What does Jupiter mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Jupiter
See Gods, Pagan ; Greece .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Jupiter
See Gods, Pagan ; Greece .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jupiter
The principal deity of the ancient Greeks and Romans. He was worshipped by them under various epithets. Barnabas was identified with this god by the Lycaonians (Acts 14:12 ), because he was of stately and commanding presence, as they supposed Jupiter to be. There was a temple dedicated to this god outside the gates of Lystra (14:13).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jupiter
JUPITER. This god is not really referred to in the Bible. The Roman god Iuppiter (‘Father of Light’ or ‘of the sky’) was recognized by the Romans as corresponding in attributes to the Greek god Zeus, and hence in modern times the term ‘Zeus’ in the Bible ( 2Ma 6:2 ) has been loosely translated ‘Jupiter.’ The name Zeus is itself cognate with the first part of the word Jupiter , and suggests the ruler of the firmament, who gives light and sends rain, thunder, and other natural phenomena from the sky. He was conceived as having usurped the authority of his father Kronos and become the chief and ruler of all the other gods. As such he was worshipped all over the Greek world in the widest sense of that term. The case of Acts 14:12-13 is further complicated, because there it is not even the Greek Zeus who is referred to, but the native supreme god of the Lycaonians, who was recognized by the author of Acts to correspond, as their chief god, to the Greek Zeus. All that we know of this god is that his temple at Lystra was without the city wall ( Acts 14:13 ), and that Barnabas, as the big silent man, was taken for him. In Acts 19:35 the phrase ‘from Jupiter’ simply means ‘from the sky’ (cf. what is said above).
A. Souter.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Jupiter
(Acts 14:12-13 [1] 19:35 [2])
The Oriental setting of the events which took place at Lystra is strongly evident in the first of these passages. The miracle of healing at once causes the barbarians to suppose that the gods had come to pay them a visit, and the impassive Barnabas is regarded as the chief. ‘True to the oriental character, the Lycaonians regarded the active and energetic preacher as the inferior, and the more silent and statuesque figure as the leader and principal’ (W. M. Ramsay, The Church in the Roman Empire, 1893, p. 57 n. [3] ). It was not that such visits were supposed to be common, but a well-known legend (Ovid, Metam. viii. 626 ff.; cf. Fasti, v. 495ff.) told of such a visit, when the aged couple Philemon and Baucis had alone received the august visitors and had been suitably rewarded; this had been localized in several districts. The people cried out in the speech of Lycaonia, and the original name of the local god given by them to Barnabas has been here replaced by the Greek equivalent, Zeus. In v. 13 Codex Bezae has a slightly different phrase which reads, ‘the temple of Zeus-before-the-city.’ The participle in the phrase τοῦ ὄντος Διὸς Προπόλεως is used in a way characteristic of Acts, viz. to introduce some title or particular phrase, and we must consider that D is correct here. Zöckler (ad loc.) and Ramsay (op. cit. p. 51f.) compare an inscription at Claudiopolis which has Zeus Proastios (i.e. ‘Jupiter-before-the-town’). The title here, then, is Propoleôs, which is actually found in an inscription at Smyrna. The Temple would be outside the city proper, and it is not quite clear whether ‘the gates’ where the sacrifice was prepared were those of the Temple, or of the city, or of the dwelling-house of the apostles. It is most probable that the Temple is referred to, the gates being chosen as a special place for the offering of a special sacrifice (Ramsay).
Baur, Zeller, Overbeck, and Wendt regard the whole incident as unhistorical, since such people would rather have considered that the miracle-workers were magicians or demons. But the local legends give ample support to the text.
In 19:35 the translation should follow Revised Version margin: ‘the Image which fell down from the clear sky.’
Literature.-See R. J. Knowling, Expositor’s Greek Testament , 1900, ad loc.; A. C. McGiffert, Apostolic Age, 1897, p. 189f.
F. W. Worsley.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jupiter
Jupiter (jû'pt-ter). The heathen god worshipped by the Greeks under the name of Zeus. He was supposed to exercise supreme power; but the actions attributed to him were frequently in the highest degree sensual and abominable. Antiochus Epiphanes dedicated the temple at Jerusalem to this deity as Zeus Olympius, that on Gerizim to him as Zeus Xenius, the "defender of strangers." 2 Maccabees 6:2. He is two or three times mentioned in the New Testament. Acts 14:12-13; Acts 19:35.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jupiter
The father that helpeth
Webster's Dictionary - Jupiter
(1):
(n.) The supreme deity, king of gods and men, and reputed to be the son of Saturn and Rhea; Jove. He corresponds to the Greek Zeus.
(2):
(n.) One of the planets, being the brightest except Venus, and the largest of them all, its mean diameter being about 85,000 miles. It revolves about the sun in 4,332.6 days, at a mean distance of 5.2028 from the sun, the earth's mean distance being taken as unity.
King James Dictionary - Jupiter
JU'PITER, n. L. the air or heavens Jovis pater.
