What does Manna mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
μάννα the food that nourished the Israelites for forty years in the wilderness. / of the manna was kept in the ark of the covenant. / symbolically 4
מָ֑ן manna. 3
הַמָּן֙ manna. 2
מָן֙ manna. 1
הַמָּ֜ן manna. 1
וּמַנְךָ֙ manna. 1
הַמָּ֥ן manna. 1
וְהַמָּ֕ן manna. 1
הַמָּ֖ן manna. 1
מָ֣ן manna. 1

Definitions Related to Manna

H4478


   1 Manna.
      1a the bread from Heaven that fed the Israelites for 40 years of wilderness wanderings.
      1b means ‘What is it?’.
      

G3131


   1 the food that nourished the Israelites for forty years in the wilderness.
   2 of the Manna was kept in the ark of the covenant.
   3 symbolically, that which is kept in the heavenly temple for the food of angels and the blessed.
   Additional Information: Manna = “what is it”.
   

Frequency of Manna (original languages)

Frequency of Manna (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Manna
A sweet exudate, called in Arabic mann or mann es-sama (manna of heaven), which exudes in drops from the Tamarix Mannifera, the tarfa tree.
A similar substance yielded by other shrubs, or, according to Niebuhr, by a species of oak tree.
A laxative exudate of the flowering ash, Traximus Ornus.
A miraculous food sent by God to the Hebrews in the Exodus, described in Exodus 16, and Numbers 11. The etymology of the name is clearly given in Exodus 16: man hu, "wvhat is it?" It is a desperate rebellion against evidence to try to identify the miraculous manna of the Exodus with the natural exudates. The daily consumption of manna, as computed by Macalister was more than 300 tons; as he rightly declares "all the Tamarisks in the desert could not have yielded this daily provision." This natural exudate is only found during two months of autumn; it has been falsely described, having none of the properties asserted of the miraculous substance of the Exodus.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Manna Oil of Saints
An oily substance which is said to have flowed, or still flows, from the relics or burial places of certain saints. Sometimes, the oil in lamps that burn before their shrines, the water that flows from the wells near their burial places, or the oil and water which in some way have come in contact with their relics. These oils are or have been used by the faithful, with the belief that they will cure bodily and spiritual ailments through the intercession of the saints with whom the oils have some connection. At present the most famous of these oils is the Oil of Saint Walburga, mentioned as early as the 9th century. It flows from the stone slab and the surrounding metal plate on which rest the saint's relics in her church in Eichstadt, Bavaria. A chemical analysis has shown that the fluid is water, but since it came into contact with the relics of the saint, the fact justifies the practise of using it as a remedy for diseases of body and soul. Among other famous oils are the Oil of Saint Menas, from a holy well near the saint's shrine in the Libyan desert, and the Oil of Saint Nicholas of Myra, which emanates from his relics at Bari, Italy, whither they were brought in 1087.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Manna
Deuteronomy 8:3 (a) This bread is a type of CHRIST, the living Bread. GOD gave it to Israel in a miraculous way. He is the living bread which sustains the lives of GOD's people. It was always pure white. It was sweet. There was enough for all. (See also John 6:49; Hebrews 9:4).
Revelation 2:17 (a) This bread is a type of some sort of unseen and unknown blessings which are given by GOD for the blessing of His people when they live victorious lives for Him. It is a gift that is lovely, precious, attractive and satisfying, but the character of it is unknown.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Manna
Heb. man-hu, "What is that?" the name given by the Israelites to the food miraculously supplied to them during their wanderings in the wilderness (Exodus 16:15-35 ). The name is commonly taken as derived from Man , An expression of surprise, "What is it?" but more probably it is derived from Manan , Meaning "to allot," and hence denoting an "allotment" or a "gift." This "gift" from God is described as "a small round thing," like the "hoar-frost on the ground," and "like coriander seed," "of the colour of bdellium," and in taste "like wafers made with honey." It was capable of being baked and boiled, ground in mills, or beaten in a mortar ( Exodus 16:23 ; Numbers 11:7 ). If any was kept over till the following morning, it became corrupt with worms; but as on the Sabbath none fell, on the preceding day a double portion was given, and that could be kept over to supply the wants of the Sabbath without becoming corrupt. Directions concerning the gathering of it are fully given (Exodus 16:16-18,33 ; Deuteronomy 8:3,16 ). It fell for the first time after the eighth encampment in the desert of Sin, and was daily furnished, except on the Sabbath, for all the years of the wanderings, till they encamped at Gilgal, after crossing the Jordan, when it suddenly ceased, and where they "did eat of the old corn of the land; neither had the children of Israel manna any more" (Joshua 5:12 ). They now no longer needed the "bread of the wilderness." This manna was evidently altogether a miraculous gift, wholly different from any natural product with which we are acquainted, and which bears this name. The manna of European commerce comes chiefly from Calabria and Sicily. It drops from the twigs of a species of ash during the months of June and July. At night it is fluid and resembles dew, but in the morning it begins to harden. The manna of the Sinaitic peninsula is an exudation from the "manna-tamarisk" tree (Tamarix mannifera), the el-tarfah of the Arabs. This tree is found at the present day in certain well-watered valleys in the peninsula of Sinai. The manna with which the people of Israel were fed for forty years differs in many particulars from all these natural products.
Our Lord refers to the manna when he calls himself the "true bread from heaven" (John 6:31-35 ; 4851-51 ). He is also the "hidden manna" (Revelation 2:17 ; Compare John 6:49,51 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Manna
There is a connection between the natural manna and the supernatural. The natural is the sweet juice of the tarfa , a kind of tamarisk. It exudes in May for about six weeks from the trunk and branches in hot weather, and forms small round white grains. It retains its consistency in cool weather, but melts with heat. It is gathered from the twigs or from the fallen leaves. The Arabs, after boiling and straining, use it as honey with bread. The color is a greyish-yellow, the taste sweet and aromatic. Ehrenberg says it is produced by an insect's puncture. It abounds in rainy seasons, some years it ceases. About 600 or 700 pounds is the present produce of a year. The region wady Gharandel (Elim) and Sinai, the wady Sheich, and some other parts of the peninsula, are the places where it is found. The name is still its Arabic designation, and is read on the Egyptian monuments (mennu , mennu hut , "white manna".) Gesenius derives it from manah , "to apportion." The supernatural character of the manna of Exodus at the same time appears.
(1) It was found not under the tamarisk, but on the surface of the wilderness, after the morning dew had disappeared.
(2) The quantity gathered in a single day exceeded the present produce of a year.
(3) It ceased on the sabbath.
(4) Its properties were distinct; it could be ground and baked as meal, it was not a mere condiment but nutritious as bread.
(5) It was found not merely where it still is, but Israel's whole way to Canaan (and not merely for a month or two each year, but all the year round). The miracle has all the conditions and characteristics of divine interpositions.
(1) A necessity, for Israel could not otherwise have been sustained in the wilderness.
(2) A divine purpose, namely to preserve God's peculiar people on which His whole providential government and man's salvation depended.
(3) Harmony between the natural and the supernatural; God fed them, not with the food of other regions, but with that of the district.
The local coloring is marked. Moses the writer could neither have been deceived as to the fact, nor could have deceived contemporaries and eye-witnesses. (Speaker's Commentary) The Scripture allusions to it are in Exodus 16:14-36; Numbers 11:7-9; Deuteronomy 8:3-16; Joshua 5:12; Psalms 78:24-25 ("angels' food"; not as if angels ate food, but food from the habitation of angels, heaven, a directly miraculous gift), Matthew 4:4; John 6:31-50; 1 Corinthians 10:3. The manna was a "small round thing as the hoar-frost on the ground," falling with the dew on the camp at night. They gathered it early every morning before the sun melted it.
If laid by for any following day except the sabbath it bred worms and stank. It was like coriander seed and bdellium, white, and its taste as the taste of fresh oil, like wafers made with honey (Numbers 11:7-9). Israel subsisted on it for 40 years; it suddenly ceased when they got the first new grain of Canaan. Vulgate, Septuagint, and Josephus (Ant. 3:1, sec. 6) derive manna from Israel's question to one another, maan huw' " 'what is this?' for they knew not what it was." God "gave it to His beloved (in) sleep" (Psalms 127:2), so the sense and context require. Israel each morning, in awaking, found it already provided without toil. Such is the gospel, the gift of grace, not the fruit of works; free to all, and needed by high and low as indispensable for true life.
To commemorate Israel's living on omers or tenth deals of manna one omer was put into a golden pot and preserved for many generations beside the ark. Each was to gather according to his eating, an omer apiece for each in his tent, a command testing their obedience, in which some failed, gathering more but gaining nought by it, for however much he gathered, on measuring it in his tent he found he had only as much as he needed for his family; type of Christian charity, which is to make the superfluity of some supply the needs of others. "that there may be equality" (2 Corinthians 8:14-15); "our luxuries should yield to our neighbor's comforts, and our comforts to his necessities" (John Howard). The manna typifies Christ.
(1) It falls from above (John 6:32, etc.) as the dew (Psalms 110:3; Micah 5:7) round the camp, i.e. the visible church, and nowhere else; the gift of God for which we toil not (John 6:28-29); when we were without merit or strength (Romans 5:6; Romans 5:8).
(2) It was gathered early; so we, before the world's heat of excitement melt away the good of God's gift to us (Psalms 63:1; Hosea 5:15; Hosea 6:4; Matthew 13:6).
(3) A double portion must be gathered for the sabbath.
(4) It was ground in the mill, as Christ was "bruised" for us to become our "bread of life."
(5) Sweet as honey to the taste (Psalms 34:8; Psalms 119:103; 1 Peter 2:3).
(6) It must be gathered "day by day," fresh each day; so today's grace will not suffice for tomorrow (1 Kings 8:59 margin; Matthew 6:11; Luke 11:3). Hoarded up it putrefied; so gospel doctrine laid up for speculation, not received in love and digested as spiritual food, becomes a savor of death not life (1 Corinthians 8:1).
(7) To the carnal it was "dry" food though really like "fresh oil" (Numbers 11:6; Numbers 11:8; Numbers 21:5): so the gospel to the worldly who long for fleshly pleasures of Egypt, but to the spiritual it is full of the rich savor of the Holy Spirit (2 Corinthians 2:14-16).
(8) Its preservation in the golden pot in the holiest typifies Jesus, now in the heavenly holiest place, where He gives of the hidden manna to him that overcometh (Revelation 2:17); He is the manna hidden from the world but revealed to the believer, who has now a foretaste of His preciousness; like the incorruptible manna in the sanctuary, the spiritual food offered to all who reject the world's dainties for Christ is everlasting, an incorruptible body, and life in Christ at the resurrection.
(9) The manna continued with Israel throughout their wilderness journey; so Christ with His people here (Matthew 28:19).
(10) It ceases when they gain the promised rest, for faith then gives place to sight and the wilderness manna to the fruit of the tree of life in the midst of the paradise of God (Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Manna
MANNA. The food of the Israelites during the wanderings ( Exodus 16:1 , Joshua 5:12 ), but not the only food available. Documents of various dates speak of ( a ) cattle ( Exodus 17:3 ; Exodus 19:13 ; Exodus 34:3 , Numbers 7:3 ; Numbers 7:6 f.), especially in connexion with sacrifice ( Exodus 24:5 ; Exodus 32:8 , Leviticus 8:2 ; Leviticus 8:25 ; Leviticus 8:31 ; Leviticus 9:4 ; Leviticus 10:14 , Numbers 7:15 ff.); ( b ) flour ( Numbers 7:13 ; Numbers 7:19 ; Numbers 7:25 etc., Leviticus 10:12 ; Leviticus 24:5 ); ( c ) food in general ( Deuteronomy 2:3 , Joshua 1:11 ).
1. The origin of the word is uncertain. In Exodus 16:13 the exclamation might be rendered, ‘It is mân !’ (note RVm [1] ). If so, the Israelites were reminded (but only vaguely, see Exodus 16:15 ) of some known substance. The similar Arabic word means ‘gift.’ More probably the words are a question ‘What is it?’ Unaware of the proper term, they thus spoke of manna as ‘the-what-is-it.’
2. The manna was flaky, small, and white (Exodus 16:14 ; Exodus 16:31 ). It resembled the ‘seed’ (better ‘fruit’) of the coriander plant ( Exodus 16:31 , Numbers 11:7 ), and suggested bdellium ( Numbers 11:7 [2]). It could be ground, and was stewed or baked ( Exodus 16:23 , Numbers 11:8 ). The taste is compared to that of honey-wafers ( Exodus 16:31 ), or oil ( Numbers 11:8 ), it was gathered fresh every morning early (but see § 4), for, if exposed to the sun, it melted ( Exodus 16:21 ; cf. Wis 19:2 ); if kept overnight (see § 4), it went had ( Exodus 16:19 f.). Each person was entitled to a measured ’omer of manna ( Exodus 16:19 ).
