What does Kiss mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
φιλήματι a kiss. / the kiss with which 6
φιλήσω to love. 2
φιλῆσαι to love. 1
φίλημά a kiss. / the kiss with which 1
אֶשְּׁקָה־ to put together 1
וְנָ֥שַׁק to put together 1
לִנְשָׁק־ to put together 1
וּשְׁקָה־ to put together 1
לְנַשֵּׁ֥ק to put together 1
יִשָּׁקֽוּן to put together 1
נַשְּׁקוּ־ to put together 1
יִשָּׁקֵ֙נִי֙ to put together 1
אֶשָׁ֣קְךָ֔‪‬‪‬ to put together 1

Definitions Related to Kiss

G5370


   1 a Kiss.
   2 the Kiss with which, as a sign of fraternal affection, Christians were accustomed to welcome or dismiss their companions in the faith.
   

G5368


   1 to love.
      1a to approve of.
      1b to like.
      1c sanction.
      1d to treat affectionately or kindly, to welcome, befriend.
   2 to show signs of love.
      2a to Kiss.
   3 to be fond of doing.
      3a be wont, use to do.
      

H5401


   1 to put together, Kiss.
      1a (Qal) to Kiss.
      1b (Piel) to Kiss.
      1c (Hiphil) to touch gently.
   2 to handle, be equipped with.
      2a (Qal) to be equipped.
      

Frequency of Kiss (original languages)

Frequency of Kiss (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Kiss, Liturgical Use of
1. As enjoined by Saint Peter and Saint Paul, early Christians terminated any reading of Scriptures with a kiss.
2. At High Mass the celebrant kisses the altar, and presents his left cheek to the deacon's, saying Pax tecum (peace be with you); the deacon conveys the salute to the sub-deacon, thence to the other clergy. This is called the Kiss of Peace.
3. The celebrant kisses the altar nine times during Mass as a symbol of respect.
4. Kissing the pope's foot is a salute of respect in solemn papal Mass, at the "veneration" of the pope by cardinals, and in a private audience.
5. A bishop kisses those he has just ordained priests.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Liturgical Use of Kiss
1. As enjoined by Saint Peter and Saint Paul, early Christians terminated any reading of Scriptures with a kiss.
2. At High Mass the celebrant kisses the altar, and presents his left cheek to the deacon's, saying Pax tecum (peace be with you); the deacon conveys the salute to the sub-deacon, thence to the other clergy. This is called the Kiss of Peace.
3. The celebrant kisses the altar nine times during Mass as a symbol of respect.
4. Kissing the pope's foot is a salute of respect in solemn papal Mass, at the "veneration" of the pope by cardinals, and in a private audience.
5. A bishop kisses those he has just ordained priests.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Kiss
In the eastern world so much was implied by this action of the kiss, that we lose many beauties of the Holy Scriptures for want of our knowledge of their customs and manners concerning it. There were the kiss of love, the kiss of reverence, the kiss of adoration and homage, the kiss of peace and reconciliation, the kiss of holy joy and delight; and, on the other hand, we read of the kiss of idolatry, the kiss of hypocrisy, of deceit, of the traitor, and the like.
It may not be amiss, for the better apprehension of the subject, to look over the Scripture a little for particular instances of this ceremony, that we may remark the diversity. I need not particularize the kisses of natural affection, so common in the word of God, between near and dear relations; for those are well understood, and require no illustration. Such, I mean, as the tender kiss of Isaac with Jacob, when receiving his son's venison, Genesis 27:26. Joseph kissing his brethren, Genesis 45:14-15. Jonathan with David, 1 Samuel 20:41 and numberless other instances of the like nature. But the kisses spoken of in Scripture implying different significations, it may not be improper to be somewhat more particular in defining. Thus the kiss of reverence or adoration, whether in religious veneration of JEHOVAH, or whether used in idolatrous worship, was meant to convey every thing that was dutiful, obedient, and affectionate. Thus the direction given in the second Psalm to kiss the Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, evidently conveys the acknowledgment due to his person and government, with the most cordial acceptation of him in his glorious mediatorial character as the Christ of God. (Psalms 2:12) On the other hand, the prophet represents the worshippers of Baal as commanding this service, in token of absolute submission to this idolatrous worship as expressed in this single act of kissing. "Let the men that sacrifice (say they) kiss the calves." (Hosea 13:2)
Besides the actions of kissing to imply the most complete adoration, we find among the orientals the act of kissing the hand, together with the corresponding action of bending the knee, smiting on the thigh, and the like, intended as expressive altogether of the most implicit subjection and reverence. (See Isaiah 45:23; Jeremiah 31:19) Thus we find Pharaoh giving commands concerning the homage to be paid Joseph. "Thou shalt be over my house, (said Pharaoh) and according to thy word shall all my people be ruled." In the margin it is, be armed or kiss: that is, shall all my people kiss thy word, thy command. (Genesis 41:40) So Job, "If I (said Job) beheld the sun when it shined, or the moon walking in brightness, and my heart hath been secretly enticed, or my mouth hath kissed my hand, this also were an iniquity to be punished by the judge, for I should have denied the God that is above." (Job 31:26-28) A similar passage we meet with in 1 Kings 19:18 where the Lord, in telling his servant the prophet Elijah, that the idolaters in Israel, many as they were, did not yet come up to the fears of his mind, saith, "Yet I have left me seven thousand in Israel, all the knees which have not bowed unto Baal, and every mouth which hath not kissed him." Both which passages are to the same amount, that the kiss was a token of the most perfect adoration.
We may notice the usage of the kiss also in token of peace and friendship, and of the greatest cordiality subsisting between persons joining in the same sentiments of and religious communion. Hence Paul directs the churches to this amount, when he saith, "Salute one another with an holy kiss." (Romans 16:16) "Greet all the brethren with an holy kiss." (1 Thessalonians 5:26; 1 Peter 5:14)
This was supposed (however treachery lurked under the garb), to have been the case when Joab took Amasa by the beard with the right hand to kiss him. (see 2 Samuel 20:9) And yet more, in an infinitely greater degree, when Judas hailed Christ with the awful salutation, "Joy to thee Rabbi, (for so hail means) and kissed him?" (Matthew 26:49) In the former instance, Joab took Amasa by the beard, we are told, which was an action betokening the highest regard of affection: for as the beard was always considered the chief honour and ornament of a man, so to touch it or kiss it was considered the highest proof of respect. On the contrary, to shave it, or to do any thing to it reproachfully, was counted the highest token of contempt. In the eastern world, many would have preferred death to the loss of the beard: and hence when David changed his behaviour before Achish, king of Gath, and feigned himself mad, and scrabbled on the doors of the gate, and "let his spittle Pall down upon his beard," (see 1 Samuel 21:13) Achish considered this disgrace done to his beard as the most confirmed proof of his madness, for no man in his right senses, he concluded, would have done so. For if by accident only, in walking the streets, one touched another's beard, nothing could atone for the injury and affront but by kissing it, to show the utmost respect. So tenacious were the orientals on these points.
I have not yet mentioned the kisses of grace in spiritual tokens, and yet these form by much the most interesting part of the subject. Hence the spouse in the Canticles, speaking of her soul's desire for the coming and manifestation of Christ in the flesh, with all the blessings connected with that manifestation, sums up her very ardent request in that comprehensive expression, "Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth, for his love is better than wine." (Song of Song of Solomon 1:2) And as those kisses of Jesus are meant to imply every thing in Christ, and with Christ, Jesus in his person, and Jesus in his fulness, suitableness, and all-sufficiency, so on our part the kiss of grace implies every thing that can denote love, adoration, faith, dependance, homage, subjection, and praise. Poor Mary at the feet of Jesus meant to express all these and more, when she washed his feet with her tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head, when she kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment. (See Luke 7:38) In these kisses she expressed all that a broken heart could testify of her soul's hope, love, faith, contrition, sorrow, and the like. It was in effect saying, I cast myself on thee, as a poor, perishing, dying sinner, and venture all on thy blood and righteousness!
