What does Joab mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יוֹאָ֔ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 27
יוֹאָב֙ son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 21
יוֹאָ֗ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 15
יוֹאָ֖ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 11
יוֹאָ֛ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 9
יוֹאָ֑ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 7
יוֹאָֽב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 6
יוֹאָ֣ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 6
יוֹאָ֥ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 5
יוֹאָ֜ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 5
וְיוֹאָב֙ son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 3
וְיוֹאָ֥ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 3
יוֹאָב֩ son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 2
יוֹאָ֨ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 2
וְיוֹאָ֕ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 2
וְיוֹאָ֛ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 2
יוֹאָ֡ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 2
לְיוֹאָ֑ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 2
וְיוֹאָ֞ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
לְיוֹאָב֙ son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
יוֹאָ֣ב ׀ son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
؟ יוֹאָ֖ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
בְּיוֹאָ֛ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
אֶלְחָנָ֥ן Jair’s son who fought the Gittites. 1
וּלְיֹאָ֖ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
וְיוֹאָ֗ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
וְיוֹאָ֨ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
לְיוֹאָ֖ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
י֠וֹאָב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
יוֹאָ֤ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
וּלְיוֹאָ֖ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
וְיוֹאָ֖ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1
וְיוֹאָ֑ב son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army. 1

Definitions Related to Joab

H3097


   1 son of David’s sister Zeruiah and general of David’s army.
   2 a Judaite descendant of Kenaz.
   3 a post exilic family.
   Additional Information: Joab = “Jehovah is father”.
   

H5854


   1 the house of Joab, a place in Judah.
   Additional Information: Ataroth = “the crowns of”.
   

H445


   1 Jair’s son who fought the Gittites.
   2 Dodo’s son who was a chief of David.
   Additional Information: Elhanan = “God has been gracious”.
   

Frequency of Joab (original languages)

Frequency of Joab (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Joab
Jehovah is his father.
One of the three sons of Zeruiah, David's sister, and "captain of the host" during the whole of David's reign (2 Samuel 2:13 ; 10:7 ; 11:1 ; 1 Kings 11:15 ). His father's name is nowhere mentioned, although his sepulchre at Bethlehem is mentioned (2 Samuel 2:32 ). His two brothers were Abishai and Asahel, the swift of foot, who was killed by Abner (2 Samuel 2:13-32 ), whom Joab afterwards treacherously murdered (3:22-27). He afterwards led the assault at the storming of the fortress on Mount Zion, and for this service was raised to the rank of "prince of the king's army" (2 Samuel 5:6-10 ; 1 Chronicles 27:34 ). His chief military achievements were, (1) against the allied forces of Syria and Ammon; (2) against Edom (1 Kings 11:15,16 ); and (3) against the Ammonites (2 Samuel 10:7-19 ; 11:1,11 ). His character is deeply stained by the part he willingly took in the murder of Uriah (11:14-25). He acted apparently from a sense of duty in putting Absalom to death (18:1-14). David was unmindful of the many services Joab had rendered to him, and afterwards gave the command of the army to Amasa, Joab's cousin (2 Samuel 20:1-13 ; 19:13 ). When David was dying Joab espoused the cause of Adonijah in preference to that of Solomon. He was afterwards slain by Benaiah, by the command of Solomon, in accordance with his father's injunction (2 Samuel 3:29 ; 20:5-13 ), at the altar to which he had fled for refuge. Thus this hoary conspirator died without one to lift up a voice in his favour. He was buried in his own property in the "wilderness," probably in the north-east of Jerusalem (1 Kings 2:5,28-34 ). Benaiah succeeded him as commander-in-chief of the army.
1 Chronicles 4:14 .
Ezra 2:6 .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Joab
(joh' ab) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh is father.” Military commander during most of David's reign. He was the oldest son of Zeruiah, the sister of David (2 Samuel 2:13 ; 1 Chronicles 2:16 ). He was loyal to David and ruthless in achieving his objectives. After Saul's death, David was negotiating with Abner, Saul's military commander. Joab, whose brother had been slain in battle by Abner, deceived Abner and murdered him. David publicly lamented this assassination (2 Samuel 2-3 ). Joab's exploits in the capture of Jerusalem led David to name him commander (1 Chronicles 11:4-8 ). Joab successfully led David's armies against the Ammonites (2 Samuel 10:1 ). During this campaign David sent his infamous order to have Uriah, the husband of Bathsheba, killed (2 Samuel 11:1 ).
Joab was instrumental in the reconciliation of David and Absalom (2 Samuel 14:1 ). When Absalom led a rebellion, Joab remained loyal to David. Joab killed Absalom against the clear orders of David (2 Samuel 18:14 ). He also convinced David to end his obsessive grieving for Absalom (2 Samuel 19:4-8 ). Joab murdered Amasa, whom David had named commander (2 Samuel 20:10 ). He opposed David's plan for a census, but carried it out when ordered to do so (2 Samuel 24:1-9 ).
When David was dying, Joab supported Adonijah's claim to the throne (1 Kings 1:1 ). David named Solomon king and told him to avenge Abner and Amasa by killing Joab. Although Joab fled to the tabernacle for sanctuary, Solomon ordered Benaiah to kill Joab (1 Kings 2:1 ).
Robert J. Dean
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Joab
Joab (jô'ab), whose father is Jehovah. 1. The son of Zeruiah, and nephew of David, and commander-in-chief of his army. He was an accomplished warrior, but a most unscrupulous man. 1 Chronicles 2:16; 1 Chronicles 11:6. He treacherously assassinated Abner. 2 Samuel 2:23; 2 Samuel 3:27. When Absalom rebelled Joab adhered to David; and contrary to express orders he put Absalom to death. 2 Samuel 18:14. David then made Amasa general of his army, but Joab was so offended that he also assassinated Amasa, as he had done Abner. 2 Samuel 20:10. Joab combined in the plot to set Adonijah on the throne, in defiance of the will of David, who had, by divine direction, resolved to make Solomon king. 1 Kings 2:28. After the death of David, Joab was slain at the altar, whither he had fled for protection; and was buried in his own domain in the wilderness. 2 Kings 2:5-25. 2. A descendant of Judah. 1 Chronicles 4:14. 3. One whose posterity returned from exile. Ezra 2:6; Ezra 8:9; Nehemiah 7:11.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Atroth-Beth-Joab
ATROTH-BETH-JOAB . See Ataroth, No. 4.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Joab
JOAB (‘Jahweh is father’). 1. One of the sons of Zeruiah the eldest according to 2 Samuel 2:18 , the second according to 1 Chronicles 2:16 and thus the nephew of David. It is perhaps not too much to say that, humanly speaking, the Davidic dynasty would not have been established had it not been for the military genius and the loyalty of Joab. So consistently loyal was Joab to the royal house (see Adonijah), that one is tempted to question whether the passage, 1 Kings 2:5-6 , which describes David’s ingratitude, is genuine; certain it is that if David really felt with regard to Abner and Amasa as he is described as feeling in this passage, it is surprising that he should have left to the wisdom of Solomon the duty of inflicting the punishment due; Joab’s death would seem to have been due rather to his loyalty in supporting David’s rightful heir, Adonijah.
Above all, Joab was a skilled general ; this is seen by the number of victories he gained, namely, over the army of Ishbosheth under the leadership of Abner ( 2 Samuel 2:12-32 ); over the Jebusites ( 1 Chronicles 11:6-9 ); over the Syrians and Ammonites ( 2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 2 Samuel 11:1 ; 2 Samuel 12:26-29 ); over Absalom ( 2 Samuel 18:5-17 ); over Sheba ( 2 Samuel 20:4-22 ). These are specifically mentioned, but there must have been very many more, for those which are spoken of generally as David’s victories were in all probability due to Joab, who is repeatedly spoken of as David’s commander-in-chief ( e.g. 2 Samuel 8:16 ; 2 Samuel 20:22 etc.).
Secondly, his loyalty to the house of David is Illustrated by his whole life of devoted service, and especially by such conspicuous instances as his desire to make his victory over the Ammonites appear to have been gained by David ( 2 Samuel 12:20 ff.); his slaying of Abner [1]; the reconciliation which he brought about between David and Absalom ( 2 Samuel 14:1 ff.); his slaying of Absalom when he realized his treachery to David ( 2 Samuel 18:14 ff., 2 Samuel 19:6 ); his words to David in 2 Samuel 19:5-7 one of the most striking instances of his attachment; and lastly, his championship of the rightful heir to the throne, which cost him his life ( 1 Kings 1:7 ; 1 Kings 2:34 ). How close was the tie between David and Joab may be seen, further, in the blind obedience of the latter, who was willing to be partaker in David’s sin ( 2 Samuel 11:6-26 ).
The darker side of Joab’s character is to be seen in his vindictiveness and ruthless cruelty ; for although it is only fair to plead the spirit of the age, the exigencies of the State’s weal, and the demand of blood-revenge, yet the treacherous and bloodthirsty acts of which Joab was guilty constitute a dark blot upon his character (see 2 Samuel 3:22-27 , 1 Kings 11:16 ; cf. 2 Samuel 18:14 ; 2 Samuel 20:9-10 .).
2. Son of Seralah ( 1 Chronicles 4:14 ; cf. Nehemiah 11:35 ), 3 . A family which returned with Zerubbabel ( Ezra 2:6 = Nehemiah 7:11 = Esther 5:11 Esther 5:11 ; cf. Ezra 8:9 = 1Es 8:35 ).
W. O. E.Oesterley.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Joab
Paternity; voluntary
Chabad Knowledge Base - Joab ben zeruiah
(9th century BCE) Nephew of King David and general of his armies, brother of warriors Abishai, and Asahel. Helped David secure his kingship, and loyally served him for the duration of his reign, leading the troops into battle time and again; fighting foreign enemies as well as quashing internal revolts. Nevertheless, he was over-zealous at times. Before his passing, David instructed Solomon to kill Joab to avenge the blood of two innocent generals � Abner and Amasa � whom Joab slew.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Joab
One of the captains in David's army. His name is expressive of genealogy—from Ab, a father. His history begins 2 Samuel 2:1-32 and runs through the greater part of the life of David
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Joab
AND DAVID SAID, I AM WEAK THIS DAY THOUGH ANOINTED KING
JOAB, the son of David's sister, was a man of the very foremost ability. Had it not been for David, Joab would have climbed up into the throne of Israel. As it was, he stood on the steps of the throne and faced the king all his days. Notwithstanding their family relationship, David and Joab were much of an age, and that, no doubt, helps to account for a good deal that went on between the uncle and the nephew Joab was a stern, haughty, imperious, revengeful man. His only virtue was a certain proud, patronising loyalty to his king. Joab's ambition might surely have been satisfied, for he was in more respects than one the most privileged man in the land. Even the king himself was afraid of his commander-in-chief. The sovereign took his orders meekly from his subject. After his own contemptuous way, Joab was always true to David. That is to say, he made short work with any one else who was false to David. And he performed some splendid services both as a soldier and a statesman in the extension and consolidation of David's kingdom. In his own well-read and picturesque way, Dean Stanley describes Joab very aptly as the Marlborough of the empire of Israel.
Over-ambition, to put it all in one word, was Joab's besetting sin; over-vaulting ambition. But what more would Joab have had? you may well ask. Only, do not ask that any more about Joab, or about any other ambitious and self-seeking man. Look into your own heart and answer. If you look well into your own heart, you will see there that as long as any one else has anything at all of his own, it does not matter how much you have. Joab was king in all but the crown. King, and more. But as long as his weaker uncle wore the crown, Joab's heart raged like hell. Jonathan gave over to David all that he possessed, and all that he ever expected to possess, and died a king. Joab envied David and every one else all that they had, and died an outcast. Pride, jealousy, malignity, revenge, assassination, with now and then a gleam of satanic loyalty lighting up his terrible heart-such is the son of Zeruiah. The land trembles as Joab rises on the stepping-stones of murdered men to the shining top of power and honour, only to fall under the sword of a too-slow justice an outlaw from the love and the pity of all men.
David was all heart, and passion, and sensibility; while Joab was all self-will, and pride, and as hard as a stone. David's sudden and unparalleled exaltation was never forgiven him at home. His brothers and his sisters were sufficiently proud of David toward all their neighbours; at the same time they could never enough let him see how much they thought themselves as good as he was when they were alone together. But it was Joab who carried all that to a head. David and Joab were by far the ablest members of a very able household; but David was hampered with his heart, till Joab, having no heart, got the mastery. And thus it is that, already, and before David has well sat down on the throne, we hear him saying such things as these: 'The sons of Zeruiah,' David burst out, 'be too hard for me. I am this day weak, though anointed king.' And you may be sure that when that so unkingly speech was reported to the sons of Zeruiah, it did not make them any the less hard for David. Joab's temper was not any sweeter, nor his hand any lighter, after that and many suchlike deplorably foolish speeches of David. Already David lay and writhed in a net of ten thousand invisible threads and stings; and a chain of iron is soon to be forged for David by his own besotted hands. Men of much heart are always men of much mischief to themselves and to other men. To keep much of a heart with all diligence every moment-what a superhuman task is that! To keep much of a heart, to keep it in, to keep it down, to keep it open, but not too open-who is sufficient for these things? David yielded to Joab out of simple good-nature yesterday, and again today, and he will yield something far more important tomorrow, and so on. Each time he yields it is an act of rare courtesy, fine consideration, and most beautiful good-feeling and good-will-all touched, at the same time, with a certain tincture of fear. In any other world but this, and to any other man but Joab, David's heart would be an open heaven. But as it is, David wakens up too late to find out that he is king in nothing but in name. Neither his royal word, nor his personal liberty, nor his children, nor his tears over his dead children, are his own. Such is the mischief of too much heart and too little will in one member of a family, and too little heart and too much will in another. Let both look at David and Joab, and learn, and lay to heart. For we are all in this world, and in families, for this end, to learn how to rule our hearts; now to reduce and now to enlarge; now to harden and now to soften our hearts. The heart is the man. In this world, and in the world to come, the heart alone is the man. And we are in this world and in its families to make ourselves an everlasting heart.