3. Many would identify manna with the juice of certain trees. The flowering ash (S. Europe) exudes a ‘manna’ (used in medicine); and a species of tamarisk found in the Sinai peninsula yields a substance containing sugar. The description of manna would not in every point support such an identification, but it is worth noting that manna is likened (see § 2) to bdellium, which is a resinous exudation. A more recent theory is that manna was an edible lichen like that found in Arabia, etc.
4. Manna would thus come under the category of ‘special providences,’ not ‘miracles.’ There can, however, be no doubt that the Biblical writers regarded it as miraculous. ( a ) There is enough for a host of ‘600,000 footmen.’ ( b ) The quantity gathered proves exactly suited to the consumer’s appetite ( Exodus 16:18 ). ( c ) The Sabbath supply (gathered the previous day) retains its freshness ( Exodus 16:23 f.). ( d ) An ‘omer of it is kept as a sacred object near ( Exodus 16:33 f.) but not within ( 1 Kings 8:9 ; ct. [3] Hebrews 9:4 , Revelation 2:17 ) the ark. ( e ) Allusions to it suggest the supernatural ( Nehemiah 9:20 , Psalms 78:24 f., Psa 105:40 , Esther 1:19 Esther 1:19 , Wis 16:20 ; Wis 19:21 ).
5. All this must lend significance to NT mention. Christ as the living bread is typified by manna ( John 6:31 ff., 1 Corinthians 10:3 ; 1 Corinthians 4:1-21 ); and secret spiritual sustenance is the reward for ‘him that overcometh’ ( Revelation 2:17 ).
H. F. B. Compston.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Manna
Manna was a kind of food that God first gave to the Israelites soon after they left Egypt. It remained their daily food for the next forty years (Exodus 16:4; Numbers 11:6; Psalms 78:23-24). It was not, however, their only food (Exodus 18:12; Leviticus 7:14-15; Leviticus 11:2-3; Leviticus 11:9; Numbers 11:31-34). God’s provision of the manna ceased once the people arrived in Canaan (Joshua 5:12).
The people of Israel gave the food the name ‘manna’ (meaning ‘What is it?’) because they did not know what else to call it (Exodus 16:15; Exodus 16:31). We today do not know exactly what the manna was or how it was made. Possibly it was a substance prepared by insects that sucked the gum from trees. It formed during the night and was ready to be collected in the morning. It was fine, flaky, tasted like wafers mixed with honey, and could be cooked in various ways (Exodus 16:14; Exodus 16:23; Exodus 16:31; Numbers 11:7-9).
God supplied the manna every morning, and the people had to eat it the same day. The only exceptions concerned the Sabbath rest day. There was no manna on Saturday mornings, but God gave two days’ supply each Friday, half of which the people kept for use on Saturday. Because the manna spoiled quickly, the people preserved the supply for Saturday by baking or boiling it beforehand. Moses controlled the collection and distribution of the manna so that no one had too much or too little (Exodus 16:4-5; Exodus 16:15-18; Exodus 16:23).
The command that prohibited keeping the manna overnight tested the people’s obedience. The promise that ensured complete Sabbath rest through the double supply each Friday tested their faith. But in both matters they failed (Exodus 16:19-30).
In accordance with God’s instructions, Moses put part of the manna in a jar, to keep as a memorial of how God fed his people in the wilderness. This jar was later placed in the ark of the covenant together with Aaron’s rod and the stone tablets inscribed with the law (Exodus 16:31-35; Hebrews 9:4).
God also used the manna to teach the Israelites that their lives depended not merely on the food they ate, but on their spiritual relationship with God (Deuteronomy 8:3; cf. Matthew 4:4). Jesus compared the gift of manna to satisfy physical hunger with the gift of himself to satisfy spiritual hunger. He did not need to make food fall from heaven, for he himself was the true bread from heaven (John 6:31-35). He gave himself as a sacrifice for sin, so that those who trust in him may have eternal life (John 6:48-51; cf. Revelation 2:17).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Manna
Manna, (what is this? Heb. mân). The chief food of the Israelites in the wilderness. Exodus 16:14-36; Numbers 11:7-9; Deuteronomy 8:3; Deuteronomy 8:16; Joshua 5:12; Psalms 78:24-25. The most remarkable things about the manna of the Israelites were: 1. That double the quantity was supplied on the day preceding the Sabbath or seventh day; 2. That on the Sabbath or seventh day none was furnished; 3. That what they kept from the sixth day to the seventh was sweet and good, while what they kept from any other day to the next day bred worms and became offensive. These miracles were wrought in attestation of the sanctity of the Sabbath. The manna of the Jews is described as "a small round thing," as small as "the hoarfrost on the ground," "like coriander seed" (in shape doubtless, perhaps in size and density), "of the color of bdellium." "and the taste of it like wafers made with honey." For forty years this miraculous supply of food was furnished daily to between 3,000,000 and 4,000,000 of people. Deuteronomy 29:5-6. It ceased while they were encamped at Gilgal, immediately after they had celebrated the passover for the first time in the Land of Promise. To commemorate this wonderful miracle a golden pot was provided, Exodus 16:33; Hebrews 9:4, and an omer (or one man's portion) of the manna put up for preservation and placed in or near the ark, that succeeding generations might see with their own eyes the very substance on which their fathers were miraculously fed in their long and perilous journeyings from Egypt to Canaan. The manna which is now used in medicine as a mild laxative is the juice of the flowering ash, a native of Sicily, Calabria, and other parts of the south of Europe. It is either naturally concreted, or exsiccated, and purified by art. The best manna is in oblong pieces or flakes of a pale yellow color; light, friable, and somewhat transparent. It has no characteristics in common with the manna miraculously supplied to the Israelites while journeying through the wilderness. Wherever the manna is referred to in Scripture, it is invariably regarded as a miraculous food sent directly from God. The Lord Jesus accepted the manna as a type of himself—the living bread which came down from heaven. "For the bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven and giveth life unto the world." John 6:33; John 6:48; John 6:50. The phrase "hidden manna," Revelation 2:17, figuratively describes the spiritual food which Christ supplies to those who believe in him and live by faith in him.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Manna
(man' naw) Grainlike substance, considered to be food from heaven, which sustained the Israelites in the wilderness and foreshadowed Christ, the true Bread from heaven.
Old Testament. The small round grains or flakes, which appeared around the Israelites' camp each morning with the dew, were ground and baked into cakes or boiled (Exodus 16:13-36 ). Their name may have come from the question the Israelites asked when they first saw them: “What is it (man hu)?” Today a type of manna has been identified with the secretions left on tamarisk bushes by insects feeding on the sap. The Bible emphasizes that God caused manna to appear at the right time and place to meet His people's needs.
New Testament Jesus assured the Jews that He, and not the wilderness food, was the true Bread from heaven which conferred eternal life on those who partook of it (John 6:30-58 ).
Barbara J. Bruce
King James Dictionary - Manna
MAN'NA, n.
1. A substance miraculously furnished as food for the Israelites in their journey through the wilderness of Arabia. Exodus 16 Josephus, Ant.B 3:1. considers the Hebrew word man, to signify what. In conformity with this idea, the seventy translate the passage, Exodus 16:15 . what is this? which rendering seems to accord with the following words, for they knew not what it was. And in the Encyclopedia, the translators are charged with making Moses fall into a plain contradiction. Art. Manna. But Christ and his apostles confirm the common version: "Not as your fathers ate manna, and are dead." John 6.58 . Hebrews 9:4 . And we have other evidence, that the present version is correct for in the same chapter, Moses directed Aaron to "take a pot and put a homer full of manna therein." Now it would be strange language to say, put an homer full of what, or what is it. So also verse 35. "The children of Israel ate manna forty years, &c." In both verses, the Hebrew word is the same as in verse 15.
2. In the materia medica, the juice of a certain tree of the ash-kind, the Fraxinus ornus, or flowering ash a native of Sicily, Calabria,and other parts of the south of Europe. It is either naturally concreted, or exsiccated and purified by art. The best manna is in oblong pieces or flakes of a whitish or pale yellow color, light, friable, and somewhat transparent. It is a mild laxative.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Manna
The miraculous "bread of heaven" (Psalm 78:24 ) that God provided for the Israelites while he led them through the Red Sea on dry ground and into the Wilderness of Sin (Exodus 16 ). The "small round substance" (v. 14) may have been produced by insects that punctured the fruit of the tamarisk tree, through it was consistently regarded in the Bible as a miraculous gift from God rather than as a product of nature. It was certainly miraculous in terms of its timing and quanity. .
Manna looked like coriander seed and tasted like wafers made with honey (v. 31). When the Israelites saw it, they asked each other, "What is it?" (Heb. man hu [1]). This led to the name "manna, " "what?" It came each morning, except on the Sabbath day. It could be collected each day for that day alone, and only as much as could be eaten in one day. If a person tried to collect more than needed or to store the manna for future needs, it would grow wormy and foul (v. 20). In this way it was impossible for the Israelites to evade total dependence on God or to use the manna greedily for personal gain. Miraculously, the manna could be preserved on the sixth day and eaten on the Sabbath, and it was not to be found on the Sabbath morning (vv. 22-29).
Eventually, the rebellious Israelites grew tired of the manna and regretted the day they were delivered from their bondage (Numbers 11:6 ). They came to detest the manna and longed instead for the rich foods of Egypt (v. 5). But God continued to give the Israelites a steady supply of manna during their forty years of desert wanderings. When Joshua and the children of Israel crossed the Jordan River and entered the promised land at Gilgal, they celebrated the Passover and ate the produce of the land. On that day, the manna ceased, again illustrating its miraculous provision (Joshua 5:12 ).
The purpose of the manna was to test Israel's faith, to humble them, and to teach them that one "does not live on bread alone but on every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord" (Deuteronomy 8:3,16 ). A hungry Jesus used this quote to refuse Satan's suggestion that he turn stones into bread (Matthew 4:4 ). Like the Israelites in the desert, Jesus was totally dependent on the provisions of his heavenly Father while in the wilderness of temptation (Matthew 4:11 ).
The people in Jesus' day misunderstood the significance of the manna. They longed for a physical miracle, like the manna, which would prove to them that Jesus' words were true (John 6:31 ). But Jesus wanted his disciples to seek for the bread of heaven that gives life to the world, instead of physical bread to satisfy their appetites. When they asked, "From now on give us this bread, " he answered, "I am the bread of life" (vv. 32-35). To the church in Pergamos, Jesus encouraged faithfulness by promising that true believers would receive "hidden manna" to eat (Revelation 2:17 ). Just as Moses' manna brought with it physical blessing, so this heavenly reward will bring eternal life.
William T. Arnold
See also Jesus Christ ; John, Theology of
Bibliography . F. S. Bodenheimer, BA 10 (1947):1-6; J. C. Slayton, ABD, 4:511; E. M. Yamauchi, WTJ 28 (1966):145-56.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Manna
MANNA.—The miracle of the loaves and fishes, by which Jesus fed five thousand men, stirred the multitudes to fanaticism (John 6:1-15). Their first impulse was to make Jesus king by force. On the morrow they followed Him across the sea to Capernaum, hoping that He would feed them again in some supernatural way, and suggesting the giving of bread from heaven as a suitable sign in confirmation of His high claims. Would not the prophet of Nazareth imitate the great lawgiver, who gave their fathers bread from heaven? Jesus turns their thoughts away from Moses to God: ‘It was not Moses that gave you the bread out of heaven, but my Father giveth you the true bread out of heaven.’ As God gave the fathers literal bread from heaven, so now He is giving to their children spiritual food that nourishes the soul eternally. ‘I am the bread of life; he that cometh to me shall not hunger, and he that believeth on me shall never thirst.’ ‘Your fathers did eat the manna in the wilderness, and they died.’ God has a far better gift than the manna that was gathered day by day in the wilderness. ‘I am the living bread that cometh down out of heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever; yea, and the bread which I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world’ (John 6:51).
In Revelation 2:17 the spiritual blessing promised by the glorified Christ to the victor in life’s battle is called ‘hidden manna.’
