What does Joseph mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יוֹסֵ֖ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 38
יוֹסֵ֔ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 37
ἰωσὴφ the patriarch 29
יוֹסֵף֙ the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 26
יוֹסֵ֑ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 22
יוֹסֵ֛ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 15
יוֹסֵֽף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 12
יוֹסֵ֗ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 7
יוֹסֵ֤ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 6
ἰωσήφ the patriarch 6
יוֹסֵ֜ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 5
יוֹסֵ֣ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 4
יוֹסֵף֮ the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 4
יוֹסֵף֒ the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 3
יוֹסֵ֥ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 3
ἰωσῆτος one of the ancestors of Christ 3
לְיוֹסֵ֑ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 2
יוֹסֵ֧ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 2
לְיוֹסֵ֗ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 2
וְיוֹסֵ֖ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 2
וְיוֹסֵ֕ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
יוֹסֵ֨ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
לְיוֹסֵף֮ the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
יוֹסֵ֡ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
לְיוֹסֵ֔ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
י֠וֹסֵף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
: יוֹסֵ֔ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
וְיוֹסֵ֣ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
וְיוֹסֵ֤ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
יוֹסֵ֞ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
וְיוֹסֵ֗ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
וּלְיוֹסֵ֤ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
וְיוֹסֵף֙ the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
! יוֹסֵֽף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
לְיוֹסֵף֙ the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
וּלְיוֹסֵ֣ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
וְיוֹסֵ֥ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
יוֹסֵֽף‪‬‪‬ the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
לְיוֹסֵֽף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
וְיוֹסֵ֛ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. / father of Igal 1
בִּֽיה֘וֹסֵ֤ף the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel. 1
וַיָּבֹ֥א to go in 1
וַיַּגֵּ֤שׁ to draw near 1

Definitions Related to Joseph

H3130


   1 the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel.
   2 father of Igal, who represented the tribe of Issachar among the spies.
   3 a son of Asaph.
   4 a man who took a foreign wife in the time of Ezra.
   5 a priest of the family of Shebaniah in the time of Nehemiah.
   Additional Information: Joseph = “Jehovah has added”.
   

G2501


   1 the patriarch, the eleventh son of Jacob.
   2 the son of Jonan or Jonam, one of the ancestors of Christ, Lk 3:30.
   3 the son of Judah [or Judas; better Joda] another ancestor of Jesus, Lk 3:26.
   4 the son of Mattathias, another ancestor of Christ, Lk 3:24.
   5 the husband of Mary, the mother of Jesus.
   6 a half-brother of Jesus Mat. 13:55.
   7 Joseph of Arimathaea, a member of the Sanhedrin, who favoured Jesus.
   Mt. 27:57,59; Mk 15:43,45.
   8 Joseph surnamed Barnabas Acts 4:36.
   9 Joseph call Barsabas and surnamed Justus, Acts 1:23.
   Additional Information: Joseph = “let him add”.
   

G2500


   1 one of the ancestors of Christ, Lk 3:29.
   2 Joses, the brother of Jesus, Mk 6:3.
   3 Joses, the son of Mary, the sister of the mother of Jesus, Mt. 27:56.
   4 Joses, a Levite, Acts 4:36.
   Additional Information: Joses = “exalted”.
   

H3084


   1 the eldest son of Jacob by Rachel.
   Additional Information: Joseph = “Jehovah has added”.
   

H5066


   1 to draw near, approach.
      1a (Qal) to draw or come near.
         1a1 of humans.
            1a1a of sexual intercourse.
         1a2 of inanimate subject.
            1a2a to approach one another.
      1b (Niphal) to draw near.
      1c (Hiphil) to cause to approach, bring near, bring.
      1d (Hophal) to be brought near.
      1e (Hithpael) to draw near.
      

H935


   1 to go in, enter, come, go, come in.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to enter, come in.
         1a2 to come.
            1a2a to come with.
            1a2b to come upon, fall or light upon, attack (enemy).
            1a2c to come to pass.
         1a3 to attain to.
         1a4 to be enumerated.
         1a5 to go.
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to lead in.
         1b2 to carry in.
         1b3 to bring in, cause to come in, gather, cause to come, bring near, bring against, bring upon.
         1b4 to bring to pass.
      1c (Hophal).
         1c1 to be brought, brought in.
         1c2 to be introduced, be put.
         

Frequency of Joseph (original languages)

