What does Jethro mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יִתְר֨וֹ father-in-law of Moses; also ‘Jether’. 3
יִתְרוֹ֙ father-in-law of Moses; also ‘Jether’. 1
יִתְר֖וֹ father-in-law of Moses; also ‘Jether’. 1
יִתְר֔וֹ father-in-law of Moses; also ‘Jether’. 1
יִתְרוֹ֒ father-in-law of Moses; also ‘Jether’. 1
יִתְר֥וֹ father-in-law of Moses; also ‘Jether’. 1
יֶ֣תֶר father-in-law of Moses; also ‘Jether’. 1
יִתְר֛וֹ father-in-law of Moses; also ‘Jether’. 1

Definitions Related to Jethro

H3503


   1 father-in-law of Moses; also ‘Jether’.
   Additional Information: Jethro = “his abundance”.
   

Frequency of Jethro (original languages)

Frequency of Jethro (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jethro
Father-in-law of Moses. When as a youth, Moses' life was in danger from Pharao, he took flight and went to Madian. He found a home with Raguel the priest, and eventually married Sephora, one of his seven daughters (Exodus 2). There is a tradition that he is buried on the Mount of Beatitudes.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Jethro
(jehth' roh) Personal name meaning, “excess” or “superiority.” In Exodus 3:1 , a priest of Midian and the father-in-law of Moses. Some variation exists in the Bible regarding the name of Moses' father-in-law. In Exodus 2:18 , his name is Reuel. In Numbers 10:29 it is Hobab. The nature of the relationship of these names to one another is uncertain. Of particular interest is that Jethro was a Midianite priest. The deity whom he served is not explicitly identified; in Exodus 18:11 , however, he declared Yahweh to be greater than all gods. One school of thought has discovered the origin of Israel's Yahwism in the ancient Midianite religion represented by Jethro. Such an origin is unlikely. Yahwistic faith probably is traceable at least as far back as Abraham. See Moses ; Yahweh.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jethro
Jethro (jç'thro or jĕth'ro), his excellence. A priest or prince of Midian, and father-in-law of Moses. Exodus 3:1. He is called Raguel (R. V. "Reuel"), Numbers 10:29, and Reuel, Exodus 2:18, and was probably known by either name, while Jethro was his official title. It is highly probable, too, that he was a descendant of Abraham by Keturah, the mother of Midian, Genesis 25:2; but what was the nature of his office as priest—or prince, as some say it should be rendered—we know not.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jethro
Father-in-law of Moses, and a priest of Midian, with whom Moses spent forty years of his life. He brought to Moses his wife and their two sons soon after Israel had left Egypt. He advised Moses to appoint judges for minor cases. He rejoiced and blessed God for the deliverance He had given to His people, and said, "Now I know that Jehovah is greater than all gods: for in the thing wherein they dealt proudly he was above them." He also took a burnt offering and sacrifices for God: and Aaron and all the elders of Israel came to eat bread with him before God. He thus prefigures the joy of the Gentiles in the Lord's salvation and deliverance witnessed to them in His dealings with Israel. Deuteronomy 32:43 ; Psalm 67 ; Psalm 117 . He departed again to his own land. Exodus 3:1 ; Exodus 4:18 ; Exodus 18:1-12 .
