What does Jonathan mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יְה֣וֹנָתָ֔ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 12
יְהוֹנָתָ֖ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 11
יְהוֹנָתָ֣ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 9
יְהֽוֹנָתָן֙ a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 8
יְהוֹנָתָ֛ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 4
וְיוֹנָתָ֣ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 4
יוֹנָתָ֖ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 3
יְהוֹנָתָ֜ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 3
יְהוֹנָתָ֗ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 3
יוֹנָתָ֛ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 3
יְהוֹנָתָ֤ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 3
יוֹנָתָֽן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 3
יוֹנָתָ֗ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 3
וִיהוֹנָתָ֖ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 3
יוֹנָתָ֤ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
י֣וֹנָתָ֔ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יוֹנָתָ֑ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יוֹנָתָ֧ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יוֹנָתָ֥ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יוֹנָתָ֔ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יְהוֹנָתָֽן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יֽוֹנָתָ֔ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יְהוֹנָתָ֥ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יְהוֹנָתָ֑ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יְהוֹנָתָן֙ a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 2
יוֹנָתָ֣ן ׀ a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
יֽוֹנָתָן֙ a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
יוֹנָתָ֜ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וְיוֹנָתָֽן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
בְּיוֹנָתָ֥ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וּלְיוֹנָתָ֖ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
יוֹנָתָ֣ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
הֲ‍ֽיוֹנָתָ֤ן ׀ a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִיהֽוֹנָתָן֙ a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִ֠יהוֹנָתָן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וְיוֹנָתָ֖ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וַיֹּ֨אמֶר to say 1
וִיהֽוֹנָתָ֜ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וְיוֹנָתָ֑ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִיהֽוֹנָתָ֥ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִֽיהוֹנָתָ֤ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
לִֽיהוֹנָתָ֜ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
בִּיה֣וֹנָתָ֔ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
יְהוֹנָתָ֧ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִֽיהוֹנָתָן֩ a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִיהוֹנָתָ֥ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִיהוֹנָתָ֗ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
לִיהוֹנָתָ֖ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִיהוֹנָתָ֧ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִיהוֹנָתָ֨ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
؟ וִיה֣וֹנָתָ֔ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וִיהוֹנָֽתָן־ a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
וְלִיהֽוֹנָתָן֙ a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
؟ יְהוֹנָתָֽן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath. / an uncle of David. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / one of David’s treasurers. / a scribe in the time of Jeremiah. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1
יֽוֹנָתָ֜ן a son of king Saul and a friend of David. / a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear. / one of David’s mighty warriors. / a Levite and father of Zechariah 1

Definitions Related to Jonathan

H3083


   1 a son of king Saul and a friend of David.
   2 a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear.
   3 a nephew of David who like David slew a giant of Gath.
   4 an uncle of David.
   5 one of David’s mighty warriors.
   6 one of David’s treasurers.
   7 a scribe in the time of Jeremiah.
   8 a Levite and father of Zechariah, a priest who blew the trumpet at the dedication of the wall.
   9 a son or descendant of Gershom, the son of Moses, and a priest to the tribe of Dan.
      10 a son of Kareah and a brother of Johanan; a Judaite captain after the fall of Jerusalem.
      11 another Judaite father of Peleth.
      12 father of Ebed in the time of Ezra.
      13 son of Asahel in the time of Ezra.
      14 a priest of the family of Melicu in the time of Nehemiah.
      15 son of Joiada and his successor to the high priesthood in the time of Nehemiah.
      Additional Information: Jonathan or Jehonathan = “Jehovah has given”.
      

H3129


   1 a son of king Saul and a friend of David.
   2 a son of the high priest Abiathar and the last descendant of Eli of whom we hear.
   3 one of David’s mighty warriors.
   4 a Levite and father of Zechariah, a priest who blew the trumpet at the dedication of the wall.
   5 a son of Kareah and a brother of Johanan; a Judaite captain after the fall of Jerusalem.
   6 another Judaite.
   7 father of Ebed in the time of Ezra.
   8 son of Asahel in the time of Ezra.
   9 a priest of the family of Melicu in the time of Nehemiah.
      10 son of Joiada and his successor to the high priesthood in the time of Nehemiah.
      Additional Information: Jonathan or Jehonathan = “Jehovah has given”.
      

H559


   1 to say, speak, utter.
      1a (Qal) to say, to answer, to say in one’s heart, to think, to command, to promise, to intend.
      1b (Niphal) to be told, to be said, to be called.
      1c (Hithpael) to boast, to act proudly.
      1d (Hiphil) to avow, to avouch.
      

Frequency of Jonathan (original languages)

Frequency of Jonathan (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jonathan
(Hebrew: Jehovah has given)
Name of several personages in the Old Testament.
A Levite, son of Gersam the son of Moses, who started an idolatrous worship in the house of Michas and then in the tribe of Dan when it migrated northward (Judges 17; 18).
Eldest son of Saul and friend of David, noted for his bravery against the Philistines (1 Kings 13; 14), his loyalty to David, and his glorious death on Mount Gelboe (1 Kings 31; 2 Kings 19).
The youngest son of Mathathias and brother of Judas Machabeus. He took an important part in the Machabean revolt, and was chosen leader after Judas's death. He became master of Judea for several years and was appointed high priest. Treacherously seized by Tryphon, he was murdered at Ptolemais (1Machabees 12).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jonathan
Whom Jehovah gave, the name of fifteen or more persons that are mentioned in Scripture. The chief of these are,
A Levite descended from Gershom (Judges 18:30 ). His history is recorded in 17:7-13,18:30. The Rabbins changed this name into Manasseh "to screen the memory of the great lawgiver from the stain of having so unworthy an apostate among his near descendants." He became priest of the idol image at Dan, and this office continued in his family till the Captivity.
The eldest son of king Saul, and the bosom friend of David. He is first mentioned when he was about thirty years of age, some time after his father's accession to the throne (1 Samuel 13:2 ). Like his father, he was a man of great strength and activity (2 Samuel 1:23 ), and excelled in archery and slinging (1 Chronicles 12:2 ; 2 Samuel 1:22 ). The affection that evidently subsisted between him and his father was interrupted by the growth of Saul's insanity. At length, "in fierce anger," he left his father's presence and cast in his lot with the cause of David (1 Samuel 20:34 ). After an eventful career, interwoven to a great extent with that of David, he fell, along with his father and his two brothers, on the fatal field of Gilboa (1 Samuel 31:2,8 ). He was first buried at Jabesh-gilead, but his remains were afterwards removed with those of his father to Zelah, in Benjamin (2 Samuel 21:12-14 ). His death was the occasion of David's famous elegy of "the Song of the Bow" (2 Samuel 1:17-27 ). He left one son five years old, Merib-baal, or Mephibosheth (2 Samuel 4:4 ; Compare 1 Chronicles 8:34 ).
Son of the high priest Abiathar, and one who adhered to David at the time of Absalom's rebellion (2 Samuel 15:27,36 ). He is the last descendant of Eli of whom there is any record.
Son of Shammah, and David's nephew, and also one of his chief warriors (2 Samuel 21:21 ). He slew a giant in Gath.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Jonathan
(jah' uh thuhn) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh gave.” 1. A Levite who served as priest of Micah in Ephraim and later with tribe of Dan (Judges 17-18 ). 2 . Eldest son of King Saul; mother: Ahinroam; brothers: Abinadab, Malchishua and Ish-baal; sisters Merab and Michal; son Mephibosheth (Meribbaal). Jonathan possessed courage, fidelity, and friendship. He led 1,000 soldiers to defeat the Philistines at Geba (Gibeah) (1 Samuel 13:2-3 ). Then Jonathan took only his armor-bearer to the rocky crags at Michmash and brought panic to the Philistines by killing twenty of them (1 Samuel 14:1-16 ). Saul discovered that Jonathan was missing, called for the ark of God, went to battle, and defeated the Philistines. Jonathan ate honey, unaware that Saul had forbidden the people to eat that day. Saul would have had Jonathan put to death, but the people spoke in praise of Jonathan and ransomed him from death (1 Samuel 14:27-46 ).
The next four accounts about Jonathan focus on his friendship with David. First, Jonathan formed a close friendship with David by giving him his robe, armor, sword, bow, and girdle (1 Samuel 18:1-5 ). Second, Jonathan pleaded successfully with Saul to reinstate David (1 Samuel 19:1-7 ). Third, Jonathan left Saul's table angrily to inform David that the king would never receive David again (1 Samuel 20:1-42 ). Fourth, Jonathan held a final meeting with David at Horesh. They made covenant with one another as Jonathan acknowledged David as the next king (1 Samuel 23:16-18 ).
The end of 1Samuel reports the end of Saul and three of his sons, Jonathan, Abinadab, and Melchishua, at Mount Gilboa (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ). Their bodies were first hung on the wall of Beth-shan and later retrieved to Jabesh. Eventually, David had the bones buried in the land of Benjamin, in Zela in the tomb of Kish, Jonathan's grandfather (2 Samuel 21:12-14 ). See Saul ; David ; Mephibosheth .
3. Son of Abiathar the priest in service to David (2 Samuel 15:24 ; 2Samuel 17:17,2 Samuel 17:20 ; 1 Kings 1:42-43 ).
4. An uncle of David who functioned as counselor and scribe in the royal court (1 Chronicles 27:32 ).
5. Son of Shimea or Shimeah, David's brother; slew a Philistine giant (2 Samuel 21:21 ; 1 Chronicles 20:7 ).
6. Son of Shammah; one of David's thirty mighty men (2 Samuel 23:32-33 ; 1 Chronicles 11:34 ).
7. Son of Uzziah, a royal treasurer in reign of David; called Jehonathan in 1 Chronicles 27:25 .
8. House of a scribe or secretary where Jeremiah was imprisoned (Jeremiah 37:15 ,Jeremiah 37:15,37:20 ; Jeremiah 38:26 ).
9. Son of Kareah; “Johanan;” possibly same as 8. (Jeremiah 40:8 ).
10. Father of Ebed, a returned exile (Ezra 8:6 ; 1 Esdras 8:32 ).
11. Priest during high priesthood of Joiakim (Nehemiah 12:14 ).
12. Priest, son of Joiada (Nehemiah 12:11 ).
13. Priest, son of Shemaiah and father of Zechariah, in a group who played musical instruments (Nehemiah 12:35 ).
14. Son of Asahel who supported foreign marriages in time of Ezra (Ezra 10:15 ; 1 Esdras 9:14 ).
15. A descendant of Jerahmeel (1 Chronicles 2:32-33 ).
Omer Hancock
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jonathan
Jonathan (jŏn'a-than), the gift of Jehovah. 1. A son of Gershom and a Levite, who impiously served as a priest, first to Micah, and then to the Danites in Laish or Dan. Judges 17:1-8. 2. A son of Saul, 1 Chronicles 8:33 distinguished for his lovely character. His brilliant exploit in Michmash, 1 Samuel 13:1-23; 1 Samuel 14:1-52, illustrates his pious faith, his bravery, see also 1 Samuel 13:3, when he was about 30 years old, and his favor with the people, who would not suffer him to be put to death for violating Saul's foolish vow. This valiant and generous prince, "strong like a lion and swift like an eagle," 2 Samuel 1:23, loved David as his own soul. 1 Samuel 18:1-4; 1 Samuel 19:2; 1 Samuel 20:1-42. When he knew that David was chosen of God for the throne, he nobly yielded his own claims, and while holding to his father he had a pure and disinterested friendship for David. 1 Samuel 23:16-18. He was slain with his father, in battle with the Philistines at Mount Gilboa. The beauty and pathos of the elegy in which David laments his friend are unsurpassed in literature. 2 Samuel 1:1-27. David found and cared for the only son Mephibosheth. 2 Samuel 9:1-13. There are 14 persons of this name mentioned in the Bible.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jonathan
Given of God
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jonathan
JONATHAN (‘J″ [1] hath given’). 1. A Levite, the ‘son’ of Gershom (wh. see); according to Judges 18:30 he and his sons were priests to the tribe of Dan up to the Captivity. Jonathan was taken into the service of Micah as ‘father and priest’ ( Judges 17:10 ); but, not long after he had taken up his abode there, six hundred Danites came that way and induced Jonathan to leave Micah and join them as their priest ( Judges 18:11-31 ). 2. The eldest son of Saul; he appears, in the first instance, as a brave and successful leader in battle. 1 Samuel 13:1-23 ; 1 Samuel 14:1-52 contain a graphic account of the way in which the Israelites threw off the Philistine yoke; in this campaign Jonathan took a leading part. He first of all, at the head of a thousand men, smote the Philistine garrison in Geba; this was the signal for the outbreak of war. The Philistine army gathered together and encamped in Michmash. Jonathan, accompanied only by his armour-bearer, at great risk surprised an advanced post of the Philistines, and slew about twenty men; the suddenness and success of this coup so terrified the Philistines that the whole host of them fled in panic. The popularity of Jonathan is well illustrated by the fact that the people prevented Saul from carrying out a vow which would have cost Jonathan his life ( 1 Samuel 14:24-46 ). The implicit trust which Saul placed in Jonathan is seen in the words of the latter in 1 Samuel 20:2 : ‘Behold my father doeth nothing either great or small, but that he discloseth it unto me.’ The faithfulness and trustworthiness of Jonathan as here shown gives an insight into what must have been that friendship for David which has become proverbial. All the characteristics of truest friendship are seen in Jonathan in their full beauty love ( 1 Samuel 18:1 ), faithfulness ( 1 Samuel 20:2 ff). disinterestedness ( 1 Samuel 20:12 ). and self-sacrifice ( 1 Samuel 20:24-34 ). The last we hear of Jonathan is his death upon the battlefield, fighting the foes of his country. In David’s lament the spirit of the departed hero speaks in unison with his friend: ‘Thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women’ ( 2 Samuel 1:26 ).
3. The son of the priest Mattathias; the youngest of the four Maccabæan brothers ( 2Ma 8:22 ), who played an important part during the Maccabsan revolt (see Maccabees). 4. A nephew of David ( 2 Samuel 21:21 ; cf. prob. 1 Chronicles 27:32 ). 5. A son of Abiathar the priest ( 2 Samuel 15:27 ff; 2 Samuel 17:17-20 , 1 Kings 1:42 ). 6. A scribe in whose house Jeremiah was imprisoned ( Jeremiah 37:15-20 ; Jeremiah 38:26 ). 7. A high priest ( Nehemiah 12:11 ): called in Nehemiah 12:22 f. Johanan. 8. One of David’s heroes ( 2 Samuel 23:32 , 1 Chronicles 11:34 ). 9. A Levite ( Nehemiah 12:35 ). 10. The son of Kareah ( Jeremiah 40:8 ). 11. The father of Peleth and Zaza ( 1 Chronicles 2:32 f.). 12. One of David’s treasurers ( 1 Chronicles 27:25 ). 13. Father of Ebed ( Ezra 8:6 ). 14. One of those who opposed (RV [2] ) or assisted (AV [3] ) Ezra in the matter of the foreign marriages ( Ezra 10:15 ). 15. A priest ( Nehemiah 12:14 ). 16. Son of Absalom, in the time of Simon the Maccabee ( 1Ma 13:11 ). 17 . A priest who led the prayer at the first sacrifice after the Return ( 2Ma 1:23 ).
W. O. E. Oesterley.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Jonathan ben uzziel, rabbi
(1century CE) Mishnaic sage, the greatest of Hillel's students, translated the Prophets and much of the Holy Writings into Aramaic. This translation is known as �Targum Jonathan.�
Chabad Knowledge Base - Jonathan
(a) (d. 877 BCE BCE) Son of Saul and sworn friend of David. Helped David escape Saul’s designs on his life. Led the Israelite rebellion against the Philistines and was killed in battle together with his father. (b) A common Jewish name.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jonathan
Saul's son, David's dear friend, (1 Samuel 18:1) His death, with that of Saul, gave birth to one of the most poetical as well as devout elegies the world ever knew. (2 Samuel 1:17) His name is compounded of Nathan, a gift; and Jab, the Lord. There are many of this name in Scripture.
·Jonathan, a Levite, the son of Gershom, Judges 18:20.
·Jonathan, the son of Abiather the priest, 1 Kings 1:42.
·Jonathan, the son of Shage the Hararite, 1 Chronicles 11:34.
·Jonathan, the son of Shimeah, 1 Chronicles 20:7.
·Jonathan, or Jehonathan, the son of Uzziah, 1 Chronicles 27:25.
·Jonathan, the son of Ashel, Ezra 10:15.
·Jonathan, the High Preist, Nehemiah 12:10.
·Jonathan, the Scribe, Jeremiah 37:14-15.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Jonathan
THY LOVE TO ME WAS WONDERFUL, PASSING THE LOVE OF WOMEN
JONATHAN was the eldest son of Saul, and he was thus the heir-apparent to the throne of Israel. The crown prince was a young man of great mental gifts, and he was endowed also with many most impressive moral qualities. Handsome and high-mettled, full of nerve and full of heart, Jonathan was the pride of the army and the darling of the common people. His comrades, for his beauty of person and for his swiftness of foot, were wont to call him The Gazelle. In all that, the heir-presumptive was the son of his royal father's early and best days. But the piety, the humility, the generosity, the absolutely Christ-like loyalty, tenderness, self-forgetfulness, and self-sacrifice of Jonathan-all that the son had drawn from some far higher source than from his fast-falling father Saul. But for his father's great and disastrous transgressions, Jonathan would soon have been the second king of Israel; second in succession to Saul, but second to no king that ever sat on a throne in those great qualities of mind and heart and character that give stability to a throne and add lustre to a crown.
The first time that Jonathan and David ever saw one another was on the day when Goliath fell under David's sling. Jonathan had stood beside his father Saul, and had been a spectator of the never-to-be-forgotten scene. Brave and bold and practised in war as Jonathan by that time was, with all that he had not been bold enough to face the gigantic braggart. But, with all the army, with both armies, he had been astounded to see a Bethlehemite stripling, fresh from his father's sheep, step out into the open space to face the champion of the opposing host. And when the five thousand shekels of brass rang on the open plain no voice shouted over David so soon or so long as the voice of Jonathan, the king's son. And when Saul sent for David and talked with him, Jonathan's heart went out to David, and the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved David as his own soul. And from that day on till the day when David sang his splendid elegy over Saul and over Jonathan his son, the mutual love of Jonathan and David is described all along in words of such warmth and such beauty that there is nothing like them in literature again, if we leave out the love of Christ.