Frequency of Joseph (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph ii, Emperor
Also known as Sacristan Emperor
Profile German emperor. He was the son and successor of Maria Theresa and Francis I. After 1765 he acted as emperor and co-regent with his mother in the Habsburg dominions, and upon her death in 1780 he became sole ruler. His desire to make Austria dominant in central Europe led to the Bavarian War of Succession, the first partition of Poland, and an alliance with Russia against the Turks in 1788. In order to weld the different peoples of his kingdom he made German the official language and united the administrations of the provinces into one central council in Vienna. He abolished serfdom and the death penalty, made the courts of justice independent and impartial, abolished censorship, and created the Austrian marriage law. Joseph II was the most celebrated exponent of Josephinism, or the policy of secular interference and state supremacy in ecclesiastical affairs, so called after the emperor. He consolidated almost the entire property of the Church and merged all the religious funds into one great Religionsfond for the requirements of public worship. To accomplish his purpose he suppressed all the monasteries and secularized them. For intermeddling in Church affairs, even to the regulation of candles, he was called the Sacristan Emperor.
Born 1741 in Vienna, Austria
Died 1790 in Vienna, Austria of natural causes
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lagrange, Joseph Louis
(1736-1813) Astronomer. Supplied the analytic foundation for calculus of variations, did valuable researches on differential equations, and made contributions to the solution of equations particularly by the method of combination.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Labre, Benedict Joseph, Saint
(1748-1783) Confessor, pilgrim. Born Amettes, France; died Rome, Italy. After unsuccessful attempts, because of his youth and poor health, to obtain the religious habit in the Trappist, Cistercian, and Carthusian orders, he devoted his remaining 13 years to traveling over Europe, visiting famous shrines, and leading a life of great mortification. Worn out by austerities, he collapsed outside a church in Rome, and died shortly after. He was known as the "Saint of the Forty Hours Devotion," following this devotion wherever he could. His death was followed by a multitude of miracles. Canonized; 1881. Relics in Santa Maria dei Monti, Rome. Feast, April 16,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Benziger, Joseph Charles
(1762-1841) Founder of the Catholic publishing house which bears his name. Born Einltiedeln, Switzerland; died there. The business, established in 1800, took the name of "Benziger Brothers" when he was succeeded in 1833 by his sons, Charles (1799-1873) and Nicholas (1808-1864). It still exists at Einsiedeln, under their descendants. The New York branch, now independent of the European house, and managed by the fifth generation of the family, the three sons of Nicholas C. Benziger (1859-1925), was founded in 1853. The business includes the sale of church goods of all kinds. Branches were established in Cincinnati, 1860, and Chicago, 1887. The studios are in Brooklyn, New York, Bridgeport, Connecticut, and Pietrasanta, Italy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Benziger
(1762-1841) Founder of the Catholic publishing house which bears his name. Born Einltiedeln, Switzerland; died there. The business, established in 1800, took the name of "Benziger Brothers" when he was succeeded in 1833 by his sons, Charles (1799-1873) and Nicholas (1808-1864). It still exists at Einsiedeln, under their descendants. The New York branch, now independent of the European house, and managed by the fifth generation of the family, the three sons of Nicholas C. Benziger (1859-1925), was founded in 1853. The business includes the sale of church goods of all kinds. Branches were established in Cincinnati, 1860, and Chicago, 1887. The studios are in Brooklyn, New York, Bridgeport, Connecticut, and Pietrasanta, Italy.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Caiaphas
(18-36 AD) Jewish high priest. As official head of the Sanhedrin, he was responsible for the travesty of a trial to which Christ was submitted by the Jewish authorities before they handed Him over to Pilate. After the Crucifixion Caiphas persecuted Christ's followers. He was deposed by the Roman authorities.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Caiphas
(18-36 AD) Jewish high priest. As official head of the Sanhedrin, he was responsible for the travesty of a trial to which Christ was submitted by the Jewish authorities before they handed Him over to Pilate. After the Crucifixion Caiphas persecuted Christ's followers. He was deposed by the Roman authorities.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Barbelin, Felix Joseph
(1808-1869) Jesuit, called the Apostle of Philadelphia, born Lunéville, France; died Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He labored in Philadelphia nearly 30 years, founding Saint Joseph's Hospital and establishing sodalities for men, women, and children.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph
(Hebrew: may God add)
Patriarch, eleventh son of Jacob, first-born of Rachel, immediate ancestor of the tribes of Manasses and Ephraim. His father's favorite, he was hated by his brothers, who sold him into bondage to the Ismaelites (Genesis 37). Taken into Egypt, he was kindly treated and became the personal attendant of his Egyptian master, Putiphar, eunuch of Pharao (Genesis 39). His skill in interpreting dreams brought him to the notice of Pharao who made him keeper of the royal seal and second in power in Egypt. During the famine predicted by him his brothers came from Chanaan to buy grain in Egypt and failed to recognize him. At Joseph's insistence they returned with Benjamin whereupon Joseph disclosed himself and invited his father and brothers to settle in Gessen (Genesis 47). He died at the age of 110, and his bones were later removed to Sichem in Chanaan (Joshua 24).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph, the Praise And Glory of the Heavens
(Joseph, The Praise and Glory of The Heavens) Hymn for Matins on March 19, feast of Saint Joseph. It is also used in the Office of the Solemnity of Saint Joseph, observed on the Wednesday preceding the third Sunday after Easter. It was written in the 17th century by an unknown author. There are six translations. The English title given is by A. McDougall.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph, Little Daughters of Saint
A religious institute founded in Montreal, 1857, by the Sulpician, Father Antoine Mercier, to aid the clergy both by the ministry of prayer and certain temporal services, such as the manufacture of liturgical vestments, altar-linens, etc. Poor missionaries and seminarians are especially aided by the community. They have two houses in Montreal, where the mother-house is located, and carry on their work in several seminaries.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Little Daughters of Saint Joseph
A religious institute founded in Montreal, 1857, by the Sulpician, Father Antoine Mercier, to aid the clergy both by the ministry of prayer and certain temporal services, such as the manufacture of liturgical vestments, altar-linens, etc. Poor missionaries and seminarians are especially aided by the community. They have two houses in Montreal, where the mother-house is located, and carry on their work in several seminaries.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Dixon, Joseph
Archbishop of Armagh, born Coalisland, Ireland, 1806; died Armagh, Ireland, 1866. His incumbency (1852-1866) was characterized by the inauguration of numerous undertakings for the good of the diocese. He was a staunch defender of the Holy See and his denunciation of Napoleon III for complicity in the acts of the Italian revolution was made a subject of complaint to Pius IX by the emperor. He was the author of an "Introduction to the Sacred Scriptures," long in use in Catholic seminaries.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Dixon
Archbishop of Armagh, born Coalisland, Ireland, 1806; died Armagh, Ireland, 1866. His incumbency (1852-1866) was characterized by the inauguration of numerous undertakings for the good of the diocese. He was a staunch defender of the Holy See and his denunciation of Napoleon III for complicity in the acts of the Italian revolution was made a subject of complaint to Pius IX by the emperor. He was the author of an "Introduction to the Sacred Scriptures," long in use in Catholic seminaries.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Forbin-Janson, Charles Auguste Marie Joseph, Comte
Bishop of Nancy and Toul, born Paris, France, 1785; died near Marseilles, France, 1844. Sacrificing a political career under Napoleon, he became a priest in 1811, and with Abbe de Rauzan founded the Missionaries of France. He was raised to the episcopate, 1824, but had to leave France, as he refused to sign the Gallican declaration of 1682. At the request of Bishop Flaget and Bishop Purcell, he was sent by Gregory XVI on a successful missionary tour through the United States and Canada, 1839-1841, and in 1842 went to Rome, where he was made a Roman count and Assistant at the Pontifical Throne. The following year he returned to France and founded the Association of the Holy Childhood.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Scaliger
Born 1540; died 1609. Eminent classical philologist. Wrote in Latin with idiomatic vivacity. Famed for his knowledge of epigraphy, numismatics and chronology. First European scholar to enter into correspondence with the Samaritans.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Cottolengo, Blessed
Born Bra, Italy, 1786; died Chieri, 1842. He became a canon of the Church of Corpus Christi at Turin, where, in imitation of Saint Vincent de Paul, he worked among the poor and sick, and completed the Casa della Providenza, a group of hospitals and asylums with accommodation for 7000 patients. In connection with this work he established houses of the Sisters of Saint Vincent de Paul, of Saint Thais, of Carmel, of Suffrage, of Mary of the Seven Dolors, of the Good Shepherd, of Brothers of Saint Vincent de Paul, of Hermits of Gassin, and of Fathers of the Holy Trinity. The Blessed Virgin appeared to him twice. Beatified, 1917. Feast, at Alba Pompea, O.F.M., and at Turin, April 30,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph, Hermann, Blessed
Born Cologne, Germany, 1150; died Hoven, 1241. At a very early age, Hermann had a tender devotion to the Blessed Virgin. Entering the monastery of the Premonstratensian Canons at Steinfeld (1162) he was ordained and appointed chaplain of the Cistercian nuns at Hoven. He soon became known by the name of Joseph, which the Blessed Virgin, calling him her chaplain and spouse, bestowed on him. Represented in art, offering an apple to the statue of the Virgin and Child. The cause of his canonization was begun, 1626, but interrupted. Relics at Steinfeld, Cologne, and Antwerp. Feast, April 7,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Lister
British surgeon who promoted the idea of sterile surgery. Born April 5, 1827 at Upton, Essex, England; died February 10, 1912. Son of Joseph Jackson Lister who helped develop the compound microscope. Quaker. First Baron Lister of Lyme Regis. Renowned for his work in antiseptics, particularly his system of antiseptic bandaging.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Lister, Joseph
British surgeon who promoted the idea of sterile surgery. Born April 5, 1827 at Upton, Essex, England; died February 10, 1912. Son of Joseph Jackson Lister who helped develop the compound microscope. Quaker. First Baron Lister of Lyme Regis. Renowned for his work in antiseptics, particularly his system of antiseptic bandaging.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fesch, Joseph
Cardinal, uncle of Napoleon I, born Ajaccio, Corsica, January 3, 1763; died Rome, Italy, May 13, 1839. After ordination, he embraced the military career, becoming commissary of war under his nephew in 1795. When hostility to religion somewhat abated, he reentered ecclesiastical life and helped to negotiate the Concordat of 1801. In 1802 he was named Archbishop of Lyons, and, receiving the cardinal's hat in 1803, was appointed ambassador to Rome. He induced Pius VII to crown Napoleon in Paris, and was present at the ceremony. Though powerless to prevent the rupture between the emperor and the Holy See, he prevented Napoleon from acknowledging an independent Gallican Church, upheld papal rights in the matter of canonical institution, and fell into imperial disfavor by protesting his loyalty to the exiled pontiff. After the Restoration he resided in Rome, his diocese being governed meanwhile by an administrator.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Tieffentaller
Catholic geographer. Born 1710; died 1785. Renowned for his studies on the geography of Hindustan, particularly his maps of the Ganges basin.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph de Jouvancy
Catholic Jesuit philologist. Born 1643; died 1719. Had a masterly knowledge of classical Latin. Edited many school editions of Latin authors. Wrote a lexicon Novus apparatus graeco-latinus, cum interpretatione gallica, and an important work on philology which became an official text-book of the Society of Jesus.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jouvancy, Joseph de
Catholic Jesuit philologist. Born 1643; died 1719. Had a masterly knowledge of classical Latin. Edited many school editions of Latin authors. Wrote a lexicon Novus apparatus graeco-latinus, cum interpretatione gallica, and an important work on philology which became an official text-book of the Society of Jesus.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Kehrein, Joseph
Catholic philologist. Born 1808; died 1876. Author of numerous works on the German language and on the history of German literature.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Kehrein
Catholic philologist. Born 1808; died 1876. Author of numerous works on the German language and on the history of German literature.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Neve, Felix Jean Baptiste Joseph
Catholic philologist. Born 1816; died 1893. Professor of Greek and Latin literature at the University of Louvain for 36 years, and at the same time gave a course of studies in the Sanskrit language and literature. Learned in the Armenian language and literature, and published important translations and commentaries on all these subjects.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph o'Dwyer
Catholic physician; born Cleveland, Ohio, 1841; died New York, New York, 1898. After graduating from public schools at London, Ontario, he studied and practised medicine in New York. The sight of so many children dying from suffocation in diphtheria led him to experimentation which resulted in his system of intubation, one of the most valuable practical discoveries of his age.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fraunhofer, Joseph Von
Catholic scientist and physicist. Born Straubing, Bavaria, 1787; died Munich, Germany, 1826. At the age of twelve he became an apprentice to a lens-grinder, working six years without pay. By his unaided efforts he rose to be professor royal in the Munich optical institute, 1819. His fame rests chiefly on his initiation of spectrum analysis, the discovery of the Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum and his establishing of the laws of diffraction.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Von Fraunhofer
Catholic scientist and physicist. Born Straubing, Bavaria, 1787; died Munich, Germany, 1826. At the age of twelve he became an apprentice to a lens-grinder, working six years without pay. By his unaided efforts he rose to be professor royal in the Munich optical institute, 1819. His fame rests chiefly on his initiation of spectrum analysis, the discovery of the Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum and his establishing of the laws of diffraction.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mount Saint Joseph on the Ohio
Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, founded 1920. Conducted by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul. Preparatory school, colleges of arts and sciences, education, home economics, music, extension courses, summer school. See also the college's web site.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mount Saint Joseph, College of
Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, founded 1920. Conducted by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul. Preparatory school, colleges of arts and sciences, education, home economics, music, extension courses, summer school. See also the college's web site.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Calasanctius, Saint
Confessor, founder of the Piarist Order, born Petralta, Aragon, 1556; died Rome, Italy, 1648. He studied law and theology, received the degree of Doctor of Laws; and was ordained in 1583. He became attached to Bishop della Figuera to whom he rendered invaluable service as secretary and theologian. Upon the death of the bishop, he journeyed to Rome, and as a member of the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine he began his work of caring for and educating homeless children. In 1597 he established a free school, the first in Europe, and five years later founded the Order of Piarists to continue his charitable work. Canonized, 1767. Feast, Roman Calendar, August 27,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph of Cupertino, Saint
Confessor, mystic, born Cupertino, Italy, 1603; died Osimo, Italy, 1663. Of lowly origin and no education, he was apprenticed in his youth to a shoemaker. In 1620 he became a lay brother in the Capuchin monastery near Tarento; was later admitted as an oblate at the Franciscan convent near Cupertino, and was ordained priest, 1628. Throughout his life he was favored with heavenly visions, and practised the most austere mortifications. Many miracles were effected through him. Canonized, 1767. Buried in the chapel of the Conception, Osimo. Feast, Roman Calendar, September 18,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Flaget, Benedict Joseph
First Bishop of Bardstown, born Contournat, France, 1763; died Louisville, Kentucky, 1850. Educated at the Sulpician Seminary, Clermont, he joined the Society of Saint Sulpice in 1783; and was ordained priest at Issy, 1787. He taught dogmatic theology at Nantes and at Angers, but left France during the Revolution and arrived at Baltimore, 1792. He was appointed missionary to the Indians at Fort Vincennes, 1792; professor at Georgetown College, 1794; and then was sent to help found a college at Havana, 1798. He returned to Baltimore, 1801, and was consecrated Bishop of Bardstown, Kentucky, 1810. The diocese was large, having within its jurisdiction at first the territory now approximately comprising 10 states; it was devoid of funds and in need of spiritual care. Bishop Flaget consecrated his cathedral at Bardstown in 1819. In 1834 his diocese was limited to Kentucky and Tennessee, and it soon had a seminary, 4 colleges, 3 religious orders of men, 3 convents, several academies, and an orphan asylum. A visit to Europe, 1835-1839, netted him financial aid for his diocese, which was transferred to Louisville, 1841. Here he built a convent for the Religious of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd of Angers, 1843, with his private funds.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph of Arimathea, Saint
First century; born Arimathea, Palestine. He was a wealthy Israelite and a disciple of Christ. He requested from Pilate the body of Jesus and with the help of Nicodemus placed it in the tomb. The legend which tells of his coming to Gaul, 63 AD, and subsequently to Great Britain, where he is supposed to have founded the first Christian oratory at Glastonbury, is fabulous. Patron of the church at Glastonbury. Feast, March 17,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Montcalm, Louis Joseph Gozon, Marquis de
French general; born Candiac, France, 1712; died Quebec, Canada, 1759. Of warlike ancestry, he was a soldier at 15, but continued his excellent classical education by reading. After a successful series of campaigns on the Continent, he succeeded Dieskau in command of the French army in Canada, 1755. Against the odds of discordant relations with Governor Vaudreuil, Bigot's dishonesty, apathy of the French court, impoverished condition of the colony and army, and disproportionate resources of the enemy, Montcalm was heroically faithful to duty. After his victory at Carillon (Ticonderoga), 1758, he raised a cross inscribed in thanksgiving to the God of Hosts. The Battle of the Plains of Abraham when both Montcalm and Wolfe met death, is considered by its results as having saved Canada from the French Revolution. Montcalm was a brave and noble commander, who always gave to God the glory of his victories.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Quin, Michael Joseph
Journalist and writer. Born in 1796 in Thurles, County Tipperary, Ireland; died in Boulogne-sur-Mer, France in 1843. He contributed to the Morning Herald and the Morning Chronicle, edited the Monthly Review from 1825 to 1832, the Catholic Journal, and the Tablet, and in 1836 he founded and edited the Dublin Review. His works include A Steam Voyage down the Danube and Steam Voyages on the Seine, and Moselle, and the Rhine.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Imbert, Lawrence Mary Joseph, Blessed
Martyr, Bishop of Korea, born Calais, 1797; died Korea, 1839. He entered the Foreign Mission Seminary at Paris, 1818, and was ordained a priest of the Society of Foreign Missions of Paris, the following year. Selected for the Chinese mission, the Province Szechuan was the first scene of his apostolic labors. In 1836 he was consecrated Bishop of Korea, where he spent the remainder of his life with his two companions, Father Chastan and Father Maubant. These three devoted themselves entirely to the evangelization of the heathen until 1839, when they gave themselves up to the government, were cast into prison, and beheaded on September 21, of that year. Their bodies remained exposed for several days but were finally buried on Mountain Noku. Beatification, 1857. Feast, Jesuit calendar, June 10,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Marchand, Blessed
Martyr, born Passavant, France, 1803; died Cochin, China, 1835. He entered the seminary at Orsan, 1821, was transferred to Besançon, and was ordained a priest of the Society of Foreign Missions of Paris. Appointed to Cochin China he reached the field of his Apostolic labors, 1830. After two years in that country, he was offered the position of head of the Foreign Mission Seminary at Paris. He declined this offer, and for his disinterested zeal received a larger district in the province of Binh-Thuean. In 1833 a decree was issued for the arrest of all European missionaries. Father Marchand was made prisoner and taken to Saigon, where he was held for 18 months. Saigon was besieged 1835, Father Marchand was put in chains, and accused of high treason. He was conducted in a cage of Hue, tortured with hot pincers, and finally brought to the Christian village of Thoduck, and; cut into pieces. His dead body was chopped up and thrown into the sea; his head, after three days' exposure, was treated in the same way. Beatification, 1900.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marchand, Joseph, Blessed
Martyr, born Passavant, France, 1803; died Cochin, China, 1835. He entered the seminary at Orsan, 1821, was transferred to Besançon, and was ordained a priest of the Society of Foreign Missions of Paris. Appointed to Cochin China he reached the field of his Apostolic labors, 1830. After two years in that country, he was offered the position of head of the Foreign Mission Seminary at Paris. He declined this offer, and for his disinterested zeal received a larger district in the province of Binh-Thuean. In 1833 a decree was issued for the arrest of all European missionaries. Father Marchand was made prisoner and taken to Saigon, where he was held for 18 months. Saigon was besieged 1835, Father Marchand was put in chains, and accused of high treason. He was conducted in a cage of Hue, tortured with hot pincers, and finally brought to the Christian village of Thoduck, and; cut into pieces. His dead body was chopped up and thrown into the sea; his head, after three days' exposure, was treated in the same way. Beatification, 1900.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Passerat, Venerable
Member of the Congregation of the Most Holy Redeemer, born Joinville, France, 1772; died Bruges, Belgium, 1858. He left the army to enter the congregation at Warsaw. Having become vicar-general over all Transalpine communities, he founded new houses all over the world. After being driven out of Vienna, 1848, he became director of the Redemptoristines at Bruges. Process for his beatification began in 1892.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Marcoux
Missionary and linguist, born in Canada, 1791; died there, 1855. Ordained 1813, he evangelized the Iroquois, first at Saint Regis, later at Caughnawaga. He acquired such proficiency in the Iroquois tongue as to attain a high rank among philologists through his Iroquois grammar and French-Iroquois dictionary. Father Marcoux translated into Iroquois, Father De Ligny's "Life of Christ," and published in that language a collection of prayers, hymns, and canticles, a catechism; calendar of Catholic ritual, and a number of sermons.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Marcoux, Joseph
Missionary and linguist, born in Canada, 1791; died there, 1855. Ordained 1813, he evangelized the Iroquois, first at Saint Regis, later at Caughnawaga. He acquired such proficiency in the Iroquois tongue as to attain a high rank among philologists through his Iroquois grammar and French-Iroquois dictionary. Father Marcoux translated into Iroquois, Father De Ligny's "Life of Christ," and published in that language a collection of prayers, hymns, and canticles, a catechism; calendar of Catholic ritual, and a number of sermons.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph de Veuster, Blessed
Missionary priest, born Tremeloo, Belgium, 1840; died Molokai, Hawaii, 1889. Member of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, he was sent to Hawaii where he became resident priest in the leper reserve at Molokai, and for years was the only person to minister to their spiritual and medical wants. Stricken with disease, 1885, he continued his work to the end. His name was attacked by a Presbyterian minister named Hyde, and brilliantly vindicated by Robert Louis Stevenson in a philippic entitled "Father Damien" (Notre Dame, Indiana, 1911). He was declared Venerable in 1977, and beatified on June 3, 1995.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph le Caron
Missionary, born near Paris, France, 1586; died France, 1632. Entering the Recollects when already ordained, he was one of the first four missionaries sent to Canada, and the pioneer among the Hurons. He evangelized the Montagnais of Tadousac, in 1622. In 1629 he was sent back to France by the English after they captured Quebec. Le Caron is the author of the first Huron dictionary.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - le Caron, Joseph
Missionary, born near Paris, France, 1586; died France, 1632. Entering the Recollects when already ordained, he was one of the first four missionaries sent to Canada, and the pioneer among the Hurons. He evangelized the Montagnais of Tadousac, in 1622. In 1629 he was sent back to France by the English after they captured Quebec. Le Caron is the author of the first Huron dictionary.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Salzmann
Missionary. Born in 1819 in Münzbach, Austria; died in 1874 in Saint Francis, Wisconsin. He was ordained in 1842 and labored five years in Austria before coming as missionary to America. In Milwaukee he became pastor of Saint Mary's, and entered upon a long struggle with German freethinkers. There he founded the Saint Francis Seminary in 1856; the Pio Nono College; the Catholic Normal School of the Holy Family, which was the first Catholic normal school in the United States; and the American branch of the Saint Cecilia Society.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Eckhel
Numismatist, born Enzesfeld, Lower Austria, 1737; died Vienna, Austria, 1798. As a Jesuit he taught poetry and rhetoric in colleges of his Society, and also turned his attention to numismatics; and on the suppression of the Society of Jesus he became director of the imperial cabinet of ancient coins at Vienna. He published a catalogue of the collection (1779), for which he devised a new method of arrangement. By his "Doctrina nummorum veterum" (Science of Ancient Coins), published in eight volumes (1792-1798), he became the founder of the scientific numismatics of classical antiquity.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph, Son of
Our Lord, "as it was supposed", according to Saint Luke 3:23.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mount Saint Joseph College
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph. Preparatory school, college of arts and sciences, special courses, and summer school.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph Renan
Philosopher, critic, and Orientalist. Born on February 28, 1823Treguier, France; died on October 12, 1892 in Paris, France. His early training was received from his mother and sister, and in the seminary of his village. He decided to enter the priesthood, and to that end! attended seminaries in Paris and Issy. His interest in Oriental philology and early Christianity led him to adopt the scepticism and rationalism of the Kantian philosophers, and in 1845 he left the seminary. The French government sent him on a scientific mission to Palestine where he wrote a life of Christ which was abhorrent to all Christians, regardless of sect. This was followed by an equally objectionable life of Saint Paul. These, together with monographs on Oriental studies, earned him renown as stylist rather than historian, and betrayed the Modernistic errors in his thought.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Maistre, Joseph Marie de, Count
Political philosopher, brother of Xavier de Maistre, born Chambery, France, 1753; died Turin, Italy, 1821. He passed fourteen years at Saint Petersburg as Sardinian plenipotentiary. He was a profound thinker and ranks very high in French letters. He had an intense love of religion, a firm belief in authority, and a detestation of the 18th-century rationalism, as is evidenced in his "Considerations sur la France," "Du pape," and "Les soirées de Saint Petersbourg."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph de Maistre, Count
Political philosopher, brother of Xavier de Maistre, born Chambery, France, 1753; died Turin, Italy, 1821. He passed fourteen years at Saint Petersburg as Sardinian plenipotentiary. He was a profound thinker and ranks very high in French letters. He had an intense love of religion, a firm belief in authority, and a detestation of the 18th-century rationalism, as is evidenced in his "Considerations sur la France," "Du pape," and "Les soirées de Saint Petersbourg."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Mount Saint Joseph Abbey
Roscrea, County Tipperary, Ireland. Cistercian Abbey, founded 1818, by Dom Bruno Fitzpatrick, abbot of Mount Melleray. In 1905 it founded the Cistercian College Roscrea, a boarding school for boys. See also the abbey's and college's web sites.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fenwick, Benedict Joseph
Second Bishop of Boston, brother of Edward Dominic Fenwork, born Leonardstown, Maryland, 1782; died Boston, Massachusetts, 1846. He studied and taught at Georgetown. In 1805 he entered the Sulpician Seminary, Baltimore, but on the restoration of the Society of Jesus in the United States, 1806, he joined the order. Ordained by Bishop Neale in 1808, he was sent to New York, where he became head of the New York Literary Institution, founded, 1809, as a college, on the present site of the cathedral, and closed in 1814, on the recall of the Jesuits to Maryland. He served for a time as administrator of the New York diocese and under Bishop Connolly as vicar-general. From 1817-1818 he was president of Georgetown. Sent to Charleston, 1818, to arrange difficulties originating in the trustee system, he remained there two years after the arrival of Bishop England, 1820. He was again president of Georgetown, 1824-1825. Named to succeed Bishop Cheverus of Boston, he was consecrated in Baltimore, November 1, 1825. He established a seminary in his own home, and by 1827 had a school in the basement of the cathedral. In 1829 he founded one of the earliest Catholic papers in the United States, "The Jesuit, or the Catholic Sentinel." His zeal resulted in the building within 20 years of 35 churches, of which eight were in Boston. He removed the Ursulines from an unsuitable location in Boston to Charlestown, early in his episcopacy; in 1834 the convent was destroyed at the hands of a fanatical mob. Their actions were condemned at a public meeting in Faneuil Hall, presided over by the mayor of Boston. In 1843Bishop Fenwick established the Jesuits in charge of Holy Cross College at Worcester, replacing a former academy founded by Father James Fitton in 1838. At his death the Catholics in Massachusetts numbered 53,000, an increase of 20,000 in 10 years.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph, Saint
Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary and foster-father of Our Lord, born probably Bethlehem; died probably Nazareth. All that we know about this saint is that he was a direct descendant of David, that he was a just and pious man, and that he was a poor man and an humble carpenter. The Gospel relates that he was espoused to Mary and that he was thinking of putting her away when an angel revealed to him the Mystery of the Incarnation (Matthew 1). From that time, he took care of the Mother and Child and provided for their necessities. When he died is not known, but it is probable that he was not living when Our Lord began to preach. Public recognition of Saint Joseph is first found among the Eastern Copts in the 4th century; the Church began to celebrate his feast in the 6th century. Among the saints who had a special devotion to him are Saint Teresa and Saint Francis de Sales. The solemnity of his patronage of the universal Church, declared in 1870, by Pope Pius IX is kept on Wednesday of the second week after Easter. Wednesday is the day of the week and March the month given over to devotion to him. Patron of carpenters and of a happy death. Emblems: rod and plane. Feast, Roman Calendar, March 19,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Joseph, Litany of Saint
The latest litany to be added to the approved list for public devotion. It is a time-honored prayer in honor of the holy foster-father of Jesus Christ and was sanctioned in March, 1909, by Pius X, who was tenderly devoted to Saint Joseph whose name he bore from Baptism. It follows closely the form of the Litany of Loreto, and is one of the most charming and devotional of the litanies.
Lord, have mercy on us. Lord, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us. Christ, hear us. Christ, graciously hear us.
God, the Father of Heaven, Have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world, Have mercy on us.
God the Holy Ghost, Have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, one God, Have mercy on us.
Holy Mary, Pray for us.
Holy Joseph, Pray for us.
Noble Son of the House of David, Pray for us.
Light of the Patriarchs, Pray for us.
Husband of the Mother of God, Pray for us.
Chaste Guardian of the Virgin, Pray for us.
Foster-father of the Son of God, Pray for us.
Sedulous Defender of Christ, Pray for us.
Head of the Holy Family, Pray for us.
Joseph most just, Pray for us.
Joseph most chaste, Pray for us.
Joseph most prudent, Pray for us.
Joseph most valiant, Pray for us.
Joseph most obedient, Pray for us.
Joseph most faithful, Pray for us.
Mirror of patience, Pray for us.
Lover of poverty, Pray for us.
Model of all who labor, Pray for us.
Glory of family life, Pray for us.
Protector of Virgins, Pray for us.
Pillar of families, Pray for us.
Consolation of the afflicted, Pray for us.
Hope of the sick, Pray for us.
Patron of the dying, Pray for us.
Terror of the demons, Pray for us.
Protector of the holy Church, Pray for us.
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.
He made him master of his house, and ruler of all his possesions.
O God, You were pleased to choose Saint Joseph as the husband of Mary and the guardian of your Son. Grant that, as we venerate him as our protector on earth, we may deserve to have him as our intercessor in heaven. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Litany of Saint Joseph
The latest litany to be added to the approved list for public devotion. It is a time-honored prayer in honor of the holy foster-father of Jesus Christ and was sanctioned in March, 1909, by Pius X, who was tenderly devoted to Saint Joseph whose name he bore from Baptism. It follows closely the form of the Litany of Loreto, and is one of the most charming and devotional of the litanies.
Lord, have mercy on us. Lord, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us. Christ, hear us. Christ, graciously hear us.
God, the Father of Heaven, Have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world, Have mercy on us.
God the Holy Ghost, Have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, one God, Have mercy on us.
Holy Mary, Pray for us.
Holy Joseph, Pray for us.
Noble Son of the House of David, Pray for us.
Light of the Patriarchs, Pray for us.
Husband of the Mother of God, Pray for us.
Chaste Guardian of the Virgin, Pray for us.
Foster-father of the Son of God, Pray for us.
Sedulous Defender of Christ, Pray for us.
Head of the Holy Family, Pray for us.
Joseph most just, Pray for us.
Joseph most chaste, Pray for us.
Joseph most prudent, Pray for us.
Joseph most valiant, Pray for us.
Joseph most obedient, Pray for us.
Joseph most faithful, Pray for us.
Mirror of patience, Pray for us.
Lover of poverty, Pray for us.
Model of all who labor, Pray for us.
Glory of family life, Pray for us.
Protector of Virgins, Pray for us.
Pillar of families, Pray for us.
Consolation of the afflicted, Pray for us.
Hope of the sick, Pray for us.
Patron of the dying, Pray for us.
Terror of the demons, Pray for us.
Protector of the holy Church, Pray for us.
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.
Lamb of God, you take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.
He made him master of his house, and ruler of all his possesions.
O God, You were pleased to choose Saint Joseph as the husband of Mary and the guardian of your Son. Grant that, as we venerate him as our protector on earth, we may deserve to have him as our intercessor in heaven. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Denzinger, Heinrich Joseph Dominicus
Theologian, born Liege, Belgium, 1819; died Würzburg, Germany, 1883. He taught theology at Würzburg from 1848, and was one of the pioneers of positive theology in Catholic Germany. His best-known work is his "Enchiridion," or handbook of the chief conciliar decrees, with a list of condemned propositions.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Caiaphas, Joseph
(18-36 AD) Jewish high priest. As official head of the Sanhedrin, he was responsible for the travesty of a trial to which Christ was submitted by the Jewish authorities before they handed Him over to Pilate. After the Crucifixion Caiphas persecuted Christ's followers. He was deposed by the Roman authorities.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Caiphas, Joseph
(18-36 AD) Jewish high priest. As official head of the Sanhedrin, he was responsible for the travesty of a trial to which Christ was submitted by the Jewish authorities before they handed Him over to Pilate. After the Crucifixion Caiphas persecuted Christ's followers. He was deposed by the Roman authorities.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Caelitum Joseph Decus, Atque Nostre
(Joseph, The Praise and Glory of The Heavens) Hymn for Matins on March 19, feast of Saint Joseph. It is also used in the Office of the Solemnity of Saint Joseph, observed on the Wednesday preceding the third Sunday after Easter. It was written in the 17th century by an unknown author. There are six translations. The English title given is by A. McDougall.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Charles Joseph
Bishop of Nancy and Toul, born Paris, France, 1785; died near Marseilles, France, 1844. Sacrificing a political career under Napoleon, he became a priest in 1811, and with Abbe de Rauzan founded the Missionaries of France. He was raised to the episcopate, 1824, but had to leave France, as he refused to sign the Gallican declaration of 1682. At the request of Bishop Flaget and Bishop Purcell, he was sent by Gregory XVI on a successful missionary tour through the United States and Canada, 1839-1841, and in 1842 went to Rome, where he was made a Roman count and Assistant at the Pontifical Throne. The following year he returned to France and founded the Association of the Holy Childhood.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Kansas City-Saint Joseph, Missouri, Diocese of
Comprises 15,329 square miles of Missouri. Erected on September 10, 1880. Suffragan of Saint Louis. See also:
diocese of Kansas City-Saint Joseph
Catholic-Hierarchy.Org
patron saints index
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Calasanctius, Joseph, Saint
Confessor, founder of the Piarist Order, born Petralta, Aragon, 1556; died Rome, Italy, 1648. He studied law and theology, received the degree of Doctor of Laws; and was ordained in 1583. He became attached to Bishop della Figuera to whom he rendered invaluable service as secretary and theologian. Upon the death of the bishop, he journeyed to Rome, and as a member of the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine he began his work of caring for and educating homeless children. In 1597 he established a free school, the first in Europe, and five years later founded the Order of Piarists to continue his charitable work. Canonized, 1767. Feast, Roman Calendar, August 27,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Chaumonot, Pierre Joseph
Jesuit missionary, born near Châtillon-sur-Seine, France, 1611; died Quebec, Canada, 1693. He labored among the Hurons and the New York Onondagas, established the Canadian Congregation of the Holy Family, and founded the settlement now known as Jeune Lorette
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Camel, George Joseph
Kamel, George Joseph (1661-1706) Botanist, born Brünn, Moravia; died Manila, Philippines. He entered the Society of Jesus as a lay brother, 1682, and in 1688, was sent to the Philippines as a missionary. He made valuable investigations of the plants and natural history of the islands which were published in the "Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society," and wrote an extensive work on "Medicinal Plants of the Philippines." A genus of evergreen shrubs is named in his honor Camellia
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Kamel, George Joseph
Kamel, George Joseph (1661-1706) Botanist, born Brünn, Moravia; died Manila, Philippines. He entered the Society of Jesus as a lay brother, 1682, and in 1688, was sent to the Philippines as a missionary. He made valuable investigations of the plants and natural history of the islands which were published in the "Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society," and wrote an extensive work on "Medicinal Plants of the Philippines." A genus of evergreen shrubs is named in his honor Camellia
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Joseph
Remover or increaser.
The elder of the two sons of Jacob by Rachel (Genesis 30:23,24 ), who, on the occasion of his birth, said, "God hath taken away [1] my reproach." "The Lord shall add [2] to me another son" (Genesis 30:24 ). He was a child of probably six years of age when his father returned from Haran to Canaan and took up his residence in the old patriarchal town of Hebron. "Now Israel loved Joseph more than all his children, because he was the son of his old age," and he "made him a long garment with sleeves" (Genesis 37:3 , RSV marg.), i.e., a garment long and full, such as was worn by the children of nobles. This seems to be the correct rendering of the words. The phrase, however, may also be rendered, "a coat of many pieces", i.e., a patchwork of many small pieces of divers colours. When he was about seventeen years old Joseph incurred the jealous hatred of his brothers (Genesis 37:4 ). They "hated him, and could not speak peaceably unto him." Their anger was increased when he told them his dreams (37:11).
Jacob desiring to hear tidings of his sons, who had gone to Shechem with their flocks, some 60 miles from Hebron, sent Joseph as his messenger to make inquiry regarding them. Joseph found that they had left Shechem for Dothan, whither he followed them. As soon as they saw him coming they began to plot against him, and would have killed him had not Reuben interposed. They ultimately sold him to a company of Ishmaelite merchants for twenty pieces (shekels) of silver (about ,10s.), ten pieces less than the current value of a slave, for "they cared little what they had for him, if so be they were rid of him." These merchants were going down with a varied assortment of merchandise to the Egyptian market, and thither they conveyed him, and ultimately sold him as a slave to Potiphar, an "officer of Pharaoh's, and captain of the guard" (Genesis 37:36 ). "The Lord blessed the Egyptian's house for Joseph's sake," and Potiphar made him overseer over his house. At length a false charge having been brought against him by Potiphar's wife, he was at once cast into the state prison (39; 40), where he remained for at least two years. After a while the "chief of the cupbearers" and the "chief of the bakers" of Pharaoh's household were cast into the same prison (40:2). Each of these new prisoners dreamed a dream in the same night, which Joseph interpreted, the event occurring as he had said.
This led to Joseph's being remembered subsequently by the chief butler when Pharaoh also dreamed. At his suggestion Joseph was brought from prison to interpret the king's dreams. Pharaoh was well pleased with Joseph's wisdom in interpreting his dreams, and with his counsel with reference to the events then predicted; and he set him over all the land of Egypt (Genesis 41:46 ), and gave him the name of Zaphnath-paaneah. He was married to Asenath, the daughter of the priest of On, and thus became a member of the priestly class. Joseph was now about thirty years of age.
As Joseph had interpreted, seven years of plenty came, during which he stored up great abundance of corn in granaries built for the purpose. These years were followed by seven years of famine "over all the face of the earth," when "all countries came into Egypt to Joseph to buy corn" (Genesis 41:56,57 ; 47:13,14 ). Thus "Joseph gathered up all the money that was in the land of Egypt, and in the land of Canaan, for the corn which they bought." Afterwards all the cattle and all the land, and at last the Egyptians themselves, became the property of Pharaoh.
During this period of famine Joseph's brethren also came down to Egypt to buy corn. The history of his dealings with them, and of the manner in which he at length made himself known to them, is one of the most interesting narratives that can be read (Genesis 4245-45 ). Joseph directed his brethren to return and bring Jacob and his family to the land of Egypt, saying, "I will give you the good of the land of Egypt, and ye shall eat the fat of the land. Regard not your stuff; for the good of all the land is yours." Accordingly Jacob and his family, to the number of threescore and ten souls, together with "all that they had," went down to Egypt. They were settled in the land of Goshen, where Joseph met his father, and "fell on his neck, and wept on his neck a good while" (Genesis 46:29 ).
The excavations of Dr. Naville have shown the land of Goshen to be the Wady Tumilat, between Ismailia and Zagazig. In Goshen (Egyptian Qosem) they had pasture for their flocks, were near the Asiatic frontier of Egypt, and were out of the way of the Egyptian people. An inscription speaks of it as a district given up to the wandering shepherds of Asia.
Jacob at length died, and in fulfilment of a promise which he had exacted, Joseph went up to Canaan to bury his father in "the field of Ephron the Hittite" (Genesis 47:29-31 ; 50:1-14 ). This was the last recorded act of Joseph, who again returned to Egypt.
"The 'Story of the Two Brothers,' an Egyptian romance written for the son of the Pharaoh of the Oppression, contains an episode very similar to the Biblical account of Joseph's treatment by Potiphar's wife. Potiphar and Potipherah are the Egyptian Pa-tu-pa-Ra, 'the gift of the sun-god.' The name given to Joseph, Zaphnath-paaneah, is probably the Egyptian Zaf-nti-pa-ankh, 'nourisher of the living one,' i.e., of the Pharaoh. There are many instances in the inscriptions of foreigners in Egypt receiving Egyptian names, and rising to the highest offices of state."
By his wife Asenath, Joseph had two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50 ). Joseph having obtained a promise from his brethren that when the time should come that God would "bring them unto the land which he sware to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob," they would carry up his bones out of Egypt, at length died, at the age of one hundred and ten years; and "they embalmed him, and he was put in a coffin" (Genesis 50:26 ). This promise was faithfully observed. Their descendants, long after, when the Exodus came, carried the body about with them during their forty years' wanderings, and at length buried it in Shechem, in the parcel of ground which Jacob bought from the sons of Hamor (Joshua 24:32 ; Compare Genesis 33:19 ). With the death of Joseph the patriarchal age of the history of Israel came to a close.
The Pharaoh of Joseph's elevation was probably Apepi, or Apopis, the last of the Hyksos kings. Some, however, think that Joseph came to Egypt in the reign of Thothmes III. (see PHARAOH), long after the expulsion of the Hyksos.
The name Joseph denotes the two tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh in Deuteronomy 33:13-17 ; the kingdom of Israel in Ezekiel 37:16,19 , Amos 5:6 ; and the whole covenant people of Israel in Psalm 81:4 .
One of the sons of Asaph, head of the first division of sacred musicians (1 Chronicles 25:2,9 ).
The son of Judah, and father of Semei (Luke 3:26 ). Other two of the same name in the ancestry of Christ are also mentioned (3:24,30).
The foster-father of our Lord (Matthew 1:16 ; Luke 3:23 ). He lived at Nazareth in Galilee (Luke 2:4 ). He is called a "just man." He was by trade a carpenter (Matthew 13:55 ). He is last mentioned in connection with the journey to Jerusalem, when Jesus was twelve years old. It is probable that he died before Jesus entered on his public ministry. This is concluded from the fact that Mary only was present at the marriage feast in Cana of Galilee. His name does not appear in connection with the scenes of the crucifixion along with that of Mary (q.v.), John 19:25 .
A native of Arimathea, probably the Ramah of the Old Testament (1 Samuel 1:19 ), a man of wealth, and a member of the Sanhedrim (Matthew 27:57 ; Luke 23:50 ), an "honourable counsellor, who waited for the kingdom of God." As soon as he heard the tidings of Christ's death, he "went in boldly" (lit. "having summoned courage, he went") "unto Pilate, and craved the body of Jesus." Pilate having ascertained from the centurion that the death had really taken place, granted Joseph's request, who immediately, having purchased fine linen (Mark 15:46 ), proceeded to Golgotha to take the body down from the cross. There, assisted by Nicodemus, he took down the body and wrapped it in the fine linen, sprinkling it with the myrrh and aloes which Nicodemus had brought (John 19:39 ), and then conveyed the body to the new tomb hewn by Joseph himself out of a rock in his garden hard by. There they laid it, in the presence of Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of Joses, and other women, and rolled a great stone to the entrance, and departed (Luke 23:53,55 ). This was done in haste, "for the Sabbath was drawing on" (Compare Isaiah 53:9 ).
Surnamed Barsabas (Acts 1:23 ); also called Justus. He was one of those who "companied with the apostles all the time that the Lord Jesus went out and in among them" (Acts 1:21 ), and was one of the candidates for the place of Judas.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Joseph
(joh' ssihf) Personal name meaning, “adding.” Name of several men in the Bible, most importantly a patriarch of the nation Israel and the foster father of Jesus. Old Testament 1. Joseph in the Old Testament primarily refers to the patriarch, one of the sons of Israel. Joseph was the eleventh of twelve sons, the first by Jacob's favorite wife, Rachel. His name, “may he [1] add,” was a part of Rachel's prayer at his birth (Genesis 30:24 ).
As the child of Jacob's old age and Rachel's son, Joseph became the favorite and was given the famous “coat of many colors” (Genesis 37:3 ; “long robe with sleeves,” NRSV, NEB; “richly ornamented robe” NIV) by his father. This and dreams which showed his rule over his family inspired the envy of his brothers, who sold Joseph to a caravan of Ishmaelites (Genesis 37:1 ).
Joseph was taken to Egypt where he became a trusted slave in the house of Potiphar, an official of the pharaoh. On false accusations of Potiphar's wife, Joseph was thrown in the royal prison, where he interpreted the dreams of two officials who had offended the pharaoh (Genesis 39-40 ). Eventually Joseph was brought to interpret some worrisome dreams for the pharaoh. Joseph predicted seven years of plenty followed by seven years of famine and recommended a program of preparation by storing grain. Pharaoh responded by making Joseph his second in command (Genesis 41:39-45 ).
With the famine, persons from other countries came to Egypt to buy food, including Joseph's brothers. They did not recognize him, but Joseph saw the fulfillment of his earlier dreams in which his brothers bowed down to him. After testing their character in various ways, Joseph revealed himself to them on their second visit (Genesis 42-45 ). Under Joseph's patronage, Jacob moved into Egypt (Genesis 46:1-47:12 ). Joseph died in Egypt but was embalmed and later buried in Shechem (Genesis 50:26 ; Exodus 13:19 ; Joshua 24:32 ).
That the influential Joseph (Genesis 47:13-26 ) is not known from Egyptian records would be expected if he served under a Hyksos pharaoh, as seems likely. See Exodus 1:8 , NRSV) did not “know” of him in a political or historical sense.
While in Egypt, Joseph became the father of two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50-52 ), who were counted as sons of Jacob (Genesis 48:5-6 ) and whose tribes dominated the northern nation of Israel. The name Joseph is used later in the Old Testament as a reference to the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh (Numbers 1:32 ; Numbers 36:1 ,Numbers 36:1,36:5 ; 1 Kings 11:28 ) or as a designation for the whole Northern Kingdom (Psalm 78:67 ; Ezekiel 37:16 ,Ezekiel 37:16,37:19 ; Amos 5:6 ,Amos 5:6,5:15 ; Amos 6:6 ; Obadiah 1:18 ; Zechariah 10:6 ).
Four other men named Joseph are mentioned in the Old Testament: 2. the spy of the tribe of Issachar (Numbers 13:7 ); 3 . a Levite of the sons of Asaph (1 Chronicles 25:2 ); 4 . a contemporary of Ezra with a foreign wife (Ezra 10:42 ); and Ezra 10:5 . a priest in the days of high priest Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:14 ).
New Testament 6. Several Josephs are mentioned in the New Testament, the most important being the husband of Mary, mother of Jesus. He was a descendant of David, a carpenter by trade (Matthew 13:55 ), and regarded as the legal or foster father of Jesus (Matthew 1:16 ,Matthew 1:16,1:20 ; Luke 2:4 ; Luke 3:23 ; Luke 4:22 ; John 1:45 ; John 6:42 ). Upon learning of Mary's pregnancy, Joseph, being a righteous man, sought to put her away without public disgrace. His response to God's assurances in a dream further demonstrated his piety and character (Matthew 1:18-25 ). Joseph took Mary to his ancestral home, Bethlehem, was with her at Jesus' birth, and shared in the naming, circumcision, and dedication of the child (Luke 2:8-33 ). Directed through dreams, Joseph took his family to Egypt until it was safe to return to Nazareth (Matthew 2:13-23 ). As dedicated father, he was anxious with Mary at the disappearance of Jesus (Luke 2:41-48 ). Joseph does not appear later in the Gospels, and it is likely that he died prior to Jesus' public ministry.
7. Also important in the New Testament is Joseph of Arimathea, a rich member of the Sanhedrin and a righteous man who sought the kingdom of God (Matthew 27:57 ; Mark 15:43 ; Luke 23:50 ). After the crucifixion, Joseph, a secret disciple of Jesus, requested the body from Pilate and laid it in his own unused tomb (Matthew 27:57-60 ; Mark 15:43-46 ; Luke 23:50-53 ; John 19:38-42 ). Arimathea is probably the same as Ramathaim-zophim (1 Samuel 1:1 ) northwest of Jerusalem.
Two Josephs are mentioned in the genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:24 ,Luke 3:24,3:30 ). Another was a brother of Jesus, apparently named after His father (Matthew 13:55 ; KJV “Joses” as in Mark 6:3 ). It likely but uncertain that the brother of James (Matthew 27:56 ; Joses in Mark 15:40 ,Mark 15:40,15:47 ) is a different person. Joseph was also another name of both Barsabbas (Acts 1:23 ) and Barnabas (Acts 4:36 ).
Daniel C. Browning Jr.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Joseph
(Ἰωσήφ)
1. The elder of Jacob’s two sons by Rachel, the eleventh Patriarch, the ancestor of the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh. In St. Stephen’s address before the Sanhedrin reference is made to Joseph’s being sold by his brothers, God’s presence with him in Egypt, his promotion to be governor of the land, his manifestation of himself to his brethren, his invitation to his father and all his kindred to migrate to Egypt (Acts 7:9-14), and finally, at a much later date, the rise of a Pharaoh who ‘knew not Joseph’ (7:18).
The question of the historicity of the narrative in Genesis was never raised by the Apostolic Church, nor by the modern Church till the dawn of the age of criticism. The critical verdict is that the story is based upon facts which have been idealized in the spirit of the earlier Hebrew prophets. That the tradition of a Hebrew minister in Egypt, who saved the country in time of famine, ‘should be true in essentials is by no means improbable’ (J. Skinner, Genesis [1] 441). Driver thinks it credible that an actual person, named Joseph, ‘underwent substantially the experiences recounted of him in Gn.’ (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ii. 771b). See H. Gunkel, Genesis, 1910, p. 356f.
In Hebrews 11:21 allusion is made to the blessing received by Joseph’s two sons from his dying father. In Hebrews 11:22 Joseph is placed on the roll of the ‘elders’-saints of the OT-who by their words and deeds gave evidence of their faith. The particular facts selected as proving his grasp of things unseen-which is the essence of faith (Hebrews 11:1)-are his death-bed prediction of the exodus of the children of Israel and his commandment regarding the disposal of his bones (Genesis 50:24-25; cf. Joshua 24:32). Though he was an Egyptian governor, speaking the Egyptian language, and married to an Egyptian wife, he was at heart an unchanged Hebrew, and his dying eyes beheld the land from which he had been exiled as a boy, the homeland of every true Israelite.
2. Joseph Barsabbas, surnamed Justus, was one of those who accompanied Jesus during His whole public ministry and witnessed His Resurrection. He was therefore nominated, along with Matthias, for the office made vacant by the treachery and death of Judas Iscariot (Acts 1:21-23). After prayer ‘the lot fell upon Matthias’ (Acts 1:26). It is admitted even by radical critics that Jesus deliberately chose twelve disciples (corresponding to the twelve tribes of Israel), and it was natural that these should seek to keep their sacred number unimpaired. The name ‘Barsabbas’ (or ‘Barsabas,’ C, Vulgate , Syrr.) has been variously explained as ‘child of the Sabbath,’ ‘son of Sheba,’ ‘warrior,’ or ‘old man’s son.’ The Roman surname Justus was adopted in accordance with a Jewish custom which prevailed at the time-cf. ‘John whose surname was Marcus’ (Acts 12:12; Acts 12:25), and ‘Saul, who is also Paulus’ (Acts 13:9). It is a natural conjecture-no more-that this Joseph was the brother of Judas Barsabbas (Acts 15:22). Eusebius (HE [2] i. 12) regards him as one of ‘the Seventy’ (Luke 10:1), and records (iii. 39) that a ‘wonderful event happened respecting Justus, surnamed Barsabbas, who, though he drank a deadly poison, experienced nothing injurious (μηδὲν ἀηδές), by the grace of God.’
3. Joseph, surnamed Barnabas (Acts 4:36). See Barnabas.
James Strahan.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Caiaphas, Joseph
Appointed high priest (after Simon ben Camith) by the procurator Valerius Gratus, under Tiberius. He continued in office from A.D. 26 to 37, when the proconsul Vitellius deposed him. The president of the Jewish council (Sanhedrim) which condemned the Lord Jesus, Caiaphas declaring Him guilty of blasphemy. (See ANNAS , his father-in-law, and father of five High priests, besides having been High priest himself, wielded a power equal to that of Caiaphas, whose deputy (sagan) he probably was. Hence he and Caiaphas are named as high priests together (Luke 3:2); and the band led away the Lord to him first, then to Caiaphas (John 18:13-24). Annas is called the high priest Acts 4:6, perhaps because he presided over the council (Sanhedrin).
The priesthood at the time no longer comprehended the end of their own calling. Providence therefore, while employing him as the last of the sacerdotal order (for it ceased before God at the death of Messiah, the true and everlasting Priest, whose typical forerunner it was) to prophesy Christ's death for the people, left him to judicial blindness as to the deep significance of his words: "Ye know nothing at all, nor consider that it is expedient for us that one man should die for the people, and that the whole nation perish not" (John 11:50-52). A proof that the Holy Spirit, not merely man's spirit, is the inspirer of the sacred writers (1 Peter 1:10-12). Balaam similarly was a bad man, yet uttered under the Spirit true and holy prophecies. Unscrupulous vigor, combined with political. shrewdness, characterizes him in the New Testament, as it also kept him in office longer than any of his predecessors. See Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:57-65.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Joseph (2)
JOSEPH (Ἰωσήφ).—1. The patriarch, mentioned only in the description of the visit of Jesus to Sychar (John 4:5).—2. 3. Joseph son of Mattathias and Joseph son of Jonam are both named in the genealogy of Jesus given in Lk. (Luke 3:24; Luke 3:30).* [1] —4. One of the brethren of the Lord, Matthew 13:55 (Authorized Version Joses, the form adopted in both Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 in Matthew 27:56, Mark 6:3; Mark 15:40; Mark 15:47. See Joses).
5. Joseph, the husband of Mary and the reputed father of Jesus (Luke 3:23), is not mentioned in Mk., and only indirectly in Jn. (Deuteronomy 22:23-24; John 6:42). He was of Davidic descent; and, though Mt. and Lk. differ in the genealogical details, they connect Jesus with Joseph and through him with David (Matthew 1:1 ff., Luke 3:23 ff.). Joseph, who was a carpenter (Matthew 13:55) and a poor man, as his offering in the temple showed Luke 2:24), lived in Nazareth (Luke 2:4) and was espoused to Mary, also of Nazareth (Luke 1:26). By their betrothal they entered into a relationship which, though not the completion of marriage, could be dissolved only by death or divorce. Before the marriage ceremony Mary was ‘found with child of the Holy Ghost,’ but the angelic annunciation to her was not made known to Joseph. He is described as a just man (Matthew 1:19), a strict observer of the Law. The law was stern (John 1:45), but its severity had been mitigated and divorce had taken the place of death. Divorce could be effected publicly, so that the shame of the woman might be seen by all; or it could be done privately, by the method of handing the bill of separation to the woman in presence of two witnesses.† [2] Joseph, not willing to make Mary a public example, ‘was minded to put her away privily’ (Matthew 1:18). An angel, however, appeared to him in a dream, telling him not to fear to marry Mary, as the conception was of the Holy Ghost, and also that she would bring forth a son, whom he was to name Jesus (Matthew 1:20 f.). The dream was accepted as a revelation,‡ [3] as a token of Divine favour, and Joseph took Mary as his wife, but did not live with her as her husband till she had brought forth her firstborn son (Matthew 1:24 f.).
Before the birth of Christ there was an Imperial decree that all the world should be taxed, and Joseph, being of the house and lineage of David, had to leave Nazareth and go to Bethlehem, to be taxed with Mary.§ [4] In Bethlehem Jesus was born; and there the shepherds, to whom the angel had announced the birth of the Saviour, found Mary and Joseph and ‘the babe lying in a manger’ (Luke 2:16). At the circumcision, on the eighth day after the birth, the child received the name ‘Jesus’ which Joseph had been commanded to give Him; and on a later day, when Mary’s purification was accomplished (cf. Leviticus 12:2-4), she and Joseph took Jesus to the temple in Jerusalem (Luke 2:22), to ‘present him to the Lord’* [5] and to offer a sacrifice, according to the requirements of the law (Exodus 13:2, Leviticus 12:8). Joseph fulfilled the law as if he were the father of Jesus; and after the ceremonies in the temple he must have returned with Mary and her son to Bethlehem, which was 6 miles distant from Jerusalem. In Bethlehem the Wise Men who had come from the East saw Mary and ‘the young child’ and worshipped Him; and after their departure the angel of the Lord appeared again to Joseph, bidding him take Mary and the child and flee into Egypt on account of Herod, who would seek to destroy Him (Matthew 2:13). Joseph was quick to obey, and rising in the night he took the young child and His mother and departed for Egypt, where Herod had no authority (Matthew 2:14). In Egypt they were to remain till the angel brought word to Joseph (Matthew 2:13); and there they dwelt, possibly two or even three years, till the death of Herod, when the angel again appeared in a dream to Joseph. The angel commanded him to take the young child and His mother and go into the land of Israel. Obedience was at once given by Joseph, but he became afraid when he learned that Archelaus was reigning in Judaea. Again the angel appeared in a dream, and after a warning Joseph proceeded to Nazareth, which was not under the rule of Archelaus, who had an evil reputation, but under that of the milder Antipas (Matthew 2:14-23).
It is recorded of Joseph that he and Mary went every year, at the Passover, to Jerusalem, and that when Jesus was twelve years of age He accompanied them. On that occasion Jesus tarried in Jerusalem, after Joseph and Mary, thinking He was with them in the company, had left the city. When they had gone a day’s journey they found He was not with them, and they turned back to Jerusalem. After three days they found Him in the temple among the doctors, and they were amazed. Mary’s words, ‘Son, why hast thou thus dealt with us? behold, thy father and I have sought thee sorrowing.’ called forth an answer which Joseph and Mary did not understand. But after the incident in Jerusalem, Jesus went with them to Nazareth and ‘was subject unto them’ (Luke 2:41-51). Mary’s words and the record of the subjection of Jesus to her and Joseph indicate that Joseph stood to Jesus in the place of an earthly father. How long that relationship continued is unknown, since the time of the death of Joseph is not stated in the Gospels. It may be accepted as a certainty that he was not alive throughout the period of the public ministry of Jesus, seeing that he is not directly or indirectly mentioned along with His mother and brothers and sisters (Mark 3:31; Mark 6:3).
6. Joseph of Arimathaea (Ἰωσὴφ ὁ ἀπὸ Ἀριμαθαίας, see Arimathaea).—A rich and pious Israelite (Matthew 27:57), a member of the Sanhedrin (Mark 15:43), who, secretly for fear of the Jews, was Jesus’ disciple (John 19:38). He had not consented to the death of Jesus (Luke 23:51), and could not therefore have been present at the Council, where they all condemned Him to be guilty of death (Mark 14:64). The timidity which prevented him from openly avowing his discipleship, and perhaps from defending Jesus in the Sanhedrin, fled when he beheld the death of the Lord. Jewish law required that the body of a person who had been executed should not remain all night upon the tree, but should ‘in any wise’ be buried (Deuteronomy 21:22-23). This law would not bind the Roman authorities, and the custom in the Empire was to leave the body to decay upon the cross (cf. Hor. Ep. i. xvi. 48; Plautus, Mil. Glor. II. iv. 19). But at the crucifixion of Jesus and of the two malefactors, the Jews, anxious that the bodies should not remain upon the cross during the Sabbath, besought Pilate that the legs of the crucified might be broken and death hastened, and that then the bodies might be taken away (John 19:31). According to Roman law, the relatives could claim the body of a person executed (Digest, xlviii. 24, ‘De cadav. punit.’). But which of the relatives of Jesus had a sepulchre in Jerusalem where His body might be placed? Joseph, wishing the burial not to be ‘in any wise’ (cf. Joshua 8:29), but to be according to the most pious custom of his race, went to Pilate and craved the body. The petition required boldness (Mark 15:43), since Joseph, with no kinship in the flesh with Jesus, would be forced to make a confession of discipleship, which the Jews would note. Pilate, too, neither loved nor was loved by Israel, and his anger might be kindled at the coming of a Jew, and the member of the Sanhedrin be assailed with insults. Pilate, however, making sure that Jesus was dead, gave the body. Perhaps he had pity for the memory of Him he had condemned, or perhaps the rich man’s gold, since Pilate, according to Philo (Op. ii. 590), took money from suppliants, secured what was craved. Joseph, now with no fear of the Jews, acted openly, and had to act with speed, as the day of preparation for the Sabbath was nearly spent. Taking down the body of Jesus from the cross (and other hands must have aided his), he wrapped it in linen which he himself had bought (Mark 15:46). In the Fourth Gospel it is told how Nicodemus, bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about an hundred pound weight, joined Joseph, and how they took the body and wound it in linen clothes with the spices (John 19:40). Near the place of crucifixion was a garden, and in the garden a new sepulchre, which Joseph had hewn out in the rock, doubtless for his own last resting-place; and in that sepulchre, wherein was never man yet laid, was placed the body of Jesus prepared for its burial (Matthew 27:60, John 19:41). In the court at the entrance to the tomb, the preparation would be made. All was done which the time before the Sabbath allowed reverent hands to do; and then Joseph, perhaps thinking of the pious offices that could yet be done to the dead, rolled a great stone to the door of the sepulchre and departed (Matthew 27:60). On late legends regarding Joseph of Arimathaea see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, vol. ii. p. 778.
J. Herkless.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - le Moyne, Joseph
(1668-1724) Sieur de Serigny. Governor of Rochefort, France.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - le Moyne, Joseph-Dominique-Emmanuel
(1738-1807)
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Benedict Joseph Labre, Saint
(1748-1783) Confessor, pilgrim. Born Amettes, France; died Rome, Italy. After unsuccessful attempts, because of his youth and poor health, to obtain the religious habit in the Trappist, Cistercian, and Carthusian orders, he devoted his remaining 13 years to traveling over Europe, visiting famous shrines, and leading a life of great mortification. Worn out by austerities, he collapsed outside a church in Rome, and died shortly after. He was known as the "Saint of the Forty Hours Devotion," following this devotion wherever he could. His death was followed by a multitude of miracles. Canonized; 1881. Relics in Santa Maria dei Monti, Rome. Feast, April 16,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - le Verrier, Urbain Jean Joseph
