What does Josiah mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יֹאשִׁיָּ֖הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 7
יֹאשִׁיָּ֥הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 6
יֹאשִׁיָּ֣הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 6
יֹֽאשִׁיָּ֑הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 4
יֹאשִׁיָּ֑הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 4
יֹאשִׁיָּ֙הוּ֙ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 4
יֹאשִׁיָּֽהוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 3
יֹאשִׁיָּ֔הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 2
יֹאשִׁיָּ֛הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 2
יֹאשִׁיָּ֗הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 2
ἰωσίαν king of Judah 1
יֹאשִׁיָּ֤הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
יֹאושִׁיָּ֖הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
לְיֹאשִׁיָּ֣הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
יֹאשִׁיָּ֜הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
יֹ֣אשִׁיָּ֔הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
יֹאשִׁיָּהוּ֒ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
ἰωσίας king of Judah 1
יֹאשִׁיָּ֨הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
יֹֽאשִׁיָּ֙הוּ֙ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
יֹֽ֠אשִׁיָּהוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
יֹאשִׁיָּ֧הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
יֹֽאשִׁיָּ֜הוּ son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1
יֹאשִׁיָּ֣ה son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 3years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led. 1

Definitions Related to Josiah

H2977


   1 son of Amon by Jedidah who succeeded his father to the throne of Judah and reigned for 31 years; his reign is noteworthy for the great revivals back to the worship of Jehovah which he led.
   2 a returned exile and son of Zephaniah at whose house took place the solemn and symbolical crowning of Joshua the high priest in the time of Zechariah the prophet.
   Additional Information: Josiah = “whom Jehovah heals”.
   

G2502


   1 king of Judah, who restored among the Jews the worship of the true God, and after a reign of thirty one years was slain in battle about 611 BC.
   Additional Information: Josiah = “whom Jehovah heals”.
   

Frequency of Josiah (original languages)

Frequency of Josiah (English)

Dictionary

Hitchcock's Bible Names - Josiah
The Lord burns; the fire of the Lord
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Josiah
Healed by Jehovah, or Jehovah will support. The son of Amon, and his successor on the throne of Judah (2 Kings 22:1 ; 2 Chronicles 34:1 ). His history is contained in 2 Kings 2223,23 . He stands foremost among all the kings of the line of David for unswerving loyalty to Jehovah (23:25). He "did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, and walked in all the way of David his father." He ascended the throne at the early age of eight years, and it appears that not till eight years afterwards did he begin "to seek after the God of David his father." At that age he devoted himself to God. He distinguished himself by beginning a war of extermination against the prevailing idolatry, which had practically been the state religion for some seventy years (2 Chronicles 34:3 ; Compare Jeremiah 25:3,11,29 ). In the eighteenth year of his reign he proceeded to repair and beautify the temple, which by time and violence had become sorely dilapidated (2 Kings 22:3,5,6 ; 23:23 ; 2 Chronicles 34:11 ). While this work was being carried on, Hilkiah, the high priest, discovered a roll, which was probably the original copy of the law, the entire Pentateuch, written by Moses.
When this book was read to him, the king was alarmed by the things it contained, and sent for Huldah, the "prophetess," for her counsel. She spoke to him words of encouragement, telling him that he would be gathered to his fathers in peace before the threatened days of judgment came. Josiah immediately gathered the people together, and engaged them in a renewal of their ancient national covenant with God. The Passover was then celebrated, as in the days of his great predecessor, Hezekiah, with unusual magnificence. Nevertheless, "the Lord turned not from the fierceness of his great wrath wherewith his anger was kindled against Judah" (2 Kings 22:3-20 ; 23:21-27 ; 2 Chronicles 35:1-19 ). During the progress of this great religious revolution Jeremiah helped it on by his earnest exhortations.
Soon after this, Pharaoh-Necho II. (q.v.), king of Egypt, in an expedition against the king of Assyria, with the view of gaining possession of Carchemish, sought a passage through the territory of Judah for his army. This Josiah refused to permit. He had probably entered into some new alliance with the king of Assyria, and faithful to his word he sought to oppose the progress of Necho.
The army of Judah went out and encountered that of Egypt at Megiddo, on the verge of the plain of Esdraelon. Josiah went into the field in disguise, and was fatally wounded by a random arrow. His attendants conveyed him toward Jerusalem, but had only reached Hadadrimmon, a few miles south of Megiddo, when he died (2 Kings 23:28,30 ; Compare 2 Chronicles 35:20-27 ), after a reign of thirty-one years. He was buried with the greatest honours in fulfilment of Huldah's prophecy (2 Kings 22:20 ; Compare Jeremiah 34:5 ). Jeremiah composed a funeral elegy on this the best of the kings of Israel (Lamentations 4:20 ; 2 Chronicles 35:25 ). The outburst of national grief on account of his death became proverbial (Zechariah 12:11 ; Compare Revelation 16:16 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Josiah
(joh ssi' uh) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh heals.” Judah's king from about 640-609 B.C. He succeeded his father Amon, an idolatrous king, who ruled for only two years before being murdered by his servants (2 Kings 21:19-23 ; 2 Chronicles 33:21-24 ). Josiah became king at the age of eight due to wishes of “the people of the land” who put his father's assassins to death (2 Kings 21:24 ). Josiah's reign lasted for thirty-one years (2 Kings 22:1 ; 2 Chronicles 34:1 ). The Book of 2Chronicles reveals much about the early years of Josiah. In his eighth year as king he began to seek the God of David (2 Chronicles 34:3 ). Josiah initiated a religious purge of Jerusalem, Judah, and surrounding areas during his twelfth year on the throne (2 Chronicles 34:3-7 ). This purge included tearing down the high places, the Asherah, and the altars to Baal. The high places were essentially Canaanite worship centers that had been taken over by Israel. The Asherah were cult objects associated with the worship of Baal, the fertility god of Canaan. See Asherah .
In his eighteenth year as king an unexpected event turned his energies in new directions. A “Book of the Law” was discovered while repairs were being made on the Temple. Hilkiah, the high priest, found the book and gave it to Shaphan, the scribe, who in turn read it to King Josiah. Upon hearing the message of the book, Josiah tore his clothes, a sign of repentance, and humbled himself before God. Josiah was assured that the promised destruction would not come in his time (2 Kings 22:8-20 ; 2 Chronicles 34:15-28 ). The reading of this book prompted Josiah to instigate the most far-reaching religious reforms in Israel's history.
What was this “Book of the Law” and when was it written? Most scholars believe that this book included at least the core of our present Book of Deuteronomy, either 2 Chronicles 5-26 or 12-26. A major thrust of the Book of Deuteronomy was to call the nation Israel to exclusive loyalty to Yahweh. Perhaps a thrust such as this inspired the Josianic revival.
The Bible is silent about the remaining years of Josiah until his death. On the international scene during those years Assyria's power was waning, and Babylon's was on the rise. Assyria had aligned itself with Egypt against Babylon. Pharoah Neco's troups were passing through territory north of Judah en route to join forces with Assyria. Josiah's army blocked the movement of Egyptian troups at Megiddo. In the battle that followed Josiah was mortally wounded (2 Kings 23:29 ). His body was taken to Jerusalem where he was buried. There was great mourning for him throughout the land (2 Chronicles 35:24-25 ). Though only thirty-nine when he died, Josiah was remembered as Judah's greatest king (2 Kings 23:25 ):
“Neither before nor after Josiah was there a king like him who turned to the Lord as he did—with all his heart and with all his soul and with all his strength, in accordance with the Law of Moses” (NIV).
See Jeremiah ; Deuteronomy.
M. Stephen Davis
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Josiah
JOSIAH. 1. King of Judah, who succeeded his father Amon when only eight years old ( 2 Kings 22:1 ). The religious condition of the people, which was bad under Amon, continued without essential improvement, so far as we know, until the eighteenth year of Josiah. The sudden change then made resulted from the finding of the Book of Instruction in the Temple ( 2 Kings 22:8 ff.); but it is possible that the minds of king and people were prepared for it by the Scythian invasion. The demand of the book for a thorough reformation powerfully affected the king and his officers. The book was read publicly, and king and people entered into a solemn covenant to act according to its injunctions. Its central demand was the removal of all altars in the country except the one at Jerusalem. This was henceforth to be the only sanctuary in Judah. The carrying out of this programme is related in detail, and we learn that the conclusion of the work was marked by the celebration of the Passover in a new manner and with unusual solemnity ( 2 Kings 23:21 ff.).
Josiah’s reign was characterized by justice, as we learn from Jeremiah, but we know no more of it until the end of the king’s life. The Assyrian empire was tottering to its fall, and Pharaoh-necho thought to seize the provinces nearest him and attach them to Egypt. He therefore invaded Palestine with an army. Josiah was ill-advised enough to attempt resistance. In the battle which ensued he was slain (2 Kings 23:29 ). His motive in undertaking this expedition has been much discussed. Probably he hoped to restore the real independence of Judah. That he was beloved by his people is indicated by their deep and long-continued mourning.
2. Son of Zephaniah ( Zechariah 6:10 ).
H. P. Smith.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Josiah
JOSIAH.—The well-known king of Judah, named in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:10 f.).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Josiah
Josiah (jo-sî'ah), whom Jehovah heals. One of the pious kings of Judah. He reigned 31 years, b.c. 640-610. He ascended the throne at the early age of eight years, and before his eighteenth year he had cut off and destroyed all the idols of the land, with their temples, groves, and monuments; and had ransacked the sepulchres of the idolatrous priests, and burned their bones upon the altars, in accordance with the prophecy of the man of God, announced in the presence of Jeroboam 326 years before Josiah was born. 2 Kings 22:1-267; 1618389121_4; 2 Chronicles 34:1-2. In the prosecution of the thorough repair and purification of the temple, Hilkiah "found the book of the Law of the Lord by Moses." Josiah immediately convoked the whole realm, and in person read the book of the Law to them, and exacted from them a promise to obey it. 2 Kings 22:8-20; 2 Chronicles 34:14-33. The Scythians are supposed to have invaded Palestine between the thirteenth and the eighteenth year of his reign. Josiah was mortally wounded at Megiddo, and died at Jerusalem. Jeremiah the prophet was greatly affected by it, and composed an elegy on the occasion, 2 Chronicles 35:25, and all those accustomed to celebrate in song the worth and achievements of men of great eminence, both men and women, mourned for Josiah for ages after his death. Indeed, the mourning was such as to become proverbial. Zechariah 12:11. He was only 39 years of age when he died.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Josiah
JOSIAH was born with a tender heart, says Huldah the prophetess. Josiah's father and grandfather were the two worst kings that had ever sold Israel into slavery. And Josiah inherited from his father and from his grandfather a name of shame, an undermined throne, a divided and a distracted kingdom, a national religion and a public worship debased, and, indeed, bestialised; and, over all, a fearful looking for of judgment. And all that broke and made tender Josiah's heart from the day of his birth. We are told nothing of Josiah's unhappy mother. But may we not be allowed to believe that her heart also was made tender within her by all that she had come through, till she bore and brought up her son Josiah to be the most tender-hearted man in all Israel, till Mary bore and brought up her child to be the most tender-hearted man in all the world?
If a boy has a good mother and a good minister he is all but independent of his father. And with Jedidah for his mother, and with Jeremiah for his minister, both Manasseh his grandfather and Amon his father taken together did not succeed in corrupting and destroying young Josiah. The tender heart of the young prince took all the good out of his so terribly untoward circumstances, and escaped all the evil, till Jeremiah was able to pronounce this noble panegyric over the too early grave of Josiah,-'That it is good for a man to bear the yoke in his youth; and that it is also good for such a man quietly to hope and to wait for the salvation of the Lord.' With Jeremiah every Sabbath-day among the ruins of the temple, and with Jedidah every week-day at home, notwithstanding all Josiah's drawbacks and heart-breaks,-or, rather, because of them,-I do not wonder that Josiah soon became the very best sovereign that had ever sat on the throne of David.
Early in the days of his youth Josiah began to seek after the God of David his father. That is to say,-however well a boy may have been brought up; however good a mother he may have had, and however efficient and faithful a minister, the time soon comes when every young man must seek his own God for himself. Neither David's God, nor Jedidah's God, nor Jeremiah's God will suffice for Josiah. Josiah is an orphan and a prince with a terrible heritage of woe. And a second-hand and a merely educational and hereditary knowledge of God will not suffice for Josiah's singular and extraordinary case. Josiah cannot rest till he is able to say for himself-'Thou art my God. Early will I seek thee. O Lord, truly I am Thy servant, the son of Thine handmaid; Thou hast loosed my bonds.' And, all the time, while Josiah still sought the Lord, and till he found Him, the tenderness of Josiah's heart kept him safe and unspotted from all the corruptions of the world. A boy will be at a school where all kinds of evil are rampant. He will then enter a workshop or an office where so many young men go astray. But there has always been something about that boy that has kept him through it all both pure and pious. And it has been his tender heart that has done it. Augustine has his finest passage in point. Monica's son, like Jedidah's son, had drunk in the name of Jesus Christ with his mother's milk; and all the folly of philosophy, and all the sweetness of sensuality could never seduce nor satisfy Augustine's heart. God had made Augustine's great heart for Himself; and neither true nor false, neither sweet nor bitter, neither good nor bad, could solace or satiate that deep, predestinated heart. Nothing, and no one, but God Himself. So it was with Josiah. And so it was with ourselves. And so it has been, and so it will be, with thousands of the sons of mothers like Jedidah, and with thousands of the scholars and young communicants of ministers like Jeremiah and Zephaniah.
Josiah was only twenty years of age when he set about a national reformation of religion as radical and as complete as anything that Martin Luther or John Calvin or John Knox themselves ever undertook. But with this immense difference. Both Luther and Calvin and Knox had the whole Word of God in their hands both to inspire them and to guide them and to support them in their tremendous task. But Josiah had not one single book or chapter or verse even of the Word of God in his heathen day. The Five Books of Moses were as completely lost out of the whole land long before Josiah's day as much so as if Moses had never lifted a pen. And thus it was that Josiah's reformation had a creativeness, an originality, an enterprise, and a boldness about it, such that in all these respects it has completely eclipsed all subsequent reformations and revivals, the greatest and the best. The truth is, the whole of that immense movement that resulted in the religious regeneration of Jerusalem and Judah in Josiah's day,-it all sprang originally and immediately out of nothing else but Josiah's extraordinary tenderness of heart. The Light that lighteth every man that cometh into the world shone with extraordinary clearness in Josiah's tender heart and open mind. And Josiah walked in that Light and obeyed it, till it became within him an overmastering sense of divine duty and an irresistible direction and drawing of the Divine Hand; and till he performed a work for God and for Israel second to no work that has ever been performed under the greatest and the best of the prophets and kings of Israel combined. It is a very noble spectacle. This royal youth of but about twenty years old, and the son and heir of Manasseh and Amon, having the intellectual boldness and the spiritual originality to take all his statesmanship, and all his churchman ship, and all his international politics, and all his righteous wars, as well as all his personal and household religion, all out of his own tender heart. There never was a nobler proof of our Lord's great New Testament principle that he that doeth the will of God shall know the doctrine. For it was in the progress of that reformation and revival of religion which his own tender heart had alone dictated to him that the long-lost law of Moses was recovered. And recovered in as many divine and commanding and rewarding words, so as to sanction and seal, as if from heaven itself, all the bold and believing task that Josiah had wholly of himself undertaken. We all profess to believe in special providences and in divine interpositions; but, surely, the extraordinary providence that brought to the light of day and put into Josiah's hands the long-lost law of Moses concerning the worship and morals of Israel was an incomparable miracle of the Divine grace and goodness. Josiah was worthy; and God's recognition and reward of Josiah's worth came to Josiah at the very best moment, and in the very best way; for it came to him as the very law of the living God; and that, too, as good as if it had been written on the spot by God's own living hand. Humanly speaking, we should never have heard of the Five Books of Moses, as we have heard of them, but for Josiah's tender heart. Humanly speaking, and popularly speaking, our Old Testament would have begun with the Book of Joshua but for Josiah's tender heart. Had Josiah's heart not been tender toward the house of God, the temple would have been let lie in its utter ruin, till the buried Books of Moses would have been to this day the possession and the prey of the moles and the bats. Moses, says Matthew Henry, had a narrow turn for his life in Josiah's day. You do well to tremble at the thought of how near you were to the total loss of Moses and his law. And you are almost angry at Matthew Henry for telling you what you did not know before. But try your own hand on Moses and Josiah, and explain to me how you think you could have had Moses in your Bible but for Josiah; and, again, but for Josiah's tender heart. I defy you to do it. At any rate,-this is far more to your purpose-be sure of this, that both Moses, and David, and Paul, and John, and Jesus Christ Himself, are all as good as never written; they are as good as completely lost to you; till you take to them a tender heart, and out of that, a reformed and a repaired life. It will only be after your heart is tender and your life repaired that Hilkiah and Shaphan and Huldah the prophetess will be able to discover and to read to you either the law of Moses, or the grace and truth that has come by Jesus Christ. Till then, your Bible also is as good as buried under the ruin and rubbish of your fallen life. But when your heart is made tender by your father's sins and by your own; as also, by all God's providences towards you, and by all His grace in you; and when, in addition, your life has been made believing and obedient; then God's Word will more and more flash out continually upon you, a lamp to your feet and a light to your path.
When the law of the Lord, as it was written in the newly disinterred Books of Moses, was read for the first time to Josiah, and while Shaphan the scribe was still reading it, Josiah rose up and rent to pieces his royal robe. After having looked for it, I do not read that Shaphan the scribe rent his robe, nor Ahikam the son of Shaphan, nor Hilkiah the priest, nor Achbor, nor Asahiah the servant of Josiah, nor Huldah the prophetess. Josiah alone rent his robe as the law was read. Their hearts were not so tender as was Josiah's heart. They had not come through so much from their youth up. The iron of God had not entered their hearts, and the law of God after it. The finding of the law was, no doubt, a great event in sacred archæology, as well as in sacred letters, to Shaphan and Hilkiah; but it did not come home to their hearts as it all came home to Josiah's heart. It was Moses speaking to them: but it was God Himself speaking to Josiah. It was an old book to them: but it was the Word of the Living God to him. He felt-such was his tender heart-that all he had attained to, and all he had reformed and done, was just nothing at all while so much remained to be and to do. He felt, as Isaiah felt, that all his righteousnesses were but so much filthy rags. If you have any real Interest in these things; if you care to go to the sources and are not indolently content with my poor paraphrase of these intensely interesting Scriptures: if you are a true student, a true sinner, and a true reformer of yourself and of the ruins that lie all around you-you will read 2 Kings and 2 Chronicles to yourselves, if only to see what a reformer both of himself and of his whole land Josiah was: and all that out of his own tender heart. And, best of all, how unsatisfied, and how tender-hearted he was with all he had done. All which, you must know, was the Holy Ghost in Josiah's tender heart before the Holy Ghost had yet been given. Has He even yet been given in that way to you? Do you rend your heart every day as you hear and read the Word of God? Or, are your clothes as whole, and your hearts, as were Hilkiah's and Shaphan's, and all the rest of the merely official and salaried servants of the palace and the temple? On the other hand, if all you have done only adds itself on to what you have not done: if your best works break your heart even more than your worst: if it is no rhetoric that all your righteousnesses are so much filthy rags: then, I wish much to assure you, that so it always is when the Holy Spirit accompanies the Word of God, either read or heard. Jeremiah-you all know the proverbial penitent, and the contrite heart, that Jeremiah was-but Jeremiah did not think that. He did not feel that. Oh that mine head were waters, and mine eyes a fountain of tears! wept that hard-hearted and dry-eyed prophet. 'I can sin much,' cries holy Lancelot Andrewes to God every night, 'but I cannot repent much. Woe is me for my hard and dry heart. Give me, O God, a molten heart. Give tears. Give the grace of tears. Give me, O Lord, this great grace. None were so welcome to me. Not all the good things of this life are to be coveted by me in comparison with tears. Tears such as Thou didst give to David, and to Jeremiah, and to Josiah, and to Peter, and to her out of whom were cast seven devils. O God, give the chief of sinners some tears for his great sin, and for Thy great salvation.' And the Word of God has never yet been aright read to you, or aright heard and believed by you, unless you feel like Josiah, and Jeremiah, and Peter, and Andrewes every day. Your religion is not worth one straw, as true religion, unless it is every day breaking and making more tender your hard heart. Woe unto you that laugh now, for ye shall mourn and weep. But blessed are ye that weep now, for ye shall laugh for it all when all tears shall have been wiped from your eyes.