John R. Sampey.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Manna
In the margin of the Bible it is called Man-hu, (Exodus 16:15) meaning the bread with which the Lord fed. Israel in the wilderness. It was altogether miraculous: for this food began to fall from heaven from the time the Israelites arrived in the wilderness of Zin, which was the sixteenth day of the second month after their departure from Egypt, until that they came to Canaan, during the pilgrimage of forty years. And what rendered this daily mercy the more miraculous was, that on the Sabbath-days it never fell, during the whole of this eventful period. I beg the reader to read the interesting account of it, Exodus 16:1-36 throughout: it will well reward his attention, The children of Israel called it Man-hu; that is, they asked the question, "What is this, far it is peculiar?" And hence Moses, (Deuteronomy 8:3) reminds Israel of their surprize at first beholding it. "Who fed thee (said Moses) with that peculiar things which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know."
The miracle itself was designed to be a standing miracle, for Israel to remember and record in their generations for ever; hence an omer of it was to be reserved in a pot, and laid up before the Lord for a memorial. Here was a double proof of the miracle; for the manna itself was s perishable and delicate, that if only kept for day, it bred worms and stank; yet, to teach Israel to reverence the Sabbaths, that which we kept for the use of the Sabbath bred no worm nor stank; and the omer of it also which was laid up before the Lord, was preserved pure generation to generation.
It was also no less miraculous, the immense quantity which regularly fell every day in the supply. It gave supply to the whole camp Israel—six hundred thousand on foot that we men, besides children, and mixed multitude that went with Israel, came out of Egypt; therefore allowing for increase, we may safely put down near a million of souls, who were daily fed from the supply of manna. (See Exodus 12:37-38) The manna had a remarkable quality, which, though not miraculous, is recorded as worthy our observation. Though it melted at the heat of the sun, yet when brought into the tent it became hard, so that the people ground it in mills, or beat it in a mortar. (See Numbers 11:7-8 and Exodus 16:20-21) It may be proper to observe, that what is now called manna in the shop of the apothecary, hath no One resemblance or connection whatever with the manna of Scripture, but is the gum, or balsam, of certain trees. We are told indeed by historians, that in Arabia and in Calabria, and in other places, there is a dew on the ground still to be seen like manna. But that this cannot be similar to the manna of Israel is evident, for it is of medicinal quality, and affects the bowels. The Jews are so tenacious respecting the manna of their fathers, that they pronounce an anathema and execration on every one that would call in question the miraculous nature of it. And Christians ought not to be less earnest in defence of the same precious truth, since the manna of the Old Testament was but typical and figurative of the bread of life under the New. Jesus was all along thus represented to Israel; and was then, and is now, the living bread, by faith, with which the Lord feeds all the true Israel. (See John 6:31-58; Revelation 2:17)
Chabad Knowledge Base - Manna
The: the food from heaven provided to the Jews in the desert after the exodus from Egypt
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Manna
The food miraculously supplied from heaven to the Israelites during the forty years of their wanderings. Its name signifies 'what is it?' for they knew not what it was. It fell every morning except on the Sabbath, and had to be gathered early, or it melted. If kept till the second dayit bred worms, except the double quantity gathered on the day before the Sabbath, which was good on the second day. The quantity to be gathered was on an average an omer (about 4 pints) for every man. Some gathered more and some less, and when they measured it with an omer "he that gathered much had nothing over, and he that gathered little had no lack; they gathered every man according to his eating."
The explanation given by the Rabbis is that though several in a family went out to gather the manna, when it was brought home and measured it was found to be just an omer for each of them. The more probable explanation is that though on an average an omer was the portion for each, some needed more and others less, and therefore every one gathered 'according to his eating,' according to what he knew he would require, and thus every one had enough and there was nothing wasted. The former part of the passage is quoted in 2 Corinthians 8:15 , to show that in making a collection for the poor saints there should be the carrying out of this divine principle of 'equality,' the abundance of some contributing to the need of others.
The manna ceased as soon as the Israelites had crossed the Jordan, and eaten of the old corn of the promised land. The manna is described as being likecoriander seed, of the colour of bdellium. It was ground in mills, or pounded in a mortar, and baked in pans, or made into cakes. It tasted like wafers made with honey, Exodus 16:31 ; but afterwards, when the people had lost their relish for it, like fresh oil. Numbers 11:6-9 . The people, alas, murmured because they had nothing to eat but the manna.
The manna is typical of Christ Himself, the vessel of God's good pleasure, and of heavenly grace here on earth — the heavenly One in the midst of earthly circumstances. He is this heavenly grace now for His own, so that grace is ministered to them for the wilderness journey. When they are viewed as in the land, that is, as made to sit in heavenly places in Christ, and entering in spirit upon their heavenly and eternal portion, then Christ in glory, the centre of all the Father's counsels, is their food, as the 'old corn' of the promised land. The Christian, whose heart is not set for God's purpose, gets tired of the manna, and longs, alas, for other food, as the Israelites did. Exodus 16:15-35 ; Deuteronomy 8:3,16 ; Joshua 5:12 ; Nehemiah 9:20 ; Psalm 78:24 ; Hebrews 9:4 . In Revelation 2:17 the Lord promises to give to the overcomer in the church in Pergamos to eat of the HIDDEN MANNA, that is, some sweet secret communion with Himself, known in the glory as the One who suffered here.
Webster's Dictionary - Manna Croup
(1):
The portions of hard wheat kernels not ground into flour by the millstones: a kind of semolina prepared in Russia and used for puddings, soups, etc. - called also manna groats.
(2):
The husked grains of manna grass.
Webster's Dictionary - Manna
(1):
(n.) A sweetish exudation in the form of pale yellow friable flakes, coming from several trees and shrubs and used in medicine as a gentle laxative, as the secretion of Fraxinus Ornus, and F. rotundifolia, the manna ashes of Southern Europe.
(2):
(n.) A name given to lichens of the genus Lecanora, sometimes blown into heaps in the deserts of Arabia and Africa, and gathered and used as food.
(3):
(n.) The food supplied to the Israelites in their journey through the wilderness of Arabia; hence, divinely supplied food.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Manna
מן , Exodus 16:15 ; Exodus 16:33 ; Exodus 16:35 ; Numbers 11:6-7 ; Numbers 11:9 ; Joshua 5:12 ; Nehemiah 9:20 ; Psalms 78:24 ; μαννα , John 6:31 ; John 6:49 ; John 6:58 ; Hebrews 9:4 ; Revelation 2:17 ; the food which God gave the children of Israel during their continuance in the deserts of Arabia, from the eighth encampment in the wilderness of Sin. Moses describes it as white like hoar frost, round, and of the bigness of coriander seed. It fell every morning upon the dew; and when the dew was exhaled by the heat of the sun, the manna appeared alone, lying upon the rocks or the sand. It fell every day except on the Sabbath, and this only around the camp of the Israelites. Every sixth day there fell a double quantity; and though it putrefied and bred maggots when it was kept any other day, yet on the Sabbath there was no such alteration. The same substance which was melted by the heat of the sun when it was left abroad, was of so hard a consistence when brought into the tent, that it was beaten in mortars, and would even endure the fire, being made into cakes and baked in pans. It fell in so great quantities during the whole forty years of their journey, that it was sufficient to feed the whole multitude of above a million of souls.
Every man, that is, every male or head of a family, was to gather each day the quantity of an omer, about three quarts English measure; and it is observed that "he that gathered much had nothing over, and he that gathered little had no lack," because his gathering was in proportion to the number of persons for whom he had to provide. Or every man gathered as much as he could; and then, when brought home and measured by an omer, if he had a surplus, it went to supply the wants of some other family that had not been able to collect a sufficiency, the family being large, and the time in which the manna might be gathered, before the heat of the day, not being sufficient to collect enough for so numerous a household, several of whom might be so confined as not to be able to collect for themselves. Thus there was an equality; and in this light the words of St. Paul lead us to view the passage, 2 Corinthians 8:15 . To commemorate their living upon manna, the Israelites were directed to put one omer of it into a golden vase; and it was preserved for many generations by the side of the ark.
Our translators and others make a plain contradiction in the relation of this account of the manna, by rendering it thus: "And when the children of Israel saw it, they said one to another, It is manna; for they knew not what it was;" whereas the Septuagint, and several authors, both ancient and modern, have translated the text according to the original: "The Israelites seeing this, said one to another, What is it? מן חוא ; they could not give it a name. Moses immediately answers the question, and says, "This is the bread which the Lord hath given you to eat." From Exodus 16:31 , we learn that this substance was afterward called מן , probably in commemoration of the question they had asked on its first appearance. What this substance was, we know not. It was nothing that was common in the wilderness. It is evident that the Israelites never saw it before; for Moses says, "He fed thee with manna which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know," Deuteronomy 8:3 ; Deuteronomy 8:16 ; and it is very likely that nothing of the kind had ever been seen before; and by a pot of it being laid up in the ark, it is as likely that nothing of the kind ever appeared after the miraculous supply in the wilderness had ceased. The author of the book of Wisdom, Wis_16:20-21 , says, that the manna so accommodated itself to every one's taste that it proved palatable and pleasing to all. It has been remarked that at this day, what is called manna is found in several places; in Arabia, on Mount Libanus, Calabria, and elsewhere. The most famous is that of Arabia, which is a kind of condensed honey, which exudes from the leaves of trees, from whence it is collected when it has become concreted. Salmasius thinks this of the same kind which fed the children of Israel; and that the miracle lay, not in creating any new substance, but in making it fall duly at a set time every day throughout the whole year, and that in such plenty as to suffice so great a multitude. But in order for this, the Israelites must be supposed every day to have been in the neighbourhood of the trees on which this substance is formed; which was not the case, neither do these trees grow in those deserts. Beside, this kind of manna is purgative, and the stomach could not endure it in such quantity as is implied by its being eaten for food. The whole history of the giving the manna is evidently miraculous; and the manna was truly "bread from heaven," as sent by special interposition of God.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saints, Manna Oil of
An oily substance which is said to have flowed, or still flows, from the relics or burial places of certain saints. Sometimes, the oil in lamps that burn before their shrines, the water that flows from the wells near their burial places, or the oil and water which in some way have come in contact with their relics. These oils are or have been used by the faithful, with the belief that they will cure bodily and spiritual ailments through the intercession of the saints with whom the oils have some connection. At present the most famous of these oils is the Oil of Saint Walburga, mentioned as early as the 9th century. It flows from the stone slab and the surrounding metal plate on which rest the saint's relics in her church in Eichstadt, Bavaria. A chemical analysis has shown that the fluid is water, but since it came into contact with the relics of the saint, the fact justifies the practise of using it as a remedy for diseases of body and soul. Among other famous oils are the Oil of Saint Menas, from a holy well near the saint's shrine in the Libyan desert, and the Oil of Saint Nicholas of Myra, which emanates from his relics at Bari, Italy, whither they were brought in 1087.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Manna
The miraculous food given by God to the Israelites during their wanderings in the desert. It was a small grain, white like hoarfrost, round, and of the size of coriander-seed, Exodus 16:1-36 Numbers 11:1-35 . It fell every morning, with the dew, about the camp of the Israelites, and in so great quantities during the whole forty years of their journey in the wilderness, that it was sufficient to serve the entire multitude instead of bread, Exodus 16:35 Deuteronomy 29:5,6 Joshua 5:12 . It is nowhere said that the Israelites had no other food, that numerous flocks and herds accompanied the camp of Israel is clear from many passages. Certainly the daily sacrifices were offered, and no doubt to her offerings affording animal food on which the priests and Levites subsisted, according to their offices.
When manna was first sent the Israelites "knew not what it was," and "said one to another", MAN-HU, which means, What is it? Most interpreters think that form the frequent repetition of this inquiry the name MAN or manna arose. Burckhardt says, that in the valleys around Sinai a species of manna is still found, dropping from the sprigs of several trees, but principally from the tamarisk, in the month of June. It is collected by the Arabs, who make cakes of it, and call it honey of betrouk. See Exodus 16:31 . Since his time it has been ascertained by Dr. Ehrenburg that the exudation of this manna is occasioned by an insect, which he has particularly described. Besides this substance and the manna of commerce, which is used as a laxative medicine, and is produced by the ash-trees of southern Europe, several other vegetable products in Arabia, Persia, etc., of similar origin and qualities, are known by the same name. It is in vain, however, to seek to identify with any of these the manna of the Israelites, which was evidently a special provision for them, beginning and terminating with their need of it. It was found, not on trees and shrubs, but on "the face of the wilderness" wherever they went; and was different in its qualities from any now known by that name, being dry enough to grind and bake like grain, but breeding worms on the second day. It was miraculous in the amount that fell, for the supply of millions; in not falling on the Sabbath; in falling in double quantities the previous day; and in remaining fresh during the Sabbath. By these last three peculiarities God miraculously attested the sanctity of the Sabbath, as dating from the creation and not from Mount Sinai. Moreover, a specimen of manna as laid up in a golden vase in the ark of the covenant in memory of a substance which would otherwise have perished, Hebrews 9:4 .
