What does Legion mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
λεγιών a legion 1
λεγιὼν a legion 1
λεγιῶνα a legion 1

Definitions Related to Legion

G3003


   1 a Legion, a body of soldiers whose number differed at different times, and in the time of Augustus seems to have consisted of 6826 men (i.e. 6100 foot soldiers, and 726 horsemen).
   

Frequency of Legion (original languages)

Frequency of Legion (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Catholic Benevolent Legion
A fraternal life insurance society with headquarters in Brooklyn, New York, organized in 1881. Its object is to unite fraternally for social, benevolent, and intellectual improvement, Catholic men between the ages of 18,55. Life insurance not to exceed $5,000 was given in various amounts to members according to an optional classification, assessments for which were governed by the age of the member. The original figures of these have been increased to meet the requirements of sounder insurance.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Legion
A regiment of the Roman army, the number of men composing which differed at different times. It originally consisted of three thousand men, but in the time of Christ consisted of six thousand, exclusive of horsemen, who were in number a tenth of the foot-men. The word is used (Matthew 26:53 ; Mark 5:9 ) to express simply a great multitude.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Legion
The largest division of the Roman army, of which it was, in order and armament, the miniature; 6,000 foot, with a body of horse. Matthew 26:53, "thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to My Father, and He shall presently give Me more than twelve legions of angels," against this band from the Roman "legion"; not merely My twelve apostles, but twelve "legions," and these "angels?" (compare 2 Kings 6:17; Daniel 7:10.) In Mark 5:9 the demon-possessed says, "my name is legion, for we are many," "because many demons (Greek) were entered into him."
Holman Bible Dictionary - Legion
(lee' giohn) In the New Testament a collection of demons (Mark 5:9 ,Mark 5:9,5:15 ; Luke 8:30 ) and the host of angels (Matthew 26:53 ). Behind this usage was the Roman military designation. The legions were the best soldiers in the army. At different times in Rome's history, the legion numbered between 4,500,6,000 soldiers. It was composed of differently skilled men: spearmen, commandos, skirmish specialists, calvary, and reserves. Originally, one had to be a property owner and Roman citizen to belong, but these requirements were waived depending on the need for troops.
Mike Mitchell
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Legion
LEGION. This term, which means literally ‘a gathering,’ looks back to the early days of the Roman citizen army. In the time of the Empire it indicated a force of about 6000 infantry, together with complements of other arms. The infantry proper were divided into ten cohorts (the word is tr. [1] ‘ band ’ [2] in Matthew 27:27 , Mark 15:16 , John 18:3 ; John 18:12 , Acts 10:1 ; Acts 21:31 ; Acts 27:1 ), each containing about 600 men, and each commanded on occasion by a military tribune. Of these tribunes there were six to a legion. A cohort was itself subdivided into ten centuries, each commanded by a centurion. It is not necessary to remember all these facts in studying the NT use of the word ‘legion’ ( Matthew 26:53 , Mark 5:9 ; Mark 5:15 , Luke 8:30 ). What chiefly impressed Semites was apparently the size of the legion, and ‘legion’ appears to have become a proverb among them for a large number of persons in orderly combination.
A. Souter.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Legion
LEGION (λεγιών [1], a loan-word from the Latin legio, which meant originally a ‘gathering’ of the citizen army of Rome).—The word ‘legion’ occurs in two contexts in the Gospels. One is in the scene at Gethsemane, when Peter cut off the ear of the high priest’s slave (Matthew 26:53); the other occurs in the narrative about the man with the unclean spirit in the country of the Gerasenes (Mark 5:9; Mark 5:15, Luke 8:30; but not in Matthew’s account, which gives two men). In both cases the reference is to the large number of persons who compose a legion: in the one case the legions of angels are at the disposal of Jesus, if He asks for them; in the other the great number of evil spirits can be described only by the name ‘legion.’ The present writer cannot recall any such use of the word ‘legion’ in non-Christian authors. It seems certain also that in the NT the word is not a translation of any Aramaic word. The conclusion is that, if Aramaic is behind the passages where the word occurs, the expression was imported into that language from Greek, and reveals the great impression made on the minds of Orientals by the vast organized unity of the Roman army, with which they had become acquainted since the Roman occupation of Syria by Pompey (b.c. 64–63). At least three and often more (see Hardy’s Studies in Roman History, 181 ff.) legions were quartered in that province during the whole of the 1st cent. a.d., and the sight of these magnificent troops, as they marched in column along the great roads of the country, must have powerfully impressed the natives with the numbers and power of the Roman people. An innumerable number of persons came to be spoken of as a legion.