Only, if you will have Josiah's tender heart in this hard-hearted world, you will have to pay a heavy price for it. Josiah paid a heavy price at the last for his tender heart. Josiah's tender heart, after it had done him all the good that we have seen, and more, at last it did him this terrible evil, that it lost him his life for this life. Josiah's tender heart was the cause of his too early death. The narrative is obscure and perplexed, and it lends itself to be read in more ways than one. But as I read Josiah's end it is something like this,-The king's tender heart led him out to do battle against the hereditary enemy of Israel and the oppressor and persecutor of the weak; in short, he went out against the Sultan of Turkey of that day. And the Judge of all the earth and the God of battles, for His own deep ends, let that battle go against Josiah, till Josiah said, Have me away, for I am wounded. Being unsuccessful, as we say, Josiah is almost universally blamed for letting his tender heart take up the sword. But I, for one, am quite content to leave Josiah's tender-hearted statesmanship to the arbitrament of the last day. I, for one, will applaud Josiah till my applause is reversed by Him whose tender heart took Him also to His death. And till Jesus Christ from the great white throne condemns and sentences Josiah for his too tender heart, I shall continue to read this to myself on his tombstone in the valley of Megiddo:
-This,
the remembrance of josiah is like the perfume of the apothecary, and his name is like music at a banquet of wine. for his pure and holy youth jehovah was his shield in the hour of temptation, till he behaved himself rightly in the conversion of his people, and till he took away all their abominations of iniquity. he directed his heart to the lord, and he established the worship of god: and all because his heart was so tender. the remembrance of josiah in judah and in jerusalem is like the perfume of the apothecary, and like music at a banquet of wine.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Josiah
king of Judah, deserves particular mention on account of his wisdom and piety, and some memorable events that occurred in the course of his reign. He succeeded to the throne, upon the assassination of his father Amon, at the age of eight years, B.C. 640; and at a period when idolatry and wickedness, encouraged by his father's profligate example, very generally prevailed. Josiah, who manifested the influence of pious and virtuous principles at a very early age, began, in his sixteenth year, to project the reformation of the kingdom, and to adopt means for restoring the worship of the true God. At the age of twenty years he vigorously pursued the execution of the plans which he had meditated. He began with abolishing idolatry, first at Jerusalem, and then through different parts of the kingdom; destroying the altars which had been erected, and the idols which had been the objects of veneration and worship. He then proceeded, in his twenty-sixth year, to a complete restoration of the worship of God, and the regular service of the temple. While he was prosecuting this pious work, and repairing the temple, which had been long neglected, and which had sunk into a state of dilapidation, the book of the law, which had been concealed in the temple, was happily discovered. This was, probably, a copy of the Pentateuch, which had been lodged there for security by some pious priest in the reign of Ahaz or Manasseh. Josiah, desirous of averting from himself and the kingdom threatened judgments, determined to adhere to the directions of the law, in the business of reformation which he had undertaken; and to observe the festivals enjoined by Moses, which had been shamefully neglected. With this view he assembled all the elders of the people in the temple at Jerusalem; and, having ascended the throne, read the book of the Mosaic law, and then entered into a solemn covenant to observe the statutes and ordinances which it enjoined. To this covenant the whole assembly testified their consent. The ark was restored to its proper place; the temple was purified; idolatrous utensils were removed, and those appropriate to the worship of God substituted in their room. After these preparations, the passover was observed with singular zeal and magnificence. This took place in the eighteenth year of Josiah's reign: but, in pursuing his laudable plans of reformation, he was resisted by the inveterate habits of the Israelites; so that his zealous and persevering efforts were ineffectual. Their degeneracy was so invincible, that the almighty Sovereign was provoked to inflict upon them those calamities which were denounced by the Prophet Zephaniah. In the thirty-second year of Josiah's reign, Pharaoh-Necho, king of Egypt, advanced with his army against Carchemish, a city situated on the river Euphrates. He was opposed by the king of Judah; so that a bloody battle ensued at Megiddo, in which Josiah received a mortal wound, which terminated in his death, after he had been conveyed to Jerusalem, in the thirty-ninth year of his reign, B.C. 609. His death was greatly lamented by all his subjects; and an elegy was written on the occasion by the Prophet Jeremiah, which is not now extant, 2 Kings 22, 23; 2 Chronicles 34, 35.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Josiah
Son of Amon and great-grandson of Hezekiah, a pious king of Judah, who introduced great reforms in the temple worship, and in the religious character of the nation in general. No king set himself more earnestly to destroy every vestige of idolatry out of the land. Among other things, he defiled the altars of the idols at Bethel by burning upon them the bones from the tombs of their deceased priests; as had been foretold more than three centuries before, 1 Kings 13:2 . While cleaning and repairing the temple at his command, the priests found the temple copy of the five books of the law, perhaps the original copy from Moses' own hand. The sacred book was too much neglected in those days of declension; and even the pious Josiah seems to have been impressed by the closing chapters of Deuteronomy as though he had never read them before. To avert the judgments there threatened, he humbled himself before God, and sought to bring the people to repentance. He caused them to renew their covenant with Jehovah, and celebrated the Passover with a solemnity like that of its first institution. The repentance of the people was heartless, and did not avert the divine judgments. Josiah, however, was taken away from the evil to come. He met death in battle with Pharaohnecho, whose passage across his territory to attack the king of Assyria, Josiah felt obliged to resist. The death of this wise and pious king was deeply lamented, by the prophet Jeremiah and all the people, Zechariah 12:11 . He began to reign B. C. 641, at the age of eight years, and reigned thirty-one years, 2 Kings 22:1-23:37 2 Chronicles 34:1-35:27 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Josiah
("supported or healed by Jehovah".)
1. Son of Amon and Jedidab; began to reign at eight years old (641 B.C.) and reigned 31 years, to 610 B.C. (2 Kings 22 to 24; 2 Chronicles 34-35). The first 12 chapters of Jeremiah may refer to this period. At the age of 16, "while he was yet young, he began to seek after the God of David his father." Since Amon was wicked it is likely that Jedidah ("beloved"), like Lois and Eunice (2 Timothy 1:5), had early instilled into her child pious principles which bore fruit betimes, for in spite of the closing error which cost him his life the Holy Spirit, who remembers the graces and ignores the exceptional fails of believers, testifies "he declined neither to the right hand nor to the left." At the age of 20, in the 12th year of his reign, he began to purge Judah and Jerusalem of the high places or Asherah, and images of the sun and Baal, and strewed their dust on the graves of their former worshippers. (See GRΟVΕS.)
The events of the purging out idolatry, the temple repair, and the finding of the law, in Kings are arranged according to subject matter; but in Chronicles chronologically. The repairing of the temple recorded 2 Kings 22:3-7, in a period by itself, subordinate to the discovery of the law, in the 18th year of Josiah's reign, must have been chronologically before that date, since in that year the builders were already repairing and the money for the work had been collected by the Levites who kept the door. The abolishing of the idols must have begun before the people made the covenant (2 Kings 23:3). The discovery of the law Hilkiah quickened his zeal in abolishing them throughout the whole kingdom.(See HILKIAH.) In 2 Kings their suppression is narrated more minutely, the Passover celebration is summarized; in Second Chronicles their suppression is summarized (2 Chronicles 34:3-7; 2 Chronicles 34:33), but the Passover fully described (2 Chronicles 35:1-19).
Josiah spared not even the high places which pious Hezekiah had left, nor those of Solomon in his apostasy, nor their priests (Chemarim), as Zephaniah 1:4 foretold; also Manasseh his grandfather's grove (Asherah) in the Lord's house (2 Kings 21:7; 2 Kings 23:6). He defiled Tophot in the valley of the children of Hinnom, where the people used to make their children pass through the fire to Moloch; and burned the chariots of the sun, and took away the stored horses, and destroyed Ahaz' altars on the housetop. (See HINNOM.) He fulfilled on the Bethel calf altar the prophecy of the man of God to Jeroboam, given three centuries before, and declaring his very name (as Isaiah did that of Cyrus ages before), but respected the prophet's sepulchre (1 Kings 13). His purgation thus extended to northern Israel as far as Naphtali, as well as to Judah. It was in repairing the temple that Moses' copy of the law, in his own handwriting, or at, least the original temple copy from his, was found. That the law was not previously unknown appears from the king's conduct on its discovery.
He at once accepted its authority without mistrust as genuine and authentic; and read or caused it to be read in the ears of all the men of Judah, the priests and the prophets ("Levites" in 2 Chronicles 34:30). These too all accepted it, evidently because they and he had always recognized its truths generally (as his extirpation of idolatry already implied), but now he and they are brought into immediate contact, as it were, with Moses himself, through the original temple copy. His tenderness of heart (conscience) and his humbling himself before God with tears and rent garments brought God's promise through Huldah that he should be "gathered to his grave in peace," and "should not see the evil God was about to bring on" Jerusalem. It is true he fell in battle; but his remains were (and were the last) buried in his fathers' sepulchres "in peace," before seeing the enemy overthrow his capital (compare Jeremiah 34:5; Isaiah 57:1-2). "Because thou humblest thyself when thou heardest what I spake ... I also have heard thee." God is toward men what they are toward Him (Psalms 18:25-26).
In this same year, the 26th of his age, the 18th of his reign, Josiah and his people entered into a covenant to keep the law of Jehovah with all their heart and all their soul (2 Kings 23:3; 2 Chronicles 34:31-33). His only fault was his supposition that by frustrating Necho's expedition to the Euphrates against Assyria he might avert God's predicted judgment on Judah. He scarcely realized the depth of Israel's apostasy, and hoped his reformation would enlist God's cooperation against the Egyptians. Nineveh was falling, if not already fallen. The Syrian princes, those independent as Josiah as well as Assyria's vassals, hoped now to be free from every foreign yoke; it was therefore necessary now to check the Egyptian, for though Necho was not marching against Judah but against Carchemish by Euphrates, Josiah knew that if once the Egyptians gained Coelosyria his independence would be gone.
Necho appealed in vain to Josiah to leave him alone, as it was "against the house of his war" (his hereditary enemy) that he was marching, and that God commanded him, so that if Josiah interfered he would be "meddling with God." He thought the reference to God would have weight with Josiah. Of course Pharaoh's view of the Godhead was distinct from Josiah's. Josiah forgot his ancestor Solomon's inspired counsel (Proverbs 17:14; Proverbs 26:17). Josiah's reformation had not removed the deep seated evil (as Jeremiah and Zephaniah testify), so that the deceased Manasseh's sin, acting still far and wide though hiddenly now, awaited God's fierce anger on Jerusalem, as he was warned by God through Huldah (2 Kings 22:16-20). Hence Josiah was permitted, not without culpability on his part, to meddle in the ungodly world's wars, and so to fall, and with himself to withdraw the last godly ruler from the people henceforth given over to punishment (2 Kings 23:25-30).
Necho came by sea to Palestine, landing at Accho. If he had come by Philistia Josiah would have met him there, and not allowed him to advance to Megiddo. There, in the great battle field of Palestine, Esdraelon plain, Necho, when they met face to face, slew him. Josiah was carried wounded from Hadadrimmon to die before be reached Jerusalem. He was buried with every honour, and Jeremiah composed a dirge, annually chanted at Hadadrimmon (not the "Lamentations" over Jerusalem after its fall). Compare Jeremiah 22:10 "weep not for the dead, neither bemoan him" (namely, Josiah slain at Megiddo or Magdolum in Herodotus); he is at peace. The church, while potent in the world for God, must not descend to the world's level and use the world's weapons for even a good end. Her controversy must first be with herself so long as corruption is in her, and then she must yield herself to God to be wielded by Him in the world for His glory.
Antichrist superseding spiritual Babylon appropriately falls at Armageddon, i.e. the hill of Megiddo, the scene of godly Josiah's fall through descending to the world's carnal strifes as Babylon's ally (Revelation 16:14-18); the Jews' future mourning for Him whom they pierced, before God's interposition against all nations confederate against Jerusalem, answers to their mourning for Josiah at Megiddo (Zechariah 12:10-11). Josiah's greatness harmonizes with the parallel decline and fall of Assyria. Josiah exercised a sovereignty over Samaria and Galilee (2 Chronicles 34:6), besides Judah. In 633 B.C. the Medes attacked Nineveh. Then the Scythians (from whom Bethshan got its Greek name Scythopolis) desolated western Asia. Then Egypt cast off the Assyrian yoke, and Psammetik I attacked southern Syria. Finally, in 626 or 624 B.C., the Medes, Babylonians, and Susianians destroyed Nineveh and divided the empire.This gave Josiah the opportunity to free Judah from the Assyrian yoke which his grandfather had borne, and to enlarge his kingdom. (See for further illustrations of the Scripture harmony with secular history, NECHO.)
2. Josiah, son of Zephaniah cheen ("grace") (Zechariah 6:9; Zechariah 6:15). At his house in Jerusalem the three from Babylon were guests, from whom Zechariah by God's command took silver and gold to make crowns for the high priest Joshua's head.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Josiah
1. Son and successor of Amon king of Judah: he reigned thirty-one years, B.C. 641-610. He did that which was right in the sight of the Lord. He began to reign when eight years old, and at the age of sixteen he sought after God. When he was about twenty years old he began to destroy all the high places, and groves, and images, and altars. He burnt the bones of the priests of Baalim upon their altars, as foretold in 1 Kings 13:2 . These things he did not only in Judah but also in the cities of Manasseh, Ephraim, and Simeon, even unto Naphtali. 2 Kings 22:1,2 ; 2 Chronicles 34:1-7 .
Having purged the land of idolatry he set his hand to repair the house of the Lord. While this was in progress Hilkiah the priest found a copy of the law, which had evidently been lost sight of. It was read to the king, who was so moved on hearing its precepts, and knowing how they had been violated, that he rent his clothes, and sent to inquire of the Lord. The answer was that the evil and the curses found in the book should fall upon the people; but, because Josiah's heart was tender, and he had humbled himself, the judgement should not be executed in his days. He then assembled all the people at the temple; made them hear the law, and renew the covenant of obedience to Jehovah their God. And it is added that "all his days they departed not from following the Lord, the God of their fathers." 2 Kings 22:3-20 ; 2 Kings 23:1-20 ; 2 Chronicles 34:8-33 .
In the eighteenth year of Josiah, the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread were kept. The ark was restored to its place in the temple, from which apparently it had been removed for some purpose. The testimony is that "there was no Passover like to that kept in Israel from the days of Samuel the prophet." Thus was Josiah enabled to recall the people to a sense of their responsibility, and to the means of their communion with God in the ordinance of the Passover. 2 Kings 23:21-28 ; 2 Chronicles 35:1-19 .
In the thirty-first year of his reign, Josiah, perhaps from fidelity to former treaties with Assyria, went out to oppose the king of Egypt when he himself was in no way attacked; and, though warned 'from the mouth of God,' he persisted in his purpose. He disguised himself, yet he was wounded and died. Jeremiah lamented for him and the singers also in their songs. 2 Chronicles 35:20-26 . His reign was like the last shining of God's lamp in Judah: though he had zealously followed the Lord, the heart of the people was not changed. Jeremiah 3:6-10 : cf. Zephaniah. In Matthew 1:10,11 the name is JOSIAS.
2. Son of Zephaniah, at whose house Zechariah assembled the chief men of the captivity when Joshua the son of Josedech was crowned. Zechariah 6:10 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Josiah
After fifty-five years rule of the wicked Manasseh, plus two years rule of his equally wicked son Amon, Judah’s spiritual condition was the worst it had ever been (see MANASSEH, KING OF JUDAH). Josiah became king when his father Amon was assassinated (640 BC) but, being only eight years old at the time, he was for some years under the direction of government officials (2 Chronicles 33:25; 2 Chronicles 34:1). At the age of sixteen he became a believer in the one true God, and at the age of twenty he began religious reforms that lasted many years (2 Chronicles 34:2-5).
Religious affairs
One possible influence that led Josiah to begin his reforms was the preaching of the prophet Zephaniah (Zephaniah 1:1). Another prophet, Jeremiah, began his ministry in the early years of Josiah’s reforms (Jeremiah 1:1-2; Jeremiah 3:6).
During the evil days of Manasseh, the temple in Jerusalem had been damaged and the law of God forgotten. In the sixth year of Josiah’s reforms, workmen repairing the temple found scrolls of this long-forgotten law. Josiah was shocked to find how far Judah had departed from God. He soon learnt that the nation was heading for judgment, but God encouraged him to continue his reforms, so that the people might turn to God and avoid the threatened judgment (2 Kings 22:3-20).
With this encouragement from God, Josiah gathered Jerusalem’s leading citizens together at the temple, where the law was read to them. He gained their support in renewing the nation’s covenant with God and in helping his ongoing reforms (2 Kings 23:1-3). An increasingly confident Josiah then destroyed all false shrines and other idolatrous objects throughout the country, and centralized the nation’s public worship in Jerusalem, where it was under his supervision (2 Kings 23:4-14; 2 Kings 23:24; 2 Chronicles 34:6-7). He burnt the bones of the false prophets on their altar, after which he destroyed it (2 Kings 23:15-20; cf. 1 Kings 13:1-3; 1 Kings 13:29-32).
Having removed idolatry, Josiah re-established the worship of Yahweh by keeping the Passover. This gave him the opportunity to organize the priests and Levites according to the order set out by David. He wanted to make sure that the entire worship procedure was conducted properly. The nation’s leading officials joined Josiah in providing large numbers of sacrificial animals for the festival. It was the most spectacular Passover ever seen in Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 35:1-19).
Political affairs
One factor that assisted Josiah in carrying out such wide-sweeping reforms was the decline of Assyria. He was even able to extend his control into areas of the former northern kingdom that Assyria had conquered (2 Kings 23:15; 2 Kings 23:19; 2 Chronicles 34:6-7).
Assyria eventually fell to Babylon in 612 BC. Pharaoh Necho of Egypt, fearing this expansion of Babylonian power, set out to attack Babylon. In doing so he had to pass through areas of Palestine that Judah controlled, so Josiah tried to resist him. The result was that Josiah was killed in battle (609 BC) and Judah fell temporarily under the overlordship of Egypt (2 Kings 23:29-30; 2 Chronicles 35:20-27).
Josiah was only thirty-nine years old when he died (2 Kings 22:1). Those of his people who later suffered under the cruel hand of his son Jehoiakim looked back with gratitude on his compassion and justice (2 Chronicles 35:25; Jeremiah 22:15-19). Josiah won unqualified praise for his reforms (2 Kings 23:25), but few people were genuinely converted. Idolatrous ideas were so deeply rooted in the people’s hearts that judgment on the nation was inevitable (2 Kings 23:26-27).

