What does Jeroboam mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יָרָבְעָ֖ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 14
יָרָבְעָ֣ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 13
יָרָבְעָ֧ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 9
יָרָבְעָ֔ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 8
יָרָבְעָ֥ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 7
יָרָבְעָ֑ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 7
יָרָבְעָֽם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 5
יָֽרָבְעָם֙ the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 4
יָרָבְעָ֤ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 4
לְיָרָבְעָ֖ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 4
יָרָבְעָ֗ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 3
יָרָבְעָ֛ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 2
יָרָבְעָ֜ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 2
וְיָרָבְעָ֖ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 2
יָֽרָבְעָ֔ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 2
יָרָבְעָם֒ the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
וְיָֽרָבְעָ֗ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
וְיָרָבְעָ֗ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
יָרָבְעָם֙ the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
יָרָבְעָ֡ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
לְיָֽרָבְעָ֤ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
לְיָֽרָבְעָם֙ the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
לְיָרָבְעָ֗ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
וְיָרָבְעָם֩ the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
וְיָרָבְעָ֛ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
יָרָבְעָ֣ם ׀ the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
לְיָֽרָבְעָ֔ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
וְיָֽרָבְעָ֖ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1
יָרָבְעָ֨ם the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign. / the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel 1

Definitions Related to Jeroboam

H3379


   1 the first king of the northern kingdom of Israel when the kingdom split at the death of Solomon and the 10 tribes split off from Judah and Benjamin and the kingdom under Solomon’s son Rehoboam; idolatry was introduced at the beginning of his reign.
   2 the 8th king of the northern kingdom of Israel, son of Joash, and 4th in the dynasty of Jehu; during his reign the Syrian invaders were repelled and the kingdom restored to its former borders but the idolatry of the kingdom was maintained.
   Additional Information: Jeroboam = “the people will contend”.
   

Frequency of Jeroboam (original languages)

Frequency of Jeroboam (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jeroboam
Jeroboam (jĕr'o-bô'am), whose people are many. There were two kings of this name: 1. The first king of the divided kingdom of Israel, b.c. 975-954, was the son of Nebat. He was made by Solomon the superintendent of the taxes exacted from the tribe of Ephraim. 1 Kings 11:28. He made the most of his position, and at last was perceived by Solomon to be aiming at the monarchy. He was leaving Jerusalem, when he was met by Ahijah the prophet, who gave him the assurance that, on condition of obedience to his laws, God would establish for him a kingdom and dynasty equal to that of David. 1 Kings 11:29-40. Solomon attempting to arrest Jeroboam, caused his night into Egypt. There he remained until Solomon's death. Jeroboam married Ano, the elder sister of the Egyptian queen Tahpenes, and returned to Shechem, where took place the conference with Rehoboam, and the final revolt which ended in the elevation of Jeroboam to the throne of the northern kingdom. Fearing that the yearly pilgrimages to Jerusalem would undo all the work which he effected, he boldly decided to rend the religious unity of the nation, which was as yet unimpaired. He caused two golden calves to be made and set up at the two extremities of his kingdom, one at Dan and the other at Bethel. It was while dedicating the altar at Bethel that a prophet from Judah suddenly appeared, who denounced the altar, and foretold its desecration by Josiah. The king, stretching out his hand to arrest the prophet, felt it withered and paralyzed, and only at the prophet's prayer saw it restored. Jeroboam was at constant war with the house of Judah, and in a battle with Abijah was defeated, and soon after died in the 22d year of his reign, 2 Chronicles 13:20, and was buried in his ancestral sepulchre. 1 Kings 14:20. 2. Jeroboam II., the son of Joash, the fourth king of the dynasty of Jehu, b.c. 825-784 He was one of the most prosperous of the kings of Israel. He repelled the Syrian invaders, took their capital city Damascus, 2 Kings 14:28, and recovered the whole of the ancient dominion from Hamath to the Dead sea. 2 Kings 14:25. Ammon and Moab were reconquered, and the trans-Jordanic tribes were restored to their territory, 2 Kings 13:5; 1 Chronicles 5:17-22; but it was merely an outward restoration.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam
(jehr oh boh' am) Personal name possibly meaning, “he who contends for justice for the people” or “may the people multiply.” 1. First king of the Northern Kingdom Israel about 926-909 B.C. Jeroboam had an interesting rise to power. He managed the laborers Solomon had conscripted for his huge building projects (1 Kings 11:28 ). During Solomon's reign Ahijah, a prophet from Shiloh, confronted Jeroboam, tore his own coat into twelve pieces, and gave ten of them to Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:29-39 ). Ahijah interpreted this as God's pledge that Jeroboam would become king over ten of the twelve tribes. Upon Solomon's death, Jeroboam learned that the tribes would assemble at Shechem to make Solomon's son Rehoboam their king. Seizing upon the people's resentment toward Solomon's high-handed policies, Jeroboam led the ten tribes to revolt against the house of David. They then crowned Jeroboam king. The inspired biblical writers did not consider Jeroboam a good king. Rather he became the example of evil kings in Israel because he built temples in Dan and Bethel with golden calves representing God's presence. What appeared to be good politics diverted people from worshiping at Jerusalem, God's chosen place. All the following northern kings suffered the biblical writers' condemnation because they walked in the ways of Jeroboam, encouraging worship at Dan and Bethel (see for example 1Kings 15:26,1 Kings 15:34 ; 1Kings 16:19,1 Kings 16:31 ). Jeroboam also instituted new worship practices at his temples (1 Kings 12:25-33 ), intentionally making Israelite worship different from that in Jerusalem, though claiming to worship the same God with the same worship traditions. Prophetic warnings failed to move Jeroboam (1 Kings 13:1-14:20 ).