The full strength of a Roman legion was about 6000 men, or about that of a modern infantry division, but the subdivision was different. Instead of brigades, battalions, companies, and sections, there were 10 cohortes, each commanded by a tribunus militum, 3 manipuli in each cohors, and 2 centuriœ in each manipulus. The uniform of all ordinary legionaries was the same. The legion was commanded by a legatus legionis (lieutenant-general). See also Band.
Literature.—W. Ramsay, A Manual of Roman Antiquities, revised and partly rewritten by R. Lanciani, 15th ed. (London, 1894) ch. xii. (on p. 459 f. there are references to other literature).
Alex. Souter.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Legion
A Roman legion, of six thousand men. If the poor man possessed of a legion of devils was thus numbered, what a state to contemplate! (See Mark 5:9) I rather think the expression is of the figurative kind, or, as the poor man himself saith, a legion meant many. Our Lord meant the expression, no doubt, exactly as it is, when he said "twelve legions of angels." (Matthew 26:53)
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Antibes Legion
Troops organized at Antibes, France, by Napoleon III, and placed at the disposal of Pope Pius IX in 1866, for the defense of Rome against the Italian government.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Legion, Thundering
A name given to those Christians who served in the Roman army of Marcus Antoninus, in the second century. The occasion of it was this:
When that emperor was at war with the Marcomanni, his army was enclosed by the enemy, and reduced to the most deplorable condition by the thirst under which they languished in a parched desert. Just at this time they were remarkably relieved by a sudden and unexpected rain. This event was attributed to the Christians, who were supposed to have effected this by their prayers; and the name of the thundering legion was given to them, on account of the thunder and lightning that destroyed the enemy, while the shower revived the fainting Romans. Whether this was really miraculous or not, has been disputed among learned men. They who wish to see what has been said on both sides, may consult Witsius Dissertat. de Legione Fulminatrice, which is subjoined to his AEgyptiaca, in defense of this miracle; as also, what is alleged against it by Dan Lauroque, in a discourse upon that subject subjoined to the Adversaria Sucra of Matt. Lauroque, his father. The controversy between Sir Peter King and Mr. Moyle upon this subject is also worthy of attention.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Legion, Thebian
A name given, in the time of Dioclesian, to a whole legion of Christians, consisting of more than six thousand men, who were said to have suffered martyrdom by the order of Maximian. Though this story had never wanted patrons, yet it is disbelieved by many. Dr. Jortin, in his usual facetious way, says, that it stands upon the authority of one Eucherius, bishop of Lyons, and a writer of the fifth century, who had it from the Theodorus, another bishop who had the honour and felicity to find the reliques of these martyrs by revelation, and perhaps by the smell of the bones!
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Legion
In the Roman army a body of troops consisting of from three to five thousand; but the term is also used for an indefinite number. The Lord said that His Father on His request would send Him more than twelve legions of angels. Matthew 26:53 . The demons who possessed the man among the Gadarenes said, "My name is Legion; for we are many." Mark 5:9,15 ; Luke 8:30 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Legion,
the chief subdivision of the Roman army, containing about 6000 infantry, with a contingent of cavalry. The term does not occur in the Bible in its primary sense, but appears to have been adopted in order to express any large number, with the accessory ideas of order and subordination. (Matthew 26:53 ; Mark 5:9 )
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Legion
The Roman legions were composed each of ten cohorts; a cohort, of fifty maniples; a maniple, of fifteen men; consequently, a full legion contained six thousand soldiers. Jesus cured one who called himself "legion," as if possessed by a legion of devils, Mark 5:9 . He also said to Peter, who drew his sword to defend him in the olive garden: "Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, who shall presently give me more than twelve legions of angels?" Matthew 26:53 .
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Legion
1: λεγιών (Strong's #3003 — Noun Feminine — legion — leg-eh-ohn' ) otherwise spelled legeon, "a legion," occurs in Matthew 26:53 , of angels; in Mark 5:9,15 , and Luke 8:30 , of demons. Among the Romans a "legion" was primarily a chosen (lego, "to choose") body of soldiers divided into ten cohorts, and numbering from 4,200 to 6,000 men (Gk. speira, see BAND). In the time of our Lord it formed a complete army of infantry and cavalry, of upwards of 5,000 men. The "legions" were not brought into Judea till the outbreak of the Jewish war (A.D. 66), as they were previously employed in the frontier provinces of the Empire. Accordingly in its NT use the word has its other and more general significance "of a large number."
Webster's Dictionary - Legion
(1):
(n.) A group of orders inferior to a class.
