What does Jesuits mean in the Bible?

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1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jesuits
Also known as the Company of Jesus or the Jesuits. A body of clerics regular organized for Apostolic work, following a religious rule and relying on alms for their support. Founded at Montmartre, Paris, France in 1534 by Saint Ignatius Loyola, it was the chief instrument of the Catholic Reformation. Pope Paul III approved the new rule in 1540, and Ignatius was elected the first general of the order in 1541. The constitutions, drafted by him and based on his Spiritual Exercies were adopted in 1558. It was the first order which enjoined by its constitutions devotion to the cause of education. The ministry of the Society consists chiefly in preaching; teaching catechism; administering the sacraments; conducting missions in parishes; taking care of parishes; organizing pious confraternities; teaching in schools of every grade; writing books, pamphlets, periodical articles; going on foreign missions, and special missions when ordered by the pope. The general resides at Rome and has a council of assistants. The motto of the Society is "Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam" (For the greater glory of God).
While the preachers and missionaries evangelized Italy, colleges were establIshed at Padua, Venice, Naples, Bologna, Florence, Parma, and other cities. After 1544 their success in Spain was rapid and the province established in 1547 was subdivided into three in 1554. In France many colleges were founded, beginning with the College de Clermont in 1550. Under Henry IV the Society increased rapidly. The politico-religious history of the Society under King Louis XIV centers round Jansenism and the lives of the king's confessors, especially PP. Annat, Ferrier, La Chaise, and Michel Le Tellier. The cause of the Jesuits was also compromised by the various quarrels of Louis XIV with Pope Innocent XI, especially concerning the regals and the Gallican Articles of 1682. The first Jesuit to labor in Germany was Blessed Peter Faber who won to the ranks Saint Peter Canisius. The first residence was in Cologne in 1544, the first college at Vienna in 1552. Hungary was included in the province of Austria; the chief patron of the order was Cardinal Peter Pazmany. Canisius visited Poland in 1558, and animated King Sigismund to an energetic defense of Catholicism. The colleges of Braunsberg (1584) and Vilna (1569) became centers of Catholic activity in northeastern Europe. In 1608 the province was sub-divided into Lithuania and Poland. The first settlement in Belgium was at Louvain in 1542; Flanders became a separate province in 1564. Jesuit congregations, or sodalities of the Blessed Virgin were first instituted at Rome by a Belgian Jesuit, Jean Leunis, in 1563, and were taken up enthusiastically by his native country. The Society had great difficulty in finding an entrance into England, but early Jesuits exerted themselves on behalf of the English seminary at Douai and of the refugees at Louvain, and took charge of many colleges on the continent, Valladolid, Saint Omer, and Seville. Their period of greatest prosperity was under King James II (1685 to 1688). Ireland was first visited in 1542, but immense difficulties had to be overcome. Many Irish colleges were founded on the continent. The greatest extension in Ireland was naturally during the dominance of the Confederation (1642 to 1654 ). Missionary labor was the chief occupation of the Irish Jesuits. The Scottish mission may be said to have begun with Father James Gordon in 1584, and Fathers Edmund Hay and John Drury who came in 1581. They also conducted colleges on the continent. After the Revolution the Fathers were scattered but returned with reduced numbers.
The field of foreign missions is held in greatest esteem among the Jesuits. Saint Francis Xavier went to Goa, India in 1542, to Ceylon, Malacca in 1545; Japan in 1549. Missions on the west coast of Africa were organized from Goa. Others were founded in Abyssinia; Persia; Japan, which gradually developed into a province; China; Central and South America; Paraguay; Mexico; United States under Father Andrew White and other JesuIts from the English mission (1634), where they worked among the Indians. The French had missions as French colonies in Canada, the Antilles, Guiana, and India and missions of the Levant, in Syria, among the Maronites, etc.
In 1773Pope Clement XIV issued the Brief of suppression by which the entire Jesuit order was suppressed throughout Christendom. He had heeled under pressure of the Spanish Court and the Duc de Choiseul and other strong influenses. In the separate countries (Portugal, France, Spain) the Jesuits had been already expelled some years before. The suppression was due to the same causes which in further development brought about the French Revolution. Empress Catherine of Russia and Frederick II of Prussia opposed this measure and maintained the Society as a teaching body, so that the Society was never wholly suppressed. During most of the time of the suppression the only priests in the United States were Jesuits. Pope Pius VII restored the Society by Brief in 1814.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Jesuits
The cat having a long time preyed upon the mice, the poor creatures at last, for their safety, contained themselves within their holes; but the cat finding his prey to cease, as being known to the mice that he was indeed their enemy and a cat, deviseth this course following, namely, changeth his hue, getting on a religious habit, shaveth his crown, walks gravely by their holes; and yet perceiving that the mice kept their holes, and looking out, suspected the worst, he formally, and father-like, said unto them, 'Quodfueram non sum, frater, caftul aspice fonsum: O brother, I am not as you take me for; I am no more a cat; see my habit and shaven crown.' Hereupon some of the more credulous and bold among them were again, by this deceit, snatched up; and therefore when afterwards he came, as before, to entice them forth, they would come out no more, but answered, 'Talk what you can, we will never believe you; you bear still a cat's heart within you.' And so here the Jesuits, yea, and priests too, for they are all joined in the tails, like Samson's foxes: Ephraim against Manasseh, and Manasseh against Ephraim, and both against Judah.: Sir E. Coke.
JOY: at Finding Salvation.
We are told of some Turks, who have, upon the sight of Mahomet's tomb, put out their eyes, that they might not defile them, forsooth, with any common object, after they had been blessed with seeing one so sacred. I am sure many gracious souls there have been, who, with a prospect of. heaven's glory set before the eye of their faith, have been so ravished by the sight, that they desired God even to seal up their eyes by death, with Simeon, who would not by his good-will have lived a day after that blessed hour in which his eyes had beheld the salvation of God.: W. Gurnall.
JOY OF OUR RELIGION: as an Evidence of its Truth.
How I long for my bed! Not that I may sleep: I lie awake often and long! but to hold sweet communion with my God. What shall I render unto him for all his revelations and gifts to me? Were there no historical evidence of the truth of Christianity, were there no well-established miracles, still I should believe that the religion propagated by the fishermen of Galilee is divine. The holy joys it brings to me must be from heaven. Do I write this boastingly, brother? Nay, it is with tears of humble gratitude that I tell of the goodness of the Lord.': Extract from a Private Letter from Bapa Padmanji, one of the Native Converts in India.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Jesuits
Or the Society of Jesus; a famous religious order of the Romish Church, founded by Ignatius Loyola, a Spanish knight, in the sixteenth century. The plan which this fanatic formed of its constitution and laws, was suggested, as he gave out, by the immediate inspiration of Heaven. But, notwithstanding this high pretension, his design met at first with violent opposition. The pope, to whom Loyola had applied for the sanction of his authority to confirm the institution, referred his petition to a committee of cardinals. they represented the establishment to be unnecessary as well as dangerous, and Paul refused to grant his approbation of it. At last, Loyola removed all his scruples, by an offer which it was impossible for any pope to resist. He proposed, that besides the three vows of poverty, of chastity, and of monastic obedience, which are common to all the orders of regulars, the members of his society should take a fourth vow of obedience to the pope, binding themselves to go whithersoever he should command for the service of religion, and without requiring any thing from the holy see for their support.
At a time when the papal authority had received such a shock by the revolt of so many nations from the Romish church, at a time when every part of the popish system was attacked with so much violence and success, the acquisition of a body of men, thus peculiarly devoted to the see of Rome, and whom it might set in opposition to all its enemies, was an object of the highest consequence. Paul, instantly perceiving this, confirmed the institution of the Jesuits by his bull; granted the most ample privileges to the members of the society, and appointed Loyola to be the first general of the other. The event fully justified Paul's discernment in expecting such beneficial consequences to the see of Rome from this institution. In less than half a century the society obtained establishment in every country that adhered to the Roman Catholic church; its power and wealth increased amazingly; the number of its members became great; their character as well as accomplishments were still greater; and the Jesuits were celebrated by the friends and dreaded by the enemies of the Romish faith, as the most able and enterprising order in the church. 2. Jesuits, object of the order of.
The primary object of almost all the monastic orders is to separate men from the world, and from any concern in its affairs. In the solitude and silence of the cloister, the monk is called to work out his salvation by extraordinary acts of mortification and piety. He is dead to the world, and ought not to mingle in its transactions. He can be of no benefit to mankind but by his example and by his prayers. On the contrary, the Jesuits are taught to consider themselves as formed for action. They are chosen soldiers, bound to exert themselves continually in the service of God, and of the pope, his vicar on earth. Whatever tends to instruct the ignorant, whatever can be of use to reclaim or oppose the enemies of the holy see, is their proper object. That they may have full leisure for this active service, they are totally exempted from those functions, the performance of which is the chief business of other monks. They appear in no processions; they practise no rigorous austerities; they do not consume one half of their time in the repetition of tedious offices; but they are required to attend to all the transactions of the world on account of the influence which these may have upon religion: they are directed to study the dispositions of persons in high rank, and to cultivate their friendship; and, by the very constitution and genius of the order, a spirit of action and intrigue is infused into all its members. 3. Jesuits, peculiarities of their policy and government.
Other orders are to be considered as voluntary associations, in which, whatever affects the whole body, is regulated by the common suffrage of all its members. But Loyola, full of the ideas of implicit obedience, which he had derived from his military profession, appointed that the government of his order should be surely monarchical. A general chosen for life, by deputies from the several provinces, possessed power that was supreme and independent, extending to every person and to every case. To his commands they were required to yield not only outward obedience, but to resign up to him the inclinations of their own wills, and the sentiments of their own understandings. Such a singular form of policy could not fail to impress its character on all its members of the order, and to give a peculiar force to all its operations. There has not been, perhaps, in the annals of mankind, any example of such a perfect despotism exercised, not over monks shut up in the cells of a convent, but over men dispersed among all the nations of the earth. As the constitutions of the order vest in the general such absolute dominion over all its members, they carefully provide for his being perfectly informed with respect to the character and abilities of his subjects.
Every novice who offers himself as a candidate for entering into the order, is obliged to manifest his conscience to the superior, or a person appointed by him; and is required to confess not only his sins and defects, but to discover the inclinations, the passions, and the bent of the soul. This manifestation must be renewed every six months. Each member is directed to observe the words and actions of the novices, and are bound to disclose every thing of importance concerning them to the superior. In order that this scrutiny into their character may be as complete as possible, a long novitiate must expire, during which they pass through the several gradations of rank in the society; and they must have attained the full age of thirty-three years before they can be admitted to take the final vows by which they become professed members. By these various methods, the superiors under whose immediate inspection the novices are placed, acquire a thorough knowledge of their dispositions and talents; and the general, by examining the registers kept for this purpose, is enable to choose the instruments which his absolute power can employ in any service for which he thinks meet to destine them. 4. Jesuits, progress of the power and influence of.
As it was the professed intention of this order to labour with unwearied zeal in promoting the salvation of men, this engaged them, of course, in many active functions. From their first institution, they considered the education of youth as their peculiar province: they aimed at being spiritual guides and confessors; they preached frequently in order to instruct the people; they set out as missionaries to convert unbelieving nations. Before the expiration of the sixteenth century, they had obtained the chief direction of the education of youth in every Catholic country in Europe. they had become the confessors of almost all its monarchs' a function of no small importance in and reign, but, under a weak prince, superior to that of minister. They were the spiritual guides of almost every person eminent for rank or power; they possessed the highest degree of confidence and interest with the papal court, as the most zealous and able champions for its authority; they possessed, at different periods, the direction of the most considerable courts in Europe; they mingled in all affairs, and took part in every intrigue and revolution. But while they thus advanced in power, they increased also in wealth; various expedients were devised for eluding the obligation of the vow of poverty. Besides the sources of wealth common to all the regular clergy, the Jesuits possessed one which was peculiar to themselves.
Under the pretext of promoting the success of their missions, and of facilitating the support of their missionaries, they obtained a special license from the court of Rome, to trade with the nations which they laboured to convert: in consequence of this, they engaged in an extensive and lucrative commerce, both in the East and West Indies; they opened warehouses in different parts of Europe, in which they vended their commodities. Not satisfied with trade alone, they imitated the example of other commercial societies, and aimed at obtaining settlements. They acquired possession, accordingly, of the large and fertile province of Paraguay, which stretches across the southern continent of America, from the bottom of the mountains of Potosi to the confines of the Spanish and Portuguese settlements on the banks of the river De la Plata. Here, indeed, it must be confessed, they were of service: the found the inhabitants in a state little different from that which takes place among men when the first begin to unite together; stangers to the arts; subsisting precariously by hunting or fishing; and hardly acquainted with the first principles of subordination and government.