Sentence search

Josias - (joh ssi' awss) KJV transliteration of Greek form of Josiah (Matthew 1:10-11 ). See Josiah
Huldah - She was consulted after Josiah the king of Judah saw a copy of the Book of the Law found as preparations were being made to restore the Temple. She prophesied judgment for the nation but a peaceful death for Josiah the king. See Josiah
Huldah - The prophetess consulted by Josiah when Hilkiah found the law. (See Josiah; HILKIAH
Josi'as - Josiah, king of Judah
Hul'Dah - (weasel ), a prophetess, whose husband, Shallum, was keeper of the wardrobe in the time of King Josiah. It was to her that Josiah had recourse, when Hilkiah found a book of the law, to procure an authoritative opinion on it
Jedidah - Mother of Josiah ( 2 Kings 22:1 )
Zebudah - Daughter of Pedaiah and wife of Josiah
Zebudah - Given, the wife of Josiah and mother of Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:36 )
Jedidah - Daughter of Adaiah, and mother of Josiah king of Judah
Joaohaz - 1Es 1:34 = Jehoahaz , the son of Josiah; cf
Josiah - Josiah became king at the age of eight due to wishes of “the people of the land” who put his father's assassins to death (2 Kings 21:24 ). Josiah's reign lasted for thirty-one years (2 Kings 22:1 ; 2 Chronicles 34:1 ). The Book of 2Chronicles reveals much about the early years of Josiah. Josiah initiated a religious purge of Jerusalem, Judah, and surrounding areas during his twelfth year on the throne (2 Chronicles 34:3-7 ). Hilkiah, the high priest, found the book and gave it to Shaphan, the scribe, who in turn read it to King Josiah. Upon hearing the message of the book, Josiah tore his clothes, a sign of repentance, and humbled himself before God. Josiah was assured that the promised destruction would not come in his time (2 Kings 22:8-20 ; 2 Chronicles 34:15-28 ). The reading of this book prompted Josiah to instigate the most far-reaching religious reforms in Israel's history. ...
The Bible is silent about the remaining years of Josiah until his death. Josiah's army blocked the movement of Egyptian troups at Megiddo. In the battle that followed Josiah was mortally wounded (2 Kings 23:29 ). Though only thirty-nine when he died, Josiah was remembered as Judah's greatest king (2 Kings 23:25 ):...
“Neither before nor after Josiah was there a king like him who turned to the Lord as he did—with all his heart and with all his soul and with all his strength, in accordance with the Law of Moses” (NIV)
Hen (Person) - Hebrew word for “grace, favor” used as either a proper name or a title (meaning “favored one”) of Josiah son of Zephaniah (Zechariah 6:14 ; compare Zechariah 6:10 ) if the present Hebrew text is original. The Syriac version (followed by the NRSV, REB, TEV) has the name Josiah in place of Hen in Zechariah 6:14
Zebu'Dah - (bestowed ), wife of Josiah and mother of King Jehoiakim
Hen (1) - Zechariah 6:14 ("favor"), the same person as Josiah ("God founds or supports"), Zechariah 6:10
Josiah - JOSIAH
Huldah - King Josiah sent to her when a copy of the law had been found. Her message from the Lord was that God would surely bring the evils upon the people according to what the book said, because they had turned to idolatry; but Josiah having humbled himself, the Lord did not bring the evils in his day
Jedida - ) Amon's queen, mother of good Josiah; of Boscath near Lachish, daughter of Adaiah (2 Kings 22:1)
Jed'Idah - (one beloved ), queen of Amon and mother of the good king Josiah
Hen - (rest ), probably a son of Zephaniah, and apparently the same who is called Josiah in (Zechariah 6:10 )
Hen - (rest ), probably a son of Zephaniah, and apparently the same who is called Josiah in (Zechariah 6:10 )
Josiah - Josiah became king when his father Amon was assassinated (640 BC) but, being only eight years old at the time, he was for some years under the direction of government officials (2 Chronicles 33:25; 2 Chronicles 34:1). ...
Religious affairs...
One possible influence that led Josiah to begin his reforms was the preaching of the prophet Zephaniah (Zephaniah 1:1). Another prophet, Jeremiah, began his ministry in the early years of Josiah’s reforms (Jeremiah 1:1-2; Jeremiah 3:6). In the sixth year of Josiah’s reforms, workmen repairing the temple found scrolls of this long-forgotten law. Josiah was shocked to find how far Judah had departed from God. ...
With this encouragement from God, Josiah gathered Jerusalem’s leading citizens together at the temple, where the law was read to them. An increasingly confident Josiah then destroyed all false shrines and other idolatrous objects throughout the country, and centralized the nation’s public worship in Jerusalem, where it was under his supervision (2 Kings 23:4-14; 2 Kings 23:24; 2 Chronicles 34:6-7). ...
Having removed idolatry, Josiah re-established the worship of Yahweh by keeping the Passover. The nation’s leading officials joined Josiah in providing large numbers of sacrificial animals for the festival. ...
Political affairs...
One factor that assisted Josiah in carrying out such wide-sweeping reforms was the decline of Assyria. In doing so he had to pass through areas of Palestine that Judah controlled, so Josiah tried to resist him. The result was that Josiah was killed in battle (609 BC) and Judah fell temporarily under the overlordship of Egypt (2 Kings 23:29-30; 2 Chronicles 35:20-27). ...
Josiah was only thirty-nine years old when he died (2 Kings 22:1). Josiah won unqualified praise for his reforms (2 Kings 23:25), but few people were genuinely converted
Jedidah - ” Mother of Josiah king of Judah (2 Kings 22:1 )
Ashtoreth - Josiah finally destroyed the altars Solomon built (2 Kings 23:13 )
Hamutal - Daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah, and wife of king Josiah
Conani'ah - (made by Jehovah ), one of the chiefs of the Levites in the time of Josiah
na'Than-me'Lech - (the gift of the king ), a eunuch (Authorized Version "chamberlain") in the court of Josiah
Hamutal - Mother of the kings Jehoahaz and Zedekiah, sons of Josiah
Hamutal - Daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah, wife of king Josiah, mother of Jehoahaz and Mattaniah or Zedekiah (2 Kings 23:31; 2 Kings 24:18)
Jeho-ad'Dan - (Whom Jehovah adorns ), queen to King Josiah, and mother of Amaziah of Judah
jo'Ahaz - (whom Jehovah holds ), the father of Joah, the chronicler or keeper of the records to King Josiah
Josiah - Josiah (jo-sî'ah), whom Jehovah heals. He ascended the throne at the early age of eight years, and before his eighteenth year he had cut off and destroyed all the idols of the land, with their temples, groves, and monuments; and had ransacked the sepulchres of the idolatrous priests, and burned their bones upon the altars, in accordance with the prophecy of the man of God, announced in the presence of Jeroboam 326 years before Josiah was born. " Josiah immediately convoked the whole realm, and in person read the book of the Law to them, and exacted from them a promise to obey it. Josiah was mortally wounded at Megiddo, and died at Jerusalem. Jeremiah the prophet was greatly affected by it, and composed an elegy on the occasion, 2 Chronicles 35:25, and all those accustomed to celebrate in song the worth and achievements of men of great eminence, both men and women, mourned for Josiah for ages after his death
Azali'ah - (whom the Lord reserved ), the father of Shaphan the scribe in the reign of Josiah
Neco - ) of the 26th dynasty of Egypt whose forces killed Josiah in battle ( 2 Kings 23:29-35 ; 2 Chronicles 35:20-24 ) and who installed Jehoiakim as king of Judah in his place (2 Kings 23:34-35 ). Josiah met Neco in battle as the latter was on route to Carchemish. See Assyria; Egypt ; Josiah
Nathan-Melech - An official in the reign of Josiah, whose name is used to designate one of the halls or chambers of the Temple ( 2 Kings 23:11 )
Jeconias - One of the captains over thousands in the time of Josiah ( 1E Esther 1:9 ); called in 2 Chronicles 35:9 Conaniah
Hamu'Tal - (akin to the dew ), daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah; one of the wives of King Josiah
Sichem - (Hebrew: shoulder) ...
Israelite city north of Bethel and Silo, in the tribe of Ephraim; first capital of the Kingdom of Israel, noted as the burial-place of Joseph (Josiah 24)
Hamutal - Kinsman of the dew, the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah, wife of king Josiah, and mother of king Jehoahaz (2 Kings 23:31 ), also of king Zedekiah (2 Kings 24:18 )
Hilkiah - A faithful high priest in the reign of Josiah, 2 Kings 22:20
Ahikam - Sent by Josiah to Huldah the prophetess, when the book of the law was found in the temple, 2 Kings 22:12
Nathan-Melech - ” Nathan-Melech served as an official of King Josiah (2 Kings 23:11 )
Huldah - The prophetess in the reign of Josiah, consulted respecting the denunciations in the newfound copy of the Book of the Law, 2 Kings 22:14-20 2 Chronicles 34:22-28 , B
Hab'Akkuk - He probably lived about the twelfth or thirteenth year of Josiah, B
Jehoiada - A high priest, who preserved the life and throne of the young Josiah against the usurping Athaliah
Megiddo - A city of Manasseh, rendered remarkable for the death of Josiah, (2 Kings 23:29) It seems derived from Magad, rich fruit
Megiddo - a city of the tribe of Manasseh, famous for the battle fought there between Pharaoh-Necho and King Josiah, in which the latter was defeated and mortally wounded, Joshua 17:11 ; Judges 1:27 ; 2 Kings 23:29
Josiah - JOSIAH was born with a tender heart, says Huldah the prophetess. Josiah's father and grandfather were the two worst kings that had ever sold Israel into slavery. And Josiah inherited from his father and from his grandfather a name of shame, an undermined throne, a divided and a distracted kingdom, a national religion and a public worship debased, and, indeed, bestialised; and, over all, a fearful looking for of judgment. And all that broke and made tender Josiah's heart from the day of his birth. We are told nothing of Josiah's unhappy mother. But may we not be allowed to believe that her heart also was made tender within her by all that she had come through, till she bore and brought up her son Josiah to be the most tender-hearted man in all Israel, till Mary bore and brought up her child to be the most tender-hearted man in all the world?...
If a boy has a good mother and a good minister he is all but independent of his father. And with Jedidah for his mother, and with Jeremiah for his minister, both Manasseh his grandfather and Amon his father taken together did not succeed in corrupting and destroying young Josiah. The tender heart of the young prince took all the good out of his so terribly untoward circumstances, and escaped all the evil, till Jeremiah was able to pronounce this noble panegyric over the too early grave of Josiah,-'That it is good for a man to bear the yoke in his youth; and that it is also good for such a man quietly to hope and to wait for the salvation of the Lord. ' With Jeremiah every Sabbath-day among the ruins of the temple, and with Jedidah every week-day at home, notwithstanding all Josiah's drawbacks and heart-breaks,-or, rather, because of them,-I do not wonder that Josiah soon became the very best sovereign that had ever sat on the throne of David. ...
Early in the days of his youth Josiah began to seek after the God of David his father. Neither David's God, nor Jedidah's God, nor Jeremiah's God will suffice for Josiah. Josiah is an orphan and a prince with a terrible heritage of woe. And a second-hand and a merely educational and hereditary knowledge of God will not suffice for Josiah's singular and extraordinary case. Josiah cannot rest till he is able to say for himself-'Thou art my God. ' And, all the time, while Josiah still sought the Lord, and till he found Him, the tenderness of Josiah's heart kept him safe and unspotted from all the corruptions of the world. So it was with Josiah. ...
Josiah was only twenty years of age when he set about a national reformation of religion as radical and as complete as anything that Martin Luther or John Calvin or John Knox themselves ever undertook. But Josiah had not one single book or chapter or verse even of the Word of God in his heathen day. The Five Books of Moses were as completely lost out of the whole land long before Josiah's day as much so as if Moses had never lifted a pen. And thus it was that Josiah's reformation had a creativeness, an originality, an enterprise, and a boldness about it, such that in all these respects it has completely eclipsed all subsequent reformations and revivals, the greatest and the best. The truth is, the whole of that immense movement that resulted in the religious regeneration of Jerusalem and Judah in Josiah's day,-it all sprang originally and immediately out of nothing else but Josiah's extraordinary tenderness of heart. The Light that lighteth every man that cometh into the world shone with extraordinary clearness in Josiah's tender heart and open mind. And Josiah walked in that Light and obeyed it, till it became within him an overmastering sense of divine duty and an irresistible direction and drawing of the Divine Hand; and till he performed a work for God and for Israel second to no work that has ever been performed under the greatest and the best of the prophets and kings of Israel combined. And recovered in as many divine and commanding and rewarding words, so as to sanction and seal, as if from heaven itself, all the bold and believing task that Josiah had wholly of himself undertaken. We all profess to believe in special providences and in divine interpositions; but, surely, the extraordinary providence that brought to the light of day and put into Josiah's hands the long-lost law of Moses concerning the worship and morals of Israel was an incomparable miracle of the Divine grace and goodness. Josiah was worthy; and God's recognition and reward of Josiah's worth came to Josiah at the very best moment, and in the very best way; for it came to him as the very law of the living God; and that, too, as good as if it had been written on the spot by God's own living hand. Humanly speaking, we should never have heard of the Five Books of Moses, as we have heard of them, but for Josiah's tender heart. Humanly speaking, and popularly speaking, our Old Testament would have begun with the Book of Joshua but for Josiah's tender heart. Had Josiah's heart not been tender toward the house of God, the temple would have been let lie in its utter ruin, till the buried Books of Moses would have been to this day the possession and the prey of the moles and the bats. Moses, says Matthew Henry, had a narrow turn for his life in Josiah's day. But try your own hand on Moses and Josiah, and explain to me how you think you could have had Moses in your Bible but for Josiah; and, again, but for Josiah's tender heart. ...
When the law of the Lord, as it was written in the newly disinterred Books of Moses, was read for the first time to Josiah, and while Shaphan the scribe was still reading it, Josiah rose up and rent to pieces his royal robe. After having looked for it, I do not read that Shaphan the scribe rent his robe, nor Ahikam the son of Shaphan, nor Hilkiah the priest, nor Achbor, nor Asahiah the servant of Josiah, nor Huldah the prophetess. Josiah alone rent his robe as the law was read. Their hearts were not so tender as was Josiah's heart. The finding of the law was, no doubt, a great event in sacred archæology, as well as in sacred letters, to Shaphan and Hilkiah; but it did not come home to their hearts as it all came home to Josiah's heart. It was Moses speaking to them: but it was God Himself speaking to Josiah. If you have any real Interest in these things; if you care to go to the sources and are not indolently content with my poor paraphrase of these intensely interesting Scriptures: if you are a true student, a true sinner, and a true reformer of yourself and of the ruins that lie all around you-you will read 2 Kings and 2 Chronicles to yourselves, if only to see what a reformer both of himself and of his whole land Josiah was: and all that out of his own tender heart. All which, you must know, was the Holy Ghost in Josiah's tender heart before the Holy Ghost had yet been given. Tears such as Thou didst give to David, and to Jeremiah, and to Josiah, and to Peter, and to her out of whom were cast seven devils. ' And the Word of God has never yet been aright read to you, or aright heard and believed by you, unless you feel like Josiah, and Jeremiah, and Peter, and Andrewes every day. ...
Only, if you will have Josiah's tender heart in this hard-hearted world, you will have to pay a heavy price for it. Josiah paid a heavy price at the last for his tender heart. Josiah's tender heart, after it had done him all the good that we have seen, and more, at last it did him this terrible evil, that it lost him his life for this life. Josiah's tender heart was the cause of his too early death. But as I read Josiah's end it is something like this,-The king's tender heart led him out to do battle against the hereditary enemy of Israel and the oppressor and persecutor of the weak; in short, he went out against the Sultan of Turkey of that day. And the Judge of all the earth and the God of battles, for His own deep ends, let that battle go against Josiah, till Josiah said, Have me away, for I am wounded. Being unsuccessful, as we say, Josiah is almost universally blamed for letting his tender heart take up the sword. But I, for one, am quite content to leave Josiah's tender-hearted statesmanship to the arbitrament of the last day. I, for one, will applaud Josiah till my applause is reversed by Him whose tender heart took Him also to His death. And till Jesus Christ from the great white throne condemns and sentences Josiah for his too tender heart, I shall continue to read this to myself on his tombstone in the valley of Megiddo:...
-This,...
the remembrance of Josiah is like the perfume of the apothecary, and his name is like music at a banquet of wine. the remembrance of Josiah in judah and in jerusalem is like the perfume of the apothecary, and like music at a banquet of wine
Huldah - Josiah consulted her on account of the book found in the house of the Lord. (2 Kings 22:14) We cannot sufficiently admire the firmness of this woman, in the answer she returned to king Josiah
Ach'Bor - (Genesis 36:38,39 ; 1 Chronicles 1:49 ) ...
Son of Michaiah, a contemporary of Josiah, (2 Kings 22:12,14 ; Jeremiah 26:22 ; 36:12 ) called ABDON in (2 Chronicles 34:20 ) (B
Sha'Phan - (coney ), the scribe or secretary of King Josiah
Ahikam - He was sent by Josiah, king of Judah, to Huldah the prophetess, 2 Kings 22:12 , to consult her concerning the book of the law, which had been found in the temple
Silo - For three centuries after the conquest of the Promised Land it was the dwelling-place of the Tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant (Josiah 18)
Hadadrimmon - A place in the valley of Megiddo, where the good king Josiah lost his life in a battle with the Ethiopians, 2 Kings 23:29 2 Chronicles 35:20-25
Nathan-Melech - A eunuch or chamberlain in Josiah's court, by whose chamber at the entering in of Jehovah's house, in the suburbs, were the horses sacred to the sun; these Josiah took away and burned the sun chariots with fire (2 Kings 23:11)
Megiddon, Valley of - The passage perhaps alludes to the death of Josiah on this plain (2 Chronicles 35:22 )
Asahi'ah - (the Lord hath made ), a servant of King Josiah, sent by him to seek information of Jehovah respecting the book of the law which Hilkiah found in the temple, ( 2 Kings 22:12,14 ) also called ASAIAH
Meshullam - ...
...
Grandfather of Shaphan, "the scribe," in the reign of Josiah (2 Kings 22:3 ). ...
...
A Levite of the family of Kohath (2 Chronicles 34:12 ), in the reign of Josiah
Jehoiakim - ” Son of Josiah who succeeded Jehoahaz as king of Judah (609-597). He and his predecessor on the throne were brothers, sons of Josiah
Zephani'ah - The date of the book is given in the inscription--viz, the reign of Josiah, from 642 to 611 B. It is most probable moreover, that the prophecy was delivered before the eighteenth year of Josiah. (Jeremiah 52:24,27 ; 2 Kings 25:18,21 ) ...