Astronomer, born Saint-Lô, France, 1811; died Paris, France, 1877. He was successively professor at the Ecole Polytechnique, the College Stanislas, and the University of Paris. In 1839 he published a calculation of the planetary orbits from 100,000 B.C. to A.D. 100,000, proving the stability of the solar system, but his great triumph was his theoretical calculation of the exact spot where the hitherto undiscovered planet Neptune was to be found, as was done under his direction by Galle at Berlin, September 23, 1846. He also suggested the existence of a planet between Mercury and the sun. Between 1858,1877 he compiled most valuable tables of the movements of the solar system. In 1853 he succeeded Arago as director of the Paris Observatory. He founded the International Meteorological Institute, and organized the French weather bureau service. He was a fervent Catholic and did not hesitate to condemn publicly the materialistic and sceptical tendencies of so many modern scholars.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - o'Dwyer, Joseph
Catholic physician; born Cleveland, Ohio, 1841; died New York, New York, 1898. After graduating from public schools at London, Ontario, he studied and practised medicine in New York. The sight of so many children dying from suffocation in diphtheria led him to experimentation which resulted in his system of intubation, one of the most valuable practical discoveries of his age.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Benedict Joseph Flaget
First Bishop of Bardstown, born Contournat, France, 1763; died Louisville, Kentucky, 1850. Educated at the Sulpician Seminary, Clermont, he joined the Society of Saint Sulpice in 1783; and was ordained priest at Issy, 1787. He taught dogmatic theology at Nantes and at Angers, but left France during the Revolution and arrived at Baltimore, 1792. He was appointed missionary to the Indians at Fort Vincennes, 1792; professor at Georgetown College, 1794; and then was sent to help found a college at Havana, 1798. He returned to Baltimore, 1801, and was consecrated Bishop of Bardstown, Kentucky, 1810. The diocese was large, having within its jurisdiction at first the territory now approximately comprising 10 states; it was devoid of funds and in need of spiritual care. Bishop Flaget consecrated his cathedral at Bardstown in 1819. In 1834 his diocese was limited to Kentucky and Tennessee, and it soon had a seminary, 4 colleges, 3 religious orders of men, 3 convents, several academies, and an orphan asylum. A visit to Europe, 1835-1839, netted him financial aid for his diocese, which was transferred to Louisville, 1841. Here he built a convent for the Religious of Our Lady of Charity of the Good Shepherd of Angers, 1843, with his private funds.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hunter, Sylvester Joseph
Jesuit educator, born Bath, England, 1829; died Stonyhurst, England, 1896. Graduating at Cambridge with high mathematical honors, he subsequently adopted the legal profession, becoming rapidly noted as a practitioner and author. He embraced Catholicity in 1857 and four years later joined the Jesuits. He modernized the course of studies in Stonyhurst College and later directed the Jesuit house of studies at Saint Beuno's, where he wrote his valuable "Outlines of Dogmatic Theology."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Benedict Joseph Fenwick
Second Bishop of Boston, brother of Edward Dominic Fenwork, born Leonardstown, Maryland, 1782; died Boston, Massachusetts, 1846. He studied and taught at Georgetown. In 1805 he entered the Sulpician Seminary, Baltimore, but on the restoration of the Society of Jesus in the United States, 1806, he joined the order. Ordained by Bishop Neale in 1808, he was sent to New York, where he became head of the New York Literary Institution, founded, 1809, as a college, on the present site of the cathedral, and closed in 1814, on the recall of the Jesuits to Maryland. He served for a time as administrator of the New York diocese and under Bishop Connolly as vicar-general. From 1817-1818 he was president of Georgetown. Sent to Charleston, 1818, to arrange difficulties originating in the trustee system, he remained there two years after the arrival of Bishop England, 1820. He was again president of Georgetown, 1824-1825. Named to succeed Bishop Cheverus of Boston, he was consecrated in Baltimore, November 1, 1825. He established a seminary in his own home, and by 1827 had a school in the basement of the cathedral. In 1829 he founded one of the earliest Catholic papers in the United States, "The Jesuit, or the Catholic Sentinel." His zeal resulted in the building within 20 years of 35 churches, of which eight were in Boston. He removed the Ursulines from an unsuitable location in Boston to Charlestown, early in his episcopacy; in 1834 the convent was destroyed at the hands of a fanatical mob. Their actions were condemned at a public meeting in Faneuil Hall, presided over by the mayor of Boston. In 1843Bishop Fenwick established the Jesuits in charge of Holy Cross College at Worcester, replacing a former academy founded by Father James Fitton in 1838. At his death the Catholics in Massachusetts numbered 53,000, an increase of 20,000 in 10 years.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Joseph
Joseph (jô'zef), increase, 1. The elder of Jacob's two sons by Rachel, Genesis 37:3, and beloved by his father. The gift of the new robe, or coat of many colors, was perhaps intended to give him the rights of primogeniture, as the son of his first wife, in place of Reuben who had forfeited them. Genesis 35:22; 1 Chronicles 5:1. He was born in Mesopotamia. Genesis 30:22-24. By a wonderful providence of God he was raised from a prison to be the chief ruler of Egypt under Pharaoh. "The story of his father's fondness, of his protest against sin among his brothers, of their jealous hostility and his prophetic dreams, of his sale by his brethren to Midianites and by them to Potiphar in Egypt, of the divine favor on his pure and prudent life, his imprisonment for three to twelve years for virtue's sake, his wonderful exaltation to power and his wise use of it for the good of the nation, of his tender and reverent care of his father, his magnanimity to his brethren, and his faith in the future of God's chosen people, is one of the most pleasing and instructive in the Bible, and is related in language inimitably natural, simple, and touching. It is too beautiful for abridgment, and too familiar to need full rehearsal."—Hand. The history of Joseph is strikingly confirmed by the Egyptian monuments. Joseph married the princess Asenath, daughter of Potipherah, priest of On; and his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, Genesis 41:50, whom Jacob adopted. Genesis 48:5, became the heads of two of the twelve tribes of Israel. 2. The son of Heli and reputed father of Jesus Christ. He was a just man, and of the house and lineage of David. He lived at Nazareth in Galilee. He espoused Mary, the daughter and heir of his uncle Jacob, and before he took her home his wife received the angelic communication recorded in Matthew 1:20. When Jesus was twelve years old, Joseph took his mother and Jesus to keep the passover at Jerusalem, and when they returned to Nazareth he continued to act as a father to the child Jesus, and was reputed to be so indeed. But here our knowledge of Joseph ends. That he died before our Lord's crucifixion is indeed tolerably certain, by what is related, John 19:27; and, perhaps, Mark 6:3, may imply that he was then dead. But where, when, or how he died, we know not. 3. Joseph of Arimathæa, a rich and pious Israelite, probably a member of the Great Council or Sanhedrin. He is further characterized as "a good man and a just." Luke 23:50. We are told that he did not "consent to the counsel and deed" of his colleagues in the death of Jesus. On the evening of the crucifixion Joseph "went in boldly unto Pilate and craved the body of Jesus." Pilate consented. Joseph and Nicodemus then, having enfolded the sacred body in the linen shroud which Joseph had bought, placed it in a tomb hewn in a rock, in a garden belonging to Joseph, and close to the place of crucifixion. There is a tradition that he was one of the seventy disciples. 4. Joseph, called Barsabas, and surnamed Justus: one of the two persons chosen by the assembled church, Acts 1:23, as worthy to fill the place in the apostolic company from which Judas had fallen.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Aillon, Joseph de la Roche d'
(died 1656) Recollect missionary. He landed at Quebec, 1625; was among the Hurons, 1626; passed to the Neutral Nation, remaining with them three months, barely escaping death; returned to the Hurons; and published an account of his sojourn amongst the Neutrals, describing their country and customs.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gorres, Johann Joseph
Author, and champion of Catholic interests in Germany, born Coblenz, Germany, 1776; died Munich, Germany, 1848. His earliest writings reveal his admiration for the principles of the French Revolution, but a visit to Paris in 1800 cured him of his enthusiasm. Returning to Coblenz he taught physics till 1806, when he became a docent at Heidelberg, then a center of German Romanticism, in which he was interested. Two years later he was again at Coblenz, where he devoted himself to mythology and was named superintendent of education. His struggle for civiland religious liberty provoked the hostility of the Prussian government, and to escape arrest he fled to Strasbourg. Gradually he took a more active part in the defense of the Church. In 1827 he was called to the University of Munich, and became the leading spirit in a brilliant Catholic circle including Arndts, Dollinger, Mohler, Phillips, and other scholars, who worked for a renovation of the spiritual life, and the civilliberty of Catholics. As a result of his study of the medieval mystical writers, he produced his great work on Christian mysticism, and when the Prussians arrested the Archbishop of Cologne he at once opposed the infringement of ecclesiastical rights by the civilpower, and became a constant contributor to the newly established "Historisch-politische Blatter." In his last years he showed his loyalty once more by his condemnation of the schism of Johann Ronge (1845).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gillow, Joseph
Born 1850; died 1921. English historical and archaeological writer. Educated at Ushaw College, he published the first volume of his "Literary and Bibliographical Dictionary of the English Catholics," 1885, completing the set in 1902. Honorable recorder of the Catholic Record Society and member of its council, he was elected to the Manchester School Board 1880, and gave evidence for the cause of the English martyrs, 1888.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Amiot, Jean Joseph Marie
Born in 1718 at Toulon, France; died on October 9, 1793 in Beijing, China. French Jesuit missionary to China. Learned Orientalist whose writings helped expose and explain China to Europe.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Arimathea, Joseph of, Saint
First century; born Arimathea, Palestine. He was a wealthy Israelite and a disciple of Christ. He requested from Pilate the body of Jesus and with the help of Nicodemus placed it in the tomb. The legend which tells of his coming to Gaul, 63 AD, and subsequently to Great Britain, where he is supposed to have founded the first Christian oratory at Glastonbury, is fabulous. Patron of the church at Glastonbury. Feast, March 17,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Abbey, Mount Saint Joseph
Roscrea, County Tipperary, Ireland. Cistercian Abbey, founded 1818, by Dom Bruno Fitzpatrick, abbot of Mount Melleray. In 1905 it founded the Cistercian College Roscrea, a boarding school for boys. See also the abbey's and college's web sites.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Caiaphas, Joseph
Appointed high priest by the governor Valerius Gratus, A.D. 26, he remained in office until A.D. 36, when he was deposed by the proconsul Vitellius. He prophesied that it was expedient that one man should die for the nation, that the whole nation might not perish. John 11:50,51 . He presided at the trial of the Lord, Matthew 26:3,57 ; Luke 3:2 ; John 11:49 ; John 18:13,28 ; and was present when Peter and John were brought before the Sanhedrim. Acts 4:6 .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Arnoudt, Peter Joseph
(1811-1865) Writer, born Moere, Belgium; died Cincinnati, Ohio. He entered the Society of Jesus at Florissant, Missouri, and taught in the Jesuit colleges of that state. His Imitation of the Sacred Heart of Jesus has been translated into many languages.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Bayma, Joseph
(1816-1892) Mathematician and scientist, born Piedmont, Italy; died Santa Clara, California. He entered the Society of Jesus, 1832. Exiled from Italy in 1860, he took refuge at Stonyhurst, England, where he wrote his Realis Philosophia. He is best known for his Molecular Mechanics, a metaphysical mathematical work dealing with the constitution of matter. In 1868 Bayma left England for California, where he taught mathematics for many years at Santa Clara and published several scientific text-books.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hermann Joseph, Blessed
Born Cologne, Germany, 1150; died Hoven, 1241. At a very early age, Hermann had a tender devotion to the Blessed Virgin. Entering the monastery of the Premonstratensian Canons at Steinfeld (1162) he was ordained and appointed chaplain of the Cistercian nuns at Hoven. He soon became known by the name of Joseph, which the Blessed Virgin, calling him her chaplain and spouse, bestowed on him. Represented in art, offering an apple to the statue of the Virgin and Child. The cause of his canonization was begun, 1626, but interrupted. Relics at Steinfeld, Cologne, and Antwerp. Feast, April 7,.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gozon, Louis Joseph, Marquis de Montcalm
French general; born Candiac, France, 1712; died Quebec, Canada, 1759. Of warlike ancestry, he was a soldier at 15, but continued his excellent classical education by reading. After a successful series of campaigns on the Continent, he succeeded Dieskau in command of the French army in Canada, 1755. Against the odds of discordant relations with Governor Vaudreuil, Bigot's dishonesty, apathy of the French court, impoverished condition of the colony and army, and disproportionate resources of the enemy, Montcalm was heroically faithful to duty. After his victory at Carillon (Ticonderoga), 1758, he raised a cross inscribed in thanksgiving to the God of Hosts. The Battle of the Plains of Abraham when both Montcalm and Wolfe met death, is considered by its results as having saved Canada from the French Revolution. Montcalm was a brave and noble commander, who always gave to God the glory of his victories.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Joseph
Increase; addition
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Joseph
JOSEPH (in OT and Apocr. [1] ). 1. The patriarch. See next article. 2. A man of Issachar ( Numbers 13:7 ). 3. A son of Asaph ( 1 Chronicles 25:2 ; 1 Chronicles 25:9 ). 4. One of the sons of Bani who had married a foreign wife ( Ezra 10:42 ); called in 1Es 9:34 Josephus. 5. A priest ( Nehemiah 12:14 ). 6. An ancestor of Judith ( Jdt 8:1 ). 7. An officer of Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:18 ; 1Ma 5:56 ; 1Ma 5:60 ). 8. In 2Ma 8:22 , and probably also 10:19, Joseph is read by mistake for John , one of the brothers of Judas Maccabæus.
JOSEPH. Jacob’s eleventh son, the elder of the two sons of Rachel; born in Haran. The name is probably contracted from Jehoseph ( Psalms 81:5 ), ‘May God add’ (cf. Genesis 30:23 f., where etymologies from two sources are given). Joseph is the principal hero of the later chapters of Genesis, which are composed mainly of extracts from three documents. J [2] and E [3] supply the bulk of the narrative, and as a rule are cited alternately, the compiler often modifying a quotation from one document with notes derived from the other. From P [4] some six or seven short excerpts are made, the longest being Genesis 46:6-27 , where the object and the parenthetic quality are evident. For the details of analysis, see Driver LOT [5] 6 , 17 ff. The occasional differences of tradition are an evidence of original independence, and their imperfect harmonization in the joint narrative is favourable to its substantial historicity.
At present the date of Joseph can be only provisionally fixed, as the account of his life neither mentions the name of the ruling Pharaoh nor refers to distinctive Egyptian manners or customs in such a way as to yield a clue to the exact period. The Pharaoh of the oppression is now generally taken to be Rameses ii. of the 19th dynasty ( c [2] . b.c. 1275 1208); and if this be correct, the addition of the years of residence in Egypt ( Exodus 12:41 ) would bring Joseph’s term of office into the reign of the later Hyksos kings ( c [2] . b.c. 2098 1587; for dates and particulars, see Petrie, History of Egypt ).
With the return of Jacob to Hebron (Genesis 35:27 ) he ceases to be the central figure of the story, and Joseph takes his place. Of his life to the age of 17 ( Genesis 37:2 ) nothing is told, except that he was his father’s favourite, and rather too free in carrying complaints of his brothers and telling them of his boyish dreams. Sent to Shechem, he found that his brothers had taken their flocks northwards fifteen miles, to the richer pasturage of Dothan. As soon as he came within sight, their resentment perceived its opportunity, and they arranged to get rid of him and his dreams; but the two traditions are not completely harmonized. J [2] represents Judah as inducing his brothers to sell Joseph to a company of Ishmaelites; but E [3] makes Reuben a mediator, whose plans were frustrated by a band of Midianites, who had in the interval kidnapped Joseph and stolen him away ( Genesis 40:15 ). The phraseology is against the identification of the two companies; and the divergent traditions point to a natural absence of real agreement among the brothers, with a frustration of their purposes by means of which they were ignorant. What became of Joseph they did not really know; and to protect themselves they manufactured the evidence of the blood-stained coat.
In Egypt, Joseph was bought by Potiphar, a court official, whose title makes him chief of the royal butchers and hence of the body-guard; and the alertness and trustworthiness of the slave led quickly to his appointment as major domo (Egyp. mer-per ), a functionary often mentioned on the monuments (Erman, Life in Anc. Egypt , 187 f.). Everything prospered under Joseph’s management; but his comeliness and courtesy attracted the notice of his master’s wife, whose advances, being repelled, were transformed into a resentment that knew no scruples. By means of an entirely false charge she secured the removal of Joseph to the State prison, which was under the control of Potiphar ( Genesis 40:3 ), and where again he was soon raised to the position of overseer or under-keeper. Under his charge were placed in due course the chief of the Pharaoh’s butlers and the chief of his bakers, who had for some unstated reason incurred the royal displeasure. Both were perplexed with dreams, which Joseph interpreted to them correctly. Two years later the Pharaoh himself had his duplicated dream of the fat and lean kine and of the full and thin ears; and as much significance was attached in Egypt to dreams, the king was distressed by his inability to find an interpreter, and ‘his spirit was troubled.’ Thereupon the chief butler recalled Joseph’s skill and his own indebtedness to him, and mentioned him to the Pharaoh, who sent for him, and was so impressed by his sagacity and foresight that exaltation to the rank of keeper of the royal seal followed, with a degree of authority that was second only to that of the throne. The Egyptian name of Zaphenath-paneah (of which the meaning is perhaps ‘The God spake and he came into life,’ suggesting that the bearer of the name owed his promotion to the Divine use of him as revealer of the Divine will) was conferred upon him, and he married Asenath , daughter of one of the most important dignitaries in the realm, the priest of the great national temple of the sun at On or Heliopolis, seven miles north-east of the modern Cairo.
So far as Egypt was concerned, Joseph’s policy was to store the surplus corn of the years of plenty in granaries, and afterwards so to dispose of it as to change the system of land-tenure. Famines in that country are due generally to failure or deficiency in the annual inundation of the Nile, and several of long endurance have been recorded. Brugsch ( Hist . 2 i. 304) reports an inscription, coinciding in age approximately with that of Joseph, and referring to a famine lasting ‘many years,’ during which a distribution of corn was made. This has been doubtfully identified with Joseph’s famine. Other inscriptions of the kind occur, and are sufficient to authenticate the fact of prolonged famines, though not to yield further particulars of the one with which Joseph had to deal. His method was to sell corn first for money (rings of gold, whose weight was certified by special officials), and when all this was exhausted ( Genesis 47:15 ), corn was given in exchange for cattle of every kind, and finally for the land. The morality of appropriating the surplus produce and then compelling the people to buy it back, must not be judged by modern standards of justice, but is defensible, if at all, only in an economic condition where the central government was responsible for the control of a system of irrigation upon which the fertility of the soil and the produce of its cultivation directly depended, and where the private benefit of the individual had to be ignored in view of a peril threatening the community. Instead of regarding the arrangement as a precedent to be followed in different states of civilization, ground has been found in it for charging Joseph with turning the needs of the people into an occasion for oppressing them; and certainly the effect upon the character and subsequent condition of the people was not favourable. The system of tenure in existence before, by which large landed estates were held by private proprietors, was changed into one by which all the land became the property of the crown, the actual cultivators paying a rental of one-fifth of the produce ( Genesis 47:24 ). That some such change took place is clear from the monuments (cf. Erman, Life in Anc. Egypt , 102), though they have not yielded the name of the author or the exact date of the change. An exception was made in favour of the priests ( Genesis 47:22 ), who were supported by a fixed income in kind from the Pharaoh, and therefore had no need to part with their land. In later times (cf. Diodorus Siculus, i. 73 f.) the land was owned by the kings, the priests, and the members of a military caste; and it is not likely that the system introduced by Joseph lasted long after his death. The need of rewarding the services of successful generals or partisans would be a strong temptation to the expropriation of some of the royal lands.
The peculiarity of the famine was that it extended over the neighbouring countries (Genesis 41:56 f.); and that is the fact of significance in regard to the history of Israel, with which the narrative in consequence resumes contact. The severity of the famine in Canaan led Jacob to send all his sons except Benjamin ( Genesis 42:4 ) to buy corn in Egypt. On their arrival they secured an interview with Joseph, and prostrated themselves before him ( Genesis 37:7 , Genesis 42:6 ); but in the grown man, with his shaven face [10] and Egyptian dress, they entirely failed to recognize their brother. The rough accusation that they were spies in search of undefended ways by which the country might be invaded from the east, on which side lines of posts and garrisons were maintained under two at least of the dynasties, aroused their fears, and an attempt was made to allay Joseph’s suspicions by detailed information. Joseph catches at the opportunity of discovering the truth concerning Benjamin, and, after further confirming in several ways the apprehensions of his brothers, retains one as a hostage in ward and sends the others home. On their return ( Genesis 42:35 E [3] ), or at the first lodging-place ( Genesis 42:27 J [2] ) on the way, the discovery of their money in their sacks increased their anxiety, and for a time their father positively refused to consent to further dealings with Egypt. At length his resolution broks down under the pressure of the famine ( Genesis 43:11 ff.). In Egypt the sons were received courteously, and invited to a feast in Joseph’s house, where they were seated according to their age ( Genesis 43:33 ), and Benjamin was singled out for the honour of a special ‘mess’ (cf. 2 Samuel 11:8 ) as a mark of distinction. They set out homewards in high spirits, unaware that Joseph had directed that each man’s money should be placed in his sack, and his own divining-cup of silver ( Genesis 44:5 ; the method of divination was hydromancy an article was thrown into a vessel of water, and the movements of the water were thought to reveal the unknown) in that of Benjamin. Overtaken at almost their first halting-place, they were charged with theft, and returned in a body to Joseph’s house. His reproaches elicited a frank and pathetic speech from Judah, after which Joseph could no longer maintain his incognito . He allayed the fears of his conscience-stricken brothers by the assurance that they had been the agents of Providence ‘to preserve life’ ( Genesis 45:5 ; cf. Psalms 105:17 ff.); and in the name of the Pharaoh he invited them with their father to settle in Egypt, with the promise of support during the five years of famine that remained.
Goshen, a pastoral district in the Delta about forty miles north-east of Cairo, was selected for the new home of Jacob. The district was long afterwards known as ‘the land of Rameses’ (Genesis 47:11 ) from the care spent upon it by the second king of that name, who often resided there, and founded several cities in the neighbourhood. In Egypt swine-herds and cow-herds were ‘an abomination’ to the people ( Genesis 46:34 ; cf. Hdt. ii. 47, and Erman, op. cit. 439f.), but there is no independent evidence that shepherds were, and the contempt must be regarded as confined to those whose duties brought them into close contact with cattle, for the rearing of cattle received much attention, the superintendent of the royal herds being frequently mentioned in the inscriptions. Joseph’s household and brothers flourished during the seventeen years ( Genesis 47:27 f.) Jacob lived in Egypt. Before his death he blessed Joseph’s two sons, giving preference to the younger in view of the greatness of the tribe to be derived from him, and leaving to Joseph himself one portion above his brethren, viz. Shechem ( Genesis 48:22 RVm [13] ). After mourning for the royal period of seventy days ( Genesis 50:3 ; cf. Diod. Sic. i. 72), Joseph buried his father with great pomp in the cave of Machpelah, and cheered his brothers by a renewed promise to nourish and help them. He is said to have survived to the age of 110 ( Genesis 50:22 ), and to have left injunctions that his body should be conveyed to Canaan when Israel was restored. The body was carefully embalmed ( Genesis 50:26 ), and enclosed in a mummy-case or sarcophagus. In due course it was taken charge of by Moses ( Exodus 13:19 ), and eventually buried at Shechem ( Joshua 24:32 ).
Of the general historicity of the story of Joseph there need be no doubt. Allowance may be made for the play of imagination in the long period that elapsed before the traditions were reduced to writing in their present form, and for the tendency to project the characteristics of a tribe backwards upon some legendary hero. But the incidents are too natural and too closely related to be entirely a product of fiction; and the Egyptian colouring, which is common to both of the principal documents, is fatal to any theory that resolves the account into a mere elaboration in a distant land of racial pride. Joseph’s own character, as depicted, shows no traces of constructive art, but is consistent and singularly attractive. Dutifulness ( 1Ma 2:53 ) is perhaps its keynote, manifested alike in the resistance of temptation, in uncomplaining patience in misfortune, and in the modesty with which he bore his elevation to rank and power. Instead of using opportunities for the indulgence of resentment, he recognizes the action of Providence, and nourishes the brothers ( Sir 49:15 ) who had lost all brotherly affection for him. On the other hand, there are blemishes which should be neither exaggerated nor overlooked. In his youth there was a degree of vanity that made him rather unpleasant company. That his father was left so long in ignorance of his safety in Egypt may have been unavoidable, but leaves a suspicion of inconsiderateness. When invested with authority he treated the people in a way that would now be pronounced tyrannical and unjust, enriching and strengthening the throne at the expense of their woe; though, judged by the standards of his own day, the charge may not equally lie. On the whole, a very high place must be given him among the early founders of his race. In strength of right purpose he was second to none, whilst in the graces of reverence and kindness, of insight and assurance, he became the type of a faith that is at once personal and national (Hebrews 11:22 ), and allows neither misery nor a career of triumph to eclipse the sense of Divine destiny.
R. W. Moss.
JOSEPH (in NT). 1. 2. Two ancestors of our Lord, Luke 3:24 ; Luke 3:30 .
3. The husband of Mary and ‘father’ of Jesus. Every Jew kept a record of his lineage, and was very proud if he could claim royal or priestly descent; and Joseph could boast himself ‘a son of David’ ( Matthew 1:20 ). His family belonged to Bethlehem, David’s city, but he had migrated to Nazareth ( Luke 2:4 ), where he followed the trade of carpenter ( Matthew 13:55 ). He was betrothed to Mary, a maiden of Nazareth, being probably much her senior, though the tradition of the apocryphal History of Joseph that he was in his ninety-third year and she in her fifteenth is a mere fable. The tradition that he was a widower and had children by his former wife probably arose in the interest of the dogma of Mary’s perpetual virginity. The Evangelists tell us little about him, but what they do tell redounds to his credit. (1) He was a pious Israelite, faithful in his observance of the Jewish ordinances ( Luke 2:21-24 ) and feasts ( Luke 2:41-42 ). (2) He was a kindly man. When he discovered the condition of his betrothed, he drew the natural inference and decided to disown her, but he would do it as quietly as possible, and, so far as he might, spare her disgrace. And, when he was apprised of the truth, he was very kind to Mary. On being summoned to Bethlehem by the requirements of the census, he would not leave her at home to suffer the slanders of misjudging neighbours, but took her with him and treated her very gently in her time of need ( Luke 2:1-7 ). (3) He exhibited this disposition also in his nurture of the Child so wondrously entrusted to his care, taking Him to his heart and well deserving to be called His ‘father’ ( Luke 2:33 ; Luke 2:41 ; Luke 2:48 , Matthew 13:55 , John 1:45 ; John 6:42 ). Joseph never appears in the Gospel story after the visit to Jerusalem when Jesus had attained the age of twelve years and become ‘a son of the Law’ ( Luke 2:41-51 ); and since Mary always appears alone in the narratives of the public ministry, it is a reasonable inference that he had died during the interval. Tradition says that he died at the age of one hundred and eleven years, when Jesus was eighteen.
4. One of the Lord’s brethren, Matthew 13:55 , where AV [12] reads Joses , the Greek form of the name. Cf. Mark 6:3 .
5. Joseph of Arimathæa. A wealthy and devout Israelite and a member of the Sanhedrim. He was a disciple of Jesus, but, dreading the hostility of his colleagues, he kept his faith secret. He took no part in the condemnation of Jesus, but neither did he protest against it; and the likelihood is that he prudently absented himself from the meeting. When all was over, he realized how cowardly a part he had played, and, stricken with shame and remorse, plucked up courage and ‘went in unto Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus’ ( Mark 15:43 ). It was common for friends of the crucified to purchase their bodies, which would else have been cast out as refuse, a prey to carrion birds and beasts, and give them decent burial; and Joseph would offer Pilate his price; in any case he obtained the body ( Mark 15:45 ). Joseph had a garden close to Calvary, where he had hewn a sepulchre in the rock for his own last resting-place; and there, aided by Nicodemus, he laid the body swathed in clean linen ( Matthew 27:57-61 = Mark 15:42-47 = Luke 23:50-56 = John 19:38-42 ).
6. Joseph Barsabbas , the disciple who was nominated against Matthias as successor to Judas in the Apostolate. He was surnamed, like James the Lord’s brother, Justus ( Acts 1:23 ). Tradition says that he was one of the Seventy ( Luke 10:1 ). 7. See Barnabas.
David Smith.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Joseph
(a) (1562-1452 BCE) Son of Jacob and Rachel, eleventh of the Twelve Tribes. As the oldest son of his favored wife, Jacob loved him dearly and gave him preferential treatment, causing Joseph's brothers to envy him and sell him into slavery. He landed in Egypt, where, after enduring slavery and prison, he interpreted Pharaoh’s puzzling dreams and became viceroy of the land. During the famine that followed he brought his family down to Egypt, setting the stage for their slavery and ultimately their Exodus. Buried in Joseph’s Tomb in Shechem. (b) A common Jewish name.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Joseph
Genesis 37:9-10 (c) This character is a type of the Lord JESUS in many respects. Forty-two different aspects of CHRIST may be seen in his life. In this Scripture, Joseph is a type of CHRIST in that he is honored by his father and mother. They and all of his brothers must bow down in obeisance to him, as every knee shall bow to CHRIST.
Genesis 43:3 (c) Here Joseph is a true type of GOD, the Judge, and Benjamin is a type of the Lord JESUS. It is almost a repetition of that beautiful truth in John 14:6. No man can see the Father's face unless he comes with the Lord JESUS, the elder brother.
Genesis 49:22 (c) This is a type of the fruitful Christian who, though persecuted and hindered by others, nevertheless continues to bear fruit in the regions round about as well as in the home parish. Israel was to be a blessing to Gentiles.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Epping, Joseph
Astronomer and Assyriologist, born Neuenkirchen, Westphalia, 1835; died Exaeten, Holland, 1894. He was one of a band of Jesuits who went to Ecuador at the request of Garcia Moreno, and became professor of mathematics at the Polytechnicum of Quito. After Moreno's assassination he went to Holland, where he taught astronomy and mathematics. In 1882 appeared "Der Kreislauf im Kosmos," a refutation of Kant and Laplace. He discovered the key to the Babylonian astronomical tables, publishing the results of his investigations in 1899.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Alemany, Joseph Sadoc
First Archbishop of San Francisco, born Vich, Spain, 1814; died Valencia, 1888. A Dominican missionary in Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee, he was appointed Bishop of Monterey, 1850, and transferred in 1853 to the newly created metropolitan see of San Francisco. When he resigned in 1883, his province had grown from the 21 secularized missions of the Franciscans to a Catholic population of about 300,000. He inaugurated the first efforts for adjustment of the Pious Fund.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Eckhel, Joseph Hilarius
Numismatist, born Enzesfeld, Lower Austria, 1737; died Vienna, Austria, 1798. As a Jesuit he taught poetry and rhetoric in colleges of his Society, and also turned his attention to numismatics; and on the suppression of the Society of Jesus he became director of the imperial cabinet of ancient coins at Vienna. He published a catalogue of the collection (1779), for which he devised a new method of arrangement. By his "Doctrina nummorum veterum" (Science of Ancient Coins), published in eight volumes (1792-1798), he became the founder of the scientific numismatics of classical antiquity.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Joseph
The well known son of Jacob, whose history we have in Genesis from the thirtieth chapter to the end of the book. This made, in the margin of the Bible, is Adding—from Jasaph, to increase. It were needless to enter particulars of Joseph's history, when the Bible hath given it so beautifully. But perhaps it may not be an unacceptable service to observe on the history of this patriarch, what a remarkable character he is, and in what numberless instances he appears as a type of Christ: taken altogether, perhaps the greatest in the whole Scriptures. I shall particularize in a few leading features.
As Joseph was the beloved son of Jacob, and distinguished by his father with special tokens, of his affection, and which excited the envy of his brethren; so Christ, the beloved and only begotten son of God, by means of that distinguishing token of JEHOVAH, in setting him up, the Head of his body the church, and giving him a kingdom, in his glorious character of Mediator, called forth, as is most generally believed, that war we read of in heaven in the original rebellion of angels. (See Revelation 12:1-17) The coat of many colours Joseph wore might not unaptly be said to represent the several offices of the Lord Jesus when on earth—his prophetical, priestly, and kingly character. The dreams of Joseph, implying his superiority over his brethren and his father's house, interpreted with an eye to Christ, are very striking circumstances of the preeminency of his character. Of him, indeed, might the prophecy of Jacob respecting Judah be fully applied: "Thou art he whom thy brethren shall praise: thy hand shall be in the neck of thine enemies, and thy father's children shall bow down be fore thee." (Genesis 49:8) The mission of Joseph to his brethren, by the father, to see if they were well, and how they fared, (Genesis 37:14) is a striking representation of the mission of God's dear Son to this our world. He came indeed, not only to seek, but to save that which was lost; but like another Joseph, the treatment he received corresponded in all points, only in an infinitely higher degree of baseness and cruelty. They sold Joseph for a slave, for twenty pieces of silver, and he was carried down into Egypt, and from the pit and the prison he arose, by divine favour, to be Governor over the whole land. But our Joseph was not only sold for thirty pieces of silver, but at length crucified and slain, and from the grave which he made with the wicked and with the rich in his death, by his resurrection and ascension, at the right hand of power, he is become the universal and eternal Governor both of heaven and earth.
The temptations of Joseph, by the wife of Potiphar, bear no very distant resemblance to the temptations of the Lord Jesus by Satan. The trial to the one, was the lusts of the flesh; the trial to the other, was the pride of life. But the grace imparted to Joseph, to repel the temptation, and the punishment he suffered by a false imputation, very beautifully set forth the innocency of Christ triumphing over the Devil's temptation in the wilderness, and the imputation of our sin to Jesus, who himself bore our sins in his own body on the tree, though himself without sin, neither was guile found in his mouth. In the exaltation of Joseph at the right hand of Pharaoh, and all the famished country coming to him for bread, we behold a lovely type, indeed, of our Almighty Joseph exalted at the right hand of God, and dispensing blessings of grace and mercy in the living bread, which is himself, to a famished world. And as then the Zapnathpaaneah of Egypt revealed secrets, and the cry was, Go unto Joseph, what he saith unto you do: so now, in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ, we do, indeed, behold our Wonderful Counsellor, who hath made known to us his and his Father's will, and the one desire of every soul is, to go unto Jesus, whatsoever he saith unto us is blessed, and our duty to obey.
In the going down of Israel into Egypt with all his house, constrained by famine to seek bread-what a striking portrait is here also drawn of the true Israel of God, constrained by the famine of soul to seek to Jesus for supply. And though like the brethren of Joseph, little do we at first know, that the Lord of the country is our brother, though in the first awakenings of spiritual want the Governor may seem with us, as Joseph did to them, to speak roughly; yet when the whole comes to be opened tour view, and Jesus is indeed discovered to be Lord of all the land, how, like Joseph's brethren, are we immediately made glad, and eat and drink at his table with him, forgetting all past sorrow in present joy, and partaking of that "bread of life, of which whosoever eateth shall live forever!" Such, among many other striking particularities, are the incidents in the history of the patriarch Joseph, which are highly typical of Christ.
Under the article of Joseph we must not forget to observe, that there are several more of the name mentioned in Scripture, and of some importance:
·Joseph the husband of Mary, the mother of the Lord Jesus Christ, Matthew 1:15; Mat 1:18.
·Joseph, or Joses, son of Mary and Cleophas, supposed to be one of those who did not at first believe on Christ, but was afterwards converted, John 7:5.
·Joseph, called Barsabas, a candidate for the apostleship with Matthias. See Acts 1:23.
·Joseph of Arimathea, John 19:38.
·Joseph, husband to Salome.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Joseph And Mary
SAINT MATTHEW and Saint Luke, the first and the third Evangelists, tell us all that we are told of Mary. They tell us that she was the espoused wife of Joseph a carpenter of Nazareth, and that the Divine Call came to her after her espousal to Joseph and before her marriage. What a call it was, and what a prospect it opened up! No sooner was Mary left alone of the angel than she began to realise something of what had been appointed her, and what she must now prepare herself to pass through. The sharp sword that the aged Simeon afterwards spoke of with such passion was already whetted, and was fast approaching her devoted and exposed heart. On a thousand sacred canvases throughout Christendom we are shown the angel of the annunciation presenting Mary with a branch of lily as an emblem of her beauty and as a seal of her purity. But why has no spiritual artist stained the whiteness of the lily with the red blood of a broken heart? For no sooner had the transfiguring light of the angel's presence faded from her sight than a deep and awful darkness began to fall upon Joseph's espoused wife. Surely if ever a suffering soul had to seek all its righteousness and all its strength in God alone, it was the soul of the Virgin Mary in those terrible days that followed the annunciation. Blessed among women as all the time she was; unblemished in soul and in body like the paschal lamb as she was; like the paschal lamb also she was set apart to be a divine sacrifice, and to have a sword thrust through her heart. Mary must have passed through many dark and dreadful days when all she had given her to lean upon would seem like a broken reed. Hail, thou that art highly favoured of the Lord, the angel had said to her. But all that would seem but so many mocking words to her as she saw nothing before her but an open shame, and, it might well be, an outcast's death. And, so fearfully and wonderfully are we made, and so fearful and wonderful was the way in which the Word was made flesh, that who can tell how all this may have borne on Him who was bone of her bone, and flesh of her flesh; to whom Mary was in all things a mother, as He was in all things to her a son. For,
Hers was the face that unto Christ had most resemblance.
Great is the mystery of godliness: God manifest in the flesh. A man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief. These are the beginnings of sorrows.
Joseph's part in all this is told us by Saint Matthew alone. And as we read that Evangelist's particular account of that time, we see how sharp that sword was which pierced Joseph's soul also. His heart was broken with this terrible trial, but there was only one course left open to him. Conclude the marriage he could not, but neither could he consent to make Mary a public example, and there was only left to him the sad step of revoking the contract and putting her away privately. Joseph's heart must have been torn in two. For Mary had been the woman of all women to him. She had been in his eyes the lily among thorns. And now to have to treat her like a poisonous weed-the thought of it drove him mad. Oh, why is it that whosoever comes at all near Jesus Christ has always to drink such a cup of sorrow? Truly they who are brother or sister or mother to Him must take up their cross daily. These are they who go up through great tribulation.
What a journey that must have been of Mary from Nazareth to Hebron, and occupied with what thoughts. Mary's way would lead her through Jerusalem. She may have crossed Olivet as the sun was setting. She may have knelt at even in Gethsemane. She may have turned aside to look on the city from Calvary. What a heavy heart she must have carried through all these scenes as she went into the hill country with haste. Only two, out of God, knew the truth about Mary; an angel in heaven, and her own heart on earth. And thus it was that she fled to the mountains of Judah, hoping to find there an aged kinswoman of hers who would receive her word and would somewhat understand her case. As she stumbled on drunk with sorrow Mary must have recalled and repeated many blessed scriptures, well known to her indeed, but till then little understood. "Commit thy way unto the Lord; trust also in Him, and He will bring it to pass; and He shall bring forth thy righteousness as the light, and thy judgment as the noonday. Thou shalt keep them in the secret of thy presence from the pride of men; thou shalt keep them in a pavilion from the strife of tongues." Such a pavilion Mary sought and for a season found in the remote and retired household of Zacharias and Elizabeth.
It is to the meeting of Mary and Elizabeth that we owe the Magnificat, the last Old Testament psalm, and the first New Testament hymn, "My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Saviour." We cannot enter into all Mary's thoughts as she sang that spiritual song, any more than she could in her day enter into all our thoughts as we sing it. For, noble melody as her Magnificat is, it draws its deepest tones from a time that was still to come. The spirit of Christian prophecy moved her to utter it, but the noblest and fullest prophecy concerning Christ fell far short of the evangelical fulfilment.
She is a happy maiden who has a mother or a motherly friend much experienced in the ways of the human heart to whom she can tell all her anxieties; a wise, tender, much-experienced counsellor, such as Naomi was to Ruth, and Elizabeth to Mary. Was the Virgin an orphan, or was Mary's mother such a woman that Mary could have opened her heart to any stranger rather than to her? Be that as it may, Mary found a true mother in Elizabeth of Hebron. Many a holy hour the two women spent together sitting under the terebinths that overhung the dumb Zacharias's secluded house. And, if at any time their faith wavered and the thing seemed impossible, was not Zacharias beside them with his sealed lips and his writing table, a living witness to the goodness and severity of God? How Mary and Elizabeth would stagger and reason and rebuke and comfort one another, now laughing like Sarah, now singing like Hannah, let loving and confiding and pious women tell.
Sweet as it is to linger in Hebron beside Mary and Elizabeth, our hearts are always drawn back to Joseph in his unspeakable agony. The absent are dear, just as the dead are perfect. And Mary's dear image became to Joseph dearer still when he could no longer see her face or hear her voice. Nazareth was empty to Joseph; it was worse than empty, it was a city of sepulchres in which he sought for death and could not find it. Day after day, week after week, Joseph's misery increased, and when, as his wont was, he went up to the synagogue on the Sabbath day, that only made him feel his loneliness and his misery all the more. Mary's sweet presence had often made the holy place still more holy to him, and her voice in the Psalms had been to him as when an angel sings. On one of those Sabbaths which the exiled Virgin was spending at Hebron Joseph went up again to the sanctuary in Nazareth seeking to hide his great grief with God. And this, I feel sure, was the Scripture appointed to be read in the synagogue that day: "Ask thee a sign of the Lord thy God; ask it either in the depth, or in the height above. Therefore the Lord Himself shall give you a sign: Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel." Joseph's heart was absolutely overwhelmed within him as he listened to that astounding Scripture. Never had ear or heart of man heard these amazing words as Joseph heard them that day. And then, when he laid himself down to sleep that night, his pillow became like a stone under his head. Not that he was cast out; but he had cast out another, and she the best of God's creatures. Ay, and she perhaps-how shall he whisper it even to himself at midnight-the virgin-mother of Immanuel! A better mother he could not have. So speaking to himself till he was terrified at his own thoughts, weary with another week's lonely labour, and aged with many weeks' agony and despair, Joseph fell asleep. Then a thing was secretly brought to him, and his ear received a little thereof. There was silence, and he heard a voice saying to him, "Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife, for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost." Gabriel was sent to reassure Joseph's despairing heart, to demand the consummation of the broken-off marriage, and to announce the Incarnation of the Son of God. Did Joseph arise before daybreak and set out for Hebron to bring his outcast home? There is room to believe that he did. If he did, the two angel-chastened men must have had their own thoughts and counsels together even as the two chosen women had. And as Joseph talked with Zacharias through his writing table, he must have felt that dumbness, and even death itself, would be but a light punishment for such unbelief and such cruelty as his. But all this, and all that they had passed through since the angel came to Zacharias at the altar, only made the re-betrothal of Joseph and Mary the sweeter and the holier, with the aged priest acting more than the part of a father, and Elizabeth acting more than the part of a mother.
For my own part, I do not know the gift or the grace or the virtue any woman ever had that I could safely deny to Mary. The divine congruity compels me to believe that all that could be received or attained or exercised by any woman would be granted beforehand, and all but without measure, to her who was so miraculously to bear, and so intimately and influentially to nurture and instruct, the Holy Child. We must give Mary her promised due. We must not allow ourselves to entertain a grudge against the mother of our Lord because some enthusiasts for her have given her more than her due. There is no fear of our thinking too much either of Mary's maidenly virtues, or of her motherly duties and experiences. The Holy Ghost in guiding the researches of Luke, and in superintending the composition of the Third Gospel, especially signalises the depth and the piety and the peace of Mary's mind. At the angel's salutation she did not swoon nor cry out. She did not rush either into terror on the one hand or into transport on the other. But like the heavenly-minded maiden she was, she cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be. And later on, when all who heard it were wondering at the testimony of the shepherds, it is instructively added that Mary kept all these things and pondered them in her heart. And yet again, when another twelve years have passed by, we find the same Evangelist still pointing out the same distinguishing feature of Mary's saintly character, "They understood not the saying which Jesus spake unto them; but His mother kept all these sayings in her heart."
And, again, if we are to apply this sure principle to Mary's case, "according to your faith so be it unto you," then Mary must surely wear the crown as the mother of all them who believe on her Son. If Abraham's faith has made him the father of all them who believe, surely Mary's faith entitles her to be called their mother. If the converse of our Lord's words holds true, that no mighty work is done where there is unbelief: if we may safely reason that where there has been a mighty work done there must have been a corresponding and a co-operating faith; then I do not think we can easily overestimate the measure of Mary's faith. If this was the greatest work ever wrought by the power and the grace of Almighty God among the children of men, and if Mary's faith entered into it at all, then how great her faith must have been! Elizabeth saw with wonder and with worship how great it was. She saw the unparalleled grace that had come to Mary, and she had humility and magnanimity enough to acknowledge it. "Blessed art thou among women: Blessed is she that believeth, for there shall be a performance of those things which were told her from the Lord." "Blessed is she that believeth," said Elizabeth, no doubt with some sad thoughts about herself and about her dumb husband sitting beside her. "Blessed is the womb that bare Thee," cried on another occasion a nameless but a true woman, as her speech bewrayeth her, "and Blessed be the paps that Thou hast sucked." But our Lord answered her, and said, "Yea, rather, blessed are they that hear the word of God and keep it." And again, "Whosoever shall do the will of My Father in heaven, the same is My brother, and sister, and mother
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Joseph
THE LORD WAS WITH JOSEPH
JOSEPH, the future ruler of Egypt, was tlie late-born and the greatly-beloved son of Jacob and Rachel. Joseph inherited all his mother's proverbial gracefulness and sweetness and attractive beauty. And then Joseph's intellectual gifts were such that, taken along with the purity and the nobility of his character, they lifted him up out of a pit, and out of a prison, and set him in a seat of power and of honour scarcely second to the seat of Pharaoh himself. At the same time Joseph climbed up to that high seat through many great risks and out of many great sufferings; and he ran some of the greatest of those risks at the hand of his too-doting father. Were it not that our own hearts so continually condemn us, we would turn on Jacob with indignation for his mischievous treatment of Joseph. Can Jacob have forgotten the sea of trouble into which his father's favouritism, and his mother's indulgence, cast both themselves and their children? The woful harvest of all that long past folly is still making both Jacob's life and many other lives as bitter as death to this day; and vet here is Jacob poisoning the whole of his family life also, and spoiling Joseph, just as Isaac and Rebekah had spoiled and poisoned their own and their children's lives when Jacob and Esau were still their children. We would denounce Jacob for his insane treatment of Joseph were it not that we are all ourselves repeating sins and follies every day from which we and our families have suffered for generations.
Joseph's coat of many colours was like to have been his winding-sheet, such was the envy and the hatred of his half-brothers at Rachel's well-favoured, richly-talented, and over-ornamented son. 'Our coats be of one colour; so should his,' grumbled Dan, and all Dan's brothers agreed with his spiteful and angry words. The patriarchs, moved with envy, says Stephen in the Acts, sold Joseph into Egypt And Jacob, on his death-bed, when he was blessing Joseph, said of him that the archers had hated him, and had shot their arrows at him, and had sorely wounded him. It is usual for mankind, says Josephus on the text, to envy their nearest relatives and their best friends for their eminence and for their prosperity. And yet, if Dan would but wait a little, and would but command himself a little, the brightness will soon begin to fade out of his brother's many-coloured coat. Let a short season run and there will be nothing to pain Dan's eye and to wring and heat his heart. Some other fond father will soon begin to clothe his spoiled son in a coat full of more and more brilliant colours than Joseph's coat; till Joseph's coat will be so eclipsed that he also will join the archers' ranks, and will shoot at his rival with their envious arrows. Another author will soon rise and will take the public taste. His new books will soon be on every table, and his new name in every mouth, till that success which so galls you today will be completely forgotten by you and forgiven. His crowded pews will before long begin to thin out, and new orators will spring up and will attract and draw off that preacher's painful crowd. And if none of these considerations will quiet Dan's evil eye, and if he really feels his eye to be an evil and a wicked and a murderous eye, let him take his evil eye to God. To whom else can such an eye as that bo taken? Let him lift his so sorely stung eye up to Joseph's God. Ask the God of love to consider you and to pity you. Ask Him not to spurn and spit on you. Ask Him to be merciful to your secret and incessant misery. Shut your door on God and yourself, and on your knees ask Him still to add to your brother's goodliness, and to his talents, and to his honour, and to his happiness, and to his usefulness; if only He will anoint your eyes with enough love, and if only He will take out of your eyes that same evil light that glanced so murderously in the patriarchs' eyes as often as they again saw Joseph in his shining coat. Importune Him to enable you to love Joseph, till you enjoy, as if they were your own, those so many and so shining colours of his coat. If ever Almighty God has wrought that salvation in Dan, or in any of Dan's brothers on this side the new Jerusalem, ask Him, for Christ's sake, to do it a little to you.
Joseph was only seventeen years old when his two so intoxicating dreams came to him. You must always recall Joseph's unripe age, and his complete inexperience, before you blame him too much for the way he talked about his prerogatives and prospects of greatness. The time will come when all Joseph's splendid achievements, and all his matchless honour and glory, will not make Joseph open a lip about himself. But he was only seventeen as yet, and he had never been for an hour out of his father's flattering sight. And thus it was that Joseph's future modesty, and humility, and self-command, and knowledge of other men's hearts, and thoughtfulness for other men's feelings and temptations, had not yet begun to come to him. Had Joseph been but a little older, and had he been but once or twice at Dothan, he would have hidden his dreams in his heart like so many guilty secrets. But, innocent child that be was, he must up and out of his bed, and tell all his dreams to all the house. And so intent was he in what so much interested himself that he did not see the ugly looks on the faces of his brothers. And, like Joseph, till we are well past seventeen, and have been for some time away from home, we talk about nothing else but our own dreams also. Other men dreamed last night as well as we, but they never get their mouths open where we are. We talk the whole table down. We have just come home from the pulpit, or from the platform, or from the desk, or from the instrument, or from a visit, or from an entertainment, or from what not, and our vain hearts are full. We never think that all the other people at table are as full of themselves as we are. We never see that they also are bursting to get at the only topic that interests them, which is not at all the same topic that so interests us. We mistake that silence and that suspense. We think that all that silence and all that suspense means that all our audience are as full of our interests as we are ourselves, and are waiting to hear us. While all the time, they can scarcely command themselves with weariness and disgust. Be sure your company is as full of you as you are of yourself before you again give the reins to your galloping tongue. Be sure that they all worship you. Be sure that you are their god. Be sure that they are all your wife and children. Be sure that they have no interests, or occupations, or vanities of their own. Be sure of all their love and devotion and patience. In short, be sure that you are in heaven before you keep the whole house waiting to break their fast till you have told out to the end all your dreams of last night. And it came to pass that they stripped Joseph of his coat, his coat of many colours, that was upon him. And they took him and cast him into a pit, and then they sat down to eat bread. Is that another subtlety of Moses? Does Moses insinuate that Joseph's brothers had never till now sat down to eat bread in entire peace since the day that Joseph began to dream? With all their faults, Joseph would have been eating bread at that moment with the patriarchs but for his spotted coat and his irrepressible dreams. I overheard a conversation something like this not long ago: 'Shall we ask him to dinner, and invite So-and-so to meet him?' 'No, I think not.' 'Why?' 'Why? Because the last time he was with us he talked two mortal hours about himself, till everybody but himself must have seen contempt and disgust written as plain as day on every face. No. But if only he were not so full of himself, what a welcome guest he would be! And with such talents, and with such a position, what might he not do!'
There are some men, on the other hand, whom you can never waylay into once opening their lips about themselves. Two such men stand out enviably and honourably to me in my acquaintance. And they are just the two men in all my acquaintance I would most like to hear on themselves. But, no. Never they. Whether it is pride-I sometimes think it is; or whether it is scorn of their company-as it may well be; or whether it is absence of mind, or age, or experience, or knowledge of the hearts of men, till they will not commit themselves to men, I am sometimes divided; but, be it what it may, I never yet saw either of them take up a single moment of Joseph's time. There is such a thing as having too much of a good thing. And there is a golden mean in this matter also, if Joseph from the one side, and my two friends from the other side, could only strike it.
That dreadful pit in Dothan was the beginning of Joseph's salvation. The first night he spent in that pit recalled to Joseph's mind what his father had often told him of his first night from home, as also of that other night at the Jabbok. And as Joseph lay in that horrible pit, and dreamed and prayed, behold, the very same ladder of Bethel is let down into the bottom of the pit. 'I am the Lord God of Abraham, and of Isaac, and of Jacob thy father. And behold, I am with thee, and will keep thee in all places whither thou goest. For I will not leave thee till I have done all that which I have spoken to thee of.' And, all that night after, Joseph could think of nothing else but the sins of his youth; his vanity, his proud superiority and superciliousness to his brothers, his evil reports concerning his brothers, his talkativeness about himself, and all the temptations and provocations into which he had led his brothers. That deep pit was brimful of such remorseful thoughts and prayers, when Judah appeared at its mouth with cords and grappling irons to draw Joseph up to the daylight. But it was only to kill him with a far worse death; for that morning Joseph was sold to the Midianite slave-dealers of Egypt for twenty pieces of silver. Twenty pieces of silver was Joseph's whole price that day in Dothan. Those who know Joseph's after-history will flash forward their minds, and will contrast the Prime Minister of Pharaoh with that slave lad sold for that paltry price at the mouth of that pit that day. And, tomorrow, when you buy an apprentice, or a message boy, of his widowed mother for five shillings a week, think of Joseph for a moment, and say to yourself, Who knows what the future may have in store for my message boy and for me? Who knows how I may go down, while he goes up? Who knows the talents of God that may lie hidden in that friendless buy? Who knows what place he may be predestined to fill in the church and in the world? And even if he comes to nothing of all that; if he never becomes a great man, yet, even so, such thoughts, such imaginations, such forecasts will help you to treat him well, and will help to make you a good man and a good master, whatever your slave-boy may come, or may not come, to be.
The good work that the pit in Dothan began in Joseph, those still more terrible days and nights on the way down to Egypt carried on. Lashed to the loaded side of a huge cane-waggon, and himself loaded with the baggage of Gilead for the Egyptian market, Joseph toiled on under the mid-day sun, thankful to be left alone of his churlish masters in the red-hot air. Put yourself in Joseph's place. The fondling of his father; a child on whom no wind was ever let blow, and no sun was ever let strike; with servants to wait on his every wish, and to dress and anoint him for every meal; with loving looks and fond words falling continually upon him from the day he was born; and now, lashed to the side of a slave caravan, and with the whistling whip of his Ishmaelite owner laid on his shoulder till he sank in the sand. But you must add this to the picture, else you will not have the picture complete: 'The Lord was with Joseph, and Joseph found grace in the sight of the Lord.' Yes, the Lord was more with Joseph, more and better far, than ever He had been as long as Joseph was the spoiled child of his father, and the continual snare of his brothers. And there are young men in this city suffering hardships and persecutions in workshops and in offices as sore to bear as was Joseph's load of labour and ill-usage of the Ishmaelites. And the Lord is with them also as He never was so long as they were spoilt sons at home, getting all things their own way. And as they silently and prayerfully take up their cross daily, and wait out the will of God, they are thereby putting off a past that would have been their sure destruction-and had almost been-and are preparing themselves for a future as sure, and as full of the providence of God, as ever was Joseph's future. It is good for a man that he bear the yoke in his youth. He sitteth alone and keepeth silence, because he hath borne it upon him. He putteth his mouth in the dust, if so be there may be hope. He giveth his cheek to him that smiteth him; he is filled full with reproach. For the Lord will not cast off for ever; but, though He cause grief, yet will He have compassion according to the multitude of His mercies. 'How many saints,' William Law rejoices, 'has adversity sent to heaven! And how many poor sinners has prosperity plunged into everlasting misery! This man had never been debauched, but for his fortune and advancement; that had never been pious, but through his poverty and disgrace. She that is envied for her beauty may perchance owe all her misery to it; and another may be for ever happy for having no admirers of her person. One man succeeds in everything, and so loses all; another meets with nothing but crosses and disappointments, and thereby gains more than all the world is worth.'
Even if Potiphar paid thirty or even forty pieces of silver for his Hebrew slave, we know now what a good bargain he got that day. For that handful of silver the captain of Pharaoh's guard came into possession of all the splendid talents that lay hid in Joseph's greatly gifted mind, and all the magnificent moral character the first foundations of which had been laid in the pit in Dothan, and had been built up in God every step of the long wilderness journey. All Joseph's deep repentance also, and all his bitter remorse; all his self-discovery, and all his self-condemnation; with all his reticence and all his continence,-Potiphar took all that home from the slave-market that day in exchange for his handful of Egyptian silver. Joseph was now to be plunged into the most corrupt society that rotted in that age on the face of the earth. And had he not come into that pollution straight out of a sevenfold furnace of sanctifying sorrow, Joseph would no more have been heard of. The sensuality of Egypt would have soon swallowed him up. But his father's God was with Joseph. The lord was with Joseph to protect him, to guide him, and to give him the victory. The Lord was with him to more imprisonment, and then to more promotion; to more and more honour, and place, and power, till this world had no more to bestow upon Joseph. And, through it all, Joseph became a better and an ever better man all his days. A nobler and an ever nobler man. A more and more trustworthy, and a more and more trusted and consulted man. More and more loyal to truth and to duty. More and more chaste, temperate, patient, enduring, forgiving; full of mind and full of heart; and full, no man ever fuller, of a simple and a sincere piety and praise of God, till he became a very proverb both in the splendour of his services, and in the splendour of his rewards.
Webster's Dictionary - Joseph
(n.) An outer garment worn in the 18th century; esp., a woman's riding habit, buttoned down the front.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Allion, Joseph de la Roche d'
(died 1656) Recollect missionary. He landed at Quebec, 1625; was among the Hurons, 1626; passed to the Neutral Nation, remaining with them three months, barely escaping death; returned to the Hurons; and published an account of his sojourn amongst the Neutrals, describing their country and customs.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gassner, Johann Joseph
Priest and celebrated exorcist, born Braz, Austria, 1727; died Pondorf, 1779. When his physicians had failed to restore his health, he applied exorcism and was cured. Convinced that certain maladies were caused by the evil spirit, he utilized the procedure on others with wonderful success. The fame of these cures caused him to be invited to the Diocese of Constance, to Ratisbon, and elsewhere, and everywhere he obtained similar results. He worked openly in the presence of Catholics, Protestants, scientists, and ecclesiastics, following everywhere the directions of the Church ritual. Official records of his cures were made, and the commissions appointed by Ingolstadt University and the imperial government approved of his procedure.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Joseph
son of Jacob and Rachel, and brother to Benjamin, Genesis 30:22 ; Genesis 30:24 . The history of Joseph is so fully and consecutively given by Moses, that it is not necessary to abridge so familiar an account. In place of this, the following beautiful argument by Mr. Blunt for the veracity of the account drawn from the identity of Joseph's character, will be read with pleasure:—I have already found an argument for the veracity of Moses in the identity of Jacob's character, I now find another in the identity of that of Joseph. There is one quality, as it has been often observed, though with a different view from mine, which runs like a thread through his whole history, his affection for his father. Israel loved him, we read, more than all his children; he was the child of his age; his mother died while he was yet young, and a double care of him consequently devolved upon his surviving parent. He made him a coat of many colours; he kept him at home when his other sons were sent to feed the flocks. When the bloody garment was brought in, Jacob in his affection for him,—that same affection which, on a subsequent occasion, when it was told him that after all Joseph was alive, made him as slow to believe the good tidings as he was now quick to apprehend the sad; in this his affection for him, I say, Jacob at once concluded the worst, and "he rent his clothes and put sackcloth upon his loins, and mourned for his son many days, and all his daughters rose up to comfort him; but he refused to be comforted, and he said, For I will go down into the grave unto my son mourning."
Now, what were the feelings in Joseph which responded to these? When the sons of Jacob went down to Egypt, and Joseph knew them, though they knew not him; for they, it may be remarked, were of an age not to be greatly changed by the lapse of years, and were still sustaining the character in which Joseph had always seen them; while he himself had meanwhile grown out of the stripling into the man, and from a shepherd boy was become the ruler of a kingdom; when his brethren thus came before him, his question was, "Is your father yet alive?" Genesis 43:7 .