He is apparently called REUELin Exodus 2:18 ; and HOBAB in Numbers 10:29 , where RAGUELis REUELin the Hebrew. This passage says that Raguel, the Midianite, was the father of HOBAB, the father-in-law of Moses (see also Judges 4:11 ), so that in Exodus 2:18 'father' may signify 'grandfather.' Hobab may have been the personal name, and Jethro an official name. In Judges 1:16 Moses' father-in-law is called a Kenite, but the exact signification of this term is not known.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jethro
His excellence; his posterity
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jethro
JETHRO (once, Exodus 4:18 a Jether ). An Arab sheik and priest of the Sinaitic Peninsula, the father-in-law of Moses; referred to by this name in Exodus 3:1 ; Exodus 4:18 ; Exodus 18:1-2 ff. (E [1] ), as Reuel in the present text of Exodus 2:18 (J [2] ), and as Hobab in Numbers 10:29 (also J [2] ). He welcomed Moses and received him into his family ( Exodus 2:21 ), and many years later visited him at Sinai ( Exodus 18:1 ff.), heard with wonder and delight of the doings of Jahweh on behalf of Israel ( Exodus 18:9 ff.), and gave advice about administration ( Exodus 18:17-26 ). Later still he probably acted as guide to the Israelites ( Numbers 10:29 ff.; cf. the AV [4] of Judges 1:16 ; Judges 4:11 ). As to the two or three names, it may be noted that Arabic inscriptions (Minæan) repeatedly give a priest two names. The name Jethro (Heb. Yithrô ) may mean ‘pre-eminence.’ See art. Hobab.
W. Taylor Smith.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Jethro
Idolatrous high priest of Midian. Father of Zipporah, father-in-law of Moses. Eventually he abandoned his pagan lifestyle and joined the Israelites in the desert shortly after the Exodus. There he suggested the creation of a hierarchy of magistrates and judges to assist Moses in the task of administrating justice. Also known by six other names, including Chever and Reu’el.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jethro
The father-in-law of Moses. This man is rendered memorable in Scripture history from his connection with Moses; but for this, it is more than probable he would never have been known even by name in the christian church. His name signifies excellence. His being a priest in Midian, doth not explain what his religion was. Some have thought, that he had a knowledge of the God of Israel, else Moses would not have been allied to him; and they that are of that opinion say, that he was descended from Midian, the son of Abraham, and Keturah. (See Genesis 25:1-2) There is some little difficulty in explaining one Scripture by another respecting this man. Exodus 3:1 he is called Jethro; Numbers 10:29 he is called Raguel; and some have thought, that Hobab was a third name by which he was known: but this, it should rather seem, was the brother of Moses's wife, Zipporah.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jethro
"Moses' father-in-law," a shepherd-prince or priest of Midian, Exodus 3:1 4:18 18:1-27 . When the Hebrews were at mount Sinai, he visited Moses, gave him some wise counsel as to the government of the tribes, and then returned to his own people. See Exodus 18:10,11 , and some infer that he was a descendant of Abraham, through Midian, Genesis 25:2 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jethro
His excellence, or gain, a prince or priest of Midian, who succeeded his father Reuel. Moses spent forty years after his exile from the Egyptian court as keeper of Jethro's flocks. While the Israelites were encamped at Sinai, and soon after their victory over Amalek, Jethro came to meet Moses, bringing with him Zipporah and her two sons. They met at the "mount of God," and "Moses told him all that the Lord had done unto Pharaoh" (Exodus 18:8 ). On the following day Jethro, observing the multiplicity of the duties devolving on Moses, advised him to appoint subordinate judges, rulers of thousands, of hundreds, of fifties, and of tens, to decide smaller matters, leaving only the weightier matters to be referred to Moses, to be laid before the Lord. This advice Moses adopted (Exodus 18 ). He was also called Hobab (q.v.), which was probably his personal name, while Jethro was an official name. (See MOSES .)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jethro
(See HOBAB.) Reuel's oldest son. Father-in-law of Moses, by whose counsel Moses chose chief men from the tribes to be rulers of thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, and to judge minor causes, reserving the weightier ones to himself (Exodus 18). "Jethro took a burnt offering and sacrifices for God," being a priest of the true God. The primitive faith still had its representatives here and there in the Gentile world after Abraham's call, e.g. Jethro, and Melchizedek. Reuel's name, from Εl ("God"), implies he too was a God-worshipping priest-prince of his tribe, though the majority of the tribe bordering on the Hamite Canaan were idolaters (Exodus 2:16). Zipporah's repugnance to circumcision (Exodus 4:24-26) shows that it was not universal even among worshippers of the true God.
