What does Library mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Library, Laurentian
Famous library of Florence founded by Cosmo de' Medici in 1441, which was confiscated when the Medici were expelled from the city and was bought by canons of San Lorenzo at the instigation of Savonarola. In 1508 it was bought by Cardinal Giovanni de' Meaici and taken to Rome. Clement VII restored it to San Lorenzo in 1523 and had it placed in a room built after the design of Michelangelo. It contains 7000 manuscripts, many of which were collected by the Medici with the assistance of Greek scholars from Constantinople. Among its treasures are Codex Amiatinus, a Vergil (5th century), Pandects (6th century).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Laurentian Library
Famous library of Florence founded by Cosmo de' Medici in 1441, which was confiscated when the Medici were expelled from the city and was bought by canons of San Lorenzo at the instigation of Savonarola. In 1508 it was bought by Cardinal Giovanni de' Meaici and taken to Rome. Clement VII restored it to San Lorenzo in 1523 and had it placed in a room built after the design of Michelangelo. It contains 7000 manuscripts, many of which were collected by the Medici with the assistance of Greek scholars from Constantinople. Among its treasures are Codex Amiatinus, a Vergil (5th century), Pandects (6th century).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Library, Ambrosian
One of the famous libraries of the world, founded by Cardinal Federigo Borromeo at Milan between 1603,1609. It consists of a single hall, 75 foot by 29 foot, with bookcases along the walls, lighted by large semi-circular windows at each end. The books are procured by agents from all parts of Europe and also from the East. It was one of the first libraries to offer facilities for research, accessible to all students.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Library, Palatine
Original name of the Vatican Library, whose present name dates from 1588 when Pope Sixtus V commissioned Fontana to erect a new building to house the books of the old Palatine Library. At present it refers to a collection in the Vatican which was donated from the Heidelberg Library by Maximilian of Bavaria, 1622. It contains from 10,000 to 12,000 printed books and about 2,450 manuscripts.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Palatine Library
Original name of the Vatican Library, whose present name dates from 1588 when Pope Sixtus V commissioned Fontana to erect a new building to house the books of the old Palatine Library. At present it refers to a collection in the Vatican which was donated from the Heidelberg Library by Maximilian of Bavaria, 1622. It contains from 10,000 to 12,000 printed books and about 2,450 manuscripts.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Library
A systematically arranged collection of writings. A private library is one owned by an individual; a public library is one owned corporately and open to use by many. A special library of official records is an archive. Many of the earliest libraries were archives housed in palaces or temples.
Though the Bible does not use the word library, it makes indirect allusions to collections of books. The Bible itself is a “library,” and was called such in Latin—bibliotheca . It was probably not until about A.D. 300 that all 66 books were published in a single volume.
The Material and Form of Ancient Books The earliest writings, which were from Mesopotamia, were inscribed in cuneiform on clay tablets, which ranged in size from six by-six-inches up to seven-by-thirteen inches. Longer historical texts would be placed on clay barrels or prisms. One omen series required 71 tablets for 8,000 lines. Each tablet when translated would be the equivalent of a few pages in English rather than a complete book.
Egypt provided the ancient world with its famous papyrus, made from the stalks of a reed plant. As this was imported into Greece through the Phoenician harbor of Byblos, the Greeks called a book biblos . The word Bible is derived from its plural ta biblia , “the books,” and the Greek word for library bibliotheke meant a container for such a book. Papyri sheets were normally written only on one side. They could be attached together to form long scrolls (an Egyptian royal papyrus could be over 100 feet long). Greek papyri rolls were generally shorter. The longer books of the New Testament, such as Matthew or Acts, would take a 30-foot scroll.
The Dead Sea Scrolls from Palestine were written on leather. The famous Isaiah Scroll Isaiah 23 1/2 feet long; the newly published Temple Scroll was originally 28 1/2 feet long. Late in 200's B.C., the city of Pergamum was supposedly forced by a shortage of papyrus to invent “parchment” (also called vellum), a specially treated animal skin which was stretched thin until it became translucent.
The Jews and pagan Greeks and Romans used both papyri and parchments in scroll form. Christians, perhaps as early as the first century, began to use the codex form, that is, the folding of several sheets of papyrus or parchment in a “book” form. This had several advantages. Both sides of the pages could be used; it was more compact; and above all one could more readily find Scripture references. Almost all of the early Christian Scriptures preserved in Egypt's dry climate are papyri codices.
When Paul was in prison in Rome, he requested “the books but especially the parchments” (2 Timothy 4:13 ). The books were probably scrolls of the Old Testament. On the other hand, the parchments were probably parchment codices, possibly of his notes and letters.
Archives and Libraries in the Old Testament Era Abraham came from Mesopotamia, which had a well-developed tradition of palace and temple archives/libraries. Since 1974 over 20,000 tablets have been found in the archives of Ebla in northern Syria from pre-Abrahamic times. See Ebla . Many of the 25,000 tablets from Mari (1700s B.C.) and of the 4,000 tablets from Nuzi (1400s B.C.) have helped to illuminate the backgrounds of the Hebrew patriarchs. See Mari ; Nuzi . Sumerian texts from among the 20,000 tablets at Nippur (before 1500 B.C.), and Akkadian texts from among the 20,000 tablets of Ashurbanipal's (about 668-629 B.C.) famous library at Nineveh have provided literary parallels to biblical stories such as the Gilgamesh Epic. See Sumer ; Ashurbanipal ; Archaeology. Texts written in five scripts and seven languages from the libraries of Ugarit shed important light on the literary and religious background of the Canaanites. See Ugarit, Ras Shamara.
Joseph and Moses (Acts 7:22 ) had access to the royal libraries of Egypt. The excavations of Amarna have uncovered a building with shelves for storing rolls and an inscription, “Place of the Records of the Palace of the King.” Ramesses II (1290-1224 B.C.) had some 20,000 rolls, which no doubt included medical works like the Ebers Papyrus, literary works like The Shipwrecked Sailor, and magical texts like The Book of the Dead.
Solomon, who was famed as a prolific author (1 Kings 4:32 ), must have had an extensive library. It was probably at the palace archives that such documents as the Book of the Chronicles of the Kings of Israel (1 Kings 14:19 ) and of the Kings of Judah (1 Kings 14:29 ), were housed. Sacred texts were kept in the Temple (2 Kings 23:2 )
We know from the Bible that Persian kings kept careful archives (Ezra 4:15 ; Ezra 5:17 ; Ezra 6:1 ). Ahasuerus (Xerxes) had a servant read from his chronicle one night as a cure for his insomnia (Esther 6:1 ).
In 1947 the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in jars in caves near Qumran. These were originally from the library of the Essene monastery. They included manuscripts of all of the Old Testament books except for Esther, works from the Old Testament Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, and sectarian compositions such as The Manual of Discipline, The War Scroll, and The Temple Scroll. The excavators also recovered a table, a bench, and ink wells from the scriptorium, where the manuscripts were copied. See Dead Sea Scrolls .
Greek and Roman Libraries The tyrants of the 500s B.C., Peisistratus of Athens and Polycrates of Samos, were the first Greeks to gather libraries. Individuals such as Euripides, Plato, and Aristotle also had their own libraries. Alexander the Great took with him copies of Homer, of the Greek tragedians, and of various poets.
The first corporate Hellenistic library was conceived by Ptolemy I at Alexandria in Egypt, and then established by Demetrius of Phalerum (Athens) under Ptolemy II (285-247 B.C.). This became the greatest library in the ancient world, amassing up to 700,000 scrolls. The main building was in the palace area with a secondary collection near the Serapeum. Many of the first librarians were outstanding scholars and literary critics, such as Zenodotus of Ephesus, Apollonius of Rhodes, Callimachus the poet, and Eratosthenes the geographer. Callimachus compiled an annotated catalogue, the Pinakes , in 120 scrolls. It is possible that the learned Apollos (Acts 18:24 ) may have made use of this famous library.
The second largest Hellenistic library was established at Pergamum (Revelation 1:11 ) by Eumenes II (197-158 B.C.) The excavators have identified a building next to the temple of Athena as the library. Rows of holes evidently held shelves for the scrolls; stone inscriptions identified the busts of authors. Antony gave Cleopatra its 200,000 scrolls in 41 B.C.
By the first century B.C., wealthy Romans, such as Cicero and Lucullus, had well-stocked libraries in their villas. Satirists mocked those like Trimalchio, who acquired books but never read them. Some 1800 badly scorched papyri have been recovered from a wealthy man's library at Herculaneum, which was buried by volcanic mud from Vesuvius' eruption in A.D. 79.