In Psalm 78:24-25 , manna is called "angels' food" and "corn of heaven," in token of its excellence, and that it came directly from the hand of God. The people gathered on an average about three quarts for each man. They who gathered more than they needed, shared it freely with others; it could not be hoarded up: and thus, as Paul teaches us, 2 Corinthians 8:13-15 , it furnishes for all men a lesson against hoarding the earthly and perishable gifts of God, and in favor of freely imparting to our brethren in need.
This great boon of God to the Israelites also offers many striking analogies, illustrative of "the true Bead" which came down form heaven to rebellious and perishing man, John 6:31-58 Revelation 2:17 . Like the manna, Christ descends from above around the camp of his church in daily abundant supplies, to meet the wants of every man.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Manna
(what is this? ) (Heb. man ). The most important passages of the Old Testament on this topic are the following: ( Exodus 16:14-36 ; Numbers 11:7-9 ; 11:5,16; Joshua 5:12 ; Psalm 78:24 ; 25 ) From these passages we learn that the manna came every morning except the Sabbath, in the form of a small round seed resembling the hear frost that it must be gathered early, before the sun became so hot as to melt it; that it must be gathered every day except the Sabbath; that the attempt to lay aside for a succeeding day, except on the clay immediately preceding the Sabbath, failed by the substance becoming wormy and offensive; that it was prepared for food by grinding and baking; that its taste was like fresh oil, and like wafers made with honey, equally agreeable to all palates; that the whole nation, of at least 2,000,000, subsisted upon it for forty years; that it suddenly ceased when they first got the new corn of the land of Canaan; and that it was always regarded as a miraculous gift directly from God, and not as a product of nature. The natural products of the Arabian deserts and other Oriental regions which bear the name of manna have not the qualities or uses ascribed to the manna of Scripture. The latter substance was undoubtedly wholly miraculous, and not in any respect a product of nature, though its name may have come from its resemblance to the natural manna The substance now called manna in the Arabian desert through which the Israelites passed is collected in the month of June from the tarfa or tamarisk shrub ( Tamarix gallica ). According to Burckhardt it drops from the thorns on the sticks and leaves with which the ground is covered, and must be gathered early in the day or it will be melted by the sun. The Arabs cleanse and boil it, strain it through a cloth and put it in leathern bottles; and in this way it can be kept uninjured for several years. They use it like honey or butter with their unleavened bread, but never make it into cakes or eat it by itself. The whole harvest, which amounts to only five or six hundred pounds, is consumed by the Bedouins, "who," says Schaff consider it the greatest dainty their country affords." The manna of European commerce conies mostly from Calabria and Sicily. It's gathered during the months of June and July from some species of ash ( Ornus europaea and O. rotundifolia ), from which it drops in consequence of a puncture by an insect resembling the locust, but distinguished from it by having a sting under its body. The substance is fluid at night and resembles the dew but in the morning it begins to harden.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Manna
1: μάννα (Strong's #3131 — Noun Neuter — manna — man'-nah ) the supernaturally provided food for Israel during their wilderness journey (for details see Exodus 16 and Numbers 11 ). The Hebrew equivalent is given in Exodus 16:15 , RV marg., "man hu." The translations are, RV, "what is it?;" AV and RV marg., "it is manna." It is described in Psalm 78:24,25 as "the corn of heaven" and "the bread of the mighty," RV text and AV marg. ("angels' food," AV text), and in 1 Corinthians 10:3 , as "spiritual meat." The vessel appointed to contain it as a perpetual memorial, was of gold, Hebrews 9:4 , with Exodus 16:33 . The Lord speaks of it as being typical of Himself, the true Bread from Heaven, imparting eternal life and sustenance to those who by faith partake spiritually of Him, John 6:31-35 . The "hidden manna" is promised as one of the rewards of the overcomer, Revelation 2:17 ; it is thus suggestive of the moral excellence of Christ in His life on earth, hid from the eyes of men, by whom He was "despised and rejected;" the path of the overcomer is a reflex of His life.
None of the natural substances called "manna" is to be identified with that which God provided for Israel.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Manna
MANNA.—The miracle of the loaves and fishes, by which Jesus fed five thousand men, stirred the multitudes to fanaticism (John 6:1-15). Their first impulse was to make Jesus king by force. On the morrow they followed Him across the sea to Capernaum, hoping that He would feed them again in some supernatural way, and suggesting the giving of bread from heaven as a suitable sign in confirmation of His high claims. Would not the prophet of Nazareth imitate the great lawgiver, who gave their fathers bread from heaven? Jesus turns their thoughts away from Moses to God: ‘It was not Moses that gave you the bread out of heaven, but my Father giveth you the true bread out of heaven.’ As God gave the fathers literal bread from heaven, so now He is giving to their children spiritual food that nourishes the soul eternally. ‘I am the bread of life; he that cometh to me shall not hunger, and he that believeth on me shall never thirst.’ ‘Your fathers did eat the manna in the wilderness, and they died.’ God has a far better gift than the manna that was gathered day by day in the wilderness. ‘I am the living bread that cometh down out of heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever; yea, and the bread which I will give is my flesh, for the life of the world’ (John 6:51).
In Revelation 2:17 the spiritual blessing promised by the glorified Christ to the victor in life’s battle is called ‘hidden manna.’
John R. Sampey.

Sentence search

Manna Croup - - called also Manna groats. ...
(2):...
The husked grains of Manna grass
Manna - ...
Manna looked like coriander seed and tasted like wafers made with honey (v. This led to the name "manna, " "what?" It came each morning, except on the Sabbath day. If a person tried to collect more than needed or to store the Manna for future needs, it would grow wormy and foul (v. In this way it was impossible for the Israelites to evade total dependence on God or to use the Manna greedily for personal gain. Miraculously, the Manna could be preserved on the sixth day and eaten on the Sabbath, and it was not to be found on the Sabbath morning (vv. ...
Eventually, the rebellious Israelites grew tired of the Manna and regretted the day they were delivered from their bondage (Numbers 11:6 ). They came to detest the Manna and longed instead for the rich foods of Egypt (v. But God continued to give the Israelites a steady supply of Manna during their forty years of desert wanderings. On that day, the Manna ceased, again illustrating its miraculous provision (Joshua 5:12 ). ...
The purpose of the Manna was to test Israel's faith, to humble them, and to teach them that one "does not live on bread alone but on every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord" (Deuteronomy 8:3,16 ). ...
The people in Jesus' day misunderstood the significance of the Manna. They longed for a physical miracle, like the Manna, which would prove to them that Jesus' words were true (John 6:31 ). To the church in Pergamos, Jesus encouraged faithfulness by promising that true believers would receive "hidden Manna" to eat (Revelation 2:17 ). Just as Moses' Manna brought with it physical blessing, so this heavenly reward will bring eternal life
Manna - Manna was a kind of food that God first gave to the Israelites soon after they left Egypt. God’s provision of the Manna ceased once the people arrived in Canaan (Joshua 5:12). ...
The people of Israel gave the food the name ‘manna’ (meaning ‘What is it?’) because they did not know what else to call it (Exodus 16:15; Exodus 16:31). We today do not know exactly what the Manna was or how it was made. ...
God supplied the Manna every morning, and the people had to eat it the same day. There was no Manna on Saturday mornings, but God gave two days’ supply each Friday, half of which the people kept for use on Saturday. Because the Manna spoiled quickly, the people preserved the supply for Saturday by baking or boiling it beforehand. Moses controlled the collection and distribution of the Manna so that no one had too much or too little (Exodus 16:4-5; Exodus 16:15-18; Exodus 16:23). ...
The command that prohibited keeping the Manna overnight tested the people’s obedience. ...
In accordance with God’s instructions, Moses put part of the Manna in a jar, to keep as a memorial of how God fed his people in the wilderness. ...
God also used the Manna to teach the Israelites that their lives depended not merely on the food they ate, but on their spiritual relationship with God (Deuteronomy 8:3; cf. Jesus compared the gift of Manna to satisfy physical hunger with the gift of himself to satisfy spiritual hunger
Coriander - The Manna might be compared to the coriander seed in respect to its form or shape, as it was to bdellium in its colour. See Manna
Manna - Manna, (what is this? Heb. The most remarkable things about the Manna of the Israelites were: 1. The Manna of the Jews is described as "a small round thing," as small as "the hoarfrost on the ground," "like coriander seed" (in shape doubtless, perhaps in size and density), "of the color of bdellium. To commemorate this wonderful miracle a golden pot was provided, Exodus 16:33; Hebrews 9:4, and an omer (or one man's portion) of the Manna put up for preservation and placed in or near the ark, that succeeding generations might see with their own eyes the very substance on which their fathers were miraculously fed in their long and perilous journeyings from Egypt to Canaan. The Manna which is now used in medicine as a mild laxative is the juice of the flowering ash, a native of Sicily, Calabria, and other parts of the south of Europe. The best Manna is in oblong pieces or flakes of a pale yellow color; light, friable, and somewhat transparent. It has no characteristics in common with the Manna miraculously supplied to the Israelites while journeying through the wilderness. Wherever the Manna is referred to in Scripture, it is invariably regarded as a miraculous food sent directly from God. The Lord Jesus accepted the Manna as a type of himself—the living bread which came down from heaven. The phrase "hidden Manna," Revelation 2:17, figuratively describes the spiritual food which Christ supplies to those who believe in him and live by faith in him
Melezitose - ) A variety of sugar, isomeric with sucrose, extracted from the Manna of the larch (Larix)
Coriander - The Manna which fell in the wilderness was like coriander-seed, Exodus 16:31 Numbers 11:7 . See Manna
Manna - Manna. ’ More probably the words are a question ‘What is it?’ Unaware of the proper term, they thus spoke of Manna as ‘the-what-is-it. The Manna was flaky, small, and white (Exodus 16:14 ; Exodus 16:31 ). Each person was entitled to a measured ’omer of Manna ( Exodus 16:19 ). Many would identify Manna with the juice of certain trees. Europe) exudes a ‘manna’ (used in medicine); and a species of tamarisk found in the Sinai peninsula yields a substance containing sugar. The description of Manna would not in every point support such an identification, but it is worth noting that Manna is likened (see § 2) to bdellium, which is a resinous exudation. A more recent theory is that Manna was an edible lichen like that found in Arabia, etc. Manna would thus come under the category of ‘special providences,’ not ‘miracles. Christ as the living bread is typified by Manna ( John 6:31 ff
Bdellium - Its colour is referred to in the description of the Manna, Numbers 11:7 , and in Genesis 2:12 it is mentioned with gold and onyx stones as characterising the land of Havilah. The white pearl seems the more probable allusion, for the Manna is in Exodus 16:14 compared also to the hoar frost
Sin, Desert of - " So the Lord gave them quails for a day, and Manna for forty years, till they came to the borders of Canaan. On this day there fell no Manna, but on the preceding they were directed to gather two days' provision. To perpetuate the memorial of "this bread from heaven" to future generations, a pot of Manna, which was preserved fresh, by a standing miracle, was ordered to be laid up beside the ark of the covenant, in the sanctuary, Exodus 16
Manna - It fell for the first time after the eighth encampment in the desert of Sin, and was daily furnished, except on the Sabbath, for all the years of the wanderings, till they encamped at Gilgal, after crossing the Jordan, when it suddenly ceased, and where they "did eat of the old corn of the land; neither had the children of Israel Manna any more" (Joshua 5:12 ). " This Manna was evidently altogether a miraculous gift, wholly different from any natural product with which we are acquainted, and which bears this name. The Manna of European commerce comes chiefly from Calabria and Sicily. The Manna of the Sinaitic peninsula is an exudation from the "manna-tamarisk" tree (Tamarix mannifera), the el-tarfah of the Arabs. The Manna with which the people of Israel were fed for forty years differs in many particulars from all these natural products. ...
