What does Joram mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יְהוֹרָ֜ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 3
יְהוֹרָ֥ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 2
יוֹרָם֙ son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 2
יְהוֹרָ֖ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 2
ἰωράμ the son of Jehoshaphat 1
וְיֹרָ֣ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
יוֹרָ֖ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
לְיוֹרָ֤ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
י֠וֹרָם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
יוֹרָ֑ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
יוֹרָ֥ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
יְהוֹרָ֡ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
וִיהוֹרָם֩ son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
לִיהוֹרָ֥ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
ἰωρὰμ the son of Jehoshaphat 1
יְהוֹרָ֗ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
יְהוֹרָם֙ son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
יְהוֹרָ֣ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
לִֽיהוֹרָ֖ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
הָי֛וּ to be 1
יֽוֹרָם־ son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1

Definitions Related to Joram

H3088


   1 son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal.
   2 son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 12 years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter.
   3 a priest in the reign of Jehoshaphat.
   Additional Information: Jehoram or Joram = “Jehovah is exalted”.
   

G2496


   1 the son of Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, succeeded his father on the throne of Judah.
   Additional Information: Jehoram = “whom Jehovah has exalted”.
   

H3141


   1 son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal.
   2 son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 12 years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter.
   3 a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith.
   4 son of Toi, king of Hamath.
   Additional Information: Joram = “Jehovah is exalted”.
   

Frequency of Joram (original languages)

Frequency of Joram (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Joram
=Jeho'ram.
One of the kings of Israel (2 Kings 8:16,25,28 ). He was the son of Ahab.
Jehoram, the son and successor of Jehoshaphat on the throne of Judah (2 Kings 8:24 ).
Holman Bible Dictionary - Joram
(joh' ruhm) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh is exalted.” Name of a king of Israel (849-843 B.C.) and a king of Judah (850-843 B.C.) The possibility of confusion between them is aggravated by several factors. For one thing, both are also called Jehoram. For another, they were contemporary with one another. Finally, each reigned in proximity to a person named Ahaziah: Joram of Judah was succeeded on the throne by his son, whose name was Ahaziah; Joram of Israel came to the throne at the death of his brother, who was also named Ahaziah. The account of the reign of Joram (Jehoram) of Israel is found in 2 Kings 3:1 . He led a coalition with Judah and Edom, advised by Elisha, to defeat Moab. The reign of Joram of Judah is treated in 2 Kings 8:1 . He married the daughter of Ahab of Israel and brought Baal worship to Judah. Edom and Libnah gained independence from Judah in his reign. See Israel ; Chronology of Biblical Period.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Joram
JORAM.—Son of Jehoshaphat, named in our Lord’s genealogy (Matthew 1:6).
JORDAN
1. Name.—The name of this river is in the OT נדְדֵּן; LXX Septuagint Ἰορδάνης, Ἰόρδανος, Ἰορδάννης; NT always Ἰορδάνης; Josepheus. Ἰορδάνης, Ἰόρδανος.
The form of the word Yardçn is difficult to explain. To say, with Ewald (Ausf. Lehrbuch der heb. Sprache8 [1] , p. 426), or with Olshausen (Lehrbuch der heb. Sprache, p. 405), that the primitive form is Yardân or Yardǎn, does not help us much; and we can hardly suppose, like Stade (Lehrbuch der heb. Grammatik, p. 176) or Winckler (Altorient. Forsch. i. p. 422 f.), that it is a word borrowed from another language, seeing that it is accompanied by the article. It might be better to hold, with Seybold (MNDPV [2] , 1896, p. 10 f.), that the LXX Septuagint has preserved the real vocalization, Yordan, formed on the analogy of korban, shuthan. The name of the Jordan has not yet been found in the cuneiform inscriptions; but it figures in an Egyptian text (Anast. i. xxiii. 1) in the form of Y-ira-du-na (W. M. Müller, As. u. Eur. pp. 97f., 196).
The word יַרִדֵּן is a common noun, and is therefore always accompanied by the article (הַיַרִדֵּן), with a few exceptions, which will he pointed out below. Yet it is worthy of note that we have not a single passage in which çn is treated with certainty as a common noun.
From the point of view of etymology, it is most natural to connect this word with the verb יָרַד ‘to descend,’ and this is how it is treated by the prevalent opinion, found, however, more frequently among geographers than among philologists, according to which the Jordan is ‘the descending,’ ‘the flowing,’ a name which might, of course, be applicable to any stream of water, and which, in a single particular case, would have become a proper name, just as the Hebrews called the Euphrates הַנֶּהָד, ‘river.’ But it is more probable that, while retaining the root יִרַד as our starting-point, we should interpret çn as the place to which one goes down, . to drink, .e. ‘the watering-place.’ Two authors, Seybold (V [2] , 1896, l.e.) and Cheyne (Encye. Bibl. ii. col. 2575), have, independently of each other, suggested this explanation. If this derivation is correct, the modern Arabic name of the Jordan would be a literal translation of the old name, for they call it esh-Sherî’a, ‘the watering-place,’ and more fully esh-Sherî’a el-Kebireh, ‘the great watering-place, to distinguish it from another stream, its tributary, the Sherî’at el-Manaḍireh (Yarmuk). However, there is found also among the Arabs the name el-Urdunn, an approximate transcription of the Hebrew name (cf. Kampffmeyer, in ZDPV [4] xv. [5] p. 27; Ed. König, Lehrgebäude der heb. Spraehe, 1f. i. p. 461).
We must mention one other way of explaining the name of the Jordan, which used to be in great favour with the Fathers of the Church as well as the Jewish teachers. According to this interpretation, the name Jordan may be divided into Jor and Dan, and these two monosyllables denote the two sources of the river. Dan, that is to say, is the name of the city of Dan, formerly Laïsh or Leshem (Joshua 18; Joshua 1 Jos 9:47), and consequently that of the branch of the river issuing from it; Jor is the name of the other stream, and Jordan is the final name of the river from the point where the two branches unite. This explanation was given by St. Jerome, and accepted by many writers after him. An attempt has been made to support it by interpreting Jor as a contraction of Yĕʾôr (יִאֹד), a Heb. word meaning ‘watercourse,’ and used especially in reference to the Nile. This strange etymology has now no interest except that of curiosity, and is not upheld by anybody, any more than another found in the Talmud (, 55), which takes çn to be a contraction of dan or dan, and thus brings in both the verb ‘to descend’ and the name of the city of Dan.
The only passages in which Yardçn is used without the article are: (a) Job 40:23, where it may be equally well translated by ‘the Jordan’ or ‘a river’; but several commentators doubt whether the text is reliable; Budde suggests deleting this word as a gloss; Gunkel and Winckler change it into Yĕ’ôr (יְאד) because in the same passage reference is made to the Nile; Cheyne into îhôn (נִיחוֹן) for the same reason. () Psalms 42:7, where ‘hay-Yardçn (אֶדֶץ הַיַדְדֵּן) seems to denote ‘the country of the Jordan,’ .e. probably the region round about the sources of the river, which is confirmed by the mention of Hermon or rather the Hermons (in the plural) in the same verse. It must be observed, however, that, according to the Talmud, the river bore the name of Jordan only between the Lake of Tiberias and the Dead Sea, a statement which is neither confirmed nor contradicted by the Bible, and cannot be proved in any way; we may add that, according to some writers, the present custom is exactly the opposite, for it is alleged—has the claim any foundation?—that at the present day only the part of the river above the lake is called , and the part below, îa.