1. The supreme deity among the Greeks and Romans. 2. One of the superior planets, remarkable for its brightness. Its diameter is about eighty-nine thousand miles its distance from the sun, four hundred and ninety millions of miles, and its revolution round the sun a little less than twelve years.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jupiter
The supreme god of the heathen Greeks and Romans. He was called the son of Saturn and Ops, and was said to have been born in Crete. The character attributed to him in pagan mythology was a compound of all that is wicked, obscene, and beastly in the catalogue of human crime. Still he was ever described as of noble and dignified appearance and bearing. Barnabas was supposed by the people of Lystra to represent him, Acts 14:12,13 ; 19:35 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jupiter,
Ζεύς.Supreme god of Greece and Rome, though the religious ideas of the two nations differed considerably. At Lystra the heathen inhabitants supposed Jupiter was impersonated by Barnabas, and at Ephesus they professed that the image of Diana had fallen from Jupiter, or heaven. Acts 14:12,13 ; Acts 19:35 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jupiter
The Greek and Roman supreme god. After the cure of the impotent man the people of Lystra called Barnabas (the more commanding in appearance) Jupiter and Paul (the speaker) Mercury, the god of eloquence (Acts 14:12-13, "Jupiter before the city," i.e. his temple was in front of the city). Antiochus Epiphanes (Daniel 8, 11), the Old Testament antichrist, to subvert the Jewish religion, dedicated the temple of Jehovah at Jerusalem to the Greek Olympian Jupiter. (2 Maccabees 6)

Sentence search

Jovicentric - ) Revolving around the planet Jupiter; appearing as viewed from Jupiter
Jove - ) The planet Jupiter. ) The chief divinity of the ancient Romans; Jupiter
Zeus - See Jupiter
Diotrephes - Nourished by Jupiter
Jupiter - After the cure of the impotent man the people of Lystra called Barnabas (the more commanding in appearance) Jupiter and Paul (the speaker) Mercury, the god of eloquence (Acts 14:12-13, "Jupiter before the city," i. Antiochus Epiphanes (Daniel 8, 11), the Old Testament antichrist, to subvert the Jewish religion, dedicated the temple of Jehovah at Jerusalem to the Greek Olympian Jupiter
Jupiter, - At Lystra the heathen inhabitants supposed Jupiter was impersonated by Barnabas, and at Ephesus they professed that the image of Diana had fallen from Jupiter, or heaven
Bacchus - ) The god of wine, son of Jupiter and Semele
Circumjovial - ) One of the moons or satellites of the planet Jupiter
Mercurius - Mythology represented Mercurius as having once visited Phrygia with Jupiter his father, and having been refused hospitality by all except Baucis and Philemon, two old peasants (Ovid, Jupiter once more visiting the earth "in the likeness of men. Barnabas, the more stately and majestic in mien, they called Jupiter (2 Corinthians 10:10)
Ibbartas - ) One of several finback whales of the North Atlantic; - called also Jupiter whale
Jovian - ) Of or pertaining to Jove, or Jupiter (either the deity or the planet)
Taranis - ) A Celtic divinity, regarded as the evil principle, but confounded by the Romans with Jupiter
Mauzzim - " The reference may be to the fact that Antiochus Epiphanes erected a temple to Jupiter Capitolinus at Antioch, and dedicated Jehovah's temple at Jerusalem to Jupiter Olympius (Livy 41:20; 2 Maccabees 6:2)
Mercurius - One of the heathen deities fabled to be the son of Jupiter and Maia. Barnabas and Paul were taken by the people at Lystra for Jupiter and Mercury
Zeus - He was identified with Jupiter
Ammon - or HAMMON, or Jupiter-AMMON, an epithet given to Jupiter in Lybia, where was a celebrated temple of that deity under the denomination of Jupiter Ammon, which was visited by Alexander the Great. He was esteemed the Zeus of Greece, and the Jupiter of Latium, as well as the Ammon of the Egyptians. In process of time, these two names were joined; and he was called Jupiter Ammon. For this reason the city of Ammon, No-ammon, or the city of Ham, was called by the Greeks Diospolis, or the city of Jupiter. Jupiter Ammon, or the Egyptian Jupiter, was usually represented under the figure of a ram; though in some medals he appears of a human shape, having only two ram's horns growing out beneath his ears
Pluto - ) The son of Saturn and Rhea, brother of Jupiter and Neptune; the dark and gloomy god of the Lower World
ju'Piter - Jupiter or Zeus is mentioned in two passages of the New Testament, on the occasion of St. Paul's visit to Lystra, ( Acts 14:12,13 ) where the expression "Jupiter, which was before their city," means that his temple was outside the city
Diana - ) The daughter of Jupiter and Latona; a virgin goddess who presided over hunting, chastity, and marriage; - identified with the Greek goddess Artemis
Mauzzim - He had begun to build a temple to Jupiter Capitolinus in Antioch (Livy, xli. But Antiochus also sent ‘an old man from Athens’ to ‘pollute the temple in Jerusalem, and to call it the temple of Jupiter Olympius’ ( 2Ma 6:2 ). Hence some have claimed consideration for the Olympian Jupiter
Aegis - ) A shield or protective armor; - applied in mythology to the shield of Jupiter which he gave to Minerva
Asteroid - one of the numerous small planets whose orbits lie between those of Mars and Jupiter; - called also planetoids and minor planets
Thunderer - to Jupiter
Pandora - ) A beautiful woman (all-gifted), whom Jupiter caused Vulcan to make out of clay in order to punish the human race, because Prometheus had stolen the fire from heaven. Jupiter gave Pandora a box containing all human ills, which, when the box was opened, escaped and spread over the earth
Minos - ) A king and lawgiver of Crete, fabled to be the son of Jupiter and Europa
Castor And Pollux - Twin sons of Jupiter, and guardians of seamen, according to heathen mythology
Jupiter - Jupiter. The Roman god Iuppiter (‘Father of Light’ or ‘of the sky’) was recognized by the Romans as corresponding in attributes to the Greek god Zeus, and hence in modern times the term ‘Zeus’ in the Bible ( 2Ma 6:2 ) has been loosely translated ‘Jupiter. ’ The name Zeus is itself cognate with the first part of the word Jupiter , and suggests the ruler of the firmament, who gives light and sends rain, thunder, and other natural phenomena from the sky. In Acts 19:35 the phrase ‘from Jupiter’ simply means ‘from the sky’ (cf
Saturn - ) One of the planets of the solar system, next in magnitude to Jupiter, but more remote from the sun. ) One of the elder and principal deities, the son of Coelus and Terra (Heaven and Earth), and the father of Jupiter
Hebe - ) The goddess of youth, daughter of Jupiter and Juno
Ate - ...
