What does Justice mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
מִשְׁפָּֽט judgment 15
מִשְׁפָּ֑ט judgment 14
מִשְׁפָּ֖ט judgment 7
מִשְׁפָּ֔ט judgment 5
וּמִשְׁפָּ֑ט judgment 4
κρίσιν a separating 4
מִשְׁפָּט֙ judgment 4
מִשְׁפָּ֥ט judgment 3
מִשְׁפַּט־ judgment 2
וּמִשְׁפָּ֥ט judgment 2
؟ הַמִּשְׁפָּֽט judgment 2
מִשְׁפָּטִֽי judgment 2
צֶ֥דֶק justice 2
צֶ֔דֶק justice 2
מִשְׁפָּ֗ט judgment 2
וּצְדָקָ֖ה justice 2
מִשְׁפַּ֥ט judgment 2
צֶֽדֶק justice 1
וּבִצְדָקָ֑ה justice 1
לִשְׁפֹּ֥ט to judge 1
וּ֝מִשְׁפָּטֶ֗ךָ judgment 1
בְמִשְׁפָּֽט judgment 1
צְ֝דָקָ֗ה justice 1
וּ֭מִשְׁפָּט judgment 1
וּ֝מִשְׁפָּ֗ט judgment 1
מִשְׁפָּ֪ט judgment 1
מִשְׁפַּ֤ט judgment 1
וּמִשְׁפַּ֣ט judgment 1
מִשְׁפָּט֨וֹ judgment 1
מִשְׁפָּט֖וֹ judgment 1
؟ צֶֽדֶק justice 1
הִטּֽוּ to stretch out 1
לְהַטֹּֽת to stretch out 1
! וְהִצְדַּקְתִּֽיו to be just 1
הַצְדִּֽיקוּ to be just 1
וְצִדְקַ֥ת justice 1
צִדְקַ֤ת justice 1
מִשְׁפָּ֨ט ׀ judgment 1
בְצֶ֔דֶק justice 1
צֶ֖דֶק justice 1
בַּמִּשְׁפָּ֑ט judgment 1
δικαιοσύνην in a broad sense: state of him who is as he ought to be 1
מִ֝שְׁפַּ֗ט judgment 1
לְמִשְׁפָּט֙ judgment 1
κρίσις a separating 1
וָדִֽין judgment. 1
מִדִּין֙ judgment. 1
דִּ֥ין judgment. 1
דִּ֣ין judgment. 1
דִּ֑ין judgment. 1
מִשְׁפַּ֖ט judgment 1
מִשְׁפָּ֤ט judgment 1
וּמִשְׁפָּט֙ judgment 1
וּבְמִשְׁפָּ֔ט judgment 1
בְּמִשְׁפָּ֣ט judgment 1
לְמִשְׁפָּ֥ט judgment 1
וּמִשְׁפָּטִ֔י judgment 1
וּ֝מִשְׁפָּטִ֗ים judgment 1
לַמִּשְׁפָּט֙ judgment 1
בְּמִשְׁפָּ֑ט judgment 1
לַמִּשְׁפָּ֔ט judgment 1
מִשְׁפָּטִ֑י judgment 1
מִשְׁפָּ֣ט judgment 1
וּמִשְׁפַּ֖ט judgment 1
וּמִשְׁפָּ֣ט judgment 1
לְ֝מִשְׁפָּ֗ט judgment 1
δίκη custom 1
וּמִשְׁפָּ֖ט judgment 1
מִשְׁפָּטִ֔י judgment 1
בְּ֭מִשְׁפָּט judgment 1
יִשְׁפֹּ֤ט ׀ to judge 1

Definitions Related to Justice

H4941


   1 judgment, Justice, ordinance.
      1a judgment.
         1a1 act of deciding a case.
         1a2 place, court, seat of judgment.
         1a3 process, procedure, litigation (before judges).
         1a4 case, cause (presented for judgment).
         1a5 sentence, decision (of judgment).
         1a6 execution (of judgment).
         1a7 time (of judgment).
      1b Justice, right, rectitude (attributes of God or man).
      1c ordinance.
      1d decision (in law).
      1e right, privilege, due (legal).
      1f proper, fitting, measure, fitness, custom, manner, plan.
      

G2920


   1 a separating, sundering, separation.
      1a a trial, contest.
   2 selection.
   3 judgment.
      3a opinion or decision given concerning anything.
         3a1 esp.
         concerning Justice and injustice, right or wrong.
      3b sentence of condemnation, damnatory judgment, condemnation and punishment.
   4 the college of judges (a tribunal of seven men in the several cities of Palestine; as distinguished from the Sanhedrin, which had its seat at Jerusalem).
   5 right, Justice.
   

H6664


   1 Justice, rightness, righteousness.
      1a what is right or just or normal, rightness, justness (of weights and measures).
      1b righteousness (in government).
         1b1 of judges, rulers, kings.
         1b2 of law.
         1b3 of Davidic king, Messiah.
         1b4 of Jerusalem as seat of just government.
         1b5 of God’s attribute.
      1c righteousness, Justice (in case or cause).
      1d rightness (in speech).
      1e righteousness (as ethically right).
      1f righteousness (as vindicated), justification (in controversy), deliverance, victory, prosperity.
         1f1 of God as covenant-keeping in redemption.
         1f2 in name of Messianic king.
         1f3 of people enjoying salvation.
         1f4 of Cyrus.
         

H6666


   1 Justice, righteousness.
      1a righteousness (in government).
         1a1 of judge, ruler, king.
         1a2 of law.
         1a3 of Davidic king Messiah.
      1b righteousness (of God’s attribute).
      1c righteousness (in a case or cause).
      1d righteousness, truthfulness.
      1e righteousness (as ethically right).
      1f righteousness (as vindicated), justification, salvation.
         1f1 of God.
         1f2 prosperity (of people).
      1g righteous acts.
      

H5186


   1 to stretch out, extend, spread out, pitch, turn, pervert, incline, bend, bow.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to stretch out, extend, stretch, offer.
         1a2 to spread out, pitch (tent).
         1a3 to bend, turn, incline.
            1a3a to turn aside, incline, decline, bend down.
            1a3b to bend, bow.
            1a3c to hold out, extend (fig.
            ).
      1b (Niphal) to be stretched out.
      1c (Hiphil).
         1c1 to stretch out.
         1c2 to spread out.
         1c3 to turn, incline, influence, bend down, hold out, extend, thrust aside, thrust away.
         

H1780


   1 judgment.
   

H1779


   1 judgment.
      1a judgment.
      1b cause, plea.
      1c condemnation, judgment.
      1d dispute, legal suit, strife.
      1e government.
      

H8199


   1 to judge, govern, vindicate, punish.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to act as law-giver or judge or governor (of God, man).
            1a1a to rule, govern, judge.
         1a2 to decide controversy (of God, man).
         1a3 to execute judgment.
            1a3a discriminating (of man).
            1a3b vindicating.
            1a3c condemning and punishing.
            1a3d at theophanic advent for final judgment.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to enter into controversy, plead, have controversy together.
         1b2 to be judged.
      1c (Poel) judge, opponent-at-law (participle).
      

H6663


   1 to be just, be righteous.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to have a just cause, be in the right.
         1a2 to be justified.
         1a3 to be just (of God).
         1a4 to be just, be righteous (in conduct and character).
      1b (Niphal) to be put or made right, be justified.
      1c (Piel) justify, make to appear righteous, make someone righteous.
      1d (Hiphil).
         1d1 to do or bring Justice (in administering law).
         1d2 to declare righteous, justify.
         1d3 to justify, vindicate the cause of, save.
         1d4 to make righteous, turn to righteousness.
      1e (Hithpael) to justify oneself.
      

G1349


   1 custom, usage.
   2 right, just.
   3 a suit at law.
   4 a judicial hearing, judicial decision, esp.
   sentence of condemnation.
   5 execution of a sentence, punishment.
      5a to suffer punishment.
   6 the goddess Justice, avenging Justice.
   

G1343


   1 in a broad sense: state of him who is as he ought to be, righteousness, the condition acceptable to God.
      1a the doctrine concerning the way in which man may attain a state approved of God.
      1b integrity, virtue, purity of life, rightness, correctness of thinking feeling, and acting.
   2 in a narrower sense, Justice or the virtue which gives each his due.
   

Frequency of Justice (original languages)

Frequency of Justice (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Justice
Among men, it is ordinarily understood as a virtue by which we give to every one what is his due, what we owe him. God does not owe, nor can He owe anything to anyone. Whatever there is outside of God is the creature of God, and the Creator cannot owe anything to His creature. The justice of God is in this, that He loves good and hates evil, and hence He rewards the good and punishes the evil. He does so necessarily, because both His love and His hatred are necessarily operative not merely in affection.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Justice, Original
The aggregate of all those organically correlated prerogatives which constituted the state of our first parents in Paradise. This primitive state before the Fall included the gift of sanctifying grace, exemption from concupiscence, bodily immortality, habitual infused science, and the non-necessity of suffering. The first named gift is strictly supernatural; the others, less strictly supernatural, and more commonly called preternatural gifts, were allied with this to form the rich endowment which Adam was to transmit to all his descendants.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Original Justice
The aggregate of all those organically correlated prerogatives which constituted the state of our first parents in Paradise. This primitive state before the Fall included the gift of sanctifying grace, exemption from concupiscence, bodily immortality, habitual infused science, and the non-necessity of suffering. The first named gift is strictly supernatural; the others, less strictly supernatural, and more commonly called preternatural gifts, were allied with this to form the rich endowment which Adam was to transmit to all his descendants.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mirror of Justice
Title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Litany of Loretto, symbolizing the reflection of God's justice in her unspotted soul.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Justice, Mirror of
Title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Litany of Loretto, symbolizing the reflection of God's justice in her unspotted soul.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Justice of God
That perfection of his nature whereby he is infinitely righteous in himself and in all he does, the righteousness of the divine nature exercised in his moral government. At first God imposes righteous laws on his creatures and executes them righteously. Justice is not an optional product of his will, but an unchangeable principle of his very nature. His legislative justice is his requiring of his rational creatures conformity in all respects to the moral law. His rectoral or distributive justice is his dealing with his accountable creatures according to the requirements of the law in rewarding or punishing them (Psalm 89:14 ). In remunerative justice he distributes rewards (James 1:12 ; 2 Timothy 4:8 ); in vindictive or punitive justice he inflicts punishment on account of transgression (2 Thessalonians 1:6 ). He cannot, as being infinitely righteous, do otherwise than regard and hate sin as intrinsically hateful and deserving of punishment. "He cannot deny himself" (2 Timothy 2:13 ). His essential and eternal righteousness immutably determines him to visit every sin as such with merited punishment.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Justice
The order God seeks to reestablish in His creation where all people receive the benefits of life with Him. As love is for the New Testament, so justice is the central ethical idea of the Old Testament. The frequency of justice is sometimes missed by the reader due to a failure to realize that the wide range of the Hebrew word mishpat , particularly in passages that deal with the material and social necessities of life. Nature of justice Justice has two major aspects. First, it is the standard by which penalties are assigned for breaking the obligations of the society. Second, justice is the standard by which the advantages of social life are handed out, including material goods, rights of participation, opportunities, and liberties. It is the standard for both punishment and benefits and thus can be spoken of as a plumb line. “I shall use justice as a plumb-line, and righteousness as a plummet” (Isaiah 28:17 , REB).
Often people think of justice in the Bible only in the first sense as God's wrath on evil. This aspect of justice indeed is present, such as the judgment mentioned in John 3:19 . Often more vivid words like “wrath” are used to describe punitive justice (Romans 1:18 ).
Justice in the Bible very frequently also deals with benefits. Cultures differ widely in determining the basis by which the benefits are to be justly distributed. For some it is by birth and nobility. For others the basis is might or ability or merit. Or it might simply be whatever is the law or whatever has been established by contracts. The Bible takes another possibility. Benefits are distributed according to need. Justice then is very close to love and grace. God “executes justice for the orphan and the widow, and loves the strangers, providing them food and clothing” (Deuteronomy 10:18 , NRSV; compare Psalm 113:7-96 ; Isaiah 30:18 ).
Various needy groups are the recipients of justice. These groups include widows, orphans, resident aliens (also called “sojourners” or “strangers”), wage earners, the poor, and prisoners, slaves, and the sick (Job 29:12-17 ; Psalm 146:7-9 ; Malachi 3:5 ). Each of these groups has specific needs which keep its members from being able to participate in aspects of the life of their community. Even life itself might be threatened. Justice involves meeting those needs. The forces which deprive people of what is basic for community life are condemned as oppression (Micah 2:2 ; Ecclesiastes 4:1 ). To oppress is to use power for one's own advantage in depriving others of their basic rights in the community (see Mark 12:40 ). To do justice is to correct that abuse and to meet those needs (Isaiah 1:17 ). Injustice is depriving others of their basic needs or failing to correct matters when those rights are not met (Isaiah 62:1-24 ; Job 29:12-17 ). Injustice is either a sin of commission or of omission.
The content of justice, the benefits which are to be distributed as basic rights in the community, can be identified by observing what is at stake in the passages in which “justice,” “righteousness,” and “judgment” occur. The needs which are met include land (Ezekiel 45:6-9 ; compare Micah 2:2 ; Micah 4:4 ) and the means to produce from the land, such as draft animals and millstones (Deuteronomy 22:1-4 ; Romans 13:1-247 ). These productive concerns are basic to securing other essential needs and thus avoiding dependency; thus the millstone is called the “life” of the person (Deuteronomy 24:6 ). Other needs are those essential for mere physical existence and well being: food (Deuteronomy 10:18 ; Psalm 146:7 ), clothing (Deuteronomy 24:13 ), and shelter (Psalm 68:6 ; Job 8:6 ). Job 22:5-9 ,Job 22:5-9,22:23 ; Job 24:1-12 decries the injustice of depriving people of each one of these needs, which are material and economic. The equal protection of each person in civil and judicial procedures is represented in the demand for due process ( Deuteronomy 16:18-20 ). Freedom from bondage is comparable to not being “in hunger and thirst, in nakedness and lack of everything” (Deuteronomy 28:48 NRSV).
Justice presupposes God's intention for people to be in community. When people had become poor and weak with respect to the rest of the community, they were to be strengthened so that they could continue to be effective members of the community—living with them and beside them (Leviticus 25:35-36 ). Thus biblical justice restores people to community. By justice those who lacked the power and resources to participate in significant aspects of the community were to be strengthened so that they could. This concern in Leviticus 25:1 is illustrated by the provision of the year of Jubilee, in which at the end of the fifty year period land is restored to those who had lost it through sale or foreclosure of debts ( Leviticus 25:28 ). Thus they regained economic power and were brought back into the economic community. Similarly, interest on loans was prohibited (Leviticus 25:36 ) as a process which pulled people down, endangering their position in the community.
These legal provisions express a further characteristic of justice. Justice delivers; it does not merely relieve the immediate needs of those in dire straits (Psalm 76:9 ; Isaiah 45:8 ; Isaiah 58:11 ; 1618839439_7 ). Helping the needy means setting them back on their feet, giving a home, leading to prosperity, restoration, ending the oppression (Psalm 68:5-10 ; Psalm 10:15-16 ; compare 107; 1618839439_86 ). Such thorough justice can be socially disruptive. In the Jubilee year as some receive back lands, others lose recently-acquired additional land. The advantage to some is a disadvantage to others. In some cases the two aspects of justice come together. In the act of restoration, those who were victims of justice receive benefits while their exploiters are punished (1 Samuel 2:7-10 ; compare Luke 1:51-53 ; Luke 6:20-26 ).
The source of justice As the sovereign Creator of the universe, God is just (Psalm 99:1-4 ; Genesis 18:25 ; Deuteronomy 32:4 ; Jeremiah 9:24 ), particularly as the defender of all the oppressed of the earth (Psalm 76:9 ; Psalm 103:6 ; Jeremiah 49:11 ). Justice thus is universal (Psalm 9:7-9 ) and applies to each covenant or dispensation. Jesus affirmed for His day the centrality of the Old Testament demand for justice (Matthew 23:23 ). Justice is the work of the New Testament people of God (James 1:27 ).
God's justice is not a distant external standard. It is the source of all human justice (Proverbs 29:26 ; 2Chronicles 19:6,2 Chronicles 19:9 ). Justice is grace received and grace shared (2 Corinthians 9:8-10 ).
The most prominent human agent of justice is the ruler. The king receives God's justice and is a channel for it (Psalm 72:1 ; compare 1618839439_8 ,Romans 13:1-2,13:4 ). There is not a distinction between a personal, voluntary justice and a legal, public justice. The same caring for the needy groups of the society is demanded of the ruler (Psalm 72:4 ; Ezekiel 34:4 ; Jeremiah 22:15-16 ). Such justice was also required of pagan rulers (Daniel 4:27 ; Proverbs 31:8-9 ).
Justice is also a central demand on all people who bear the name of God. Its claim is so basic that without it other central demands and provisions of God are not acceptable to God. Justice is required to be present with the sacrificial system (Amos 5:21-24 ; Micah 6:6-8 ; Isaiah 1:11-17 ; Matthew 5:23-24 ), fasting (Isaiah 58:1-10 ), tithing (Matthew 23:23 ), obedience to the other commandments (Matthew 19:16-21 ), or the presence of the Temple of God (Jeremiah 7:1-7 ).
Justice in salvation Apart from describing God's condemnation of sin, Paul used the language and meaning of justice to speak of personal salvation. “The righteousness of God” represents God in grace bringing into the community of God through faith in Christ those who had been outside of the people of God (particularly in Romans but compare also Ephesians 2:12-13 ). See Law; Government ; Poverty ; Righteousness ; Welfare.
Stephen Charles Mott
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Justice
JUSTICE (I.). Justice, as an attribute of God, is referred to in AV [1] in Job 37:23 , Psalms 89:14 (RV [2] ‘righteousness’), and Jeremiah 50:7 . In all cases the Heb. is tsedeq or tsedâqâh , the word generally represented by ‘righteousness’ (see art.). The Divine justice is that side of the Divine righteousness which exhibits it as absolute fairness. In one passage this justice, in operation, is represented by mishpât ( Job 36:17 ). The thought of the Divine justice is sometimes expressed by the latter word, tr. [3] in EV [2] ‘ judgment ’: Deuteronomy 32:4 , Psalms 89:14 ; Psalms 97:2 , Isaiah 30:18 . It is implied in Abraham’s question ( Genesis 18:25 ): ‘Shall not the judge of all the earth do right,’ rather ‘do justice?’ (Heb. mishpât ). In Daniel 4:37 ‘His ways are judgment,’ the original is dîn . In Acts 28:4 RV [2] has ‘Justice’ instead of ‘vengeance.’ As the capital J [6] is intended to indicate, the writer must have had in his mind the goddeas of justice of Greek poetry, Dikç , the virgin daughter of Zeus, who sat by his side. But the people of Malta were largely Semites, not Hellenes. What was their equivalent? A positive answer cannot be given, but it may be noted that Babylonian mythology represented ‘justice and rectitude’ as the children of Shamash the sun-god, ‘the judge of heaven and earth,’ and that the Phœnicians had in their pantheon a Divine being named tsedeq .
W. Taylor Smith.
JUSTICE (II.).
1. The administration of justice in early Israel . ( a ) The earliest form of the administration of justice was that exercised by the head of the family. He was not only the final authority to whom the members of a family appealed when questions of right and wrong had to be decided, and to whose sentence they had to submit, but he also had the power of pronouncing even the death penalty (see Genesis 38:24 ). On the other hand, the rights of each member of the family were jealously safeguarded by all the rest; if harm or injury of any kind were sustained by any member, all the members were bound to avenge him; in the case of death the law of blood-revenge laid upon all the duty of taking vengeance by slaying a member of the murderer’s family, preferably, but not necessarily, the murderer himself.
( b ) The next stage was that in which justice was administered by the ‘elders’ of a clan or tribe (see Numbers 11:16 ). A number of families, united by ties of kinship, became, by the formation of a clan, a unity as closely connected as the family itself. In this stage of the organization of society the procedure in deciding questions of right and wrong was doubtless much the same as that which obtains even up to the present day among the Bedouin Arabs. When a quarrel arises between two members of the tribe, the matter is brought before the acknowledged head, the sheik. He seeks to make peace between them; having beard both sides, he declares who is right and who is wrong, and settles the form of satisfaction which the latter should make; but his judgment has no binding force, no power other than that of moral suasion; influence is brought to bear by the members of the famity of the one declared to be in the wrong, urging him to submit, the earlier régime thus coming into play, in a modified way; but if he is not to be prevailed upon, the issue is decided by the sword. In Exodus 18:13-27 we have what purports to be the original institution of the administration of justice by the elders of clans, Moses himself acting in the capacity of a kind of court of appeal ( Exodus 18:26 ); it is, of course, quite possible that, so far as Israel was concerned, this account is historically true, but the institution must have been much older than the time of Moses, and in following Jethro’s guidance, Moses was probably only re-instituting a régime which had long existed among his nomad forefathers. It is a more developed form of tribal justice that we read of in Deuteronomy 21:18-21 ; here the father of a rebellious son, finding his authority set at nought, appeals to the ‘elders of the city’; in the case of being found guilty the death-sentence is pronounced against the son, and the sentence is carried out by representatives of the community. The passage is an important one, for it evidently contains echoes of very early usage, the mention of the mother may imply a distant reminiscence of the matriarchate; and the fact that the head of the family exercises his power recalls the earlier régime already referred to, while the present institution of the administration of justice by elders is also borne witness to. See, further, Judges.
Another point of importance which must be briefly alluded to is the ‘ judgment of God. ’ In the case of questions arising in which the difficulty of finding a solution appeared insuperable, recourse was had to the judgment of God (see Exodus 22:8-9 ); the ‘judges’ referred to here (RV [2] has ‘God’ in the text, but ‘judges’ in the mg.) were those who were qualified to seek a decision from God. See, in this connexion, Deuteronomy 21:1-9 .
( c ) In the monarchical period a further development takes place; the older system, whereby justice was administered by the elders of the cities, is indeed still seen to be in vogue (cf. 1 Kings 21:8-13 ); but two other powers had now arisen, and both tended to diminish the power and moral influence of the elders of the cities, so far as their judicial functions were concerned.
(i) The king . It is probable that at first he decided appeals only, but in course of time all important matters so far as this was possible were apparently brought before him (see 1 Samuel 8:20 , 2Sa 14:4 ff; 2 Samuel 15:2-6 , 1 Kings 3:9 , 2 Kings 15:5 ); according to 1 Kings 7:7 , Solomon had a covered place constructed, which was called the ‘ porch of judgment ,’ and which was in close proximity to his own palace. But though the king was supreme judge in the land, it would obviously soon have become impossible for him to attend to all the more important causes even; the number of these, as well as other calls upon his time, necessitated the appointment of representatives who should administer justice in the king’s name. The appointment of these must have further curtailed the powers of the earlier representatives of justice, already referred to. One of the worst results, however, of this was that the motives of administering justice became different; in the old days, when the sheik, or the city elder, was called upon to decide an issue, he did it rather in the capacity of a friend who desired peace between two other friends than as a strictly legal official; his interest in the disputants, as being both of his own kin, or at all events both members of the same community to which he belonged, impelled him to do his utmost to make peace. It was otherwise when a stranger had to decide between two men of whom he knew nothing; he had no personal interest in them, nor would it have been his main endeavour to try to secure a lasting peace between the two, as had been the case in earlier days among the sheiks and city elders; the tie of kinship was absent. The result was that personal interest of another kind asserted itself, and, as there is abundant evidence to show, the administration of justice was guided rather by the prospect of gain than in the interests of equity. It is an ever-recurring burden in the Prophetical writings that justice is thwarted through bribery: ‘Every one loveth gifts and followeth after rewards’ ( Isaiah 1:23 ; see, further, Isaiah 5:7 ; Isaiah 5:20 ; Isaiah 5:23 , Micah 3:11 ; Micah 7:3 , Ezekiel 18:8 ; Ezekiel 22:12 etc., and cf. the picture of the ideal judge in Isaiah 11:3-4 ). A very aggravated instance of the miscarriage of justice is recorded in 1 Kings 21:1-29 ; but such cases were undoubtedly rare exceptions; so far as Israel and Judah were concerned, it was not from the central authority that the perversion of justice proceeded, but rather from the king’s representatives, the ‘princes’ ( sârim ), who misused their authority for nefarious ends.
(ii) The priesthood . Even before the Exile the administration of justice was to a large extent centred in the hands of the Levitical priesthood; nothing could illustrate this more pointedly than Deuteronomy 19:15-21 , where the outlines of a regular, formulated, judicial system seem to be referred to, in which the final authority is vested in the priesthood. What must have contributed to this more than anything else was the fact that from early times such matters as seemed to the elders of the city to defy a satisfactory solution were, as we have already seen, submitted to the judgment of God; the intermediaries between God and men were the priests, who carried the matter into the Divine presence, received the Divine answer, and announced that answer to those who came for judgment (see Exodus 22:8-9 , and esp. Deuteronomy 33:8 ff. ‘And of Levi he said, Thy Thummim and thy Urim are with tby godly one.…’). It is easy to see how, under these circumstances, the authority of the priesthood, in all matters, tended constantly to increase (see, further, Deuteronomy 17:8-13 ; Deuteronomy 19:15-21 ).
But in spite of the rise of these two new factors the king and the priesthood it must be borne in mind that the elders of the cities still continued to carry out their judicial functions.
Regarding what would correspond to the modern idea of a law court, we have no data to go upon so far as the earliest period is concerned; but it may be taken for granted that, among the nomads, those who had a quarrel would repair to the tent of the sheik, in which an informal court would be held. From the time of the settlement in Canaan, however, and onwards, when city life had developed, there is plenty of information on the subject. The open space in the immediate vicinity of the city gate was the usual place for assemblies of the people, and it was here that the more formal ‘courts of law’ were held (see Amos 5:12 ; Amos 5:15 , Deuteronomy 21:19 ; Deuteronomy 22:15 ; Deuteronomy 25:7 , Zechariah 8:16 ; the ‘porch of judgment’ of king Solomon [8], already referred to, was of course exceptional).
2. Post-exilic period . At the time of Ezra we find that the administration of justice by the elders of the city, which had continued throughout the period of the monarchy, is still in vogue (see Ezra 7:25 ; Ezra 10:14 ); they presided over the local courts in the smaller provincial towns. These smaller courts consisted of seven members; in the larger towns the corresponding courts consisted of twenty-three members. In the event of these lower courts not being able to come to a decision regarding any matter brought before them, the case was carried to the superior court at Jerusalem, the Sanhedrin (wh. see). The procedure in these courts was of the simplest character: the injured person brought his complaint before the judges, previous notice having been given, and publicly gave his version of the matter; the accused then in his turn defended himself; judging from Job 31:35 a written statement was sometimes read out; the testimony of two witnesses at least was required to substantiate an accusation; according to the Talmud, these witnesses had to be males and of age, but the testimony of a slave was not regarded as valid. Before witnesses gave their testimony they were adjured to speak the truth, and the whole truth. False witnesses and these were evidently not unknown had to suffer the same punishment as the victim of their false testimony would have had to undergo, or had undergone. If no witnesses were forthcoming, the truth of a matter had, so far as possible, to be obtained by the cross-questioning and acumen of the judges.
3. In the NT . The administration of justice under the Roman régime comes before us in connexion with St. Paul ( Acts 24:1-27 ff.). According to Roman law, when a Roman citizen was accused of anything, the magistrate could fix any time that suited him for the trial; however long the trial might be postponed, the accused was nevertheless imprisoned for the whole time. But there were different kinds of imprisonment recognized by Roman law, and it lay within the magistrate’s power to decide which kind the prisoner should suffer. These different grades of custody were: the public gaol, where the prisoner was bound in chains (cf. Acts 12:6 ; Acts 21:33 ); in the custody of a soldier, who was responsible for the prisoner, and to whom the prisoner was chained; and an altogether milder form, according to which the accused was in custody only so far that he was under the supervision of a magistrate, who stood surety for him; it was only those of high rank to whom this indulgence was accorded. In the case of St. Paul it was the second of these which was put in force.
As regards appeals to the Emperor (Acts 25:11-12 ), the following conditions applied when one claimed this right. In the Roman provinces the supreme criminal jurisdiction was exercised by the governor of the province, whether proconsul, proprætor, or procurator; no appeal was permitted to provincials from a governor’s judgment; but Roman citizens had the right of appealing to the tribunes, who had the power of ordering the case to be transferred to the ordinary tribunals at Rome. But from the time of Augustus the power of the tribunes was centred in the person of the Emperor; and with him alone, therefore, lay the power of hearing appeals. The form of such an appeal was the simple pronunciation of the word ‘Appello’; there was no need to make a written appeal, the mere utterance of the word in court suspended all further proceedings there.
W. O. E. Oesterley.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Justice
(Heb. sedeq [ Isaiah 40:14 ). He evenhandedly rewards good, and he does not ignore the sins of any (Psalm 33:5 ; 37:6,28 ; 97:2 ; 99:4 ). Human judges do well to remember God in their courts. God does not take bribes (Deuteronomy 10:17 ) or pervert justice in any way (Genesis 18:25 ; 2 Chronicles 19:7 ).
At the same time, God rarely delivers instant justice. The world does not seem fair while evil still abounds, and so the oppressed petition God to intervene on their behalf (Psalm 7:9 ; Proverbs 29:26 ). Their prayers may even take the form of a complaint (Habakkuk 1:2-4 ), although people must not challenge God's essential justice (Job 40:8 ; Malachi 2:17 ). That God will decisively intervene in the future is the biblical hope.
This philosophical issue of theodicy underlies the story of Job. On the one hand is his friends' false assumption that Job's trouble must fit his crimes (8:3-7), whereas on his part, Job claims to be the victim of an injustice, and demands that God remedy the situation (19:7; 27:2; 29:14; 34:5-6).
The justice of God is reaffirmed in the New Testament (Romans 3:5-6 ; 9:14 ; 1 John 1:9 ; Revelation 16:5-7 ; 19:11 ). Because he is just, God never shows partiality or favoritism (Matthew 5:45 ; Acts 10:34-35 ; Romans 2:6,11 ; Ephesians 6:9 ; 1 Peter 1:17 ).
Human Justice Based on God's Law . Just law is law that reflects God's standards (Genesis 9:5-6 ; Deuteronomy 1:17 ), and not mere human reasoning (Habakkuk 1:7 ). According to the Sinai covenant, judges are to uphold the Mosaic law by acquitting the innocent and condemning the guilty. A breach of justice consists of a verdict that runs contrary to the law or that does not accord with the known facts (Exodus 23:1-9 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-3 ).
In a culture where judges, not juries, render a verdict, false accusations, bribery, and influence peddling are the favored devices of injustice (Deuteronomy 16:18-20 ; Amos 2:6-7 ; Proverbs 17:23 ; 19:28 ; Isaiah 5:23 ; Jeremiah 5:28 ; Ezekiel 22:29 ; 1 Samuel 8:3 ; Zechariah 7:9-10 ). The victims are disproportionately from the poor, among whom are the fatherless, the widow, and the resident alien (Deuteronomy 27:19 ; Psalm 82 ). The righteous judge must never show partiality to the rich (Deuteronomy 24:17 ), nor for that matter to the poor (Leviticus 19:15 ); he must render true judgment at all times.
Under the monarchy, the king is the final arbiter of justice (2 Samuel 8:15 ; 15:3-4 ; 1 Kings 10:9 ; Proverbs 20:8 ). Kings are warned about injustice (Proverbs 16:10 ; Jeremiah 21:12 ; 22:2-3 ; Micah 3:1-3,9-11 ). Solomon's wisdom makes him a just king (1 Kings 3:11-12,28 ; 2 Chronicles 9:8 ).
At the same time, justice is not a virtue for judges and kings alone; all Israel is to follow in the "paths of justice" (Genesis 18:19 ; Psalm 106:3 ; Proverbs 21:15 ; Isaiah 1:17,59 ). Pursuing justice in life is of greater worth than religious ritual (Proverbs 21:3 ; Micah 6:8 ; cf. Matthew 23:23 ). Justice must lead to honesty, even in mundane business transactions (Leviticus 19:35-36 ; Hosea 12:7 ).
In the New Testament, the love of justice is a virtue (2Col 7:11; Isaiah 28:5-6 ), yet Christians may not take justice into their own hands (1 Thessalonians 4:6 ). At times it is better to suffer injustice than to bring the gospel into disrepute by taking a brother to court (1 Corinthians 6:7-8 ).
Divine Justice and the Justification of the Wicked . The gospel promises escape from God's just wrath against sin (Romans 1:32 ). Before human judges the Savior was unjustly tried and executed (Isaiah 53:8 ; John 7:24 ; Acts 3:14 ). From the divine perspective, however, Jesus' death satisfied God's justice (Romans 3:26 ). Thus God remains a righteous judge even as he justifies those sinners who believe in Christ (Luke 18:14 ; Galatians 3:11-13 ).
Justice and the Kingdom of God . The Old Testament looks forward to the time when God will exercise absolute justice over all creation (Psalm 98:9 ; Ecclesiastes 3:16 ; Philippians 4:8 ; 29:19-21 ). The New Testament emphasizes the approach of final judgment, when all people will be evaluated according to their works (Romans 2:5 ; 3:5-6 ; Revelation 20:13 ).
Psalm 72 is a prayer for a king who would protect the poor, a psalm that looks beyond Solomon to an ideal just king. The Old Testament goes on to predict that the Messiah will execute justice on God's behalf ( Isaiah 9:7 ; 11:3-4 ; 16:4b-5 ; 28:17 ). In the New Testament, Jesus already begins to carry out the Father's justice while on earth (Matthew 12:18-21 ; John 5:28-30 ), but it is in the future that he will execute God's will over all (Acts 17:31 ; Revelation 19:11 ).
Gary Steven Shogren
See also Justification ; Righteousness
Bibliography . F. B chel and V. Herntrich, TDNT, 3:921-54; R. D. Culver, TWOT, 2:948-49; C. Hodge, Systematic Theology, 1:416-27; G. Quell and G. Schrenk, TDNT, 2:174-225.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Justice
In his analysis of justice (δικαιοσύνη), Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics, bk. v.) distinguishes the justice which is co-extensive with virtue-is, in fact, ‘perfect virtue’-from the special justice which consists in fairness of dealing with our neighbours. The NT writers use the word δικαιοσύνη almost exclusively in the former sense, connecting it with the righteousness of God (see Righteousness). The lesser righteousness is, however, included under the greater; and though the emphasis is laid on mercy or love as ‘the fulfilling of the law’ (Romans 13:10), justice is also recognized as a duty towards Him who is ‘just’ as well as the merciful ‘justifier’ of them that believe (see Love). Thus the Apostle enumerates ‘things just’ (ὄσα δίκαια) in his catalogue of Christian virtues (Philippians 4:8). He urges his readers likewise to set their thoughts on that which is ‘honourable’ or ‘seemly’ (καλά), not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight of men (Romans 12:17, 2 Corinthians 8:21; 2 Corinthians 13:7). This Christian justice covers the whole round of life. All men are entitled to their full dues, alike of tribute, custom, fear, honour, service and wage. The Christian master respects the honour not merely of his wife and children, but oven of his slaves (Ephesians 5:22 ff., Colossians 3:18 ff.). The servant also deals justly with his master, not stealing or purloining, as heathen slaves were wont to do, but ‘with good will doing service, as unto the Lord, and not unto men’ (Ephesians 6:5 ff., Colossians 3:22 ff., Titus 2:10 ff., 1 Peter 2:18 ff.). For such service the labourer is worthy of an honest wage (1 Timothy 5:18, 2 Timothy 2:6). The same principle applies to the preacher of the gospel, even though he refuse to accept his privileges (1 Corinthians 9:13 ff.). In their relations as citizens, Christian men are actuated by the most sensitive regard for honour. Though he stands for Christian freedom, the Apostle feels morally obliged to send back Philemon’s slave, however helpful he found him to be; and he further takes on his own shoulders full liability for Onesimus’ misdeeds (Philemon 1:10 ff.). In order that public justice may be upheld, too, the Christian is urged to pray for kings and all in high places of authority (1 Timothy 2:1 f.), and to be subject to all their ordinances for the Lord’s sake (Titus 3:1 f., 1 Peter 2:13 ff.). But he himself is entitled to justice before the law. No man suffered more for his Master’s sake than St. Paul; and no one wrote more serious words on the sin of litigiousness (1 Corinthians 6:1 ff.). Yet, in defence of his just rights as a citizen, he not only asserted his Roman freedom (Acts 16:37; Acts 22:25; Acts 25:10), but defended himself before the courts to the very last (Acts 24:10 ff; Acts 25:10 f., 2 Timothy 4:16 ff.). For to him the courts were there to secure justice for all. See Trial-at-Law.
A. R. Gordon.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Justice (2)
JUSTICE
In the Authorized Version of NT the word ‘justice’ does not occur, δἰκαιοσύνη being always translated ‘righteousness.’ For the adj. δικαιος we have ‘just’ and ‘righteous’ used interchangeably. God is just (1 John 1:9, Revelation 15:3), righteous (John 17:25, 2 Timothy 4:8); Christ is the Just One (Acts 3:14; Acts 7:52), and righteous (1 John 2:1). Men, both as individuals and collectively, are just or righteous (Matthew 1:9; Matthew 5:45; Matthew 10:41; Matthew 13:43, Acts 10:22; Acts 24:15). In Luke 15:11-32 we have just, and in Revelation 16:7 righteous judgment. In Colossians 4:1 τὸ δίκαιον refers to what is due by masters to their slaves; and in Matthew 20:4 to a money payment for work done. This haphazard rendering of δίκαιος is partially rectified in the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885. In classical Greek the noun and the adj. are sometimes used in the wider sense of moral rectitude in general; but under the influence of the Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy its later usage inclines to the narrower sense of political and social justice. Aristotle (Nic. Ethiopic v. 1. 15) qualifies the general idea by making it refer to what is due to one’s neighbour; and Plato (Republic, Bks. i. ii. iv.) deals with δἰκαιοσύνη at great length but almost exclusively in the sense of political and individual justice, though he does attempt to give the idea a wider scope by connecting it with that of the Absolute Good. In Biblical Greek, both in the LXX Septuagint and the NT, the wider meaning is restored, and is the common one. In Luke 1:6 Zacharias and Elisabeth are said to be δίκαιοι; and this is explained, if not defined, by the words τορευόυενοι ἐν τασκις ταις ἐντολαῖς καὶ δικαιώμασι τοῦ Κυρίου ἀμεμττοι. This is the general idea of righteousness; but our word ‘justice’ must be taken as signifying the recognition and fulfilment of what is due from one to another, righteous dealing between persons, each rendering to others what is their right and due. See also art. Righteous.
1. The justice of God.—The justice of God is an aspect of His righteousness, and belongs, therefore, to His essential nature. It may be shown to have significance for the Divine life, even apart from His relation to others. God’s attributes are not all of co-ordinate worth. His omnipotence, e.g., is subordinate to His ethical attributes; it does not use them as a means to accomplish its ends, but they use it. Omnipotence is not a power to do what it wills, but to do what God wills; and as His will is holy, it can be only ethically determined. If in God’s nature mere power were supreme, and holiness and love subordinate, this would be as contrary to justice as when, in a kingdom, the rule of right has been overturned by irresponsible violence. As in the State, justice is the controlling principle which preserves the body politic for the discharge of its several functions, so, in the Divine justice, we have the regulative principle of order in the Divine nature and life.
(1) God’s justice in His relations with men.—He shows favour to the righteous. He could not withhold His approval of that in them which is the object of complacency and delight in Himself. This does not mean that they have a claim on God for a happy earthly lot, and exemption from earthly troubles. This doctrine of recompense was the prevalent one during the early and non-reflective stage of Israel’s religious progress; but it did not bear the strain put on it by the national calamities. In the teaching of Christ it is repudiated: Matthew 5:45; Matthew 13:28-29, Luke 16:25; Luke 18:1-5, John 9:2-3; and in Romans 8:18; Romans 8:39 and Hebrews 12:11 an explanation of the sufferings of the righteous is given which goes far to remove their seeming variance with the justice of God. They are part of His fatherly discipline by which His children are prepared for their heavenly inheritance (2 Corinthians 4:16-17, Hebrews 5:8). Even here they have their great reward in the favour and friendship of God (Matthew 5:10-12; 1 Peter 2:19-20; 1Pe_3:12; 1Pe_3:14).
(2) God’s justice in relation to sin.—God is just, and will therefore punish sin. This is one of the Christian certainties (Galatians 6:7). Different views, however, have been held as to the nature of the punishment and its object. Some think (and this is Ritschl’s opinion) that the true punishment of sin consists in the sense of guilt and alienation from God which a persuasion of the Divine displeasure awakens; and that the outward evils which are regarded as punishments are really due to natural causes that have no relation to human guilt (Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation, 47 ff., 257 ff.). Now, the sense of God’s displeasure must always be a most important part of punishment, and might almost stand for the whole of it, if we could suppose the sinner as responsive to it as he ought to be, as, e.g., a saint made perfect in holiness would be. To such a saint the sense of alienation from God would be harder to bear than the most untoward outward calamity. But sin increasingly blunts the sinner’s susceptibility to suffering from this source; and if no effective provision has been made to bring God’s displeasure home to him, he would at last work out his term of punishment. There may be no link of causation between our sin and most of the outward evils of life. Maeterlinck may be right in saying that nature knows nothing of justice; but in that case we should have to believe with him that neither can nature be regarded as the creation of a Being in whom ethical attributes are supreme (Maeterlinck, Buried Temple, Essay on the ‘Mystery of Justice’).
God’s justice in relation to sin is at once retributive, educative, and protective. It is retributive because it punishes sin simply as sin; it is educative or reformatory because the punishment is also intended for the moral improvement of the transgressor; it is protective because by the punishment others are restrained from wrong-doing, and are themselves guarded against the evils which would result from the prevalence of unpunished sin. That the Scripture view of God’s justice implies retribution may be shown from many passages: Matthew 16:27; Matthew 16:24-25, Luke 12:45-48, Romans 2:6; Romans 2:16; Romans 6:23, 2 Corinthians 5:10, Colossians 3:25, 2 Thessalonians 1:9, Hebrews 2:2; Hebrews 10:27. One could scarcely gather from these passages that God’s sole aim in punishment is the reformation of the offender. Yet this is the popular view with many modern theologians. As a protest against the once prevalent opinion that God, in punishing, desires merely to exact vengeance without any regard to the sinner’s repentance, it has its justification. But, like other reactionary views, it carries us too far in the opposite direction. The whole drift of Biblical teaching is that God punishes sinners because they deserve it. Punishment is the reaction of His holy nature against wrong-doing, and without it the moral order of the world could not be maintained. If sin did not arouse His displeasure, He would not be holy; and if He did not manifest His displeasure objectively by punishment, men could not know that He is holy. But it is said that God is love, and that what love inflicts is chastisement, not punishment in the retributive sense. Holy love, however, cannot accomplish its end unless the sinner is brought to feel that he deserves punishment. How could punishment benefit him if, while undergoing it, he believed that it had not been merited? Retribution does tend to the offender’s improvement, and this is part of God’s purpose in it; but its reformatory influence never takes effect until the sinner acknowledges its justice. His improvement begins only when he is brought into this state of mind and feeling. If, indeed, God’s sole aim were reformation, it would follow that, if rewards carried with them the same benefits as punishments, as in many cases they do, then the offender would deserve them, and this because of his sin. In like manner it would be very difficult to persuade people that it is right that they should be protected from the spread of violence by the punishment of those to whom punishment was not justly due.
God’s justice is also shown in the forgiveness of sins on condition of repentance. Repentance is a sign that the disciplinary purpose which accompanies retribution has not missed its mark; and if now God withheld forgiveness, it would imply a failure of justice. According to 1 John 1:9, ‘God is faithful and just (δίκαιος) to forgive.’ Forgiveness and punishment are alike connected with the justice of God. The justice of forgiveness further appears from this, that the man who repents is a different moral person from the man who had sinned. His relation to his sin has been reversed; for whereas formerly his will was identified with sin, it is now identified with the mind and will of God regarding it. In proportion to the depth and sincerity of his repentance, we feel that he is a changed man, and should no longer be treated as if sin still formed part of the texture of his being. He has separated from, and now unsparingly condemns, his past sinful self; and, having thus come over to the side of righteousness, he is no longer a fit object of the Divine displeasure. Theologians, who first make logical distinctions between the Divine attributes and then reason from these as if they were real distinctions, say that justice cannot, but love alone can, forgive; as if love and justice were two contending powers in God’s nature. In reality, it is holy love that forgives; and this means that love and justice are joined hand in hand in forgiveness as they are in punishment. From a non-moral love gifts would come, but they might not be blessings; and justice without love never could be perfectly just, for love is part of the tribute which justice demands. The OT and NT writers never attempt to reconcile love and justice, because they were not conscious of any contrariety between them (see Matthew 6:12; Matthew 6:14-15; Matthew 12:31-32; Matthew 18:15-17; Matthew 18:21-35, Luke 6:37; Luke 7:37-50; Luke 13:3; Luke 13:5; John 5:30; Luke 17:3-4; Luke 18:10-14; Luke 22:61-62; cf. John 21:15-17, Acts 2:39; Acts 3:19; Acts 5:31; 2 Peter 3:9, 1 John 1:9). Of course, imperfection clings to all human repentance, because past sin disqualifies even the sincerest penitent for that godly sorrow for sin ‘which worketh repentance not to be repented of’ (2 Corinthians 7:10). Hence the need for the work of Christ and the regenerating influence of the Spirit, by which imperfect repentance is atoned for and made perfect.
2. Justice in man.—If man has been created in the image of God, we should expect to find reflected in him the same supremacy of the ethical attributes as exists in God. Thus for him also justice or righteousness will be the supreme law of his being, obligatory, not through any human convention, but in virtue of man’s Godlikeness. As supreme, it will be regulative of his whole life, determining his use of his freedom, the outflow of his emotions and thoughts, his activity in all human relations. Justice will regulate his life Godward, for God has definite claims on man for devotion and service; and as in Christ He has made Himself known as a Father and Saviour, these claims are, for the Christian, raised to a higher sphere of obligation. These are duties which man owes to God, and, when they are withheld, justice is violated. God is robbed when that which is His due is not rendered (Malachi 3:8). Hence the just or righteous (δίκαιος) man is represented as walking ‘in all the commandments of the Lord blameless’ (Luke 1:6), and of these the first and greatest is, ‘Thou shalt love the Lord with all thy heart’ (Matthew 22:37). Not until we give God this wholehearted love do we give Him His due. We are then ‘just before God’; and from 1 John 3:10; 1 John 3:17; 1 John 4:20-21; 1 John 5:1 we learn that only when man responds to God’s claim can he fulfil the obligations of love and justice to his fellow-men. That man can be just or unjust in relation to God appears also from passages in which sin is spoken of as a state of indebtedness—God being the creditor and man the debtor (Matthew 5:26; Matthew 6:12; Matthew 18:23-35, Luke 7:41-43); and from those parables in which God and man are related as Master and servant, or King and subject (Matthew 20:1-16; Matthew 21:33-41; Matthew 25:14-30; Mark 12:1-12).
One characteristic of the NT doctrine of justice, as compared with the views current in the Jewish and classical worlds, is a noteworthy enlargement of its sphere. Justice to man as man was a subject of speculation among the Stoics, but in the popular morality its obligation was ignored and even repudiated. The Jew hated the Samaritan (Luke 9:54) and despised the Gentile, with whom he would not share his privileges (Acts 21:27-30). Why should they show favour to those whom God had not honoured? The Greek was bound by moralties to his fellow-citizens, but between him and the barbarians there was no moral reciprocity; if he was conscious of any obligation, it was an obligation to do them all the injury he could. Then again there was the slave class, who were regarded as incapable of virtue, and, therefore, like the lower animals, outside the ethical sphere. Thus Jew and Gentile alike acknowledged no moral relationship between themselves and the vast majority of the race. It was, therefore, a great step in advance when Christ proclaimed a universal Kingdom of justice and love, and taught that, since God was the Father of all, they were due to all men, on the ground not of citizenship or nationality, but of humanity and of their common relationship to God (Matthew 5:43-48; Matthew 28:19, Luke 10:30-37, John 3:16; John 12:32).
There was also a subjective enlargement of its sphere. Under the influence of Pharisaic teaching and example, the moral law had come to be regarded as merely an external rule of conduct; the inner world of thought and motive and feeling being overlooked or regarded as of only secondary importance. All the virtues had thus suffered deterioration, and justice among them. But in the Sermon on the Mount, Christ claimed this neglected sphere for the moral law. Its authority was extended so as to cover the entire life of men, for in the spiritual realm of being, thoughts and feelings are accounted as deeds, as acts of the moral self. And this was an infinite extension of the sway of justice. ‘Out of the heart proceed adulteries, fornications, murders, thefts’ (Mark 7:21). Sin is not confined to outward acts; it begins the moment evil thoughts and desires arise in the heart; and a régime of justice is necessary there. To be angry with our brother without cause is to do him wrong (Matthew 5:22); and the man is accounted guilty who, while refraining from actual murder, yet thinks in his heart, ‘I would, if I dared.’ Our neighbour has a claim on us, that we should think and feel justly regarding him; and when this is withheld, we fail to give him his due. Again, the sin of adultery may be begun and completed by simply looking on a woman to lust after her (Matthew 5:28). Before the tribunal of the Kingdom, the man is adjudged to have wronged the woman. The Christian law of justice is embodied in the Golden Rule, ‘All things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them’ (Matthew 7:12); and also in the second of the great commandments, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself’ (Mark 12:31). According to the Golden Rule, we are to regard our fellow-man as an alter ego, to put ourselves in his place, and judge his claims or needs and our duties from his point of view (Philippians 2:4-8). Then the commandment tells us positively what our obligation is. ‘Thou shalt love him as thyself,’ not with a non-moral love, which seeks nothing higher than the happiness of its objects. We are to care for him with that holy love which attaches itself to that in him which in ourselves is the legitimate object of our self-love,—the moral self or soul which was created in, and can be restored to, the image of God. It is for His moral perfections that we love God; and the claims of Christian justice are met, only when our love for others has as its aim their restoration to Godlikeness (Matthew 16:26, James 5:20, Hebrews 13:17). The Christian law requires us not merely to refrain from doing our neighbour wrong, but to promote, even at the cost of self-sacrifice, his highest well-being as we would our own. For a Christian man to say, ‘I have done my neighbour justice, and he has no claim on me for more,’ is to prove false to the Christian ideal; for, in the Kingdom of righteousness, benevolence is not something that may be withheld, but is simply justice made perfect.
Literature.—For meaning of δίκαιος and δικαιοσύνη see Grimm-Thayer, Lex.; Cremer, Bib.-Th. Lex.; Westcott, Ep. of Jn. 24 f.; Sanday-Headlam, Rom. [1] 28 ff. See also T. Aquinas, Sum. i., Qu. xxi. ii. 2, Qu. lviii.–lxxxi.; Hodge, Syst. Theol. vol. i.; the Dogmatics of Martensen and Dorner; Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation; Moberly, Atonement and Personality, esp. i.–iv.; Clarke, Outline of Theol.; Stevens, Chr. Doct. of Salvation; the Christian Ethics of Martensen (Social), Dorner, Newman Smyth; Luthardt. Hist. of Chr. Ethics; Wendt, Teaching of Jesus, vol. i.; C. Wagner, Justice; Seeley, Ecce Homo. In the following works on General Ethics, ‘Justice’ is, in the main, treated from the Christian standpoint: Hegel. Phil. [2] of Right; Bradley, Ethiopic Studies; Green, Proleg. to Ethics, also Principles of Polit. Obligation; M‘Kenzie, Introd. to Social Phil. [2] ; Seth, Ethical Principles; Maeterlinck, Essay on the ‘Mystery of Justice’ in his Buried Temple [4].
A. Bisset.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Just, Justice
The due reward or punishment for an act. Justice is getting what is deserved. God is merciful but He is also just (Deuteronomy 32:4 - righteous) and must punish sin. In the grace of God, justice fell upon His Son so that mercy would fall upon us. (See also Proverbs 8:15; Genesis 18:19; Hebrews 10:38).
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Justice
Consists in an exact and scrupulous regard to the rights of others, with a deliberate purpose to preserve them on all occasions sacred and inviolate. It is often divided into commutative and distributive justice. The former consists in an equal exchange of benefits; the latter in an equal distribution of rewards and punishments. Dr. Watts gives the following rules respecting justice.
1. It is just that we honour, reverence, and respect those who are superiors in any kind, Ephesians 6:1 ; Ephesians 6:3 . 1 Peter 2:17 . 1 Timothy 5:17 .
2. That we show particular kindness to near relations, Proverbs 17:17 .
3. That we love those who love us, and show gratitude to those who have done us good, Galatians 4:15 .
4. That we pay the full due to those whom we bargain or deal with, Romans 13:1-14 : Deuteronomy 24:14 .
5. That we help our fellow-creatures in cases of great necessity, Ex.xxiii. 4.
6. Reparation to those whom we have wilfully injured." Watts's Serm. ser. 24, 25, vol. 2: Berry Street Lect. ser. 4. Grove's Mor. Phil. p. 332, vol.ii. Wollaston's Relig. of Nature, p. 137, 141; Jay's Ser. vol. 2: p. 131.
Webster's Dictionary - Justice
(1):
(a.) Agreeableness to right; equity; justness; as, the justice of a claim.
(2):
(a.) A person duly commissioned to hold courts, or to try and decide controversies and administer justice.
(3):
(v. t.) To administer justice to.
(4):
(a.) Conformity to truth and reality in expressing opinions and in conduct; fair representation of facts respecting merit or demerit; honesty; fidelity; impartiality; as, the justice of a description or of a judgment; historical justice.
(5):
(a.) The quality of being just; conformity to the principles of righteousness and rectitude in all things; strict performance of moral obligations; practical conformity to human or divine law; integrity in the dealings of men with each other; rectitude; equity; uprightness.
(6):
(a.) The rendering to every one his due or right; just treatment; requital of desert; merited reward or punishment; that which is due to one's conduct or motives.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Justice
A principle of righteousness and equity, controlling our conduct, and securing a due regard to all the rights of others-their persons, property, character, and interests. It has to do, not with pecuniary transactions alone, but with all our intercourse with society. It forms a chief element of the character approved in God's word; and a truly just man has but to "love mercy, and walk humbly with God," to fulfil all righteousness. Justice in magistrates, rulers, and judges, must be fearless and impartial, and all its decisions such as will bear revision before the court of heaven, Deuteronomy 1:16,17 2 Samuel 23:3 2 Chronicles 19:6-10 . Judgement is peculiarly the prerogative of God, and every earthly tribunal lies under the shadow of the "great white throne." A just judgment is the voice of God; and hence an unjust one is doubly hateful in his sight.
THE JUSTICE OF GOD is that essential and infinite attribute which makes his nature and his ways the perfect embodiment of equity, and constitutes him the model and the guardian of equity throughout the universe, Deuteronomy 32:4 Psalm 89:14 . The justice of God could not leave the world without laws, and cannot fail to vindicate them by executing their penalties; and as all mankind perpetually break them, every human soul is under condemnation, and must perish, unless spared through the accepted ransom, the blood of Christ.
THE ADMINSITRATION OF JUSTICE among the Hebrews, was characterized by simplicity and promptitude. In early times the patriarch of each family was its judge, Genesis 38:24 . Afterwards, in the absence of more formal courts, the elders of a household, tribe, or city, were its judges by natural right. In the wilderness, Moses organized for the Jews a regular system of judges, some having jurisdiction over ten families, others over fifty, one hundred, or one thousand. The difficult cases were referred to Moses, and he often sought divine direction concerning them, Exodus 18:21-26 Leviticus 24:12 . These judges were perhaps the "princes of the congregation," and the chiefs of the families and tribes of whom we afterwards read, Numbers 27:3 . In the land of Canaan, local magistrates were appointed for every city and village; and these were instructed to cooperate with the priests, as being all together under the theocracy, the actual government of Jehovah, the supreme Judge of Israel, Deuteronomy 16:18 17:8-Zechariah 3:1-38 21:16 . Their informal courts were held in the gate of the city, as the most public and convenient place, Deuteronomy 21:9 22:15 25:7 ; and in the same place contracts were ratified, Ruth 4:1,9 Jeremiah 32:7-15 . Deborah the prophetess judged Israel beneath a palm-tree, Judges 4:5 . Samuel established virtually a circuit court, 1 Samuel 7:16 8:1 ; and among the kings, Jehoshaphat made special provision for the faithful administration of justice, 2 Chronicles 19:1-11 . The kings themselves were supreme judges, with almost unlimited powers, 1 Samuel 22:16 2 Samuel 4:9,10 1 Kings 22:26 . They were expected, however, to see that justice was everywhere done, and seem to have been accessible to all who were wronged. Frequent complaints are on record in the sacred books of the maladministration of judges, of bribery and perjury, 1 Samuel 8:3 1 Kings 21:8-14 Isaiah 1:23 10:1 Micah 3:11 7:3 .
There was no class among the Jews exactly corresponding to our lawyers. The accuser and the accused stood side by side before the judge, with their witnesses, and pleaded their own cause. The accuser is named in several places, Satan, that is, the adversary, Psalm 109:6 1618839439_41 . No one could be condemned without the concurring testimony of at least two witnesses, Numbers 35:30 ; and these failing, he was obliged to make oath of his innocence, Exodus 22:11 Hebrews 6:16 . The sentence of the judge was instantly executed; and in certain cases the witnesses cast the first stone, Deuteronomy 17:5,7 25:2 Joshua 7:24 1 Samuel 22:18 1 Kings 2:24 Proverbs 16:14 . The same frightful celerity still marks the administration of justice in the East. The application of torture to extract evidence is only once mentioned, and that under the authority of Rome, Acts 22:24 . See SANHEDRIM and SYNAGOGUE .
King James Dictionary - Justice
JUST'ICE, n. L. justitia, from justus, just.
1. The virtue which consists in giving to every one what is his due practical conformity to the laws and to principles of rectitude in the dealings of men with each other honesty integrity in commerce or mutual intercourse. Justice is distributive or commutative. Distributive justice belongs to magistrates or rulers, and consists in distributing to every man that right or equity which the laws and the principles of equity require or in deciding controversies according to the laws and to principles of equity. Commutative justice consists in fair dealing in trade and mutual intercourse between man and man. 2. Impartiality equal distribution of right in expressing opinions fair representation of facts respecting merit or demerit. In criticisms, narrations, history or discourse, it is a duty to do justice to every man, whether friend or foe. 3. Equity agreeableness to right as, he proved the justice of his claim. This should, in strictness, be justness. 4. Vindictive retribution merited punishment. Sooner or later, justice overtakes the criminal. 5. Right application of equity. His arm will do him justice. 6. Low L. justiciarius. A person commissioned to hold courts, or to try and decide controversies and administer justice to individuals as the Chief Justice of the king's bench, or of the common pleas, in England the Chief Justice of the supreme court in the United States, &c. and justices of the peace. JUST'ICE, To administer justice. Little used.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Justice
Throughout the Bible, justice is closely connected with righteousness. Both words have a breadth of meaning in relation to character and conduct, and both are commonly concerned with doing right or being in the right (see RIGHTEOUSNESS).
God, the sovereign ruler of the universe, is perfect in justice (Genesis 18:25; Deuteronomy 32:4; Romans 2:14-154). At the same time he is merciful. Sinners can have hope only because of the perfect harmony of justice and mercy within the divine nature (Exodus 34:6-7; Zephaniah 3:5; cf. Job 4:17; Malachi 3:6-7). There is no way that sinners can bring themselves into a right relationship with a just and holy God, but God is merciful to them. Through Jesus Christ, God has provided a way of salvation by which he can bring repentant sinners into a right relationship with himself, yet be just in doing so (Ephesians 5:8-1198; see JUSTIFICATION).
In addition to the justice that is evident in God’s way of salvation, justice should be evident in the common affairs of human society. This is the aspect of justice that the present article is chiefly concerned with. The perfect expression of justice in governing human society is seen in the authority exercised by Jesus the King-Messiah (Isaiah 9:7; John 5:30; Acts 22:14; see KING). But God wants justice in the operations of all earthly governments, and likewise in private dealings between individuals (Deuteronomy 16:18-20; Deuteronomy 25:13-16).
Basic concerns
Since people exist in God’s image (Genesis 1:27), there is within them an awareness of things being right or wrong, good or bad, just or unjust. The law of God is, as it were, written on their hearts (Isaiah 58:6-7). Though sin has hindered people’s understanding and dulled his consciences, the law of God remains within them. This unwritten law is what makes it possible for them to know what justice is and to draw up law-codes to administer justice in society.
The ancient Hebrew law-code demonstrates how the universal and timeless principles of justice can be applied to the cultural and social habits of a particular people and era. Moses’ law, given by God himself, sets out the sort of justice that God requires (Deuteronomy 16:18; Deuteronomy 32:44-47).
Justice must be the same for all, rich and poor alike (Exodus 23:3; Exodus 23:6-7; Deuteronomy 1:15-17). Laws must not be designed to suit the people of power and influence, but must protect the rights of those who can be easily exploited, such as foreigners, widows, orphans, debtors, labourers and the poor in general (Exodus 21:1-11; Exodus 22:21-27; Exodus 23:6-12; Deuteronomy 14:28-29; Deuteronomy 15:11). Also penalties must fit the crime, being neither too heavy nor too light (Exodus 21:23-25; see PUNISHMENT).
Although the history of Israel mentions many kings, judges and other administrators who upheld such principles of justice (2 Samuel 8:15; 2 Samuel 23:3-4; Psalms 101; Isaiah 33:15-16; Jeremiah 22:15), it also mentions many who ignored them (1 Samuel 8:3; 2 Kings 21:16; Ecclesiastes 5:8; Isaiah 5:23; Jeremiah 22:17; see RULER). In both Old and New Testament times godly people were fearless in condemning injustice, whether committed by civil authorities or religious leaders. Civil power gives no one the right to do as he likes, and religious exercises are no substitute for common justice (Isaiah 1:14-17; Isaiah 1:23; Isaiah 59:14-15; Amos 5:11-12; Amos 5:21-23; Micah 7:3; Mark 11:15-17; Mark 12:40; Luke 6:25; Luke 16:19-25; James 5:1-6).
Influence for good
God’s way of dealing with the sinfulness of human society begins not with changing the social order, but with changing individuals. Those individuals, however, are part of society, and they will help change society as they promote the values of life they have learnt through coming to know God (Matthew 5:13; Matthew 5:16; 1 Corinthians 7:21-24; Ephesians 4:17-24; 1618839439_4). Genuine moral goodness includes within it a concern to correct social injustice. This involves not merely condemning evil, but positively doing good (Isaiah 1:17; Acts 16:35-390; Amos 5:24; Micah 6:8; Matthew 23:23; Luke 3:10-14; Colossians 4:1; James 1:27).
Political conditions vary from one country to another, and these will largely determine the extent to which God’s people can actively try to persuade the government to improve social justice. Much depends on what rights citizens have to choose their government and influence its decisions (see GOVERNMENT). But no matter what kind of government they live under, God’s people should always work to promote values of human dignity (cf. Psalms 8:5-8). In so doing they may undermine unjust practices and eventually see them removed (Ephesians 2:13-16; Ephesians 5:25; Ephesians 6:5-9; Philem 16; see RACE; SLAVE; WOMEN; WORK). No government, however, can relieve them of their personal responsibility to help the disadvantaged in society (Leviticus 25:35-40; 1618839439_18; Matthew 5:9; Matthew 25:34-36; Luke 10:30-36).
Bearing with injustice
Christians may suffer injustice in the form of discrimination and even persecution, both from governments and from citizens. Like Jesus they must accept any such opposition bravely and not try to retaliate (Romans 12:19-21; 1 Peter 2:15; 1 Peter 2:21-23; 1 Peter 3:13; 1 Peter 4:16; see PERSECUTION). There may be cases where they claim their rights in support of those principles of justice that government officials are supposed to administer (1618839439_81; Acts 22:25; Acts 25:10-11), but they should not use their rights for selfish purposes.
When Jesus told his followers that they were not to demand ‘an eye for an eye’, he was not undermining the basis of civil justice (which does demand ‘an eye for an eye’ and positively ‘returns evil for evil’ by imposing a penalty to fit the offence). Rather Jesus was telling his followers that the spirit ruling in their hearts must not be the same as that which operates in a code of legal justice. God’s people must always be prepared to sacrifice their rights and even do good to those who harm them (Matthew 5:38-42; 1 Corinthians 6:7-8; Philippians 2:4; cf. 1 Corinthians 9:15).

