieces are a Pieta; The Marriage of Saint Catherine, and The Virgin Enthroned with Saints
Runaway - ) Accomplished by running away or elopement, or during flight; as, a runaway Marriage
Beaton, David - He negotiated the renewal of the French alliance, and the Marriage of James V, and for his services received the Bishopric of Mirepoix, 1537, and the cardinal's hat
Forum - In canon law, internal forum, the realm of conscience, is contrasted with the external or outward forum; thus, a Marriage might be null and void in the internal forum, but binding outwardly, i
Margaret of Scotland, Saint - As queen, Margaret used her influence in the interests of the faith; she convoked a synod which made regulations concerning the Lenten fast, Easter Communion, and Marriage laws
Herodias - Some time after, Herod met John the Baptist, who boldly declared the Marriage to be unlawful
Authorize - ) To make legal; to give legal sanction to; to legalize; as, to authorize a Marriage
Bill - Bill of divorce; see Marriage
Adultery - ) The unfaithfulness of a married person to the Marriage bed; sexual intercourse by a married man with another than his wife, or voluntary sexual intercourse by a married woman with another than her husband
Eliezer - He is now dealing with us, communing with us, giving us gifts, and leading us along the way until He brings us to the Son at the great Marriage feast
Consort - ) To unite or join, as in affection, harmony, company, Marriage, etc
Evacuate - ) To make void; to nullify; to vacate; as, to evacuate a contract or Marriage
Bid - Go ye into the highways, and as many as ye shall find, bid to the Marriage
Unequal - So the Christian and the sinner, the unsaved person, are not to be joined together in Marriage, in business, or in anything that constitutes a yoke, for they are not equal
Scotland, Margaret of, Saint - As queen, Margaret used her influence in the interests of the faith; she convoked a synod which made regulations concerning the Lenten fast, Easter Communion, and Marriage laws
at'ta-i -
Grandson of Sheshan the Jerahmeelite through his daughter Ahlai, whom he gave in Marriage to Jarha, his Egyptian slave
Incest - The queen of Portugal was married to her uncle; and the prince of Brazil, the son of that incestuous Marriage, is wedded to his aunt. But they had dispensations for these unnatural Marriages from his holiness. ...
Upon this principle the Marriage, as well as other cohabitation of brothers and sisters of lineal kindred, and of all who usually live in the same family, may be said to be forbidden by the law of nature. Restrictions which extend to remoter degrees of kindred than what this reason makes it necessary to prohibit from intermarriage, are founded in the authority of the positive law which ordains them, and can only be justified by their tendency to diffuse wealth, to connect families, or to promote some political advantage. "The Levitical law, which is received in this country, and from which the rule of the Roman law differs very little, prohibits Marriage between relations within three degrees of kindred; computing the generations not from but through the common ancestor, and accounting affinity the same as consanguinity. the issue, however, of such Marriages are not bastardized, unless the parents be divorced during their lifetime
Matrimony - ...
Christian matrimony, the union of baptized Christians, is a sacrament which unites a Christian man and woman in lawful Marriage. Any Marriage is a contract, but the Marriage of baptized persons is more: it is a true sacrament, giving great and special graces to those who receive it worthily. God's law prohibits Marriage between persons who are within very close degrees of blood-relationship, and other impediments have been established by the law of the Church. ...
The ceremonies of a Catholic Marriage are simple. The Church urges strongly that Marriages of Catholics should take place in church and with a Nuptial Mass, but will dispense with these conditions for sufficient reasons
Marriage - ...
All this shows that God's institution of Marriage was the union of one man and one woman, the two and only two, becoming one. ...
In early times Marriages were also contracted between near relatives. God has providentially so ordered it in all countries called christian that a man is allowed to have but one wife; and in the best of those countries a man cannot divorce his wife except when she herself has already broken the Marriage bond. ...
Of the ancient Marriage ceremonies very little is known. On the night of a Marriage the young women went forth with lamps or torches to meet the bridegroom and to escort him to the house of the bride, as in Matthew 25 . " They had Marriage feasts, as in the parable of Matthew 22 (when a special garment was provided for each of the guests), and as the one to which the Lord, His mother, and His disciples were invited at Cana, where the Lord made the water into wine. ...
The assembly has been espoused as a chaste virgin to Christ, 2 Corinthians 11:2 ; and it waits for that glorious time when it will be said, "Let us be glad and rejoice, and give honour to him: for the Marriage of the Lamb is come, and his wife hath made herself ready . Blessed are they which are called unto the Marriage supper of the Lamb
Marriage - Marriage. The institution of Marriage dates from the time of man's original creation. The Marriage bond is not to be dissolved except on the strongest grounds. Our Lord and his apostles re-established the integrity and sanctity of Marriage, Matthew 19:9; Matthew 5:32; Matthew 19:9; Romans 7:3; 1 Corinthians 7:10-11, and enforced moral purity, Hebrews 13:1-25; Hebrews 4:1-16, etc. During the interval between betrothal and Marriage, the bride lived with her friends; her communications with her future husband were carried on through a friend deputed for the purpose, termed the "friend of the bridegroom. At the Marriage ceremony the bride removed from her father's house to that of the bridegroom or bis father. The duties of the wife in the Hebrew household were multifarious, Genesis 18:6; 2 Samuel 13:8, the distribution of food, Proverbs 31:15, the manufacture of the clothing, Proverbs 31:13; Proverbs 31:21-22; and the legal rights of the wife are noticed in Exodus 21:10, under the three heads of food, raiment, and duty of Marriage or conjugal right. Marriage is used to illustrate the spiritual relationship between God and his people
Ally - ) To unite, or form a connection between, as between families by Marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league, or confederacy; - often followed by to or with
Hymenaeus - (hi' meh nee' uhss) Personal name of the Greek god of Marriage
Birth, Defect of - The defect may be cured by the subsequent Marriage of the parents, or by a papal rescript, or by religious profession, or by a dispensation; but such legitimatization does not remove the impediment against receiving the cardinalate, or consecration as a bishop, abbot, or prelate nullius
Defect of Birth - The defect may be cured by the subsequent Marriage of the parents, or by a papal rescript, or by religious profession, or by a dispensation; but such legitimatization does not remove the impediment against receiving the cardinalate, or consecration as a bishop, abbot, or prelate nullius
Matrimonial Separation - The separation or husband and wife, or a limited divorce from bed and board, without the right of remarriage until the death of one of parties, is sometimes permitted by the Church on account of adultery, or lapse into heresy, or the entrance into a religious life on the part of husband or wife. The common married life ceases but the Marriage bond remains intact (1 Corinthians 7; Mark 10; Matthew 19)
Kindred, Table of - Itis interesting to note that this Table is (or at least was until afew years ago) embodied in the Statutes of the State ofMaryland, and that in some other States there are laws forbiddingthe Marriage of first cousins
Divorce - The dissolution of the Marriage tie was regulated by the Mosaic law (Deuteronomy 24:1-4 )
Nicholas i, Pope, Saint - He upheld the right of appealing to Rome, against the decisions of Archbishop Hincmar of Rheims; defended the integrity of the Marriage bond against Lothair II; and supported Ignatius, Patriarch of Constantinople against, the intruder, Photius
Propose - ) To offer one's self in Marriage
Publish - ) To make known by posting, or by reading in a church; as, to publish banns of Marriage
Antonio Allegri Correggio - Two of his finest paintings are the "Holy Night" in the Dresden museum, and "The Marriage of Saint Catherine" in the Louvre
Ally - ) To unite, or form a connection between, as between families by Marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league, or confederacy; - often followed by to or with
Separation, Matrimonial - The separation or husband and wife, or a limited divorce from bed and board, without the right of remarriage until the death of one of parties, is sometimes permitted by the Church on account of adultery, or lapse into heresy, or the entrance into a religious life on the part of husband or wife. The common married life ceases but the Marriage bond remains intact (1 Corinthians 7; Mark 10; Matthew 19)
Divorce (2) - God created the first pair of human beings of different sexes that they might be united in the Marriage bond. The Marriage bond, therefore, which may be said to have been instituted by God Himself, must be from an ideal standpoint indissoluble. 10: ‘She sent him [2] a bill of divorce, and dissolved her Marriage with him, though this was against the Jewish laws’). And there is no reason why He may not have been acquainted with the possibility of divorce by women in the West, or why, even if He had not this in view, He may not have wished to emphasize His point by stating the wrongfulness of divorce, on either side, of the Marriage bond. ’ That is to say, the Marriage bond is indissoluble. In other words, Christ here assumes that divorce must follow adultery, and what He is here prohibiting is not such divorce, which He assumes as necessary, but divorce and consequent remarriage on any other grounds. It might further be argued that the words παρεκτὸς λόγου πορνείας affect only the first clause, and that remarriage after divorce even on the ground of adultery is here prohibited. Because, if adultery be held to have broken the Marriage tie so effectually as to justify divorce, it must surely be held to leave the offended husband free to contract a new tie. And Mark 10:1-12, with its criticism of the alleged Mosaic sanction of divorce, leaves no room for doubt that on that occasion at least Christ pronounced Marriage to be a divinely instituted ordinance which should under no circumstances be broken by divorce. We might suppose that He taught His disciples that, whilst from an ideal standpoint, Marriage, for all who wished to discern and to obey the guidance of the Divine will in life, ought to be an indissoluble bond, yet, human nature and society being what they are, divorce was a necessary and expedient consequence of the sin of adultery. , that Marriage from an ideal standpoint is indissoluble. , to state the accommodating and secondary character of the legal sanction of divorce, and to reaffirm the sanctity of Marriage. Adultery and Marriage. ‘Marriage’; Dykes, Manifesto of the King, 255 ff
Manoah - We hear of Manoah on four more occasions: we find him remonstrating with his son about the proposed Philistine Marriage ( Judges 14:2-3 ); he accompanied his son on the preliminary visit to Timnah ( Judges 14:5 ; Judges 14:8 ), and again to the Marriage itself ( Judges 14:9-10 )
Drusilla - This Marriage did not take place, as Epiphanes refused to undergo the rite of circumcision (Ant. The Marriage took place seemingly in a
Concubine - And there was this farther distinction between the lawful wife, and the concubine, there was no religious ceremony used at the taking of a concubine; whereas, the lawful wife was usually betrothed to her husband before Marriage, and sometimes, from the very childhood of the respective parties. And when the time appointed for the consummation of the Marriage arrived, this was always done with great order and solemnity: and all the friends of the respective parties were invited to the wedding. I hope the reader will not lose sight of the Marriage of Jesus with our nature, in this view of the subject, and will remember, that the union of Christ with his church, is uniformly set forth in the most blessed similitudes and figures of this kind through the whole Bible. (See Hosea 2:19-20) At the final consummation of all things, Jesus will bring home his bride, and then will be the Marriage-supper of the Lamb in heaven. I am not now taking up the subject in respect to the sad immorality of it, though the awful consequences, in the instances of thousands, too loudly condemn daily the breach of the Marriage vow on that score; but I am carrying the matter higher, in shewing the awfulness of it, as a defiance of the divine appointment. " (1 Corinthians 7:2)...
I must not finish the subject without first desiring the reader to take with him that sweet thought, that in the Marriage of the Lord Jesus with our nature (which the Marriage-state in nature is a type of), both in the general purpose of it with his church at large, and with the person of every individual member of his mystical body in particular, there is no concubine to interrupt the present and everlasting happiness of our union with Christ Jesus
Concubine - The practice was contrary to God’s plan for Marriage (namely, one man and one woman united for life, to the exclusion of all others; see Marriage), but human society had moved far away from God’s plan (Romans 1:20-32). Although Israelite law tolerated concubinage, it did not tolerate sexual relations with a person who was not one’s Marriage partner
Ceremony - ) Ar act or series of acts, often of a symbolical character, prescribed by law, custom, or authority, in the conduct of important matters, as in the performance of religious duties, the transaction of affairs of state, and the celebration of notable events; as, the ceremony of crowning a sovereign; the ceremonies observed in consecrating a church; Marriage and baptismal ceremonies
King david - This earned him the hand of King Saul�s daughter Michal in Marriage
David, king - This earned him the hand of King Saul�s daughter Michal in Marriage
Catherine of Aragon - After 18 years of Marriage and five children, Henry divorced her on the basis that as she had been his brother's wife, it was not lawful for them to marry
Lamech - He was the first to violate the primeval ordinance of Marriage (Genesis 4:18-24 )
Sanbal'Lat - The only other incident in his life is his alliance with the high priest's family by the Marriage of his daughter with one of the grandsons of Eliashib; but the expulsion from the priesthood of the guilty son of Joiada by Nehemiah promptly followed
Orders, Religious - Orders religious military are those instituted to defense of the faith, and privileged to say mass, and who are prohibited Marriage, &c
Aragon, Catherine of - After 18 years of Marriage and five children, Henry divorced her on the basis that as she had been his brother's wife, it was not lawful for them to marry
Bashemath - The women may have had two names, or another name have been given them on their Marriage
Effeminate - The king, by his voluptuous life and mean Marriage, became effeminate, and less sensible of honor
Vow - ) Specifically, a promise of fidelity; a pledge of love or affection; as, the Marriage vow
Leviticus - 1-7, the laws of offerings; 8-10, the consecration of Aaron and his family; 11-15, the laws concerning that which is clean and that which is unclean; 16, the atonement as the sum-total of all means of grace; 17-20, the separation of Israel from heathendom in food, Marriage, etc
Eunuch - Our Savior speaks of some who "have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven's sake;" that is, who have voluntarily abstained from Marriage, in order more effectually to labor for the kingdom of God, Matthew 19:12 ; and the apostle Paul commends the same abstinence in certain exceptional cases in time of persecution, 1 Corinthians 7:26,27
Kin - Relation, properly by consanguinity or blood,but perhaps sometimes used for relation by affinity or Marriage
Registers, Parochial - Five distinct books, in which the parish priest is required to record respectively the baptisms, confirmations, and Marriages that take place in his parish (except Marriages of conscience, which are recorded in the secret archives of chancery), deaths among his people, and, as far as possible, the actual spiritual condition of his parish. Annotations of subsequent confirmation, Marriage, reception of subdiaconate, or solemn religious profession, must be made alongside the record of baptism in the baptismal register and always transcribed into certificates of baptism
the Bidden to the Reat Marriage Supper And Some of Their Excuses - YOU are all bidden to this great Marriage supper. The invitations sent out to our Marriage suppers have to be limited to the more intimate friends of the bride and the bridegroom. You are all bidden to this Marriage. What, then, is your answer to be tonight?...
This is a most extraordinary Marriage and Marriage supper. And therefore you must not measure what is now to be said about this Marriage by what you have seen or heard of the Marriages of this world. For there are far better worlds than this world, and there are far better Marriages than this world has ever seen. Indeed, this Marriage that is in your offer tonight is the only real and true and perfect Marriage that has ever been made in this or in any other world, or that ever will be made. You have been dreaming about Marriages all your days, but a Marriage like this has never entered your most extravagant imaginations. For this is nothing less than the Marriage of the Eternal Son of God with your own immortal soul. And the Father of the Bridegroom has His heart so much set upon this Marriage that he has sent His servant tonight to say to you that all things are now ready. Some of our Marriages take a long time to get all things ready. And this great Marriage has not by any means been made ready in a day. This Marriage was actually proposed and planned for and the preparations began to be made for it before the foundations of this world were laid. You like to read and hear about Marriages, and the arranging of Marriages, and how the course of true love did, or did not, run smooth. It only remains for you to say that your heart within you is as the chariots of Amminadib in the Song of Solomon, and your Marriage is consummated, or will be consummated immediately. For this day fortnight the Marriage supper of the Lamb is to be made ready here
Affinity - affinitas, from affinis, adjacent, related by Marriage ad and finis, end. The relation contracted by Marriage, between a husband and his wife's kindred, and between a wife and her husband's kindred in contradistinction from consanguinity or relation by blood
Canticles - This basis is either the Marriage of Solomon with Pharoah's daughter or his Marriage with an Israelitish woman, the Shulamite
Bride - Under this head an account of the Marriage customs of ancient times, the knowledge of which is so necessary to explain many allusions in the Holy Scriptures, may be properly introduced. Among the Jews, the state of Marriage was, from the remotest periods of their history, reckoned so honourable, that the person who neglected or declined to enter into it without a good reason, was thought to be guilty of a great crime. Such a mode of thinking was not confined to them; in several of the Grecian states, Marriage was held in equal respect. The Jews did not allow Marriageable persons to enter into that honourable state without restriction; the high priest was forbidden by law to marry a widow; and the priests of every rank, to take a harlot to wife, a profane woman, or one put away from her husband. The Marriage engagement of a minor, without the knowledge and consent of the parents, was of no force; so sacred was the parental authority held among that people. Samson also consulted his parents about his Marriage; and entreated them to get for him the object of his choice. Marriage contracts seem to have been made in the primitive ages with little ceremony. The suitor himself, or his father, sent a messenger to the father of the woman, to ask her in Marriage. " The contract of Marriage was made in the house of the woman's father, before the elders and governors of the city or district. Ten or twelve months commonly intervened between the ceremony of espousals and the Marriage: during this interval, the espoused wife continued with her parents, that she might provide herself with nuptial ornaments suitable to her station. This custom serves to explain a circumstance in Samson's Marriage, which is involved in some obscurity. These words seem to refer to the ceremony of espousals; the following, to the subsequent Marriage: "And after a time he returned to take her,"...
Judges 14:8 . From the time of the espousals, the bridegroom was at liberty to visit his espoused wife in the house of her father; yet neither of the parties left their own abode during eight days before the Marriage; but persons of the same age visited the bridegroom, and made merry with him. These circumstances are distinctly marked in the account which the sacred historian has given us of Samson's Marriage: "So his father went down unto the woman, and made there a feast; for so used the young men to do. The Marriage ceremony was commonly performed in a garden, or in the open air; the bride was placed under a canopy, supported by four youths, and adorned with jewels according to the rank of the married persons; all the company crying out with joyful acclamations, "Blessed be he that cometh!" It was anciently the custom, at the conclusion of the ceremony, for the father and mother and kindred of the woman, to pray for a blessing upon the parties. The use of perfumes at eastern Marriages is common; and upon great occasions very profuse. The husband and wife, on the day of their Marriage, being both in the same palanquin, go about seven and eight o'clock at night, accompanied with all their kindred and friends; the trumpets and drums go before them; and they are lighted by a number of flambeaux; immediately before the palanquin walk many women, whose business it is to sing verses, in which they wish them all manner of prosperity. A Jewish Marriage seems to have been conducted in much the same way; for in that beautiful psalm, where David describes the majesty of Christ's kingdom, we meet with this passage: "And the daughter of Tyre shall be there with a gift; even the rich among the people shall entreat thy favour. ...
The following extract from Ward's "View of the Hindoos" very strikingly illustrates this parable: "At a Marriage, the procession of which I saw some years ago, the bridegroom came from a distance, and the bride lived at Serampore, to which place the bridegroom was to come by water. Those that were invited to the Marriage were expected to appear in their best and gayest attire. If the bridegroom was in circumstances to afford it, wedding garments were prepared for all the guests, which were hung up in the antechamber for them to put on over the rest of their clothes, as they entered the apartments where the Marriage feast was prepared. "...
The following extract will show the importance of having a suitable garment for a Marriage feast, and the offence taken against those who refuse it when presented as a gift
Virgin Virginity - Paul regards himself as the paranymph-the one who brings the bride to the bridegroom on the Marriage day. To Him His earthly sojourn with His disciples was like a Marriage feast and His removal was regarded as the time of their widowhood (Matthew 9:15). It is noteworthy that Marriage is used by both as a fit symbol of this most glorious reality. Paul regards Christian Marriage as in some way deriving its glory from the true Marriage-of Christ and His Church (Ephesians 5:27 ff. Had the words ‘with women’ been wanting, this meaning would be the natural one, and the reference would be to those who as the true bride of Christ refused to give worship to Caesar; but the words ‘with women’ make the literal interpretation practically certain, and the passage indicates not so much a depreciation of Marriage as an ascetic horror of immorality. 2]'>[2], a story which if true proves that Marriage was not an insuperable obstacle to the highest fidelity). 23: ‘But Paphnutius, the confessor, stood up and testified against this proposition; he said that Marriage was honorable and chaste, and that cohabitation with their own wives was chastity, and advised the Synod not to frame such a law, for it would be difficult to bear, and might serve as an occasion of incontinence to them and their wives; and he reminded them that according to the ancient tradition of the church, those who were unmarried when they took part in the communion of sacred orders were required to remain so, but that those who were married were not to put away their wives. While the writer here does not directly oppose Marriage yet he does regard virginity for the Lord’s sake as a privileged position and as receiving from the Lord a corresponding reward, and, although the number 144,000 is an apocalyptic ideal, yet we may safely infer that there was a considerable opinion in favour of celibacy in St. Paul here discusses the question of the Marriage of virgins (i. maidens of Marriageable age) as a specific instance of the question of Marriage in general, and he does so not abstractly or exhaustively but in view of a definite situation. He makes it clear that Marriage is no sin, not even though in his view this world-age is speedily coming to an end. Mary’s husband]'>[1]6 He recommends, however, in view of the present necessity, of the shortened earthly horizon, of the straits to which Christians were put, and of the fact that Marriage made it more difficult for parties to face these conditions, that they remain as they are, married and unmarried alike. The Apostle sees clearly the objections to his views, especially in the case of daughters of Marriageable age. Nothing is said of the maiden’s own opinion, unless from 1 Corinthians 7:28 we infer that the father should not put pressure on the daughter if she desired a reasonable Marriage. ...
This passage, however, has been recently explained as referring not to Marriageable daughters at all but to what are known as ‘virgines subintroductae’ (or συνείσακτοι). It is to this custom, according to some, that the Apostle is here referring, and his recommendation is that where the woman has fallen in love either with him who cohabits with her or with another then Marriage should take place: where, however, firmness of purpose in virginity exists, this condition of cohabitation should continue. At first this custom may have arisen from the highest spiritual motives among those to whom sexual intercourse even in Marriage was degrading, and it may have been practised by married persons who resolved to live in absolute chastity;† Lamp - ...
...
Lamps or torches were used in connection with Marriage ceremonies (Matthew 25:1 )
Laicism - Anti-clerical proponents of a separation of Church and State laicize, by measures of governmental supervision and control, functions that for ages belonged to the Church: education, Marriage, hospitals, and charity organizations and maintenance of parishes, churches, convents and other religious institutions
Memlinc, Hans - The Hospital of Saint John in Bruges has his "Adoration of the Magi," "The Marriage of Saint Catherine," and the fourteen scenes of the "Shrine of Saint Ursula
Memling, Hans - The Hospital of Saint John in Bruges has his "Adoration of the Magi," "The Marriage of Saint Catherine," and the fourteen scenes of the "Shrine of Saint Ursula
Heth - Esau's Marriage to one of the daughters of Heth "grieved the mind" of Isaac and Rebekah, for their morals were lax and their worship idolatrous (Genesis 26:34-35; Genesis 27:46)
Spit, Spittle - The brother who refused to perform levirate Marriage (have a child by his brother's wife to carry on the name of the brother, Deuteronomy 25:5-6 ) would have his face spit in by the spurned wife of the brother (Deuteronomy 25:7-9 )
Hans Memlinc - The Hospital of Saint John in Bruges has his "Adoration of the Magi," "The Marriage of Saint Catherine," and the fourteen scenes of the "Shrine of Saint Ursula
Hans Memling - The Hospital of Saint John in Bruges has his "Adoration of the Magi," "The Marriage of Saint Catherine," and the fourteen scenes of the "Shrine of Saint Ursula
Drusilla - She was first espoused to Epiphanes, son of Antiochus king of Comagena, on condition of his embracing the Jewish religion; but as he afterwards refused to be circumcised, Drusilla was given in Marriage by her brother to Azizus king of Emessa
Victurinus - ), and as to the penalties to be inflicted in the case of Marriage with a deceased wife's sister, which were very severe ( Epp
Wife - In Marriage two equal human beings, a man and a woman, have two different functions, those of husband and wife (Genesis 2:24-25). ...
The Marriage partnership...
The husband’s exclusively male characteristics mean that he starts the process that produces children in the family, and perhaps this is why he carries the ultimate responsibility for the family. The relationship between them is patterned on the relationship between Christ and the church (Ephesians 5:24-25; Ephesians 5:32; see also Marriage). The husband’s headship in Marriage does not mean he can command absolute obedience. ...
Special difficulties may arise in the case where the wife becomes a Christian after Marriage, but her husband remains a non-Christian
Canticles - The sacred writers were, by God's condescension, authorized to illustrate his strict and intimate relation to the church, by the figure of a Marriage; and the emblem must have been strikingly becoming and expressive to the conceptions of the Jews, since they annexed ideas of peculiar mystery to this appointment, and imagined the Marriage union to be a counterpart representation of some original pattern in heaven. Solomon, therefore, in celebrating the circumstances of his Marriage, was naturally led, by a train of correspondent reflections, to consider that spiritual connection which it was often employed to symbolize; and the idea must have been the more forcibly suggested to him, as he was at this period preparing to build a temple to God, and thereby to furnish a visible representation of the Hebrew church. The ideas which the sacred writers furnish concerning the mystical relation between Christ and his church, though well accommodated to our apprehensions by the allusion of a Marriage union, are too general to illustrate every particular contained in this poem, which may be supposed to have been intentionally decorated with some ornaments appropriate to the literal construction. No similitude, indeed, could be chosen so elegant and apposite for the illustration of this intimate and spiritual alliance, as a Marriage union, if considered in the chaste simplicity, of its first institution, or under the interesting circumstances with which it was established among the Jews
Abigail - The issue of the Marriage was, as some critics suppose, two sons, Chileab and Daniel, 2 Samuel 3:3 ; 1 Chronicles 3:1 ; but it is most probable that these names were borne by one person
Influence of the Church on Civil Law - The Church revolutionized legislation in regard to slavery, Marriage, paternal authority, and legal procedure
Law, Influence of the Church on Civil Law - The Church revolutionized legislation in regard to slavery, Marriage, paternal authority, and legal procedure
Bashemath - ) Bashemath is doubtless a name of praise conferred on her at Marriage
Lord's Supper - Only Paul uses the phrase “Lord's Supper” (1 Corinthians 11:20 ), although implication of it is made in Revelation 19:9 (“marriage supper of the Lamb”)
Fidelity - Observance of the Marriage covenant as the fidelity of a husband or wife
Epikeia - , to presume that Marriage may be contracted because of grave inconvenience in spite of an existing diriment impediment
Abelians - They regulated Marriage after the example of Abel, who, they pretended, was married, but lived in a state of continence: they therefore allowed each man to marry one woman, but enjoined them to live in the same state
Ease, Chapel of - Ordinarily such churches and chapels may not have a baptismal font or a cemetery independently of the parish church; nor may reserved parochial functions, such as Baptism and Marriage, be performed in them without the permission of the pastor
Succursal Church - Ordinarily such churches and chapels may not have a baptismal font or a cemetery independently of the parish church; nor may reserved parochial functions, such as Baptism and Marriage, be performed in them without the permission of the pastor
Hobab - Those who hold this opinion maintain that the Hebrew word rendered father-in- law, Judges 4:11 may denote simply a relation by Marriage
New Testament, Divorce in the - God's will in regard to the important matter of indissolubility of Marriage was first revealed to man in Paradise, when God created man and woman and united them in Marriage so that "they shall be two in one flesh" (Genesis 2)
Divorce in the New Testament - God's will in regard to the important matter of indissolubility of Marriage was first revealed to man in Paradise, when God created man and woman and united them in Marriage so that "they shall be two in one flesh" (Genesis 2)
Husband - Very little is said of the legal form of Marriage, but the Marriage tie has been held sacred from the beginning and by mankind everywhere
Aragon - By the Marriage of his daughter to Ramon Berenguer V, Count of Barcelona, Aragon and Catalonia were united. The Marriage of his descendant Ferdinand the Catholic with Isabella of Castile united the two kingdoms
Genealogy - One, or perhaps two, levirate Marriages in the family of Joseph—i. , a Marriage of a man to the childless widow of his elder brother, the children of the second Marriage being reckoned as the legal descendants of the first husband
Solomon the Song of - God frequently condescends to take the Marriage-tie as illustrative of the close fellowship of himself with his chosen. And the last glorious triumph is called the Marriage-supper of the Lamb, where the bride is presented pure and undefiled, every stain obliterated, resplendent in glistening robes, the meet consort of a royal spouse
Concubine - ...