'And it came to pass that the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David.' You knit things together that are of the same kind; things that are of the same substance, and fibre, and texture, and strength, and endurance. You knit a thread to a kindred thread. You knit a cord to a kindred cord. You knit a three-fold cord to a three-fold cord. You knit a chain of iron to a chain of iron; a chain of brass to a chain of brass; a chain of gold to a chain of gold; and a chain of gold of the same size, and strength, and purity, and beauty to a chain of gold of the same size, and strength, and purity, and beauty. Now Jonathan's soul was a chain of gold, of the same size, and strength, and purity, and beauty as David's soul. Jonathan, as being the elder man, had for long been looking and longing for a soul like David's soul to which his own soul might be knit; and before the sun set that day the son of Saul had found in the son of Jesse a soul after his own soul, and he was at rest. Jonathan's soul was that day knit to another soul, if possible, still more tender, and pure, and pious, and noble, and loyal than his own; till Jonathan was the happiest man in all Israel that day. And that pattern of friendship, knit that day between Jonathan and David, has been the ensample and the seal of all true friendships among men ever since. It was a sweet fancy of Plato that at the great aboriginal creation of human souls they all came from the hand of the God of power, and wisdom, and love, and holiness twain in one. All human souls came into existence already knit together like the souls of Adam and Eve, like the souls of David and Jonathan, like the souls of Jesus and John, like the souls of Christ and His church. But Sin, the great sunderer and separater and scatterer of souls, came in and cleft asunder soul-consort from soul-consort till all our souls since the fall start this lonely life alone. And all the longings, and cravings, and yearnings, and hungerings, and thirstings, and faintings, and failings that fill the souls of men and women-it is all in search of that brother-soul, that sister-soul, that spousal-soul that we have all loved long since and lost a while. And every true comradeship, every true courtship, every true espousalship, every true married life is the divine recovery and reunion of twin-soul to twin-soul, as all human souls were in the great beginning, and will for ever be in God and in God's house of love and rest and satisfaction. And had Plato read Hebrew, how he would have hailed Jonathan and David as another example of two long-lost and disconsolate souls, finding rest in their primogenial, spousal, re-knit, and never-again-to-be-separated soul.
'And Jonathan loved David as his own soul.' Had I read this for this once only, I would have passed over it as a permissible hyperbole in the sacred writer. But when I read again and again and again that Jonathan loved David as his own soul, till I come down to David's splendid hyperbolical elegy over the slaughter of Saul and Jonathan; and then, when I go back and read Jonathan's whole dealing with David in the light of that golden chain of hyperboles, I stop, and think, and say to myself that there must be much more here than stands on the surface. Till I find myself saying to this sacred writer, Lo, in all this speakest thou plainly, and speakest no hyperbole. Yes; happy, happy Jonathan! For it was not of thee that David spake in that bitter psalm. 'Yea, mine own familiar friend,' David said, but not of thee, 'in whom I trusted, which did eat of my bread, hath lifted up his heel against me.' Nor was it of thee in another still more bitter psalm, 'But it was thou, a man mine equal, my guide, mine acquaintance. We took sweet counsel together, and walked unto the house of God in company. The words of his mouth were sweeter than butter, but war was in his heart; his words were softer than oil, yet were they drawn swords.' No, happy Jonathan, it was not of thee. Nor was this of thee, 'Thou didst speak peace to thy neighbour, while mischief was in thy heart.' Nor this, 'Thou didst bless with thy mouth, whilst thou didst curse inwardly.' Thy tongue, saintly man, did not frame deceit. Thou didst not sit and speak against thy brother. Jeremiah never said of thee in the bitterness of his heart that he heard the defaming of many. Thou never saidest concerning the friendless prophet, Report, and I will report it. He excepted thee when he upbraided them all round, and said, All my familiars watch for my halting. Nor did David's Son after thou hadst kissed Him say to thee, Friend, wherefore art thou come? Nor did Hamlet ever say to thee, 'O villain, villain, smiling, damned villain! My tables-meet it is I set it down, that one may smile, and smile, and be a villain.' Thy sin never found thee out. Thou never knewest the plague of a villain's heart. Thou never criedst, Create in me a clean heart, O Lord! Isaiah said, but thou never needest to say, I am a man of unclean lips. Great Jonathan! Dear Jonathan! We kiss thy feet. Till thy great Antitype comes we shall see no man born of woman again like thee!
'Then Jonathan and David made a covenant because he loved him as his own soul.' Jonathan's love was like the love of women in this, that it led Jonathan to leave his father's house behind him and to give his hand and his heart in a covenant to David. A woman cannot find rest but in the house of her husband. Knit as her heart is, and will for ever be, to her father and to her mother, yet there is a soul somewhere in God's hand to whom she was knit before she was born, and when God opens His hand twin-soul leaps out to meet twin-soul, and she is married in the Lord. Now, it was something like that. David, in the warmth of his heart and in the sharpness of his sorrow, said that the love of Jonathan to him was still more wonderful than that. No love can be more wonderful than the love of a woman when she loves in God; when the warmth, and the tenderness, and the faithfulness, and the endurance, and the self-sacrifice of nature is all deepened, and strengthened, and ennobled, and made everlasting in the transforming and transcending love of God. And it was because Jonathan's love had so much of a woman's love in it; and, added to that, so much of God's love, that David's rapture rose to such a sublime height over it. There was something in Jonathan's love that David had never met with in any of the women whose love he had ever been blessed with, Abigail's, or Michal's, or Solomon's mother's love, or any love his fathers had told him of in their days. And the surpassing love of Jonathan stood so alone because it stood so in God. Jonathan's heart had for long been full of God, and God is love. Under Samuel's ministry, Jonathan's heart had early been knit to God, and thus it was that his heart so knit itself round David's heart, in whom he found a man after God's own heart. And thus it was that father, and mother, and crown of Israel, and all, were counted loss to Jonathan as soon as he found David who had been so found of God. You will see the same thing to some extent in your own house every day. True religion, the knowledge and the love of God in your child's heart, will compel him to seek friends outside of your door if you are without the knowledge and the love of your son's God. How happy is that son who can love and honour and open all his heart to his father and mother in the Lord! But how unhappy if not! Jonathan loved Saul his father with a noble, devoted, loyal, and truly filial love. He followed his father's falling fortunes till father and son and all fell at last in the field. But all the time Saul had a son at his side whose deep and pure and holy heart he could neither understand, nor value, nor satisfy. Saul had begotten a son in Jonathan who was as much greater and better than himself as heaven is greater and better than earth; I might almost say than hell. Jonathan made a covenant with David, and with the house of David; and in making that covenant, and in the very terms of it, Jonathan, as we see in the Scriptures of it, spake less to David than he spake to David's God, the Lord God of Israel.
'And Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that was upon him, and gave it to David, and his garments, even to his sword, and to his bow, and to his girdle.' A wife's marriage ring is the seal of her husband's covenant with her, and her covenant with him. The rainbow in heaven is the seal of God's covenant with Noah, and with the earth. The water is the seal of God's covenant in baptism; and the bread and the wine in the supper. And, in like manner, Jonathan's robe, and his garments, and his sword, and his bow, and his girdle, were the signs and the seals of Jonathan's covenant that he made that day with David. In the bread and in the wine, Christ and all the benefits of the new covenant are represented, sealed, and applied to believers. And in Jonathan's robe, and raiment, and sword, and bow, and girdle, the kingdom of Israel, and all its honour and power and glory, were represented and sealed to David by this extraordinary action of Jonathan. The son and heir of Saul stripped himself naked for the sake of his sworn friend. Jonathan was such a miraculous and sacramental friend to David, that he stripped himself bare in order to clothe, and adorn, and seal David to the throne of Israel. In his measure, and so far as was in his power, Jonathan did that day all that Jesus Christ did in the fulness of time. Jonathan was only the sinful son of a sinful father, whereas Jesus Christ was the Son of God. But nothing more is said even of the Son of God Himself in this respect, than that He stripped Himself bare for His enemies, and clothed them with His robe and with His diadem. Well, all that Jonathan does to David. Jonathan is a disciple of Jesus Christ, born out of due time. Jonathan is all but Jesus Christ Himself come already in the Old Testament. As Jonathan strips himself to the bone, you look at him doing it and you exclaim, How could he ever do it! My brethren, your amazed exclamation betrays you. It is natural to you, and it shows to all who hear you that you have not yet begun to strip yourself for friend or enemy. If you had, if you had once even begun so to strip yourself, you would not cry out in such astonishment how Jonathan could do it. If you knew it, how could he help doing it? How could he do anything else? How could he stop doing it, till it was all done? He could not. And neither can you when once you have begun to do it. For the first time you will taste what true life is when you strip yourself bare of your best robe to put it upon your rival: upon him who is coming up so fast to supplant you. And you will drink deeper and deeper of the fountain of life as you go on to strip off your sword, and your bow, and your girdle to put them upon him. Of such is the kingdom of heaven. To such, and to such only, will it be said, Come up hither. Such, and such only, are highly exalted at the last. Such, and such only as make themselves of no reputation now. If you do it as they did it, you will yet sit down beside Jesus Christ and Jonathan, but not otherwise. At no less price to you than to them. But at the same price to you as to them. And it is for this cause that you have a robe given you, and garments, and a sword, and a bow, and a girdle, and a rival, and a supplanter.
'And it was told Saul. And Saul sought David every day. And David saw that Saul was come out to seek his life. And David was in the wilderness of Ziph in a wood. And Jonathan, Saul's son, arose and went to David into the wood, and strengthened David's hand in God.' There is a two-edged sword in the French tongue to this effect, that there is something in the misfortunes of our best friends that is not wholly displeasing to our secret hearts. But not to Jonathan's secret heart. Let every man defend himself from that sword of God as he is best able. Here is Jonathan's defence and shield, this: 'And Saul's son arose and went to David in the wood, and strengthened his hand in God.' That is Jonathan's shield against that sharp sword, and the hand of God in His own word holds it up over Jonathan. Be sure you see the full truth and the full beauty of that visit of Jonathan to the wood of Ziph. David was in danger of losing his faith in God. Which, if he had lost, he would have been the coming king of Israel, and Jonathan's rival, no longer. And Jonathan seeing that, came to the wood of Ziph to strengthen David in God lest his faith should fail. Was there ever a nobler deed done on the face of the earth till the Son of God came to do such deeds, and to show us all the way? If I had been Jonathan, I would have looked to David to strengthen me. I would have insisted that I needed the sympathy and the strength. It would have been a long time before I would have left my palace in Gibeah to go down to the wood of Ziph to strengthen the hand of my best friend, if that strength was to carry him over my head and put me under his feet. And Jonathan said to David, 'Fear not, for thou shalt be king over Israel, and I shall be next unto thee.'
Are any of you being sent at this moment to that school to which God sent Jonathan? Are humiliations, and disappointments, and losses, and defeats your tutors and governors? Then, take Jonathan's history home with you tonight to imitate it. Grudge not your neighbour his divinely ordained promotion or praise. But, rather, as you have opportunity, strengthen his hand in God. As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten, and humble, and put down, and make second. But to him that overcometh will I grant to sit with Me in My throne, even as I also overcame.
He always wins who sides with God,To him no chance is lost;God's will is sweetest to him whenIt triumphs at his cost.The cross of Christ was made of a tree that had grown in the wood of Ziph, and yours will be made of the same shining timber.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jonathan
the son of Saul, a prince of an excellent disposition, and in all varieties of fortune a sincere and steady friend to David. Jonathan gave signal proofs of courage and conduct upon all occasions that offered, during the wars between his father and the Philistines. The death of Jonathan was lamented by David, in one of the noblest and most pathetic odes ever uttered by genius consecrated by pious friendship. See 1 Samuel 13:16 , &c; 1 Samuel 14:1-2 , &c.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jonathan
1. A Levite, son of Gershom, and grandson of Moses, who after the death of Joshua impiously served as a priest, first to Micah, and then to the Danites in Laish or Dan, where his posterity succeeded him until the captivity, Judges 17:1-18:31 .
2. The eldest son of Saul, and one of the loveliest characters in Old Testament history. The narrative of his brilliant exploit in Michmash, 1 Samuel 13:1-14:52 , illustrates his pious faith, his bravery, (see also 1 Samuel 13:3 ) and the favor borne him by the people, who would not suffer him to be put to death in consequence of Saul's foolish vow. This valiant and generous prince loved David as his own soul, 1 Samuel 18:1-4 19:2 20:1-42 ; and though convinced that his friend was chosen of God for the throne, nobly yielded his own pretensions, and reconciled fidelity to his father with the most pure and disinterested friendship for David. He perished with his father, in battle with the Philistines at mount Gilboa; and nothing can surpass the beauty and pathos of the elegy in which David laments his friend, 2 Samuel 1:1-27 , whose son Mephibosheth he afterwards sought out and befriended, 2 Samuel 9:1-13 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jonathan
("Jehovah's gift".)
1. Son of Gershom. (See GERSHOM.) Sprung from Moses (changed to "Manasseh" in the keri or margin Hebrew): Judges 18:30. It marks how prone to idolatry were the Israelites, that the priest to Micah's images and afterward to the Danites was a Levite, whose special duty it was to maintain pure Jehovah's worship, and he a descendant of Moses himself! Idolatry begins with the people, it being natural to our sensuous cravings; then it seeks the sanction of the church. Micah began with robbery of his own mother; her curses extorted restitution; she as a meritorious act consecrated the money for a "graven image" (pecel ) and the "molten pedestal" (massecah ) on which it stood like Aaron's calf (Exodus 32:4), to be a representation of Jehovah; it was the forerunner of Jeroboam's calves long after and idol. (See CALVES; IDOL.)
Micah had a domestic sanctuary in which he consecrated his son as priest; here the image was set. The ephod was an imitation of the high priest's shoulder dress. The teraphim or household gods were also worshipped as givers of prosperity and as oracles. The time was very shortly after Joshua's death, an age when there was no king, and the law and the judges were not as yet well established (Judges 17:1-6). Micah afterwards found a Levite for the service, who had sojourned in Bethlehem Judah and left it to seek maintenance where he could, in Mount Ephraim. It was Jonathan. With the self deceiving folly of idolaters Micah then said, "now I know that Jehovah will do me good seeing I have a Levite to my priest," as if a Levite's presence could bless where both priest and patron were apostates from the God of all blessing.
Five Danite spies, on their way to search for a settlement in the far N. for their tribe, recognized Jonathan. At their request he consulted God for them and promised them success. Six hundred Danites of Zorah and Eshtaol, led by the spies' report, marched to Dan or Laish. (See DAN.) On their way the live carried off the graven image, ephod, teraphim, and molten (cast) pedestal (Keil). Jonathan at their invitation was. "glad" to accompany them; ambition readily prompted the desire to be priest to a tribe and clan rather than to one individual. Micah with self convicting folly expostulated in vain, "ye have taken away my gods which I made (!) and the priest, ... and what have I more?" His loss was his gain, and their gain a fatal loss, if only he and they knew it. The priesthood remained hereditary in the family of Jonathan "until the captivity of the ark" (the taking of the ark by the Philistines), and Micah's images of his own making remained set up "all the time that the house of God was in Shiloh." Their idolatry was in the land of spiritual light and privileges (Luke 12:47-48).
2. Saul's oldest son. About 30 when first introduced, commanding a thousand at Gibeah (1 Samuel 13:2; compare 2 Samuel 2:8; 2 Samuel 2:10, which shows that Ishbosheth his younger brother was 40 at Saul's death). Meribbaal, or Mephibosheth, was born to him five years before his death (2 Samuel 4:4; 1 Chronicles 8:34). Famed for swiftness and strength as a warrior (2 Samuel 1:23); and especially for skill with the bow (2 Samuel 1:22; 1 Chronicles 12:2). His "bow turned not back," his invariable accoutrement (1 Samuel 18:4; 1 Samuel 20:35). Dutifully devoted to his father, whose constant companion he was (1 Samuel 20:2; 1 Samuel 20:25), yet true to his bosom friend David, whose modest:, youthful beauty, and heroic bravery won his whole heart at their first meeting after Goliath's fall, against whom nevertheless Saul cherished such deadly spite. He knew David's loyalty amidst all his father's suspicions.
Knowing also God's revealed will to exalt David to Saul's forfeited throne, Jonathan bowed to it with pious submission. Instead of jealousy, unselfish love made him rejoice in his friend's prospective exaltation at his own cost, and only covet to be next in rank to David: as he said when he went to David "and strengthened his hand in God," his last interview with him in the wood of Ziph (1 Samuel 23:16-17). Loving David "as his own soul" (1 Samuel 20:17; 1 Samuel 20:42), he withstood his father's reproaches and attempts to alienate his affections by representing "as long as the son of Jesse liveth ... thou shalt not be established, nor thy kingdom." He privately intimated to David his father's resolve to kill him (1 Samuel 19:2); but at the intercession of Jonathan (1 Samuel 19:4-6) Saul for the present gave up his design, saying "as the Lord liveth, he shall not be slain."
Soon he renewed his attempt, and David fled to Naioth. Jonathan then covenanted with David that he should show kindness to him and his house forever, when David's kingdom would be established (1 Samuel 20), a promise faithfully fulfilled by David to Mephibosheth. In vain he remonstrated with Saul in David's behalf; his father actually hurled a javelin at himself. Jonathan then only "rose from (his place beside his father at) table in fierce anger (the only time of his losing self command toward his father) and (did eat no meat," etc. Yet he clung to his father through life, and "in death they were not divided" (2 Samuel 1:23). The second last parting scene was especially touching; David and Jonathan "kissed one another and wept with one another until David exceeded" (1 Samuel 20:41). Jonathan by smiting the Philistine garrison (1 Samuel 13:2-3; or else an officer, Netzib, as William Tell rose against Gesler) at Geba gave the signal for a general revolt of Israel against its oppressors. (See GIBEAH.)
