What does Joshua mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יְהוֹשֻׁ֖עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 27
יְהוֹשֻׁ֔עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 26
יְהוֹשֻׁ֙עַ֙ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 23
יְהוֹשֻׁ֜עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 20
יְהוֹשֻׁ֛עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 18
יְהוֹשֻׁ֑עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 12
יְהוֹשֻׁ֗עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 11
יְהוֹשֻׁ֣עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 10
יְהוֹשֻׁ֤עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 9
יְהוֹשֻׁ֥עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 7
וִיהוֹשֻׁ֣עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 6
יְהוֹשֻֽׁעַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 6
יְ֠הוֹשֻׁעַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 5
וִיהוֹשֻׁ֖עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 5
יְהוֹשֻׁעַ֮ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 4
יְהוֹשֻׁ֨עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 3
יְהוֹשֻׁ֧עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 3
יְהוֹשֻׁעַ֒ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 2
יְהוֹשֻׁ֡עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 2
ἰησοῦ Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites 2
יְהוֹשֻׁ֣עַ־ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
יְהוֹשׁ֔וּעַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
וִיהוֹשֻׁ֙עַ֙ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
וִיהוֹשֻׁ֨עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
וִיהוֹשֻׁ֕עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
בִּיהוֹשֻׁ֖עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
יְהוֹשֻׁ֣עַ ׀ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
יְהוֹשֻׁעַ֙ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
וִיהוֹשֻׁ֪עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
לִיהוֹשֻׁ֥עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
לִֽיהוֹשֻׁ֑עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
לִיהוֹשֻׁ֣עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
ἰησοῦς Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites 1
וִֽיהוֹשֻׁ֣עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
וִֽיהוֹשֻׁ֔עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
לִֽיהוֹשֻׁ֗עַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
יְהוֹשׁ֣וּעַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1
יֵשׁ֨וּעַ son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan. 1

Definitions Related to Joshua

H3091


   1 son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan.
   2 a resident of Beth-shemesh on whose land the Ark of the Covenant came to a stop after the Philistines returned it.
   3 son of Jehozadak and high priest after the restoration.
   4 governor of Jerusalem under king Josiah who gave his name to a gate of the city of Jerusalem.
   Additional Information: Joshua or Jehoshua = “Jehovah is salvation”.
   

G2424


   1 Joshua was the famous captain of the Israelites, Moses’ successor.
   2 Jesus, son of Eliezer, one of the ancestors of Christ.
   3 Jesus, the Son of God, the Saviour of mankind, God incarnate.
   4 Jesus Barabbas was the captive robber whom the Jews begged Pilate to release instead of Christ.
   5 Jesus, surnamed Justus, a Jewish Christian, an associate with Paul in the preaching of the gospel.
   Additional Information: Jesus = “Jehovah is salvation”.
   

H3442


   1 son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim and successor to Moses as the leader of the children of Israel; led the conquest of Canaan.
   2 son of Jehozadak and high priest after the restoration.
   3 a priest in the time of David who had charge of the 9th course.
   4 a Levite in the reign of Hezekiah.
   5 head of a Levitical house which returned from captivity in Babylon.
   6 father of a builder of the wall of Jerusalem in the time of Nehemiah.
   7 a town in southern Judah reinhabited by the people of Judah after the return from captivity.
   Additional Information: Jeshua = “he is saved”.
   

Frequency of Joshua (original languages)

Frequency of Joshua (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joshua
Son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, Moses's successor, the commander of the army of Israel in its battle with Amalec, and one of the spies sent into Chanaan.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joshua, Book of
The sixth book of the Bible, treating of the conquest of Chanaan by the Israelites under Josue. After crossing the Jordan and capturing Jericho the Israelites defeated the Chanaanites and divided the conquered territory among the twelve tribes. Before his death Josue addressed the assembled people urging them to remain faithful to their God. The book itself was written in great part by an eye-witness, probably Josue himself. The precise knowledge of lesser details, the ancient names of Chanaanite towns, the treating of Rahab as a living contemporary, and the mention of memorial stones as still in the Jordan (4:9), justify this view, which both the Jews and the Fathers upheld. A later writer is responsible for the account of Josue's death, for additional explanatory glosses, and, in general, for the editing of the book. The historical value of the narrative is substantiated by its fidelity to older geographical names and to some circumstances of the time which archaeology is able to control. No Catholic exegete will regard the miracles recorded in Josue as an objection to its historical veracity. Saint Paul, Saint James, and Saint Stephen accepted the facts narrated as history, and this has ever been the opinion in the Catholic Church.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Joshua, the Book of
Contains a history of the Israelites from the death of Moses to that of Joshua. It consists of three parts:
The history of the conquest of the land (1-12).
The allotment of the land to the different tribes, with the appointment of cities of refuge, the provision for the Levites (13-22), and the dismissal of the eastern tribes to their homes. This section has been compared to the Domesday Book of the Norman conquest.
The farewell addresses of Joshua, with an account of his death (23,24). This book stands first in the second of the three sections, (1) the Law, (2) the Prophets, (3) the "other writings" = Hagiographa, into which the Jewish Church divided the Old Testament. There is every reason for concluding that the uniform tradition of the Jews is correct when they assign the authorship of the book to Joshua, all except the concluding section; the last verses (24:29-33) were added by some other hand.
There are two difficulties connected with this book which have given rise to much discussion,
The miracle of the standing still of the sun and moon on Gibeon. The record of it occurs in Joshua's impassioned prayer of faith, as quoted (Joshua 10:12-15 ) from the "Book of Jasher" (q.v.). There are many explanations given of these words. They need, however, present no difficulty if we believe in the possibility of God's miraculous interposition in behalf of his people. Whether it was caused by the refraction of the light, or how, we know not.
Another difficulty arises out of the command given by God utterly to exterminate the Canaanites. "Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right?" It is enough that Joshua clearly knew that this was the will of God, who employs his terrible agencies, famine, pestilence, and war, in the righteous government of this world. The Canaanites had sunk into a state of immorality and corruption so foul and degrading that they had to be rooted out of the land with the edge of the sword. "The Israelites' sword, in its bloodiest executions, wrought a work of mercy for all the countries of the earth to the very end of the world." This book resembles the Acts of the Apostles in the number and variety of historical incidents it records, and in its many references to persons and places; and as in the latter case the epistles of Paul (see Paley's Horae Paul.) confirm its historical accuracy by their incidental allusions and "undesigned coincidences," so in the former modern discoveries confirm its historicity. The Amarna tablets (see ADONIZEDEC ) are among the most remarkable discoveries of the age. Dating from about B.C. 1480 down to the time of Joshua, and consisting of official communications from Amorite, Phoenician, and Philistine chiefs to the king of Egypt, they afford a glimpse into the actual condition of Palestine prior to the Hebrew invasion, and illustrate and confirm the history of the conquest. A letter, also still extant, from a military officer, "master of the captains of Egypt," dating from near the end of the reign of Rameses II., gives a curious account of a journey, probably official, which he undertook through Palestine as far north as to Aleppo, and an insight into the social condition of the country at that time. Among the things brought to light by this letter and the Amarna tablets is the state of confusion and decay that had now fallen on Egypt. The Egyptian garrisons that had held possession of Palestine from the time of Thothmes III., some two hundred years before, had now been withdrawn. The way was thus opened for the Hebrews. In the history of the conquest there is no mention of Joshua having encountered any Egyptian force. The tablets contain many appeals to the king of Egypt for help against the inroads of the Hebrews, but no help seems ever to have been sent. Is not this just such a state of things as might have been anticipated as the result of the disaster of the Exodus? In many points, as shown under various articles, the progress of the conquest is remarkably illustrated by the tablets. The value of modern discoveries in their relation to Old Testament history has been thus well described:
"The difficulty of establishing the charge of lack of historical credibility, as against the testimony of the Old Testament, has of late years greatly increased. The outcome of recent excavations and explorations is altogether against it. As long as these books contained, in the main, the only known accounts of the events they mention, there was some plausibility in the theory that perhaps these accounts were written rather to teach moral lessons than to preserve an exact knowledge of events. It was easy to say in those times men had not the historic sense. But the recent discoveries touch the events recorded in the Bible at very many different points in many different generations, mentioning the same persons, countries, peoples, events that are mentioned in the Bible, and showing beyond question that these were strictly historic. The point is not that the discoveries confirm the correctness of the Biblical statements, though that is commonly the case, but that the discoveries show that the peoples of those ages had the historic sense, and, specifically, that the Biblical narratives they touch are narratives of actual occurrences."
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Joshua
Jehovah is his help, or Jehovah the Saviour. The son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim, the successor of Moses as the leader of Israel. He is called Jehoshua in Numbers 13:16 (A.V.), and Jesus in Acts 7:45 and Hebrews 4:8 (RSV, Joshua). He was born in Egypt, and was probably of the age of Caleb, with whom he is generally associated. He shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites at their great battle against the Amalekites in Rephidim ( Exodus 17:8-16 ). He became Moses' minister or servant, and accompanied him part of the way when he ascended Mount Sinai to receive the two tables (Exodus 32:17 ). He was also one of the twelve who were sent on by Moses to explore the land of Canaan (Numbers 13:16,17 ), and only he and Caleb gave an encouraging report. Under the direction of God, Moses, before his death, invested Joshua in a public and solemn manner with authority over the people as his successor (Deuteronomy 31:23 ). The people were encamped at Shittim when he assumed the command (Joshua 1:1 ); and crossing the Jordan, they encamped at Gilgal, where, having circumcised the people, he kept the Passover, and was visited by the Captain of the Lord's host, who spoke to him encouraging words (1:1-9).
Now began the wars of conquest which Joshua carried on for many years, the record of which is in the book which bears his name. Six nations and thirty-one kings were conquered by him (Joshua 11:18-23 ; 12:24 ). Having thus subdued the Canaanites, Joshua divided the land among the tribes, Timnath-serah in Mount Ephraim being assigned to himself as his own inheritance. (See SHILOH; PRIEST .)
His work being done, he died, at the age of one hundred and ten years, twenty-five years after having crossed the Jordan. He was buried in his own city of Timnath-serah (Joshua 24 ); and "the light of Israel for the time faded away."
Joshua has been regarded as a type of Christ (Hebrews 4:8 ) in the following particulars: (1) In the name common to both; (2) Joshua brings the people into the possession of the Promised Land, as Jesus brings his people to the heavenly Canaan; and (3) as Joshua succeeded Moses, so the Gospel succeeds the Law.
The character of Joshua is thus well sketched by Edersheim:, "Born a slave in Egypt, he must have been about forty years old at the time of the Exodus. Attached to the person of Moses, he led Israel in the first decisive battle against Amalek (Exodus 17:9,13 ), while Moses in the prayer of faith held up to heaven the God-given 'rod.' It was no doubt on that occasion that his name was changed from Oshea, 'help,' to Jehoshua, 'Jehovah is help' (Numbers 13:16 ). And this name is the key to his life and work. Alike in bringing the people into Canaan, in his wars, and in the distribution of the land among the tribes, from the miraculous crossing of Jordan and taking of Jericho to his last address, he was the embodiment of his new name, 'Jehovah is help.' To this outward calling his character also corresponded. It is marked by singleness of purpose, directness, and decision...He sets an object before him, and unswervingly follows it" (Bible Hist., iii. 103)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Joshua
(jahssh yoo uh) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh delivered.” 1. Leader of Israelites who first took control of Promised Land of Canaan. Joshua is one of the unsung heroes of the Old Testament. He, not Moses, led the people into the Promised Land. He was a person of such stature that he could succeed the incomparable Moses and compile a record of notable success (Joshua 24:31 ). The Hebrew variations of Joshua are Oshea (Numbers 13:16 ); Hosea (Hosea 1:1 ). English versions differ in their transliteration of the Hebrew names. Its New Testament equivalent is Jesus. Joshua was born in Egypt during the period of slavery. He was a member of Ephraim, the important tribe that later formed the heart of the Northern Kingdom of Israel. He first appeared during the battle with the Amalekites during the desert travels. He was Moses' general, who led the troops in the actual fighting while Aaron and Hur held up Moses' hands (Exodus 17:8-13 ).
Joshua was Moses's servant (Exodus 24:13 ). He was on the mountain when Moses received the Law (Exodus 32:17 ). He was also one of the twelve spies Moses sent to investigate Canaan (Numbers 13:8 ). He and Caleb returned with a positive, minority report. Of all the adults alive at that time, only the two of them were allowed to live to enter the land of Canaan (Numbers 14:28-30 ,Numbers 14:28-30,14:38 ).
The Lord selected Joshua to be Moses' successor long before Moses' death (Numbers 27:15-23 ; Deuteronomy 31:14-15 ,Deuteronomy 31:14-15,31:23 ; Deuteronomy 34:9 ). Joshua was a military leader, a political leader, and a spiritual leader. He was quiet and unassuming, but he was not buffaloed by his responsibilities or the task that lay before him. He was a battlefield genius, particularly in the areas of careful planning, strategy, and execution. He was a capable administrator for the nation, effective in maintaining harmony among people and groups. He was a spokesman to the people for the Lord. Though he did not receive the Law as Moses had, he communicated the Lord's will and the Lord's message much like Moses.
Joshua was at the helm of the nation during the conquest and the distribution and settlement of Canaan. He led in the covenant renewal at mount Ebal and Shechem (Joshua 8:30-35 ; Joshua 24:1-28 ). He was able to challenge his people by both word and example. His pattern is a hard one to better. See Joshua, The Book of ; Moses .
2. High priest of community who returned from Babylonian Exile in 538 B.C. See Jeshua 3.
Dan Gentry Kent
Holman Bible Dictionary - Joshua, the Book of
The Book of Joshua is the sixth book of the English Old Testament. It is the first book of the second division of the Hebrew Old Testament, the Prophets. The book is named after its central character, Moses' successor, Joshua the son of Nun. Authorship and Date The Former Prophets are all anonymous. That means that no author is mentioned in the book. Some Bible students think Joshua wrote the book except for the death reports (Joshua 24:29-33 ); but the book gives no indication that Joshua had anything to do with writing the whole book, though he did write the laws on which the covenant renewal was based (Joshua 24:26 ).
It is also difficult to date the writing of books like this. Some Bible students suggest a time about a hundred years after Joshua's death, or at least by the time of the beginning of the monarchy. A date around 1045 B.C. would place it within the lifetime of Samuel, who was in a sense the last of the judges and the one who anointed the first two kings. Other Bible students think the Book of Joshua only reached its present form when the Former Prophets were collected together during the Exile.
The events of the book apparently took place in the last half of the thirteenth century, from about 1250 to 1200 B.C., though some would date the Exodus and the conquest earlier, in the middle of the fifteenth century.
Contents The Book of Joshua tells the story of a significant Bible event, the conquest of the land of Canaan. It tells this story in light of the theological themes of the Book of Deuteronomy, and thus the historical books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings are often spoken of as the Deuteronomic History.
The book has only two main parts, and an appendix:
I. The Conquest of the Land, 1–12.
II. The Settlement of the Land, 13–22.
III. Joshua's Farewell Addresses, 23–24.
The Book of Joshua standardizes the conquest stories to some extent. For example, the accounts are from the standpoint of the general who led the entire nation, whereas the Book of Judges is more from the standpoint of the foot soldier who did the actual fighting.
A surface reading of the Book of Joshua would give the impression that the invasion was complete and final. However, numerous passages (Joshua 13:13 ; Joshua 15:63 ; Joshua 16:10 ; Joshua 17:12-13 , Joshua 17:16-18 ) agree with the Book of Judges to show that it was up to the individual clans to root out the many pockets of Canaanite resistance still scattered throughout the land. The difference is between occupation and subjugation, the former in the Book of Joshua and the latter in the Book of Judges.
Through it all, the emphasis of the book is on the Lord's mighty acts. Joshua was rightly celebrated as an effective military leader. The people were generally obedient and courageous. However, the glory goes to God alone (Joshua 3:10 ; Joshua 4:23-24 ; Joshua 24:29-33 ). He is the true hero of the book.
Nature of the Covenant in the Book of Joshua The Lord's covenant with His people was always more universalistic and inclusive than we usually realize. We see this clearly in the Book of Joshua. Rahab, the Canaanite prostitute, was accepted, along with her family, as a part of the covenant community (Joshua 2:9-13 ; Joshua 6:22-23 ,Joshua 6:22-23,6:25 ). It may well be that people related to the Hebrews who lived in the Shechem area voluntarily joined in their fellowship of faith (Joshua 8:30-35 ). The people of Gibeon and its four-city league of cities were accepted, and even became associated with Temple service (Joshua 9:3-27 ). The covenant was not limited by race or nation; it was open to anyone of faith.
Holy War in the Book of Joshua The Hebrews did not divide life up into sacred and secular spheres as we do. To them all of life was holy, in the sense that it was lived under the direction of the Lord. They saw the Lord at work on behalf of His people in every area of life. Thus the soldiers were holy. They were under strict religious regulations. Religious ceremonies prepared them for battle (Joshua 5:2-11 ).
The Lord received the credit for all victories. All of the spoils of battle belonged to Him (Joshua 6:18-19 ). None was to be taken for personal use. This is related to the idea of cherem or ban. It might seem ruthless or even immoral by our modern Western standards, but it was a part of the world of that day. A certain city, for instance Jericho in Joshua 6:1 , was placed under the ban. It was devoted to destruction in the name of the Lord. Everything in it was to either be destroyed or else placed in the Lord's service in the tabernacle.
The ban was a common practice in the Semitic world and was also known among the Greeks. Some suggest that it served to control looting and that it offered an enemy encouragement to surrender without a struggle.
Moral Problems of the Book of Joshua The Book of Joshua is filled with war, conquest, and destruction. Its teaching is that the Lord allowed his people to conquer the land of Canaan, to take possession of the area He had promised to the patriarchs.
But why would the Lord allow one nation to attack and defeat another? Several factors need to be taken into consideration in studying a book that has so little of loving your enemy or turning the other cheek.
One must begin by admitting that Joshua lived centuries before Christ appeared to reveal the Father's will fully and completely. We should not expect to find completed Christian truth in a book written so long before Christ came.
The Hebrew people saw paganism as a poison. Pagan religious views were a spiritual infection that was both highly contagious and deadly. It could be controlled only by strict quarantine and eradication. Holy war became God's method in that setting to achieve this purpose. Holy war was not set up as an eternal example (compare Deuteronomy 20:16 ).
One element in the explanation for the holy wars of Joshua is judgment on sin. The iniquity of the Amorites (Canaanites) was at last full (Genesis 15:16 ). The catch to this arrangement is that if the other nations could be judged for their sins, the Hebrew people could, too, and later were. See Conquest; War; Joshua .
Outline
I. God Brought Victory to a People of the Book (Joshua 1:1-12:24 ).
A. To possess the promise, God's people must be faithful to the book (Joshua 1:1-18 ).
B. God uses unexpected persons to fulfill His promises (Joshua 2:1-24 ).
C. God exalts His leaders and proves His presence so all people may know Him (Joshua 3:1-4:24 ).
D. God's people must worship Him to prepare for the victories He promises —(Joshua 5:1-15 ).
E. Divine power, not human might, provides victory for God's people (Joshua 6:1-27 ).
F. A disobedient people cannot expect God's victories (Joshua 7:1-26 ).
G. A repentant people receive a strategy for victory from God (Joshua 8:1-35 ).
H. Human cunning and disobedience cannot overcome the purposes of God (Joshua 9:1-27 ).
I. God fights for His people (Joshua 10:1-43 ).
J. God fulfills His promises, giving victory to an obedient people (Joshua 11:1-12:24 ).
II. God Divides the Spoils of Victory According to the Needs of His People (Joshua 13:1-21:45 ).
A. The complete rest is still incomplete (Joshua 13:1-7 ).
B. History shows God's provision for His people (Joshua 13:8-33 ).
C. God rewards heroes of faith (Joshua 14:1-15 ).
D. God fulfilled His promise of land to His people (Joshua 15:1-17:13 ).
E. God provided for specific needs of His people (Joshua 17:14-18 ).
F. God called a hesitant people to action to receive the promised gift (Joshua 18:1-10 ).
G. God gave the land to an obedient people (Joshua 18:11-19:48 ).
H. God and His people rewarded their faithful leader (Joshua 19:49-51 ).
I. God decreed legal protection for the accused among His people (Joshua 20:1-9 ).
J. God provided for the needs of His priests (Joshua 21:1-42 ).
K. God fulfills all His promises (Joshua 21:43-45 ).
III. God Calls His Victorious People to Unity in Worship and Devotion (Joshua 22:1-24:33 ).
A. God's rest, commandments, and blessing unify His people (Joshua 22:1-6 ).
B. Worship unifies God's people forever despite geographical barriers (Joshua 22:7-34 ).
C. Israel had to be faithful to God's direction or face the loss of His gifts (Joshua 23:1-16 ).
D. God calls His people to remember the history of God's faithfulness and choose to serve only Him (Joshua 24:1-28 ).
E. Faithful leaders keep a people faithful (Joshua 6:16 ).
Dan Gentry Kent
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Joshua
JOSHUA (on forms and meaning of the name see next art.). 1. The successor of Moses. See next article. 2. The Bethshemite in whose field was the stone on which the ark was set, on its return from the land of the Philistines ( 1 Samuel 6:14 ; 1 Samuel 6:18 ). 3. The governor of Jerusalem in the time of Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:8 ). 4. The high priest who along with Zerub. directed affairs at Jerusalem after the restoration ( Haggai 1:1 ; Haggai 1:12 ; Haggai 1:14 etc., Zechariah 3:1 ; Joshua 9:3-9 ; Zechariah 3:6 etc.). In the books of Hag. and Zec. he is called Joshua, in Ezr. and Neh Jeshua (wh. see). See also Jesus, 2 .
JOSHUA (cf. Jesus, 1 ). The successor of Moses as leader of Israel. He is called Hoshea in Joshua 10:28-43 , Numbers 13:8 ; and in Numbers 13:16 this is represented as his original name. But Numbers 13:1-33 is late, and the versions in Dt. show that ‘Joshua’ was probably the original reading. The most likely rendering of the name is ‘Jahweh is salvation.’ The son of Nun and of the tribe of Ephraim, he commanded the army in the battle with Amalek ( Exodus 17:8-16 ), attended on Moses at Mt. Sinai ( Exodus 32:17 f.), and at the Tent of Meeting ( Exodus 33:11 ; all these passages are from E [1] ); acted as one of the twelve spies ( Numbers 13:8 ; Numbers 14:6-9 ), was spared along with Caleb ( Numbers 14:30 ; Joshua 10:9-12 ; all P [2] ). His subsequent history belongs to the story of the conquest of Canaan (see following article). He was buried in Timnath-serah ( Joshua 19:50 ; Joshua 24:30 ) or Timnath-heres ( Judges 2:9 ), in the hill-country of Ephraim.
The view is widely held that Joshua has no historical reality as a person, that his name is merely the name of a clan in Ephraim, and that his leadership in Israel represents, and puts back into the period of the conquest the commanding position which Ephraim had come to hold in the Israelite confederation. And the effort is made to show that he makes his appearance first in E [1] , the N. Israelite or Ephraimite source. But the old poetic fragment Joshua 10:12 f. represents him as speaking in the name of united Israel, and Joshua 17:14-18 brings him into view in his dealings with his own tribe as having more than their interests in his mind, as being in some sense the arbiter of the confederacy. And while it is difficult on any reading of the history to understand why all our sources say nothing about the conquest of Central Palestine, this becomes doubly difficult if originally this was the scene of Joshua’s first activity and influence. The historical foundation for making the hero of Ephraim into the conqueror of all Canaan is absent.
It seems more probable that Joshua led the nation in their first assault on Palestine, that under his leadership the entry by Jericho was won, and a wedge thrust into the land by the capture of Bethel and Ai. After this early and united victory, the tribes may have divided for their future settlements, and the separate conquests may have been carried out, as the traditions in Jg. represent them, in a more piecemeal and imperfect fashion. But this is not incompatible with the fact that Joshua may have retained such a position of arbiter as, e.g. , Joshua 17:1-18 gives him. The loose confederacy, which still recognized its unity against its enemies, may have turned naturally for guidance to one who led its early efforts. In our later sources the conquest was conceived in a different fashion. It was represented as thorough, and as carried out by a united people. The writers naturally grouped all this round the name of one who had been able, though only for a short time, to give the tribes a sense of unity and to begin their assault on their new land. They idealized both his person and his work. But only on the supposition that there was something to idealize is it possible to understand why a man, who belongs to a clan in Ephraim which is otherwise unknown, came to be set up as the hero under whom they won their foothold among the nations, and passed from wandering tribes into a people.
A. C. Welch.
JOSHUA
1. Place in the Canon . The book was placed by the Jews among the Early Prophets, i.e. Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings. The reason generally accepted for this is that Joshua, unlike Exodus or Leviticus, does not contain Torah or law. But Genesis, which recounts only the origins of the nation to which the Torah was delivered, was included in the Pentateuch; Joshua, which relates the conquest of the land where the Torah was to be practised, was excluded. Jewish tradition worked with criteria of which we are ignorant, but in separating Joshua from the Pentateuch it may have recognized the presence of different documents.
Modern criticism has insisted on connecting the book more closely with the Pentateuch, on the ground that, since all the Pentateuch documents look forward to the fulfilment of Jahweh’s promise of Palestine, Joshua, which relates the conquest, is a necessary sequel. This, however, forgets ( a ) that all Hebrew history is a unity in which the conquest of Palestine is merely an incident; ( b ) that Deuteronomy looks forward beyond the conquest to the erection of a national sanctuary, for which Joshua provides no more than the foundation. And there are other evidences that Joshua formed part of a history which extended through the period of the Judges to the establishment of the kingdom in Jerusalem. It is possible that a wider recognition of this fact may help to clear up some of the difficult questions as to the composition of the book.
2. Structure and contents . The book falls into three parts: ( a ) the conquest, chs. 1 12; ( b ) the division of the land, chs. 13 21; ( c ) a conclusion, chs. 22 24. It is convenient to discuss these separately.
( a ) In chs. 1 12, an account, closely akin to JE [4] , supplies the foundation. It relates the mission of the spies to Jericho ( Joshua 2:1-9 ; Joshua 2:12-24 ), and the consequent passage of Jordan ( Joshua 3:1 ; Joshua 3:5 ; Joshua 3:10-17 , Joshua 4:1-11 a, Joshua 4:15-18 , Joshua 4:20 ). In the latter story a difference in substance proves the presence of two accounts, but every effort to identify one of these with J [5] , the other with E [1] , fails from insufficient criteria. It recounts the circumcision at Gilgal, which it views as a novelty (‘the second time’ of Joshua 5:2 is absent from the LXX [7] ), since by this means the reproach of the circumcised Egyptians is removed from the people ( Joshua 5:2 f., Joshua 5:8 f.). The story of the capture of Jericho and Ai (in both of which the presence of two accounts is clear) follows ( Joshua 5:13 to Joshua 6:27 , Joshua 7:2-26 , Joshua 8:1-29 ), with the trespass of Achan. Joshua then makes a compact with the Gibeonites ( Zechariah 3:3 a, Joshua 9:11-15 a, Joshua 9:16 , Joshua 9:22 f., Joshua 9:26 , Joshua 20:7-96 a), and advances to the victory at Beth-horon ( Joshua 10:1-7 ; Numbers 14:38 b 14a), to the execution at Makkedah ( Joshua 10:15-24 ; Joshua 10:26 f.), and to the victory at the Waters of Merom ( Joshua 11:1-9 [8]).
This account has been thoroughly revised by an editor who is closely akin in spirit and language to the author of the framework of Deuteronomy. He added an introduction into which he has fused earlier material (ch. 1). He brought out certain features in connexion with the passage of Jordan the fear inspired in the Canaanites, the presence of the 2 1 / 2 tribes, the exaltation of Joshua by Jahweh (Joshua 2:10 f., Joshua 3:2-4 ; Joshua 3:6-9 , Joshua 4:11 b, Joshua 4:12 , Joshua 4:14 , Joshua 4:21-24 , Joshua 5:1 ). He gave a different reason for the circumcision at Gilgal ( Joshua 5:4-7 ), and added some details to the fraud of the Gibeonites ( Joshua 9:1 f., Joshua 9:9 b, Joshua 9:10 , Joshua 9:24 f., Joshua 9:27 b.), and to the story of Beth-horon ( Joshua 9:8 ; Joshua 9:12 a, Joshua 9:14 b, Joshua 9:25 ). He concluded the conquest of the South ( Deuteronomy 32:44 ) and the victory at Merom ( Joshua 11:10-23 ), with a summary of the result; and he added a review of the entire conquest in ch. 12. In his work he does not add independent material to his original, but by his arrangement and omissions gives a new aspect to the account. Thus several indications point to his having omitted much from his documents. It is sufficient to mention one the absence of any account of the conquest of Central Palestine. This is the more remarkable since at Joshua 8:30-35 we have a statement of how Joshua built an altar at Ebal, before the country between Gilgal and Mount Ephraim was subdued. Probably this formed the conclusion to JE [4] ’s narrative of the conquest of Central Palestine; possibly it was derived from E [1] , a source which was specially interested in North Israelite sanctuaries, and which (see Deuteronomy) was a favourite source with D [11] . Further, the conquest of South Palestine in its present form does not agree with Joshua 15:14-19 = Judges 1:10-15 . The latter passages represent South Palestine as conquered, not in one sweeping rush, but gradually; not by the action of the united tribes under one head, but by the effort of one tribe or of several in combination. Again, Joshua 11:21 f. assigns to Joshua the victory over the Anakim, which in Joshua 14:12 , Joshua 15:15 ff. and Judges 1:10-15 is attributed to Judah, and especially to Caleb. Evidently the editor has sought to group round one representative figure, and assign to a specific period, the conquest which covered a considerable time and engaged many leaders. His chief interest in the details of history centres round their capacity to be used to point a moral. Thus it is noteworthy bow few chronological data appear in the chapters in comparison with earlier books. He gives prominence to the motives which governed Joshua, and to the Divine support promised to and received by him. He magnifies the leader’s successes, and considers him the representative of the nation and the successor of Moses.
A few verses in this section, Joshua 4:13 ; Joshua 4:19 , Joshua 5:10-12 , Joshua 7:1 , Joshua 9:15 b, Joshua 9:17-21 , are generally assigned to P [2] , but they are so isolated and so vague that nothing can be done with them except catalogue them, and express the doubt whether they ever belonged to a separate work.
( b ) In chs. 13 21 the situation is different, and the critical results more uncertain. The same three sources can be traced as in the earlier section; but, on the one hand, the portions assigned to P [2] take a character and range wholly unlike those which characterize this document throughout the Pentateuch; on the other, it is still a subject of debate whether the section owes its final form to a Deuteronomic or a Priestly editor, D [11] or P [2] . The present writer’s view is that D [11] edited this section also, using as his sources JE [4] and what is called P [2] . (The other view is held, e.g. , by Driver.)
(1) P [2] (so called), as the more complete, is given first. It began with the assembly of the tribes at Shiloh for the division (Joshua 18:1 ), and a statement as to the lot assigned to the 2 1 /2 tribes ( Joshua 13:15-32 ). It then proceeded to the division ( Joshua 14:1-5 ). The lot of Judah is first described ( Joshua 15:1-13 ; Joshua 15:20-44 ; Joshua 15:48-62 ). Then follows the lot of the children of Joseph ( Joshua 16:4-8 , Joshua 17:1 a, Joshua 17:3 f., Joshua 17:7 , Joshua 17:9 a, Joshua 17:9 c, Joshua 17:10 a), who are counted as two, and of whom Manaseeh, as firstborn, is named first. The lots of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:11-28 ), Simeon ( Joshua 19:1-8 ), Zebulun ( Joshua 19:10-16 ), Issachar ( Joshua 19:17-23 ), Asher ( Joshua 19:24-31 ), Naphtali ( Joshua 19:32-39 ), Dan ( Joshua 19:40-46 ; Joshua 19:48 ) are described, and then comes a conclusion ( Joshua 19:51 ) corresponding with the opening ( Joshua 18:1 ). On this followed the law and list of the cities of refuge ( Joshua 20:1-3 ; Joshua 17:14-18 a, 1619165731_54 ), and a list of the Levitical cities ( Joshua 21:1-42 ).
(2) D [11] incorporated with this, material drawn from JE [4] . He introduced the division of the land with a review of the undivided land, and a statement of the lot assigned to the 2 1 /2 tribes (Joshua 13:1-14 ). He therefore dislodged the introduction ( Joshua 18:1 ). Into the lot of Judah he inserted the account of Caleb’s settlement there ( Joshua 14:6-15 , Joshua 15:14-19 ), and of Jerusalem ( Joshua 15:63 ).[22]. Into the lot of the children of Joseph he inserted material from the older source ( Joshua 16:1-3 ; Joshua 16:9 f., Joshua 17:1 b, Joshua 17:2 , Joshua 17:5 , Joshua 17:8 , Joshua 17:9 b, Joshua 17:10-18 ), which represented the lot of the sons as one ( Joshua 20:6 ). Before the lot of Benjamin he placed the statement of a survey made for the seven remaining tribes ( Joshua 18:2-6 ; Joshua 18:8-10 [from JE [4] ; Joshua 18:7 is from D [11] ]). This may represent the historical fact that the two strong clans of Judah and Ephraim were the first to be settled. But the break at this point in the original source gave occasion to insert Joshua 18:1 here. In the description of the remaining seven lots only a few verses ( Joshua 19:9 ; Joshua 19:47 ; Joshua 19:49 f.) come from JE [4] , but the list of Naphtali’s cities ( Joshua 19:32-39 ), which is entirely different in character from the description of the other lots, may be from JE [4] , according to which ( Joshua 18:9 ) the country was distributed by cities. This is one of the facts which support those who hold that P [2] edited JE [4] .
It deserves notice that the account of Judah, Benjamin, and Simeon the districts which were inhabited after the Exile is more exhaustive than that of the others. The fact suggests that the editor, who gave the book its final form, wrote at a late date, or at least that late hands retouched the book.
In the account of the cities of refuge (ch. 20), Joshua 18:4 f., Joshua 18:6 b, which have been added to the earlier source, are absent from the LXX [7] . They must have been added at a late date to bring the section into agreement with the Deuteronomic law.
(3) D [11] concluded the section on the division of the land with his formal close, Joshua 21:43-45 .
( c ) In chs. 22 24 D [11] took the account of the dismissal of the 2 1 /2 tribes ( Joshua 22:9-34 ) from P [2] , providing it with his own introduction ( Joshua 22:1-6 ). The account is late, since it views the conquest as simultaneous, complete, and national. He took ch. 24 the renewal of the covenant from JE [4] (probably E [1] ), and added only a few verses ( Joshua 24:11 b, Joshua 24:13 ; Joshua 24:31 ). To these he attached Joshua’s parting counsels (ch. 23).
The source named P [2] takes much the same position about the conquest as the final editor. The chief difference lies in the fact that it associates Eleazar with Joshua, but these two formally divide the conquered territory.
It seems probable that the Book of Joshua once formed part of a greater whole a history written in the Deuteronomic spirit and based on earlier sources, which covered the period from the conquest to the kingdom. This view is tenable along with the opinion that P [2] was the final editor, who, adding some sections on the division which he extracted from older sources, brought the book to its present form.
A. C. Welch.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Joshua, Theology of
Joshua the Faithful Warrior and Leader . Moses gave Joshua his name, meaning, "the Lord has delivered." The change from his former name, Hoshea ("he has delivered, " Numbers 13:16 ; Deuteronomy 32:44 ), reflects a confession of the God of Israel as Savior. Joshua first appears in Israel's war with the Amalekites (Exodus 17:8-13 ). He fights on behalf of Moses and leads Israel to victory. He thus personifies Israel at war. When he reappears in Exodus 24:13 , Joshua climbs Mount Sinai alongside Moses. Later (32:17), Joshua warns Moses of the noise that comes from the camp below where Israel engages in idolatry. He joins Moses in the covenant-making process and in watching over its preservation. With Caleb, Joshua spies out the land and returns a positive evaluation of the possibilities of Israelite occupation (Numbers 14 ). He appreciates and bears witness to the promised land as God's gift to Israel. Finally, Joshua is designated as Moses' successor and is commissioned to succeed him.
Four theological themes appear in the descriptions of Joshua in the Pentateuch: Joshua's divine commission as leader of Israel, his military leadership, his allocation of the land, and his role in Israel's covenant with God. In each case, God's word and power lie behind Joshua. These same four themes reappear in the Book of Joshua.
The Commission of a New Leader . The first chapter of the Book of Joshua establishes Joshua's leadership as divinely appointed successor to Moses. With Moses' death, God addresses Joshua directly, promising both the land which he promised to Moses (Deuteronomy 34:4 ) and his divine presence, just as he had given it to Moses (Joshua 1:3-5 ). The commands to be strong and courageous (vv. 6,7, 9) define the mission of Joshua. Their context of God's promised presence suggests that it is the divine choice and enablement of Joshua that precedes his leadership and gives it success. It only remains for Joshua to be recognized as leader by the Israelites, something he achieves through completion of the divinely appointed tasks involved in crossing the Jordan River. This miraculous crossing is God's means for exalting Joshua in the eyes of all Israel (Joshua 4:14 ).
Holy War and the Extermination of the Canaanites . Joshua's military leadership recurs throughout the first twelve chapters. Its theological dimensions incorporate questions of holy war and the extermination of all people from the land. How could a loving God allow such a slaughter, not only of the idolatrous Canaanites but also of their innocent children? Appeals to the sovereignty of God and his wrathful judgment may be made but the question persists as to the apparent wantonness of the destruction. An alternative, or perhaps complementary, explanation focuses on the exceptions of Rahab's family and of the Gibeonites, who escaped divine wrath through confession of faith in Israel's God (2:8-13; 9:9-10,24-25). Does this imply that such an option was always open to those who would renounce idolatry and submit themselves to Israel and to Israel's God? Although the Israelites seem reluctant to allow any who live in Canaan to survive (9:7) and the Gibeonites are saved only by deceit, it remains true that we are never told of any Canaanites who confessed the lordship of Israel's God and who subsequently were put to death. As to the slaughter of innocents, there is no specific mention of the killing of children. The accounts of Jericho's defeat and of the massacre at Ai mention men and women, as well as young and old, but they do not specify children (as opposed to "youth, young man" cf. 6:21; 8:22-24). This may be due to the nature of these places as fortresses rather than as population centers. Hazor's destruction mentions the extermination of everything that breathed (8:11-14). Even here, however, it is not certain that any others than the army remained in the city by the time the Israelites reached it. This is not intended to suggest that no innocents were killed, but rather to point out how little the Bible informs us about such matters. The concept of the ban, in which divine judgment required Israel to render back to God through killing and destruction all who rejected Israel's God, was common throughout the ancient Near East. What is unique in the theology of Joshua is the record of exceptions to this rule, lives spared through the confession of belief in the God of Israel and in his mission for his people.
The Land as an Inheritance . Joshua's allocation of the land in chapters 13-21 continues the process already begun by Moses in Transjordan. Although the land west of the Jordan had the unique role of divine promise to the patriarchs and to Moses, the allotments of Reuben, Gad, and part of Manasseh also formed part of what was to become the land of Israel. Insofar as God is giving this land to his people as an inheritance, the tribal allotments, as well as the Levitical cities and the cities of refuge, take on a covenantal character. This land inheritance formed the material wealth of the families of Israel. It could be passed on from generation to generation as a means of preserving the wealth of the family and as a means of integrating the life, livelihood, and faith of each new generation with those preceding it. For this reason many of the towns mentioned in the town lists and boundary descriptions of these chapters are identical to the names of families found in the extended genealogies of 1 Chronicles 1-9 . The idealistic nature of these allotments is suggested from Joshua 13:1-7 and throughout the allotments. The witness of the Canaanite presence and occupation of parts of the land is not negated by the affirmation that all of God's promises were fulfilled (21:43-45). Instead, this promise looks forward to the completion of the settlement process and the full occupation of the land by Israel such as would be confirmed by the Bible during the reigns of David and Solomon. The whole account bears witness to God's gracious provision for the lives of his people and to the faithfulness of their response in laying claim to their inheritance.
The Covenant between God and Israel . The covenant making over which Joshua presides dominates the book. It is explicitly detailed in 8:30-35 and in the whole of chapter 24. In both of these sections Joshua's leadership establishes Israel in close relationship with God. God's grace enables the nation to occupy its land and to worship God alone. Yet the covenantal aspect of the text is not found only here. Indeed, the circumcision and Passover celebration in chapter 5, as well as the theological role of the tribal allotments as part of Israel's covenantal inheritance from God, suggest that fulfillment of the covenant remains an integral part of the whole book.
The text that confirms God's covenant with his people includes a divine rehearsal of the words of the Lord through Moses (24:2). There follows a review of God's work among the patriarchs, as well as Moses and Aaron, in promising and bringing the people into the land. This is supplemented by God's continual leadership and provision for the present generation in bringing them through the kingdoms east of the Jordan River, in enabling them to cross the Jordan, and in waging war on their behalf so that they can occupy the land. All these activities are interpreted as part of God's gift to the people. In return, his covenant requires exclusive loyalty to the Lord as the only God worshiped in Israel. The people agree to this and bear witness against themselves if they forsake God and serve foreign deities.
God as Holy and as Deliverer . The character of God is evident throughout the book, especially in terms of his holiness and his saving Acts. The divine holiness is found in the ceremonies that are commanded and observed. These include the memorial stones set up at Gilgal to commemorate the crossing of the Jordan River (4:19-24) with a special role for the priesthood and the ark of the covenant (chaps. 3-4); the Israelite circumcision (5:1-3); the Passover celebration (5:10); Joshua's confrontation with the commander of the Lord's army (5:13-15); the special instructions for crossing the Jordan with the ark (chaps. 3-4) and for marching around Jericho for seven days (chap. 6); the identification of the sin of Achan, his capital punishment, and the marking of the site of his burial (chap. 7); the erection of an altar east of the Jordan in order to remember the lordship of Israel's God (22:26- 27); and the establishment of a memorial stone at Shechem after the ceremony of covenant renewal (24:26-27). These Acts and memorials point to God's special selection of his people. God's holiness could only be challenged at the peril of those who did so, whether in the case of Achan or of the many peoples who opposed the Israelites and thereby rejected God's will for his people. All faced death for their sins.
The saving Acts of God are clearly represented in the military victories of the people against their enemies, especially in the miraculous collapse of Jericho's walls (6:20) and the divine control of the sun and the hailstones in such a manner as to aid Israel (10:11-14). They are found in the content of the confessions of Rahab, of the Gibeonites, and of Joshua as already mentioned. In addition, they occur in notes of how the enemies of Israel hear of the Israelite victories and how their courage melts (5:1); how God's presence with Joshua leads to his fame spreading throughout the land (6:27); and how the armies of Canaan learn of God's Acts but still refuse to accept God's sovereignty and signify this by perpetrating war against Israel (9:1-2; 10:1-5; 11:1-5).
The Inheritance of the People . In addition to the obedience of the people in taking possession of the land according to God's will, there is a significant theological theme of rest before God. After the wars the whole land has rest (11:23). The people as well find rest as they enter into their inheritance. This is generally true of the division of the land. Specific references are also found, as in the cases of Caleb whose conquest of Hebron results in the land being given rest (14:15) and of Joshua who settled in Timnath Serah (19:50). The records of the deaths and burials of Joshua, Joseph, and Eleazar, which conclude the book (24:29-33) reflect a final resting place for them in three sites located throughout the central hill country of Palestine, the region where Israel first settled.
Joshua in the Context of Israel's History . As a book that provides a transition from the Pentateuch and the lawgiving of Moses to the settled society and rule of the judges and the kings of Israel, this work presents a past ideal in which a leader like Moses brought the people into the promised land and proceeded on faith to lay claim to it. God's gracious gift of the land and his provision for the people as their leader and guide bear witness to later generations of divinely willed leadership for Israel and of how the faithful fulfillment of the covenant could bring upon God's people all the blessings involved in their occupation of the land. The later failures of Israel's leadership and of the people brought divine judgment, which revoked these blessings by uprooting the people from that land and sending them into exile. Even so, the prophetic promises looked forward to a return to the promised land and to a full claim of these blessings under a messianic leader who would rule the people in perfect fulfillment of the covenant and in a renewal of the rich blessings of the land to which Joshua had led the people so long ago.
Richard S. Hess
See also Israel
Bibliography . T. C. Butler, Joshua ; L. G. Lawson, CBQ 53:25-36; M. H. Woudstra, The Book of Joshua ; K. L. Younger, Jr., Ancient Conquest Accounts: A Study in Ancient Near Eastern and Biblical History Writing .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Joshua
(יְהוֹשֻׁעַ, later יֵשׁוּעַ, ‘Jahweh is deliverance or salvation’)
Joshua, the successor of Moses in the leadership of Israel, was named Ἰησοῦς in the Septuagint and NT, and therefore ‘Jesus’ in the English Authorized Version ; but the Revisers, in accordance with their rule of reproducing OT names in the Hebrew rather than the Greek form, have changed this into ‘Joshua.’ St. Stephen in his apologia speaks of the fathers entering with Joshua into the possession of the nations (Acts 7:45); and the writer of Hebrews, imbued with Alexandrian-i.e. Platonic and Philonic-teaching as to the distinction between visible things and their heavenly ideas, says that the rest which Joshua gave the Israelites, when he led them into the promised land, was after all not the Rest of God, but only the material symbol suggesting the spiritual reality-the Sabbath-rest which remains in the unseen world for the people of God (Hebrews 4:8-9).
James Strahan.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Joshua
Joshua (jŏsh'u-ah), Saviour, or whose help is Jehovah. Written also Hoshea, Oshea, Jehoshua, Jeshua, and Jesus. 1. The son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim. 1 Chronicles 7:27, and minister of Moses. Exodus 24:13. He is mentioned first in connection with the fight against Amalek at Rephidim, when he was chosen by Moses to lead the Israelites. Exodus 17:9. He was one of the twelve spies who were sent, Numbers 13:17, to explore the land of Canaan, and one of the two, Numbers 14:6, who gave an encouraging report of their journey. Moses, shortly before his death, was directed, Numbers 27:18, to appoint Joshua leader over the people. God himself gave Joshua a charge through the lawgiver. Deuteronomy 31:14; Deuteronomy 31:23. Under God's direction, Joshua 1:1, Joshua assumed the command of the people at Shittim, sent spies into Jericho, crossed the Jordan, fortified a camp at Gilgal, circumcised the people, kept the passover, and was visited by the Captain of the Lord's Host. The miraculous fall of Jericho terrified the Canaanites. In the great battle of Beth-horon the Amorites were signally routed, and the south country was open to the Israelites. Joshua returned to the camp at Gilgal, having conquered half of Palestine. He defeated the Canaanites under Jabin king of Hazor, In six years six tribes, with 31 petty chiefs, were conquered. Joshua, now stricken in years, proceeded to make the division of the conquered land. Timnath-serah in Mount Ephraim was assigned as Joshua's peculiar inheritance. After an interval of rest, Joshua convoked an assembly from all Israel. He delivered two solemn addresses, recorded in Josh. chaps. 23, 24. He died at the age of 110 years, and was buried in his own city, Timnath-serah. Joshua's character is a very noble one; and few blemishes are found in it. The favored disciple of Moses, he learned to be faithful to the Lord God. Once, indeed, he was too jealous for what he conceived to be Moses' honor. Numbers 11:28-29. He was generally bold and fearless, though an unexpected check at one time dispirited him. But, with these small exceptions, an able commander, a wise ruler, a faithful servant of the Lord, Joshua shines as a bright star among the noble worthies of Old Testament history. 2. An inhabitant of Beth-shemesh, in whose land was the stone at which the milch-kine stopped when they drew the ark of God with the offerings of the Philistines from Ekron to Beth-shemesh. 1 Samuel 6:14; 1 Samuel 6:18, b.c. 1124. 3. A governor of the city who gave his name to a gate of Jerusalem, 2 Kings 23:8, in the reign of Josiah, b.c. 628. 4. Jeshua the son of Jozadak. Haggai 1:14; Haggai 2:2; Zechariah 8:1, etc.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Bassett, Joshua
(c.1641-1720) Convert and controversialist, born Lynn Regis, England; died London. Elected Master of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, England, under James II, he declared himself a Catholic, had Mass celebrated in his rooms at the college, and altered the college statutes unfavorable to Catholics.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Joshua
A savior; a deliverer
Chabad Knowledge Base - Joshua
(a) (1355-1245 BCE) Devoted student of Moses -- “didn’t budge from Moses’ tent.” Led the battle against Amalek; was one of the ten spies dispatched to reconnoiter the Land of Canaan. Succeeded Moses as leader of the Israelites and led the nation into Canaan. (b) Common Jewish name.
Joshua, the book of: The book of Tanach relating the history of the Israelites from their entry into Canaan until Joshua's passing (1273-1245 BCE).
Chabad Knowledge Base - Joshua ben hananiah, rabbi
(Circa 50-130 CE) Mishnaic sage, headed a Torah academy in Bekiin, one of Johanan ben Zakkai's most prominent disciples and his successor as head of the Sanhedrin, and teacher of Rabbi Akiba. A needle maker by trade, he lived in extreme poverty. The Talmud records many discussions and debates Rabbi Joshua held with non-believers, including the Emperor Hadrian and his daughter.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Joshua
Joshua 1:1 (c) He is a type of the Lord JESUS who, as the Commander and Leader of His people, conquers their enemies and leads them in triumph into blessed resting places.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Joshua
The son of Nun, whose name and history we have very fully related in the church of the wilderness, and afterward in his victories, as set forth in the book which bears his name. His name in Hebrew is the same as Jesus in Greek, signifying a Saviour; from Jashah, to save; and Jah, the Lord. This man was an evident type of Christ. See his history in the Book of Joshua.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Joshua
JOSHUA, THE SON OF NUN, MOSES' SERVANT
WHERE were Gershom and Eliezer all this time? Were they both dead? Or, if living, had theyno heart for their father's God till it had been better for them and for their father that they had never been born? Can it be possible that even Moses had come so far short as this, in the supreme duty and fast-passing opportunity of bringing up his own sons? Had her husband been so cumbered with the exodus, and with the law, and with all the cares and labours of the leadership in Israel, that he had no leisure so much as to eat his meals beside Zipporah and her two sons? Had Moses been far too long in accepting a staff of elders to assist him in ruling and judging Israel? And were Gershom and Eliezer grown up and gone clean out of hand before their father had wakened up to that and was aware of it? But, when all is said, it is far less the father than the mother in this matter. Had Moses house, then, been so divided against itself that it fell upon his two sons? And had Miriam and Aaron been right after all in their hot opposition to their brother's marriage with the Ethiopian woman? We ask these questions at the text, but we get no answer. We are left to look for the answers to all these questions in our own house, among our own sons and daughters, and in our own heart and conscience. At the same time, though Moses had wholly lost hold of his own sons, there is this to be said for the father of Gershom and Eliezer: that he had an immense attraction for some other men's sons. There was nothing more remarkable about Moses than the openness of his heart and the freshness of his mind to double the age of ordinary men; as Isaac Walton says, God had blessed Moses with perfect intellectuals and a cheerful heart to old age; and the young men who were always about him had had a great deal to do with that. You will sometimes see stranger young men crowding around a minister in his classes and in his congregational work, and saving their own souls by so doing, while those young men that have been born in the family are never so much as seen or heard of. And that was always the case with Moses. There was quite a circle of young men continually around Moses, and Joshua, the son of Nun, was the choicest and the most capable of them all. We know nothing as yet about Joshua-nothing but this, that he was not the son of Moses and Zipporah, but of a certain unknown man named Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim. Joshua had no such start in life as Gershom and Eliezer had, but by his high character and his great services he not only took their crowns from them, but at the same time he won a crown and sceptre and a great name in Israel all his own.
It is stated again and again in the sacred history that Joshua stood before Moses and was his minister. Stood ready, that is, to run the great man's errands, and to set out with him on his hallowed expeditions, and, in short, to be more than a son to Moses in the absence of bis own sons. 'He departed not out of the tabernacle' is another very remarkable testimony for that time concerning the son of Nun. Now, in that Joshua was exactly like his Great Namesake in the New Testament whose wont it was to go up to the synagogue of Nazareth every Sabbath day, and who said to His father and mother when they sought Him all through Jerusalem sorrowing: 'How is it that ye seek Me? Wist ye not that I must be about My Father's business?' Joseph and Mary had sought the child Jesus in all those places where other sorrowing fathers and mothers were seeking their lost sons also,-among the theatres, and the circuses, and the shows, and the races, and the wrestling arenas, and the inns, and shops, and streets of Jerusalem; but He departed not out of the temple. We, too, have boys sometimes among ourselves not unlike that. They love and choose and are always to be found among good things, in good places, and reading good books while yet they are still mere children. They take to the Sabbath-school, and to the church, and to the Bible-class, and to the missionary meeting as other boys take, and no blame to them, to cricket, and football, and fishing, and shooting. Wordsworth has two such boys:
Never did worthier lads break English bread:The finest Sunday that the autumn saw,With all its mealy cluster of ripe nuts,Could never keep those boys away from church,Or tempt them to one hour of Sabbath breach,Leonard and James!And as such boys rise to he young men they are already promising pillars in the house of their fathers' God. They are our Sabbath-school teachers, our elders and our deacons, our best preachers and pastors, and the heads of our seminaries and colleges. And Joshua, the son of Nun, was the first figure and far-off forerunner of all such young men as he stood before Moses, and was his minister, and went up with him to the mount, and never departed out of the tabernacle.
There is no finer grace to be found in any young man's heart than his admiration and reverence for great and good men. We really are already what we love and admire and honour. And when a young man has eyes to see and a heart to love and honour those good and gifted men he reads and hears about; or, still better, those who live near him, nothing could be a sounder sign or a surer promise of his own future character than that.
We live by admiration. hope, and love;And even as these are well and wisely fixed,In dignity of being we ascend.The mother of Gershom and Eliezer, from the very little that we see of her, would seem to have been a froward, forward woman, and a rude and disrespectful wife; and a worse up-bringing than that what child could ever have? But Joshua's nameless mother-judging her from her son, she must have been a true mother in Israel. And she had already her full wages paid her when she saw her son Joshua standing of his own accord before Moses and serving him as his minister. And if she lived to see him at the head of the tribes of Israel, and leading them on from victory to victory, she would feel herself to have been far more than overpaid for all the watchfulness, and all the care, and all the nights of prayer she had laid out on her noble boy. And thus it came about that through her, and through some other nameless mothers like her, what Moses missed so much at home he found so thankfully as often as he went abroad, when Joshua and his companions gathered round Moses to drink in his counsels and to execute his commands. But it was Joshua alone in all the camp who was all to Moses that John was to Jesus. Moses loved and trusted Joshua, and Joshua lay at Moses' feet. At the same time, the defect of Joshua's finest quality, as we are wont to call it, came out on an occasion, and was warmly and nobly rebuked by Moses, as we read in a very beautiful passage in the Book of Numbers. There was a day of Pentecost in Israel as Moses grew old, when the Spirit of the Lord fell on seventy of the elders of Israel in order to fit them to be Moses' assessors and assistants in ruling and in teaching the refractory people. And, as God would have it, over and above the selected seventy, there were two exceptional men on whom the Spirit fell also, till Joshua grudged and fretted at the way the people's eyes were drawn off his master and turned to Eldad and Medad as they prophesied in the camp. 'Forbid them, my lord!' said Joshua, in his jealousy for Moses. To which speech of Joshua Moses made the golden answer: 'Enviest thou for my sake? Would God that all the Lord's people were prophets, and that the Lord would put His Spirit upon them!' see John 3:26, the margin steps in and says. And when we turn to John's gospel we find this fine parallel passage: 'A man can receive nothing,' said the Baptist, 'except it be given from heaven. Ye yourselves bear me witness that I said, I am not the Christ. The Christ must increase, but I must decrease.' It is beautiful to see Moses' best disciple so jealous of other gifted men, and all out of pure honour and love to his great master; and it is beautiful to see the same mistaken loyalty in John's disciples. But both Moses and John shine splendidly to all time in their rebukes to their disciples, and show themselves to be the true masters of such deserving disciples in their never-to-be-forgotten answers and lessons and reproofs. Moses, and John, and Paedaritus of Sparta, Moses' contemporary, who, when he was passed over and left out in the election of the Three Hundred, went home to his house beaming with happiness, it did him so much good to see that there were so many men in Sparta who were better men than himself.