Father of Josiah, 2, (Zechariah 6:10 ) and of Hen, according to the reading of the received text of (Zechariah 6:14 )
Shaphan - A coney, a scribe or secretary of king Josiah (2 Kings 22:3-7 )
Achbor - Son of Michaiah and servant of Josiah
Jehoahaz - (2 Kings 13:1) and Jehoahaz, or Shallum; son of Josiah, king of Judah, (Jeremiah 22:11) The name is a compound, signifying, from Achaz, a possession of the Lord
Achbor - A courtier under Josiah, son of Micaiah ( 2 Kings 22:12 ; 2 Kings 22:14 ), and father of Elnathan ( Jeremiah 26:22 om
Ahikam - One of the deputation sent by king Josiah to Huldah the prophetess ( 2 Kings 22:12 ; 2 Kings 22:14 , 2 Chronicles 34:20 )
Hadad-Rimmon - It was in the valley of Megiddo, Zechariah 12:11, and the scene of a great lamentation over the death of Josiah
Hen - Some would substitute for ‘Hen’ the name ‘Joshua’ [3] found in Zechariah 6:10
Shaphan - A scribe or secretary under King Josiah, to whom he read from the newly found autograph roll of the book of the law, 2 Kings 22:12 ; Jeremiah 29:3 ; 36:10 ; Ezekiel 8:11
ha'Dad-Rim'Mon - is, according to the ordinary interpretation of (12:11) a place in the valley of Megiddo (a part of the plain of Esdraelon, six miles from Mount Carmel and eleven from Nazareth), where a national lamentation was held for the death of King Josiah
Jahath - ...
...
A Levite of the family of Merari, one of the overseers of the repairs of the temple under Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:12 )
Armageddon - a place spoken of, Revelation 16:16 , which literally signifies "the mountain of Mageddon," or "Megiddo," a city situated in the great plain at the foot of Mount Carmel, where the good prince Josiah received his mortal wound, in the battle against Necho, king of Egypt. Pool, does not signify any particular place, but is used in allusion to Megiddo, mentioned Judges 5:19 , where Barak overcame Sisera with his great army, and where Josiah was slain, 2 Kings 23:30
a'Mon - Amon devoted himself wholly to the service of false gods, but was killed in a conspiracy, and was succeeded by his son Josiah
Che'Mosh - Solomon introduced, and Josiah abolished, the worship of Chemosh at Jerusalem
Shaphan - Sent by king Josiah, With the governor of the city and the recorder, to Hilkiah to take account of the money collected for repairing the temple. Josiah then sent Shaphan, etc
Jahath - A Merarite Levite in the time of Josiah ( 2 Chronicles 34:12 )
Achbor - Father of king Jehoiakim's ready tool in evil, Elnathan (Jeremiah 26:22-23); Achbor was, on the contrary, an instrument of good Josiah, to inquire the Lord's will from the prophetess Huldah
Josiah - The repairing of the temple recorded 2 Kings 22:3-7, in a period by itself, subordinate to the discovery of the law, in the 18th year of Josiah's reign, must have been chronologically before that date, since in that year the builders were already repairing and the money for the work had been collected by the Levites who kept the door. ...
Josiah spared not even the high places which pious Hezekiah had left, nor those of Solomon in his apostasy, nor their priests (Chemarim), as Zephaniah 1:4 foretold; also Manasseh his grandfather's grove (Asherah) in the Lord's house (2 Kings 21:7; 2 Kings 23:6). ...
In this same year, the 26th of his age, the 18th of his reign, Josiah and his people entered into a covenant to keep the law of Jehovah with all their heart and all their soul (2 Kings 23:3; 2 Chronicles 34:31-33). The Syrian princes, those independent as Josiah as well as Assyria's vassals, hoped now to be free from every foreign yoke; it was therefore necessary now to check the Egyptian, for though Necho was not marching against Judah but against Carchemish by Euphrates, Josiah knew that if once the Egyptians gained Coelosyria his independence would be gone. ...
Necho appealed in vain to Josiah to leave him alone, as it was "against the house of his war" (his hereditary enemy) that he was marching, and that God commanded him, so that if Josiah interfered he would be "meddling with God. " He thought the reference to God would have weight with Josiah. Of course Pharaoh's view of the Godhead was distinct from Josiah's. Josiah forgot his ancestor Solomon's inspired counsel (Proverbs 17:14; Proverbs 26:17). Josiah's reformation had not removed the deep seated evil (as Jeremiah and Zephaniah testify), so that the deceased Manasseh's sin, acting still far and wide though hiddenly now, awaited God's fierce anger on Jerusalem, as he was warned by God through Huldah (2 Kings 22:16-20). Hence Josiah was permitted, not without culpability on his part, to meddle in the ungodly world's wars, and so to fall, and with himself to withdraw the last godly ruler from the people henceforth given over to punishment (2 Kings 23:25-30). If he had come by Philistia Josiah would have met him there, and not allowed him to advance to Megiddo. Josiah was carried wounded from Hadadrimmon to die before be reached Jerusalem. Compare Jeremiah 22:10 "weep not for the dead, neither bemoan him" (namely, Josiah slain at Megiddo or Magdolum in Herodotus); he is at peace. the hill of Megiddo, the scene of godly Josiah's fall through descending to the world's carnal strifes as Babylon's ally (Revelation 16:14-18); the Jews' future mourning for Him whom they pierced, before God's interposition against all nations confederate against Jerusalem, answers to their mourning for Josiah at Megiddo (Zechariah 12:10-11). Josiah's greatness harmonizes with the parallel decline and fall of Assyria. Josiah exercised a sovereignty over Samaria and Galilee (2 Chronicles 34:6), besides Judah. This gave Josiah the opportunity to free Judah from the Assyrian yoke which his grandfather had borne, and to enlarge his kingdom. Josiah, son of Zephaniah cheen ("grace") (Zechariah 6:9; Zechariah 6:15)
Jehoahaz - otherwise SHALLUM, the son of Josiah, king of Judah, Jeremiah 22:11 . Josiah having been wounded mortally by Necho, king of Egypt, and dying of his wounds at Megiddo, Jehoahaz was made king in his room, though he was not Josiah's eldest son, 2 Kings 23:30-32
Necho ii - 610-594), the contemporary of Josiah, king of Judah. Here a fierce battle was fought and Josiah was slain (2 Chronicles 35:20-24 ). On his return march he deposed Jehoahaz, who had succeeded his father Josiah, and made Eliakim, Josiah's eldest son, whose name he changed into Jehoiakim, king
Pedaiah -
The father of Zebudah, who was the wife of Josiah and mother of king Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:36 )
Jahath - Descendant of Merari, and an overseer at the repairing of the temple under Josiah
Ahi'Kam - (a brother who raises up ), son of Shaphan the scribe, an influential officer at the court of Josiah, was one of the delegates sent by Hilkaih to consult Huldah
Chemosh - Solomon introduced, and Josiah abolished, the worship of Chemosh at Jerusalem
Chemosh - One of the chief gods of the Moabites and the Ammonites, the worship of which was introduced at Jerusalem by Solomon, and abolished by Josiah
Joah - Joahaz' son,"recorder" or annalist to Josiah; took part in repairing the temple (2 Chronicles 34:8)
Hilkiah - ...
...
The high priest in the reign of Josiah (1 Chronicles 6:13 ; Ezra 7:1 ). This remarkable discovery occurred in the eighteenth year of Josiah's reign (B. (See Josiah; SHAPHAN
Hilki'ah - (2 Kings 18:37 ; Isaiah 22:20 ; 36:22 ) [1] ...
High priest in the reign of Josiah. ) His high priesthood was rendered particularly illustrious by the great reformation effected under it by King Josiah, by the solemn Passover kept at Jerusalem in the 18th year of that king's reign, and above all by the discovery which he made of the book of the law of Moses in the temple
Corruption, Mount of - These places of worship were destroyed by Josiah (2 Kings 23:13 )
Mattaniah - He was the third son of Josiah, who fell at Megiddo
Joah - ) or keeper of the state archives under King Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:8 )
Babe - In Isaiah 3:4 the word "babes" refers to a succession of weak and wicked princes who reigned over Judah from the death of Josiah downward to the destruction of Jerusalem
Zephaniah - Father of Josiah and of Hen
Joah - Son of Joahaz, and recorder: he was sent by Josiah to repair the temple
Josiah - Josiah. The religious condition of the people, which was bad under Amon, continued without essential improvement, so far as we know, until the eighteenth year of Josiah. ...
Josiah’s reign was characterized by justice, as we learn from Jeremiah, but we know no more of it until the end of the king’s life. Josiah was ill-advised enough to attempt resistance
Josiah - The sacred book was too much neglected in those days of declension; and even the pious Josiah seems to have been impressed by the closing chapters of Deuteronomy as though he had never read them before. Josiah, however, was taken away from the evil to come. He met death in battle with Pharaohnecho, whose passage across his territory to attack the king of Assyria, Josiah felt obliged to resist
Chemosh - It was for this ‘abomination of Moab’ that Solomon erected a temple ( 1 Kings 11:7 ), later destroyed by Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:13 )
Chemosh - The worship of this god, "the abomination of Moab," was introduced at Jerusalem by Solomon (1 Kings 11:7 ), but was abolished by Josiah (2 Kings 23:13 )
Achbor - Man King Josiah commissioned to ask God the meaning of the Book of the Law found in the Temple
Jehoahaz - ...
The third king named Jehoahaz was a son of Josiah. Pharaoh Necho, having just defeated and killed Josiah, considered himself the overlord of Judah and would not accept Jehoahaz as king
Chemarim - Josiah put them down (2 Kings 23:5 margin; Hosea 10:5)
Shaphan - Son of Azaliah and perhaps father of Ahikam, Gemariah, Elasah, and Jaazaniah: he was scribe or secretary to king Josiah
Ahikam - Son of Shaphan the scribe, and one of those sent by Josiah to Huldah the prophetess to inquire of the Lord as to the book of the law that had been found
Lament - Jeremiah lamented for Josiah
Hadad-Rimmon - It is alluded to by the prophet (Zechariah 12:11 ) in a proverbial expression derived from the lamentation for Josiah, who was mortally wounded near this place (2 Chronicles 35:22-25 )
Chariots of the Sun - RSV translation in 2 Kings 23:11 for a sculpture that Josiah removed from the Jerusalem Temple
Asahiah, Asaiah - An officer sent by Josiah to Huldah the prophetess after the book of the law had been found
Abdon - A courtier of Josiah, 2 Chronicles 34:20 ; in 2 Kings 22:12 called Achbor
ja'Hath - (1 Chronicles 24:22 ) ...
A Merarite Levite in the reign of Josiah
Rosh - They invaded the land of Judah in the days of Josiah
Jahath - Levite verseer of Temple repair under King Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:12 )
Michaiah - Father of an officer of King Josiah (2 Kings 22:12 )
Obed - Father of Azariah, a commander assisting in coronation of King Josiah (2 Chronicles 23:1 )
Amon (2) - His own servants conspired and slew him in his own house, and in their turn were slain by the people, who raised his son Josiah to the throne
Zephaniah - One of the minor prophets, in the days of Josiah
Gedali'ah - (God is my greatness ), son of Ahikam (Jeremiah's protector, ( Jeremiah 26:24 ) and grandson of Shaphan the secretary of King Josiah
Jeiel - ...
...
One of the chief Levites, who made an offering for the restoration of the Passover by Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:9 )
Amon - His servants conspired against him, and slew him in his own house; but the people killed all the conspirators, and established his son Josiah on the throne
Libnah - It was the native place of Hamutal, the queen of Josiah (2 Kings 23:31 )
Ahikam - Son of Shaphan the scribe, sent by Josiah to Huldah the prophetess (2 Kings 22:12)
Ashtaroth, Ashtoreth - Josiah destroyed the emblems of her worship as introduced by Solomon
Hadadrimmon - The allusion is considered to be the occasion when Josiah was smitten in that same valley, though the histories do not speak of any mourning there
ab'Don - ...
Son of Micah, a contemporary of Josiah, (2 Chronicles 34:20 ) called Achbor in (2 Kings 22:12 ) (B
Eliakim - The son and successor of Josiah, king of Judah
jo'ah - (2 Chronicles 29:12 ) ...
The son of Joahaz, and annalist or keeper of the records to Josiah
Ambassador - Pharaoh Necho sent ambassadors to prevent King Josiah of Judah (640-609) from joining in the battle at Megiddo, but Josiah persisted and died (2 Chronicles 35:21 )
Bethlehem - (Hebrew: house of bread) ...
(1) Bethlehem of Zebulon (Josiah 19), a small town 7 miles northwest of Nazareth
Zephaniah - The father of one Josiah in Babylon ( Zechariah 6:10 ; Zechariah 6:14 )
Carchemish - Apparently it was taken by the Assyrians, Isaiah 10:5,9 ; afterwards conquered by Necho king of Egypt, after the battle of Megiddo, in which Josiah was killed, 2 Chronicles 35:20 , where it is CHARCHEMISH
Jeiel - A chief of the Levites in the time of Josiah
Asaiah - One of the deputation sent by Josiah to consult Huldah the prophetess, 2 Kings 22:12 ; 2 Kings 22:14 (AV Adaiah - Father of Jedidah and grandfather of Josiah, king of Judah
Jeremiah, the Book of - In the chronological order of its several predictions and divine messages, is somewhat difficult of arrangement; but may be divide, by a natural and sufficiently accurate method, in to four general sections, containing severally the prophecies uttered in the reigns of Josiah, Jehoiakim, Zedekiah, and Gedaliah
Armaged'Don - ( Revelation 16:16 ) The scene of the struggle of good and evil is suggested by that battle-field, the plain of Esdraelon, which was famous for two great victories, of Barak over the Canaanites and of Gideon over the Midianites; and for two great disasters, the deaths of Saul and Josiah
Jozabad - A chief of the Levites in the days of Josiah
Shal'Lum - (2 Kings 15:10-14 ) ...
The husband of Huldah the prophetess, (2 Kings 22:14 ; 2 Chronicles 34:23 ) in the reign of Josiah. (1 Chronicles 2:40,41 ) ...
The third son of Josiah king of Judah, known in the books of Kings and Chronicles as Jehoahaz
Joah - Son of royal scribe under King Josiah (640-609 B
Ahikam - Brother of support = helper, one of the five whom Josiah sent to consult the prophetess Huldah in connection with the discovery of the book of the law (2 Kings 22:12-14 ; 2 Chronicles 34:20 )
Micah - Father of Abdon, a contemporary of Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:20 ); at 2 Kings 22:12 , the form Micaiah is used
Huldah - ‘The prophetess, wife of Shallum, keeper of the wardrobe,’ living in a part of Jerusalem called the Mishneh (‘second quarter’), whose advice Josiah sought, by a deputation of his chief ministers, on the alarming discovery of ‘the book of the law’ in the Temple, in 621 b
Shrine - King Josiah had them demolished during his reign (2 Kings 23:19 )
Milcom - Solomon established a sanctuary for him on the Mount of Olives, which seems to have continued till it was destroyed by Josiah ( 1Ki 11:5 ; 1 Kings 11:33 , 2 Kings 23:13 )
Habakkuk - He lived in the reign of Jehoiakim or of Josiah
Shallum - The husband of Huldah the prophetess in the time of Josiah, 2 Kings 22:14
Zephaniah - He prophesied in the days of Josiah, king of Judah (B. ...
...
The father of Josiah, the priest who dwelt in Jerusalem when Darius issued the decree that the temple should be rebuilt (Zechariah 6:10 )
Eliakim - He was the son of Josiah
Megiddo - When Pharaoh-necho came from Egypt against the king of Assyria, Josiah joined the latter, and was slain at Megiddo
Jehoahaz - Also called Shallum, 1 Chronicles 3:15 , the third son and the successor of Josiah king of Judah, B
Jehoiakim - Or ELIAKIM, second son of Josiah, brother and successor of Jehoahaz or Shallum, king of Judah, for whom he was substituted by the king of Egypt
Shallum - ...
...
Keeper of the temple vestments in the reign of Josiah (2 Kings 22:14 ). ...
...
A son of king Josiah (1 Chronicles 3:15 ; Jeremiah 22:11 ), who was elected to succeed his father on the throne, although he was two years younger than his brother Eliakim
Jeremiah - One of the chief prophets of the Old Testament, prophesied under Josiah, Jehoiakim, and Zedekiah, and also after the captivity of the latter. 628, in the thirteenth year of King Josiah
Zephaniah - Father of Josiah and Hen (Zechariah 6:10 ,Zechariah 6:10,6:14 ), possibly identical with 2
Nethaneel - ...
...
A chief Levite in the time of Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:9 )
Carchemish - Taken by Pharaoh Necho after the battle of Megiddo in which king Josiah, Babylon's ally, fell 610 B
Asaiah - Servant of King Josiah sent with others to Huldah, the prophet, to determine meaning of book of law found in the Temple about 624 B
Adaiah - Grandfather of King Josiah (2 Kings 22:1 )
Zephaniah - He prophesied in the reign of Josiah, about B
Armageddon - For an exposition of the apostle's meaning, the reader must be referred to commentaries; it will be sufficient here to say that there is an allusion to that great battle-field where Barak and Gideon conquered, Judges 4:1-24; Judges 5:19; Judges 6:33; Judges 7:1-25; where Saul and Josiah fell, 1 Samuel 29:1; 1 Samuel 31:1-13; 2 Samuel 4:4; 2 Chronicles 35:20-24; the plain of Esdraelon, on the southern border of which Megiddo stood
Megiddo - Here king Ahaziah died, and King Josiah was defeated, slain, and sorely lamented, 2 Kings 9:27 ; 23:29 ; Zechariah 12:11
Moloch - Solomon (1 Kings 11:7 ) erected a high place for this idol on the Mount of Olives, and from that time till the days of Josiah his worship continued (2 Kings 23:10,13 )
Hashabiah - Levite who assisted Josiah at the great passover feast
Nethaneel - Levite in the time of Josiah
Nethanel - A chief of the Levites under Josiah ( 2 Chronicles 35:9 [1])
Ben-Hinnom - King Josiah defiled and did away with the altars there (2 Kings 23:10 )
Abdon - ...
The son of Micah, one of those whom Josiah sent to the prophetess Huldah to ascertain from her the meaning of the recently discovered book of the law (2Chronicles 34:20)
Amon - Good King Josiah, Amon's son, succeeded to his throne
High Places - See (1 Kings 22:43) Of good king Josiah, much praise was due to him on this account
Obadiah - the prophet is thought to have been the same as the governor of Ahab's house, 1 Kings 18:3 , &c; and some are of opinion, he was that Obadiah whom Josiah made overseer of the works of the temple, 2 Chronicles 34:12
Samuel, Books of, - On the other hand, it could hardly have been written later than the reformation of Josiah, since it seems to have been composed at a time when the Pentateuch was not acted on as the rule of religious observances, which received a special impetus at the finding of the Book of the Law at the reformation of Josiah. All, therefore, that can be asserted with any certainty is that the book, as a whole, can scarcely have been composed later than the reformation of Josiah, and that it could not have existed in its present form earlier than the reign of Rehoboam
Maaseiah - ...
...
One who was sent by king Josiah to repair the temple (2 Chronicles 34:8 )
Jaazaniah - His father Shaphan may have been the counselor of Josiah (2 Kings 22:1 )
Nethaneel - Under Josiah gave liberal offerings for the solemn Passover (2 Chronicles 35:9)
Eliakim - The son of Josiah who was placed on the throne of Judah by Pharaoh Neco of Egypt (2 Kings 23:34 )
Jeremiah - Man of Libnah, whose daughter Hamutal was the wife of Josiah
Hadadrimmon - There is no ground for supposing an allusion to the mourning for king Josiah, which, of course, took place in Jerusalem, not in the valley of Megiddo
Joz'Abad - ) ...
A chief Levite in the reign of Josiah
Jehiel - ...
...