'It is worse than a crime,' says an astute politician, 'it is a blunder.' And though it was a clear enough crime in David to pass by Joab's murder of Abner, it came out afterwards to be a most terrible blunder. All David's after-life might well have been different but for that blunder. There might have been no 'matter of Uriah,' and no rebellion of Absalom, and none of the many other miseries that so desolated David's house, had he not committed this fatal blunder of letting Joab live. David knew his duty quite well. 'The Lord shall reward the doer of evil according to his wickedness,' David proclaimed over Abner's mangled body. Yes; but David held the sword for no other purpose than to be the Lord's right hand in rewarding all the evil that was done in Israel in his day. But, then, Joab was the most powerful and the most necessary man in Israel, and Abner had no friends, and David contented himself with pronouncing an eloquent requiem over Abner, and leaving his murderer to go free in all his offices and all his honours. Joab was deep enough to understand quite well why his life was spared. He knew quite well that it was fear and not love that had moved David to let him live. It was a diplomatic act of David to spare Joab, but David was playing with a far deeper diplomatist than himself. Very soon we shall see this respited assassin ordering David about and dictating to him, till we shall pity David as well as blame him. Joab's impunity speedily shot up into an increased contempt for David, till secret contempt became open insolence, and open insolence open and unavenged rebellion. Was it not a blunder?
In the corrupted currents of this world,Offence's gilded hand may shove by justice,And oft 'tis seen, the wicked prize itselfBuys out the law: but 'tis not so above;There is no shuffling, there the action liesIn his true nature; and we ourselves compell'd,Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults,To give in evidence.'And it came to pass in the morning that David wrote a letter to Joab, and sent it by the hand of Uriah. And he wrote in the letter saying: Thou shalt set Uriah in the forefront of the hottest battle, and retire from him, that he may be smitten and die.' That dreadful letter shows us David's desperation, indeed; but it shows us also David's estimate of Joab. Had Jonathan been spared to be second to David this would never have happened. David would never have dared to send such a letter as that to Jonathan. But Jonathan was taken and Joab was left, and David had Joab for his tool to impress on our hearts the terrible portent of a bloodstained holiness. But how could Joab have the utter depravity and the cold blood to do it? you ask. How could he plan an attack, and sham a retreat, and risk a defeat, and all to murder a noble, spotless, unsuspecting comrade? It was not soldierly obedience. Joab did not care one straw for the king's letter. When it suited him, Joab could tear up the king's letters and throw them in his face. Unless you can tell us, we shall never in this world know why Joab murdered Uriah after that letter. Unless you are astute enough, and wicked enough, and then honest enough to tell us, we shall not know till the day of judgment what all passed through Joab's heart when he read that letter, and read it again with his glancing eyes. Joab had some sufficient motive for following out David's detestable orders. But unless you find out Joab's motive among your own motives, we shall have to leave him alone. It was like Pilate and the chief priests with our Lord between them. They also had their motives. Only, their motives are as plain as day, while Joab was a deep man-deeper, quite possibly, than any man here. And it came to pass that, when Joab observed the city, he assigned Uriah unto a place where he knew that valiant men were on the wall. And Uriah fell. And David said to Joab's messenger, Let not this thing displease thee. But the thing that David had done displeased the Lord. And the Lord had Joab in His hand henceforth as the rod of his displeasure, and Joab had David's letter in his hand till, if there is a man on the face of the earth to be pitied from that time forward, it is David.
Better a living dog than a dead lion. David was the first lion of the tribe of Judah, and it is sad to see how his teeth and his claws were broken, and his sinews cut, by his tormentors. You are but a dog beside David. Only, you have this, that you are still alive, and young, and free, and unsold as yet, whereas David is dead. You are too young to have written any letters yet worth any one keeping. 'Destroy this letter as soon as you have read it,' David wrote at the top of it. 'Under the strictest seal of secrecy, and on the king's own business,' Uriah read on the envelope, and handed it with all speed and respect to his chief. 'Read and burn instantly,' wrote David in state cipher. But Joab was not the man to throw an autograph letter of the king into the fire. Joab recollected what prices such letters bring in the auction rooms, and, instead of burning David's letter, he folded it carefully, and buttoned it up in his breast-pocket. That letter was still deep down in Joab's breast-pocket when Benaiah at David's demand fell upon him and slew him in spite of the horns of the altar. You are still in your innocence, and have written no letters. And were you my only son, may I bury you first before you write your first letter to Joab.
Tool turned tyrant-that shortly sums up Joab and David for the next thirty years. Only an insult here and a humiliation there has been preserved to us out of the daily insults and humiliations that Joab heaped upon David. Joab had no more pity than a tiger, and the tiger's claws were never out of David's flesh from the matter of Uriah down to David's death. David had said unto Nathan, I have sinned against the Lord. And Nathan had said unto David, The Lord also hath put away thy sin, thou shalt not die. But David had far better have died and been buried beside his sin. Thou answeredst them, O Lord our God; Thou wast a God that forgavest them, but Thou tookest vengeance of their inventions. And Joab was just the instrument to glut himself in the divine vengeance. 'Joab insolently falls foul of David,' is one of Matthew Henry's plain-spoken remarks. And again, 'He calls David a fool to his face.' We have only one in a thousand of Joab's insolent speeches to David's face. But the sacred writer surely selects and preserves his very best instance of tool turned tyrant and his insolent speech, in the case of Absalom. Joab ran Absalom three times through the heart right in the teeth of David's command to spare and save Absalom alive. And then, when David broke out in that terrible sorrow which sounds in our hearts to this day, Joab would not have it. There has been enough weeping now for Absalom, said Joab to David. Let there be no more. And David dried his eyes on the spot like a cowed child, and turned to the business of the kingdom, cursing Joab all the time in his heart. It was David's sad case that made our Lord say in David's city a thousand years after, Verily, verily, I say unto you, whosoever committeth sin is the servant of sin. And all Scripture is full of the same warning. Know ye not that to whom ye yield yourselves servants to obey, his servants ye are whom ye obey? For of whom a man is overcome, of the same he is brought in bondage. All this of David and Joab is only the life of some of ourselves sold for nought, and written out with all plainness of speech, and put of God into our hands.
I have been sorely tempted to take up the mystical interpretation of Shimei and Joab. Those two Scripture characters so lend themselves to the mystical method. Those two thorns in David's flesh-and there are more like them-so suit into the secretest depths of our own spiritual experience. Those two bad men were, each in his own wicked way, of such rich and indispensable use to David, if David was to be searched out, hunted down, laid low, and saved at last. They so struck in, made of God and kept of God for the very purpose, to tempt, and to vex, and to humiliate, and to weaken, and to keep broken David's broken heart. They, Joab especially, were ever with David. Joab with his insolence, and his cruelty, and his family familiarity, and his equality in years, and all that eating in and growing, on to David's deathbed-I declare it is another parable of that cunning Nathan, and not a true and honest history at all! It is a subtle allegory all the time; and that, too, of our own life. Yes, that is it. It is my life and yours; if your life is at all like mine, or is going to be, you who are yet young. It is our own life under sin, as Paul says, and under grace. Under forgiveness, and then under vengeance, as David says, and had such a good right to say. Only, come, all ye who would learn beforehand the ways of God, and we will tell you as good as anything that ever was told even of David. As good. As sad. As painful. As awful. And still more amazing in its grace. Shimei cursing and throwing stones. Joab, first tool and then ever after tyrant. We will show you such a letter. A sackful of such letters. And the writer of them walking softly, and never ceasing from prayer and tears on account of them all his days. O sacred chronicler, look well to your laurels! If once we take pen in hand, where would you be-Shimei, and Joab, and Absalom, and Ahithophel and all! O Lord, open Thou my lips, and I will show forth Thy praise. Then will I teach transgressors Thy ways, and sinners shall be converted unto Thee. Thou art my hiding-place; Thou shalt compass me about with songs of deliverance. Thou shalt hide them in the secret of Thy presence from the pride of men. Thou shalt keep them secretly in a pavilion from the strife of tongues. Be of good courage, and He shall strengthen your heart, all ye that hope in the Lord.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Joab
was the son of Zeruiah, David's sister, and brother to Abishai and Asahel. He was one of the most valiant soldiers and greatest generals in David's time; but he was also cruel, revengeful, and imperious. He performed great services for David, to whose interests he was always firm, and was commander-in-chief of his troops, when David was king of Judah only. His history is related in the second book of Samuel and the first book of Kings. See DAVID , See ABNER , and See AMASA .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Joab
Son of Zeruiah, David's sister, and brother of Abishai and Asahel, was the commander of David's army during almost the whole of his reign, 2 Samuel 5:6-10 . He was a valiant warrior, and an able general; and his great influence on public affairs was often exerted for good, as in the rebellion of Absalom, and the numbering of Israel, 2 Samuel 18:1-19:42 24:1-25 . But as a man he was imperious, revengeful, and unscrupulous: witness his treacherous assassination of Abner, and of his cousin Amasa, 2 Samuel 3:27 20:9-10 ; his bearing towards David, 2 Samuel 3:39 19:5 , and connivance with him in the matter of Uriah; his slaying Absalom, and conspiring with Adonijah against the divinely appointed heir to the throne; for all which he was at length put to death by order of Solomon, 1 Kings 2:1-46 .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Joab
("Jehovah father".)
1. Oldest of the three sons of Zeruiah, David's sister. The father is not named; his sepulchre was in Bethlehem (2 Samuel 2:32). Revengeful and bold as his brother Abishai, at the same time more able as a statesman (2 Samuel 2:18; 2 Samuel 2:22; 2 Samuel 3:27). Early joined David, whose family and relatives were not safe from Saul (1 Samuel 22:3-4; 1 Samuel 26:6). Became "captain of the host." Abishai is mentioned in David's flight before Saul; but Joab not until after Saul's death. Then, commanding David's servants, Joab encountered Abner at the pool of Gibeon by the challenge of the latter, and defeated him with the loss of only 19 men. Up to Abner's involuntary slaughter of the fleet-footed Asahel, Abner's relations with Joab had been not unkindly. Joab, at Abner's appeal to his generosity, the Benjamites having rallied round the fleeing chief, forbore to press the vanquished to extremities. He added further (2 Samuel 2:27), "unless thou hadst spoken (challenged to combat, 2 Samuel 2:14) surely then in the morning the people would have gone away every one from following his brother," i.e. there would have been no such fratricidal strife at all.
But Joab cherished revenge for his brother's death; and on his return front pursuing a troop, finding that Abner had been favorably received by David, he broke out into a reproof of the king as though Abner had come as a spy; then by messengers recalled the unsuspecting general, and, taking him aside at the gateway of Hebron as if for a peaceable conversation, treacherously stabbed him. Jealousy of a possible rival in David's favor probably was an additional incentive. David, deeply grieved, prayed that the guilt and its penalty might ever rest on Joab and his house, and constrained Joab to appear at the funeral with rent clothes and in sackcloth. Yet David felt himself powerless to punish Joab and his brother; "these men, the sons of Zeruiah, be too hard for me," at once necessary to him and too formidable to provoke. He left the punishment with the Lord (2 Samuel 3:39, compare 2 Samuel 19:7). Joab speedily attained the command in chief by his being first gallantly to scale the Jebusite stronghold and drive out the enemy.
Then he was employed by David to aid him in fortifying the stronghold which became "the city of David" (1 Chronicles 11:4-8). Joab had an armour-bearer, Nahari the Beerothite (2 Samuel 23:37), and ten young men as bearers of his equipment (2 Samuel 18:15). He had a lordly title (2 Samuel 11:11), "my lord ... general of the king's army" (1 Chronicles 27:34). Besides his usual residence at Jerusalem Joab had a house and barley fields in the country not far from the capital (2 Samuel 14:30; Job 8:13-195); and "he was buried in his own house in the wilderness," probably that of Judah, as Joab's mother, David's step sister, would naturally dwell near Bethlehem. However, Absalom's residence next Joab seems rather to point to the N. near Baalhazor (2 Samuel 13:23; 2 Samuel 14:30; 1 Chronicles 2:54). (See BAALHAZOR.) In the war with Ammon, undertaken to avenge the indignity offered David's ambassadors by Hanun, Joab defeated Ammon's ally the Syrians while Abishai was defeating the Ammonites.
His exhortation before the battle was worthy of a better man: "be of good courage, and let us play the men for our people, and for the cities of our God; and the Lord do that which seemeth Him good" (2 Samuel 10:12). Bad men may utter good religious sentiments; practice is the test. David gave the final blow to the rallying Syrians with their brethren from beyond Euphrates under Shobach, Hadarezer's captain. Joab, after David's defeat of Edom in the Valley of Salt (2 Samuel 8:13-14), was six months engaged in slaying the Edomite males, in revenge for their invasion of Israel in David's absence (1 Kings 11:15-16; Psalm 44); his first care was to bury the Israelites slain during the invasion by Edom. The victory over Edom is variously attributed to David as king, to Joab as commander in chief, who slew 12,000, and to Abishai, who slew 6,000, under Joab (1 Chronicles 18:12). Psalm 60 (title) was composed by David after he had beaten Aram of the two floods (Naharaim); this victory the psalmist takes as an earnest that the expedition setting out to occupy Edom would succeed; compare Psalms 60:8-9; Psalms 60:12, with 2 Samuel 8:14.
So terrible was Joab's name to Edom that their prince Hadad did not venture to return from Egypt until he knew "that Joab the captain of the host was dead" (1 Kings 11:21-22). The completion of the war with Ammon was due to Joab who, going forth at the beginning of the next year, took Rabbah the lower city on the river (2 Samuel 11-12). Joab loyally and magnanimously desired David to come and take the acropolis on the N.W., commanding the rest of the city, that the general might not receive the glory which ought to belong to the king. Joab showed a wickedly unscrupulous fidelity as David's tool for murdering Uriah, by setting him in the forefront to encounter a sortie from the city, and then deserting him. Joab thus was in possession of the awful secret of the king, and henceforth exercised an almost complete sway over him (2 Samuel 19:7). David could no longer revenge Abner's blood on his own accomplice in the murder of Uriah.