The Philistines poured in marauding parties, and Israel's cause seemed more hopeless than ever (1 Samuel 13). Saul and he had but 600 men in Gibeah, who were without sword and spear (the Philistines having taken away all their smiths); many Israelites had fled beyond Jordan. As Jonathan had provoked this aggravation of Philistine tyranny in concert with Saul, so Jonathan determined alone to deliver Israel (1 Samuel 14). His armourbearer agreed with all his heart to join in the hazardous enterprise; Jonathan's strong faith in God inspired his companion in arms with the same chivalrous devotion; "there is no restraint to the Lord, to save by many or few." Having fixed on an omen from God of success, they received it in the scoffing invitation of the Philistine guards on the other side of the steep Michmash defile, the key to command the E. in ascending from the Philistine plain: "come up to us and we will show you a thing" (compare 2 Samuel 5:6).
Jonathan and his armourbearer smote 20 of them in rapid succession. A panic ensued, the Philistines thought themselves outnumbered, and an earthquake completed the confusion; and the Israelites, with the Philistines in the camp an those hidden heretofore in Mount Ephraim and now emerging, joined in the pursuit as far W. as Ajalon. Saul, by his rash curse on any who should eat that day until the foe should be overthrown, retarded his own aim through weakening his people, involved them in violating the law by flying ravenously on the spoil at evening and eating flesh with the blood, and bound himself to put to death for tasting honey, and so receiving refreshment, his own beloved son, from which he was rescued only by the people's interposition. "Jonathan's soul was knit with David's," so that the latter testifies, "thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women"; like a Homeric hero, he gave his friend all his own arms, stripping himself (compare the Antitype, Philippians 2:7-8): 1 Samuel 18:1-4; 2 Samuel 1:26.
Jonathan holds the chief place in David's touching elegy, "the bow song" (the song on Jonathan famed for the bow) on his death with Saul and his two brothers in the battle of Gilboa (1 Samuel 31). (See DAVID.) His corpse with the others was fastened to the wall of Bethsham; from whence the men of Jabesh Gilead rescued it. Finally it was removed to Zelah in Benjamin (2 Samuel 21:12-14). Jonathan's pious and filial self devotion appears in his readiness (like Isaac) to die at his father's command because of the rash adjuration of the latter; type of the Son of God, volunteering to die for us because Adam by eating the forbidden fruit had his "eyes opened" (Genesis 3; 1 Samuel 14:27; 1 Samuel 14:43); again in his continuing to the last faithful to Saul, though his father had attempted his life, and though he knew that his father's kingdom was doomed to fall and David to succeed.
3. David's nephew, son of Shimeah, Jonadab's brother. At once "a wise man and learned scribe and counselor" (for the Hebrew dod , "uncle," means a relative and so "nephew": 1 Chronicles 27:32; 2 Samuel 21:21; 1 Chronicles 20:7), and a brave warrior who like David slew a giant Philistine, of Gath, remarkable for six toes and six fingers.
4. The high priest Abiathar's son. In Absalom's rebellion returned with his father from Olivet to act as David's spy with Ahimaaz, conveying the tidings from Abiathar and Hushai in the city (2 Samuel 15:36; 2 Samuel 15:2 Samuel 17). Announced at Adonijah's feast to the guests, including Abiathar, the unwelcome tidings of Solomon's being anointed (1 Kings 1:41-49).
5. Son of Shage the Ararite, i.e. mountaineer (1 Chronicles 11:34). "Shammah" in 2 Samuel 23:33 stands instead of "son of Shage," probably all error of the transcriber from ver. 11; Chronicles has the true reading.
6. Ezra 8:6.
7. Ezra 10:15.
8. Nehemiah 12:14.
9. Jeremiah 40:8.
10. The high priest Joiada's son and successor. The genealogies of the priests and Levites were kept in his high priesthood, and the national chronicles were continued to his time (Nehemiah 12:11-22-23). Notorious for murdering in the temple his own brother Jesus, who had tried to supplant him by the Persian general Bagoas' help. The latter in consequence entered and polluted the temple and imposed a tax of 50 shekels for every lamb sacrificed (Josephus, Ant. 11:7, section 1). Jonathan or John was high priest 32 years.
11. Nehemiah 12:35; of the course of Shemaiah (so Lord A.C. Hervey reads for "son of".)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jonathan
1. Son of Gershom and grandson of Moses or Manasseh, q.v. Though only a Levite he acted as priest in the house of Micah, who had a graven image, an ephod, and teraphim. He afterwards became priest to the tribe of Dan. He inquired of the Lord for them, and gave a reply as if God had answered him. Judges 17:7-13 ; Judges 18:1-30 . He was called 'a young man out of Beth-lehem-judah, of the family of Judah.' This may mean that he had merely resided there. Bethlehem was not a Levitical city. He had been sojourning where he could in those troublous times.
2. Son of Saul and friend of David. Jonathan was a valiant man, and a man of faith. He slew the garrison of the Philistines in Geba. 1 Samuel 13:2,3 . This caused the Philistines to gather together their armies; and Jonathan went secretly and alone with his armour-bearer, but in reliance on the Lord, up to their garrison, and the Philistines were smitten. But Jonathan, in pursuing them, tasted a little wild honey, not knowing that his father had pronounced a curse upon any that should taste food until evening. Desiring to follow up the victory, Saul inquired of God but received no reply, therefore lots were cast to discover why God would not answer — the lot fell on Jonathan and his father said he must die; but the army rescued him. 1 Samuel 14:1-46 .
On David's slaying Goliath, Jonathan made a covenant with him because he 'loved him as his own soul,' and gave to David his robe and his weapons. 1 Samuel 18:1-4 . He afterwards sheltered David from the malice of Saul, and gave proof of his love in that though he was heir to the throne, he agreed that David should be king, and he would be next to him. 1 Samuel 19:1-7 ; 1 Samuel 20:1-42 ; 1 Samuel 23:16-18 . Nevertheless Jonathan remained with his father, rather than with the one who was anointed by God to be His king, and with his father he perished. In this he was a type of the future remnant, who, having left the true David, will go through the tribulation. 1 Samuel 31:2 .
3. Son of Abiathar the high priest. 2 Samuel 15:27,36 ; 2 Samuel 17:17,20 ; 1 Kings 1:42,43 .
4. Son of Shimeah, David's brother. He killed the giant who had twelve fingers and twelve toes. 2 Samuel 21:21 ; 1 Chronicles 20:7 .
5,6. Two of David's mighty men. 2 Samuel 23:32 : 1 Chronicles 11:34 .
7. Son of Jada, a descendant of Judah. 1 Chronicles 2:32,33 .
8. Uncle of David: his counsellor and secretary 1 Chronicles 27:32 .
9. Ancestor of some who returned from exile. Ezra 8:6 .
10. Son of Asahel: he superintended the separation of the Jews from their strange wives. Ezra 10:15 .
11. Son of Joiada, a priest. Nehemiah 12:11 .
12. Priest 'of Melicu.' Nehemiah 12:14 .
13. Son of Shemaiah, a priest. Nehemiah 12:35 . Apparently called JEHONATHAN in Nehemiah 12:18 .
14. The scribe in whose house Jeremiah was imprisoned. Jeremiah 37:15,20 ; Jeremiah 38:26 .
15. Son of Kareah. Jeremiah 40:8 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jonathan
In the early days of Saul’s kingship, the Israelite army consisted of two main divisions, one under the command of Saul, the other under the command of his eldest son, Jonathan (1 Samuel 13:2; 1 Samuel 14:49). Early in his career, Jonathan showed his sharp thinking and his courage when he took his armour-bearer and carried out a daring raid that threw the enemy Philistines into confusion. Though it was a risky adventure, it resulted in a notable victory for Israel (1 Samuel 14:1-48).
When David became a member of Saul’s court and then of his army, he and Jonathan became close friends (1 Samuel 18:1-4). David’s victories stirred up Saul’s jealousy and hatred, but Jonathan defended him and intervened on his behalf. He successfully pleaded with his father to stop trying to kill David (1 Samuel 19:1-7).
Unknown to Jonathan, Saul renewed his attacks on David (1 Samuel 19:8-11). When Jonathan heard about this, he determined to find out Saul’s real intentions towards David (1 Samuel 20:1-23). Unlike his father, Jonathan showed no jealousy of David, even when his father reminded him that David was a threat to his own chances of becoming king (1 Samuel 20:30-34).
Jonathan helped David escape, but neither he nor David plotted against the king. Their sole purpose was to save David’s life. While remaining loyal to the king, Jonathan reassured David that nothing could change the relationship between them. He knew that David would be the next king, and he would be happy to serve under him as chief minister (1 Samuel 23:16-18).
Some years later Jonathan was tragically killed in a battle with the Philistines. David’s love for him is seen in the song of remembrance he wrote after his friend’s premature death (1 Samuel 31:2; 2 Samuel 1:17-27).

Sentence search

Kareah - Father of Johanan and Jonathan. (See JOHANAN; Jonathan
Jonathan - In the early days of Saul’s kingship, the Israelite army consisted of two main divisions, one under the command of Saul, the other under the command of his eldest son, Jonathan (1 Samuel 13:2; 1 Samuel 14:49). Early in his career, Jonathan showed his sharp thinking and his courage when he took his armour-bearer and carried out a daring raid that threw the enemy Philistines into confusion. ...
When David became a member of Saul’s court and then of his army, he and Jonathan became close friends (1 Samuel 18:1-4). David’s victories stirred up Saul’s jealousy and hatred, but Jonathan defended him and intervened on his behalf. ...
Unknown to Jonathan, Saul renewed his attacks on David (1 Samuel 19:8-11). When Jonathan heard about this, he determined to find out Saul’s real intentions towards David (1 Samuel 20:1-23). Unlike his father, Jonathan showed no jealousy of David, even when his father reminded him that David was a threat to his own chances of becoming king (1 Samuel 20:30-34). ...
Jonathan helped David escape, but neither he nor David plotted against the king. While remaining loyal to the king, Jonathan reassured David that nothing could change the relationship between them. ...
Some years later Jonathan was tragically killed in a battle with the Philistines
Apphus - The surname of Jonathan the Maccabee. The name is usually thought to mean ‘dissembler’; and some suppose that it was given to Jonathan for his stratagem against the tribe of the Jambri, who had killed his brother John ( 1Ma 9:37-41 )
Odomera - A chief, slain by Jonathan ( 1Ma 9:66 )
Eshek - Descendant of Saul through Jonathan
Shage - A Hararite, father of Jonathan
Jonathan - Jonathan possessed courage, fidelity, and friendship. Then Jonathan took only his armor-bearer to the rocky crags at Michmash and brought panic to the Philistines by killing twenty of them (1 Samuel 14:1-16 ). Saul discovered that Jonathan was missing, called for the ark of God, went to battle, and defeated the Philistines. Jonathan ate honey, unaware that Saul had forbidden the people to eat that day. Saul would have had Jonathan put to death, but the people spoke in praise of Jonathan and ransomed him from death (1 Samuel 14:27-46 ). ...
The next four accounts about Jonathan focus on his friendship with David. First, Jonathan formed a close friendship with David by giving him his robe, armor, sword, bow, and girdle (1 Samuel 18:1-5 ). Second, Jonathan pleaded successfully with Saul to reinstate David (1 Samuel 19:1-7 ). Third, Jonathan left Saul's table angrily to inform David that the king would never receive David again (1 Samuel 20:1-42 ). Fourth, Jonathan held a final meeting with David at Horesh. They made covenant with one another as Jonathan acknowledged David as the next king (1 Samuel 23:16-18 ). ...
The end of 1Samuel reports the end of Saul and three of his sons, Jonathan, Abinadab, and Melchishua, at Mount Gilboa (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ). Eventually, David had the bones buried in the land of Benjamin, in Zela in the tomb of Kish, Jonathan's grandfather (2 Samuel 21:12-14 )
Zaza - Son of Jonathan, a son of Jada
Zaza - Son of Jonathan, a descendant of Jerahmeel (1 Chronicles 2:33)
Binea - A descendant of Jonathan ( 1 Chronicles 8:37 ; 1 Chronicles 9:43 )
Bocheru - A descendant of Jonathan ( 1 Chronicles 8:38 ; 1 Chronicles 9:44 )
Zaza - (zay' zuh) A son of Jonathan and descendant of Jerahmeel (1 Chronicles 2:33 )
za'za, - one of the sons of Jonathan, a descendant of Jerahmeel
Tahrea - Son of Micah, a descendant of Jonathan
Merib-Baal - Contender with Baal, (1 Chronicles 8:34 ; 9:40 ), elsewhere called Mephibosheth (2 Samuel 4:4 ), the son of Jonathan
Sha'ge - (erring ), father of Jonathan the Hararite, one of David's guard
Ezel - Some stone, or cairn, near Saul's residence, the scene of the interview of David and Jonathan
Peleth - Son of Jonathan, a descendant of Jerahmeel
Artillery - In 1 Samuel 20:40 it refers to the bow and arrows Jonathan had used
Jaddua - Son of Jonathan, a descendant of Jeshua the priest
Jonathan - Jonathan gave signal proofs of courage and conduct upon all occasions that offered, during the wars between his father and the Philistines. The death of Jonathan was lamented by David, in one of the noblest and most pathetic odes ever uttered by genius consecrated by pious friendship
Jonathan - Jonathan (‘J″ Kareah - Bald, the father of Johanan and Jonathan, who for a time were loyal to Gedaliah, the Babylonian governor of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 40:8,13,15,16 )
Zelah - Slope; side, a town in Benjamin, where Saul and his son Jonathan were buried (2 Samuel 21:14 )
al'Emeth - (covering ), a Benjamite, son of Jehoadah or Jarah, ( 1 Chronicles 8:36 ; 9:42 ) and descended from Jonathan the son of Saul
Jonathan - THY LOVE TO ME WAS WONDERFUL, PASSING THE LOVE OF WOMEN...
JONATHAN was the eldest son of Saul, and he was thus the heir-apparent to the throne of Israel. Handsome and high-mettled, full of nerve and full of heart, Jonathan was the pride of the army and the darling of the common people. But the piety, the humility, the generosity, the absolutely Christ-like loyalty, tenderness, self-forgetfulness, and self-sacrifice of Jonathan-all that the son had drawn from some far higher source than from his fast-falling father Saul. But for his father's great and disastrous transgressions, Jonathan would soon have been the second king of Israel; second in succession to Saul, but second to no king that ever sat on a throne in those great qualities of mind and heart and character that give stability to a throne and add lustre to a crown. ...
The first time that Jonathan and David ever saw one another was on the day when Goliath fell under David's sling. Jonathan had stood beside his father Saul, and had been a spectator of the never-to-be-forgotten scene. Brave and bold and practised in war as Jonathan by that time was, with all that he had not been bold enough to face the gigantic braggart. And when the five thousand shekels of brass rang on the open plain no voice shouted over David so soon or so long as the voice of Jonathan, the king's son. And when Saul sent for David and talked with him, Jonathan's heart went out to David, and the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David, and Jonathan loved David as his own soul. And from that day on till the day when David sang his splendid elegy over Saul and over Jonathan his son, the mutual love of Jonathan and David is described all along in words of such warmth and such beauty that there is nothing like them in literature again, if we leave out the love of Christ. ...
'And it came to pass that the soul of Jonathan was knit to the soul of David. Now Jonathan's soul was a chain of gold, of the same size, and strength, and purity, and beauty as David's soul. Jonathan, as being the elder man, had for long been looking and longing for a soul like David's soul to which his own soul might be knit; and before the sun set that day the son of Saul had found in the son of Jesse a soul after his own soul, and he was at rest. Jonathan's soul was that day knit to another soul, if possible, still more tender, and pure, and pious, and noble, and loyal than his own; till Jonathan was the happiest man in all Israel that day. And that pattern of friendship, knit that day between Jonathan and David, has been the ensample and the seal of all true friendships among men ever since. All human souls came into existence already knit together like the souls of Adam and Eve, like the souls of David and Jonathan, like the souls of Jesus and John, like the souls of Christ and His church. And had Plato read Hebrew, how he would have hailed Jonathan and David as another example of two long-lost and disconsolate souls, finding rest in their primogenial, spousal, re-knit, and never-again-to-be-separated soul. ...
...
'And Jonathan loved David as his own soul. But when I read again and again and again that Jonathan loved David as his own soul, till I come down to David's splendid hyperbolical elegy over the slaughter of Saul and Jonathan; and then, when I go back and read Jonathan's whole dealing with David in the light of that golden chain of hyperboles, I stop, and think, and say to myself that there must be much more here than stands on the surface. Yes; happy, happy Jonathan! For it was not of thee that David spake in that bitter psalm. ' No, happy Jonathan, it was not of thee. Great Jonathan! Dear Jonathan! We kiss thy feet. Till thy great Antitype comes we shall see no man born of woman again like thee!...
'Then Jonathan and David made a covenant because he loved him as his own soul. ' Jonathan's love was like the love of women in this, that it led Jonathan to leave his father's house behind him and to give his hand and his heart in a covenant to David. David, in the warmth of his heart and in the sharpness of his sorrow, said that the love of Jonathan to him was still more wonderful than that. And it was because Jonathan's love had so much of a woman's love in it; and, added to that, so much of God's love, that David's rapture rose to such a sublime height over it. There was something in Jonathan's love that David had never met with in any of the women whose love he had ever been blessed with, Abigail's, or Michal's, or Solomon's mother's love, or any love his fathers had told him of in their days. And the surpassing love of Jonathan stood so alone because it stood so in God. Jonathan's heart had for long been full of God, and God is love. Under Samuel's ministry, Jonathan's heart had early been knit to God, and thus it was that his heart so knit itself round David's heart, in whom he found a man after God's own heart. And thus it was that father, and mother, and crown of Israel, and all, were counted loss to Jonathan as soon as he found David who had been so found of God. How happy is that son who can love and honour and open all his heart to his father and mother in the Lord! But how unhappy if not! Jonathan loved Saul his father with a noble, devoted, loyal, and truly filial love. Saul had begotten a son in Jonathan who was as much greater and better than himself as heaven is greater and better than earth; I might almost say than hell. Jonathan made a covenant with David, and with the house of David; and in making that covenant, and in the very terms of it, Jonathan, as we see in the Scriptures of it, spake less to David than he spake to David's God, the Lord God of Israel. ...