A "prince" and "ruler of the house of God" who contributed liberally to the renewal of the temple sacrifices under Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:8 )
Fly - Figure for troublesome and numerous foes, as Pharaoh Necho's hosts who slew king Josiah at Megiddo (2 Kings 23:29-30). , David (2 Samuel 12:14), Solomon (1 Kings 11), Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 18; 2 Chronicles 19:2), Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:21-22)
Maaseiah - Governor of Jerusalem under Josiah; superintended the restoration of the temple (2 Chronicles 34:8)
Jezreel (2) - There Barak and Gideon triumphed; Deborah sung her war song; Saul and Jonathan fell near by, on the mountains of Gilboa; here king Josiah was mortally wounded by the Egyptians
Hilkiah - Son of Shallum, or Meshullam, and high priest in the time of Josiah king of Judah
Abdon - A member of the team named by King Josiah to seek God's guidance as to the meaning of the book Hilkiah, the priest, found in the Temple (2 Chronicles 34:20 )
Johanan - A son of Josiah ( 1 Chronicles 3:15 )
Ada'Iah -
Maternal grandfather of King Josiah, and native of Boscath in the lowlands of Judah
Jehoahaz - In 2 Kings 23:30 , the son and successor of Josiah as king of Judah (609 B
Zephaniah - Ninth of the minor prophets; "in the days of Josiah," between 642 and 611 B. He prophesied in the former part of Josiah's reign. "...
Fulfilled by Josiah (2 Kings 23:4-5). Josiah's reformation was begun in the 12th year of his reign, and was completed in the 18th. Zephaniah in denouncing the different forms of idolatry paved the way for Josiah's work, and probably cooperated with the king from the 12th to the 18th year. "The remnant of Baal" (Zephaniah 1:4) implies that Josiah's reformation was already begun but not completed. Father of Hen or Josiah (Zechariah 6:14)
Josiah - The answer was that the evil and the curses found in the book should fall upon the people; but, because Josiah's heart was tender, and he had humbled himself, the judgement should not be executed in his days. ...
In the eighteenth year of Josiah, the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread were kept. " Thus was Josiah enabled to recall the people to a sense of their responsibility, and to the means of their communion with God in the ordinance of the Passover. ...
In the thirty-first year of his reign, Josiah, perhaps from fidelity to former treaties with Assyria, went out to oppose the king of Egypt when he himself was in no way attacked; and, though warned 'from the mouth of God,' he persisted in his purpose
Adaiah - The maternal grandfather of Josiah, 2 Kings 22:1
Recorder - In the reign of Josiah another of the name of Joah filled this office (2 Chronicles 34:8 )
Gedaliah - ...
The son of Ahikam, and grandson of Shaphan, secretary of king Josiah (Jeremiah 26:24 )
Manasseh, King of Judah - Even the sweeping reforms of Josiah a few years later were not able to rid Judah of Manasseh’s evil (2 Kings 23:24-27)
Megiddo, Megiddon - The rout of Sisera's army was in this district; and at Megiddo Josiah fell when he rashly attacked Pharaoh-nechoh
Amon - The people avenged him by putting all the conspirators to death, and secured the succession to his son Josiah
Ashtaroth - The worship of Ashtoreth was suppressed by Josiah
Kid'Ron, - In the time of Josiah it was the common cemetery of the city
Nahum - ...
By the time Josiah became king of Judah (640 BC), Assyria had weakened sufficiently for Josiah to carry out extensive political and religious reforms in Judah. Nahum was most likely one of those prophets who began to preach in Judah during the revival of prophetic activity that occurred during Josiah’s reign
Josiah - Josiah immediately gathered the people together, and engaged them in a renewal of their ancient national covenant with God. This Josiah refused to permit. Josiah went into the field in disguise, and was fatally wounded by a random arrow
Josiah - Josiah, who manifested the influence of pious and virtuous principles at a very early age, began, in his sixteenth year, to project the reformation of the kingdom, and to adopt means for restoring the worship of the true God. Josiah, desirous of averting from himself and the kingdom threatened judgments, determined to adhere to the directions of the law, in the business of reformation which he had undertaken; and to observe the festivals enjoined by Moses, which had been shamefully neglected. This took place in the eighteenth year of Josiah's reign: but, in pursuing his laudable plans of reformation, he was resisted by the inveterate habits of the Israelites; so that his zealous and persevering efforts were ineffectual. In the thirty-second year of Josiah's reign, Pharaoh-Necho, king of Egypt, advanced with his army against Carchemish, a city situated on the river Euphrates. He was opposed by the king of Judah; so that a bloody battle ensued at Megiddo, in which Josiah received a mortal wound, which terminated in his death, after he had been conveyed to Jerusalem, in the thirty-ninth year of his reign, B
Jeremiah - ...
...
The father of Hamutal (2 Kings 23:31 ), the wife of Josiah. He was called to the prophetical office when still young (1:6), in the thirteenth year of Josiah (B. He left his native place, and went to reside in Jerusalem, where he greatly assisted Josiah in his work of reformation (2 Kings 23:1-25 )
Johanan - Eldest son of Josiah kingof Judah
Necho - Josiah, king of Judah, being tributary to the king of Babylon, opposed Necho on his first expedition against Nebuchadnezzar, and gave him battle at Megiddo, where he received the wound of which he died. 2 Chronicles 36:4; Then coming to Jerusalem, he set up Eliakim, or Jehoiakim, Josiah's first-born, in his place
Shaphan - ‘The scribe’ (secretary of state) of Josiah in 621 b. Shaphan appears to have been the chief lay leader in the execution of Josiah’s reforms
Tahpanhes - In Jeremiah 2:16 "the children of Noph (Memphis, the capital) and Tahapanes" (with which the Jews came most in contact) represent the Egyptians generally, who under Pharaoh Necho slew the king of Judah, Josiah, at Megiddo, and deposed Jehoahaz for Eliakim or Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:29-30; 2 Kings 23:33-35)
Hinnom, Valley of - To prevent this Josiah defiled TOPHETH in this valley
Hashabiah - A chief of the Levites in the time of Josiah ( 2 Chronicles 35:9 ); called in 1E Esther 1:9 Sabias
Teraphim - They were used in some way for divination, and are included among the images and idols which Josiah cleared from the land
Hinnon - (Isaiah 30:33; Jeremiah 7:31) And it is said, that Josiah, the good king, "defiled the place;" that is, he destroyed it for the purpose for which it had been used, by those wretched parents who had been deluded to sacrifice their children to the idol-god Molech, in this spot
je-i'el - (2 Chronicles 29:13 ) ...
One of the chiefs of the Levites in the time of Josiah
Zephaniah - ...
The new era was marked not only by the preaching of Zephaniah, but also by the religious reforms of the new king, Josiah (who had come to the throne in 640 BC). It seems that Zephaniah and Josiah were related (Zephaniah 1:1). Josiah’s reforms, which lasted many years, were aimed at removing idolatry and restoring the true worship of God in Jerusalem. The wrong attitudes promoted by Manasseh were so deeply rooted that Josiah’s reforms could not remove them (2 Kings 23:26-27)
Molech - The shrine was not destroyed till the reign of Josiah, three hundred years later (1 Kings 11:5; 1 Kings 11:7; 2 Kings 23:10; 2 Kings 23:13)
Jehoahaz - Son and successor of Josiah, king of Judah, 2 Kings 23:30; called Shallum, 1 Chronicles 3:15; Jeremiah 22:11
Jehoahaz - Son and successor of Josiah king of Judah: he reigned only three months, B
High Places - Even Solomon, after the erection of the temple, and other kings, till the time of Josiah, frequently sacrificed on hills and mountains
Hinnom - It was the place where children were made "to pass through the fire to Molech," and was defiled by Josiah, in order to extinguish forever such detestable rites
Ambassador - Ambassadors came from Babylon to visit Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 32:31 ; and from the king of Egypt to Josiah
Sprinkle - In his reform, Josiah ground up the Canaanite idol images and “scattered, strewed,” the dust over the graves of idolworshipers ( Megid'do - When Pharaoh-necho came from Egypt against the king of Assyria, Josiah joined the latter, and was slain at Megiddo
Jeho'Ahaz - , ( 2 Kings 14:24,25 ) ...
Jehoahaz, otherwise called Shallum, son of Josiah, whom he succeeded as king of Judah
Hilkiah - In the 18th year of Josiah's reign the king directed him to have the Lord's house repaired out of the money contributed by the people. Probably Josiah, owing to the neglect of the law in Manasseh's and Amon's ungodly reigns, had never heard the law read from before. The intimate acquaintance with both its words and truths which the psalmists and prophets long before Josiah's time display establishes the certainty of the Pentateuch's prior existence and of its being the basis of their inspired utterances. Josiah's final and utter destruction of idolatrous symbols, removal of wizards, and keeping of the Passover were the fruits of his hearing Deuteronomy 16, 18. Josiah read (i. ...
Shaphan the professional "scribe" read it to Josiah, who as well as Hilkiah probably could not read, for reading and writing were confined to the "scribes," excepting a few who like Moses had learned in Egypt (Acts 7:22). Hilkiah was employed by Josiah also to consult Huldah the prophetess for him, and to help with Zechariah and Jehiel, "rulers of the house of God," in celebrating the Passover (2 Chronicles 34:20-22; 2 Chronicles 35:2; 2 Chronicles 35:8)
Jezreel - The valley was important militarily as a battle site for Deborah (Judges 4-5 ), Gideon (Judges 6-7 ), Saul (2 Samuel 4:1 ), Jehu (2 Kings 9-10 ), and Josiah (2 Kings 22:1 )
Jaazaniah - Shaphan was the scribe who read to Josiah the law
Chemosh - Solomon introduced, and Josiah overthrew, Chemosh worship in Jerusalem
Jehoahaz - Jehoahaz of Judah (in 1Es 1:34 Joachaz or Jeconias ; in 1Es 1:38 Zarakes ) was the popular choice for the throne after the death of Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:30 )
Nethan'e-el - ) ...
A chief of the Levites in the reign of Josiah
Jehoahaz - Son of Josiah; at his father's death the people took and made him king, 610 B. With Josiah the regular succession of David's house ceased. " After his victory at Megiddo, Necho intended to march forward to the Euphrates, but hearing that Jehoahaz had ascended the throne as the people's favorite, whose leanings would be on the side of Babylon against Egypt, like Josiah's, he sent a division of his army, which took Jerusalem and dethroned Jehoahaz, and laid a heavy tribute on the land. ...
Indeed Pharaoh did not recognize the reign of Jehoahaz because elevated without his consent; therefore the words are "Pharaoh made Eliakim king in the room of Josiah his father" (2 Kings 23:34). Jeremiah 22:10; "weep ye not for the dead (Josiah; 2 Chronicles 35:24-25), (so much as) for him that goeth away; for he shall return no more," namely, Jehoahaz
Prophetess - Huldah spoke God's words of judgment (2 Kings 22:16-17 ) and forgiveness (2 Kings 22:18-20 ) to King Josiah
Jehoiakim - Called Eliakim, son of Josiah and king of Judah
Athaliah - Finally, Jehoiada, the priest, led a revolt, crowning the child Josiah as king and bringing about Athaliah's death (2 Kings 11:5-20 )
Kidron, Kedron, Brook - Josiah also burnt there the symbols of idolatry
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
643...
Amon,...
641...
Josiah,...
Jeremiah
Jehoiachin - otherwise called Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 , and Jeconiah, 1 Chronicles 3:17 , the son of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and grandson of Josiah
Kidron - In the time of Josiah it became the common burial-place of the city, 2 Kings 23:16, and so it is today
Joha'Nan - ...
The first-born son of Josiah king of Judah
Hashabi'ah - ) ...
A Levite one of the "chiefs" of his tribe, who officiated for King Josiah at his great Passover feast
Jehoiakim - When his father Josiah was killed in battle with Pharaoh Necho (609 BC), the people of Judah made one of Josiah’s younger sons king in preference to the older Jehoiakim (2 Chronicles 35:20-25; 2 Chronicles 36:1-2). ...
Conflict with Jeremiah...
The chief opponent of Jehoiakim was the prophet Jeremiah, who had begun his preaching earlier, in the reign of Josiah (Jeremiah 1:1-3)
Obadiah - ...
...
A Levite who superintended the repairs of the temple under Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:12 )
Nebuchadrezzar - Josiah fell in a vain effort to repel him ( 2 Kings 23:29 ), but Nebuchadrezzar defeated him at Carchemish (b
Nethaneel - A Levite who contributed to the Passover offering when Josiah was king (2 Chronicles 35:9 )
Amon - He was put to death by a palace conspiracy, but the assassins were punished by the populace, who placed Josiah on the throne ( 2 Kings 21:19 ff
Jehiel - A leading priest under Josiah who distributed large offerings to the priests for their Passover offerings (2 Chronicles 35:8 )
Kidron or Cedron - In this valley and in that of Hinnom, at their confluence, kings Asa, Josiah, and Hezekiah destroyed the idols and abominations by which Jerusalem was defiled, 1 Kings 15:13 2 Kings 23:4,6,12 2 Chronicles 29:16
Jehoiakim - Second son of Josiah and Zebudah, daughter of Pedaiah of Rumah (Arumah in Manasseh, near Shechem? Judges 9:41); Johanan was the oldest son. ) Pharaoh bound Jehoiakim to exact tribute from Judah, for Josiah's having taken part with Babylon against him: one talent of gold and 100 talents of silver (40,000 British pounds). In Jehoiakim's fourth year Necho suffered his great defeat from Babylon at Carehemish, wherein he lost his possessions between Euphrates and the Nile, and returned no more to Judaea; so that Josiah's death was not unavenged (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2). Sad contrast to his father Josiah, who "did justice, and it was well with him. " Nebuchadnezzar from Carchemish marched to Jerusalem, and fettered him as Pharaoh Necho's tributary, in the third (Dan 1) or fourth year of his reign (the diversity being caused by reckoning Jehoahaz' reign as a year, or not), intending to take him to Babylon; bat afterward for the sake of his former ally Josiah, his father, restored him as a vassal. Yet he and his servants "were not afraid," a contrast even to the princes who "were afraid both one and other when they had heard all the words"; a still sadder contrast to his father Josiah whose "heart was tender," and who "rent his clothes" on hearing the words of the law just found (2 Kings 22:11; 2 Kings 22:13; 2 Kings 22:19-20). The two-edged sword of God's Spirit converts the humble and tender as Josiah, draws out the latent hatred of the ungodly as J
Megiddo - ) Here godly Josiah fell in conflict with Pharaoh Necho (2 Chronicles 35:22-24; Zechariah 12:11). (See Josiah; HADADRIMMON
Hinnom - King Josiah defiled the place, 2 Kings 23:10 , probably by making it a depository of filth. It has been a common opinion that the later Jews, in imitation of Josiah, threw into this place all manner of filth, as well as the carcasses of animals and the dead bodies of malefactors; and that with reference to either the baleful idolatrous fires in the worship of Moloch, or to the fires afterwards maintained there to consume the mass of impurities that might otherwise have occasioned a pestilence, came the figurative use of the fires of Gehenna, that is, valley of Hinnom, to denote the eternal fire in which wicked men and fallen spirits shall be punished
Medium - Josiah destroyed them as part of his reforms (2 Kings 23:24 )
Esdraelon - Josiah here attacked Pharaoh-necho on his way to Mesopotamia and was slain ( 2 Kings 23:30 )
Splendor - The basic significance of “splendor and majesty” with overtones of superior power and position is attested in the application of this word to kings: “Therefore thus saith the Lord concerning Jehoiakim the son of Josiah king of Judah; They shall not lament for him, saying, Ah my brother! or, Ah sister! they shall not lament for him, saying, Ah lord! or, Ah his glory!” ( Jeho-i'Akim - (whom Jehovah sets up ), called Eliakim, son of Josiah and king of Judah
Zedekiah - The last king of Judah, the son of Josiah, and the uncle of Jehoiachin
Arad - ...
Another Arad location about seventeen miles west northwest of Beersheba is not mentioned in the Bible, but was an important fortress for Judah from Solomon's time to Josiah, over three hundred years. The Temple may well have been destroyed during Josiah's reforms which tolerated only the one Temple in Jerusalem
Pharaoh - ...
References to ten pharaohs can be clearly distinguished in the Old Testament: the Pharaoh of Abraham, Genesis 12:10-20 ; of Joseph, Genesis 39-50 ; of the Oppression, Exodus 1:1 ; of the Exodus, Exodus 2:23-15:19 ; of 1 Chronicles 4:18 ; of Solomon, 1 Kings 3-11 ; of Rehoboam, called Shishak, king of Egypt, 1 Kings 14:25 ; of Hezekiah and Isaiah, 2 Kings 18:21 ; Isaiah 36:1 ; of Josiah, 2 Kings 23:29 ; of Jeremiah 44:30 and Ezekiel 29:1-16
Teraphim - Josiah attempted to suppress this form of idolatry (2 Kings 23:24 )
Jehoiakim - Name given by Pharaoh-Necho, to ELIAKIM son of Josiah king of Judah, whom he made king in the room of Jehoahaz his brother
Bethel - The first of these was fulfilled by Josiah, 2 Kings 23:13 ; and the others in the later desolation of Bethel, where nothing but ruins can now be found
Book(s) - ...
The Book of the Law During the reign of Josiah, Hilkiah, the high priest, found a copy of the “Book of the Law” in the Temple (2 Kings 22:8 ). Josiah based his reforms of the religion of Israel on the laws found in this book (2 Kings 23:1 ). The book is not explicitly identified in 2Kings, but by comparing the measures undertaken by Josiah and the laws of Deuteronomy it is very likely that the “Book of the Law” was a copy of Deuteronomy. ”...
Various other works are also mentioned in 1,2Chronicles: genealogies of the tribe of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:17 ), the “Chronicles of King David” (1 Chronicles 27:24 ), an untitled work containing the plan for the Temple (1 Chronicles 28:19 ), works on the organization of the Levites written by David and Solomon (2 Chronicles 35:4 ), and lamentations for the death of Josiah by Jeremiah and others (2 Chronicles 35:25 )
Megiddo - , on his march against the king of Assyria, passed through the plains of Philistia and Sharon; and King Josiah, attempting to bar his progress in the plain of Megiddo, was defeated by the Egyptians
Esdraelon - Here also Barak defeated Sisera, and Saul's army was defeated by the Philistines, and king Josiah, while fighting in disguise against Necho, king of Egypt, was slain (2 Chronicles 35:20-27 ; 2 Kings 2329-29 )
Kidron - It afterwards became the receptacle for all manner of impurities (2 Chronicles 29:16 ; 30:14 ); and in the time of Josiah this valley was the common cemetery of the city (2 Kings 23:6 ; Compare Jeremiah 26:23 )
Hashabiah - Levite leader under Josiah who provided animals for the Levites to celebrate Passover (2 Chronicles 35:9 )
Maaseiah - Governor of Jerusalem under Josiah ( 2 Chronicles 34:8 )
Maaseiah - Governor of Jerusalem during the reign of Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:8 )
Shallum - Son of Josiah king of Judah: he succeeded his father, but after a reign of three months he was deposed by Pharaoh-necho, and taken to Egypt, where he died
Names - , was employed as in Eliezer, Exodus 18:4 , Amuel, Josiah, Adonijah
Jeremi'ah, Book of - 1-21, including prophecies from the thirteenth year of Josiah to the fourth of Jehoiakim; ch
Hin'Nom - To put an end to these abominations the place was polluted by Josiah, who renders it ceremonially unclean by spreading over it human bones and other corruptions, (2 Kings 23:10,13,14 ; 2 Chronicles 34:4,5 ) from which time it appears to have become the common cesspool of the city, into which sewage was conducted, to be carried off by the waters of the Kidron
mi'Cah - (1 Chronicles 23:30 ) ...
The father of Abdon, a man of high station in the reign of Josiah
Josi'ah - The great day of Josiah's life was the day of the passover in the eighteenth year of his reign. Josiah was mortally wounded, and died before he could reach Jerusalem
Ark - ...
