What does Judas mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἰούδας the fourth son of Jacob. / an unknown ancestor of Christ. / a man surnamed the Galilean 20
ἰούδαν the fourth son of Jacob. / an unknown ancestor of Christ. / a man surnamed the Galilean 7
ἰούδα the fourth son of Jacob. / an unknown ancestor of Christ. / a man surnamed the Galilean 4
ἰούδᾳ the fourth son of Jacob. / an unknown ancestor of Christ. / a man surnamed the Galilean 1

Definitions Related to Judas

G2455


   1 the fourth son of Jacob.
   2 an unknown ancestor of Christ.
   3 a man surnamed the Galilean, who at the time of the census of Quirinus, excited the revolt in Galilee, Acts 5:37.
   4 a certain Jew of Damascus, Acts 9:11.
   5 a prophet surnamed Barsabas, of the church at Jerusalem, Acts 15:22,27,32.
   6 the apostle, Jn 14:22, who was surnamed Lebbaeus or Thaddaeus, and according to opinion wrote the Epistle of Jude.
   7 the half-brother of Jesus, Mt. 13:55.
   8 Judas Iscariot, the apostle who betrayed Jesus.
   Additional Information: Judah or Judas = “he shall be praised”.
   

Frequency of Judas (original languages)

Frequency of Judas (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Machabeus, Judas
(Hebrew: makeb, hammer)
Son of the priest Mathathias (1Machabees 2) and leader of the Jewish army, who waged a war of independence against Syria and delivered his people from the Syrian yoke. He sent messengers to Rome to secure protection against the oppression of the Syrians, but before their success became known in the East, he was defeated and slain, 161 BC, on the battlefield at Laisa (1Machabees 4-9; 2Machabees 10-15). His deeds are the subject of an oratorio by Handel. The books of Machabees are so called because they contain the history of the Jews. under Judas Machabeus and his brethren.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Judas Machabeus
(Hebrew: makeb, hammer)
Son of the priest Mathathias (1Machabees 2) and leader of the Jewish army, who waged a war of independence against Syria and delivered his people from the Syrian yoke. He sent messengers to Rome to secure protection against the oppression of the Syrians, but before their success became known in the East, he was defeated and slain, 161 BC, on the battlefield at Laisa (1Machabees 4-9; 2Machabees 10-15). His deeds are the subject of an oratorio by Handel. The books of Machabees are so called because they contain the history of the Jews. under Judas Machabeus and his brethren.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Judas-Light
A wooden imitation of the paschal candle.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Judas Thaddeus, Saint
Apostle, brother of Saint James the Less, and one of the "Brothers of Jesus" (Luke 6; Acts 1; Matthew 10; Mark 3). He is not to be confused with Thaddeus of Edessa, one of the 72 disciples, Judas Jacobi, or Judas Simon, disciples of the Apostles. After the Lord's Supper, Judas asked Christ why He would not manifest Himself to the world (John 14). Judas's missionary work was performed principally in Palestine, also in Syria, Mesopotamia, and Persia. The place of his death is unknown; Beirut and Arad in Phenicia have been mentioned as possible places, and there is a tradition that he suffered martyrdom. His Epistle, addressed to all the churches in the East, and to the Jews in particular, is in some parts coincident with 2Peter. Patron of desperate cases, and hospitals. Emblems: a sword, a square rule, and a club. Relics in Saint Peter's, Rome, and at Toulouse. Feast, Roman Calendar, October 28,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Judas Iscariot
One of the 12Apostles, who betrayed Our Lord for 30 pieces of silver. When the priests refused to take back the silver, he cast the pieces down in the Temple and "went out and hanged himself with an halter" (Matthew 27).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Iscariot, Judas
One of the 12Apostles, who betrayed Our Lord for 30 pieces of silver. When the priests refused to take back the silver, he cast the pieces down in the Temple and "went out and hanged himself with an halter" (Matthew 27).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Judas
The Graecized form of Judah.
The patriarch (Matthew 1:2,3 ).
Son of Simon (John 6:71 ; 13:2,26 ), surnamed Iscariot, i.e., a man of Kerioth (Joshua 15:25 ). His name is uniformly the last in the list of the apostles, as given in the synoptic (i.e., the first three) Gospels. The evil of his nature probably gradually unfolded itself till "Satan entered into him" (John 13:27 ), and he betrayed our Lord (18:3). Afterwards he owned his sin with "an exceeding bitter cry," and cast the money he had received as the wages of his iniquity down on the floor of the sanctuary, and "departed and went and hanged himself" (Matthew 27:5 ). He perished in his guilt, and "went unto his own place" (Acts 1:25 ). The statement in Acts 1:18 that he "fell headlong and burst asunder in the midst, and all his bowels gushed out," is in no way contrary to that in Matthew 27:5 . The sucide first hanged himself, perhaps over the valley of Hinnom, "and the rope giving way, or the branch to which he hung breaking, he fell down headlong on his face, and was crushed and mangled on the rocky pavement below." Why such a man was chosen to be an apostle we know not, but it is written that "Jesus knew from the beginning who should betray him" (John 6:64 ). Nor can any answer be satisfactorily given to the question as to the motives that led Judas to betray his Master. "Of the motives that have been assigned we need not care to fix on any one as that which simply led him on. Crime is, for the most part, the result of a hundred motives rushing with bewildering fury through the mind of the criminal."
A Jew of Damascus (Acts 9:11 ), to whose house Ananias was sent. The street called "Straight" in which it was situated is identified with the modern "street of bazaars," where is still pointed out the so-called "house of Judas."
A Christian teacher, surnamed Barsabas. He was sent from Jerusalem to Antioch along with Paul and Barnabas with the decision of the council (Acts 15:22,27,32 ). He was a "prophet" and a "chief man among the brethren."
Holman Bible Dictionary - Judas Iscariot
(jyoo' dawss ihss car' ih aht) Personal name meaning, “Judah from Kerioth.” Betrayer of Jesus. See Judas .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Judas
(jyoo' duhss) Greek transliteration of Hebrew personal name Judah meaning, “Praise Yahweh.” The proper name Judas was very common in the time of Christ because it was not only the Greek form of one of the twelve patriarchs, but it was also made popular by the Jewish hero Judas Maccabaeus who led the nation in their fight for independence from Syria in 166 B.C. The New Testament mentions seven men named Judas. Most of them are only mentioned in passing. 1. One of Jesus' ancestors (Luke 3:30 ). 2 . A brother of the Lord (Matthew 13:55 ; Mark 6:3 ). Acts speaks of five others named Judas. 3. Judas of Galilee was one of those who led a revolt against the Romans and died as a result. The exact year of this revolt is uncertain, perhaps 6 A.D. (Acts 5:37 ). 4 . After his experience on the road to Damascus Paul went to the house of a man named Judas who lived on Straight Street. Ananias found him there three days later. 5. Judas, surnamed Barsabas, was one of those chosen by the Church of Jerusalem to go with Paul and Barnabas to deliver the letter from James to the church at Antioch concerning the important matter of Gentile salvation (Acts 15:22 ).
6. Jesus' twelve disciples include two named Judas. The first is always listed after James the son of Alphaeus, and is called the brother of James (Luke 6:16 ; Acts 1:13 ). He appears to have been known also by the name Lebbaeus Thaddaeus (Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ). His only recorded words are found in John 14:22 .
7. The last of these was Judas Iscariot. All of the Gospels place him at the end of the list of disciples because of his role as betrayer. Iscariot is an Aramaic word which means “man of Kerioth”, a town near Hebron. He was the only disciple from Judea. He acted as treasurer for the disciples but was known as a miser and a thief (John 12:5-6 ). He was present at the Last Supper, during which Jesus predicted his betrayal (Luke 22:21 ; Matthew 26:20-21 ). The price of the betrayal was 30 pieces of silver, which Judas returned to Jewish leaders; then he went out and hanged himself. He died in sorrow but without repentance. The money, which could not be returned to the treasury because it was blood money, was used to buy a potter's field in Judas' name (Matthew 27:3-10 ; compare Acts 1:18-19 ).
Gerald Cowen
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Judas the Galilaean
Judas the Galilaean, a Zealot leader at the time of the census under Quirinius, was probably the son of Hezekiah (Josephus, Ant. xvii. x. 5, Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) ii. iv. 1), a leader of a band of robbers (i.e. revolutionists) in Galilee. Herod, while representing his father, had captured and summarily executed Hezekiah with a number of his followers without having recourse to the Sanhedrin or Hyrcanus (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) i. x. 5, Ant. xiv. ix. 2, 3, xvii. x. 5). If this identification be correct (so Graetz, Schürer, Goethe; contra Krenkel, Schmiedel), it enables us to trace the development of the Zealot movement from its origin as the Messianic party favouring ‘direct action.’ The death of Hezekiah apparently left Judas at the head of a movement against Roman rule similar to that of Mattathias and his body of revolutionaries against the Syrians.
Josephus declares in Ant. xviii. i. 1. that Judas was born in Gamala in Gaulonitis, but in Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) ii. viii. 1 and elsewhere he calls him a Galilaean (so too Acts 5:37). This discrepancy may be due to a confusion of a Galilaean Gamala with the better-known town of the same name east of Jordan; or to the fact that the activities of Judas were largely confined to Galilee; or to the loose use of the word ‘Galilaean’ to describe a Jew born near Galilee.
During the administration of Quintilius Varus (6-4 b.c.) Judas took advantage of the disorders following the death of Herod i., seized and plundered Sepphoris, and armed his followers with weapons taken from the city’s arsenal. He is charged by Josephus (Ant. xvii. x. 5, Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) . ii. iv. 1) with seeking to make himself king. This accusation, however, like the description of his followers (‘of profligate character’) by Josephus, is probably to be charged to the bias of the historian. For, when Quirinius undertook to make a census of Judaea (see Dict. of Christ and the Gospels i. 275a), Judas allied himself with a Pharisee named Zadok and raised the signal for a theocratic or Messianic revolt, calling upon the Jews to refuse to pay tribute to the Romans and to recognize God alone as their ruler (Ant. xviii. i. 1, xx. v. 2, Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) II. viii. 1). Whether he succeeded in actually organizing a revolt is not altogether clear (Ant. xx. v. 2 is not so reliable as xvii. i. 1), but in Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) vii. viii. 1 he is said ‘to have persuaded not a few of the Jews not to submit to the census.’ That he was the centre of actual disturbance is by no means improbable in the light of succeeding events; for from this combination of revolutionary spirit and Pharisaism emerged the fourth party of the Jews, the Zealots. From this time until their last stand at Masada, the Zealots were the representatives of a politico-revolutionary Messianism, as distinguished from the eschatological hopes of the Pharisees and Essenes. Judas (‘a cunning Sophist’ [1]) was evidently bent on putting into practice a political programme, and may very likely have undertaken to organize a theocracy without a human ruler. If so, we know nothing as to the actual results of his endeavours except that Josephus (Ant. xviii. i. 1, 6) attributes to him and his ‘philosophy’ the violence and miseries culminating in the destruction of the Temple. This philosophy he describes as a compound of Pharisaic beliefs and revolutionist love of liberty.
We have no precise knowledge as to the fate of Judas, but in Acts 5:37 he is said to have ‘perished.’ From the fact that he is here mentioned after Theudas (q.v. [2] ), it has been conjectured that Luke has confused his fate with that of his sons. Too much weight, however, should not be given to this conclusion, for it seems hardly probable that Josephus should have omitted any misfortune coming to a man he so cordially disliked.
Judas left three sons, all of whom were leaders in the Zealot movement. Of these, two-Jacob and Simon-were crucified by Tiberius Alexander the procurator (a.d. 46-48), for leading a revolt (Ant. xx. v. 2), and the third, Menahem (also a ‘Sophist’-a word indicating a propagandist as well as a revolutionist), became a leader of the extreme radicals during the first period of the war with Rome. After having armed himself from the Herodian arsenal at Masada, he became for a short time the master of a part of Jerusalem, but was tortured and executed, together with his lieutenants, by Eleazar of the high-priestly party.
Shailer Mathews.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Judas
JUDAS (in Apocr. [1] ), the Gr. equivalent of the Heb. name Judah . 1. The third son of Mattathias, called Maccahæus ( 1M Malachi 2:4 etc.). See Maccabees, § 2 . 2 . One of two captains who stood by Jonathan at Hazor ( 1Ma 11:70 ). 3. A Jew holding some important position at Jerusalem; he is named in the title of a letter sent from the Jews of Jerusalem and Judæa and the Jewish Senate to their brethren in Egypt, and to a certain Aristobulus ( 2M Malachi 1:10 ). 4. A son, probably the eldest, of Simon the Maccabee ( 1Ma 16:2 ). In b.c. 135, he, with his father and another brother named Mattathias, was murdered at Dok by Ptolemy, the son of Abubus ( 1Ma 16:11-17 ). 5. Esther 9:23 Esther 9:23 = Judah of Ezra 10:23 .
JUDAS (in NT)
1. Judas Iscariot . See following article.
2. Judas, the son of James (see James 4:1-17 ). one of the twelve Apostles ( Luke 6:16 ), called by Mt. ( Matthew 10:3 ) Lebbæus and by Mk. ( Mark 3:18 ) Thaddæus. The only thing recorded of him is that, when Jesus promised in the Upper Room to manifest Himself to the man that loved Him, he inquired: ‘Lord, what is come to pass that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?’ ( John 14:22 RV [2] ); showing that he shared the common ideal of the Messianic Kingdom. He pictured it as a worldly kingdom, and was expecting that Jesus would presently flash forth in majesty before an astonished world and ascend the throne of David; and he wondered what could have happened to prevent this consummation.
3. Judas, the Lord’s brother ( Matthew 13:55 = Mark 6:3 ). See Brethren of the Lord. He was the author of the Short Epistle of Jude ( i.e. Judas), where he styles himself ‘the servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James’ ( Judges 1:1 ), and, like James, exhibits a stern zeal for morality.
4. Judas, the Galilæan . He is so called both in the NT ( Acts 5:37 ) and in Josephus, though he belonged to Gamala in Gaulanitis on the eastern side of the Lake of Galilee; perhaps because Galilee was the scene of his patriotic enterprise. At the enrolment or census under Quirinius in a.d. 7, Judas raised an insurrection. He perished, and his followers were scattered, but their spirit did not die. They banded themselves into a patriotic fraternity under the significant name of the Zealots , pledged to undying hostility against the Roman tyranny and ever eager for an opportunity to throw off its yoke.
5. Judas, a Jew of Damascus ( Acts 9:11 ). His house was in the Straight Street, and Saul of Tarsus lodged there after his conversion.
6. Judas Barsabbas , one of two deputies Silas being the other who were chosen by the rulers of the Church at Jerusalem to accompany Paul and Barnabas to Antioch, and report to the believers there the Council’s decision on the question on what terms the Gentiles should be admitted into the Christian Church ( Acts 15:22-33 ). Judas and Silas are described as ‘chief men among the brethren’ ( Acts 15:22 ) and ‘prophets’ ( Acts 15:32 ). Since they bore the same patronymic, Judas may have been a brother of Joseph Barsabbas ( Acts 1:23 ). 7. An ancestor of Jesus ( Luke 3:30 ).
David Smith.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Judas Iscariot
JUDAS ISCARIOT. One of the Twelve, son of Simon Iscariot ( John 6:71 ; John 13:26 RV [1] ). Iscariot (more correctly Iscarioth ) means ‘the man of Kerioth.’ Kerioth was a town in the south of Judæa, and Judas was the only one of the Twelve who was not a Galilæan. He had an aptitude for business, and acted as treasurer of the Apostle-band ( John 12:6 ; John 13:29 ).
Judas turned traitor, and sold the Lord to the high priests for thirty pieces of silver, the price of a slave (Exodus 21:32 ); and this dire treachery constitutes one of the hardest problems of the Gospel history. It seems to present an inevitable dilemma: either Jesus did not know what would happen, thus failing in foresight and discernment; or, as St. John expressly declares ( John 6:64 ), He did know, and yet not only admitted Judas to the Apostolate, but appointed him to an office which, by exciting his cupidity, facilitated his crime. A solution of the problem has been sought by making out in various ways that Judas was not really a criminal.
(1) In early days it was held by the Cainites, a Gnostic sect, that Judas had attained a higher degree of spiritual enlightenment than his fellows, and compassed the death of Jesus because he knew that it would break the power of the evil spirits, the rulers of this world. (2) Another ancient theory is that he was indeed a covetous man and sold the Master for greed of the pieces of silver, but never thought that He would be slain. He anticipated that He would, as on previous occasions, extricate Himself from the hands of His enemies; and when he saw Him condemned, he was overwhelmed with remorse. He reckoned, thought Paulus in more recent times, on the multitude rising and rescuing their hero from the rulers. (3) He shared the general wonderment of the disciples at the Lord’s procrastination in coming forward as the King of Israel and claiming the throne of David, and thought to force His hand and precipitate the desired consummation. ‘His hope was,’ says De Quincey, ‘that Christ would no longer vacillate; he would be forced into giving the signal to the populace of Jerusalem, who would then rise unanimously.’ Cf. Rosegger, INRI , Eng. tr. [2] p. 263. (4) His faith in his Master’s Messiahship, thought Neander, was wavering. If He were really the Messiah, nothing could harm Him; if He were not, He would perish, and it would be right that He should.
Such attempts to justify Judas must be dismissed. They are contrary to the Gospel narrative, which represents the Betrayal as a horrible, indeed diabolical, crime (cf. John 6:70 , Luke 22:3-4 ). If the Lord chose Judas with clear foreknowledge of the issue, then, dark as the mystery may be, it accords with the providential ordering of human affairs, being in fact an instance of an ancient and abiding problem, the ‘irreconcilable antinomy’ of Divine foreknowledge and human free will. It is no whit a greater mystery that Jesus should have chosen Judas with clear prescience of the issue, than that God should have made Saul king, knowing what the end would be.
Of course Judas was not chosen because he would turn traitor, but because at the outset he had in him the possibility of better things; and this is the tragedy of his career, that he obeyed his baser impulses and surrendered to their domination. Covetousness was his besetting sin, and he attached himself to Jesus because, like the rest of the disciples, he expected a rich reward when his Master was seated on the throne of David. His discipleship was a process of disillusionment. He saw his worldly dream fading, and, when the toils closed about his Master, he decided to make the best of the situation. Since he could not have a place by the throne, he would at least have the thirty shekels.
His resolution lasted long enough to carry through the crime. He made his bargain with the high priests (Matthew 26:14-16 = Mark 14:10-11 = Luke 22:3-6 ) evidently on the Wednesday afternoon, when Jesus, after the Great Indictment ( Matthew 23:1-39 ), was occupied with the Greeks who had come craving an interview ( John 12:20-22 ); and promised to watch for an opportunity to betray Him into their hands. He found it next evening when he was dismissed from the Upper Room ( John 13:27-30 ). He knew that after the Supper Jesus would repair to Gethsemane, and thither he conducted the rulers with their band of soldiers. He thought, no doubt, that his work was now done, but he had yet to crown his ignominy. A difficulty arose. It lay with the soldiers to make the arrest, and, seeing not one man but twelve, they knew not which to take; and Judas had to come to their assistance. He gave them a token: ‘The one whom I shall kiss is he’; and, advancing to Jesus, he greeted Him with customary reverence and kissed Him effusively ( Matthew 26:47-50 = Mark 14:43-46 = Luke 22:47-49 ).
It must have been a terrible ordeal for Judas, and in that hour his better nature reasserted itself. He realized the enormity of what he had done; and he followed his Master and, in an agony of remorse, watched the tragedy of His trial and condemnation by the Sanhedrin. It maddened him; and as the high priests were leaving the Hall of Hewn Stone, the Sanhedrin’s meeting-place, he accosted them, clutching the accursed shekels in his wild hands. ‘I have sinned,’ he cried, ‘in that I betrayed innocent blood.’ He thought even now to annul the bargain, but they spurned him and passed to the Sanctuary. He followed, and, ere they could close the entrance, hurled the coins after them into the Holy Place; then rushed away and hanged himself (Matthew 27:3-5 ).
Such is St. Matthew’s account. The tragedy was so appalling that legends grew apace in the primitive Church, and St. Luke has preserved one of these in a parenthesis in St. Peter’s speech at the election of Matthias (Acts 1:18-19 ). One is glad to think that St. Matthew’s is the actual history. Judas sinned terribly, but he terribly repented, and one wishes that, instead of destroying his miserable life, he had rather fled to the Cross and sought mercy at the feet of his gracious Lord. There was mercy in the heart of Jesus even for Judas.
Was Judas present at the Eucharist in the Upper Room? St. John alone mentions his departure; and since he does not record the institution of the Supper, it is open to question whether the traitor ‘went out’ after it or before it. From Luke 22:17-21 it has been argued that he was present, but St. Luke’s arrangement is different from that of St. Matthew and St. Mark, who put the institution after the announcement of the Betrayal ( Matthew 26:21-29 = Mark 14:18-25 ). According to St. John’s account, Judas seems to have gone out immediately after the announcement, the institution following John 13:38 , and ch. 14 being the Communion Address.
David Smith.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Judas Iscariot (2)
JUDAS ISCARIOT
i.The NT sources.
ii.Name and Designations:
(a)Judas.
(b)Iscariot.
(c)One of the Twelve.
(d)A thief.
(e)Betrayer or traitor.
(f)A devil.
(g)Son of perdition.
iii.Other NT references to Judas:
(a)Before the Betrayal;
(b)Describing the Betrayal;
(c)After the Betrayal.
iv.The character of Judas:
(a)The good motives theory;
(b)The Satan incarnate theory;
(c)The mingled motives theory; he was (α) covetous, (β) ambitious, (γ) jealous.
v.References to Judas in post-Biblical literature:
(a)Apocryphal works;
(b)Early Christian writings.
(c)Folk-lore.
Literature.
i. The NT sources.—The basis of any satisfactory solution of the fascinating and perplexing problem of the personality of Judas must be a comprehensive and careful study of the words of Jesus and the records of the Evangelists. Interest in his life and character may have been unduly sacrificed to dogmatic discussions of ‘fix’d fate, free will, foreknowledge absolute,’ but the reaction in favour of psychological methods of study may be carried to excess. Conclusions arrived at by the use of these methods are not always consistent with the historical data furnished by the Gospels. In psychological as well as theological investigations, speculation may prove an unsafe guide; at least it should always move in a path made by prolonging the lines laid down in the documents which are the main sources of our information. Theories framed by induction from a critical comparison of the narratives may claim to be attempts to untie the knot, but theories involving excisions from, and conjectural emendations of, the text of the Gospels and Acts are mere cuttings of the knot. A frank acknowledgment that there are difficulties at present inexplicable is preferable to the adoption of such violent methods of removing them. The NT material available for the investigation of the subject in its manifold aspects is found in the following passages:
1. The lists of the Apostles: Mark 3:16 ff., Matthew 10:2 ff., Luke 6:13 ff.
2. Early allusions to Judas: John 6:64 ff; John 12:4 ff; John 17:12, Luke 22:3 (cf. Mark 14:4 f., Matthew 26:8 f.).
3. The narratives of the Betrayal: Mark 14:10 f., Matthew 26:14 ff., Luke 22:4 ff.; John 13:2 ff.; Mark 14:18 ff., Matthew 26:21 ff., Luke 22:21 ff., John 13:21 ff.; Mark 14:43 ff., Matthew 26:47 ff., Luke 22:47 f., John 18:2 ff.
4. The two accounts of the death of Judas: Matthew 27:3 ff., Acts 1:16 ff.
From this classification it will be seen that, with the exception of Luke 22:3, the Synoptists say nothing about Judas before the Betrayal; their account of the Betrayal also differs in many details from that given in the Fourth Gospel. Some divergent traditions it is difficult, and perhaps impossible, to harmonize; assumptions that the one is an intentional modification of the other, or that they are contradictory, must be carefully examined; suggestions that they are supplementary, or mutually explanatory, must be fairly considered. Statements in the Fourth Gospel which are said to show John’s bias against Judas will be investigated in due course.
ii. Name and Designations
(a) Judas.—In all the lists of the Twelve this is the name of the Apostle mentioned last. Another Apostle (see preced. art. No. 1) bore this common Jewish name, but ‘Judas’ now means the Betrayer of Jesus. His sin has stamped the word with such evil significance that it has become the class-name of perfidious friends, who are ‘no better than Judases’ (cf. ‘Judas-hole,’ ‘Judas-trap,’ etc.).
Ἰούδας is the Gr. form of the Heb. Judah (יהוּדָה), which in Genesis 29:35 is derived from the verb ‘to praise’ (יָדָה), and is taken as meaning ‘one who is the subject of praise’ (cf. Genesis 49:8). The etymology is disputed, but in its popular sense it suggests a striking paradox, when used of one whose name became a synonym for shame.
(b) Iscariot: the usual surname of Judas. Ἰσκαριώθ, a transliteration from Heb., is the best attested reading in Mark 3:19; Mark 14:10, Luke 6:16; Ἰσκαριώτης, the Graecized form in Matthew 26:14, Luke 22:3, John 6:71; John 13:2; John 13:26; ὁ Ἰσκαριώτης in Matthew 10:4, John 12:4; John 14:22. Eight of these passages refer to Judas; in two (John 6:71; John 13:26) his father Simon is called Iscariot; once (John 14:22) his fellow-Apostle is distinguished from his more famous namesake as ‘not the Iscariot.’ Only in John 13:2 does the full phrase occur—‘Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon.’ Nestle thinks that ἁπὸ Καριώτου, a reading of Codex Bezae, found four times in Jn instead of Ἰακαριώτης, is a paraphrastic rendering of Iscariot by the author of the Fourth Gospel. Chase furnishes other evidence for this reading (The Syro-Latin Text of the Gospels, p. 102f.), but argues that it cannot be part of the original text. His conclusion is that an early Syriac translator represented Ἰσκαριώτης by this paraphrase (cf. ExpT [1] ix. pp. 189, 240, 283)
Two facts already mentioned have an important bearing on the interpretation of Ἰακαριώτης: (1) the true reading, ‘Simon Iscariot,’ shows that the epithet was equally applicable to the father and the son, and this twofold use of the word suggests that it is a local name; (2) the paraphrase ἀπὸ Καριώτου confirms the view that Judas is named after his place of abode (cf. Zahn, Das Evangelium des Matthäus, p. 393). Cheyne says ‘we should have expected απο κεριωθ,’ yet admits that ‘it is a plausible view’ that Ἰσκαριώτης is derived from Ish-Kerioth (אִישׁ קְרָיוֹח), ‘a man of Kerioth’ (Ency. Bibl. ii. 2624). Dalman (The Words of Jesus, p. 51 f.) thinks that Ἰσκαριώθ was the original reading, and points back to the Hebrew, whilst ὁ ἁπὸ Καριώτου corresponds to the equivalent Aramaic דִּקִרִיוֹת or דְּמִן קְרִיוֹת Hence the surname Iseariot probably means ‘a Kariothite.’
It is impossible to say with certainty where the Kerioth was situate of which Judas was a native. (1) On account of this difficulty, Cheyne conjectures that Ἱεριχωτής, ‘a man of Jericho,’ is the true reading. (2) The majority of scholars incline to the view that Kerioth is the Kerioth-Hezron or Hazor of Joshua 15:25 (Vulgate Carioth); Buhl identifies the place with the modern Karjaten in South Judah (GAP [2] p. 182). (3) Others suggest the Kerioth mentioned in Amos 2:2, Jeremiah 48:24 (LXX Septuagint Καριώθ),—an important city, either Kir-Moab, or Ar, the capital of Moab. Harper (‘Am. and Hos.,’ Int. Crit. Com. p. 42) says that ‘the reference in the Moabite stone (l. 13) favours Ewald’s view that it is another name for Ar.’ A less probable opinion is that the town referred to is Κορέαι or Kurawa (Josephus BJ i. vi. 5, iv. viii. 1; Ant. xiv. iii. 4) in North Judaea (Buhl, GAP [2] p. 181). If any one of these towns was the birthplace of Judas, he was not a Galilaean.
(c) ‘One of the Twelve.’—In the Synoptic Gospels this phrase is found only in the narrative of the Betrayal, and it is applied only to Judas. It marks the mingled sorrow and indignation of the Evangelists, that within that select circle there could be a single treacherous heart. The simple formula is once changed by St. Luke (22:3), who adds to his statement that ‘Satan entered into Judas’ these significant words: ‘being of the number of the twelve’—i.e. counted among those whom Jesus called His friends, but about to become an ally of His foes, because in spirit he was ‘none of his’ (cf. Matthew 26:14; Matthew 26:47, Mark 14:10; Mark 14:20; Mark 14:43, Luke 22:3; Luke 22:47). In the Fourth Gospel the phrase is used once of another than Judas; like a note of exclamation, it expresses surprise that Thomas, a member of the Apostolic band, was absent when the risen Saviour appeared to His disciples (John 20:24). But St. John also applies the phrase to Judas, giving it a position in which its tragic and pathetic emphasis cannot be mistaken: ‘You—the twelve, did not I choose? and of you one is a devil. Now he spake of Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot; for it was he that was about to betray him—one of the twelve’ (John 6:70-71). St. John’s phrase (εἶς ἐκ τῶν δώδεκα) differs slightly from that used by the Synoptists (εἶς τῶν δώδεκα); Westcott suggests that it marks ‘the unity of the body to which the unfaithful member belonged’ (Com. in loc.).
That Judas was ‘one of the twelve’ is an important factor in the problem presented by his history. It implies that Jesus saw in him the material out of which an Apostle might have been made,—the clay out of which a vessel unto honour might have been shaped; it implies that Judas, of free-will, chose to follow Jesus and to continue with Him; and it implies that Judas heard from the Master’s lips words of gracious warning against the peril of his besetting sin. On the other hand, the fact that Judas was ‘one of the twelve’ does not imply that Jesus had the betrayal in view when He chose this Apostle and entrusted him with the common purse; it does not imply that even in that most holy environment Judas was exempted from the working of the spiritual law that such ‘evil things’ as ‘thefts … covetings, … deceit … proceed from within, and defile the man’ (Mark 7:22 f.); and it does not imply that there were no good impulses in the heart of Judas when he became a disciple of Jesus. Of Judas in his darkest hour the words of Lavater are true: he ‘acted like Satan, but like a Satan who had it in him to be an Apostle.’
In Mark 14:10 the best supported reading (אBCLM) is ὁ εἶς τῶν δώδεκα, with a note in (Revised Version margin)—‘Gr. the one of the twelve.’ Wright (Synopsis of the Gospels in Greek, p. 31, cf. p. 147) is of opinion that Mk. distinctly calls Judas ‘the chief of the twelve.’ He takes ὁ εἶς as equal to ὁ πρῶτος, as in τῇ μιᾷ τῶν σαββάτων (Mark 16:2). But the definite article is not found with this phrase in any other passage in the Gospels; moreover, it is almost impossible to believe that when the Gospels were written the assertion that Judas was ‘the chief’ or even primus inter pares had a place in the original text. On the other hand, Field (Notes on the Translation of the NT, in loc.) is scarcely justified in saying ‘ὁ εἶς τῶν δ. can mean nothing but “the first (No. 1) of the twelve,” which is absurd.’* [4] The unique reading may, however, preserve a genuine reminiscence of a time in the earlier ministry of Jesus when Judas, the treasurer of the Apostolic company, had a kind of priority. If this were so, there would come a time when, as Wright suggests, the supporters of Judas would become ‘jealous of the honour bestowed on Peter.’† [5] Jealousy would account not only for the dispute about rival claims to be the greatest, but also for the respective positions of Judas and Peter at the supper-table. The most probable explanation of the details given (Matthew 26:23, John 13:23; John 13:26) is that John was reclining on the right of Jesus; but Judas ‘claimed and obtained the chief seat at the table’ next Jesus, and was reclining on His left, whilst ‘the lowest place was voluntarily taken by Peter, who felt keenly the Lord’s rebuke of this strife for precedence’ (cf. Andrews, The Life of our Lord, p. 485; Edersheim, Life and Times, ii. 493).
(d) ‘A thief.’—The meaning of the statement that ‘Judas was a thief’ (John 12:6) is quite plain, if the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 correctly renders the following sentence: ‘and having the bag, took away (ἐβάσταζεν) what was put therein.’ βαστάζω means (1) to bear, (2) to bear away, as in John 20:15 (cf. ‘cattle-lifting’). Its use in the sense of bearing away secretly or pilfering is established (cf. Field, op. cit. in loc.). In this context the statement that Judas carried the money put into the bag which was in his possession seems singularly tame, if it is not mere repetition. On the other hand, to say that Judas had formed the habit of pilfering is a natural explanation of the assertion that he had been guilty of theft. Weiss (Leben Jesu, ii. 443) thinks that ‘John had found out thefts committed by the greedy Judas’; this does not necessarily imply that the thefts were known to John at the time of Mary’s anointing, for they may have come to light after that act, but before the narrative was shaped in this form.
The rendering of ἐβάσταζεν by the neutral word ‘hare’ is adopted by some, who hold that John’s words do not imply more than that Judas had a thievish disposition. Ainger adopts this interpretation in a finely-wrought study of the character of Judas (The Gospel and Human Life, p. 231). It is true in a sense that ‘he may have been a thief long before he began to steal,’ but this exposition involves the unlikely assumption that the betrayal of Jesus was the ‘first act by which he converted his spirit of greed into actual money profit.’ If Judas had not formed the habit of pilfering, it is more difficult to understand how the thirty pieces of silver could be a real temptation to him.