Although the taking of concubines was not totally prohibited, monogamous Marriage was more common and seems to be the biblical ideal (Genesis 2:24 ; Mark 10:6-9 ). See Marriage ; Polygamy; Slavery
ma'ry the Virgin, - (Psalm 132:11 ; Luke 1:32 ; Romans 1:3 ) She had a sister, named, like herself, (John 19:25 ) and she was connected by Marriage, (Luke 1:36 ) with Elizabeth, who was of the tribe of Levi and of the lineage of Aaron. She was betrothed to Joseph of Nazareth; but before her Marriage she became with child by the Holy Ghost, and became the mother of Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world. These four occasions are--
The Marriage at Cana in Galilee took place in the three months which intervened between the baptism of Christ and the passover of the year 27
Feast - " ...
A — 2: δεῖπνον (Strong's #1173 — Noun Neuter — deipnon — dipe'-non ) denotes (a) "the chief meal of the day," dinner or supper, taken at or towards evening; in the plural "feasts," Matthew 23:6 ; Mark 6:21 ; 12:39 ; Luke 20:46 ; otherwise translated "supper," Luke 14:12,16,17,24 ; John 12:2 ; 13:2,4 ; 21:20 ; 1 Corinthians 11:21 (of a social meal); (b) "the Lord's Supper," 1 Corinthians 11:20 ; (c) "the supper or feast" which will celebrate the Marriage of Christ with His spirtual Bride, at the inauguration of His Kingdom, Revelation 19:9 ; (d) figuratively, of that to which the birds of prey will be summoned after the overthrow of the enemies of the Lord at the termination of the war of Armageddon, Revelation 19:17 (cp. ...
A — 4: γάμος (Strong's #1062 — Noun Masculine — gamos — gam'-os ) "a wedding," especially a wedding "feast" (akin to gameo, "to marry"); it is used in the plural in the following passages (the RV rightly has "marriage feast" for the AV, "marriage," or "wedding"), Matthew 22:2,3,4,9 (in verses Matthew 22:11,12 , it is used in the singular, in connection with the wedding garment); 25:10; Luke 12:36 ; 14:8 ; in the following it signifies a wedding itself, John 2:1,2 ; Hebrews 13:4 ; and figuratively in Revelation 19:7 , of the Marriage of the Lamb; in Revelation 19:9 it is used in connection with the supper, the wedding supper (or what in English is termed "breakfast"), not the wedding itself, as in ver
Ivo of Chartres, Saint - His opposition to the adulterous Marriage of Philip I won him a prison cell, 1092
Cleopatra - 150 she was given in Marriage by her father to Alexander Balas ( 1Ma 10:57-58 ; Jos
Hivites - We also find the Hivites in the north in mount Lebanon, and Israel was beguiled into making Marriage contracts with them
Naomi - " She sought the welfare of Ruth, whose Marriage with Boaz comforted her, and she became nurse to their son Obed
Join - ) To unite in Marriage
Laban - Laban’s deceit of Jacob in the Marriage arrangements began a long contest of trickery between the two, as each tried to outdo the other
Lord's Prayer, the - TheChurch has always taken these words literally, so that in all herservices—Daily Prayer, Litany, Baptism, Confirmation, HolyCommunion, Marriage, Visitation of the Sick, etc
Polygamy - In the article of population, which it has been thought to promote, the community gain nothing (nothing, I mean, compared with a state in which Marriage is nearly universal;) for the question is not, whether one man will have more children by five or more wives than by one; but whether these five wives would not bear the same or a greater number of children to five separate husbands. may be construed by an easy implication to prohibit polygamy; for if "whoever putteth away his wife, and marrieth another, committeth adultery;" he who marrieth another without putting away the first is no less guilty of adultery; because the adultery does not consist in the repudiation of the first wife (for however unjust or cruel that may be, it is not adultery, ) but entering into a second Marriage during the legal existence and obligation of the first. Paul's writings which speak of Marriage, always suppose it to signify the union of one man with one woman, Romans 7:2-3 . In England, besides the nullity of the second Marriage, it subjects the offender to transportation or imprisonment and branding for the first offence, and to capital punishment for the second. ...
And whatever may be said in behalf of polygamy, when it is authorized by the law of the land, the Marriage of a second wife, during the life- time of the first, in countries where such a second Marriage is void, must be ranked with the most dangerous and cruel of those frauds by which a woman is cheated out of her fortune, her person, and her happiness. "When we reflect, " says he, "that the primitive institution of Marriage limited it to one man and one woman; that this institution was adhered to by Noah and his sons, amidst the degeneracy of the age in which they lived, and in spite of the examples of polygamy which the accursed race of Cain had introduced; when we consider how very few (comparatively speaking) the examples of this practice were among the faithful; how much it brought its own punishment with it; and how dubious and equivocal those passages are in which it appears to have the sanction of the divine approbation; when to these reflections we add another, respecting the limited views and temporary nature of the more ancient dispensations and institutions of religion how often the imperfections and even vices of the patriarchs and people of God in old times are recorded, without any express notification of their criminality how much is said to be commanded, which our reverence for the holiness of God and his law will only suffer us to suppose were for wise ends permitted; how frequently the messengers of god adapted themselves to the genius of the people to whom they were sent, and the circumstances of the times in which they lived; above all, when we consider the purity, equity, and benevolence of the Christian law, the explicit declaration of our Lord and his apostle Paul respecting the institution of Marriage, its design and limitation; when we reflect, too, on the testimony of the most ancient fathers, who could not possibly be ignorant of the general and common practice of the apostolic church; and, finally, when to these considerations we add those which are founded on justice to the female sex, and all the regulations of domestic aeconomy and national policy, we must wholly condemn the revival of polygamy
Chaplains of Sisters - They may not perform any reserved parochial functions such as Baptism or Marriage, in the convent chapel, without special permission of the bishop
Nathanael - ) Tradition makes Nathanael to have been the bridegroom at the Marriage of Cana, to which he belonged
Naamah - Septuagint makes Naamah daughter of Ana or Hanun, son of Nahash; thus David's war with Hanun terminated in a re-alliance, and Solomon's Marriage to Naamah would be about two years before David's death, for Rehoboam the offspring of it was 41 on ascending the throne, and Solomon's reign was 40 years
Kenaz - " Caleb gave him his daughter to wife, a Marriage in Keil's view not forbidden in the law
Sarah - Her story is from her Marriage identified with that of the patriarch till the time of her death
Chloe - The Corinthians had "written" to Paul consulting him about Marriage, things offered to idols, decorum in church assemblies, but not a syllable about the disorders that had crept in
Contraction - ) A Marriage contract
Berechiah - His family was tied in Marriage to Tobiah, Nehemiah's enemy (Nehemiah 6:17-19 )
Carmel - There Nabal treated David and his men with disrespect and disregard, an action eventually resulting in Nabal's death and David's Marriage to his widow Abigail (1 Samuel 25:2-40 )
Assent - We consent to a proposal of Marriage
Ask - ) To publish in church for Marriage; - said of both the banns and the persons
Asenath - ...
Asenath is the heroine of a remarkable Jewish and Christian romance, in which she renounces her false gods before her Marriage with Joseph; it can be traced back to the 5th cent
Espouse - To betroth to promise or engage in Marriage, by contract in writing, or by some pledge as, the king espoused his daughter to a foreign prince
Unite - ) Hence, to join by a legal or moral bond, as families by Marriage, nations by treaty, men by opinions; to join in interest, affection, fellowship, or the like; to cause to agree; to harmonize; to associate; to attach
Sisters, Chaplains of - They may not perform any reserved parochial functions such as Baptism or Marriage, in the convent chapel, without special permission of the bishop
Rebek'ah - where the beautiful story of her Marriage is related
Benediction - A Blessing, such as that given at the end of theCommunion Office and in the Marriage Service
Insanity - Marriage is forbidden to the perpetually insane, but in the case of an individual who has sane intervals and has contracted a Marriage during such an interval, it is valid
Castile - The counts appointed to rule over the new territory increased in power and revolted against the kings, one of the most famous being Fernan Gonzalez, who continued to foment discord even after the Marriage of his daughter to the king's son. At the instigation of the nobles Henry IV the Impotent declared his daughter Joan illegitimate, and the kingdom passed to his sister Isabella the Catholic (1474) whose Marriage with Ferdinand of Aragon united the kingdoms, forming the basis of the modern Kingdom of Spain
Fornication - It is in vain to argue the innocency of fornication from the natural passions implanted in us, sense "marriage is honourable in all, " and wisely appointed for the prevention of those evils which would otherwise ensue; and, besides the existence of any natural propensity in us, is no proof that it is to be gratified without any restriction. It disqualifies the deluded creatures to be either good wives, or mothers, in any future Marriage, ruining that modesty which is the guardian of nuptial happiness
Join - To unite in league or Marriage. To unite with in Marriage, league, confederacy, partnership or society
Family - One word (mishpachah ) was used to describe the larger partriarchal clan which included those persons related by blood, Marriage, slaveship, and even animals (as found in the fourth commandment, Exodus 20:10 ). ...
In the Marriage, the male had power over the female or females (Genesis 3:16 ). The fathers were responsible for arranging Marriages for the sons (Genesis 24:4 ) and writing contracts for the daughters. Hebrew Marriages were covenant Marriages (Malachi 2:14 ). Marriages were based on faithfulness and vows of covenant love. ...
Marriage in the New Testament was founded on a love bond experienced by both male and female in contrast to the arranged Marriage of the Old Testament. ...
The Marriage relationship was important in the New Testament. There was to be Marriage between one man and one woman (Mark 10:6-8 ; Ephesians 5:31 ). Jesus believed that the love bond made the Marriage vows sacred, and they were not to be broken (Mark 10:11-12 ; Luke 16:18 ). Jesus affirmed the value of Marriage but did not view it as more important than the family of God. ...
The nature of the Christian Marriage relationship, guided by Christlike love, called for both man and woman to give themselves voluntarily and sacrificially to each other (Ephesians 5:21 ). This mutual love commitment was a radical departure from the Old Testament Marriage model. The New Testament Marriage union was based on an equal and mutual sharing guided by love (1 Corinthians 7:4 ). See Father ; Mother ; Marriage ; Sex; Woman ; Children; Divorce
Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius - He gave his youngest daughter Fausta in Marriage to Constantine and having again assumed the imperial dignity was surrendered to Constantine by his own soldiers; he was eventually pardoned
Hammath - Original ancestor of Kenites and Rechabites ( 1 Chronicles 2:55 ; KJV reads, “Hamath”; TEV, REB see a verbal construction meaning, “intermarried” or “connected by Marriage
Aretas - The only one mentioned in Scripture gave his daughter in Marriage to Herod Antipas; but she being repudiated by Herod, Aretas made war upon him and destroyed his army
Mahli - Their cousins, the sons of Kish, therefore took them in Marriage, and prevented the extinction of their father’s name
Basemath - Some talk of literary sources; others of new names given women at Marriage; others of copyists' changes of the text
Laban - After Abraham's steward related that he had come to find a wife for Isaac, Laban and his father give their permission for the Marriage (Genesis 24:1 : 50-51 )
Fee - ) Reward or compensation for services rendered or to be rendered; especially, payment for professional services, of optional amount, or fixed by custom or laws; charge; pay; perquisite; as, the fees of lawyers and physicians; the fees of office; clerk's fees; sheriff's fees; Marriage fees, etc
Faithful - True to the Marriage covenant as a faithful wife or husband
Adamites - They detested Marriage; maintaining that the conjugal union would never have taken place upon earth, had sin been unknown
Evolution, Cultural - The theory of organic evolution extended to social life, religion, law, morality, Marriage, the family, ethics, etc
Abishag - After his death, Adonijah requested her in Marriage, for which he lost his life; Solomon perceiving in this a design upon the crown also
Affinity - ) Relationship by Marriage (as between a husband and his wife's blood relations, or between a wife and her husband's blood relations); - in contradistinction to consanguinity, or relationship by blood; - followed by with, to, or between
Laban - After Abraham's steward related that he had come to find a wife for Isaac, Laban and his father give their permission for the Marriage (Genesis 24:1 : 50-51 )
Betrothing - The Marriage was not complete until the bride was at least twelve years old; yet the betrothal could be dissolved only by divorce or death, Matthew 1:18-25 Luke 2:27
Ring - The custom of the Wedding Ring was probably adopted by theearly Church from the Marriage customs of the Jews and also of theheathen, as its use has been almost universal
Sex, Biblical Teaching on - ” The biblical language for sexuality is rich with variety as it describes God's will and human behavior regarding this aspect of God's creative power: the power to bring new life into being within the family and the pleasure of companions within Marriage. Different standards of fidelity in Marriage are found (Numbers 5:11-31 ; Deuteronomy 22:22-29 ) where unfaithful wives are more severely dealt with than husbands. These are all declared to be outside of the will of God for man and woman who are called to live together in monogamous fidelity within the covenant of Marriage. Intimate sexual behavior outside of Marriage is considered sexual immorality in the biblical perspective. For the noncelibate, Marriage is the only approved outlet for sexual expression (1 Corinthians 7:9 ; Titus 2:5-6 ). Within the limits of Marriage, sex is for procreation of children, the enhancement of the one-flesh relationship, and the pleasure of the married couple whose love can be nourished thereby
Betray - ) To lead astray, as a maiden; to seduce (as under promise of Marriage) and then abandon
Hobab - Others say that the Hebrew term for father-in-law really has the more general meaning of “related by Marriage
Interims - , Marriage of the clergy and communion under both kinds
Dowry - The term is also applied to the property which a wife brings to her husband in Marriage
Lanfranc - He obtained the papal dispensation for the Marriage of William, Duke of Normandy, to Matilda of Flanders, and after William's invasion of England, 1066, Lanfranc was made Archbishop of Canterbury
Timnah - Here Samson celebrated his Marriage
Chastity, Vow of - If the vow be a simple one, which may be anyone of four kinds (of virginity, of not marrying, of receiving Sacred Orders, or of entering religion), it is a hindering impediment, rendering a Marriage unlawful although valid, unless a dispensation be obtained
Machaerus - John the Baptist was probably cast into the prison connected with this castle by Herod Antipas, whom he had reproved for his adulterous Marriage with Herodias
Caleb Ephratah - ...
Caleb had two wives, Azubah mother of Jerioth (according to Jerome's reading), and Ephrath mother of Hur, this second Marriage of Caleb not taking place until after Hezron's death
Bathsheba - She is said by tradition to have composed Proverbs 31 as an admonition to Solomon on his Marriage to Pharaoh's daughter
Wife - The ordinance of Marriage was sanctioned in Paradise (Genesis 2:24 ; Matthew 19:4-6 )
Adriel - Son of Barzillai the Meholathite, to whom Saul gave Merab his daughter in Marriage, previously promised to David (1 Samuel 18:19)
Conjugate - ) To unite in Marriage; to join
Betrothment - Among the Jews this was looked upon as being as binding as Marriage, and could not be dissolved except by divorce
Earring - We find that in the Old Testament scripture, the earring was a token and pledge of overtures to Marriage
Eunuch - Those who voluntarily abstain from Marriage in order to devote themselves more exclusively to the interests of the kingdom of God
Conceive - ...
Notes: (1) The phrase echo, "to have," with koite, "a lying down, a bed," especially the Marriage bed, denotes "to conceive," Romans 9:10
Debir - Joshua as the leader of Israel is represented as taking it, but in Judges we find that it was actually taken by Othniel, to whom Caleb gave his daughter Achsah in Marriage for its capture
Concubine - Since the abrogation of polygamy by Jesus Christ, and the restoration of Marriage to its primitive institution, concubinage is ranked with adultery or fornication
Ring - In its liturgical use the nuptial ring blessed was the Marriage ceremony, and worn on the fourth finger, is emblematic of the conjugal fidelity
Laban - His character is shown in the gladness with which he gave his sister Rebekah in Marriage to the only son of his rich uncle, Abraham, Genesis 24:30,50 ; and in his deceitful and exacting treatment of Jacob his nephew and son-inlaw, against which Jacob defended himself by cunning as well as fidelity
Divorce, - "a legal dissolution of the Marriage relation
Mir'Iam - (Exodus 15:1-19 ) She took the lead, with Aaron, in the complaint against Moses for his Marriage with a Cushite, (Numbers 12:1,2 ) and for this was attacked with leprosy
Essenes - A sect of the Jews who practiced a strict ceremonial asceticism, discouraging Marriage, having community of goods, temperate, industrious, charitable, opposed to all oaths, slavery, and war, like the modern Society of Friends, and also, unlike t temple of the soul, tinged their deep veneration for Moses' laws, which in every way favor Marriage
Concubine - From the beginning, when man was sinless it was not so; for God made male and female that in Marriage "they TWAIN should be one flesh" Matthew 19:4-5; Matthew 19:8). ...
The bondmaid or captive was not to be cast away arbitrarily after lust had been gratified (Exodus 21:7-9; Deuteronomy 21:10-11); she was protected by legal restraints whereby she had a kind of secondary Marriage relationship to the man
Bertha, Wife of Ethelbert, King of Kent - The date of her Marriage is unknown, but it was probably after the death of her mother, although Bede speaks of the king receiving her "a parentibus. " Ethelbert was still a heathen, and on his Marriage it was made a condition that his wife should be allowed to enjoy the exercise of her own religion, and should be attended by a bishop
Alliances - But alliances by Marriage with idolaters are reprobated as incentives to latitudinarianism first and at last, to conformity with paganism (Deuteronomy 7:3-6). ...
Solomen's alliance with Pharaoh by Marriage was the precursor of importing horses contrary to the law, leaning too much on human forces, and of contracting alliances with Moabite, Ammonite, Edomite, Sidonian, and Hittite wives, who seduced him from God. Jehoshaphat's son Jehoram's Marriage with Ahab's daughter, Athaliah, was fatal to him and to Ahaziah and his other sons except Joash (2 Chronicles 21; 22)
Adultery - The Marriage vow is witnessed before God, and accompanied with circumstances of solemnity and religion, which approach to the nature of an oath. ...
But this can never amount to a justification, unless it could be shown that the obligation of the Marriage vow depends upon the condition of reciprocal fidelity; a construction which appears founded neither in expediency, nor in terms of the vow, nor in the design of the legislature, which prescribed the Marriage rite
Dinah - Shechem, acting on his own behalf, proposed Marriage, promising to accept any conditions of dower her father and brothers might impose. The Marriage took place, and afterwards her full brothers, Simeon and Levi, slew Shechem and took Dinah out of his house. This story is clearly an elaboration of the earlier form, despite its one or two more antique touches, and suggests, moreover, the spirit at work in Ezra’s Marriage reforms
Hieracas, an Egyptian Teacher - Mosheim connects this with his reprobation of Marriage imagining that it arose from the necessity of replying to the objection that Marriage was a state ordained by God in Paradise. The most salient point in his practical teaching was that he absolutely condemned Marriage holding that though permitted under the old dispensation since the coming of Christ no married person could inherit the kingdom of heaven. If it was objected that the apostle had said "marriage is honourable in all," he appealed to what the same apostle had said "a little further on" (1 Corinthians 7 ) when he wished all to be as himself and only tolerated Marriage" because of fornication," i
Orestes Augustus Brownson - He was ordained a Universalist minister, but later denying all Divine revelation, left the ministry and adopted Robert Dale Owen's communistic theories of property and Marriage
Dismissal Ipso Facto - The following, committed by a religious of either sex, effect dismissal ipso facto: public apostasy from the Catholic Faith; flight with a person of the opposite sex (even without intention to marry); attempted Marriage, even civil
Ingeborg - As she refused to go, she was 'shut up' in a monastery and some courtier bishops declared her Marriage invalid, under pretext of a distant relationship with Philip's first wife
Tamar - A Canaanite woman, married to Er and then to his brother Onan (see Marriage, 4)
Daughter-in-Law - Marriage made them an integral member of the family
Nonna, Mother of Gregory Nazianzen - We know of two other children of the Marriage, a sister named Gorgonia, probably older than Gregory, and a brother named Caesarius
Michal - King Saul's younger daughter (2 Samuel 3:14-16 ) given to David in Marriage for the price of one hundred dead Philistines (1 Samuel 18:20-29 )
Ban - ) Notice of a proposed Marriage, proclaimed in church
Skirt - “To reveal a skirt” (literal reading of Deuteronomy 22:30 ; Deuteronomy 27:20 ) is a euphemism for sexual relationships, since placing the skirt over a woman of Marriageable age was the same as claiming her for Marriage (Ruth 3:7-14 )
Concubine - ...
Christianity has restored the sacred institution of Marriage to its original character, and concubinage is ranked with the sins of fornication and adultery (Matthew 19:5-9 ; 1 Corinthians 7:2 )
Priscillianists - For they denied the reality of Christ's birth and incarnation; maintained that the visible universe was not the production of the Supreme Deity, but of some daemon or malignant principle; adopted the doctrines of aeons, or emanations from the divine nature; considered human bodies as prisons formed by the author of evil to enslave celestial minds; condemned Marriage, and disbelieved the resurrection of the body
Gratian, Decree of - " The first part deals with the written sources of canon law and of ecclesiastical persons; the second treats of ecclesiastical administration, Marriage, and penance; the third comments upon Sacraments and Sacramentals
Achsah - Daughter of Caleb, son of Jephunneh, the Kenezite; given by him in Marriage to his younger brother, Othniel, for having taken Debir, or Kirjath Sepher (i
Salma - , by residence or Marriage becoming head of Bethlehem in Caleb's territory, Salma was reckoned of Caleb's family)
Witness - ) One who sees the execution of an instrument, and subscribes it for the purpose of confirming its authenticity by his testimony; one who witnesses a will, a deed, a Marriage, or the like
Divorce - A dissolution of the Marriage relation
Sacra Romana Rota - Besides notaries and other officers, there are the promoter of justice or prosecuting attorney and the defender of the bond for cases relating to Marriage, sacred ordination, and religious profession
Rota, Sacra Romana - Besides notaries and other officers, there are the promoter of justice or prosecuting attorney and the defender of the bond for cases relating to Marriage, sacred ordination, and religious profession
Tinneh - Polygamy was prevalent and the Marriage-tie was loose
Concubine - The gospel has restored the original law of Marriage, Genesis 2:24 Matthew 19:5 1 Corinthians 7:2 , and concubinage is ranked with fornication and adultery
Hosea - It is disputed whether the Marriage of the prophet was a real transaction, or an allegorical vision; in all probability the latter is the correct view; but in either case it illustrates the relations of the idolatrous Israel to her covenant God
ha'Dad - Pharaoh, the predecessor of Solomon's father-in-law, treated him kindly, and gave him his sister-in-law in Marriage
Marriage - ...
Malachi 2:11 (a) The affection of Judah for idols is compared to a Marriage wherein the heart that should have been joined to the Lord turned away from Him to be joined to idols. Collectively, we will enjoy this precious mutual event some day above the clouds when all the Church of GOD is united together, differences are forgotten, sectarian lines are eliminated, and the saints go marching in to the Marriage supper of the Lamb
Family (Jewish) - Betrothal (Matthew 1:18), as a covenant, was equivalent to Marriage; it prevented the woman from being married to any other man until she had received a writing of divorce. Divorce, Marriage
Clean, Unclean, Common - ...
The distinction, ‘clean’ (καθαρός) and ‘unclean’ (ἀκάθαρτος), refers in the OT and primitive religions to definite departments of life, such as food, sanitation, contact with the dead, and Marriage (Leviticus 11-15). The Apostle treats Marriage (q. He would place restrictions on the Marriage of believers with unbelievers. Many of the old tabus on food, Marriage, travel, the Sabbath, were rooted in fact
Napoleon i - This Marriage was performed on the eve of the coronation. The pope's refusal to annul Jerome Bonaparte's Marriage, Napoleon's refusal to act when the French Civil Code was introduced into Italy, extension of Napoleon's domains by the Treaty of Presburg, occupation of the papal state of Ancona, general attitude of Pius not to regard Napoleon's enemies as his, resulted in strained relations between them, and when Pius required Joseph Bonaparte to submit to the Holy See's suzerainty before recognizing him as King of Naples, Napoleon threatened to cease regarding the pope as temporal prince, and to cut his peoples from communication with Rome. The pope of course would not grant this, but diocesan authorities annulled the Marriage, 1810, on the grounds of the absence of parish priest and witnesses
Rebekah - The well-known story of the facts leading up to the Marriage of Isaac and Rebekah is told in Genesis 24:1-67 , and gives valuable information as to early Marriage customs. The servant loads her with gifts, and her family, led by her brother Laban, being convinced of Abraham’s wealth, and recognizing the will of Heaven in the selection, agrees to the Marriage
Torch - 459), assemble at sunset on the occasion of a Marriage, and move with dance and song through the street to the house of the Marriage festival bearing torches in their hands. With our presen slender knowledge of the Marriage customs of the Jews in the time of our Lord, it is impossible to determine exactly the nature of the torches or lamps of the parable, but the balance of probability seems to incline to some kind of lamp-torch lifted high into the air
Immanuel - The sign of Isaiah 7:14 constitutes a blessing on an upcoming Marriage, predicting that a virgin who was engaged to be married would be able to have a child early in the Marriage. It is likely that Isaiah's Marriage to a prophetess is in fact briefly described in 8:1-3
Hosea - ...
The Book The two broad divisions of the Book of Hosea are: (1) Hosea's Marriage, Hosea 1-3 ; and (2) Hosea's Messages, Hosea 4-14 . ...
The Marriage Hosea's Marriage and family life dominate Hosea 1-3 and surface from time to time in the remainder of the book. How to interpret the prophet's Marriage is not a settled issue. A few take the Marriage to be an allegory. Some accept it as a literal Marriage to a woman who became promiscuous after Marriage. Most handle it as an actual Marriage to a cult prostitute
Adultery - ...