The ark disappears from post-Solomonic biblical history except for a passing reference in 2 Chronicles 35:3 , where the Levites are charged by Josiah no longer to carry the ark about. This may be as much a reflection of a postexilic understanding of Josiah (the new David who would correct the behavior of the Levites) as that of the actual ark itself
Grave - Josiah did not desecrate this tomb out of respect for him (2 Kings 23:15-18 ). Josiah broke into the tombs at Bethel and burned the bones of the idolatrous priests upon the altar there to defile it (2 Kings 23:15-17 )
Zephaniah, Book of - ...
The Date of Zephaniah According to Zephaniah 1:1 Zephaniah's ministry occurred during the reign of Josiah (640-609 B. In 621King Josiah instituted a sweeping reformation of worship in Judah (see 2 Kings 22:3-23:25 ), which officially abolished the worship of Baal and the stars mentioned in Zephaniah 1:4-6 . In short, it is a good guess that he preached between 630,621, but he might have flourished anytime during the reign of Josiah
Lamentations - Jeremiah wrote "lamentations" on the death of Josiah, and it was made "an ordinance in Israel" that "singing women" should "speak" of that king in lamentation. ...
So here he writes "lamentations" on the overthrow of the Jewish city and people, as Septuagint expressly state in a prefatory verse, embodying probably much of the language of his original elegy on Josiah (Lamentations 4:16-17), and passing now to the more universal calamity, of which Josiah's sad death was the presage and forerunner. Thus, the words originally applied to Josiah (Lamentations 4:20) Jeremiah now applies to the throne of Judah in general, the last representative of which, Zedekiah, had just been blinded and carried to Babylon (compare Jeremiah 39:5-7): "the breath of our nostrils, the anointed of Jehovah, was taken in their pits, of whom we said, Under his shadow we shall live among the (live securely in spite of the surrounding) pagan. " The language, true of good Josiah, is too favorable to apply to Zedekiah personally; it is as royal David's representative, and type of Messiah, and Judah's head, that he is viewed. The events probably are included under Manasseh and Josiah (2 Chronicles 33:11; 2 Chronicles 35:20-25), Jehoahaz, Jehoiakim, and Zedekiah (2 Chronicles 36:3, etc
Geba - In the days of King Josiah (640-609 B
Topheth - Josiah threw down its altars and heaped here the filth of the city, so that, with its carcasses preyed on by worms and its perpetual fires for consuming refuse, it became a type of hell (Isaiah 66:24)
Ashurbanipal - His reign was contemporary with the reigns of Manasseh, Amon, and Josiah, Kings of Judah
Armageddon - One of the most stunning and decisive defeats for God's people took place here when King Josiah perished in battle with Pharaoh-nechoh (2 Kings 23:29-30 )
Grove - Manasseh set a graven image of the grove that he had made in the temple, which Josiah removed, burnt, and ground to powder
Jehoiakim - The religious abuses which had been abolished by Josiah seem to have returned with greater strength than ever
Chariots of War - Chariots were sometimes consecrated to the sun; and the Scripture observes, that Josiah burned those which had been dedicated to the sun by his predecessors, 2 Kings 23:11
Jeiel - Officer among the Levites who provided them offerings to sacrifice at the Passover under Josiah about 622 B
Necho or Pharaoh-Necho - Josiah king of Judah being tributary to the king of Babylon, opposed Necho on his first expedition against Nebuchadnezzar, and gave him battle at Megiddo, where he received the wound of which he died; and Necho pressed forward, without making any long stay in Judea
Jezreel - It was where Barak triumphed, and where Josiah was defeated, Judges 5:19 ; 2 Chronicles 35:22 — Megiddo being in the same locality
Bethel - There the prophet from Judah foretold the overthrow of the calf altar by Josiah. Josiah, as foretold, defiled the altar with dead men's bones, but disturbed not the sepulchre of the prophet of Judab when he discerned its title
Judah, Kingdom of - (2 Chronicles 30:1-18, , Josiah). ) For a century and a half this vassalage lasted, with occasional periods of independence, as under the godly Hezekiah and Josiah. (See HEZEKIAH; Josiah. But, after Hezekiah, Manasseh's enormous wickedness so provoked Jehovah that the piety of his grandson Josiah, Amon's son, could procure only a respite
Shemai'ah - ) ...
A Levite in the reign of Josiah
Zedekiah - He was the third son of Josiah, and his mother's name was Hamutal, the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah, and hence he was the brother of Jehoahaz (2 Kings 23:31 ; 24:17,18 )
Ammonite - The high places built for this idol by Solomon, at the instigation of his Ammonitish wives, were not destroyed till the time of Josiah (2 Kings 23:13 )
Horse - Before the reforms of Josiah, horses sacred to the sun were kept in the Temple ( 2 Kings 23:11 ; cf
Megiddo - Here king Ahaziah ( 2 Kings 9:27 ) died; and the good king Josiah, interfering in a quarrel between Pharaoh-necho and the king of Assyria, and opposing the former’s progress in the dangerous passage of Megiddo, was also slain ( 2 Kings 23:29-30 , 2 Chronicles 35:22 ), to the grief of all Israel ( Zechariah 12:11 )
Armageddon - Deborah and Barak defeated Sisera and his Canaanite army there (Judges 4-5 ), Gideon drove off the Midianites and Amalekites (Judges 6 ), Saul and the army of Israel were defeated because of their failure to trust in God (1 Samuel 31 ), and the Egyptian army under Pharaoh Neco killed Josiah, king of Judah (2 Kings 23:29 )
Education - This was the ONE book of national education in the reformations undertaken by Jehoshaphat and Josiah (2 Chronicles 17:7-9; 2 Chronicles 34:30)
Jeremiah - He prophesied under Josiah, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, and Zedekiah; and for some time during the exile
Judah the Kingdom of - From Egypt came Shishak, who humbled Judah, 2 Chronicles 12:2-12; Zerah, whose million of men were routed by king Asa, 2 Chronicles 14:9-12; and Josiah was slain at Megiddo
Gehenna - The recollection of this terrible worship gave to the valley a sinister character, and led to its being defiled by Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:6 ; 2 Kings 23:10 ), for the purpose of preventing these rites
Esdraelon - Here Josiah, king of Judah, fell, fighting against Necho, king of Egypt, ...
2 Kings 23:29
Naphtali - Josiah purged their country from idols
Zedekiah - The twentieth and last king of Judah, son of Josiah and Hamutal, and uncle to Jeconiah his predecessor, 2 Kings 24:17,19 Jeremiah 52:1
Obadi'ah - ) ...
A Merarite Levite in the reign of Josiah, and one of the overseers of the workmen in the restoration of the temple
ma-Ase'Iah - (2 Chronicles 28:7 ) ...
The governor of Jerusalem in the reign of Josiah
Deuteronomy - This section, it is now agreed, was the Law-book found in the Temple in the 18th year of Josiah (b. Thus Josiah abolished the high places in Judah and Jerusalem ( Deuteronomy 22:8 ; Deuteronomy 22:13 ), and confined legitimate worship to the sanctuary at Jerusalem; and this centralization of the cult is the dominating idea of Deuteronomy 5:1-33 ; Deuteronomy 6:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 7:1-26 ; Deuteronomy 8:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 9:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 10:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 11:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 12:1-32 ; Deuteronomy 13:1-18 ; Deuteronomy 14:1-29 ; Deuteronomy 15:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 16:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 17:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 18:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 19:1-21 ; Deuteronomy 20:1-20 ; Deuteronomy 21:1-23 ; Deuteronomy 22:1-30 ; Deuteronomy 23:1-25 ; Deuteronomy 24:1-22 ; Deuteronomy 25:1-19 ; Deuteronomy 26:1-19 . Again, Josiah purified the Jahweh-worship from baser elements, destroying the Asherah ( 2 Kings 23:6 , cf. ...
It is, however, a more difficult question how far the reforms which Josiah instituted in obedience to Deut. But the code itself survived to be discovered under Josiah, and to become the basis of a pregnant reform
Jeremiah - The father-in-law of King Josiah of Judah (640-609 B. He was called to be a prophet in the thirteenth year of King Josiah (627/6 B. ...
Jeremiah's call came in the thirteenth year of King Josiah, about 627/6 B. Josiah remains however, the only Jewish king contemporary with Jeremiah to and about whom no word is spoken in the whole book. No concrete reference appears to any of the dramatic changes of national liberation and religious reformation within the last eighteen years of Josiah's reign (2 Kings 22:1-23:30 )
Lamentations, Book of - In 2 Chronicles 35:25 we read that ‘ Jeremiah lamented for Josiah, and all the singing men and singing women spake of Josiah unto this day; and they made them an ordinance in Israel: and behold they are written in the lamentations. has nothing to do with Josiah
Bethel - At length all traces of the idolatries were extirpated by Josiah, king of Judah (2 Kings 23:15-18 ); and the place was still in existence after the Captivity (Ezra 2:28 ; Nehemiah 7:32 )
Zedekiah - The name given by Nebuchadnezzar to Mattaniah, son of Josiah, whom he set on the throne of Judah
Shemaiah - Levite in the days of Josiah
Josh'ua - (2 Kings 23:8 ) (In the reign of Josiah, B
Jeremiah - Some have supposed his father to have been that Hilkah, the high priest, by whom the book of the law was found in the temple in the reign of Josiah: but for this there is no better ground than his having borne the same name, which was no uncommon one among the Jews; whereas, had he been in reality the high priest, he would doubtless have been mentioned by that distinguishing title, and not put upon a level with priests of an ordinary and inferior class. Jeremiah appears to have been very young when he was called to the exercise of the prophetical office, from which he modestly endeavoured to excuse himself by pleading his youth and incapacity; but being overruled by the divine authority, he set himself to discharge the duties of his function with unremitted diligence and fidelity during a period of at least forty-two years, reckoning from the thirteenth year of Josiah's reign. The best arrangement of the chapters appears to be according to the list which will be subjoined; the different reigns in which the prophecies were delivered were most probably as follows: The first twelve chapters seem to contain all the prophecies delivered in the reign of the good King Josiah. Jehoiakim, the eldest son of Josiah, succeeded. The last king of Judah was Zedekiah, the youngest son of Josiah
Jeroboam - It was while dedicating the altar at Bethel that a prophet from Judah suddenly appeared, who denounced the altar, and foretold its desecration by Josiah
Shemaiah - Levite in days of Josiah about 621 B
Sim'Eon - The only thing which can be interpreted into a trace of its having taken any part with the northern kingdom are the two casual notices of (2 Chronicles 15:9 ) and 2 Chronicles 34:6 Which appear to imply the presence of Simeonites there in the reigns of Asa and Josiah
Azariah - Son of Hilkiah the high priest in the time of Josiah
Habakkuk - He is generally placed in the time of Josiah or a little later: it was before the captivity of Judah, for that is foretold
Mount Olivet - ) Hence, in the after-reign of the good king Josiah, when the king, removed those idols, so much prophaned had been this mount, that it had acquired the name of the mount of corruption
Joshua - Governor of the city of Jerusalem in the days of Josiah
Habakkuk - He probably prophesied in the 12th or 13th year of Josiah (630 or 629 B. ...
Zephaniah 1:7 is an imitation of Habakkuk 2:20; now Zephaniah (Zephaniah 1:1) lived under Josiah, and prophesied (compare Zephaniah 3:5; Zephaniah 3:15) after the restoration of Jehovah's worship, i. after the 12th year of Josiah's reign, about 624 B. Jeremiah moreover began prophesying in Josiah's 13th year; now Jeremiah borrows from Habakkuk (compare Habakkuk 2:13 with Jeremiah 51:58); thus, it follows that 630 or 629 B
Jeremiah - A Jew of Libnah, whose daughter, Hamutal or Hamital, was one of the wives of Josiah, and mother of Jehoahaz ( 2 Kings 23:31 ) and Zedekiah ( 2 Kings 24:18 , Jeremiah 52:1 ). He prophesied under Josiah and his sons from the year 626 to the fall of Jerusalem in b. ...
Through Josiah’s minority (see Josiah) the ethnicizing régime of Manasseh continued; Jeremiah’s earliest preaching (chs. The nomad cavalry would reach with difficulty the Judæan highlands; and if Josiah, coming of age about this time, showed a bold front against them and saved his country from their ravages, we can account for the prestige that he enjoyed and used to such good purpose. At the same date, or even earlier, the Assyrian over-lordship had been renounced; for we find Josiah exercising independent sovereignty. Jeremiah praises Josiah, in contrast to his son, as an upright and prosperous king, good to the poor and commending his religion by his rule ( Jeremiah 22:15-17 ). ...
The great event of Josiah’s reign was the reformation effected by him in its eighteenth year (b. However disappointing in its immediate spiritual effects, the work of Josiah and his band of reformers gave the people a written law-book and a definitely organized religious system, which they carried with them into the Exile to form the nucleus of the OT Scriptures and the basis of the later Judaism. ...
The fall of Josiah in battle concluded the interval of freedom and prosperity enjoyed by Judah under his vigorous rule. The revived national faith in Jehovah, which had rested on Josiah’s political success, was shaken by his fall; the character of the new king, and the events of his reign, furthered the reaction. 626 621; ( b ) the time of disillusion and silence, subsequent to Josiah’s reforms, 621 608; ( c ) the critical epoch, 608 604, opened by the fall of Josiah at Megiddo and closing in the fourth year of Jehoiakim after the battle of Carchemish and the advent of Nebuchadrezzar, when the paroxysm of the prophet’s soul was past and his vision of the future grew clear; ( d ) the stage of full illumination, attained during the calamities of the last days of Jerusalem. But as the danger from the northern hordes passed and Josiah’s rule brought new prosperity, the prophet’s vaticinations were discounted; his pessimism became an object of ridicule. ...
( b ) Jeremiah’s attitude towards Josiah’s reformation is the enigma of his history. 1 12), apart from the doubtful allusion in Jeremiah 11:1-8 , ignores the subject; Josiah’s name is but once mentioned, by way of contrast to Jehoiakim, in Jeremiah 22:13-19 . Convinced of this, Jeremiah appears to have early withdrawn, and stood aloof for the rest of Josiah’s reign. ...
( c ) Josiah’s death at Megiddo pricked the bubble of the national religiousness; this calamity recalled Jeremiah to his work. But the restoration means something far better than recovery of the land; it will be a spiritual renovation, a change of heart going deeper than Josiah’s renewal of the old covenant
Jerobo'am - It was while dedicating the altar at Bethel that a prophet from Judah suddenly appeared, who denounced the altar, and foretold its desecration by Josiah, and violent overthrow
High Place - Hezekiah and Josiah zealously destroyed the high places, which included the buildings thereon and the idols connected therewith
Zechariah - A Kohathite Levite under Josiah, an overseer of the temple repairs (2 Chronicles 34:12). A ruler of the temple under Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:8), "the second priest" next to Hilkiah the high priest (2 Chronicles 34:9; 2 Kings 25:18)
Zechari'ah - ) ...
A Kohathite Levite in the reign of Josiah. ) ...
One of the rulers of the temple in the reign of Josiah
Esdraelon - Josiah died in battle against Pharaoh Neco at Megiddo (2 Chronicles 35:20-24 )
Manasseh - The western Manasseh, of which only a few glimpses are visible in the later history of Israel, always showed itself on the right side; as, for instance, in the cases of Asa, 2 Chronicles 15:9; Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 30:1; 2 Chronicles 30:11; 2 Chronicles 30:18, and Josiah, 2 Chronicles 34:6; 2 Chronicles 9:2
Joshua - A governor of the city who gave his name to a gate of Jerusalem, 2 Kings 23:8, in the reign of Josiah, b
Apries - Apries was the son of Psammis, and grandson of Necho, or Nechao, who waged war against Josiah, king of the Jews
Lamentations of Jeremiah - Josephus, and several other learned men, have referred them to the death of Josiah; but the more common opinion is, that they were applicable only to some period subsequent to the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar
Jezreel - Here the hosts of Sisera were swept away, Judges 4:1-24 ; and here Josiah fell, fighting against Pharaohnecho, 2 Kings 23:29
Dan - ...
As Josiah came to the throne of Judah in 639 B. Josiah incorporated the former Northern Kingdom territories into a united country, restoring the classical borders of Israel to “from Dan to Beersheba
Host of Heaven - Manasseh's efforts were reversed when Josiah came to the throne (2 Kings 23:7 )
Zechariah - One of the rulers of the Temple under Josiah ( 2 Chronicles 35:8 [1])
Passover - (See Josiah
Moon - Josiah put down those who burned incense to the moon (2 Kings 23:5)
Taxes - The Assyrian and Egyptian conquerors imposed heavy taxes on the Israelite and Jewish kings, Mendhem, Hoshea, Hezekiah, Josiah (2 Kings 15:20; 2 Kings 17:4; 2 Kings 18:14; 2 Kings 23:35)
Grove - So 2 Kings 23:6, where it is nonsense "Josiah brought out the grove (Asherah) from the house of the Lord"; Manasseh had "set this graven image of Asherah in the house" (2 Kings 21:7; 2 Kings 22:7; compare Judges 3:7)
Bethel - There were sons of the prophets dwelling at Beth-el, 2 Kings 2:3 , but the idolatrous altar was not destroyed until the days of Josiah
Zephaniah, Prophecy of - The date to the prophecy is 'the days of Josiah' king of Judah, who reigned B. Within four years of the close of Josiah's reign Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar, the holy vessels carried away, and the captivity of Judah commenced
People of the Land - They appear slightly later in the avenging of Amon's murder and the elevation of Josiah to the kingship (2 Kings 21:24 )
Zephaniah, Theology of - He prophesied during the reign of Josiah (1:1; 640-609 b. Zephaniah's faithfulness to God was challenged as he matured during or after the corrupt reigns of Josiah's grandfather, Manasseh, and his father, Amon. The book perhaps also underscores Zephaniah's piety by showing his genealogy of four generations going back to Hezekiah (1:1), another godly king of Judah, who was also an ancestor of Josiah. ...
It is unclear when in Josiah's reign Zephaniah prophesied. , the start of Josiah's religious reforms, calling the people back to a true worship of God. These prophecies could come from later in Josiah's reign, calling the people to obey the same call to godliness to which their king had already responded
Pharaoh - ) (See Josiah; NEBUCHADNEZZAR; JERUSALEM; EGYPT, on Pharaoh Necho II and Pharaoh Hophra. Josiah opposed his design and fell at Megiddo
Pharaoh - He made an expedition against Assyria, but was encountered by Josiah, king of Judah, at Megiddo
Moon - Moon-worship by the burning of incense was offered in Jerusalem, and put down by Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:5 )
Human Sacrifice - Josiah defiled Topheth as a part of his reformation so that “no one might burn his son or his daughter as an offering to Molech” (2 Kings 23:10 RSV)
Ark of the Covenant - At least, Josiah commanded them to bring it back to the sanctuary, and forbade them to carry it about, as they had hitherto done, 2 Chronicles 35:3
Kedron - So under Josiah (2 Kings 23:4-12); it was then the common cemetery (2 Kings 23:6)
Megiddo - Josiah attempted to head off Pharoah Neco II as he advanced along the coastal plain on his way to Carchemish (609 B. ), but Josiah's attack ended when Neco II's archers fatally wounded him (2 Kings 23:29-30 ; 2 Chronicles 35:22-24 )
Zedekiah - ...
King of Judah...