She circumcised the younger son only to save Moses from God's wrath, the elder was evidently already circumcised. Moses' delay in circumcising the younger was a sinful yielding to his wife. The occurrence induced him to send her back and his sons, and not take them to Egypt; Jethro brought them to him after Israel's arrival at Sinai. Jethro of Midian (Abraham's descendant) celebrated a sacrificial meal with Aaron and Israel's elders; the representative firstfruits of the pagan who would afterward enter into fellowship with God and His people; as Amalek, another descendant of Abraham, represents on the contrary the pagan world hostile to the Lord and His people.

Sentence search

Ragu'el, -
Probably the same as Jethro. [1] (B
Hobab - He was apparently the father-in-law of Moses, and if so he is the same as Jethro. See Jethro
Zipporah - Daughter of Jethro, wife of Moses, and mother of Eliezer and Gershom. When Moses fled from Egypt into Midian, and there stood up in defense of the daughters of Jethro, priest or prince of Midian, against shepherds who would have hindered them form watering their flocks, Jethro took him into his house, and gave him his daughter Zipporah in marriage, Exodus 2:15-22 ; 4:25 ; 18:2-4
Raguel - See Jethro
Zipporah - Daughter of Reuel, or Jethro, and wife of Moses. She had been sent back during the tribulation and deliverance of Israel, and then was brought by Jethro with her two sons to Moses. Jethro is a type of the Gentile rejoicing in the deliverance of Israel, and bringing back the loved remnant thereof in the last days
Reuel - If he be identified with Jethro (q. ), then this may be regarded as his proper name, and Jether or Jethro (i
Raguel - Prince priest of Midian; father of Zipporah, Moses' wife, and of Jethro and Hobab. (See Jethro; HOBAB
Hobab - Son of Jethro, and brother-in-law to Moses, His name signifies, beloved, from Chabab, to love
Raguel - ), Exodus 2:18 , the father-in-law of Moses, and probably identical with Jethro (q
Jethro - Jethro (jç'thro or jĕth'ro), his excellence. "Reuel"), Numbers 10:29, and Reuel, Exodus 2:18, and was probably known by either name, while Jethro was his official title
Hobab - Jethro (Exodus 3:1 ; Exodus 18:2 ) and Reuel (Exodus 2:16 ) are also given as names for the father-in-law of the great lawgiver. Others say Reuel and Jethro were different names for the same person, while Hobab was the son of Reuel or Raguel (Numbers 10:29 ) and thus the brother-in-law of Moses. See Moses ; Jethro ; Reuel
Jethro - Moses spent forty years after his exile from the Egyptian court as keeper of Jethro's flocks. While the Israelites were encamped at Sinai, and soon after their victory over Amalek, Jethro came to meet Moses, bringing with him Zipporah and her two sons. On the following day Jethro, observing the multiplicity of the duties devolving on Moses, advised him to appoint subordinate judges, rulers of thousands, of hundreds, of fifties, and of tens, to decide smaller matters, leaving only the weightier matters to be referred to Moses, to be laid before the Lord. ), which was probably his personal name, while Jethro was an official name
Kenites - Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, was of this people
Jethro - "Jethro took a burnt offering and sacrifices for God," being a priest of the true God. Jethro, and Melchizedek. The occurrence induced him to send her back and his sons, and not take them to Egypt; Jethro brought them to him after Israel's arrival at Sinai. Jethro of Midian (Abraham's descendant) celebrated a sacrificial meal with Aaron and Israel's elders; the representative firstfruits of the pagan who would afterward enter into fellowship with God and His people; as Amalek, another descendant of Abraham, represents on the contrary the pagan world hostile to the Lord and His people
Hobab - According to one supposition he was the same as Jethro, Moses' father-in-law, Zipporah being called the daughter of Reuel as one of his descendants. According to another view, he was the brother of Jethro
Hobab - It is therefore probable that by this time Reuel's son Jethro had succeeded him in his hereditary priesthood. Moreover, Hobab is not Jethro (Exodus 18:27), for Jethro left the Israelites for his own land Midian before they reached Sinai, whereas Hobab accompanied them and settled in Canaan (Judges 1:16; Judges 4:11). ...