Cheyne gets rid of the difficulty by assuming that the text is corrupt. In his conjectural emendation the word ‘thief’ has no place; he reads ‘because he was a harsh man, and used to carry the common purse’ (ὅτι χαλετὸς ἦν καὶ τὸ κοινὸν βαλλάντιον ἐβάσταζε). ‘The statement about Judas’ in this hypothetical text is then naïvely said to be ‘worthy of more credit than it has sometimes received from advanced critics’ (Ency. Bibl. ii. 2625).
(e) ‘Betrayer’ or ‘traitor.’—In the list of the Apostles given in Luke 6:16 there is a variation from the phrase by which Judas is usually described. Instead of δς καὶ παρέδωκεν αὐτόν (‘who also betrayed him,’ lit. ‘delivered him up’) St. Luke has δς ἐγένετο προδότης, well rendered by Field—‘who turned traitor’ (cf. Amer. Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘became a traitor’; Weymouth, ‘proved to be a traitor’). The translation in the Authorized and Revised Versions—‘which was the traitor’—neither brings out the force of γίνομαι, nor the significance of the omission of the article.
The statement that Judas ‘turned traitor’ should be remembered in framing or estimating theories to account for his history; it confirms what has been said on this subject under (c). From this point of view the various phrases used in the Gospels will repay careful discrimination: most frequent is the simple statement of the tragic deed as a historic fact—‘who betrayed him’ (Mark 3:19 παρέδωκεν); but there is also the prophecy, ‘The Son of Man is about to be betrayed’ (Matthew 17:22 μέλλει παραδίδπσθαι), and the statement, when the time was drawing nigh, that the process had already begun, ‘The Son of Man is being betrayed’ (Matthew 26:2 παραδίδαται). Similarly, Judas is described as ‘he who would betray him’ (John 6:64 ὁ παραδώσων), ‘he who is betraying me’ (Matthew 26:46 ὁ παραδιδούς), and as ‘he who had betrayed him’ (Matthew 27:3 ὁ παραδούς). In this connexion John 6:64 deserves special attention: ‘Jesus knew from the beginning … who it was that should betray him.’ Needless difficulties are occasioned when ‘from the beginning’ is regarded as referring to any period before the call of Judas; the thought seems to be that Jesus perceived ‘from the beginning’ of His intercourse with Judas the spirit that was in him. Hence the statement is wrongly interpreted in a fatalistic sense. The rendering, ‘Jesus knew who it was that would betray him’ has the advantage of suggesting that Jesus discerned the thoughts and intents of His unfaithful Apostle, and knew that ‘the germ of the traitor-spirit was already in the heart of Judas’ (cf. W. F. Moulton in Schaff’s Popular Commentary, in loc.).* [6]
(f) ‘A devil.’—In John 6:70 there is a contrast between the hopes of Jesus when He chose (ἐξελεξάμην) the Twelve, and His present grief over the moral deterioration of one whose nature is now devilish (διάβολός ἐστιν). Our Lord’s spiritual discourse to the multitude brought all who heard it to the parting of the ways; it shattered the hopes of those who were eager to share in the glories of an earthly kingdom. On the inner circle of the Apostles that teaching also cast its searching light; to Jesus, though not to Peter (v. 69), it was plain that Judas was at heart a deserter,—in sympathy with those who ‘went back and walked no more with him.’ What Jesus detected in Judas was ‘a sudden crystallization of evil, diabolic purpose, which made him a very adversary of the one whom he called friend’ (Wright, op. cit. in loc.). But an adversary is not an irreconcilable foe; the assertion taken in its full strength of meaning is a message of conciliation as well as of warning. It involved no lowering of the position of Judas among the Twelve, for his name is not mentioned; and it assuredly involved no relaxing of our Lord’s efforts to scatter with the light of love the gloom which was creeping into the heart of one whom He had chosen ‘to be with him.’ A strained interpretation of the saying underlies the statement that it ‘appears to be inconsistent with the equal confidence in all the disciples shown by Jesus according to the Synoptic tradition’ (Ency. Bibl. ii. 2624). ‘No man,’ says Pressensé, ‘could be more akin to a devil than a perverted apostle’ (Jesus Christ, p. 324).
(g) ‘Son of perdition.’—The Gr. word rendered ‘perdition’ in this phrase (John 17:12) is ἀπώλεια, which signifies the state of being lost. It is the substantive derived from the same root as the main verb of the sentence (ἀπώλετο). The connexion of thought is not easy to reproduce in English. Ainger (op. cit. p. 227) brings out the sense of the passage in a paraphrase: ‘None of them is lost, but he whose very nature it was to be lost—he (that is to say) whose insensibility to the Divine touch, whose irresponsiveness to the heavenly discipline, made it a certainty that he should fall away.’ The apostasy of Judas is traced to the ‘natural gravitation’ of his character. By a well-known Hebraism Judas is described as the ‘son of’ that which stamps his nature; he is of such a character that his proper state is one of loss (cf. 2 Thessalonians 2:3). The same word (ἀπώλεια) is rendered ‘waste’ in the Synoptic accounts of Mary’s anointing (Matthew 26:9, Mark 14:4). ‘To what purpose is this waste?’ was the expression of indignation of ‘some’ (Mk.) of the disciples; perhaps it was originally the question of Judas, though St. John does not say so. It may well be, however, that he whose audible murmur, ‘Why this loss or waste?’ was echoed by the other disciples is himself described by Jesus as ‘the son of loss’—‘the waster.’
This verse (John 17:12) is often appealed to by rival champions of Calvinism and Arminianism. In Bishop Sanderson’s Works (v. 324 f.) there is a letter to him from H. Hammond, who affirms that ‘here it is expressly said that Judas, though by his apostasy now become the son of perdition, was by God given to Christ.’ But the true reading is, ‘I kept them in thy name which thou hast given me’ ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885), and the thought (cf. John 17:9 ‘those whom thou hast given me’) is rather that ‘they in whom the Father’s object is attained’ are those ‘given’ to the Son; Judas, therefore, was not so given. ‘To suppose that Judas is now brought before us as one originally doomed to perdition, and that his character was but the evolving of his doom, would contradict not only the meaning of the Hebraic expression “son of” (which always takes for granted moral choice), but the whole teaching of this Gospel. In no book of the NT is the idea of will, of choice on the part of man, brought forward so repeatedly and with so great an emphasis’ (W. F. Moulton, op. cit. in loc.).
iii. Other NT References to Judas
(a) Before the Betrayal.—The obscurity which rests upon the early history of Judas accounts to a large extent for the difficulty of estimating his character. But for occasional allusions in the Fourth Gospel, all that is related of him before the Betrayal is that he was one of the chosen Twelve, and that he turned traitor. There is, however, a statement peculiar to St. Luke among the Synoptists, which is obviously intended to furnish an explanation of the act of Betrayal—‘Satan entered into Judas’ (john 22:3). It finds a fitting place in the introduction to the narrative of the Betrayal in the psychological Gospel which so often gives internal reasons; ‘the Gospel of the physician is also the Gospel of the psychologist’ (Alexander, Leading Ideas of the Gospels, p. 107). The same phrase, ‘Satan entered into him’ (εἰσῆλθεν εἰς ἐκεῖνον ὁ Σατανᾶς), is also found in John 13:27, and it is preceded by the statement (John 13:2) that the devil had ‘already put into the heart (ἤδη βεβληκότος εἰς τὴν καρδίαν) of Judas’ the thought of betrayal. It is true, as Cheyne says (Ency. Bibl. ii. 2625), that in Jn. we have ‘a modification of the Synoptic tradition,’ but that is not equivalent to ‘quite a different account.’ So far from asserting that ‘it was at the Last Supper that the hateful idea occurred to Judas,’ St. John prefaces his description of the proceedings at the Supper (δείπνου γινομένου) by the emphatic assertion that ‘already’ (ἤδη), i.e. at some time other than the Supper, the suggestion of the devil had been entertained by Judas. In St. Luke’s brief account it is said, once for all, that ‘Satan entered into Judas.’ In the Fourth Gospel the genesis of the foul purpose is distinguished from its consummation; the Satanic influences were not irresistible; the devil had not full possession of the heart of Judas until, ‘after the sop,’ he acted on the suggestion which had then become his own resolve.
The Fourth Gospel also makes the Anointing at Bethany (John 12:4 f.) a definite stage in the process which is sometime
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Judas Iscariot
The only biblical reference to Judas Iscariot by name outside the Gospels is Acts 1:16-20; Acts 1:25, and there he is called neither ‘Iscariot’ nor ‘the traitor’ (προδότης, as in Luke 6:16), nor is his action spoken of by the term παραδιδόναι. He is described in Luke 6:17 as the one who ‘became guide (ὁδηγός) to them that arrested Jesus,’ and in Luke 6:20 as having ‘fallen away (παρέβη) from the ministry and apostleship to go to his own place’ (see Place). It is interesting, however, to note the other allusions to our Lord’s betrayal in the Acts and in the Epistles. (1) In Acts 3:13 St. Peter attributes it virtually to the Israelites themselves (δν ὑμεῖς παρεδώκατε κτλ.; cf. Acts 2:23), and so again (2) in Acts 7:52 does St. Stephen (τοῦ δικαίου οὗ νῦν ὑμεῖς προδόται καὶ φονεῖς ἐγένεσθε). (3) In Romans 4:25 St. Paul, quoting Isaiah 53:12 (Septuagint ), says less definitely that Jesus our Lord παρεδόθη διὰ τὰ παραπτώματα ἡμῶν; (4) but in 1 Corinthians 11:23 the very act and time of betrayal are alluded to in connexion with the institution of the Last Supper (ἐν τῇ νυκτὶ ᾗ παρεδίδετο κτλ.). On the other hand, St. Paul three times describes the betrayal from the point of view of our Lord’s own voluntary submission, viz. (5) Galatians 2:20 : παραδόντος ἑαυτὸν ὑπὲρ ἐμοῦ; (6) Ephesians 5:2 : παρέδωκεν ἑαυτὸν ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν; (7) Ephesians 5:25 : ἐαυτὸν παρέδωκεν ὑπὲρ ἐκκλησίας (cf. 1 Peter 2:23 : παρεδίδου τῷ κρίνοντι δικαίως, and see John 10:17-18; John 17:19 etc.); and once (8) even of the Father Himself (ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν πάντων παρέδωκεν αὐτόν, Romans 8:32).
As to Judas’s grievous end itself, as recorded in the Acts, it is not necessary here to compare it in detail with the account given in Matthew 27:3 ff.; it is sufficient to say that in the present state of our information the two accounts are well-nigh, if not quite, irreconcilable. But various points in the Lucan record remain to be reviewed.
(a) St. Peter in his opening address at the election of St. Matthias infers that the inclusion of the traitor in the number of the apostles and his obtaining a share in their ministry was a mysterious dispensation by which was fulfilled the prediction of Psalms 41:9, so recently quoted by our Lord Himself (John 13:18), together with its necessary consequences as foreshadowed in two other Psalms (Psalms 69:25; Psalms 109:8): that is, if John 13:20 be an original part of St. Peter’s speech, and not, as is possible, a part of the Lucan (or later) elucidation of the passage contained in John 13:18-19. In any case, all three quotations, but specially for our purpose now, the last two, are of interest as illustrating the free use made of the text of Scripture and its secondary application. In Psalms 41:9 the actual wording bears little likeness to the Septuagint , being a more literal rendering of the Hebrew, while its original reference is to some treacherous friend (e.g. Ahithophel, the unfaithful counsellor of David). In Psalms 69:25 the text is more exact, but the original figure employed (ἡ ἔπαυλις αὐτῶν, not αὐτοῦ) suggests a nomad encampment of tents rendered desolate because of the cruel persecutions which their occupants had practised, while Psalms 109:8 has in view one particular official, like Doeg or Ahithophel, who has been false to his trust, and therefore it is, to our modern notions, more appropriately and with less strain transferred to the case of Judas.
(b) The passage John 13:18-19, with or without John 13:20 (see above), would seem to be an editorial comment inserted in the middle of St. Peter’s address either by the author of the Acts himself or, as has been thought, by some later glossator or copyist. Of the latter view there is, we believe, no indication in the history of the text. If, as is more likely, therefore, it is due to St. Luke, he has here adopted an account of the traitor’s grievous end which is independent of, and in some details apparently irreconcilable with, St. Matthew’s (Matthew 27:3 ff.), but to a less extent, we are inclined to think, than is sometimes held. For it is not out of keeping with eastern modes of treating facts for St. Luke to speak of the ‘field of blood’ being acquired by the traitor himself with the price of his iniquity (qui facit per alium, facit per se), which St. Matthew more accurately says was actually purchased by the chief priest, whilst the horribly graphic description of his suicide is little more than a conventional way of representing St. Matthew’s simple ἀπελθὼν ἀπήγξατο.
(c) For the title Akeldama and its interpretation see separate article, s.v.
It remains to remark that St. Peter’s expression, as recorded in his address, and the apostolic prayer of ordination, for which he was probably responsible and the mouthpiece, breathe much more of the spirit of primitive Christianity in their restrained and chastened style than the more outspoken and almost vindictive statements of John 13:18-19, so that one would not be altogether surprised to find that the latter are, as has been suggested, a less genuine tradition of a later age.
C. L. Feltoe.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Judas
Judas (jû'das). 1. The son of Jacob, "Judah" in R. V. Matthew 1:2; Matthew 3:2. The faithless apostle who betrayed his master. Matthew 10:4; Mark 3:19; Luke 6:16. He was Simon's son, John 6:71, and is called Iscariot, probably from his birthplace, perhaps from Kerioth in Judah, Joshua 15:25, or from Kartan, or Kartah, in Galilee. Joshua 21:32; Joshua 21:34. Of this man's earlier life we know nothing, nor for what reason he was induced to follow Jesus. Why our Lord appointed Judas an apostle, the sacred narrative does not tell us. Jesus knew and expressed his knowledge of Iscariot's character. John 6:64; John 6:70-71. In calling him our Lord acted only in accordance with the general administration of his kingdom. This is illustrated by one of his parables, Matthew 13:24-30; and it is no more than we continually see,—ungodly men in place and power, both in the world and in the church, with gifts which they abuse and responsibilities which increase their condemnation. It has often been a puzzle to those who did not understand the moral government of God, comp. Psalms 73:1-28; but he will eventually vindicate his wisdom and his justice. Meanwhile valuable lessons of warning and circumspection are taught by the fate of such as have perverted their privileges to their own ruin. Judas maintained a fair character among his fellow-apostles, and was entrusted with the custody of their money, John 12:6; John 13:29; nor do they seem to have suspected him even when our Lord was distinctly warning them that one of their number would betray him. Matthew 26:21-24; John 13:22. This was Judas' question to the priests: "What will ye give me?" Matthew 26:15. Satan espied bis opportunity and took it. Luke 22:8. Probably Judas began to see that he was suspected, and, when the Lord in answer to his hypocritical question, had distinctly told him of his treason, full of additional passion, he went recklessly about his work. Matthew 26:25; John 13:26-30. He was fulfilling prophecy, but was unconscious of it. His own evil heart it was that prompted him; and therefore the guilt of his deed was upon himself. When confronted with the results of his base treachery, he was seized with remorse, returned the bribe, and hanged himself. 3. One described as one of the Lord's brethren, Matthew 13:55, called also Juda. Mark 6:3 A. V. An interesting story is related of his family by Eusebius. The emperor Domitian was alarmed by what he had heard of Messiah's kingdom, and ordered some of the descendants of the house of David to be sought out and brought to him. Those so presented to the emperor were the grandsons of Judas; but the hardness of their hands, proving that they were but ordinary peasants, and their description of the spiritual nature of the new sovereignty, removed all apprehensions. They were let go, and lived on, honored as the Lord's relatives, into the reign of Trajan. 4. A brother of James, and one of the apostles; called also Thaddæus and Lebbæus. Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:16; John 14:22; Acts 1:13; Matthew 13:55. 5. Judas of Galilee, a leader of an insurrection "in the days of taxing "—i.e., the census—a.d. 6, and who, according to Gamaliel, was very successful for a time, but was ultimately completely defeated. Acts 5:37. We find in Josephus an allusion to a man, who is there said to have been born in the city of Gamala in Gaulanitis, and to have been the founder of a new sect, which did not differ from that of the Pharisees save in a fanatical love of liberty and refusal to support the Roman state. 6. The one whose house in Straight street, Damascus, sheltered Paul during his blindness. Acts 9:11; Acts 9:17. This Judas may have kept an inn; it is unlikely that he was a disciple. 7. Judas, surnamed Barsabas, a "chief man among the brethren," a "prophet," who was chosen along with Paul and Barnabas and Silas to carry the decisions of the council of Jerusalem, a.d. 50, to Antioch. Acts 15:22-33.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Judas
Jude
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Judas
Matthew 26:47 (c) He is generally used as a type of the ingrate who turns traitor to the friend he should love and becomes an enemy of one to whom he is deeply indebted.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Judas
JUDE, JUDAS
There were two of this name well known in the Scriptures of the New Testament, the one an apostle of Christ, called in Matthew's gospel, (Matthew 10:3) Lebbeus, whose surname was Thaddeus, and by Luke, the brother of James; and he is again noticed by the persons who thought slight of our Lord and his doctrine, as his brother, Matthew 13:55. This was the Judas which spake to Christ in the midst of our Lord's sermon, and said, "Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?" (Luke 22:14-39) He is the Jude to whom, under the Holy Ghost, we are indebted for that precious morsel of gospel truth which is contained in the Epistle that bears his name. The other Jude or Judas is he who was surnamed Barsabas, (see Acts 15:22) and who was commissioned by the apostles to go to the church at Antioch. We have the account of his journey in the same chapter,. (Acts 15:30, etc) There is another Judas different from both the former, mentioned Acts 9:11. Lastly, Judas Iscariot, the traitor. Some read it Ish-cariot, the man of carioth; but certainly more properly Ish and corath, the man of murder.
See Iscariot
The awful character of this man is related to us so fully in the gospels, that there can need nothing more than a reference to those sacred records to obtain the most complete account of him, together with his tremendous doom: for what can more fully decide the everlasting ruin of the traitor than the Lord Jesus's account of him, when summing up all in one the most finished picture of misery, Jesus saith "good were it for that man, if he had never been born!" (Mark 14:11)
It hath been a subject of some debate in the early church respecting Judas Iscariot, whether he did or did not receive the Lord's Supper. Some have insisted upon it that he did, and others, equally positive, have asserted that he did not. The best way to determine the point, will be to regard what the Evangelists have said upon the subject; for it must be from their testimony alone a right judgment can be formed. I shall therefore, bring each of them in their relation concerning this matter before the reader, and then leave it to his own determination which opinion to take. Matthew gives a particular account of the whole proceedings of the Supper from first to last, (Matthew 26:20-30) and expressly states that when the twelve: consequently Judas was included. And so unconscious were the rest of the disciples who the traitor was, when the Lord at the table intimated that one of them should betray him, that they were exceeding sorrowful, and began to say unto him every one, Lord, is it I? And when the Lord to the enquiry of Judas declared that he was the person, there is nothing said of his departure, but that the Lord proceeded to bless the bread and the cup, and said, "Drink ye all of it." After the supper, when they had sung a hymn, they went out into the mount of Olives. This is the whole relation as given by Matthew. Mark states the circumstances very nearly to the same amount; (Mark 14:12-26) This evangelist observes, that prior to the supper Judas had been with the chief priests, and covenanted with them to betray Christ unto them. This however did not prevent him from mingling with the other disciples at the table, for Mark saith, that in the evening Jesus "came with the twelve;" and he adds, that "as they sat and did eat" Jesus intimated the circumstance of one of them betraying him. But from this evangelist's account it doth not appear that any discovery was then made of the traitor, neither is there the least idea afforded as if Judas was not present at the whole supper.
Luke is yet more particular in his account of the supper. (See John 14:22) He saith, that when the hour was come, Jesus sat down, and "the twelve apostles with him." And what is much to the point in respect to the question now under consideration, this evangelist, in his statement of this memorable transaction, represents the Lord as proceeding to the supper, and giving both the bread and the cup to them before he intimated the presence of the traitor. So that, according to this relation of the subject, the Supper was finished when Jesus declared concerning the act of betraying him. John hath said nothing of the Supper itself, except he had respect to it in the opening of John 13:1-38. The reason, no doubt, of his silence was, that as the other evangelists had related the circumstances so particularly, and his gospel being principally intended as supplementary, to record those things of the Lord Jesus which they had omitted, there needed not again the account of the transactions of the Supper. But if the evangelist meant the Lord's Supper in the Passover, when he said, (John 13:2) "And supper being ended, the devil having now put into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon's son, to betray him"-if this was the sacramental supper, then it will follow that all that is subsequent in this chapter was also subsequent to the service. And as the evangelist John saith also in this same chapter, that it was after the sop which Jesus gave him, as a token of the traitor, that "Satan entered into him," then must it have been after the supper. Such are the several relations given by the several evangelists on this memorable point. The reader will now judge for himself, when he hath duly considered the whole taken together. But I cannot see the very great importance of the question, whether Judas Iscariot did or did not receive the Lord's Supper. Put the case that he did-what did he receive? Nothing, surely, more than the mere outward sign. He had no part or lot in the matter. He had no union with Christ, and consequently no communion with him in the ordinance. For as the apostle justly and decidedly states it, "what concord hath Christ with Belial?" (2 Corinthians 6:15) Judas being present at the table, and partaking of the elements of the table, became neither benefited himself, nor was it injurious to others. We read in earlier periods of the church, that "when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, Satan came also among them." (Job 1:6) But was the meeting unhallowed to the sons of God because the devil came in the midst? Were the apostles of Christ less apostles because Judas was "numbered with them, and had obtained part of this ministry?" (Acts 1:17) And surely if the Lord Jesus, well knowing as he did whom he had chosen, was pleased to number him for a time with the apostles, might he not for a time also allow him to sit down with the apostles at the same table? Yea, did not the Lord Jesus expressly tell the church, that these things were his own appointment, and perfectly known in all their consequences by his divine mind, when he said, "Have I not chosen you twelve, and one of you is a devil?" (John 6:70) If choosing Judas to be an apostle, at the time Christ knew that he was a devil, did not in the least contaminate the rest of the apostles, neither injure the cause of Jesus, it must undeniably follow, that his being present at the supper could not pollute the supper, nor the faithful partakers of the supper. These things can never be injured by outward causes. The "precious and the vile" must necessarily in this world be often brought together, but the ordinance can receive no taint from the worthlessness of partakers. Ordinances of every kind, like the gospel itself, will prove "a savour of life unto life" unto some, whilst "a savour of death unto death" unto others. Here lies the grand discriminating mark, "the Lord knoweth them that are his." (2 Timothy 2:19) And while the Lord knoweth them that are his, he no less knoweth them that are not. And we have already left upon record, the awful sentence which will be read to all such in the great day of God. "Then shall ye begin to say, We have eaten and drunk in thy presence, and thou hast taught in our streets. But he shall say, I tell you I know ye not whence ye are; depart from me, all ye workers of iniquity." (Luke 13:26-27) Indeed, may we not go farther, and suppose, that from this very appointment the Lord intended special good to his people? Was it not in effect saying, that if in the instance of the Lord Jesus himself a Judas is permitted, yea, appointed to attend his person, can it be wondered at in the minglings up of life, that his people should be so exercised? If in the college of apostles, out of twelve persons one should be a devil, can his people complain that they are sometimes called "to dwell with Mesech, and to have their habitation among the tents of Kedar?" Did Jesus, the Lord of life and glory, who might have commanded twelve legions of angels to attend him, permit, yea, even appoint a known devil to be his servant, to be with him in his miracles and his ministry, yea, to be one of the party at his farewell super-and what doth the meek and gentle Saviour teach thereby all his tried ones upon earth but this, that in their intercourse with the graceless they are to call to mind the unequalled humblings of Jesus in such instances. If he endured such a contradiction of sinners against himself, they are not to be wearied nor faint in their mind. The most blessed purposes are in the design. It hath been so in the church of God from the beginning, and will continue so unto the end. In the family of Adam there was a Cain; in Noah's house there was a Ham; Isaac had his Esau as well as Jacob; and, above all, the Lord Jesus had Judas. Tares are in the church as well as the pure wheat; and it is Jesus himself that saith, "Let both grow together unto the harvest." But then when the harvest comes, the final and everlasting separation takes place; then it will be no longer needful that characters so very opposite should dwell together. "Then will I say (saith the Lord Jesus) to the reapers, Gather ye together first the tares, and bind them in bundles to burn them: but gather the wheat into my barn." (Matthew 13:30)
I cannot dismiss the view we have taken of this subject without making one short observation more on the occasion, namely, to remark how it is in our reading the Scriptures hastily to leap to conclusions, and to frame our opinions according to our supposed fitness of things, and not by the standard of the divine word. Assuming it for granted that Jesus, who knew the hearts of all men, neither needed that nay should shew him, would not have permitted Judas to partake of his supper, they instantly leap to a conclusion, that it could not be, and decide upon it accordingly. We are told by Chrysostom, that a similar offence was taken in his days, by some weak and injudicious Christians, at that sweet passage in St. John's Gospel, (John 11:35) where it is said, that Jesus wept. Concluding, that it was unsuitable and unbecoming the person and dignity of the Lord Jesus to be affected with human passions, they struck it out of their Bibles. But it was happy for us, and the Christian world at large, that when striking it out of their Bibles they could not strike it out of ours. Blessed be the Lord for presiding over his word, and preserving to us the sweet passage; for surely, to all true believers in Jesus, such views of Jesus are among the loveliest and most endearing parts in his divine character. Nothing can be more soothing and consolatory to a poor, sorrowful, afflicted follower of the Lord Jesus in his hours of suffering, than the consideration that he who is now exalted at the right hand of the majesty on high, was once, when on earth, "a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief." And the highest possible relief to the anguish of the soul under temptation, is the consciousness of the sympathy and compassion of Christ. He who wept when upon earth in beholding the tears of his people, cannot be unfeeling of them now though in heaven. And we have authority to conclude, that this sweet feature in the character of Jesus is as much his as ever; "in that he hath suffered, being tempted, he knoweth how to succour them that are tempted."
Let me only beg to add one observation more in relation to the traitor Judas, and then take a final farewell of his history forever; namely, concerning the awful death of the man, and the judgments that followed in his bowels gushing out. One of the evangelists saith, that he hanged himself. (Matthew 27:3-5) And another adds, "that falling headlong, he burst asunder, and all his bowels gushed out." (Acts 1:18-19) both events, no doubt, took place: and as by the suffocation induced by hanging, a great swelling might most probably take place, when he fell, the rupture of the lower part of the belly, called the abdomen, gave way, and the bowels gushed out. Think, what a spectacle! How justly the object of detestation both to God and man! And think if possible what followed.-To all the tremendous miseries of eternity he had to add, the special and peculiar aggravation in the everlasting and unceasing thought-that he, of all the creation of God, had this worm of conscience that never dieth, to prey upon him to all eternity, that he it was that betrayed the Lord of life and glory.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot
IN the opening chapter of the Acts of the Apostles we are introduced into the first congregational meeting, so to call it, that ever was held in the Church of Christ. There are a hundred-and-twenty members present in the upper room, and the Presbytery of Jerusalem are met there with the congregation: moderator, clerk, and all. Peter presides; and he discharges the duties of the day with all that solemnity of mind and all that intensity of heart which we seldom miss in Peter. The solemnity of the meeting would solemnise any man. It would melt a far harder heart than the heart of the emotional son of Jonas ever was. For Judas Iscariot, a member of the Presbytery, so to call him, has turned out to have been the son of perdition all the time. For thirty pieces of silver he had become guide to them that took Jesus. Peter himself had wellnigh gone down into the same horrible pit with Judas: and he also would have been in his own place by this time, had it not been that his Master prayed for Peter that his faith might not fail. And thus it is that Peter is now sitting in that seat of honour and influence and authority, and is conducting the election of a successor to Judas, with all that holy fear and with all that firm faith which makes that upper room, under Peter's presidency, such a pattern to all vacant congregations to all time. Considering her age and her size, the Church of Jerusalem had a large number of men any one of whom could quite well have been put forward and proposed for the vacant office. But Peter and his colleagues, with a great sense of responsibility, had prepared a short leet of two quite outstanding and distinguished men; Joseph, who was surnamed Justus, and Matthias. And then one of the eleven led the congregation in prayer in these well-remembered words-"Lord, Thou knowest the hearts of all men: show whether of these two Thou hast chosen." And the lot fell upon Matthias, and he was numbered with the eleven apostles.
Now, somewhat remarkable to say, never before the day of his election, and never after it, is Matthias's name so much as once mentioned in all the New Testament. At the same time, we have Matthias's footprints, so to speak, oftener than once on the pages of the four Gospels. And a man's mere footprints, and the direction they point to, will sometimes tell us far more about the real character and capacity of the man than whole volumes of printed matter about him. The first time we see one of Matthias's footprints is on the sands of Bethabara beyond Jordan, where John was baptizing. Like Andrew and Simon the sons of Jonas, and like John the son of Zebedee, Matthias was a disciple of the Baptist at that time, confessing his sins. The next day John seeth Jesus coming to him, and saith to Matthias, Behold the Lamb of God. And Matthias heard him speak, and he followed Jesus, along with John and Andrew. And when Peter tabled Matthias's name on the day of the election, he certified all these things about Matthias to the ten, and to the women, and to Mary the mother of Jesus, and to His brethren, and to the whole hundred-and-twenty. And more than that, Peter certified to the whole congregation that, when many who had been baptized, apostatised and went back and walked no more with John and Jesus, Matthias, said Peter, has this to his praise, that he has endured and has persevered up to this very present. Not only so, but this also, that Matthias had been a witness with the eleven of the resurrection of the Lord. And these, added Peter, are the two indispensable tests of fitness for this vacant office; a three years' conversion and faithful diseipleship, and this also, that he had seen the risen Lord with his own eyes. And the lot fell upon Matthias.
Now, it is sometimes not very unlike that when you yourselves meet to call a minister. Tremendous as the moment is: everlasting as the issues are that hang upon that moment: you may never have heard so much as the name of that candidate for the pastorate of your immortal soul. You may never so much as have heard him once open his mouth either to pray or to preach. Not one of the hundred-and-twenty had ever heard this stranger man Matthias once open his mouth. But Peter has had his eye on Matthias all along. Peter knew far more about both Joseph and Matthias than they could have believed. Peter was all ears and all eyes where a future apostle and pastor was concerned. And so it is sometimes still. All you really know about your future minister you have to take sometimes on the best testimony you can get. As one of our own elders once said when we were calling our young minister: "I would rather trust to those two capable men who know him and have heard him preach, than I would trust to my own ears." And he spake with both wisdom and humility in so saying. Like the hundred-and-twenty, little as you know about your future minister, you know this much, that when all the other young men at school and college were choosing learning, and philosophy, and medicine, and law, and the army, and the navy, and trade, and manufactures, and so on; this youth now in your offer was led to choose the word of God, and the pulpit, and the pastorate, for his life-work. And, with all that, you may with some assurance, put your hand to his call, after you have made your importunate and personal prayer about this whole momentous matter to Him who knows the hearts of all men. For He knows your heart better than you know it yourself: and He knows just what kind of a minister your heart needs: your own heart and your children's hearts. And, then, He knows the hearts of all those probationers also, and whether their hearts are properly in their Master's work or no. As also what motive it was that made them ministers at first, and with what motive and with what intention they are laying out their future work among you. How well it is, both for congregations and candidates, that He knows all men's hearts, and that all men's hearts are in His hands.
Three years ago Matthias had come through a very sharp trial of faith, and love, and patience, and perseverance. At his conversion and baptism Matthias had prepared his heart to leave all and to follow Christ. But instead of being invited to do what with all his heart he wished to do, Matthias was deliberately passed over by our Lord in His election of the twelve. Matthias had been in Christ, as Paul says, a long time before some of those men who were lifted over his head; and here was he as good as set aside and clean forgotten. And, just suppose, what is more than likely, that Matthias knew Judas's secret heart and real character quite well; what a shock it was to Matthias's faith, and love, and whole religious life, to see such a deceiver as Iscariot was, deliberately chosen by Christ, when Matthias would have shed the last drop of his blood for the Master who had refused to employ him. But Matthias, for all that, did not let his heart sour. He accepted being set aside as his proper place. He found in himself only too many reasons why he was so set aside. He was like the defeated candidate in Plutarch who, departing home from the election to his house, said to them at home that it did him good to see that there were three hundred men in Athens who were better men than he was. And thus it was that when many men would have turned away and gone after another master, Matthias said to himself: 'Office or no office, election or rejection, call or no call, to whom else can I go?' Nay, not only did Matthias keep true to his Master through all these humiliations and disappointments, but he continued to behave himself and to lay out his life just as if he had been elected and ordained. So much so, that without ordination he worked harder at the out-of-the-way work of the discipleship than some of those did who were elected, and ordained, and honoured, and rewarded men. And thus it was that Peter was able to certify to the hundred-and-twenty that Matthias had been as true and as loyal to his Lord all those three years as the very best of the eleven had been. 'And thus,' said Peter, 'if there were some who were numbered among us who were not at heart of us, there were others who were at heart and in life really of us, though they were not as yet written down among us.' So have I myself seen heaven-born and highly-gifted ministers of Christ passed over in the day when this and that vacant charge met to cast their lots. And, like Matthias, I have seen such men left out at the beginning only to be the more promoted and employed in the end. But then, to be sure, they were like Matthias in this also, that all their days they were men of staunchest loyalty to their Master, and men of sleepless labour for His cause. When a door shall open, and where, is not the true servant's business, nor his anxiety. It is the true servant's part to be ready; which the truest of all servants never feels that he is. And disappointments and procrastinations to all such men are but extended opportunities to enable them to be somewhat less unready for their call when it comes. If Matthias had been a modern probationer you would not have found him going about complaining against this committee and that congregation. You would not have seen him going about idle all the week, and then turning up at each new vacancy with the same old and oft-fingered sermon. No. You may shut all your doors on some candidates, but you cannot shut them out from their books, and from the hidden and unstipended work that their hearts love. You cannot, with all your ill-cast lots, either embitter or alienate a truly elect, and humble-minded, and diligent disciple of Christ, And with all your ill-advised elections the stone that is fit for the wall will not always be let lie in the ditch.