Joab next, by the wise woman of Tekoa and her parable, induced the king to restore Absalom, which Joab saw was David's own wish, though justice constrained him to severity. He thus at once ingratiated himself with the reigning king, and with Absalom his probable successor, one less likely to punish Joab for murdering Abner than Solomon. David discerned Joab's hand in the Tekoan woman's application. Like the clever schemes of bad men generally, the issue baffled his calculations. Absalom with characteristic recklessness, when he failed to induce Joab to come to him, set fire to his barley and so forced Joab to mediate for his admission to the king's presence. The rebel son was slain by Joab himself, and Joab did not escape his own condign punishment (1618384002_62). Possibly Joab at first was disposed to join the rebel; but Absalom's appointment of Amasa to the command "instead of Joab" determined Joab's course (2 Samuel 17:25), and made him thenceforward bitter against Absalom, so that after thrusting three darts through his heart he had his corpse cast into a pit and heaped with stones.
Aware of the anguish the act would cause David, Joab restrained Ahimaaz who was eager to carry the tidings to the king. The grief of David was overwhelming, and was only restrained by Joab's indignant warning that, unless he went forth and spoke encouragingly to his victorious soldiers, all would desert him. David stung by his disrespectful plainness, and feeling that Joab if his own interest was at stake was as little to be depended on as the adversary just defeated, appointed Amasa to supersede Joab. But Amasa was as dilatory as Joab was prompt. David therefore, when Sheba's rebellion broke out, had to send Abishai to pursue the rebel at once, with Joab's men and all the mighty men. Joab, meeting Amasa at the great stone in Gibeon, pretended to kiss him in friendship, holding his beard with the right hand, and then stabbed him with the sword in his left hand. Jealousy made this "bloody and deceitful man" reckless what blood he shed when a rival came across his path.
One of Joab's aides de camp stood by the corpse and invited all to follow Joab; but all stood still at the ghastly sight. Then he removed the body out of the highway, and cast a cloth over it; so the people moved on, and Joab resumed the chief command, with the blood of the treacherously murdered victim still upon his girdle and sandals (1 Kings 2:5), David felt himself powerless to punish him (2 Samuel 23:6-7). Joab so effectively besieged Abel of Beth Maachah that the townsmen were glad to save their town by sacrificing Sheba, throwing his head, at the suggestion of a wise woman in the town, over the wall to Joab. He was adverse to David's command to him to number the people, "why will he (or else it) be a cause of trespass to Israel?" i.e., why by seeking thine own glory in the power and resources of thy kingdom wilt thou bring the penalty from God upon Israel? Dissatisfaction too might be bred among the people. Joab was therefore slow in executing the command, so Levi and Benjamin had not been counted when David revoked the command before the census was complete (1 Chronicles 21:2; 1 Chronicles 21:6; 1 Chronicles 27:24; 1 Chronicles 27:1 Samuel 24).
Conscience at times works on the most daring, as in this case. Joab even dedicated of the spoils won in battle to maintain the house of the Lord (1 Chronicles 26:27-28). But the true character soon showed itself again, and even the worldly sagacity which heretofore had kept him on the winning side in the end forsook him, for with Abiathar Joab joined in Adonijah's rebellion, and Solomon, by David's dying charge, had him slain at the altar of Gibeon where he had fled for sanctuary, but which afforded no protection to a treacherous murderer (Exodus 21:14). The curse of David and of Solomon doubtless pursued his descendants also (2 Samuel 3:29; 1 Kings 2:33). Enrogel is still called "the well of Job" (Joab) from his share in Adonijah's coronation there. For the spiritual lesson of his history see Ecclesiastes 8:11-13.
2. Son of Seraiah. 1 Chronicles 4:14. "Father (founder) of the valley of Charashim," i.e. craftsmen; "for they (Joab's descendants) were craftsmen." This valley was a little N. of Jerusalem (Nehemiah 11:35). Tradition represented (Jerome, Quaest. Hebrew in Paralip.) that the temple architects were chosen from his sons.
3. Head of a numerous family which returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:6; Ezra 8:9; Nehemiah 7:11). Joab's and Jeshua's sons were probably, in the registration of those who returned, represented by the sons of Pahath Moab, so instead of "of" translated "for (i.e. representing) the sons of Jeshua and Moab."
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Joab
1. Son of Zeruiah the sister of David. He was a bold and successful warrior, and was made David's commander-in-chief; but he is not mentioned as associated with David until he was established at Hebron, and he is not classed among David's valiant men. He treacherously slew Abner in cold blood, avowedly because Abner had killed Asahel, Joab's brother; but the latter had been slain in battle. 2 Samuel 3:23-27 . He was the unscrupulous instrument of David's sin in causing the death of Uriah. 2 Samuel 11:14-17 . The return of Absalom was brought about by his means, but when Absalom revolted Joab remained faithful to David, and with his own hand slew Absalom. 2 Samuel 18:11-15 . Though David on this occasion needed to be reminded that his life and throne had been saved, yet Joab's arrogant and threatening language to the king was unjustifiable; and Amasa was made captain of the host in the room of Joab.
This roused the jealousy of Joab, and he craftily slew Amasa and resumed his place at the head of the army. 2 Samuel 20:4-10 . David had said before this, "These men, the sons of Zeruiah, be too hard for me;" but his own sin in the matter of Uriah made him feeble in the presence of Joab's murder of Amasa.
When David wished the people to be numbered, Joab endeavoured to dissuade him from it. The worldly wisdom in which he always acted, and not in faith, perceived the impolicy of the act. 2 Samuel 24:1-4 . His aiding Adonijah led to his ruin. When Solomon was declared king, David reminded him of what Joab had done to him, and how he had slain two captains in time of peace, and asked that his hoar head should not go down to the grave in peace. 1 Kings 2:5,6 . When Joab heard of the failure of Adonijah's cause, he saw his danger, fled to the tabernacle, and caught hold of the horns of the altar. Refusing to leave when summoned, he was put to death at the altar. Thus punishment for the murders he had committed, though long delayed, fell now in righteous judgement upon him. 1 Kings 2:33,34 .
2. Descendant of Caleb the son of Hur. 1 Chronicles 2:54 .
3. Son of Seraiah: described as "the father of the valley of Charashim," or craftsmen. 1 Chronicles 4:14 .
4,5. Two whose descendants returned from exile. Ezra 2:6 ; Ezra 8:9 ; Nehemiah 7:11 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joab
It seems that Joab and his brothers were among the several hundred people who joined David during his flight from Saul. The private army that David formed from these people later became the central fighting force in his royal army (1 Samuel 22:1-2; 1 Samuel 26:6; 1 Samuel 30:9; 2 Samuel 2:13). (For map covering the region of David’s activities see DAVID.)
In the two-year civil war that followed Saul’s death, Joab quickly established himself as David’s military leader (2 Samuel 2:28). He was also a close relative of David (1 Chronicles 2:13-16). When Saul’s former commander, Abner, defected to David, Joab saw him as a threat and murdered him. Joab used the excuse that he was retaliating because Abner had killed his brother in battle. But David saw it as murder and never forgave Joab (2 Samuel 2:12-23; 2 Samuel 3:23-39; 1 Kings 2:5-6).
Not long after these events, David became undisputed king of Israel. In response to David’s declaration that he wanted to take Jerusalem from its Canaanite inhabitants, Joab led a victorious assault on the city and was rewarded by being appointed commander-in-chief of the Israelite army (1 Chronicles 11:6; 1 Chronicles 18:15). He was a clever, brave and loyal soldier (2 Samuel 10:6-19; 2 Samuel 11:1; 2 Samuel 12:262Sa_11:6-25).
When, as a consequence of David’s wrongdoing, his family started to break up, Joab tried to preserve the dynasty by ensuring that there was a recognized heir to the throne. He considered that the most suitable of David’s sons for the position was Absalom, but Absalom had committed murder and fled to a neighbouring country. Joab therefore worked out a clever plan that enabled Absalom to return from exile without having to stand trial (2 Samuel 14:1-24).
Once back in Jerusalem, Absalom heartlessly used Joab to pursue his own ambitions (2 Samuel 14:28-33). When Absalom rebelled against David and seized the throne, Joab again upheld David. He brought the rebellion to a swift end by killing Absalom, even though it was against David’s wishes (2 Samuel 18:2; 2 Samuel 18:5; 2 Samuel 18:9-16). He then rebuked David for his lack of gratitude to those who had saved him (2 Samuel 19:1-8).
Upon resuming his rule in Jerusalem, David appointed Absalom’s general, Amasa, chief of the army in place of Joab. This was clearly unfair to Joab, who had been loyal to David and won him the victory (2 Samuel 19:13). Soon there was another uprising against David. When Amasa proved himself to be a poor leader, Joab murdered him and took control of the army as of old (2 Samuel 20:4-10; 2 Samuel 20:23).
In the palace conflict to decide which son would succeed the ageing David as king, Joab supported Adonijah in opposition to Solomon, who was David’s choice (1 Kings 1:5-8; 1 Kings 1:13; 1 Kings 1:19; 1 Chronicles 28:5). On becoming king, Solomon executed Joab. A violent death seemed a fitting end for one whose life had been marked by so many acts of violence (1 Kings 2:28-35).

Sentence search

Joab - Joab, whose brother had been slain in battle by Abner, deceived Abner and murdered him. Joab's exploits in the capture of Jerusalem led David to name him commander (1 Chronicles 11:4-8 ). Joab successfully led David's armies against the Ammonites (2 Samuel 10:1 ). ...
Joab was instrumental in the reconciliation of David and Absalom (2 Samuel 14:1 ). When Absalom led a rebellion, Joab remained loyal to David. Joab killed Absalom against the clear orders of David (2 Samuel 18:14 ). Joab murdered Amasa, whom David had named commander (2 Samuel 20:10 ). ...
When David was dying, Joab supported Adonijah's claim to the throne (1 Kings 1:1 ). David named Solomon king and told him to avenge Abner and Amasa by killing Joab. Although Joab fled to the tabernacle for sanctuary, Solomon ordered Benaiah to kill Joab (1 Kings 2:1 )
Bithron - ” As David ruled Judah in Hebron and Ishbosheth ruled Israel in Mahanaim, their armies clashed under generals Joab and Abner. Joab and his brothers pursued. Finally Joab quit pursuing
Atroth - (KJV) or ATROTH-BETH-JOAB (at' rahth-behth-joh' awb) Place name meaning “crowns of the house of Joab
Joab - It seems that Joab and his brothers were among the several hundred people who joined David during his flight from Saul. )...
In the two-year civil war that followed Saul’s death, Joab quickly established himself as David’s military leader (2 Samuel 2:28). When Saul’s former commander, Abner, defected to David, Joab saw him as a threat and murdered him. Joab used the excuse that he was retaliating because Abner had killed his brother in battle. But David saw it as murder and never forgave Joab (2 Samuel 2:12-23; 2 Samuel 3:23-39; 1 Kings 2:5-6). In response to David’s declaration that he wanted to take Jerusalem from its Canaanite inhabitants, Joab led a victorious assault on the city and was rewarded by being appointed commander-in-chief of the Israelite army (1 Chronicles 11:6; 1 Chronicles 18:15). ...
When, as a consequence of David’s wrongdoing, his family started to break up, Joab tried to preserve the dynasty by ensuring that there was a recognized heir to the throne. Joab therefore worked out a clever plan that enabled Absalom to return from exile without having to stand trial (2 Samuel 14:1-24). ...
Once back in Jerusalem, Absalom heartlessly used Joab to pursue his own ambitions (2 Samuel 14:28-33). When Absalom rebelled against David and seized the throne, Joab again upheld David. ...
Upon resuming his rule in Jerusalem, David appointed Absalom’s general, Amasa, chief of the army in place of Joab. This was clearly unfair to Joab, who had been loyal to David and won him the victory (2 Samuel 19:13). When Amasa proved himself to be a poor leader, Joab murdered him and took control of the army as of old (1 Samuel 26:6; 2 Samuel 20:23). ...
In the palace conflict to decide which son would succeed the ageing David as king, Joab supported Adonijah in opposition to Solomon, who was David’s choice (1 Kings 1:5-8; 1 Kings 1:13; 1 Kings 1:19; 1 Chronicles 28:5). On becoming king, Solomon executed Joab
Joab - " Abishai is mentioned in David's flight before Saul; but Joab not until after Saul's death. Then, commanding David's servants, Joab encountered Abner at the pool of Gibeon by the challenge of the latter, and defeated him with the loss of only 19 men. Up to Abner's involuntary slaughter of the fleet-footed Asahel, Abner's relations with Joab had been not unkindly. Joab, at Abner's appeal to his generosity, the Benjamites having rallied round the fleeing chief, forbore to press the vanquished to extremities. ...
But Joab cherished revenge for his brother's death; and on his return front pursuing a troop, finding that Abner had been favorably received by David, he broke out into a reproof of the king as though Abner had come as a spy; then by messengers recalled the unsuspecting general, and, taking him aside at the gateway of Hebron as if for a peaceable conversation, treacherously stabbed him. David, deeply grieved, prayed that the guilt and its penalty might ever rest on Joab and his house, and constrained Joab to appear at the funeral with rent clothes and in sackcloth. Yet David felt himself powerless to punish Joab and his brother; "these men, the sons of Zeruiah, be too hard for me," at once necessary to him and too formidable to provoke. Joab speedily attained the command in chief by his being first gallantly to scale the Jebusite stronghold and drive out the enemy. Joab had an armour-bearer, Nahari the Beerothite (2 Samuel 23:37), and ten young men as bearers of his equipment (2 Samuel 18:15). Besides his usual residence at Jerusalem Joab had a house and barley fields in the country not far from the capital (2 Samuel 14:30; 1 Kings 2:34); and "he was buried in his own house in the wilderness," probably that of Judah, as Joab's mother, David's step sister, would naturally dwell near Bethlehem. However, Absalom's residence next Joab seems rather to point to the N. ) In the war with Ammon, undertaken to avenge the indignity offered David's ambassadors by Hanun, Joab defeated Ammon's ally the Syrians while Abishai was defeating the Ammonites. Joab, after David's defeat of Edom in the Valley of Salt (2 Samuel 8:13-14), was six months engaged in slaying the Edomite males, in revenge for their invasion of Israel in David's absence (1 Kings 11:15-16; Psalm 44); his first care was to bury the Israelites slain during the invasion by Edom. The victory over Edom is variously attributed to David as king, to Joab as commander in chief, who slew 12,000, and to Abishai, who slew 6,000, under Joab (1 Chronicles 18:12). ...