Sentence search

Judicatory - ) Administration of Justice. ) Pertaining to the administration of Justice; dispensing Justice; judicial; as, judicatory tribunals. ) A court of Justice; a tribunal
Adoni-Zedek - Justice of the Lord; lord of Justice
Justicement - ) Administration of Justice; procedure in courts of Justice
Zedekiah - The Lord is my Justice; the Justice of the Lord
Justice - Justice is distributive or commutative. Distributive Justice belongs to magistrates or rulers, and consists in distributing to every man that right or equity which the laws and the principles of equity require or in deciding controversies according to the laws and to principles of equity. Commutative Justice consists in fair dealing in trade and mutual intercourse between man and man. In criticisms, narrations, history or discourse, it is a duty to do Justice to every man, whether friend or foe. Equity agreeableness to right as, he proved the Justice of his claim. Sooner or later, Justice overtakes the criminal. His arm will do him Justice. A person commissioned to hold courts, or to try and decide controversies and administer Justice to individuals as the Chief Justice of the king's bench, or of the common pleas, in England the Chief Justice of the supreme court in the United States, &c. and Justices of the peace. JUST'ICE, To administer Justice
Judicature - ) The state or profession of those employed in the administration of Justice; also, the dispensing or administration of Justice. ) A court of Justice; a judicatory
Cardinal Virtues - Justice, prudence, temperance, and fortitude, are called the four cardinal virtues, as being the basis of all the rest. ...
See Justice, &c
Justice - As love is for the New Testament, so Justice is the central ethical idea of the Old Testament. The frequency of Justice is sometimes missed by the reader due to a failure to realize that the wide range of the Hebrew word mishpat , particularly in passages that deal with the material and social necessities of life. Nature of Justice Justice has two major aspects. Second, Justice is the standard by which the advantages of social life are handed out, including material goods, rights of participation, opportunities, and liberties. “I shall use Justice as a plumb-line, and righteousness as a plummet” (Isaiah 28:17 , REB). ...
Often people think of Justice in the Bible only in the first sense as God's wrath on evil. This aspect of Justice indeed is present, such as the judgment mentioned in Deuteronomy 16:18-20 . Often more vivid words like “wrath” are used to describe punitive Justice (Romans 1:18 ). ...
Justice in the Bible very frequently also deals with benefits. Justice then is very close to love and grace. God “executes Justice for the orphan and the widow, and loves the strangers, providing them food and clothing” (Deuteronomy 10:18 , NRSV; compare Hosea 10:12 ; Isaiah 30:18 ). ...
Various needy groups are the recipients of Justice. Justice involves meeting those needs. To do Justice is to correct that abuse and to meet those needs (Isaiah 1:17 ). Injustice is depriving others of their basic needs or failing to correct matters when those rights are not met (Jeremiah 5:28 ; Job 29:12-17 ). Injustice is either a sin of commission or of omission. ...
The content of Justice, the benefits which are to be distributed as basic rights in the community, can be identified by observing what is at stake in the passages in which “justice,” “righteousness,” and “judgment” occur. Job 22:5-9 ,Job 22:5-9,22:23 ; Job 24:1-12 decries the injustice of depriving people of each one of these needs, which are material and economic. ...
Justice presupposes God's intention for people to be in community. Thus biblical Justice restores people to community. By Justice those who lacked the power and resources to participate in significant aspects of the community were to be strengthened so that they could. ...
These legal provisions express a further characteristic of Justice. Justice delivers; it does not merely relieve the immediate needs of those in dire straits (Psalm 76:9 ; Isaiah 45:8 ; Isaiah 58:11 ; Isaiah 62:1-2 ). Such thorough Justice can be socially disruptive. In some cases the two aspects of Justice come together. In the act of restoration, those who were victims of Justice receive benefits while their exploiters are punished (1 Samuel 2:7-10 ; compare Luke 1:51-53 ; Luke 6:20-26 ). ...
The source of Justice As the sovereign Creator of the universe, God is just (Psalm 99:1-4 ; Genesis 18:25 ; Deuteronomy 32:4 ; Jeremiah 9:24 ), particularly as the defender of all the oppressed of the earth (Psalm 76:9 ; Psalm 103:6 ; Jeremiah 49:11 ). Justice thus is universal (Psalm 9:7-9 ) and applies to each covenant or dispensation. Jesus affirmed for His day the centrality of the Old Testament demand for Justice (Matthew 23:23 ). Justice is the work of the New Testament people of God (James 1:27 ). ...
God's Justice is not a distant external standard. It is the source of all human Justice (Proverbs 29:26 ; 2Chronicles 19:6,2 Chronicles 19:9 ). Justice is grace received and grace shared (2 Corinthians 9:8-10 ). ...
The most prominent human agent of Justice is the ruler. The king receives God's Justice and is a channel for it (Psalm 72:1 ; compare Romans 13:1-2 ,Romans 13:1-2,13:4 ). There is not a distinction between a personal, voluntary Justice and a legal, public Justice. Such Justice was also required of pagan rulers (Daniel 4:27 ; Proverbs 31:8-9 ). ...
Justice is also a central demand on all people who bear the name of God. Justice is required to be present with the sacrificial system (Amos 5:21-24 ; Micah 6:6-8 ; Isaiah 1:11-17 ; Matthew 5:23-24 ), fasting (Isaiah 58:1-10 ), tithing (Matthew 23:23 ), obedience to the other commandments (Matthew 19:16-21 ), or the presence of the Temple of God (Jeremiah 7:1-7 ). ...
Justice in salvation Apart from describing God's condemnation of sin, Paul used the language and meaning of Justice to speak of personal salvation
Justice - ) Agreeableness to right; equity; justness; as, the Justice of a claim. ) A person duly commissioned to hold courts, or to try and decide controversies and administer Justice. ) To administer Justice to. ) Conformity to truth and reality in expressing opinions and in conduct; fair representation of facts respecting merit or demerit; honesty; fidelity; impartiality; as, the Justice of a description or of a judgment; historical Justice
Appeal - See Justice
Melchizedek - King of Justice
Tzedakah - "justice, righteousness"); charity ...
Jehozadak - Justice of the Lord
Zidkijah - Justice of the Lord
Juise - ) Judgment; Justice; sentence
Unjustice - ) Want of Justice; injustice
Unjust - ) Acting contrary to the standard of right; not animated or controlled by Justice; false; dishonest; as, an unjust man or judge. ) Contrary to Justice and right; prompted by a spirit of injustice; wrongful; as, an unjust sentence; an unjust demand; an unjust accusation
Justice of God - Justice is not an optional product of his will, but an unchangeable principle of his very nature. His legislative Justice is his requiring of his rational creatures conformity in all respects to the moral law. His rectoral or distributive Justice is his dealing with his accountable creatures according to the requirements of the law in rewarding or punishing them (Psalm 89:14 ). In remunerative Justice he distributes rewards (James 1:12 ; 2 Timothy 4:8 ); in vindictive or punitive Justice he inflicts punishment on account of transgression (2 Thessalonians 1:6 )
Administration - NAS translates Hebrew idiom “to do Justice” as “administer Justice” ( 2 Samuel 8:15 ; 1 Kings 3:28 ; 1 Chronicles 18:14 ). Similarly, NAS translates the idiom “to judge Justice” as “administer Justice” (Jeremiah 21:12 ). The Old Testament seeks to lead people in authority to establish a society in which God's law brings fairness and Justice to all people without favoritism and prejudice
Righten - ) To do Justice to
Cutchery - ) A hindoo hall of Justice
Rightfully - ) According to right or Justice
Chief-Justiceship - ) The office of chief Justice
Righten - RIGHTEN, To do Justice to
Beatitudes - The blessings pronounced in the opening words of the Sermon on the Mount: eight in Saint Matthew, on ...
the poor in spirit,
the meek,
mourners,
justice-seekers,
the merciful,
peacemakers,
clean of heart,
persecuted;
and four in Saint Luke, ...
the poor in spirit,
justice-seekers,
mourners,
victims of persecution
Eirenarch - ) A Justice of the peace; irenarch
Justicer - ) One who administers Justice; a judge
Court - See House, § 2 ; Justice; Tabernacle; Temple
Justiceship - ) The office or dignity of a Justice
Justiceable - ) Liable to trial in a court of Justice
Colorable - ) Specious; plausible; having an appearance of right or Justice
Justiciable - ) Proper to be examined in a court of Justice
Reencloth - ) A board or court of Justice formerly held in the counting house of the British sovereign's household, composed of the lord steward and his officers, and having cognizance of matters of Justice in the household, with power to correct offenders and keep the peace within the verge of the palace, which extends two hundred yards beyond the gates
Just, Justice - Justice is getting what is deserved. In the grace of God, Justice fell upon His Son so that mercy would fall upon us
Threefold - ) Consisting of three, or thrice repeated; triple; as, threefold Justice
Bribery - The danger of bribery is the opportunity it presents for the perversion of Justice (see 1 Samuel 8:3 ; Proverbs 17:23 ; Isaiah 1:23 ; Micah 3:11 ; Micah 7:3 ). The poor, because they had no bribe to offer, were either discriminated against when the judgment was handed down or had difficulty getting a trial at all (see Job 6:22 where a bribe is necessary to get Justice done). Bribery, because it perverted Justice, is prohibited in the Bible ( Exodus 23:8 ; Deuteronomy 16:19 )
Righter - ) One who sets right; one who does Justice or redresses wrong
Justice - God does not take bribes (Deuteronomy 10:17 ) or pervert Justice in any way (Genesis 18:25 ; 2 Chronicles 19:7 ). ...
At the same time, God rarely delivers instant Justice. Their prayers may even take the form of a complaint (Habakkuk 1:2-4 ), although people must not challenge God's essential Justice (Job 40:8 ; Galatians 3:11-134 ). On the one hand is his friends' false assumption that Job's trouble must fit his crimes (8:3-7), whereas on his part, Job claims to be the victim of an injustice, and demands that God remedy the situation (19:7; 27:2; 29:14; 34:5-6). ...
The Justice of God is reaffirmed in the New Testament (Romans 3:5-6 ; 9:14 ; 1 John 1:9 ; Revelation 16:5-7 ; 19:11 ). ...
Human Justice Based on God's Law . A breach of Justice consists of a verdict that runs contrary to the law or that does not accord with the known facts (Exodus 23:1-9 ; 1618839439_83 ). ...
In a culture where judges, not juries, render a verdict, false accusations, bribery, and influence peddling are the favored devices of injustice (Deuteronomy 16:18-20 ; 1 Samuel 8:3 ; Proverbs 17:23 ; 19:28 ; Isaiah 5:23 ; Jeremiah 5:28 ; Ezekiel 22:29 ; Amos 2:6-7 ; Zechariah 7:9-10 ). ...
Under the monarchy, the king is the final arbiter of Justice (2 Samuel 8:15 ; 15:3-4 ; 1 Kings 10:9 ; Proverbs 20:8 ). Kings are warned about injustice (Proverbs 16:10 ; Jeremiah 21:12 ; 22:2-3 ; Micah 3:1-3,9-11 ). ...
At the same time, Justice is not a virtue for judges and kings alone; all Israel is to follow in the "paths of Justice" (Genesis 18:19 ; Psalm 106:3 ; Proverbs 21:15 ; Isaiah 1:17,59 ). Pursuing Justice in life is of greater worth than religious ritual (Proverbs 21:3 ; Micah 6:8 ; cf. Justice must lead to honesty, even in mundane business transactions (Leviticus 19:35-36 ; Hosea 12:7 ). ...
In the New Testament, the love of Justice is a virtue (2Col 7:11; Philippians 4:8 ), yet Christians may not take Justice into their own hands (1 Thessalonians 4:6 ). At times it is better to suffer injustice than to bring the gospel into disrepute by taking a brother to court (1 Corinthians 6:7-8 ). ...
Divine Justice and the Justification of the Wicked . From the divine perspective, however, Jesus' death satisfied God's Justice (Romans 3:26 ). ...
Justice and the Kingdom of God . The Old Testament looks forward to the time when God will exercise absolute Justice over all creation (Psalm 98:9 ; Malachi 2:17 ; Isaiah 28:5-6 ; 29:19-21 ). The Old Testament goes on to predict that the Messiah will execute Justice on God's behalf ( Isaiah 9:7 ; 11:3-4 ; 16:4b-5 ; 28:17 ). In the New Testament, Jesus already begins to carry out the Father's Justice while on earth (Matthew 12:18-21 ; John 5:28-30 ), but it is in the future that he will execute God's will over all (Acts 17:31 ; Revelation 19:11 )
Vare - ) A wand or staff of authority or Justice
Vengeance - , "(that which proceeds) out of Justice," not, as often with human "vengeance," out of a sense of injury or merely out of a feeling of indignation. ...
Notes: (1) Dike, "justice," is translated "vengeance" in the AV of Acts 28:4 and Jude 1:7 : see Justice
Attemper - ) To soften, mollify, or moderate; to soothe; to temper; as, to attemper rigid Justice with clemency. ) To mix in just proportion; to regulate; as, a mind well attempered with kindness and Justice
Judicial - ) Pertaining or appropriate to courts of Justice, or to a judge; practiced or conformed to in the administration of Justice; sanctioned or ordered by a court; as, judicial power; judicial proceedings; a judicial sale
King's Bench - It consisted of a chief Justice and four puisne, or junior, Justices. Its jurisdiction was transferred by the judicature acts of 1873 and 1875 to the high court of Justice created by that legislation
Vengeance - In Deuteronomy 32:35 Romans 12:19 Hebrews 10:30 Jude 1:7 , means retributive Justice- a prerogative of God with which those interfere who seek to avenge themselves. So also in Acts 28:4 ; though many suppose that the islanders meant the goddess of Justice, Dike, whom the Greeks and Romans regarded as a daughter of Jupiter, and feared as an independent, just, and unappeasable deity
Adversary - The meaning of Satan (1 Peter 5:8); also divine Justice (Luke 12:58-59)
Judgment-Hall - In ancient times Justice was dispensed in the open, usually in the market-place, near the city gate. With the development of civic life, however, special courts of Justice began to be built. Thus Solomon had his ‘throne-room’ or portico erected within the complex of his palace buildings (1 Kings 7:7), where Justice continued to be administered no doubt till the latest period of the Monarchy. The administration of Justice in basilicae has been traced to Pompeii and other centres of Roman life, but was apparently not the custom in Palestine, the word translated ‘judgment hall’ in the Authorized Version (John 18:28; John 18:33; John 19:9, Acts 23:35) being really πραιτώριον or palace
Punitive - ) Of or pertaining to punishment; involving, awarding, or inflicting punishment; as, punitive law or Justice
Athenagoras - Second-century, Athenian philosopher, and Christian convert, who wrote a plea for Justice towards persecuted Christians
Certiorari - ) A writ issuing out of chancery, or a superior court, to call up the records of a inferior court, or remove a cause there depending, in order that the party may have more sure and speedy Justice, or that errors and irregularities may be corrected. It is obtained upon complaint of a party that he has not received Justice, or can not have an impartial trial in the inferior court
Honesty - In principle, an upright disposition moral rectitude of heart a disposition to conform to Justice and correct moral principles, in all social transactions. In fact, upright conduct an actual conformity to Justice and moral rectitude
Virtues, the Cardinal - The four virtues, namely, Prudence, Justice,Temperance and Fortitude, which Solomon sets forth in the Book ofWisdom, VIII, 7, are called Cardinal Virtues because they are mostimportant in the Christian Life. ...
JUSTICE, rendering to all their dues
Jesher - (jee' sshuhr) Personal name meaning, “he sets right, establishes Justice
Extradite - ) To deliver up by one government to another, as a fugitive from Justice
Justly - ) In a just manner; in conformity to law, Justice, or propriety; by right; honestly; fairly; accurately
Tyrannize - ) To act the tyrant; to exercise arbitrary power; to rule with unjust and oppressive severity; to exercise power others not permitted by law or required by Justice, or with a severity not necessary to the ends of Justice and government; as, a prince will often tyrannize over his subjects; masters sometimes tyrannize over their servants or apprentices
Righteousness - Justice, holiness. The righteousness of God is the essential perfection of his nature; sometimes it is put for his Justice
Honesty - ...
See Justice
Shiphtan - (sshihp' tuhn) Personal name meaning, “process of Justice
Rightfulness - ) The quality or state of being rightful; accordance with right and Justice
Virtues, Cardinal - The four principal virtues upon which the rest of the moral virtues turn, namely Justice, prudence, temperance, and fortitude
Elokim - one of G-d�s sacred Names, specifically relating to the Divine attribute of Justice and His manifestation in nature ...
Retributory - ) Of or pertaining to retribution; of the nature of retribution; involving retribution or repayment; as, retributive Justice; retributory comforts
Zidki'Jah - (justice of Jehovah ) a priest or family of priests who signed the covenant with Nehemiah
Extraditable - ) Subject, or liable, to extradition, as a fugitive from Justice
Mirror of Justice - Title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Litany of Loretto, symbolizing the reflection of God's Justice in her unspotted soul
Justice, Mirror of - Title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Litany of Loretto, symbolizing the reflection of God's Justice in her unspotted soul
Wrongfully - Unjustly in a manner contrary to the moral law or to Justice as, to accuse one wrongfully to suffer wrongfully
Justice - Throughout the Bible, Justice is closely connected with righteousness. ...
God, the sovereign ruler of the universe, is perfect in Justice (Genesis 18:25; Deuteronomy 32:4; Revelation 15:3). Sinners can have hope only because of the perfect harmony of Justice and mercy within the divine nature (Exodus 34:6-7; Zephaniah 3:5; cf. ...
In addition to the Justice that is evident in God’s way of salvation, Justice should be evident in the common affairs of human society. This is the aspect of Justice that the present article is chiefly concerned with. The perfect expression of Justice in governing human society is seen in the authority exercised by Jesus the King-Messiah (Isaiah 9:7; John 5:30; Acts 22:14; see KING). But God wants Justice in the operations of all earthly governments, and likewise in private dealings between individuals (Deuteronomy 16:18-20; Deuteronomy 25:13-16). This unwritten law is what makes it possible for them to know what Justice is and to draw up law-codes to administer Justice in society. ...
The ancient Hebrew law-code demonstrates how the universal and timeless principles of Justice can be applied to the cultural and social habits of a particular people and era. Moses’ law, given by God himself, sets out the sort of Justice that God requires (Deuteronomy 16:18; Deuteronomy 32:44-47). ...
Justice must be the same for all, rich and poor alike (Exodus 23:3; Exodus 23:6-7; Deuteronomy 1:15-17). ...
Although the history of Israel mentions many kings, judges and other administrators who upheld such principles of Justice (2 Samuel 8:15; 2 Samuel 23:3-4; Psalms 101; Isaiah 33:15-16; Jeremiah 22:15), it also mentions many who ignored them (1 Samuel 8:3; 2 Kings 21:16; Ecclesiastes 5:8; Isaiah 5:23; Jeremiah 22:17; see RULER). In both Old and New Testament times godly people were fearless in condemning injustice, whether committed by civil authorities or religious leaders. Civil power gives no one the right to do as he likes, and religious exercises are no substitute for common Justice (Isaiah 1:14-17; Isaiah 1:23; Isaiah 59:14-15; Amos 5:11-12; Amos 5:21-23; Micah 7:3; Mark 11:15-17; Mark 12:40; Luke 6:25; Luke 16:19-25; James 5:1-6). Genuine moral goodness includes within it a concern to correct social injustice. ...
Political conditions vary from one country to another, and these will largely determine the extent to which God’s people can actively try to persuade the government to improve social Justice. ...
Bearing with injustice...
Christians may suffer injustice in the form of discrimination and even persecution, both from governments and from citizens. There may be cases where they claim their rights in support of those principles of Justice that government officials are supposed to administer (Acts 16:35-39; Acts 22:25; Acts 25:10-11), but they should not use their rights for selfish purposes. ...
When Jesus told his followers that they were not to demand ‘an eye for an eye’, he was not undermining the basis of civil Justice (which does demand ‘an eye for an eye’ and positively ‘returns evil for evil’ by imposing a penalty to fit the offence). Rather Jesus was telling his followers that the spirit ruling in their hearts must not be the same as that which operates in a code of legal Justice
Fall of Adam - Since by the grace of original Justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his fall
Adam, Fall of - Since by the grace of original Justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that grace is termed his fall
Torment - basanos (Matthew 4:24 ), the "touch-stone" of Justice; hence inquisition by torture, and then any disease which racks and tortures the limbs
Conciergerie - ) A celebrated prison, attached to the Palais de Justice in Paris
Adla'i - (justice of Jehovah ), Ancestor of Shaphat, the overseer of David's herds that fed in the broad valleys
Mercy - Mercy is the act of not administering Justice when that Justice is punitive. (Compare with Justice and grace
Antiphrasis - ) The use of words in a sense opposite to their proper meaning; as when a court of Justice is called a court of vengeance
Righteously - Justly in accordance with the laws of Justice equitably as a criminal righteously condemned
Threefold - Three-double consisting of three or thrice repeated, as threefold Justice
Cheats - ...
See HONESTY, Justice
Warrantable - ) Authorized by commission, precept, or right; justifiable; defensible; as, the seizure of a thief is always warrantable by law and Justice; falsehood is never warrantable
Juridical - ) Pertaining to a judge or to jurisprudence; acting in the distribution of Justice; used in courts of law; according to law; legal; as, juridical law
Tatnai - A governor of Samaria under Darius, whose administration was characterized by great Justice and moderation towards the Jews, Ezra 5:1-6:22 , B
Officer - The two words so rendered in the New Testament denote --
An inferior officer of a court of Justice, a messenger or bailiff, like the Roman viator or lictor. (Matthew 5:25 ; Acts 5:22 ) ...
Officers whose duty it was to register and collect fines imposed by courts of Justice
Equally - ) In an equal manner or degree in equal shares or proportion; with equal and impartial Justice; without difference; alike; evenly; justly; as, equally taxed, furnished, etc
Porte - ) The Ottoman court; the government of the Turkish empire, officially called the Sublime Porte, from the gate (port) of the sultan's palace at which Justice was administered
Jurisprudence - ) The science of juridical law; the knowledge of the laws, customs, and rights of men in a state or community, necessary for the due administration of Justice
Ligeance - ) The connection between sovereign and subject by which they were mutually bound, the former to protection and the securing of Justice, the latter to faithful service; allegiance
Uprightness - Honesty integrity in principle or practice conformity to rectitude and Justice in social dealings
Just Branch - God says: "I will raise up to David a just branch: and a king shall reign, and shall be wise: and shall execute judgment and Justice in the earth" (Jeremiah 23). " The ideal king of the future will be characterized by Justice and deserves to bear the name "The Lord our just one" (Jeremiah 23)
Habitation - Justice and judgment are the habitation of God's throne (Psalm 89:14 , Heb. mekhon, "foundation"), because all his acts are founded on Justice and judgment
Rendition - ) The act of rendering; especially, the act of surrender, as of fugitives from Justice, at the claim of a foreign government; also, surrender in war
Justice - In his analysis of Justice (δικαιοσύνη), Aristotle (Nicomachean Ethics, bk. ) distinguishes the Justice which is co-extensive with virtue-is, in fact, ‘perfect virtue’-from the special Justice which consists in fairness of dealing with our neighbours. The lesser righteousness is, however, included under the greater; and though the emphasis is laid on mercy or love as ‘the fulfilling of the law’ (Romans 13:10), Justice is also recognized as a duty towards Him who is ‘just’ as well as the merciful ‘justifier’ of them that believe (see Love). This Christian Justice covers the whole round of life. In order that public Justice may be upheld, too, the Christian is urged to pray for kings and all in high places of authority (1 Timothy 2:1 f. But he himself is entitled to Justice before the law. For to him the courts were there to secure Justice for all
Justice (2) - JUSTICE...
In the Authorized Version of NT the word ‘justice’ does not occur, δἰκαιοσύνη being always translated ‘righteousness. are sometimes used in the wider sense of moral rectitude in general; but under the influence of the Platonic and Aristotelian philosophy its later usage inclines to the narrower sense of political and social Justice. ) deals with δἰκαιοσύνη at great length but almost exclusively in the sense of political and individual Justice, though he does attempt to give the idea a wider scope by connecting it with that of the Absolute Good. This is the general idea of righteousness; but our word ‘justice’ must be taken as signifying the recognition and fulfilment of what is due from one to another, righteous dealing between persons, each rendering to others what is their right and due. The Justice of God. —The Justice of God is an aspect of His righteousness, and belongs, therefore, to His essential nature. If in God’s nature mere power were supreme, and holiness and love subordinate, this would be as contrary to Justice as when, in a kingdom, the rule of right has been overturned by irresponsible violence. As in the State, Justice is the controlling principle which preserves the body politic for the discharge of its several functions, so, in the Divine Justice, we have the regulative principle of order in the Divine nature and life. ...
(1) God’s Justice in His relations with men. In the teaching of Christ it is repudiated: Matthew 5:45; Matthew 13:28-29, Luke 16:25; Luke 18:1-5, John 9:2-3; and in Romans 8:18; Romans 8:39 and Hebrews 12:11 an explanation of the sufferings of the righteous is given which goes far to remove their seeming variance with the Justice of God. ...
(2) God’s Justice in relation to sin. Maeterlinck may be right in saying that nature knows nothing of Justice; but in that case we should have to believe with him that neither can nature be regarded as the creation of a Being in whom ethical attributes are supreme (Maeterlinck, Buried Temple, Essay on the ‘Mystery of Justice’). ...
God’s Justice in relation to sin is at once retributive, educative, and protective. That the Scripture view of God’s Justice implies retribution may be shown from many passages: Matthew 16:27; Matthew 16:24-25, Luke 12:45-48, Romans 2:6; Romans 2:16; Romans 6:23, 2 Corinthians 5:10, Colossians 3:25, 2 Thessalonians 1:9, Hebrews 2:2; Hebrews 10:27. How could punishment benefit him if, while undergoing it, he believed that it had not been merited? Retribution does tend to the offender’s improvement, and this is part of God’s purpose in it; but its reformatory influence never takes effect until the sinner acknowledges its Justice. ...
God’s Justice is also shown in the forgiveness of sins on condition of repentance. Repentance is a sign that the disciplinary purpose which accompanies retribution has not missed its mark; and if now God withheld forgiveness, it would imply a failure of Justice. ’ Forgiveness and punishment are alike connected with the Justice of God. The Justice of forgiveness further appears from this, that the man who repents is a different moral person from the man who had sinned. Theologians, who first make logical distinctions between the Divine attributes and then reason from these as if they were real distinctions, say that Justice cannot, but love alone can, forgive; as if love and Justice were two contending powers in God’s nature. In reality, it is holy love that forgives; and this means that love and Justice are joined hand in hand in forgiveness as they are in punishment. From a non-moral love gifts would come, but they might not be blessings; and Justice without love never could be perfectly just, for love is part of the tribute which Justice demands. The OT and NT writers never attempt to reconcile love and Justice, because they were not conscious of any contrariety between them (see Matthew 6:12; Matthew 6:14-15; Matthew 12:31-32; Matthew 18:15-17; Matthew 18:21-35, Luke 6:37; Luke 7:37-50; Luke 13:3; Luke 13:5; Luke 15:11-32; Luke 17:3-4; Luke 18:10-14; Luke 22:61-62; cf. Justice in man. Thus for him also Justice or righteousness will be the supreme law of his being, obligatory, not through any human convention, but in virtue of man’s Godlikeness. Justice will regulate his life Godward, for God has definite claims on man for devotion and service; and as in Christ He has made Himself known as a Father and Saviour, these claims are, for the Christian, raised to a higher sphere of obligation. These are duties which man owes to God, and, when they are withheld, Justice is violated. We are then ‘just before God’; and from 1 John 3:10; 1 John 3:17; 1 John 4:20-21; 1 John 5:1 we learn that only when man responds to God’s claim can he fulfil the obligations of love and Justice to his fellow-men. ...
One characteristic of the NT doctrine of Justice, as compared with the views current in the Jewish and classical worlds, is a noteworthy enlargement of its sphere. Justice to man as man was a subject of speculation among the Stoics, but in the popular morality its obligation was ignored and even repudiated. It was, therefore, a great step in advance when Christ proclaimed a universal Kingdom of Justice and love, and taught that, since God was the Father of all, they were due to all men, on the ground not of citizenship or nationality, but of humanity and of their common relationship to God (Matthew 5:43-48; Matthew 28:19, Luke 10:30-37, John 3:16; John 12:32). All the virtues had thus suffered deterioration, and Justice among them. And this was an infinite extension of the sway of Justice. Sin is not confined to outward acts; it begins the moment evil thoughts and desires arise in the heart; and a régime of Justice is necessary there. The Christian law of Justice is embodied in the Golden Rule, ‘All things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them’ (Matthew 7:12); and also in the second of the great commandments, ‘Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself’ (Mark 12:31). It is for His moral perfections that we love God; and the claims of Christian Justice are met, only when our love for others has as its aim their restoration to Godlikeness (Matthew 16:26, James 5:20, Hebrews 13:17). For a Christian man to say, ‘I have done my neighbour Justice, and he has no claim on me for more,’ is to prove false to the Christian ideal; for, in the Kingdom of righteousness, benevolence is not something that may be withheld, but is simply Justice made perfect. Wagner, Justice; Seeley, Ecce Homo. In the following works on General Ethics, ‘Justice’ is, in the main, treated from the Christian standpoint: Hegel. ]'>[2] ; Seth, Ethical Principles; Maeterlinck, Essay on the ‘Mystery of Justice’ in his Buried Temple [4]
Adonizedek - The lord of Zedek: supposed to, have been one of the ancient names of Jerusalem; and which is said to have had four: Salem, Jebus, Zedek, (or Justice) and Jerusalem
Justness - ) The quality of being just; conformity to truth, propriety, accuracy, exactness, and the like; Justice; reasonableness; fairness; equity; as, justness of proportions; the justness of a description or representation; the justness of a cause
Equity - Justice right. In practice, equity is the impartial distribution of Justice, or the doing that to another which the laws of God and man, and of reason, give him a right to claim. It is the treating of a person according to Justice and reason. Justice impartiality a just regard to right or claim as, we must, in equity, allow this claim
National Catholic Women's Union - See also the Social Justice Review web site
Candid - ) Free from undue bias; disposed to think and judge according to truth and Justice, or without partiality or prejudice; fair; just; impartial; as, a candid opinion
Mittimus - ) A precept or warrant granted by a Justice for committing to prison a party charged with crime; a warrant of commitment to prison
Amende Honorable - Form of satisfaction inflicted on condemned criminale in France as late as the 17th century; they appeared before the ecclesiastical judge, stripped to the waist, barefoot, with candle in hand, begging pardon of God, the king, and Justice
Chapiter - That which is delivered by the mouth of the Justice in his charge to the inquest
Living Creatures - They are distinguished from angels (Revelation 15:7 ); they join the elders in the "new song" (5:8,9); they warn of danger from divine Justice (Isaiah 6:3-5 ), and deliver the commission to those who execute it (Ezekiel 10:2,7 ); they associate with the elders in their sympathy with the hundred and forty-four thousand who sing the new song (Revelation 14:3 ), and with the Church in the overthrow of her enemies (19:4). They are supposed to represent mercy, as distinguished from Justice, mercy in its various instrumentalities, and especially as connected with the throne of God, the "throne of grace
Rectitude - ) Rightness of principle or practice; exact conformity to truth, or to the rules prescribed for moral conduct, either by divine or human laws; uprightness of mind; uprightness; integrity; honesty; Justice
Seneschal - Sometimes the seneschal had the dispensing of Justice, and was given high military commands
Theodicy - ) A vindication of the Justice of God in ordaining or permitting natural and moral evil
Unjust - Contrary to Justice and right wrongful as an unjust sentence an unjust demand an unjust accusation
Dill - Jesus accused the scribes and Pharisees of tithing their dill but neglecting Justice, mercy, and faith (Matthew 23:23 )
Madon - (may' dahn) Place name meaning, “site of Justice
Rightly - ) According to Justice; according to the divine will or moral rectitude; uprightly; as, duty rightly performed
Fuero - ) A place where Justice is administered
Ample - ) Fully sufficient; abundant; liberal; copious; as, an ample fortune; ample Justice
Erroneous - ) Containing error; not conformed to truth or Justice; incorrect; false; mistaken; as, an erroneous doctrine; erroneous opinion, observation, deduction, view, etc
Chabakkuk - ...
Chabakkuk The book of Tanach containing Habakkuk's prophecies, foretelling the Chaldean victory over the Judeans, Chaldea's ultimate downfall, and asserting G-d's Justice
Government of God - Is the disposal of his creatures, and all events relative to them, according to his infinite Justice, power, and wisdom
Influence of the Church on Civil Law - Ecclesiastics have assisted in legislation, government, and the administration of Justice from the beginning of the Christian Era. , the Lex Romana Visigothorum; dispensed Justice in civiland criminal matters; and advised rulers, e
Law, Influence of the Church on Civil Law - Ecclesiastics have assisted in legislation, government, and the administration of Justice from the beginning of the Christian Era. , the Lex Romana Visigothorum; dispensed Justice in civiland criminal matters; and advised rulers, e
Mall - ) A court of Justice. ) A place where Justice is administered
Jurisdiction - The legal power of authority of doing Justice in cases of complaint the power of executing the laws and distributing Justice. Jurisdiction, in its most general sense, is the power to make, declare or apply the law when confined to the judiciary department, it is what we denominate the judicial power,the right of administering Justice through the laws, by the means which the laws have provided for that purpose
Habakkuk - ...
Habakkuk, the book of: The book of Tanach containing Habakkuk's prophecies, foretelling the Chaldean victory over the Judeans, Chaldea’s ultimate downfall, and asserting G-d's Justice
Habakkuk (2) - ...
Habakkuk, the book of: The book of Tanach containing Habakkuk's prophecies, foretelling the Chaldean victory over the Judeans, Chaldea�s ultimate downfall, and asserting G-d's Justice
Plumbline - Amos 7:7 (a) The carpenter's plummet for lining up the wall into a perfect vertical line is a type of the care which GOD exercises in determining that every soul is dealt with in perfect righteousness, Justice and equity
Bailey - ) A prison or court of Justice; - used in certain proper names; as, the Old Bailey in London; the New Bailey in Manchester
Connivent - ) Forbearing to see; designedly inattentive; as, connivent Justice
Rigorous - ) Manifesting, exercising, or favoring rigor; allowing no abatement or mitigation; scrupulously accurate; exact; strict; severe; relentless; as, a rigorous officer of Justice; a rigorous execution of law; a rigorous definition or demonstration
Verger - ) An attendant upon a dignitary, as on a bishop, a dean, a Justice, etc
Abiah - Samuel having entrusted to his sons the administration of public Justice, and admitted them to a share in the government, they behaved so ill, that the people demanded a king, 1 Samuel 8:2
Plead - ]'>[1] ‘plead’ always means to ‘argue for or against a cause’ as in a court of Justice, never to ‘pray’ or ‘beseech
Sins That Cry to Heaven For Vengeance - Sins which on account of their manifest and heinous malice, cry, as it were, for vengeance, and call on Divine Justice to punish them signally
Concealment - ) Suppression of such facts and circumstances as in Justice ought to be made known
Ratuitous - ) Given without an equivalent or recompense; conferred without valuable consideration; granted without pay, or without claim or merit; not required by Justice
Dishonesty - ) Violation of trust or of Justice; fraud; any deviation from probity; a dishonest act
Reconcilation - This is effected by his Justice being satisfied, so that he can, in consistency with his own nature, be favourable toward sinners. Justice demands the punishment of sinners. The death of Christ satisfies Justice, and so reconciles God to us
Conservator - ) An officer who has charge of preserving the public peace, as a Justice or sheriff
Propitiation - ) That which propitiates; atonement or atoning sacrifice; specifically, the influence or effects of the death of Christ in appeasing the divine Justice, and conciliating the divine favor
Hannah - Her song of praise on this occasion, 1 Samuel 2:1-10, is a magnificent hymn to the holiness and Justice of Jehovah, and has been compared with the song of Mary
Seduction - In a special sense, that specific sin against Justice and the sixth commandment whereby a person forcefully persuades another of either sex to engage in unlawful sexual intercourse. This sin contains the twofold malice of injustice and impurity
Condescend - To descend from the privileges of superior rank or dignity, to do some act to an inferior, which strict Justice or the ordinary rules of civility do not require. To recede from ones rights in negotiation, or common intercourse, to do some act, which strict Justice does not require
Sympathy: Fruit of Experience - Hone in his 'Year Book,' has the following anecdote of Charles Pratt, Earl Camden, when Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. The Chief Justice sat down upon them, and after awhile, having a mind to know what the punishment was, he asked his companion to open them and put him in. In the meantime, the Chief Justice being tired of the stocks, tried in vain to release himself. The Chief Justice rose, and, leaning over the bench, said, in a half-whisper, 'Brother, have you ever been in the stocks?' 'Really, my lord, never
Exemplary - ) Serving as a warning; monitory; as, exemplary Justice, punishment, or damages
Judiciary - ) That branch of government in which judicial power is vested; the system of courts of Justice in a country; the judges, taken collectively; as, an independent judiciary; the senate committee on the judiciary
pi'Thom - (the city of Justice ), one of the store-cites Israelites for the first oppressor, the Pharaoh "which knew not Joseph
Justice - Justice (I. Justice, as an attribute of God, is referred to in AV [2] has ‘Justice’ instead of ‘vengeance. ]'>[6] is intended to indicate, the writer must have had in his mind the goddeas of Justice of Greek poetry, Dikç , the virgin daughter of Zeus, who sat by his side. What was their equivalent? A positive answer cannot be given, but it may be noted that Babylonian mythology represented ‘justice and rectitude’ as the children of Shamash the sun-god, ‘the judge of heaven and earth,’ and that the Phœnicians had in their pantheon a Divine being named tsedeq . ...
Justice (II. The administration of Justice in early Israel . ( a ) The earliest form of the administration of Justice was that exercised by the head of the family. ...
( b ) The next stage was that in which Justice was administered by the ‘elders’ of a clan or tribe (see Numbers 11:16 ). In Exodus 18:13-27 we have what purports to be the original institution of the administration of Justice by the elders of clans, Moses himself acting in the capacity of a kind of court of appeal ( Exodus 18:26 ); it is, of course, quite possible that, so far as Israel was concerned, this account is historically true, but the institution must have been much older than the time of Moses, and in following Jethro’s guidance, Moses was probably only re-instituting a régime which had long existed among his nomad forefathers. It is a more developed form of tribal Justice that we read of in Deuteronomy 21:18-21 ; here the father of a rebellious son, finding his authority set at nought, appeals to the ‘elders of the city’; in the case of being found guilty the death-sentence is pronounced against the son, and the sentence is carried out by representatives of the community. The passage is an important one, for it evidently contains echoes of very early usage, the mention of the mother may imply a distant reminiscence of the matriarchate; and the fact that the head of the family exercises his power recalls the earlier régime already referred to, while the present institution of the administration of Justice by elders is also borne witness to. ...
( c ) In the monarchical period a further development takes place; the older system, whereby Justice was administered by the elders of the cities, is indeed still seen to be in vogue (cf. But though the king was supreme judge in the land, it would obviously soon have become impossible for him to attend to all the more important causes even; the number of these, as well as other calls upon his time, necessitated the appointment of representatives who should administer Justice in the king’s name. The appointment of these must have further curtailed the powers of the earlier representatives of Justice, already referred to. One of the worst results, however, of this was that the motives of administering Justice became different; in the old days, when the sheik, or the city elder, was called upon to decide an issue, he did it rather in the capacity of a friend who desired peace between two other friends than as a strictly legal official; his interest in the disputants, as being both of his own kin, or at all events both members of the same community to which he belonged, impelled him to do his utmost to make peace. The result was that personal interest of another kind asserted itself, and, as there is abundant evidence to show, the administration of Justice was guided rather by the prospect of gain than in the interests of equity. It is an ever-recurring burden in the Prophetical writings that Justice is thwarted through bribery: ‘Every one loveth gifts and followeth after rewards’ ( Isaiah 1:23 ; see, further, Isaiah 5:7 ; Isaiah 5:20 ; Isaiah 5:23 , Micah 3:11 ; Micah 7:3 , Ezekiel 18:8 ; Ezekiel 22:12 etc. A very aggravated instance of the miscarriage of Justice is recorded in 1 Kings 21:1-29 ; but such cases were undoubtedly rare exceptions; so far as Israel and Judah were concerned, it was not from the central authority that the perversion of Justice proceeded, but rather from the king’s representatives, the ‘princes’ ( sârim ), who misused their authority for nefarious ends. Even before the Exile the administration of Justice was to a large extent centred in the hands of the Levitical priesthood; nothing could illustrate this more pointedly than Deuteronomy 19:15-21 , where the outlines of a regular, formulated, judicial system seem to be referred to, in which the final authority is vested in the priesthood. At the time of Ezra we find that the administration of Justice by the elders of the city, which had continued throughout the period of the monarchy, is still in vogue (see Ezra 7:25 ; Ezra 10:14 ); they presided over the local courts in the smaller provincial towns. The administration of Justice under the Roman régime comes before us in connexion with St
Palatine Count - In the times of the Frankish kings and German emperors palatine counts were the representatives of the crown and as such presided in the high court of Justice of a palatinate
Dishonesty - Violation of trust or of Justice fraud treachery any deviation from probity or integrity applied to acts
Exaggeration - ) The act of exaggerating; the act of doing or representing in an excessive manner; a going beyond the bounds of truth reason, or Justice; a hyperbolical representation; hyperbole; overstatement
County - ) A circuit or particular portion of a state or kingdom, separated from the rest of the territory, for certain purposes in the administration of Justice and public affairs; - called also a shire
Equally - Impartially with equal Justice
Respecter - One that respects chiefly used in the phrase, respecter of persons, which signifies a person who regards the external circumstances of others in his judgment, and suffers his opinion to be biased by them, to the prejudice of candor, Justice and equity
Unrighteousness - Injustice a violation of the divine law, or of the plain principles of Justice and equity wickedness
Cancelli - ) An interwoven or latticed wall or inclosure; latticework, rails, or crossbars, as around the bar of a court of Justice, between the chancel and the nave of a church, or in a window
Legal Interest - Excessive interest is a sin against Justice, unlawful, and illegal
Interest, Legal - Excessive interest is a sin against Justice, unlawful, and illegal
Shaphat - (sshay' fat) Personal name meaning, “He has established Justice
Dinah - (di' nah) Personal name meaning, “justice” or “artistically formed
Wormwood - The Old Testament prophets pictured wormwood as the opposite of Justice and righteousness (Amos 5:7 ; Jeremiah 23:15 )
Punishment - ) A penalty inflicted by a court of Justice on a convicted offender as a just retribution, and incidentally for the purposes of reformation and prevention
Venerable - The virtues are the Theological Virtues of faith, hope and charity and the Cardinal Virtues of prudence, Justice, fortitude and temperance
Catholic Central Verein of America - Its aims are to promote a Christian philosophy of life, to apply its ideals to industrial, commercial, social, civic,and political problems, to defend religious liberty, to promote the restoration of society on a Christian basis, to foster brotherly love among its members, to advance civicvirtues and the fulfilment of public duty, and to work for an increase of Justice and charity in all human relations. It publishes a monthly organ, the "Central Blatt and Social Justice
Grace - It is different than Justice and Mercy. Justice is getting what we deserve
Vengeance - Such infliction, when it proceeds from malice or more resentment, and is not necessary for the purposes of Justice, is revenge, and a most heinous crime. When such infliction proceeds from a mere love of Justice, and the necessity of punishing offenders for the support of the laws, it is vengeance, and is warrantable and just
John o'Hagan - His brilliant career at the bar was crowned by his elevation to the High Court of Justice by Gladstone
Chancery - ) In England, formerly, the highest court of judicature next to the Parliament, exercising jurisdiction at law, but chiefly in equity; but under the jurisdiction act of 1873 it became the chancery division of the High Court of Justice, and now exercises jurisdiction only in equity
Punishment - blots out the attribute of retributive Justice; transmutes sin into misfortune instead of guilt; turns all suffering into chastisement; converts the piacular work of Christ into moral influence
o'Hagan, John - His brilliant career at the bar was crowned by his elevation to the High Court of Justice by Gladstone
Image of God - Essential likeness is perfected accidentally by natural and supernatural virtues, especially by charity and Justice
Puisne - ) Younger or inferior in rank; junior; associate; as, a chief Justice and three puisne Justices of the Court of Common Pleas; the puisne barons of the Court of Exchequer
Displeasure - ) The feeling of one who is displeased; irritation or uneasiness of the mind, occasioned by anything that counteracts desire or command, or which opposes Justice or a sense of propriety; disapprobation; dislike; dissatisfaction; disfavor; indignation
Injustice - injustitia in and justitia,justice
God, Image of - Essential likeness is perfected accidentally by natural and supernatural virtues, especially by charity and Justice
Jethro - There he suggested the creation of a hierarchy of magistrates and judges to assist Moses in the task of administrating Justice
Antosiandrians - The Antosiandrians deny that man is made just, with that Justice wherewith God himself is just; that is, they assert that he is not made essentially but only imputatively just; or that he is not really made just, but only pronounced so
Ulema - ) A college or corporation in Turkey composed of the hierarchy, namely, the imams, or ministers of religion, the muftis, or doctors of law, and the cadis, or administrators of Justice
Balance - The emblem of Justice (Job 31:6; Psalms 62:9; Proverbs 11:1) the test of truth and honesty
Rightful - ) Consonant to Justice; just; as, a rightful cause
Tyranny - ) The government or authority of a tyrant; a country governed by an absolute ruler; hence, arbitrary or despotic exercise of power; exercise of power over subjects and others with a rigor not authorized by law or Justice, or not requisite for the purposes of government
Reconciliation - restored us (the world, 2 Corinthians 5:19) to His favor by satisfying the claims of Justice against us. Christ's blood was the ransom or price paid at God's own cost to reconcile the exercise of His mercy with Justice, not as separate, but as the eternally co-existing harmonious attributes in the unchangeable God. )...
Romans 3:25-26, "God in Christ reconciles the world to Himself," as 2 Corinthians 5:19 explains, by "not imputing their trespasses unto them," and by in the first instance satisfying His own Justice and righteous enmity against sin (Psalms 7:11; Isaiah 12:1). God's Justice is (humanly speaking) propitiated by Christ's sacrifice. But as God's love was side by side from everlasting with His Justice, Christ's sacrifice is never expressly said to propitiate God (but Hebrews 2:17 virtually implies something like it), lest that sacrifice should seem antecedent to and producing God's grace. ...
God's love originated Christ's sacrifice, whereby God's Justice and love are harmonized. So Christ, having assumed my nature into His person, and so satisfied divine Justice for my sins, I am received into favor again with the most high God
Rerum Novarum - The Church being interested chiefly in the religious and moral aspects of social questions, the State has the duty and the right to intervene on behalf of Justice and of social and individual well-being. Thoughtful men look upon Pope Leo XIII's Encyclical as the most fruitful and effective document on industrial Justice thus far pronounced
Sanction - Divine Wisdom and Justice demand a truly adequate sanction. Such complete and final sanction is not to be found in this world of struggle between good and evil, where the forces of evil at times seem victorious, but in the future life with its eternal rewards or happiness and the eternal punishments or misery through which goodness and virtue as well as Divine Justice are finally triumphant
Equitable - ) Possessing or exhibiting equity; according to natural right or natural Justice; marked by a due consideration for what is fair, unbiased, or impartial; just; as an equitable decision; an equitable distribution of an estate; equitable men
Partiality - Partiality springs from the will and affections, rather than from a love of truth and Justice
Court - ) The hall, chamber, or place, where Justice is administered. ) The persons officially assembled under authority of law, at the appropriate time and place, for the administration of Justice; an official assembly, legally met together for the transaction of judicial business; a judge or judges sitting for the hearing or trial of causes. ) A tribunal established for the administration of Justice
Just - In a moral sense, upright honest having principles of rectitude or conforming exactly to the laws, and to principles of rectitude in social conduct equitable in the distribution of Justice as a just judge. Conformed to rules of Justice doing equal Justice
Jehoiarib - (jih hoy' aw rihb) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh creates Justice
Joiarib - (joy uh rihb) Short form of Jehoiarib meaning, “Yah establishes Justice
Equity - ) Equality of rights; natural Justice or right; the giving, or desiring to give, to each man his due, according to reason, and the law of God to man; fairness in determination of conflicting claims; impartiality
Henry ii, Saint - He inaugurated needed reforms in the monasteries and strengthened the various ecclesiastical sees of his kingdom, built churches and monasteries, and ruled wisely, tempering Justice with mercy
Exactor - An extortioner one who compels another to pay more than is legal or reasonable one who demands something without pity or regard to Justice