Caesar was killed in 44 B.C. before he could erect Rome's first public library. This was built some time after 39 B.C. by Asinius Pollio. Augustus built three public libraries; Tiberius built another in the temple of Augustus. Most Roman libraries, such as Trajan's famous Biblioteca Ulpia, had both Greek and Latin collections.
The Use of Libraries The use of archives and libraries would be restricted, first of all, by literacy; and, secondly, in the case of temple or palace archives, to priests and scribes. At Alalakh (1700 B.C.) we have a record of only seven scribes out of a population of 3,000.
Though powerful individuals like the emperors could borrow books, most libraries did not permit books to circulate. An inscription from Athens reads: “No book shall be taken out, since we have sworn thus. [1] open from the first hour (of daylight) until the sixth.” See Paper; Writing .
Edwin Yamauchi
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Library
LIBRARY. See Writing, § 5.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Ambrosian Library
One of the famous libraries of the world, founded by Cardinal Federigo Borromeo at Milan between 1603,1609. It consists of a single hall, 75 foot by 29 foot, with bookcases along the walls, lighted by large semi-circular windows at each end. The books are procured by agents from all parts of Europe and also from the East. It was one of the first libraries to offer facilities for research, accessible to all students.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Alexandrian Library
This celebrated collection of books was first founded by Ptolemy Soter, for the use of the academy, or society of learned men, which he had founded at Alexandria. Beside the books which he procured, his son, Ptolemy Philadelphus, added many more, and left in this library at his death a hundred thousand volumes; and the succeeding princes of this race enlarged it still more, till at length the books lodged in it amounted to the number of seven hundred thousand volumes. The method by which they are said to have collected these books was this: they seized all the books that were brought by the Greeks or other foreigners into Egypt, and sent them to the academy, or museum, where they were transcribed by persons employed for that purpose. The transcripts were then delivered to the proprietors, and the originals laid up in the library. Ptolemy Euergetes, for instance, borrowed of the Athenians the works of Sophocles, Euripides, and AEschylus, and only returned them the copies, which he caused to be transcribed in as beautiful a manner as possible; the originals he retained for his own library, presenting the Athenians with fifteen talents for the exchange, that is, with three thousand pounds sterling and upwards. As the museum was at first in the quarter of the city called Bruchion, the library was placed there; but when the number of books amounted to four hundred thousand volumes, another library, within the Serapeum, was erected by way of supplement to it, and, on that account, called the daughter of the former. The books lodged in this increased to the number of three hundred thousand volumes; and these two made up the number of seven hundred thousand volumes, of which the royal libraries of the Ptolemies were said to consist. In the war which Julius Caesar waged with the inhabitants of Alexandria, the library of Bruchion was accidentally, but unfortunately, burnt. But the library in Serapeum still remained, and there Cleopatra deposited the two hundred thousand volumes of the Pergamean library with which she was presented by Marc Antony. These, and others added to them from time to time, rendered the new library more numerous and considerable than the former; and though it was plundered more than once during the revolutions which happened in the Roman empire, yet it was as frequently supplied with the same number of books, and continued, for many ages, to be of great fame and use, till it was burnt by the Saracens, A.D. 642. Abulpharagius, in his history of the tenth dynasty, gives the following account of this catastrophe: John Philoponus, surnamed the Grammarian, a famous peripatetic philosopher, being at Alexandria when the city was taken by the Saracens, was admitted to familiar intercourse with Amrou, the Arabian general, and presumed to solicit a gift inestimable in his opinion, but contemptible in that of the barbarians; and this was the royal library. Amrou was inclined to gratify his wish, but his rigid integrity scrupled to alienate the least object without the consent of the caliph. He accordingly wrote to Omar, whose well known answer was dictated by the ignorance of a fanatic: "If these writings of the Greeks agree with the Koran, or book of God, they are useless, and need not be preserved; if they disagree, they are pernicious, and ought to be destroyed." The sentence of destruction was executed with blind obedience: the volumes of paper or parchment were distributed to the four thousand baths of the city; and such was their number, that six months were barely sufficient for the consumption of this precious fuel.
Webster's Dictionary - Library
(1):
(n.) A building or apartment appropriated for holding such a collection of books.
(2):
(n.) A considerable collection of books kept for use, and not as merchandise; as, a private library; a public library.

Sentence search

Library, Palatine - Original name of the Vatican Library, whose present name dates from 1588 when Pope Sixtus V commissioned Fontana to erect a new building to house the books of the old Palatine Library. At present it refers to a collection in the Vatican which was donated from the Heidelberg Library by Maximilian of Bavaria, 1622
Palatine Library - Original name of the Vatican Library, whose present name dates from 1588 when Pope Sixtus V commissioned Fontana to erect a new building to house the books of the old Palatine Library. At present it refers to a collection in the Vatican which was donated from the Heidelberg Library by Maximilian of Bavaria, 1622
Library - ) A considerable collection of books kept for use, and not as merchandise; as, a private Library; a public Library
Bibliotheca - ) A Library
Bibliotheke - ) A Library
Libraries - ) of Library...
Library - Library
Bibliothecal - ) Belonging to a Library
August Von Schlegel - Editor of the periodical, Indian Library which treated principally of the Oriental languages
Schlegel, August Wilhelm Von - Editor of the periodical, Indian Library which treated principally of the Oriental languages
Bookplate - ) A label, placed upon or in a book, showing its ownership or its position in a Library
Librarian - ) One who has the care or charge of a Library
Bodleian - ) Of or pertaining to Sir Thomas Bodley, or to the celebrated Library at Oxford, founded by him in the sixteenth century
Demotics - ) The department of knowledge relative to the care and culture of the people; sociology in its broadest sense; - in Library cataloguing
Alexandrian - ) Of or pertaining to Alexandria in Egypt; as, the Alexandrian Library
Vatican - Peter, including the pope's palace, a museum, a Library, a famous chapel, etc
Alexandrian Library - Beside the books which he procured, his son, Ptolemy Philadelphus, added many more, and left in this Library at his death a hundred thousand volumes; and the succeeding princes of this race enlarged it still more, till at length the books lodged in it amounted to the number of seven hundred thousand volumes. The transcripts were then delivered to the proprietors, and the originals laid up in the Library. Ptolemy Euergetes, for instance, borrowed of the Athenians the works of Sophocles, Euripides, and AEschylus, and only returned them the copies, which he caused to be transcribed in as beautiful a manner as possible; the originals he retained for his own Library, presenting the Athenians with fifteen talents for the exchange, that is, with three thousand pounds sterling and upwards. As the museum was at first in the quarter of the city called Bruchion, the Library was placed there; but when the number of books amounted to four hundred thousand volumes, another Library, within the Serapeum, was erected by way of supplement to it, and, on that account, called the daughter of the former. In the war which Julius Caesar waged with the inhabitants of Alexandria, the Library of Bruchion was accidentally, but unfortunately, burnt. But the Library in Serapeum still remained, and there Cleopatra deposited the two hundred thousand volumes of the Pergamean Library with which she was presented by Marc Antony. These, and others added to them from time to time, rendered the new Library more numerous and considerable than the former; and though it was plundered more than once during the revolutions which happened in the Roman empire, yet it was as frequently supplied with the same number of books, and continued, for many ages, to be of great fame and use, till it was burnt by the Saracens, A. Abulpharagius, in his history of the tenth dynasty, gives the following account of this catastrophe: John Philoponus, surnamed the Grammarian, a famous peripatetic philosopher, being at Alexandria when the city was taken by the Saracens, was admitted to familiar intercourse with Amrou, the Arabian general, and presumed to solicit a gift inestimable in his opinion, but contemptible in that of the barbarians; and this was the royal Library
Lucas Holste - Librarian of the Vatican Library
Lucas Holstenius - Librarian of the Vatican Library
Holste, Lucas - Librarian of the Vatican Library
Holstenius, Lucas - Librarian of the Vatican Library
Mai, Angelo - He entered the Society of Jesus, in 1811 was appointed to the Ambrosian Library, Milan. After leaving the Jesuits, 1819 he was appointed to the Vatican Library
Angelo Mai - He entered the Society of Jesus, in 1811 was appointed to the Ambrosian Library, Milan. After leaving the Jesuits, 1819 he was appointed to the Vatican Library
Alexander of Jerusalem, Saint - He was later coadjutor Bishop of Jerusalem; ordained Origen to the priesthood; and built a Library at Jerusalem
Abbey of Saint Gall - Its schools and Library were numbered among the most celebrated of Europe. The Library suffered at the hands of the Humanists (14th century) and the Calvinists (16th century) who removed many valuable manuscripts and books, but in 1530 Abbot Diethelm instituted a noteworthy restoration
Saint Gall, Abbey of - Its schools and Library were numbered among the most celebrated of Europe. The Library suffered at the hands of the Humanists (14th century) and the Calvinists (16th century) who removed many valuable manuscripts and books, but in 1530 Abbot Diethelm instituted a noteworthy restoration
Library - A private Library is one owned by an individual; a public Library is one owned corporately and open to use by many. A special Library of official records is an archive. ...