They went down a second time, and again the question was, "Is your father well, the old man of whom ye spake, is he yet alive?" More he could not venture to ask, while he was yet in his disguise. By a stratagem he now detains Benjamin, leaving the others, if they would, to go their way. But Judah came near unto him, and entreated him for his brother, telling him how that he had been surety to his father to bring him back; how that his father was an old man, and that this was the child of his old age, and that he loved him; how it would come to pass that if he should not see the lad with him he would die, and his gray hairs be brought with sorrow to the grave; for "how shall I go to my father, and the lad be not with me, lest, peradventure, I see the evil that shall come on my father?" Here, without knowing it, he had struck the string that was the tenderest of all. Joseph's firmness forsook him at this repeated mention of his father, and in terms so touching: he could not refrain himself any longer; and, causing every man to go out, he made himself known to his brethren. Then, even in the paroxysm which came on him, (for he wept aloud, so that the Egyptians heard,) still his first words uttered from the fulness of his heart were, "Doth my father yet live?" He now bids them hasten and bring the old man down, bearing to him tokens of his love and tidings of his glory. He goes to meet him; he presents himself unto him, and falls on his neck, and weeps on his neck a good while; he provides for him and his household out of the fat of the land; he sets him before Pharaoh. By and by he hears that he is sick, and hastens to visit him; he receives his blessing; watches his death bed; embalms his body; mourns for him threescore and ten days; and then carries him, as he had desired, into Canaan to bury him, taking with him, as an escort to do him honour, "all the elders of Israel, and all the servants of Pharaoh, and all his house, and the house of his brethren, chariots, and horsemen, a very great company." How natural was it now for his brethren to think that the tie by which alone they could imagine Joseph to be held to them was dissolved, that any respect he might have felt or feigned for them must have been buried in the cave of Machpelah, and that he would now requite to them the evil they had done! "And they sent a messenger unto Joseph, saying, Thy father did command before he died, saying, So shall ye say unto Joseph, Forgive, I pray thee now, the trespass of thy brethren, and their sin; for they did unto thee evil." And then they add of themselves, as if well aware of the surest road to their brother's heart, "Forgive, we pray thee, the trespass of the servants of the God of thy father." In every thing the father's name is still put foremost: it is his memory which they count upon as their shield and buckler.
It is not the singular beauty of these scenes, or the moral lesson they teach, excellent as it is, with which I am now concerned, but simply the perfect artless consistency which prevails through them all. It is not the constancy with which the son's strong affection for his father had lived through an interval of twenty years' absence, and, what is more, through the temptation of sudden promotion to the highest estate;—it is not the noble- minded frankness with which he still acknowledges his kindred, and makes a way for them, "shepherds" as they were, to the throne of Pharaoh himself;—it is not the simplicity and singleness of heart which allow him to give all the first-born of Egypt, men over whom he bore absolute rule, an opportunity of observing his own comparatively humble origin, by leading them in attendance upon his father's corpse to the valleys of Canaan and the modest cradle of his race;—it is not, in a word, the grace, but the identity of Joseph's character, the light in which it is exhibited by himself, and the light in which it is regarded by his brethren, to which I now point as stamping it with marks of reality not to be gainsayed.
Some writers have considered Joseph as a type of Christ; and it requires not much ingenuity to find out some resemblances, as his being hated by his brethren, sold for money, plunged into deep affliction, and then raised to power and honour, &c; but as we have no intimation in any part of Scripture that Joseph was constituted a figure of our Lord, and that this was one design of recording his history at length, all such applications want authority, and cannot safely be indulged. The account seems rather to have been left for its moral uses, and that it should afford, by its inimitable simplicity and truth to nature, a point of irresistible internal evidence of the truth of the Mosaic narrative.
2. JOSEPH, the husband of Mary, and reputed father of Jesus, was the son of Jacob, and grandson of Matthan, Matthew 1:15-16 . The place of his stated residence was Nazareth, particularly after the time of his marriage. We learn from the evangelists that he followed the occupation of a carpenter, Matthew 13:55 ; and that he was a just man, or one of those pious Israelites who looked for the coming of the Messiah, Matthew 1:19 . It is probable that Joseph died before Christ entered upon his public ministry; for upon any other supposition we are at a loss to account for the reason why Mary, the mother of Jesus, is frequently mentioned in the evangelic narrative, while no allusion is made to Joseph; and, above all, why the dying Saviour should recommend his mother to the care of the beloved disciple John, if her husband had been then living, John 19:25-27 .
3. JOSEPH OF ARIMATHEA, a Jewish senator, and a believer in the divine mission of Jesus Christ, John 19:38 . St. Luke calls him a counsellor, and also informs us that he was a good and just man, who did not give his consent to the crucifixion of Christ, Luke 23:50-51 . And though he was unable to restrain the sanhedrim from their wicked purposes, he went to Pilate by night, and solicited from him the body of Jesus. Having caused it to be taken down from the cross, he wrapped it in linen, and laid it in his own sepulchre, which, being a rich man, he appears to have recently purchased, and then closed the entrance with a stone cut purposely to fit it, Matthew 27:57-60 ; John 19:38-42 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Joseph
1. The son of Jacob and his beloved Rachel, born in Mesopotamia, Genesis 30:22-24 , B. C. 1747. He is memorable for the wonderful providence of God, which raised him from a prison to be the grandvizier of Egypt, and made him the honored means of saving countless human lives. His history is one of the most pleasing and instructive in the Bible; and is related in language inimitably natural, simple, and touching. It is too beautiful for abridgment, and too familiar to need rehearsal. It throws much light on the superintending providence of God, as embracing all things, great and small in the perpetual unfolding of his universal plan. No narrative in the Bible more strikingly illustrates the protective and elevating power of the fear of God, and its especial value for the young. To behold this lovely image of filial piety and unwavering faith, of self-control in youth and patience in adversity, of discretion and fidelity in all stations of life, serenely walking with God through all, and at death intrusting soul and body alike into his hands, Hebrews 11:22 ; may well lead the young reader to cry, Oh that the God of Joseph were my God, Genesis 37:1-36 39:1-50:26 . Joseph died, aged on hundred and ten, B. C. 1637; and when the Israelites, a century and a half later, went up from Egypt, they took his bones, and at length buried them in Shechem, Exodus 13:19 Joshua 24:32 . A Mohammedan wely or tomb covers the spot regarded generally, and it may be correctly, as the place of his burial. It is a low stone enclosure, and stands in quiet seclusion among high trees, at the western entrance of the valley of Shechem, at the right of the traveller's path and nearer mount Ebal than mount Gerizim.
2. The husband of Mary, Christ's mother. His genealogy is traced in Matthew 1:1-15 , to David, Judah, and Abraham. See Mark 6:3 . He was a pious and honorable man, as appears from his whole course towards Mary and her son. They both attended the Passover at Jerusalem when Christ was twelve years of age, Luke 2:41-51 ; and as no more is said of him in the sacred narrative, and Christ committed Mary to the care of one of his disciples, he is generally supposed to have died before Christ began his public ministry. He seems to have been well known among the Jews, Mark 6:3 John 6:42 .
3. A native of Arimathea, but at the time of Christ's crucifixion a resident at Jerusalem. He was doubtless a believer in the Messiah, and "waited for the kingdom of God." He was a member of the Jewish Sanhedrim, and opposed in vain their action in condemning the Savior, Luke 23:51 . When all was over, he "went in boldly unto Pilate, and craved the body of Jesus." It was now night and the Jewish Sabbath was at hand. He therefore, with the aid of Nicodemus, wrapped the body in spices, for the time, and laid it in his own tomb, Mark 15:43-46 John 19:38-42 .
4. A disciple of Christ, also named Justus, and Barsabas. See BARSABAS .
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Erie)
A community founded from the Philadelphia house in 1860 by Mother Agnes Spencer of Carondelet. Villa Maria Academy was made the mother-house for the Erie diocese in 1897. The congregation manages a college and academy, hospitals, a day nursery, an orphanage, a training school for boys, and a home for the aged, besides parochial schools, in the Diocese of Erie.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of Annecy
A province of the Sisters of Saint Joseph, established in England, Scotland, France, Switzerland, and India, with mother-house at Annecy, France. In England and Scotland (Blairs College, Aberdeen) they devote themselves entirely to teaching. Iin India (Diocese of Vizagapatam), where they first went in 1849, the work is general as in France. The congregation is in charge of elementary, day and boarding schools, a college, orphanages, workhouses, organizations for unemployed girls, hospitals, and dispensaries.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Sacred Heart of Jes
A purely Australian congregation founded at Penola, South Australia in 1866 by Father Julian Tennison Woods and Blessed Mary Mackillop. The sisters did pioneer missionary work in Australia, and engage in various kinds of charitable works. The congregation has over 140 houses, including schools, in Australia and New Zealand. The mother-house is at Sydney.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Apparition
A religious congregation founded at Gaillac, France in 1832 by Emilie de Vialar for the education of children, the care of the sick, and various kinds of charitable works in the missions. The constitutions are adapted to the Rule of Saint Augustine. The congregation has approximately houses, include schools, hospitals, and dispensaries in France, Italy, Malta, Bulgaria, Greece, Cyprus, Crete, Chios, Syria, Palestine, Turkey, Armenia, Africa, Burma, and Australia. The mother-house is at Marseilles.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Presentation
A religious congregation founded in France in 1826 by Abbe Fleury and Mlle. Louise Lemarchand, for the care and education of children. The sisters have house, schools and orphanages in France, England, Belgium, the Netherlands, the United States, and Canada. The mother-house is at Broons, Cotes-du-Nord, France.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Joseph, Little Daughters of
A religious institute founded in Montreal, 1857, by the Sulpician, Father Antoine Mercier, to aid the clergy both by the ministry of prayer and certain temporal services, such as the manufacture of liturgical vestments, altar-linens, etc. Poor missionaries and seminarians are especially aided by the community. They have two houses in Montreal, where the mother-house is located, and carry on their work in several seminaries.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of Peace
A religious order of women founded by Bishop E Bagshawe in 1884 at Nottingham, England, for educating the young, caring for orphans, the sick and the blind, and instructing converts. The order manages residences for girls, schools, hospitals, and orphanages, in England, Scotland, Italy, Canada, and the United States. The mother-house is at Nottingham.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Joseph, Brothers of
An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau. The congregation consists of priests and lay brothers bound by simple vows and the threefold purpose of self-sanctification, preaching the Divine Word, and the Christian education of youth in all phases of instruction. The oldest and most extensive existing province is that of the United States, with the mother-house at Notre Dame, Indiana, dating from 1842; the Canadian Province was established five years later. The special mission field assigned Holy Cross by the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples is the Province of Eastern Bengal. At the General Chapter of 1920 the rules and constitutions were thoroughly revised to conform to the New Code of Canon Law.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scaliger, Joseph Justus
Born 1540; died 1609. Eminent classical philologist. Wrote in Latin with idiomatic vivacity. Famed for his knowledge of epigraphy, numismatics and chronology. First European scholar to enter into correspondence with the Samaritans.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Tieffentaller, Joseph
Catholic geographer. Born 1710; died 1785. Renowned for his studies on the geography of Hindustan, particularly his maps of the Ganges basin.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sons of Saint Joseph
Congregation founded at Ghent, Belgium in 1817 by Canon van Crombrugghe for the Christian education of the poor. Father Crombrugghe drew up a few rules which were the basis of the future constitutions,and the first community of Josephites opened at Grammont in 1817 a house known as Jerusalem. The next year the founder gave a constitution to his religious and the first Josephites bound themselves by the three customary vows. During the first 13 years of its existence the order educated between 3000,4000 boys. In 1830 when Dutch rule in Belgium was discontinued and liberty of instruction was included in the new constitution, the Josephites began to take an active part in the work of education. They were in demand everywhere for the direction of schools and colleges, so that the original object of the institute was gradually modified. Under the generalship of Father Ignatius, many new houses were opened, the two most important being those at Melle and Louvain. Great progress was made by the congregatiqn under Father Remy de Sadeleer and in 1863 it obtained a laudatory Brief from the Holy See. In 1869 the Josephites opened a college at Croydon, England. The mother-house is at Gammont.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Joseph, Sons of
Congregation founded at Ghent, Belgium in 1817 by Canon van Crombrugghe for the Christian education of the poor. Father Crombrugghe drew up a few rules which were the basis of the future constitutions,and the first community of Josephites opened at Grammont in 1817 a house known as Jerusalem. The next year the founder gave a constitution to his religious and the first Josephites bound themselves by the three customary vows. During the first 13 years of its existence the order educated between 3000,4000 boys. In 1830 when Dutch rule in Belgium was discontinued and liberty of instruction was included in the new constitution, the Josephites began to take an active part in the work of education. They were in demand everywhere for the direction of schools and colleges, so that the original object of the institute was gradually modified. Under the generalship of Father Ignatius, many new houses were opened, the two most important being those at Melle and Louvain. Great progress was made by the congregatiqn under Father Remy de Sadeleer and in 1863 it obtained a laudatory Brief from the Holy See. In 1869 the Josephites opened a college at Croydon, England. The mother-house is at Gammont.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of Saint Vallier
Congregation founded in 1683 by Monsignor Jean Baptiste de la Croix with two sisters of Saint Joseph from Le Puy, who took charge of his hospital at Saint Vallier, France, where the mother-house is still located. The sisters maintain a provincial house and novitiate, and teach in primary schools.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Boston)
Established at Jamaica Plain in 1873, from the Brooklyn foundation at the request of Father Thomas Magennis; novitiate opened at Jamaica Plain in 1876, and after three transfers, established at Framingham, Massachusetts, mother-house at Brighton. The congregation manages parochial schools, academies, a college, trade school, homes for women, adolescents, and working-girls, in the archdiocese of Boston, at Sierra Madre, and Los Angeles.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Chicago)
Established at La Grange, Illinois in 1899, by Mother Stanislaus Leary of Rochester with two other sisters. The mother-house was erected at Nazareth Park in 1900. The congregation manages academies and parochial schools, all in the Archdiocese of Chicago. The mother-house is at La Grange.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Ogdensburg)
Established at Watertown, New York in 1880 by sisters of the Buffalo community. The congregation manages academies, grade and high schools, a conservatory of music, an orphanage, and a hospital, in the Diocese of Ogdensburg. The mother-house is at Watertown.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet
Established in 1836 by six sisters from the rnother-house at Lyons, at the request of Bishop Rosati of Saint Louis, Missouri. The chief power of administration is in the hands of a superior-general, residing at Saint Louis. The congregation, comprising five provinces (Saint Louis, Saint Paul, Troy, Los Angeles, and Augusta) in 26 archdioceses and dioceses of the United States includes colleges, academies, diocesan high schools, Indian and deaf-mute schools, hospitals, orphan. ages, infant homes, day nursery, and home for the friendless, besides parochial schools attended by the sisters.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Philadelphia)
Established in 1847, when four members of the community at Carondelet, in response to Bishop Kenrick's appeal, took charge of an orphan asylum in Philadelphia. Independent mother-house erected in 1858. Autonomy preserved, under episcopal direction, in 1863 when the Sisters of Carondelet formed a generalate. Received papal approbation in 1895. The sisters manages parochial elementary and high schools, a college, academies, industrial and commercial schools, an orphanage, a deaf-mute institute, day nursery, and settlement house in the archdioceses of Baltimore and Philadelphia, and the dioceses of Harrisburg, Newark, and Trenton. The mother-house is at Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Saint Augustine)
Established in 1866 at the request of Bishop Verot from the mother-house at Le Puy. Separation from the French mother-house in 1889. The congregation manages missions, academies, and an orphanage, in the Diocese of Saint Augustine. The mother-house is in the city of Saint Augustine.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of le Puy (Fall River)
Established in 1902 by nine sisters from the mother-house at Le Puy, France, who took charge of schools in French parishes of the Diocese of Fall River, where the congregation has now manages schools. The provincial house and novitiate are in the city of Fall River.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Superior)
Established in 1907 by three sisters from Cincinnati at the request of Bishop Schinner and with the cooperation of the Jesuits of Cincinnati. The community has four houses, including the mother-house and novitiate, an academy, a hospital, and a parochial school, all in the city of Superior.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Pembroke)
Established in the diocese in 1910 by sisters from Peterborough. Converted to a separate community in 1921 with the mother-house at Pembroke. The sisters conduct schools and academies in the Diocese of Pembroke.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Peterborough)
Established in the diocese of Peterborough in 1890 by sisters from Toronto. The congregation manages academies, high schools, continuation and separate schools, hospitals, orphanages, missions, and a House of Providence, in the dioceses of Peterborough, Saulte-Sainte-Marie, and Alexandria, and the archdiocese of Ottawa. The mother-house is at Peterborough.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Wichita)
First founded from Concordia in 1887 at Abllene, Kansas, then in the Diocese of Leavenworth. The mother-house was erected in 1888, transferred to Parsons in 1896, which, by a redivision of the Kansas dioceses, came under the Diocese of Wichita in 1897; mother-house again transferred about 1900 to the city of Wichita where it is still located. The Community has includes an academy, parochial schools, hospitals, training schools for nurses, and a sanitarium, in the dioceses of Wichita, Denver, and Oklahoma.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Hamilton)
Foundation made in 1852 from the Toronto mother-house, becoming a separate community with novitiate at Hamilton, Ontario in 1856. The congregation manages schools, hospitals, a sanitarium, and an orphanage, all in the Diocese of Hamilton.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Religious Hospitallers of Saint Joseph
Founded at La Fleche, France in 1636 by Marie de la Ferre, and dedicated to the service of the poor. The society has 24 houses, including hospitals and clinics in France and Belgium, and in the United States and Canada hospitals and orphanages. The mother-house is at La Fleche.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph
Founded at Le Puy, France in 1650 by Father Jean Paul Medaille, SJ, assisted by Rightt Reverend Henri de Maupas, a friend and disciple of Saint Vincept de Paul, for the Christian education of children. The residence of Mme. de Joux became the cradle of the "Institute." A number of young women, eager for social service in religion, offered themselves and were received by the bishop as the first members of the congregation. The constitutions, drawn up by Bishop de Maupas, are based on the Rules of Saint Ignatius; approbation in 1655. The congregation spread over the whole of France, to Savoy, Italy, and Corsica, with numerous hospitals, schools, and orphanages. Dispersed in 1793, their property confiscated, the community was reassembled at Saint Etienne in 1807 by Mother Saint John Fontbonne, thence removed to Lyons, from which mother-house foundations have been made in Armenia, Egypt, Corsica, the Indies, Mexico, and the United States; the congregation is now represented in nearly every country of Europe, Asia, and Africa. The sisters were introduced into America in 1836 by the Right Reverend Joseph Rosati of the Diocese of Saint Louis, Missouri. The movement for general government, with a member of the congregatjon as superior instead of episcopal control, was begun in 1860 and brought to a successful issue in 1877. The Buffalo, Philadelphia, and Brooklyn houses did not change their form of government. In the census of 1925 the Sisters of Saint Joseph numbered 10,000 (2500 under a superior-general residing at Carondelet in Saint Louis, 7500 under diocesan administration). In Canada, as in the United States, the sisters teach in day and boarding schools, and conduct orphanages, homes, hospitals, and other institutions.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Concordia)
Founded at Newton, Kansas in 1883 as a mission from the Rochester community. Mother-house established at Concordia in 1884 by Mother Mary Stanislaus Leary, assisted by members of the Erie community. The congregation manages a college for women, academies, high and grade schools, hospitals, a sanitarium, training schools for nurses, an orphanage, and a home for the aged, in the Archdiocese of Chicago, and the dioceses of Concordia, El Paso, Grand Island, Kansas City, Leavenworth, Marquette, and Rockford. The mother-house is at Concordia.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of Saint Hyacinthe
Founded at Saint Hyacinthe, Canada in 1877 by Bishop Louis Zephirin Moreau, for the education of children. The congregation has houses and schools in Canada and the United States. The mother-house is at Saint Hyacinthe.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of Chambery
Founded in 1812 at Chambery, France, by a colony of sisters frorn the mother-house at Lyons. The Rule, based on that of Saint Augustine, was approved in 1874. The congregation, formerly diocesan, then became subject to a superior-general. It has been established in the United States since 1885. The congregation has 147 houses, including parochial and high schools, hospitals, a leper asylum, homes for the aged, workrooms for girls, and orphanages, in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, Italy, Brazil, and the United States (in the Archdiocese of Baltimore, and the dioceses of Hartford and Springfield). The general mother-house is still at Chambery, the provincial house for the United States at Hartford, Connecticut.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of Bourg
Founded in 1819 at Belley, France, from the mother-house at Lyons. Constituted as an independent diocesan congregation in 1823. Mother-house transferred to Bourg in 1825, and from there foundations were made throughout France. The sisters were sent to Bay Saint Louis, Diocese of Natchez in 1854. A novitiate was opened at New Orleans in 1863 where the provincial now resides. The sisters conduct novitiates, schools, an asylum, and a home for working girls, in the archdioceses of Cincinnati, Dubuque, and New Orleans, and in the dioceses of Crookston, Natchez, and Superior. The general mother-house is still at Bourg.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Wheeling)
Founded in 1853, by sisters from Carondelet. Has been independent, with mother-house at Wheeling, since 1860. The congregation manages hospitals, training schools for nurses, an academy, and orphanages, besides parochial elementary and high schools conducted by the sisters, in various parts of the Diocese of Wheeling.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Brooklyn)
Founded in 1856 at Williamsburg, Long Island, New York at the request of Bishop Loughlin of Brooklyn, from the Philadelphia community; transferred to Flushing in 1860. The mother-house is now in Brentwood, New York. The congregation manages parochial and trade schools, academies, a college for women, hospitals and orphanages, all in the diocese of Brooklyn.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Pittsburgh)
Founded in 1869 at Ebensburg (Diocese of Altoona). Mother-house transferred to Baden, Pennsylvania in 1901. The congregation manages grade and high schools, an academy for boys, a preparatory school for the novitiate, a teacher's college, a hospital and dispensary, a training school for nurses, and an infant home in the dioceses of Pittsburgh and Altoona, and a mission in Yuanchow, China.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Beaverton, Oregon)
Founded in 1886 by Archbishop Gross at Sublimity, Oregon for the education of youth. The sisters conduct academies, schools, and a home for orphaned boys in the Archdiocese of Oregon City. The mother-house is at Beaverton.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Haydn, Franz Joseph
Founder of the Viennese school of composition, born Rohrau, Austria, 1732; died Vienna, Austria, 1809. He became a chorister at Saint Stephen's, Vienna, 1740, but his voice failing, he turned to composition basing his style chiefly on Bach. Devoted to religion, he recognized that his talents came from above and made use of the endowment for the glory of God. He always inscribed his compositions: "Laus Deo." He composed masses and oratorios, notably the "Creation," his masterpiece, and other sacred music. The "Seven Words" and the "Seasons" are well-known oratorios. His masses, though not reconcilable with present liturgical requirements, are genuine masterpieces. Called "the inventor of the symphony," his knowledge of instrumentation raised that high form of composition to a classic level on which future development was based. He wrote 125 symphonies. Chamber-music he also enriched by his contributions in quartet form and he wrote twenty operatic scores. His brother, Johann Michael (1737-1806), organist at Saint Peter's, Salzburg, was a prolific composer with a predilection for liturgical texts, but lacking in originality.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hefele, Karl Joseph Von
Historian, Bishop of Rottenburg, born Unterkochen, Wurttemberg, 1809; died Rottenburg, 1893. He taught church history at Tübingen (1836-1869), where he opposed Illuminism and laid special emphasis on Christian archaeology. Hefele accepted the definition of papal infallibility after opposing it during the deliberations of the Vatican Council. His best-known work is a great history of the councils.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Burlington)
Introduced into the diocese from Brooklyn community in 1873, by Reverend Charles Boylan. The congregation has elementary, boarding, and high schools, a commercial school, a day nursery, and a home for aged women, all in the Diocese of Burlington. The mother-house is at Rutland, Vermont.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Rochester)
Introduced into the diocese from the Buffalo mother-house in 1864. Affiliation with Buffalo was dissolved in 1868, following the division of that diocese. The mother-house later transferred to Pittsford, New York. The sisters manage a teacher's college, an academy, parochial schools, a preparatory school for small boys, a high school, orphanages, a home for the aged, and a hospital, all in the Diocese of Rochester.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Buffalo)
Introduced into the diocese in 1854, by four sisters from Carondelet, becoming an autonoous commnnity in 1868. The congregation manages schools, academies, orphanages, homes for the aged, for infants, and for working girls, an institute for the deaf, and a protectory for homeless boys, all in the Diocese of Buffalo. The mother-house is in the city of Buffalo.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Springfield)
Introduced into the diocese in 1880 from the Brooklyn community then at Flushing, Long Island, New York. Established at Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts. The Springfield mission constituted an independent mother-house for the diocese in 1885. The congregation manages a scholasticate connected with the novitiate, a college and academy, and parochial schools, in the Diocese of Springfield. The mother-house is in the city of Springfield.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Detroit)
Introduced into the diocese in 1889 by sisters of the Ogdensburg community. The novitiate was transferred to Nazareth, Michigan in 1897. The congregation manages a college and academy, a boarding school for small boys, parish schools, an old peoples home, hospitals, a foundling home, and an orphanage, all in the Diocese of Detroit. The mother-house is at Nazareth.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Veuster, Joseph de, Blessed
Missionary priest, born Tremeloo, Belgium, 1840; died Molokai, Hawaii, 1889. Member of the Fathers of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, he was sent to Hawaii where he became resident priest in the leper reserve at Molokai, and for years was the only person to minister to their spiritual and medical wants. Stricken with disease, 1885, he continued his work to the end. His name was attacked by a Presbyterian minister named Hyde, and brilliantly vindicated by Robert Louis Stevenson in a philippic entitled "Father Damien" (Notre Dame, Indiana, 1911). He was declared Venerable in 1977, and beatified on June 3, 1995.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Salzmann, Joseph
Missionary. Born in 1819 in Münzbach, Austria; died in 1874 in Saint Francis, Wisconsin. He was ordained in 1842 and labored five years in Austria before coming as missionary to America. In Milwaukee he became pastor of Saint Mary's, and entered upon a long struggle with German freethinkers. There he founded the Saint Francis Seminary in 1856; the Pio Nono College; the Catholic Normal School of the Holy Family, which was the first Catholic normal school in the United States; and the American branch of the Saint Cecilia Society.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of Lyons (Portland)
Mother-house at Lyons, France. Novitiate at South Berwick, Maine. The sisters conduct boarding schools, an academy, and a parochial school, in the Diocese of Portland.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Cleveland)
Mother-house in the city of Cleveland. They conduct including parochial elementary and high schools, and academies, all in the Diocese of Cleveland.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph, Polish
Organized in 1901 by Bishop Messmer of the Diocese of Green Bay, Wisconsin when 42 Polish School Sisters of Saint Francis separated from their community at Milwaukee and founded a convent and academy at Stevens Point, Wisconsin. They follow the Rule of the Third Order of Saint Francis and conduct parochial schools and academies in the archdioceses of Chicago and Milwaukee, and the dioceses of Green Bay, La Crosse, Superior, Detroit, Cleveland, Peoria, Hartford, and Denver. The mother-house and novitiate are at Stevens Point.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Son of Joseph
Our Lord, "as it was supposed", according to Saint Luke 3:23.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Renan, Joseph Ernest
Philosopher, critic, and Orientalist. Born on February 28, 1823Treguier, France; died on October 12, 1892 in Paris, France. His early training was received from his mother and sister, and in the seminary of his village. He decided to enter the priesthood, and to that end! attended seminaries in Paris and Issy. His interest in Oriental philology and early Christianity led him to adopt the scepticism and rationalism of the Kantian philosophers, and in 1845 he left the seminary. The French government sent him on a scientific mission to Palestine where he wrote a life of Christ which was abhorrent to all Christians, regardless of sect. This was followed by an equally objectionable life of Saint Paul. These, together with monographs on Oriental studies, earned him renown as stylist rather than historian, and betrayed the Modernistic errors in his thought.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Saint Joseph, Scapular of
Promoted by the Capuchin Fathers, and used locally since 1880. Approved by Pope Leo XIII on April 15, 1898. It is violet, with white bands; on each half is a square of gold cloth; that on the front part bearing a picture of Saint Joseph, with the words "Saint Joseph, Patron of the Church, Pray for us"; that on the other part bearing the papal crown and keys, with the words Spiritus Domini Ductor Ejus (The Spirit of the Lord is His Guide).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Scapular of Saint Joseph
Promoted by the Capuchin Fathers, and used locally since 1880. Approved by Pope Leo XIII on April 15, 1898. It is violet, with white bands; on each half is a square of gold cloth; that on the front part bearing a picture of Saint Joseph, with the words "Saint Joseph, Patron of the Church, Pray for us"; that on the other part bearing the papal crown and keys, with the words Spiritus Domini Ductor Ejus (The Spirit of the Lord is His Guide).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph of Cluny
Religious congregation founded by Blessed Anne Marie Javouhey at Seurre, France in 1798 for educating the young, nursing the sick, and caring for orphans. The congregation manages schools, hospitals, dispensaries, clinics, sanitariums, insane asylums, and orphanages, in France, England, Ireland, Scotland, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, India, Ceylon, Africa, Madagascar, the Seychelles Islands, Nossi-Be, Reunion, the West Indies, Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, French Guiana, Chile, Peru, and Oceania. The mother-house is in Paris.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Toronto)
The congregation from which have branched the other foundations of Sisters of Saint Joseph in Upper Canada. The sisters were established in Canada in 1851 by Reverend Mother Delphine Fontbonne from Philadelphia. The congregation manages a college, academies for girls, and for small boys, separate and parochial schools, hospitals, training schools for nurses, an orphanage, and a House of Providence, for the aged poor and infirm, in the archdioceses of Toronto, Winnipeg, and Vancouver, the Diocese of Victoria, and the Vicariate Apostolic of the Yukon. The motherhouse is in Toronto.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Fort Wayne)
With mother-house at Tipton, Indiana manages academies, parochial schools, and hospitals, in the diocese of Fort Wayne and Baker City.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Akiba ben Joseph
(c. 50-c.135 CE) Among the greatest of the Mishnaic sages. Unless otherwise stated, all Mishnayos are presumed to be in accordance with the Rabbi Akiva's view. He was the son of converts, and an unlearned shepherd. At the age of 40, at the insistence of his wife, he began studying Torah,under Eliezer ben Hyrcanus, Joshua ben Hananiah, and Nahum Ish Gamzu ultimately attracting 24,000 students including Rabbi Simeon ben Yohai, Rabbi Meir and Rabbi Judah ben Ilai. He supported Bar Kochba's revolt. He was imprisoned and savagely murdered by the Romans for teaching Torah (he is one of the Ten Martyrs).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Joseph
Eleventh son of Jacob and first of Rachel. The interesting history of Joseph is too well known to need being given in its detail, but attention should be given to the many respects in which Joseph was a striking type of the Lord Jesus. He was the beloved one of his father: this with the intimations given to him of his future position, destined for him by God in the midst of his family, stirred up the envy of his brethren and resulted in his being sold to the Gentiles: as the Lord was hated by His brethren the Jews, and sold by one of them. Joseph was accounted as dead. He was brought very low, being cast into prison, under a false accusation against him because he would not sin: his feet were 'made fast in the stocks,' and the iron entered his soul: in all these circumstances he was foreshadowing the Lord in His humiliation.
On the elevation of Joseph to power he was unknown to his brethren, as the Lord in exaltation is now to His brethren after the flesh. During thistime he had a Gentile wife and children and became 'fruitful': so while the Lord is rejected by the Jews, God is gathering from the nations a people for His name. Joseph ruled over the Gentiles, as the Lord will do. Then all Joseph's brethren bowed down to him, as eventually all the twelve tribes will bow down to the Lord. This is followed by all the descendants of Jacob being placed in a fruitful part of the country, as the nation will be gathered to the pleasant land in the millennium.
The beautiful and touching way in which Joseph dealt with his brethren, will be repeated in a magnified way by the Lord's tender and loving dealing with the remnant of Judah when they come to speak to Him about the wounds in His hands, and to mourn over the way He was treated by them. They will then see that, notwithstanding their hatred, He laid the foundation in His death for their future blessing.
When Jacob prophetically blessed His sons, Joseph had a prominent place. Genesis 49:22-26 . He was to be very fruitful, with branches running over the wall: so the blessing of Israel through Christ extends to the Gentiles. He was sorely grieved, hated, and shot at, as was the Lord; but his bow abode in strength, and from him was the shepherd, the stone of Israel (two titles of the Lord). Then the blessings of heaven and of the deep, of the breasts and of the womb, are multiplied on the head and on the crown of Joseph, as the one separated from his brethren: all foreshadowing, though to be far exceeded by, the many crowns and the glory in heaven and on earth of the true Nazarite, now sanctified in heavenly glory, the Lord Jesus. For the blessing by Moses cf. Deuteronomy 33:13-17 . Joseph, when about to die, had faith that God would surely deliver Israel from Egypt and gave directions concerning his bones. Genesis 37 — Genesis 50 ; Exodus 13:19 . For the Egyptian king under whom it is supposed that Joseph lived, see EGYPT.
2. Father of Igal, of Issachar. Numbers 13:7 .
3. Son of Asaph: appointed to the service of song. 1 Chronicles 25:2,9 .
4. One who had married a strange wife. Ezra 10:42 .
5. Priest 'of Shebaniah' who returned from exile. Nehemiah 12:14 .
6. Husband of Mary the mother of Jesus. He was 'a just man,' and was obedient to the instructions he received from God as to his wife, and in protecting the infant Jesus. He was of the house and lineage of David, his genealogy being given in Matthew 1 and perhaps in Luke 3 . The visit to Jerusalem, when the Lord was twelve years old, is the last incident recorded of him. He is once called 'the carpenter,' Matthew 13:55 , as is the Lord also in Mark 6:3 . It was a custom for all Jews to learn a trade. Matthew 1:16-25 ; Matthew 2:13,19 ; Luke 1:27 ; Luke 2:4-43 ; Luke 3:23 ; Luke 4:22 ; John 1:45 ; John 6:42 .
7. Joseph of Arimathaea, an honourable counsellor, and a rich man. He was a secret disciple of Jesus, and had not consented to the action of the Sanhedrim in condemning the Lord. He boldly asked for the body of Jesus, and interred it in his own new tomb, thus fulfilling Isaiah 53:9 ; Matthew 27:57,59 ; Mark 15:43 ; Luke 23:50 ; John 19:38 .
8-10. Son of Mattathias; son of Juda; and son of Jonan — three in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus. Luke 3:24,26,30 .
11. Disciple, also called BARSABAS, surnamed JUSTUS, who, with Matthias, was selected as fit to take the place of Judas, but the lot fell on Matthias. Acts 1:23 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joseph of Arimathea
Among the members of the Jewish Council that condemned Jesus to death were at least two who disagreed with the decision. One was Nicodemus (cf. John 7:50-51), the other a man named Joseph who came from the Judean village of Arimathea (Luke 23:50-51; John 19:38-39).
Joseph was a just and righteous man, well respected, wealthy, and a follower of Jesus (Matthew 27:57; Mark 15:43; Luke 23:50). Though he feared the Jews, he was bold enough to ask Pilate for the body of Jesus so that he might give Jesus an honourable burial. With Nicodemus he took the body down from the cross, anointed it with spices, wrapped it in linen and placed it in the tomb that he had prepared for himself (Matthew 27:58-60; John 19:38-42).
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Joseph Barsabas
surnamed Justus. One of the two chosen as candidates for Judas Iscariot's vacant apostleship; therefore he must have followed Jesus from His baptism to His ascension, and so was fitted to be a witness of His resurrection (Acts 1:22). Lightfoot suggests that he was Joses son of Alphaeus, and that Judas Barsabas was his brother and the apostle Jude. Said (Papias, Eusebius, H.E. iii. 39) to have drunk deadly poison without hurt, by our Lord's grace.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Joseph
The older of Jacob's two sons by Rachel. Having been long barren, she said at his birth "God hath taken away (asaph ) my reproach"; "the Lord (I regard this son as the earnest that He) will add (yaacaph ) to me another son," a hope fulfilled afterward in Benjamin's birth. Seventeen years old when sold into Egypt (Jacob being 108, and Isaac living 12 years afterward), 30 when made governor (Genesis 30:23-24; Genesis 37:2; Philippians 2:6-885), Genesis 41:39 before Jacob came into Egypt; so born 1906 B.C. He is called" son of Jacob's old age," as the comfort of his father's declining years, when his elder brothers by misconduct grieved their father, and Benjamin as yet was too young to minister to him. While Jacob was with the aged Isaac at Hebron his sons were tending flocks. Joseph reported their evil doings to Jacob, early manifesting moral courage and right principle under temptation (Exodus 23:2). Jacob marked his love to Joseph by giving him a "coat of many colors" (ketonet pacim ), the distinctive mark of kings' daughters who were virgins (2 Samuel 13:18), strictly a long "tunic reaching to the extremities" or ankles.
These robes generally had a stripe round the skirts and sleeves. On the tomb of Chnumhotep at Benihassan, under the 12th dynasty, the Semitic visitors are represented in colored robes, of pieces sewn together. Jacob probably designed hereby to give Joseph, the firstborn of Rachel who, but for Laban's trick, was his rightful first wife as she was his dearest,the primogeniture forfeited by Reuben (1 Chronicles 5:1; Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:4). The Arab chief to this day wears an aba or garment of different colored stripes as emblem of office. The more his father loved the more his brethren hated him, and could not speak peaceably to him (Ecclesiastes 4:4; compare the Antitype Genesis 42:21-22; John 5:17-20; John 7:5; John 15:23-25). The preeminence given him by his earthly was confirmed by his heavenly Father in two successive dreams.
In his simplicity, possibly with some degree of elation, but certainly with the divine approval (for the revelation was given to be made known, Matthew 10:27), he told the dreams to his brethren, which only aggravated their hatred: the first, their sheaves bowing to his sheaf (pointing to his coming office of lord of the Egyptian granaries); the second, the sun, moon, and 11 stars bowing to him (these heavenly bodies symbolizing authorities subject to his chief rule; compare the coming eclipse of the natural luminaries and earthly potentates before the Antitype, Matthew 24:29-30; Revelation 6:12). In the Antitype the Old Testament prophecies answer to Joseph's dreams; the Jewish rulers rejected Him, though knowing, yet practically knowing not, the prophecies concerning Him (Acts 13:27). Leah or else Bilhah, Rachel's handmaid, answers to the "moon," "thy mother," as Jacob to the "sun," and the 11 stars to the 11 brothers (Genesis 37:6-10).
He told his second dream to his father as well as to his brethren, because it affected not merely them but Jacob and his mother also. His father at first was displeased with what seemed at variance with a son's submission to his parent. But, like Mary in the case of the Antitype, he "observed the saying" (Luke 2:19; Luke 2:51). Unbelief, along with a secret misgiving that it might prove true after all, and bitter envy, wrought upon the brothers. So upon their father sending Joseph from the vale of Hebron in the S. to Shechem in the N. to inquire after their welfare and the flocks, when they saw him afar off at Dothan, they conspired to slay him, saying "we shall see what will become of his dreams." So as to the Antitype, Matthew 21:38; Matthew 27:1. Stephen and the apostles evidently contemplated Joseph as type of Jesus (Acts 7:9-14; Acts 3:13-18). Jacob's special love shadows God's love to His Only Begotten (Matthew 3:17).
Joseph's readiness at his father's calls answers to the good Shepherd, the Son of God's volunteering to come securing our eternal welfare at the cost of His life (Psalms 40:6-7; John 10:11). Providence turned aside their first plan. Reuben persuades them to avoid the guilt of blood by casting him into a dry pit or cistern, intending to return and deliver him. In his absence (the narrative with the artlessness of truth never explains why Reuben was absent at the crisis; a forger would have carefully made all plain) they strip off his coat of many colors (type of the human body with its manifold perfections which the Father "prepared" the Son, and which His unnatural brethren stripped Him of: Hebrews 10:5; 1618401209_6); and while he was in the pit "eat bread" (Proverbs 30:20; compare John 18:28; Zechariah 9:11). Ishmaelite or Midianite merchants from Gilead, with spicery, balm, and myrrh (gum ladanum), for Egypt, the land of embalming the dead (Genesis 50:2-3), passed by; and Judah, type of Judas, proposes the new plan of selling their brother for 20 pieces of silver (Leviticus 27:5) to the strangers (compare Matthew 20:19; Luke 18:32; Luke 20:20, the Jews delivering Jesus to the Gentile Romans).
Thus, they thought they had foiled forever the prediction of his elevation, but this was the very means of realizing it, by God's overruling and matchless counsels. Compare the Antitype (Acts 4:25-28; Isaiah 28:29; Proverbs 19:21). Joseph's anguish of soul is noticed incidentally in the brothers' self reproach (Genesis 42:21). Affection for his father is a trait characterizing him throughout, even as the father loved him, so that at his supposed loss through a wild beast (his sons having sent him Joseph's tunic dipped in blood) Jacob refused to be comforted. Severance from his father was the bitterest ingredient in his cup of slavery. So the Antitype, Matthew 27:46. His chief inquiries long afterward were about his father (Genesis 43:7; Genesis 45:13; Genesis 45:28; Genesis 41:51), and the remembrance of "his father" was with him the strongest plea after Jacob's death, that the brothers thought they could urge for their being forgiven (Genesis 50:16-17).
Reuben with characteristic instability forbore to tell his father the truth, while he had not consented to their deed. Jacob's cry, "I will go down into sheol unto my son," implies his belief in a future state, for he thought his son devoured by wild beasts, therefore not in the "grave." The Midianites sold Joseph to Potiphar ("one devoted to the royal house"; phar ), an eunuch, i.e. court attendant, of Pharaoh, chief of the executioners (Hebrew, or "commander of the body guard"), the superintendence of executions belonging to the chiefs of the military caste. Potiphar controlled the king's prison (Genesis 39:20), which was in "the house of the captain of the guard" (Potiphar's successor according to some, but Potiphar, where also Joseph was prisoner (Genesis 40:3). (See POTIPHAR.) Joseph at first "prospered" as Potiphar's steward ("Jehovah making all that he did to prosper in his hand"), supervising his gardens, lands, fisheries, and cattle. Farming in Egypt was carried on with the utmost system, as the Egyptian monuments attest; the stewards registering all the operations, to check the notorious dishonesty of the workmen.
Joseph's knowledge of flocks qualified him in some degree for the post, and his integrity made him trustworthy in it, so that his master felt he could safely entrust to his charge his household and all that he had, and "the Lord blessed the Egyptian's house for Joseph's sake" (as in Jacob's case, Genesis 30:27); Psalms 1:3. But now his virtue encountered a severer test than that of his brothers' bad example; Potiphar's wife, with the lustfulness of Egyptian women, conceived a passion for his beauty and tempted him. Seemingly, his safety was in compliance, his danger if he should provoke her by non-compliance. Had he given way to animal appetite he would have yielded; but his master's absolute confidence in him, which gave him the opportunity with probable impunity ("my master wotteth not what is with me in the house"), was just the reason he gives for not abusing that confidence. Above all, regard for God restrained him instinctively: "how CAN (not merely shall) I do this great wickedness, and sin against God?"
So Matthew 7:18; 1 John 3:9, "cannot." Willful sin is impossible so long as one is under the principle of grace. On "against God," the feature of sin which constitutes its chief heinousness, see Psalms 51:4; 2 Samuel 12:13. When she importuned him day by day, he avoided being with her; they who would escape sin should flee temptation and occasions of sin. When she caught his garment he fled, leaving it in her hand. Then she accused him of the very sin to which she tried in vain to tempt him. An Egyptian story, in the papyrus d'Orbiney in the British Museum, The Two Brothers, in later times, seems founded on that of Joseph, the elder brother's wife tempting the younger with almost the same words as Potiphar's wife used to Joseph. The story of Saneha in one of the oldest papyri records his elevation to high rank under a Pharaoh of the 12th dynasty, and his developing the resources of Egypt just as Joseph did. Potiphar's not putting Joseph to death implies that he did not feel sure of his wife's story, and half suspected Joseph might be innocent.
It cannot have been he but another who entrusted the prisoners to Joseph; for if Potiphar believed him innocent, as the committing of prisoners to him would imply, he would not have left him in prison. His doing so was providentially ordered for Joseph's elevation. Joseph's lettering, "the iron entering into his soul," is alluded to in Psalms 105:17-18. The keeper of the prison, however, discovered his trustworthiness, and committed to him all the prisoners, "the Lord giving him favor in the keeper's sight" (Proverbs 16:7). After a time the chief of Pharaoh's cupbearers (Hebrew), and the chief of his bakers or confectioners, were cast into prison by the king; the captain of the guard committed them as men of rank to Joseph's custody. His interpretation of their dreams, the vine with three branches and the pressing the grape juice into Pharaoh's cup, and the three baskets of white bread (the Egyptians being noted for their fancy bread and pastry) out the uppermost of which the birds ate, came to pass; Pharaoh restored the chief cupbearer, and decapitated the chief baker.
The mention of wine is confirmed by the monuments, which make it the beverage of the rich, beer that of the poor, and represent the process of fermenting wines in early times. The chief cupbearer forgot his promise and his benefactor Joseph (Amos 6:6); compare the Antitype, Psalms 31:12, He "remembered" the companion of His suffering (Luke 23:42). After two years Pharaoh's two dreams of the seven fat and seven lean kine out of the river (Nile, yeowr Hebrew, aa Αur Egyptian, "great river": also Hapi, i.e. Apis, the sacred name; appropriately "kine" come out of "the river," fertilizing the land by its overflow in the absence of rain, for grain and pasture of cattle, Apis the god being represented as a bull, and Athor, Isis, or mother earth, as a cow), feeding in a meadow (the sedge or rank grass by the river's edge, achuw ), and the seven rank ears of grain on one stalk, such as still is grown in Egypt, devoured by the seven thin ears which were blasted by the S.E. wind, called Joseph to the chief cupbearer's remembrance.
Having in vain consulted his magicians or "sacred scribes" (chartumim , "bearers of spells"; the "sorcerers" do not occur until Exodus 7:11), Pharaoh through Joseph learned the interpretation, that seven years of famine (doubtless owing to failure of the Nile's overflow) should succeed to and consume all the stores remaining from the seven plenteous years. (See DIVINATION.) Like Daniel in the great heathen worldking's court at the close of Israel's history, so Joseph at its beginning, in like circumstances and with like abstinence from fleshly indulgences, interprets the Gentile monarch's dreams; marking, the immeasurable superiority of the kingdom of God, even at its lowest point, to the world kingdoms. It is an undesigned mark of genuineness that Joseph is represented as "shaving" before entering Pharaoh's presence, for the Hebrew wore a beard, but the Egyptians cut it and the hair close, and represent on the monuments the idea of slovenliness or low birth by giving a beard to a man.
Joseph recommended the king to appoint a chief officer and subordinates to take up by taxation a fifth of the produce in the plenteous years against the famine years. The king raised Joseph as one" in whom the Spirit of God was," to be grand vizier over his house and his people, reserving the throne alone for himself. He put his signet ring (the names of the Pharaohs were always written in an elongated, signet like, ring) on Joseph's hand in token of delegated sovereignty, a gold chain about his neck, and arrayed him in the fine linen peculiar to the Egyptian priests; and made him ride in his second chariot, while the attendants cried "Abrech," ("Rejoice thou") (Egyptian), calling upon him to rejoice with all the people at his exaltation (Canon Cook, Speaker's Commentary) Pharaoh named Joseph "Zaphnath Paaneah." the food of life or of the living. Compare the Antitype (John 6:35) occupying the mediatorial throne with the Father's delegated tower, giving the bread of life first to His own brethren the Jews. then to the world.
Then Joseph, who shrank from adulterous lusts, in righteous retribution received pure wedded joys in union with Asenath ("devoted to Neith and Isis") daughter of Potipherah ("devoted to Ra, the sun god") priest of ON , Heliopolis or Bethshemesh (the city of the sun god), the religious capital. Pharaoh doubtless ordered the marriage, to link his prime minister with the noblest in the land. Pharaoh himself was invested with the highest sacerdotal dignity, and could remove all disqualifications, so as to enable Joseph to be allied to the proud and exclusive priest caste. The Egyptian religion, though blended with superstitions, retained then much of the primitive revelation, the unity, eternity, and self existence of the unseen God. The sun was made His visible symbol, the earliest idolatry (Job 31:26, Sabeanism). Joseph probably drew Asenath to his own purer faith. Joseph certainly professed openly his religion without molestation (Genesis 42:18), and Pharaoh recognizes the God of Joseph and His Spirit as the true God (Genesis 41:32-38-39).
Like the Antitype (Luke 3:23), Joseph was 30 in entering on his public ministry, so that he was 13 years in Egypt, in Potiphar's house and in prison, before his elevation. With characteristic energy as a steward he made an immediate tour throughout Egypt, and laid up grain in immense quantities, all registered accurately by scribes when the granaries were being filled (as Egyptian monuments represent). God gave him two children, to whom he gave Hebrew names, showing he remembered as ever the God of his fathers: Manasseh, "forgetting," "for God," said he, "hath made me forget all my toil and all my father's house" (i.e. not literally forgetting his relatives, for "his father" was uppermost in his affections; but has swallowed past sorrow in present joy; compare Psalms 90:15; Isaiah 65:16-17; Isaiah 61:7; Isaiah 62:4; Revelation 7:14-17; spiritually, Psalms 45:10); and Ephraim, "doubly fruitful," Joseph again attributing all to God, "God hath caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction" (compare Genesis 49:22; John 15:2 ff). (See EGYPT, on Joseph.)
Apophis the last of the shepherd kings was supposed to be the Pharaoh over Joseph. But Apophis was not master of all Egypt, as Joseph's Pharaoh was. "Shepherds were an abomination" in Joseph's time, which could not have been the case under a shepherd king. Osirtasin I, the second king of the 12th dynasty, was perhaps Joseph's Pharaoh. This dynasty was especially connected with On. There still stand Osirtasin's name and title on the famous obelisk, the oldest and finest in Egypt. Chnumhotep, Osirtasin's relative and favorite, is described upon the tombs of Benihassan as possessing the qualities so esteemed in Joseph "When years of famine occurred he plowed all the lands producing abundant food." The tenure under the crown, subject to a rent of a fifth of the increase, could only emanate from a native Pharaoh. Had it been a shepherd king's work, it would have been set aside on the return of the native dynasties. Amenemha III, sixth of the 12th dynasty, established a complete system of dikes, locks, and reservoirs, to regulate the Nile's overflow.
He fitted the lake Moeris for receiving the overflow; near it was Pianeh, "the house of life," answering to Zaphnath Paaueah, "the food of life." If he be Joseph's Pharaoh Joseph was just the minister to carry out his grand measures. In the seven famine years the Egyptians as well as the people of adjoining lands, W. Africa, Ethiopia, Arabia, Syria, which shared in the drought (for the tropical rains on the Abyssinian mountains, on which the Nile's rise depends, have the same origin as the Palestine rains), and which partially depended on Egypt the granary of many countries (Acts 27:6; Acts 27:38), came to buy grain. Pharaoh's one reply to all was: "go to Joseph, what he saith to you, do" (compare the Antitype: John 6:45 ff; John 2:5). His brethren too came and bowed before him, unconsciously fulfilling the dream which they had so striven to frustrate (Acts 4:27-28; Proverbs 19:21; Proverbs 21:30). His speech and manners were Egyptian, so that they knew him not though he knew them.
So the Antitype's brethren shall at last, like all others, bow before Him who is supereminently exalted just because He humbled Himself (Philippians 2:6-11; Psalms 22:22; Psalms 22:26-29). He knows His people before they know Him (John 15:16; John 10:14; Galatians 4:9). Joseph spoke roughly to his brethren, at once to avoid recognition and to bring them to repentance: "ye are spies, to see the nakedness (the assailable, because defenseless, points) of the land ye are come." Egypt was exposed to incursions of Canaanite Hittites and Arabs, and the invasion of the shepherds or Hyksos was already impending. (See EGYPT.) Joseph bartered grain successively for the Egyptian money (the money was in the form of rings not coined but weighed), cattle and land, of which he retained only a fifth of the produce for Pharaoh and took nothing from the priests. Diodorus adds the warriors as possessing land, but this was the king's special favor to them and apparently after Joseph.
Not Joseph but Pharaoh it was who made the exception in behalf of the idolatrous priests, giving them grain without requiring their land (Genesis 47:22). Herodotus mentions the allotment of the soil by the crown among the people. The monuments record several famines and precautions taken against it. Joseph's statesmanship appears in the policy adopted. The Egyptians became the king's servants, and their property his, by their own voluntary act. His generous principle of dealing with them then, asking only a fifth after establishing the right to all, won their universal approval of an evenly distributed instead of an unequal taxation. A fifth was probably the sole tax on them. Joseph's policy was to centralize power in the monarch's hands, a well ordered monarchy being the best in the existing state of Egypt to guard against the recurrence of famines by stores laid by systematically, and by irrigation in the absence of the Nile's overthrow, and by such like governmental works, instead of leaving all to the unthrifty and unenterprising cultivators.
The removal to cities (Genesis 47:19-26) facilitated his providing the people with food. The Egyptians did not regard one fifth as an exorbitant rent, but acknowledged "thou hast saved our lives" (compare the Antitype, Acts 5:31). Joseph's brethren in replying as to their father and family kept up the old lie, "one is not." Joseph required that one of them should fetch the youngest who was they said with his father, and kept them three days in ward, then let them take back grain for their households, but bound Simeon before their eyes as a hostage for their bringing Benjamin and so proving their truthfulness. As they had separated him from his father so he separated one from them, possibly the ringleader in their cruelty to Joseph (compare Genesis 34; Genesis 49:5-7.) As they had seen his anguish of soul so now their souls were in terrified anguish, with the stings of conscience added (John 1:11): retribution in kind (Numbers 32:23 ff; Matthew 7:2).
Joseph heard their self reproaching, remorseful cry, "we are verily guilty concerning our brother in that we saw ... and we would not hear" (Proverbs 21:13). Joseph, though cherishing no revenge nay feeding his enemy when hungry (Romans 12:20), saw that temporary affliction was needed to bring them to penitence (Hosea 5:15; Job 36:8-9). He filled their sacks (Hebrew, "vessels") and restored their money (Luke 6:34-35). divine guidance led Joseph to require Benjamin, the surest way of bringing Jacob and the whole family into their Egyptian house of bondage and training. His real kindness to them here shows that the severity was used in the interests of justice and their ultimate good by humiliation, while he retained all a brother's tenderness. The discovery of their money alarmed both the brothers and Jacob; "all these things are against me," but see Romans 8:31. Reuben offered to let his two sons be slain if he did not bring Benjamin back.
At last, when want of grain forced him, Jacob gave a reluctant consent on Judah's undertaking to be surety for Benjamin. So with double money and a present of balm (balsam gum), honey (else grape juice boiled down to syrup, dibs ), spices (storax ), myrrh (ladanum ), and nuts (pistachio nuts), they brought Benjamin. Tremblingly they told the steward as to their money, for they feared on being brought into the house they should be imprisoned there. The steward reassured them and brought forth Benjamin. Again they fulfilled the dream, bowing before Joseph twice to the earth. His tender affection all but burst out at the sight of Benjamin, but as before by turning from them and weeping (Genesis 42:24), so now by entering into a chamber and weeping there, he maintained composure (compare the Antitype's yearning love for His brethren after the flesh: Jeremiah 31:20; Isaiah 63:15). At dinner the Egyptians, dreading pollution from those who killed cows, which were sacred in Egypt, sat apart from the Hebrew, and Joseph sat alone according to his high rank.
Each was served separately; all were ranged according to age, but the youngest had five messes for their one sent from before Joseph. The monuments accord with this representation. They drank freely ("were merry".) On the morrow, by putting his silver cup (bowl from which wine was poured into smaller cups) in Benjamin's sack, and sending his steward after them upon their leaving the city where Joseph lived, he elicited Judah's generous offer to be bondsman and so not bring his father's grey hairs with sorrow to the grave, bound up as Jacob's life was with Benjamin's. (See DIVINATION.) Divining cups were used by gazing into the water as a mirror. The Nile was "the cup of Egypt," the sacred cup symbolized it. Joseph to keep up his disguise spoke as an Egyptian. He was not faultless; here he exceeded legitimate bounds of disguise, and implied his use of divination, which his former disclaiming of all knowledge otherwise than by God's revelation proves he did not practice (Genesis 41:16). Joseph could refrain no longer.
The thought of his father's loving anxiety moved him to make himself known to them. He wept aloud while "they were troubled at his presence"; it was as if the ghost of one whom they had murdered stood before them. They shrank from him, but he said "come near to me" (compare Matthew 14:26; the Antitype and His future comforting of Zion, Isaiah 40:2; Isaiah 61:2-3). Joseph soothes their remorse, "be not angry with yourselves, for God did send me before you to preserve life." So Acts 3:12-18; Acts 4:27-28. He gave them the kiss of reconciliation and wept over them. Above all he tells them: "haste ye ... to my father and say, God hath made me lord of all Egypt, come down and thou shalt dwell in Goshen near me." (See GOSHEN.) Pharaoh and his court were pleased at the arrival of his brethren, and rendered him all help in removing his father and the whole household. His knowledge of his brethren suggested his charge, "see that ye fall not out by the way," one laying the blame of their unnatural conduc
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joseph the Son of Jacob
The story of Joseph is among the best known in the Bible. It spreads over more than a dozen chapters of Genesis and shows how God was fulfilling his promises to Abraham.
God had promised Canaan to Abraham and his descendants, but those descendants would be able to take possession of it only when they had sufficient numbers to do so. First of all, therefore, they had to develop as a nation, and the story of Joseph shows how this became possible. It recounts the events that led to their migration to Egypt and their subsequent growth and development. Although, after Joseph’s death, they suffered a period of slavery, in due course they left Egypt and took possession of Canaan (cf. Genesis 15:13-16).
From Canaan to Egypt
Joseph was Jacob’s eleventh son but, being Rachel’s firstborn, he soon became Jacob’s favourite (Genesis 30:22-24; Genesis 33:1-7). By the time Joseph was seventeen, his brothers so hated him that they decided to get rid of him. They sold him to traders who took him to Egypt, though they told their father that a wild animal had killed him (Genesis 37).
In spite of his blameless behaviour, Joseph ended up in prison. Because of his good conduct, he was given a position of responsibility that proved to be of benefit to the other prisoners, but he waited in vain for anyone to help him (Genesis 39; Genesis 40). When at last someone told the king of Joseph’s wisdom, Joseph warned the king of a coming famine and advise him how to deal with it. The king was so impressed that he made Joseph the administrator of the famine relief program, and then governor of all Egypt (Genesis 41:1-45; Acts 7:9-10).
Governor of Egypt
At the time of his appointment as governor, Joseph was thirty years of age (Genesis 41:46). He married an Egyptian and they produced two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:47-52).
Egypt alone had made preparations for the famine, with the result that people came from everywhere to buy food. Among these were Joseph’s brothers. Although Joseph recognized them, they did not recognize him (Genesis 41:53-57; Genesis 42:1-8).
To see if his brothers had changed for the better over the years, Joseph cleverly arranged a striking sequence of events. He worked them into a trap from which they could have easily escaped by sacrificing their brother Benjamin, who was their father’s new favourite. But they refused to forsake Benjamin (Genesis 42:9-38; Genesis 43; Genesis 44). Joseph, satisfied that his brothers had experienced a genuine change of heart, told them who he was. He then sent wagons to Canaan to bring Jacob and all his family to Egypt (Genesis 45; Genesis 46; Acts 7:11-14).
Joseph arranged for all Jacob’s family to settle in Goshen in the Nile Delta. There, separated from the Egyptians, they could multiply and develop without their culture or religion being corrupted by the Egyptians (Genesis 47:1-12). Meanwhile Joseph continued as governor, and his economic policies saved Egypt from disaster (Genesis 47:13-26).
Later events
Before Jacob died, he raised the two sons of Joseph, Manasseh and Ephraim, to equal status with the brothers of Joseph. Manasseh and Ephraim would therefore become heads of tribes in Israel. Joseph, by receiving two tribes instead of one, received the inheritance of the firstborn (Genesis 48; Genesis 49:22-26; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2).
When Jacob died, Joseph’s brothers feared he might now have revenge against them. Joseph was saddened by such mistrust and reassured his brothers that he would continue to look after them (Genesis 50:1-21).
Joseph lived over ninety years in Egypt, but he still believed that Canaan was the land his people would one day possess. Before he died he showed his faith in God’s promises by leaving instructions that when the people of Israel eventually moved to Canaan, they take his remains with them (Genesis 50:22-26; Exodus 13:19; Hebrews 11:22). His descendants buried his bones at Shechem, in the tribal area of Ephraim (Joshua 24:32).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joseph the Husband of Mary
Two lines of descent from David came together in Jesus. The royal line through Solomon and the kings of Judah came through Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, giving grounds for Jesus’ right to the throne of David (Matthew 1:1-16). The other line, through another of David’s sons, also led to Joseph (Luke 3:23-31).
Possibly, however, the genealogy in Luke is that of Mary, not Joseph. Since the genealogy preserves only the names of the males, Joseph (according to this theory) would be ‘son’ of Heli only because he was married to Heli’s daughter; that is, he would be Heli’s son-in-law.
Both Matthew 1:16 and Luke 3:23 emphasize that Joseph was not the natural father of Jesus. Jesus was conceived in the womb of the virgin Mary by the direct activity of God’s Spirit, without the help of any man. It is understandable that Joseph was called the father of Jesus (John 1:45; Matthew 2:19-2330), because legally he was, but Joseph knew that he was not the cause of Mary’s pregnancy. When he thought of breaking the engagement with Mary secretly (for he did not want to embarrass her), God told him that Mary was morally blameless and her pregnancy was miraculous (Matthew 1:18-25; cf. Luke 1:26-35).
After the birth, Joseph showed a loving concern for both Mary and Jesus, and a readiness to act promptly when God directed him (Matthew 2:13-15; 1618401209_5). With Mary he took the baby to Jerusalem for the ceremonies required by the Jewish law (Luke 2:22). Later they settled in Nazareth in the north (Matthew 2:23), but they went each year to Jerusalem for the Passover (Luke 2:41).
Joseph was a well known carpenter in Nazareth (Matthew 13:55) and he taught his carpentry skills to Jesus (Mark 6:3). Apparently he was no longer alive when Jesus engaged in his public ministry, as the Gospel writers do not mention him in references to current members of Jesus’ family (Matthew 13:55-56; Mark 6:3; John 19:26-27). The brothers and sisters of Jesus were probably children of Mary and Joseph, born to them once they began sexual relations after the birth of Jesus (Matthew 1:25).