The word Jordan in the rôle of common noun is further proved by the expression ‘Jordan of Jericho’ (יַדְדֵּן יְדֵחוֹ), in the construct state. The meaning of this will be examined below, in connexion with the lower course of the river near where it falls into the Dead Sea.
2. General geography and geology.—The total length of the valley of the Jordan, from its source to its mouth at the Dead Sea, is about 120 miles. It stretches from north to south in a practically straight line. It begins as a continuation of the Bekaʽa (Cœle-Syria), that valley which stretches between the Lebanon on the west and the Anti-Lebanon on the east, but whose waters run towards the north. Almost immediately after leaving Lake Huleh, which is 7 feet above the level of the Mediterranean, the Jordan begins to fall below the level of the sea; the Lake of Tiberias is 682 feet, the Dead Sea 1292 feet, below it. There is not another example of such a marked depression on the surface of our globe, except with tracts covered by the seas; the other cases which may be cited attain much less depths; the greatest is about 300 feet in the Sahara, while, taking into account the depth of the Dead Sea (1300 feet), we get a total of almost 2600 feet. G. A. Smith has well said (HGHL [6] p. 407): ‘Among the rivers of the world the Jordan is unique by a twofold distinction of Nature and History.… The Nile and the Jordan, otherwise so different, are alike in this, that the historical singularity of each has behind it as remarkable a singularity of physical formation.… Every one knows the incomparableness of the Nile.… In its own way the Jordan is as solitary and extreme an effect of natural forces. There may be something on the surface of another planet to match the Jordan Valley; there is nothing in this.’
As regards the geological explanation of this remarkable phenomenon, we may say that it was supplied in the 19th cent, in a very satisfactory manner by the experts who made a study of Palestine, and the valley of the Jordan and the Dead Sea in particular: Fraas, Hull, Lartet, and Blanckenhorn. The following is briefly the result of their labours. When, during the Eocene period, and even before it, during the Cretaceous period, successive strata of limestone had been deposited, there was produced towards the end of the Eocene epoch, by the action of lateral (east and west) pressure, a falling away, i.e. a ‘fault’ or fracture was formed in the earth’s crust. This movement, however, was not of a convulsive nature, it was not a sudden cataclysm, but a slow and gradual process, extending over a long period of time. The result of it was the formation of the parallel chains of Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon, and further south that of the two ranges of hills which skirt the Jordan valley. The southern end of this depression is, from the point of view of the flow of water, a transverse ridge reaching 650 feet above the Red Sea and the Mediterranean, and situated about 46 miles from Akabah and more than 73 miles from the Dead Sea.
At the end of the Miocene and the beginning of the Pliocene period, the waters in the Jordan valley must have been just about at their present level. But the pluvial period (Pliocene) brought about a considerable raising of the aqueous surface enclosed; the Jordan valley became a lake which must have been about 200 miles long and more than 2000 feet deep. The glacial period (post-Pliocene), during which the temperature sank considerably and the rainfall increased, only served to accentuate this state of affairs still more. Then, at the close of this period, the streams of water diminished, and also the lake, until things once more arrived at their present state. On the lateral slopes of the valley traces of the heights to which the waters rose are still distinguishable; some of the most notable of these traces are 1180, others 347, feet above the present level of the Dead Sea.
Alongside of this theory, held in common by those who have studied this question, we must mention, as worthy of attention, the one which W. Libbey, Professor of Physical Geography in the University of Princeton, has recently published (Libbey and Hoskins, The Jordan Valley and Petra, ii. pp. 251–260).
The ancients were completely ignorant of the fact that the bottom of the Jordan valley lay below the level of the Mediterranean Sea. Nor were they aware at that time that the depression between the Dead Sea and the Gulf of Akabah was intersected by a sort of natural barrier, forming two anticlinal slopes and making a dividing line for the waters. And even in the first part of the 19th cent, it was held by Carl Ritter, W. M. Leake, de Hoff, Léon de Laborde, etc., that formerly—perhaps even in historical times before the catastrophe of Sodom and Gomorrah—the Jordan passed through the Dead Sea, continued its southward course, and flowed into the Red Sea. Those are ideas which have had to be given up. It was in 1836–37 that two German scholars, von Schubert and Roth, and at the same time two Englishmen, G. H. Moore and W. G. Beke, discovered that the Jordan valley sank far down below the level of the sea. The Austrian Russegger, the Frenchman Jules de Berton, and the Englishman Symonds soon confirmed this sensational discovery, as a consequence of explorations carried on in quite an independent way. Before them, famous travellers, such as Seetzen (1806–07), Burckhardt (1810–12), Irby and Mangles (1817–18), had visited those same parts without any suspicion of the strange phenomenon regarding the altitude.
The course of the Jordan is interrupted twice—first by the Lake of Huleh, a description of which occurs later in the course of the present article, then by the Lake of Tiberias or Sea of Galilee (which see); we have not to examine this here. These interruptions quite naturally cause us to divide the next part of this article into three sections: (a) the sources of the Jordan, (b) the Upper Jordan as far as Lake Tiberias, (c) the Lower Jordan from the Lake of Tiberias to the Dead Sea.
3. The sources of the Jordan.—Just as in the Alps the traditional opinion of mountaineers does not always show as the principal source of a river the one which tourists or even geographers would denote as such, so is it with the Jordan. The most northerly of its sources, the one which gives rise to the stream which covers the longest distance, is found near Hasbeya, at 1846 feet above the sea, at the foot of the Great Hermon. The name Hasbani is given to the river which starts there and flows towards the south, following a course parallel at first to that of the Litani; between these twin valleys there is only a short distance and a ridge of mountains of moderate height; so that one might quite well imagine the Hasbani rejoining the Litani, and falling along with it into the Mediterranean. But, on the contrary, it remains faithful to its course from north to south, and is joined by a tributary, which some modern scholars would include among the sources of the Jordan—the Nahr-Bareighit (Flea River), ‘the smallest of the four sources of the Jordan’ (Libbey and Hoskins, i. p. 89), but which is usually left aside, so that attention may be given I only to the three other more important ones. These are, besides the Hasbani, the one which springs forth at Tell el-Kadi, and the one which emerges from the grotto of Banias. The Tell el-Kadi source is called the Leddan. This unexplained name is interpreted by some as containing an allusion to the city of Dan, situated in this region, and generally (G. A. Smith, however, is an exception, HGHL [6] pp. 480, 678) identified with Tell el-Kadi, Kadi, ‘judge,’ being considered the exact equivalent of the Heb. Dan. The source of Tell el-Kadi is double, in the sense that it streams forth, at 500 feet above the sea, in two places close together under a hillock which is about 300 feet broad and covered with tall trees, and rises in a very striking manner from the plain, over which it towers about 60 feet. The stream which flows from it is the shortest but most copious of the sources of the Jordan; it is not, therefore, on account of its abundance, but because of its short length, that Josephus calls it ‘the little Jordan’ (BJ iv. i. 1; Ant. viii. viii. 4), or ‘the lesser Jordan’ (Ant. v. iii. 1). Lastly, we find the ‘river of Banias,’ Nahr-Banias, which starts at 1200 feet above the sea from a grotto, the ancient shrine of the Semitic, and then of the Graeco-Roman, gods, well known under the name of Paneion, and round which arose the city known under the names of Caesarea Philippi and Paneas, and now called Banias, a corruption of the latter name. Josephus mentions, under the name of Paneas, both the town and the district of which it was the centre; he also mentions the Paneion, and speaks of ‘the famous fountain’ (cf. BJ i. xxi. 3, iii. x. 7; Ant. xv. x. 3, xviii. ii. 1). He adds that the water of the source comes from Lake Phiala, situated 120 stades from Caesarea; this is, undoubtedly, the small lake nowadays called Birket-Ram (cf. Schumacher in ZDPV [4] ix. [5]0 p. 256f.), but it is only 60 stades distant. There is, however, no subterranean communication between this lake, an ancient volcanic crater, and the Paneion source.