Though the Bible does not use the word Library, it makes indirect allusions to collections of books. The Bible itself is a “library,” and was called such in Latin—bibliotheca . The word Bible is derived from its plural ta biblia , “the books,” and the Greek word for Library bibliotheke meant a container for such a book. ) famous Library at Nineveh have provided literary parallels to biblical stories such as the Gilgamesh Epic. ...
Solomon, who was famed as a prolific author (1 Kings 4:32 ), must have had an extensive Library. These were originally from the Library of the Essene monastery. ...
The first corporate Hellenistic Library was conceived by Ptolemy I at Alexandria in Egypt, and then established by Demetrius of Phalerum (Athens) under Ptolemy II (285-247 B. This became the greatest Library in the ancient world, amassing up to 700,000 scrolls. It is possible that the learned Apollos (Acts 18:24 ) may have made use of this famous Library. ...
The second largest Hellenistic Library was established at Pergamum (Revelation 1:11 ) by Eumenes II (197-158 B. ) The excavators have identified a building next to the temple of Athena as the Library. Some 1800 badly scorched papyri have been recovered from a wealthy man's Library at Herculaneum, which was buried by volcanic mud from Vesuvius' eruption in A. before he could erect Rome's first public Library. [1] open from the first hour (of daylight) until the sixth
Libraries - After the introduction of Christianity each church became the nucleus of a Library, as a collection of books was needed for church services. Among the earliest accumulations was the Library founded at Jerusalem principally by Bishop Alexander, c. More important was the Library of Caesarea in Palestine collected by the martyr Pamiphilus (died 308), which contained a number of manuscripts used by Origen in Rome. Pope Damasus (366-384) built a record office (archivum) in Rome which served as a depository of official documents, a Library, and chancery, and was connected with the Basilica of Saint Lawrence. Pope Agapetus (535-536) erected a building on the Caelian Hill, later known as the Library of Saint Gregory. , 1614; the Casanatense, Rome, founded by Cardinal Girolamo Casanata, 1698; the Mazarin, Paris, founded by Cardinal Mazarin, 1643; the Mediceo-Laurenziana, Florence, founded by Clement VII, 1671, and the Library of Louvain University, founded 1627, on a collection bequeathed to the university by Beyerlinck
Cerne Abbey - It was once the property of the Abbey of Cerne, but is now in the University Library, Cambridge
Abbey, Cerne - It was once the property of the Abbey of Cerne, but is now in the University Library, Cambridge
Use of Bangor - A Bangor Pontifical is preserved in the cathedral Library of Bangor
Bangor, Use of - A Bangor Pontifical is preserved in the cathedral Library of Bangor
Athenaeum - ) A building or an apartment where a Library, periodicals, and newspapers are kept for use
Alcove - ) A recessed portion of a room, or a small room opening into a larger one; especially, a recess to contain a bed; a lateral recess in a Library
Shelve - ) To furnish with shelves; as, to shelve a closet or a Library
Alexander Viii, Pope - He pronounced the Declaration of Gallican Liberties void, assisted Venice against the Turks with subsidies, and enlarged the Vatican Library
Pergamos - There was here collected by the kings of this race a noble Library of two hundred thousand volumes, which, after the country was ceded to the Romans, was transported to Egypt for Cleopatra, and added to the Library at Alexandria
Mount Saint Vincent, College of - Buildings include chapel, laboratories, gymnasium, Library, museum, and art studios
General Theological Seminary - Volumes in the Library 30,000
Federico Borromeo - " He founded the Ambrosian Library, and wrote numerous works on various ecclesiastical sciences
Ansegisus, Saint - Becoming Abbot of Fontenelle he made this monastery famous for learning, discipline, and its Library
Fragments, Carlsruhe - Two fragments of four pages each, commonly labelled A and B, preserved in the Library of Carlsruhe
Catholic Reading Guild - Special attention is given at the central Library in London to the needs of non-Catholics, and courses of instructional reading are supplied by the librarian
Carlsruhe Fragments - Two fragments of four pages each, commonly labelled A and B, preserved in the Library of Carlsruhe
Displace - ) To change the place of; to remove from the usual or proper place; to put out of place; to place in another situation; as, the books in the Library are all displaced
Richard de Bury - He founded a Library in Durham College, Oxford, bequeathing his books to it
Richard of Bury - He founded a Library in Durham College, Oxford, bequeathing his books to it
Ashurbanipal - Ashurbanipal's legacy is his famous Library which contained more than 20,000 clay tablets. The Library was located in the Assyrian capital of Nineveh and was discovered in 1853. Most of what we know about the Assyrian Empire is derived from his Library
Madrid, Spain - The first public Library was the San Isidro, founded by the Jesuits; the National Museum (Museo del Prado) contains masterpieces of nearly all the European schools of painting and sculpture
Mame, Alfred Henri Amand - In addition to numberless liturgical and devotional works, the firm excelled in illustrated books, and published a celebrated Library for Christian youth
Alfred Mame - In addition to numberless liturgical and devotional works, the firm excelled in illustrated books, and published a celebrated Library for Christian youth
Gaetano Sanseverino - He became canon of the cathedral and scrittore in the National Library, and founded La Scienza e la Fede (1840), a periodical in the interest of Christian philosophy
Sanseverino, Gaetano - He became canon of the cathedral and scrittore in the National Library, and founded La Scienza e la Fede (1840), a periodical in the interest of Christian philosophy
Ceolfrid, Saint - In his last journey to Rome, prior to which he had resigned his abbacy, he carried as a gift to the pope the famous "Codex Amiatinus," written (690-716) at Wearmouth or Jarrow, containing the oldest text of Saint Jerome's Vulgate, and now in the Laurentian Library, Florence
Aiguillon, Marie de Vignerot de Pontcourlay, Duche - After Richelieu's death she carried out his designs for the completion of the Sorbonne and the National Library
Abbey of Saint Victor - In 1800 the church and other buildings were confiscated; and the Library was dispersed
Welcome - ) Free to have or enjoy gratuitously; as, you are welcome to the use of my Library
Alexander Vii, Pope - " A patron of art, he beautified Rome, enlarged the Vatican Library, and befriended men of letters
Saint Victor, Abbey of - In 1800 the church and other buildings were confiscated; and the Library was dispersed
Volume - Of such volumes, Ptolemy's Library in Alexandria contained 3 or 700,000. The number of volumes in the Royal Library, in rue de Richlieu, at Paris, is variously estimated
Pergamos - The city was noted for its vast Library, containing 200,000 volumes
Flaccus, Saint - He succeeded Aelbert, in 767, as head of the cathedral school of York and established its Library
Abbey of Corbey - At its suppression in 1790 the buildings were partly demolished but the church still remains with fine portal and towers; the Library was transferred to Saint-Germain-des-Pres in 1624
Library, Laurentian - Famous Library of Florence founded by Cosmo de' Medici in 1441, which was confiscated when the Medici were expelled from the city and was bought by canons of San Lorenzo at the instigation of Savonarola
Laurentian Library - Famous Library of Florence founded by Cosmo de' Medici in 1441, which was confiscated when the Medici were expelled from the city and was bought by canons of San Lorenzo at the instigation of Savonarola
Charles Russell Writer - He was appointed a member of the Historical Manuscript Commission in 1869, and acted as joint editor of the Report on the Carte Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library
Alrinus, Saint - He succeeded Aelbert, in 767, as head of the cathedral school of York and established its Library
Abbey of Corbie - At its suppression in 1790 the buildings were partly demolished but the church still remains with fine portal and towers; the Library was transferred to Saint-Germain-des-Pres in 1624
Alcuin, Saint - He succeeded Aelbert, in 767, as head of the cathedral school of York and established its Library
Gelasian Sacramentary - The book exists in several manuscripts, the oldest of which is preserved in the Vatican Library (manuscript Reginae 316)
Sacramentary, Gelasian - The book exists in several manuscripts, the oldest of which is preserved in the Vatican Library (manuscript Reginae 316)
Russell, Charles William - He was appointed a member of the Historical Manuscript Commission in 1869, and acted as joint editor of the Report on the Carte Manuscripts in the Bodleian Library
Leo Xii, Pope - The Roman College was restored to the charge of the Jesuits, 1824, Freemasonry and other secret societies were condemned, the Vatican printing-press was restored, and the Vatican Library enriched
Deer - One of the oldest monuments of Scottish literature is the Book of Deer, now in the Cambridge University Library
Deir - One of the oldest monuments of Scottish literature is the Book of Deer, now in the Cambridge University Library
Kuyunjik - Recent excavations have revealed the Library of Asurbanipal and various ancient sculptures and coins
Ninive - Recent excavations have revealed the Library of Asurbanipal and various ancient sculptures and coins
Sixtus v, Pope - A patron of art, he built the Lateran Palace, completed the Quirinal, enlarged the Sapienza, raised the obelisk of the Vatican, restored the columns of Trajan and Antoninus Pius, and erected the Vatican Library, with its printing office
Sixtus iv, Pope - Became the second founder of the Vatican Library
Ferdinand Victor Eugene Delacroix - He decorated the Library of the Luxembourg with scenes from the "Divine Comedy," and was engaged in decorating the church of Saint Sulpice when he died
Delacroix, Ferdinand Victor Eugene - He decorated the Library of the Luxembourg with scenes from the "Divine Comedy," and was engaged in decorating the church of Saint Sulpice when he died
Leonine Sacramentary - Found in the Library of the Cathedral Chapter of Verona, it was published by Joseph Bianchini in 1735 in the fourth volume of his edition of Anastasius Bibliothecarius and was by him arbitrarily attributed to Pope Leo I (440-461)
Catholic Stage Guild - The guild's ambitions include the making of an international Library of Christian dramatic literature; the private production of appropriate plays; and eventually the possession of its own theater
Jacobins - Political club of French Revolution, originating in the Club Breton at Versailles in 1789, named Jacobins because their meetings were held in the refectory and Library of the Dominican monastery, rue Saint Honore, Paris, which they rented
Sacramentary, Leonine - Found in the Library of the Cathedral Chapter of Verona, it was published by Joseph Bianchini in 1735 in the fourth volume of his edition of Anastasius Bibliothecarius and was by him arbitrarily attributed to Pope Leo I (440-461)
Maccabees, Books of the - ...