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Kiss
Of affection (Genesis 27:26,27 ; 29:13 ; Luke 7:38,45 ); reconciliation (Genesis 33:4 ; 2 Samuel 14:33 ); leave-taking (Genesis 31:28,55 ; Ruth 1:14 ; 2 Samuel 19:39 ); homage (Psalm 2:12 ; 1 Samuel 10:1 ); spoken of as between parents and children (Genesis 27:26 ; 31:28,55 ; 48:10 ; 50:1 ; Exodus 18:7 ; Ruth 1:9,14 ); between male relatives (Genesis 29:13 ; 33:4 ; 45:15 ). It accompanied social worship as a symbol of brotherly love (Romans 16:16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 co 13:12 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:26 ; 1 Peter 5:14 ). The worship of idols was by kissing the image or the hand toward the image (1 Kings 19:18 ; Hosea 13:2 ).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Kiss
The customary salutation in the East as a mark of respect or affection (Genesis 27:26; Song of Solomon 1:2; Luke 7:45); hence the token used by the hypocrite to pretend love (2 Samuel 15:5 Absalom; Matthew 26:48 Judas). The "kiss of charity" or love, "an holy kiss" (pure and chaste), was the pledge of Christian brotherhood (Apostol. Const. 2:57; 8:11) in the early church (Justin Martyr, Apology 1:65), especially at the Lord's supper, when the kiss was passed through the congregation, the men kissing the men, the women the women (Romans 16:16; 1 Corinthians 16:20; 2 Corinthians 13:12; Acts 20:37; 1 Thessalonians 5:26; 1 Peter 5:14). Tertullian calls it (de Orat. 14) "the kiss of peace." Not a mere conventional salutation, "the mystic kiss" (Clemens Alex. Paedag. 3:11), i.e. symbolizing union in Christ. A kiss was the mark also of reverence and subjection. So Samuel after anointing Saul kissed him (1 Samuel 10:1). Also used in religious "adoration" (derived from the Latin, ad os "to the mouth," namely, kissing the hand in homage), whether of idols (Job 31:27; 1 Kings 19:18; Hosea 13:2) or of Jehovah (Psalms 2:12). So the Muslims kiss the Kaabaat Mecca.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kiss
KISS (Heb. nĕshîqah , Gr. Philçma ). Kissing is a mark of affection between parents and children ( Genesis 27:26 f., Ruth 1:9 , 1 Kings 19:20 etc.), members of a family, or near connexions ( Genesis 29:13 ; Genesis 45:15 ), and equals in rank ( 2 Samuel 20:9 , Acts 20:37 ). Guests are received with a kiss ( Luke 7:45 ). A kiss from a superior marks condescension ( 2 Samuel 15:5 ; 2 Samuel 19:39 ). These kisses may he on the lips, but are usually on the cheek or neck. The kiss was a token of love ( Song of Solomon 1:2 ; Song of Solomon 8:1 ), of homage and submission ( Genesis 41:40 , Job 31:27 , Psalms 2:12 ), and was also an act of idolatrous worship ( 1 Kings 19:18 , Hosea 13:2 ). The Moslems kiss the black stone at Mecca. Juniors and inferiors kiss the hands of seniors and superiors. A wife kisses the hand or beard of her husband. The hand, garments, even the feet of one appealed to may he kissed. Prohably Judas presumed to salute with the kiss of an equal ( Matthew 26:49 etc.). A kiss on the hand would have been natural. The ‘holy kiss,’ or ‘kiss of love’ ( 1 Corinthians 16:20 , 1 Peter 5:14 ), marked the tie that united Christians in a holy brotherhood.
W. Ewing.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Kiss
Most often used of the touching of the lips to another person's lips, cheeks, shoulders, hands, or feet as a gesture of friendship, acceptance, respect, and reverence. The location of the kiss carried different meanings as Jesus made clear in the episode of the woman kissing his feet (Luke 7:36-50 ). With the exception of three occurrences (Proverbs 7:13 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:2 ; Song of Song of Solomon 8:1 ), the term is used without any erotic overtones. Kiss translates two Hebrew words and three Greek words; the basic Hebrew term is found 32 times, and the basic Greek term is found seven times.
In the Old Testament close relatives kissed at greeting and departing with the connotation of acceptance most often in the foreground (Genesis 27:26-27 ; Genesis 29:11 ; Genesis 50:1 ; Exodus 18:7 ; 1 Samuel 10:1 ; Ruth 1:9 ). The term was further used of the gesture of reverence to idols (1 Kings 19:18 ; Hosea 13:2 ) as well as to the Lord (Psalm 2:12 ). A kiss of betrayal is also found (2 Samuel 20:9 ). The term “kiss” in the New Testament is used of Judas (Mark 14:44-45 ), of the father to the prodigal as a sign of acceptance and reconciliation (Luke 15:20 ), of the Ephesian elders to Paul as a sign of gratitude (Acts 20:37 ), of the woman who kissed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7:38 ), and of the “holy kiss” (1 Thessalonians 5:26 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 Corinthians 13:12 ; Romans 16:16 ).
The holy kiss was widely practiced among the early Christians as a manner of greeting, a sign of acceptance, and an impartation of blessing. This custom could well have been used to express the unity of the Christian fellowship. The substitute kiss involved kissing the hand and waving it in the direction of the object to be kissed (Job 31:27 ). The kiss of betrayal from Judas does not belong to the category of the kiss of Joab to Amasa (2 Samuel 20:9 ), but was the sign of respect from pupil to master. Either the action of Judas did not accord with his inner feeling, or his action had other motivation than betrayal.
The kiss still survives in the Near Eastern culture as a sign of love, respect, and reverence.
G. Al Wright, Jr.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Kiss (2)
KISS.—Originally a token of affection belonging to the intimate conditions of family life, but extended to more general relationships.
1. To kiss the hands is the expression of respect towards seniority and higher rank. Children in Oriental homes are taught to rise at the entrance of visitors and salute in this way. It is also their first form of greeting to parents and adult relatives before being kissed on the lips and cheek by them. When two sheikhs meet they kiss each other’s hands in recognition of the rank held by each. Kissing the hand, or making an attempt to do so, often occurs when one person receives a commission from another or undertakes to do some work for him. The feeling of respect originating in the relationship of child to parent is extended to that of employed and employer.
With regard to the salutation of Judas Iscariot (Luke 22:47-48), to have kissed the hand of Christ after the interval of absence caused by his conference with the chief priests would have been but an ordinary tribute of respect, and as such would have escaped the notice of the disciples, while giving the required information to those who had come with him. If, on the other hand, the kiss was on the face, it was an act of presumption for an Oriental disciple to take the initiative in offering to his master the salutation of equal friendship. The prodigal son, in meeting his father, would be described as kissing his hands before being embraced and kissed by the latter (Luke 15:20).
2. Among those of the same age, and where the relationships of life permitted it, the salutation is given sometimes on the lips, but more frequently on the check or neck. For intimate relatives or acquaintances of the same sex to part for a time, or to meet after a period of separation without such salutation, would seem strained and unnatural (Luke 15:20). In this form of greeting all thought of superior and inferior is lost in the equality of affection and identity of interest (Acts 20:37). Such was the kiss of peace or salutation of goodwill that prevailed for a time in the congregations of the early Church. It testified to the new bond of fellowship in the family of the firstborn, and was called a holy kiss (Romans 16:16) as a reminder of Christian sainthood, and also a kiss of love (1 Peter 5:14) made possible by the love that had given them such discipleship and communion.
G. M. Mackie.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Kiss
See Salutation.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Kiss
This is a sign of trust and affection, either true or false. A few Scriptures are given herewith to show the many ways in which the word "kiss" is used in the Scriptures:
Genesis 27:26 (c) Kiss of devotion
Genesis 45:15 (c) Kiss of reconciliation
Genesis 50:1 (c) The farewell kiss
Ruth 1:14 (c) Kiss of desertion
1 Samuel 10:1 (c) Kiss of honor
1 Samuel 20:41 (c) Kiss of confidence
2 Samuel 15:5 (c) Kiss of treason
2 Samuel 20:9 (c) Kiss of hypocrisy
Job 31:27 (c) Kiss of connivance
Psalm 2:12 (c) Kiss of trust
Psalm 85:10 (c) Kiss of justice
Proverbs 7:13 (c) Kiss of impudence
Proverbs 27:6 (c) The enemy's kiss
Song of Solomon 1:2 (c)Kiss of affection
Luke 7:45 (c) Kiss of gratitude
Luke 22:48 (c) Kiss of betrayal
Acts 20:37 (c) Kiss of sorrow
Romans 16:16 (c) Holy kiss of saints
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Kiss
This common mode of salutation among relatives is sanctified by its adoption in the church. Five of the Epistles close with the exhortation to greet one another with a holy kiss, or kiss of love. Romans 16:16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 Corinthians 13:12 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:26 ; 1 Peter 5:14 . When Paul said farewell to the elders of Ephesus, they wept sore, and fell on his neck and kissed him. Permission to kiss the hand of a superior is a mark of honour. The heathen kissed their gods. 1 Kings 19:18 ; Hosea 13:2 . In the case of distant objects of worship, like the sun and moon, they kissed the hand (Job 31:26,27 ), hence the most usual word for worship in the N.T. is προσκυνέω, from κυνέω, to kiss. Kings and judges of the earth are exhorted to kiss the Son when He comes to reign, lest He be angry, and they perish. Psalm 2:12 .
Webster's Dictionary - Kiss
(1):
(v. t.) To touch gently, as if fondly or caressingly.
(2):
(v. i.) To make or give salutation with the lips in token of love, respect, etc.; as, kiss and make friends.
(3):
(v.) A small piece of confectionery.
(4):
(v.) A salutation with the lips, as a token of affection, respect, etc.; as, a parting kiss; a kiss of reconciliation.
(5):
(v. i.) To meet; to come in contact; to touch fondly.