Our Lord refers to the Manna when he calls himself the "true bread from heaven" (John 6:31-35 ; 4851-51 ). He is also the "hidden Manna" (Revelation 2:17 ; Compare John 6:49,51 )
Manna - Manna. But Christ and his apostles confirm the common version: "Not as your fathers ate Manna, and are dead. And we have other evidence, that the present version is correct for in the same chapter, Moses directed Aaron to "take a pot and put a homer full of Manna therein. "The children of Israel ate Manna forty years, &c. The best Manna is in oblong pieces or flakes of a whitish or pale yellow color, light, friable, and somewhat transparent
Coriander - A round aromatic seed, the Coriandrum sativum, to which the Manna was compared, both as to form and colour
Melitose - ) A variety of sugar isomeric with sucrose, extracted from cotton seeds and from the so-called Australian Manna (a secretion of certain species of Eucalyptus)
Manna -
A sweet exudate, called in Arabic mann or mann es-sama (manna of heaven), which exudes in drops from the Tamarix Mannifera, the tarfa tree. The etymology of the name is clearly given in Exodus 16: man hu, "wvhat is it?" It is a desperate rebellion against evidence to try to identify the miraculous Manna of the Exodus with the natural exudates. The daily consumption of Manna, as computed by Macalister was more than 300 tons; as he rightly declares "all the Tamarisks in the desert could not have yielded this daily provision
Manna - 1: μάννα (Strong's #3131 — Noun Neuter — Manna — man'-nah ) the supernaturally provided food for Israel during their wilderness journey (for details see Exodus 16 and Numbers 11 ). , "it is Manna. The "hidden Manna" is promised as one of the rewards of the overcomer, Revelation 2:17 ; it is thus suggestive of the moral excellence of Christ in His life on earth, hid from the eyes of men, by whom He was "despised and rejected;" the path of the overcomer is a reflex of His life. ...
None of the natural substances called "manna" is to be identified with that which God provided for Israel
Dulcite - (OH)2, occurring naturally in a Manna from Madagascar, and in certain plants, and produced artificially by the reduction of galactose and lactose or milk sugar
Onion - Numbers 11:5 (c) This vegetable is a type of that which the world offers to the Christian in the place of Manna from Heaven. So those who participate in the things of the world and have no use for the heavenly Manna can easily be distinguished by the effect in their lives
Corn - The 'OLD CORN OF THE LAND'was what the Israelites began to eat after crossing the Jordan, when the Manna ceased. The Manna is rather heavenly grace for wilderness circumstances
Manna - Here was a double proof of the miracle; for the Manna itself was s perishable and delicate, that if only kept for day, it bred worms and stank; yet, to teach Israel to reverence the Sabbaths, that which we kept for the use of the Sabbath bred no worm nor stank; and the omer of it also which was laid up before the Lord, was preserved pure generation to generation. It gave supply to the whole camp Israel—six hundred thousand on foot that we men, besides children, and mixed multitude that went with Israel, came out of Egypt; therefore allowing for increase, we may safely put down near a million of souls, who were daily fed from the supply of Manna. (See Exodus 12:37-38) The Manna had a remarkable quality, which, though not miraculous, is recorded as worthy our observation. (See Numbers 11:7-8 and Exodus 16:20-21) It may be proper to observe, that what is now called Manna in the shop of the apothecary, hath no One resemblance or connection whatever with the Manna of Scripture, but is the gum, or balsam, of certain trees. We are told indeed by historians, that in Arabia and in Calabria, and in other places, there is a dew on the ground still to be seen like Manna. But that this cannot be similar to the Manna of Israel is evident, for it is of medicinal quality, and affects the bowels. The Jews are so tenacious respecting the Manna of their fathers, that they pronounce an anathema and execration on every one that would call in question the miraculous nature of it. And Christians ought not to be less earnest in defence of the same precious truth, since the Manna of the Old Testament was but typical and figurative of the bread of life under the New
Manna - ...
When Manna was first sent the Israelites "knew not what it was," and "said one to another", MAN-HU, which means, What is it? Most interpreters think that form the frequent repetition of this inquiry the name MAN or Manna arose. Burckhardt says, that in the valleys around Sinai a species of Manna is still found, dropping from the sprigs of several trees, but principally from the tamarisk, in the month of June. Ehrenburg that the exudation of this Manna is occasioned by an insect, which he has particularly described. Besides this substance and the Manna of commerce, which is used as a laxative medicine, and is produced by the ash-trees of southern Europe, several other vegetable products in Arabia, Persia, etc. It is in vain, however, to seek to identify with any of these the Manna of the Israelites, which was evidently a special provision for them, beginning and terminating with their need of it. Moreover, a specimen of Manna as laid up in a golden vase in the ark of the covenant in memory of a substance which would otherwise have perished, Hebrews 9:4 . ...
In Psalm 78:24-25 , Manna is called "angels' food" and "corn of heaven," in token of its excellence, and that it came directly from the hand of God. Like the Manna, Christ descends from above around the camp of his church in daily abundant supplies, to meet the wants of every man
Water Grass - ...
(4):...
Manna grass
Manna - MANNA. ’ ‘Your fathers did eat the Manna in the wilderness, and they died. ’ God has a far better gift than the Manna that was gathered day by day in the wilderness. ...
In Revelation 2:17 the spiritual blessing promised by the glorified Christ to the victor in life’s battle is called ‘hidden Manna
Manna - MANNA. ’ ‘Your fathers did eat the Manna in the wilderness, and they died. ’ God has a far better gift than the Manna that was gathered day by day in the wilderness. ...
In Revelation 2:17 the spiritual blessing promised by the glorified Christ to the victor in life’s battle is called ‘hidden Manna
Food, Angels' - " It doubtless refers to the Manna
Tamarisk - mannifera) is the source of one kind of Manna
Coriander Seed - The Manna of the wilderness period was like coriander seed either in appearance (Exodus 16:31 ) or taste (Numbers 11:7 )
Bdellium - Numbers 11:7; "The color of the Manna was as the color of Bdellium. This answers to the parallel comparison of Manna to the white hoar frost on the ground (Exodus 16:14)
Manna - The most important passages of the Old Testament on this topic are the following: ( Exodus 16:14-36 ; Numbers 11:7-9 ; 11:5,16; Joshua 5:12 ; Psalm 78:24 ; 25 ) From these passages we learn that the Manna came every morning except the Sabbath, in the form of a small round seed resembling the hear frost that it must be gathered early, before the sun became so hot as to melt it; that it must be gathered every day except the Sabbath; that the attempt to lay aside for a succeeding day, except on the clay immediately preceding the Sabbath, failed by the substance becoming wormy and offensive; that it was prepared for food by grinding and baking; that its taste was like fresh oil, and like wafers made with honey, equally agreeable to all palates; that the whole nation, of at least 2,000,000, subsisted upon it for forty years; that it suddenly ceased when they first got the new corn of the land of Canaan; and that it was always regarded as a miraculous gift directly from God, and not as a product of nature. The natural products of the Arabian deserts and other Oriental regions which bear the name of Manna have not the qualities or uses ascribed to the Manna of Scripture. The latter substance was undoubtedly wholly miraculous, and not in any respect a product of nature, though its name may have come from its resemblance to the natural Manna The substance now called Manna in the Arabian desert through which the Israelites passed is collected in the month of June from the tarfa or tamarisk shrub ( Tamarix gallica ). " The Manna of European commerce conies mostly from Calabria and Sicily
Coriander - To it in form and color the Manna is compared (Exodus 16:31; Numbers 11:7)
Trehala - ) An amorphous variety of Manna obtained from the nests and cocoons of a Syrian coleopterous insect (Larinus maculatus, L
Manna - It fell every morning upon the dew; and when the dew was exhaled by the heat of the sun, the Manna appeared alone, lying upon the rocks or the sand. Or every man gathered as much as he could; and then, when brought home and measured by an omer, if he had a surplus, it went to supply the wants of some other family that had not been able to collect a sufficiency, the family being large, and the time in which the Manna might be gathered, before the heat of the day, not being sufficient to collect enough for so numerous a household, several of whom might be so confined as not to be able to collect for themselves. To commemorate their living upon Manna, the Israelites were directed to put one omer of it into a golden vase; and it was preserved for many generations by the side of the ark. ...
Our translators and others make a plain contradiction in the relation of this account of the Manna, by rendering it thus: "And when the children of Israel saw it, they said one to another, It is Manna; for they knew not what it was;" whereas the Septuagint, and several authors, both ancient and modern, have translated the text according to the original: "The Israelites seeing this, said one to another, What is it? מן חוא ; they could not give it a name. It is evident that the Israelites never saw it before; for Moses says, "He fed thee with Manna which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know," Deuteronomy 8:3 ; Deuteronomy 8:16 ; and it is very likely that nothing of the kind had ever been seen before; and by a pot of it being laid up in the ark, it is as likely that nothing of the kind ever appeared after the miraculous supply in the wilderness had ceased. The author of the book of Wisdom, Wis_16:20-21 , says, that the Manna so accommodated itself to every one's taste that it proved palatable and pleasing to all. It has been remarked that at this day, what is called Manna is found in several places; in Arabia, on Mount Libanus, Calabria, and elsewhere. Beside, this kind of Manna is purgative, and the stomach could not endure it in such quantity as is implied by its being eaten for food. The whole history of the giving the Manna is evidently miraculous; and the Manna was truly "bread from heaven," as sent by special interposition of God
Manna - "...
The explanation given by the Rabbis is that though several in a family went out to gather the Manna, when it was brought home and measured it was found to be just an omer for each of them. ...
The Manna ceased as soon as the Israelites had crossed the Jordan, and eaten of the old corn of the promised land. The Manna is described as being likecoriander seed, of the colour of bdellium. The people, alas, murmured because they had nothing to eat but the Manna. ...
The Manna is typical of Christ Himself, the vessel of God's good pleasure, and of heavenly grace here on earth — the heavenly One in the midst of earthly circumstances. The Christian, whose heart is not set for God's purpose, gets tired of the Manna, and longs, alas, for other food, as the Israelites did. In Revelation 2:17 the Lord promises to give to the overcomer in the church in Pergamos to eat of the HIDDEN Manna, that is, some sweet secret communion with Himself, known in the glory as the One who suffered here
Leeks - After a steady diet of Manna in the wilderness, they were ready to return to slavery and the foods of servitude (Numbers 11:5 )
Mannite - ) A white crystalline substance of a sweet taste obtained from a so-called Manna, the dried sap of the flowering ash (Fraxinus ornus); - called also mannitol, and hydroxy hexane
Manna - There is a connection between the natural Manna and the supernatural. The name is still its Arabic designation, and is read on the Egyptian monuments (mennu , mennu hut , "white Manna". " The supernatural character of the Manna of Exodus at the same time appears. The Manna was a "small round thing as the hoar-frost on the ground," falling with the dew on the camp at night. 6) derive Manna from Israel's question to one another, maan huw' " 'what is this?' for they knew not what it was. ...
To commemorate Israel's living on omers or tenth deals of Manna one omer was put into a golden pot and preserved for many generations beside the ark. The Manna typifies Christ. ...
(8) Its preservation in the golden pot in the holiest typifies Jesus, now in the heavenly holiest place, where He gives of the hidden Manna to him that overcometh (Revelation 2:17); He is the Manna hidden from the world but revealed to the believer, who has now a foretaste of His preciousness; like the incorruptible Manna in the sanctuary, the spiritual food offered to all who reject the world's dainties for Christ is everlasting, an incorruptible body, and life in Christ at the resurrection. ...
(9) The Manna continued with Israel throughout their wilderness journey; so Christ with His people here (Matthew 28:19). ...