But is there anything possible to our very best probationers that can at all be compared to this qualification of those days-to have companied with the Lord Jesus all the time He went out and in among His disciples? Yes; I think there is. Nay, not only so; but when we enter into all the inwardness and depth of this matter we come to see that our students of divinity and our probationers have actually some great advantages over the twelve disciples themselves. Our Lord's words are final, and full of instruction and comfort to us, on this matter. His words to Thomas, I mean. Jesus saith to him "Thomas, because thou hast seen, thou hast believed; blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed." And you will all recall Sir Thomas Browne's noble protestation: "Now, honestly, I bless myself that I never saw Christ nor His disciples. I would not have been one of Christ's patients on whom He wrought His wonders. For then had my faith been thrust upon me, nor should I enjoy that greater blessing pronounced to all that believe and saw not. I believe He was dead and buried, and rose again: and desire to see Him in His glory, rather than to contemplate Him in His cenotaph or sepulchre. They only had the advantage of a bold and noble faith who lived before His coming, and who upon obscure prophecies and mystical types could raise a belief and expect apparent impossibilities." To have seen and handled the Word of Life; to have had Him dwelling among them, full of grace and truth, as John says; to have had Him going in and out among them, as Peter says, was a privilege incomparable and unspeakable. At the same time, let any student in our day read his Greek Testament, with his eye on the Object: let him be like John Bunyan:-"Methought I was as if I had seen Him born, as if I had seen Him grow up, as if I had seen Him walk through this world, from the Cradle to the Cross: to which, when He came, I saw how gently He gave Himself up to be hanged and nailed on it for my sins and wicked doings. Also, as I was musing on this His progress, that dropped on my spirit, He was ordained for the slaughter," and so on. Let any of our students company with Christ all the time He went in and out in that manner, and he may depend upon it that the beautiful benediction which our Lord addressed in reproof to Thomas will be richly fulfilled to that wise-hearted student all his happy ministerial days, and through him to his happy people. Now, if there were a divinity student here I would ask and demand of him out of this Scripture for students-Are you so companying with Christ while you are still at college? Do you see with all your inward eyes what you read in your New Testament? Do you believe and believe and believe your way through the four Gospels? Is your faith the very substance itself of the things you hope for, and the absolute and conclusive evidence of the things you do not as yet see? Do you pray your way through the life of Christ? Do you put the lepers, and the sick, and the possessed with devils, and the dead in their graves, out of their places, as you read about them; and do you put yourself into their places, and say what they say, and hear and accept what is said to them? For, if so, then you will receive, all your preaching and pastoral days, the end of your faith, the salvation of your own soul, and the salvation of the souls of your people.
Then, again, could any of our probationers be put forward by his proposer as Matthias was still put forward by Peter? No. It could not possibly be said of any man living in these dregs of time of ours that he had been an actual witness of the resurrection of Christ. And yet I am not so sure of that. Strange things can be said when you come to speak about a true probationer. With man it is impossible; but not with God With God all things are possible. I myself know probationers who are witnesses of the very best authority that Christ is risen indeed. Let such a young preacher come to your vacant pulpit with Ephesians 1:19-23; Ephesians 2:1 for his Sabbath morning exposition; and let him set forth with Paul, that the spiritual quickening of a soul dead in trespasses and sins is done by the same mighty power that quickened and raised up Christ, and you will soon see if he knows what he is speaking about. And if he does: if he makes your hearts to burn with the noble doctrine of his and your oneness with the risen Christ, then you have in your offer a living witness of apostolic rank for Christ's resurrection. You might have the angel who rolled away the stone and sat on it for your other candidate, but he should have no vote of mine. Give me for my minister, not Gabriel himself, but a fellow-sinner who has been quickened together with Christ, and who can describe the process and the experience till my death-cold heart burns within me with the resurrection-life of Christ. Give me a minister whom God has raised from the dead, and you may have all the sounding brasses and tinkling cymbals in heaven and earth for me. And I am glad to say that there are not a few probationers abroad of that experience. Only, are you sure you will recognise them when they appear and preach in your pulpit? For-
A jest's prosperity lies in the earOf him that hears it, never in the tongueOf him that speaks it.Let the hundred-and-twenty take heed how they hear.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Judas Iscariot
or, as he is usually called, the traitor, and betrayer of our Lord. "The treachery of Judas Iscariot," says Dr. Hales, "his remorse, and suicide, are occurrences altogether so strange and extraordinary, that the motives by which he was actuated require to be developed, as far as may be done, where the evangelists are, in a great measure, silent concerning them, from the circumstances of the history itself, and from the feelings of human nature. Judas, the leading trait in whose character was covetousness, was probably induced to follow Jesus at first with a view to the riches, honours, and other temporal advantages, which he, in common with the rest, expected the Messiah's friends would enjoy. The astonishing miracles he saw him perform left no room to doubt of the reality of his Master's pretensions, who had, indeed, himself in private actually accepted the title from his Apostles; and Judas must have been much disappointed when Jesus repeatedly refused the proffered royalty from the people in Galilee, after the miracle of feeding the five thousand, and again after his public procession to Jerusalem. He might naturally have grown impatient under the delay, and dissatisfied also with Jesus for openly discouraging all ambitious views among his disciples; and, therefore, he might have devised the scheme of delivering him up to the sanhedrim, or great council of the nation, (composed of the chief priests, scribes, and elders,) in order to compel him to avow himself openly as the Messiah before them; and to work such miracles, or to give them the sign which they so often required, as would convince and induce them to elect him in due form, and by that means enable him to reward his followers. Even the rebukes of Jesus for his covetousness, and the detection of his treacherous scheme, although they unquestionably offended Judas, might only serve to stimulate him to the speedier execution of his plot, during the feast of the passover, while the great concourse of the Jews, from all parts assembled, might powerfully support the sanhedrim and their Messiah against the Romans. The success of this measure, though against his master's will, would be likely to procure him pardon, and even to recommend him to favour afterward. Such might have been the plausible suggestions by which Satan tempted him to the commission of this crime. But when Judas, who attended the whole trial, saw that it turned out quite contrary to his expectations, that Jesus was capitally convicted by the council, as a false Christ and false prophet, notwithstanding he had openly avowed himself; and that he wrought no miracle, either for their conviction or for his own deliverance, as Judas well knew he could, even from the circumstance of healing Malchus, after he was apprehended; when he farther reflected, like Peter, on his Master's merciful forewarnings of his treachery, and mild and gentle rebuke at the commission of it; he was seized with remorse, and offered to return the paltry bribe of thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders instantly on the spot, saying, ‘I sinned in delivering up innocent blood;' and expected that on this they would have desisted from the prosecution. But they were obstinate, and not only would not relent, but threw the whole load of guilt upon him, refusing to take their own share; for they said, ‘What is that to us? see thou to that;' thus, according to the aphorism, loving the treason, but hating the traitor, after he had served their wicked turn. Stung to the quick at their refusal to take back the money, while they condemned himself, he went to the temple, cast down the whole sum in the treasury, or place for receiving the offerings of the people; and, after he had thus returned the wages of iniquity, he retired to some lonely place, not far, perhaps, from the scene of Peter's repentance; and, in the frenzy of despair, and at the instigation of the devil, hanged himself; crowning with suicide the murder of his master and his friend; rejecting his compassionate Saviour, and plunging his own soul into perdition! In another place it is said that, ‘falling headlong, he burst asunder, and all his bowels gushed out,' Acts 1:18 . Both these accounts might be true: he might first have hanged himself from some tree on the edge of a precipice; and, the rope or branch breaking, he might be dashed to pieces by the fall."
The above view of the case of Judas endeavours ingeniously to account for his conduct by supposing him influenced by the motive of compelling our Lord to declare himself, and assume the Messiahship in its earthly glory. It will, however, be recollected, that the only key which the evangelic narrative affords, is, Judas's covetousness; which passion was, in him, a growing one. It was this which destroyed whatever of honest intention he might at first have in following Jesus; and when fully under its influence he would be blinded by it to all but the glittering object of the reward of iniquity. In such a mind there could be no true faith, and no love; what wonder, then, when avarice was in him a ruling and unrestrained passion, that he should betray his Lord? Still it may be admitted that the knowledge which Judas had of our Lord's miraculous power, might lead him the more readily to put him into the hands of the chief priests. He might suppose that he would deliver himself out of their hands; and thus Judas attempted to play a double villany, against Christ and against his employers.
Webster's Dictionary - Judas-Colored
(a.) Red; - from a tradition that Judas Iscariot had red hair and beard.
Webster's Dictionary - Judas
(1):
(a.) Treacherous; betraying.
(2):
(n.) The disciple who betrayed Christ. Hence: A treacherous person; one who betrays under the semblance of friendship.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Judas
1. ISCARIOT, that is, man of Carioth or Kerioth, a city of Judah, Joshua 15:25 . Being one of the twelve apostles of our Lord, Judas seems to have possessed the full confidence of his fellow apostles, and was entrusted by them with all the presents which were made them, and all their means of subsistence; and when the twelve were sent out to preach and to work miracles, Judas appears to have been among them, and to have received the same powers. He was accustomed, however, even at this time, to appropriate part of their common stock to his own use, John 12:6 ; and at length sealed his infamy by betraying his Lord to the Jews for money. For the paltry sum of about , he engaged with the Jewish Sanhedrin to guide them to a place where they could seize him by night without danger of a tumult. But when he learned the result, a terrible remorse took possession of him; not succeeding in undoing his fatal work with the priests, he cast down before them the price of blood, crossed the gloomy valley of Hinnom, and hung himself, Matthew 27:3-10 . Luke, in Acts 1:18 , adds that he fell headlong and burst asunder, probably by the breaking of the rope or branch. The steep hillside south of the valley of Hinnom might well be the scene of such a twofold death. See ACELDAMA .
The remorseful confession of Judas was a signal testimony to the spotless innocence of Christ, Matthew 27:4 ; and his awful end is a solemn warning against avarice, hypocrisy, and all unfaithfulness, Matthew 26:34 John 17:12 Acts 1:25 .
2. One of the apostles, called also Jude, Lebbeus, and Thaddeus, Matthew 10:3 Mark 3:18 Jude 1:1 , the son of Alpheus and Mary, and brother of James the LESS. See James 2,3 . He was the author of the epistle which bears his name, Mark 6:3 Luke 6:16 Acts 1:13 .
3. The brother of our Lord, Matthew 27:56 . Supposed by many to have been only a cousin, and the same as Judas 2. The apostle. But his "brethren" did not believe in him until near the close of his ministry. See James 3 4 . A Christian teacher, called also Barsabas, sent from Jerusalem to Antioch with Paul and Barnabas, Acts 15:22,27,32 .
5. Surnamed "the Galilean," called also, by Josephus, the Gaulonite. He was born at Gamala, a city of Gaulonitis near the southeastern shore of the lake of Tiberias. In company with one Sadoc, he attempted to excite a sedition among the Jews, but was destroyed by Quirinus, or Cyrenius, at that time governor of Syria and Judea, Acts 5:37 .
6. A Jew at Damascus, with whom Paul lodged, Acts 9:11 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Thaddeus, Judas, Saint
Apostle, brother of Saint James the Less, and one of the "Brothers of Jesus" (Luke 6; Acts 1; Matthew 10; Mark 3). He is not to be confused with Thaddeus of Edessa, one of the 72 disciples, Judas Jacobi, or Judas Simon, disciples of the Apostles. After the Lord's Supper, Judas asked Christ why He would not manifest Himself to the world (John 14). Judas's missionary work was performed principally in Palestine, also in Syria, Mesopotamia, and Persia. The place of his death is unknown; Beirut and Arad in Phenicia have been mentioned as possible places, and there is a tradition that he suffered martyrdom. His Epistle, addressed to all the churches in the East, and to the Jews in particular, is in some parts coincident with 2Peter. Patron of desperate cases, and hospitals. Emblems: a sword, a square rule, and a club. Relics in Saint Peter's, Rome, and at Toulouse. Feast, Roman Calendar, October 28,.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Judas Iscariot
Son of Simon and one of the twelve apostles. He was a false disciple: when the Lord said to His apostles 'ye are clean,' He excepted Judas in the words 'but not all.' He was sent out with the others to preach, and no exception is made in his case as to the working of miracles in the name of the Lord Jesus. Under the plea of the necessities of the poor he complained of money being wasted when Mary anointed the Lord. Yet he did not really care for the poor: he was treasurer, and was a thief. Satan knew the covetousness of Judas and put it into his heart to betray the Lord for money, which he did for thirty pieces of silver. Satan afterwards, as the Adversary, took possession of him to insure the success of the betrayal.
Judas probably thought that the Lord would escape from those who arrested Him, as He had escaped from previous dangers, while he would gain the money. When the Lord was condemned, Judas was filled with remorse, confessed he had betrayed innocent blood, and cast the money into the temple. He was a complete dupe of Satan, who first tempted him to gain the money, and then would not let him keep it. He went and hanged himself, and probably falling from the tree, his bowels gushed out. An awful termination of a sinful course. The Lord called him the 'son of perdition.'
In modern times men have erroneously argued that his confession under remorse showed true repentance, and that there is hope of his salvation! but it is not so: he fell 'that he might go to his own place.' It was a trial of man under new circumstances: to be a 'familiar friend' (Psalm 41:9 ) of the Lord Jesus, to hear His gracious words, see His miracles, and probably be allowed to work miracles himself in His name; and yet, as in every other trial of man, he fell. Judas is a solemn instance of how far a person may be under the influence and power of Christianity, and yet become an apostate: cf. Hebrews 6:1-6 . He is mentioned in Matthew 10:4 ; Matthew 26:14-47 ; Matthew 27:3 ; Luke 22:3,47,48 ; John 13:2,26,29 ; John 18:2-5 ; Acts 1:16,25 , etc.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Judas
1. The patriarch JUDAH. Matthew 1:2,3 .
2. One of the apostles, brother of James. Luke 6:16 ; John 14:22 ; Acts 1:13 . Called JUDE in Jude 1 ; and apparently the same as 'Lebbaeus, whose surname was Thaddaeus.' Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 .
3. One of the brethren of the Lord. Matthew 13:55 : called JUDA in Mark 6:3 .
4. Judas of Galilee, who raised an insurrection in the days of the taxing, A.D. 6. He was killed by the Romans and his followers were dispersed. Acts 5:37 .
5. One in Damascus with whom Paul lodged. Acts 9:11 .
6. A 'prophet' sent from Jerusalem to Antioch. Acts 15:22 . See BARSABAS, No. 2.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Judas Barsabas
A leading man among the brethren at Jerusalem (Acts 15:22). A "prophet" (Acts 15:32). Along with Silas accompanied Paul and Barnabas to deliver the epistle concerning the obligations of Gentiles, from the council at Jerusalem to the church at Antioch, and to confirm the same by word of mouth (Acts 15:27). Judas accordingly with Silas under the Spirit "exhorted the brethren with many words, and confirmed them" (Acts 15:32). After tarrying there a space "they were let go in peace from the brethren unto the apostles" (the Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, Alexandrinus manuscripts omit Acts 15:34). Probably Judas was brother of Joseph Barsabas (Acts 1:23).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Judas
At whose house, in the street called Straight at Damascus (now the "street of bazaars," reaching long, straight, and wide from the S. gate into the heart of the city), Saul of Tarsus lodged after his conversion (Acts 9:11). The house is still professedly shown a few steps out of the "street of bazaars," in an open space, "the sheikh's place." It has a stone floored square room, partly wailed off for a tomb shown as "the tomb of Ananias."
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Judas
It seems that, after the treachery of Judas Iscariot in betraying Jesus, the name Judas became unpopular among Christians. Those who already had the name Judas often preferred some other name.
For example, Jesus’ group of twelve apostles included a second man named Judas, but when writers mention him they point out that he was the son of a man named James, and not Judas Iscariot. To avoid confusion, this apostle apparently took another name, Thaddaeus (or Lebbaeus) (Matthew 10:3; Luke 6:16; John 14:22; see THADDAEUS). One of Jesus’ brothers was named Judas, but on becoming a believer he was known by the shorter name, Jude (Matthew 13:55; see JUDE). A prophet named Judas in the Jerusalem church took another name, Barsabbas (Acts 15:22; Matthew 26:47-5619). (Concerning Judas the Galilean mentioned in Acts 5:37 see ZEALOT.)
Judas Iscariot
Judas the betrayer was commonly known as Iscariot (meaning ‘man of Kerioth’), after the home town of his father, Simon (Matthew 10:4; John 6:71). As treasurer for the group of twelve apostles, Judas had responsibility for funds donated for the poor. It later became evident that he had been stealing some of the money for himself (John 12:5-6; John 13:29).
Jesus had seen the evil in Judas’ heart long before those final acts of treachery that resulted in Jesus’ crucifixion (John 6:70-71; John 17:12). Judas’ criticism of Mary’s anointing of Jesus showed his lack of spiritual insight (John 12:3-8). The other disciples still did not suspect him of disloyalty, even when Jesus told them a betrayer was among them (Matthew 26:20-25; John 13:2; John 13:21-30).
The Jewish leaders had been wondering how to arrest Jesus without creating a riot (Luke 22:1-2), but the defection of one of Jesus’ apostles made their task easier. Judas demanded payment for his part in the plot, and the Jewish leaders agreed (Matthew 26:14-16; Luke 22:3-6). The vital information that Judas gave the Jews concerned the secret place where Jesus prayed with his disciples. In the middle of the night, when the people of Jerusalem were asleep, Judas led an armed group of temple guards and Roman soldiers to the place. His final act of treachery was to identify the one to be arrested by kissing him (1618092396_2; John 18:2-12).
Judas gained no satisfaction from his evil work. He knew he had done wrong in helping to crucify an innocent man, but he made no effort to correct the wrong. Instead he committed suicide; though first he tried to ease his conscience by returning the money that the priests had given him (Matthew 27:3-5).
It seems that Judas went into a field and tried to hang himself, but in doing so he injured himself internally and his stomach burst. When his body was found, the priests took the betrayal money Judas had returned and with it bought the field in his name. Originally known as Potter’s Field, the place was renamed Field of Blood and used as a cemetery for Gentiles (Matthew 27:6-10; Acts 1:18-19).

Sentence search

Redbud - See Judas tree, under Judas
Jude - = Judas. Among the apostles there were two who bore this name, (1) Judas (Jude 1:1 ; Matthew 13:55 ; John 14:22 ; Acts 1:13 ), called also Lebbaeus or Thaddaeus (Matthew 10:3 ; Mark 3:18 ); and (2) Judas Iscariot (Matthew 10:4 ; Mark 3:19 ). He who is called "the brother of James" (Luke 6:16 ), may be the same with the Judas surnamed Lebbaeus
Judas - It seems that, after the treachery of Judas Iscariot in betraying Jesus, the name Judas became unpopular among Christians. Those who already had the name Judas often preferred some other name. ...
For example, Jesus’ group of twelve apostles included a second man named Judas, but when writers mention him they point out that he was the son of a man named James, and not Judas Iscariot. One of Jesus’ brothers was named Judas, but on becoming a believer he was known by the shorter name, Jude (Matthew 13:55; see JUDE). A prophet named Judas in the Jerusalem church took another name, Barsabbas (Acts 15:22; Acts 15:27). (Concerning Judas the Galilean mentioned in Acts 5:37 see ZEALOT. )...
Judas Iscariot...
Judas the betrayer was commonly known as Iscariot (meaning ‘man of Kerioth’), after the home town of his father, Simon (Matthew 10:4; John 6:71). As treasurer for the group of twelve apostles, Judas had responsibility for funds donated for the poor. ...
Jesus had seen the evil in Judas’ heart long before those final acts of treachery that resulted in Jesus’ crucifixion (John 6:70-71; Matthew 26:20-2513). Judas’ criticism of Mary’s anointing of Jesus showed his lack of spiritual insight (John 12:3-8). Judas demanded payment for his part in the plot, and the Jewish leaders agreed (Matthew 26:14-16; Luke 22:3-6). The vital information that Judas gave the Jews concerned the secret place where Jesus prayed with his disciples. In the middle of the night, when the people of Jerusalem were asleep, Judas led an armed group of temple guards and Roman soldiers to the place. ...
Judas gained no satisfaction from his evil work. ...
It seems that Judas went into a field and tried to hang himself, but in doing so he injured himself internally and his stomach burst. When his body was found, the priests took the betrayal money Judas had returned and with it bought the field in his name
Thaddaeus - Breast, the name of one of the apostles (Mark 3:18 ), called "Lebbaeus" in Matthew 10:3 , and in Luke 6:16 , "Judas the brother of James;" while (John 14:22 ), probably referring to the same person, speaks of "Judas, not Iscariot. , Jude or Judas, the author of the epistle
Law of Non-Contradiction - For example, we have a set of two statements about Judas. 1) Judas hung himself. 2) Judas fell down and his bowels spilled out. Neither statement about Judas contradicts the other. The statements can be harmonized by stating: Judas hung himself and then his body fell down and his bowels spilled out. ...
In order to make the set of statements contradictory, we would have something like: 1) Judas hung himself. 2) Judas did not hang himself
Barsabas - Name given Joseph Justus, candidate not elected when church chose replacement for Judas, the traitor (Acts 1:23 ). Last name of Judas, who Jerusalem church chose to go with Paul and Silas to Antioch after the Jerusalem council (Acts 15:22 ). See Apostle; Judas ; Joseph ; Justus
Lebbaeus - Courageous, a surname of Judas (Jude), one of the twelve (Matthew 10:3 ), called also Thaddaeus, not to be confounded with the Judas who was the brother of our Lord
Aceldama - The field Judas Iscariot purchased, where he killed himself (Acts 1:19 ). ” Evidently it was purchased with the money that had been paid to Judas for betraying Jesus. See Judas
Iscariot - See Judas
Jude - See Judas...
Jude - See Judas
Barsabbas - See Joseph, Judas
Lebbeus - See Judas 2
Sop - Most interpreters feel that Jesus was making his last appeal to Judas to change his mind. Although Judas accepted the bread signifying friendship, John said, “Satan entered into him” (John 13:27 ). At that moment Judas gave himself over to the will of Satan and left to betray Jesus. See Judas
Iscariot - See Judas Iscariot
Iscariot - —See Judas Iscariot
Kerioth - —See Judas Iscariot
Thaddaeus - See Judas No 2
Judas - ” The proper name Judas was very common in the time of Christ because it was not only the Greek form of one of the twelve patriarchs, but it was also made popular by the Jewish hero Judas Maccabaeus who led the nation in their fight for independence from Syria in 166 B. The New Testament mentions seven men named Judas. Acts speaks of five others named Judas. Judas of Galilee was one of those who led a revolt against the Romans and died as a result. After his experience on the road to Damascus Paul went to the house of a man named Judas who lived on Straight Street. Judas, surnamed Barsabas, was one of those chosen by the Church of Jerusalem to go with Paul and Barnabas to deliver the letter from James to the church at Antioch concerning the important matter of Gentile salvation (Acts 15:22 ). Jesus' twelve disciples include two named Judas. The last of these was Judas Iscariot. The price of the betrayal was 30 pieces of silver, which Judas returned to Jewish leaders; then he went out and hanged himself. The money, which could not be returned to the treasury because it was blood money, was used to buy a potter's field in Judas' name (Matthew 27:3-10 ; compare Acts 1:18-19 )
Traitor - —See Judas Iscariot, ii
Perdition, Son of - —See Judas Iscariot
Iscariot - ” Surname of both the disciple Judas who betrayed Jesus (Mark 3:19 ) and of his father Simon (John 6:71 ). If bandit is the meaning of the name, Judas and his father may have been members of a patriotic party, the Zealots. See Judas ; Kerioth
Son of Perdition - —See Judas Iscariot, ii
Thaddeus - See Judas 2
Bacenor - An officer of Judas Maccabæus ( 2Ma 12:35 )
Barsabbas - and Judas (in NT), 6
Posidonius - An envoy sent by Nicanor to Judas ( 2Ma 14:18 )
Jew - a contraction of Judas of Judah
Judas - Judas (in Apocr. ...
Judas (in NT)...
1. Judas Iscariot . Judas, the son of James (see James 4:1-17 ). Judas, the Lord’s brother ( Matthew 13:55 = Mark 6:3 ). Judas), where he styles himself ‘the servant of Jesus Christ and brother of James’ ( Judges 1:1 ), and, like James, exhibits a stern zeal for morality. Judas, the Galilæan . 7, Judas raised an insurrection. Judas, a Jew of Damascus ( Acts 9:11 ). Judas Barsabbas , one of two deputies Silas being the other who were chosen by the rulers of the Church at Jerusalem to accompany Paul and Barnabas to Antioch, and report to the believers there the Council’s decision on the question on what terms the Gentiles should be admitted into the Christian Church ( Acts 15:22-33 ). Judas and Silas are described as ‘chief men among the brethren’ ( Acts 15:22 ) and ‘prophets’ ( Acts 15:32 ). Since they bore the same patronymic, Judas may have been a brother of Joseph Barsabbas ( Acts 1:23 )
Judas-Colored - ) Red; - from a tradition that Judas Iscariot had red hair and beard
Baean - The name of an unknown tribe destroyed by Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:4 )
Apollophanes - A Syrian killed at the taking of Gazara by Judas Maccabæus
Barsabas - JOSEPH, also called JUSTUS, who was nominated with Matthias as suitable to fill the place of Judas Iscariot. The surname of Judas, who with Silas was sent to Antioch with the decision arrived at by the church at Jerusalem respecting Gentile converts being circumcised
Barsabas - He was one of the candidates for the vacancy in the apostleship, occasioned by the fall of Judas Iscariot. The surname of Judas, a Christian teacher, and one of the "chief men among the brethren
Judas Iscariot - See Judas
Maccabean - ) Of or pertaining to Judas Maccabeus or to the Maccabees; as, the Maccabean princes; Maccabean times
Lebbaeus - See Judas
Avaran - Surname of Eleazar, a brother of Judas Maccabæus ( Malachi 2:5 Malachi 2:5 ; 1Ma 6:43 )
Judas Iscariot (2) - JUDAS ISCARIOT...
i. Name and Designations:...
(a)Judas. Other NT references to Judas:...
(a)Before the Betrayal;...
(b)Describing the Betrayal;...
(c)After the Betrayal. The character of Judas:...
(a)The good motives theory;...
(b)The Satan incarnate theory;...
(c)The mingled motives theory; he was (α) covetous, (β) ambitious, (γ) jealous. References to Judas in post-Biblical literature:...
(a)Apocryphal works;...
(b)Early Christian writings. —The basis of any satisfactory solution of the fascinating and perplexing problem of the personality of Judas must be a comprehensive and careful study of the words of Jesus and the records of the Evangelists. Early allusions to Judas: John 6:64 ff; John 12:4 ff; John 17:12, Luke 22:3 (cf. The two accounts of the death of Judas: Matthew 27:3 ff. ...
From this classification it will be seen that, with the exception of Luke 22:3, the Synoptists say nothing about Judas before the Betrayal; their account of the Betrayal also differs in many details from that given in the Fourth Gospel. Statements in the Fourth Gospel which are said to show John’s bias against Judas will be investigated in due course. Name and Designations...
(a) Judas. 1) bore this common Jewish name, but ‘Judas’ now means the Betrayer of Jesus. His sin has stamped the word with such evil significance that it has become the class-name of perfidious friends, who are ‘no better than Judases’ (cf. ‘Judas-hole,’ ‘Judas-trap,’ etc. ...
(b) Iscariot: the usual surname of Judas. Eight of these passages refer to Judas; in two (John 6:71; John 13:26) his father Simon is called Iscariot; once (John 14:22) his fellow-Apostle is distinguished from his more famous namesake as ‘not the Iscariot. ’ Only in John 13:2 does the full phrase occur—‘Judas Iscariot, the son of Simon. 189, 240, 283)...
Two facts already mentioned have an important bearing on the interpretation of Ἰακαριώτης: (1) the true reading, ‘Simon Iscariot,’ shows that the epithet was equally applicable to the father and the son, and this twofold use of the word suggests that it is a local name; (2) the paraphrase ἀπὸ Καριώτου confirms the view that Judas is named after his place of abode (cf. ’...
It is impossible to say with certainty where the Kerioth was situate of which Judas was a native. If any one of these towns was the birthplace of Judas, he was not a Galilaean. ’—In the Synoptic Gospels this phrase is found only in the narrative of the Betrayal, and it is applied only to Judas. Luke (22:3), who adds to his statement that ‘Satan entered into Judas’ these significant words: ‘being of the number of the twelve’—i. In the Fourth Gospel the phrase is used once of another than Judas; like a note of exclamation, it expresses surprise that Thomas, a member of the Apostolic band, was absent when the risen Saviour appeared to His disciples (John 20:24). John also applies the phrase to Judas, giving it a position in which its tragic and pathetic emphasis cannot be mistaken: ‘You—the twelve, did not I choose? and of you one is a devil. Now he spake of Judas, the son of Simon Iscariot; for it was he that was about to betray him—one of the twelve’ (John 6:70-71). ...
That Judas was ‘one of the twelve’ is an important factor in the problem presented by his history. It implies that Jesus saw in him the material out of which an Apostle might have been made,—the clay out of which a vessel unto honour might have been shaped; it implies that Judas, of free-will, chose to follow Jesus and to continue with Him; and it implies that Judas heard from the Master’s lips words of gracious warning against the peril of his besetting sin. On the other hand, the fact that Judas was ‘one of the twelve’ does not imply that Jesus had the betrayal in view when He chose this Apostle and entrusted him with the common purse; it does not imply that even in that most holy environment Judas was exempted from the working of the spiritual law that such ‘evil things’ as ‘thefts … covetings, … deceit … proceed from within, and defile the man’ (Mark 7:22 f. ); and it does not imply that there were no good impulses in the heart of Judas when he became a disciple of Jesus. Of Judas in his darkest hour the words of Lavater are true: he ‘acted like Satan, but like a Satan who had it in him to be an Apostle. distinctly calls Judas ‘the chief of the twelve. But the definite article is not found with this phrase in any other passage in the Gospels; moreover, it is almost impossible to believe that when the Gospels were written the assertion that Judas was ‘the chief’ or even primus inter pares had a place in the original text. ) explains the phrase as a contrast with οἱ λοιπαι, ‘the rest’; Judas was ‘the only one of the twelve’ who turned traitor. ]'>[4] The unique reading may, however, preserve a genuine reminiscence of a time in the earlier ministry of Jesus when Judas, the treasurer of the Apostolic company, had a kind of priority. If this were so, there would come a time when, as Wright suggests, the supporters of Judas would become ‘jealous of the honour bestowed on Peter. 536), that ‘viewed in its primary elements (not in its development) Peter’s character was, among the disciples, the likest to that of Judas. ’]'>[5] Jealousy would account not only for the dispute about rival claims to be the greatest, but also for the respective positions of Judas and Peter at the supper-table. The most probable explanation of the details given (Matthew 26:23, John 13:23; John 13:26) is that John was reclining on the right of Jesus; but Judas ‘claimed and obtained the chief seat at the table’ next Jesus, and was reclining on His left, whilst ‘the lowest place was voluntarily taken by Peter, who felt keenly the Lord’s rebuke of this strife for precedence’ (cf. ’—The meaning of the statement that ‘Judas was a thief’ (John 12:6) is quite plain, if the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 correctly renders the following sentence: ‘and having the bag, took away (ἐβάσταζεν) what was put therein. In this context the statement that Judas carried the money put into the bag which was in his possession seems singularly tame, if it is not mere repetition. On the other hand, to say that Judas had formed the habit of pilfering is a natural explanation of the assertion that he had been guilty of theft. 443) thinks that ‘John had found out thefts committed by the greedy Judas’; this does not necessarily imply that the thefts were known to John at the time of Mary’s anointing, for they may have come to light after that act, but before the narrative was shaped in this form. ...
The rendering of ἐβάσταζεν by the neutral word ‘hare’ is adopted by some, who hold that John’s words do not imply more than that Judas had a thievish disposition. Ainger adopts this interpretation in a finely-wrought study of the character of Judas (The Gospel and Human Life, p. ’ If Judas had not formed the habit of pilfering, it is more difficult to understand how the thirty pieces of silver could be a real temptation to him. ‘The statement about Judas’ in this hypothetical text is then naïvely said to be ‘worthy of more credit than it has sometimes received from advanced critics’ (Ency. ’—In the list of the Apostles given in Luke 6:16 there is a variation from the phrase by which Judas is usually described. ...