(6):
(v. t.) To salute with the lips, as a mark of affection, reverence, submission, forgiveness, etc.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Kiss
Kiss. Kissing the lips in salutation was customary among near relatives of both sexes. Genesis 29:11; Song of Solomon 8:1. Between individuals of the same sex, and in a limited degree between those of different sexes, the kiss on the cheek as a mark of respect or an act of salutation has at all times been customary in the East. In the Christian Church the kiss of charity was practiced not only as a friendly salutation, but as an act symbolical of love and Christian brotherhood. Romans 16:16; 1 Corinthians 16:20; 2 Corinthians 13:12; 1 Thessalonians 5:26; 1 Peter 5:14 Among the Arabs the women and children kiss the beards of their husbands or fathers. The superior returns the salute by a kiss on the forehead. In Egypt an inferior kisses the hand of a superior, generally on the back, but sometimes, as a special favor, on the palm also. Kissing is spoken of in Scripture as a mark of respect or adoration to idols. 1 Kings 19:18; Hosea 13:2.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Kiss
a mode of salutation, and token of respect, which has been practised in all nations. It was also in ordinary use among the Jews; hence Judas in this way saluted his Master. But there was also the kiss of homage, as one of the ceremonies performed at the inauguration of the kings of Israel. The Jews called it the kiss of majesty. Psalms 2:12 , seems to be an allusion to this. St. Paul speaks frequently of the kiss of peace, which was in use among believers, and was given by them to one another as a token of charity and union, publicly in their religious assemblies, Hebrews 13:24 . Kissing the feet is in eastern countries expressive of exuberant gratitude or reverence.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Kiss
A — 1: φίλημα (Strong's #5370 — Noun Neuter — philema — fil'-ay-mah ) "a kiss" (akin to B), Luke 7:45 ; 22:48 , was a token of Christian brotherhood, whether by way of welcome or farewell, "a holy kiss," Romans 16:16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 Corinthians 13:12 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:26 , "holy" (hagios), as free from anything inconsistent with their calling as saints (hagioi); "a kiss of love," 1 Peter 5:14 . There was to be an absence of formality and hypocrisy, a freedom from prejudice arising from social distinctions, from discrimination against the poor, from partiality towards the well-to-do. In the churches masters and servants would thus salute one another without any attitude of condescension on the one part or disrespect on the other. The "kiss" took place thus between persons of the same sex. In the "Apostolic Constitutions," a writing compiled in the 4th century, A.D., there is a reference to the custom whereby men sat on one side of the room where a meeting was held, and women on the other side of the room (as is frequently the case still in parts of Europe and Asia), and the men are bidden to salute the men, and the women the women, with "the kiss of the Lord."
B — 1: φιλέω (Strong's #5368 — Verb — phileo — fil-eh'-o ) "to love," signifies "to kiss," in Matthew 26:48 ; Mark 14:44 ; Luke 22:47 .
B — 2: καταφιλέω (Strong's #2705 — Verb — kataphileo — kat-af-ee-leh'-o ) denotes "to kiss fervently" (kata, intensive, and No. 1); the stronger force of this verb has been called in question, but the change from phileo to kataphileo in Matthew 26:49 ; Mark 14:45 can scarcely be without significance, and the act of the traitor was almost certainly more demonstrative than the simple kiss of salutation. So with the kiss of genuine devotion, Luke 7:38,45 ; 15:20 ; Acts 20:37 , in each of which this verb is used.
King James Dictionary - Kiss
KISS,
1. To salute with the lips. 2. To treat with fondness to caress. The hearts of princes kiss obedience.
3. To touch gently. When the sweet wind did gently kiss the trees.
KISS, n. A salute given with the lips a common token of affection.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Kiss
This salutation was customary in the East, to express regard and reverence, as well as affection, Genesis 29.13 ; Ruth 1.14 ; Acts 20.37 . Sometimes the beard was kissed, 2 Samuel 20:9 ; and in token of humble affection, the feet, Luke 7:38 . Images and the heavenly bodies were worshipped by kissing the hand towards them, 1 Kings 19:18 Job 31:27 Hosea 13:2 . The expression, "Kiss the Son," Psalm 2:12 , may be illustrated by 1 Samuel 10:1 , where king Saul receives the kiss of allegiance from Samuel. This salutation being customary in those days between man and man, was used in the early church as a pledge of Christian peace and charity, Romans 16:16 1 Peter 5:14 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Kiss
Kissing the lips by way of affectionate salutation was customary among near relatives of both sexes, in both patriarchal and later times. (Genesis 29:11 ; Song of Solomon 8:1 ) Between individuals of the same sex, and in a limited degree between those of different sexes, the kiss on the cheek as a mark of respect or an act of salutation has at all times been customary in the East, and can hardly be said to be extinct even in Europe. In the Christian Church the kiss of charity was practiced not only as a friendly salutation, but as an act symbolical of love and Christian brotherhood. (Romans 16:16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 Corinthians 13:12 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:6 ; 1 Peter 5:14 ) It was embodied in the earlier Christian offices, and has been continued in some of those now in use. Among the Arabs the women and children kiss the beards of their husbands or fathers. The superior returns the salute by a kiss on the forehead. In Egypt an inferior kisses the hand of a superior, generally on the back, but sometimes, as a special favor, on the palm also. To testify abject submission, and in asking favors, the feet are often kissed instead of the hand. The written decrees of a sovereign are kissed in token of respect; even the ground is sometimes kissed by Orientals int he fullness of their submission. (Genesis 41:40 ; 1 Samuel 24:8 ; Psalm 72:9 ) etc. Kissing is spoken of in Scripture as a mark of respect or adoration to idols. (1 Kings 19:18 ; Hosea 13:2 )

Sentence search

Kiss - A few Scriptures are given herewith to show the many ways in which the word "kiss" is used in the Scriptures:...
Genesis 27:26 (c) Kiss of devotion...
Genesis 45:15 (c) Kiss of reconciliation...
Genesis 50:1 (c) The farewell Kiss...
Ruth 1:14 (c) Kiss of desertion...
1 Samuel 10:1 (c) Kiss of honor...
1 Samuel 20:41 (c) Kiss of confidence...
2 Samuel 15:5 (c) Kiss of treason...
2 Samuel 20:9 (c) Kiss of hypocrisy...
Job 31:27 (c) Kiss of connivance...
Psalm 2:12 (c) Kiss of trust...
Psalm 85:10 (c) Kiss of justice...
Proverbs 7:13 (c) Kiss of impudence...
Proverbs 27:6 (c) The enemy's Kiss...
Song of Solomon 1:2 (c)Kiss of affection...
Luke 7:45 (c) Kiss of gratitude...
Luke 22:48 (c) Kiss of betrayal...
Acts 20:37 (c) Kiss of sorrow...
Romans 16:16 (c) Holy Kiss of saints...
Buss - ) A Kiss; a rude or playful Kiss; a smack. ) To Kiss; esp. to Kiss with a smack, or rudely
Kiss - Kiss, ...
1. The hearts of princes Kiss obedience. When the sweet wind did gently Kiss the trees. ...
Kiss, n
Exosculate - ) To Kiss; especially, to Kiss repeatedly or fondly
Kiss - Kiss (Heb. Kissing is a mark of affection between parents and children ( Genesis 27:26 f. Guests are received with a Kiss ( Luke 7:45 ). A Kiss from a superior marks condescension ( 2 Samuel 15:5 ; 2 Samuel 19:39 ). These Kisses may he on the lips, but are usually on the cheek or neck. The Kiss was a token of love ( Song of Solomon 1:2 ; Song of Solomon 8:1 ), of homage and submission ( Genesis 41:40 , Job 31:27 , Psalms 2:12 ), and was also an act of idolatrous worship ( 1 Kings 19:18 , Hosea 13:2 ). The Moslems Kiss the black stone at Mecca. Juniors and inferiors Kiss the hands of seniors and superiors. A wife Kisses the hand or beard of her husband. The hand, garments, even the feet of one appealed to may he Kissed. Prohably Judas presumed to salute with the Kiss of an equal ( Matthew 26:49 etc. A Kiss on the hand would have been natural. The ‘holy Kiss,’ or ‘kiss of love’ ( 1 Corinthians 16:20 , 1 Peter 5:14 ), marked the tie that united Christians in a holy brotherhood
Unkiss - ) To cancel or annul what was done or sealed by a Kiss; to cancel by a Kiss
Kiss - The "kiss of charity" or love, "an holy Kiss" (pure and chaste), was the pledge of Christian brotherhood (Apostol. 2:57; 8:11) in the early church (Justin Martyr, Apology 1:65), especially at the Lord's supper, when the Kiss was passed through the congregation, the men Kissing the men, the women the women (Romans 16:16; 1 Corinthians 16:20; 2 Corinthians 13:12; Acts 20:37; 1 Thessalonians 5:26; 1 Peter 5:14). 14) "the Kiss of peace. " Not a mere conventional salutation, "the mystic Kiss" (Clemens Alex. A Kiss was the mark also of reverence and subjection. So Samuel after anointing Saul Kissed him (1 Samuel 10:1). Also used in religious "adoration" (derived from the Latin, ad os "to the mouth," namely, Kissing the hand in homage), whether of idols (Job 31:27; 1 Kings 19:18; Hosea 13:2) or of Jehovah (Psalms 2:12). So the Muslims Kiss the Kaabaat Mecca
Osculate - ) To Kiss one another; to Kiss. ) To Kiss
Kiss - Five of the Epistles close with the exhortation to greet one another with a holy Kiss, or Kiss of love. When Paul said farewell to the elders of Ephesus, they wept sore, and fell on his neck and Kissed him. Permission to Kiss the hand of a superior is a mark of honour. The heathen Kissed their gods. In the case of distant objects of worship, like the sun and moon, they Kissed the hand (Job 31:26,27 ), hence the most usual word for worship in the N. is προσκυνέω, from κυνέω, to Kiss. Kings and judges of the earth are exhorted to Kiss the Son when He comes to reign, lest He be angry, and they perish
Kiss - A — 1: φίλημα (Strong's #5370 — Noun Neuter — philema — fil'-ay-mah ) "a Kiss" (akin to B), Luke 7:45 ; 22:48 , was a token of Christian brotherhood, whether by way of welcome or farewell, "a holy Kiss," Romans 16:16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 Corinthians 13:12 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:26 , "holy" (hagios), as free from anything inconsistent with their calling as saints (hagioi); "a Kiss of love," 1 Peter 5:14 . The "kiss" took place thus between persons of the same sex. , there is a reference to the custom whereby men sat on one side of the room where a meeting was held, and women on the other side of the room (as is frequently the case still in parts of Europe and Asia), and the men are bidden to salute the men, and the women the women, with "the Kiss of the Lord. " ...