2. Powerful king of Israel in the dynasty of Jehu about 793-753 B.C. (2 Kings 14:23-29 ). He managed to restore prosperity and territory to a weak nation but continued the religious practices of Jeroboam I and thus met condemnation from the biblical writers. Jonah, Amos, and Hosea prophesied during his reign. Jeroboam basically restored the boundaries of David's empire, reaching even into Syria.
M. Stephen Davis
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam (2)
Son of Jehoash, or Joash, and his successor on the throne of Israel. He was made co-regent in B.C. 836, and reigned alone 41 years: B.C. 825-784. Very little is recorded of this king except that he obtained signal victories over the Syrians, and Hamath and Damascus were recovered, for the Lord had mercy on Israel. "He departed not from all the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat." Amos announced his death by the sword. 2 Kings 13:13 ; 2 Kings 14:16-29 ; 2 Kings 15:1,8 ; 1 Chronicles 5:17 ; Hosea 1:1 ; Amos 1:1 ; Amos 7:9-11 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam (1)
Son of Nebat, of the tribe of Ephraim, and king of Israel. He reigned twenty-two years: B.C. 975-954. He had been an officer under Solomon, but Ahijah the prophet, having found him, tore his new garment into twelve pieces, and gave him ten of them, telling him that he should be king over ten of the tribes. Solomon thereupon sought to kill him, but he fled to Egypt and stayed there till the death of Solomon. On the division of the kingdom, Jeroboam was made king of the ten tribes. Fearing that his subjects, if they went up to Jerusalem to worship, would be alienated from him, he made two golden calves, placing one in Beth-el in the south, and the other in Dan in the north; and declared that these were the gods that had brought Israel out of Egypt. Priests of the common people were ordained by him, sacrifices were offered, and feast days devised. Thus the nation through their king sank at once into open idolatry: a warning to those in Christendom who devise out of their own heart their forms of worship, etc.
A man of God came from Judah to cry against the altar at Beth-el, and the king's hand, on being put forth to seize him, was dried up. On the prophet entreating the Lord his hand was restored, but he repented not of his idolatry. He had been told that if he would follow the Lord as David had done, his house should be established; but his dynasty extended only to his son Nadab. Jeroboam is charged with doing evil above all that had been before him, and his doings became a proverb. For Israel to sin "as Jeroboam the son of Nebat," was a mark of consummate wickedness. 1 Kings 11:26-40 ; 1 Kings 12 .- 1 Kings 14 ., etc.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jeroboam
JEROBOAM is the name of two kings of Israel.
1. Jeroboam I . was the first king of the northern tribes after the division. His first appearance in history is as head of the forced labourers levied by Solomon. This was perhaps because he was hereditary chief in Ephraim, but we must also suppose that he attracted the attention of Solomon by his ability and energy. At the same time he resented the tyranny of the prince whom he served, and plotted to overthrow it. The design came to the knowledge of Solomon, and Jeroboam fled to Egypt. On the king’s death he returned, and although he did not appear on the scene when the northern tribes made their demand of Rehoboam, he was probably actively enlisted in the movement. When the refusal of Rehoboam threw the tribes into revolt, Jeroboam appeared as leader, and was made king ( 1 Kings 11:26 ff., 1 Kings 12:1 to 1 Kings 14:20 ). Jeroboam was a warlike prince, and hostilities with Judah continued throughout his reign. His country was plundered by the Egyptians at the time of their invasion of Judah. It is not clearly made out whether his fortification of Shechem and Penuei was suggested by the experiences of this campaign or not. His religious measures have received the reprobation of the Biblical writers, but they were intended by Jeroboam to please the God of Israel. He embellished the ancestral sanctuaries of Bethel and Dan with golden bulls, in continuance of early Israelite custom. It is fair to assume also that he had precedent for celebrating the autumn festival in the eighth instead of the seventh month.
2. Jeroboam II . was the grandson of Jehu. In his time Israel was able to assert its ancient vigour against its hereditary enemy Syria, and recover its lost territory. This was due to the attacks of the Assyrians upon the northern border of Damascus ( 2 Kings 14:23-29 ). The temporary prosperity of Israel was accompanied by social and moral degeneracy, as is set forth distinctly by Amos and Hosea.
H. P. Smith.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jeroboam
This man's name is proverbial.—Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin. Such is the awful account given of him by God the Holy Ghost. His name seems to be in some measure characteristic of the man—he that rejects—from Jarah to reject; and his history awfully proves, how he rejected the counsel of God against his own soul. His history we have in 1 Kings 11:28 - 1 Kings 14:20. There was another Jeroboam, the son of Jehoash. (See 2 Kings 14:23) During this man's reign, the prophets Hosea, Amos and, Jonah exercised their ministry.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Jeroboam
GOD may have that in his heart for you, which you must not once let enter your heart for yourself. Your name may be written in the divine decree for something, the bare thought of which you must cast out of your heart like poison. And all Jeroboam's great talents, and all his great services, and all his great prospects, and all his great temptations, and all his great sins-all happened to him for ensamples; and they are all written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come.