For years and years, and all the time wholly unknown to anybody but himself, Moses had been schooling his own heart till the case of Eldad and Medad only called out into words what had for long been in his thoughts. Joshua had but put in rude and angry words the bitter jealousy that Moses had for years and years been battling with in secret. And Moses' magnificent answer to Joshua was but another proof of the incomparable meekness and sweetness of Moses' so subdued heart. And then, when long afterwards we find Moses suing for a successor who should take up his work and finish it, he does it in a way that proclaims Moses to have been a man after God's own heart long before David was born. 'Let the Lord, the God of the spirits of all flesh, set a man over the congregation, which may go out before them, and which may lead them out, and which may bring them in; that the congregation of the Lord be not as sheep which have no shepherd.' Noble soul! Great servant and great saint of God! Though his eye was not dim, nor his natural strength abated, yet because it was made clear to him that it was the will of God, and that the time had now come when he was to stand aside and give up his place to another man, he put off his harness and his honour without one murmur. The cross would, no doubt, have been somewhat less sharp had Gershom or Eliezer stood ready to take up the laid-down leadership, and it may well have been the last pang of that painful time to Moses that he had no son of his own to take his place, to finish his work, and to transmit his name. Aaron, the high priest, under a like bereavement, held his peace. And so did his desolate brother, the great law-giver and leader of Israel. And the Lord said unto Moses, Take thee Joshua, the son of Nun, a man in whom is the Spirit, and lay thine hand upon him. And thou shalt put some of thine honour upon him, that all the congregation of Israel may be obedient. And Moses did as the Lord commanded him. 'A man in whom is the Spirit,' said the Lord, who gave to Joshua that great gift. The Spirit of the Lord had begun in Joshua from a child, from his mother's milk, indeed; and to him that hath shall be given, till by the time that Moses died we are reassured and rewarded as we read that Joshua, the son of Nun, was full of the spirit of wisdom, and the children of Israel hearkened unto him, and did as the Lord commanded Moses.
It is a great epoch to a nation and to a church, as well as a great testing time to all concerned, when an old leader has to put off his harness, and when a new and an untried man is summoned up to put on his harness for all the toils and crosses that await him. I was present once at such an impressive moment, and I often remember it. An old servant of God who had been a very Moses to multitudes in our land was about to die when he sent for the man who had been a very Joshua, a son and a servant to him, and from his death-bed addressed him in words of love and trust and prophetic assurance that must often come back to his heart, as they often come back to mine. And then the old leader put his arms round his successor's neck and kissed him, and lay down and died. Men like Moses and Joshua, and all who serve God and man, pass through extreme and painful experiences. The time had been when Caleb and Joshua stood absolutely alone with their life in their hand as all Israel bade stone them with stones. But never, all his days, was Joshua more or better the servant of God, and the best and the most far-seeing friend of the people of Israel, than he was just at that solitary, slanderous, murderous moment.
Just when Joshua was in the act of putting on his armour to attempt his first battle, he looked up, and, behold! a man stood over-against him with his sword drawn in his hand. 'Art thou for us?' demanded Joshua of the armed man; 'or art thou for our adversaries?' 'Nay,' answered the mysterious soldier, 'but as Captain of the Lord's host am I come.' And Joshua fell on his face, and said, 'What saith my Lord unto His servant?' And on the seventh day Jericho fell into Joshua's hands without sword or spear of Joshua.
Fell flat every stone wall of it before a blast of rams' horns only blown over Jericho in the name of the Lord. And Joshua from that day learned how to enter on the wars of the Lord in a way he never forgot. David, also, while yet a ruddy youth, had read the Book of Joshua in the intervals of feeding his father's flock. For we hear him as he puts off Saul's helmet of brass and coat of mail and takes five smooth stones out of the brook. Turning to Goliath, David said, 'Thou comest to me with a sword, and with a spear, and with a shield, but I come to thee in the name of the Lord of hosts. For today all this assembly shall know that the Lord saveth not with sword and spear, for the battle is the Lord's, and He will give you into our hands.' And all down sacred history, through Israel, and not less through England and Scotland, there have never failed prophets to preach how to war a good warfare, nor has the Lord's hosts lacked leaders like Joshua, who fell at that Divine Captain's feet and worshipped. Theodor Keim, in his volume of genius on our Lord's early life on earth, says that in His choice of a trade, which He was bound to choose, though He chose to be a carpenter, Jesus of Nazareth might have chosen anything else, anything but to be a soldier. But, surely, He was a soldier before Jericho, when He said to Joshua that He had come to him as Captain of the Lord's host. And we see Him in the thick and at the head of many a bloody battle all down the ages, till at last we are let see Him clothed with a vesture dipped in blood, and on His vesture and on His thigh a name written, King of kings, and Lord of lords. But we are not all soldiers, and we civilians have this same Divine Man as our forerunner and example as well as soldiers. For, in the manifold wisdom and abounding grace of God, the Son of God appears to each one of us as we enter life, and summons us to put the shoes oft' our feet as we stand on that holy ground. To the young soldier He appears in vision as a captain, to the young preacher He appears as a preacher, to the young pastor He is the chief shepherd, to the young merchant He is an example of successful buying and selling, to a master He appears as a master, and to a servant as a servant; sometimes He is a lover, sometimes He is a husband, sometimes a son, and sometimes a brother, and so on, till He never leaves any man at his entrance on life without a divine vision, and an ideal example, and a sacred summons to take his shoes off his feet. And all young men who, like Joshua, make their start on this holy ground,-they shall surely finish their course and keep the faith till the Captain of their salvation shall not be ashamed to call them His brethren. Loose thy shoes from off thy feet. And Joshua did so.
With all his clearness of head and with all his honesty of heart, Joshua made one great mistake in the opening of his military and diplomatic life. That great mistake arose out of his youth and inexperience, and he is not much to be blamed-by us, at any rate-for making that mistake. All the same, that mistake, once made, was disastrous and irretrievable. The Gibeonites were terrified to death at the approach of Joshua and his army. And they made as if they were come to him from a far country, a country that he would never have commission or interest to conquer, but with whose people it would be to his advantage in many ways to be good friends and in a league of peace. And their old shoes, and old bottles, and old bread, and their wily speeches, and other fine fetches completely circumvented Joshua, till he made a covenant of peace with a cruel, corrupt, and accursed people that he had been armed and ordained and commanded to sweep off the face of the earth. And for this, and for other like mistakes of ignorance, and simplicity, and over-leniency, both Joshua and all Israel suffered long and bitterly. The mystical interpretation here tells us that pride was the sin of the Amorite, and envy the sin of the Hittite, and wrath of the Perizzite, and gluttony and lechery of the Girgashite and the Hivite, while covetousness and sloth were the corruptions of the Canaanite and the Jebusite. And then that same method of interpretation passes on to this, that many young men when they first enter on their inexperience of sanctification are cheated into sparing some of their pride under this disguise, and some of their envy under that. Gluttony and lust also come to them each under its own cloak of deceit, and covetousness and sloth also each under its own mask, till all their days many men are tempted and led into this and that besetting sin through early ignorance and simplicity and self-will. Still, just as Joshua put the Gibeonites to hew wood and draw water for the altar of the Lord when he could not root them out, so we may turn the remnants of our pride, and envy, and ill-will, and gluttony, and sloth to this same good use. These things will try us and will prove us, as the Scripture says, to see what is in our hearts, and whether we will serve God in spite of them or not. It was the thorn that was in the apostle's flesh that brought down this word to him: 'My grace is sufficient for thee, and My strength is made perfect in weakness.' And the children of the Gibeonites, while thorns in their eyes and scourges in their sides, and snares and traps to them, were at the same time hewers of wood and drawers of water for the congregation, and for the altar of the Lord to this day, in the place which the Lord shall choose.
Joshua never ceased all his life long to mourn over the great mistake he had made at Gilgal. He could not shut his eyes a single day to the disastrous results of that great mistake to himself and to all Israel. And when he was on his death-bed it all came back to him, till he summoned the heads of Israel around him to hear his dying apology and protest; 'Choose you out this day among all the gods of the Gibeonites and the other Canaanites the god that you and your children will serve; but know this, that as for me and my house we will serve the Lord.' You all know, I suppose, what that meant on Joshua's dying lips that day. Joshua had never forgotten that day of days in the great days of his youth, when Moses took his young servant up with him to the top of the mount, ay, and even into the cleft rock itself.
From that awful day never a day, never a night, never an hour of a day or a night, had passed over Joshua that he had not heard the Lord passing by and proclaiming, The Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, long-suffering, and abundant in goodness and truth, keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving iniquity, and transgression, and sin. Ever since that day on the mount and in the cleft rock the Lord, and no heathen god of them all, had been Joshua's God. Happy man who had such a revelation made to him in the days of his youth! Happy man, who could call all Israel to come and see that he was leaving a house behind him of the same experience, of the same fixed mind, and of the same assured and inherited happiness. Young men, still choosing whom and what you will serve; young fathers and young mothers, still choosing a God for yourselves and for your household,-Joshua speaks to you out of his noble life, so nobly begun and now so nobly ended. Choose and say. Are you yourselves to be, and are you to bring up your children after you to be, Amorites, and Hittites, and Hivites, and Canaanites, and Jebusites in the land? Are you to let ambition, and envy, and pride, and anger, and self-will rule in your hearts and be your household gods? No! Never, never! Not so long as you have still this day in your choice for yourselves and for your households the Lord, the Lord God, merciful and gracious, and abundant in goodness and truth. And Moses and Joshua made haste in the cleft rock, and they bowed their heads to the earth, and they said, If now we have found grace in Thy sight, pardon our iniquity and our sin, and take us for Thine inheritance. And from that day it was so.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Joshua
the son of Nun. He was of the tribe of Ephraim, and born A.M. 2460. He devoted himself to the service of Moses, and in Scripture he is commonly called the servant of Moses, Exodus 24:13 ; Exodus 33:11 ; Deuteronomy 1:38 , &c. His first name was Hosea, or Oshea; Hoseah signifying saviour; Jehoshua, the salvation of God, or he will save. The first opportunity which Joshua had to signalize his valour was in the war made by the divine command against the Amalekites, Exodus 17:9-10 .
He defeated and routed their whole army. When Moses ascended Mount Sinai to receive the law of the Lord, and remained there forty days and forty nights without eating or drinking, Joshua remained with him, though, in all probability, not in the same place, nor with the same abstinence, Exodus 24:13 ; Exodus 32:17 . Joshua was "filled with the spirit of wisdom," qualifying him for the arduous and important station of governing Israel, to which he was called by the special command of God, Numbers 27:18-20 ; Deuteronomy 31:7 ; Deuteronomy 31:14 ; Deuteronomy 34:9 ; Joshua 1:5 . His piety, courage, and disinterested integrity are conspicuous throughout his whole history; and, exclusive of the inspiration which enlightened his mind and writings, he derived divine information, sometimes by immediate revelation from God, Joshua 3:7 ; Joshua 5:13-15 ; at others from the sanctuary, through the medium of Eleazar, the high priest, the son of Aaron, who, having on the breast plate, presented himself before the mercy seat on which the Shechinah, or visible symbol of the divine presence, rested, and there consulted Jehovah by the Urim and Thummim, to which an answer was returned by an audible voice.
Joshua succeeded Moses in the government of Israel about the year of the world 2553, and died at Timnathserah in the hundred and tenth year of his age, A.M. 2578. He was about the age of eighty-four when he received the divine command to pass over Jordan, and take possession of the promised land, Joshua 1:1-2 . Having accomplished that arduous enterprise, and settled the chosen tribes in the peaceable possession of their inheritance, he retired to Shechem, or, according to some Greek copies, to Shiloh; where he assembled the elders of Israel, the heads of families, the judges and other officers; and, presenting themselves before God, he recapitulated the conduct of Divine Providence toward them, from the days of Abraham to that moment; recounted the miraculous and gracious dispensations of God toward their fathers and themselves; reminded them of their present enviable lot, and concluded his solemn address with an exhortation in these emphatic words: "Now, therefore, fear the Lord, and serve him in sincerity and truth; and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the Lord," Joshua 24.
The book of Joshua continues the sacred history from the period of the death of Moses to that of the death of Joshua and of Eleazar; a space of about thirty years. It contains an account of the conquest and division of the land of Canaan, the renewal of the covenant with the Israelites, and the death of Joshua. There are two passages in this book which show that it was written by a person contemporary with the events it records. In the first verse of the fifth chapter, the author speaks of himself as being one of those who had passed into Canaan: "And it came to pass when all the kings of the Amorites, which were on the side of Jordan westward, and all the kings of the Canaanites, which were by the sea, heard that the Lord had dried up the waters of Jordan from before the children of Israel, until we were passed over, that their heart melted." And from the twenty-fifth verse of the following chapter, it appears that the book was written before the death of Rahab: "And Joshua saved Rahab the harlot alive, and her father's household, and all that she had; and she dwelleth in Israel even unto this day; because she hid the messengers which Joshua sent to spy out Jericho." Though there is not a perfect agreement among the learned concerning the author of this book, yet by far the most general opinion is, that it was written by Joshua himself; and, indeed, in the last chapter it is said that "Joshua wrote these words in the book of the law of God;" which expression seems to imply that he subjoined this history to that written by Moses. The last five verses, giving an account of the death of Joshua, were added by one of his successors; probably by Eleazar, Phinehas, or Samuel.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Joshua
1. The son of Nun, a distinguished leader of the Hebrews, and the successor of Moses. His name at first was Oshea, Numbers 13:8,16 ; and in the New Testament he is called Jesus, Acts 7:45 Hebrews 4:8 . Both the names, Joshua and Jesus, signify savior, deliverer. See JESUS. Joshua led Israel over the Jordan, and took possession of the promised land; he conquered the Canaanites, and then distributed the country among the tribes. He is first mentioned as the leader of Israel against the Amalekites at Rephidim,
Exodus 17:8-16 . See also Numbers 14:6 . At the passage over Jordan he was eighty-four years of age; and after about twenty-six years employed in his appointed work, and then judging Israel at his at Timnath-serah, he died, B. C. 1426. His last grand convocation of all Israel, at Shechem, and his solemn address to them and renewal of their covenant with God, form the worthy close of a life on which in the sacred records no blot rests. He seems to have served the Lord with singular fidelity. No man witnessed more or greater miracles than he; and in his life may be found many points of resemblance to that of the greater "Captain of the Lord's host," who establishes his people in the true promised land.
THE BOOK OF JOSHUA contains the narrative of all these transactions, and was written by Joshua himself, or under his direction, B. C. 1427. From Joshua 24:27 on, was of course added by a later hand; but all was done under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, 2 Timothy 3:16 .
2. The son of Josedech. See JESHUA .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Joshua, Book of
This book gives the history of Israel in crossing the Jordan, their conquests over the nations, and the division of the land among the twelve tribes. It is typical of the believer's entering, in the power of the Spirit, into the purpose of God, as quickened together with Christ; of his conflict with the spiritual powers of wickedness in the heavenlies; and of his enjoyment of the promises of God. Joshua was commissioned by God Himself. Courage and obedience, under God, would ensure success. He is exhorted to be strong and God would not fail him. Israel had a title to all that was promised to Abraham, but they would possess that whereon the soles of their feet trod, and thus it would become theirs. So the Christian must make his calling and election sure, entering into the possession of his heavenly privileges.
Joshua 2 . The spies learned that the fear of Israel had fallen upon the people of the land, and the faith of Rahab saved her and her family. A Gentile gets a place in the promised possession by faith. See RAHAB.
Joshua 3 , Joshua 4 . For the passage into the land see JORDAN.
Joshua 5 . The first thing on entering the land was that the males must be circumcised: this was done at Gilgal, and the reproach of Egypt was rolled away. What answers to this with the Christian is found in Colossians 2:11Colossians 3:3-5 ; the renunciation of the life of flesh through Christ having been cut off on the cross; of those it can be said, "Ye are dead . . . . mortify therefore your members which are upon the earth." The Passover was also kept, a type of the peaceful remembrance by the believer of that death which has enabled him to enjoy the promise; and they ate of the old corn of the land (type of a heavenly Christ), and the manna ceased: cf. 2 Corinthians 5:16 . This was all fitting them to take their place as the Lord's host. Then Jehovah was manifested to Joshua as Captain of the host, with a drawn sword in His hand. Joshua fell to the earth and worshipped.
Joshua 6 , Joshua 7 . Jericho (type of the world antagonistic to the Lord's rights ranged under Satan) was the first city taken, and the manner of its destruction showed plainly that power for conquest was really in Jehovah. God said the whole was accursed and must be destroyed, and a curse should rest upon the man who should rebuild the city. All was not however destroyed, for Achan had taken of the accursed things. Unconscious of this sin and confiding in their own strength, they attacked Ai in vain. The sin of Achan was accounted as a sin of the people: 'Israel hath sinned,' God said; and there could be no power or blessing until the evil was put away (as in the action enjoined upon the church at Corinth).
Joshua 8 . The evil being judged, Ai was destroyed, and in this case the cattle and spoil were taken. An altar was built unto Jehovah, and the law was written upon stones, the whole of it being read before all the congregation: cf. Deuteronomy 27:2-8 . This shows the conditions on which they were to possess the land, namely, obedience to the word.
Joshua 9 , Joshua 10 . When the kings in the south heard of the destruction of Jericho and Ai, they conspired together to oppose Israel. But the Gibeonites wrought deceitfully, saying they had come from very far. Type of the devices of Satan, against which the Christian is warned. Prayer was overlooked, and there was confidence in human wisdom. Five kings attacked Gibeon for making the league with Israel, but were totally defeated by Joshua, and the kings were hanged. To lengthen the day for conquest the sun and moon stood still, for it was Jehovah who fought for Israel. Thus the confederacy of the south was overthrown, and the country of the south was conquered, and Joshua returned to Gilgal . Type of the Christian abiding in the place of renunciation of self, and mortifying the deeds of the flesh in the power of resurrection.
Joshua 11 , Joshua 12 . From Gilgal Joshua went again in strength against the confederacy of the north, being encouraged by Jehovah, and conquered everywhere, cutting off the Anakims from the mountains, and "so Joshua took the whole land according to all that the Lord said unto Moses." The Gibeonites and their allies from three other cities (Joshua 9:17 ) were the only ones that made a league with Israel. The names then are given of the two kings conquered by Moses on the east of Jordan and thirty-one kings on the west smitten by Joshua.
Joshua 13 . Chapter 12 closes the first part of the book, which says that the whole land had been taken; but Joshua 13 opens with the statement that there remained "yet very much land to be possessed." In one sense they had taken all from north to south, so that they could divide the land among the tribes; but all their enemies were not destroyed, and they did not really possess all the land promised unto Abraham. This is typical of the Christian having all things, and yet failing to enter into his full heavenly position. The tribe of Levi had a peculiar standing: "the Lord God of Israel was their inheritance;" and "the sacrifices of the Lord God of Israel made by fire" were their inheritance. These are a type of Christians as priests, who do not belong to earth, but to heaven. There were minor conquests in taking possession, and mention is made of Balaam the soothsayer being slain: God's judgement had reached the wicked man.
Joshua 14 — Joshua 17 . In dividing the land Caleb had a privileged portion. Of Joseph it was said, "Thou art a great people, and hast great power:" in Ephraim and Manasseh Joseph had two portions. The details are given as to the boundaries of the tribes.
Joshua 18 , Joshua 19 . The tabernacle was set up at Shiloh, which was fairly central, 32 3' N, and the allotment of the possessions of the tribes was made in Shiloh before the Lord, at the door of the tabernacle of the congregation. Type of the Christian getting his position from heaven. To Joshua was given an inheritance, Timnath-serah in mount Ephraim.
Joshua 20 . Six cities of refuge were appointed to which the man-slayer could flee. See REFUGE.
Joshua 21 . Forty-eight cities were appointed for dwelling places for the Levites. Then it is repeated that "Jehovah gave unto Israel all the land which he sware to give unto their fathers; and they possessed it, and dwelt therein." They had rest, and not any good thing that Jehovah had promised failed them. Yet, as we have seen, there were parts that they had not made their own, and in which there dwelt those who were ready to seduce them on the one hand, and to oppress them on the other.
Joshua 22 . The warriors of the two and a half tribes, who had crossed the Jordan to aid in the conquest of the land on the west, were dismissed to their possessions on the east of Jordan, with the blessing of Joshua. These tribes staying on the east led to difficulty. By the border of the Jordan they built a great altar 'to see to;' which they afterwards described as a witness that they had part in Jehovah. They were beginning to feel the consequences of having fallen short of God's calling, and of taking lower ground. The tribes on the west feared that the altar had been built in separation from the worship of Jehovah, and sent princes with Phinehas the priest to protest against it, but on hearing the explanation given, they were satisfied that the tribes on the east were faithful in heart.
Joshua 23 , Joshua 24 . In conclusion Joshua rehearses the dealings of the Lord with their ancestors, and the great things He had done for them. There were blessings for them if they were obedient; but curses if they forsook the Lord. The people, not knowing their own weakness, declared that they would serve the Lord. They thus still remained under law, their obedience being the condition of their living in peace, and being blessed by Jehovah. Thus a covenant was made with the people that day, a statute, and an ordinance in Shechem. A great stone was set up as a witness of the covenant. Joshua, the faithful servant of the Lord, died, being 110 years old. To this is added the testimony that "Israel served the Lord all the days of Joshua, and all the days of the elders that overlived Joshua, and which had known all the works of the Lord, that he had done for Israel."
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Joshua, the Book of
"The doomsday book of Palestine," especially Joshua 13-23. Authenticated by Scripture references to the events recorded in it (Psalms 78:53-65; Psalms 28:21; Habakkuk 3:11-13; Acts 7:45; Hebrews 4:8; Hebrews 11:30-32; James 2:25). Joshua after destroying the kings, so that Israel had rest from war in the open field, divided generally the land; but this is quite consistent with the after statements that years passed before the process of division was completed and the allotments finally settled. Joshua was directed to divide land not yet in Israel's actual possession (Joshua 13:1-14;Joshua 13:5). God designed that Israel should occupy the land by degrees, lest the beasts should multiply and the land be desolate (Exodus 23:28-30); for instance, though the kings of Jerusalem and Gezer were slain, their people were not rooted out until long after.
The slackness of Israel to extirpate the accursed Canaanites was also a cause of non-immediate possession (Joshua 11:16; Joshua 11:23; Joshua 12:7; Joshua 12:10-12; compare Joshua 15:63; Joshua 16:10; Joshua 17:1; Joshua 17:16; Joshua 18:1; Joshua 18:3; Joshua 19:51). Joshua is based on the Pentateuch (to which it is joined by the conjunction "now" or "and" at its beginning), "now" but distinct from it. Compare Joshua 13:7 with Numbers 34:13; Numbers 13:17 with Numbers 32:37; Numbers 13:21-22 with Numbers 31:8; Numbers 13:14; Numbers 13:33; Numbers 14:4, with Deuteronomy 18:1-2; Numbers 18:20; Numbers 21 with Numbers 35.
UNITY. The book evidently is that of an eye witness, so minute and vivid are the descriptions. The narrative moves on in one uninterrupted flow for the first 12 chapters of Joshua. Jehovah's faithfulness is exhibited in the historical fulfillment of His covenanted promises, with which the book opens (Joshua 1:2-9, the programme of the book).
I. The promise, Joshua 1:2-5, is fulfilled (Joshua 2-12), the conquest of the land by Jehovah's mighty help, "from the wilderness and this Lebanon unto ... Euphrates ... and the great sea (the Mediterranean) toward the going down of the sun." The limit, the Euphrates, was not actually reached until Solomon's reign (1 Kings 4:21), and the full realization awaits Christ's millennial reign (Genesis 15:18; Psalms 72:8); but the main step toward its fulfillment was taken. Joshua's conquests, though overwhelming at the time, could only be secured by Israel's faithfully following them up.
II. The promise, Joshua 6-7, that Joshua should divide the land is recorded as fulfilled (Joshua 13-22).
III. The means of realizing this two-fold promise, "only be very courageous to do ... all the law ... turn not to the right hand or to the left ... this book of the law shall not depart out of thy mouth, but thou shalt meditate therein day and night, that thou mayest observe to do all that is written therein ... for then thou shalt have good success .... Be strong and of a good courage for the Lord thy God is with thee wheresoever thou goest" (Joshua 1:7-9), are urged upon the people in detail by Joshua as his last testimony (Joshua 23:24). The connection and method traceable throughout prove the unity of the book. The variety in the style of the historical compared with the topographical parts is what we should expect. The "three days" (Joshua 1:11) are not the time within which the crossing actually took place, but the time allowed to the people to prepare for crossing: prepare victuals to be able to leave Shittim within three days, so as to be ready to cross Jordan.
The spies sent from Shittim to Jericho (the key of Canaan) on the same day as Joshua gave this charge to Israel had to hide three days after leaving Jericho, so that they could not have returned until the evening of the fourth day after they were sent (Joshua 2:22). The morning after this Israel left Shittim for Jordan, where they halted again; three days afterward they crossed, i.e. eight days intervened between their being sent and Israel's crossing. The drying up of Jordan is the counterpart of the drying up of the Red Sea under Moses, Joshua's master and predecessor. Throughout the warlike and the peaceful events of this book, comprising a period of 25 years (compare Joshua 14:7-10) from 1451 to 1426 B.C., God's presence is everywhere felt. Joshua is His conscious and obedient agent.
AUTHOR. That Joshua wrote the book is probable because
(1) he certainly wrote one transaction in it (Joshua 24:26), and scarcely any but Joshua himself is likely to have written the parting addresses, his last legacy to Israel (Joshua 23-24).
(2) None but Joshua could have supplied the accounts of his communion with God (Joshua 1:1 ff; Joshua 3:7; Joshua 4:2; Joshua 5:2; Joshua 5:9; Joshua 5:13; Joshua 6:2; Joshua 7:10; Joshua 8:1; Joshua 10:8; Joshua 11:6; Joshua 13:1-2; Joshua 20:1; Joshua 24:2).
(3) Joshua was best qualified by his position to describe the events, and to collect the documents of this book; it was important that the statement of the allotments should rest on such a decisive authority as Joshua.
(4) He would be following his master and predecessor Moses' pattern in recording God's dealings with Israel through him; Joshua 24:26 looks like his own subscription, as Moses in Deuteronomy 31, both being followed by an appendix as to the author's death.
(5) In Joshua 5:1; Joshua 5:6, he uses the first person, "we passed over"; and in Joshua 6:25, "Rahab dwelleth in Israel even unto this day"; both passages imply a contemporary writer.
Keil gives a list of phrases and forms peculiar to this book and the Pentateuch, marking its composition in or near the same age. Judges 3:1-3; Judges 1:27-29, repeat Joshua 13:2-6; Joshua 16:10; Joshua 17:11, because Joshua's description suited the times described by the inspired writer of Judges. The capture of Hebron and Debir by Judah and its hero Caleb is repeated in Judges 1:9-15 from Joshua 15:13-20. Possibly the account of the Danite occupation of Leshem or Laish is a later insertion in Joshua 19:47 from Judges 18:7. So also the account (Joshua 15:63; Joshua 18:28) of the joint occupation of Jerusalem by Israel and the Jebusites may be an insertion from Judges 1:8; Judges 1:21.
In the case of an authoritative record of the allotment of lands, which the book of Joshua is, the immediate successors who appended the account of his death (probably one or more of the elders who took part in Joshua's victories and outlived him: "we," Joshua 5:1; Joshua 5:6; Joshua 24:31; Judges 2:7) would naturally insert the exact state of things then, which in Joshua's time were in a transition state, his allotments not having been taken full possession of until after his death. The expulsion of the Jebusites from Jerusalem at the beginning of David's reign proves that Joshua and Judges were written before David. The Gibeonites were in Joshua's time (Joshua 9:27) "hewers of wood and drawers of water" for the sanctuary "even unto this day," but Saul set aside the covenant and tried to destroy them; so that the book of Joshua was before Saul. The only Phoenicians mentioned are the Sidonians, reckoned with the Canaanites as doomed to destruction; but in David's time Tyre takes the lead of Sidon, and is in treaty with David (Joshua 13:4-6; 2 Samuel 5:11).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Joshua
1. Son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim. His name was originally OSHEA, or HOSHEA, but it was changed by Moses into Jehoshua, and this was contracted into Joshua, which is the same as JESUS in the Greek, and signifies 'Jehovah the saviour.' Joshua was one of the twelve spies, and he with Caleb brought up a true report of the land, and was one of the two survivors of the men who came out of Egypt that entered the land. The first notice of Joshua is when he led the army against the Amalekites and overcame them while Moses' hands were held up. Exodus 17:9 . He is afterwards called the 'minister' of Moses, and as such he went up with him into the mount of God. Exodus 24:13 ; Exodus 32:17 . Joshua was appointed the successor of Moses, not as law-giver, but as leader. He had 'the spirit,' and some of the honour of Moses was put upon him. Numbers 27:18-23 ; Deuteronomy 1:38 ; Deuteronomy 3:28 .
The principal work of Joshua was to lead the Israelites into the land of promise, not on the ground of their righteousness, but of the promises made to the fathers; the subjugation of the former inhabitants, and dividing the land as a possession for the twelve tribes, and these things are recorded in the BOOK OF JOSHUA. In these points Joshua was a type of Christ as leader or Captain of His saints. He is once called JESHUA. Nehemiah 8:17 .
2. A Beth-shemite in whose field the cows stopped when they brought up the ark from the Philistines. 1 Samuel 6:14,18 .
3. Governor of the city of Jerusalem in the days of Josiah. 2 Kings 23:8 .
4. Son of Josedech: high priest, who on the return from exile was called upon to be strong in building the temple. Haggai 1:1,12,14 ; Haggai 2:2,4 . He is also referred to as representing the people, clothed with filthy garments, and Satan standing as his enemy. Jehovah rebuked Satan, for He had chosen Jerusalem. Joshua could not make himself fit, but the filthy garments were taken away and he was clothed, and had a fair mitre placed upon his head. His experience represents how God will bring Israel into blessing under Christ the Branch, though it may be applied to the salvation of a sinner now. Zechariah 3:1-9 ; Zechariah 6:11 . He is called JESHUA in Ezra and Nehemiah. See JESHUA, No. 3.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Joshua
Canaan, on Procopius' inscription in Mauritania confirming the historical facts). (See CANAAN.) JOSHUA or JEHOSHUA.
1. He was Hoshea only ("he will save") up to his noble witness after spying Canaan. Henceforth, Jehovah's name is prefixed, Jehovah by him would save Israel (Numbers 13:16). This forms the contrast in the Antitype (Matthew 1:21), "thou shalt call His name Jesus, for Himself (Greek, not merely 'Jehovah by him') shall save His people." Son of Nun, of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:27). Born about the time when Moses fled to Midian, he endured in youth the slave labour amidst Egyptian brick kilns. Probably he even in Egypt was recognized as an officer among his brethren; for at his first public act, choosing and leading picked men of Israel against the attacking Amalekites at Rephidim (Exodus 17:9) he is introduced abruptly without description as one already well known by the designation Joshua (not Hoshea) given by anticipation. (See AMALEKITES.) Moses discerned by the Spirit his sterling qualities, solid rather than brilliant.
Joshua learned to rule by obeying first; then he ruled for God, not self. God commanded Moses to write in the book (Hebrew, namely, the history of God's dealings with Israel) and rehearse it in Joshua's ears. Joshua inflicted the first decisive blow on the doomed nations; this was an earnest to him of the subsequent conquest of Canaan. Next as Moses' "minister" Joshua accompanied him along with Aaron, Nadab, Abihu, and 70 elders up the mountain of God; but Moses went alone into the cloud (Exodus 24:9; Exodus 24:13-15). On the descent Joshua heard the noise of the people shouting, and with a warrior's thought he said to Moses, "there is a noise of war in the camp"; but it was the noise of singers in the calf worship. When Moses removed the tabernacle of meeting between God and His people from the camp, Joshua, then "a young man" (perhaps an official term for an attendant, Numbers 11:28; Deuteronomy 1:38 "Joshua who standeth before thee"), departed not out of the tabernacle; the Lord's house and communion is the best qualification for those who are afterward to fight the Lord's battles.
Sent to spy out Canaan as representing Ephraim; Caleb represented Judah. (See CALEB.) They two alone of the 12 brought a good report, and encouraged the people not to fear the inhabitants for the Lord was with Israel (contrast Psalms 106:24; Numbers 13:8; Numbers 13:16; Numbers 14). The people would have stoned both, but the glory of Jehovah suddenly appeared in the tabernacle. The ten other spies were smitten with the plague and died. Joshua and Caleb alone of all that generation above 20 years of age survived the 40 years' wilderness wanderings that ensued, because "they wholly followed the Lord" (Numbers 32:11-12). Moses shortly before death, by Jehovah's direction, solemnly invested Joshua with authority as his successor. The Spirit was already in Joshua. Moses by laying on hands added the formal and public sign, and instrumentally gave him thereby more of "the spirit of wisdom." The previous receiving of inward grace does not dispense with the outward sign (Numbers 27:18-23; Acts 9:1-18; Acts 10:44-48).
Moses put some of his own honour (dignity and authority) upon Joshua, making him vice leader, that Israel might obey him preparatory to his becoming chief after Moses' death. Joshua was inferior to Moses in standing before Eleazar the high priest to inquire through him and his Urim and Thummim, of Jehovah; Moses enjoyed direct communion with God. When Joshua omitted to inquire in the Gibeonites' case he suffered for it. Moses gave Joshua a charge before the high priest and congregation. Joshua's solemn inauguration to the office to which he had previously been called is in Deuteronomy 31:14-23. God Himself recognizes Joshua in it by summoning him into the tabernacle with Moses, while the divine pillar of cloud manifested Jehovah's presence (compare Acts 15:8-9; Numbers 12:5). He commands Moses and Joshua to write Moses' song, and teach it to Israel as a witness against them of God's benefits, their duties, and the penalty of their apostasy. Jehovah's "charge" by Moses was: "be strong and of a good courage, for thou shalt bring the children of Israel into the land which I sware unto them, and I will be with thee."
Once only did Joshua show an envious spirit, but it was in behalf of his beloved master Moses, not for self. When Eldad and Medad prophesied in the camp separately from the rest of the 70 who received of the spirit that was upon Moses, in his presence, Joshua said, "my lord Moses, forbid them;" he replied, "enviest thou for my sake? would God that all the Lord's people were prophets," etc. (Numbers 11:28-29; compare John 3:26; Luke 9:49; Numbers 11:25; Acts 11:17). Jehovah repeated the charge (Joshua 1:1-9), enjoining" courage" in "doing according to all the law, turning not from it to the right or left," and promising consequent prosperity and Jehovah's continual presence as "his God wheresoever he went." God kept His promise, working mighty miracles in his behalf, and giving Israel all the land and rest round about; no good thing failed which the Lord had spoken (Joshua 21:43-45). The people honoured Joshua as they had Moses. During his lifetime Israel came nearest to realizing the ideal of the people of God (Joshua 11:15; Joshua 24:31).
Joshua took the command at Shittim, sent spies to Jericho, crossed Jordan, fortified his camp at Gilgal, circumcised the people (for Israel's work was a spiritual one, and men still having the badge of fleshliness were not fit agents for the Lord's work: Joshua 10:40; Judges 5:31), kept the Passover, (after which on their eating the old grain of the land the manna ceased,) and received the assurance of Jericho's fall and God's fighting against Israel's foes from the uncreated Angel of Jehovah (Joshua 5:13-15; Joshua 6:2-5), the Captain of Jehovah's host (Matthew 26:53; Exodus 23:20-23; Revelation 19:11-14). The charge "loose thy shoe from off thy feet" identifies Him with the Jehovah of Exodus 3:5. Ganneau suggests that Sartabeh the mountain was the spot whereon the Captain of Jehovah's host, Hebrew: Sarsaba , appeared to Joshua, and thence takes its name. It is invisible W. of Jericho; but to one starting from Riha to the E. it appears at all points.
The divine Captain was on a height above Joshua, for "he lifted up his eyes" toward Him, and went unto Him. Jericho fell by miracle. (See JERICHO.) The repulse at AI, through Achan's sin, taught Israel their success depended on their doing God's work of wrath in God's holy way, without greed. (See ACHAN.) Ai then fell. Joshua wrote the law on EBAL, and read it before the assembled people, half on that side and half. over against Gerizim. (See GERIZIM.) By neglecting to consult Jehovah Joshua was entrapped into the league with Gibeon; but having sworn he honourably kept his oath (Psalms 15:4; Ecclesiastes 5:2; contrast 2 Samuel 21:2-6, etc.). (See GIBEON.) This brought on the attack of the five confederate kings whom he defeated at Makkedah, aided by a divinely sent hailstorm and prolongation of daylight: the condition of the air was probably rendered by God, at Joshua's believing prayer, highly refractive so as to cause the sun to be seen long after its actual descent beneath the horizon, as the fata morgana in Sicily and the arctic region; compare the recession of the sun dial shadow under Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:11).
The miracle was local, not universal, if we are to judge from the language, "stand ... upon Gibeon, ... in the valley of Ajalon;" so Exodus 8:22; Exodus 10:23. The mention of the moon with the "sun" hints at the true theory of the earth's rotation on its axis, which requires that if the sun apparently stood the moon should apparently stand too. Habakkuk (Habakkuk 3:10-11) refers to it: "the sun and moon stood still in their habitation." The words "hasted not to go down" imply a gradual not a sudden check to the ordinary phenomena of the sun's apparent motion. Joshua subdued the S. to Kadesh Barnea and Gaza, then the northern confederated kings under Jabin, at Merom, and the country even unto Baalgad in the valley of Lebanon under Mount Hermon and unto "great Zidon." (Tyre was still inferior, merely a stronghold subordinate to Zidon. In the books Samuel and Kings this is reversed, marking the early date of the book of Joshua). Israel often disliked destroying all; but God's command required utter extermination of the Canaanites (Joshua 10:40).
Like the earthquake or pestilence, they were simply God's executioners, without personal bloodthirstiness, required to exhibit His hatred of idolatry, and learning themselves to hate it. For 500 years God had borne with longsuffering those guilty nations. Neither the piety of Melchizedek nor the awful punishment of Sodom and Gomorrah had led them to repentance. Now their "iniquity was full" (Genesis 15:16). In six years six nations and 31 kings, including the giant Anakim, their former dread, fell before Joshua. (See ANAKIM.) Their extermination was "a work of mercy for all the countries of the earth to the very end of the world." Next Joshua, now aged, allotted the land, along with Eleazar and the tribal heads (Joshua 14:1; Joshua 17:4). Timnath Serah in Ephraim was assigned to Joshua himself," the city which he asked" (Joshua 19:49). His singular unselfishness herein appears; he who might have claimed the first and best is served the last, and with no extraordinary possession above the rest. The congregation set up the tabernacle at Shiloh (Joshua 18).
Six cities of refuge were appointed, 48 to the Levites; and the two and a half transjordanic tribes were dismissed home with blessings (Joshua 20-22). The slackness of Israel in taking possession of the promised land and destroying the Canaanites was the drawback to the completeness of Joshua's work (Joshua 18:3); after their long nomadic life the people were slow in settling down in separate homes; fear of the foes' attack too made them shrink from the trouble of defending themselves severally: a root of bitterness left which bore deadly fruit under the judges.
A long time after Jehovah had given rest unto Israel from all foes, Joshua, now old, convened all Israel (Joshua 23) represented by their heads, judges, and officers, to either Timhath Serah his home or Shiloh the sanctuary, and exhorted them to love and serve Jehovah ("be ye very courageous to do all that is written in the law, turn not aside to the right or to the left," Joshua 23:6; the same as God had enjoined Himself, Joshua 1:7), constrained by His past benefits, His promises of future help, and His threats of leaving the nations to be snares, scourges, and thorns to vex and destroy Israel in the event of apostasy. Again he gathered all the tribes with their heads and officers to Shechem, as being the place where Abram received God's first promise of the land after his migration into Canaan (Genesis 12:6-7); more especially because here Jacob on his return from Mesopotamia settled, and removed his household's strange gods (Genesis 33:19; Genesis 35:2-4), just as Joshua now wished Israel to renew the covenant binding them to renunciation of all idols. Here too Joseph's bones were buried (Joshua 24:32). Joshua was buried at 110 years of age in Timnath Serah. His piety comes brightly out in his dying exhortation:
(1) God's call to Abraham was one of pure grace, not for his merit; Israel's fathers and Terah had "served other gods" (Joshua 24:2; Joshua 24:14; Genesis 31:53; Genesis 19:34), but Jehovah has through miraculous interposition brought Israel to the promised land; put away therefore all the gods ye served in Egypt (Leviticus 17:7; Ezekiel 20:18; Joshua 24:14); but, if not,
(2) choose you (if you are bent on self destruction) which idols you like, "but as for me and my house (Genesis 18:19) we will serve the Lord" (compare Ruth 1:15; 1 Kings 18:21; John 6:67; Luke 10:42).
When the people, self confidently (like Peter, Luke 22:33), promised faithfulness, Joshua replied "ye cannot serve the Lord," i.e. without putting away heart idols (for they had no wooden, stone, or metal images to put away): Deuteronomy 6:5-6; Matthew 6:24. See Joshua 24:23, "put away the strange gods which are IN you," heart idols, inconsistent with the service of Jehovah who is "a jealous God" (Ezekiel 20:39). On the people expressing still their resolution to serve Jehovah, Joshua made a covenant between God and them; and wrote the covenant and the words spoken on both sides in the law book of God, adding it to that written by Moses, and set up a stone as a memorial on the spot, under a terebinth tree by the sanctuary (or place hallowed to Jehovah by Abraham), and as a visible silent witness of their engagement. His influence under God kept them faithful both in his own time and that of the elders who outlived him.
A pious warrior, almost without blemish, one who learned to command in advanced age by obeying when a youth, ever looking up to Jehovah with childlike faith, worshipping with devout prostration the Captain of the Lord's host, dispensing kingdoms yet content at the last with a petty inheritance, as disinterested and unselfish as he was brave, generous, and patriotic. Joshua typifies Jesus whose name he bears (Acts 7:45; Hebrews 4:8). Moses representing the law could not bring Israel into Canaan; that was reserved for Joshua. So Jesus perfects what the law could not, and brings His people into the heavenly inheritance (Acts 13:39; Hebrew 4; Hebrews 7:19-25). He leads His people through a Jordan-like flood of troubles and death itself without being overwhelmed (Isaiah 43:2). He bruises Satan under their feet (Joshua 10:24; Psalms 110:5; Malachi 4:3; Romans 16:20). Jesus is the minister of the true circumcision (Joshua 5:2-9; compare Romans 15:8; Romans 2:29; Colossians 2:11; Colossians 2:13).
Joshua was buried in the border of his inheritance in Timnath Serah (probably now Kefr Haris) in Mount Ephraim, on the northern side of the hill Gaash (Joshua 24:30). (See TIMNATH SERAH.) The Septuagint adds: "there they laid with him in the tomb the stone knives with which he circumcised the children of Israel in Gilgal ... and there they are unto this day." If this addition of the Septuagint be trustworthy, it will be a curious proof that flint knives lay in situ for 12 centuries, from the 16th to the third century B.C., the date of Septuagint. At all events it shows that flint knives are no proof of a barbarous race ages before the historic period; such knives were used by civilized races in the historic times. M. Guerin professes to have discovered at Tigne (Timnath Serah), Joshua's tomb. In the hill there one tomb has a vestibule, into which the light penetrates. There are 300 niches for lamps. The vestibule admits to two chambers, one with 15 receptacles for bodies, the other but one; many sharp flint knives were found on removing the dirt from the floor of the tomb, as also in Gilgal, the passage of Jordan. The pillars in the vestibule are surrounded by a fillet of Egyptian style.
2. 1 Samuel 6:14-18.
3. 2 Kings 23:8.
4. (See JESHUA.)
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joshua the Son of Jehozadak
In 539 BC Cyrus of Persia conquered Babylon and immediately gave permission to the captive Jews to return to their homeland and rebuild Jerusalem and the temple. Chief among those who returned were the governor Zerubbabel and the high priest Joshua (or Jeshua) the son of Jehozadak (or Jozadak) (Ezra 2:1-2).
Joint leadership
Under the leadership of Zerubbabel and Joshua, the returned exiles set up the altar soon after they arrived in Jerusalem (Ezra 3:1-2). They laid the foundation of the temple the next year (Ezra 3:8-11), but when opposition discouraged the builders, the work stopped (Ezra 4:1-5).
Sixteen years later God raised up the prophets Haggai and Zechariah to stir up Zerubbabel, Joshua and the people to get to work once more on the temple (Ezra 4:24; Ezra 5:1-2; Haggai 1:1-11). When work restarted, the prophets brought further messages of encouragement to the people through Zerubbabel and Joshua (Haggai 1:12-15; Haggai 2:1-9).
The rebuilding of the temple was a preparation for the coming of the Messiah. When, in anticipation of this Messiah, the Jews conducted a coronation ceremony, the person they should have crowned was Zerubbabel, for he was not only governor but also a Davidic prince in the line of the Messiah (Matthew 1:6; Matthew 1:12; Matthew 1:16). Instead they crowned the priest Joshua, to avoid any action that may have appeared to the Persians as treason. The ceremony emphasized that the joint rule of Joshua and Zerubbabel, the priest and the prince, foreshadowed the rule of the priest-king Messiah (Zechariah 6:9-14).
Dealing with sin
In a vision that the prophet Zechariah saw, Joshua the high priest was standing before God in dirty garments. Standing beside Joshua was Satan, ready to make the accusation that the people were unclean because of their long exile in idolatrous Babylon. They were therefore no longer fit to serve God or build him a temple. By clothing Joshua in clean garments, God showed that he had forgiven and cleansed his people (Zechariah 3).
Sadly, the people’s renewed devotion was short-lived. Joshua’s sons did not truly follow God and, like many of their countrymen, married unbelieving non-Jewish women. When rebuked by Ezra, they put away their foreign wives and offered sacrifices for their wrongdoing (Ezra 10:18-19).
A Dictionary of Early Christian Biography - Joshua (1) Stylites, a Syrian Monk
Joshua (1) Stylites, a Syrian monk; a native of Edessa, entered the monastery of Zuenin near Amida in Mesopotamia. After some years he determined to imitate St. Simeon and live the rest of his days on a column, from which he derives his distinguishing name. Before this he had written in 507 the history of his times from 495, entitled, History of the Calamities which befel Edessa, Amida, and all Mesopotamia . A full description, with quotations from the original Syriac, is given by Assemani (Bibl. Or. i. 260). It was published at Leipzig in 1878, in the Abhandlungen für die Kunde des Morgenlandes , in the original Syriac, with a French trans. by Abbé Paulin Martin. The translator describes it as the most ancient history extant in Syriac, and specially valuable because of Joshua's personal share in the events. His text corrects many omissions and mistakes in Assemani's abstract. He fixes its composition between 510–515, and classes Joshua as a Monophysite, while Assemani regarded him as orthodox.
[1]
[2]
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joshua the Son of Nun
Like Moses, Joshua was born and brought up in Egypt. He became Moses’ chief assistant on the journey from Egypt to Canaan and, when Moses died, became Israel’s new leader and led the people into Canaan. The name Joshua means ‘Yahweh (Jehovah) saves’. Translated via the Aramaic into Greek, the name becomes ‘Jesus’.
Assistant to Moses
Joshua’s leadership qualities became evident soon after the Israelites left Egypt. When some raiding Amalekites attacked the Israelite procession, Moses hurriedly appointed Joshua to form and command a fighting force. Through courage and prayer, Israel won its first battle (Exodus 17:8-14).
As Moses’ chief assistant, Joshua kept watch when Moses entered God’s presence on Mt Sinai (Exodus 24:13) and when Moses spoke face to face with God in his tent (Exodus 33:11). Joshua was so loyal to Moses that he wanted Moses to silence two men who prophesied, lest people listen to them and ignore Moses (Numbers 11:26-29).
When Moses sent representatives from the twelve tribes to spy out Canaan, Joshua was the representative from the tribe of Ephraim. Only he and Caleb, the representative from the tribe of Judah, believed that God could give Israel victory over the Canaanites. The people chose to accept the report of the ten unbelieving spies and tried to kill Joshua and Caleb. God announced that Israel would therefore remain in the wilderness for the next forty years, till all those currently over twenty years of age (except Joshua and Caleb) had died, and a new generation had grown up (Numbers 13:1-16; Numbers 14:6-10; Numbers 14:26-30).
Conqueror of Canaan
Forty years later, when the new generation was ready to enter Canaan, Moses appointed Joshua as his divinely chosen successor (Numbers 27:18-22; Deuteronomy 31:14; Deuteronomy 34:9). Joshua would direct the conquest of Canaan and, with Eleazar the high priest, oversee the division of the land among Israel’s tribes (Numbers 34:17; Deuteronomy 1:38; Deuteronomy 3:28; Deuteronomy 31:23). After Moses’ death, God gave Joshua special encouragement for the tasks ahead (Joshua 1:5-9).
Joshua’s proven faith, combined with his long experience as an administrator and army general, enabled him to carry out the work entrusted to him. He organized the people and sought out information for the advance into Canaan (Joshua 1:10-11; Joshua 2:1); he ensured that people and priests carried out the rituals God required of them (Joshua 3:7-13; Joshua 5:2-3); and he submitted totally to God’s directions (Joshua 5:13-15). The book of Joshua records how Israel crossed the Jordan River, conquered Canaan and divided the land among its tribes (see JOSHUA, BOOK OF).
The entire operation for the conquest and division of Canaan showed Joshua’s courage, faith, obedience and honesty (Joshua 6:15-16; Hebrews 11:30). When he found wilful disobedience among the people, he dealt promptly with the guilty person (Joshua 7:10-12; Joshua 7:16; Joshua 7:25). Victory followed, whereupon Joshua led the Israelites to Shechem, where they renewed their promise of obedience to God and his covenant demands (Joshua 8:30-35).
Joshua then attacked to the south, but the people of Gibeon saved themselves by tricking the Israelites into making a peace treaty with them. The reason for the Israelites’ mistake was their failure to ask God’s direction; but, having made an agreement, they kept it (Joshua 9:14-19). The outcome was that soon they had to defend the Gibeonites against an attack by hostile neighbours, but in doing so they experienced miraculous exhibitions of God’s power (Joshua 10:1-14). From this victory Joshua went on to conquer all southern Canaan (Joshua 10:28-43), and then northern Canaan (Joshua 11:1-15).
A godly administrator
After the conquest of Canaan, the Israelite tribes settled in their respective areas (Joshua 14:1). But Joshua had constantly to remind the individual tribes to drive out the Canaanites from the scattered areas they still occupied (Joshua 13:1; Joshua 17:16-18; Joshua 18:3). Joshua himself settled in a district that he had chosen, by God’s permission, within the territory of his own tribe, Ephraim (Joshua 19:49-50).
Nothing is recorded of Joshua’s life till the occasion of his address to the nation just before his death (Joshua 23:1). The people followed God throughout Joshua’s time and the time of those he had trained, showing that he was as strong and godly a leader in civilian affairs as he had been in military affairs (Joshua 24:31). In his final address he warned of the dangers of idolatry and challenged the people to maintain their faithfulness to God (Joshua 24:14-15). He died at 110 years of age and was buried on his home property (Joshua 24:29-30).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joshua, Book of
The subject of the book of Joshua is the conquest and division of the land of Canaan. Moses, who had led the people for the previous forty years, died before the people entered Canaan (his death having been recorded in the final chapter of the previous book, Deuteronomy). He was succeeded by the man from whom the book of Joshua takes its name.
Authorship, style and purpose
There is no statement in the book of Joshua telling us who wrote it, though some of the material may have been based on what Joshua himself wrote (e.g. Joshua 24:25-26). The writer probably also used other historical books of that era (Joshua 10:13), along with national and tribal records (Joshua 18:8-9).
Although it outlines the conquest of Canaan, the book of Joshua does not give a detailed record of events. The battle for Canaan lasted a long time (Joshua 11:18), at least five years (Joshua 14:7; Joshua 14:10), yet some of the more extensive battle campaigns are passed over in a few verses. By contrast, events of apparently little military importance are sometimes given in considerable detail.
The reason for this unevenness of treatment is that the book was intended to be not a chronological record of facts, but a prophetical interpretation of an important era of Israel’s history. The writer’s main concern was to show how God was revealing himself and his purposes through the experiences of his people Israel. (For the prophetical significance of the group of books to which Joshua belongs, the Former Prophets, see PROPHECY.)
Summary of contents
Chapters 1 to 5 deal with Israel’s entry into Canaan. From the outset the emphasis is on the fact that God is giving the land to Israel. Nevertheless, the people, and particularly Joshua, must be courageous, trusting and obedient to God if their invasion is to be successful (1:1-18).
After spying out the land in order to plan the invasion intelligently (2:1-24), the Israelites crossed the Jordan River and set up camp at Gilgal. To impress upon people the religious significance of the invasion, the narrative emphasizes such matters as the ritual cleansing of the people, the leadership of the priests, the prominence of the ark of the covenant, the miraculous crossing of the Jordan, and the obedience to the covenant commands by those who were till then uncircumcised. The appearance of the angel of the Lord further demonstrated that the entire operation was divinely directed (3:1-5:15; see also JOSHUA THE SON OF NUN).
The overthrow of Jericho gave more examples of the religious significance of Israel’s conquest: the role of the priests and the ark, the repeated use of the symbolic number ‘seven’ in the proceedings, and the judgment that followed disobedience to God’s commands (6:1-7:26). Only after the leaders dealt with the sin, did Israel make further advances into central Canaan (8:1-29). The people then reaffirmed their obedience to the covenant by which God had given Canaan to them (8:30-35).
Having split Canaan by their drive through the central region, the Israelites then conquered the south (9:1-10:43) and the north (11:1-15). The summary that follows emphasizes again that Israel’s occupation of Canaan was in fulfilment of God’s promises (11:16-12:24). (For a map showing towns that the Israelites conquered and regions that the Israelite tribes subsequently occupied see JUDGES, BOOK OF.)
With Canaan now the possession of Israel, Joshua, together with the high priest and the tribal leaders, began the task of dividing the land between the twelve tribes. The area west of Jordan (Canaan itself) was divided between nine and a half tribes; the other two and a half tribes (Reuben, Gad and half of Manasseh) received their inheritance in the land east of Jordan that Israel had conquered in the time of Moses (13:1-14:5). Of the area west of Jordan, the largest and best portions went also to two and a half tribes – Judah (14:6-15:63) and the remainder of the Joseph tribes, Ephraim and the other half of Manasseh (16:1-17:18). The seven smaller tribes then received their tribal allotments (18:1-19:51). The Levites, who had no tribal area of their own, were given towns in all the other tribes (20:1-21:45).
Apart from the story of an early misunderstanding between the eastern and western tribes (22:1-34), nothing more is recorded of the era till the time of Joshua’s final address to the nation many years later (23:1-16). Before he died, Joshua called Israel’s leaders to assemble for another covenant renewal ceremony. Through them he reminded the people that if they wanted to enjoy the blessings of the covenant, they had to be obedient to its requirements (24:1-33).

Sentence search

Jarmuth - City of Judah, taken from the Amorites by Joshua. Joshua 10:3,5,23 ; Joshua 12:11 ; Joshua 15:35 ; Nehemiah 11:29 . Joshua 21:29 . Probably the same as REMETH in Joshua 19:21 , and RAMOTH in 1 Chronicles 6:73
Tappuah - Joshua 15:34 . Joshua 16:8 ; Joshua 17:8 . Probably connected with ENTAPPUAH in Joshua 17:7 . City whose king was killed under Joshua, but whether the same as either of the above is unknown. Joshua 12:17
Joshua, the Book of - "The doomsday book of Palestine," especially Joshua 13-23. Joshua after destroying the kings, so that Israel had rest from war in the open field, divided generally the land; but this is quite consistent with the after statements that years passed before the process of division was completed and the allotments finally settled. Joshua was directed to divide land not yet in Israel's actual possession (Joshua 13:1-14;Joshua 13:5). ...