Fornication may be, in some sense, covered by a subsequent Marriage of the parties; but adultery cannot be so healed
Palace, Lateran - It came into the possession of Maximian, who included it in the dowry of his daughter Fausta at the time of her Marriage to Constantine the Great in 307
Lateran Palace - It came into the possession of Maximian, who included it in the dowry of his daughter Fausta at the time of her Marriage to Constantine the Great in 307
Bithiah - The Marriage probably took place in the wilderness shortly after the Exodus
Davidists - He rejected Marriage with the Adamites; held with Manes, that the soul was not defiled by sin; and laughed at the self-denial so much recommended by Jesus Christ
Buckle - ) To join in Marriage
Nazareth - Hither, before their Marriage, was the angel Gabriel sent to announce the coming birth of Christ ( Luke 1:26-38 ), and hither the Holy Family retired after the flight to Egypt ( Matthew 2:23 )
Albigensianism - They commended suicide especially by starvation, their endura, and in general, the extinction of human life, and advocated abstention from Marriage, preferring concubinage as less evil
Lamentation - When a young person dies unmarried, part of the ceremony of mourning is a form of Marriage (see art
Jebusites - They joined in another confederacy (Joshua 11:3 ) and were again defeated, but they were not rooted out of the land; and Israel mingled with them in Marriage
Alabaster Box - When a girl approached the Marriageable age, she obtained a box according to her ability to pay and her station in life. When her lover requested her hand and heart in Marriage, then the girl, if she desired to answer in the affirmative, obtained the box from its hiding place and broke it at his feet
Andrew, Saint - On Saint Andrew's eve in Germany it is customary for girls to supplicate Saint Andrew to reveal the identity of their future husband; on the day following the young people float cups in a tub, and if a boy's and a girl's cup drifting together are intercepted by a cup inscribed "priest" it indicates Marriage
Shealtiel - From this Marriage sprang Shealtiel, Malchiram, and the other "sons," i
Governor - " The "governor" of a Marriage-feast was the bridegroom's friend, who took charge of the entertainment, John 2:8-9
Albigenses - They commended suicide especially by starvation, their endura, and in general, the extinction of human life, and advocated abstention from Marriage, preferring concubinage as less evil
Anna - Being then disengaged from the ties of Marriage, she thought only of pleasing the Lord; and continued without ceasing in the temple, serving God night and day, with fasting and prayer, as the Evangelist expresses it
Heir - Daughters had no share in the patrimony, (Genesis 21:14 ) but received a Marriage portion
Consent - Agreement of the mind to what is proposed or state by another accord hence, a yielding of the mind or will to that which is proposed as, a parent gives his consent to the Marriage of his daughter. We give our assent to the Marriage of a daughter
Henry Viii, King - In January, 1533, to anticipate the birth of Anne's child, the future Queen Elizabeth, he went through a form of Marriage with Anne; in May, Cranmer declared the Marriage valid, and Elizabeth was born in September, 1533
Incest - In the beginning of the world, and again, long after the deluge, Marriages between near relations were allowed. In the time of Abraham and Isaac, these Marriages were permitted, and among the Persians much later; it is even said to be esteemed neither criminal nor ignominious among the remains of the old Persians at this day. Some authors believe that Marriages between near relations were permitted, or, at least, tolerated, till the time of Moses, who first prohibited them among the Hebrews; and that among other people they were allowed even after him. The degrees of consanguinity within which Marriage was prohibited are stated in Leviticus 18:6-18 . Upon this principle, the Marriage, as well as other co- habitations, of brothers and sisters, of lineal kindred, and of all who usually live in the same family, may be said to be forbidden by the law of nature. Restrictions which extend to remoter degrees of kindred than what this reason makes it necessary to prohibit from intermarriage, are founded in the authority of the positive law which ordains them, and can only be justified by their tendency to diffuse wealth, to connect families, or to promote some political advantage. The Levitical law, which is received in this country, and from which the rule of the Roman law differs very little, prohibits Marriages between relations within three degrees of kindred; computing the generations, not from, but through, the common ancestor, and accounting affinity the same as consanguinity. The issue, however, of such Marriages are not bastardized, unless the parents be divorced during their life time
Woman - See, further, Family, Marriage. ) and Marriage and divorce ( Matthew 5:31 f. In a later Pauline Epistle Marriage becomes a type of the union between Christ and the Church ( Ephesians 5:22-33 )
Family (Jesus) - ...
(a)Marriage. His mother was present with Him at the Marriage at Cana, and after that event He went down with her and His brethren to Capernaum and made a short stay there (John 2:12, cf. (a) The pivot on which family life turns is Marriage, and this subject holds a unique place in the teaching of Christ. On Marriage His words are distinct and afford specific guidance about details. True Marriage rests ultimately upon a spiritual basis, the physical aspect is but an accident. Adultery, Divorce, and Marriage). ...
(b) The attitude of Jesus towards Marriage was necessarily reflected in His treatment of women. ...
This fundamental conception erects an insuperable barrier between the teaching of Jesus and those varieties of Socialism which aim at the abolition of the traditional form of the family, which rests on the assumption that Marriage is a life-long obligation. 68–73 (for the teaching on Marriage); Harnack, What is Christianity? Lect
Brother - Some have supposed that they may have been the children of Joseph by a former Marriage, and others that they were the children of Mary, the Virgin's sister, and wife of Cleophas
Levirate Marriage - The son begotten of the levirate Marriage inherited the name of the deceased man and his possessions
Asenath - The Marriage into this idolatrous family seems to have borne evil fruit afterward in the idolatry of Joseph's descendants, Ephraim, and the calf worship
Marriage, Levirate - The son begotten of the levirate Marriage inherited the name of the deceased man and his possessions
Michal - ...
Not long after the Marriage, Saul laid a plot to kill David in David’s house, but Michal’s quick thinking saved him (1 Samuel 19:11-17)
Needlework - The second robe we receive at the Marriage supper of the Lamb, and is made up by us in our many words and deeds done for the glory of GOD
Couple - A male and female connected by Marriage, betrothed or allied as a married couple a young couple
Jehoshaphat - The alliance was cemented by the Marriage of the crown prince Jehoram to Ahab’s daughter Athaliah ( 2 Kings 8:18 )
Flood - Men and women were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in Marriage, until the day that Noah entered the ark; and did not know until the Flood came and took them all away
Caleb - This was immediately granted to him, and the following chapter relates how he took possession of Hebron, driving out the three sons of Anak; and how he offered Achsah his daughter in Marriage to whoever would take Kiriath-sepher, i
Adultery - (Leviticus 19:20-22 ) At a later time, and when owing, to Gentile example, the Marriage tie became a looser bond of union, public feeling in regard to adultery changed, and the penalty of death was seldom or never inflicted
Rebecca, Rebekah - ...
Twenty years after her Marriage Rebecca became the mother of twin-sons, Esau and Jacob
ca'Leb - This was immediately granted to him, and the following chapter relates how he took possession of Hebron, driving out the three sons of Anak; and how he offered Achsah his daughter in Marriage to whoever would take Kirjath-sepher, i
Flood - Men and women were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in Marriage, until the day that Noah entered the ark; and did not know until the Flood came and took them all away
Ennodius (1) Magnus Felix, Bishop of Pavia - In 489, the year in which Theodoric invaded Italy, his aunt died, and he was saved from beggary by Marriage ( Eucharist. of Pavia, whose exhortations determined him to renounce his Marriage, with the consent of his wife, who retired into a convent
Hosea, Theology of - Foundational to Hosea's message and teaching about God are his Marriage to Gomer and her departure after the birth of three children. The opening surprise of the book is that God initiated Hosea's Marriage to this harlot (1:2); but the greater, unexpected surprise is that he tells Hosea to find his adulterous wife, bring her back, and love her again (3:1-2). ...
The details of Hosea's Marriage begin the book but are quickly dropped as the focus shifts away from the personal life of Hosea to the relationship between God and Israel. ...
Fueling the symbolism of Hosea's Marriage was the covenant, which provided a legal form for the expression and governance of the relationship God desired with his people. It moves from the heights of an intimate knowledge, symbolized by Marriage and paternal love, to the depths of anguish and despair over Israel's apostasy and idolatry as pictured by the adultery of Gomer. The graciousness and mercy of God did not include ignoring sin!...
Hosea's understanding of sin and its effects upon people is vividly presented through his own Marriage and the list of crimes levied against his people. ...
While God knew Israel (5:3) in the closeness of a relationship that could be imaged by Marriage, Israel no longer knew God (2:8; 11:3). The allusions to a new, restored relationship so strongly portrayed in Hosea's Marriage and by the names of his children are effectively balanced at the end of the book, which encloses the judgment of God within the parameters of his love and mercy
Joseph ii, Emperor - He abolished serfdom and the death penalty, made the courts of justice independent and impartial, abolished censorship, and created the Austrian Marriage law
Josephinism - He abolished serfdom and the death penalty, made the courts of justice independent and impartial, abolished censorship, and created the Austrian Marriage law
Indians, Maya - Marriage was strictly regulated and polygamy unknown
Maya Indians - Marriage was strictly regulated and polygamy unknown
Michal - Meanwhile she was given in Marriage to another man, Phalti or Phaltiel of Gallim (1 Samuel 25:44 ), but David afterwards formally reclaimed her as his lawful wife (2 Samuel 3:13-16 )
Bethuel - Blunt (Undesigned Coincidences) notices Bethuel's consistent insignificance in the whole affair of his daughter's Marriage
Rizpah - ...
Her Marriage to Abner was the occasion of a quarrel between him and Ishbosheth, which led to Abner's going over to the side of David (2 Samuel 3:17-21 )
Mary Tudor - She was popular at first, but her projected Marriage with Philip II of Spain excited discontent culminating in Wyatt's rebellion
Handkerchief Napkin - The σουδάριον appears among the items of dowry in Marriage contracts of the 2nd and 3rd cent
Apostolici - They are also said to have resembled Tatian, the Encratites, and the "Cathari" (Novatianists), in that they refused to admit offenders to communion, and condemned Marriage
Caraites - They extend their prohibition of Marriage to more degrees of affinity, and admit not of divorce on any slight or trivial grounds
Sacristan Emperor - He abolished serfdom and the death penalty, made the courts of justice independent and impartial, abolished censorship, and created the Austrian Marriage law
Tudor, Mary - She was popular at first, but her projected Marriage with Philip II of Spain excited discontent culminating in Wyatt's rebellion
Sacred - Secrets of Marriage still are sacred held
ra'Chel - The beauty of Rachel, Jacob's deep love and long servitude for her, their Marriage, and Rachel's death on giving birth to Benjamin, with Jacob's grief at her loss, ( Genesis 48:7 ) makes a touching tale
Concubine - Babylonian and Assyrian law codes regulate primary and secondary Marriages more specifically than do the Old Testament laws. ...
The story of Judges 19-20 suggests that the terminology used of relationships in a regular Marriage are also used in a concubinage relationship. Engelhart...
See also Marriage ...
...
Rahab - By her Marriage to Salmon; from whom sprang Boaz; and by the Marriage of Boaz with Ruth, sprang Obed; and from Obed, Jesse; and from Jesse, David; and from David, after twice fourteen generations after the flesh, sprang Christ
Bed, Couch - ’ In Hebrews 13:4, where the imperatives of the Revised Version should be noted, the Marriage-bed (κοίτη) is referred to, and is synonymous with the state of Marriage itself
the Children of Capernaum Playing at Marriages And Funerals in the Market-Place - 'Come,' cries a leading boy, 'Come and let us have a Marriage. We had a Marriage yesterday, when you were the bridegroom. ' But the bridegroom would not have a funeral, and the dead man would not have a Marriage, till a quarrel arose, and till their fathers and mothers had to separate their children and take them home. Just because a Marriage was proposed by one playfellow his neighbour would not have a Marriage. The Marriage game was surely a far more delightful game than the funeral game. " And it was enough that this little Cæsar of Capernaum said that he would not have a Marriage but a funeral. If it is a Marriage that is proposed, put yourself at their disposal. But put them all off till you have seen this Marriage carried smoothly and sweetly through
Family - Hosea and other prophets constantly dwell upon the thought of a monogamous Marriage as being a symbol of the union between God and His people; and denounce idolatry as unfaithfulness to this spiritual Marriage-tie. Side by side with the growth of the recognition of monogamy as the ideal form of Marriage, polygamy was practised even as late as NT times. He it was who arranged the Marriage of his sons ( Genesis 24:4 ; Genesis 28:2 , Judges 14:2 ), and had the right to sell his daughters ( Exodus 21:7 ). A childless widow could demand, though not enforce, re-marriage with her brother-in-law ( Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ). In spite of the prohibition of the later code ( Leviticus 20:21 ), levirate Marriage seems to have been practised at the time of Christ ( Matthew 22:25 ff
Incest - Marital relations with the following persons are forbidden: one's mother, father's wife, sister and half-sister, son's daughter, daughter's daughter, step-sister (a possible meaning of Leviticus 18:11 ), father's sister, mother's sister, father's brother's wife, daughter-in-law, brother's wife, wife's mother, and the joint Marriage of a woman and her daughter, a woman and her son's or daughter's daughter, a woman and her sister (while the former is still alive, Leviticus 18:18 ), a woman and her mother. Also, in contrast to Leviticus 20:21 stands the legislation and practice of levirate Marriage, a special case in which a brother or close kin is expected to marry the childless widow of a brother and father a child who would carry on the family lineage in the dead brother's name. ...
The guidelines that defined the kinship limits of Hebrew Marriage practice are not stated in the biblical texts. Hebrew Marriage practices were exogamous on the level of the household, the extended patrilineal family that was the foundational social unit of ancient Hebrew society. However, Hebrew Marriage practice was also basically endogamous on the level of clan and tribe, so that one married within one's clan to create lineage solidarity and to preserve the clan's landed inheritance. Parallel patrilineal cousins, who could be living one's household, were allowed, even preferred, in Marriage
Fornication - In the pagan world, while μοιχεία was regarded as sinful on a woman’s part mainly on the ground that it infringed the husband’s rights, fornication or sexual intercourse outside the Marriage bond or even by husbands was allowable. This is probably the meaning in Acts 15:20, though some interpret it of Marriage within the prohibited degrees (Leviticus 18:20). We are not concerned in this article with the vexed question of what constituted fornication in the case of re-marriage after divorce. Our Lord’s teaching on this point is doubtful, owing to the absence of the qualifying expression in Mark, although the existence of the qualification in Matthew indicates that in the early Church re-marriage was allowed to the guiltless party. Whether, again, Marriage within the prohibited degrees constituted πορνεία is not discussed in the NT. It saw in Marriage a preventive against fornication; St
Order de Santiago de la Espada - It comprised several classes: ...
canons, who administered the sacraments
canonesses, to serve pilgrims
religious knights
married knights
Marriage required the king's authorization and during Advent, Lent, and on certain festivals the knights lived in their monasteries, observing continence
Order of Saint James of Compostela - It comprised several classes: ...
canons, who administered the sacraments
canonesses, to serve pilgrims
religious knights
married knights
Marriage required the king's authorization and during Advent, Lent, and on certain festivals the knights lived in their monasteries, observing continence
Knox, John - In 1569, five years after his second Marriage, he suffered an apoplectic stroke from which he never fully recovered
Feast - As a mark of hospitality (Genesis 19:3 ; 2 Samuel 3:20 ; 2 Kings 6:23 ); on occasions of domestic joy (Luke 15:23 ; Genesis 21:8 ); on birthdays (Genesis 40:20 ; Job 1:4 ; Matthew 14:6 ); and on the occasion of a Marriage (Judges 14:10 ; Genesis 29:22 )
Eve - Not from his head, lest she should rule over him; nor from his feet, lest he should tyrannize over her; but from his side, to denote that species of equality which is to subsist in the Marriage state
John Knox - In 1569, five years after his second Marriage, he suffered an apoplectic stroke from which he never fully recovered
Epiphany, the - Anexamination of the services for the Feast of the Epiphany showsthat the commemoration is really threefold: (1) Our Lord'sManifestation by a star to the Magi; (2) The Manifestation ofthe glorious Trinity at His Baptism, and (3) The Manifestation ofthe glory and Divinity of Christ by His miraculous turning waterinto wine at the Marriage in Cana of Galilee; all of which are saidto have happened on the same day, though not in the same year
Parents - ...
It is within this total Marriage relationship, not outside it, that God intends children to be born and grow up
Gomer - Still others have believed she was an ordinary woman who became unfaithful after her Marriage to Hosea
Tamar - See Levirate Marriage
Household - the inmates of a house, subordinate indeed to the master, but attached to him by ties of relationship or Marriage
Bastard - By the and canon laws, a bastard becomes a legitimate child, by the intermarriage of the parents, at any future time. But by the laws of this country, as by those of England, a child, to be legitimate, must at least be born after the lawful Marriage
Favor - ) A gift or represent; something bestowed as an evidence of good will; a token of love; a knot of ribbons; something worn as a token of affection; as, a Marriage favor is a bunch or knot of white ribbons or white flowers worn at a wedding
Keturah - His second Marriage, at the age of one hundred and forty years, shows his faith in the divine promise, that he should be a "father of many nations;" for which purpose his constitution might be miraculously renewed, as Sarah's was
Bride, Bridechamber, Bridegroom - ...
3: νυμφών (Strong's #3567 — Noun Masculine — numphon — noom-fohn' ) signifies (a) "the room or dining hall in which the Marriage ceremonies were held," Matthew 22:10 ; some mss
Boaz - He was open and honourable in all his dealings with her, whether concerning Marriage or property (Ruth 3:11-13; Ruth 4:1-6)
Betrothal - Jewish Marriage customs were in origin the same as those of other Semitic peoples, but Jewish civilization was far removed from its primitive stages. The Talmudic seder on Marriage includes two tractates, Kethuboth and Kiddushin, dealing largely with the preliminaries of Marriage, the latter especially with betrothal, but it is considerably later than the NT period. Until the time of the Marriage proper the bride-to-be remained in her own family. —Complete details as to the Talmudic requirements regarding betrothal are given in Kiddushin; see also the article ‘Betrothal, in the Jewish Encyclopedia, and Mielziner, Jewish Law of Marriage and Divorce
Widow - 2 ( c ); Marriage, 6. ’ Since it could not have been the Apostle’s wish that only widows over sixty should receive pecuniary help from the Church (for many young widows might be in great poverty), and since he could not describe the re-marriage of such a widow-pensioner as a rejection of her faith, it follows that the list of widows, from which the younger widows were to be excluded, was not the list of those who were in receipt of Church relief, but rather a list of those, from among the pensioner-widows, who were considered suitable by age and character to engage officially in Church work
Fornication - Fornication meant being unfaithful to a Marriage commitment (Judges 19:2 ). Some Stoic philosophers reacted against such practices and condemned sex outside Marriage
Unity - God's ideal for Marriage is for husband and wife to experience unity of life, “one flesh” (Genesis 2:24 ). Stubbornness of will (“hardness” of heart, Mark 10:5 ) continues to disrupt God's desired unity in Marriage
Husband - As husband and wife they were partners in a Marriage relation where each was equipped to complement the other. The self-sacrificing love that the husband should exercise towards the wife is the same as that which Christ has exercised towards the church (Ephesians 5:25-31; see also Marriage)
Song of Solomon, Theology of - The Song, however, stands against such attempts and tells the church that sexuality within the context of Marriage is something God created for the pleasure of his human creatures. In many Old Testament Scriptures, Marriage is an underlying metaphor for Israel's relationship with God. Rather, we read it in the light of the pervasive Marriage metaphor of the Old Testament. The New Testament also uses human relationships as metaphors of the divine-human relationship, and none clearer than Marriage
Women - (For details relating to the role of women in Marriage and the family see Marriage; WIFE; FAMILY. ...
Israelite law helped restore the status of women by giving them rights in matters such as Marriage (Deuteronomy 22:13-21; cf
Joy - sama [ Song of Solomon 1:4 ), to Marriage (Proverbs 5:18 ), the birth of children (Psalm 113:9 ), the gathering of the harvest, military victory (Isaiah 9:3 ), and drinking wine (Psalm 104:15 ). Spiritual joys are expressed by the metaphors of feasting, Marriage, victory in military endeavors, and successful financial undertakings. Jesus joins the joys of Marriage and spiritual ones by describing John the Baptist's reaction to his coming as the joy (chara [ John 3:29-30 )
Love - This word may refer to an erotic but legal love outside Marriage. Marriage may be consummated without the presence of love for one’s Marriage partner ( Omri (1) - The alliance was cemented by the Marriage of Ahab and Jezebel, so important for the later history
Adoption - ...
Adoption by matrimony is the taking the children of a wife or husband, by a former Marriage, into the condition of natural children
Concubines - Christianity disallows such evil, and recognises the relationship as established of God, and hence the sanctity of the Marriage tie in those whom God joins together
Bed - ...
3: κοίτη (Strong's #2845 — Noun Feminine — koite — koy'-tay ) primarily "a place for lying down" (connected with keimai, "to lie"), denotes a "bed," Luke 11:7 ; the Marriage "bed," Hebrews 13:4 ; in Romans 13:13 , it is used of sexual intercourse
Lamp - Judges 15:4 The use in Marriage processions of lamps fed with oil is alluded to in the parable of the ten virgins
Jehoshaphat - But, the alliance involved a Marriage between Jehoshaphat's son Jehoram and Ahab's daughter Athaliah
Eleaanor - In 1152 at Beaugency their Marriage was annulled on the plea of consanguinity by a church council under the presidency of Samson, Archbishop of Rheims, and that same year Eleanor married Henry, who had just succeeded his father as Count of Anjou and Duke of Normandy
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh whose daughter, Bithiah, was given in Marriage to Mered, a descendant of Judah. The Pharaoh who gave the sister of his queen in Marriage to Hadad, an Edomite of royal blood, who escaped the massacre of Joab and fled to Egypt
Mary - She was connected by Marriage, Luke 1:36, with Elisabeth, who was of the tribe of Levi and of the lineage of Aaron. She was betrothed to Joseph of Nazareth; but before her Marriage she became with child by the Holy Ghost, and became the mother of Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world
Solomon's Song - Numerous and very different opinions have been held as to the subject and plan of this poem; but that its design is to set forth the spiritual love and mutual communion between Christ and his people, is evident from its harmony, when so understood, with the large class of Scripture passages which represent God and particularly Christ as the husband of the church, and employ the Marriage relation in its various aspects to illustrate the relation between the Savior and his people. John Brown of Haddington, in the introduction to his admirable paraphrase of this book, says, "If understood of the Marriage and fellowship between Christ and his people, it will appear most exalted, instructive, and heart-warming
Jovinianus, Heretic - His praise of virginity seemed to do some wrong to Marriage. He himself abstained from Marriage, merely because of the troubles involved in it
Homosexuality - As long as this form of sexuality is expressed monogamously, it is argued, homosexual relations merely constitute an expansion of the biblical view of Marriage. Others deduce that homosexual relations are merely an expansion of the category of Marriage under this rubric of fellowship; that is, intimacy and not biology is the appropriate measure of conformity to the Genesis Marriage model. But apart from the debatability of this notion of the image of God in Genesis (dominion is the probable focus of the term), the definition of Marriage cannot be limited to the meaning of the image of God. However important the social and spiritual aspects of Marriage may be, the physical aspect is no less fundamental to its definition. Because a homosexual relationship cannot produce a unity of sexually differentiated beings, there cannot be a Marriage. ...
Condemnations of sexual sin in the Old Testament focus on heterosexual Acts, but it is important to note that all sexual sin, including homosexuality, is prohibited in relation to the positive model of Marriage presented in Genesis. Thus, while the Old Testament describes homosexual activity as intrinsically unjust or impure, these condemnations do not differ qualitatively from condemnations of heterosexual deviations from the Marriage model. The reaffirmation of sexually differentiated Marriage in the New Testament, as noted above, suggests that this levitical condemnation of the violation of differentiation retains its force throughout the entire biblical period. Niddah 13b) links masturbation and pederasty together as violations of Marriage, and in so doing makes reference to harming children, offending with the hand or the foot, and cutting off offending limbs rather than going down to the pit of destruction
Lois And Eunice - But with all that she made the tremendous mistake of giving her only daughter in Marriage to a man who was still an absolute heathen. And, but for some pagan and overpowering influences holding him back, under the transforming influences of Lois's noble character and Eunice's holy beauty he would surely have become all that Lois and Eunice prayed for so unceasingly that he might become before the Marriage. But let Lois only give her consent; let Lois only give her dear daughter to him in Marriage; and she will never have to repent putting her great trust in his hands. Till at last when she could hold out no longer, Lois gave her long-withheld consent to the mixed Marriage. Nor did Peter's beautiful promise ever come true so as to mend matters in that so mixed and so unequally-yoked Marriage. " For some reason or other, that so apposite promise was never fulfilled to that so mismanaged Marriage. And the daily growth of the uncircumcised child only made the broken law of God against all such mixed Marriages as theirs had been the more poignant to their broken hearts: as also, the same law of God as to the proper nurture and admonition of such unhappy children as their child was. Just in what things, and naming them, we have come so shamefully short of our Marriage-vows, and of our honest, and at one time, warmhearted, intentions. It is far easier, believe me, to begin all these good things before your Marriage than after it. For they are come here tonight to warn you against a mixed Marriage like theirs
Gift - The refusal of a present was regarded as a high indignity; and this constituted the aggravated insult noticed in Matthew 22:11 , the Marriage robe having been offered and refused
Dear - , "much more precious"); (b) in the metaphorical sense, "held in honor, esteemed, very dear," Acts 5:34 , "had in honor," RV (AV, "had in reputation"); so in Hebrews 13:4 , RV, "let Marriage be had in honor;" AV, "is honorable;" Acts 20:24 , "dear," negatively of Paul's estimate of his life; James 5:7 , "precious" (of fruit); 1 Peter 1:19 , "precious" (of the blood of Christ); 2 Peter 1:4 (of God's promises)
Boaz - There being no objection to an Israelite's Marriage with a Moabitess marks an early date (contrast Ezra 9)
Montanists - They condemned second Marriages, allowed the dissolution of Marriage, and observed three lents
Ahithophel - How natural Ahithophel's sense of wrong toward David, the murderer of his grandson by Marriage and the corrupter of his granddaughter! The evident undesignedness of this coincidence confirms the veracity of the history
Judah - His Marriage, an incident in his son's life, and his intrigue with Tamar are recorded in Genesis 38:1-30
Demand - The common expression, a king sent to demand another kings daughter in Marriage, is improper
Ercole Consalvi - When he declined to assist at the emperor's Marriage to Marie-Louise, 1810, Napoleon expelled him from the Tuileries, deprived him of his dignities, and exiled him to Rheims
Adoni'Jah - " (1 Kings 1:52 ) The death of David quickly followed on these events; and Adonijah begged Bath-sheba to procure Solomon's consent to his Marriage with Abishag, who had been the wife of David in his old age
Theories of Population - To forestall the operation of the positive checks, Malthus advocated certain "preventive" checks, chiefly "moral restraint," or the postponement of Marriage
Unite - To join to connect in a near relation or alliance as, to unite families by Marriage to unite nations by treaty
Encratites - ), heretics who abstained from flesh, wine, and the Marriage bed, believing them essentially impure. Not to speak of the Indian ascetics (to whom Clement of Alexandria refers as predecessors of the Encratites), the abstinence of the Essenes, both in respect of food and of Marriage, is notorious. We find from the Clementines that the Ebionite sects which arose out of Essenism permitted Marriage but disallowed flesh meat and wine; and that their doctrine respecting God's work of creation was quite orthodox. But he adds that a defence of their doctrines in eight books had been published by a leader of theirs Dositheus a Cilician in which he inveighed against Marriage and the tasting of wine or partaking of flesh meat
Immorality, Sexual - As the world's population grows, so do the human misdemeanors (Genesis 6:5-6 ), which seem to include mixed Marriages (Genesis 6:2 ) and possible sexual perversions, although the latter are not mentioned explicitly. These fall into two groups, one dealing with carnal associations among people closely related by blood (consanguinity), and the other governing the sexual behavior of persons related through Marriage (affinity). The Marriage of a man, a woman, and her mother is deemed wicked, and the offenders sentenced to be burned with fire so as to expunge completely the wickedness of the act from the holy community. ...
The Marriage of a man with his sister from either side of the family is declared a highly immoral union, and the participants are to be put to death. Any Marriage relationship that was too close would have exerted a devastating effect on community solidarity by provoking family feuds that could last for centuries. ...
Serious problems would also have arisen through intermarriage when the result of such unions was the concentration of lands and riches in the hands of a few Hebrew families. But the commandment prohibiting adultery deals with an act of a highly personal nature, occurring between normally consenting adults, which violates the "one flesh" character of Marriage. The prophets view the covenant as equivalent to a Marriage relationship between God and Israel (Isaiah 54:5-8 ). ...
