What does Kenites mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הַקִּינִ֣ים the tribe from which the father-in-law of Moses was a member and which lived in the area between southern Palestine and the mountains of Sinai. 1
מִקַּ֔יִן the tribe from which the father-in-law of Moses was a member and which lived in the area between southern Palestine and the mountains of Sinai. 1

Definitions Related to Kenites

H7017


   1 the tribe from which the father-in-law of Moses was a member and which lived in the area between southern Palestine and the mountains of Sinai.
   Additional Information: Kenite = “smiths”.
   

Frequency of Kenites (original languages)

Frequency of Kenites (English)

Dictionary

Morrish Bible Dictionary - Kenites
There seem to have been several different peoples called by this name, without any apparent link between them. Thus
1. There were some in the land when it was promised to Abraham. Genesis 15:19 .
2. Jethro, or Raguel, Moses' father-in-law, is called a Kenite, Judges 1:16 , and is also called a Midianite. Numbers 10:29 . The Midianites sprung from Midian, the son of Abraham and Keturah, Genesis 25:2 ; so these Kenites were probably a branch of the Midianites. The children of the Kenite, Moses' father-in-law, left Jericho, the city of palm trees, and went into the wilderness of Judah, which was to the south of Arad, and dwelt there. Judges 1:16 Apparently Heber the Kenite travelled north, and was neutral between Israel and their enemies; but Jael his wife smote Sisera in her tent. Judges 4:11,17 ; Judges 5:24 . Others remained in the far south, for when Saul was going to smite the Amalekites he warned the Kenites, for their own safety, to depart from among them, because they had befriended Israel when they came from Egypt. 1 Samuel 15:6 . They were still in the neighbourhood when David feigned to have attacked them. He regarded them as friends, and sent presents to them. 1 Samuel 27:10 ; 1 Samuel 30:29 .
3. There were Kenites whom Balaam saw dwelling in the rocks, and who were to be carried away by Asshur. Numbers 24:21,22 . These may have been a remnant of the Kenites mentioned in Genesis 15:19 .
4. Descendants of Hemath, the father of the house of Rechab. 1 Chronicles 2:55 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Kenites
A Midianite race, for Jethro the Kenite is called priest prince of Midian (Exodus 2:15-16; Exodus 4:19; Judges 1:16; Judges 4:11). The connection with Moses explains their continued alliance with Israel, accompanying them to Jericho "the city of palm trees" (Judges 1:16; compare 2 Chronicles 28:15), thence to the wilderness of Judah, where "they dwelt among the people" (Israel), realizing Moses' promise to Hobab, whose name appears slightly altered as that of a wady opposite Jericho (Numbers 10:32). (See HOBAB.) Hence Saul in a friendly spirit warned them to leave the Amalekites whom he was about to destroy (1 Samuel 15:6), and David sent presents to them, having previously pretended to Achish that he had invaded their southern border (1 Samuel 27:10; 1 Samuel 30:29). (See HEBER; HAZEZON TAMAR; RECHABITES; JEHONADAB.)
E. Wilton (Imperial Dictionary). suggests that Kenites is a religious rather than a gentilic term, meaning "a worshipper of the goddess Kain", one form of Ashtoreth or Astarte. This would account for God's denunciation of the Kenites by Balaam (Numbers 24:21-22 margin). Evidently the Kenites to be dispossessed by Israel (Genesis 15:19) were distinct from the Kenites to whom Hobab and Jethro belonged. The latter were of Midianite origin, sprung from Abraham and Keturah, occupying the region E. of Egypt and W. of Seir and the gulf of Akabah (Genesis 25:2); the former were Canaanites of the city Kain, which was taken by Judah (Joshua 15:57). The Canaanite Kenites Balaam denounces; or else more probably Balaam's prophecy is "Kain (the Midianite Kenites) shall not be exterminated until Asshur shall carry him away into captivity" (Keil).
Thus "strong is thy dwelling place, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock," is figurative. The Kenites did not as Edom dwell in the rocks (Obadiah 1:3-4), but by leaving their nomadic life near Horeb to join Israel wandering in quest of a home the Kenite really placed his rest upon a safe rock, and would only be carried away when Assyria and Babylon took Israel and Judah; with the difference however that Judah should be restored, but the Kenites not so because they forfeited God's blessing by maintaining independence of Israel though intimately joined and by never entering inwardly into God's covenant of grace with Israel.
