What does Mansion mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Mansion
MANSION. The English word occurs in Scripture only in John 14:2 , ‘In my Father’s house are many man-sioos’ (RVm [1] ‘Or, abiding places ’). Its retention is an archaism, for the modern connotation of a house of some dignity is quite lacking from the word as used by Tindale (1525), apparently from the Vulg. [1] mansiones , ‘abiding places.’ The Gr. word ( monç ), like the Latin, means (1) the act of abiding, (2) a place of abode. In the NT it occurs also in John 14:23 , where ‘make our abode’ is Greek idiom for ‘abide.’ Hence the thought in John 14:2 is simply that there is ample room for the disciples in the Father’s house. In the LXX [3] the Gr. word occurs only once, viz. 1Ma 7:38 , ‘give them no abiding place’ (RV [4] ‘suffer them not to live any longer’).
S. W. Green.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Mansion
Place to dwell or abide, separate living quarters.
Before going away, Jesus promised to make provision of a dwelling place for His disciples (John 14:2 ). The Greek noun means “abiding places.” KJV translated this as “mansions,” which meant a dwelling place but has come to represent an elaborate, expensive house in English. Thus modern translations read, “dwelling places” or “rooms.” Christian theology holds that Christ's followers will abide with Him eternally in heavenly dwelling places.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Mansion
MANSION (μονή, John 14:2; John 14:23).—1. ‘Mansion,’ like μονή, is properly an abstract noun, meaning ‘a staying,’ ‘an abiding.’ In English literature it is first found in Hampole’s Psalter, 5. 8 (c. [1] 1340 a.d.), ‘þai entire in til God is house of heuen and takis þaire joy and þaire mansyon in þaire perfeccioun.’ So in the B text of Piers Plowman, Langland says of Pride (B xiv. 26): ‘Arst in the maister than in the man some mansioun he hath’ (he dwelleth in the master rather than in the man). The C text (c. [1] 1393) keeps the word while it extends the limits of Pride’s abode (xvii. 59): ‘Other in the maister, other in the man, some mancion he shewith.’ But Hampole and Lydgate (1420) also use ‘mansion’ of a dwelling-place. A charter of Henry vi. (1444) uses it of a hostel, and Fabyan (1512) of the chief residence of a lord, whence it gains its modern meaning of ‘an imposing abode,’ which is seen even in Shakspeare (2 Henry IV. iii. ii. 351). Bacon, however, still uses the word in its abstract sense in the Advancement of Learning (1605), and both Shakspeare and Milton use it of ‘an abiding-place’ without the suggestion of a building (Timon of Athens, v. i. 218; Paradise Lost, i. 268, viii. 296). From the Vulgate mansiones it is used by Wyclif for ‘halting-places’ in Exodus 17:1, but in translations from the Greek (as Whiston’s Josephus, 1737) this meaning represents σταθμός, not μονή, and so has no bearing upon the sense of John 14:2. The Vulgate also uses mansiones in John 14:2, and is responsible for Hampole’s use of the English form of the word in the sense of ‘dwelling-places.’ That sense was confirmed in the language, partly by Chaucer (Knight’s Tale, 1116), but mainly by the influence of Tindale’s Version of the NT (1526), ‘In my fathers housse are many mansions,’ and (2 Corinthians 5:1) ‘Our erthy mancioun wherein we now dwell,’ copied by Milton in Il Penseroso, 92.
2. But while the English ‘mansion’ and the identical French word maison have retained from their common original only the developed meaning of ‘dwelling-place,’ the Greek μονή is nowhere in extant literature found with this meaning, save only in John 14:2. Westcott (with Liddell and Scott) explains its use in this verse by the supposed occurrence of the word in Pausanias (x. 31:7) in the sense of ‘a halting-place for the night.’ But the ordinary reading in that passage seems impossible Greek, and is certainly corrupt (see J. G. Frazer’s note): τέτμηται δὲ διὰ τῶν μονῶν ἡ ὁδός is not an intelligible expression for the traditional meaning, ‘there are halting-places at intervals upon the road.’ One MS reads μηνῶν, from which W. M. Ramsay conjectures διὰ τῶν Μηρηνῶν, ‘the road has been carried through the country of the M. (beside Minos’ tomb).’