Hobab and Jethro ("excellency") were probably brothers of Zipporah, Moses' wife, and sons of Reuel; Hobab the younger, and therefore not bound, as Jethro the elder, to his own tribe by the duties of an hereditary priesthood. We do not hear of Jethro after his departure from Israel before Sinai. As Jethro helped Moses in counsel as a judicious administrator, so Hobab helped him as the experienced Arab sheikh familiar with the tracks, passes, and suitable places of the wilderness for an encampment, quick eyed in descrying the far off shrubs which betoken the presence of water, and knowing well where there was danger of hostile attacks
Jethro - Of particular interest is that Jethro was a Midianite priest. One school of thought has discovered the origin of Israel's Yahwism in the ancient Midianite religion represented by Jethro
Ithrite - ” Descendants of Jether or Jethro (Exodus 4:18 ) or a clan whose home was Kiriath-jearim (1 Chronicles 2:53 )
Zip'Porah, - daughter of Reuel or Jethro, the priest of Midian, wife of Moses and mother of his two sons Gershom and Eliezer
Jether - ), called elsewhere Jethro (q
Zipporah - (a) Daughter of Jethro; Moses’ wife
je'Thro - Reuel is probably his proper name, and Jethro his official title
Eliezer - He remained with his mother and brother Gershom with Jethro when Moses returned to Egypt. They were restored to Moses when Jethro heard of his departure out of Egypt
Jethro - Jethro (once, Exodus 4:18 a Jether ). The name Jethro (Heb
Reuel - See Jethro
Hobab - ) the father-in-law of Moses is uniformly named Jethro . Thus Jethro (E Raguel - These passages represent him as the father of Hobab and Zipporah, and he is generally supposed to be the same as Jethro, Moses' father-in-law. Some, however, think he was Jethro's father, and that he is called the father of the others as being the head of the family
Reuel - See Hobab and Jethro
Hobab - Beloved, the Kenite, has been usually identified with Jethro (q
Rephidim - Moses' father-in-law, Jethro, came to Rephidim and helped the leader delegate his authority over the people (Exodus 18:13-26 )
Jether - a mistake for Jethro
Rephidim - Moses' father-in-law, Jethro, came to Rephidim and helped the leader delegate his authority over the people (Exodus 18:13-26 )
Kenites - Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, was a Kenite, and his family accompanied the Israelites, and settled with other Kenites in various parts of the Holy Land, Judges 1:16 ; 4:11 ; 1 Samuel 30:29 ; 1 Chronicles 2:55
Kenites - Moses' father-in-law, Jethro, is called a “priest of Midian” (Exodus 3:1 ) and is described as a Kenite (Judges 1:16 ). See Moses , Jethro ; Cain ; Amalekites; Midianites
Goodness - Jethro rejoiced for all the goodness which Jehovah ...
had done to Israel
Midian, Midianites - Here he met Jethro (also called Reuel), the priest of Midian, and married his daughter. See Amalekites; Baal-peor ; Gideon ; Ishmaelites; Jethro ; Kenites
Kenites - people who dwelt westward of the Dead Sea, and extended themselves pretty far into Arabia Petraea: for Jethro, the priest of Midian, and father-in-law to Moses, was a Kenite, Judges 1:16 ; 1 Chronicles 2:55 ; 1 Samuel 15:6 . From the story of Jethro, who is expressly said to be a Midianite, they appear to have retained the worship of the true God among them; for which, and their kindness to the Israelites when passing their country, they were spared in the general destruction of the nations bordering on Canaan
Rephidim - While the Israelites were encamped at Rephidim, on the western side of Horeb, the mount of God, Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, who lived in that neighbourhood, and was priest and prince of Midian, came to visit him, with his wife Zipporah, and his two sons, Eleazar and Gershom, who had accompanied him part of the way to Egypt, but returned home again; and they rejoiced with him "for all the goodness which the Lord had done for Israel, whom he had delivered out of the hand of the Egyptians;" and upon this occasion, Jethro, as "a priest of the most high God," of the order of Melchizedek, "offered a burnt-offering and sacrifices of thanksgiving to God, at which Aaron and all the elders of Israel ate bread with Jethro before God," by a repetition of the eucharistic feast upon a sacrifice which Melchizedek formerly administered to Abraham, Genesis 14:18 ; Exodus 18:1-12 . Jethro appears to have been distinguished not only for his piety, but also for his political wisdom