The connection of Midian and the Kenites appears in the name Kenney still attached to a wady in the midst of the Muzeiny or Midianites. Midian (and the Kenites) and Amalek were associated, as still are the Muzeiny and Aleikat (Amalek). The Muzeiny commit their flocks to women, as Jethro committed his to his daughters. The name Medinah betrays connection with Midian. The power of ingratiating themselves with their neighbours characterized the Kenites (Judges 4:17). Also the love of tent life, hospitality, the use of goat's milk whey, the employment of women in men's work, so that the sexes had free contact and yet the female part of the tent was inviolable (4, 5; Exodus 2:4; Numbers 25).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Kenites
Smiths, the name of a tribe inhabiting the desert lying between southern Palestine and the mountains of Sinai. Jethro was of this tribe (Judges 1:16 ). He is called a "Midianite" (Numbers 10:29 ), and hence it is concluded that the Midianites and the Kenites were the same tribe. They were wandering smiths, "the gipsies and travelling tinkers of the old Oriental world. They formed an important guild in an age when the art of metallurgy was confined to a few" (Sayce's Races, etc.). They showed kindness to Israel in their journey through the wilderness. They accompanied them in their march as far as Jericho (Judges 1:16 ), and then returned to their old haunts among the Amalekites, in the desert to the south of Judah. They sustained afterwards friendly relations with the Israelites when settled in Canaan (Judges 4:11,17-21 ; 1 Samuel 27:10 ; 30:29 ). The Rechabites belonged to this tribe (1 Chronicles 2:55 ) and in the days of (Jeremiah 35:7-10 ) are referred to as following their nomad habits. Saul bade them depart from the Amalekites (1 Samuel 15:6 ) when, in obedience to the divine commission, he was about to "smite Amalek." And his reason is, "for ye showed kindness to all the children of Israel when they came up out of Egypt." Thus "God is not unrighteous to forget the kindnesses shown to his people; but they shall be remembered another day, at the farthest in the great day, and recompensed in the resurrection of the just" (M. Henry's Commentary). They are mentioned for the last time in Scripture in 1 Samuel 27:10 ; comp 30:20.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Kenites
(kehn' itess) Name of a tribe meaning, “smith.” Nomadic tribe, probably of blacksmiths, whose land, along with that of the Kadmonites and Kenizzites God promised to Abraham (Genesis 15:19 ). Their home was the southeastern hill country of Judah. Balaam pronounced doom and captivity for them (Numbers 24:21-22 ). Moses' father-in-law, Jethro, is called a “priest of Midian” (Exodus 3:1 ) and is described as a Kenite (Judges 1:16 ). This association suggests a close relationship between the Kenites and Midianites. Some scholars have suggested that Moses learned about the worship of Yahweh through Kenite influence, but this theory has not been accepted by all scholars.
The Kenites lived among the Amalekites during the time of Saul. The Kenites “showed kindness” to Israel during the time of the Exodus (1 Samuel 15:6 ). The chronicler includes the Kenite, Hemath, the father of the Rechabites, as one of the ancestors of the tribe of Judah (1 Chronicles 2:55 ). No mention is made of the Kenites in the late history of Israel suggesting to many scholars that they disappeared or lost their identity shortly after 1000 B.C.