'And Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that was upon him, and gave it to David, and his garments, even to his sword, and to his bow, and to his girdle. And, in like manner, Jonathan's robe, and his garments, and his sword, and his bow, and his girdle, were the signs and the seals of Jonathan's covenant that he made that day with David. And in Jonathan's robe, and raiment, and sword, and bow, and girdle, the kingdom of Israel, and all its honour and power and glory, were represented and sealed to David by this extraordinary action of Jonathan. Jonathan was such a miraculous and sacramental friend to David, that he stripped himself bare in order to clothe, and adorn, and seal David to the throne of Israel. In his measure, and so far as was in his power, Jonathan did that day all that Jesus Christ did in the fulness of time. Jonathan was only the sinful son of a sinful father, whereas Jesus Christ was the Son of God. Well, all that Jonathan does to David. Jonathan is a disciple of Jesus Christ, born out of due time. Jonathan is all but Jesus Christ Himself come already in the Old Testament. As Jonathan strips himself to the bone, you look at him doing it and you exclaim, How could he ever do it! My brethren, your amazed exclamation betrays you. If you had, if you had once even begun so to strip yourself, you would not cry out in such astonishment how Jonathan could do it. If you do it as they did it, you will yet sit down beside Jesus Christ and Jonathan, but not otherwise. And Jonathan, Saul's son, arose and went to David into the wood, and strengthened David's hand in God. But not to Jonathan's secret heart. Here is Jonathan's defence and shield, this: 'And Saul's son arose and went to David in the wood, and strengthened his hand in God. ' That is Jonathan's shield against that sharp sword, and the hand of God in His own word holds it up over Jonathan. Be sure you see the full truth and the full beauty of that visit of Jonathan to the wood of Ziph. Which, if he had lost, he would have been the coming king of Israel, and Jonathan's rival, no longer. And Jonathan seeing that, came to the wood of Ziph to strengthen David in God lest his faith should fail. Was there ever a nobler deed done on the face of the earth till the Son of God came to do such deeds, and to show us all the way? If I had been Jonathan, I would have looked to David to strengthen me. And Jonathan said to David, 'Fear not, for thou shalt be king over Israel, and I shall be next unto thee. '...
Are any of you being sent at this moment to that school to which God sent Jonathan? Are humiliations, and disappointments, and losses, and defeats your tutors and governors? Then, take Jonathan's history home with you tonight to imitate it
Peleth - ...
...
One of the sons of Jonathan (1 Chronicles 2:33 )
Yonatan ben uzziel - This translation is known as �Targum Jonathan
Jonathan ben uzziel, rabbi - This translation is known as �Targum Jonathan
Kareah - Father of Johanan and Jonathan
Lovely - ...
Saul and Jonathan were lovely and pleasant in their lives - 2 Samuel 1
Kare'ah - (bald ), the father of Johanan and Jonathan, who supported Gedaliah's authority and avenged his murder
Jaddua - ...
...
The last high priest mentioned in the Old Testament (Nehemiah 12:11,22 ), sons of Jonathan
Jehonathan - Longer form of Jonathan often used in Hebrew text for Jonathan as in 1Samuel 14:6,1 Samuel 14:8 . Earliest Hebrew scribes noted that Jonathan was a descendant of Moses, but the present Hebrew text says Manasseh. See Jonathan
Shammah - He is the same as Shimeah , father of Jonadab ( 2 Samuel 13:3 ), the Shimea of 1 Chronicles 2:16 , and the Shimei , father of Jonathan who slew the giant ( 2 Samuel 21:21 ). In 1 Chronicles 20:7 Jonathan is called son of Shimea. 2 Samuel 23:38 should read ‘Jonathan son of Shammah, the Hararite. ’ Read, with Lucian, ‘son of Jonathan
Azel - A descendant of Jonathan ( 1 Chronicles 8:37 f
bo'Zes - (the height ), one of the two sharp rocks between the passages which Jonathan entered the Philistine garrison
Antipater - Son of Jason, one of two ambassadors sent by Jonathan to the Romans and to the Spartans to renew ‘the friendship and the confederacy’ ( 1Ma 12:16 ; 1Ma 14:22 )
Hararite - and Chronicles "Jonathan, son of Shammah (David's brother Shimei) the Hararite
Ebed - Son of Jonathan; one of "the sons of Adin" (Ezra 8:6), who returned from Babylon with Ezra
pe'Leth - ) ...
Son of Jonathan and a descendant of Jerahmeel
Michmash - Before the battle could begin, Jonathan and his armor bearer sneaked into the Philistine camp, killed twenty sentries, and set off great confusion, resulting in the Philistines fighting each other (1 Samuel 14:20 ). It served as Jonathan Maccabeus' residence and seat of government (1 Maccabees 9:73 ). See Jonathan ; Intertestamental History
Chaldee Paraphrase - of Jonathan, son of Uziel;...
3
Bozez - side "over against Michmash," "between the passages" whereby Jonathan entered the Philistines' garrison (1 Samuel 14:4-5)
Bozez - ” A sharp rock marking a passage in the wadi Suwenit near Michmash through which Jonathan and his armor-bearer went to fight the Philistines (1 Samuel 14:4 )
Ebed - Son of Jonathan, of Adin
Chalphi - The father of Judas, one of the two captains of Jonathan Maccabæus who stood firm in a battle fought against the Syrians at Hazor in N
Ziba - Post; statue, "a servant of the house of Saul" (2 Samuel 9:2 ), who informed David that Mephibosheth, a son of Jonathan, was alive
Nadabath - An unidentified town (?), east of the Jordan, in the neighbourhood of which a wedding party of the sons of Jambri was attacked, and many of them slain, by Jonathan and Simon ( 1Ma 9:37 ff
Jashen - ) Kennicott reads, "of the sons of Hashem, Gouni; Jonathan the son of Shamha
Michmash - It comes into prominence in connexion with the daring raid made by Jonathan and his armour-bearer upon the Philistines there encamped ( 1 Samuel 13:1-23 ; 1 Samuel 14:1-52 ). Indications of its position may be obtained from the Jonathan story and also from Isaiah’s picture of the course of an Assyrian raid ( Isaiah 10:28 ). For a time it was the seat of the government of Jonathan Maccabæus ( 1Ma 9:73 )
Shammah - Older brother of David (1 Samuel 16:9 ; 1 Samuel 17:13 ) and father of Jonadab (2Samuel 13:3,2 Samuel 13:32 ) and Jonathan (2 Samuel 21:21 ) if the similar Hebrew spellings in 2Samuel point to the same person mentioned in 1Samuel. Another of David's military heroes (2 Samuel 23:33 ) or, with a slight change of the Hebrew text suggested by many commentators, the father of Jonathan, the military hero (REB, NRSV, NIV)
Sham'Mah - (1 Chronicles 27:8 ) ...
In the list of David's mighty men in (2 Samuel 23:32,33 ) we find "Jonathan, Shammah the Hararite;" while in the corresponding verse of (1 Chronicles 11:34 ) it is Jonathan
Michmas - A town of Benjamin noted in the Philistine war of Saul and Jonathan. Later it became the residence of Jonathan Maccabæus and the seat of his government
Alexander Balas - In their struggle for the throne the rivals sought to outbid each other for the support of Jonathan Maccabæus, who elected to side with Alexander, and was appointed high priest by him (b. Jonathan defeated Apollonius, one of the generals of Demetrius, and received still further honours ( 1Ma 10:1-89 )
Seneh - The acacia; rock-thorn, the southern cliff in the Wady es-Suweinit, a valley south of Michmash, which Jonathan climbed with his armour-bearer (1 Samuel 14:4,5 )
Jambri - The outrage was avenged by Jonathan and Simon, who waylaid and slaughtered a large party of the ‘sons of Jambri’ ( 1Ma 9:35-42 )
Alemeth - Descendant of Jonathan, son of Saul
Jehonathan - Apparently called Jonathan in Nehemiah 12:35
Zabade'Ans, - an Arab tribe who were attacked and spoiled by Jonathan, on his way back to Damascus from his fruitless pursuit of the army of Demetrius
Zelah - The last resting place of the bones of Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 21:14); probably therefore the original seat of the Kish family
Asphar - A pool in the desert of Tekoa, or Jeshimon, where Jonathan and Simon the Maccabees encamped
Azrikam - A descendant of Jonathan ( 1 Chronicles 8:38 ; 1 Chronicles 9:44 )
e'Bed - ...
Son of Jonathan; one of the Bene-Adin who returned form Babylon with Ezra
Ezel - A separation, (1 Samuel 20:19 ), a stone, or heap of stones, in the neighbourhood of Saul's residence, the scene of the parting of David and Jonathan (42)
Machir - A friend of Mephibosbeth, the son of Jonathan, 2 Samuel 9:4,5
Ash'Urites, the - Only in (2 Samuel 2:9 ) By some of the old interpreters the name is taken as meaning the Geshurites; but if we follow the Targum of Jonathan, "the Asherites" will denote the inhabitants of the whole of the country west of the Jordan above Jez-reel
Keilah - Here Jonathan sought him out, "and strengthened his hand in God. " This was the last interview between David and Jonathan (23:16-18)
Ele'Asah - ) ...
Son of Rapha or Rephaiah; a descendant of Saul through Jonathan and Merib-baal or Mephibosheth
Zelah - ” Town allotted to Benjamin (Joshua 18:28 ), in which the bones of Saul and Jonathan were buried (2 Samuel 21:14 )
Zabadaeans - The name of an Arabian tribe defeated by Jonathan Maccabæus, b
Demetrius Nikator - , but was forced by Jonathan Machabeus to release the Jews from taxation and to increase their territory
Hillel - 9 CE) Mishnaic sage, native of Babylon, student of Shemaiah and Abtalion, teacher of Jonathan ben Uzziel and Johanan ben Zakkai, Nasi of the Sanhedrin
Nikator, Demetrius - , but was forced by Jonathan Machabeus to release the Jews from taxation and to increase their territory
Alemeth - Descendant of Saul and Jonathan in tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:36 )
Antiochus (1) - 144) by Jonathan the Maccabee to renew the covenant made by Judas with the Romans, and to enter into friendly relations with the Spartans
Guni - Probably we should also read ‘the Gunite’ for ‘ Jonathan ’ in 2 Samuel 23:32 ; and for ‘the Gizonite ’ in 1 Chronicles 11:34
Jezreel (2) - There Barak and Gideon triumphed; Deborah sung her war song; Saul and Jonathan fell near by, on the mountains of Gilboa; here king Josiah was mortally wounded by the Egyptians. It is the valley of Jezreel proper; the battle-field where Gideon triumphed and Saul and Jonathan were overthrown
Jaddua - Son and successor in the high priesthood of Jonathan or Johanan, and last of the high priests mentioned in the Old Testament
Shimea - Named also SHAMMAH, father of Jonathan and Jenadab ; distinct from SHAMMUA or SHAMMUAH, David's son by Bathsheba (1 Chronicles 3:5; 1 Chronicles 20:7 margin)
Gilboa - A mountain east of the plain of Jezreel, and where Saul and Jonathan were slain in battle, and from whence Saul went to consult the witch of Endor
Jaddu'a -
Son and successor in the high priesthood of Jonathan or Johanan
Bacchides - see) in the priesthood; defeated Jonathan the Maccabee, and at a later period besieged him in the fortress of Bethbasi; was finally compelled to entertain proposals for peace ( 1Ma 7:3-20 ; 1Ma 9:1-72 ; 1Ma 10:12 ; Jos
Esh-Baal - Saul's son Jonathan named his son Merib-baal. See Ish-bosheth ; Ishvi ; Merib-baal; Jonathan
Parvaim - Abbreviated front Sepharvaim, which stands in Syriac version and the targum of Jonathan for Sephar (Zaphar a seaport on the coast of Hadramaut; Genesis 10:30, Knobel)
Jonathan - Jonathan was a valiant man, and a man of faith. This caused the Philistines to gather together their armies; and Jonathan went secretly and alone with his armour-bearer, but in reliance on the Lord, up to their garrison, and the Philistines were smitten. But Jonathan, in pursuing them, tasted a little wild honey, not knowing that his father had pronounced a curse upon any that should taste food until evening. Desiring to follow up the victory, Saul inquired of God but received no reply, therefore lots were cast to discover why God would not answer — the lot fell on Jonathan and his father said he must die; but the army rescued him. ...
On David's slaying Goliath, Jonathan made a covenant with him because he 'loved him as his own soul,' and gave to David his robe and his weapons. Nevertheless Jonathan remained with his father, rather than with the one who was anointed by God to be His king, and with his father he perished
Kareah - ” Father of Johanan and Jonathan during the time of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 40:8 ,Jeremiah 40:8,40:13 ,Jeremiah 40:13,40:15-16 ; Jeremiah 41:11 ,Jeremiah 41:11,41:13-14 ,Jeremiah 41:13-14,41:16 ; Jeremiah 42:1 ,Jeremiah 42:1,42:8 ; Jeremiah 43:2 ,Jeremiah 43:2,43:4-5 ; spelled Careah in 2 Kings 25:23 , KJV)
Assassins, the - Josephus says that at Felix’s suggestion they murdered Jonathan son of Ananus, the high priest ( Ant
Targum - They have what is called the Targum of Jonathan, and the Targum of Onkelos. Jonathan was about 30 years before the coming of our Lord, and Onkelos somewhat later
Mephibosheth - A son of Jonathan, also called Merib-baal, 1 Chronicles 8:34 . When David found himself in peaceable possession of the kingdom, he sought for all that remained of the house of Saul, that he might show them kindness, in consideration of the friendship between him and Jonathan
Michmash - Jonathan smote the garrison or officer. (See Jonathan. Then followed Jonathan's bold enterprise, which issued in their rout, from Michmash, the farthest point E. 6, section 2) says that the part of Michmash held by them consisted of three summits, entrenched by a line of rocks, and ending in a long sharp precipice almost impregnable; here Jonathan and his armorbearer clambered up at their invitation. Here Jonathan Maccabeus had his seat of government (1 Maccabees 9:73)
Lamentation - The first example of this form of poetry is the lament of David over Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:17-27 )
Gilboa - Mountain range where Saul and Jonathan were slain
Ziba - A rich steward of Saul, whom David charged with similar duties towards Mephibosheth, son of Jonathan, 2 Samuel 9:2-10
Horesh - As David hid there from Saul, Jonathan, Saul's son, came out to help him and made a covenant of mutual help (1 Samuel 23:15-18 )
Eliphelet - ...
...
A descendant of king Saul through Jonathan (1 Chronicles 8:39 )
Jehonathan - A more exact rendering of the name usually represented in English as Jonathan
Jonathan - It was Jonathan. for their tribe, recognized Jonathan. Jonathan at their invitation was. The priesthood remained hereditary in the family of Jonathan "until the captivity of the ark" (the taking of the ark by the Philistines), and Micah's images of his own making remained set up "all the time that the house of God was in Shiloh. ...
Knowing also God's revealed will to exalt David to Saul's forfeited throne, Jonathan bowed to it with pious submission. " He privately intimated to David his father's resolve to kill him (1 Samuel 19:2); but at the intercession of Jonathan (1 Samuel 19:4-6) Saul for the present gave up his design, saying "as the Lord liveth, he shall not be slain. Jonathan then covenanted with David that he should show kindness to him and his house forever, when David's kingdom would be established (1 Samuel 20), a promise faithfully fulfilled by David to Mephibosheth. Jonathan then only "rose from (his place beside his father at) table in fierce anger (the only time of his losing self command toward his father) and (did eat no meat," etc. The second last parting scene was especially touching; David and Jonathan "kissed one another and wept with one another until David exceeded" (1 Samuel 20:41). Jonathan by smiting the Philistine garrison (1 Samuel 13:2-3; or else an officer, Netzib, as William Tell rose against Gesler) at Geba gave the signal for a general revolt of Israel against its oppressors. As Jonathan had provoked this aggravation of Philistine tyranny in concert with Saul, so Jonathan determined alone to deliver Israel (1 Samuel 14). His armourbearer agreed with all his heart to join in the hazardous enterprise; Jonathan's strong faith in God inspired his companion in arms with the same chivalrous devotion; "there is no restraint to the Lord, to save by many or few. ...
Jonathan and his armourbearer smote 20 of them in rapid succession. "Jonathan's soul was knit with David's," so that the latter testifies, "thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women"; like a Homeric hero, he gave his friend all his own arms, stripping himself (compare the Antitype, Philippians 2:7-8): 1 Samuel 18:1-4; 2 Samuel 1:26. ...