B — 1: φιλέω (Strong's #5368 — Verb — phileo — fil-eh'-o ) "to love," signifies "to Kiss," in Matthew 26:48 ; Mark 14:44 ; Luke 22:47 . ...
B — 2: καταφιλέω (Strong's #2705 — Verb — kataphileo — kat-af-ee-leh'-o ) denotes "to Kiss fervently" (kata, intensive, and No. 1); the stronger force of this verb has been called in question, but the change from phileo to kataphileo in Matthew 26:49 ; Mark 14:45 can scarcely be without significance, and the act of the traitor was almost certainly more demonstrative than the simple Kiss of salutation. So with the Kiss of genuine devotion, Luke 7:38,45 ; 15:20 ; Acts 20:37 , in each of which this verb is used
Ba - ) To Kiss
Kess - ) To Kiss
Deosculate - ) To Kiss warmly
Kissed - ) of Kiss...
Kiss - Kiss. Kissing the lips in salutation was customary among near relatives of both sexes. Between individuals of the same sex, and in a limited degree between those of different sexes, the Kiss on the cheek as a mark of respect or an act of salutation has at all times been customary in the East. In the Christian Church the Kiss of charity was practiced not only as a friendly salutation, but as an act symbolical of love and Christian brotherhood. Romans 16:16; 1 Corinthians 16:20; 2 Corinthians 13:12; 1 Thessalonians 5:26; 1 Peter 5:14 Among the Arabs the women and children Kiss the beards of their husbands or fathers. The superior returns the salute by a Kiss on the forehead. In Egypt an inferior Kisses the hand of a superior, generally on the back, but sometimes, as a special favor, on the palm also. Kissing is spoken of in Scripture as a mark of respect or adoration to idols
Kissing - ) of Kiss...
Kissed - Kiss'ED, pp. Saluted with a Kiss
Osculatorium - It was used in the Middle Ages to convey the Kiss of peace to the faithful, and was first brought to the altar for the celebrant to Kiss at the proper place in tke Mass, then brought to each of the congregation in turn at the altar rails. In the medieval Nuptial Mass the Kiss of peace was conveyed to the bridegroom by this means and transmitted by him to the bride
Sin: Punishment of - What a diabolical invention was the 'Virgin's Kiss,' once used by the fathers of the Inquisition! The victim was pushed forward to Kiss the image, when, lo, its arms enclosed him in a deadly embrace, piercing his body with a hundred hidden knives. The tempting pleasures of sin offer to the unwary just such a virgin's Kiss
Kiss - ; as, Kiss and make friends. ; as, a parting Kiss; a Kiss of reconciliation
Tablet, Peace - It was used in the Middle Ages to convey the Kiss of peace to the faithful, and was first brought to the altar for the celebrant to Kiss at the proper place in tke Mass, then brought to each of the congregation in turn at the altar rails. In the medieval Nuptial Mass the Kiss of peace was conveyed to the bridegroom by this means and transmitted by him to the bride
Kiss - The location of the Kiss carried different meanings as Jesus made clear in the episode of the woman Kissing his feet (Luke 7:36-50 ). Kiss translates two Hebrew words and three Greek words; the basic Hebrew term is found 32 times, and the basic Greek term is found seven times. ...
In the Old Testament close relatives Kissed at greeting and departing with the connotation of acceptance most often in the foreground (Genesis 27:26-27 ; Genesis 29:11 ; Genesis 50:1 ; Exodus 18:7 ; 1 Samuel 10:1 ; Ruth 1:9 ). A Kiss of betrayal is also found (2 Samuel 20:9 ). The term “kiss” in the New Testament is used of Judas (Mark 14:44-45 ), of the father to the prodigal as a sign of acceptance and reconciliation (Luke 15:20 ), of the Ephesian elders to Paul as a sign of gratitude (Acts 20:37 ), of the woman who Kissed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7:38 ), and of the “holy Kiss” (1 Thessalonians 5:26 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 Corinthians 13:12 ; Romans 16:16 ). ...
The holy Kiss was widely practiced among the early Christians as a manner of greeting, a sign of acceptance, and an impartation of blessing. The substitute Kiss involved Kissing the hand and waving it in the direction of the object to be Kissed (Job 31:27 ). The Kiss of betrayal from Judas does not belong to the category of the Kiss of Joab to Amasa (2 Samuel 20:9 ), but was the sign of respect from pupil to master. ...
The Kiss still survives in the Near Eastern culture as a sign of love, respect, and reverence
Kiss - In the eastern world so much was implied by this action of the Kiss, that we lose many beauties of the Holy Scriptures for want of our knowledge of their customs and manners concerning it. There were the Kiss of love, the Kiss of reverence, the Kiss of adoration and homage, the Kiss of peace and reconciliation, the Kiss of holy joy and delight; and, on the other hand, we read of the Kiss of idolatry, the Kiss of hypocrisy, of deceit, of the traitor, and the like. I need not particularize the Kisses of natural affection, so common in the word of God, between near and dear relations; for those are well understood, and require no illustration. Such, I mean, as the tender Kiss of Isaac with Jacob, when receiving his son's venison, Genesis 27:26. Joseph Kissing his brethren, Genesis 45:14-15. But the Kisses spoken of in Scripture implying different significations, it may not be improper to be somewhat more particular in defining. Thus the Kiss of reverence or adoration, whether in religious veneration of JEHOVAH, or whether used in idolatrous worship, was meant to convey every thing that was dutiful, obedient, and affectionate. Thus the direction given in the second Psalm to Kiss the Son, the Lord Jesus Christ, evidently conveys the acknowledgment due to his person and government, with the most cordial acceptation of him in his glorious mediatorial character as the Christ of God. (Psalms 2:12) On the other hand, the prophet represents the worshippers of Baal as commanding this service, in token of absolute submission to this idolatrous worship as expressed in this single act of Kissing. "Let the men that sacrifice (say they) Kiss the calves. " (Hosea 13:2)...
Besides the actions of Kissing to imply the most complete adoration, we find among the orientals the act of Kissing the hand, together with the corresponding action of bending the knee, smiting on the thigh, and the like, intended as expressive altogether of the most implicit subjection and reverence. " In the margin it is, be armed or Kiss: that is, shall all my people Kiss thy word, thy command. (Genesis 41:40) So Job, "If I (said Job) beheld the sun when it shined, or the moon walking in brightness, and my heart hath been secretly enticed, or my mouth hath Kissed my hand, this also were an iniquity to be punished by the judge, for I should have denied the God that is above. " (Job 31:26-28) A similar passage we meet with in 1 Kings 19:18 where the Lord, in telling his servant the prophet Elijah, that the idolaters in Israel, many as they were, did not yet come up to the fears of his mind, saith, "Yet I have left me seven thousand in Israel, all the knees which have not bowed unto Baal, and every mouth which hath not Kissed him. " Both which passages are to the same amount, that the Kiss was a token of the most perfect adoration. ...
We may notice the usage of the Kiss also in token of peace and friendship, and of the greatest cordiality subsisting between persons joining in the same sentiments of and religious communion. Hence Paul directs the churches to this amount, when he saith, "Salute one another with an holy Kiss. " (Romans 16:16) "Greet all the brethren with an holy Kiss. " (1 Thessalonians 5:26; 1 Peter 5:14)...
This was supposed (however treachery lurked under the garb), to have been the case when Joab took Amasa by the beard with the right hand to Kiss him. (see 2 Samuel 20:9) And yet more, in an infinitely greater degree, when Judas hailed Christ with the awful salutation, "Joy to thee Rabbi, (for so hail means) and Kissed him?" (Matthew 26:49) In the former instance, Joab took Amasa by the beard, we are told, which was an action betokening the highest regard of affection: for as the beard was always considered the chief honour and ornament of a man, so to touch it or Kiss it was considered the highest proof of respect. For if by accident only, in walking the streets, one touched another's beard, nothing could atone for the injury and affront but by Kissing it, to show the utmost respect. ...