Whereas the female is cast in an inferior, passive role in the Old Testament sexual legislation, Jesus considers the woman as equal to the man in his teachings about divorce and remarriage. Much discussion has taken place about Christ's return to the strict Marriage ideals of Genesis 2:24 ( Mark 10:6 ) and the explanatory clause "except for marital unfaithfulness" (Matthew 5:32 ; 19:9 ), which allows for remarriage after divorce and which does not occur in either Mark 10:11 or Luke 16:18 . It was in reality, however, a rare occurrence, and at that mostly the prerogative of the rich, since poor men could not afford another dowry or "bride price" for a subsequent Marriage. If this explanation is correct, Jesus was addressing a Jewish controversy that had no bearing on God's Marriage ideals in the age of grace, and which Mark and Luke consequently ignored because the exception did not apply to their audiences of Christian believers. Sexual activity is to be confined to the Marriage relationship, and if a married man or woman has sexual intercourse with someone other than the spouse, that person has committed adultery
Court - ) To endeavor to gain the affections of; to seek in Marriage; to woo
Conviction - John the Baptist “convicted” Herod Antipas because of his illicit Marriage to Herodias, his brother's wife (Luke 3:19 )
Montanists - The "Spirit" ordered three Lents to be observed, and re-marriage and flight from persecution were forbidden
Jehohanan - Jehohanan's Marriage to a prominent Jerusalem family gave Tobiah an information system concerning Jerusalem happenings
Medicine - ...
The washing's, the restriction in diet to clean animals and the prohibition of pork, the separation of lepers, the laws of Marriage and married intercourse (Leviticus 15), the cleanliness of the camp (Deuteronomy 23:12-14), and the comprehension of all varieties of healthful climate in Palestine, account for Israel's general exemption from epidemics and remarkable healthiness
Treaty - The treaty was sometimes strengthened by a Marriage between members of the two royal families, which gave further opportunity for the introduction of foreign religious practices into Israel (1 Kings 3:1; 1 Kings 11:1-6; 1 Kings 16:30-33)
Louis Xiv - Although he succeeded at the age of five, his personal government did not begin until 1661, after his Marriage with Maria Theresa of Austria
Jabesh (1) - For not having come to Mizpeh at Israel's command, under an imprecatory oath against all defaulters, when the tribes began war with Benjamin (Judges 20:1-3; Judges 21:5), its males were all killed, and its virgins, 400 in number, were given in Marriage to the 600 Benjamites who survived the war with Israel (Judges 21:1; Judges 21:8-14)
Settlement - ) That which is bestowed formally and permanently; the sum secured to a person; especially, a jointure made to a woman at her Marriage; also, in the United States, a sum of money or other property formerly granted to a pastor in additional to his salary
Brothers, Jesus - It claims that Jesus' brothers were the sons of Joseph by an earlier Marriage
Henry iv, King - In 1599 his Marriage was annulled by Clement VIII
Patriarchs - Marriage is sacred (Genesis 34:7; Genesis 34:13; Genesis 34:31; Genesis 38:24). Intermarriage with idolaters is treason to God and the chosen seed (Genesis 26:34-35; Genesis 27:46; Genesis 28:1; Genesis 28:6-9)
Pomegranate - "...
The cup of betrothal He gave her at the last supper, the Marriage cup shall be at His return (Matthew 26:29; Revelation 19:7-9)
Epistles to the Corinthians - The object and plan of the epistle is accordingly twofold: the denunciation and correction of abuses and crimes, 1:10 to 6:20, in which are treated the dissensions, avoidance of sinners, sins of injustice and impurity; and a reply to the questions addressed to him, 7:1 to 16:4, in which are treated Marriage and celibacy, meats offered to idols, divine services and the Holy Eucharist, the charisma, the resurrection, the collection for the poor of Jerusalem
Bottle - ...
In the days of our Lord, it is certain that stone, as well as earthen vessels, were known, for we read of such at the Marriage in Cana of Galilee
Andrew - Andrew then introduced his brother Simon, and they went with him to the Marriage in Cana, but afterward returned to their ordinary occupation, not expecting, perhaps, to be farther employed in his service
Nakedness - To uncover the nakedness of any one, is commonly put for a shameful and unlawful conjunction, or an incestuous Marriage, Leviticus 20:19 ; Ezekiel 16:37
Philip - Philip followed him; he was present at the Marriage of Cana in Galilee
Esther - The book of Esther is so called, because it contains the history of Esther, a Jewish captive, who by her remarkable accomplishments gained the affections of King Ahasuerus, and by Marriage with him was raised to the throne of Persia; and it relates the origin and ceremonies of the feast of Purim, instituted in commemoration of the great deliverance, which she, by her interest, procured for the Jews, whose general destruction had been concerted by the offended pride of Haman
Phil'ip - Philip apparently was among the first company of disciples who were with the Lord at the commencement of his ministry at the Marriage at Cana, on his first appearance as a prophet in Jerusalem, John 2
Ahab - His alliance with the Phœnicians was cemented by his Marriage with Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, king of Tyre ( 1 Kings 16:31 ), who was also, if we may trust Josephus, priest of Astarte. At a later date Ahab entered into alliance with Judah, giving his daughter Athaliab in Marriage to Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat ( 2 Kings 8:18 )
Ahab - ...
Ahab's Marriage to a Phoenician princess had both commercial and political benefits. ...
During Ahab's days, Israel enjoyed peace with Judah, largely as a result of a Marriage he arranged between princess Athaliah and Joram, the crown prince of Judah
First-Born - In case a man married with a widow, who by a previous Marriage had become the mother of children, the first-born as respected the second husband was the eldest child by the second Marriage
Sexuality, Human - ...
Marriage . Christian Marriage can be considered a loving, bonded, sexually exclusive relationships that is publicly declared to exist between a man and a woman in a manner recognized by society as licit and proper. But the biblical pattern for Marriage is described as being "one flesh, " a term patterned after expressions used to describe genetic relationships of the closest order (Genesis 29:14 ; 37:27 ; 2 Samuel 5:1 ; 16:11 ; 19:12-13 ; 1 Kings 8:19 ; 2 Kings 20:18 ; 1 Chronicles 11:1 ; 2 Chronicles 6:9 ; Isaiah 39:7 ; 49:26 ; 58:7 ). In the Gospels, Jesus makes an appeal to the Edenic narrative and order of creation theology in order to demonstrate the inappropriateness of casually dissolving a Marriage (Matthew 19:4-5 ; Mark 10:6-8 ). Discussions about sexual intercourse, aside from proscriptions about engaging in it either before or outside Marriage, have been considered a taboo in Christian circles. In describing a Marriage, the word does not expressly portray sexual relations, but speaks to the deep and intimate bonds that give sanction to any functional Marriage and that are to undergird sexual activity conducted within it. She calls him handsome and proclaims her Marriage bed to be fertile (verdant 1:16). Sexual intercourse thus becomes a vital element in the communication process so essential for any sound Marriage. The intimacy, care, and love transmitted in that act, properly contextualized within a Marriage, are not only permissible but highly desirable. ...
In the New Testament Paul, recognizing the value of a healthy sex life for a solid Marriage, warns married couples that they should not use the other's sexual desire as a weapon. If the initial sexual act is that which consummates the Marriage whereby two now become "one flesh, " it is reasonable to conclude that this represents a "channelizing" or confinement of all sexual activity to expressions that reinforce the solidarity of the marital union. A woman who was not a virgin was considered "damaged goods" and was therefore less eligible for Marriage, presumably commanding a lower bride-price (Exodus 22:17 ). Because the girl's Marriageability had been severely compromised, the money was probably designed to provide for the girl's livelihood in her father's house
Modus Vivendi - By the concordat a detailed understanding was arrived at touching those religious matters with a temporal relationship, as holding of church property, assisting at Catholic Marriages without any state intervention, deciding Marriage issues of nullity, passing upon the competency of public school teachers as religious instructors or taking exception to them when a danger to faith or morals, of having the clergy treated in judicial and pre-judicial processes in keeping with their canonical immunity
Immorality - Any illicit sexual activity outside of Marriage
Shoe - shows that this symbolism, somewhat differently performed, with another still more expressive, was also adopted in the case of one renouncing his right to his deceased brother’s wife (See Marriage, § 4 )
Marriage-Feasts - ) To some such Marriage-feast Jesus and his five disciples were invited at Cana of Galilee
Return - 1: ἀναλύω (Strong's #360 — Verb — analuo — an-al-oo'-o ) "to depart" in Philippians 1:23 , signifies "to return" in Luke 12:36 , used in a simile of the "return" of a lord for his servants after a Marriage feast (RV)
Thutmose - ...
Thutmose IV, like Thutmose II, seized his position by Marriage
Bride - In Revelation, the church, as the bride of the Lamb, has prepared herself for Marriage by performing righteous deeds (John 19:7-8 )
Week - celebrate the Marriage feast for a week with Leah (Genesis 29:27), are explicit allusions to this division of time (compare Judges 14:12); also Joseph's mourning for Jacob seven days (Genesis 50:10)
Kinsman - In the case of an untimely death of a husband without a son, the law of levirate Marriage becomes operative—that is, the husband's brother was obligated to raise up a male descendant for his deceased brother and thus perpetuate the deceased's name and inheritance
Court - To woo to solicit for Marriage
Gomer - Contracts for Marriages, it is said, were never formed without giving with the woman a certain measure of corn, as well as money, for a Marriage portion
Concubine - The New Testament teaching restores Marriage to its original character, requiring a man to be the husband of one wife
Children - Daughters usually remained in the women's apartments till Marriage
Vivendi, Modus - By the concordat a detailed understanding was arrived at touching those religious matters with a temporal relationship, as holding of church property, assisting at Catholic Marriages without any state intervention, deciding Marriage issues of nullity, passing upon the competency of public school teachers as religious instructors or taking exception to them when a danger to faith or morals, of having the clergy treated in judicial and pre-judicial processes in keeping with their canonical immunity
Murder - Like the Sabbath and Marriage, it is a primeval and universal institution for mankind, and all nations have so recognized it, Acts 28:4
Sacrament - Forexample, if a man would be saved he must receive Holy Baptism andHoly Communion where these Sacraments are to be had; but for hissalvation it is not necessary that he should be married, or ordainedto the Sacred Ministry, and yet Marriage and Ordination arethoroughly sacramental in character in that they are graceconferring, and therefore, in her book of Homilies the Church callsthem Sacraments, The great English divines generally take thisposition in regard to the Sacraments and the Sacramental Systemof the Church
Laban (2) - 1:16, and Hebrew tradition) or was of weak character, so that Laban is prominent in arranging for Rebekah's Marriage to Isaac; but Niebuhr observes Eastern custom, then as now, gave brothers the main share in defending sisters' honour and settling as to their Marriage (Genesis 34:13; Judges 21:22; 2 Samuel 13:20-29)
Caleb - "...
By Marriage and submission to the bond of Jehovah's covenant with Israel he became a true Israelite by adoption; a specimen of God's mercy to the Gentiles even in Old Testament times, and a pledge of the opening of the door of faith to them widely in the New Testament So Jethro, Rahab, Ruth, Naaman. This consideration helps to account for the large numbers of Israelites at the Exodus; proselytes and Marriage connections from other races swelled the number of Israelites of pure blood
Sanctification - This does not mean that God makes the man into a Christian, but that he accepts the man as part of an equal Marriage. God considers the Marriage to be holy on account of the believing partner; it is a lawful union (1 Corinthians 7:14)
Fortunatus, Bishop of Poictiers - Crossing the Alps and passing into Austrasia, he visited king Siegbert, for whom he composed an epithalamium on his Marriage with Brunehault, couched in terms of extravagant flattery. that on the Marriage of Galesuintha, sister of Brunehaut, with Chilperic, and his Elegy upon the Fall of Thuringia
Hosea - ...
Because the covenant between Israel and Yahweh was likened to a Marriage covenant, Israel’s association with other gods was really spiritual adultery (Hosea 4:17; 2 Kings 15:1-2; Hosea 6:10; Hosea 7:16; Hosea 8:5-6; see BAAL). Hosea, who still loved his erring wife, had remained faithful to his Marriage covenant, and when he found Gomer a slave, he bought her back (Hosea 3:1-3)
Canticles; the Song of Solomon - The union of Christ and His church was the original fact in the mind of God, on which human Marriage is based (Ephesians 5:23-32). "The daughter of Zion was at that time openly married to Jehovah; for it is thenceforth that the prophets in reproving Israel's sin speak of it as a breach of her Marriage covenant. ...
The songs heretofore sung by her were the preparatory hymns of her childhood; the last and crowning 'song of songs' was prepared for the now mature maiden against the day of her Marriage to the King of kings" (Origen: see Moody Stuart's admirable commentary). But a further Marriage is intended, that of the individual soul to the Lord, for Christ "loves one, as if that one were all"; and finally the yet future Marriage of the whole elect church (Revelation 19:7-8; Revelation 21:2; Revelation 21:9). sought in Marriage by Him
Asceticism (2) - The stricter members of the brotherhood eschewed Marriage. It expressed itself chiefly in fasting, and did not include either voluntary poverty or abstinence from Marriage. They emphasized His forty days’ fast, His abstinence from Marriage, His voluntary poverty, and leaped to the conclusion that the highest life, as exemplified by Jesus, was the life of asceticism or world-denial. He accepted the hospitality of rich men and poor, He was present at meals, He contributed to the gaiety of a Marriage-feast, He permitted very precious ointment to be poured upon His feet, He had a love for children, welcomed the society of women, and clearly enjoyed the domestic life of the home in Bethany. of Marriage or property—seems to have been, not the desire to avoid these things as in themselves incompatible with spiritual perfection, but the desire to leave Himself perfect freedom in the prosecution of His work. ...
(2) So, too, in respect of Marriage. Just as elsewhere, in His pregnant, paradoxical way, Jesus bids men ‘hate’ father, and mother, and wife, and children (Luke 14:26), if their claims tend to supersede the claims of God (Matthew 10:37); so here He bids those who are convinced that God’s claims demand the whole of their time and energy, to refrain altogether from entering the Marriage state. On the contrary, it is clear that Jesus regarded Marriage as the right and natural course for the majority of people, and He even chose a married man as the chief of His apostles. In short, while recognizing that through special circumstances the individual might be called upon to renounce the gratifications of Marriage, Jesus appears to indicate that such renunciation is an exceptional duty imposed on the few, not a general rule for the many. Marriage in itself is not to be avoided as a thing debasing; it debases only when men refuse to subordinate it to the claims of the Kingdom
Raphael - he directs Tobias to take the heart, liver, and gall of a fish, manages the Marriage, binds the demon, fetches money from Rages, and heals Tob 12:12-20 gives his description of himself, a passage which probably became the groundwork of later speculations
ta'Mar - ...
Daughter of Absalom, (2 Samuel 14:7 ) became, by her Marriage with Uriah of Gibeah, the mother of Maachah, the future queen of Judah or wife of Abijah
Berenice, Bernice - Two sons were the issue of this Marriage
Manoah - " Manoah and his wife remonstrated with Samson on choosing a Philistine as his wife (Judges 14:2-3); but they accompanied him to the Marriage feast at Timnath
Right - Paul deals with the question of Marriage, and especially with that of ministerial stipends (1 Corinthians 9)
Sacrament - Later, Christians extended the use of the term to preaching, the Lord's Supper, foot washing, blessing, Marriage, ordination, and any other rite seen as a channel of divine grace into the heart and life of the believer
Banquet - Also in the Book of Revelation, the final victory day is described in terms of a “marriage supper of the Lamb” of God (Revelation 19:9 )
Brethren of the Lord - ’ ( a ) They were supposed to be sons of Joseph by a former Marriage , having thus no blood-relationship with Jesus
Judah the Kingdom of - Later, an alliance was formed by the Marriage of Jehoshaphat's son with Ahab's daughter, Athaliah, 1 Kings 22:1-53; 2 Chronicles 18:1-34, who usurped the crown
Belshazzar - He is said to have been a usurper, and by such a Marriage would have consolidated his position on the throne
Shulamite - Some have supposed that it is in consequence of her Marriage with Solomon, and bearing therefore his name; for Shulamite is the feminine, as Solomon is the masculine, both being derived from Shalem peace
Jewel - Genesis 24:51 (c) In this passage the servant represents the Holy Spirit who brings gifts from the Father and the Son to the bride who will one day be at the Marriage supper of the Lamb
Affinity - There are several degrees of affinity, wherein Marriage was prohibited by the law of Moses: thus the son could not marry his mother, nor his father's wife, Leviticus 18:7 , &c
Vessel - (4)]'>[1], the view that the "vessel" signifies the wife, and that the reference is to the sanctified maintenance of the married state, is supported by the facts that in 1 Peter 3:7 the same word time, "honor," is used with regard to the wife; again in Hebrews 13:4 , timios, "honorable" (RV, "in honor") is used in regard to Marriage; further, the preceding command in 1 Thessalonians 4 is against fornication, and the succeeding one ( 1 Thessalonians 4:6 ) is against adultery
Loose - , John 11:44 ; Acts 22:30 ; (4) of Satan, Revelation 20:3,7 , and angels, Revelation 9:14,15 ; (5) metaphorically, of one diseased, Luke 13:16 ; of the Marriage tie, 1 Corinthians 7:27 ; of release from sins, Revelation 1:5 (in the most authentic mss
Heir - Childlessness was regarded as such a calamity that the ordinary laws of forbidden degrees of affinity in Marriage (Leviticus 18:16) were set aside. Naomi, being past age of Marriage, Boaz takes Ruth her daughter-in-law, and has also to redeem the sold inheritance of Elimelech, Naomi's husband
Parents - Nor have parents any right to sell their children into slavery; to shut up daughters and younger sons in nunneries and monasteries, in order to preserve entire the estate and dignity of the family; or to use any arts, either of kindness or unkindness, to induce them to make choice of this way of life themselves; or in countries where the clergy are prohibited from Marriage, to put sons into the church for the same end, who are never likely to do or receive any good in it sufficient to compensate for this sacrifice; nor to urge children to Marriages from which they are averse, with the view of exalting or enriching the family, or for the sake of connecting estates, parties, or interests; nor to oppose a Marriage in which the child would probably find his happiness, from a motive of pride or avarice, of family hostility or personal pique
Hymenaeus - It is not impossible that ‘Hymenaeus’ is an ironical nickname denoting that the bearer was one who shared the Gnostic dislike of Marriage, or else scoffing at the Gnostic doctrine of the mystic Marriage of the soul with the spirit
Faithfulness - Hosea portrays God’s relation to Israel as a Marriage and states God’s promise of “faithfulness” to Israel: “And I will betroth thee unto me for ever; yea, I will betroth thee unto me in righteousness, and in judgment, and in loving-kindness, and in mercies. As in the Marriage relationship, “faithfulness” is not optional
Supper - ...
(2) The second passage contains a double picture: (a) Revelation 19:17-18,6 ‘And he saith unto me, Write, Blessed are they which are bidden to the Marriage supper of the Lamb. Here it is the picture of a Marriage-feast. Most vividly the Apostle here sets forth the tragic contrast between the ‘marriage supper’ of the Lamb (Revelation 19:9) and the destruction of the slain, on whose carcasses the birds shall feed
Veil - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:7) If the reader enters into the full apprehension of the custom of the vail, he will consider the spouse of Christ as here clothed with her Radid, her Marriage vail, shewing who she was, and that she was in subjection to her own husband, (Ephesians 5:23-24) seeking him in the ordinances, which are here called the streets of the city, were she ought to seek him; and the watchmen, the ministers of the gospel, found her in this enquiry, but instead comforting her with some new and sweet view of her Lord, speaking to her in her then dispirit case and circumstances, in shewing her the safety of a soul justified in Christ's blood and righteousness, however dark and uncomfortable in herself; instead of this, time keepers took away her vail, her covering in Christ, treated her as if a strumpet, as though she was not married to Jesus, and had no right to the Radid, or Marriage vail. Oh, how little do the best-taught ministers of Christ know of their people's sorrows, and of Jesus's all-suitableness and all-sufficiency! But to take away the believer's Radid, her Marriage vail, her wedding garment, her nuptial band, in Christ, oh! what a wounding, what smiting, of a poor sin-sick soul must this be! And it is possible yea, more than possible, that Christ own ministers may but too often fall into this error, when, instead of making Christ what God the Father had made him, the Alpha and Omega of his church, they are directing their people to somewhat besides Jesus for comfort and consolation
Woman - The place of women in Marriage gained a higher interpretation. The Roman matron had indeed held a high place in the ancient Roman home, though she passed into the absolute legal power of her husband by the older type of religions Marriage. 236), but this was the outcome of the newer type of Marriage as a civil contract; its laxity of divorce and the break-up of the older family life show its peculiar perils. We can hardly exaggerate the gulf that separates this idea of Marriage from that in which the relationship is primarily physical. Marriage is to be held in honour among all (Hebrews 13:4; cf. , Ephesians 5:3), so characteristic of early Christian ethics, is based on the principle that the body is the temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19); the condemnation of extramarital sexual relationships is the natural complement of the attitude to Marriage itself (1 Thessalonians 4:4). The expectation of a speedy end largely explains his preference of celibacy to Marriage (1 Corinthians 7:7; cf
Honour (2) - And to be invited to the Marriage-supper of the King’s Son is a greater honour than any this world affords (Matthew 22)
Abstinence - In 1 Timothy 4:3-4, he foretells the rise of Gnostic heretics, the forerunners of the ascetics of the apostate Greek and Latin churches who should forbid Marriage, and command to abstain from meats which God created to be received with thanksgiving
Alliance - His Marriage with Pharaoh’s daughter probably had a political significance ( 1 Kings 3:1 ; 1 Kings 9:16 )
Fee - It is applied particularly to the reward of professional services as the fees of lawyers and physicians the fees of office clerk's fees sheriff's fees Marriage fees, &c
Hamor - According to p ( Genesis 34:1-2 a, Genesis 34:4 ; Genesis 34:6 ; Genesis 34:8-10 ; Genesis 34:13-18 ; Genesis 34:20-25 (partly) Genesis 34:27-29 ), Hamor negotiates with Jacob and his sons for the Marriage of Shechem and Dinah, with the object of amalgamating the two peoples; circumcision is imposed by the sons of Jacob upon the whole Hamorite tribe, and then they attack the city, slaying all the males and carrying off the whole of the spoil
Excuse - The third was detained by pleasure; his Marriage seemed a sufficient reason, and he simply said οὐ δύναμαι
Concupiscence - He called on faithfulness in Marriage rather than on the immoral practices of the Greek and Roman world of his day (Galatians 5:16 )
Possession (2) - But in John 2:6 where he gives an account of the miracle at the Marriage feast in Cana of Galilee, he tells of ‘six water-pots of stone’ (λίθιναι ὑδρίαι), which were clearly ‘pots’ of a very different kind—too large to use at table, or to be portable in the ordinary way
Eve - The oneness of flesh is the foundation of the inseparable Marriage union of one man with one woman (Malachi 2:15; Matthew 19:5). Thus, Marriage is the holy appointment of God, based on the relations by creation between man and woman
Virgin - Israelites considered it important that a woman be a virgin at the time of her Marriage, and their law set out penalties for the loss of virginity before Marriage (Exodus 22:16-17; Deuteronomy 22:13-19; see ADULTERY; FORNICATION). It refers to any young woman of Marriageable age
Adultery - The sanctity of Marriage in patriarchal times appears from Abraam's fear, not that his wife will be seduced from him, but that he may be killed for her sake. The conduct of Pharaoh and Abimelech (Genesis 12; 20), implies the same reverence for the sacredness of Marriage
Adoption - ...
The practices of polygamy (multiple wives—see Genesis 29:1 ; Deuteronomy 21:15-17 ) and concubinage (socially accepted cohabitation without Marriage—see Romans 8:17-18 ; Genesis 30:3 ) served as means of ensuring descendants in Old Testament times. Levirate Marriage (Deuteronomy 25:5-10 ; see Mark 12:19 ) provided offspring even for the deceased
Abstinence - ...
More narrowly interpreted, abstinence is a refraining from certain outward actions-as eating, drinking, worldly business, Marriage, etc. Marriage and celibacy. -We are not here concerned with the NT doctrine of Marriage (q. To begin with, Marriage is viewed by St. In view of the approaching world-end in which he believed, Marriage meant the multiplication of troubles that would make fidelity to Christ more difficult; and perhaps in this light also the propagation of the race was undesirable. It is the supremacy of single-hearted devotion to Christ that ho holds out as an ideal, and his view is that in some cases Marriage endangers this. Again, Marriage is not to him simply a preventive against uncleanness (see article Soberness). It is also the object of sanctification, and its relations have their own honour (1 Thessalonians 4:4; see Marriage, Virginity). …’ The institutions of society-‘marriage, the state, the rights of possession-are of Divine appointment, and must be upheld and honoured, however short the time before the order to which they belong shall pass away forever’ (Stevens, Theol, of NT, 1899, p
Image, Nebuchadnezzar's - The mixing of iron and clay is possibly a reference to failed attempts to unite these kingdoms by Marriage treaties (Daniel 2:43 )
Sacrament - ) The Romanists, however, add to this number confirmation, penance, extreme unction, ordination, and Marriage, holding in all seven sacraments
Gezer - A few years later, Egypt's pharaoh captured the city from the Canaanites and gave it to Solomon as a wedding gift for Solomon's Marriage with the pharaoh's daughter
Bed - ) (Used as the symbol of matrimony) Marriage
Flax - "Fine linen, clean and white," is the emblem of "the righteousness (distributively) of saints," the bride's attire for" the Marriage of the Lamb," Revelation 19:7-8 (each saint having for himself Christ's righteousness imputed for justification, and imparted by the Spirit for sanctification)
Apocrypha - ...
The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ...
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch
Assumption of Moses
Fourth Book of Esdras
Apocalypse of Baruch
Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis
Third Book of Esdras
Third Book of Machabees
History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon
Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ...
Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and Marriage of the Blessed Virgin
Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew
Arabic Gospel of the Infancy
History of Joseph the Carpenter
Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews
Gospel according to the Egyptians
Gospel of Peter
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Marcion
Gospel of Bartholomew
Gospel of Matthias
Gospel of Nicodemus
Gospel of the Twelve Apostles
Gospel of Andrew
Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Thaddeus
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor
Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea
Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter
Acts of John
Acts of Andrew
Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew
Acts of Thomas
Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul
Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul and Thecla
Acts of Philip
Acts of Matthew
Acts of Simon and Jude
Acts of Barnabas
Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini
Nostri Jesu
Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter
Pseudo-Epistles of Paul
Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans
Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter
Apocalypse of Paul
Harlot - Apart from breaches of the Marriage vows, immoral relations between the sexes were deemed venial ( Deuteronomy 22:28 ff
High Priest - Herod appointed no less than five high priests himself, and one of them, Simon, as the price of his daughter in Marriage
Evangelization of Peoples, Congregation For the - It has no competency, however, in matters of faith, Marriage causes, questions of sacred rites, and over religious as such
On - ...
The city On, according to Josephus, was given to the Israelites to dwell in, when they first went into Egypt; and it was a daughter of a priest of the temple of the sun at this place, who was given in Marriage to Joseph by Pharaoh
Corinthians - He replies to their queries respecting celibacy and Marriage, and the eating of food offered to idols; and meets several errors and sins prevalent in the church by timely instructions as to disputes among brethren, decorum in public assemblies, the Lord's supper, the resurrection of believers, true charity, and the right use of spiritual gifts, in which the Corinthian Christians excelled, but not without a mixture of ostentation and disorder
Sacred Congregation de Propaganda Fide - It has no competency, however, in matters of faith, Marriage causes, questions of sacred rites, and over religious as such
Sacred Congregation For the Propagation of the Fai - It has no competency, however, in matters of faith, Marriage causes, questions of sacred rites, and over religious as such
Head - ...