Waif - ) Goods found of which the owner is not known; originally, such goods as a pursued thief threw away to prevent being apprehended, which belonged to the king unless the owner made pursuit of the felon, took him, and brought him to Justice
Gown, the Black - An Academical gown; an official or distinctivedress worn by students and officers of a College or University,and also by officials of a Court of Justice
Justice - Justice in magistrates, rulers, and judges, must be fearless and impartial, and all its decisions such as will bear revision before the court of heaven, Deuteronomy 1:16,17 2 Samuel 23:3 2 Chronicles 19:6-10 . ...
THE Justice OF GOD is that essential and infinite attribute which makes his nature and his ways the perfect embodiment of equity, and constitutes him the model and the guardian of equity throughout the universe, Deuteronomy 32:4 Psalm 89:14 . The Justice of God could not leave the world without laws, and cannot fail to vindicate them by executing their penalties; and as all mankind perpetually break them, every human soul is under condemnation, and must perish, unless spared through the accepted ransom, the blood of Christ. ...
THE ADMINSITRATION OF Justice among the Hebrews, was characterized by simplicity and promptitude. Samuel established virtually a circuit court, 1 Samuel 7:16 8:1 ; and among the kings, Jehoshaphat made special provision for the faithful administration of Justice, 2 Chronicles 19:1-11 . They were expected, however, to see that Justice was everywhere done, and seem to have been accessible to all who were wronged. The same frightful celerity still marks the administration of Justice in the East
Diocesan Court - It consists of: ...
a vicar-general with general vicarious power in spiritual and temporal matters, who is one tribunal with his bishop and can be removed from office at will;
an official, who corresponds to a chief Justice in the civilcourts, having ordinary power;
a chancellor, to keep the records a promoter of Justice, like a district attorney;
a defender of the bond of Marriage and Sacred Orders, whose duty it is to defend the existence of a true marriage or valid Orders when either is attacked;
synodal judges, who may be called associate Justices and who are generally named in the diocesan synod;
examiners, who preside at examinations of the clergy and intervene in certain cases of removal of parish priests;
parish priest consultors, who also are called in sometimes in the removal of irremovable pastors or in the transfer of ordinary pastors; auditors, who assist the judges in ecclesiastical trials by citing witnesses, etc
Righteousness - Justice, holiness. The righteousness of God is the absolute and essential perfections of his nature; sometimes it is put for his Justice
Agag - ...
Another king of the Amalekites whom Saul spared unlawfully, but whom Samuel on his arrival in the camp of Saul ordered, in retributive Justice (Judges 1 ), to be brought out and cut in pieces (1Samuel 15:8-33
Proselyte - Among the Hebrews, proselytes were distinguished into two sorts: the first called proselytes of the gate, because suffered to live among them, and were those who observed the moral law only, and the rules imposed on the children of Noah; the second were called proselytes of Justice, who engaged to receive circumcision, and the whole law of Moses, and enjoyed all the privileges of a native Hebrew
Bribe - A bribe is a consideration given or promised to a person, to induce him to decide a cause, give testimony, or perform some act contrary to what he knows to be truth, Justice or rectitude
Tribunal - ) The seat of a judge; the bench on which a judge and his associates sit for administering Justice
Gate - Thus the gates of hell means hell itself; gates of judgment, the place where Justice was awarded
Adonize'Dek - (lord of Justice ), the Amorite king of Jerusalem who organized a league with four other Amorite princes against Joshua
Consistory - ) A civil court of Justice
Publican - Hence the Jews classed them with sinners, and would not allow them to enter the temple or the synagogues, to partake of the public prayers or offices of judicature, or to give testimony in a court of Justice
Infinite - An attribute of God denoting that He has no limit to any of His perfections, wisdom, beauty, power, Justice, but has in Himself the fulness of being and of every perfection
Fugitive - ; a deserter; as, a fugitive from Justice
Revenge - According to modern usage, to inflict pain deliberately and maliciously, contrary to the laws of Justice and humanity, in return for injury, pain or evil received to wreak vengeance spitefully on one who injures or offends. According to modern usage, a malicious or spiteful infliction of pain or injury, contrary to the laws of Justice and christianity, in return for an injury or offense. Revenge is dictated by passion vengeance by Justice
Justice - It is often divided into commutative and distributive Justice. Watts gives the following rules respecting Justice
Blood-Avenger - The sacredness of human life, and the Justice of punishing a murderer by death, are grounded on the fact that man was made in the image of God, Genesis 9:6 . With Justice, the passion for revenge often conspired to secure the death of the criminal
Reason - Right Justice that which is dictated or supported by reason. Reasonable claim Justice. Moderation moderate demands claims which reason and Justice admit or prescribe. The most probable way of bringing France to reason, would be by the making an attempt on the Spanish West Indies - ...
In reason, in all reason, in Justice with rational ground
Catechism of Saint Peter Canisius - The division of the subject-matter is as follows: Faith (Apostles' Creed); Hope and Prayer (Lord's Prayer, Hail Mary); Charity and the Commandments of God and the Church; the Sacraments; Christian Justice, i
Eldad - Whom God has loved, one of the seventy elders whom Moses appointed (Numbers 11:26,27 ) to administer Justice among the people
Curia - ) Any court of Justice
Procedendo - ) A writ by which the commission of the Justice of the peace is revived, after having been suspended
Adonizedek - Adonizedek (a-dô'nî-zç'ăek or a-dŏn-i-zç'dek), lord of Justice
Saint Peter Canisius, Catechism of - The division of the subject-matter is as follows: Faith (Apostles' Creed); Hope and Prayer (Lord's Prayer, Hail Mary); Charity and the Commandments of God and the Church; the Sacraments; Christian Justice, i
Contempt - ) Disobedience of the rules, orders, or process of a court of Justice, or of rules or orders of a legislative body; disorderly, contemptuous, or insolent language or behavior in presence of a court, tending to disturb its proceedings, or impair the respect due to its authority
By - ’...
In 1 Corinthians 4:4 ‘I know nothing by myself,’ by means contrary to, against , as in Hamilton’s Catechism , 1559 (the Tabil), ‘Jugis quhilk fur lufe of rewardis dols ony thing by the ordour of Justice’; also fol
Determination - Justice is promoted by a speedy determination of causes, and criminal
Distribute - To dispense to administer as, to distribute Justice
Daysman - The compound arose from the use of the word ‘day’ in a technical sense, to signify a day for dispensing Justice
Purgatory - ) A state or place of purification after death; according to the Roman Catholic creed, a place, or a state believed to exist after death, in which the souls of persons are purified by expiating such offenses committed in this life as do not merit eternal damnation, or in which they fully satisfy the Justice of God for sins that have been forgiven
Righteous - Applied to things, it denotes consonant to the divine will or to Justice as a righteous act
Hall - 1: αὐλή (Strong's #833 — Noun Feminine — aule — ow-lay' ) "a court," most frequently the place where a governor dispensed Justice, is rendered "hall" in Mark 15:16 ; Luke 22:55 , AV (RV, "court")
Catholic Council For International Relations - " It endeavors to give Catholics in Great Britain a greater and more sympathetic knowledge of their fellow Catholics in other countries; to create a Catholic public opinion, informed by the tradition of the Church, which shall be a real power for international Justice and peace; to enable Catholics to understand, appreciate, and when necessary, criticize from the standpoint of religion, the international organizations and movements of the day. By means of pamphlets and the quarterly publication of "A Catholic Survey," it establishes Catholic principles of international morality and Justice
Catholic Survey - " It endeavors to give Catholics in Great Britain a greater and more sympathetic knowledge of their fellow Catholics in other countries; to create a Catholic public opinion, informed by the tradition of the Church, which shall be a real power for international Justice and peace; to enable Catholics to understand, appreciate, and when necessary, criticize from the standpoint of religion, the international organizations and movements of the day. By means of pamphlets and the quarterly publication of "A Catholic Survey," it establishes Catholic principles of international morality and Justice
Gentleness - word is that which is suggested by equity as opposed to strict legal Justice; it expresses the quality of considerateness, of readiness to look humanely and reasonably at the facts of a case. ; he thinks there are no words in English which answer exactly to it, the ideas of equity and fairness, which are essential to its import, usually getting less than Justice in the proposed equivalents
Condemnation - In the Old Testament theocracy God mediated his Justice through judges, kings, priests, and prophets. In the New Testament the church's leaders are accountable for administering his Justice to the people of God. Through his prophets he continued to call Israel to obedience, yet his theocratic rulers frequently neglected his Justice by condemning the innocent and vindicating the guilty. Eventually God condemned this miscarriage of Justice by sending other nations to carry Israel into captivity. Thus the Old Testament generally stresses the Justice of God in punishing sinners during the present life, not the afterlife (but see Daniel 12:2 ). ...
To summarize, the theme of condemnation is always seen in the Bible against the background of a just God who creates, redeems, and covenants with his people so that they may live out his Justice on the earth. Sinners who come to this God in faith are not condemned, but are expected to live together in a community where Justice prevails in the vindication of the oppressed and the condemnation of the oppressor
Justice - The Justice of God is in this, that He loves good and hates evil, and hence He rewards the good and punishes the evil
Martyr - "
In a court of Justice (Matthew 18:16 ; 26:65 ; Acts 6:13 ; 7:58 ; Hebrews 10:28 ; 1 Timothy 5:19 )
Mercy Seat - Mercy meets the needs and requirements of Justice
Heroic Virtue - It means eminence in practise of the social or cardinal virtues, prudence, Justice, temperance, and fortitude, and in the theological or godly virtues, faith, hope, and charity
Precedent - ) A judicial decision which serves as a rule for future determinations in similar or analogous cases; an authority to be followed in courts of Justice; forms of proceeding to be followed in similar cases
Areopagus - the high court at Athens, famed for the Justice of its decisions; and so called, because it sat on a hill of the same name, or in the suburbs of the city, dedicated to Mars, the god of war, as the city was to Minerva, his sister
Council - ...
A kind of jury or privy council, (Acts 25:12 ) consisting of a certain number of assessors, who assisted Roman governors in the administration of Justice and in other public matters
Respect of Persons - The judges of the Hebrews were directed to give sentence strictly according to truth and Justice, without regard to the comparative wealth, influence or other advantage of one party over the other, Leviticus 19:15 Deuteronomy 16:17 Proverbs 24:23
Virtue, Heroic - It means eminence in practise of the social or cardinal virtues, prudence, Justice, temperance, and fortitude, and in the theological or godly virtues, faith, hope, and charity
Assize - ) An assembly of knights and other substantial men, with a bailiff or Justice, in a certain place and at a certain time, for public business. ) The periodical sessions of the judges of the superior courts in every county of England for the purpose of administering Justice in the trial and determination of civil and criminal cases; - usually in the plural
College - In Russia, the denomination, college, is given to councils of state, courts or assemblies of men intrusted with the administration of the government, and called Imperial college the college of foreign affairs the college of war the admiralty college the college of Justice the college of commerce the medical college. So also there are colleges of surgeons and in Britain, a college of philosophy, a college of heralds, a college of Justice, &c
Right - In morals and religion, just equitable accordant to the standard of truth and Justice or the will of God. That alone is right in the sight of God, which is consonant to his will or law this being the only perfect standard of truth and Justice. You are right, Justice, and you weigh this well. According to the law or will of God, or to the standard of truth and Justice as, to judge right. Conformity to the will of God, or to his law, the perfect standard of truth and Justice. Conformity to human laws, or to other human standard of truth, propriety or Justice. Justice that which is due or proper as, to do right to every man. To do Justice to to relieve from wrong as, to right an injured person
Avenge, Avenger - A — 1: ἐκδικέω (Strong's #1556 — Verb — ekdikeo — ek-dik-eh'-o ) ek, "from," dike, "justice," i. , that which proceeds from Justice, means (a) "to vindicate a person's right," (b) "to avenge a thing. In 2 Thessalonians 1:8 it is said of the act of Divine Justice which will be meted out to those who know not God and obey not the Gospel, when the Lord comes in flaming fire at His second advent
Imputation - , he assumed our "law-place," undertook to answer the demands of Justice for our sins
Balance - A "pair of balances" is a symbol of Justice and fair dealing (Job 31:6 ; Psalm 62:9 ; Proverbs 11:1 )
Emblem - ) A visible sign of an idea; an object, or the figure of an object, symbolizing and suggesting another object, or an idea, by natural aptness or by association; a figurative representation; a typical designation; a symbol; as, a balance is an emblem of Justice; a scepter, the emblem of sovereignty or power; a circle, the emblem of eternity
Seven - ...
The number seven occurs very frequently throughout the book of Revelation, and in each case it indicates the perfect character of GOD, His perfect integrity, equity and Justice in all His dealings with men
Purgatory - Few depart this life so pure as to be totally exempt from spots of this nature, and from every kind of debt due to God's Justice. Therefore few will escape without suffering something from his Justice for such debts as they have carried with them out of this world, according to that rule of divine Justice by which he treats every soul hereafter according to its own works, and according to the state in which he finds it in death. From these propositions, which the Papist considers as so many self-evident truths, he infers that there must be some third place of punishment; for since the infinite goodness of God can admit nothing into heaven which is not clean and pure from all sin both great and small, and his infinite Justice can permit none to receive the reward of bliss who as yet are not out of debt, but have something in Justice to suffer, there must of necessity, be some place or state, where souls departing this life, pardoned as to the external guilt or pain, yet obnoxious to some temporal penalty, or with the guilt of some venial faults, are purged and purified before their admittance into heaven
Purgatory - Few depart this life so pure as to be totally exempt from spots of this nature, and from every kind of debt due to God's Justice. Therefore, few will escape without suffering something from his Justice for such debts as they have carried with them out of this world, according to the rule of divine Justice, by which he treats every soul hereafter according to his works, and according to the state in which he finds it in death. From these positions, which the papist considers as so many self- evident truths, he infers that there must be some third place of punishment; for since the infinite holiness of God can admit nothing into heaven that is not clean and pure from all sin, both great and small, and his infinite Justice can permit none to receive the reward of bliss, who as yet are not out of debt, but have something in Justice to suffer, there must, of necessity, be some place or state, where souls departing this life, pardoned as to the eternal guilt of sin, yet obnoxious to some temporal penalty, or with the guilt of some venial faults, are purged and purified before their admittance into heaven
Basilica - ) Originally, the place of a king; but afterward, an apartment provided in the houses of persons of importance, where assemblies were held for dispensing Justice; and hence, any large hall used for this purpose
Integrity - Integrity as a preternatural gift was a part of man's initial equipment in the state of original Justice
False Humanitarianism - The Christian duty of charity and Justice includes all the best elements of this system, and avoids its errors
Areopagus - ...
A sovereign tribunal at Athens, famous for the Justice and impartiality of its decisions
Habitation - Jeremiah 50:7 pictures the Lord as the dwelling place of Justice or “their true pasture” (NIV; compare Psalm 71:3 ; Psalm 91:9 )
Nationalism - Deifying the nation, it does not recognize the sovereignty of principles of Justice
Comforter - It means properly "one who is summoned to the side of another" to help him in a court of Justice by defending him, "one who is summoned to plead a cause
Comforter - It means properly "one who is summoned to the side of another" to help him in a court of Justice by defending him, "one who is summoned to plead a cause
Humanitarianism, False - The Christian duty of charity and Justice includes all the best elements of this system, and avoids its errors
Puffery: Spiritual - When we read the exaggerated accounts which are so frequently issued, lauding to the skies the successful labours of certain evangelists of doubtful vocation, we are reminded of the battle of Aliwal, of which an officer wrote, 'Aliwal was the battie of the despatch, for none of us knew we had fought a battle until the particulars appeared in a document which did more than Justice to every one concerned
Uckewallists - His argument was this, that the period of time which extended from the birth of Christ to the descent of the Holy Ghost was a time of deep ignorance, during which the Jews were destitute of divine light; and that, of consequence, the sins and enormities which were committed during this interval were in a great measure excusable, and could not merit the severest displays of the divine Justice
Fleece - To strip of money or property to take from, by severe exactions, under color of law or Justice, or pretext of necessity, or by virtue of authority
Atonement - Following Anselm, it is now usually held that Satan had no rights over man, but that Christ suffered because man by sin had incurred a debt to Divine Justice and that this required a satisfaction that could be paid only by a God-Man Redeemer
Jurisdiction - ) The legal power, right, or authority of a particular court to hear and determine causes, to try criminals, or to execute Justice; judicial authority over a cause or class of causes; as, certain suits or actions, or the cognizance of certain crimes, are within the jurisdiction of a particular court, that is, within the limits of its authority or commission
Mint - Christ reproved them because that, while they were so precise in these lesser matters, they neglected the more essential commandments of the law, and substituted observances, frivolous and insignificant, in the place of Justice, mercy, and truth
Adullam - Adullam (a-dŭl'lam), Justice of the people
Righteousness - Rectitude, Justice, holiness; an essential perfection of God's character, Job 36:3 ; Isaiah 51:5-8 ; John 17:25 ; and of his administration, Genesis 18:25 ; Romans 3:21,22 ; 10:3
Pharaoh - ...
An ancient pharaoh was an absolute monarch, supreme commander of the armies, chief Justice of the royal court, and high priest of all religion. His absolute power may be seen in that Justice was defined as “what Pharaoh loves”; wrongdoing as “what Pharaoh hates
Revenge - Jesus supported the law of Moses (Matthew 5:17), but he opposed people who used the principle of civil Justice (‘an eye for an eye’, etc. The spirit that rules in the hearts of God’s people is not the same as that which rules in the code of legal Justice (Matthew 5:38-42)
Gallio - Paul being about to speak, Gallio told the Jews, that if the matter in question were a breach of Justice, or an action of a criminal nature, he should think himself obliged to hear them; but, as the dispute was only concerning their law, he would not determine such differences, nor judge them. Sosthenes, the chief ruler of the synagogue, was beaten by the Greeks before Gallio's seat of Justice; but this governor did not concern himself about it
Judge, Ecclesastical - While the bishop may act as judge in matters subject to him, he is recommended to allow the officialis or chief Justice to try cases together with the associate Justices
Landmark - Hosea 5:10 condemns the ruthless rulers of Judah as like those who remove landmarks, that is, those who have no regard for Justice or for the traditional law
Counsellor - But in Daniel 3:2-3 it means a Justice; and in Mark 15:43 , Luke 23:50 , it is used of Joseph of Arimathæa as a member of the Sanhedrin
Grace, Habitual - A supernatural quality infused by God into the soul at the moment of justification, perfecting the soul in a supernatural way, establishing it in Justice and sanctity, making it a sharer in the Divine Nature, truly constituting it an adopted son of God with a title to eternal life, and consecrating it as a living temple of the Most High God
Habitual Grace - A supernatural quality infused by God into the soul at the moment of justification, perfecting the soul in a supernatural way, establishing it in Justice and sanctity, making it a sharer in the Divine Nature, truly constituting it an adopted son of God with a title to eternal life, and consecrating it as a living temple of the Most High God
Confession - The acknowledgment of a debt by a debtor before a Justice of the peace, &c
Ecclesiastical Judge - While the bishop may act as judge in matters subject to him, he is recommended to allow the officialis or chief Justice to try cases together with the associate Justices
Justification - ) The act of justifying or the state of being justified; a showing or proving to be just or conformable to law, Justice, right, or duty; defense; vindication; support; as, arguments in justification of the prisoner's conduct; his disobedience admits justification
Sedition - A factious commotion of the people, a tumultuous assembly of men rising in opposition to law or the administration of Justice, and in disturbance of the public peace
Melchisedech - (Hebrew: king of Justice) ...
King of Salem, most probably Jerusalem, and a priest of the Most High God. Melchisedech is a type of Christ (Psalms 109; Hebrews 7), because of his titles, King of Justice, King of Peace, Priest of the Most High God; and because of his eternal priesthood
Melchizedek - (Hebrew: king of Justice) ...
King of Salem, most probably Jerusalem, and a priest of the Most High God. Melchisedech is a type of Christ (Psalms 109; Hebrews 7), because of his titles, King of Justice, King of Peace, Priest of the Most High God; and because of his eternal priesthood
Due - That is due from me to another which contract, Justice or propriety requires me to pay, and which he may justly claim as his right. That which is owed that which one contracts to pay, do or perform to another that which law or Justice requires to be paid or done
Judgment - )...
For ‘judgment’ in the sense of Justice see art. Justice
Mercy - That benevolence, mildness or tenderness of heart which disposes a person to overlook injuries, or to treat an offender better than he deserves the disposition that tempers Justice, and induces an injured person to forgive trespasses and injuries, and to forbear punishment, or inflict less than law or Justice will warrant
Heaven - (Anglo-Saxon: heofon) ...
In Holy Writ the term heaven is used to designate the dwelling-place of God, His angels, and saints, as well as their happiness, and is called the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 5), the kingdom of God (Mark 9), the kingdom of Christ (Luke 22), the house of the Father (John 14), the city of God, the heavenly Jerusalem (Hebrew 12), the holy place (Hebrew 9), paradise (2 Corinthians 12), life everlasting (Matthew 19), the joy of the Lord (Matthew 25), crown of life (James 1), crown of Justice (2 Timothy 4), crown of glory (1 Peter 5), eternal inheritance (Hebrews 9). Reason proves that God in His infinite wisdom and Justice must give virtue its due reward
Judgment - The act of judging the act or process of the mind in comparing its ideas, to find their agreement or disagreement, and to ascertain truth or the process of examining facts and arguments, to ascertain propriety and Justice or the process of examining the relations between one proposition and another. Justice and equity. The final trial of the human race,when God will decide the fate of every individual, and award sentence according to Justice
Righteousness - God’s righteousness demands social Justice (Isaiah 5:7-9; Amos 5:6-7; Amos 5:24). Justice, in fact, is a prominent characteristic of righteousness in the Bible (see Justice). ...
The Bible commonly uses ‘righteousness’ and related words in a legal setting, where a judge must administer Justice righteously
Right - ) A just judgment or action; that which is true or proper; Justice; uprightness; integrity. ) To do Justice to; to relieve from wrong; to restore rights to; to assert or regain the rights of; as, to right the oppressed; to right one's self; also, to vindicate. ) According to the law or will of God; conforming to the standard of truth and Justice; righteously; as, to live right; to judge right. ) Conformed to the constitution of man and the will of God, or to Justice and equity; not deviating from the true and just; according with truth and duty; just; true
Decoy - ) A person employed by officers of Justice, or parties exposed to injury, to induce a suspected person to commit an offense under circumstances that will lead to his detection
Shephatiah - (ssheh fuh ti' uh) Personal name in longer and shorter Hebrew forms meaning, “Yahweh has created Justice
Machale, John - He labored and wrote incessantly to secure Catholic Emancipation, legislative independence, Justice for tenants and the poor, and vigorously assailed the proselytizers and the anti-Catholic anti-national system of public education
John Machale - He labored and wrote incessantly to secure Catholic Emancipation, legislative independence, Justice for tenants and the poor, and vigorously assailed the proselytizers and the anti-Catholic anti-national system of public education
Mattaniah - King Zedekiah's (Jehovah's Justice) original name, changed when Nebuchadnezzar put him on the throne instead of his nephew Jehoiachin (2 Kings 24:17)
Goodness of God - "Goodness and Justice are the several aspects of one unchangeable, infinitely wise, and sovereign moral perfection
Bench - ) To sit on a seat of Justice
Probity - "It consists in the habit of actions useful to society, and in the constant observance of the laws which Justice and conscience impose upon us
Hall - An edifice in which courts of Justice are held as Westminster Hall, which was originally a royal palace,the kings of England formerly holding their parliaments and courts of judicature in their own dwellings, as is still the practice in Spain
Just - ) Conforming or conformable to rectitude or Justice; not doing wrong to any; violating no right or obligation; upright; righteous; honest; true; - said both of persons and things
Adul'Lam - (justice of the people ), Apocr
Behove - 1: ὀφείλω (Strong's #3784 — — opheilo — of-i'-lo, of-i-leh'-o ) "to owe," is once rendered "behove," Hebrews 2:17 ; it indicates a necessity, owing to the nature of the matter under consideration; in this instance, the fulfillment of the Justice and love of God, voluntarily exhibited in what Christ accomplished, that He might be a merciful and faithful High Priest
Economics - The science of the application of the principles of Justice to social life. ,properly regulated human affection, and equity, are for him essentials of Justice; the only solid basis of Justice is the Fatherhood of God; almsgiving is of obligation because of brotherly love and brotherly equality. Some of the Fathers of the 4th century regarded private ownership as the result of sin, as a means of avoiding violence and confusion, and almsgiving obligatory, because charity is part of Justice. ...
The development of capital injected new subjects into the study of economics, chiefly that of usury, first of the Justice of requiring any interest at all for borrowed money and then of excessive interest
Injury - Injustice is opposed to Justice in general, whether negative or positive;an injury to negative Justice alone. ...
See Justice. this is injustice, too, but not the whole idea of it; for it is injustice, also to refuse or neglect doing what ought to be done. Now if we consider the value of character, the resentment which the injurious person has of such treatment when it comes to his own turn to suffer it, the consequence of a man's losing his good name, and finally, the difficulty of making reparation, we must at once see the injustice of lessening another's good character
Judgment, Universal - In this way the Justice, goodness, and wisdom of God will be manifested and will be recognized by all men
Final Judgment - In this way the Justice, goodness, and wisdom of God will be manifested and will be recognized by all men
Judgment, Final - In this way the Justice, goodness, and wisdom of God will be manifested and will be recognized by all men
Judgment, General - In this way the Justice, goodness, and wisdom of God will be manifested and will be recognized by all men
Last Judgment - In this way the Justice, goodness, and wisdom of God will be manifested and will be recognized by all men
Administration - ) The act of administering, or tendering something to another; dispensation; as, the administration of a medicine, of an oath, of Justice, or of the sacrament
Henry de Bracton - It is uncertain whether he was ever chief Justice, though he often pleaded before Henry III
Henry de Bratton - It is uncertain whether he was ever chief Justice, though he often pleaded before Henry III
General Judgment - In this way the Justice, goodness, and wisdom of God will be manifested and will be recognized by all men
Officer - , "one who does," or "accomplishes" (akin to prasso, "to do"), was used in Athens of one who exacts payment, a collector (the word is frequently used in the papyri of a public accountant); hence, in general, a court "officer," an attendant in a court of Justice (so Deissmann); the word is used in Luke 12:58 (twice)
Partial - It is important to Justice that a judge should not be partial
Patience - The act or quality of waiting long for Justice or expected good without discontent
Universal Judgment - In this way the Justice, goodness, and wisdom of God will be manifested and will be recognized by all men
Propitiation - The reformed churches allow of no propitiation, but that one offered by Jesus on the cross, whereby divine Justice is appeased, and our sins forgiven, Romans 3:25 . " Thus Jesus Christ is called the propitiation or atonement, as his complete righteousness appeases his Father, and satisfies his law and Justice for all our transgressions
Evil - ...
Moral evil is any deviation of a moral agent from the rules of conduct prescribed to him by God, or by legitimate human authority or it is any violation of the plain principles of Justice and rectitude. Not well not with Justice or propriety unsuitable
Tooth - The opinion that it is every man's right and duty to do himself Justice, and to revenge his own injuries, is by no means eradicated from among the Afghans, a people of India, to the southward of Cashmere, and according to a paper in the Asiatic Researches, supposed to be descended from the Jews; and the right of society, even to restrain the reasonable passions of individuals, and to take the redress of wrongs and the punishment of crimes into its own hands, is still very imperfectly understood: or, if it is understood, is seldom present to the thoughts of the people; for although, in most parts of their country, Justice might now be obtained by other means, and though private revenge is every where preached against by the mollahs, priests, and forbidden by the government, yet it is still lawful, and even honourable in the eyes of the people, to seek that mode of redress
Charles Russell Lawyer - In 1894 he was made lord of appeals, and raised to the peerage for life; he was also appointed lord chief Justice
Bondage - They are said to be in bondage to sin, to Satan, to their own consciences, to the law of God, to the Justice of God, to the fear of death, and eternal judgment
Consistory - A word commonly used for a council house of ecclesiastical persons, or place of Justice in the spiritual court: a session or assembly of prelates
Circuit - ) A certain division of a state or country, established by law for a judge or judges to visit, for the administration of Justice
Displeasure - Some irritation or uneasiness of the mind, occasioned by any thing that counteracts desire or command, or which opposes Justice and a sense of propriety
Distribution - Dispensation administration to numbers a rendering to individuals as the distribution of Justice
Areopagus, or Mars Hill - Here was held the highest and most ancient and venerable court of Justice in Athens for moral and political matters
Execute - To carry into effect as, to execute law or Justice
Prostrate - ) to overthrow; to demolish; to destroy; to deprive of efficiency; to ruin; as, to prostrate a village; to prostrate a government; to prostrate law or Justice
Epistle to the Romans - In the Epistle he dwells on the justification of mankind through faith in Christ, the sinfulness of the world, the meaning and fruits of justification, why Israel failed to come unto the law of Justice, what faith is, and why it is essential, and its fruits, viz:, humility, obedience, unity, and charity
Bithynia - It may be, with some Justice, considered as a province taught by Peter; and we read that when Paul attempted to go into Bithynia, the Spirit suffered him not, Acts 16:7
Throne - His throne is also sublimely described as everlasting, and as built upon Justice and equity, Psalm 45:6 ; 97:2
Russell, Charles - In 1894 he was made lord of appeals, and raised to the peerage for life; he was also appointed lord chief Justice
Romans, Epistle to the - In the Epistle he dwells on the justification of mankind through faith in Christ, the sinfulness of the world, the meaning and fruits of justification, why Israel failed to come unto the law of Justice, what faith is, and why it is essential, and its fruits, viz:, humility, obedience, unity, and charity
Murder - In regal times the duty of execution of Justice on a murderer seems to have been assumed to some extent by the sovereign, as was also the privilege of pardon
Atonement - The use of the word and the noun kopher , throughout the Old Testament, proves that, as applied to the atonement or reconciliation between God and man, it implies not merely what is man's part in finding acceptance with God, but, in the first instance, what God's Justice required on His part, and what His love provided, to justify His entering into reconciliation with man. In Leviticus 1:4; Leviticus 4:26; Leviticus 5:1; Leviticus 5:16-18; Leviticus 5:16; Leviticus 17:11, the truth is established that the guilt is transferred from the sinful upon the innocent substitute, in order to make amends to violated Justice, and to cover (atone: kipper' al ) or put out of sight the guilt (compare Micah 7:19 end), and to save the sinner from the wages of sin which is death. Not that Jesus' death induced God to love us; but because God loved us He gave Jesus to reconcile the claims of Justice and mercy, "that God might be just and at the same time the justifier of him that believeth in Jesus" (Romans 3:26; 2 Corinthians 5:18-21). restored us to His favor, by satisfying the claims of Justice against us. Christ's blood was the ransom paid at the expense of God Himself, to reconcile the exercise of mercy and Justice, not as separate, but as the eternally harmonious attributes in the same God. ) Conscience feels instinctively the penal claims of violated divine Justice, and can only find peace when by faith it has realized that those claims have been fully met by our sacrificed substitute (Hebrews 9:9; 1 Corinthians 5:7; Hebrews 10:22; 1 Peter 3:21). Opponents of the doctrine of vicarious atonement say, "it exhibits God as less willing to forgive than His creatures are bound to be;" but man's Justice, which is the faint reflex of God's, binds the judge, however lamenting the painful duty, to sentence the criminal to death as a satisfaction to outraged law. " But the claim of God's righteousness is not pressed apart from that of God's love; both move in beautiful unity; the atonement is at once the brightest exhibition of His love and of His Justice; it does not render God merciful, but opens a channel whereby love can flow in perfect harmony with His righteous law, yea "magnifying the law and making it honorable" (Isaiah 42:21). ...
Anything short of an adequate satisfaction would be so far an abatement; of divine Justice; and if part of the sin might be forgiven without the satisfaction, why not all? If God can dispense with the claims of Justice in part, He can as well do it altogether. ...
God has determined it, that in Christ's infinite dignity of person and holiness above that of any creature, there is ensured the adequateness of the satisfaction, made by His obedience and suffering, to meet the claims of Justice against those whose nature He voluntarily assumed; nay more, to set forth God's glory more brightly than ever; also God has revealed that by believing the sinner becomes one with the Redeemer, and so rightly shares in the redemption wrought by Him the Head of the redeemed
Neighbor - This lawyer-scribe unknowingly expresses a fundamental issue in all of ethics: For whom are we responsible in issues of Justice and mercy? Jesus' answer was the parable of the Good Samaritan and the fundamental ideas of the parable find their roots in both Old Testament and Jewish soil. With such tendencies, it is not surprising that legislation had to be given to Israel to encourage compassion and Justice for the non-Jew. The fundamental basis for this is that at one time Israel was also a sojourner while in Egypt; therefore, Israel is to treat its sojourners with compassion and Justice (Leviticus 19:33-34 ; Deuteronomy 10:19 ; 24:22 ). Essentially, then, the Mosaic laws demand both compassion and Justice to be guaranteed for the foreigner because God loves the sojourner (Deuteronomy 10:18 ). ...
In spite of this insistence of the law that Israel was to be kind to foreigners and treat them with compassion and Justice, the preponderance of emphasis is on the "neighborliness" to be shown to fellow members of the covenant with Israel. Thus, we are to understand the parable of the good Samaritan as addressing the issue of the "limits" of one's responsibility and we are to see Jesus saying that there are no limits; one cannot exclusively exercise compassion or Justice for one's own kind
Christianity - The religion of Christ; the faith which He has inspired; the teachings and moral practises inculcated by this faith; the spirit of Justice, charity, of obedience to law, purity of morals, and sanctity of domestic life which characterize the manners of those who adhere to this faith; and the consequent character of the civilization which is known as Christian and which influences even those who have never believed in Christ or who have lost that faith
Atonement - The satisfaction offered to divine Justice for the sins of mankind by the death of Jesus Christ; by virtue of which all true penitents believing in Christ are reconciled to God, are freed from the penalty of their sins, and entitled to eternal life
Face - "Face" signifies also anger, Justice, severity (Genesis 16:6,8 ; Exodus 2:15 ; Psalm 68:1 ; Revelation 6:16 )
Satisfaction - In the Christian system it denotes that which Christ did and suffered in order to satisfy divine Justice, to secure the honours of the divine government, and thereby make an atonement for the sins of his people
Elah - Thus retributive Justice pays transgressors in kind
Honest - Upright just fair in dealing with others free from trickishness and fraud acting and having the disposition to act at all times according to Justice or correct moral principles applied to persons
Ignorance - It is an insult upon Justice to suppose it will punish men because they were ignorant of things which they were physically incapable of knowing
Kiss - A few Scriptures are given herewith to show the many ways in which the word "kiss" is used in the Scriptures:...
Genesis 27:26 (c) Kiss of devotion...
Genesis 45:15 (c) Kiss of reconciliation...
Genesis 50:1 (c) The farewell kiss...
Ruth 1:14 (c) Kiss of desertion...
1 Samuel 10:1 (c) Kiss of honor...
1 Samuel 20:41 (c) Kiss of confidence...
2 Samuel 15:5 (c) Kiss of treason...
2 Samuel 20:9 (c) Kiss of hypocrisy...
Job 31:27 (c) Kiss of connivance...
Psalm 2:12 (c) Kiss of trust...
Psalm 85:10 (c) Kiss of Justice...
Proverbs 7:13 (c) Kiss of impudence...
Proverbs 27:6 (c) The enemy's kiss...
Song of Solomon 1:2 (c)Kiss of affection...
Luke 7:45 (c) Kiss of gratitude...
Luke 22:48 (c) Kiss of betrayal...
Acts 20:37 (c) Kiss of sorrow...
Romans 16:16 (c) Holy kiss of saints...
Equivocation - This is wrong when the information is due by any obligation of Justice or charity, but permissible and even advisable when the interrogation is impertinent or unjust; it is practised universally in such cases even by those who affect to deem it wrong
Enos - The eastern people make the following additions to his history:—that Seth, his father, declared him sovereign prince and high priest of mankind, next after himself; that Enos was the first who ordained public alms for the poor, established public tribunals for the administration of Justice, and planted, or rather cultivated, the palm tree
Minister - ) An officer of Justice
Path - The paths of Justice (Proverbs 2:8 ; Proverbs 8:20 ), peace (Proverbs 3:17 ), and rightenousness refer to the practice of these qualities
Jael - The song of Deborah celebrates the act as one of Justice and heroism, and as a divine judgement which, as well as the defeat of Sisera's host, was the more disgraceful to him for being wrought by a woman, Judges 5:1 ; 21:25,25
Gibeon - When Saul broke the treaty and murdered some of the Gibeonites, his sons were executed in ‘blood for blood’ Justice (2 Samuel 21:1-9)
Consecration - With the prophets God's holiness was understood to include Justice, righteousness, and many ethical concerns. In Matthew 23:16-24Jesus criticized the scribes and Pharisees on the basis of their neglect of Justice, mercy, and faith
Judge - )...
In their administration of Justice, judges were to be strictly impartial, favouring neither the poor nor the rich (Exodus 23:2-3; Exodus 23:6; Deuteronomy 1:16-17; see Justice)
Self-Defence - ...
That a person forfeits his own life to the sword of Justice, by taking away another's unprovoked, is a principle not to be disputed. This being so, I ask, whence should arise the obligation to let another kill me, rather than venture to save myself by destroying my enemy? It cannot arise from a regard to society, which, by my suffering another to kill me, loses two lives; that of an honest man by unjust violence, and that of his murderer, if it can be called a loss, by the hand of Justice. Self-defence, therefore, may be with Justice practised, ...
1
Atonement - " Christ's satisfaction is all he did in the room and in behalf of sinners to satisfy the demands of the law and Justice of God. , it is now consistent with his Justice to manifest his love to transgressors. The primary idea presented to us in different forms throughout the Scripture is that the death of Christ is a satisfaction of infinite worth rendered to the law and Justice of God (q
Intercession of Christ - His interposing for sinners by virtue of the satisfaction he made to divine Justice. Christ appears before God with his own body; but whether he intercedes vocally or not cannot be known: though it is most probable, I think, that he does not: however, it is certain that he does not intercede in like manner as when on earth, with prostration of body, cries and tears, which would be quite inconsistent with his state of exaltation and glory; nor as supplicating an angry judge, for peace is made by the blood of the cross; nor as litigating a point in a court of judicature; but his intercession is carried on by showing himself as having done, as their surety, all that law and Justice could require, by representing his blood and sacrifice as the ground of his people's acceptance with the Father, Revelation 5:6 . Righteous: for it is founded upon Justice and truth, 1 John 3:5
Throne - When the king or elders assembled to administer Justice, they sat on the throne of Justice ( Justice from henceforth even for ever” ( Jeremiah, Theology of - A succinct characterization of God is given in 9:24: God delights in steadfast love, Justice, and righteousness. Further, God charges his people with deceit and insensitivity to injustice (5:23-29). Confused, he asks about Justice (12:1c). ...
The Dynamics of an Agenda for Justice (chaps. The overriding theological concern in the disputations of Sections D and D1 is Justice: "Administer Justice every morning" (21:11). The biblical concept of Justice involves much more than fairness. Justice, the fundamental requirement for political life, is a topic that surfaces sharply in the royal roll call (22:10-23:6). In building an ostentatious palace at the expense of the poor and needy, Jehoiakim failed to do Justice (22:13-17). 34-38 = D1), the same concern for Justice appears in the story of Zedekiah's freeing and then reenslaving the slaves (34:1-22). A fundamental conviction is that God is tenacious about Justice. ...
Integrity, part of the Justice agenda, is the forefront issue in the indictment against another leadership group, the prophets. Any misuse of power, whether by kings or prophets, is altogether counter to "justice, " a matter of "doing the right. ...
Justice for All . The subject of Justice, highlighted in surrounding chapters (21-29,34-38), also brackets the enlarged Book of Comfort (30:11; 33:15). If doing Justice means to pay attention to the oppressed, then God, fully committed to Justice, has swung into action because Israel had become known as "an outcast … for whom no one cares" (30:17)
Prodigal Son - The fact of the young man’s wrongdoing and the sincerity of his repentance are accepted by both; but while the elder brother challenges the Justice and propriety of rejoicing over the return of one who had been so headstrong and foolish, the father firmly defends the course he had followed, and, in terminating the discussion, speaks with a finality that is not to be questioned: ‘It was meet that we should make merry and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found. Love alone is capable of rendering the conscience sensitive to the finest shades of Justice. The father’showed mercy because he loved his son, and in showing mercy dispensed the truer Justice; for mercy is but Justice perfectly applied. The elder brother failed in his duty to brother and father alike, because he lacked the affection that would have swept away his shallow notions of Justice, and pointed out a better way. And in that of the Labourers in the Vineyard, is it not the mean and grudging spirit of the whole-day labourers that is condemned, since their rights were not infringed nor their interests invaded by the generous treatment accorded to the late-comers?...
What men require in their dealings with one another is the loving heart, and in dealing with our erring and repentant brethren nothing else will give the insight and tenderness needed to fulfil the ends of real Justice
Correct - ) To make right; to bring to the standard of truth, Justice, or propriety; to rectify; as, to correct manners or principles
Magistrate - The Strategoi were the duumviri, the two praetors appointed to preside over the administration of Justice in the colonies of the Romans
Agag - But Samuel executed retributive Justice (as in the case of Adonibezek, Judges 1), hewing him to pieces, and so making his mother childless, as he had made other women childless by hewing their sons to pieces (in consonance with his fiery character, as Agag means)
Tobiah, the Children of - Crowns were made of them by Zechariah (Zechariah 6:9-15), at Jehovah's direction, and set on the high priest Joshua's head, as type of Messiah the King Priest who harmonizes in Himself the conflicting claims of Justice as the King and love as the Father and Priest (Ephesians 2:13-17; Ephesians 1:10)
Iron - The apocalyptic Messiah is to rule the nations with a rod of iron (Revelation 2:27; Revelation 12:5; Revelation 19:15), a symbol of inflexible Justice (cf
Administration - dispensation distribution exhibition as the administration of Justice, of the sacrament, or of grace
Complaint - Accusation a charge against an offender, made by a private person or informer to a Justice of the peace or other proper officer, alleging that the offender has violated the law, and claiming the penalty due to the prosecutor
Error - Deviation from law, Justice or right oversight mistake in conduct
Requisition - ) A formal demand made by one state or government upon another for the surrender or extradition of a fugitive from Justice
Caprasius Presbyter at Lerins - Hilarius describes their new monastery as being distinguished for chastity, faith, wisdom, Justice, truth
Justify - ) To prove or show to be just; to vindicate; to maintain or defend as conformable to law, right, Justice, propriety, or duty
Breastplate - It was called the memorial, Exodus 28:12; Exodus 28:29, inasmuch as it reminded the priest of his representative character in relation to the twelve tribes; and it is also called the breastplate of judgment, Exodus 28:15, perhaps because it was worn by him who was instrumentally the fountain of Justice and judgment to the Jewish church
Restitution - that act of Justice by which we restore to our neighbour whatever we have unjustly deprived him of, Exodus 22:1 ; Luke 19:8
Religion - In this latter sense religion is a special virtue allied to Justice, because it prompts man to render to God what is due Him by strict right from His rational creatures
Sacra Romana Rota - Besides notaries and other officers, there are the promoter of Justice or prosecuting attorney and the defender of the bond for cases relating to marriage, sacred ordination, and religious profession
Rota, Sacra Romana - Besides notaries and other officers, there are the promoter of Justice or prosecuting attorney and the defender of the bond for cases relating to marriage, sacred ordination, and religious profession
Sanctuary - ...
The temple or earthly sanctuary is an emblem of heaven, Psalm 102:19 Hebrews 9:1,24 ; and God himself is called a sanctuary, Isaiah 8:14 Ezekiel 11:16 , in reference to the use of temples as a place of refuge for fugitives, because he is the only safe and sacred asylum for sinners pursued by the sword of divine Justice
Edrei - Underneath the city are many large caves, forming a subterranean city, with streets and houses; but a recent traveller found the entrance blocked by a rock, and was told that the passage had been blown up to prevent the caves being used as a hiding place from Justice
Caiaphas - His craft and subtle diplomacy as well as his supreme disregard for Justice and religion are revealed in the advice he gave to the assembled Sanhedrin after Jesus had won the people by the raising of Lazarus-‘It is expedient that one die for the people’ (John 11:50). Caiaphas is a type of the wily ecclesiastical opportunist, who places the success of himself and the institution he represents before all claims of truth or Justice
Governor - ...
A ruler in his capacity of lawgiver and dispenser of Justice. (Ezra 4:7 ; 6:6 ) The "governor" beyond the river had a judgment-seat beyond Jerusalem, from which probably he administered Justice when making a progress through his province
Gate - The oriental resort for business, converse, bargaining, and news (Genesis 19:1; Genesis 23:10; Psalms 69:12), for addresses and reading the law (2 Chronicles 32:6; Nehemiah 8:1; Nehemiah 8:3; Proverbs 1:21; Jeremiah 17:19), or administering Justice (Joshua 20:4; Ruth 4:1; Deuteronomy 16:18; Deuteronomy 21:19). in the place of Justice, in lawsuits. , not only among drunken revelers, but in the grave deliberations of the judges in the place of Justice I was an object of obloquy. they refuse them their right in the place of Justice; (Amos 5:10) "they hate him that rebuketh in the gate," namely, the judge who condemns them (Zechariah 8:16)
Pilate - Malicious, artful, yet not free from superstition, he was not destitute of some sense of Justice, as his weak efforts to secure the acquittal of Jesus show
Prison - ...
Such conditions were not as common in Israel as in neighbouring countries, because the law of Moses encouraged respect for Justice and human life
Adoni-Zedec - Lord of Justice or righteousness, was king in Jerusalem at the time when the Israelites invaded Palestine (Joshua 10:1,3 )
Gospel: to be Preached Simply - May we shrewdly guess that if they had any secret to tell they should put it in intelligible language, and that their pompous involved sentences are only a screen for their utter ignorant of the matter? When we hear preachers talking of div things in a style savoring more of metaphysical subtile than of gospel plainness; when the seeking sinner cam find out the way of salvation because of their philosophic jargon, may we not with Justice suspect that the preach does not know the gospel, and conceals his culpable ignorant behind the veil of rhetorical magniloquence? Surely if a man understood a matter so important to all his hearers the way of salvation, he would feel constrained to tell it all in words which all might comprehend