But we must go back to the first beginning of Jeroboam's great temptations and great transgressions. It was King Solomon's many and terrible falls from godliness and from virtue that first set such a fatal snare before Jeroboam's feet. Solomon by this time was rushing insensate to his own ruin, and to the ruin of his royal house. If it were not written all over the Bible we would not believe it. Solomon's beautiful dream at Gibeon, his splendid prayer at the dedication of the temple, his wisdom, and his understanding, and his largeness of heart-it is all clean forgotten now. It is all become now like the morning cloud and the early dew. Can this be the same Solomon? Can this be that Solomon to whom the Lord appeared twice? For Solomon went after Ashtoreth, the goddess of the Zidonians, and after Molech, the abomination of the Ammonites. Then did Solomon build an high place for Chemosh, the abomination of Moab, in the hill of God that is before Jerusalem, and for Molech, the abomination of Ammon. In his old age, and when he should have been by this time a rare and a ripe saint of God, Solomon added this also to his other transgressions, an insane passion for building palaces both for himself and for his heathen queens, and temples and altars for their cruel and unclean gods, and great fortifications, and all manner of proud and costly and reckless public works. And, with it all, there was this also; Every stone of all Solomon's temples and palaces and heathen altars was laid wet with the blood of an oppressed and exasperated people. The prophet Samuel had foretold all this to the elders of Israel, and had got little thanks from them for so foretelling it. But every jot and tittle of God's great prophet had by this time been long proved true; and every warning word of his was now like a fire in the bones of Solomon's miserable subjects. As they bled to death under the whip of the tax-gatherer and the task-master, the people gnashed their teeth at their fathers and at themselves. For had not Samuel told it thus to their face? 'He will take your sons and appoint them for himself, for his chariots, and for his horsemen; and he will set them to ear his ground, and to reap his harvest, and to make his instruments of war. And he will take your fields, and your vineyards, and your olive-yards, even the best of them, and will give them to his servants. And he will take your menservants and your maidservants, and your goodliest young men, and will put them to his work, and ye shall be his servants. And ye shall cry out in that day, and the Lord will not hear you in that day,' Well, that day was now fully come. And it was amid all the terrible oppression and suffering of that day that Jeroboam rose so fast and so high in Solomon's service. Jeroboam's outstanding talents in public affairs, his skilful management of men, his great industry, and his great loyalty, as was thought, all combined to bring the son of Nebat under Solomon's royal eye, till there was no trust too important, and no promotion too high for young Jeroboam. And then, to crown it all, as time went on Satan more and more entered into Jeroboam's heart. And Jeroboam allowed Satan in his heart, and listened to Satan speaking in his heart, 'You are a greatly talented man. There is no other man in all the land fit to be your equal. Solomon is old, and his son is a fool. And who is to be king after Solomon dies? Thinkest thou ever who is fit to be king? Saul was but the son of Kish. David himself was but the son of Jesse. There has never been, and there never will be, respect of persons with the God of Israel. Jeroboam, you love your widowed mother. Play the man, then, but a little longer, and your mother will live to hear the cry of the people before she dies, this so sweet cry to her ears, Long live King Jeroboam!' And Jeroboam kept all these things and pondered them in his heart.
All this time, Ahijah the prophet, with those terrible eyes of his, was sleeplessly watching both the fast-coming fall of Solomon, as well as the immense industry and steady rise of Jeroboam. Ahijah's eyes, like a flame of fire, saw, naked and open, all that was hidden so deep in Jeroboam's heart; and he heard, as with God's own ears, all that Satan said to Jeroboam in his heart. Ahijah watched Jeroboam at his work, and he saw, till he could not be silent, that Jeroboam was fast undermining the walls of Jerusalem in his heart, all the time that he was receiving praise and promotion for building those walls up with his hands. 'Lay down thy plummet,' said Ahijah in hot anger to Jeroboam one day-'lay down thy measuring line, and come out to the potter's field with me.' And Jeroboam laid down his building and came out after Ahijah, Then Ahijah suddenly turned and stripped off his new garment that was upon Jeroboam, and tore it up into twelve pieces, and said, 'Thus and thus hast thou torn up the kingdom of Solomon in thine heart. And it shall be so. Take thee ten of these torn-up pieces and hide them with thee till all that is in thine heart shall come true.' And then the prophet, softening somewhat, went on to tell the trembling builder that if he would but cast Satan and all his counsels and all his hopes out of his heart from that day, then the God of Israel would make him a sure house, so that he and his seed should sit on the throne of Israel for ever. And Ahijah thrust the ten torn pieces upon Jeroboam and departed. And Jeroboam returned to his work on the wall of Jerusalem with his heart all in a flame. And it came to pass that when Solomon heard of all that, Solomon turned to be against Jeroboam. And Solomon eyed Jeroboam as Saul had eyed David, and as we all eye those gifted men who are fast rising to push us out of our seat. And just as David fled to Ramah from the javelin of Saul, so Jeroboam fled to Egypt from the same weapon of Solomon. And not Joseph, and not Moses himself, rose so fast and so high in Egypt as Jeroboam rose. In a short space of time the fugitive overseer of Solomon's works had actually become the son-in-law of Pharaoh himself. Jeroboam was a born king and statesman; and both Israel and Egypt, both heaven and earth, confessed it to be so. And if only Jeroboam had tarried the Lord's leisure, and had kept his heart clean and humble, Jeroboam would soon have been king over all Israel, he and his sons, till the Messiah came Himself to sit down on David's undivided throne.