The Leddan and the river of Banias meet at an altitude of 148 feet, after the Leddan has flowed 5 miles. A little farther down, the Hasbani, in its turn, becomes united with them: whence the Jordan is formed.
4. The Upper Jordan.—From the confluence, which we have just mentioned, to the Lake of Tiberias the course of the Jordan is unimportant from a historical point of view. The books of the Bible do not speak of it, and later writers very seldom. Nor, from a specifically geographical point of view, has this part of the river any great importance. Its chief interest lies in the fact that at 10 miles distance from the confluence it forms a lake or lagoon, the Bahr or Buheirat (lake or small lake) Huleh, triangular in shape, the level of which is 7 feet above the Mediterranean, and which is rich in papyrus plants. The size of this sheet of water varies very much according to the seasons: at one time it is a considerable limpid stretch, at another it is simply a kind of huge morass. Its traditional identification with ‘the waters of Merom’ (Joshua 11:5; Joshua 11:7) must be regarded with caution (cf. ZDPV [4] ix. [5]0 p. 252); the evidence of Josephus is not favourable. He gives this lake another name, that of ‘the lake of the Semechonites’ (BJ iv. i. 1; cf. ZDPV [4] l.e. and p. 348 f.). As regards the modern name Huleh, it is perhaps derived from the word Ulatha, by which Josephus denotes a district near Banias. For the description of the whole upper course of the Jordan from its sources to the Lake of Tiberias, including Lake Huleh, see Macgregor, The Rob Roy on the Jordan, 1869, 5th ed. 1880.
As soon as it leaves Lake Huleh, the Jordan begins to flow below the level of the sea, and falls almost 700 feet in a distance of 10 miles. We must here notice a bridge, the Jisr Benât-Yaʽkub, ‘bridge of Jacob’s Daughters,’ sometimes wrongly called ‘bridge of Jacob’ or ‘bridge of Jacob’s Sons’; the name itself is really difficult to explain; see on this subject an ingenious solution suggested in PEFSt [13] , 1898, p. 29f., by B. Z. Friedmann.
5. The Lower Jordan.—The Jordan issues from the Lake of Tiberias at a place called Bab et-Tum, leaving on the east the little modern village of Semakh, which has no bridge connecting it with the right bank, and as the river is not fordable at this place, the passage, naturally of frequent occurrence, is accomplished by means of boats. A little farther down there are the remains of an ancient bridge called at the present day Umm el-Kanatir, and again at a short distance below, the ruins of another bridge, Umm es-Sidd. There the Jordan begins to assume a very sinuous course, describing endless meanders; Pliny spoke of it as an amnis ambitiosus, i.e. a winding river. The distance in a straight line from the Lake of Tiberias to the Dead Sea is about 65 miles, but if we take into account all the sinuosities of the river it reaches a total of 200 miles.
The Jordan valley at this part is now called the Ghôr, i.e. ‘depression,’ ‘valley.’ Even in the OT it was designated (Joshua 13:19; Joshua 13:27) by the name ha-’çmek, ‘the valley,’ in opposition to the neighbouring heights. But a name much more frequent in the OT is ‘Arabah, which was applied to the valley to the north as well as that to the south of the Dead Sea; nowadays the name ‘Arabah, which has been preserved, is applied only to the valley to the south of the Dead Sea. In Greek, not in the LXX Septuagint, but in Josephus, Eusebius, etc., ‘Arabah is rendered Αὐλών. Josephus also uses the expressions ‘wide wilderness’ and ‘the great plain’ (BJ iii. x. 7, iv. viii. 2; Ant. iv. vi. 1).
The Ghôr is hemmed in on either side by chains of mountains, or at least hills, of variable height, but sometimes rising 1500 or even 1800 feet above the bed of the river. The slopes are generally somewhat steep, but not to such an extent as to prevent their being scaled. Especially at the spots where the wadis come down from one of the side mountains, means of access are opened up. The soil of the valley is fertile, especially in the northern and middle parts. As to the river itself, it flows in a bed which it has hollowed out for itself, called the Zôr. This bed is somewhat variable in breadth, and it may be easily seen that the river has frequently changed its course. Thus at Damieh, of which we shall speak below, and where we find the half-ruined arches of a bridge of the Middle Ages, the Jordan actually no longer passes under the bridge, but at some distance from it. The ground bordering either side of the river is covered with very thick brushwood; this is undoubtedly what is called in Jeremiah 12:5; Jeremiah 49:19; Jeremiah 50:44, Zechariah 11:3 the נִּאוֹן הַיַרִדּן, i.e. ‘the majesty ( Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘pride’) of Jordan’ (Authorized Version ‘the swelling of Jordan’ [5]3 arises from a wrong interpretation, as if the reference here was to the floods of Jordan; these do exist; they are sometimes sudden and very violent, rendering the fords impassable; cf. Joshua 3:15, Sirach 24:26 (36)).
The vegetation, especially as we go further south, becomes very nearly tropical, and the fauna resembles that of Africa. The lion, which abounded in ancient times, and continued to be encountered even in the Middle Ages, has completely disappeared. But other carnivorous animals are found here, leopards and hyaenas, as well as wild boars, porcupines, etc. In Palestine 58 species of birds are met with, which are also N. African: nearly all of them belong to the Ghôr. The flora has the same character, it recalls that of Nubia, Abyssinia, the Sahara, and the region of the great African lakes. Great heat prevails throughout this whole region, a fact which is quite naturally explained when we remember that it is a valley shut in between high walls, at its highest point 682 and at its lowest 1292 feet below the sea-level. The temperature varies from 77° to 130° Fahr. This circumstance undoubtedly accounts largely for the fact that there are not and never have been any towns on the banks of the Jordan. But another reason for the latter important fact may be found in the danger to which the inhabitants would be exposed, owing to the impossibility of effectually fortifying themselves against attacks. The few towns of the Ghôr at one time populated, e.g. Phasaël and Jericho, are on the height at some distance from the river, near protecting mountains. The other inhabited places are only wretched villages.
The Jordan forms a very large number of rapids; about thirty may be counted, apart from the whirlpools, which are numerous. There is also a considerable number of fords; the majority of them—22—are in the northern part, to the north of Karn Sartabeh; there are 5 more in the south. A little to the north of Beisan there is a bridge, which dates from the Middle Ages, the Jisr el-Mujamieh, on the way—an ancient Roman road—leading from the plain of Jezreel to Gadara and Damascus. Further south is the ruined bridge of Damieh; and lastly, near Jericho, a modern bridge, the Jisr el-Ghoranich, at the place where the mosaic map of Madaba indicates a ferry-boat. For information regarding the fords of the Jordan, see G. A. Smith, HGHL [6] p. 336 f.