So terrible was Joab's name to Edom that their prince Hadad did not venture to return from Egypt until he knew "that Joab the captain of the host was dead" (1 Kings 11:21-22). The completion of the war with Ammon was due to Joab who, going forth at the beginning of the next year, took Rabbah the lower city on the river (2 Samuel 11-12). Joab loyally and magnanimously desired David to come and take the acropolis on the N. Joab showed a wickedly unscrupulous fidelity as David's tool for murdering Uriah, by setting him in the forefront to encounter a sortie from the city, and then deserting him. Joab thus was in possession of the awful secret of the king, and henceforth exercised an almost complete sway over him (2 Samuel 19:7). ...
Joab next, by the wise woman of Tekoa and her parable, induced the king to restore Absalom, which Joab saw was David's own wish, though justice constrained him to severity. He thus at once ingratiated himself with the reigning king, and with Absalom his probable successor, one less likely to punish Joab for murdering Abner than Solomon. David discerned Joab's hand in the Tekoan woman's application. Absalom with characteristic recklessness, when he failed to induce Joab to come to him, set fire to his barley and so forced Joab to mediate for his admission to the king's presence. The rebel son was slain by Joab himself, and Joab did not escape his own condign punishment (Job 8:13-19). Possibly Joab at first was disposed to join the rebel; but Absalom's appointment of Amasa to the command "instead of Joab" determined Joab's course (2 Samuel 17:25), and made him thenceforward bitter against Absalom, so that after thrusting three darts through his heart he had his corpse cast into a pit and heaped with stones. ...
Aware of the anguish the act would cause David, Joab restrained Ahimaaz who was eager to carry the tidings to the king. The grief of David was overwhelming, and was only restrained by Joab's indignant warning that, unless he went forth and spoke encouragingly to his victorious soldiers, all would desert him. David stung by his disrespectful plainness, and feeling that Joab if his own interest was at stake was as little to be depended on as the adversary just defeated, appointed Amasa to supersede Joab. But Amasa was as dilatory as Joab was prompt. David therefore, when Sheba's rebellion broke out, had to send Abishai to pursue the rebel at once, with Joab's men and all the mighty men. Joab, meeting Amasa at the great stone in Gibeon, pretended to kiss him in friendship, holding his beard with the right hand, and then stabbed him with the sword in his left hand. ...
One of Joab's aides de camp stood by the corpse and invited all to follow Joab; but all stood still at the ghastly sight. Then he removed the body out of the highway, and cast a cloth over it; so the people moved on, and Joab resumed the chief command, with the blood of the treacherously murdered victim still upon his girdle and sandals (1 Kings 2:5), David felt himself powerless to punish him (2 Samuel 23:6-7). Joab so effectively besieged Abel of Beth Maachah that the townsmen were glad to save their town by sacrificing Sheba, throwing his head, at the suggestion of a wise woman in the town, over the wall to Joab. Joab was therefore slow in executing the command, so Levi and Benjamin had not been counted when David revoked the command before the census was complete (1 Chronicles 21:2; 1 Chronicles 21:6; 1 Chronicles 27:24; 1 Chronicles 27:1 Samuel 24). Joab even dedicated of the spoils won in battle to maintain the house of the Lord (1 Chronicles 26:27-28). But the true character soon showed itself again, and even the worldly sagacity which heretofore had kept him on the winning side in the end forsook him, for with Abiathar Joab joined in Adonijah's rebellion, and Solomon, by David's dying charge, had him slain at the altar of Gibeon where he had fled for sanctuary, but which afforded no protection to a treacherous murderer (Exodus 21:14). Enrogel is still called "the well of Job" (Joab) from his share in Adonijah's coronation there. craftsmen; "for they (Joab's descendants) were craftsmen. Joab's and Jeshua's sons were probably, in the registration of those who returned, represented by the sons of Pahath Moab, so instead of "of" translated "for (i
am'Asa - 1023, was appointed commander-in-chief and suffered defeat by Joab. (2 Samuel 18:6 ) David, incensed against Joab for killing Absalom, forgave Amasa and appointed him Joab's successor. (2 Samuel 19:13 ) Joab afterwards, when they were both in pursuit of the rebel Sheba, pretending to salute Amasa stabbed him with his sword
Atroth-Beth-Joab - ATROTH-BETH-JOAB
Joab - Joab (jô'ab), whose father is Jehovah. When Absalom rebelled Joab adhered to David; and contrary to express orders he put Absalom to death. David then made Amasa general of his army, but Joab was so offended that he also assassinated Amasa, as he had done Abner. Joab combined in the plot to set Adonijah on the throne, in defiance of the will of David, who had, by divine direction, resolved to make Solomon king. After the death of David, Joab was slain at the altar, whither he had fled for protection; and was buried in his own domain in the wilderness
Amasa - He commanded the army of the rebel Absalom ( 2 Samuel 17:25 ); but was completely routed by Joab in the forest of Ephraim ( 2 Samuel 18:6-8 ). David not only pardoned him, but gave him the command of the army in place of Joab ( 2 Samuel 19:13 ). He was treacherously slain by Joab at ‘the great stone of Gibeon’ ( 2 Samuel 20:9-12 )
Naharai - The armourbearer of Joab ( 2 Samuel 23:37 , 1 Chronicles 11:39 )
Naharai, Nahari - The Beerothite, armour-bearer to Joab
Joab - AND DAVID SAID, I AM WEAK THIS DAY THOUGH ANOINTED KING...
JOAB, the son of David's sister, was a man of the very foremost ability. Had it not been for David, Joab would have climbed up into the throne of Israel. Notwithstanding their family relationship, David and Joab were much of an age, and that, no doubt, helps to account for a good deal that went on between the uncle and the nephew Joab was a stern, haughty, imperious, revengeful man. Joab's ambition might surely have been satisfied, for he was in more respects than one the most privileged man in the land. After his own contemptuous way, Joab was always true to David. In his own well-read and picturesque way, Dean Stanley describes Joab very aptly as the Marlborough of the empire of Israel. ...
Over-ambition, to put it all in one word, was Joab's besetting sin; over-vaulting ambition. But what more would Joab have had? you may well ask. Only, do not ask that any more about Joab, or about any other ambitious and self-seeking man. Joab was king in all but the crown. But as long as his weaker uncle wore the crown, Joab's heart raged like hell. Joab envied David and every one else all that they had, and died an outcast. The land trembles as Joab rises on the stepping-stones of murdered men to the shining top of power and honour, only to fall under the sword of a too-slow justice an outlaw from the love and the pity of all men. ...
David was all heart, and passion, and sensibility; while Joab was all self-will, and pride, and as hard as a stone. But it was Joab who carried all that to a head. David and Joab were by far the ablest members of a very able household; but David was hampered with his heart, till Joab, having no heart, got the mastery. Joab's temper was not any sweeter, nor his hand any lighter, after that and many suchlike deplorably foolish speeches of David. To keep much of a heart with all diligence every moment-what a superhuman task is that! To keep much of a heart, to keep it in, to keep it down, to keep it open, but not too open-who is sufficient for these things? David yielded to Joab out of simple good-nature yesterday, and again today, and he will yield something far more important tomorrow, and so on. In any other world but this, and to any other man but Joab, David's heart would be an open heaven. Let both look at David and Joab, and learn, and lay to heart. ' And though it was a clear enough crime in David to pass by Joab's murder of Abner, it came out afterwards to be a most terrible blunder. There might have been no 'matter of Uriah,' and no rebellion of Absalom, and none of the many other miseries that so desolated David's house, had he not committed this fatal blunder of letting Joab live. But, then, Joab was the most powerful and the most necessary man in Israel, and Abner had no friends, and David contented himself with pronouncing an eloquent requiem over Abner, and leaving his murderer to go free in all his offices and all his honours. Joab was deep enough to understand quite well why his life was spared. It was a diplomatic act of David to spare Joab, but David was playing with a far deeper diplomatist than himself. Joab's impunity speedily shot up into an increased contempt for David, till secret contempt became open insolence, and open insolence open and unavenged rebellion. 'And it came to pass in the morning that David wrote a letter to Joab, and sent it by the hand of Uriah. ' That dreadful letter shows us David's desperation, indeed; but it shows us also David's estimate of Joab. But Jonathan was taken and Joab was left, and David had Joab for his tool to impress on our hearts the terrible portent of a bloodstained holiness. But how could Joab have the utter depravity and the cold blood to do it? you ask. Joab did not care one straw for the king's letter. When it suited him, Joab could tear up the king's letters and throw them in his face. Unless you can tell us, we shall never in this world know why Joab murdered Uriah after that letter. Unless you are astute enough, and wicked enough, and then honest enough to tell us, we shall not know till the day of judgment what all passed through Joab's heart when he read that letter, and read it again with his glancing eyes. Joab had some sufficient motive for following out David's detestable orders. But unless you find out Joab's motive among your own motives, we shall have to leave him alone. Only, their motives are as plain as day, while Joab was a deep man-deeper, quite possibly, than any man here. And it came to pass that, when Joab observed the city, he assigned Uriah unto a place where he knew that valiant men were on the wall. And David said to Joab's messenger, Let not this thing displease thee. And the Lord had Joab in His hand henceforth as the rod of his displeasure, and Joab had David's letter in his hand till, if there is a man on the face of the earth to be pitied from that time forward, it is David. But Joab was not the man to throw an autograph letter of the king into the fire. Joab recollected what prices such letters bring in the auction rooms, and, instead of burning David's letter, he folded it carefully, and buttoned it up in his breast-pocket. That letter was still deep down in Joab's breast-pocket when Benaiah at David's demand fell upon him and slew him in spite of the horns of the altar. And were you my only son, may I bury you first before you write your first letter to Joab. ...
...
Tool turned tyrant-that shortly sums up Joab and David for the next thirty years. Only an insult here and a humiliation there has been preserved to us out of the daily insults and humiliations that Joab heaped upon David. Joab had no more pity than a tiger, and the tiger's claws were never out of David's flesh from the matter of Uriah down to David's death. And Joab was just the instrument to glut himself in the divine vengeance. 'Joab insolently falls foul of David,' is one of Matthew Henry's plain-spoken remarks. ' We have only one in a thousand of Joab's insolent speeches to David's face. Joab ran Absalom three times through the heart right in the teeth of David's command to spare and save Absalom alive. And then, when David broke out in that terrible sorrow which sounds in our hearts to this day, Joab would not have it. There has been enough weeping now for Absalom, said Joab to David. And David dried his eyes on the spot like a cowed child, and turned to the business of the kingdom, cursing Joab all the time in his heart. All this of David and Joab is only the life of some of ourselves sold for nought, and written out with all plainness of speech, and put of God into our hands. ...
I have been sorely tempted to take up the mystical interpretation of Shimei and Joab. They, Joab especially, were ever with David. Joab with his insolence, and his cruelty, and his family familiarity, and his equality in years, and all that eating in and growing, on to David's deathbed-I declare it is another parable of that cunning Nathan, and not a true and honest history at all! It is a subtle allegory all the time; and that, too, of our own life. Joab, first tool and then ever after tyrant. O sacred chronicler, look well to your laurels! If once we take pen in hand, where would you be-Shimei, and Joab, and Absalom, and Ahithophel and all! O Lord, open Thou my lips, and I will show forth Thy praise
Joahaz - Father of Joab the ‘recorder’ ( 2 Chronicles 34:8 )
Amasa - Captain of Judah's army replacing Joab during Absalom's rebellion against his father David (2 Samuel 17:25 ). She was sister of Zeruiah, Joab's mother (2 Samuel 17:25 ) or sister to David and to Zeruiah, Joab's mother (1 Chronicles 2:16 ). When he defeated the rebel forces and Joab murdered Absalom (2 Samuel 18:14 ), David made peaceful overtones to Judah by inviting Amasa as his relative to assume command of his army (2 Samuel 19:13 ). Joab marched among David's army and cunningly killed Amasa (2 Samuel 20:10 ). This served as reason for David to advise Solomon to do away with Joab (1 Kings 2:5 ) and thus reason for Solomon to kill Joab (1 Kings 2:28-34 )
Amasa - Amasa having thus received the command of Absalom's troops, engaged his cousin Joab, general of David's army, and was worsted. But, after the defeat of Absalom's party, David, being angry at Joab for killing Absalom, pardoned Amasa, and gave him the command of his own army. Joab, with his people, accompanied him; and these troops were scarcely got as far as the great stone in Gibeon, before Amasa came and joined them with his forces. Then said Joab to Amasa, "Art thou in health, my brother?" and took him by the beard with his right hand to kiss him; and treacherously smote him under the fifth rib, so that he expired
Naharai - Snorer, a Berothite, one of David's heroes, and armour-bearer of Joab (1 Chronicles 11:39 )
Asahel - the son of Zeruiah, and brother of Joab. To revenge his death, his brother Joab, some years after, treacherously killed Abner, who had come to wait on David at Hebron, in order to procure him to be acknowledged king by all Israel, 2 Samuel 3:26-27
jo'ab - ) Joab first appears after David's accession to the throne at Hebron. Abner slew in battle Asahel, the youngest brother of Joab; and when David afterward received Abner into favor, Joab treacherously murdered him. [1] There was now no rival left in the way of Joab's advancement, and at the siege of Jebus he was appointed for his prowess commander-in-chief --"captain of the host. " In the wide range of wars which David undertook, Joab was the acting general. (2 Samuel 14:1-20 ) When the relations between father and son were reversed by the revolt of Absalom, Joab remained true to the king, taking the rebel prince's dangerous life in spite of David's injunction to spare him, and when no one else had courage to act so decisive a part. The king transferred the command to Amasa, which so enraged Joab that he adroitly assassinated Amasa when pretending to welcome him as a friend. Joab fled to the shelter of the altar at Gibeon, and was here slain by Benaiah
Zeruiah - Sister of David, and mother of his famous generals, Joab, Abishai, and Asahel, 1 Chronicles 2:16
zo'Rites, the, - are named in the genealogies of Judah, (1 Chronicles 2:54 ) apparently among the descendants of Salma and near connections of Joab
Yoav - Before his passing, David instructed Solomon to kill Joab to avenge the blood of two innocent generals � Abner and Amasa � whom Joab slew
Joab ben zeruiah - Before his passing, David instructed Solomon to kill Joab to avenge the blood of two innocent generals � Abner and Amasa � whom Joab slew
Tahtimhodshi - Place visited by Joab during his taking the census of Israel, apparently in the north-east of Palestine
Abner - Commander of Saul's army and for a time enemy of David, afterwards reconciled, but treacherously slain by David's commander Joab, David bewailed his death
Ammah - Hill to which Joab pursued Abner and Abishai, it was 'before Giah by the way of the wilderness of Gibeon
Ataroth - ATAROTH THE HOUSE OF Joab (1 Chronicles 2:54), or "Crowns the house of Joab," a town in Judah
City of Waters - Joab captured it for David (2 Samuel 12:27 )
Abner - While Ishbosheth's and David's troops lay near each other, hard by Gibeon, Abner challenged Joab to select twelve of David's warriors to fight with an equal number of his. Joab consented: the twenty- four engaged; and fell together on the spot. Still he was followed by Joab and Abishai, till he, who in the morning sported with murder, was obliged at even to entreat that Joab would stay his troops from the effusion of blood, 2 Samuel 2. Abner had just left the feast at which David had entertained him, when Joab, informed of the matter, warmly remonstrated, asserting, that Abner had come as a spy. On his own authority he sent a messenger to invite him back, to have some farther communication with the king; and when Abner was come into Joab's presence, the latter, partly from jealousy lest Abner might become his superior, and partly to revenge his brother Asahel's death, mortally stabbed him in the act of salutation
am'Mah - (head ), The hill of, A hill facing Giah by the way of the wilderness of Gibeon, named as the point to which Joab pursued Abner ( 2 Samuel 2:24 )
Nahar'a-i - (snorter ) the armor-bearer of Joab, called NAHARI in the Authorized Version of (2 Samuel 23:37 ) He was a native of Beeroth
Abner - Joab, David's general, went into a jealous rage when David welcomed Abner. Joab then killed Abner, who was buried in Hebron (2 Samuel 3:1 )
Asahel - Son of David's sister Zeruiah, and brother of Joab; one of David's thirty heroes, and extremely swift of foot; killed by Abner, at the battle of Gibeon, 2 Samuel 2:18,23
Tahtim-Hodshi, Land of - Visited by Joab in taking the census, between Gilead and Dan Jaan; therefore is E
Abner - He was, however, treacherously slain by Joab, either to revenge the death of Asahel, Joab's brother, who Abner had formerly killed, or more probably from jealousy. He also charged Solomon to punish the crime of Joab with death, 1 Kings 2:5,6
Ammah - A cubit, the name of a hill which Joab and Abishai reached as the sun went down, when they were in pursuit of Abner (2 Samuel 2:24 )
Berites - Palestine, visited by Joab in pursuing Sheba, son of Bichri (2 Samuel 20:14), "all the Berites
Joab - Joab (‘Jahweh is father’). It is perhaps not too much to say that, humanly speaking, the Davidic dynasty would not have been established had it not been for the military genius and the loyalty of Joab. So consistently loyal was Joab to the royal house (see Adonijah), that one is tempted to question whether the passage, 1 Kings 2:5-6 , which describes David’s ingratitude, is genuine; certain it is that if David really felt with regard to Abner and Amasa as he is described as feeling in this passage, it is surprising that he should have left to the wisdom of Solomon the duty of inflicting the punishment due; Joab’s death would seem to have been due rather to his loyalty in supporting David’s rightful heir, Adonijah. ...