The Jesuits set themselves to instruct and civilize these savages: they taught them to cultivate the ground, build houses, and brought them to live together in villages, &c. They made them taste the sweets of society, and trained them to arts and manufactures. Such was their power over them, that a few Jesuits presided over some hundred thousand Indians. But even in this meritorious effort of the Jesuits for the good of mankind, the genius and spirit of their order was discernible: they plainly aimed at establishing in Paraguay an independent empire, subject to the society alone, and which, by the superior excellence of its constitution and police, could scarcely have failed to extend its dominion over all the southern continent of America. With this view, in order to prevent the Spaniards or Portuguese in the adjacent settlements from acquiring any dangerous influence over the people within the limits of the province subject to the society, the Jesuits endeavoured to inspire the Indians with hatred and contempt of these nations: they cut off all intercourse between their subjects and the Spanish or Portuguese settlements.
When they were obliged to admit any person in a public character from the neighbouring governments, they did not permit him to have any conversation with their subjects; and no Indian was allowed even to enter the house where these strangers resided, unless in the presence of a Jesuit. In order to render any communication between them as difficult as possible, they industriously avoided giving the Indians any knowledge of the Spanish or of any other European language; but encouraged the different tribes which they had civilized to acquire a certain dialect of the Indian tongue, and laboured to make that the universal language throughout their dominions. As all these precautions, without military force, would have been insufficient to have rendered their empire secure and permanent, they instructed their subjects in the European art of war, and formed them into bodies completely armed, and well disciplined. 5. Jesuits, pernicious effects of this order in civil society.
Though it must be confessed that the Jesuits cultivated the study of ancient literature, and contributed much towards the progress of polite learning; though they have produced eminent masters in every branch of science, and can boast of a number of ingenious authors; yet, unhappily for mankind, their vast influence has been often exerted with the most fatal effects. Such was the tendency of that discipline observed by the society in forming its members, and such the fundamental maxims in its constitution, that every Jesuit was taught to regard the interest of the order as the capital object to which every consideration was to be sacrificed. As the prosperity of the order was intimately connected with the preservation of the papal authority, the Jesuits, influenced by the same principle of attachment to the interest of their society, have been the most zealous patrons of those doctrines which tend to exalt ecclesiastical power on the ruins of civil government. They have attributed to the court of Rome a jurisdiction as extensive and absolute as was claimed by the most presumptuous pontiffs in the dark ages.
They have contended for the entire independence of ecclesiastics on the civil magistrates. They have published such tenets concerning the duty of opposing princes who were enemies of the Catholic faith, as countenanced the most atrocious crimes, and tended to dissolve all the ties which connect subjects with their rulers. As the order derived both reputation and authority from the zeal with which it stood forth in defense of the Romish church against the attacks of the reformers, its members, proud of this distinction, have considered it as their peculiar function to combat the opinions, and to check the progress of the Protestants. They have made use of every art, and have employed every weapon against them. They have set themselves in opposition to every gentle or tolerating measure in their favour. They have incessantly stirred up against them all the rage of ecclesiastical and civil persecution. Whoever recollects the events which have happened in Europe during two centuries, will find that the Jesuits may justly be considered as responsible for most of the pernicious effects arising from that corrupt and dangerous casuistry, from those extravagant tenets concerning ecclesiastical power, and from that intolerant spirit which have been the disgrace of the church of Rome throughout that period, and which have brought so many calamities upon society. 6. Jesuits, downfall in Europe.
Such were the laws, the policy, and the genius of this formidable order; of which, however, a perfect knowledge has only been attainable of late. Europe had observed, for two centuries, the ambition and power of the order; but while it felt many fatal effects of these, it could not fully discern the causes to which they were to be imputed. It was unacquainted with many of the singular regulations in the political constitution or government of the Jesuits, which formed the enterprising spirit of intrigue that distinguished its members, and elevated the body itself to such a height of power. It was a fundamental maxim with the Jesuits, from their first institution, not to publish the rules of their order: these they kept concealed as an impenetrable mystery. They never communicated them to strangers, nor even to the greater part of their own members: they refused to produce them when required by courts of justice; and by a strange solecism in policy, the civil power in different countries authorized or connived at the establishment of an order of men, whose constitution and laws were concealed with a solicitude which alone was a good reason for having excluded them. During the prosecutions which have been carried on against them in Portugal and France, the Jesuits have been so inconsiderate as to produce the mysterious volumes of their institute.
By the aid of these authentic records, the principles of their government may be delineated, and the sources of their power investigated, with a degree of certainty and precision which, previous to that event, it was impossible to attain. The pernicious effects of the spirit and constitution of this order rendered it early obnoxious to some of the principal powers in Europe, and gradually brought on its downfall. There is a remarkable passage in a sermon preached at Dublin by Archbishop Brown, so long ago as the year 1551, and which may be considered almost as prophetic. It is as follows: "But there are a new "fraternity of late sprung up who call "themselves Jesuits, which will deceive "many, much after the Scribes and "Pharisees' manner. Amongst the "Jews they shall strive to abolish the "truth, and shall come very near to do "it. For these sorts will turn them- "selves into several forms; with the "heathen, a heathenist; with the atheist "an atheist; with the Jews, a Jew; "with the reformers, a reformade, pur- "posely to know your intentions, your "minds, your hearts, and your inclina- "tions, and thereby bring you, at last, to "be like the fool that said in his heart, "there was no god.
These shall be "spread over the whole world, shall be "admitted into the councils of princes, "and they never the wiser; charming "of them, yea, making your princes "reveal their hearts, and the secrets "therein, and yet they not perceive it; "which will happen from falling from "the law of God, by neglect of fulfil- "ling the law of God, and by winking "at their sins; yet, in the end, God, to "justify his law, shall suddenly cut off "this society, even by the hands of "those who have most succoured them, "and made use of them; so that at the "end they shall become odious to all "nations. They shall be worse than "Jews, having no resting place upon "earth; and then shall a Jew have "more favour than a Jesuit." This singular passage seems to be accomplished. The emperor Charles V. saw it expedient to check their progress in his dominion: they were expelled England by proclamation 2 James I. in 1604; Venice in 1606; Portugal in 1759; France in 1764; Spain and Sicilly in 1767; and totally suppressed and abolished by Pope Clement XIV. in 1773. Enc. Brit. Mosheim's Ecc. Hist. Harlesian Misc. vol. 5: p. 566; Broughton's Dict.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jesuits
or the society of Jesus, one of the most celebrated monastic orders of the Romish church, was founded in the year 1540, by Ignatius Loyola. Forsaking the military for the ecclesiastical profession, he engaged himself in the wildest and most extravagant adventures, as the knight of the blessed virgin. After performing a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and pursuing a multitude of visionary schemes, he returned to prosecute his theological studies in the universities of Spain, when he was about thirty- three years of age. He next went to Paris, where he collected a small number of associates; and, prompted by his fanatical spirit, or the love of distinction, began to conceive the establishment of a new religious order. He produced a plan of its constitution and laws, which he affirmed to have been suggested by the immediate inspiration of Heaven, and applied to the Roman pontiff, Paul III, for the sanction of his authority to confirm the institution. At a time when the papal authority had received so severe a shock from the progress of the Reformation, and was still exposed to the most powerful attacks in every quarter, this was an offer too tempting to be resisted. The reigning pontiff, though naturally cautious, and though scarcely capable, without the spirit of prophecy, of foreseeing all the advantages to be derived from the services of this nascent order, yet clearly perceiving the benefit of multiplying the number of his devoted servants, instantly confirmed by his bull the institution of the Jesuits, granted the most ample privileges to the members of the society, and appointed Loyola to be the first general of the order.
2. The simple and primary object of the society, says a writer in the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia, was to establish a spiritual dominion over the minds of men, of which the pope should appear as the ostensible head, while the real power should reside with themselves. To accomplish this object, the whole constitution and policy of the order were singularly adapted, and exhibited various peculiarities which distinguished it from all other monastic orders. The immediate design of every other religious society was to separate its members from the world; that of the Jesuits, to render them masters of the world. The inmate of the convent devoted himself to work out his own salvation by extraordinary acts of devotion and self-denial; the follower of Loyola considered himself as plunging into all the bustle of secular affairs, to maintain the interests of the Romish church. The monk was a retired devotee of heaven; the Jesuit a chosen soldier of the pope. That the members of the near order might have full leisure for this active service, they were exempted from the usual functions of other monks. They were not required to spend their time in the long ceremonial offices and numberless mummeries of the Romish worship. They attended no processions, and practised no austerities. They neither chanted nor prayed. "They cannot sing," said their enemies: "for birds of prey never do." They were sent forth to watch every transaction of the world which might appear to affect the interests of religion, and were especially enjoined to study the dispositions and cultivate the friendship of persons in the higher ranks. Nothing could be imagined more open and liberal than the external aspect of the institution, yet nothing could be more strict and secret than its internal organization. Loyola, influenced, perhaps, by the notions of implicit obedience which he had derived from his military profession, resolved that the government of the Jesuits should be absolutely monarchical. A general, chosen for life by deputies from the several provinces, possessed supreme and independent power, extending to every person, and applying to every case. Every member of the order, the instant that he entered its pale, surrendered all freedom of thought and action; and every personal feeling was superseded by the interests of that body to which he had attached himself. He went wherever he was ordered; he performed whatever he was commanded; he suffered whatever he was enjoined; he became a mere passive instrument incapable of resistance. The gradation of ranks was only a gradation in slavery; and so perfect a despotism over a large body of men, dispersed over the face of the earth, was never before realized.
The maxims of policy adopted by this celebrated society were, like its constitution, remarkable for their union of laxity and rigour. Nothing could divert them from their original object; and no means were ever scrupled which promised to aid its accomplishment. They were in no degree shackled by prejudice, superstition, or real religion. Expediency, in its most simple and licentious form, was the basis of their morals, and their principles and practices were uniformly accommodated to the circumstances in which they were placed; and even their bigotry, obdurate as it was, never appears to have interfered with their interests. The paramount and characteristic principle of the order, from which none of its members ever swerved, was simply this, that its interests were to be promoted by all possible means, at all possible expense. In order to acquire more easily an ascendancy over persons of rank and power, they propagated a system of the most relaxed morality, which accommodated itself to the passions of men, justified their vices, tolerated their imperfections, and authorized almost every action which the most audacious or crafty politician would wish to perpetrate. To persons of stricter principles they studied to recommend themselves by the purity of their lives, and sometimes by the austerity of their doctrines. While sufficiently compliant in the treatment of immoral practices they were generally rigidly severe in exacting a strict orthodoxy in opinions. "They are a sort of people," said the Abbe Boileau, "who lengthen the creed and shorten the decalogue." They adopted the same spirit of accommodation in their missionary undertakings; and their Christianity, chamelionlike, readily assumed the colour of every religion where it happened to be introduced. They freely permitted their converts to retain a full proportion of the old superstitions, and suppressed, without hesitation, any point in the new faith which was likely to bear hard on their prejudices or propensities. They proceeded to still greater lengths; and, beside suppressing the truths of revelation, devised the most absurd falsehoods, to be used for attracting disciples, or even to be taught as parts of Christianity. One of them in India produced a pedigree to prove his own descent from Brama; and another in America assured a native chief that Christ had been a valiant and victorious warrior, who, in the space of three years, had scalped an incredible number of men, women, and children. It was, in fact, their own authority, not the authority of true religion, which they wished to establish; and Christianity was generally as little known, when they quitted the foreign scenes of their labours as when they entered them.
These detestable objects and principles, however, were long an impenetrable secret: and the professed intention of the new order was to promote, with unequalled and unfettered zeal, the salvation of mankind. Its progress, nevertheless, was at first remarkably slow. Charles V, who is supposed, with his usual sagacity, to have discerned its dangerous tendency, rather checked than encouraged its advancement; and the universities of France resisted its introduction into that kingdom. Thus, roused by obstacles, and obliged to find resources within themselves, the Jesuits brought all their talents and devices into action. They applied themselves to every useful function and curious art; and neither neglected nor despised any mode, however humble, of gaining employment or reputation. The satirist's description of the Greeks in Rome has been aptly chosen to describe their indefatigable and universal industry:—
Grammaticus, rhetor, geometres, pictor, aliptes, Augur, schoenobates, medicus, magus; omnia novit Graeculus. — Juvenal. lib. v. 76.