Apart, then, from John 14:2, μονή remains a purely abstract noun, meaning (1) abiding, (2) continuance, (3) rest. The ease with which it passes from the first to the last of these meanings can be seen from Plato, Crat. 437 B, where μνήμη is defined as a μονή, and not a φορά; Ar. Phys. v. 6. 8 (ὥστε κινήσει μονὴ ἐναντία); Polybius, iv. 41, 4, 5, where it is twice coupled with στάσις; and most of all in Plutarch, whose writings (a.d. 80–120) are contemporary with St. John’s Gospel.
Like the classical authors, Plutarch still uses μονή, in the literal sense of ‘a stay’ or ‘a continuance’: οὔτε μονὴν ἐν τῶ βίῳ τοῖς ἀγαθοῖς οὔτε ἐξαγωγὴν τοῖς κακοῖς (1042 D), ἀλλὰ καὶ τούτοις μονὴν οἴονται καθήκουσαν εἶναι κἀκείνοις ἐξαγωγήν, 1063 D. But in 1024 F, though μονή answers to τὸ μένου, Plutarch opposes it, like Aristotle, to κίνησις: ἔστι γὰρ ἡ μὲν νόησις τοῦ νοοῦτος κίνησις περὶ τὸ μένον, ἡ δὲ δόξα μονὴ τοῦ αἰσθανομένου περὶ τὸ κινούμενον. So in 927 A the material elements as conceived by Empedocles are reduced to order by the introduction of the principle of love (φιλότητος ἐγγενομένης), ἳνα … τὰ μὲν κινήσεως τὰ δὲ μονῆς ἀνάγκαις ἐνδεθένπα … ἁρυονίαν καὶ κοινωνίαν ἀπεργάσηται τοῦ παντός, where μονή has the complete meaning of rest as opposed to motion. And in 747 C he uses the plural of ‘rests’ in dancing; ἐνταῦθα δὲ αἑ μοναὶ πέρατα τῶν κινήσεων εἰσίν.
In John 14:2, however, the immediate mention of ‘a place’ seems to demand a concrete meaning for μοναί, though it has no parallel elsewhere. If so, the senses of ‘abode’ in vv. 2 and 23, concrete and abstract respectively, will be derived from the idea of rest that has become attached to the word, as well as from the original idea of remaining. The difference is seen at once when the μονὴν ποιεῖσθαι of John 14:23 is compared with the same phrase in Thuc. i. 131: Pausanias the victor of Plataea, intriguing with the Persians in Asia Minor, was ‘prolonging his stay to no good purpose’ (οὐκ ἐπ ̓ ἀγαθῷ τὴν μονὴν ποιούμενος), μονήν, as the Scholiast remarks, being practically equivalent to ἀργίαν, ‘idleness.’ In John 14:23 the phrase combines, like μοναί in John 14:2, the meanings of ‘abiding’ and ‘rest’ with that of the ‘home’ in which the rest is found. All the same suggestions are found in 1 Maccabees 7:38, the only passage in the LXX Septuagint where μονή occurs: μνήσθητι τῶν δυσφημιῶν αὐτῶν, καὶ μὴ δῳς αὐτοῖς μονήν (‘and suffer them not to live any longer,’ Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ).
3. The μονή of the Christian in the spiritual world (John 14:2) and the μονή of God in the Christian (John 14:23) are evidently intended to be correlative: ‘Abide in me, and I in you’ (John 15:4). Their consummation realizes the ideal of John 17:21; John 17:23; meanwhile they are the NT fulfilment of the two OT ideals of rest: ‘Rest in the Lord and wait patiently for him’ (Psalms 37:7), and ‘Arise, O Lord, into thy resting-place; thou, and the ark of thy strength’ (Psalms 132:8). John 14:2, that is, refers not only to the perpetual ‘rest’ or ‘home’ in the life hereafter, but, like v. 23, to the ‘abiding’ fellowship with the Divine in this life (Matthew 28:20, Revelation 21:8). See artt. Abiding, and Father’s House.