The configuration of the Jordan valley is remarkable for its formation into terraces (in Arabic tabakât), the river flowing between the lowermost of these. There is no comparatively equal and continuous incline from the mountain to the river, but a succession of horizontal platforms, with sudden and very steep slopes, which form what are called the steep banks or cliffs of Jordan. They are marly, and have a tendency to become worn, and even to give way. The Zôr itself is bordered by them, and the Jordan often flows, at least at one side, along the foot of a declivity impossible of ascent. This is the case, e.g., in front of the so-called place of the Baptism at the latitude of Jericho. These terraces correspond to the different levels attained by the waters of the great lake which at one time filled the whole valley, and which first increased and then sank down again.
The Jordan is fed by numerous tributaries. The most important of these are on the left bank. One of them, the Hieromax of the Greeks, the Yarmuk of the Rabbis, the Sherî‘at el-Manaḍireh of the Arabs, already mentioned above, flows down from the high plateau on the east of Lake Tiberias, and passes between the warm springs of el-Hammah and the ancient Gadara (modern Umm Keis). Further south, also on the eastern bank, the Jordan receives the Zerka (blue river), the Yabbok of ancient times, which, after passing ‘Amman (Rabbath-Ammon, Philadelphia), describes an immense semi-circle towards the east, resumes its westward course, passes to the south of Jerash (Gerasa), and at last empties itself into the Jordan; the position of its mouth has considerably changed in the course of the centuries. On the right bank, we must mention the Nahr-Jalud, which springs from the fountain of Harod at the foot of Mt. Gilboa and passes to Beisan; then, close to Jericho, the Wadi el-Kelt, which tradition, probably wrongly, identifies with the Cherith of the Bible.
It is scarcely necessary to say that the Jordan is not navigable. Yet on three occasions the attempt has been made to sail down its course from the Lake of Tiberias to the Dead Sea. The first time it was an Irishman, Costigan, who, in 1835, accomplished this daring feat alone in a boat for one oarsman; the second time it was Lieutenant Molyneux, of the British Navy, in 1847. Both succeeded in reaching the Dead Sea, but both died soon after from the strain which they had undergone. Lastly, in 1848, an American expedition, under Lieutenant Lynch, sailed all the way down in two boats specially built for the purpose, reached the Dead Sea, and were able to record a whole series of very useful observations. Other travellers have also made a careful study of the Jordan valley, but from the land; besides those whom we have already mentioned, we may recall the names of Robinson, Guérin, and Conder. Long before there was any question of scientific explorations, pilgrims had followed the course of the Jordan through the whole of the Ghôr, e.g. Antonius Martyr in the 6th cent., Willibald in the 8th; we may add to these the name of King Baldwin i., who passed up from Jericho to the Lake of Tiberias.
While the northern part of the Ghôr is fertile, and more especially the environs of Beisan, it is very different in the south, near Jericho. This town, it is true, and its immediate neighbourhood, form a kind of oasis; but the rest of this region is not nearly so rich, the soil being impregnated with salt substances; one is reminded of the nearness of the Dead Sea.
It is this district that is referred to in the passages of the OT where the ‘Jordan of Jericho’ is spoken of. This does not mean a particular branch of the river, far less another stream of the same name (as, e.g., they say in Valais, ‘the Visp of Saas’ and ‘the Visp of Zermatt’). It is simply ‘the Jordan in the district of Jericho.’ See Numbers 22:1; Numbers 26:3; Numbers 26:63; Numbers 31:12; Numbers 33:48; Numbers 33:50; Numbers 34:15; Numbers 35:1; Numbers 36:13, Joshua 13:32; Joshua 16:1; Joshua 20:8, 1 Chronicles 6:63 (78). We must correct the Authorized Version and Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 in this respect, and remember that Jordan is originally a common noun.
Another Biblical expression referring to this particular region is Kikkar hay-Yardçn (כִּכִּר הַיַרְדֵּן), Genesis 13:10 f., or hak-Kikkâr (Genesis 13:12; Genesis 19:17; Genesis 19:25; Genesis 19:28 f., Nehemiah 3:22; Nehemiah 12:28), lit. ‘the circle’ (.e. the basin) of the Jordan, or, more briefly, ‘the circle’; in Greek ἠ τερίχωρις τοῦ
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Joram
JORAM. 1. 2. See Jehoram ( 1 and 2 ). 3. Son of Toi ( 2 Samuel 8:10 ) (in 1 Chronicles 18:10 called Hadoram ). 4. A Levite ( 1 Chronicles 26:25 ). 5. Esther 1:9 Esther 1:9 = 2 Chronicles 35:9 Jozabad .
Webster's Dictionary - Joram
(n.) See Jorum.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Joram
the son and successor of Ahab, king of Israel. See JEHU .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Joram or Jehoram
1. Son of Ahab king of Israel, succeeded his older brother Ahaziah in the throne, B. C. 896, and reigned twelve years. He discontinued the worship of Baal, but followed the "sin of Jeroboam." During his reign, the Moabites revolted. Joram secured the aid of Jehoshaphat king of Judah, and after receiving for his allies' sake a miraculous deliverance from drought, defeated the Moabites with great slaughter. Not long after he was involved in war with Ben-hadad king of Syria, and Hazael his successor; and in this time occurred the miraculous deliverance of Samaria from siege and famine, and also various miracles of Elisha, including the healing of Naaman. Joram was wounded in a battle with Hazael, and met his death, in the suburbs of Ramoth-gilead, by the hand of Jehu his general. His body was thrown into the field of Naboth at Jezreel, and with him perished the race of Ahab, 1 Kings 21.18-29 ; 2 Kings 1.17 ; 3.1 ; 6.9 .
2. The son and successor of Jehoshaphat king of Judah. He reigned with his father, from B. C. 889, four years, and four years alone; in all eight years. Unhappily he was married to Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, whose evil influence did much to render his reign a curse to the land. He slew his own brothers, five in number, and seized their possessions. He also introduced Phoenician idols and their worship into Judah. The divine wrath was shown in leaving him unaided under a successful revolt of the Edomites, and repeated invasions of the Philistines and Arabians. His country, the city, and his own household were ravaged, his body was afflicted with a frightful dysenteric illness, and after death a burial in the royal sepulchres was denied him, 2 Kings 8:16-24 2 Chronicles 21:1-20 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Joram
(See JEHORAM.)
1. 2 Chronicles 17:8.
2. 1 Chronicles 26:25.
3. Toi's son, sent from Hamath to congratulate David on his victories over Hadadezer (2 Samuel 8:10).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Joram, Jehoram
1. Son and successor of Jehoshaphat, king of Judah: he reigned eight years, B.C. 892-885. He, as of the seed of David, formed an unholy alliance by marrying Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel. He put to death his six brothers, and established Baal worship at Jerusalem. He was punished by the Philistines and Arabians taking possession of his treasures, and carrying his wives and children into captivity. He was warned as to his course by 'a writing' from the prophet Elijah (which was doubtless written some time before, 2 Chronicles 21:12 ), foretelling that God would smite His people with a great plague; the king's disease should be such that his bowels should fall out; and it was thus that he miserably died. 1 Kings 22:50 ; 2 Kings 1:17 ; 2 Kings 8:16-29 ; 2 Kings 11:2 ; 2 Kings 12:18 ; 1 Chronicles 3:11 ; 2 Chronicles 21:1-20 ; 2 Chronicles 22:1,11 ; Matthew 1:8 .