Another form of headship is found in the Marriage relationship
Majorianus, Julius Valerius - The sixth law, intended to encourage Marriage, forbade nuns to take the veil before the age of forty
Hosea - After Marriage she proved unfaithful, and Hosea heard that the woman whom he had been led by Jahweh to marry had had within her all along the tendency to unfaithfulness. She was not at the time of Marriage an actual harlot, but, had Hosea only fully understood, he would have known when he married her, as these years afterwards he has come to know, that when Jahweh said, ‘Go, marry Gomer,’ He was really saying ‘Go, marry a woman who will bestow her love on others. ’ His new, sad knowledge does not make him feel less but more that his Marriage had been ordered of God
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - Having reproved the Corinthians for these abuses, the Apostle answers the questions put in their letter to him, as to Marriage and other social questions; perhaps also as to Christian worship, the doctrine of the Resurrection, and the collection for the poor of Judæa. ]'>[2] 110) supposes the Apostle to mean that the Roman law forbade such Marriage. Questions of Moral Sin and of Marriage ( 1 Corinthians 6:12 to 1 Corinthians 7:40 ). True Marriage is the most perfect symbol of the relation between Christ and the Church ( 1 Corinthians 6:15 ff. 7 the Apostle answers the Corinthians’ questions about Marriage. The better heathen tried to enforce Marriage as a cure for immorality; while the Jews looked on it as an universal duty. Ramsay supposes, therefore, that the Corinthians wished to make Marriage compulsory, and that St. Against this it is urged that the Essenes (a Jewish sect) upheld non-marriage. The subject is concluded with advice as to widows’ re-marriage
Samson - He goes down alone, meets the lion alone, returns to his home after his visit to his bride ( Judges 13:8 ‘to take her’ being another gloss); then after an interval he goes back to celebrate the Marriage he has arranged; Judges 13:10 a is particularly absurd as it stands. There is no state of war between the two peoples, but free intercourse and even intermarriage. Sociatly the story gives us a picture of primitive Marriage customs. 14 is the clearest OT example of a sadika Marriage (see Marriage, § 1). The story emphasizes the evils of foreign Marriages ( Judges 14:3 ), of laxity in sexual relations, and of toying with temptation
Leo Xiii, Pope - Among Leo's great encyclicals are those dealing with socialism, capital and labor, Christian Marriage, Freemasonry, the Christian basis of political life, and the true idea of liberty
Dancing - Marriage processions involved dancing with timbrels and other musical instruments (1619114480_2 )
Father's House - During patriarchal times a Marriage was expected to be within the house of one's father (Genesis 11:29 ; Genesis 20:12 ; Genesis 24:4 ,Genesis 24:4,24:15 ,Genesis 24:15,24:38 ,Genesis 24:38,24:40 ; Genesis 29:10 ; Exodus 6:20 ; Numbers 36:8-10 ). Some of these Marriages within the clan were later prohibited (Leviticus 18:9 ,Leviticus 18:9,18:12 ; Leviticus 20:17 ,Leviticus 20:17,20:19 )
Rebekah - ) A model Marriage: God's direction was asked and given, the godly seed was equally yoked with the seed of the godly, the parents sanctioned it, Rebekah was one who had as a maiden discharged domestic duties diligently; her beauty, courtesy, willing consent, modesty, all made her deservedly attractive, and secured Isaac's love at once and permanently
Blood - In law, a kinsman of the whole blood is one who descends from the same couple of ancestors of the half blood, one who descends from either of them singly, by a second Marriage
Flesh - To be one flesh is to be closely united, as in Marriage
Aerius, Founder of the Heretical Sect of the Aerians - Philaster, whose unconfirmed authority is very small, confounds the Aerians with the Encratites, and asserts that they practised abstinence from food and rejected Marriage (Philast
Virgin - The word ‛almâh represents those who are eligible for Marriage but are neither wives (queens) nor concubines
Armenian Church - ...
"They have among them a number of monasteries and convents, in which is maintained a severe discipline; Marriage is discountenanced, though not absolutely prohibited; a married priest cannot obtain promotion, and the higher clergy are not allowed to marry
Woman - Christianity forbids a man to have more than one wife, or to divorce her for any cause but one, Matthew 5:32 19:3-9 ; declares that bond and free, male and female, are all one in Christ, Galatians 3:28 ; and that in heaven they are no more given in Marriage, but are as the angels of God, Matthew 22:33
Covenant - The Marriage compact is called "the covenant of God" (Proverbs 2:17 ), because the Marriage was made in God's name
Mary - If “kinswoman” in Luke 1:36 is a reference for family line and not a relationship established by Marriage, then Mary's family heritage may have been priestly. In John 2:1-11 , Mary's presence at Jesus' first public miracle of changing water to wine at the Marriage at Cana underscores, in a profound manner, that Jesus' destiny challenges all norms, including that of immediate family relationships
Miriam - ...
But for her brother's Marriage, Miriam would have been the sovereign woman in all Israel for all her days. But Moses' Marriage was more than Miriam could bear. And, but for Moses' Marriage Miriam would have shone beside Moses till her eye also was not dim, nor her natural strength abated. But Moses' Marriage made Miriam as weak and as evil and as wicked as any weak and evil and wicked woman in all the camp. What a life of torment did Miriam live in those days because of Moses' Marriage! Her heart was full of hell-fire at Moses' innocent wife and innocent children, and even at her meek and innocent brother himself. I would know then whether Miriam had any good reason and justification for resisting her brother's Marriage
Hosea - On the subject of his Marriage with Gomer,...
(See Gomer)...
some have thought, that this was a parable, and only intended by the Lord in a figurative way, to shew the Lord's grace to his adulterous Israel and Judah
Sarah - At the time of her Marriage to Abraham in Mesopotamia, Sarah’s name was Sarai and Abraham’s was Abram
Sheba, Queen of - Solomon marries the queen, and the Abyssinians, to whom the story passed from the Arabs, call her Makeda, and trace from this Marriage the lineage of all their kings
Soldiers - In the parable of the Marriage of the King’s Son (Matthew 22:1 ff
Stranger - Though tolerated they must not violate the fundamental laws by blaspheming Jehovah, breaking the sabbath by work, eating leavened bread at the Passover, infringing the Marriage laws, worshipping Moloch, or eating blood (Leviticus 24:16; Leviticus 18:26; Leviticus 20:2; Leviticus 17:10; Leviticus 17:15; Exodus 20:10; Exodus 12:19)
Bed - Marriage matrimonial connection
Mammaea or Mamaea, Julia - By her Marriage with the Syrian Gessius Marcianus she became the mother of Alexander Severus, and soon afterwards was a widow
Hierocles of Alexandria, a Philosopher - ...
We conclude by quoting a passage on Marriage; shewing the singularly modern and Christian type of his mind. "Marriage is expedient, first, because it produces a truly divine fruit, namely children, our helpers alike when we are young and strong, and when we are old and worn
Ancestor-Worship - ...
( e ) It is argued that the object of the levirate Marriage ( Deuteronomy 25:5 ff. But the motive stated in Deuteronomy 25:6 , ‘that his name be not put out in Israel,’ is so sufficient that the connexion of the levirate Marriage with Ancestor-worship seems forced
Mary, the Virgin - Some time after their betrothal, which came generally among the Jews a year before the Marriage, the angel Gabriel was sent from God to Nazareth to tell her of One who was to be born of her, and who should ‘be called holy, the Son of God’ (Luke 1:35). , which records Joseph’s intention to put Mary away privily when her condition became known to him, and speaks of his subsequent Marriage with her in obedience to the angelic messages. The Marriage would afford ‘not only outward but moral protection’ both to the mother and to the unborn Babe. That the Virgin is still spoken of as ἐμνηστευμένη in Luke 2:5 is not to be taken as necessarily indicating that the Marriage had not yet taken place. She was present at the Marriage feast at Cana (John 2:1), after which she went down to Capernaum (John 2:12) with Jesus and His brethren and His disciples
Popery - And though the council of Trent was repeatedly petitioned by several princes and states to abolish this restraint, the obligation of celibacy was rather established than relaxed by this council; for they decreed, that Marriage contracted after a vow of continence, is neither lawful nor valid; and thus deprived the church of the possibility of ever restoring Marriage to the clergy. ...
For if Marriage, after a vow, be in itself unlawful, the greatest authority upon earth cannot dispense with it, nor permit Marriage to the clergy who have already vowed continence
Nero - Gnaeus died in the year 40 when his son was barely three years old, and Agrippina, possessed by limitless ambition, schemed soon after for a second Marriage, with no less a person than the reigning Claudius himself (Emperor a. 49, such Marriages having been legalized by the Senate (Tac. 53 the Marriage with Octavia took place. Among his private relationships during his reign may be mentioned his passion for his Greek mistress Acte, his Marriage in a. His Marriage with the male Pythagoras took place in a. With him the Caesarian race, weakened by intermarriage, debauchery, and madness, came to an end
Hadad - Pharaoh gave him house, victuals, and land, and his wife Tahpenes the queen's sister in Marriage, who bore him Genubath
Heaven - The sensuous descriptions of heaven to be found in the Jewish apocalypses and in Mohammedanism are altogether excluded by the sayings of Jesus relative to Marriage in the new age ( Mark 12:25 ||), and those of St
Vessel - Lightfoot considers it a more serious objection that by using such an expression as σκεῦος κτᾶσθαι the Apostle would seem to be lowering himself to the sensual view of the Marriage relation, and adopting the depreciatory estimate of the woman’s position which prevailed among both Jews and heathen at the time, whereas it is his constant effort to exalt both the one and the other
Avenger - ...
The human avenger is tied closely to the institutions of cities of refuge, land ownership, and levirate Marriage
Bear - Hosea uses the image of Marriage and childbearing to describe God’s relationship to Israel (1:3, 6, 8)
Foot - This office was usually performed by servants and slaves; and hence Abigail answers David, who sought her in Marriage, that she should think it an honor to wash the feet of the king's servants, 1 Samuel 25:41
Child - One of God’s purposes for human Marriage is that a husband and wife produce children and build a secure and contented family
Eve - Indeed, the Marriage relationship involving these first two humans (vv. , the man's prior creation, the woman's derivation from the man, his designation of her as woman, and the focus on a man's initiative in the establishment of a Marriage relationship [2])
Gerizim - For this Marriage he was threatened with expulsion unless he divorced his wife. According to Nehemiah 13:28, a grandson of Eliashib the high priest was son-in-law to Sanballat, and was expelled for this ‘mixed Marriage
Governor - ...
...
Governor of the feast (John 2:9 ), who appears here to have been merely an intimate friend of the bridegroom, and to have presided at the Marriage banquet in his stead
Adam - Marriage is thus a divine institution, first in order of time, as well as of importance and blessedness to mankind
Homosexuality - Moreover, all sexual behavior is to take place in the context of Marriage
Firstborn - As head of the house after his father's death, the eldest son customarily cared for his mother until her death, and he also provided for his sisters until their Marriage
Prostitution - The covenant was imaged as a Marriage between the Lord and the people; their continual interest in other gods, especially Baal, was seen as a form of harlotry
Jehonadab - ) Rechab, father of Jehonadab, belonged to the Kenites connected with Israel through Moses' Marriage; these (Heber and Jael) with Israel entered Canaan, and shared their inheritance, though remaining nomads in tents, some in the far N
Directory - It also orders, that the sabbath be kept with the greatest strictness, both publicly and privately; that Marriage be solemnized by a lawful minister of the word, who is to give counsel to, and pray for the parties; that the sick be visited by the minister under whose charge they are; the dead to be buried without any prayers or religious ceremonies; that days of fasting are to be observed when the judgments of God are abroad, or when some important blessings are desired; that days of thanksgiving for mercies received be also observed; and, lastly, that singing of Psalms together in the congregation is the duty of Christians
Samson - "...
His Marriage with a woman of Timnath was so far "of the Lord" that it became in the ways of God an occasion against the Philistines to whom he had allied himself
Bill - In the eyes of Jesus, no document, however formal, could prevent divorce from being a violation of God’s purpose in instituting Marriage
Reproach - 30:23) carried a sense of disgrace in a society where Marriage and fertility were highly spoken of
Mary, the Mother of Jesus - She was with Him and His disciples at the Marriage feast at Cana, when He uttered another mysterious sentence: "Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine hour is not yet come
Caleb - Assisted by a portion of his tribe, he marched against Hebron, and slew the children of Anak: thence he proceeded to Debir, and finding the place almost impregnable, he offered his daughter Achsah in Marriage to the hero that should take it
Servant - In the case of a female Hebrew slave, there was not the release at the end of six years: but if Marriage with the owner or his son did not take place, she was not to be sold to a foreigner, but "he shall cause her to be redeemed," i
Circumcision - ...
Origin Several theories seek to explain and describe the nature and origin of circumcision: (1) initiatory rite—before Marriage (as the Shechemites in Genesis 34:14-24 ) or at puberty; (2) physical hygiene—to prevent the attraction or transmission of diseases; (3) tribal mark of distinction; (4) rite of entry into the community of faith
Marcella, Friend of Jerome - She married, but her husband died after seven months, and she refused a second Marriage offered her by the wealthy Cerealis, a man of consular rank but advanced in years
Pammachius, a Roman Senator - After his Marriage, he seems to have occupied himself much with scriptural studies and church life
Sigebert i - 23), his motives in seeking Brunichild's hand in Marriage, as described by Gregory (iv
Roman Law - These included the right to vote for magistrates, the right to be elected as a magistrate, the right to contract a legal Marriage, the right to hold property in the Roman community, and the right to appeal to the people, and in later times to the emperor, against the sentences passed by magistrates or other officials of rank. Upon their Marriage, daughters passed into the power of another family's patria potestas . See Trial of Jesus ; Citizen, Citizenship ; Marriage and Family; and Pilate, Pontius
Crimes And Punishments - However, slaves and sojourners (foreigners) did not have an equal standing with free Israelites—though their treatment in Israel was often better than in surrounding nations; and women did not have equal standing with the men in Israelite culture—especially in regard to Marriage and divorce laws and laws pertaining to sexual offenses. The offenses subject to capital punishment were: intentional homicide (Exodus 21:12 ; Leviticus 24:17 ; Numbers 35:16-21 ,1619114480_6:29-34 ), giving false testimony in capital cases (Deuteronomy 19:16-21 ), idolatry (Exodus 20:3-5 ; Leviticus 20:1-5 ; Numbers 25:1-9 ; Deuteronomy 13:2-19 ; Deuteronomy 17:2-7 ; 1 Kings 15:11-13 ; 2 Kings 10:18-28 ), kidnapping an Israelite (Exodus 21:16 ; Deuteronomy 24:7 ), incest, homosexuality, and beastiality (Exodus 22:19 ; Leviticus 20:11-17 ), rape (if the victim did not cry for help, she, too, should be executed; Deuteronomy 22:23-27 ), adultery (Leviticus 20:10-12 ; Deuteronomy 22:22 ), other sexual relations outside Marriage (Leviticus 21:9 ; Deuteronomy 22:20-21 ,Deuteronomy 22:20-21,22:23-24 ), false prophecy (Deuteronomy 13:1-5 ; Deuteronomy 18:20-22 ; 1 Kings 22:19-28 ; Jeremiah 26:9 ,Jeremiah 26:9,26:15-16 ; Jeremiah 28:5-9 ), magic, divination, and witchcraft (Exodus 22:18 ; Leviticus 19:26 ,Leviticus 19:26,19:31 ; Leviticus 17:3-4,175 ,Leviticus 20:6,20:27 ; Leviticus 24:14-16,24 ; 1Samuel 28:3,1 Samuel 28:9 ), violation of the Sabbath (Exodus 20:8-11 ; Exodus 23:12 Exodus 31:14-17 ; Exodus 34:21 ; Exodus 35:1 ;Exodus 35:1;2:1 ; Leviticus 23:3 ; Numbers 15:32-36 ; Nehemiah 13:15-22 ), blasphemy (Leviticus 24:14-16 ,Deuteronomy 18:10:23 ; 1 Kings 21:13 ), cursing or striking one's parents (Exodus 21:15 ,Exodus 21:15,21:17 ), disobeying the ruling of the court of appeals (Deuteronomy 17:8-13 ), and certain crimes against the king (1 Samuel 20:31 ; 1 Samuel 22:7-19 ; 2 Samuel 12:5 ; 2 Samuel 13:30 ; 2 Samuel 15:12 ; 2Samuel 16:5-9,2 Samuel 16:21 ; 1Kings 1:21,1 Kings 1:51 ; 1 Kings 2:22-25 ; 1 Kings 12:18-19 ; 1 Kings 21:10 )
Mary - She was connected by Marriage with Elisabeth, who was of the lineage of Aaron (Luke 1:36 ). She was present at the Marriage in Cana
Leviticus - ...
Second;...
(1) Israel's life as holy and separate from heathendom, in food, Marriage, and toward fellow men, Leviticus 17-20; the mutual connection of Leviticus 18; Leviticus 19; Leviticus 20, is marked by recurring phrases, "I are the Lord," "ye shall be holy, for I . In Leviticus 18:18 the prohibition against Marriage with a wife's sister is during the wife's lifetime
Hosea - On his Marriage to Gomer, Henderson thinks that there is no hint of its being in vision, and that she fell into lewdness after her union with Hosea, thus fitly symbolizing Israel who lapsed into spiritual whoredom after the Marriage contract with God on Sinai
Church - " (John 14:19) And his servant, the apostle Paul, describes the intimate connection of Christ with his church, under the similitude of the Marriage state. It is but as an espousal, a betrothing before; but in that day the church is brought home by her all-lovely and all-loving Husband, to the Marriage supper of the lamb in heaven
Genealogy - So generally, though no uniform interpretation of the genealogies is possible, a Marriage will often point to the incorporation of new elements into the tribe, a birth to a fresh subdivision or migration, or an unfruitful Marriage to the disappearance of a clan. Smith ( Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia , p
Jehovah Our Righteousness - " (Isaiah 45:24) I would only add, as a farther confirmation of the interest the church hath in Christ and the oneness there is between them, the church also is called the Lord our righteousness, because her glorious Husband is so; thus proving her Marriage by taking the name of her husband
Song of Songs - Always, however, the love is in the context of a relationship where a man and a woman commit themselves to each other in Marriage, to the exclusion of all others (Song of Song of Solomon 2:16; Song of Solomon 6:3; Song of Solomon 7:10)
Hardness of the Heart - Discussing the permanence of Marriage and the concession that Moses made to the children of Israel, Jesus said, “For the hardness of your heart he wrote you this precept
Blameless - The Scriptures further define the sphere of the Christian's blameless behavior as including godly service (James 1:27 ) and the Marriage bed (Hebrews 13:4 )
Malachi - They have demonstrated their wrong attitude to God in many ways: their offering of disgraceful sacrifices (1:6-14); the worthless behaviour of the priests (2:1-9); the sexual immorality that has produced divorce from Israelite partners and Marriage to idol-worshippers (2:10-16); their irreverent complaining against God; and their cheating him of the offerings due to him (2:17-3:18)
Dinah - Shechem offered the usual reparation, Marriage, and a payment to her father. But the offense was by an alien Hamor therefore proposed to establish intermarriage and commerce between the two peoples
Aphraat (Aphrahat, Farhad - Nevertheless, all are warned that open abandonment of the resolution and avowed Marriage is better than secret incontinence
Gennadius (11) Massiliensis, Presbyter of Marseilles - Though celibacy is rated above matrimony, to condemn Marriage is Manichean (67)
Solomon - His Marriage with the daughter of Pharaoh, king of Egypt, is symbolical of Christ having the church (mainly Gentiles) with Him when He comes to reign
Care, Careful - Marriage was regarded as legitimate and honourable in the early Church, but St
Cross - Interchanged as a cross Marriage, when a brother and sister intermarry with two persons who have the same relation to each other
Witness - In the case of a newly married woman charged by her own husband, his testimony is sufficient to prove her guilty of adultery unless her parents have clear evidence proving her virginity before her Marriage ( Make (Cut) a Covenant - ” This word implies the cutting off of a Marriage by means of a “bill of divorcement”: “When a man hath taken a wife, and married her, and it come to pass that she find no favor in his eyes, because he hath found some uncleanness in her: then let him write her a bill of divorcement, and give it in her hand, and send her out of his house” ( Caius, Ecclesiastical Writer - 25) purporting to be written by a great apostle and ascribed by Caius to Cerinthus, in which the author professes to have been shewn by angels that after the resurrection Christ's kingdom should be earthly, that men should inhabit Jerusalem, should be the slaves of lusts and pleasures, and should spend a thousand years in Marriage festivities
Evagrius - He seems to have won general esteem and goodwill, for on his second Marriage the city was filled with rejoicing, and great honours were paid him by the citizens
Abuse, Abusers - Marriage), circumstances (e
Divorce - Finding himself, however, unable, to overrule feelings and practices of very ancient standing, he merely annexed to the original institution of Marriage a very serious admonition to this effect, viz
Love - Courtship chiefly in the phrase, to make love, that is, to court to woo to solicit union in Marriage
Fellowship - Neither are they to share in Marriage with non-believers (2 Corinthians 6:14-15) or in religious feasts where food has been offered to idols (1 Corinthians 10:20-21)
Woman - Marriage and divorce are areas in which woman's rights were subordinate to those of man. Marriage and divorce were issues of great importance to women, since their lives were lived mainly in the roles of wife and mother. Their emotional, social, and financial security was dependent on their Marriages. Responsive to the plight of women, He offset the male bias toward divorce and strengthened Marriage as a permanent union. See Divorce ; Family ; Marriage ; Sex, Teaching on
Law - Disobedience does not automatically invalidate a covenant, any more than a husband's rudeness to a wife he vowed to cherish invalidates his Marriage covenant. Ezra applied a law prohibiting Marriage to Canaanites, who had ceased to exist historically, broadly to Marriage with non-Canaanite foreigners, because in that situation the same principle (marriage to foreigners leads to religious assimilation) applied, even though the letter of the law could not ( Ezra 9:1-2 ; cf
the Ten Virgins - ' And thus it was that when our Lord and His disciples were called to that Marriage where the original of this parable took place, as soon as He saw the five wise virgins admitted to the Marriage, and the five foolish virgins shut out, He turned to the twelve and said,-The kingdom of heaven is just like that. What is it that makes your heart to be so dark, and so sad, and so unready, sometimes? Why is there so little life and light and joy in your heart? Why is your religious experience so flat and so stale, when it should be as full of gladness as if your whole life were one continual making ready for your Marriage? What is really the matter with you and with your heart? In plain English, and in few words, it is the absence from your heart of the Spirit of God. If we had God's Holy Spirit shed abroad in our heart we would make every house in which we live, and every company into which we enter, like a continual Marriage supper
Hammurabi - ...
(4) Marriage (127-161). These cases involve the rights of both parties, dowry settlements, bridal gifts, Marriage offenses, and divorce. A husband captured abroad had his Marriage protected
Laws, Penal - From 1691 to 1749, the following enactments were passed and enforced: ...
Catholics were forbidden to have schools at home or to attend Catholic schools abroad
excluded from civiland military employment and from professions
forbidden to keep a horse worth above five pounds
a Catholic landlord had to leave his estate to his children in equal shares
if the wife or oldest son became Protestant, she at once obtained separate maintenance and he received the whole estate
a Protestant's estate was given to the nearest Protestant heir
a child becoming Protestant was maintained by Chancery
Catholics were forbidden to intermarry with Protestants (1689)
no Papist could act as guardian (1689)
secular priests must be registered (1703)
no priests were admitted from abroad
priests must take an oath of abjuration (1709)
it was high treason for a priest to perform a mixed Marriage, which was declared null and void (1725)
Catholics were forbidden to vote for Parliament (1727)
There was a slight relaxation of these measures in 1771, a date which marks the beginning of relief for Catholics. In 1792Catholics were admitted to the Bar, and were permitted to erect schools without permission; inter-marriage between Catholics and Protestants was legalized
Slave - In respect to Marriage there were some peculiarities which, to our ideas, would be regarded as hardships. (Exodus 21:7-9 ) It diminishes the apparent harshness of this proceeding if we look on the purchase money as in the light of a dowry given, as was not unusual, to the parents of the bride; still more, if we accept the rabbinical view that the consent of the maid was required before the Marriage could take place
Capital Punishment - Sex relations outside of Marriage: (a) before Marriage, but discovered afterward (Deuteronomy 22:20-21 ), the woman alone to be executed; (b) relations with another's betrothed (Deuteronomy 22:23-24 ), both to be executed; (c) the harlotry of a priest's daughter (Leviticus 21:9 ); 9
Dionysius (3), Bishop of Corinth - We may see traces of the same heresy in the subjects treated of in the letter to the churches of Pontus (the home of Marcion), to which Dionysius gave instructions concerning Marriage and chastity (marriage having been proscribed by Marcion), and which he also exhorted to receive back those who returned after any fall, whether into irregularity of living or into heretical error
Leovigild, Arian King of the Visigoths - By a previous Marriage he had two sons, Hermenigild and Reccared. —In 572 (or 573) the king had made both the sons of his first Marriage "consortes regni" (J
Cry - To cry off, in the vulgar dialect, is to publish intentions of Marriage
Household - See Marriage ; Servant; Slave; Steward; Temple
French Prophets - Their message was (and they were to proclaim it as heralds to the Jews, and every nation under heaven, beginning at England, ) that the grand jubilee, the acceptable year of the Lord, the accomplishment of those numerous Scriptures concerning the new heaven and the new earth, the kingdom of the Messiah, the Marriage of the Lamb, the first resurrection, or the new Jerusalem descending from above, were now even at the door; that this great operation was to be wrought on the part of man by spiritual arms only, proceeding from the mouths of those who should by inspiration, or the mighty gift of the Spirit, be sent forth in great numbers to labour in the vineyard; that this mission of his servants should be witnessed to by signs and wonders from heaven, by a deluge of judgments on the wicked universally throughout the world, as famine, pestilence, earthquakes, &c
Wedding Garment - The attitude of the king throughout the story is represented as so generous that it is inconceivable that he should fling one of his guests into a dungeon because he was unable to find for himself a suitable Marriage garment
Dancing - In family life this was principally the event of Marriage (Matthew 11:17, Luke 7:32); and a similar expression of feeling often attended the birth of a son, recovery from sickness, return from a journey, or the reception of a guest whose presence called for such a manifestation of grateful rejoicing
Companion - ...
Similar to the above is the sense of “marriage partner”: “His mouth is most sweet: yea, he is altogether lovely
Noah - ...
Noah is called a "preacher of righteousness," 2 Peter 2:5 , but another scripture shows that his preparing the ark and his preaching had no effect: "they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in Marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark, and knew not until the flood came, and took them all away
Mennonites - In some parts of North Holland, young people are baptized on the day of their Marriage
Noah - ...
Noah is called a "preacher of righteousness," 2 Peter 2:5 , but another scripture shows that his preparing the ark and his preaching had no effect: "they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in Marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark, and knew not until the flood came, and took them all away
Crimes And Punishments - the usual purchase price (see Marriage), estimated in D [2] Deuteronomy 18:6-18 under seventeen heads (see Marriage)
Invitation - There are clouds on the horizon, and the echo of distant thunders; but the foreground is full of happy figures intent on celebrating the Marriage of the soul to its Divine Lover and Friend, and on enjoying the new-found fellowship of God as the Giver of life and salvation. In the parable of the Marriage of the King’s Son, the first guests invited treat the offer with scorn (Matthew 22:3), and ‘make light’ of it, preferring to find their satisfaction in their own way, and even maltreating the king’s messengers. Returning to the parable of the Marriage, we find a final episode in which the man without a ‘wedding-garment’ is dealt with
Adam - The truer and deeper view of Marriage which Christians should adopt must be based on a nobler morality,—on a morality which takes its stand on the primeval nature of man and woman as God made them. Thus Jesus bases the absolute indissolubility of the Marriage tie on the union of man and woman from the first. Marriage
Adam - The truer and deeper view of Marriage which Christians should adopt must be based on a nobler morality,—on a morality which takes its stand on the primeval nature of man and woman as God made them. Thus Jesus bases the absolute indissolubility of the Marriage tie on the union of man and woman from the first. Marriage
Greece, Religion And Society of - ...
Greek society had customs, mores, and laws that controlled Marriage and family life. Instead, Marriages were arranged by parents of the bride and groom. Such a Marriage was not without love and affection. ” While children were a concern of Marriage, abortion was permitted. The father's closest relative was responsible for arranging her Marriage and providing her with a dowry
Incarnation - ...