The fourth was found in the Library of Lyons, but was afterwards burned
Bibles, Picture - Among the earliest, the "Bible Moralisee" (in allusion to the moral lessons frequently interspersed), or "Bible Historiee," a work of the 13th century, is preserved in sections in the Bodleian Library (Oxford), the British Museum, and the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris
Sepharvaim - , where he established a great Library
Patmos - It once contained a valuable Library, from which was purchased in 1814 the 9th cent
Bibles, Chained - Until the middle of the 11th century all books, and for centuries afterwards the greater bulk of them, were locked in chests, or in recesses of Library walls, to insure them against loss or theft. The earliest document to refer to chained books is the catalogue of the Library of Saint Peter's monastery at Weissenberg, Alsace (1040). The Protestant Reformation did not essentially alter the medieval conception of a Library
Chained Bibles - Until the middle of the 11th century all books, and for centuries afterwards the greater bulk of them, were locked in chests, or in recesses of Library walls, to insure them against loss or theft. The earliest document to refer to chained books is the catalogue of the Library of Saint Peter's monastery at Weissenberg, Alsace (1040). The Protestant Reformation did not essentially alter the medieval conception of a Library
Bernardino di Betto di Biagio Pinturicchio - In the Piccolomini Library of the cathedral of Siena he painted ten scenes from the life of the future Pope Pius II, helped possibly by the young Raphael
Asnapper - " He formed at Nineveh a Library of clay tablets, numbering about 10,000
Bartolomeo Eustachius - Appointed professor of anatomy at the Roman University, he availed himself of opportunities for original work and recorded his anatomical investigations in a series of plates with text attached, Clement XI defraying the expense of publishing those which had been deposited in the Vatican Library
Furnish - To supply with any thing wanted or necessary as, to furnish a family with provisions to furnish arms for defense to furnish a table to furnish a Library to furnish one with money or implements
Agrapha - Recent discovery of the Nag Hammadi Library has increased our examples
Eustachius, Bartolomeo - Appointed professor of anatomy at the Roman University, he availed himself of opportunities for original work and recorded his anatomical investigations in a series of plates with text attached, Clement XI defraying the expense of publishing those which had been deposited in the Vatican Library
Stephanus, Bishop of Ephesus - collection of sermons in the Vienna imperial Library (Lambecii, Comment
Alexandria - The finest Library in the ancient world with over 500,000 volumes attracted many scholars. The Mouseion (Museum) complimented the Library as the center of worship for the Muses, goddesses of “music,” dancing, and letters
Pamphili, Eusebius - He made the acquaintance of Pamphilus, the founder of the magnificent Library which remained for several centuries the glory of the Church of Caesarea, assisted in editing the Septuagint, and when Pamphilus was beheaded in the persecution of Diocletian assumed the name Eusebius Pamphili
Matthias Corvinus - He introduced the humanities into Hungary, established the Corvinian Library at Buda, reformed taxation, and earned the title of "The Just" for his enactments in judicial affairs
Caesarea, Eusebius of - He made the acquaintance of Pamphilus, the founder of the magnificent Library which remained for several centuries the glory of the Church of Caesarea, assisted in editing the Septuagint, and when Pamphilus was beheaded in the persecution of Diocletian assumed the name Eusebius Pamphili
Affliction: Endears the Promises - His Bible, still preserved in the Library of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, has the passage marked with a pen in the margin
Henry Spelman - This was supposed to have perished in the Great Fire, but part of it was discovered in the Bodleian Library
Eusebius Pamphili - He made the acquaintance of Pamphilus, the founder of the magnificent Library which remained for several centuries the glory of the Church of Caesarea, assisted in editing the Septuagint, and when Pamphilus was beheaded in the persecution of Diocletian assumed the name Eusebius Pamphili
Escorial - Famous building, Spain; about 27 miles northwest of Madrid, known as El real Monasterio de San Lorenzo del Escorial, comprising a monastery, church, mausoleum, palace, college, Library, and art-galleries
Egbert - One of his greatest works was the foundation of the famous School of York and its celebrated Library
Spelman, Henry - This was supposed to have perished in the Great Fire, but part of it was discovered in the Bodleian Library
Fontenelle, Abbey of - The monastery was famed for its Library and school, where calligraphy in particular, as well as letters, sciences, and the fine arts, were cultivated
Quito, Ecuador, City of - It still occupies a portion of the old Jesuit College, and its excellent Library is formed in part from the San Luis seminary
Abbey of Fontenelle - The monastery was famed for its Library and school, where calligraphy in particular, as well as letters, sciences, and the fine arts, were cultivated
Abbey of Saint Wandrille - The monastery was famed for its Library and school, where calligraphy in particular, as well as letters, sciences, and the fine arts, were cultivated
Saint Wandrille, Abbey of - The monastery was famed for its Library and school, where calligraphy in particular, as well as letters, sciences, and the fine arts, were cultivated
Per'Gamos - The city was noted for its vast, Library, containing 200,000 volumes
Johannes Bessarion - He bequeathed his Greek codices to Venice, where they formed the nucleus of the Library of Saint Mark
Bessarion, Johannes - He bequeathed his Greek codices to Venice, where they formed the nucleus of the Library of Saint Mark
Deusdedit - This work, taken partly from earlier collections, and partly from documents in the Lateran Library, by which Deusdedit meant to defend the rights of the Church in keeping with the measures of Gregory VII, reveals him as one of the most important of the pre-Gratian canonists
de Rossi, Giovanni Battista - Graduated in law at the Sapienza, he was appointed a scriptor at the Vatican Library
Oscott - Its Library of 30,000 volumes contains the Harvington, Marini, Kirk, and Forbes collections, as well as valuable collections of early printed books and manuscripts
John Shea - The John Gilmary Shea Papers, a collection of correspondence, manuscripts, and research materials, are preserved in the Georgetown University Library (Special Collections Division)
Giovanni de Rossi - Graduated in law at the Sapienza, he was appointed a scriptor at the Vatican Library
Alexandria - Learning was cultivated and a famous Library was collected
Shea, John Dawson Gilmary - The John Gilmary Shea Papers, a collection of correspondence, manuscripts, and research materials, are preserved in the Georgetown University Library (Special Collections Division)
Pamphilus, Presbyter of Caesarea - The Library thus formed was subsequently repaired, after its injuries during the persecution of Diocletian, by Acacius and Euzoïus, the successors of Eusebius in the see of Caesarea (Hieron. In the catechetical school of Alexandria Pamphilus had conceived a most ardent admiration for Origen, with whose works he made it his special object to enrich his Library, copying the greater part himself (Hieron. The Library he collected was destroyed when Caesarea was taken by the Arabs in the 7th cent
Alexandria - It possessed a famous Library of 700,000 volumes, which was burned by the Saracens (A
Muratori, Luigi Antonio - Educated by the Jesuits and at the University of Modena, he was ordained in 1694, and in 1695 commenced his work of collecting unedited ancient manuscripts, at the Ambrosian Library in Milan
Luigi Muratori - Educated by the Jesuits and at the University of Modena, he was ordained in 1694, and in 1695 commenced his work of collecting unedited ancient manuscripts, at the Ambrosian Library in Milan
Tarachus, Also Called Victor - in the Colbertine Library
Biblical Institute at Rome, the - A Library, archaeological museum, and special publication complete the facilities of the school
Nicholas v, Pope - When elected he restored parts of Rome, welcomed Humanists, and founded the Vatican Library which he designated was to be opened to all scholars
Tommaso Parentucelli - When elected he restored parts of Rome, welcomed Humanists, and founded the Vatican Library which he designated was to be opened to all scholars
On - Tradition makes Plato and other Greek philosophers study in Heliopolis; later, the foundation of the Alexandrian Library, on the one hand, deprived Heliopolis of the glory of learning, and, on the other, the old traditions of royal descent from the Sun-god had little weight with the Ptolemys
Osnappar - He is distinguished chiefly as the great conserver of the ancient Babylonian literature, whose rich and varied collections have come to us from his own Library in Nineveh
Smyr'na - There was a large public Library there, and also a handsome building surrounded with porticos which served as a museum
Found - To begin to form or lay the basis as, to found a college or a Library
University of Coimbra, Portugal - The Library contains over 300,000 volumes
Samaritan Pentateuch - de Sancy, French ambassador at Constantinople, obtained it for Pietro della Valle, and sent it to the Library of the Orateire at Paris in 1623. Another is in the Ambrosian Library of Milan. Two more, procured by Pierese, are in the Imperial Library of Paris. ...