(2):
(n.) A body of foot soldiers and cavalry consisting of different numbers at different periods, - from about four thousand to about six thousand men, - the cavalry being about one tenth.
(3):
(n.) A great number; a multitude.
(4):
(n.) A military force; an army; military bands.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Legion
Legion. A division of the Roman army. The number of men in it differed at various times. Originally a legion consisted of about 3000; but in the time of Augustus it contained about 6000: there were also cavalry attached, to the amount of one-tenth of the infantry. Each legion was divided into ten cohorts, each cohort into three maniples, and each maniple into two centuries, which, according to the name, should comprise 100 men. The word legion came in the course of time to express indefinitely a large number; so it is used in Matthew 26:53; Mark 5:9; Mark 5:15; Luke 8:30; and so we frequently now use it.
King James Dictionary - Legion
LE'GION, n. L. legio, from lego, to collect.
1. In Roman antiquity, a body of infantry consisting of different numbers of men at different periods, from three to five thousand. Each legion was divided into ten cohorts, each cohort into ten companies, and each company into two centuries. 2. A military force military bands. 3. A great number. Where one sin has entered, legions will force their way through the same breach.
My name is legion, for we are many. Mark 5 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Legion
The number in a Roman legion varied at different periods, from three thousand to more than twice that number. In the time of Christ a legion contained six thousand, besides the cavalry. There were ten cohorts in each legion; which were divided each into three maniples or bands, and these into two centuries containing one hundred men each. In the Bible a legion means a number indefinitely large. The Savior cured a demoniac who called himself "Legion" as if possessed my myriads of demons, Mark 5:9 . The expression, "twelve legions of angels," Matthew 26:53 , illustrate the immensity of the heavenly host, and their zealous devotion to Christ.

Sentence search

Legionary - ) Belonging to a Legion; consisting of a Legion or Legions, or of an indefinitely great number; as, Legionary soldiers; a Legionary force. ) A member of a Legion
Legion - The number in a Roman Legion varied at different periods, from three thousand to more than twice that number. In the time of Christ a Legion contained six thousand, besides the cavalry. There were ten cohorts in each Legion; which were divided each into three maniples or bands, and these into two centuries containing one hundred men each. In the Bible a Legion means a number indefinitely large. The Savior cured a demoniac who called himself "Legion" as if possessed my myriads of demons, Mark 5:9 . The expression, "twelve Legions of angels," Matthew 26:53 , illustrate the immensity of the heavenly host, and their zealous devotion to Christ
Legion - A Roman Legion, of six thousand men. If the poor man possessed of a Legion of devils was thus numbered, what a state to contemplate! (See Mark 5:9) I rather think the expression is of the figurative kind, or, as the poor man himself saith, a Legion meant many. Our Lord meant the expression, no doubt, exactly as it is, when he said "twelve Legions of angels
Legion - Legion. Originally a Legion consisted of about 3000; but in the time of Augustus it contained about 6000: there were also cavalry attached, to the amount of one-tenth of the infantry. Each Legion was divided into ten cohorts, each cohort into three maniples, and each maniple into two centuries, which, according to the name, should comprise 100 men. The word Legion came in the course of time to express indefinitely a large number; so it is used in Matthew 26:53; Mark 5:9; Mark 5:15; Luke 8:30; and so we frequently now use it
Band - A band of Roman soldiers consisted of the tenth part of a Legion, called a "cohort;" it varied, according to the size of the Legion, from 400 to 600 soldiers
Cohort - See Band, Legion
Legion - The Roman Legions were composed each of ten cohorts; a cohort, of fifty maniples; a maniple, of fifteen men; consequently, a full Legion contained six thousand soldiers. Jesus cured one who called himself "legion," as if possessed by a Legion of devils, Mark 5:9 . He also said to Peter, who drew his sword to defend him in the olive garden: "Thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to my Father, who shall presently give me more than twelve Legions of angels?" Matthew 26:53
Soldier - See Army, Legion, War
Legion - Legion. Of these tribunes there were six to a Legion. It is not necessary to remember all these facts in studying the NT use of the word ‘legion’ ( Matthew 26:53 , Mark 5:9 ; Mark 5:15 , Luke 8:30 ). What chiefly impressed Semites was apparently the size of the Legion, and ‘legion’ appears to have become a proverb among them for a large number of persons in orderly combination
Legioned - ) Formed into a Legion or Legions; Legionary
Lambe, Alphonsus - Upon returning home in 1949, he joined the Legion of Mary and soon became an enthusiastic member. Worked to expand the Legion throughout Ireland. With Seamus Grace, he was sent as a Legion of Mary envoy to South America in 1953. Worked his remaining six years promoting the Legion of Mary in Colombia, Argentina, Ecuador, Uruguay and Brazil; reported to have established over 2,000 groups. His enthusiasm for the faith and the Legion was contagious, and he taught and inspired many. ...