In pagan mythology, the goddess of mischief, who was cast down from heaven by Jupiter
Massa Candida - 253) who hurled themselves into a vat of burning lime rather than burn incense to Jupiter
Pleiades - ) The seven daughters of Atlas and the nymph Pleione, fabled to have been made by Jupiter a constellation in the sky
White Company - 253) who hurled themselves into a vat of burning lime rather than burn incense to Jupiter
Mercurius - , "the speaker") of the Greeks (Acts 14:12 ), a heathen God represented as the constant attendant of Jupiter, and the god of eloquence
Partenope - ) One of the asteroids between Mars and Jupiter, descovered by M
Hercules - ) A hero, fabled to have been the son of Jupiter and Alcmena, and celebrated for great strength, esp
Perseus - ) A Grecian legendary hero, son of Jupiter and Danae, who slew the Gorgon Medusa
Jovial - ) Of or pertaining to the god, or the planet, Jupiter
Capitol - ...
(2):...
The temple of Jupiter, at Rome, on the Mona Capitolinus, where the Senate met
Castor - (cass' tawr); POLLUX (pahl' luhx sons of Jupiter ) In Acts 28:11 , the sign or figurehead of the ship which carried Paul from Malta toward Rome
June - ) The sister and wife of Jupiter, the queen of heaven, and the goddess who presided over marriage
Goddess - ...
When the daughter of Jupiter presented herself among a crowd of goddesses, she was distinguished by her graceful stature and superior beauty
Cas'Tor And Pol'Lux, - (Acts 28:11 ) the twin sons of Jupiter and Leda, were regarded as the tutelary divinities of sailors; hence their image was often used as a figure-head for ships
Cassini, Giovanni Domenico - Determined the period of rotation of Jupiter, Venus, and Mars, made researches on lunar librations and on the zodiacal light, advanced a theory of comet motion, discovered four Saturnian satellites, suggested oval paths in place of the ellipses of Kepler which were named Cassinians in his honor, and was first director of the Paris Observatory
Jupiter - Barnabas was identified with this god by the Lycaonians (Acts 14:12 ), because he was of stately and commanding presence, as they supposed Jupiter to be
Olympius - Jupiter
Aelia Capitolina - Temples were erected to Capitoline Jupiter and to Phrygian Astarte
Star of the Wise Men - ) Smith's Bible Dictionary ably disproves the theory of its being a conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn which took place thrice in 7 B. Curiously a star appeared in September, 1604, between Mars and Saturn, after a conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter in Pisces, but at a shorter interval than the star of the Magi after the conjunction in 7 B
Prometheus - Jupiter, being angry at this, sent Mercury to bind Prometheus to Mount Caucasus, where a vulture preyed upon his liver
Orbit - ) The path described by a heavenly body in its periodical revolution around another body; as, the orbit of Jupiter, of the earth, of the moon
Corruptions: Indulgence of - The man of the world in the olden time bowed to the fallen statue of Jupiter, by way of bespeaking the favour of the god in the event of his being again lifted on his pedestal What are those provisions for the flesh, which too many Christians so readily make, but a kind of homage to the old man whom they profess to have renounced? ...