Restitution - That act of Justice by which we restore to our neighbour whatever we have unjustly deprived him of, Exodus 22:1
Avenge - ...
In these examples, avenge implies that the evil inflicted on the injuring party is a satisfaction or Justice done to the injured, and the party vindicated is the object of the verb
Hurt, Hurtful - ...
B — 1: ἀδικέω (Strong's #91 — Verb — adikeo — ad-ee-keh'-o ) signifies, intransitively, "to do wrong, do hurt, act unjustly" (a, negative, and dike, "justice"), transitively, "to wrong, hurt or injure a person
War of the Peasants - Luther's attitude was equivocal, and he urged upon the princes the Justice of certain demands, while he suggested to the peasants the withdrawal of others
Redemption - Sometimes the compound word is used; which signifies to buy again, or out of the hands of another, as the redeemed are bought out of the hands of Justice, as in Galatians 3:13 . The ends of redemption are, that the Justice of God might be satisfied; his people reconciled, adopted, sanctified, and brought to glory
Habakkuk - Its relevance to Habakkuk’s question is seen in the final words, where Habakkuk learns to trust in the wisdom and Justice of God. As for the Babylonians, the ones whom God uses to carry out that punishment, Habakkuk will leave God to deal with them according to his wisdom and Justice (3:16-19)
Trial-at-Law - Primitive Justice. -The earliest form of Justice was personal redress. ...
In this system of reprisals there were at least the germs of social Justice; for the very ferocity of the vengeance deterred men from wrong-doing. The actual execution of Justice was left to the injured party, and in the case of ‘manifest’ crimes like open murder and house-breaking ancient codes interposed no check on summary vengeance; but where the least doubt existed, and the accused claimed the privilege of trial, society demanded clear evidence of his guilt, at the same time seeking to control the fierce impulses of the avenger by limiting punishment to the responsible wrong-doer, and making the penalty correspond as nearly as possible to the gravity of the offence; in other words, replacing the principle of unrestricted vengeance by the ius talionis-‘an eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth. ’ This higher platform of Justice is represented by the simple courts that survive to the present day among the Arabs of the desert, and in the primitive village communities of Southern Russia. As the result of a sharp canvassing of the facts and testing of evidence, often supported by oath, and in earlier times by the ordeal of battle, fire, or water, a decision is arrived at, inspired by that swift instinct for Justice so characteristic of the primitive mind, which the condemned party can evade only at the cost of expulsion from his kindred and tribe. -The roots of Hebrew Justice are embedded in the primeval principle of reprisals. the heads of families) seated as a formal court of Justice. In times of social disorder, as the prophets lament so frequently, Justice could be bought and sold for money (cf. In the last case the witnesses cast the first stones, the rest of the people carrying through the execution, and thus sharing responsibility for the act of Justice (Deuteronomy 17:7). The judgment of kings like David and Solomon was naturally influenced by regard for the best interests of the people; but in the hands of more reckless monarchs this judicial absolutism was the source of grave perversions of Justice, such as the suborning of false witnesses to compass the death of the innocent (1 Kings 21:8 ff. ...
A certain safeguard against injustice was found in the growing influence of the priesthood. On the fall of the monarchy they assumed the full responsibilities of Justice. 200), and show how strongly the passion for Justice still possessed the Jewish mind-although gross miscarriages of Justice may sometimes have occurred in practice-and how closely mercy is linked with judgment. There are still, indeed, survivals of primitive Justice. presided over Roman Justice as a whole), on hearing the claims of both parties in iure, drew up a judicial formula, embodying a brief statement of the case in dispute (demonstratio), the plaintiff’s claim (intentio), a request to the judge to adjudicate the person or property as he thought most fitting (adjudicatio), and instructions to condemn the accused or dismiss the case as the evidence warranted (condemnatio). A wise governor respected the customary laws of his province, allowing minor offences to be tried before the local courts, and even in graver crimes directing the proceedings of the national councils with a view to securing full Roman Justice, rather than suppressing their former prerogatives. ...
Imperial government introduced a change in the spirit rather than in the form of Justice. But the real threads of Justice were increasingly gathered into the Emperor’s own hand. But in his case Roman Justice came definitely athwart the hot passions of Jewish prejudice; for the main sphere of his activity lay within the direct administration of Rome, and he himself enjoyed the privileges of a free-born Roman citizen. of category) ready to hear all matters of public order and Justice (Acts 19:35 ff
Pavement - That, moreover, there were, as a rule, in the larger centres of population, fixed places for the administration of Justice is not unlikely. 3: καθίσας ἐπὶ βήματος ἐν τῷ μεγάλῳ σταδίῳ) has been cited in support of a view that Pilate used ‘the open market-place’ (so Whiston, followed by many) at Jerusalem for the administration of Justice; but the passage refers to Caesarea, and the rendering of στάδιον as a synonym of ἀγορά is not well established. Each stationary camp, again, had its tribunal, sometimes formed of turf but more frequently of stone, and from it the general addressed the soldiers and the tribunes administered Justice
Divine Attributes - , Justice, goodness, truth, power, freedom
Appeal - A party to an ecclesiastical trial who considers that he has a grievance against the sentence, as well as the promoter of Justice and the defender of the bond, in suits in which they took part, have the right of appealing from the sentence to the next highest court or to the Holy See
Attributes, Divine - , Justice, goodness, truth, power, freedom
Correction - The act of correcting the act of bringing back, from error or deviation, to a just standard, as to truth, rectitude, Justice or propriety as the correction of opinions or manners
Duty - Forbearance of that which is forbid by morality, law, Justice or propriety. It is our duty to refrain from lewdness, intemperance, profaneness and injustice
Execution - In law, the carrying into effect a sentence or judgment of court the last act of the law in completing the process by which Justice is to be done, by which the possession of land or debt, damages or cost, is obtained, or by which judicial punishment is inflicted
Merit - Signifies desert, or to earn: originally the word was applied to soldiers and other military persons, who, by their labours in the field, and by the various hardships they underwent during the course of a campaign, as also by other services they might occasionally render to the commonwealth, were said, merere stipendia, to merit, or earn their pay; which they might properly be said to do, because they yielded in real service an equivalent to the state for the stipend they received, which was therefore due to them in Justice
Lord - ) A title bestowed on the persons above named; and also, for honor, on certain official persons; as, lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief Justice, etc
Sanctuary - (1) Consecrated place giving protection to those fleeing from Justice or persecution
Jehoshaphat - Jehoshaphat was beguiled by Ahab into an unsuccessful war with the Syrians, but soon resumed his labors in behalf of religion and Justice
Felix - Meanwhile his wife Drusilla, who was a Jewess, desired to hear Paul explain the new religion; and the apostle being summoned before them, discoursed with his usual boldness on Justice, chastity, and the final judgment
Market - In Greek AGORA, in Latin FORUM, a large open area in many ancient cities, especially of Greece and Rome, having the public market on one side only, the other sides of the are being occupied by temples, theatres, colonnades, courts of Justice, baths, and other public structures, the whole square often presenting a magnificent appearance
the - The independent tribunals of Justice in our country, are the security or private rights,and the best bulwark against arbitrary power
Rephaim - They appear to have excelled in violence and crime, and hence are monuments of divine Justice
Seat - The place of sitting throne chair of state tribunal post of authority as the seat of Justice judgment-seat
Writ - In some of the United States, writs are issued by any single judge or Justice of the peace, in the name and by the authority of the senate
Reprobation - It is as manifestly contrary to his Justice. Here, indeed, we would not assume to measure this attribute of God by unauthorized human conceptions; but when God himself has appealed to those established notions of Justice and equity which have been received among all enlightened persons, in all ages, as the measure and rule of his own, we cannot be charged with this presumption. " We may then be bold to affirm that Justice and equity in God are what they are taken to be among reasonable men; and if all men every where would condemn it, as most contrary to Justice and right; that a sovereign should condemn to death one or more of his subjects for not obeying laws which it is absolutely impossible for them, under any circumstances which they can possibly avail themselves of, to obey, and much more the greater part of his subjects; and to require them, on pain of aggravated punishment, to do something in order to the pardon and remission of their offences, which he knows they cannot do, say to stop the tide or to remove a mountain; it implies a charge as obviously unjust against God, who is "just in the judgments which he executeth," to suppose him to act precisely in the same manner in regard to those whom he has passed by and rejected, without any avoidable fault of their own; to destroy them by the simple rule of his own sovereignty, or, in other words, to show that he has power to do it. Every received notion of Justice is thus violated. We grant, indeed, that some proceedings of the Almighty may appear at first irreconcilable with Justice, which are not so; as that we should suffer pain and death, and be infected with a morally corrupt nature, in consequence of the transgression of our first progenitors; that children should suffer for their parents' faults in the ordinary course of providence; and that in general calamities the comparatively innocent should suffer the same evils as the guilty. This circumstance alters the terms of their probation; but if every condition of probation leaves to men the possibility and the hope of eternal life, and the circumstances of all are balanced and weighed by Him who administers the affairs of individuals on principles, the end of which is to turn all the evils of life into spiritual and higher blessings, there is, obviously, no impeachment of Justice in the circumstances of the probation assigned to any person whatever. It is surely not possible for the ingenuity of man to reconcile this to any notion of just government which has ever obtained; and by the established notions of Justice and equity in human affairs, we are taught by the Scriptures themselves to judge of the divine proceedings in all completely stated and comprehensible cases. In the administration of favour, there is place for the exercise of that prerogative which, in a just sense, is called the sovereignty of God; but Justice knows but of one rule; it is, in its nature, settled and fixed, and looks not at the person, but the case. ...
Finally, not to multiply these instances of the difficulties which accompany the doctrine of absolute reprobation, or of preterition, (to use the milder term, though the argument is not in the least changed by it,) it destroys the end of punitive Justice
Blind - You will note that when "Justice" is seen in sculpture or in painting, she has no hands and her eyes are blindfolded. This is to teach us that Justice takes no bribes, and is not affected by the standing or the relationship of the person who is being judged
Joseph ii, Emperor - He abolished serfdom and the death penalty, made the courts of Justice independent and impartial, abolished censorship, and created the Austrian marriage law
Josephinism - He abolished serfdom and the death penalty, made the courts of Justice independent and impartial, abolished censorship, and created the Austrian marriage law
Malachias - The question of the people: "Where is the God of judgment?" (2) is answered in the second part by the promise of the Messia! the "Sun of Justice" (4)
Cecil, William, Baron Burghley - His cruel treatment of Catholics and his employment of a band of ruthless spies who seemed to draw the line at nothing in acquiring information, have caused him to be severely and justly criticized; in 1583 he published a pamphlet entitled "The Execution of Justice" which popularized the calumny that the Catholics executed by his orders and by those of the other ministers had been guilty of treason against their sovereign, while in reality most of them had been executed solely because of their attachment to the Catholic faith
Quietness - It is a calm, steady, regular way of proceeding within the bounds and measures prescribed by reason, Justice, and charity, modesty and sobriety
Works, Good - Are those actions which are conformable to truth, Justice, or propriety; whether natural, civil, relative, moral, or religious
Candlestick - And the lesson is that if we have received a truth or a joy through Christ, who is the Light of the World, it is common sense and common Justice not to hide it in fear or selfishness, but to use it as a means of illustrating our Father God and illumining those around us (Matthew 5:16)
Business - A lawyer's business is to do Justice to his clients
Viper - Nay, so terrible was the nature of these creatures, that they were very commonly thought to be sent as executioners of divine vengeance upon mankind, for enormous crimes which had escaped the course of Justice
Sacristan Emperor - He abolished serfdom and the death penalty, made the courts of Justice independent and impartial, abolished censorship, and created the Austrian marriage law
William Cecil, Baron Burghley - His cruel treatment of Catholics and his employment of a band of ruthless spies who seemed to draw the line at nothing in acquiring information, have caused him to be severely and justly criticized; in 1583 he published a pamphlet entitled "The Execution of Justice" which popularized the calumny that the Catholics executed by his orders and by those of the other ministers had been guilty of treason against their sovereign, while in reality most of them had been executed solely because of their attachment to the Catholic faith
Widow - The humanity and Justice of true religion are shown in the Bible, as might be expected, by numerous indications that God and the friends of God sympathize with the sorrows, supply the wants, and defend the rights of the widow, Exodus 22:22-24 Deuteronomy 16:11 24:17,19 Psalm 68:5 Isaiah 1:17 10:2 Jeremiah 22:3 Matthew 23:14
Pretorium - Some think that by this he means the palace of the emperor Nero; and others, that he intends the place where the roman Praetor sat to administer Justice, that is, his tribunal
Solomon - Unsurpassed among the Hebrews for sagacity, peace enabled him to organize the kingdom; provide for its defense by means of fortresses and a standing army; advance the orderly administration of Justice; develop trade; and embellish the capital with magnificent edifices, the most noteworthy being the temple and his own palace
Ordinance - Isaiah and James give the same solution to the faithless observance of outward forms: cease to do evil, learn to do good, seek Justice, correct oppression, defend the fatherless, plead for the widow (Isaiah 1:16-17 ; James 1:27 ). The ordinances and statutes reveal God's will and his understanding of what it means to do good, seek Justice, and correct oppression
Bed - ...
Bed of Justice, in France, was a throne on which the king was seated when he went to parliament. Hence the phrase, to hold a bed of Justice
Gate - is often used in Scripture to denote a place of public assembly, where Justice was administered, Deuteronomy 17:5 ; Deuteronomy 17:8 ; Deuteronomy 21:19 ; Deuteronomy 22:15 ; Deuteronomy 25:6-7 , &c. The gate of judgment is a term still common to the Arabians to express a court of Justice, and even introduced by the Saracens into Spain. This gate, called the gate of judgment, according to eastern forms, was the place where the kings administered Justice
Proselyte - The first, proselytes of the gate; the others, proselytes of Justice or righteousness. ...
Proselytes of Justice or of righteousness were those converted to Judaism, who had engaged themselves to receive circumcision, and to observe the whole law of Moses. Boys under twelve years of age, and girls under thirteen, could not become proselytes till they had obtained the consent of their parents, or, in case of refusal, the concurrence of the officers of Justice
Gate - At the gates of cities courts of Justice were frequently held, and hence "judges of the gate" are spoken of (Deuteronomy 16:18 ; 17:8 ; 21:19 ; 25:6,7 , etc
Theft - " This law requires Justice, truth, and faithfulness in all our dealings with men; to owe no man any thing, but to give to all their dues; to be true to all engagements, promises, and contracts; and to be faithful in whatever is committed to our care and trust
Difference - A regular administration of Justice according to fixed laws differences a civilized from a savage state
Dignity - True honor nobleness or elevation of mind, consisting in a high sense of propriety, truth and Justice, with an abhorrence of mean and sinful actions opposed to meanness
Fiery - Deuteronomy 33:2 (a) In GOD's law He revealed His Justice, His righteousness and His power
Favor - ) A kind act or office; kindness done or granted; benevolence shown by word or deed; an act of grace or good will, as distinct from Justice or remuneration
Apostolic Signatura - Originally a double Signatura, it was divided in 1492 into two distinct Signaturas, one of grace, and one of Justice
Correct - To make right to rectify to bring to the standard of truth, Justice, or propriety as, to correct manners or principles
Endor - It was an instance of God's overruling the wickedness of men, to manifest his own supremacy and Justice
Signatura, Apostolic - Originally a double Signatura, it was divided in 1492 into two distinct Signaturas, one of grace, and one of Justice
Palace - This included the ‘House of the Forest of Lehanon,’ a great hall, 100 cubits long, 50 broad, 30 high, with four rows of pillars; a ‘porch of pillars,’ 50 cubits by 30; the ‘porch of the throne’ for a court of Justice; a dwelling-house for himself, and another for Pharaoh’s daughter
na'Both - For the signal retribution taken on this judicial murder --a remarkable proof of the high regard paid in the old dispensation to the claims of Justice and independence --see AHAB ; JEHU ; JEZEBEL
Atonement - Is the satisfying Divine Justice by Jesus Christ giving himself a ransom for us, undergoing the penalty due to our sins, and thereby releasing us from that punishment which God might justly inflict upon us, Romans 5:11 . The Hebrew word signifies covering, and intimates that our offences are, by a proper atonement, covered from the avenging Justice of God. God had a mind to make a very illustrious display both of his Justice and of his grace among mankind; on these accounts he would not pardon sin without a satisfaction. Because God intended to make a full display of the terrors of his Justice, and his divine resentment for the violation of his law, therefore he appointed his own Son to satisfy for the breach of it, by becoming a proper sacrifice of expiation or atonement, Galatians 3:10 ; Galatians 3:13 ...
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Reform - ...
Jesus cannot be claimed with any Justice as a victim on the altar of political reform. He believed that by interfering with the Law, even to have Justice done, His disciples might do their spiritual life more harm than such action would do good in a temporal aspect. ‘Jesus’ disciple ought to be able to renounce the pursuit of his rights, and ought to co-operate in forming a nation of brothers, in which Justice is done, no longer by the aid of force, but by free obedience to the good, and which is united, not by legal regulations, but by the ministry of love’ (Harnack, What is Christianity? p
Command - ) To have power or influence of the nature of authority over; to obtain as if by ordering; to receive as a due; to challenge; to claim; as, Justice commands the respect and affections of the people; the best goods command the best price
Freedom of Speech And of the Press - Speech and writing must first of all correspond to the truth; and after that they must be governed by Justice and charity
Freedom of the Press - Speech and writing must first of all correspond to the truth; and after that they must be governed by Justice and charity
Beneficence - ...
Next to Justice, the most prominent virtue in the system of morality, is beneficence
Tithe - In the first two passages He contrasts the minute exactness with which the Pharisees observe their less important and external laws of tithe with their careless disregard of the inner and more important virtues of Justice, mercy, faith, and the love of God
Doctrine - Thus the idea of God's sovereignty excites submission; his power and Justice promote fear; his holiness, humility and purity; his goodness, a ground of hope; his love excites joy; the obscurity of his providence requires patience; his faithfulness, confidence
Torment (2) - Christ read off to them in vivid words what their vision was too dull to see,—the penalties attached to their sin by the law that ‘Justice founded and eternal Love
Flame - ...
Daniel 7:9 (a) This figure indicates GOD's Justice and righteousness against all evil, sin and hypocrisy
Infinity - His purity, holiness, and Justice, Job 4:17-18
Shem - Lastly, the Jews say, that he taught men the law of Justice, and the manner of reckoning months and years, and the intercalations of the months
Ordinary - According to established order methodical regular customary as the ordinary forms of law or Justice
Speech, Freedom of - Speech and writing must first of all correspond to the truth; and after that they must be governed by Justice and charity
Petrus, Bishop of Edessa - 505, Peter made a second application to the emperor, who received him with frowns and rebuked him for leaving his distressed flock at such a time, but, feeling the Justice of the request, remitted the taxes for the whole province, sending the order without informing Peter (ib
Theodebert i., King of the Franks - 548); and according to Gregory of Tours, when he had come to the throne "he shewed himself governing with Justice, honouring the priests, doing good to the churches, succouring the poor and distributing benefits charitably and liberally " ( Hist
Merit - Strict merit (de condigno) is had when the relation between service and return is one of equality inasmuch as the service freely rendered to another is, according to the common estimate, equal to the return which is then due in Justice. Lesser merit (de congruo) is had when the relation of equality is lacking and a return is due not in Justice but because of a certain becomingness appealing to the liberality of the one served
Vengeance - Vengeance reflects a sense of Justice in restoring the right. Scaer...
See also Accursed ; Devote, Devoted ; Judgment ; Justice ; Providence of God ; Punishment ; Worship ; Wrath of God ...
Bibliography
Elder; Aged - The “elder” was recognized by the people for his gifts of leadership, wisdom, and Justice. He was set apart to administer Justice, settle disputes, and guide the people of his charge
Judgment, Last - The Justice of God requires it; for it is evident that this attribute is not clearly displayed in the dispensation of things in the present state, 2 Thessalonians 1:6-7 . and acting with strict Justice, 2 Timothy 4:8 . ...
They also think, that the Justice of the proceedings of that day requires it, since it is presumed and known by the whole world that they were prone to sin, as well as others; and, before conversion, as great sinners as any, and after it their sins had a peculiar aggravation. Therefore, why should not they be made public, as a glory due to the Justice and holiness of God, whose nature is opposite to all sin? And this they farther suppose to be necessary, that so the impartiality of divine Justice may appear
Zedekiah - Zedekiah (zĕd'e-kî'ah), Justice of Jehovah
Lazarus - One of the principal characters in a parable Jesus told to warn the selfish rich that Justice eventually will be done
Mediator - Such a mediator must be at once divine and human, divine, that his obedience and his sufferings might possess infinite worth, and that he might possess infinite wisdom and knowlege and power to direct all things in the kingdoms of providence and grace which are committed to his hands (Matthew 28:18 ; John 5:22,25,26,27 ); and human, that in his work he might represent man, and be capable of rendering obedience to the law and satisfying the claims of Justice (Hebrews 2:17,18 ; 4:15,16 ), and that in his glorified humanity he might be the head of a glorified Church (Romans 8:29 )
Noah - And 350 years did he live among his posterity, a monument of God's Justice and God's faithfulness
Book of Life - The judgment of God was thus supposed to be based upon absolute Justice, and determined by the balance of recorded good and evil deeds
Dispense - To administer to apply, as laws to particular cases to distribute Justice
Balances - God called on Israel for economic Justice that began with proper weights and balances
Judgment the Day of - And this has sometimes grievously perplexed God's servants, who have not known how to reconcile the fact with his holy Justice
Demand - Here the claim is derived from law or Justice
Widow - Israel was admonished to treat “widows” and other socially disadvantaged people with Justice, God Himself standing as their protector ( Judgment - ) The act of determining, as in courts of law, what is conformable to law and Justice; also, the determination, decision, or sentence of a court, or of a judge; the mandate or sentence of God as the judge of all
Proselyte - The other class were called "proselytes of Justice;" that is, complete, perfect proselytes, and were those who had abandoned their former religion, and bound themselves to the observance of the Mosaic Law in its full extent
Wrong - To injure to treat with injustice to deprive of some right, or to withhold some act of Justice from. To do injustice to by imputation to impute evil unjustly
Supralapsarians - Persons who hold that God, without any regard to the good or evil works of men, has resolved, by an eternal decree, supra lapsum, antecedently to any knowledge of the fall of Adam, and independently of it, to save some and reject others: or, in other words, that God intended to glorify his Justice in the condemnation of some, as well as his mercy in the salvation of others; and, for that purpose, decreed that Adam, should necessarily fall. ...
The decree of the means includes the decree to create men to permit them to fall, to recover them out of it through redemption by Christ, to sanctify them by the grace of the Spirit, and completely save them; and which are not to be reckoned as materially many decrees, but as making one formed decree; or they are not to be considered as subordinate, but as co-ordinate means, and as making up one entire complete medium; for it is not to be supposed that God decreed to create man, that he might permit him to fall, in order to redeem, sanctify, and save him; but he decreed all this that he might glorify his grace, mercy, and Justice. " If they mean that Justice requires a creature to devote himself to the worship and glorifying of his Creator, we grant it; if they mean that the attributes of God are displayed in all his works, we grant this too: but if the proposition be intended to affirm that God had no other view in creating men, so to speak, than his own interest, we deny the proposition, and affirm that God created men for their own happiness, and in order to have subjects upon whom he might bestow favours. We desire to be informed, in the next place, say they, how it can be conceived that a determination to damn millions of men can contribute to the glory of God? We easily conceive, that it is for the glory of divine Justice to punish guilty men: but to resolve to damn men without the consideration of sin, to create them that they might sin, to determine that they should sin in order to their destruction, is what seems to us more likely to tarnish the glory of God than to display it
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - Justice was neither to be withheld from the poor (Exodus 23:6 ) nor distorted because a person was poor (23:3; Leviticus 19:15 ). Hannah's prayer reveals the plight of the poor along with their dependence upon the Lord (1 Samuel 2:5-8 ), while Nathan's parable to David shows the nature of oppression, the relativity of poverty (this poor man was not destitute), and the concern of the king to provide Justice for the poor (2 Samuel 12:1-4 ). This situation was further accentuated with the influx of idolatry and increase of injustice during the divided monarchy. He rescued (35:10), raised (113:7), and satisfied them (132:15); it was the Lord who secured Justice for the poor and the needy (140:12). Poverty is a result of laziness (6:10-11; 10:4; 20:13; 24:33-34), lack of discipline (13:18), idleness (14:23; 28:19), haste (21:5), excess (21:17; 23:20-21), and injustice (13:23). Poverty is quite realistically presented in Job 24 , where the poor are portrayed as hungry, thirsty, naked, and suffering from various kinds of injustice and oppression including the loss of poverty, family, and life. The poor are bought and sold, trampled, crushed, oppressed, forced, and denied Justice by those who are in a position to do otherwise. They trample on the heads of the poor as upon the dust of the ground and deny Justice to the oppressed" (2:6-7). Instead of defending the poor and upholding the Law of God they took bribes and gifts to pervert Justice (Isaiah 1:23 )
Wrong - ) To treat with injustice; to deprive of some right, or to withhold some act of Justice from; to do undeserved harm to; to deal unjustly with; to injure
Othniel - "He judged Israel (not merely settling their internal disputes in Justice as civil judge, but restoring their right in relation to their foreign oppressor, for it is added), and went out to war
Gilgal - This was one of the three towns to which Samuel resorted for the administration of Justice (1 Samuel 7:16 ), and here also he offered sacrifices when the ark was no longer in the tabernacle at Shiloh (1 Samuel 10:8 ; 13:7-9 )
Ignorance - It appears to be in accordance with natural Justice that ignorance should be regarded as modifying moral responsibility, and this is fully recognized in the Scriptures
Louis Xiv - At first he treated the Protestants with Justice
Josiah - ...
Josiah’s reign was characterized by Justice, as we learn from Jeremiah, but we know no more of it until the end of the king’s life
Possessed of the Devil - The general term made use of in our courts of Justice in the indictment of criminals, is plain in proof for the running phrase is, that such an one, not having the fear of God before his eyes, and being moved by the instigation of the devil, did such and such things
Protest - ) A declaration made by a party, before or while paying a tax, duty, or the like, demanded of him, which he deems illegal, denying the Justice of the demand, and asserting his rights and claims, in order to show that the payment was not voluntary
Gate - courts of Justice, or for meeting kings and rulers or ambassadors
Bull - It is used chiefly in matters of Justice or of grace
Judge - ) A public officer who is invested with authority to hear and determine litigated causes, and to administer Justice between parties in courts held for that purpose
Reward - A bribe a gift to pervert Justice
Truth - The duty of a court of Justice is to discover the truth
Vary - To deviate to depart as, to vary from the law to vary from the rules of Justice or reason
Judges - Their first work was that of deliverers and leaders in war; they then administered Justice to the people, and their authority supplied the want of a regular government
Micah, Book of - ...
Social conditions...
With the prosperity of the eighth century came the social evils of greed, corruption, injustice and immorality. Corruption in the law courts made it easy for these people to do as they wished, while poorer class people found it impossible to gain even the most basic Justice (Micah 3:9-11; Micah 7:3). ...
Micah was particularly concerned with the injustice done to the poor farmers. ...
Because of the injustice of the officials and merchants with whom they had to deal, the farmers were forced to borrow from the wealthy to keep themselves in business (Micah 3:1-3; Micah 6:10-12). The people still followed the sacrifices and ceremonies of the Israelite religion, but Micah warned that formal religion was hateful to God if Justice and love were absent (Micah 6:6-8)
Vengeance - If the idea of wrath is associated with the use of the word, as in Romans 3:5; Romans 13:4, such ‘wrath’ (ὀργή) is the eternal righteousness or Justice of God acting in harmony with His revealed will. ’ War as a method of giving expression to the law of international righteousness is admittedly repugnant to the Christian conscience; but until the method is superseded as the result of a consensus gentium, a Christian nation is not absolved from the duty of vindicating either by offensive or by defensive warfare the eternal principles of right and Justice
on (2) - Reputed the oldest capital in Egypt, it and Memphis are mentioned in very early inscriptions as the two seats of Justice; Thebes is added in hieroglyphics of the 18th dynasty; "the three seats of Justice of both Egypts. " Under the Greek rulers, On, Memphis, and Thebes sent forth ten Justices to the surrounding districts
Complete - ...
Without any deficiency or flaw in executing Justice, God is likewise never lacking in mercy and power to bestow benevolences of every kind. ...
The God of perfect Justice and goodness expects total devotion from His creatures
Elders - He established over Israel heads of thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, that Justice might be readily administered to applicants; only difficult eases were referred to himself, Exodus 18:24-25 , &c. This, according to the generality of interpreters, was the beginning of the sanhedrim; but, to support this opinion, many things must be supposed, whereby to infer, that this court of Justice was constantly in being during the Scripture history
Judges - They were very different from the ordinary administrators of Justice among the Hebrews, respecting whom, see Justice
Moral Aspects of Monopoly - Monopolistic prices are not unjust provided they do not exceed the limits laid down by the objective, and subjective rules of Justice, viz. Even where the monopoly has complied with the double rule of Justice cited, there is no good reason why in the case of reduced cost of production, the monopoly should absorb all the benefits of the improvement. However no injustice is done if the monopoly lowers its prices and keeps them lowered after the competitors have failed, or simply raises them to the profitable though just level because no unjust means have been used. Railway favoritism is immoral because:
it is forbidden by law, being condemned by sound general opinion
the railroad as a quasi-public agency is under obligation to treat all its patrons with the same distributive Justice that the state would be obliged to accord them were it the owner of the railroad
the lowered prices granted the monopoly imply exorbitantly high rates extorted from the independent shippers
The monopoly is a formal cooperator in this injustice in as much as it requests, urges and even intimidates the railroad into granting the preferential rates. Of itself then, monopoly is not necessarily unjust, but experience teaches that the power of committing injustice inherent in every monopoly cannot be unreservedly intrusted to the average man, or group of men. Hence it is the duty of the state to prevent tne existence of unnecessary monopolies, and to exercise strict supervision over the necessary ones, in order to prevent monopolistic injustice
Monopoly - Monopolistic prices are not unjust provided they do not exceed the limits laid down by the objective, and subjective rules of Justice, viz. Even where the monopoly has complied with the double rule of Justice cited, there is no good reason why in the case of reduced cost of production, the monopoly should absorb all the benefits of the improvement. However no injustice is done if the monopoly lowers its prices and keeps them lowered after the competitors have failed, or simply raises them to the profitable though just level because no unjust means have been used. Railway favoritism is immoral because:
it is forbidden by law, being condemned by sound general opinion
the railroad as a quasi-public agency is under obligation to treat all its patrons with the same distributive Justice that the state would be obliged to accord them were it the owner of the railroad
the lowered prices granted the monopoly imply exorbitantly high rates extorted from the independent shippers
The monopoly is a formal cooperator in this injustice in as much as it requests, urges and even intimidates the railroad into granting the preferential rates. Of itself then, monopoly is not necessarily unjust, but experience teaches that the power of committing injustice inherent in every monopoly cannot be unreservedly intrusted to the average man, or group of men. Hence it is the duty of the state to prevent tne existence of unnecessary monopolies, and to exercise strict supervision over the necessary ones, in order to prevent monopolistic injustice
Monopoly, Moral Aspects of - Monopolistic prices are not unjust provided they do not exceed the limits laid down by the objective, and subjective rules of Justice, viz. Even where the monopoly has complied with the double rule of Justice cited, there is no good reason why in the case of reduced cost of production, the monopoly should absorb all the benefits of the improvement. However no injustice is done if the monopoly lowers its prices and keeps them lowered after the competitors have failed, or simply raises them to the profitable though just level because no unjust means have been used. Railway favoritism is immoral because:
it is forbidden by law, being condemned by sound general opinion
the railroad as a quasi-public agency is under obligation to treat all its patrons with the same distributive Justice that the state would be obliged to accord them were it the owner of the railroad
the lowered prices granted the monopoly imply exorbitantly high rates extorted from the independent shippers
The monopoly is a formal cooperator in this injustice in as much as it requests, urges and even intimidates the railroad into granting the preferential rates. Of itself then, monopoly is not necessarily unjust, but experience teaches that the power of committing injustice inherent in every monopoly cannot be unreservedly intrusted to the average man, or group of men. Hence it is the duty of the state to prevent tne existence of unnecessary monopolies, and to exercise strict supervision over the necessary ones, in order to prevent monopolistic injustice
Atonement - ...
His infinite holiness and Justice, and the intrinsic demerit of sin, require this. As no other sacrifice of like value could be found, proof was given to the universe that sin was the most disastrous evil, and that its "punishment was not the arbitrary act of an inexorable judge, but the unavoidable result of perfect holiness and Justice, even in a Being of infinite mercy. And so God is a great King, and as a king he administers public Justice and will not arbitrarily clear the guilty
Expiation, Propitiation - Expiation emphasizes the removal of guilt through a payment of the penalty, while propitiation emphasizes the appeasement or averting of God's wrath and Justice. Other scholars see God as the object receiving the offering for sin which then in some sense pacifies His anger and meets His holy need for Justice. In the New Testament setting, this would mean that on the cross Jesus either dealt with the evil nature of human sin and covered it so that God forgives it, or it means that Jesus satisfied God's holy anger and Justice so that forgiven sinners could freely enter the presence of the holy God. Some scholars would see both ideas present in the word hilasmos , so that God in grace initiated the sacrifice of Jesus to provide covering and forgiveness for human sin but that He also received the sacrifice which satisfied His anger and Justice
Ban - ’ In this brief treatment of a large subject we propose to distinguish between the war ban, the Justice ban, and the private ban. The Justice ban differs from the other in being applicable only to members of the theocratic community. ’ The following verse, on the contrary, must refer to the Justice ban
Magna Carta - Its chief purpose was to protect the feudal rights of the baronage, especially in the matter of dues, service, and the administration of Justice, though clauses in favor of the Church, merchants, and villeins were included
Witness - See also Justice (II
Carta, Magna - Its chief purpose was to protect the feudal rights of the baronage, especially in the matter of dues, service, and the administration of Justice, though clauses in favor of the Church, merchants, and villeins were included
Exorcism - Then follow the litanies, psalms, and prayer; after which the exorcist asks the devil his name, and adjures him by the mysteries of the Christian religion not to afflict the person any more; then, laying his right hand on the daemoniac's head, he repeats the form of exorcism, which is this: "I exorcise thee, unclean spirit, in the name of Jesus Christ: tremble, O Satan, thou enemy of the faith, thou foe of mankind, who hast brought death into the world; who hast deprived men of life, and hast rebelled against Justice, thou seducer of mankind, thou root of all evil, thou source of avarice, discord, and envy
Redemption - It is the plain doctrine of Scripture that "Christ saves us neither by the mere exercise of power, nor by his doctrine, nor by his example, nor by the moral influence which he exerted, nor by any subjective influence on his people, whether natural or mystical, but as a satisfaction to divine Justice, as an expiation for sin, and as a ransom from the curse and authority of the law, thus reconciling us to God by making it consistent with his perfection to exercise mercy toward sinners" (Hodge's Systematic Theology)
Judgment, the Final - Then the secrets of all hearts will be brought to light (1 Corinthians 4:5 ; Luke 8:17 ; 12:2,3 ) to vindicate the Justice of the sentence pronounced
Diadem - ...
The word “diadem” was used in a metaphorical sense of the prudent person (Proverbs 14:18 ), of Justice (Job 29:14 ), of God (Isaiah 28:5 ), of God's presence (Ezekiel 21:26 ), and of Jerusalem (Isaiah 62:3 )
Rainbow - In other words, mercy tempers Justice: ‘Deus in judiciis semper foederis sui meminit’ (Grotius, quoted by H
Headdress - In Job 29:14, "my judgment (justice) was as
Foundation - In Psalms 11:3 ; Psalms 75:3 ; Psalms 82:5 , Ezekiel 30:4 , the idea is applied metaphorically to the ‘fundamental’ principles of law and Justice on which the moral order rests
Loan - See Borrow, Borrowing; Coins ; Ethics in the Bible; Jubilee, Year of; Justice ; Law; Poor, Widows, Orphans, Levites ; Sabbatical Year ; Slavery; Stranger ...
David Nelson Duke...
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Act - ) The result of public deliberation; the decision or determination of a legislative body, council, court of Justice, etc
Horse - ...
Revelation 19:11 (b) The white horse - typical of the great power which the Lord JESUS will exhibit in righteousness and Justice when He comes forth from Heaven as the Almighty Conqueror
Saviour - Had he not been God, how should he have been able to save, for who less than God can save? And had he not been man, there would not have been a suitability in the Lord Jesus Christ for such an office, Justice so requiring that the same nature which sinned, and broke the divine law, should atone and make ample restoration
Court - The hall, chamber or place where Justice is administered
Warrant - ) A precept issued by a magistrate authorizing an officer to make an arrest, a seizure, or a search, or do other acts incident to the administration of Justice
Unrighteousness - A — 1: ἀδικία (Strong's #93 — Noun Feminine — adikia — ad-ee-kee'-ah ) denotes (a) "injustice," Luke 18:6 , lit. , "the judge of injustice;" Romans 9:14 ; (b) "unrighteousness, iniquity," e. , deceit such as "unrighteousness" uses, and that in every variety; Antichrist and his ministers will not be restrained by any scruple from words or deeds calculated to deceive; 2 Thessalonians 2:12 , of those who have pleasure in it, not an intellectual but a moral evil; distate for truth is the precursor of the rejection of it; 2 Timothy 2:19 , RV; 1 John 1:9 , which includes (c) "a deed or deeds violating law and Justice" (virtually the same as adikema, "an unrighteous act"), e
Sadducees - Their party had, moreover, a political complexion: they were austere, it may be added, in their habits, and severe in the administration of Justice
Refine - To purify, as the mind or moral principles to give or implant in the mind a nice perception of truth, Justice and propriety in commerce and social intercourse
Lord - An honorary title bestowed on certain official characters as lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief Justice, &c
Judgment - The revelation of his Justice, appalling but unstained, will fill the universe with approving wonder; but the revelation of his yet more amazing goodness will crown him with unutterable glory
God - It reveals him to us as a Spirit, the only being from everlasting and to everlasting by nature, underived, infinite, perfect, and unchangeable in power, wisdom, omniscience, omnipresence, Justice, holiness, truth, goodness, and mercy
Laodice'a - (justice of the people ), a town in the Roman province of Asia situated in the valley of the Maeander, on a small river called the Lycus, with Colossae and Hierapolis a few miles distant to the west
Gate - ...
Places for public deliberation, administration of Justice, or of audience for kings and rulers or ambassadors
Profit - With this we may compare Plato’s words: ‘What will anyone be profited if under the influence of honour or money or power, aye, or under the excitement of poetry, he neglect Justice and virtue?’ (see Jowett’s Plato, iii
Samuel - Samuel also exercised the judicial role of judge, administering Justice at Bethel, Gilgal, Mizpah, and Ramah (1 Samuel 7:15-17 ). Thus in life and death Samuel cast a long shadow over Israel's history of worship, rule, prophecy, and Justice
Predestination - On the one side it has be observed, that it is impossible to reconcile it with our ideas of the Justice and goodness of God, that it makes God to be the author of sin, destroys moral distinction, and renders all our efforts useless. May we not ask, Why does he suffer those inequalities of Providence? Why permit whole nations to lie in idolatry or ages? Why leave men to the most cruel barbarities? Why punish the sins of the fathers in the children? In a word, Why permit the world at large to be subject to pains, crosses, losses, evils of every kind, and that for so many thousands of years? And, yet, will any dare call the Deity unjust? The fact is, our finite minds know but little of the nature of divine Justice, or any other of his attributes
Strife - This “dispute” is set in the context of a mutual law structure binding both parties and a court which is empowered to decide and execute Justice. 34:8 rı̂yb signifies a “case” already argued and won and awaiting Justice: “For it is the day of the Lord’s vengeance, and the year of recompenses for the controversy of Zion
Throne - is used for that magnificent seat on which sovereign princes usually sit to receive the homage of their subjects, or to give audience to ambassadors; where they appear with pomp and ceremony, and from whence they dispense Justice; in a word, the throne, the sceptre, the crown, are the ordinary symbols of royalty and regal authority. So D'Herbelot tells us that a Persian monarch of aftertimes gave the governor of one of his provinces permission to seat himself in a gilded chair, when he administered Justice; which distinction was granted him on account of the importance of that post, to which the guarding a pass of great consequence was committed
Peace, Spiritual - Thus peace and righteousness are often linked in the Old Testament (Psalm 72:7 ; Psalm 85:10 ; Isaiah 9:7 ; Isaiah 32:17 ; Isaiah 48:18 ; Isaiah 60:17 ), as are peace and Justice (Isaiah 59:8 ). To be at peace is to be upright (Malachi 2:6 ), to be faithful (2 Samuel 20:19 ), to be an upholder of the truth (Esther 9:30 ; Zechariah 8:19 ), and to practice Justice (Isaiah 59:8 ; Zechariah 8:16 )
Government - At times they may decide to speak and act in support of the principle of Justice that the government is supposed to administer (Daniel 5:24-28; Isaiah 5:22-23; Micah 3:1-3; 1618839439_83; Acts 22:25; Acts 25:10-11). In such countries Christians can not only pray for God’s will to be done on earth, but they can actively work for those values of Justice, freedom, morality, honesty and compassion that God desires for human society (Matthew 6:10). Amos 2:6-7; 1618839439_52; Zephaniah 3:3; see Justice)
Death - Injustice could be accepted in individual lives (for example, prosperity among the wicked, misfortune among the righteous) because it was assumed that Justice eventually prevailed in the group . Job and Ecclesiastes questioned the idea that Justice is always served in this life. Ezekiel and Jeremiah affirmed that God's Justice could not be satisfied simply by reference to the group, but had to apply to the individual (Jeremiah 31:29-30 ,Jeremiah 31:29-30,31:33-34 ; Ezekiel 18:19-20 ). Finally, the Book of Daniel teaches that to serve Justice in individual lives, the dead had to be raised by God, “some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt” (Daniel 12:2 )
Amos - Justice was distorted. Amos' opposition to those moral and religious evils led him to emphasize the primary theme of the book: “let Justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an everlasting stream” (Amos 5:24 RSV). His word of judgment was severe for the “first ladies of Samaria” who encouraged the injustice and violence of their husbands “who oppress the poor, who crush the needy, who say to their husbands, Bring, that we may drink!'” ( Amos 4:1 RSV). Because of such injustice and the failure to bind authentic religious experience with a social conscience, Amos claimed that the nation was already dead. For individuals who were superficially and confidently “at ease in Zion, and to those who feel secure on the mountain of Samaria” ( Amos 6:1 RSV), their only hope rested in the renewal of authentic religious experience leading to a life of Justice and righteousness which overflow the land ( Amos 5:24 ). God calls His people to practice Justice and righteousness (1618839439_2 )
Delegate, Apostolic - ...
The Apostolic delegation is not a tribunal of Justice, but the delegate may decide conflicts in competence, as specified by church law (canon 1612,2)
Gad - And he provided the first part for himself, because there, in a portion of the lawgiver, was he seated; and he came with the heads of the people, he executed the Justice of the Lord, and his judgements with Israel
Jeroboam - (jehr oh boh' am) Personal name possibly meaning, “he who contends for Justice for the people” or “may the people multiply
Chaplain - the persons vested with a power of retaining chaplains, together with the number each is allowed to qualify, are as follow: an archbishop eight; a duke or bishop six; marquis or earl five; viscount four; baron, knight of the garter, or lord chancellor, three: a duchess, marchioness, countess, baroness, the treasurer or comptroller of the king's house, clerk of the closet, the king's secretary, dean of the chapel, almoner, and master of the rolls, each of them two; chief Justice of the king's bench, and ward of the cinque ports, each one
Essenes - The novitiate was for a year, and then a two years probation before membership, which, on oath of an awful kind (the only oath permitted), bound them to piety, Justice, obedience, honesty, and secrecy as to the books of the sect and the names of the angels
Equity - Is that exact rule of righteousness or Justice, which is to be observed between man and man
Benevolence - ; those we owe to families and individuals, as affection, care, provision, Justice, forbearance, &c
Sword - The word was used as a metaphor for war (Jeremiah 14:15 ; Matthew 10:34 ); the sword was an instrument of divine Justice (Ezekiel 21:3 ; Revelation 1:16 )
Conventicle - Also suffering a meeting to be held in a house is twenty pounds penalty: Justices of peace have power to enter such houses, and seize persons assembled: and if they neglect their duty, they forfeit 100l. know of such proceedings, and do not inform a Justice of peace or chief magistrate, he shall forfeit 5l
Wages - His Justice also ensured that the reward of the unrighteous was equal to their crimes (Psalm 109:20 ; Romans 6:23 ; 2 Peter 2:15 )
Pillar - ...
Proverbs 9:1 (a) The seven pillars mentioned here probably are knowledge, discretion, judgment, understanding, equity, righteousness, Justice
Hall - The Authorized Version renders αὐλή by ‘palace’ in Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:58; Matthew 26:69, Mark 14:54; Mark 14:66, Luke 11:21, John 18:15, when the reference is to the place where the governor dispensed Justice; by ‘fold’ in John 10:1; John 10:16 of the place where the sheep were kept at night; and by ‘court’ in Revelation 11:2, as designating the court of the temple
Prudence - Plato styles prudence the leading virtue; and Cicero observes, "that not one of the virtues can want prudence, " which is certainly most true, since without prudence to guide them, piety would degenerate into superstition, zeal into bigotry, temperance into austerity, courage into rashness, and Justice itself into folly