2. Son of Ahab and Jezebel. He succeeded his brother Ahaziah, king of Israel, and reigned twelve years, B.C. 896-884. He wrought evil in the sight of the Lord, but put away the image of Baal that his father had made. The king of Moab revolted against him, and he asked Jehoshaphat king of Judah to go with him to punish the Moabites. These two kings, with the king of Edom, assembled their armies, but there was no water to drink. They then appealed to Elisha for help, but he said that except Jehoshaphat had been there he would not have looked upon Joram. A miracle was wrought and there was abundance of water. God also gave them a great victory over the Moabites, which led the king of Moab to offer his eldest son as a burnt offering to his god, and the Israelites departed.
The time however was approaching for God's judgement on the house of Ahab. Joram and Ahaziah king of Judah went against the Syrians in Ramoth-gilead. There Joram was wounded, and he returned to Jezreel to be healed, leaving his army at Ramoth-gilead. In the meantime a prophet, sent by Elisha, visited the camp and anointed Jehu to be king of Israel, with instructions to smite the house of Ahab totally. Jehu being proclaimed king, he hastily drove to Jezreel to fulfil his mission and Joram, as he fled before Jehu, was killed by an arrow. 2 Kings 1:17 ; 2 Kings 3:1-25 ; 2 Kings 8:16-29 ; 2 Kings 9:14-26,29 ; 2 Chronicles 22:5-7 .
3. Son of Toi king of Hamath. 2 Samuel 8:10 . Apparently the same as HADORAM in 1 Chronicles 18:10 .
4. Son of Jeshaiah, a Levite. 1 Chronicles 26:25 .
5. Priest, who was sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the people. 2 Chronicles 17:8 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joram
See JEHORAM.

Sentence search

Jehoram - ” Alternate form of Joram. See Joram
Jehoram - See Joram
Jehoram - See Joram
Jehosh'Eba - (Jehovah's oath ), daughter of Joram king of Israel, and wife of jehoiada the high priest. ) As she is called, (2 Kings 11:2 ) "the daughter of Joram , sister of Ahaziah," it has been conjectured that she was the daughter, not of Athaliah, but of Joram by another wife
Joram - Finally, each reigned in proximity to a person named Ahaziah: Joram of Judah was succeeded on the throne by his son, whose name was Ahaziah; Joram of Israel came to the throne at the death of his brother, who was also named Ahaziah. The account of the reign of Joram (Jehoram) of Israel is found in 2 Kings 3:1 . The reign of Joram of Judah is treated in 2 Kings 8:1
Zair - Place in Edom where Joram attacked the Edomites
Zair - Little, a place probably east of the Dead Sea, where Joram discomfited the host of Edom who had revolted from him (2 Kings 8:21 )
Bidkar - Fellow officer and afterwards Jehu's captain; he executed the sentence on Joram, or Jehoram, son of Ahab, by casting him into the field of Naboth
Zair - A place in Idumea where Joram defeated Edom after having been first shut in, then cutting his way through; 2 Chronicles 21:9, omit Zair and have instead im saraio , "with his captains
Jehoshabeath - Daughter of Joram king of Israel, and wife of Jehoiada, high priest
Joram - Joram
Bidkar - (bihd' kahr) Officer of Jehu who took body of Joram, king of Israel (852-841 B. Bidkar and Jehu had originally served as chariot officers for Ahab, Joram's father
Naaman - in the time of Joram, king of Israel. He was afflicted with leprosy; and when the little Hebrew slave-girl that waited on his wife told her of a prophet in Samaria who could cure her master, he obtained a letter from Benhadad and proceeded with it to Joram
Jehosheba - ) Daughter of king Joram of Israel. Possibly her mother may have been another wife of Joram (2 Kings 11:2)
to'i - (erring ), king of Hamath on the Orontes, who, after the defeat of his powerful enemy the Syrian king Hadadezer by the army of David, sent his son Joram or Hadoram to congratulate the victory and do him homage with presents of gold and silver and brass
Jezebel - She continued her evil influence as her son Joram ruled (2 Kings 9:22 ). Elisha anointed Jehu to replace Joram. Jehu assassinated Joram and then went to Jezreel after Jezebel
Hadoram - , Hadoram wrongly appears as Joram
Jehoram - He is also called Joram. See Joram
Zair - ” Place where Joram, king of Judah (853-841 B
Jeshaiah -
A Kohathite Levite, the father of Joram, of the family of Eliezer (1 Chronicles 26:25 ); called also Isshiah (24:21)
Tibni - The Septuagint say Joram his brother helped his cause
Gehazi - Later he related to king Joram all the things which Elisha had done
Jehoram - Judah and Israel each had a king named Jehoram (often shortened to Joram). ...
Israel’s Jehoram (often called Joram, to avoid confusion) was brother-in-law to Judah’s Jehoram. When wounded in battle with Syria, Joram returned to his summer palace in Jezreel to recover
Zair - ]'>[1] of 2 Kings 8:21 , Joram, in the course of his campaign against Edom, ‘passed over to Zair
Ahaziah - Joram, king of Israel, 2 Kings 7, going to attack Ramoth Gilead, which the kings of Syria had taken from his predecessors, was there dangerously wounded, and carried by his own appointment to Jezreel, for the purpose of surgical assistance. Ahaziah, Joram's friend and relation, accompanied him in this war, and came afterward to visit him at Jezreel. In the meantime, Jehu, the son of Nimshi, whom Joram had left besieging the fortress of Ramoth, rebelled against his master, and set out with a design of extirpating the house of Ahab, according to the commandment of the Lord, 2 Kings 9. Joram and Ahaziah, who knew nothing of his intentions, went to meet him. Jehu killed Joram dead upon the spot: Ahaziah fled, but Jehu's people overtook him at the going up of Gur, and mortally wounded him; notwithstanding which, he had strength enough to reach Megiddo, where he died
Toi - King of Hamath on the Orontes; sent his son Hadoram or Joram with presents of gold, silver, and brass, to congratulate David on his victory over Hadadezer, king of Zobah, whose kingdom bordered on Hamath and who probably had tried to reduce Toi to vassalage
Geha'zi - Later in the history he is mentioned as being engaged in relating to King Joram all the great things which Elisha had done
Ramoth Gilead - Keenly fought for by the Israelites and their enemies the Syrians under Ahab and Joram (1 Kings 22:4; it had been seized by Benhadad I from Omri; Josephus Joram of Israel allied himself with Ahaziah of Judah (2 Chronicles 22:5-6), gained and kept Ramoth Gilead in spite of Hazael (2 Kings 9:14-15; Josephus Kingdom of Juda - List of kings: Roboam, Abiam, Asa, Josaphat, Joram, Ochozias, Athalia, Joas, Amasias, Azarias, Joatham, Achaz, Ezechias, Manasses, Amon, Josias, Joachaz, Joakim, Joachin, Sedecias
Juda, Kingdom of - List of kings: Roboam, Abiam, Asa, Josaphat, Joram, Ochozias, Athalia, Joas, Amasias, Azarias, Joatham, Achaz, Ezechias, Manasses, Amon, Josias, Joachaz, Joakim, Joachin, Sedecias
Israel, Kingdom of - List of kings: Jeroboam, Nadab, Baasa, Ela, Zambri, Amri, Achab, Ochozias, Joram, Jehu, Joachaz, Joas, Jeroboam II, Zacharias, Sellum, Manahem, Phaceia, Phacee, Osee
Kingdom of Israel - List of kings: Jeroboam, Nadab, Baasa, Ela, Zambri, Amri, Achab, Ochozias, Joram, Jehu, Joachaz, Joas, Jeroboam II, Zacharias, Sellum, Manahem, Phaceia, Phacee, Osee