The slackness of Israel to extirpate the accursed Canaanites was also a cause of non-immediate possession (Joshua 11:16; Joshua 11:23; Joshua 12:7; Joshua 12:10-12; compare Joshua 15:63; Joshua 16:10; Deuteronomy 18:1-27; Joshua 17:16; Joshua 18:1; Joshua 18:3; Joshua 19:51). Joshua is based on the Pentateuch (to which it is joined by the conjunction "now" or "and" at its beginning), "now" but distinct from it. Compare Joshua 13:7 with Numbers 34:13; Numbers 13:17 with Numbers 32:37; Numbers 13:21-22 with Numbers 31:8; Numbers 13:14; Numbers 13:33; Numbers 14:4, with 1619165731_38; Numbers 18:20; Numbers 21 with Numbers 35. The narrative moves on in one uninterrupted flow for the first 12 chapters of Joshua. Jehovah's faithfulness is exhibited in the historical fulfillment of His covenanted promises, with which the book opens (Joshua 1:2-9, the programme of the book). The promise, Joshua 1:2-5, is fulfilled (Joshua 2-12), the conquest of the land by Jehovah's mighty help, "from the wilderness and this Lebanon unto . Joshua's conquests, though overwhelming at the time, could only be secured by Israel's faithfully following them up. The promise, Joshua 6-7, that Joshua should divide the land is recorded as fulfilled (Joshua 13-22). Be strong and of a good courage for the Lord thy God is with thee wheresoever thou goest" (Joshua 1:7-9), are urged upon the people in detail by Joshua as his last testimony (Joshua 23:24). The "three days" (Joshua 1:11) are not the time within which the crossing actually took place, but the time allowed to the people to prepare for crossing: prepare victuals to be able to leave Shittim within three days, so as to be ready to cross Jordan. ...
The spies sent from Shittim to Jericho (the key of Canaan) on the same day as Joshua gave this charge to Israel had to hide three days after leaving Jericho, so that they could not have returned until the evening of the fourth day after they were sent (Joshua 2:22). The drying up of Jordan is the counterpart of the drying up of the Red Sea under Moses, Joshua's master and predecessor. Throughout the warlike and the peaceful events of this book, comprising a period of 25 years (compare Joshua 14:7-10) from 1451 to 1426 B. Joshua is His conscious and obedient agent. That Joshua wrote the book is probable because...
(1) he certainly wrote one transaction in it (Joshua 24:26), and scarcely any but Joshua himself is likely to have written the parting addresses, his last legacy to Israel (Joshua 23-24). ...
(2) None but Joshua could have supplied the accounts of his communion with God (Joshua 1:1 ff; Joshua 3:7; Joshua 4:2; Joshua 5:2; Joshua 5:9; Joshua 5:13; Joshua 6:2; Joshua 7:10; Joshua 8:1; Joshua 10:8; Joshua 11:6; Joshua 13:1-2; Joshua 20:1; Joshua 24:2). ...
(3) Joshua was best qualified by his position to describe the events, and to collect the documents of this book; it was important that the statement of the allotments should rest on such a decisive authority as Joshua. ...
(4) He would be following his master and predecessor Moses' pattern in recording God's dealings with Israel through him; Joshua 24:26 looks like his own subscription, as Moses in Deuteronomy 31, both being followed by an appendix as to the author's death. ...
(5) In Joshua 5:1; Joshua 5:6, he uses the first person, "we passed over"; and in Joshua 6:25, "Rahab dwelleth in Israel even unto this day"; both passages imply a contemporary writer. Judges 3:1-3; Judges 1:27-29, repeat Joshua 13:2-6; Joshua 16:10; Joshua 17:11, because Joshua's description suited the times described by the inspired writer of Judges. The capture of Hebron and Debir by Judah and its hero Caleb is repeated in Judges 1:9-15 from Joshua 15:13-20. Possibly the account of the Danite occupation of Leshem or Laish is a later insertion in Joshua 19:47 from Judges 18:7. So also the account (Joshua 15:63; Joshua 18:28) of the joint occupation of Jerusalem by Israel and the Jebusites may be an insertion from Judges 1:8; Judges 1:21. ...
In the case of an authoritative record of the allotment of lands, which the book of Joshua is, the immediate successors who appended the account of his death (probably one or more of the elders who took part in Joshua's victories and outlived him: "we," Joshua 5:1; Joshua 5:6; Joshua 24:31; Judges 2:7) would naturally insert the exact state of things then, which in Joshua's time were in a transition state, his allotments not having been taken full possession of until after his death. The expulsion of the Jebusites from Jerusalem at the beginning of David's reign proves that Joshua and Judges were written before David. The Gibeonites were in Joshua's time (Joshua 9:27) "hewers of wood and drawers of water" for the sanctuary "even unto this day," but Saul set aside the covenant and tried to destroy them; so that the book of Joshua was before Saul. The only Phoenicians mentioned are the Sidonians, reckoned with the Canaanites as doomed to destruction; but in David's time Tyre takes the lead of Sidon, and is in treaty with David (Joshua 13:4-6; 2 Samuel 5:11)
Dehir - A town in the mountains of Judah, Joshua 15:49, one of a group of eleven cities to the west of Hebron. The earlier name of Debir was Kirjath-sepher, "city of book," Joshua 15:15; Judges 1:11, and Kirjath-sannah, "city of palm," Joshua 15:49. Joshua 21:15; 1 Chronicles 6:58. Joshua 13:26. Joshua 15:7. One of the five kings hanged by Joshua. Joshua 10:5; Joshua 10:23; Joshua 10:26
Jarmuth - A town in the shephelah or low hills (not "the plain ") of Judah (Joshua 15:35). Piram its king was one of the five confederated to punish Gibeon for submitting to Joshua (Joshua 10:3; Joshua 10:5); routed at Beth-horon; executed at Makkedah (Joshua 10:23). (Joshua 21:29). REMETH in Joshua 19:20; RAMOTH in 1 Chronicles 6:73
Makkedah - A royal city of the Canaanites in the plains of Judah, where Joshua, executed the are confederate kings. Joshua 10:10; Joshua 12:16; Joshua 15:41
Kirjath-Arba - The city of Arba, Arba being its founder, or the city of Four—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Adam having been buried there—is mentioned Genesis 23:2; Genesis 35:27; Joshua 14:15; Joshua 15:13; Joshua 15:54; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:11; Judges 1:10; Nehemiah 11:25
Debir - to Joshua 10:3 joined other four kings against Joshua, but was defeated and put to death along with his allies at Makkedah. A town first known as Kiriath-sepher ( Joshua 15:15 , Judges 1:11 ) in the neighbourhood of Hebron, and inhabited by Anakim ( Joshua 11:21 ), conquered by Joshua ( Joshua 10:38 ; Joshua 11:21 ; Joshua 12:13 ), or more specifically by Othniel ( Joshua 15:15 ), assigned as a Levitical city ( Joshua 21:15 , 1 Chronicles 6:58 ) in the tribe of Judah ( Joshua 15:49 ). An alternative name Kiriath-sannah , once recorded ( Joshua 15:49 ), is probably a corruption of Kiriath-sepher, due primarily to the similarity of p and n in the old Hebrew alphabet. A place named in the northern boundary of Judah, near the valley of Achor ( Joshua 15:7 ). A place, not identified, in the border of the trans-Jordanic territory of Gad ( Joshua 13:26 )
Anab - ” Joshua eliminated the Anakim from southern Judah including Hebron, Debir, and Anab (Joshua 11:21 ). Joshua allotted the mountain city to Judah (Joshua 15:50 )
Debir (2) - King of Eglon (a town in the lowland of Judah), one of the five hanged by Joshua (Joshua 10:3; Joshua 10:23)
Achshaph - A royal city of the Canaanites, Joshua 11:1 , conquered by Joshua, and assigned to the tribe of Asher, Joshua 12:20 ; 19:25
Shimron - Canaanitish city conquered by Joshua and allotted to Zebulun. Joshua 11:1 ; Joshua 19:15
Azmon - An unknown place on the border of Judah ( Numbers 34:4 , Joshua 15:4 ); called in Joshua 15:29 ; Joshua 19:3 Ezem
Joshua the Son of Nun - Like Moses, Joshua was born and brought up in Egypt. The name Joshua means ‘Yahweh (Jehovah) saves’. ...
Assistant to Moses...
Joshua’s leadership qualities became evident soon after the Israelites left Egypt. When some raiding Amalekites attacked the Israelite procession, Moses hurriedly appointed Joshua to form and command a fighting force. ...
As Moses’ chief assistant, Joshua kept watch when Moses entered God’s presence on Mt Sinai (Exodus 24:13) and when Moses spoke face to face with God in his tent (Exodus 33:11). Joshua was so loyal to Moses that he wanted Moses to silence two men who prophesied, lest people listen to them and ignore Moses (Numbers 11:26-29). ...
When Moses sent representatives from the twelve tribes to spy out Canaan, Joshua was the representative from the tribe of Ephraim. The people chose to accept the report of the ten unbelieving spies and tried to kill Joshua and Caleb. God announced that Israel would therefore remain in the wilderness for the next forty years, till all those currently over twenty years of age (except Joshua and Caleb) had died, and a new generation had grown up (Numbers 13:1-16; Numbers 14:6-10; Numbers 14:26-30). ...
Conqueror of Canaan...
Forty years later, when the new generation was ready to enter Canaan, Moses appointed Joshua as his divinely chosen successor (Numbers 27:18-22; Deuteronomy 31:14; Deuteronomy 34:9). Joshua would direct the conquest of Canaan and, with Eleazar the high priest, oversee the division of the land among Israel’s tribes (Numbers 34:17; Deuteronomy 1:38; Deuteronomy 3:28; Deuteronomy 31:23). After Moses’ death, God gave Joshua special encouragement for the tasks ahead (Joshua 1:5-9). ...
Joshua’s proven faith, combined with his long experience as an administrator and army general, enabled him to carry out the work entrusted to him. He organized the people and sought out information for the advance into Canaan (Joshua 1:10-11; Joshua 2:1); he ensured that people and priests carried out the rituals God required of them (Joshua 3:7-13; Joshua 5:2-3); and he submitted totally to God’s directions (Joshua 5:13-15). The book of Joshua records how Israel crossed the Jordan River, conquered Canaan and divided the land among its tribes (see Joshua, BOOK OF). ...
The entire operation for the conquest and division of Canaan showed Joshua’s courage, faith, obedience and honesty (Joshua 6:15-16; Hebrews 11:30). When he found wilful disobedience among the people, he dealt promptly with the guilty person (Joshua 7:10-12; Joshua 7:16; Joshua 7:25). Victory followed, whereupon Joshua led the Israelites to Shechem, where they renewed their promise of obedience to God and his covenant demands (Joshua 8:30-35). ...
Joshua then attacked to the south, but the people of Gibeon saved themselves by tricking the Israelites into making a peace treaty with them. The reason for the Israelites’ mistake was their failure to ask God’s direction; but, having made an agreement, they kept it (Joshua 9:14-19). The outcome was that soon they had to defend the Gibeonites against an attack by hostile neighbours, but in doing so they experienced miraculous exhibitions of God’s power (Joshua 10:1-14). From this victory Joshua went on to conquer all southern Canaan (Joshua 10:28-43), and then northern Canaan (Joshua 11:1-15). ...
A godly administrator...
After the conquest of Canaan, the Israelite tribes settled in their respective areas (Joshua 14:1). But Joshua had constantly to remind the individual tribes to drive out the Canaanites from the scattered areas they still occupied (Joshua 13:1; Joshua 17:16-18; Joshua 18:3). Joshua himself settled in a district that he had chosen, by God’s permission, within the territory of his own tribe, Ephraim (Joshua 19:49-50). ...
Nothing is recorded of Joshua’s life till the occasion of his address to the nation just before his death (Joshua 23:1). The people followed God throughout Joshua’s time and the time of those he had trained, showing that he was as strong and godly a leader in civilian affairs as he had been in military affairs (Joshua 24:31). In his final address he warned of the dangers of idolatry and challenged the people to maintain their faithfulness to God (Joshua 24:14-15). He died at 110 years of age and was buried on his home property (Joshua 24:29-30)
Joshua - Joshua (on forms and meaning of the name see next art. The governor of Jerusalem in the time of Josiah ( Joshua 17:14-185 ). , Zechariah 3:1 ; Joshua 4:21-246 ; Zechariah 3:6 etc. he is called Joshua, in Ezr. ...
Joshua (cf. show that ‘Joshua’ was probably the original reading. He was buried in Timnath-serah ( Joshua 19:50 ; Joshua 24:30 ) or Timnath-heres ( Judges 2:9 ), in the hill-country of Ephraim. ...
The view is widely held that Joshua has no historical reality as a person, that his name is merely the name of a clan in Ephraim, and that his leadership in Israel represents, and puts back into the period of the conquest the commanding position which Ephraim had come to hold in the Israelite confederation. But the old poetic fragment Joshua 10:12 f. represents him as speaking in the name of united Israel, and Joshua 17:14-18 brings him into view in his dealings with his own tribe as having more than their interests in his mind, as being in some sense the arbiter of the confederacy. And while it is difficult on any reading of the history to understand why all our sources say nothing about the conquest of Central Palestine, this becomes doubly difficult if originally this was the scene of Joshua’s first activity and influence. ...
It seems more probable that Joshua led the nation in their first assault on Palestine, that under his leadership the entry by Jericho was won, and a wedge thrust into the land by the capture of Bethel and Ai. But this is not incompatible with the fact that Joshua may have retained such a position of arbiter as, e. , Joshua 17:1-18 gives him. ...
Joshua...
1. Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings. The reason generally accepted for this is that Joshua, unlike Exodus or Leviticus, does not contain Torah or law. But Genesis, which recounts only the origins of the nation to which the Torah was delivered, was included in the Pentateuch; Joshua, which relates the conquest of the land where the Torah was to be practised, was excluded. Jewish tradition worked with criteria of which we are ignorant, but in separating Joshua from the Pentateuch it may have recognized the presence of different documents. ...
Modern criticism has insisted on connecting the book more closely with the Pentateuch, on the ground that, since all the Pentateuch documents look forward to the fulfilment of Jahweh’s promise of Palestine, Joshua, which relates the conquest, is a necessary sequel. This, however, forgets ( a ) that all Hebrew history is a unity in which the conquest of Palestine is merely an incident; ( b ) that Deuteronomy looks forward beyond the conquest to the erection of a national sanctuary, for which Joshua provides no more than the foundation. And there are other evidences that Joshua formed part of a history which extended through the period of the Judges to the establishment of the kingdom in Jerusalem. It relates the mission of the spies to Jericho ( Joshua 2:1-9 ; Joshua 2:12-24 ), and the consequent passage of Jordan ( Joshua 3:1 ; Joshua 3:5 ; Joshua 3:10-17 , Joshua 4:1-11 a, Joshua 4:15-18 , Joshua 4:20 ). It recounts the circumcision at Gilgal, which it views as a novelty (‘the second time’ of Joshua 5:2 is absent from the LXX [7] ), since by this means the reproach of the circumcised Egyptians is removed from the people ( Joshua 5:2 f. , Joshua 5:8 f. The story of the capture of Jericho and Ai (in both of which the presence of two accounts is clear) follows ( Joshua 5:13 to Joshua 6:27 , Joshua 7:2-26 , Joshua 8:1-29 ), with the trespass of Achan. Joshua then makes a compact with the Gibeonites ( Joshua 9:3-9 a, Joshua 9:11-15 a, Joshua 9:16 , Joshua 9:22 f. , Joshua 9:26 , Joshua 9:27 a), and advances to the victory at Beth-horon ( Joshua 10:1-7 ; Joshua 10:9-12 b 14a), to the execution at Makkedah ( Joshua 10:15-24 ; Joshua 10:26 f. ), and to the victory at the Waters of Merom ( Joshua 11:1-9 [8]). He brought out certain features in connexion with the passage of Jordan the fear inspired in the Canaanites, the presence of the 2 1 / 2 tribes, the exaltation of Joshua by Jahweh (Joshua 2:10 f. , Joshua 3:2-4 ; Joshua 3:6-9 , Joshua 4:11 b, Joshua 4:12 , Joshua 4:14 , 1619165731_62 , Joshua 5:1 ). He gave a different reason for the circumcision at Gilgal ( Joshua 5:4-7 ), and added some details to the fraud of the Gibeonites ( Joshua 9:1 f. , Joshua 9:9 b, Joshua 9:10 , Joshua 9:24 f. , Joshua 9:27 b. ), and to the story of Beth-horon ( Joshua 9:8 ; Joshua 9:12 a, Joshua 9:14 b, Joshua 9:25 ). He concluded the conquest of the South ( Joshua 10:28-43 ) and the victory at Merom ( Joshua 11:10-23 ), with a summary of the result; and he added a review of the entire conquest in ch. This is the more remarkable since at Joshua 8:30-35 we have a statement of how Joshua built an altar at Ebal, before the country between Gilgal and Mount Ephraim was subdued. Further, the conquest of South Palestine in its present form does not agree with Joshua 15:14-19 = Judges 1:10-15 . Again, Joshua 11:21 f. assigns to Joshua the victory over the Anakim, which in Joshua 14:12 , Joshua 15:15 ff. He gives prominence to the motives which governed Joshua, and to the Divine support promised to and received by him. ...
A few verses in this section, Joshua 4:13 ; Joshua 4:19 , Joshua 5:10-12 , Joshua 7:1 , Joshua 9:15 b, Joshua 9:17-21 , are generally assigned to P [22]. Into the lot of the children of Joseph he inserted material from the older source ( Joshua 16:1-3 ; Joshua 16:9 f. , Joshua 17:1 b, Joshua 17:2 , Joshua 17:5 , Joshua 17:8 , Joshua 17:9 b, Joshua 17:10-18 ), which represented the lot of the sons as one ( 1619165731_32 ). Before the lot of Benjamin he placed the statement of a survey made for the seven remaining tribes ( Joshua 18:2-6 ; Joshua 18:8-10 [from JE [4] ; Joshua 18:7 is from D [4] , but the list of Naphtali’s cities ( Joshua 19:32-39 ), which is entirely different in character from the description of the other lots, may be from JE [4] , according to which ( Joshua 18:9 ) the country was distributed by cities. 20), Joshua 18:4 f. , Joshua 18:6 b, which have been added to the earlier source, are absent from the LXX [11] concluded the section on the division of the land with his formal close, Joshua 21:43-45 . ]'>[11] took the account of the dismissal of the 2 1 /2 tribes ( Joshua 22:9-34 ) from P [1] , providing it with his own introduction ( Joshua 22:1-6 ). ]'>[1] ), and added only a few verses ( Joshua 24:11 b, Joshua 24:13 ; Joshua 24:31 ). To these he attached Joshua’s parting counsels (ch. The chief difference lies in the fact that it associates Eleazar with Joshua, but these two formally divide the conquered territory. ...
It seems probable that the Book of Joshua once formed part of a greater whole a history written in the Deuteronomic spirit and based on earlier sources, which covered the period from the conquest to the kingdom
Arbathite - ‘A native of Beth-arabah,’ a town in the wilderness of Judah ( Joshua 15:6 ; Joshua 15:51 ; Joshua 18:22 )
Kirjath Sannah - ) It was in the mountains of Judah, not the usual habitat of palms, rather it was the Canaanite center of religious teaching (Joshua 15:49) KIRJATH SANNAH or KIRJATH SEPHER, "city of a book. " Joshua took it and slew its king and inhabitants (Joshua 10:38-39; Joshua 12:13). frontier (Joshua 15:7; Joshua 15:15-16; Joshua 11:21;Joshua 21:15; Judges 1:11-12)
Libnah - A city of Canaan, in the lowland of Judah, was taken by Joshua, Joshua 10:29-32; Joshua 10:39; Joshua 12:15, and assigned to the priests, Joshua 15:42; Joshua 21:13; 1 Chronicles 6:57; revolted against Joram, 2 Kings 8:22; 2 Chronicles 21:10; was besieged by Sennacherib, 2 Kings 19:8; Isaiah 37:8
Baalah - City in Judah on the border of Benjamin, Joshua 15:9-11 , (called Baale of Judah in 2 Samuel 6:2 ), the same as KIRJATH-JEARIM (q. Joshua 15:60 ; Joshua 18:14,15 ; 1 Chronicles 13:6 . Joshua 15:29 : apparently given to Simeon, and called BALAH in Joshua 19:3 , and BILHAH in 1 Chronicles 4:29
Michmethah - of and facing Shechem (Joshua 17:7); but Joshua 16:6 says Ephraim's border went out toward the sea to Michmethah on the N. side; Grove supposes a gap between Joshua 16:5 and Joshua 16:6
Debir - Amorite king of Eglon, slain by Joshua. Joshua 10:3,23,26 . Joshua as the leader of Israel is represented as taking it, but in Judges we find that it was actually taken by Othniel, to whom Caleb gave his daughter Achsah in marriage for its capture. Joshua 10:38,39 ; Joshua 11:21 ; Joshua 12:13 ; Joshua 15:7,15,49 ; Joshua 21:15 ; Judges 1:11,12 ; 1 Chronicles 6:58 . Joshua 15:7 . Joshua 13:26
Cities of Refuge - Numbers 35:6; Numbers 35:13; Numbers 35:15; Joshua 20:2; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 20:9. Shechem, in Ephraim, Joshua 21:21; 1 Chronicles 6:67; 2 Chronicles 10:1. Hebron, in Judah, Joshua 21:13; 2 Samuel 5:5; 1 Chronicles 6:55; 1 Chronicles 29:27; 2 Chronicles 11:10. On the east side of Jordan—Bezer, in the tribe of Reuben, in the plains of Moab, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:36. Ramoth-gilead, in the tribe of Gad, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 21:38; 1 Kings 22:3. Golan, in Bashan, in the half-tribe of Manasseh, Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 21:27; 1 Chronicles 6:71
Bethul - (Joshua 19:4) answering to CHESIL in Joshua 15:30; also the southern Bethel (Joshua 12:16), not the northern Bethel
Achshaph - Joshua 12:20. A city conquered by Joshua, and afterwards assigned to the tribe of Asher. Joshua 19:25
Jebus - The tribe of Jebusites were partially subdued by Joshua, Joshua 10:23; Joshua 10:40; Joshua 12:10; Joshua 15:63; and they were permitted to remain after the conquest of Jebus, by David. Joshua 15:8; Joshua 18:16; Zechariah 9:7
Achshaph - border of territory assigned to Asher ( Joshua 19:25 ). Its king joined Jabin’s confederacy, which was defeated by Joshua, and the ruler of Achshaph was amongst the slain ( Joshua 11:1 ; Joshua 12:20 )
Gath-Rimmon - A city of Dan, given to the Levites (Joshua 19:45; Joshua 21:24; 1 Chronicles 6:69). of Jordan, assigned to the Levites (Joshua 21:25). Ibleam, Joshua 17:11) in 1 Chronicles 6:70, which is probably the true reading in Joshua, the copyist's eye catching "Gath-rimmon" in the previous verse
Naphoth-Dor - (nay' fahth Dawwr) RSV alternate form of Naphath-Dor (Joshua 11:2 ). The NIV consistently used the form Naphoth Dor (Joshua 11:2 ; Joshua 12:23 ; 1 Kings 4:11 )
Adoni-Zedek - ” King of Jerusalem who gathered coalition of Canaanite kings to fight Gibeon after Joshua made a peace treaty with Gibeon (Joshua 10:1 ). Joshua marched to Gibeon's aid and defeated the coalition. Joshua made a public example of the kings before executing them (Joshua 10:22-26 ). Joshua carefully obeyed the law by taking them from the trees before nightfall (Deuteronomy 21:23 )
Baal, Baalah, Baalath - = Kiriath-jearim ( 1 Chronicles 13:6 , Joshua 15:9-10 ). Baalath-beer ( Joshua 19:8 , 1 Chronicles 4:33 [1]), a site in the Negeb. of Judah ( Joshua 15:29 ; Joshua 19:3 , 1 Chronicles 4:29 ). Mount Baalab, between Ekron and Jabneel ( Joshua 15:11 ), possibly, as M. An unknown town of Dan ( Joshua 19:44 )
Beth-ho'Ron - (house of caverns ), the name of two towns or villages, an "upper" and a "nether," ( Joshua 16:3,5 ; 1 Chronicles 7:24 ) on the road from Gibeon to Azekah, (Joshua 10:10,11 ) and the Philistine plain. Beth-horon lay on the boundary line between Benjamin and Ephraim, (Joshua 16:3,5 ) and Joshua 18:13,14 Was counted to Ephraim, ( Joshua 21:22 ; 1 Chronicles 7:24 ) and given to the Kohathites. (Joshua 21:22 ; 1 Chronicles 6:68 ) ( 1 Chronicles 6:53 ) The two Beth-horons still survive in the modern villages of Beit-ur, et-tahta and el-foka
Horam - King of Gezer conquered by Joshua. Joshua 10:33
Kiriath-Arba - ” The ancient name for the city of Hebron (Joshua 15:54 ). It was the chief city in the hill country of Judah (Joshua 15:54 ) and was both a Levitical city (Joshua 21:11 ) and a city of refuge (Joshua 20:7 ). Caleb captured the city for Israel (Joshua 15:13-14 ). According to some, Kiriath-Arba was originally named after Arba the Anakite hero (Joshua 14:15 ; see Joshua 15:13 )
Timnath-Heres - ; TIMNATH-SERAH (Tihm' nath-hee' reez; tihm' nath-ssee' ruh) Place of Joshua's inheritance and burial (Judges 2:9 ; Joshua 19:50 ; Joshua 24:30 ). Timnath-Serah means, “remaining portion,” pointing to land given to Joshua following distribution of land to the tribes (Joshua 19:50 ; Joshua 24:30 )
Joshua, the Book of - The Book of Joshua is the sixth book of the English Old Testament. The book is named after its central character, Moses' successor, Joshua the son of Nun. Some Bible students think Joshua wrote the book except for the death reports (Joshua 24:29-33 ); but the book gives no indication that Joshua had anything to do with writing the whole book, though he did write the laws on which the covenant renewal was based (Joshua 24:26 ). Some Bible students suggest a time about a hundred years after Joshua's death, or at least by the time of the beginning of the monarchy. Other Bible students think the Book of Joshua only reached its present form when the Former Prophets were collected together during the Exile. ...
Contents The Book of Joshua tells the story of a significant Bible event, the conquest of the land of Canaan. It tells this story in light of the theological themes of the Book of Deuteronomy, and thus the historical books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings are often spoken of as the Deuteronomic History. Joshua's Farewell Addresses, 23–24. ...
The Book of Joshua standardizes the conquest stories to some extent. ...
A surface reading of the Book of Joshua would give the impression that the invasion was complete and final. However, numerous passages (Joshua 13:13 ; Joshua 15:63 ; Joshua 16:10 ; Joshua 17:12-13 , Joshua 17:16-18 ) agree with the Book of Judges to show that it was up to the individual clans to root out the many pockets of Canaanite resistance still scattered throughout the land. The difference is between occupation and subjugation, the former in the Book of Joshua and the latter in the Book of Judges. Joshua was rightly celebrated as an effective military leader. However, the glory goes to God alone (Joshua 3:10 ; Joshua 4:23-24 ; Joshua 6:16 ). ...
Nature of the Covenant in the Book of Joshua The Lord's covenant with His people was always more universalistic and inclusive than we usually realize. We see this clearly in the Book of Joshua. Rahab, the Canaanite prostitute, was accepted, along with her family, as a part of the covenant community (Joshua 2:9-13 ; Joshua 6:22-23 ,Joshua 6:22-23,6:25 ). It may well be that people related to the Hebrews who lived in the Shechem area voluntarily joined in their fellowship of faith (Joshua 8:30-35 ). The people of Gibeon and its four-city league of cities were accepted, and even became associated with Temple service (Joshua 9:3-27 ). ...
Holy War in the Book of Joshua The Hebrews did not divide life up into sacred and secular spheres as we do. Religious ceremonies prepared them for battle (Joshua 5:2-11 ). All of the spoils of battle belonged to Him (Joshua 6:18-19 ). A certain city, for instance Jericho in Joshua 6:1 , was placed under the ban. ...
Moral Problems of the Book of Joshua The Book of Joshua is filled with war, conquest, and destruction. ...
One must begin by admitting that Joshua lived centuries before Christ appeared to reveal the Father's will fully and completely. ...
One element in the explanation for the holy wars of Joshua is judgment on sin. See Conquest; War; Joshua . God Brought Victory to a People of the Book (Joshua 1:1-12:24 ). To possess the promise, God's people must be faithful to the book (Joshua 1:1-18 ). God uses unexpected persons to fulfill His promises (Joshua 2:1-24 ). God exalts His leaders and proves His presence so all people may know Him (Joshua 3:1-4:24 ). God's people must worship Him to prepare for the victories He promises —(Joshua 5:1-15 ). Divine power, not human might, provides victory for God's people (Joshua 6:1-27 ). A disobedient people cannot expect God's victories (Joshua 7:1-26 ). A repentant people receive a strategy for victory from God (Joshua 8:1-35 ). Human cunning and disobedience cannot overcome the purposes of God (Joshua 9:1-27 ). God fights for His people (Joshua 10:1-43 ). God fulfills His promises, giving victory to an obedient people (Joshua 11:1-12:24 ). God Divides the Spoils of Victory According to the Needs of His People (Joshua 13:1-21:45 ). The complete rest is still incomplete (Joshua 13:1-7 ). History shows God's provision for His people (Joshua 13:8-33 ). God rewards heroes of faith (Joshua 14:1-15 ). God fulfilled His promise of land to His people (Joshua 15:1-17:13 ). God provided for specific needs of His people (Joshua 17:14-18 ). God called a hesitant people to action to receive the promised gift (Joshua 18:1-10 ). God gave the land to an obedient people (Joshua 18:11-19:48 ). God and His people rewarded their faithful leader (Joshua 19:49-51 ). God decreed legal protection for the accused among His people (Joshua 20:1-9 ). God provided for the needs of His priests (Joshua 21:1-42 ). God fulfills all His promises (Joshua 21:43-45 ). God Calls His Victorious People to Unity in Worship and Devotion (Joshua 22:1-24:33 ). God's rest, commandments, and blessing unify His people (Joshua 22:1-6 ). Worship unifies God's people forever despite geographical barriers (Joshua 22:7-34 ). Israel had to be faithful to God's direction or face the loss of His gifts (Joshua 23:1-16 ). God calls His people to remember the history of God's faithfulness and choose to serve only Him (Joshua 24:1-28 ). Faithful leaders keep a people faithful (Joshua 24:29-33 )
Piram - Amorite king of Jarmuth, conquered by Joshua. Joshua 10:3
Nun - Son of Elishama, and father of Joshua. (Joshua 1:1)...
Baalgad - Place at the foot of Mount Hermon in the valley of Lebanon, the northern limit of Joshua's conquest. Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5
Timnathheres , Timnathserah - City given to Joshua, and where he was buried. Joshua 19:50 ; Joshua 24 : 30; Judges 2:9
Ramoth - A Gershonite Levitical city in Issachar ( 1 Chronicles 6:58 , (73)), apparently = Remeth of Joshua 19:21 and Jarmuth of Joshua 21:23 ; Joshua 21:2 . For ‘Ramoth in Gilead’ ( Deuteronomy 4:43 , Joshua 20:8 ; Jos 21:38 , 1 Chronicles 6:65 (80)) see...
Ramoth-Gilead
Shimron Meron - One of the 34 kings conquered by Joshua (Joshua 12:20; Joshua 11:1). In Joshua 19:15 Shimron Meron appears among the towns of Zebulun
Baal-Gad - A place under Hermon, in the valley of Lebanon, referred to only as the northern limit of the country conquered by Joshua ( Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 ; Joshua 13:5 )
Piram - ” King of Jarmuth southwest of Jerusalem and member of a coalition of five Amorite kings who battled Joshua unsuccessfully (Joshua 10:3 ,Joshua 10:3,10:23 )
Balah - BALAH ( Joshua 19:3 ). An unknown town of Simeon; perhaps identical with Bealoth ( Joshua 15:24 ) and Bilhah ( 1 Chronicles 4:29 ); called Baalah in Joshua 15:29 , where it is assigned to Judah
Ebron - (ee' brahn) City in territory of Asher (Joshua 19:28 ), spelled Hebron in KJV. Several manuscripts in Joshua 19:28 plus the lists in Joshua 21:30 ; 1 Chronicles 6:39 have Abdon
Madon - Its king joined with others to oppose Joshua and was slain. Joshua 11:1 ; Joshua 12:19
Kedesh - Joshua 15:23 . Canaanite city, taken by Joshua, allotted to Issachar, and given to the Levites. Called KISHION in Joshua 19:20 and KISHON in Joshua 21:28 . Joshua 12:22 ; Joshua 19:37 ; Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 ; 2 Kings 15:29 ; 1 Chronicles 6:76
Shimronmeron - City whose king was slain by Joshua. Joshua 12:20
Shimron-Meron - (sshihm' rahn-mee' rahn) Town in list of cities Joshua defeated (Joshua 12:20 ). Apparently a longer name of Shimron (Joshua 11:1 ), though the earliest Greek translation and some commentators see two separate cities here
Half Tribe - The term usually refers to that part of Manasseh dwelling to the east of the Jordan along with Reuben and Gad (Numbers 32:33 ; Deuteronomy 3:13 ; Joshua 1:12 ; Joshua 4:12 ; Joshua 22:1 ). Those living west of the Jordan are sometimes called “the rest of the tribe of Manasseh” (Joshua 17:2 NRSV) or the “other half” ( Joshua 22:7 )
Achan - In Joshua 7:1 , a Judahite whose theft of a portion of the spoil from Jericho brought divine displeasure and military defeat on the Israelite army. After the battle of Ai, the Lord told Joshua the reason for Israel's defeat was that the ban concerning the spoil of Jericho had been violated (Joshua 7:11 ). Achan was discovered to be the guilty party, and he and his family were stoned to death (Joshua 7:25 ). See Ai ; Joshua
Horam - A king of Gezer defeated and slain by Joshua ( Joshua 10:33 )
Horam - King of Gezer, who helped Lachish, but fell before Joshua (Joshua 10:33)
Clouted - The shoes of the Gibeonites were 'patched' to deceive Joshua. Joshua 9:5
Ashnah - Two unknown sites of towns in Judah ( Joshua 15:33 ; Joshua 15:43 )
Halak, Mount - The southern limits of Joshua's conquests. Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7
Kiriath-Jearim - Prior to Israel’s conquest of Canaan, the inhabitants of Kiriath-jearim were known as Gibeonites, after the name of a more important town in the region (Joshua 9:3; Joshua 9:17; see GIBEON). Kiriath-jearim was on the border between Benjamin and Judah, and was known also as Kiriath-baal, Baalah, Baale-judah and Kiriath-arim (Joshua 15:9; Joshua 15:60; Joshua 18:14; Joshua 18:21-28; 2 Samuel 6:2; Ezra 2:25)
Hoham - ” King of Hebron who joined forces with the king of Jerusalem to punish Gibeon for making an alliance with Joshua (Joshua 10:3 ). He was one of five kings shut in cave, used to show Israel's superiority over the kings by the symbol of Israel's captains putting their feet on the kings' necks, and then killed and hung on a tree (Joshua 10:15-26 ). Thus Joshua gained control of the south, destroying Hebron (Joshua 10:36-37 )
Anak, Anakim - They dwelt insouthern Palestine, Hebron being especially mentioned as their city, which was given to Caleb after the Anakim had been destroyed by Joshua, except that a remnant escaped and retired to the cities of Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod. Numbers 13:22,33 ; Deuteronomy 1:28 ; Deuteronomy 2:10,11,21 ; Deuteronomy 9:2 ; Joshua 11:21,22 ; Joshua 14:12,15 ; Joshua 15:13,14 ; Joshua 21:11 ; Judges 1:20
Beth-Hoglah - ” Border city between tribes of Judah and Benjamin (Joshua 15:6 ; Joshua 18:19 ,Joshua 18:19,18:21 )
Ashdoth Pisgah - ("Springs of Pisgah," or "the hill") (Deuteronomy 3:17; Deuteronomy 4:49; Joshua 12:3; Joshua 13:20). of the Dead Sea are hereby defined; "the springs" is one of the leading physical divisions of the country, namely, those at the base of the Moabite mountains (Joshua 10:40; Joshua 12:8)
Jehoshua - (jih hahssh' yoo uh) Variant KJV spelling for Joshua in Numbers 13:16 . See Joshua
Eltekeh - A city on Dan's border, allotted to the Kohaihites (Joshua 19:44; Joshua 21:23)
Rabbith - (rab bihth) Unidentified site in territory of Issachar (Joshua 19:20 ). Rabbith is possibly a corruption of Daberath, a site included in other lists of Issachar's territory (Joshua 21:28 ; 1 Chronicles 6:72 ) but missing in Joshua 19:1
Gaash - of Gaash hill or mount was Timnath Serach, the city given by Israel to Joshua at his request, in the region "mount Ephraim," where also he was buried (Joshua 19:49-50; Joshua 24:30; Judges 2:9)
Jarmuth - City whose king joined southern coalition against Joshua and Gibeon (Joshua 10:1 ). Joshua “stored” the king in the cave of Makkedah before shaming him and slaying him (compare Joshua 12:11 ). It lay in the western “lowlands,” the “foothills” (NIV) or Shephelah (REB) of the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:33 ,Joshua 15:33,15:35 ). A city of the Levites in the tribal territory of Issachar (Joshua 21:29 ; compare Joshua 19:21 ; 1 Chronicles 6:58 , both spelled differently and differing from 1
Kishon - A town on Issachar's border, allotted to the Gershonite Levites (Joshua 19:20; Joshua 31:28)
Lasha'Ron - (the plain ), one of the Canaanite towns whose kings were killed by Joshua. ( Joshua 12:18 )
Beth-Arabah - Joshua 15:6; Joshua 15:61. Included in Benjamin (Joshua 18:22)
Kanah - A town in the district of Asher, Joshua 19:28; now a village, ʾAin Kana, six miles southeast of Tyre. Joshua 16:8; Joshua 17:9
Chinnereth - A city ( Deuteronomy 3:17 , Joshua 11:2 [1] Joshua 19:35 ) which gave its name to the Sea of Chinnereth ( Numbers 34:11 , Joshua 12:3 ; Joshua 13:27 ), the OT designation of the Sea of Galilee
ja'Bin - (Joshua 11:1-3 ) Joshua surprised the allied forces by the waters of Merom, ver. ) During the ensuing wars Joshua again attacked Jabin, and burnt his city. (Joshua 11:1-14 ) ...
A king of Hazor, whose general, Sisera, was defeated by Barak
Geder - City in the south of Palestine, the king of which was slain by Joshua. Joshua 12:13
Aphekah - (uh fee' kah) City Joshua assigned to tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:53 )
Reba - One of the five kings of the Midianites slain by Joshua. Numbers 31:8 ; Joshua 13:21
Jebusi - (jehb' yoo ssi) KJV reading (Joshua 18:16 ,Joshua 18:16,18:28 ) for Jebusite
Gathrimmon - Joshua 19:45 ; Joshua 21:24 . Joshua 21:25 . In 1 Chronicles 6:69 there is also a Gath-rimmon given to the Levites, situate in the tribe of Ephraim; but this does not agree with Joshua, and by comparing the two lists, this appears to be the same as No. ) and this is supposed to be the same place as Gath-rimmon in Joshua 21:25
Timnath-Serah - A town in the mountains of Ephraim, which was assigned to Joshua; and in which he was buried. Joshua 19:49-50; Joshua 24:30
Beth-Arabah - ” A border town of tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:6 , Joshua 15:61 ) also claimed as a city of Benjamin (Joshua 18:22 )
Shim'Ron-me'Ron - The king of Shimron-meron is mentioned as one of the thirty-one kings vanquished by Joshua. ( Joshua 12:20 ) It is probably the complete name of the place elsewhere called Shimron, a city of Zebulun. (Joshua 11:1 ; 19:15 )
Gaza - This was given by Joshua to Judah. (Joshua 15:47)...
Baalah -
A city in the south of Judah (Joshua 15:29 ), elsewhere called Balah (Joshua 19:3 ) and Bilhah (1 Chronicles 4:29 ). ...
...
A city on the northern border of the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:10 ), called also Kirjath-jearim, q. ...
...
A mountain on the north-western boundary of Judah and Dan (Joshua 15:11 )
Tappuah (1) - A city of Judah in the shephelah or low hilly region (Joshua 15:34); on the lower slopes of the hills, 12 miles W. On Ephraim's border, not far from the Mediterranean, "THE LAND OF Tappuah," in the territory of Ephraim but belonging to Manasseh (Joshua 16:8; Joshua 17:8). Having a good spring it is called En Tappuah (Joshua 17:7)
Hammon - Joshua 19:28 . By comparing this list of Levitical cities with the one in Joshua 21 , Hammon appears to be the same as HAMMOTH-DOR (Joshua 21:32 ); and this, by the similarity of the name, appears to be the same as HAMMATH in Joshua 19:35
Tappuah - Joshua 15:34. Joshua 16:8; Joshua 17:8. It is not certain which of these two places is intended in Joshua 12:17
Chephirah - One of the four cities of the Gibeonites which Joshua delivered from the coalition led by the king of Jerusalem (Joshua 9:17 ). Joshua assigned it to the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 18:26 )
Jar'Muth - (Joshua 16:35 ) Its king, Piram, was one of the five who conspired. to punish Gibeon for having made alliance with Israel, (Joshua 10:3,5 ) and who were routed at Beth-horon and put to death by Joshua at Makkedah. (Joshua 21:29 )
Japhia -
The king of Lachish, who joined in the confederacy against Joshua (Joshua 10:3 ), and was defeated and slain. Called also Horam (Joshua 10:33 ). ...
...
A town in the southern boundary of Zebulum (Joshua 19:12 ); now Yafa, 2 miles south-west of Nazareth
Hill of the Foreskins - (Hebrew Gibeath-haaraloth ) Place near Gilgal where Joshua circumcised the Israelites born during the wilderness wandering (Joshua 5:3 )
Eltolad - Judah allotted to Simeon (Joshua 15:30; Joshua 19:4; 1 Chronicles 4:29 TOLAD)
Lasharon - Canaanite city captured by Joshua. Joshua 12:18
Horam - ” King of Gezer whose attempt to deliver Lachish from Joshua resulted in his death and the annihilation of his army (Joshua 10:33 ), though his city remained a Canaanite stronghold (Joshua 16:10 ; compare 1 Kings 9:16 )
Shimron-Meron - A Canaanite town, west of Jordan, whose king was among those whom Joshua smote ( Joshua 12:20 ). Comparing its position in the list with that of Shimron in the list given in Joshua 11:1 , we may infer that the two places are identical
en-Tappuah - A place on the boundary of Manasseh ( Joshua 17:7 ). see) of Joshua 16:8 ; Joshua 17:8
Madon - A leading Canaanite city, whose king Jobab was killed at Merom with Jabiu's confederates (Joshua 11:1; Joshua 12:19)
Mouldy - KJV spelling of moldy (Joshua 9:5 ,Joshua 9:5,9:12 )
Mashal - Called MISHEALin Joshua 19:26 ; and MISHALin Joshua 21:30
Piram - The king of Jarmuth, defeated by Joshua at Beth-horon and afterwards put to death ( Joshua 10:3 ff
Timnath-Heres - TIMNATH-HERES (in Joshua 19:50 ; Joshua 24:30 written Timnath-serah ). A place assigned to Joshua as an inheritance and burying-place ( Judges 2:9 )
Merom - A lake in northern Palestine, where Joshua won a victory. Joshua 11:5; Joshua 11:7
Tappuah - Now Teffuh, a town among the hills northwest of Hebron, Joshua 1:17 ; 15:53 . Another city of Judah, southwest of Hebron, Joshua 15:34 . A town on the line of Ephraim and Manesseh, Joshua 15:34
Gezer - A royal city of the Canaanites, Joshua 10:33 12:12 ; between Bethhoron and the Mediterranean, Joshua 16:3 ; afterwards on the western border of Ephraim, and assigned to the Levites, Joshua 16:3 21:21 . The Canaanites long retained a foothold in it, Joshua 16:10 Judges 1:29 ; but were dispossessed by a king of Egypt, and the place given to his daughter, the wife of Solomon, 1 Kings 9:16 , who fortified it
Eglon - One of the five confederate cities which attacked Gibeon, but were conquered by Joshua. Joshua 10:3-37 ; Joshua 12:12 ; Joshua 15:39
Makkedah - (mak kee' duh) Name meaning, “Place of shepherds,” of a Canaanite city, the site of Joshua's rout of the combined forces of five Canaanite kings (Joshua 10:10 ). The kings sought refuge in nearby caves but were trapped there (Joshua 10:16 ). Joshua captured the city, killing all its population (Joshua 10:28 ). Later, Makkedah was assigned to the Shephelah (lowland) district of Judah (Joshua 15:4-1 )
Beth-Shemesh - A city on the north of Judah belonging to the priests, Joshua 15:10; Joshua 21:16; perhaps Ir-shemesh and Mount Heres, Joshua 19:41; Judges 1:35; noted as the place to which the ark was returned, 1 Samuel 6:9-20; now a heap of ruins near ʾAin Shems, about 14 miles west of Jerusalem. Joshua 19:38. A city on the border of Issachar, Joshua 19:22; perhaps the same as No
Gib'Eon - (hill city ), one of the four , cities of the Hivites, the inhabitants of which made a league with Joshua, ( Joshua 9:3-15 ) and thus escaped the fate of Jericho and Ai. (Joshua 11:19 ) Gibeon lay within the territory of Benjamin, ch. (Joshua 18:25 ) and with its "suburbs" was allotted to the priests, ch. (Joshua 21:17 ) of whom it became afterwards a principal station
Hazor - When the armies of Israel entered Canaan under Joshua, they conquered Hazor and burnt it (Joshua 11:1; Joshua 11:10-11). In the division of Canaan that followed, Hazor fell within the tribal area of Naphtali (Joshua 19:32; Joshua 19:36)
Mishal - A town of Asher, assigned to the Gershonite Levites (Joshua 19:26; Joshua 21:30)
Arba - From him their city Hebron got its name, Kirjath Arba (Joshua 14:15; Joshua 15:13; Joshua 21:11)
Jokneam - A city of Zebulun, allotted to the Merarite Levites (Joshua 21:34; Joshua 19:11). Its Canaanite king (Jokneam of Carmel) Joshua slew (1 Kings 12:22)
Hough - KJV term meaning to hamstring (Joshua 11:6 ,Joshua 11:6,11:9 ; 2 Samuel 8:4 ; 1 Chronicles 18:4 )
Balah - A city in the tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:3 ), elsewhere called Bilhah (1 Chronicles 4:29 ) and Baalah (Joshua 15:29 )
Remeth - ) or Ramoth (1 Chronicles 6:73 ; Joshua 19:21 ), and probably also of Jarmuth (Joshua 21:29 )
Adithaim - ” City Joshua allotted to Judah (Joshua 15:36 )
e'Ther - (abundance ), one of the cities of Judah in the low country, the Shefelah , ( Joshua 15:42 ) allotted to Simeon. (Joshua 19:7 )
mi'Shal, - (entreaty ), one of the towns in the territory of Asher, ( Joshua 19:26 ) allotted to the Gershonite Levites. (Joshua 21:30 )
Kedesh-Naphtali - KEDESH-NAPHTALI ( Judges 4:6 ; called also ‘ Kedesh ’ Joshua 12:22 ; Joshua 19:37 , Judges 4:9-11 , 2 Kings 15:29 ; and ‘ Kedesh in Galilee ’ in Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 , 1 Chronicles 6:76 ). Evidently, from the name meaning ‘holy,’ a sacred site from ancient times; a city of refuge ( Joshua 20:7 ) and a Levitical city ( Joshua 21:32 )
Cities of Refuge, - (Numbers 35:6,13,15 ; Joshua 20:2,7,9 ) There were three on each side of Jordan. (Joshua 21:21 ; 1 Chronicles 6:67 ; 2 Chronicles 10:1 ) ...
HEBRON , in Judah. (Joshua 21:13 ; 2 Samuel 5:5 ; 1 Chronicles 6:55 ; 29:27 ; 2 Chronicles 11:10 ) ...
On the east side of Jordan - BEZER , in the tribe of Reuben, in the plains of Moab. (4:43; Joshua 20:8 ; 21:36 ) 1 Maccabees 5:26 . (4:43; Joshua 21:38 ; 1 Kings 22:3 ) ...
GOLAN , in Bashan, in the half-tribe of Manasseh. (4:43; Joshua 21:27 ; 1 Chronicles 6:71 )
Debir - King of Eglon who joined in Jerusalem-led coalition against Joshua and lost (Joshua 10:3 ). Joshua annihilated its residents (Joshua 10:38 ; compare Joshua 11:21 ; Joshua 12:13 ). Joshua 15:15 describes Caleb's challenge to Othniel to capture Debir, formerly called Kiriath Sepher. Joshua 15:49 gives yet another name, Kiriath Sannah, to Debir. It became a levitical city for the priests ( Joshua 21:15 ). A town on the northern border of Judah (Joshua 15:7 ). A town in Gad east of the Jordan given various spellings in the Hebrew Bible: Lidebor ( Joshua 13:26 ); Lwo Debar ( 2 Samuel 9:4-5 ); Lo' Debar ( 2 Samuel 17:27 ); Lo' Dabar ( Amos 6:13 )
Taanach, Tanach - Ancient Canaanite city: its king was slain by Joshua, but the inhabitants were not driven out. Joshua 12:21 ; Joshua 17:11,12 ; Joshua 21:25 ; Judges 1:27 ; Judges 5:19 ; 1 Kings 4:12 ; 1 Chronicles 7:29
Edrei - A royal city of Og, king of Bashan ( Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Deuteronomy 3:10 , Joshua 12:4 ; Joshua 13:12 ), the scene of the battle at which Og was defeated ( Numbers 21:33 , Deuteronomy 3:1 ); assigned to the eastern division of Manasseh ( Joshua 13:31 ). A town in Naphtali ( Joshua 19:37 ), not identified
Neah - Named only in Joshua 19:13 . identical with Neiel of Joshua 19:27
a'Zem, - (bone ), a city in the extreme south of Judah, ( Joshua 15:29 ) afterwards allotted to Simeon. (Joshua 19:3 ) Elsewhere it is EZEM
Misrephoth Maim - To this place, somewhere near Sidon, Joshua pursued the kings whom he conquered at the waters of Merom (Joshua 11:8; Joshua 13:6)
Achshaph - ” City state which joined Jabin, King of Hazor, in opposing Joshua as he invaded northern Israel (Joshua 11:1 ). Achshaph was a border city for Asher (Joshua 19:25 )
Hazor - The city of King Jabin: destroyed by Joshua, Joshua 11:1; Joshua 11:10-11; given to Naphtali, Joshua 19:36; again possessed by the Canaanites, Judges 4:2. Joshua 11:4; Judges 4:3. A city in the south of Judah; probably should be written Hazor-ithman, Joshua 15:23. 4 Hezron, which is Hazor, Joshua 15:25; rendered by Canon Cook "Kerioth Hezron, which is Hazor
Dor - (dwelling ), ( Joshua 17:11 ; 1 Kings 4:11 ) an ancient royal city of the Canaanites, (Joshua 12:23 ) whose ruler was an ally of Jabin king of Hazor against Joshua. (Joshua 11:1,2 ) It appears to have been within the territory of the tribe of Asher, though allotted to Manasseh, (Joshua 17:11 ; Judges 1:27 ) Solomon stationed at Dor one of his twelve purveyors
Hivites - Among the many tribal groups that occupied Canaan before the Israelites dispossessed them were the people known as Hivites (Genesis 10:15-17; Exodus 3:8; Exodus 23:28; Deuteronomy 7:1; Joshua 3:10). They lived mainly in the mountain country of northern Palestine and Lebanon (Joshua 11:3; 2 Samuel 24:6-79; 1619165731_70), though some lived in Shechem and others as far south as Gibeon (Genesis 34:2; Joshua 9:3; Joshua 9:7; Joshua 11:19)
Beth-Birei - A town of Simeon (1 Chronicles 4:31), corresponding to Bethlebaoth in Joshua 19:6; Joshua 15:32, in the extreme S
a'Chor, Valley of - ( Joshua 7:24,26 ) On the northern boundary of Judah, (Joshua 15:7 ) near Jericho
Beth-Arabah - House of the desert, one of the six cities of Judah, situated in the sunk valley of the Jordan and Dead Sea (Joshua 18:22 ). In Joshua 15:61 it is said to have been "in the wilderness. It is called Arabah ( Joshua 18:18 )
Kanah - The name of a brook that forms part of the boundary between Ephraim and Manasseh (Joshua 16:8 ; Joshua 17:9 ). Some of the cities of Manasseh, however, were south of the brook Kanah (Joshua 16:9 ). A city on the northern border of Asher (Joshua 19:28 )
Aphek - Royalcity of the Canaanites, the king of which was killed by Joshua, Joshua 12:18 : probably the same as APHEKAHin Joshua 15:53 . City in the north border of Asher, from which in the time of Joshua the inhabitants were not expelled. Joshua 13:4 ; Joshua 19:30 : called APHIKin Judges 1:31
Jose - (joh' ssih) KJV spelling of otherwise unknown ancestor of Jesus, representing Joshua in Hebrew and Jesus in Greek. Modern translations read Joshua (Luke 3:29 )
Mishal - A town of Asher ( Joshua 19:26 ), given to the Gershonite Levites ( Joshua 21:30 ) = 1 Chronicles 6:74 Mashal
Che'Sil - (idolatrous ), a town in the extreme south of Palestine, ( Joshua 15:30 ) 15 Miles southwest of Beersheba. In (Joshua 19:4 ) the name is BETHUL
Kanah - A ‘brook’ or wady in the borders of Ephraim ( Joshua 16:8 ; Joshua 17:9 ) which has been identified (doubtfully) with Wady Kanah near Shechem ( Nâblus ). A town in the northern boundary of Asher ( Joshua 19:28 ), possibly to be identified with the modern Kana , a short distance S
Ashan - ” City in western hills of tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:42 ) given to tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:7 ). The Aaronic priests claimed Ashan as one of their cities (1 Chronicles 6:59 ; called Ain in Joshua 21:16 )
Arba - ARBA is named ‘the father of the Anak’ in Joshua 14:15 (so read also Joshua 21:11 , cf. Joshua 15:13 )
Dor - A royal city of the Canaanites, Joshua 11:2; Joshua 12:23, within the territory of Asher, but allotted to Manasseh, Joshua 17:11; Judges 1:27; 1 Chronicles 7:29, and it was one of Solomon's provision-districts, 1 Kings 4:11; now Tantûra, eight miles north of Cæsarea, where there are considerable ruins
a'in - ...
One of the southernmost cities of Judah, (Joshua 15:32 ) afterwards allotted to Simeon, (Joshua 19:7 ; 1 Chronicles 4:32 ) and given to the priests. (Joshua 21:16 )
Remeth - ” Town in Issachar's territory (Joshua 19:21 ), likely identical with Ramoth (1 Chronicles 6:73 ) and Jarmuth (Joshua 21:29 )
Kiriath-Baal - ” Another name for Kiriath-Jearim in Joshua 15:60 ; Joshua 18:14
Geder - One of the 31 kings defeated by Joshua W. of Jordan (Joshua 12:13)
Ezem - It is supposed to be the same as AZEM in Joshua 15:29 ; Joshua 19:3
Anab - A city of Judah in the Negeb hills ( Joshua 11:21 ; Joshua 15:50 ), inhabited first by the Anakim
Shema (1) - A town of Judah (Joshua 15:26), deriving its origin from Hebron, and in its turn colonizing Maon (1 Chronicles 2:43-45; Joshua 15:26)
a'Nab - (grape-town ), a town in the mountains of Judah, ( Joshua 15:50 ) named with Debir and Hebron as once belonging to the Anakim. (Joshua 11:21 )
Dimnah - A Levitical city in Zebulun ( Joshua 21:35 ). 1 Chronicles 6:22 , Joshua 19:13 )
Tap'Push - (Joshua 15:34 ) ...