I have not yet mentioned the Kisses of grace in spiritual tokens, and yet these form by much the most interesting part of the subject. Hence the spouse in the Canticles, speaking of her soul's desire for the coming and manifestation of Christ in the flesh, with all the blessings connected with that manifestation, sums up her very ardent request in that comprehensive expression, "Let him Kiss me with the Kisses of his mouth, for his love is better than wine. " (Song of Song of Solomon 1:2) And as those Kisses of Jesus are meant to imply every thing in Christ, and with Christ, Jesus in his person, and Jesus in his fulness, suitableness, and all-sufficiency, so on our part the Kiss of grace implies every thing that can denote love, adoration, faith, dependance, homage, subjection, and praise. Poor Mary at the feet of Jesus meant to express all these and more, when she washed his feet with her tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head, when she Kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment. (See Luke 7:38) In these Kisses she expressed all that a broken heart could testify of her soul's hope, love, faith, contrition, sorrow, and the like
Kiss - But there was also the Kiss of homage, as one of the ceremonies performed at the inauguration of the kings of Israel. The Jews called it the Kiss of majesty. Paul speaks frequently of the Kiss of peace, which was in use among believers, and was given by them to one another as a token of charity and union, publicly in their religious assemblies, Hebrews 13:24 . Kissing the feet is in eastern countries expressive of exuberant gratitude or reverence
Kiss (2) - KISS. To Kiss the hands is the expression of respect towards seniority and higher rank. It is also their first form of greeting to parents and adult relatives before being Kissed on the lips and cheek by them. When two sheikhs meet they Kiss each other’s hands in recognition of the rank held by each. Kissing the hand, or making an attempt to do so, often occurs when one person receives a commission from another or undertakes to do some work for him. ...
With regard to the salutation of Judas Iscariot (Luke 22:47-48), to have Kissed the hand of Christ after the interval of absence caused by his conference with the chief priests would have been but an ordinary tribute of respect, and as such would have escaped the notice of the disciples, while giving the required information to those who had come with him. If, on the other hand, the Kiss was on the face, it was an act of presumption for an Oriental disciple to take the initiative in offering to his master the salutation of equal friendship. The prodigal son, in meeting his father, would be described as Kissing his hands before being embraced and Kissed by the latter (Luke 15:20). Such was the Kiss of peace or salutation of goodwill that prevailed for a time in the congregations of the early Church. It testified to the new bond of fellowship in the family of the firstborn, and was called a holy Kiss (Romans 16:16) as a reminder of Christian sainthood, and also a Kiss of love (1 Peter 5:14) made possible by the love that had given them such discipleship and communion
Smack - ) To Kiss with a close compression of the lips, so as to make a sound when they separate; to Kiss with a sharp noise; to buss. ) To open, as the lips, with an inarticulate sound made by a quick compression and separation of the parts of the mouth; to make a noise with, as the lips, by separating them in the act of Kissing or after tasting. ) A loud Kiss; a buss. ) To Kiss with a sharp noise; to buss
Kiss, Liturgical Use of - As enjoined by Saint Peter and Saint Paul, early Christians terminated any reading of Scriptures with a Kiss. At High Mass the celebrant Kisses the altar, and presents his left cheek to the deacon's, saying Pax tecum (peace be with you); the deacon conveys the salute to the sub-deacon, thence to the other clergy. This is called the Kiss of Peace. The celebrant Kisses the altar nine times during Mass as a symbol of respect. Kissing the pope's foot is a salute of respect in solemn papal Mass, at the "veneration" of the pope by cardinals, and in a private audience. A bishop Kisses those he has just ordained priests
Liturgical Use of Kiss - As enjoined by Saint Peter and Saint Paul, early Christians terminated any reading of Scriptures with a Kiss. At High Mass the celebrant Kisses the altar, and presents his left cheek to the deacon's, saying Pax tecum (peace be with you); the deacon conveys the salute to the sub-deacon, thence to the other clergy. This is called the Kiss of Peace. The celebrant Kisses the altar nine times during Mass as a symbol of respect. Kissing the pope's foot is a salute of respect in solemn papal Mass, at the "veneration" of the pope by cardinals, and in a private audience. A bishop Kisses those he has just ordained priests
Kiss - Kissing the lips by way of affectionate salutation was customary among near relatives of both sexes, in both patriarchal and later times. (Genesis 29:11 ; Song of Solomon 8:1 ) Between individuals of the same sex, and in a limited degree between those of different sexes, the Kiss on the cheek as a mark of respect or an act of salutation has at all times been customary in the East, and can hardly be said to be extinct even in Europe. In the Christian Church the Kiss of charity was practiced not only as a friendly salutation, but as an act symbolical of love and Christian brotherhood. Among the Arabs the women and children Kiss the beards of their husbands or fathers. The superior returns the salute by a Kiss on the forehead. In Egypt an inferior Kisses the hand of a superior, generally on the back, but sometimes, as a special favor, on the palm also. To testify abject submission, and in asking favors, the feet are often Kissed instead of the hand. The written decrees of a sovereign are Kissed in token of respect; even the ground is sometimes Kissed by Orientals int he fullness of their submission. Kissing is spoken of in Scripture as a mark of respect or adoration to idols
Osculation - ) The act of Kissing; a Kiss
Salutations - ...
Of greetings in practice, the Kiss, well known in Oriental lands, is urged five times, besides being mentioned in Acts 20:37 -‘Salute one another with a holy Kiss’ (1 Corinthians 16:20, 2 Corinthians 13:12, Romans 16:16, 1 Thessalonians 5:26 [8], and 1 Peter 5:14 [9]). When the sorcerer attempts to awaken the dead by a Kiss, he will pour his own soul into him (cf. ] In ancient Rome the Kiss was a sign of family relationship, so that there developed a formal law of the Kiss (ius osculi) between relatives, going as far as those between whom marriage was forbidden. The salutation by the Kiss was taken over under Christianity as a matter of course, but, like everything else, purified and sanctified. References in the NT presuppose an assembly for worship, where the Epistles are read, the Kiss being not yet perhaps a formal part of the service, but a general practice on the ground of brotherly love in religious communion. Whether in NT times the Kiss was promiscuous between the sexes cannot be answered certainly, though it is risky to argue from later custom that it was. Paul (1 Timothy 2:9-15), and general customs among both Jews and Greeks, make it exceedingly unlikely that the Kiss was given promiscuously. But later, in the 2nd and 3rd centuries, with the growth of larger freedom and self-confidence, the Kiss became more general. Seeberg thinks, from the ancient custom of the Kiss in the Lord’s Supper service, and from the passages on the Kiss in the Epistles, that the Epistles especially (not so much the Gospels) were read in the evening service, to which in the early Church the Supper was limited, and that the Kiss as a part of the worship took place after that reading. ’ Besides, in 1 Corinthians 16:22, after the Kiss of 1 Corinthians 16:20 comes the Marana tha (‘The Lord is coming’ [13]) and the benediction, and we know from the Didache that the Marana tha was an element of the oldest liturgy of the Supper; consequently St. Paul in this passage connects an exhortation to the Kiss with the Supper liturgy. The Lord’s Supper Kiss at the end of different NT Epistles proves that these Epistles are intended to be read in the evening public worship. ...
As we go into the post-Apostolic Age, we find the Kiss a secure part of public worship. ‘When we have ceased from prayer, we salute one another with a Kiss. Athenagoras quotes an extra-canonical Scripture warning against an abuse of the Kiss, saying that ‘the Kiss, or rather the salutation, should be given with the greatest care; since, if there be mixed with it the least defilement of thought, it excludes us from eternal life’ (Legat. Clement of Alexandria also recognizes abuses which crept in, and refers to the resounding Kisses in church which made suspicions and evil reports among the heathen, and claims that the Kiss must be ‘mystic’ (Paed. Tertullian presupposes omission of the Kiss when fasting, but declaims against the omission (except on Good Friday), believing that the Kiss of brotherhood is a part of every true prayer (de Orat. On the other hand, he refers to the embarrassment the custom causes in the case of an unbelieving husband who is unwilling for his wife ‘to meet any one of the brethren to exchange a Kiss’ (ad Uxor. Origen refers the custom of the Kiss after prayer to Romans 16:16 and other Scripture, and says that the Kiss must be holy, chaste, and sincere, an expression of peace and simplicity (ad Rom. 11) insisted on order in this part of the service; the clergy to Kiss the bishop, the laity the men, the women the women, going back in this last particular to the probable use of the Apostolic Church. [9]0 430-435; V
Kiss - Sometimes the beard was Kissed, 2 Samuel 20:9 ; and in token of humble affection, the feet, Luke 7:38 . Images and the heavenly bodies were worshipped by Kissing the hand towards them, 1 Kings 19:18 Job 31:27 Hosea 13:2 . The expression, "Kiss the Son," Psalm 2:12 , may be illustrated by 1 Samuel 10:1 , where king Saul receives the Kiss of allegiance from Samuel
Adore - "To Kiss the hand with the mouth" in homage (Job 31:26-27. and my mouth hath Kissed my hand". So "kiss the Son," i
Accolade - (Latin: ad collum, to the neck) Ceremony used in conferring knighthood, either by a Kiss, or by a slight blow on the neck, the second form being still used in England; also, a form of salutation and farewell used in some countries by clerics or religious, like the peace salutation among the clergy at solemn Mass
Salute - ) A sign, token, or ceremony, expressing good will, compliment, or respect, as a Kiss, a bow, etc. ) Hence, to give a sign of good will; to compliment by an act or ceremony, as a Kiss, a bow, etc
Adore - To "kiss the Son" in Psalm 2:12 is to adore and worship him
Parting - Given at separation as a parting Kiss or look
Eucharist - " Then the deacon cried out aloud, "Mutually embrace and Kiss each other, " which being done, the whole congregation prayed for the universal peace and welfare of the church, for the tranquility and repose of the world, for the prosperity of the age, for wholesome weather, and for all ranks and degrees of men. During the time of administration they sang hymns and psalms; and having concluded with prayer and thanksgiving, the people saluted each other with a Kiss of peace, and so the assembly broke up
Salute - To Kiss. A Kiss
Scapular of Saint Dominic - It was approved on November 23, 1903 by Pope Pius X who granted an indulgence to the wearers every time that they devoutly Kiss it
Saint Dominic, Scapular of - It was approved on November 23, 1903 by Pope Pius X who granted an indulgence to the wearers every time that they devoutly Kiss it
Adoration of the Cross - The clergy then remove their shoes, an ancient sign of reverence, and, kneeling, Kiss the crucifix. The laity then venerate the crucifix by Kissing it
Greetings - ’...