The word Kenite is probably related to an Aramaic word that means “smith.” Some scholars think the traveling blacksmiths of the Middle Ages resembled the Kenites. This would account for their relations with different peoples. In addition to their nomadic character, the biblical evidence also indicates that the Kenites were never completely absorbed by another people but maintained a separate existence throughout their history. See Moses , Jethro ; Cain ; Amalekites; Midianites.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Kenites
KENITES . A nomadic tribe, closely connected with the Amalekites (wh. see), and probably indeed a branch of them, but having friendly relations with Israel, and ultimately, it seems, at least in the main, absorbed in Judah. Hobab , Moses’ father-in-law ( Judges 1:16 ; Judges 4:11 RVm [1] ), who had been invited by Moses and had doubtless accepted the invitation to he a guide to Israel in the wilderness ( Numbers 10:29-32 ), was a Kenite; and his descendants came up from Jericho with the tribe of Judah into the S. part of their territory (Arad is about 17 miles S. of Hebron), though afterwards, true to their Bedouin instincts, they roamed beyond the border and rejoined their kinsmen, the Amalekites, in the N. of the Sinaitic Peninsula ( Judges 1:16 ; read in this verse, with MSS of LXX [2] , ‘the Amalekite’ for ‘the people’ three letters have dropped out in the Heb.). When Saul, many years later, attacked the Amalekites, he bade the Kenites separate themselves from them, on the ground that they had shown kindness to Israel at the time of the Exodus ( 1 Samuel 15:6 , alluding doubtless to Hobab’s guidance, Numbers 10:29-32 ). In Judges 4:11 Heber the Kenite is mentioned as having separated himself from the main body of the tribe, and wandered northwards as far as the neighbourhood of Kedesh (near the Waters of Merom). From 1 Samuel 27:10 ; 1 Samuel 30:29 we learn that in the time of David there was a district in the S. of Judah inhabited by Kenites; it is possible also that Kinah , in the Negeb of Judah ( Joshua 15:22 ), and Kain in the hill-country ( Joshua 15:57 ), were Kenite settlements. The Rechabites , with whom the nomadic life had become a religious Institution ( Jeremiah 35:1-19 ), were Kenites ( 1 Chronicles 2:55 ). In Genesis 15:19 the Kenites are mentioned among the ten nations whose land was to be taken possession of by Israel; the reference is doubtless to the absorption of the Kenites in Judah. In Numbers 24:21 f. Balaam, with a play on the resemblance of the name to the Heb. kçn , ‘nest,’ declares that though their ‘nest’ is among the rocky crags (namely, in the S. of Judah), they would in the end be carried away captive by the Assyrians (‘ Kain ’ in Numbers 24:22 is the proper name of the tribe of which ‘Kenite’ Is the gentilic adj.; cf. Judges 4:11 RVm [1] . Observe here that the oracle on the Kenites follows closely upon that on the Amalekites).
The word kain means in Heb. a ‘spear’ ( 2 Samuel 21:16 ), and in Arab. [4] an ‘iron-smith’; in Aram, also the word corresponding to ‘Kenite’ denotes a ‘metal-worker’; it has hence been conjectured (Sayce) that the ‘Kenites’ were a nomad tribe of smiths. There is, however, no support for this conjecture beyond the resemblance in the words.
S. R. Driver.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Kenites
Possession; purchase; lamentation
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Kenites
A people that dwelt with the Amalekites: so called from Kanah, a possession. Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, was of this people. (1 Samuel 15:6)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Kenites