Sentence search

Zaph(e)Nath-p(a)Aneah - ” Pharaoh's name for Joseph when he made Joseph second only to himself in Egypt (Genesis 41:45 ). See Joseph
Potiphar - Acquired Joseph as his slave and appointed him to run all his household affairs. He later cast Joseph into prison because of his wife’s false accusation that Joseph raped her
Potiphar - ” Egyptian captain of the guard who purchased Joseph from the Midianite traders (Genesis 37:36 ; Genesis 39:1 ). He saw great potential in Joseph's abilities and appointed him as steward over his household. Potiphar's wife tried to seduce Joseph, but he refused her advances. Because of this rejection, she told her husband that Joseph tried to rape her. Potiphar had Joseph thrown in prison
Sar hamashkim - Was incarcerated in the same prison-dungeon as Joseph, where Joseph correctly deciphered a dream he had, interpreting it as a sign that he would be restored to his original post. He later recommended that Joseph interpret Pharaoh's dreams, leading to Joseph's appointment as viceroy of Egypt
Pharaoh's butler - Was incarcerated in the same prison-dungeon as Joseph, where Joseph correctly deciphered a dream he had, interpreting it as a sign that he would be restored to his original post. He later recommended that Joseph interpret Pharaoh's dreams, leading to Joseph's appointment as viceroy of Egypt
Potiphar's wife - Wife of Joseph's master, Potiphar. Attempted to seduce Joseph. When Joseph resisted her overtures, she claimed that he raped her and he was thrown into prison
Potiphar - , to the sun-god, the Egyptian to whom the Ishmaelites sold Joseph (Genesis 39:1 ). Joseph, though a foreigner, gradually gained his confidence, and became overseer over all his possessions. Believing the false accusation which his profligate wife brought against Joseph, Potiphar cast him into prison, where he remained for some years. (See Joseph
Zelicha - (Potiphar's Wife): Wife of Joseph's master, Potiphar. Attempted to seduce Joseph. When Joseph resisted her overtures, she claimed that he raped her and he was thrown into prison
s.s.j. - = Saint Joseph's Society of the Sacred Heart; Josephites...
- or -...
= Sisters of Saint Joseph...
- or -...
= Society of Saint John...
- or -...
= Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Third Order of Saint Francis ...
Joseph, the Praise And Glory of the Heavens - (Joseph, The Praise and Glory of The Heavens) Hymn for Matins on March 19, feast of Saint Joseph. It is also used in the Office of the Solemnity of Saint Joseph, observed on the Wednesday preceding the third Sunday after Easter
Caelitum Joseph Decus, Atque Nostre - (Joseph, The Praise and Glory of The Heavens) Hymn for Matins on March 19, feast of Saint Joseph. It is also used in the Office of the Solemnity of Saint Joseph, observed on the Wednesday preceding the third Sunday after Easter
Heli - ” The son of Matthat and father of Joseph, Jesus' earthly father (Luke 3:23-24 ). His relationship to Jesus is variously explained by Bible students in light of Matthew 1:16 which makes Joseph's father to be Jacob. He has been seen as the father of Joseph, a more remote ancestor of Joseph, or an ancestor of Mary. Either Jacob and Heli are variant names of the same person, “son of” means “descendant of” as in other genealogies, or Luke preserved the genealogy of Mary rather than of Joseph
j.m.j. - = Jesus, Mary, Joseph ...
Barsabbas - See Joseph, Judas
Joseph - Joseph in the Old Testament primarily refers to the patriarch, one of the sons of Israel. Joseph was the eleventh of twelve sons, the first by Jacob's favorite wife, Rachel. ...
As the child of Jacob's old age and Rachel's son, Joseph became the favorite and was given the famous “coat of many colors” (Genesis 37:3 ; “long robe with sleeves,” NRSV, NEB; “richly ornamented robe” NIV) by his father. This and dreams which showed his rule over his family inspired the envy of his brothers, who sold Joseph to a caravan of Ishmaelites (Genesis 37:1 ). ...
Joseph was taken to Egypt where he became a trusted slave in the house of Potiphar, an official of the pharaoh. On false accusations of Potiphar's wife, Joseph was thrown in the royal prison, where he interpreted the dreams of two officials who had offended the pharaoh (Genesis 39-40 ). Eventually Joseph was brought to interpret some worrisome dreams for the pharaoh. Joseph predicted seven years of plenty followed by seven years of famine and recommended a program of preparation by storing grain. Pharaoh responded by making Joseph his second in command (Genesis 41:39-45 ). ...
With the famine, persons from other countries came to Egypt to buy food, including Joseph's brothers. They did not recognize him, but Joseph saw the fulfillment of his earlier dreams in which his brothers bowed down to him. After testing their character in various ways, Joseph revealed himself to them on their second visit (Genesis 42-45 ). Under Joseph's patronage, Jacob moved into Egypt (Genesis 46:1-47:12 ). Joseph died in Egypt but was embalmed and later buried in Shechem (Genesis 50:26 ; Exodus 13:19 ; Joshua 24:32 ). ...
That the influential Joseph (Genesis 47:13-26 ) is not known from Egyptian records would be expected if he served under a Hyksos pharaoh, as seems likely. ...
While in Egypt, Joseph became the father of two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50-52 ), who were counted as sons of Jacob (Genesis 48:5-6 ) and whose tribes dominated the northern nation of Israel. The name Joseph is used later in the Old Testament as a reference to the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh (Numbers 1:32 ; Numbers 36:1 ,Numbers 36:1,36:5 ; 1 Kings 11:28 ) or as a designation for the whole Northern Kingdom (Psalm 78:67 ; Ezekiel 37:16 ,Ezekiel 37:16,37:19 ; Amos 5:6 ,Amos 5:6,5:15 ; Amos 6:6 ; Obadiah 1:18 ; Zechariah 10:6 ). ...
Four other men named Joseph are mentioned in the Old Testament: 2. Several Josephs are mentioned in the New Testament, the most important being the husband of Mary, mother of Jesus. Upon learning of Mary's pregnancy, Joseph, being a righteous man, sought to put her away without public disgrace. Joseph took Mary to his ancestral home, Bethlehem, was with her at Jesus' birth, and shared in the naming, circumcision, and dedication of the child (1618401209_53 ). Directed through dreams, Joseph took his family to Egypt until it was safe to return to Nazareth (Matthew 2:13-23 ). Joseph does not appear later in the Gospels, and it is likely that he died prior to Jesus' public ministry. Also important in the New Testament is Joseph of Arimathea, a rich member of the Sanhedrin and a righteous man who sought the kingdom of God (Matthew 27:57 ; Mark 15:43 ; Luke 23:50 ). After the crucifixion, Joseph, a secret disciple of Jesus, requested the body from Pilate and laid it in his own unused tomb (Matthew 27:57-60 ; Mark 15:43-46 ; Luke 23:50-53 ; John 19:38-42 ). ...
Two Josephs are mentioned in the genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:24 ,Luke 3:24,3:30 ). Joseph was also another name of both Barsabbas (Acts 1:23 ) and Barnabas (Acts 4:36 )
o.s.j. - = Oblates of Saint Joseph ...
c.s.j. - = Congregation of Saint Joseph ...
Joseph the Son of Jacob - The story of Joseph is among the best known in the Bible. First of all, therefore, they had to develop as a nation, and the story of Joseph shows how this became possible. Although, after Joseph’s death, they suffered a period of slavery, in due course they left Egypt and took possession of Canaan (cf. ...
From Canaan to Egypt...
Joseph was Jacob’s eleventh son but, being Rachel’s firstborn, he soon became Jacob’s favourite (Genesis 30:22-24; Genesis 33:1-7). By the time Joseph was seventeen, his brothers so hated him that they decided to get rid of him. ...
In spite of his blameless behaviour, Joseph ended up in prison. When at last someone told the king of Joseph’s wisdom, Joseph warned the king of a coming famine and advise him how to deal with it. The king was so impressed that he made Joseph the administrator of the famine relief program, and then governor of all Egypt (Genesis 41:1-45; Acts 7:9-10). ...
Governor of Egypt...
At the time of his appointment as governor, Joseph was thirty years of age (Genesis 41:46). Among these were Joseph’s brothers. Although Joseph recognized them, they did not recognize him (Genesis 41:53-57; Genesis 42:1-8). ...
To see if his brothers had changed for the better over the years, Joseph cleverly arranged a striking sequence of events. Joseph, satisfied that his brothers had experienced a genuine change of heart, told them who he was. ...
Joseph arranged for all Jacob’s family to settle in Goshen in the Nile Delta. Meanwhile Joseph continued as governor, and his economic policies saved Egypt from disaster (Genesis 47:13-26). ...
Later events...
Before Jacob died, he raised the two sons of Joseph, Manasseh and Ephraim, to equal status with the brothers of Joseph. Joseph, by receiving two tribes instead of one, received the inheritance of the firstborn (Genesis 48; Genesis 49:22-26; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2). ...
When Jacob died, Joseph’s brothers feared he might now have revenge against them. Joseph was saddened by such mistrust and reassured his brothers that he would continue to look after them (Genesis 50:1-21). ...
Joseph lived over ninety years in Egypt, but he still believed that Canaan was the land his people would one day possess
Serah - According to the Midrash, she softly delivered the news to her grandfather Jacob that Joseph was still alive. Playing a song on her harp, she gradually mixed in the words "Joseph is alive
f.s.s.j. - = Franciscan Sisters of Saint Joseph ...
Asenath - Wife of Joseph and daughter of a priest in Egyptian temple at On or Heliopolis. Asenath was Pharaoh's present to Joseph (Genesis 41:45 )
Holy Days of Obligation - There are ten such feasts for the universal Church, though certain countries are exempt from the observance of some of these: ...
All Saints
Ascension
Assumption
Christmas
Corpus Christi
Epiphany
Immaculate Conception
New Year's Day
Saint Joseph
Saints Peter and Paul
Suppressed feasts are not to be restored without permission of the Holy See. Thus in the United States, Epiphany, Corpus Christi, Saint Joseph, and Saints Peter and Paul, in England the feasts of Saint Joseph and the Immaculate Conception, in Ireland the feast of Saint Joseph, and in Australia the feasts of the Epiphany, Corpus Christi, Saint Joseph, Saints Peter and Paul, and the Immaculate Conception are not observed
p.s.s.j. - = Poor Sisters of Saint Joseph-Hermanas ...
c.s.j.p. - = Sister of Saint Joseph of Peace ...
Pot'Iphar, - with whom the history of Joseph is connected is described as an officer of Pharaoh chief of the executioners, an Egyptian. When Joseph was accused, his master contented himself with casting him into prison. [1]
Joseph the Husband of Mary - The royal line through Solomon and the kings of Judah came through Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, giving grounds for Jesus’ right to the throne of David (Matthew 1:1-16). The other line, through another of David’s sons, also led to Joseph (Luke 3:23-31). ...
Possibly, however, the genealogy in Luke is that of Mary, not Joseph. Since the genealogy preserves only the names of the males, Joseph (according to this theory) would be ‘son’ of Heli only because he was married to Heli’s daughter; that is, he would be Heli’s son-in-law. ...
Both Matthew 1:16 and Luke 3:23 emphasize that Joseph was not the natural father of Jesus. It is understandable that Joseph was called the father of Jesus (John 1:45; John 6:42), because legally he was, but Joseph knew that he was not the cause of Mary’s pregnancy. ...
After the birth, Joseph showed a loving concern for both Mary and Jesus, and a readiness to act promptly when God directed him (Matthew 2:13-15; Matthew 2:19-23). ...
Joseph was a well known carpenter in Nazareth (Matthew 13:55) and he taught his carpentry skills to Jesus (Mark 6:3). The brothers and sisters of Jesus were probably children of Mary and Joseph, born to them once they began sexual relations after the birth of Jesus (Matthew 1:25)
Potiphar - The prison in which he confined Joseph was an apartment arched, vaulted, and rounded (ha-sohar ) for strength (called a "dungeon," Genesis 40:15), in the house of the chief of the executioners (Genesis 40:3). ...
Joseph's feet at first "they afflicted with fetters, the iron entered into has soul" (Psalms 105:17-18); but Jehovah gave him favor in the sight of "the keeper of the prison," probably distinct from Potiphar. There seems little ground for thinking that Potiphar was succeeded by another "chief of the executioners," "the keeper of the prison" was entrusted by Potiphar with Joseph. Potiphar scarcely believed his lustful wife's story, or he would have killed Joseph at once; but instead he put him in severe imprisonment at first, then with Potiphar's connivance the prison keeper put the same confidence in Joseph as Potiphar himself had put in him when he was free. Egyptian monuments, in harmony with Scripture, represent rich men's stewards, as Joseph, carefully registering all the produce of the garden and field, and storing it up. (See Joseph
Flowering Rod - Emblem in art associated with Saint Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin; in token of his purity, his rod, according to legend, having put forth lilies. ...
Emblema de arte associateva con Sancte Joseph, sposo del Virgine Benedicte; symbolic de su puritate, su virga, accordante a legenda, pulsava lillios
Potiphar - A high officer of Pharaoh, who purchased Joseph of the Midianites, and made him master of his house, but afterwards imprisoned him on a false charge. He is supposed by some to have been the same "captain of the guard" who promoted Joseph in prison, Genesis 37:36 ; 39:23
Rod, Flowering - Emblem in art associated with Saint Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin; in token of his purity, his rod, according to legend, having put forth lilies. ...
Emblema de arte associateva con Sancte Joseph, sposo del Virgine Benedicte; symbolic de su puritate, su virga, accordante a legenda, pulsava lillios
j.ss.r. - = The Redemptorists Sisters of Saint Joseph (Josephite Sisters) ...
Zaphenath-Paneah - The name given by Pharaoh to Joseph ( Genesis 41:45 ). Joseph, p
Juda - He saved the life of Joseph by interceding with his brethren, proposing that he be sold to the Ismaelites. On the second journey to Egypt he persuaded Jacob to consent to the departure of Benjamin, for whom he pleaded before Joseph after the incident of the cup, thus forcing Joseph to reveal his identity
Arimathea - (ahr ih muh thee' uh) City of Joseph, the disciple who claimed the body of Jesus following the crucifixion, and in whose own new tomb the body was placed (Matthew 27:57 ). See Joseph of Arimathea
March - (Roman god, Mars) Month of special devotion to Saint Joseph
Benjamin - (Hebrew: son of my right hand) Youngest son of Jacob, and preferred with Joseph above all the other sons. Pressed by famine, Jacob would not send Benjamin with his brethren into Egypt, to seek grain, but consented when Joseph refused to give the grain unless the brothers were accompanied by Benjamin, to whom he was very devoted (Genesis 42,43)
Manasseh - (Son of Joseph): (a) Joseph’s eldest son
Our Lady of the Elms, College of - Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph
Barsabbas - See Joseph (in NT), 5
Matthan - —Grandfather of Joseph the husband of Mary, Matthew 1:15
Joses - In Matthew 13:55 KJV follows some Greek manuscripts in reading Joses for a brother of Jesus, but modern translations follow the earliest manuscripts in reading Joseph. Some Bible students see Joses as a dialectical pronunciation or a Greek substitute for the Hebrew Joseph. Barnabas' original name was Joseph in the Greek of Acts 4:36
Josech - JOSECH (Authorized Version Joseph)
Elmo'Dam - (measure ), son of Er, in the genealogy of Joseph
Barsabas - Name given Joseph Justus, candidate not elected when church chose replacement for Judas, the traitor (Acts 1:23 ). See Apostle; Judas ; Joseph ; Justus
Christian Seneca - Joseph Hall (1574 - 1656), Bishop of Norwich, a divine eminent as a moralist
Janna - Son of Joseph in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Semei - Son of Joseph, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Josech - ]'>[1] Joseph )
Mat'Than - (gift ), grandfather of Joseph the husband of the Virgin Mary
Joseph (2) - JOSEPH (Ἰωσήφ). Joseph son of Mattathias and Joseph son of Jonam are both named in the genealogy of Jesus given in Lk. * [2] Joseph, not willing to make Mary a public example, ‘was minded to put her away privily’ (Matthew 1:18). ]'>[3] as a token of Divine favour, and Joseph took Mary as his wife, but did not live with her as her husband till she had brought forth her firstborn son (Matthew 1:24 f. ...
Before the birth of Christ there was an Imperial decree that all the world should be taxed, and Joseph, being of the house and lineage of David, had to leave Nazareth and go to Bethlehem, to be taxed with Mary. § [4] In Bethlehem Jesus was born; and there the shepherds, to whom the angel had announced the birth of the Saviour, found Mary and Joseph and ‘the babe lying in a manger’ (Luke 2:16). At the circumcision, on the eighth day after the birth, the child received the name ‘Jesus’ which Joseph had been commanded to give Him; and on a later day, when Mary’s purification was accomplished (cf. Leviticus 12:2-4), she and Joseph took Jesus to the temple in Jerusalem (Luke 2:22), to ‘present him to the Lord’*
It is recorded of Joseph that he and Mary went every year, at the Passover, to Jerusalem, and that when Jesus was twelve years of age He accompanied them. On that occasion Jesus tarried in Jerusalem, after Joseph and Mary, thinking He was with them in the company, had left the city. ’ called forth an answer which Joseph and Mary did not understand. Mary’s words and the record of the subjection of Jesus to her and Joseph indicate that Joseph stood to Jesus in the place of an earthly father. How long that relationship continued is unknown, since the time of the death of Joseph is not stated in the Gospels. Joseph of Arimathaea (Ἰωσὴφ ὁ ἀπὸ Ἀριμαθαίας, see Arimathaea). But which of the relatives of Jesus had a sepulchre in Jerusalem where His body might be placed? Joseph, wishing the burial not to be ‘in any wise’ (cf. The petition required boldness (Mark 15:43), since Joseph, with no kinship in the flesh with Jesus, would be forced to make a confession of discipleship, which the Jews would note. Joseph, now with no fear of the Jews, acted openly, and had to act with speed, as the day of preparation for the Sabbath was nearly spent. In the Fourth Gospel it is told how Nicodemus, bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about an hundred pound weight, joined Joseph, and how they took the body and wound it in linen clothes with the spices (John 19:40). Near the place of crucifixion was a garden, and in the garden a new sepulchre, which Joseph had hewn out in the rock, doubtless for his own last resting-place; and in that sepulchre, wherein was never man yet laid, was placed the body of Jesus prepared for its burial (Matthew 27:60, John 19:41). All was done which the time before the Sabbath allowed reverent hands to do; and then Joseph, perhaps thinking of the pious offices that could yet be done to the dead, rolled a great stone to the door of the sepulchre and departed (Matthew 27:60). On late legends regarding Joseph of Arimathaea see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, vol
Heli - Elevation, father of Joseph in the line of our Lord's ancestry (Luke 3:23 )
Joseph, Litany of Saint - It is a time-honored prayer in honor of the holy foster-father of Jesus Christ and was sanctioned in March, 1909, by Pius X, who was tenderly devoted to Saint Joseph whose name he bore from Baptism. ...
Holy Joseph, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most just, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most chaste, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most prudent, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most valiant, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most obedient, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most faithful, Pray for us. ...
O God, You were pleased to choose Saint Joseph as the husband of Mary and the guardian of your Son
Litany of Saint Joseph - It is a time-honored prayer in honor of the holy foster-father of Jesus Christ and was sanctioned in March, 1909, by Pius X, who was tenderly devoted to Saint Joseph whose name he bore from Baptism. ...
Holy Joseph, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most just, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most chaste, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most prudent, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most valiant, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most obedient, Pray for us. ...
Joseph most faithful, Pray for us. ...
O God, You were pleased to choose Saint Joseph as the husband of Mary and the guardian of your Son
Judah - The leader of the Tribes, he encouraged his brothers to sell Joseph rather than leave him to die, and later stood up to Joseph when Benjamin’s safety was at stake
Potipherah - His daughter Pharaoh gave in marriage to Joseph. The Egyptians and Hebrew were not then so exclusive as afterward; Joseph was now naturalized with an Egyptian name, as viceroy. Asenath probably adopted Joseph's faith (Genesis 41:45; Genesis 41:50; Genesis 43:32; Genesis 46:20)
Bramah Press - A hydrostatic press of immense power, invented by Joseph Bramah of London
Manas'Ses - (Matthew 1:10 ) ...
Manasseh the son of Joseph
Whitworth Gun - A form of rifled cannon and small arms invented by Sir Joseph Whitworth, of Manchester, England
Josech - KJV reads Joseph
Potiphar - Pharaoh's captain of the guard, to whom Joseph was sold
Manassites - Descendants of Manasseh, son of Joseph
Shulchan aruch - Joseph Karo (1488-1575 C
R. shmaryahu gurary (rashag) - Rav Shemaryahu Gurary; 1897-1989; eldest son-in-law of Rabbi Joseph Yitzchak, the sixth Chabad Rebbe ...
Mele'a - the son of Menan, and ancestor of Joseph in the genealogy of Jesus Christ
co'Sam - (a diviner ), son of Elmodam, in the line of Joseph the husband of Mary
Joseph - Joseph (jô'zef), increase, 1. The history of Joseph is strikingly confirmed by the Egyptian monuments. Joseph married the princess Asenath, daughter of Potipherah, priest of On; and his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, Genesis 41:50, whom Jacob adopted. When Jesus was twelve years old, Joseph took his mother and Jesus to keep the passover at Jerusalem, and when they returned to Nazareth he continued to act as a father to the child Jesus, and was reputed to be so indeed. But here our knowledge of Joseph ends. Joseph of Arimathæa, a rich and pious Israelite, probably a member of the Great Council or Sanhedrin. On the evening of the crucifixion Joseph "went in boldly unto Pilate and craved the body of Jesus. Joseph and Nicodemus then, having enfolded the sacred body in the linen shroud which Joseph had bought, placed it in a tomb hewn in a rock, in a garden belonging to Joseph, and close to the place of crucifixion. Joseph, called Barsabas, and surnamed Justus: one of the two persons chosen by the assembled church, Acts 1:23, as worthy to fill the place in the apostolic company from which Judas had fallen
Saint Joseph's College For Women - Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph
Dallas, Texas, Diocese of - Father Joseph Martinere (later vicar-general) ministered there for many years before the diocese was established. Dunne (1893-1910), Joseph P
Rashag - Acronym for Rav Shemaryahu Gurary; 1897-1989; eldest son-in-law of Rabbi Joseph Yitzchak, the sixth Chabad Rebbe ...
t.o.s.f. - = Tertiary of Third Order of Saint Francis...
- or -...
= Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Third Order of Saint Francis ...
Mount Saint Joseph College - Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph
Mel'Chi -
The son of Janna, and ancestor of Joseph in the genealogy of Jesus Christ
Matthan - Grandfather of Joseph ( Matthew 1:15 ); perhaps to be identified with Matthat , who occupies the same place in Luke 3:24
Asenath - Daughter of Poti-pherah, priest of On, wife of Joseph, and mother of Manasseh and Ephraim
Jan'na - (flourishing ), son of Joseph, and father of Melchi, in the genealogy of Christ
Astronomer - ...
CATHOLICS ...
Giovanni Domenico Cassini
Mary Agnes Clerke
Nicolaus Copernicus
Andrew Claude de la Chevois Crommelin
Francesco Denza
Joseph Epping
Herve Auguste Etienne Albans Faye
Galileo Galilei
Edward Heis
Johann Von Lamont
Urbain Jean Joseph Le Verrier
Giuseppe Piazzi
Lorenzo Respighi
Giovanni Sante Gasparo Santini
Christoph Scheiner, S.
OTHER CHRISTIAN ASTRONOMERS ...
Johann Bayer
Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel
Tycho Brahe
Sir Thomas Makdougall Brisbane
Johann Franze Encke
John Flamsteed
Sir William Herschel
Sir John Frederick William Herschel
Johann Hevelius
Sir William Huggins
Johann Kepler
Joseph Louis Lagrange
Canon A
Astronomy - ...
CATHOLICS ...
Giovanni Domenico Cassini
Mary Agnes Clerke
Nicolaus Copernicus
Andrew Claude de la Chevois Crommelin
Francesco Denza
Joseph Epping
Herve Auguste Etienne Albans Faye
Galileo Galilei
Edward Heis
Johann Von Lamont
Urbain Jean Joseph Le Verrier
Giuseppe Piazzi
Lorenzo Respighi
Giovanni Sante Gasparo Santini
Christoph Scheiner, S.
OTHER CHRISTIAN ASTRONOMERS ...
Johann Bayer
Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel
Tycho Brahe
Sir Thomas Makdougall Brisbane
Johann Franze Encke
John Flamsteed
Sir William Herschel
Sir John Frederick William Herschel
Johann Hevelius
Sir William Huggins
Johann Kepler
Joseph Louis Lagrange
Canon A
Asenath - Daughter of Poti-phera, priest of On, wife of Joseph and mother of Ephraim and Manasseh ( Genesis 41:45 ; Genesis 41:50 ; Genesis 46:20 ). The name, like the other Egyptian names in the story of Joseph, is of a well-known late type, prevalent from about b. ...
Asenath is the heroine of a remarkable Jewish and Christian romance, in which she renounces her false gods before her marriage with Joseph; it can be traced back to the 5th cent
Saint Joseph, Scapular of - It is violet, with white bands; on each half is a square of gold cloth; that on the front part bearing a picture of Saint Joseph, with the words "Saint Joseph, Patron of the Church, Pray for us"; that on the other part bearing the papal crown and keys, with the words Spiritus Domini Ductor Ejus (The Spirit of the Lord is His Guide)
Scapular of Saint Joseph - It is violet, with white bands; on each half is a square of gold cloth; that on the front part bearing a picture of Saint Joseph, with the words "Saint Joseph, Patron of the Church, Pray for us"; that on the other part bearing the papal crown and keys, with the words Spiritus Domini Ductor Ejus (The Spirit of the Lord is His Guide)
Heli - Father of Joseph, husband of the Virgin Mary
Zaphnath-Paaneah - Savior of the world, an Egyptian name given by Pharaoh to Joseph, in commemoration of the salvation wrought through him, Genesis 41:45
jo'Sech, - the form of name given in the Revised Version for Joseph , in (Luke 3:26 ) It is not found in the Old Testament
Mount Saint Mary's College, Los Angeles - Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph
Listerism - ) The systematic use of antiseptics in the performance of operations and the treatment of wounds; - so called from Joseph Lister, an English surgeon
Potiph'Erah, - was priest or prince of On, and his daughter Asenath was given Joseph to wife by Pharaoh
Potiphar - Potiphar, with whom the history of Joseph is connected, is described as "an officer of Pharaoh, chief of the executioners, an Egyptian. When Joseph was accused, his master contented himself with casting him into prison
Joseph - It were needless to enter particulars of Joseph's history, when the Bible hath given it so beautifully. ...
As Joseph was the beloved son of Jacob, and distinguished by his father with special tokens, of his affection, and which excited the envy of his brethren; so Christ, the beloved and only begotten son of God, by means of that distinguishing token of JEHOVAH, in setting him up, the Head of his body the church, and giving him a kingdom, in his glorious character of Mediator, called forth, as is most generally believed, that war we read of in heaven in the original rebellion of angels. (See Revelation 12:1-17) The coat of many colours Joseph wore might not unaptly be said to represent the several offices of the Lord Jesus when on earth—his prophetical, priestly, and kingly character. The dreams of Joseph, implying his superiority over his brethren and his father's house, interpreted with an eye to Christ, are very striking circumstances of the preeminency of his character. " (Genesis 49:8) The mission of Joseph to his brethren, by the father, to see if they were well, and how they fared, (Genesis 37:14) is a striking representation of the mission of God's dear Son to this our world. He came indeed, not only to seek, but to save that which was lost; but like another Joseph, the treatment he received corresponded in all points, only in an infinitely higher degree of baseness and cruelty. They sold Joseph for a slave, for twenty pieces of silver, and he was carried down into Egypt, and from the pit and the prison he arose, by divine favour, to be Governor over the whole land. But our Joseph was not only sold for thirty pieces of silver, but at length crucified and slain, and from the grave which he made with the wicked and with the rich in his death, by his resurrection and ascension, at the right hand of power, he is become the universal and eternal Governor both of heaven and earth. ...
The temptations of Joseph, by the wife of Potiphar, bear no very distant resemblance to the temptations of the Lord Jesus by Satan. But the grace imparted to Joseph, to repel the temptation, and the punishment he suffered by a false imputation, very beautifully set forth the innocency of Christ triumphing over the Devil's temptation in the wilderness, and the imputation of our sin to Jesus, who himself bore our sins in his own body on the tree, though himself without sin, neither was guile found in his mouth. In the exaltation of Joseph at the right hand of Pharaoh, and all the famished country coming to him for bread, we behold a lovely type, indeed, of our Almighty Joseph exalted at the right hand of God, and dispensing blessings of grace and mercy in the living bread, which is himself, to a famished world. And as then the Zapnathpaaneah of Egypt revealed secrets, and the cry was, Go unto Joseph, what he saith unto you do: so now, in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ, we do, indeed, behold our Wonderful Counsellor, who hath made known to us his and his Father's will, and the one desire of every soul is, to go unto Jesus, whatsoever he saith unto us is blessed, and our duty to obey. And though like the brethren of Joseph, little do we at first know, that the Lord of the country is our brother, though in the first awakenings of spiritual want the Governor may seem with us, as Joseph did to them, to speak roughly; yet when the whole comes to be opened tour view, and Jesus is indeed discovered to be Lord of all the land, how, like Joseph's brethren, are we immediately made glad, and eat and drink at his table with him, forgetting all past sorrow in present joy, and partaking of that "bread of life, of which whosoever eateth shall live forever!" Such, among many other striking particularities, are the incidents in the history of the patriarch Joseph, which are highly typical of Christ. ...
Under the article of Joseph we must not forget to observe, that there are several more of the name mentioned in Scripture, and of some importance:...
·Joseph the husband of Mary, the mother of the Lord Jesus Christ, Matthew 1:15; Mat 1:18. ...
·Joseph, or Joses, son of Mary and Cleophas, supposed to be one of those who did not at first believe on Christ, but was afterwards converted, John 7:5. ...
·Joseph, called Barsabas, a candidate for the apostleship with Matthias. ...
·Joseph of Arimathea, John 19:38. ...
·Joseph, husband to Salome
Eliud - ” Great, great grandfather of Joseph, the earthly father of Jesus (Matthew 1:14-15 )
Sychem - In Stephen's speech, Acts 7:16, He tells us that the other patriarchs as well as Joseph were buried there (Joshua 24:32)
Saint Rose, College of - Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet
he'li - (ascending ), the father of Joseph the husband of the Virgin Mary, ( Luke 13:23 ) perhaps the grandfather of Mary herself
jo'Seph - Joseph brought the evil report of his brethren to his father, and they hated him because his father loved him more than he did them, and had shown his preference by making a dress which appears to have been a long tunic with sleeves, worn by youths and maidens of the richer class. They resolved to kill him, but he was saved by Reuben, who persuaded the brothers to cast Joseph into a dry pit, to the intent that he might restore him to Jacob. Sold into Egypt to Potiphar, Joseph prospered and was soon set over Potiphar's house, and "all he had he gave into his hand;" but incurring the anger of Potiphar's wife ch. Joseph, being sent for, interpreted them in the name of God, foretelling the seven years of plenty and the seven years of famine. Pharaoh at once appointed Joseph not merely governor of Egypt, but second only to the sovereign, and also gave him to wife Asenath, daughter of Potipherah priest of On (Hieropolis), and gave him a name or title, Zaphnath-paaneah (preserver of life). Joseph's first act was to go throughout all the land of Egypt. ( Genesis 41:54-57 ) [1] After the famine had lasted for a time, apparently two years, Joseph gathered up all the money that was found in the land of Egypt and in the land of Canaan, for the corn which they brought, and brought it into Pharaoh's house, (Genesis 47:13,14 ) and when the money was exhausted, all the cattle, and finally all the land except that of the priests, and apparently, as a consequence, the Egyptians themselves. Now Jacob, who had suffered also from the effects of the famine, sent Joseph's brother to Egypt for corn. The whole story of Joseph's treatment of his brethren is so graphically told in Genesis42-45 and is so familiar, that it is unnecessary here to repeat it. On the death of Jacob in Egypt Joseph carried him to Canaan, and laid him in the cave of Machpelah, the burying-place of his fathers. Joseph lived "a hundred and ten years," having been more than ninety in Egypt. " (Genesis 50:26 ) His trust Moses kept, and laid the bones of Joseph in his inheritance in Shechem, in the territory of Ephraim his offspring. All that is told us of Joseph in the New Testament may be summed up in a few words. He espoused Mary, the daughter and heir of his uncle Jacob,a nd before he took her home as his wife received the angelic communication recorded in (Matthew 1:20 ) When Jesus was twelve years old Joseph and Mary took him with them to keep the passover at Jerusalem, and when they returned to Nazareth he continued to acct as a father to the child Jesus, and was reputed to be so indeed. But here our knowledge of Joseph ends. ...
Joseph of Arimathaea, a rich and pious Israelite, probably a member of the Great Council or Sanhedrin. On the very evening of the crucifixion, when the triumph of the chief priests and rulers seemed complete, Joseph "went in boldly unto Pilate and craved the body of Jesus. Joseph and Nicodemus then, having enfolded the sacred body in the linen shroud which Joseph had bought, consigned it to a tomb hewn in a rock, in a garden belonging to Joseph, and close to the place of crucifixion. ...
Joseph, called Barsabas, and surnamed Justus; one of the two person chosen by the assembled church, (Acts 1:23 ) as worthy to fill the place in the apostolic company from which Judas had fallen
Arimathaea - A place known only in connexion with Joseph
Lacasterian - ) Of or pertaining to the monitorial system of instruction followed by Joseph Lancaster, of England, in which advanced pupils in a school teach pupils below them
Desire of the Everlasting Hills - Part of Jacob's blessing on Joseph (Genesis 49), interpreted as the desire of hymanity for a Messias, a Saviour from over the hills that blend with the heavens
Kansas City-Saint Joseph, Missouri, Diocese of - See also: ...
diocese of Kansas City-Saint Joseph
Catholic-Hierarchy
Igal - Son of Joseph, of the tribe of Issachar
Arimathea - A city of Palestine, whence came Joseph the counsellor, mentioned in Luke 23:51
University of Saint Joseph's College - Memramcook, Saint Joseph, New Brunswick Founded in 1864
Saint Catherine, College of - Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - The following propositions will explain the true construction of these genealogies:--
They are both the genealogies of Joseph, i. of Jesus Christ as the reputed and legal son of Joseph and Mary. Matthew is Joseph's genealogy as legal successor to the throne of David. Luke's is Joseph's private Genealogy, exhibiting his real birth as David's son, and thus showing why he was heir to Solomon's crown. ...
Mary, the mother of Jesus, was in all probability the daughter of Jacob, and first cousin to Joseph her husband. Thus: Matthan or Matthat Father of Jacob, Heli Jacob Father of Mary = Jacob'e heir was (Joseph) Heli Father of Joseph JESUS, called Christ. (Godet, Lange and many others take the ground that Luke gives the genealogy of Mary, rendering (Luke 3:23 ) thus: Jesus "being (as was suppposed ) the son of Joseph, (but in reality) the son of Heli
Justus - Surname of Joseph Barsabas (Acts 1:23)
Josiphiah - (jah ssih fi' uh) Personal name meaning, “Yah adds to,” a longer form of Joseph
Coffin - Used in Genesis 50:26 with reference to the burial of Joseph
Embalming - This specifically Egyptian (non-Israelitish) method of treating dead bodies is mentioned in Scripture only in the cases of Jacob and Joseph ( Genesis 50:2 f
Sichem - (Hebrew: shoulder) ...
Israelite city north of Bethel and Silo, in the tribe of Ephraim; first capital of the Kingdom of Israel, noted as the burial-place of Joseph (Josiah 24)
Zaphnathpaaneah - Name given to Joseph by Pharaoh. ' The two latter meanings suit Joseph well, as being a type of Christ
Arimathea - City of Judea (Luke 23), home of the Joseph who buried Christ in his tomb (Matthew 27); location unknown, probably between Jerusalem and Joppa, possibly Ramleh, two miles south of Lod
Potiphar - An officer in the court of Pharaoh—master to the patriarch Joseph (Genesis 37:36) His name is derived, as it should seem to be, from Parah, which means to scatter
Thirty - Joseph was thirty years old when he stood before Pharaoh
Iste Quem Laeti Colimus - Hymn for Lauds on March 19, feast of Saint Joseph; written in the 17th century by an unknown author
Homiletic And Pastoral Review, the - A monthly magazine published in New York City by Joseph F Wagner, Inc
Atad - Place near the Jordan, where Joseph, his brethren, and the Egyptians made great lamentation at the burial of Jacob
Worshipped Throughout the Church to Earth's Far en - Hymn for Lauds on March 19, feast of Saint Joseph; written in the 17th century by an unknown author
as'Enath - (worshipper of Neith ), daughter of Potipherah, priest, or possibly prince, of On [1], wife of Joseph, (Genesis 41:45 ) and mother of Manasseh and Ephraim
Interpreter - We meet with this word twice in the history of Joseph. And the person that did this office between Joseph and his brethren is supposed, by the expression and the name of Malats, by which he is so called, to be a softener of Jacob's sons' speeches, by way of conciliating the favour of Joseph. And it would have been no violence to the passage if, instead of reading it as it is in our Bibles, it had been read, "and they knew not that Joseph heard them, for the Advocate was between them. ...
And this view appears still more striking from Joseph's history as related to us in our own translation. For beside this interpretation given by the Malats to Joseph, it is plain, that Joseph and his brethren conversed together without the medium of an interpreter, as we read in the twenty-fourth verse: for there it is said, "that he turned himself about from them and wept; and returned to them again and communed with them. And though I would not go so far as to say, that the glorious Mediator of his people was prefigured in every use of it, yet I do venture to think it was peculiarly significant on this occasion amidst the brethren of Joseph. The church of Christ now, which those sons of Israel then represented, when standing before our governor, do not always know, that our Almighty Joseph knows, hears, and regards all; and yet, while carrying on his many offices, how often doth he commune with his people, both with and without mediums! Well might John behold him with his many crowns upon his head; for surely every office of his, in every individual sinner saved by him, demands a new crown of glory
Rachel - Mother of Joseph and Benjamin (Genesis 30-35), she died giving birth to the latter and was buried near Bethlehem
Potiphera - Belonging to the sun, the priest of On, city of the sun, whose daughter Asenath was the wife of Joseph, Genesis 41:45
Ephraim - The second son of Joseph, born in Egypt (Genesis 41:52 ; 46:20 ). The intention of Joseph was that the right hand of the aged patriarch should be placed on the head of the elder of the two; but Jacob set Ephraim the younger before his brother, "guiding his hands wittingly. " Before Joseph's death, Ephraim's family had reached the third generation (Genesis 50:23 )
Embalming - Joseph gave orders for the embalming of the body of his father Jacob, Genesis 50:1-2 ; and Moses informs us that the process took up forty days. Joseph himself also was embalmed, Genesis 50:26
Asenath - An Egyptian name, meaning "gift of the sun-god", daughter of Potipherah, priest of On or Heliopolis, wife of Joseph (Genesis 41:45 )
Giovanni Pichler - He wrought gems of exquisite beauty: "Hercules," "Sappho," and portraits of Pope Pius VI and Emperor Joseph II
Asenath - Daughter of Potipherag, priest or prince of On; given in marriage by Pharaoh to Joseph, as adding honor and strength to his high office
Heli - The father of Joseph, in the genealogy of Jesus ( Luke 3:23 )
Montgolfier - ) A balloon which ascends by the buoyancy of air heated by a fire; a fire balloon; - so called from two brothers, Stephen and Joseph Montgolfier, of France, who first constructed and sent up a fire balloon
Saxhorn - ) A name given to a numerous family of brass wind instruments with valves, invented by Antoine Joseph Adolphe Sax (known as Adolphe Sax), of Belgium and Paris, and much used in military bands and in orchestras
Benjamin - With his brother Joseph’s sale and presumed death, he assumed the status of Jacobs’s favored son
Minded - ...
Joseph was minded to put her away privily
Horse - 47:17: “And they brought their cattle unto Joseph: and Joseph gave them bread in exchange for horses, and for the flocks, and for the cattle of the herds, and for the asses. This was the time of Joseph
Levitation -
term used by Spiritists to designate the physical phenomena by which object are suspended in the air by supposed supernormal means ...
the experience of certain ecstatics, lifted from the ground when at prayer; those reported to have his gift include:
Saint Agnes of Montepulciano
Blessed Ambrose Sansedoni of Siena
Blessed Archangela Girlani
Saint Charbel Makhlouf
Saint Christina Ciccarelli
Saint Christina the Astonishing
Blessed Flora of Beaulieu
Blessed Frances de Posadas
Saint Francis Fasani
Saint Francis of Paola
Blessed James of Bitetto
Saint John Joseph of the Cross
Saint Joseph of Cupertino
Saint John of Sahagun
Blessed Louise degli Albertoni
Saint Lutgardis
Blessed Maria Adeodata Pisani
Blessed Maria Bagnesi
Blessed Mary of Jesus Crucified
Saint Padre Pio
Dothan - Two wells, a famous pasture-ground where Joseph found his brethren watching their flocks. The "two wells" are still in existence, one of which bears the name of the "pit of Joseph" (Jubb Yusuf)
i'Gal -
One of the spies, son of Joseph, of the tribe of Issachar
Mary - The lesser known of these were the mother of John Mark (Acts 12:12; for details see MARK), a member of the church in Rome (Romans 16:6), and a woman who was wife of Clopas and mother of two sons, James and Joseph (Matthew 27:56; Mark 15:40; Luke 1:46-56; Mark 16:1; John 19:25). On the morning of Jesus’ resurrection, she and some others, including Mary the mother of James and Joseph, went to anoint the body of Jesus, but found the tomb empty (Matthew 28:1-5; John 20:1). ...
At the time God revealed this to Mary, she lived in the town of Nazareth in Galilee, where she was engaged to be married to a local carpenter named Joseph. (Concerning the families from which Mary and Joseph came see Joseph THE HUSBAND OF MARY. When she returned to Nazareth pregnant, Joseph was deeply troubled, but he too submitted to God’s will after he received a revelation of the divine purposes (Luke 1:56; Matthew 1:18-25). ...
Some months later, Joseph and Mary moved to Bethlehem in Judea for a census, and there the baby was born (Luke 2:1-7; Luke 2:19). When Joseph and Mary later took the baby to Jerusalem for certain Jewish ceremonies, Mary learnt a little of what lay ahead. ...
Because of the threat of violence from Herod, Joseph sought safety for Mary and the baby Jesus by taking them to Egypt. ...
Joseph and Mary brought Jesus up to be obedient to his parents and to be instructed in the teachings of the Old Testament (Luke 2:42-46; Luke 2:51). ...
The children born to Mary and Joseph after Jesus were James, Joseph, Simon, Judas and at least two daughters (Matthew 13:55-56; Mark 6:3)
Rings - When Pharaoh committed the government of Egypt to Joseph, he took his ring from his finger and gave it to Joseph, Genesis 41:42 . The ring was used chiefly to seal with, and Scripture generally assigns it to princes and great persons; as the king of Egypt, Joseph, Ahaz, Jezebel, King Ahasuerus, his favourite Haman, Mordecai, King Darius, 1 Kings 21:8 ; Esther 3:10 , &c; Daniel 6:17 . Pharaoh gave his ring to Joseph, as a token of authority
Barsabas - Son of Saba, the surname (1) of Joseph, also called Justus (Acts 1:23 ), some identify him with Barnabas; (2) of Judas, who was a "prophet
Dungeon - ...
They brought Joseph hastily out of the dungeon
ca'Iaphas, - (depression ), in full Joseph CAIAPHAS, high priest of the Jews under Tiberius
Joseph - The interesting history of Joseph is too well known to need being given in its detail, but attention should be given to the many respects in which Joseph was a striking type of the Lord Jesus. Joseph was accounted as dead. ...
On the elevation of Joseph to power he was unknown to his brethren, as the Lord in exaltation is now to His brethren after the flesh. Joseph ruled over the Gentiles, as the Lord will do. Then all Joseph's brethren bowed down to him, as eventually all the twelve tribes will bow down to the Lord. ...
The beautiful and touching way in which Joseph dealt with his brethren, will be repeated in a magnified way by the Lord's tender and loving dealing with the remnant of Judah when they come to speak to Him about the wounds in His hands, and to mourn over the way He was treated by them. ...
When Jacob prophetically blessed His sons, Joseph had a prominent place. Then the blessings of heaven and of the deep, of the breasts and of the womb, are multiplied on the head and on the crown of Joseph, as the one separated from his brethren: all foreshadowing, though to be far exceeded by, the many crowns and the glory in heaven and on earth of the true Nazarite, now sanctified in heavenly glory, the Lord Jesus. Joseph, when about to die, had faith that God would surely deliver Israel from Egypt and gave directions concerning his bones. For the Egyptian king under whom it is supposed that Joseph lived, see EGYPT. Joseph of Arimathaea, an honourable counsellor, and a rich man
Christ, Genealogy of - Saint Matthew's list is divided artificially into three equal parts of 14 names each, with several intentional omissions: from Abraham the father of the chosen people to David the king, to whose family the promise was made (2 Kings 7); David and the royal line after him to the Babylonian captivity; the descendants of the royal line from the captivity to Joseph, the legal father of Our Lord. Saint Luke proceeds in reverse order; he starts from Joseph and goes, beyond Abraham, back to Adam the father of the human race, in accord with the character of his Gospel; and he merely enumerates the names without grouping them according to a thesis or point, as is the case in Saint Matthew. , those between Abraham and David, then Salathiel and Zorobabel after the captivity, and Joseph the foster-father of Christ; the others are absent from Matthew's list, or the persons are different. Not a few authors hold that Saint Luke gives Mary's genealogy; but this view is more generally considered improbable, so that both lists are taken as giving Joseph's ancestry. The genealogies show His relationship to the royal family of Juda through Joseph, as it was only through the father, legal or natural, that the rights could be transmitted, and Joseph was the legal father of Jesus
Genealogy of Christ - Saint Matthew's list is divided artificially into three equal parts of 14 names each, with several intentional omissions: from Abraham the father of the chosen people to David the king, to whose family the promise was made (2 Kings 7); David and the royal line after him to the Babylonian captivity; the descendants of the royal line from the captivity to Joseph, the legal father of Our Lord. Saint Luke proceeds in reverse order; he starts from Joseph and goes, beyond Abraham, back to Adam the father of the human race, in accord with the character of his Gospel; and he merely enumerates the names without grouping them according to a thesis or point, as is the case in Saint Matthew. , those between Abraham and David, then Salathiel and Zorobabel after the captivity, and Joseph the foster-father of Christ; the others are absent from Matthew's list, or the persons are different. Not a few authors hold that Saint Luke gives Mary's genealogy; but this view is more generally considered improbable, so that both lists are taken as giving Joseph's ancestry. The genealogies show His relationship to the royal family of Juda through Joseph, as it was only through the father, legal or natural, that the rights could be transmitted, and Joseph was the legal father of Jesus
Joseph - "Now Israel loved Joseph more than all his children, because he was the son of his old age," and he "made him a long garment with sleeves" (Genesis 37:3 , RSV marg. When he was about seventeen years old Joseph incurred the jealous hatred of his brothers (Genesis 37:4 ). ...
Jacob desiring to hear tidings of his sons, who had gone to Shechem with their flocks, some 60 miles from Hebron, sent Joseph as his messenger to make inquiry regarding them. Joseph found that they had left Shechem for Dothan, whither he followed them. "The Lord blessed the Egyptian's house for Joseph's sake," and Potiphar made him overseer over his house. Each of these new prisoners dreamed a dream in the same night, which Joseph interpreted, the event occurring as he had said. ...
This led to Joseph's being remembered subsequently by the chief butler when Pharaoh also dreamed. At his suggestion Joseph was brought from prison to interpret the king's dreams. Pharaoh was well pleased with Joseph's wisdom in interpreting his dreams, and with his counsel with reference to the events then predicted; and he set him over all the land of Egypt (Genesis 41:46 ), and gave him the name of Zaphnath-paaneah. Joseph was now about thirty years of age. ...
As Joseph had interpreted, seven years of plenty came, during which he stored up great abundance of corn in granaries built for the purpose. These years were followed by seven years of famine "over all the face of the earth," when "all countries came into Egypt to Joseph to buy corn" (Genesis 41:56,57 ; 47:13,14 ). Thus "Joseph gathered up all the money that was in the land of Egypt, and in the land of Canaan, for the corn which they bought. ...
During this period of famine Joseph's brethren also came down to Egypt to buy corn. Joseph directed his brethren to return and bring Jacob and his family to the land of Egypt, saying, "I will give you the good of the land of Egypt, and ye shall eat the fat of the land. They were settled in the land of Goshen, where Joseph met his father, and "fell on his neck, and wept on his neck a good while" (Genesis 46:29 ). ...
Jacob at length died, and in fulfilment of a promise which he had exacted, Joseph went up to Canaan to bury his father in "the field of Ephron the Hittite" (Genesis 47:29-31 ; 50:1-14 ). This was the last recorded act of Joseph, who again returned to Egypt. ...
"The 'Story of the Two Brothers,' an Egyptian romance written for the son of the Pharaoh of the Oppression, contains an episode very similar to the Biblical account of Joseph's treatment by Potiphar's wife. ' The name given to Joseph, Zaphnath-paaneah, is probably the Egyptian Zaf-nti-pa-ankh, 'nourisher of the living one,' i. " ...
By his wife Asenath, Joseph had two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50 ). Joseph having obtained a promise from his brethren that when the time should come that God would "bring them unto the land which he sware to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob," they would carry up his bones out of Egypt, at length died, at the age of one hundred and ten years; and "they embalmed him, and he was put in a coffin" (Genesis 50:26 ). With the death of Joseph the patriarchal age of the history of Israel came to a close. ...
The Pharaoh of Joseph's elevation was probably Apepi, or Apopis, the last of the Hyksos kings. Some, however, think that Joseph came to Egypt in the reign of Thothmes III. ...
The name Joseph denotes the two tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh in Deuteronomy 33:13-17 ; the kingdom of Israel in Ezekiel 37:16,19 , Amos 5:6 ; and the whole covenant people of Israel in Psalm 81:4 . " Pilate having ascertained from the centurion that the death had really taken place, granted Joseph's request, who immediately, having purchased fine linen (Mark 15:46 ), proceeded to Golgotha to take the body down from the cross. There, assisted by Nicodemus, he took down the body and wrapped it in the fine linen, sprinkling it with the myrrh and aloes which Nicodemus had brought (John 19:39 ), and then conveyed the body to the new tomb hewn by Joseph himself out of a rock in his garden hard by
Abelmizraim - Meadow of the Egyptians; so called from the seven days' lamentation of Joseph and his company, on bringing up the body of Jacob from Egypt for burial, Genesis 50:10,11
Munich And Freising, Germany, Archdiocese of - Notable bishops include ...
Blessed Joseph of Freising
Pope Benedict XVI
See also ...
Catholic-Hierarchy
Statute - Joseph was able to create laws as a ruler in Egypt (Genesis 47:26 )
Already - ...
Joseph was in Egypt already
Genealogy of the Lord Jesus - The list in Luke is much fuller, having from David to Joseph forty-one names, where Matthew has only twenty-six. Jesus was 'supposed' or 'accounted' to be the son of Joseph, and 'Joseph was of Heli' without the word 'begat. ...
There is more difficulty as to the genealogy in Luke: is it the lineal line of Joseph or Mary? Women are never quoted as forming a line of succession, yet Christ is spoken of as the 'seed' of the woman, Genesis 3:15 ; 'come of woman,' Galatians 4:4 ; 'the seed of Abraham,' Hebrews 2:16 ; 'the seed of David according to flesh,' Romans 1:3 ; 2 Timothy 2:8 ; 'the offspring of David. And as the Lord was not really the son of Joseph, these scriptures can only be fulfilled through His mother, who must have been a lineal descendant of David and Abraham. In accordance with the above it will be seen that Matthew in speaking of the birth of the Lord frequently mentions Joseph, seldom Mary; whereas Luke frequently mentions Mary, but seldom Joseph
Asenath - Daughter of Potipherah, prince priest of On; Joseph's wife; mother of Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 41:50; Genesis 46:20). If it be the Hebrew name assumed on her conversion (as (See BITHIAH means "daughter of Jehovah") and union with Joseph, it may be from asan , "a storehouse," in allusion to Joseph's national service, and Ephraim's name meaning "fruitfulness". The marriage into this idolatrous family seems to have borne evil fruit afterward in the idolatry of Joseph's descendants, Ephraim, and the calf worship. Foreigners had been raised to high rank by Pharaohs of the early empire; Joseph, as Abraham's descendant, would be regarded as of noble birth, and be admitted, especially at the command of an absolute king, into alliance with the haughty priest caste. However, as it is not represented in the monuments until the 19th dynasty, long after Joseph, he probably first introduced it
Genealogy - One, or perhaps two, levirate marriages in the family of Joseph—i. That Matthew gives the legal or royal genealogy of Joseph, Luke the private line of Joseph. That Matthew gives the genealogy of Joseph, Luke the genealogy of Mary
Genesis - It includes a period of near two thousand four hundred years, from the beginning of the world to the death of Joseph
Saint Louis, Missouri, Archdiocese of - Suffragan dioceses include ...
Jefferson City, Missouri
Kansas City-Saint Joseph, Missouri
Springfield-Cape Girardeau, Missouri
See also ...
Catholic-Hierarchy
Zaph'Nath-pa-Ane'ah, - a name given by Pharaoh to Joseph
Juda - Son of Joanna, and son of Joseph, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Josephus, Catholicos of Armenia - Josephus (2), catholicos of Armenia (Le Quien, Or. Joseph was one of the band of Armenian scholars trained under Mesrob and Isaac the Great and afterwards in the schools of Athens and Constantinople. The name of Joseph, bp. This seems Joseph's first appearance in these events. Exasperated by that bold manifesto, the king ordered the leading Armenian princes to appear before him, and they, depositing a confession of their faith with Joseph, obeyed (ib. On behalf of his distressed country Joseph appealed to the emperor Theodosius II. The Armenian Christians nevertheless assembled in arms, 60,000 in number, among them Joseph, Leontius the priest, many other priests and a multitude of deacons. Joseph and Leontius, when about to be put to death, asked to be sent to the king, hoping to make terms for their people. Thus much Elisha relates of Joseph in his 7th chap. 455) and on the 25th of the month Hroditz, the patriarch Joseph, Sahag, bp
Joseph - THE LORD WAS WITH Joseph...
JOSEPH, the future ruler of Egypt, was tlie late-born and the greatly-beloved son of Jacob and Rachel. Joseph inherited all his mother's proverbial gracefulness and sweetness and attractive beauty. And then Joseph's intellectual gifts were such that, taken along with the purity and the nobility of his character, they lifted him up out of a pit, and out of a prison, and set him in a seat of power and of honour scarcely second to the seat of Pharaoh himself. At the same time Joseph climbed up to that high seat through many great risks and out of many great sufferings; and he ran some of the greatest of those risks at the hand of his too-doting father. Were it not that our own hearts so continually condemn us, we would turn on Jacob with indignation for his mischievous treatment of Joseph. Can Jacob have forgotten the sea of trouble into which his father's favouritism, and his mother's indulgence, cast both themselves and their children? The woful harvest of all that long past folly is still making both Jacob's life and many other lives as bitter as death to this day; and vet here is Jacob poisoning the whole of his family life also, and spoiling Joseph, just as Isaac and Rebekah had spoiled and poisoned their own and their children's lives when Jacob and Esau were still their children. We would denounce Jacob for his insane treatment of Joseph were it not that we are all ourselves repeating sins and follies every day from which we and our families have suffered for generations. ...
Joseph's coat of many colours was like to have been his winding-sheet, such was the envy and the hatred of his half-brothers at Rachel's well-favoured, richly-talented, and over-ornamented son. The patriarchs, moved with envy, says Stephen in the Acts, sold Joseph into Egypt And Jacob, on his death-bed, when he was blessing Joseph, said of him that the archers had hated him, and had shot their arrows at him, and had sorely wounded him. It is usual for mankind, says Josephus on the text, to envy their nearest relatives and their best friends for their eminence and for their prosperity. Some other fond father will soon begin to clothe his spoiled son in a coat full of more and more brilliant colours than Joseph's coat; till Joseph's coat will be so eclipsed that he also will join the archers' ranks, and will shoot at his rival with their envious arrows. To whom else can such an eye as that bo taken? Let him lift his so sorely stung eye up to Joseph's God. Shut your door on God and yourself, and on your knees ask Him still to add to your brother's goodliness, and to his talents, and to his honour, and to his happiness, and to his usefulness; if only He will anoint your eyes with enough love, and if only He will take out of your eyes that same evil light that glanced so murderously in the patriarchs' eyes as often as they again saw Joseph in his shining coat. Importune Him to enable you to love Joseph, till you enjoy, as if they were your own, those so many and so shining colours of his coat. ...
Joseph was only seventeen years old when his two so intoxicating dreams came to him. You must always recall Joseph's unripe age, and his complete inexperience, before you blame him too much for the way he talked about his prerogatives and prospects of greatness. The time will come when all Joseph's splendid achievements, and all his matchless honour and glory, will not make Joseph open a lip about himself. And thus it was that Joseph's future modesty, and humility, and self-command, and knowledge of other men's hearts, and thoughtfulness for other men's feelings and temptations, had not yet begun to come to him. Had Joseph been but a little older, and had he been but once or twice at Dothan, he would have hidden his dreams in his heart like so many guilty secrets. And, like Joseph, till we are well past seventeen, and have been for some time away from home, we talk about nothing else but our own dreams also. And it came to pass that they stripped Joseph of his coat, his coat of many colours, that was upon him. Is that another subtlety of Moses? Does Moses insinuate that Joseph's brothers had never till now sat down to eat bread in entire peace since the day that Joseph began to dream? With all their faults, Joseph would have been eating bread at that moment with the patriarchs but for his spotted coat and his irrepressible dreams. Whether it is pride-I sometimes think it is; or whether it is scorn of their company-as it may well be; or whether it is absence of mind, or age, or experience, or knowledge of the hearts of men, till they will not commit themselves to men, I am sometimes divided; but, be it what it may, I never yet saw either of them take up a single moment of Joseph's time. And there is a golden mean in this matter also, if Joseph from the one side, and my two friends from the other side, could only strike it. ...
That dreadful pit in Dothan was the beginning of Joseph's salvation. The first night he spent in that pit recalled to Joseph's mind what his father had often told him of his first night from home, as also of that other night at the Jabbok. And as Joseph lay in that horrible pit, and dreamed and prayed, behold, the very same ladder of Bethel is let down into the bottom of the pit. ' And, all that night after, Joseph could think of nothing else but the sins of his youth; his vanity, his proud superiority and superciliousness to his brothers, his evil reports concerning his brothers, his talkativeness about himself, and all the temptations and provocations into which he had led his brothers. That deep pit was brimful of such remorseful thoughts and prayers, when Judah appeared at its mouth with cords and grappling irons to draw Joseph up to the daylight. But it was only to kill him with a far worse death; for that morning Joseph was sold to the Midianite slave-dealers of Egypt for twenty pieces of silver. Twenty pieces of silver was Joseph's whole price that day in Dothan. Those who know Joseph's after-history will flash forward their minds, and will contrast the Prime Minister of Pharaoh with that slave lad sold for that paltry price at the mouth of that pit that day. And, tomorrow, when you buy an apprentice, or a message boy, of his widowed mother for five shillings a week, think of Joseph for a moment, and say to yourself, Who knows what the future may have in store for my message boy and for me? Who knows how I may go down, while he goes up? Who knows the talents of God that may lie hidden in that friendless buy? Who knows what place he may be predestined to fill in the church and in the world? And even if he comes to nothing of all that; if he never becomes a great man, yet, even so, such thoughts, such imaginations, such forecasts will help you to treat him well, and will help to make you a good man and a good master, whatever your slave-boy may come, or may not come, to be. ...
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The good work that the pit in Dothan began in Joseph, those still more terrible days and nights on the way down to Egypt carried on. Lashed to the loaded side of a huge cane-waggon, and himself loaded with the baggage of Gilead for the Egyptian market, Joseph toiled on under the mid-day sun, thankful to be left alone of his churlish masters in the red-hot air. Put yourself in Joseph's place. But you must add this to the picture, else you will not have the picture complete: 'The Lord was with Joseph, and Joseph found grace in the sight of the Lord. ' Yes, the Lord was more with Joseph, more and better far, than ever He had been as long as Joseph was the spoiled child of his father, and the continual snare of his brothers. And there are young men in this city suffering hardships and persecutions in workshops and in offices as sore to bear as was Joseph's load of labour and ill-usage of the Ishmaelites. And as they silently and prayerfully take up their cross daily, and wait out the will of God, they are thereby putting off a past that would have been their sure destruction-and had almost been-and are preparing themselves for a future as sure, and as full of the providence of God, as ever was Joseph's future. For that handful of silver the captain of Pharaoh's guard came into possession of all the splendid talents that lay hid in Joseph's greatly gifted mind, and all the magnificent moral character the first foundations of which had been laid in the pit in Dothan, and had been built up in God every step of the long wilderness journey. All Joseph's deep repentance also, and all his bitter remorse; all his self-discovery, and all his self-condemnation; with all his reticence and all his continence,-Potiphar took all that home from the slave-market that day in exchange for his handful of Egyptian silver. Joseph was now to be plunged into the most corrupt society that rotted in that age on the face of the earth. And had he not come into that pollution straight out of a sevenfold furnace of sanctifying sorrow, Joseph would no more have been heard of. But his father's God was with Joseph. The lord was with Joseph to protect him, to guide him, and to give him the victory. The Lord was with him to more imprisonment, and then to more promotion; to more and more honour, and place, and power, till this world had no more to bestow upon Joseph. And, through it all, Joseph became a better and an ever better man all his days
Afraid - ...
Joseph was afraid to sin against God
Achim - —An ancestor of Joseph, according to the genealogy of our Lord in St
Heli - ...
Another Heli is mentioned in the New Testament (Luke 3) as the father of Saint Joseph in accordance with the levirate law, though in reality he was his uncle
Machir - Joseph had Machir's children upon his knees (Genesis 50:23), i. they were adopted by Joseph from their birth
Aven - It appears, however, highly probable, by the behaviour of Pharaoh to Joseph and Jacob, and especially by Joseph's care to preserve the land to the priests, Genesis 47:22-26 , that the true religion prevailed in Egypt in his time; and it is incredible that Joseph should have married the daughter of the priest of On, had that name among the Egyptians denoted only the material light; which, however, no doubt they, like all the rest of the world, idolized in after times, and to which we find a temple dedicated among the Canaanites, under this name, Joshua 7:2
Abel-Misraim - the floor of Atad, beyond the river Jordan, where Joseph, his brethren, and the Egyptians mourned for the death of Jacob, Genesis 50:11 . On this occasion the funeral procession was, at the command of Joseph, attended by "all the elders of Egypt, and all the servants of Pharaoh, and all his house, and the house of his brethren, chariots and horsemen, a very great company;" an affecting proof, as it has been remarked, of Joseph's simplicity and singleness of heart, which allowed him to give to the great men of Egypt, over whom he bore absolute rule, an opportunity of observing his own comparatively humble origin, by leading them in attendance upon his father's corpse to the valleys of Canaan, the modest cradle of his race, and to their simple burial places
Augustus - Augustus was the emperor who appointed the enrolment, Luke 2:1 , which obliged Joseph and the Virgin to go to Bethlehem, the place where the Messiah was to be born
Mattan - ...
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The son of Eleazar, and father of Jacob, who was the father of Joseph, the husband of the Virgin Mary (Matthew 1:15 )
Rachel - Originally childless, she eventually gave birth to Joseph and Benjamin, but died in the course of her second childbirth
Shaalbim - Held by the Amorites, but at last reduced to be tributary by the house of Joseph
Joseph - Joseph reported their evil doings to Jacob, early manifesting moral courage and right principle under temptation (Exodus 23:2). Jacob marked his love to Joseph by giving him a "coat of many colors" (ketonet pacim ), the distinctive mark of kings' daughters who were virgins (2 Samuel 13:18), strictly a long "tunic reaching to the extremities" or ankles. Jacob probably designed hereby to give Joseph, the firstborn of Rachel who, but for Laban's trick, was his rightful first wife as she was his dearest,the primogeniture forfeited by Reuben (1 Chronicles 5:1; Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:4). In the Antitype the Old Testament prophecies answer to Joseph's dreams; the Jewish rulers rejected Him, though knowing, yet practically knowing not, the prophecies concerning Him (Acts 13:27). So upon their father sending Joseph from the vale of Hebron in the S. Stephen and the apostles evidently contemplated Joseph as type of Jesus (Acts 7:9-14; Acts 3:13-18). ...
Joseph's readiness at his father's calls answers to the good Shepherd, the Son of God's volunteering to come securing our eternal welfare at the cost of His life (Psalms 40:6-7; John 10:11). Joseph's anguish of soul is noticed incidentally in the brothers' self reproach (Genesis 42:21). Affection for his father is a trait characterizing him throughout, even as the father loved him, so that at his supposed loss through a wild beast (his sons having sent him Joseph's tunic dipped in blood) Jacob refused to be comforted. " The Midianites sold Joseph to Potiphar ("one devoted to the royal house"; phar ), an eunuch, i. Potiphar controlled the king's prison (Genesis 39:20), which was in "the house of the captain of the guard" (Potiphar's successor according to some, but Potiphar, where also Joseph was prisoner (Genesis 40:3). ) Joseph at first "prospered" as Potiphar's steward ("Jehovah making all that he did to prosper in his hand"), supervising his gardens, lands, fisheries, and cattle. ...
Joseph's knowledge of flocks qualified him in some degree for the post, and his integrity made him trustworthy in it, so that his master felt he could safely entrust to his charge his household and all that he had, and "the Lord blessed the Egyptian's house for Joseph's sake" (as in Jacob's case, Genesis 30:27); Psalms 1:3. An Egyptian story, in the papyrus d'Orbiney in the British Museum, The Two Brothers, in later times, seems founded on that of Joseph, the elder brother's wife tempting the younger with almost the same words as Potiphar's wife used to Joseph. The story of Saneha in one of the oldest papyri records his elevation to high rank under a Pharaoh of the 12th dynasty, and his developing the resources of Egypt just as Joseph did. Potiphar's not putting Joseph to death implies that he did not feel sure of his wife's story, and half suspected Joseph might be innocent. ...
It cannot have been he but another who entrusted the prisoners to Joseph; for if Potiphar believed him innocent, as the committing of prisoners to him would imply, he would not have left him in prison. His doing so was providentially ordered for Joseph's elevation. Joseph's lettering, "the iron entering into his soul," is alluded to in Psalms 105:17-18. After a time the chief of Pharaoh's cupbearers (Hebrew), and the chief of his bakers or confectioners, were cast into prison by the king; the captain of the guard committed them as men of rank to Joseph's custody. The chief cupbearer forgot his promise and his benefactor Joseph (Amos 6:6); compare the Antitype, Psalms 31:12, He "remembered" the companion of His suffering (Luke 23:42). wind, called Joseph to the chief cupbearer's remembrance. ...
Having in vain consulted his magicians or "sacred scribes" (chartumim , "bearers of spells"; the "sorcerers" do not occur until Exodus 7:11), Pharaoh through Joseph learned the interpretation, that seven years of famine (doubtless owing to failure of the Nile's overflow) should succeed to and consume all the stores remaining from the seven plenteous years. ) Like Daniel in the great heathen worldking's court at the close of Israel's history, so Joseph at its beginning, in like circumstances and with like abstinence from fleshly indulgences, interprets the Gentile monarch's dreams; marking, the immeasurable superiority of the kingdom of God, even at its lowest point, to the world kingdoms. It is an undesigned mark of genuineness that Joseph is represented as "shaving" before entering Pharaoh's presence, for the Hebrew wore a beard, but the Egyptians cut it and the hair close, and represent on the monuments the idea of slovenliness or low birth by giving a beard to a man. ...