"A Protean tribe, one knows not what to call, Which shifts to every form, and shines in all: Grammarian, painter, augur, rhetorician,
Rope-dancer, conjuror, fiddler, and physician,— All trades his own, your hungry Greekling counts."
GIFFORD.
They laboured with the greatest assiduity to qualify themselves as the instructers of youth, and succeeded, at length, in supplanting their opponents in every Catholic kingdom. They aimed, in the next place, to become the spiritual directors of the higher ranks; and soon established themselves in most of the courts which were attached to the papal faith, not only as the confessors, but frequently also as the guides and ministers, of superstitious princes. The governors of the society pursuing one uniform system with unwearied perseverance, became entirely successful; and, in the space of half a century, had in a wonderful degree extended the reputation, the number, and influence of the order. When Loyola, in 1540, petitioned the pope to authorize the institution of the Jesuits, he had only ten disciples; but in 1608 the number amounted to 10,581. Before the expiration of the sixteenth century they had obtained the chief direction of the education of youth in every Catholic country in Europe, and had become the confessors of almost all its noblest monarchs. In spite of their vow of poverty, their wealth increased with their power; and they soon rivalled, in the extent and value of their possessions, the most opulent monastic fraternities. About the beginning of the seventeenth century, they obtained from the court of Madrid the grant of the large and fertile province of Paraguay, which stretches across the southern continent of America, from the mountains of Potosi to the banks of the river La Plata; and, after every deduction which can reasonably be made from their own accounts of their establishment, enough will remain to excite the astonishment and applause of mankind. They found the inhabitants in the first stage of society, ignorant of the arts of life, and unacquainted with the first principles of subordination. They applied themselves to instruct and civilize these savage tribes. They commenced their labours by collecting about fifty families of wandering Indians, whom they converted and settled in a small township. They taught them to build houses, to cultivate the ground, and to rear tame animals; trained them to arts and manufactures, and brought them to relish the blessings of security and order. By a wise and humane policy, they gradually attracted new subjects and converts; till at last they formed a powerful and well organized state of three hundred thousand families.
Though the power of the Jesuits had become so extensive, and though their interests generally prospered during a period of more than two centuries, their progress was by no means uninterrupted; and, by their own misconduct, they soon excited the most formidable counteractions.
Scarcely had they effected their establishment in France, in defiance of the parliaments and universities, when their existence was endangered by the fanaticism of their own members. John Chastel, one of their pupils, made an attempt upon the life of Henry IV; and Father Guiscard, another of the order, was convicted of composing writings favourable to regicide. The parliaments seized the moment of their disgrace, and procured their banishment from every part of the kingdom, except the provinces of Bourdeaux and Toulouse. From these rallying points, they speedily extended their intrigues in every quarter, and in a few years obtained their re-establishment. Even Henry, either dreading their power, or pleased with the exculpation of his licentious habits, which he found in their flexible system of morality, became their patron, and selected one of their number as his confessor. They were favoured by Louis XIII, and his minister Richelieu, on account of their literary exertions; but it was in the succeeding reign of Louis XIV, that they reached the summit of their prosperity. The Fathers La Chaise and Le Teltier were successively confessors to the king; and did not fail to employ their influence for the interest of their order: but the latter carried on his projects with so blind and fiery a zeal, that one of the Jesuits is reported to have said of him, "He drives at such a rate, that he will overturn us all." The Jansenists were peculiarly the objects of his machinations, and he rested not till he had accomplished the destruction of their celebrated college and convent at Port Royal. Before the fall, however, of this honoured seminary, a shaft from its bow had reached the heart of its proud oppressor. The "Provincial Letters of Pascal" had been published, in which the quibbling morality and unintelligible metaphysics of the Jesuits were exposed in a strain of inimitable humour, and a style of unrivalled elegance. The impression which they produced was wide and deep, and gradually sapped the foundation of public opinion, on which the power of the order had hitherto rested. Under the regency of the duke of Orleans, the Jesuits, and all theological personages and principles were disregarded with atheistical superciliousness; but under Louis XV, they partly recovered their influence at court, which, even under Cardinal Fleury, they retained in a considerable degree. But they soon revived the odium of the public by their intolerant treatment of the Jansenists, and probably accelerated their ruin by refusing, from political rather than religious scruples, to undertake the spiritual guidance of Madame de la Pampadour, as well as by imprudently attacking the authors of the "Encyclopedie." Voltaire directed against them all the powers of his ridicule, and finished the piece which Pascal had sketched. Their power was brought to a very low ebb, when the war of 1756 broke out, which occasioned the famous law-suit that led to their final overthrow.
In the mean time the king of Portugal was assassinated; and Carvalho, the minister, who detested the Jesuits, found means to load them with the odium of the crime. Malagrida, and a few more of these fathers, were charged with advising and absolving the assassins; and, having been found guilty, were condemned to the stake. The rest were banished with every brand of infamy, and were treated with the most iniquitous cruelty. They were persecuted without discrimination, robbed of their property without pity, and embarked for Italy without previous preparation; so that, no provision having been made for their reception, they were literally left to perish with hunger in their vessels. These incidents prepared the way for a similar catastrophe in France. In March, 1762, the French court received intelligence of the capture of Martinico by the British; and, dreading a storm of public indignation, resolved to divert the exasperated feelings of the nation, by yielding the Jesuits to their impending fate. On the sixth of August, 1762, their institute was condemned by the parliament, as contrary to the laws of the state, to the obedience due to the sovereign, and to the welfare of the kingdom. The order was dissolved, and their effects alienated. But in certain quarters, where the provincial parliaments had not decided against them, Jesuits still subsisted; and a royal edict was afterward promulgated, which formally abolished the society in France, but permitted its members to reside within the kingdom under certain restrictions.
In Spain, where they conceived their establishment to be perfectly secure, they experienced an overthrow equally complete, and much more unexpected. The necessary measures were concerted under the direction of De Choiseul, by the Marquis D'Ossun, the French ambassador at Madrid, with Charles III, king of Spain, and his prime minister, the Count D'Aranda. The execution of their purposes was as sudden as their plans had been secret. At midnight, March 31st, 1767, large bodies of military surrounded the six colleges of the Jesuits in Madrid, forced the gates, secured the bells, collected the fathers in the refectory, and read to them the king's order for their instant transportation. They were immediately put into carriages previously placed at proper stations; and were on their way to Carthagena before the inhabitants of the city had any intelligence of the transaction. Three days afterward, the same measures were adopted with regard to every other college of the order in the kingdom; and, ships having been provided at the different seaports, they were all embarked for the ecclesiastical states in Italy. All their property was confiscated, and a small pension assigned to each individual as long as he should reside in a place appointed, and satisfy the Spanish court as to his peaceable demeanour. All correspondence with the Jesuits was prohibited, and the strictest silence on the subject of their expulsion was enjoined under penalties of high treason. A similar seizure and deportation took place in the Indies, and an immense property was acquired by the government. Many crimes and plots were laid to the charge of the order; but whatever may have been their demerit, the punishment was too summary to admit of justification; and many innocent individuals were subjected to sufferings beyond the deserts even of the guilty. Pope Clement III, prohibited their landing in his dominions; and, after enduring extreme miseries in crowded transports, the survivors, to the number of two thousand three hundred, were put ashore on Corsica. The example of the king of Spain was immediately followed by Ferdinand VI, of Naples, and soon after by the prince of Parma. They had been expelled from England in 1604; from Venice in 1606; and from Portugal in 1759, upon the charge of having instigated the families of Tavora and D'Aveiro to assassinate King Joseph I. Frederick the Great, of Prussia, was the only monarch who showed a disposition to afford them protection; but in 1773 the order was entirely suppressed by Pope Clement XIV, who is supposed to have fallen a victim to their vengeance. In 1801 the society was restored in Russia by the Emperor Paul; and in 1804, by King Ferdinand, in Sardinia. In August, 1814, a bull was issued by Pope Plus VII, restoring the order to all their former privileges, and calling upon all Catholic princes to afford them protection and encouragement. This act of their revival is expressed in all the solemnity of papal authority; and even affirmed to be above the recall or reversion of any judge, with whatever power he may be clothed; but to every enlightened mind it cannot fail to appear as a measure altogether incapable of justification, from any thing either in the history of Jesuitism, or in the character of the present times.
3. It would be in vain to deny that many considerable advantages were derived by mankind from the labours of the Jesuits. Their ardour in the study of ancient literature, and their labours in the instruction of youth, greatly contributed to the progress of polite learning. They have produced a greater number of ingenious authors than all the other religious fraternities taken together; and though there never was known among their order one person who could be said to possess an enlarged philosophical mind, they can boast of many eminent masters in the separate branches of science, many distinguished mathematicians, antiquarians, critics, and even some orators of high reputation. They were in general, also, as individuals, superior in decency, and even purity of manners, to any other class of regular clergy in the church of Rome. But all these benefits by no means counterbalanced the pernicious effects of their influence and intrigues on the best interests of society.
The essential principles of the institution, namely, that their order is to be maintained at the expense of the society at large, and that the end sanctifies the means, are utterly incompatible with the welfare of any community of men. Their system of lax and pliant morality, justifying every vice, and authorizing every atrocity, has left deep and lasting ravages on the face of the moral world. Their zeal to extend the jurisdiction of the court of Rome over every civil government, gave currency to tenets respecting the duty of opposing princes who were hostile to the Catholic faith: which shook the basis of all political allegiance, and loosened the obligations of every human law. Their indefatigable industry, and countless artifices in resisting the progress of reformed religion, perpetuates the most pernicious errors of Popery, and postponed the triumph of tolerant and Christian principles. Whence, then, it may well be asked, whence the recent restoration? What long latent proof has been discovered of the excellence, or even the expedience, of such an institution? The sentence of their abolition was passed by the senates, and monarchs, and statesmen, and divines, of all religions, and of almost every civilized country in the world. Almost every land has been stained and torn by their crimes; and almost every land bears on its public records the most solemn protests against their existence.

Sentence search

Jesuitocracy - ) Government by Jesuits; also, the whole body of Jesuits in a country
Foley, Henry - As lay brother socius to the English provincial of the Jesuits for 30 years, he compiled "The Records of the English Provinces of the Society of Jesus" and "Jesuits in Conflict
Henry Foley - As lay brother socius to the English provincial of the Jesuits for 30 years, he compiled "The Records of the English Provinces of the Society of Jesus" and "Jesuits in Conflict
s.j. - = Society of Jesus; Societatis Iesu; Jesuits ...