Ammonite - Cornu ammonis, from Jupiter Ammon, whose statues were represented with ram's horns
Vengeance - So also in Acts 28:4 ; though many suppose that the islanders meant the goddess of justice, Dike, whom the Greeks and Romans regarded as a daughter of Jupiter, and feared as an independent, just, and unappeasable deity
Castor - " In heathen mythology, "Castor" and "Pollux" were the names of twin sons of Jupiter, who presided over the destinies of sailors
Zeus - Barnabas was mistaken for Zeus (equivalent of the Roman god, Jupiter) by the people of Lystra after Paul healed a cripple (Acts 14:8-12 )
Phaethon - He is fabled to have obtained permission to drive the chariot of the sun, in doing which his want of skill would have set the world on fire, had he not been struck with a thunderbolt by Jupiter, and hurled headlong into the river Po
Gad (3) - the deity of fortune, a Babylonian idol worshipped by the Jews, answering to either the moon or Jupiter, related to Syriac gado , and Arab jad "good fortune
Conjunction - ) The meeting of two or more stars or planets in the same degree of the zodiac; as, the conjunction of the moon with the sun, or of Jupiter and Saturn
Jupiter - Jupiter (jû'pt-ter)
Mammon - Wealth is as truly an idol to those who set their hearts on it, as Jupiter or Diana; and no idolater can enter heaven
Mauzzim - The opinion of Gesenius is that "the god of fortresses" was Jupiter Capitolinus, for whom Antiochus built a temple at Antioch
Ammon, or no-Ammon, or no - Similar is its Greek name Diospolis, the city of Jupiter-Ammon. " The vast ruins of the temples of Luxor and Carnac still proclaim the grandeur and magnificence with which the worship of Jupiter-Ammon was conducted
Abomination of Desolation - The Daniel 9:27 denotes, probably, the image of Jupiter, erected in the temple of Jerusalem by command of Antiochus Epiphanes
Meni - The goddess Fortune, Septuagint, answering to the planet Venus, "the lesser good fortune"; the planet Jupiter being the greater, and answering to Gad
Merodach - ) Epithet of Bel the Babylonian Jupiter, termed "the senior of the gods," "the judge," and by Nebuchadnezzar in inscriptions "the great lord, the most ancient," and by Neriglissar "the firstborn of gods, the layer up of treasures
Caster And Pollux - The Dioscuri or two mythical sons of the chief idol of Rome and Greece, Jupiter
Falsifiability - A non falsifiable statement would be, "There is a green lizard sitting in a rocking chair on the fourth largest moon of Jupiter
Pergamos - Here were splendid temples of Zeus or Jupiter, Athene, Apollo, and Æsculapius
Tribute - After the destruction of the temple this was sequestrated by Vespasian and his successors and transferred to the temple of the Capitoline Jupiter
Amon (1) - The Greeks called him Jupiter Ammon
Mercu'Rius - Hermes was the son of Zeus (Jupiter) and Maia the daughter of Atals, and is constantly represented as the companion of his father in his wandering upon earth
Temple - The most celebrated of the ancient pagan temples were that of Belus in Babylon, that of Vulcan at Memphis, that of Jupiter at Thebes, that of Diana at Ephesus, that of Apollo in Miletus,that of Jupiter Olympius in Athens, and that of Apollo at Delphi
Moon - ) A secondary planet, or satellite, revolving about any member of the solar system; as, the moons of Jupiter or Saturn
Star in the East - The fanciful theory of the distinguished astronomer Kepler, that the conjunction of the planets Jupiter and Saturn six years before the common Christian era may have constituted the "star in the east," does not appear to meet the terms of the inspired narrative
Diana - Diana was said to be the daughter of Jupiter by Latona, and twin sister of Apollo. Her image, fabled to have fallen down from Jupiter in heaven, seems to have been a block of wood tapering to the foot, with a female bust above covered with many breasts, the head crowned with turrets, and each hand resting on a staff
Nicolas Poussin - Other works are The Rape of the Sabines; The Childhood of Jupiter; Moses Striking the Rock; Et in Arcadia Ego, and the set called The Seven Sacraments
Year - ) The time in which any planet completes a revolution about the sun; as, the year of Jupiter or of Saturn
Opposition - ) The situation of a heavenly body with respect to another when in the part of the heavens directly opposite to it; especially, the position of a planet or satellite when its longitude differs from that of the sun 180¡; - signified by the symbol /; as, / / /, opposition of Jupiter to the sun
Per'Gamos - Here were splendid temples of Zeus or Jupiter, Athene, Apollo and AEsculapius
Garlands - ...
In Acts 14:8-18 we are told that, on the healing of a lame man by the Apostles Paul and Barnabas at Lystra in Asia Minor, the people imagined the wonder-workers to be incarnations of the gods Jupiter and Mercury, and declared, ‘The gods are come down to us in the likeness of men’ (v. In accordance with this idea, and probably also with a view to reaping the fruits of the religious excitement that had been aroused, the priest of Jupiter brought forth oxen and garlands to the gates of the city for sacrifice (v
Temple - ) A place or edifice dedicated to the worship of some deity; as, the temple of Jupiter at Athens, or of Juggernaut in India
Baal Zebub - Winkelman has given the figures of two heads, "both of them images of Jupiter, called by the Greeks ‘Απομυιος , and by the Romans Muscarius; that is to say, fly driver; for to this Jupiter was attributed the function of driving away flies
Lycaonia - "The speech of Lycaonia" was probably a corrupt mixture of Greek and Syriac; the people's objects of worship were those of the Greeks and Romans, Mercury and Jupiter, whose visit to this quarter is one of Ovid's fables ( Belt - ) One of certain girdles or zones on the surface of the planets Jupiter and Saturn, supposed to be of the nature of clouds
Jupiter - (Acts 14:12-13 [1] 19:35 [2])...