people who dwelt westward of the Dead Sea, and extended themselves pretty far into Arabia Petraea: for Jethro, the priest of Midian, and father-in-law to Moses, was a Kenite, Judges 1:16 ; 1 Chronicles 2:55 ; 1 Samuel 15:6 . When Saul was sent to destroy the Amalekites, the Kenites, who had joined them, perhaps by compulsion, were ordered to depart from them, that they might not share in their fate; and the reason assigned was, that they "showed kindness to the children of Israel when they came up out of Egypt," 1 Samuel 15:6 . Which, according to the margin of our Bible, is to be understood of the father-in- law of Moses and his family. From the story of Jethro, who is expressly said to be a Midianite, they appear to have retained the worship of the true God among them; for which, and their kindness to the Israelites when passing their country, they were spared in the general destruction of the nations bordering on Canaan. Of these Kenites were the Rechabites, the Tirathites, the Shimeathites, and the Suchathites, mentioned in 1 Chronicles 2:55 , whose chief office was that of scribes. ( See RECHABITES. ) Balaam, when invited by Balak, king of Moab, to curse Israel, stood upon a mountain, whence he addressed the Kenites, and said, "Strong is thy dwelling place, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock; nevertheless, the Kenite shall be wasted until Asher shall carry thee away captive," Numbers 24:21-22 . The Kenites dwelt in mountains and rocks almost inaccessible. They were conquered and carried into captivity, by Nebuchadnezzar. After Saul the Kenites are not mentioned; but they subsisted, being mingled among the Edomites and other nations of Arabia Petraea.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Kenites
A people who dwelt west of the Dead sea, and extended themselves far into Arabia Petraea. Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, was a Kenite, and his family accompanied the Israelites, and settled with other Kenites in various parts of the Holy Land, Judges 1:16 ; 4:11 ; 1 Samuel 30:29 ; 1 Chronicles 2:55 . Heber and the Rechabites were their descendants. The Kenites of whom we read appear to have known and served Jehovah, and the whole tribe were friendly to the Hebrews. Saul spared them, when sent to destroy the Amalekites among whom they dwelt, Numbers 24:20,21 ; 1 Samuel 15:6 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Kenites
The name Kenites usually refers to that tribal group within the Midianite people to which Moses’ in-laws belonged. This group had apparently mingled with the ancient Kenite people (who were among the early inhabitants of Canaan) and so were referred to as both Kenites and Midianites (Genesis 15:19; Exodus 2:15-21; Judges 1:16; Judges 4:11). The Israelites allowed the Kenite in-laws of Moses, and their descendants, to live among them in Canaan, and at times showed a special concern for them (Judges 1:16; 1 Samuel 15:6; 1 Samuel 30:26-29; 1 Chronicles 2:55; Nehemiah 3:14).

Sentence search

Kenites - This association suggests a close relationship between the Kenites and Midianites. ...
The Kenites lived among the Amalekites during the time of Saul. The Kenites “showed kindness” to Israel during the time of the Exodus (1 Samuel 15:6 ). No mention is made of the Kenites in the late history of Israel suggesting to many scholars that they disappeared or lost their identity shortly after 1000 B. ” Some scholars think the traveling blacksmiths of the Middle Ages resembled the Kenites. In addition to their nomadic character, the biblical evidence also indicates that the Kenites were never completely absorbed by another people but maintained a separate existence throughout their history
Kenites - suggests that Kenites is a religious rather than a gentilic term, meaning "a worshipper of the goddess Kain", one form of Ashtoreth or Astarte. This would account for God's denunciation of the Kenites by Balaam (Numbers 24:21-22 margin). Evidently the Kenites to be dispossessed by Israel (Genesis 15:19) were distinct from the Kenites to whom Hobab and Jethro belonged. The Canaanite Kenites Balaam denounces; or else more probably Balaam's prophecy is "Kain (the Midianite Kenites) shall not be exterminated until Asshur shall carry him away into captivity" (Keil). The Kenites did not as Edom dwell in the rocks (Obadiah 1:3-4), but by leaving their nomadic life near Horeb to join Israel wandering in quest of a home the Kenite really placed his rest upon a safe rock, and would only be carried away when Assyria and Babylon took Israel and Judah; with the difference however that Judah should be restored, but the Kenites not so because they forfeited God's blessing by maintaining independence of Israel though intimately joined and by never entering inwardly into God's covenant of grace with Israel. ...