All this time, matters went on from bad to worse in Jerusalem, till Solomon died and Rehoboam his son reigned in his stead. But with all that God's prophets and God's providences could do, neither Solomon nor his son altered their insane and suicidal ways one iota. In their utter exasperation and despair the oppressed people at last took the strong and desperate step of sending a secret embassy to Egypt to beseech Jeroboam to return and deliver them from their miseries. And Jeroboam left Egypt at once, and came back with the Hebrew ambassadors. And, whatever may have been in Jeroboam's heart, no fault at all can be found with the words of his ultimatum to Rehoboam. 'Thy father made our yoke grievous; now, therefore, make thou the grievous service of thy father and his heavy yoke lighter, and we will serve thee.' But Rehoboam was demented enough to answer Jeroboam and the people with this insolence: 'My father chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you with scorpions.' At that, 'To your tents, O Israel,' rose the cry of rebellion till it rent the air. 'Now see to thine own house, O David.' So Israel rebelled against the house of David that day. And Jeroboam was made king over the ten tribes that day. There was none that followed the house of David but the tribe of Judah only.
Now, here is our first admonition. Had Jeroboam on the day of his coronation, and henceforth, but taken Ahijah home to be his counsellor, Jeroboam had ability enough, and divine right enough, to have built up Israel into a great kingdom for God and for himself. But Jeroboam never loved Ahijah. He both feared and hated Ahijah. He was never at home, as we say, with Ahijah. He was never happy when he was alone with Ahijah, His heart, neither on the wall nor on the throne, was ever single enough for Ahijah's all-searching eyes. And thus it was that Satan still kept his place in Jeroboam's heart, and was still Jeroboam's counsellor in all the affairs of the state, and in all the affairs of the family, till Jeroboam's great fall, from which he and his people never recovered, came about in this way. The ten tribes continued to go up to Jerusalem to Solomon's temple to worship God. And as they did so Jeroboam began to fear lest, in their worship together, Judah and Israel should both so return to the Lord together, that the breach in the kingdom would be healed, and he and his son cast out of his rebellious throne. The fact is, we have here before us in black and white, to this day, the very identical words that Jeroboam at that time spake in his heart. He said this in his heart: 'If my people go up to do service in this way in the house of the Lord at Jerusalem, then shall the hearts of this people turn back to Rehoboam, and they will kill me and my son with me.' Whereupon Jeroboam took counsel, and made two unclean idols of gold, and said. It is too much for you to go up to Jerusalem; behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt, You are not to suppose that Jeroboam was so stupid as to believe what he said and did that day. No. But he knew how stupid, and, indeed, how brutish at bottom his people were, as well as how superstitious. He knew well, also, how party spirit and ill-will had all along prevailed between Samaria and Jerusalem; and, the bad man that he was, Jeroboam deliberately set himself to traffic, and to establish his throne, in the sensuality, in the stupidity, and in the ill-will of his hoodwinked subjects.
But, happily for us all, there is nothing in God's name to usward that is more sure and more true than is His long suffering, and His immense patience, and the many calls to repentance that He sends us before He finally casts us off, And? lest Jeroboam should lose himself through his fear and hate at Ahijah, God actually condescended to set the old and faithful prophet aside and to send a new prophet to Jeroboam: a prophet whose eyes had not yet read Jeroboam's heart, and against whom Jeroboam could have taken up no umbrage. Unless we both know ourselves and hate ourselves, we shall be certain both to hate and put away from us the preacher who tells us to our faces what is in our heart, as Jeroboam hated and put away Ahijah; which hatred of Jeroboam at him was all the time one of Ahijah's surest seals, both to himself and to Jeroboam, that he was a true prophet of the heart-searching God.