Jonathan holds the chief place in David's touching elegy, "the bow song" (the song on Jonathan famed for the bow) on his death with Saul and his two brothers in the battle of Gilboa (1 Samuel 31). Jonathan's pious and filial self devotion appears in his readiness (like Isaac) to die at his father's command because of the rash adjuration of the latter; type of the Son of God, volunteering to die for us because Adam by eating the forbidden fruit had his "eyes opened" (Genesis 3; 1 Samuel 14:27; 1 Samuel 14:43); again in his continuing to the last faithful to Saul, though his father had attempted his life, and though he knew that his father's kingdom was doomed to fall and David to succeed. Jonathan or John was high priest 32 years
Bow - In 2 Samuel 1:18 David's elegy on Saul and Jonathan is called 'The Bow
Mephibosheth - A son of Jonathan, who was granted special position and privilege in David's court (2 Samuel 9:1 ). Jonathan was killed in battle when Mephibosheth was five years old
Mich'Mas - (hidden ), a town which is known to us almost solely by its connection with the Philistine war of Saul and Jonathan. (Ezra 2:27 ; Nehemiah 7;31 ) At a later date it became the residence of Jonathan Maccabaeus and the seat of his government. " Immediately below the village the great wady spreads out to a considerable width --perhaps half a mile; and its bed is broken up into an intricate mass of hummocks and mounds, two of which, before the torrents of three thousand winters had reduced and rounded their forms, were probably the two "teeth of cliff" --the Bozes and Seneh of Jonathan's adventure
Lasthenes - When Demetrius was endeavouring to make terms with Jonathan the Maccabæan, he wrote to Lasthenes in favour of the Jews, and forwarded a copy of his letter to the Jewish prince ( 1Ma 11:29-37 )
Asahel - Father of Jonathan who returned from exile
Bahurim - Here Shimei resided, who poured forth vile abuse against David, and flung dust and stones at him and his party when they were making their way down the eastern slopes of Olivet toward Jordan (16:5); and here Jonathan and Ahimaaz hid themselves (17:18)
Eliphalet , Eliphelet - Son of Eshek, a descendant of Jonathan
Ahimaaz - While his father Zadok was in Jerusalem, 2 Samuel 15:29 , Ahimaaz and Jonathan continued without the city, 2 Samuel 17:17 , near En-Rogel, or the fountain of Rogel; thither a maid servant came to tell them the resolution which had been taken in Absalom's council: whereupon they immediately departed to give the king intelligence. But being discovered by a young lad who gave information concerning them to Absalom, that prince sent orders to pursue them: Ahimaaz and Jonathan, fearing to be taken, retired to a man's house at Baharim, in whose court-yard there was a well, wherein they concealed themselves
Machabees, the - He was succeeded in command by his youngest brother, Jonathan (161 B. Jonathan defeated Bacchides, revenged the death of his brother, and made peace with Alexander who had usurped the throne of Demetrius, the successor to Antiochus. A period of peace followed in which Jonathan ruled as high priest in Jerusalem, but Tryphon, who was plotting for the throne of Asia, treacherously captured him at ptolemais and later put him to death
en-Rogel - It was at this fountain that Jonathan and Ahimaaz lay hid after the flight of David (2 Samuel 17:17 ); and here also Adonijah held the feast when he aspired to the throne of his father (1 Kings 1:9 )
Ashurites - The Targum of Jonathan reads Beth Asher, "the house of Asher," so also several Hebrew manuscripts The Asherites will then be the whole country W
Elasah - Descendant of Saul and Jonathan in tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 8:37 ); spelled Eleasah in English translations
Jaddua - Successor of Jonathan or Johanan in the high priesthood
Resen - The targums of Jonathan and Jerusalem explain Resen as Τel-assar "the mound of Asshur
Arius - 300); and Jonathan Maccabeus refers to these communications in a letter which he sent by his ambassadors to Sparta ( c Mephibosheth - Saul had a son of this name, and so had Jonathan his son, (2 Samuel 4:4 and 2 Samuel 21:8-9) His name signifies reproach from the mouth, from Pe, a mouth—and Bosh, shame. It is thought by some, that the proper name of Jonathan's son was Merib-baal, (see 1 Chronicles 8:34) and that his name was changed to Mephibosheth, because the Israelites were cautious of using the name of Baal
Gilboa - In this vicinity Saul, and Jonathan were defeated by the Philistines, and died, 1 Samuel 28:4,25
Duke - ]'>[1] to the chiefs of Edom, with the exception of Joshua 13:21 ‘dukes of Sihon,’ and 1Ma 10:65 (applied to Jonathan Maccabæus)
Gilbo'a - ( 1 Samuel 28:4 ) with 1 Samuel 29:1 It is mentioned in Scripture only in connection with one event in Israelitish history, the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan by the Philistines
Mephibosheth - Son of Jonathan, the son of Saul. When David came into power he inquired if there were any of Saul's descendants to whom he could show the kindness of God for Jonathan's sake, and Mephibosheth was found. David and Jonathan had made a league together as to their seed. " When Saul's descendants were required for a recompense to the Gibeonites David spared Mephibosheth for Jonathan's sake, nor was he mentioned when the king died. Rizpah protected the bodies by day and by night, until David caused their remains to be buried with those of Saul and Jonathan
en-Rogel - Jonathan and Ahimaaz, the priests' sons, stayed at En-rogel as messengers to relay to David what the priests might learn from Absalom when he took over Jerusalem from his father (2 Samuel 17:17 )
Counsellor - yaats, the counsellors in Israel, such as Jonathan, and Ahithophel, David's counsellors, 1 Chronicles 27:32,33
Rescue - ...
So the people rescued Jonathan that he died not
Masada - Jonathan Maccabeus first fortified the rock
Eliphelet - A descendant of Jonathan ( 1 Chronicles 8:39 )
Example - ...
Jonathan, the model friend
Geba - It was held by the Philistines, but taken by Jonathan, 1 Samuel 13:3 : was a northern landmark of Judah, 2 Kings 23:8; was rebuilt by Asa, 1 Kings 15:22; held by the Assyrians, Isaiah 10:29; peopled by Benjamites after the captivity, Ezra 2:26
Michmas, Michmash - It was where Jonathan smote the garrison of the Philistines, when the victory might have been greater had not Saul distressed the people by his forbidding them to take food until the evening
Dagon - There was a temple of Dagon at Gaza, Judges 16:23, and one at Ashdod, 1 Samuel 5:1; 1 Samuel 5:7; the latter was destroyed by Jonathan Maccabæus
Bahurim - The place where Paltiel, son of Laish, was ordered to relinquish Michal ( 2 Samuel 3:16 ); where Shimei dwelt, who cursed David in his flight ( 2 Samuel 16:5 ); where Ahimaaz and Jonathan hid in the well from Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:18-19 ); and the home of Azmaveth, one of David’s mighty men ( 1Ch 11:33 , 2 Samuel 23:31 , where Barhumite is written for Baharumite )
Jasher - We have only two specimens from the book, (1) the words of Joshua which he spake to the Lord at the crisis of the battle of Beth-horon (Joshua 10:12,13 ); and (2) "the Song of the Bow," that beautiful and touching mournful elegy which David composed on the occasion of the death of Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:18-27 )
lo-Debar - ” After Saul and Jonathan had been defeated on Mount Gibeon (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ), Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son (2 Samuel 4:4 ) took refuge with Machir in the city of Lo-Debar (2 Samuel 9:4 )—a city of Gad located in the eastern part of Gilead just south of the Sea of Chinnereth (Galilee). After David became king, he called for Mephibosheth so he could show kindness to the lone descendant of Jonathan (2 Samuel 9:1-5 )
lo-Debar - ” After Saul and Jonathan had been defeated on Mount Gibeon (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ), Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son (2 Samuel 4:4 ) took refuge with Machir in the city of Lo-Debar (2 Samuel 9:4 )—a city of Gad located in the eastern part of Gilead just south of the Sea of Chinnereth (Galilee). After David became king, he called for Mephibosheth so he could show kindness to the lone descendant of Jonathan (2 Samuel 9:1-5 )
Bela - The close resemblance of this name to that of ‘Balaam, the son of Beor,’ the seer, is noteworthy, and has given rise to the Targum of Jonathan reading ‘Balaam, the son of Beor’ in Genesis 36:32
Mephibosheth - The son of Jonathan and grandson of Saul, 2 Samuel 4:4; also called "Meribbaal"= contender against Baal
Artillery - And Jonathan gave his artillery to his lad
Achish - Saul and his sons, including Jonathan, died in the battle (1 Samuel 31:1-6 )
Asahel - Father of Jonathan, who opposed Ezra’s action in connexion with the divorce of foreign wives ( Ezra 10:16 )
Jehohanan - Ezra 10:6 ( Jonas , Esther 9:1 Esther 9:1 ; Johanan , Nehemiah 12:22-23 ; Jonathan , Nehemiah 12:11 ) high priest
Geba - Apparently while Saul was king the Philistines had a garrison there, which Jonathan smote
Eliph'Elet - (2 Samuel 23:34 ) ...
Son of Eshek, a descendant of King Saul through Jonathan
David, King - During the Philistine war, David, relying on God, slew the giant Goliath and won the friendship of Jonathan, son of Saul. When Saul and Jonathan fell at Gilboa, David, by God's command, went up to Hebron to claim the throne
en-Rogel - It was outside Jerusalem; and David’s spies, Jonathan and Ahimaaz, were here stationed in quest of news of the revolt of Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:17 )
Ahimaaz - He and Jonathan were stationed outside Jerusalem to learn Absalom’s plans; after an adventurous journey they succeeded in warning David ( 2 Samuel 15:27 ; 2 Samuel 15:36 ; 2 Samuel 17:17-21 )
Seneh - ) The southern of the two isolated rocks in the passage of Michmash, mentioned in Jonathan's enterprise (1 Samuel 14:4; 1 Samuel 14:8), the nearer of the two to Geba. In going from Geba to Michmash, instead of going round by the passage of Michmash where the two valleys unite, Jonathan went directly across the ridge over the two rocks which lay between the passages or valleys
da'Gon - (1 Samuel 5:5,6 ; 1 Chronicles 10:10 ) The latter temple was destroyed by Jonathan in the Maccabaean wars
ge'ba - During the wars of the earlier part of the reign of Saul, Geba was held as a garrison by the Philistines, (1 Samuel 13:3 ) but they were ejected by Jonathan
as'Ahel - ) ...
A priest, father of Jonathan, in the time of Ezra
Targums - The Targum of Jonathan to the prophetical books (these include what we call the historical books). ’ This latter is sometimes erroneously called the ‘Targum of Jonathan ben Uzziel on the Pentateuch’; but though this Jonathan was believed to be the author of the Targum to the Prophets which bears his name (see below), there was not the slightest ground for ascribing to him the authorship of the Targum to the Pentateuch (‘Targum Jerushalmi’). ]'>[3] ,’ which of course stood for ‘Jerushalmi,’ was taken to refer to ‘Jonathan,’ the generally acknowledged author of the Targum to the Prophets; thus it came about that this Targum to the Pentateuch, as well as the Targum to the Prophets, was called the Targum of Jonathan. But in other respects the ‘Targum Jerushalmi’ (or ‘Targum of pseudo-Jonathan’) differs from that of Onkelos, especially in its being far less a translation than a free paraphrase. ’...
The Targum of Jonathan to the Prophets owes its name to an ancient tradition, according to which Jonathan ben Uzziel composed it ‘from the mouths of Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi’ ( Megillah , 3 a ); this is merely a figurative way of saying that the traditional interpretation, as supposed to have been handed down by these prophets, was embodied in written form by Jonathan. It is said of this Jonathan that when he sat down and occupied himself with the study of the Law, every bird that happened to fly over his head was burned; the reason of this was that so many angels gathered around him in order to hear the words of the Law from his mouth ( Succah , 28 a
Of much later date, and also of less importance than the Targums of Onkelos, pseudo-Jonathan, or Jonathan, is the Targum Jerushalmi to the Prophets
Jezreel, Valley of - Two centuries after this the Israelites were here defeated by the Philistines, and Saul and Jonathan, with the flower of the army of Israel, fell (1 Samuel 31:1-6 )
Jasher - A book alluded to only in Joshua 10:13 as containing Joshua's, miracle of commanding the sun and the moon to stand still; 2 Samuel 1:18 as containing David's elegy over Saul and Jonathan, entitled the "bow" song, celebrating Jonathan famous for the bow (compare 2 Samuel 1:22 and Psalm 60), a national song to be "taught'" to the people (not "he bade them teach the children of Judah (the use of) the bow"): Deuteronomy 31:19
Gibeah - "Gibeah of Benjamin" was occupied by Jonathan with 1,000 chosen men, three miles in the S. ...
Jonathan smote the garrison at Geba, and the Philistines in consequence gathering a vast host drove Saul's little army before them out of Bethel and Michmash down the eastern passes to Gilgal near Jericho, in the Jordan valley; took Michmash, Saul's former quarters, and sent out plunderers N. Jonathan however held a force in Gibeah (1 Samuel 14:2) where Saul, Samuel, and Ahiah the priest with the ephod joined him from Gilgal (1 Samuel 13:7). ...
Then followed the gallant stealthy assault of the Philistine garrison by Jonathan and his armor-bearer, the first knowledge of which was conveyed to Saul by his watchmen in Gibeah, who at dawn saw "the multitude melting away and beating down one another
Ahaz -
A grandson of Jonathan (1Chronicles 8:35; 9:42)
Hushai - By so doing he was enabled both to defeat the plans of Ahithophel and to keep David informed (by means of Ahimaaz and Jonathan, the sons of Zadok and Abiathar the priests) of the progress of events in Jerusalem ( 2 Samuel 16:16 to 2 Samuel 17:23 )
Johanan - See Jonathan, No
Aphek - Where the Philistines encamped when Saul and Jonathan were killed
Tryphon - His real aim, however, was to gain the crown for himself, and this he accomplished after he had murdered in succession Jonathan the Maccabee ( 1Ma 12:39-50 ) and Antiochus ( 1Ma 13:31 f
Bahurim - Here, in the court of a house, Jonathan and Ahimaaz lay hidden under the well's covering upon which grain was spread
Honey - The vegetable honey exuded from trees, as the Tamarix mannifera, and is found only in small globules which must he carefully collected and strained, so that it cannot be what Jonathan ate in the wood (1 Samuel 14:25), or the "wild honey" which John Baptist ate (Matthew 3:4)
Judges (2) - 17-21, an account, detached from the preceding and out of chronological order, of the invasion of Laish by the Danites, in connection with the story of Micah and his priest, Jonathan, chaps
Round - ...
1 Samuel 14:45 (a) In this peculiar way and by this figure the people are asserting that no harm of any kind shall come to Jonathan who had won such a great victory over the Philistines
Ammiel - Father of Machir, in whose house Mephibosheth, son of Jonathan and grandson of Saul, lived after the death of his father and grandfather
Ahaz - A descendant of Jonathan
Targum - The principal ones are the Pentateuch by Onkelos, and the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and the Prophets (except Daniel), by Jonathan Ben Uzziel. ...
As an illustration Genesis 22:10-13 is quoted from the Pentateuch of Onkelos, and from the one known as the Pseudo-Jonathan. ...
PSEUDO-JONATHAN
Jashar, Book of - ( b ) 2 Samuel 1:19-27 ; in this case the quotation is a much longer one, consisting of David’s lamentation over Saul and Jonathan
Jannes And Jambres - " (Speaker's Commentary, note at end of Exodus 7) The Targum of Jonathan mentions Jannes and Jannes as "chiefs of the magicians
Beth-Aven - Saul defeated the Philistines here after God used his son Jonathan to start the victory (1 Samuel 14:23 )
Mattathias - A captain in the army of Jonathan the Maccabæan ( 1Ma 11:70 )
Ziph (1) - The last interview of David and Jonathan was in the wood here
Kedesh - It was taken by Tiglath-pileser in the reign of Pekah, 2 Kings 15:29, and here the battle took place between Jonathan Maccabæus and Demetrius
Mephibosheth - A son of Jonathan ( 2 Samuel 4:4 ), called also in 1 Chronicles 8:34 ; 1 Chronicles 9:40 Merib ( b ) aal , really the original form of the name ‘Baal contends’ or ‘Baal’s warrior. ’...
David, on succeeding to the throne, instead of destroying all the family of Saul, as was usual on such occasions, spared Mephibosheth out of regard for his father Jonathan (2 Samuel 9:1 )
Naked (And Forms) - ...
1 Samuel 20:30 (b) Saul is accusing Jonathan of insulting his mother, and denying his birthright privileges by his loyalty to David. Jonathan was the heir to the throne and therefore would inherit the glory, the power and the wealth of his father if he remained true to his father
Modin - He was buried at Modin ( 1Ma 2:70 ), as were his illustrious sons Judas ( 1Ma 9:19 ) and Jonathan ( 1Ma 13:25 )
Gilboa - ) The scene of the death of Saul and Jonathan (1 Samuel 31:1; 2 Samuel 1:6,21: "ye mountains (for there is not merely one mountain) of Gilboa, let there be no dew, neither rain upon you, nor fields of firstfruit offerings," i
Asahel - The father of Jonathan who along with Jahaziah opposed Ezra's direction for the men of Judah to separate themselves from the foreign wives they had married
Apollonius - From Jamnia he sent a pompous defiance to Jonathan Maccabæus, who, however, captured Joppa and defeated Apollonius
Friend, Friendship - Consequently, friendship may be simple association ( Genesis 38:12 ; 2 Samuel 15:37 ) or loving companionship, the most recognizable example being that between David and Saul's son, Jonathan (1Samuel 18:1,1 Samuel 18:3 ; 1 Samuel 20:17 ; 2 Samuel 1:26 ). See Body of Christ ; David ; Love ; Neighbor ; Jonathan
Absalom - The father of Mattathias, one of the captains who stood by Jonathan at Hazor ( 1Ma 11:70 = Jos. It is perhaps the same Absalom whose son Jonathan was sent by Simon to secure Joppa ( 1Ma 13:11 = Jos
Mephibosheth - Saul's grandson, son of Jonathan. ) When Saul and Jonathan fell at Gilboa Mephibosheth was but five years old. He had been for a considerable time living in obscurity with Machir in Lodebar beyond Jordan, near Mahanaim, his uncle Ishbosheth's seat of government, when David through Ziba heard of him, and for the sake of Jonathan, and his promise respecting Jonathan's seed (1 Samuel 20:15; 1 Samuel 20:42), restored to him all the land of Saul and admitted him to eat bread at his table at Jerusalem continually. ...
Mephibosheth typifies man once son of the King; then having lost his right by the fall, as Mephibosheth did by Saul's and Jonathan's death at Gilboa. Bearing a name of reproach like Mephibosheth, instead of his name of innocence; banished to the outskirts of the moral wilderness, like Mephibosheth in Lodebar; liable to perish by the sword of justice, as Saul's other sons (2 Samuel 21); paralyzed by original sin, as Mephibosheth lamed from infancy in both feet; invited by the Lord and Savior, after having spoiled principalities, to sit down at the royal table (Matthew 8:11; Revelation 19:7; Revelation 19:9), as Mephibosheth was by David after conquering all his foes, on the ground of the everlasting covenant (Jeremiah 31:3); as David regarded Mephibosheth because of his covenant with Jonathan (1 Samuel 20:15; 1 Samuel 20:42)
Goliath - He came into public notice now as the deliverer of Israel and the chief among Saul's men of war (18:5), and the devoted friend of Jonathan
Gershom - Many manuscripts of Judges 18:30 list Jonathan, Gershom's son and Moses' grandson, as founder of the priesthood in the sanctuary at Dan (NIV, NRSV, REB), though the traditional printed Hebrew text reads Manasseh rather than Moses (KJV, NAS)
Ashkelon - Here Jonathan Maccabæus was honourably received ( 1Ma 10:86 ; 1Ma 11:60 ), and it was the birthplace of Herod the Great
Ahimaaz - He, with Jonathan, Abiathar's son, contrived to bring David Intelligence, during Absalom's rebellion, of Ahithophel's counsel, and Hushai's endeavor to counteract it
Jon'Athan, - (1 Samuel 14:6-16 ) During the pursuit, Jonathan, who had not heard of the rash curse, ch. Saul would have sacrificed him; but the people interposed in behalf of the hero of that great day, and Jonathan was saved. (1 Samuel 14:24-45 ) The chief interest of Jonathan's career is derived from the friendship with David, which began on the day of David's return from the victory over the champion of Gath, and continued till his death
Mephibosheth - ...