Zedekiah the king was the third son of Josiah to sit upon the throne of Judah
Har-Magedon - The primary reference, no doubt, would be to Israel’s victory ‘by the waters of Megiddo’ over the kings of Canaan (Judges 5:19), which might be taken as typical of the triumph of God and His Kingdom over the hostile world-powers; but the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan at the eastern extremity of the plain (1 Samuel 31:1), the disastrous struggle of Josiah on the same field against Pharaohnecoh (2 Kings 23:29, 2 Chronicles 35:22), and Zechariah’s reference to ‘the mourning of Hadadrimmon in the valley of Megiddon’ (Zechariah 12:11), would heighten the suggestion of a great day of overthrow and destruction
Alliances - Josiah on the other hand was Assyria's ally against Pharaoh Necho of Egypt, and fell a victim to meddling in the world's quarrels (2 Chronicles 35:20-25)
Sun - Josiah destroyed by fire (the very element which was worshipped) the chariots, and removed the horses consecrated to the sun (2 Kings 23:5; 2 Kings 23:11-12)
Crown - The crown was placed upon the head of young King Josiah, when he was presented to the people, in order to be acknowledged by them, 2 Chronicles 23:11
Pharaoh - Pharaoh Necho, in the time of Josiah, B
Habakkuk - ”...
The Times Judah had just experienced the exhilaration of the glorious days of Josiah, marked by freedom, prosperity, and a great religious revival. King Josiah, attempting to block the Egyptians as they moved north along the Palestinian coast to aid Assyria, was killed at Megiddo in northern Palestine. In his place the Egyptians set up Josiah's son, Jehoiakim
Refuge, Cities of - ...
(2) When the provincial high places and altars were suppressed by Josiah in b. They were established first in the time of Josiah when the boundaries and the population of the Jewish State would be comparatively small, and Jewish authority did not likely cross the Jordan to the east
Prophets - Zephaniah, soon after the beginning of the reign of Josiah, and before the destruction of Nineveh. Jeremiah, in the thirteenth year of Josiah king of Judah, B
Jeremiah - ...
Forty years of preaching...
Jeremiah began his prophetic work in 627 BC, the thirteenth year of the reign of Josiah, king of Judah (Jeremiah 1:1-2). Josiah had carried out sweeping reforms, firstly to remove all the idolatrous and immoral practices that had become deeply rooted in Judah over the previous generations, then to re-establish the true worship of Yahweh (2 Kings 22; 2 Kings 23:1-25). When Egypt, the leading nation to Judah’s south, decided to challenge Babylon, Josiah tried to stop the Egyptians from passing through Palestine and was killed in battle (609 BC; 2 Kings 23:28-30)
Molech, Moloch - Josiah suppressed the worship and defiled Topheth
Jehoshaphat, Valley of - "Armageddon" in Revelation 16:16 corresponds: from har "a mountain", and Megiddo "the valley of Jezreel", the great battle field of Canaan, where godly Josiah fell before Pharaoh Necho
Beer-Sheba - This idiom also served to show the extent of the reforms of three southern kings: Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 19:4 , “Beer-sheba to mount Ephraim”), Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 30:5 , “Beer-sheba even to Dan”), and Josiah (2 Kings 23:8 , “from Geba to Beer-sheba”)
Gehenna (2) - Historically, this valley is the traditional site of the worship paid to Molech, first by Ahaz (2 Chronicles 28:3), and later by Manasseh (33:6), who made their children pass through the fire; but which was later defiled by Josiah (2 Kings 23:10), and thereafter seems to have been made the receptacle of the city’s offal; and in later Jewish thought became a symbol of the supposed place of future punishments (cf
Ashtaroth - Josiah destroyed the shrines built to her (2 Kings 23:13 )
Baal - Jeremiah threatens the Jews who had sacrificed to Baal on the house-top, Jeremiah 32:29 ; and Josiah destroyed the altars which Ahaz had erected on the terrace of his palace, 2 Kings 23:12
Chariot - ...
Mention may be made, finally, of the chariots set up at the entrance to the Temple at Jerusalem, which were destroyed by Josiah
Moloch - ) Josiah defiled the sanctuaries of both
High Places - Hezekiah and Josiah removed them utterly, as opposed to the letter of the law and mostly to the spirit of it too (2 Kings 18:4; 2 Kings 23:5 margin; 2 Chronicles 34:3)
Burial - David mourned for the deaths of Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:17-27 ), and Jeremiah lamented the death of Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:25 )
Gaza - "...
"Pharaoh" Necho fulfilled the prophecy on returning from slaying Josiah at Megiddo (2 Chronicles 35:20) (Grotius)
Cedron - And God the Holy Ghost was graciously pleased to make Cedron again memorable, as typical of the Lord Jesus Christ, when Asa, Hezekiah, and Josiah, burnt and destroyed the idols of the land, and cast the accursed things of the groves into this brook
Jeremiah - Son of Hilkiah, a priest in Anathoth of Benjamin; not the high priest Hilkiah who discovered the book of the law in Josiah's reign (2 Kings 22:8), for Jeremiah's father is not designated as "the priest" or "the high priest. The independent history (2 Chronicles 35:25; 2 Chronicles 36:12; 2 Chronicles 36:21) mentions his "lamentation for Josiah," Zedekiah's "not humbling himself before Jeremiah the prophet speaking from the mouth of Jehovah," and the Babylonian captivity "to fulfill Jehovah's word by the mouth of Jeremiah until the land had enjoyed her sabbaths, for as long as she lay desolate she kept sabbath to fulfill threescore and ten years" (Jeremiah 27:7; Jeremiah 25:9-12; Jeremiah 26:6-7; Jeremiah 29:10). , the 13th of Josiah's reign, while a mere youth at Anathoth, three miles from Jerusalem (Jeremiah 1:2), "the word of Jehovah came to him" just as manhood was opening out to him, calling him to lay aside his natural sensitiveness and timid self distrust, and as Jehovah's minister, by the might of Jehovah's efficacious word, to "root out . ...
Jeremiah must have at first exercised his office in contemplation rather than action, for he is not mentioned in connection with Josiah's reforms, or the great Passover held in the 18th year of his reign, five years subsequent to Jeremiah's call. Indications of affinity or friendship with some of the actors in it occur in the sameness of names: Jeremiah's father bearing the name of Hilkiah, Josiah's high priest; his uncle that of Shallum, Huldah's husband (Jeremiah 32:7; compare 2 Kings 22:14); Ahikam, Jeremiah's protector (Jeremiah 26:24), was also the fellow worker with Huldah in the revival; moreover Maaseiah, governor of Jerusalem, sent by Josiah as ally of Hilkiah in repairing the temple (2 Chronicles 34:8), was father of Neriah, the father of both Baruch and Seraiah, Jeremiah's disciples (Jeremiah 36:4; Jeremiah 51:59). Eighteen years after his first call king Josiah died. )...
Jeremiah, like Isaiah (1618389121_39), foresaw that the tendency of many to desire an alliance with Egypt, upon the dissolution of the Assyrian empire whose vassal Manasseh was, would end in sorrow (Jeremiah 2:18): "what hast thou to do in the way of (with going down to) Egypt? to drink the waters of Sihor (to seek hosts as allies from the Nile land)?" Josiah so far molded his policy according to Jeremiah's counsel; but he forgot that it was equally against God's will for His people to lean upon Assyrian or Babylonian "confidences" as upon Egyptian (Jeremiah 36 - 37); so taking the field as ally of Assyria and Babylon against the Egyptian Pharaoh Necho he fell (2 Kings 23:29). Josiah's death was one of his bitterest sorrows (Jeremiah 22:10; Jeremiah 22:15-16), the remembrance of his righteous reign intensified the pain of witnessing the present injustice of his successors. In Jeremiah 22:11-12 Jeremiah foretold that Josiah's son, Shallum or Jehoahaz who reigned but three months and was carried to Egypt by Pharaoh Necho, should never return. The "princes," including doubtless some of Josiah's counselors or their sons, interposed in his behalf (Jeremiah 26:16), appealing to Micah's case, who had uttered a like prophecy in Hezekiah's reign with impunity; adding the implication which they durst not express, that though Urijah who prophesied similarly was brought back from his flight into Egypt, and slain by Jehoiakim, yet that the notorious prostration of the state showed that evil, not good, is the result of such persecutions. ...
So Ahikam his friend, the former officer of good Josiah (2 Kings 22:12; 2 Kings 22:14), saved him from death; however Jeremiah deemed it prudent not to appear in public then
Daniel - 623, during the reign of Josiah
Kin - With the abolition of the local sanctuaries by the reforms of Josiah it was necessary to appoint certain special sanctuaries, which are known as cities of refuge (see Refuge [3])
Nahum - Many vassal nations revolted along with Josiah of Judah (2 Kings 22-23 )
Ark - , the Tabernacle with all its sacred furniture was hidden by Jeremiah (or, according to the Talmud, by Josiah) in a cava of Mt
Prepare - ” So Josiah told the people “to prepare” themselves for the Passover ( Zedekiah - He was the son of Josiah, and uncle to Jehoiachin his predecessor, 2 Kings 24:17 ; 2 Kings 24:19
Ark - This may account for the subsequent statement that it was reinstated by Josiah
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - Josiah later cleansed Jerusalem of the excesses of Canaanite worship (2 Kings 23 ). The proclamation was to be made in the temples of their idols and among the people (1 Samuel 31:6-10 ): the Baals and Ashtoreths were mightier than the Lord!...
Ashtoreth's influence was finally discredited by Josiah, who "cleaned house" by destroying the shrines erected by Solomon. A final chapter concerning Baal worship was written during the reigns of Jehu and Josiah, when the southern kingdom and its capital were purged of the worship of Baal (2 Kings 10 ; 23:1-30 )
Assyria - In the reign of Josiah, when Zephaniah prophesied, Nineveh and the kingdom of Assyria were standing; and their fall was predicted by that Prophet, Zephaniah 1:3 ; Zephaniah 2:13 . And in the end of his reign, Pharaoh-Necho, king of Egypt, the successor of Psammitichus, went up against the king of Assyria to the river Euphrates, to fight against Carchemish, or Circutium; and in his way thither slew Josiah, 2 Kings 23:29 ; 2 Chronicles 35:20 ; and therefore the last king of Assyria was not yet slain. But in the third and fourth years of Jehoiakim, the successor of Josiah, the two conquerors having taken Nineveh, and finished their war in Assyria, prosecuted their conquests westward; and, leading their forces against the king of Egypt, as an invader of their right of conquest, they beat him at Carchemish, and took from him whatever he had recently taken from the Assyrians, 2 Kings 24:7 ; Jeremiah 46:2 ; "and therefore we cannot err," says Sir Isaac Newton, "above a year or two, if we refer the destruction of Nineveh, and fall of the Assyrian empire, to the third year of Jehoiakim," or the hundred and fortieth, or according to Blair, the hundred and forty-first year of Nabonassar; that is, the year B
Moses - Only the good king Josiah and, to a lesser extent, Hezekiah matched that model. Josiah modeled a reformation in Jerusalem on the basis of the Mosaic model
Exile - Judah's hopes were dashed when King Josiah (640-609) was killed at the battle of Megiddo (2 Kings 23:29 ). Jehoahaz, one of Josiah's sons, ruled Judah for three months in 609 B. Jehoiakim, a second son of Josiah, served as king of Judah for eleven years (609-597 B
Scripture - The earliest reference to any such record is in the narrative of the finding of the Book of the Law by Hilkiah the scribe in the time of Josiah ( 2 Kings 22:3 ff
Prostitution - When Josiah carried out his reform, he had to remove the male cult prostitutes from the temple itself (2 Kings 23:7 )
Gate - ...
Josiah defiled "the high places of the gates in the entering in of the gate
Fathers - ...
The fathers praised are Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Israel, Moses, Aaron, Phinehas, Joshua, Caleb, the Judges, Samuel, Nathan, David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, Hezekiah, Isaiah, Josiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Job, the Twelve, Zerubbabel, Joshua the priest, Nehemiah
Cease - Josiah “put down the idolatrous priests …” (2 Kings 23:5)
Zedeki'ah - He was the son of Josiah by his wife Hamutal, and therefore own brother to Jehoahaz
Pen'Tateuch, the, - The book which was discovered the temple in the reign of Josiah, and which is entitled, (2 Chronicles 34:14 ) "a book of the law of Jehovah by the hand of Moses," was substantially, it would seem the same volume, though it may afterward have undergone some revision by Ezra
Idolatry - Even Isaiah can anticipate the erection in Egypt of a pillar ( Isaiah 19:19 ) like those which Josiah in the next century destroyed ( 2 Kings 23:14 ). prophets that prepared the way for the remarkable reformation under Josiah ( 2 Kings 18:4 ; 2 Kings 23:1-37 ). Josiah’s reign was epoch-making in everything connected with Hebrew religious thought and practice
Ecclesiastes, the Book of - , was mistaken as recommending the Epicurean sensuality against which Paul (Psalms 89:30) protests, and was made an objection to the book; but the eating and drinking recommended is that associated with labor, not idleness; with pious "fear of God," not sensual ignoring of the future Judge; the cheerful, contented "eating and drinking" which characterized Judah and Israel under Solomon (1 Kings 4:20), and under Josiah (Jeremiah 22:15, "Did not thy father (Josiah) eat and drink, and do judgment and justice, and then it was well with him?")...
So Nehemiah enjoins (Nehemiah 8:10-12)
Baal (1) - Josiah made a thorough eradication of it (2 Kings 23:4-14)
Asherah - The graven image of Asherah set up by Manasseh in the Temple ( 2 Kings 21:7 ), when destroyed by Josiah, is simply termed the asherah ( 2 Kings 23:6 )
Jeremiah, Book of - This prophecy commenced in the thirteenth year of Josiah, B. It was given in the days of Josiah, when there had been a reformation, but they had not turned to God with the whole heart: backsliding Israel had justified herself more than treacherous Judah
Nebuchadnezzar - (See Josiah; MEGIDDO
Ezra - A "ready scribe in the law of Moses" (Ezra 7:6; Ezra 7:11-12); "a scribe of the words of the commandments of the Lord and of His statutes to Israel"; "a scribe of the law of the God of heaven"; "priest"; a worthy descendant of Hilkiah the priest under Josiah, who "found the book of the law in the house of the Lord" (2 Chronicles 34:14-15); son or descendant of Seraiah (not the high priest
Ashtoreth - This deity, especially known as the Sidonian goddess for whom Solomon erected a shrine, later destroyed by Josiah ( 1Ki 11:5 ; 1 Kings 11:33 , 2 Kings 23:13 ), was worshipped by all Semitic nations
High Place - Only Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:3-4 ) and Josiah (2 Kings 23:4-15 ) had the courage to destroy the high places in the land of Judah
Altar - that Josiah succeeded in abolishing ‘the high places’ and destroying or desecrating their altars ( 2 Kings 23:5 ff
Psalms - The only times of such additions were those of religious revivals, namely, under Jehoshaphat, Hezekiah, and Josiah (to whose reign probably belong Psalm 77; Psalm 92; Psalm 100; this series has the common theme, Jehovah's manifestation for His people's comfort and their foes' confusion). ...
Neither Heman nor the sons of Heman are named in the superscriptions, but the sons of Korah; perhaps because Heman, though musical and head of the Korahitic singers, was not also poetically gifted as was Asaph; Psalm 88, is gloom throughout, yet the title calls it (shir ) a "song" of joy; this can only refer to Psalm 89 which follows being paired with it; it was when the "anointed" of David's throne (Josiah) had his "crown profaned on the ground," being not able to" stand in the battle" (Psalms 89:43), and his son Jehoahaz after a three months' reign was carried to Egypt by Pharaoh Necho (2 Chronicles 35:20-25; 2 Chronicles 36:1-4; Psalms 89:45); the title, "to the chief musician," shows the temple was standing, Josiah had just before caused a religious revival. Thrupp (Smith's Bible Dictionary) maintains that as Psalm 73-83 do not all proceed from Asaph, but from members of the choir which he founded, so the psalms in Books III, IV, V, inscribed with the name of David, were written by his royal representatives for the time being (Hezekiah, Josiah, Zerubbabel, etc
Manasseh (1) - Many out of Manasseh were among the penitents coming southwards to Judah, and joining in the spiritual revivals under Asa (2 Chronicles 15:9), Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 30:1; 2 Chronicles 30:10-11; 2 Chronicles 30:18; 2 Chronicles 31:1), and Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:6-9)
Burial - The "graves of the children of the people" were and are in the valley of Kedron or Jehoshaphat (2 Kings 23:6); and on the graves of them that had sacrificed to the idols and groves Josiah strawed the dust of their idols (2 Chronicles 34:4): "the graves of the common people" outside the city (Jeremiah 26:23)
Hell - So the godly Josiah defiled the valley, making it a receptacle of carcass and criminals' corpses, in which worms were continually gendering
Ark of the Covenant - Josiah commanded them to bring it back to the sanctuary, and it was accordingly replaced, 2 Chronicles 35:3
Idolatry, - (Isaiah 29:13 ) With the death of Josiah ended the last effort to revive among the people a purer ritual
Urim And Thummim - The oracles of the Lord were thenceforth delivered by the prophets; as by Ahijah to Jeroboam 1 Kings 11:29 ; by Shemaiah to Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:22 ; by Elijah to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 21:17-29 ; by Michaiah to Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 1 Kings 22:7 ; by Elisha to Jehoshaphat and Jehoram, 2 Kings 3:11-14 ; by Isaiah to Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:6-34 ; 2 Kings 20:1-11 ; by Huldah to Josiah, 2 Kings 22:13-20 ; by Jeremiah to Zedekiah, Jeremiah 32:3-5 , &c
Philistines - , a contemporary of Josiah of Judah, captured Gaza (Herod
Pha'Raoh, - 610, he made war against the king of Assyria, and, being encountered on his way by Josiah, defeated and slew the king of Judah at Megiddo
Israel, History of - ...
Very soon after Manasseh, however, King Josiah (640-609) reversed the decline Manasseh had set in motion. Under Josiah, and at least as early as 621, the Deuteronomic Reformation was instituted. On the one hand, Josiah sought to take advantage of the weakened conditions of both the Mesopotamian and Egyptian powers to unite anew the Northern and Southern Kingdoms. This reform had long-range repercussions on the development of Yahwism and Judaism, but the primary impetus for the reform was removed with Josiah's death in 609 as he fought against Pharaoh Necho of Egypt at Megiddo (2 Kings 23:29 ). ...
Following Josiah's death, the nation no longer had the leadership to sustain an effective reformation
Egypt - ...
Egypt recovered this shock under Psammetichus I of Sais (twenty-sixth dynasty), and in the days of Josiah, PHARAOH-NECHO, anxious to rival the glories of the eighteenth and nineteenth dynasties, set out to attack the king of Assyria and to recover the long-lost sway of Egypt over Syria. Josiah opposed Necho, but was slain at Megiddo. Nekau, or Necho, killed Josiah at Megiddo (B
Chronicles, Theology of - Jehoshaphat, Ahaz, Hezekiah, and Josiah are explicitly compared to David and Solomon (17:3; 28:1; 29:2; 34:2-3). They could abandon the forms of Yahweh worship (Ahaz and Manasseh) or restore them (Hezekiah and Josiah)
High Place, Sanctuary - Whatever may have been the extent of Hezekiah’s efforts in this direction, it was not until the eighteenth year of the reign of Josiah (622 621 b. With the early death of Josiah the local cults revived, and it needed the discipline of the Exile to secure the victory of the Deuteronomic demand for the centralization of the cultus
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - , details in Josiah's reign are discussed only after the discovery of the Book of the Law). The datum point of Judah's history was the great reform of Josiah, while the great villain was Manasseh, who was considered to be immediately responsible for the downfall of the kingdom. The writer of Kings recognizes that God's justice does not always work out in every way the same; Manasseh lived a long time (2 Kings 21 ; 24:3-4 ), while Josiah died in battle, a fateful omen for the nation (2 Kings 23:29 ). Much space, however, is given to Josiah's reform, which, although being an immediate failure, set the stage for the restoration (2 Kings 23:29-30 )
Nations - ...