The statement that Judas ‘turned traitor’ should be remembered in framing or estimating theories to account for his history; it confirms what has been said on this subject under (c). Similarly, Judas is described as ‘he who would betray him’ (John 6:64 ὁ παραδώσων), ‘he who is betraying me’ (Matthew 26:46 ὁ παραδιδούς), and as ‘he who had betrayed him’ (Matthew 27:3 ὁ παραδούς). ’ Needless difficulties are occasioned when ‘from the beginning’ is regarded as referring to any period before the call of Judas; the thought seems to be that Jesus perceived ‘from the beginning’ of His intercourse with Judas the spirit that was in him. The rendering, ‘Jesus knew who it was that would betray him’ has the advantage of suggesting that Jesus discerned the thoughts and intents of His unfaithful Apostle, and knew that ‘the germ of the traitor-spirit was already in the heart of Judas’ (cf. *
(a) Before the Betrayal. —The obscurity which rests upon the early history of Judas accounts to a large extent for the difficulty of estimating his character. Luke among the Synoptists, which is obviously intended to furnish an explanation of the act of Betrayal—‘Satan entered into Judas’ (john 22:3). The same phrase, ‘Satan entered into him’ (εἰσῆλθεν εἰς ἐκεῖνον ὁ Σατανᾶς), is also found in John 13:27, and it is preceded by the statement (John 13:2) that the devil had ‘already put into the heart (ἤδη βεβληκότος εἰς τὴν καρδίαν) of Judas’ the thought of betrayal. ’ So far from asserting that ‘it was at the Last Supper that the hateful idea occurred to Judas,’ St. at some time other than the Supper, the suggestion of the devil had been entertained by Judas. Luke’s brief account it is said, once for all, that ‘Satan entered into Judas. ’ In the Fourth Gospel the genesis of the foul purpose is distinguished from its consummation; the Satanic influences were not irresistible; the devil had not full possession of the heart of Judas until, ‘after the sop,’ he acted on the suggestion which had then become his own resolve
Lebbaeus - Thaddaeus or Judas, the brother of James (Mark 3:18)
Joseph Barsabas - One of the two chosen as candidates for Judas Iscariot's vacant apostleship; therefore he must have followed Jesus from His baptism to His ascension, and so was fitted to be a witness of His resurrection (Acts 1:22). Lightfoot suggests that he was Joses son of Alphaeus, and that Judas Barsabas was his brother and the apostle Jude
Seron - A Syrian commander defeated by Judas Maccabæus at Beth-horon ( Malachi 3:18 Malachi 3:18 ; 1Ma 3:23 f
Thaddaeus - ” See Disciples , Judas 6; Lebbaeus
Matthias - A disciple chosen by lot to fill up the number of the apostles after the fall of Judas Iseariot
Spy Wednesday - The Wednesday in Holy Week, intimating that Judas Iscariot was watching the movements of Our Lord in order to secure His betrayal
Wednesday, Spy - The Wednesday in Holy Week, intimating that Judas Iscariot was watching the movements of Our Lord in order to secure His betrayal
Thaddaeus - He is doubtless to be identified with the ‘ Judas [1] of James,’ who appears in the Lukan lists ( Luke 6:18 , Acts 1:13 ; so RV [3] renders ‘ brother of James’), and with the ‘Judas, not Iscariot,’ of John 14:22 , though some Syrian writers have made this last Judas to be the same as the Apostle Thomas (syr sin reads here ‘Thomas,’ syr cur reads ‘Judas Thomas’), Thomas being confessedly only a surname, ‘the Twin. ’...
In all four lists Thaddæus (or Judas) comes next to Simon the Cananæan or Zealot, and may not improbably have been his brother or intimate friend (cf. the variant ‘Judas Zelotes’ in Matthew 10:3 , noted below). ’ Some other Old Latin MSS have ‘Judas Zelotes,’ and syr sin has ‘Judas son ( sic ) of James’ (syr cur is wanting here). 283), Thaddæus, ‘who is Lebbæus and Judas,’ is distinguished from ‘Judas of James,’ and is said to have preached at Edessa, to have been buried in Egypt, and to have been crucified
Barsabas - He was on of the two candidates nominated to fill the vacancy left by Judas Iscariot in the apostleship, Acts 1:1-26 . Judas Barsabas was "a prophet" and a distinguished member of the Jerusalem church
Matthias - The disciple chosen in the room of the traitor Judas
Lantern - LANTERN (φανός) occurs in John 18:3, where the band of soldiers accompanying Judas is described as provided with lanterns and torches (see Lamp)
Elasa - The scene of the defeat and death of Judas Maccabæus
Iscariot - A name peculiarly suited to the traitor Judas: for the word means, a man of murder; from Ish, a man; and Corath, he that cuts off
Potter's Field - the land that was bought with the money for which Judas sold our Saviour, Matthew 27:7 ; Matthew 27:10 , and which he returned
Dositheus - A soldier of Judas Maccabæus, who made a vain attempt to take Gorgias prisoner ( 2Ma 12:35 ). An officer of Judas Maccabæus ( 2Ma 12:19 ; 2Ma 12:24 )
Judas Thaddeus, Saint - He is not to be confused with Thaddeus of Edessa, one of the 72 disciples, Judas Jacobi, or Judas Simon, disciples of the Apostles. After the Lord's Supper, Judas asked Christ why He would not manifest Himself to the world (John 14). Judas's missionary work was performed principally in Palestine, also in Syria, Mesopotamia, and Persia
Jude, Saint - He is not to be confused with Thaddeus of Edessa, one of the 72 disciples, Judas Jacobi, or Judas Simon, disciples of the Apostles. After the Lord's Supper, Judas asked Christ why He would not manifest Himself to the world (John 14). Judas's missionary work was performed principally in Palestine, also in Syria, Mesopotamia, and Persia
Barsabas - Peter proposed to the disciples to fill up the place of Judas the traitor, by choosing another Apostle, Acts 1:21 , Barsabas was nominated along with Matthias; but the lot fell on Matthias, who was therefore numbered with the eleven Apostles. BARSABAS was also the surname of Judas, one of the principal disciples mentioned, Acts 15:22 , &c. This is all we know of Barsabas Judas
Thaddeus, Judas, Saint - He is not to be confused with Thaddeus of Edessa, one of the 72 disciples, Judas Jacobi, or Judas Simon, disciples of the Apostles. After the Lord's Supper, Judas asked Christ why He would not manifest Himself to the world (John 14). Judas's missionary work was performed principally in Palestine, also in Syria, Mesopotamia, and Persia
Gethsemane - A place to which Christ retired with His disciples ( Matthew 26:35 , Mark 14:32 ), and where Judas betrayed Him. It was probably a favourite resort of our Lord, as Judas knew where He was likely to be found
Gaddis - The surname of Johanan or John, the eldest brother of Judas Maccabæus
Thaddaeus - Same as Lebbaeus or Judas not Iscariot (John 14:22)
Akeldama - —The name given in Acts 1:19 to the field purchased with the price of Judas’ treachery. ...
The two accounts of the death of Judas (Matthew 27:3 f. ) are hard to reconcile (see Judas, and art. The salient features of the Matthaean tradition are—(a) Judas stricken with remorse returned the money paid to him as the price of his treachery; (b) he hanged himself in despair, nothing being said as to the scene of his suicide; (c) the priests bought with the money a field known as ‘the Potter’s Field,’ which (d) thenceforth was called ἀγρὸς αἳματος, the allusion being to the blood of Christ, shed through the treachery of Judas; (e) the field was devoted to the purpose of a cemetery for foreigners. In Acts, on the other hand, (a) nothing is said of a refunding of the money by Judas; (b) his death was not self-inflicted, nor was it caused by hanging; it is described as due to a fall and a consequent rupture of the abdomen; (c) the held was bought by Judas himself, and not by the priests; (d) nothing is said of its former use as a ‘potter’s field,’ nor (e) of the purpose for which it was used after the death of Judas; (f) the blood which gave its name to the field was that of Judas, by which it was defiled, for (g) the field Akeldama is identified with the place of his death, a fact of which there is no mention in Matthew. ...
The only point common to the two accounts is that the name by which the field was known in the next generation after Judas’ death was an Aramaic word which was variously rendered ἀγρὸς αἳματος and χωρίον αἳματος by Mt. The field which was purchased with the wages of Judas was originally a ‘potter’s field,’ or pit, in the neighbourhood of Jerusalem. Within half a century the name became corrupted to חֲקִל דָּמָא ‘the Field of Blood,’ the allusion being variously interpreted of the blood of Christ and the blood of Judas. ...
Tradition has distinguished Akeldama, the field purchased with Judas’ thirty pieces of silver, from the scene of his death—a distinction of sites which though inconsistent with Acts 1, is compatible with Mt. hoc est, ager sanguinis, in quo omnes peregrine sepeliuntur’ (§ 26), near Siloam; but the fig-tree ‘on which Judas banged himself’ was shown him on the N. Arculf seems to place the latter upon the Hill of Evil Counsel (§ 18), where it is shown at the present day; but the tradition has not been constant, the ‘elder-tree’ of Judas having been pointed out to Sir J
Akeldama - —The name given in Acts 1:19 to the field purchased with the price of Judas’ treachery. ...
The two accounts of the death of Judas (Matthew 27:3 f. ) are hard to reconcile (see Judas, and art. The salient features of the Matthaean tradition are—(a) Judas stricken with remorse returned the money paid to him as the price of his treachery; (b) he hanged himself in despair, nothing being said as to the scene of his suicide; (c) the priests bought with the money a field known as ‘the Potter’s Field,’ which (d) thenceforth was called ἀγρὸς αἳματος, the allusion being to the blood of Christ, shed through the treachery of Judas; (e) the field was devoted to the purpose of a cemetery for foreigners. In Acts, on the other hand, (a) nothing is said of a refunding of the money by Judas; (b) his death was not self-inflicted, nor was it caused by hanging; it is described as due to a fall and a consequent rupture of the abdomen; (c) the held was bought by Judas himself, and not by the priests; (d) nothing is said of its former use as a ‘potter’s field,’ nor (e) of the purpose for which it was used after the death of Judas; (f) the blood which gave its name to the field was that of Judas, by which it was defiled, for (g) the field Akeldama is identified with the place of his death, a fact of which there is no mention in Matthew. ...
The only point common to the two accounts is that the name by which the field was known in the next generation after Judas’ death was an Aramaic word which was variously rendered ἀγρὸς αἳματος and χωρίον αἳματος by Mt. The field which was purchased with the wages of Judas was originally a ‘potter’s field,’ or pit, in the neighbourhood of Jerusalem. Within half a century the name became corrupted to חֲקִל דָּמָא ‘the Field of Blood,’ the allusion being variously interpreted of the blood of Christ and the blood of Judas. ...
Tradition has distinguished Akeldama, the field purchased with Judas’ thirty pieces of silver, from the scene of his death—a distinction of sites which though inconsistent with Acts 1, is compatible with Mt. hoc est, ager sanguinis, in quo omnes peregrine sepeliuntur’ (§ 26), near Siloam; but the fig-tree ‘on which Judas banged himself’ was shown him on the N. Arculf seems to place the latter upon the Hill of Evil Counsel (§ 18), where it is shown at the present day; but the tradition has not been constant, the ‘elder-tree’ of Judas having been pointed out to Sir J
Aceldama - ) The potter's field, said to have lain south of Jerusalem, purchased with the bribe which Judas took for betraying his Master, and therefore called the field of blood
Judas Barsabas - Judas accordingly with Silas under the Spirit "exhorted the brethren with many words, and confirmed them" (Acts 15:32). Probably Judas was brother of Joseph Barsabas (Acts 1:23)
Theodotus - One of the messengers sent by Nicanor to Judas Maccabæus ( 2Ma 14:19 )
Heel, Lifted His - Jesus applied the expression to Judas, who accepted Jesus' hospitality but then plotted His arrest (John 13:18 )
Waste - Judas thought that the pouring forth of the ointment upon the head of Christ was ἀπώλεια (Matthew 26:8 ||). It is very significant that Christ used the word, which Judas had applied to Mary, of Judas himself. Judas Iscariot in vol
Malchus - A servant of the high-priest who came with Judas to the Garden of Gethsemane
Chalphi - The father of Judas, one of the two captains of Jonathan Maccabæus who stood firm in a battle fought against the Syrians at Hazor in N
Beth-Zacharias - It was the scene of the defeat of Judas Maccabæus by Lysias
Bishoprick, - where the office, is 'apostleship,' for which one was chosen to take the place of Judas Iscariot
Price of Blood - —An expression used by the priests of the Temple in reference to the money Judas Iscariot had received for the betrayal of his Master. They would neither accept it for themselves, when Judas offered to restore it, nor, when flung down in the sanctuary, did they regard it as fit for the holy uses of the Temple. (For the story of Judas’ end, and the divergent account in Acts 1:18-19, see Akeldama, Judas Iscariot). It is true, their manifestation of scrupulous feeling was somewhat belated: it would have become them better to have no dealings whatever with Judas. In this case the compact made with Judas was very much more dishonourable on his side than on theirs; for they were sworn enemies of Christ, he a professed friend. It was hallowed by the sacrifice associated with it, just as the blood-money in Judas’ hands was tainted and defiled by a betrayal equivalent to murder. —See under Judas Iscariot, but esp
Lebbaeus - ‘Judas Zelotes’]'>[7]—and of all witnesses for the Textus Receptus . ...
A trace of the name ‘Lebbaeus’ is also found in the list of the Apostles as given in Tatian’s Diatessaron according to Ishodad; but here ‘Lebbaeus’ is inserted between ‘James’ and ‘son of Alphai,’ and Judas Jacobi is added afterwards (see Zahn’s Com. The Syriac lexicographer Bar Bahlul explained that Judas Thomas was called Lebbaeus and Thaddaeus on account of his wisdom. The Manuscripts AB give וליביום הדין דאתקרי תאדי סימון ק׳ C has וליזדם הרין רחקדי סימן ק׳ Here וליודם seems to be a combination of ‘Lebbaeus’ and ‘Judas,’ and תקדי a confusion of ‘Thaddaeus’ with ‘was surnamed. 46, Judas Jacobi is mentioned as third bishop of Jerusalem. 283, distinguishes Judas Jacobi as the tenth Apostle from Θαδδαῖος ὁ Λεβαῖος καὶ Ἰούδας as the eleventh. In the Synaxaries of the Greek Church (1) Judas (in Lk. From him is distinguished (2) the Apostle Thaddaeus, who is also Lebbaeus, one of the Seventy, celebrated on the 21st August; and (3) Judas Zelotes on the 22nd May. Judas (i. 906), it may be stated that this strange combination ‘Judas Zelotes,’ mentioned above as the reading of the Old Latin Manuscripts in Matthew 10:3, is attested for Rome by the chronographer of the year 334, by the list of the canonical books of the year 382; and for Ravenna by the mosaics of the great Baptistry (5th cent. the latter name is not an abbreviation of Judas Jacobi, but of Judas Zelotes. ...
That there was another Judas besides the traitor among the Twelve is attested by John 14:22, and it is possible that later his name was less used to avoid remembrance of the traitor and confusion with him, and that his original name ‘Judas’ was replaced by ‘Thaddaeus’ in Mk. In Acts 1:13 we have three names—Joseph, Barsabbas, Justus; in a similar way we should get here three or even four—Judas, son of James, Lebbaeus, Thaddaeus
Demetrius Soter - King of the Seleucidæ, who made war against Judas Machabeus and defeated him in a third campaign, 161 B
Accos - Grandfather of one of the envoys sent to Rome by Judas Maccabæus in b
Soter, Demetrius - King of the Seleucidæ, who made war against Judas Machabeus and defeated him in a third campaign, 161 B
Brother - Observe, that in Matthew 13:55 , James, and Joses, and Judas, are called the αδελφοι , brethren, of Christ, but were most probably only his cousins by his mother's side; for James and Joses were the sons of Mary, Matthew 27:56 ; and James and Judas, the sons of Alpheus, Luke 6:15-16 ; which Alpheus is therefore probably the same with Cleopas, the husband of Mary, sister to our Lord's mother, John 19:25
Haceldama - (Aramaic, hagal dema, field of blood) ...
Name given to the potter's field, purchased with the price of the treason of Judas to be a burial-place for strangers (Matthew 27; Acts 1)
Mac'Cabees - This title, which was originally the surname of Judas, one of the sons of Mattathias, was afterward extended to the heroic family of which he was one of the noblest representatives. 166, having named Judas --apparently his third son--as his successor in directing the war of independence. After gaining several victories over the other generals of Antiochus, Judas was able to occupy Jerusalem except the "tower," and purified the temple exactly three years after its profanation. This victory was the greatest of Judas' successes, and practically decided the question of Jewish independence; but shortly after Judas fell at Eleasa, fighting at desperate odds against the invaders. After the death of Judas, Jonathan his brother succeeded to the command, and later assumed the high-priestly office
Chaereas - He was slain upon the capture of Gazara by Judas Maccabæus ( 2Ma 10:32-38 )
Sop - Our Lord took a piece of unleavened bread, and dipping it into the broth of bitter herbs at the Paschal meal, gave it to Judas
Barsabas - Son of Saba, the surname (1) of Joseph, also called Justus (Acts 1:23 ), some identify him with Barnabas; (2) of Judas, who was a "prophet
Judas Iscariot - Judas ISCARIOT. ’ Kerioth was a town in the south of Judæa, and Judas was the only one of the Twelve who was not a Galilæan. ...
Judas turned traitor, and sold the Lord to the high priests for thirty pieces of silver, the price of a slave (Exodus 21:32 ); and this dire treachery constitutes one of the hardest problems of the Gospel history. John expressly declares ( John 6:64 ), He did know, and yet not only admitted Judas to the Apostolate, but appointed him to an office which, by exciting his cupidity, facilitated his crime. A solution of the problem has been sought by making out in various ways that Judas was not really a criminal. ...
(1) In early days it was held by the Cainites, a Gnostic sect, that Judas had attained a higher degree of spiritual enlightenment than his fellows, and compassed the death of Jesus because he knew that it would break the power of the evil spirits, the rulers of this world. ...
Such attempts to justify Judas must be dismissed. If the Lord chose Judas with clear foreknowledge of the issue, then, dark as the mystery may be, it accords with the providential ordering of human affairs, being in fact an instance of an ancient and abiding problem, the ‘irreconcilable antinomy’ of Divine foreknowledge and human free will. It is no whit a greater mystery that Jesus should have chosen Judas with clear prescience of the issue, than that God should have made Saul king, knowing what the end would be. ...
Of course Judas was not chosen because he would turn traitor, but because at the outset he had in him the possibility of better things; and this is the tragedy of his career, that he obeyed his baser impulses and surrendered to their domination. It lay with the soldiers to make the arrest, and, seeing not one man but twelve, they knew not which to take; and Judas had to come to their assistance. ...
It must have been a terrible ordeal for Judas, and in that hour his better nature reasserted itself. Judas sinned terribly, but he terribly repented, and one wishes that, instead of destroying his miserable life, he had rather fled to the Cross and sought mercy at the feet of his gracious Lord. There was mercy in the heart of Jesus even for Judas. ...
Was Judas present at the Eucharist in the Upper Room? St. John’s account, Judas seems to have gone out immediately after the announcement, the institution following John 13:38 , and ch
Potters Field - The name given to the piece of ground which was afterwards bought with the money that had been given to Judas
Aceldama - ...
A field said to have laid south of Jerusalem, the same as the potters field, purchased with the bribe which Judas took for betraying his master, and therefore called the field of blood
Barsabas - This man was so highly esteemed by the apostles, as to be put in nomination for the apostolic office, in the room of the traitor Judas
ke'Rioth - (Joshua 15:25 ) Supposed by some to have been the birthplace of Judas Iscariot
Potter's Field, the, - Matthew, (Matthew 27:7 ) was purchased by the Priests with the thirty pieces of silver rejected by Judas, and converted into a burial-place for Jews not belonging to the city
Judas - Judas (jû'das). Why our Lord appointed Judas an apostle, the sacred narrative does not tell us. Judas maintained a fair character among his fellow-apostles, and was entrusted with the custody of their money, John 12:6; John 13:29; nor do they seem to have suspected him even when our Lord was distinctly warning them that one of their number would betray him. This was Judas' question to the priests: "What will ye give me?" Matthew 26:15. Probably Judas began to see that he was suspected, and, when the Lord in answer to his hypocritical question, had distinctly told him of his treason, full of additional passion, he went recklessly about his work. Those so presented to the emperor were the grandsons of Judas; but the hardness of their hands, proving that they were but ordinary peasants, and their description of the spiritual nature of the new sovereignty, removed all apprehensions. Judas of Galilee, a leader of an insurrection "in the days of taxing "—i. This Judas may have kept an inn; it is unlikely that he was a disciple. Judas, surnamed Barsabas, a "chief man among the brethren," a "prophet," who was chosen along with Paul and Barnabas and Silas to carry the decisions of the council of Jerusalem, a
Apostle Spoons - The place of Judas Iscariot was supplied sometimes by Paul, more often by Matthias
Juda - One of the brethren of the Lord, Mark 6:3 : called Judas in Matthew 13:55
ju'Das Iscar'Iot - (Judas of Kerioth ). ( Joshua 15:25 ) Of the life of Judas before the appearance of his name in the lists of the apostles we know absolutely nothing. As soon as the twelve were recognized as a body, travelling hither and thither with their Master, receiving money and other offerings, and redistributing what they received to the poor, it became necessary that some one should act as the steward and almoner of the small society, and this fell to Judas. (Why was such a man chosen to be one of the twelve? -- (1) There was needed among the disciples, as in the Church now, a man of just such talents as Judas possessed, --the talent for managing business affairs. What was Judas' motive in betraying Christ? -- (1) Anger at the public rebuke given him by Christ at the supper in the house of Simon the leper. (6) Perhaps, also, Judas "abandoned what seemed to him a failing cause, and hoped by his treachery to gain a position of honor and influence in the Pharisaic party. " The end of Judas. -- (1) Judas, when he saw the results of his betrayal, "repented himself. (Matthew 27:6-10 ) (4) Judas himself, in his despair, went out and hanged himself, (Matthew 27:5 ) at Aceldama, on the southern slope of the valley of Hinnom, near Jerusalem, and in the act he fell down a precipice and was dashed into pieces. " (5) Judas' repentance may be compared to that of Esau. Judas proved his repentance to be false by immediately committing another sin, suicide
Judas Iscariot - He was a false disciple: when the Lord said to His apostles 'ye are clean,' He excepted Judas in the words 'but not all. Satan knew the covetousness of Judas and put it into his heart to betray the Lord for money, which he did for thirty pieces of silver. ...
Judas probably thought that the Lord would escape from those who arrested Him, as He had escaped from previous dangers, while he would gain the money. When the Lord was condemned, Judas was filled with remorse, confessed he had betrayed innocent blood, and cast the money into the temple. Judas is a solemn instance of how far a person may be under the influence and power of Christianity, and yet become an apostate: cf
Thadde'us, - Luke, (Luke 6:16 ; Acts 1:13 ) it seems scarcely possible to doubt that the three names, of Judas, Lebbeus and Thaddeus were borne by one and the same person
Judas the Galilaean - Judas the Galilaean, a Zealot leader at the time of the census under Quirinius, was probably the son of Hezekiah (Josephus, Ant. ’ The death of Hezekiah apparently left Judas at the head of a movement against Roman rule similar to that of Mattathias and his body of revolutionaries against the Syrians. that Judas was born in Gamala in Gaulonitis, but in Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) ii. This discrepancy may be due to a confusion of a Galilaean Gamala with the better-known town of the same name east of Jordan; or to the fact that the activities of Judas were largely confined to Galilee; or to the loose use of the word ‘Galilaean’ to describe a Jew born near Galilee. ) Judas took advantage of the disorders following the death of Herod i. 275a), Judas allied himself with a Pharisee named Zadok and raised the signal for a theocratic or Messianic revolt, calling upon the Jews to refuse to pay tribute to the Romans and to recognize God alone as their ruler (Ant. Judas (‘a cunning Sophist’
We have no precise knowledge as to the fate of Judas, but in Acts 5:37 he is said to have ‘perished. ...
Judas left three sons, all of whom were leaders in the Zealot movement
Aceldama - Field of blood, a small field south of Jerusalem, which the priest purchased with the thirty pieces of silver that Judas had received as the price of our Savior's blood, Matthew 27:8 ; Acts 1:19 . Judas is said, Acts 1:8 , to have purchased the field, because it was bought with his money
Gephyrun - A city captured by Judas Maccabæus ( 2Ma 12:13 ; AV Uckewallist - In addition, however, they held that Judas and the murderers of Christ were saved
Traitor - 1: προδότης (Strong's #4273 — Noun Masculine — prodotes — prod-ot'-ace ) denotes "a betrayer, traitor;" the latter term is assigned to Judas, virtually as a title, in Luke 6:16 ; in 2 Timothy 3:4 it occurs in a list of evil characters, foretold as abounding in the last days
Jude, the Lord's Brother - The list of the Lord’s brothers is given in Mark 6:3 as ‘James, and Joses, and Judas [1], and Simon,’ in Matthew 13:55 as ‘James, and Joseph, and Simon, and Judas. ’ It would be precarious, even apart from the variation in order, to infer that Judas was one of the younger brothers of Jesus; still, this is not improbable, especially if, as the present writer believes, ‘the brethren of the Lord’ were sons of Joseph and Mary. If the statement in John 7:5 can be trusted, that at that time the brethren of Jesus did not believe in Him, he cannot be identified with ‘Judas, the son of James,’ who is mentioned in Luke’s list of the apostles (Luke 6:16, Acts 1:13), and described in John 14:22 as ‘Judas (not Iscariot)
Matthias - A disciple of Christ, and witness of his ministry from the commencement, who was appointed by lot to supply the vacancy in the company of the twelve apostles occasioned by the apostacy of Judas
Antiochus (1) - 144) by Jonathan the Maccabee to renew the covenant made by Judas with the Romans, and to enter into friendly relations with the Spartans
Sop - The nature of the sop given to Judas. Jesus, as the host at the Last Supper, would hand this sop, first of all, to Judas, who is supposed to have occupied the place of chief honour at the table (see art. It seems much more probable, then, that this sop was not the specific Paschal sop passed round to the company by the host, but a particular sop that Jesus offered to Judas on purely personal grounds. And it was not by any accident of Judas’ position at the table, but because of a deep purpose in the heart of Jesus, that this sop was given. —This offering of the sop to Judas, which is not mentioned by the Synoptists (though Mt. (a) It was a sign given to the beloved disciple, in response to his question, ‘Lord, who is it?’ that Judas was the one of the company who was about to betray his Master (John 13:25-26). He did not make a show of friendliness to Judas merely for the sake of giving John a private sign. A whole world of blessed possibility lay for Judas in that proffered sop; Divine love was in it, and free forgiveness, and full restoration—if only he would repent of his meditated crime. Judas ‘received the sop’ (John 13:30), and doubtless ate it. And so Judas, ‘having received the sop, [8], ‘went out straightway: and it was night
Alcimus - Either because he was not of high priestly family (though of the stock of Aaron, 1Ma 7:14 ), or, more probably, from his Hellenizing tendencies, his appointment was stoutly opposed by Judas Maccabæus, and received hut scanty recognition at Jerusalem. It was not, however, till the defeat and death of Judas at Elasa that he was in a position to commence his Hellenizing measures, and shortly afterwards he died of paralysis (b
Drachma - Mentioned in the Old Testament when Judas sends 12,000 drachmas to Jerusalem that sacrifices may be offered for the dead (2Macabees)
Kerioth - Judas the traitor was probably a native of this place, and hence his name Iscariot
Possible - ) Capable of existing or occurring, or of being conceived or thought of; able to happen; capable of being done; not contrary to the nature of things; - sometimes used to express extreme improbability; barely able to be, or to come to pass; as, possibly he is honest, as it is possible that Judas meant no wrong
Apostolic, College - After the death of Judas to show that Christ wished them to be a religious society, they immediately elected Matthias "to take the place of this ministry and 'Apostleship" (Acts 1) ...
Jude - See Judas 2
Theudas - This incident is said to have taken place some time before the days of Judas of Galilee, who led a revolt at the time of ‘the enrolment. Soon afterwards Fadus’s successor, Alexander, put to death two sons of Judas of Galilee-the Judas who had raised an insurrection when Quirinius made an enrolment of the Jews. ...
The agreement between Acts and Josephus with respect to Judas is apparent, although it is not certain that they have exactly the same date in mind (cf. Josephus places him nearly forty years after Judas, and thus subsequent to the time of Gamaliel, while Acts makes Theudas precede Judas. Other analysts would also derive the verse about Judas from a secondary source. Josephus, it will be remembered, after referring to Theudas’s fate, goes on to remark that soon afterwards the sons of Judas of Galilee were put to death. The author of Acts, so the argument runs, had vaguely remembered, or carelessly noted, the succession ‘Theudas … Judas,’ without precisely observing that Josephus was speaking in this connexion not of the fate of the well-known Judas but of that of the sons of Judas
Hanukkah - An eight-day festival that commemorated the cleansing and rededication of the Temple following the victories of Judas Maccabeus in 167/165 B. ” After Antiochus Epiphanes conducted pagan worship in the Temple, Judas Maccabeus cleansed the Temple from the pollution of pagan worship
Simon - ...
Descendant of Juda (1Paralipomenon 4)
Simon, surnamed Thasi, brother of Judas Machabeus (1Machabees 2)
Simon of the tribe of Benjamin; governor of the Temple (2Machabees 3)
Simon who is called Peter, the Apostle (Matthew 4)
Simon the Cananean, the Apostle (Matthew 10)
one of the relatives of Our Lord, identified erroneously with the preceding (Matthew 13)
Simon the leper, a resident of Bethany (Matthew 26)
a Pharisee at whose house the penitent woman washed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7)
Simon the Cyrenean, who helped Our Lord carry the Cross (Matthew 27)
the father of Judas (John 6)
Simon Magus, a magician in the time of the Apostles (Acts 8)
Simon the tanner, a Christian of Joppe, in whose house Peter had the vision commanding him to receive the Gentiles into the faith (Acts 10)
Simon called Niger, a Christian living at Antioch in the time of the Apostles (Acts 13)
Cainites - They had in particular great veneration for Judas, under the pretence that the death of Christ had saved mankind
Dish - Judas' dipping in the same dish as the Lord betokened friendly intimacy
Innocent - : as uttered by Judas in reference to the Lord, to whom it could be truthfully applied as 'guiltless;' and by Pilate in reference to himself
Timotheus - A leader of the Ammonites who was defeated in many battles by Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:6 ff
Eleven, Eleventh - , undecim), is used only of the eleven Apostles remaining after the death of Judas Iscariot, Matthew 28:16 ; Mark 16:14 ; Luke 24:9,33 ; Acts 1:26 ; 2:14
Aceldama - " So called because it was bought with the price of blood, according to Matthew 27:6-8; and because it was the scene of retribution in kind, the blood which Judas caused to be shed being avenged by his own blood, according to Acts 1:19; Revelation 16:6. The purchase of the field was begun by Judas, and was completed after Judas' death by the priests, who would not take the price of blood from Judas but used the pieces of silver to pay for the field. "The potter" represents God's absolute power over the clay framed by His own hand: so appropriate in the case of Judas, "the son of perdition," of whom Jesus says, "It had been good for that man if he had not been born"; given over to a reprobate mind and its awful doom
Jason - (Hebrew: healer) ...
(1) Son of Eleazer, sent by Judas Machabeus to Rome to make a treaty with the Romans (1Machabees 8). He also wrote the exploits of Judas Machabeus in five books, from which the author of 2Machabees has taken his recital (2Machabees 2)
Mattathias - A son of Simon the high priest, who was murdered, together with his father and brother Judas, at a banquet at Dok, by Ptolemy the son of Abubus ( 1Ma 16:14-16 ). One of three envoys sent by Nicanor to treat with Judas Maccabæus ( 2Ma 14:19 )
Thaddaeus - From the comparison of the lists of names in the four Gospels, it seems that ‘Thaddaeus’ was another name for Judas the son of James (Matthew 10:3; Mark 3:18; Luke 6:16; John 14:22; Acts 1:13)
Pieces of Gold - ) The 30 pieces paid to Judas were "shekels," the price of a slave's life (Exodus 21:32), Exodus 21:3 British pounds or 4 British pounds: Zechariah 11:12-13
Jude, - called also LEBBEUS and THADDEUS , Authorized Version "Judas the brother of James," one of the twelve apostles
Judas Iscariot - "The treachery of Judas Iscariot," says Dr. Judas, the leading trait in whose character was covetousness, was probably induced to follow Jesus at first with a view to the riches, honours, and other temporal advantages, which he, in common with the rest, expected the Messiah's friends would enjoy. The astonishing miracles he saw him perform left no room to doubt of the reality of his Master's pretensions, who had, indeed, himself in private actually accepted the title from his Apostles; and Judas must have been much disappointed when Jesus repeatedly refused the proffered royalty from the people in Galilee, after the miracle of feeding the five thousand, and again after his public procession to Jerusalem. Even the rebukes of Jesus for his covetousness, and the detection of his treacherous scheme, although they unquestionably offended Judas, might only serve to stimulate him to the speedier execution of his plot, during the feast of the passover, while the great concourse of the Jews, from all parts assembled, might powerfully support the sanhedrim and their Messiah against the Romans. But when Judas, who attended the whole trial, saw that it turned out quite contrary to his expectations, that Jesus was capitally convicted by the council, as a false Christ and false prophet, notwithstanding he had openly avowed himself; and that he wrought no miracle, either for their conviction or for his own deliverance, as Judas well knew he could, even from the circumstance of healing Malchus, after he was apprehended; when he farther reflected, like Peter, on his Master's merciful forewarnings of his treachery, and mild and gentle rebuke at the commission of it; he was seized with remorse, and offered to return the paltry bribe of thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and elders instantly on the spot, saying, ‘I sinned in delivering up innocent blood;' and expected that on this they would have desisted from the prosecution. "...