Jesuited - ) Conforming to the principles of the Jesuits
Jean-de-Brebeuf College - Cote-des-Neiges, Montreal, Canada, opened, 1928; conduced by the Jesuits
Saint Mary of the Lake Provincial Seminary - Conducted by secular clergy and Jesuits
Holy Cross College - Worcester, Massachusetts, founded, 1843; conducted by the Jesuits; college of arts and sciences
Saint Mary's College, Montreal - Conducted by Jesuits
Saint Beuno's College - The theologate of the English Jesuits
John Carroll University - Cleveland, Ohio, founded 1886; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; college of arts and sciences; extension courses
University, John Carroll - Cleveland, Ohio, founded 1886; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; college of arts and sciences; extension courses
Saint Aloysius College - Glasgow, Scotland An offshoot of Stonyhurst founded in 1859 by the Jesuits
Saint Mary's College, Kansas - Conducted by Jesuits
Saint Joseph's College, Pennsylvania - Conducted by the Jesuits
Jesuitess - ) One of an order of nuns established on the principles of the Jesuits, but suppressed by Pope Urban in 1633
Saint Ignatius' College, California - Conducted by Jesuits
Omer, Saint - In 1678 Artois became a French possession and the college prospered under the friendly government until 1762 when the Parliament of Paris expelled all Jesuits from France. The school was moved to Bruges and work continued until the suppression of the Jesuits in 1773
Saint Omer - In 1678 Artois became a French possession and the college prospered under the friendly government until 1762 when the Parliament of Paris expelled all Jesuits from France. The school was moved to Bruges and work continued until the suppression of the Jesuits in 1773
University, Xavier - Conducted by the Jesuits from 1840; it was then known as Saint Xavier College
Saint Xavier College - Conducted by the Jesuits from 1840; it was then known as Saint Xavier College
Saint John's University, Ohio - Conducted by the Jesuits
University, Georgetown - Washington, DC, founded 1189; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, commerce or foreign service, law, medicine, dentistry, graduate school
Georgetown University - Washington, DC, founded 1189; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, commerce or foreign service, law, medicine, dentistry, graduate school
Loyola University, Chicago, Illinois - Founded, 1869; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, commerce, law, medicine, dentistry; correspondence school; summer school
Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana - Founded, 1904; conducted by the Jesuits; colleges of arts and sciences, law, dentistry, pharmacy; graduate, special, and extension schools; summer school
University, Loyola, Chicago, Illinois - Founded, 1869; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, commerce, law, medicine, dentistry; correspondence school; summer school
University, Loyola, New Orleans, Louisiana - Founded, 1904; conducted by the Jesuits; colleges of arts and sciences, law, dentistry, pharmacy; graduate, special, and extension schools; summer school
Saint Ignatius' College, Ontario - Founded in 1894 by the Jesuits at the request of Cardinal Vaughan, and enlarged in 1907
Jesuitical - ) Of or pertaining to the Jesuits, or to their principles and methods
Calicut, India, Diocese of - Comprises part of the District of Malabar; erected 1923; originally suffragan of Bombay, today of Verapoly; entrusted to the Jesuits
Jesuitism - ) The principles and practices of the Jesuits
Quito, Ecuador, City of - It contained a seminary in charge of the Jesuits, which was the center of ecclesiastical studies for all middle, and northern South America, and high schools run by the Dominicans and Augustinians. The university founded by Sixtus V and Philip II and opened in 1621 by the Jesuits, was reorganized 1895 and is now a State institution. The observatory was erected under the celebrated astronomer, Father Menten, and German Jesuits lectured there until they were expelled, through the Masons
Canisius College - Buffalo, New York, founded 1870; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; college of arts and sciences; teachers' courses; summer school; professors, 47; students, 959; degrees conferred in 1929,159
Gonzaga University - Spokane, Washington, founded 1887; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; college of arts and sciences; schools of law, commerce, and finance; Saturday courses; correspondence, graduate, and summer schools
University, Gonzaga - Spokane, Washington, founded 1887; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; college of arts and sciences; schools of law, commerce, and finance; Saturday courses; correspondence, graduate, and summer schools
Reductions of Paraguay - The colonists opposed the movement, but Philip III of Spain aided the Jesuits with subsidies and legal measures. The Indians filled the communities and the venture grew so successful under the management of the Jesuits that the Spanish Government was no longer obliged to subsidize it. The Jesuits taught the young, managed the community, and fostered the common arts, agriculture, and cattle-raising. The treaty was rescinded, 1761, but six years later Charles III of Spain dealt the fatal blow to the Reductions when he signed the edict exiling the Jesuits from Spanish colonies in America. After their destruction a fable grew up concerning their wealth, which was supposed to have been hidden by the Jesuits. Among the many Jesuits who labored in the Reductions were Father Maceta, Father Cataldillo, Father de Mendoza, Father Mazetta, Father Diaz, Father Ruiz, Father Baraza, and Father de Montoya
Embarkation - ) That which is embarked; as, an embarkation of Jesuits
University, Concordia - Founded, 1896 as Loyola College, affiliated with the University of Montreal, and conducted by the Jesuits
Saint Louis University - Founded in 1818, Conducted by Jesuits
Fordham University - Fordham, New York, New York, founded, 1841; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, law, pharmacy, business administration, social service; teachers' college, post-graduate and summer schools
University, Fordham - Fordham, New York, New York, founded, 1841; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, law, pharmacy, business administration, social service; teachers' college, post-graduate and summer schools
University, Creighton - Omaha, Nebraska, USA, founded 1878; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, commerce, law, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy; summer school; teachers' courses; professors, 237; students, 2996; degrees conferred, 1929,385
Santa Clara University - Conducted by the Jesuits
Gaubil, Antoine - He was the greatest astronomer and historian among the 18th century French Jesuits in China, his numerous works being still highly prized
Catholic Indian Missions of the United States - By 1568 several missions were established in Florida by Jesuits, in 1577,1593 by Franciscans, and by 1655 despite numerous attacks, there were 35 Franciscan missions in Florida and Georgia with 26,000 Christian Indians. ...
MARYLAND After the foundation of the English Catholic colony in 1634, missions were established especially among the Piscataway by the Jesuits but the work was prematurely ended in 1645 by the attacks of the Puritans and other malcontents. Later (1619) the Recollects, the Capuchins (1633), and the Jesuits labored among the Abenaki and the Penobscot. ...
NEW YQRK and PENNSYLVANIA The hostility of the five Iroquois tribes to the French made permanent missions impossible in New York State and resulted in wholesale torture and martyrdom of the Jesuits (1642-1653). ...
OHIO RIVER and LAKE REGION In 1660,1674, 1727, missions were established by Jesuits among the various tribes in Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana, and Illinois, and flourished until the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1764 and the removal of the tribes in 1820 to 1840. In 1699 the Paris Congregation of Foreign Missions made settlements in Mississippi and Arkansas, and in 1700 the Jesuits undertook missions in Alabama and Louisiana, and later took over the control of the Louisiana colony, the Ursuline convent established at New Orleans in 1727 being due to their efforts. These missions never attained much prosperity because of the intrigues of English traders, general neglect, and continual attacks from the Indians and were brought to a close by the expulsion of the Jesuits (1764). ...
NORTHERN and CENTRAL PLAINS The Indians of this district were visited by Father Juan de Padilla in 1540, by Jesuits in 1666, and by Father Hennepin, Franciscan Recollect, in 1680, but regular missions were not established until 1837 in Minnesota, in Montana (1840) the famous Flathead Mission inaugurated by Father de Smet, and later in Oklahoma, Nebraska, North Dakota, and other states. ...
NEW MEXICO and ARIZONA The earliest mission in this territory was undertaken by Franciscans in 1542 but there was little success on account of the Pueblo revolt (1680) in which 21 missionaries were massacred, and the expulsion of the Jesuits (1767). Missions were established in Idaho by Jesuits (1841), in Washington and Oregon by seculars (1839), and later among the Upper Columbian Tribes by Oblates
Spring Hill College - Conducted by the Jesuits, it was the first Catholic college in the South, and the fifth older Catholic college in the country
Detroit, University of - Founded, 1877; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, engineering, architecture, commerce, journalism, law, commerce and finance, foreign trade, commercial art; special, evening, and extension schools; professors, 148; students, 3270; degrees conferred 1929,281
Scholasticus - ...
(2)Name for Jesuits making studies prior to ordination
University of Detroit - Founded, 1877; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, engineering, architecture, commerce, journalism, law, commerce and finance, foreign trade, commercial art; special, evening, and extension schools; professors, 148; students, 3270; degrees conferred 1929,281
Ogilvie, John, Saint - He was converted from Calvinism at Louvain, and having joined the Jesuits returned to the Scottish mission
John Ogilvie, Saint - He was converted from Calvinism at Louvain, and having joined the Jesuits returned to the Scottish mission
Freiburg im Breisgau, University of - In 1520 the Jesuits were entrusted with the faculty of arts and temporarily with two of the theological chairs. The Jesuits remained and opened a studium gallicanum under the patronage of Louis XIV, 1684. After the Peace of Ryswick, 1697, the professoriate returned from Constance to Freiburg and the contentions between the university and the Jesuits were settled by the "Viennese Transaction," by which the Jesuits were still excluded from the rectorate but were given the building which they occupied, the "Alte Burse," and received an increased annual stipend
University of Freiburg im Breisgau - In 1520 the Jesuits were entrusted with the faculty of arts and temporarily with two of the theological chairs. The Jesuits remained and opened a studium gallicanum under the patronage of Louis XIV, 1684. After the Peace of Ryswick, 1697, the professoriate returned from Constance to Freiburg and the contentions between the university and the Jesuits were settled by the "Viennese Transaction," by which the Jesuits were still excluded from the rectorate but were given the building which they occupied, the "Alte Burse," and received an increased annual stipend
Masse, Enemond - He was one of the first Jesuits sent to New France, established a mission at Bar Harbor, Maine, made three journeys to America, and labored among the Indians at Sillery from 1632 until his death
Enemond Masse - He was one of the first Jesuits sent to New France, established a mission at Bar Harbor, Maine, made three journeys to America, and labored among the Indians at Sillery from 1632 until his death
University, Loyola Marymount - Founded as Los Angeles College in 1911; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; schools of arts and sciences, and law
Milan, Ateneo of - Established, 1859, by Jesuits and directed by them; comprises a military school, preparatory school, and high school, and classical, scientific, pre-medical, and college courses leading to degrees of A
Diaz, Pedro - Sent to Mexico by Saint Francis Borgia, with the first band of Jesuits assigned to that country, he founded the colleges of Oaxaca, Guadalajara and Merida, and started the Jesuit missions among the Indians of New Spain
Marquette University - Founded 1881; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; colleges of arts and sciences, dentistry, business administration, applied science and engineering, journalism, hospital administration; schools of law, medicine, speech, music, nursing; graduate, extension, special, and summer schools; athletic department; evening courses
Ateneo of Manila - Established, 1859, by Jesuits and directed by them; comprises a military school, preparatory school, and high school, and classical, scientific, pre-medical, and college courses leading to degrees of A
University, Marquette - Founded 1881; conducted by the Jesuits; preparatory school; colleges of arts and sciences, dentistry, business administration, applied science and engineering, journalism, hospital administration; schools of law, medicine, speech, music, nursing; graduate, extension, special, and summer schools; athletic department; evening courses
Sisters of Saint Joseph -(Superior) - Established in 1907 by three sisters from Cincinnati at the request of Bishop Schinner and with the cooperation of the Jesuits of Cincinnati
Passionist - The members of the order unite the austerities of the Trappists with the activity and zeal of the Jesuits and Lazarists
Cinchona - or more of bitter febrifuge alkaloids; Peruvian bark; Jesuits' bark
Beaumont College - An institution molded on the English public school, founded by the Jesuits, 1861, on the property of Beaumont Lodge, Old Windsor; prepares students for the universities
Regular, Clerks - , Jesuits, Theatines; in a broader sense, similar institutes without the solemn vows, e
Gonsalo Garcia, Saint - He assisted the Jesuits in Japan as a catechist for eight years, and then engaged successfully in commerce at Alacao
Garcia, Gonsalo, Saint - He assisted the Jesuits in Japan as a catechist for eight years, and then engaged successfully in commerce at Alacao
Habit, Religious - , Jesuits, is to use the habit worn by the priests in the country in which they reside, but long established custom has supplanted this rule in many places
Religious Habit - , Jesuits, is to use the habit worn by the priests in the country in which they reside, but long established custom has supplanted this rule in many places
Quapaw Indians - They were evangelized first by the Jesuits and later by the Vincentians
Indians, Quapaw - They were evangelized first by the Jesuits and later by the Vincentians
Lusaka, Zambia, Archdiocese of - Prefecture apostolic of Broken Hill, Rhodesia, Africa; established July 14, 1927; entrusted to the care of the Polish Jesuits
Saint Christopher - Banished in 1646, they were replaced by Jesuits from Martinique, and later by Carmelites
Bernard, Claude - Priest - After studying under the Jesuits at Dôle, he went to Paris, became a priest, and devoted his immense fortune to the poor, the sick, and the imprisoned
Baegert, Johann Jakob - He spent 19 years on the Californian mission, till the expulsion of the Jesuits, 1767
University of Heidelberg, Germany - Its progress was destroyed by the Thirty Years' War and in 1629 it was reorganized as a Catholic institution and some chairs filled by the Jesuits, but the work was entirely suspended, 1631-1652, when it was restored as a Protestant institution. In 1703 under the Catholic Elector John William of the House of Palatine-Neuburg, the first Jesuits were appointed as professors and a Catholic faculty of theology was established. Through the Jesuits a preparatory seminary was established, the Seminarium ad Carolum Borromreum
Heidelberg, Germany, University of - Its progress was destroyed by the Thirty Years' War and in 1629 it was reorganized as a Catholic institution and some chairs filled by the Jesuits, but the work was entirely suspended, 1631-1652, when it was restored as a Protestant institution. In 1703 under the Catholic Elector John William of the House of Palatine-Neuburg, the first Jesuits were appointed as professors and a Catholic faculty of theology was established. Through the Jesuits a preparatory seminary was established, the Seminarium ad Carolum Borromreum
Ratio Studiorum - (Latin: ratio, method; studium, study) ...