Above all, Joab was a skilled general ; this is seen by the number of victories he gained, namely, over the army of Ishbosheth under the leadership of Abner ( 2 Samuel 2:12-32 ); over the Jebusites ( 1 Chronicles 11:6-9 ); over the Syrians and Ammonites ( 2 Samuel 10:1-19 ; 2 Samuel 11:1 ; 2 Samuel 12:26-29 ); over Absalom ( 2 Samuel 18:5-17 ); over Sheba ( 1618384002_5 ). These are specifically mentioned, but there must have been very many more, for those which are spoken of generally as David’s victories were in all probability due to Joab, who is repeatedly spoken of as David’s commander-in-chief ( e. ); his slaying of Abner [1]; the reconciliation which he brought about between David and Absalom ( 2 Samuel 14:1 ff. How close was the tie between David and Joab may be seen, further, in the blind obedience of the latter, who was willing to be partaker in David’s sin ( 2 Samuel 11:6-26 ). ...
The darker side of Joab’s character is to be seen in his vindictiveness and ruthless cruelty ; for although it is only fair to plead the spirit of the age, the exigencies of the State’s weal, and the demand of blood-revenge, yet the treacherous and bloodthirsty acts of which Joab was guilty constitute a dark blot upon his character (see 2 Samuel 3:22-27 , 1 Kings 11:16 ; cf
Ish-Bosheth - A severe battle soon after occurred at Gibeon, between the army of David, under Joab, and the army of Ish-bosheth, under Abner, in which the latter was utterly defeated. Abner was killed afterward by Joab
Naharai - ” One of David's thirty elite warriors who served as armor-bearer to Joab (2 Samuel 23:37 ; 1 Chronicles 11:39 )
Sirah - A well near Hebron from which Abner was recalled by Joab
Joab - He treacherously slew Abner in cold blood, avowedly because Abner had killed Asahel, Joab's brother; but the latter had been slain in battle. The return of Absalom was brought about by his means, but when Absalom revolted Joab remained faithful to David, and with his own hand slew Absalom. Though David on this occasion needed to be reminded that his life and throne had been saved, yet Joab's arrogant and threatening language to the king was unjustifiable; and Amasa was made captain of the host in the room of Joab. ...
This roused the jealousy of Joab, and he craftily slew Amasa and resumed his place at the head of the army. David had said before this, "These men, the sons of Zeruiah, be too hard for me;" but his own sin in the matter of Uriah made him feeble in the presence of Joab's murder of Amasa. ...
When David wished the people to be numbered, Joab endeavoured to dissuade him from it. When Solomon was declared king, David reminded him of what Joab had done to him, and how he had slain two captains in time of peace, and asked that his hoar head should not go down to the grave in peace. When Joab heard of the failure of Adonijah's cause, he saw his danger, fled to the tabernacle, and caught hold of the horns of the altar
Zeruiah - Stricken of the Lord, David's sister, and the mother of Abishai, Joab, and Asahel (1 Chronicles 2:16 ), who were the three leading heroes of David's army, and being his nephews, they were admitted to the closest companionship with him
Ammah - A hill facing Giah by way of the wilderness of Gibeon, where Joab ceased pursuing Abner after Asahel's death (2 Samuel 2:24)
Giah - ” Place where David's general Joab confronted Abner, Saul's general, after Abner killed Joab's brother Asahel (2 Samuel 2:24 )
Helkath-Hazzurim - The name given to the spot at Gibeon where the fatal combat took place between the twelve champions chosen on either side from the men of Abner and Joab ( 2 Samuel 2:16 )
Amasa - Defeated in the wood of Ephraim by Joab (2 Samuel 18). ...
David, to atone for past neglect, pardoned, and even promoted him to command the army in the room of the overbearing Joab. Amasa's slowness in crushing Sheba's rebellion, perhaps owing to the disinclination of the troops to be under his command, obliged David to dispatch Abishai with the household guards, and Joab accompanied them. " There Joab, while taking with his right hand Amasa's beard to kiss him, with his left stabbed him with his sword (2 Samuel 20:10)
Abner - War soon broke out between the two rival kings, and a "very sore battle" was fought at Gibeon between the men of Israel under Abner and the men of Judah under Joab. In this engagement he killed, in self-defence, Asahel, the brother of Joab and Abishai. He then undertook to procure David's recognition throughout Israel; but after leaving his presence for the purpose was enticed back by Joab, and treacherously murdered by him and his brother Abishai, at the gate of the city, ostensibly in retaliation for the death of Asahel; really, we may suppose, through jealousy, as he would have at least rivalled Joab in position
Sirah - ” A well (“cistern of Sirah” NRSV) where Joab and Abishai murdered Abner for killing their brother Asahel (2 Samuel 3:26-30 )
Tekoa, Tekoah - From this place Joab procured a "wise woman," who pretended to be in great affliction, and skilfully made her case known to David. The object of Joab was, by the intervention of this woman, to induce David to bring back Absalom to Jerusalem (2 Samuel 14:2,4,9 )
Abishai - Son of David's sister Zeruiah, and brother of Joab. With Joab he slew Abner
General - With reference to Sisera (Judges 4:7 ) and Joab (1 Chronicles 27:34 ), a general (NRSV) is the highest ranking officer in command of an army
Absalom - Eventually he returned, and later led a revolt against his father, which ended when he was killed by Joab
Ahimaaz - After the battle, in which Absalom was overcome and slain, 17, Ahimaaz desired leave of Joab to carry the news thereof to David. But instead of him Joab sent Cushi to carry the news, and told Ahimaaz that he would send him to the king upon some other occasion; but soon after Cushi was departed, Ahimaaz applied again to Joab, praying to be permitted to run after Cushi; and, having obtained leave, he ran by the way of the plain, and outran Cushi
Amasa - He was the general of Absalom's army, and was defeated by his cousin Joab, 2 Samuel 17:1-18:33 . David afterwards offered him a pardon and the command of his troops in the place of Joab, whose overbearing conduct he could no longer endure, 2 Samuel 19:13
Abner - A battle fatal to Abner, who was the leader of Ish-boseth's army, was fought with David's army under Joab at Gibeon (2Samuel 2:12). Abner, escaping from the field, was overtaken by Asahel, who was "light of foot as a wild roe," the brother of Joab and Abishai, whom he thrust through with a back stroke of his spear (2Samuel 2:18-32). At this time Joab was absent from Hebron, but on his return he found what had happened. Abner had just left the city; but Joab by a stratagem recalled him, and meeting him at the gate of the city on his return, thrust him through with his sword (2Samuel 3:27,31-39; 4:12
Zimmah - Father or ancestor of Joab (2 Chronicles 29:12); the same collocation of names is in 1 Chronicles 6:20-21
Abel (of) Beth-Maacah - Where Sheba took refuge from Joab ( 2 Samuel 20:14-18 ); it was captured by Ben-hadad ( 1 Kings 15:20 ), and by Tiglath-pileser ( 2 Kings 15:29 ); corresponding to the modern Abil , west of Tell el-Kadi , and north of Lake Huleh
Abel-Beth-Maachah - It was at tacked by Joab, 2 Samuel 20:14-15 : by Ben-hadad, 1 Kings 15:20; and by Tiglath-Pileser, 2 Kings 15:29
Amasa - David pardoned Amasa, but he was assassinated by Joab
Abner ben ner - Later, realizing that Ish Bosheth's rule could not last, he negotiated a peace agreement with Ish Bosheth's rival, David�but was treacherously killed by Joab
Cushite -
The messenger sent by Joab to David to announce his victory over Absalom (2 Samuel 18:32 )
si'Rah - (the turning ) , The well of, from which Abner was recalled by Joab to his death at Hebron
Thank - ...
Joab bowed himself and thanked the king
Abishai - ” Son of David's sister Zeruiah and brother of Joab, David's general (1 Chronicles 2:15-16 ). He was with David when he spared Abner (1 Samuel 26:7 ) and with Joab pursuing Abner (2 Samuel 2:24 ) and killing Abner (2 Samuel 3:30 )
Sheba (1) - ) A woman in it saved the city by cutting off and casting Sheba's head to Joab (see Ecclesiastes 9:14-15). (See AMASA; Joab
Abishai - His brothers were Joab and Asahel ( 2 Samuel 2:18 ). An editorial addition ( 2 Samuel 3:30 ) associates him with Joab in the blood-revenge taken on Abner
Benaiah - He adhered to Solomon when some favored the pretensions of Adonijah, slew Joab at the command of Solomon, and was made general of the army in his stead, 1 Kings 1:36 2:29-35
Uri'ah - 1035, he followed Joab to the siege, and with him remained encamped in the open field. On the morning of the third day David sent him back to the camp with a letter containing the command to Joab to cause his destruction in the battle. The device of Joab was to observe the part of the wall of Rabbath-ammon where the greatest force of the besieged was congregated, and thither, as a kind of forlorn hope to send Uriah. Just as Joab had forewarned the messenger, the king broke into a furious passion on hearing of the loss. The messenger, as instructed by Joab, calmly continued, and ended the story with the words, "Thy servant also Uriah the Hittite, is dead
Tahtim Hodshi, the Land of - A place east of Jordan, which Joab and his officers visited when making the census for David ( 2 Samuel 24:6 )
Asahel - David's nephew, youngest son of Zeruiah, David's sister; brother of Joab and Abishai
Dan-Jaan - Visited by Joab in taking the census for David; lying on the route between Gilead and Zidon
Tah'Tim-Hod'Shi - (lowlands of Hodshi? ) , The land of, one of the places visited by Joab during his census of the land of Israel
Amasa - He was appointed by David to command the army in room of his cousin Joab (2 Samuel 19:13 ), who afterwards treacherously put him to death as a dangerous rival (2 Samuel 20:4-12 )
She'ba - (2 Samuel 20:1,2 ) Sheba traversed the whole of Palestine apparently rousing the population, Joab following in full pursuit to the fortress Abel Beth-maachah, where Sheba was beheaded
Zeruiah - ” Mother of three of David's generals, Joab, Abishai, and Asahel (2 Samuel 2:18 )
She'ba - (2 Samuel 20:1,2 ) Sheba traversed the whole of Palestine apparently rousing the population, Joab following in full pursuit to the fortress Abel Beth-maachah, where Sheba was beheaded
Zim'Mah - ...