Action - ) A suit or process, by which a demand is made of a right in a court of Justice; in a broad sense, a judicial proceeding for the enforcement or protection of a right, the redress or prevention of a wrong, or the punishment of a public offense
Race - ) The divine favor toward man; the mercy of God, as distinguished from His Justice; also, any benefits His mercy imparts; divine love or pardon; a state of acceptance with God; enjoyment of the divine favor
God - Further, I mean a Being, who, having these prerogatives, has the Supreme Good, or rather is the Supreme Good, or has all the attributes of Good in infinite intenseness; all wisdom, all truth, all Justice, all love, all holiness, all beautifulness; who is omnipotent, omniscient, omnipresent; ineffably one, absolutely perfect; and such, that what we do not know and cannot even imagine of Him, is far more wonderful than what we do and can
Bottom - I do see the bottom of Justice Shallow
Record - ) An official contemporaneous memorandum stating the proceedings of a court of Justice; a judicial record
Apostolic Delegate - ...
The Apostolic delegation is not a tribunal of Justice, but the delegate may decide conflicts in competence, as specified by church law (canon 1612,2)
Gate - It should have been the place of true judgement and Justice, but was not always so
Miser - Sometimes it is equity, for Justice requires that every one should enjoy the fruit of his own labours, and those of his ancestors
Alms - first, They should be given with Justice; only our own, to which we have a just right, should be given
Race - ) The divine favor toward man; the mercy of God, as distinguished from His Justice; also, any benefits His mercy imparts; divine love or pardon; a state of acceptance with God; enjoyment of the divine favor
Office - Thus we speak of the office of secretary of state, of treasurer, of a judge, of a sheriff, of a Justice of the peace, &c
Cause - So we say, the cause of truth or of Justice
Society of Our Lady of Good Counsel - Although essentially a Catholic society, the question of religion does not arise so far as applicants for help are concerned; assistance is freely given to all regardless of creed, social status, or character; it is only necessary that clients be poor and have right and Justice on their side
Publican - It is even said that they would not allow them to enter the temple or the synagogues, to engage in the public prayers or offices of judicature, or to give testimony in a court of Justice
Gate - ...
In oriental cities there was always an open space or place adjacent to each gate, and these were at the same time the market places, and the place of Justice, Genesis 23:10-18 Ruth 4:1-12 Deuteronomy 16:18 21:19 25:6,7 Proverbs 22:22 Amos 5:10,12,15
Respect - Partial regard undue bias to the prejudice of Justice as the phrase, respect of persons
Pilate or Pontius Pilate - But he had not the firmness of character, the deep-rooted principle of Justice, and the consciousness of rectitude necessary to carry him through; and after repeated efforts, Luke 23:7,14-20 ; John 18:31,38 ; 19:4-6,9-12,15 , he at length gave way, and sacrificed a righteous man, rather than to provoke complaints against his administration and an investigation by the emperor
Reconciliation - For this reconciliation, by the cross of Christ is in a way of atonement or satisfaction to divine Justice for sin; and with respect hereunto, we are said to be reconciled to God by the death of his Son while we are enemies, which is of much the same import with Christ's dying for the ungodly, and while we were yet sinners, Romans 5:6 ; Romans 5:8 ; Romans 5:10 . Now as all the legal sacrifices of atonement, and the truly expiatory sacrifices of Christ, were offered not to the offenders, but to God, to reconcile him in them, what can reconciliation by the death, blood, or cross of Christ mean, but that the law and Justice of God were thereby satisfied, and all obstructions, on his part, to peace and friendship toward sinners are removed, that he might not pursue his righteous demands upon them, according to the holy resentments of his nature and will, and the threatenings of his law for their sins; but might mercifully forgive them, and take them into a state of favour with himself, upon their receiving the atonement, or reconciliation (Romans 5:11 , ) by faith, after the offence that sin had given him, and the breach it had made upon the original friendship between him and them?" ...
See articles ATONEMENT, MEDIATOR, and PROPITIATION; Grot
Faithfulness - 98:3, NASB), and with mishpat (“justice” cf. In these verses, the words “righteousness,” “judgment” (“justice”), “loving-kindness,” “mercies,” and “faithfulness” bear out the conclusion that the synonyms for 'ĕmûnâh are covenantal terms expressive of God’s “faithfulness” and “love
Refuge - They were wont to send some prudent persons to meet those who were pursuing their revenge for the relations, that they might dispose them to clemency, and persuade them to wait the decision of Justice. ...
Though the man-slayer had fled to the city of refuge, yet he was not on this account exempted from the pursuit of Justice
Elder - Moses had, at the suggestion of Jethro, appointed officers to administer Justice, Exodus 18:26, but he seems to have required, further, a body of (if they may be so called) political advisers. Those who locally administered Justice are said to have been termed "elders of the gate," Proverbs 31:23; Lamentations 5:14; because that was the place where a court was often held
Righteousness - God the Father is righteous (just); Jesus Christ his Son is the Righteous (Just) One; the Father through the Son and in the Spirit gives the gift of righteousness (justice) to repentant sinners for salvation; such believing sinners are declared righteous (just) by the Father through the Son, are made righteous (just) by the Holy Spirit working in them, and will be wholly righteous (just) in the age to come. ...
The noun righteousness/justice (Gk. So we have just, Justice, justify and right, righteous, righteousness, rightwise (old English). The appropriate background to bear in mind for understanding the teaching of both John the Baptist and Jesus the Christ on righteousness/justice are two of the dominant ideas of the Old Testament. Hosea, the prophet of divine love, ties righteousness with mercy, loving kindness, and Justice (2:19; 10:12). ...
Peter Toon...
See also Ethics ; God ; Justice ...
Bibliography
Calvinism - This is the scheme of predestination as exhibited by Calvin; and to the objection taken from Justice, he replies, "They" (the objectors) "inquire by what right the Lord is angry with his creatures who had not provoked him by any previous offence; for that to devote to destruction whom he pleases, is more like the caprice of a tyrant, than the lawful sentence of a judge. For the will of God is the highest rule of Justice; so that what he wills must be considered just, for this very reason, because he wills it. ...
He pretends that to assign any cause to the divine will is to suppose something antecedent to, something above God, and therefore "impious;" as if we might not suppose something IN God to be the rule of his will, not only without any impiety, but with truth and piety; as, for instance, his perfect wisdom, holiness, Justice, and goodness; or, in other words, to believe the exercise of his will to flow from the perfection of his whole nature; a much more honourable and Scriptural view of the will of God than that which subjects it to no rule, even though it should arise from the nature of God himself. When he calls the will of God, "the highest rule of Justice," beyond which we cannot push our inquiries, he confounds the will of God, as a rule of Justice to us, and as a rule to himself. This will is our rule; yet even then, because we know that it is the will of a perfect being: but when Calvin represents mere will as constituting God's own rule of Justice, he shuts out knowledge, discrimination of the nature of things, and holiness; which is saying something very different from that great truth, that God cannot will any thing but what is perfectly just. It is to say that blind will, will which has no respect to any thing but itself, is God's highest rule of Justice; a position which, if presented abstractedly, many Calvinists themselves would spurn. Calvin was not, however, content thus to leave the matter; but resorts to an argument, in which he has been generally followed by those who have adopted his system with some mitigations: "As we are all corrupted by sin, we must necessarily be odious to God, and that not from tyrannical cruelty, but in the most equitable estimation of Justice. If all whom the Lord predestinates to death are, in their natural condition, liable to the sentence of death, what injustice do they complain of receiving from him?" To this Calvin very fairly states the obvious rejoinder made in his day; and which the common sense of mankind will always make,— "They object, Were they not by the decree of God antecedently predestinated to that corruption which is now stated as the cause of their condemnation? When they perish in their corruption, therefore, they only suffer the punishment of that misery into which, in consequence of his predestination, Adam fell, and precipitated his posterity with him. How the passage may be proved from its context to have no respect to the eternal state of men at all; but, if that were less obvious, it gives no answer to the objection; and we are brought round again, as indeed he confesses, to his former, and indeed only, argument, that the whole matter as he states it, is to be referred back to the divine will; which will, though perfectly arbitrary, is, as he contends, the highest rule of Justice: "I say, with Augustine, that the Lord created those whom he certainly foreknew would fall into destruction; and that this was actually so, because he willed it; but of his will, it belongs not to us to demand the reason, which we are incapable of comprehending; nor is it reasonable, that the divine will should be made the subject of controversy with us, which is only another name for the highest rule of Justice. On such a scheme it is therefore worse than trifling to attempt to make out a case of Justice in favour of this assumed divine procedure, by alleging the corruption and guilt of man: a point which, indeed, Calvin himself, in fact, gives up when he says, "That the reprobate obey not the word of God, when made known to them, is justly imputed to the wickedness and depravity of their hearts, provided it be at the same time stated, that they are abandoned to this depravity, because they have been raised up by a just but inscrutable judgment of God, to display his glory in their condemnation. It was by availing themselves of the ineffectual struggles of Calvin to give some colour of Justice to his reprobating decree by fixing upon the corruption of man as a cause of reprobation, that some of his followers endeavoured, in the very teeth of his own express words, to reduce his system to sublapsarianism. As all men have sinned in Adam, and have become exposed to the curse and eternal death, God would have done no injustice to any one, if he had determined to leave the whole human race under sin and the curse, and to condemn them on account of sin; according to those words of the Apostle, ‘All the world is become guilty before God,' Romans 3:19 ; Romans 3:23 ; Romans 6:23 . Moreover, Holy Scripture doth illustrate and commend to us this eternal and free grace of our election, in this more especially, that it doth testify all men not to be elected; but that some are non-elect, or passed by, in the eternal election of God, whom truly God, from most free, just, irreprehensible, and immutable good pleasure, decreed to leave in the common misery into which they had, by their own fault, cast themselves; and not to bestow on them living faith, and the grace of conversion; but having been left in their own ways, and under just judgment, at length, not only on account of their unbelief, but also of all their other sins, to condemn and eternally punish them, to the manifestation of his own Justice
Court Systems - The Levite, therefore, appealed to all the tribes of Israel for Justice. In Israel the king did not have the authority to enact new laws or to make arbitrary legal rulings contrary to the prevailing understanding of Justice. ...
The ideal of the just king who oversees the dispensing of Justice for all his subjects was known in Israel. By judging justly, the courts taught God's law and the principles of divine Justice
Sanhedrin - That this cannot have been the case is seen already in the fact that, according to Biblical authority itself, king Jehoshaphat is mentioned as having instituted the supreme court at Jerusalem ( 2 Chronicles 19:8 ); but that this court cannot have been identical with the Sanhedrin of later times is clear from the fact that, whereas the latter had governing powers as well as judicial functions, the former was a court of Justice and nothing else. ...
The Sanhedrin was conceived of mainly as a court of Justice , the equivalent Heb. It was only in cases when the sentence of death was pronounced that the latter had to be ratified by the Roman authorities ( John 18:31 ); the case of the stoning of Stephen must be regarded as an instance of mob-justice
Micah - In the first discourse (1-2) God rises in majesty to punish idolatry and send distress over Juda, to punish injustice, and none can thwart Him, and the Redemption is introduced, "I will assemble and gather together all of thee, O Jacob: I will bring together the remnant of Israel. In the third discourse (6-7) God challenges His people to come into judgment against Him, and plead their case against His own; God's blessings are contrasted with their base ingratitude and sins, and the penalty is awarded; however, Justice must yield to mercy, and the dawn of Messianic glory is once more foretold
Micheas - In the first discourse (1-2) God rises in majesty to punish idolatry and send distress over Juda, to punish injustice, and none can thwart Him, and the Redemption is introduced, "I will assemble and gather together all of thee, O Jacob: I will bring together the remnant of Israel. In the third discourse (6-7) God challenges His people to come into judgment against Him, and plead their case against His own; God's blessings are contrasted with their base ingratitude and sins, and the penalty is awarded; however, Justice must yield to mercy, and the dawn of Messianic glory is once more foretold
Job, Book of - Quite apart from the prologue (1:2), as well as the epilogue (42:7-16), three parts may be distinguished: ...
three discussions of Job with his friends and two monologues (3-31)
four discourses of Eliu, rebuking Job and his friends for some of their views, and extolling the wisdom and Justice of God (32-38)
utterances of God Himself teaching that His ways are not matters for the curious searching of human intellect (38-42:6)
Composed in the highest style of Hebrew poetry, it indicates great technical skill on the part of the author, and is embellished with rich oriental imagery
Everlasting Punishment - Thus, to wrestle with the idea of “everlasting punishment” is to grapple with notions of time, Justice, evil, and the end of time
Elder - They appear as governors (Deuteronomy 31:28 ), as local magistrates (16:18), administering Justice (19:12)
Bethel - Here also Samuel held in rotation his court of Justice (1 Samuel 7:16 )
Book - ...
The book of judgment (Daniel 7:10 ) refers to the method of human courts of Justice as illustrating the proceedings which will take place at the day of God's final judgment
Right, Rightly - ...
B — 1: δίκαιος (Strong's #1342 — Adjective — dikaios — dik'-ah-yos ) "just, righteous, that which is in accordance with" dike, "rule, right, Justice," is translated "right" in Matthew 20:4 ; Matthew 20:7 , AV only (RV omits, according to the most authentic mss
Everlasting Punishment - Thus, to wrestle with the idea of “everlasting punishment” is to grapple with notions of time, Justice, evil, and the end of time
Restitution - The guidelines for making complete restitution also included a provision for punitive damages (up to five times what had been lost), Justice that moved beyond “an eye for an eye
Dust - To throw dust was a sign of contempt (2 Samuel 16:13 ), though to throw it in the air may have been a demand for Justice (Acts 22:23 )
Foundation - ...
The foundations of Psalm 11:3 are the foundations of life, security, community, Justice, and religion
Confusion of Tongues - God's Justice in punishing of those who, in idolizing their own fame, forget him to whom praise is due
Lawyer - His functions were three-fold: to study and interpret the Law (and the traditions arising from it), to hand it down by teaching, and to apply it in the Courts of Justice
Civil - Relating to the community, or to the policy and government of the citizens and subjects of a state as in the phrases, rights, government, privileges, war, Justice
Dust - ’...
The throwing of dust in the air is still a not uncommon way of expressing rage, or emphasizing an appeal for Justice
Reason - ) Due exercise of the reasoning faculty; accordance with, or that which is accordant with and ratified by, the mind rightly exercised; right intellectual judgment; clear and fair deductions from true principles; that which is dictated or supported by the common sense of mankind; right conduct; right; propriety; Justice
Law - ) Legal science; jurisprudence; the principles of equity; applied Justice
Mediator - So far as man is sensible of his own guilt and of the holiness and Justice of God, he shrinks from any direct communication with a being he has so much reason to fear
Lawyer - His functions were three-fold: to study and interpret the Law (and the traditions arising from it), to hand it down by teaching, and to apply it in the Courts of Justice
Goodness - It is a character that combines love, mercy, patience, faithfulness, Justice, holiness and wrath in perfect balance (Exodus 33:19; Exodus 34:5-7; Psalms 86:5; Romans 11:22)
Peregrinus, Called Proteus - He escaped Justice by transferring his property to the municipality and then passed over to Palestine, where he became a Christian, and, according to Lucian's account, a bishop or at least a presbyter
Timotheus i., Archbaptist of Alexandria - Facundus transcribes a letter of his to Diodore of Tarsus, referring to Athanasius as having spoken highly of Diodore, and professing his own inability to do Justice to his virtue and orthodox zeal ( Pro Defens
Mediator - Man, in his state of innocence, was in friendship with God; but, by sinning against him, he exposed himself to his just displeasure; his powers became enfeebled, and his heart filled with enmity against him, Romans 8:6 : he was driven out of his paradisaical Eden, and totally incapable of returning to God, and making satisfaction to his Justice. Colossians 1:21 ; and in the fulness of time he came into this world, obeyed the law, satisfied Justice, and brought his people into a state of grace and favour; yea, into a more exalted state of friendship with God than was lost by the fall, Ephesians 2:18
Condemn, Condemnation - ...
A — 2: καταδικάζω (Strong's #2613 — Verb — katadikazo — kat-ad-ik-ad'-zo ) signifies "to exercise right or law against anyone;" hence, "to pronounce judgment, to condemn" (kata, "down, or against," dike, "justice"), Matthew 12:7,37 ; Luke 6:37 ; James 5:6 . 1 above); hence "a judging, a passing of judgment upon a person or thing;" it has a variety of meanings, such as judicial authority, John 5:22,27 ; Justice, Acts 8:33 ; James 2:13 ; a tribunal, Matthew 5:21,22 ; a trial, John 5:24 ; 2 Peter 2:4 ; a judgment, 2 Peter 2:11 ; Jude 1:9 ; by metonymy, the standard of judgment, just dealing, Matthew 12:18,20 ; 23:23 ; Luke 11:42 ; Divine judgment executed, 2 Thessalonians 1:5 ; Revelation 16:7 ; (b) sometimes it has the meaning "condemnation," and is virtually equivalent to krima (a); see Matthew 23:33 ; John 3:19 ; James 5:12 , hupo krisin, "under judgment
Jesus Christ - No one ever bore this name with so much Justice, nor so perfectly fulfilled the signification of it, as Jesus Christ, who saves from sin and hell, and has merited heaven for us by the price of his blood. No words can describe that character in which such firmness and gentleness, such dignity and humility, such enthusiasm and calmness, such wisdom and simplicity, such holiness and charity, such Justice and mercy, such sympathy with heaven and with earth, such love to God and love to man blended in perfect harmony
Micah - The style of Micah is nervous, concise, and elegant, often elevated, and poetical, but sometimes obscure from sudden transitions of subject; and the contrast of the neglected duties of Justice, mercy, humility, and piety, with the punctilious observance of the ceremonial sacrifices, affords a beautiful example of the harmony which subsists between the Mosaic and Christian dispensations, and shows that the law partook of that spiritual nature which more immediately characterizes the religion of Jesus
Pharaoh - By confirming Pharaoh in his hardness of heart, God showed the greatness of Pharaoh’s evil and the Justice with which he punished it (Exodus 9:12; Romans 9:14-18; see PLAGUE)
Cedar - But God in retributive Justice "consumed the glory of the Assyrian's forest" figuratively; fulfilling His threat, "the rest of the trees of his forest shall be few that a child may write them" (Isaiah 10:18-19)
Father - Still the parent was not to inflict death, but to bring the refractory child before the city elders in the gate or place of Justice (Deuteronomy 21:18-21)
Redemption - In Him we expiate our sins and satisfy Divine Justice, in Him we are reconciled to God and God to us
Omniscience - ...
When we come to the testimony of Scripture, we find Christ growing in knowledge (Luke 2:52), and afterwards limiting Himself to be a teacher not even in matters of civil Justice (Luke 12:14), but only in the highest region of religion
Theonas, Bishop of Alexandria - The Christian chamberlains were not to take money for procuring audience, must be clear of all avarice, duplicity, and scurrility, acting in all things with modesty, courtesy, affability, and Justice, must discharge their several duties in the fear of God, with love for their prince and with exact diligence, regarding all his orders which did not clash with God's as coming from God Himself, and taking care in their ministrations to put away all gloom or bad temper, and to refresh his weariness by a cheerful manner and glad obedience
Mercy - Mercy may also be shown to them by a proper mitigation of Justice, and not extending the punishment beyond the nature or desert of the crime. In like manner, when a magistrate, through excessive clemency, suffers a criminal who is a pest to society to escape unpunished, or so mitigates the sentence of the law as to put it into his power to do still greater hurt to others, he violates not only the laws of Justice, but of mercy too
Capital Punishment - The Complexities and Inequalities of the Criminal Justice System: The system favors the rich over the poor. A sense of Justice requires that a murderer be punished, yet nonlethal punishment preserves the life-valuing role of the state. Is this more in line with a biblical sense of Justice which also values life? To be effective, punishment should be certain, swift, and impartial
Righteousness - , as social Justice and goodness. ‘Righteousness’ is too formal and abstract in its associations for a modern mind; ‘justice,’ again, is too narrow and, like ‘integrity’ and ‘morality,’ it is insufficiently charged with religious feeling. ]'>[7] and when it passed into the vocabulary of Judaism and of early Christianity its range became still wider, stretching from ‘justice’ across a broad field of meaning to ‘piety’ or ‘goodness. ...
In the cognate sense of Justice, i. Plutarch observes that the Justice of Aristides was what impressed his contemporaries most, and won for him ‘that most royal and divine title or “the Just. Justice which alone of the divine excellences is within our reach, commands least interest. ]'>[14] ‘Thou hast loved Justice and hated lawlessness,’ and later on (Hebrews 7:2) recalls the meaning of Melchizedek’s name as ‘king of Justice
Sanhedrin - form of συνέδριον, ‘council,’ specifically ‘court of Justice[3]) is the name of the high court of Justice and supreme council, specifically at Jerusalem (Sanh. 4) in contradistinction to ‘the Little Sanhedrin of Twenty-three,’ the Bçth, Dîn shel shib‛îm we eḥâd, ‘the court of Justice of seventy-one’ (Sanh. 4) and most frequently Bçth Dîn hag-gadôl shebyerûshâlaim, ‘the high court of Justice of Jerusalem’ (Sôṭâ, i. 4), also Bçth Dîn hag-gadôl shebhlishkath haggâzîth, ‘the great court of Justice which has its sessions in the hall of hewn stones’ (Sifrç Dt. Another name for the Sanhedrin (possibly the Jerusalemic and not national Council of Justice) is βουλή (Jos. The story in 2 Chronicles 19:1-2 of a high court of Justice established by king Jehoshaphat, after Deuteronomy 17:8 f. The name Synhedrion (Aramaized Sanhedrin), which denotes chiefly a court of Justice, came into popular use under Ptolemaic rule; and, as its Hebrew equivalent, the name Ḥeber hâ-Yehûdîm appears on Hasmonaean coins, which read: ‘Joḥannan the high priest, the head, and the Council (representative) of the Jews’ (Madden, op. Two such masters known under the name of zûggôth (= duumviri), one with the title of Nâsî (prince), the other with that of Ab Bçth Dîn (‘father of the court of Justice’), are recorded to have presided over the Sanhedrin from about the middle of the 2nd to the middle of the 1st cent
Soul - It is also argued from the consent of all nations; the consciousness that men have of sinning; the sting of conscience; the Justice and providence of God
Impurity - The saints and prophets of the Old Testament were sensible of this; and our Saviour, in the Gospel, has strongly inculcated, ...
that they are not outward and corporeal pollutions which render us unacceptable to God, but such inward pollutions as infect the soul, and are violations of Justice, truth, and charity
Sanhedrin - (Greek: syn, with; hedra, seat) ...
The supreme council and court of Justice among the Jews
Samuel - The twelve tribes, when he assumed their charge, were in a low condition both morally and politically he freed them from all foreign yokes, administered Justice with vigor and impartiality, promoted education and true religion, united the tribes, and raised them higher in the scale of civilization
Temper - To mix so that one part qualifies the other to bring to a moderate state as, to temper Justice with mercy
Common - Some of these rules may have originated in edicts or statutes which are now lost, or in the terms and conditions of particular grants or charters but it is most probable that many of them originated in judicial decisions founded on natural Justice and equity, or on local customs. It consists of a chief Justice and three other Justices, and has cognizance of all causes, real, personal or mixed, as well by original writ, as by removal from the inferior courts
Eye - Jesus replaced this concept of Justice with His requirement of love for enemies (Matthew 5:38 ). Bribes blind the eyes of judges causing them to ignore Justice ( Deuteronomy 16:19 ; 1 Samuel 12:3 )
Shimei - "...
But on his deathbed David felt, though he forgave Shimei the personal wrong, yet that public Justice required his punishment in some form, for David was not likely, in going to appear before God, to cherish revenge after having spared him twice when he might justly have slain him. Thus he brought, "on his own head" his wickedness towards David which David had left unavenged; Justice had its course so by "taking away the wicked from before the king, his throne was established in righteousness" (Proverbs 25:5; 1 Kings 2:36-46; Psalms 7:16; Ezekiel 17:19)
Judges - Salian has observed, that they not only presided in courts of Justice, but were also at the head of the councils, the armies, and of every thing that concerned the government of the state; though they never assumed the title either of princes, governors, or the like. The lower courts of Justice, in their several cities, were held in their gates, Deuteronomy 16:15
Job, the Book of - Thus, perhaps it is best just to take the book as an illustration of the nature of God and His Justice in dealing with humankind, a Justice people often cannot recognize and never fully understand. However, that did not mean that God was not in control or that He would not one day bring about real Justice (Job 21:1-34 ). Two important issues are the cause and effect of suffering and the Justice and care of God. Prologue: A Righteous Man Can Endure Injustice Without Sinning (Job 1:1-2:10 ). Second Round: Does the Fate of the Wicked Prove the Mercy and Justice of God? (Job 15:1-21:34 ). Job: In a world without Justice or friends, a just person must wait for a Redeemer to win his case (Job 19:1-29 ). Job: Lying comforters do not help my struggle against the injustice of God (Job 21:1-34 )
Resurrection - Even though theodicy is not directly in view, at the core of the psalm is a proclamation of God's Justice, which is dispensed to the fool and the wise person after death. The psalm reveals God's Justice being demonstrated in theodicy: "Deliver me; save me because of your unfailing love. Yet God's Justice is revealed in the afterlife, as indicated in verse 19: "Your dead will live; their bodies will rise. With the prophetic voice being silent in the second temple period, and a feeling of the remoteness of God, harmonization with the Justice of God took the form of requital after death. ...
The resurrection of Jesus is a testimony to the general resurrection of all humans, which will be followed by the dispensing of God's Justice; to the righteous there will be a "resurrection of life" and to the unrighteous a "resurrection of condemnation" (John 5:28-29 ; cf. Therefore, faith in God's Justice in resolving the problem of theodicy is "vain" (cf
Zechariah, Book of - History shows the Justice of God and the sinfulness of His people (Zechariah 1:4-6 ). God seeks Justice, mercy, and compassion (Zechariah 7:8-10 ). God commands truthfulness, Justice, and peace (Zechariah 8:16-19 )
Government - Heads of families make agreements with one another and settle quarrels among their dependents ( Genesis 21:22 ; Genesis 31:45 ); the only sanction to which they can appeal is the Divine Justice which ‘watches’ between them ( Genesis 31:49 ; Genesis 31:53 , Genesis 49:7 ). In time of peace the main function of the king is the administration of Justice ( 2 Samuel 15:2 , 2 Kings 15:5 ); his subjects have the right of direct access ( 2 Kings 8:8 ). The administration of Justice always included a Divine element ( Exodus 18:15 ; Exodus 18:19 ; Exodus 21:6 ; Exodus 22:8 ; cf. Justice (ii
Judge (Office) - (1) An official with authority to administer Justice by trying cases; (2) one who usurps the perogative of a judge; (3) a military deliverer in the period between Joshua and David (for this sense, see Judges, Book of)
Dan (2) - Le Clerc suggests that the fountain was called Dan, "judge," as Ainmishpat means "the fount of Justice
Evil Speaking - Persons in the administration of Justice may speak words which in private intercourse would be reproachful
Reconciliation - ...
Once God has dealt with sin according to his standards of Justice and holiness, he can reconcile guilty sinners
Bar - ) The railing that incloses the place which counsel occupy in courts of Justice
God - ELOHIM concentrates all the divine attributes assigned to the idols severally, and, besides those, others which corrupt man never of himself imagined, infinite love, goodness, Justice, wisdom, creative power, inexhaustible riches of excellence; unity, self existence, grace, and providence are especially dwelt on, Exodus 3:13-15; Exodus 15:11; Exodus 34:6-7
Advocate - ...
Advocate, in the German polity, is a magistrate, appointed in the emperor's name, to administer Justice
Stranger - A foreigner settled among the covenant people, without Israelite citizenship, but subject to Israel's laws, and having a claim to kindness and Justice (Exodus 12:49; Leviticus 24:22; Leviticus 19:34; Leviticus 25:6; Deuteronomy 1:16; Deuteronomy 24:17-18; Deuteronomy 24:19; Deuteronomy 10:18-19; Deuteronomy 16:11; Deuteronomy 16:14; Deuteronomy 26:11)
Felix - ) Greed of gain supplanted conscience, so that instead of repenting of his shameful life he would not even do common Justice to Paul, but left him a prisoner because he got no bribe to set him free
Pleasure - ” Finally, in one passage this word means “affair” in the sense of a “thing” or “situation”: “If thou seest the oppression of the poor, and violent perverting of judgment and Justice in a province, marvel not at the matter [5] …” ( Levites - In the time of David their number had increased to 38,000, of which 24,000 were set apart for the ordinary services, 6000 for the teaching of the Law and the administration of Justice, 4000 as porters, and 4000 as musicians
Sin - Its guilt and evil are to be measured by the holiness, Justice, and goodness of the law it violates, the eternity of the misery it causes, and the greatness of the Sacrifice necessary to expiate it
Regard - To persuade them to pursue and preserve in virtue, in regard to themselves in Justice and goodness, in regard to their neighbors and piety towards God
San Francisco, California, City of - Burnett, who became the first American Governor of California and was later Justice of the Supreme Court of California and president of the Pacific Bank of San Francisco;
Charles Warren Stoddard, author and journalist;
Garret W
Trust - Confidence a reliance or resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, Justice, friendship or other sound principle of another person
Peace - The true prophets argued that peace could never be achieved apart from righteousness and Justice. Yoder, Shalom: The Bible's Word for Salvation, Justice, and Peace
Save - ...
In the realm of Justice and civil law yâsha‛ represents an obligation on the part of anyone who hears an outcry of one being mistreated: “For he [3] found her [4] in the field, and the betrothed damsel cried, and there was none to save her” ( Justice is executed
God - He is a "Spirit, infinite, eternal, and unchangeable in his being, wisdom, power, holiness, Justice, goodness, and truth
Widow - Widows from their poverty and unprotectedness, are regarded in OT as under the special guardianship of God ( Psalms 68:6 ; Psalms 146:9 , Proverbs 15:25 , Deuteronomy 10:18 , Jeremiah 49:11 ); and consequently due regard for their wants was looked upon as a mark of true religion, ensuring a blessing on those who showed it ( Job 29:13 ; Job 31:16 , Isaiah 1:17 , Jeremiah 7:6-7 ; Jeremiah 22:3-4 ); while neglect of, cruelty or injustice towards them were considered marks of wickedness meriting punishment from God ( Job 22:9-10 ; Job 24:20-21 , Psalms 94:6 , Isaiah 1:23 ; Isaiah 10:2 , Zechariah 7:10 ; Zechariah 7:14 , Malachi 3:5 ). is especially rich in such counsels, insisting that widows be granted full Justice ( Deuteronomy 24:17 ; Deuteronomy 27:19 ), that they be received as guests at sacrificial meals ( Deuteronomy 14:29 , Deuteronomy 16:11 ; Deuteronomy 16:14 , Deuteronomy 26:12 f
Charlemagne - In the older epics he is the incarnation of majesty, truth, and Justice, and the champion of God's church against the infidel, but the later epics paint him as a tyrant and oppressor
Charles the Great - In the older epics he is the incarnation of majesty, truth, and Justice, and the champion of God's church against the infidel, but the later epics paint him as a tyrant and oppressor
Divine Freedom - Some of the characteristics of God's nature that influence His actions toward His creation are grace (2 Corinthians 8:9 ), Justice (Zephaniah 3:5 ), love (John 3:16 ), and mercy (Micah 7:18 ; Titus 3:5 )
Urim And Thummim - So the Egyptian judge used to wear the two figures of Thmei (corresponding to Thummim), truth and Justice; over the heart of mummies of priests too was a symbol of light (answering to Urim)
Hate, Hatred - The theology underlying God's hatred rests upon two essential qualities of God: holiness and Justice
Arm - Sometimes the word expresses the might of God’s ceaseless activity either on behalf of His chosen ( Deuteronomy 33:27 , Psalms 44:3 , Isaiah 33:2 ; Isaiah 63:12 , Acts 13:17 ), or in breaking the power of His enemies ( Exodus 6:6 , Deuteronomy 5:15 , Ezekiel 21:6 ; Ezekiel 32:21 ), or again in upholding the movements and harmony of His creation, ruling in Justice with unswerving sternness ( Ezekiel 20:33 f
Street - The absence of Justice in the marketplace was an indication of the wickedness of the whole population of Jerusalem
Palace - His palace complex included the “house of the forest of Lebanon” (1 Kings 7:2 ), an immense hall featuring 45 cedar pillars and Solomon's golden shields (1 Kings 10:16-18 ), the “porch of pillars” (1 Kings 7:6 ), the “Hall of Justice” (1 Kings 7:7 NRSV), featuring an ivory and gold throne ( 1 Kings 10:18-20 ), and private dwellings for both king and Pharoah's daughter (1 Kings 7:8 )
King, - The original idea of a Hebrew King was twofold: first, that he should lead the people to battle in time of war; and, a second, that he should execute judgment and Justice to them in war and in peace
City - ]'>[6] , as often, has ‘streets’) the markets ( Matthew 11:16 , Luke 11:43 ) and market-places ( Matthew 20:3 , Luke 7:32 ) of NT where the citizens met to discuss public affairs, the children to play, and the elders to dispense Justice. Under the Hebrew monarchy and later, law and Justice were in the hands of ‘the elders of the city’ ( Deuteronomy 19:12 ; Deuteronomy 21:3 ff
David - He administered Justice to the people with impartiality, and gave a strong impulse to the general prosperity of the nation. His charge to Solomon respecting the forfeited lives of Joab and Shimei, was the voice of Justice and not of revenge
Water - For example, in the Old Testament water is a metaphor or simile for fear (Joshua 7:5 ), death (2 Samuel 14:14 ), sin (Job 15:16 ), God's presence (Psalm 72:6 ), marital fidelity (Isaiah 40:12 ), the knowledge of God (Isaiah 11:9 ), salvation (Isaiah 12:3 ), the Spirit (Isaiah 44:3-4 ), God's blessings (Isaiah 58:11 ), God's voice (Ezekiel 43:2 ), God's wrath (Hosea 5:10 ), and Justice (Amos 5:24 )
Poor - Often they had no way of gaining Justice and cried out helplessly to God to defend them (Psalms 69:33; Psalms 82:3-4; cf
Glory - As one confesses guilt and accepts rightful punishment, one is called upon to recognize the righteousness and Justice of God and give Him glory (Joshua 7:19 ; 1 Samuel 6:5 )
Eden - ...
The Hindus' tradition tells of a "first age of the world when Justice, in the form of a bull, kept herself firm on her four feet, virtue reigned, man free from disease saw all his wishes accomplished, and attained an age of 400 years
Levitical Cities - The aim of having cities of refuge was to control blood revenge by making it possible for public Justice to intervene between the slayer and the victim's avenger of blood
Orphan - True repentance meant Justice for the orphan (Isaiah 1:17 ; Jeremiah 7:6 ; 22:3 ; Zechariah 7:10 )
Servant, Service - Like David, he will rule and establish Justice on earth (42:1,4)
Mirror - The older interpretation-‘beholding as in a mirror’-loses the parallel between Moses’ direct vision of God and ours (by faith) of Christ, and fails to do Justice to the ‘unveiled face
Anathema - This gives the true view of the dooming of the Canaanites; the sinners themselves were to be made an awful example of God's punitive Justice to which they were set apart; their possessions were properly the Lord's, but were given by Him to Israel as a gift henceforth to be used to His glory
Back - To back a warrant, is for a Justice of the peace in the county where the warrant is to be executed, to sign or indorse a warrant, issued in another county, to apprehend an offender
Abijah - His speech on mount Zemaraim in mount Ephraim, before the battle, urged on Jeroboam the Justice of his cause, that God had given the kingdom to David and his sons forever "by a covenant of salt," and that Judah had the regular temple service and priesthood, whereas Israel had made golden calves their idols, and had cast out the priests; therefore "fight not ye against the Lord God of your fathers, for ye shall not prosper" (2 Chronicles 13)
Habibus, Deacon, Martyr at Edessa - His dying prayer was, "O king Christ, for Thine is this world and Thine is the world to come, behold and see that while I might have been able to flee from these afflictions I did not flee, in order that I might not fall into the hands of Thy Justice
Annas - Probably the meaning is that they exerted private influence on the judges and perverted Justice for their own ends
Shepherd - It also suggests that he is the center of national unity, the supreme protector and leader of the nation, the bestower of every earthly blessing, and the dispenser of Justice
Claudius - The Apostle spoke with his usual boldness, and discoursed to them on Justice, temperance, and the last judgment
Joash - He governed with Justice and piety, so long as he was guided by the High Priest Jehoiada
Enoch - This prophecy is a clear, and it is also an awful, description of the day of judgment, when the Messiah shall sit upon his throne of Justice, to determine the final condition of mankind, according to their works; and it indicates that the different offices of Messiah both to save and to judge, or as Prophet, Priest, and King, were known to the holy patriarchs
Noah - These precepts are seven in number: the first was against the worship of idols; the second, against blasphemy, and required to bless the name of God; the third, against murder; the fourth, against incest and all uncleanness; the fifth, against theft and rapine; the sixth required the administration of Justice; the seventh was against eating flesh with life
Judgment - ...
5: ὑπόδικος (Strong's #5267 — Adjective — hupodikos — hoop-od'-ee-kos ) "brought to trial, answerable to" (hupo, "under," dike, "justice"), Romans 3:19 , is translated "under the judgment," RV (AV, "guilty")
Comfort, Comforter, Comfortless - It was used in a court of Justice to denote a legal assistant, counsel for the defense, an advocate; then, generally, one who pleads another's cause, an intercessor, advocate, as in 1 John 2:1 , of the Lord Jesus
Amos - Bribery and corruption flourished, even in the law courts, leaving the poor with no way to obtain Justice. He condemned the greed and luxury of the rich, for he knew that they had gained their wealth through cheating, oppression and injustice (Amos 2:6-7; Amos 3:10; Amos 3:15; Amos 5:10-12; Amos 6:4-6; Amos 8:4-6). Although they kept the religious festivals, all their religious activity was hateful to God so long as they persisted in social injustice (Amos 5:21-24; Amos 8:3; Amos 8:10)
Crucifixion - ...
Jesus’ trial, before both the Jewish Council and the Roman governor, ignored many of the normal procedures, and was contrary to all accepted standards of Justice (Matthew 26:57-68; Matthew 27:11-31; see SANHEDRIN; PILATE)
Toleration Act - whereby all persons are required to resort to their parish church or chapel, upon pain of punishment by the censures of the church; and also upon pain that every person so offending, shall forfeit for every such offence twelve pence; nor the statute made in the 3d year of the late King James, inituled "An act for the better discovering and repressing Popish Recusants;" nor that other statute, intituled ...
"An act to prevent and avoid dangers which may grow by Popish Recussants;" nor any other law or statute of this realm made against Papists or Popish Recusants, shall be construed to extend to any person or persons dissenting from the Church of England, that shall take the oaths (of allegiance and supremacy) and shall make and subscribe the declaration (against Popery;) which oaths and declaration the Justices of the peace at the general sessions of the peace for the county, or place where such persons shall live, are hereby required to administer to such persons as shall offer themselves to make and subscribe the same, and thereof to keep a register; and likewise, none of the persons aforesaid shall give or pay, as any fee or reward, to any officer belonging to the court, above the sum of sixpence, for his entry of his taking the said oaths, &c. That every Justice of the peace may, at any time, require any person that goes to any meeting for exercise of religion, to make and subscribe the declaration aforesaid, and also to take the said oaths or declaration of fidelity hereinafter mentioned: in case such person scruples the taking of an oath, and upon refusal, such Justice of the peace is required to commit such person to prison, and to certify the name of such person to the next General or Quarter Sessions of the Peace, &c. Provided, That if any person or persons do and shall willingly, maliciously, or contemptuously, come into any cathedral or parish-church, chapel, or other congregation permitted by this act, and disquiet or disturb the same, or misuse any preacher or teacher, such person or persons, upon proof thereof before any Justice of the peace, by two or more sufficient witnesses, shall find two sureties, to be bound by recognizance in the penal sum of 50l. That no congregation or assembly for religious worship shall be permitted or allowed by this act until the place of such meeting shall be certified to the Bishop of the diocess, or to the Archdeacon of that archdeaconry, or to the Justices of the peace at the General or Quarter Sessions of the peace for the county, city, or place in which such meeting shall be held, and registered in the said Bishop's or Archdeacon's court respectively, or recorded at the said General or Quarter Sessions; the register or clerk of the peace whereof respectively is hereby required to register the same, and to give certificate thereof to such person as shall demand the same; for which there shall be no greater fee or reward taken than the sum of sixpence
Roman Law - In the eyes of his superiors, Pilate's first priority was public order, not the execution of Justice. If an innocent Galilean peasant was the focal point of a civil disturbance, the quelling of the disturbance, and not Justice for the peregrinus involved, was the uppermost concern for Roman officials fearful of revolts in occupied provinces. ...
The Roman system of criminal Justice distinguished between public and private penalties
Vengeance (2) - (Revised Version margin) ‘do me Justice of’) is found in the same parable (Luke 18:3; Luke 18:5). In ‘avenge’ the idea of the Justice of the redress or punishment is prominent. The moral order of the world will be vindicated by Him whose right alone it is to mete out vengeance to evildoers, who alone has adequate knowledge and wisdom to do Justice to sin
Retribution (2) - —We shall understand by this word the operation of the Divine Justice, rewarding and punishing, in this world and the next. (For human Justice see art. Facts made it impossible to hold such a theory, and we have the problem of the Divine Justice as it is raised in the Psalms, Job, etc. There are in the Gospels no ‘poetic Justice’ parables, no limelight scenes of sensational punishments of evil-doers or dramatic vindication of virtue
Wages - Samuel's birth means the dawn of a new era in which God will intervene to bring Justice, one consequence being that the wealthy will be humbled to the status of hired servants in order to earn a few scraps of food (1 Samuel 2:5 ). Even the new leader, Samuel, has sons who are more concerned with material gain than Justice (1 Samuel 8:3 ). The moral consequence is hideous as Justice is perverted and people are treated like commodities, especially the personae miserabiles . Slaves must primarily work for their Lord, not their human master, since it is he who will pay them the wage that really matters (Colossians 3:22-25 ); masters need to remember that unpaid wages scream out to God for Justice (James 5:4 )
Micah, Book of - The marketplace was full of deception and injustice (Micah 6:9-16 ). The rulers of the country, who had the responsibility of upholding Justice, did the opposite (Micah 3:1-4 ). God judges economic injustice (Micah 2:1-5 ). God's expectations are clear: Justice, mercy, piety (Micah 6:6-8 )
Judgment - Though downtrodden, they knew they were in the right, but because of the corruption of the courts they had no way of gaining a hearing and therefore no chance of getting Justice. They longed for the day when God would act in true judgment, righting the wrongs, declaring them to be right, and sentencing their opponents to punishment (Psalms 7:6-8; Psalms 9:8; Psalms 9:12; Psalms 10:2; Psalms 10:12; Psalms 10:17-18; Psalms 82:1-4; see Justice)
David - " As king of Israel, he administered Justice and judgment to all his people, was a prince of courage, and great military prudence and conduct; had frequent wars with the neighbouring nations, to which he was generally forced by their invading his dominions, and plundering his subjects. After this, when obliged, by the command of God, to give up some of Saul's family to Justice, for the murder of the Gibeonites, he spared Mephibosheth, Micah, and his family, the male descendants of Saul and Jonathan, who alone could have any pretence to dispute the crown with him, and surrendered only Saul's bastard children, and those of his daughter by Adriel, who had no right or possible claim to the throne, and could never give him any uneasiness in the possession of it; and thus showed his inviolable regard for his oaths, his tenderness to Saul, and the warmth of his gratitude and friendship to Jonathan. In the close of his life, and in the near prospect of death, to demonstrate his love of Justice, he charged Solomon to punish with death Joab, for the base murder of two great men, whom he assassinated under the pretence of peace and friendship
Trust - ) Assured resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, Justice, friendship, or other sound principle, of another person; confidence; reliance; reliance
Pagan - Plato held that the highest good consisted in imitation of God, the Absolute Good, only partly realizable in this life; virtue was the ordering of conduct according to the dictates of right reason, and included Justice, temperance, fortitude, and wisdom
Paganism - Plato held that the highest good consisted in imitation of God, the Absolute Good, only partly realizable in this life; virtue was the ordering of conduct according to the dictates of right reason, and included Justice, temperance, fortitude, and wisdom
Laetare Medal - " Following is a partial list of the recipients of the award: ...
1883 - John Gilmary Shea, historian
1884 - Patrick J Keeley, architect
1885 - Eliza Allen Starr, artist
1886 - General John Newton, army engineer
1887 - Edward Preuss, journalist
1888 - Patrick V Hickey, founder "Catholic Review"
1889 - Anna Hanson Dorsey, novelist
1890 - William T Onahan, organizer Catholic Congress
1891 - Daniel Dougherty, orator
1892 - Henry F Brownson, philosopher
1893 - Patrick Donahoe, founder "Boston Pilot"
1894 - Augustin Daly, theatrical manager
1895 - Mrs James Sadlier, writer
1896 - General William S Rosecrans, leader Army of Cumberland
1897 - Thomas Addis Emmett, surgeon
1898 - Timothy E Howard, jurist
1899 - Mary Gwendolin Caldwell, benefactor Catholic University
1900 - John Creighton, founder Creighton University
1901 - William Bourke Cockran, orator
1902 - John B Murphy, surgeon
1903 - Charles J Bonaparte, attorney-general
1904 - Richard C Kerens, philanthropist
1905 - Thomas B Fitzpatrick, business man
1906 - Francis Quinlan, medical specialist
1907 - Katherine E Conway, author
1908 - James C Monaghan, lecturer
1909 - Frances Tiernan, (Christian Reid), litterateur
1910 - Maurice Francis Egan, writer
1911 - Agnes Repplier, essayist
1912 - Thomas M Mulry, charity worker
1913 - Charles G Herbermann, editor-in-chief "Catholic Encyclopedia"
1914 - Edward Douglas White, chief Justice of the United States
1915 - Mary V Merrick, founder, Christ Child Society
1916 - James J Walsh, physician and author
1917 - William Shepherd Benson, admiral
1918 - Joseph Scott, lawyer
1919 - George Duval, philanthropist
1920 - Lawrence F Flick, physician
1921 - Elizabeth Nourse, artist
1922 - Charles P Neil, economist
1923 - Walter George Smith, lawyer
1924 - Charles D Maginnis, architect
1925 - Albert Francis Zahm, scientist
1926 - Edward N Hurley, business man
1927 - Margaret Anglin, actress
1928 - Jack J Spalding, lawyer
1929 - Alfred Emmanuel Smith, statesman
1930 - Frederick P Kenkel, director of Central Bureau of the Central Verein
1931 - James J Phelan, philanthropist
1932 - Stephen J Maher, tuberculosis expert
1933 - John McCormack, vocalist
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1935 - Frank H Spearman, author
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1942 - Helen Constance White, teacher and author
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1965 - Frederick Dominic Rossini, teacher and scientist
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1984 - John T Noonan, jurist
1985 - Guido Calabresi, jurist
1986 -
1987 -
1988 -
1989 -
1990 -
1991 -
1992 - Daniel Patrick Moynihan, US senator
1993 - L John Durney, teacher and journalist
1994 -
1995 -
1996 - Sister Helen Prejean, anti-death penalty activist
1997 - Father Virgilio Elizondo, theologian and writer
1998 -
1999 -
2000 - Andrew J McKenna, businessman
2001 - Monsignor George G Higgins, labour activist priest
2002 - Father John Smyth, educator
2003 - Peter and Peggy Steinfels, writers
2004 - Father Bryan Hehir, theologian
2005 - Joseph E Murray, organ transplant pioneer
Chicago, Illinois - The delegates to the convention were welcomed by President Bonney of the World's Congress Auxiliary "on behalf of the World's Exposition and the fifty million non-Catholics who loved Justice and religious liberty
Gibeon - Fleeing from Justice, Ishmael, the murderer of the Babylonian-appointed “governor” Gedaliah, was overtaken at Gibeon (Jeremiah 41:1 )
Pardon - A point of Justice, God having received satisfaction by the blood of Christ, 1 John 1:9
Widow - ...
In addition to these four widows, who were actual persons, a widow is a character in one of our Lord’s parables (Luke 18:1-8), who, having no power to enforce the Justice she claims, obtains it at length by her importunity; and from this our Lord draws His a fortiori conclusion that God will hear and answer those who cry day and night unto Him
Law of Christ - In Isaiah 42:1-4 we read that God's chosen servant will one day establish Justice throughout the earth and that "the coastlands will wait expectantly for His law" (NASB)