Born Friday June 24, 1932 in Tullamore, Ireland ...
Died January 21, 1959 at Buenos Aires, Argentina of stomach cancer; buried in the Irish Christian Brothers vault, Recoleta Cemetery, Buenos Aires ...
Venerated; pending; his Cause for Canonization was introduced by the Archdiocese of Buenos Aires in 1978; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Alphonsus Lambe, contact...
Concilium Legionis Mariae...
Morning Star Avenue...
Brunswick Street...
Dublin 7, IRELAND ...
Prayers O God, who by your infinite mercy inflamed the heart of your servant, Alphonsus Lambe with an ardent love for you and for Mary, our Mother; a love which revealed itself in a life of intense labour, prayer and sacrifice for the salvation of souls, grant, if it be your will, that we may obtain, by his intercession, what we cannot obtain by our own merits. - Prayer for the Beatification of the Servant of God, Alphonsus Lambe ...
Additional Information Legion of Mary - portuguese...
Legion of Mary, Tidewater...
Tullamore Parish...
Readings Alfie's life was like a meteor. ...
- Hilde Firtel, Legion of Mary envoy ...
Alfie Lambe - Upon returning home in 1949, he joined the Legion of Mary and soon became an enthusiastic member. Worked to expand the Legion throughout Ireland. With Seamus Grace, he was sent as a Legion of Mary envoy to South America in 1953. Worked his remaining six years promoting the Legion of Mary in Colombia, Argentina, Ecuador, Uruguay and Brazil; reported to have established over 2,000 groups. His enthusiasm for the faith and the Legion was contagious, and he taught and inspired many. ...
Born Friday June 24, 1932 in Tullamore, Ireland ...
Died January 21, 1959 at Buenos Aires, Argentina of stomach cancer; buried in the Irish Christian Brothers vault, Recoleta Cemetery, Buenos Aires ...
Venerated; pending; his Cause for Canonization was introduced by the Archdiocese of Buenos Aires in 1978; if you have information relevant to the Cause of Alphonsus Lambe, contact...
Concilium Legionis Mariae...
Morning Star Avenue...
Brunswick Street...
Dublin 7, IRELAND ...
Prayers O God, who by your infinite mercy inflamed the heart of your servant, Alphonsus Lambe with an ardent love for you and for Mary, our Mother; a love which revealed itself in a life of intense labour, prayer and sacrifice for the salvation of souls, grant, if it be your will, that we may obtain, by his intercession, what we cannot obtain by our own merits. - Prayer for the Beatification of the Servant of God, Alphonsus Lambe ...
Additional Information Legion of Mary - portuguese...
Legion of Mary, Tidewater...
Tullamore Parish...
Readings Alfie's life was like a meteor. ...
- Hilde Firtel, Legion of Mary envoy ...
Centurion - The commander of a century or military company, of which there were 60 in a Roman Legion. At first there were, as the name implies, 100 men in each century; subsequently the number varied according, to the strength of the Legion
Regiment - NIV term for cohort, a tenth of a Legion (Acts 10:1 ; Acts 27:1 )
Legion - 1: λεγιών (Strong's #3003 — Noun Feminine — Legion — leg-eh-ohn' ) otherwise spelled legeon, "a Legion," occurs in Matthew 26:53 , of angels; in Mark 5:9,15 , and Luke 8:30 , of demons. Among the Romans a "legion" was primarily a chosen (lego, "to choose") body of soldiers divided into ten cohorts, and numbering from 4,200 to 6,000 men (Gk. The "legions" were not brought into Judea till the outbreak of the Jewish war (A
Augustus Band - The word σπεῖρα signifies 'cohort,' the tenth part of a 'legion
Legion - LEGION (λεγιών [1], a loan-word from the Latin legio, which meant originally a ‘gathering’ of the citizen army of Rome). —The word ‘legion’ occurs in two contexts in the Gospels. In both cases the reference is to the large number of persons who compose a Legion: in the one case the Legions of angels are at the disposal of Jesus, if He asks for them; in the other the great number of evil spirits can be described only by the name ‘legion. ’ The present writer cannot recall any such use of the word ‘legion’ in non-Christian authors. ) Legions were quartered in that province during the whole of the 1st cent. An innumerable number of persons came to be spoken of as a Legion. ...