The Oriental setting of the events which took place at Lystra is strongly evident in the first of these passages. ‘Jupiter-before-the-town’)
Gerizim - 186, the Samaritans entreated him that their temple upon Gerizim, which hitherto had been dedicated to an unknown and nameless god, might be consecrated to Jupiter the Grecian, which was easily consented to by Antiochus. The temple of Gerizim subsisted some time after the worship of Jupiter was introduced into it; but it was destroyed by John Hircanus Maccabaeus, and was not rebuilt till Gabinius was governor of Syria; who repaired Samaria, and called it by his own name
Abomination - The "abomination of desolation" foretold by the Prophet Daniel 10:27, 11:31, is supposed by some interpreters to denote the statue of Jupiter Olympius, which Antiochus Epiphanes caused to be erected in the temple of Jerusalem. The second of the passages above cited may probably refer to this circumstance, as the statue of Jupiter did, in fact, "make desolate," by banishing the true worship of God, and those who performed it, from the temple. 132, the Romans accomplished the prediction of Daniel by building a temple to Jupiter Capitolinus, where the temple of God in Jerusalem had stood
Abomination of Desolation - He built an idolatrous altar on the altar of burnt offering to Jupiter Olympius, and dedicated the temple to him, and offered swine's flesh. The Roman emperor Hadrian erected a temple to Jupiter upon the site of the Jewish temple; but probably "the consummation to be poured upon the desolate" is yet future
Ashtoreth, Plural Ash'Taroth - ...
As Baal or Bel denotes, in the astrological mythology of the East, the male star of fortune, the planet Jupiter; so Ashtoreth signifies the female star of fortune, the planet Venus
Astronomy - The planets Jupiter and Venus were worshipped under various names, as Baal and Ahtoreth, Gad and Meni, Isaiah 65:11
Fair - ...
2: εὐδία (Strong's #2105 — Noun Feminine — eudia — yoo-dee'-ah ) denotes "fair weather," Matthew 16:2 , from eudios, "calm;" from eu, "good," and dios, "divine," among the pagan Greeks, akin to the name for the god Zeus, or Jupiter
Endor - The ancient world had many such oracles; the most famous of which were that of Jupiter-Ammon in Lybia, and that of Delphi in Greece: and in all of them, the answers to those who consulted them were given from the mouth of a female; who, from the priestess of Apollo at Delphi, has generally received the name of Pythia
Wonder - The seven wonders of the world were the Egyptian pyramids, the Mausoleum erected by Artemisia, the temple of Diana at Ephesus, the walls and hanging gardens of Babylon, the colossus at Rhodes, the statue of Jupiter Olympius, and the Pharos or watch-tower of Alexandria
Rimmon (1) - He was thus in some features the analogue of Zeus or Jupiter and Thor
Mercury - Hermes’), like ‘Jupiter’ (q
Bar-Kochba - The revolt erupted because the Roman Emperor Hadrian had begun to rebuild Jerusalem as a pagan city with plans to replace the ruined Jewish Temple with one dedicated to Jupiter
Crete - In Crete was the fabled birthplace of Jupiter, king of the gods
Mount - ) Any one of seven fleshy prominences in the palm of the hand which are taken as significant of the influence of "planets," and called the mounts of Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Saturn, the Sun or Apollo, and Venus
Diana - Her image, which was reputed to have fallen down from Jupiter, seems to have been a block of wood shaped into a female bust above covered with many breasts, the head crowned with turrets, and each hand resting on a staff
Baal - But the Greek and Roman writers give to the Babylonian Bel the name of Jupiter Belus, meaning the planet Jupiter, which was regarded, along with the planet Venus, as the guardian and giver of all good fortune; and formed, with Venus, the most fortunate of all constellations, under which alone fortunate sovereigns could be born
Hiram - He raised banks at the eastern part of Tyre which enlarged the city, and he built a causeway to connect the city with the island temple of Jupiter Olympius in the harbor, after which he modernized the temple
No - , No, where Jupiter Amon had his temple
Week - The Mahratta week has Aditwar (from aditya the sun, and war day), Somwar (from som the moon) Monday, Mungulwar (from Μungul Mars) Tuesday, Boodhwar (from Βoodh Mercury) Wednesday, Bruhusputwar (from Βruhusputi Jupiter), Shookurwar (from Shookru Venus), and Shuniwar (from Shuni Saturn)
Abominable - This was Daniel's prediction of the pollution of the temple at Jerusalem, by Antiochus Epiphanes, who set up in it the altar and the statue of Jupiter Olympus: the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the abomination that maketh desolate drove ail the true worshippers of God from the temple
Abomination - This was Daniel's prediction of the pollution of the temple at Jerusalem, by Antiochus Epiphanes, who set up in it the altar and the statue of Jupiter Olympus: the daily sacrifice was taken away, and the abomination that maketh desolate drove ail the true worshippers of God from the temple
Gad - Rendered "troops" in Isaiah 65:11 , but generally supposed to be the name of a heathen god of fortune; and perhaps of the planet Jupiter, the star of good fortune
Star of the Magi - Others, noting that there were conjunctions of two of the brighter planets, Jupiter and Saturn (b. 7), and Jupiter and Venus (b
Names in New Testament - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
New Testament, Names in - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
Galilei, Galileo - Among his contributions to the field of science were the discovery of the isochronism of the pendulum; a demonstration of the laws of projectiles; the first satisfactory demonstration of the laws of equilibrium, and the principle of virtual velocities; an exposition of the true principle of flotation; his discovery of physical features on the moon resembling those on the earth, and the satellites of Jupiter, both of which resulted from his construction of a telescope which maguified 32 times
Galileo Galilei - Among his contributions to the field of science were the discovery of the isochronism of the pendulum; a demonstration of the laws of projectiles; the first satisfactory demonstration of the laws of equilibrium, and the principle of virtual velocities; an exposition of the true principle of flotation; his discovery of physical features on the moon resembling those on the earth, and the satellites of Jupiter, both of which resulted from his construction of a telescope which maguified 32 times
Abomination - " Antiochus Epiphanes caused an altar to be erected on the altar of burnt-offering, on which sacrifices were offered to Jupiter Olympus
Year - The time in which any planet completes a revolution as the year of Jupiter or of Saturn
Astrology - The famous calculation of Kepler shows that an unusual conjunction of Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn took place about b
Onion - Religious nation, sure! and blest abodes, Where ev'ry garden is o'errun with gods!" ...