Gallio - But such a savage and illegal protest against Gallio’s decision could not have passed unnoticed by him; on the other hand, a public demonstration against the unpopular and disputatious Jews whom he had just dismissed might appear to him a rough sort of Justice which he could afford to overlook, especially as it put the seal of popular approval on his action (see Sosthenes)
Sosthenes - Paul was that ‘the Greeks, who always hated the Jews, took advantage of the marked snub which the governor had inflicted on them, to seize and beat Sosthenes, who had been appointed to replace Crispus as Archisynagogos,’-a ‘piece of “Lynch law,” which probably seemed to him [2] to be a rough sort of Justice’ (Ramsay, St
Avenge - ...
Lamech’s sword song is a scornful challenge to his fellows and a blatant attack on the Justice of God: “… for I have slain a man to my wounding, and a young man to my hurt
Affection - Now, in order to ascertain whether our affections are excited in a spiritual manner, we must enquire whether that which moves our affections be truly spiritual, whether our consciences be alarmed, and our hearts impressed; whether the judgment be enlightened, and we have a perception of the moral excellency of divine things; and lastly, whether our affections have a holy tendency and produce the happy effects of obedience to God, humility in ourselves, and Justice to our fellow creatures
Festus - ...
Turning to the Book of Acts, we find that there, while Justice is done to the promptness with which Festus addressed himself to his duties and to the lip-homage he was ready to pay to ‘the custom of the Romans,’ he appears in a less favourable light, and the outstanding fact meets us of the estimate which St
Aceldama - The Mishna reports, that it was not allowed, for any among the Jews who died by the common hands of Justice, to be buried in the sepulchre of their fathers, except their flesh was first consumed
Rephidim - By his advice, which also was approved by the Lord, Moses, to relieve himself from the fatigue of administering Justice to the people, the whole day, from morning until evening, instituted inferior judges or magistrates over thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, as his deputies, who were to relieve him from the burden of judging the smaller causes, but to refer the greater or more difficult to Moses, for his decision
Debts - Such a restoration was no loss to the creditor; for he had it in his power at last, by the aid of summary Justice, to lay hold of the whole property of the debtor; and if he had none, of his person: and, in the event of non-payment, as before stated, to take him for a bond slave
Friends - Fox evidently considered himself as acting under a divine commission, and went, not only to fairs and markets, but into courts of Justice and "steeple houses," as he called the churches, warning all to obey the Holy Spirit, speaking by him
Oath - Its force depends upon our conviction of the infinite Justice of God; that he will not hold those guiltless who take his name in vain; and that the loss of his favor immeasurable outweighs all that could be gained by false witness
Power - (4) in Romans 13:1 civil magistrates are called ‘the higher powers’ because of their superior rank, authority, and influence as officers ordained of God for the administration of Justice among men (cf
Purification - -An exhibition on a great scale of an act of Justice purges a people
Josiah - Those of his people who later suffered under the cruel hand of his son Jehoiakim looked back with gratitude on his compassion and Justice (2 Chronicles 35:25; Jeremiah 22:15-19)
Exodus - The exodus was a sign to the people of this Redeemer-God’s love (Deuteronomy 4:37; Deuteronomy 7:8; Hosea 11:1), power (Deuteronomy 9:26; 2 Kings 17:36; Psalms 81:10) and Justice (Deuteronomy 6:21-22; Joshua 24:5-7)
Amos, Theology of - The three most prominent features of that portrait are his sovereignty, Justice, and grace. ...
Another important feature in Amos's portrait of Yahweh is his Justice. Yahweh's Justice is a corollary to his holiness and righteousnessattributes that reflect his very essence and that he expects will distinguish those who name him as their God (Exodus 19:5-6 ; Leviticus 11:44-45 ; 20:7 ; Amos 5:14-15,24 ). These relationships are to be characterized by the sort of love that manifests itself in loyalty and faithfulness to him (Deuteronomy 6:4-14 ; Amos 5:4-6 ) and Justice and compassion to their neighbors (Leviticus 19:9-18 ; Leviticus 26:3-39 ). ...
Yahweh's Justice is observable, as well, in his dealings with other nations. Despite Yahweh's insistence that Justice be meted out in an atmosphere of fairness, truthfulness, and impartiality (Acts 14:17-8 ; Deuteronomy 10:17-18 ; 19:15-19 ; 25:1-3 ), Israel's courts dispense lies, exploitation, and verdicts favorable to those with the means to purchase them (Amos 2:6-8 ; 5:7,10-12 ; 6:12 ; 8:6 )
Love - Paul restricts the love of God to the circle of believers, thus making sonship co-extensive with adoption=justifications; on the other hand, he emphasizes, side by side with love, the working of sovereignty and Justice as equally influential attributes in God, whence also the effectual communication of the Divine love to the sinner cannot, according to the Apostle, take place except as a result of the sovereign choice of God and after satisfaction to His Justice. Paul’s, delimiting the mutual claims or the love and Justice of God, is not found in our Lord’s teaching. If the comparison be instituted with this in mind, it will be seen that in our Lord’s eschatological utterances the sovereignty and Justice of God occupy no less central a place than in the Pauline doctrine of salvation, and that the love of God in its eschatological setting is to Jesus as much a redemptive factor as it is in the Pauline gospel
Hosea, Theology of - God wanted actioncovenant loyalty that evidenced kindness in action, Justice at all levels, and a knowledge that portrayed the Lord's righteousness (6:6; 10:12; 12:6)but Israel offered insincerity and rejected God (6:4; 8:2-3). God's Justice meant that he would bring judgment upon them; his holiness meant that it was inescapable. Hosea envisioned a new betrothal (2:19) and a new relationship (1:10; 2:16) that would produce the true covenant fruit of righteousness, Justice, love, compassion, and knowledge (2:19-20)
Covenant - He is also to be considered as the mediator of the covenant by whom Justice is satisfied, and man reconciled to God. In the covenant of grace he appears as infinitely merciful, adjudging life to the elect sinner, agreeably to his wisdom and Justice. The special end of the covenant of works was the manifestation of the holiness, goodness, and Justice of God; but the special end of the covenant of grace, is the praise of the glory of his grace, and the revelation of his unsearchable and manifold wisdom
Amos - There is no such thing as Justice; the very semblance of it is the oppression of the weak by the strong. Jehovah’s first demands were morality and Justice and kindliness, and any sacrificial system that removed the emphasis from these things and placed it on the observance of ritual was an abomination ( Amos 5:21-25 ). In that direct vision of Jehovah, Amos learned the truths which he was the first to proclaim to the world: that Jehovah was the God of the whole earth; that the nations were in His keeping; that Justice and righteousness were His great demands; that privilege, if it meant opportunity, meant likewise responsibility and liability to the doom of those who have seen and have not believed
Righteousness - ; in the remainder, about one-fifth of the whole, by ‘just,’ ‘justice,’ ‘justify,’ ‘right. A court of Justice was, in theory, ‘the place of righteousness’ ( Ecclesiastes 3:16 ). , a little got by right conduct) than great revenues with injustice
Iniquity - Synonyms for 'âven with this sense are ra’, “evil,” and rasha’, “wicked,” opposed to “righteousness” and “justice. The prophetic hope lay in the period after the purification of Israel, when the messianic king would introduce a period of Justice and righteousness (Isa. ...
The Septuagint has several translations: anomia (“lawlessness”); kopos (“work; labor; toil”); mataios (“empty; fruitless; useless; powerless”); poneria (“wickedness; maliciousness; sinfulness”); and adikia (“unrighteousness; wickedness; injustice”)
Litany of the Sacred Heart - ...
Heart of Jesus, vessel of Justice and love, have mercy on us
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus - ...
Heart of Jesus, vessel of Justice and love, have mercy on us
Litany of Loreto - ...
Mirror of Justice, pray for us
Good, Goodness - In the New Testament many words describe the specific characteristics and behaviors of good people, including "just/justice, " "righteous/ righteousness, " "holy/holiness, " "pure/ purity, " "gentle/gentleness, " and "kind/kindness
Epiphanes, a Gnostic Writer - He was the author of a work on Justice, which he made to consist in equality
Strife - It was essentially a conflict of ideals, a strife between Justice on the one hand and generosity on the other
Hell - Besides, it is not true, it is observed, that temporary crimes do not deserve eternal punishments, because the infinite majesty of an offended God adds a kind of infinite evil to sin, and therefore exposes the sinner to infinite punishment; and that hereby God vindicates his injured majesty, and glorifies his Justice
Hell - Besides, it is not true, it is observed, that temporary crimes do not deserve eternal punishments, because the infinite majesty of an offended God adds a kind of infinite evil to sin, and therefore exposes the sinner to infinite punishment; and that hereby God vindicates his injured majesty, and glorifies his Justice
Loreto, Litany of - ...
Mirror of Justice, pray for us
Circoncelliones - Intoxicated with a barbarous zeal, they renounced agriculture, professed continence, and assumed the title of "Vindicators of Justice, and protectors of the oppressed
Malachi - A dispute about God's Justice (Malachi 2:17-3:5 )...
V
Ananias - That this was no mere natural effect of excitement appears from the sentence expressly pronounced by Peter on Sapphira, and immediately executed by God, whose instrument of Justice Peter was
Gibeah - as in the presence of Him the righteous Judge who appointed the retributive Justice, 2 Samuel 21:14 ff; 2 Samuel 21:9), by the Gibeonites in revenge for his attempt to slay them in violation of the covenant
Governor - They administered the law with a competence and a Justice which have never been surpassed
Judas - Psalms 73:1-28; but he will eventually vindicate his wisdom and his Justice
Evil Spirits - They speak out of their own heart, and are so far from executing God’s Justice or anger upon the wicked that He interposes to check them, and to protect men from being misled
Arbitration - Christ lays down universal laws of Justice and love, but does not apply them
Death - ...
“Death” may also come upon someone in a violent manner, as an execution of Justice: “And if a man have committed a sin worthy of death and he be to be put to death, and thou hang him on a tree: his body shall not remain all night upon the tree …” ( Publican - It is even said, that they would not allow them to enter into their temple or synagogues, nor to join in prayers, nor even allow their evidence in a court of Justice on any trial; nor would they accept of their offerings in the temple
Sacred Heart, Litany of the - ...
Heart of Jesus, vessel of Justice and love, have mercy on us
Hosea - The two prophets who began to attack the social injustice and religious corruption of the age were Amos and Hosea. Corrupt religion produces a corrupt nation, whether in its everyday life (4:1-5:7), its foreign policy (5:8-14), its loyalty to God (5:15-6:6) or its concern for Justice (6:7-7:7)
Officer (2) - * Crimes And Punishments - ]'>[5] , who was regarded as the only fountain of law and Justice, it will be convenient to group under this head those belonging to the special sphere of religious belief and its outward expression in worship. Everything that would tend to impair the impartial and effective administration of Justice is emphatically condemned in the Hebrew codes, the giving and receiving of bribes , in particular, being forbidden even in the oldest legislation (BC 23:8 ‘for a gift blindeth them that have sight’). Against those who would defeat the ends of Justice by perjury and false witness , the law is rightly severe (D Micah, Theology of - Unlike the false prophets, for whom money speaks louder than God (3:5,11), Micah, filled with the power of the Lord's Spirit, preaches Justice (3:8). What the Lord actually requires is that the believer practice Justice and faithful love, walking wisely with him. ...
As God's Justice informs Micah's judgment-oracles and his righteousness the salvation-oracles, so God's other sublime attributes inform both
King, Kingship - How was Israel to understand the relationship between their obligation to Yahweh, the divine King, on the one hand, and their obligation to the human king on the other? What was the role of the human king in ancient Israel, and to what extent was this role realized? What conditions gave rise to the idea of the coming of a future messianic king who would someday establish peace and Justice in all the earth?...
It is important to understand the way in which the Old Testament presents the relationship between divine and human kingship. ...
This approach, however, does violence to the many positive biblical statements concerning God's design for the institution of kingship in the context of this sovereign plan for the redemption of his people, and ultimately for the uNIVersal triumph of peace and Justice on the earth. During his reign wars will cease and peace and Justice will be established in the earth (Isaiah 2:1-5 ; 11:1-10 ; Amos 9:11-15 )
War - Whatever the circumstances, Christians must, like their God, work to achieve Justice and peace (cf. Isaiah 2:4; 1 Chronicles 22:8; Isaiah 11:1-9; Matthew 5:6; Matthew 5:9; see Justice; PEACE)
Malachi, Theology of - ...
Throughout the Scriptures the Lord is portrayed again and again as a God of Justice and righteousness, but strangely, here at the end of the Old Testament his Justice is questioned (2:17)
Servant of the Lord - Both were chosen by God and characterized by righteousness and Justice ( Justice and righteousness (42:1,4; 49:2)
Necessitarians - " On the other hand, it is justly remarked, that "those who believe the being and perfections of God, and a state of retribution, in which he will reward and punish mankind according to the diversity of their actions, will find it difficult to reconcile the Justice of punishment with the necessity of crimes punished. But we cannot maintain his Justice in this particular, if men's actions be necessary either in their own nature, or by the divine decrees
King - Some kings brought Justice and peace to the people, but others were cruel and corrupt (1 Kings 21:1-14; 1618839440_64; 2 Kings 21:16; 2 Chronicles 17:3-4; 2 Chronicles 17:9; Jeremiah 22:13-17). In contrast to the kings of a former era, this king would rule with perfect wisdom, power, love and Justice (Isaiah 9:6-7; Isaiah 11:2-5; Jeremiah 33:15)
God - ארכּ? פים , EREC APAYIM long- suffering, the Being who, because of his tenderness, is not easily irritated, but suffers long and is kind; רב , RAB, the great or mighty One: חסד , CHESED, the bountiful Being, he who is exuberant in his beneficence; אמת , EMETH, the Truth, or True One, he alone who can neither deceive nor be deceived; נצר חסד , NOTSER CHESED, the Preserver of bountifulness, he whose beneficence never ends, keeping mercy, for thousands of generations, showing compassion and mercy while the world endures; נשא עון ופשע וחטאה , NOSE AVON VAPESHA VECHATAAH, he who bears away iniquity, transgression, and sin; properly the Redeemer, the Pardoner, the Forgiver, the Being whose prerogative it is to forgive sin, and save the soul; נקה לא ינקה NAKEH LO YINNAKEH, the righteous Judge, who distributes Justice with an impartial hand; and עין פקד , PAKED AVON, &c, he who visits iniquity, he who punishes transgressors, and from whose Justice no sinner can escape; the God of retributive and vindictive Justice. His tender mercy, in the compassion showed to the fallen pair; his Justice, in forgiving them only in the view of a satisfaction to be hereafter offered to his Justice by an innocent representative of the sinning race; his love to that race, in giving his own Son to become this Redeemer, and in the fulness of time to die for the sins of the whole world; and his holiness, in connecting with this provision for the pardon of man the means of restoring him to a sinless state, and to the obliterated image of God in which he had been created. " That he is just in the administration of his government: "Shall not the Judge of the whole earth do right?" "Clouds and darkness are round about him; judgment and Justice are the habitation of his throne. Barrow, "we mean a Being of infinite wisdom, goodness, and power, the Creator and the Governor of all things, to whom the great attributes of eternity and independency, omniscience and immensity, perfect holiness and purity, perfect Justice and veracity, complete happiness, glorious majesty, and supreme right of dominion belong; and to whom the highest veneration, and most profound submission and obedience are due
Feast of the Immaculate Conception - Her soul was never stained by original sin, nor by the depraved emotions, passions, and weaknesses consequent on that sin, but created in a state of original sanctity, innocence, and Justice
Charities - Charity to man is the fulfilment of duties over and beyond those of Justice to our fellow creatures, whom we recognize as having the same nature, the same destiny, the same Redeemer as ourselves
Immaculate Conception - Her soul was never stained by original sin, nor by the depraved emotions, passions, and weaknesses consequent on that sin, but created in a state of original sanctity, innocence, and Justice
Immaculate Conception, Feast of the - Her soul was never stained by original sin, nor by the depraved emotions, passions, and weaknesses consequent on that sin, but created in a state of original sanctity, innocence, and Justice
Parents - As it relates to the present life, habits of courage, application, trade, prudence, labour, Justice, contentment, temperance, truth, benevolence, &c
Caesarea - Its special features were a large harbour protected by a huge mole and by a wall with 10 lofty towers and colossi; a promenade round the port, with arches where sailors could lodge; a temple of Augustus raised on a platform, and visible far out at sea, containing two colossal statues of Rome and the Emperor; a system of drainage whereby the tides were utilized to flush the streets; walls embracing a semicircular area stretching for a mile along the sea-coast; two aqueducts, one of them 8 miles in length, displaying great engineering skill; a hippodrome; an amphitheatre capable of seating 20,000 persons; a theatre; a court of Justice, and many other noble structures
Suffering - As eschatological hopes matured in late Old Testament and intertestamental times, the righteous looked forward to the Day of the Lord when they would be vindicated and Justice would reign (Daniel 12:1 )
Judgment Seat of Christ - "Each" (the word is important as showing the universality of the judgment) "will receive what is due, " which makes it clear that Justice will be done; there will be nothing capricious or half-hearted at that tribunal
Levirate Law - In the resurrection, since they all had her, whose wife shall she be of the seven? Jesus in His answer to the Sadducees did not discuss the Justice or injustice of the Levirate law, or examine the purpose of Moses in decreeing it; but, asserting that they had erred, not knowing the Scriptures or the power of God, He showed them that in the resurrection men neither marry nor are given in marriage, but are as the angels of God in heaven; and then He proceeded to declare that belief in immortality is involved in our consciousness of the being of God
Bar - The railing that incloses the place which counsel occupy in courts of Justice
Abiathar - It is an instance of God's retributive Justice that Saul's murder of the priests deprived him thenceforth of their services in inquiring of the Lord (1 Chronicles 13:3); step by step he sank, until, bereft of legitimate means of obtaining divine counsel, he resorted to the illicit course of consulting the witch of Endor, and so filled the measure of his iniquity and brought on himself destruction (1 Chronicles 10:13)
Felix - ...
The cynical disregard of Felix for Justice, and his inordinate greed are alike brought to view in his treatment of the Apostle Paul
Philemon, the Epistle to - "...
"Paul was the common friend of the parties at variance; he must conciliate a man who had good reason to be offended; he must commend the offender, yet neither deny nor aggravate the fault; he must assert Christian equality in the face of a system which hardly recognized the humanity of the slave; he could have placed the question on the ground of his own personal rights, yet must waive them to secure an act of spontaneous kindness; his success must be a triumph of love, and nothing be demanded for the sake of the Justice which could have claimed everything; he limits his request to a forgiveness of the wrong and g restoration to favor, yet so guards his words as to leave scope for all the generosity which benevolence might prompt toward one whose condition admitted of so much alleviation
Impute - And if God accepts such a ransom; yea, he himself appoints it: and if the sinner by Christ's righteousness be made holy: and if the sins of the sinner be all done away by Christ's voluntary sufferings and death: if the law of God be thus honoured; the Justice of God thus satisfied; all the divine perfections glorified by an equivalent; yea, more than an equivalent, inasmuch as Christ's obedience and death infinitely transcend in dignity and value the everlasting obedience of men and angels; surely, here is the fullest assurance of the truth of the doctrine of Christ's imputed righteousness, and the perfect approbation of JEHOVAH to the blessed plan of redemption
Thessalonians - Paul, after saluting the Thessalonian Christians in the name of himself, Silas, and Timothy, assures them that he constantly returned thanks to God on their account, and mentioned them in his prayers; he acknowledges the readiness and sincerity with which they embraced the Gospel, and the great reputation which they had acquired by turning from idols to serve the living God, 1 Thessalonians i; he reminds them of the bold and disinterested manner in which he had preached among them; comforts them under the persecutions which they, like other Christians, had experienced from their unbelieving countrymen, and informs them of two ineffectual attempts which he had made to visit them again, 1 Thessalonians 2; and that, being thus disappointed, he had sent Timothy to confirm their faith, and inquire into their conduct; he tells them that Timothy's account of them had given him the greatest consolation and joy in the midst of his affliction and distress, and that he continually prayed to God for an opportunity of seeing them again, and for their perfect establishment in the Gospel, 1 Thessalonians 3; he exhorts to purity, Justice, love, and quietness, and dissuades them against excessive grief for their deceased friends, 1 Thessalonians 4; hence he takes occasion to recommend preparation for the last judgment, the time of which is always uncertain; and adds a variety of practical precepts
Lot - In him they had before their eyes an illustrious example of the exercise of genuine piety, supported by unsullied Justice and benevolent actions
Aichmalotarch - The princes of the captivity resided at Babylon, where they were installed with great ceremony, held courts of Justice, &c, and were set over the eastern Jews, or those settled in Babylon, Chaldaea, Assyria, and Persia
Servant - The households of some of the early patriarchs contained many servants, who were apparently treated with kindness and Justice; the highest trusts were sometimes confided to them, and they might inherit their master's estate, Genesis 14:11-16 15:2-4 24:1-10
Jeshua - It is the "counsel" of infinite wisdom (Isaiah 9:6; 1618839440_96; Hebrews 6:17) to reconcile God's Justice as a king with His love as father and priest
Glory - God’s glory is an expression of his character – his goodness, love, Justice, power and holiness (Exodus 33:18-19; Exodus 34:6-7; Psalms 29:3; Isaiah 6:3; John 12:41; Romans 3:23)
Education in Bible Times - In addition, the verse identifies the desired goal or outcome of education: a lifestyle of doing Justice and righteousness. As human beings love their neighbors as themselves (Leviticus 19:18 ), practice righteousness and Justice (Genesis 18:19 ), and pursue holiness (Leviticus 11:44 ) they walk in the way of the Lord in that they mirror God's character. Like the legal tradition associated with the covenants, both wisdom and prophecy were rooted in the behavioral outcomes of loving God and doing righteousness and Justice (Proverbs 1:3,2:9 ; Hosea 6:6 ; Micah 6:8 ). Sociologically, the practice of education facilitated assimilation into the community of faith and ensured the stabilization of that community because the principle of "doing Justice" permeated society (Leviticus 19:15,18 ). Regrettably, devotion to the law of God displaced devotion to God himself so that certain circles of Judaism now ignored the very essence of Torahfaith, Justice, and mercy
Ethics - The prophets called constantly for Justice; they condemned perjury and bribery, the selfish luxury of women, the scarcity of upright men, the lack of trust between neighbors through lies, deceitfulness, and fraud, as people preferred lies to truth and nourished "the lie within the soul. ...
Micah appeals briefly to nature and history to testify what God is like, but rests his argument chiefly on his own indignation at injustice, his inner sense of the kind of world God wants and will achieve if only people listen to their own hearts (6:1-5,8). Thereafter Jeremiah knew it was "not for man to direct his steps": he needed to know the Lord who practices and delights in kindness, Justice, and righteousness. ...
The Book of the Covenant (Exodus 20:22-23:19 ) presupposes a simple agricultural background; vengeful impulses of primitive society are here moderated by a sense of proportion and Justice. Oppression of widows, orphans, and foreigners and perversion of Justice are strictly forbidden. Moderation, equity, and philanthropy, reinforced by religious reverence, are the Book's guiding principles: God defends Justiceand is compassionate
Tabernacle - Now it lies broken in the presence of God, calling out for Justice. How can God be Justice and Love at the same time? The answer is the "cover" (mercy-seat). God's Justice cannot be satisfied magically, but it must be satisfied
Cherub (1) - Revelation 2:7; Revelation 22:14; they, with the flaming sword, were the forerunners of the sanctuary, where the Cherub on either side of the bright Shekinah cloud (from which, as on Sinai, the flame might at any moment dart) looked down on the blood-sprinkled mercy-seat of the ark, God's meeting place in reconciliation with sinners by the stoning blood; mercy and Justice meeting together in man's redemption. As the mercy-seat (typifying Christ as our propitiation) interposed between the law inside the ark and the cherubim outside, so Christ interposes between the divine Justice and the redeemed
Remnant - A more acceptable answer takes God's Justice into account. But not all the populace is equally guilty, and while the pious do not escape the effects of the destruction, God in his Justice spares them; they become the remnant
Providence - Providence displays God's omnipresence, holiness, Justice and benevolence. "He that denies providence denies God's attributes, His omniscience which is the eye of providence, His mercy and Justice which are the arms of providence, His power which is its life and motion, His wisdom which is the rudder whereby providence is steered, and holiness the compass and rule of its motion" (Charnock)
Clean, Cleanness - Thus to be clean meant not merely the negative aspects of being free from disease or defilement, but the positive demonstration in daily life of God's high moral and ethical qualities of absolute purity, mercy, Justice, and grace. The killing of the innocent called for a response in Justice from the entire Israelite community, based upon a principle of blood retribution (Numbers 35:33 ; Deuteronomy 19:10 )
Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus - ...
Jesus, the sun of Justice, have mercy on us
Litany of the Holy Name - ...
Jesus, the sun of Justice, have mercy on us
Shekinah - It was present where three were gathered to administer Justice
Delight - God delights in showing mercy (Micah 7:18 ), and kindness, Justice, and righteousness bring him pleasure and cause him delight (Jeremiah 9:23 )
Religion - We, indeed, admit may propositions as certainly true, upon the sole authority of the Jewish and Christian Scriptures, and we receive these Scriptures with gratitude as the lively oracles of God; but it is self-evident that we could not do either the one or the other, were we not convinced by natural means that God exists; that he is a being of goodness, Justice, and power; and that he inspired with divine wisdom the penmen of these sacred volumes
Tithes - But they neither taught nor practised the more important matters of faith, love, mercy and Justice (Matthew 23:4; Matthew 23:23; Luke 11:42; Luke 11:46; Luke 18:12)
Fall of Man - Visible contempt of God's majesty and Justice
Anger - In the end Job is rebuked because he has doubted God's Justice (chaps
Holy Name, Litany of the - ...
Jesus, the sun of Justice, have mercy on us
Numbers, Book of - Those who have an allegiance to Justice beyond the idea of a family-blood feud (Numbers 35:1 )
Wrath, Wrath of God - The emotional response to perceived wrong and injustice, often translated “anger,” “indignation,” “vexation,” and “irritation. ...
Old Testament The wrath of God appears in the Old Testament as a divine response to human sin and injustice. ...
New Testament Jesus' teaching supports the concept of God the Father as a God of wrath who judges sin and Justice
Inquisition - king of France, not only to enact the most barbarous laws against heretics, and to commit to the flames, by the ministry of public Justice, those who were pronounced such by the inquisitors, but also to maintain the inquisitors in their office, and grant them their protection in the most open and solemn manner
Wicked - When in Israel’s history Justice did not prevail, the “guilty” were acquitted: “… When the wicked beareth rule, the people mourn” ( Sojourn, Dwell - They are admonished to treat the client with Justice, righteousness, and love because like Abraham ( Alexandrians - 2), ‘governs the people and administers Justice among them, and sees that they fulfil their obligations and obey orders, just like the archon of an independent city
Ceremony - They said long prayers, but it was for a show; they gave alms, but it was after they had sounded a trumpet, that the eye of man might be fixed upon their beneficence; and, as to the point now under review, they were most strikingly described by our Saviour, when he said of them, "They pay tithe of mint, and anise, and cummin, but they neglect the weightier matters of the law, Justice, and mercy, and truth
Breastplate - Jahn says the most probable opinion is, that URIM and THUMMIM (אורים , ותמים light and Justice, Septuagint, δηλωσις και αληθεια ) [1] was a sacred lot, 1 Samuel 14:41-42
Judge - ...
A — 2: δικαστής (Strong's #1348 — Noun Masculine — dikastes — dik-as-tace' ) denotes "a judge" (from dike, "right, a judicial hearing, Justice;" akin to dikazo, "to judge"), Acts 7:27,35 ; some mss
Baltimore, Maryland, City of - Parishioners of the cathedral have included the most distinguished Catholics of their times, and some of the most prominent figures in American history, notably Charles Carroll of Carrollton, signer of the Declaration of Independence, and Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney
Zedeki'ah - (justice of Jehovah )
Deuteronomy - ...
The updated covenant document dealt with a number of matters, including faithfulness in worship (12:1-13:18), honesty in religious and social matters (14:1-16:17), Justice in government (16:18-19:21), respect for human life (20:1-21:23), sexual purity (22:1-23:25), protection for the disadvantaged in society (24:1-25:4), and integrity in family relations, business dealings and religious duties (25:5-26:15)
Paradox - In the teaching of Jesus we have unworldly simplicity united with worldly shrewdness (Matthew 7:15; Matthew 10:16-17; Matthew 16:6; Matthew 18:2-3, Luke 16:1-12), the universal beneficence and compassion of God bound up with severe and inexorable Justice (Matthew 5:45; Matthew 11:20-30; Matthew 18:15-35; Matthew 20:1-16; Matthew 25:14-30); we have the great and deep conceptions of life through death, joy through suffering, love through severance, peace through conflict, victory through surrender, self-realization through self-renunciation, the conquest of the world through the cross of shame (Luke 14:25-33, John 12:24-26; John 16:20; John 16:33; John 12:32)
Sanhedrin (2) - —The supreme council and high court of Justice in Jerusalem during the Greek and Roman periods. συνέδριον suggests a court of Justice, and so, still more explicitly, does בֵּית דִּין. It was an aristoeratic assembly and high court of Justice, in which, alongside of the priestly nobility and the noble families outside the priestly circle, representatives of the more numerous Pharisee party found a place, the Sadducee element, however, retaining the weight of influence. The Sanhedrin was thus a political assembly and court of Justice, representing in the main the aristocratic elements in the Jewish community
Destructionists - ...
So when our Saviour is fortifying the minds of his disciples against the power of men, by an awe of the far greater power of God, and the punishment of his Justice, he expresseth himself thus: Fear not them that kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do; fear him who is able to destroy both soul and body in hell. The very term, death, is most frequently made use of to signify the end of wicked men in another world, or the final effect of divine Justice in their punishment
Priest - And he must be suited in personal feeling and interest, to take part with them, and for him in whose suit he acts; so that neither party between whom he acts, as Priest and Mediator, may suffer wrong, but both parties have right and Justice shewn them by his priestly administration. Surety for the representation of his people, he could not have fulfilled the law, answered the demands of Justice, proved himself to be the seed of the woman, redeemed the mortgaged inheritance of his poor brother, by death overcome death, and by rising to life again become the resurrection and the life, and been suited to be the Head of his body the church, "the fulness that filleth all in all
Canaan - Whatever Justice there may be in any of these reasons, they are not those which the Bible assigns. It was these sins the Jews were to abhor and exterminate; they were to act as agents of God's Justice, and not for the gratification of their own avarice, anger, or lust, the spoil and the captives being all devoted to destruction
Ecclesiastes - The result was that wickedness usurped the place of Justice ( Ecclesiastes 3:16 ), and the upper classes crushed the poor with an oppression from which there was no escape ( Ecclesiastes 4:1 ); the country groaned under an irresponsible officialism, each official being unable to move a finger in the cause of Justice
the Ethiopian Eunuch - But we are far from Jerusalem here; and of whom speaketh the prophet this?' "Should we make it our first aim in the pulpit to do full Justice to the subject we have in hand; or should our immediate and sole endeavour be to do good to our hearers?" said one of my most thoughtful friends to me the other day. Philip, at any rate, set himself in the first place, and with all his might, to do full Justice to his great subject. And it was in the progress of that full Justice that the eunuch got all the good that the best hearer even in our day could get from the best preacher
the Queen of Sheba - For, so far as I have seen, that wonderful woman has never had adequate Justice done to her. And, on the other hand, however great, and good, and wise, and famous any man is, if the Name of the Lord is not his strong tower, I fear I do not do that man full Justice. Affairs of state, as we would say: her anxieties about her treaties of war and peace; her seat of judgment and Justice over her own people; royal-family matters also, no doubt; and matters, maybe, still nearer her heart
Judgments of God - The Scriptures give us many awful instances of the display of divine Justice in the punishment of nations, families, and individuals, for their iniquities. ...
Four years after, in his great distress, he attempted to kill himself; but being as mean- spirited and dastardly as he was wicked and cruel, he had not the resolution to do that piece of Justice to the world, and was forced to beg assistance. ...
His distemper increased till his entrails were all corrupted, and came out of his body; and thus he perished, as signal an example as ever was known of the divine Justice rendering to the wicked according to their deeds
Canaanites - Now, when God, for the wickedness of a people, sends an earthquake, or a fire, or a plague among them, there is no complaint of injustice, especially when the calamity is known, or expressly declared beforehand, to be inflicted for the wickedness of such people. It is rather regarded as an act of exemplary penal Justice, and, as such, consistent with the character of the moral Governor of the universe. For where is the great difference, even to them, whether they were destroyed by an earthquake, a pestilence, a famine, or by the hands of an enemy? Where is the difference, even to our imperfect apprehensions of divine Justice, provided it be, and is known to be, for their wickedness that they are destroyed? But this destruction, you say, confounded the innocent with the guilty. ...
But, farther, if punishing them by the hands of the Israelites rather than by a pestilence, an earthquake, a fire, or any such calamity, be still an objection, we may perceive, I think, some reasons for this method of punishment in preference to any other whatever; always bearing in our mind, that the question is not concerning the Justice of the punishment, but the mode of it
Interpretation - The present writer is of opinion that neither explanation does full Justice to the author’s idea
Names of Our Lord - ...
IN THE OLD TESTAMENT ...
Almighty Word, Wisdom of Solomon 18:15
Brightness of Eternal Light, Wisdom of Solomon 7:26
Child, Isaiah 9:6
Counsellor, Isaiah 9:6
Desire of Eternal Hills, Genesis 49:26
Desired of all nations, Aggeus 2:8
Emmanuel, Isaiah 7:14
Expectation of nations, Genesis
Father of World to Come, Isaiah
God the Mighty, Isaiah 9:6
Holy One of Israel, Isaiah 43:3
Holy One, Psalms 15:10
Just Branch, Jeremiah 23:5
Just, Isaiah 45:8
King of Glory, Psalms 23:7
Lord of Hosts, Isaiah 9:7
Lord Our Just One, Jeremiah 23:6
Man of Sorrows, Isaiah 53:3
Man, Michah 5:5
My Just One, Isaiah 41:10
Orient, Zachariah 6:12
Prince of Peace, Isaiah 9:6
Root of Jesse, Isaiah 11:10
Ruler of the Earth, Isaiah 16:1
Sun of Justice, Malachi 4:2
Wonderful, Isaiah 9:6
USED BY HIMSELF ...
Bread of Life, John 6:35
Door, John 10:9
Good Shepherd, John 10:11
Life, John 11:25
Light of the World, John 9:5
Lord, John 13:13
Master, John 13:13
Resurrection and Life, John 11:25
Son of Man, Matthew 8:2O
Son, John 5:22
Vine, John 15:1
Way, Truth, and Life, John 14:6
USED BY THE APOSTLES and EVANGELISTS ...
Advocate, 1 John 2:1
Almighty, Apocalypse 1:8
Alpha and Omega, Apocalypse 1:8
Amen, Apocalypse 3:14
Author and Finisher of Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Author of Life, Acts 3:15
Beginning and End, Apocalypse 1:8
Blessed God, Mark 14:61
Child Jesus, Luke 2:43
Christ Jesus, 1 Timothy 1:1
Christ, Matthrew 1:18
Corner-Stone, Epheisans 2:21
Day Star, 2 Peter 1:19
Faith, Hebrews 12:2
Faithful Witness, Apocalypse 1:5
First and Last, Apocalypse 1:17
First Born from the Dead, Apocalypse 1:5
Galitean, Matthew 26:69
God of the Jews, Romans 3:29
Great Pastor, Hebrews 13:20
He that is to come, Hebrews 10:37
Head, Ephesians 4:15
High Priest, Hebrews 2:17
Jesus Christ the Just, 1 John 2:1
Jesus, Matthew 27:17
Key of David, Apocalypse 3:7
King of Kings, Apocalypse 19:16
Lamb of God, John 1:29
Life Eternal, 1 John 1:2
Lion of the Tribe of Juda, Apocalypse 5:5
Living Stone, 1 Peter 2:4
Lord Jesus Christ, Acts 10:48
Lord of All, Galatians 4:1
Lord of Lords, Apocalypse 19:16
Lord Our God, Apocalypse 4:11
Mediator, Hebrews 9:15
Messias, John 1:41 (passim)
Only Begotten of the Father, John 1:14
Our Lord Jesus Ghrist, Romans 1:4
Pascha Nostrum, 1 Corinthians 5:7
Power of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Priest, Hebrews 8:4
Prince of the kings of the earth, Apocalypse 1:5
Rabbi, John 1:18
Rock of Scandal, Romans 9:33
Root of David, Apocalypse 5:6
Saviour of the world, John 4:42
Saviour, Luke 2:11
Son of David, Mark 12:86
Son of God, Matthew 8:29
Son of Joseph, Luke 3:23
Son of the Living God, Matthew 16:16
Star of the morning, Apocalypse 2:23
Stone of stumbling, 1 Peter 2:8
Stone, Matthew 21:42
Teacher, John 3:2
That which was from the beginning, 1 John 1:1
Victim, Ephesians 5:2
Wisdom of God, 1 Corinthians 1:24
Word, John 1:1
Word of God, Apocalypse 19:13
Word of Life, 1 John 1:1
USED BY OTHERS ...
Adonai, O Antiphons
Angel in the liturgy of the Mass
Captain of our salvation, Ephiphany, Matins
Captain of the Martyrs, Octain of Saint Stephen, Matins
Carpenter's Son, Matthew 13:55
Christ our King, First Wednesday in Advent, Matins
Christ the Lord, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Eagle, Saint Maximus, Homily 42
Eternal, Christmas Day, Lauds
Eternal Word of God made Flesh, Ember Saturday in Advent, Martins
Glory of Thy people Israel, Luke 2:32
God of God, title in Gloria
God our Saviour, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
God the Son, Saturday within Octave of Christmas, Matins
Great Prophet, First Sunday in Advent, Lauds
Heavenly Bridegroom, Epiphany, Lauds
Holy, Luke 1:35
Holy One of God, Luke 4
King of all the earth, Second Monday in Advent, Vespers
King of Angel Hosts above, Circumcision, Matins
King of Heaven, Christmas Day, Matins
King of Israel, Mark 15:32
King of Righteousness, Third Thursday in Advent, Matins
King of the Gentiles, O Antiphons
King of the Jews, Matthew 2:2
King Peaceful, Christmas Day, Vespers (I)
Light to the revelation of the Gentiles, Luke 2:32
Light of Light, title in Gloria
Lord of Angels, Eve of Epiphany, Matins
Lord Our King, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Lawgiver, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord our Saviour, Circumcision, Matins
Lord that shall rule, Fourth set of antiphons
Lord the King, Ephiphany, Matins
Lord the Ruler, Second Sunday in Advent, Matins
Contribution - Yet another prophet issues a call for true Justice and compassion (Zechariah 7:9-10 )
Habakkuk - Habakkuk therefore, confident that God is of purer eyes than to behold evil (Habakkuk 1:13), sets himself in an attitude of waiting for the Lord's own solution of this perplexing apparent anomaly (Habakkuk 2:1); Jehovah desires him accordingly, "write the vision" of God's retributive Justice plainly, so "that he may run that readeth it," namely, "run" to tell to all the good news of the foe's doom and Judah's deliverance, or, as Grotius, run through it, i
Mines - ...
He sits to His work, not perfunctorily, but with patient love and unflinching Justice
Mephibosheth - Bearing a name of reproach like Mephibosheth, instead of his name of innocence; banished to the outskirts of the moral wilderness, like Mephibosheth in Lodebar; liable to perish by the sword of Justice, as Saul's other sons (2 Samuel 21); paralyzed by original sin, as Mephibosheth lamed from infancy in both feet; invited by the Lord and Savior, after having spoiled principalities, to sit down at the royal table (Matthew 8:11; Revelation 19:7; Revelation 19:9), as Mephibosheth was by David after conquering all his foes, on the ground of the everlasting covenant (Jeremiah 31:3); as David regarded Mephibosheth because of his covenant with Jonathan (1 Samuel 20:15; 1 Samuel 20:42)
Hasmonean - He had a solid reputation of piety and Justice, and managed to gain the right of hereditary succession for his heirs (1 Maccabees 14:41-49 )
Passion - ...
It may with Justice be advanced, that the happiness of ourselves in this department is of much greater utility than abstuser speculations concerning the nature of the human soul, or even the most accurate knowledge of its intellectual powers; for it is according as the passions and affections are excited and directed towards the objects investigated by our intellectual natures that we become useful to ourselves or others: that we rise into respectability, or sink into contempt; that we diffuse or enjoy happiness, diffuse or suffer misery
Torah - Jesus never denied the authority of the Torah, but denounced the elevation of ritual concerns above “weightier matters of the law: Justice and mercy and faith” (Matthew 23:23 NRSV)
Soul - Volitional/spiritual yearning is also assigned to nepes [ Psalm 42:1-2 ), Justice (Isaiah 26:8-9 ), evil (Proverbs 21:10 ), and political power (2 Samuel 3:21 )
Perfect, Perfection - " God's perfection is an attribute of who he is as a person, not an idea or theoretical postulate, and it involves ethical qualities like Justice and uprightness rather than properties that would indulge selfish human desire and pleasure (as in "a perfect meal" or "a perfect day")
Anabaptists - It is but Justice to observe also, that the Baptists in England and Holland are to be considered in a different light from those above-mentioned: they profess an equal aversion to all principles of rebellion on the one hand, and to enthusiasm on the other
Ammi - And it is worthy the reader's closest consideration, in farther proof of these grand truths, that the putting them away, in consequence of their adulteries, had been done in strict Justice, and by right
Go Out, Go Forth - 51:5), His Justice ( Ways - We find through the whole of Scripture this kind of expressions: The way of peace, of Justice, of iniquity, of truth, of darkness
Neonomianism - Is faith, or any other grace or acts of ours, any atonement for sin, satisfaction to Justice, meriting qualification, or any part of that righteousness for which we are justified at God our Creator's bar
Job - ...
The main problem discussed in Job is the Justice of God in suffering the righteous to be afflicted, while the wicked prosper
Call - Demand requisition public claim as, listen to the calls of Justice or humanity
Mountains - Thus Mount Ararat is a standing memorial of the deluge of man's sin, God's Justice, and God's mercy
Samuel - Without being prophets we could predict what kind of a judge Samuel would make when he sat down on the seat of Justice. Josephus says that Samuel had an 'inborn love of Justice. Some men still, both in public and in private life, have that same love of Justice born in them. Some other men, again, most men indeed, have an inborn love of injustice that they have to fight against all their days. In his office of judge he was continually on circuit dispensing Justice and judgment up and down the land
Elijah - Elijah defended Yahweh's sovereignty over history and Justice, as well as over false gods (1 Kings 17-18 ). In this position, God demanded the rule of law and Justice, and watched over ethical and legal morals
Debt, Debtor (2) - The exhibition of a certain spirit in face of it was what His heart craved, a spirit which should do Justice to the best instincts of a true humanity. ...
Jesus saw many around Him glorying in fancied privilege and very zealous for the Law, yet omitting its essential matters—justice, mercy, faith
Arrest - ]'>[7] It is related of John Bunyan that once, as he was preaching, a Justice came with several constables to arrest him. ‘The Justice commanded him to come down from his stand, but he mildly told he was about his Master’s business, and must rather obey His voice than that of man
Law - It therefore naturally devolved upon Moses to establish a central authority for the administration of Justice, which should be universally accessible and universally recognized. Justice (II. The state of civilization may be inferred from the fact that the principles of civil and criminal Justice are all comprehended under the two heads of retaliation and pecuniary compensation (cf. The laws, however, recognize, and even insist upon, the claims of humanity and Justice. His distinction between ‘the weightier matters’ of ‘justice, mercy, fidelity,’ and the lighter of tithes and washings, was calculated to revolutionize current Judaism
Psalms, Theology of - ...
Supplicants also normally express trust in Yahweh, based on such realities as his steadfastness and dependability, his presence with worshipers, and his concern for Justice and the vindication of the righteous (7:10-11; 13:5; 28:7-8; 31:14; 52:8; 56:3-4; 130:4-6; 140:7,12). He thereby demonstrates his covenantal faithfulness, establishes his Justice, and maintains his honor and reputation. The psalmists emphasize Yahweh's all-encompassing rule by extolling his work as creator (93:1b; 96:5b), his evident glory and majesty (47:1-2; 93:1-4; 96:1-3,6-9; 97:1-6; 99:1-3), his sovereignty and victorious exploits among the nations (47:3-9; 98:1-3), his omnipotence in comparison to the impotence of pagan deities (96:4-5; 97:7-9), and his establishment of universal Justice and righteousness (96:10-13; 98:4-9; 99:4). The king was expected, indeed he undertook, to rule with Justice and integrity (72:1-7,12-14; 101). Second, such links are not surprising given the psalmists' vision of the establishment of Yahweh's universal and everlasting kingdom of righteousness, Justice, and peace and its temporal, historical embodiment in the rule of the Israelite king
Zephaniah, Book of - God's righteous Justice will be impartial (Zephaniah 3:1-8 )
Covenant - It is still in force, however, as it rests on the immutable Justice of God, and is binding on all who have not fled to Christ and accepted his righteousness
Repentance - For the prophets, such a turning or conversion was not just simply a change within a person; it was openly manifested in Justice, kindness, and humility ( Micah 6:8 ; Amos 5:24 ; Hosea 2:19-20 )
Resurrection - They grope for a firm hope in Justice and help beyond the grave
Ruth - The family life of David's ancestors is sketched to show how they walked in single hearted piety toward God, and Justice and love, modesty and purity towards man
Ashtoreth - 1800) aptly calls ‘queen of the gods, into whose hands are delivered the commands of the great gods, lady of Nineveh, daughter of Sin, sister of Shamash, who rules all kingdoms, who determines decrees, the goddess of the universe, lady of heaven and earth, who hears petitions, heeds sighs; the merciful goddess who loves Justice
Bezer - And if fleeing to Christ when the avenger of blood, that is, the law of God, and the Justice of God, is pursuing him, he takes shelter in the Lord Jesus, the Bezer of his people, and the city of refuge for security, before he be overtaken, he is in safety for ever
Goat - The Suretyship of Christ is hereby most blessedly shadowed forth; and both the law of God and the Justice of God in that Suretyship evidently satisfied
Caecilianus, Archdeacon And Bishop of Carthage - " The rigoristic party appealed to the Justice of the emperor, and courted full inquiry to be conducted in Gaul—at a distance, that is, from the spot where passions and convictions were so strong and one-sided. The bitterness of this decision was modified by Caecilian's friendly proposal of compromise; but his advances were rejected, and the cry of injustice raised
Moses - His institutions breathe a spirit of freedom, purity, intelligence, Justice, and humanity, elsewhere unknown; and above all, of supreme love, honor, and obedience to God
Greece, Religion And Society of - (2) The Areopagus functioned as a court of Justice judging persons who had committed murder, mutilation, poisoning, or treason. ...
In addition to these basic groups, laws were established that ensured Justice. The long tenure of his reforms attests to the validity of them as well as the Athenian's devotion to Justice
Job, Theology of - God utilizes his power and wisdom to bring about social Justice, whether delivering the lowly or thwarting the schemes of crafty criminals (5:10-16). Also Job portrays God as unjust Judge (9:22-24) who is cruel (30:21-22) and unfair to him (19:6-22) and to many innocent victims of social injustice (24:1-12). ...
Elihu states that the Almighty does not pervert Justice (34:12) but is a sovereign (v. ...
Even Elihu argues that God operates according to retribution so that he ought not be accused of perverting Justice (34:11-12). Because of this dogma, Job impugns God's Justice in order to justify himself (see 40:8)
Hammurabi - The sceptre and ring are symbols of Justice and order. The stele begins by describing the king's divine call to “make Justice to shine forth in the land, to destroy the evil and the wicked, that the strong might not oppress the weak to give light to the land
Wisdom - The greatest sources of danger to true religion were:” ( a ) an orthodoxy which held the ancient traditions inviolable and refused to see the facts of the present ( b ) the scepticism and discouragement arising out of the miseries of the time which seemed to deny the Justice and goodness of God; and ( c ) the inroads of Greek civilization which seemed to threaten the whole fabric of Judaism. ...
The weakness of this traditional position is exposed by the Book of Job, which points out the fact that the righteous man is often the most sorely afflicted, and seeks to reconcile this fact with belief in the Justice and goodness of God
Mercy, Merciful - This was often coupled with a command for Justice ( Micah 6:8 ; compare Hosea 12:6 ; Zechariah 7:9 ). It can be used negatively as in Hebrews 10:28 where it describes the merciless Justice of the Law
Stoning - But, if the occasion which led to Stephen’s being put on his defence was the accusation of blasphemy brought against him by the witnesses (and the statement of Acts 6:13 can hardly be challenged), it is difficult to conceive of a self-constituted tribunal attempting to adjudicate upon a grave charge of the sort, involving the penalty of death, with which the supreme court of Justice alone among the Jews had authority to deal. Benzinger, ‘Law and Justice,’ in Encyclopaedia Biblica iii