The Council of Ephesus considered the Marriage christology of Nestorius, Bishop of Constantinople. He held that the union of the human and divine in Jesus was like the Marriage of a husband and wife
Solomon - , the first after their legal Marriage (2 Samuel 12 ). The first half of his reign was, however, by far the brighter and more prosperous; the latter half was clouded by the idolatries into which he fell, mainly from his heathen intermarriages (1 Kings 11:1-8 ; 14:21,31 ). As soon as he had settled himself in his kingdom, and arranged the affairs of his extensive empire, he entered into an alliance with Egypt by the Marriage of the daughter of Pharaoh (1 Kings 3:1 ), of whom, however, nothing further is recorded
Punishment - In the case of a man raping a single woman, he could be forced to marry her (relinquishing the right to divorce) and pay her father the Marriage present, but no punishment was required (1619114480_16 ). In the case of seduction, the result was the same except that no mention is made of divorce and the father could still be paid the Marriage present though he disallowed the wedding (Exodus 22:16-17 )
Communion - In the former, particular food is supposed to bring the partaker into communion with the god physically (or rather hyper-physically), to transfer the essence and virtues of the god into the man and so to make him god (deify him); in the latter, it is the community of the meal which unites all partakers to one another and to the hero in the same sense as Marriage or friendship unites distinct personalities. Robertson Smith, Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia, new ed
Fertility Cult - The fertility of the land was ensured not by ritual reenactment of the sacred Marriage but by obedience to the demands of the covenant (Deuteronomy 28:1 ,Deuteronomy 28:1,28:3-4 ,Deuteronomy 28:3-4,28:11-12 )
Church of England - " But, falling out with the pope about his Marriage, he took the government of ecclesiastical affairs into his own hand; and, having reformed many abuses, entitled himself supreme head of the church
Southcotters - She then favours her readers with a long ESSAY on the Marriage of the Lamb, and as variety is always pleasing, it commences in sober prose, but ends in jingling rhyme
Sam'Son - He availed himself of this circumstance, and of the custom of proposing riddles at Marriage feasts, to lay a snare for the Philistines
Samar'Itans - 409, a certain Manasseh, a man of priestly lineage, on being expelled from Jerusalem by nehemiah for an unlawful Marriage, obtained permission from the Persian king of his day, Darius Nothus, to build a temple on Mount Gerizim for the Samaritans, with whom he had found refuge
Ruth - Before the assembled witnesses, Boaz fulfilled the custom of levirate Marriage and received the blessing of witnesses (Ruth 4:7-12 )
Flesh - (3) Relationship by birth or Marriage ( Genesis 2:24 ; Genesis 37:27 , Nehemiah 5:5 ), for which also the further phrase ‘flesh and bones’ is found ( Genesis 2:23 , 2 Samuel 19:12 ) a phrase which is also used to describe the reality of the humanity of Jesus after His resurrection ( Luke 24:39 )
Call, Calling - The meaning “invite/summon” is encountered principally in the parables of the great banquet (Luke 14:16-25 ) and the Marriage feast (Matthew 22:2-10 )
Felix - Suetonius knows of yet another Marriage-also to a princess (Claud
Gallery - (John 14:21-22) And until that he brings them home to the Marriage-supper of the Lamb in heaven, while upon earth, having espoused them to himself, he brings them by faith into his chambers, opens to them more and more of his unsearchable riches, gives a foretaste of the glory hereafter to be revealed, and by the gracious influences of his Holy Spirit, induceth all those blessed effects in the soul which the apostle Peter so delightfully describes: "Whom having not seen, ye love; in whom, though now you see him not, yet believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable, and full of glory; receiving the end of your faith, even the salvation of your souls
am ha'Arez - A Pharisee would not accept the evidence of an ‘am hâ’ârez as a witness, nor give him his daughter in Marriage
Parable - ...
Marriage-feast, Matthew 22:2-14
Peter - After his Marriage he resided at Capernaum, Matthew 8:14 Luke 4:38 , though called at a later period to labor else where as an apostle, and it would seem often accompanied in his journeys by his wife, 1 Corinthians 9:5
Flesh - A man and a woman united in Marriage become one flesh, and people related to each other share the same flesh (Genesis 2:24; Genesis 29:14; Romans 1:3; Romans 4:1; Romans 9:3; see also BODY)
Herod - His Marriage with Mariamme, the heiress of the Hasmonæan house, and his league with Rome, indicate the story of his life. His Marriage was one both of love and of policy. The corroding immorality of his race shows itself in his Marriage with Herodias , his brother’s wife, and the wanton offence thereby given to Jewish sensibilities
Widows - Paul speaks so strongly about the remarriage of young widows is no proof-on our view of the meaning of ‘a woman of one man’-that younger widows if they remarried and again became widows would be excluded from the roll, for they would still be faithful to one husband. , is separated by a wide chasm from the opinion which became prevalent later when the remarriage of widows was regarded with horror. This view was based on the depreciation of Marriage itself as early as the Pastor of Hermas (Mand. 4), but remarriage is not yet regarded as sinful. But it is so regarded by Athenagoras, who says that ‘a second Marriage is a pleasing adultery’ (εὐπρεπὴς μοιχεία‚ Leg. the Apostle shows a much more sympathetic appreciation of family life and of the Marriage relationship
Joseph And Mary - They tell us that she was the espoused wife of Joseph a carpenter of Nazareth, and that the Divine Call came to her after her espousal to Joseph and before her Marriage. Conclude the Marriage he could not, but neither could he consent to make Mary a public example, and there was only left to him the sad step of revoking the contract and putting her away privately. " Gabriel was sent to reassure Joseph's despairing heart, to demand the consummation of the broken-off Marriage, and to announce the Incarnation of the Son of God
Patricius, or Saint Patrick - Gaul there existed no prohibition of clerical Marriage in the last quarter of the 4th cent. 20, 405, shews, first, that the prohibition of Marriage was only a late innovation, as be refers to the decree of pope Siricius, not quite 20 years before (Mansi, iii. ); secondly, that Innocent permitted the clergy of Toulouse to live with their wives if they had contracted Marriage in ignorance of papal legislation
Genealogy - ...
At the same time we must remember many became incorporated in a tribe or family by Marriage, service, or friendship, besides those belonging to it by birth. ...
Early Marriage will in the case of some, as princes, make 30 years too long for a generation
Timothy - He was the child of a mixed Marriage, his father (probably dead at the time of his selection by Paul) being a Greek and his mother a Jewess ( Acts 16:1 )
Hagar - The Marriage law was then less definitely recognized than at the beginning, and than subsequently
Bible - It is to remove the land-mark of the Scriptures, and to be guilty of that breach in divorcing the Marriage of the testaments, and what God hath joined together for man to put asunder
Remove, Depart - This same nuance is applied to Marriage, or taking a wife (Ruth 1:4)
Trespass - The word further signifies man’s unfaithfulness to his fellow man; particularly it is illustrative of unfaithfulness in Marriage: “If any man’s wife go aside, and commit a trespass against him, And a man lie with her carnally …” ( Child - They spent their time in learning those domestic and other arts, which are befitting a woman's situation and character, till they arrived at that period in life when they were to be sold, or, by a better fortune, given away in Marriage, Proverbs 31:13 ; 2 Samuel 13:7
Manichaeans - Considering all sensual enjoyments to be in some degree criminal, they were enemies to Marriage; though, at the same time, knowing that all men cannot receive this saying, they allowed it to the second class of their disciples, called auditors; but by no means to the perfect or confirmed believers
Wine - Our Saviour turned water into wine at a Marriage feast, and directed it to be used in celebrating the Lord's supper. Wine was produced on occasions of ordinary hospitality, Genesis 14:18, and at festivals, such as Marriages
Education - He brought about respect for womanhood, for the sanctity of Marriage, and for the ties of home life
Joseph (2) - By their betrothal they entered into a relationship which, though not the completion of Marriage, could be dissolved only by death or divorce. Before the Marriage ceremony Mary was ‘found with child of the Holy Ghost,’ but the angelic annunciation to her was not made known to Joseph
Unbelief - The higher and nobler conceptions of Marriage that arose through Christian teaching suggested to many the question whether relations contracted under pre-Christian conditions should be continued, especially where one spouse refused to accept the Christian faith and became an unbeliever. On the other hand, Marriage of a believer after conversion with an unbeliever was deemed an un-Christian act (2 Corinthians 6:14)
Caecilia, Saint, Roman Lady - She went through the Marriage ceremonies; but when alone with her young husband, told him of her vow, and Valerian allowed her to keep it. She is described as steeling her heart at her Marriage festivities against all the allurements to sensual pleasure, and among these, special mention is made of the "symphonia instrumentorum" to which she refused to hearken; but "organis cantantibus die nuptiarum" she made melody in her heart to God, saying, "May my heart and body be undefiled
Law of God - A typical illustration of the propriety of such a distinction is found in that passage in which Jesus, dealing with the question of Marriage and divorce, treats the Mosaic law on the subject as an instance of accommodation to an imperfect state of society (Matthew 19:3-8 || Mark 10:2-9). Christ’s reply to the question of His adversaries on this point was simply to remind them of the original Divine ordinance, according to which the Marriage bond was made indissoluble. The Law of Moses permitted divorce, but the Law of God maintained the sanctity of the Marriage bond, and this represented the point of view from which the whole question ought to be regarded
Nabal - On the occasion of the sheep-shearing ten days before his Marriage, and then on the occasion of the sheep-shearing ten days before his death. Had David been in the wilderness of Paran at that sunny sheep-shearing immediately before Nabal's Marriage, and had he asked for the crumbs that fell from the bridegroom's table, David would have been set in the place of honour at the smiling sheep-master's right hand. Obstinate also gave a great sheep-shearing feast before his Marriage
Symbol - Marriage, as an Oriental relationship of purchased possession, was an emblem of Palestine in covenant with God, and of the Church as the bride of Christ
Essenes (2) - The indications of incipient dualism which may be found in their abstinence from Marriage and in other ascetic practices, find a parallel in their doctrine of immortality, wherein they agreed with the Pharisees against the Sadducees as to the immortality of the soul, but differed from the Pharisees in denying the resurrection of the body
Hosea, Book of - ( Hosea 1:4 , see Hosea), was not written until some years later, for it also records the birth of Lo-ammi ( Hosea 1:9 ), which was separated by hardly less and possibly more than 5 years from the date of Hosea’s Marriage
Rachel - Jacob's first interview, courteous removal of the stone at the well's mouth, emotion, and kissing her in the usual mode of salutation in pastoral life in the East in those days, are simply and graphically narrated; his love to her making his seven years' service "seem but a few days"; the imposition of Leah upon him, his second term of service for her, and his receiving her in Marriage
Heaven - ...
Negatives of present provisional conditions and evils form a large part of the subordinate description of heaven's bliss: no Marriage (Luke 20:34-36), no meats for the belly (1 Corinthians 6:13), no death, no sorrow, crying, pain; no defilement, no curse, no night, no candle, no light of the sun, for the Lord God giveth them light (Revelation 21:4; Revelation 21:27; Revelation 22:3; Revelation 22:5)
Virgin, Virgin Birth - The word itself referred to a young woman, usually of Marriageable age. Adherents of Mary's perpetual virginity believe Mark was referring to children of Joseph by a first Marriage
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - Yet He was God's extraordinary gift to Joseph through his proper wife Mary, and the fruit of his Marriage to her, not as natural offspring of his body but as supernatural fruit
Adam in the nt - The truer and deeper view of Marriage must be based on a morality which takes its stand upon the primeval nature of man and woman
Aaron - In Numbers 12:1 he and Miriam spoke against Moses' Marriage to the Cushite (Ethiopian) woman
Ammi - Hence, though the law of divorce, among men, allowed not a return to each other after separation, yet, in the Lord's Marriage with his church, the gospel not only allowed a return, but graciously appointed it
Domitianus, the Emperor - He gave him his niece Flavia Domitilla in Marriage, changed the names of his sons to Vespasian and Domitian and designated them as heirs to the empire, and nominated Clemens as his colleague in the consulship
Mark, Gospel by - ...
Of the discourses that followed the Lord's entry into Jerusalem, the parables of the Two Sons and the Marriage of the King's Son are not found in this gospel; nor the parables of the Ten Virgins, the Talents, and the Sheep and the Goats
Anitipas - The evangelists, who were better informed than Josephus, as being eye witnesses of what passed, and particularly acquainted with John and his disciples, assure us, that the true reason for imprisoning John was the aversion of Herod and Herodias against him, on account of his liberty in censuring their scandalous Marriage, Matthew 14:3-4 ; Mark 6:14 ; Mark 6:17-18 ; Luke 3:19-20
Israel, Kingdom of - The princes of his house cultivated an alliance with the king of Judah which was cemented by the Marriage of Jehoram and Athaliah
Death (2) - The cessation of death is conjoined with that of Marriage (Luke 20:35-36). As the Marriage relation is natural and necessary to man’s earthly state, but has no place in the life of higher spirits, so with death
Adultery - the violation of the Marriage bed. If a woman was betrothed to a man, and was guilty of this infamous crime before the Marriage was completed, she was, in this case, along with her paramour, to be stoned, Deuteronomy 22:22-24
Optatus, Bishop of Milevis - By rebaptizing Donatists rob Christians of their Marriage-garment which suits all ages and conditions of life. The rebaptized will rise no doubt at the last day but will rise naked and the voice of the Master will be heard "Friend I once knew thee and gave thee a Marriage-garment
Kulturkampf - Civil Marriage became compulsory, 1875, and all religious communities except those devoted to the care of the sick were expelled from the empire
Rejoice - ), "ye rejoice greatly;" in the event of the Marriage of the Lamb, Revelation 19:7 , "be exceeding glad," RV; (II) in the Middle Voice, (a) of "rejoicing" in persecutions, Matthew 5:12 (2nd part); in the light of testimony for God, John 5:35 ; in salvation received through the gospel, Acts 16:34 , "he rejoiced greatly," RV; in salvation ready to be revealed, 1 Peter 1:6 ; at the revelation of His glory, 1 Peter 4:13 , "with exceeding joy," lit
Eye - In some way Sarah was vindicated; Abimelech and his company could see nothing to criticize in her behavior; and her Marriage was saved
Reuben - Jacob's firstborn, Leah's son, born long after the Marriage
Mary - 12), who (as noted above) may be her sons, Joseph's sons by a previous Marriage, or the cousins of Jesus
Jezebel - By her Marriage to King Ahab of Israel, Jezebel helped to join Phoenicia and Israel together in a political and religious alliance
Samson - …'I am weary of my life!' said Rebekah to Isaac over the Marriage of Esau, and in terror of a like Marriage of Jacob. And both Manoah and his wife said the same thing over Samson's Marriage
Expediency - ’ Jesus then refers to three classes of persons for whom Marriage is inexpedient: (a) eunuchs ‘which were so born from their mother’s womb,’ i. those whose physical constitution unfitted them for Marriage; (b) eunuchs ‘which were made eunuchs of men,’ i. those who voluntarily abstain from Marriage, not for their own sake only, but also for the sake of all that the Kingdom of Heaven implies
Circumcision - This in itself was distinctively different from contemporary pagan practices, which seem to have associated the rite either with puberty or with approaching Marriage
Manasseh - There is an account of his Marriage to a Syrian (1 Chronicles 7:14 ); and the only thing afterwards recorded of him is, that his grandchildren were "brought up upon Joseph's knees" (Genesis 50:23 ; RSV, "born upon Joseph's knees") i
Philippians, the Epistle to the - Nero, having divorced Octavia and married Poppaea a Jewish proselytess (who then caused Octavia to be murdered), promoted Tigellinus, the promoter of the Marriage, a wicked monster, to the Praetorian prefecture
James, the Lord's Brother - Those who prefer to believe otherwise, hold either (1) that they were the sons of Joseph by a former Marriage, or (2) the sons of Mary’s sister
Loneliness - (c) His conduct was social enough—as distinet from that of John and of the Essenes—to give rise to the slanders about ‘a gluttonous man and a winebibber’ (Matthew 11:19, Luke 7:34); He went to the Marriage at Cana (John 2:1); He was found at the feast in Simon’s house (Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:3, also Luke 7:36); with Matthew (Matthew 9:10, Luke 5:29), and Zacehaeus (Luke 19:6); and contrasted Himself with John as one who ‘comes eating and drinking’ (Matthew 11:19, Luke 7:34)
Inspiration - Paul also, when writing on the question of Marriage, makes a distinction between what he wrote as his judgement, and what he wrote as commandments of the Lord
Break, Breaker, Breaking, Brake - , of "breaking" commandments, not only infringing them, but loosing the force of them, rendering them not binding, Matthew 5:19 ; John 5:18 ; of "breaking" the Law of Moses, John 7:23 ; Scripture, John 10:35 ; of the "breaking up" of a ship, Acts 27:41 ; of the "breaking down" of the middle wall of partition, Ephesians 2:14 ; of the Marriage tie, 1 Corinthians 7:27
Judges, Book of - They served the Lord as long as Joshua lived and the elders he had appointed, and then they forsook God, allied themselves by Marriage with the Canaanites, and turned to idolatry
Quakers - "To monthly meetings also belongs the allowing of Marriages; for our society hath always scrupled to acknowledge the exclusive authority of the priests in the solemnization of Marriage. The meeting then appoints a committee to inquire whether they be clear of other engagements respecting Marriage; and if at a subsequent meeting, to which the parties also come and declare the continuance of their intention, no objections be reported, they have the meeting's consent to solemnize their intended Marriage. Of such Marriage the monthly meeting keeps a record; as also of the births and burials of its members
Song of Songs - is a collection of love-songs, composed expressly for, or at any rate suitable for use at, Marriage festivals. Is regulated by Marriage. We should indeed have been glad to find some recognition of the loftier side of Marriage, or something to remind us of Proverbs 31:1-31
Clean And Unclean - The time when Marriage is consummated was especially dangerous, and this idea is clearly seen in Tob 8:1-3 , though this instance is unique in Jewish sacred literature. 2 Samuel 11:11 ), and this may also be the cause for a bridegroom’s exemption from military service for a year after Marriage ( Deuteronomy 24:5 ). The reason for this is not obvious; rites of circumcision were performed by many primitive nations at the time of puberty (whether for decorative purposes, or in order to prepare a young man or woman for Marriage, or for some other reason), and it is possible that among the Jews this custom had been thrown back to an earlier period of life
Ethics - The fifth protects the order of primitive society; the sixth, seventh, and eighth, the sanctity of life, Marriage, and property (on which life might depend). Seduction involves Marriage and dowry. " Essenes outdid Pharisees in strictness, discouraging Marriage, sharing possessions, and rejecting the temple
Esau - A man's choice in his Marriage, more than anything else in this life, makes it manifest what that man is, and where his heart is. Now, Esau's Marriage, fatal step as it also was, was not the passionate impulse of a moment, any more than his sale of his birthright had been. ...
What with the purpose of God according to election, and that purpose communicated to Rebekah when she went to inquire of the Lord; what with Isaac's love for Esau because he did eat of his venison; what with Rebekah's retaliatory love for Jacob; what with Esau's increasing levity and profanity, and Jacob's increasing subtlety; what with Esau's defiant Canaanite Marriage; and now, to crown all, Isaac's old age, blindness, and fast-approaching end-what with all that, that was as unhappy a house as was at that moment on the face of this unhappy earth
Family Life And Relations - It was the father's task to arrange Marriages (Exodus 22:17 ) and to discipline his sons (1 Samuel 3:13 ). ...
Another effort to promote harmony in the family was the law forbidding Marriage of sisters to the same husband (Leviticus 18:18 ), an obvious effort to avoid the sort of strife that had infected Jacob's household. Williams...
See also Divorce ; Marriage ; Woman ; Widow ...
Bibliography
Mary, the Virgin - ...
(1) At the Marriage of Cana (John 2), in the three months between Christ's baptism and the Passover of A. Two Passovers had elapsed since the Marriage in Cana, and He had twice made the circuit of Galilee
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - The more I imagine myself present at that Marriage, the more convinced I become that our Lord was that humble-minded man Himself. Till the only difficulty at the Marriage Supper of the Lamb will be to get the chief rooms at that Supper to be filled with their proper guests
the Man Who Took a Rain of Mustard Seed And Sowed it in His Field - The kingdom of heaven is like that, He said, as often as He saw a field of wheat all sown over with tares; or a vineyard with a husbandman working in it; or a lost sheep; or a prodigal son; or a Marriage procession; or a few little children playing at Marriages and funerals in the market-place. What more like a mustard seed than those few drops of midnight blood sprinkled so stealthily on the lintels and the door-posts of those slave-huts in the land of Egypt? And yet all the passover-days in Israel, and all our own communion days in the Church of Christ, and the Marriage supper of the Lamb in His Father's house, have all sprung up, and will yet Spring up, out of that small mustard seed
Sacraments - Paul’s ‘This mystery is great’ ( Ephesians 5:32 ) by ‘Sacramentum hoc magnum est’; a rendering that had not a little to do with the subsequent erection of Marriage into a sacrament
Saul - Michal, Saul’s daughter, is offered to him in Marriage in return for one hundred Philistines
Truth - Some “forbid Marriage and demand abstinence from foods, which God created to be received with thanksgiving by those who believe and know the truth” (1 Timothy 4:3 NRSV
Virtue - Marriage is lawful and honourable (1 Corinthians 7, Hebrews 13:4), though with its dangers to supreme spiritual service (1 Corinthians 7, Revelation 14:4), but sexual immorality is strongly denounced (1 Thessalonians 4:3, 1 Corinthians 5, etc
Covenant, Book of the - The position of women is that the daughter is the property of her father, who receives money for her when he gives her in Marriage, and also exacts from any who should dishonour her the price she would have brought as a bride; the injury is thought of as being done not to the daughter, who is only a chattel, but to the father
Word - Even today a couple can make or create a Marriage by saying “I do
Guest - He was one of the guests at the Marriage in Cana of Galilee (John 2:1 ff
Bethabara - The Marriage festivities at Cana would in all probability extend over several days, towards the close of which the supply of wine failed: and the language used is perhaps intended to convey that Christ and His disciples were not present at the beginning
Fasting (2) - Alluding to a Rabbinic ordinance that all mourning be suspended during the Marriage-week, He says that fasting, which is a sign of mourning, would be inconsistent with the joy which ‘the children of the bride-chamber’ experience ‘while the bridegroom is with them
Jephtha - The disposal of his daughter's person in Marriage was, indeed, a parent's right, and frequently done; but this right never extended to the offering a child in sacrifice
a'Braham - After Isaac's Marriage with Rebekah and his removal to Lahai-roi, Abraham took to wife Keturah, by whom he had six children, Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbok and Shuah, who became the ancestors of nomadic tribes inhabiting the countries south and southeast of Palestine
Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible - ...
Marriage of king's son
Pha'Raoh, - --The mention that the queen was brought into the city of David while Solomon's house and the temple and the city wall were building shows that the Marriage took place not later than the eleventh year of the king, when the temple was finished, having been commenced in the Pharaoh led an expedition into Palestine
Macrina, the Younger - Of these her father selected a young advocate, of good birth and position, and when he was cut off by a premature death, Macrina resolutely refused any further proposals of Marriage ( ib
Covenant - The word "covenant, " infrequently heard in conversation, is quite commonly used in legal, social (marriage), and religious and theological contexts. In political situations, it can be translated treaty; in a social setting, it means a lifelong friendship agreement; or it can refer to a Marriage. Marriage is a bond (covenant) for life. The holy Marriage had taken place
Rome And the Roman Empire - 54 to speed up the succession of Nero, her son by a previous Marriage. ...
Trajan adopted Hadrian, his nephew by Marriage, who succeeded him (A
Constantinus i - For three years after Marriage he found sufficient employment in consolidating his government in the West, and in wars upon the frontier of the Rhine, over which he began to build a bridge at Cologne. Constantine had allied himself with one of the Eastern Augusti, Licinius, whom he engaged in Marriage with his sister Constantia, but had to proceed against the counsels and wishes of his generals and the advice of the augurs ( Pan
Jordanis, Historian of the Goths - The outline of the fortunes of the Goths in Italy is related very briefly, and the work closes with the captivity of Vitigis, and another mention of the Marriage of Mathasuentha with Germanus. Three times he alludes to the Marriage of Mathasuentha, widow of Vitigis (with whom she had been brought captive to Constantinople), to Germanus, brother of the emperor Justinian (cc
Essenes - ...
The stricter Essenes abjured private property and Marriage in order to secure entire attention to the Torah
Heaven - Jesus taught that there would be no marrying or giving in Marriage in heaven (Luke 20:34-36 )
Gnostics - ...
Their persuasion that evil resided in matter, as its centre and source, made them treat the body with contempt, discourage Marriage, and reject the doctrine of the resurrection of the body, and its re-union with the immortal spirit
Roman Empire - It was ever instilling humanity, coldly commended by an impotent philosophy, among men and women whose infant ears had been habituated to the shrieks of dying gladiators; it was giving dignity to minds prostrated by years of despotism; it was nurturing purity and modesty, and enshrining the Marriage bed in a sanctity long almost lost, and rekindling the domestic affections; substituting a calm and rational faith for worn out superstitions, gently establishing in the soul the sense of immortality
Kingdom of God - He said that the kingdom is like a farmer (Matthew 13:24 ), a seed (Matthew 13:31 ), a yeast (Matthew 13:33 ), a treasure (Matthew 13:44 ), a pearl merchant (Matthew 13:45 ), a fishnet (Matthew 13:47 ), an employer (Matthew 20:1 ), a king inviting people to a Marriage feast (Matthew 22:2 ), and ten young women (Matthew 25:1 )
Lamb - The Lamb is pictured as the central figure in a Marriage feast-the Bridegroom whose bride is the New Jerusalem (Revelation 19:7; Revelation 19:9, Revelation 21:9), hidden with God until the fullness of time
Cosmopolitanism - It is noteworthy that the ground of Marriage fidelity is carried back from Moses to the Creation (Matthew 19:4, Mark 10:6), and the Sadducees are referred, on the subject of the resurrection, to God’s language to the pre-Mosaic patriarchs (Mark 12:18, Luke 20:37); still Christ regards as final a combination of Deuteronomy 6:4 and Leviticus 19:18 (Mark 12:28 ff
Galerius, Emperor - There were no children of the Marriage, which was anything but happy, but the gentle Valeria adopted her husband's bastard son Candidian
People - ...
‛Am may also include those who enter by religious adoption and Marriage
Jacob - Laban would not consent to give him his daughter in Marriage till he had served seven years; but to Jacob these years "seemed but a few days, for the love he had to her
Ptolemae'us, - After the Marriage of Ptolemy and Cleopatra was consummated B
Linus (1) - Peter, we are told, by his preaching of chastity had caused a number of matrons to leave the Marriage bed of their husbands, who were thus infuriated against the apostle
Nicodemus - This hen Gorion was a rich man, and is reported to have spent a vast sum on the Marriage of his daughter, who afterwards sank into abject poverty
Severus Sulpicius, an Historian - He became an advocate and married a woman of consular rank and wealth, who did not long survive the Marriage
Siricius, Bishop of Rome - Siricius disclaims any disparagement of Marriage, "at which," he says, "we assist with the veil," though he "venerates with greater honour virgins devoted to God, who are the fruit of Marriages
Procurator - Antonius Felix was brother of Claudius’ great minister of finance (a rationibus), Pallas, and, probably on account of his Marriage into a higher class, was raised to the equestrian order before his appointment to Judaea
Woman - ...
The Old Testament consistently commends women to monogamous Marriage and sexual fidelity, based on God's creation ordinance (Genesis 2:24 ; endorsed again by both Jesus [1] and Paul [1]). Her devotion to her mother-in-law Naomi leads to her covenant-faithfulness to Yahweh and to a surprising proposal of Marriage to her redeemer-kinsman Boaz ( Ruth 3:9 ). Blomberg...
See also Eve ; Family Life and Relations ; Head, Headship ; Marriage ; Person, Personhood ; Sexuality, Human ; Widow ...