The full strength of a Roman Legion was about 6000 men, or about that of a modern infantry division, but the subdivision was different. The uniform of all ordinary Legionaries was the same. The Legion was commanded by a legatus Legionis (lieutenant-general)
Legion - Each Legion was divided into ten cohorts, each cohort into ten companies, and each company into two centuries. Where one sin has entered, Legions will force their way through the same breach. ...
My name is Legion, for we are many
Legion - Matthew 26:53, "thinkest thou that I cannot now pray to My Father, and He shall presently give Me more than twelve Legions of angels," against this band from the Roman "legion"; not merely My twelve apostles, but twelve "legions," and these "angels?" (compare 2 Kings 6:17; Daniel 7:10. ) In Mark 5:9 the demon-possessed says, "my name is Legion, for we are many," "because many demons (Greek) were entered into him
Batavian - ) Of or pertaining to (a) the Batavi, an ancient Germanic tribe; or to (b) /atavia or Holland; as, a Batavian Legion
Band - The "band of Roman soldiers" referred to in (Matthew 27:27 ) and elsewhere was the tenth part of a Legion
Cohort - ) A body of about five or six hundred soldiers; the tenth part of a Legion
Battalion - RSV translation of one-tenth of a Roman Legion—about six hundred men
Army - The Roman army was divided into Legions. The number in a Legion varied from 3000 to 6000, each under "chief captains," Acts 21:31, who commanded by turns. The Legion was subdivided into ten cohorts ("band,"), Acts 10:1; the cohort into three maniples, and the maniple into two centuries, containing originally 100 men, as the name implies: but subsequently from 50 to 100 men, according to the strength of the Legion. There were thus sixty centuries in a Legion, each under the command of a centurion. In addition to the Legionary cohorts, independent cohorts of volunteers served under the Roman standards
Jean du Pouget - Anthropologist and chevalier of the Legion of Honor; Marquis de Nadaillac
Caerleon - (Celtic: caer, fortress; Latin: Legionum, of the Legions: from its being the headquarters for over 200 years of the Roman Second Legion) ...
Town, Monmouthshire, England, on Usk River, associated with the legends of King Arthur
Legion - The Lord said that His Father on His request would send Him more than twelve Legions of angels. The demons who possessed the man among the Gadarenes said, "My name is Legion; for we are many
Century - ) One of sixty companies into which a Legion of the army was divided
Abbey, Saint Maurice of Agaunum - Abbey nullius of Augustinian Canons in the Canton of Valais, Switzerland, site of the martyrdom of the Theban Legion
Saint Maurice of Agaunum Abbey - Abbey nullius of Augustinian Canons in the Canton of Valais, Switzerland, site of the martyrdom of the Theban Legion
Augouard, Philippe Prosper - In 1896 he was created Chevalier and in 1913 an officer of the Legion of Honor
Severus, Septimius - Legate of the fourth Legion on the Euphrates and later governor of Upper Pannonia. Proclaimed emperor by the Danube Legions in 193
Septimius Severus - Legate of the fourth Legion on the Euphrates and later governor of Upper Pannonia. Proclaimed emperor by the Danube Legions in 193
Legion - The Legions were the best soldiers in the army. At different times in Rome's history, the Legion numbered between 4,500,6,000 soldiers
Vespasian - He was born into a wealthy family and became a military hero as commander of a Legion under Emperor Claudius. After becoming commander of three Legions, he was ordered to quell the Jewish revolt in Palestine in A
Laurier, Wilfrid - He was made a Knight of the Grand Cross of Saint Michael and Saint George, 1897, became a member of the imperial privy council, and received from the French Republic the star of a grand officer of the Legion of Honor
Legion, Thebian - A name given, in the time of Dioclesian, to a whole Legion of Christians, consisting of more than six thousand men, who were said to have suffered martyrdom by the order of Maximian
Wilfrid Laurier - He was made a Knight of the Grand Cross of Saint Michael and Saint George, 1897, became a member of the imperial privy council, and received from the French Republic the star of a grand officer of the Legion of Honor
Church Temperance Society - The Church Temperance Legion deals with boys, seeking toinduce them to keep sober, pure, and reverent from the earliestyears of manhood and it endeavors to perpetuate those habits in men
Masada - After a long struggle to recapture the fortress, the Tenth Legion raised an enormous seige ramp and broke through the walls
Army - --The Roman army was divided into Legions, the number of which varied considerably (from 3000 to 6000), each under six tribuni ("chief captains,") (Acts 21:31 ) who commanded by turns. The Legion was subdivided into ten cohorts ("band,") (Acts 10:1 ) the cohort into three maniples, and the maniple into two centuries, containing originally 100 men, as the name implies, but subsequently from 50 to 100 men, according to the strength of the Legion. There were thus 60 centuries in a Legion, each under the command of a centurion. (Acts 10:1,22 ; Matthew 8:5 ; 27:54 ) In addition to the Legionary cohorts, independent cohorts of volunteers served under the Roman standards