Joseph recommended the king to appoint a chief officer and subordinates to take up by taxation a fifth of the produce in the plenteous years against the famine years. The king raised Joseph as one" in whom the Spirit of God was," to be grand vizier over his house and his people, reserving the throne alone for himself. He put his signet ring (the names of the Pharaohs were always written in an elongated, signet like, ring) on Joseph's hand in token of delegated sovereignty, a gold chain about his neck, and arrayed him in the fine linen peculiar to the Egyptian priests; and made him ride in his second chariot, while the attendants cried "Abrech," ("Rejoice thou") (Egyptian), calling upon him to rejoice with all the people at his exaltation (Canon Cook, Speaker's Commentary) Pharaoh named Joseph "Zaphnath Paaneah. ...
Then Joseph, who shrank from adulterous lusts, in righteous retribution received pure wedded joys in union with Asenath ("devoted to Neith and Isis") daughter of Potipherah ("devoted to Ra, the sun god") priest of ON , Heliopolis or Bethshemesh (the city of the sun god), the religious capital. Pharaoh himself was invested with the highest sacerdotal dignity, and could remove all disqualifications, so as to enable Joseph to be allied to the proud and exclusive priest caste. Joseph probably drew Asenath to his own purer faith. Joseph certainly professed openly his religion without molestation (Genesis 42:18), and Pharaoh recognizes the God of Joseph and His Spirit as the true God (Genesis 41:32-38-39). ...
Like the Antitype (Luke 3:23), Joseph was 30 in entering on his public ministry, so that he was 13 years in Egypt, in Potiphar's house and in prison, before his elevation. not literally forgetting his relatives, for "his father" was uppermost in his affections; but has swallowed past sorrow in present joy; compare Psalms 90:15; Isaiah 65:16-17; Isaiah 61:7; Isaiah 62:4; Revelation 7:14-17; spiritually, Psalms 45:10); and Ephraim, "doubly fruitful," Joseph again attributing all to God, "God hath caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction" (compare Genesis 49:22; John 15:2 ff). (See EGYPT, on Joseph. )...
Apophis the last of the shepherd kings was supposed to be the Pharaoh over Joseph. But Apophis was not master of all Egypt, as Joseph's Pharaoh was. "Shepherds were an abomination" in Joseph's time, which could not have been the case under a shepherd king. Osirtasin I, the second king of the 12th dynasty, was perhaps Joseph's Pharaoh. Chnumhotep, Osirtasin's relative and favorite, is described upon the tombs of Benihassan as possessing the qualities so esteemed in Joseph "When years of famine occurred he plowed all the lands producing abundant food. " If he be Joseph's Pharaoh Joseph was just the minister to carry out his grand measures. Pharaoh's one reply to all was: "go to Joseph, what he saith to you, do" (compare the Antitype: John 6:45 ff; John 2:5). Joseph spoke roughly to his brethren, at once to avoid recognition and to bring them to repentance: "ye are spies, to see the nakedness (the assailable, because defenseless, points) of the land ye are come. ) Joseph bartered grain successively for the Egyptian money (the money was in the form of rings not coined but weighed), cattle and land, of which he retained only a fifth of the produce for Pharaoh and took nothing from the priests. Diodorus adds the warriors as possessing land, but this was the king's special favor to them and apparently after Joseph. ...
Not Joseph but Pharaoh it was who made the exception in behalf of the idolatrous priests, giving them grain without requiring their land (Genesis 47:22). Joseph's statesmanship appears in the policy adopted. Joseph's policy was to centralize power in the monarch's hands, a well ordered monarchy being the best in the existing state of Egypt to guard against the recurrence of famines by stores laid by systematically, and by irrigation in the absence of the Nile's overthrow, and by such like governmental works, instead of leaving all to the unthrifty and unenterprising cultivators. Joseph's brethren in replying as to their father and family kept up the old lie, "one is not. " Joseph required that one of them should fetch the youngest who was they said with his father, and kept them three days in ward, then let them take back grain for their households, but bound Simeon before their eyes as a hostage for their bringing Benjamin and so proving their truthfulness. As they had separated him from his father so he separated one from them, possibly the ringleader in their cruelty to Joseph (compare Genesis 34; Luke 2:19. ...
Joseph heard their self reproaching, remorseful cry, "we are verily guilty concerning our brother in that we saw . Joseph, though cherishing no revenge nay feeding his enemy when hungry (Romans 12:20), saw that temporary affliction was needed to bring them to penitence (Hosea 5:15; Job 36:8-9). divine guidance led Joseph to require Benjamin, the surest way of bringing Jacob and the whole family into their Egyptian house of bondage and training. Again they fulfilled the dream, bowing before Joseph twice to the earth. At dinner the Egyptians, dreading pollution from those who killed cows, which were sacred in Egypt, sat apart from the Hebrew, and Joseph sat alone according to his high rank. ...
Each was served separately; all were ranged according to age, but the youngest had five messes for their one sent from before Joseph. ) On the morrow, by putting his silver cup (bowl from which wine was poured into smaller cups) in Benjamin's sack, and sending his steward after them upon their leaving the city where Joseph lived, he elicited Judah's generous offer to be bondsman and so not bring his father's grey hairs with sorrow to the grave, bound up as Jacob's life was with Benjamin's. Joseph to keep up his disguise spoke as an Egyptian. Joseph could refrain no longer. Joseph soothes their remorse, "be not angry with yourselves, for God did send me before you to preserve life
Joseph Lister - Son of Joseph Jackson Lister who helped develop the compound microscope
Lister, Joseph - Son of Joseph Jackson Lister who helped develop the compound microscope
Maistre, Xavier de - Romance writer, brother of Count Joseph Marie de Maistre, born Chambery, France, 1763; died Saint Petersburg, Russia, 1852
Atad - ” Owner of threshing floor east of the Jordan River where Joseph stopped to mourn the death of his father before carrying Jacob's embalmed body across the Jordan to Machpelah for burial
Zaphhath Paaneah - Egyptian title of Joseph, Zfntanch; from zaf "corn food," nt "of," anch "life" (Genesis 41:45). " Not as Hebrew interpreters (Josephus e'Phra-im - (double fruitfulness ), the second son of Joseph by his wife Asenath
e'Phra-im - (double fruitfulness ), the second son of Joseph by his wife Asenath
e'Phra-im - (double fruitfulness ), the second son of Joseph by his wife Asenath
Dungeon - Joseph called his prison a dungeon, though perhaps it was not a pit
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Saint Vallier - Congregation founded in 1683 by Monsignor Jean Baptiste de la Croix with two sisters of Saint Joseph from Le Puy, who took charge of his hospital at Saint Vallier, France, where the mother-house is still located
e'Phra-im - (double fruitfulness ), the second son of Joseph by his wife Asenath
Matthias - ) The 120 disciples nominated ("appointed") two, Joseph Barsabas and Matthias, having the requirements. (See Joseph BARSABAS
Joseph of Arimathea - John 7:50-51), the other a man named Joseph who came from the Judean village of Arimathea (Luke 23:50-51; John 19:38-39). ...
Joseph was a just and righteous man, well respected, wealthy, and a follower of Jesus (Matthew 27:57; Mark 15:43; Luke 23:50)
Zelophehad - A descendant of Joseph, whose death in the wilderness, leaving five daughters and no sons, led to the establishment of a law that in such cases daughters should inherit the patrimony of their father; but they were not to marry out of their tribe, Numbers 26:33 27:1-11 Joshua 17:3,4
pi'Thom - (the city of justice ), one of the store-cites Israelites for the first oppressor, the Pharaoh "which knew not Joseph
Bilhah - He was deprived of the birth-right, which was given to the sons of Joseph
Reuben - His shining moment was when he dissuaded his brothers from killing Joseph before they sold him into slavery
Fetters - It is said of Joseph that his feet were hurt with fetters
Pithom - One of the store-cities built bythe Israelites for the Pharaoh 'who knew not Joseph
Abel-Mizraim - The place where Joseph and his company halted seven days in passing from Egypt to Canaan to bury Jacob
Dothan - Dothan is the area to which Joseph traveled to find his brothers (Genesis 37:17 ). From there, Joseph was sold to a caravan of Ishmaelites and carried to Egypt, following an ancient trade route over the Plain of Dothan to Egypt. ...
In 1953, excavations were begun by Joseph E
Dream - The most remarkable instances of this are recorded in the history of Jacob (Genesis 28:12 ; 31:10 ), Laban (31:24), Joseph (37:9-11), Gideon (Judges 7 ), and Solomon (1 Kings 3:5 ). To Joseph "the Lord appeared in a dream," and gave him instructions regarding the infant Jesus (Matthew 1:20 ; 2:12,13,19 )
Shuthelah - Hervey, viewing 1 Chronicles 7 as corrupt, restores the line of Shuthelah thus:...
(1) Joseph;...
(2) Ephraim;...
(3) Shuthelah;...
(4) Eran or Laadan;...
(5) Ammihud;...
(6) Elishama, captain of Ephraim (Numbers 1:10);...
(7) Nun;...
(8) Joshua. The Ephraim who mourned for his sons Ezer and Elead was not the patriarch son of Joseph, but a descendant who bore Ephraim's name
Pit - It was into such a dry cistern that Joseph was cast
Cheyenne - A Catholic mission was founded among them, 1884, by Reverend Joseph Eyler, who brough with him a community of Ursulines
Mattithiah - ...
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The son of Amos, and father of Joseph, in the genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:25 )
Auriesville, New York - In 1884Father Joseph Loyzance, S
Saints, Patron - , Saint Joseph, Patron of the Universal Church, Francis Xavier, Catholic Missions, Camillus of Lellis, hospitals
after whom churches, parishes, or other institutions are named
after whom persons are named in Baptism or Confirmation
Chemistry - ...
Catholics ...
Jean Antoine Chaptal
Michel Eugene Chevreul
Henri Etienne Sainte-Claire-Deville
Jean Baptiste Dumas
Antoine Laurent Lavoisier
Theophrastus Paracelsus
Louis Pasteur
Pierre Joseph Pelletier
Theophile Jules Pelouze
Louis Jacques Thénard
Louis Nicolas Vauquelin
Other Christian Chemists ...
Johan Jacob Berzelius
Robert Boyle
John Dalton
Sir Humphry Davy
Charles Friedel
Martin Heinrich Klaproth
Justus von Liebig
William Henry Perkins
Joseph Priestley
William Ramsey
Ira Remsen
Christian Friedrich Schonbein
Charles Adolphe Wurtz
Judah - It was Judah that interposed in behalf of Joseph, so that his life was spared (Genesis 37:26,27 ). ...
Soon after the sale of Joseph to the Ishmaelites, Judah went to reside at Adullam, where he married a woman of Canaan
Atad - ) A trodden space for threshing, beyond Jordan, where Joseph and his brethren and the Egyptian retinue made for seven days "great and very sore lamentation" over the body of Jacob, whence the Canaanites called the place Abel Mizraim, "the mourning of the Egyptians. " The same route by which Joseph had been led captive was that by which the grand Egyptian procession doing honor to his deceased father proceeded
Simeon - Joseph kept Simeon bound in Egypt to ensure that he would see Benjamin (Genesis 42:24 ). When Joseph and Mary brought Jesus to the Temple for the purification rites, Simeon announced to them God's plan for the boy (Luke 2:34 )
Joseph - In this Scripture, Joseph is a type of CHRIST in that he is honored by his father and mother. ...
Genesis 43:3 (c) Here Joseph is a true type of GOD, the Judge, and Benjamin is a type of the Lord JESUS
Arimathea - This was likewise the native place of Joseph, called Joseph of Arimathea, who begged and obtained the body of Jesus from Pilate, ...
Matthew 26:57
Scolopii - A religious order founded in Rome in 1597 by Saint Joseph Calasanctius, to provide free education for poor children. In 1617 these two societies were separated and by a Brief; the Congregation of Saint Joseph Calasanctius was instituted, the members professing three simple vows
Betrothal - ...
New Testament Mary and Joseph were betrothed but did not live together until their wedding. When Mary came to be with child during betrothal, Joseph decided to quietly divorce her. In a dream from God, the apparent unfaithfulness of Mary was explained to Joseph as a miracle of the Holy Spirit
Abel-Mizraim - ) The threshingfloor of Atad; so called by the Canaanites, because it was the chief scene of the funeral laments of Joseph and his Egyptian retinue for Jacob (Genesis 50:4-11). The same route by which Joseph was led captive was, in the striking providence of God, that which they took to do honor to his deceased father, being the longer and more public way from Egypt to Canaan. " The phrase, "Joseph spake unto the house of Pharaoh" implies that Pharaoh and his estates in council decreed a state funeral for Jacob, in which the princes, nobles, and chief men of Egypt, with their pomp of chariots and equipages, took part
Ephraim - (a) Joseph�s second son
Arimathea - A "city of the Jews" (Luke 23:51 ), the birth-place of Joseph in whose sepulchre our Lord was laid (Matthew 27:57,60 ; John 19:38 )
Potipherah - Joseph married his daughter, Asenath, at the pharaoh's command (Genesis 41:45 )
Descry - The house of Joseph sent to descry Bethel
Arimathaea - The city of Joseph, the 'honourable counsellor,' who was permitted by Pilate to take down the body of the Lord and bury it in his own new to tomb
Rama - Site of the tomb of Rachel, mother of Joseph and Benjamin, who wept for her children "and would not be comforted" (Jeremias 31)
ju'da -
Son of Joseph, in the genealogy of Christ
Cupbearer, - (Nehemiah 1:11 ) The chief cupbearer, or butler, to the king of Egypt was the means of raising Joseph to his high position
Joseph - Stephen’s address before the Sanhedrin reference is made to Joseph’s being sold by his brothers, God’s presence with him in Egypt, his promotion to be governor of the land, his manifestation of himself to his brethren, his invitation to his father and all his kindred to migrate to Egypt (Acts 7:9-14), and finally, at a much later date, the rise of a Pharaoh who ‘knew not Joseph’ (7:18). Driver thinks it credible that an actual person, named Joseph, ‘underwent substantially the experiences recounted of him in Gn. ...
In Hebrews 11:21 allusion is made to the blessing received by Joseph’s two sons from his dying father. In Hebrews 11:22 Joseph is placed on the roll of the ‘elders’-saints of the OT-who by their words and deeds gave evidence of their faith. Joseph Barsabbas, surnamed Justus, was one of those who accompanied Jesus during His whole public ministry and witnessed His Resurrection. It is a natural conjecture-no more-that this Joseph was the brother of Judas Barsabbas (Acts 15:22). Joseph, surnamed Barnabas (Acts 4:36)
Egypt - ...
The story of Joseph gives a much more detailed picture of Egypt and the ambiguity of its role. Egypt is a place of oppression, as Joseph is initially enslaved, eventually ending up in prison. Egypt is also a place of hope and refuge as Joseph is raised to be second in the land. One of the themes of the Joseph story is that God is not restricted by national boundaries. He blesses the property of Potipher (and, by extension, Potipher himself) when Joseph is his overseer (Genesis 39:5 ). Egypt had a reputation as a place of wisdom, and Joseph appeals to this aura by calling on them to find a man "discerning and wise" (Genesis 41:33 ). Of course, Joseph is the man they need, one of the Wise, those who know the way the world works in both a divine and a human sense. ...
The place of wisdom, the land of refuge and hope, becomes the land of slavery when "a new king, who did not know about Joseph, came to power in Egypt" (Exodus 1:8 ). Matthew reports that Joseph was warned in a dream to take Jesus and his mother "and escape to Egypt" (Matthew 2:14 ). After the death of Herod, an angel tells Joseph to return to the land of Israel
Atad - Buckthorn, a place where Joseph and his brethren, when on their way from Egypt to Hebron with the remains of their father Jacob, made for seven days a "great and very sore lamentation
Hamor - He-ass, a Hivite from whom Jacob purchased the plot of ground in which Joseph was afterwards buried (Genesis 33:19 )
Belloc, Elizabeth Rayner Parkes - Great-granddaughter of Joseph Priestly, the discoverer of oxygen, and mother of Hilaire Belloc and Mrs
Shroud - After His crucifixion, Jesus' body was so buried by Joseph of Arimathea and the women disciples (Matthew 27:59-61 )
Manasseh - The eldest son of Joseph
a'Bel-Mizra'im - (meadow of Egypt ), the name given by the Canaanites to the floor of Atad, at which Joseph, his brothers and the Egyptians made their mourning for Jacob
Joseph - Joseph (in OT and Apocr. One of the sons of Bani who had married a foreign wife ( Ezra 10:42 ); called in 1Es 9:34 Josephus. In 2Ma 8:22 , and probably also 10:19, Joseph is read by mistake for John , one of the brothers of Judas Maccabæus. ...
Joseph. Joseph is the principal hero of the later chapters of Genesis, which are composed mainly of extracts from three documents. ...
At present the date of Joseph can be only provisionally fixed, as the account of his life neither mentions the name of the ruling Pharaoh nor refers to distinctive Egyptian manners or customs in such a way as to yield a clue to the exact period. 1275 1208); and if this be correct, the addition of the years of residence in Egypt ( Exodus 12:41 ) would bring Joseph’s term of office into the reign of the later Hyksos kings ( c
With the return of Jacob to Hebron (Genesis 35:27 ) he ceases to be the central figure of the story, and Joseph takes his place. ]'>[2] represents Judah as inducing his brothers to sell Joseph to a company of Ishmaelites; but E [3] makes Reuben a mediator, whose plans were frustrated by a band of Midianites, who had in the interval kidnapped Joseph and stolen him away ( Genesis 40:15 ). What became of Joseph they did not really know; and to protect themselves they manufactured the evidence of the blood-stained coat. ...
In Egypt, Joseph was bought by Potiphar, a court official, whose title makes him chief of the royal butchers and hence of the body-guard; and the alertness and trustworthiness of the slave led quickly to his appointment as major domo (Egyp. Everything prospered under Joseph’s management; but his comeliness and courtesy attracted the notice of his master’s wife, whose advances, being repelled, were transformed into a resentment that knew no scruples. By means of an entirely false charge she secured the removal of Joseph to the State prison, which was under the control of Potiphar ( Genesis 40:3 ), and where again he was soon raised to the position of overseer or under-keeper. Both were perplexed with dreams, which Joseph interpreted to them correctly. ’ Thereupon the chief butler recalled Joseph’s skill and his own indebtedness to him, and mentioned him to the Pharaoh, who sent for him, and was so impressed by his sagacity and foresight that exaltation to the rank of keeper of the royal seal followed, with a degree of authority that was second only to that of the throne. ...
So far as Egypt was concerned, Joseph’s policy was to store the surplus corn of the years of plenty in granaries, and afterwards so to dispose of it as to change the system of land-tenure. 304) reports an inscription, coinciding in age approximately with that of Joseph, and referring to a famine lasting ‘many years,’ during which a distribution of corn was made. This has been doubtfully identified with Joseph’s famine. Other inscriptions of the kind occur, and are sufficient to authenticate the fact of prolonged famines, though not to yield further particulars of the one with which Joseph had to deal. Instead of regarding the arrangement as a precedent to be followed in different states of civilization, ground has been found in it for charging Joseph with turning the needs of the people into an occasion for oppressing them; and certainly the effect upon the character and subsequent condition of the people was not favourable. ) the land was owned by the kings, the priests, and the members of a military caste; and it is not likely that the system introduced by Joseph lasted long after his death. On their arrival they secured an interview with Joseph, and prostrated themselves before him ( Genesis 37:7 , Genesis 42:6 ); but in the grown man, with his shaven face [10] and Egyptian dress, they entirely failed to recognize their brother. The rough accusation that they were spies in search of undefended ways by which the country might be invaded from the east, on which side lines of posts and garrisons were maintained under two at least of the dynasties, aroused their fears, and an attempt was made to allay Joseph’s suspicions by detailed information. Joseph catches at the opportunity of discovering the truth concerning Benjamin, and, after further confirming in several ways the apprehensions of his brothers, retains one as a hostage in ward and sends the others home. In Egypt the sons were received courteously, and invited to a feast in Joseph’s house, where they were seated according to their age ( Genesis 43:33 ), and Benjamin was singled out for the honour of a special ‘mess’ (cf. They set out homewards in high spirits, unaware that Joseph had directed that each man’s money should be placed in his sack, and his own divining-cup of silver ( Genesis 44:5 ; the method of divination was hydromancy an article was thrown into a vessel of water, and the movements of the water were thought to reveal the unknown) in that of Benjamin. Overtaken at almost their first halting-place, they were charged with theft, and returned in a body to Joseph’s house. His reproaches elicited a frank and pathetic speech from Judah, after which Joseph could no longer maintain his incognito . Joseph’s household and brothers flourished during the seventeen years ( Genesis 47:27 f. Before his death he blessed Joseph’s two sons, giving preference to the younger in view of the greatness of the tribe to be derived from him, and leaving to Joseph himself one portion above his brethren, viz. 72), Joseph buried his father with great pomp in the cave of Machpelah, and cheered his brothers by a renewed promise to nourish and help them. ...
Of the general historicity of the story of Joseph there need be no doubt. Joseph’s own character, as depicted, shows no traces of constructive art, but is consistent and singularly attractive. ...
Joseph (in NT). Every Jew kept a record of his lineage, and was very proud if he could claim royal or priestly descent; and Joseph could boast himself ‘a son of David’ ( Matthew 1:20 ). He was betrothed to Mary, a maiden of Nazareth, being probably much her senior, though the tradition of the apocryphal History of Joseph that he was in his ninety-third year and she in her fifteenth is a mere fable. Joseph never appears in the Gospel story after the visit to Jerusalem when Jesus had attained the age of twelve years and become ‘a son of the Law’ ( Luke 2:41-51 ); and since Mary always appears alone in the narratives of the public ministry, it is a reasonable inference that he had died during the interval. Joseph of Arimathæa. It was common for friends of the crucified to purchase their bodies, which would else have been cast out as refuse, a prey to carrion birds and beasts, and give them decent burial; and Joseph would offer Pilate his price; in any case he obtained the body ( Mark 15:45 ). Joseph had a garden close to Calvary, where he had hewn a sepulchre in the rock for his own last resting-place; and there, aided by Nicodemus, he laid the body swathed in clean linen ( Matthew 27:57-61 = Mark 15:42-47 = Luke 23:50-56 = John 19:38-42 ). Joseph Barsabbas , the disciple who was nominated against Matthias as successor to Judas in the Apostolate
Medical Science - The science comprising: ...
anatomy, which treats of organic structure
bacteriology, the science of bacteria
cytology, the spience of cell organisms
embryology, which treats of the early development of organisms
hygiene, which treats of health improvement and preservation
physiology, which deals with the functions and processes of living organisms
surgery
The following names are distinguished in the various branches of the science: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Bedford, Gunning Samuel
Bernard, Claude
Caldani, Leopoldo Marco Antonio
Carnoy, Jean Baptiste
Dwight, Thomas
Eustachius, Bartolomeo
Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Hieronymus
Fallopio, Gabriello
Laennec, Rene Theophile Hyacinthe
Larrey, Baron Dominique Jean
Malpighi, Marcello
Morgagni, Giovanni Battista
Müller, Johannes Peter
Nelaton, Auguste
Noble, Daniel
O'Dwyer, Joseph
Paracelsus, Theophrastus
Renaudot, Theophraste
Schwann, Theodor
Semmelweiss, Ignaz Philipp
Skoda, Josef
Spallanzani, Lazzaro
Steno, Nicolaus
Vesalius, Andreas
OTHER CHRISTIANS ...
Baglivi, Giorgio
Bell, Charles
Boerhaave, Hermann
Cooper, Astley Paston
Flourens, Marie Jean Pierre
Hahnemann, Christian Friedrich Samuel
Hall, Marshall
Haller, Albrecht von
Harvey, William
Hufeland, Christoph Wilhelm
Hyrtl, Josef
Koch, Heinrich Hermann Robert
Lister, Joseph
Paget, James
Simpson, James Young
Vierordt, Karl von
Volkmann, Alfred Wilhelm
Wagner, Rudolph
Simeon - He was detained by Joseph in Egypt as a hostage (42:24). ...
...
One of the ancestors of Joseph (Luke 3:30 )
Dothan - ) At it Joseph was put into a well pit (from whence it derived its name) become dry, and afterward sold to Ishmaelite merchants who traveled that route between Syria and Egypt (Genesis 37:17); near Shechem. Into such a pit doubtless Joseph was cast here
Archer - Genesis 49:23 (a) The word is used here to represent the ten brothers of Joseph and also Potiphar's wife and other enemies who sought to injure and in fact to kill Joseph
Science, Medical - The science comprising: ...
anatomy, which treats of organic structure
bacteriology, the science of bacteria
cytology, the spience of cell organisms
embryology, which treats of the early development of organisms
hygiene, which treats of health improvement and preservation
physiology, which deals with the functions and processes of living organisms
surgery
The following names are distinguished in the various branches of the science: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Bedford, Gunning Samuel
Bernard, Claude
Caldani, Leopoldo Marco Antonio
Carnoy, Jean Baptiste
Dwight, Thomas
Eustachius, Bartolomeo
Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Hieronymus
Fallopio, Gabriello
Laennec, Rene Theophile Hyacinthe
Larrey, Baron Dominique Jean
Malpighi, Marcello
Morgagni, Giovanni Battista
Müller, Johannes Peter
Nelaton, Auguste
Noble, Daniel
O'Dwyer, Joseph
Paracelsus, Theophrastus
Renaudot, Theophraste
Schwann, Theodor
Semmelweiss, Ignaz Philipp
Skoda, Josef
Spallanzani, Lazzaro
Steno, Nicolaus
Vesalius, Andreas
OTHER CHRISTIANS ...
Baglivi, Giorgio
Bell, Charles
Boerhaave, Hermann
Cooper, Astley Paston
Flourens, Marie Jean Pierre
Hahnemann, Christian Friedrich Samuel
Hall, Marshall
Haller, Albrecht von
Harvey, William
Hufeland, Christoph Wilhelm
Hyrtl, Josef
Koch, Heinrich Hermann Robert
Lister, Joseph
Paget, James
Simpson, James Young
Vierordt, Karl von
Volkmann, Alfred Wilhelm
Wagner, Rudolph
Pharaoh Pharaohis Daughter - In biblical history several Pharaohs are met with, especially in connexion with Abraham, Joseph, and Moses. Stephen proves God’s care for Joseph and Moses by the confidence Pharaoh placed in the former, and the protection given to the latter by the daughter of the reigning king
Foreign Mission Sisters of Saint Dominic (Maryknol - A congregation founded by Mother Mary Joseph, O
Flight Into Egypt - After the departure of the wise men, the angel of the Lord told Joseph to fiy into Egypt with the Infant Jesus and His mother, as Herod had evil designs against them; there they remained until the death of Herod (Matthew 2)
Nuts - These nuts were among the good things sent to Joseph by his father. Josephus and others speak of the walnut tree growing in Palestine
Barsabas - Joseph, also called JUSTUS, who was nominated with Matthias as suitable to fill the place of Judas Iscariot
Hamor - Prince of the Hivites and father of Shechem, of whose family Jacob bought a piece of ground in which Joseph was buried
Barsabas - The surname of Joseph, also surnamed Justus, one of the first disciples of Christ
Egypt, Flight Into - After the departure of the wise men, the angel of the Lord told Joseph to fiy into Egypt with the Infant Jesus and His mother, as Herod had evil designs against them; there they remained until the death of Herod (Matthew 2)
do'Than - (two wells ), a place first mentioned ( Genesis 37:17 ) in connection with the history of Joseph, and apparently as in the neighborhood of Shechem
Tribes of Israel - ]'>[2] ’s genealogy (Genesis 29:1-35 ; Genesis 30:1-43 ), is not 12 but 13, and in the following order:...
Leah tribes Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah 4 Bilhah (Rachel) tribes Dan, Naphtali 2 Zilpah (Leah) tribes Gad, Asher 2 Leah tribes Issachar, Zebulun 2 Rachel tribes Joseph = (Manasseh, Ephraim) 2 Benjamin (born in Palestine), Genesis 35:18 1 13 To obtain the number 12 from this scheme it is necessary to omit Levi, or to count Manasseh and Ephraim as one. Joseph is younger than the others because it entered and settled in Canaan later than Simeon, Levi, and Judah, etc. , and Genesis 34:1-31 , which shows Joseph in possession of the region of Shechem, formerly occupied by Simeon and Levi. The mothers, Leah and Rachel, represent different tribal groups at the head of which stand respectively Reuben and Joseph ( 1 Chronicles 5:1-2 ). History, however, gives us no record of Reuben’s priority in leadership, but assigns that rôle to Joseph, so that the primacy of the Reuben tribe must go back to an earlier time and to the East Jordan. It is possible that the tribes which entered Canaan under Reuben’s leadership, or during his supremacy, were classed under Leah, while those which followed under the lead of Joseph were classed under Rachel. The position of Issachar and Zebulun indicates that they were later in acquiring a foothold than the four earlier Leah tribes, yet earlier than Joseph. The position assigned to the Bilhah and Zilpah tribes, Guthe thinks, may be explained by their having come into closer relations to Joseph, and to Reuben or the last of the two Leah tribes respectively, and hence their mothers were given as handmaids to Rachel and Leah
Brothers, Jesus - Their names appear again in the parallel passage of Matthew 13:55 , except Joseph is used as the alternate spelling of Joses (see NAS). It claims that Jesus' brothers were the sons of Joseph by an earlier marriage. Mary and Joseph then had four sons in the way all humans normally do
Joseph - The history of Joseph is so fully and consecutively given by Moses, that it is not necessary to abridge so familiar an account. Blunt for the veracity of the account drawn from the identity of Joseph's character, will be read with pleasure:—I have already found an argument for the veracity of Moses in the identity of Jacob's character, I now find another in the identity of that of Joseph. When the bloody garment was brought in, Jacob in his affection for him,—that same affection which, on a subsequent occasion, when it was told him that after all Joseph was alive, made him as slow to believe the good tidings as he was now quick to apprehend the sad; in this his affection for him, I say, Jacob at once concluded the worst, and "he rent his clothes and put sackcloth upon his loins, and mourned for his son many days, and all his daughters rose up to comfort him; but he refused to be comforted, and he said, For I will go down into the grave unto my son mourning. "...
Now, what were the feelings in Joseph which responded to these? When the sons of Jacob went down to Egypt, and Joseph knew them, though they knew not him; for they, it may be remarked, were of an age not to be greatly changed by the lapse of years, and were still sustaining the character in which Joseph had always seen them; while he himself had meanwhile grown out of the stripling into the man, and from a shepherd boy was become the ruler of a kingdom; when his brethren thus came before him, his question was, "Is your father yet alive?" Genesis 43:7 . Joseph's firmness forsook him at this repeated mention of his father, and in terms so touching: he could not refrain himself any longer; and, causing every man to go out, he made himself known to his brethren. " How natural was it now for his brethren to think that the tie by which alone they could imagine Joseph to be held to them was dissolved, that any respect he might have felt or feigned for them must have been buried in the cave of Machpelah, and that he would now requite to them the evil they had done! "And they sent a messenger unto Joseph, saying, Thy father did command before he died, saying, So shall ye say unto Joseph, Forgive, I pray thee now, the trespass of thy brethren, and their sin; for they did unto thee evil. It is not the constancy with which the son's strong affection for his father had lived through an interval of twenty years' absence, and, what is more, through the temptation of sudden promotion to the highest estate;—it is not the noble- minded frankness with which he still acknowledges his kindred, and makes a way for them, "shepherds" as they were, to the throne of Pharaoh himself;—it is not the simplicity and singleness of heart which allow him to give all the first-born of Egypt, men over whom he bore absolute rule, an opportunity of observing his own comparatively humble origin, by leading them in attendance upon his father's corpse to the valleys of Canaan and the modest cradle of his race;—it is not, in a word, the grace, but the identity of Joseph's character, the light in which it is exhibited by himself, and the light in which it is regarded by his brethren, to which I now point as stamping it with marks of reality not to be gainsayed. ...
Some writers have considered Joseph as a type of Christ; and it requires not much ingenuity to find out some resemblances, as his being hated by his brethren, sold for money, plunged into deep affliction, and then raised to power and honour, &c; but as we have no intimation in any part of Scripture that Joseph was constituted a figure of our Lord, and that this was one design of recording his history at length, all such applications want authority, and cannot safely be indulged. Joseph, the husband of Mary, and reputed father of Jesus, was the son of Jacob, and grandson of Matthan, Matthew 1:15-16 . It is probable that Joseph died before Christ entered upon his public ministry; for upon any other supposition we are at a loss to account for the reason why Mary, the mother of Jesus, is frequently mentioned in the evangelic narrative, while no allusion is made to Joseph; and, above all, why the dying Saviour should recommend his mother to the care of the beloved disciple John, if her husband had been then living, John 19:25-27 . Joseph OF ARIMATHEA, a Jewish senator, and a believer in the divine mission of Jesus Christ, John 19:38
Chain - A chain of precious metal was worn as a sign of rank, as by Joseph and Daniel, or purely as an ornament
Balm, - Jacob sent a little to Joseph
Nicodemus - At the time when the priests and Pharisees had sent officers to seize Jesus, Nicodemus declared himself openly in his favour, John 7:45 , &c; and still more so when he went with Joseph of Arimathea to pay the last duties to his body, which they took down from the cross, embalmed, and laid in a sepulchre
Separatists - Many of its members emigrated to America in 1817 under the leadership of Joseph Bliumeler and settled at Zoar, Ohio
Sisters of Saint Joseph of Annecy - A province of the Sisters of Saint Joseph, established in England, Scotland, France, Switzerland, and India, with mother-house at Annecy, France
Shaving - Hence Joseph shaved before he was presented to Pharaoh, Genesis 41:14
Manger - 103, states that "Joseph lodged in a cave near Bethlehem. The upper platform, reached by steps, was probably occupied by the inn and its occupants; the lower level, from which the steps arose, was usually appropriated to cattle and goats, and on this occasion was used by Joseph and Mary on account of the crowded state of the regular inn or khan
Embalming - When Jacob died in Egypt, "Joseph commanded his servants, the physicians, to embalm his father, for burial in Canaan. Joseph also was himself embalmed, that his body might be carried with the children of Israel when they left Egypt for Palestine
Juda - ...
...
Son of Joanna, and father of Joseph in Christ's maternal ancestry (26), probably identical with Abiud (Matthew 1:13 ), and with Obadiah (1 Chronicles 3:21 )
Institute of Presentation Brothers - The mother-house is at Mount Saint Joseph, Cork, Ireland
Nicodemus - Nicodemus was a member of the Sanhedrin, and finally became a follower of Christ, and came with Joseph of Arimathæa to take down and embalm the body of Jesus
Luz - A city in the land of the Hittites which a man founded after showing the tribe of Joseph how to conquer Bethel ( Judges 1:26 )
Virgin, Virgin Birth - Mary was a young woman betrothed (engaged) to Joseph. ...
Matthew gave the account from the viewpoint of Joseph. Joseph planned to divorce her without public scandal. Only then did God reveal to Joseph that the child was conceived through the Holy Spirit. An angel appeared to her while she was still a virgin betrothed to Joseph. ...
Some believe the New Testament teaches that Mary remained a virgin, but it appears that she and Joseph had several children after the birth of Jesus: James, Joses, Judas, Simon, and sisters (Mark 6:3 ). Adherents of Mary's perpetual virginity believe Mark was referring to children of Joseph by a first marriage. See Ahaz ; Christ; Divorce ; Incarnation ; Isaiah ; Jesus; Joseph ; Maid; Marys of the Bible; Messiah
Dreams, Interpretation of - , Jacob's ladder dream (Genesis 28) and that of Saint Joseph on the flight of the Holy Family into Egypt (Matthew 2), still dreams generally arise from merely natural causes and convey no knowledge beyond what could be obtained from other natural sources
Interpretation of Dreams - , Jacob's ladder dream (Genesis 28) and that of Saint Joseph on the flight of the Holy Family into Egypt (Matthew 2), still dreams generally arise from merely natural causes and convey no knowledge beyond what could be obtained from other natural sources
Camel, George Joseph - Kamel, George Joseph (1661-1706) Botanist, born Brünn, Moravia; died Manila, Philippines
Kamel, George Joseph - Kamel, George Joseph (1661-1706) Botanist, born Brünn, Moravia; died Manila, Philippines
Ishmaelite - The people to whom Joseph was sold by his brothers are called Ishmaelites in Genesis 37:25
Rava - 352) Talmudic sage, student of Rav Nahman, Rav Sheshet, and Rav Joseph
Bough - Genesis 49:22 (a) This is a picture of the blessed and fruitful influence of Joseph in the life of all nations when he was governor of Egypt
Chains - as the insignia, of office: Joseph and Daniel were invested with gold chains
Embalm - Joseph commanded his servants, the physicians, to embalm his father and the physicians embalmed Israel
Espousals of the Blessed Virgin Mary - Formerly a feast celebrated on January 23, in honor of the Blessed Virgin's espousal to Saint Joseph
Dothan - Where Joseph found his brethren, Genesis 37:17, and Elisha resided
Barsabas - Joseph Barsabas, surnamed The Just, was one of Christ's early disciples, and probably among the seventy
Refrain - ...
Then Joseph could not refrain himself before all them that stood by
George Kamel - Kamel, George Joseph (1661-1706) Botanist, born Brünn, Moravia; died Manila, Philippines
Sisters of the Most Precious Blood (o'Fallon) - The institute has parochial schools and an academy in the Archdiocese of Saint Louis and the dioceses of Lincoln, Omaha, Springfield, and Saint Joseph
Nicode'Mus - He finally became a follower of Christ, and came with Joseph of Arimathaea to take down and embalm the body of Jesus
Brother - ) were probably the younger children of Joseph and Mary. Some have supposed that they may have been the children of Joseph by a former marriage, and others that they were the children of Mary, the Virgin's sister, and wife of Cleophas
Potiphar - Genesis 39:1-23 , a high Egyptian official in the story of Joseph. Joseph was sold to Potiphar, on whose wife’s accusation he was cast into the king’s prison (in Potiphar’s own house), to which Pharaoh afterwards committed his chief butler and chief baker. In the passage Genesis 41:45 and the repeated description of Joseph’s wife, the forms of the names and the title of the priest are much more precisely Egyptian
Archelaus - Josephus ( Joseph, at Herod's death, was about to return with the child Jesus from Egypt to the Holy Land, "he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea;" and "he was afraid to go thither" (Matthew 2:22). Josephus undesignedly supplies this confirmation of Scripture. That this cruel act was what made Joseph afraid of him is the more likely, as before his accession he had no public post whereby men might have known his character. Joseph turned to Galilee, where the less cruel brother Antipas reigned. The kingdom was originally designed for Antipas; its unexpected transference to Archelaus made Joseph change his direction. The fact of Joseph's fear is stated, the cause is not; but Archelaus's character otherwise known accounts for it
Bowing - Abraham "bowed himself to the people of the land" (Genesis 23:7 ); so Jacob to Esau (Genesis 33:3 ); and the brethren of Joseph before him as the governor of the land (Genesis 43:28 )
Handicraft - Hence, Joseph the carpenter taught the holy Jesus his trade; and many of His own country marveled that works so mighty should be wrought by one like themselves, an artisan: "is not this the carpenter?" (Mark 6:3)
Genesis - The first book of the sacred scriptures of the Old Testament, containing the history of the creation, of the apostasy of man, of the deluge, and of the first patriarchs, to the death of Joseph
Jacob - He returned to Canaan but lived his final years in Egypt, where he went to be with his son Joseph, viceroy of Egypt
Chest - The two exceptions alluded to are (a) the "coffin" in which the bones of Joseph were carried from Egypt, ( Genesis 50:26 ) and (b) the "chest" in which Jehoiada the priest collected the alms for the repairs of the temple
Sisters Adorers of the Most Precious Blood (Ruma) - This branch includes academies, hospitals, an orphanage, a working girls' home, and mission schools, in the Archdiocese of Saint Louis, and in the dioceses of Belleville, Concordia, El Paso, Oklahoma, Lincoln, Saint Joseph, Springfield, and Wichita
Requite - ...
Joseph will certainly requite us all the evil which we did to him
Beschi, Costanzo Giuseppe - His classic "Tembavani" (Unfading Garland) is the noblest epic poem in honor of Saint Joseph in any language; "Paramartaguru Kadey" (Adventures of the teacher Paramarta) is a delightful, witty satire, the most fascinating book in Tamil
Hamor - Later the remains of Joseph, Jacob's son, were buried on this parcel of land (Joshua 24:32 )
Lefebvre, Camille - Apostle of the Acadians, born Saint Philippe, Quebec, 1831; died Saint Joseph, New Brunswick, 1895. He began the erection of Saint Joseph's College
Johann Overbeck - His masterpiece, "Madonna of the Roses," is in the Portiuncula in Assisi; other noted works are frescoes depicting the "History of Joseph," and Tasso's "Jerusalem Delivered
Overbeck, Johann Friedrich - His masterpiece, "Madonna of the Roses," is in the Portiuncula in Assisi; other noted works are frescoes depicting the "History of Joseph," and Tasso's "Jerusalem Delivered
Tap'Push - (Joshua 15:34 ) ...
A place on the boundary of the "children of Joseph
Camille Lefebvre - Apostle of the Acadians, born Saint Philippe, Quebec, 1831; died Saint Joseph, New Brunswick, 1895. He began the erection of Saint Joseph's College
Archelaus - It was for fear of him that Joseph and Mary turned aside on their way back from Egypt
Taxing - The decree for the enrolment was the occasion of Joseph and Mary's going up to Bethlehem
Zaphnath-Paaneah - The name which Pharaoh gave to Joseph when he raised him to the rank of prime minister or grand vizier of the kingdom (Genesis 41:45 )
Ephraim - Younger son of the patriarch Joseph (Genesis 41), born in Egypt, during the seven years of plenty
Gorres Society - It was named for Johann Joseph Gorres and has its headquarters at Bonn, although annual sessions are held in other cities
Evariste Huc - With a companion, Joseph Gabet, he visited the nomadic tribes of those regions and on encountering a Tibetan embassy accompanied it to Lhasa, where he was well received
Ephraim - One of the sons of Joseph
Archelaus - From his known oppressive character Joseph feared to bring back the infant Jesus into his territory, and turned aside to Galilee, which was under the jurisdiction of his brother Antipas. Josephus relates that soon after his accession he put to death 3,000 Jews: eventually, for his tyranny to the Jews and the Samaritans he was deposed and banished to Vienne in Gaul
Benjamin - " See Joseph
Sisters Adorers of the Precious Blood - A cloistered contemplative order, founded at Saint Hyacinthe, Canada in 1861 by Aurelie Caouette, in religion Mother Catherine-Gurelie of the Precious Blood, with the cooperation of Monsignor Joseph La Rocque
Seventh-Day Adventists - Connected with this movement, begun in 1845,1846 in New England, were Joseph Bates, James White, and Mrs
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Toronto) - The congregation from which have branched the other foundations of Sisters of Saint Joseph in Upper Canada
Camel - Jacob readily believed the lie told to him by his ten sons about the death of Joseph. He refused to believe the truth that these same men brought to him informing him that Joseph was alive
Brick - Later, because of famine, Joseph moved his family to Egypt (Genesis 46:6 ). A new Pharaoh who “knew not Joseph” (Exodus 1:6-8 ) enslaved the Jews
Embalming - In Genesis 50:2-3 , it is recorded that Joseph ordered the embalming of Jacob's body and that “physicians” required forty days to perform the process. Genesis 50:26 says Joseph was embalmed and laid to rest in Egypt
Tribes - The two sons of Joseph were adopted by Jacob in place of Joseph
Rings - When Pharaoh committed the government of Egypt to Joseph, he gave him his ring from his finger, Genesis 41:42 . ...
The ring was used chiefly as a signet to seal with, and Scripture generally assigns it to princes and great persons; as the king of Egypt, Joseph, Ahaz, Jezebel, king Ahasuerus, his favorite Haman, Mordecai, king Darius, etc
Hyksos - The word, which does not appear in the Bible, was later misinterpreted by Josephus as meaning “shepherd kings. ...
Joseph's rise to power (Genesis 41:39-45 ) as pharaoh's second-in-command would have been far more likely under a Hyksos king. Joseph was related ethnically to the Semitic Hyksos rulers, while the native Egyptians regarded Semites with contempt. Ahmose I is very likely the pharaoh “who did not know Joseph” (Exodus 1:8 NRSV). If Joseph served a Hyksos pharaoh, an Egyptian king would not have “known” of him in a political or historical sense, nor would he have regarded him as significant in an ethnic sense
Brethren of the Lord - Jesus was Mary’s first-born ( Luke 2:7 ), and she subsequently (according to the view accepted in the present article) bore to Joseph four sons, James, Joseph, Judas, and Simon, and several daughters ( Matthew 13:55-56 = Mark 6:3 ). ’ ( a ) They were supposed to be sons of Joseph by a former marriage , having thus no blood-relationship with Jesus
Benjamin - " It is said in the after pages of her history, that God "remembered Rachel, and that God hearkened unto her and opened her womb; and she bare a son, and called his name Joseph;" that is, as the margin of the Bible renders it, adding; and said,"the Lord shall add to me another son. See also Joseph. ) After the birth of Joseph, Rachel conceived again, and bore Benjamin, on which occasion she died
Cleopas - according to Eusebius and Epiphanius, was brother of Joseph, both being sons of Jacob. He was the father of Simeon, of James the Less, of Jude, and Joseph or Joses. Supposing Cleopas to have been the brother of Joseph, and father of James, &c, Calmet thinks it more probable that as he was a Galilean, he dwelt in some city of Galilee
Joseph, Hermann, Blessed - He soon became known by the name of Joseph, which the Blessed Virgin, calling him her chaplain and spouse, bestowed on him
Hermann Joseph, Blessed - He soon became known by the name of Joseph, which the Blessed Virgin, calling him her chaplain and spouse, bestowed on him
Joseph - As the oldest son of his favored wife, Jacob loved him dearly and gave him preferential treatment, causing Joseph's brothers to envy him and sell him into slavery. Buried in Joseph’s Tomb in Shechem
Nazarene - Joseph and Mary, when they returned from Egypt, went to reside at Nazareth, "that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene
Augustus - This is the emperor who appointed the enrolment mentioned Luke 2:1 , which obliged Joseph and the Virgin Mary to go to Bethlehem, the place where Jesus Christ was born
Wagons - Were sent by Joseph to convey his father's family into Egypt
Tribe - But this patriarch on his death-bed adopted Ephraim and Manasseh, the two sons of Joseph, and would have them also to constitute two tribes in Israel, Genesis 48:5 . Instead of twelve tribes, there were now thirteen, that of Joseph being two
Reuben - Reuben, having defiled his father's concubine Bilhah, lost his birthright and all the privileges of primogeniture, the preeminence in the family being given to Judah, and the double portion to the two sons of Joseph, Genesis 35:22 48:5 49:3,4,8,10 1 Chronicles 5:1,2 . He shared in his brother's jealousy of Joseph, and yet interposed to save his life at Dothan with the design of restoring him privately to his father, Genesis 37:18-30
Sechem - SICHEM, SYCHEM, or SHECHEM, called also Sychar in the New Testament afterward Neapolis, and in the present day Nablous, Naplous, Napolose, and Naplosa, (for it is thus variously written,) a city of Samaria, near the parcel of ground which Jacob bought of Hamor, the father of Shechem, and gave to his son Joseph. Here Joseph's bones were brought out of Egypt to be interred; and on the same piece of ground was the well called Jacob's well, at which our Saviour sat down when he had the memorable conversation with the woman of Samaria, John 4, which caused her, and many other inhabitants of Sechem, or Sychar, as it is there called, to receive him as the Messiah. Clarke says, "The traveller directing his footsteps toward its ancient sepulchres, as everlasting as the rocks in which they are hewn, is permitted, upon the authority of sacred and indisputable record, to contemplate the spot where the remains of Joseph, of Eleazer, and of Joshua, were severally deposited. Along the valley, we beheld ‘a company of Ishmaelites coming from Gilead,' as in the days of Reuben and Judah, ‘with their camels bearing spicery, and balm, and myrrh,' who would gladly have purchased another Joseph of his brethren, and conveyed him as a slave to some Potiphar in Egypt
Leontius, Priest And Martyr of Armenia - Joseph and a large body of his clergy, including Leontius, were present to encourage the Christian forces (Lazarus, § 34 in Langl. Leontius, who is everywhere mentioned with Joseph, and is usually the orator, as he is the chief inspirer, of the whole movement, delivered a fervent address before the battle (given fully by Langlois), dwelling on the examples of Phineas, Elijah, Gideon, and other famous believers in O. Joseph, Leontius, and their companions, were taken to the court of Persia, and put on their defence
Justus -
Another name for Joseph, surnamed Barsabas
Granary - Granary might refer simply to jars or bags of grain (Genesis 42:25 ), to plastered or unplastered pits, to silos (perhaps Luke 12:18 ), or even to large structures with numerous rooms (Hezekiah's storehouse, 2 Chronicles 32:28 , or those used by Joseph to store large amounts of grain, Genesis 41:49 )
Arimathea - The birthplace or abode of the rich man Joseph, who, by Pilate's leave, which he "boldly" craved, casting away the "fear" which had previously kept him from open discipleship (Mark 15:43; John 19:38), buried our Lord's body in his own "new tomb" at Jerusalem
Reuben - He showed kindness to Joseph, and was the means of saving his life when his other brothers would have put him to death (37:21,22)
Rachel - ” Younger daughter of Laban, the second wife and cousin of Jacob, and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin
Nut - Sent as a present to Joseph in Egypt from Jacob in Canaan (Genesis 43:11)
Mandrake - Only when God “remembered Rachel” did she bear Joseph (Genesis 30:24 )
Galilee - Joseph and Mary belonged to Nazareth, the chief city in the south, and there Jesus lived the greater part of His life
Allouez, Claude - He was one of the first to visit Lake Michigan, naming it "Lake Saint Joseph
Ataroth - border of the territory of the children of Joseph ( Joshua 16:2 ), called Ataroth-addar in v
Goshen - ' Pharaoh bade Joseph place his father and his brethren in the best of the land
Rachel - Matthew 2:18 , have put Rachel for the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh, the children of Joseph, the son of Rachel
Interpret - To explain or unfold the meaning of predictions, vision, dreams or enigmas to expound and lay open what is concealed from the understanding as, Joseph interpreted the dream of Pharaoh
Than - Israel loved Joseph more than all his children
Judas Barsabas - Probably Judas was brother of Joseph Barsabas (Acts 1:23)
Simeon - The Holy Ghost had assured him, that he should not die before he had seen the Christ of the Lord; he therefore came into the temple, prompted by inspiration, just at the time when Joseph and Mary presented Jesus Christ there, in obedience to the law. Simeon took the child into his arms, gave thanks to God, and then blessed Joseph and Mary
Ephraim - A grandson of Jacob, and the brother of Manasseh, the first-born of Joseph by Asenath, the daughter of Potiphera, priest of On ( Genesis 41:50 f. ]'>[3] connects the name with the verb pârâh , ‘to be fruitful,’ and makes it refer to Joseph’s sons. In the Blessing of Jacob ( Genesis 49:22 ) there may be a play upon the name when Joseph, who there represents both Ephraim and Manasseh, is called ‘a fruitful bough. ]'>[4] ) tells an interesting story of how Jacob adopted his Egyptian grandsons, Ephraim and Manasseh, into his own family, and at the same time, against the remonstrances of Joseph, conferred the blessing of the firstborn upon Ephraim hence Ephraim’s predestined superiority in later history. ...
The appearance of Joseph in the Blessing of Jacob, with no mention of his sons, who according to J Cupbearer - The “chief butler” of the Joseph story (Genesis 40:2 ) was a cupbearer who was overseer of a staff of his own
Devotions, Popular - Various prayers and pious practises, whether in common at Church or in private, in honor of: the Blessed Trinity; Our Divine Lord, His Holy Infancy, His Holy Name, His Five Wounds, His Passion, His Sacred Heart, His Presence in the Holy Eucharist; the Holy Ghost; the Angels Guardian, Saint Michael; the Blessed Virgin, under her various titles as Help of Christians, Mediatrix of Divine Grace, Queen of the Holy Rosary; and of certain saints, Joseph, Anne, Monica, Benedict, Francis of Assisi, Anthony of Padua, Dominic, Francis Xavier, Aloysius, Rita, Teresa of Jesus, each treated in the article under these several titles; for the souls in Purgatory and for a Happy Death (Bona Mars)
Jacob's Well - It is called Jacob's Well because the patriarch who "drank thereof himself, and his children, and his cattle" gave it to the tribe of Joseph
Census - A census or enrollment of the people is mentioned several times in the Old Testament and notably in the New Testament (Luke 2), the enrollment of "the whole world" which occasioned the journey of Joseph and Mary to Bethlehem wherc Christ was born
Jacob - After stopping at Bethel and Ephrata (Genesis 35), he came to Hebron where he dwelt quietly, leaving it only to rejoin his son Joseph in Egypt, and to spend his last days in the land of Gessen
Jason - (jay' ssuhn) Personal name often used by Jews as a substitute for Hebrew Joshua or Joseph and also used by Gentiles
Sister - , Matthew 19:29 ; of the "sisters" of Christ, the children of Joseph and Mary after the virgin birth of Christ, e
Surety - Judah became surety for Benjamin to Joseph (Genesis 43:9 ; Genesis 44:32 )
Fellow - of Genesis 39:2 ‘And the Lorde was with Joseph, and he was a luckie fellowe
Left Hand - Joseph protested against his eldest being blest with Jacob's left hand (Genesis 48:13-19 )
Cistern - The "pit" into which Joseph was cast (Genesis 37:24 ) was a Beer or dry well
Example - ...
Joseph, the model of piety
Calebephratah - That Hezron could have died there (though it is not at all known where the place was) has been thought an impossibility, for was he not with the Israelites living in Egypt? Yes, but at least in the time of Joseph, he and others may have visited Canaan, and on one of his visits have died there, and thus the place have come to be named after his son and his son's wife ? 1 Chronicles 2:19
Abiezer - Son of Manasseh and grandson of Joseph (Joshua 17:2 ; 1 Chronicles 7:18 )
Governor - Joseph was governor over the land of Egypt
Martyrs - Martyrs, the Ten Ten Mishnaic sages who were killed by the Romans in the second century CE as an atonement for the sale of Joseph
Ten martyrs - Ten Martyrs, the: Ten Mishnaic sages who were killed by the Romans in the second century CE as an atonement for the sale of Joseph
Annas - In the reign of Tiberius he was deposed, and was followed at short intervals by Ismael, Eleasar son of Ananus or Annas, Simon, and Joseph Caiaphas, son-in-law of Annas. Josephus relates that the five sons of Annas became high priests, and under the last, also named Annas, James the Lord's brother was martyred
Genesis - The general divisions of the book are as follows: ...
the creation of the world and early history of mankind (1-11), including the Fall, the promise of a Redeemer, and the Deluge; ...
the early history of the Jews (12-50), including Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph
Augustus - Augustus was the emperor who appointed the enrollment, Luke 2:1, causing Joseph and Mary to go to Bethlehem, the place where Jesus was born
Well of the Samaritan Woman - It is called Jacob's Well because the patriarch who "drank thereof himself, and his children, and his cattle" gave it to the tribe of Joseph
Shepherds - It appears by the history of Joseph that the patriarch used this policy when bringing his father and his brethren before Pharaoh, in order that they might be separated from the Egyptians, and have the land of Goshen assigned them. There might perhaps be somewhat %in this for which the hatred arose; but then had this been the sole motive in the mind of Joseph, his plan of separation must have had respect still farther—the hatred would not have subsided by the %mere separation, in putting his family in Goshen. ...
I rather think, (though I speak not in the most distant way decidedly upon the subject) that the mind of the patriarch Joseph had an eye to Christ and aimed, upon this and every other occasion, to keep up the gracious distinction of character of the seed of Abraham, whose first and most decisive feature all along was of "the people that dwell alone, and that were not to be reckoned among the nations
Simeon - Some have thought he was more guilty than his brethren in the treatment of Joseph, Genesis 37:20 42:24 43:23 ; but he may have been detained as a hostage because he was one of the eldest sons. It had been revealed to him that he should not die before he had seen the Christ so long promised; and he therefore came into the temple, promoted by inspiration, just at the time when Joseph and Mary presented our Savior there, in obedience to the law. Simeon took the child in his arms, gave thanks to God, and blessed Joseph and Mary
Benjamin - The youngest son of Jacob by Rachel, and the only full brother of Joseph ( Genesis 30:22 f. Pressed by a famine, his ten brothers went down to Egypt, and Jacob, solicitous for his welfare, did not allow Benjamin to accompany them; but Joseph made it a condition of his giving them corn that they should bring him on their return. The two names may point to the union of two related tribes, and the persistence of the traditions that Benjamin was the full brother of Joseph, whereas the other Joseph tribes (Manasseh and Ephraim) are called sons, would indicate not only a close relationship to Joseph, but also a comparatively early development into an independent tribe. This and the fact that Shimei, a Benjamitc, claims ( 2 Samuel 19:20 ) to be’ of the house of Joseph,’ suggest that the tribe was an offshoot of the latter
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - , 52 that He was regarded by both the crowd and the rulers at Jerusalem as being of Galilaean, and therefore presumably not Davidie, parentage; it is by no means certain, and to many it may seem in no way probable, that the writer, in the interest of a ‘tragic irony’ (see Westcott, Speaker’s Commentary on John 7:42), refrained from noting the fact of the birth at Bethlehem, and the Davidie lineage of Joseph or Mary. show clearly that He did not choose to support His claim by an appeal to fleshly parentage; while the words of Philip (John 1:45 ‘We have found him, of whom Moses in the law, and the prophets, did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph’), and of the crowd at Capernaum (John 6:42 ‘Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know?’), left, as they are, without comment by the Evangelist, suggest that he was unacquainted with the story of the birth at Bethlehem, and laid no stress on the Davidie descent. ...
In all the books thus far mentioned no intimation is given whether the descent of Jesus is traced through Mary or Joseph: this fact must be recognized, however it is explained. The First and Third Gospels, which (at all events in their present form) teach the doctrine of the birth from a virgin, also contain formal pedigrees of Joseph, with the evident intention of proving that Jesus was the heir of David. The general facts in regard to the divergences of the two pedigrees of Joseph are well known. Matthew (1618401209_7) begins with Abraham, and traces the line in fourteen generations to David; then through Solomon in fourteen generations to Jechoniah at the time of the carrying away to Babylon: then in fourteen (or thirteen according to our present text) generations through Shealtiel and Zerubbabel to Matthan, Jacob, Joseph, and Jesus. Luke (Luke 3:23-38) makes Joseph the son of Heli, and grandson of Matthat (by some identified without any proof with Matthan of Matthew 1:15), and traces his descent through Zerubbabel and Shealtiel to Nathan the son of David; then (with only slight or textually doubtful divergences from Mt. This original document may or may not have ended ‘Joseph begat Jesus’ (Ἰωσὴφ δὲ ἐγέννησεν τὸν Ἰησοῦν): it is perhaps the easiest solution of the difficulties of this verse to suppose that, if it did so end, the compiler omitted the last step, as in conflict with his belief in the Virgin-birth, and added a note to the previous step to explain the relation in which Jesus stood to Joseph. If in Westcott and Hort’s edition of the NT the notes be struck out, it will be seen that a perfectly symmetrical pedigree of Joseph is left. He discusses fully the reading in Matthew 1:16, and concludes that we cannot look on the reading of the Sinaitic Syriac (‘Jacob begat Joseph; Joseph, to whom was betrothed Mary the Virgin, begat Jesus, who is called the Christ’) as containing traces of an original text. ) thinks that the Curctonian Syriac (‘Jacob begat Joseph, to whom was betrothed Mary the Virgin, who bore Jesus Christ’) represents the Greek from which the Syriac version was made more closely than does the Sinaitic. If, therefore, the compiler followed a pedigree ready to hand, he did so only as far as the step ‘Jacob begat Joseph’; and textual criticism will not help us to reconstruct the presumed original document beyond that point. In the usual text stress is laid on Joseph being the husband of Mary, probably to show that, as he recognized his wife’s son as in a legal sense his own, Jesus was legally the heir of David. ]'>[4] (‘Jacob begat Joseph, to whom being betrothed the Virgin Mary begat Jesus that is called Christ’), and also the Old Latin and Syriac versions, this point is missed, and there is little doubt that the Received Text is right. ...
Codex Bezae in Luke 3 gives a pedigree in the Lukan form, but the names from Joseph to David are taken from Mt. —The descent of Joseph is traced through Nathan the son of David. The number of derivatives of the name Nathan, and the repetition of the names Melchi, Joseph, and Jesus in the Lukan pedigree, can be taken equally well to prove its genuineness or the ingennity of its compiler. Luke’s methods it may be assumed that he would not have inserted matter in his Gospel unless he had had satisfactory evidence of its genuineness and historical accuracy, and we have seen that the character of the list of names he gives, from David to Joseph, agrees well with this view. Luke the names Matthat and Levi were evidently left out, so that he regarded Melchi as grandfather of Joseph. Heli died without children, and Jacob, in accordance with the levirate law, raised up seed to his brother, and begat Joseph. Thus Joseph was physically son of Jacob, legally of Heli
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - Both lists agree from Abraham to David, except that Aram or Ram in Ruth 4:18-2281 = Arm in Luke 3:33 (best text); but between David and Joseph the lists have only Shealtiel and Zerubbabel, and possibly two other names (see below), in common. Between Zerubbabel and Joseph the names are perhaps from some traditional list of the heirs of the kings, but some names here also have been omitted, for in Mt. genealogy ends with Matthan, Jacob, Joseph. The names between Nathan and Shealtiel are not derived from the OT, and those between Zerubbabel and Joseph are otherwise unknown to us, unless, as Plummer supposes ( ICC [16] of Heli. ’ The important thing was to state Jesus’ birthright, and the only possible way to do this would be through Joseph. ...
It must, however, be added that Joseph and Mary were probably near relations. ]'>[9]2 , ‘Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus,’ etc. The lately discovered Sinaitic-Syriac palimpsest has ‘Jacob begat Joseph: Joseph, to whom was betrothed Mary the Virgin, begat Jesus. ), who thinks that it is not original, but derived from a variant of the ordinary text: ‘Jacob begat Joseph, to whom being betrothed the Virgin Mary bare Little Sisters of the Poor - The mother-house is at La Tour Saint Joseph in Saint-Pern, IIIe-et-Vilaine, France
Mailros, Chronica de - An ancient copy of the manuscript is in the British Museum and has been edited for the Bannatyne Club by Joseph Stevenson, SJ, who also prepared the English edition in Church Historians of England
Leonine Sacramentary - Found in the library of the Cathedral Chapter of Verona, it was published by Joseph Bianchini in 1735 in the fourth volume of his edition of Anastasius Bibliothecarius and was by him arbitrarily attributed to Pope Leo I (440-461)
Music, Passion - The Passion music reached its highest development under Bach (1685-1750) and Joseph Haydn
Counsellor - But in Daniel 3:2-3 it means a justice; and in Mark 15:43 , Luke 23:50 , it is used of Joseph of Arimathæa as a member of the Sanhedrin
Archangel, Gabriel the - The Jews venerated Gabriel as the angel of judgment and placed him after Michael; Christian tradition holds that it was he who appeared to Saint Joseph and the angels, and who strengthened Our Lord in the garden at Gethsemane
Gabriel the Archangel - The Jews venerated Gabriel as the angel of judgment and placed him after Michael; Christian tradition holds that it was he who appeared to Saint Joseph and the angels, and who strengthened Our Lord in the garden at Gethsemane
Glastonbury Thorn - The legend is that the original tree grew from the staff of Saint Joseph of Arimathea, who came to Glastonbury A
Benjamin - Genesis 43:5, Genesis 43:13 (c) This person is a type of CHRIST in that his brothers could not see the face of Joseph unless he came with them
Nicodemus - At last, in the trying scene of the crucifixion, he avowed himself a believer, and came with Joseph of Arimathea to pay the last duties to the body of Christ, which they took down from the cross, embalmed, and laid in the sepulchre, John 19:39
Thorn, Glastonbury - The legend is that the original tree grew from the staff of Saint Joseph of Arimathea, who came to Glastonbury A
Sacramentary, Leonine - Found in the library of the Cathedral Chapter of Verona, it was published by Joseph Bianchini in 1735 in the fourth volume of his edition of Anastasius Bibliothecarius and was by him arbitrarily attributed to Pope Leo I (440-461)
Yearn - Joseph made haste, for his bowels did yearn upon his brother
Just - In the Gospels it is used of Joseph (Matthew 1:19), Simeon (Luke 2:25), John the Baptist (Mark 6:20), Joseph of Arimathaea (Luke 23:50), and Christ (Matthew 27:19; Matthew 27:24)
Ephraim - The second son of Joseph, born in Egypt before the famine, Genesis 41:50-52, and therefore upwards of 20 at Jacob's death. Joseph, when he was apprised of his father's sickness, was anxious to obtain the recognition of his sons Manasseh and Ephraim. But he placed the younger, Ephraim, before the elder, Manasseh, "guiding his hands wittingly," in spite of Joseph's remonstrance, and prophetically declaring that the posterity of Ephraim should be far greater and more powerful than the posterity of Manasseh
On - The first mention of this place in the Bible is in the history of Joseph, to whom we read Pharaoh gave "to wife Asenath the daughter of Potipherah priest of On. ver, Genesis41:60 and Genesis46:20 (On is to be remembered not only as the home of Joseph, but as the traditional place to which his far-off namesake took Mary and the babe Jesus in the flight to Egypt
Ephraim - was the name of Joseph's second son, by Asenath, Potiphar's daughter. Ephraim, with his brother Manasseh, was presented by his father Joseph to Jacob on his death bed, Genesis 48:8 , &c. Joseph was desirous to change his hands, but Jacob answered, "I know it, my son; Manasseh shall be multiplied, but Ephraim shall be greater
Sisters of Saint Joseph - The sisters were introduced into America in 1836 by the Right Reverend Joseph Rosati of the Diocese of Saint Louis, Missouri. In the census of 1925 the Sisters of Saint Joseph numbered 10,000 (2500 under a superior-general residing at Carondelet in Saint Louis, 7500 under diocesan administration)
On - The first mention of this place in the Bible is in the history of Joseph, to whom we read Pharaoh gave "to wife Asenath the daughter of Potipherah priest of On. ver, Genesis41:60 and Genesis46:20 (On is to be remembered not only as the home of Joseph, but as the traditional place to which his far-off namesake took Mary and the babe Jesus in the flight to Egypt
Reuben - )...
The chieftainship was transferred to Judah, the double portion to Joseph; the firstborn of the beloved Rachel superseding the firstborn of slighted Leah, not however to gratify the father's preference (Deuteronomy 21:15-17), but to fulfill God's holy purpose. He saved Joseph's life from the crafty and cruel brothers, Levi, Simeon, Judah, and the rest, by insisting that his blood should not be shed, but he be cast into a pit, Reuben secretly intending to deliver him out of their hands. These took advantage of his temporary absence to sell Joseph (Genesis 37:20 ff). He probably had gone to seek means to rescue Joseph. ...
Reuben was deeply moved to find Joseph gone; he rent his clothes, crying, "the child is not, and I, where shall I go?" Years after he reminded them of his remonstrance (Genesis 42:22): "spoke I not unto you saying, Do not sin against the child, and ye would not hear? Therefore behold also his blood is required. " Again, his offer to Jacob (Genesis 42:37) to stake his own two sons' lives for the safety of Benjamin, Joseph's surviving brother, is another trait of kindliness. But consistent resoluteness was wanting; putting Joseph in the pit was a compromise with the brothers' wickedness; decided, firm, unyielding resistance would have awed them and saved Joseph
Raamses, Rameses - In Genesis 47:11 Joseph, by Pharaoh’s command, gives to Jacob’s family ‘a possession in the land of Egypt, in the best of the land, in the land of Rameses
Marianists - Religious order founded at Bordeaux, France, in 1817 by Guillaume Joseph Chaminade
Oblates of Mary Immaculate - Religious order founded on January 25, 1816, at Aix, Provence, France, by Saint Charles Joseph Eugene de Mazenod, composed of priests and lay brothers
Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate - Religious order founded on January 25, 1816, at Aix, Provence, France, by Saint Charles Joseph Eugene de Mazenod, composed of priests and lay brothers
Embalming - The embalming of Jacob and Joseph was according to the Egyptian custom, which was partially followed by the Jews (2 Chronicles 16:14 ), as in the case of king Asa, and of our Lord (John 19:39,40 ; Luke 23:56 ; 24:1 )
Mixed Multitude - and ruled Egypt, beginning with Salatis master of Avaris, Tanis, or Zoan, and ending with Apophis, their last king, expelled by Aahmes I the "new king that knew not Joseph. " Hated in Egypt, they naturally emigrated with Israel (compare Josephus contra Apion, 1:14, section 26)
Nativity of Christ - Joseph and Mary were providentially led to go up to Bethlehem at this period, and there Christ was born (Matthew 2:1,6 ; Luke 2:1,7 )
Holy Sepulcher - It was a new monument, belonging to Joseph of Arimathea, hewn out of a rock, and closed by a great stone (Matthew 27)
Conspire - ...
They conspired against Joseph to slay him
Linen - Joseph was arrayed in 'vestures of fine linen