Hadoram -
The son of Tou, king of Hamath, sent by his father to congratulate David on his victory over Hadarezer, king of Syria (1 Chronicles 18:10 ; called Joram 2 Samuel 8:10 )
Hadoram - The same as Joram in 2 Samuel 8:10
Libnah - A city of Canaan, in the lowland of Judah, was taken by Joshua, Joshua 10:29-32; Joshua 10:39; Joshua 12:15, and assigned to the priests, Joshua 15:42; Joshua 21:13; 1 Chronicles 6:57; revolted against Joram, 2 Kings 8:22; 2 Chronicles 21:10; was besieged by Sennacherib, 2 Kings 19:8; Isaiah 37:8
Joram, Jehoram - They then appealed to Elisha for help, but he said that except Jehoshaphat had been there he would not have looked upon Joram. Joram and Ahaziah king of Judah went against the Syrians in Ramoth-gilead. There Joram was wounded, and he returned to Jezreel to be healed, leaving his army at Ramoth-gilead. Jehu being proclaimed king, he hastily drove to Jezreel to fulfil his mission and Joram, as he fled before Jehu, was killed by an arrow
Gehazi - He afterwards appeared before king Joram, to whom he recounted the great deeds of his master (2 Kings 8:1-6 )
Jozabad - The eponym of a Levitical family ( 2 Chronicles 31:13 ; 2 Chronicles 35:9 [1]). A priest who had married a foreign wife ( Ezra 10:22 [1]3)
Jehu - the son of Jehoshaphat, and grandson of Nimshi, captain of the troops of Joram the king of Israel, was appointed by God to reign over Israel, and to avenge the sins committed by the house of Ahab, 1 Kings 19:16 . Jehu was then at the siege of Ramoth-Gilead, commanding the army of Joram, the king of Israel, when a young prophet appeared, who took him aside from the officers of the army, in the midst of whom he was sitting, and, when alone in a chamber, poured oil on his head, and said to him, "Thus saith the Lord, I have anointed thee king over Israel; thou shalt smite the house of Ahab, and avenge the blood of the prophets which hath been shed by Jezebel. " Joram, who at that time reigned over the kingdom of Israel, was then at Jezreel in a state of indisposition, having been wounded at the siege of Ramoth-Gilead. As he approached that city, a centinel gave notice that he saw a troop coming in great haste; on which Joram despatched an officer to discover who it was: but Jehu, without giving the latter any answer, ordered him to follow in his rear. Joram sent a second, and Jehu laid upon him the same command. Finding that neither of them returned, Joram himself, accompanied by Ahaziah, king of Judah, proceeded in his chariot toward Jehu, whom they met in the field of Naboth the Jezreelite. Joram inquired, "Is it peace, Jehu?" To which the latter replied, "How can there be peace so long as the whoredoms of thy mother Jezebel, and her witchcrafts, are so many?" Joram instantly took the alarm, and, turning to Ahaziah, said, "We are betrayed. " At the same time Jehu drew his bow, and smote Joram between his shoulders, so that the arrow pierced his heart, and he died in his chariot
Ben-Hadad - The second fought with the Israelite kings Ahab and Joram (or Jehoram)
Ramoth - Here Ahad died, Joram was wounded, and Jehu was anointed king of Israel, 1 Kings 22:1-53 2 Kings 8:28,29 9:1-14 2 Chronicles 22:5,6
Ahaziah - He formed an alliance with Joram king of Israel and went with him against Hazael king of Syria. Joram was wounded and went to Jezreel to be healed. Ahaziah afterwards went to visit Joram, and God caused his death by Jehu when he cut off the house of Ahab
Mesha - Joram the son of Ahab, with the aid of Judah and Edom, made war upon him, and besieged him in his capital
Joram or Jehoram - Joram secured the aid of Jehoshaphat king of Judah, and after receiving for his allies' sake a miraculous deliverance from drought, defeated the Moabites with great slaughter. Joram was wounded in a battle with Hazael, and met his death, in the suburbs of Ramoth-gilead, by the hand of Jehu his general
Jezebel - Daughter of Ethbaal king of the Zidonians, wife of Ahab king of Israel, and mother of Ahaziah, Joram, and Athaliah. He killed Joram and wounded the king of Judah, then as he rode into Jezreel, Jezebel, with painted face and head attired, looked from a window and taunted him with "Had Zimri peace who slew his master?" But on Jehu asking who was on his side, the eunuchs looked out, and at his request they threw her down to the ground
Kir - It was once nearly destroyed by Joram king of Israel, 2 Kings 3:25
Ramoth-Gilead - A similar attempt was afterwards made by Ahaziah and Joram, when the latter was wounded (2 Kings 8:28 )
Ramoth-Gilead - Joram did recapture the city (2 Kings 9:14 ; compare 2 Kings 8:28 )
Naboth - The murder of Naboth seems to have deeply impressed the popular mind, and the deaths of Joram and Jezebel near the spot were regarded as Divine retribution on the act ( 2 Kings 9:25 ; 2 Kings 9:36 )
Zichri - Son of Joram, a Levite
Jehu - ...
The "son" of Jehoshaphat and grandson of Nimshi, (compare 1 Kings 19:16 2 Kings 9:2 ) a general of the army of Joram, slew his master, and usurped the throne of Israel, B
Naboth - Ahab's blood in retribution was washed from the chariot in the pool of Samaria, where harlots were bathing (so translated instead of "and they washed the armour"), while dogs licked up the rest of the blood (1 Kings 22:38); the further retribution was on his seed Joram (2 Kings 9)
Libnah - Taking advantage of an Edomite revolt, it rose against Judah under Joram ( 2 Kings 8:22 )
Ramoth Gilead - Joram was successful in taking it, but was wounded by the Syrians
Hazael - ...
Hazael began his brutal attacks on Israel during the reign of Ahab’s son Joram (2 Kings 8:28-29)
Libnah - It illustrated western border rebellion against King Joram of Judah (853-841 B
Ahaziah - He reigned for one year and died after being wounded as he fled from Jehu while visiting King Joram of Israel (2 Kings 9:27 )
Naaman - The highly esteemed general of Ben-hadad, king of Damascene Syria in the time of Joram king of Israel
Jezrael - Returning to Jezrael, in order to surprise the king, Jehu killed with his own hand Joram, who had come out to meet him (4Kings 9)
Jezrahel - Returning to Jezrael, in order to surprise the king, Jehu killed with his own hand Joram, who had come out to meet him (4Kings 9)
Jezreel - Returning to Jezrael, in order to surprise the king, Jehu killed with his own hand Joram, who had come out to meet him (4Kings 9)
Jezreel - Ahab’s wife Jezebel, their son Joram and others of the royal household were killed at Jezreel in Jehu’s bloody revolution (2 Kings 8:29; 2 Kings 9:16-37; 2 Kings 10:11; Hosea 1:4-5)
Ahaziah - He met his death at the hand of Jehu, while in company with Joram, son of Ahab
Ahaziah - ...
The son of Joram, or Jehoram, and sixth king of Judah
Jezebel - For even after Ahab's death she maintained the ascendency over her son Joram
Elath - The Israelites held possession of Elath one hundred and fifty years, when the Edomites, in the reign of Joram, recovered it
Jehoshaphat - Having failed in a commercial enterprise with Ahaziah, he declined a second trial, 1 Kings 22:48,49 but united with Joram, his successor, in a war with Moab
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
896...
Joram,...
892...
Jehoram,...