So Lucian in his Jupiter, where he is giving an account of the different deities worshipped by the several inhabitants of Egypt, says, Πηλουσιωταις δε κρομμυον , "those of Pelusium worship the onion
Cappadocia - ‘In Morimene, among the Venasii, is a temple of Jupiter, with buildings capable of receiving nearly 3000 hierodouli
Oracle - The principal oracles of antiquity are, that of Abae, mentioned by Herodotus; that of Amphiaraus, at Oropus in Macedonia; that of the Branchidae at Didymeum: that of the camps at Lacedaemon; that of Dodona; that of Jupiter Ammon; that of Nabarca in the country of the Anariaci, near the Caspian Sea; that of Trophonius, mentioned by Herodotus; that of Chrysopolis; that of Claros, in Ionia; that of Amphilochus at Mallos; that of Petarea; that of Pella in Macedonia; that of Phaselides in Cilicia; that of Sinope in Paphlagonia; that of Orpheus's head at Lesbos, mentioned by Philostratus. Jupiter, beside that of Dodona and some others, the honour of which he shared with Apollo, had one in Boeotia under the name of Jupiter the Thunderer, and another in Elis, one at Thebes and at Meroe, one near Antioch, and several others. The Pythian declared, that Minerva, the protectress of Athens, had endeavoured in vain to appease the wrath of Jupiter; yet that Jupiter, in complaisance to his daughter, was willing the Athenians should save themselves within wooden walls; and that Salamis should behold the loss of a great many children, dear to their mothers, either when Ceres was spread abroad, or gathered together. Let things go how they will, thou wilt secure thyself by this Jupiter, whom Minerva is endeavouring to appease. If the Greeks lose the battle, Jupiter proved inexorable to the last; if they gain it, why then Minerva at length prevailed
Habibus, Deacon, Martyr at Edessa - of Edessa, the emperor commanded the altars of the gods to be everywhere repaired, sacrifices and libations offered and incense burnt to Jupiter
Grace - To few great Jupiter imparts this grace
Gennadius (10), Bishop of Constantinople - Theodorus also relates how a painter, presuming to depict the Saviour under the form of Jupiter, had his hand withered, but was healed by the prayers of Gennadius
Barnabas - Paul curing one AEneas, who had been lame from his birth, the people of Lystra regarded them as gods; calling Barnabas, Jupiter; and Paul, Mercury; and would have sacrificed to them, which the two Apostles with great difficulty hindered: nevertheless, soon afterward, they were persecuted in this very city
Nile - The Egyptians paid divine honours to this river, and called it Jupiter Nilus
Gods - The principal of the ancient gods, whom the Romans called dii majorum gentium, and Cicero celestial gods, Varro select gods, Ovid nobiles deos, others consentes deos, were Jupiter, Juno, Vesta, Minerva, Ceres, Diana, Venus, Mars, Mercury, Neptune, Vulcan, and Apollo. Jupiter is considered as the god of heaven; Neptune, as god of the sea; Mars, as the god of war; Apollo, of eloquence, poetry, and physic; Mercury, of thieves; Bacchus, of wine; Cupid, of love, &c
Hadrianus, Publius Aelius, Emperor - In 131 the emperor began to execute the plan conceived earlier in his reign of making Jerusalem a Roman colonia and rebuilding it as Aelia Capitolina thus commemorating both the gens to which the emperor belonged and its consecration to the Capitolian Jupiter. On one of the gates a marble statue of the unclean beast was a direct insult to Jewish feeling while Christian feeling was outraged by a statue of Jupiter on the site of the resurrection and of Venus on that of the crucifixion
Rome - On the top of the Capitoline Hill was the Capitolium , or great temple dedicated to Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, and on the Palatine Hill the principal residence of the Emperor, and the Temple of Apollo, containing the public libraries, Greek and Latin
Helena, Companion of Simon Magus - We are told also by Irenaeus and Hippolytus that the Simonians had images of Simon as Jupiter and of Helen as Minerva, which they honoured, calling the former lord, the latter lady
Antiochus - Finally, trying to plunder Jupiter's temple at Elymais, he "fell" in an insurrection of the inhabitants. Antiochus commanded all on pain of death to conform to the Greek religion, and consecrated the temple to Jupiter Olympius or Capitolinus. Antiochus "took away the daily sacrifice, and placed (on the 15th day of Cisleu, on Jehovah's altar) the abomination (idol, Jupiter Olympius' image) that maketh desolate," i
Astrology - The magi spoke of it as a single entity, but some scholars have regarded it as a conjunction of Jupiter, Mars, and Saturn
Baal - Such were Jupiter, Mars, Bacchus, and Apollo, or the sun
Ath'Ens - The most remarkable building of these despots was the gigantic temple of the Olympian Zeus or Jupiter
Antiochus - To ensure this ...
at Jerusalem with the few that still clung to the place, an image of Jupiter Olympius was...
erected in the temple and on an altar sacrifices were offered to this god
Barnabas - Chrysostom justly infers that Barnabas was of a commanding and dignified appearance, as the people of Lystra, on the cure of the impotent man, supposed that he was their national god, Jupiter, king of the gods, come down from heaven (Acts 14:8-12)
Chaldaea - Some interpret Ur = the moon goddess; the Chaldees being moon worshippers or Sabeans, from tsaba' "the heavenly hosts," worshipped Bel, the planet Jupiter, Nebo, Mercury, etc
Idol - ...