Literature.—For the English word see Oxford English Dict., where its history is fully illustrated; Aldis Wright’s Bible Word-Book, 387, 388; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible iii. 238. The Greek word is very insufficiently treated both in Stephanus and in Liddell and Scott; for Plutarch’s uses see Wyttenbach’s Index, where, however, some references are misprinted. Reference may further be made to Expos. Times, viii. [3] 496, x. [4] 303; Expositor, ii. ii. [5] 281, iii. [6] 397, iv. vi. [7] 209; A. Maclaren, The Holy of Holies (1890), p. 12; R. W. Dale, Christ and the Future Life (1895), pp. 33–84; J. Parker, City Temple Pulpit, i. (1899), p. 259.
Frank Richards.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Mansion
John 14:2 (b) Our blessed Lord used this word to describe the wonderful place He is preparing in glory for His own children. We do not know what it is like, nor just where in glory it will be located, but we do know that if the architect of the universe is making it, it will be gorgeous, glorious and marvelous.
Webster's Dictionary - Mansion
(1):
(n.) A twelfth part of the heavens; a house. See 1st House, 8.
(2):
(n.) The house of the lord of a manor; a manor house; hence: Any house of considerable size or pretension.
(3):
(n.) A dwelling place, - whether a part or whole of a house or other shelter.
(4):
(n.) The place in the heavens occupied each day by the moon in its monthly revolution.
(5):
(v. i.) To dwell; to reside.

Sentence search

Casa - ) A house or Mansion
Mains - ) The farm attached to a Mansion house
Tenantless - ) Having no tenants; unoccupied; as, a tenantless Mansion
Roomy - ) Having ample room; spacious; large; as, a roomy Mansion; a roomy deck
Rectory - ) A rector's Mansion; a parsonage house
Appurtenance - Appropriately, such buildings, rights and improvements, as belong to land, are called the appurtenances as small buildings are the appurtenances of a Mansion
Hall - ) A name given to many manor houses because the magistrate's court was held in the hall of his Mansion; a chief Mansion house
Domicile - ) An abode or Mansion; a place of permanent residence, either of an individual or a family
Eliashib - He rebuilt the eastern city wall (3:1), his own Mansion being in that quarter, on the ridge Ophel (3:20,21)
Habitation - Place of abode a settled dwelling a Mansion a house or other place in which man or any animal dwells
Domain - ) Landed property; estate; especially, the land about the Mansion house of a lord, and in his immediate occupancy; demesne
Castle - ) Any strong, imposing, and stately Mansion
Pithom - (pi' thahm) Egyptian place name Per-Atum meaning, “mansion or estate of Atum” (an Egyptian god)
Nest - The place or bed formed or used by a bird for incubation or the Mansion of her young, until they are able to fly
Quarantine - ) The period of forty days during which the widow had the privilege of remaining in the Mansion house of which her husband died seized
Castle - The house or Mansion of a nobleman or prince
Harbor - ) The Mansion of a heavenly body
Battle Abbey - Suppressed, 1538, the buildings were given to Sir Anthony Browne, who tore them down and built a Mansion on the site, leaving only the entrance and some ruins which still remain
Mansion - Mansion. ]'>[2] Mansiones , ‘abiding places
Garden - A piece of ground appropriated to the cultivation of herbs, or plants, fruits and flowers usually near a Mansion-house
Baalzebub (Beelzebub) - On the other hand, if the NT spelling, ‘Baal of the Mansion (temple),’ is to be preferred, it would seem to indicate that the OT form is a deliberate perversion originating with some pious scribe, who was perhaps offended at such a title being given to any other than Jahweh
Seat - Mansion residence dwelling abode as Italy the seat of empire
Rest - " God's rest ("My rest" Hebrews 4:3) was a sabbatism, so will ours be; a home for the exile, a Mansion for the pilgrim, a sabbath for the workman weary of the world's weekday toil
Paradise - ) From Sanskrit paradesa , "a foreign ornamental garden" attached to a Mansion (Nehemiah 2:8; Ecclesiastes 2:5 "gardens," Song of Solomon 4:13 "orchard," pardes )