Mephibosheth was the son and heir of Jonathan, David's oldest and best friend. Mephibosheth, the future king of Israel, was only five years old when Jonathan his father, and Saul his grandfather, both fell in the same battle on Mount Gilboa, and with their fall their family fell from the throne. In the terror that took possession of Jonathan's household that terrible day, Mephibosheth's nurse caught up the child and fled with him in her arms. David sits in the throne of Saul and Jonathan and Mephibosheth, and his enemies are all subdued round about David. In his remembrance of God's great mercies, and in the magnanimity of his heart, David often called Saul and Jonathan to mind. And David said, Is there yet any that is left of the house of Saul, that I may show him kindness for Jonathan's sake? And there was of the house of Saul a servant whose name was Ziba. And the king said, Is there not yet any of the house of Saul, that I may show the kindness of God to him? And Ziba said unto the king, Jonathan hath yet a son, which is lame on his feet. And David said unto him, Fear not, for I will surely show thee kindness for Jonathan, thy father's sake, and will restore thee all the lands of Saul thy father, and thou shalt eat bread at my table continually. Thou art not able to bear arms for me; but thy father so strengthened my hands in God, that to have seen the face of his son that morning, and to have heard the voice of Jonathan's son would have done for me and for my cause what thy father did. Say no more, Mephibosheth, said David, as he saw Jonathan's son crawling so abjectly before him. And the king spared Mephibosheth, the son of Jonathan, the son of Saul, because of the Lord's oath that was between them, between David and Jonathan the son of Saul. ...
Now, the first thing that goes to our hearts out of this miserable story is this, that Mephibosheth was the son of Jonathan. But Solomon, as he moralises in one place on fathers and sons with Jonathan and Mephibosheth before him, tells us to rejoice with trembling when our sons are born to us, for who knoweth whether they shall be wise men or fools?...
Rarely into the branches of the treeDoth human worth mount up: and so ordainsHe who bestows it, that as His free giftIt may be called. And Jonathan was like Hephæstion in this, that he loved David at all times, whereas his son Mephibosheth resembled Craterus in this, that he preferred David on the throne to David off the throne. Jonathan strengthened David's hand in God in the wood of Ziph; but Mephibosheth, like another classical character, fled the empty cask. ' And though you will not easily believe it, the author of that letter himself has enough of Jonathan's crippled and disinherited son still in himself to give a tang of remorse to some of his very best letters
David - ...
Saul's son Jonathan became David's closest friend (1 Samuel 18:1 ). With the help of Michal and Jonathan, David escaped from Saul and made contact with Samuel, the prophet (1 Samuel 19:18 ). Jonathan and David made a vow of eternal friendship, and Jonathan risked his own life to protect David (1 Samuel 20:1 ). ...
King of Judah Hearing of the deaths of Saul and Jonathan, David avenged the murderer of Saul and sang a lament over the fallen (2 Samuel 1:1 ). He also remembered his promise to Jonathan and cared for his lame son Mephibosheth (2 Samuel 9:1 )
Malachias - Septuagint reads: "My angel" and Targum Jonathan paraphrases: "My angel (messenger) whose name is Esdras
Kish - He was buried in Zela of Benjamin, where Saul and Jonathan were buried (2 Samuel 21:14 )
Machir - He is recognized in the Old Testament for the assistance he provided Mephibosheth, the son of Jonathan (2 Samuel 9:1 , especially 2 Samuel 9:4-5 ) and David during the period of Absalom's rebellion (2 Samuel 17:27-29 )
Bow - The use of the bow in war had long been common among the Jews, Genesis 48:22 ; and to "teach them the bow," is by some supposed to mean, teach them by some supposed to mean, teach them the song of THE BOW, the lamentation over Saul and Jonathan, which follows; so called from the mention of the weapon in Genesis 48:22 , as the first four books in the Bible take their title in Hebrew from the first word in each
Honey - The honey which Jonathan ate in the wood, ( 1 Samuel 14:25 ) and the "wild honey" which supported John the Baptist, (Matthew 3:42 ) have been referred to this species
Targum - But though the custom of making these sorts of expositions in the Chaldee language, be very ancient among the Hebrews, yet they have no written paraphrases or Targums before the aera of Onkelos and Jonathan, who lived about the time of our Saviour. Jonathan is placed about thirty years before Christ, under the reign of Herod the Great. The Targum of Jonathan, son of Uziel, is upon the greater and lesser prophets
Geba - Jonathan dislodged them in a gallant assault with his armor-bearer alone (1 Samuel 14)
Jonathan - Jonathan (jŏn'a-than), the gift of Jehovah
Ashdod - It was again captured by Judas Maccabæus ( 1Ma 5:68 ), and again by Jonathan ( 1Ma 10:84 )
Aphek - Eventually the Philistines defeated Israel, bringing death to Saul and Jonathan
Ahimaaz - When Absalom revolted and David had to flee from Jerusalem, Zadok continuing true to David, returned to the city, and Ahimaaz, and Jonathan son of Abiathar, remained at En-rogel; to whom Zadok sent word of the counsel of Ahithophel and of Hushai by a 'wench,' and they hastened to David with the news
Ahimelech - David, being reformed by his friend Jonathan that Saul was determined to destroy him, thought it prudent to retire
Aphek - Eventually the Philistines defeated Israel, bringing death to Saul and Jonathan
Demetrius - 153); and he and Demetrius competed for the support of Jonathan ( 1Ma 10:1-21 ; Jos. He bought off the opposition of Jonathan by the addition of three Samaritan provinces to Judæa, and the exemption from tribute of the country thus enlarged ( 1Ma 11:20-37 ; Jos
Saul - Saul and Jonathan , his son, were encamped in Michmash and Gibeah (Geba), when Jonathan smote the ‘garrison’ (?) of the Philistines in Geba, thus precipitating the struggle. The plan of the Philistines was to send out plundering parties, and Jonathan threw the whole camp into confusion by surprising one of its guerilla headquarters ( 1 Samuel 13:1-3 , 1 Samuel 14:1 f. An inquiry was taken to the oracle, and the fault was found to lie with Jonathan, who confessed to having tasted honey
Love - ...
A special use of this word relates to an especially close attachment of friends: “… The soul of Jonathan was knit with the soul of David, and Jonathan loved him as his own soul” ( Jonathan and David made a covenant because he loved him as his own soul
Maccabees - Jonathan (b. The land, however, was not at peace, and in the interests of order Bacchides gave Jonathan the right to maintain an armed force at Michmash. As a sort of licensed revolutionist, Jonathan was sought as an ally by the two rivals for the Syrian throne, Alexander Balas and Demetrius i. Each made him extravagant offers, but Jonathan preferred Alexander Balas; and when the latter defeated his rival, Jonathan found himself a high priest, a prince of Syria, and military and civil governor of Judæa (b. , Jonathan laid siege to the citadel of Jerusalem, which was still in the hands of the Syrians. Jonathan thereupon became a supporter of Demetrius ii. Thanks to the disturbance in the Syrian Empire, Jonathan conquered various cities in the Maritime Plain and to the south of Judæa, re-established treaties with Rome and Sparta, and strengthened the fortifications of Jerusalem, cutting off the Syrian garrison with a high wall. This steady advance towards independence was checked, however, by the treacherous seizure of Jonathan by Trypho, the guardian and commanding general of the young Antiochus v. 143 135), another son of Mattathias, succeeded Jonathan when the affairs of the State were in a critical position. After the death of Aristobulus, his widow Alexandra (Salome) released his three brothers from prison, and married the oldest of them, Alexander Jannæus (or Jonathan), making him king and high priest
Har-Magedon - The primary reference, no doubt, would be to Israel’s victory ‘by the waters of Megiddo’ over the kings of Canaan (Judges 5:19), which might be taken as typical of the triumph of God and His Kingdom over the hostile world-powers; but the defeat and death of Saul and Jonathan at the eastern extremity of the plain (1 Samuel 31:1), the disastrous struggle of Josiah on the same field against Pharaohnecoh (2 Kings 23:29, 2 Chronicles 35:22), and Zechariah’s reference to ‘the mourning of Hadadrimmon in the valley of Megiddon’ (Zechariah 12:11), would heighten the suggestion of a great day of overthrow and destruction. Against this, however, must be set the statements that Barak with his 10,000 men ‘went down from mount Tabor’ to meet Sisera (Judges 4:14), that Zebulun and Naphtali ‘jeoparded their lives unto the death in the high places of the field’ (Judges 5:18), and that Saul and Jonathan fell ‘in mount Gilboa’ (1 Samuel 31:1; 1 Samuel 31:8; cf
Beth-Horon - The Philistines sent one unit of their army the way of Beth-horon to attack Saul and Jonathan (1 Samuel 13:18 )
Pharisees - ' Josephus speaks of them as early as the reign of Jonathan (B
Gershom - The son of Gershom, Jonathan , and his descendants were priests to the tribe of the Danites; but the fact that these latter set up for themselves a graven image, and that therefore the descendants of Gershom were connected with worship of this kind, was regarded as a grave evil by later generations, for which reason the word ‘Moses’ in Judges 18:30 was read ‘Manasseh’ by the insertion of an n above the text; it was thought derogatory to the memory of Moses that descendants of his should have been guilty of the worship of graven images
Esdra-e'Lon - This is the "valley of Jezreel" proper --the battle-field on which Gideon triumphed, and Saul and Jonathan were overthrown
Enrogel - Here Jonathan and Ahimaaz remained to receive intelligence for David from within the walls (2 Samuel 17:17). This spring suits better, as being nearer Jerusalem than Bir-eyub, which is too far for 2 Samuel 17:17, and altogether away from the direct road over Olivet to Jordan, and too much in full view of the city for Jonathan's and Ahimaaz' secret purpose
Johanan - Some interpreters would say that Jonathan ( Nehemiah 12:11 ) is a copyist's error for Johanan, but this is not likely
Flee - David “fled” from Naioth in Ramah in order to come to Jonathan ( Bethshean - ...
The men of Jabesh Gilead stole the bones of Saul and Jonathan and Saul's other two sons from the wall in "the street" or open space before the gate of Bethshean (2 Samuel 21:12
Friend - Abraham is called "the friend of God" (2 Chronicles 20:7) And the friendship of David and Jonathan is proverbial
Honey - It would seem that this flowing honey is bee honey, and this fact illustrates the story of Jonathan, 1 Samuel 14:25,27
mi'Cah - (1 Chronicles 5:5 ) ...
The son of Meribbaal or Mephibosheth, the son of Jonathan
Ahijah - ...
His rash adjuration binding the people not to eat all day, until he was avenged on the Philistines, involved the people in the sin of ravenously eating the cattle taken, with the blood, and Jonathan in that of unwittingly sinning by tasting honey, and so incurring the penalty of death. Saul ought to have had the conscientiousness which would have led him never to take such an oath, rather than the scrupulosity which condemned the people and Jonathan instead of himself. No answer having been given, owing to Jonathan's sin of ignorance for which Saul was to blame, Saul's wish was defeated
Geba - This is evidently the base camp for Saul and Jonathan in their fight with the Philistines (1 Samuel 13:16-14:18 ), though the Hebrew texts and modern translations confuse Geba and Gibeah here
Medeba - Jonathan a venged this ( 1Ma 9:36-42 ; Jos
Jannes - The paraphrast Jonathan says they were the sons of Balaam, who accompanied him to Balak, king of Moab
Shiloh - It is thus that the paraphrasts, Onkelos and Jonathan, and the ancient Hebrew commentaries upon Genesis, and the Talmudists explain it
David - The modesty and prudence of his behaviour, and his approved courage and resolution, gained him the confidence and friendship of Jonathan, the king's eldest son, "Who loved him as his own soul," became his advocate with his father, and obtained from him a promise, confirmed by an oath, that he would no more attempt to destroy him. But Saul's jealousy returned by a fresh victory David gained over the Philistines; who, finding the king was determined to seek his life, retired from court, and was dismissed in peace by Jonathan, after a solemn renewal of their friendship, to provide for his own safety. His friendship with Jonathan, the king's son, was a friendship of strict honour, for he never seduced him from his allegiance and filial duty. After this, when obliged, by the command of God, to give up some of Saul's family to justice, for the murder of the Gibeonites, he spared Mephibosheth, Micah, and his family, the male descendants of Saul and Jonathan, who alone could have any pretence to dispute the crown with him, and surrendered only Saul's bastard children, and those of his daughter by Adriel, who had no right or possible claim to the throne, and could never give him any uneasiness in the possession of it; and thus showed his inviolable regard for his oaths, his tenderness to Saul, and the warmth of his gratitude and friendship to Jonathan
Abiathar - Abiathar's two sons, Ahimelech and Jonathan, followed their father in the priesthood
Mephib'Osheth - ...
The son of Jonathan, grandson of Saul and nephew of the preceding; called also Merib-baal
Gib'e-ah - We next meet with Glbeah of Benjamin during the Philistine wars of Saul and Jonathan
Saul - Saul, with 2,000 men, occupied Michmash and Mount Bethel; while his son Jonathan, with 1,000 men, occupied Gibeah, to the south of Geba, and seemingly without any direction from his father "smote" the Philistines in Geba. Jonathan became impatient, and with his armour-bearer planned an assault against the Philistines, unknown to Saul and the army (14:1-15). Jonathan and his armour-bearer went down into the wady, and on their hands and knees climbed to the top of the narrow rocky ridge called Bozez, where was the outpost of the Philistine army. Jonathan had, while passing through the wood in pursuit of the Philistines, tasted a little of the honeycomb which was abundant there (14:27). They suspended his headless body, with that of Jonathan, from the walls of Bethshan
Arms - It was this ponderous (compare 2 Samuel 2:23) weapon, not the lighter "javelin" (as KJV) which he hurled at David twice, and at Jonathan (1 Samuel 18:11; 1 Samuel 19:10; 1 Samuel 20:33). Captains of high rank did not disdain to seek expertness in it: as Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:22), Jehu (2 Kings 9:24). In the beginning of Saul's reign the Philistines had reduced Israel so as that "no smith was found throughout all the land of Israel; for the Philistines said, Lest the Hebrew make them swords or spears; so in the day of battle there was neither sword nor spear found in the hand of any of the people but with Saul and with Jonathan" (1 Samuel 13:19-22)
Versions, Ancient, of the Old And New Testaments, - Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Kings, the twelve minor prophets, --called TARGUM OF Jonathan BEN-UZZIEL. Targum of Jonathan ben-Uzziel and Jerushalmi-Targum on the Pentateuch . --Onkelos and Jonathan on the Pentateuch and prophets, whatever be their exact date, place, authorship and editorship, are the oldest of existing Targums, and belong in their present shape, to Babylon and the Babylonian academies flourishing between the third and fourth centuries A
Saul - Saul was young in beginning his reign (1 Samuel 9:2), but probably verging toward 40 years old, as his son Jonathan was grown up (1 Samuel 13:2). ...
Jonathan smote the garrison, and so brought on a Philistine invasion in full force, 30,000 chariots. The Israelites, as the Romans under the Etruscan Porscna, were deprived by their Philistine oppressors of all smiths, so that no Israelite save Saul and Jonathan had sword or spear (1 Samuel 13:19-21). " Jonathan's exploit in destroying the Philistine garrison (1 Samuel 14) eventuated in driving the Philistines back to their own land. (See Jonathan. Jonathan's unconscious violation of Saul's adjuration, by eating honey which revived him (1 Samuel 13:27-29, "enlightened his eyes," Psalms 13:3), was the occasion of Saul again taking lightly God's name to witness that Jonathan should die (contrast Exodus 20:7). But the guilt, which God's silence when consulted whether Saul should follow after the Philistines implied, lay with Saul himself, for God's siding "with Jonathan" against the Philistines ("he hath wrought with God this day") was God's verdict acquitting him. ...
For a brief time a better feeling returned to Saul through Jonathan's intercession for David (1 Samuel 19:4-6); but again the evil spirit returned, and Saul pursued David to Michal's house, and even to Samuel's presence at Naioth in Ramah. Yet soon after, because Jonathan let David go, Saul cast a javelin at his noble unselfish son, saying, "thou hast chosen the son of Jesse to thine own confusion, for as long as he liveth thou shalt not be established, nor thy kingdom" (1 Samuel 20:28-33)
Counselor - David employed certain advisors or counselors in his court, including Ahithophel, Jehoida, and Jonathan (1 Chronicles 27:32 )
Friendship - David and Jonathan, Paul and Timothy, our Lord and Lazarus, as well as John, are striking instances of friendship
Christ: the Preacher's Great Theme - The best sermon is that which is fullest of Christ, A Welsh minister, when preaching at the chapel of my dear brother Jonathan George, was saying that Christ was the sum and substance of the gospel, and he broke out into the following story:–A young man had been preaching in the presence of a venerable divine, and after he had done, he foolishly went to the old minister and enquired, 'What do you think of my sermon, sir?' 'A very poor sermon indeed,' said he
Ahimaaz - Zadok the priest's son; the messenger in Absalom's rebellion, with Jonathan, Abiathar's son, to carry tidings from Hushai, David's friend and spy
Gihon - The Targum of Jonathan, Arable and Syriac, has Siloam for Gihon in 1 Kings 1
Zechariah - Son of Jonathan, a priest: he assisted in the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem
Fat - ...