With all that, Jeroboam was not a common man. And Jeroboam's sins were not the sins of a common man. It is only kings, and kings' counsellors, and popes, and bishops, and ministers, and elders, and such like, who can sin and make nations and churches and congregations to sin. But they can do it. And they are doing it every day. All who divide, and keep divided, nations, and churches, and families, and friends in order to make a name, or a living, or a party, or just a despite for themselves out of such divisions, they are the true seed of Jeroboam. All who inflame and perpetuate such divisions lest they should lose their stake of money, or of influence, or of occupation, or of pure ill-will; all able men who prostitute their talents to write or speak about men on the other side, as they would not like themselves to be spoken or written about-let them lay it to heart in whose lot they shall surely stand when every man shall give an account of himself to God. But common and mean men are not incapacitated and shut out by their commonness and meanness from sharing in Jeroboam's royal sin. The commonest and meanest man among us has more than enough of this terrible power of both sinning himself and making other men to sin. Every man among us has, in countless ways and on countless occasions, first sinned himself and then made other men to sin. Go back honestly into your past life and see. Take time; take a true light back with you, and look around, and see. Come up, as you shall one day be compelled to come up through your past life whether you will or no, and see. Some of them are dead and gone to judgment with the lesson in sin you gave them laid up before God against you. Some of them are still sinning here, and are prolonging your days in teaching a new generation to sin your sin. Sin yourself, if you will sin. But, as you would have a drop of water to cool your tongue in that torment, do not make other men to sin. Break the Sabbath law, neglect God's house, do despite to His means of grace, drink, bet, pollute yourself, scoff, blaspheme: your soul is your own. Make your bed in hell, if you will have it so; but, as God will smite you for it, let alone the young, and the innocent, and the pure, and the unsuspecting. So Jeroboam, who sinned and who made Israel to sin, though dead, yet speaketh.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jeroboam
the son of Nebat and Zeruah, was born at Zereda, in the tribe of Ephraim, 1 Kings 11:26 . He is the subject of frequent mention in Scripture, as having been the cause of the ten tribes revolting from the dominion of Rehoboam, and also of his having "made Israel to sin," by instituting the idolatrous worship of the golden calves at Dan and Bethel, 1 Kings 12:26-33 . He seems to have been a bold, unprincipled, and enterprising man, with much of the address of a deep politician about him; qualities which probably pointed him out to King Solomon as a proper person to be entrusted with the obnoxious commission of levying certain taxes throughout the tribes of Ephraim and Manasseh. On a certain day, as Jeroboam was going out of Jerusalem into the country, having a new cloak wrapped about his shoulders, the Prophet Ahijah met him in a field where they were alone, and seizing the cloak of Jeroboam, he cut it into twelve pieces, and then addressing him, said, "Take ten of them to thyself; for thus saith the Lord, I will divide and rend the kingdom of Solomon, and will give ten tribes to thee. If, therefore, thou obeyest my word and walkest in my ways as David my servant has done, I will be with thee, and will establish thy house for ever, and put thee in possession of the kingdom of Israel," 1 Kings 11:14-39 . Whether it were that the promises thus made by Ahijah prompted Jeroboam to aim at taking their accomplishment into his own hands, and, with a view to that, began to solicit the subjects of Solomon to revolt; or whether the bare information of what had passed between the prophet and Jeroboam, excited his fear and jealousy, it appears evident that the aged monarch took the alarm, and attempted to apprehend Jeroboam, who, getting notice of what was intended him, made a precipitate retreat into Egypt, where he remained till the death of Solomon. He then returned, and found that Rehoboam, who had succeeded his father Solomon in the throne of David, had already excited the disgust of ten of the tribes by some arbitrary proceedings, in consequence of which they had withdrawn their allegiance from the new monarch. These tribes no sooner heard of his return than they invited him to appear among them in a general assembly, in which they elected him to be king over Israel. Jeroboam fixed his residence at Shechem, and there fortified himself; he also rebuilt Penuel, a city beyond Jordan, putting it into a state of defence, in order to keep the tribes quiet which were on that side Jordan, 1 Kings 12:1-25 .
But Jeroboam soon forgot the duty which he owed to God, who had given him the kingdom; and thought of nothing but how to maintain himself in the possession of it, though he discarded the worship of the true God. The first suggestion of his unbelieving heart was, that if the tribes over whom he reigned were to go up to Jerusalem to sacrifice and keep the annual festivals, they would be under continual temptations to return to the house of David. To counteract this, he caused two golden calves to be made as objects of religious worship, one of which he placed at Dan, and the other at Bethel, the two extremities of his dominions; and caused a proclamation to be made throughout all his territories, that in future none of his subjects should go up to Jerusalem to worship; and, directing them to the two calves which had been recently erected, he cried out, "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt!" He also caused idolatrous temples to be built, and priests to be ordained of the lowest of the people, who were neither of the family of Aaron nor of the tribe of Levi. 1 Kings 12:26-33 . Having appointed a solemn public festival to be observed on the fifteenth day of the eighth month, in order to dedicate his new altar, and consecrate his golden calves, he assembled the people at Bethel, and himself went up to the altar for the purpose of offering incense and sacrifices. At that instant a prophet, who had come, divinely directed, from Judah to Bethel, accosted Jeroboam and said, "O altar, altar, thus saith the Lord, A child shall be born to the house of David, Josiah by name; and upon thee shall he sacrifice the priests of the high places who now burn incense upon thee: he shall burn men's bones upon thee." To confirm the truth of this threatening, the prophet also added a sign, namely, that the altar should immediately be rent asunder, and the ashes and every thing upon it poured upon the earth. Jeroboam, incensed at this interference of the prophet, stretched out his hand and commanded him to be seized; but the hand which he had stretched out was instantly paralyzed, and he was unable to draw it back again. The altar, too, was broken, and the ashes upon it fell to the ground according to the prediction of the prophet. Jeroboam now solicited his prayers that his hand might be restored to him.
The man of God interposed his supplication to Heaven, and the king's hand was restored to him sound as before. Jeroboam then entreated him that he would accompany him to his own house, and accept a reward; but he answered, "Though thou shouldst give me the half of thine house, I would not go with thee, nor will I taste any thing in this place, for the Lord hath expressly forbidden me to do so," 1 Kings 13:1-10 . But notwithstanding this manifest indication of the displeasure of Heaven, it failed of recovering Jeroboam from his impious procedure. He continued to encourage his subjects in idolatry, by appointing priests of the high places, and engaging them in such worship as was contrary to the divine law. This was the sin of Jeroboam's family, and it was the cause of its utter extirpation. Some time after his accession to the throne of Israel, his favourite son Abijah fell sick, and, to relieve his parental solicitude, Jeroboam instructed his wife to disguise herself, and in that state to go and consult the Prophet Ahijah concerning his recovery. This was the same prophet who had foretold to Jeroboam that he should be king of Israel. He was now blind through old age; but the prophet was warned of her approach, and, before she entered his threshold, he called her by name, told her that her son should die, and then, in appalling terms, denounced the impending ruin of Jeroboam's whole family, which shortly after came to pass. After a reign of two-and-twenty years, Jeroboam died, and Nadab, his son, succeeded to the crown, 1 Kings 13:33-34 ; 1 Kings 14:1-20 .