je'Ther -
Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses
Kenite - Jethro, Moses' father-in-law, was a Kenite
Kenites - A Midianite race, for Jethro the Kenite is called priest prince of Midian (Exodus 2:15-16; Exodus 4:19; Obadiah 1:3-43; Judges 4:11). Evidently the Kenites to be dispossessed by Israel (Genesis 15:19) were distinct from the Kenites to whom Hobab and Jethro belonged. The Muzeiny commit their flocks to women, as Jethro committed his to his daughters
Jethro - Exodus 3:1 he is called Jethro; Numbers 10:29 he is called Raguel; and some have thought, that Hobab was a third name by which he was known: but this, it should rather seem, was the brother of Moses's wife, Zipporah
Midian - Its chief was Jethro (or Reuel), whose daughter Moses married (v
Rechabites - " These Kenites, afterward styled Rechabites, were of the family of Jethro, otherwise called Hobab, whose daughter Moses married; for "the children of the Kenite, Moses's father-in-law," it is said, "went up out of the city of palm trees with the children of Judah, and dwelt among the people," Judges 1:16 ; and we read of "Heber the Kenite, who was of the children of Hobab, the father-in- law of Moses, who had severed himself from the Kenites," or from the bulk of them who settled in the tribe of Judah, "and pitched his tent in the plain of Zaanaim," Judges 4:11 . They appear to have sprung from Midian, the son of Abraham by Keturah, Genesis 25:2 ; for Jethro, from whom they are descended, is called a Midianite, Numbers 10:23
Ken'Ite, the, - They were a branch of the larger nation of Midian, --from the fact that Jethro, who in Exodus (see ( Exodus 2:15,16 ; 4:19 ) etc
Jethro - ' Hobab may have been the personal name, and Jethro an official name
Midian, Mtdianites - Jethro (E Kenites - Jethro, or Raguel, Moses' father-in-law, is called a Kenite, Judges 1:16 , and is also called a Midianite
Prince - Indeed the word is sometimes rendered priest also, as in thee case of Jethro, priest or prince of Midian
Eliezer - ' He, with his mother and his brother were left in the care of Jethro until after the Exodus, when they joined Moses in the wilderness
Kenites - Jethro was of this tribe (Judges 1:16 )
Counsel, To - 18:19, where Jethro says to his son-in-law Moses: “I will give thee counsel, and God shall be with thee
Jael - Wife of Heber the Kenite, a descendant of Jethro, father-in-law of Moses, who was head of an Arab clan which was established in the north of Palestine
Left, Remain - The name of Jethro, Moses’ father-inlaw, is derived from this word
Priests - Jethro, the priest of Midian, brought sacrifices to God and worshiped with Moses, Aaron, and the elders of Israel (Exodus 18:12 )
Midian - It farther passed to the south of the land of Edom, into the peninsula of Mount Sinai, where Moses met with the daughter of Jethro, the priest of Midian, whom he married
Exodus, Book of - Jethro brought to Moses his wife and his two sons: sacrifices were offered by Jethro, a Gentile, who ate with Israel
Midianite - Here in Midian Moses became the servant and afterwards the son-in-law of Reuel or Jethro, the priest
Hate - Jethro advised Moses to select men who hated [4]5 covetousness to be secondary judges over Israel ( Caleb - "...
By marriage and submission to the bond of Jehovah's covenant with Israel he became a true Israelite by adoption; a specimen of God's mercy to the Gentiles even in Old Testament times, and a pledge of the opening of the door of faith to them widely in the New Testament So Jethro, Rahab, Ruth, Naaman
Elder - Moses had, at the suggestion of Jethro, appointed officers to administer justice, Exodus 18:26, but he seems to have required, further, a body of (if they may be so called) political advisers
Moses - ...