Term commonly used to designate the educational system of the Jesuits; an abbreviation of the official title Ratio atque Institutio Studiorum Societatis Jesu. It was formulated during the years 1584 to 1599 by representative Jesuits from various parts of Europe, who drew upon the salient features in the educational systems of the great universities of the day, Liege, Louvain, and Paris, and the humanistic schools of the Renaissance
Innocent Xiii, Pope - As pope he regulated abuses in Spain, assisted Venice against the Turks with subsidies, decided against the Jesuits in the Chinese Rites controversy, and continued the pension bestowed by his predecessor on the Stuart Pretender
Calcutta, India, Archdiocese of - The Jesuits visited the region in the 16th century, towards the close of which the territory was placed under the care of the Augustinians
Jesuits - Also known as the Company of Jesus or the Jesuits. The cause of the Jesuits was also compromised by the various quarrels of Louis XIV with Pope Innocent XI, especially concerning the regals and the Gallican Articles of 1682. The Society had great difficulty in finding an entrance into England, but early Jesuits exerted themselves on behalf of the English seminary at Douai and of the refugees at Louvain, and took charge of many colleges on the continent, Valladolid, Saint Omer, and Seville. Missionary labor was the chief occupation of the Irish Jesuits. ...
The field of foreign missions is held in greatest esteem among the Jesuits. Others were founded in Abyssinia; Persia; Japan, which gradually developed into a province; China; Central and South America; Paraguay; Mexico; United States under Father Andrew White and other Jesuits from the English mission (1634), where they worked among the Indians. In the separate countries (Portugal, France, Spain) the Jesuits had been already expelled some years before. During most of the time of the suppression the only priests in the United States were Jesuits
Jesus, Company of - Also known as the Company of Jesus or the Jesuits. The cause of the Jesuits was also compromised by the various quarrels of Louis XIV with Pope Innocent XI, especially concerning the regals and the Gallican Articles of 1682. The Society had great difficulty in finding an entrance into England, but early Jesuits exerted themselves on behalf of the English seminary at Douai and of the refugees at Louvain, and took charge of many colleges on the continent, Valladolid, Saint Omer, and Seville. Missionary labor was the chief occupation of the Irish Jesuits. ...
The field of foreign missions is held in greatest esteem among the Jesuits. Others were founded in Abyssinia; Persia; Japan, which gradually developed into a province; China; Central and South America; Paraguay; Mexico; United States under Father Andrew White and other Jesuits from the English mission (1634), where they worked among the Indians. In the separate countries (Portugal, France, Spain) the Jesuits had been already expelled some years before. During most of the time of the suppression the only priests in the United States were Jesuits
Jesus, Society of - Also known as the Company of Jesus or the Jesuits. The cause of the Jesuits was also compromised by the various quarrels of Louis XIV with Pope Innocent XI, especially concerning the regals and the Gallican Articles of 1682. The Society had great difficulty in finding an entrance into England, but early Jesuits exerted themselves on behalf of the English seminary at Douai and of the refugees at Louvain, and took charge of many colleges on the continent, Valladolid, Saint Omer, and Seville. Missionary labor was the chief occupation of the Irish Jesuits. ...
The field of foreign missions is held in greatest esteem among the Jesuits. Others were founded in Abyssinia; Persia; Japan, which gradually developed into a province; China; Central and South America; Paraguay; Mexico; United States under Father Andrew White and other Jesuits from the English mission (1634), where they worked among the Indians. In the separate countries (Portugal, France, Spain) the Jesuits had been already expelled some years before. During most of the time of the suppression the only priests in the United States were Jesuits
Society of Jesus - Also known as the Company of Jesus or the Jesuits. The cause of the Jesuits was also compromised by the various quarrels of Louis XIV with Pope Innocent XI, especially concerning the regals and the Gallican Articles of 1682. The Society had great difficulty in finding an entrance into England, but early Jesuits exerted themselves on behalf of the English seminary at Douai and of the refugees at Louvain, and took charge of many colleges on the continent, Valladolid, Saint Omer, and Seville. Missionary labor was the chief occupation of the Irish Jesuits. ...
The field of foreign missions is held in greatest esteem among the Jesuits. Others were founded in Abyssinia; Persia; Japan, which gradually developed into a province; China; Central and South America; Paraguay; Mexico; United States under Father Andrew White and other Jesuits from the English mission (1634), where they worked among the Indians. In the separate countries (Portugal, France, Spain) the Jesuits had been already expelled some years before. During most of the time of the suppression the only priests in the United States were Jesuits
Indians, Cree - The French Jesuits first evangelized the Crees, c1731Later missionaries were Oblates, assisted by the Grey Nuns
Hunter, Sylvester Joseph - He embraced Catholicity in 1857 and four years later joined the Jesuits
Guiana, British - Their labors were continued by Dominicans, Capuchins, and finally by Jesuits, who established most of the permanent missions and settlements there
Sylvester Hunter - He embraced Catholicity in 1857 and four years later joined the Jesuits
Juan Mariana - His voluminous "History of Spain" is his masterpiece, but his "De rege et regis institutione," dedicated to Philip III of Spain, and "worthy of all respect from kings themselves as from their educators," writes the Protestant Dr Leutbecher, has caused him to be one of the most maligned Jesuits, owing to a misconstrued observation in favor of the assassination of Henry III and the justification under very exceptional circumstances of the deposition and killing of tyrants. The book was at once officially condemned by the Jesuits and its correction ordered, and the members of the Society were forbidden to preach such a doctrine
Mariana, Juan - His voluminous "History of Spain" is his masterpiece, but his "De rege et regis institutione," dedicated to Philip III of Spain, and "worthy of all respect from kings themselves as from their educators," writes the Protestant Dr Leutbecher, has caused him to be one of the most maligned Jesuits, owing to a misconstrued observation in favor of the assassination of Henry III and the justification under very exceptional circumstances of the deposition and killing of tyrants. The book was at once officially condemned by the Jesuits and its correction ordered, and the members of the Society were forbidden to preach such a doctrine
Indians, Spokan - About 1841 they came under the influence of the Jesuits
Darwin, Australia, Diocese of - Jesuits missionaries landed at Palmerston (modern Darwin) on September 24, 1882
Montmagny, Charles Huault de - Second French Governor of Canada; born France; died Saint Christopher, in the Antilles, c1651He was educated by the Jesuits, joined the Order of Malta, 1622, and fought against the Moslems and corsairs of Africa
Charles Montmagny - Second French Governor of Canada; born France; died Saint Christopher, in the Antilles, c1651He was educated by the Jesuits, joined the Order of Malta, 1622, and fought against the Moslems and corsairs of Africa
Belize City-Belmopan, Diocese of - Entrusted to the Jesuits of the Missouri Province
Harare, Zimbabwe, Archdiocese of - Elevated to the Prefecture Apostolic of Zambese, Rhodesia on March 9, 1915 and entrusted to the English Jesuits
Epping, Joseph - He was one of a band of Jesuits who went to Ecuador at the request of Garcia Moreno, and became professor of mathematics at the Polytechnicum of Quito
Spokan Indians - About 1841 they came under the influence of the Jesuits
Victoria, Australia, Diocese of - Jesuits missionaries landed at Palmerston (modern Darwin) on September 24, 1882
Victoria-Palmerston, Australia, Diocese of - Jesuits missionaries landed at Palmerston (modern Darwin) on September 24, 1882
Theodat Sagard - They requested the Jesuits to take the mission
Madrid, Spain - The first public library was the San Isidro, founded by the Jesuits; the National Museum (Museo del Prado) contains masterpieces of nearly all the European schools of painting and sculpture
Leonard of Port Maurice, Saint - A pupil of the Jesuits, he entered the Riformella, a branch of the Franciscans, 1697, and spent his life giving missions in Tuscany, Central and Southern Italy, and Corsica, which were crowned with wonderful success
Molyneux, Robert - President of Georgetown College, 1793-1796,1806-1808, he was named superior of the Jesuits in America, 1806
John Eudes, Saint - He was instructed in religion and learning by the Jesuits at Caen, and ordained, December 20, 1625
Ministry: Best Men Needed For it - Amongst the Jesuits they have a rule, that they who are unapt for greater studies, shall study cases of conscience
Eudes, John, Saint - He was instructed in religion and learning by the Jesuits at Caen, and ordained, December 20, 1625
Robert Molyneux - President of Georgetown College, 1793-1796,1806-1808, he was named superior of the Jesuits in America, 1806
End Justifies the Means - The Jesuits were accused of approving any evil means, in order to attsain their end. The Supreme Court of Cologne, March 30, 1905, decided that in no one of the citations was the maxim employed in the sense attributed to the Jesuits ("The Messenger
Confessor - have been constantly Jesuits; before him, the Dominicans and Cordeliers shared the office between them. The confessors of the house of Austria, have also ordinarily been Dominicans and Cordeliers, but the latter emperors have all taken Jesuits
Alaska - Charles John Seghers, Archbishop of Victoria, had taken up the evangelization of Alaska, and with two Jesuits, Fathers Paschal Tosi and Aloysius Robaut, and a man named Fuller, crossed Chilcoot Pass. The Jesuits remained at the mouth of the Stewart River, while the archbishop and Fuller proceeded to Nulato
Apostolic Schools - Nearly all the religious orders have followed the Jesuits in establishing such institutions. There are well-known apostolic schools at Mungret, Ireland, under the Jesuits; Wernhoutsburg, Holland, under the Vincentians; Tournai, Belgium, under the Salesians; and Freshfield, England, under the Missionaries of Saint Joseph's, Mill Hill
Ecuador - The Jesuits later joined in the labors, and Christianity spread through the country, but after the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1767 and the subsequent revolution, the natives relapsed into paganism
Schools, Apostolic - Nearly all the religious orders have followed the Jesuits in establishing such institutions. There are well-known apostolic schools at Mungret, Ireland, under the Jesuits; Wernhoutsburg, Holland, under the Vincentians; Tournai, Belgium, under the Salesians; and Freshfield, England, under the Missionaries of Saint Joseph's, Mill Hill
Ravignan, Gustave FrançOis Xavier Delacroix de - However, the Jesuits' strife continued until they were forced to disband for a time in France. In 1854 he brought out Clement XIII et Clement XIV, a dispassionate treatise, of no great literary merit, on the defender and the suppressor of the Jesuits
Mai, Angelo - After leaving the Jesuits, 1819 he was appointed to the Vatican library
Manila, Philippine Islands, Archdiocese of - Suffragan sees: ...
Antipolo
Cubao
Imus
Kalookan
Malolos
Novaliches
Parañaque
Pasig
San Pablo
The following religious orders were represented in the diocese at an early date: Augustinians (1565), Franciscans (1577), Jesuits (1581), Dominicans (1587), and Recollect Fathers (1600)
Cadillac, Antoine de la Mothe - Utilizing his position to carry on illegal traffic, he quarreled with the Jesuits who protested against his abuses in transactions with the Indians
Rector - the Jesuits gave this name to the superiors of such of their houses as were either seminaries or colleges
America (Publication) - A national Catholic weekly review founded by the Jesuits of the U
Angelo Mai - After leaving the Jesuits, 1819 he was appointed to the Vatican library
Oetinga - The number of pilgrims who visit this shrine is so great that it has been necessary for the Augustmians to seek the aid of the Jesuits, Franciscans, Capuchins, Redemptorists, and some secular priests
Oettingen - The number of pilgrims who visit this shrine is so great that it has been necessary for the Augustmians to seek the aid of the Jesuits, Franciscans, Capuchins, Redemptorists, and some secular priests
Altotting - The number of pilgrims who visit this shrine is so great that it has been necessary for the Augustmians to seek the aid of the Jesuits, Franciscans, Capuchins, Redemptorists, and some secular priests
Monita Secreta - Rich young men were to be enticed into the ranks, wealthy widows wheedled of their fortunes, Jesuits advanced to bishoprics, and other orders belittled, while the world was to be persuaded that the Society was animated by the purest motives. To these may be added such pronounced anti-Jesuits as von Lang, Dollinger, Friedrich, Huber and Reusch, as well as the Protestant historian Gieseler
Nanjing, China, Archdiocese of - A new Vicariate Apostolic of Kiangnan was created on January 21, 1856 and confided to French Jesuits; it comprised the civilprovince of Kiangsu; residence, Shanghai. Jesuits control: ...