The above view of the case of Judas endeavours ingeniously to account for his conduct by supposing him influenced by the motive of compelling our Lord to declare himself, and assume the Messiahship in its earthly glory. It will, however, be recollected, that the only key which the evangelic narrative affords, is, Judas's covetousness; which passion was, in him, a growing one. In such a mind there could be no true faith, and no love; what wonder, then, when avarice was in him a ruling and unrestrained passion, that he should betray his Lord? Still it may be admitted that the knowledge which Judas had of our Lord's miraculous power, might lead him the more readily to put him into the hands of the chief priests. He might suppose that he would deliver himself out of their hands; and thus Judas attempted to play a double villany, against Christ and against his employers
Dedication, Feast of the - Instituted by Judas Machabæus (64 B
Feast of the Dedication - Instituted by Judas Machabæus (64 B
Feast of Lights - Instituted by Judas Machabæus (64 B
Lights, Feast of - Instituted by Judas Machabæus (64 B
Zealots - A sect of Jews which originated with Judas the Gaulonite (Acts 5:37 )
Dish - Judas dipped his hand with a "sop" or piece of bread in the same dish with our Lord, thereby indicating friendly intimacy (Matthew 26:23 )
Potter's Field - Matthew 27:3-10 records that the priests bought the field with the money Judas returned
Akrabbim - The scene of Judas Maccabens' victory over Edom
Acel'Dama - (the field of blood ) ( Akeldama in the Revised Version), the name given by the Jews of Jerusalem to a field near Jerusalem purchased by Judas with the money which he received for the betrayal of Christ, and so called from his violent death therein
Thaddaeus - 13) gives a story, which he says he found in the archives of Edessa, that after the ascension of our Lord, the apostle Judas Thomas sent Thaddaeus, one of the seventy disciples, to Edessa, to king Abgarus the Black, and that he cured the king of a serious illness, converted him with all his people to Christianity, and died at Edessa after many years of successful labours. Thaddaeus was at a later date confused with the apostle Judas Thaddaeus
Maccabees - From the initials of Judas Maccabeus' motto, Μiy Κamowka Βe -'Εlohiym Υahweh , "who is like unto Thee, Jehovah, among the gods?" (Exodus 15:11
Kerioth - Judas, the disciple of Jesus, may have been from Kerioth
Matthias - ”) Disciple who followed Jesus from the time of John's ministry of baptism until Jesus' ascension, who was chosen by lot and prayer to succeed Judas as an apostle and official witness to the resurrection (Acts 1:20-26 )
Ammonites - In the time of Judas Machabeus, they were still a strong people, whom he subdued with difficulty
Friend - It is a different word, however, in Greek, by which he addressed Judas, Matthew 26:50 ; the word there translated friend, means simply companion, and appears to have been used as a conversational term not implying friendship
Apostle - " These twelve were arranged in three groups, Simon Peter and his brother Andrew, with James and John, the two sons of Zebedee; then Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, and Matthew; and, lastly, James, the son of Alpheus, Lebbeus (called Thaddeus, Judas, and Jude), Simon Zelotes or the Canaanite, and Judas Iscariot. One, however, Judas, betrayed him; and when Jesus was seized they all forsook him. One was appointed to fill the place of Judas, The Scripture account is as follows: "His bishopric let another take. " Matthias was chosen by lot to fill the place of Judas
Beth-Zur - Judas Maccabæus here defeated the Greeks under Lysias in b
Azarias - A captain of Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:18 ; 1Ma 5:56 ; 1Ma 5:60 )
Matthi'as - (gift of God ), the apostle elected to fill the place of the traitor Judas
Simon - Father, or brother, of Judas Iscariot, himself surnamed Iscariot ( John 6:71 ; John 13:26 ‘Judas of Simon Iscariot,’ John 13:2 ‘Judas Iscariot of Simon’)
Thomas - ’ If, as Eusebius states, the Apostle’s name was Judas, he would be styled ‘the Twin’ to distinguish him from Judas the son of James and Judas Iscariot
Judas - Being one of the twelve apostles of our Lord, Judas seems to have possessed the full confidence of his fellow apostles, and was entrusted by them with all the presents which were made them, and all their means of subsistence; and when the twelve were sent out to preach and to work miracles, Judas appears to have been among them, and to have received the same powers. ...
The remorseful confession of Judas was a signal testimony to the spotless innocence of Christ, Matthew 27:4 ; and his awful end is a solemn warning against avarice, hypocrisy, and all unfaithfulness, Matthew 26:34 John 17:12 Acts 1:25 . Supposed by many to have been only a cousin, and the same as Judas 2
Dedication, Feast of - An annual Feast to celebrate the dedication of the Temple by Judas Maccabeus after it had been polluted by Antiochus Epiphanes, B
Maccabees - two apocryphal books of Scripture, containing the history of Judas and his brothers, and their wars against the Syrian kings in defence of their religion and liberties, so called from Judas, the son of Mattathias, surnamed Maccabaeus, as some authors say, from the word מכבי , formed of the initials of מיאּ?כמכה באלים יהוה , "Who is like unto thee, O Lord, among the gods?" Exodus 15:11 , which was the motto of his standard; whence those who fought under his standard were called Maccabees, and the name was generally applied to all who suffered in the cause of true religion, under the Egyptian or Syrian kings. This name, formed by abbreviation according to the common practice of the Jews, distinguished Judas Maccabaeus by way of eminence, as he succeeded his father, B. Those, also, who suffered under Ptolemy Philopater of Alexandria, fifty years before this period, were afterward called Maccabees; and so were Eleazar, and the mother and her seven sons, though they suffered before Judas erected his standard with the motto from which the appellation originated. And therefore, as these books, which contain the history of Judas and his brothers, and their wars against the Syrian kings, in defence of their religion and liberties, are called the first and second books of the Maccabees; so that book which gives us the history of those who, in the like cause, under Ptolemy Philopater, were exposed to his elephants at Alexandria, is called the third book of the Maccabees; and that which is written by Josephus, of the martyrdom of Eleazar, and the seven brothers and their mother, is called the fourth book of the Maccabees. The second book of the Maccabees begins with two epistles sent from the Jews of Jerusalem to the Jews of Egypt and Alexandria, to exhort them to observe the feast of the dedication of the new altar erected by Judas, on his purifying the temple. After these epistles follows the preface of the author to his history, which is an abridgment of a larger work, composed by one Jason, a Jew of Cyrene, who wrote in Greek the history of Judas Maccabaeus, and his brethren, and the wars against Antiochus Epiphanes, and Eupator his son. It contains a history of about fifteen years, from the execution of Heliodorus's commission, who was sent by Seleucus to fetch away the treasures of the temple, to the victory obtained by Judas Maccabaeus over Nicanor; that is, from the year of the world 3828 to the year 3843, B. For a farther account of Judas Maccabaeus, and of his brothers, whose history is recorded in the first and second books of the Maccabees, and also by Josephus, we refer to the article JEWS
Apostles - Their names are as follows (Matthew 10; Mark 3; Luke 6): ...
Andrew
Bartholomew
James the Greater
James the Lesser
John
Matthew
Matthias (elected in place of Judas)
Philip
Simon Peter
Simon
Thaddeus or Jude
Thomas
Though not one of the twelve Apostles, Saint Paul is numbered as an Apostle of the first rank
Jazer - Judas Maccabæus took the city, which was then in the hands of the Ammonites ( 1Ma 5:9 ; Jos
Hanukkah - ) The Jewish Feast of the Dedication, instituted by Judas Maccabaeus, his brothers, and the whole congregation of Israel, in 165 b
Confirmation - Judas and Silas, messengers from Jerusalem to Antioch, being prophets, exhorted the brethren with many words and confirmed them
Ashteroth-Karnaim - 164, Judas Maccabæus destroyed the temple of Atargatis (wh
ju'Das of Galilee, - (Acts 5:37 ) According to Josephus, Judas was a Gaulonite of the city of Gamala, probably taking his name of Galilean from his insurrection having had its rise in Galilee
Headlong - ...
2: πρηνής (Strong's #4248 — Adjective — prenes — pray-nace' ) an adjective denoting "headlong, prone," is used with the verb ginomai, "to become," in Acts 1:18 , of the death of Judas, "falling headlong;" various suggestions have been made as to the actual details; some ascribe to the word the meaning "swelling up
Judas - JUDE, Judas...
There were two of this name well known in the Scriptures of the New Testament, the one an apostle of Christ, called in Matthew's gospel, (Matthew 10:3) Lebbeus, whose surname was Thaddeus, and by Luke, the brother of James; and he is again noticed by the persons who thought slight of our Lord and his doctrine, as his brother, Matthew 13:55. This was the Judas which spake to Christ in the midst of our Lord's sermon, and said, "Lord, how is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us, and not unto the world?" (John 14:22) He is the Jude to whom, under the Holy Ghost, we are indebted for that precious morsel of gospel truth which is contained in the Epistle that bears his name. The other Jude or Judas is he who was surnamed Barsabas, (see Acts 15:22) and who was commissioned by the apostles to go to the church at Antioch. (Acts 15:30, etc) There is another Judas different from both the former, mentioned Acts 9:11. Lastly, Judas Iscariot, the traitor. ...
See Iscariot...
The awful character of this man is related to us so fully in the gospels, that there can need nothing more than a reference to those sacred records to obtain the most complete account of him, together with his tremendous doom: for what can more fully decide the everlasting ruin of the traitor than the Lord Jesus's account of him, when summing up all in one the most finished picture of misery, Jesus saith "good were it for that man, if he had never been born!" (Mark 14:11)...
It hath been a subject of some debate in the early church respecting Judas Iscariot, whether he did or did not receive the Lord's Supper. Matthew gives a particular account of the whole proceedings of the Supper from first to last, (Matthew 26:20-30) and expressly states that when the twelve: consequently Judas was included. And so unconscious were the rest of the disciples who the traitor was, when the Lord at the table intimated that one of them should betray him, that they were exceeding sorrowful, and began to say unto him every one, Lord, is it I? And when the Lord to the enquiry of Judas declared that he was the person, there is nothing said of his departure, but that the Lord proceeded to bless the bread and the cup, and said, "Drink ye all of it. Mark states the circumstances very nearly to the same amount; (Mark 14:12-26) This evangelist observes, that prior to the supper Judas had been with the chief priests, and covenanted with them to betray Christ unto them. But from this evangelist's account it doth not appear that any discovery was then made of the traitor, neither is there the least idea afforded as if Judas was not present at the whole supper. But if the evangelist meant the Lord's Supper in the Passover, when he said, (John 13:2) "And supper being ended, the devil having now put into the heart of Judas Iscariot, Simon's son, to betray him"-if this was the sacramental supper, then it will follow that all that is subsequent in this chapter was also subsequent to the service. But I cannot see the very great importance of the question, whether Judas Iscariot did or did not receive the Lord's Supper. For as the apostle justly and decidedly states it, "what concord hath Christ with Belial?" (2 Corinthians 6:15) Judas being present at the table, and partaking of the elements of the table, became neither benefited himself, nor was it injurious to others. " (Job 1:6) But was the meeting unhallowed to the sons of God because the devil came in the midst? Were the apostles of Christ less apostles because Judas was "numbered with them, and had obtained part of this ministry?" (Acts 1:17) And surely if the Lord Jesus, well knowing as he did whom he had chosen, was pleased to number him for a time with the apostles, might he not for a time also allow him to sit down with the apostles at the same table? Yea, did not the Lord Jesus expressly tell the church, that these things were his own appointment, and perfectly known in all their consequences by his divine mind, when he said, "Have I not chosen you twelve, and one of you is a devil?" (John 6:70) If choosing Judas to be an apostle, at the time Christ knew that he was a devil, did not in the least contaminate the rest of the apostles, neither injure the cause of Jesus, it must undeniably follow, that his being present at the supper could not pollute the supper, nor the faithful partakers of the supper. " (Luke 13:26-27) Indeed, may we not go farther, and suppose, that from this very appointment the Lord intended special good to his people? Was it not in effect saying, that if in the instance of the Lord Jesus himself a Judas is permitted, yea, appointed to attend his person, can it be wondered at in the minglings up of life, that his people should be so exercised? If in the college of apostles, out of twelve persons one should be a devil, can his people complain that they are sometimes called "to dwell with Mesech, and to have their habitation among the tents of Kedar?" Did Jesus, the Lord of life and glory, who might have commanded twelve legions of angels to attend him, permit, yea, even appoint a known devil to be his servant, to be with him in his miracles and his ministry, yea, to be one of the party at his farewell super-and what doth the meek and gentle Saviour teach thereby all his tried ones upon earth but this, that in their intercourse with the graceless they are to call to mind the unequalled humblings of Jesus in such instances. In the family of Adam there was a Cain; in Noah's house there was a Ham; Isaac had his Esau as well as Jacob; and, above all, the Lord Jesus had Judas. Assuming it for granted that Jesus, who knew the hearts of all men, neither needed that nay should shew him, would not have permitted Judas to partake of his supper, they instantly leap to a conclusion, that it could not be, and decide upon it accordingly. "...
Let me only beg to add one observation more in relation to the traitor Judas, and then take a final farewell of his history forever; namely, concerning the awful death of the man, and the judgments that followed in his bowels gushing out
Theudas - 1) speaks of a Theudas who misled the people and gave himself out for a prophet, at least ten years after Gamaliel’s speech; and also a little afterwards (§ 2) speaks of the sons of Judas the Galilæao, the instigator of a rebellion in the time of Quirinius. Luke ( Acts 5:37 ) speaks successively of Theudas and Judas, and it is alleged that he erroneously put their names into Gamaliel’s mouth owing to a misreading of Josephus
Apostle - It will be seen by the lists that follow that Lebbaeus, Thaddaeus and Judas are the same person; and that Simon the Canaanite (Cananaean) and Simon Zelotes are the same; Peter is also called Simon; and Matthew is calledLevi. 10 Judas. 10 Judas. ...
naean and 12 Judas 1. 12 Judas I. ...
12 Judas Iscariot. Judas Iscariot is always named last. ...
On the death of Judas Iscariot, Matthias, an early disciple, was chosen in his place, for there must be (irrespective of Paul, who, as we have seen, held a unique place) twelve apostles as witnesses of His resurrection, Acts 1:22 ; Revelation 21:14 as there must still be twelve tribes of Israel
Matthias, Saint - (Hebrew: Mattithiah, gift of Jahveh) ...
Disciple selected with Barsabas, after the Ascension, from those followers of Christ who were deemed qualified for appointment to the Apostleship vacant through the betrayal and death of Judas
Sop - "It was such a piece of bread a sop dipped in broth that Jesus gave to Judas, (John 13:26 ) and again, in Matthew 26:23 It is said "he that dippeth his hand with me in the dish," i
Gethsemane - Judas led the enemies of Jesus to Gethsemane where Jesus was arrested and taken away for trial. ” See Mount of Olives; Kidron; Judas
Theudas - As Theudas preceded Judas the Galilaean according to Luke, he must have revolted at the close of Herod's reign (for Judas appeared in 6 A
Kiss - The term “kiss” in the New Testament is used of Judas (Mark 14:44-45 ), of the father to the prodigal as a sign of acceptance and reconciliation (Luke 15:20 ), of the Ephesian elders to Paul as a sign of gratitude (Acts 20:37 ), of the woman who kissed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7:38 ), and of the “holy kiss” (1 Thessalonians 5:26 ; 1 Corinthians 16:20 ; 2 Corinthians 13:12 ; Romans 16:16 ). The kiss of betrayal from Judas does not belong to the category of the kiss of Joab to Amasa (2 Samuel 20:9 ), but was the sign of respect from pupil to master. Either the action of Judas did not accord with his inner feeling, or his action had other motivation than betrayal
Machabeus, Judas - under Judas Machabeus and his brethren
Judas Machabeus - under Judas Machabeus and his brethren
Dip, Dipped, Dippeth - 1, "to dip into," is used of the act of Judas in "dipping" his hand with that of Christ in the dish, Matthew 26:23 ; Mark 14:20
Galilean - All the apostles, with the exception of Judas Iscariot (Acts 1:11 ), were Galileans
Maccabees, the - Mattathias the Asmonean, an aged priest, rallied together the national party, and his son Judas, surnamed MACCABEUS, succeeded in defeating their enemies; and for a time a degree of national freedom was enjoyed
Adullam - Judas Maccabaeus encamped in the plain of Adullam, where he passed the Sabbath day, 2Ma_12:38
Holofernes - ...
Holofernes has been variously identified with Ashurbanipal, Cambyses, Orophernes of Cappadocia (a friend of Demetrius Soter, the enemy of the Jews), Nicanor (the Syrian general conquered by Judas Maccahæus), Scaurus (Pompey’s lieutenant in Syria), and Severus (Hadrian’s general)
Uckewallists - He entertained a favourable opinion of the eternal state of Judas and the rest of Christ's murderers
Traitor, - ' It is applied to Judas, who delivered up his Lord
Judas - Judas of Galilee, who raised an insurrection in the days of the taxing, A
Ahithophel - He was the type of Judas in his treachery and in his end. (See Judas
Backsliding - The difference between backsliding as a temporary failure and backsliding as apostacy is seen in the actions of the two disciples, Peter and Judas. Peter was restored, but Judas was lost (Luke 22:31-32; Luke 22:47-62; John 17:12; Acts 1:15-16; cf
Dedication, Feast of the - 167), and the rebuilding of the altar after the Syrian invaders had been driven out by Judas Maccabaeus
Torches - On the night of his betrayal, when our Lord was in the garden of Gethsemane, Judas, "having received a band of men and officers from the chief priests and Pharisees, cometh thither with lanterns and torches and weapons" (John 18:1-3 )
Silas - He and Judas, surnamed Barsabas, were chosen by the church there to accompany Paul and Barnabas on their return to Antioch from the council of the apostles and elders (Acts 15:22 ), as bearers of the decree adopted by the council
Emmaus - Emmaus Nicopolis, now ‘Amwas , on the main Jerusalem-Jaffa road, the scene of the defeat of Gorgias by Judas ( 1Ma 3:40 ; 1Ma 3:57 ; 1Ma 4:3-27 ), held and fortified by Bacchides ( 1Ma 9:50 )
Professor - as Saul, Jehu, Judas, Demas, the foolish virgins, &c
Apostle - The twelve apostles of Jesus were Simon Peter, Andrew, James the son of Zebedee, John, Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, Thaddaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot
Kiss - It was also in ordinary use among the Jews; hence Judas in this way saluted his Master
Apostle - The names of the twelve are, Simon Peter; Andrew, his brother; James, the son of Zebedee, called also "the greater;" John, his brother; Philip; Bartholomew; Thomas; Matthew, or Levi; Simon the Canaanite; Lebbeus, surnamed Thaddeus, also called Judas or Jude; James, "the less," the son of Alphaeus; and Judas Iscariot, Matthew 10:2-4 Mark 3:16 Luke 6:14
Backsliding - It may be considered as partial when applied to true believers, who do not backslide with the whole bent of their will; as voluntary, when applied to those who, after professing to know the truth, wilfully turn from it, and live in the practice of sin; as final, when the mind is given up to judicial hardness, as in the case of Judas. We should consider the awful instances of apostacy, as Saul, Judas, Demas, &c; the many warnings we have of it, Matthew 24:13
Gethsemane - Oil-press, a garden or grove in the valley at the foot of the Mount of Olives, over against Jerusalem, to which our Savior sometimes retired, and in which he endured his agony, and was betrayed by Judas, Matthew 26:36-57 . " From this garden he could readily see the crowd of men "with lanterns and torches" emerging from the city gate, and hastening, under the guidance of Judas, to seize him
Jonathan -
The youngest son of Mathathias and brother of Judas Machabeus. He took an important part in the Machabean revolt, and was chosen leader after Judas's death
Ahithophel - He was the type of Judas (Psalm 41:9 )
Bags - Judas carried in it the common property of the Twelve
Nicanor - 166 against Judas Maccabæus, but was defeated
Dedication, Feast of - Commemorating the purging of the temple and rebuilding of the altar after Judas Maccabaeus had driven out the Syrians, 164 B
Box - For Judas’ money-box ( John 12:6 ; John 13:29 AV Potter's Field - The field that was bought with the thirty pieces of silver paid to Judas for the betrayal of the Lord is thus called
Ahithophel - He has generally been taken as foreshadowing Judas of the N
Dedication, Feast of the, - the festival instituted to commemorate the purging of the temple and the rebuilding of the altar after Judas Maccabbeus had driven out the Syrians, B
Zacchaeus - An officer put to death by Judas Maccabæus for treachery ( 2Ma 10:18-22 )
Taxing - [1] The second and more important, (Acts 6:37 ) is distinctly associated, in point of time, with the revolt of Judas of Galilee
Matthias - Elected to the apostleship instead of Judas the traitor
Cananaean - The Cananæans or Zealots were a sect founded by Judas of Gamala, who headed the opposition to the census of Quirinius (a
Beggars - The Psalmist said that during the whole of his life he had not seen the righteous forsaken, nor his seed begging bread, Psalm 37:25 ; whereas of a wicked one, typical of Judas, it is said, "Let his children be continually vagabonds and beg," Psalm 109:10 ; but in bringing in strength and salvation Jehovah "lifteth up the beggar from the dunghill, to set them among princes," 1 Samuel 2:8
James, Son of Alphaeus - He was most probably the writer of the Epistle of James, and the brother of Jude, or Judas, who was also an apostle
Spikenard - Of it the ointment with which Mary anointed Jesus was made; it was so costly that Judas and other disciples murmured at the waste (Mark 14:3-5; John 12:3-5), its worth being 300 denarii , about 9 British pounds 7s
Taxes, Taxation, Taxing - In Acts 5:37 the same term is employed, but the enrolment in this case may have included the taking an account of their property (as stated by Josephus) which led to Judas heading a revolt
Aceldama - A field said to have been intended for the burial of strangers, which the chief priests bought with the money returned by Judas, as the price of the Saviour's blood
Hasmonean - One son, Judas, gained particular reputation as fighting like a lion. He was given the title Judas Maccabeus (from maqqaba “hammer”) for his fighting enthusiasm and style. Although Judas and Jonathan played important leadership roles, the Hasmonean dynasty clearly emerged under Simon, who was widely recognized as secular and religious leader of homeland Judaism. These included embracing some forms of Hellenism (he changed the name of his three sons from Judas, Mattathias, and Jonathan, all names of Maccabean heroes, to Aristobulus, Antigonus, and Alexander Janneus). Judas Aristobulus I successfully challenged his widowed mother and claimed the title king
Apostasy - Final, when men are given up the judicial hardness of heart, as Judas
Simon - Simon the father of Judas Iscariot (John 6:71; John 13:2; John 13:26)
Silas - When a dispute was raised at Antioch about the observation of the legal ceremonies, they chose Paul, Barnabas, Judas, and Silas, to go to Jerusalem, to advise with the Apostles concerning this question
Matthias - After the ascension of our Lord, the Apostles retiring to Jerusalem in expectation of the effusion of the Holy Ghost, as had been promised, Peter proposed to fill up the place of Judas: to this the disciples agreed
Bag - It is used of the "bag" which Judas carried, John 12:6 ; 13:29 ; in the Sept
Cainites - They regarded Judas the traitor as having full cognizance of the truth. The Cainites possessed a fictitious work entitled ‘The Gospel of Judas,’ and Irenaeus says that he had himself collected writings of theirs, where they advocated that the work of Hystera should be dissolved. He also says that Judas forced the Archons, or rulers, against their will to slay Christ, and thus assisted us to the salvation of the Cross. Philaster, on the other hand, assigns the action of Judas to his knowledge that Christ intended to destroy the truth-a purpose which he frustrated by the betrayal. There is no doubt that they applauded the action of Judas in the betrayal, but our authorities differ as to the motive which prompted him. The view that Judas through his more perfect γνῶσις penetrated the wish of Jesus more successfully than the others, and accomplished it by bringing Him to the Cross through which He effected redemption, is intrinsically the more probable
Maccabees - His son Judas, "the Maccabee," succeeded him (B
Galileans - They sprang from one Judas, a native of Gaulam, in upper Galilee, upon the occasion of Augustus appointing the people to be mustered, which they looked upon as an instance of servitude which all true Israelites ought to oppose
Bag - ...
John 12:6 (a) Judas was the treasurer for the disciples and was stealing from the fund entrusted to his care
Bethhoron - ...
It was near these cities that Judas Maccabaeus won his victory over Seron; and here that the Roman Cestius Gallus was signally defeated
Friend - ...
So Christ calls Judas his friend, though a traitor
Aceldama - The field was bought with the money paid to Judas for betraying his Lord but which he in despair could not keep
Commune - ...
3: συλλαλέω (Strong's #4814 — Verb — sullaleo — sool-lal-eh'-o ) "to talk together," is translated "communed" in Luke 22:4 , of the conspiracy of Judas with the chief priests
Brother - Yet this is not quite certain, as it may be that the James, Joses, and Judas in Matthew 13:55 , are the nephews of Christ alluded to in Matthew 27:56 Luke 6:15,16 John 19:25 ; Cleophas and Alphaeus being probably the same
Bag - (Proverbs 7:20 ) ...
The "bag" which Judas carried was probably a small box or chest
Machabees, the - At the death of Mathathias, Judas Machabeus, his third son, drove the Syrians and Hellenists out of Jerusalem, rededicated the Temple, and began an offensive and defensive alliance with the Romans. Before the treaty was concluded, however, Judas, with 800 men, risked battle at Laisa with an overwhelming army of Syrians under Bacchides, and was slain
Dish - ...
A comparative study of the four records which tell of Jesus’ reference to His impending betrayal brings to light some not unimportant minor differences, and at the same time reveals the agreement of all the writers in the belief that He knew of the intentions of Judas, and warned the latter against the dark deed. Matthew not only adds a more distinct note by employing the aorist (ἐμβάψας) instead of the present Middle (ἐμβαπτόμενος), by which he evidently intended to convey the idea of time, but he also informs us that Jesus gave a direct affirmative reply (σὺ εἶπας) to Judas’ question. ...
Most scholars have sought to establish the relative positions of Jesus and Judas at this Passover feast from the incidents referred to by all four Evangelists (cf. If, indeed, opposite each triclinium at the table there had been a τρύβλιον, then the answer of Jesus to His disciples’ questions would show clearly that Judas reclined immediately on His left. This, however, as we have already intimated, is not probable; and the only data by which an approximately correct impression may be received lie in the words spoken by Jesus to Judas himself, and recorded partly by St. Mark; see Bengel’s Gnomon of NT on Mark 14:20), and that in this way Jesus was able to convey privately to Judas the fact that He knew of the latter’s intention
Bag - ...
...
The "bag" of Judas was a small box (John 12:6 ; 13:29 )
Apostle - Twelve persons were selected by Christ for this purpose and Judas, one of the number, proving an apostate, his place was supplied by Matthias
Akeldama - The name of the ‘potter’s field’ ( Acts 1:19 ), purchased for the burial of strangers with the blood-money returned by Judas ( Matthew 27:3 )
Gethsemane - Here also He was betrayed by Judas with a kiss, and arrested
Hazor - " It is supposed to have been the home of Judas Iscariot, the man of Kerioth, Matthew 10:4; Conder suggested Kheshram, north of Beer-sheba, as the site of this Hazor
Judas - Nor can any answer be satisfactorily given to the question as to the motives that led Judas to betray his Master. The street called "Straight" in which it was situated is identified with the modern "street of bazaars," where is still pointed out the so-called "house of Judas
Habitation - ...
Acts 1:20 (a) The word is used in this passage to indicate the home in which Judas and his family lived. The whole family was blotted out by the Lord, and Judas and his family had no successors
Potter - —‘The Potter’s Field’ was the name of the property in the purchase of which the chief priests spent the thirty pieces of silver returned by Judas, and which they proposed to use as a burial-place for strangers (Matthew 27:7). Matthew 27:8 states that this spot came in consequence to be known as ‘the field of blood—that is, the field bought with the price of blood; but a different reason for that name is given in Acts 1:18-19, where Judas himself purchases the field, and commits suicide in it
Potter - —‘The Potter’s Field’ was the name of the property in the purchase of which the chief priests spent the thirty pieces of silver returned by Judas, and which they proposed to use as a burial-place for strangers (Matthew 27:7). Matthew 27:8 states that this spot came in consequence to be known as ‘the field of blood—that is, the field bought with the price of blood; but a different reason for that name is given in Acts 1:18-19, where Judas himself purchases the field, and commits suicide in it
Maccabees - Judas (b. Judas was essentially a warrior, whose plans involved not only the re-establishment of the Torah, but also, in all probability, the re-establishment of the Jewish State in at least a semi-independent position. then sent Lysias, the Imperial chancellor, to put down the revolt, and he in turn sent a large body of troops against Judas, under three generals Ptolemy, Nicanor, and Gorgias. Judas called the fighting men of Galilee together at Mizpah, organized them, and at Emmaus surprised and utterly defeated the forces of Gorgias (b. In the autumn of 165, Lysias himself came against Judas at the head of a great army, but was defeated at Bethzur. Thereupon, in December 165, Judas cleansed the Temple of the Syrian pollutions and inaugurated the re-established worship with a great feast. Lysias returned with a great army, and at Beth-zacharias completely defeated Judas. Judas and his party, however, remained in revolt, and when Lysias returned to Syria, undertook war against Alcimus himself. He was defeated by Judas at Capharsalama, and retreated to Jerusalem, where he threatened to burn the Temple if Judas were not delivered up. This once more brought ‘the Pious’ to the support of Judas, who decisively defeated the Syrians at Adasa, Nicanor himself being killed. Josephus states that at this time Alcimus died and Judas was made high priest. Although this is probably an error, Judas was now at the head of the State. This international policy of Judas displeased ‘the Pious,’ however, and they deserted him; and before the message of the Senate could reach Demetrius, Judas had been defeated by the Syrian general Bacchides , at Elasa, and killed ( 1M Malachi 3:1 to 1Ma 9:22 )
Modin - He was buried at Modin ( 1Ma 2:70 ), as were his illustrious sons Judas ( 1Ma 9:19 ) and Jonathan ( 1Ma 13:25 )
Dedicate, Dedication - ), instituted by Judas Maccabaeus, 164, B
Apostates - As we regarded the singular memorial we thought of Judas and Demas, and then, as we heard in spirit the Master's warning word, 'One of you shall betray me,' we asked within our soul the solemn question, 'Lord, is it I?' Every one's eve rests longer upon the one dark vacancy than upon any one of the many fine portraits of the merchant monarchs; and so the apostates of the church are far more frequently the theme of the world's talk than the thousands of good men and true who adorn the doctrine of God our Savior in all things
Thief - Judas ‘was a thief, and having the bag’ (lit
Dedication, Feast of the - After the desecration of the Temple and altar by Antiochus Epiphanes, Judas Maccabæus re-consecrated them in b
Apollonius - Judas Maccabæus defeated and slew him, wearing his sword ever after ( Malachi 3:10 Malachi 3:10 ff
Arbela - of Bîr ez-Zeit , where the battle was fought with Judas
Thief - It is applied to Judas
Asmonaeans - Under the able conduct of Judas, surnamed Maccabaeus, and his valiant brothers, the Jews maintained a religious war for twenty-six years with five successive kings of Syria; and after destroying upwards of two hundred thousand of their best troops, the Maccabees finally established the independence of their own country, and the aggrandisement of their family
Accuser - 1), is used 34 times as a title of Satan, the Devil (the English word is derived from the Greek); once of Judas, John 6:70 , who, in his opposition of God, acted the part of the Devil
Silas - On occasion of a dispute at Antioch, as to the observance of legal ceremonies, Paul and Barnabas were chosen to go to Jerusalem, to advise with the apostles; and they returned with Judas and Silas
Beard - These facts explain many passages of Scripture: as the gross insult offered to David's ambassadors, 2 Samuel 10:4-14 ; the zealous indignation of Nehemiah, Nehemiah 13:25 ; the mode in which the feigned insanity of David was expressed, 1 Samuel 21:12 , and the grief of Mephibosheth, 1 Samuel 19:24 ; the treachery of Judas; also several passages in the prophets, Isaiah 7:20 50:6 Ezekiel 5:1-5
mo'Din, - At Modin the Maccabean armies encamped on the eves of two of their most memorable victories --that of Judas over Antiochus Eupator, 2 Maccabees 13:14 , and that of Simon over Cendebeus
Matthias, Feast of Saint - Matthias in the New Testament is that to be found inActs I:15-26 where it is recorded that he was chosen to be an Apostlein the place of the traitor Judas
Thom'as - According to Eusebius, his real name was Judas. Out of this name has grown the tradition that he had a twin-sister, Lydia, or that he was a twin-brother of our Lord; which last, again, would confirm his identification with Judas. John; and this amounts to three traits, which, however, so exactly agree together that, slight as they are they place his character before us with a precision which belongs to no other of the twelve apostles except Peter, John and Judas Iscariot
James - James the father (Authorized Version ‘brother’) of Judas, Luke 6:16 (‘not Iscariot,’ John 14:22, the Thaddaeus of Mt. The Authorized Version translation is derived from the Latin of Beza, and is due to a confusion of this Judas with a quite different person, Judas (Jude) the ‘brother of James’ (Judges 1:1, Matthew 13:55). The older English versions have either ‘Judas of James’ (Wyclif = Vulgate Iudam Iacobi) or ‘Judas James’ sonne’ (Tindale, etc. Luke), Judas of James (= Thaddaeus, with whom he is coupled by Mt. ), and Judas Iscariot. He is the eldest of four brothers, James, Joseph, Judas, and Simon (Simon and Judas, Matthew 13:55)
Mass, Saints of the - Before the Consecration, in the prayer Communicantes, commemoration is made of ...