Grove in 1861 brought a 4to copy from Nablus for the Count of Paris, in whose Library it is. 1000; a good copy is in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, presented by Dr
Manuscripts - ), now in the Imperial Library, St. Petersburg, with the exception of a small portion, which is in the University Library, Leipzig, contains OT (with considerable losses), NT (complete), followed by Ep. ), Codex Bezae, in Cambridge University Library, Nn. ), Basel University Library, A. 119 in Wright’s catalogue), and Berlin, Royal Library, Orient. This MS, Codex Nitriensis Curetonianus (Burkitt’s C), consists of 82½ leaves in the British Museum and 3 leaves in Berlin; and came from the great Library of the Convent of St. Complete photographs of it are in Cambridge University Library; Westminster College, Cambridge; Rylands’ Library, Manchester: photos of separate pages in Burkitt, vol. Earl of Crawford’s MS 1, now Rylands’ Library, Manchester, of the 6th cent. Oxford, Bodleian Library, Huntington, 17,*
b: Verona, Cathedral Library (Biblioteca Capitolare). 1185) except one leaf, which is in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin (N. A copy of the MS made before its present mutilation exists in the Vallicellian Library, Rome, as U. , London, 1880); reports on the copy in the Vallicellian Library were published by H. ...
f: Brixianus; in the Capitular Library of Brescia
Ambrose, Saint - So also was the Order of Saint Ambrose, founded at Milan in the 14th century, several Oblate congregations, and the Ambrosian Library, founded by Cardinal Federigo Borromeo
Alexandria - It had the greatest Library of ancient times, which contained upward of 700,000 rolls or volumes. The additional or "new Library" in the Serapeum, afterward increased to about 500,000 volumes, including the original 300,000 volumes, was destroyed by the fanatical vandalism of the Saracens in a
Codex - Another important codex from the fourth century is in the Vatican Library in Rome
Nineveh - ...
One of the most remarkable of recent discoveries is that of the Library of King Assur-bani-pal, or, as the Greek historians call him, Sardanapalos, the grandson of Sennacherib (q. ) This Library consists of about ten thousand flat bricks or tablets, all written over with Assyrian characters. These strange clay leaves found in the royal Library form the most valuable of all the treasuries of the literature of the old world. The Library contains also old Accadian documents, which are the oldest extant documents in the world, dating as far back as probably about the time of Abraham
Assyria - ), greatest of all Assyrian kings, to whom we owe part of our knowledge of Assyro-Babylonian history, as he caused the most important historical texts and inscriptions to be copied and placed in a fine Library which he built in his palace
Chrysologus, Petrus, Archbishop of Ravenna - 524; partly in the conflagration of the archbishop's Library at Ravenna, c
Chicago, Illinois - The first free Library in the city, the Union Catholic Library Association, lost a collection of 2,500 volumes
Nineveh - He found Ashurbanipal's palace and Library in 1853. He amassed a Library of 20,000 tablets, which contained important literary epics, magical and omen collections, royal archives and letters
Benedetto Gaetani - During his pontificate he founded the university of Rome, encouraged the painter Giotto, and enlarged the Vatican Library
Gaetani, Benedetto - During his pontificate he founded the university of Rome, encouraged the painter Giotto, and enlarged the Vatican Library
Sepharvaim - Here probably was a Library, similar to that found at Nineveh, and which has been in part deciphered by G
Canon of Scripture, the, - " The canonical books were also called "books of the testament," and Jerome styled the whole collection by the striking name of "the holy Library," which happily expresses the unity and variety of the Bible
Lutheran - The National Lutheran Council was organized, 1918, as an agency whose regular work consisted of: external representation of the Lutheran Church, especially in relation to the national government; statistics; reference Library; and publicity
Lutheranism - The National Lutheran Council was organized, 1918, as an agency whose regular work consisted of: external representation of the Lutheran Church, especially in relation to the national government; statistics; reference Library; and publicity
Alexan'Dria, - Its collection of books grew to be the greatest Library of ancient times, and contained at one time 700,000 rolls or volumes
Paper, Papyrus - See Bible, Text and Versions; Library ; Writing
Caesarius, Bishop of Chrysostom - Cranmer's Library. His reputation was cleared by the rediscovery by Emeric Bigot, in a Florentine Library, of doubtless the very MS
Fructuosus (1), m., Bishop of Tarragona - calendar in the Library of the cathedral of Astorga
Pergamos - The Library was its great boast; founded by Earaches and destroyed by Caliph Omar
Alexander, Bishop of Jerusalem - His chief claim to celebrity rests on the Library he formed at Jerusalem, and on the boldness with which he supported Origen against his bishop, Demetrius of Alexandria
Nag Hammadi - Because of the close proximity of Nag Hammadi to the site of an important discovery of ancient documents relating to gnosticism, the collection of documents is usually referred to as the Nag Hammadi documents or Library. With the Nag Hammadi discovery, however, a small Library of actual gnostic writings became available for study
Holy Grail, the - Edwin Abbey has beautifully represented the "Quest of the Holy Grail" in 15 mural paintings in the Boston Public Library
University of Bologna - Its Library was founded by Aldrovandi in 1605 and numbers about 250,000 volumes
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - The most important of them is the finding of the stone tablets or books which formed the great Library at Nineveh, founded by Shalmaneser B. This Library was more than doubled by Sardanapalus
Alexandria - (2) The Library , which was the greatest treasure of the city, was founded by the first Ptolemy. The Library was in two portions; and, in the siege of Alexandria by Julius Cæsar, the part stored in the Museum was burned; a loss, however, which was largely made up by the presentation to Cleopatra, by Mark Antony, of the Royal Library of Pergamum. History is undecided as to whether this celebrated Library was destroyed in a
Ink - Such vitriolic ink as has been used on the old parchment manuscripts would have corroded the delicate leaves of the papyrus, as it has done the skins of the most ancient manuscripts of Virgil and Terence, in the Vatican Library; the letters are sunk into the parchment, and some have eaten quite through it, in consequence of the corrosive acid of the vitriolic ink, with which they were written
Lachish - A replica of this relief may be found in the Library of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, ...
Gallus (11), Abbat, the Apostle of Switzerland - Gall gave rise to one of the most celebrated monasteries of the middle ages, and its Library to this day stands unrivalled in the wealth and variety of its ancient manuscripts
Moses of Khoren - Moses had studied long at Edessa, where the Library was very rich in ancient Assyrian chroniclers
Titus, Bishop of Bostra - in the Library of the Johanneum at Hamburg
Ptolemies - In particular the early Ptolemies supported a large group of scholars at the famous Museum and developed the nucleus of the great Library
House - This house must have a right foundation, JESUS CHRIST:...