Greetings vary with the rank of parties, from the abject prostration of the subject before his sovereign, to the familiar Kiss of friendly equals. He will, at times, Kiss the hand of his superior, and raise it to his brow. One interceding for another (Mark 7:25), or begging a favour (Matthew 18:26; Matthew 18:29), will fall down flat; while in token of utter submission one may Kiss a benefactor’s feet (Luke 7:38; Luke 7:45). Slaves or servants Kiss the sleeve or skirt of their lord’s clothing. To touch (Matthew 9:20) or Kiss the hem of the garment indicates great reverence. In the Greek Church worshippers often Kiss the skirt of the priest’s robe. To Kiss upon the cheek is a sign of warm affection (Luke 15:20), of the love and esteem of friends
Liturgy, Peace in - In word and ceremony jt oocurs frequently, particularly at Holy Mass, in the Canon, in prayers six times, and twice in action as the priest drops the particle of the Host into the chalice, and as he gives the Kiss of peace to the deacon, who in turn passes it on to the assisting clergy
Pax - ) The Kiss of peace; also, the embrace in the sanctuary now substituted for it at High Mass in Roman Catholic churches. ) A tablet or board, on which is a representation of Christ, of the Virgin Mary, or of some saint and which, in the Mass, was Kissed by the priest and then by the people, in mediaeval times; an osculatory
Salutation - See also Gestures, Kiss
Christ: Sympathy With His People - If,' says Augustine, 'a man should come up to embrace thee, to Kiss and honour thee upward, and beneath with a pair of shoes beaten full of nails, tread upon thy bare foot; the head shall despise the honor done unto it, and for the foot that smarteth, say, Why treadest thou upon me? So when feigned gospellers honor Christ our Head, sitting in heaven, and oppress his members on earth, the Head shall speak for the feet that smart, and say, Why treadest thou on me?' Paul had a zeal toward God, but he did tread upon Christ's feet on earth, for whom the Head crieth forth of heaven, 'Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me?' Although Christ sitteth on the right hand of his Father, yet lieth he on earth; he suffereth all calamities here on earth, he is many times evil entreated here on earth
Adore - The prostration of the whole body, Kissing the earth, and the like, savour much of idolatry. ...
See Kiss
Lip - ...
LIP, To Kiss
Lip - ) To touch with the lips; to put the lips to; hence, to Kiss
Ring - As a sign of reverence the faithful Kiss a bishop's ring especially before receiving communion from his hand
Salutation - " Their more formal salutations they accompany with various ceremonies or gestures; sometimes they embrace and Kiss each other; sometimes an inferior Kiss the hand or the beard of a superior, or bows low, with the hand upon the breast, and afterwards raises it to his lips or forehead
Salutation - They were sent from the saints located where the epistles were written to the saints addressed, together with, at times, the injunction to greet one another with 'a holy Kiss,' that being the ordinary form of salutation in the East among the men as well as among the women
Gethsemane - Here also He was betrayed by Judas with a Kiss, and arrested
Amasa - Then said Joab to Amasa, "Art thou in health, my brother?" and took him by the beard with his right hand to Kiss him; and treacherously smote him under the fifth rib, so that he expired
Adoration - ) The word is compounded of ad, "to," and os, "mouth;" and literally signifies to apply the hand to the mouth; manum ad os admovere, "to Kiss the hand;" this being in eastern countries one of the great marks of respect and submission. , by kneeling, falling prostrate, Kissing the feet, hands, garments, &c. ...
The Persian manner of adoration, introduced by Cyrus, was by bending the knee, and falling on the face at the prince's feet, striking the earth with the forehead, and Kissing the ground. ...
It is particularly said of Dioclesian, that he had gems fastened to his shoes, that divine honours might be more willingly paid him, by Kissing his feet. ...
The practice of adoration may be said to be still subsisting in England, in the custom of Kissing the king's or queen's hand. ...
Adoration is also used in the court of Rome, in the ceremony of Kissing the pope's feet. These prelates finding a vehement disposition in the people to fall down before them, and Kiss their feet, procured crucifixes to be fastened on their slippers; by which stratagem, the adoration intended for the pope's person is supposed to be transferred to Christ. ...
Adoration properly is paid only to the pope when placed on the altar, in which posture the cardinals, conclavists, alone are admitted to Kiss his feet. ...
Adoration is more particularly used for Kissing one's hand in presence of another as a token of reverence. The Jews adored by Kissing their hands, and bowing down their heads; whence in their language Kissing is properly used for adoration. This illustrates a passage in Psalm it, "Kiss the Son lest he be angry;"—that is, pay him homage and worship
Adoration - (1 Kings 2:19 ) It was accompanied by such acts as a Kiss, (Exodus 18:7 ) laying hold of the knees or feet of the person to whom the adoration was paid, (Matthew 28:9 ) and Kissing the ground on which he stood. (Psalm 72:9 ; Micah 7:17 ) Similar adoration was paid to idols, (1 Kings 19:18 ) sometimes, however, the act consisted simply in Kissing the hand to the object of reverence, (Job 31:27 ) and in Kissing the statue itself
Beard - To insult it by word or act was the grossest indignity; to take it respectfully in the right hand and Kiss it, was a mode of expressing high esteem and love permitted only to the nearest friends
Women - (Genesis 24:64,65 ) Jacob saluted Rachel with a Kiss in the presence of the shepherds
Hand - To Kiss the hand is an act of homage (1 Kings 19:18 ; Job 31:27 ), and to pour water on one's hands is to serve him (2 Kings 3:11 )
Amasa - " There Joab, while taking with his right hand Amasa's beard to Kiss him, with his left stabbed him with his sword (2 Samuel 20:10)
Sign - circumcision as a sign of the covenant); (3) as an ‘indication’-Matthew 26:48 (Judas’ Kiss), Luke 2:12 (to the Shepherds) Luke 2:34 (the child Jesus set for a sign); (4) hence for some wonderful indication-Matthew 24:3; Matthew 24:30, Mark 13:4 (of Christ’s Coming), Matthew 16:1; Matthew 16:4, Mark 8:11, Mark 16:17; Mark 16:20, Luke 11:15; Luke 11:29 (to show Christ’s power), Matthew 16:3 (signs of the times) Matthew 16:4 (sign of Jonah), 1 Corinthians 14:22 (tongues and prophesying as a sign of the power of Christianity); and therefore for a ‘miracle’ or wonderful deed which has instruction as its object
Agapae - The Kiss of charity, with which the ceremony used to end, was no longer given between different sexes; and it was expressly forbidden to have any beds or couches for the convenience of those who should be disposed to eat more at their ease
Adoration - The word is compounded, of ad, "to," and os oris, "mouth;" and literally signifies to apply the hand to the mouth, "to Kiss the hand;" this being in the eastern countries, one of the great marks of respect and submission. The practice of adoration may be said to be still subsisting in England, in the ceremony of Kissing the king's or queen's hand, and in serving them at table, both being performed kneeling on one knee
Mouth - ) To put mouth to mouth; to Kiss
Sign - circumcision as a sign of the covenant); (3) as an ‘indication’-Matthew 26:48 (Judas’ Kiss), Luke 2:12 (to the Shepherds) Luke 2:34 (the child Jesus set for a sign); (4) hence for some wonderful indication-Matthew 24:3; Matthew 24:30, Mark 13:4 (of Christ’s Coming), Matthew 16:1; Matthew 16:4, Mark 8:11, Mark 16:17; Mark 16:20, Luke 11:15; Luke 11:29 (to show Christ’s power), Matthew 16:3 (signs of the times) Matthew 16:4 (sign of Jonah), 1 Corinthians 14:22 (tongues and prophesying as a sign of the power of Christianity); and therefore for a ‘miracle’ or wonderful deed which has instruction as its object
Beard - Only the nearest friends were permitted to touch the beard, which marks the foul treachery of Joab in taking his cousin Amasa's beard to Kiss him, or rather it (2 Samuel 20:9)
Foot - To kneel down and clasp the feet and even to Kiss them is still the Oriental preliminary to an important request. Sometimes the word is allowed to do service for the deed, as when the supplicant says, ‘Allow me to Kiss your feet
Thomas Apameensis, Bishop of Apamea - Thomas fixed a day for its exhibition, to which the people of the neighbouring towns also eagerly repaired; among them the parents of Evagrius, bringing with them the future historian, who vividly describes the crowds pressing to see, and seeking to Kiss, the sacred wood
Hospitality - Sometimes a Kiss characterized the hospitable reception (Luke 7:45)
Sun - And hence, under diving teaching, Job could and did say, that he dared to Kiss his hand in token of adoration when he saw the Sun shining, in his strength, or the Moon walking in her brightness
Hospitality - Sometimes a Kiss characterized the hospitable reception (Luke 7:45)
Burial - It was customary for the nearest relatives to close the eyes of the dying and give them the parting Kiss, and then to commence the wailing for the dead, Jeremiah 46:4 50:1 ; in this wailing, which continued at intervals until after the burial, they were joined by other relatives and friends, John 11:19 , whose loud and shrill lamentations are referred to in Mark 5:38
Banquet - Sometimes they Kissed the lips, hands, knees, or feet, as the person deserved more or less respect. The Jews welcomed a stranger to their house in the same way; for our Lord complains to Simon, that he had given him no Kiss, had welcomed him to his table with none of the accustomed tokens of respect. Thou gavest me no Kiss; but this woman, since the time I came in, hath not ceased to Kiss my feet. And it was customary for them to Kiss the feet of those to whom they thought a more than common respect was due; for the daughter of Philocleon, in Aristophanes, washed her father, anointed his feet, and, stooping down, Kissed them