Bibliography
Covenant - With Hosea, the figure of Marriage, probably not viewed as yet by the prophet as a species of covenant, serves the same purpose. Hosea has it in the form of the new Marriage which Jehovah will contract with Israel. Mark 8:38 and Matthew 12:39 speak of the Jews as an ‘adulterous generation,’ and probably the later prophetic representation of the covenant as a Marriage-covenant lies at the basis of this mode of statement
Thecla - They disclaimed personal knowledge of Paul but represented him as urging on the young abstinence from Marriage under the threat of forfeiting their part in the resurrection which (they said) he promised to the celibate only; whereas the true resurrection (as they professed themselves ready to explain) was already past for those that have children in whom they live anew; and men rise again when they fully know the true God. Accordingly next morning Thamyris with other magistrates and a great multitude repaired to the house of Onesiphorus and dragged Paul before the tribunal of Castelius the "proconsul," accusing him merely of dissuading maidens from Marriage; though Demas and Hermogenes were at hand prompting him "Say that he is a Christian and thus shalt thou procure his death. Paul's teaching her prospects of prosperous Marriage, and reckons her near to Elias, John the Baptist, and even the Virgin Mother
Clement of Alexandria - 125); On Marriage ( Paed. The book closes with a preliminary discussion of Marriage. The third book investigates the true doctrine of Marriage (§§ 57–60) as against those who indulged in every license on the ground that bodily actions are indifferent (1–11; 25–44); and, on the other hand, those who abstained from Marriage from hatred of the Creator (12–24; 45–46)
Common Life - Marriage is recognized by Him as a holy tie, an indissoluble Divine institution, and thus obtains a position more honourable than it had ever held before (Matthew 19:3-9, Mark 10:2-12). His presence and first miracle at the wedding at Cana of Galilee (John 2:1-11)—a miracle which shows His deep sympathy with even trivial human needs—is in itself a consecration of Marriage
Esau - Rebekah, hearing of the vengeful design of Esau against her favorite son, by recalling to Isaac's remembrance Esau's ill judged Marriage secured the father's consent to Jacob's departure from the neighborhood of the daughters of Heth to that of his own kindred, and at the same time the confirmation of the blessing (Genesis 27:46; Genesis 28:1)
Bishop - Yet as Jews and Gentiles regarded second Marriages with prejudice (compare Anna, Luke 2:36-37), and a bishop ought to stand well in the esteem of his flock, he should be married but once. The prohibition may also refer to a second Marriage after a divorce
Body of Christ - Similarly, Old Testament portrayals of God as bridegroom and Israel as bride do not stress unity nor do they portray the Marriage as a "one flesh" relationship
Womanliness - May we find any such signs of womanliness in the character or teaching of Jesus?...
Jesus assigned great importance to Marriage and family, the sanctity and unity of the home
Zacharias - A Jewish priest, a member of the family of Abijah, Zacharias had been so careful to observe the law regarding the Marriage of priests (Leviticus 21:7-14), that he chose for wife one of the sacerdotal house, a daughter of Aaron (Luke 1:5), named after Aaron’s wife (Exodus 6:23), Elisabeth, who was as pious as himself
Head, Headship - ...
Paul Ferguson...
See also Adam ; Church, the ; Eve ; Marriage ...
Bibliography
Hour - ’ At the Marriage feast in Cana, when appealed to by His mother with a suggestion for His help, He replied, ‘Woman, what have I to do with thee? Mine hour is not yet come’ (John 2:4)
Son of God - Applied in the plural to the godly Seth's descendants (not angels, who "neither marry nor are given in Marriage," Luke 20:35-36), "the salt of the earth" heretofore, amidst its growing corruption by the Cainites. ) When it lost its savour ("for that he also (even the godly seed) is become flesh" or fleshly) by contracting Marriages with the beautiful but ungodly, God's Spirit ceased to strive with man, and judgment fell (Genesis 6:2-4)
Census - Luke’s expression ‘betrothed’ is to be pressed, would indicate not merely that the Marriage was not publicly known or officially recognized, but that she herself must also have been of the family of David, and as such was enrolled in her own right
England - After his death the direction of ecclesiastical affairs passed to Thomas Cranmer, who legalized the Marriage of the clergy, advocated the substitution of tables for altars, and took part in the compilation of the second Prayer-book of Edward VI
Sabbath - Like the institution of Marriage, it was given to man for the whole race
Manes, Called Also Mani - The pretext of the persecution was that the spread of the sect was hostile to the human race through their opposition to Marriage (Assem
Reccared - Reccared (the uniform spelling in coins and inscriptions), younger son of LEOVIGILD by his first Marriage
Noah - Marriage, cannot be predicated of angels, fornication and going after strange flesh; moreover Christ states expressly the "angels neither marry nor are given in Marriage" (Matthew 22:30; Luke 20:35-36). ...
"Unequal yoking" of believers with unbelievers in Marriage has in other ages also broken down the separation wall between the church and the world, and brought on apostasy; as in Solomon's case (compare Nehemiah 13:23-26; 2 Corinthians 6:14). Marriages engrossing men just before the flood are specified in Matthew 24:38; Luke 17:27. Mixed Marriages were forbidden (Exodus 34:16; Genesis 27:46; Genesis 28:1)
Mahometanism - Again: our Saviour expressly tells us, that, at the resurrection, "they will neither marry nor be given in Marriage; but be like the angels of God in heaven. According to its author, there will not only be Marriage, but also servitude in the next world. And as Marriage will take place, so a new race will be introduced in heaven; for, says the Koran, "If any of the faithful in paradise be desirous of issue, it shall be conceived, born, and grown up in the space of an hour
Ethics - ...
The essence of the Decalogue can be found in three areas: [2] right relations with God (first command, internal worship of God; second, external worship of God; third, verbal worship of God); [3] right relations with time (fourth command), and [4] right relations with society (fifth command, sanctity of the family; sixth, sanctity of life; seventh, sanctity of Marriage and sex; eighth, sanctity of property; ninth, sanctity of truth; and tenth, sanctity of motives). It was made for the Marriage relationship and meant for enjoyment (Proverbs 5:15-21 ), not just procreation
Pseudo-Chrysostomus - He regards the apostle's permission of a second Marriage as but licence given on account of the hardness of men's hearts, a second Marriage in itself being but "honesta fornicatio
Moses - ]'>[4] smote him because he had not been circumcised before Marriage; but Zipporah saved him by circumcising the child, and thus circumcising Moses by proxy ( Exodus 4:19 ; Exodus 4:24-26
Greek Church - They approve of the Marriage of priests, provided they enter into that state before their admission into holy orders. They condemn all fourth Marriages
Justification - Hosea's personal experience in Marriage served also as a parable of God's relationship with Israel
Fellowship - Also it was used of Marriage, of the shared life of two persons, a man and a woman, together
Jehoiada - Jehoiada had saved Joash's life and throne, and had been God's providential instrument in preventing the extinction of David's line, which then hung upon the one seemingly frail thread, but which could not be broken since to it belonged the promises of Messiah; he had stifled the idolatry transplanted into Judah by Joram's Marriage into apostate Ahab's house, and restored Jehovah's worship
Malachi, Theology of - Ezra and Nehemiah had condemned intermarriage with foreigners, a practice that may have gone hand in hand with divorce. Men were breaking their Marriage covenants and wedding pagans, a sure way to get entangled with idolatry (2:11-14)
Home (2) - Homely joys are illustrated in the Marriage at Cana (John 2), in the sojourn of Jesus as a guest in the home at Bethany (Luke 10:28, John 12:1-2). The great crises of all domestic life—births, Marriages, deaths—must surely, some or all of them, have marked the history of the home of Jesus during those years
Judaizing - We find also indications, but much less prominent, of some such abstinences in the matter of foods (probably chiefly animal food and wine) as at Colossae and Rome, with a probability that Marriage would before long come likewise under a religious ban
Samaria - Manasseh, of priestly descent, having been expelled for an unlawful Marriage by Nehemiah, built a temple on Mount Gerizim for the Samaritans by Darius Nothus' permission
Faithfulness - Masters must put a new spirit into their oversight; slaves must become only the more diligent and faithful in their service; husbands and wives must remain faithful to their Marriage vows, even when the new bond to Christ has been fashioned
Firstborn - Hence the husband of several wives would have to redeem the firstborn of each one of them, while the husband of a woman who had had children by a previous Marriage need not redeem her child although it was his firstborn’ (Jewish Encyc
Callistus, Pope - (3) He also relaxed the Marriage laws of the church, thereby bringing them into conflict with those of the state; and Hippolytus says that a general immorality was the consequence
Matthew, Gospel by - Notwithstanding their opposition, He spoke of the certainty of the establishment of God's purpose in the parable of the Marriage of the King's Son
Parents (2) - The match might have been arranged by other parties (see Marriage), but the relations of the wedded pair would be characterized by a growing love
John the Baptist - " Elisabeth was related to the Virgin Mary; but Scripture does not state the exact relationship; the Greek in Luke 1:36 (sungenees ), which our Bible renders "cousin," means any "relation" or "kinswoman," whether by Marriage or birth
Theodoricus, the Ostrogoth - His only surviving daughter Amalasuintha he had given in Marriage in 515 to Eutharic, a descendant of the Amals, whose consulship in 519 was celebrated with great magnificence at Rome
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - ]'>[3] Levi speaks of his Marriage and sons (xi. 11); he speaks of his Marriage with Bathshua (viii. 1-8), Er and Onan’s sin and death, the evil result of his [8] Canaanite Marriage (x
Ethics (2) - When a husband puts away his wife, he places her in a position of moral jeopardy; for, should she associate herself with another man, whether in a second Marriage or in a passing act of immorality, she thereby completes the dissolution of the first Marriage, which hitherto was legally binding. Such is the only judgment possible, if Marriage is to be regarded not merely as a legal bond, under the control of the civil magistrate, but as a moral covenant, for whose inviolability men are responsible, not to one another, but to God
Helena, Saint, Mother of Constantine the Great - In outward appearance it differed nothing from the ordinary civil Marriage by mutual consent, and was sometimes called "conjugium inaequale. The looseness of the Marriage tie among the Romans is a quite sufficient explanation of these acts, without supposing any offence or misconduct on the part of the wife, or any special heartlessness on that of the husband
Family - 1 Peter 3:1-7), For children and dependents see below, and for the relation of husband and wife, see Marriage. The relation of the younger to the elder in the family must have been greatly simplified by the spread of monogamy in the OT (see Marriage), and in Christian times there would have been very few complications in this respect
Joseph - This is concluded from the fact that Mary only was present at the Marriage feast in Cana of Galilee
Jeremiah - God ordered him to live without Marriage and family (Jeremiah 16:2 )
Claudius - His Marriage with aelia Paetina, by whom he had a daughter, had the same end
Election - Many of the parables of Jesus, such as that of the Marriage feast (Matthew 22:1-14 ) and that of the laborers in the vineyard (Matthew 20:1-16 ), illustrate the sovereignty of God in salvation
Wine - 67) shows that Kefr Kana, not; Kana el Jelil, answers to the Cana of Galilee (so called to distinguish it from the better known Cana of Judaea, John 2), the scene of our Lord's first miracle at the Marriage
Inheritance - According to the levirate law, however, when a man died leaving no son, his brother or other next-of-kin ( go’çl ) must marry the widow, and her firstborn son by this Marriage became the heir of her previous husband ( Deuteronomy 25:6 )
Liberty (2) - He claims the right (ἐξουσία) of free action in the common affairs of life, in food, in Marriage, in the pastor not necessarily labouring manually, but sharing in material provision in return for his spiritual toiling (1 Corinthians 9:4-6; 1 Corinthians 9:12 bis), just as St
Slave, Slavery (2) - He was incapable of contracting a legal Marriage, and was not regarded as invested with any rights. In regard to females, the Talmud decides that a wife can never be sold into slavery, but that a daughter under Marriageable age can; with the apparent proviso that, if she be sold again, the purchaser must not be a foreigner
Gaudentius, Bishop of Brescia - In addition to the eight discourses on the directions in Exodus concerning the Passover and two on the Marriage at Cana, which had been delivered during that Eastertide, he sent also four on various Gospel texts, and a fifth on the Maccabean martyrs
Persia - His Marriage with Esther in his seventh year immediately followed his flight from Greece, when lie gave himself up to the pleasures of the seraglio
Apollos - Would not his eloquence, his philosophical bent, and his reiterated emphasis on Jesus as the Christ, lead to imperfect conversions? And may not the preference for the gift of tongues, or the difficulties about Marriage, be traced naturally to this eloquent ascetic? In Corinth, St
Drunkenness - 301), who made abstinence from flesh, wine, and Marriage the chief part of their religion, seeking salvation not by faith but by asceticism
Philistia - The Egyptian Pharaoh took Gezer at the head of the Philistia plain, and gave it as his daughter's Marriage portion to Solomon (1 Kings 9:16-17); and Solomon fortified it and Bethhoron, to command the passes from the Philistia plain to the central region
Church of England - Henry's affections being estranged from his queen Catharine, and fixed on Anne Boleyn, he requested a divorce from his wife; but the pope hesitating, the archbishop of Canterbury annulled his former Marriage
Solomon - It is thought that on occasion of this Marriage, Solomon composed the Canticles, which are a kind of epithalamium
Joseph - The place of his stated residence was Nazareth, particularly after the time of his Marriage
Love - A covenant is an agreement between two parties that carries with it obligations and blessings, and in the case of God and Israel this covenant was likened to the Marriage bond
David - This man offers to fight in single combat with any Israelite who will come out and face him, but in spite of the high reward offered by the king to any one who will slay him namely, great riches and the king’s daughter in Marriage nobody appears to answer the challenge. The Marriage was destined to influence materially the history of Israel (see Adonijah)
Hittites And Hivites - Esau's Marriage to two Hittite women (“daughters of Heth daughters of the land”) greatly grieved and displeased his parents (Genesis 26:34-35 ; Genesis 27:46 )
Holiness - ); and, for priests, compliance with special rules about mourning and Marriage ( Leviticus 21:1-15 )
Idolatry - ( b ) Their environment was thus perilous, and the danger was intensified by intermarriage with idolaters. Solomon and Ahab by their Marriage alliances introduced and promoted idol cults
Worldliness - If in a special situation he seems to deprecate and even disparage Marriage and the family-life (1 Corinthians 7:1; 1 Corinthians 7:7-8; 1 Corinthians 7:28; 1 Corinthians 7:40), he yet shows unrivalled insight into their ideal significance and their value for spiritual education (Ephesians 5:22-33; Ephesians 6:1-9)
Nehemiah - God's way demands purity in Marriage and in ministers (Nehemiah 13:23-31 )
Covenant - The word was used for alliances of friendship ( 1 Samuel 18:3 , Psalms 55:20 ), and of Marriage ( Proverbs 2:17 , Malachi 2:14 )
Promise - Specific forms of promise such as the mutual plighting of troth in Marriage ceremonies often form part of a religious ritual
Circumstantiality in the Parables - Luke has become the Marriage-feast of the king’s son, i
Claim - Similarly, we have allusions to war, judicial punishment, parental authority, Marriage and divorce, fasting and sumptuous living
Appreciation (of Christ) - ...
We look for appreciation from His nearest disciples, a quick obedience, a joy that has no place for fasting (Mark 2:18), the mother’s confidence at the Marriage-feast at Cana (John 2:5), the great utterances of His forerunner the Baptist (John 1:30; John 3:30), the exalted vision of the Transfiguration (Mark 9:5), and that Petrine outburst, repeated by all, as they neared Gethsemane—‘If I should die with thee, I will not deny thee
Aeon - Those who are counted worthy of it ‘neither marry nor are given in Marriage, neither can they die any more’ (Luke 20:35 f
Cerinthus, Opponent of Saint John - In his "dream" and "phantasy" the Lord shall have an earthly kingdom in which the elect are to enjoy pleasures, feasts, Marriages, and sacrifices. His notions of eschatology are radically Jewish: they may have originated, but do not contain, the Valentinian notion of a spiritual Marriage between the souls of the elect and the Angels of the Pleroma
Mary - The Gospel speaks nothing more of the Virgin Mary till the Marriage at Cana of Galilee, at which she was present with her son Jesus
Covenant - Concerning the illustration that likens the covenant between God and Israel to the Marriage covenant see LOVE, sub-heading ‘Steadfast love’
Church - ...
If the picture of the body emphasizes the life, unity and growth that Christ gives to the church, the picture of Marriage emphasizes the love that Christ has for the church
Leander (2) - Its laudation of the celibate life and depreciation of Marriage are quite in the taste of the time, and, to judge from Song of Solomon 5 of C
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - ...
Confining our attention for the moment to the direct male line, we note that in the first section the names are taken from 1 Chronicles 2:1-15, and that if Salmon was the younger contemporary of Joshua (as is implied by his Marriage with Rahab), there are only four generations to cover the 300 or 400 years between that time and David’s reign. ...
In regard to Rahab, there is no evidence for her Marriage with Salmon, nor is anything known that would be likely to have suggested the idea: it would seem that the compiler was determined to introduce the name, and therefore, without evidence and against all chronological probability, made her the wife of the father of Boaz
Athenagoras - Was Athenagoras a Montanist? —This idea was suggested by Tillemont, who founds it upon two points in the opinions of Athenagoras, his account of prophecy, and his absolute condemnation of second Marriages. The severe condemnation of second Marriage, in the works of Athenagoras, is doubtless a point of contact with the Montanists; but the same view is very common with the Greek Fathers ( vid. They give very much the same view of the Christian way of life; and both lay great stress on chastity, and on the confining of Marriage to its sole end, the begetting of children
Character - ’ Though Jesus maintained the sanctity of the Marriage tie (Matthew 19:4 ff. The spiritual side of Marriage has been greatly developed by the revelation of the issues of life (Matthew 19:4-9, Ephesians 5:22-33)
Law of Moses - (24:1-4) Marriage within certain degrees forbidden. (22:13-27) (2) Rape or seduction of an unbetrothed virgin to be compensated by Marriage, with dowry (50 shekels), and without power of divorce; or, if she be refused, by payment of full dowry. ( Exodus 22:16,17 ; 22:28,29) (3) Unlawful Marriages (incestuous, etc. (e) Laws against unnatural Marriages and lusts
Apostles - Apostles had the right to Marriage and to being paid for their ministry (1 Corinthians 9:5-6 )
Slave, Slavery - In practice the maid-servant, though the concubine of the master, is often the special property of the mistress ( Genesis 16:6 a, Genesis 16:9 , Genesis 25:12 , Genesis 30:3 ), at times having been given to her at Marriage ( Genesis 24:56 ; Genesis 29:24 ; Genesis 29:29 )
Isaac - ...
The gift from God of the twin sons was the answer to Isaac's prayer, after 20 years of childless Marriage; for God in giving the greatest blessings delays fulfilling His promise in order to call forth His people's persevering, waiting, prayerful faith (Genesis 25:21)
King (2) - Jerusalem ‘the city of the great king’ (Matthew 5:35), the parable of the Unmerciful Servant (18:23); and in particular, the parable of the Marriage Feast (22:1ff
Corinthians, Epistles to the - ...
1 Corinthians 7 : The apostle answers their questions as to Marriage
Song of Solomon - With others it is held to represent 'the pure love and mystical union and Marriage of Christ and His church,' which will be seen to be the idea in the headings of the chapters in the A
Dominion (2) - He will open to His faithful ones the door to the eternal festival of joy, but will close the door of the heavenly Marriage feast on ‘the unfaithful’ (Matthew 7:22-23; Matthew 25:11-12, Luke 13:27-29)
Parable - The pound (Luke 19:12), two sons (Matthew 21:28), the vineyard (Matthew 21:33), Marriage (Matthew 22:2); the ten virgins, talents, sheep and goats (Matthew 25)
da'Vid - His position in Saul's court seems to have been first armor-bearer, ( 1 Samuel 16:21 ; 18:2 ) then captain over a thousand, (1 Samuel 18:13 ) and finally, on his Marriage with Michal, the king's second daughter, he was raised to the high office of captain of the king's body-guard, second only, if not equal, to Abner, the captain of the host, and Jonathan, the heir apparent
Missions - In the later series of parables, as in that of the Vineyard and the Husbandmen, it is said, ‘The kingdom of God shall be taken away from you, and shall be given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof’ (Matthew 21:43); in the Marriage Feast the direction is found, ‘Go ye … into the highways, and as many as ye shall find, bid to the Marriage’ (Matthew 22:9, Luke 14:23); in the Sheep and the Goats there is a picture of the judgment of ‘all nations’ (Matthew 25:32)
Animals - They form samples of the rich dainties prepared for the Marriage feast of the king’s son, and illustrate the magnificent scale of the entertainment which those summoned to partake so insolently spurned. The bulls and fatlings in the parable of the Marriage Feast, and the fatted calf in the parable of the Returning Prodigal, alike stand for the lavish generosity of God’s love, which the Scribes and Pharisees could not appreciate, even when offered to themselves, the king’s invited guests, much less when those prodigals, the publicans and sinners, were likewise embraced therein
Nestorian Church - By another canon of this council Marriage was expressly allowed to all ranks of the hierarchy. His reign saw the breach with the "Westerns" healed more or less, as the council of Bait Lapat was repudiated (though the canon on episcopal Marriage was allowed to stand) and another confession of faith was drawn up
Benjamin - ...
David was connected with Saul of Benjamin by Marriage with his daughter, and therefore, feeling the political importance of the connection, made it a preliminary of his league with Abner that Michal should be restored to him, though Phaltiel had her heart (2 Samuel 3:13-16)
Esther - His Marriage to a Jewess was in contravention of the law that he must marry a wife belonging to one of the seven great Persian families
Nebuchadnezzar - Nitocris was probably his second queen, an Egyptian (for this ancient name was revived about this time, as the Egyptian monuments prove), for he lived 60 years after his Marriage to his first queen Amuhia (625 B
Apocrypha - The Protevangelium of James, for example, tells the story of Mary's birth, childhood, and eventual Marriage to Joseph (a widower with children), culminating in a detailed account of the birth of Jesus (in a cave) and a strong affirmation of Mary's virginity
Games - In Judges 14:12-14 the propounding and guessing of riddles as a wager appears as part of the entertainment of a Marriage feast
the Angel of the Church in Thyatira - ...
Marriage or celibacy, an helpmeet or an hindrance, children or childlessness, good children or bad, health or sickness, congregational prosperity or congregational adversity, and all else; absolutely and without any reserve everything must come under that great law for all men, but a thousand times more for all ministers; that great law which the greatest of ministers has thus enunciated:-"For we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to His purpose
Simeon - The Canaanitess mother of Shaul (Genesis 46:10) and the Horite father of Shaphat the spy from Simeon (Numbers 13:5) indicate the laxness of Simeon in Marriage connections, from whence sprang his paganish degeneracy
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - He harmonizes them (expressly, however, not as a matter of tradition) on the theory of levirate Marriages, supposing that two half-brothers, sons of different fathers, married the same woman, and that the issue of the second Marriage was therefore legally accounted to the elder, but physically to the younger brother. It is a difficulty that two, or even three, such Marriages must be supposed in the list; and this theory is almost universally rejected by moderns. 7) that they must have been of the same tribe, because ‘intermarriages between different tribes were not permitted
Widow - If she was childless and of Marriageable age (i. The story of Judah and Tamar (Genesis 38 ) is an example of this custom of "levirate" Marriage
Pharisees - The Mishna has six divisions (on seeds, feasts, women's Marriage, etc
Swedenborgians - ...
Some other peculiar doctrines of minor importance might be enlarged on in this place if it was deemed necessary; such as the doctrine concerning the human soul, as being in a human form; concerning the Marriage of the good and the true, as existing in the holy word, and in all things in nature
Isaiah - Jerom, on the authority of some rabbinical writers, says, that the prophet gave his daughter in Marriage to Manasseh, king of Judah; but this opinion is scarcely credible, because Manasseh did not commence his reign until about sixty years after Isaiah had begun to discharge his prophetic functions
David - To this period, belong the circumstances narrated in the concluding chapters of the first book of Samuel—the adventure with Nabal, and David's Marriage with Abigail; his twice sparing Saul's life; perhaps the battle for the water of the well of Bethlehem, 1 Chronicles 11:15-19; and also the residence with Achish, who gave him Ziklag
Patriarchs, the - The circumstances attending his Marriage to Rebekah afforded Isaac great comfort after the death of his mother (Genesis 24:67 )
Phoenicia, phNicians - ...
For some reason Sidon so excelled the other cities in the eyes of Israelites and Greeks, that in the OT and Homer the Phœnicians are frequently called ‘Sidonians,’ even when, as in the case of Ahab’s Marriage, Tyrians are really referred to (cf
Parousia (2) - ), or as the arrival of an absent master at an hour when his servants are not looking for him (Luke 12:42-46), or as the return of the bride-groom in the night-time, leading his bride and the Marriage party to the wedding-feast (Matthew 25:1-13)
Persecution - Many of the principal Protestants were invited to Paris under a solemn oath of safety, upon occasion of the Marriage of the king of Navarre with the French king's sister. The queen dowager of Navarre, a zealous Protestant, however, was poisoned by a pair of gloves before the Marriage was solemnized
Gnosticism - The Saviour descends, and after innumerable sufferings is able to lead back the fallen aeon to the Pleroma, where He unites with her in a spiritual Marriage. This led them to forbid Marriage and indulgence in certain kinds of food
Jeremiah - So that he may be in person, as well as in word, a prophet of the coming tribulation, Marriage is forbidden him and all participation in domestic life ( Jeremiah 16:1-13 ), a sentence peculiarly bitter to his tender and affectionate nature. He strongly recalls Hosea, whose love for ‘Ephraim’ he shares, and whose similitude of the Marriage-union between Jehovah and Israel supplies the basis of his appeals
Innocentius, Bishop of Rome - Those who had married widows he debars from ordination, citing the prohibition of such Marriages to the high-priest under the Mosaic law. He decides that they are to be so accounted, for baptism is not the commencement of a new life in such sort as to relax the obligations of a previous Marriage. He insists, as so often in his letters, on the incapacity for ordination of such as had married widows or had married twice, and again protests that baptism cannot annul the obligation of a previous Marriage
Annunciation, the - The fact that, in spite of his inevitable suspicions, he took her in Marriage, requires us to believe that to him also had been revealed God’s purposes respecting his betrothed. They are intensely Jewish in tone; but we may be sure that Judaism, with its enthusiastic estimate of the blessings of Marriage, would not have invented them
Timothy, Epistles to - The errors leaning towards asceticism, with its prohibition of Marriage, and of certain foods, and perhaps of wine also ( 1Ti 4:1-4 ; 1 Timothy 4:8 ; 1 Timothy 5:23 ), may indeed have sprung from forms of Judaism which had become ascetic; but just as likely indeed more likely they may have come from Gentile sources
Nehemiah, Theology of - They renounce foreign Marriages and working on the Sabbath. When foreign Marriage laws were disregarded he struck the offenders and even pulled their hair out. ...
These Marriages were threatening to undermine the very core of Israel's national identity
Seven Words, the - He had told her, both when she found Him in the Temple and also at the Marriage feast in Cana (Luke 2:49, John 2:4), that there was a higher duty than that which He owed to her, a higher relationship than that between mother and son,—He was not only her son, He was also her Lord,—yet the earthly relationship is not forgotten
Prophecy, Prophets - Hosea's Marriage taught about God's relationship with Israel (Hosea 2:1-13 ; see also 1619114480_48 ; Ezekiel 4:1-3 ; Jeremiah 19:10-11 )
Salutations - ] In ancient Rome the kiss was a sign of family relationship, so that there developed a formal law of the kiss (ius osculi) between relatives, going as far as those between whom Marriage was forbidden
Wealth (2) - Luke 18:22; in the parable of the Marriage Feast (Matthew 22:1-14) it is the ‘good and bad’ who are gathered in from the highways, in the parable of the Great Supper (Luke 14:16-24) it is the ‘poor and maimed and blind and lame
Woman (2) - ...