Lazarus - Poor Lazarus sat outside the Mansion of the nameless rich man to receive whatever food might fall from the banquet table (Luke 16:19-31 )
Field - A piece of land inclosed for tillage or pasture any part of a farm, except the garden and appurtenances of the Mansion properly land not covered with wood, and more strictly applicable to tillage land than to mowing land, which is often called meadow
Mansion - MANSION (μονή, John 14:2; John 14:23). ‘Mansion,’ like μονή, is properly an abstract noun, meaning ‘a staying,’ ‘an abiding. ’ But Hampole and Lydgate (1420) also use ‘mansion’ of a dwelling-place. From the Vulgate Mansiones it is used by Wyclif for ‘halting-places’ in Exodus 17:1, but in translations from the Greek (as Whiston’s Josephus, 1737) this meaning represents σταθμός, not μονή, and so has no bearing upon the sense of John 14:2. The Vulgate also uses Mansiones in John 14:2, and is responsible for Hampole’s use of the English form of the word in the sense of ‘dwelling-places. ’ That sense was confirmed in the language, partly by Chaucer (Knight’s Tale, 1116), but mainly by the influence of Tindale’s Version of the NT (1526), ‘In my fathers housse are many Mansions,’ and (2 Corinthians 5:1) ‘Our erthy mancioun wherein we now dwell,’ copied by Milton in Il Penseroso, 92. But while the English ‘mansion’ and the identical French word maison have retained from their common original only the developed meaning of ‘dwelling-place,’ the Greek μονή is nowhere in extant literature found with this meaning, save only in John 14:2
Unbelievers - According to them, the most horrible crimes or the purest virtues are all equally the same, since an eternal annihilation shall soon equalise the just and the impious, and for ever confound them both in the dreary Mansion of the tomb
Bethany - One of our modern travellers tells us, that, at the entrance into it, there is an old ruin, called the castle of Lazarus, supposed to have been the Mansion house where he and his sisters resided
Lord - ...
But now I was the lord of this fair Mansion
Eliakim - Antitypically, "the government shall be upon Messiah's shoulder" (Isaiah 9:6; Isaiah 22:22); He shuts or opens at will the access to the heavenly Mansion (Revelation 3:7), He has the keys also of hell (the grave) and death (Revelation 1:18)
Place - ) A position which is occupied and held; a dwelling; a Mansion; a village, town, or city; a fortified town or post; a stronghold; a region or country
Abiding - ‘Mansions’ ((Revised Version margin) ‘abiding-places’) is the stately rendering (Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885), through the Vulgate Mansiones, of the noun in John 14:2; but it becomes impossible in John 14:23 of the same chapter when the translators fall back on ‘abode. ’ Further, in the English of to-day ‘mansion’ suggests merely a building, and that of an ostentatious type. The Scottish ‘manse,’ self-contained, modest, and secure, would be a nearly exact equivalent if it carried with it more than the idea of a dwelling-house; yet neither it nor ‘mansion’ has any correspondent verb. ...
As soon as the student turns from the Synoptists to the Johannine literature, the idea of ‘mansion’ (one could wish it were a theological term) becomes full, luminous, and suggestive. Moreover, as if the Evangelist and letter-writer would not suffer the spiritual point to be lost, he perpetually reminds his readers and children of the sphere of ‘mansion,’ and the source of its power
Abiding - ‘Mansions’ ((Revised Version margin) ‘abiding-places’) is the stately rendering (Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885), through the Vulgate Mansiones, of the noun in John 14:2; but it becomes impossible in John 14:23 of the same chapter when the translators fall back on ‘abode. ’ Further, in the English of to-day ‘mansion’ suggests merely a building, and that of an ostentatious type. The Scottish ‘manse,’ self-contained, modest, and secure, would be a nearly exact equivalent if it carried with it more than the idea of a dwelling-house; yet neither it nor ‘mansion’ has any correspondent verb. ...