Aurora University, Shanghai
Saint Ignatius College, Zikawei
Little Seminary, Zikawei
Theological Seminary, Zikawei
The Marist Brothers conduct ...
Saint Francis Xavier's College
College of Joan of Arc, Shanghai
The Daughters of Charity maintain ...
Saint Mary's Hospital, Shanghai
Saint Joseph's Civil Hospital, Shanhai
The Helpers of the Holy Souls have boarding and day schools in Shanghai; an Apostolic school, Christian, and pagan boarding schools at Zikawei
Arizona - This and nine other missions, including Guevavi, later replaced by Tumacacori, were given over to the Franciscans after Spain had ordered the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1767. In 1863 the Jesuits took over the parish and Mass was again offered in the abandoned church of San Xavier del Bac
Secreta, Monita - Rich young men were to be enticed into the ranks, wealthy widows wheedled of their fortunes, Jesuits advanced to bishoprics, and other orders belittled, while the world was to be persuaded that the Society was animated by the purest motives. To these may be added such pronounced anti-Jesuits as von Lang, Dollinger, Friedrich, Huber and Reusch, as well as the Protestant historian Gieseler
Jesuits - Paul, instantly perceiving this, confirmed the institution of the Jesuits by his bull; granted the most ample privileges to the members of the society, and appointed Loyola to be the first general of the other. In less than half a century the society obtained establishment in every country that adhered to the Roman Catholic church; its power and wealth increased amazingly; the number of its members became great; their character as well as accomplishments were still greater; and the Jesuits were celebrated by the friends and dreaded by the enemies of the Romish faith, as the most able and enterprising order in the church. Jesuits, object of the order of. On the contrary, the Jesuits are taught to consider themselves as formed for action. Jesuits, peculiarities of their policy and government. Jesuits, progress of the power and influence of. Besides the sources of wealth common to all the regular clergy, the Jesuits possessed one which was peculiar to themselves. ...
The Jesuits set themselves to instruct and civilize these savages: they taught them to cultivate the ground, build houses, and brought them to live together in villages, &c. Such was their power over them, that a few Jesuits presided over some hundred thousand Indians. But even in this meritorious effort of the Jesuits for the good of mankind, the genius and spirit of their order was discernible: they plainly aimed at establishing in Paraguay an independent empire, subject to the society alone, and which, by the superior excellence of its constitution and police, could scarcely have failed to extend its dominion over all the southern continent of America. With this view, in order to prevent the Spaniards or Portuguese in the adjacent settlements from acquiring any dangerous influence over the people within the limits of the province subject to the society, the Jesuits endeavoured to inspire the Indians with hatred and contempt of these nations: they cut off all intercourse between their subjects and the Spanish or Portuguese settlements. Jesuits, pernicious effects of this order in civil society. ...
Though it must be confessed that the Jesuits cultivated the study of ancient literature, and contributed much towards the progress of polite learning; though they have produced eminent masters in every branch of science, and can boast of a number of ingenious authors; yet, unhappily for mankind, their vast influence has been often exerted with the most fatal effects. As the prosperity of the order was intimately connected with the preservation of the papal authority, the Jesuits, influenced by the same principle of attachment to the interest of their society, have been the most zealous patrons of those doctrines which tend to exalt ecclesiastical power on the ruins of civil government. Whoever recollects the events which have happened in Europe during two centuries, will find that the Jesuits may justly be considered as responsible for most of the pernicious effects arising from that corrupt and dangerous casuistry, from those extravagant tenets concerning ecclesiastical power, and from that intolerant spirit which have been the disgrace of the church of Rome throughout that period, and which have brought so many calamities upon society. Jesuits, downfall in Europe. It was unacquainted with many of the singular regulations in the political constitution or government of the Jesuits, which formed the enterprising spirit of intrigue that distinguished its members, and elevated the body itself to such a height of power. It was a fundamental maxim with the Jesuits, from their first institution, not to publish the rules of their order: these they kept concealed as an impenetrable mystery. During the prosecutions which have been carried on against them in Portugal and France, the Jesuits have been so inconsiderate as to produce the mysterious volumes of their institute. It is as follows: "But there are a new "fraternity of late sprung up who call "themselves Jesuits, which will deceive "many, much after the Scribes and "Pharisees' manner
Leo Xii, Pope - The Roman College was restored to the charge of the Jesuits, 1824, Freemasonry and other secret societies were condemned, the Vatican printing-press was restored, and the Vatican Library enriched
Jesuit's Bark - Knowledge of its medicinal-properties and use were extended throughout Europe by the Jesuits
Indians, Moxos - On the expulsion of the Jesuits from Spanish America, 1161, the Moxos Missions were turned over to the Franciscans
Moxos Indians - On the expulsion of the Jesuits from Spanish America, 1161, the Moxos Missions were turned over to the Franciscans
Moyos - On the expulsion of the Jesuits from Spanish America, 1161, the Moxos Missions were turned over to the Franciscans
John of Avila, Blessed - During John's apostolate of forty years he attracted by his preaching and by his saintly life notable disciples, as Saint Theresa, Saint John of God, and Saint Francis Borgia, and spread the power of the Jesuits throughout Spain
Olivaint, Pierre - After teaching history for some years at Grenoble and Paris he entered the Jesuits, 1845, stirred thereunto by the attacks being made on them by the state
Caughnawaga - This mission after being moved several times was transferred to Caughnawaga in 1716, and is now under the care of Jesuits
Avila, John of, Blessed - During John's apostolate of forty years he attracted by his preaching and by his saintly life notable disciples, as Saint Theresa, Saint John of God, and Saint Francis Borgia, and spread the power of the Jesuits throughout Spain
Rector - ) The superior officer or chief of a convent or religious house; and among the Jesuits the superior of a house that is a seminary or college
Bark, Jesuit's - Knowledge of its medicinal-properties and use were extended throughout Europe by the Jesuits
Bark, Peruvian - Knowledge of its medicinal-properties and use were extended throughout Europe by the Jesuits
Choiseul, Etienne Francois, Duc de - He aided in suppressing the French Jesuits, 1764, and his religious policy aimed at paralyzing the Church
Campbell, Thomas - He was the author of "Pioneer Priests of North America," "Names of God," a translation from Lessius, "Pioneer Laymen of North America," "Various Discourses," a collection of sermons, and the important historical work, "The Jesuits
Cecil Calvert - Although his policy was always that of religious toleration, he came into conflict with the Jesuits over Indian grants of land to the latter and certain privileges claimed by them
Cecilius Calvert - Although his policy was always that of religious toleration, he came into conflict with the Jesuits over Indian grants of land to the latter and certain privileges claimed by them
Calvert, Cecil - Although his policy was always that of religious toleration, he came into conflict with the Jesuits over Indian grants of land to the latter and certain privileges claimed by them
Calvert, Cecilius - Although his policy was always that of religious toleration, he came into conflict with the Jesuits over Indian grants of land to the latter and certain privileges claimed by them
Thomas Campbell - He was the author of "Pioneer Priests of North America," "Names of God," a translation from Lessius, "Pioneer Laymen of North America," "Various Discourses," a collection of sermons, and the important historical work, "The Jesuits
Lorenzo Hervas y Panduro - On the suppression of the Jesuits he returned to Europe from America, where he was a missionary, and wrote in Italian an extensive treatise in several volumes on cosmography, in which he investigates the development and ethnological relationship of the different nations on the basis of language, and also the origin of language
Hervas y Panduro, Lorenzo - On the suppression of the Jesuits he returned to Europe from America, where he was a missionary, and wrote in Italian an extensive treatise in several volumes on cosmography, in which he investigates the development and ethnological relationship of the different nations on the basis of language, and also the origin of language
Regulars - When used in the phrase "Clerks Regular" the word refers to those religious, as the Theatines and the Jesuits, who are not monks in the proper use of the term, to distinguish them from the members of the older monastic orders, as the Benedictines
Baptist, Peter, Saint - With him were crucified six Franciscan friars, 17 native Franciscan tertiaries, and the Jesuits, Paul Miki, John Goto, and James Kisai
Shuswaps - They were visited by the Jesuits in the 17th century and later by the Oblates
Canisius, Peter, Saint - He introduced the Jesuits into Bavaria, Bohemia, Swabia, the Tyrol, and Hungary
Holywell - The 14th-century Gothic chapel which encloses it is now used for Welsh services of the Anglican church and the well itself which sends up 21 tons of water a minute has been leased by the Jesuits of the mission
Fenwick, Benedict Joseph - Ordained by Bishop Neale in 1808, he was sent to New York, where he became head of the New York Literary Institution, founded, 1809, as a college, on the present site of the cathedral, and closed in 1814, on the recall of the Jesuits to Maryland. In 1843Bishop Fenwick established the Jesuits in charge of Holy Cross College at Worcester, replacing a former academy founded by Father James Fitton in 1838
Benedict Joseph Fenwick - Ordained by Bishop Neale in 1808, he was sent to New York, where he became head of the New York Literary Institution, founded, 1809, as a college, on the present site of the cathedral, and closed in 1814, on the recall of the Jesuits to Maryland. In 1843Bishop Fenwick established the Jesuits in charge of Holy Cross College at Worcester, replacing a former academy founded by Father James Fitton in 1838
Manila Observatory - The work is carried on under the Jesuits, assisted by natives
Sahaptin - The Jesuits, assisted by the Sisters of Saint Joseph, carry on missionary work among them at Saint Joseph's mission, Slickpoo, Idaho
Catholic Indian Missions of Canada - The Jesuits, who proved to be a more vital force in this field, arrived in 1625, and were followed by the Sulpicians, 1651, who took up the work of the former after the suppression of the Society, 1773. In 1735, missionaries accompanied the French explorers to the middle west where, by 1818, missions were flourishing under the control of the Jesuits and Sulpicians who by 1838 had reached the far west, and established missions there, 1842. ...
Among the missionaries who labored in Canada were: the Jesuits Bressani, Chaumonot, Massé, Brébeuf, Chabanel, Daniel, Garnier, Lalemant, Labrosse, Nobili, and Du Rancquet; the Recollects Jamay, Dolbeau, Le Caron, who prepared a dictionary of the Huron language; Sagard, the historian of the early Catholic missions in Canada, and Hennepin; the Sulpicians De Queylus, Souart, Picquet, Mathevet, who prepared a dictionary of the Abenaki language; Thavenet, Guichart, and Cuocq; the Oblates of Mary Immaculate Durocher, Tache, Faraud, Grollier, called the Apostle of the Arctic Circle; Grandin, and D'Herbomez; and the secular priests Brabant, Nicoloye, and Demers
Jansenists - In the year 1640, the two universities just mentioned, and particularly father Molina and father Leonard Celsus, thought fit to condemn the opinions of the Jesuits on grace and free will. This having set the controversy on foot, Jansenius opposed to the doctrine of the Jesuits the sentiments of St. This treatise was attacked by the Jesuits, who accused Jansenius of maintaining dangerous and heretical opinions; and afterwards in 1642, obtained of Pope Urban VIII. a formal condemnation of the treatise wrote by Jansenius; when the partisans of Janenius gave out that this bull was spurious, and composed by a person entirely devoted to the Jesuits. It was not only on account of their embracing the doctrines of Augustine, that the Jesuits were so imbittered against them; but that which offended the Jesuits, and the other creatures of the Roman pontiff, was, their strict piety, and severe moral discipline
Innsbruck - In 1857 through the efforts of the Bishop of Brixen the theology was given to the Jesuits
Miguel de Molinos - Accused of pernicious teachings by the Jesuits and Dominicans, the Inquisition ordered his books to be examined, but acquitted him
Molinos, Miguel de - Accused of pernicious teachings by the Jesuits and Dominicans, the Inquisition ordered his books to be examined, but acquitted him
Chile - Missionary work among the Araucanian (Mapuche) Indians was undertaken at the end of the 16th century by the Jesuits who were expelled, 1168, but readmitted, 1843
Delaware - Jesuits from Bohemia Manor in Maryland established the Apoquiniminck Mission in New Castle County some time before 1750, sending a priest monthly to attend the five or six Catholic families of the vicinity
Ludovisi, Alessandro - He was educated by the Jesuits, entered the papal service as a judge, was Archbishop of Cremona, nuncio to Savoy, and cardinal-priest
Gregory xv, Pope - He was educated by the Jesuits, entered the papal service as a judge, was Archbishop of Cremona, nuncio to Savoy, and cardinal-priest
Alessandro Ludovisi - He was educated by the Jesuits, entered the papal service as a judge, was Archbishop of Cremona, nuncio to Savoy, and cardinal-priest
English College - Rome, founded, 1579, by a Bull of Gregory XIII and entrusted to the Jesuits, after whose suppression, 1773, its administration was handed over to secular priests
Bahia - Thome de Sousa, first governor of Brazil, arrived at Bahia in 1549 with six Jesuits, the first to come to the New World, and two days later the first Mass was said there
New Jersey - The first priests to visit the scattered Catholics of northern New Jersey were two Jesuits, Father Thomas Harvey and Father Charles Gage, who had come from England in 1682 with Governor Thomas Dongan of New York. Other early missionary priests were the Jesuits, Father Ferdinand Farmer (Steinmeyer) and Father Robert Harding of Philadelphia
Japan - The first Christian missionaries who arrived in 1549, were Saint Francis Xavier, two other Jesuits, and three Japanese who had become Christians in India. At this time there were about 300,000 Christians; the missionaries were Jesuits, secular priests, Franciscans, Dominicans, and Augustinians
Maryland - In 1651Cecilius Calvert, second Lord Baltimore, gave the Jesuits a grant of 10,000 acres near Calverton Manor for their Indian missions. Since Catholics were proscribed from institutions of higher learning, the Jesuits founded their own classical academy at Bohemia Manor, 1745, the foundation there having been made by Father Thomas Mansell, 1706. As early as 1677 the first school of this kind had been established in the colony by the Jesuits
Abyssinian Church - ...