Society of Mary, of Paris - Religious order founded at Bordeaux, France, in 1817 by Guillaume Joseph Chaminade
Sepulcher, Holy - It was a new monument, belonging to Joseph of Arimathea, hewn out of a rock, and closed by a great stone (Matthew 27)
Manasseh - The first-born of Joseph. When he and his brother Ephraim were boys, and Jacob, their grandfather, was about to die, Joseph took them into the patriarch's presence to receive his blessing. The territory of Manasseh occupied by a tribe descended from Joseph, and divided into two portions—one east of the Jordan, and the other west of it 1
Goshen - Joseph naturally placed his family on the border land between Egypt and Palestine, the promised land, and at the same time near himself at Tunis or else Memphis the capital of Egypt. The answer of Joseph's brethren to Pharaoh (Genesis 46:28; Genesis 46:34), "thy servants have been herdsmen from our youth," (Joseph so instructing them "that ye may dwell in . Joseph lived under the 12th or 13th dynasty, a native not a shepherd dynasty (as Genesis 46:34 proves)
Continence - Scipio the younger exhibited the nobles example of continence recorded in Pagan history an example surpassed only by that of Joseph in sacred history
Litany - Only five litanies are approved for public devotions: ...
Litany of Loreto
Litany of Saint Joseph
Litany of the Holy Name of Jesus
Litany of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Litany of the Saints
Nathanael - " Philip, like Andrew finding his own brother Simon (John 1:41), and the woman of Samaria (John 4:28-29) inviting her fellow townsmen, having been found himself by Jesus, "findeth" his friend Nathanael, and saith, "we have found (he should have said, we have been found by: Isaiah 65:1; Philippians 3:12 ff, Song of Solomon 1:4) Him of whom the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth the son of Joseph" (he should have said the Son of God)
Eliakim - An ancestor of Joseph the husband of Mary (Matthew 1:13 )
Seal - Joseph was given pharaoh's ring when he was placed in command of the country (Genesis 41:42 ), symbolizing Joseph's right to act with the ruler's authority
Pharoah - It should seem that Pharaoh was the common name of the kings of Egypt, since we find that both he that knew Joseph, and he that knew him not, were both called Pharaoh
Espouse - When as his mother Mary was espoused to Joseph
Abrech - ]'>[3] ( Genesis 41:43 ‘then he made him [4] to ride in the second chariot which he had; and they cried before him, Bow the knee; and he set him over all the land of Egypt’)
Help - ‛Âzar is first found in the Old Testament in Jacob’s deathbed blessing of Joseph: “… The God of thy father, who shall help thee …” ( Gilead - The merchants who bought Joseph came from Gilead, and were carrying balm into Egypt, Genesis 37:25
Sisters of the Precious Blood (Maria Stein) - The sisters conduct schools (boarding and day), a sanitarium, orphanages, and a home for the aged, in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, and the dioceses of Cleveland, Fort Wayne, Kansas City, Monterey-Fresno, Saint Joseph, Toledo, and Tucson
Rachel - Rachel was the mother of Joseph and Benjamin, and died soon after the birth of the latter
Saint John's Seminary, England - This school did not survive long, and after World War I Bishop Amigo of Southwark founded the College of Saint Joseph at Mark Cross, Sussex, for the boys in humanities
Hew, Hew Down, Hewn - ...
A — 2: λατομέω (Strong's #2998 — Verb — latomeo — lat-om-eh'-o ) signifies "to hew out stones" (from latomos, "a stone-cutter;" las, "a stone," temno, "to cut"), and is used of the sepulchre which Joseph of Arimathaea had "hewn" out of a rock for himself, where the body of the Lord was buried, Matthew 27:60 ; Mark 15:46
Nazareth - At Nazareth the angel appeared to Mary: the home of Joseph, Luke 1:26; Luke 2:39, and to that place Joseph and Mary returned after their flight into Egypt
Michigan - A third mission was established, 1679, at the mouth of the Saint Joseph River by Recollects accompanying La Salle, Father Louis Hennepin, Father Gabriel de la Ribourde, and Father Zenobius Membre. Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Loretto
Marquette
Nazareth
Olivet
Saint Charles
Saint Clair
Saint Helen
Saint Ignace
Saint Jacques
Saint James
Saint John
Saint Joseph
Saint Louis
Sault Sainte Marie
Ecclesiastical divisions include the archdiocese ...
Detroit
and the dioceses of ...
Gaylord
Grand Rapids
Kalamazoo
Lansing
Marquette
Saginaw
See also, ...
patron saints index
Reuben - As a result the civil leadership of Israel went to the tribe of Judah, the religious leadership to Levi, and the double portion of the inheritance to Joseph. This meant that Joseph received the right to have two tribes (which were descended from his sons, Ephraim and Manasseh) (Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:3-4; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2)
Weaker One, Little One - 50:7-8: “And Joseph went up to bury his father; and with him went up all the servants of Pharaoh, the elders of his house, and all the elders of the land of Egypt, and all the house of Joseph, and his brethren and his father’s house: only their little ones, and their flocks, and their herds, they left in the land of Goshen
Matthias - The disciple who was nominated against Joseph Barsabbas (see Joseph [1], No
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh who promoted Joseph (about B. The Pharaoh who knew not Joseph (about B
Minister, Serve - The first time it is used in the Hebrew Bible is in the story of Joseph as he becomes the slave of Potiphar: “And Joseph found grace in his sight, and he served [1] him …” ( Maternus, Julius Firmicus - Maternus, arguing against the Egyptians that Sarapis was originally the patriarch Joseph, derives the name Sarapis from Σαρᾶς ἀπό , because Joseph was the descendant of Sarah
Tribes, the Twelve - After Levi was separated for the priesthood, the number twelve was maintained by Ephraim and Manasseh being mentioned instead of Joseph. In Revelation 7 , where the tribes are sealed for blessing, Dan is omitted, as being a type of Antichrist: Ephraim is also omitted, the number being made up by inserting Levi and by Joseph being mentioned as well as Manasseh. 4 Judah...
2 Simeon 2 Simeon 2 Simeon 4 Judah 7 Gad 8 Asher 1 Reuben...
3 Levi 3 Levi 4 Judah 3 Levi 11a Manasseh 6 Naphtali 7 Gad...
4 Judah 4 Judah 9 Issachar 12 Benjamin 4 Judah 11a Manasseh 8 Asher...
5 Dan 10 Zebulun 10 Zebulun 11b Ephraim 11b Ephraim 11b Ephraim 6 Naphtali...
6 Naphtali 9 Issachar 11b Ephraim 11a Manasseh 12 Benjamin 1 Reuben 11a Manasseh...
7 Gad 5 Dan 11a Manasseh 10 Zebulun 2 Simeon 4 Judah 2 Simeon...
8 Asher 7 Gad 12 Benjamin 9 Issachar 10 Zebulun 12 Benjamin 3 Levi...
9 Issachar 8 Asher 5 Dan 7 Gad 9 Issachar 2 Simeon 9 Issachar...
10 Zebulun 6 Naphtali 8 Asher 5 Dan 8 Asher 9 Issachar 10 Zebulun...
11Joseph 11 Joseph 7 Gad 6 Naphtali 6 Naphtali 10 Zebulun 11 Joseph...
12 Benjamin 12 Benjamin 6 Naphtali 8 Asher 5 Dan 7 Gad 12 Benjamin...
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Genealogy of Jesus Christ - Matthew's Gospel contains, not Joseph's direct ancestors, but the succession of heirs to David's and Solomon's throne. The steps of Joseph's direct parentage did not coincide with those of the succession to the throne. The words "as was supposed" (Luke 3:23) imply that Christ's sonship to Joseph was only a reputed not a real one. Yet He was God's extraordinary gift to Joseph through his proper wife Mary, and the fruit of his marriage to her, not as natural offspring of his body but as supernatural fruit. Hence attention is drawn to Joseph's being "son of David" (Matthew 1:20), "of the house and lineage of David" (Luke 2:4, compare Luke 1:32). Mary must have been of the same tribe and family as Joseph, according to the law (Numbers 36:8). Probably Matthan of Matthew is the Matthat of Luke, and Jacob and Heli were brothers; and Heli's son Joseph, and Jacob's daughter Mary, first cousins. Joseph, as male heir of his uncle Jacob, who had only one child, Mary, would marry her according to the law (Numbers 36:8). ...
Thus the genealogy of the inheritance (Matthew's) and that of natural descent (Luke's) would be primarily Joseph's, then Mary's also
Hebrew (Descendent of Eber) - It distinguished Joseph from the Egyptians and slaves of other ethnic identity (Genesis 39:14 ,Genesis 39:14,39:17 ; Genesis 41:12 ; Genesis 43:32 )
Fathers of the Holy Cross - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Josephites - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Catholic Record Society - An organization, founded, 1904, largely through the efforts of Joseph S
Parents - 1: γονεύς (Strong's #1118 — Noun Masculine — goneus — gon-yooce' ) "a begetter, a father" (akin to ginomai, "to come into being, become"), is used in the plural in the NT, Matthew 10:21 ; Mark 13:12 ; six times in Luke (in Luke 2:43 , RV, "His parents," AV, "Joseph and His mother"); six in John; elsewhere, Romans 1:30 ; 2 Corinthians 12:14 (twice); Ephesians 6:1 ; Colossians 3:20 ; 2 Timothy 3:2
Leah - When Jacob returned to Palestine from Padan-aram, Leah and her children were placed in front of Rachel and Joseph, evidently to absorb any violence from Esau, Jacob's brother
Holy Cross, Congregation of the - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Holy Cross, Fathers of the - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Holy Cross, Priests of the - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Holy Cross, Religious of the - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Jason - (Ἰάσων)...
Jason is a Greek name, often adopted by Jews of the Dispersion, sometimes as not unlike the names Joseph or Joshua
Annas - Eleazar, son of Annas, followed Ismael; then Simon; then Joseph Caiaphas, son-in-law of Annas (John 18:13
Famine - The most severe famines recorded in scripture are the two of seven years' duration, one in the time of Joseph, and the other in the days of Elisha
False Prophet, (the) - Examples of modern day false prophets are Joseph Smith (Mormonism), Charles Taze Russell (Jehovah's Witnesses), Mary Baker Eddy (Christian Science), etc
Annunciation - While the announcement to Mary about the Incarnation has become associated with the annunciation, the announcements to Samson (Judges 13:2-5 ), Joseph (Matthew 1:20-25 ), and Zechariah (Luke 1:11-20 ) follow a similar pattern
Matthias - They then presented two persons, Joseph Barsabas, surnamed Justus, and Matthias
Birthright - Thus Isaac was preferred to Ishmael, Jacob to Esau, Joseph to Reuben, David to his elder brethren, Solomon to Adonijah
Sahaptin - The Jesuits, assisted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph, carry on missionary work among them at Saint Joseph's mission, Slickpoo, Idaho
Father - Joseph was a father to Pharoah, Genesis 45:8 , as his counselor and provider
Religious of the Holy Cross - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Religious of the Notre Dame of the Holy Cross - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Salvatorists - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Saint Joseph, Brothers of - An amalgamation of two French Societies, the Brothers of Saint Joseph (Josephites) founded at Ruille, 1820, by Father Jacques Dujarie, and transferred to Le Mans, being there united with the Fathers of the Holy Cross (Salvatorists), established 1839, by Father Basile Moreau
Eli'Akim - ) ...
Eldest son of Abiud or Judah; brother of Joseph, and father of Azor
Cistern, - Joseph was cast into a "pit," (Genesis 37:22 ) as was Jeremiah
Embalm - "Joseph commanded his servants the physicians to embalm his father (Jacob). " Joseph himself also at death was embalmed, "and was put in a coffin in Egypt" (Genesis 50:2-3; Genesis 50:25-26). "...
This accounts for Joseph having in his retinue a number of physicians. " The dearest process (that used in Jacob's and Joseph's case) cost a silver talent (250 British pounds)
Egypt - Matthew relates that Joseph, in obedience to the command of God, conveyed by an angel in a dream, took refuge in Egypt with the child and His mother from the murderous intentions of Herod the king (Matthew 2:13 f. Joseph, however, feared to enter Judaea because of Archelaus, Herod’s son and successor; and in obedience to a second vision directed his course to Galilee, and settled at Nazareth (Matthew 2:22 f. ), Joseph and Mary with the Child set out for Egypt at cock-crow, and reach a great city and temple with an idol to whose shrine the other idols of Egypt send gifts. Thereafter Joseph and Mary depart, being afraid lest the Egyptians should burn them to death because of the destruction of the idol. ) two handits are encountered, whose names are given as Titus and Dumachus, the former of whom bribes his companion not to molest Joseph and Mary; and the child Jesus foretells His crucifixion at Jerusalem thirty years later with these two robbers, and that Titus shall precede Him into Paradise. ) records the number of attendants, with riding animals, a waggon, pack-oxen and asses, sheep and rams, that set out with Joseph and Mary from Judaea. Afterwards Joseph is commanded to return into the land of Judah. The History of Joseph, ch
Egypt - Matthew relates that Joseph, in obedience to the command of God, conveyed by an angel in a dream, took refuge in Egypt with the child and His mother from the murderous intentions of Herod the king (Matthew 2:13 f. Joseph, however, feared to enter Judaea because of Archelaus, Herod’s son and successor; and in obedience to a second vision directed his course to Galilee, and settled at Nazareth (Matthew 2:22 f. ), Joseph and Mary with the Child set out for Egypt at cock-crow, and reach a great city and temple with an idol to whose shrine the other idols of Egypt send gifts. Thereafter Joseph and Mary depart, being afraid lest the Egyptians should burn them to death because of the destruction of the idol. ) two handits are encountered, whose names are given as Titus and Dumachus, the former of whom bribes his companion not to molest Joseph and Mary; and the child Jesus foretells His crucifixion at Jerusalem thirty years later with these two robbers, and that Titus shall precede Him into Paradise. ) records the number of attendants, with riding animals, a waggon, pack-oxen and asses, sheep and rams, that set out with Joseph and Mary from Judaea. Afterwards Joseph is commanded to return into the land of Judah. The History of Joseph, ch
Arimathea, or Ramah - (Dual, Ramathaim,) A city whence came Joseph the counselor, in whose new tomb the body of Jesus laid, Matthew 27:57 John 19:38
Joseph - At Joseph's insistence they returned with Benjamin whereupon Joseph disclosed himself and invited his father and brothers to settle in Gessen (Genesis 47)
Innsbruck - It remained under Jesuit control until suppressed by Joseph II in 1781
Institute of the Holy Family - The seven distinct branches of the association are: ...
Sisters of the Holy Family proper, or Solitary Sisters, devoted to contemplation
Sisters of Saint Joseph, in charge of orphanages
Sisters of Loreto, conducting private day schools and boarding schools
Sisters of the Immaculate Conception, educational and nursing
Sisters of Hope, care of the sick
Field Sisters, maintaining agricultural orphanages
Sisters of Saint Martha, the lay sisters of the above congregations
The Institute has over 200 houses, in France, England, Italy, Spain, Ceylon, India, South Africa, Canada, the United States, and South America
Exodus, Book of - The time comprised in this book, from the death of Joseph to the erection of the tabernacle in the wilderness, is about one hundred and forty-five years, on the supposition that the four hundred and thirty years (12:40) are to be computed from the time of the promises made to Abraham (Galatians 3:17 )
Famine - But the most remarkable of all was that which arose in Egypt in the days of Joseph, which lasted for seven years (Genesis 4145-45 ). Josephus makes mention of the famine which occurred A
Bilhah - Reuben, Jacob's firstborn, defiled her, and was therefore deprived of the birthright, which was given to the sons of Joseph (Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:4; 1 Chronicles 5:1)
Cerinthians - They believed that he was a mere man, the son of Joseph and Mary; but that in his baptism a celestial virtue descended on him in the form of a dove; by means whereof he was consecrated by the Holy Spirit, made Christ, and wrought so many miracles; that, as he received it from heaven, it quitted him after his passion, and returned to the place whence it came; so that Jesus, whom they called a pure man, really died, and rose again; but that Christ, who was distinguished from Jesus, did not suffer at all
Clopas - For his connexion with Joseph and the family of Jesus, see art
Gardens - Mentioned in Scripture, of Eden (Genesis 2:8,9 ); Ahab's garden of herbs (1 Kings 21:2 ); the royal garden (2 Kings 21:18 ); the royal garden at Susa (Esther 1:5 ); the garden of Joseph of Arimathea (John 19:41 ); of Gethsemane (John 18:1 )
Holy Shroud - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Spies - The sending of spies to ascertain the strength or state of an enemy's country was known as early as Genesis 42 , when Joseph treated his brethren as such
Array - ...
Pharaoh arrayed Joseph with fine linen
Betrothment - Mary, the mother of the Lord Jesus, was betrothed to Joseph, and he contemplated putting her away privately, but was instructed as to the truth of her condition by the angel of the Lord
Unicorn - It probably represents Joseph, with his great influence for the benefit of his children
Barsabas - Joseph Barsabas, surnamed Justus, was one of the first disciples of Jesus Christ, and probably one of the seventy
Treasure - Joseph acquainted his brethren, when they found their money returned in their sacks, that God had given them treasures, Genesis 43:23
Goshen - ...
Hence Joseph recommended it to his family as "the best of the land,"...
Genesis 47:11 , and "the fat of the land
Weaving - The "vestures of fine linen" such as Joseph wore, Genesis 41:42, were the product of Egyptian looms
Ring - The blessing of the so-called "ring of Saint Joseph" is reserved to the Carmelite Fathers
Linen - , 2 Samuel 6:14 ; SHESH, worn by Joseph when governor of Egypt, Genesis 41:42 , and by the virtuous woman in Proverbs 31:22 , (see SILK ;) and BUTZ, of which the veil of the temple and David's outer mantle were made, ...
1 Chronicles 15:27 2 Chronicles 2:14 3:14 5:12
Sisters of the Holy Family -(Bordeaux) - The seven distinct branches of the association are: ...
Sisters of the Holy Family proper, or Solitary Sisters, devoted to contemplation
Sisters of Saint Joseph, in charge of orphanages
Sisters of Loreto, conducting private day schools and boarding schools
Sisters of the Immaculate Conception, educational and nursing
Sisters of Hope, care of the sick
Field Sisters, maintaining agricultural orphanages
Sisters of Saint Martha, the lay sisters of the above congregations
The Institute has over 200 houses, in France, England, Italy, Spain, Ceylon, India, South Africa, Canada, the United States, and South America
Shroud, Holy - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Shroud of Turin - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Turin, Shroud of - This name is given primarily to a relic, preserved at Turin, Italy, since 1578, for which the claim is made that it is the actual "clean linen coat" in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ (Matthew 27), after the Crucifixion
Famine - The most remarkable one was that of seven years in Egypt, while Joseph was governor, Genesis 41:1-57
Captives - They were sold into servitude, like Joseph
Brother - In Matthew 12:46-50 13:55,56 Mark 3:31-35 , the brothers of Christ are so mentioned, in connection with his mother and sisters, as almost to require us to believe they were children of Joseph and Mary, younger than Jesus
Hawaii - It was here that Father Damien carried on his heroic work, 1873-1889, assisted, 1886, by Brother Joseph Dutton, who continued in his stead
Annas - 25 Joseph Caiaphas, son-in-law of An-nas, became high priest, ( John 18:13 ) but in Luke 3:2 Annas and Caiaphas are both called high priests
Illinois - Priests of the Quebec Seminary, among them Father Jean Bergier, had also labored among the Illinois Indians from about 1698, especially at Cahokia opposite Saint Louis, and when the French post of Fort Chartres was established near Kaskaslia, 1718, they served the little church of Saint Ann there, and also that of Saint Joseph at Prairie du Rocher, 5 miles away. ...
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Assumption
Hennepin
Mount Carmel
Olivet
Saint Anne
Saint Augustine
Saint Charles
Saint David
Saint Elmo
Saint Francisville
Saint Jacob
Saint James
Saint John
Saint Joseph
Saint Libory
Saint Marie
Saint Peter
San Jose
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Chicago
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Belleville
Joliet
Peoria
Rockford
Springfield
See also: ...
patron saints index
Missouri - ...
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state include, ...
Conception
Mount Carmel
Saint Anne
Saint Antony
Saint Aubert
Saint Catherine
Saint Charles
Saint Clair
Saint Genevieve
Saint Elizabeth
Saint Francisville
Saint Francois
Saint George
Saint James
Saint Johns
Saint Joseph
Saint Louis
Saint Marys
Saint Patrick
Saint Paul
Saint Peters
Saint Thomas
Santa Fe
Santa Rosa
Vera Cruz
Ecclesiastically, the state is governed by the archdiocese of ...
Saint Louis
and the dioceses of ...
Jefferson City
Kansas City-Saint Joseph
Springfield-Cape Girardeau
See also, ...
patron saints index
Nazareth, Nazarene - ...
The angel went to Nazareth to announce to Mary and Joseph the coming birth of Jesus (Luke 1:26-28 ). Following Jesus' birth in Bethlehem and the sojourn in Egypt, Joseph and Mary returned with Jesus to Nazareth (Matthew 2:19-23 ), where Jesus grew from boyhood to manhood (Luke 2:39-40 ; Mark 6:1-6 ), being stamped as a Nazarene (Matthew 2:23 ), apparently a midrashic play on the Hebrew term netser , “shoot” in Isaiah 11:1
Isdigerdes ii, King of Persia - It was answered in a council of eighteen Armenian bishops, headed by the patriarch Joseph, at Ardashad in 450. In 455 or 456 the Persians triumphed in a great battle, wherein the patriarch Joseph and many nobles were taken prisoners and martyred
Genealogy - 1-25 and Luke 3:1-38 , differ from each other; one giving probably the genealogy of Christ's reputed father Joseph, and the other that of his mother Mary. Joseph was the legal father of Christ, and of the same family connections with Mary; so that the Messiah was a descendant of David both by law and "according to the flesh. The public records, which Josephus says were scrupulously kept down to his day, perished with the ruin of the Jews as a nation
Mary - She was, like Joseph, of the tribe of Judah and of the lineage of David. She was betrothed to Joseph of Nazareth; but before her marriage she became with child by the Holy Ghost, and became the mother of Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world. She was at Jerusalem with Joseph, at Cana and at Capernaum
Pharaoh - Pharaoh, the master of Joseph, Genesis 37:36 39:1-23 Acts 7:10,13 , B. Some suppose that the Pharaoh to whom Joseph became Prime Minister was the son of the one mentioned in Genesis 37:36 . Pharaoh, who knew not Joseph, and under whom Moses was born, B
Sisters - ’ That there were more than two seems to follow from the Matthaean addition (πᾶσαι) to the Markan question, ‘Are not his sisters here with us?’ It is true that tradition ascribed two daughters to Joseph, though one uncanonical Gospel at least describes Joseph as acknowledging sons, but denying the presence of daughters in his household. The daughters of Joseph are almost universally said to be two in number (‘Genuit quoque sibi … duas filias,’ Hist. Josephus Fabri Lignarii, cap. Other writers give their names very variously as Mary and Salome, Anna and Salome, Esther and Thamar; while Theophylact curiously enough names three as the daughters of Joseph—Esther, Thamar, and Salome (see Donehoo’s Apocryphal and Legendary Life of Christ, p. If the identification by Hegesippus of Clopas with the brother of Joseph be correct, we have the interesting fact that this Mary, thus referred to by St
Joseph And Mary - They tell us that she was the espoused wife of Joseph a carpenter of Nazareth, and that the Divine Call came to her after her espousal to Joseph and before her marriage. But why has no spiritual artist stained the whiteness of the lily with the red blood of a broken heart? For no sooner had the transfiguring light of the angel's presence faded from her sight than a deep and awful darkness began to fall upon Joseph's espoused wife. ...
Joseph's part in all this is told us by Saint Matthew alone. And as we read that Evangelist's particular account of that time, we see how sharp that sword was which pierced Joseph's soul also. Joseph's heart must have been torn in two. ...
Sweet as it is to linger in Hebron beside Mary and Elizabeth, our hearts are always drawn back to Joseph in his unspeakable agony. And Mary's dear image became to Joseph dearer still when he could no longer see her face or hear her voice. Nazareth was empty to Joseph; it was worse than empty, it was a city of sepulchres in which he sought for death and could not find it. Day after day, week after week, Joseph's misery increased, and when, as his wont was, he went up to the synagogue on the Sabbath day, that only made him feel his loneliness and his misery all the more. On one of those Sabbaths which the exiled Virgin was spending at Hebron Joseph went up again to the sanctuary in Nazareth seeking to hide his great grief with God. " Joseph's heart was absolutely overwhelmed within him as he listened to that astounding Scripture. Never had ear or heart of man heard these amazing words as Joseph heard them that day. So speaking to himself till he was terrified at his own thoughts, weary with another week's lonely labour, and aged with many weeks' agony and despair, Joseph fell asleep. There was silence, and he heard a voice saying to him, "Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife, for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost. " Gabriel was sent to reassure Joseph's despairing heart, to demand the consummation of the broken-off marriage, and to announce the Incarnation of the Son of God. Did Joseph arise before daybreak and set out for Hebron to bring his outcast home? There is room to believe that he did. And as Joseph talked with Zacharias through his writing table, he must have felt that dumbness, and even death itself, would be but a light punishment for such unbelief and such cruelty as his. But all this, and all that they had passed through since the angel came to Zacharias at the altar, only made the re-betrothal of Joseph and Mary the sweeter and the holier, with the aged priest acting more than the part of a father, and Elizabeth acting more than the part of a mother
Annas - After various changes, the office was given to Joseph, also called Caiaphas, the son-in-law of Annas, about A
Naples, Italy, City of - Under Spanish rule from 1442, conquered by Austria in the War of the Spanish Succession, a French republic in 1799, and a kingdom under Joseph Bonaparte in 1806, it was finally annexed to Italy in 1861
Devotion, Days of - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Days of Devotion - In Great Britain they are: ...
Easter Monday
Easter Tuesday
Whit Monday
Whit Tuesday
Purification of Blessed Virgin Mary (February 2,)
Saint Matthias (February 24,)
Saint Gregory the Great (March 12,)
Saint Joseph (March 19,)
Annunciation (March 25,)
Saint George (April 26,)
Saints Philip and James (May 1,)
Finding of the Cross (May 3,)
Saint Augustine (May 27,)
Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (June 24,)
Saint James, Apostle (July 25,)
Saint Anne (July 26,)
Saint Lawrence (August 10,)
Saint Bartholomew (August 24,)
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary (September 8,)
Saint Matthew (September 21,)
Saint Michael, Archangel (September 29,)
Saints Simon and Jude (October 28,)
Saint Andrew, Apostle (November 30,)
Immaculate Conception (December 8,)
Saint Thomas, Apostle (December 21,)
Saint Stephen (December 26,)
Saint John the Apostle (December 27,)
Holy Innocents (December 28,)
Saint Thomas of Canterbury (December 29,)
Saint Silvester (December 31,)
They are the same in Ireland, excepting that the Immaculate Conception is a holyday of obligation
Oscott - Offered to Bishop Milner, 1808, he accepted it and under his vigorous government it took on new life, the buildings were enlarged, and by 1840 its growth necessitated the building of a new college designed by Joseph Potter
Ephraim - ” The younger son of Joseph by the Egyptian Asenath, daughter of the priest of On (Genesis 41:52 )
Nicodemus - That man was Joseph of Arimathea
Glastonbury Abbey - Benedictine monastery, Somersetshire, England, the center of early Christian tradition in England, founded, according to the legendary history of William of Malmesbury, by Saint Joseph of Arimathea, A
Abbey, Glastonbury - Benedictine monastery, Somersetshire, England, the center of early Christian tradition in England, founded, according to the legendary history of William of Malmesbury, by Saint Joseph of Arimathea, A
Eleven - Genesis 37:9 (a) The eleven stars represent the eleven brothers of Joseph who were to bow down to him as they afterward did
Birth-Right - He forfeited his birth-right for defiling his father's bed, and it was given to Joseph, who in Ephraim and Manasseh had a double portion among the tribes
Deed - And Joseph said to them, what deed is this which ye have done? Gen
Bow - Hence, the dying patriarch, when blessing Joseph, speaks of "his bow abiding in strength, because his arms were made strong by the hands of the mighty God of Jacob
Calligonus, Eunuch And Chamberlain to Valentinian ii - 175) supposes that these events were in the mind of Ambrose when he wrote the 6th chapter of his book on Joseph
Geography - ...
Albertus Magnus
Alexander Neckam
Antoine Thomson d'Abbadie
Christopher Columbus
Claudius Clavus
Elie Colin
Ferdinand Magellan
Fra Mauro
Heinrich Scherer
Jacques Marquette
Joseph Tieffentaller
Juan de la Cosa
Louis Joliet
Martin Behaim
Martin Martini
Martin Waldseemuller
Olaus Magnus, Bishop
Rene Robert Cavalier de La Salle
Vasco da Gama
Vasco Nunez de Balboa
Rochester, New York, Diocese of - Nazareth Academy for girls was established by the Sisters of Saint Joseph shortly afterwards
Sychar - of, Neapolis (Shechem ) by the field of Joseph with Jacob's well. The tomb of Joseph is a third of a mile northeastward, thence a path ascends to Aschar which is visible from Jacob's well
Saint Louis, Missouri, City of - The city was raised to an episcopal see in 1826, with Right Reverend Joseph Rosati as incumbent, and three years later the Sisters of Charity founded a hospital which did noble work during the cholera epidemic of 1849, caring for 1330 patients, and sacrificing two sisters. Various religious orders came to the assistance of the bishop; Sisters of Saint Joseph in 1836; Visitation Nuns in 1844; Ursuline Nuns in 1848, and the Christian Brothers, who, by 1852 had charge of five schools
Embalming - Thus the body of Joseph was preserved, to be conveyed into the land of promise after nearly two centuries, Genesis 50:26 . Thus the body of the Savior was embalmed entire by Joseph and Nicodemus, while, ignorant of this, the two Mary's and their friends were prepared to render him a similar honor when the Jewish Sabbath was past, John 19:38 - 40
Reuben - He saved the life of Joseph when his brothers thought to kill him, and when they went to buy corn in Egypt, he offered to be responsible for Benjamin's safety. (Joseph, type of Christ separated from His brethren, had the birthright
Dreams - For instance, Joseph, in Matthew 1:1 and Matthew 2:1 , understood the dreams concerning Mary and Herod even though no mention is made of interpretation. The Old Testament Joseph had this kind of dream in Genesis 37:1 . ...
In the Old Testament Joseph and Daniel are the preeminent interpreters of dreams. The accounts of Joseph identify God as the Source of Joseph's ability when he came before Pharaoh (Genesis 41:16 )
Genesis, Book of - ...
In Joseph a new branch of the history commences: he is hated by his brethren and is sold to the Gentiles, but becomes their saviour — an evident type of Christ in His sufferings and His glory. Joseph takes a Gentile wife in his rejection, as Christ takes a bride outside of Israel. Jacob blesses his twelve sons, dies, and is buried in Canaan; and Joseph, before he died, being sure that God would visit them and bring them out of the land, bade them carry up his bones from Egypt. See ABRAHAM, ISAAC, JACOB, Joseph
Ephraim (1) - ) Joseph's second son by Asenath, named so, "for," said Joseph, "God hath caused me to be fruitful in the land of my affliction. " Born during the seven plenteous years; the "doubly fruitful" may refer to both the fruitfulness vouchsafed to Joseph and the plenty of the season. Jacob wittingly guided his hands so as to lay his right on Ephraim and his left on Manasseh, notwithstanding Joseph's remonstrance; saying, "Manasseh shall be great, but his younger brother shall be greater than he, and his seed shall become a multitude of nations. ...
Before Joseph's death Ephraim's family had reached the third generation (Genesis 50:23). ...
Still in Moses' blessing Ephraim stands pre-eminent over Manasseh; and he and Manasseh are compared to the two horns of the reem (not unicorn but the gigantic wild ox, now extinct, or urus); "with them he (Joseph) shall push the people together to the ends of the earth, and they are the ten thousands of Ephraim and they are the thousands of Manasseh. " Moreover Joseph's land is "blessed of the Lord for the precious things of heaven . "His glory (is like) the firstling of his bullock," rather "the firstling of his (Joseph's) bullock (i. Ephraim made by Jacob in privileges the firstborn of Joseph's offspring; the singular 'bullock' being used collectively for all Joseph's offspring, and expressing their strength) is his glory. "...
Whereas Jacob dwelt on Joseph's trials, and prophetically the severe wars of his descendants, in which God would strengthen them as He had strengthened Joseph, Moses looks onward to their final triumph and peaceful enjoyment of all precious things in their land. - The two great tribes of Judah and Joseph (Ephraim and Manasseh) took their inheritance first. of Bethel, called Neara by Josephus, abounding in water, and so likely to be near Ras el Ain (five miles N. ...
The territory of the twofold "house of Joseph" was 55 miles from E. ...
From the time of the severance of the ten tribes from Judah, brought about by Rehoboam's infatuation and Jeroboam's ("ruler over all the charge of the house of Joseph") rousing Ephraim's innate self-elation, Ephraim became the representative and main portion of the northern kingdom; for the surrounding pagan, the luxurious Phoenicians, the marauding Midianites, the Syrians and Assyrians from the N
Jacob - Add to these his domestic troubles and misfortunes; the impatience of his favourite wife, "Give me children, or I die;" her death in bearing her second son, Benjamin; the rape of his daughter Dinah; the perfidy and cruelty of her brothers, Simeon and Levi, to the Shechemites; the misbehaviour of Reuben; the supposed death of Joseph, his favourite and most deserving son:—these were, all together, sufficient to have brought down his gray hairs with sorrow to the grave, had he not been divinely supported and encouraged throughout the whole of his pilgrimage. For the circumstances which led Jacob into Egypt, see Joseph . ...
When Jacob, at the invitation of Joseph, went down to Egypt, Joseph introduced his father to his royal master; and the patriarch, in his priestly character, blessed Pharaoh, and supplicated the divine favour for the king. The patriarch, perceiving that his dissolution was near, sent for Joseph, and bound him by a solemn promise to bury him with his fathers in Canaan. Shortly after this, Jacob was taken ill, and it being reported to Joseph, he hastened to the bedside of his father, taking with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim. He next blessed the infant children of Joseph; but, as he placed his hands upon their heads, he crossed them, putting his right upon Ephraim the younger, and his left upon Manasseh the elder. Joseph wished to correct the mistake of his father, but Jacob persisted, being guided by a divine impulse; and he gave to each of the lads a portion in Israel, at the same time declaring that the younger should be greater than the elder, Genesis 48:22 . Joseph, having closed the eyes of his father, and wept over him, commanded the physicians to embalm the body. After a general mourning of seventy days, he solicited the king's permission to go with the remains of Jacob into Canaan, to which Pharaoh consented; and with Joseph went up all the state officers and principal nobility of Egypt, so that when they came to the place of interment, the Canaanites were astonished, and said, "This is a grievous mourning to the Egyptians," Genesis 50:1-11
Burial - In compliance with the oath which he made him swear unto him (47:29-31), Joseph, assisted by his brethren, buried Jacob in the cave of Machpelah (50:2,13). At the Exodus, Moses "took the bones of Joseph with him," and they were buried in the "parcel of ground" which Jacob had bought of the sons of Hamor (Joshua 24:32 ), which became Joseph's inheritance (Genesis 48:22 ; 1 Chronicles 5:1 ; John 4:5 ). ...
Our Lord was buried in a new tomb, hewn out of the rock, which Joseph of Arimathea had prepared for himself (Matthew 27:57-60 ; Mark 15:46 ; John 19:41,42 )
Brother - The arguments for the "brethren" of Jesus (James, Joses, Simon, and Judas) mentioned in Matthew 13:56 being literally His brothers, born of Joseph and Mary, are:...
(1) their names are always connected with Mary, "His brethren" is the phrase found nine times in the Gospels, once in Acts (Acts 1:14);...
(2) nothing is said to imply that the phrase is not to be taken literally. ...
(2) If Joseph had been their father, they would have been some one time at least designated in the usual mode "sons of Joseph. The naming of Jesus' brethren with His virgin mother so often may be because Jesus and she took up their abode at the home of Mary, the Virgin's sister, after Joseph's death; for that he soon died appears from his name being never mentioned after Luke 2
Ephraim - Second son of Joseph and Asenath. When Israel blessed the two sons of Joseph he set Ephraim before his elder brother, saying he should be greater, and his seed should become a multitude (or, 'fatness') of nations. ...
Ephraim had the place of the first-born (Jeremiah 31:9 ), the birthright being taken from Reuben and given to Joseph
Manasseh - the eldest son of Joseph, and grandson of the patriarch Jacob, Genesis 41:50 , was born, A. The name Manasseh signifies forgetfulness, because Joseph said, "God hath made me forget all my toil, and all my father's house. " When Jacob was going to die, Joseph brought his two sons to him, that his father might give them his last blessing, Genesis 48
Ephraim - Second son of Joseph and Asenath. When Israel blessed the two sons of Joseph he set Ephraim before his elder brother, saying he should be greater, and his seed should become a multitude (or, 'fatness') of nations. ...
Ephraim had the place of the first-born (Jeremiah 31:9 ), the birthright being taken from Reuben and given to Joseph
Manasseh (1) - ) Joseph's firstborn by Asenath, whose birth "made him forget all his toil and all (the sorrow he endured through) his father's house" (Genesis 41:51). Joseph had the portion of the firstborn by having the double portion, i. When Joseph took Ephraim in his right toward Israel's left hand, and Manasseh in his left toward Israel's right hand, Israel put his right upon Ephraim the younger, and his left upon Manasseh wittingly, notwithstanding Joseph's remonstrance. ) Manasseh's son by an Aramitess (Syrian) concubine, Machir, had children "borne upon Joseph's knees" (Genesis 50:23), i. Moses in his last blessing (Deuteronomy 33:13-17) gives Joseph (i. Ephraim and Manasseh) the "precious things of the earth" by "the good will of Him that dwelt in the bush, "in contrast to Joseph's past "separation from his brethren," his horns like the two of the wild bull (not "unicorn"), namely, "the ten thousands of Ephraim and the thousands of Manasseh shall push," etc. In the declension of the nation Isaiah (Isaiah 9:20-21) foretells that the two sons of Joseph, once so intimately united, should be rent into factions thirsting for one another's blood, "they shall eat every man the flesh of his own arm, Manasseh Ephraim, and Ephraim Manasseh, and they together against Judah. "...
After the fall of the ten tribes, Psalm 80 expresses Judah's prayer of sympathy for her sister: "give ear, O Shepherd of Israel, Thou that leadest Joseph like a flock
Jacob - Finally Rachel produced a son, Joseph, and he became Jacob’s favourite (Genesis 29:31-35; Genesis 30:1-24). Out of these circumstances came the dramatic sequence of events recorded in the long story of Joseph (see Joseph THE SON OF JACOB). Before he died, he raised Joseph’s two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, to the same status as his own sons (Genesis 48:1-6). This was because he had given Joseph the birthright that the eldest son had lost (1 Chronicles 5:1-2; cf. Now Joseph, through his two sons, would receive twice the inheritance of the other sons (Genesis 48:14-16; Genesis 49:26)
Virgin Birth - He is popularly regarded and spoken of as the son of Joseph (cf. Matthew 13:55 ‘Is not this the carpenter’s son?’ Luke 4:22, John 1:45; John 6:42); and even in the Nativity narrative of the Third Gospel, Mary and Joseph are several times referred to as ‘his parents’ (γονεῖς, Luke 2:27; Luke 2:41; Luke 2:43),* [2] and I sought thee sorrowing’ (Luke 2:30-328). It is quite clear that Jesus was popularly looked upon by His contemporaries as Joseph’s son by natural generation. In preserving, therefore, the popular references to Jesus as Joseph’s son, the First and Third Gospels conform to psychological and historic truth. , occurs: ‘And some went away to the chief priests, and to the chiefs of the Pharisees, and told them that Jesus the son of Joseph had done great signs,’ etc. ’ On the other hand, if such references as those cited above from the Gospels had exhibited a mechanical consistency in describing Jesus as the Son of Mary (to the entire exclusion of Joseph), the representation would have justly been impugned as violating the canons of historical and psychological truth. ...
In social life and as a member of the Jewish nation, Jesus, during His earthly life, would necessarily be regarded as Joseph’s son. As Dalman has pointed out, ‘If no other fatherhood was alleged, then the child must have been regarded as bestowed by God upon the house of Joseph’; and while Joseph was alive, Mary and her son were undoubtedly under his legal protection. This consideration will help to explain the fact that both genealogies trace the Davidic descent of Jesus through Joseph (not through Mary). On any view Jesus belonged to the family of Joseph; and if any formal and official birth-register ever had any independent existence in the Temple or elsewhere, Jesus would naturally appear therein as Joseph’s son. In Luke 2, it is urged, the view of the narrative is that Mary was Joseph’s wife, and that he was the father of Jesus (cf. Luke 2:33 ‘his father and his mother,’ Luke 2:41 ‘his parents,’ Luke 2:48 ‘thy father and I’); the Davidic pedigree of Jesus is traced through Joseph, with the harmonistic explanation ‘as was supposed’ (Luke 3:23); ‘and with this agrees the early reading apparently preserved in the Sinaitic-Syriac, Luke 2:5, “with Mary his wife. ’ An immediate conception is meant, not one that would naturally follow after Joseph had in due course taken her to wife; and this immediate conception is implied by the words ‘with haste’ in Luke 2:39. There would be nothing extraordinary in Mary’s conceiving a son as Joseph’s wife. For genealogical purposes it was necessary to link Jesus to previous generations through His foster-father Joseph. The significant fact still remains that the figure of Joseph is quite subordinated in the Lukan account, while that of Mary is proportionately enhanced in lonely importance. ), in that of Jesus it is made to the mother (Luke 1:28); and while the Baptist’s birth is represented as the occasion of such profound joy on the part of Zacharias that the latter’s dumbness is overcome, and he bursts into the strains of the Benedictus (Luke 1:68-79), no such rôle is assigned to Joseph. What reason can be adduced for this deliberate minimizing of the part assigned to Joseph—a feature that characterizes the Lukan narrative throughout—except it be that the fundamental fact, dominating and forming the climax of the whole, is the miraculous birth of Jesus of a virgin mother?† [17] In the Matthaean narrative the annunciation to Joseph (Matthew 1:20-21) is probably a citation from one of these Hebrew hymns, which has been translated into Greek. It has often been remarked that the narrative in the First Gospel is written from the standpoint of Joseph, that in the Third from the point of view of Mary
Uriel - In the lost ‘Prayer of Joseph’ he is the angel with whom Jacob wrestled, the eighth in rank from God, Jacob being the first
Judah - It was he who advised his brethren to sell Joseph to the Ishmaelite merchants, rather than stain their hands with his blood, Genesis 37:26
Nazareth - It was a place of no history (being entirely unmentioned in the OT, Josephus, or the Talmud), no importance, and, possibly, of bad reputation ( John 1:48 ). Here, however, lived Mary and Joseph
Signet - Examples of such rings in the Bible are: Pharaoh's ring given to Joseph (Genesis 41:42 ), Ahasuerus' ring given to Haman and then to Mordecai after Haman was hanged (Esther 3:10 ,Esther 3:10,3:12 ; Esther 8:2 ), King Darius' sealing the den of lions after Daniel was thrown into it (Daniel 6:17 )
Pharaoh - He takes the same relationship to Joseph as GOD the Father takes toward CHRIST
Augustus - He ruled the Roman Empire, including Palestine, when Jesus was born and ordered the taxation that brought Joseph and Mary to Bethlehem (Luke 2:1 )
Esser, Thomas - Baptismal name: Herman Joseph Esser
Bishop - The original word means "overseer," such as Joseph was in Potiphar's house, Genesis 39:4, or as the 3600 men were in Solomon's temple, 2 Chronicles 2:18, or as Uzzi was of the Levites, Nehemiah 11:22
Raiment - A coat or robe of many colours, such as Jacob gave to Joseph, is also a mark of distinction
Ananias - He was the son of Nebedaeus, succeeded Joseph son of Camydus, and preceded Ismael son of Phabi
Thomas Esser - Baptismal name: Herman Joseph Esser
Benjamin - He was a great comfort to his father, who saw in him the beloved wife he had buried, and Joseph whose loss he mourned
Seven Words of Christ - Joseph Haydn and Theodore Dubois have interpreted them in oratorio form
Bar'Nabas - (son of consolation or comfort ) a name given by the apostles, ( Acts 4:36 ) to Joseph (or Jose), a Levite of the island of Cyprus, who was early a disciple of Christ
Mary of Cleophas - ...
Mary was probably the Virgin's older sister or half-sister; she married Cleophas and by him had four sons, James (the apostle), Joses ("Joseph" Vaticanus manuscript, "John" Sinaiticus manuscript), Jude (the apostle), and Simon, and three daughters. Joseph too was dead, for he is never mentioned after Luke 2
Minnesota - The first missionary work was done by Father Joseph Jacques Marest, S. ...
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following, ...
Loretto
Sacred Heart
Saint Anthony Falls
Saint Bonifacius
Saint Charles
Saint Clair
Saint Cloud
Saint Francis
Saint Hilaire
Saint James
Saint Joseph
Saint Leo
Saint Louis Park
Saint Martin
Saint Michael
Saint Paul
Saint Peter
Saint Vincent
Ecclestiastical divisions include the archdiocese ...
Saint Paul and Minneapolis
and the dioceses, ...
Crookston
Duluth
New Ulm
Saint Cloud
Winona
See also, ...
patron saints index
Holy Grail, the - To the Early History class belong: "Joseph d'Arimathie" and "Merlin" by Robert de Boron (1170); the "Grand Saint Graal" (13th century); and the French prose romance, "Queste del Saint Graal," which was embodied in Malory's "Morte d'Arthur. The Grail is said to have been the dish used by Christ at the Paschal supper, to have been used by Joseph of Arimathea to gather the Precious Blood of Christ, and to have been brought to England
Jude, the Lord's Brother - The list of the Lord’s brothers is given in Mark 6:3 as ‘James, and Joses, and Judas [1], and Simon,’ in Matthew 13:55 as ‘James, and Joseph, and Simon, and Judas. ’ It would be precarious, even apart from the variation in order, to infer that Judas was one of the younger brothers of Jesus; still, this is not improbable, especially if, as the present writer believes, ‘the brethren of the Lord’ were sons of Joseph and Mary
Albany - Conroy, erected Saint Joseph's church, established a home for the aged in care of the Little Sisters of the Poor, and orphanages under the direction of the Sisters of Charity and the Christian Brothers. Charitable institutions in the city include Saint Peter's Hospital, in charge of the Sisters of Mercy, House of the Good Shepherd, for delinquent females and for the educating and reforming of wayward children, Saint Vincent's Female Orphan Asylum under the supervision of the Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul, who also have under their care a maternity hospital and infant home, and two day nurseries in care of the Sisters of Mercy and the Sisters of Saint Joseph. Educational institutions in addition to parochial schools include the College of Saint Rose conducted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph of Carondelet, and the Christian Brothers Academy
Apocrypha - ...
The following is a list of the Apocrypha: ...
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Jewish Apocalypses ...
Book of Henoch
Assumption of Moses
Fourth Book of Esdras
Apocalypse of Baruch
Apocalypse of Abraham
Legendary Apocrypha of Jewish Origin ...
Book of Jubilees, or Little Genesis
Third Book of Esdras
Third Book of Machabees
History and Maxims of Ahikar, the Assyrian
Apocryphal Psalms and Prayers ...
Psalms of Solomon
Prayer of Manasses
Jewish Philosophy ...
Fourth Book of Machabees
Apocrypha of Jewish Origin with Christian Accretions ...
Sibylline Oracles
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Ascension of Isaias
Apocrypha Of Christian Origin ...
Apocryphal Gospels of Catholic Origin ...
Protoevangelium Jacobi, or Infancy Gospel of James, describing the birth, education, and marriage of the Blessed Virgin
Gospel of the Pseudo-Matthew
Arabic Gospel of the Infancy
History of Joseph the Carpenter
Transitu Marire, or Evangelium Joannis, describing the death and assumption of the Blessed Virgin
Judaistic and Heretical Gospels ...
Gospel according to the Hebrews
Gospel according to the Egyptians
Gospel of Peter
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of Marcion
Gospel of Bartholomew
Gospel of Matthias
Gospel of Nicodemus
Gospel of the Twelve Apostles
Gospel of Andrew
Gospel of Barnabas
Gospel of Thaddeus
Gospel of Philip
Gospel of Eve
Gospel of Judas Iscariot
Pilate Literature and Other Apocrypha concerning Christ ...
Report of Pilate to the Emperor
Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea
Pseudo-Correspondence of Jesus and Abgar, King of Edessa
Gnostic Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter
Acts of John
Acts of Andrew
Acts and Martyrdom of Matthew
Acts of Thomas
Acts of Bartholomew
Catholic Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles ...
Acts of Peter and Paul
Acts of Paul
Acts of Paul and Thecla
Acts of Philip
Acts of Matthew
Acts of Simon and Jude
Acts of Barnabas
Acts of James the Greater
Apocryphal Doctrinal Works ...
Testamentum Domini
Nostri Jesu
Preaching of Peter, or Kerygma Petri
Apocryphal Epistles ...
Pseudo-Epistle of Peter
Pseudo-Epistles of Paul
Pseudo-Epistles to the Laodiceans
Pseudo-Correspondence of Paul and Seneca
Christian Apocryphal Apocalypses ...
Apocalypse of Peter
Apocalypse of Paul
Nazarene - ...
The next enquiry is, which of the sacred writers is it that thus predicted Christ should be called a Nazarene? To which I answer, in type and figure; Jacob and Moses both represented this great truth in their dying testimonies concerning Joseph, the typical Nazarite of the Lord Jesus Christ. Jacob's prophecy concerning Joseph in this particular runs thus: (Genesis 49:26) "The blessings of thy father have prevailed above the blessings of my progenitors, unto the utmost bound of the everlasting hills: they shall be on the head of Joseph, and on the crown of the head of him that was separate from his brethren. Moses, in like manner, makes use of the same allusion, when delivering his dying prediction concerning Joseph as typical of Christ. For the good will of him, (said he) my dweller in the bush, (referring to his first views of God incarnate, Exodus 3:2 compared with Acts 7:30) "Let the blessing come upon the head of Joseph, and upon the top of the head of him that was separate from his brethren. " In the original the very same word for separate is used as Genesis 49:26—so that Moses as well as Jacob, declared by the type Joseph, that the great Antitype should be the Nazarite or separate from among his brethren. ) "And in the sixth month, the angel Gabriel was sent from God, unto a city of Galilee named Nazareth, to a virgin espoused to a man, whose name was Joseph, of the house of David, and the virgin's name was Mary. " (Mark 1:24) Next we find the apostles giving in their testimony to the same blessed truth, John 1:45 "We have found him (saith Philip) of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph. (Acts 22:8)...
From the whole then, I hope the reader will think with me, that God the Holy Ghost had all along a design, from the first dawn of revelation, with an eye to the Lord Jesus in this most important character; and to this end and purpose directed his servants' minds, Jacob and Moses, to point to this great Nazarite, by type and figure, in the separation of Joseph from his brethren
Medals, Religious - , Sain Joseph, Saint Dominic, Saint Aloysius, Saint Francis of Assisi, Saint Agnes, Saint Anne, Saint Rita, the popular Medal of Saint ChrIstopher, and also the highly indulgenced Medal of Saint Benedict
those in honor of religious events and of devotions, e
Catholic Work For the Blind - To supply Catholic literature gratuitously for the blind in the United States, Joseph Stadelman founded, in 1900, a society called "The Xavier Free Publication Society for the Blind of the City of New York," which prints and circulates thousands of volumes
Grace - Thus Joseph found grace; that is, favour in the sight of his master
Unicorn - In Deuteronomy 33:17, "his (Joseph's) horns are like the horns of an unicorn" (so margin rightly, not "unicorns"); "the ten thousands of Ephraim and the thousands of Manasseh," two tribes sprung from the one Joseph, are the two horns from one head
Manasseh - One of at least two sons born to Joseph by Asenath (Genesis 41:50-51 )
Caiaphas - Joseph Caiaphas, the son-in-law of Annas ( John 18:13 ), was high priest between a
Cupbearer - The first mention of this officer is in the story of Joseph ( Genesis 40:1-15 ), where the term rendered butler in EV Coin - The "pieces of silver" paid by Abimelech to Abraham (Genesis 20:16 ), and those also for which Joseph was sold (37:28), were proably in the form of rings
Sister - After that she was a normal mother with her husband Joseph
Elimelech - The whole of the book of Ruth is interesting, not only as a true history of events which took place in the church, but, like that of Joseph, is typical and figurative of higher things
Generation - "Joseph saw Ephraim's children of the third generation," Genesis 50:23
Rachel - Apparently she prayed to God, for we read that He 'hearkened' to her: she bore Joseph and then Benjamin, at whose birth she died
Famine - Then succeeded that remarkable famine which Joseph was enabled to predict, and which extended widely over Egypt and various other regions
Viatorians - Religious order founded in 1835 at Vourles near Lyons, France, by Father Louis Joseph Querbes, under the patronage of Saint Viator
Edward Fenwick - First Bishop of Cincinnati, brother of Benedict Joseph Fenwick, born Leonardstown, Maryland, 1768; died Wooster, Ohio, 1832. In 1818 he built Saint Joseph's, near Somerset, the first church in Ohio, with a Dominican convent nearby
Zerubbabel or Zorobabel - We know nothing further of his history, except that from him both Joseph and Mary descended, Matthew 1:13 Luke 3:27
Religious Medals - , Sain Joseph, Saint Dominic, Saint Aloysius, Saint Francis of Assisi, Saint Agnes, Saint Anne, Saint Rita, the popular Medal of Saint ChrIstopher, and also the highly indulgenced Medal of Saint Benedict
those in honor of religious events and of devotions, e
Adoption - " As he give no inheritance to their father Joseph, the effect of this adoption was simply the doubling of their inheritance. Thus, 1 Chronicles 2:21 , Machir, grandson of Joseph, and father of Gilead, Numbers 26:29 , gave his daughter to Hezron, "who took her; and was a son of sixty years," sixty years of age, "and she bare hi Segub; and Segub begat Jair, who had twenty-three cities in the land of Gilead," Joshua 13:30 1 Kings 4:13
Ephraim, the Tribe of - The descendants of Joseph formed two of the tribes of Israel, whereas each of the other sons of Jacob was the founder of only one tribe. It was not till the close of the first period of Jewish history that God 'refused the tabernacle of Joseph, and chose not the tribe of Ephraim, but chose the tribe of Judah, the Mount Zion which he loved' (Psalm 78:67,68 )
Hart - The Targums say he first told Jacob that Joseph was yet alive; "he giveth goodly words. The hind is emblematic of the grace, innocence, and loveliness (Song of Solomon 2:9) of the Antitype to Joseph (Genesis 49:23-24)
Staff - ’ The reference is to the act of the patriarch when he received the solemn oath of Joseph, that he would bury him with his fathers (‘Israel bowed himself upon the bed’s head,’ Genesis 47:31). ’ There is no difficulty of interpretation if the Septuagint is followed: Jacob may have stood up to receive the oath of Joseph
Star - ...
Genesis 37:9 (a) The explanation of this type is that the eleven stars were the eleven brothers of Joseph, while the sun and moon represented Joseph's father and mother. These eleven brethren bowed down to their brother Joseph just as he had dreamed
ma'ry the Virgin, - She was, like Joseph, of the tribe of Judah and of the lineage of David. She was betrothed to Joseph of Nazareth; but before her marriage she became with child by the Holy Ghost, and became the mother of Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the world
Judah - ' It was Judah who advised the selling of Joseph rather than taking his life: so his descendants, the Jews, delivered the Lord into the hands of the Gentiles. He was able to persuade his father to let Benjamin be taken into Egypt, and when appeals were to be made to Joseph it was Judah who made them
Mary, the Virgin - There is no reason to doubt that the Virgin, as well as Joseph, belonged to the tribe of Judah and to the family of David (Luke 1:32; Luke 1:69, Romans 1:3, 2 Timothy 2:8, Hebrews 7:14), although it is almost certain, on the other hand, that both Mt. give, not her genealogy, but Joseph’s. According to a theory brought forward in connexion with the harmonizing of the two genealogies of our Lord, Mary was a cousin of Joseph her husband (art. That her family was but a humble one may be inferred from her betrothal to Joseph ‘the carpenter,’ especially if there be any truth in the tradition as to the disparity of their ages. Equally impossible is it to suppose that she believed that the child promised would be the fruit of a future union with Joseph. The supposition that her journey was due to the intention of Joseph to put her away is a baseless one. , which records Joseph’s intention to put Mary away privily when her condition became known to him, and speaks of his subsequent marriage with her in obedience to the angelic messages. Had she not been Joseph’s wife, Jewish custom would have forbidden her making the journey along with him. When Joseph went up to Bethlehem to get himself enrolled, Mary went also, not because it was necessary, but because ‘she would be anxious at all risks not to be separated from Joseph’ (Plummer, in loc. Here in Nazareth it was that those brothers and sisters of the Lord, of whom we read in the course of the Gospel narrative, were born to Mary and Joseph (for other views see art. Yet of the Virgin’s life during the interval between our Lord’s twelfth year and His Baptism we know nothing but what is contained in these words and those which immediately precede, as to her Son’s subjection to her and Joseph. It is, however, an easily drawn inference from the absence of any mention of Joseph in the later Gospel narrative, that he died during this interval. ‘The Arabic Historia Josephi (cc. 14, 15) places his death in our Lord’s eighteenth year, when Joseph had reached the age of 111’ (Swete on Mark 6:3)
Mary - In 6:1-6a Jesus is identified as "the son of Mary, a brother [1] of James, Joseph, Judas and Simon, " and he is said to have "sisters. Nevertheless all served God's messianic plan; so does Mary, whose son was not begotten by Joseph (v. ...
In 1:18-25 Joseph acknowledges Jesus as his son by claiming him and naming him, so that he is truly "a son of David. " Further, Joseph is told and recognizes that Mary conceived her Son in a miraculous way through the direct and unique action of the Holy Spirit. 12), who (as noted above) may be her sons, Joseph's sons by a previous marriage, or the cousins of Jesus
Mary -
The wife of Joseph, the mother of Jesus, called the "Virgin Mary," though never so designated in Scripture (Matthew 2:11 ; Acts 1:14 ). While she resided at Nazareth with her parents, before she became the wife of Joseph, the angel Gabriel announced to her that she was to be the mother of the promised Messiah (Luke 1:35 ). Joseph was supernaturally made aware (Matthew 1:18-25 ) of her condition, and took her to his own home. There for thirty years Mary, the wife of Joseph the carpenter, resides, filling her own humble sphere, and pondering over the strange things that had happened to her. Probably also during this period Joseph died, for he is not again mentioned. There Mary remained till all was over, and the body was taken down and laid in Joseph's tomb
Boyhood of Jesus - Apart from Mark 6:3 (the only passage in which He is called ὁ τέκτων, and not merely ὁ τοῦ τέκτονος υἱός), common sense would teach us that He who deigned to live in a carpenter’s household, under real human conditions, in His youth, would help Joseph, and learn the art he practised. This is implied in His subjection to Joseph (Luke 2:51). ...
During the stay at Nazareth, where Joseph and Mary settled after their return from Egypt (Matthew 2:23), the Babe (τὸ βρέφος, Luke 2:16) passed into the stage of young boyhood. Joseph may have gone at other seasons; at this season Mary usually (ἐπορεύοντο, imperfect of ‘habit’) accompanied him. John 7:2; John 7:8-10 show that the ‘brethren of the Lord’ attended the feast of Tabernacles, which may be an indication of what Joseph’s custom was. Herod the Great had tried to kill the Child, Archelaus was considered by Joseph to be as dangerous, and therefore Jesus was kept out of his dominions. But His answer to Joseph and Mary (Luke 2:49) implies some self-knowledge, and perhaps a step in the acquirement of that self-knowledge and consciousness. No doubt our Lord followed this custom, and no doubt also Joseph gave the explanation, either in the traditional words as handed down to the modern Jews, or in a freer, perhaps a fuller manner (cf. We should expect pious Jews, like Joseph and Mary, to remain the whole time, not because it was a precept, but out of devotion. 247) argues that Joseph and Mary set out for home before the close of the Feast, because the Talmud says that ‘during Feasts’ (not after them) ‘the members of the Temple Sanhedrin came out on to the terrace and taught the people, contrary to the usual custom of sitting as a court of appeal,’ and he thinks that Christ was there. Luke’s words are therefore perhaps compatible with Joseph and Mary having left on the third day, the so-called half-holiday, when it was lawful to return home, but we prefer (in spite of Edersheim’s Talmudical argument) to think that they ‘stayed to the end’ of the Feast. Luke, however, does not say that Jesus remained for any such reason, nor that Joseph and Mary lost sight of Him through any failure of duty. Possibly Joseph and Mary joined their fellow-travellers from Galilee, in the belief that the Child, who would know the time and point of departure, was among the younger pilgrims. ...
Our Lord’s ‘parents’ (γονεῖς, Luke 2:43—‘Joseph and his mother’ is a correction in the interests of orthodox dogma), being ignorant of His having stayed behind, went therefore a day’s journey towards home. ]'>[8] As this refers to a period only twelve years previous, Joseph and Mary could easily find some of these residents of Jerusalem, even if the connexion had not been kept up in the yearly Passover visits (Luke 2:41). We think that the reason for Joseph and Mary spending at least a day in Jerusalem before going up to the Temple, was that they and our Lord were well known to this group of persons, and that they thought of Him as possibly among friends at Jerusalem, just as they had thought it possible on the first day of the separation that He was among the pilgrims. It has, moreover, been suggested that on the journey up to Jerusalem, Mary for the first time told Him the story of His birth, of the messages of the angels, of the Magi, of Simeon, of Anna, of the flight into Egypt, and of the dreams of Joseph. It is worth noting that while Authorized Version has ‘astonished’ for the feeling of the bystanders (Luke 2:47 ἐξίσταντο) and ‘amazed’ for that of Joseph and Mary (Luke 2:48
Joseph ii, Emperor - Joseph II was the most celebrated exponent of Josephinism, or the policy of secular interference and state supremacy in ecclesiastical affairs, so called after the emperor
Josephinism - Joseph II was the most celebrated exponent of Josephinism, or the policy of secular interference and state supremacy in ecclesiastical affairs, so called after the emperor
Lilies - In Christian art it is an emblem of ...
the Annunciation, to indicate the purity of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Saint Agnes of Montepulciano
Saint Angelus of Jerusalem, as a symbol of his pure speech
Saint Anthony of Padua
Saint Antonius of Florence
Saint Casimir of Poland
Saint Catherine of Siena
Saint Catherine of Sweden
Saint Clydog
Saint Columba of Rieti
Saint Daria
Saint Didacus
Saint Dominic de Guzman
Saint Emerentiana, as a symbol of a pure death
Saint Francis Xavier
Gabriel the Archangel due to his connection to the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Annunciation
Saint Gertrude the Great
Saint Joseph, whose staff (according to an ancient legend) bloomed into lilies in the presence of Mary as a symbol of his chastity
Saint Justina of Padua
Saint Kenelm
Saint Lydwina of Schiedam
Saint Martina
Saint Margaret of Hungary
Saint Mary Anne de Paredes, in reference the lily that grew from her spilled blood
Saint Nicholas of Tolentino
Blessed Osanna Andreasi
Saint Pulcheria
Saint Ursicinus of Saint-Ursanne
and others
Lily - In Christian art it is an emblem of ...
the Annunciation, to indicate the purity of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Saint Agnes of Montepulciano
Saint Angelus of Jerusalem, as a symbol of his pure speech
Saint Anthony of Padua
Saint Antonius of Florence
Saint Casimir of Poland
Saint Catherine of Siena
Saint Catherine of Sweden
Saint Clydog
Saint Columba of Rieti
Saint Daria
Saint Didacus
Saint Dominic de Guzman
Saint Emerentiana, as a symbol of a pure death
Saint Francis Xavier
Gabriel the Archangel due to his connection to the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Annunciation
Saint Gertrude the Great
Saint Joseph, whose staff (according to an ancient legend) bloomed into lilies in the presence of Mary as a symbol of his chastity
Saint Justina of Padua
Saint Kenelm
Saint Lydwina of Schiedam
Saint Martina
Saint Margaret of Hungary
Saint Mary Anne de Paredes, in reference the lily that grew from her spilled blood
Saint Nicholas of Tolentino
Blessed Osanna Andreasi
Saint Pulcheria
Saint Ursicinus of Saint-Ursanne
and others
Sell - "Let us sell Joseph to the Ishmaelites- And they sold him for twenty pieces of silver
Joseph, Saint - Public recognition of Saint Joseph is first found among the Eastern Copts in the 4th century; the Church began to celebrate his feast in the 6th century
North Carolina - These included Father Le Mercier at Raleigh in 1805, Reverend Joseph de Cloriviere of Charleston at Fayetteville in 1812, Reverend Nicholas Kerney of Norfolk at Newbern and Wilmington in 1819
North Dakota - The first missionary within the limits of North Dakota was the Reverend Joseph Severe Dumoulin, sent by Bishop Plessis of Quebec to minister to a colony of Canadians who had been driven south from
Weaving - We find it practiced with great skill by the Egyptians at a very early period; The vestures of fine linen" such as Joseph wore, (Genesis 41:42 ) were the product of Egyptian looms
Prison - The first occasion on which we read of a prison is in the history of Joseph in Egypt. Then Potiphar, "Joseph's master, took him, and put him into the prison, a place where the king's prisoners were bound" (Genesis 39:20-23 )
Machir - Oldest son of Manasseh and grandson of Joseph (Joshua 17:1 )
Dream - Joseph was warned by God in a dream
Shechem - Jacob himself bought ground from the children of Hamor, and in it Joseph was buried (Joshua 24:32)
Antidikomarianitae - who (in opposition to the Κολλυριδιάνιδες ) maintained the novel supposition advanced at that time by Bonosus of Sadica, and by Helvidius, that "our Lord's brethren" were children borne by the Blessed Virgin to Joseph after our Lord's birth
John - In 2Ma 8:22 , and perhaps again 10:19, he is by mistake called Joseph
Embalming - Jacob and Joseph were both embalmed in Egypt, but we do not read that it was ever practised by the children of Israel
Imposition of Hands - The dying patriarch blessed the sons of Joseph, putting his hands significantly upon the head of each
Suburbs - It denotes the untilled ground outside a city or the “pasture land” belonging to the cities: “For the children of Joseph were two tribes, Manasseh and Ephraim: therefore they gave no part unto the Levites in the land, save cities to dwell in, with their suburbs for their cattle and for their substance” ( Manas'Seh - (forgetting ), the eldest son of Joseph, ( Genesis 41:51 ; 46:20 ) born 1715-10 B
Sacristan Emperor - Joseph II was the most celebrated exponent of Josephinism, or the policy of secular interference and state supremacy in ecclesiastical affairs, so called after the emperor
Cistern - Joseph was placed in a “broken” cistern by his brothers (Genesis 37:20-29 )
ra'Chel - 1753) and mother of Joseph and Benjamin
Manas'Seh - (forgetting ), the eldest son of Joseph, ( Genesis 41:51 ; 46:20 ) born 1715-10 B
ex'Odus - (Exodus 19:40 ; 38:1 ) ...
The first part contains an account of the following particulars: the great increase of Jacob's posterity in the land of Egypt, and their oppression under a new dynasty, which occupied the throne after the death of Joseph; the birth, education, flight and return of Moses; the ineffectual attempts to prevail upon Pharaoh to let the Israelites go; the successive signs and wonders, ending in the death of the first-born, by means of which the deliverance of Israel from the land of bondage is at length accomplished, and the institution of the Passover; finally the departure out of Egypt and the arrival of the Israelites at Mount Sinai
Honey - In the second place the term debash applies to a decoction of the juice of the grape, which is still called dibs , and which forms an article of commerce in the East, it was this, and not ordinary bee-honey, which Jacob sent to Joseph, ( Genesis 43:11 ) and which the Tyrians purchased from Palestine
Deep, the - When Jacob blessed his son Joseph with “blessings of the deep that lieth under,” he was attempting to bestow fertility on Joseph and his offspring and on their land (Genesis 49:25 ; compare Deuteronomy 33:13-17 )
Indiana - In 1686 land along the Saint Joseph River, near the present site of Notre Dame University at South Bend was given by the French government of Quebec to the Jesuits for an Indian mission, and there the zealous pioneer, Father Claude Allouez, ministered, dying in 1689. Early in the 18th century French posts were established at For Miami near the Indian village of Kikionga, or Kiskakon, on the Saint Joseph Branch of the Maunee Reiver, now Fort Wayne; at Fort Ouiatenon on the Wabash, near the present Lafayette; and at the Poste au Ouabache, on the lower Wabash, subsequently named Vincennes
Herod the Great - He left orders with his uncle Joseph that if he were put to death, Mariamne was to be killed. On his return, his sister Salome poisoned his mind with suspicions of his wife's infidelity with Joseph, who had unwisely betrayed the orders of Herod. He was however reconciled with his wife, but Joseph was put to death and Alexandra imprisoned
Temptation - We read of the temptation of Joseph (Genesis 39 ), of David (2 Samuel 24 ; 1 Chronicles 21 ), of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 32:31 ), of Daniel (Daniel 6 ), etc
Honesty - Jacob's sons repeatedly assured Joseph of their honesty (Genesis 42:11 ,Genesis 42:11,42:19 ,Genesis 42:19,42:31 ,Genesis 42:31,42:33-34 ), never guessing that their brother knew their deceptive natures all too well (Genesis 37:31-33 )
Rachel - Her sons were Joseph and Benjamin: she died in giving birth to Benjamin
On - ...
"It was at On that Joseph wooed and won the dark-skinned Asenath, the daughter of the high priest of its great temple
Magic - We read also of the divining cup of Joseph (Genesis 44:5 )
Worship - In a dream, Joseph saw the sheaves of his brothers “bowing down” before his sheaf ( Midian - Joseph was probably bought by them, perhaps in company with Ishmaelites
Envy - Examples abound in the Bible, such as are suggested by the relations between Cain and Abel, Jacob and Esau, Rachel and Leah, Joseph and his brothers, Saul and David, Haman and Mordecai, the elder brother and the prodigal son, the Roman evangelists of Philippians 1:15 and the Apostle Paul, and many others