Burial - The nearest relatives usually closed the eyes of the dying, gave them the parting Kiss, and then began the wailing for the dead
Greeting - A Kiss was frequently a part of such greeting (Genesis 29:13 ; Romans 16:16 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 Corinthians 13:12 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:26 ; 1 Peter 5:14 )
Calf Worship - Kissing them was one mode of adoration (Hosea 13:2); contrast God's command," Kiss the Son, lest He be angry and ye perish" (Psalms 2:12)
Peace: of a Believer - Hearken to its changeful tune as it ripples over its pebbly bed, or leaps adown the wheel, or sports in eddies where the trees bend down their branches to Kiss the current
Supper (2) - Guests were welcomed by the host with a Kiss (Luke 7:45); their feet were washed by slaves (Luke 7:44); their hair, beards, and sometimes their clothes and feet were anointed with perfumed oil (Luke 7:38, John 12:3); and garlands of flowers were sometimes provided for the decoration of their heads (Wisdom of Solomon 2:7 f
Hand - To "kiss the hand" expresses adoration (Job 31:27)
Brotherly Love - The basic word used for the brotherly type of love, phileo , sometimes means “to Kiss,” which was to show close friendship (Mark 14:44 )
Gestures - Lastly, we notice the Kiss as the sign of love, real or feigned, as in the case of the sinful woman (Luke 7:45), of Judas (Mark 14:45 and || Mt. It is true that the Kiss was the ordinary way of greeting a Rabbi (see Swete on Mark 14:45), but in all these cases much more than ordinary courtesy is intended by the gesture, and probably καταφιλεῖν in these passages means ‘to Kiss fervently,’ or (in the case of Judas) ‘ostentatiously. ’ For the Kiss in OT, cf. Genesis 29:11; Genesis 33:4; Genesis 45:15, Exodus 18:7, 1 Samuel 20:41, 2 Samuel 15:5; 2 Samuel 19:39; 2 Samuel 20:9, many of which passages speak of Kisses of greeting like that of Judas, to which Joab’s is indeed strangely similar
Banquets - A Kiss was the proper courtesy wherewith the heat received each guest; to omit it was to be wanting in kindliness (Luke 7:4-5)
Crucified - His arms spread to receive, his feet fixed to wait, and his head bowed down as if to Kiss his people
Worship, Worshiping - A — 1: προσκυνέω (Strong's #4352 — Verb — proskuneo — pros-koo-neh'-o ) "to make obeisance, do reverence to" (from pros, "towards," and kuneo, "to Kiss"), is the most frequent word rendered "to worship
Courtesy - At the same time the courtesies practised were not always sincere (note the Kiss of Judas), and were, moreover, occasionally violated in a peculiarly flagrant manner, as we learn from the treatment Christ received once and again from those who opposed Him, especially the treatment He received immediately before His death
Meals - (Esther 6:14 ; Proverbs 9:3 ; Matthew 22:4 ) The visitors were received with a Kiss, (Luke 7:45 ) water was furnished for them to wash their feet with, (Luke 7:44 ) the head, the beard, the feet, and sometimes the clothes, were perfumed with ointment, (Psalm 23:5 ; John 12:3 ) on special occasions robes were provided, (Matthew 22:11 ) and the head was decorated with wreaths
Burial - As soon as the last breath had fled, the nearest relation, or the dearest friend, gave the lifeless body the parting Kiss, the last farewell and sign of affection to the departed relative. This was a custom of immemorial antiquity; for the patriarch Jacob had no sooner yielded up his spirit, than his beloved Joseph, claiming for once the right of the first-born, "fell upon his face and Kissed him. " The parting Kiss being given, the company rent their clothes, which was a custom of great antiquity, and the highest expression of grief in the primitive ages
Funeral, Rites - It needs only to be observed, that, after the funeral service, they Kiss the crucifix, and salute the mouth and forehead of the deceased; after which, each of the company eats a bit of bread, and drinks a glass of wine in the church, wishing the soul a good repose, and the afflicted family all consolations
Meals - The guests were received with a Kiss; water for the feet, ointment for the person, and robes were supplied (Luke 7:38-45)
Mediator - The plan of salvation, therefore, by such a Mediator, is the most suitable to human beings that possibly could be; for here "Mercy and truth meet together, righteousness and peace Kiss each other
Perpetua, Vibia - The Kiss of peace is given (c
Reverence - The term προσκυνεῖν, which means ‘to Kiss the hand to,’ and then ‘to bow down before,’ is often used in the Gospels to signify the sentiment of reverential regard, and even of worship (Matthew 2:2; Matthew 2:8-11; Matthew 4:9; Matthew 14:33; Matthew 15:25; Matthew 20:20; Matthew 28:17, Mark 5:6; Mark 15:19)
Peace - ” This meaning is found in questions: “And Joab said to Amasa, Art thou in health, my brother? And Joab took Amasa by the beard with the right hand to Kiss him” ( Build - Laban complained to Jacob that he had not allowed him “to Kiss my sons and my daughters” ( Scribes - The salutations in the market-place, (Matthew 23:7 ) the reverential Kiss offered by the scholars to their master or by rabbis to each other the greeting of Abba, father (Matthew 23:9 ) the long robes with the broad blue fringe, (Matthew 23:5 ) --all these go to make up the picture of a scribe's life
Pilgrimage - So often as they pass by the black stone, they either Kiss it, or touch it with their hand, and Kiss that
Hand - To Kiss one's hand, is an act of adoration, 1 Kings 19:18 . "If I...
beheld the sun when it shined, and my mouth hath Kissed my hand," Job 31:27
Lamaism - The grand lama is only to be seen in a secret place of his palace, amidst a great number of lamps, sitting cross-legged on a cushion, and decked all over with gold and precious stones; while, at a distance, the people prostrate themselves before him, it being not lawful for any so much as to Kiss his feet
Mary Magdalene - ) Truly the poet writes: Not she with traitorous Kiss her Master stung, Not she denied Him with unfaithful tongue; She, when apostles fled, could dangers brave, Last at His cross, and earliest at His grave
Guest - ) introduce us to the courtesies which, if not necessarily shown to a guest, were marks of honour and regard, the giving of water to wash the feet, the Kiss of welcome, the anointing of the head with oil
Absalom - At all events, directly after receiving the king's Kiss of reconciliation, he began popularity hunting, to the disparagement of his father, whose moral hold on the people had been weakened by his sin with Bathsheba, and who probably as years advanced attended personally to judicial ministrations less than is the usual policy of oriental kings
Lama, Grand - ...
The grand lama, it has been said, is never to be seen but in a secret place of his palace, amidst a great number of lamps, sitting cross-legged on a cushion, and decked all over with gold and precious stones, where at a distance the people prostrate themselves before him, it not being lawful for any, so much as to Kiss his feet
Fellowship - One sign of this fellowship is mutual intercession (2 Corinthians 1:11, Colossians 4:3, 2 Thessalonians 3:1), another is the Kiss of peace (2 Corinthians 13:12, 1 Thessalonians 5:26)
the Much Forgiven Debtor And His Much Love - ...
But who and what is this? For, behold a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she saw that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster box of ointment, and stood at His feet behind Him weeping, and began to wash His feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and Kissed His feet, and anointed them with the ointment. Thou gavest Me no Kiss: but this woman, since the time I came in, hath not ceased to Kiss My feet. Behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, brought an alabaster box of ointment, and stood at His feet behind Him weeping, and began to wash His feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and Kissed His feet, and anointed them with the ointment
Mary Magdalene - And now that He has ascended to His Father's house, He is saying to His saints and to His angels to this very day the very same words that He said in Simon's house-"This woman since I came in hath not ceased to Kiss my feet. Cease not to Kiss His feet till I come, but give up thy place to me when I come
Sandemanians - Their Kiss of charity used on this occasion at the admission of a new member, and at other times when they deem it necessary and proper; their weekly collection before the Lord's supper, for the support of the poor, and defraying other expenses; mutual exhortation; abstinence from blood and things strangled; washing each other's feet, when, as a deed of mercy, it might be an expression of love, the precept concerning which, as well as other precepts, they understand literally: community of goods, so far as that every one is to consider all that he has in his possession and power, liable to the calls of the poor and the church; and the unlawfulness of laying up treasures upon earth, by setting them apart for any distant, future, and uncertain use
Judas Iscariot - He gave them a token: ‘The one whom I shall Kiss is he’; and, advancing to Jesus, he greeted Him with customary reverence and Kissed Him effusively ( Matthew 26:47-50 = Mark 14:43-46 = Luke 22:47-49 )
Spitting - The offender instantly not only begged pardon for what every one saw was unintentional, but Kissed his beard in token of respect. This had the desired effect, and seemed to pacify; and perhaps nothing but the Kiss would have repaired the wrong
Abba - In the common acts of respect observed in the East, when servants do reverence to their masters, or superiors, it is always done by Kissing the feet, or the garment. But when children meet their parents, and do reverence, they Kiss the hand, or the head. Persons of equality, or relations, do it by Kissing the hand, head, or shoulder of each other. Let the reader connect this with Jacob Kissing his son, and the church's call unto Christ
Sign - Judas' Kiss clearly designated Jesus as the One the mob was seeking (Matthew 26:48 )
Hand - Matthew 27 ...