About the middle of the sixteenth century, the Jesuits attempted a mission to Abyssinia, in the hope of reducing it to the pope's authority; but without success. In the following century, however, the Jesuits were all expelled, Abyssinia returned to its ancient faith, and nothing more was heard of the church of Abyssinia, till the latter part of the last century. ...
After the expulsion of the Jesuits, all Europeans were interdicted; nor does it appear that any one dared to attempt an entrance until the celebrated Mr
Lima, Peru - The Jesuits arrived at Lima in 1567, founded schools and colleges, and introduced the printing press, from which a catechism, the first book printed in the New World, was issued
Henry Coleridge - Ordained in Rome in 1856, he joined the Jesuits on returning to England in 1857
Rochester, New York, Diocese of - Originally part of the diocese of Buffalo, and in the early days of its history under the spiritual jurisdiction of the Jesuits, who had flourishing missions throughout the section
Innuit - The great Oblate Father Petitot visited the Eskimo in 1865, reaching Alaska in 1870, and the Jesuits established their first Alaska mission in 1886
Chantry - Shuttleworth, until 1919, when the appeal of Francis Cardinal Bourne for Edward Egan, who had made bequests to the Jesuits for Masses, won this privilege for Catholics
Muratori, Luigi Antonio - Educated by the Jesuits and at the University of Modena, he was ordained in 1694, and in 1695 commenced his work of collecting unedited ancient manuscripts, at the Ambrosian library in Milan
Luigi Muratori - Educated by the Jesuits and at the University of Modena, he was ordained in 1694, and in 1695 commenced his work of collecting unedited ancient manuscripts, at the Ambrosian library in Milan
Gabriel Garcia Moreno - He brought to Ecuador from Panama, with dictator Noboa's permission, some Jesuits expelled from New Granada, thus earning the eyer lasting enmity of the Liberal party
Garcia Moreno, Gabriel - He brought to Ecuador from Panama, with dictator Noboa's permission, some Jesuits expelled from New Granada, thus earning the eyer lasting enmity of the Liberal party
Eskimo - The great Oblate Father Petitot visited the Eskimo in 1865, reaching Alaska in 1870, and the Jesuits established their first Alaska mission in 1886
Esquimaux - The great Oblate Father Petitot visited the Eskimo in 1865, reaching Alaska in 1870, and the Jesuits established their first Alaska mission in 1886
Saint Augustine, Florida, City of - Saint Francis Borgia sent Jesuits in 1566
Islands, Philippine - The first bishop, the Dominican Salazar and a few Jesuits in 1581. Missions are conducted by the Jesuits, Franciscans, Benedictines, Augustinians, Vincentians, and the Society of the Divine Word
Jesuits - The reigning pontiff, though naturally cautious, and though scarcely capable, without the spirit of prophecy, of foreseeing all the advantages to be derived from the services of this nascent order, yet clearly perceiving the benefit of multiplying the number of his devoted servants, instantly confirmed by his bull the institution of the Jesuits, granted the most ample privileges to the members of the society, and appointed Loyola to be the first general of the order. The immediate design of every other religious society was to separate its members from the world; that of the Jesuits, to render them masters of the world. Loyola, influenced, perhaps, by the notions of implicit obedience which he had derived from his military profession, resolved that the government of the Jesuits should be absolutely monarchical. Thus, roused by obstacles, and obliged to find resources within themselves, the Jesuits brought all their talents and devices into action. When Loyola, in 1540, petitioned the pope to authorize the institution of the Jesuits, he had only ten disciples; but in 1608 the number amounted to 10,581. ...
Though the power of the Jesuits had become so extensive, and though their interests generally prospered during a period of more than two centuries, their progress was by no means uninterrupted; and, by their own misconduct, they soon excited the most formidable counteractions. The Fathers La Chaise and Le Teltier were successively confessors to the king; and did not fail to employ their influence for the interest of their order: but the latter carried on his projects with so blind and fiery a zeal, that one of the Jesuits is reported to have said of him, "He drives at such a rate, that he will overturn us all. The "Provincial Letters of Pascal" had been published, in which the quibbling morality and unintelligible metaphysics of the Jesuits were exposed in a strain of inimitable humour, and a style of unrivalled elegance. Under the regency of the duke of Orleans, the Jesuits, and all theological personages and principles were disregarded with atheistical superciliousness; but under Louis XV, they partly recovered their influence at court, which, even under Cardinal Fleury, they retained in a considerable degree. ...
In the mean time the king of Portugal was assassinated; and Carvalho, the minister, who detested the Jesuits, found means to load them with the odium of the crime. In March, 1762, the French court received intelligence of the capture of Martinico by the British; and, dreading a storm of public indignation, resolved to divert the exasperated feelings of the nation, by yielding the Jesuits to their impending fate. But in certain quarters, where the provincial parliaments had not decided against them, Jesuits still subsisted; and a royal edict was afterward promulgated, which formally abolished the society in France, but permitted its members to reside within the kingdom under certain restrictions. At midnight, March 31st, 1767, large bodies of military surrounded the six colleges of the Jesuits in Madrid, forced the gates, secured the bells, collected the fathers in the refectory, and read to them the king's order for their instant transportation. All correspondence with the Jesuits was prohibited, and the strictest silence on the subject of their expulsion was enjoined under penalties of high treason. It would be in vain to deny that many considerable advantages were derived by mankind from the labours of the Jesuits
Frederick ii (2) - He aided the Catholics gathering from Silesia and Poland, gave his protection to the Jesuits even after their suppression, and made an unsuccessful attempt to establish a "Catholic Vicariate of Berlin" having complete authority over Prussian Catholics
Frederick the Great - He aided the Catholics gathering from Silesia and Poland, gave his protection to the Jesuits even after their suppression, and made an unsuccessful attempt to establish a "Catholic Vicariate of Berlin" having complete authority over Prussian Catholics
Sons of the Sacred Heart of Verona - Until 1900 they were under the direction of the Jesuits
Quebec, Canada, City of - They were joined by the Jesuits in 1625, who were sent out through the influence of the Duchesse d'Aiguillon under whose patronage the Sisters of the Hotel Dieu also came in 1639. Upon the inauguration of British rule tbe Canadians requested the King to maintain the Catholic Hierarchy and permission was given for the consecration of Bishop Briand, in Paris in 1766, but the Recollects and Jesuits were forbidden to receive novices; the latter were left in possession of their estates, however, until the death of the last priest, when they were confiscated
Flagellants - Their practises were later revived as a means of orthodox public penance, flagellant processions being encouraged by the Jesuits in Austria, the Netherlands, the East Indies, and South America
Moliere - He studied under the Jesuits in Paris, graduated in law at Orleans, and in 1643, changed his name to Moliere, and joined the "troop" of the Béjart and in conjunction with them started L'Illustre Théâtre which proved a failure
Jean Poquelin - He studied under the Jesuits in Paris, graduated in law at Orleans, and in 1643, changed his name to Moliere, and joined the "troop" of the Béjart and in conjunction with them started L'Illustre Théâtre which proved a failure
Indiana - In 1686 land along the Saint Joseph River, near the present site of Notre Dame University at South Bend was given by the French government of Quebec to the Jesuits for an Indian mission, and there the zealous pioneer, Father Claude Allouez, ministered, dying in 1689. He returned there for a time from Kaskaskia and other missions in 1764, to reestablish the church after the loss of the French possessions to the English, and had special permission to continue his labors after the expulsion of the Jesuits
New Orleans, Louisiana, City of - It was placed under the authority of the Bishop of Quebec, and the Indians of the territory were under the spiritual jurisdiction of the Jesuits. The Jesuits also introduced into Louisiana the culture of sugar-cane, oranges, and figs. In 1847 the Jesuits resumed activities in the city and the erection of their college was begun
Chinese Rites - The methods of the Jesuits were bitterly, sometimes unjustly, attacked
Rites, Chinese - The methods of the Jesuits were bitterly, sometimes unjustly, attacked
University of Coimbra, Portugal - The college of classical languages and literature was confided to the Jesuits and colleges were also founded for the students of the various religious orders
Rubens, Peter Paul - His mother was a Catholic, and he was first taught by the Jesuits in Cologne
Baltimore, Maryland, City of - The mission at Baltimore was first attended by priests from the Hickory Mission (founded 1720), and in 1766 the Jesuits arrived. An undenominational college was conducted under the auspices of Saint Mary's Seminary of Saint Sulpice from 1803 until 1852 when Loyola College was founded by the Jesuits. The Jesuits were formally established there in 1833, and in the same year Archbishop Whitfield erected from his private fortune Saint James's church for English-speaking Catholics, which passed later to the Redemptorists who built there the first convent of their order in the United States
Russia - The Jesuits made good headway until they were expelled in 1689, to be recalled by Peter the Great, who, at first considerate towards Catholics, later legislated violently against them and banished the Jesuits in 1719. But Catholic principles were propagated by the Jesuits whom Catherine invited to White Russia in 1719
Jansenists - " This he had not the courage to publish; but it was printed after his death, and from it his enemies, the Jesuits, extracted the propositions above named; but the correctness and fidelity of their extracts maybe justly questioned. ...