Centurion - However, the chief centurion of a Legion. Some of those mentioned in the NT were on special service in command of their units, and separated from the cohorts or Legions of which they formed a part
Gadarenes - One of them said his name was Legion
Gadara - A Legion of demons were cast out of two men, and entered a herd of swine, causing their destruction
Jean Corot - He was made a commander of the Legion of Honor in 1867
Cohort - A Roman military unit with capacity of 1000 men; ten cohorts formed a Legion
Maurice And Companions, Saint - Martyrs, died Agaunum (now Saint Maurice), Switzerland c286 According to the legend, the Theban Legion of which Maurice was the leader, composed entirely of Christians, had been sent by Emperor Maximian Herculius into Gaul to suppress the Bagandre revolt
Centurion - 1: ἑκατοντάρχης (Strong's #1543 — Noun Masculine — hekatontarchos — hek-at-on-tar'-khace, hek-at-on-tar'-khos ) "a centurion," denotes a military officer commanding from 50 to 100 men, according to the size of the Legion of which it was a part (hekaton, "a hundred," archo, "to rule"), e
la Farge, John - For this achievement he was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honor, 1891
Millet, Jean Francois - At fifty he was made a chevalier of the Legion of Honor
John la Farge - For this achievement he was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honor, 1891
Jean Millet - At fifty he was made a chevalier of the Legion of Honor
Army - A 'Legion' was a body that contained within itself all the gradations of the army. Every Legion at times contained 10 cohorts of 600 each; every cohort 3 maniples of 200; and every maniple 2 centuries of 100: hence the name of centurion or commander of 100 men, as found in Acts 10:1,22 , etc. Each Legion was presided over by 6 chiefs, χιλίαρθος,each commanding 1,000 men, mostly translated 'chief captain,' as in Acts 21:31-37 , etc
Kiriath-Jearim - A garrison from the Tenth Legion was stationed there
Legion, Thundering - This event was attributed to the Christians, who were supposed to have effected this by their prayers; and the name of the thundering Legion was given to them, on account of the thunder and lightning that destroyed the enemy, while the shower revived the fainting Romans. de Legione Fulminatrice, which is subjoined to his AEgyptiaca, in defense of this miracle; as also, what is alleged against it by Dan Lauroque, in a discourse upon that subject subjoined to the Adversaria Sucra of Matt
Abila - Latin inscriptions found here respecting the repairs of the road by the Abileni, and concerning the 16th Legion, identify the place
Band - —A Roman Legion, the full strength of which was about 6000 men, was divided into ten cohorts (600), and each cohort into three maniples (200). ’ The troops in Judaea, however, as in other provinces governed by a procurator, consisted simply of auxiliaries, not Roman citizens, but provincials; these were not formed into Legions, but merely into cohorts, of strength varying from 500 to 1000, sometimes consisting purely of infantry, sometimes including cavalry also
Band - —A Roman Legion, the full strength of which was about 6000 men, was divided into ten cohorts (600), and each cohort into three maniples (200). ’ The troops in Judaea, however, as in other provinces governed by a procurator, consisted simply of auxiliaries, not Roman citizens, but provincials; these were not formed into Legions, but merely into cohorts, of strength varying from 500 to 1000, sometimes consisting purely of infantry, sometimes including cavalry also
Army - Augustus found himself master of three standing armies, his own and those of Lepidus and Antony, amounting to 45 Legions. By ruthlessly eliminating inferior elements he obtained a thoroughly efficient force of 25 Legions. Distributing the Legions in the frontier provinces of the Empire-which had the Atlantic as its boundary on the west, the Rhine and the Danube on the north, the Euphrates on the east, and the deserts of Arabia and Africa on the south-he charged them to guard the borders which were exposed to the attacks of restless barbarians. ...
The Legions were recruited from the Roman citizens of Italy and the provinces. The Legion was no longer under six tribunes commanding by turns. The supreme authority was now entrusted to a legatus Legionis, who was the deputy of the Emperor as commander-in-chief of the whole army. The efficiency of the soldiers depended largely upon the 60 centurions, who formed the backbone of the Legion. The term of service was 20 years, and on discharge the Legionary received a bounty or land. Each Legion bore a title and a number, e. ...