Father of ancestor of Joab, a Gershonite in the reign of Hezekiah
She'ba - (2 Samuel 20:1,2 ) Sheba traversed the whole of Palestine apparently rousing the population, Joab following in full pursuit to the fortress Abel Beth-maachah, where Sheba was beheaded
Ahava - Perhaps the Joab of 2 Kings 17:24
Uriah - His death was purposely brought about by an understanding between Joab and David, in order that David's guilt in the case of Bathsheba might be concealed, and that he might obtain her for his wife
Asahel - Brother of Joab and Abishai, David's nephew (2 Samuel 2:18 ). That act led at last to the murder of Abner by Asahel's brother Joab (2 Samuel 3:27-30 )
Abner - He set Ish-bosheth on his father’s throne, and fought long and bravely against David’s general, Joab ( 2 Samuel 2:1-32 ). Dreading the loss of his own position, and thirsting for revenge, Joab murdered him at Hebron ( 2 Samuel 3:26 f. David gave him a public funeral, dissociated himself from Joab’s act ( 2 Samuel 3:31-37 ), and afterwards charged Solomon to avenge it ( 1 Kings 2:5 )
Zeruiah - Zeruiah had three sons, Joab, Abishai, and Asahel, the leaders of David's army; but it is not stated who was her husband
Asahel - When fighting against Ish-bosheth at Gibeon, in the army of his brother Joab, he was put to death by Abner, whom he pursued from the field of battle (2 Samuel 2:18,19 )
ma'Acah - (Joshua 12:5 ) The Ammonite war was the only occasion on which the Maacathites came into contact with Israel when their king assisted the Ammonites against Joab with a force which he led himself
Ittai - He is afterwards with David at Mahanaim, holding in the army equal rank with Joab and Abishai (2 Samuel 18:2,5,12 )
Numbering of the People - Besides the numbering of the tribes mentioned in the history of the wanderings in the wilderness, we have an account of a general census of the whole nation from Dan to Beersheba, which David gave directions to Joab to make (1 Chronicles 21:1 ). Joab very reluctantly began to carry out the king's command. While Joab was engaged in the census, David's heart smote him, and he became deeply conscious of his fault; and in profound humiliation he confessed, "I have sinned greatly in what I have done
Joab - His two brothers were Abishai and Asahel, the swift of foot, who was killed by Abner (2 Samuel 2:13-32 ), whom Joab afterwards treacherously murdered (3:22-27). David was unmindful of the many services Joab had rendered to him, and afterwards gave the command of the army to Amasa, Joab's cousin (2 Samuel 20:1-13 ; 19:13 ). When David was dying Joab espoused the cause of Adonijah in preference to that of Solomon
Hadad - son of the king of East Edom, was carried into Egypt by his father's servants, when Joab, general of David's troops, extirpated the males of Edom. Hadad being informed that David was dead, and that Joab was killed, desired leave to return into his own country
Amasa - David forgave him and promised him the command of the army, but he was treacherously slain by Joab
Instead - ...
Absalom made Amasa captain of the hose instead of Joab
Hadad - After the death of David and Joab, he returned to Edom and made an ineffectual effort to throw off the yoke of Solomon, 1 Kings 11:14-22 2 Chronicles 8:17
Absalom - After three years, at the intercession of Joab, David permitted him to return to Jerusalem, and at length received him again into favor, 2 Samuel 14:1-33 . David retired from Jerusalem; Absalom followed him; and in the battle, which ensued, the troops of the latter were defeated, and he himself, being caught by his head in a tree, was found and slain by Joab
Dan-Jaan - Joab and his officers in taking the census came ‘to Dan-jaan and round about to Zidon’ ( 2 Samuel 24:6 )
Zeruiah - Mother of Abishai (called so from Ishai = Jesse), Joab, and Asahel, "the sons of Zeruiah"; sister of Abigail and of the sons of Jesse (1 Chronicles 2:13-17)
Sirah, the Well of - Whence Joab recalled Abner to murder him at Hebron (2 Samuel 3:16; 2 Samuel 3:26)
Tekoa, Tekoah - The 'wise woman' Joab employed to speak to the king respecting the return of Absalom was from this city
Asahel - The nephew of David, son of his sister Zeruiah, and brother of Joab and Abishai
Abishai - ) Nephew of David by his sister Zeruiah; brother of Joab and Asahel. Joab was more of the experienced general, Abishai the devoted champion for David
ab'Salom - At the end of that time he was brought back by an artifice of Joab. David, however, would not see Absalom for two more years; but at length Joab brought about a reconciliation. He was dispatched by Joab in spite of the prohibition of David, who, loving him to the last, had desired that his life might be spared
Ittai - Later, Ittai shared command of David's army with Joab and Abishai (2 Samuel 18:2 )
Beeroth - A Gibeonite city, usually coupled in enumeration with Chephirah and Kiriath-jearim ( Joshua 9:17 , Ezra 2:25 , Nehemiah 7:29 ); assigned to the tribe of Benjamin ( Joshua 18:25 , 2 Samuel 4:2 ); the home of Rechab, murderer of Ish-bosheth ( 2 Samuel 4:2 ), and of Naharai, armour-bearer of Joab ( 2 Samuel 23:37 )
Ataroth - ]'>[1] Atroth-beth-Joab )
Zebadiah - Son of Asahel, the brother of Joab
Salt, Valley of - It is conjectured that while David was leading his army against the Ammonites and Syrians, the Edomites invaded the south of Judah, and that David sent Joab or Abishai against them, who drove them back and finally subdued Edom
Abelbethmaachah - It was here that Sheba took shelter from Joab, but was put to death by the inhabitants
Absalom - By the instigation of Joab, Absalom was recalled, but not admitted into the presence of his father until a later period. A war followed, and Absalom in riding through a wood, was caught by his head in the branches of an oak, and was there put to death by Joab. David's grief was extreme, but he was recalled to his duties by Joab
Rabbah - After David had subdued all their allies in a great war, he sent Joab with a strong force to take their city. , the lower city on the river, as distinguished from the citadel), Joab sent for David to direct the final assault (11:1; 12:26-31)
ab'Ner - War soon broke out between the two rival kings, and a "very sore battle" was fought at Gibeon between the men of Israel under Abner and the men of Judah under Joab. He then undertook to procure his recognition throughout Israel; but after leaving his presence for the purpose was enticed back by Joab, and treacherously murdered by him and his brother Abishai, at the gate of the city, partly, no doubt, from fear lest so distinguished a convert to their cause should gain too high a place in David's favor, but ostensibly in retaliation for the death of Asahel
Adoni'Jah - Adonijah's cause was espoused by Abiathar and by Joab the famous commander of David's army. [1] His name and influence secured a large number of followers among the captains of the royal army belonging to the tribe of Judah, comp
Adonijah - Having gained over Joab and Abiathar and other adherents, he at length openly revolted and claimed the crown while David was yet living
Asahel - The youngest son of Zeruiah, David’s sister, and the brother of Joab and Abishai
Hadare'Zer - ) After the first repulse of the Ammonites and their Syrian allies by Joab, Hadarezer sent his army to the assistance of his kindred the people of Maachah, Rehob and Ishtob
Abishai - With his brothers Joab and Asahel, Abishai joined David during David’s flight from Saul
Zion - Joab ventured and won. ...
How David heard of the secret passage, and how Joab accomplished the feat, is not recorded; but Capt
Absalom - After three years, by means of Joab, he was enabled to return to Jerusalem, and in two years more fully restored to David's favor. David wished to spare his unhappy son's life; but, in the rout, his mule carrying him under the thick boughs of an oak, his head was caught; and Joab, being made aware of this, dispatched him
Rabbath - When David declared war against the Ammonites, his general, Joab, laid siege to Rabbath-Ammon, where Uriah lost his life by a secret order of his prince; and when the city was reduced to the last extremity, Joab sent for David to hasten and go thither, to enjoy the honor of taking it, 2 Samuel 11:12
Rab'Bah - (3:11) David sent Joab to besiege Rabbah. Joab succeeded in capturing a portion of the place --the "city of waters," that is, the lower town so called from its containing the perennial stream which rises in and still flows through it
Rabbah - The chief event connected with Rabbah which the OT relates is its siege by Joab, in connexion with which Uriah the Hittite, by the express direction of king David, lost his life (see 2 Samuel 11:1 ; 2 Samuel 12:26-27 ; 2 Samuel 12:29 and 1 Chronicles 20:1 ). These conditions gave Joab his opportunity to carry out David’s perfidious order ( 2 Samuel 11:15 ff. ’ This Joab captured, after which David came and captured Rabbah itself. It is probable, however, that the text of Samuel is corrupt that we should read ‘city’ or ‘cistern of waters’ and that Joab, like Antiochus III
Rabbah - After Hanun's insult Abishai and Joab defeated the allies Ammon and the Syrians of Bethrehob, Zoba, Ishtob, and Maachah (2 Samuel 10). Next, Joab with the whole army and the king's bodyguard (including Uriah: 2 Samuel 23:39) besieged Ammon (2 Samuel 11; 1 Chronicles 19; 20). Joab finally took the lower town, which, from the stream rising in it and flowing through it perennially, is called "the city of waters," and from the king's palace "the royal city. " Then in a characteristic speech, half jest half earnest (2 Samuel 12:28, compare 2 Samuel 19:6-7), which shows the power he had gained over David through David's secret and wicked commission (Deuteronomy 3:11), he invited David to crown the capture by taking the citadel lest if he (Joab) took it, it should be called after his name
Abishai - A son of Zeruiah, David's sister, brother of Joab and Asahel, one of the bravest of David's mighty men, 1 Chronicles 2:16 , and always faithful to his royal uncle
Medeba - Here was fought the great battle in which Joab defeated the Ammonites and their allies (1 Chronicles 19:7-15 ; Compare 2 Samuel 10:6-14 )
Ithra - ” He was the father of Amasa, and the general Absalom appointed to replace David's general Joab when he revolted against his father (2 Samuel 17:25 ). Ithra's wife, Abigail, was Joab's aunt
Ahimaaz - Ahimaaz was eager to carry the tidings of Absalom’s defeat; but Joab preferred to send by an Ethiopian slave the unwelcome news of the prince’s death
Abel-Beth-Maachah - It was besieged by Joab (2 Samuel 20:14 ), by Benhadad (1 Kings 15:20 ), and by Tiglath-pileser (2 Kings 15:29 ) about B
Paran - King Hadad of Edom eluded Joab by going through Padan to Egypt (1 Kings 11:17-18 )
as'Ahel - When fighting under his brother Joab at Gibeon, he pursued Abner, who was obliged to kill him in self-defence
Zeruiah - The mother of David’s officers Abishai, Joab, and Asahel, who are always referred to as ‘sons of Zerulah
Mother - The wise woman who appealed to Joab as 'a mother in Israel,' was at once listened to
Absalom - David left Jerusalem and sent his army to find Absalom but not to hurt him (2 Samuel 15:5 ), but Joab murdered him (2 Samuel 15:14 )
Abisha'i, - (father of a gift ), The eldest of the three sons of Zeruiah, David's sister, and brother to Joab and Asahel
Abner - At Gibeon Abner's army was beaten by Joab's; and in fleeing Abner, having tried to deter Asahel, Joab's brother, from following him (since Abner shrank from a blood feud with Joab), but in vain, was at last constrained in self defense to slay him (2 Samuel 2). But Joab, by a message, brought him back from the well of Sirah, and, taking him aside to speak peaceably, murdered him, Abishai also being an accomplice, for the blood of Asahel (Numbers 35:19; 2 Samuel 3:30; 2 Samuel 3:39), and on Joab's part also, as appears likely from Amasa's case, from fear of Abner's becoming a rival in the chief command (2 Samuel 20:4-10). If Abner had been really slain in revenge for blood, as Joab asserted, he ought to have been delivered up "bound hand and foot. " But Joab, instead of waiting for his being delivered up with the legal formalities to the authorized penalty (if he were really guilty, which he was not), as an assassin, stabbed him as a worthless fellow (1 Kings 2:5)
Uriah - David added to his iniquity by securing Uriah's death, with the connivance of Joab, at the hands of the children of Ammon
Jehoiada - Father of Benaiah, the successor of Joab, 2 Samuel 8:18 ; 2 Samuel 20:23 etc
Abishai - He was the brother of Joab and Asahel (2 Samuel 2:18 ; 1 Chronicles 2:16 )
Pahath Moab - Pahath Moab was probably a family of the Shilonites or sons of Shelah of Judah "who anciently had the dominion in Moab" (1 Chronicles 4:22; compare 1 Chronicles 4:14 with 1 Chronicles 2:54, Joab)
Gibeon - It is also memorable for two scenes in the life of Joab, 2 Samuel 2:12-32 20:8-12 Jeremiah 41:12
Sheba - Joab joined the expedition, and having treacherously put Amasa to death, assumed the command of the army. While Joab was engaged in laying siege to this city, Sheba's head was, at the instigation of a "wise woman" who had held a parley with him from the city walls, thrown over the wall to the besiegers, and thus the revolt came to an end
Absalom - As the result of a stratagem carried out by a woman of Tekoah, Joab received David's sanction to invite Absalom back to Jerusalem. ...
Absalom at length marched out against his father, whose army, under the command of Joab, he encountered on the borders of the forest of Ephraim. Absalom fled on a swift mule; but his long flowing hair, or more probably his head, was caught in the bough of an oak, and there he was left suspended till Joab came up and pierced him through with three darts
Ambassador - ...
Men of high rank usually; as Sennacherib sent his chief captain, Chief cupbearer, and chief eunuch, Tartan, Rabsaris, Rabshakeh, whom Hezekiah's chief men of the kingdom, Eliakim over the household, Shebna the secretary, and Joab the recorder, met (2 Kings 18:17-18; Isaiah 30:4; Isaiah 33:7; compare Isaiah 18:2)
Salt, Valley of - (See Joab; DAVID; AMAZIAH; ABISHAI
Confer - ...
Adonijah conferred with Joab and Abiathar
Abishai - Abishai (a-bĭsh'a-î or a-bĭ-shâ'i), father of a gift, eldest son of Zeruiah, David's sister, brother of Joab and Asahel, one of the bravest of David's "mighty men," 1 Chronicles 2:16, always faithful to his royal uncle, and usually a personal attendant
Adonijah - He was joined by Joab and Abiathar, and seems to have had the countenance of his brothers
ha'Dad - In his childhood he escaped the massacre under Joab, and fled with a band of followers into Egypt
Adonijah - He was apparently the oldest of David's sons at the close of David's life, and may have supposed that he would succeed to the throne; but without consulting his father he said, "I will be king," and both Joab and Abiathar helped him
Adonijah - 2 Samuel 3:2-4), and had the support of the army commander Joab and the senior priest Abiathar (1 Kings 1:5-7)
Jesse - (On his removal to Moab in David's flight from Saul see DAVID, also see ABIGAIL on Jesse's connection with her and Joab, Abishai and Asahel, and Zeruiah
Gibeon - A “sporting” battle (2 Samuel 2:14 ) by the pool of Gibeon ensued in which the men of Joab proved to be victorious. Joab pursued Amasa, a leader of the revolt, to the great stone in Gibeon where Joab left him “wallowing in his blood in the middle of the highway” (2 Samuel 20:12 NAS)
Absalom - ...