A place on the boundary of the "children of Joseph. " (Joshua 16:8 ; 17:8 ) Its full name was probably En-tappuah. (Joshua 17:7 ) ("Around the city was a district called the land of Tappuah; the city belonged to Ephraim and the land to Manasseh. (Joshua 17:8 ) " --Schaff
Ataroth - A place on the boundary of Ephraim and Manasseh (Joshua 16:2; Joshua 16:5; Joshua 16:7); possibly the same as ATAROTH ADDAR, on the W. side of the nether Bethheron" (Joshua 18:13)
Dor - of Carmel; assigned to Manasseh, though within Asher (Joshua 11:2; Joshua 12:23; Joshua 17:11); Joshua 17:9 miles N
Bethlebaoth - ) A town in Simeon's lot (Joshua 19:6; Joshua 15:32) in the far S
Gaash - A shaking, a hill, on the north side of which Joshua was buried (Joshua 24:30 ; Judges 2:9 ), in the territory of Ephraim
Tochen - The parallel lists in Joshua 15:42 ; Joshua 19:7 have Ether
Hazar-Shual - ("fox or jackal village"); in southern Judah, between Hazar-Gaddah and Beersheba (Joshua 15:28; Joshua 19:3; 1 Chronicles 4:28; Nehemiah 11:27); now Saweh
Gib'Bethon - (a hill ), a town allotted to the tribe of Dan, ( Joshua 19:44 ) and afterwards given with its "suburbs" to the Kohathite Levites. (Joshua 21:23 )
an'Akim - (long-necked ), a race of giants, descendants of Arba, ( Joshua 15:13 ; 21:11 ) dwelling in the southern part of Canaan, and particularly at Hebron, which from their progenitor received the name of "city of Arba. (Joshua 14:15 ) The race appears to have been divided into three tribes or families, bearing the names Sheshai, Ahiman and Talmai. Though the war-like appearance of the Anakim had struck the Israelites with terror in the time of Moses, (Numbers 13:28 ; 9:2) they were nevertheless dispossessed by Joshua, (Joshua 11:21,22 ) and their chief city, Hebron, became the possession of Caleb. (Joshua 15:14 ; Judges 1:20 ) After this time they vanish from history
ha'Zor - (Joshua 19:36 ) Its position was apparently between Ramah and Kedesh, ibid. (Joshua 12:19 ) on the high ground overlooking the Lake of Merom. (Joshua 11:1 ; Judges 4:2,17 ; 1 Samuel 12:9 ) It was the principal city of the whole of north Palestine. (Joshua 11:10 ) It was fortified by Solomon, (1 Kings 9:15 ) and its inhabitants were carried captive by Tiglath-pileser. (Joshua 15:23 ) ...
Hazor-Hadattah = "new Hazor" another of the southern towns of Judah. (Joshua 15:25 ) ...
A place in which the Benjamites resided after their return from the captivity
Anakim - Descended from Arba (Joshua 15:13; Joshua 21:11), dwelling in the S. Anak is the name of the race rather than an individual; compare Joshua 14:15. They were in the spies' time a terror to Israel (Numbers 13:28), but were destroyed by Joshua, except a remnant who escaped to the Philistine cities, Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod (Joshua 11:21-22). Caleb, who brought tidings as a spy concerning them, was eventually their destroyer (Joshua 15:14). ...
Hence we find a giant race among the Philistines, and in Gath, in David's days (1 Samuel 17; 2 Samuel 21:15-22); an undesigned coincidence between the independent histories Joshua and 1 and 2 Samuel, confirming the truth of both. Their chief city Hebron became Caleb's possession for his faith, shown in having no fear of their giant stature since the Lord was on Israel's side (Joshua 15:14; Judges 1:20; compare Numbers 13:22; Numbers 13:28; Numbers 13:30-33; Numbers 14:24)
Ach'Shaph - (fascination ), a city within the territory of Asher, named between Beten and Alammelech, ( Joshua 19:25 ) originally the seat of a Canaanite king. (Joshua 11:1 ; 12:20 )
el-Tekeh - (God its fear ), one of the cities in the border of Dan, ( Joshua 19:44 ) which with its suburbs was allotted to the Kohathite Levites. (Joshua 21:23 )
Adonizedek - A king of Jerusalem who made an alliance with four other kings against Joshua. The five kings were utterly routed, and hid themselves in a cave at Makkedah; but were taken by Joshua, and put to death, Joshua 10:1-43
Kibzaim - A city of Mount Ephraim (Joshua 21:22); given to the Kohathite Levites; ("two heaps". boundary of Ephraim (Joshua 16:9; Joshua 17:9-10)
a'i - " (Joshua 7:2 ; 8:9 ) It was the second city taken by Israel after the passage of the Jordan, and was "utterly destroyed. " (Joshua 7:3-5 ; 8:1 ; Joshua 9:3 ; 10:1,2 ; 12:9 ) ...
A city of the Ammonites, apparently attached to Heshbon
en-Gan'Nim - (Joshua 15:34 ) ...
A city on the border of Issachar. (Joshua 19:21 ) allotted with its "suburbs" to the Gershonite Levites, (Joshua 21:29 ) probably Jenin , the first village encountered on the ascent from the great plain of Esdraelon into the hills of the central country
Iphtahel - ” Valley separating tribal territories of Zebulun and Asher (Joshua 19:14 ,Joshua 19:14,19:27 )
Hoshea (1) - HOSHEA or Joshua. JΑΗ added makes it Joshua, i
Beth-Hoglah - BETH-HOGLAH (‘place of the partridge’), Joshua 15:6 ; Joshua 18:19
Piram - One of the Kings destroyed by Joshua. (Joshua 10:3, etc
Helkath - (Joshua 19:25. ) Allotted to the Gershonite Levites (Joshua 21:31)
Jarmuth - Joshua, in his battles, killed the king of Jarmuth. (Joshua 10:5)...
Gesh'Uri - (3:14; Joshua 12:5 ; 13:11 ) ...
An ancient tribe which dwelt in the desert between Arabia and Philistia. (Joshua 13:2 ; 1 Samuel 27:8 )
be'Thul - (dweller in God ) a town of Simeon in the south named with Eltolad and Hormah, ( Joshua 19:4 ) called also Chesil and Bethuel. (Joshua 15:30 ; 1 Chronicles 4:30 )
Dab'Areh - (pasture ), ( Joshua 21:28 ) or DABERATH , a town on the boundary of Zebulun. (Joshua 19:12 ) Under the name of Debarieh it still lies at the western foot of Tabor
Gezer, Gezrites - It was taken by Joshua, and allotted to Ephraim, and afterwards to the Kohathites, 1 Chronicles 6:67 ; 1 Chronicles 7:28 ; but the ancient inhabitants held possession. Joshua 10:33 ; Joshua 12:12 ; Joshua 16:3,10 ; Joshua 21:21 ; Judges 1:29 ; 1 Samuel 27:8 ; 1 Kings 9:15-17
ta'Anach - (sandy ), an ancient Canaanitish city whose king is enumerated among the thirty-one kings conquered by Joshua. ( Joshua 12:21 ) It came into the half tribe of Manasseh, (Joshua 17:11 ; 21:25 ; 1 Chronicles 7:29 ) and was bestowed on the Kohathite Levites. (Joshua 21:25 ) Taanach is almost always named in company with Megiddo, and they were evidently the chief towns of that fine rich district which forms the western portion of the great plain of Esdraelon
Ephraim, Mount - The central mountainous district of Palestine occupied by the tribe of Ephraim (Joshua 17:15 ; 19:50 ; 20:7 ), extending from Bethel to the plain of Jezreel. In Joshua's time (Joshua 17:18 ) these hills were densely wooded. Joshua was buried at Timnath-heres among the mountains of Ephraim, on the north side of the hill of Gaash (Judges 2:9 ). This region is also called the "mountains of Israel" (Joshua 11:21 ) and the "mountains of Samaria" (Jeremiah 31:5,6 : Amos 3:9 )
Japhia - Border town of tribal territory of Zebulun (Joshua 19:3 ). King of Lachish who joined southern coalition against Joshua and met death by cave of Makkedah (Joshua 10:1-27 ,Joshua 10:1-27,10:31-32 )
Ekron - The most northerly of the five cities of the Philistines, Joshua 13:3; in the lowlands of Judah, Joshua 15:11; conquered by Judah, Joshua 15:45; allotted to Dan, Joshua 19:43; reconquered by Samuel, 1 Samuel 5:10; 1 Samuel 7:14; again a Philistine city, 1 Samuel 17:52; 2 Kings 1:2; Jeremiah 25:20; Amos 1:8; Zechariah 9:5; now called Akir, on a hill 12 miles southeast of Joppa, a wretched village of about 50 mud hovels
Hilen - Called HOLONin Joshua 15:51 ; Joshua 21:15
Jattir - ” Town in the hills of the tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:48 ). Joshua reserved it for the Levites (Joshua 20:14 )
Kanah - A bound of Asher, next "great Zidon" (Joshua 19:28), Perhaps Ain Kana, eight miles S. (Joshua 16:8; Joshua 17:9)
Chinnereth, Sea of - Afterward the lake of Gennesaret, a corruption of Chinnereth (Joshua 12:3; Joshua 13:27). A fortified city of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35); probably the same as Tiberius, from which the lake or sea was named in a similar way (Numbers 34:11; John 6:1)
Hepher - Numbers 26:32 ; Numbers 27:1 ; Joshua 17:2,3 . City and district, taken by Joshua. Joshua 12:17 ; 1 Kings 4:10
Adummim - It formed the border of Judah and Benjamin in the tribal allotments Joshua made (Joshua 15:7 ; Joshua 18:17 )
Abel-Shittim - In the plains of Moab ( Numbers 33:49 ); otherwise Shittim, the last ( Joshua 3:1 ) trans-Jordanic stage where the Israelites encamped. Hence Joshua sent his spies ( Joshua 2:1 )
Meph'a-Ath - (splendor height ), city of the Reubenites, one of the towns independently an Heshhon, ( Joshua 13:18 ) lying in the district of the Mishor comp. (Joshua 13:17 ) and Jere 48:21 Authorized Version "plain," which probably answered to the modern Belka . ( Joshua 21:37 ; 1 Chronicles 6:79 ) Its site is uncertain
Chesil - ” A city of the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:30 ). A similar list giving the boundary of Simeon in Joshua 19:4 spells the name Bethul, a reading supported for Joshua 15:30 by the Septuagint, the earliest Greek translation
Gath-Rim'Mon - (Joshua 21:24 ; 1 Chronicles 6:69 ) situated on the plain of Philistia, apparently not far from Joppa. (Joshua 19:45 ) ...
A town of the half tribe of Manasseh west of the Jordan, assigned to the Levites. (Joshua 21:25 ) The reading Gath-rimmon is probably an error of the transcribers
Kedesh - A city in the southern part of Judah (Joshua 15:23 ). A Canaanite town in eastern Galilee defeated by Joshua (Joshua 12:22 ). The town was allotted to Naphtali (Joshua 19:32 ,Joshua 19:32,19:37 ) and was called Kedesh in Naphtali (Judges 4:6 ). It was also called Kedesh in Galilee and given to the Gershonite Levites as one of their cities (Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 ). The town is also called Kishon (Joshua 21:28 KJV; Kishion in other versions)
Madon - Strife, a Canaanitish city in the north of Palestine (Joshua 11:1 ; 12:19 ), whose king was slain by Joshua; perhaps the ruin Madin, near Hattin, some 5 miles west of Tiberias
Engannim - A town of Judah, probably near Bethel, Joshua 15:34 . A city of the priests, in Issachar, now Jenin, fifteen miles south of mount Tabor, Joshua 19:21 ; 21:29
Kish'Ion - (hardness ), one of the towns on the boundary of the tribe of Issachar, ( Joshua 19:20 ) which with its suburbs was allotted to the Gershonite Levites. (Joshua 21:28 ) Authorized Version KISHON
Josh'ua, Book of - Named from Joshua the son of Nun, who is the principal character in it. ...
Joshua's farewell; chs. Joshua himself is generally named as the author by the Jewish writers and the Christian fathers; but no contemporary assertion or sufficient historical proof of the fact exists, and it cannot be maintained without qualification. (Joshua 24:29-33 ) were obviously added at a later time. Some events, such as the capture of Hebron, of Debir, (Joshua 15:13-19 ) and Judges 1:10-15 Of Leshem, ( Joshua 19:47 ) and Judges 18:7 And the joint occupation of Jerusalem, ( Joshua 15:63 ) and Judges 1:21 Probably did not occur till after Joshua's death. (It was written probably during Joshua's life, or soon after his death (B
Chesil - CHESIL ( Joshua 15:30 ). ]'>[1] reads Bethel , probably for Bethul , as in the parallel passage, Joshua 19:4 , and Chesil of MT Rabbah - This city, with Kirjathbaal, or Kinjathjearim, was among those which Joshua divided by lot to Israel. (Joshua 15:60)...
RABBAH, or RABBATH AMMON
Perizzites - Joseph's descendants were told by Joshua to take the land of the Perizzites, where they are classed with the giants. Joshua 17:15 . It is not known definitely in what part of Canaan they were originally located, but by Joshua 17:14-18 it was probably near Manasseh's lot on the west. Genesis 13:7 ; Exodus 3:8,17 ; Joshua 3:10 ; Joshua 9:1 ; Judges 1:4,5 ; 1 Kings 9:20 ; Ezra 9:1 ; Nehemiah 9:8 , etc
Kirjath-Jearim - One of the four cities of the Gibeonites, Joshua 9:17, situated on the border of Judah and Benjamin, Joshua 15:9; Joshua 18:14-15, but belonging to Judah, Joshua 15:60; Judges 18:12; was also called Baalah, Joshua 15:9-10, or Baale of Judah, 2 Samuel 6:2, or Kirjath-baal
Hazar-Susah - ” Town in tribal allotment of Simeon (Joshua 19:5 ). As most towns of Simeon also appear in Judah's allotment (compare Joshua 19:1 ), many Bible students think this is another name for Sansannah in Joshua 15:31
Bethaven - of Bethel (Joshua 7:2; Joshua 18:12), between it and Michmash 1 Samuel 13:5; 1 Samuel 14:23). pasture land of Bethaven (Joshua 18:12
Makkedah - Canaanitish city, connected with which was a cave in which the five Amorite kings took refuge on the day of Joshua's victory at Gibeon and Beth-horon. Joshua 10:10-29 ; Joshua 12:16 ; Joshua 15:41
Bileam - IBLEAM is the same name by transposition of letters (Joshua 17:11); GATH-RIMMON in Joshua 21:24
Kiriath-Sepher - ” Used in Joshua 15:15-16 as another name for Debir. Kiriath-Sannah is the same city ( Joshua 15:49 )
Chesulloth - Joshua 19:18 . Probably the same as CHISLOTH-TABOR in Joshua 19:12 , and TABOR in 1 Chronicles 6:77
Bileam - Supposed to be the same as GATH-RIMMON in Joshua 21:25 , and perhaps the same as IBLEAM in Joshua 17:11
Kanah - A brook which separated Ephraim and Manasseh, and fell into the Mediterranean north of Joppa, Joshua 16:8 17:9 . A town in the tribe of Asher, Joshua 19:24,28
Beth-Leb'Aoth - (house of lionesses ), a town in the lot of Simeon, ( Joshua 19:6 ) in the extreme south of Judah. [1] In (1 Chronicles 4:31 ) the name is given BETH-BIREI
Gil'Gal -
The site of the first camp of the Israelites on the west of the Jordan, the place at which they passed the first night after crossing the river, and where the twelve stones were set up which had been taken from the bed of the stream, (Joshua 4:19,20 ) comp. Joshua 4:3 Where also they kept the first passover in the land of Canaan ch. ( Joshua 5:10 ) It was "in the east border of Jericho," apparently on a hillock or rising ground, (Joshua 5:3 ) comp. Joshua 5:9 In the Arboth-Jericho (Authorized Version "the plains"), that is, the hot depressed district of the Ghor which lay between the town and the Jordan. ( Joshua 5:10 ) Here Samuel was judge, and Saul was made king. (2 Samuel 19:40 ) A Gilgal is spoken of in (Joshua 15:7 ) in describing the north border of Judah. In (Joshua 18:17 ) it is given as Geliloth. ...
The "king of the nations of Gilgal" or rather perhaps the "king of Goim at Gilgal," is mentioned in the catalogue of the chiefs overthrown bv Joshua. (Joshua 12:23 ) Possibly the site of this place is marked by the modern village Jiljulieh , about four miles south of Antipatris, which lies 16 miles northeast of Joppa
Tappuah - City in the Shephelah district of Judah (Joshua 15:34 ), possibly Beit Nettif about twelve miles west of Bethlehem. City of the north border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:8 ) whose environs were allotted to Manasseh (Joshua 17:7-8 ), likely the Tappuah of Joshua 12:17 and 2 Kings 15:16
Hazor - A chief city of northern Canaan, whose king Jabin, at the head of an allied host, was defeated by Joshua, Joshua 11:1-13 . Hazor revived, however, and for a time oppressed the Israelites; but was subdued by Barak, fortified by Solomon, and remained in the possession of Israel until the invasion of Tiglathpileser, Joshua 19:36 ; Judges 4:2 ; 1 Kings 9:15 ; 2 Kings 15:29 . Cities in Judah and Benjamin, Joshua 15:23 ; Nehemiah 11:33
Hoham - HOHAM , king of Hebron, formed an alliance with other four kings against Gibeon, but was defeated by Joshua at Beth-horon, and put to death along with his allies at Makkedah ( Joshua 10:3 ff
a'Shan - ( Joshua 15:42 ) In (Joshua 19:7 ) and 1 Chronicles 4:32 It is mentioned again as belonging to Simeon
Chephirah - Joshua 9:17, which was afterwards assigned to Benjamin. Joshua 18:26; see Ezra 2:25; Nehemiah 7:29
el-Tolad - (God's kindred ), one of the cities in the south of Judah, ( Joshua 15:30 ) allotted to Simeon, (Joshua 19:4 ) and in possession of that tribe until the time of David
be-e'Roth - (wells ), one of the four cities of the Hivites who deluded Joshua into a treaty of peace with them. ( Joshua 9:17 ) It is now el-Bireh , which stands about 10 miles north of Jerusalem
Debir -
One of the eleven cities to the west of Hebron, in the highlands of Judah (Joshua 15:49 ; Judges 1:11-15 ). It was originally one of the towns of the Anakim (Joshua 15:15 ), and was also called Kirjath-sepher (q. Caleb, who had conquered and taken possession of the town and district of Hebron (Joshua 14:6-15 ), offered the hand of his daughter to any one who would successfully lead a party against Debir. , a dowry]'>[1]: for thou hast given me a south land" (Joshua 15:19 , A. ...
...
...
A place near the "valley of Achor" (Joshua 15:7 ), on the north boundary of Judah, between Jerusalem and Jericho. ...
...
The king of Eglon, one of the five Canaanitish kings who were hanged by Joshua (Joshua 10:3,23 ) after the victory at Gibeon. Here they were kept confined till Joshua returned from the pursuit of their discomfited armies, when he caused them to be brought forth, and "Joshua smote them, and slew them, and hanged them on five trees" (26)
Ashnah - of Jerusalem, Asena (Joshua 15:33). of Jerusalem (Joshua 15:43), now Esna
Kiriath-Sannah - ” Another name for the city of Debir, also known as Kiriath-Sepher (Joshua 15:15-16 ,Joshua 15:15-16,15:49 )
Enrimmon - Probably the same as RIMMON in Joshua 15:32 ; Joshua 19:7
je'Sus -
The Greek form of the name Joshua or Jeshua, a contraction of Jehoshua, that is, "help of Jehovah" or "saviour. " (Numbers 13:16 ) ...
Joshua the son of Nun
je'Sus -
The Greek form of the name Joshua or Jeshua, a contraction of Jehoshua, that is, "help of Jehovah" or "saviour. " (Numbers 13:16 ) ...
Joshua the son of Nun
Bethmarcaboth - of Judah (Joshua 19:5; 1 Chronicles 4:31). As Madmannah appears instead of Bethmarcaboth in the list Joshua 15:30-31, possibly Bethmarcaboth was substituted for Madmannah in Joshua 19:5, in Solomon's times
Ezem - ” Town in Judah's tribal territory but settled by tribe of Simeon (Joshua 15:29 ; Joshua 19:3 ; 1 Chronicles 4:29 ). KJV spells Azem in Joshua
Gedor -
A city in the mountains or hill country of Judah (Joshua 15:58 ), identified with Jedar, between Jerusalem and Hebron. ...
...
1 Chronicles 4:39 , the Gederah of Joshua 15:36 , or the well-known Gerar, as the LXX. ...
...
A town apparently in Benjamin (1 Chronicles 12:7 ), the same probably as Geder (Joshua 12:13 )
Tappuah -
A town in the valley or lowland of Judah; formerly a royal city of the Canaanites (Joshua 12:17 ; 15:34 ). ...
...
A town on the border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:8 ). ...
...
En-tappuah, the well of the apple, probably one of the springs near Yassuf (Joshua 17:7 )
Edrei - Royal city of Og, king of Bashan (Joshua 12:4 ). The clan of Machir in the tribe of Manasseh laid claim to the city (Joshua 13:31 ). A fortified city in the tribal territory of Naphtali (Joshua 19:37 )
Ephraim, Mount - Scripture specifies that the following cities were located in the hill country of Ephraim: Bethel (Judges 4:5 ); Gibeah (Joshua 24:33 ); Ramah (Judges 4:5 ); Shamir (Judges 10:1 ); Shechem (Joshua 20:7 ); Timnath-heres or -serah (Joshua 19:50 ; Judges 2:9 )
Taanach - A royal Canaanitish city in Issachar, but assigned to Manasseh, Joshua 12:21; Joshua 17:11; Judges 1:27; Judges 5:19; 1 Kings 4:12, also written "Tanach. " Joshua 21:25, A
Jabin - A powerful king in the time of Joshua, at Hazor in the north of Canaan. The league which he organized to crush Joshua, only made his own ruin more complete, Joshua 11:1-23 B
Dor - Its king joined the northern coalition against Joshua (Joshua 11:2 ; Joshua 12:23 ) but met defeat. Dor lay in the territory assigned Asher, but the tribe of Manasseh claimed it (Joshua 17:11 ). The Canaanites maintained political control (Joshua 17:12 ; Judges 1:27 )
Libnah - A Canaanite city taken by Joshua after Makkedah and before Lachish ( Joshua 10:29 etc. ), named between Arad and Adullam ( Joshua 12:16 ), and between Makkedah and Ether in the Shephçlah ( Joshua 15:42 ). It was given to the Levites ( Joshua 21:18 , 1 Chronicles 6:67 )
Halak - ” Mountain marking southern extent of Joshua's conquests (Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 )
Mephaath - ) A town of Reuben (Joshua 13:17-18; Joshua 21:37); a dependency of Heshbon, N
Japhia (1) - One of the five Amorite kings confederated against Joshua (Joshua 10:3), defeated at Beth-horon, and slain at Makkedah
Helkath - A Levitical city belonging to the tribe of Asher ( Joshua 19:25 ; Joshua 21:31 )
Chesil - of Judah (Joshua 15:30). Perhaps the same as Bethul, of Simeon, within Judah's inheritance, or Bethuel (Joshua 19:4; 1 Chronicles 4:30; 1 Samuel 30:27), "Bethel" among the cities of the extreme S
Balah - ” City in tribal territory of Simeon (Joshua 19:3 ), apparently the same as Baalah (Joshua 15:29 ) and Bilhah (1 Chronicles 4:29 )
Beth-Biri - A town of Simeon, perhaps textual error for Beth-lebaoth , Joshua 19:6 = Lebaoth , Joshua 15:32
Arba - ” Father of Anak for whom Kiriath-arba was named (Joshua 14:15 ; Joshua 15:13 )
Beth-Hog'la - (partridge-house ), and Holg'lah a place on the border of Judah, ( Joshua 15:6 ) and of Benjamin. (Joshua 18:19,21 ) A magnificent spring and a ruin between Jericho and the Jordan still bear the names of Ainhajala
Debir (1) - First taken by Joshua (Joshua 10:38-39; Joshua 11:21; Joshua 12:13; Joshua 15:49). of Hebron (Joshua 15:49); so Van de Velde identifies it with Dilbeh, S. ...
At 6 1/2 miles northward are the "upper and lower springs," which Caleb's daughter begged for, in the valley Seil el Dilbeh, in all 14 springs divided into three groups; no other such are found in the Judah "south country," or Negeb; a brook flows through the small gardens for four or five miles (Judges 1:15; Joshua 15:19). Conder states the important discovery that "the list in Joshua 12, which precedes all the other topographical lists, forms the key of the whole system. Debir stood, according to Joshua 15:19, in "a dry and" ("south land"), therefore Dilbeh near fine springs cannot be the site. ...
"Joshua returned to (made a detour to attack) Debir" (Joshua 10:38-40. It was allotted to the priests (Joshua 21:15; 1 Chronicles 6:58). A place on the northern bound of Judah, near the valley of Achor (Joshua 15:7), between Jericho and Jerusalem (Joshua 15:7). Part of the boundary of Gad (Joshua 13:26); in the high pastures E
Chesulloth - CHESULLOTH ( Joshua 19:18 ). The same as Chisloth-tabor , Joshua 19:12
Ambush - Joshua at the capture of Ai lay in ambush, and so deceived the inhabitants that he gained an easy victory (Joshua 8:4-26 )
Kiriath - (kihr ih awth) Place name meaning, “city” in tribal territory of Benjamin (Joshua 18:28 NAS, NIV; KJV has Kirjath, an alternate spelling). The same as Kiriath-Jearim (see Joshua 18:28 NRSV, REB, TEV)
Segub - Died when Hiel set up the gates of accursed Jericho, as Joshua foretold (Joshua 6:26; 1 Kings 16:34)
hi'el - after 915), and in whom was fulfilled the curse pronounced by Joshua, (Joshua 6:26 ) five hundred years before
Beth-Mar'Caboth - ( Joshua 19:5 ; 1 Chronicles 4:31 ) In the parallel list, (Joshua 15:31 ) MADMANNAH occurs in place of Beth-marcaboth
Hel'Hath - (portion ), the town named as the starting-point for the boundary of the tribe of Asher, ( Joshua 19:25 ) and allotted with its "suburbs" to the Gershonite Levites. (Joshua 21:31 ) Perhaps Yerka , seven miles from Acre
Makkedah - The place where Joshua (Joshua 10:10; Joshua 10:16-28) executed the five confederate kings in the afternoon of the 24 hours' day on which he won the victory at Bethhoron. Joshua first made his captains put their feet upon the five kings' necks (Psalms 149:8-9; Malachi 4:3) to assure them by this earnest of their future success under God, then executed them deliberately and judicially, and left them hanging to five trees until evening in sight of the defenders of Makkedah so as to strike terror into the enemy. Makkedah was in the shephelah or "low hilly region" (not "valley" as KJV); Joshua 15:33-41. Joshua 15:41 names Gederoth, Beth-dagon, Naameh, and Makkedah together, corresponding respectively to Kutrah, Beit Dejan, Nyaneh, and Mug hat; Kutrah and Mughar near together, Nyaneh six miles N
Hazor - It was taken and burnt by Joshua; rebuilt and allotted to Naphtali, but was retaken by a second Jabin, king of Canaan, who was defeated by Deborah and Barak. Joshua 11:1-13 ; Joshua 12:19 ; Joshua 19:36 ; Judges 4:2,17 ; 1 Samuel 12:9 ; 1 Kings 9:15 ; 2 Kings 15:29 . Joshua 15:23 . ' Joshua 15:25
de'Bir -
A town in the mountains of Judah, (Joshua 15:49 ) one of a group of eleven cities to the west of Hebron. The earlier name of Debir was Kirjath-sepher, "city of book," (Joshua 15:15 ; Judges 1:11 ) and Kirjath-sannah, "city of palm. " (Joshua 15:49 ) It was one of the cities given with their "suburbs" to the priests. (Joshua 21:15 ; 1 Chronicles 6:58 ) Debir has not been discovered with certainty in modern times; but about three miles to the west of Hebron is a deep and secluded valley called the Wady Nunkur , enclosed on the north by hills, of which one bears a name certainly suggestive of Debir-- Dewir-ban. " (Joshua 15:7 ) A Wady Dabor is marked in Van Deuteronomy Velde's map as close to the south of Neby Musa , at the northwest corner of the Dead Sea. ...
The "border of Debir" is named as forming part of the boundary of Gad, (Joshua 13:26 ) and as apparently not far from Mahanaim
de'Bir -
A town in the mountains of Judah, (Joshua 15:49 ) one of a group of eleven cities to the west of Hebron. The earlier name of Debir was Kirjath-sepher, "city of book," (Joshua 15:15 ; Judges 1:11 ) and Kirjath-sannah, "city of palm. " (Joshua 15:49 ) It was one of the cities given with their "suburbs" to the priests. (Joshua 21:15 ; 1 Chronicles 6:58 ) Debir has not been discovered with certainty in modern times; but about three miles to the west of Hebron is a deep and secluded valley called the Wady Nunkur , enclosed on the north by hills, of which one bears a name certainly suggestive of Debir-- Dewir-ban. " (Joshua 15:7 ) A Wady Dabor is marked in Van Deuteronomy Velde's map as close to the south of Neby Musa , at the northwest corner of the Dead Sea. ...
The "border of Debir" is named as forming part of the boundary of Gad, (Joshua 13:26 ) and as apparently not far from Mahanaim
Ashtaroth - of Jordan, called so from being a seat of Ashtoreth's worship, "Og dwelt in Ashtaroth, in Edrei" (Deuteronomy 1:4; Joshua 12:4; Joshua 13:12-31; Joshua 9:10). Allotted to Machir, son of Manasseh; and, out of Manasseh's portion, then allotted to the sons of Gershom, their other Levitical city here being Golan (Joshua 21:27), called Be-eshterah (i
Chinnereth - Lyre, the singular form of the word (Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 19:35 ), which is also used in the plural form, Chinneroth, the name of a fenced city which stood near the shore of the lake of Galilee, a little to the south of Tiberias. The Sea of Chinnereth (Numbers 34:11 ; Joshua 13:27 ), or of Chinneroth (Joshua 12 :: 3 ), was the "lake of Gennesaret" or "sea of Tiberias" (Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 11:2 )
Mountain - Also a mountainous region, "the mountain of Israel" and "Judah" (Joshua 40:16; Joshua 40:21), i. the highland as opposed to the plain, the hill country (Joshua 21:11). Even more than with ourselves the parts of a mountain are compared to bodily members: the head KJV "top," the ears Aznoth Tabor (Joshua 19:34), the shoulder, the back
Geliloth - GELILOTH (‘stone circles,’ Joshua 18:17 ). Identical with the Gilgal of Joshua 15:7 , and possibly with the Bath-gilgal of Nehemiah 12:29 . in Joshua 13:2 ; Joshua 22:10-11 and Joel 3:4 , and is tr
Debir - A word, an oracle, Judges 1:11 , a place called also KIRJATH-SEPHER, a city of books; and KIRJATH-SANNAH, a city of literature, Joshua 5:15,15 . It was a city in the south-west part of Judea, conquered from the Anakim by Joshua, but recaptured by the Canaanites, and resubdued by Othniel, and afterwards given to the priests, Joshua 10:38,39 15:15-17 21:15 . There was another Debir in Gad, and a third on the border of Benjamin, Joshua 13:26 15:7
Dor - One of the cities which joined Jabin against Joshua ( Joshua 11:2 ), and whose king was killed ( Joshua 12:23 ). It lay apparently on or near the border between Manasseh and Asher, so that its possession was ambiguous ( Joshua 17:11 )
Jobab - ...
A Canaanitish king (Joshua 11:1 ) who joined the confederacy against Joshua
Baal (3) - A town of Simeon (1 Chronicles 4:33), identical with BAALATH BEER (Joshua 19:8), i. " (Negeb), a parched region (Joshua 19:8)
Beth-Biri - It is apparently the same as Lebaoth (Joshua 15:22 ) and Beth-lebaoth (Joshua 19:6 )
Geliloth - ” A border point north of Jerusalem in tribal allotment of Benjamin (Joshua 18:17 ). It appears to correspond to Gilgal in the description of Judah Joshua 15:7
Baal-Gad - This was another of the heathen idols, and as we learn from the book of Joshua, (Joshua 11:17) was set up in the valley of Lebanon
Shaaraim - City in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:36 ). Town where tribe of Simeon lived (1 Chronicles 4:31 ), but the parallel texts read Shilhim (Joshua 15:32 ) and Sharuhen (Joshua 19:6 )
Avim, Avites - A people who once inhabited the villages of Philistia, who were destroyed by the Caphtorims, Deuteronomy 2:23 ; a remnant being left till the days of Joshua. Joshua 13:3 . Joshua 18:23
Rehob (2) - A town allotted to Asher (Joshua 19:28), near Sidon. Another town of Asher (Joshua 19:30); assigned to the Gershonite Levites (Joshua 21:31); kept by the Canaanites through Asher's remissness (Judges 1:31)
Lodge - In Biblical usage, a temporary resting place, for example, in a private home (Joshua 2:1 ; Acts 10:18 ), or a campground (Joshua 4:3 ,Joshua 4:3,4:8 ; Isaiah 10:29 )
Libnah - City in the south-west taken by Joshua and its inhabitants totally destroyed. Joshua 10:29-39 ; Joshua 21:13 ; 1 Chronicles 6:57 ; 2 Chronicles 21:10 ; Isaiah 37:8 ; Jeremiah 52:1
Adonize'Dek - (lord of justice ), the Amorite king of Jerusalem who organized a league with four other Amorite princes against Joshua. The confederate kings having laid siege to Gibeon, Joshua marched to the relief of his new allies and put the besiegers to flight. ( Joshua 10:1-27 ) (B
Jericho - The present town of Jericho, the Old Testament town destroyed by Joshua, and the New Testament town visited by Jesus all occupied different sites, though these sites are within a kilometre or so of each other. Its first mention in the Bible concerns events about 1240 BC, when the Israelites under Joshua approached Canaan from the plains of Moab, crossed the Jordan River and conquered Jericho in their first battle in Canaan (Numbers 22:1; Joshua 2; Joshua 3; Joshua 4; Joshua 5; Joshua 6). ...
Joshua announced a curse over Jericho, and for the next few hundred years no one dared rebuild the town properly, though some sort of settlement still existed there (Joshua 6:26; Judges 3:13; 2 Samuel 10:5). When a man named Hiel later rebuilt the city, he suffered the punishment announced by Joshua (1 Kings 16:34; cf. Joshua 6:26)
Bethhoron - On the road from Gibeon (now el Jib) to Azekah and the Philistine plain (Joshua 10:10-11; Joshua 16:3; Joshua 16:5; Joshua 18:13-14), on the boundary between Benjamin and Ephraim, but counted to the latter and given to the Kohathites (Joshua 21:22). enlarged and fortified) both the upper and nether Bethhoron, and was of the family whence sprang Joshua (1 Chronicles 7:24; 1 Chronicles 7:27). ) Here Joshua conquered the five kings of the Amorites. From Gibeon to upper Bethhoron is a distance of four miles, partly descent, but mainly ascent; hence it is called the "going up" to Bethhoron (Joshua 10:10-11), but in the second stage of Joshua's pursuit it is the "going down to Bethhoron," the descent beginning from the upper village toward the lower one
Ai - the Ai (Genesis 12:8); a royal city (Joshua 7:2; Joshua 8:9; Joshua 8:23; Joshua 8:29; Joshua 10:1-2; Joshua 12:9); E. In the valley behind Joshua placed his ambush. Across the intervening valley is the spot where Joshua stood when giving the preconcerted signal
Hebron - Joshua 21:11; Joshua 15:13-14; Judges 1:10. Hebron was taken by Joshua, Joshua 10:36-37; Joshua 12:10, and the region given to Caleb, Joshua 14:13; was rebuilt and made a Levitical city and a city of refuge, Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:11; was the royal residence of David, 2 Samuel 2:1-14; 1 Kings 2:11; became the headquarters of the rebellious Absalom, 2 Samuel 15:10; was fortified by Rehoboam and repeopled after the captivity
Hazor - The city of Jabin ( Joshua 11:1 etc. ), in Naphtali ( Joshua 19:36 ), S. It was taken and destroyed by Joshua. A town in the Negeb of Judah ( Joshua 15:23 ), unidentified. A town also in the Negeh ( Joshua 15:25 ), identical with Kerioth-hezron
Bethhoron - The district is memorable as where Joshua conquered the Amorites, and near which God smote them with hailstones. Joshua 10:10,11 ; Joshua 16:3,5 ; Joshua 18:13,14 ; Joshua 21:22 ; 1 Samuel 13:18
Gibeon - A city of the Hivites, Joshua 9:3-21, about six miles north of Jerusalem. Near it Joshua commanded the sun to stand still, Joshua 10:12-13; Isaiah 28:21; the city was given to Benjamin and to the Levites, Joshua 18:25; Joshua 21:17; it was the scene of a notable battle, 2 Samuel 2:12-24; 2 Samuel 20:8-10; of the hanging of seven of Saul's sons, 2 Samuel 21:1-6; the tabernacle was set up at Gibeon, 1 Chronicles 16:39; and Solomon offered great sacrifices there, 1 Kings 3:4-5; 1 Kings 9:2; 2 Chronicles 1:3; 2 Chronicles 1:13; Jehoram recovered captives at Gibeon, Jeremiah 41:12-16; its people helped to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem after the captivity, Nehemiah 3:7; Nehemiah 7:25; Ezra 2:20, margin
Michmethah - ” Site near Shechem (Joshua 16:6 ; Joshua 17:7 )
Sarid - A border town of Zebulun ( Joshua 19:10 ; Joshua 19:12 ) Probably Sa r id is a copyist’s error for Sa d id, which may be identified with Tell Shadûd , to the N
Irshemesh - ” Town in tribal territory of Dan (Joshua 19:41 ) on the border of the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:10 , called Beth-shemesh or house of the sun)
Anab - Grape-town, one of the cities in the mountains of Judah, from which Joshua expelled the Anakim (Joshua 11:21 ; 15:50 )
Eltolad - ” Village in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:30 ), given to tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:4 )
Hazar-Shual - Judah ( Joshua 15:28 = 1 Chronicles 4:28 ) or Simeon ( Joshua 19:3 ), re-peopled by Jews after the Captivity ( Nehemiah 11:27 )
Holon - A town in the mountains of Judah; allotted to the priests (Joshua 15:51; Joshua 21:15); HILEN in 1 Chronicles 6:58
Chephirah - One of Gibeon's four cities (Joshua 9:17), afterward belonging to Benjamin (Joshua 18:26)
Madon - ” Town in Galilee whose king joined in an unsuccessful alliance against Israel (Joshua 11:1 ; Joshua 12:19 )
Kishion - A town allotted to Issachar ( Joshua 19:20 ), given to the Levites ( Joshua 21:28 )
Halak, - HALAK , or the ‘smooth mountain,’ Joshua 11:17 ; Joshua 12:7 (only). This eminence has not been identified, but its approximate locality is indicated by the words ‘that goeth up to Seir’; and it formed the southern limit of Joshua’s conquests
Mearah - Place in the north of Canaan, mentioned by Joshua as a boundary of the land that had not then been possessed: it is called in the margin 'the cave. ' Joshua 13:4
Oshea - Same as Joshua
Jehoshua - Same as Joshua
Jeshua - Same as Joshua
Gilgal - Gilgal is most closely associated with Joshua, but the number of Gilgals involved continues an unsolved question. After crossing the Jordan, Joshua established the first camp at Gilgal (Joshua 4:19 ). There Joshua took twelve stones from the bed of the river to set up a memorial for the miraculous crossing. There God appeared to Joshua and affirmed his mission (Joshua 5:1 ). This Gilgal apparently became Israel's military base of operations (Joshua 9:6 ; Joshua 10:6 ; Joshua 14:6 ), though some scholars would identify this with a Gilgal farther north near Shechem. Joshua set up Gilgal as the border between Judah and Benjamin (Joshua 15:7 ; compare Joshua 18:17 ), though many Bible students think the border town must be south of the original camp. This could be the same Gilgal of Deuteronomy 11:30 , if Joshua's original town is not meant. This could be near tell Jiljulieh or at Joshua's first landing place near the Jordan. This was apparently tell Jiljulieh about three miles southeast of Shiloh, though it could still be Joshua's original Gilgal. Gilgal of the nations is mentioned as a royal city near Dor (Joshua 12:23 ). The earliest Greek translation reads this as “kings of the nations in Galilee,” which many scholars think is the original reading, a copyist of the Hebrew text using the word “Gilgal” since it had become familiar in the earlier chapters of Joshua. See Beth-gilgal ; Elisha ; Joshua ; Samuel ; Saul
Avim, or Avites - Some yet remained in the time of Joshua, Joshua 13:3 . They are conjectured to have been the same people with the Hivites, of whom traces were found in various parts of Canaan, Genesis 34:2 Joshua 9:7 11:3
Geder - ” City whose king Joshua killed (Joshua 12:13 ). 1 Chronicles 27:28 mentions an official from Geder, but the relationship of this Geder to that of Joshua 12:1 to the other cities mentioned above cannot be determined
Shaaraim - A town of Jadah, in the Shephçlah, mentioned in Joshua 15:36 . A town of Simeon ( 1 Chronicles 4:31 ); called Sharuhen in Joshua 19:5 , and Shilhim in Joshua 15:32
Gath-Rimmon - A city in Dan, near Jebud and Bene-herak ( Joshua 19:45 ), assigned to the Kohathites ( Joshua 21:24 ), and reckoned ( 1 Chronicles 6:69 ) to Ephraim. A city of Manasseh, assigned to the Kohathites ( Joshua 21:25 )
Beth-She'Mesh - (Joshua 15:10 ) It is now 'Ainshems , about two miles from the great Philistine plain, and seven from Ekron. (Joshua 19:22 ) ...
One of the "fenced cities" of Naphtali. (Joshua 19:38 ; Judges 1:33 ) ...
An idolatrous temple, or place in Egypt
en-Shemesh - EN-SHEMESH (‘sun-spring,’ Joshua 15:7 ; Joshua 18:17 )
Ether - A city in the shephelah or low country of Judah; allotted to Simeon (Joshua 15:42; Joshua 19:7)
Gath-Rimmon -
A Levitical city in the tribe of Dan (Joshua 19:45 ; 21:24 ; 1 Chronicles 6:69 ). ...
...
Another city of the same name in Manasseh, west of the Jordan (Joshua 21:25 ), called also Bileam (1 Chronicles 6:70 )
Tochen - The statement of Joshua 19:7 and Joshua 15:42 implies Tochen in Chronicles is another name for Ether, in the shephelah or "low hills" between the mountains of Judah and the maritime low plain
Azmon - Joshua assigned it to Judah (Joshua 15:4 )
Mephaath - A city of Reuben ( Joshua 13:18 ); assigned to the Levites ( Joshua 21:37 , 1 Chronicles 6:79 ); a Moabite city in Jeremiah 48:21
Jesus - The Greek form of Joshua, it occurs in Acts 7:45 ; Heb, 4:8, for Joshua the son of Nun
Gaash - A hill in the district of mount Ephraim, on the side of which Joshua was buried. Joshua 24:30 ; Judges 2:9
Lachish - a city of Palestine, Joshua 10:23 ; Joshua 15:39
Daberath - Joshua 19:12 ; 1 Chronicles 6:72 . In Joshua 21:28 it is called DABAREH in the A
Beth-da'Gon -
A city in the low country of Judah, (Joshua 15:41 ) and therefore not far from the Philistine territory. (Joshua 19:27 )
ma'Don - Its king joined Jabin and his confederates in their attempt against Joshua at the waters of Xierom, and like the rest was killed. ( Joshua 11:1 ; 12:19 )
Baalah - City on northern border of tribe of Judah equated with Kirjath-jearim (Joshua 15:9-11 ). It is called Baale of Judah (2 Samuel 6:2 ) and may be the same as Kirjath-baal (Joshua 15:60 ). See Joshua 15:29 ) that may be same as Balah (Joshua 19:3 ) and as Bilhah (1 Chronicles 4:29 )
Jarmuth - A royal city of the Canaanites ( Joshua 10:3 etc. ), in the Shephçlab, assigned to Judah ( Joshua 15:35 ). A city in Issachar, allotted to the Gershonite Levites ( Joshua 21:29 , LXX Adoni-Zedek - King of Jerusalem at the time of the invasion of Canaan by the Israelites under Joshua. Joshua came unexpectedly upon the allied kings, and utterly routed them. They were discovered in a cave at Makkedah, and brought before Joshua, who ordered them to be slain. The mouth of the cave was filled up with great stones ( Joshua 10:1-27 )
Anak, Anakim - ’ In the genealogizing narrative of Joshua 15:13-14 there were three sons or clans of Anak; Sheshai, Ahiman, and Talmai. Joshua 11:21 gives them a wider habitat , as scattered over the hill-country of Palestine generally, whence they were exterminated by Joshua. In Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod some remnants were to be found after Joshua’s time ( Joshua 11:22 )
Zaanannim - Zaanaim, (Joshua 19:33 )
Timnath-Serah - The city in Mount Ephraim given to Joshua ( Joshua 19:50 ), where he was buried ( Joshua 24:30 ), lying on the N. Josephus calls the burial-place of Joshua Thamna , and this probably corresponds to Timnath of 1Ma 9:50 , although there it is reckoned to Judæa. One, distinguished by size and workmanship, may be that pointed out as Joshua’s in the time of Eusebius and Jerome. The Samaritans place the burial of Joshua at Kefr Hâris , a village some 10 miles S. , one of which, Neby Kift (‘the prophet of the portion or lot’), may be identified with Joshua
Fountain - Thus the frequency of the Hebrew root En, meaning spring, in place names: En-dor (Joshua 17:11 ); En-eglaim (Ezekiel 47:10 ); En-gannim (Joshua 15:34 ); En-gedi (Joshua 15:62 ); En-haddah (Joshua 19:21 ); En-hakkore (Judges 15:19 ); En-hazor (Joshua 19:37 ); En-rimmon; (Nehemiah 11:29 ); En-rogel and En-shemesh (Joshua 15:7 ); and En-tappuah (Joshua 17:7 ). Enaim (Enam, Joshua 15:34 ) means “two springs
Daberath - ” Border city of Zebulun near Mount Tabor (Joshua 19:12 ). In Joshua 21:28 it is a city given the Levites from the territory of Issachar
Azekah - A town in the tribe of Judah, about fifteen miles south-west of Jerusalem; mentioned in the narratives of Joshua and Saul, Joshua 10:10 ; 1 Samuel 17:1 ; taken by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 34:7 , but afterwards repeopled by the Jews, Nehemiah 11:30
Zanoah - A town in the Shephçlah ( Joshua 15:34 , Nehemiah 3:13 ; Nehemiah 11:30 , 1 Chronicles 4:18 ). A place in the mountains ( Joshua 15:63 ), possibly Zanûta S
Bozer - of Jordan, allotted to the family of Merari (Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:36)
Beeroth - Wells, one of the four cities of the Hivites which entered by fraud into a league with Joshua. It belonged to Benjamin (Joshua 18:25 )
Nun - The father of Joshua ( Exodus 33:11 , Numbers 11:28 , Joshua 1:1 etc
Cor-Ashan - The place may be the same as Ashan of Joshua 15:42 ; Joshua 19:7
Gederah - ) A town of Judah in the shephelah , or hills between the mountains and plain (Joshua 15:36). ) GEDEROTH "sheepcotes", and GEDEROTHAIM "two sheepcotes", were in the same region (Joshua 15:41)
Ashnah - A city in the valley of the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:33 ), possibly modern Aslin. A second city in the valley or shephelah of Judah (Joshua 15:43 ), possibly modern Idna, about eight miles northwest of Hebron
Gaash - The hill where Joshua was buried. Joshua 24:30; Judges 2:9
Japhia - There was a city of this name, (Joshua 19:12) and there was a king of this name, Japhia king of Lachish, (Joshua 10:3) And David had a son named Japhia
Mount Gaash - This was the memorable sepulchre of Joshua, in Tinmath Serah, in mount Ephraim. (See Joshua 24:30
Ebron - EBRON ( Joshua 19:28 ). It was a Levitical city ( Joshua 21:30 , 1 Chronicles 6:74 )
en-Rim'Mon - ( Nehemiah 11:29 ) Perhaps the same as "Ain and Rimmon," (Joshua 15:32 ) and "Ain, Remmon," (Joshua 19:7 ) and see (1 Chronicles 4:32 )
en-She'Mesh - (fountain of the sun ), a spring which formed one of the landmarks on the north boundary of Judah, ( Joshua 15:7 ) and the south boundary of Benjamin, (Joshua 18:17 ) perhaps Ain Haud or Ain-Chot --the "well of apostles" --about a mile below Bethany
Ham'Mon -
A city in Asher, (Joshua 19:28 ) apparently not far from Zidon-rabbah. ...
A city allotted out of the tribe of Naphtali to the Levites, (1 Chronicles 6:76 ) and answering to the somewhat similar names HAMMATH and HAMMOTH-DOR in Joshua
Tappuah - Probably the name is that of a town in the Shephçlah ( Joshua 15:34 . of Jordan whose kings Joshua smote ( Joshua 12:17 )
Hazar - Hazar is a common element in place names: Hazar-enan ( Ezekiel 47:17 ); Hazar-gaddah (Joshua 15:27 ); Hazar-shual (Joshua 15:28 ); Hazar-susah (Joshua 19:5 )
Nahalal - (nuh hal' uhl) Place name meaning, “pasture” with alternate forms: Nahallal (Joshua 19:15 ); Nahalol (Judges 1:30 ). Town Zebulun's territory allotted to the Levites (Joshua 19:15 ; Joshua 21:35 )
Jokneam - A royal Canaanite city ‘in Carmel’ ( Joshua 13:22 ), on the boundary of Zebulun ( Joshua 19:11 ), ‘the brook’ before it being the Kishon. It was assigned to the Merarite Levites ( Joshua 21:34 )
Adonizedek - The Amorite king of Jerusalem who organized a league with four other Amorite princes against Joshua. These confederate kings having laid siege to Gibeon, Joshua marched to the relief of his new allies and put the besiegers to flight. Joshua 10:1-27
Joshua, Book of - Joshua was commissioned by God Himself. ...
Joshua 2 . ...
Joshua 3 , Joshua 4 . ...
Joshua 5 . Then Jehovah was manifested to Joshua as Captain of the host, with a drawn sword in His hand. Joshua fell to the earth and worshipped. ...
Joshua 6 , Joshua 7 . ...
Joshua 8 . ...
Joshua 9 , Joshua 10 . Five kings attacked Gibeon for making the league with Israel, but were totally defeated by Joshua, and the kings were hanged. Thus the confederacy of the south was overthrown, and the country of the south was conquered, and Joshua returned to Gilgal . ...
Joshua 11 , Joshua 12 . From Gilgal Joshua went again in strength against the confederacy of the north, being encouraged by Jehovah, and conquered everywhere, cutting off the Anakims from the mountains, and "so Joshua took the whole land according to all that the Lord said unto Moses. " The Gibeonites and their allies from three other cities (Joshua 9:17 ) were the only ones that made a league with Israel. The names then are given of the two kings conquered by Moses on the east of Jordan and thirty-one kings on the west smitten by Joshua. ...
Joshua 13 . Chapter 12 closes the first part of the book, which says that the whole land had been taken; but Joshua 13 opens with the statement that there remained "yet very much land to be possessed. ...
Joshua 14 — Joshua 17 . ...
Joshua 18 , Joshua 19 . To Joshua was given an inheritance, Timnath-serah in mount Ephraim. ...
Joshua 20 . ...
Joshua 21 . ...
Joshua 22 . The warriors of the two and a half tribes, who had crossed the Jordan to aid in the conquest of the land on the west, were dismissed to their possessions on the east of Jordan, with the blessing of Joshua. ...
Joshua 23 , Joshua 24 . In conclusion Joshua rehearses the dealings of the Lord with their ancestors, and the great things He had done for them. Joshua, the faithful servant of the Lord, died, being 110 years old. To this is added the testimony that "Israel served the Lord all the days of Joshua, and all the days of the elders that overlived Joshua, and which had known all the works of the Lord, that he had done for Israel
Barjesus - Son of Jesus or Joshua
Kirjath - A city, Joshua 18:28
Gibbethon - A town of Dan; given to the Kohathites, Joshua 19:44; Joshua 21:23; held by the Philistines in the reigns of Jeroboam, Nadab, Baasha, Elah, Zimri, and Omri
Hamstring - Horses captured in war were frequently hamstrung (KJV, hough) (Joshua 11:6 ,Joshua 11:6,11:9 ; 2 Samuel 8:4 ; 1 Chronicles 18:4 )
Baalah - BAALAH (the Canaanite designation) equates to KIRJATH JEARIM, or KIRJATH BAAL, now Kuriat el E'nab (Joshua 15:9-10-11 ("Mount Baal"), 60); supposed by many to be Emmaus. in 2 Samuel 6:2 called BAALE of Judah; Joshua 19:3 Balah; 1 Chronicles 4:29 BILHAH
Mashal - At Joshua 19:26 ; Joshua 21:30 the name appears as Misheal (KJV) or Mishal (modern translations)
Ataroth-Addar - ” A border town in Ephraim (Joshua 16:5 ), bordering Benjamin (Joshua 18:13 ), probably modern Khirbet Attara at the foot of tell en-Nasbeh or possibly identical with tell en-Nasbeh and thus with biblical Mispah
Abdon (2) - A city of Asher given to the Levites of Gershom's family: Joshua 21:30; 1 Chronicles 6:74. Hebron is substituted for it in Joshua 19:28
Sarid - A landmark on Zebulun's boundary (Joshua 19:10; Joshua 19:12)
Chesulloth - ” A border town of the tribe of Issachar (Joshua 19:18 ), probably the same as the border town of Zebulon called Chisloth-tabor in Joshua 19:12
Eleazar - He was then united with Moses in the divine communications, Numbers 26:1, and with Joshua, who was solemnly inaugurated before him. Eleazar entered Canaan, and, in conjunction with Joshua, divided it among the tribes. Joshua 14:1; Joshua 17:4; Joshua 21:1. His death is mentioned, Joshua 24:33, but not the time of it: perhaps it was near that of Joshua, He was succeeded as high priest by his son Phinehas
Jokmeam - It lay on the border, perhaps outside of the tribal territory of Zebulun (Joshua 19:11 , spelled Jokneam) and was assigned the Levites (Joshua 21:34 , spelled Jokneam). Joshua defeated its king whose kingdom was near Mount Carmel (Joshua 12:22 , spelled Jokneam). City of the Levites from tribe of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 6:68 ), either omitted in list in Joshua 21:22 or to be equated with Kibzaim there
Avim - (Joshua 13:2-3. " A trace of them may be in Avvim, a city of Benjamin (Joshua 18:23), whither they may have been driven when the took refuge in the hills of Bethel. Compare Joshua 9:7; Joshua 9:17 with Joshua 18:22-27
Anakim - The descendants of Anak (Joshua 11:21 ; Numbers 13:33 ; Deuteronomy 9:2 ). They dwelt in the south of Palestine, in the neighbourhood of Hebron (Genesis 23:2 ; Joshua 15:13 ). There were various tribes of Anakim (Joshua 15:14 ). Joshua finally expelled them from the land, except a remnant that found a refuge in the cities of Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod (Joshua 11:22 )
Beth-Shemesh - A town in Judah ( Joshua 15:10 etc. , called Ir-Shemesh in Joshua 19:41 ) allotted to the children of Aaron ( Joshua 21:15 ). A city in Issachar ( Joshua 19:22 ), unidentified. A city in Naphtali ( Joshua 19:38 ), unidentified
ai, Hai - It was conquered by Joshua — after a repulse because of the sin of Achan — by a stratagem; it was burnt and made a 'heap. ' Joshua 7:2-5 ; Joshua 8:1-29 ; Joshua 10:1,2 . In the district there are ruins scattered along the narrow summit of a ridge, and a depression among the rocky heights well suited for an ambuscade such as Joshua employed
Aphek - A royal city of the Canaanites whose king was slain by Joshua. Joshua 12:18. Joshua 15:53. A city of Asher, Joshua 19:30, in the north of Palestine, near Sidon, Joshua 13:4; supposed to be the same as Aphik, Judges 1:31, and the classical Aphaca, noted in later history for its temple of Venus; now Afka, near Lebanon
Eglon - A Canaanite city whose king entered an alliance with four other Canaanite rulers against Gibeon (Joshua 10:3 ). The Gibeonites had made a treaty with Israel (Joshua 9:1 ). Subsequently, Eglon was captured by the Israelite army under Joshua. See Joshua ; Judges; Ehud
Rimmon - Town allotted to tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:32 ) but then given to Simeon (Joshua 19:7 ; compare 1 Chronicles 4:32 ). See Joshua 19:13 ; 1 Chronicles 6:77 ), probably the original reading for present Dimnah (Joshua 21:35 )
Rephaim - Joshua 15:8; Joshua 18:16; and translated "the valley of the giants" in the A. Genesis 14:5; Deuteronomy 3:11-13; Joshua 13:12; Joshua 17:15
Eglon - A town near Lachish, mentioned only in connexion with the campaign of Joshua. Its king, Debir, joined the coalition against the Gibeonites ( Joshua 10:3 ), and after the reduction of Lachish Joshua captured and destroyed it ( Joshua 10:34 f
Jeb'Usites - (Numbers 13:29 ) When Jabin organized his rising against Joshua, the Jebusites joined him. (Joshua 11:3 ) "Jebus, which is Jerusalem," lost its king in the slaughter of Beth-horon, (Joshua 10:1,5,26 ) comp. Joshua 12:10 Was sacked and burned by the men of Judah, ( Judges 1:21 ) and its citadel finally scaled and occupied by David
Anak - Only Joshua and Caleb believed Israel could conquer them (Numbers 13:22-33; Deuteronomy 9:2). ...