...
a heating plant to keep the heart and soul on fire for GOD;...
a kitchen so that the food may be prepared for the soul;...
a Library for the education and instruction of the mind;...
a music room to keep the heart singing;...
a parlor for hospitality;...
a bedroom for rest;...
a bath room for cleansing;...
an attic for storage;...
and also the light of the Word and the water of the Spirit
Philippus, of Side - Another considerable fragment is reported to exist in the Imperial Library at Vienna, entitled de Christi Nativitate, et de Magis , giving the acts of a disputation held in Persia concerning Christianity between certain Persians and Christians, at which Philip was himself present
Sinaiticus Codex - , which he deposited in the university Library of Leipsic, under the title of the Codex Frederico-Augustanus, after his royal patron the king of Saxony
Book - In some cases these have been found in such numbers as to form quite a Library
Joannes Scholasticus, Bishop of Constantinople - of the Paris Library the Nomocanon is attributed to Theodoret, but in all others to John
Alexandria - Ptolemy Soter, the first of that line of kings, formed the museum, the Library of 700,000 volumes, and several other splendid works
John Carroll - Active always in civicaffairs, he was president of the Female Humane Charity School of Baltimore, head of the Library Company, and one of the three trustees of Saint John's College at Annapolis
Bible - Bible, the English form of the Greek name Biblia , meaning "books," the name which in the fifth century began to be given to the entire collection of sacred books, the "Library of Divine Revelation
Carroll, John - Active always in civicaffairs, he was president of the Female Humane Charity School of Baltimore, head of the Library Company, and one of the three trustees of Saint John's College at Annapolis
Deluge - 2000, and which formed part of the priestly Library at Erech (q
Build - ...
a Library, for we are to keep studying, learning and reading
Works of the Law - Bruce, Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 57 (1974-75): 259-79; C
Isaacus Antiochenus, a Priest of Antioch in Syria - ...
The Library of the British Museum possesses about 80 of the discourses, hymns, prayers, etc
Open - ) Free to be used, enjoyed, visited, or the like; not private; public; unrestricted in use; as, an open Library, museum, court, or other assembly; liable to the approach, trespass, or attack of any one; unprotected; exposed
Order - ) Of material things, like the books in a Library
Pergamum - It is said that king Eumenes, the founder of the Library, invented the use of this preparation of sheep-skin or goat-skin for the purposes of writing
Text of the New Testament - Catherine at Sinai in 1844, and acquired by him for the University Library at Leipzig; while the remainder (156 leaves of the OT, and the entire NT, with the Epistle of Barnabas and part of the ‘Shepherd’ of Hermas, on 148 leaves) were found by him in the same place in 1859, and eventually secured for the Imperial Library at St. The corrections of א ca were derived (according to a note affixed to the Book of Esther) from a MS corrected by the martyr Pamphilus, the disciple of Origen and founder of the Library of Cæsarea. in 1627, and so passed, with the rest of the Royal Library, to the British Museum in 1757. 1209 in the Vatican Library at Rome, where it has been since about 1481. Codex Bezae , in the University Library at Cambridge, to which it was presented in 1581 by Theodore Beza, who obtained it in 1562 from the monastery of St. Codex Laudianus , in the Bodleian Library at Oxford. The most important (T or T a in the Library of the Propaganda at Rome) consists of 17 leaves from Lk. , in the Bodleian Library at Oxford
Cassiodorus (or Rather, Cassiodorius) Magnus Aurelius - He endowed the monastery with his extensive Roman Library (Div. Nor was the influence of his example confined to his own age, institution, or country; the multiplication of manuscripts became gradually as much a recognized employment of monastic life as prayer or fasting; and for this the statue of Cassiodorus deserves an honourable niche in every Library
bi'Ble - These books are a Library in themselves being written in every known form old literature. (2) The Vatican (codex Vaticanus , B), named from the Vatican Library at Rome, where it is kept
Nin'Eveh - He has discovered not only the buildings, but the remains of fin ancient Library written on stone tablets. These leaves or tablets were from an inch to 1 foot square, made of terra-cotta clay, on which when soft the inscriptions were written; the tablets were then hardened and placed upon the walls of the Library rooms, so as to cover the walls. This royal Library contained over 10,000 tablets
Jannes And Jambres - The Acts of Peter and Paul (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, xvi
Praedestinatus, an Author - in the Cathedral Library of Rheims by Sirmond, who somewhat inappropriately gave it its title from those against whom it was directed, and several times reprinted, e
New Testament - The Latin version before Jerome's having become variously altered in different copies caused the need for his translation from the original Greek of manuscripts current at Rome (and in a few passages probably from Origen's Greek manuscripts in the Caesarean Library), at Damasus' suggestion. Codex Guelpherbytani (P, Q), two fragmentary rescriptae, sixth century: P, the Gospels; Q, Luke and John: in the ducal Library at Wolfenbuttel. San Gallensis (delta), in the Library of Gall, Greek and Latin four Gospels. E, Laudianus, Greek and Latin; Laud gave it to Bodleian Library, Oxford; brought from Sardinia; Hearne edited it 1715; sixth century (Tischendorf). Library, Germain; seventh century. Manuscripts of Paul's epistles besides 'aleph, A, B, C, D (delta in Lachmann), Claromontanus, Greek and Latin, in Royal Library, Paris; came from Clermont, Beza had owned it; all Paul's epistles except a few verses; Tischendorf published it, 1852; sixth century. ...
H, Coislinianus, at Paris; fragment of Paul's epistles; brought from Mount Athos; Montfaucon edited it in 1715; though Constantinopolitan in origin it agrees with the ancient authorities, not the Byzantine and received text; sixth or seventh century, but its authority is that of the best text of Caesarea in the beginning of the fourth century; the transcriber's note is, "this copy was collated with a copy in Caesarea belonging to the Library of S
Hexapla - This celebrated work, which Montfaucon imagines consisted of sixty large volumes, perished long ago; probably with the Library at Cxsarea, where it was preserved in the year 653; though several of the ancient writers have preserved us pieces thereof, particularly St
Babylon, Kingdom of - A great Babylonian Library was founded in the reign of Sargon
Unrighteousness - … It is good to follow the angel of righteousness, but to bid farewell to the angel of iniquity’ (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, vol
Levites - ’§ Severianus, Bishop of Gabala - in the Ambrosian Library and others in the Coislinian
Simeon Stylites - in the imperial Library at Vienna, ascribes it to Simeon of Mesopotamia ( Comm
the Angel of the Church in Pergamos - Pergamos possessed a Library also that rivalled in size and in value the world-renowned Library of Alexandria itself. Two hundred thousand volumes stood entered on the catalogue of the public Library of Pergamos
America (Land) - 1125,and its existence is corroborated by several letters in the Vatican Library
Hesychius (25), Presbyter of Jerusalem - , especially one in the University Library of Cambridge containing Pss
Hexapla - This celebrated work, which Montfaucon imagines consisted of fifty large volumes, perished long ago, probably with the Library at Caesarea, where it was preserved, in the year 653; though several of the ancient writers have preserved us portions of it, particularly St
Order - Regular disposition or methodical arrangement of things a word of extensive application as the order of troops or parade the order of books in a Library the order of proceedings in a legislative assembly
Patmos - 1088, on the site of an old temple-which has lost most of the treasures of its once valuable Library, including the 9th cent
Aristeas - The author pretends to have been one of the two ambassadors—Andreas, ἀρχισωματοφύλαξ of the king, being the other—sent by king Ptolemaeus Philadelphus to the high priest Eleazar of Jerusalem in order to get for him a copy of the Law, and men to translate it for the Royal Library at Alexandria
Ebla - A larger room was part of the court Library where a majority of its 14,000 texts dealt with an international textile trade and the payment of taxes and tribute in metals, mainly silver and gold. ...
Excavation since 1974 has contributed additional collections of tablets to the Ebla Library and archive that now include over 17,000 items
Ebla - A larger room was part of the court Library where a majority of its 14,000 texts dealt with an international textile trade and the payment of taxes and tribute in metals, mainly silver and gold. ...
Excavation since 1974 has contributed additional collections of tablets to the Ebla Library and archive that now include over 17,000 items
Caesarea - His successor, Pamphilius, built on that reputation and founded a Library that was second only to Alexandria
Acacius, Bishop of Caesarea - ...