While Moses may have learned about his ancestral God from Jethro, his father-in-law, the "priest of Midian" (Exodus 3:1 ), his first encounter with the Lord is at Mount Horeb, where he observes a bush burning with fire, and hears God's announcement that he is the God of Moses' ancestors. When he is overwhelmed by the numbers of people coming to him for legal decisions (Exodus 18:13 ), he willingly follows the advice of Jethro as to how he should conduct his judicial responsibilities (Exodus 18:24-26 )
Exodus - ) Moses ( Exodus 2:1 ; Exodus 2:10 ), whose father-in-law is Jethro ( Exodus 3:1 ), receives his revelation ( Exodus 3:6 ; Exodus 3:21 Exodus 3:21 f) and commission ( Exodus 4:17 f. Jethro visits and advises Moses (ch
Judges - Sigonius supposes that these elders and judges of cities were the original constitution settled in the wilderness by Moses, upon the advice given him by Jethro, Exodus 18:21-22 , and continued by divine appointment after the settlement in the land of Canaan; whereas others imagine that the Jethronian prefectures were a peculiar constitution, suited to their condition while encamped in the wilderness, but laid aside after they came into Canaan
Moses - Here he married Zipporah, daughter of the wise and pious Jethro, and became familiar with life in the desert
Exodus, Book of - Moses' father-in-law Jethro brought Moses' wife and children back to him in the wilderness and praised God for all that He had done for Moses and the people. Jethro also advised Moses how to organize a more efficient judicial system, relieving Moses of stress (Exodus 18:1 )
Call - Often the summons is in the form of a friendly invitation, as when Reuel (or Jethro) told his daughters to “invite him [2] to have something to eat” ( Wells - A trough was also placed by the well, from which the daughters of Jethro watered his flocks, Exodus 2:16 ; and, if we may judge from circumstances, was a usual contrivance in every part of the east
Samaritan Pentateuch - ) Names reduced to one uniform spelling, where the Hebrew has various forms, as Jethro and Joshua
Moses - ...
In Midian Moses lived with a local chief named Jethro (or Reuel), from whom he probably learnt much about desert life and tribal administration. He married one of Jethro’s daughters, and from her had two sons (Exodus 2:16-22; Exodus 18:1-3)
Moses - In the land of Midian he married Zipporah, daughter of Jethro, the priest of Midian, by whom he had two sons
Priest, Christ as - The priestly activity of drawing near to God in sacrifice and prayer is introduced in the Old Testament through Abel the head of a family (Genesis 4:4 ), Melchizedek the king of Salem and priest of God Most High (Genesis 14:18 ), Jethro the priest of Midian (Exodus 18:1 ), Aaron (Exodus 28:1 ), and the Levites (Exodus 32:28-29 ; Numbers 1:47-53 )
Balaam - Abimelech of Gerar, Melchizedek, Job, Jethro, are all instances of the truth that knowledge of the one true God was not restricted to Abraham's descendants
mo'Ses - They returned unusually soon to their father, Jethro, and told him of their adventure
Israel - Moses, they tell us, fled from Egypt and took refuge in Midian with Jethro, a Kenite priest (cf. ), it was Jethro, the Kenite or Midianite priest, who initiated them into the rite and mediated the covenant
Arabia - The greater part of this division was more exclusively the possession of the Midianites, or land of Midian; where Moses, having fled from Egypt, married the daughter of Jethro, and spent forty years keeping the flocks of his father-in-law: no humiliating occupation in those days, and particularly in Midian, which was a land of shepherds; the whole people having no other way of life than that of rearing and tending their flocks, or in carrying the goods they received from the east and south into Phenicia and Egypt. It was a similar flock also which the daughters of Jethro were watering when first encountered by Moses; a trifling event in itself, but important in the history of the future leader of the Jews; and showing, at the same time, the simple life of the people among whom he was newly come, as well as the scanty supply of water in their country, and the strifes frequently occasioned in obtaining a share of it