(10) It ceases when they gain the promised rest, for faith then gives place to sight and the wilderness Manna to the fruit of the tree of life in the midst of the paradise of God (Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:2; Revelation 22:14)
Bamah - BAMAH (only Ezekiel 20:29 ) is the ordinary word for ‘high place,’ but is here retained in its Hebrew form as the word ‘manna’ in the parallel case Exodus 16:15 , on account of the word-play: ‘What ( mah ) is the ba-mah to which ye go ( bâ )?’ See, further, High Place
Manna - Their name may have come from the question the Israelites asked when they first saw them: “What is it (man hu)?” Today a type of Manna has been identified with the secretions left on tamarisk bushes by insects feeding on the sap. The Bible emphasizes that God caused Manna to appear at the right time and place to meet His people's needs
Sin, Wilderness of - It was here that God first provided Manna and quail for them to eat
Sin - Here the Israelites were first fed with Manna and quails
Kib'Roth-Hatta-Avah, - as in the margin, the graves of lust , a station of the Israelites in the wilderness, where, growing tired of Manna and desiring flesh, they murmured, and God sent them quails in great abundance, but smote great numbers of them with a plague and they died
Bdellium - Occurs only in Genesis 2:12 , where it designates a product of the land of Havilah; and in Numbers 11:7 , where the Manna is likened to it in colour
Mortar - The Manna was ground in mills or beaten in a mortar
Bdellium - Numbers 11:7 likens Manna to bdellium in appearance
Bdellium - ]'>[2] ) of Manna
Leek - The Hebrews complained in the wilderness, that Manna grew insipid to them; they longed for the leeks and onions of Egypt, Numbers 11:5
Ark of the Covenant Person - A title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary to signify her Divine motherhood, that as the ark of old, made of incorruptible wood and adorned with pure gold, contained the precious treasures of the Divine law and the Manna from heaven, so she, the true ark, bore within her not merely the law but the Lawgiver, not merely the Divine presence as manifested over the ark of the covenant, but the Divine One Himself, and the Living Bread from heaven
Bdellium - It is also said that the Manna, like the hoar-frost, Exodus 16:14, or coriander-seed in size, was like bdellium in color
Mill - The Manna which fell in the wilderness was tough enough so that people ground it in mills before cooking it (Numbers 11:7-8 ). See Manna
Tamarisk - ” Some believe the resin which the tamarisk produces may have been the Manna eaten by the Hebrews during the wilderness wanderings
Mortar - This well-known utensil was employed by the Hebrews in preparing Manna for use, Numbers 11:8
Kibroth-Hattaavah - The graves of lust, one of the encampments of Israel in the wilderness, where they desired of God flesh for their sustenance, declaring they were tired of Manna, Numbers 11:34,35 33:16
Mortar - Mortars were used in the wilderness for pounding the Manna (Numbers 11:8 )
Coriander - gad, (Exodus 16:31 ; Numbers 11:7 ), seed to which the Manna is likened in its form and colour
Manna - rotundifolia, the Manna ashes of Southern Europe
Sin, Wilderness of - God heard their murmurings, and gave them "manna" and then quails in abundance
Sin, Wilderness of, - In the wilderness of Sin the Manna was first gathered, and those who adopt the supposition that this was merely the natural product of the tarfa bush find from the abundance of that shrub in Wady es-Sheikh , southeast of Wady Ghurundel , a proof of local identity
Bread - )...
Manna, that unusual food that God provided for the Israelites on their journey from Egypt to Canaan, was known as ‘bread from heaven’ (Exodus 16:4; John 6:31; see Manna)
Heaven: Its Variety - The heavenly Manna tastes to every man's peculiar liking
Leek - These are used as types of various kinds of pleasures and pursuits offered by the world to those who belong to this world and have never tasted the heavenly Manna
Bdellium - Hence the opinion of the Jewish writers is not to be contemned, namely, that pearls are to be here understood, of which great quantities are found on the shores of the Persian gulf and in India, and which might not inaptly be compared with Manna, as in Numbers 11:7
Worm - ...
...
The Manna bred worms (tola'im), but on the Sabbath there was not any worm (rimmah) therein (Exodus 16:20,24 )
Money - Shekels were coined bearing a pot of Manna and an almond rod
Aaron's Rod - Later Jewish tradition, however, transferred it, along with the pot of Manna, to a place within the ark ( Hebrews 9:4 )
Mortar - medokah , wherein the Manna was pounded for use (Numbers 11:8)
Capernaum - It was in this building that our Lord gave the well-known discourse in John 6 ; and it was not without a certain strange feeling that on turning over a large block we found the pot of Manna engraved on its face, and remembered the words, 'I am that bread of life: your fathers did eat Manna in the wilderness, and are dead
Ark of the Covenant - Inside of the Ark were the tablets of the Ten Commandments, a jar of Manna, and Aaron's Rod that budded (Hebrews 9:4)
Bdellium - The bedoleh, in Genesis, is undoubtedly some precious stone; and its colour, mentioned in Numbers, where the Manna is spoken of as of the colour of bdellium, is explained by a reference to Exodus 16:14 ; Exodus 16:31 , where it is likened to hoar frost, which being like little fragments of ice, may confirm the opinion that the bdellium is the beryl, perhaps that pellucid kind, called by Dr
Pergamos - ...
Jesus will compensate with "the hidden Manna" (in contrast to the occult arts of Aesculapius) the Pergamene Christian who rejects the world's dainties for Christ. Like the incorruptible Manna preserved in the sanctuary, the spiritual feast Jesus offers, an incorruptible life of body and soul, is everlasting
Ark of the Covenant Item - Sacred chest measuring about 45 x27 x27 inches (Exodus 37) and containing the Tables of the Law and perhaps also a golden vessel of Manna and the rod of Aaron (Exodus 16; Numbers 17; 3Kings 8; Hebrews 9)
Sabbath-Day's Journey - There is no injunction as to this in the law, but when some of the people went out to gather Manna on the Sabbath, Moses enjoined, "Abide ye every man in his place, let no man go out of his place on the seventh day
Kibroth-Hattaavah - Then a disgust fell on the multitude at having nothing to eat but the Manna day after day, no change, no flesh, no fish, no high-flavoured vegetables, no luscious fruits
Worm - Rimmah synonymous with toleah ; applied to the worm bred in the Manna when kept more than a day (Exodus 16:26), tolaim , answering to rimmah (Exodus 16:24); so in Job 25:6; maggots and larvae of insects which feed on putrefying matter (Job 21:26; Job 24:20; Job 7:5; Job 17:4); maggots were bred in Job's sores produced by elephantiasis
Rock - The Manna was literally ‘food from heaven’ to him (1 Corinthians 10:3; cf. ); and both the water and the Manna were a foreshadowing of the Christian sacraments of Baptism and the Lord’s Supper (1 Corinthians 10:2; 1 Corinthians 10:16). Paul’s argument is briefly this: ‘all’ ate of the same spiritual food (1 Corinthians 10:3), and ‘all’ drank of the same spiritual drink (1 Corinthians 10:4)-the Manna and the water being intended to sustain the spirit as well as the body-but only two (Caleb and Joshua) recognized the spiritual presence of Christ, who in His pre-existent state was ever with Israel in their gathering of the Manna and beside every cliff which Moses struck
Quail - Psalms 105:40 connects the quail with the Manna , and therefore refers to Exodus 16:13, the first sending of quails, the psalm moreover referring to God's acts of grace
Ark of God - In the ark were placed the two tables of stone (the righteousness demanded by God from man), and afterwards the golden pot that had Manna, and Aaron's rod that budded. It is significant too that now there were only the two tables of stone in the ark, 1 Kings 8:1-11 : the Manna had ceased when they ate of the old corn of the land, which is typical of a heavenly Christ; and the witness of Aaron's rod was no longer needed now they were in the kingdom. The wilderness circumstances, in which the Manna and the priesthood of Christ were so necessary, were now passed
Ark of the Covenant - A small chest of coffer, three feet nine inches in length, two feet three inches in breadth, and two feet three inches in height, in which were contained the golden pot that had Manna, Aaron's rod, and the tables of the covenant
Type - Thus Adam and Melchizedek, the prophetic and the priestly office, Manna and the brazen serpent, the smitten rock and the passage over Jordan, the Passover and the Day of Atonement, Canaan and the cities of refuge are scriptural types of Christ
Mortar And Pestle - ...
The Manna is expressly said to have been beaten in mortars as well as ground in mills (Numbers 11:8 )
Money - ) were then coined bearing the figure of the almond rod and the pot of Manna
Food - In the wilderness their ordinary food was miraculously supplied in the Manna
Honey - And the Manna from heaven, that the Lord fed the church with in the wilderness forty years, is said in taste, to have been "like wafers made with honey
Fade - The trees represent the Godly leaders, the preachers, the teachers, who are feeding the saints of GOD with heavenly Manna, and whose testimonies (leaves) are bright, constant and unfailing
Signs - ' He was Himself God's sign, according to Isaiah 7:14 , as the Manna was the sign of God to Israel in the wilderness
Ark of the Covenant - It was also probably a reliquary for the pot of Manna and the rod of Aaron
Moses - Only a few can be enumerated here: The Passage of the Red Sea and the Canticle of Moses (Exodus 14-15); the Manna (16); the promulgation of the Law on Mount Sinai (19-31); the many revolts of the people, who are saved each time by the intervention of their leader (Exodus 16; Numbers 13-14,21); the march from Mount Sinai to Cades, and the stay at Cades for 38 years during which the present generation is condemned never to enter the Promised Land (Numbers 10-20); Moses himself is excluded from it because of his lack of confidence at the "Waters of Contradiction" (ib
Heaven - The place where Manna, the heavenly food, came from
Capernaum - " Vine leaves, and the pot of Manna, are still to be seen among the rich carvings of the ruins Of the lintel at Tell Hum. If Jesus' discourse at Capernaum (John 6:31-32) was delivered in the synagogue of what is now Tell Hum, how appropriate is the Jews' reference to the Manna, and His reply, "My Father giveth you the true bread from heaven
Glory - " The glory of the Lord appeared to Israel in the cloud also, when he gave them Manna and quails, Exodus 16:7 ; Exodus 16:10
Christ - Some types of CHRIST:...
Aaron, Exodus 28:2 (c)...
Adam, Genesis 5:2 (c)...
Ark, (covenant), Exodus 25:10 (c)...
Ark, (Noah's), Genesis 6:14 (c)...
Ass, Genesis 49:14 (c)...
Author, Hebrews 5:9 (c)...
Bishop, 1 Peter 2:25 (a)...
Body, 1 Corinthians 12:12 (a)...
Branch, Zechariah 3:8 (a)...
Bread, John 6:51 (a)...
Bridegroom, Matthew 25:1 (b)...
Bullock, Leviticus 1:5 (c)...
Burnt Offering, Leviticus 1:3 (b)...
Calf, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Captain, Hebrews 2:10 (a)...
Chief, Song of Solomon 5:10 (b)...
Commander, Isaiah 55:4 (b)...
Cornerstone, Isaiah 28:16 (a)...
Covert, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
David, 2 Samuel 19:10 (c)...
Day, Psalm 118:24 (b)...
Door, John 10:9 (a)...
Eagle, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Flour, Leviticus 2:1 (c)...
Foundation, Isaiah 28:16 (b)...
Fountain, Zechariah 13:1 (b)...
Garment, Isaiah 61:10 (b), Romans 13:14...
Gate, Psalm 118:20 (b)...
Gold, Isaiah 13:12 (a)...
Headstone, Psalm 113:22 (b)...
Heir, Hebrews 1:2 (a)...
Hen, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Hiding Place, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
High Priest, Hebrews 4:14 (a)...
Isaac, Genesis 24:36 (c)...
Jacob, Genesis 32:28 (c)...
Jonah, Matthew 12:40 (a)...
Joseph, Genesis 37:7 (c)...
Joshua, Joshua 1:1 (c)...
Judge, Acts 17:31 (a)...
King, Psalm 2:6 (a)...
Lamb, Revelation 5:6 (a)...
Leaves, Revelation 22:2 (c)...
Light, John 8:12 (a)...
Lily of the Valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Lion, Revelation 5:5 (a)...
Manna, John 6:32 (a)...
Master of the House, Luke 13:25 (b)...
Meal, 2 Kings 4:41 (c)...
Mediator (umpire), 1 Timothy 2:5 (a)...
Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18 (c)...
Merchantman, Matthew 13:45 (b)...
Owl, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Ox:, Ezekiel 1:10 (b)...
Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Peace Offering, Leviticus 3:1 (c)...
Pelican, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Physician, Jeremiah 8:22 (c)...
Pigeon, Leviticus 12:6 (c)...
Propitiation (mercy seat), Romans 3:25 (a)...
Ram, Genesis 22:13 (a)...
Rock, Matthew 16:18 (a)...
Rock of Ages, Isaiah 26:4 (margin) (a)...
Rose of Sharon, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Root, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sabbath, Colossians 2:16-17 (b)...
Seed, Genesis 3:15 (a)...
Serpent, John 3:14 (a)...
Shepherd, John 10:11 (a)...
Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21 (a)...
Sin Offering, Leviticus 4:32 (c)...
Solomon, 1 Kings 10:13 (c)...
Sower, Matthew 13:37 (a)...
Sparrow, Psalm 102:7 (a)...
Star, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sun, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Temple, John 2:19 (a)...
Thief, Revelation 3:3 (a)...
Tree, Revelation 22:2 (b)...
Trespass Offering, Leviticus 5:6 (c)...
Turtle dove, Leviticus 1:14 (c)...
Vine, John 15:5 (a)...
Worm, Psalm 22:6 (a)...