Joab perceiving how the king took to heart Absalom's exile suborned a woman of Tekoa, by an imaginary case, to extort from the king (whose justice would not allow his love for Absalom to let him escape some penalty for Amnon's murder) the admission of the general principle that, in special cases where the life taken could not be recalled, means for restoring the loved and living banished one should be devised; just as God, considering the brevity of man's life, weak and irrecoverable when gone, "as water spilt on the ground, does not take a (sinner's) soul away" (so the Hebrew text of 2 Samuel 14:14 for "neither doth God respect any person"), but deviseth means that His banished be not (for ever) expelled from Him. Impatient of delay in his ambitious schemes, he sent for Joab, and, not being heeded, he burnt Joab's grain (as Samson did to the Philistines, Judges 15:4), which drove Joab to intercede with David for Absalom's admission to his presence. ...
His locks, on which he prided himself (Judges 14:25-26), were the means of his destruction, for they kept him suspended from a terebinth tree until Joab pierced him; and David, whom the unnatural son would have gladly smitten, but who charged Joab, Abishai, and Ittai, his three generals, to spare the youth for his sake, mourned pathetically for his death: "O Absalom, my son, would God I had died for thee; my son, my son!" His grave was a pit, over which the insulting conquerors heaped stones, as over Achan and the king of Ai (Joshua 7:26; Joshua 8:29)
Hadad-Ezer - Ammonites saw David was too strong for them and hired Syrian troops, including those of Hadad-ezer, to help them, but Joab, David's general, defeated them (2 Samuel 10:6-19 )
Tekoa - From here came the ‘wise woman’ sent by Joab to plead for Absalom ( 2 Samuel 14:2 ; 2 Samuel 14:4 ; 2 Samuel 14:8 ); Rehoboam fortified it ( 2 Chronicles 11:6 ), and apparently it continued to be a fortress ( Jeremiah 6:1 ); Amos ‘was among the herdmen of Tekoa’ ( Amos 1:1 )
Baana - A captain of Ishbosheth's army after Saul died and Abner deserted to David and was killed by Joab
Gibeon - are visible still amidst the trees lower down; this was "the pool of Gibeon" where Abner's and Joab's men had the encounter ending in Asahel's death and issuing in Abner's own murder. ) Here immediately at "the great stone in Gibeon," some old landmark, Joab pursuing the Benjamite rebel Sheba among the towns of his tribe met and treacherously murdered Amasa (2 Samuel 20:5-10). Retributively it was here also that Joab met his doom from Benaiah while clinging to the brazen altar of the tabernacle at Gibeon (1 Kings 2:28-34; 1 Chronicles 16:39-41
Absalom - Joab procured his recall, but he was not admitted into his father’s presence. In his usual imperious fashion he next compelled Joab to bring about his full restoration ( 2 Samuel 14:29 ff. This really happened, through Joab’s agency
Abner - In one of the conflicts between the two houses Abner was overcome, and Asahel, Joab's brother, 'light of foot as a wild roe,' pursued Abner. But Joab, who was absent, was angry when he heard of it, probably jealous lest the command of the army should be divided between himself and Abner. This last was accomplished, according to David's dying injunction, by the direction of King Solomon, and Joab was slain by Benaiah
Benaiah - He played an important role in the young king’s coronation ( 1 Kings 1:38 ; 1 Kings 1:44 ), and was subsequently ordered to dispatch Joab, whose place as commander-in-chief he then filled ( 1 Kings 2:28-35 )
Zabad - descendant, just as Joab, Abishai, and Asahel, are called from the mother's side sons of Zeruiah, who married a foreigner
Rabbah, Rabbath - Joab, however, attacked it, and, during its siege, Uriah, by the instigation of David, lost his life
Ahimaaz - When the royal forces had gained the victory, he offered to convey the news to David; but his request was refused by Joab because of Absalom's death. After Cushi had been despatched, Ahimaaz again solicited permission to run, and, having overcome Joab's reluctance, he started, outran Cushi, and apprised the king of the success achieved
Murder - )...
Not even Jehovah's altar could save Joab (1 Kings 2:5-6; 1 Kings 2:31). The sovereign assumed the power of executing or pardoning murderers (2 Samuel 1:15-16, David and the Amalekite slayer of Saul; 2 Samuel 13:39; 2 Samuel 14:7-11, David in respect to Anmon and Absalom; 1 Kings 2:34, Solomon and Joab)
Commander - When Abner was killed by Joab, David said to his servants (palace officials), “Know ye not that there is a prince and a great man fallen this day in Israel?” ( Joab, Abishai, and Ittai were “commanders” in David’s army (cf
Seraiah - Second son of Kenaz father of Joab, and brother of Othniel ( 1 Chronicles 4:13-14 ) 5
Hadadezer - Joab, who was sent against this confederate host, found them in double battle array, the Ammonities toward their capital of Rabbah, and the Syrian mercenaries near Medeba
Ahimaaz - Joab at first refused; but after Cushi had started, he allowed Ahimaaz to go also; who, being swift of foot, reached David first and told him of the defeat of Absalom, but let Cushi tell of his death
Abner - But he was treacherously murdered by David’s commander Joab, in retaliation for Abner’s earlier killing of Joab’s brother in battle (2 Samuel 3:24-30; cf
Gibeon - ...
This place is again brought into notice as the scene of a battle between the army of Ish-bosheth under Abner and that of David led by Joab. ...
Here, "at the great stone," Amasa was put to death by Joab (2 Samuel 20:5-10 ). To the altar of burnt-offering which was at Gibeon, Joab (1 Kings 2:28-34 ), who had taken the side of Adonijah, fled for sanctuary in the beginning of Solomon's reign, and was there also slain by the hand of Benaiah
Teko'a, - The "wise woman" whom Joab employed to effect a reconciliation between David and Absalom was obtained from this place
Helkath-Hazzurim - Joab had the command of David's army of trained men, who encamped on the south of the pool, which was on the east of the hill on which the town of Gibeon was built, while Abner's army lay on the north of the pool
Seraiah -
The father of Joab (1 Chronicles 4:13,14 )
Medeba - A fortress in David's time (1 Chronicles 19:7-15), before which Joab defeated Ammon and the Syrians of Maachah, Mesopotamia, and Zobah
Nahash - Again Hadarezer rallied the Syrian host, which was totally destroyed by the Israelite army under Joab in a decisive battle fought at Helam (2 Samuel 10:17 ), near to Hamath (1 Chronicles 18:3 )
Abel-Beth-Maacha - Sheba, son of Bichri, the rebel against David, 80 years before the Syrian invasion under Benhadad, Asa's ally, was here besieged by Joab; and the city was saved by the proverbial shrewdness of its inhabitants, who hearkened to their fellow townswoman's wise advice to sacrifice the one man Sheba to the safety of the whole inhabitants
Bena'Iah - (1 Chronicles 27:5 ) Benaiah remained faithful to Solomon during Adonijah's attempt on the crown, (1 Kings 1:8,10,32,38,44 ) and was raised unto the place of Joab as commander-in-chief of the whole army
Edom - David was striving with Aram of the two rivers (Naharaim) and Aram-Zobah when Joab returned and smote of Edom in the Valley of Salt (the scene also of Amaziah's victory over Edom, the plain S. Israel's slain lay unburied until Joab returned from smiting Edom along with Abishai. Translated in the title, "when David had beaten down Aram of the two floods," "when Joab returned," which he did not do all he had fully conquered the Syrians; Psalms 60:4, "Thou hast given a banner," etc. ...
David as king, Joab as commander in chief and Abishai under Joab, smote Edom. Abishai first killed 6,000, Joab afterward 12,000 (as the title of Psalm 60 states); so in all 18,000 (in 2 Samuel 8:13)
Abimelech - Abimelech's fate served as an illustration Joab used to protect himself from David (2 Samuel 11:21 )
Hadarezer - After Joab's first repulse of Ammon and their Syrian allies Hadarezer, undaunted by defeat twice (2 Samuel 8:3; 2 Samuel 8:5), sent a host under the command of Shophach to assist his kinsmen of Maachah, Rehob, and Ishtob; David in person routed them completely at Helam; thus, the Syrian confederacy was overthrown, Hadarezer's subordinate princes submitted to David who dedicated to Jehovah the 1000 "shields" or "weapons (shelet ) of gold" taken in the first war; these were long known as king David's (Song of Solomon 4:4; 2 Chronicles 23:9). Psalm 60 by David was composed after victory in part had been gained over Aram Naharaim (Syria of the two floods) and Aram (Syria) of Zobah the kingdom of Hadarezer, who had come to help his vassals of Mesopotamia, the region of the two rivers Tigris and Euphrates; after having conquered the two Syrias, Joab returned and smote Edom in the valley of Salt; Psalm 60 refers to the expedition subsequently undertaken to occupy Edom in revenge for Edom's invasion of Israel
Gihon - This probably was the way Joab entered into the city and captured it for David (2 Samuel 5:8 ; 1 Chronicles 11:6 )
Tekoa - The wise woman whom Joab suborned to persuade David to restore Absalom belonged to Tekoa (2 Samuel 14)
Gibeon - It was near 'the great stone' in Gibeon that Joab treacherously slew Amasa; and in retribution it was to the same city he fled to lay hold on the horns of the altar for protection, but where he was put to death
Left, Remain - So, yether is used to refer to “the rest of the vessels” left in Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar (1618384002_31 RSV), and the men who were left after Joab had assigned his picked men in the battle lines ( Absalom - ...
After three years without a recognized heir to David in Jerusalem, David’s army commander Joab was worried about the stability of David’s dynasty
Samuel, Second Book of - There were wars between the two houses, but David does not appear in them; they were conducted by Joab and Abner. Abner, taking affront at the rebuke of Ish-bosheth concerning Rizpah, Saul's concubine, revolted to David; but as he had previously killed Asahel, Joab's brother, in one of the wars, Joab treacherously slew him, doubtless as much out of jealousy as to avenge the death of his brother. Even Joab could see that it was an error, and sought to divert the king from his purpose; but Satan succeeded, and the people were numbered
Uriah - After David’s ineffectual attempt to use him as a shield for his own sin, he was killed in battle in accordance with the instructions of David to Joab
Play - Thus we read, (2 Samuel 2:14) "Abner said to Joab, let the young men now arise and play before us
Trumpet - Joab sounded the trumpet, to give the signal of retreat to his soldiers, in the battle against those of Abner's party, and in that against Absalom; and lastly, in the pursuit of Sheba the son of Bichri
Beard - Only the nearest friends were permitted to touch the beard, which marks the foul treachery of Joab in taking his cousin Amasa's beard to kiss him, or rather it (2 Samuel 20:9)
Gibeon - Here the champions of David fought those of the rival king Ish-bosheth ( 2 Samuel 2:18-32 ), and defeated them; and here Joab murdered Amasa ( 2 Samuel 20:9 )
Hadad - He escaped the massacre of Edomites perpetrated by Joab, David’s general, and fled (according to the received reading) to Egypt, whose king befriended him, and gave him his sister-in-law as his wife
Obadi'ah - ) ...
The son of Jehiel, of the sons of Joab, who came up in the second caravan with Ezra
Uriah - ...
David's attempt to hide his sin by bringing Uriah home to his wife from the war with Ammon was foiled by Uriah's right sentiment as a soldier and chivalrous devotion to Israel and to God: "the ark and Israel and Judah abide in tents, and my lord Joab and the servants of my lord are encamped in the open fields; shall I then go into mine house to eat, drink, and lie with my wife?" This answer was well fitted to pierce David's conscience, but desire of concealment at all costs urged David on. ...
On the third day David, by a letter which he consigned to Uriah's charge, bade his ready tool Joab set this brave soldier in the forefront of the fight
Benaiah - Having remained faithful in Adonijah's rebellion (1 Kings 1:8; 1 Kings 1:10; 1 Kings 1:32-38; 1 Kings 1:44), and having by Solomon's command slain him and Joab, he was promoted to the latter's post as commander in chief (1 Kings 2:25; 1 Kings 2:34-35; 1 Kings 4:4)
Forest - It was in this forest that Absalom was slain by Joab
Jebus - ...
But Joab ascended the height and took it (2 Samuel 5:6-9; 1 Chronicles 11:6)
Kiss - The kiss of betrayal from Judas does not belong to the category of the kiss of Joab to Amasa (2 Samuel 20:9 ), but was the sign of respect from pupil to master
Ahimaaz - Joab, knowing David's fondness for Absalom, had not wished Ahimaaz to go at all on that day, but youths will hardly believe their elders wiser than themselves
za'Dok - (2 Samuel 19:11 ) When Adonijah, in David's old age, set up for king, and had persuaded Joab, and Abiathar the priest, to join his party, Zadok was unmoved, and was employed by David to anoint Solomon to be king in his room
Sim'Eon - (Joshua 19:1-8 ; 1 Chronicles 4:28-33 ) Of these places, with the help of Judah, the Simeonites possessed themselves, (Judges 1:3,17 ) and there they were found, doubtless by Joab, residing in the reign of David
Adonijah - The old, trusted servants of the kingdom, Joab and Abiathar, rally round him, as one would expect; he gathers his friends together at the stone of Zoheleth, and by the visible act of sacrificing, proclaims his kingship; this last was, however, an act of unwisdom, as it gave a handle to his enemies, for king David was still alive. Had the old commander-in-chief Joab had time to assemble his forces, no doubt the issue would have been different; but Bathsheba and her friends had laid their plans too well, and they won the day
Ever, Everlasting - Le‛ôlâm is applied to the curse set upon the dead Joab and his descendants. The other more dynamic phrase (‘ad ‛ôlâm), applied to David and his descendants, emphasizes the ever-continued, ever-acting presence of the blessing extended into the “indefinite future”: “Their blood shall therefore return upon the head of Joab, and upon the head of his seed for ever [5]: but upon David, and upon his seed, and upon his house, and upon his throne, shall there be peace for ever [6] from the Lord
Peace - ” This meaning is found in questions: “And Joab said to Amasa, Art thou in health, my brother? And Joab took Amasa by the beard with the right hand to kiss him” ( Ittai - At the battle of Mahunaim Ittai had equal rank with Joab and Abishai (2 Samuel 18:2; 2 Samuel 18:5; 2 Samuel 18:12)
Hadad - In childhood escaped the massacre of every Edomite male by Joab, and fled into Egypt
Kiss - " (1 Thessalonians 5:26; 1 Peter 5:14)...