Eliezer
Jehu - Along the way, he was responsible for the deaths of Joram, king of Israel; Ahaziah, king of Judah; Jezebel, still powerful former queen of Israel, and some 70 surviving members of the household of Israel's late King Ahab
Elath - In the reign of Joram the Edomites recovered it, but lost it again to Uzziah, 2 Kings 8:20 14:22 ; and he to Rezin, 2 Kings 16:6
Jehu - However, he did not hesitate to leave the battle and head west for Jezreel, where the Israelite king Jehoram (or Joram) was recovering from wounds received in battle (2 Kings 8:28-29; 2 Kings 9:1-2; 2 Kings 9:14; 2 Kings 9:16). ...
Joram’s mother Jezebel was with him at Jezreel; so was Judah’s king Ahaziah, who was a grandson of Ahab and Jezebel and a nephew of Joram
Hazael - Soon after becoming king of Syria, Hazael joined in combat against both Ahaziah, king of Judah, and Joram, king of Israel (2 Kings 8:28-29 ; 2 Kings 9:14-15 )
Esau - David put garrisons throughout all Edom (where the descendants of Esau dwelt, Genesis 36:8 ) and all they of Edom became his servants, 2 Samuel 8:14 ; but later on in the days of Joram, Edom revolted from under the hand of Judah; and though Joram wasable to punish them, yet Judah was growing weaker, and 'Edom revolted from under the hand of Judah, unto this day
Elias - Subsequently he denounced Achab for the murder of Naboth and reprimanded Ochozias and Joram, King of Juda
Elijah - Subsequently he denounced Achab for the murder of Naboth and reprimanded Ochozias and Joram, King of Juda
Ahaziah - ...
After Ahaziah’s death, his brother Jehoram (or Joram) became king of Israel (2 Kings 1:17)
Jehoram - JEHORAM , in the shorter form Joram , is the name of two kings in the OT
Jezebel - Jezebel’s evil influence in the land of Israel, especially in combating the religion of Jahweh in the Interests of Baal-worship, was exercised not only during the twenty-two years of Ahab’s reign, but also during the thirteen years of the rule of her two sons, Ahaziah and Joram; moreover, this influence extended, though in a less degree, to the Southern Kingdom of Judah, where Athaliah, the daughter of Jezebel, seems to have followed in the footsteps of her mother ( 2 Kings 8:18 )
Naboth - Ahab humbled himself at Elijah's words (1 Kings 21:28,29 ), and therefore the prophecy was fulfilled not in his fate but in that of his son Joram (2 Kings 9:25 )
Hazael - ...
The next mention of Hazael shows him fighting at Ramoth-gilead against the allied armies of Joram, king of Israel, and Ahaziah, king of Judah (2 Kings 8:28-29 ; 2 Kings 9:14 ; 2 Kings 9:16 ); the narrative here breaks off to deal with other matters, and does not say what the result of the fighting was, but from 2 Kings 10:32 ff
Medeba - Joram and Jehoshaphat made an unsuccessful attempt to retake these cities ( 2 Kings 3:1-27 ), but Jeroboam II
Naaman - A Syrian captain, who, in the days of Joram king of Israel, was cured of his leprosy through Elisha the prophet
Obadiah - However, a closer study seems to favor the view that these and other verses refer to an earlier event, such, for instance, as is narrated in 2Paralipomenon, 21,16, where is described the pillage of Jerusalem under Joram, king of Juda (849-842 B
Omri - Half the people desired Tibni (1 Kings 16:15-27), who according to the Septuagint was helped by his brother Joram, but died defeated
Abdias, Book of - However, a closer study seems to favor the view that these and other verses refer to an earlier event, such, for instance, as is narrated in 2Paralipomenon, 21,16, where is described the pillage of Jerusalem under Joram, king of Juda (849-842 B
Ahaziah - There his destruction from God ensued by Jehu, who conspired against Joram. The recurrence of the same names Joram and Ahaziah in both the dynasties of Israel and Judah is a delicate mark of truth, it being the natural result of the intermarriages
Obadiah - His prophetic theme is Edom; and Edom's revolt under Joram, Jehoshaphat's son, is recorded 2 Chronicles 21:10. The capture of Jerusalem alluded to by Obadiah is probably that by the Philistines and Arabs under Joram (2 Chronicles 21:8-10; 2 Chronicles 21:16-17), when Edom, who had just before revolted from under Judah and had been punished by Joram, in revenge gave an earnest of that unbrotherly cruelty which he in a still worse degree showed at Jerusalem's capture by Nebuchadnezzar
Mesha - ]'>[3] ‘rebelled’) necessarily implies; (4) the unsuccessful expedition by Joram and his allies to reduce Mesha to submission, recorded in 2 Kings 3:6-27
Jezreel - To Jezreel came Joram to recover from the wounds received in battle with the Syrians ( 2 Kings 8:29 ); and here, on the revolt of Jehu, were that king and his mother Jezebel slain (ch
Sick, To Be - When Joram is described as being sick because of wounds suffered in battle (2 Kings 8:29, RSV), perhaps it would be better to say that he was weak
Moabites - ...
At times, as in the days of Ruth, there was peace between them and Israel; but a state of hostility was far more common, as in the time of Eglon, Judges 3:12-30 ; of Saul, 1 Samuel 14:47 ; of David, 2 Samuel 8:2,12 ; of Joram and Jeroboam, 2 Kings 3:13,20 14:25
Gehazi - "...
Still in 2 Kings 8:4 Gehazi appears as "servant of the man of God," narrating to king Joram the great acts of Elisha and the restoration to life of the Shunammite's son, when lo! she herself appeared
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - "Joram begat Ozias," i. But Joram really begat Ahaziah, Ahaziah Jehoash, Jehoash Uzziah
Esdraelon - Jehu killed his rivals Joram and Ahaziah at Jezreel (2 Kings 9:1 )
Arm - The heart was said to be situated ‘between the arms,’ and, therefore, in the murder of Joram, the deadly aim of Jehu resulted in the instantaneous death of the former ( 2 Kings 9:24 )
Genealogy of the Lord Jesus - ' Ozias is placed as the son of Joram, but on consulting 1 Chronicles 3:11,12 (where for Ozias is read Azariah, as also in 2 Kings 14:21 ), it will be seen that three kings are omitted, Ahaziah, Joash, and Amaziah
Amaziah - His design was to employ these troops against Edom, which had revolted from Judah, in the reign of Joram about fifty-four years before, 2 Kings 8:20
Samaria - Samaria was unsuccessfully besieged by the Syrians in the reigns of Ahab and Joram
Damascus - Ahaziah, king of Judah (841), joined Joram, king of Israel (852-841), in battle against Hazael with Joram being wounded
Jezebel - She survived Ahab 14 years, and still as queen mother exercised an evil influence in the courts of her sons Ahaziah and Joram of Israel, and in that of her daughter Athaliah's husband Jehoram (2 Chronicles 21:6; 2 Chronicles 22:2)
Ahab - ...
During Ahab's days, Israel enjoyed peace with Judah, largely as a result of a marriage he arranged between princess Athaliah and Joram, the crown prince of Judah
Edom, Edomites - 1618091549_4 ), and Edomites helped him in his war with Moab ( 2 Kings 3:1-27 ); in the reign of Joram, his successor, the Edomites regained their independence after a bloody revolution ( 2 Kings 8:20-21 ); at the beginning of the next century Amaziah reconquered them for a short time, capturing Sela, and slaughtering a large number of them ( 2 Kings 14:7 )
Jeho'Ram - he accordingly made an alliance with his nephew Ahaziah, who had just succeeded Joram on the throne of Judah, and the two kings proceeded to occupy Ramoth-gilead by force
Elisha - ), Jehoram or Joram (852 B
Elijah - ...