Joshua and Caleb were, in fact, the ones who eventually led the attack on the Anakim. Most of the Anakim were slaughtered, the only ones who managed to escape being those who found refuge in the Philistine towns of Gaza, Gath and Ashdod (Joshua 11:21-22; Joshua 14:6-15)
Iron (1) - City of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38)
Anaharath - Within Naphtali's territory (Joshua 19:19)
Ashtaroth - A city of Bashan, in the kingdom of Og (Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Joshua 12:4 ; 13:12 ; 9:10 ). It was in the half-tribe of Manasseh (Joshua 13:12 ), and as a Levitical city was given to the Gershonites (1 Chronicles 6:71 ). The name Beesh-terah (Joshua 21:27 ) is a contraction for Beth-eshterah, i
Baal Gad - limit of Joshua's victories, as Hamath was the N. limit (Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7; Joshua 13:5)
en-Rimmon - Ain and Rimmon or Remmon appear as separate cities in the tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:32 ), settled by the tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:7 ). These two are often read as one city (Joshua 19:7 , RSV but not NRSV), but this makes the numbers of the cities in the lists inaccurate
Shihor of Egypt - The black, turbid river (Joshua 13:3; Joshua 15:4; Joshua 15:47; SIHOR is the less correct form); 1 Chronicles 13:5
Gezer - Joshua 10:33; Joshua 12:12. Gezer was in Ephraim; given to Kohath, Joshua 21:21; 1 Chronicles 6:67; noticed in the wars of David, 1 Samuel 27:8; 2 Samuel 5:25; 1 Chronicles 20:4; burned by Pharaoh in Solomon's days, 1 Kings 9:15-17; given to Solomon's Egyptian wife, and rebuilt by him; was an important city in the time of the Maccabees
Anak, Anakim - They lived in Hebron and the hill country (Joshua 11:21 ) before being destroyed by Joshua. Their remnants then lived among the Philistines (Joshua 11:22 )
Baal Gad - limit of Joshua's victories, as Hamath was the N. limit (Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7; Joshua 13:5)
Lachish - It was conquered by Israel in the time of Joshua (Joshua 10:3-5; Joshua 10:32) and later became an important military outpost for the defence of Jerusalem and other highland towns (2 Kings 18:13-17; 2 Chronicles 11:5; 2 Chronicles 11:9; Jeremiah 34:7; Micah 1:13; see PALESTINE)
Hadattah - ” Part of name Hazor-hadattah (Joshua 15:25 ). The earliest Greek translations apparently read the Hebrew word for “their villages” that reappears in this section of Joshua instead of Hadattah
Chephirah - CHEPHIRAH (‘village,’ Joshua 9:17 ; Joshua 18:26 , Ezra 2:25 , Nehemiah 7:29 )
Lebaoth - of Judah (Joshua 15:32), afterward transferred to Simeon (Joshua 19:6), whose portion, like Levi's, was "scattered" in Israel (Genesis 49:5-7) on account of the cruelty in Genesis 34:25-26
Adam, the City of - Is referred to in Joshua 3:16 . At this city the flow of the water was arrested and rose up "upon an heap" at the time of the Israelites' passing over (Joshua 3:16 )
Beth-Gader - It is probably the same as Geder (Joshua 12:13 ), if that is the proper reading. Some students of Joshua suggest the original text read Gezer or Gerar
Dimnah - ” Town in tribal territory of Zebulun given to Levites (Joshua 21:35 ). Compare Joshua 19:13
Gaash - Joshua was buried there (Joshua 24:30 )
Madmannah - A town in the Negeb of Judah ( Joshua 15:31 ), named with Hormah and Ziklag. Its place is taken in Joshua 19:5 etc
Carmi - the "troubler of Israel" (Joshua 7:1; Joshua 7:18; 1 Chronicles 2:7); son of Zabdi or Zimri
Nephtoah - ” Boundary marker for Judah and Benjamin (Joshua 15:9 ; Joshua 18:15 )
Bohan - to Joshua 15:6 ; Joshua 18:17 (both P Avvim - Joshua 13:4 ) as primitive inhabitants of S. A Benjamite town ( Joshua 18:23 ); site unknown
Heshbon - It was given to the tribe of Reuben, Joshua 13:17 . It was probably made over to Gad, since we meet with it among the cities which were given to the Levites, Joshua 21:39
Baal-Gad' - A city in the valley of Lebanon at the foot of Hermon; the northernmost point, to which the wars of Joshua reached, Joshua 11:17 ; 12:7 ; 13:5
ge'Der - The king of Geder was one of the thirty-one kings who were overcome by Joshua on the west of the Jordan. ( Joshua 12:13 ) (B
Kir'Jath-ar'ba - (Joshua 14:15 ; Judges 1:10 ) The identity of Kirjath-arba with Hebron is constantly asserted. (Genesis 23:2 ; 35:27 ; Joshua 14:15 ; 15:13,54 ; 20:7 ; 21:11 )
Ebal - The town and the mountains were closely linked in some important events in Israel’s history (Joshua 8:32-35; Joshua 24:1; for details see SHECHEM)
Joshua - ) Joshua or JEHOSHUA. Probably he even in Egypt was recognized as an officer among his brethren; for at his first public act, choosing and leading picked men of Israel against the attacking Amalekites at Rephidim (Exodus 17:9) he is introduced abruptly without description as one already well known by the designation Joshua (not Hoshea) given by anticipation. ...
Joshua learned to rule by obeying first; then he ruled for God, not self. God commanded Moses to write in the book (Hebrew, namely, the history of God's dealings with Israel) and rehearse it in Joshua's ears. Joshua inflicted the first decisive blow on the doomed nations; this was an earnest to him of the subsequent conquest of Canaan. Next as Moses' "minister" Joshua accompanied him along with Aaron, Nadab, Abihu, and 70 elders up the mountain of God; but Moses went alone into the cloud (Exodus 24:9; Exodus 24:13-15). On the descent Joshua heard the noise of the people shouting, and with a warrior's thought he said to Moses, "there is a noise of war in the camp"; but it was the noise of singers in the calf worship. When Moses removed the tabernacle of meeting between God and His people from the camp, Joshua, then "a young man" (perhaps an official term for an attendant, Numbers 11:28; Deuteronomy 1:38 "Joshua who standeth before thee"), departed not out of the tabernacle; the Lord's house and communion is the best qualification for those who are afterward to fight the Lord's battles. Joshua and Caleb alone of all that generation above 20 years of age survived the 40 years' wilderness wanderings that ensued, because "they wholly followed the Lord" (Numbers 32:11-12). Moses shortly before death, by Jehovah's direction, solemnly invested Joshua with authority as his successor. The Spirit was already in Joshua. ...
Moses put some of his own honour (dignity and authority) upon Joshua, making him vice leader, that Israel might obey him preparatory to his becoming chief after Moses' death. Joshua was inferior to Moses in standing before Eleazar the high priest to inquire through him and his Urim and Thummim, of Jehovah; Moses enjoyed direct communion with God. When Joshua omitted to inquire in the Gibeonites' case he suffered for it. Moses gave Joshua a charge before the high priest and congregation. Joshua's solemn inauguration to the office to which he had previously been called is in Deuteronomy 31:14-23. God Himself recognizes Joshua in it by summoning him into the tabernacle with Moses, while the divine pillar of cloud manifested Jehovah's presence (compare Numbers 11:25; Numbers 12:5). He commands Moses and Joshua to write Moses' song, and teach it to Israel as a witness against them of God's benefits, their duties, and the penalty of their apostasy. "...
Once only did Joshua show an envious spirit, but it was in behalf of his beloved master Moses, not for self. When Eldad and Medad prophesied in the camp separately from the rest of the 70 who received of the spirit that was upon Moses, in his presence, Joshua said, "my lord Moses, forbid them;" he replied, "enviest thou for my sake? would God that all the Lord's people were prophets," etc. Jehovah repeated the charge (Joshua 1:1-9), enjoining" courage" in "doing according to all the law, turning not from it to the right or left," and promising consequent prosperity and Jehovah's continual presence as "his God wheresoever he went. " God kept His promise, working mighty miracles in his behalf, and giving Israel all the land and rest round about; no good thing failed which the Lord had spoken (Joshua 21:43-45). The people honoured Joshua as they had Moses. During his lifetime Israel came nearest to realizing the ideal of the people of God (Joshua 11:15; Joshua 24:31). ...
Joshua took the command at Shittim, sent spies to Jericho, crossed Jordan, fortified his camp at Gilgal, circumcised the people (for Israel's work was a spiritual one, and men still having the badge of fleshliness were not fit agents for the Lord's work: Joshua 10:40; Judges 5:31), kept the Passover, (after which on their eating the old grain of the land the manna ceased,) and received the assurance of Jericho's fall and God's fighting against Israel's foes from the uncreated Angel of Jehovah (Joshua 5:13-15; Joshua 6:2-5), the Captain of Jehovah's host (Matthew 26:53; Exodus 23:20-23; Revelation 19:11-14). Ganneau suggests that Sartabeh the mountain was the spot whereon the Captain of Jehovah's host, Hebrew: Sarsaba , appeared to Joshua, and thence takes its name. ...
The divine Captain was on a height above Joshua, for "he lifted up his eyes" toward Him, and went unto Him. Joshua wrote the law on EBAL, and read it before the assembled people, half on that side and half. ) By neglecting to consult Jehovah Joshua was entrapped into the league with Gibeon; but having sworn he honourably kept his oath (Psalms 15:4; Ecclesiastes 5:2; contrast 2 Samuel 21:2-6, etc. ) This brought on the attack of the five confederate kings whom he defeated at Makkedah, aided by a divinely sent hailstorm and prolongation of daylight: the condition of the air was probably rendered by God, at Joshua's believing prayer, highly refractive so as to cause the sun to be seen long after its actual descent beneath the horizon, as the fata morgana in Sicily and the arctic region; compare the recession of the sun dial shadow under Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:11). Joshua subdued the S. In the books Samuel and Kings this is reversed, marking the early date of the book of Joshua). Israel often disliked destroying all; but God's command required utter extermination of the Canaanites (Joshua 10:40). In six years six nations and 31 kings, including the giant Anakim, their former dread, fell before Joshua. " Next Joshua, now aged, allotted the land, along with Eleazar and the tribal heads (Joshua 14:1; Joshua 17:4). Timnath Serah in Ephraim was assigned to Joshua himself," the city which he asked" (Joshua 19:49). The congregation set up the tabernacle at Shiloh (Joshua 18). ...
Six cities of refuge were appointed, 48 to the Levites; and the two and a half transjordanic tribes were dismissed home with blessings (Joshua 20-22). The slackness of Israel in taking possession of the promised land and destroying the Canaanites was the drawback to the completeness of Joshua's work (Joshua 18:3); after their long nomadic life the people were slow in settling down in separate homes; fear of the foes' attack too made them shrink from the trouble of defending themselves severally: a root of bitterness left which bore deadly fruit under the judges. ...
A long time after Jehovah had given rest unto Israel from all foes, Joshua, now old, convened all Israel (Joshua 23) represented by their heads, judges, and officers, to either Timhath Serah his home or Shiloh the sanctuary, and exhorted them to love and serve Jehovah ("be ye very courageous to do all that is written in the law, turn not aside to the right or to the left," Joshua 23:6; the same as God had enjoined Himself, Joshua 1:7), constrained by His past benefits, His promises of future help, and His threats of leaving the nations to be snares, scourges, and thorns to vex and destroy Israel in the event of apostasy. Again he gathered all the tribes with their heads and officers to Shechem, as being the place where Abram received God's first promise of the land after his migration into Canaan (Genesis 12:6-7); more especially because here Jacob on his return from Mesopotamia settled, and removed his household's strange gods (Genesis 33:19; Genesis 35:2-4), just as Joshua now wished Israel to renew the covenant binding them to renunciation of all idols. Here too Joseph's bones were buried (Joshua 24:32). Joshua was buried at 110 years of age in Timnath Serah. His piety comes brightly out in his dying exhortation:...
(1) God's call to Abraham was one of pure grace, not for his merit; Israel's fathers and Terah had "served other gods" (Joshua 24:2; Joshua 24:14; Genesis 31:53; Genesis 19:34), but Jehovah has through miraculous interposition brought Israel to the promised land; put away therefore all the gods ye served in Egypt (Leviticus 17:7; Ezekiel 20:18; Joshua 24:14); but, if not,...
(2) choose you (if you are bent on self destruction) which idols you like, "but as for me and my house (Genesis 18:19) we will serve the Lord" (compare Ruth 1:15; 1 Kings 18:21; John 6:67; Luke 10:42). ...
When the people, self confidently (like Peter, Luke 22:33), promised faithfulness, Joshua replied "ye cannot serve the Lord," i. See Joshua 24:23, "put away the strange gods which are IN you," heart idols, inconsistent with the service of Jehovah who is "a jealous God" (Ezekiel 20:39). On the people expressing still their resolution to serve Jehovah, Joshua made a covenant between God and them; and wrote the covenant and the words spoken on both sides in the law book of God, adding it to that written by Moses, and set up a stone as a memorial on the spot, under a terebinth tree by the sanctuary (or place hallowed to Jehovah by Abraham), and as a visible silent witness of their engagement. Joshua typifies Jesus whose name he bears (Acts 7:45; Hebrews 4:8). Moses representing the law could not bring Israel into Canaan; that was reserved for Joshua. He bruises Satan under their feet (Joshua 10:24; Psalms 110:5; Malachi 4:3; Romans 16:20). Jesus is the minister of the true circumcision (Joshua 5:2-9; compare Romans 15:8; Romans 2:29; Colossians 2:11; Colossians 2:13). ...
Joshua was buried in the border of his inheritance in Timnath Serah (probably now Kefr Haris) in Mount Ephraim, on the northern side of the hill Gaash (Joshua 24:30). Guerin professes to have discovered at Tigne (Timnath Serah), Joshua's tomb
Kattath - A city of Zebulun (Joshua 19:15)
Idalah - A city of Zebulun (Joshua 19:15)
Rabbith - A town of Issachar (Joshua 19:20)
Bethpazzez - A town of Issachar (Joshua 19:21)
Balah - Joshua 19:3; a town of Simeon
Chisloth-Tabor, j - CHISLOTH-TABOR , Joshua 19:12
Thimnathah - A town in Dan (Joshua 19:43)
be-Eshterah - BE-ESHTERAH ( Joshua 21:27 )
Kirjath-Baal - The city of Baal, Joshua 15:60
Kirjathhaim - Two cities so called, Joshua 13:19
Overlive - KJV term meaning, “outlive” (Joshua 24:31 )
ga'Zathites, the, - (Joshua 13:3 ) the inhabitants of Gaza
Jethlah - A city of Dan (Joshua 19:42)
Misrephoth-Maim - Burning of waters, supposed to be salt-pans, or lime-kilns, or glass-factories, a place to which Joshua pursued a party of Canaanites after the defeat of Jabin (Joshua 11:8 )
en-Shemesh - ” Town on border between tribal territories of Judah (Joshua 15:7 ) and Benjamin (Joshua 18:17 )
Achor - ” The valley in which Achan and his household were stoned to death (Joshua 7:24-26 ). See Joshua
Beth-Boron - The name of two places, the "Upper" and "Nether" Beth-horon, Joshua 16:3; Joshua 16:5, about three miles apart, on the opposite sides of a ravine or steep pass—the Thermopylæ of Palestine—on the road from Jerusalem to the sea-coast
Kedesh - A city of refuge, in Naphtali; now Kedis, three miles northwest of lake Merom, Joshua 19:37 ; 20:7 . A city in the south of Judah, Joshua 15:23
Kenizzite - The Kenizzites lived in the Negev, the southern desert region of Judah, before the conquest of the land by Joshua. Their son was Caleb (Numbers 32:12 ; Joshua 14:6 ,Joshua 14:6,14:14 ; Joshua 15:13 )
Hivites - They voluntarily surrendered their country to Joshua. Joshua 9:7; Joshua 11:19. The main body of the Hivites were then living on the northern confines of western Palestine—"under Hermon in the land of Mizpeh," Joshua 11:3; "in Mount Lebanon, from Mount Baal-hermon unto the entering in of Hamath
Idalah - A town of Zebulun ( Joshua 19:15 )
Helek - A portion, (Joshua 17:2 ), descended from Manasseh
Ophni - Mouldy, a city of Benjamin (Joshua 18:24 )
Shihon - Overturning, a town of Issachar (Joshua 19:19 )
Eltekon - A town in Judah's mountains (Joshua 15:59)
Bizjothjah - A town in southern Judah (Joshua 15:28)
Hali - A town on Asher's boundary (Joshua 19:25)
Neah - On the boundary of Zebulun (Joshua 19:13)
Naphtali, Mount - The mountainous district of Naphtali (Joshua 20:7 )
Shimron-Meron - The same, probably, as Shimron (Joshua 12:20 )
Ummah - Vicinity, a town of Asher (Joshua 19:30 )
Rakkath - A fortified town of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35)
Ramath Mizpeh - Gad's northern landmark (Joshua 13:26)
Joshua - Joshua is one of the unsung heroes of the Old Testament. He was a person of such stature that he could succeed the incomparable Moses and compile a record of notable success (Joshua 24:31 ). The Hebrew variations of Joshua are Oshea (Numbers 13:16 ); Hosea (Hosea 1:1 ). Joshua was born in Egypt during the period of slavery. ...
Joshua was Moses's servant (Exodus 24:13 ). ...
The Lord selected Joshua to be Moses' successor long before Moses' death (Numbers 27:15-23 ; Deuteronomy 31:14-15 ,Deuteronomy 31:14-15,31:23 ; Deuteronomy 34:9 ). Joshua was a military leader, a political leader, and a spiritual leader. ...
Joshua was at the helm of the nation during the conquest and the distribution and settlement of Canaan. He led in the covenant renewal at mount Ebal and Shechem (Joshua 8:30-35 ; Joshua 24:1-28 ). See Joshua, The Book of ; Moses
Hittites - In Joshua (Joshua 1:4; Joshua 9:1; Joshua 11:3-4; Joshua 12:8) they appear as the principal power occupying upper Syria, between Palestine and the Euphrates. The Egyptian monuments represent them (Sheta) as forming a confederacy of chiefs, Egypt's opponents in the valley of the Orontes, during the 19th and 20th dynasties of Manetho, including Joshua's time. As the Philistines appear in Joshua (Joshua 13:3; Judges 3:3) predominant in S. Their military power is represented in Joshua as consisting in chariots (1 Kings 10:29; 2 Kings 7:6)
Hazar-Shual - ” Town near Beersheba in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:28 ) but allotted to tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:3 ; 1 Chronicles 4:28 )
Halak, the Mount - "the smooth mountain", "which goeth up to Seir" (Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7); the southern extremity of Joshua's conquests
Kedemoth - of the Dead Sea, assigned to Reuben (Joshua 13:18), then to the Merarite Levites (Joshua 21:37)
Bethtappua - ) A town in the hilly part of Judah (Joshua 15:46; Joshua 15:53; 1 Chronicles 2:43, where Tappuah is the son of Hebron)
Ithrite - The latter may have been Hivites (compare Joshua 9:7 ,Joshua 9:7,9:17 )
Mephaath - ” Town in Reuben's tribal allotment (Joshua 13:18 ), assigned to the Levites (Joshua 21:37 ; 1 Chronicles 6:79 )
Madon - A royal city of the Canaanites in the north ( Joshua 11:1 ; Joshua 12:19 )
Beth-Lebaoth - ” City in territorial allotment of tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:6 ). It is apparently the same as Lebaoth in Judah's inheritance (Joshua 15:32 )
Misheal - ” Levitical town in the territory of Asher (Joshua 19:26 ). Elsewhere, the KJV used the form Mishal (Joshua 21:30 ) or Mashal (1 Chronicles 6:74 )
Sansannah - ” Town in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:31 ). Apparently the same as Hazar-susah (Joshua 19:5 ) and Hazar-susim (1 Chronicles 4:31 ), thus assigned to tribe of Simeon
Arad - A city in the Negeb, the king of which provoked Israel ( Numbers 21:1 ) and was slain by Joshua ( Joshua 12:14 )
Sansannah - A town in the Negeb or south country (Joshua 15:31), also called Ηazar Susah or Susim , "horse court," i. "depot of horses" (Joshua 19:5, compare 1 Chronicles 4:31)
en-ro'Gel - (fount of the fuller ), a spring which formed one of the landmarks on the boundary line between Judah, ( Joshua 15:7 ) and Benjamin. (Joshua 18:16 ) It may be identified with the present "Fountain of the Virgin," 'Ain Umm ed-Daraj , the perennial source from which the pool of Siloam is supplied
Beth-ar'Abah - (house of the desert ), one of the six cities of Judah which were situated down in the Arabah, the sunk valley of the Jordan and Dead Sea, ( Joshua 15:61 ) on the north border of the tribe. (Joshua 18:22 )
Jat'Tir - (pre-eminent ), a town of Judah in the mountain districts, ( Joshua 15:48 ) one of the group containing Socho, Eshtemoa, etc. See also (Joshua 21:14 ; 1 Samuel 30:27 ; 1 Chronicles 6:57 ) By Robinson it is identified with 'Attir , six miles north of Molada and ten miles south of Hebron
Abiel - One of David’s heroes ( 1 Chronicles 11:32 ), from Beth-arabah in the wilderness of Judah ( Joshua 15:6 ; Joshua 15:61 ; Joshua 18:22 )
Misrephoth-Maim - From the Waters of Merom the defeated Canaanites fled to Great Zidon, and unto Misrephoth-maim ( Joshua 11:8 ). boundary of the Zidonians, who had not been driven out by Joshua ( Joshua 13:6 )
Shimron - Canaanite city-state which joined Hazor's northern coalition against Joshua and met defeat (Joshua 11:1 ). It was allotted to the tribe of Zebulun (Joshua 19:15 )
Beeroth - One of the four cities of the Hivites which deceived Joshua into making a treaty of peace. Joshua 9:17 ; Joshua 18:25 ; 2 Samuel 4
Ain - A city of southern Palestine, first given to Judah, Joshua 15:32; afterward assigned to Simeon, Joshua 19:7; and then to the Levites, Joshua 21:16; 1 Chronicles 4:32
Taralah - An unknown town of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:27 )
Tanach - (tay' nak) KJV form of Taanach (Joshua 21:25 )
Ophni - A town of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:24 ); unknown
Beth-Baal-Meon - BETH-BAAL-MEON ( Joshua 13:17 )
Kerioth-Hezron - KERIOTH-HEZRON ( Joshua 15:25 )
Lakkum - An unknown town of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:38 )
Adadah - of Judah (Joshua 15:22)
Amad - In Asher, between Alammelech and Misheal (Joshua 19:23)
Bealoth - Joshua 15
Oshea - Son of Nun, afterwards named Joshua
Shaalabbin - A town in Dan (Joshua 19:42)
Aphekah - APHEKAH ( Joshua 15:53 )
Acrab'Bim - See MAALEH-ACRABBIM, (Joshua 15:3 ) in the margin
Adoni-Zedec - Lord of justice or righteousness, was king in Jerusalem at the time when the Israelites invaded Palestine (Joshua 10:1,3 ). He formed a confederacy with the other Canaanitish kings against the Israelites, but was utterly routed by Joshua when he was engaged in besieging the Gibeonites. The history of this victory and of the treatment of the five confederated kings is recorded in Joshua 10:1-27 . Among the Tell Amarna tablets (see Joshua 10 , and indeed throw light on the wars of conquest generally, so that they may be read as a kind of commentary on the book of Joshua
Aphek - Same as Aphekah (Joshua 15:58). A Canaanite royal city, the king of which was killed by Joshua (Joshua 12:18). of Asher (Joshua 19:30). " border of the Amorites" (Joshua 13:4-5), the Aphaca of the classics, famed for Venus' temple, now Afka, on the N
ke'Desh -
In the extreme south of Judah, (Joshua 15:23 ) same as Kadesh and Kadesh-barnea. (1 Chronicles 6:72 ) The Kadesh mentioned among the cities whose kings were slain by Joshua, (Joshua 12:22 ) in company with Megiddo and Jokneam of Carmel, would seem to have been this city of Issachar. ...
Kedesh; also Kedesh in Galilee; and once, (Judges 4:6 ) Kedesh-naphtali, one of the fortified cities of the tribe of Naphtali, named between Hazor and Edrei, (Joshua 19:37 ) appointed as a city of refuge, and allotted with its "suburbs" to the Gershonite Levites. (Joshua 20:7 ; 21:32 ; 1 Chronicles 6:76 ) It was the residence of Barak, (Judges 4:6 ) and there he and Deborah assembled the tribes of Zebulun and Naphtali before the conflict, being probably, as its name implies, a "holy place" of great antiquity
Hiel - ” Man from Bethel who rebuilt Jericho at the price of the life of two of his sons (1 Kings 16:34 ), fulfilling the divine curse Joshua issued when he destroyed Jericho (Joshua 7:26 )
Beth-Dagon -
A city in the low country or plain of Judah, near Philistia (Joshua 15:41 ); the modern Beit Degan, about 5 miles from Lydda. ...
...
A city near the south-east border of Asher (Joshua 19:27 )
Azekah - Dug over, a town in the Shephelah or low hills of Judah (Joshua 15:35 ), where the five confederated Amoritish kings were defeated by Joshua and their army destroyed by a hailstrom (10:10,11)
Beth-Dagon - Town in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:41 ). Town in Asher (Joshua 19:27 ) without certain present location
Rekem - One of five Midianite kings whom Israel defeated in Moses' time (Numbers 31:8 ; Joshua 13:21 ). Unidentified site in Benjamin (Joshua 18:27 )
Jattir - A town in the hills of Judah (Joshua 15:48), one of the nine allotted to the sons of Aaron (Joshua 21:14; 1 Chronicles 6:57)
Daberath - A city said in Joshua 19:12 to belong to Zebulun, but in Joshua 21:28 and 1 Chronicles 6:72 to be a Levitical city in Issachar
Taanach - In the division made by Joshua, it was given to Manasseh in the portion of Issachar and Asher. (See Joshua 17:11) But in Deborah's song of victory, she describes the battle of Sisera as near these borders
Sharuhen - ...
A town in Judah allotted to Simeon (Joshua 19:6). Called SHILHIM in Joshua 15:32, SHAARAIM in 1 Chronicles 4:31
Zanoah - Village in Judah identified with khirbet Zanu about three miles south southeast of Beth-Shemesh (Joshua 15:34 ). City in the highlands of Judah (Joshua 15:56 ), whose identification with khirbet Zanuta, ten miles southwest of Hebron or khirbet Beit Amra is disputed
Dimnah - Levitical city of Zebulun, Joshua 21:35 ; but it is not mentioned in the cities of this tribe in Joshua 19:10-16 , and in the Levitical cities of Zebulun in 1 Chronicles 6:77 the name of RIMMON occurs, which makes it appear probable that the two names refer to the same place
Pasture - Open land surrounding towns and villages, regarded as common property to be freely used by village shepherds and herdsmen (Numbers 35:2 ,Numbers 35:2,35:7 ; Joshua 14:4 ; Joshua 21:11 )
Timnath-Serah - Or Timnath-Heres, Judges 2:9 , a town in Ephraim, which yielded to Joshua a home, an income, and a burial-place, Joshua 19:50 ; 24:30
Hor'Mah - (a place laid waste ), or ZEPHATH , (Judges 1:17 ) was the chief town of a king of a Canaanitish tribe on the south of Palestine, which was reduced by Joshua, and became a city of the territory of Judah, (Joshua 15:30 ; 1 Samuel 30:30 ) but apparently belonged to Simeon
Ked'Emoth - (beginnings ), one of the towns in the district east of the Dead Sea allotted to the tribe of Reuben, ( Joshua 13:18 ) given by the Merarite Levites. (Joshua 21:37 ; 1 Chronicles 6:79 ) It possibly conferred its name on the "wilderness," or uncultivated pasture land, "of Kedemoth
Ash'Nah - the name of two cities, both in the lowlands of Judah: (1) named between Zoreah and Zanoah, and therefore probably northwest of Jerusalem, (Joshua 15:33 ) and (2) between Jiptah and Nezib, and therefore to the southwest of Jerusalem. (Joshua 15:43 ) Each, according, to Robinson's map (1857), would be about 16 miles from Jerusalem
Hivites - Hivites are found in Gibeon (Joshua 9:7 ; Joshua 11:19 ), Shechem (Genesis 34:2 ), below Hermon in the land of Mizpah (Joshua 11:3 ), and in the Lebanon mountains (Judges 3:3 ). In addition, the Septuagint or earliest Greek translation reads “Horite” for “Hivite” in some texts (Genesis 34:2 ; Joshua 9:7 )
Shittim - While at Shittim, they were blessed by Balaam (whom Balak had hired to curse Israel; Numbers 22-24 ; compare Micah 6:5 ), committed sin with the Moabite and Midianite women (Numbers 25:1 ), and Joshua was announced as Moses' successor (Deuteronomy 34:9 ). Joshua sent spies out from Shittim (Joshua 2:1 ; compare Joshua 3:1 )
Shuthelah - Ancestor of Joshua (1 Chronicles 7:20-27). Hervey, viewing 1 Chronicles 7 as corrupt, restores the line of Shuthelah thus:...
(1) Joseph;...
(2) Ephraim;...
(3) Shuthelah;...
(4) Eran or Laadan;...
(5) Ammihud;...
(6) Elishama, captain of Ephraim (Numbers 1:10);...
(7) Nun;...
(8) Joshua. The affair with the men of Gath (Joshua 7:20-27; Joshua 8:13) was probably after Israel's settlement in Canaan; and Ephraim and Shuthelah mean the individuals of their descendants who represented them as heads of the tribe or family
Jokdeam - A city in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:56 )
Enhaddah - A town on the border of Issachar (Joshua 19:21)
Alammelech - ) A place in Asher's territory (Joshua 19:26)
Amam - of Judah (Joshua 15:26)
Rakkath - (Joshua 19:35) From Rakah empty
Amam - (ay' man) Place name in southern Judah (Joshua 15:26 )
Ophrah - A city of Benjamin, (Joshua 18:23) from Haphar, dust
Non - Nun, the father of Joshua
Caleb - At that time he was forty years of age (Joshua 14:7). Only Joshua, the spy who went as the representative of the tribe of Ephraim, supported Caleb (Numbers 14:6-9). During the next forty years all who were at that time twenty years of age or over (except Caleb and Joshua) would die in the wilderness (Numbers 14:28-35). ...
When, forty years later, a new generation had grown up and the people were about to enter Canaan, Moses appointed one leader from each of the twelve tribes to assist the new leader Joshua and the high priest Eleazar in the division of the land. Groups of unconquered Canaanites were still scattered throughout the country, but each Israelite tribe was responsible for overcoming the enemies within its territory (Joshua 13:1-7; cf. Joshua 15:63; Joshua 16:10; Joshua 17:12; Joshua 17:18). Caleb conquered them and took possession of their towns (Joshua 14:6-15; Joshua 15:13-14). The conqueror was Othniel, who later became a great leader in Israel (Joshua 15:15-19; Judges 3:9-11)
Helkath - ” Border town in the tribal allotment of Asher (Joshua 19:25 ) given to the Levites (Joshua 21:31 )
Hilen - The parallel passage (Joshua 21:15 ; compare Joshua 15:51 ) reads Holon
Moladah - A city reckoned to Judah in Joshua 15:26 , and to Simeon in Joshua 19:2 , 1 Chronicles 4:28
Shimron - One of the towns whose kings Jabin called to his assistance ( Joshua 11:1 ). It was afterwards allotted to the tribe of Zebulun ( Joshua 19:15 )
Beyond - When used with reference to Jordan, signifies in the writings of Moses the west side of the river, as he wrote on the east bank (Genesis 50:10,11 ; Deuteronomy 1:1,5 ; 3:8,20 ; 4:46 ); but in the writings of Joshua, after he had crossed the river, it means the east side (Joshua 5:1 ; 12:7 ; 22:7 )
Lasharon - A Canaanite town, the king of which Joshua slew (Joshua 12:18), probably now Saruneh, S
Hadattah - of Judah (Joshua 15:25), the Qeri (the Hebrew margin) reads Hazor-hadattah, i. of Ascalon, which is in the shephelah , whereas Joshua places it among towns of S
Shittim - Acacias, also called "Abel-shittim" (Numbers 33:49 ), a plain or valley in the land of Moab where the Israelites were encamped after their two victories over Sihon and Og, at the close of their desert wanderings, and from which Joshua sent forth two spies (q. ) "secretly" to "view" the land and Jericho (Joshua 2:1 )
Kirjath-Sannah - , of the palm(?), Joshua 15:49 ; the same as Kirjath-sepher (15:16; Judges 1:11 ) and Debir (q. ), a Canaanitish royal city included in Judah (Joshua 10:38 ; 15:49 ), and probably the chief seat of learning among the Hittites
Giloh - Exile, a city in the south-west part of the hill-country of Judah (Joshua 15:51 ). It was the native place or residence of the traitor Ahithophel "the Gilonite" (Joshua 15:51 ; 2 Samuel 15:12 ), and where he committed suicide (17:23)
Kedemoth - A place apparently on the upper course of the Arnon, assigned to Reuben ( Joshua 13:18 ), and a Levitical city ( Joshua 21:37 = 1 Chronicles 6:79 )
Kedesh - A city in the south of Judah ( Joshua 15:23 ) whose site is uncertain. A city in Issachar ( 1 Chronicles 6:72 ), where, however, Kedesh is not improbably a textual error for Kishion of the parallel passage ( Joshua 21:28 )
Kiriathaim - of Madeba ( Genesis 14:5 , Numbers 32:37 , Joshua 13:19 , Jeremiah 48:23 , Ezekiel 25:9 ); unidentified. A town in Naphtali ( 1 Chronicles 6:76 ), called Kartan in Joshua 21:32
Hiel - In him was fulfilled the curse pronounced by Joshua that he should lay the foundation of the city in his firstborn and set up the gates in his youngest son. Joshua 6:26
Zabdi - Son of Zerah, Achan's forefather (Joshua 7:1; Joshua 7:17-18)
Ahi'Man - ) The whole race was cut off by Joshua, (Joshua 11:21 ) and the three brothers were slain by the tribe of Judah
Joshua the Son of Jehozadak - Chief among those who returned were the governor Zerubbabel and the high priest Joshua (or Jeshua) the son of Jehozadak (or Jozadak) (Ezra 2:1-2). ...
Joint leadership...
Under the leadership of Zerubbabel and Joshua, the returned exiles set up the altar soon after they arrived in Jerusalem (Ezra 3:1-2). ...
Sixteen years later God raised up the prophets Haggai and Zechariah to stir up Zerubbabel, Joshua and the people to get to work once more on the temple (Ezra 4:24; Ezra 5:1-2; Haggai 1:1-11). When work restarted, the prophets brought further messages of encouragement to the people through Zerubbabel and Joshua (Haggai 1:12-15; Haggai 2:1-9). Instead they crowned the priest Joshua, to avoid any action that may have appeared to the Persians as treason. The ceremony emphasized that the joint rule of Joshua and Zerubbabel, the priest and the prince, foreshadowed the rule of the priest-king Messiah (Zechariah 6:9-14). ...
Dealing with sin...
In a vision that the prophet Zechariah saw, Joshua the high priest was standing before God in dirty garments. Standing beside Joshua was Satan, ready to make the accusation that the people were unclean because of their long exile in idolatrous Babylon. By clothing Joshua in clean garments, God showed that he had forgiven and cleansed his people (Zechariah 3). Joshua’s sons did not truly follow God and, like many of their countrymen, married unbelieving non-Jewish women
Sharaim - (sshuh ree' zuh) KJV spelling of Shaaraim in Joshua 15:36
Shilhim - A town of Judah ( Joshua 15:32 )
Mozah - An issuing of water, a city of Benjamin (Joshua 18:26 )
Horem - Consecrated, one of the fenced cities of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38 )
Heshmon - Fatness, a town in the south of Judah (Joshua 15:27 )
Hadashah - New, a city in the valley of Judah (Joshua 15:37 )
Archite (the) - ) Archi was near Bethel (Joshua 16:2)
Eshean - A city of Judah in the hilly country (Joshua 15:52)
Arab - A city of Judah in the hilly district (Joshua 15:52)
Leshem - Joshua 19:47 Leshem (See LAISH; DAN, Lasha (Genesis 10:19)
Shikkeron - (SShihk' keh rahn) Modern translations' spelling of Shicron (Joshua 15:11 )
Thimnathah - (thihm' nuh thah) KJV alternate form of Timnah (Joshua 19:43 )
Humtah - A city of Judah in the mountain district (Joshua 15:54)
Nun - Sprung from Ephraim; father of Joshua (1 Chronicles 7:20-27)
Yiron - (ihi' ruhn) NAS spelling of Iron (Joshua 19:38 )
Maacath - (may' uh cath) NRSV, NAS spelling of Maacah (Joshua 13:13 )
Shahazimah - A town of Issachar between Tabor and Jordan (Joshua 19:22)
Achor - On the northern boundary of Judah (Joshua 15:7)
Zaretan - (zehr' eh than) KJV form of Zarethan in Joshua 3:16
Amam - Joshua 15:26 : not identified
Ophni - A city of Benjamin, (Joshua 18:24) perhaps from Gophni, weary
Wilily - Joshua 9
Jabneh - Building, (2 Chronicles 26:6 ), identical with Jabneel (Joshua 15:11 )
Janum - Slumber, a town in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:53 )
Rephah - Son of Ephraim, and ancestor of Joshua
Hew - The references to “hewers of wood” together with drawers of water (Joshua 9:21 ,Joshua 9:21,9:23 ,Joshua 9:23,9:27 ; Deuteronomy 29:11 ) probably refer to those who gathered firewood
Beth-Jeshimoth - ” A town in Moab where Israel camped just before Moses died and Joshua led them across the Jordan (Numbers 33:49 ). Joshua 12:3 lists it as land Israel took from Sihon, king of the Amorites. Moses gave it to the tribe of Reuben ( Joshua 13:20 )
Rehob - Town in the territory of Asher (Joshua 19:28 ,Joshua 19:28,19:30 ). Elsewhere, Rehob in Asher is assigned to the Levites (Joshua 21:31 ; 1 Chronicles 6:75 )
Mahanaim - ” City somewhere in the hill country of Gilead on the tribal borders of Gad and eastern Manasseh (Joshua 13:26 ,Joshua 13:26,13:30 ). It was a Levitical city (Joshua 21:38 )
Girzites - border of Ephraim ( Joshua 10:33 ; Joshua 16:3 ; Joshua 16:10 , Judges 1:29 )
Ai - Taken by Joshua. Joshua 7:2-5; Joshua 8:1-29
ek'Ron - ( Joshua 13:3 ) Like the other Philistine cities its situation was in the lowlands. (Joshua 15:45,46 ; Judges 1:18 ) Afterwards we find it mentioned among the cities of Dan. (Joshua 19:43 ) Before the monarchy it was again in full possession of the Philistines
Aijalon - (AIJALON or AJALON, "a place of gazelles" (Joshua 19:42; Joshua 21:24). Alluded to in the memorable apostrophe of Joshua, "Sun, stand thou still upon Gibeon, and thou moon in the valley of Ajalon" (Joshua 10:12)
Joshua - (יְהוֹשֻׁעַ, later יֵשׁוּעַ, ‘Jahweh is deliverance or salvation’)...
Joshua, the successor of Moses in the leadership of Israel, was named Ἰησοῦς in the Septuagint and NT, and therefore ‘Jesus’ in the English Authorized Version ; but the Revisers, in accordance with their rule of reproducing OT names in the Hebrew rather than the Greek form, have changed this into ‘Joshua. Stephen in his apologia speaks of the fathers entering with Joshua into the possession of the nations (Acts 7:45); and the writer of Hebrews, imbued with Alexandrian-i. Platonic and Philonic-teaching as to the distinction between visible things and their heavenly ideas, says that the rest which Joshua gave the Israelites, when he led them into the promised land, was after all not the Rest of God, but only the material symbol suggesting the spiritual reality-the Sabbath-rest which remains in the unseen world for the people of God (Hebrews 4:8-9)
Aroer - If Aroer be meant by "the city in the midst of the river," Joshua 13:9, it may have originated in the circumstance that the city stood partly on the bank, and partly extending into the river. Deuteronomy 2:36; Deuteronomy 3:12; Deuteronomy 4:48; Joshua 12:2; Joshua 13:16; Judges 11:28; Jeremiah 48:19. The site is still called Ayra, Numbers 32:34; Joshua 13:25; 2 Samuel 24:5; Isaiah 17:2; but possibly another city near Damascus
Dabareh - (dab' uh reh) KJV spelling of Daberath (Joshua 21:28 )
Great Sea - Mediterranean Sea (Numbers 34:6-7 ; Joshua 15:12 )
Misheal - (Joshua 19:26 ), a town of Asher, probably the same as Mishal
Heleph - Exchange, a city on the north border of Naphtali (Joshua 19:33 )
Irpeel - ) A city of Benjamin (Joshua 18:27)
Kartah - A town of Zebulnn, assigned to the Merarite Levites (Joshua 21:34)
Dabbasheth - A town on the boundary of Zebulun (Joshua 19:11)
Humtah - A city of Judah ( Joshua 15:54 )
Ittah Kazin - ) On Zebulun's boundary (Joshua 19:13)
Nahallal - (nuh hal' lal) Alternate form of Nahalal (Joshua 19:15 KJV, TEV)
Cabbon - CABBON ( Joshua 15:40 )
Karka - of Judah ( Joshua 15:3 )
Adami - A place on the border of Naphtali (Joshua 19:33); afterward Damin
Kirjath-Sannah - The city of the bush, from Senah, a bush, Joshua 15:49
Naarath - (Joshua 16:7) From Nahar, youth or child
Nezib - A city or village spoken of Joshua 15:43
Othniel - (Joshua 15:17) From Leth, time—and El, God
re'Phah, - a son of Ephraim, and ancestor of Joshua
Jethlah - Suspended; high, a city on the borders of Dan (Joshua 19:42 )
Ramoth Gilead - 2 Kings 8:28 or Ramath Mizpeh in Joshua 13:26. ) A city of refuge in Gad (Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:38). of Gad (Joshua 13:26), which Es Salt is not. The Arabic of Joshua 13:26 has Ramah el Jeresh or Ramah el Jerash (Gerasa)
Bezer - A city of refuge in tribal territory of Reuben (Deuteronomy 4:43 ; Joshua 20:8 ), set aside as a city for the Levites (Joshua 21:36 )
Haeleph - ” Some interpreters combine the preceding town name in Joshua 18:28 to read, “Zelah Haeleph” as one town, following early Greek manuscript evidence. Town in tribal territory of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:28 )
Hammath - A fortified city in Naphtali (Joshua 19:35). In Joshua 21:32 it appears as the Gershonite Levite city of refuge, HAMMOTH DOR
Zanoah -
A town in the low country or shephelah of Judah, near Zorah (Joshua 15:34 ). ...
...
A town in the hill country of Judah, some 10 miles to the south-west of Hebron (Joshua 15:56 )
Ramath - ” An element of several names: Ramath-lehi meaning, “height of the jawbone,” site of Samson's victory over the Philistines (Judges 15:17 ); Ramath-Mizpeh (alternately Ramath-Mizpah) meaning, “height of lookout or watchtower” (Joshua 13:26 ); Ramath-Negeb meaning, “Ramath of the South,” (Joshua 19:8 ; 1 Samuel 30:27 )
Hornet - Whence Zoreah is named (Joshua 15:38). , is perhaps figurative for I will send terror on them (Joshua 2:11; Deuteronomy 2:25), so that they will flee as if before a swarm of hornets
Baalath-Beer - ” A city in the tribal allotment of Simeon (Joshua 19:8 ), identified with Ramath of the south (KJV) or Ramah of the Negev (NAS, NIV, NRSV). It may be identical with Baal (1 Chronicles 4:33 ) and/or with Bealoth (Joshua 15:24 )
Naphath-Dor - (nay' fath-Dawwr) Designation of the region surrounding the coastal city of Dor about fifteen miles west of Megiddo (Joshua 12:23 ; 1 Kings 4:11 ). The alternate form Naphoth-Dor is used at Joshua 11:2
Jattir - A town of Judah in the southern mountains, a Levitical city ( Joshua 15:48 ; Joshua 21:14 , 1 Chronicles 6:42 )
Gibbethon - ) A town allotted to Dan (Joshua 19:44), afterwards to the Kohathite Levites (Joshua 21:23)
Ahimam - The three were slain by the tribe of Judah, and the whole race was cut off by Joshua (Joshua 11:21; Judges 1:10)
Zorah - ” City of Dan (Joshua 19:41 ) about thirteen miles west of Jerusalem on the border with Judah (Joshua 15:33 ; “Zoreah,” KJV)
Silence - "And the sun stood still, and the moon stayed," Joshua 10:12-13 , or were silent, at the commandment of Joshua
Beth-Aven - A place and desert near Bethel on the east, Joshua 7:2; Joshua 18:12; 1 Samuel 13:5; 1 Samuel 14:23; a name reproachfully used at times for Bethel itself, after the golden calves were there set up, Hosea 4:15; Hosea 10:5; Bethel meaning the "house of God
Taanach - A Caanite royal city, Joshua 12:21 , in the territory of Issachar, but assigned to Manesseh, Joshua 17:11 ; 21:25
ka'Nah - " (Joshua 19:28 ) ...
The river, a stream falling into the Mediterranean, which formed the division between the territories of Ephraim and Manasseh, the former on the sought, the latter on the north. (Joshua 16:8 ; 17:9 )
Ham'Math - ( Joshua 19:35 ) It was near Tiberias, one mile distant, and had its name Chammath, "hot baths," because it contained those of Tiberias. In the list of Levitical cities given out of Naphtali, (Joshua 21:32 ) the name of this place seems to be given as HAMMOTH-DOR
Jobab - King of Madon, conquered by Joshua. Joshua 11:1
Adadah - (ad' uh duh) Place name of city in southeastern Judah (Joshua 15:22 )
Shebarim - Breaks; ruins, a place near Ai (Joshua 7:5 ; RSV marg
Ashdodites, - the inhabitants of Ashdod, (Nehemiah 4:7 ) called Ashdothites in (Joshua 13:3 )
Betonim - boundary of Gad (Joshua 13:26)
Eshtemoh - (ehssh' tih moh) Variant Hebrew spelling of Eshtemoa (Joshua 15:50 )
Hadashah - A town in the shephelah or low hills of Judah (Joshua 15:37)
Keziz - Abrupt; cut off, a city of the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 18:21 )
Gazathite - (gay' zuhth ite) KJV spelling of Gazite in Joshua 13:3
Heshmon - An unknown town in the extreme south of Judah ( Joshua 15:27 )
Iim - A city of Judah ( Joshua 15:29 ); site unknown
Eleph - ) A town of Benjamin, whose inhabitants followed pastoral life (Joshua 18:28)
Ezem - In Joshua 19:3 AZEM
Nachor - (nay' kawr) KJV alternate form of Nahor (Joshua 24:2 ; Luke 3:34 )
Ithnan - A city in the Negeb of Judah ( Joshua 15:23 ); site uncertain
Allammelech - A town of Asher, probably near Acco ( Joshua 19:26 )
Kirjath-Jearim - The city of woods, Joshua 15:9 so called from Jahar, a forest
i'Ron - (pious ), one of the cities of Naphtali, ( Joshua 19:38 ) hitherto totally unknown
i'Ron - (pious ), one of the cities of Naphtali, ( Joshua 19:38 ) hitherto totally unknown
le'Shem - (precious stone ), another form of Laish, afterward Dan, occurring in ( Joshua 19:47 )
Zid'Dim - (the declivities ), a fortified town in the allotment of Naphtali, ( Joshua 10:35 )
Neiel - (Joshua 19:27) From Nuah, shaking—and El, God
Jokdeam - A city of Judah in the mountains (Joshua 15:56), S
Joshua - The first opportunity which Joshua had to signalize his valour was in the war made by the divine command against the Amalekites, Exodus 17:9-10 . When Moses ascended Mount Sinai to receive the law of the Lord, and remained there forty days and forty nights without eating or drinking, Joshua remained with him, though, in all probability, not in the same place, nor with the same abstinence, Exodus 24:13 ; Exodus 32:17 . Joshua was "filled with the spirit of wisdom," qualifying him for the arduous and important station of governing Israel, to which he was called by the special command of God, Numbers 27:18-20 ; Deuteronomy 31:7 ; Deuteronomy 31:14 ; Deuteronomy 34:9 ; Joshua 1:5 . His piety, courage, and disinterested integrity are conspicuous throughout his whole history; and, exclusive of the inspiration which enlightened his mind and writings, he derived divine information, sometimes by immediate revelation from God, Joshua 3:7 ; Joshua 5:13-15 ; at others from the sanctuary, through the medium of Eleazar, the high priest, the son of Aaron, who, having on the breast plate, presented himself before the mercy seat on which the Shechinah, or visible symbol of the divine presence, rested, and there consulted Jehovah by the Urim and Thummim, to which an answer was returned by an audible voice. ...
Joshua succeeded Moses in the government of Israel about the year of the world 2553, and died at Timnathserah in the hundred and tenth year of his age, A. He was about the age of eighty-four when he received the divine command to pass over Jordan, and take possession of the promised land, Joshua 1:1-2 . Having accomplished that arduous enterprise, and settled the chosen tribes in the peaceable possession of their inheritance, he retired to Shechem, or, according to some Greek copies, to Shiloh; where he assembled the elders of Israel, the heads of families, the judges and other officers; and, presenting themselves before God, he recapitulated the conduct of Divine Providence toward them, from the days of Abraham to that moment; recounted the miraculous and gracious dispensations of God toward their fathers and themselves; reminded them of their present enviable lot, and concluded his solemn address with an exhortation in these emphatic words: "Now, therefore, fear the Lord, and serve him in sincerity and truth; and put away the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the Lord," Joshua 24. ...
The book of Joshua continues the sacred history from the period of the death of Moses to that of the death of Joshua and of Eleazar; a space of about thirty years. It contains an account of the conquest and division of the land of Canaan, the renewal of the covenant with the Israelites, and the death of Joshua. " And from the twenty-fifth verse of the following chapter, it appears that the book was written before the death of Rahab: "And Joshua saved Rahab the harlot alive, and her father's household, and all that she had; and she dwelleth in Israel even unto this day; because she hid the messengers which Joshua sent to spy out Jericho. " Though there is not a perfect agreement among the learned concerning the author of this book, yet by far the most general opinion is, that it was written by Joshua himself; and, indeed, in the last chapter it is said that "Joshua wrote these words in the book of the law of God;" which expression seems to imply that he subjoined this history to that written by Moses. The last five verses, giving an account of the death of Joshua, were added by one of his successors; probably by Eleazar, Phinehas, or Samuel
Hadashah - A town in the Shephçlah of Judah ( Joshua 15:37 ); site unknown
Hazar-Gaddah - An unknown town in the extreme south of Judah ( Joshua 15:27 )
Zereth-Shahar - A Reubenite town ( Joshua 13:19 )
Hadattah - New, one of the towns in the extreme south of Judah (Joshua 15:25 )
Aznoth-Tabor - ) Marking the boundary of Naphtali (Joshua 19:24)
Bene-Berak - A city of Dan (Joshua 19:45)
Maralah - A landmark of Zebulun somewhere on the ridge of Carmel (Keil) (Joshua 19:11)
Bethgader - A place (Joshua 12:13, Geder), 1 Chronicles 2:51, occupied by Caleb's descendants
Arab - Ambush, a city in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:52 ), now Er-Rabiyeh
Jahazah - An alternate KJV form of Jahaz (Joshua 21:36 ; Jeremiah 48:21 )
Rakkon - A town of Dan, not far from Joppa; Yerakon in Septuagint (Joshua 19:46)
Tolad - El Tolad in Joshua 19:4
Ithlah - A town of Dan, near Aijalon ( Joshua 19:42 )
Adamah - of the sea of Galilee (Joshua 19:36)
Kedesh Naphtali - (Joshua 19:37)...
See Kadesh-Barnea
a'Mad - ( Joshua 19:26 ) only
Nibshan - A city of Judah, (Joshua 15:62) If from Shanah, it means to change
Nekeb - (Joshua 19:33) Nekeb, that bores, or makes a penetration
Jagur - Place of sojourn, a city on the southern border of Judah (Joshua 15:21 )
Jattir - Pre-eminent, a city in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:48 ; 21:14 )
Hexateuch - The term was coined by source critics impressed with the supposed similarity of sources behind Joshua and the Pentateuch as well as the need for fulfillment of the promise of land to Abraham in the conquest of Cannan. More recent scholarship has evidenced a renewed appreciation of the canonical arrangement in which Joshua begins the “former prophets” or history of Israel from its entrance into the Promised Land until its departure with the Exile. Joshua forms something of a bridge linking the promises to the Patriarchs and the story of Moses with the later history of Israel
en-Gannim - A town in the tribal territory of Judah located in the Shephalah (Joshua 15:34 ). Town in tribal territory of Issachar designated as city for Levites (Joshua 19:21 ; Joshua 21:29 )
Villages - chatser , an enclosure of huts; chatserot ; from a root "to enclose"; unwalled suburbs outside of walled towns (Joshua 13:23; Joshua 13:28; Joshua 15:32; Leviticus 25:31; Leviticus 25:34)
Jabin - In another account ( Joshua 11:1-9 ) of this episode the victory of the two tribes of Zebulun and Naphtali is represented as a conquest of the whole of northern Canaan by Joshua. Both accounts ( Joshua 11:1-9 , Judges 4:1-24 ) are fragments taken from an earlier, and more elaborate, source; the Jabin in each passage is therefore one and the same person
Captain - For he it was, most probably, that Joshua saw in vision, long before his incarnation, before the walls of Jericho, as captain of the Lord's host, and before whom Joshua fell on his face. (Joshua 5:13-15) It is very blessed to see and know the Lord Jesus under this character, and to fight under his banner
Dibon - It was built by Gad, Numbers 32:34, and hence called Dibon-gad; was assigned to Reuben, Joshua 13:9; Joshua 13:17; was also called Dimon. A town in the south of Judah, Nehemiah 11:25; the same as Dimonah, Joshua 15:22, and probably modern ed-Dheib
Zabdi - The grandfather of Achan ( Joshua 7:1 ; Joshua 7:17-18 ), called in 1 Chronicles 2:6 Zimri
Beth-Jeshimoth - Originally belonging to Sihon's kingdom; assigned to Reuben (Joshua 12:3; Joshua 13:20); afterward it became "the glory" of Moab (Ezekiel 25:9)
Ashan - (Joshua 15:42): a city of the low country of Judah. In 1 Chronicles 6:59 a priests' city; holding the same place as the similar Ain in Joshua's list (Joshua 21:16)
Moladah - A city in southern Judah, next Edom (Joshua 15:26), given to Simeon (Joshua 19:2; 1 Chronicles 4:28)
Kinah - border of Judah, next Edom (Joshua 15:22). " Some must be compound names, otherwise the list would exceed the number specified in Joshua 15:32
Kirjath-Arba - ), so called from the name of its founder, one of the Anakim (Genesis 23:2 ; 35:27 ; Joshua 15:13 ). It was given to Caleb by Joshua as his portion
Achzib -
A town in the Shephelah, or plain country of Judah (Joshua 15:44 ); probably the same as Chezib of Genesis 38:5 = Ain Kezbeh. Ecdippa), always retained in their possession though assigned to the tribe of Asher ( Joshua 19:29 ; Judges 1:31 )
Ziph - ...