2 Samuel 1:22 (b) Jonathan conquered the power of the enemy though they were great, strong, mighty and wealthy
Caiaphas - 4029 to 4038, he was succeeded by Jonathan, son of Ananas, or Annas
Mac'Cabees - After the death of Judas, Jonathan his brother succeeded to the command, and later assumed the high-priestly office
Hasmonean - Although Judas and Jonathan played important leadership roles, the Hasmonean dynasty clearly emerged under Simon, who was widely recognized as secular and religious leader of homeland Judaism. These included embracing some forms of Hellenism (he changed the name of his three sons from Judas, Mattathias, and Jonathan, all names of Maccabean heroes, to Aristobulus, Antigonus, and Alexander Janneus)
da'Vid - Jonathan was inspired by the romantic friendship which bound the two youths together to the end of their lives. His position in Saul's court seems to have been first armor-bearer, ( 1 Samuel 16:21 ; 18:2 ) then captain over a thousand, (1 Samuel 18:13 ) and finally, on his marriage with Michal, the king's second daughter, he was raised to the high office of captain of the king's body-guard, second only, if not equal, to Abner, the captain of the host, and Jonathan, the heir apparent. He had two faithful allies, however, in the court --the son of Saul, his friend Jonathan, and the daughter of Saul, his wife Michal. (1 Samuel 25:42,43 ) Finally comes the new of the battle of Gilboa and the death of Saul and Jonathan
Much - Jonathan, Saul's son, delighted much in David
Continually - ”...
Because of his covenant with Jonathan, David said to Mephibosheth: “… And you shall eat at my table regularly” ( Urim And Thummim - ]'>[6] God of Israel, why hast thou not answered thy servant this day? If the iniquity be in me or in my son Jonathan, J″ David - ...
David’s victory over Goliath had a twofold result; firstly, the heroic deed called forth the admiration, which soon became love, of the king’s son Jonathan; a covenant of friendship was made between the two, in token of which, and in ratification of which, Jonathan took off his apparel and armour and presented David with them. This friendship lasted till the death of Jonathan, and David’s pathetic lamentation over him (2 Samuel 1:25-27 ) points to the reality of their love. A further attempt to be rid of David is frustrated by Jonathan ( 1 Samuel 19:1-7 ), and at last Saul himself tries to kill him by throwing a javelin at him whilst playing on his harp; again he fails, for David nimbly avoids the javelin, and escapes to his own house. On Samuel’s advice, apparently, he goes to Jonathan by stealth to see if there is any possibility of a reconciliation with the king; Jonathan does his best, but in vain ( 1 Samuel 20:1-42 ), and David realizes that his life will be in danger so long as he is anywhere within reach of Saul or his emissaries. In the meantime the war between Israel and the Philistines ends disastrously for the former, and Saul and Jonathan are slain
Esdraelon - Saul and Jonathan died at the hands of the Philistines in the Valley of Jezreel (1Samuel 29:1,1 Samuel 29:11 ; 1 Samuel 31:1-7 )
Felix - 20:8, section 5, 6; Acts 21:88) and riots, but he once employed the zealot assassins (Sicarii) to murder the high priest Jonathan
Consume - ” David tells Jonathan that if Saul is very angry, “be sure that evil is determined by him” ( David - Jesse had a brother, Jonathan, whom David made one of his counselors (1 Chronicles 27:32). His brother Shimeah had two sons connected with his subsequent history, Jonadab, the subtle, bad, selfish adviser of incestuous Amnon (2 Samuel 13:3; 2 Samuel 13:32-33), and Jonathan who killed a giant of Gath (2 Samuel 21:21). The words (1 Samuel 18:1) "when David made an end of speaking unto Saul, the soul of Jonathan was knit unto the soul of David," imply a lengthened detail of all concerning his father and himself. Subsequently, he was captain of the king's bodyguard, next to Abner the captain of the host and Jonathan the heir apparent, and sat with the king at table daily (1 Samuel 20:25; 1 Samuel 22:14). " But God can raise up friends to His people in their enemy's house; and as Pharaoh's daughter saved Moses, so Saul's son Jonathan and daughter Michal saved David. After having promised in the living Jehovah's name David's safety to Jonathan, and after David had "slain the Philistines with a great slaughter" from which they did not recover until the battle in which Saul fell, Saul hurled his javelin at David with such force that it entered into the wall and then would have killed David in his own house, but that by Michal's help he escaped through a window. Jonathan, his bosom friend, he saw once again and never after. After taking affectionate leave of Jonathan, David fled to Nob, where the tabernacle was, in order to inquire God's will concerning his future course, as was David's custom
David - ...
The love of Jonathan and David is beautiful, but Jonathan could not protect David from the hatred of Saul, and David resorted to the priest, who gave him the hallowed bread. He was obliged to wander elsewhere, but Jonathan met him in a wood and encouraged him, assuring David that he knew he would surely be king; and there they made a covenant together: cf. Both Saul and Jonathan were slain in the contest that followed
Lot - Among the Jews lots were used with the expectation that God would so control them as to give a right direction to them, as in the choice of the apostle Matthias, Acts 1:26, and in the cases of Saul and Jonathan, and Jonah and his companions to determine who had offended God
Antiochus - Antiochus Theos, to strengthen himself in his new acquisition, sent letters to Jonathan Maccabaeus, high priest and prince of the Jews, confirming him in the high priesthood, and granting him four toparchies, or four considerable places, in Judea. He also received Jonathan into the number of his friends, sent him vessels of gold, permitted him to use a gold cup, to wear purple, and a golden buckle; and he gave his brother, Simon Maccabaeus, the command of all his troops on the coast of the Mediterranean, from Tyre to Egypt. Jonathan, engaged by so many favours, declared resolutely for Antiochus, or rather for Tryphon, who reigned under the name of this young prince; and on several occasions he attacked the generals of Demetrius, who still, possessed many places beyond Jordan and in Galilee, 1Ma_11:63 , &c; 1Ma_12:24 ; 1Ma_12:34 . He thought it necessary, in the first place, to secure Jonathan Maccabaeus, who was one of the most powerful supporters of Antiochus's throne. He came, therefore, with troops into Judea, invited Jonathan to Ptolemais, and there, on frivolous pretences, made him prisoner. However, Simon, Jonathan's brother, headed the troops of Judea, and opposed Tryphon, who. Tryphon, being disappointed, put Jonathan to death at Bassa or Bascama, and returned into Syria, where, without delay, he executed his design of killing Antiochus
Beauty - Though the Hebrews did not exalt the human form as did the ancient Greeks, some men are referred to as exceedingly handsome: David (1 Samuel 16:12 ), Absalom (2 Samuel 14:25 ), Daniel (Daniel 1:15 ), Joseph, Jonathan, and even Moses as a child (Exodus 1 )
Ishbosheth - ) Youngest of Saul's four sons, and his successor according to eastern usage, though Mephibosheth (whose name was similarly changed from Meribbaal), son of his oldest brother Jonathan, was alive
Judas - One of two captains who stood by Jonathan at Hazor ( 1Ma 11:70 )
Adonijah - Adonijah, at the tidings announced by Jonathan, Abiathar's son, fled for sanctuary, to the horns of the altar
Lydda - Re-occupied by the Jews after the Exile (Nehemiah 11:35), it was nevertheless governed by the Samaritans till the time of Jonathan Maccabaeus, when the Syrian king Demetrius II
Gedaliah - ...
Jeremiah, when given his choice by Nebuzaradan where he should dwell, attached himself to Gedaliah, who was joined also by a promiscuous multitude of "men, women, and children, and of the poor of the land"; also by Ishmael of the blood royal, Johanan and Jonathan, Seraiah, the sons of Ephai, Jezaniah, and their men; also by the Jews who had been driven to Moab, Ammon, and Edom, but who now with reassured confidence began to gather, as formerly, "wine and summer fruits
Zadok - At Absalom's revolt Zadok and the Levites bearing the ark accompanied David in leaving Jerusalem, but at his request returned with the ark and along with Hushai and Abiathar became David's medium of knowing events passing in the city, through Jonathan and Ahimaaz
Assassins - The first man who was slain by them was Jonathan the high priest, after whom many were stain every day, and the fear men were in of being so treated was more harassing than the calamity itself everybody expecting death every hour, as men do in war
Covenant - (Genesis 21:32) And in like manner, David and Jonathan
Claudius - Felix sent to Rome Eleazar, son of Dinaeus, captain of a band of robbers, who had committed great ravages in Palestine; he procured the death of Jonathan, the high priest, who sometimes freely represented to him his duty; he defeated a body of three thousand men, whom an Egyptian, a false prophet, had assembled upon the Mount of Olives
Solomon's Song - Jonathan Edwards says, "I found an inward sweetness that would carry me away in my contemplations
Ptolemais - There Simon routed the Syrian Greeks (1 Maccabees 5:15), and there Jonathan was treacherously captured by Trypho (1 Maccabees 12:45-48)
Good - 19:4, ṭôb describes the way Jonathan spoke about David: “And Jonathan spake good of David unto Saul his father, and said unto him, Let not the king sin against his servant, against David; because he hath not sinned against thee, and because his works have been [4] very good
David - At this time a close friendship began to develop between David and Saul’s son Jonathan. It lasted many years, and was ended only by Jonathan’s tragic death in battle (1 Samuel 18:1; see Jonathan)
Singing - Jonathan Edwards, observes, that "as it is the command of God that all should sing, so all should make conscience of learning to sing, as it is a thing that cannot be decently performed at all without learning
Rechab - to minister in the sanctuary before Jehovah so long as Israel's sanctuary and polity stand: so Levi (Deuteronomy 10:8; Deuteronomy 18:5-7; Genesis 18:22; Judges 20:28; Psalms 134:1; Jeremiah 15:19); so the targum of Jonathan translated "ministers before Me
Brotherly Love - Often the love relationship between people is in the context of covenant, as with David and Jonathan (1 Samuel 18:1-3 )
Ashdod - Judas Maccabeus destroyed altars and images in Ashdod (1 Maccabees 5:68 ), and Jonathan later burned the temple of Dagon, those who took refuge there, and ultimately the city itself (1 Maccabees 10:84-87 )
Girdle - Thus, to ratify the covenant which Jonathan made with David, and to express his cordial regard for his friend, among other things, he gave him his girdle
Joab - Jonathan gave over to David all that he possessed, and all that he ever expected to possess, and died a king. Had Jonathan been spared to be second to David this would never have happened. David would never have dared to send such a letter as that to Jonathan. But Jonathan was taken and Joab was left, and David had Joab for his tool to impress on our hearts the terrible portent of a bloodstained holiness
Mercy, Merciful - ...
Like racham, chesed describes a variety of human relationships: husband and wife ( Genesis 20:13 ), next-of-kin (Genesis 24:49 ), father and son (Genesis 47:29 ), host and guest (Rahab and the spies—Joshua 2:12-14 ), friends like David and Jonathan (1Samuel 20:8,1 Samuel 20:14-17 ), king and subjects (2 Samuel 2:5 ). Also like racham , it expresses itself in action: Rahab delivered the spies; Jonathan protected David from Saul. Thus, the spies promised protection for Rahab, and David pledged to protect the house of Jonathan
David - The deep-laid plots of the enraged king, who could not fail to observe that David "prospered exceedingly," all proved futile, and only endeared the young hero the more to the people, and very specially to Jonathan, Saul's son, between whom and David a life-long warm friendship was formed. Jonathan made a fruitless effort to bring his father to a better state of mind toward David (1 Samuel 20 ), who, being made aware of the fact, saw no hope of safety but in flight to a distance. While encamped there, in the forest in the district of Ziph, he was visited by Jonathan, who spoke to him words of encouragement (23:16-18). David composed a beautiful elegy, the most beautiful of all extant Hebrew odes, a "lamentation over Saul and over Jonathan his son" (2 Samuel 2:1-42 ). It bore the title of "The Bow," and was to be taught to the children, that the memory of Saul and Jonathan might be preserved among them
Micah, Micaiah - But a Levite, named Jonathan, comes to the house of Micah while journeying; Micah induces him to be his priest instead of the son whom he had first consecrated
Burial - David mourned for the deaths of Saul and Jonathan (Deuteronomy 14:1 ), and Jeremiah lamented the death of Josiah (2 Chronicles 35:25 )
Gaza - The last clause can scarcely be correct, for Gaza was a strong city in the time of Jonathan the Maccabee (1 Maccabees 11:61 f
Manasseh - Father of Gershom, the father of Jonathan, the idolatrous priest in the tribe of Dan
Go Away, Leave - ” The first biblical occurrence of gâlâh carries this nuance: “And the children of Dan set up the graven image: and Jonathan … and his sons were priests to the tribe of Dan until the day of the captivity of the land” ( Friend - is taken for one whom we love and esteem above others, to whom we impart our minds more familiarly than to others, and that from a confidence of his integrity and good will toward us: thus Jonathan and David were mutually friends
Samuel, First Book of - Jonathan, Saul's son, was a man of faith: he had previously attacked the Philistines, and now, with his armour-bearer only, began again to smite them. Jonathan, who had not heard of this, tasted a little honey. He raised an altar unto God, and then enquired of God, and would have put Jonathan to death for eating the honey had not the people prevented it. ...
Jonathan's heart was knit to David, and he endeavoured to divert his father from his murderous intentions
Friend, Friendship - The friendship of David and Jonathan (1 Samuel 18:1-4 ; 20:14-17 ) has all three components, as does the friendship between Paul and the Philippian church (see, e. ...
One of the greatest biblical examples of the "friend who sticks closer than a brother" is the relationship between David and Jonathan. Jonathan's loyalty to David runs deeper than his loyalty to his father Saul or his own ambitions (1 Samuel 18:1-4 ; 20:14-17 ). The dirge David sings when he hears of Jonathan's death marks their relationship as a high point of human friendship (2 Samuel 1:17-27 )
Poetry - ...
David's lament over Jonathan is a beautiful specimen of another feature of Hebrew poetry, the strophe; three strophes being marked by the thrice recurrence of the dirge, sung by the chorus; the first dirge sung by the whole body of singers representing Israel; the second by a chorus of damsels; the third by a chorus of youths (2 Samuel 1:17; 2 Samuel 1:27). Hence several odes of the highest order are not included: Moses' songs (Exodus 15; 30), Deborah's (Judges 5), Hannah's (1 Samuel 2), Hezekiah's (Isaiah 38:9-20), Habakkuk's (Habakkuk 3), and even David's dirge over Saul and Jonathan
Naphtali - " The targums of Pseudo-Jonathan and Jerusalem say Naphtali first told Jacob Joseph was alive
Saul, King of Israel - The song also honoured Saul’s son Jonathan, who died in the same battle (1618419047_4)
Prepare - 20:31 Saul tells Jonathan: “For as long as the son of Jesse liveth upon the ground, thou shalt not be established, nor thy kingdom
Mesrobes - , Moses Taronensis, Kioud of Arabeza, afterwards patriarch, Mamprus lector, Jonathan, Khatchig, Joseph of Baghin, Eznig, Knith bp
Court Systems - Saul's death sentences on Jonathan (1 Samuel 14:39 ) and the priests at Nob (1 Samuel 22:6-23 ) were not accepted by the people. Jonathan was not punished, and the priests were finally killed by a non-Israelite
Bethlehem - The Levite Jonathan, son of Gershom, who became the Danites' priest at their northern settlement, and the Levite's concubine whose cruel death at Gibeah caused the destruction of Benjamin, came from Bethlehem (Judges 17:7; Judges 18:30; Judges 19:9
Gibeon - " David afterwards removed the bones of Saul and Jonathan at Jabeshgilead (21:12,13)
New Testament - ) Acts 9:26-28 ; (Galatians 1:18 )...
37 Caius (Caligula) emperor of Rome; reigns 4 years...
Herod Agrippa succeeds Herod Antipas...
Caiaphas deposed, and Jonathan made high priest...
38 Paul, at Damascus and in Arabia
Redeem - 14:45 indicates that money is not intrinsic in the word; Saul is determined to execute Jonathan for his involuntary transgression, but “… the people rescued Jonathan, that he died not
Judah - The "lion," the king of beasts, is Jacob's image for Judah; afterward it was his standard, with the motto "Rise up, Lord, let Thine enemies be scattered" (Targum in Pseudo Jonathan). " Spiritually the targums of Jerusalem and Pseudo Jonathan refer this also to Messiah
Covenant - Jonathan and David cut a covenant of friendship in which Jonathan acknowledged David's right to the throne (1 Samuel 18:3 ; 1 Samuel 23:18 ). At the time Jonathan possessed greater authority than David, but in the covenant he acknowledged David's coming authority over him
House - 20:16: “So Jonathan made a covenant with the house of David
Ishmael - A son of Azel, a descendant of Saul through Jonathan ( 1 Chronicles 8:38 ; 1 Chronicles 9:44 )
Zechariah - A priest, son of Jonathan, blew the trumpet at the dedication of the city wall (Nehemiah 12:35; Nehemiah 12:41)
Zechari'ah - ...
One of the priests, son of Jonathan, who blew with the trumpets at the dedication of the city wall by Ezra and Nehemiah
Benjamin - Moreover Ehud, judge and deliverer of Israel from Eglon of Moab, was of Benjamin; also Saul and Jonathan, whose prowess was famed (2 Samuel 1:18-19; 2 Samuel 1:23). Down them they were driven again by Saul and Jonathan
David - David is now established in the king's favor: he is specially beloved by Jonathan; he is set over the men of war, 1 Samuel 18:5, perhaps made captain of the body-guard, and employed in various services the rest of the campaign; by which his popularity was increased. Convinced by an interview with Jonathan that Saul's enmity was no mere transient passion, 1 Samuel 20:1-42, David went to Nob, where his duplicity cost the high priest his life, and thence to Achish, king of Gath, where, to escape the jealousy of the Philistines, he simulated madness
Jewish Parties in the New Testament - The earliest reference to them is dated in the time of Jonathan (160-143 B
Bread - 20:27, lechem represents an entire meal: “… Saul said unto Jonathan his son, Wherefore cometh not the son of Jesse to meat, neither yesterday, nor today?” Thus, “to make bread” may actually mean “to prepare a meal”: “A feast is made for laughter, and wine maketh merry …” ( Samuel, Second Book of - He then graciously showed kindness to the house of Saul in the person of Mephibosheth, son of Jonathan: though lame on both his feet, he sat continually at the king's table
Save - 14:45 yeshû‛âh is used of a human act: “And the people said unto Saul, Shall Jonathan die, who hath wrought this great salvation in Israel?” The word is used infrequently of deliverance and/or help effected by things ( Covenant - …” David and Jonathan made a “covenant” of mutual protection that would be binding on David’s descendants forever ( Ahithophel - Ahithophel may not have been exactly a Jonathan, and yet he may have been a very dear and well-deserving friend for all that. David and Ahithophel were such close companions, indeed, that had it not been for Jonathan, the proverb might have run thus-David and Ahithophel: so was the soul of David knit to the soul of Ahithophel. Jonathan strengthened David's hand in God, it is true; but this out of David and about Ahithophel is almost as good
Arms And Armor - Jonathan and Jehu were individual marksmen. Twice the disturbed Saul hurled his javelin at David (1 Samuel 18:10-11 ; 1 Samuel 19:9-10 ) and even once at his own son Jonathan (1 Samuel 20:33 )
Kiss - Jonathan with David, 1 Samuel 20:41 and numberless other instances of the like nature
Shekinah - Here the same verb (ἐπισκιάζω) is used as in the LXX Septuagint of Exodus 40:34-35 of the cloud which rested on the Tabernacle when it was filled with the ‘glory of the Lord,’ which in the Targum (pseudo-Jonathan) becomes the ‘glory of the Shekinah of the Lord
Melchizedek - ]'>[2] Jonathan), and the narrative was taken to mean that the priesthood was transferred to Abraham, while the rest of the descendants of Shem were excluded
Samuel, the Books of - The only book quoted is the Book of Jasher ("the upright", namely, "nation"), 2 Samuel 1:18, the bow song or elegy over Saul and Jonathan; once elsewhere (Joshua 10:13)
Urim And Thummim - "But was this sacred lot used likewise in criminal trials?" Yes, says Michaelis, only to discover the guilty, to convict them; for in the only two instances of its use in such cases which occur in the whole Bible, namely, in Joshua 7:14-18 , 1 Samuel 14:37-45 , we find the confessions of the two delinquents, Achan and Jonathan, annexed
Philistines - ...