The reforms instituted by king Josiah in the Southern Kingdom (2 Kings 22:1 f
Know, Knowledge - ...
In the doing of justice and righteousness, Josiah is said to have known God (Jeremiah 22:15-16 )
Habakkuk - If dated about the year 600, it falls in the reign of Jehoiakim, in the period of reaction that followed the defeat and death of Josiah at Megiddo (608)
Ammonites - Presumably the worship of Milcom continued in Jerusalem until it was stamped out by Josiah many years later (2 Kings 23:13 )
Jeroboam - At that instant a prophet, who had come, divinely directed, from Judah to Bethel, accosted Jeroboam and said, "O altar, altar, thus saith the Lord, A child shall be born to the house of David, Josiah by name; and upon thee shall he sacrifice the priests of the high places who now burn incense upon thee: he shall burn men's bones upon thee
Pentateuch - ...
But, long previous to the captivity, two particular examples, deserving peculiar attention, occur in the Jewish history, of the public and solemn homage paid to the sacredness of the Mosaic law as promulgated in the Pentateuch; and which, by consequence, afford the fullest testimony to the authenticity of the Pentateuch itself: the one in the reign of Hezekiah, while the separate kingdoms of Judah and Israel still subsisted; and the other in the reign of his great grandson Josiah, subsequent to the captivity of Israel
Chronicles, Books of - After the evil reigns of Manasseh and Amon (33:1-25), there was a final reform under Josiah
Kings, Books of - ...
Josiah repaired the temple and reformed the nation (22:1-23:27), but he could not save Judah from destruction
Bible - After having been concealed in the dangerous days of the idolatrous kings of Judah, and particularly in the impious reigns of Manasseh and Amon, it was found in the days of Josiah, the succeeding prince, by Hilkiah the priest, in the temple. To this purpose he adds, that the surprise manifested by Hilkiah, on the discovery of it, and the grief expressed by Josiah when he heard it read, plainly show that neither of them had seen it before. He adds, that the surprise expressed by Josiah and the people, at his reading the copy found by Hilkiah, may be accounted for by adverting to the history of the preceding reigns, and by recollecting how idolatrous a king Manasseh had been for fifty-five years, and that he wanted neither power nor inclination to destroy the copies of the law, if they had not been secreted by the servants of God. The law, after being so long concealed, would be unknown almost to all the Jews; and thus the solemn reading of it by Josiah would awaken his own and the people's earnest attention; more especially, as the copy produced was probably the original written by Moses
Teach, Teacher - Jehoshaphat and Josiah oversaw the teaching of true religion and the overthrow of false religious structures (2 Chronicles 17:5-9 ; 34:33-35:4 )
Scribes - In the reign of David, Seraiah, 2 Samuel 8:17 , in the reign of Hezekiah, Shebna, 2 Kings 18:18 , and in the reign of Josiah, Shaphan, 2 Kings 22:3 , are called scribes, and are ranked with the chief officers of the kingdom; and Elishama the scribe, Jeremiah 36:12 , in the reign of Jehoiakim, is mentioned among the princes
Chronology of the Biblical Period - ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
Zedekiah - ) Youngest son of Josiah and Hamutal (Jeremiah 1:3; Jeremiah 37:1), brother to Jehoahaz (2 Kings 24:17-18; 2 Kings 23:31)
Jerusalem - Nearly a century later, following the apostasy of Manasseh and the reforms of Josiah, Jehoiakim ascended the throne of David in Jerusalem. Jeremiah had supported the reforms of Josiah, but in the end the people were too hardened to change
Messiah - On the other hand, the reign of Josiah reawakened the hopes of the faithful adherents of Jahweh, and it is significant that Messianic expectation revives in the oracles of Jeremiah. ...
Probably Micah 5:1-8, like Jeremiah 23:5-8, may be assigned to the earlier years of the reign of Josiah, when the religious and political outlook of Judah appeared more hopeful, and the overthrow of Assyria seemed as probable as it did to Isaiah after b
Egypt - At Megiddo Josiah encountered him, b. " Pharaoh-necho was met on his expedition against the Assyrians by Josiah, who was slain
Kings, the Books of - shedding and idolatry (the effects of which on the people the faithful Josiah could only undo externally) at last provoked God to give up Judah too to captivity; so Jehoiachin first and Zedekiah last were led away to Babylon, and Jerusalem and the temple were destroyed. Hezekiah's purification of the temple, Josiah's Passover (2 Chronicles 29 - 31:35). The frequent reference to the Pentateuch accords with the interest Jeremiah was sure to feel in the discovery under Josiah of the temple copy (Jeremiah 11:3-5 compare Deuteronomy 27:26; Jeremiah 32:18-21 compare Exodus 20:6; Exodus 6:6 Jeremiah 34:14 compare Deuteronomy 15:12)
Temple of Jerusalem - During the long and disastrous reign of King Manasseh many abominable idols and pagan cult objects were placed in the Temple which good King Josiah had to remove during his reform (2Kings 23:4-6,2 Kings 23:11-12 ). Both Hezekiah and Josiah were able to centralize worship in the Jerusalem Temple during their reforms and even recover some worshipers from the north for the Jerusalem sanctuary, but Josiah's successor, Jehoiakim, reversed all of Josiah's reforms and filled up the Temple with pagan abominations (Ezekiel 8:1 )
Canon of the Old Testament - Even a high priest in Josiah’s reign had apparently had no occasion to consult the Law-book for a long period. Josiah’s reformation . The first trace of a Canon is to be found in the reign of King Josiah about b. In such conditions at Jerusalem there came about Josiah’s reformation, described in 2 Kings 22:1-20 ; 2 Kings 23:1-37 . In consequence, Josiah convened a general assembly at Jerusalem, and read the words of the book to all the people
Ark of the Covenant - Josiah restored it to its place in the house of God (2 Chronicles 33:7; 2 Chronicles 35:3)
Covenant - Hezekiah and the people solemnly agree to reform the worship ( 2 Chronicles 29:10 ); Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:3 ) and Ezra ( Ezra 10:3 ) lead the people into a covenant to observe the Law
Serve - “So all the service of the Lord was prepared the same day, to keep the passover, and to offer burnt offerings upon the altar of the Lord, according to the commandment of King Josiah” ( Temple - After this it was frequently profaned and pillaged; was repaired by Joash, 2 Kings 12:5-14, and by Josiah, 2 Chronicles 29:3-9
Psalms, Book of, - , the interest of which centers in the times of Hezekiah stretches out, by its last two psalms, to the reign of Manasseh: it was probably compiled in the reign of Josiah
High Priest - The six first tally well to the six first kings, Amariah the sixth priest answering to Jehoshaphat the' sixth king from David; also the five last tally to the five last kings, Hilkiah son of Shallum, fourth from the end, tallying to Josiah, the fourth king from the end. David arranged the temple service and 24 priest courses; Solomon dedicated the temple; Jehoshaphat directed Amariah and the priests as to teaching the people; Hezekiah led the reformation, and urged on Azariah; Josiah encouraged the priests in the service of the Lord's house
King - Josiah bases his reform not on a new law, but on the newly found Book of the Law ( 2 Kings 23:1-3 ), to which he and the elders swear allegiance
Weights And Measures - There could have been variation between official and unofficial weights, including the setting of new standards by reform administrations such as that of good King Josiah
Moab - Among Solomon's foreign concubines were Moabitish women, to whose god Chemosh he built "a high place on the hill before (facing) Jerusalem" (1 Kings 11:1; 1 Kings 11:7; 1 Kings 11:33), where it remained until Josiah defiled it four centuries afterward (2 Kings 23:13)
Nebuchadnezzar - Sent by Nabopolassar to punish Pharaoh Necho, the conqueror of Josiah at Megiddo
Deuteronomy, the Book of - ...
The “book of the law” found during the repair of the Temple in the eighteenth year of Josiah's reign (621 B. That identity cannot be proved, but the nature of the reforms of Josiah and the contents of Deuteronomy show an interesting similarity. For example, the call for centralization of worship (Deuteronomy 12:1 ) is matched by Josiah's destruction of all altars except the one in the Temple in Jerusalem (2 Kings 23:4-20 )
Government - Josiah gathered the elders of Judah and Jerusalem after finding the Book of the Law in the Temple, and they covenanted to keep that law (2 Kings 23:1-3 )
Name, Names - And the curious recrudescence of words of this class in and about the reign of Josiah ( Huldah , ‘weasel,’ Shaphan , ‘rock-badger,’ etc
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - ]'>[1] (inserting Rahab and Ruth, and calling David ‘the king’), and agrees with 1 Chronicles 2:1-16 ; it then gives the names of the kings to Jechoniah, from 1 Chronicles 3:10-15 , but inserts ‘the [2] of Uriah’ and omits kings Abaziah, Joash, and Amaziah between Joram and Uzziah (= Azariah), and also Jehoiakim son of Josiah and father of Jechoniah (Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 ) or Jehoiachin ( 2 Chronicles 36:8 )
Pharaoh - ...
...
The Pharaoh by whom Josiah was defeated and slain at Megiddo (2 Chronicles 35:20-24 ; 2 Kings 23:29,30 )
Zechariah, Book of - 9 11 and 12 14 were distinguished as separate prophecies, dated respectively, from internal evidence, in the time of Hosea, and shortly after the death of Josiah
Levites - So under Josiah the Levites had as their characteristic designation that they "taught all Israel" (2 Chronicles 35:3-15)
Chronicles, the Books of - For this end, the Chronicles give a summary history of David, introduced by the closing scene of Saul's life, and of the succeeding kings, especially of some of the greatest and best kings who built or restored the temple, abolished corruption, and established the services in due order, as Jehoshaphat, Hezekiah, Josiah, etc
Kings, 1 And 2 - ...
Of the kings of Judah, only Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:3-7 ) and Josiah (2 Kings 22:2 ) were praised without reservation because they adhered to these two principles
Hell - This final punishment was usually located in a valley south of Jerusalem, known in Hebrew as Gen Hinnom or the Valley of Hinnom (2Apoc Baruch 59:10 ; 4 Ezra 7:36 ), and in Greek as gehenna [ 2 Kings 16:3 ; 2 Chronicles 28:3 ; 33:6 ; Jeremiah 7:31-34 ; 19:6 ), this valley was further desecrated when Josiah used it as Jerusalem's refuse dump (2 Kings 23:10 ) and it was prophesied as the place of God's future fiery judgment (Isaiah 30:33 ; 66:24 ; Jeremiah 7:31-32 )
King, Kingship - Even among the kings of Judah, only Hezekiah and Josiah receive unqualified approval (2 Kings 18:3-7 ; 22:2 )
Arms And Armor - At least four Israelite kings were severely or fatally wounded by enemy arrows: Saul (1 Samuel 31:3 ), Ahab (1 Kings 22:34 ), Joram (2 Kings 9:24 ), and Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:23 )
Joel, Book of - König prefers the latter part of the reign of Josiah (b
Law - 621, king Josiah inaugurated a national reformation resulting from the discovery of a Book of the Law in the Temple. All the evidence points to this book being practically identical with Deuteronomy; all the reforms which Josiah inaugurated were based upon laws practically indistinguishable from those we now possess in the Deuteronomic Code; in fact, no conclusion of historical or literary criticism has been reached more nearly approaching to absolute certainty than that the Book of the Law brought to light in 621 was none other than the fifth book of the Pentateuch
Jerusalem - In the reign of Josiah the Book of the Law was discovered, and the king devoted himself to the repairs of the Temple and the moral reformation which that discovery involved ( 2 Kings 22:1-20 ). The death of Josiah at Megiddo was disastrous for the kingdom of Judah, and he was succeeded by a series of petty kinglings, all of them puppets in the hands of the Egyptian or Babylonian monarchs
Jews - ...
Josiah, however, again promoted it, and carried it to a higher pitch than in the reigns of David and Solomon. After Josiah was slain by Pharaoh Necho, king of Egypt, the people returned to idolatry, and God gave them up to servitude to the Egyptians and the Chaldeans
Transportation And Travel - Foreign rulers also fought to hold the city (which was destroyed over a dozen times during its period of occupation), and king Josiah of Judah died here defending the pass against the army of Pharaoh Necho II in 609 B
Ezekiel - Josiah (640-609 B
Olives, Mount of - Josiah defiled Solomon's idolatrous high places, breaking the "statues," cutting down the groves, and filling their places with men's bones
Music And Musical Instruments - The reformations under both Hezekiah and Josiah included the restoring of the musical ritual belonging to David’s time ( 2 Chronicles 29:25 ff; 2 Chronicles 35:15 )
Chronology - ; Ahaz' 16 years begin at 718; Hezekiah's 29 begin at 702; Manasseh's 55 begin at 673; Amon's two begin at 618; Josiah's 31 begin at 616; Jehoiakim's 11 begin at 585. The Apis tablets of Egypt prove the synchronism of Josiah and Pharaoh Necho; also they demonstrate that of Hezekiah and Tirhakah
Priest, Priesthood - ...
Second Kings 23:4-20 lists five categories of priests that existed in ancient Israel before Josiah's reformation, and arranges them according to their proximity to the Jerusalem temple: (1) the high priest (v. According to this passage, a significant feature of Josiah's religious reformation was his eradication of all priests (and their cultic accouterments) except those who functioned legitimately within Jerusalem temple. The importance of the Levites in the priestly functions of the sanctuary are well illustrated by their involvement in the reforms of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29-31 ) and Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:9 ; 35:10-15 )
Wages - Few are the rulers who, like Josiah, protected the powerless from the powerful; the majority are like his son, whose life was obsessed with making a profit through oppression and extortion (Jeremiah 22:16-17 )
Assyria, History And Religion of - Outlying states, such as Judah under Josiah, were free to rebel without fear
Apocrypha - Paralleling material in the last chapters of 2Chronicles, Ezra, and Nehemiah, it covers the period from Josiah to the reading of the law by Ezra
Deuteronomy, the Book of - ...
Possibly also the book of the law found in the temple by Hilkiah the high priest and brought before king Josiah, after disuse for the 60 years of the two previous reigns, was Deuteronomy alone. Josiah's reforms are just those most insisted upon in Deuteronomy
Tombs - , eleven (David, Solomon, Rehoboam, Abijah, Asa, Jehoshaphat, Ahaziah, Amaziah, Jotham, Hezekiah, Josiah; also the good priest Jehoiada) were buried in one common subterranean receptacle in "the city of David
Jews, Judaism - The history of that kingdom was marred and largely inglorious, despite the reforms of devout kings such as Hezekiah and Josiah
Temple - The relativizing of the temple and moral earnestness that we see in Jeremiah were precisely the points of the Deuteronomic theology that influenced the short-lived reforms of Josiah
Apocrypha - First Esdras (Third in the Vulgate) is the canonical book of Ezra in Greek, which in reconstructed form tells the story of the decline and fall of the kingdom of Judah from the time of Josiah
Pentateuch - put it in the side of the ark that it may be a witness against thee," as it proved under Josiah
War - Such were Joshua, Caleb, Gideon, Jephthah, Samson, David, Josiah, and the Maccabees, whose names alone are their own sufficient encomiums
Jeroboam - 8:8, section 5), cried against the altar: "behold, a child born unto the house of David, Josiah, upon thee shall offer the priests of the high places that burn incense (burn sacrifices) upon thee (retribution in kind), and men's bones shall be burnt upon thee," to defile thee. Josiah's name, as Cyrus', in Isaiah 44:28; Isaiah 45:1, is specified as a concrete description of what God would do by him ("he whom Jehovah will support"), to execute His judgment on Bethel and its priests: fulfilled 2 Kings 23:15-20
Sacrifice And Offering - With the abolition of the local sanctuaries by Josiah in b
Joshua - The governor of Jerusalem in the time of Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:8 )
Zechariah, Theology of - Following the reforms of Josiah (ca
Heman - ' Josiah and Jeremiah bore their yoke also all their youth; but Heman bore his yoke all his days
Passover (i.) - At the period of the revival of religion during the reign of Josiah, there was another celebration that stood out conspicuously among the memories of the festival (2 Kings 23:22, 2 Chronicles 35:1-17)
Kings, Books of - The first place is given to Hezekiah and Josiah (who are classed with David), just because they did away with these ancient sanctuaries. Josiah’s reforms, as is well known, were the direct result of the finding of this book in the Temple
Canaan, History And Religion of - It took many centuries (note King Josiah's removal from the Jerusalem Temple about 621 B. ) is remembered as a reforming king (2 Chronicles 29-31 ), Josiah (640-609 B
Prophet - Thus Isaiah announces the name of Cyrus ages before his appearance; so as to Josiah, 1 Kings 13:2
Deuteronomy, Theology of - , identifying it as the document that gave impetus for the reformation of Josiah of Judah (2 Kings 22:8-13 )
Idol - In Judah several arose, Asa, Jehoshaphat, Hezekiah, Josiah
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - This evil tendency was encouraged by Manasseh ( 2 Kings 21:6 ), but in the reformation of Josiah, idolatry, witchcraft, and the use of teraphim were suppressed ( 2 Kings 23:24 ) in accordance with Deuteronomy 18:10-12 (D Genealogies of Jesus Christ - ; the names Jehoiakim and Eliakim are inserted between Jechoniah and Josiah as if they referred to two different persons, instead of being two names for the same man; and also Amaziah, Joash, and Ahaziah between Uzziah and Joram (see Resch, TU Create, Creation - 1 Chronicles 3:11-12 ]'>[7]; and Jehoiakim between Josiah and Jechoniah/Jehoiachin in 1:11; Biblical Theology - The southern kingdom is favored with spiritual renewals under noble kings like Hezekiah and Josiah
Elijah - So Isaiah foretold concerning Cyrus' future kingdom (Isaiah 44-45); and Ahijah concerning Josiah (1 Kings 13:2)
Babel - ...
Josiah, as ally of Babylon, met him in spite of warning and was slain at Megiddo (2 Chronicles 35:20-25; 2 Kings 23:29)
Egypt - Solomon married a Pharaoh's daughter; Tirhakah helped Hezekiah; So made a treaty with Hoshea; Pharaoh Necho was unwilling to war with Josiah; and Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) raised the Chaldaean siege of Jerusalem as Zedekiah's ally
Messiah - ...
The reformation of Josiah finds an echo in the equally exultant expectation of Jeremiah that Jehovah would surely place a descendant of David upon the throne, a ‘righteous branch,’ and one who would deliver Israel (Jeremiah 33:14-16 )
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - The most common term for prophet (occurring over three hundred times in the Old Testament) is nabi [ Exodus 15:20 ); Deborah (Judges 4:4 ); the prophet Isaiah's wife (Isaiah 8:3 ); and Huldah, the one who interpreted the Book of the Law discovered in the temple during the days of Josiah (2 Kings 22:14 ; 2 Chronicles 34:22 )
Jerusalem - Within the space of sixty-six years more it was taken by Pharaoh-Necho, king of Egypt, whom Josiah, king of Judah, had opposed in his expedition to Carchemish; and who, in consequence, was killed at the battle of Megiddo, and his son Eliakim placed on the throne in his stead by Necho, who changed his name to Jehoiakim, and imposed a heavy tribute upon him, having sent his elder brother, Jehoahaz, who had been proclaimed king at Jerusalem, a prisoner to Egypt, where he died, 2 Kings 23; 2 Chronicles 35