But the Legions were not the only guardians of the peace of the Empire. The auxiliaries were more lightly armed than the Legionaries (see Armour); they were not so well paid; and on their discharge they received a bounty or the Roman franchise. ...
As Judaea was a province of the second rank, governed by a procurator, it was not (like Syria) garrisoned by Legionaries, but by auxiliaries, who had their headquarters in Caesarea
Guard (2) - A certain number were attached to each Legion, besides others belonging to the Praetorian guard, who were closely attached to the Emperor’s person and ready for any special service
Gethsemane - The tenth Legion, moreover, was posted about the mount of Olives (5:2, section 3, 6:2, section 8); and in the siege a wall was carried along the valley of Kedron to the Siloam fountain (5:10, section 2)
Army - The Roman army was divided into Legions, each under six tribunes ("chief captains," chiliarchs, Acts 21:31), who commanded in turn. The Legion had 10 cohorts ("bands," speira, Acts 10:1), the cohort into three maniples, the maniple into two centuries (each 100 men originally), commanded by a centurion (Acts 10:1-22; Matthew 8:5). "Augustus' band" or cohort (Acts 27:1) were either volunteers from Sebaste, or a cohort similar to "the Augustan Legion
Soldiers - They can hardly have been Roman Legionaries, but may have been members of Herod Antipas’ army engaged in some local expedition, of which we know nothing, or even, as Ewald supposes, only a kind of police or gendarmes employed in custom-house duties. Acts 10:1) who desired to have his servant healed, speaks of the soldiers who were under his command, and, in contrast to (1) above, his remarks bring out forcibly the idea of discipline and organization, which was to be found in a Roman Legion
Lunatics - "A Legion" besought Christ's permission to enter into a numerous herd of two thousand swine; which they did, and drove the whole herd down a precipice into the sea, where they were all drowned
Vespasian - In the year 41-42 Vespasian was sent to Germany in command of a Legion, at that time stationed at Argentoratum (Strasbourg), and fought against the Germans. With this Legion, the Legio II. Sending his son Titus very early in 67 to bring a Legion from Alexandria, he himself went from Nero’s quarters in Achaia over the Hellespont by land to Syria, and collected the Roman forces there. Their combined forces amounted to three Legions, twenty-three cohorts, six squadrons, and a large number of Asiatic auxiliary troops, or a total of 60,000 men. There he put two Legions into winter quarters, and sent the third to Scythopolis. ...
One Legion being sent to Scythopolis, with the other two he marched again to Caesarea on the coast. Having heard reports of the rising of Vindex in Gaul, he returned hurriedly from Caesarea by Antipatris, Thamna, Lydda, and Jamnia to Ammaus, where he established one of his Legions. Vespasian’s hesitation was removed by the attitude of his troops, who were jealous that the German Legions had been able to create an Emperor. It was this Alexander who in Alexandria on 1st July 69 proclaimed Vespasian Emperor, and made the two Legions in Egypt take the oath to him. Early in November Mucian had also sent a Legion to put down the Dacians, who took advantage of the unsettled state of the Empire to attack the Roman military camps in Mœsia. The result of this was that in all six Legions were added to his forces. A number of other Legions, however, adopted a waiting attitude. Antonius Primus, commander of the seventh Legion, had been ordered to remain at Aquileia, but of his own accord he marched into Italy. Three Legions in Spain and one in Britain now came over to Vespasian. Important changes were made in the constitution of the Legions at this time, especially by the discharge of those that had proved disloyal
War - The cohort had 500 or 600 men, and the Legion embraced ten cohorts
Army - , see War, also Fortification and Siegecraft; and for the Roman army in NT times see Legion
Potter, Pottery - ...