The great respect in which Jesus held the position of woman, the high dignity He attached to it, is shown not only by His actions and words, but by the new sanctity which He gave to Marriage
Person, Personhood - ...
Human relationship in the Old Testament goes beyond Marriage
Imagination - Thus He was fond of drawing His word-pictures from the occupations of such familiar folk as shepherds, husbandmen, fishermen; from social customs in the home,—marriage ceremonies, feasts, salutations, journeyings; and even from bodily life and sensations,—the eye, ear, bones, feet, hunger and thirst, laughing, mourning, sickness, sleep, etc
Glory - Passing over the strictly doxological passages, we note that ‘glory’ is given to God (or to Christ) (a) by the character or conduct of men: by the strength of their trust (Romans 4:20), in eating, drinking, and all that they do (1 Corinthians 10:31), by thanksgiving (2 Corinthians 4:15), brotherly charity (2 Corinthians 8:19), the fruits of righteousness (Philippians 1:11), repentance and confession of sin (Revelation 16:9); (b) by the results of God’s own saving work, the Exaltation of Christ (Philippians 2:11), the faithful fulfilment of His promises in Christ (2 Corinthians 1:20), the reception of both Jews and Gentiles into the Church (Romans 15:7), the predestination of believers to the adoption of children (Ephesians 1:6), the whole accomplishment of that predestination, by faith, the sealing of the Spirit, and final redemption (Ephesians 1:14), by the Marriage of the Lamb, the final and eternal union of Christ with the redeemed, sanctified, and glorified Church
Keeping - For example, at the Marriage in Cana the ruler of the feast is reported as having said to the bridegroom, ‘Thou hast kept (τηρέω) the good wine until now’ (John 2:10)
Laughter - , Matthew 9:14, Mark 2:18); He made it a habit to enter convivial assemblies, and was a guest at feasts where laughter, jest, and song were a part of the order of the day;§ Hermogenes (1), a Teacher of Heretical Doctrine - As for the charge of frequent Marriages, if Hermogenes, who in 207 would be advanced in life, was then married to a third wife, a writer so fond of rhetorical exaggeration as Tertullian might describe him as one who had formed a practice of marrying ( nubit assidue ), or who had "married more women than he had painted. " Tertullian's language may imply that Hermogenes had also endeavoured to prove from Scripture that a second Marriage was not unlawful
Manichees - They abstained entirely from eating the flesh of any animal, following herein the doctrine of the ancient Pythagoreans: they also condemned Marriage
Diocletian, Emperor - Each was called on to prove his loyalty to the system into which he was adopted by a new Marriage
Calling - "To call" signifies to invite to the blessings of the Gospel, to offer salvation through Christ, either by God himself, or, under his appointment, by his servants; and in the parable of the Marriage of the king's son, Matthew 22:1-14 , which appears to have given rise, in many instances, to the use of this term in the Epistles, we have three descriptions of "called" or invited persons
Banquet - Such, we have reason to believe, was the governor of the feast at the Marriage in Cana of Galilee, which our Lord honoured with his presence
Aaron - The priest and high priest differed also in their Marriage restrictions; for the high priest might not marry a widow, nor a divorced woman, nor a harlot, but a virgin only; whereas the other priests might lawfully marry a widow, Leviticus 21:7
House - When many people are to be admitted, as upon the celebration of Marriage, the circumcising of a child, or occasions of the like nature, the company is rarely or never received into one of the chambers
Ethics - ...
The immediate community in which Christians must give expression to their standards is the family (Ephesians 5:22-33; Ephesians 6:1-4; see FAMILY; Marriage)
Monnica - By her Monnica and her sisters (no brothers are mentioned) were taught to abstain entirely from drinking even water between meal-times, with the aim of guarding them beforehand against habits of intemperance when, after Marriage, they should become "dominae apothecarum et cellariorum" ( ib
Gospels, Apocryphal - it was regarded as possessed of heretical tendencies, particularly those of the Encratites, who were opposed to Marriage. ...
The first sixteen chapters abound in anecdotes concerning Jesus and His trial, in which the question of the legitimacy of Jesus’ birth is established by twelve witnesses of the Marriage of Mary and Joseph
Dates (2) - ’ But it is probable, in fact it is to be inferred from His mother’s information of the exhausted wine, that our Lord was not present on the first day of the Marriage festivities, which generally extended over a week, and were concluded with a supper (art. ‘Marriage’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible), and it was quite possible for Him and His disciples to have accomplished the journey from the vicinity of Jericho to Nazareth (about 60 miles) in three or four days; so that there is no necessity to select a site for His baptism within one day’s journey of Cana. Again, the favourits time for such Marriages was March (Wetzstein in Ztschr
Hilarius (7) Pictaviensis, Saint - ...
On the expressions concerning divorce (Mat_5:31-32) Hilary regards Christian Marriage as absolutely indissoluble. —Hilary, during his exile, learnt that there was some prospect of his daughter Abra, though only in her 13th year, being sought in Marriage
Augustus (2) - His own example, unfortunately, did not enable him to take up a very high position on the subject of Marriage. Again and again he interposed to dissolve existing Marriages, when his policy as to the succession required it. High motives, therefore, we do not expect to find in his legislation on Marriage
Corinth - The elders of the church had written to consult Paul on minor points: (1) meats offered to idols; (2) celibacy and Marriage; (3) the proper use of spiritual gifts in public worship; (4) the collection for the saints at Jerusalem (1 Corinthians 16:1, etc
Thousand Years - ...
The Marriage of the Lamb and bride, then begun in heaven, shall unfold the mysteries of the now obscure Song
Wages - To use the metaphor of Marriage, the people have been divorced from their Divine Husband (Isaiah 50:1 )
Moses - , shows us that abstinence from idolatrous sacrifices and abstinence from sexual immorality are closely related, and that πορνεία here refers not merely to the forbidden degrees of Marriage but also to ceremonial prostitution; the Gentile Christians must abstain both from taking part in the sacrificial meals of the heathen world and from the immoralities connected therewith, i
Abraham - Abraham being left alone at Isaac's Marriage, and having his youthful vigor renewed at Isaac's generation, married Keturah
Hilarius Arelatensis, Saint, Bishop of Arles - Leo found the charge of Marriage with a widow not proven against Chelidonius; and formally (as he had already done informally) pronounced him restored to his rank of bishop and to his see
Parable - The Marriage FOR THE KING'S SON: God will do honour to His Son
the Importunate Widow - When you meet a Marriage, say Behold, the bridegroom cometh! When the sun sets in the west, say There shall be no night in heaven
Man - ...
‘Ish is often used in Marriage contexts (cf
Daniel - For, having matters to do, there was neither feast, nor banquet, nor Marriage, nor any pastime that could stay him, as they had done other captains
Assyria - At length Nebuchadnezzar, the son of Nabopolassar, married Amyit, the daughter of Astyages, king of the Medes, and sister of Cyaxares and by this Marriage, the two families having contracted affinity, they conspired against the Assyrians
Fall of Man - ) That the intimacy and indissolubility of the Marriage relation rests upon the formation of the woman from the man; for our Lord quotes the words in Genesis, where the obligation of man to cleave to his wife is immediately connected with that circumstance: "And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called woman, because she was taken out of man
Resurrection - It is also laid down by our Lord, that "in the resurrection they shall neither marry nor be given in Marriage, but be like to the angels of God;" and this also implies a certain change of structure; and we may gather from the declaration of the Apostle, that though "the stomach," is now adapted "to meats, and meats to the stomach," yet God will "destroy both it and them;" that the animal appetite for food will be removed, and the organ now adapted to that appetite will have no place in the renewed frame
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - Such are: the Marriage in Cana of Galilee, with which the public ministry opens; the conversation with the Samaritan woman; the healing of the paralytic at the pool of Bethesda; the incident of the man born blind; the raising of Lazarus, which in St. In the Marriage at Cana, the feeding of the multitude, the healing of the blind man, and the raising of Lazarus, the Evangelist himself tells us the spiritual meaning of the miracle, in words spoken either by the Lord Himself or by some one else
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - Several of Gregory's letters are addressed to monks who had left their monasteries for the world and Marriage. To 599 is assigned the extensive conversion of the Lombards to Catholicism, brought about after the death of king Antharis through the Marriage of this Theodelinda, his widow, with Agilulph duke of Turin, who consequently succeeded to the throne
Donatus And Donatism - The Lord had commanded His disciples to compel the resisting to come to the Marriage-feast and that Marriage-feast was the unity of the Body of Christ
Covenant - ...
Marriage involved covenant obligations with God as the witness (Malachi 2:14 )
Sanctification, Sanctify - Paul, is a term of relationship, not primarily of character, is evident from 1 Corinthians 7:14 , where ‘the unbelieving husband’ or ‘wife’ is said to ‘have been sanctified in’ the Christian wedded partner, so that their offspring are ‘holy’: the person of the unbeliever, under the Marriage-bond, is holy in the believer’s eyes, as indeed every possession and instrument of life must be (see 1 Timothy 4:3-5 )
Law - The sabbath, Marriage, sacrifices (Genesis 2; Genesis 4; Exodus 16:23-29), distinction of clean and unclean (Genesis 7:2), the shedding of blood for blood (Genesis 9:6), circumcision (Genesis 17), the penalty for fornication, and the Levirate usage (a brother being bound to marry and raise up seed by a deceased brother's widow, Genesis 38:8; Genesis 38:24) were some of the patriarchal customs which were adopted with modifications by the Mosaic code
Scribes - Even in the time of Ezra a feud had arisen between those who held strictly by the Law—especially in the matter of foreign alliances—and those who, like the aristocratic high-priestly families, had sought to increase their influence by Marriage with outsiders
Individuality - The woman of Samaria, no longer able to command the protection of even the poorest Marriage tie, and too disreputable to appear at the well except when the midday sun kept the other women at home, is offered living water to refresh her soul parched for sympathy, and is so interpreted to herself that she said, ‘He told me all that ever I did’ (John 4:1-26)
Essenes - Josephus speaks of a branch who allowed Marriage (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) ii
Aaron - Their pretext against Moses was his Ethiopian wife, a Marriage abhorrent to Hebrew feelings
the Prodigal Son - From the temptation and fall of Adam, on to the Marriage supper of the Lamb-all the history of the Church of God, and all the experiences of the individual sinner and saint, are to be found set forth in this most wonderful of all our Lord's histories
Roman Catholics - That Marriage is a sacrament, they think evident from Ephesians 5:32 : "This is a great mystery," representing the mystical union of Christ and his church
Individuality - The woman of Samaria, no longer able to command the protection of even the poorest Marriage tie, and too disreputable to appear at the well except when the midday sun kept the other women at home, is offered living water to refresh her soul parched for sympathy, and is so interpreted to herself that she said, ‘He told me all that ever I did’ (John 4:1-26)
Night (2) - In Palestine, as in all Eastern lands, the Marriage ceremony was celebrated after nightfall; lamps and torches were always the accompaniment of weddings (cf
Obedience (2) - at the Marriage in Cana of Galilee (John 2:4)
Sacrifice And Offering - Still more numerous were the special occasions of sacrifice the installation of a king ( 1 Samuel 11:15 , the arrival of an honoured guest, family events such as the weaning of a child, a circumcision, a Marriage, the dedication of a house ( Deuteronomy 20:5 ): no compact or agreement was completed until sealed by a sacrifice ( Genesis 31:54 etc
Solomon - nothing is said of the intrigues attending his accession, his foreign Marriages and idolatry, or his final troubles, even with Jeroboam. ( a ) Early in his reign he married Pharaoh’s daughter ( 1 Kings 3:1 ), who brought as her Marriage portion Gezer ( 1 Kings 9:16 )
Jacob - The valley was suitable for the recuperation of the flocks and herds after so long a journey; and it is probable, from the character of the buildings erected, as well as from the fact that opportunity must be given for Dinah, one of the youngest of the children ( Isaiah 30:21 ), to reach a Marriageable age ( Isaiah 34:2 ff. But most of the difficulties disappear on the assumption that Shechem’s Marriage was, as was natural, expedited, a delight to himself and generally approved amongst his kindred ( Genesis 34:19 )
Hating, Hatred - He forbade hatred even of an enemy (Luke 6:27); He condemned evasion of the Fifth Commandment (1619114481_87), and taught the sanctity of the Marriage bond (Mark 10:2-9); He showed tender thought for His mother (John 19:25 f
Example - The inevitable limitations of mere statutes He overcomes by an appeal to the Divine example and order (as in the case of the law of the Sabbath and the law of Marriage, John 5:17, Matthew 19:4-9, in the latter case appealing also to Scripture as well as to fact)
Friendship - (a) The area within which the grace may be displayed is much extended by the teaching of Christianity upon the dignity of woman, whereby Marriage loses any trace of the offence with which even many enlightened Jews regarded it,* Angels - ...
They neither marry nor are given in Marriage; and so in the resurrection life there is no marrying, for men will be ‘as angels in heaven’ (Matthew 22:30, Mark 12:25), ‘equal to angels’ (ἰσάγγελοι, Luke 20:36)
Psalms - And the conquest in the Psalms is followed, like the conquest in the Revelation, by the Marriage of the conqueror
Poetry - Marriage occasions furnished the very best opportunity for the composition of songs, and for their execution to the accompaniment of music
Nature And Natural Phenomena - There is the happiest Marriage of word and fact, type and antitype, in His teaching
Priscillianus And Priscillianism, Priscillian - Marriage was proscribed; austerities of all sorts required
Sidonius Apollinaris, Saint - Avitus had two sons, Ecdicius and Agricola, with whom, after his Marriage, Sidonius lived on most friendly and affectionate terms
Church, the - The image of Marriage is applied to God and Israel in the Old Testament (see Isaiah 54:5-6 ; 62:5 ; Hosea 2:7 ; etc
Hannah - All the more-Why is it? Is it to spare and shield them from the preoccupation and the dispersion of affection, and from the coldness and the rudeness and the neglect of one another that so many of their neighbours suffer from? And is it to teach them a far finer tenderness, and a far rarer honour, and a far sweeter solicitude for one another? Or, on the other hand, is it out of pure jealousy on God's part? Is it that He may be able to say to them, Am I not better to thee than ten sons? Or, again, is it in order to make them meet, long before His other sons and daughters around them are made meet, for that life in which they shall neither marry nor be given in Marriage? Which of all these reasons, or what other reason, has their God for what He does with so many of His best saints? But all this time we have been intruding into those things of which he says to us-What is that to thee?...
Elkanah of Mount Ephraim, Hannah's husband, was, as we say, a true gentleman
Bible - ...
The lovely character of Christ in the Bible, the perfect manhood and Godhead combined, above whatever uninspired man conceived not to say attained, the adaptation of the Bible to man's varied distresses (which occupy the larger part of it), and to his circumstances in all times and places, the completeness wherewith the end corresponds to the beginning, the close presenting before us man enjoying God's presence and Marriage-like union with Him, no curse, no sin, no pain, no death, and the tree of life and waters of life which the beginning represented him as possessing before the fall, all assure us that "the words of the Lord are pure, as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times" (Psalms 12:6)
Maccabees - , son of Alexander and Alexandra, became a member of the household of Herod after the latter’s Marriage with Mariamme
Number - It is a little difficult to reconcile with the well-known Oriental custom of early Marriage
Kingdom of God - They were to avoid divorce, refrain from Marriage, love their enemies, turn the other cheek, not retaliate, give to whoever had a need
Jeremiah, Theology of - It is especially in chapters 2-3 that the pain of God surfaces, and in the context of rejection, as of a spouse in a Marriage: "Does a maiden forget her jewelry, a bride her wedding ornaments? Yet my people have forgotten me, days without number" (2:32)
Hebrews, Epistle to the - A few exhortations follow as to love, hospitality, and the Marriage bond
Angels (2) - ]'>[5] nor are given in Marriage [9], but are as the angels of God in heaven
Jonathan - ' A wife's Marriage ring is the seal of her husband's covenant with her, and her covenant with him
Paul - He offered guidance in Marriage matters: 1 Corinthians 7:1
Timothy, First And Second, Theology of - Apparently, there were hypocrites who were forbidding Marriage and were advocating abstention from certain foods, things that Paul insists were among the good things created by God to be rightfully enjoyed
Timothy And Titus Epistles to - ...
The Spirit, through prophets in the Church, perhaps also through the words of written prophecy, foretells that there will be a great apostasy, led by teachers under demonic influence, who will enjoin abstinence from Marriage and certain foods
Gods, Pagan - Hera, whose Roman equivalent was Juno, was the wife of Zeus and goddess of Marriage, women, and motherhood
Holy, Holiness - Sexual purity within and without Marriage, real and submissive lifestyle commitments that cause unbelievers to reflect on the nature of the Christian God, blamelessness of heart, good works, contentment, and constant praise are but a few of the results of the new nature God both imputes and imparts to the New Testament believer
Leprosy - The Talmud teaches that ẓâra‘ath refers to any disease with cutaneous eruptions or sores, and indeed some references appear to demonstrate that the writers considered the disease non-contagious; as, for example, the rule that a bridegroom, suspecting himself affected, might wait till seven days after his Marriage before reporting his condition
Dependence - The symbol of the Marriage relationship, with all the consequences involved, is not only found in the Johannine idealism (Revelation 19:7; Revelation 21:2; Revelation 21:9), but discovers itself underlying St
Christian Life - Paul has frequently been criticized, but on the whole they made for domestic purity and the strengthening of the Marriage tie, in an age when the matrimonial relationship was losing its binding and sacred sanctions
Doctrines - Again He spoke of the Kingdom as future, and that in connexion with the final coming, the Parousia, of the Son of Man; so in the parables of the Great Supper (Luke 14:15; Luke 14:24), of the Marriage Feast (Matthew 22:1-14), of the Ten Virgins (Matthew 25:1-13)
Sacraments - Paul asserts regarding Marriage, τὸ μυστήριον τοῦτο μέγα ἐστίν
Vespasian - By a statute of the same year certain officers and men of the household troops were given the right to enter on legal Marriage
Bethlehem - With Ruth the Moabitess, through her Marriage with Boaz, the ‘mighty man of wealth’ of Bethlehem-judah (Ruth 2:1), there entered a strain of Gentile blood,—although we remember that Lot, the ancestor of Moab, was the nephew of the great ancestor of Israel—into the pedigree of Christ according to the flesh (Matthew 1:5), as if in token that, in a day still far off, Jew and Gentile should be one in Him
Fall (2) - —Our Lord makes no reference to the story of the Fall in all His recorded teaching, His only allusion to our first parents at all being the general statement in connexion with Marriage (Matthew 19:4, Mark 10:6)
Sin - 24:1-4, after forbidding adulterous Marriage practices, concludes: “… For that is abomination before the Lord: and thou shalt not cause the land to sin …” (KJV); the RSV renders this passage: “You shall not bring guilt upon the land
Papyri And Ostraca - leases, accounts and receipts, contracts of Marriage and divorce, wills, denunciations, notes of trials, and tax-papers, are there in innumerable examples; moreover, there are letters and notes, schoolboys’ exercise-books, horoscopes, diaries, petitions, etc
Peter, First Epistle of - , Marriage, slavery, obedience to civil rulers; and how much of this was common Christian belief and practice
Leucius, Author of n.t. Apocryphal Additions - It condemned Marriage and regarded all generation as the work of the evil principle; denied that demons were created by God; related childish stories of miraculous restoration to life, of both men and cattle; and in the Acts of John used language which the Iconoclasts regarded as favouring them
Corinthians, First And Second, Theology of - 13]'>[4] their sexual abstinence in Marriage Create, Creation - The Marriage relationship (2:24-25) symbolizes all other forms of human coexistence designed to satisfy the primal yearning for fellowship
Education in Bible Times - At age twenty a young man was ready for Marriage and independent full-time employment, and at age thirty he might assume an official position of responsibility
Romans, Theology of - ...
The exhortation of 6:15-23 is for the Romans to live no longer as slaves of sin but as slaves of God; in 7:1-6, to live as those freed from a former Marriage by death of the previous partner so that one may marry again (in this case, Christ)
Dates - -(2) The Marriage of Felix and Drusilla is, according to Josephus, rendered impossible before 55
Honorius, Flavius Augustus, Emperor - 4 Marriage with a deceased wife's sister or husband's brother was forbidden
Joshua - Had Moses house, then, been so divided against itself that it fell upon his two sons? And had Miriam and Aaron been right after all in their hot opposition to their brother's Marriage with the Ethiopian woman? We ask these questions at the text, but we get no answer
Moses - However, his Marriage to the Ethiopian must have been at a later period than Josephus states, namely, after Zipporah's death in the wilderness wanderings
House - ...
Should occasion arise, through the Marriage of a son or otherwise, to enlarge the house, this was done by building one or more additional rooms on another side of the court
Biblical Theology - The clarity of his God-given insights into the apostolic office, the nature of life "in Christ, " justification by grace through faith, the mission of the church to Jew and Gentile alike, the ongoing place of ethnic Israel in the divine plan, the sanctity of Marriage and the sex roles God ordained, the practical outworkings of Christ's Spiritall these and more are the priceless heirlooms granted to the church, largely Gentile since first-century times, through Paul, an ex-Pharisee
God - Traces of ‘Animism,’ or belief in the activity of the spirits of one’s dead relations, and its consequence ‘Ancestor-worship,’ have been found in the mourning customs of Israel, such as cutting the hair, wounding the flesh, wearing sackcloth, funeral feasts, reverence for tombs, and the levirate Marriage, and in the name elohim ( i
Judges (1) - The fourteenth chapter gives an account of Samson’s courtship and Marriage with the Philistine woman of Timnah: Judges 13:1-4 his first meeting with her, and his desire that his parents should go down to Timnah to secure her for him, they at first demur, but ultimately they accompany him thither
Jesus Christ - John's denunciation of Herod Antipas's illegal Marriage to his brother's wife provoked her ire, his imprisonment, and ultimately his death
Gospels (2) - either as unnecessary, such divorce being almost unheard of, or as implied in our Lord’s declaration that Marriage, generally speaking, is indissoluble
Immanuel - ’ All that can with certainty be said of the word used by Isaiah is that it indicates a young woman of Marriageable age, but says nothing as to whether she is married or not. In its original meaning ‘it expresses the fact that the great mythic mother-goddess was independent of the Marriage tie’ (p
Lord's Supper (ii) - In a further sense they refer to the ‘marriage supper of the Lamb, (Revelation 19:9); the ‘kingdom of God’ is the consummated Kingdom of glory: the drinking ‘new’ is in that state in which ‘all things’ are made ‘new’ (Revelation 21:5), newness being a characteristic feature of the future as well as of the present Christian life
Matthew, Gospel According to - In relation to sexual morality, they were to be chaste in thought (Matthew 5:28); Marriage was an indissoluble bond, broken only by adultery (Matthew 19:9)
Hellenism - A Marriage between East and West, symbolized by his own wedding with Roxane at Persepolis, was his aim
Colossians, Epistle to the - Of the specific Essene prohibition of Marriage there is no trace at Colossae
Gregorius Nyssenus, Bishop of Nyssa - The date of this temporary desertion must be placed either before 361 or after 363, about the same time as his Marriage
Psalms - Psalm 42; Psalm 43; Psalm 84; Psalm 86 (according to Hengstenberg, as occurring in the midst of Korahitic psalms though superscribed with David's name), refer to Absaiom's rebellion; Psalm 44 on the invasion of the Edomites (2 Samuel 8:13; 1 Chronicles 18:12; 1 Kings 11:15-16); Psalm 49 of general import; Psalm 45 on King Messiah's Marriage to Israel and the church, in Solomon's time; Psalm 47; Psalm 48; Psalm 83, in Jehoshaphat's time; Psalm 46; Psalm 87, refer to Sennacherib's host overthrown before Jerusalem, in Hezekiah's reign; Psalm 85; Psalm 88; Psalm 89, before the Babylonian captivity
John, the Gospel by - ...
John 2 gives a type of millennial blessing in the Marriage feast (Jesus being the source of the 'good wine' — the best joy — when the wine of Israel had run out), and His divine right in cleansing the temple would be proved by His power in raising the temple of His body, by which, for the time, the material temple was set aside
Joseph - Pharaoh doubtless ordered the Marriage, to link his prime minister with the noblest in the land
Revelation, the - Its day being over, the Marriage of the Lamb is come and His wife is ready
Elijah - " But Elijah discerned in Joram the covetous and murderous spirit which would frustrate all Jehoshaphat's forethought, the fatal result of the latter's carnal policy in forming Marriage alliance with wicked Ahab
Babel - Nabopolassar deserted to the enemy, arranged a Marriage between his son Nebuchadnezzar and the Median leader's daughter, and joined hi besieging the Assyrian capital
Moravians - Their children are educated with peculiar care; their subjection to their superiors and elders is singular, and, appears particularly striking in their missions and Marriages. ) In Marriage, they may only form a connexion with those of their own communion. And as the lot must be cast to sanction their union, each receives his partner as a divine appointment; and, however strange this method may appear to those who consult only their passions or their interest, it is observable, that no where fewer unhappy Marriages are found than among the Brethren
Samaria, Samaritans - Some twenty years ago, the Samaritans, fearing the extinction of their sect, sought to arrange for intermarriage with the Jews, but this was refused. ...
In accordance with the Law, the levirate Marriage is practised; but with the difference, that it is not the brother, but the nearest friend that takes his wife
Egypt - As absolute, Pharaoh could command the Marriage of Joseph to the daughter of the priest of On, however reluctant the priesthood might be to admit a foreigner
Israel - The Marriages of individuals may represent the alliances or union of tribes. Israel is called an Aramæan ( Deuteronomy 26:5 ), and the account of the Marriage of Jacob ( Genesis 29:1-35 ; Genesis 30:1-43 ; Genesis 31:1-55 ) shows that Israel was kindred to the Aramæans. This latter statement is perhaps true for those Canaanites who held out in these fortresses, but reasons will be given later for believing that by intermarriage a gradual fusion between Canaanites and Israelites took place
Law - Our Lord’s reformation of the Marriage law is also a case for ( b ) above: He rectifies the law by the aid of the law; in man’s creation He finds a principle which nullifies the provisions that facilitated divorce
John (the Apostle) - On the next day after his first meeting with Jesus, John accompanied Him to Galileé, and was present at the Marriage feast at Cana (John 2:1-11)
Messiah - The father of Joseph, as mentioned by Luke, seems to have been his father by Marriage only; so that it was, in reality, Mary's pedigree that is traced by Luke, though under her husband's name; and this being the natural line of descent, and that of Matthew the legal one, by which, as a king he would have inherited the crown, there is no inconsistency between them
Gnosticism - Every union of philosophy and religion is the Marriage of a mortal with an immortal: the religion lives; the philosophy grows old and dies
Law (2) - In John 2:6 we read of the six stone water-pots for the water of purification at the Marriage in Cana; and the same Gospel tells us how the Jews purified themselves for the Passover (John 11:55), or took precautions against defilement which would disqualify them from eating it (John 18:28)
Ambrosius of Milan - According to him, Marriage is the more painful state, as well as the less favourable to spiritual devotion
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - Another treatise written during this period, against the layman HELVIDIUS, the pupil of Auxentius of Milan, on the perpetual virginity of Mary, though its main points are well argued, exhibits the same fanatical aversion to Marriage, combined with a supercilious disregard of his opponent which was habitual to Jerome. , where all these incidents are narrated), leaving Paulina, then of Marriageable age, and her young brother Toxotius, embarked at the same time, but visited Epiphanius in Cyprus on their way
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - Marriage with a deceased wife's sister he denounced as prohibited by the laws both of Scripture and nature ( Ep
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - 3) Anthusa, while John was an infant, was left a widow at the age of twenty, refused all offers of Marriage, and devoted herself to the education of her boy and the care of his property ( de Sacerdot
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - Marriage he condemned
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - 297), and contemplated Marriage, at the same time returning to his former manner of life (Soz