Charm - God gave Joseph the ability to be charming or gain favor with the Egyptian jailer (Genesis 39:21 )
Arimathaea - ARIMATHaeA (Ἁριμαθαία) is mentioned in Matthew 27:57, Mark 15:43, Luke 23:51, and John 19:38 as the place from which Joseph, who buried the body of Jesus, came up to Jerusalem
Archelaus - ...
Joseph was warned in a dream to avoid Judea because of Archelaus' rule
Thompson, William -
heat, which treats of the effects produced by the force of the form of energy known as heat
optics, which treats of all connected with the phenomena of sight
electricity and magnetism, which treat of the agency of electricity and phenomena caused by it, and of the laws of magnetic force
Among those who have made important contributions to the science are: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Ampere, Andre Marie
Babinet, Jacques
Beccaria, Giovanni Battista
Becquerel, Antoine Cesar
Becquerel, Antoine Henri
Branley, Edward
Coulomb, Charles Augustin
Delany, Patrick Bernard
Fizeau, Armand Hippolyte Louis
Foucault, Jean Bernard Leon
Fraunhofer, Joseph van
Fresnel, Augustin-Jean
Galilei, Galileo
Galvani, Luigi
Gramme, Zenobe Theophile
Grimaldi, Francesco Maria
Haüy, René Just
Mariotte, Edme
Matteucci, Carlo
Melloni, Macedonio
Nobili, Leopoldo
Regnault, Victor
Torricelli, Evangelista
Volta, Alessandro
OTHER CHRISTIAN PHYSICISTS ...
Boyle, Robert
Brewster, David
Faraday, Michael
Helmholtz, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand van
Hertz, Heinrich Rudolf
Huygens, Christian
Joule, James Prescott
Maxwell, James Clerk
Mayer, Julius Robert
Newton, Isaac
Oersted, Hans Christian
Ohm, Georg Simon
Rankine, W
William Thompson -
heat, which treats of the effects produced by the force of the form of energy known as heat
optics, which treats of all connected with the phenomena of sight
electricity and magnetism, which treat of the agency of electricity and phenomena caused by it, and of the laws of magnetic force
Among those who have made important contributions to the science are: ...
CATHOLICS ...
Ampere, Andre Marie
Babinet, Jacques
Beccaria, Giovanni Battista
Becquerel, Antoine Cesar
Becquerel, Antoine Henri
Branley, Edward
Coulomb, Charles Augustin
Delany, Patrick Bernard
Fizeau, Armand Hippolyte Louis
Foucault, Jean Bernard Leon
Fraunhofer, Joseph van
Fresnel, Augustin-Jean
Galilei, Galileo
Galvani, Luigi
Gramme, Zenobe Theophile
Grimaldi, Francesco Maria
Haüy, René Just
Mariotte, Edme
Matteucci, Carlo
Melloni, Macedonio
Nobili, Leopoldo
Regnault, Victor
Torricelli, Evangelista
Volta, Alessandro
OTHER CHRISTIAN PHYSICISTS ...
Boyle, Robert
Brewster, David
Faraday, Michael
Helmholtz, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand van
Hertz, Heinrich Rudolf
Huygens, Christian
Joule, James Prescott
Maxwell, James Clerk
Mayer, Julius Robert
Newton, Isaac
Oersted, Hans Christian
Ohm, Georg Simon
Rankine, W
Ephraim - The second son of Joseph, born in Egypt, Genesis 41:52
Noph - Here, it is supposed, Joseph was a prisoner and a ruler, and here Moses stood before Pharaoh
Goshen - It was occupied by the Hebrews from the time of Joseph until the Exodus. Joseph met his father there. Possibly, the Hebrews settled here with the Hyksos during Joseph's time. (1) The pharaoh assigned Goshen to Joseph's family when they entered Egypt (Genesis 47:6 ,Genesis 47:6,47:11 ). (3) It may be possible to date Joseph's entrance to Egypt with the Hyksos control of the Delta
Mourning - It was an occasion of studied publicity and ceremonial; so Abraham for Sarah (Genesis 23:2), Jacob for Joseph (Genesis 37:34-35), Joseph and the Egyptians for Jacob 70 days and a further period of seven (Genesis 50:3-10), Israel for Aaron 80 days (Numbers 20:29), and for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8)
Famine - ...
These passages should be compared with the terrible description of Deuteronomy 28:49-57 , and with Josephus’ account of the last siege of Jerusalem ( BJ V. The device by which Joseph warded off its worst effects is illustrated by Egyptian inscriptions. In one, Baba, who lived about the time of Joseph, says: ‘I collected corn, as a friend of the harvest-god, and was watchful at the time of sowing. The famine of Acts 11:28 is usually identified with one mentioned by Josephus ( Ant
Claudius, the Emperor - When Herod Antipas and Herodias came to court the favour of Caligula (Joseph. His presence there when Claudius came to the throne (Joseph
Tribe - But Jacob on his death bed adopted Ephraim and Manasseh, the sons of Joseph, and would have them also to constitute two tribes of Israel, Genesis 48:5 . Instead of twelve tribes, there were now thirteen, that of Joseph being divided into two
Benjamin - His brothers, touched perhaps with some sense of their cruel wrong to Joseph, seem to have treated him with tenderness; and, when they first went down to Egypt to buy corn, he was left at home. Joseph, however, required that he should be brought, and, to insure the return of the brethren, kept Simeon as a hostage
Ostensorium - ...
In art it is associated with ...
Saint Alphonsus Liguori because of his particular devotion to the Eucharist
Saint Clare of Assisi in allusion to the miraculous dispersion of the Saracens by it; it is her proper attribute
Saint Frances of Rome
Saint Joseph
Blessed Juliana of Cornillon
Saint Thomas Aquinas who composed the office of the Sacrament; it is still in use
Monstrance - ...
In art it is associated with ...
Saint Alphonsus Liguori because of his particular devotion to the Eucharist
Saint Clare of Assisi in allusion to the miraculous dispersion of the Saracens by it; it is her proper attribute
Saint Frances of Rome
Saint Joseph
Blessed Juliana of Cornillon
Saint Thomas Aquinas who composed the office of the Sacrament; it is still in use
Christian Calendar - Furthermore it determines the following feasts that were introduced much later: Patronage of Saint Joseph, Trinity Sunday, Corpus Christi, and the Sacred Heart
Calendar, Christian - Furthermore it determines the following feasts that were introduced much later: Patronage of Saint Joseph, Trinity Sunday, Corpus Christi, and the Sacred Heart
Birds in Symbolism -
As emblems of the saints, birds in general are associated in art with ...
Saint Francis of Assisi
Blessed Joseph Anchieta
Saint Valentine of Rome
Genesis - The second part presents the early history of Israel down to the death and burial of Joseph (12-50)
Weaving - ) The "fine linen" of Joseph (Genesis 41:42) accords with existing specimens of Egyptian weaving equal to the finest cambric. Sacerdotal garments were woven without seam (Josephus, Arizona - In 1859 he sent Reverend Joseph P
Dreams - ...
Joseph, the reputed father of the Lord, was directed several times by means of dreams; and Pilate was warned by his wife to have nothing to do with that just man because of what she had suffered in a dream
Manasseh - The eldest son of Joseph, born in Egypt
Symbolism, Birds in -
As emblems of the saints, birds in general are associated in art with ...
Saint Francis of Assisi
Blessed Joseph Anchieta
Saint Valentine of Rome
Judah - His name appears honorably in the history of Joseph, Genesis 37:26,27 44:16-34 ; but disgracefully in that of Tamar his daughter-in-law, Genesis 38:1-30
Revive - When he saw the wagons which Joseph had sent to carry him, the spirit of Jacob their father revived
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh of Joseph, Genesis 41:1-57, was the last, or the last but one, of the fifteenth dynasty; probably identical with Apophis, who reigned at least 26 years, b. The Pharaoh of the Oppression—" the new king over Egypt who knew not Joseph," Exodus 1:8, and under whose reign Moses was born—probably Rameses II
Monasteries, Suppression of - In Germany and the Austrian dominions in the 18th century, Josephinism, a politico-religious movement named for Emperor Joseph II, made the Church subservient to the State. During the reign of Joseph II, 1782, suppressions occurred within the Empire
Salmon - 8) says that Salome was a daughter of Joseph, and Nicephorus Callistus (HE ii. 3) makes her Joseph’s wife. These traditions, at any rate, indicate a belief in some connexion between Salome and the house of Joseph
Mary, the Mother of Jesus - ...
An enrolment, or census, decreed by the imperial power of Rome, caused Joseph, to whom Mary had been espoused, to take her to the city of Bethlehem, where, according to prophecy, Jesus was born. Homage was also rendered to Him by the Magi, but, to avoid the murderous intentions of Herod, Joseph was directed to carry Mary and the young child into Egypt
Jesus - To distinguish him from others so called, he is spoken of as "Jesus of Nazareth" (John 18:7 ), and "Jesus the son of Joseph" (John 6:42 ). ...
In the "fulness of time" he was born at Bethlehem, in the reign of the emperor Augustus, of Mary, who was betrothed to Joseph, a carpenter (Matthew 1:1 ; Luke 3:23 ; Compare John 7:42 ). Herod's cruel jealousy led to Joseph's flight into Egypt with Mary and the infant Jesus, where they tarried till the death of this king (Matthew 2:13-23 ), when they returned and settled in Nazareth, in Lower Galilee (2:23; Compare Luke 4:16 ; John 1:46 , etc
Joseph - To behold this lovely image of filial piety and unwavering faith, of self-control in youth and patience in adversity, of discretion and fidelity in all stations of life, serenely walking with God through all, and at death intrusting soul and body alike into his hands, Hebrews 11:22 ; may well lead the young reader to cry, Oh that the God of Joseph were my God, Genesis 37:1-36 39:1-50:26 . Joseph died, aged on hundred and ten, B
Suppression of Monasteries - In Germany and the Austrian dominions in the 18th century, Josephinism, a politico-religious movement named for Emperor Joseph II, made the Church subservient to the State. During the reign of Joseph II, 1782, suppressions occurred within the Empire
Pharaoh - Pharaoh of Joseph ( Genesis 39:1-23 etc. It has been conjectured that the Pharaoh of Joseph was one of the Hyksos kings, but it is not advisable to press for historical identifications in this beautiful legend
Mary - the mother of Jesus, and wife of Joseph. She was of the royal race of David, as was also Joseph her husband; and she was also cousin to Elizabeth, the wife of Zacharias the priest, Luke 1:5 ; Luke 1:36 . Mary being espoused to Joseph, the Angel Gabriel appeared to her, to announce to her that she should be the mother of the Messiah, Luke 1:26-27 , &c. An edict of Caesar Augustus having decreed, that all subjects of the empire should go to their own cities, to register their names according to their families, Joseph and Mary, who were both of the lineage of David, went to Bethlehem, from whence sprung their family. Angels made this event known to shepherds, who were in the fields near Bethlehem, and these came in the night to Joseph and Mary and saw the child laying in the manger, and paid him their adoration. ...
Mary and Joseph went every year to Jerusalem to the passover; and when Jesus was twelve years of age, they took him with them
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - In all except two Joseph is held up as an example of chastity or forgiveness. 7); reminds them of how Joseph conquered temptation (iv. -He tells how strong and fearless he was, yet he was jealous of Joseph and plotted his death, because the prince of deceit sent forth the spirit of jealousy and blinded his mind; but God’s angel delivered Joseph, as Simeon was away when Joseph came. He recalls Joseph’s forgiving treatment of his brethren; ‘he was a good man, and had the Spirit of God within him. -He is not conscious of sin, except his suppression of the truth about Joseph. He gives details of the selling of Joseph: his price is spent on sandals by eight of the brethren; his
The Testament of Joseph (‘concerning self-control,’ β). Joseph tells him in Egypt what his brethren did. He speaks of Jacob’s prediction that in Joseph should be fulfilled the prophecy of heaven-that the sinless should die for ungodly men (iii. He tells how he had a vision of Joseph in his absence (x
Manasseh - The firstborn son of Joseph, and full brother of Ephraim ( Genesis 41:51 f. ’ Josephus ( Ant . In Joshua 17:14-18 we read of the complaint of the ‘children of Joseph’ to Joshua that he had given them (‘him’) only one lot, despite the fact that he was a great people. ]'>[11] , the next oldest document, includes Ephraim and Manasseh in the phrase ‘sons of Joseph’ ( Joshua 16:1-4 ), ‘house of Joseph’ ( Joshua 17:17
Whether Joseph was a tribe has been doubted, because there is no mention of it in Judges 5:1-31 , and the fact that the name Machir appears to be from the root mâchar , ‘to sell,’ has raised the question whether the story of Joseph’s sale into Egypt did not arise in connexion with it
Parents (2) - —Joseph was in any case the legal father of Jesus (Dalman, The Words of Jesus); hence the parental and filial relation as illustrated in the Holy Family may be discussed apart from questions treated of elsewhere (see Virgin-birth). If His ‘understanding and answers’ were cause of astonishment (Luke 2:47), the explanation points, in part at any rate, to early training given by His mother; to the careful discharge, by Joseph, of the paternal duties, so preparing Him for the eventful day when, arrived at the age of twelve years, He would become a ‘son of the Law. The strict discipline above spoken of is implied in Luke 2:51 (καὶ ἦν ὑποτασσόμενος αὐτοῖς): the respect and obedience which Joseph and Mary claim as their due are promptly rendered by the boy, the growing youth. With the resumption of the narrative Jesus has arrived at manhood; Joseph disappears from the scene, and attention accordingly centres on the relations of Jesus with the widowed mother. 27; Abrahams, Jewish Life in the Middle Ages, which goes back to earlier days; Joseph, Judaism as Creed and Life; Maurice, Social Morality; J
Tribes - In the lists of the tribes, as we find them in the OT, considerable variations are to be found, and frequently the tribes descended from Joseph (Ephraim and Manasseh) have to be regarded as one in order to make the number twelve. The tribes enumerated are Judah, Reuben, Gad, Asher, Naphtali, Manasseh, Simeon, Levi, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, and Benjamin. The remarkable features about this list are the substitution of Joseph for Ephraim, and the omission of Dan, which seems to have fallen into disrepute at a comparatively early date
Pharisees - Josephus compared the Pharisees to the sect of the Stoics. We are not to suppose that there were not many individuals among them who were upright and pure, for there were such men as Nicodemus, Gamaliel, Joseph of Arimathæa, and Paul
Pharaoh - ...
References to ten pharaohs can be clearly distinguished in the Old Testament: the Pharaoh of Abraham, Genesis 12:10-20 ; of Joseph, Genesis 39-50 ; of the Oppression, Exodus 1:1 ; of the Exodus, Exodus 2:23-15:19 ; of 1 Chronicles 4:18 ; of Solomon, 1 Kings 3-11 ; of Rehoboam, called Shishak, king of Egypt, 1 Kings 14:25 ; of Hezekiah and Isaiah, 2 Kings 18:21 ; Isaiah 36:1 ; of Josiah, 2 Kings 23:29 ; of Jeremiah 44:30 and Ezekiel 29:1-16
Johann Von Hontheim - Joseph II of Austria sought the realization of a national church, followed by Leopold I of Tuscany
Febronianism - Joseph II of Austria sought the realization of a national church, followed by Leopold I of Tuscany
Nathanael - (1) When told by Philip, ‘We have found him of whom Moses in the law and the prophets did write Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph,’ Nathanael hesitated
Nicodemus - But after the Crucifixion, ashamed of his cowardice, he at last avowed himself and joined with Joseph of Arimathæa in giving the Lord’s body a kingly burial ( John 19:39 )
Onias - Rameses - There is mentioned in Egyptian monuments RΗΜSS , son of Aahmes I (Lepsius); the new Pharaoh "that knew not Joseph
Hontheim, Johann Nikolaus Von - Joseph II of Austria sought the realization of a national church, followed by Leopold I of Tuscany
Judah - We know more of him than of the other patriarchs except Joseph, whose life he saved, advising the sale
Shepherd - Joseph instructed his brethren to tell Pharaoh that they were shepherds, and they asked permission to dwell in Goshen, for every shepherd was an abomination to the Egyptians
Abomination - Therefore Joseph tells his brethren to inform Pharaoh, "Our trade hath been about cattle, both we and also our fathers," i. The Egyptians themselves reared cattle, as Pharaoh's offer to make Joseph's brethren "overseers of his cattle" proves (Genesis 47:6), and as their sculptures and paintings show; but they abominated the nomad shepherds, or Bedouins, because the Egyptians, as being long civilized, shrank, and to the present day shrink, from the lawless predatory habits of the wandering shepherd tribes in their vicinity
Alphaeus - The father of James the Apostle ( Matthew 10:3 = Mark 3:18 = Luke 6:15 = Acts 1:13 ), commonly identified with James the Little, son of Mary and brother of Joses or Joseph ( Mark 15:40 = Matthew 27:56 )
Enough - Genesis 33 ...
Israel said, it is enough Joseph is yet alive
Gilead - The Ishmaelites who bought Joseph were travelling with balm and myrrh from Gilead
Set, Place - Often it expresses “putting” hands on someone or something: “… Joseph shall put his hand upon thine eyes [1]” ( Scapular of the Help of the Sick - At their reception, members are given a scapular of black woollen cloth; the portion over the breast is a copy of the above picture of the Mother of God and at her feet are Saint Joseph and Saint Camillus, the two other patrons of the sick and of the confraternity
Help of the Sick, Scapular of the - At their reception, members are given a scapular of black woollen cloth; the portion over the breast is a copy of the above picture of the Mother of God and at her feet are Saint Joseph and Saint Camillus, the two other patrons of the sick and of the confraternity
Gilead - The Ishmaelites who bought Joseph were travelling with balm and myrrh from Gilead
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, City of - In 1856 the seminary of Saint Francis of Sales was founded by Dr Joseph Salzmann, who was also founder of the first Catholic normal school in the United States, and Pio Nono College in the suburb of Saint Francis (1871)
Kentucky - ...
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Louisville
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Bardstown
Covington
Lexington
Owensboro
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Cardinal
Christmas
Gethsemane
Holy Cross
Loretto
Mount Carmel
Nazareth
Sacramento
Saint Catharine
Saint Charles
Saint Helen's
Saint John
Saint Joseph
Saint Mary
Saint Mary's City
Saint Paul
Saint Vincent
Trappist
Trinity
See also, ...
patron saints index
Money - The history of Joseph affords evidence of the constant use of money, silver of a fixed weight
Branch - Luke 2:7 shows the depressed state of David's royal line, represented by Joseph and Mary, at the time when Jesus was born "out of the stem of Jesse" (the stump cut close to the roots at that time); "a root out of a dry ground
Remission, Remit - They could not, nor could anyone subsequently, forgive sins, any more than that Joseph actually restored the butler to his office and hanged the baker ( Genesis 41:13 ), or any more than that the prophets actually accomplished things when they declared that they were about to be done (Jeremiah 1:10 ; Ezekiel 43:3 )
Gerizim - It was probably at this time that the coffin containing the embalmed body of Joseph was laid in the "parcel of ground which Jacob bought of the sons of Hamor" (Genesis 33:19 ; 50:25 ). Josephus relates (Ant 11:8,2-4) that Sanballat built a temple for the Samaritans on this mountain, and instituted a priesthood, as rivals to those of the Jews at Jerusalem
Daemons - Joseph Mede, (see Works, p
Almond - , as a present to Joseph, probably because this tree was not a native of Egypt
Midian, Midianites - Midianites took Joseph to Egypt (Genesis 37:28 ,Genesis 37:28,37:36 )
Cistern - Hungary - Peter Pazmany, greatest of the archbishops of Esztergom (1616-1637) checked the decline of the Catholic faith and brought about a counter-reformation with ecclesiastical reorganization, after which the Church continued to recover strength, assisted by the Habsburgs until the time of Joseph II (1780-1790)
Manger - ), Joseph and Mary may have moved into the side of the house occupied by the cattle, from which the living-room is distinguished by a higher floor, with a little hollow in the edge, out of which the cattle eat
Child - Thus Joseph is called a child at the time when he was probably about sixteen years of age (Genesis 37:3 ); and Benjamin is so called when he was above thirty years (44:20)
Hamor - Abraham bought only a burying place, Jacob a dwelling place, which long after was also Joseph's burial place (Joshua 24:32) referred to by Stephen (Acts 7:16). ...
Stephen with elliptical brevity sums up from six chaps, of Old Testament in one sentence the double purchase (by Abraham from Ephron the Hittite, Genesis 23; and by Jacob from the children of Hamor), the double burial place (Abraham's cave of Machpelah and Jacob's ground near Shechem), and the double burial (of Jacob in the cave of Machpelah, and of Joseph in the ground at Shechem), just because the details were familiar to both himself and the Jewish council; not, as rationalism objects, because he was ignorant of or forgot the historical facts so notorious from the Old Testament
Dream - But it is the Israelites Joseph and Daniel who interpret; for pagandom is passive, Israel active, in divine things to the glory of the God of Israel
Cistern - So Joseph was cast into a "pit" (Genesis 37:22); Jeremiah into one miry at the bottom, and so deep that he was let down by cords (Jeremiah 38:6), said to be near "Herod's gate
Husband - Mary had been espoused to Joseph, and he is called her husband
Bind - 39:20, which tells how Joseph was “imprisoned” after being wrongfully accused by Potiphar’s wife
Prison - Joseph was cast into prison, and his feet were hurt with fetters (Psalm 105:18 ), though it does not appear that there was any trial as to the crime of which he was accused. God interfered on his behalf, and made the keeper or jailor favourable to him, and he committed all the prisoners into Joseph's care
Embalm - Hence we read of Joseph giving directions to the physicians to embalm the body of his father
Nicodemus - By the time the Lord Jesus had finished his redemption-work on the cross, we find Nicodemus so advanced in the divine life and his love to Christ, that, in company with Joseph of Arimathea, he went boldly unto Pilate and begged the body of Jesus
Esther - Archbishop Usher supposed, that by Ahasuerus was meant Darius Hystaspes, and Joseph Scaliger contended that Xerxes was meant; but Dean Prideaux has very satisfactorily shown, that by Ahasuerus we are to understand Artaxerxes Longimanus. Josephus also considered Ahasuerus and Artaxerxes as the same person; and we may observe, that Ahasuerus is always translated Artaxerxes in the Septuagint version; and he is called by that name in the apocryphal part of the book of Esther
South Carolina - Gallagher, a brilliant but headstrong priest, had been made pastor in 1793, but the ministry of several zealous priests, including Father Le Mercier in 1803, Father Joseph de Cloriviere in 1812, and the forceful Jesuit, Father Benedict Fenwick, later bishop of Boston in 1818, tided over the Church until the appointment of the distinguished first bishop, Right Reverend John England in 1820
ma'ry Magdalene - ( John 19:25 ) She remained by the cross till all was over, and waited till the body was taken down and placed in the garden sepulchre of Joseph of Arimathaea, (Matthew 27:61 ; Mark 15:47 ; Luke 23:55 ) when she, with Salome and Mary the mother of James, "bought sweet spices that they might come and anoint" the body
Council, Councillor - ...
3: βουλευτής (Strong's #1010 — Noun Masculine — bouleutes — bool-yoo-tace' ) Joseph of Arimathaea is described as "a councillor of honorable estate," Mark 15:43 , RV; cp
Laetare Medal - " Following is a partial list of the recipients of the award: ...
1883 - John Gilmary Shea, historian
1884 - Patrick J Keeley, architect
1885 - Eliza Allen Starr, artist
1886 - General John Newton, army engineer
1887 - Edward Preuss, journalist
1888 - Patrick V Hickey, founder "Catholic Review"
1889 - Anna Hanson Dorsey, novelist
1890 - William T Onahan, organizer Catholic Congress
1891 - Daniel Dougherty, orator
1892 - Henry F Brownson, philosopher
1893 - Patrick Donahoe, founder "Boston Pilot"
1894 - Augustin Daly, theatrical manager
1895 - Mrs James Sadlier, writer
1896 - General William S Rosecrans, leader Army of Cumberland
1897 - Thomas Addis Emmett, surgeon
1898 - Timothy E Howard, jurist
1899 - Mary Gwendolin Caldwell, benefactor Catholic University
1900 - John Creighton, founder Creighton University
1901 - William Bourke Cockran, orator
1902 - John B Murphy, surgeon
1903 - Charles J Bonaparte, attorney-general
1904 - Richard C Kerens, philanthropist
1905 - Thomas B Fitzpatrick, business man
1906 - Francis Quinlan, medical specialist
1907 - Katherine E Conway, author
1908 - James C Monaghan, lecturer
1909 - Frances Tiernan, (Christian Reid), litterateur
1910 - Maurice Francis Egan, writer
1911 - Agnes Repplier, essayist
1912 - Thomas M Mulry, charity worker
1913 - Charles G Herbermann, editor-in-chief "Catholic Encyclopedia"
1914 - Edward Douglas White, chief justice of the United States
1915 - Mary V Merrick, founder, Christ Child Society
1916 - James J Walsh, physician and author
1917 - William Shepherd Benson, admiral
1918 - Joseph Scott, lawyer
1919 - George Duval, philanthropist
1920 - Lawrence F Flick, physician
1921 - Elizabeth Nourse, artist
1922 - Charles P Neil, economist
1923 - Walter George Smith, lawyer
1924 - Charles D Maginnis, architect
1925 - Albert Francis Zahm, scientist
1926 - Edward N Hurley, business man
1927 - Margaret Anglin, actress
1928 - Jack J Spalding, lawyer
1929 - Alfred Emmanuel Smith, statesman
1930 - Frederick P Kenkel, director of Central Bureau of the Central Verein
1931 - James J Phelan, philanthropist
1932 - Stephen J Maher, tuberculosis expert
1933 - John McCormack, vocalist
1934 -
1935 - Frank H Spearman, author
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1942 - Helen Constance White, teacher and author
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1955 - George Meaney, labour leader
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1965 - Frederick Dominic Rossini, teacher and scientist
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1972 - Dorothy Day, activist
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1984 - John T Noonan, jurist
1985 - Guido Calabresi, jurist
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1992 - Daniel Patrick Moynihan, US senator
1993 - L John Durney, teacher and journalist
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1996 - Sister Helen Prejean, anti-death penalty activist
1997 - Father Virgilio Elizondo, theologian and writer
1998 -
1999 -
2000 - Andrew J McKenna, businessman
2001 - Monsignor George G Higgins, labour activist priest
2002 - Father John Smyth, educator
2003 - Peter and Peggy Steinfels, writers
2004 - Father Bryan Hehir, theologian
2005 - Joseph E Murray, organ transplant pioneer
on (2) - Josephus (Ant 10:9, section 7) says Nebuchadnezzar, the fifth year after Jerusalem's fall, left the siege of Tyre to march against Egypt. (See Joseph. ) Tradition makes On the place visited by Joseph, Mary, and our Lord, and a sycamore is shown under which they rested in their flight (Hosea 11:1; Matthew 2:15)
Aceldama - Now as the Lord Jesus, being considered by the law as a criminal, (John 18:30) was thus liable to have been cast out with the common dead; what an overruling power must it have been, to prompt the minds of the honourable counsellor, Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus a ruler of the Jews, to have begged the forfeited body from Pilate!...
And there was another providence, directing all this to the accomplishment of the purpose intended; in that the request was so well timed before the chief priests could influence Pilate's mind to refuse; and Pilate's mind so guided by the Lord, to grant the request before that he had power to deliberate. Had the Sanhedrim foreseen such a thing, no doubt they would have been beforehand with Joseph and Nicodemus, and prevailed upon the governor to deny
Hear - 37:17, a man told Joseph that he “heard” Joseph’s brothers say, “Let us go to Dothan”; in other words, he unintentionally “overheard” them say it. ...
Joseph asked his brothers to “listen” as he recounted what he had dreamed ( Israel in Egypt - When Joseph was in power, Jacob and his whole household settled in the land: there they multiplied and became a great nation. In time a king reigned who knew not Joseph, and the people were reduced to cruel bondage. See EGYPT and Joseph...
A question not easily answered is, How long were the Israelites in Egypt? In Genesis 15:13 ; Acts 7:6 , the period seems to be stated as four hundred years
Genesis - ...
Troubles arose among Jacob’s twelve sons, with the result that one of them, Joseph, was sold as a slave and taken to Egypt. But God was controlling the affairs of his people, and through a series of remarkable events, Joseph eventually became governor over Egypt. More than twenty years after Joseph’s brothers had sold him as a slave, they met him in Egypt when they went there to buy food. ...
Years later Joseph died, but before his death he expressed his unwavering faith in God’s promises
Genesis, Theology of - Genesis has the following structure:...
Prologue...
Primeval History...
1:1-11:26...
Transition...
Genealogy...
11:27-32...
Threat...
The Abraham Cycle...
12:1-25:11...
Transition...
Genealogy...
24:12-18...
Threat...
The Jacob Cycle...
25:19-35:22b...
Transition...
Genealogy...
35:22c-36:40...
Threat...
The Joseph Cycle...
37:1-46:7...
Transition...
Genealogy...
46:8-27...
Resolution...
Settlement in Egypt...
46:28-50:26...
The "Primeval History" (Genesis 1:1-11:26 ) sets the stage for the whole of the book. Although the ancestors are Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and the twelve, the literary narrative concentrates on Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph. Hence the story ends on a bleak note with Joseph, their sponsor and protector, placed in a coffin. Joseph is first cruelly sold into slavery by his brothers and then wrongly accused of rape by his master's wife, but through this series of cruel circumstances, he rises to the summit of power in the Egyptian empire (chaps. Joseph aptly describes the providential nature of his story: "Even though you intended to harm me, God intended it for good, in order to preserve a numerous people, as he is doing today" (50:20 NRSV). Psalm 105:9-23 briefly recounts the story of Genesis with emphasis on the Joseph narrative. 2-16) with emphasis on how God overruled the jealousy of Joseph's brothers in order to fulfill the promises. On a less complex level, Hebrews also refers to Abel, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph as examples of persevering faith (11:4-22)
Adoption - Jacob adopted as his own Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, on the same footing as Reuben and Simeon, his two elder sons (Genesis 48:5). Thereby he was able to give Joseph his favorite son more than his single share, with his brothers, of the paternal heritage. So Mary, being daughter of Heli, and Joseph her husband being adopted by him on marrying his daughter, an heiress (as appears from her going to Bethlehem to be registered in her pregnancy), Joseph is called in Luke's genealogy son of Heli
Surname - ]'>[3] Similar changes are recorded of Abram, Joseph, Jacob, Solomon, Daniel, Pashhur, Tophet, and even of Jahweh Himself. -In Nazareth Joseph was known as ὁ τέκτων,5 [18] Joseph ἀπὸ Ἀριμαθαίας,19 Judah - He saved Joseph from death by the cruel and covetous plan of selling him to the Midianites. Judah was the brethren's spokesman in prevailing on Jacob to let Benjamin go to Egypt, and he undertook to be surety for him (Genesis 43:3-10); and when Joseph's cup was found with Benjamin, professed their guilt and liability to bondservice, though actually innocent of stealing it, in order in oriental fashion to move pity. ...
Then Judah touchingly appealed to the supposed Egyptian prince to detain him as a bondservant instead of his youngest brother, by describing his father's love for Benjamin after having lost Joseph, and the danger of bringing down his grey hairs with sorrow to the grave, so that Joseph could refrain no longer but made himself known (Genesis 44). Judah too is the one who prepares the way before his father in going to meet Joseph and settle in Goshen (Genesis 46:28). Though "the birthright was Joseph's" he was not registered as firstborn, because of Judah's prevalence on the threefold ground, Jacob's blessing, Judah's historic preeminence, and David the prince (1 Chronicles 28:4) being chosen from Judah. ...
Judah in his conduct before Joseph in Egypt manifested true nobility; if he had sold his brother yet he was willing to be sold himself for the youngest brother
On - The legend of the wonder-bird Phoenix, early used to illustrate the doctrine of the resurrection, arose here; to this city Joseph, delivered from prison, came with royal honors to marry the daughter of Potipherah, "dedicated to Ra. " Josephus reports that On was the home of Jacob on his arrival in Egypt
Forty Hours' Adoration - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Forty Hours' Devotion - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Forty Hours' Prayer - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Quarantore - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Quarant' Ore - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Devotion, Forty Hours' - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Order of the Most Holy Trinity - An edict of Joseph II in 1784 suppressed them in Austria and the Low Countries, and the Revolution in 1789 suppressed them in all the territories to which they had spread
Dubourg, Louis Guillaume Valentin - After the appointment of Right Reverend Joseph Rosati as coadjutor, with residence in Saint Louis, in 1823, Bishop Dubourg established himself at New Orleans
Messiah - The rabbis got over the Messianic prophecies which prove Jesus to be Messiah by imagining a Messiah ben Joseph who should suffer, distinct from Messiah ben David who should reign; but the prophecies of the suffering and glory are so blended as to exclude the idea of any but one and the same Messiah (compare Isaiah 52:7; Isaiah 52:13-14; Isaiah 52:15; Isaiah 52:53)
Inn - ...
In Bethlehem, Joseph and Mary could find no room at the inn (Luke 2:7 )
Adoration - Joseph's brethren bowed down before him. To Joseph, Genesis 41:43
Louis Dubourg - After the appointment of Right Reverend Joseph Rosati as coadjutor, with residence in Saint Louis, in 1823, Bishop Dubourg established himself at New Orleans
Unicorn, - The reem of the Hebrew Bible, however, has nothing at all to do with the one-horned animal of the Greek and Roman writers, as is evident from (33:17) where in the blessing of Joseph it is said; "his glory is like the firstling of his bullock, and his horns are like the horns of a unicorn ;" not, as the text of the Authorized Version renders it, "the horns of unicorns
Arise - There arose a new king who knew not Joseph
Physician - the word is rapha, 'to heal,' and in Genesis 50:2 Joseph called upon such to embalm the body of his father, a certain amount of chemical knowledge being needed also for that
Obadiah, Book of - the house of Jacob shall be a fire, and the house of Joseph a flame, and the house of Esau for stubble
Adoration, Forty Hours' - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Jannes - By this last word he meant probably the patriarch Joseph
Proseuchae - Joseph Mede and Dr
Genealogy - The genealogy of our Saviour is deduced by the evangelists from Adam to Joseph and Mary, through a space of four thousand years and upward
Trinitarians - An edict of Joseph II in 1784 suppressed them in Austria and the Low Countries, and the Revolution in 1789 suppressed them in all the territories to which they had spread
Genesis - It contains an account of the creation; the primeval state and fall of man; the history of Adam and his descendants, with the progress of religion and the origin of the arts; the genealogies age, and death of the patriarchs until Noah; the general defection and corruption of mankind, the general deluge, and the preservation of Noah and his family in the ark; the history of Noah and his family subsequent to the time of the deluge; the repeopling and division of the earth among the sons of Noah; the building of Babel, the confusion of tongues, and the dispersion of mankind; the lives of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph
ju'Dah - ) Of Judah's personal character more traits are preserved than of any other of the patriarchs, with the exception of Joseph, whose life he in conjunction with Reuben saved. (Genesis 43:3-10 ) and when, through Joseph's artifice, the brothers were brought back to the palace, he is again the leader and spokesman of the band
Chariot, - The earliest mention of chariots in Scripture is in Egypt, where Joseph, as a mark of distinction, was placed in Pharaoh's second chariot
Famine - The most remarkable famine was that of the reign of the Fatimee Khaleefeh, El-Mustansir billah, which is the only instance on record of one of seven years duration in Egypt since the time of Joseph (A
Tribes of Israel, the - Rachel's sons were Joseph (Genesis 30:22-24 ), who became the father of Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 41:50-52 ), and Benjamin (Genesis 35:16-18 ). During the years of famine as the sons of Jacob traveled back and forth between Egypt and Canaan, Simeon was held hostage by Joseph at one point ( Genesis 42:24 ). Joseph was the first son born to Jacob by Rachel, Jacob's favorite wife (Genesis 30:22-24 ). Two of the tribes of Israel came from Joseph, namely, Ephraim and Manasseh . ...
The story of Joseph is the most eventful of the sons of Jacob. The Blessing of Jacob (Genesis 49:22-26 ) mentions only Joseph; the Blessing of Moses (Deuteronomy 33:13-17 ) begins with Joseph and notes Ephriam and Manasseh, the song of Deborah (Judges 5:14 ) speaks of Ephraim and Machir. Manasseh was the oldest son of Joseph and Asenath. He was the only full-blooded brother of Joseph
Burial - John the Baptist's disciples buried his body (Matthew 14:12 ), and Joseph of Arimathea buried Jesus (Matthew 27:57-60 ; Mark 15:42-46 ; Luke 23:50-53 ; John 19:38-42 ; [1] ). ...
Joseph L
Burial - Joseph closed his father's eyelids soon after Jacob's death (Genesis 46:4 ). Embalming is mentioned only in the burial accounts of Jacob and Joseph (Genesis 50:2-3 , Genesis 50:26 ) and there only because of the Egyptian setting and plans to move the bodies
Dream - In the OT dreams are described somewhat in detail, especially those of Jacob (Genesis 28:10-22), of Joseph (Genesis 37:5-10), of Nebuchadrezzar (Daniel 2, 4), and of Daniel (Daniel 7). In the NT, the only instances given are those of the appearance of the angel to Joseph (Matthew 1:20-23; Matthew 2:13; Matthew 2:19-20), the dream of the Magi (Matthew 2:12), and the notable dream of Pilate’s wife (Matthew 27:19)
Manasseh - Eldest son of Joseph and Asenath, and head of one of the tribes of Israel. When Jacob blessed the two sons of Joseph he crossed his hands so that Ephraim the younger son should have the chief blessing
Day - The word denotes a period of twenty-four hours: “And it came to pass, as she spake to Joseph day by day …” ( Joseph went into the house to do his business …” ( Joseph’s lips, the phrase connotes “this present result” (literally, “as it is this day”): “But as for you, ye thought evil against me; but God meant it unto good, to bring to pass, as it is this day, to save much people alive” ( Mary, the Virgin - ) Probably Matthan of Matthew is Matthat of Luke, and Jacob and Heli were brothers; and Heli's son Joseph, and Jacob's daughter Mary, were first cousins. Joseph, as male heir of his uncle Jacob who had one only child Mary, would marry her according to the law (Numbers 36:8). Thus the genealogy of the inheritance or succession to David's throne (Matthew's) and that of natural descent (Luke's) would be primarily Joseph's, then Mary's also (Psalms 132:11; Luke 1:32; Romans 1:3). ) Mary was living at Nazareth, by this time betrothed to Joseph, when the angel Gabriel came from God to her in the sixth month of Elisabeth's pregnancy. ...
Then followed Joseph's discovery of the conception and his tender dealing with her, and reception of her by God's command (Matthew 1), as being the virgin foretold who should bring forth Immanuel (Isaiah 7:14; Jeremiah 31:22). (See Joseph. She and Joseph (who is never after mentioned) "understood not Jesus' sayings, but Mary kept them all in her heart. As at the finding in the temple He disclaimed Joseph's authority as His father in the highest sense, cf6 "wist ye not (thou Mary and Joseph) that I must be about My (divine) Father's business", so here He disclaims her right as human mother to dictate His divine acts, "they have no wine
She'Chem - it was at this time that the patriarch purchased from that chieftain "the parcel of the field" which he subsequently bequeathed, as a special patrimony, to his son Joseph. The well of Jacob and the tomb of Joseph are still shown in the neighborhood of the town. The tomb of Joseph lies about a quarter of a mile north of the well, exactly in the centre of the opening of the valley
Manasseh, Tribe of - Ephraim and Manasseh were the sons of Joseph. ...
When Jacob determined to give the firstborn’s blessing to Joseph instead of to Reuben (for Reuben had disqualified himself by raping one of his father’s concubines; Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:3-4; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2), he raised Joseph’s two sons to the same status as Joseph’s brothers (Genesis 48:5-6). As a result Joseph, through his two sons, received two tribes, but each of his brothers received only one
Jacob - ...
Jacob loved Joseph more than all his other sons, which caused them to hate Joseph; they also hated him for the communications given to him through dreams, and eventually sold him to the Ishmeelites. Again Jacob was dealt with deceitfully; his sons pretended that they had found Joseph's coat stained with blood, and Jacob was greatly distressed. ...
Jacob at the close of his life rose up to the height of God's thoughts, and by faith blessed the two sons of Joseph, being led of God to cross his hands, and gave the richest blessing to Ephraim
Jacob - ...
Jacob loved Joseph more than all his other sons, which caused them to hate Joseph; they also hated him for the communications given to him through dreams, and eventually sold him to the Ishmeelites. Again Jacob was dealt with deceitfully; his sons pretended that they had found Joseph's coat stained with blood, and Jacob was greatly distressed. ...
Jacob at the close of his life rose up to the height of God's thoughts, and by faith blessed the two sons of Joseph, being led of God to cross his hands, and gave the richest blessing to Ephraim
Ephraim - Joseph and his Egyptian wife had two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50-52). When the aged Jacob gave his parting blessings to his family, he gave the firstborn’s blessing to Joseph instead of to Reuben (because of Reuben’s immorality with Jacob’s concubine; Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:3-4; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2). This meant that Joseph would father two tribes in Israel instead of one. Jacob therefore raised Joseph’s two sons to the same level as Jacob’s other sons, so that Joseph’s two sons would each have his own tribe (Genesis 48:5-6)
Shechem (1) - ...
Here first in Canaan God appeared to Abraham (Genesis 12:6), and here he pitched his tent and built an altar under the oak or terebinth (not "plain") of Moreh; here too Jacob re-entered the promised land (Genesis 33:18-19), and "bought a parcel of a field where he had spread his tent," from the children of Hamor, Shechem's father, and bequeathed it subsequently to Joseph (Genesis 48:22; Joshua 24:32; John 4:5); a dwelling place, whereas Abraham's only purchase was a burial place. ...
Josephus (B. Joseph was buried there (Joshua 24:32; Acts 7:16). ...
(5) The Bethel of the calf is mentioned in connection with Samaria (1 Kings 13:32; 2 Kings 23:19; Amos 4:1-4; Amos 5:6), and the old prophet at Bethel was of Samaria according to Josephus (2 Kings 23:18). The so-called "tomb of Joseph," a quarter of a mile N. Maundrell's description applies better to another tomb named from Joseph at the N
Son, Sonship - Mary’s surprised expostulation in Luke 2:48 suggests the perfect dutifulness of His childhood’s years; and we may be sure the child was ‘father of the man,’ as to what He was in the after-time as (probably) the mainstay and head of the home at Nazareth on the death of Joseph. (α) In the ordinary sense of the word He is described as ‘the son of Joseph’ and ‘the son of Mary. Cheyne’s conjecture, that ‘Jesus the son of Joseph’ may mean ‘Jesus a member of the house of Joseph’ (EBi Egypt - 1728 Joseph was carried into Egypt and sold to Potiphar: his exaltation followed; the famine commenced, and eventually Jacob and all his family went into Egypt. See Joseph. At length a king arose who knew not Joseph, doubtless at the commencement of a new dynasty, and the children of Israel were reduced to slavery. ...
Very interesting questions arise — which of the kings of Egypt was it who promoted Joseph? which king was it that did not know Joseph? and which king reigned at the time of the Plagues and the Exodus? The result more generally arrived at is that the Pharaoh who promoted Joseph was one of the Hyksos (who being of Semitic origin, were more favourable to strangers than were the native Egyptians), and was probably APEPA or APEPI II, the last of those kings. Some Egyptologers consider other kings more probable than the above, placing the time of Joseph before the period of the Hyksos, while others place it after their exit. It was a king of Egypt who caused to be translated the Old Testament into Greek, the LXX, quoted by the Lord Himself when on earth; and it was to Egypt that Joseph fled with the young child and His mother from the wrath of Herod. Apepa II supposed to be the king who exalted Joseph
Leprosy - The Church which from very early times has promoted the spiritual and temporal welfare of the leper continues the work in various leper colonies, including Carville, Louisiana, where the Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul minister to them, and Molokai, scene of the heroic labors of Father Damien and "Brother" Joseph Dutton
Mormons - A Protestant sect founded by Joseph Smith at Fayette, Seneca County, New York, 1830
Latter Day Saints - A Protestant sect founded by Joseph Smith at Fayette, Seneca County, New York, 1830
Detroit, Michigan, City of - The first permanent Catholic mission within the present limits of Detroit was at Fort Saint Joseph or Pontchartrain; in the interest of French claims a few Canadian families under Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac settled about the fort in 1701, and on July 26, their first pastor, Father Constantine Delhalle, began the still existing records of the church of Saint Anne
Names in New Testament - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
New Testament, Names in - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
Ohio - Although the Jesuit Father Joseph de Bonnecamps accompanied Celoroil de Bienville on his expedition through Ohio in 1749, and preached to the Indians they encountered, no mission was founded. He said Mass in the home of the Dittoes near the last-named settlement, and when he sent a Dominican, Reverend Edward Fenwick, to the Ohio mission, in 1814, it was on a site given by the Dittoes that the first church, Saint Joseph's, was erected in 1818
Mourn - Abraham mourned for Sarah (Genesis 23:2 ); Jacob for Joseph (37:34,35); the Egyptians for Jacob (50:3-10); Israel for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ), for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ), and for Samuel (1 Samuel 25:1 ); David for Abner (2 Samuel 3:31,35 ); Mary and Martha for Lazarus (John 11 ); devout men for Stephen (Acts 8:2 ), etc
Taxing - For the enrolment is mentioned in order to explain why Joseph and Mary came from Nazareth to Bethlehem at the time when Jesus was born. 6 (Josephus Ant
Eleazar - Eliud's son, three generations above Joseph, husband of the Virgin Mary (Matthew 1:15)
Birthright - A double portion fell to the firstborn, compare Deuteronomy 21:15-17, whence Joseph's two sons, who received the birthright forfeited by Reuben the firstborn, were counted as heads of the tribes Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 48:5-6; Genesis 48:22; Genesis 49:4; 1 Chronicles 5:1). Thus Isaac is preferred to Ishmael, Jacob to Esau, Joseph to Reuben, David to his elder brothers
Grave-Clothes - Gospel of Peter, 6), was ‘wrapped’ (ἐνετύλιξεν, Matthew 27:59, Luke 23:53) or ‘swathed’ (ἐνείλησεν, Mark 15:46) in the shroud of linen cloth (σινδόνι) which Joseph of Arimathaea had procured on his way back to Golgotha, and which is described as ‘fresh’ or ‘unused’ (καθαρᾷ, Matthew 27:59), in accordance with the sacred use to which it was put (cf
Rachel - Jacob already had ten sons and a daughter by the time Rachel gave birth to her first son, Joseph (Genesis 29:31-35; Genesis 30:1-24)
Beard - In consonance with this Egyptian usage, Scripture, with the undesigned propriety of truth, represents Joseph as having "shaved his beard," which he had allowed to grow in prison, before entering Pharaoh's presence (Genesis 41:14)
Lord, Brethren of the - His father was a certain Alphaeus, equivalent to the Cleophas or Clopas of John 19, according to the synoptic Gospels (Matthew 10; Mark 3; Luke 6), and his mother, Mary, was a close attendant on Jesus (Mark 15), being a sister of the mother of Jesus (John 19) or a sister-in-law (on Hegesippus's assertion that Cleophas was Saint Joseph's brother). ...
 ...
Joseph or Joses, probably next in age to James (Matthew 13), is only noteworthy because his mother, at the scene of the Crucifixion, is identified by the use of his name (Mark 15). There is no need to believe (like the Syrians and Greeks, moved by the "protoevangelium Jacobi" and other apocryphals) that they are Saint Joseph's children by a wife deceased, or (as Helvidius and other heretics thought) by Mary after Jesus's birth
Eliakim - As Joseph over Pharaoh's palace, Azrikam "governor of Ahaz' house" (2 Chronicles 28:7); chamberlain, treasurer, prefect of the palace (Genesis 41:40), chief minister
Ring - Pharaoh's transfer of his ring from his finger to Joseph betokened his investing him with royal authority (Genesis 41:42; a device, as the beetle or the owner's name, was engraven on it, Exodus 28:11)
Trades - It was quite usual, though by no means universal, for a son to follow the trade of his father, as Jesus did that of Joseph, who was a carpenter (Matthew 13:55, Mark 6:3)
Gabriel Richard - The first permanent Catholic mission within the present limits of Detroit was at Fort Saint Joseph or Pontchartrain; in the interest of French claims a few Canadian families under Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac settled about the fort in 1701, and on July 26, their first pastor, Father Constantine Delhalle, began the still existing records of the church of Saint Anne
Child - JESUS was never called a child of Joseph, nor the child of man, nor the child of GOD
Apion - ...
(i) His hostility to Judaism was deep, persistent, and unscrupulous (Joseph. 21), as the direct extracts preserved by Josephus from his writings clearly prove. Josephus exposes the ignorance, mendacity, and self-contradictions of Apion
Jacob - Deborah and Rachel died before he reached Hebron; Joseph, the favorite son of Jacob, was sold into Egypt eleven years before the death of Isaac; and Jacob had probably reached his 130th year when he went thither
Coat - ...
Jacob made Joseph a coat of many colors
Genealogies - At the census Joseph and Mary went to Bethlehem, for they were of the lineage of David; Anna was of the tribe of Asher, and Paul of the tribe of Benjamin
Ahasuerus - Joseph Scaliger maintains that Xerxes was the Ahasuerus, and Hamestris his queen, the Esther, of Scripture. Josephus positively says that this was the person
Scapular - The rules concerning scapulars are: ...
the investing must be done by an authorized person
the scapular may be given in any place, to any Catholic, even to an infant
it must be worn as described above
if replaced, no blessing is required
if it is laid aside for a considerable time, the benefits are forfeited during that time
The Church has approved 18 kinds of scapulars: ...
Scapular of Mount Carmel
Scapular of Our Lady of Ransom
Scapular of Saint Benedict
Scapular of Saint Dominic
Scapular of Saint Joseph
Scapular of Saint Michael the Archangel
Scapular of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary
Scapular of the Help of the Sick
Scapular of the Holy Face
Scapular of the Immaculate Conception
Scapular of the Immaculate Heart of Mary
Scapular of the Most Blessed Trinity
Scapular of the Mother of Good Counsel
Scapular of the Passion (black)
Scapular of the Passion (red)
Scapular of the Precious Blood
Scapular of the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Scapular of the Seven Dolors
Richard, Gabriel - The first permanent Catholic mission within the present limits of Detroit was at Fort Saint Joseph or Pontchartrain; in the interest of French claims a few Canadian families under Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac settled about the fort in 1701, and on July 26, their first pastor, Father Constantine Delhalle, began the still existing records of the church of Saint Anne
New York, State of - Another missionary cruelly tortured by the Mohawks, 1644, was Father Joseph Bressani, who was also rescued by the Dutch. The first permanent mission was established the next year, not far from Syracuse, by Father Joseph Chaumonot and Father Claude Dablon. Each of the Five Nations then had a mission; the pioneer mission of the Onondagas being restored, Saint Mary's of the Martyrs being established for the Mohawks at Tionnontoguen, near Ossemenon, Saint Francis Xavier's for the Oneidas, Saint Joseph's for the Cayugas, and Saint Michael's for the Senecas. ...
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Carmel
Saint Albans
Saint Bonaventure
Saint Clara
Saint Huberts
Saint James
Saint Johnsville
Saint Josephs
Saint Lawrence
Saint Remy
Saint Regis Falls
Ecclesiastically, the state is governed by the archdiocese of ...
New York
and the dioceses of ...
Albany
Brooklyn
Buffalo
Ogdensburg
Rochester
Rockville Centre
Syracuse
See also ...
patron saints index
Levi - Simeon, as the one detained in Egypt, by Joseph, was probably the foremost of Levi's sons in the cruel attack on Rachel's son, and Levi probably joined him, though the spite began with the base born sons of Bilhah and Zilpah. The discipline made the sons, once so unfeeling towards Joseph, to become self sacrificing for Benjamin
Philip the Apostle - The Lord probably knew Philip before, as the latter knew Hint as "son of Joseph" (expressing the ordinary belief), John 1:45. "...
Sincere in aim, defective in knowledge; for it was Christ who found him, not he Christ (Isaiah 65:1); and Jesus was Son of God, not of Joseph His reputed father, husband of Mary
Watch - In Job 7:12 mishmâr means “watch” or “guard” in general (over a potentially dangerous criminal): “Am I a sea, or a whale, that thou settest a watch over me?”...
Mishmâr can also represent a “place of confinement,” such as a jail: “And he put them in ward in the house of the captain of the guard, into the prison, the place where Joseph was bound” ( Joseph put his brothers “into ward three days” ( Exodus - Those who adopt the longer term reckon thus: ...
| Years | | From the descent of Jacob into Egypt to the | death of Joseph 71 | | From the death of Joseph to the birth of | Moses 278 | | From the birth of Moses to his flight into | Midian 40 | | From the flight of Moses to his return into | Egypt 40 | | From the return of Moses to the Exodus 1 | | 430 ...
Others contend for the shorter period of two hundred and fifteen years, holding that the period of four hundred and thirty years comprehends the years from the entrance of Abraham into Canaan (see LXX. They reckon thus: ...
| Years | | From Abraham's arrival in Canaan to Isaac's | birth 25 | | From Isaac's birth to that of his twin sons | Esau and Jacob 60 | | From Jacob's birth to the going down into | Egypt 130 | | (215) | | From Jacob's going down into Egypt to the | death of Joseph 71 | | From death of Joseph to the birth of Moses 64 | | From birth of Moses to the Exodus 80 | | In all
Samaritans - ...
Upon the return of the Jews from the Babylonish captivity, and the rebuilding of Jerusalem and the temple, the religion of the Samaritans received another alteration on the following occasion; one of the sons of Jehoiada, the high priest, whom Josephus calls Manasseh, married the daughter of Sanballat the Horonite; but the law of God having forbidden the intermarriages of the Israelites with any other nation, Nehemiah set himself to reform this corruption, which had spread into many Jewish families, and obliged all that had taken strange wives immediately to part with them, Nehemiah 13:23-30 . But when the Jews suffered persecution, the Samaritans disowned them, and alleged that they were Phenicians originally, or descended from Joseph, or Manasseh his son. Joseph Scaliger, being curious to know their usages, wrote to the Samaritans of Egypt, and to the high priest of the whole sect, who resided at Neapolis. At the time when they wrote to Scaliger, they reckoned one hundred and twenty-two high priests; affirmed that the Jews had no high priests of the race of Phinehas; and that the Jews belied them in calling them Cutheans; for that they are descended from the tribe of Joseph by Ephraim
Jacob - While journeying from Bethel to Ephrath (the Canaanitish name of Bethlehem), Rachel died in giving birth to her second son Benjamin (35:16-20), fifteen or sixteen years after the birth of Joseph. ...
Jacob was soon after this deeply grieved by the loss of his beloved son Joseph through the jealousy of his brothers (37:33). Then follows the story of the famine, and the successive goings down into Egypt to buy corn (42), which led to the discovery of the long-lost Joseph, and the patriarch's going down with all his household, numbering about seventy souls (Exodus 1:5 ; Deuteronomy 10:22 ; Acts 7:14 ), to sojourn in the land of Goshen
Nicodemus - Josephus (Ant. Some writers, who regard the Fourth Gospel as un-historical, suggest that our Nicodemus is simply a typical character, constructed by the Evangelist from the traditions of ben Gorion, with the aid of the Synoptic references to Joseph of Arimathaea. ‘Nicodemus’) says: ‘Nicodemon ben Gorion passes into the Gospel under the shadow of Joseph of Arimathaea’; and speaks of ‘a conflate development of Joseph into two persons
Brethren of the Lord (2) - According to the Epiphanian view, they were sons of Joseph by a former wife. According to the Helvidian view, they were sons of Joseph and Mary born after Jesus. ’ That the brethren were members of the same family as Jesus, and stood in some definite filial relation to Joseph and Mary, is distinctly stated in Matthew 13:55 ||, ‘Is not this the carpenter’s son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joseph,* [13] partly because it ‘is obviously an attempt of an ardent champion of celibacy to maintain the perpetual virginity not only of Mary, but of Joseph;† Jacob - Joshua seems to have regarded it as the limit of his expedition, and there the Law was promulgated and Joseph’s hones were buried ( Joshua 24:25 ; Joshua 24:32 ; cf. ...
From the time of his return to Hebron, Jacob ceases to be the central figure of the Biblical narrative, which thenceforward revolves round Joseph. Among the leading incidents are Joseph’s mission to inquire after his brethren’s welfare, the inconsolable sorrow of the old man on the receipt of what seemed conclusive evidence of Joseph’s death, the despatch of his surviving sons except Benjamin to buy corn in Egypt (cf. The story turns next to Jacob’s delight at the news that Joseph is alive, and to his own journey to Egypt through Beersheha, his early home, where he was encouraged by God in visions of the night ( Genesis 46:1-7 ). In Egypt he was met by Joseph, and, after an interview with the Pharaoh, settled in the pastoral district of Goshen ( Genesis 47:6 ), afterwards known as ‘the land of Rameses’ (from Rameses ii. Jacob lived in Egypt seventeen years ( Genesis 47:28 ), at the close of which, feeling death to be nigh, he extracted a pledge from Joseph to bury him in Canaan, and adopted his two grandsons, placing the younger first in anticipation of the pre-eminence of the tribe that would descend from him ( Genesis 48:19 , Hebrews 11:21 ). To Joseph himself was promised, as a token of special affection, the conquered districts of Shechem on the lower slopes of Gerizim ( Genesis 48:22 , John 4:5 ). After blessing his sons, Jacob gave them together the directions concerning his funeral which he had given previously to Joseph, and died ( Genesis 49:33 ). Father of Joseph, the husband of Mary ( Matthew 1:15 f
Sychar - ‘A city of Samaria,’ near to the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son Joseph ( John 4:5 )
Zachariah, Zacharias - Father of Joseph, an officer of Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:18 ; 1Ma 5:66 ). It is more likely to be due to the Evangelist, or, still more, to a scribe, who perhaps was misled by the mention by Josephus of a ‘Zacharias son of Baruch,’ murdered in the Temple by the Zealots ( BJ IV
Zadok - A warrior of David’s, of the house of Aaron ( 1 Chronicles 12:28 ), identified by Josephus ( Ant. An ancestor of Joseph the husband of Mary ( Matthew 1:14 Tomb of Jesus - It was a “new tomb” which had been “hewn out in the rock” by Joseph of Arimathea (Matthew 27:60 ; compare Luke 23:50-56 ) who had apparently prepared it for his own family's use
Taxes - An enrollment for the purposes of taxation under the Roman emperor brought Joseph and Mary to Bethlehem, where Jesus was born (Luke 2:1-7 )
Deliverance, Deliverer - Joseph was God's agent to deliver His people from famine (Genesis 45:7 )
Chariot - The first mention of the chariot is when Joseph, as a mark of distinction, was placed in Pharaoh's second state chariot (Genesis 41:43 ); and the next, when he went out in his own chariot to meet his father Jacob (46:29)
Barnabas - ...
Barnabas in Acts Barnabas was a Levite and native of the island of Cyprus, named Joseph (Joses), before the disciples called him Barnabas
Barnabas - A surname given by the Apostles to Joseph, the Levite, whose first recorded deed ( Acts 4:36 ) was the selling of his property and the devotion of its proceeds to the needs of the Christian community
More - ...
Israel loved Joseph more than all his children
Bull - Moses portrayed the future strength of Joseph with the term “shor ” (Deuteronomy 33:17 )
Naked (And Forms) - ...
Genesis 42:9 (a) Joseph accused his brethren of being spies who came to see the military installations, the defense measures, and the riches of the land, with a view to invading and conquering Egypt
Matthias - We there gather (1) that he was one of those who had ‘companied with’ the apostles ‘all the time that the Lord Jesus went in and out among’ them, ‘beginning from the baptism of John’ until the Ascension; (2) that he was antecedently the less prominent of the two put forward, his bare name only being given, while Joseph is further described by a patronymic ‘called Barsabbas,’ and also by a surname ‘Justus’ (δίκαιος); for, says Bengel, ‘eo cognomine videri poterat praeferri debere, nisi,’ as he justly adds ‘postea demum hoc cognomen nactus est ut agnosceret quamvis Matthias electus esset, ipsum tamen sua laude non excidisse’; and (3) that anyhow the Lord who is καρδιογνώστης unerringly declared him (ἀναδεῖξαι) the more suitable for the apostleship
Caiaphas - (Καιάφας)...
Caiaphas, or Joseph Caiaphas, was appointed high priest in a. -Josephus, passim; Schürer, GJV Shechem - The bones of Joseph were buried there
Bonosus, Founder Bonosiani Sect - Bonosus is only known to us as holding the same views with Helvidius with regard to the perpetual virginity of the mother of our Lord, and as to His brethren, whom he affirmed to have been the natural offspring of Joseph and Mary
Stephen - Joseph they had refused; Moses they had repelled; they had turned to idolatry; had slain the prophets; had always resisted the Holy Ghost; and had been the betrayers and murderers of the Just One
Face - ...
Joseph bowed himself with his face to the earth
Guard - Joseph was sold to Potiphar, a captain of Pharaoh's guard
Hamor - Of the latter’s sons, Joseph alone is related in the OT to have been buried in the tomb bought from the sons of Hamor ( Joshua 24:32 )
Archelaus - He was the elder of the two sons of Herod the Great by Malthace, a Samaritan woman (Josephus BJ i. Thus at the beginning of his reign an evil reputation was gained by Archelaus, and the alarm of Joseph may be understood (‘But when he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea in the room of his father Herod, he was afraid to go thither’). —Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews, Wars of the Jews [1], as cited above; references s
Sick, To Be - It is found in the text for the first time near the end of the Book of Genesis when Joseph is told: “Behold, thy father is sick …” ( Birthright - The paternal blessing was also in a peculiar sense the right of the first-born, though the right itself and all the blessings of it might be forfeited or transferred, as in the case of Jacob and Esau, Genesis 25:33; Reuben and Joseph, 1 Chronicles 5:1
ja'Cob - Deborah and Rachel died before he reached Hebron; Joseph, the favorite son of Jacob, was sold into Egypt eleven years before the death of Isaac; and Jacob had probably exceeded his 130th year when he went tither
Miraculous Conception - Luke has introduced into the genealogy of Jesus, Luke 3:23 , and of which, otherwise, it is not possible to give a good account, ων , ως ενομιζετο , υιος ‘Ιωσηφ ; [1] and we can discover a peculiar significancy in an expression of the Apostle Paul, Galatians 4:4 , "God sent forth his Son, made of a woman
Midian - The Midianites, together with their neighbours, the Ishmaelites, were early engaged in the trade between the east and the west, as we find the party to whom Joseph was sold, carrying spices, the produce of the east, into Egypt; and, taking Gilead in their way, to add the celebrated and highly prized balm of that country to their merchandise
Birthright - Reuben forfeited the blessings of his birthright, as we see by the express declaration of his father Jacob, in his benediction of his children, Genesis 49:1 , &c, for the crime of incest with his father's concubine, on account of which his tribe continued all along in obscurity; while the priesthood was conferred on Levi, the government on Judah, and the double portion on Joseph, to descend to their respective tribes
Dreams - Joseph was favoured very early with prophetic dreams, whose signification was easily discovered by Jacob, Genesis 37:5
Beautiful - In Genesis it is said of all the trees in the garden of Eden, Genesis 2:9 , especially of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, Genesis 3:6 ; of the countenances of Rebekah, Genesis 26:7 , Rachel, Genesis 29:17 and Joseph, Genesis 39:6
Pit - (that into which Joseph was cast Consent - " It is said negatively of Joseph of Arimathaea, who had not "consented" to the counsel and deed of the Jews, Luke 23:51 (Middle Voice)
Laurentius, an Antipope - by Joseph Blanchinus in his ed
Archaeology, Christian - ...
Joseph Alexandre Martigny (1808-1880) Canon of Belley, published Dictionnaire des antiquites chretiennes, Paris, 1865, the first work of its kind; the vast erudition displayed therein has caused the book to be justly valuable. ...
Other Christians ...
Joseph Bingham (1668-1723) Clergyman, was the author of an important work on Christian antiquities
Christian Archaeology - ...
Joseph Alexandre Martigny (1808-1880) Canon of Belley, published Dictionnaire des antiquites chretiennes, Paris, 1865, the first work of its kind; the vast erudition displayed therein has caused the book to be justly valuable. ...
Other Christians ...
Joseph Bingham (1668-1723) Clergyman, was the author of an important work on Christian antiquities
Irish Martyrs - MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Martyrs, Irish - MacFerge with his companions
Peter Costello
Peter O'Higgins
Raymond Keogh
Raymond O'Moore
Richard Barry
Richard Overton
Stephen Petit
Thaddeus Moriarty
Thomas O'Higgins
Vincent Gerard Dillon
William Lynch
William MacGollen
William O'Connor
Order of Saint Francis ...
Anthony Musaeus
Anthony O'Farrel
Antony Broder
Bernard Connaeus
Bernard O'Horumley
Bonaventure de Burgo
Brother Thomas and his companion
Charles MacGoran
Christopher Dunleavy
Conor Macuarta
Cornelius O'Dougherty
Cornelius O'Rourke
Daniel Clanchy
Daniel Himaecan
Daniel O'Neilan
Denis O'Neilan
Dermot O'Mulrony
Didacus Cheevers
Donagh O'Rourke
Donatus O'Hurley
Edmund Fitzsimon
Eugene O'Cahan
Eugene O'Leman
Fergal Ward
Francis Fitzgerald
Francis O'Mahony
Francis O'Sullivan
Galfridius O'Farrel
Henry Delahoyde
Hilary Conroy
Hugh MacKeon
James Pillanus
James Saul
Jeremiah de Nerihiny
John Cathan
John Cornelius
John Esmund
John Ferall
John Honan
John Kearney
John O'Daly
John O'Dowd
John O'Lochran
John O'Molloy
Joseph Rochford
Lochlonin MacO'Cadha
Magnus O'Fodhry
Mattheus O'Leyn
Maurice O'Scanlon
Neilan Loughran
Nicholas Wogan
Patrick O'Brady
Patrick O'Kenna
Paulinus Synott
Peter O'Quillan
Peter Stafford
Phelim O'Hara
Philip Flasberry
Philip O'Lea
Raymond Stafford
Richard Butler
Richard Synnot
Roger Congaill
Roger de Mara
Roger O'Donnellan
Roger O'Hanlon
Terence Magennis
Thaddeus (or Thomas) O'Daly
Thaddeus O'Boyle
Thaddeus O'Caraghy
Thaddeus O'Meran
Thomas Fitzgerald
Walter de Wallis
William Hickey
Order of Saint Augustine ...
Austin Higgins
Donatus O'Kennedy
Donatus Serenan
Fulgentius Jordan
Peter Taaffe
Raymond O'Malley
Thaddeus O'Connel
Thomas Deir
Thomas Tullis
William Tirrey
Carmelite Order ...
Angelus of Saint Joseph
Peter of the Mother of God
Thomas Aquinas of Jesus
Order of the Blessed Trinity ...
Cornelius O'Connor
Eugene O'Daly
Society of Jesus ...
Dominic O'Collins
Edmund MacDaniell
John Bath
Robert Netterville
William Boyton
Foreknowledge - When Joseph's brothers sold him as a slave, God was in reality sending Joseph to devise a plan that would save the whole family from starvation (Genesis 45:5-7 ). The brothers intended to harm him, but God knew that many lives would be saved through Joseph's wise planning (50:20). By storing food in Egypt, Joseph partially fulfilled the promise to Abraham that "all peoples on earth will be blessed through you" (Genesis 12:3 )
Fullness - In Deuteronomy 33:16-17 , Moses blesses the tribe of Joseph. As he describes the various facets of God's blessing on Joseph, he moves from material blessing to the favor of God
Jacob's Well - ...
The well is described (John 4:5) as in the neighbourhood of ‘a city of Samaria called Sychar, near to the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son Joseph. Somewhere within its borders the bones of Joseph were afterwards buried (Joshua 24:32, cf. The traditional sites of Jacob’s Well and Joseph’s Tomb (a little to the N
See, Perceive - When Joseph advised Pharaoh “to look out a man discreet and wise,” he was telling him to choose or select such a man ( Joseph was handsome in form [1] and appearance [1]” (NASB)
Eating - In Joseph's day they neither ate with the Egyptians, nor the Egyptians with them, Genesis 43:32 ; nor, in our Saviour's time, with the Samaritans, John 4:9 . Joseph, entertaining his brethren in Egypt, seated them separately, each at his particular table; and he himself sat down separately from the Egyptians, who ate with him; but he sent to his brethren portions out of the provisions which were before him, Genesis 43:31 , &c. Joseph sent his brother Benjamin a portion five times larger than those of his other brethren
James - Passing over the father of Joseph the husband of the Virgin Mary, according to St. She had another son Joseph. He is the eldest of four brothers, James, Joseph, Judas, and Simon (Simon and Judas, Matthew 13:55). ...
The following passages outside the Gospels have to do with this James: 1 Corinthians 15:7, Acts 1:13; Acts 12:17; Acts 12:15 (passim) Acts 21:18-25, Galatians 1:18-19; Galatians 2:1-10; Josephus Ant. From these passages we learn that he was converted to a full acknowledgment of Christ (probably by the Resurrection), that the Lord appeared to him specially, that he became head of the Church of Jerusalem, and that he was put to death by the Jews either just before the siege (Hegesippus) or some ten years earlier (Josephus). The names of the four brothers, James, Joseph, Simon (= Simeon), and Jude (= Judah), are those of patriarchs. Twelve persons are mentioned in the NT as Bearing the name Siunon (Simeon), and nine that of Joseph (Joses)
Egypt - It was in the time of the Hyksos that Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph entered Egypt. , we must see the "new king, who knew not Joseph. All this occurred before the time of the new king "which knew not Joseph" (Exodus 1:8 ). The exile of Joseph and the migration of Jacob to "the land of Goshen" occurred about 200 years later
Sim'Eon - Besides the massacre of Shechem, (Genesis 34:25 ) the only personal incident related of Simeon is the fact of his being selected by Joseph as the hostage for the appearance of Benjamin
Divination - This is illustrated in the history of Joseph (Genesis 41:25-32 ) and of (Daniel 2:27 ; 4:19-28 )
Irrigation - Joseph may have fulfilled this role during his service for Pharaoh
Ramah - It may also be the town, Arimathea, hometown of Joseph, in whose tomb Jesus was buried (Matthew 27:57-60 )
Louisiana - ...
Catholic influence on place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Convent
Saint Amant
Saint Benedict
Saint Bernard
Saint Francisville
Saint Gabriel
Saint James
Saint Joseph
Saint Landry
Saint Martinville
Saint Maurice
Saint Patrick's
Saint Rose
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
New Orleans
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Alexandria
Baton Rouge
Houma-Thibodaux