To Kiss the hand, imports adoration
Mediator - "Kiss the Son lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little: blessed are all they that put their trust in him
Sarah - Kiss the rod rather. Kiss the rod, and the hand that holds it
Reproach (2) - Was there not a more piercing reproach in His voice when He said to the traitor, ‘Judas, with a Kiss dost thou betray the Son of Man?’ (Luke 22:48); and in His eyes when, as the cock crew, He turned and looked upon Peter (Luke 22:60-61)?...
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Worship - ║ Then followed the benediction; “The Grace of the Lord Jesus be with you all”; the “kiss of peace”; and the congregation dispersed. Having ended the prayers, we salute one another with a Kiss
Brother - "O (said she) that thou wert as my brother that sucked the breasts of my mother! when I should find thee without I would Kiss thee; yea, I should not be despised
Joab - Joab, meeting Amasa at the great stone in Gibeon, pretended to Kiss him in friendship, holding his beard with the right hand, and then stabbed him with the sword in his left hand
Temptation - His repeated references to His coming betrayal (Matthew 17:22; Matthew 20:18; Matthew 26:2), His plain allusion to the presence of the traitor at the Last Supper (Luke 22:21), His giving the sop to Judas (John 13:26), may all be regarded as loving endeavours to strengthen him against temptation; and even when all these efforts had proved vain, what good was still in him was appealed to in the pathetic reproach, ‘Betrayest thou the Son of Man with a Kiss?’ (Luke 22:48)
Arrest - Casting shame to the winds, be gave them a sign: ‘The one whom I shall Kiss is he. ’ Then he advanced and, greeting Jesus with feigned reverence: ‘Hail, Rabbi!’ Kissed Him effusively
Temptation - His repeated references to His coming betrayal (Matthew 17:22; Matthew 20:18; Matthew 26:2), His plain allusion to the presence of the traitor at the Last Supper (Luke 22:21), His giving the sop to Judas (John 13:26), may all be regarded as loving endeavours to strengthen him against temptation; and even when all these efforts had proved vain, what good was still in him was appealed to in the pathetic reproach, ‘Betrayest thou the Son of Man with a Kiss?’ (Luke 22:48)
Anointing (2) - He was a Pharisee of the better sort, yet he shared the pride of his order and put a difference betwixt Jesus and the other guests, withholding from Him the customary courtesies: the Kiss of welcome, the ablution of the feet, the anointing of the head. As He reclined at table, she stole to His couch and, stooping over His feet, rained hot tears upon them, wiped them with her flowing tresses, Kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment
Elisha - Even the Elijah you so often go back upon, were he here again, he would not be exactly the same man, with exactly the same mantle, the hem and the hair of which you were so wont to Kiss
Touch - Though the connexion be not one of verbal identity, such references to a false or hostile touch of Christ suggest themselves as the betraying Kiss of Judas (Mark 14:45), and the smiting in the high priest’s palace (Mark 14:65)
Jerusalem - On Fridays and feast days they assemble in numbers; they Kiss the stones and weep, and pray for the restoration of their city and temple, being, alas, still blind to the only true way of blessing through the Lord Jesus whom they crucified
John the Baptist - " No thanks to John not to be jealous of the Son of God! But had Jesus been simply a carpenter of Nazareth, and John's cousin to boot, turned suddenly such a popular preacher with all men, and with all John's baptized disciples going after him; and had John, in that case, said all this about his own decreasing, then I would down on the spot and Kiss his feet
Elesbaan, a King, Hermit, And Saint of Ethiopia - He received Justinian's letter with every sign of respect, and began to prepare his forces to take part in the Persian war even before Julian was dismissed from his court with the Kiss of peace (Johannis Malalae, Chronographia , xviii
Jesus Christ - But if the Psalm be inquired into more narrowly, and compared with parallel prophecies; if it be duly considered, that not only is the extraordinary person here spoken of called "the Son of God," but that title is so ascribed to him as to imply, that it belongs to him in a manner that is absolutely singular, and peculiar to himself, seeing he is said to be begotten of God, Isaiah 49:7 , and is called, by way of eminence, "the Son," Isaiah 49:12 ; that the danger of provoking him to anger is spoken of in so very different a manner from what the Scripture uses in speaking of the anger of any mere creature, "Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way when his wrath is kindled but a little;" that when the kings and judges of the earth are commanded to serve God with fear, they are at the same time commanded to Kiss the Son, which in those times and places was frequently an expression of adoration; and, particularly, that, whereas other Scriptures contain awful and just threatenings against those who trust in any mere man, the Psalmist nevertheless expressly calls them blessed who trust in the Son here spoken of;—all these things taken together make up a character of unequivocal divinity: and, on the other hand, when it is said, that God would set this his Son as his King on his holy hill of Zion, Isaiah 49:6 , this, and various other expressions in this Psalm, contain characters of that subordination which is appropriate to that divine Person who was to be incarnate, and engage in a work assigned to him by the Father
Meals - Arrived at his host’s residence, the guest is received with a Kiss ( Luke 7:45 ), his feet are washed ( Luke 7:44 ), and his head is anointed with perfumed oil ( Luke 7:38 ; cf
Love - On the other hand, φιλεῖν seems to have as its fundamental root-meaning the intimacy of bodily touch, ‘fondling,’ ‘caressing,’ whence it can signify ‘to Kiss’; it therefore denotes the love of close association in the habitual relations of life-love, between kindred, between husband and wife, between friends (Matthew 6:5; Matthew 10:37; Matthew 23:6, Luke 20:46, John 11:3; John 11:36; John 12:25; John 15:19, 1 Timothy 6:10 [1], 2 Timothy 3:4 [2], Titus 2:4 [3], James 4:4 [4])
Meekness (2) - When He was wounded to the heart by the treachery of Judas, and the betrayal was sealed by a hypocritical Kiss, His answer to the traitor showed how superior He was to the natural resentment of men: ‘Comrade, is it for this that thou art come?’ (Matthew 26:50)
Peter, the Epistles of - conscientiousness, a motive for enduring sufferings; "living hope" (1 Peter 1:3); "an inheritance incorruptible, undefiled, and that fadeth not away" (1 Peter 1:4); "kiss of charity" (1 Peter 5:14)
Jonathan - Nor did David's Son after thou hadst Kissed Him say to thee, Friend, wherefore art thou come? Nor did Hamlet ever say to thee, 'O villain, villain, smiling, damned villain! My tables-meet it is I set it down, that one may smile, and smile, and be a villain. Great Jonathan! Dear Jonathan! We Kiss thy feet
Persecution - Eusebius has recorded that Polycarp, after in vain endeavouring to persuade Anicetus, who was bishop of Rome, to embrace his opinion as to some point with respect to which they differed, gave him, notwithstanding, the Kiss of peace, while Anicetus communicated with the martyr; and Irenaeus mentions that although Polycarp was much offended with the Gnostic heretics, who abounded in his days, he converted numbers of them, not by the application of constraint or violence, but by the facts and arguments which he calmly submitted for their consideration
Aaron - And Aaron Kissed Moses, and Moses told Aaron all that the Lord bad said concerning him, till Aaron answered, and shrank back, and said: Surely it is not so. I would take no rest till I had found them, and then, as God said of Aaron, I would be glad when I saw them, and I would Kiss them, and claim them as my own
Absolution - One night he said, ‘Sister, I think I am dying, and it is so hard; but I think if you Kissed me as if I was a good boy, I could bear it. ’ This boy, conscious of an evil past and struggling to escape from it, felt as if the Kiss of that good woman would give him cheer, and hope of acceptance with God—would be, in fact, an absolution
Religious Experience - Although, when a sinner repented and was forgiven, it was only the joy of God and the angels which the Synoptics thought important enough to mention (Luke 15:7; Luke 15:10), incidentally we learn that the return to God brings a Kiss to the soul and a song to the lips (Luke 15:20; Luke 15:24)
Ordination - The great characteristic of all ordinations for many centuries after the Ascension was their extreme simplicity, no matter to what office a person was ordained; a prayer and laying on of hands were practically all, except that the Kiss of peace, and, in the case of a bishop, enthronization, were added
Joseph - He gave them the Kiss of reconciliation and wept over them
Jerusalem - They take pleasure in her ruins, and would Kiss the very dust for her sake
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - ...
(b ) Certain ceremonies, "empty" (vacuae ) Tertullian calls them, but illustrative of many an interesting point of ritual and practice of the time, are next considered: Washing the hands before prayer; praying with the cloak taken off; sitting after prayer; the Kiss of peace; the "Stations" (c