The connection of Midian and the Kenites appears in the name Kenney still attached to a wady in the midst of the Muzeiny or Midianites. Midian (and the Kenites) and Amalek were associated, as still are the Muzeiny and Aleikat (Amalek). The power of ingratiating themselves with their neighbours characterized the Kenites (Judges 4:17)
Kinah - Kenites
Sucathite - (ssyoo' ch thite) A people who claimed ancestry from the Kenites and the Rechabites (1 Chronicles 2:55 )
Kain - Adam and Eve's son Cain is spelled the same in Hebrew, and many scholars regard Cain as the ancestors of the Kenites. Kain was a settlement of the Kenites
Kenites - When Saul was sent to destroy the Amalekites, the Kenites, who had joined them, perhaps by compulsion, were ordered to depart from them, that they might not share in their fate; and the reason assigned was, that they "showed kindness to the children of Israel when they came up out of Egypt," 1 Samuel 15:6 . Of these Kenites were the Rechabites, the Tirathites, the Shimeathites, and the Suchathites, mentioned in 1 Chronicles 2:55 , whose chief office was that of scribes. ) Balaam, when invited by Balak, king of Moab, to curse Israel, stood upon a mountain, whence he addressed the Kenites, and said, "Strong is thy dwelling place, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock; nevertheless, the Kenite shall be wasted until Asher shall carry thee away captive," Numbers 24:21-22 . The Kenites dwelt in mountains and rocks almost inaccessible. After Saul the Kenites are not mentioned; but they subsisted, being mingled among the Edomites and other nations of Arabia Petraea
he'Math - (heat ), a person or place named in the genealogical lists of Judah, as the origin of the Kenites, and the "father" of the house of Rechab
Kenites - Kenites . When Saul, many years later, attacked the Amalekites, he bade the Kenites separate themselves from them, on the ground that they had shown kindness to Israel at the time of the Exodus ( 1 Samuel 15:6 , alluding doubtless to Hobab’s guidance, Numbers 10:29-32 ). of Judah inhabited by Kenites; it is possible also that Kinah , in the Negeb of Judah ( Joshua 15:22 ), and Kain in the hill-country ( Joshua 15:57 ), were Kenite settlements. The Rechabites , with whom the nomadic life had become a religious Institution ( Jeremiah 35:1-19 ), were Kenites ( 1 Chronicles 2:55 ). In Genesis 15:19 the Kenites are mentioned among the ten nations whose land was to be taken possession of by Israel; the reference is doubtless to the absorption of the Kenites in Judah. Observe here that the oracle on the Kenites follows closely upon that on the Amalekites). ]'>[4] an ‘iron-smith’; in Aram, also the word corresponding to ‘Kenite’ denotes a ‘metal-worker’; it has hence been conjectured (Sayce) that the ‘Kenites’ were a nomad tribe of smiths
Kenites - Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, was a Kenite, and his family accompanied the Israelites, and settled with other Kenites in various parts of the Holy Land, Judges 1:16 ; 4:11 ; 1 Samuel 30:29 ; 1 Chronicles 2:55 . The Kenites of whom we read appear to have known and served Jehovah, and the whole tribe were friendly to the Hebrews
Kenites - The name Kenites usually refers to that tribal group within the Midianite people to which Moses’ in-laws belonged. This group had apparently mingled with the ancient Kenite people (who were among the early inhabitants of Canaan) and so were referred to as both Kenites and Midianites (Genesis 15:19; Exodus 2:15-21; Judges 1:16; Judges 4:11)
Kinah - Perhaps a settlement of the Kenites
Rechabites - They belonged to the Kenites, who accompanied the children of Israel into Palestine, and dwelt among them. Saul also showed kindness to the Kenites (1 Samuel 15:6 ). The main body of the Kenites dwelt in cities, and adopted settled habits of life (30:29); but Jehonadab forbade his descendants to drink wine or to live in cities
Kenites - The Midianites sprung from Midian, the son of Abraham and Keturah, Genesis 25:2 ; so these Kenites were probably a branch of the Midianites. Others remained in the far south, for when Saul was going to smite the Amalekites he warned the Kenites, for their own safety, to depart from among them, because they had befriended Israel when they came from Egypt. There were Kenites whom Balaam saw dwelling in the rocks, and who were to be carried away by Asshur. These may have been a remnant of the Kenites mentioned in Genesis 15:19
Kenite - The Kenites were friendly with the Canaanites, Amalekites, and Israelites. A family of Kenites came of Hemath, father of the house of Rechab
Kenizzite - The Kenizzites were probably related to the Kenites from whom they would have learned the craft of metal-working (1 Chronicles 4:13-14 ). See Kenaz ; Kenites
Arad - In its vicinity the Kenites settled ( Judges 1:16 )
ja'Bez -
Apparently a place at which the families of the scribes resided who belonged to the families of the Kenites