This was supposed (however treachery lurked under the garb), to have been the case when Joab took Amasa by the beard with the right hand to kiss him. (see 2 Samuel 20:9) And yet more, in an infinitely greater degree, when Judas hailed Christ with the awful salutation, "Joy to thee Rabbi, (for so hail means) and kissed him?" (Matthew 26:49) In the former instance, Joab took Amasa by the beard, we are told, which was an action betokening the highest regard of affection: for as the beard was always considered the chief honour and ornament of a man, so to touch it or kiss it was considered the highest proof of respect
David - The rebellions of Absalom, Sheba, and Adonijah, the famine and plague that afflicted his people, the crimes of Joab, etc. His charge to Solomon respecting the forfeited lives of Joab and Shimei, was the voice of justice and not of revenge
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh who gave the sister of his queen in marriage to Hadad, an Edomite of royal blood, who escaped the massacre of Joab and fled to Egypt
Grave - Joshua was buried in “his inheritance in Timnath-serah (Joshua 24:30 ); Samuel on his estate at Ramah (1 Samuel 25:1 ; 1 Samuel 28:3 ); Joab on his property in the desert (1 Kings 2:34 ); Manasseh “in the garden of his own house” (2 Kings 21:18 ); and Jesus in the garden tomb of Joseph of Arimathea (Matthew 27:60 ; Mark 15:46 ; Luke 23:53 ; John 19:41 )
Servant, Service - ...
Many persons in the Old Testament are called "servants, " among them Abraham (Genesis 26:24 ), Jacob (Genesis 32:4 ), Joshua (Joshua 24:29 ), Ruth (Ruth 3:9 ), Hannah (1 Samuel 1:11 ), Samuel (1 Samuel 3:9 ), Jesse (1 Samuel 17:58 ), Uriah the Hittite (2 Samuel 11:21 ), Joab (2 Samuel 14:20 ), Isaiah (Isaiah 20:3 ), Daniel (Daniel 9:17 ), Ben-Hadad of Aram (1 Kings 20:32 ), and Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (Jeremiah 25:9 )
Adonijah - Adonijah was supported by Abiathar, Eli's descendant of Ithamar's (Aaron's fourth son's) line, the junior line, and Joab who perhaps had a misgiving as to the possibility of Solomon's punishing his murder of Abner and Amasa, and a grudge toward David for having appointed the latter commander in chief in his stead (2 Samuel 19:13)
Census - We read that Joab did not finish the numbering of the people "because there fell wrath for it against Israel," 1 Chronicles 27:24 : so that the number in Samuel may be of those actually counted, and that in Chronicles may include an estimate of the districts not canvassed
Refuge, Cities of - One who has treacherously sullied his hands with blood can find no refuge at the altar of God; he may be taken from it to death ( Exodus 21:14 ), or he may even be struck down at the altar, as was the fate of Joab ( 1 Kings 2:30-31 ; 1 Kings 2:34 ). It is not at all likely that Joab’s death was brought about at the altar in Jerusalem because of some exceptional authority exercised over it by the king. Joab evidently knew he could be put to death there ( 1 Kings 2:30 )
Burial - Joab (1 Kings 2:34 ) "was buried in his own house in the wilderness
Solomon - He put to death Adonijah who had usurped the throne, and Joab who had shed innocent blood; and he cast Abiathar out of the priesthood
Abijah - David may have had 30,000 with him at Jerusalem, from whence Joab went out, which may be here included, but which are not included in 1 Chronicles 21:5
Girdle - A girdle curiously and richly wrought was among the ancient Hebrews a mark of honour, and sometimes bestowed as a reward of merit: for this was the recompense which Joab declared he meant to bestow on the man who put Absalom to death: "Why didst thou not smite him there to the ground? and I would have given thee ten shekels of silver, and a girdle," 2 Samuel 18:11
David - The first encounter between the two opposing armies, led on the one side by Abner, and on the other by Joab, took place at the pool of Gibeon. Abner now sided with David, and sought to promote his advancement; but was treacherously put to death by Joab in revenge for his having slain his brother Asahel at Gibeon (3:22-39). Absalom, afraid of the consequences of his guilt, fled to Geshur beyond Jordan, where he remained for three years, when he was brought back through the intrigue of Joab (2 Samuel 14 ). Absalom's army was defeated, and himself put to death by the hand of Joab (9-18). Joab favoured Adonijah
Epistle - The first mentioned in the Old Testament is that of David to Joab, sent by Uriah (2 Samuel 11:14); a usage perhaps borrowed from the Phoenicians, with whose king Hiram he was intimate
Sheba - Knowing that Joab and Abishai were on his heels, he shut himself up in Abel-beth-maacah (modern Abil ), a town in the extreme north. The place would speedily have been carried by assault had not a woman, whose judgment was highly esteemed by the inhabitants, persuaded them to throw Sheba’s head over the wall to Joab ( 2 Samuel 20:4 )
Mediator, Mediation - They also use mediators to argue a case or to negotiate terms of peace with a hostile party, as Moses did with Pharaoh on behalf of Israel (Exodus 6:28-12:32 ) and Joab did with David on behalf of Absalom (2 Samuel 14:1-24 ). Both kinds of mediation are sometimes intertwined in the Bible, as when Moses used Aaron to mediate between himself and Pharaoh (Exodus 7:1-2 ) and Joab used the wise woman of Tekoa to mediate his message about Absalom to David (2 Samuel 14:2-20 )
Absalom - And, then, all the plots and counter-plots connected with Absalom's revenge, and flight, and restoration, and too-late reconciliation to his father; his deep-laid schemes to wrench the kingdom out of his father's hands; and then his defeat and murder by Joab-all that, if we have the courage to look at it, will give us a picture of the men and the times, humiliating beyond all words, and never to be forgotten. David and his wives and concubines and mixed-up children, Tamar and her half-brother Amnon, Absalom and Jonadab, Joab and the wise woman of Tekoa, Ittai and Shimei, Ahithophel and Hushai, and the righteousness and the grace of God reigning over them all. For it was David's unwillingness to trouble Amnon that made Absalom in the cause of his sister first a murderer, and then a conspirator, and then, after a life of terrible trouble, himself a mangled corpse under the revengeful and murderous hands of Joab, that other arch-troubler of Israel
David - He, with a noble confidence, made the commander of the rebel forces general of his own army, in the room of Joab, whom he intended to call to an account for murder and other crimes. In the close of his life, and in the near prospect of death, to demonstrate his love of justice, he charged Solomon to punish with death Joab, for the base murder of two great men, whom he assassinated under the pretence of peace and friendship
da'Vid - Fortifications were added by the king and by Joab, and it was known by the special name of the "city of David. The occasion which led to this warning was the census of the people taken by Joab at the king's orders, (2 Samuel 24:1-9 ; 1 Chronicles 21:1-7 ; 27:23,24 ) which was for some reason sinful in God's sight
Army - ...
A "captain of the host," or commander in chief, led the army in time of war; as Abner under Saul, Joab under David. Levi and Benjamin were not reckoned, the latter owing to Joab's repugnance to the census (1 Chronicles 21:6)
Altar - Joab was denied the sanctuary of the horns because he had conspired to kill Amasa and Abner
Shimei - " The impunity of Shimei as of Joab had brought the law into discredit, for Shimei was living in court favor at Jerusalem, "thou hast with thee Shimei" (1 Kings 2:8)
Fortification And Siegecraft - It was on a similar outer wall ( chçl ) that the ‘wise woman of Abel of Beth-maacah’ held parley with Joab ( 2 Samuel 20:15 ; for the reading see Cent. According to 1 Chronicles 11:6 , Joab was the first to scale the walls of the Jebusite fortress of Zion, when David took it by assault. This was evidently the method adopted by Joab at the blockade of Rabbath-ammon, which was forced to capitulate after the capture of the ‘water fort’ (for this rendering see Cent. The ‘mount’ is first met with in the account of Joab’s siege of Abel of Beth-maacah ( 2 Samuel 20:15 ff. ]'>[6] Joab is represented as, at the same time, ‘battering’ or, in RVm David - But Abner was murdered by Joab, David's nephew and commander-in-chief, a man too powerful to be punished; and shortly after Ish-bosheth was assassinated by two of his officers; and then the nation was reunited; and David reigned over the kingdom of Israel; seven years and six months having elapsed since he had taken the crown of Judah. He had lingered at Jerusalem, while Joab was besieging Rabbah of the children of Ammon
Letter - ...
Old Testament One of the earliest biblical references to a letter was the letter that David wrote to Joab about Uriah (2 Samuel 11:14-15 )
Save - So Joab told Abishai: “If the Syrians be too strong for me, then thou shalt help me …” ( Mesopotamia - About four hundred years after Cushan-Rishathaim, we find the northern parts of Mesopotamia in the hands of the Syrians of Zobah; as we are told, in 2 Samuel x, that Hadarezer, king of Zobah, after his defeat by Joab, "sent and brought out the Syrians that were beyond the river" Euphrates
Give - And Joab gave up the sum of the number of the people to the king
Goel - It would seem that if no avenger of blood appeared, or if he were dilatory in the pursuit of the murderer, it became the duty of the magistrate himself to inflict the sentence of the law; and thus we find that David deemed this to be his duty in the case of Joab, and that Solomon, in obedience to his father's dying entreaty, actually discharged it by putting that murderer to death, ...
1 Kings 2:5 ; 1 Kings 6:28-34
David - In the meantime David, hearing what is going on in Jerusalem, withdraws across the Jordan, and halts at Mahanaim; here he gathers his forces together under the leadership of Joab. Whilst thus hanging he is pierced by Joab, in spite of David’s urgent command that he should not be harmed. A second rebellion, of a much less serious character, was that of Sheba, who sought to draw the northern tribes from their allegiance; it was, however, easily quelled by Joab (ch
Solomon - He also executed the commander-in-chief of the army, Joab (1 Kings 2:28-34), and sent the priest Abiathar into exile (1 Kings 2:26-27)
Arms - The BATON, or SCEPTRE (shebet ) used in 2 Samuel 18:14 of the "darts" with which Joab killed Absalom
Heart - 28:29); “… [1] took three darts in his hand, and thrust them through the heart of Absalom …” ( Tombs - ...
Joshua was buried in his inheritance in Timnath Serah (Nehemiah 3:15-16); Samuel in his own house at Ramah (1 Samuel 25:1); Joab in his house in the wilderness (1 Kings 2:34), i. ...
This explains the difficulty, "they buried Samuel in his house" (his tomb, not his dwelling: Isaiah 22:16, where "habitation" is explained by "sepulchre"): 1 Samuel 25:1; 1 Kings 2:34, "Joab was buried in his own house in the wilderness"; 2 Chronicles 33:20, "they buried Manasseh in his own house," which is explained 2 Kings 21:18, "in the garden of his own house, in the garden of Uzza
Feet - ...
1 Kings 2:5 (a) This is a reference to the evil way of Joab in killing those whom he thought might hinder his leadership, and replace him as the general of the army
Leper - ...
It was generally hereditary (compare 2 Samuel 3:29, "let there not fail from the house of Joab
Wise, Skilled - Joab hired a “wise” woman to make David change his mind about Absalom ( Deliver - 14:45), and when Joab and his men were to help one another in battle ( David - in His Races - David might have put Joab, and Shimei, and all the rest of his tutors and governors, in the front of the battle as he put Uriah; but he could not cast a piece of a millstone on his Maker from the walls of Rabbah, and he would not now if he could. David held back his bad passions at Saul, and at Shimei, and at Joab, occasion after occasion, till we were almost worshipping David
Court Systems - Powerful third parties were involved in the first two cases; Joab set up the audience with David, and the Shunammite had an advocate present in the person of Gehazi, Elisha's servant
Armour, Arms - ...
The armourbearer is met with as early as the time of Abimelech ( Judges 9:54 ), and later in connexion with Jonathan, Saul, and Goliath, and with Joab, who had several ( 2 Samuel 18:15 )
King - Joab, 2 Samuel 12:27 )
Jerusalem - David at last took the hitherto impregnable stronghold, which was therefore called "the city of David" (Joab being the first in the assault, 1 Chronicles 11:6), and built his palace there. of the city, watered by Ain Ayub (the well of Joab)
David - Jesse's wife, David's mother, is not named; but Nahash her former husband is the one by whom she had two daughters, David's half-sisters: Zeruiah, mother of Abishai, Joab and Asahel; and Abigail, mother of Amasa by Jether or Ithra (1 Chronicles 2:13-17; 2 Samuel 17:25). Joab had ten (2 Samuel 18:15)
David - Violence and political intrigue are interspersed in the accounts of David's wars, Saul's attempts on David's life, the violence of Joab and his brothers, the murder of Uriah, fratricide among David's sons, the slaughter of the helpless Absalom, and David's plans for the deaths of his enemies soon after his own death
Hospitality - Joab would have been safe had he not outlawed himself in this regard ( 1 Kings 2:31 ff
Census - ...
The next numbering was that by David, contrary to Joab's advice (2 Samuel 24:1-9; 1 Chronicles 21:1; 1 Chronicles 21:5; 1 Chronicles 27:24). The census was not completed, through the reluctance of Joab to proceed, and through David's revoking the order before it was finished
Solomon - The deposition of Abiathar, and the execution of Joab and Shimei, were natural consequences; and in the case of the two last, Solomon was only following the advice of his father ( 1 Kings 2:5 ; 1 Kings 2:8 )
Solomon - ) Joab the murderer he put to death, according to his father's dying charge, illustrating Solomon's own words, Ecclesiastes 8:12-13
Jerusalem - And he built the city round about, even from Millo round about, and Joab repaired the rest of the city