Shortly afterward Elijah wrote a letter (miqtab ) which came subsequently "to Joram," son of the pious Jehoshaphat: "Thus saith the Lord God of David thy father (of whom thou art proving thyself so unworthy a successor), because thou hast not walked in the ways of Jehoshaphat thy father, nor. ...
Already in Elijah's lifetime Joram had begun to reign jointly with his father Jehoshaphat (2 Kings 8:16; 2 Kings 8:18) and had betrayed his evil spirit which was fostered by Athaliah his wife, Ahab's daughter. Jehoshaphat in his lifetime, with worldly prudence, while giving the throne to Joram, gave Joram's brethren "great gifts and fenced cities. " But Elijah discerned in Joram the covetous and murderous spirit which would frustrate all Jehoshaphat's forethought, the fatal result of the latter's carnal policy in forming marriage alliance with wicked Ahab. Therefore, as Elijah had committed to Elisha the duty laid on himself by God of foretelling to Hazael his elevation to the Syrian throne (Elisha being Elijah revived in spirit), so Elijah committed to him the writing which would come after Elijah's translation to Joram with all the solemnity of a message from Elijah in the unseen world to condemn the murder when perpetrated which Elijah foresaw he would perpetrate. But the language, 2 Chronicles 21:12, implies in some stricter sense it was Elijah's writing delivered by Elisha, his successor, to Joram
Elisha - ...
Joram showed no less want of faith, than Benhadad showed want of religious knowledge. ...
Joram, in language identical with his mother Jezebel's threat against Elijah (1 Kings 19:2; 2 Kings 6:31), makes Elisha the scape-goat of the national calamity, as though his late act in leading the blinded Syrians to Samaria and glorifying Jehovah above Baal were the cause, or suspecting it was by Elisha's word of prayer, as it was by Elijah's formerly (1 Kings 17), that the famine came (See JEHORAM); "God do so and more also to me, if the head of Elisha shall stand on him this day. Elisha replies that as "this evil (the famine) is of Jehovah," so the suddenness of its removal by the morrow at "the word of Jehovah" would prove it not to be futile, as Joram said, to "wait for Jehovah. " The Lord will not allow Joram's perversity to stop the current of divine mercy. Elisha, when Joram and Israel failed to be reformed by God's mercies, proceeded to Damascus to execute Elijah's commission (1 Kings 19:15-16). Joram was wounded, but the fortress still resisted Syria
Hittites - Kings of the Hittites are said to have been contemporary with Solomon ( 1 Kings 10:29 ; 1 Kings 11:1 ), also a century later contemporary with Joram of Israel ( 2 Kings 7:6 )
Oracles - ” Specific sayings about God's judgment on Joram ( 2 Kings 9:25 NRSV) and Joash ( 2 Chronicles 24:27 NRSV) are also called oracles. When Jehu killed Joram (2 Kings 9:25 ), he had the body taken to Naboth's vineyard in order that an oracle pronounced in Ahab's day might be fulfilled
Divination And Magic - Jehu responded to the question of Joram, king of Israel, as to whether he came in peace, “What peace, so long as the whoredoms of thy mother Jezebel and her witchcrafts are so many?” (2 Kings 9:22 )
Bible, Egypt in the - ...
Save for an obscure allusion to an alliance between Joram, king of Israel (851-842), and the reigning Pharao, Egypt does not appear again on the scene of Biblical history until the last years of the Northern Kingdom, when Osee, the last king of Israel, in order to prevent being engulfed in the ever-growing torrent of Assyrian invasion, called on the help of Sua, probably the future Shabaka, founder of the XXVth Dynasty, then a high officer in the Egyptian Empire (4Kings 17)
Edom - Edom regained independence from Judah under Joram, who succeeded Jehoshaphat to the throne (2 Kings 8:20-22 )
Egypt in the Bible - ...
Save for an obscure allusion to an alliance between Joram, king of Israel (851-842), and the reigning Pharao, Egypt does not appear again on the scene of Biblical history until the last years of the Northern Kingdom, when Osee, the last king of Israel, in order to prevent being engulfed in the ever-growing torrent of Assyrian invasion, called on the help of Sua, probably the future Shabaka, founder of the XXVth Dynasty, then a high officer in the Egyptian Empire (4Kings 17)
Chronology of the Biblical Period - ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
Ahab - Elijah with awful majesty denounces his sentence, "in the place where dogs licked Naboth's blood, shall dogs lick thine" (fulfilled to the letter on Joram his offspring, 2 Kings 9, primarily also on Ahab himself, but not "in the place" where Naboth's blood was shed); while the king abjectly cowers before him with the cry, "Hast thou found me, O mine enemy?" All his male posterity were to be cut off, as Jeroboam's and Baasha's, the two previous dynasties, successively had been (See ELIJAH). " Ahab's treachery did not secure his escape, an arrow "at a venture" humanly speaking, but guided by God really, wounded him fatally; and the dogs licked up his blood, according to the Lord's word of which Joram's case in 2 Kings 9:25 was a literal fulfillment (1 Kings 21:19), on the very spot, while his chariot and armor were being washed (1 Kings 22:38)
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - ]'>[1] (inserting Rahab and Ruth, and calling David ‘the king’), and agrees with 1 Chronicles 2:1-16 ; it then gives the names of the kings to Jechoniah, from 1 Chronicles 3:10-15 , but inserts ‘the [2] of Uriah’ and omits kings Abaziah, Joash, and Amaziah between Joram and Uzziah (= Azariah), and also Jehoiakim son of Josiah and father of Jechoniah (Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 ) or Jehoiachin ( 2 Chronicles 36:8 )
Jehoram - ("exalted by Jehovah"), JEHORAM or Joram. ...
For the last year of his reign he synchronized with Ahaziah, Joram's son, slain along with him by Jehu (2 Kings 9)
Arms And Armor - At least four Israelite kings were severely or fatally wounded by enemy arrows: Saul (1 Samuel 31:3 ), Ahab (1 Kings 22:34 ), Joram (2 Kings 9:24 ), and Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:23 )
Chronology - Matthew 1:8) names are often passed over, a man being called "the son of" a remote ancestor, his father and grandfather and great grandfather being omitted; as Joram is followed by Ozias, Ahaziah, Joash, and Amaziah being omitted
Kings, the Books of - The second period (1 Kings 12:1-2 Kings 10) comprises three stages:...
(1) the enmity at first between Judah and Israel from Jeroboam to Omri, 1 Kings 12:1-16:28;...
(2) the intermarriage between the royal houses of Israel and of Judah, under Ahab, down to the destruction of both kings, Joram of Israel and Ahaziah of Judah, by Jehu, 1 Kings 16:29-2 Kings 10;...
(3) the renewal of hostilities, from Jehu's accession in Israel and Athaliah's usurpation in Judah to Israel's captivity in Hezekiah's sixth year, 1 Kings 11-17
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - ; the names Jehoiakim and Eliakim are inserted between Jechoniah and Josiah as if they referred to two different persons, instead of being two names for the same man; and also Amaziah, Joash, and Ahaziah between Uzziah and Joram (see Resch, TU Create, Creation - , Ahaziah, Joash, and Amaziah between Joram/Jehoram and Uzziah/Azariah in 1:8-9; Joram - JORAM