When Saul became king the Philistines tried to break his power, but were defeated through the bravery of Jonathan (1 Samuel 13:1-23 ; 1 Samuel 14:1-52 )
Versions - Those extant are the Targum of Onkelos (or AQUILA, Smith's Bible Dictionary) on the Pentateuch (so named not because written by Aquila but because in Aramaic it did what Aquila aimed at in his Greek version, namely, to counteract the arbitrary corruptions of the Septuagint and to produce a translation scrupulously literal, for the benefit of those not knowing the original language); the Targum of Jonathan ben Uzziel on the first and last prophets, more probably of Rabbi Joseph the blind, in the middle of the fourth century, full of invectives against Rome (Isaiah 34:9 mentioning Armillus (Antichrist), Isaiah 10:4; Germany, Ezekiel 38:6); also his targum on the Pentateuch; the Targum of Jerusalem on parts of the Pentateuch. ...
The Targum of Jonathan ben Uzziel and the Targum of Jerusalem are twin brothers, really but one work; these were written in Palestine much later and less accurately than that of Onkelos, which belongs to the Babylonian school; Jonathan ben Uzziel, in the fourth century, cannot have been the author, for this targum speaks of Constantinople (Numbers 24:19-24), the Turks (Genesis 10:2), and even Mahomet's two wives (Genesis 21:21)
Version - ...
The targum of Jonathan ben Uzziel comes next to that of Onkelos in respect of age and value
Micah - (See Jonathan
Book(s) - ...
The Book of Jashar (or Upright) A book quoted twice in the Old Testament: Joshua's poetic address to the sun and the moon (Joshua 10:12-13 ) and David's lament for Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:17-27 )
Jehu - Soon after this, he met with Jonathan, the son of Rechab; and taking him up into his chariot, "Come with me," said he, "and see my zeal for the Lord
Jews - Antiochus IV (Epiphanes), King of Syria, made a violent attempt to hellenize the Jews; but a priest of Modin named Mattathias, and his sons, Judas Machabeus, Jonathan, and Simon, carried on a long and successful struggle against the armies of Syria, and at length, in 143 BC, gained complete independence for Judea
Sanhedrim - Basnage places it under Judas Maccabaeus and his brother Jonathan
Deliver - ” A couple of exceptions are when Jonathan brought respite to the Israelites from the Philistine pressure ( Paul as a Pastor - " Evangelical humility, as Jonathan Edwards so splendidly treats it, lay deep down like a foundation-stone under all Paul's attainments as a saint of God and as an apostle of Jesus Christ. " There are few things in ministerial history that makes my heart bleed like the tragedy of Jonathan Edwards' breach with his congregation, and then his banishment from his congregation
Abba (2) - ]'>[1] of Onkelos and pseudo-Jonathan; see Dalman, Aramaisch-Neuhebräisches Wörterbuch, s
Armour, Arms - ...
The armourbearer is met with as early as the time of Abimelech ( Judges 9:54 ), and later in connexion with Jonathan, Saul, and Goliath, and with Joab, who had several ( 2 Samuel 18:15 )
Philistia - (See Jonathan; DAVID; ISRAEL; MICHMASH
Samaria - But Alexander Balas, king of Syria, restored to Jonathan Maccabaeus the cities of Lydda, Ephrem, and Ramatha, which he cut off from the country of Samaria, 1Ma_10:30 ; 1Ma_10:38 ; 1Ma_11:28 ; 1Ma_11:34
Eagle - ...
In the affecting lamentation of David over Saul and Jonathan, their impetuous and rapid career is described in forcible terms: "They were swifter than eagles; they were stronger than lions," 2 Samuel 1:23
Lamentations - David's lament over Jonathan and Saul, also that over Abner, are the earliest specimens of sacred elegy (2 Samuel 1:17-27; 2 Samuel 3:33-34)
Sadducees (2) - To solve the difficulty, Kuenen and Montet postulate a Zadok, ‘perhaps a contemporary of Jonathan the Asmonaean’ (Kuenen, l
Corner-Stone - 384; Jonathan Edwards, Works [3], ii
Habits - The clothes of those Philistines whom Samson slew at Askelon required no altering to fit his companions; nor the robe of Jonathan, to answer his friend
High Priest - Alexander Balas, a contender for the Seleucid throne, appointed Jonathan Maccabee “high priest” and “king's friend” (1 Maccabees 10:20 )
Hopkinsians - an American divine, who in his sermons and tracts has made several additions to the sentiments first advanced by the celebrated Jonathan Edwards, late president of New-Jersey College. Jonathan's righteousness was imputed to Mephibosheth when David showed kindness to him for his father Jonathan's sake
King - Although Saul was chosen by the people and David invited by the elders of Judah to be king, yet Saul himself regarded it as the natural thing that Jonathan should succeed him ( 1 Samuel 20:30 ff
Philistim - Tryphon, regent of the kingdom of Syria, gave to Jonathan, the Asmonean, the government of the whole coast of the Mediterranean, from Tyre to Egypt; consequently, all the country of the Philistines
Arms - There is express mention of this military girdle, where it is recorded that Jonathan, to assure David of his entire love and friendship by some visible pledges, stripped himself not only of his usual garments, but of his military habiliments, his sword, bow, and girdle, and gave them to David
Old Testament - [2] In the (translations of Aquila and the other Greek interpreters, the fragments of whose works remain to us in the Hexapla, we have evidence of the existence of a text differing but little from our own; so also (in the Targums of Onkelos and Jonathan
Name, Names - Abbreviations of both these classes are fairly common: Abi , for Abijah ; Palti , for Paltiel; Nathan , for Jonathan or Nathanael , etc
the Angel of the Church in Thyatira - We have never had deeper-wading preachers than Jonathan Edwards and Thomas Boston, and never since the garden of Eden has there been two ministers happier at home than they were
Prophets - " Our translators elsewhere retain the same Hebrew word, as supposing it to be the proper name of a place, "Jonathan smote the garrison of the Philistines that was in Geba," 1 Samuel 13:3
Bible - , in its present form is the Jerusalem Targum, known as the Targum of pseudo-Jonathan. The official Targum of the Prophets also bears the name of Jonathan
John - Relative of Annas, the high priest (Acts 4:6 ), unless manuscripts reading Jonathan are right
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - " Jonathan Edwards has now made this borrowed phrase famous in some of the golden pages of his Religious Affections
Ishmael - Ishmael as well as the brothers Johanan and Jonathan, sons of Kareah, had commanded separate bands which watched the issue of the siege from the S
Chronicles, the Books of - At 1 Chronicles 9:35 begins Saul's genealogy, taken from the tables drawn up in Hezekiah's reign (for 14 generations from Jonathan to Azel correspond to the 14 from David to Hezekiah); then the history of (mainly) Judah's kings follows, and of the events down to the end of the book of Ezra, which suit the patriotic purpose of the compiler
Greece - References to Athenians and Spartans occur in 1 Maccabees 12-14, 2 Maccabees 6:1; 2 Maccabees 9:15; a long list of Greek cities is found in 1 Maccabees 15:23; and, according to 1 Maccabees 12:6, Jonathan the Hasmonaean greeted the Spartans as brethren and sought an alliance with them against Syria
Jephthah - His own son, Jonathan, inadvertently ate a honey comb, not knowing of his father's oath, for which Saul sentenced him to die. No father, merely by his own authority, could put an offending, much less an innocent, child to death, upon any account, without the sentence of the magistrates, Deuteronomy 21:18-21 , and the consent of the people, as in Jonathan's case
mo'Ses - The immediate pedigree of Moses is as follows: Levi was the father of: Gershon -- Kohath -- Merari Kohath was the father of: Amram = Jochebed Amram = Jochebed was the father of: Hur = Miriam -- Aaron = Elisheba -- Moses = Zipporah Aaron = Elisheba was the father of: Nadab -- Abihu -- Eleazar -- Ithamar Eleazar was the father of: Phineas Moses = Zipporah was the father of: Gershom -- Eliezer Gershom was the father of: Jonathan The history of Moses naturally divides itself into three periods of 40 years each
Text, Versions, And Languages of ot - Far more paraphrastic is the Targum of the Pentateuch known as the Targum of Jonathan , or the Jerusalem Targum . The chief Targum of the Prophets is that known as the Targum of Jonathan ben Uzziel : it is not much younger than the Targum of Onkelos, and is by some considered to be even earlier
Jews - Mattathias, the priest, with his sons, chiefly Judas, Jonathan, and Simon, who were called Maccabees, bravely fought for their religion and liberties. After his death, Jonathan and Simon, his brethren, successively succeeded him; and both wisely and bravely promoted the welfare of the church and state
Lots - ; (b) the reverent manipulation of sacred things through which the deity had indicated his pleasure to make known his will, a good example of which is the use by the Hebrew priests of ‘the Urim and the Thummim’; (c) the selecting of a method by which the deity was perfectly free to express his will without human interference, a good example of which is seen in the action of Jonathan (1 Samuel 14:9-13)
Star (2) - ]'>[9] a description which is based, apparently, on Numbers 24:17 :...
‘There shall come forth a star out of Jacob,...
And a sceptre shall rise out of Israel’;...
In the Targum Onkelos this is rendered:...
‘When a king shall arise out of Jacob,...
And the Messiah shall be anointed from Israel’;...
And in pseudo-Jonathan:...
‘When the mighty King of Jacob’s House shall reign,...
And the Messiah, the Power sceptre of Israel, shall be anointed
Apocrypha - Much detail is given about the careers of Judas and Jonathan
Barzillai - From within the walls of his lofty keep in far-off Gilead, Barzillai had watched the ways of God with His people Israel in the south country all through the days of Eli, and Samuel, and Saul, and David, and Joah, and Jonathan, and Mephibosheth, and Absalom, and his humble heart and his hospitable house had always been open to the oppressed, and to the persecuted, and to the poor
Simon Maccabaeus - surnamed Thossi, son of Mattathias, and brother of Judas and Jonathan
Parables - Jonathan Swift's Guilliver's Travels is an allegory as is John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress
Jews - Judas Maccabaeus was slain in battle, and his brother Jonathan succeeded him in the government. The most ancient are that of Onkelos on the law, and that of Jonathan Ben Uzziel on the prophets: the former is supposed to be of greater antiquity than the latter, and it approaches, in simplicity and purity of style, to the Chaldee of Daniel and Ezra
Baptism - The Targum of Jonathan on Exodus 12:44 is the earliest authority for the common notion that the Jews baptized male (besides circumcising them) and female proselytes
Shimei - But after he has said all that it is possible to say upon it, he exclaims, Oh! what a deep is here, that created wit cannot take up! Jonathan Edwards takes it up with all his matchless wit in his fine letter to Thomas Gillespie of Carnock, and elsewhere in his golden works
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - "It has often appeared to me," says Jonathan Edwards, "that if God were to mark my heart-iniquity my bed would be in hell
Paul's Great Heaviness And Continual Sorrow of Heart - Well, here are some examples of the uses that Jonathan Edwards makes of nature also
Agony - ; Jonathan Edwards, Works, ii
Jeroboam - , consecrated by the Danites' image worship, at which Moses' descendant (See Jonathan officiated; so that no part of his kingdom was beyond easy reach of one or other of the two sanctuaries
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Emotions that might be limited by the restriction of prose, expressed themselves through the poetry of music as seen in David's moving lament at the death of Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:19-27 )
Gratianus, Emperor - Ambrose alludes to his prowess in the chase adopting the language of David's elegy over Jonathan—"Gratiani sagitta non est reversa retro" (de Obitu Valent
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - Agabus of Jerusalem came to Jonathan Edwards's grave and godly wife in Northampton in the shape of a young preacher
Dress - ) of Jonathan ( 1 Samuel 18:4 ), and of Ezra ( Ezra 9:3 ; Ezra 9:5 ), the little ‘coat’ of the boy-priest Samuel ( 1 Samuel 2:19 ), and his ‘mantle’ at a later stage ( 1 Samuel 15:27 )
Poetry - The finest example is that of David over Saul and Jonathan ( 2 Samuel 1:17 ff
Lots - ; (b) the reverent manipulation of sacred things through which the deity had indicated his pleasure to make known his will, a good example of which is the use by the Hebrew priests of ‘the Urim and the Thummim’; (c) the selecting of a method by which the deity was perfectly free to express his will without human interference, a good example of which is seen in the action of Jonathan (1 Samuel 14:9-13)
Calvinists - ...
See Calvin's Institutes; Life of Calvin; Brine's Tracts; Jonathan Edwards' Works; Gill's Cause of God and Truth; Toplady's Historic Proof and Works at large; Assembly's Catechism; Fuller's Calvinistic and Socinian Systems compared
Canaan, History And Religion of - Jonathan had a son, Merib-baal (1 Chronicles 8:34 )
War, Holy War - Jonathan and his armor bearer spontaneously attacked and routed a seemingly impregnable Philistine garrison in this way (1 Samuel 14:1-23 )
Language of Christ - The two principal Targums are (1) that on the Pentateuch, known as the Targum of Onkelos, which is characterized by its almost slavish literalism; and (2) that of Jonathan ben-Uzziel on the Prophets, i
Solomon - I can imagine many open-minded young men here, and many open-minded old men like Jonathan Edwards, who will go back to the prophetic precomposition and the prophetic reproduction of this great prayer with thankfulness to God for the splendid service that Christian scholarship is doing to Holy Scriptures, and not least to Solomon's psalms and songs and prayers and proverbs in our open-eyed, believing, and truly reverential day
David - in His Races - If any one has the steadiness of eye and the strength of head, and the spiritual ambition and enterprise, to penetrate into this region of things, he will find a field rich in these and in many suchlike spiritual blessings in Jonathan Edwards's Religious Affections
Alpha And Omega (2) - ]'>[5] Jonathan on Deuteronomy 3:29 (‘ego ille est, qui est, et qui fuit, et qui erit’)
Poetry of the Hebrews - Of elegiac poetry, many very beautiful specimens occur in Scripture; such as the lamentation of David over his friend Jonathan; several passages in the prophetical books; and several of David's Psalms, composed on occasions of distress and mourning
Leprosy - Jonathan Hutchinson, F
Old Testament - So do the targums of Onkelos and Jonathan
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - It was employed to discover the wrongdoer in the cases of Achan ( Joshua 7:14 ) and Jonathan ( 1 Samuel 14:41-42 )
High Priest - His successors were Joiakim, Eliashib, Joiada, Johanan (Jonathan), and Jaddua
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - " His love to Origen was like that of Jonathan for David
Father, Fatherhood - ...
As in the Greek translation of the OT, so in the Targums of Onkelos and Jonathan (1st cent
Sin - 20:1: “And David … said before Jonathan, what have I done? what is mine iniquity [14]? and what is my sin [15] before thy father, that he seeketh my life?” (cf
Priests And Levites - But the robe is also the common name for the upper garment, and is used of that worn by Jonathan and Saul ( 1 Samuel 18:4 ; 1 Samuel 24:4 )
Jeremiah - Then the princes smote and imprisoned him in the house of Jonathan the scribe. After many days in the dungeon Zedekiah the king took him out, and inquired secretly (compare John 3:2; John 5:44; John 12:43; John 19:38), "is there any word from Jehovah?" Jeremiah without regard to his earthly interests (contrast Jeremiah 6:14; Isaiah 30:10; Ezekiel 13:10) foretold Zedekiah's being delivered up to Nebuchadnezzar, and begged not to be left to "die" in Jonathan's house
Money - ’ The title of ‘king’ first appears on bronze coins of Alexander Jannæus ‘Jonathan the king’ who also first introduced a Greek, in addition to a Hebrew, legend
Moses - ) By Zipporah, Reuel's daughter, he had two sons: Gershom, father of Jonathan, and Eliezer (1 Chronicles 23:14-15); these took no prominent place in their tribe
Terah - ...
Jonathan Edwards, one of the purest and princeliest souls that ever were made perfect through suffering, has told all that fear God what God did for his soul
Psalms - ...
(1) such as is directly religious is included in the psalter, therefore not David's dirge over Saul and Jonathan (2 Samuel 1:17-27)
Book - And there can be no doubt that David's elegy upon Saul and Jonathan, 2 Samuel 1:18 , is called קשת or the bow, in conformity with this peculiarity of taste
Covenant - A friendship bond was sealed by oath between David and Jonathan (1 Samuel 20:3,16-17 )
Bible - About fifty years before the time of Christ were written the Targums of Onkelos on the Pentateuch, and of Jonathan Ben-Uzziel on the Prophets; (according to the Jewish classification of the books of the Old Testament;) which are evidence of the genuineness of those books at that time