Acacius enriched with parchments the Library at Caesarea founded by Pamphilus (Hieron
Symmachus q. Aurelius - Cardinal Mai discovered in the Ambrosian Library fragments of 9 speeches of Symmachus, which he published in 1815, and again in 1846
Nineveh - It may indeed be said that the Library of Nineveh has been opened in modern times, and the details of the records made thousands of years ago can now be read
Ephesus - The grandeur of the ancient city is evident in the remains uncovered by archaeologists, including the ruins of the Artemision, the civic agora, the temple of Domitian, gymnasiums, public baths, a theater with seating for 24,000, a Library, and the commercial agora, as well as several streets and private residences
Georgius, Arian Bishop of Alexandria - 16), and as "unlearned," but he undoubtedly collected a Library which Julian, no bad judge, describes as "very large and ample," richly stored with philosophical, rhetorical, and historical authors, and with various works of "Galilean" or Christian theology ( Epp
Illuminati (3) - of the Minerval Academy and Library; of the questions proposed to the candidates for degrees, and the various ceremonies of admission to each; and of the pretended morality, real blasphemies, and absolute atheism, of the founder and his tried friends
Euthalius (5), Deacon of Alexandria - at Rome by Laurentius Alexander Zacagnius, praefect of the Vatican Library, in vol
Philo - 8 one might infer that Philo remained at Rome until the time of Claudius (Jerome thinks rather of a second voyage), and that under the new régime Philo was honoured by the Senate, while his works, (in particular in Flaccum and de Legatione ad Gaium) found a place in the public Library. Cohn thinks he can prove that all our MSS_ go back to the famous Library of Pamphilus at Caesarea, or rather to the work of the two presbyters Acacius and Euzoїus, who about a. 350 copied the papyrus rolls of this Library into parchment books
Book(s) - See Writing ; Letter ; Library
Versions, Ancient, of the Old And New Testaments, - in the Ambrosian Library at Milan that we possess accurate means of knowing this Syriac version
Apostolic Fathers - ” The author cited authoritative writings that are now definitely identified as Gnostic in the Library discovered at Nag Hammadi in Egypt
Samaritans - They are now in the Library at Paris, and have been translated into Latin by Father Morin, priest of the oratory; and printed in the collection of letters of that father in England, 1662, under the title of "Antiquitates Ecclesiae Orientalis
Ptolemae'us, - Ptolemy bestowed liberal encouragement on literature and science, founding the great Library and museum at Alexandria, and gathered about him many men of learning, as the poet Theocritus, the geometer Euclid and the astronomer Aratua
Muratorian Fragment - in the Ambrosian Library at Milan
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - While there, he acquired a considerable Library ( Ep. 30), but taking his Library, he travelled through Thrace, Pontus, Bithynia, Galatia, Cappadocia and Cilicia, to Antioch. ), in or close to the monastery, surrounded by his Library, to which he continually added, as is shewn by his constant reference to a great variety of authors, sacred and profane, and by his account of obtaining a copy of the Hexapla from the Library at Caesarea (Comm
New Testament - of the entire Greek Bible which seems to have been in the Vatican Library almost from its commencement (cir. Estienne (Stephanus) published his first edition (1546), which was based on a collation of MSS, in the Royal Library with the Complutensian text
New York, City of - The club possesses a valuable Library of over 50,000 volumes including several rare manuscripts
Cassianus (11) Johannes, Founder of Western Monachism - In Schaff and Wace's Post-Nicene Library there is a translation of most of them, with valuable prolegomena and notes by Dr
Greek Versions of ot - 285 247), describes how the king, at the suggestion of his librarian, Demetrius of Phalerum, resolved to obtain a Greek translation of the laws of the Jews for the Library of Alexandria; how, at the instigation of Aristeas, he released the Jewish captives in his kingdom, to the number of some 100,000, paying the (absurdly small) sum of 20 drachmas apiece for them to their masters; how he then sent presents to Eleazar, the high priest at Jerusalem, and begged him to send six elders out of each tribe to translate the Law; how the 72 elders were sent, and magnificently entertained by Ptolemy, and were then set down to their work in the island of Pharos; and how in 72 days they completed the task assigned to them. The great MSS of the Hexapla and Tetrapla were preserved for a long time in the Library established by Origen’s disciple, Pamphilus, at Cæsarea, and references are made to them in the scholia and subscriptions of some of the extant MSS of the LXX Alexandria - This prince founded an academy, called the Museum, in which a society of learned men devoted themselves to philosophical studies, and the improvement of all the other sciences; and he also gave them a Library, which was prodigiously increased by his successors
New Testament - Library series
Mss - Codex Amiatinus , in the Laurentian Library at Florence, containing the whole Bible. ...
Δ Codex Dunelmensis , in Durham Cathedral Library; 7th or 8th century. Codex Oxoniensis , in the Bodleian Library; 8th century
Acts of the Apostles - ]'>[2] , 1001 (E=Codex Laudianus† Luke (2) - Monsignor Mercati, of the Vatican Library, has found an instance even of the nominative, on the sarcophagus of Concordius at Arles, matteus marcus lucanvs ioannes (ib
Septuagint - They were treated with the highest honour; they were assigned a quiet and convenient building on the island of Pharos, removed from the distractions of the city; and there, in seventy-two days, they translated the Hebrew Bible into Greek, for the enrichment of Ptolemy’s Library; and the translation was received with delight by king and people
Assyria - He gathered a famous Library at Kouyunjik, the terra cotta tablets of which have been preserved
Church of England - Paul; and Baronius affirms, on the authority of an ancient manuscript in the Vatican Library, that the Gospel was planted in Britain by Simon Zelotes, the Apostle, and Joseph of Arimathea; and that the latter came over A
Versions - "...
The Durham Book, of the ninth century (in British Museum, Cottonian manuscripts), has the Anglo Saxon interlinear with the Latin Vulgate The Rushworth Gloss of the same century is in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. In the Library of Ch
Benedictus of Nursia, Abbott of Monte Cassino - The cave, the well-known "il Sagro Speco," is shewn about three miles of very steep ascent above the town of Subiaco, and the traditionary spot marked by a monastery, once famous for its Library and for the first printing press in Italy, where the youthful anchoret rolled naked in the thorn-bushes to overcome sensual temptations (Mab
Vulgate - The Library and scriptorium of this monastery (many of the inmates of which were English or Irish monks) first became notable under abbot Gozbert (816 836), and perhaps reached the height of their importance under abbot Hartmut (872 883). , the best being the ‘Correctorium Vaticanum,’ so called from a MS in the Vatican Library. The first book to be printed in Europe was the Latin Bible, published in 1456 by Gutenberg and Fust (now popularly known as the Mazarin Bible, from the circumstance that the first copy of it to attract notice in modern times was that in the Library of Cardinal Mazarin)
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - Library , Origen's works, vol. The best interpretation of the title is "A creed not of all the dogmas of the church but only of some in opposition to the heretics who deny them" (Ante-Nicene Library vol
Gnosticism - Two literary discoveries have both inspired and tended to support this line of research—the Dead Sea Scrolls at Qumran in 1946 and the Nag Hammadi Library in 1945 with many gnostic documents
Bible, Translations - for the royal Library of Alexandria
Gelasius (1) i, Bishop of Rome - ]'>[2] A Sacramentary in several books found in the queen of Sweden's Library, and published by Thomasius in 1680, is supposed to be the Gelasian one
Hammurabi - ...
Lawgiver In 1898 some fragments were published of cuneiform tablets from the Library of Ashurbanipal, king of Assyria
Asia Minor, Cities of - Located on the Upper Acropolis were a large theater, Library, agora, palace, barracks, and altar of Zeus
Versions of the Scripture, Ancient - CODICES AMBROSIANI, being five manuscripts, now in the Ambrosian Library ofMilan
Alexandria - ]'>[4] in which divine honours were paid to the Roman emperors, but the Museum, which in many ways resembled a modern university, with lecture halls and State-paid professors, and the Library, in which were accumulated the books of Greece, Rome, Egypt, and India, to the number (according to Josephus, Ant
Angel - Indeed, the ancient Sadducees are represented as denying all spirits; and yet the Samaritans, and Caraites, who are reputed Sadducees, openly allowed them: witness Abusaid, the author of an Arabic version of the Pentateuch; and Aaron, a Caraite Jew, in his comment on the Pentateuch; both extant in manuscript in the king of France's Library
Book - For the king of Pergamus, in collecting his Library, was led to the invention of parchment made of those skins. The Library of that university, before the year 1300, consisted only of a few tracts, chained or kept in chests, in the choir of St
Creation - That the Hebrew cosmogony is influenced by such a tradition is proved by its striking likeness to the Babylonian story of creation as contained in cuneiform tablets from Ashurbanipal’s Library, first unearthed in 1872
Martyr - Legends grew up which in time invested every member of the apostolic college with the martyr’s halo (a collection of these stories may be seen in the Ante-Nicene Christian Library, vol
the Man Who Had Not on a Wedding Arment - Robert Bruce's book is not in the circulating Library, and it is too dear for you who are laymen to be expected to buy it
the Angel of the Church of the Laodiceans - Shut not thy heart, nor thy Library, against S
Macarius Magnus, Magnes, a Writer - Mark's Library at Venice, which when afterwards sought for had disappeared
Marcellus, Bishop of Ancyra - 202), and after him Cardinal Newman ( Library of the Fathers , xix
Canon of the New Testament - monk’s commonplace book in the Ambrosian Library at Milan, and published it in 1740. An important step towards the settlement of the Canon on historical and scientific lines was taken by Eusebius, who, with his wide reading and the great Library of Pamphilus to resort to, also brought a fair and judicious mind to face the problems involved
Arabia - In the former country, the Fatimites collected a Library of a hundred thousand manuscripts, beautifully transcribed, and very elegantly bound; and in the latter, the Ommiades formed another of six hundred thousand volumes; forty-four of which were employed in the catalogue. What a change since the days of Omar, when the splendid Library of the Ptolemies was wantonly destroyed by the same people! A retribution, though a slight one, was thus made for their former devastations; and many Grecian works, lost in the original, have been recovered in their Arabic dress
Nineveh - Asshurbani-pal succeeded, a hunter and warrior; his Library of clay tablets, religious, legal, historical, and scientific, is in British Museum
Bible, Texts And Versions - They represent the remains of a Library of a group of separatist Jews who lived in the caves in the area and worked in a type of monastery
the Slothful Servant Who Hid His Lord's Money - Good books for children are so cheap nowadays that you do not need to be rich in order to have a delightful little Library provided for every poor girl's lodgings, and for every Sabbath-school child's mother's house
Apocrypha, New Testament - ” This document is one of almost fifty discovered in 1945 near Nag Hammadi in Upper Egypt as a part of what many scholars believe was the Library of a Gnostic community
Elesbaan, a King, Hermit, And Saint of Ethiopia - Arethae , extant in two forms: the earlier and more authentic, found by Lequien in the Colbert Library (Oriens Christianus , ii
Septuagint - According to one account, Ptolemy Philadelphus, king of Egypt, caused this translation to be made for the use of the Library which he had founded at Alexandria at the request and with the advice of the celebrated Demetrius Phalereus, his principal librarian
Patricius, or Saint Patrick - ...