...
A city in the south of Judah (Joshua 15:24 ), probably at the pass of Sufah. ...
...
A city in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:55 ), identified with the uninhabited ruins of Tell ez-Zif, about 5 miles south-east of Hebron
Bor-Ashan - It is usually equated with Asham, the town of Judah in which Simeon lived (Joshua 15:42 ; Joshua 19:7 )
Holon - A city of Judah in the Hebron hills, given to the Levites ( Joshua 15:51 ; Joshua 21:15 )
Misrephoth-Maim - (mihss' rih fahth may' ihm) Limit of pursuit of the coalition of King Jabin of Hazor (Joshua 11:8 ; Joshua 13:6 )
Beor - ]'>[1] , Joshua 24:9 , also Numbers 31:8 , Deuteronomy 23:4 , Joshua 13:22 , Micah 6:5 , 2 Peter 2:15 ( Bosor , AV Night March - Troops were sometimes positioned at night for an ambush or attack (Joshua 8:3 ; Joshua 10:9 ; Judges 9:32 ; 1 Samuel 14:36 )
Carmi - A Judahite, the father of Achan ( Joshua 7:1 ; Joshua 7:18 , 1 Chronicles 2:7 )
Eshtemoa - In the tribe of Judah ( Joshua 15:50 here called Eshtemoh ), a Levitical city in the district of Hebron ( Joshua 21:14 ), to which David sent a share of the spoil of the Philistines ( 1 Samuel 30:28 )
Lassharon - A town taken by Joshua ( Joshua 12:18 )
Achzib - Town in southern Judah, perhaps modern Tel el-Beida near Lachish (Joshua 15:44 ). A border town of Asher ( Joshua 19:29 ) which the Israelite tribe could not conquer (Judges 1:31 )
Gibbethon - A town belonging to the tribe of Dan, and a Levitical city ( Joshua 19:44 ; Joshua 21:23 )
Kirjathaim - Numbers 32:37 ; Joshua 13:19 . Probably the same as KARTAN in Joshua 21:32
Ach'Zib - (Joshua 15:44 ; Micah 1:14 ) It is probably the same with CHEZIB and CHOZEBA , which see. ...
A town belonging to Asher, (Joshua 19:29 ) from which the Canaanites were not expelled, (Judges 1:31 ) afterwards Ecdippa
Kirjath-Jearim, or Kirjath-Baal - Joshua 15:9,60 , a city of the Gibeonites afterwards given to Judah. It was on the confines of Benjamin, Joshua 18:14,15 , about nine miles from Jerusalem in the way to Lydda
Rekem - One of the five kinglets of Midian slain by Moses ( Numbers 31:8 , Joshua 13:21 ). An unidentified city of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:27 )
Nahal'al, - ( Joshua 21:35 ) It is the same which in (Joshua 19:15 ) is inaccurately given in the Authorized Version as Nahallal, the Hebrew being in both cases identical
Jiph'Thah-el - (which God opens ), The valley of, a valley which served as one of the landmarks for the boundary of both Zebulun, ( Joshua 19:14 ) and Asher. (Joshua 19:27 ) Dr
Eshtem'o-a, - and in shorter form Eshtemoh ( obedience ), a town of Judah in the mountains, ( Joshua 15:50 ) allotted to the priest. (Joshua 21:14 ; 1 Chronicles 6:57 ) It was one of the places frequented by David and his followers during the long period of their wanderings
Jarmuth -
A town in the plain of Judah (Joshua 15:35 ), originally the residence of one of the Canaanitish kings (10:3,5,23). ...
...
A Levitical city of the tribe of Issachar (Joshua 21:29 ), supposed by some to be the Ramah of Samuel (1 Samuel 19:22 )
Mizpah, Mizpeh - Some suppose it to be identical with RAMATH-MIZPEH in Joshua 13:26 ; and this to be the same as RAMOTH-GILEAD. LAND OF MIZPEH, the resort of the Hivites, who joined with Jabin to attack Joshua. It was 'under Hermon,' and therefore in the north of Palestine, Joshua 11:3 ; this is possibly the same as ...
3. VALLEY OF MIZPEH to which Joshua chased the allies. Joshua 11:8 . Joshua 15:38 . Joshua 18:26
Shahazumah - A town allotted to Issachar ( Joshua 19:22 )
Hammoth-Dor - Warm springs, a Levitical city of Naphtali (Joshua 21:32 ); probably Hammath in 19:35
en-Hazor - ) A fenced city in the territory of Naphtali (Joshua 19:37)
Drawer of Water - (Deuteronomy 29:11 ; Joshua 9:21,23 ), a servile employment to which the Gibeonites were condemned
Jeshuah - See Jeshua ; Joshua
Haphraim - A city of Issachar (Joshua 19:19), or "the two pits
Bealoth - of Judah (Joshua 15:24)
Geder - A walled place, (Joshua 12:13 ), perhaps the same as Gederah or Gedor (15:58)
Hazar-Gaddah - of Judah (Joshua 15:27)
Beth-Palet - (behth-paz' zehz) KJV spelling in Joshua 15:27 of Beth-pelet
Bealoth - BEALOTH ( Joshua 15:24 )
Beth-Lebaoth - BETH-LEBAOTH ( Joshua 19:6 ‘house of lionesses’?)
Evi - One of the five kings of Midian slain ( Numbers 31:8 , Joshua 13:21 )
Adithaim - ADITHAIM ( Joshua 15:36 )
Lachish - A city south of Judah, Joshua 10:23
Neah - (Joshua 19:13) The word Neah or Noch, means a city
Jebu'si - (Joshua 15:8 ; 18:16,28 )
Beth-Horon - Joshua used the road to chase the coalition of southern kings led by the king of Jerusalem (Joshua 10:10 ). The border between the tribes of Ephraim and Benjamin was at Beth-horon (Joshua 16:3 ,Joshua 16:3,16:5 ; Joshua 18:13-14 ). The city belonged to Ephraim but was set aside for the Levites (Joshua 21:22 )
Azekah - City where Joshua defeated southern coalition of kings led by Adonizedek of Jerusalem (Joshua 10:10 ), as God cast hailstones from heaven on the fleeing armies. In the battle Joshua commanded the sun and moon to stand still (Joshua 10:12 ). Joshua allotted it to Judah (Joshua 15:35 )
Judah Territory of - — The district assigned to the tribe of Judah in the Promised Land, with its cities, is described in Joshua 15:1-63. Joshua 19:1-9. Joshua 15:33-47. Joshua 15:48-60. Joshua 15:61-62. Joshua 15:21-62
Ibleam - ” City in tribal territory of Issachar but given to tribe of Manasseh (Joshua 17:11 ). Many Bible students think Ibleam was the original reading for the Levite city in Joshua 21:25 , where the Hebrew text now reads “Gath-rimmon,” also read in Joshua 21:24 . A copyist may have copied the name from Joshua 21:24 into Joshua 21:25
Og - His rule extended over sixty cities, of which the two chief were Ashtaroth and Edrei ( Joshua 12:4 ). The whole of his kingdom was assigned to the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and half-Manasseh ( Deuteronomy 3:1-13 , Numbers 32:33 ; see also Deuteronomy 1:4 ; Deuteronomy 4:47 ; Deuteronomy 31:4 , Joshua 2:10 ; Joshua 9:10 ; Joshua 13:12 ; Joshua 13:30 )
Shiloh - There that the nation’s leaders set up the tabernacle and the people held religious festivals (Joshua 18:1; Joshua 18:8-10; Joshua 19:51; Joshua 22:9; Joshua 22:12; Judges 18:31; Judges 21:19-21; 1 Samuel 1:3; 1 Samuel 1:9; 1 Samuel 3:21; 1 Samuel 4:3)
Machir - Oldest son of Manasseh and grandson of Joseph (Joshua 17:1 ). He was the father of Gilead (Joshua 17:1 ), Peresh, and Sheresh (1 Chronicles 7:16 ), and a daughter whose name is not given (1 Chronicles 2:21 ). Apparently Machir along with his family had a reputation for being expert warriors (Joshua 17:1 ). “Because he was a man of war,” Machir was allotted the territory of Bashan and Gilead, east of the Jordan (Joshua 17:1 ). Apparently the territory of the Machirites started at the site of Mahanaim, on the Jabbok River, extended northward, and included the region around the Yarmuk River (Joshua 13:29-31 )
a'Phek -
A royal city of the Canaanites, the king of which was killed by Joshua, (Joshua 12:18 ) probably the same as APHEKAH in (Joshua 15:53 ) ...
A city, apparently in the extreme north of Asher, (Joshua 19:30 ) from which the Canaanites were not ejected, (Judges 1:31 ) though here it is APHIK . This is probably the same place as APHEK, (Joshua 13:4 ) on the extreme north "border of the Amorites,"; identified with the Aphaca of classical times, the modern Afka
Rimmon - A city in the south of Judah, towards the border of Edom, Joshua 15:32 ; in Joshua 19:7 counted to Simeon; In Zechariah 14:10 named as lying to the far south of Jerusalem. In Joshua 19:13 one of the boundaries of Zebulun is given as ‘Rimmon which stretcheth to the Nç‘âh’ (AV [2] the name appears as Rimmono , and in Joshua 21:35 as Rimmonah (for which, by a textual error, MT Beth-Shemesh -
A sacerdotal city in the tribe of Dan (Joshua 21:16 ; 1 Samuel 6:15 ), on the north border of Judah (Joshua 15:10 ). ...
...
A city between Dothan and the Jordan, near the southern border of Issachar (Joshua 19:22 ), 7 1/2 miles south of Beth-shean. ...
...
One of the fenced cities of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:38 ), between Mount Tabor and the Jordan
Jabin - ” King of Hazor (Joshua 11:1 ; Judges 4:1 ; Psalm 83:10 ). Leader of northern coalition of kings who attacked Joshua at the water of Merom and met their death (compare Joshua 12:19-24 ). This Jabin must certainly be differentiated from the one Joshua fought, leading to the assumption by many scholars that a dynasty of kings in Hazor carried the name Jabin
Ephraim - He was the progenitor of the tribe of Ephraim, which occupied a region slightly to the northwest of the Dead Sea (Joshua 16:1 ) and was the leading tribe of the Northern Kingdom, ever ready to assert its rights (Joshua 17:15 ; Judges 3:27 ; Judges 4:5 ; Judges 7:24-8:3 ; Judges 12:1 ). Joshua was an Ephraimite (Joshua 19:50 )
Libnah - See Joshua 10:29-30 ). Joshua allotted it to the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:42 ) and separated it as a city for the Levites (Joshua 21:13 )
Achan - Son of Carmi, of the tribe of Judah ( Joshua 7:1 ). It is brought home to Joshua ( Joshua 7:8-12 ) that the defeat at Ai was due to the fact of Jahweh’s covenant having been transgressed. According to Joshua 7:25-26 , this valley was so called after Achan, the ‘troubler’ of Israel
Alliance - On the Israelites entering into Canaan they were forbidden to make any league with the people of the land, they were not to show them any mercy, nor to make any marriages with them, Deuteronomy 7:2,3 ; and later, when Joshua was about to die, he said to them, that with the nations that were still left they were to make no marriages, nor to go in unto them. Joshua 23:12,13 . Joshua and the princes of Israel were, alas, deceived by the Gibeonites, and without seeking counsel of God they made a covenant with them. Joshua 9:3-21
Rephaim - Og, king of Bashan, was one of the posterity of the Rephaim, Joshua 12:4 . Also in the time of Joshua there were some of their descendants in the land of Canaan, Joshua 17; Joshua 15
Ajalon - A town in the tribe of Dan, assigned to the Levites, sons of Kohath, Joshua 19:42; Joshua 21:24; Judges 1:35, and a city of refuge. The valley is the place where Joshua commanded the sun and moon to stand still, and they obeyed him. Joshua 10:12; see also 1 Samuel 14:31
Kedesh - A town on the southern boundary of Judah, Joshua 15:23; perhaps identical with Kadesh or Kadesh-barnea. In the parallel list, Joshua 21:28, its name is Kishon. A fortified city belonging to the tribe of Naphtali; allotted to the Gershonite Levites, Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:32; 1 Chronicles 6:76, and made a city of refuge
ba'Shan - " (3:10,13; Joshua 12:5 ; 13:12,30 ) It was taken by the children of Israel after their conquest of the land of Sihon from Arnon to Jabbok. It extended from the "border of Gilead" on the south to Mount Hermon on the north, (3:3,10,14; Joshua 12:5 ; 1 Chronicles 5:23 ) and from the Arabah or Jordan valley on the west to Salchah (Sulkhad ) and the border of the Geshurites and the Maachathites on the east. ( Joshua 12:3-5 ; 3:10) This important district was bestowed on the half-tribe of Manasseh, (Joshua 13:29-31 ) together with "half Gilead
ha'Zer, - ( Numbers 34:4 ) ADAR (Joshua 15:3 ) ...
HAZAR-ENAN (village of fountains ), the place at which the northern boundary of the land promised to the children of Israel was to terminate. Ezekiel 47:17 ; 48:1 ...
HAZAB GADDAH (village of fortune ), one of the towns in the southern district of Judah, ( Joshua 15:27 ) named between Moladah and Heshmon. ( Joshua 15:28 ; 19:3 ; 1 Chronicles 4:28 ) ...
HAZAR-SUSAH (village of horses ), one of the "cities" allotted to Simeon in the extreme south of the territory of Judah. ( Joshua 19:5 )
Amad - City allotted to tribe of Asher (Joshua 19:26 )
Shikkeron - A place on the northern boundary of Judah ( Joshua 15:11 )
te'Lah - (vigor ), a descendant of Ephraim, and ancestor of Joshua
Janim - (jay' nihm) Modern translation spelling of Janum following written Hebrew text (Joshua 15:53 )
Kattath - (Joshua 19:15 ), a town of Asher, has been identified with Kana el Jelil
Telah - ” An ancestor of Joshua (1 Chronicles 7:25 )
Dimonah - A city in southern Judah, near the Idumean desert (Joshua 15:22 Dibon), Nehemiah 11:25
Jagur - A town in the extreme south of Judah ( Joshua 15:21 )
Jearim, Mount - Mentioned only in Joshua 15:10 , where it is identified with Chesalon (wh
Leshem - A form, occurring only in Joshua 19:47 bis , of the name Laish (see Dan)
Maon - A city of Judah, (Joshua 15:55) The word means an habitation
Hazaraddar - Called ADAR in Joshua 15:3
Bethpalet - Joshua 15:27 : called BETH-PHELET in Nehemiah 11:26
Amam - AMAM ( Joshua 15:26 only)
Hannathon - border of Zebulun, Joshua 19:14
Jokdeam - A city of Judah ( Joshua 15:58 ), whose site has not been identified
Shihon - A town of Issachar (Joshua 19:19)
Humtah - (Joshua 15:54) Humtah is the Hebrew word for snail
ho'Sah - (refuge ), a city of Asher, ( Joshua 19:29 ) The next landmark on the boundary to Tyre
Nahalal - (Joshua 19:15) The meaning of this name is strength, from Hallal
Dimonah - City in the south of Judah, Joshua 15:22 : perhaps the same as DIBON, No
Ebez - A city of Issachar ( Joshua 19:20 )
Rab'Bith - ( Joshua 18:20 ) only
ho'Sah - (refuge ), a city of Asher, ( Joshua 19:29 ) The next landmark on the boundary to Tyre
Ai - The repulse of the Israelite attempt on the city ( Joshua 7:2-5 ) led to the exposure of the crime of Achan; when that was expiated, the city was captured and destroyed ( Joshua 8:1-28 ) by a ruse. It never reappears in history, though it continued to be inhabited: it is the Aiath in Isaiah’s description of the march of the Assyrian ( Joshua 10:28 ), and the Aija of Nehemiah 11:31 . This, however, cannot in any case be the same place, which was within the tribe of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:23 , where Avvim is possibly a corruption for the name of this city). That the city was insignificant is definitely stated in Joshua 7:3 , and indicated by the fact that in the list of captured cities it is almost the only one of which the situation is specified ( Joshua 12:9 ). Its capture, however, made a deep impression on the Canaanites ( Joshua 9:3 ; Joshua 10:1 )
Josh'ua - Moses, shortly before his death, was directed, (Numbers 27:18 ) to invest Joshua with authority over the people. God himself gave Joshua a charge by the mouth of the dying lawgiver. (31:14,23) Under the direction of God again renewed, (Joshua 1:1 ) Joshua assumed the command of the people at Shittim, sent spies into Jericho, crossed the Jordan, fortified a camp at Gilgal, circumcised the people, kept the passover, and was visited by the Captain of the Lord's host. Joshua returned to the camp at Gilgal, master of half of Palestine. Joshua, now stricken in years, proceeded to make the division of the conquered land. Timnath-serah in Mount Ephraim was assigned as Joshua's peculiar inheritance. After an interval of rest, Joshua convoked an assembly from all Israel. He delivered two solemn addresses, recorded in (Joshua 23:24 ) He died at the age of 110 years, and was buried in his own city, Timnath-serah
Holon - Town in the hill country of Judah allotted to tribe of Judah and given as city for Levites (Joshua 15:51 ; Joshua 21:15 )
Iim - Town on southern border of tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:29 ). Its location is not known, and it does not appear in parallel lists in Joshua 19:3 ; 1 Chronicles 4:29
Ashdoth-Pisgah - (Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 12:3 ; 13:20 ) in Authorized Version, but in Revised Version translated "slopes of Pisgah. " The name Ashdoth is translated "springs" in the Authorized Version, but "slopes" in the Revised Version, of Joshua 10:40,12:8
Achzib - City of Judah, Joshua 15:44 ; Micah 1:14 : probably the same that is called elsewhere CHEZIB and perhaps CHOZEBA. Joshua 19:29 ; Judges 1:31
Azekah - City in the plain of Judah with adjacent villages, near Shochoh, the scene of one of Joshua's victories. Joshua 10:10,11 ; Joshua 15:35 ; 1 Samuel 17:1 ; 2 Chronicles 11:9 ; Nehemiah 11:30 ; Jeremiah 34:7
Hail - A hail-storm destroyed the army of the Amorites when they fought against Joshua (Joshua 10:11 )
Nahalal - A town of Zebulun ( Joshua 19:15 ), given to the Levites ( Joshua 21:35 )
Kedemoth - ” One of the Levitical cities in the tribal territory of Reuben assigned to the family of Merari (Joshua 13:18 ; Joshua 21:37 ; 1 Chronicles 6:79 )
Adummim - The Ascent of ( Joshua 15:7 ; Joshua 18:17 ), is the steep pass in which the road ascends from Jericho to Jerusalem
Geder - An unidentified Canaanitish town, whose king was amongst those conquered by Joshua ( Joshua 12:13 only)
Kirjath-Sepher - This was the portion which Joshua assigned to Caleb, and it was called Debir before. See Joshua 14:6-7 and Judges 1:10-13
Eglon - Joshua 10:3-5; Joshua 15:39; now ʾAjlan, a hill of ruins, ten miles northeast of Gaza
Aijalon - a city of the Canaanites; the valley adjoining to which is memorable in sacred history from the miracle of Joshua, in arresting the course of the sun and moon, that the Israelites might have sufficient light to pursue their enemies, Joshua 10:12-13
Libnah - A city in the western part of Judah, not far from Lachish, conquered by Joshua from the Canaanites, and assigned to the priests, Joshua 10:29,30 15:42 21:13 1 Chronicles 6:57
Kenizzites - They appear to have mingled with other Canaanites, and lost their distinctive name before the time of Joshua. Two men so named are mentioned in Bible history, both subsequent to the Kenizzites, Genesis 36:15,42 ; Joshua 14:6 ; 15:17
go'Lan - (circle ), a city of Bashan, (4:43) allotted out of the half tribe of Manasseh to the Levites, ( Joshua 21:27 ) and one of the three cities of refuge east of the Jordan. ch (Joshua 20:8 ) Its very site is now unknown
Hail - A hail-storm destroyed the army of the Amorites when they fought against Joshua (Joshua 10:11 )
Ajalon or Aijalon - A town in the tribe of Dan, assigned to the Levites, sons of Kohath, Joshua 21:24 . The valley lies towards the north, and is the place where Joshua commanded the sun and moon to stand still, and they obeyed him, Joshua 10:12 ...
2
Aroer - An ancient city on the north side of the Arnon, in the southern border of the tribe of Reuben, Deuteronomy 2:36 4:48 Joshua 13:9 . It was in the territory of the Amorites, Joshua 12:2 , but seems to have fallen at a later day into the hands of Moab, Jeremiah 48:19 . A town in the tribe of God, probably east of Rabbath-Ammon, Joshua 13:25 , and perhaps on the Jabbok, 2 Samuel 24:5
Adullam - An ancient city in the plain of Judah, southwest of Jerusalem, Genesis 38:1 Joshua 15:35 . Its king was slain by Joshua, Joshua 12:15
Kerioth-Hezron - KJV takes the Hebrew to refer to two cities in Joshua 15:25 —thus, Kerioth and Hezron. Hezron would be identified with the city of Hazor mentioned in Joshua 15:23 , a city in the south of Judah near Kadesh-barnea (Joshua 15:3 )
Ain - A southern city of Judah, afterward of Simeon, then assigned to the priests (Joshua 15:32; Joshua 19:7; Joshua 21:16)
Ajalon Aijalon - It was in the lot of Dan, Joshua 21:24 ; but being a border city it is also connected with Benjamin, 1 Chronicles 8:13 ; or with Ephraim, 1 Chronicles 6:69 ; or with Judah and Benjamin, when Rehohoam fortified the city. THE VALLEY OF AJALON is the place where Joshua, when pursuing the Amorites, bade the sun and the moon stand still. Joshua 10:12
Rimmon - A town of Palestine, near the frontier of Edom, Joshua 15:21,32 Zechariah 14:10 , in the region assigned to the tribe of Simeon, Joshua 19:7 1 Chronicles 4:32 Nehemiah 11:29 . A city of Zebulun, assigned to the Levites, Joshua 19:13 ; perhaps the same as Rimmono, 1 Chronicles 6:77 , which may be traced in the modern village Rimmaneh, northwest of mount Tabor
Adonizedec - Gibeon sent to Joshua for help and the five kings were overcome. Joshua 10:1-27 . Letters from Adonizedec entreating the king of Egypt to send soldiers to defend him from the Abiri (Hebrews) have been found among the Tell Amarna Tablets (see under EGYPT) These letters give a vivid account, from a Canaanitish point of view, of the wars which took place when Joshua took possession of the land
Joshua, Book of - The subject of the book of Joshua is the conquest and division of the land of Canaan. He was succeeded by the man from whom the book of Joshua takes its name. ...
Authorship, style and purpose...
There is no statement in the book of Joshua telling us who wrote it, though some of the material may have been based on what Joshua himself wrote (e. Joshua 24:25-26). The writer probably also used other historical books of that era (Joshua 10:13), along with national and tribal records (Joshua 18:8-9). ...
Although it outlines the conquest of Canaan, the book of Joshua does not give a detailed record of events. The battle for Canaan lasted a long time (Joshua 11:18), at least five years (Joshua 14:7; Joshua 14:10), yet some of the more extensive battle campaigns are passed over in a few verses. (For the prophetical significance of the group of books to which Joshua belongs, the Former Prophets, see PROPHECY. Nevertheless, the people, and particularly Joshua, must be courageous, trusting and obedient to God if their invasion is to be successful (1:1-18). The appearance of the angel of the Lord further demonstrated that the entire operation was divinely directed (3:1-5:15; see also Joshua THE SON OF NUN). )...
With Canaan now the possession of Israel, Joshua, together with the high priest and the tribal leaders, began the task of dividing the land between the twelve tribes. ...
Apart from the story of an early misunderstanding between the eastern and western tribes (22:1-34), nothing more is recorded of the era till the time of Joshua’s final address to the nation many years later (23:1-16). Before he died, Joshua called Israel’s leaders to assemble for another covenant renewal ceremony
Reba - One of the five kinglets of Midian slain by Moses ( Numbers 31:8 , Joshua 13:21 )
ma-al'eh-Acrab'Bim - (ascent of scorpions ), the full form of the name given as AKRABBIM in (Joshua 15:3 ) [1]
Nibshan - Fertile; light soil, a city somewhere "in the wilderness" of Judah (Joshua 15:62 ), probably near Engedi
Beth-Tappuah - House of apples, a town of Judah, now Tuffuh, 5 miles west of Hebron (Joshua 15:53 )
Bethanath - A fenced city of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38), whence the Canaanites were not expelled (Judges 1:33)
Geliloth - Circles; regions, a place in the border of Benjamin (Joshua 18:17 ); called Gilgal in 15:7
Anak - Long-necked, the son of Arba, father of the Anakim (Joshua 15:13 ; 21:11 , Heb
Gibeath - (gihb' ih ath) Alternative Hebrew spelling for Gibeah (Joshua 18:28 ) preserved in KJV spelling
Maralah - A place on the west border of Zebulun ( Joshua 19:11 )
Nibshan - A city in the desert of Judah ( Joshua 15:62 )
Hilen - Holon in Joshua 21:15
Chesulloth - In Issachar (Joshua 19:18)
Eleph - ELEPH ( Joshua 18:28 only)
Kartan - A city of Naphtali ( Joshua 21:32 )
Middin - A town in the wilderness of Judah ( Joshua 15:61 )
Migdal-el - A town of Naphtali’ ( Joshua 19:33 ) between Iron and Horem
Makkedah - A place rendered memorable by Joshua's victory over it. (See Joshua 10:29) The word means adoration
Bethbirei - Apparently the same as BETH-LEBAOTH in Joshua 19:6
Hukkok - (Joshua 19:31) probably Chakak, so called, meaning statutes, writings
Kirjath-Arba - The city of four; Arba, four, being joined to it, Joshua 15:13
ir-She'Mesh - (city of the sun ), a city of the Danites ( Joshua 19:41 ) probably identical with Beth-shemesh
Oshea - (oh' sshee uh) KJV alternate form of Hoshea (Joshua) at Numbers 13:8 ,Numbers 13:8,13:16
Joshua - ), and Jesus in Acts 7:45 and Hebrews 4:8 (RSV, Joshua). Under the direction of God, Moses, before his death, invested Joshua in a public and solemn manner with authority over the people as his successor (Deuteronomy 31:23 ). The people were encamped at Shittim when he assumed the command (Joshua 1:1 ); and crossing the Jordan, they encamped at Gilgal, where, having circumcised the people, he kept the Passover, and was visited by the Captain of the Lord's host, who spoke to him encouraging words (1:1-9). ...
Now began the wars of conquest which Joshua carried on for many years, the record of which is in the book which bears his name. Six nations and thirty-one kings were conquered by him (Joshua 11:18-23 ; 12:24 ). Having thus subdued the Canaanites, Joshua divided the land among the tribes, Timnath-serah in Mount Ephraim being assigned to himself as his own inheritance. He was buried in his own city of Timnath-serah (Joshua 24 ); and "the light of Israel for the time faded away. " ...
Joshua has been regarded as a type of Christ (Hebrews 4:8 ) in the following particulars: (1) In the name common to both; (2) Joshua brings the people into the possession of the Promised Land, as Jesus brings his people to the heavenly Canaan; and (3) as Joshua succeeded Moses, so the Gospel succeeds the Law. ...
The character of Joshua is thus well sketched by Edersheim:, "Born a slave in Egypt, he must have been about forty years old at the time of the Exodus
Hazor -
A stronghold of the Canaanites in the mountains north of Lake Merom (Joshua 11:1-5 ). Jabin the king with his allied tribes here encountered Joshua in a great battle. Joshua gained a signal victory, which virtually completed his conquest of Canaan (11:10-13). The result was one of the most remarkable victories for Israel recorded in the Old Testament (Joshua 19:36 ; Jeremiah 49:28-33 ; 1 Samuel 12:9 ). ...
...
A city in the south of Judah (Joshua 15:23 ). ...
...
"Kerioth and Hezron" (Joshua 15 :: 25 ) should be "Kerioth-hezron" (as in the RSV), the two names being joined together as the name of one place (e
Gibeon - The leading city of the four which beguiled Joshua into making a league with them, on the plea of their being far distant. Joshua 9:3-17 . When the Amorites attacked Gibeon, because they had made peace with Israel, Joshua hastened to their deliverance, and to lengthen the daylight he said, "Sun, stand thou still upon Gibeon. " Joshua 10:1-41 . Joshua 18:25 ; Joshua 21:17
Jericho - (See Joshua 6:1-27) It was situated about seven leagues from Jerusalem, and about two from the river Jordan, (Joshua 18:20-21) and was called by Moses the city of palm trees; and, no doubt, in point of pleasantness, must have been a lovely place. There is somewhat particularly striking concerning Jericho being cursed by Joshua before the Lord, and yet that Rahab the harlot should be of this city, concerning whom such blessed things are spoken of in Scripture. (See on the one hand, Joshua 6:26 compared with 1 Kings 16:34; and on the other, see Joshua 2:1-24 with Hebrews 11:31) If the reader will be at the trouble to count the period between Joshua's curse on Jericho, and the rebuilding of Jericho by Hiel the Bethelite, he will find that near five hundred and thirty-seven years had passed between the one and the other. The Hebrews paid great respect to the Cherem, that is, the curse of Joshua
Irpeel - A city of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:27 ); possibly the ruin Rafât , N
Rabbith - A town of Issachar ( Joshua 19:20 ), probably the modern Râba , on the S
Shilhim - Aqueducts, a town in the south of Judah (Joshua 15:32 ); called also Sharuhen and Shaaraim (19:6)
Mashal - Entreaty, a levitical town in the tribe of Asher (1 Chronicles 6:74 ); called Mishal (Joshua 21:30 )
Girgashites - (See CANAAN) Joshua 24:11
Almon - Hidden, one of the sacerdotal cities of Benjamin (Joshua 21:18 ), called also Alemeth (1 Chronicles 6:60 )
Dannah - Murmuring, a city (Joshua 15:49 ) in the mountains of Judah about 8 miles south-west of Hebron
Taralah - ” Unidentified site in Benjamin, likely northwest of Jerusalem (Joshua 18:27 )
Maaleh-Acrabbim - Joshua 15:3 AV Sansan'Nah - (palm branch ), one of the towns in the south district of Judah, named in ( Joshua 15:31 ) only
Janim - A town in the mountains of Hebron, near Beth-tappuah ( Joshua 15:53 )
Kinah - A town in the extreme south of Judah ( Joshua 15:22 )
Remmon - A city, Joshua 19:7
Secacah - One of Judah's six cities in the midbar or wilderness bordering on the Dead Sea (Joshua 15:61)
Zemaraim - Joshua 18:22 : Identified with ruins at es Sumrah, 31 55' N, 35 29' E
Mearah - (See Joshua 13:4) It should seem to have been a cavern, or cave, as Mahar, a cavern
a'Bez - (lofty ), a town in the possession of Issachar, named between Kishion and Remeth in ( Joshua 19:20 ) only
Beth-pa'Let - (house of flight ), a town among those in the extreme south of Judah, named in ( Joshua 15:27 )
Jok'de-an - (possessed by the people ), a city of Judah, in the mountains, ( Joshua 15:56 ) apparently south of Hebron
Ben-eb'Erak - (son of lightning ), one of the cities of the tribe of Dan, mentioned only in ( Joshua 19:45 )
Aphe'Kah - (strong place ), a city of Judah, in the mountains ( Joshua 15:53 ) probably the same as APHEK , 1
Jericho - The course of events, from the sending of the spies to the destruction of Achan for infraction of the tabu on the spoil, is too well known to need repetition here (see Joshua 1:1-18 ; Joshua 2:1-24 ; Joshua 3:1-17 ; Joshua 4:1-24 ; Joshua 5:1-15 ; Joshua 6:1-27 ; Joshua 7:1-26 ). A small hamlet remained on the site, belonging to Benjamin ( Joshua 18:21 ), which was insignificant enough for David’s ambassadors to retire to, to recover from their insulting treatment by Hanun ( 2 Samuel 10:5 , 1 Chronicles 19:5 ). The city was re-founded by Hiel, a Bethelite, who apparently endeavoured to avert the curse pronounced by Joshua over the site by sacrificing his sons ( 1 Kings 16:34 )
Kirjath Jearim - Its other names BAALAH, BAALE of Judah, KIRJATH BAAL, betray its original connection with Baal worship (Joshua 15:9; Joshua 15:60; Joshua 18:14; 1 Chronicles 13:3; 1 Chronicles 13:6). Called simply Kirjath and assigned to Benjamin (Joshua 18:28). It was one of the four Gibeonite cities which obtained peace with Israel by deceit (Joshua 9:17)
Beth-Horon - Here Joshua defeated the Canaanites ( Joshua 10:10-14 ). The Beth-horons were on the frontier between Benjamin and Ephraim ( Joshua 16:3-5 ; Joshua 18:13-14 ). They belonged to the latter ( Joshua 21:22 ), and followed the Northern Kingdom
Gilgal - A celebrated place between the Jordan and Jericho, where the Israelites first encamped, after the passage of that river; where also they were circumcised, and kept their first Passover in Canaan, Joshua 4:19 5:9,10 . It continued to be the headquarters of the Israelites for several years, while Joshua was occupied in subduing the land, Joshua 9:6 10:6,15,43 . A considerable city was afterwards built there, Joshua 15:7 , which became famous for many events. Another Gilgol lay near Antipatris, Joshua 12:23 Nehemiah 12:29
Timnah -
A town of Judah (Joshua 15:10 ). It has been identified with Timnatha of Dan (Joshua 19:43 ), and also with Timnath (Judges 14:1,5 )
Ether - Town in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:42 ). A town occupied by tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:7 )
Beth-Dagon - A city of Judah ( Joshua 15:41 ), somewhere in the Shephelah. A border city in the tribe of Asher ( Joshua 19:27 ), not yet discovered
Michmethah - The word occurs only in Joshua 16:6 ; Joshua 17:7 , in each case with the article, therefore probably not a proper name
Arbite - Joshua 16:2 and ‘Hushai the Archite,’ 2 Samuel 15:32 ; but a place ‘Arab. of Judah, is mentioned Joshua 15:52
zo'Rah - (hornet ), a town in the allotment of the tribe of Dan, ( Joshua 19:41 ) It is previously mentioned ch. (Joshua 15:33 ) in the catalogue of Judah, among the places in the district of the Shefelah (Authorized Version "Zoreah"), It was the residence of Manoah and the native place of Samson
Peor - Abbreviated form of Baal-Peor (lord of Peor), a god whom the Israelites were led to worship (Numbers 25:18 ; Numbers 31:16 ; Joshua 22:17 ). See Joshua 15:59 REB, following the earliest Greek translation)
Kirjathaim - It fell within the limits of the tribe of Reuben, Numbers 32:37 Joshua 13:19 ...
2. A Levitical city in Naphtali, 1 Chronicles 6:76 ; called Kartan, in Joshua 21:32
Arba - An ancestor of the Anakim, and founder of Hebron, to which he gave its ancient name, Joshua 15:13
Sansannah - ]'>[1] ‘the South’) allotted to Judah ( Joshua 15:31 )
Sheshai - A clan resident in Hebron, driven thence by Caleb ( Numbers 13:22 , Joshua 15:14 , Judges 1:10 )
Nun - Beyond the fact that he was the father of Joshua nothing more is known of him (Exodus 33:11 )
Hukkok - Decreed, a town near Zebulun, not far from Jordan, on the border of Naphtali (Joshua 19:34 )
Irshemesh - ) In Dan (Joshua 19:41)
Cain (2) - ) A city in the low hilly country (shephelah ) of Judah (Joshua 15:57)
Archi - A city on the boundary of Ephraim and Benjamin (Joshua 16:2 ), between Bethel and Beth-horon the nether
Kithlish - A man's wall, a town in the plain of Judah (Joshua 15:40 )
Sallai - ...
...
A priest in the days of Joshua and Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 12:20 )
Reba - Fourth, one of the Midianite chiefs slain by the Israelites in the wilderness (Numbers 31:8 ; Joshua 13:21 )
Kishion - Hardness, a city of Issachar assigned to the Gershonite Levites (Joshua 19:20 ), the same as Kishon (21:28)
Horem - A city of Naphtali in the mountains ( Joshua 19:38 ); prob
Maarath - A town of Judah ( Joshua 15:59 )
si'Rach, - the father of Jesus (Joshua), the writer of the Hebrew original of the book of Ecclesiasticus
Janum - A town of Judah in the mountain district near Hebron (Joshua 15:53)
Ummah - A city of Asher's allotment (Joshua 19:30)
Jehud - A town of Dan (Joshua 19:45)
Naaran - (nay' uh ran) City allotted to Ephraim, likely identical with Naarah (1 Chronicles 7:28 ; compare Joshua 16:7 )
Biziothiah - BIZIOTHIAH ( Joshua 15:28 )
Eth-Kazin - frontier of Zebulnn, whose site has not been identified ( Joshua 19:13 )
Ahihud - Prince of Asher; assisted Joshua and Eleazar in dividing Canaan (Numbers 34:27)
Zaanan - Probably the same as ZENAN in Joshua 15:37
Shicron - end of the northern boundary of Judah (Joshua 15:11); between Ekron and Jabneel
a'Mam - (gathering place ), a city in the south of Judah named with Shema and Moladah in ( Joshua 15:26 ) only
je'Hud - (praised ), one of the towns of the tribe of Dan, ( Joshua 19:45 ) named between Baalath and Bene-berak
Madmannah - A city near Gaza, first assigned to Judah, and afterwards to Simeon, Joshua 15:31 1 Chronicles 2:49
Mig'Dal-Gad - (tower of Gad ), a city of Judah, ( Joshua 15:37 ) in the district of the Shefelah, or maritime lowland
Gederotha'im - (two sheepfolds ), a town in the low country of Judah, ( Joshua 15:36 ) named next in order to Gederah
ho'Ham - ( Joshua 10:3 ) (B
Dimo'Nah, - a city in the south of Judah, (Joshua 15:22 ) perhaps the same as DIBON in (Nehemiah 11:25 )
Conquest of Canaan - The Book of Joshua and the first chapter of the book of Judges describe the conquest of Canaan, which resulted in Israel's settlement in the land of promise. ...
Joshua's Strategy Joshua led a three-campaign invasion of Canaan. ...
After Moses died, Joshua became the new leader of the Israelites. As God instructed him, Joshua led the people across the Jordan River into Canaan. The crossing was made possible by a supernatural separation of the water of the Jordan (Joshua 3-4 ). From there Joshua led the first military campaign against the Canaanites in the sparsely-populated central highlands, northwest of the Dead Sea. In response the walls of Jericho collapsed, allowing the invaders to destroy the city (Joshua 6:1 ). After Achan was executed, the Israelites were able to destroy Ai (Joshua 7-8 ). One group, the Gibeonites, avoided destruction by deceiving the Israelites into making a covenant of peace with them (Joshua 9:1 ). The kings threatened to attack the Gibeonites, causing Joshua to come to the defense of his new allies. Joshua then launched a southern campaign which resulted in the capture of numerous Canaanite cities (Joshua 10:1 ). ...
Joshua's third and last military campaign was in northern Canaan. Joshua made a surprise attack upon them at the waters of Merom, utterly defeating his foe (Joshua 11:1-15 ). ...
The invasion of Canaan met with phenomenal success; large portions of the land fell to the Israelites (Joshua 11:16-12:24 ). However, some areas still remained outside their control, such as the heavily-populated land along the coast and several major Canaanite cities like Jerusalem (Joshua 13:1-5 ; Joshua 15:63 ; Judges 1:1 ). Even though some sections of the land remained to be conquered, God instructed Joshua to apportion Canaan to the tribes which had not yet received territory (Joshua 13:7 ). See Achan ; Ai ; Exodus ; Gilgal ; Jericho ; Joshua
Machir -
Manasseh's oldest son (Joshua 17:1 ), or probably his only son (see 1 Chronicles 7:14,15 ; Compare Numbers 26:29-33 ; Joshua 13:31 ). They settled in land taken from the Amorites (Numbers 32:39,40 ; Deuteronomy 3:15 ) by a special enactment (Numbers 36:1-3 ; Joshua 17:3,4 )
Jahaz - JAHAZA (Joshua 13:18), JAHAZAH (Joshua 21:36), JAHZAH (Numbers 21:23; Deuteronomy 2:32; Judges 11:20; Isaiah 15:4; Jeremiah 48:21; Jeremiah 48:34). Jahaza was assigned to Reuben, then to the Merarite Levites (1 Chronicles 6:78; Joshua 21:36)
Zerah - One of his descendants was Achan, who was executed for taking forbidden booty (Joshua 7:1 ,Joshua 7:1,7:25 ). Zerah is included in Matthew's genealogy of Christ, although Perez was the direct ancestor (Joshua 1:3 )
Lachish - Joshua 10:1-43; Joshua 3:1-17. It was one of the Canaanitish cities which was subdued by Joshua and included in Judah; fortified by Jeroboam
Jahaz - Jahaz is mentioned in connexion with Kedemoth ( Joshua 13:18 ; Joshua 21:36 ). Jahaz was one of the Levite cities of Reuben belonging to the children of Merari ( Joshua 13:18 ; Joshua 21:36 (see note in RVm Sea - THE SALT SEA,Numbers 34:3,12 ; also called 'the east sea,' Ezekiel 47 :18; Joel 2:20 ; 'the former sea,' Zechariah 14:8 ; 'the sea of the plain,' Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 3:16 ; Joshua 12:3 ; 2 Kings 14:25 . THE SEA OF GALILEE,Mark 1:16 ; also called the 'Sea of Tiberias,' John 21:1 ; the 'Sea of Chinnereth,' Numbers 34:11 ; Joshua 12:3 ; Joshua 13 :27; the 'Lake of Gennesaret,' Luke 5:1
Geshur, Geshurites - border of Bashan ( Deuteronomy 3:14 , Joshua 12:6 ; Joshua 13:11 ). The Geshurites were not expelled by the half-tribe of Manasseh, to whom their land had been allotted ( Joshua 13:13 ), and were still ruled by an independent king in the reign of David, who married the daughter of Talmai, king of Geshur ( 2 Samuel 3:3 ). On the strength of Joshua 13:2 and 1 Samuel 27:8 , it has been maintained that there was another tribe of this name in the neighbourhood of the Philistines; but the evidence in support of this view is very precarious
Earthquake - These events occurred in the place and at the time God had earlier announced, showing that they had resulted from his direct intervention (Genesis 19:12-14; Genesis 19:24-28; Joshua 3:7-8; Joshua 3:13-17; Joshua 6:5; Joshua 6:20)
Open Place - Enaim; the same probably as Enam (Joshua 15:34 ), a city in the lowland or Shephelah
Tir'Zah - ( Numbers 26:33 ; 27:1 ; 36:11 ; Joshua 17:3 ) (B
zi'or - ( Joshua 15:54 ) It belongs to the same group with Hebron
Kitron - Knotty, a city of Zebulun (Judges 1:30 ), called also Kattath (Joshua 19:15 ); supposed to be "Cana of Galilee
Migdal-el - Tower of God, a fortified city of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38 ), supposed by some to be identical with Magdala (q
Kartan - A city of Naphtali, assigned to the Gershonite Levites (Joshua 21:32); in 1 Chronicles 6:76 expanded into Kirjathaim
Neah - Shaking, or settlement, or descent, a town on the east side of Zebulun, not far from Rimmon (Joshua 19:13 )
Chithlish - CHITHLISH ( Joshua 15:40 , AV Mearah - Mentioned amongst the districts of Palestine that had yet to be possessed ( Joshua 13:4 )
Shi'Hon - (ruin ), a town of Issachar, named only in ( Joshua 19:19 ) Eusebius mentions it as then existing "near Mount Tabor
Dimnah - A city of Zebulun given to the Merarite Levites (Joshua 21:35)
Ithnan - of Judah, bordering on the desert (Joshua 15:23-24; 1 Samuel 15:4)
Heleph - The place from which Naphtali's boundary commenced (Joshua 19:33)
Cabbon - Town in tribal allotment of Judah (Joshua 15:40 )
Bozkath - A town of Judah ( Joshua 15:39 , 2 Kings 22:1 ), in the plain near Lachish and Eglon
Arab - ARAB ( Joshua 15:52 )
Abez - Town allotted to Issachar (Joshua 19:20 )
Parah - A city allotted to Benjamin (Joshua 18:23)
Medeba - A city beyond Jordan, Joshua 13:16
ir'pe-el - ( Joshua 18:27 ) No trace has yet been discovered of its situation
Aznoth-Tabor - corner of the portion of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:34 )
Dilan - DILAN ( Joshua 15:38 )
Rearward - The strong battalion that closed and guarded the rear of an army, Joshua 6:13 ; Isaiah 52:12 ; 58:8
Tir'Zah - ( Numbers 26:33 ; 27:1 ; 36:11 ; Joshua 17:3 ) (B
mo'Zah - (fountain ), one of the cities in the allotment of Benjamin, ( Joshua 18:26 ) only, named between hae-Cephirah and Rekem
Dil'Ean - ( Joshua 15:38 ) It has not been identified with certainty
Rem'Mon - (pomegranate ), a town in the allotment of Simeon, ( Joshua 10:7 ) elsewhere accurately given in the Authorized Version as Rimmon
Eleph - City in the tribe of Benjamin, Joshua 18:28
Bethshemesh - boundary of Judah (Joshua 15:10), itself low in situation. In the field of Joshua the Bethshemite was "the great Abel" (the Septuagint reads Aben "stone"; others retaining Abel explain it "the stone of mourning," compare 1 Samuel 6:19) whereon the ark was set (1 Samuel 6:18). Providence fitly arranged that Bethshemesh being a priests' city (Joshua 21:16; 1 Chronicles 1:59) had Levites and priests ready on the spot duly to receive the ark and sacrifice before it. ) Ir-shemesh was the older name (compare Joshua 15:10; Joshua 19:41; Joshua 19:43; 1 Kings 4:9). A city on Issachar's border (Joshua 19:22). A fenced city of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38; Judges 1:33)
Mizpah - On Mount Gilead, also called Mizpeh of Gilead, Judges 11:29, and elsewhere, probably Ramoth-mizpeh, Joshua 13:26, and Ramoth-gilead, 1 Kings 4:13, and elsewhere, the place where Laban and Jacob set up a heap of stones as a witness and landmark between them. The land of Mizpeh, in the north of Palestine, the residence of the Hivites, Joshua 11:3; possibly identical with—4. The valley of Mizpeh, Joshua 11:3; Joshua 11:8, whither the confederate hosts were pursued by Joshua; perhaps the modern Bukaʾa, the great country of Cœle-Syria, between Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon. A city in Judah, Joshua 15:38; possibly identical with the modern Tell es-Sâfiyeh. Joshua 11:8. A city in Benjamin, Joshua 18:26, where Israel assembled
Joshua - His name was originally OSHEA, or HOSHEA, but it was changed by Moses into Jehoshua, and this was contracted into Joshua, which is the same as JESUS in the Greek, and signifies 'Jehovah the saviour. ' Joshua was one of the twelve spies, and he with Caleb brought up a true report of the land, and was one of the two survivors of the men who came out of Egypt that entered the land. The first notice of Joshua is when he led the army against the Amalekites and overcame them while Moses' hands were held up. Joshua was appointed the successor of Moses, not as law-giver, but as leader. ...
The principal work of Joshua was to lead the Israelites into the land of promise, not on the ground of their righteousness, but of the promises made to the fathers; the subjugation of the former inhabitants, and dividing the land as a possession for the twelve tribes, and these things are recorded in the BOOK OF Joshua. In these points Joshua was a type of Christ as leader or Captain of His saints. Joshua could not make himself fit, but the filthy garments were taken away and he was clothed, and had a fair mitre placed upon his head
Rahab - When Joshua sent two spies to survey Jericho in anticipation of the Israelites’ impending invasion of Canaan, they stayed at her inn. According to the Midrash, she later converted to Judaism and married Joshua
Bealoth - Town on southern border of tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:24 ). This may be the same as Baalath-beer (Joshua 19:8 )
Sibmah - It became part of their tribal inheritance (Joshua 13:19 ). Isaiah mentioned it in his lament over Moab (Joshua 16:8-9 ; compare Jeremiah 48:32 )
Aven - Referred to a valley, perhaps one in place of popularly-known names such as Beth-aven for Beth-el (Joshua 7:2 ; Joshua 18:12 )
Achzib - A town in Asher ( Joshua 19:29 ), from which the natives could not be dislodged ( Judges 1:31 ): it lay on the coast between Acre and Tyre. of the Shephelah ( Joshua 15:44 ), near Mareshah
Hammath - One of the ‘fenced’ cities of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:35 ), probably the same as Hammon of 1 Chronicles 6:76 and Hammoth-dor of Joshua 21:32
Abiram - Hiel laid the foundation of Jericho in Abiram his first-born, and thus fulfilled the first part of the prophecy by Joshua. Joshua 6:26 ; 1 Kings 16:34
Heshmon - ” Town in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:27 )
Hadashah - ” Town in tribal territory of Judah situated in vicinity of Lachish (Joshua 15:37 )
Chephar-Ammoni - CHEPHAR-AMMONI (‘village of the Ammonites,’ Joshua 18:24 )
Shion - A town of Issachar ( Joshua 19:19 ), prob
Helkath - Smoothness, a town of Asher, on the east border (Joshua 19:25 ; 21:31 ); called also Hukok (1 Chronicles 6:75 )
Irpeel - ” Town in tribal territory of Benjamin (Joshua 18:27 )
Beth-Haran - The same as Beth-aram (Joshua 13:27)
Karkaa - A floor; bottom, a place between Adar and Azmon, about midway between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea (Joshua 15:3 )
Azmon - border of Palestine, near the torrent of Egypt, wady el Arish (Numbers 34:4-5; Joshua 15:4)
Helek - Son of Gilead the Manassite, Numbers 26:30 , Joshua 17:2 (P Hoglah - Daughter of Zelophehad, Numbers 26:33 ; Numbers 27:1 ; Numbers 36:11 , Joshua 17:3 (P Hammon - A city in Asher near great Sidon (Joshua 19:28)
Kartah - ” Levitical city in the territory of Zebulun (Joshua 21:34 )
Eshan - ESHAN ( Joshua 15:52 )
Sansannah - A city of Judah, (Joshua 15:31) If Senah, a bush, it should seem to mean "the bush of the bush
Abez - A town in Issachar (Joshua 19:20)
Courageous - Joshua 1
Halhul - A city of Judah ( Joshua 15:58 )
Arbite - (ahr' bite) Native of Arab, a village in Judah near Hebron (Joshua 15:52 ), identified as modern er-Rabiyeh
me-Jar'Kon - ( Joshua 19:46 ) only in the neighborhood of Joppa or Japho
za'Reth-Sha'Har - (splendor of the dawn ), a place mentioned only in ( Joshua 13:19 ) in the catalogue of the towns allotted to Reuben
it'Tah-ka'Zin - ( Joshua 19:13 ) It has not been identified
Zaanannim - Joshua 19:33 , a town in the north of Naphtali, near Kedesh and the foot of Anti-Lebanon, Judges 4:11
Zaanan - Micah 1:11 , supposed to be the same as Zenan, Joshua 15:37 , a town in the plain country of Judah
Parah - A city in Benjamin ( Joshua 18:23 )
ke'Ziz - (cut off ) , The valley of, one of the "cities" of Benjamin, ( Joshua 18:21 ) and the eastern border of the tribe
Karka'a, - ( Joshua 15:3 ) Its site is unknown
Beth-Paz'Zez - (house of the dispersion ), a town of Issachar named with En-haddah ( Joshua 19:21 ) and of which nothing is known
Hog'Lah - ( Numbers 26:33 ; 27:1 ; 36:11 ; Joshua 17:3 ) (B
a'Bel, Stone of - (the great abel ), the place where the ark rested in the field of Joshua at Beth-shemesh
Joshua - Joshua (jŏsh'u-ah), Saviour, or whose help is Jehovah. Moses, shortly before his death, was directed, Numbers 27:18, to appoint Joshua leader over the people. God himself gave Joshua a charge through the lawgiver. Under God's direction, Joshua 1:1, Joshua assumed the command of the people at Shittim, sent spies into Jericho, crossed the Jordan, fortified a camp at Gilgal, circumcised the people, kept the passover, and was visited by the Captain of the Lord's Host. Joshua returned to the camp at Gilgal, having conquered half of Palestine. Joshua, now stricken in years, proceeded to make the division of the conquered land. Timnath-serah in Mount Ephraim was assigned as Joshua's peculiar inheritance. After an interval of rest, Joshua convoked an assembly from all Israel. Joshua's character is a very noble one; and few blemishes are found in it. But, with these small exceptions, an able commander, a wise ruler, a faithful servant of the Lord, Joshua shines as a bright star among the noble worthies of Old Testament history
Eleazar - God directed that when Moses died, the new leader Joshua would not speak to God face to face as Moses had, but would receive God’s instructions through the high priest Eleazar (Numbers 27:18-23). God directed also that Joshua and Eleazar together were to be in charge of the work of dividing Canaan between Israel’s twelve tribes (Numbers 34:17; cf. Joshua 17:4; Joshua 19:51; Joshua 21:1)
Dannah - ” Town assigned tribe of Judah in the hill country (Joshua 15:49 )
Ummah - An Asherite city ( Joshua 19:30 ), probably a slip, owing to resemblance of Heb
Maarath - Desolation, a place in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:59 ), probably the modern village Beit Ummar, 6 miles north of Hebron
Hoham - He and his allies were defeated (Joshua 10:3,5,16-27 )
Hazar-Gaddah - Village of fortune, a city on the south border of Judah (Joshua 15:27 ), midway between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea
Bozkath - A city of the shephelah or low land of Judah (Joshua 15:39; 2 Kings 22:1), to which Josiah's grandmother belonged
Migdal Gad - An old sanctuary, probably of Gad, the god of fortune; in the shephelah or "low-rolling hills" of Judah (Joshua 15:37)
Baalath-Beer - Baalah of the well, (Joshua 19:8 , probably the same as Baal, mentioned in 1 Chronicles 4:33 , a city of Simeon
Rakkath - Shore-town, a "fenced city" of the tribe of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 )
Mozah - A town of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:28 )
Heshmon - Near Beersheba (Joshua 15:27)
Japhleti - border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:3)
Kirjath-Sannah - (kihr' jath-ssan' nuh) KJV spelling of Kiriath-Sannah; another name for the city of Debir (Joshua 15:49 )
Leshem - ” City tribe of Dan occupied (Joshua 19:47 )
Beth-Gader - It may be the same as Geder , Joshua 12:13
Betonim - BETONIM ( Joshua 13:26 )
Anem - In Joshua 19:21 "Engannim," of which "Anem" may be contraction
Adar (1) - Southern boundary of Judah and the Holy Land, called also Hazar-Addar: Joshua 15:3
Addar - A town on the border of Judah south of Beersheba ( Joshua 15:3 )
Dabbesheth - A town in the westward border of Zebulun ( Joshua 19:11 ), identified with Dabsheh , E
Zenan - A town in the low hills of Judah (the shephelah ) (Joshua 15:37)
Amad - AMAD ( Joshua 19:26 only)
Tirzah - One of the 31 cities captured by Joshua ( Joshua 12:24 ). One of the five daughters of Zelophehad ( Numbers 26:33 ; Numbers 27:1 ; Numbers 36:11 , Joshua 17:3 )
Neck - made them turn their backs in flight before me (Keil); so Exodus 23:27, or enabled me to put my foot on their necks, subjecting them utterly to me; as Joshua 10:24; Joshua 11:8; Joshua 11:12; Psalms 110:5
Beeroth - ) One of the four Hivite cities (the others being Gibeon, Chephirah, and Kirjath Jearim: Joshua 9:17), which obtained peace with Joshua by false pretenses. Allotted to Benjamin (Joshua 18:25)
Kenaz - Founder of the family of Kenezites (adopted into Israel), of whom were Caleb and Othniel (Joshua 14:14). Younger brother of Caleb and father of Othniel (Joshua 15:17). "The Kenizzites" of Genesis 15:19 either had ceased to exist before Joshua, or probably Moses added their name subsequently, as those descendants of Kenaz were adopted into Israel subsequently, to whom Caleb belonged
Gath-Rimmon - Town in tribal territory of Dan (Joshua 19:45 ) and set aside for Levites (Joshua 21:24 ). Gath-rimmon also appears in the Hebrew text of Joshua 21:25 though not in the earliest Greek translation or in the parallel in 1 Chronicles 6:70
Timnah - Town assigned to Dan (Joshua 19:43 ), located on the southern border with Judah (Joshua 15:10 ). Village in the hill country of Judah (Joshua 15:57 )
Jehozadak - ) It is suggestive that the names of the last king and of the representative of the high priesthood in the captivity both express that the suspension of the throne and of the priesthood was Jehovah's righteous judgment for Judah's sins; moreover Joshua or Jeshua, who restored the temple altar, expresses salvation; as the former Joshua led the hitherto homeless Israelites into Canaan their inheritance; and as Jesus, the Antitype, saves us from our sins and leads us into the heavenly rest. (See Joshua; JESHUA
Perizzite - From Joshua 11:3; Joshua 17:15, they seem to have occupied the woods and mountains. of Palestine, also on the western sides of Mount Carmel (Joshua 17:15-18)
Gerizim - A mountain near Shechem, from which the blessings were pronounced, as the curses were from Mount Ebal, Deuteronomy 11:29; Deuteronomy 27:1-13; Joshua 8:30-33. Six tribes were placed on Gerizim, and six on Ebal, Deuteronomy 27:12-13; the ark was probably in the valley between them, and Joshua read the blessings and cursings successively. Joshua 8:33-34; Deuteronomy 27:14-15
Goshen - Joshua 10:41; Joshua 11:16. A city in the hill-country of Judah, Joshua 15:51
Jazer - The tribe of Gad rebuilt and settled Jazer (Numbers 32:35 ; compare Joshua 13:25 ). Joshua assigned it to the Levites (Joshua 21:39 )
Ed - In the Hebrew (and also in the Greek) text of Joshua 22:34 the name given by the two and a half tribes to the altar erected by them on the east bank of the Jordan has dropped out. The west bank is suggested by Joshua 22:10 in its present form, and maintained also by RV [1] in Joshua 22:11 , by a translation of doubtful admissibility, ‘in the forefront of the land of Canaan, on the side that pertaineth to the children of Israel
Gad, the Tribe of - They embraced half Gilead, (3:12) or half the land of the children of Ammon, ( Joshua 13:25 ) probably the mountainous district which is intersected by the torrent Jabbok, including, as its most northern town, the ancient sanctuary of Mahanaim. ( Joshua 13:25 ) West was the Jordan. (Joshua 13:27 ) The character of the tribe is throughout strongly marked --fierce and warlike
Hepher - Son of Gilead the Manassite, and father of Zelophehad, Numbers 26:32 ; Numbers 27:1 , Joshua 17:2 f. A Canaanite royal city, named immediately before Aphek ( Joshua 12:17 )
Madmannah - ” City in the Negeb assigned to Judah (Joshua 15:31 ), possibly identical with Beth-marcaboth (Joshua 19:5 )
Beth-Aven - Close to Ai ( Joshua 7:2 ), by the wilderness ( Joshua 18:12 ), north-west of Michmash ( 1 Samuel 13:5 ), and on the way to Aijalon ( 1 Samuel 14:23 ), still inhabited in the 8th cent
Ain - A town in Judah ( Joshua 15:32 ), or Simeon ( Joshua 19:7 ), where Ain arid Rimmon should be taken together
Jabneel -
A town in the north boundary of Judah (Joshua 15:11 ), called afterwards by the Greeks Jamnia, the modern Yebna, 11 miles south of Jaffa. ...