As soon as the student turns from the Synoptists to the Johannine literature, the idea of ‘mansion’ (one could wish it were a theological term) becomes full, luminous, and suggestive. Moreover, as if the Evangelist and letter-writer would not suffer the spiritual point to be lost, he perpetually reminds his readers and children of the sphere of ‘mansion,’ and the source of its power
House - In a general sense, a building or shed intended or used as a habitation or shelter for animals of any kind but appropriately, a building or edifice for the habitation of man a dwelling place, Mansion or abode for any of the human species
Arden - Men sometimes build gardens for themselves with a Mansion, flowers, and all the peculiar treasures of the wealthy, but arrange no place for CHRIST
Beelzebub or Beelzebul - The supposition that the name corresponds to Aramaic בעלדבבא = ‘enemy’ is not very likely, nor the other that it is the Baal of the heavenly Mansion who became the Baal of the nether world (JAS, 1878, pp
Symmachus q. Aurelius - He had a Mansion on the Coelian near S
Quarter - ...
Head-quarters, the tent or Mansion of the commander in chief of an army
Father's House - Mansion. (3) The emphasis on the ‘many Mansions’ would seem to suggest that the perfect communion with God does not involve a mere absorption in Him. ’ The saying in the Gospel declares that there will be room for all these separate Mansions within the one ‘Father’s house
Origenists - That the earth after its conflagration shall become habitable again, and be the Mansion of men and animals, and that in eternal vicissitudes
Power of the Keys - But from the use of the word ‘key’ by Jesus Himself in Luke 11:52 , and from the analogy of Isaiah 22:22 , Revelation 3:7 , it is probable that the keys are those not of the storehouse but of the Mansion itself, and that the gift of them points to the privilege of admitting others into the Kingdom
Lazarus - ...
The parable is a drama with two scenes: (1) The conditions of the Rich Man and the Beggar here the former with his Mansion, his fine clothing, his sumptuous table; and the latter lying at his gateway, full of sores, with none to tend him, hungrily eyeing the feast, and glad of any scraps that were flung to him
Heaven - There is his Father's house, into which he is gone before, to prepare Mansions of bliss for his disciples; it is the kingdom conferred upon him as the reward of his righteousness, and of which he has taken possession as their forerunner, Acts 1:11 ; Hebrews 6:19-20 . Whiston supposes the air to be the Mansion of the blessed, at least for the present; and he imagines that Christ is at the top of the atmosphere, and other spirits nearer to or more remote from him according to the degree of their moral purity, to which he conceives the specific gravity of their inseparable vehicles to be proportionable
Epicureans - In their external shape the gods resemble men; and though the place of their residence is unknown to mortals; it is without doubt the Mansion of perfect purity, tranquillity, and happiness
Flavianus (4) i, Bishop of Antioch - As bishop he continued to occupy the family Mansion at Antioch, which he devoted to the reception of the sick and distressed of his flock
Abel - For the Holy Ghost also is the purchase of Christ's blood, a new heart also, and a whole lifetime of the means of grace The Bible also, the Sabbath day, the Lord's table, a minister after God's own heart, deep, divine, unsearchable providences, a peaceful death-bed, a happy resurrection morning, a place at the right hand of the Judge, an open acknowledgment and acquittal on the day of judgment, 'Come, ye blessed of My Father,' and then a Mansion with our own name in blood upon its door-post and its lintel to all eternity! Yes; precious blood indeed! What blood that must be that can so outery and drown silent in its depths all the accusing cries that are even now going up to God all behind me and all around me! I feel that I would need a whole Redeemer and all His redeeming blood to myself
Heaven - A building and Mansion of God, 2 Corinthians 5:1
the Rich Man And Lazarus - At the same time he did not issue an angry order that that putrifying corpse, called Lazarus, must no more pollute the air before the door of his Mansion
Talents - And, of course, he cannot enter into the joy of his lord, but from the brilliantly lit banqueting-hall where the feast is held is thrust into the homeless darkness outside the Mansion
Jerusalem - Jerusalem is the centre around which the exiled sons of Judah build, in imagination, the Mansions of their future greatness. The grave is strown with red earth, supposed to be of the Ager Damascenes of which Adam was made; by the side of the corpse is placed a stick, and the priest tells him that the devil will tempt him to become a Christian, but that he must make good use of his stick; that his trial will last three days, and that he will then find himself in a Mansion of glory," &c