Tubal-Cain - The name seems to be made up of Tubal (or the Tibareni, noted for production of bronze articles ( Ezekiel 27:13 )) and Cain (‘smith’), as the ancestor of the Kenites or ‘Smiths
City of Palm Trees - Probably to be identified with a site near Jericho where the Kenites lived (Judges 1:16 ; see Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 3:13 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 )
Kain - A clan name = the Kenites (wh
Rechabites - The Rechabites, though they dwelt among the Israelites, did not belong to any of their tribes; for they were Kenites, as appears from 1 Chronicles 2:55 , where the Kenites are said to have come of "Hemath, the father of the house of Rechab. " These Kenites, afterward styled Rechabites, were of the family of Jethro, otherwise called Hobab, whose daughter Moses married; for "the children of the Kenite, Moses's father-in-law," it is said, "went up out of the city of palm trees with the children of Judah, and dwelt among the people," Judges 1:16 ; and we read of "Heber the Kenite, who was of the children of Hobab, the father-in- law of Moses, who had severed himself from the Kenites," or from the bulk of them who settled in the tribe of Judah, "and pitched his tent in the plain of Zaanaim," Judges 4:11
Jabez (2) - A town where the scribes belonging to the families of the Kenites resided (1 Chronicles 2:55; a school said by the Targum to have been founded by Othniel, called also Jabez; Rechab is made Rechabiah son of Eliezer, Moses' son): the Tirathites, Shimeathites, and Sucathites; they came of Hemath, the father of the house of Rechab
Hazezon Tamar - ) Perhaps this was "the city of palm trees" (Judges 1:16) (though Jericho is generally called so: Deuteronomy 34:3), from which the Kenites, the tribe of Moses' father-in-law, went into the wilderness of Judah with the children of Judah
Heber - He separated himself ( Judges 4:11 ) from his Bedouin caste of Kenites or nomad smiths, whose wanderings were confined chiefly to the south of Judah, and settled for a time near Kedesh on the plain to the west of the Sea of Galilee
Heber (2) - The Kenites migrated with the children of Judah into the wilderness of Judah at the time of the conquest of Canaan (Judges 1:16)
Jehonadab - Son of Rechab, of the clan of the Kenites ( 1 Chronicles 2:55 ), and formulator of the rules imposed upon descendants, the Rechabites ( Jeremiah 35:1-19 ; see Rechabites)
Hammath - Original ancestor of Kenites and Rechabites ( 1 Chronicles 2:55 ; KJV reads, “Hamath”; TEV, REB see a verbal construction meaning, “intermarried” or “connected by marriage
Midian, Mtdianites - A nomadic tribe or group of tribes, said by an early genealogy ( Genesis 25:2 ) to be descended from Abraham by Keturah, of which the Kenites (wh. As Jethro is also said to be a Kenite ( Judges 1:16 ), probably the Kenites were a part of the Midianites. If this is so, it was a different branch of Midianites from the Kenites
Midian - One clan, the Kenites, dwelt near Mount Sinai, and to it Moses fled from Pharaoh (Exodus 2:15)
South - Besides the application of "the Negeb" to the whole district there are ethnological and geographical subdivisions; the Negeb of the Cherethites, the Negeb of the Kenites, the Negeb of Judah the Negeb of Arad, the Negeb of Jerahmeel. Tel Arad marks the Negeb of the Kenites reaching to the S
Canaanites, the - In Genesis 15:18-21 , where the land promised to Abram extends to the river Euphrates, there are ten nations mentioned: the Kenites, the Kenizzites, the Kadmonites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Rephaims, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites
Ken'Ite, the, - The important services rendered by the sheikh of the Kenites to Moses during a time of great pressure and difficulty were rewarded by the latter with a promise of firm friendship between the two peoples
Jerahmeel - The Kenites occupied the wilderness of Judah S
Jehonadab - the Kenites that came of Hemath, the father of the house of Rechab" ("the rider". ) Rechab, father of Jehonadab, belonged to the Kenites connected with Israel through Moses' marriage; these (Heber and Jael) with Israel entered Canaan, and shared their inheritance, though remaining nomads in tents, some in the far N
Amalek, Amalekites - ...
On their close kindred, the Kenites, see Kenites
Arad - Subsequently the Kenites settled in Arad near the tribe of Judah (Judges 1:16-17 )
Kenites - He is called a "Midianite" (Numbers 10:29 ), and hence it is concluded that the Midianites and the Kenites were the same tribe
Midian, Midianites - See Amalekites; Baal-peor ; Gideon ; Ishmaelites; Jethro ; Kenites
Hobab - On his nationality, and the events connected with him, see Kenites, Midian, Jethro
Gezer - and the Kenites," it cannot be meant in 1 Samuel 27:8
Jael - The Kenites were on friendly terms both with the Israelites ( Judges 1:16 ) and with the Canaanites, to whom Jabin and his general, Sisera, belonged
Cain - ) ...