Widow - But the vast majority of the contexts are legal in nature, either dealing with Justice (the legal protection of the widow) or injustice (the exploitation of her status). Similarly, the church must persistently pray for eschatological Justice, the redressing of all wrongs against her (Luke 18:1-8 )
Propitiation - As the Justice of God is punitive, (and if it is not punitive, his laws are a dead letter,) then is there wrath in God; then is God angry with the wicked; then is man, as a sinner, obnoxious to this anger; and so a propitiation becomes necessary to turn it away from him. ...
It by no means follows, however, that this wrath is a passion in God; or that, though we contend that the awful attribute of his Justice requires satisfaction, in order to the forgiveness of the guilty, we afford reason to any to charge us with attributing vengeful affections to the divine Being
Holy - Neither holiness nor personhood alone can do Justice to the biblical portrayal of God
Song of Solomon - This view tries to do Justice to the alteration of speakers in the Song in its various dialogues
Day - Such decision is urged because God has "set a day when he will judge the world with Justice by the man he has appointed" (Acts 17:31 )
Resurrection of Christ - His resurrection is a proof that he made a full atonement for our sins, that his sacrifice was accepted as a satisfaction to divine Justice, and his blood a ransom for sinners
Trial of Jesus - Two systems of Justice combined to produce a sentence of death for Jesus
Wisdom And Wise Men - Some of its major topics are: knowledge, the world, Justice, virtue, family, and faith
Servant of the Lord, the - He is to bring God's Justice to all the nations (Isaiah 42:1 ,Isaiah 42:1,42:4 )
Foreigner - Some psalms envisioned the time when all nations would become subject to an Israelite king who would rule the world with Justice
Hierocles of Alexandria, a Philosopher - When sojourning at Constantinople he came into collision with the government (or, as Kuster interprets it, with the Christian authorities) and was severely beaten in the court of Justice, possibly (as Zeller conjectures) for his adherence to the old religion
Gad (1) - of Jordan, along with them: Numbers 32:17; Numbers 32:21; Numbers 32:32; Joshua 1:14; Joshua 4:12), he executed the Justice of Jehovah (Moses prophetically foresees Gad will do what Jehovah required of His people as righteousness) and His judgments (in fellowship) with (the rest of) Israel
Samuel, Second Book of - David subdued all the enemies of Israel, and executed judgement and Justice unto all the people
Barabbas - In his desire to save Jesus, Pilate bethought himself of this custom as offering a loophole of escape from the dilemma in which he found himself between his own sense of Justice and his unwillingness to give offence to the multitude
Oath - A pound of tea cannot travel regularly from the ship to the consumer, without costing half a dozen oaths at least; and the same security for the due discharge of their office, namely, that of an oath, is required from a churchwarden and an archbishop; from a petty constable and the chief Justice of England
Hand - To stretch out one's hand, signifies to chastise, to exercise severity or Justice, Ezekiel 25:7
Poverty - During the period of the later monarchy, however, commerce, city-life, and luxury grew apace, and the greed and heartless oppression of the rich, the corruption and perversion of Justice, which this state of things brought in its train, were constantly denounced by the great writing prophets, esp
Judges - Their sacro-sanctity is marked by their bearing the designation "gods," as exercising some of God's delegated power: Psalms 82:1; Psalms 82:6; Exodus 21:6, Hebrew "gods" for "'judges," God being the source of all Justice
Judgment Damnation - Justice was administered in His name, and as the supreme Judge He saw that right was done. It would, however, be too much to say that His actions were regarded as invariably regulated by a regard for Justice. Not till we come to the great prophets do judgment and Justice appear as equivalent terms. Even in the ease of Israel, Justice must take its course (Amos 3:2)
Exodus, Book of - Justice for damage done to another's property (Exodus 21:33-22:15 )...
E. Justice when a virgin is seduced (Exodus 22:16-17 )...
F
Kindness (2) - ...
A view of Christ’s ethical teaching as a whole makes it clear that the stress thus laid on the duty of kindness favours no loosening of obligation to Justice and fidelity in the manifold relationships of men, nor does it do away with the duty and need of punishment when that obligation is violated. Love of neighbour and of enemy is as truly reconcilable with the claims of Justice on the human plane as is God’s benignity with His righteous government
Ethics - Beyond the family is the larger community where they live and work, and where they inevitably meet conduct that is contrary to their Christian understanding of righteousness, truth and Justice (Ephesians 6:5-9; see Justice; WORK)
Truth - Sometimes ‘truth’ denotes Justice as administered by a ruler or a judge ( Exodus 18:21 , Proverbs 20:28 ), and, in particular, by the Messianic King ( Psalms 45:4 , Isaiah 42:3 )
Esther - Throughout, the book points to Justice and indicates that faithfulness to the covenant people is a duty whether it pays or not
Flood - ...
Theological Proclamation of the Flood God took account of earth's wickedness, the persistent human bent toward evil, the corruption that filled the earth with injustice. Self-consistency demanded Justice equal to the wickedness and prompted a determination to blot out mankind
Slave - ...
The law given to Israel at Sinai was not a program for the ideal society, but a legal system designed to maintain order and administer Justice among a people whose way of life was already well established
Supremacy - The Christian conscience, however laggard the will, cannot but confess the Justice of the Master’s question: ‘Why call ye me Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say?’ (Luke 6:46)
Gentiles - Israel's mission was to bring Justice (Isaiah 42:1 ) and light to the nations (Isaiah 49:6 )
Elder - In the legal codes of Deuteronomy the elders are responsible for administering Justice, sitting as judges in the city gate (Deuteronomy 22:15 ), deciding cases affecting family life (Deuteronomy 21:18-21 , Deuteronomy 22:13-21 ), and executing decisions (Deuteronomy 19:11-13 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-9 )
Truth - The truth of God is described in the words “faithfulness” (Romans 3:3 ) and “justice” (Romans 3:5 )
Water - Per contra, he imagines ‘the angel of the waters’ turning Rome’s rivers and fountains of water into blood (Revelation 16:4); for, as she has shed the blood of saints like water, it is but just that she should have to drink blood-a grim species of poetic Justice
Oath - A pound of tea cannot travel regularly from the ship to the consumer without costing half a dozen oaths at least; and the same security for the due discharge of their office, namely, that of an oath is required from a churchwarden and an archbishop, from a petty constable, and the chief Justice of England
Tradition - On the one hand, through the ceaseless activity of the scribes, the written Law was enriched by a wealth of oral statutes (תּוֹרָה שֶׁבְּעַל־פָּה, ‘the Torah that came by mouth’), partly natural expansions of the Law, arising from the force of custom and the new necessities of life, or as legal precedents from the courts of Justice, partly definitions, interpretations, or detailed applications of the Law
Covenant, Book of the - ’ In early Semitic life Justice was administered according to a series of tôrôth , or judicial and priestly decisions, originally transmitted orally, but gradually written down for more exact use as precedents
Absalom - ...
Joab perceiving how the king took to heart Absalom's exile suborned a woman of Tekoa, by an imaginary case, to extort from the king (whose Justice would not allow his love for Absalom to let him escape some penalty for Amnon's murder) the admission of the general principle that, in special cases where the life taken could not be recalled, means for restoring the loved and living banished one should be devised; just as God, considering the brevity of man's life, weak and irrecoverable when gone, "as water spilt on the ground, does not take a (sinner's) soul away" (so the Hebrew text of 2 Samuel 14:14 for "neither doth God respect any person"), but deviseth means that His banished be not (for ever) expelled from Him
Community of Goods - Gregory the Great rightly interprets the spirit of the NT when he says that when we give what they need to those who are in want, we give them that which is their own; we are not giving away what is ours, we are rather discharging an obligation of Justice than performing a work of mercy (Lib
Zephaniah, Theology of - God is both a God of Justice and holiness, exacting judgment upon those who oppose him, and also a God of love and compassion, showing these to his faithful followers
Keep, Watch, Guard - God says of Abraham: “For I know him, that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord, to do Justice and judgment …” ( Pilate - He is represented, both by Philo and Josephus, as a man of an impetuous and obstinate temper, and, as a judge, one who used to sell Justice, and, for money, to pronounce any sentence that was desired
Altar - The wilful murderer, indeed, sought protection there in vain; for by the express command of God he might be dragged to Justice, even from the altar
Urim And Thummim - The whole land was partitioned by lot; and that, in after times, the lot continued to be used, even in courts of Justice, we see from Proverbs 16:33 ; Proverbs 18:18 ; where we are expressly taught to remember, that it is Providence which maketh the choice, and that therefore we ought to be satisfied with the decision of the lot, as the will of God
Parousia - He was the Christ in the sense that ( a ) He was anointed (empowered) by God to deliver men; ( b ) He was gathering and preparing men for His Kingdom; ( c ) He died and rose to manifest the Justice and love of God, and thus save those who accepted Him as Christ; ( d ) He would return to conquer Satan, judge both the living and the dead, and establish His Kingdom either in heaven or on a renewed earth
Law - These rules depend on natural law, or the principles of Justice which spring from the social state or they are founded on customs, compacts, treaties, leagues and agreements between independent communities
Job, Book of - He recognizes God's hand in his afflictions, but denies they are brought on by wrong-doing; and becomes still clearer in the view that only the future life can vindicate God's Justice. It proves that a charge of injustice against God involves the consequence that the accuser is more competent that he to rule the universe
Blood - Therefore, until a murderer was punished, the blood of the murdered person cried out for Justice (Genesis 4:10; Numbers 35:33; Deuteronomy 19:11-13)
Plagues of Egypt - The design of these visitations, growing more awful and tremendous in their progress, was to make Pharaoh know, and confess, that the God of the Hebrews was the supreme Lord, and to exhibit his power and his Justice in the strongest light to all the nations of the earth, Exodus 9:16 ; 1 Samuel 4:8 , &c; to execute judgment upon the Egyptians and upon all their gods, inanimate and bestial, for their cruelty to the Israelites, and for their grovelling polytheism and idolatry, Exodus 7:14-17 ; Exodus 12:12 . Pharaoh had humbled himself, and acknowledged his own and his people's guilt, and the Justice of the divine plague: the Lord, therefore, forbore this time to harden his heart. This was an act of perfect retributive Justice, to make the Egyptians pay for the long and laborious services of the Israelites, whom they had unjustly enslaved, in violation of their charter
Christianity - It represents the present and past state of society, as in contest with its own principles of Justice, mercy, and truth; but teaches the final triumph of the latter over every thing contrary to itself. When such is the moral nature of Christianity, how obvious is it that its tendency both as to individuals and to society must be in the highest sense beneficial! From every passion which wastes, and burns, and frets, and enfeebles the spirit, the individual is set free, and his inward peace renders his obedience cheerful and voluntary: and we might appeal to infidels themselves, whether, if the moral principles of the Gospel were wrought into the hearts, and embodied in the conduct, of all men, the world would not be happy; whether if governments ruled, and subjects obeyed, by the laws of Christ; whether if the rules of strict Justice which are enjoined upon us regulated all the transactions of men, and all that mercy to the distressed which we are taught to feel and to practise came into operation; and whether, if the precepts which delineate and enforce the duties of husbands, wives, masters, servants, parents, children, did, in fact, fully and generally govern all these relations,—whether a better age than that called golden by the poets, would not then be realized, and Virgil's...
Jam redit et Virgo, redeunt Saturnia regna, ...
[1] ...
be far too weak to express the mighty change? [1] Such is the tendency of Christianity. What beauty appears in the whole! How just a symmetry! What exact proportion in every part! How desirable is the happiness here described! How venerable, how lovely is the holiness!" "If," says Bishop Taylor, "wisdom, and mercy, and Justice, and simplicity, and holiness, and purity, and meekness, and contentedness, and charity, be images of God, and rays of divinity, then that doctrine, in which all these shine so gloriously, and in which nothing else is ingredient, must needs be from God
Philippi - Popularly regarded as inspired by the Pythian Apollo, the girl was evidently no mere impostor, but a person of abnormal gifts and temperament, perhaps with symptoms of epilepsy, who believed herself to be the mouthpiece of a divine power, and gave free expression to her intuitions, often astonishing those who consulted her by the Justice and truth of her oracular words. In the end the magistrates saved themselves by begging the prisoners to leave the town quietly, and the historian’s point is that in acceding to this request the apostles forfeited the unquestionable right to appeal against a gross maladministration of Justice
Habakkuk - The first question, Why does violence rule where there should be Justice (Habakkuk 1:2-5 ) expressed the prophet's sense of dismay, either about conditions within his own land caused by Jehoiakim, or by the oppression of weak countries by stronger powers. In light of what follows, internal injustice seems to have been the object of his concern. A Prophet Perplexed: Why Does God Permit Injustice? (Habakkuk 1:1-17 )...
A
Refuge, Cities of - Practically, then, the community administered Justice, but when the death penalty was to be exacted, it was exacted not by the community, but by the avenger of blood in accordance with primitive usage ( Deuteronomy 19:12-13 )
le'Vites - They, with the priests, formed the majority of the permanent Sanhedrin, and as such had a large share in the administration of Justice even in capital cases
Sacrifice - (Proverbs 21:3 :) "To do Justice and judgment is more acceptable to the Lord than sacrifice
Blood - "Turn you to the stronghold, ye prisoners of hope" (Zechariah 9:12) Once in Christ, He can defy avenging Justice (Romans 8:33-34)
Philosophy - In contrast to Epicurean philosophy, individuals achieve well-being and peace through their consonance with nature (which was in a constant state of change) by having the qualities of bravery, Justice, self-control, and a competent intellect
Know, Knowledge - ...
In the doing of Justice and righteousness, Josiah is said to have known God (Jeremiah 22:15-16 )
Legalism - The prophets in particular denounce preoccupation with the niceties of sacrificial ritual while inward obedience expressed in Justice, compassion, and humility is lacking (1 Samuel 15:22-23 ; Isaiah 1:10-20 ; Amos 2:6-8 ; 4:4-5 ; 5:21-24 ; 1618839440_6 )
Philosophists - All ideas of Justice and injustice, of virtue and vice, of glory and infamy, are purely arbitrary, and dependent on custom
Giving - It is founded in Justice, the recognition of the true relations which men hold one to another in Christ
Refuge - And how truly blessed is it to discover, that in his person, blood, and righteousness, as the glorious Head and Mediator of his redeemed, they are secretly and securely hid with Christ in God; so that neither law nor Justice, sin nor Satan, death nor hell, the world nor the grave, can come to injure them
Proverbs, Book of - ...
In Proverbs 1 the purport of the proverbs is pointed out: it is that instruction in wisdom, Justice, judgement, and equity might be received: the fear of the Lord is the starting point
Habakkuk - He receives an answer that a new and startling display of the Divine Justice is about to be made
Man - The consequence of this evil act was, that man lost the chief good: his nature was corrupted; his powers depraved, his body subject to corruption, his soul exposed to misery, his posterity all involved in ruin, subject to eternal condemnation, and for ever incapable to restore themselves to the favour of God, to obey his commands perfectly, and to satisfy his Justice, Galatians 3:1-29 : Romans 5:1-21 : Genesis 3:1-24 : Ephesians 2:1-22 : Romans 3:1-31 : passim
Way - 40:27: “Why sayest thou, O Jacob, and speakest, O Israel, My way is hid from the Lord, and [6] from my God?” In one passage derek signifies the overall course and fixed path of one’s life, or his “destiny”: “O Lord, I know that the way of man is not in himself: it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps” ( Water - 5:10), Justice (Amos 5:24; KJV, “judgment”), and strong feelings (Job 3:24)
Pentateuch - In the former we see the pious monarch of Judah assembling the priests and Levites and the rulers of the people; to deplore with him the trespasses of their fathers against the divine law, to acknowledge the Justice of those chastisements which, according to the prophetic warnings of that law, had been inflicted upon them; to open the house of God which his father had impiously shut, and restore the true worship therein according to the Mosaic ritual, 2 Kings 18; 2 Chronicles 29; 2 Chronicles 30; with the minutest particulars of which he complied, in the sin-offerings and the peace- offerings which, in conjunction with his people, he offered for the kingdom and the sanctuary and the people, to make atonement to God for them and for all Israel; restoring the service of God as it had been performed in the purest times
Joel - Their bribery and perversion of Justice occasioned the cry for a monarchy
Justification - ) "The just shall live by faith" (Habakkuk 2:4) is thrice quoted by Paul:...
(1) Romans 1:17, where the emphasis is on "just," the gospel plan of saving men sets forth "the righteousness (justice) of God" as excluding the righteousness of man, Gentile and Jew alike (Romans 1:17 ff; Romans 2; Romans 3:25)
Man - "according to (kata) man," is used only by the Apostle Paul, of "(1) the practices of fallen humanity, 1 Corinthians 3:3 ; (2) anything of human origin, Galatians 1:11 ; (3) the laws that govern the administration of Justice among men, Romans 3:5 ; (4) the standard generally accepted among men, Galatians 3:15 ; (5) an illustration not drawn from Scripture, 1 Corinthians 9:8 ; (6) probably = 'to use a figurative expression' (see AV, marg
Nicodemus - There was a sufficient sense of truth and Justice, and of personal interest in Jesus, to enable him to risk the anger of the majority by a protest, but enough of caution or timidity to put the protest into an indirect and tentative form rather than into a bold defence of the Master
Evil - They are frequently seen as antonyms for words denoting Justice, faithfulness, honesty, proper (just) administration, and rightness. But objectively, the act would have been Justice executed because of the immoral conduct of the Assyrians. Morally, the issue is Justice, not evil
Government - ...
Law and Justice in society were fundamental concerns for the Sumerians, as well as for the later Mesopotamians, since they believed that upon such principles the survival of the state depended. ...
Prominent Sumerian rulers had identified themselves with law and Justice in an attempt to reduce the amount of administrative corruption in their city-states. Under Roman rule the Sanhedrin was responsible for governing Judea, and in Christ's time it was respected as the supreme court of Justice (Matthew 26:59 ; John 11:47 )
Will - The Justice of all legislative enactments evidently and essentially depends on the principle, that the things prohibited can be avoided, or, in other words, might have been done otherwise than they were done; and this is the very turning point of the controversy. Thus our affirmative knowledge of the Deity, as derived from this part of our inquiry, consists in the certainty, (though his nature is unknown to us,) that he is the creative source of all that is great, glorious, and good, in heaven or in earth; while we may negatively conclude, that his moral government shall, on the whole, be conducted in a manner not inconsistent with whatever is excellent in the exercise of power and wisdom, Justice and mercy, goodness and truth. For it shows us that as, on the one side, we cannot pretend to such an insight into the nature and character of the divine knowledge as to deduce therefrom a system of eternal and irrespective decrees; so neither, on the other, can this system of moral government be ascribed to the Deity, because it would be manifestly unworthy, not merely of him who has created all moral excellence, but of any of those beings on whom he has conferred the most ordinary degrees of mercy and Justice
Testimony - The seat of Justice in Old Testament Israel was the legal assembly, which usually met near the town gate. God's desire for Justice establishes a precedent for his people to follow. To defend the cause of the powerless and to testify against injustice reflect knowledge of God's ways and personal obedience to him (Isaiah 1:17 ; Jeremiah 22:16 )
Law - Biblical laws are insufficiently comprehensive to be considered a "law-code, " but served as paradigmatic illustrations (not rigid rules) of Justice that a judge could apply or modify according to circumstances. Jesus designates Justice, mercy, and faithfulness as "more important" matters in the law (Matthew 23:23 )
Joab - The land trembles as Joab rises on the stepping-stones of murdered men to the shining top of power and honour, only to fall under the sword of a too-slow Justice an outlaw from the love and the pity of all men. Was it not a blunder?...
In the corrupted currents of this world,Offence's gilded hand may shove by Justice,And oft 'tis seen, the wicked prize itselfBuys out the law: but 'tis not so above;There is no shuffling, there the action liesIn his true nature; and we ourselves compell'd,Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults,To give in evidence
Atonement - the satisfaction offered to divine Justice by the death of Christ for the sins of mankind, by virtue of which all true penitents who believe in Christ are personally reconciled to God, are freed from the penalty of their sins, and entitled to eternal life. The voluntary sufferings of the Divine Son of God "for us," that is, in our room and stead, magnify the Justice of God; display his hatred to sin; proclaim "the exceeding sinfulness" of transgression, by the deep and painful manner in which they were inflicted upon the Substitute; warn the persevering offender of the terribleness, as well as the certainty, of his punishment; and open the gates of salvation to every penitent
Jews - They had their own magistrates as well as their own courts of Justice
Teach, Teacher - His approach to the Old Testament differs from that of Israel's leaders in that his teaching stresses love, Justice, and mercy over external matters
Judges, Book of - The eleven tribes rallied to the Levite's call for Justice; Benjamin defended the town of Gibeah, and civil war followed
Tools - The true levels determined by the measuring line and the plumb line are compared to the Justice and righteousness God required of Israel and Judah (2 Kings 21:13 ; KJV, “plummet”; Isaiah 28:17 ; Amos 7:7-8 )
Death - universal, Genesis 5:1-32 : necessary, that God's Justice may be displayed, and his mercy manifested; desirable to the righteous, Luke 2:28-30
Jehoiakim - Sad contrast to his father Josiah, who "did Justice, and it was well with him
Waterpot - ’ Full Justice, it may be argued, is thus done to the spiritual import of the miracle, which was intended to represent that what the Law with its elaborate ceremonial could not do, Jesus could now do for those unto whom He had come—impart to them the true joy of salvation (cf
Womanliness - It is supremely significant that love, the grace of the home, and not Justice, the virtue of the State, is made the first and greatest commandment (Mark 12:29-31)
Repentance - A striking example is found in Isaiah 1:16-17 : "Take your evil deeds out of my sight! Stop doing wrong, learn to do right! Seek Justice, encourage the oppressed
Gods - If their beloved Law, to which they were constantly appealing, hesitated not to designate as ‘gods’ (אֳלהים) the judges whose partiality and injustice provoked their arraignment by God, and the solemn warning to ‘judge the weak and fatherless, do Justice to the afflicted and destitute’ (Psalms 82:3), surely the charge of blasphemy came badly from those men who recognized in this Law their final court of appeal
Polygamy - "When we reflect, " says he, "that the primitive institution of marriage limited it to one man and one woman; that this institution was adhered to by Noah and his sons, amidst the degeneracy of the age in which they lived, and in spite of the examples of polygamy which the accursed race of Cain had introduced; when we consider how very few (comparatively speaking) the examples of this practice were among the faithful; how much it brought its own punishment with it; and how dubious and equivocal those passages are in which it appears to have the sanction of the divine approbation; when to these reflections we add another, respecting the limited views and temporary nature of the more ancient dispensations and institutions of religion how often the imperfections and even vices of the patriarchs and people of God in old times are recorded, without any express notification of their criminality how much is said to be commanded, which our reverence for the holiness of God and his law will only suffer us to suppose were for wise ends permitted; how frequently the messengers of god adapted themselves to the genius of the people to whom they were sent, and the circumstances of the times in which they lived; above all, when we consider the purity, equity, and benevolence of the Christian law, the explicit declaration of our Lord and his apostle Paul respecting the institution of marriage, its design and limitation; when we reflect, too, on the testimony of the most ancient fathers, who could not possibly be ignorant of the general and common practice of the apostolic church; and, finally, when to these considerations we add those which are founded on Justice to the female sex, and all the regulations of domestic aeconomy and national policy, we must wholly condemn the revival of polygamy
God - Justice
For - Aristotle is for poetical Justice
Pilate - His sense of Justice, compassion, and involuntary respect for the Holy Sufferer yielded to his selfishness, worldly policy, and cynical unbelief
Poor (Person), Weak (Person) - He also warns that if men fail to provide Justice, He will do so ( Dionysius of Alexandria - The former therefore affirmed that to divide the ὑπόστασις was to make separate gods; the latter affirmed with equal Justice that there could be no Trinity unless each ὑπόστασις was distinct
Altar - In Revelation 14:18 the prophet sees an angel come out from the altar, the spirit or genius of fire, an Iranian conception; and in Revelation 16:7 he personifies the altar itself and makes it proclaim the truth and Justice of God
Alexander - Alexander said that he had granted this exemption only to the Jews, and that at his return he would inquire into the affair, and do them Justice
Pharisees - ...
The history of Pharisaism enables us to understand its spirit and ruling ideas, to do Justice to its greatness, while emphasizing its limitations and defects
Altar - In Revelation 14:18 the prophet sees an angel come out from the altar, the spirit or genius of fire, an Iranian conception; and in Revelation 16:7 he personifies the altar itself and makes it proclaim the truth and Justice of God
God - Yahweh was not a despot whose actions were irrational, but he acted according to the principles of Justice that he had set forth in the Torah, and he required that Israel operate by the same standard of Justice. While human beings would argue the issue on the level of Justice, God would prefer to argue it on the level of grace
Sin - The death of the newly born child and the subsequent distractions arising out of the affair of Absalom are looked on as expressions of God’s wrath and of retributive Justice (see 2 Samuel 12:10-18 ). The love of money, with its attendant evils of injustice, and robbery of the poor by the wealthy, is inveighed against by both Amos and Hosea as deserving of the wrath of God (cf. ), and it may be said that it is owing to the preaching of these four prophets that the centre of gravity, as it were, of sin is changed, and the principles of universal Justice and love, as the fundamental attributes of Jehovah’s character and rule, are established
Isaiah - The character of true religion was absent; they needed to desist from evil, to learn to do good, to seek Justice, correct oppression, defend the fatherless, plead for the widow (Isaiah 1:17 ). Indeed, they mimicked sarcastically Isaiah's plain speech as childish prattle, to which he retorted that if they did not understand simple Hebrew, Yahweh would speak to them in Assyrian! Yet, those that trusted in God stood on a firm foundation, a foundation laid in righteousness and Justice
Economic Life - ...
Because of the importance this distribution held for the well-being of the people, the threshing floor gradually became associated with the administration of Justice for the community. Similarly, Ruth's coming to Boaz as he lay on the threshing floor after the winnowing (Ruth 3:8-14 ) may have been an attempt to obtain Justice regarding the ownership of her dead husband's estate
Meekness (2) - There are those who, by natural disposition, are timid and compliant, who have not manliness enough to resent injustice, who do not retaliate when they are wronged simply because they dare not. But this gentle and peaceable disposition is not inconsistent with a burning indignation at the injustice and evil conduct of men, when wider interests are concerned. According to the Russian moralist, who has preached with great power the Quaker doctrine of non-resistance to evil, the old right of requital was abolished by Christ; not only should there be no private retaliation against wrong, but there should be no recourse to any legal tribunal when one has suffered injury or injustice. Against this interpretation of the law of Christ in an absolute sense we have to set not only Christ’s own example, when in the sacred name of Justice He challenged the man who smote Him at the bar of judgment (John 18:23), but also the whole tenor of the Christian law. So long as there is any reasonable hope that meek endurance of wrong will turn the wrongdoer to a better frame of mind, we should be willing to suffer injustice; but when that hope has proved itself vain, there is nothing inconsistent with the spirit of meekness and Christian love in securing that Justice shall be done and evil defeated by the procedure of civil law
Pilate - The Jews, when they saw that Roman Justice might win and Jesus be released, held over Pilate the threat of a report to the Emperor on his conduct. That Pilate had a tender enough conscience or a sound enough idea of Justice to try to save this ‘slave,’ should be remembered to his credit
David - “Of the increase of his government and peace there shall be no end, upon the throne of David, and upon his kingdom, to order it, and to establish it with judgment and with Justice from henceforth even forever” (Isaiah 9:7 )
Violence - Lawlor...
See also Judgment ; Justice ; Providence of God ; War, Holy War ; Wrath of God ...
Bibliography
Habakkuk, Theology of - The prophet Habakkuk faced the violence and injustice of King Jehoiakim (609-597 see Jeremiah 22:13-18 ) as well as the cruel onslaught of Babylonia. Human nature is such that if Justice is delayed, they will be swift to do evil
Solomon - " In front of this "house" was another building, which was called the Porch of Pillars, and in front of this again was the "Hall of Judgment," or Throne-room (1 Kings 7:7 ; 10:18-20 ; 2 Chronicles 9:17-19 ), "the King's Gate," where he administered Justice and gave audience to his people
Justification - Balancing this view, the Hebrew conception of Justice also included an important redemptive element
Retaliation - That law could be, at best, but a very rough-and-ready method of dispensing Justice
Isaiah - Isaiah 1:8 , Isaiah 5:1-7 ) of the people to Jahweh, and in their failure to trust Him or to understand that what He required was not sacrifice, which was offered by the people in wearisome abundance, but Justice and humanity (cf
Remember, Remembrance - The call for God to remember his unique relation to Israel does not mean that God always remembers to bless, for in his Justice he will also punish (Jeremiah 14:10 ; Hosea 7:2 ; 8:13 ; 9:9 )
Heathen - The Apostle also does Justice to heathen ethics in Philippians 4:8 -‘an exhortation,’ as Weizsäcker says (Apostolic Age, ii
Blood - (2) Blood further symbolizes the life violently taken (Acts 1:19; Acts 22:20, Romans 3:15, Revelation 16:5), for which the murderer is responsible (Acts 5:28, Revelation 17:6; Revelation 18:24), and liable to the just judgment of God (Revelation 6:10; Revelation 19:2), perhaps, in poetic Justice, a punishment like the crime (cf
Proselytes - Kind treatment in remembrance of Israel's own position as strangers formerly in Egypt (Exodus 22:21; Exodus 23:9; Deuteronomy 10:18-19; Leviticus 19:33-34), Justice (Leviticus 24:22; Deuteronomy 1:16; Deuteronomy 24:17; Deuteronomy 24:19-21), share in gleanings and tithe of the third year (Deuteronomy 14:29), were the stranger's right
Advocate - It is not enough, in our common courts of Justice, between man and man, that many an able and a feeling heart could stand up for poor guilty criminals, and plead their cause
Great, To Be; Heavy - This meaning emerges in Job 32:9: “The great may not be wise, nor may elders understand Justice” (cf
Almsgiving - He exposes also the ugliness of boasting of our giving before God (Luke 18:11 parable of the Pharisee and the Publican); insists that Justice, mercy, and truth are of infinitely greater importance than minute scrupulousness in tithing, and lays down the comprehensive principle that, however there may be opportunities for us to do more than we have been explicitly commanded, yet we never can do more than we owe to God: ‘When ye have done all, say, We are unprofitable servants: we have done that which it was our duty to do’ (Luke 17:10)
Epicureans - Against the diseases of the mind philosophy provides sufficient antidotes; the virtues are its instruments for this purpose; the radical spring of which is prudence, or wisdom, and this instructs men to free their understanding from the clouds of prejudice; to exercise temperance and fortitude in the government of themselves; and to practise Justice toward all others
Judah, Kingdom of - In spite of his pious efforts for the instruction of his people through the princes, Levites, and priests, in God's law (2 Chronicles 17), and for the administration of Justice in the fear of Jehovah (2 Chronicles 19), his affinity with Ahab and Ahaziah nearly cost him his life at Ramoth Gilead (2 Chronicles 18), and again in the wilderness of Edom (2 Kings 3:8-11), and caused the loss of his ships in Ezion Geber (2 Chronicles 20:36-37)
Cloth, Clothing - God's Justice is compared to the fuller's wash soap (Malachi 3:2 )
Priest - ...
The high priest was at the head of all religious affairs, and was the ordinary judge of all difficulties that belonged thereto, and even of the general Justice and judgment of the Jewish nation, as being at the head of all the priests by whom this was administered, Deuteronomy 17:8-12 19:17 21:5 33:8,10 Ezekiel 44:24
Blood - (2) Blood further symbolizes the life violently taken (Acts 1:19; Acts 22:20, Romans 3:15, Revelation 16:5), for which the murderer is responsible (Acts 5:28, Revelation 17:6; Revelation 18:24), and liable to the just judgment of God (Revelation 6:10; Revelation 19:2), perhaps, in poetic Justice, a punishment like the crime (cf
Ethics (2) - Thus we can do full Justice to the moral creed of Jesus only by giving adequate consideration to the circumstance that He lived in intimate sympathy and steadfast accord with the noblest and devoutest thoughts of His people’s Bible. While with painful precision they attend to the tithing of the meanest garden produce, they neglect the weightiest matters of the Law—justice, mercy, and faithfulness (Matthew 23:23). There can be no dubiety as to the purport of ‘justice’ or ‘mercy’ in this passage; they are meant to cover the great social obligations of the ruling to the dependent classes—the non-perversion of the Law, the succour of widows and orphans, the relief of the poor
Persecution - It is being increasingly recognized that the individual has demonstrated the Justice of his claim to the sole possession of this territory. Moral suasion would have made no appeal to the mind of the age, and it was only poetic Justice that the prophet was able to turn the tables on his adversaries. The prophets thus came into collision with current theology, for they declared that Jahweh was not simply the God of Israel, but the God of righteousness, and they came up against popular religion, for they identified religion with the practice of social Justice
Day of the Lord, God, Christ, the - The reason for such calamity lies in Israel's failure to do Justice (5:7,10-12) and her devotion to gods other than Yahweh (5:25-27). There is Justice after all
Ethics - By grace and not by bare Justice Divine action was guided. Faith, hope, love, transfigure and supplement the ancient virtues, temperance, courage, wisdom, Justice, while around them grow many gentle excellences not recognized before Christ gave them their true rank; and yet it is not by its wealth of moral teaching so much as by its assurance of ability to resist temptation and to attain spiritual manhood that Christianity has gained preeminence
Messiah - In the first the Messiah is portrayed as a military conquering hero, ‘breaking in pieces the oppressor’s mace’; in the second, the sounds of discord cease, and He, sprung from Jesse’s stock, is the ruler of Justice and peace in God’s ‘holy mountain’ of Zion, where even the powers of violence and injustice are turned into submission to a Divine authority. Jeremiah 23:5-8,) he foretells the coming days when a righteous branch or shoot shall be raised unto David, who shall reign prudently and execute judgment and Justice
Fire - Here is expressed to the fullest extent the righteous Justice and judgment of GOD, whereby the sinner suffers forever because of his wickedness, his rebellion, and his refusal to believe GOD. GOD's fierce anger is displayed in all its Justice, righteousness and purity
Baxterianism - "...
The benefits derived to all men equally, from the satisfaction of Christ, he thus states:—...
"All mankind, immediately upon Christ's satisfaction, are redeemed and delivered from that legal necessity of perishing which they were under, (not by remitting sin or punishment directly to them, but by giving up God's jus puniendi [7] into the hands of the Redeemer; nor by giving any right directly to them, but per meram resultantiam [8] this happy change is made for them in their relation, upon the said remitting of God's right and advantage of Justice against them,] and they are given up to the Redeemer as their owner and ruler, to be dealt with upon terms of mercy which have a tendency to their recovery. Faith is a fruit of the death of Christ, (and so is all the good which we do enjoy,) but not directly, as it is satisfaction to Justice; but only remotely, as it proceedeth from that jus dominii [10] which Christ has received to send the Spirit in what measure and TO WHOM HE WILL, and to succeed it accordingly; and as it is...
necessary to the attainment of the farther ends of his death in the certain gathering and saving of THE ELECT
Persecution - This persecution continued several years, with different degrees of severity in many parts of the empire; and was so much the more afflicting, because the Christians generally suffered under the notion of malefactors and traitors, and under an emperor famed for his singular Justice and moderation. Slaughter and piety are quite opposite to each other; nor can truth consist with violence, or Justice with cruelty
Issachar - " Retributive Justice pays blood with blood (Revelation 16:6)
Neonomians - Is faith, or any other grace or act of ours, any atonement for sin, satisfaction to Justice, meriting qualification, or any part of that righteousness for which we are justified at God our Creator's bar
Inheritance - The career of Israel, as a nation, the influence, even the existence, of its religion, would he endangered by the dispossession of Canaan; moreover, it was recognized that as long as the people remained true to Jehovah, He on His part would remain true to them, and would not suffer them to be dispossessed, but would make them dwell securely in their own land, in order that they might establish on their side those conditions of righteousness and Justice which represented the national obligations, if Jehovah’s covenant with them was to be maintained
Incest - They presented individual cases, which served as representatives of the larger body of commonly known law, for the purpose of identifying the relevant principles of Justice
Mennonites - In consequence of this doctrine, they admit none to the sacrament of baptism but persons that are come to the full use of their reason; they neither admit civil rulers into their communion, nor allow any of their members to perform the functions of magistracy; they deny the lawfulness of repelling force by force; and consider war, in all its shapes, as unchristian and unjust: they entertain the utmost aversion to the execution of Justice, and more especially to capital punishments: and they also refuse to confirm their testimony by an oath
Church of England - And since our reformers were men of temper and moderation, it seems but Justice, I am sure it is but reasonable, to think they intended such a latitude as I contend for, so that both parties, the followers of Arminius as well as of Calvin, might subscribe
Love - God’s love is not an irrational emotion divorced from Justice and righteousness, but a firm and steadfast attitude that earnestly desires the well-being of his creatures
Sacrifice - He could not offer his own forfeited life to divine Justice, but in the life of the innocent fellow creature was found a suitable typical representative. ...
Dedication alone would ignore God's holy Justice, between which and our sin there must be an insuperable barrier without atonement
Hosea - Hosea's stress is not upon righteousness and Justice, as was the case with Amos, but the knowledge of God and loyal love
Blood - ...
When Pilate saw that Justice was being distorted at the trial of Jesus, he washed his hands symbolically and declared his own innocence: “I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye to it Proverbs, Book of - ...
Thinking Proverbially The short proverbs in Proverbs 10-29 cover a wealth of topics from wives ( Proverbs 11:22 ; Proverbs 18:22 ; Proverbs 25:24 ) to friends (Proverbs 14:20 ; Proverbs 17:17-18 ; Proverbs 18:17 ; Proverbs 27:6 ), strong drink (Proverbs 23:29-35 ; Proverbs 31:4-7 ), wealth and poverty, Justice and injustice, table manners and social status (Proverbs 23:1-8 ; compare 1618839440_83 ; Luke 14:7-11 ). It is better to be poor and godly: “Better is a little with righteousness than great revenues with injustice” (Proverbs 16:8 ; compare Proverbs 17:23 ;
Elder - In the promised land, elders were also to be appointed to maintain Justice locally (1 Peter 5:1-45 ; 21:18-21 ; 22:15-19 ; Ruth 4:1-12 ), but a higher tribunal of priests and a judge existed for difficult cases (Deuteronomy 17:8-9 )
Fall, the - God himself did not change; humanity broke the covenant relationship and true to himself and his Word, God in righteousness and Justice, dealt accordingly
Sadducees (2) - And being themselves in comfortable circumstances, they were satisfied with the present, and felt no special need of a future rectification in the interests of Justice
Ecclesiastes, the Book of - , was mistaken as recommending the Epicurean sensuality against which Paul (1 Corinthians 15:32-33) protests, and was made an objection to the book; but the eating and drinking recommended is that associated with labor, not idleness; with pious "fear of God," not sensual ignoring of the future Judge; the cheerful, contented "eating and drinking" which characterized Judah and Israel under Solomon (1 Kings 4:20), and under Josiah (Jeremiah 22:15, "Did not thy father (Josiah) eat and drink, and do judgment and Justice, and then it was well with him?")...
So Nehemiah enjoins (Nehemiah 8:10-12)
Freedom - Mary's Magnificat stresses God's power and Justice in bringing down the proud and mighty from their thrones while exalting the humble and oppressed (Luke 1:51-53 )
Hymns - ...
Harnack, with Justice, calls the writer an original poet, whose metaphors and similes are excellently chosen and arrest attention by their beauty and strength
Redeem - ” Thus the kinsman-redeemer was responsible for preserving the integrity, life, property, and family name of his close relative or for executing Justice upon his murderer
Diodorus, Presbyter of Antioch - Thus, not without Justice, he has been deemed the virtual parent of Nestorianism and called "a Nestorian before Nestorius
Judgment - The last reluctant sinner is finally separated from the congregation of the righteous, Psalms 1:5 ; and inflexible Justice, so often disregarded, derided, and defied, gives forth their eternal doom! But to the saints this shall be a day of glory and honour
Sacrifice - By his offering of himself once for all, Hebrews 10:3 , he has superseded all other sacrifices, and saves forever all who believe, Ephesians 5:2 Hebrews 9:11-26 ; while without this expiatory sacrifice, divine Justice could never have relaxed its hold on a single human soul
Hebrews - Within the last few years they have received more Justice at the hands of some of the European states; but they have usually held their possessions by a very precarious tenure
Joab - ...
Joab next, by the wise woman of Tekoa and her parable, induced the king to restore Absalom, which Joab saw was David's own wish, though Justice constrained him to severity
Lactantius - He seems to be of opinion that the Word was generated in time; but it is an easy matter to give a Catholic sense to that expression, as we have seen it done to others: and we may be with Justice allowed to do so, since he plainly establishes the Divinity of the Word in that very place
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - Eutyches was then introduced, and made his statement, beginning, "I commend myself to the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, and the true verdict of your Justice. " It was read by Beronicianus, the secretary of the imperial consistory, and stated that "at the recent council at Ephesus, this good ( χρηστός ) Dioscorus, disregarding Justice, and supporting Eutyches in heresy—having also gained power by bribes, and assembled a disorderly multitude—did all he could to ruin the Catholic faith, and to establish the heresy of Eutyches, and condemned us: I desire, therefore, that he be called to account, and that the records of his proceedings against us be examined. " "Was Flavian," asked Paschasinus, "allowed such freedom of speech as this man takes?" "No," said the magistrates significantly; "but then this council is being carried on with Justice" ( ib
Sin - Risking oversimplification, among the most common Hebrew terms, hattat [1] means a missing of a standard, mark, or goal; pesa [2] means the breach of a relationship or rebellion; awon [3] means perverseness; segagah [2] signifies error or mistake; resa [2] means godlessness, injustice, and wickedness; and amal [6], when it refers to sin, means mischief or oppression. They trample on the heads of the poor as upon the dust of the ground and deny Justice to the oppressed" (Amos 2:6-7 ). It does not even exist in the sense that love or Justice do
Baruch, Apocalypse of - The capture of Jerusalem, and the vindication of God’s power and Justice in respect to it. 4); after seven days God reveals to him that Justice will be done on the heathen (xiii
Isaac - The idea though wrong in its application, rested on a primeval tradition of God's Justice having appointed the sacrifice of precious life as the atonement for sin
Judgment - This exhibits the vital union of righteous souls with Christ, for the new life which His disciples obtain through Him would dispose them to pronounce judgment upon the same principles of Justice as does their Lord
Hopkinsians - Universal good-will also implies the whole of the duty we owe to our neighbour, for Justice, truth, and faithfulness, are comprised in universal benevolence; so are temperance and chastity. This is the source of all falsehood, injustice, and oppression, as it excites mankind by undue methods to invade the property of others
Temptation - ’ This statement seems to be contradicted by Jesus’ quotation from Deuteronomy 6:16 in His answer to the second temptation in Matthew 4:7, as well as by the sixth petition of the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:13); but tempting God does not mean soliciting Him to sin, but trying His Justice and patience, challenging Him to give proof of His perfection to such a degree as to incur His displeasure, and to expose oneself to His judgment; and the temptations into which God is asked not to lead us, are the circumstances or the states of mind which, though to the strong they might prove the opportunities of winning ‘the crown of life’ (James 1:12), to weakness may be the occasions of failure and transgression
Jehoshaphat - O our God, wilt Thou not judge (do us Justice on) them? For we have no might against this great company
Names of God - He would establish a new kingdom of Justice
Angels - Worship and service are their twofold function; priests in the heavenly temple (Isaiah 6:1-3; 1 Kings 22:19; Daniel 7:9-10; Revelation 5:11), and sent forth thence on God's missions of love and Justice
Pope - They are divided into different congregations for the more easy despatch of business; and some of them have the principal offices in the pontiffical court; as that of cardinal, vicar, penitentiary, chancellor, chamberlain, prefect of the signature of Justice, prefect of memorials, and secretary of state
Free Will - We can conceive that He might have made the material universe other than He has made it, but we cannot conceive Him as acting otherwise than in love and holiness and Justice
Abraham - As far as his present and past are concerned, it but sets forth retributive Justice redressing for him and Dives alike the unequal balance of earth
Hopkinsians - Justice, truth, and faithfulness, are comprised in universal benevolence. It is the foundation of all covetousness and sensuality; of all falsehood, injustice, and oppression; as it excites mankind, by undue methods, to invade the property of others
Law - A — 1: νόμος (Strong's #3551 — Noun Masculine — nomos — nom'-os ) akin to nemo, "to divide out, distribute," primarily meant "that which is assigned;" hence, "usage, custom," and then, "law, law as prescribed by custom, or by statute;" the word ethos, "custom," was retained for unwritten "law," while nomos became the established name for "law" as decreed by a state and set up as the standard for the administration of Justice
Philemon Epistle to - ’ Finally, as if apologizing, with winning courtesy and confidence, for the injustice he has been doing to Philemon through superabundant intercession, ‘I well know,’ he declares, ‘that thou wilt perform even beyond what I ask. … His success must be a triumph of love, and nothing be demanded for the sake of the Justice which could have claimed everything
Abraham - As far as his present and past are concerned, it but sets forth retributive Justice redressing for him and Dives alike the unequal balance of earth
Omnipotence - Holiness, Justice, faithfulness, love, are the innermost attributes of God, and they also represent the goal of human life; and in the measure man attains to these, does he attain to union with God
Temptation - ’ This statement seems to be contradicted by Jesus’ quotation from Deuteronomy 6:16 in His answer to the second temptation in Matthew 4:7, as well as by the sixth petition of the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:13); but tempting God does not mean soliciting Him to sin, but trying His Justice and patience, challenging Him to give proof of His perfection to such a degree as to incur His displeasure, and to expose oneself to His judgment; and the temptations into which God is asked not to lead us, are the circumstances or the states of mind which, though to the strong they might prove the opportunities of winning ‘the crown of life’ (James 1:12), to weakness may be the occasions of failure and transgression
Sea - Paul’s Bay, between the little island of Salmonetta and the mainland of Melita, they ran the vessel aground (Acts 27:41); Going on shore, the barbarians, seeing a viper clinging to Paul’s hand, regarded him as a murderer, whom, though he had escaped from the sea, the goddess Justice would not suffer to live (Acts 28:4)
Prophecy, Prophet - God would accept his people’s worship only if they conducted themselves with righteousness before him and Justice to others (Isaiah 1:12-17; Amos 5:21-24; Micah 6:6-8)
Government - The elders regularly dispensed Justice at the city gate (Deuteronomy 21:19 )
Nahum - This plea is followed by the statement that such a literary form points to a late origin; and consequently the prologue is held to have been composed or constructed in the post-exilic period, and prefixed as an appropriate Introduction to the oracle of Nahum on account of its expression of the general principle of God’s avenging Justice, of which the drama of Nineveh was supposed to afford a striking illustration