2. JEROBOAM, the second of that name, was the son of Jehoash, king of Israel. He succeeded to his father's royal dignity, A.M. 3179, and reigned forty-one years. Though much addicted to the idolatrous practices of the son of Nebat, yet the Lord was pleased so far to prosper his reign, that by his means, according to the predictions of the Prophet Jonah, the kingdom of the ten tribes was restored from a state of great decay, into which it had fallen, and was even raised to a pitch of extraordinary splendour. The Prophets Amos and Hosea, as well as Jonah, lived during this reign.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam
The first king of Israel, an Ephraimite, the son of Nebat. During the latter part of Solomon's reign, and while an officer under him, he plotted against him, and was obliged to flee into Egypt. On the death of Solomon, he was summoned by the ten tribes to return and present their demands to Rehoboam; and when these were refused, he was chosen king of the revolted tribes, B. C. 975. He reigned twentytwo years. The only notable act of his reign marked him with infamy, as the man "who made Israel to sin." It was the idolatrous establishment of golden calves at Bethel and Dan that the people might worship there and not at Jerusalem. He also superseded the sons of Aaron by priests chosen from "the lowest of the people." This unprincipled but effective measure, in which he was followed by all the kings of Israel, was a confession of weakness as well as of depravity. Neither miracles nor warnings, nor the premature death of Abijah his son could dissuade him. He was at war with Judah all his days, and with the brief reign of Nadab his son the doomed family became extinct, 1 Kings 12:1-14:20 2 Chronicles 10:1-19 13:1-22 .
JEROBOAM SECOND, the thirteenth king of Israel, son and successor of Joash, B. C. 825 reigned forty-one years. He followed up his father's successes over the Syrians, took Hamath and Damascus, and all the region east f the Jordan down to the Dead Sea, and advanced to its highest point the prosperity of that kingdom. Yet his long reign added heavily to the guilt of Israel, by increased luxury, oppression, and vice. After him, the kingdom rapidly declined, and his own dynasty perished within a year, 2 Kings 14:23-29 15:8-12 . See also the contemporary prophets, particularly Amos and Hosea.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam
Increase of the people.
The son of Nebat (1 Kings 11:26-39 ), "an Ephrathite," the first king of the ten tribes, over whom he reigned twenty-two years (B.C. 976-945). He was the son of a widow of Zereda, and while still young was promoted by Solomon to be chief superintendent of the "burnden", i.e., of the bands of forced labourers. Influenced by the words of the prophet Ahijah, he began to form conspiracies with the view of becoming king of the ten tribes; but these having been discovered, he fled to Egypt (1 Kings 11:29-40 ), where he remained for a length of time under the protection of Shishak I. On the death of Solomon, the ten tribes, having revolted, sent to invite him to become their king. The conduct of Rehoboam favoured the designs of Jeroboam, and he was accordingly proclaimed "king of Israel" (1 Kings 12 :: 1-20 ). He rebuilt and fortified Shechem as the capital of his kingdom. He at once adopted means to perpetuate the division thus made between the two parts of the kingdom, and erected at Dan and Bethel, the two extremities of his kingdom, "golden calves," which he set up as symbols of Jehovah, enjoining the people not any more to go up to worship at Jerusalem, but to bring their offerings to the shrines he had erected. Thus he became distinguished as the man "who made Israel to sin." This policy was followed by all the succeeding kings of Israel. While he was engaged in offering incense at Bethel, a prophet from Judah appeared before him with a warning message from the Lord. Attempting to arrest the prophet for his bold words of defiance, his hand was "dried up," and the altar before which he stood was rent asunder. At his urgent entreaty his "hand was restored him again" (1 Kings 13:1-6,9 ; Compare 2 Kings 23:15 ); but the miracle made no abiding impression on him. His reign was one of constant war with the house of Judah. He died soon after his son Abijah (1 Kings 14:1-18 ).
Jeroboam II., the son and successor of Jehoash, and the fourteenth king of Israel, over which he ruled for forty-one years, B.C. 825-784 (2 Kings 14:23 ). He followed the example of the first Jeroboam in keeping up the worship of the golden calves (2 Kings 14:24 ). His reign was contemporary with those of Amaziah (2 Kings 14:23 ) and Uzziah (15:1), kings of Judah. He was victorious over the Syrians (13:4; 14:26,27), and extended Israel to its former limits, from "the entering of Hamath to the sea of the plain" (14:25; Amos 6:14 ). His reign of forty-one years was the most prosperous that Israel had ever known as yet. With all this outward prosperity, however, iniquity widely prevailed in the land (Amos 2:6-8 ; 4:1 ; 6:6 ; Hosea 4:12-14 ). The prophets (Hosea 1:1 ), (Joel 3:16 ; Amos 1:1,2 ), (Amos 1:1 ), and Jonah (2 Kings 14:25 ) lived during his reign. He died, and was buried with his ancestors (14:29). He was succeeded by his son Zachariah (q.v.). His name occurs in Scripture only in 2 Kings 13:13 ; 14:16,23,27,28,29 ; 15:1,8 ; 1 Chronicles 5:17 ; Hosea 1:1 ; Amos 1:1 ; 7:9,10,11 . In all other passages it is Jeroboam the son of Nebat that is meant.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam
("whose people is many".) "Rehoboam," ("enlarger of the people"), is much the same. Both names appear first in Solomon's time, when Israel's numbers were vastly increased.