The Phoenicians anointed stones (often aerolites, as that "which fell down from Jupiter," sacred to Diana of Ephesus, Acts 19:35) to various gods, like the stone anointed by Jacob (Genesis 28:18; Jeremiah 44:17-18,4) at Bethel, called therefore Baetylia (compare also Genesis 31:45). Gad was the sun, or Jupiter, representing fortune, Meni the moon or Venus, representing fate (Isaiah 65:11). , must be added to Jupiter; and, instead of one omnipresent God, deities whose power was restricted to localities were worshipped (1 Kings 20:23; 1 Kings 20:28; 2 Kings 17:26)
Flies - Among these may be reckoned Baalzebub, the fly-god of Ekron: Hercules muscarum abactor, "Hercules, the expeller of flies;" and hence Jupiter had the titles of απομυιος , μυιαγρος , μυιοχορος , because he was supposed to expel flies, and especially to clear his temples of these insects
Nebuchadnezzar - The lowest, in honor of Saturn, was black; that of Jupiter was orange; that of Mars red, that of the sun yellow, that of Venus green, and that of Mercury blue
Altar - Antiochus Epiphanes erected a small altar to Jupiter-‘the abomination of desolation’ (1 Maccabees 1:54)-upon the θυσιαστήριον of the temple, and ‘on the twenty-fifth day of the month they sacrificed upon the idol-altar (βωμός) which was upon the altar of God (θυσιαστήριον)
Altar - Antiochus Epiphanes erected a small altar to Jupiter-‘the abomination of desolation’ (1 Maccabees 1:54)-upon the θυσιαστήριον of the temple, and ‘on the twenty-fifth day of the month they sacrificed upon the idol-altar (βωμός) which was upon the altar of God (θυσιαστήριον)
Fall, Fallen, Falling, Fell - , "fallen" from the sky, is rendered "image which fell down from Jupiter" (RV marg
Hand - Jupiter had a farm on his hands
Dates (2) - Kepler suggested that a conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter in the zodiacal sign of the Pisces, similar to that which took place in Dec. ]'>[1] 1606 between Jupiter and Saturo, and waned in March 1604, may have appeared then. Two Jewish traditions, one that the star of the Messiah should be seen two years before His birth, and the other that the conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter in Pisces portended something of importance for the Jewish nation, might be mentioned
Priest - It is used of a Gentile priesthood in Acts 14:15 (‘the priest of Jupiter’), and also in Heb
Gods, Pagan - At the head of the Greek pantheon was Zeus, the Roman Jupiter, god of the sky, originally the weather or storm god. When the people of Lystra assumed Barnabas and Paul to be gods (Acts 14:8-18 ), they called Paul Hermes because he was the spokesman; and they identified Barnabas with Zeus or Jupiter
Jeru'Salem - 135, and among other buildings erected a temple of Jupiter Capitolinus on the site of the temple. He gave to it the name of AElia Capitolina, thus combining his own family name with that of the Capitoline Jupiter
Domitian - In 82 the rebuilding of the Temple of Jupiter on the Capitoline Hill, which had been destroyed by fire in 80, was completed
Vespasian - In particular, the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus was rebuilt, and the documents which had perished in the Record Office were, as far as possible, replaced. ...
Palestine was now made the private property of the Emperor, like Egypt; 800 veterans were settled at Ammaus, about 3 or 4 miles from Jerusalem, and the old Temple tax (Matthew 17:24) had to be paid to Jupiter Capitolinus
Samaria - Gerizim belonged to Almighty God,’ and petitioned ‘Antiochus, the god Epiphanes,’ to permit them to name it ‘the temple of Jupiter Hellenius’ (ib
Antichrist - ) Distinct from the" little horn" of Daniel 8, which is connected with the third, not the fourth, kingdom; ANTIOCHUS Epiphanes, of the Syrian fourth part of the divided Graeco-Macedonian or third kingdom, who persecuted the Jews, prohibited circumcision, and substituted the worship of Jupiter Olympius, with whom he identified himself as if God, instead of that of Jehovah, in the templeat Jerusalem
Lucianus, a Famous Satirist - Sometimes his attack is more direct—as in the Ζεὺς Τραγῳδός , Jupiter the Tragedian, where the plain insinuation is that the general profession of belief in the gods was simply occasioned by the odium and alarm which a contrary assertion would excite
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - How does Jupiter occupy himself on Olympus? asked Chilo at Æsop
Jerusalem - A temple to the Capitoline Jupiter was erected on the site of the temple
Antioch - ’ Here he erected a Senate House, a temple to Jupiter Capitolinus on one of the eminences of Mt
Idolatry - Thus we find that the primary gods of the Heathens in general were Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Apollo, Mercury, Venus, and Diana; by which we can understand no other than the sun and moon, and the five greatest luminaries next to these
Rome And the Roman Empire - He left evidence of his propensity for building all over the Mediterranean world including the arch at the entrance to the precincts of the Athenian temple of Jupiter, the Ecce Homo Arch in Jerusalem, his villa near Rome, and the magnificent Pantheon in Rome, whose perfectly preserved construction continually awes the visitor
Star (2) - The most famous of these is that of Kepler (1605), who thought of a close conjunction of the planets Jupiter and Saturn in the constellation Pisces,—a rare combination which takes place only once in 800 years, and which occurred no less than three times in the year 747 a
Jerusalem - Having thus reduced this unfortunate city into entire submission, and rendered resistance useless, the next step of Antiochus was to abolish the Jewish religion altogether, by publishing an edict which commanded all the people of his dominions to conform to the religion of the Greeks: in consequence of which, the service of the temple ceased, and a statue of Jupiter Olympus was set up on the altar. ...