Our Lady
twelve Apostles (including Saint Paul, but excluding Judas Iscariot)
Pope Saint Linus
Pope Saint Cletus
Pope Saint Clement
Pope Saint Sixtus
Pope Saint Cornelius
Saint Cyprian of Carthage
Saint Lawrence
Saint Chrysogonus
Saint John the Martyr
Saint Paul the Martyr
Saint Cosmas
Saint Damian
After the Consecration, in the prayer Nobis quoque peccatoribus, we pray for fellowship with certain other apostles and martyrs ...
Saint John the Baptist
Saint Stephen the First Martyr
Saint Matthias the Apostle
Saint Barnabas the Apostles
Saint Ignatius of Antioch
Pope Saint Alexander I
Saint Marcellinus
Saint Peter the Exorcist
Saint Felicitas
Saint Perpetua
Saint Agatha
Saint Lucy
Saint Agnes
Saint Cecilia
Saint Anastasia
It is noteworthy that all the above are martyrs, and either Romans or saints popular at Rome, as our Mass is the local liturgy of the city of Rome
Kiss - The customary salutation in the East as a mark of respect or affection (Genesis 27:26; Song of Solomon 1:2; Luke 7:45); hence the token used by the hypocrite to pretend love (2 Samuel 15:5 Absalom; Matthew 26:48 Judas)
Simon - The father of Judas Iscariot (John 6:71 )
Galilaean - Some suppose Barabbas to have been arrested in connexion therewith; some would associate it with the revolt of Judas of Galilee (Josephus BJ ii
Altars in the Temple of Jerusalem - Antiochus Epiphanes desecrated this second altar, 168, and on that account it was completely removed by Judas Machabeus, 165, and a new one was erected which apparently remained until the destruction of Herod's Temple by the Romans 70 A
Ahithophel - Perhaps there may be a reference in Psalms 41:9; Psalms 55:12-14, to Ahithophel, and possibly through him to a yet worse traitor, Judas
Saints of the Mass - Before the Consecration, in the prayer Communicantes, commemoration is made of ...
Our Lady
twelve Apostles (including Saint Paul, but excluding Judas Iscariot)
Pope Saint Linus
Pope Saint Cletus
Pope Saint Clement
Pope Saint Sixtus
Pope Saint Cornelius
Saint Cyprian of Carthage
Saint Lawrence
Saint Chrysogonus
Saint John the Martyr
Saint Paul the Martyr
Saint Cosmas
Saint Damian
After the Consecration, in the prayer Nobis quoque peccatoribus, we pray for fellowship with certain other apostles and martyrs ...
Saint John the Baptist
Saint Stephen the First Martyr
Saint Matthias the Apostle
Saint Barnabas the Apostles
Saint Ignatius of Antioch
Pope Saint Alexander I
Saint Marcellinus
Saint Peter the Exorcist
Saint Felicitas
Saint Perpetua
Saint Agatha
Saint Lucy
Saint Agnes
Saint Cecilia
Saint Anastasia
It is noteworthy that all the above are martyrs, and either Romans or saints popular at Rome, as our Mass is the local liturgy of the city of Rome
Kiss - Prohably Judas presumed to salute with the kiss of an equal ( Matthew 26:49 etc
Ird - ...
Psalm 109:19 (a) This figure is used about Judas whose bitter attitude of cursing toward CHRIST, and the hatred of his heart toward his Master is compared to this garment which surrounded his whole person and influenced his whole life
John - The father of Eupolemus ( 1Ma 8:17 , 2Ma 4:11 ), who was sent by Judas Maccabæus as an ambassador to Rome
Kidron, Kedron, Brook - The Lord also crossed it on His last visit to Gethsemane, when He was about to be delivered up by Judas
Galileans - It happened, when the tax was levied by Quirinus, that one Judas, of Galilee, otherwise called Gaulonites, in company with Zaduk, a Sadducee, publicly taught, that such taxation was repugnant to the law of Moses, according to which the Jews, they maintained, had no king but God
Simon - The father of Judas Iscariot
Perdition - The phrase “son of perdition” describes the person who has fallen victim to this destruction (compare Judas in John 17:12 )
James - James, the father of the Apostle Judas ( Luke 6:16 RV [3] ‘Judas the brother of James’ is an impossible identification of the Apostle Judas with the author of the Epistle ( Judges 1:1 )
Dedication, Feast of - The dedication commemorated in it was the dedication of a new altar by Judas Maccabaens in b. For three years this state of profanation had continued, but when the third anniversary of the desecration came round, the heroic efforts of Judas Maccabaens and his companions had reached such success that they were able to cleanse the Holy Place and to set up a new altar in place of that which had been defiled, spending a week in special services for its dedication; and, in order to commemorate this, Judas Maccabaens ordained ‘that the days of the dedication of the altar should be kept in their seasons from year to year by the space of eight days, from the five and twentieth day of the month Chislev, with gladness and joy’ (1 Maccabees 4:59)
Beth-Horon - 945, in the list of his conquests, and the pass was the scene of a victory of Judas Maccabeus
Repentance - This word is used with reference to the repentance of Judas ( Matthew 27:3 )
Beth-Horon - Here Judas Maccabæus defeated the Syrian general Seron ( 1Ma 3:13-24 ) and five years afterwards Nicanor ( 1 Chronicles 7:39-40 ); more than 200 years later the Jews at the same place beat back the Roman army under Cestius Gallus
Jabneel - Judas is said to have burned its harbour; it was captured by Simon from the Syrians
Ashdod - It was again captured by Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:68 ), and again by Jonathan ( 1Ma 10:84 )
Mac'Cabees, Books of - and closes with the victory of Judas Maccabaeus over Nicanor. 8-15, is to be regarded as a series of special incidents from the life of Judas, illustrating the providential interference of God in behalf of his people, true in substance, but embellished in form
Self-Seeking - Micah 2:1-2 ; that it is contrary to the example of all wise and good men: that the most awful examples of the punishment of this sin are recorded in Scripture; as Pharaoh, Achan, Haman, Gehazi, Absalom, Ananias and Sapphira, Judas, and many others
Idumaea - Judas Maccabaeus fought against the Idumaeans with much success (1 Maccabees 5:3) in 164
Ananias - Peter, was the signal proof of God’s anger on this Judas-like hypocrisy
Satan - By collecting the passages where Satan, or the devil, is mentioned, it may be concluded, that he fell from heaven with his company; that God cast him down from thence for the punishment of his pride; that by his envy and malice, sin, death, and all other evils came into the world; that, by the permission of God, he exercises a sort of government in the world over subordinate apostate angels like himself; that God makes use of him to prove good men, and chastise bad ones; that he is a lying spirit in the mouth of false prophets and seducers; that it is he, or his agents, that torment or possess men, and inspire them with evil designs, as when he suggested to David, the numbering of the people, to Judas to betray his Lord and Master, and to Ananias and Sapphira to conceal the price of their field; that he is full of rage like a roaring lion, and of subtlety like a serpent, to tempt, to betray, to destroy, and involve us in guilt and wickedness; that his power and malice are restrained within certain limits, and controlled by the will of God; in a word, that he is an enemy to God and man, and uses his utmost endeavours to rob God of his glory, and men of their souls
Simon - The father of Judas Iscariot, John 6:71 13:2,26
Perdition - In John 17:12 the phrase is applied to Judas Iscariot, while in 2 Thessalonians 2:3 it is used of the ‘man of sin,’ or Antichrist
Jude, Saint - Also called Thaddaeus or Labbaeus, "the brother ofJames," and whose name sometimes appears as Judas, and in oneinstance it is added in parenthesis, "not Iscariot
Jude - It is generally believed that the author of the letter of Jude was the younger brother of Jesus, whose original name Judas was later shortened to Jude (Mark 6:3)
Joseph - He was therefore nominated, along with Matthias, for the office made vacant by the treachery and death of Judas Iscariot (Acts 1:21-23). It is a natural conjecture-no more-that this Joseph was the brother of Judas Barsabbas (Acts 15:22)
Bag - Judas may have been entrusted with it as being the best fitted for such work; but what might have proved a blessing, as giving useful employment for his talents, became the means of his ruin. See Judas Iscariot
Predestination - ...
Two special problems that arise in relation to predestination are the place of Judaism (Romans 9-11 ) and of Judas (John 6:70-71 ) in the determination of God. Judas was chosen by Jesus as were all of the disciples. As all disciples of Jesus, Judas had the capacity for betrayal—so did Peter. Judas exercised his will to betray. The evil one found in Judas a willing instrument (John 13:27 ). Judas did not have to do it, but he did
Strangling - Matthew 27:5 of Judas)
Enough - It is difficult, however, to find examples of this meaning in Greek usage of the word, and apecho may here refer, in its commercial significance, to Judas (who is mentioned immediately afterwards), with the meaning "he hath received" (his payment); cp
Nicolaitans - 46) explain, followers of Nicolas one of the seven (Acts 6:3; Acts 6:5) as there was a Judas among the twelve; confounding the later Gnostic Nicolaitans with those of Michaelis explains Nicolas (conqueror of the people) is the Greek for the Hebrew Balsam ("destroyer of the people," bela' 'am ); as we find both the Hebrew and Greek names, Abaddon, Apollyon; Satan, devil
Fall - Professing Christians are attached to the church, or the people of GOD, as Judas was, but they are not a part of that living group known as the Church of JESUS CHRIST, or the body of the Lord JESUS
Heel - ...
Psalm 41:9 (b) By this we understand that Judas secretly and deceitfully betrayed JESUS to His enemies
Hazor - This place has been identified with el-Kuryetein, and has been supposed to be the home of Judas Iscariot
Jude, Epistle of - The author was "Judas, the brother of James" the Less (Jude 1:1 ), called also Lebbaeus (Matthew 10:3 ) and Thaddaeus (Mark 3:18 )
Candlestick, Seven-Branched - Judas Machabeus provided a new one (1Machabees 4), somewhat different in shape from the one described in Exodus
the Last Supper - Also prominent in all four Gospels is Jesus' prediction of His betrayal by Judas (Matthew 26:21-24 ; Mark 14:18-21 ; Luke 22:21-22 ; John 13:21 )
Zealot - A group of Jews, led by a man called Judas the Galilean, rebelled against this direct taxation, claiming that God’s people should not pay taxes to a pagan emperor
Sign - circumcision as a sign of the covenant); (3) as an ‘indication’-Matthew 26:48 (Judas’ kiss), Luke 2:12 (to the Shepherds) Luke 2:34 (the child Jesus set for a sign); (4) hence for some wonderful indication-Matthew 24:3; Matthew 24:30, Mark 13:4 (of Christ’s Coming), Matthew 16:1; Matthew 16:4, Mark 8:11, Mark 16:17; Mark 16:20, Luke 11:15; Luke 11:29 (to show Christ’s power), Matthew 16:3 (signs of the times) Matthew 16:4 (sign of Jonah), 1 Corinthians 14:22 (tongues and prophesying as a sign of the power of Christianity); and therefore for a ‘miracle’ or wonderful deed which has instruction as its object
Ordain - Matthias was ordained to take the place of Judas, Acts 1:22 : γίγνομαι, 'to become
Mary, Sister of Lazarus And Martha - Judas and others were indignant at what they called 'waste,' but the Lord defended Mary's action, and said He was being anointed for His burial: this act should be told of her in the whole world
Seven-Branched Candlestick - Judas Machabeus provided a new one (1Machabees 4), somewhat different in shape from the one described in Exodus
Habitation - ...
4: ἔπαυλις (Strong's #1886 — Noun Feminine — epaulis — ep'-ow-lis ) "a farm, a dwelling" (epi, "upon," aulis, "a place in which to pass the night, a country house, cottage or cabin, a fold"), is used in Acts 1:20 of the habitation of Judas
Place (His Own) - Peter states that Judas, into whose place he was being appointed, ‘fell away’ (παρέβη, Vulg. 35) with his characteristic ingenuity and large-heartedness, have suggested that Judas’s motive for hurrying away from this world to the other was not remorse but contrition; having failed to obtain Christ’s pardon here, he hastened to meet Him and obtain it in the place of the departed
Sign - circumcision as a sign of the covenant); (3) as an ‘indication’-Matthew 26:48 (Judas’ kiss), Luke 2:12 (to the Shepherds) Luke 2:34 (the child Jesus set for a sign); (4) hence for some wonderful indication-Matthew 24:3; Matthew 24:30, Mark 13:4 (of Christ’s Coming), Matthew 16:1; Matthew 16:4, Mark 8:11, Mark 16:17; Mark 16:20, Luke 11:15; Luke 11:29 (to show Christ’s power), Matthew 16:3 (signs of the times) Matthew 16:4 (sign of Jonah), 1 Corinthians 14:22 (tongues and prophesying as a sign of the power of Christianity); and therefore for a ‘miracle’ or wonderful deed which has instruction as its object
Mary, Sister of Lazarus - ...
When Judas and the disciples, led by him, objected to the waste of ointment worth 300 pence (about 9 British pounds and 16 shillings) which might have been given to the poor, Jesus vindicated and richly rewarded her: cf6 "why trouble ye the woman? let alone, she hath wrought a good work on Me, she hath done what she could, ye have the poor always with you but Me ye have not always (See 1618092396_13); she hath come aforehand to anoint My body to the burying; wheresoever this gospel shall be preached throughout the whole world, this also that she hath done shall be spoken of for a memorial of her. " (See Judas
Disperse, Dispersion - 2, signifies "to scatter abroad," in Matthew 26:31 ; Mark 14:27 , metaphorically of sheep; in Luke 1:51 , of the proud; in John 11:52 , of the "scattering" of the children of God; in Acts 5:37 , of the followers of Judas of Galilee (AV, "were dispersed"); cp
Desolate, Desolation - have it in Luke 13:35 ; in reference to the habitation of Judas, Acts 1:20 , and to Sarah, from whom, being barren, her husband had turned, Galatians 4:27
Hanging - Judas, one of the twelve disciples of our Lord, in a desperate effort to resolve guilt and atone for the misdeed of betraying Jesus for thirty pieces of silver, went out into the night and hanged himself (Matthew 27:5 )
Matthias - 6) and chosen to fill the place of Judas
Exorcists - Is it not more probable that the Lord was in that passage alluding to His disciples? The Lord was a mysterious person whom they could not comprehend; and He was charged with casting out demons by the prince of demons; but the Lord said, By whom do your children (the origin of whom you do know) cast them out? On the other hand, the Lord describes some of the lost as pleading that they had cast out demons in His name, Matthew 7:22 ; but these also speak of having prophesied in His name; so that they would be persons who had made a profession, as Judas who was sent out with the other apostles
Zealot - The term could also be applied to a general attitude and movement illustrated by Judas of Gamala and Saddok, a Pharisee, who led an abortive revolt against a Roman census in a
Laver - John 13:4-14 is somewhat analogous to this, where the apostles, though declared to be clean (except Judas), needed that their feet should be washed, because of the defilements of the way, in order to have part with Christ when He went to the Father
Lots, Casting - In order to fill up the vacancy caused by the fall of Judas, the lot was resorted to; but was on that occasion accompanied by prayer that the Lord would show which of the two He had chosen
Bag, Purse, Wallet - ]'>[4] crisping pins ), ( f ) The ‘bag’ which Judas carried ( John 12:6 ; John 13:29 ) was rather a small box (RVm Murder - Nothing is said especially in the law respecting selfmurder, and only the cases of Saul, Ahithophel, and Judas are described in the Bible, 1 Samuel 31:4 2 Samuel 17:23 Acts 1:18
Spies - In this sense Judas was the great spy, being in close touch with Jesus, and familiar with all His movements,—a fact which explains the roundabout directions given to the two Apostles as to where they should prepare the Passover meal. It was essential that Judas should not know the place beforehand, in order that the solemn proceedings and Christ’s last discourse might not be interrupted by the coming of the band from the priests to effect His arrest
Friend - And our Saviour calls Judas the traitor friend. ...
However, this being spoken in the person of him who made the feast, it is generally taken for a usual compellation, and that Christ, following the like courteous custom of appellation and friendly greeting, did so salute Judas, which yet left a sting behind it in his conscience, who knew himself to be the reverse of what he was called
Rebels - And we read of no traitor in the word of God but the traitor Judas, who is said to have fallen by transgression, that he might go to his own place, (Acts 1:25) his own proper place, his birth-right. Christ speaking of this very traitor Judas, saith of him, "It had been good for that man if he had not been born. " (Jude 1:1:4) And Paul speaks of similar characters under the general term of traitors, (2 Timothy 3:4) So that Judas and his company, the reprobate, are the only traitors we meet with in the word of God; and in this sense rebels and traitors are one and the same
Names in New Testament - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
New Testament, Names in - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
Essenes - (Judas being the earliest mentioned), but are never noticed in New Testament, the reason doubtless being their isolation from general society
Simon - ) The fifth was the father of Judas Iscariot (John 13:2; John 13:26)
Lord, Brethren of the - " ...
 ...
Jude or Judas Thaddeus was, like his elder brother James (Matthew 13; Jude 1:1), slow to understand Jesus's true mission (as, indeed, all the brothers were, according to John 7), like him, drawn to the apostleship (Luke 6), and, like him, the author of a catholic epistle
Brethren of the Lord - Jesus was Mary’s first-born ( Luke 2:7 ), and she subsequently (according to the view accepted in the present article) bore to Joseph four sons, James, Joseph, Judas, and Simon, and several daughters ( Matthew 13:55-56 = Mark 6:3 )
Census - The other reference is that of Gamaliel's remark about Judas of Galilee, who rose up “in the days of the census” only to later perish (Acts 5:37 NIV)
Simon - Simon, father of Judas Iscariot
It - It was Judas who betrayed Christ
Damas'Cus, - (Acts 9:11 ) The house of Judas and that of Ananias are shown, but little confidence can be placed in any of these traditions
Jude, Epistle of - Written by Jude the brother of James, and apparently the same person as the apostle Judas, q
Disciple (2) - ...
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Judas of James. ...
 ...
Judas of James. ...
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Judas Iscariot. ...
 ...
Judas Iscariot. ...
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Judas Iscariot. ...
 ...
Judas of James
Zachariah, Zacharias - Father of Joseph, an officer of Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:18 ; 1Ma 5:66 )
Devil, Devlish - Judas, who gave himself over to the "Devil," was so identified with him, that the Lord described him as such, John 6:70 (see John 13:2 )
Insurrection - Josephus tells of notable leaders such as Ezekias, his son Judas, and his four grandsons, all of whom were put to death (Ant
Confirmation - There are 3 passages in Acts ( Acts 14:22 ; Acts 15:32 ; Acts 15:41 ) in w hich Paul and Barnabas, or Judas and Silas, or Paul by himself, are said to have confirmed ‘the souls of the disciples,’ ‘the brethren,’ ‘the churches
Matthias - , where his appointment by lot to fill the place of Judas among the Twelve Apostles is described
Fell - ...
Acts 1:25 (a) Judas was in an exalted position, being called by CHRIST to be one of the twelve
Pontius Pilate - Like Judas, it had been well for him if he had never been born, though alas, the Jewish rulers, who delivered up the Lord after having seen His miracles and heard His words, had the greater sin
Transgress, Transgression - , "to go aside" (para), hence "to go beyond," is chiefly used metaphorically of "transgressing" the tradition of the elders, Matthew 15:2 ; the commandment of God, Matthew 15:3 ; in Acts 1:25 , of Judas, AV, "by transgression fell" (RV, "fell away"); in 2 John 1:9 some texts have this verb (AV, "transgresseth"), the best have proago (see GO , No
Bethany - The anointing by Mary, introduced by Mark, after mention of the chief priests' plot "two days" before the Passover, is not in chronological order, for it was six days before the Passover (John 12), but stands here parenthetically, to account for Judas' spite against Jesus. Judas "promised and sought opportunity to betray Him unto them in the absence of the multitude " (Luke 22:6); Matthew (Matthew 26:5) similarly represents the chief priests, in compassing His death, as saying," Not on the feast day, lest there be an uproar among the people
Upper Room (2) - see): " translation="">Mark 14:17, " translation="">Matthew 26:20, " translation="">Luke 22:14; (2) the washing of the Apostles’ feet and subsequent discourse: " translation="">John 13:2-20; (3) the prophecy of the betrayal of our Lord by Judas: " translation="">Mark 14:18-21, " translation="">Matthew 26:21-25, " translation="">Luke 22:21-23, " translation="">John 13:21-35; (4) the Institution of the Eucharist: " translation="">1 Corinthians 11:23-25, " translation="">Mark 14:22-25, " translation="">Matthew 26:26-29, " translation="">Luke 22:19-20 (see Lord’s Supper); (5) the prophecy of the denial of our Lord by St. John was on His right hand, Judas in the place of honour on His left hand, and St. John by what sign to know the traitor without the rest hearing, " translation="">John 13:26; (2) the giving of the ‘sop’ first to Judas, " translation="">John 13:26, " translation="">Mark 14:20, " translation="">Matthew 26:23; (3) the inquiry of Judas whether he was the traitor, and our Lord’s reply without the rest hearing the latter, " translation="">Matthew 26:25, " translation="">John 13:27-30; (4) the beckoning of St. John should ask our Lord who was the traitor, " translation="">John 13:23-24; (5) the possibility that in the ‘contention’ among the Apostles (" translation="">Luke 22:24), if this took place in connexion with the Supper and before it, Judas claimed and obtained the chief place; (6) the possibility that after our Lord’s rebuke of the ‘contention’ (" translation="">Luke 22:25-30), St
Festivals, Religious - This feast was appointed by Judas Maccabaeus in commemoration of the purification of the temple after it had been polluted by Antiochus Epiphanes
Damascus - The street called "Straight," in which Judas lived, in whose house Saul was found by Ananias, is known by the name Sultany, or "Queen's Street
Satan - "By collecting the passages, " says Cruden, "where Satan, or the devil, is mentioned, it may be observed, that he fell from heaven with all his company; that God cast him down from thence for the punishment of his pride; that, by his envy and malice, sin, death, and all other evils, came into the world; that, by the permission of God, he exercises a sort of government in the world over his subordinates, over apostate angels like himself; that God makes use of him to prove good men and chastise bad ones; that he is a lying spirit in the mouth of false prophets, seducers, and heretics; that it is he, or some of his, that torment or possess men; that inspire them with evil designs, as he did David, when he suggested to him to number his people; to Judas, to betray his Lord and Master; and to Ananias and Sapphira, to conceal the price of their field
Simon - ...
...
The father of Judas Iscariot (John 6:71 ; 13:2,26 )
Lots - Matthias was chosen to be Judas' successor by lot (Acts 1:26 )
Kiss (2) - ...
With regard to the salutation of Judas Iscariot (Luke 22:47-48), to have kissed the hand of Christ after the interval of absence caused by his conference with the chief priests would have been but an ordinary tribute of respect, and as such would have escaped the notice of the disciples, while giving the required information to those who had come with him
Apocrypha - ...
The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ...
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch
Assumption of Moses
Fourth Book of Esdras
Apocalypse of Baruch
Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis
Third Book of Esdras
Third Book of Machabees
History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon
Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ...
Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and marriage of the Blessed Virgin
Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew
Arabic Gospel of the Infancy
History of Joseph the Carpenter
Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews
Gospel according to the Egyptians
Gospel of Peter
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Marcion
Gospel of Bartholomew
Gospel of Matthias
Gospel of Nicodemus
Gospel of the Twelve Apostles
Gospel of Andrew
Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Thaddeus
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor
Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea
Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter
Acts of John
Acts of Andrew
Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew
Acts of Thomas
Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul
Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul and Thecla
Acts of Philip
Acts of Matthew
Acts of Simon and Jude
Acts of Barnabas
Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini
Nostri Jesu
Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter
Pseudo-Epistles of Paul
Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans
Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter
Apocalypse of Paul
Alabaster - Judas valued it at three hundred pence
Concise Chronological Table of Bible History - ...
165...
Judas Maecabæus recovers Jerusalem
Caiaphas - When Judas had betrayed Jesus, he was first taken before Annas, who sent him to his son- in-law, Caiaphas, who possibly lived in the same house, John 18:24
Demoniacs - The case of Judas Iscariot was somewhat different, inasmuch as it was Satan himself that entered into that wretched man
Peraea - ...
The removal of the Jews from the Peræa by Judas ( 1Ma 5:45 ) left it in Gentile hands
Struggles of Soul - The knowledge that Judas would betray Him troubled Him in spirit (ἐταράχθη τῷ πνεύματι, John 13:21), love, grief, disappointment, indignation struggling together. ...
What struggles of soul must have resulted from the thwarting of His love and grace by the misunderstanding or unbelief of His relatives (Mark 3:31-35), His disciples (Matthew 15:17; Matthew 16:9; Matthew 26:31, Mark 14:27), His fellow-townsmen (Mark 6:6), and the Jerusalem which He so loved that He wept over it (Luke 13:34; Luke 19:41)! He strove to turn Judas from his betrayal (John 6:70, Matthew 17:22; Matthew 26:23, John 13:27, Luke 22:48), and to save Peter from his denial (Luke 22:32)
Judas Iscariot - The only biblical reference to Judas Iscariot by name outside the Gospels is Acts 1:16-20; Acts 1:25, and there he is called neither ‘Iscariot’ nor ‘the traitor’ (προδότης, as in Luke 6:16), nor is his action spoken of by the term παραδιδόναι. ...
As to Judas’s grievous end itself, as recorded in the Acts, it is not necessary here to compare it in detail with the account given in Matthew 27:3 ff. In Psalms 69:25 the text is more exact, but the original figure employed (ἡ ἔπαυλις αὐτῶν, not αὐτοῦ) suggests a nomad encampment of tents rendered desolate because of the cruel persecutions which their occupants had practised, while Psalms 109:8 has in view one particular official, like Doeg or Ahithophel, who has been false to his trust, and therefore it is, to our modern notions, more appropriately and with less strain transferred to the case of Judas
Domitianus, the Emperor - The grandchildren of Judas, the brother of the Lord, were taken to Rome and brought into the emperor's presence. The apostle, as the chosen friend of the Son of David, may have been pointed out by the delatores of Ephesus as the descendants of Judas were in Judea
Apostles - They understood the betrayal by Judas as fulfillment of Scripture (Acts 1:16 ) and felt the need to replace him to keep their number at twelve. The Jerusalem representatives—Judas Barsabbas and Silas—completed their task and returned to the apostles (Acts 15:33 ). ” Luke has a second Judas, where Matthew and Mark list Lebbeus or Thaddeus. ...
Thaddeus and Judas, brother of James, are apparently the same person, though some scholars suggest that some sections of the early church had slightly different lists of the apostles' names
Arrest - —When Judas, withdrawing from the Supper, betook himself to the high priests and informed them that he was ready to implement his agreement (see Betrayal), their simplest way would have been to accompany him back to the upper room and there arrest Jesus. It was a motley band that followed Judas. ...
When he had guided the band to the garden, Judas doubtless would fain have kept in the background, but he was doomed to drink his cup of degradation to the dregs. It was necessary that Judas should come forward and resolve their perplexity
Apostles - The remaining five names—Thomas, James the son of Alphaeus, Simon the Zealot, Judas or Lebbaeus or Thaddaeus, and Judas Iscariot are new. That there were two Judes among the Apostles is plain from the language of John 14:22, where ‘Judas not Iscariot’ is mentioned. In two of the lists of the Apostles, those in Luke (Luke 6:16) and Acts (Acts 1:13), he is described as ‘Judas of James’; that is almost certainly Judas the son not the brother of James. In Matthew 10:3 and Mark 3:18 this Judas is called Thaddaeus, or, according to the Western text, Lebbaeus; and he was probably known indifferently as Judas or as Thaddaeus. Most commonly it is regarded as a geographical term signifying ‘man of Kerioth,’ but where Kerioth was situated is keenly canvassed, some placing it to the east of the Dead Sea and others in the south of Judah (see Judas Iscariot). The third is formed of James the son of Alphaeus, Simon the Zealot, Judas or Thaddaeus, and Judas Iscariot. Is this arrangement due to accident, or does it rest on a perception of the historical importance of the disciples at the time at which it was drawn up? The places given to Peter and Judas and the contents of the different groups suggest that there is here an indication of the view taken of the Apostles in the early Church
Treasure, Treasury, Treasurer - In Matthew 27:6 ‘treasury’ represents korbanâs (the depository of the ‘corban,’ see Sacrifice and Offering, § 1 ( a )), the sacred treasury into which the chief priests would not put Judas’ 30 pieces of silver
Book - In man's point of view it has in it names of highly privileged professors who have but a name to live, but are dead spiritually, and therefore may be blotted out, as was Judas (Revelation 3:5; Matthew 13:12; Matthew 25:29); but in God's point of view it contains those only who are never blotted out, but elected finally to life (John 10:28-29; Acts 13:48; Revelation 20:12; Revelation 20:15), "written among the living in (the heavenly) Jerusalem" (Isaiah 4:3)
Archelaus - One of Herod's last deeds was the putting Judas and Matthias to death for instigating young men to pull down a golden eagle set up contrary to Moses' law over the temple gate by Herod; at the Passover which succeeded Herod's death, before Archelaus had as yet the emperor's ratification of his accession, Archelaus, finding several commiserating the martyrs, caused his cavalry to inclose at the temple and slay 3,000 men
Perdition - Judas is called ὁ υἱὸς τῆς ἀπωλείας (John 17:12), ‘son of perdition,’ and the same phrase is used of ὁ ἄνθρωπος τῆς ἀνομίας, ‘the man of sin,’ in 2 Thessalonians 2:3, which is variously interpreted of the Roman Emperor, the Roman Empire, or a false Messiah (cf
Bloodguilt - ...
Judas incurred bloodguilt by betraying Jesus (“innocent blood,” Matthew 27:4 )
Hebron - After the Captivity it was for a time in the hands of the Edomites (though from Nehemiah 11:25 it would appear to have been temporarily colonized by the returned Jews), but was re-captured by Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:65 )
Devil - Matthew 4:1; he "entered into Judas," Luke 22:3; he is the deceiver which deceiveth the whole world, Revelation 12:9, etc
James - His mother's name was Mary, (3) and his brethren were Joses and Judas, (3) Matthew 27:56, Mark 15:40
Judah - In Luke 3:33 ; Hebrews 7:14 ; Revelation 5:5 ; Revelation 7:5 , the name is given as JUDA: and in Matthew 1:2,3 , it is Judas
Repentance - Judas repented of what he had done (Matthew 27:3 ). In this context the meaning is regret or remorse; Judas' repentance was not the type that leads towards salvation
Eusebius of Alexandria, a Writer of Sermons - On the Treason of Judas. (In this case, as in regard to premature departure from church, he does not scruple to refer to Judas
Silas - ...
Silas was a Christian prophet (Acts 15:32 ), one of the ‘chief men among the brethren’ (therefore doubtless of Jewish birth), who with ‘Judas called Barsabbas’ was sent as a delegate from the Apostolic Council with Paul and Barnabas, to convey the decision of the Council ( Acts 15:22 ff
Apostle - Judas Iscariot, one of "the twelve," fell by transgression, and Matthias was substituted in his place (Acts 1:21 )
Zealot - 6) calls them a ‘fourth sect of Jewish philosophy,’ and says that ‘Judas the Galilaean was the founder
Feasts - The 25th of Chisleu, the Feast of Dedication, instituted by Judas Maccabeus when the temple was re-dedicated after being defiled by Antiochus Epiphanes, B
Judah, the Kingdom of - They were first subject to the kingdom of Persia, then to the kingdom of Greece, and after a short time of freedom under Judas MACCABEUS and his successors they became subject to Rome
Jewish Parties in the New Testament - It is usually assumed that they were the spiritual descendants of the Hasidim, the loyal fighters for religious freedom in the time of Judas Maccabeus. Josephus states that the Zealots began with Judas the Galilean seeking to lead a revolt over a census for taxation purposes (A
Surprise - By the treachery of Judas they were able to surprise Him, unprotected by the multitude, in Gethsemane. Although the growing estrangement of Judas was, from its beginnings, perceived by Him (John 6:64; see Dods’ comment in loco in Expositor’s Gr
Peter - And at the same time, and almost in the same breath, He said harder things to Peter than He ever said to any other of His twelve disciples, unless it was to Judas. Four times the list of elected men is given in the Gospels; and, while the order of the twelve names varies in all other respects, Peter's name is invariably the first in all the lists, as Judas's name is as invariably the last. Can you imagine, have you come through any experience that enables you to imagine, what Peter's thoughts would be as he mounted the pulpit stairs to preach Judas's funeral sermon? Judas had betrayed his Master. Judas lies a cast-out suicide in Aceldama! 'O the depths of the Divine mercy to me! That I who sinned with Judas; that I who had made my bed in hell beside Judas; should be held in this honour, and should be ministering to the holy brethren! O to grace how great a debtor!' And again, just think what all must have been in Peter's mind as he stood up in Solomon's porch to preach the Pentecost sermon
Judah - See Judas ; Geography; Tribes of Israel; Patriarchs; Israel
Taxes - Judas of Galilee raised a revolt against it (Josephus Jude - The author of this epistle, called Judas, and also Thaddeus and Lebbeus, was one of the twelve Apostles; he was the son of Alpheus, brother of James the less, and one of those who were called our Lord's brethren
Tribute - Then Judas, surnamed the Galilean, formed a sedition, and made an insurrection, to oppose the levying of this tribute
Names - ...