1. Founder of the northern kingdom of Israel. Son of Nebat and Zeruah of Zereda or Zarthan in the Jordan valley (1 Kings 7:46); of Ephraim (so "Ephrathite" means, 1 Kings 11:26; 1 Samuel 1:1). His mother is called a "widow woman." When Solomon was building Millo, and was closing the gap (not "the breaches," for no hostile attack had been made since David had fortified the city, 2 Samuel 5:9), long afterwards called Tyropreon, separating Zion from Moriah and Ophel, so as to bring the temple mount within the city wall, and so complete the fortification of the city of David, he found Jeroboam able and energetic in "doing the work" (margin, 1 Kings 11:28), so he made him overseer over all "the hoary work" of the house of Joseph. In this post Jereboam attempted a rebellion, the Ephraimites being impatient because of the heavy taxes and works imposed, and so having their old jealousy of Judah awakened afresh.
Events moved on, in God's providence, steadily toward the appointed end: Jeroboam of Ephraim over an army of Ephraimite work. men, employed for 20 years in works for the glory of Judah, and for palaces and idol temples (besides Jehovah's temple transferred from Shiloh in northern Israel to Judah's capital), all for a prince no longer of their own line. Naturally, Jeroboam became their king, and they wreaked their vengeance on Adoniram the collector in chief of taxes for those hated works. Solomon suppressed the rebellion, and Jeroboam fled to Egypt. Ahijah the prophet of Shiloh had previously met Jeroboam by the way, and drawn him aside into the field, and in Jehovah's name intimated that Jeroboam should have ten tribes, and the house of David one, for the apostasy of Solomon and the people, vividly symbolizing the fact as already accomplished in God's counsel by tearing His new (answering to the youthful vigour of the kingdom) four grainered garment into twelve pieces, and giving him ten.
As two, not merely one, remained, the numbers are symbolical not arithmetical, ten expressing completeness and totality (1 Kings 12:20), "they made Jeroboam king over all Israel." (See ISRAEL.) Ahijah's words, "thou shalt reign according to all that thy soul desireth," imply Jeroboam already in heart aspired to the throne before his overt rebellion. God gave no promise of permanence to Jeroboam as He did to the house of David, simply "if thou wilt walk in My ways I will build thee a sure house." Jeroboam fulfilled not the condition, and so his house was extirpated at his son's death (1 Kings 15:25-31). David's seed was to be afflicted, but "not for ever." The tribes shall be united again in Messiah the Son of David (Ezekiel 37:16-22). Ahijah's prophecy did not justify Jeroboam's attempt. Samuel anointed David in Saul's reign; yet David, even when God had put Saul his deadly foe in his power, would not lay violent hands on the Lord's anointed, but waited patiently God's way and time for raising him to the throne.
God had expressly said, "I will make Solomon prince all the days of his life"; so that Jeroboam had no pretext from Ahijah for rebellion, and Solomon would have justly slain him had he not escaped to Shishak or Sheshonk of Egypt. Sheshonk having dethroned the Pharaoh whose daughter Solomon had married, had naturally espoused Jeroboam's cause. At Solomon's death the Israelites called Jeroboam out of Egypt, for they had been longing for a less theocratic and more worldly kingdom, impatient already of submission to the royal house appointed by Jehovah (2 Samuel 20). Israel, having the right of making king whomsoever God chose (2 Samuel 2:4; 2 Samuel 5:3; 1 Chronicles 29:22), assembled to Shechem (Nablus now) for that purpose, the ancient place of national assembly in Ephraim (Joshua 24:1), and more suited than Jerusalem to their design of transferring the government to Jeroboam. Jeroboam, having formerly superintended Ephraim in the works of Solomon at Jerusalem in building Mille and repairing the city of David (1 Kings 11:27), could readily suggest calumnies from his own professed experience.
Jeroboam as their spokesman, begged of Rehoboam a reduction of their tribute and heavy service, due no doubt to Solomon's maintaining such splendour and erecting magnificent buildings. They forgot the blessings of his reign, the peace, wealth, and trade which they enjoyed. Rehoboam, following the young men's counsel rather than the old and experienced counselors of his father (Proverbs 27:10), answered harshly (1 Kings 15:1): "My little finger shall be thicker than my father's loins .... my father chastised you with whips, but I ... with scorpions," i.e. scourges with barbed points like a scorpion's sting. Had he "served them," they would have been "his servants for ever." By acting the tyrant he precipitated the secession. Adopting the watchword of Sheba's rebellion they cried "what portion have we in David? to your tents, O Israel; now see to thine own house (to Judah, of which David's representative was head), David."