Lack, Lacking - of Exodus 16:18 ), the circumstance of the gathering of the Manna being applied to the equalizing nature of cause and effect in the matter of supplying the wants of the needy
Brazen Serpent - It had been kept from the days of Moses, in memory of a miracle, in the same manner as the pot of Manna was: and Asa and Jehoshaphat did not extirpate it when they rooted out idolatry, because in their reign they did not observe that the people worshipped this serpent, or burnt incense to it; and therefore they left it as a memorial
Kibroth Hattaavah - The first supply of quails was on the 15th day of the second month after the Exodus (Exodus 16; Psalms 105:40), just before the Manna
Leviathan - " And what was the result? "The Lord thy God brought thee forth water out of the rock of flint; he fed thee in the wilderness with Manna, which thy fathers knew not, that he might humble thee, and that he might prove thee, to do thee good at thy latter end
Sabbath - The first time the Sabbath is specifically mentioned in scripture is in Exodus 16:23 , after the Manna had been given from heaven; but the Sabbath clearly had its origin in the sanctification and blessing of the seventh day after the six days of creative work
Money - The Jewish coins bore an almond rod and a vase of Manna, but no image of any man was allowed
Rock - And whether he was preached as the rock, or the paschal lamb, or the Manna, or the brazen serpent, all pointed to Jesus, and in him all had their completion. Hence it proves that from the beginning all the grace the church would stand in need of through the whole period of time in every individual instance of it, this glorious Head of his body the church had in him; and whether it was the Manna or the rook, he, and he alone, was the sum and substance of all
Bread - Manna is called bread from heaven, Exodus 16:4
Ark of the Covenant - a small chest or coffer, three feet nine inches in length, two feet three inches in breadth, and two feet three inches in height; in which were contained the golden pot that had Manna, Aaron's rod, and the tables of the covenant, Numbers 17:10 ; Hebrews 9:4 . However, the defect was supplied as to the outward form, for in the second temple there was also an ark of the same dimensions with the first, and put in the same place; but it wanted the tables of the law, Aaron's rod, and the pot of Manna; nor was there any appearance of the divine glory over it; nor any oracles delivered from it
Living (2) - —Two things—the Manna and the bread of the miracle which He had just wrought—were present to our Lord’s mind when He preached at Capernaum, and also to the minds of His hearers. Can He “rain down Manna upon us to eat, and give us of the corn of heaven” (Psalms 78:24), that we may see and believe Him (John 6:30)? The Manna,’ said they, ‘supplied the wants of all the hosts of Israel for forty years, but He has furnished us with no more than one meal. ’ This led Jesus to set forth the difference between the Manna and ‘the true bread from heaven’ (John 6:32). Inasmuch as the Manna was sent down from above, and was continually renewed, it was a type of the true bread. These distinctions of the bread of the miracle as well as the Manna from the true bread of the soul are important and vital, and they assist us to lay hold of our Lord’s meaning when He said, ‘I am the living bread
Ark of the Covenant - ...
Besides the tables of the covenant, placed by Moses in this sacred coffer, God appointed the blossoming rod of Aaron to be lodged there, Numbers 17:10 Hebrews 9:4 ; a golden vase of Manna gathered in the wilderness, Exodus 16:33,34 , and a copy of the book of the law, Deuteronomy 31:26
Ark - Later traditions also mentioned a portion of preserved Manna and Aaron's rod as being in the ark (Hebrews 9:4 )
Testimony - It was before this testimony the omer of Manna was placed
Ark - As such, the ark contained the memorials of God's great redemptive acts—the tablets upon which were inscribed the Ten Commandments, an omer or two quarts of Manna, and Aaron's rod
Shiloh (2) - ...
On the lintel over the doorway, between two wreaths of flowers, is carved a vessel shaped like a Roman amphora , so closely resembling the "pot of Manna ," as found on coins and in the ruins of the synagogue at Capernaum, that it doubtless formed part of the original building
Temple, the Second - This second temple had not the ark, the Urim and Thummim, the holy oil, the sacred fire, the tables of stone, the pot of Manna, and Aaron's rod
Wisdom of Solomon - To the former Solomon is ‘one of Moses’ disciples,’ and the author of the Proverbs; he shows no acquaintance with the remarkable comments of Wisdom on the Manna. ...
The work is otherwise used by the Oral Tradition, yet perhaps not in such a way as to permit of any inference with regard to its language, In Exodus Rabba, 25, the Manna is described as ‘having in it all sorts of tastes, so that each Israelite was tasting what he wished’; this represents Wisdom of Solomon 16:20, πρὸς πᾶσαν ἡδονὴν ἱσχύοντα καὶ πρὸς πᾶσαν ἁρμόνιον γεῦσιν, but the correspondence is not quite literal. Thus in Deuteronomy 8:3 the lesson of the Manna is said to have been ‘that man does not live by bread alone, but by every utterance of the mouth of God’-an obscure proposition, since the Manna is repeatedly called ‘bread’; and even if it be admitted that the Deuteronomist does not allow it that title (29:6), the ‘utterance of the mouth of God’ is far from clear. In Wisdom of Solomon 16:26 the lesson is worded ‘that the fruits which grow do not feed the man, but Thy word maintains them that trust in Thee,’ and it is inferred from the fact that the nutritive power of the Manna was dependent on the observation of certain precepts: collected in the morning, it would resist the heat of the oven; but the heat of the sun would melt it, etc
Meat - Rather, the Manna and quails, a heaven-sent "booty" (treasure trove) to the hungering people
Wilderness - The good news was that God had provided Manna, quail, and water from the rock
Ark - The golden pot of Manna (the adj
Eat - ...
God provides many good things to eat, such as Manna to the Israelites ( Exodus - God "heard their murmurings" and gave them quails and Manna, "bread from heaven" (1618422738_53 ). Moses directed that an omer of Manna should be put aside and preserved as a perpetual memorial of God's goodness
Ark - The two tables of stone which constituted the "testimony" or evidence of God's covenant with the people (Deuteronomy 31:26 ), the "pot of Manna" (Exodus 16:33 ), and "Aaron's rod that budded" (Numbers 17:10 ), were laid up in the ark (Hebrews 9:4 )
Colour - It is applied to milk (Genesis 49:12 ), Manna (Exodus 16:31 ), snow (Isaiah 1:18 ), horses (Zechariah 1:8 ), raiment (Ecclesiastes 9:8 )
Meals - Israel ate bread or Manna in the morning, flesh in the evening (Exodus 16:12); the Passover supper in the evening confirms this
Fulfill - In the same way, Christ in giving His life corresponded to the life-giving Manna from heaven (John 6:31-32 ; Exodus 16:15 )
Bread, Bread of Presence - ...
The Manna in the wilderness is the quintessential example of bread as a provision of God
Exodus - The book of Exodus brings before us many and singular types of Christ: Moses, Deuteronomy 18:15 ; Aaron, Hebrews 4:14-16 ; the paschal lamb, Exodus 12:46 John 19:36 1 Corinthians 5:7-8 ; the Manna, Exodus 1:1-40:38 16:15 1 Corinthians 10:3 ; the rock in Horeb, Exodus 17:6 1 Corinthians 10:4 ; the mercy seat, Exodus 37:6 Romans 3:25 Hebrews 4:16 ; the tabernacle, Exodus 40:1 - 38 , "The Word tabernacled among us," John 1:14 . Where and how these long years were spent we are not informed, nor by what routes they traversed the desert, nor how they were furnished with food except Manna
Symbol - The journey to Canaan supplied Passover, Manna, rock, redemption, better country, rest
Exodus, Book of - The Manna was to be gathered daily
Rock - The epithet ‘spiritual’ does not deny the literal reality of that to which it refers; the Manna was literal to St
Sabbath - It is next referred to in connection with the gift of Manna to the children of Israel in the wilderness (Exodus 16:23 ); and afterwards, when the law was given from Sinai (20:11), the people were solemnly charged to "remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy
Angel - When the Manna is called "angels' food," this is merely to denote its excellence (Psalm 78:25 )
Spices - The Israelites compared the Manna to the coriander seed (Exodus 16:31 ; Numbers 11:7 )
Gilgal - The Manna and pillar of cloud were not withdrawn, because God would sustain the rising generation with the prospect of the ban being removed, and of the covenant temporarily suspended being renewed
Type - THE Manna given by God from heaven to the Israelites — type of heavenly grace for wilderness circumstances set forth in Christ who was the true Bread come down from heaven
Fulfillment - In his teachings, Jesus employed the typological approach to contrast the temporality of the wilderness Manna with the permanent quality of the sustenance that he, as the living bread, could offer (John 6:32-35 ). ...
Again, the Manna (Exodus 16:14-16 ) and the water that gushed from the rock in the wilderness (Exodus 17:6 ; Numbers 20:11 ) were interpreted by Paul as depicting the sustaining Christ who was with the Lord's ancient people in their journey (1 Corinthians 10:3-4 )
Sabbath - Further, before the Sinaitic law was given the sabbath law is recognized in the double Manna promised on the sixth day, that none might be gathered on the sabbath (Exodus 16:5; Exodus 16:23). Exodus 16:29 refers to not going from their place to gather Manna on the Sabbath
Miracles - The simple truth is that God, for wise purposes, allowed some of the natural laws to be suspended, and at times He put forth His almighty power, as in supplying the Israelites with Manna from heaven, and in feeding thousands from a few loaves and fishes, or by recalling life that had left the body. ...
Curing the waters of Marah Exodus 15:23-25 ...
Manna from heaven Exodus 16:14-35 ...
Water from the rock at Rephidim Exodus 17:5-7 ...
Death of Nadab and Abihu Leviticus 10:1 - 2 ...
The earth swallows the murmurers, and...
the death of Korah, Dathan and Abiram Numbers 16:31-40 ...
Budding of Aaron's rod at Kadesh Numbers 17:8 ...
Water from the rock at Meribah Numbers 20:7-11 ...
The brazen serpent: Israel healed Numbers 21:8 - 9 ...
Balaam's ass speaking Numbers 22:21-35 ...
Parting the Jordan Joshua 3:14-17 ...
In the Land
Tabernacle - , the oblong chest containing the two tables of stone, the pot of Manna, and Aaron's rod that budded
Bread - The diet of the early Hebrews ordinarily consisted of bread, meat, and liquids: “And he humbled thee, and suffered thee to hunger, and fed thee with Manna, which thou knewest not, neither did thy fathers know; that he might make thee know that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord …” ( Victory - " The Lord will grant to the one who overcomes the following: eating of the tree of life, in the paradise of God (2:7); immunity to the second death (2:11); receipt of the "hidden Manna, " a white stone with a new name inscribed on it, known only to the person himself (2:17); power over the nations, to rule over them with a rod of iron (2:26-27); being clad in white garments, name not being blotted out of the book of life, and the confession of his name before the Father and the angels (3:5); made a pillar in the temple of God; and three new names: the name of God, the name of the city of God, the new Jerusalem, and the Lord's own new name (3:12); and sitting on the Lord's throne with him (3:21)
Heaven - The miraculous Manna came from God's heavenly storehouses for Israel in the wilderness (Exodus 16:11-15 )
Miracle - ...
Quails and Manna sent, Exodus 16:1-36
Type - Genesis 2:24), Christian baptism by the passage of the Red Sea (1 Corinthians 10:1-2), the bread and wine of the Lord’s Supper by the Manna and water of the wilderness (1 Corinthians 10:3-4), and Christ Himself by the rock from which the water flowed (1 Corinthians 10:4). The triumph song of Moses and the children of Israel (Exodus 15:1, Deuteronomy 31:30; Deuteronomy 32:4) becomes ‘the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb’ (Revelation 15:3); the Manna by which Israel was fed in the wilderness tells of a hidden Manna given to him that over-cometh (Revelation 2:17); the twelve tribes reappear in the twelve companies of the sealed servants of God (Revelation 7:4-8); Jerusalem itself is transfigured into the new Jerusalem, the city of God (Revelation 3:12, Revelation 21:2; Revelation 21:10); Mount Zion, to which the tribes went up, becomes the gathering place of the hosts of the redeemed (Revelation 14:1-3)
Sabbath - There are not wanting indirect evidences of its observance, as the intervals between Noah's sending forth the birds out of the ark, an act naturally associated with the weekly service, (Genesis 8:7-12 ) and in the week of a wedding celebration, (Genesis 29:27,28 ) but when a special occasion arises, in connection with the prohibition against gathering Manna on the Sabbath, the institution is mentioned as one already known
Cloud, Cloud of the Lord - In a positive sense, clouds represent unlimited extent (of God's faithfulness and truth, Psalm 36:5 ; 57:10 ; 108:4 ; of Babylon's judgment, Jeremiah 51:9 ); life-giving refreshment (of the king's favor, Proverbs 16:15 ); a normal occurrence (cycle of nature, Ecclesiastes 11:3 ); shade or shelter (from the "heat" of the ruthless, Isaiah 25:5 ); calm (of the Lord in his heavenly sanctuary, Isaiah 18:4 ); covering or concealment (of Israel's sins in forgiveness, Isaiah 44:22 ); speed and mobility (of the Gentiles "flying" to Mount Zion, Isaiah 60:8 ); and an abundant outpouring (of the "rain" of righteousness, Isaiah 45:8 , and of Manna in the wilderness, Psalm 78:23 )
Money - ); inscribed "shekel of Israel"; a vase, possibly the pot of Manna, and the Hebrew letter 'Αleph ( א ) above it (i
Oil - As in all Eastern lands, oil was largely used in the preparation of food ; familiarity with this use of it is presupposed in the comparison of the taste of the strange Manna to that of the familiar ‘cakes baked with oil’ ( Numbers 11:8 RVm Abundance, Abundant, Abundantly, Abound - ...