The Jesuits, their implacable enemies, never ceased until they prevailed upon their sovereign, Louis XIV, to destroy the abbey of Port Royal, and banish its inhabitants
Bavaria - William IV repressed the Protestant Reformation and introduced the Jesuits into the University of Ingolstadt (1541), and under two of his successors William V (1579-1598) and Maximilian I (1598-1651), who became an elector of the Holy Roman Empire, Bavaria was a prominent ally of the counter-Reformation and the Catholic League
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, City of - The Jesuits, established in Milwaukee in 1856, opened Marquette College, now Marquette University, in 1880, and have charge of the Gesu, one of the handsomest churches in the northwest
Florida - Among the earliest missionaries connected with the foundation were several Jesuits sent out by Saint Francis Borgia in 1566-1568
John Hughes - He established Saint Joseph's Seminary at Rose Hill, Fordham, in 1840, and Saint John's College in 1841, the Jesuits being put in charge in 1846
Hughes, John - He established Saint Joseph's Seminary at Rose Hill, Fordham, in 1840, and Saint John's College in 1841, the Jesuits being put in charge in 1846
Siam - Both were murdered in 1569, but others soon took their places, and in spite of intermittent persecution, in which there were additional martyrs, the work was continued by the same orders and by others, including Jesuits and Augustinians
Thailand - Both were murdered in 1569, but others soon took their places, and in spite of intermittent persecution, in which there were additional martyrs, the work was continued by the same orders and by others, including Jesuits and Augustinians
South Carolina - Among the Jesuits sent out in 1566 by Saint Francis Borgia to the SpanisIi colonies of North America was Father John Rogel of Pamplona
May Laws - Preliminary to the May Laws was the abolition of the Catholic department in the ministry of public worship (1871), the placing of the State in exclusive control of education, and the expulsion of the Jesuits from the empire (1873). A year later a like expulsion was decreed against the Redemptorists; Lazarists; Priests of the Holy Ghost, and Nuns of the Sacred Heart as being religious associations allied to the Jesuits
Laws, May - Preliminary to the May Laws was the abolition of the Catholic department in the ministry of public worship (1871), the placing of the State in exclusive control of education, and the expulsion of the Jesuits from the empire (1873). A year later a like expulsion was decreed against the Redemptorists; Lazarists; Priests of the Holy Ghost, and Nuns of the Sacred Heart as being religious associations allied to the Jesuits
Kulturkampf - Education was put exclusively into the hands of the state and the Jesuits were expelled from the empire, 1873. A year later a like expulsion was decreed against the Redemptorists, Lazarists, Fathers of the Holy Ghost, and Religious of the Sacred Heart as being communities allied with the Jesuits. Under William II Catholic students of Divinity were again declared exempt from military service in time of peace; in 1891 the accumulated funds of the dioceses were restored to their owners; the Redemptorists were readmitted in 1894, and the laws against the Jesuits were modified in 1905
Forty Hours' Adoration - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Forty Hours' Devotion - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Forty Hours' Prayer - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Quarantore - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Quarant' Ore - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Devotion, Forty Hours' - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
Dubourg, Louis Guillaume Valentin - In 1818 the Religious of the Sacred Heart made their first foundation in America, at Saint Charles, moving soon after to Florissant, where the Jesuits also were established in 1823
Michigan - The first Indians of Michigan to have the Gospel preached to them were the Chippewas living near Sault Sainte Marie who were visited by the Jesuits, Blessed Isaac Jogues, and Father Charles Raymbaut, 1642, the rapids then receiving their name
Louis Dubourg - In 1818 the Religious of the Sacred Heart made their first foundation in America, at Saint Charles, moving soon after to Florissant, where the Jesuits also were established in 1823
Adoration, Forty Hours' - Introduced by Saint Anthony Mary Zaccaria in Milan and Vicenza, 1527, it was spread to many places in Italy by the Capuchin, Joseph of Fermo, and was introduced into Rome and Germany by Jesuits under Saint Ignatius
India - Franciscans, Dominicans, Jesuits, and Augustinians were the first missionaries in India
Mississippi - The French settlers of Old Biloxi, near Ocean Springs, established by Iberville in 1699, and abandoned for Mobile in 1702, were served first by Father Bordenave and then by the Jesuits, Father Paul du Ru, and Father Pierre Donge
Maine - More lasting missions were established by the Capuchins, 1633, at Pentagoet on the Penobscot (the present Castine), and by the Jesuits, 1646, under Father Gabriel Druillettes at Norridgewock on the Kennebec
Missouri - He was followed by Father Jean Baptiste Salleneuve, and Father Jean Baptiste de la Morinie, who were driven away when Louisiana expelled the Jesuits, 1763
Kansas - 1825,to transplant beyond the Mississippi many eastern tribes of Indians who aroused the zeal of devoted Jesuits
America (Land) - 1536) for this purpose, and Franciscans, Dominicans, and other religious orders, especially Jesuits, became the protectors as well as the teachers of the natives. ...
The first French colony was established in 1534 at the mouth of the Saint Lawrence explored by Champlain, the first permanent settlement at Quebec in 1608, and French power in Canada was strengthened by the Jesuits, who strove to win the Iroquois to Christianity and friendship with France
New York, State of - By 1684 there were only two French Jesuits left among the Five Nations, Father Jacques and Father Jean de Lamberville. The first priests to reside in New York City were the English Jesuits, Father Thomas Harvey, Father Henry Harrison, and Father Charles Gage, the first of whom came over in 1683 with the Catholic governor, Thomas Dongan, appointed by the Duke of York
Norway - According to the present laws all religions are tolerated, and all religious orders may be admitted except the Jesuits
Missions, California - Missionary work in Upper California was entrusted to the Franciscans, who had made several settlements in Lower California after the expulsion of the Jesuits (1767)
California Missions - Missionary work in Upper California was entrusted to the Franciscans, who had made several settlements in Lower California after the expulsion of the Jesuits (1767)
Oates, Titus - by the Jesuits to the English College at Valladolid, after five months he was expelled and was sent back to London
Minnesota - In 1727 Fort Beauharnois was built near the town of Frontenac by Rene Boucher who had in his train two Jesuits, Father Michel (Louis-Ignace) Guignas and Father Nicolas Le Gounor
Oregon - He returned in 1844 from a trip to Belgium for assistance, bringing four Jesuits and several Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur
Albany - In its earliest period the missions included in its territory were under the tutelage of Quebec and were ministered to by the Jesuits, among them Blessed Isaac Jogues
Jubilee - In 1640, the Jesuits celebrated a solemn jubilee at Rome, that being the centenary, or hundredth year from their institution; and the same ceremony was observed in all their houses throughout the world
Titus Oates - by the Jesuits to the English College at Valladolid, after five months he was expelled and was sent back to London
Leo Xiii, Pope - He studied under the Jesuits at Viterbo and at the Roman College, acquiring that classical facility in Latin and Italian, later justly admired in his official writings and poems
Jesuits - ' And so here the Jesuits, yea, and priests too, for they are all joined in the tails, like Samson's foxes: Ephraim against Manasseh, and Manasseh against Ephraim, and both against Judah
Montreal, Quebec, Canada, City of - This event was followed by rapid progress in the work of education; the Brothers of the Christian Schools arrived the following year; the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, 1841; the Grand Seminaire, founded, 1840, was followed by the Seminaire de Philosophie, 1894; by order of the Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples a branch of Laval University was opened in Montreal, 1876, and in 1896 the Jesuits established Loyola College
Lazarists - During the 18th century the Vincentians passed over into China; they were called to Macao by the Portuguese Government in 1784, and directed many houses of education there; after the suppression of the, Jesuits they replaced that order in the Levant and in China
Vincentians - During the 18th century the Vincentians passed over into China; they were called to Macao by the Portuguese Government in 1784, and directed many houses of education there; after the suppression of the, Jesuits they replaced that order in the Levant and in China
Impostors - Israel Tonge and Titus Oates are infamous for the concoction of a mythical plot between the pope and the Jesuits; they were emulated by Thomas Dangerfield, an impersonator of the Duke of Monmouth; to these must be added William Fuller. Of the crowd of impostors flourishing at the beginning of the 18th century the most conspicuous were the ex-Jesuit, Archibald Bower, author of a scurrilous "History of the Popes"; the fantastic Psalmanazar (1679-1763), who, among other activities, calumniated the Jesuits; Joanna, Southcott (died 1814); Richard Brothers (c
Exegesis - Scripturae" of the Jesuits merit special mention
Exegete - Scripturae" of the Jesuits merit special mention
Scotland - The Jesuits labored valiantly; and one holy missionary, John Ogilvie, was put to death for his faith at Glasgow, in 1615. In 1653Rome incorporated the scattered clergy of Scotland under William Ballantyne, while Jesuits, Benedictines, Franciscans, Vincentians, and Irish missionaries worked together to maintain the position of the Church
New York, City of - Thomas Dongan, Catholic Governor of New York enacted, 1683, the first law establishing religious liberty passed in New York, and, 1685, the first Catholic educational institution in New York State, the New York Latin School, was established by the Jesuits Father Thomas Harvey, Father Henry Harrison, and Father Charles Gage. Under the able supervision of the Jesuits a college known as the New York Literary Institution was in operation until 1813, when due to the uncertain status of the order at that period it was disorganized
England - After their oppression during the Commonwealth, with the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 they looked forward to a recompense for their services, but the king, recognizing the strong anti-Catholic feeling throughout the nation, kept the penal laws on the statute book and at intervals issued proclamations banishing Jesuits and other priests from the kingdom. In 1679 eight Jesuits, two Franciscans, five secular priests, and seven laymen were put to death, and many more died in prison for their faith
New France - Probably at the suggestion of Champlain, but in response to the urgent solicitation of the Recollects the Jesuits came in 1625 to take up the work of the missions inaugurated by their predecessors, Biard and Masse, at Port Royal, 1611, and by the Recollects
American Martyrology -
VIRGINIA ...
Juan Bautista de Segura, the novices Gabriel de Granada and Sancho de ZeveUos, and the lay-brothers Oristoval Redondo and Pedro Linares, Jesuits, killed by an Indian guide at Occoquan, February 18, 1571.
Luis de Quiros and the lay brothers Gabriel de Solis and Juan Mendez, Jesuits, killed! by Indians at Axacan, February 14, 1571
Act of Faith - The negative and relapsed being first strangled and burnt, the professed mount their stakes by a ladder, and Jesuits, after several repeated exhortations to be reconciled to the church, part with them; telling them that they leave them to the devil, who is standing at their elbow, to receive their souls, and carry them with him to the flames of hell
Education - Beginning with the establishment of seminaries after the plan of the Council of Trent, of the academies and colleges of the religious orders, notably of the Jesuits and Benedictines, of the elementary schools in parishes and other centers, the Church today has a vast system of education in almost every country
Germany - The Catholic cause was upheld by several princes of the Church, as Stanislaus Hosius and Giovanni Commendone, Saint Fidelis of Sigmaringen, the Carthusians of Cologne, and the first German Jesuits, notably Peter Faber and Peter Canisius; after the Council of Trent Albert V and William V of Bavaria were the acknowledged leaders of Catholicism
Rome - For ecclesiastical instruction there are, besides the various Italian and foreign colleges, three great ecclesiastical universities: the Gregorian, under the Jesuits; the schools of the Roman Seminary; and the Collegio Angelico of the Dominicans
Protestant - Chillingworth, addressing himself to a writer in favour of the church of Rome, speaks of the religion of the Protestants in the following excellent terms: "Know then, sir, that when I say the religion of Protestants is in prudence to be preferred before yours, on the one side, I do not understand by your religion the doctrine of Bellarmine, or Baronius, or any other private man among you, nor the doctrine of the Sorbonne, of the Jesuits, or of the Dominicans, or of any other particular company among you, but that wherein you all agree, or profess to agree, the doctrine of the council of Trent; so, accordingly, on the other side, by the religion of Protestants, I...
do not understand the doctrine of Luther, or Calvin, or Melancthon, nor the confession of Augsburg, or Geneva, nor the catechism of Heidelberg, nor the articles of the church of England; no, nor the harmony of Protestant confessions; but that in which they all agree, and which they all subscribe with a greater harmony, as a perfect rule of faith and action; that is, the Bible
Mendicants - However, the power of the Dominicans and Franciscans greatly surpassed that of the other two orders, insomuch that these two orders were, before the reformation, what the Jesuits have been since that happy and glorious period; the very soul of the hierarchy, the engines of the state, the secret springs of all the motions of the one and the other, and the authors and directors of every great and important event, both in the religious and political world
Casuistry - See Jesuits
Maronites - Formerly, the Jesuits had two missionaries at their house at Antoura, and the Lazarites have now succeeded them in their mission
Cassianus (11) Johannes, Founder of Western Monachism - Benedict ordered them to be read daily; they were highly approved also by the founders of the Dominicans, Carthusians, and Jesuits
Dominicans - The papal see never had more active and useful abettors than this order, and that of the Jesuits
Roman Catholics - On resuming his government, Pope Pius VII soon restored the order of Jesuits and the inquisition; so that the Roman Catholic religion is now reinstated in its ancient splendour and authority
Pharisees (2) - Edersheim compares them with the Jesuits in the Roman Church (Sketches of Jew
Vulgate - , at the instance, it is believed, of the Jesuits, with whom Sixtus had quarrelled; and in the same year a new edition was issued under the authority of Clement, with a preface by the famous Jesuit Bellarmin, in which (to avoid the appearance of a conflict between Popes) the suppression of the Sixtine edition is falsely stated to be due to the abundance in it of printers’ errors, and to have been contemplated by Sixtus himself
Nestorius And Nestorianism - Of the progress of Nestorianism in China there can be no doubt, for the Jesuits found a monument there, recording the fact