Where pottery of the Seleucid age, with Greek names stamped on the handles, or Roman pottery, ‘ribbed amphoræ, and tiles stamped with the stamp of the tenth Legion,’ or Arab glazed ware, is found, sites may be dated with approximate accuracy
Paradise (2) - It means something that the NT receives ‘Legion’ and ‘Praetorium’ from Rome, and ‘Paradise’ from Persia
Apolinaris, or Apolinarius Claudius - 174, since it is likely that it contained the reference to the miracle of the Thundering Legion elsewhere quoted by Eusebius from Apolinaris ( H
Titus (Emperor) - Titus was quaestor about the year 65, and in the beginning of 67 he was in command of a Legion. He began the work by bringing the fifteenth Legion (Apollinaris) from Alexandria to Judaea in a very short time, considering that it was winter, and successfully besieged Jaffa and Jotapata. After sending the fifth and fifteenth Legions back to their former garrisons and selecting 700 captives for his triumph, he took the usual route by sea from Alexandria past Rhegium to Puteoli (see Roads and Travel), and thence to Rome
Naphtali - 180) quotes a saying from the Talmud: ‘It is easier to raise a Legion of olives in Galilee than to bring up a child in Palestine. When the Syrian kingdom fell before the Assyrian armies, northern Israel was exposed, as never before, to the relentless Legions of the East; and ‘in the days of Pekah, king of Israel, came Tiglath-pileser Caligula - The most useful thing Gaius did in the way of provincial government was to put the Legion which was in the province of Africa under the command of an Imperial legatus
Captain - The Legion consisting normally of 6000 men, the six tribuni took command for two months in turn. Palestine, however, being a Roman province of the second rank, did not possess a full Legionary garrison
Mary Magdalene - a "legion" of) demons (compare Matthew 12:45; Mark 16:9)
Aurelius, Marcus, Roman Emperor - Thundering Legion in D
Monk - Cominic, with a Legion of others; all which see under their proper heads
Trajan - From 89 to 97 he was in command of a Legion serving successively in Spain and Germany, and in the latter country he quelled a revolt of two Legions at Vindonissa (modern Windisch)
Monk - Dominic, with a Legion of others
Claim - With the formal appeal of a litigant, ‘Legion’ demands a proof of Christ’s right to interfere (Mark 5:7)
Samaria - Gathered on the top of Gerizim, a company of them preferred death to surrender, and 11,600 are said to have been cut to pieces by Vespasian’s fifth Legion (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) III
Zebedee - His earlier years were spent in the midst of its fierce politics, He knew the various party watchwords; He knew what was meant by ‘wars and rumours of wars’; He had come into contact with soldiers from Tabor and Sepphoris, and early learned the terrors associated with the word ‘legion’; He had met returned slaves—redeemed, freed, or fugitive; He had wrought in the villages of this tribe, and we can even think of Joseph taking the young Jesus to work with him at Sepphoris during the busy days of its rebuilding—for there was not the same objection to entering it as the polluted Tiberias
Mark, the Gospel of - Mark's Gospel contains many terms borrowed from Latin and written in Greek, consider “taking counsel” (Mark 3:6 ), “Legion” (Mark 5:9 ), “tribute” (Mark 12:14 ), “scourged” (Mark 15:15 )
Mercy - Cleansed of the Legion of demons, the healed man is told to return home and declare the mercy that God has shown to him (Mark 5:19 )
Diocletian, Emperor - Maurice and the Theban Legion at Martigny (Octodurum), of St
Olives, Mount of - ...
Before the ridge is a plateau large enough to afford camping ground for the two Roman Legions of Titus, and at the same time hidden from view of the city; it has also the military advantages of being directly upon the line of communication, of being difficult to approach from the front, and having good communication with the flanks and rear. , the second camp, the fifth Legion, could camp on a large plain stretching toward Tel el Ful, close to the great northern road
Bible, Texts And Versions - Some have calculated that the cost of one complete Bible made by a professional scribe in the fourth century would equal the salary of a member of the Roman Legion for forty years
Galilee - ‘In Asher, oil flows like a river,’ said the Rabbis, who also held that it was ‘easier to raise a Legion of olive trees in Galilee than to raise one child in Judaea
Friendship - ...
(3) The claim of old friends was recognized by Jesus when He cast out the devils from ‘Legion’ (Mark 5:19)
Poetry of the Hebrews - Let any person read the historical introduction to the book of Job, contained in the first and second chapters, and then go on to Job's speech in the beginning of the third chapter, and he cannot avoid being sensible that he passes all at once from the Legion of prose to that of poetry
Lunatic - Loss of personality is the dominant feature of the case, evidenced by the absence of the sense of all fitness, causing him to destroy his clothing and rush about in nakedness, and by his positive feeling of being possessed by a Legion of devils which tore his life asunder
Aristion (Aristo) - 120–140?) after ‘Apostolic narratives’ (ἀποστόλικας διηγήσεις), and in a Legion whence Papias could obtain them only from ‘travellers who came his way
Roman Empire - In Africa the Legion was taken from the senatorial proconsul and put under the command of a special legatus
Sea of Galilee - ‘It is easier,’ saith Rabbi Eliezer ben Simon, ‘to nourish a Legion of olives in Galilee than to bring up one child in the land of Israel’ (Ber
Jerusalem - ) by the Romans, who here maintained a Legion (τάγμα Jerusalem (2) - He says the fifth Legion raised a bank at the tower of Antonia ‘over against the middle of the pool that is called Struthius
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - The city of Cyrrhus, though the winter quarters of the tenth Legion, could boast little dignity or architectural beauty