Surnames were sometimes given from the place where one lived or from which one came, as in the case of Judas Iscariot (wh
Deceit, Deception, Guile - They endeavour, by subtle questions, to entangle Him in His talk (Matthew 22:15); they attempt to deceive the people as to His true character (Mark 3:22-30, John 9:24); they plot together as to how He may be put to death (John 11:53); they enter into a covenant with Judas to betray Him (Matthew 26:14-15); they set up false witnesses, and pervert and misrepresent His teaching (Matthew 26:59-62, Luke 23:1). The first Apostles of the Lord were by no means exempt from serious faults and frailties of character; but, with the exception of Judas, they were singularly honest and upright men; men with a genuine enthusiasm for goodness
Antiochus - (For an account of the struggle of Mattathias and Judas against Antiochus, see Maccabees). 163, when Judas Maccabæus was defeated ( 1Ma 6:32-47 )
Coins - ...
Another reference to silver money occurs in Matthew 26:15 in the agreement between the high priest and Judas for betraying Jesus. So, Judas' pay could have been thirty silver shekels
Hebron - It was not recaptured until Judas Maccabeus sacked the city in 164 B
Sanhedrin - The chief priests conspired with Judas to betray Jesus (Matthew 26:14-16 )
Quirinius - This latter census was a basis of taxation, and was made according to the Roman method: it thus aroused the rebellion of Judas ( Acts 5:37 )
Lamb - ...
Judas inspected Him from the standpoint of personal fellowship
Appoint - ...
Acts Matthias was appointed by the casting of lots to replace Judas among the Twelve (1:12-26)
Joseph - Joseph, called Barsabas, and surnamed Justus: one of the two persons chosen by the assembled church, Acts 1:23, as worthy to fill the place in the apostolic company from which Judas had fallen
Census - The same Greek word is translated 'taxing' in Acts 5:37 , when Judas headed an insurrection
Amulets And Charms - ]'>[2] ) found by Judas Maccabæus on the bodies of his soldiers were heathen charms against death in battle, the peculiar Gr
Assassins - 1), whom Josephus describes as an able man and a descendant of that Judas who had led the revolt against the census under Quirinius
Eusebius, Bishop of Pelusium - ) to reclaim the offenders, but that the physician could not compel the patient to follow his advice, that "God the Word Himself" could not save Judas (iv
Sion - From the top of the hill you see, to the south, the valley of Ben Hinnom; beyond this, the field of blood, purchased with the thirty pieces of silver given to Judas; the hill of Evil Counsel, the tombs of the judges, and the whole desert toward Hebron and Bethlehem
War - At a given signal, each side raised its battle-cry ( Judges 7:21 , Amos 1:14 , Jeremiah 4:19 ) as it rushed to the fray; for the wild slogan of former days, the Ironsides of the Jewish Cromwell, Judas the Maccabee, substituted prayer ( 1Ma 5:33 ) and the singing of Psalms ( 2Ma 12:37 ). As examples of more elaborate tactics may be cited Joab’s handling of his troops before Rabbath-ammon ( 2 Samuel 10:9-11 ), and Benhadad’s massing of his chariots at the battle of Ramoth-gilead ( 1 Kings 22:31 ); the campaigns of Judas Maccabæus would repay a special study from this point of view
Satan - He "entered" Judas Iscariot (Luke 22:3 ), and "filled the heart" of Ananias (Acts 5:3 ). He was able to "enter" Judas Iscariot (Luke 22:3 ; cf
Joppa - In retaliation Judas Maccabeus raided the city, burned the harbor installations, torching the anchored ships as well (2 Maccabees 12:3-9 )
Brother - The arguments for the "brethren" of Jesus (James, Joses, Simon, and Judas) mentioned in Matthew 13:56 being literally His brothers, born of Joseph and Mary, are:...
(1) their names are always connected with Mary, "His brethren" is the phrase found nine times in the Gospels, once in Acts (Acts 1:14);...
(2) nothing is said to imply that the phrase is not to be taken literally
Ashdod - Judas Maccabeus destroyed altars and images in Ashdod (1 Maccabees 5:68 ), and Jonathan later burned the temple of Dagon, those who took refuge there, and ultimately the city itself (1 Maccabees 10:84-87 )
Thirteen - ...
joh13 - Judas left JESUS and betrayed Him to His enemies
Aceldama - It was very properly called so, because it was purchased with the thirty pieces of silver, which the traitor Judas received of the chief priests for Christ's blood
Acts of the Apostles - The principal facts recorded in it are, the choice of Matthias to be an Apostle in the room of the traitor Judas; the descent of the Holy Ghost on the day of pentecost; the preaching, miracles, and sufferings of the Apostles at Jerusalem; the death of Stephen, the first martyr; the persecution and dispersion of the Christians; the preaching of the Gospel in different parts of Palestine, especially in Samaria; the conversion of St
Edom, Edomites - Here Judas Maccabæus fought with the Edomites ( 1Ma 5:3 ; 1Ma 5:65 ), and John Hyrcanus shortly before the end of the 2nd cent
Philip - He had a turn for practical affairs, and, just as Judas was treasurer to the Apostolic company, so Philip was purveyor, attending to the commissariat (Bengel on John 6:5 )
Woe - has πλὴν οὐαί, bringing out with emphasis the responsibility of Judas, who was free to act, notwithstanding the τὸ ὡρισμένον. This, which is perhaps the saddest sentence in the Gospels, was spoken without vindictiveness, although it undoubtedly reveals that our Lord was wounded to the quick by the treachery of Judas. It is not the devoting of Judas to destruction. 286) that we should have to greet it as the removal of a hundred-pound weight from the heart of Christendom if the treachery of Judas could be proved to have had no existence
Apostle - Accordingly care was taken, on the death of Judas, to choose another, to make up the number, Acts 1:21-22 ; Acts 1:26 . Their names were, Simon Peter; Andrew, his brother; James the greater, the son of Zebedee; and John his brother, who was the beloved disciple; Philip of Bethsaida; Bartholomew; Thomas, called Didymus, as having a twin brother; Matthew or Levi, who had been a publican; James, the son of Alpheus, called James the less; Lebbeus, surnamed Thaddeus, and who was also called Judas or Jude, the brother of James; Simon, the Canaanite, so called, as some have thought, because he was a native of Cana, or, as Dr. Hammond thinks, from the Hebrew קנא , signifying the same with Zelotes, or the Zelot, a name given to him on account of his having before professed a distinguishing zeal for the law; and Judas Iscariot, or a man of Carioth, Joshua 15:25 , who afterward betrayed him, and then laid violent hands on himself. ...
After the resurrection of our Saviour, and not long before his ascension, the place of Judas the traitor was supplied by Matthias, supposed by some to have been Nathaniel of Galilee, to whom our Lord had given the distinguishing character of an "Israelite indeed, in whom there was no guile;" and the twelve Apostles, whose number was now completed, received a new commission, of a more extensive nature than the first, to preach the Gospel to all nations, and to be witnesses of Christ, not only in Jerusalem, in all Judea, and in Samaria, but unto the uttermost parts of the earth; and they were qualified for the execution of their office by a plenteous effusion of miraculous powers and spiritual gifts, and particularly the gift of tongues
Apostle - Peter states the qualifications before the election of Judas' successor (Acts 1:21), namely, that he should have companied with the followers of Jesus "all the time that the Lord Jesus went in and out among them, beginning from the baptism of John unto the day that He was taken up, to be a witness with the others of His resurrection. An order grounded on moral considerations is traceable in the enumeration of the rest: Judas, the traitor, in all the lists stands last
Pilate - But Pontius Pilate had full military and judicial authority in Judas, as being a small province attached to the larger Syria; he was responsible to the governor of Syria. )...
He had a fear of offending the Jews, who already had grounds of accusation against him, and of giving color to a charge of lukewarmness to Caesar's kingship, and on the other hand a conviction of Jesus' innocence (for the Jewish council, Pilate knew well, would never regard as criminal an attempt to free Judas from Roman dominion), and a mysterious awe of the Holy Sufferer and His majestic mien and words, strengthened by his wife's (Claudia Procula, a proselyte of the gate: Evang
Antiochus - It was on this occasion that Judas Maccabaeus retired into the wilderness with his father and his brethren, Judas Maccabaeus headed those Jews who continued faithful, and opposed with success the generals whom king Antiochus sent into Judea. The king, informed of the valour and resistance of Judas, sent new forces; and, finding his treasures exhausted, he resolved to go into Persia to levy tributes, and to collect large sums which he had agreed to pay to the Romans, 1Ma_3:5-31 ; 2Ma_9:1 , &c; 1Ma_6:1 , &c. When he was come to Ecbatana, he was informed of the defeat of Nicanor and Timotheus, and that Judas Maccabaeus had retaken the temple of Jerusalem, and restored the worship of the Lord, and the usual sacrifices. Simon furnished his sons, John Hircanus and Judas, with troops, and sent them against Cendebeus, whom they routed in the plain and pursued to Azotus
Bethsaida - Thus Josephus informs us of Judas the Gaulonite from Gamala, and also calls him in the following chapters, the Galilean; and then in another work he applies the same expression to him; from whence we may be convinced that the custom of those days paid respect to a more ancient division of the country, and bade defiance, in the present case, to the then existing political geography
Burial - With the money paid to Judas the chief priests purchased a field to use as a burial place for foreigners (Matthew 27:5-7 )
Biblical Chronology - The revolt of the Jews against Antiochus IV of Syria under Judas Machabeus took place, 167
Place - , Luke 14:9,10 , RV, "place" (AV, "room"); of the destiny of Judas Iscariot, Acts 1:25 ; of the condition of the "unlearned" or non-gifted in a church gathering, 1 Corinthians 14:16 , RV, "place;" the sheath of a sword, Matthew 26:52 ; a place in a book, Luke 4:17 ; see also Revelation 2:5 ; 6:14 ; 12:8 ; metaphorically, of "condition, occasion, opportunity" Acts 25:16 , RV , "opportunity" (AV, "license"); Romans 12:19 ; Ephesians 4:27
Robber - Judas was a thief (John 12:6), Barabbas a robber (John 18:40, cf
Judgment - the words of a poet, "For thirty pieces Judas sold himself, not Christ")
Ananias - He was not obliged to throw his property into a common Christian fund (as Peter's words show, "after it was sold, was it not in thine own power?") It was a compromise between love of Christian applause and worldliness; "Satan filled his heart" as "Satan entered into Judas" (Luke 22:3)
Purgatory - If they were, the texts referred to would rather prove that there is no such place as purgatory, since Judas did not expect the souls departed to reap any benefit from his sin- offering till the resurrection
Despondency - At one of the stages of His approach to that event, and of His own inward acceptance of it, namely after the dismissal of Judas, this joyful anticipation was expressed by Him in language even of exultation—‘Now is the Son of man glorified, and God is glorified in him’ (John 13:31)
Cedron - (2 Samuel 15:30) Thus Jesus passed Cedron under the deepest of all possible sorrows, when, with his few faithful disciples, he entered the garden from the foul conspiracy of Judas, and the high priest, and elders of his people
Purgatory - If they were, the texts referred to would rather prove that there is no such place as purgatory, since Judas did not expect the souls departed to reap any benefit from the sin-offering till the resurrection
Apostle - Peter on the occasion of electing a successor to the traitor Judas, was that he should have been personally acquainted with the whole ministerial course of our Lord from his baptism by John till the day when he was taken up into heaven
Prayer - Alike when the apostles were about to choose a successor to Judas (Acts 1:24) and when the Church of Antioch sent forth Barnabas and Paul on their first missionary journey (Acts 13:3), prayer was offered. ...
The reference in 2 Maccabees 12:43-45 to sacrifices offered for the dead by Judas Maccabaeus may be taken to prove that prayers for the dead were not unknown in our Lord’s time. But the author speaks in an apologetic way, as if the act of Judas were not a common practice
Altar - Antiochus Epiphanes took it away, but it was afterwards restored by Judas Maccabaeus (1 Maccabees 1:23 ; 4:49 )
si'Mon - ) ...
Simon the father of Judas Iscariot
Treasury - Into this treasury the chief priests would not put Judas’ thirty pieces of silver, ‘because it is the price of blood
Necessity - It was infallibly certain that Judas would betray Christ, yet he did it voluntarily
Courtesy - At the same time the courtesies practised were not always sincere (note the kiss of Judas), and were, moreover, occasionally violated in a peculiarly flagrant manner, as we learn from the treatment Christ received once and again from those who opposed Him, especially the treatment He received immediately before His death
Lot - In the New Testament, after the death of Judas, lots were cast to decide who should occupy the place of the traitor, Acts 1:26
Necessity - no hostile power) shall snatch them out of my hand’ (John 10:28) does not preclude the possibility that they may snatch themselves out of Christ’s hand by unfaithfulness; that the ‘drawing’ of the Father (John 6:44) is the attraction of Divine Love, not the Irresistible Call of Calvinism; that the ‘I pray not for the world’ of John 17:9 is to be read in the light of John 17:23, that the ‘blinding’ and ‘hardening’ of John 12:40 are a penalty for past sin; and that even the case of Judas was not one of individual predestination. The general principle bearing upon the case of Judas is laid down in Matthew 18:7 ‘Woe unto the world because of occasions of stumbling! for it must needs be that the occasions come; but woe to that man through whom the occasion cometh. To apply this to the case of Judas—the world being what it was, alienated from God and full of treachery and malice, some one was morally certain to betray Jesus to death. But that some one need not have been Judas
Lots - ...
After the suicide of Judas it was decided that a successor should be appointed. Paul should fill the place of Judas. Judas had received τὸν κλῆρον in the ministry carried on by Jesus (cf
Apocrypha, New Testament - These include the Gospel of the Twelve Apostles and the gospels of Philip, Thomas, Matthias, Judas, and Bartholomew. 400, the Gospel of Thomas (of no relation to the Infancy Gospel of Thomas ) is a collection of 114 secret sayings “which Jesus the living one spoke and Didymus Judas Thomas wrote down. It tells how Judas Thomas, “Twin of the Messiah,” was given India when the apostles divided the world by casting lots
Reproach (2) - Was there not a more piercing reproach in His voice when He said to the traitor, ‘Judas, with a kiss dost thou betray the Son of Man?’ (Luke 22:48); and in His eyes when, as the cock crew, He turned and looked upon Peter (Luke 22:60-61)?...
2. ); the remembrance of the last words addressed to him by his Master must have been as a barb to the arrow of remorse that sank so deep into the soul of Judas (Matthew 26:50, Luke 22:48)
Part - , "lot"), of that portion allotted to Judas in the ministry of the Twelve
Meals - So Jesus to Judas, treating him as a friend, which aggravates his treachery (John 13:18; John 13:26; Isaiah 5:11-22)
Temptation of Jesus - In the Fourth Gospel the temptation seems to be the confrontation with the religious authorities and His critics (see John 7-8 ) In John the devil comes to Jesus through the treachery of Judas, His friend and follower (John 6:71 ; John 13:27 )
Bread, Bread of Presence - Conversely, to take someone's bread and then turn against that person is to commit a heinous offense of ingratitude and betrayal, as in the case of Judas Iscariot (Psalm 41:9 ; John 13:18-30 )
Joseph - Disciple, also called BARSABAS, surnamed JUSTUS, who, with Matthias, was selected as fit to take the place of Judas, but the lot fell on Matthias
Luciferus i, Bishop of Calaris - He compares the emperor to the worst kings that ever reigned, and regards him as more impious than Judas Iscariot
Mary - It is thought she was the sister of the Virgin Mary, and that she was the mother of James the less, of Joses, of Simon, and of Judas, who in the Gospel are named the brethren of Jesus Christ, Matthew 13:55 ; Matthew 27:56 ; Mark 6:3 ; that is, his cousin-germans. Judas Iscariot murmured at this; but Jesus justified Mary in what she had done, saying, that by this action she had prevented his embalmment, and in a manner had declared his death and burial, which were at hand
Gestures - Lastly, we notice the kiss as the sign of love, real or feigned, as in the case of the sinful woman (Luke 7:45), of Judas (Mark 14:45 and || Mt. It is true that the kiss was the ordinary way of greeting a Rabbi (see Swete on Mark 14:45), but in all these cases much more than ordinary courtesy is intended by the gesture, and probably καταφιλεῖν in these passages means ‘to kiss fervently,’ or (in the case of Judas) ‘ostentatiously. Genesis 29:11; Genesis 33:4; Genesis 45:15, Exodus 18:7, 1 Samuel 20:41, 2 Samuel 15:5; 2 Samuel 19:39; 2 Samuel 20:9, many of which passages speak of kisses of greeting like that of Judas, to which Joab’s is indeed strangely similar
Lord (2) - represents the eleven disciples as asking, ‘Is it I, Lord?’ while Judas, the traitor, says, ‘Is it I, Rabbi?’ (Matthew 26:22; Matthew 26:25). Possibly Judas indicated his position of detachment or opposition by using ‘Rabbi’ instead of the title employed by the rest of the disciples. It is only by Judas that Jesus is addressed as ‘Rabbi’ in Mt
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - For Judas Iscariot, a member of the Presbytery, so to call him, has turned out to have been the son of perdition all the time. Peter himself had wellnigh gone down into the same horrible pit with Judas: and he also would have been in his own place by this time, had it not been that his Master prayed for Peter that his faith might not fail. And thus it is that Peter is now sitting in that seat of honour and influence and authority, and is conducting the election of a successor to Judas, with all that holy fear and with all that firm faith which makes that upper room, under Peter's presidency, such a pattern to all vacant congregations to all time. And, just suppose, what is more than likely, that Matthias knew Judas's secret heart and real character quite well; what a shock it was to Matthias's faith, and love, and whole religious life, to see such a deceiver as Iscariot was, deliberately chosen by Christ, when Matthias would have shed the last drop of his blood for the Master who had refused to employ him
Symbol - Certain characters in the Bible, such as Jonah, Mary Magdalene, Herod, Judas, have come to be identified with special types of character and conduct, and are said to be symbolical of those classes
Dan (1) - Arethas of the 10th century suggests that Dan's omission is because Antichrist is to be from him, or else to be his tool (compare Genesis 49:17; Jeremiah 8:16; Amos 8:14), as there was a Judas among the twelve
Mary - ...
The children born to Mary and Joseph after Jesus were James, Joseph, Simon, Judas and at least two daughters (Matthew 13:55-56; Mark 6:3)
Zeal - Compare the fierce activity and watchfulness of Judas with the sluggishness of the most zealous apostle, Peter
Virgin, Virgin Birth - ...
Some believe the New Testament teaches that Mary remained a virgin, but it appears that she and Joseph had several children after the birth of Jesus: James, Joses, Judas, Simon, and sisters (Mark 6:3 )
Greetings - This stains with a darker infamy the treachery of Judas (Matthew 26:49 etc)
Lost - also John 17:12 ‘None of them is lost, but the son of perdition’; see Judas Iscariot); but as a participle used passively, the form in which we find it in Luke 19:10, and in the group of parables in Luke 15, which bear especially on this subject, it signifies simply a condition of peril, grave, yet with the glad prospect of recovery
Root - ...
Judges 1:12 (b) Probably our Lord is reminding us of the fact that the enemies of GOD will be completely destroyed from off the earth as was Hitler and as was Judas
Damascus - It was taken and plundered, also, by Sennacherib, Nebuchadnezzar, the generals of Alexander the Great, Judas Maccabeus, and at length by the Romans in the war conducted by Pompey against Tigranes, in the year before Christ, 65
Chief, Chiefest, Chiefly - ...
C — 1: ἡγέομαι (Strong's #2233 — Verb — hegeomai — hayg-eh'-om-ahee ) "to lead the way, to preside, rule, be the chief," is used of the ambition "to be chief" among the disciples of Christ, Luke 22:26 ; of Paul as the "chief" speaker in Gospel testimony at Lystra, Acts 14:12 ; of Judas and Silas, as chief (or rather, "leading") men among the brethren at Jerusalem, Acts 15:22
Temptation - That Jesus discovered the moral peril in which Judas was placed from the very first indications of distrust and disloyalty to Himself, is suggested by John 6:70-71, which shows also the danger He feared for the other disciples. His repeated references to His coming betrayal (Matthew 17:22; Matthew 20:18; Matthew 26:2), His plain allusion to the presence of the traitor at the Last Supper (Luke 22:21), His giving the sop to Judas (John 13:26), may all be regarded as loving endeavours to strengthen him against temptation; and even when all these efforts had proved vain, what good was still in him was appealed to in the pathetic reproach, ‘Betrayest thou the Son of Man with a kiss?’ (Luke 22:48)
Twelve - Thaddeus: (Lebbeaus, Judas, the brother of James, son of Alphaeus). Judas Iscariot: the traitor
Temptation - That Jesus discovered the moral peril in which Judas was placed from the very first indications of distrust and disloyalty to Himself, is suggested by John 6:70-71, which shows also the danger He feared for the other disciples. His repeated references to His coming betrayal (Matthew 17:22; Matthew 20:18; Matthew 26:2), His plain allusion to the presence of the traitor at the Last Supper (Luke 22:21), His giving the sop to Judas (John 13:26), may all be regarded as loving endeavours to strengthen him against temptation; and even when all these efforts had proved vain, what good was still in him was appealed to in the pathetic reproach, ‘Betrayest thou the Son of Man with a kiss?’ (Luke 22:48)
Simeon - The great-grandfather of Judas Maccabæus ( 1M Malachi 2:1 )
Mizpah - Judas Maccabeus (1 Maccabees 3:44) assembled the Jews at Maspha, as being "aforetime a place of prayer over against (implying Mizpah was in full sight of) Jerusalem
Mary - Given the sequence of John's Gospel, Mary is represented as a follower of Jesus who is well acquainted with Jesus' ultimate destiny (compare Judas, the disciple in John 12:4 , who is not as well informed)
Mary - In 6:1-6a Jesus is identified as "the son of Mary, a brother [1] of James, Joseph, Judas and Simon, " and he is said to have "sisters
Arment - ...
Psalm 109:18 (a) This is a description of Judas Iscariot
Consecrate, Consecration - The feast of ἐγκαίνια (John 10:22) was instituted by Judas Maccabaeus (164 b
Nonnus of Panopolis - 71 (the motive of Judas); vii
Entry Into Jerusalem - After the feeding of the 5000 (John 6:14) the multitude recognized Jesus as the prophet that should come into the world, and would have seized Him and made Him a king, but He defeated their purpose; for He could not allow an emotional peasantry, ever ready to flock to the standard of a deliverer, to identify His Kingdom with this world, or His cause with that of a Judas of Galilee. ]'>[4] , the ideal son to whose descendants that throne was ensured (2 Samuel 7:16), upon which the prophets of the OT continued to build their hopes—hopes which had become greatly modified and materialized during the struggle with Antiochus and Rome, and by contact with Grecian thought, and which made the ordinary Jew dream of a deliverer with all the heroic qualities of a Judas Maceabaeus, and the more philosophic think of an earthly empire, cosmopolitan and world-ruling like the Roman. In 2 Maccabees 10:6-7 Judas Maccabaeus is welcomed with similar acclamations and ‘branches and fair boughs and palms,’ and in 1 Maccabees 13:51 Simon
Lots - ...
After the suicide of Judas it was decided that a successor should be appointed. Paul should fill the place of Judas. Judas had received τὸν κλῆρον in the ministry carried on by Jesus (cf
Lazarus - Judas and the eleven expected, that the feast in John 12:2 was the farewell feast of Lazarus, renouncing his former life and obeying Christ's command, "sell that thou hast, and give to the poor"; hence, Judas' bitter objection, "why was not this ointment sold for 300 pence and given to the poor?"...
On the night of Christ's betrayal Lazarus, whose Bethany home was near and was Christ's lodging on the previous night, in the hasty night alarm rushed eagerly with "the linen cloth (the term applied to graveclothes always, the same which he had on when the Lord raised him from the grave (John 11:44), sindon ) cast about his naked body" (Mark 14:51-52; Mark 15:46), and was seized by the high priest's servants as a second victim (John 12:10), whereas they let the other disciples escape
Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - Satan possessed Judas (Luke 22:3 )
Witness - The ability to do this was the qualification demanded in the successor to Judas (Acts 1:22), and the ground on which the Apostles justified their claim to preach Jesus (Acts 2:32; Acts 3:15; Acts 5:32; Acts 10:39) and to speak with authority in the Church (1 Peter 5:1)
Gamaliel - Luke’s narrative, he speaks of a rising under Theudas as taking place before the rising of Judas of Galilee (a
Shewbread - Anew one was made at the restoration of the temple by Judas Maccabeus (1 Maccabees 4:49)
Joseph - An officer of Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:18 ; 1Ma 5:56 ; 1Ma 5:60 ). In 2Ma 8:22 , and probably also 10:19, Joseph is read by mistake for John , one of the brothers of Judas Maccabæus. Joseph Barsabbas , the disciple who was nominated against Matthias as successor to Judas in the Apostolate
Balaam - As a Judas was among the apostles, so Balaam among the prophets, a true seer but a bad man; at the transition to the Mosaic from the patriarchal age witnessing to the truth in spite of himself, as Caiaphas did at the transition from the legal to the Christian dispensation. Like Judas and Ahithophel, Balaam set in motion the train of events which entailed his own destruction
Zebedee - Its chief town, Sepphoris (Dio-Caesarea),—the traditional home of the parents of Mary,—had been repeatedly taken, and immediately after the death of Herod, when the young child Jesus was safe in Egypt, it had been twice besieged and captured, once by Judas the son of Hezekiah (BJ II. When the boy Jesus was ten years old, the land was again to pass through the horrors of war, when Judas and his Zealots held out till overcome by Gessius Florus (Ant
Jude Epistle of - ...
The opening words of the Epistle, ‘Judas, a servant of Jesus Christ, and brother of James,’ constitute a weighty argument in favour of the traditional view that it was written by Jude the Lord’s brother. Spitta, Der zweite Brief des Petrus und der Brief des Judas, 1885; the relevant sections in NT Introductions, especially these by H
Banquet - When they ate, they raised themselves on their elbow, and made use of the right hand; which is the reason our Lord mentions the hand of Judas in the singular number: "He that dippeth his hand with me in the dish, the same shall betray me," Matthew 26:23 . Yet our blessed Redeemer did not refuse to give his disciples, and Judas Iscariot himself, that proof of his love and humility
Prophecy Prophet Prophetess - Prophets are mentioned in the Acts-Agabus (Acts 11:28; Acts 21:10), Symeon Niger, Lucius of Cyrene, and Manaen, in addition to Barnabas and Saul (Acts 13:1), and Judas and Silas (Acts 15:32). Silas and Judas, prophets of the Church of Jerusalem, are described as ἡγούμενοι (Acts 15:22); and in Hebrews 13:7 such ἡγούμενοι or leaders are described as speaking ‘the word of God
Tabernacles, the Feast of - 4,5; again, after the rebuilding of the temple by Ezra, (Nehemiah 8:13-18 ) and a third time by Judas Maccabaeus when he had driven out the Syrians and restored the temple to the worship of Jehovah
Kiss - (see 2 Samuel 20:9) And yet more, in an infinitely greater degree, when Judas hailed Christ with the awful salutation, "Joy to thee Rabbi, (for so hail means) and kissed him?" (Matthew 26:49) In the former instance, Joab took Amasa by the beard, we are told, which was an action betokening the highest regard of affection: for as the beard was always considered the chief honour and ornament of a man, so to touch it or kiss it was considered the highest proof of respect
Antiochus - ...
Daniel 11:32 b, 33-35 refer to the change that soon took place under Judas ...
Maccabeus and his brothers, commencing B
Barnabas - ) Judas and Silas were sent "with our beloved Barnabas and Paul, men that have hazarded their lives for the name of our Lord Jesus Christ," to bear back the epistle to Antioch, settling the question in the negative
Excommunication - Excommunication, in the greek church, cuts off the offender from all communion with the three hundred and eighteen fathers of the first council of Nice, and with the saints; consigns him over to the devil and the traitor Judas, and condemns his body to remain after death as hard as a flint or piece of steel, unless he humble himself, and make atonement for his sins by a sincere repentance
Jews in the New Testament - This is the name used in the treaty between Judas Maccabeus and the Romans, described in 1 Maccabees 8:23-32 : “May all go well with the Romans and with the nation of the Jews”...
Matthew, Mark, Luke The term Ioudaios occurs relatively rarely in the Synoptic Gospels, the first three Gospels which are closely parallel to each other
Ointment - When Mary anointed Jesus with a pound of costly ointment, Judas Iscariot rebuked Jesus because the ointment was worth the equivalent of one year's salary (John 12:3-8 )
Honesty - John’s scornful description of Judas as ‘a thief’ (John 12:6), indicative of the vile hypocrisy of the man’s character
Absalom - Ahithophel, like his anti-type Judas, baffled, went and hanged himself
Weights And Measures - Judas Maccabaeus, about B
Acts of the Apostles - ...
After the ascension of the Lord, and the choosing an apostle to fill the place of Judas, the first great event recorded is the day of Pentecost
Pilate - By the testimony of the traitor Judas, who hanged himself in despair, for betraying the innocent blood
jo'Seph - ...
Joseph, called Barsabas, and surnamed Justus; one of the two person chosen by the assembled church, (Acts 1:23 ) as worthy to fill the place in the apostolic company from which Judas had fallen
Apostle - They insisted, therefore, that the person to replace Judas in the apostolic group be one who, like the other apostles, had been a genuine eye witness of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism to his ascension (Acts 1:21-22; cf
Apocrypha - Much detail is given about the careers of Judas and Jonathan. This book begins with two letters written to Jews in Egypt urging them to celebrate the cleansing of the Temple by Judas
Silas or Silyanus - ...
The first appearance of Silas in Acts is at the close of the Council of Jerusalem, when he and Judas surnamed Barsabbas, described as chief men among the brethren, are chosen to accompany Paul and Barnabas to Antioch, with a letter notifying the decision
Ammon, Ammonites - Judas Maccabæus is said to have defeated the Ammonites; Psalms 83:7 reckons them among Israel’s enemies; while Justin Martyr ( Dial
Prophets - Thus it is said in Acts 13:1 , that Judas and Silas were prophets; that there were in the church at Antioch certain prophets and teachers, that is, official instructors
Severus, l. Septimius - So terrible was the outbreak that Judas, a Christian writer, made the 70 weeks of Daniel expire with the 10th year of Severus, and thought the advent of Antichrist at hand
Brethren of the Lord (2) - ]'>[2] and Simon, and Judas? And his sisters, are they not all†
As developed by subsequent writers, the Hieronymian theory affirms in addition—...