We have a copy of the Confession more than 1,000 years old preserved in the Book of Armagh, one of the great treasures of the Library of Trinity College, Dublin
Prosper, Saint, a Native of Aquitaine - in the Library of the monastery of St
Simon Magus - There is considerable force, however, in the plea of the editors of the ‘Ante-Nicene Christian Library’ that this is ‘very slight evidence on which to reject so precise a statement as Justin here makes; a statement which he would scarcely have hazarded in an apology addressed to Rome, where every person had the means of ascertaining its accuracy. If, as is supposed, he made a mistake, it must have been at once exposed, and other writers would not have so frequently repeated the story as they have done’ (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, ii
Hippolytus Romanus - In the first, speaking of ecclesiastical writers of whom letters were then preserved in the Library at Jerusalem, Eusebius mentions "likewise Hippolytus, who was bishop of another church somewhere. " In the second he gives a list of the works of Hippolytus which he had met with (not including any letters), this being probably the list of those in the Library at Caesarea, but adds that many other works by him might be found elsewhere
Archaeology And Biblical Study - The secrets of Mesopotamia began to unfold following the copying and decipherment of the Behistun inscription by Rawlinson begun in 1835, and by the later discovery in 1852 of Ashurbanipal's Library by Rassam. The most significant find here was a great Library of written documents which the king had collected from many portions of the empire
Clemens Romanus of Rome - ...
An entirely new authority for the text of the epistle was gained by the discovery in the Library of the Holy Sepulchre at Fanari, in Constantinople, of a MS. is now preserved in the Library of the Seminary of the Remonstrants at Amsterdam
Clementine Literature - in the Paris Library. which he found in the Ottobonian Library in the Vatican
Odes of Solomon - -Themanuscript [2] ...
At the moment of writing we are informed that a third edition is being published at Oxford for the Rylands Library, with a complete reproduction in facsimile of all the pages of themanuscript
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - At the same time he received, through the management of Eusebia, the emperor's sister Helena as his bride, and the gift of a Library from the empress herself (Or. His physician, Oribasius, who had charge of his Library, was only allowed to accompany him through ignorance of their intimacy (ad Ath
Assur - ...
A royal Library of clay tablets, numbering probably 10,000, was made by him at Nineveh, from which the British Museum has got its most precious treasures
Scripture (2) - Such a phrase as ‘Moses’ γράμματα’ (John 5:47), for example, probably ascribes to Moses only a single book—what we call the Pentateuch; and such a phrase as ἱερὰ γράμματα (2 Timothy 3:15) does not suggest to us a ‘Divine Library,’ but brings the OT before us as a unitary whole
Apostolic Constitutions And Canons - The ‘Ante-Nicene Library’ (vol
Woman - Donaldson (one of the editors of the Ante-Nicene Christian Library) indeed went so far as to say that ‘in the first three centuries I have not been able to see that Christianity had any favourable effect on the position of women, but, on the contrary, that it tended to lower their character and contract the range of their activity’ (CR lvi
Beda, Historian - He must have had good teachers, a good Library, and an insatiable desire for learning
Matthew, the Gospel According to - " He identifies Matthew's Hebrew Gospel with "the Gospel of the Nazarenes," which he saw in Pamphilus' Library at Caesarea
Diseases - The school was noted for its large Library and laboratory facilities
Abortion - Barr, Bulletin of the John Rylands UNIVersity Library of Manchester 51 (1968-69): 11-26; M
Canaan, History And Religion of - ...
The most significant finds have been the cuneiform tablets discovered in the royal Library and/or temple in Ugarit
Language of Christ - —Pfannkuche, Language of Palestine, Clark’s Cabinet Library, vol
Lord's Prayer (i) - ]'>[5] 6, and the Catalogue of the Syriac Manuscripts preserved in the Library of the University of Cambridge (p
Psalms of Solomon - Subsequently a fragment of another MS_ of the Syriac text was found in the Cambridge University Library, and yet another and much earlier (incomplete) MS_ in the British Museum
Dead Sea Scrolls - Cross, The Ancient Library of Qumran and Modern Biblical Studies ; R
Union With God - Donaldson (Ante-Nicene Christian Library, i
Canon of the Old Testament - Other books, apocalyptic and apocryphal, were competing for a place in the religious Library
Vespasian - Of this richly adorned temple, which included a Library, not a trace remains
Assumption of Moses - manuscript in the Ambrosian Library at Milan, and published by him in 1861, The true ‘Assumption’ survives only in quotations and references in the NT and early Christian writers; but from certain facts it appears that it was at a very early date appended to the ‘Testament
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - As copies of Dionysius's own commentary exist in the British Museum, the Bodleian Library, and elsewhere, some portions of Ephrem's work, as well as some idea of Tatian's arrangement, might be obtained from it
Fortification And Siegecraft - Sellin laid bare several forts, among them the now famous ‘castle of Ishtar-Washshur,’ in which was found ‘the first Palestinian Library yet discovered,’ in the shape of a series of cuneiform tablets containing this prince’s correspondence with neighbouring chiefs
Luke - Paul at, Athens or similar incidents are free literary compositions, and void of all historical foundation, but does show that a considerable use was made of Library clichés in setting out, illustrating, and adorning a narrative
Rufinus of Aquileia - He gave to the Latins a very large part of the Library of Greek writers
Noah - In the royal Library of the old palace of Nineveh were found about 20,000 inscribed clay tablets, now in the British Museum
Bible - The Bible is not only a Library, the books of which come from various writers in different periods of time; many of these books may be said to be composed of successive literary strata, so that the authors of the most ancient parts of them belong to much earlier times than their final redactors
Job - A far closer parallel is furnished by a partially preserved poem from the Library of Ashurbanipal, which probably reproduces an ancient Babylonian text
Barnabas, Epistle of - , London, 1891; The Writings of the Apostolic Fathers, translation Roberts, Donaldson, and Crombie (= Ante-Nicene Christian Library, i
Ascension of Isaiah - ...
(d) The Slavonic Version is extant in a manuscript in the Library of the Uspenschen Cathedral in Moscow
Education - Pamphilus, the friend of Eusebius, whose Library at Caesarea was famous, had Bibles copied to keep in stock and to be given away as occasion demanded, ‘not only to men but also to women whom he saw devoted to the reading of Scripture’ (Jerome, Apol
Josephus - 2, a statue was raised in his honour, and his works were placed in the public Library
Dates (2) - On his chair in the Library of St
Hilarius (7) Pictaviensis, Saint - —These fragments were first published in 1598 by Nicolaus Faber, who got them from the Library of Father Pithou
Jesus Christ - of the Ante-Nicene Library , 1870)
Augustine - Though those barbarians took Hippo and burned it, they saved his Library, which contained his voluminous writings
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - ...
Immediately after his death a famine occurred, which the starving multitude attributed to his prodigal expenditure, and his Library was only saved from destruction by the interposition of the archdeacon Peter
Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch - from the Cottonian Library; a third in Gk
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - of the whole in Syriac exists in the Library of the American College at Beyrout