...
A town on the border of Naphtali (Joshua 19:33 )
Chesalon - Near Kiriath-jearim on the border of Judah ( Joshua 15:10 )
Rakkon - This name in Joshua 19:46 is prob
Shaalabbin - A city of Dan (Joshua 19:42) The name seems to be taken from Shual, fox—and Bun, understanding
Michmethah - Hiding-place, a town in the northern border of Ephraim and Manasseh, and not far west of Jordan (Joshua 16:6 ; 17:7 )
Kitron - Probably the same as Kattath in Joshua 19:15
Dimnah - Dunghill, a city of Zebulun given to the Merarite Levites (Joshua 21:35 )
Anim - Fountains, a city in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:50 ), now el-Ghuwein, near Eshtemoh, about 10 miles south-west of Hebron
Zior - Littleness, a city in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:54 ); the modern Si'air, 4 1/2 miles north-north-east of Hebron
Salt, the City of - One of the cities of Judah (Joshua 15:62 ), probably in the Valley of Salt, at the southern end of the Dead Sea
Adamah - Red earth, a fortified city of Naphtali, probably the modern Damieh, on the west side of the sea of Tiberias (Joshua 19:33,36 )
Chozeba - (1 Chronicles 4:22 ), the same as Chezib and Achzib, a place in the lowlands of Judah (Genesis 38:5 ; Joshua 15:44 )
Japhia (2) - A boundary of Zebulun (Joshua 19:12)
Beth-Marcaboth - ” City allotted to tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:5 )
Kirjath-Sepher - (kihr' jath-ssee' fuhr) KJV spelling of Kiriath-Sepher; another name for the city of Debir (Joshua 15:15-165 )
Lahmam - A town of Judah ( Joshua 15:40 ), possibly mod
Giloh - A town in the hills of Judah (Joshua 15:51); the native place of Ahithophel (2 Samuel 15:12; 2 Samuel 17:23)
Anab - A town once belonging to the Anakim, in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 11:21); still so-called; ten miles S
Chozeba - Probably the same as CHEZIB, Genesis 38:5 , and ACHZIB,Joshua 15:44 ; Micah 1:14
Adadah - Town in the most southern part of Judah's possessions, Joshua 15:22 , identified by some with Adadah in the desert S
Abez - A town of Issachar only mentioned in Joshua 19:20
Ith'Nan - ( Joshua 15:23 ) No trace of its existence has yet been discovered
Nephtoah - We read of the water of Nephtoah, which went towards mount Ephron, Joshua 15:9
Baalah - A town in the tribe of Simeon, Joshua 15:29 ; 19:3 ; called also Bilhah, 1 Chronicles 4:29
Therefrom - Joshua 23
ma'Chi - (decrease ), the father of Geuel the Gadite, who went with Caleb and Joshua to spy out the land of Canaan
Beth'-Anoth - (house of echo ), a town in the mountainous district of Judah, named with Halhul, Beth-zur and others in ( Joshua 15:58 ) only
pi'Ram - (like a wild ass; fleet ) the Amorite king of Jarmuth at the time of Joshua's conquest of Canaan. ( Joshua 10:3 ) (B
Had'Ashah - (new ), one of the towns of Judah, in the maritime low country, ( Joshua 16:37 ) only, probably the ADASA of the Maccabean history
Nib'Shan - (soft soil ) one of the six cities of Judah, ( Joshua 15:62 ) which were in the district of the Midbar (Authorized Version "wilderness")
Rahab - The name Rahab appears in English versions of the Bible as belonging to a woman who features in the book of Joshua, and to a mythical sea monster that features in the poetical books. ...
A woman in Jericho...
Before Joshua opened his attack on Canaan, he sent two men to spy out the first city they would meet, Jericho. She protected the spies from the local authorities, and in return asked protection for herself and her family when the Israelites attacked Jericho (Joshua 2:1-14; Hebrews 11:31). As a result the Israelites preserved her and her family when Jericho fell, and accepted them into Israel as part of the nation (Joshua 2:15-24; Joshua 6:17; Joshua 6:22-25; James 2:25)
Jebus - The Jebusite city, a former name of Jerusalem (Joshua 18:16; Joshua 18:28; Judges 19:10-11; 1 Chronicles 11:4-5). side, which was lower ground, ever since the death of Joshua (Joshua 15:8; Joshua 15:63; Judges 1:8; Judges 1:21), had been heretofore unable to gain the Jebusite citadel, such is the characteristic bravery of mountaineers. The Jebusites were a hardy mountain tribe (Numbers 13:29; Joshua 11:3). , sent southwards to invite them to help against Joshua
Gilgal - A place on the east border of Jericho ( Joshua 4:19 ), where the Israelites first encamped after crossing Jordan, and which remained the headquarters of the congregation till after the rout of the northern kings at Merom ( Joshua 14:6 ). The stone circle from which it certainly took its name (in spite of the impossible etymology given in Joshua 5:9 ), was no doubt that to which the tradition embodied in Joshua 4:20 refers, and the same as the ‘images’ by Gilgal in the story of Ehud ( Judges 3:19 RVm Kedesh -
A place in the extreme south of Judah (Joshua 15:23 ). ...
...
A "fenced city" of Naphtali, one of the cities of refuge (Joshua 19:37 ; Judges 4:6 ). It was assigned to the Gershonite Levites (Joshua 21:32 ). It was originally a Canaanite royal city (Joshua 12:22 ), and was the residence of Barak (Judges 4:6 ); and here he and Deborah assembled the tribes of Zebulun and Naphtali before the commencement of the conflict with Sisera in the plain of Esdraelon, "for Jehovah among the mighty" (9,10)
Gaza - It is referred to in Genesis ( Genesis 10:19 ) as a border city of the Canaanites, and in Joshua 10:41 as a limit of the South country conquered by Joshua; a refuge of the Anakim ( Joshua 11:22 ), theoretically assigned to Judah ( Joshua 15:47 )
Jesus - form of the name Joshua or Jeshua, is employed as a designation of 1. Joshua the son of Nun (AV [2] has Joshua ). Jeshua (Joshua), the high priest ( 1Es 5:5 ; Esther 5:8 Esther 5:8 ; 1Es 5:48 ; 1Es 5:56 ; 1Es 5:68 ; 1Es 5:70 ; 1Es 6:2 ; Esther 9:19 Esther 9:19 , Sir 49:12 )
Caleb - He and Oshea, or Joshua the son of Nun, were the only two who brought a favorable report and encouraged the people boldly to take possession of the land. Forty-five years afterwards Caleb came to Joshua and claimed possession of the land of the Anakim, Kirjath-arba or Hebron, and the neighboring hill country. Joshua 14:1-15. Joshua 15:16-19
Aij'Alon - (Joshua 21:24 ; 1 Chronicles 6:69 ) It was a Levitical city and a city of refuge. It was originally allotted to the tribe of Dan, (Joshua 19:42 ) Authorized Version, AJALON, which tribe, however, was unable to dispossess the Amorites of the place. ...
A broad and beautiful valley near the city of Aijalon over which Joshua commanded the moon to stand still during the pursuit after the battle of Gibeon. (Joshua 10:12 ) ...
A place in Zebulon, mentioned as the burial-place of Elon, one of the Judges
la'Chish - ( Joshua 10:3,5 ) They were routed by Joshua at Beth-horon, and the king of Lachish fell a victim with the others under the trees at Makkedah. (Joshua 10:26 ) The destruction of the town shortly followed the death of the king. (Joshua 10:31-33 ) In the special statement that the attack lasted two days, in contradistinction to the other cities which were taken in one (see ver
Hazor-Haddattah - ” Town in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:25 )
Middin - Measures, one of the six cities "in the wilderness," on the west of the Dead Sea, mentioned along with En-gedi (Joshua 15:61 )
Jokdeam - ” City in tribal territory of Judah, possibly modern khirbet Raqqa near Ziph (Joshua 15:56 )
Evi - His land was allotted to Reuben (Numbers 25; Numbers 31:8; Joshua 13:21)
Zaanan - It may be identified with Zenan, in the plain country of Judah (Joshua 15:37 )
en-Haddah - (ehn-had' duh) City in tribal lot of Issachar (Joshua 19:21 )
Gittah-Hepher - (giht' tah-hee' fuhr) KJV spelling for Gath-hepher (Joshua 19:13 ) based on a variant Hebrew spelling in the text
Heleph - A town on the border of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:33 )
Telem - of Judah (Joshua 15:24)
Shaalabin - ” Town in tribal territory of Dan (Joshua 19:42 ); apparently the same as Shaalbim
Zaanaim - (za uh nah' eem) KJV, TEV spelling of Zaanannim (Judges 4:11 ) following written Hebrew text rather than scribal note and Joshua 19:33
Beth-Anoth - BETH-ANOTH ( Joshua 15:59 )
Adadah - ADADAH ( Joshua 15:22 )
Sheshai - One of Anak's three sons at Hebron, driven out and slain by Caleb leading Judah (Numbers 13:22; Joshua 15:14; Judges 1:10)
Keilah - (Joshua 15:44) The word is compounded of Kol, a voice; and Jah, the Lord
Aditha'im - (double ornament ), a town belonging to Judah, lying in the low country, and named, between Sharaim and hag-Gederah, in ( Joshua 15:36 ) only
el'Teknon - ( Joshua 15:59 ) It has not yet been identified
Mid'Din - (measures ), a city of Judah, ( Joshua 15:61 ) one of the six specified as situated in the district of "the midbar" (Authorized Version "wilderness")
Iim -
A city in the south of Judah (Joshua 15:29 )
Bowing - Bowing is also frequently mentioned as an act of adoration to idols (Joshua 23:7 ; 2 Kings 5:18 ; Judges 2:19 ; Isaiah 44:15 ), and to God (Joshua 5:14 ; Psalm 22:29 ; 72:9 ; Micah 6:6 ; Psalm 95:6 ; Ephesians 3:14 )
Jabneel - Town marking northwestern boundary of tribal territory of Judah in land of Philistines (Joshua 15:11 ); modern Yibna. See Joshua 19:33 ); modern tell en-Naam or khirbet Yemma, west-southwest of the Sea of Galilee and northeast of Mount Tabor
Jobab - King of city state of Madon who joined Jabin of Hazor in northern coalition against Joshua (Joshua 11:1 )
Shihor Libnath - Joshua 19:26. of Carmel where Asher was bounded by Manasseh (Joshua 17:10), S
Perizzites - The Perizzites were one of many Canaanite groups that occupied Canaan before the Israelites drove them out (Genesis 13:7; Genesis 15:20; Exodus 3:8; Deuteronomy 7:1; Joshua 3:10). They lived mainly in the hills of central Palestine and are found in Bible narratives concerning Bethel, Shechem and the tribal territory of Ephraim (Genesis 13:2-7; Genesis 34:26-30; Joshua 17:15)
Bohan - ” A place on the northern border of the tribal allotment of Judah called the “stone of Bohan,” “the son of Reuben” (Joshua 15:6 ). This was the southern border of the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 18:17 )
Merom - ” Place in Galilee where Joshua led Israel to defeat a coalition of Canaanite tribes under king Jabin of Hazor in a surprise attack (Joshua 11:1-7 )
Elteke - ” A city in Dan (Joshua 19:44 ) assigned to the Levites (Joshua 21:23 )
Lasharon - ” Listed as one of towns whose king Joshua killed in conquering Canaan (Joshua 12:18 )
Jabin - Joshua 11:1. He and his allies were utterly defeated in a battle with Joshua at Merom, the city of Hazor was taken, and Jabin put to death
Shilhim - of Judah (Joshua 15:32). One of Simeon's cities in Joshua 19:6 Sharuhen; SHAARAIM in 1 Chronicles 4:31
Hiel - I refer the reader to those two passages in Scripture, for the short but striking account of this man, whose boldness, in face of the curse Joshua pronounced, led him to so daring an act as that of building Jericho, and whose rashness the Lord so fully punished, in conformity to his servant's prediction. (See Joshua 6:26 with 1 Kings 16:34)...
See also Elisha...
Maacah - We learn from Joshua 13:13 , that the Israelites did not destroy the Maachathites, but permitted them to dwell in the land among them. The distribution of the half tribe of Manasseh, beyond Jordan, extended as far as this country, Deuteronomy 3:14 ; Joshua 12:5
Rehob - Two Asherite towns, neither of which has been identified ( Joshua 19:28 ; Jos 21:31 , 1 Chronicles 6:75 , Joshua 19:30 , Judges 1:31 )
Jiphthah, el, Valley of - A ravine (rather than valley; gee , not nachal ), bounding Zebulun and Asher (Joshua 19:14; Joshua 19:27)
Mahanaim - It was assigned to the Levites, Joshua 13:26; Joshua 13:30; Joshua 21:38; 1 Chronicles 6:80, and lay within the territory of Gad, north of the torrent Jabbok
Tirza -
An old royal city of the Canaanites, which was destroyed by Joshua (Joshua 12:24 ). ...
...
The youngest of Zelophehad's five daughters (Numbers 26:33 ; Joshua 17:3 )
Tabor - It served as a boundary point for the tribes of Naphtali,...
Issachar, and Zebulun (Joshua 19:12 ,Joshua 19:12,19:22 ), where the tribes worshiped early (Deuteronomy 33:18-19 ). Levitical city (1 Chronicles 6:77 ), apparently replacing Nahalal in the earlier list (Joshua 21:35 )
Beth-Shemesh - A city of Judah given to the priests, Joshua 21:16 1 Chronicles 6:59 1 Samuel 6:15 . It lay fifteen miles west of Jerusalem, near the border of Dan and of the Philistines, Joshua 15:10 1 Samuel 6:12 . Probably the same as Irshemesh, Joshua 19:41
Iron - A city of Naphtali, in the mountains, Joshua 19:38
Mishal - A city of the tribe of Asher (Joshua 21:30 ; 1 Chronicles 6:74 )
Hazor-Hadattah - New Hazor, a city in the south of Judah (Joshua 15:25 )
Ethkazin - ” Town in tribal territory of Zebulun (Joshua 19:13 )
Remmon-Methoar - (Joshua 19:13 ), rendered correctly in the Revised Version, "Rimmon, which stretcheth unto Neah," a landmark of Zebulun; called also Rimmon (1 Chronicles 6:77 )
Naarath - Girl, a town on the boundary between Ephraim and Benjamin (Joshua 16:7 ), not far probably from Jericho, to the north (1 Chronicles 7:28 )
Ziddim - Sides, a town of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 ), has been identified with Kefr-Hattin, the "village of the Hittites," about 5 miles west of Tiberias
Yeshebi - The Hebrew word rendered "inhabitants" in Joshua 17:7 , but probably rather the name of the village Yeshepheh, probably Yassuf, 8 miles south of Shechem
Gittite - A description of some Philistines who had not been conquered (Joshua 13:3 )
Piram - Like a wild ass, a king of Jarmuth, a royal city of the Canaanites, who was conquered and put to death by (Joshua 10:3,23,26 )
Dilean - A city of the shephelah or low country of Judah (Joshua 15:38), meaning gourd or cucumber
Beth-Pazzez - ” Town in tribal allotment of Issachar (Joshua 19:22 )
Karka - ” A city on the southern border of Judah (Joshua 15:3 ; KJV has Karkaa)
Kattath - A city of Zebulun ( Joshua 19:15 ), perhaps to be identified with Kartah or with Kitron of Judges 1:30
Alemeth - A priests' city in Benjamin (1 Chronicles 6:60; Joshua 21:18)
Nun - An Ephraimite, father of Joshua, and referred to in scripture only to distinguish his son, who succeeded Moses
Sychem - In Stephen's speech, Acts 7:16, He tells us that the other patriarchs as well as Joseph were buried there (Joshua 24:32)
Enshemish - (See Joshua 15:7) The name signifies the fountain of the sun, from Ain, fountain, and Shemesh, the sun
Chin'Nereth, Sea of - (Numbers 34:11 ; Joshua 13:27 ) the inland sea, which is most similarly known to us as the "Lake of Gennesareth" or "Sea of Galilee
Zanoah - The name of two towns in Judah, Joshua 15:34,56
en-ha'Zor - ( Joshua 19:37 ) It has not yet been identified
ne'ah - ( Joshua 19:13 ) only
Dan'Nah, - a city in the mountains of Judah, (Joshua 15:49 ) and probably south or southwest of Hebron
Idalah - Snares(?), a city near the west border of Zebulun (Joshua 19:15 )
Harosheth of the Gentiles - Joshua (Joshua 11:6; Joshua 11:10) had 150 years before routed the confederate kings of northern Canaan, headed by Jabin I, at the waters of Merom, the first occasion of Israel's having to encounter "chariots and horses. " Joshua "houghed (hamstrung) their horses and burned their chariots with fire" in firm faith and obedience to God's prohibition against their fighting the foe with his own weapon (Deuteronomy 17:16). ...
Unbelieving fear subsequently altered Israel's policy, so that they shrank from battling with the enemy's chariots in plains such as the Jordan valley, beside which Harosheth stood (Joshua 17:16-18; Judges 1:19), and at last adopted chariots in their armies under the kings: 2 Samuel 8:4, David; 2 Samuel 15:1, Absalom; 1 Kings 1:5, Adonijah; 1 Kings 4:26, Solomon
Lachish - In the Biblical records it first appears as joining the coalition headed by the king of Jerusalem against the Gibeonites ( Joshua 10:3 ), and as being in consequence reduced by Joshua ( Joshua 10:31 ) in spite of the assistance given to it by the king of Gezer ( Joshua 10:33 ). It is enumerated among the cities of the tribe of Judah ( Joshua 15:39 )
Aroer - City on north rim of Arnon Gorge east of Dead Sea on southern boundary of territory Israel claimed east of the Jordan River (Joshua 13:9 ). It figured in territorial claims of Reuben (Joshua 13:16 ), though the tribe of Gad originally built it (Numbers 32:34 ). Sihon, king of the Amorites, ruled it prior to Israel's conquest (Deuteronomy 4:48 ; Joshua 12:2 ). A city of the tribe of Gad (Joshua 13:25 ) near Rabbah, capital of the Ammonites. The text of Joshua 15:22 may have originally read Aroer
Hebron - Some think it was founded by Arba, one of the oldest giants in Palestine; for which reason it was called Kirjath-arba, or Arba's city, Joshua 14:15 ; which name was afterward changed to that of Hebron, Joshua 15:13 . Arba was the father of Anak; and from Anak the giants, called Anakim, took their name, who were still dwelling at Hebron when Joshua conquered the land of Canaan. The Lord assigned it for the inheritance of Caleb, Joshua 14:13 ; Joshua 10:3 ; Joshua 10:23 ; Joshua 10:37 . Joshua first took Hebron, and killed the king, whose name was Hoham. It was appointed to be a dwelling for priests, and declared to be a city of refuge, Joshua 21:13
Hazor - Canaanites occupied Hazor until Joshua destroyed it. and continuing until Joshua destroyed it. ...
Joshua 11:1-15 ; Joshua 12:19 relate how Jabin, king of Hazor, rallied the forces of the northern cities of Canaan against Joshua. Hazor was “the head of all those kingdoms” ( Joshua 11:10 ), that is, it was the dominant city-state of the Canaanite kingdoms. Joshua defeated the Canaanite forces, slew the leaders, including Jabin, and burned the city of Hazor. Some Bible students see a discrepancy between this story and the story in Joshua, saying Jabin was killed generations earlier and Hazor destroyed and taken into Israelite control. ) A different solution on the basis of archaeological excavations claims the story concerning Jabin in Joshua is accurate. The city was destroyed by Joshua and was not rebuilt as a city until the time of Solomon. This approach sees Judges 4:1 as a later account influenced by the story in Joshua. The straight biblical narrative seems to assume Joshua destroyed but did not occupy it, though it was allotted to Naphtali: ( Joshua 19:36 ). Two layers of Israelite occupation of Hazor between the destruction of the Canaanite city by Joshua and the rebuilding of the city by Solomon show merely semi-nomadic Israelite encampments, evidenced by tent or hut foundation rings, cooking pits, and storage pits. Town in tribal inheritance of Judah (Joshua 15:23 ), probably to be read with earliest Greek translation as Hazor-Ithnan. Town in southern part of tribal inheritance of Judah, probably to be read as Hazor-Hadattah (Joshua 15:25 ) with most modern translations. Town identified with Hezron (Joshua 15:25 )
Hali - ” Border town assigned to tribe of Asher (Joshua 19:25 )
Humtah - ” Town in hill country of Judah in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:54 )
Zaanan - ” Unidentified city in southermost Judah (Micah 1:11 ), probably identical with Zenan (Joshua 15:37 )
Shihor-Libnath - One of the boundaries of Asher ( Joshua 19:26 )
Thousands - (Micah 5:2 ), another name for "families" or "clans" (see Numbers 1:16 ; 10:4 ; Joshua 22:14,21 )
Chesul'Loth - ( Joshua 19:18 ) From its position int he lists it appears to be between Jezreel and Shunem (Salam )
Heres - , "sun-mountain;" probably identical with Irshemesh in Joshua 19:41
Migdal-Gad - Tower of fortune, a town in the plains of Judah, probably the modern el-Mejdel, a little to the north-east of Ascalon (Joshua 15:37 )
Jozadak - ” Father of high priest Joshua (Ezra 3:2 among others)
Jagur - ” Village on southeastern border of tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:21 )
Dannah - of Hebron (Joshua 15:49)
Kinah - An elegy, a city in the extreme south of Judah (Joshua 15:22 )
Remmon - (rehm' mahn) KJV variant of Rimmon (Joshua 19:7 )
Nezib - A town in the Shephçlah of Judah ( Joshua 15:43 ); the present Beit Nusib , 7 Roman miles from Eleutheropolis on the road to Hebron
Chesil - Ungodly, a town in the south of Judah (Joshua 15:30 ); probably the same as Bethul (19:4) and Bethuel (1 Chronicles 4:30 ); now Khelasa
Chesalon - "The side of Mount Jearim (forests) which is Chesalon" (Joshua 15:10
Chisloth Tabor - On the boundary of Zebulun (Joshua 19:12) (perhaps Iksul, W
Maaleh-Acrabbim - (may' uh leh a crab' bihm) KJV transliteration of a phrase meaning ascent...
(NAS, NRSV, REB) or pass (NIV) of Akrabbim (Joshua 15:3 )
Allammelech - ” Border town of Asher (Joshua 19:26 ) whose specific location is not known
Anim - ” City given tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:50 )
Zer - (flint ), a fortified town in the allotment of Naphtali, ( Joshua 19:35 ) only, probably in the neighborhood of the southwest side of the Lake of Gennesareth
Chephi'Rah - (the hamlet ), one of the four cities of the Gibeonites, ( Joshua 9:17 ) named afterwards among the towns of Benjamin
Chitlish - It was a city of the tribe of Judah near Lachish (Joshua 15:40 )
Joktheel - A city of Judah, Joshua 15:38 ...
2
Bezer - Its exact site is not known, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:36
Ash'Doth-Pis'Gah, - (3:17; Joshua 12:3 ; 13:20 ) and in Deuteronomy 4:49 Authorized Version, translated springs of Pisgah , i
Jiph'Tah - ( Joshua 15:43 ) It has not yet been met with
Hukkok - Recent proposals look at khirbet el-Jemeija, two miles west of Sakhmin (Joshua 19:34 ). The same Hebrew word names a Levitical city in the tribe of Asher (1 Chronicles 6:75 ), but the parallel passage (Joshua 21:31 ) reads Helkath
en-Rimmon - In Joshua 15:32 amongst the towns assigned to Judah we find ‘Ain and Rimmon,’ and in Joshua 19:7 (cf
Ziklag - In the national register of cities it is assigned to Judah ( Joshua 15:31 ) or to Simeon ( Joshua 19:5 ), and is mentioned also in the post-exilic list ( Nehemiah 11:28 )
Eshtaol - Narrow pass or recess, a town (Joshua 15:33 ) in the low country, the She-phelah of Judah. It was allotted to the tribe of Dan (Joshua 19:41 ), and was one of their strongholds
Libnah - ...
...
One of the royal cities of the Canaanites taken by Joshua (Joshua 10:29-32 ; 12:15 )
Knife - Originally of flakes of stone or flint, which was retained for sacred purposes as circumcision, even after the introduction of bronze, iron, and steel (Exodus 4:25; Joshua 5:2, margin). (See CIVILIZATION; Joshua
Rehob - ...
...
A town of Asher (Joshua 19:28 ), to the east of Zidon. ...
...
Another town of Asher (Joshua 19:30 ), kept possession of by the Canaanites (Judges 1:31 )
Nephtoah - The source of the waters of Nephtoah was a landmark between Judah and Benjamin (Joshua 15:8-9; Joshua 18:15)
Shihor - ” It formed the border of the Promised Land (Joshua 13:3 ), marking the widest extent of Israel's territorial claims (1 Chronicles 13:5 ). The earliest translators did not understand the term in Joshua 13:1
Sal'Cah, - (migration ), a city named in the early records of Israel as the extreme limit of Bashan, (3:10; Joshua 13:11 ) and of the tribe of Gad. (Joshua 12:5 ) It is identical with the town of Sulkhad (56 miles east of the Jordan, at the southern extremity of the Hauran range of mountains
Ithrite, the - an inhabitant of Jattir (mentioned in 1 Samuel 30:27 as one of David’s haunts) in the hill-country of Judah ( Joshua 15:48 ; Joshua 21:14 )
re'Hob - (Joshua 19:28 ) ...
Asher contained another Rehob, (Joshua 19:30 ) but the situation of these towns is unknown
Abel-Shittim - The spies whom Joshua sent to Jericho went from Shittim. Joshua 2:1
Chariots - The Canaanites, whom Joshua engaged at the waters of Meron, had horsemen, and a multitude of chariots, Joshua 11:4 Judges 1:19
Arabah - In particular they used the word as a name for that deep, hot and dry valley that ran north-south from the Sea of Galilee to the Gulf of Aqabah (the north-eastern arm of the Red Sea) (Deuteronomy 1:1; Deuteronomy 2:8; Deuteronomy 4:49; Joshua 11:2; Joshua 18:18-19)
Gaash - A mountain in Ephraim ( Joshua 24:30 , Judges 2:9 )
Beth-Anath - House of response, one of the fenced cities of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38 )
Shalim, Land of - Land of foxes, a place apparently to the north-west of Jerusalem (1 Samuel 9:4 ), perhaps in the neighbourhood of Shaalabbin in Dan (Joshua 19:42 )
Shaaraim -
A city in the plain of Judah (1 Samuel 17:52 ); called also Sharaim (Joshua 15:36 )
Hammon -
A town in the tribe of Asher, near Zidon (Joshua 19:28 ), identified with 'Ain Hamul
Hoham - King of Hebron (Joshua 10:3)
Beten - ” Border town of tribe of Asher (Joshua 19:25 )
Beth-Baal-Meon - ” City allotted tribe of Reuben (Joshua 13:17 )
Shi'Cron - ( Joshua 15:11 ) only
Tim'Nath-he'Res - (portion of the sun ) the name under which the city and burial-place of Joshua, previously called Timnath-serah is mentioned in ( Judges 2:9 ) [1]
Kattath - ” A town in the tribal territory of Zebulun (Joshua 19:15 )
Dannah - DANNAH ( Joshua 15:49 )
Zer - A fortified town of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35)
Asriel - A Manassite ( Joshua 17:2 , Numbers 26:31 ; in the latter the patronymic Asrielite occurs)
Arab - ” A city in the hill country of Judah near Hebron (Joshua 15:52 )
Kabzeel - (Joshua 15:21) The word is compounded of Kabatz, to assemble—and El, God
ze'Nan - ( Joshua 15:37 ) It is probably identical with ZAANAN
Eshtemoa - A city of the priests in Judah, Joshua 15:50 ; 21:14 ; 1 Samuel 30:28 ; traced by Robinson in the modern village Semua, south of Hebron
Zur - A Midianitish prince, whose daughter was slain by Phinehas, Numbers 25:15-18 , and who was himself subsequently slain in war with the Israelites, Joshua 13:21
Kir'Jath - (a city ), the last of the cities enumerated as belonging to the tribe of Benjamin, ( Joshua 18:28 ) probably identical with the better-known place Kirjath-jearim
re'Meth - ( Joshua 19:21 ) It is probably though not certainly, a distinct place from the RAMOTH of (1 Chronicles 6:73 )
Japho - Beauty, a sea-port in Dan (Joshua 19:46 ); called Joppa (q
as'Riel, - (Numbers 26:31 ; Joshua 17:2 ) He was the founder of the family of the Asrielites
Timnah - of Hebron ( Joshua 15:57 ). frontier of the tribe of Judah between Beth-shemesh and Ekron ( Joshua 15:10 ). At one time it was counted in the territory of Dan ( Joshua 19:43 ), but at another it was in Philistine possession ( Judges 14:1 )
Timnath-Serah - Remaining portion, the city of Joshua in the hill country of Ephraim, the same as Timnath-heres (Joshua 19:50 ; 24:30 ). Conder, "none is so striking as that of Joshua's home, surrounded as it is with deep valleys and wild, rugged hills. Among these is the supposed tomb of Joshua, which is said to be "the most striking monument in the country
Ebal - Joshua carried out the covenant ceremony on Ebal and Gerazim (Joshua 8:30-35 ; compare Joshua 24:1-27 ), building an altar on Ebal
Luz - Genesis 28:19 ; Genesis 35:6 ; Genesis 48:3 , Joshua 16:2 ; Joshua 18:13 , Judges 1:23-26 . The two passages in Joshua, however, seem to contradict this; both of them speak of Luz and Bethel as two distinct places
Tim'Nath-se'Rah - (portion of abundance ), the name of the city which was presented to Joshua after the partition of the country, ( Joshua 19:50 ) and in "the border" of which he was buried. (Joshua 24:30 ) It is specified as "in Mount Ephraim on the north side of Mount Gaash
Timnath Heres - ) Joshua's city and burial place, previously Timnath Serah, "portion of abundance" (Judges 2:9), the consonants being transposed subsequently, to refer to Joshua's miracle when the sun stood (Joshua 19:50). The Samaritans make it the burial place of Joshua and of Caleb; there are two sacred spots E. Joshua; and neby Culda , possibly a corruption of Caleb. The fact that the Jews venerate a place in Samaria as Joshua's tomb is a presumption in favor of this site
Beeroth - A city of the Gibeonites to which Joshua and his army came to defend the Gibeonites after making a covenant with them (Joshua 9:17 ). The city was allotted the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 18:25 )
Bilhah - A Simeonite city ( 1 Chronicles 4:29 ) = Baalah ( Joshua 15:29 ), Balah ( Joshua 19:3 ), and, according to some, Baalath ( Joshua 19:44 , 1 Kings 9:18 , 2 Chronicles 8:6 )
Adoni-Zedek - He headed the confederacy against Joshua, which the kings of Hebron, Jarmuth, Lachish, and Eglon also joined. Attacking Gebeon for having made peace with Israel, they in turn were attacked by Joshua, who came by forced march from Gilgal to the relief of his ally. Routed they fled to Bethhoron, thence to Azekah and Makkedah, amidst the fearful hailstorm from God, followed by the sun's standing still at Joshua's command. Brought forth from their hiding place, a cave at Makkedah to the mouth of which Joshua had caused great stones to be rolled, they had their necks trodden down by his captains, and then were slain and hung on trees until sunset (Deuteronomy 21:23), and their bodies were buried in the cave
Spies - Two were also sent by Joshua, who were hidden by Rahab. Joshua 2 ; Joshua 6:23 ; Hebrews 11:31
Aphek - An unidentified city in the plain of Sharon ( Joshua 12:18 ). A city which Asher failed to take ( Joshua 13:4 ; Joshua 19:30 , Judges 1:31 )
Aroer - It was captured by Sihon, king of the Amorites ( Deuteronomy 2:36 ; Deuteronomy 4:48 , Joshua 12:2 ; Joshua 13:9 , Judges 11:26 ); when conquered by Israel it was assigned to Reuben ( Deuteronomy 3:12 ); it was taken by Hazael, king of Syria ( 2 Kings 10:33 ), and apparently later on by Moab ( Jeremiah 48:19 ). ‘Amman ( Joshua 13:25 , Judges 11:33 )
Jesus Christ - Hence the Hebrews call him, Jehoshuah, or Joshua, or Joshuah, he who shall save; and as Christ means, anointed of JEHOVAH, the Sent, the Sealed of the Father; full of grace and truth; both names together carry this blessed meaning with them, Jesus Christ the Saviour of the world by the anointing of JEHOVAH to all the purposes, of salvation. Joshua the successor of Moses, and Joshua the high priest in the church, after the church was brought back from Babylon
Megiddo, Megiddon - It was conquered by Joshua. Joshua 12:21 . " Joshua 17:11 ; Judges 1:27
Ashtaroth - A city of Bashan, east of the Jordan, Deuteronomy 1:4; Joshua 9:10; Joshua 13:31; the same as Beesh-terah, Joshua 21:27; probably Tell-Ashterah, in Jaulan
Chinnereth - It formed the eastern border of Canaan, the Promised Land (Numbers 34:11 ), marking the western boundary of the tribe of Gad (Joshua 13:27 ). A city on the western edge of the Sea of Chinnereth, also called Chinneroth (Joshua 11:2 ), though this could be a reference to the Sea. The city belonged to the tribe of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 )
Gibeon - A considerable city of the Hivites, afterwards a Levitical city in the tribe of Benjamin, Joshua 18:25 21:17 . Its Canaanite inhabitants secured a treaty with Joshua and the elders of Israel by strategem, and were made hewers of wood for the sanctuary. Five neighboring kings unitedly fell upon them; but were defeated by the Jews in a great battle, during which "the sun stood still upon Gibeon," Joshua 9:10
Horites - In locations where there is extrabiblical evidence for Hurrians, the Hebrew term Hivites appears (Genesis 34:2 ; Joshua 9:7 ; Joshua 11:3 ,Joshua 11:3,11:19 ) as a designation for certain elements of the Canaanite population. The Septuagint (the ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament), however, substitutes Horites for Hivites in Genesis 34:2 and Joshua 9:7
Hebron - It was possessed by the Canaanites, until conquered by Joshua, and the city given toCaleb, in the portion of Judah. Genesis 13:18 ; Genesis 23:2,19 ; Numbers 13:22 ; Joshua 10:36 ; Joshua 20:7 ; Judges 1:10,20 ; 2 Samuel 2:11 , etc. Joshua 19:28
Mahanaim - of Jordan on the frontier of Gad and Manasseh ( Joshua 13:25 ; Joshua 13:30 ); it was a Levitical city within the territory of Gad ( Joshua 21:38 ; Joshua 21:40 )
Accursed - See Numbers 21:2 ); “put everyone to death” (Deuteronomy 2:34 ); “completely destroy” (Deuteronomy 20:17 ); “killed” (Galatians 1:8-9 ; Joshua 8:26 ); “become the Lord's permanent property” (Leviticus 27:21 ); “put a curse on destroyed” (Judges 1:17 ). REB uses “dedicated” (Leviticus 27:21 ); “devoted” (Leviticus 27:28-29 ); “utterly destroy” (Numbers 21:2 ); “put to death under solemn ban” (Deuteronomy 2:34 ); “exterminate” (Deuteronomy 7:2 ); “destroyed” (Joshua 2:10 ); “put to death” (Judges 21:11 ). “Accursed” appears in KJV for cherem only in Joshua and in 1 Chronicles 2:7 . ”...
Paul used a technical Greek term, anathema, to call for persons to be put under a holy ban or be accursed (Romans 9:3 ; 1 Corinthians 12:3 ; Joshua 6:21 ; compare 1 Corinthians 16:22 )
Ekron - A city in the Philistine Pentapolis, not conquered by Joshua ( Joshua 13:3 ), but theoretically a border city of Judah ( Joshua 15:11 ) and Dan ( Joshua 19:43 ); said, in a passage which is probably an interpolation, to have been smitten by Judah ( Judges 1:18 )
Dabbasheth - ” A border town of the tribe of Zebulun (Joshua 19:11 )
Mount of the Valley - KJV designation for an elevation in a valley in the territory of Reuben in Transjordan (Joshua 13:19 )
Nezib - It has been identified with Beit Nuzib, about 14 miles south-west of Jerusalem, in the Wady Sur (Joshua 15:43 )
Hazar-Susah - Village of the horse, the same as Sansannah, one of Solomon's "chariot cities" (Joshua 15:31 ; 2 Chronicles 1:14 ), a depot in the south border of Judah
me-Jarkon - Waters of yellowness, or clear waters, a river in the tribe of Dan (Joshua 19:46 )
Kirjath - City, a city belonging to Benjamin (Joshua 18:28 ), the modern Kuriet el-'Enab, i
Maarath - A town of Judah in the hills (Joshua 15:58-59); not far from Hebron
Bar-Jesus - Son of Joshua, the patronymic of Elymas the sorcerer (Acts 13:6 ), who met Paul and Barnabas at Paphos
Anem - ) in Joshua 19:21 ; the modern Jenin
Chephar-Haammonai - ) Among Benjamin's towns (Joshua 18:24)
Rumah - Probably Dumah, a town in the mountains of Judah near Hebron (Joshua 15:52)
Beth-Marcaboth - BETH-MARCABOTH (‘place of chariots’ Joshua 19:5 , 1 Chronicles 4:31 )
Jeezer, Jeezerites - Apparently the same as ABIEZER and ABIEZRITES in Joshua 17:2 ; Judges 6:11 , etc
Jorkeam - We should perhaps read Jokdeam , the name of an unidentified place in the Negeb of Judah ( Joshua 15:56 )
Shemida - Son of Gilead; ancestor of the SHEMIDAITES (Numbers 26:32), who obtained their lot among the male children of Manasseh (Joshua 17:2)
Migdal-el - We meet with mention of this place, Joshua 19:38
Zophar - Job 2:11, is called the Naamathite, probably because he belonged to Naamah, Joshua 15:41, a town assigned to Judah
Beeshterah - A Levitical city, in Manasseh beyond the Jordan, Joshua 21:27
Bee'Roth - Wells, a city of Benjamin, near Gibeon, Joshua 9:17
Beth-e'Mek - (house of the valley ), a place on or near the border of Asher, on the north side of which was the ravine of Jiphthah-el ( Joshua 19:27 )
Jokmeam - Named Kibzaim in Joshua 21:22
Joshua - Both the names, Joshua and Jesus, signify savior, deliverer. Joshua led Israel over the Jordan, and took possession of the promised land; he conquered the Canaanites, and then distributed the country among the tribes. ...
THE BOOK OF Joshua contains the narrative of all these transactions, and was written by Joshua himself, or under his direction, B. From Joshua 24:27 on, was of course added by a later hand; but all was done under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, 2 Timothy 3:16
Kiriath-Jearim - One of the cities of the Gibeonites ( Joshua 9:17 ), occupied by the Danites ( Judges 18:12 ), on the border between Judah and Benjamin ( Joshua 15:9 ; Joshua 18:14 ). Its older name appears to have been Kiriath-baal ( Joshua 15:60 ) or Baalah . ( Joshua 15:9-10 , 1 Chronicles 13:6 ). ’ On the other hand, it is far from the other cities of the Gibeonltes ( Joshua 9:17 )
Judah, Tribe of - This was the only case in which any tribe had its inheritance thus determined (Joshua 14:6-15 ; 15:13-19 ). The inheritance of the tribe of Judah was at first fully one-third of the whole country west of Jordan, in all about 2,300 square miles (Joshua 15 ). But there was a second distribution, when Simeon received an allotment, about 1,000 square miles, out of the portion of Judah (Joshua 19:9 ). The boundaries of the territory are described in Joshua 15:20-63 . negeb), the undulating pasture-ground between the hills and the desert to the south (Joshua 15:21 . " The number of towns in this district was thirty-eight (Joshua 15:48-60 ). ...
The "wilderness," the sunken district next the Dead Sea (Joshua 15:61 ), "averaging 10 miles in breadth, a wild, barren, uninhabitable region, fit only to afford scanty pasturage for sheep and goats, and a secure home for leopards, bears, wild goats, and outlaws" (1 Samuel 17:34 ; 22:1 ; Mark 1:13 ). Nine of the cities of Judah were assigned to the priests (Joshua 21:9-19 )
Lachish - A royal Canaanite city which joined the confederacy against Gibeon for submitting to Israel, and was taken by Joshua (Joshua 12:11; Joshua 10:3; Joshua 10:5; Joshua 10:31-32) "on the second day," which shows its strength; the other cities were taken in one day (Joshua 10:35). Assigned to Judah, in the shephelah or "low hilly country" (Joshua 15:33; Joshua 15:39)
Canaanites - When the measure of their idolatries and abominations was completed, God delivered their country into the hands of the Israelites, who conquered it under Joshua. The Joshua 11:3 , where it is related that they, along with the united forces of northern Canaan, were defeated by Joshua. There were also Hivites in middle Palestine, Genesis 23:1-20 Joshua 19:1,7 11:19 . The Numbers 13:29 Joshua 11:3 . The Joshua 24:11 . The Joshua 15:8,63 18:28 . At a later period, they spread themselves out over all the mountainous country which forms the southeastern part of Canaan, and which was called from them the "mountain of the Amorites," and afterwards the "mountain of Judea," ...
Deuteronomy 1:19,20 Numbers 13:29 Joshua 11:3
Gilead - It calls the northern half (Manasseh) Gilead in Joshua 17:1; Joshua 17:6 and half-Gilead in Joshua 13:29-31. It calls the southern half (Gad) Gilead in Joshua 13:24-25 and half-Gilead in Joshua 12:2. ...
Chief towns of Gilead that feature in the Old Testament story are Jabesh-gilead (Judges 21:8-12; 1 Samuel 11:1; 1 Samuel 31:8-13), Mahanaim (Genesis 32:1-2; Joshua 21:38; 2 Samuel 2:29; 2 Samuel 17:24), Ramoth-gilead (Joshua 21:38; 1 Kings 22:3-4; 2 Kings 8:28; 2 Kings 9:1-3), Succoth (Genesis 33:17; Joshua 13:27; Judges 8:4-16) and Penuel (Genesis 32:31; Judges 8:4-17; 1 Kings 12:25)
Gilgal - Joshua 4:19,20 ; Joshua 5:2-11 . Gilgal was not only the starting point in taking possession of the land, but the place to which Joshua returned again and again: it was the place of strength. Joshua 9:6 ; Joshua 10:6-15 ; Joshua 14:6 . In Joshua 15:7 the border of Judah's portion 'looked toward' Gilgal, which well agrees with its being near Jericho. But in Joshua 18:17 the same place is called GELILOTH, which cannot be traced. ' He was slain under Joshua. Joshua 12:23
Segub - His death is recorded in 1 Kings 16:34 (Compare Joshua 6:26 )
Beth-Anoth - House of answers, a city in the mountainous district of Judah (Joshua 15:59 )
lo-Debar - It is probably identical with Debir (Joshua 13:26 )
Telem - ...
...
A town in the southern border of Judah (Joshua 15:24 ); probably the same as Telaim
Horonite - The designation of Sanballat (Nehemiah 2:10,19 ), a native of Horonaim, or of one of the two Beth-horons, the "upper" or the "nether," mentioned in Joshua 16:3,5
Ramoth - A Levitical city in the tribe of Issachar (1 Samuel 30:27 ; 1 Chronicles 6:73 ), the same as Jarmuth (Joshua 21:29 ) and Remeth (q
Salcah - Wandering, a city of Bashan assigned to the half tribe of Manasseh (Deuteronomy 3:10 ; Joshua 12:5 ; 13:11 ), identified with Salkhad, about 56 miles east of Jordan
Migdal-el - ” Fortified town in Naphtali (Joshua 19:38 )
Ummah - ” Town in Asher (Joshua 19:30 )
Zior - A town in the hill-country of Judah ( Joshua 15:54 )
Shu'Thelah - (noise of breaking ), head of an Ephraimite family, called after him Shuthalhites, ( Numbers 26:35 ) and lineal ancestor of Joshua the son of Numb (1 Chronicles 7:20-27 )
sa'Rid - ( Joshua 19:10,12 ) All that can be gathered of its position is that it lay to the west of Chislothtabor
Eder - of Judah, on Edom's border (Joshua 15:21)
Hukkok - On the boundary of Naphtali (Joshua 19:34)
en-Hazor - EN-HAZOR (‘spring of Hazor,’ Joshua 19:37 )
Anem - see) in the parallel list ( Joshua 21:29 )
Anim - ANIM ( Joshua 15:60 only)
Jehud - A town of Dan, named between Baalath and Bene-berak ( Joshua 19:45 )
Anem - Joshua 21:29 lists the city as En-gannim
Anaharath - ” City on border of Issachar (Joshua 19:19 ) located possibly at modern Tell el-Mukharhykhash between Mount Tabor and the Jordan
Chin'Nereth - (circuit ), accurately Cinnareth, a fortified city in the tribe of Naphtali, ( Joshua 19:35 ) only, of which no trace is found in later writers, and no remains by travellers
Chephar-Ammoni - ” A village in the tribal territory of Benjamin (Joshua 18:24 )
Nun - (fish , or posterity ), the father of the Jewish captain Joshua
la'Adan -
An Ephraimite, ancestor of Joshua the son of Nun
ho'Rem - ( Joshua 19:38 ) Van Deuteronomy Velde suggests Hurah as the site of Horem
ha'Lak - (smooth ), The mount, a mountain twice, and twice only, named, was the southern limit of Joshua's conquests, ( Joshua 11:17 ; 12:7 ) but which has not yet been identified
ra'Math of the South, - (Joshua 19:8 ) It is in all probability the same place as south Ramoth
Pentateuch - "The book of the law" in Deuteronomy 48:61; Deuteronomy 29:21; Deuteronomy 30:10; Deuteronomy 31:26; "the book of the law of Moses," Joshua 23:6; Nehemiah 8:1; in Ezra 7:6, "the law of Moses," "the book of Moses" (Ezra 6:18). He uses the third person of himself, as John does in the New Testament He probably dictated much of it to Joshua or some scribe, who subsequently added the account of Moses' death and a few explanatory insertions. ...
Joshua took a Hittite city, Kirjath Sepher, "the city of the book" (Joshua 15:15), and changed the name to Debir of kindred meaning. ...
Moreover, from Joshua downward the Old Testament books abound in references to the laws, history, and words of Moses, as such, universally accepted. They are ordered to be read continually (Joshua 1:7-8); "all the law which Moses My servant commanded . this book of the law" (Joshua 8:31; Joshua 8:34; Joshua 23:6). In Joshua 1:3-8; Joshua 1:13-18 the words of Deuteronomy 11:24-25; Deuteronomy 31:6-12, and Deuteronomy 3:18-20 Numbers 32:20-28, are quoted. The priesthood is in Aaron's family (Joshua 14:1). "Eleazar," Aaron's son, succeeds to his father's exalted position and with Joshua divides the land (Joshua 21:1), as Numbers 34:17 ordained; the Levites discharge their duties, scattered among the tribes and having 48 cities, as Jehovah by Moses commanded (Numbers 35:7). So the tabernacle made by Moses is set up at Shiloh (Joshua 18:1). The sacrifices (Joshua 8:31; Joshua 22:23; 1 Samuel 13:9-10; Joshua 22:29) are those enjoined (Leviticus 1; 2; 3). ...