B — 3: πλεονάζω (Strong's #4121 — Verb — pleonazo — pleh-on-ad'-zo ) from pleion, or pleon, "more" (greater in quantity), akin to pleo, "to fill," signifies, (a) intransitively, "to superabound," of a trespass or sin, Romans 5:20 ; of grace, Romans 6:1 ; 2 Corinthians 4:15 ; of spiritual fruit, Philippians 4:17 ; of love, 2 Thessalonians 1:3 ; of various fruits, 2 Peter 1:8 ; of the gathering of the Manna, 2 Corinthians 8:15 , "had
Sabbath - The account of the sending of Manna in the desert proves that the Sabbath was already known and observed, Exodus 16:22-30
Moses - Being weary of Manna, they were given quails, which caused a plague ( Numbers 11:4-15 ; Numbers 11:18-24 a, Numbers 11:31-35 ), Dathan and Ahiram rebelled (ascribed by different comm
Existence of God - "It is proved from the miraculous events which have happened in the world; such as the overflowing of the earth by a flood; the confusion of languages; the burning of Sodom and the cities about by fire from heaven; the plagues of Egypt; the dividing of the Red Sea; raining Manna from heaven, and bringing streams of water from flinty rocks; the stopping of the course of the sun, &c
Joshua, Book of - " The Passover was also kept, a type of the peaceful remembrance by the believer of that death which has enabled him to enjoy the promise; and they ate of the old corn of the land (type of a heavenly Christ), and the Manna ceased: cf
Miracle - The Israelites' wandering in the wilderness is punctuated by various miracles of preservation and judgmentrescue when it seems they will perish (by the ongoing provision of Manna and quail chap. Feeding the five thousand recalls the Manna in the wilderness and sets up Jesus' bread of life discourse (John 6:1-15,25-59 )
Typology - He rehearsed the experiences of the people of Israel in the Exodus and in their forty years in the desert: the destruction of Pharaoh's army in the sea (Exodus 14-15 ); the eating of Manna (Exodus 16:1 ); their conduct when thirsty—Rephidim—striking the rock (Exodus 17:1 ); Kadesh—speaking to the rock (Numbers 20:1 ); sin of the gold calf (Exodus 32:1 ); fornication with the daughters of Moab at Baal of Peor (Numbers 25:1 ); murmuring when going from Mount Hor around the land of Edom (Numbers 21:1 )
Wanderings of the Israelites - If they continued to have much cattle, God could as easily have provided for their cattle as have given them Manna from heaven for themselves
Sabbath - The seventh day was hallowed at the close of the creation; its sanctity was afterward marked by the withholding of the Manna on that day, and the provision of a double supply on the sixth, and that previous to the giving of the law from Sinai: it was then made a part of that great epitome of religious and moral duty, which God wrote with his own finger on tables of stone; it was a part of the public political law of the only people to whom almighty God ever made himself a political Head and Ruler; its observance is connected throughout the prophetic age with the highest promises, its violations with the severest maledictions; it was among the Jews in our Lord's time a day of solemn religious assembling, and was so observed by him; when changed to the first day of the week, it was the day on which the first Christians assembled; it was called, by way of eminence, "the Lord's day;" and we have inspired authority to say, that both under the Old and New Testament dispensations, it is used as an expressive type of the heavenly and eternal rest. The first Sabbath kept in the wilderness was calculated from the first day in which the Manna fell; and with no apparent reference to the creation of the world
Ark of the Covenant - 1 Kings 8:9 states there was nothing in the ark of Solomon's temple save the two stone tables of the law; but Hebrews 9:4 states there were also the golden pot of Manna (the memorial of God's providential care of Israel), and Aaron's rod that budded (the memorial of the lawful priesthood, Numbers 17:3-10)
Lord's Prayer, the - ...
The key here is "not too much, not too little, but just enough, " as with God's supply of Manna in the morning and quail in the evening for Israel during the wilderness missionjust enough for the day, no more (Exodus 16:4,12-21 )
Metaphor - 213]'>[5]) calls the Divine Wisdom a rock, and makes it the same as the Manna. Paul, taking the Rabbinic legend, without necessarily accepting it as literal truth, blended with it the ideas of the ‘speaking waters,’ the Manna, and the everlasting rock of Isaiah
Lord's Prayer, the - “Give us our bread for the morrow” (RSV note to Matthew 6:11 ) may refer to the gift of Manna to be renewed at the shift of the ages
Wilderness (2) - ...
The Gospel of John alludes twice to the sojourn of Israel in the wilderness (John 3:14 Moses lifting the serpent, and John 6:31; John 6:40 the Manna)
Weights And Measures - The omer , used only in the Manna story (Exodus 16:13-36 ) was a daily ration and is calculated as a tenth of an ephah (also called issaron, “tenth”)
Angels - "Manna" is called "angels' food," "the grain of heaven"; not that angels eat it, but it came from above whence angels come, and through their ministry (Psalms 78:25)
Money - It is said to have had Aaron's rod on the one side, and the pot of Manna on the other
Eye - The Hebrews by a curious and bold metaphor call fountains eyes; and they also give the same name to colours: "And the eye," or colour, "of the Manna was as the eye," or colour, "of bdellium,"...
Numbers 11:7
Sabbath - For example, Moses instructed the people to bake and boil the Manna and put it aside until morning (Exodus 16:23-24 ), hinting that cooking was not fitting for the Sabbath
Moses - The sustenance of 600,000 men besides women and children, 40 years, in a comparative desert could only be by miracle; as the Pentateuch records, they were fed with Manna from heaven until they ate the grain of Canaan, on the morrow after which the Manna ceased (Exodus 16; Joshua 5:12)
Lord's Supper, the - The supernatural food was the Manna that came down from heaven and the supernatural drink was the water that gushed from the rock
Messiah - Still more expressions of the messianic task were given in the time of Moses; consider the pillar of fire (Christ is the light), Manna (Christ is the living bread), the water from the rock (Christ is living water and the rock), and the lifted-up bronze serpent (Christ is the lifted-up One who gives life)
the Angel of the Church in Pergamos - But now he is numbered among the children of God, and his lot is among the saints!" For then shall be fulfilled that which is written, To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the hidden Manna
Jews - After this, we find them in a dry and barren desert, without any provision for their journey; but God supplied them with water from a rock, and Manna and quails from heaven. Three thousand of them were cut off for worshipping the golden calf; and for loathing the Manna, they were punished with a month's eating of flesh, till a plague brake out among them; and for their rash belief of the ten wicked spies, and their contempt of the promised land, God had entirely destroyed them, had not Moses's prayers prevented
Exodus, the - There they remained some days, suffering at first from want of food (not of water) but supplied with quails anti then Manna
Tabernacle - Aaron's rod represents the delivering grace of God, both in the exodus events and in God's selection of the priests as mediators; the Manna represents God's sustaining grace; and the tablets of the Ten Commandments summarize the terms of the relationship
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - Or in similar expression may look to the future of the recipients of the message, as when we read, "in later days you will return to the Lord your God and obey him" (Deuteronomy 4:30 ), or in the reminder to the hearers that God gave them Manna in the wilderness "to humble and to test you so that in the end it might go well with you" (Deuteronomy 8:16 )
Numbers, Book of - Then they despised the Manna and turned back to the things of Egypt
Wilderness of the Wanderings - Next in the wilderness of Sin ("dross") Israel feeds on the heaven sent Manna, their own resources failing; so the believer as he advances begins wholly to by faith on Christ the true counting all else but dross
Plants in the Bible - ...
Coriander ( Coriandrum sativum ) provides both salad leaves and spicy seeds (Exodus 16:31 ) which were likened by the Israelites to the Manna in the desert
Meals - In this connexion it is interesting to note that while Exodus 16:31 compares the taste of Manna to that of ‘wafers made with honey,’ the parallel passage, Numbers 11:8 , compares it to ‘the taste of cakes baked with oil’ (RVm Old Testament in the New Testament, the - John 6 presents the feeding of the five thousand as a glorious repetition of the Manna miracle, signaling a greater exodus from sin and death
Wealth - En route to Canaan, however, God very clearly places stipulations on the accumulation of wealth; Manna and quail were to be collected so that no one had too little or too much (Exodus 16:16-18 ; quoted in 2 Corinthians 8:15 )
Job - The Usserian or Bible chronology dates the trial of Job about the year 1520 before the Christian era, twenty-nine years before the departure of the Israelites from Egypt; and that the book was composed before that event, is evident from its total silence respecting the miracles which accompanied the exode; such as the passage of the Red Sea, the destruction of the Egyptians, the Manna in the desert, &c; all of which happened in the vicinity of Job's country, and were so apposite in the debate concerning the ways of Providence that some notice could not but have been taken of them, if they had been coeval with the poem of Job
Joshua - ...
Joshua took the command at Shittim, sent spies to Jericho, crossed Jordan, fortified his camp at Gilgal, circumcised the people (for Israel's work was a spiritual one, and men still having the badge of fleshliness were not fit agents for the Lord's work: Joshua 10:40; Judges 5:31), kept the Passover, (after which on their eating the old grain of the land the Manna ceased,) and received the assurance of Jericho's fall and God's fighting against Israel's foes from the uncreated Angel of Jehovah (Joshua 5:13-15; Joshua 6:2-5), the Captain of Jehovah's host (Luke 9:49; Exodus 23:20-23; Numbers 13:8)
Exodus, Theology of - Water, Manna, help in combat, and guidance display his abilities to provide for Israel's needs
Exodus, the Book of - ...
Exodus describes water as wanting where none now is found, abundance where springs still exist and traces of a far greater supply anciently, tracts at the same distances where food would not be found, a natural Manna in the rainy season especially, but not adequate in quantity and nutriment without supernatural modification; nomadic hordes attack Israel just where and when the attack, judging from present appearances of the locality, might well be expected
Prayer - Note the picturesque illustration of Manna and the morning prayer ( Wis 16:27-28 )
Deuteronomy, Theology of - He who supplied Manna in the desert could and would provide all his people's needs in Canaan
Aaron - And Aaron kept in the holy place, and beside the pot of Manna and the rod that budded, a silver chest full of that same accursed ashes, and out of which chest he always sprinkled, and with many tears, all that he ate and all that he drank on every returning day of atonement
Philo - The Logos is represented by Melchizedek; the Manna and the water from the rock both represent the Logos
High Priest - Previously Moses bidding him lay up the pot of Manna before the Lord implied that the ark would, when made, be under his charge
Baruch, Apocalypse of - At the end will come the Messiah, the Manna will descend again, and Behemoth and Leviathan will be there for the saints to eat (xxix
Jesus Christ - Third, at the miraculous feeding of the five thousand and the subsequent sermon in Capernaum reflecting on that event, Jesus offers himself as the essence of the kingdom, as the bread come down from heaven and a new Manna in a new wilderness (Matthew 14:13-21 ; John 6:1-69 )
Grace - When the people of Israel complain at having only Manna and not any meat, Moses cries out to the Lord in an apparently sincere state of vexation at the burden of judging this entire people by himself: "I cannot carry all these people by myself; the burden is too heavy for me
Announcements of Death - He explains that He is the bread of heaven, the true Manna, the spiritual Messiah
John, the Gospel by - There is a contrast here between the Manna and the new and heavenly food; and life is presented from the point of view of man's appropriation,rather than as the quickening power of the Son of God, as in John 5
Vicarious Sacrifice - 17, John 6:50-51 is not an allusion to the Lord’s Supper, but is connected with the miracle of the loaves, the feeding of the multitude suggesting the idea of spiritual feeding, of Jesus’ mission to bring to men spiritual Manna by the partaking of which they would have life
Moses - ...
At Kibroth Hataavah, when the people loathed the Manna, and longed for flesh, Moses betrayed great impatience, and wished for death
Jews - This is done in memory of the Manna, of which a double portion fell on the sixth day of the week