...
A town of the Kenites, a branch of the Midianites ( Joshua 15:57 ), on the east edge of the mountain above Engedi; probably the "nest in a rock" mentioned by Balaam (Numbers 24:21 )
re'Chab - In (1 Chronicles 2:55 ) the house of Rechab is identified with a section of the Kenites, a Midianitish tribe who came into Canaan with the Israelites, and retained their nomadic habits
Proselyte - The Kenites, the Gibeonites, the Cherethites, and the Pelethites were thus admitted to the privileges of Israelites
Rock - The Kenites dwelt in the hollow places of the rocks, Numbers 24:21
Rechab, Rechabites - A genuine tradition is probably embodied in the Chronicler’s statement ( 1 Chronicles 2:55 ), that the clan of the Rechabites was connected with the Kenites , and this would square admirably with the view that the Jahweh-religion was communicated to Israel by Kenite influence
Negeb, - At this time the Negeb is described as of several parts, the Negeb of Judah, of the Jerahmeelites, and of the Kenites ( 1 Samuel 27:10 ); while in 1 Samuel 30:14 we read of the Negeb of the Cherethites and of Caleb
Cain - It is further conjectured, owing to the formation of the two names from the same root, that ‘Cain’ stands for the Kenites (cf
Judah - Kenites, commonly supposed to be of Midianite origin, we are told in Judges 1:16 , also went up from Jericho with Judah into the Wilderness
Deborah - Enthusiasm for the cause of Israel, so closely allied with the Kenites through Moses' father-in-law Hobab, caused her to commit the treacherous murder
Proselytes - But he could not hold land nor intermarry with Aaron's descendants (Leviticus 19:10; Leviticus 21:14), he is presumed to be in a subject condition (Deuteronomy 29:11); Hobab and the Kenites (Numbers 10:29-32; Judges 1:16), Rahab of Jericho (Joshua 6:25), and the Gibeonites as "hewers of wood and drawers of water" (Joshua 9), are instances of strangers joined to Israel
Eagle - When Balaam delivered his predictions respecting the fate that awaited the nations which he then particularized, he said of the Kenites, "Strong is thy dwelling, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock," Numbers 24:21 ; alluding to that princely bird, the eagle, which not only delights in soaring to the loftiest heights, but chooses the highest rocks, and most elevated mountains, as desirable situations for erecting its nest, Habakkuk 2:9 ; Obadiah 1:4
Mines And Mining - Kenites and Midianites occupied Timna, but no remains from between 1000,900 have been identified
Balaam - ...
Balaam foretold also (See AMALEK'S utter ruin; the Kenites' being carried captive by Assyria; and Assyria in its turn being afflicted by the Greeks and Romans from Chittim (Cyprus, put for all western lands whence the approach to Palestine was by sea); and these, the last destroying power, in turn, "shall perish for ever" before Messiah's kingdom
Jews, Judaism - Smaller tribal groups and clans within the tribal boundaries were in time absorbed into Judah—Kenites (Judges 1:16 ), Kenazzites (1:11-15), Simeonites (1:17), Jerahmeelites, and Othnielites
Pentateuch - The historical facts of the Pentateuch are alluded to: Jacob's descent to Egypt, Israel's deliverance by Moses and Aaron (1 Samuel 12:8); the Egyptian plagues (1 Samuel 4:8; 1 Samuel 8:8); the Kenites' kindness (1 Samuel 15:6)
Judges, the Book of - So Judges 1:16 accounts for Saul's and David's subsequent kindness to the Kenites (1 Samuel 15:6; 1 Samuel 30:29)
Canaan - ...
God's promise to Abraham was, "Unto thy seed have I given this land from the river of Egypt unto the great river the river Euphrates, the Kenites, the Kenezites, the Kadmonites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Rephaims, the Amorites, the Canaanites, the Girgashites, and the Jebusites" (Genesis 15:18-21)