Jerusalem lay in ruins about forty-seven years, when the Emperor AElius Adrian began to build it anew, and erected a Heathen temple, which he dedicated to Jupiter Capitolinus
Rome, Romans - On the top of the Capitoline Hill was the Capitolium or great temple dedicated to Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva, and on the Palatine Hill the principal residence of the Emperor, and the Temple of Apollo containing the public libraries, Greek and Latin
Nehemiah - Cupid, in the old fable, complained bitterly to Jupiter that he could never debauch the Muses, because he never could come on them sitting idle
Jerusalem - , Jerusalem fell under the tyranny of Antiochus Epiphanes, who razed its walls, set up an image of Jupiter in the temple, and used every means to force the people into idolatry
Temple - 163, who caused the daily sacrifices to be discontinued, and erected the image of Jupiter Olympus on the altar of burnt-offering
Division of the Earth - And this was conformable to their own geographical allegory; that Chronus, the god of time, or Saturn, divided the universe among his three sons, allotting the heaven to Jupiter, the sea to Neptune, and hell to Pluto
Antiochus - The statue of Jupiter Olympus was placed upon the altar of the temple, and thus the abomination of desolation was seen in the temple of God
Money (2) - After the destruction of Jerusalem, Vespasian made compulsory a poll-tax of the same amount to defray the cost of rebuilding the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus
Creation - ...
Probably all the water, strictly so-called, floated above, in the condition in which Jupiter now appears
Herod - For its sake he compromised the Jewish religion which he professed, in order to conciliate Rome, by offerings to the Capitoline Jupiter at his elevation to the throne
Paul - His mode of address is happily suited to the heathen of Lystra in turning them from their purpose of sacrificing to him and Barnabas as Mercury (for Paul was the chief speaker) and Jupiter respectively
Virgin Birth - ‘Amongst the Grecian fables,’ says Trypho, ‘it is asserted that Perseus was born of the virgin Danae; Jupiter, as they call him, coming down upon her in a shower of gold
Galatia - ’ The pagans who acclaimed the coming of Jupiter and Mercury would be likely enough, when partially Christianized, to think themselves recipients of a visit of angels
Canaan - 71, remained desolate and almost uninhabited, till the emperor Hadrian colonized it, and erected temples to Jupiter and Venus on its site
Babel - high, orange bricks, devoted probably to Jupiter; the third, 188 ft
Roads And Travel - The Via Flaminia went by Falerii, Ocriculum (modern Otricoli, where the famous bust of Jupiter was found), Narnia, Interamna (where the Emperor Tacitus was born), Nuceria, to Fanum Fortunae, where it reaches the Adriatic, then along the coast through Pisaurum to Ariminum (modern Rimini), its terminus
Paul - Thereupon these pagans took the apostles for gods, calling Barnabas, who was of the more imposing presence, Jupiter, and Paul, who was the chief speaker, Mercurius
Tatianus - Among the Romans he had found the Latiarian Jupiter delighting in human gore, Diana Aricina similarly worshipped, and this or that demon systematically urging on to what was evil
Rome - The great ornament of the Capitoline in ancient times was the temple of Jupiter, Best and Greatest (the god whom the Latin allies worshipped on the Alban Mount), together with Juno and Minerva
Simon Magus - In 56 is another reference: ‘But the evil spirits were not satisfied with saying, before Christ’s appearance, that those who were said to be sons or Jupiter were born of him; but after He had appeared and been born among men, and when they learned how He had been foretold by the prophets, and knew that He should be believed on and looked for by every nation, they again, as was said before, put forward other men, the Samaritans Simon and Menander, who did many mighty works by magic, and deceived many, and still keep them deceived
Babylon - Within the city was the temple of Belus, or Jupiter, which Herodotus describes as a square of two stadia, or a quarter of a mile: in the midst of which arose the celebrated tower, to which both the same writer, and Strabo, give an elevation of one stadium, or 660 feet; and the same measure at its base; the whole being divided into eight separate towers, one above another, of decreasing dimensions to the summit; where stood a chapel, containing a couch, table, and other things of gold
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - Julian, according to his own account, was quite unprepared for such a step, and would not accede till Jupiter had given him a sign from heaven
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - Ironically does Tertullian commend in the heathen the dread with which they regarded Caesar as more profound and reverential than that which they accorded to the Olympian Jupiter