Apocrypha - Second Esdras centers around the theme of God's Justice in the light of the devastating defeat of his people Israel by a godless nation
Ransom (2) - ’ It may thus be used, as in 1 Samuel 12:3 above, of a bribe given to blind the eyes from seeing what, in Justice, they ought to see (cf
Conscience - The conscience censures the selfishness of the Unjust Judge ( Luke 18:6 ), and assents to the injunction of considerateness and Justice ( Philippians 2:4 )
King, Christ as - His reign would be supranational and everlasting, possessing divine characteristics, restoring peace and Justice (9:2-7; 11:1-10)
Mary - The Justice of God, though permitting a substitute and surety, will not permit that substitute and surety in any other nature than man
Carpocrates, Philospher - According to Hippolytus, Carpocrates taught that Jesus surpassed other men in Justice and integrity ( σωφροσύνῃ καὶ ἀρετῇ καὶ βίῳ δικαιοσύνης , Epiphanius), and no doubt our Lord's example might have been cited only in reference to freedom from Jewish ceremonial obligations; yet the version of Irenaeus seems more trustworthy, which does not suggest that the superiority of Jesus consisted in anything but the clearer apprehension of eternal truths which His intellect retained
Trial of Jesus - ]'>[2] But the Talmud represents a much later phase of Jewish jurisprudence, and it is probable that, viewed in the light of contemporary practice, the Council were careful on the whole to observe the letter, though not the spirit, of Justice, and to practise most of the forms of legality. Thereafter the proceedings are destitute of Justice; Pilate is concerned not with his legal duty, but with the interests of his personal safety and popularity, which were endangered by his conscientious desire to release the prisoner
Boyhood of Jesus - a Roman governor had been appointed over Judaea, and Roman law and Justice, however defective at times, at least ensured safety for the Boy who had been sought for ten or eleven years before as an Infant. If this was so, their action would be somewhat similar to that in a British court of Justice where a distinguished visitor, or even witness, is sometimes complimented by an invitation to ‘take a seat on the Bench
Zechariah, Book of - Rather than fast they should observe the teachings of the earlier prophets concerning Justice and mercy
Family - Steadfast love (heed) was the basis of the covenant which created a sense of loyalty, Justice, and high regard
Stranger, Alien, Foreigner - In one of His last discourses He taught that the stranger was, along with others whom He named, one of His ‘brethren’ or next of kin, who had the right to the same ministering love which had been shown toward Himself, and solemnly said that men’s final acceptance before Him as their Judge depended upon their recognizing and doing Justice to that right
Prophecy, Prophets - For example, God's past blessing and future judgment should provoke social Justice and mercy for the disadvantaged
God - He works for the right, seeking to extend righteousness and Justice throughout the world
Animals - Murray, The Cosmic Covenant: Biblical Themes of Justice, Peace and the Integrity of Creation
Census - This latter mustering merely consisted in registering those already numbered in the public records according to their families and fathers' houses; probably according to Jethro's suggestion of classification for administering Justice, namely, in thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens (Exodus 18:25)
Babylon, History And Religion of - This standing stone, now in the Louvre, preserves some 282 laws governing various aspects of life and regulating Justice to three recognized levels of society
Creation - ...
From this point of view we are able to state the significance of the Scripture account of creation in a way which does Justice at once to its unrivalled religious value and to its lack of scientific corroboration
Gospel - Yet the spiritually poor are primarily in viewpeople broken and grieved by misery and poverty, oppression and injustice, suffering and death, national apostasy and personal sin, who in their extremity cry out to God to bring forth Justice, bestow his mercy, and establish his kingdom (Matthew 5:3-10 )
Person, Personhood - Volitional/spiritual yearning is also assigned to the nepes [ Psalm 42:1-2 ) and Justice (Isaiah 26:8-9 ), but also for evil (Proverbs 21:10 ) and political power (2 Samuel 3:21 )
Heart - —Jesus attacked, sometimes with fiery indignation, the superficiality of that righteousness which was based on a punctilious attention to certain prescribed observances,—the tithing of mint and cummin, when Justice, mercy, and the faith of the heart were neglected (Matthew 23:23, Luke 11:42); the fastings which had no genuine penitence behind them (Matthew 6:17-18); the careful washing of hands, while the heart was inwardly defiled (Matthew 15:2-3)
Silence - He dared not be true to his own high function of asserting the impartial Justice of Imperial Rome, and the result was moral ruin
Commandments - Jesus does not definitely abrogate the ritual ordinances (‘ye ought not to leave the other undone,’ Matthew 19:18-19,1), but He makes the distinction plain between these and the higher obligations, Justice, mercy, and faith
Family (Jesus) - A like care to secure Justice for women appears in the narrative preserved in John 8:1-11
Diocletian, Emperor - Altars were set up in every court of Justice, and both parties to suits compelled to sacrifice
Heart - —Jesus attacked, sometimes with fiery indignation, the superficiality of that righteousness which was based on a punctilious attention to certain prescribed observances,—the tithing of mint and cummin, when Justice, mercy, and the faith of the heart were neglected (Matthew 23:23, Luke 11:42); the fastings which had no genuine penitence behind them (Matthew 6:17-18); the careful washing of hands, while the heart was inwardly defiled (Matthew 15:2-3)
God - God can neither increase nor decrease in knowledge, love, righteousness, truth, wisdom or Justice, because he possesses these attributes in perfection (Exodus 34:6-7)
Law - ...
Israel’s law-code was suited to the customs of the time and was designed to administer Justice within the established culture
Vicarious Sacrifice - As far as the words ‘Vicarious sacrifice’ are concerned, they can be used in either sense, for Christ’s sacrifice would be vicarious if it were made to propitiate the offended dignity of God, or uphold His Justice, or maintain His law, or satisfy the demands of His ethical life, or reveal the content of His ethical nature in a supreme manifestation of saving love. ’...
We conclude, therefore, that we do not find in the Synoptics any teaching which warrants the theological deduction often made, that the vicarious sacrifice of Christ is an offering made to satisfy the Justice of God, propitiate Him in the sense of removing His displeasure, or secure the remission of sins by removing objective obstacles to the free movement of God’s grace
Socialism - Christ condemns the rich and blesses the poor; He teaches brotherhood, social service, and the abnegation of private possessions; He teaches that men are to strive to bring about a Divine Kingdom of Justice on the earth, and that they will finally be judged by their works of mercy to those whom the world despises. This is almsgiving, but, unlike modern almsgiving, it is based on a definite principle of Justice
Jesus Christ - There is no historical task which is more important than to set forth the life and teaching of Jesus Christ, and none to which it is so difficult to do Justice. The hypothesis which seems to do Justice to both sets of phenomena is that John was only the author in a similar sense to that in which Peter was the author of Mk
Divinity of Christ - Obviously it is gain to be able to review the doctrinal process and results of the past, to disentangle the Divine Truth from its temporary formulation, and to elaborate it anew in such wise as will subserve the highest interests of men to-day, as well as do Justice to its own ever fresh wealth of content. Subsequent theology accepted the assurance, departed widely from the purely Messianic portraiture, yet claimed, and with perfect Justice, that the new departures were in no sense new additions to the original Gospel, but fresh interpretations, designed to recover and vitalize truths discernible in the Gospels, but imperfectly understood by the Gospel writers
Messiah - He also elected princes to govern the Jews in their march towards the Holy Land, and to minister Justice to them when they should be possessed of it. When Sabatai was before the Cadi (or Justice of peace, ) some affirmed they saw a pillar of fire between him and the Cadi; and after some had affirmed it, others were ready to swear it, and did swear it also; and this was presently believed by the Jews of that city
Augustine - ' If any harsher expressions have escaped his pen, (as commonly it happeneth in the heats of a disputation,) they are to be qualified by this last rule, and by that before, in which it was affirmed, that ‘God could not with Justice judge and condemn the world, if all men's sins proceeded not from their own free will, but from some overruling providence which inforced them to it. In the tenth chapter of his work against the Manichaeans, the bishop of Hippo thus expresses himself: ‘Who is it that will not exclaim, How foolish it is to deliver precepts to that man who is not at liberty to perform what is commanded! And how unjust it is to condemn him who had not power to fulfil the commands! Yet these unhappy persons [11] do not perceive that they are ascribing such injustice and want of equity to God. If, however, an estimate may be formed of what this father intended in his various pacificatory doctrinal explanations from what he has actually admitted and expressed, it may be safely affirmed that no systematic writer of theology seems so completely to have entered into the last and best views of the bishop of Hippo, or so nearly reconciled the apparent discordances in them, as Arminius has done; and few other authors have rendered more ample Justice to his sentiments, talents, and character, than the famous Dutch Professor
Revelation, Book of - More particularly the Letters to the Churches are of value as criticism and Inspiration for various classes of Christians, while its pictures of the New Jerusalem and its insistence upon the moral qualifications for the citizens of the Messianic Kingdom are in themselves notable incentives to right living: Stript of its apocalyptic figures, the book presents a noble ideal of Christian character, an assurance of the unfailing Justice of God, and a prophecy of the victory of Christianity over a brutal social order
Synagogue - The general management of the synagogue of a Jewish town, where it served also as a court of Justice and in the smaller towns and villages at least as a school, was in the hands of the elders of the community
Destroy, Destruction - Adamiak, Justice and History in the Old Testament ; P
Heaven - And as for others, who are excluded from their society, they will think themselves obliged, out of a due regard to the Justice and holiness of God to acquiesce in his righteous judgments
Egypt - Other gods, like Maat (“truth,” “justice”), personified abstract concepts
High Place, Sanctuary - Thither were brought the tithes and other thankofferings for the good gifts of God; thither men resorted to consult the priestly oracle , to inquire of the ‘Lord’ in cases of difficulty; and there Justice was administered in the name of J″ Flood, the - Only the traditional universalist understanding does full Justice to all the biblical data, and this interpretation is crucial for flood theology in Genesis and for the theological implications drawn by later biblical writers
Mission - To reject divinely sent messengers and their message will mean, even for the sons of Israel, receiving the retributive Justice and forfeiting kingdom blessings at the last judgment (Matthew 22:1-14 ; Luke 14:17 )
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - He was the god of Justice, feared by evildoers
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - The writer of Kings recognizes that God's Justice does not always work out in every way the same; Manasseh lived a long time (2 Kings 21 ; 24:3-4 ), while Josiah died in battle, a fateful omen for the nation (2 Kings 23:29 )
Adam (1) - As the flaming sword represents Justice excluding man's access by his own righteousness, so the cherubim represents man reunited to God upon the ground of the mercy-seat, which is Christ our propitiatory
Historical - But the question remains, How far can metaphysics discharge its task? And, again, Can it do Justice to the Christian origins? Idealistic interpreters of Christianity are very willing to undertake the championship of the Christ idea (e
Kenosis - ‘The Kenotic theories are commendable as attempts to do Justice to the historical personality of Jesus, while assuming the ecclesiastical dogma; but are unsatisfactory in putting an undue strain on the passages in the New Testament which are supposed to teach the doctrine, and in venturing on bold assertions about the constitution of deity, which go far beyond the compass of our intelligence in these high matters’ (The Ritschlian Theology, p
Manliness - They do not condemn, however, the establishment of just government by force of arms, nor an appeal to Justice and a desire for its vindication by force, nor the use of arms in the protection of the weak
Knowledge - Masters are required to carry out all their duties with Justice and fairness, for they know that they have to account to their Unseen Master, the Lord in heaven (Colossians 3:22 ff
Esdras, the Second Book of - Their purpose is to shed light on the mysteries of the moral world, and restore the faith in God and reliance on His Justice which had been shaken by the downfall of Jerusalem
Paul as Sold Under Sin - There is a depth of misery in being so sold there is a bleak and blank hopelessness in being so sold: nay, there is a certain self-revenging admission of Justice in being so sold, that all goes to make up this uttermost agony of the self-sold slave
Brotherhood (2) - ...
When the law of brotherhood is lived out in sincerity and truth, in Justice and righteousness, in courage and faith, in all wisdom and spiritual understanding, the solution of social problems will be hastened. And it is precisely because Christ’s ideas of brotherhood have grown clearer to men’s minds that they feel the inequalities and injustices of the present order
Mediator - He undertook, on the part of the supreme Lawgiver, that the sins of those who repent shall be forgiven; and he fulfilled this undertaking by offering, in their stead, a satisfaction to divine Justice
Athanasius, Archbishop of Alexandria - He began by writing to Athanasius in behalf of Arius, and urging that, as a man whose opinions had been seriously misrepresented, he ought in Justice to be received to church communion. Athanasius, expecting no Justice from a synod held under such circumstances, persisted, Sozomen says (ii
Criticism - As Ullmann insisted, Strauss was by his own fundamental philosophical assumptions debarred from doing Justice to the Person of Jesus. Strauss felt, it would seem, the Justice of Baur’s reproof, viz
Donatus And Donatism - All heretics are, in one sense, schismatics, but all schismatics are not heretics; and the Donatists themselves protested, with Justice, against being considered heretics. They invaded pagan temples that death might be found from the sword of some infuriated idolator; they entered courts of Justice and frightened judges ordered their instant execution; travellers were stopped and threatened with instant death if they did not slay the suppliants
Eusebius of Caesarea - Constantine desired pacification but was not insensible to Justice; and the personal pleadings of Athanasius convinced him that Justice had been outraged (Ap 100 Arian
Jews - He was soon after smitten with a most loathsome and tormenting disease, and died, a signal example of divine Justice, about a year and a quarter after the birth of our Saviour, and in the thirty-seventh year of his reign, computing from the time he was declared king by the Romans. ) Archelaus acted with great cruelty and injustice; and in the tenth year of his government, upon a regular complaint being made against him by the Jews, Augustus banished him to Vienne, in Gaul, where he died. Justice was administered in the name and by the laws of Rome; though in what concerned their religion, their own laws, and the power of the high priest, and sanhedrim, or great council, were continued to them; and they were allowed to examine witnesses, and exercise an inferior jurisdiction in other causes, subject to the control of the Romans, to whom their tetrarchs or kings were also subject; and it may be remarked that, at this very period of time, our Saviour, who was now in the twelfth year of his age, being at Jerusalem with Joseph and Mary upon occasion of the passover, appeared first in the temple in his prophetic office, and in the business of his Father, on which he was sent, sitting among the doctors of the temple, and declaring the truth of God to them
Jesus Christ - No one ever bore this name with so much Justice, nor so perfectly fulfilled the signification of it, as Jesus Christ, who saves even from sin and hell, and hath merited heaven for us by the price of his blood. He does not merely exhibit a life of strict Justice, but of overflowing benignity
Justinianus i, Emperor - Oppressive as taxation had been before, he seems to have made it even more stringent; and when the land-tax and other ordinary sources of revenue failed, he was driven to such expedients as the sale of public offices, and even to the prostitution of Justice and the confiscation of the property of private persons. The administration of Justice must have been greatly improved by the promulgation of the whole binding law in the Codex, Pandects , and Institutes ; and great importance was evidently attached to the maintenance of the law schools of Berytus and Constantinople; corruption may, however, have largely prevailed among the judges
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - —This Apology—the greatest of his works—was a cry for bare Justice. —The authenticity and integrity of the treatise, as usually printed, have both been disputed; the latter with Justice, the former needlessly, and principally on account of the discredit attaching to the latter portion
Servant of the Lord - But the strongest argument for the correctness of this identification is to be found in the fact that it does fuller Justice to the general tenor of the passages: this is perfectly clear in Isaiah 42:1-4 ; here the Divine speech and the writer’s mind are alike filled with two subjects the Servant and the Nations of the world; the servant is to instruct the nations in the religion of Jahweh: granted that the servant is Israel, we have here a constantly recurring contrast, Israel and the nations; otherwise Israel is totally disregarded
Judges, Theology of - For it was in faith that Gideon, Barak, Jephthah, and Samson "conquered kingdoms, administered Justice, and gained what was promised" (Hebrews 11:32-33 )
Deuteronomy, the Book of - The second discourse begins with the Ten Commandments, the basis of the law, and develops and applies the first table; next declares special statutes as to:...
(1) religion,...
(2) administration of Justice and public officers,...
(3) private and social duties
Baptism - "...
Since God, against whom we have sinned, is satisfied with Him (and God cannot but be so, seeing it was the Father's love and Justice which provided Him), so also may we
Paul as a Believing Man - " When the two thieves died on their two crosses on Calvary, ay and even after their dead bodies were burned to ashes in Gehenna, there would still come up to the courts of Justice in Jerusalem, complaints plaints and accusations against those two malefactors from all parts of the land
Law - , sacrifices and positive ordinances, as the sabbath, were to be observed, but not made the plea for setting aside the moral duties, Justice, love, truth, obedience, which are eternally obligatory
Elect, Election - God's choices and decisions are fully consistent with his eternal wisdom, goodness, Justice, fairness, and love
Satan (2) - He is recognized as a minister of the Divine Justice, although God does tax him with overdoing his part
Sadducees - Hence the Pharisees won, but only by doing full Justice to the Sadducean position
Woe - Matthew 15:14 || Luke 6:39); as, for example, when they subverted truth and Justice by the sophistical distinctions they made in regard to the binding nature of different kinds of oaths (Matthew 23:16-22, cf
Old Testament in the New Testament, the - These examples do scant Justice to the extent to which the exodus is used as a "type" of the salvation now to be experienced in Christ
Golden Rule - ‘The negative confines us to the region of Justice; the positive takes us into the region of generosity or grace, and so embraces both law and prophets’ (Bruce, Expos
Eschatology - This is a hard, perhaps an insoluble, problem; but it is not peculiar to eschatology; for it confronts us wherever the ideas of forgiveness and Justice are placed side by side
Individuality - But in life it is not the persons who are themselves colourless who do most Justice to the individuality of others
Essenes - They bound themselves by a fearful oath to reverence God; to do Justice; hurt no man voluntarily or on command; obey the officials; conceal nothing from fellow-members, and divulge nothing of their affairs even at the risk of death; be honest and humble; communicate doctrines exactly as they had been received; and preserve carefully the sacred books and the names of the angels (ii
Shimei - Another interpretation is to take the text as it stands, and to hear David judicially charging Solomon about a case of too long delayed Justice against a blasphemer of God and the king
Crucifixion - ]'>[3] he was driven thither with goad and scourge along the most frequented streets, that the populace might profit by so signal an exhibition of the terrors of Justice; and a herald went before, bearing a board whereon the victim’s name and offence were inscribed
Wealth - Their leaders' motives for ministry are largely financial (Micah 3:11 )! Instead, they should "Seek Justice, encourage the oppressed
Amazement - Men, seeing and hearing Him, wondered, were awestruck, amazed, astonished, made afraid, with a fear which disquieted their minds and exhibited itself in bodily trembling The confusion by RV under the common rendering ‘amaze,’ ‘amazement’ of two of these groups of terms (θάμβος, θαμβέομαι, ἔκθαμβος, ἐκθαμβέομαι, and ἔκστασις, ἐξίσταμαι), seems scarcely to do Justice to the distinctive implications of either, and especially fails to mark the clear note of the higher implication of ‘awe’ that sounds in the former
Coelestinus, Commonly Called Celestine, b.p. of Rome - They pointed out that the Nicene council had ordered that all causes should be decided where they arose; nor could anyone "believe that our God will inspire a single individual with Justice, and deny it to a large number of bishops sitting in council
Absalom - Let us set on one side all the fathers and mothers in Israel to whom God hath ever said, I know him that he will command his children and his household after him, and they shall keep the way of the Lord, to do Justice and judgment, that the Lord may bring upon Abraham that which He hath spoken of him
War - The firm persuasion that God fights for the good against the wicked, discovers itself in the Old Testament, and accounts for the fact, that, not only in the Hebrew, but also in the Arabic, Syriac, and Chaldaic languages, words, which originally signify Justice, innocence, or uprightness, signify likewise victory; and that words, whose usual meaning is injustice or wickedness, also mean defeat or overthrow
Individuality - But in life it is not the persons who are themselves colourless who do most Justice to the individuality of others
Oaths - It fails to do Justice to the original
Revelation - The problem is to correlate this supernatural content with the historical process by means of which it has been revealed, and to do Justice at once to the superhuman fact and content, and the human media and conditions of the revelation
Seceders - " As this appointment neither condemned the act of the preceding assembly, nor the conduct of the commission, the seceding ministers considered it to be rather an act of grace than of Justice; and therefore, they said, they could not return to the church-courts upon this ground; and they published to the world the reasons of their refusal, and the terms upon which they were willing to return to the communion of the established church
Ethics - To know God was to know how to practice righteousness and Justice
Matthew, Gospel According to - Jesus refers to the sign of Jonah and to the repentance of the Ninevites, to whom, by his preaching, Jonah was a sign; but the First Evangelist sees (with Justice) a type of our Lord’s Resurrection in the story of Jonah in the belly of the whale ( Matthew 12:39 ff
Evangelize, Evangelism - When God acts to save and restore Israel he will relieve physical oppression by release from exile and an establishment of Justice in Messiah's reign (11:4; 29:18-19; 49:13)
Isaiah, Book of - Justice can he done to the prophetic literature only when the brevity of the several pieces is recognized, instead of being obscured by treating several distinct pieces as a single discourse
Homosexuality - Into this world of ruthless sexuality came the biblical message of restraint, Justice, and sexual complementarity, which was revolutionary in its implications
Paul the Apostle - All reality will one day reflect his perfect Justice and glory, even if the human eye cannot yet see or the human mind imagine this
God, Names of - In covenant, matters such as Justice ( Isaiah 61:8 ) and holiness (Leviticus 19:2 ) have an extremely high profile
Minister, Ministration - Matthew 5:25 (the officer of a court of Justice = πράκτωρ, Luke 12:58), Matthew 26:58, Mark 14:54; Mark 14:65, John 7:32; John 7:45-46; John 18:3; John 18:12; John 18:18; John 18:22; John 19:6, Acts 5:22; Acts 5:26 (the Temple police, or apparitors of the Sanhedrin; cf
Saul - Josephus says that Samuel had an inborn love of Justice
Gratianus, Emperor - His first acts were to punish with death some of the prominent instruments of the cruelties committed in the name of Justice and discipline, which had disgraced his father's later years, especially the hated Maximinus. His measures in behalf of the church were often tainted with injustice towards the sects
Expediency - Here we have ‘a good principle basely applied, not in the interests of self-sacrifice, but to cover a violation of Justice and truth’ (J. ), lies in its injustice
Jesuits - They never communicated them to strangers, nor even to the greater part of their own members: they refused to produce them when required by courts of Justice; and by a strange solecism in policy, the civil power in different countries authorized or connived at the establishment of an order of men, whose constitution and laws were concealed with a solicitude which alone was a good reason for having excluded them
Antichrist - Paul, writing out of his own experience of Jewish persecution and Roman Justice and protection, Judaism was the ‘man of lawlessness,’ and Rome the beneficent restraining power
Magi - " The proud monarch, himself also is smitten with a singular disease;—he remains subject to it until he acknowledges the true God; and, upon his recovery, he publicly ascribes to him both the Justice and the mercy of the punishment
Peter, Second Epistle of - This will do Justice to the moral earnestness and the true Christian note of the Epistle
Priscillianus And Priscillianism, Priscillian - They were men little likely to temper Justice with mercy
Song of Songs - Even Budde’s less drastic treatment ecarcely does Justice to the tokens of plan and unity which the book presents
Canaan - The Israelites with reluctance executed the divine Justice
Bible - It gives peace to the conscience, without lowering the holy strictness of God's Justice, but, on the contrary, in Christ "magnifying the law and making it honorable
Baptism - There the same wore is translated by, and with Justice and propriety, for we know no good sense in which we could say he came in water
Calvinists - They maintain that God hath chosen a certain number of the fallen race of Adam in Christ, before the foundation of the world, unto eternal glory, according to his immutable purpose, and of his free grace and love, without at least foresight of faith, good works, or any conditions performed by the creature; and that the rest of mankind he was pleased to pass by, and ordain to dishonour and wrath, for their sins, to the praise of his vindictive Justice
Abortion - In the Old Testament, both orphan (or fatherless; yatom [ Deuteronomy 14:29 ; 24:17-21 ; 26:12-13 ; 16:11,14 ) were echoed by prophets whose demands for social Justice showed they considered orphans, widows, and the like particularly defenseless
Philippians, Theology of - The darker Israel's history became, the brighter burned this hope for such a deliverer, a mighty king, son of David, anointed of the Spirit, a king whose kingdom would be great, an eternal kingdom of goodness and Justice (Isaiah 11:1-5 )
Revelation, Theology of - Only in this way can we do full Justice to both its eschatological tenor and its imminent fulfillment (1:3; 2:16; 3:11; 22:7,10, 12,20). Far from expressing a sub-Christian vindictiveness, as some have supposed, these passages guarantee to victims of the ultimate injustice that God will right their wrong
Ethics - The Greek philosophers, while they differed in their views of that constituted the chief good, were agreed in accepting what are known as the four cardinal virtues-prudence, temperance, fortitude, and Justice-as the basis of their classification
Merit - ...
‘The judgment on men before the heavenly court of Justice takes place with reference to the question whether the man shall live or die—whether he shall be found worthy of the future Kingdom of God or not’ (Weber, p
Collection - 58 he never loses sight of the importance and Justice of the collection, not alone as it affected those who were to receive it, but also as it affected the givers (see Romans 15:27; 2 Corinthians 9:6; 2 Corinthians 8:6 ff; 2 Corinthians 12)
Paul as a Man of Prayer - And thus it was that their fine minds never had full Justice done to them in this life
Joseph - The morality of appropriating the surplus produce and then compelling the people to buy it back, must not be judged by modern standards of Justice, but is defensible, if at all, only in an economic condition where the central government was responsible for the control of a system of irrigation upon which the fertility of the soil and the produce of its cultivation directly depended, and where the private benefit of the individual had to be ignored in view of a peril threatening the community
Force - There is Justice in this argument
David - in His Races - ' Would you know? asks William Law in his beautiful chapter on singing psalms-would you know who is the greatest saint in the world? Well, it is not he who prays most or fasts most; it is not he who gives most alms, or is most eminent for temperance, chastity, or Justice; but it is he who is always thankful to God, who wills everything that God wills, and who receives everything as an instance of God's goodness, and has a heart always ready to praise God for His goodness
Preaching - Abraham commanded his household alter him to keep the way of the Lord, and to do Justice and judgment, Genesis 18:19 ; and Jacob, when his house lapsed to idolatry, remonstrated against it, and exhorted all them that were with him to put away the strange gods, and go up with him to Bethel, Genesis 35:2-3
Division of the Earth - ...
And this furnishes an additional proof of the Justice of the expulsion of the Canaanites, as usurpers, by the Israelites, the rightful possessors of the land of Palestine, under Moses, Joshua, and their successors, when the original grant was renewed to Abraham, Genesis 15:13-21
Physical - He knew and taught in effect that it is with the moral order of things and God’s unerring and all-sufficient administration of it, as the moral Governor of the world, that evil and unjust men have to reckon; and therefore, in the exercise of the magnanimity alike of His love and of His Justice, God dispenses to them, in common with good and just men, a full and free share of His sunshine and rain
Israel, History of - ...
Amos emphasized especially social Justice (Amos 5:24 )
Tabernacle - In order to do Justice to the Priestly writers in their attempts to give literary shape to their ideas of Divine worship, it must be remembered that they were following in the footsteps of Ezekiel (chs
Poetry of the Hebrews - In order to do Justice to these, it is necessary that we transport ourselves as much as we can into the land of Judea, and place before our eyes that scenery and those objects with which the Hebrew writers were conversant
Christ, Christology - I will shepherd the flock with Justice" (34:12,15-16)
Gods, Pagan - Other gods, like Maat (truth and Justice), Sekhmet (war and disease), and Bes (god of childbirth) ruled over aspects of life
Ideal - —One great fault of all non-Christian, or pre-Christian, or imperfectly Christian ideals is their narrowness or one-sidedness: they ignore whole departments of the kingdom of moral worth, and do Justice to one part of human nature at the expense of the rest
Prayer - There can only be true prayer if one is simultaneously actively seeking good; insincere prayer cannot be a substitute for Justice and responsible action
Pharaoh - The divine right, as it used to be called, of every true king is grounded in his wisdom, and in his goodness, and in his truth, and in his Justice; he is the best born, the best brought up, the best read, the best experienced, the largest-minded and the noblest-hearted man in all the land
Christ, Christology - ...
It has been usual to divide the subject into pre-Pauline and Pauline (with post-Pauline) Christology; and the division only does Justice to the great place occupied by St
Oath - To the present writer it appears that the customary views on this subject need considerable revision if they are to be harmonized with the Gospels, with Justice to certain ‘sects’ (Quakers, Mennonites, etc. The question arises whether that is a Christian or a sub-Christian conception of Him; whether the Christian does not tell the truth, in the ordinary course, from far higher motives; and whether, by suddenly accepting an official injunction to ‘believe and shudder’ before Him whom he is usually permitted to love, he does not do an injustice to God and to himself
Death of Christ - Human sins are not just swept aside as inconsequential; God's Justice is shown in that they are borne by the sinless Son of God, and because they are borne, those who have faith in him are justified (Matthew 20:17 )
Synagogue (2) - § 7), the father could no longer be relied upon for the regular instruction of his sons, whilst a centre would have to be found in every village or group of villages for the administration of Justice, and for the transaction of the affairs of the community, in subordination to the recognized authority, whether regal or priestly
Eschatology - Opponents of universalism feel that it seriously undercuts the urgency of the call to repentance and the firmness of God's Justice and ignores too many biblical texts
Revelation, the Book of - The fifth seal (Revelation 1:9 ) is the plea of martyred saints for divine Justice upon their oppressors
Righteous, Righteousness - צְדָקָה, was generally used in a much broader sense than our word ‘justice,’ and denoted social virtue as a whole
Holy Spirit - He will be poured out corporately on all of God's people to bring about Justice, righteousness, and peace (32:15; 34:16), including their descendants forever (44:3; 59:21)
Hellenistic And Biblical Greek - The language of Polybius is closely akin to that of contemporary inscriptions; he does Justice to the demands which the spoken tongue in its development laid upon literary diction
Money (2) - This method of ascertaining the value of the silver coins of the Gospels does Justice to the fact that, in the Roman Empire then, as in Britain now, the value of silver coins was legally defined in terms of the gold standard
Athenagoras - (3) The necessity of the Divine judgment upon men in body and soul, (a ) from the Providence, (b ) from the Justice of God
Brethren of the Lord (2) - Even the Jews, according to Hegesippus, reverenced him for his piety, his unceasing prayers, his life-long Nazirite vow, and above all for his Justice (l
Assumption of Moses - The altar is polluted only by injustice (5:4). 7:6 ‘devourers of the goods … saying that they do so on the ground of Justice (or mercy)
Jesus Christ - He does not merely exhibit a life of strict Justice, but of overflowing benignity
Anger - If men had not been selfish, hypocritical, apathetic to goodness and Justice, there would not have been the tragedy on Calvary
Sin - The word “iniquity” is the best single-word equivalent, although the Latin root iniquitas really means “injustice; unfairness; hostile; adverse. ” Similarly, those who pervert Justice are described as “those who by a word make a man out to be guilty” ( Canon - if we translate the word) might have been some useful compend taken from Scripture, or composed by the wise, for the regulation of Justice and equity between man and man
Prayer - ...
A second objection is, that as God is infinitely wise and good, his wisdom and Justice will lead him to bestow "whatever is fit for us without praying; and if any thing be not fit for us, we cannot obtain it by praying
Government of the Hebrews - If any thing had been neglected, or any wrong had been done, the particular tribe concerned was amenable to the others; and, in case Justice could not be secured in any other way, might be punished with war, Joshua 22:9-34 ; Judges 20:1 , &c
Law of Moses - ( Exodus 23:5-15 ) (3) Perversion of Justice (by bribes, threats, etc
Jerusalem - In punishment for his walking in the Israelite Ahab's idolatries instead of the ways of his father, and for his slaying his brothers, Jehovah smote him with a great stroke, stirring up the spirit of the Philistines and the Arabians near the Ethiopians to break into Judah, slay all his sons except the youngest (in retributive Justice both to himself and his sons: 2 Chronicles 21:4; 2 Chronicles 21:10-20; 2 Chronicles 22:1; 2 Chronicles 24:7), and carry away all the substance in the king's house, and his wives; he himself also died of sore disease by Jehovah's visitation, and was excluded from "the sepulchres of the kings," though buried in the city of David
Romans, Theology of - ) Yet in spite of the special advantage of the Jews in being entrusted with the oracles of God (3:2), they are now no better off under the leveling Justice of God (3:9)
Hell - Dante, the greatest apocalyptist of subsequent ages, had caught the true evangelical spirit of this most awful doctrine when he wrote:...
‘Justice incited my sublime Creator;...
Created me divine Omnipotence,...
The highest Wisdom and the primal Love’...
(Inferno, iii
Preaching - Abraham commanded his household after him to keep the way of the Lord, and to do Justice and judgment, Genesis 18:19 ; and Jacob, when his house lapsed to idolatry, remonstrated against it, and exhorted them and all that were with him to put away strange gods, and to go up with him to Bethel, Genesis 25:2-3
Anger (2) - Yet when we read the Gospels with the idea of anger in our minds, we can easily see that Justice is done to it both as a virtue and a vice
Egypt - Justice herself puts to death without formality
Baptism - " There the same word, εν , is translated by; and with Justice and propriety; for we know no good sense in which we could say he came in water
Adam - It expresses, by an easy figure, the exactness of truth, Justice, and obedience; and it comprehends the state and habit both of the heart and the life
Hell - Dante, the greatest apocalyptist of subsequent ages, had caught the true evangelical spirit of this most awful doctrine when he wrote:...
‘Justice incited my sublime Creator;...
Created me divine Omnipotence,...
The highest Wisdom and the primal Love’...
(Inferno, iii
Priest - ...
(2) From this idea of such a treatment of sin as destroys its offensiveness, wiping it out or neutralizing its relation to natural Justice, it is but a step to that of propitiation
Resurrection - It might be said, and said with Justice, that the foregoing views were representative, not of contemporary popular beliefs and ideas, but of conceptions prevalent among the educated and thinking classes
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - Those who believe that atonement includes propitiation maintain that the Justice of God must be reckoned with for the character of God to be consistent
Resurrection - Paul only, as in 2 Corinthians 4:11-14, but the early Church in general, seems to have regarded the Resurrection as a result of Christ’s faith, and also as an act of necessary Justice on God’s part, ‘by the glory of the Father
Ideas (Leading) - While never ignoring the Justice, the righteousness of God, He made His hearers realize the supremacy of the Divine Love
Persecution - Actual or open, by the hand, such as the dragging of innocent persons before the tribunal of Justice, Matthew 10:18
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - ...
The narratives also make it abundantly clear, although not according to the neat formulations of systematic theology, that while God's sovereignty extends to all human actions (both good and evil ) it does not annul human responsibility, nor does it nullify God's Justice or holiness
Sexuality, Human - This interpretation does not do exegetical Justice to the narrative, for the loneliness described in 2:18-20 would be incomprehensible for a sexually undifferentiated creature unaware that he/she was lacking a sexual counterpart
Second Coming of Christ - Acts also has a reference to God's having set a day "when he will judge the world with Justice by the man he has appointed
Eschatology (2) - It has been questioned how far readers of the Gospels get from them a fair impression of the moral and religious influence exercised by the teachers of the Law, and it has been contended, with perhaps some Justice, that the impression so derived is as one-sided as the impression of the Roman Church one naturally gathers from histories of the Protestant Reformation
Luke, Gospel According to - Matthew compiled, not a formal Gospel, but a collection of our Lord’s Utterances, which was incorporated into our First Gospel, and formed so distinctive a feature of it, that the whole book was with some Justice called ‘the Gospel according to St
Mediator - ’ We are also able to do more Justice to the truth that He revealed Himself as already the Messiah during ‘the days of his flesh,’ and did not teach that His Messianic Kingdom was only an affair of the future
Day of Judgment - ...
Obviously the formal concept here is that of the Oriental monarch who establishes a court of Justice, and decrees rewards and punishment
Jeremiah - ...
Jeremiah’s style and powers as a writer have been underestimated; better Justice
Methodists - "Justification," says Mr Wesley, "sometimes means our acquittal at the last day, Matthew 12:37 : but this is altogether out of the present question; for that justification whereof our Articles and Homilies speak, signifies present forgiveness, pardon of sins, and consequently acceptance with God, who therein declares his righteousness, or Justice, and mercy, by or for the remission of sins that are past, Romans 3:25 , saying: ‘I will be merciful to thy unrighteousness, and thine iniquities I will remember no more
Abram - No passage, even in the sacred writings, exhibits a more exalted view of the divine condescension than that in which Abraham is seen expostulating on the apparent injustice of involving the innocent in the ruin of the guilty: "Shall the city perish, if fifty, if forty-five, if forty, if thirty, if twenty, if ten righteous men be found within its walls?" "Ten righteous men shall avert its doom. " Such was the promise of the celestial visitant; but the guilt was universal, the ruin inevitable; and the violation of the sacred laws of hospitality and nature, which Lot in his horror attempted to avert by the most revolting expedient, confirmed the Justice of the divine sentence
Julius (5), Bishop of Rome - the whole episcopate]'>[2] ought to have been written to, that so Justice might be done by all
Joseph - His real kindness to them here shows that the severity was used in the interests of Justice and their ultimate good by humiliation, while he retained all a brother's tenderness
Romans, Epistle to the - The Justice of God’s rejection of the Jews cannot be questioned a priori
Babel - " Originally "the gate of the god's" temple, whereat Justice used to be ministered, Babel or Babylon was secondary in importance at first to the other cities, Erech, Ur, and Ellasar
Sanctification - To the sanctified man, who understands that the God who will not let him go is Love and Holiness and Justice, either precepts or principles by themselves, no matter from what source, are as flowers broken off at the root
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - Biblical prophecy is more than "fore-telling": two-thirds of its inscripturated form involves "forth-telling, " that is, setting the truth, Justice, mercy, and righteousness of God against the backdrop of every form of denial of the same
Holy Spirit (2) - An impatient, petulant word, like ‘He is crazy,’ bursting in a moment of aoxiety or irritation or misunderstanding from hearts that at bottom loved Him, was no doubt a sin; His friends ought to have been more capable of doing Him Justice
Church - Tribal and national ideas, often irrational and debasing, had given place to principles of natural right and Justice, Roman law, like the Mosaic Law, was a παιδαγωγός to lead men to Christ
John, Theology of - That there is the slightest inconsistency between the Divine love and the Divine righteousness is incredible; but if God is love, no manifestation of God’s Justice can ever contradict this quintessential principle of His inmost nature
Augustus (2) - Where these roads led, civil government was found established, with a representative of the Emperor or the Senate, and with tribunals for the administration of Justice
Forgiveness (2) - The principle is not to be understood as a kind of Divine lex talionis, as in the parable of the Unmerciful Debtor (Matthew 18:35)—that a man does not deserve mercy himself, if he will not show it to others, though this is true and appeals to a natural sense of Justice
Law - ...
But to teach the self-existence, the unity, the wisdom, and the power of the Deity, nay, even his moral perfections of mercy, Justice, and truth, would have been insufficient to arrest the attention, and command the obedience of a nation, the majority of which looked no farther than mere present objects, and at that early period cherished scarcely any hopes higher than those of a temporal kind,—if, in addition to all this, care had not been taken to represent the providence of God as not only directing the government of the universe by general laws, but also perpetually superintending the conduct and determining the fortune of every nation, of every family, nay, of every individual
Arabia - ...
All this was wonderful; but the avenging Justice of an incensed Deity, and the sure word of prophecy, relieve our astonishment
Materialism - Allowing, however, for a moment, the Justice of the inference, from the premises which have been stated, we must remember, that we have not as yet taken in all the circumstances of the case
Moses - Thus "was God sanctified at the waters of Meribah," by his impartial Justice, in punishing his greatest favourites when they did amiss, Numbers 20:13
Polycarp - Let us remark in passing that this appearance of Polycarp before the proconsul in the open stadium is very unusual from the point of view of the forms of proconsular Justice
Montanus - The Justice of this previous condemnation Praxeas could confirm from his own knowledge of the Montanist churches and their prophesyings; and his testimony had the more weight because, having suffered imprisonment for the faith, he enjoyed the dignity of a martyr
Pharisees (2) - Hillel’s golden rule was negative, while that of Jesus was positive, showing all the difference between Justice and love
Poet - It excites no wonder, for these writers were so impressed with the interest and significance of the connexion, that they did less than Justice to the equally clear phenomenon of the element of indisputable facts that are permanently claimed by history and by science in the Christian religion
Gnosticism - In opposition to them, church writers were led to emphasize the principle that that alone is to be accounted true knowledge of things divine which can be shewn by historical tradition, written or oral, to have been derived from the teaching of Christ and His apostles, a principle the philosophic Justice of which must be admitted if Christ be owned as having filled the part in the enlightenment of the world which orthodox and Gnostics alike attributed to Him
Reformation - In Justice to this pontiff, however, it must be observed, that he showed himself not to be averse to every reformation
Incarnation (2) - ’ From them, again, it has descended, in ever deepening complexity, to the days when the absolute idealism of Hegel is met by the demand to do Justice to the reality and independence of the Self
Basilius, Bishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia - The aspect of a court of Justice with its official state and band of ministers prepared to execute its sentence might inspire awe
Character of Christ - Do Justice to the portrait of Christ, let its harmony and its uniqueness, its profound naturalness and its transcendent loveliness, make their due impression, and the conclusion presses, that the Christ of the Gospels is not a construction but a memory, an actual Figure, once beheld by eyes of flesh, and now discerned through a medium upon which contemporary influences have had no distorting effect, and which, accordingly, permits Him to be known as He was
Christ in the Early Church - With all its mystery, the Catholic faith of Nicaea and Chalcedon was felt by the common Christian conscience alone to satisfy all the different sides of truth as they are contained in Scripture, and to do Justice to all that Christians from the first had believed concerning their Master
Desire - A religious man desires to win the I approbation of the gods; a just man is persuaded that the practice of Justice will bring satisfaction; a man seeks knowledge because it is a satisfaction to know
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - The revenues accruing to the see, thus carefully secured, though with every possible regard to humanity and Justice, were expended according to the fourfold division then prevalent in the West—viz
Apostles - But this language does injustice to the rest of the Gospels, which are equally Gospels of the disciples. Their aims were high; their morals were pure; whatever their ignorance, misconceptions, defects, they were men of integrity, Justice, and mercy; diligent, candid, honest, pious, God-fearing
Authority of Christ - But there are considerations we must keep in mind if we would do Justice to all the facts
Fact And Theory - to the position which does not do Justice to the facts of Christianity, subordinating them to a purely human theory
Methodists, Protestant - He meant by the word perfection, such a degree of the love of God, and the love of man; such a degree of the love of Justice, truth, holiness, and purity, as will remove from the heart every contrary disposition towards God or man; and that this should be our state of mind in every situation and in every circumstance of life
Jerusalem - The particular objects of every species of degradation, these people bow their heads without murmuring; they endure every kind of insult without demanding Justice; they sink beneath repeated blows without sighing; if their head be required, they present it to the scimitar
Lutherans - They stated, that we may so prepare ourselves for grace as to become entitled to it congruously, not as to a debt which in strict Justice God is bound to pay, but as to a grant which it is congruous in him to give, and which it would be inconsistent with his attributes to withhold
Worship - Laws thus receive a force, which, in other circumstances, they could not acquire, even were they enacted in as great perfection; and the administration of Justice is aided by the strongest possible obligation and sanction being given to legal oaths
Nestorius And Nestorianism - "It challenged objection; it was open to misconstruction; it needed some theological insight to do it Justice; it made the perception of the true issue difficult; it stimulated that 'cultus' which has now, in the Roman church, attained proportions so portentous
Originality - How is it possible, asks Havet, with such a picture before us, to speak of Christianity as renewing the face of the earth, or to hail its advent as something entirely new and unexpected? He believes that the heathen world, if left to itself, would not have remained heathen, that its mythology and superstition would gradually have vanished, and that the feeling of human fraternity and the need of equality and Justice would have developed more and more and passed into its manners and laws
Paul (2) - Paul has ample Justice done to him, the Judaean Apostles and the Judaean Church have not
Pelagianism And Pelagius - Jerome was regarded as a chief mover in the prosecution of Pelagius and apparently by way of vengeance a violent and outrageous assault was made upon his monastery at Bethlehem which was ascribed to some of the Pelagian party with what Justice it is not easy to ascertain
Preaching Christ - The arguments from prophecy and from miracles are formal ways of expressing truths which really contain much more than these forms can carry; and our impression of the truths is too direct, immediate, and complex to have Justice done it by such arguments
Theodorus, Bishop of Mopsuestia - that Justice was done by Western writers to the importance of the great Antiochene as a theologian, an expositor, and a precursor of later thought
Christ in Mohammedan Literature - Such will be his Justice that the lion and the sheep will dwell together, and children will play with serpents