The altar built (Joshua 8:30-31; Exodus 20:25) is "as Moses commanded . " Compare also as to the ark, Joshua 3:3; Joshua 3:6; Joshua 3:8; Joshua 7:6; circumcision, Joshua 5:2; Passover, Joshua 5:10; with the Pentateuch. There is the same general assembly or congregation and princes (Joshua 9:18-21; Joshua 20:6; Joshua 20:9; Joshua 22:30; Exodus 16:22); the same elders of Israel (Joshua 7:6; Deuteronomy 31:9); elders of the city (Deuteronomy 25:8; Joshua 20:4); judges and officers (Joshua 8:33; Deuteronomy 16:18); heads of thousands (Joshua 22:21; Numbers 1:16). Bodies taken down from hanging (Joshua 8:29; Joshua 10:27; Deuteronomy 21:23). No league with Canaan (Joshua 9; Exodus 23:32). Cities of refuge (Joshua 20; Numbers 35:11-15; Deuteronomy 4:41-43; Deuteronomy 19:2-7). Inheritance to Zelophebad's daughters (Joshua 17:3; Numbers 27; 36). So Joshua (Joshua 8:30-31), Saul (Joshua 22:27), David (2 Samuel 24:25), Solomon (1 Kings 3:4), and the people (1 Kings 3:2) sacrificed through the priest
Horem - ” City in tribal allotment of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38 )
Achsah - The daughter of Caleb, given in marriage with a large dowry to his nephew Othniel, as a prize for taking the city Debir, Joshua 15:15 - 17 ; Judges 1:12,13
Migdal el - ) A fortified town of Naphtali (Joshua 19:38)
Jethlah - ” Border town of tribe of Dan (Joshua 19:42 )
Gibeah of Judah - (Joshua 15:57 ), a city in the mountains of Judah, the modern Jeba, on a hill in the Wady Musurr, about 7 1/2 miles west-south-west of Bethlehem
Secacah - Enclosure, one of the six cities in the wilderness of Judah, noted for its "great cistern" (Joshua 15:61 )
Maaleh Acrabbim - Joshua 15:3; ("the ascent of scorpions"; "Scorpion pass"
Shual, the Land of - Land of the fox, a district in the tribe of Benjamin (1 Samuel 13:17 ); possibly the same as Shalim (9:4), in the neighbourhood of Shaalabbin (Joshua 19:42 )
Kibzaim - Two heaps, a city of Ephraim, assigned to the Kohathite Levites, and appointed as a city of refuge (Joshua 21 :: 22 )
Aznoth-Tabor - ” A border town of the tribe of Naphtali (Joshua 19:34 )
Bileam - Joshua 21:25 , a parallel passage reads, “Gath-rimmon
Beth-Emek - BETH-EMEK (‘house of the deep valley’, Joshua 19:27 )
Beth-Tappuah - BETH-TAPPUAH (‘place of apples,’ Joshua 15:53 )
Piram - Amorite king of Jarmuth at Joshua's invasion (Joshua 10:3)
Hough - The horse taken by David from the Syrians were thus disabled, Joshua 11:6,9 ; 2 Samuel 8:4
Gaulan or Golan - From it was named the small province of Gaulonitis, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:27 1 Chronicles 6:71
Eshtaol - A town on the western border of Judah, afterwards given to Dan, Joshua 15:33 ; 19:41
Beth'-Anath - (house of echo or reply ), one of the "fenced cities" of Naphtali, named with Beth-shemesh, ( Joshua 19:38 ) from neither of them were the Canaanites expelled
az'Noth-ta'Bor - ( Joshua 19:34 ) The town, if town it be, has hitherto escaped recognition
Jehosh'ua - In this form is given the name of Joshua in ( Numbers 13:16 ) Once more only the name appears, --as Jehosh'uah
Sharuhen - ” Town assigned to tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:6 ) located in the territory of Judah (Joshua 15:32 , where spelling is Shilhim; in 1 Chronicles 4:31 spelling is Shaaraim; Egyptian spelling is apparently Shurahuna)
Heshbon - Intelligence, a city ruled over by Sihon, king of the Amorites (Joshua 3:10 ; 13:17 ). It was taken by Moses (Numbers 21:23-26 ), and became afterwards a Levitical city (Joshua 21:39 ) in the tribe of Reuben (Numbers 32:37 )
Hivites - They are next mentioned during the Conquest (Joshua 9:7 ; 11:19 ). They principally inhabited the northern confines of Western Palestine (Joshua 11:3 ; Judges 3:3 )
Zorah - Place of wasps, a town in the low country of Judah, afterwards given to Dan (Joshua 19:41 ; Judges 18:2 ), probably the same as Zoreah (Joshua 15:33 )
Heap - When Joshua took the city of Ai (Joshua 8 ), he burned it and "made it an heap Engannim - In the lowland of Judah (Joshua 15:34). On the border of Issachar (Joshua 19:21)
Make - Joshua 8:15 ‘Joshua and all Israel made as if they were beaten
Cinnereth - A harp, one of the "fenced cities" of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 ; Compare Deuteronomy 3:17 ). " Called Chinneroth (RSV, Chinnereth) Joshua 11:2
Adam (2) - A city beside Zarthan (Joshua 3:16), on the Jordan. Near the present ford Damieh, which possibly is derived from the ancient name Adam; the northern extremity of Israel's passage (Joshua 22:11)
Ataroth - Village on border of Benjamin and Ephraim (Joshua 16:2 ,Joshua 16:2,16:7 ) It may be modern Khirbet el-Oga in the Jordan Valley
Salcah - A city the extreme boundary of Bashan (Joshua 13:11), and of Gad (1 Chronicles 5:11). The district also (Joshua 12:5)
Jahaz - It is also called Jahaza, Joshua 13:18, A. Jahazah, Joshua 21:36; Jeremiah 48:21, A
Zin - The wilderness of Zin, stretching from Kadesh-barnea to the Dead Sea, formed part of the southern border of Canaan and later Judah (Numbers 34:3-4 ; Joshua 15:1 ,Joshua 15:1,15:3 )
Knife - (Exodus 4:25) And Joshua, at the command of the Lord, made sharp knives for the same purpose. " (See Joshua 5:2-3) And as knives of stones were then in use, it is more than probable that the earlier ages had none formed of better materials
Jab'Bok - ( Joshua 12:2,5 ) and falls into the Jordan on the east about midway between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea. (Joshua 12:2,5 ) Its modern name is Wady Zurka
Ziklag - a city of the Philistines, first assigned to the tribe of Judah, and afterward to that of Simeon, Joshua 15:31 ; Joshua 19:5 ; but it does not appear that the Philistines were ever driven out; as, when David fled into their country from Saul, Achish gave the city to him, 1 Samuel 27:5-6
Ashdod, Azoth - according to the Vulgate, or Azotus, according to the Greek, a city which was assigned by Joshua to the tribe of Judah, but was possessed a long time by the Philistines, and rendered famous for the temple of their god Dagon, Joshua 15:47
Anakim - They were nearly extirpated by the Hebrews so that only a few remained afterwards in the cities of the Philistines, Numbers 13:22; Deuteronomy 9:2; Joshua 11:21-22; Joshua 14:15; and Jeremiah 47:5, which in the Septuagint reads: "O remnant of the Anakim" that is cut off
Ziklag - Ziklag (zĭk'lăg), outpouring of a fountain? A city in the south of Judah, Joshua 15:31; afterward given to Simeon, Joshua 19:5
Zorah - Zorah (zô'rah), and Zoreah (zô're-ah), hornet's town, and Zareah (zâ're-ah), Nehemiah 11:29, a town in the low country of Judah—afterward assigned to Dan, Joshua 15:33; Joshua 19:41; the birthplace and burialplace of Samson
Og - ( Joshua 13:12 ) He was one of the last representatives of the giant race of Rephaim, and was, with his children and his people, defeated and exterminated by the Israelites at Edrei immediately after the conquest of Sihon. (Numbers 32:33 ; 3:1-13) Also (1:4; 4:47; 31:4; Joshua 2:10 ; 9:10 ; 13:12,30 ) The belief in Og's enormous stature is corroborated by an allusion to his iron bedstead preserved in "Rabbath of the children of Ammon
Zano'ah -
A town of Judah in the Shefelah or plain, (Joshua 15:34 ; Nehemiah 3:13 ; 11:30 ) possibly identical with Zanu'a . ...
A town of Judah in the highland district, (Joshua 15:66 ) not improbably identical with Sanute , about 10 miles south of Hebron
Halhul - ” Town in hill country of Judah assigned to the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:58 )
Sharaim - Two gates (Joshua 15:36 ), more correctly Shaaraim (1 Samuel 17:52 ), probably Tell Zakariya and Kefr Zakariya, in the valley of Elah, 3 1/2 miles north-west of Socoh
Hazar-Addar - It is called Adar in Joshua 15:3
Sansannah - A palm branch, or a thorn bush, a town in the south (the negeb) of Judah (Joshua 15:31 ); called also Hazarsusah (19:5), or Hazar-susim (1 Chronicles 4:31 )
um'Mah - ( Joshua 10:30 ) only
Beth-Tappuah - ” Town assigned tribe of Judah in Judean hills (Joshua 15:53 )
Mahalab - (muh hay' lawb) A town in Asher's tribal territory (Joshua 19:29 NRSV, TEV) according to the earliest Greek translation
Emek-Keziz - EMEK-KEZIZ ( Joshua 18:21 , AV Kartah - A city of Zebulun ( Joshua 21:34 ); not mentioned in the parallel passage, 1 Chronicles 6:77
Zareth-Shahar - Joshua 13:19, "in the mount of the valley" (haemeq )
Akrabbim - AKRABBIM (less correctly Acrabbim Joshua 15:3 AV Abez - Tin, or white, a town in the tribe of Issachar (Joshua 19:20 ), at the north of the plain of Esdraelon
ze'Lah - (a rib ), a city in the allotment of Benjamin, ( Joshua 18:28 ) contained the family tomb of Kish, the father of Saul
ga'Ash - (earthquake ), a hill of Ephraim, where Joshua was buried
Rak'Kath - ( Joshua 19:35 ) It was on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, not far from the warm baths of Tiberias
Mig'Dal-el - (tower of God ), one of the fortified towns of the possession of Naphtali, ( Joshua 19:38 ) only, possibly deriving its name from some ancient tower --the "tower of El," or God
Naph'Tali, Mount, - the mountainous district which formed the main part of the inheritance of Naphtali, (Joshua 20:7 ) answering to "Mount Ephraim" in the centre and "Mount Judah" in the south of Palestine
Jabin - ) against Israel: Joshua 11:1-4. " Lest Joshua should be affrighted at this formidable array, Jehovah in vision promised "I will deliver them up all slain before Israel"; I am infinitely more than a match for them, and I am on thy side. Joshua suddenly fell upon them and "chased them unto great Zidon (then the metropolis of Phoenicia, but later in David's time outstripped by Tyre), and Misrephoth Maim and unto the valley of Mizpeh eastward, until they left them none remaining. The cities he did not burn except Hazor, which he burnt and slew its king, probably on account of some renewed hostility (Joshua 11:1-13)
Ashdod - A city in the Philistine Pentapolis; not captured by Joshua ( Joshua 13:3 ), and a refuge for the unslaughtered Anakim ( Joshua 11:22 ); theoretically assigned to the tribe of Judah ( Joshua 15:47 )
Gibeonites - Joshua 9:17 . Having deceived Joshua into making a treaty with them, they were made hewers of wood and drawers of water for the house of God. Joshua 9:23 . In this passage the Gibeonites are called 'Amorites,' a common designation of the Canaanites, which does not clash with their being called Hivites in Joshua 9:7
Aphek - City whose king Joshua defeated (Joshua 12:18 ), where Philistine armies formed to face Israel in days of Samuel (1 Samuel 4:1 ) resulting in Philistine victory and capture of Israel's ark of the covenant. See Joshua 13:4 ). City assigned to Asher (Joshua 19:30 ) but not conquered (Judges 1:31 )
Aphek - City whose king Joshua defeated (Joshua 12:18 ), where Philistine armies formed to face Israel in days of Samuel (1 Samuel 4:1 ) resulting in Philistine victory and capture of Israel's ark of the covenant. See Joshua 13:4 ). City assigned to Asher (Joshua 19:30 ) but not conquered (Judges 1:31 )
Zer - A ‘fenced’ city of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:35 )
Flood - ) In Joshua 24:2,3,14,15 , the word "flood" (RSV, "river") means the river Euphrates
Moladah - Birth, a city in the south of Judah which fell to Simeon (Joshua 15:21-26 ; 19:2 )
Hosah -
A place on the border of the tribe of Asher (Joshua 19:29 ), a little to the south of Zidon
Hough - , sever the "tendon of Achilles" of the hinder legs of captured horses (Joshua 11:6 ; 2 Samuel 8:4 ; 1 Chronicles 18:4 ), so as to render them useless
Sheshai - When the Israelites obtained possession of the country the sons of Anak were expelled and slain (Joshua 15:14 ; Judges 1:10 )
Iphtah - ” Town in tribal territory of Judah in the Shephelah (Joshua 15:43 )
Kedemoth - Beginnings; easternmost, a city of Reuben, assigned to the Levites of the family of Merari (Joshua 13:18 )
Rekem - ...
...
A town of Benjamin (Joshua 18:27 )
Haphraim - ” Town in tribal territory of Issachar (Joshua 19:19 )
Telem - City in southern Judah (Joshua 15:24 ), a variant form of Telaim
Hazar-Susah - A city in Simeon ( Joshua 19:5 = 1 Chronicles 4:31 )
Sec'Acah, - ( Joshua 15:61 ) Its portion is not known
Chesalon - Strength; confidence, a place on the border of Judah, on the side of Mount Jearim (Joshua 15:10 ); probably identified with the modern village of Kesla, on the western mountains of Judah
Hoglah - Third of Zelophehad's five daughters, in whose case a daughter's right of inheritance was decided, in the absence of sons (Numbers 26:33; Numbers 27:1; Numbers 36:11; Joshua 17:3)
Mearah - ” Part of the territory left unconquered following Joshua's conquest. The site is perhaps the caves called Mughar Jezzin located east of Sidon (Joshua 13:4 )
Zenan - ” Village in the Shephelah (wilderness) district of Judah (Joshua 15:37 ), likely identified with Araq el-Kharba
Bene-Berak - A town in the territory of Dan ( Joshua 19:45 ), identified with Ibn Ibrâq , about 5 miles E
en-Haddah - EN-HADDAH ( Joshua 19:21 )
Blameless - Joshua 2 ...
Allemeth - ]'>[1] Alemeth , l Ch 6:60; Almon , Joshua 21:18
Anaharath - ANAHARATH ( Joshua 19:19 ), mentioned with Shion and Rabbith on the east side of the Plain of Esdraelon in Issachar
Leb'Aoth - (lionesses ), a town which forms one of the last group of the cities of "the south" in the enumeration of the possessions of Judah, ( Joshua 15:32 ) probably identical with Beth-lebaoth
Shaalbim - A town of God, long held by the Amorites, Joshua 19:42 ; Judges 1:35 , but in the time of Solomon the headquarters of one of his commissaries, 1 Kings 4:9
ar'ba - (Joshua 14:15 ; 15:13 ; 21:11 )
Libnah - of Palestine, taken by Joshua, though not one of the leagued cities, because he would not leave so strong a city unsubdued in his rear, after destroying Makkedah on his way to Lachish. A priests' city with its "suburbs" (Joshua 10:29-30; Joshua 10:32-39; Joshua 12:15; Joshua 15:42; Joshua 21:13). The explanation of the revolt, though satisfactory, is one inferred from comparing independent scriptures (2 Chronicles 21:10; 2 Kings 8:18; Joshua 15:42; Joshua 21:13), an undesigned propriety confirming the truth
Taanach - TAANACH ( Joshua 12:21 , 1 Kings 4:12 , 1 Chronicles 7:29 ). Though in the territory of Issachar, it belonged to Manasseh; the native Canaanites were, however, not driven out ( Joshua 17:11-13 , Judges 1:27 ). It was allotted to the Levites of the children of Kohath ( Joshua 21:25 )
Rimmon - (See Joshua 9:17 . ...
...
One of the "uttermost cities" of Judah, afterwards given to Simeon (Joshua 15:21,32 ; 19:7 ; 1 Chronicles 4:32 ). In Joshua 15:32 Ain and Rimmon are mentioned separately, but in 19:7 and 1 Chronicles 4:32 (Compare Nehemiah 11:29 ) the two words are probably to be combined, as forming together the name of one place, Ain-Rimmon=the spring of the pomegranate
Stone - Stones were commonly used for buildings, also as memorials of important events (Genesis 28:18 ; Joshua 24:26,27 ; 1 Samuel 7:12 , etc. ...
Stones were set up to commemorate remarkable events, as by Jacob at Bethel (Genesis 28:18 ), at Padan-aram (35:4), and on the occasion of parting with Laban (31:45-47); by Joshua at the place on the banks of the Jordan where the people first "lodged" after crossing the river (Joshua 6:8 ), and also in "the midst of Jordan," where he erected another set of twelve stones (4:1-9); and by Samuel at "Ebenezer" (1 Samuel 7:12 )
River of Egypt - ...
(2) Νahal Μitsaim (Numbers 34:5; Joshua 15:3-4; Joshua 15:47; 1 Kings 8:65; 2 Kings 24:7); "the torrent of Egypt": see above nahal , "a stream flowing rapidly in the rainy season, then drying up", inapplicable to the sluggish Nile ever flowing. In Joshua 13:3, "from Sihor which is before Egypt," the same torrent is marked as Israel's southern boundary, as the entering in of Hamath is the northern (Numbers 34:5; Numbers 34:8)
Hivites - Their abode was about Hermon and Lebanon (Joshua 11:3, "under Hermon in the land of Mizpeh"; Judges 3:3, "from mount Baalhermon unto the entering in of Hamath"); toward Tyre (2 Samuel 24:7), and Sichem or Shechem (Genesis 34:11), and Gibeon (Joshua 9:1; Joshua 9:7)
Ebal - On this mountain Joshua built an altar and erected a monument bearing the law of Moses ( Joshua 8:30 ); and the curses for breaches of the moral law were here proclaimed to the assembled Israelites on their formally taking possession of the Promised Land ( Deuteronomy 11:29 ; Deuteronomy 27:4 ; Deuteronomy 27:13 , Joshua 8:33 )
Mizpah or Mizpeh - A city of Benjamin, a central gathering-place of the tribes in the period of the judges, Joshua 18:26 Judges 20:1,3 21:1 . A town in the plain of Judah, Joshua 15:38 . A valley near Mount Hermon, towards Zidon, Joshua 11:3,8
Chariot - When the Israelites entered Canaan under Joshua, they were successful in conquering the hill country, but had difficulty in conquering the plains. The reason for this was that the local Canaanites were well equipped with chariots (Joshua 11:4; Joshua 17:16; Judges 1:19; Judges 4:13; 1 Samuel 13:5)
Aaronites - Thirteen cities were assigned to them, in Judah and Benjamin, Joshua 21:13-19 ; 1 Chronicles 6:57-60
Chuldah - A prophetess, descendant of Joshua and Rahab, contemporary of Zephaniah and Jeremiah
Huldah - A prophetess, descendant of Joshua and Rahab, contemporary of Zephaniah and Jeremiah
Baalath - A town of the tribe of Dan (Joshua 19:44 )
Taanath-Shiloh - Approach to Shiloh, a place on the border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:6 ), probably the modern T'ana, a ruin 7 miles south-east of Shechem, on the ridge east of the Mukhnah plain
en-Tappuah - ” A spring near the town of Tappuah which marked the border of the tribe of Manasseh and Ephraim (Joshua 17:7 )
Shihon - It was a border town of Issachar (Joshua 19:19 )
Zur - A Midianite prince slain by the Israelites ( Numbers 25:15 ; Numbers 31:8 , Joshua 13:21 )
Maralah - ” Border town in Zebulun (Joshua 19:11 )
Kabzeel - A town in the extreme south of Judah, on the border of Edom ( Joshua 15:21 , 2 Samuel 23:20 ); called in Nehemiah 11:25 Jekabzeel
Adami-Nekeb - ‘The pass Adami’ ( Joshua 19:33 ), on the border of Naphtali
Bethnimrah - City of Gad, on the east of the Jordan, Numbers 32:36 ; Joshua 13:27 : it is called NIMRAH in Numbers 32:3
Ziddim - A fortified town of Naphtali (Joshua 19:35)
Adami - ” Town in Naphtali's territory (Joshua 19:33 ), perhaps Khirbet Damiyeh north of Mount Tabor
Joshua - Joshua 1:1 (c) He is a type of the Lord JESUS who, as the Commander and Leader of His people, conquers their enemies and leads them in triumph into blessed resting places
Japhi'a - ( Joshua 19:12 ) Yafa , two miles south of Nazareth
Serug - Jewish tradition says he was the first of his line that fell into idolatry, Joshua 24:2
Chesulloth - Or CHISLOTH-TABOR, a town on the border of Zebulun and Issachar, about four miles west of mount marks its site, together with numerous excavated tombs, Joshua 19:12,18,22 1 Chronicles 6:62
be-Esh-Terah - ( Joshua 21:27 ) Probably identical with Ashtaroth
ar'Chi - (Joshua 16:2 ) A place in the neighborhood of Bethel, on the boundary between Ephraim and Benjamin
Japhi'a - ( Joshua 19:12 ) Yafa , two miles south of Nazareth
Jephunneh -
The father of Caleb, who was Joshua's companion in exploring Canaan (Numbers 13:6 ), a Kenezite (Joshua 14:14 )
Amorites - They intermarried so widely with the original Canaanites that it became common practice to use the words ‘Canaanite’ and ‘Amorite’ interchangeably as names for the whole mixed population of Canaan (Genesis 15:16; Joshua 24:15; Joshua 24:18). Nevertheless, some Amorite tribal groups in Canaan maintained their distinct identity, as did other tribal groups (Exodus 3:8; Exodus 13:5; Exodus 23:23; Joshua 9:1; Joshua 12:8). in Canaan) likewise lost their territory to the conquering Israelites (Joshua 5:1; Joshua 10:5; Joshua 11:1-8)
Joshua, Theology of - Joshua the Faithful Warrior and Leader . Moses gave Joshua his name, meaning, "the Lord has delivered. Joshua first appears in Israel's war with the Amalekites (Exodus 17:8-13 ). When he reappears in Exodus 24:13 , Joshua climbs Mount Sinai alongside Moses. Later (32:17), Joshua warns Moses of the noise that comes from the camp below where Israel engages in idolatry. With Caleb, Joshua spies out the land and returns a positive evaluation of the possibilities of Israelite occupation (Numbers 14 ). Finally, Joshua is designated as Moses' successor and is commissioned to succeed him. ...
Four theological themes appear in the descriptions of Joshua in the Pentateuch: Joshua's divine commission as leader of Israel, his military leadership, his allocation of the land, and his role in Israel's covenant with God. In each case, God's word and power lie behind Joshua. These same four themes reappear in the Book of Joshua. The first chapter of the Book of Joshua establishes Joshua's leadership as divinely appointed successor to Moses. With Moses' death, God addresses Joshua directly, promising both the land which he promised to Moses (Deuteronomy 34:4 ) and his divine presence, just as he had given it to Moses (Joshua 1:3-5 ). 6,7, 9) define the mission of Joshua. Their context of God's promised presence suggests that it is the divine choice and enablement of Joshua that precedes his leadership and gives it success. It only remains for Joshua to be recognized as leader by the Israelites, something he achieves through completion of the divinely appointed tasks involved in crossing the Jordan River. This miraculous crossing is God's means for exalting Joshua in the eyes of all Israel (Joshua 4:14 ). Joshua's military leadership recurs throughout the first twelve chapters. What is unique in the theology of Joshua is the record of exceptions to this rule, lives spared through the confession of belief in the God of Israel and in his mission for his people. Joshua's allocation of the land in chapters 13-21 continues the process already begun by Moses in Transjordan. The idealistic nature of these allotments is suggested from Joshua 13:1-7 and throughout the allotments. The covenant making over which Joshua presides dominates the book. In both of these sections Joshua's leadership establishes Israel in close relationship with God. 3-4); the Israelite circumcision (5:1-3); the Passover celebration (5:10); Joshua's confrontation with the commander of the Lord's army (5:13-15); the special instructions for crossing the Jordan with the ark (chaps. They are found in the content of the confessions of Rahab, of the Gibeonites, and of Joshua as already mentioned. In addition, they occur in notes of how the enemies of Israel hear of the Israelite victories and how their courage melts (5:1); how God's presence with Joshua leads to his fame spreading throughout the land (6:27); and how the armies of Canaan learn of God's Acts but still refuse to accept God's sovereignty and signify this by perpetrating war against Israel (9:1-2; 10:1-5; 11:1-5). Specific references are also found, as in the cases of Caleb whose conquest of Hebron results in the land being given rest (14:15) and of Joshua who settled in Timnath Serah (19:50). The records of the deaths and burials of Joshua, Joseph, and Eleazar, which conclude the book (24:29-33) reflect a final resting place for them in three sites located throughout the central hill country of Palestine, the region where Israel first settled. ...
Joshua in the Context of Israel's History . Even so, the prophetic promises looked forward to a return to the promised land and to a full claim of these blessings under a messianic leader who would rule the people in perfect fulfillment of the covenant and in a renewal of the rich blessings of the land to which Joshua had led the people so long ago. Butler, Joshua ; L. Woudstra, The Book of Joshua ; K
Vale - ...
Νachal , a wady or wide stream bed in winter filled by a torrent, but in summer dry and strewed with water worn stones and shrubs; KJV translated it also "brook," "river," "stream"; Βiqu'ah , a plain wider than a valley, the wide plain between Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon is still called Bequa'a (Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7), and Megiddo (Zechariah 12:11). Ηa-shephelah , wrongly translated "valley," a broad tract of low hills between the mountains of Judah and the coast plain (Deuteronomy 1:7; Joshua 10:40). as did Joshua, he would naturally come to Khirbet Haiy. " Khirbet Haiy also suits Joshua 8:11-13, "the Israelites pitched on the N: side of Ai; now there was a valley (gay) between them and Ai . Joshua went that night into the midst of the valley" (emek )
Caleb - ...
...
The son of Jephunneh (Numbers 13:6 ; 32:12 ; Joshua 14:6,14 ). He and Joshua the son of Nun were the only two of the whole number who encouraged the people to go up and possess the land, and they alone were spared when a plague broke out in which the other ten spies perished (Numbers 13 ; 14 ). The last notice we have of Caleb is when (being then eighty-five years of age) he came to Joshua at the camp at Gilgal, after the people had gained possession of the land, and reminded him of the promise Moses had made to him, by virtue of which he claimed a certain portion of the land of Kirjath-arba as his inheritance (Joshua 14:6-15 ; 15:13-15 ; 21:10-12 ; 1 Samuel 25:2,3 ; 30:14 ). He is called a "Kenezite" in Joshua 14:6,14 . When he gave up the city of Hebron to the priests as a city of refuge, he retained possession of the surrounding country (Joshua 21:11,12 ; Compare 1 Samuel 25:3 )
Shebarim - ” Place with symbolic name and uncertain location near Ai (Joshua 7:5 ), translated as “stone quarries” (NIV; compare REB)
Evi - He apparently ruled as a vassal of Sihon (Joshua 13:21 )
Jehud - ” Town in tribal territory of Dan (Joshua 19:45 )
Nekeb - Cavern, a town on the boundary of Naphtali (Joshua 19:33 )
Shimron - Watch-post, an ancient city of the Canaanites; with its villages, allotted to Zebulun (Joshua 19:15 ); now probably Semunieh, on the northern edge of the plain of Esdraelon, 5 miles west of Nazareth
Dilean - ” Village in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:38 )
Hazor-Hadattah - The text ( Joshua 15:25 ) is not beyond suspicion
Sharu'Hen - (refuge of grace ), a town named in ( Joshua 19:6 ) only among those which were in Jadah to Simeon
Hali - A city belonging to the tribe of Asher ( Joshua 19:25 )
Adonizedek - (See Joshua 10:1)...
Gede'Rah - (a sheepfold ), a town of Judah in the lowland country, ( Joshua 15:36 ) apparently in its eastern part
ne'Keb - ( Joshua 19:3 ) It lay between Adami and Jabneel
gi'Loh - (exile ), a town in the mountainous part of Judah, named in the first group with Debir and Eshtemoh, ( Joshua 16:51 ) it was the native place of the famous Ahithophel
Huk'Kok - ( Joshua 19:34 ) It has been recovered in Yakuk , a village in the mountains of Naphtali west of the upper end of the Sea of Galilee
Achan - Pocketed some of the spoils of Jericho -- despite Joshua’s instructions to take nothing
Galilee - ” The northern part of Palestine above the hill country of Ephraim and the hill country of Judah (Joshua 20:7 ). The Septuagint or early Greek translation referred to a king of the nations of Galilee in Joshua 12:23 , though the Hebrew reads, “Gilgal. This would indicate a leader of a coalition of city-states whom Joshua defeated. Kedesh in Galilee was a city of refuge (Joshua 20:7 ) and a city for the Levites (Joshua 21:32 )
Medeba - MEDEBA ( Numbers 21:30 , Joshua 13:9 ; Joshua 13:16 , 1 Chronicles 19:7 , Isaiah 15:2 ). It was taken from Moab by Sihon and then conquered by Israel ( Numbers 21:24-35 ) and assigned to Reuben ( Joshua 13:9-16 [1])
Gezer - ) An old Canaanite city, whose king, Horam or Elam, helping Lachish, was slain with his people by Joshua (Joshua 10:33; Joshua 12:12). A landmark of Ephraim, between lower Beth-horon and the Mediterranean (Joshua 16:3), on the S. Allotted to the Kohathite Levites (Joshua 21:21; 1 Chronicles 6:67)
Eshtemoa - Obedience, a town in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 21:14 ; 1 Chronicles 6:57 ), which was allotted, with the land round it, to the priests. It is also called "Eshtemoh" (Joshua 15:50 )
Dagon's House - The Beth-dagon of Joshua 15:41 was one of the cities of the tribe of Judah, in the lowland or plain which stretches westward. ...
The Beth-dagon of Joshua 19:27 was one of the border cities of Asher
Eshtaol - ” Town in lowlands of Shephelah of Judah allotted to the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:33 ) but also to the tribe of Dan (Joshua 19:41 )
Arabah - Plain, in the Revised Version of 2 Kings 14:25 ; Joshua 3:16 ; 8:14 ; 2 Samuel 2:29 ; 4:7 (in all these passages the A. This word is found in the Authorized Version only in Joshua 18:18
Rephaim - They were of large stature (comparable in size to the Anakim; see ANAK), and were feared by other peoples of the region (Deuteronomy 2:10-11; Deuteronomy 2:20-21; Joshua 12:4). There was a valley west of Jerusalem known as the Valley of Rephaim (Joshua 15:8; 2 Samuel 5:18)
Geba - ), on the north border of Judah near Gibeah (Isaiah 10:29 ; Joshua 18:24,28 ). It has been identified with Gaba (Joshua 18:24 ; Ezra 2:26 ; Nehemiah 7:30 ), now Jeb'a, about 5 1/2 miles north of Jerusalem
en-Rogel - ” A border town between the tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:7 ) and that of Benjamin (Joshua 18:16 )
Gibbethon - ” City in the tribal territory of Dan (Joshua 19:44 ) but assigned to the Levites (Joshua 21:23 )
Nephtoah - A town on the boundary between Judah and Benjamin ( Joshua 15:9 ; Joshua 18:16 ), usually identified with Lifta , about 2 miles N
Ziph - A city of Southern Judah ( Joshua 15:24 ). A city in the hill-country of Judah ( Joshua 15:55 ); fortified by Rehoboam ( 2 Chronicles 11:8 )
Beeroth - A Gibeonite city, usually coupled in enumeration with Chephirah and Kiriath-jearim ( Joshua 9:17 , Ezra 2:25 , Nehemiah 7:29 ); assigned to the tribe of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:25 , 2 Samuel 4:2 ); the home of Rechab, murderer of Ish-bosheth ( 2 Samuel 4:2 ), and of Naharai, armour-bearer of Joab ( 2 Samuel 23:37 )
Beth-Jeshimoth - In Joshua 12:8 it is mentioned as in the S. In Joshua 13:20 it is assigned to Reuben; and in Ezekiel 25:9 it is spoken of as belonging to Moab
Ataroth - border of the territory of the children of Joseph ( Joshua 16:2 ), called Ataroth-addar in v. end of the same border ( Joshua 16:7 )
Jabin - King of Hazor in the north, who, with confederate kings, raised an enormous army 'as the sand that is upon the sea shore,' but was signally defeated by Joshua, after he had overthrown the confederacy in the south. Joshua 11:1-11
Merom, Waters of (See Also Jordan, Lake of Huleh) - This was where Joshua defeated the confederate kings of the north. Joshua 11:5-9
Adullam - a city in the tribe of Judah, to the west of Hebron, whose king was slain by Joshua, Joshua 12:15
Mahanaim - a city of the Levites, of the family of Merari, in the tribe of Gad, upon the brook Jabbok, Joshua 21:38 ; Joshua 13:26
Bethabara - or BETHBARAH, signifies in the Hebrew a place of passage, because of its ford over the river Jordan, on the east bank of which river it stood over against Jericho, Joshua 2:7 ; Joshua 3:15-16
Goshen - ...
A district in southern Palestine conquered by Joshua. (Joshua 10:41 ) It lay between Gaza and Gibeon
Beth-Horon - Down this pass Joshua drove the Amorites, and here Paul passed by night on his way to Antipatris, Joshua 10:1-11 Acts 23:31,32
Oth'ni-el - ( Joshua 15:17 ; Judges 1:13 ; 3:9 ; 1 Chronicles 4:13 ) (B. The next mention of him is in (Judges 3:9 ) where he appears as the first judge of Israel after the death of Joshua, and the deliverer of his countrymen from the oppression of Chushahrishathaim (Judges 3:8-9 )
Makke'Dah - (place of shepherds ), a place memorable in the annals of the conquest of Canaan as the scene of the execution by Joshua of the five confederate kings, ( Joshua 10:10-50 ) who had hidden themselves in a cave at this place
hi'Vites - (Joshua 9:7 ; 11:19 ) The main body of the Hivites were at this time living in the northern confines of western Palestine-- "under Hermon, in the land of Mizpeh," (Joshua 11:3 ) --"in Mount Lebanon, from Mount Baal Hermon to the entering in of Hamath
Jahaz - Trodden down (called also Jahaza, Joshua 13:18 ; Jahazah, 21:36; Jahzah, 1 Chronicles 6:78 ), a town where Sihon was defeated, in the borders of Moab and in the land of the Ammonites beyond Jordan, and north of the river Arnon (Numbers 21:23 ; Deuteronomy 2:32 ). It was situated in the tribe of Reuben, and was assigned to the Merarite Levites (Joshua 13:18 ; 21:36 )
Beth-Emek - ” A border town in the tribal territory of Asher (Joshua 19:27 )
Eltekon - ” Village in tribal territory of Judah in southern hill country (Joshua 15:59 )
Secacah - A town mentioned ( Joshua 15:61 ) among the possessions of Judah ‘in the wilderness’ ( midbâr )
Taanath-Shiloh - boundary of Ephraim ( Joshua 16:6 )
re'Kem - (Numbers 31:8 ; Joshua 13:21 ) ...
One of the four sons of Hebron, and father of Shammai
Eltekeh - It was a city of refuge and a Levitical city (Joshua 21:23 )
Hazar-Shual - Village or enclosure of the jackal, a city on the south border of Judah (Joshua 15:28 ; Nehemiah 11:27 )
Bealoth - Citizens, a town in the extreme south of Judah (Joshua 15:24 ); probably the same as Baalath-beer (19:8)
Kartah - City, a town in the tribe of Zebulun assigned to the Levites of the family of Merari (Joshua 21:34 )
Taanath-Shiloh - ” village located about seven miles southeast of Shechem between Michmethath and Janoah (Joshua 16:6 ), identified with the modern khirbet Ta'nah el Foqa
Shebarim - A place mentioned ( Joshua 7:5 ) in the description of the pursuit of the Israelites by the men of Ai
Janohah - On the border of Ephraim (Joshua 16:6-7)
Lahmas - ” Reading of basic Hebrew manuscript (Joshua 15:40 ) adopted by REB, NIV, NAS
Lakum - ” Border town in tribal allotment of Naphtali (Joshua 19:33 )
Bileam - A Levitical city of Manasseh, the same as Ibleam of Joshua 17:11 , Jdg 1:27 , 2 Kings 9:27 : prob
Jehoshua, Jehoshuah - Name in its uncontracted form given to Joshua by 'Moses
Paarai - "of Arab", in the mountains of Judah; Joshua 15:52): 2 Samuel 23:35
Mea'Rah - (a cave ), a place named in ( Joshua 13:4 ) only
re'Kem - (Numbers 31:8 ; Joshua 13:21 ) ...
One of the four sons of Hebron, and father of Shammai
ca'Bul -
One of the landmarks on the boundary of Asher, (Joshua 19:27 ) now Kabul , 9 or 10 miles east of Accho
City of Salt - A city allotted to the tribe of Judah “in the desert” (Joshua 15:62 )
ge'Dor - (a wall ), a town int he mountainous part of Judah, ( Joshua 15:58 ) a few miles north of Hebron
az'Mon - ( Numbers 34:4,5 ; Joshua 15:4 ) It has not yet been identified
Gibeon - ” This “great city” (Joshua 10:2 ) played a significant role in Old Testament history—especially during the conquest of Canaan. Originally, the city was assigned to the tribe of Benjamin following Israel's victory in Canaan (Joshua 18:25 ) and made a city for Levites (Joshua 21:17 ). The people of Gibeon concocted a deceptive strategy to protect themselves from the Israelites (Joshua 9:1 ). Pretending to be foreigners also, the Gibeonites made a treaty with Joshua. When Joshua later discovered the truth, he forced the Gibeonites to become water carriers and woodcutters for the Israelites. Honoring this covenant, Joshua led Israel against the armies of five kings who had attacked Gibeon. During these victories the Lord caused the sun and moon to stand still (Joshua 10:1 ; compare Isaiah 28:21 ). ...
See Canaan; David ; Joshua
Kedesh - (Joshua 15:23). Of Issachar, assigned to the Gershonite Levites (1 Chronicles 6:72); Kishon in Joshua 21:28 probably the better reading. Kedesh Naphtali, or Kedesh in Galilee (Joshua 19:37), a Levitical city of refuge assigned to the Gershonite Levites (Joshua 20:7)
Harlot - The most famous harlot in the Bible is Rahab of Jericho, who saved the Israelite spies sent by Joshua to scout out the Promised Land (Joshua 2:1 ). She continued to dwell with the Israelites (Joshua 6:23-25 ). Rahab's house may have been one (Joshua 2:1 )
Rephaim, Valley of - In Joshua 15:8; Joshua 18:16, it is translated "the valley of the giants. ...
Joshua (Joshua 15:8) says Judah's boundary "went up to the top of the mountain that lieth before the valley of Hinnom westward, which is at the end of the valley, of Rephaim ("giants") northward
ta'Anath-Shi'Loh - (approach to Shiloh ), a place named once only -- ( Joshua 16:6 ) --as one of the landmarks of the boundary of Ephraim
Janum - ” Town in tribal territory of Judah (Joshua 15:53 ) near Hebron
Migdal-Gad - ” Village near Lachish in the Shephelah district of Judah (Joshua 15:37 )
Tahan - Ephraimite ancestor of Joshua (1 Chronicles 7:25 )
Hukkok - A place near Tabor on the west of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:34 )
Maroth - The town is perhaps identical with Maarath (Joshua 15:59 )
Nezib - ” Village in the Shephelah district of Judah (Joshua 15:43 )
Anim - A city in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 15:50)
Adamah - A fortified city of Naphtali ( Joshua 19:36 ); identified by Conder with ’Admah on the plateau north of Bethshean; placed by the Palestine explorers at ed-Damieh , 5 miles S
Beth-Nimrah - Numbers 32:3,36 ; Joshua 13:27 , and Nimrim, Isaiah 15:6 ; Jeremiah 48:34 ; a town in Gad, a little east of the Jordan, on a watercourse leading, from near Ramoth-Gilead, southwest into that river
Giloh - A city of Judah, Joshua 15:50 ; where Ahithophel, David's counselor dwelt; and where, after his treason against David, and the rejection of his counsel by Absalom, he hung himself, 2 Samuel 15:12 ; 17:23
Ai - (ay' i) a city located two miles from Bethel, was the site where Abram built an altar, and Joshua and Achan suffered ruin. The city was almost the ruin of Joshua's leadership (Joshua 7:1-9 ); it was the ruin of Achan and his family (Joshua 7:16-26 ); and it suffered complete ruin (Joshua 8:1-29 ). Several hundred years before Joshua, Abram built an altar on a hill just west of Ai which was also near Bethel (Genesis 12:8 ). The victory at Ai (Joshua 8:1 ) frightened the other Canaanites (Joshua 9:3 ; Joshua 10:2 ) and helped Israel to further victories
Caleb - the son of Jephunneh, of the tribe of Judah, was one of those who accompanied Joshua, when he was deputed by Moses to view the land of Canaan, which the Lord had promised them for an inheritance, Numbers 13. Moses and Aaron no sooner heard this than they fell upon their faces before the whole congregation, and Joshua and Caleb rent their clothes, imploring them to take courage and march boldly on; since, if God were with them, they might easily make a conquest of the whole land. So exasperated, however, were the multitude, that they were proceeding to stone Caleb and Joshua, when the glory of the Lord appeared upon the tabernacle, and threatened their extermination. Joshua also obtained a similar exception, Numbers 14:30 ; Numbers 14:38 . When Joshua had entered the promised land, and conquered a considerable part of it, Caleb, with the people of his tribe, came to meet him at Gilgal, and finding that he was about to divide the land among the twelve tribes, Caleb petitioned to have the country which was inhabited by the giants allotted to him, on which Joshua blessed him and granted his request. See Numbers 13, 14, Joshua 14:6-15 ; Joshua 15:13-19 ; Judges 1:9-15 ; 1 Chronicles 4:15-20
Salt, City of - A city of Judah ( Joshua 15:61-62 )
Zela - A Benjamite city ( Joshua 18:28 ), where was the family burying-place of Saul ( 2 Samuel 21:14 Timnath-Heres - Portion of the sun, where Joshua was buried (Judges 2:9 )
Parah - The heifer, a town in Benjamin (Joshua 18:23 ), supposed to be identical with the ruins called Far'ah, about 6 miles north-east of Jerusalem, in the Wady Far'ah, which is a branch of the Wady Kelt
Emek-Keziz - ” It is listed as one of the cities assigned the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 18:21 )
Middin - ” Village in the wilderness district of Judah (Joshua 15:61 )
Remmon-Methoar - (Rehm' mahn-meh thoh' ahr) KJV took Remmon-Methoar as a proper name (Joshua 19:13 )
Betonim - ” A border town in tribal allotment of Gad (Joshua 13:26 )
Kinah - ” A city in the southeast of Judah near the boundary of Edom (Joshua 15:22 )
Nibsan - ” Town assigned to the tribe of Judah (Joshua 15:62 )
Salcah - (ssal' cuh) Territory and/or city on extreme eastern border of Bashan, possibly modern Salkhad, the defensive center of the Jebel el-Druze, 63 miles east of the Jordan (Deuteronomy 3:10 ; Joshua 12:5 )
Betharam - Joshua 13:27 : held to be the same as BETH-HARAN of Numbers 32:36
Oshea - Joshua's original name (Numbers 13:8). (See Joshua
Gederah - A city in the plain of Judah, Joshua 15:36 , probably the same with the preceding Geder, and with Beth-Gader, 1 Chronicles 2:51
Beth-Jeshimoth - A city of Reuben, taken from the Moabites, Numbers 33:49 Joshua 12:3 13:20 ; but retaken by them after the captivity, Ezekiel 25:9
Shinar - A level region of indefinite extent around Babylon and the junction of the Euphrates and Tigris, Genesis 10:10 11:2 14:1 Joshua 7:21 Isaiah 11:11 Daniel 1:2 Zechariah 5:11
Ed - (witness ), a word inserted in the Authorized Version of ( Joshua 22:34 ) apparently on the authority of a few MSS
Testimony - ...
...
The altar raised by the Gadites and Reubenites (Joshua 22:10 )
Ephrain - Possibly = Ephraim city above; also = EPHRON, MOUNT, on the northern bound of Judah (Joshua 15:9)
Bamoth-Baal - Heights of Baal, a place on the river Arnon, or in the plains through which it flows, east of Jordan (Joshua 13:17 ; Compare Numbers 21:28 )
Hosah - A city of Asher, apparently south of Tyre ( Joshua 19:29 )
Sha-Ara'im - (two gates ), a city in the territory allotted to Judah, ( Joshua 15:36 ) in Authorized Version incorrectly Sharaim
Ziddim - ” Fortified town in Naphtali (Joshua 19:35 ), perhaps identifical with Hattin el-Qadim about eight miles west northwest of Tiberias
Beten - BETEN ( Joshua 19:25 )
Baalathbeer - Joshua 19:8 ; also called 'RAMATH of the South;' and in 1 Samuel 30:27 South RAMOTH; and apparently the same as BAAL in 1 Chronicles 4:33
Encourage - ...
But charge Joshua, and encourage him
Anem - This name is not found in the lists in Joshua 19 and 21 but EN-GANNIMis mentioned instead
Ches'Alon - (hopes ), a place named as one of the landmarks on the west part of the north boundary of Judah, ( Joshua 15:10 ) probably Kesla , about six miles to the northeast of Ainshems , on the western mountains of Judah
Zip'Por - ( Numbers 22:2,4,10,16 ; 23:18 ; Joshua 24:9 ; Judges 11:25 ) Whether he was the "former king of Moab" alluded to in (Numbers 21:26 ) we are not told
Libnah - a city in the southern part of the tribe of Judah, Joshua 15:42 , of which a cession was made to the priests for their habitation, and which was declared a city of refuge, 1 Chronicles 6:57
Megiddo - a city of the tribe of Manasseh, famous for the battle fought there between Pharaoh-Necho and King Josiah, in which the latter was defeated and mortally wounded, Joshua 17:11 ; Judges 1:27 ; 2 Kings 23:29
Pedahel - ” Leader of the tribe of Naphtali whom Moses appointed to assist Joshua and Eliezer in the distribution of land to the tribes living west of the Jordan (Numbers 34:28 )
Gaash - A hill of Ephraim, north of which stood Timnath-seres, celebrated for Joshua's tomb, Joshua 24
Baalath - A town in the tribe of God, Joshua 19:44
Kar'Tan - ( Joshua 21:32 ) in the parallel list of (1 Chronicles 6:1 ) the name appears, ver (1 Chronicles 6:76 ) in the more expanded form of KIRJATHAIM
Kibza'im - ( Joshua 21:22 ) In the parallel list of (1 Chronicles 6:1 ) JOKBEAM is substituted for Kibzaim
Hormah - Though the exact location of Hormah is not known, it was in the territory assigned to the tribe of Simeon (Joshua 19:4 ). The list of kings Joshua defeated includes Hormah (Joshua 12:14 ); the battle description says Judah and Simeon combined to take Hormah after Joshua's death (Judges 1:1 ,Judges 1:1,1:17 ), the city earlier being called Zephath
Tim'Nah - (Joshua 15:10 ) It is probably identical with the Thimnathah of (Joshua 19:43 ) and that again with the Timnath, or, more accurately, Timnathah, of Samson (Judges 14:1,2,5 ) and the Thamnatha of the Maccabees. (Joshua 15:57 ) A distinct place from that just examined
Megiddo - The town of Megiddo in northern Canaan fell to Israel at the time of Joshua’s conquest, though the local inhabitants were not totally destroyed. The neighbouring tribe of Manasseh was more powerful and took over the town, claiming it could drive out the remaining Canaanites, but it was not able to (Joshua 12:7; Joshua 12:21; Joshua 17:11; Judges 1:27)
Kiriath-Jearim - It was on the border where Dan, Benjamin, and Judah joined before Dan began their migration northward (Joshua 15:9 ,Joshua 15:9,15:60 ; Joshua 18:14-15 )
Knife - Joshua was ordered to make flint knives for the circumcision of Israelite males (Joshua 5:2-3 ). Since flint was not the common material used to make knives in the days of Joshua, the command to make the knives of flint probably reflects a very ancient practice of circumcision (see Genesis 17:11 ; Circumcision)
Jeshua, Jeshuah - He is called Joshua in Haggai and Zechariah: See Joshua No. Joshua the son of Nun
Gilgal - The name of the first station of the Israelites after crossing the Jordan, Joshua 4:19-20, where the twelve stones were set up, and the tabernacle remained until removed to Shiloh. Joshua 18:1. Gilgal of Joshua 12:23 is supposed to be at a Jiljûlieh, near Antipatris, in the plain of Sharon
Caleb - Of all the twelve, Caleb and Joshua acted the part of true and faithful men; and they only, of all the grown men of Israel, were permitted to enter Canaan, Numbers 14:6-24,38 26:65 . Hebron was given to him as a reward of his fidelity, according to the promise of God, Deuteronomy 1:36 Joshua 14:1-15 . He gave a portion also with his daughter Achsah to Othniel his nephew, who had earned the reward by his valor in the capture of Debir, Joshua 15:13-19 21:12
Perizzites - Exodus 3:8 ; Exodus 3:17 ; Exodus 23:23 ; Exodus 33:2 ; Exodus 34:11 , Deuteronomy 20:17 , Joshua 3:10 ; Joshua 24:11 ). Because in Genesis 15:20 and Joshua 17:15 they are mentioned with the Rephaim, some have inferred that they were one of the pre-Semitic tribes of Palestine
Kir'Jath-je'Arim - (the city of forests ), first mentioned as one of the four cities of the Gibeonites, ( Joshua 9:17 ) it next occurs as one of the landmarks of the northern boundary of Judah, ch (Joshua 15:9 ) and as the point at which the western and southern boundaries of Benjamin coincided, ch. (Joshua 18:14,15 ) and in the last two passages we find that it bore another, perhaps earlier, name --that of the great Canaanite deity Baal, namely BAALAH and KIRJATH-BAAL
Jebusites - They lived in the central highlands, where their chief centre was Jerusalem, earlier known as Jebus (Genesis 10:15-16; Genesis 15:18-21; Exodus 3:8; Numbers 13:29; Joshua 11:3; Joshua 15:63; Joshua 18:28). Although Jerusalem fell at first to Joshua’s conquering Israelites, the Jebusites soon retook it, and they kept control of it till the time of David (Judges 1:8; Judges 1:21; Judges 19:10-11)
Othniel - His wife Achsah was the daughter of Caleb (Joshua 15:16,17 ; Judges 1:13 ). Some thirty years after the death of Joshua, the Israelites fell under the subjection of Chushan-rishathaim (q
Aven - The Hebrew in Amos 1:5 (see margin) and Joshua 11:17; Joshua 12:7, for this "plain" or "valley," is Βiqu'ah ; the very name it still retains, el Buka'a
Bohan - Probably commemorating some achievement of his in the conquest of Palestine (Joshua 15:6; Joshua 18:17)
Gibeath-Haaraloth - ” KJV translates the place name in Joshua 5:3 , while modern translations transliterate it. Joshua used...
traditional flint stone knives rather than more modern metal ones to circumcise the Israelite generation about to conquer Canaan. ...
This site marked Joshua's and the nation's obedience to divine command showing readiness to receive the divine gift of the land
Zimri - Son of Zerah, and grandfather or ancestor of Achan ( 1 Chronicles 2:6 ); called Zabdi in Joshua 7:1 . Joshua 7:3
Megiddo - Joshua 12:21. A city of one of the kings whom Joshua defeated on the west of the Jordan, in the great plain of Esdraelon
Zanoah - A town in the low hall country (shephelah ) of Judah (Joshua 15:34; Nehemiah 11:30; repairers of the wall, Nehemiah 3:13). Za nutah is probably identical with another Zanoah; a town in the mountain region of Judah (Joshua 15:56), enumerated with Maon, Carmel, and Ziph S
Sihor - In Joshua 13:3 it is "Sihor which is before Egypt. Some consider that Joshua 13:3 and 1 Chronicles 13:5 refer to the Wady el Arish, which was also called 'the river of Egypt
Ashurites - ]'>[1] read ‘the Geshurites,’ whose territory bordered on that of Gilead ( Joshua 12:5 ; Joshua 13:11 ), and who might therefore be suitably included here
Geba - A Levitical city of Benjamin, Joshua 21:17; 1 Chronicles 6:60; also called Gaba. Joshua 18:24
Tirzah - One of the 31 cities of the Canaanites taken by Joshua, Joshua 12:24, and for 50 years the capital of the northern kingdom of Israel, until Omri built Samaria
Eleazar - He entered into the land of Canaan with Joshua, and is supposed to have lived there upward of twenty years. He was buried in a hill that belonged to the son of Phineas, Joshua 24
Dagon - A city in Judah was called Beth-Dagon; that is, the house, or temple, of Dagon, Joshua 15:41 ; and another on the frontiers of Asher, Joshua 19:27
Jeshua - ...
...
The son of Jozadak, and high priest of the Jews under Zerubbabel (Nehemiah 7:7 ; 12:1,7,10,26 ); called Joshua (Haggai 1:1,12 ; 2:2,4 ; Zechariah 3:1,3,6,8,9 ). ...
...
Nehemiah 8:17 ; Joshua, the son of Nun
Adullam - Joshua 15:35. The king of the place was slain by Joshua
Ramoth - A city in Gilead, within the limits of the tribe of Gad, Joshua 21:38; called also Ramah and Ramoth-Gilead. Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; 1 Chronicles 6:80
Ramoth - A famous city in the mountains of Gilead; often called RamothGilead, and sometimes Ramath-Mizpeh, or the Watchtower, Joshua 13:26 . It belonged to Gad, was assigned to the Levites, and became one of the cities of refuge beyond Jordan, Deuteronomy 4:43 Joshua 20:8 21:38
Jasher - We have only two specimens from the book, (1) the words of Joshua which he spake to the Lord at the crisis of the battle of Beth-horon (Joshua 10:12,13 ); and (2) "the Song of the Bow," that beautiful and touching mournful elegy which David composed on the occasion of the death of Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:18-27 )
Shahazimah - ” Town or mountain marking tribal boundary of Issachar (Joshua 19:22 )
Nimrah - Pure, a city on the east of Jordan (Numbers 32:3 ); probably the same as Beth-nimrah (Joshua 13:27 )
Gittite - A native of the Philistine city of Gath (Joshua 13:3 )
Bashan-Havoth-Jair - The Bashan of the villages of Jair, the general name given to Argob by Jair, the son of Manasseh (Deuteronomy 3:14 ), containing sixty cities with walls and brazen gates (Joshua 13:30 ; 1 Kings 4:13 )
Rekem - Rehem in Joshua 18:27 is a town of Benjamin
Maarath - ” Name of a village in Judah's hill country (Joshua 15:59 ), possibly identical with Maroth (Micah 1:12 )
Secacah - ” Town in tribal territory of Judah in the Judean wilderness (Joshua 15:61 )
Nekeb - (nee' kehb) KJV transliteration of a Hebrew term meaning tunnel, shaft, or mine (Joshua 19:33 )
Adithaim - A town in Judah, on a height overlooking the shephelah or low hill country (Joshua 15:36)
Shaaraim - Called SHARAIM in Joshua 15:36
Chis'Loth-ta'Bor - ( Joshua 19:12 ) It may be the village Iksal , which is now standing about 2 1/2 miles to the west of Mount Tabor
Kedemoth - It was afterwards a Levitical city of Reuben, Joshua 13:18 21:37
Beth-Bir'e-i - (house of my creation ), a town of Simeon, ( 1 Chronicles 4:31 ) which by comparison with the parallel list in (Joshua 19:6 ) appears to have had also the name Of BETH-LEBAOTH
Jok'ne-am - ( Joshua 21:34 ) Its modern site is Tell Kaimon , an eminence which stands just below the eastern termination of Carmel
Gezer - ...
Joshua defeated the king of Gezer when he tried to aid the king of Lachish (Joshua 10:33 ). Gezer formed the boundary for Ephraim's tribal allotment (Joshua 16:3 ), but Israel did not control the city (Joshua 16:10 ; Judges 1:29 ). Still, it was assigned as a city for the Levites (Joshua 21:21 ). ...
Gezer thus is a peripheral city in the Bible whose magnificent history had begun to recede a century before Joshua entered Palestine
Rahab, Rachab - The harlot who secreted the spies that Joshua sent into the land. Joshua was careful that the compact should be respected, and she and her relatives were saved. Joshua 2:1-22 ; Joshua 6:17-25
Helek - The clan received an allotment in the tribe's share of the Promised Land (Joshua 17:2 )
Zior - ” Village allotted to Judah, located in the hill country near Hebron (Joshua 15:54 )
Mearah - A cave, a place in the northern boundary of Palestine (Joshua 13:4 )
Madmannah - Dunghill, the modern el-Minyay, 15 miles south-south-west of Gaza (Joshua 15:31 ; 1 Chronicles 2:49 ), in the south of Judah
Eder -
A city in the south of Judah, on the border of Idumea (Joshua 15:21 )
Japhleti - (jaf' leht i) Place name according to KJV but name of tribal group—Japhletites—according to modern translations (Joshua 16:3 )
Stoning - Of Achan (Joshua 7:25 ), Naboth (1 Kings 21 ), Stephen (Acts 7:59 ), Paul (Acts 14:19 ; 2 co 11:25 )
Rakkon - A place upon the shore, a town belonging to Dan (Joshua 19:46 )
Kartan - Double city, a town of Naphali, assigned to the Gershonite Levites, and one of the cities of refuge (Joshua 21:32 )
Arm - "Stretched out arm," image from a warrior with spear or sword thrust forth: all the power put forth (Joshua 8:26; Isaiah 5:25)
Innkeeper - A targum (early Aramaic Free translation) on Joshua 2:1 identifies Rahab as an innkeeper
Zereda - It is probably the same as Zaretan (Joshua 3:16 ), Zererath (Judges 7:22 ), Zartanah (1 Kings 4:12 ), or the following
Bozkath - ” Town near Lachish and Eglon in tribal allotment of Judah (Joshua 15:39 )
Hanniel - Representative of tribe of Manasseh on council which helped Joshua and Eleazar divide the land among the tribes (Numbers 34:23 )
Shimeathite - (sshih mih' uh thite) Either a descendant of a person named Shimeath or, more likely, a native of the town of Shema (Joshua 15:26 ), perhaps settled by the clan of Shema (1 Chronicles 2:43 )
Hazar-Addar - It appears to be the same as Hezron of Joshua 15:3 , which in the latter passage is connected with but separated from Addar
Machbena - Machbena is probably the same as Cabbon of Joshua 15:40 , which may perhaps be identified with el-Kubeibeh , situated about 3 miles south of Beit Jibrîn
Shaphir - Attempts have been made to identify it with the Shamir of Joshua 15:48
Shaveh-Kiriathaim - It probably derived its name from the Moabite Kiriathaim ( Numbers 32:37 , Joshua 13:19 )
Neiel - ” Town assigned to Asher (Joshua 19:27 )
Ladan - A name occurring in the genealogy of Joshua ( 1 Chronicles 7:26 )
Zaanaim - It is the same place as ZAANANNIM in Joshua 19:33
Seirath - In Mount Ephraim, a continuation of the rugged, bushy ("like hair") hills which stretched to Judah's northern boundary (Joshua 15:10; Judges 3:26-27)
Asriel - They received a land allotment (Joshua 17:2 )
Remeth - (See Joshua 19:8; Jos 19:21) The word is the same as Ramoth, signifying high or lofty
Gederoth - A town of Judah in the Shephçlah ( Joshua 15:41 , 2 Chronicles 28:18 )
Alemeth - Called ALMON in Joshua 21:18
Mer'Arath - ( Joshua 15:59 ) The places which occur in company with have been identified at a few miles to the north of Hebron, but Maarath has hitherto eluded observation
Nehelamite - Perhaps a Nehelamite was a native or inhabitant of Nahallal, which is spoken of Joshua 19:15