Priest, Priesthood - Jethro, Moses' father-in-law and the priest of Midian, was also recognized as non-Israelite priest of the true God of Sinai by Moses, Aaron, and the elders of Israel (Exodus 2:16 ; 3:1 ; 18:1,10-12 )
Deuteronomy, the Book of - In first recording the appointment of captains, he attributes it to Jethro's counsel (Exodus 18:17, etc. Jethro doubtless suggested the plan, and Moses, after consulting God, laid it before the people, assigning the choice to them
Job - Melchizedec, king of Salem, was a priest of the primitive order, Genesis 14:18 ; such also was Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, in the vicinity of Idumea, Exodus 18:12
Exodus, the Book of - The only step attributed to human sagacity, the organizing of a body of assistant judges (Exodus 18), is attributed to Jethro not Moses
Gentiles - The native chiefs of Canaan treat Abraham with respect; the Pharaoh who makes Joseph lord of his house calls him ‘a man in whom the spirit of God is’; the daughter of the Pharaoh of the oppression is moved with compassion at the sight of the child Moses, and brings him up as her son; Jethro receives Moses when an exile into his family, guides him in the desert, and instructs him in the art of governing; Rahab and Ruth ‘take refuge under the wings of the God of Israel,’ and their names are in the regal genealogy; Ittai the Gittite cleaves to David, when almost all have forsaken him; the Queen of Sheba comes to hear the wisdom of Solomon; the Tyrian Hiram supplies him with materials when building the Temple, having been ‘ever a lover of David’; the widow of Zarephath, nearly destitute herself, feeds the famishing Elijah; and Naaman, the Syrian general, confesses his faith in the God of Elisha as the one true God; Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian slave, rescues Jeremiah from death, and is rewarded with a promise of personal immunity from danger; Job, an Arabian shaikh, is the lofty teacher of how ‘to suffer and be strong’; Cyrus the Persian Is the Lord’s anointed, and the deliverer of His people
Priest - )...
Job (Exodus 5:1-3), Jethro (Exodus 2:16; 2 Chronicles 19:8-107), and Balaam represent the patriarchal priest (Numbers 23:2)
Circumcision - But Moses, while in Midian with Jethro his father-in-law, did not circumcise his two sons born in that country; and during the journey of the Israelites in the wilderness, their children were not circumcised
Balaam - To keep to the Old Testament-Melchizedek, and Jethro, and Balaam, and Job were all such divine witnesses to the profane lands in which they lived
Government of the Hebrews - Yet Moses, by the advice of Jethro, his father-in-law, increased the number of rulers by the appointment of an additional number of judges; some to judge over ten, some over fifty, some over a hundred, and some over a thousand, men, Exodus 18:13-26
Offerings And Sacrifices - Even before the revelation to Moses at Sinai, offerings and sacrifices were a key part of the practice of relationship with God from Cain and Abel, to Noah, to the patriarchs, to Jethro the priest of Median, to the ratification of the Mosaic covenant by sacrifice before the tabernacle was built
Trial-at-Law - The institution of judgment by wise and able ‘elders’ is by the Elohistic writer ascribed to Moses, acting on the advice of his father-in-law Jethro (Exodus 18:17 ff
Moses - " For when, in the excess of his zeal to redress their grievances, he had slain an Egyptian, who injured one of them, in which he probably went beyond his commission, and afterward endeavoured to reconcile two of them that were at variance, they rejected his mediation; and "the man who had done wrong said, Who made thee a judge and a ruler over us? Intendest thou to kill me, as thou killedst the Egyptian yesterday?" So Moses, finding it was known, and that Pharaoh sought to slay him, fled for his life to the land of Midian, in Arabia Petraea, where he married Zipporah, the daughter of Jethro, or Reuel, prince and priest of Midian; and, as a shepherd, kept his flocks in the vicinity of Mount Horeb, or Sinai, for forty years, Exodus 2:11-21 ; Exodus 3:1 ; Exodus 18:5 ; Numbers 10:29 ; Acts 7:23-30