(d) That Simon the Zealot and Judas ‘not Iscariot’ were also brethren of the Lord
Christ in Jewish Literature - The leaders of the Jews, becoming alarmed, set up Judas, one of themselves, as an antagonist to Jesus. Judas followed him, disguised as one of his disciples, and contrived to steal from him the Divine. There Judas betrayed him to the rulers. After he was dead, Judas stole the corpse and flung it in the ditch of his garden
Night (2) - Night stands also for the close of the day of grace in the life of Judas (John 13:30). Judas went out, ‘and it was night
Jews - Antiochus IV (Epiphanes), King of Syria, made a violent attempt to hellenize the Jews; but a priest of Modin named Mattathias, and his sons, Judas Machabeus, Jonathan, and Simon, carried on a long and successful struggle against the armies of Syria, and at length, in 143 BC, gained complete independence for Judea
Esau - Judas Maccabeus defeated, and his nephew Hyrcanus conquered, and compelled them to be circumcised and incorporated with the Jews; but an Idamean dynasty, Antipater and the Herod's, ruled down to the final destruction of Jerusalem
Money - The 30 pieces of silver paid to Judas for betraying Jesus were tetradrachmas or shekels, the sum paid for a slave accidentally killed (Zechariah 11:12; Zechariah 11:18; Matthew 26:15; Exodus 21:32)
Sign - Judas' kiss clearly designated Jesus as the One the mob was seeking (Matthew 26:48 )
Repentance - Judas Iscariot was "seized with remorse" after betraying Jesus (Matthew 27:3 )
Census - It was also better known than the other; par excellence it was ‘the census’ because a great tumult arose under Judas of Galilee in connexion with it, which made the occasion famous
Corban - ’ So in Matthew 27:6 the high priests say to one another: ‘It is not lawful to cast them (Judas’ silver pieces) into the treasury (εἰς τὸν κορβανᾶν, B* κορβᾶν), for it is the price of blood
Sanhedrim - Basnage places it under Judas Maccabaeus and his brother Jonathan
Chronology of the Biblical Period - The following Jewish revolt led by Judas Maccabeus resulted in the defeat of the Seleucids and the Second Jewish Commonwealth (164 B
Philip - Some have thought that the reason of this was that Philip had charge of the commissariat of the Apostolic band, just as Judas acted as their treasurer; but of this there is no proof, and St
John, the Gospel by - To Judas however these things could not apply. Having received the sop at the hands of the blessed Lord, Judas went out immediately to betray Him; and it was night. Jesus in the garden is betrayed by Judas
Passover (i.) - Peter, and the unheard conversation of our Lord with Judas Iscariot (John 13:23-24, Matthew 26:25). This was probably the sop which Judas Iscariot received (John 13:26)
Fall, Fallen, Falling, Fell - , "having become headlong," is used of the suicide of Judas Iscariot
Number - The 1,290 (Daniel 12:11-12) and 1,335 days correspond to 1290, during which Antiochus Epiphanes profaned the temple, from the month Ijar, 145th year of the era of the Seleucidae, to Judas Maccabeus' restoration of worship, the 25th day of the ninth month Chisleu, 148th year (1 Maccabees 1:54; 1 Maccabees 4:52-56); in 45 days more Antiochus died, ending the Jews' calamities; in all 1,335
Ministry, Minister - Matthias replaced Judas among the Twelve (Acts 1 ), and Paul became the apostle to the Gentiles through a gift of the Spirit given by the exalted Lord (Acts 9 )
Friend, Friendship - " Jesus addresses Judas in this way in the garden: "Friend, do what you came for" (Matthew 26:50 )
Satan - (1 Samuel 1:6) In like manner the traitor Judas, concerning whom it is expressly said, "Satan, entered into him
Satan - Satan tempted Judas (Luke 22:5; John 23:27), Peter (Luke 22:31), Ananias and Sapphire (Acts 5)
Abgar - Judas, also called Thomas, is said to have sent Thaddaeus, one of the Seventy, to Edessa, soon after the ascension of Jesus
John - At the Last Supper, and as soon as Judas had gone out
Necessitarians - Thus, it was infallibly certain that Judas would betray Christ, yet he did it voluntarily; Jesus Christ necessarily became man, and died, yet he acted freely
Persecution - It is extremely probable that many Psalms date from this period, and the fierce nature of the struggle carried on by the Maccabees in defence of their ‘nation, religion, and laws’ is reflected in those passionate hymns which still throb with the intense feeling which the conflict roused in the breasts of the Ḥasidim, or ‘loyalists,’ who supported Judas Maccabaeus in his campaign. The Pharisees were the nationalist party, and carried on the traditions of the Ḥasidim, or ‘loyalists,’ who supported Judas Maccabaeus in his struggle for religious liberty in the 2nd cent. But the Pharisees did not fall in with the policy of the ‘zealots’ or ‘Cananaeans’ or the followers of Judas of Gal
Foresight - In the especially striking case of the choice of Judas Iscariot as one of the Apostles, it expressly explains that this was due to no ignorance of Judas’ character or of his future action (John 6:64; John 6:70; John 13:11), but was done as part of our Lord’s voluntary execution of His own well-laid plans
Ahithophel - Ahithophel has been called Judas, and all manner of evil names, for his first counsel that he gave to Absalom. ...
Now, as you know, Ahithophel, from that day to this, has been stoned in his grave at Giloh, and all manner of names called at him as he lies there: Deserter, traitor, apostate, Judas Iscariot, suicide, and all manner of evil names, because he left David and joined Absalom
Joseph - He was one of those who "companied with the apostles all the time that the Lord Jesus went out and in among them" (Acts 1:21 ), and was one of the candidates for the place of Judas
Election - Also in John the shadow side of election is posed in the person of Judas, “the son of perdition
Devil - " Peter when tempting Jesus to shun the cross did Satan's work, and therefore received Satan's name (Matthew 16:23); so Judas is called a "devil" when acting the Devil's part (John 6:70)
Jude, Epistle of - ...
The Jude who writes cannot be the Apostle Judas (Luke 6:16 , Acts 1:13 ), nor does he ever assume Apostolic authority
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - Similarly, in the New Testament, when Judas Iscariot committed suicide, the eleven moved quickly to add another to keep their number at twelve
Glory (2) - The Christian community, already ideally perfected by the separation of Judas (John 13:31), is henceforth to recognize permanently what individual intuition had already perceived and confessed at different points of the ministry
Flavianus (4) i, Bishop of Antioch - 66) on Easter and the treachery of Judas (Dial
Temple of Jerusalem - ...
The Maccabean revolt changed this, and Judas Maccabeus rededicated the Temple in 167 B. Judas' successors appointed themselves as high priests, and the Temple became more a political institution
Surname - ]'>[44] He may have been a brother of Judas ὁ καλούμενος Βαρσαββᾶς
Bread - Of this offence Judas Iscariot was guilty at the Last Supper
Confession (of Sin) - Of this nature was the confession of Judas to the chief priests and elders (Matthew 27:4, cf
Appreciation (of Christ) - He sees through the pure-minded hesitancy of Nathanael (John 1:47), He recognizes the true value of the widow’s mite (Luke 21:1-4), He draws Nicodemus the timid to Him (John 3:1), He knows what will satisfy Thomas (John 20:27), and what will please and win Zacchaeus (Luke 19:5); and His immediate followers include a Mary Magdalene as well as a Mary of Bethany, a Judas as well as a John
Judah - Conscience and natural feeling wrought on Judah, "what profit is it (like the antitype Judas, and in the keen bargaining spirit of the Jews ages afterward: John 12:4-5; Matthew 26:15), if we slay our brother and conceal his blood? Come and let us sell him
Poverty (2) - 19, 20) of the grandsons of Judas ‘the Lord’s brother’ being summoned before Domitian, and removing his suspicion of them by the appearance of their horny labourers’ hands, can hardly throw light on the circumstances of Christ’s own home
Jews - At his death, his son, Judas Maccabaeus, succeeded to the command of the army; and having defeated the Syrians in several engagements, he drove them out of Judea, and established his own authority in the country. Judas Maccabaeus was slain in battle, and his brother Jonathan succeeded him in the government. Judas Maccabaeus and his brothers were so successful, by their valour and conduct, in asserting the liberty of their country, that in a few years they not only recovered its independence, but regained almost all the possessions of the twelve tribes, destroying at the same time the temple on Mount Gerizim, in Samaria
Assumption of Moses - For him Eleazar and his seven sons had been the true heroes, and not Judas and his brethren. But, while well aware of the Maccabaean movement, he shows his aversion to Maccabaean methods by his silence in regard to the exploits of Judas and his brethren
Peter - It was he who proposed that the vacancy caused by the apostasy of Judas should be filled up
Edom - of Palestine was joined to Judaea under Judas Maccabaeus and John Hyrcanus
Wilderness (2) - Later on the same region sheltered Judas Maccabaeus and his companions (1 Maccabees 9:33)
Antiochus - " Judas, son of the patriot Mattathias, took as his motto the initials of Mi Camokah Baelim Jehovah (Exodus 15:11), "Who is like unto Thee, O Lord, among the gods?" Allusion occurs to the martyrs under Antiochus in Hebrews 11:35-37; "others were tortured, not accepting deliverance, that they might obtain a better resurrection
Intercession - The apostles and brethren pray for guidance in the appointment of a successor to Judas (Acts 1:24), as when they appoint the Seven (Acts 6:6; cf
Arms - ...
This military cap was also worn by the Persians, Ethiopians, and Libyans, Ezekiel 38:5 , and by the troops which Antiochus sent against Judas Maccabaeus, 1Ma_6:35
Intercession - The apostles and brethren pray for guidance in the appointment of a successor to Judas (Acts 1:24), as when they appoint the Seven (Acts 6:6; cf
Paul - ...
The Lord might act directly, but He chooses to employ ministerial instruments; such was Ananias whom He sent to Saul, after he had been three days without sight and neither eating nor drinking, in the house of Judas (probably a Christian to whose house he had himself led, rather than to his former co-religionists). So Judas Barsabas and Silas, chosen men of their own company, were sent with Paul and Barnabas to carry the decree to Antioch, the apostles having previously "given Paul the right hand of fellowship" as a colleague in the apostleship, and having recognized that the apostleship of the uncircumcision was committed to Paul as that of the circumcision to Peter
Moab - Nay, he used their help in crushing the Jews, Moab's old enemy; therefore Judas Maccabeus punished them with "a great overthrow" (1 Maccabees 4:61; 1 Maccabees 5:3, etc
Mercy, Merciful - This usage appears in the grim depiction of Judas' death in Acts 1:18
Name, Names - Double names were now frequent: Judas Maccabœus, Simon Zelotes , etc
Apocrypha - ...
Four books are associated, in name at least, with the Maccabees, those Jewish heroes who, led by Judas Maccabeus, waged the Maccabean Revolt in the second century b
Altar - ...
After its desecration by Antiochus Epiphanes, Judas Maccabaeus built a new altar of unhewn stones
Demon - Conversely his angels are never in the NT called ‘devils’ (διάβολοι), though in John 6:70 Judas is called διάβολος
Simeon - Father of Judas Iscariot (John 6:71; John 12:4; John 13:2; John 13:26)
Pharisees - They by their "traditions" made God's word of none effect; opposed bitterly the Lord Jesus, compassed His death, provoking Him to some "hasty words" (apostomatizein ) which they might catch at and accuse Him; and hired Judas to betray Him; "strained out gnats, while swallowing camels" (image from filtrating wine); painfully punctilious about legal trifles and casuistries, while reckless of truth, righteousness, and the fear of God; cleansing the exterior man while full of iniquity within, like "whited sepulchres" (Mark 7:6-13; Luke 11:42-44; Luke 11:53-54; Luke 16:14-15); lading men with grievous burdens, while themselves not touching them with one of their fingers
Peter - It was on his motion that a successor was appointed to Judas between the Ascension and Pentecost (Acts 1:15-26 ), his impetuosity appearing in this precipitate action (see Matthias); and it was he who acted as spokesman on the day of Pentecost ( Acts 2:14 ff
Resurrection - At the same time it is easy to see that a great stride forward had been taken already, when the atrocities of Antiochus Epiphanes brought religious despair to the hearts of all true Israelites, and roused the fervid patriotism of Judas Maccabæus and his followers. At times the writer seems to be controverting the denial of a resurrection, as when he stops to praise the action of Judas in offering sacrifices and prayers for those who had fallen in battle, on the ground that he did so because ‘he took thought for a resurrection’ ( 2Ma 12:43 )
Jesus Christ - ...
During that week there was public and unresolved conflict with the authorities and they made plans to do away with Jesus, penetrating the group by way of Judas, one of the twelve apostles. Third, Jesus appeared to the eleven (minus Judas) in Jerusalem to show that the reports were true; he had, indeed, risen and was the same Jesus, now glorified
Papias, Bishop of Hierapolis - In one fragment he mentions Justus Barsabas; in another he gives an account of the death of Judas Iscariot which seems plainly intended to reconcile the story in St. " The story tells of similar predictions concerning other productions of the earth, and relates how the traitor Judas expressed his unbelief and was rebuked by our Lord
the Penitent Thief - Nay, for anything we know, this man may at one time have been one of our Lord's disciples, quite as well as Simon Zelotes and Judas Iscariot
Ordination - Matthias was chosen and ordained to be an apostle in the room of Judas by casting lots: that being an extraordinary office, required an immediate interposition of the Divine Being, a lot being nothing more nor less than an appeal to God for the decision of an affair
Touch - Though the connexion be not one of verbal identity, such references to a false or hostile touch of Christ suggest themselves as the betraying kiss of Judas (Mark 14:45), and the smiting in the high priest’s palace (Mark 14:65)
Census - A "taxing" under Cyrenius, governor of Syria, is recorded Luke 2:1; a disturbance caused by one Judas of Galilee "in the days of the taxing" is referred to in Acts 5:37
Education (2) - All the Apostles save Judas were Galiaeans
Emmaus - an Emmaus is spoken of more than once as the scene of various occurrences: Judas Maccabaeus vanquished Gorgias there in b
Heart - —The disciples are enjoined to settle in their hearts not to meditate what they shall say (Luke 21:14); the fell design of Judas was put into his heart by Satan (John 13:2); the adulterous act is virtually done in the intention of the heart (Matthew 5:28)
Holy Day - Spitta, Der zweite Brief des Petrus und der Brief des Judas, Halle, 1885, p
Constantius ii, Son of Constantius - The Christian writers were naturally not partial to an emperor who leaned so constantly towards Arianism and was such a bitter persecutor of the Nicene faith, and did not scruple to call him Ahab, Pilate, and Judas
Matthew - Matthew, like Judas, must have money
Peter - Peter gave it as his opinion, that one should be chosen to be an Apostle in the room of Judas
Heart - —The disciples are enjoined to settle in their hearts not to meditate what they shall say (Luke 21:14); the fell design of Judas was put into his heart by Satan (John 13:2); the adulterous act is virtually done in the intention of the heart (Matthew 5:28)
Messiah - 3, 4) and the Rabbis Judas and Matthias (Ant. Judas of Gamala and a Pharisee named Zaduc organized a fourth sect coordinate with the Pharisees, Sadducees, and Essenes, and incited the people to revolt, because of the census then established
Josephus - , with its inaccurate historical sequence, Theudas-Judas of Galilee; and the error is supposed to be explained by Ant. 1, 2 [16]9, where the slaying of the sons of Judas by Tiberius Alexander is recorded after the crushing of Theudas’s insurrection by Cuspius Fadus
Jews - Mattathias, the priest, with his sons, chiefly Judas, Jonathan, and Simon, who were called Maccabees, bravely fought for their religion and liberties. Judas, who succeeded his father about 3840 gave Nicanor and the king's troops a terrible defeat, regained the temple, and dedicated it anew, restored the daily worship, and repaired Jerusalem, which was almost in a ruinous heap
Chronology of the New Testament - ), allow a little more than two years for the ministry (‘Judas did not remain so much as three years with Jesus,’ c
Cross, Crucifixion - When Satan entered Judas in betraying Jesus, he undoubtedly did not realize that the cross would prove his greatest defeat
Herod - Judas of Gamala rose in rebellion
Disciples - Though the criteria employed for replacing Judas among the twelve (Philippians 1:1 ) included being an eyewitness not only of the resurrected Jesus but also of the ministry of Jesus from the days of His baptism by John, there developed in the early church a slightly broader application of the term “apostle” which did not demand an eyewitness knowledge of Jesus' ministry
Retribution (2) - Judas is an exception, though Christ Himself never speaks of his punishment in this world
Galilee (2) - About the year 164, Simon the brother of Judas Maccabaeus pursued the Syrians to Ptolemais, and on his way back brought the Galilaean Jews and their property to Judaea (1 Maccabees 5:21-23)
Cross, Cross-Bearing - Many of the followers of Judas and Simon in Galilee had been crucified (Josephus Ant
the Mother of Zebedee's Children - It is the same evil eye with which both Peter and Judas shot hatred that day at James and John. And even had James and John got their two thrones, would they, do you think, have got one-thousandth part of the pleasure out of their thrones that Peter and the nine would have got pain? And your own cup of honour, and praise, and what not, is not half so sweet to you as it is bitter as blood to the Peters and the Judases who see it in your hand
Apostle - The ‘all’ probably looks back to ‘the twelve’ in 1 Corinthians 15:10, which is an official and not a numerical designation, for only ten were there, Thomas and Judas being absent
Lazarus - And He knew what Judas and Pilate and Herod and the people would do
Ananias And Sapphira - ' And the young men came in and found her dead, and they buried Ananias and Sapphira in Aceldama, next back-breadth to Judas Iscariot, the proprietor of the place
Simon Maccabaeus - surnamed Thossi, son of Mattathias, and brother of Judas and Jonathan
Multitude - This same fear prevented the chief priests and the Pharisees from laying hold on Jesus (Matthew 21:46); they decided not to arrest Him on the feast day (Mark 14:2), ‘lest haply there shall be a tumult of the people’ (λαοῦ, note the future ἔσται, which shows their positive expectation of trouble); and they arranged with Judas for His betrayal ‘in the absence of the multitude’ ((Revised Version margin) ‘without tumult,’ ἄτερ ὄχλου, Luke 22:6; cf
Passion Week - place the betrayal by Judas (Mark 14:10 f
John, the Gospel According to - In John 12 the anointing by Mary is repeated for its connection with Judas' subsequent history
Enoch Book of - 12); the enlightened lambs (= Chasids) and the great horn (= Judas Maccabaeus) (xc. , as Judas Maccabaeus is still warring (xc
Jerusalem - But this extremity of ignominy and oppression led, as might have been expected, to rebellion; and those Jews who still held their insulted religion in reverence, fled to the mountains, with Mattathias and Judas Maccabeus; the latter of whom, after the death of Mattathias, who with his followers and successors, are known by the name of Maccabees, waged successful war with the Syrians; defeated Apollonius, Nicanor, and Lysias, generals of Antiochus; obtained possession of Jerusalem, purified the temple, and restored the service, after three years' defilement by the Gentile idolatries. His successor, Judas, made an important change in the Jewish government, by taking the title of king which dignity was enjoyed by his successors forty-seven years, when a dispute having arisen between Hyrcanus II, and his brother Aristobulus, and the latter having overcome the former, and made himself king, was, in his turn, conquered by the Romans under Pompey, by whom the city and temple were taken, Aristobulus made prisoner, and Hyrcanus created high priest and prince of the Jews, but without the title of king
Odes of Solomon - See, further, the following passages of Syrian authors which would be too long to quote here: Acts of Judas Thomas, ed. Ephrem, speaking of Judas, says: ‘He drank living water’ (Breviarium Chaldaicum, ii
Ships And Boats - Finally, in the time of the Maccabees we read that Simon, the brother of Judas, made Joppa a seaport ( 1Ma 14:5 )
Demon - Other possible examples include the seven demons expelled from Mary Magdalene (Luke 8:1-2 ), Jesus' rebuke of Satan's suggestion through Peter (Luke 10:17-20 ; Mark 8:33 ), and his command to Judas after Satan had entered him (John 13:27 )
Elect, Election - In the New Testament, the apostles were originally chosen by Christ (Luke 6:13 ; Acts 1:2 ), but then after Christ's ascension, the church needed to fill the place of Judas
Reality - The jealous rivalries of the Twelve, and their disputes as to who should be accounted greatest (Matthew 20:20-23 Mark 9:34, Luke 22:24), the failure of some of them to meet the duty of the hour (Matthew 17:16; Matthew 26:40-43, Mark 14:40; Mark 14:50), the intolerant zeal (Luke 9:54) and ambitious scheming (Matthew 18:1,) of the two sons of Zebedee, the rash presumption (Matthew 14:28-30; Matthew 16:22-23) and weak denial (Matthew 26:69-74, Mark 14:66-71) of Peter, the treachery of Judas (Matthew 26:10-16; Matthew 26:47, Mark 14:43, Luke 22:48)—are all told with an unvarnished plainness which betokens an inward pressure to be strictly faithful to the truth
Satan (2) - John (John 13:2) informs us that Satan entered the heart of Judas and prompted him to betray his Lord
Galilee - Judas, the Leader of an agitation in the days of the enrolment of Quirinius, is described as ‘of Galilee’ (Acts 5:37)
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - And Joseph, and Mary, and Jesus, and James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas, and their sisters, all bowed their heads and sang the Hundred and Thirteenth and the Hundred and Fourteenth Psalms
Devotion - The joy of Matthew 11:25 and Luke 10:21 is another instance, as is also the outburst of triumphant relief at the retirement of Judas (John 13:31 f
Judgments of God - Judas, that betrayed our Lord, died, by his own hands, the most ignominious of all deaths
Apostolic Constitutions And Canons - 14, 18: ‘We now assembled, Peter and Andrew, James and John, Philip and Bartholomew, Thomas and Matthew, James the son of Alphaeus, and Lebbaeus who is surnamed Thaddaeus, and Simon the Canaanite, and Matthias who instead of Judas was numbered with us, and James the brother of our Lord and bishop of Jerusalem, and Paul … and have written to you this catholic doctrine [1] we have sent by our fellow-minister Clement
Agony - The fickleness of the multitude, the hypocrisy and bigotry of the Pharisees, the worldliness and selfishness of the priesthood, the treachery of Judas, the denial by Peter, the antagonism of the disciples generally to the Master’s saving purpose, the falsehood of His accusers, the hate and the craft of His persecutors,—all these were present to the consciousness of Jesus as an intolerable offence to His conscience, and an unspeakable grief to His heart
Devil - , the devil prompted the treason of Judas ( John 13:2 ), and is vicious in his lusts, a liar and a murderer ( John 8:44 ), a sinner in both nature and act ( 1 John 3:8 ; 1 John 3:10 )
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - Ibas was "a second Judas," "an adversary of Christ," an "offshoot of Pharaoh
Matthew, Gospel According to - ), which is related in close connexion with Judas’ compact with the chief priests (the Evangelists seem to mean that the ‘waste’ of the ointment greatly influenced the traitor’s action), whereas Jn
Ecclesiastes, Theology of - The Gospel narratives pay special attention to Peter and Judas: one denied him and the other rejected him
Meekness (2) - When He was wounded to the heart by the treachery of Judas, and the betrayal was sealed by a hypocritical kiss, His answer to the traitor showed how superior He was to the natural resentment of men: ‘Comrade, is it for this that thou art come?’ (Matthew 26:50)
Spirit - On the other hand, and in close connexion with His approaching death, there was the dark treachery of Judas; and when we remember the profound joy and holy satisfaction with which Jesus reviewed the success of His work in keeping near Him those committed to His charge (see John 17:12), we can understand the grief caused by the loss of ‘the son of perdition
Saul - But he has gone away and left us to deal with such characters as Esau, and Balaam, and Saul, and Judas for ourselves
Apocalyptic Literature - 83 90) were probably written in the time of Judas Maccabæus or John Hyrcanus
Zechariah, Theology of - For betraying the Lord, the chief priests paid Judas thirty pieces of silver (Matthew 26:31 ), which he subsequently cast into the temple (Matthew 27:3-5 )
Angels - In Matthew 26:53 Jesus says that angels would have ministered to Him, had He so willed, when Judas betrayed Him
Temple - Thus it continued for three years, when it was repaired and purified by Judas Maccabaeus, who restored the divine worship, and dedicated it anew
Peter (2) - The suggestion that a successor to Judas should be appointed was made by him, and at once adopted by the body of believers (Acts 1:15 ff
Political Conditions - This was the enrolment referred to by Gamaliel (Acts 5:37); and on religious as well as patriotic grounds, as seeming to involve even a competition with Jehovah for the tithes, the result was dismay on the part of the leaders of the people, and an actual revolt, headed by Judas of Gamala, who thereby founded the fanatical party of the Zealots or Cananaeans (Matthew 10:4)
Paul - The council or synod which was there held (Acts 15 ) decided against the Judaizing party; and the deputies, accompanied by Judas and Silas, returned to Antioch, bringing with them the decree of the council
Eucharist - Judas had not yet gone out ( Luke 22:21 )
Leadership - ...
The substitute for Judas was chosen by lot under the direction of the Holy Spirit and also with the qualification of being an eyewitness from John's baptism till the ascension (Acts 1:21-22 )
Influence - Their loyalty, however, remained unbroken except in one case, that of Judas
Language of Christ - In Acts 1:19 it is said with reference to the suicide of Judas in the field which he had purchased ‘with the reward of iniquity,’ ‘And it was known unto all the dwellers at Jerusalem; insomuch as that field is called in their own tongue (τῇ διαλέκτῳ αὐτῶν) Akeldama
Sorrow, Man of Sorrows - He is grieved at ingratitude (Luke 17:17), at lack of hospitality (Luke 7:44), at the profanation of the Temple (Matthew 21:12), above all, at the treachery of Judas (Matthew 26:20, John 13:21)
Zechariah, the Book of - The climax was the sale of Messiah through Judas to Rome for 30 pieces of silver (Zechariah 11:13)
David - in His Races - After death we shall be done both with death and hell; and after death we shall awake in His likeness who died, not cursing Judas, and Annas, and Caiaphas, and Herod, and the soldier with the spear, but saying over them all with His last breath, Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do
Esau - They are beginning to seek for a field of blood, and some Sabbath night, unless God himself prevent them, they will go out like Judas
Temple - 42, when Judas Maccabaeus purified and repaired it, and restored the sacrifices and true worship of Jehovah
Ideal - The Kingdom of God in popular Jewish hope was an exaltation of Israel brought about by deeds like those of Judas Maccabaeus
Sanhedrin (2) - The Hasmonaean family led them in armed revolt, and under the skilful leadership of Judas Maccabaeus and his brothers they not only regained religious liberty, but achieved the political independence of the Jewish State, of which the Hasmonaeans and their loyal followers became the rulers
Election - In the NT we find the verb used, always in the middle voice, of our Lord’s choice of the Twelve from the company of the disciples (Luke 6:13, John 6:70; John 13:18; John 15:19, Acts 1:2); of the choice of an apostle in the place of Judas (Acts 1:24); of Stephen and his colleagues (Acts 6:5); of God’s choice of the patriarchs (Acts 13:17); and of the choice of delegates to carry the decisions of the Apostolic Council to the Gentile churches (Acts 15:22; Acts 15:25)
Lord's Supper. (i.) - But Judas entered into a conspiracy with the chief priests apparently two days before ‘the Passover and the feast of unleavened bread’ (Mark 14:1; Mark 14:10-11)
Judea - The principal places in the north-east quarter of the province were Jerusalem, the capital, which was entirely destroyed in the reign of Hadrian, and replaced by a new city named AElia, a little farther north, which is now the site of the modern Jerusalem; Jericho, the city of palm trees, about nineteen miles eastward of Jerusalem, and eight from the river Jordan; Phaselis, built by Herod in memory of his brother, fifteen miles north-west of Jericho; Archelais, built by Archelaus, ten miles north of Jericho; Gophna, fifteen miles north of Jerusalem, in the road to Sichem; Bethel, twelve miles north of Jerusalem, originally called Luz; Gilgal, about one mile and a half from Jericho; Engeddi, a hundred furlongs south south-east of Jericho, near the northern extremity of the Dead Sea; Masada, a strong fortress built by Judas Maccabeus, the last refuge of the Jews after the fall of Jerusalem; Ephraim, a small town westward of Jericho; Anathoth, a Levitical town, nearly four miles north of Jerusalem
Death of Christ - All four Gospels tell of the plans ultimately made by the Jewish leaders, the part played by Judas, the arrest and the trials
Redemption (2) - Those who speak of supposed judgments on others are warned: ‘Nay but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish’ (Luke 13:3; Luke 13:5); of a Judas it is declared, ‘Good were it for that man if he had not been born’ (Matthew 26:24, Mark 14:21); the parable of the Final Judgment has such a sentence as, ‘Depart from me, ye cursed,’ etc
Food - ...
The intimate association in early times between flesh-food and sacrifice explains the abhorrence of the Hebrew for all food prepared by the heathen, as illustrated by Daniel (Daniel 1:8 ), Judas Maccabæus ( 2Ma 5:27 ), Josephus ( Vita 3), and their associates (cf
Gospels - Stroud thus tabulates the four, taking 100 as the sum:...
Portions Unique To...
Coincidences...
Total Each Gospel...
Mark...
7...
93...
100...
Matthew...
42...
58...
100...
Luke...
59...
41...
100...
John...
92...
8...
100...
John's narrative of Mary's anointing of Jesus' feet combines her actions drawn from Luke, the ointment and its value from Mark, and the admonition to Judas from Matthew
Conscience - The suicide of Judas (Acts 1:18; cf
Government of the Hebrews - Under the able conduct of Judas, surnamed Maccabeus, and his valiant brother, the Jews maintained a religious war for twenty-six years with five successive kings of Syria; and after destroying upward of two hundred thousand of their best troops, the Maccabees finally established the independence of their own country and the aggrandizement of their family
Jeremiah - ) The potter's field significantly was the purchase with the price of reprobate Judas' treachery (2 Chronicles 35:25 which quotes 1618092397_4 as Jeremiah's because Zechariah rests on Jeremiah; compare Psalms 2:8-9; Revelation 2:27)
Missions - Judas (not Iscariot) is even represented as asking, ‘How is it that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us and not unto the world?’ (John 14:22), as if the limitation of His work was a source of perplexity to him
Old Testament - Even the tragedy of Judas’ end is the immediate working out of the curse denounced in Psalms 69:25 against the enemies of the righteous (Acts 1:20)
Money - The thirty ‘pieces of silver’ for which Judas betrayed his Lord were also most probably Tyrian tetradrachms
Elisha - Acts 13:41; and on lucre-loving Gehazi-like ministers, as Judas; giving up to judicial blindness the willfully blind, John 9:39-41; and to seeing without tasting bliss those who disbelieve the gospel promise of the heavenly feast; so the rich man in hell saw Lazarus afar off in Abraham's bosom, an impassable gulf excluding himself (Luke 16:23-26)
Wandering Stars - the insane suspicions of Domitian led him to arrest some grandsons of Judas the brother of Jesus, on the ground that rumour connected the descendants of David with a revolutionary movement
Trial of Jesus - , is content to record the painful story without pointing a moral or adorning the tale; he does not stop or step aside to blacken Judas or Herod, as Thucydides has exposed Cleon and Hyperbolus, or as many subsequent writers in Christianity have treated the Jewish and Roman actors in the Passion-story
Turning - For it was addressed directly to the Twelve at a time long subsequent to their call to the Apostolate; and, with the exception of Judas, who will venture to say that the Apostles at this period were ‘unconverted’ men? Moreover, the turning which Jesus demanded of them was not that absolute turning from sin in order to follow Himself which the word ‘conversion’ is used to denote, but a turning from those foolish, unworthy ambitions which had just prompted the question, ‘Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?’ (v
Galatia - The Revised Version says that Judas Maccabaeus (circa, about 162 b
Magi - The gold consisted of thirty pennies, which had once been paid by Abraham for the cave of Machpelah, and which were afterwards given to Judas
Announcements of Death - Here Jesus reveals His consciousness of the character and work of Judas as the betrayer, a very devil (John 6:70 f
Peter - He heads the list of the Eleven, and takes the initiative in the election of a successor to Judas (Acts 1:13; Acts 1:15)
Joseph - Ishmaelite or Midianite merchants from Gilead, with spicery, balm, and myrrh (gum ladanum), for Egypt, the land of embalming the dead (Genesis 50:2-3), passed by; and Judah, type of Judas, proposes the new plan of selling their brother for 20 pieces of silver (Leviticus 27:5) to the strangers (compare Matthew 20:19; Luke 18:32; Luke 20:20, the Jews delivering Jesus to the Gentile Romans)
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - 4), reflect the exploits of Judas and his brothers
Sinlessness - And even Judas Iscariot, though he had known Him long, and had, at the moment when he spoke, a strong interest in recalling anything with which he could have found fault as an excuse for his own conduct, acknowledged that he had betrayed ‘innocent blood’ (Matthew 27:4)
Gospels - , Judas Iscariot and his father Simon Iscariot ( John 6:71 RV Gospels, Apocryphal - ...
( i ) The Gospel of Judas Iscariot , used by a sect of the Gnostics the Cainites
Jerusalem - ...
(f) The tree (with the bridge) where Judas hanged himself, and Akeldama, the field of blood (Acts 1:19), are shown, but there are rival sites for the latter, and the former has often changed (Conder, The City of Jerusalem, p
Mental Characteristics - No rule is to be directly drawn from the Lord’s treatment of the woman in the Temple, or of Zacchaeus, or of Judas Iscariot, which would apply to all adulteresses, or renegades, or traitors: each was dealt with as the particular need required
Dates (2) - 6, after the deposition of Archelaus, and caused the revolt of Judas of Gamala (Ant
Paul - This decision, which was declared to have the sanction of the Holy Ghost, was communicated to the Gentile Christians of Syria and Cilicia, by a letter written in the name of the Apostles, elders, and whole church at Jerusalem, and conveyed by Judas and Silas, who accompanied St
Possession - He suggests to Judas to betray the Master, and the final surrender of the traitor to the Tempter is described in the words ‘Satan entered into him
Papias - 186) and in relation to a seeming knowledge of Acts, shown by his traditional amplification of the end of Judas as given in Acts 1:18 f
Poet - John, in his description of the departure of Judas from the upper room (John 13:30), significantly adds, ‘and it was night
Prophet - Following the Gospel narrative, we find that the treachery of Judas was open to Him for long (John 6:70 f
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - The Gospel abounds in enigmatic utterances, such as ‘Thou hast kept the good wine until now’ (John 2:10); ‘It is expedient that one man should die for the people’ (John 11:50); ‘Judas went immediately out, and it was night’ (John 13:30); in which the reader is plainly meant to see a double meaning
Synods - The first was convened for the election of a successor to Judas in the apostleship, Acts 1:26
Palestine - Towards the Roman power He, in contrast with such revolutionaries as Judas of Galilee, maintained a strictly neutral attitude
Preaching Christ - This is found in the qualifications of the man appointed to take the place of Judas