Then they "made Jeroboam king over all Israel." His first care was to fortify (so "build" means, for the two cities existed long before) Shechem his first residence (Tirzah was his subsequent abode, 1 Kings 14:17). (It was to Shechem Rehoboam had hastened to meet Israel, to secure Ephraim's allegiance, as he knew he was sure of Judah's allegiance; Shechem had been burnt down by Abimelech). Also Penuel, to secure Gilead against enemies from the E. and N.E. Next, adopting carnal policy instead of God's will, which assured him the kingdom on condition of obedience, and which designs ultimately to reunite Israel to Judah after Judah's temporary chastisement for sin, he set up two golden calves, one at Dan the other at Bethel, to obviate the apprehended return of Israel to Rehoboam through going up to the great feasts at Jerusalem. (See CALF WORSHIP.) He thus violated God's command that there should be only one altar, namely, that at Jerusalem; still worse, he violated the second commandment by worshipping Jehovah, who is a spirit, under the form of images somewhat like the two cherubim.
Rome compared the Protestant reformation to Jeroboam's secession; but it is she who breaks the unity of the faith by representing the one God underimages, in violation of the second commandment; paving the way to violating the first, as Jeroboam's sin prepared the way for Baal worship. Borrowing Aaron's words concerning his calf, Jeroboam insinuated that his calf worship was no new religion, but a revival of their fathers' primitive one in the desert, sanctioned by the first high priest: "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt" (Exodus 32:4; Exodus 32:8). The places were hallowed by ancient tradition: Bethel on the S. of his kingdom, the scene of Jehovah's revelation to the patriarch Jacob (Genesis 28:11; Genesis 28:19; Genesis 35:7); and Dan, at the sources of the Jordan (now Tell el Kadi) in the far N., consecrated by the Danites' image worship, at which Moses' descendant (See JONATHAN officiated; so that no part of his kingdom was beyond easy reach of one or other of the two sanctuaries.
(But Condor presents various reasons for supposing, with the older writers except Josephus, that Dan and Bethel were two heights W. and S. of Shechem: Palestine Exploration Quarterly Statement, Jan. 1878. (See SHECHEM.)) He made priests of the people indiscriminately, not of Levi; any who "came to consecrate himself with a young bullock and seven rams" (2 Chronicles 13:9). Thus one sin entailed many others, and brought its own punishment; for the Levites, refusing to be priests of the calves, and the godly were alienated from him, and most emigrated to Judah (2 Chronicles 11:13-14; 2 Chronicles 11:16), strengthening Rehoboam. Jeroboam transferred the feast of tabernacles from the legal seventh to the eighth month ("the month which he had devised of his own heart," 1 Kings 11:33; see Colossians 2:23, "will worship"), his pretext being the later ripening of the vintage in the N. than in the S., but his real reason being to separate Israel from Judah religiously, the legal 15th day being still retained.
While Jeroboam stood in person to burn incense, or rather to burn the sacrificial portions of the flesh, upon the altar of Bethel, usurping the priest's office, a man of God out of Judah, impelled by (1 Kings 13:2; Hebrew in; Haggai 1:13) the word of Jehovah, Iddo according to Josephus (Ant. 8:8, section 5), cried against the altar: "behold, a child born unto the house of David, Josiah, upon thee shall offer the priests of the high places that burn incense (burn sacrifices) upon thee (retribution in kind), and men's bones shall be burnt upon thee," to defile thee. He gave also a sign of the future fulfillment of his prophecy; "the altar shall be rent, and the ashes ... poured out" (implying the altar's destruction and the desecration of the sacrificial service). Josiah's name, as Cyrus', in Isaiah 44:28; Isaiah 45:1, is specified as a concrete description of what God would do by him ("he whom Jehovah will support"), to execute His judgment on Bethel and its priests: fulfilled 2 Kings 23:15-20. Jeroboam attempting to seize the prophet had his hand dried up, and was only restored upon the prophet's intercession.
Failing by violence, Jeroboam tried to win the prophet by favors; asking him home to refresh himself with food and offering him a present. This only elicited a stronger rejection of him on the part of God. Not for half his house would the prophet go in with him, or eat or drink in the place, or return by the way he came. God would have His people to hold no communion with the apostates of Bethel, or to have any renewed communication with any on the way, which might ensue from meeting the same persons on the same road again. Contrast Balaam's tempting God (through desire of reward) by asking again, as if God would change His once for all declared will (Numbers 22-24; 1 Peter 5:2). An old prophet at Bethel, where, Lot like, he dwelt, risking the corrupting influences of bad association (1 Corinthians 15:33; 2 Corinthians 6:14-18), jealous that any should be faithful where he himself was not, and desiring to drag down the man of God to his own low level (Psalms 62:4), overtook him, and by a lie, saying "an angel of God spoke unto me, Bring him back that he may eat," overcame his constancy. He ought to have remembered God cannot contradict Himself (Numbers 23:19; Galatians 1:8-9).
The prophet, the instrument of his sin (according to God's righteous law: Proverbs 1:31; Jeremiah 2:19), became the instrument of his punishment; his tempter became his accuser: "forasmuch as thou hast disobeyed the mouth of Jehovah ... thy carcass shall not come unto the sepulchre of thy fathers." So a lion slew him, yet ate not his body, nor tore the ass, but stood passively, an emblem of mercy amidst judgment; also to mark it was no mere chance, but the visitation of Jehovah, a warning to Bethel; "if judgment begin (thus immediately) at the house of God, what shall the end be of them that obey not ... God; and if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and sinner appear?" (1 Peter 4:17-18). God chastises His children immediately, so that they may not be condemned with the world; He is slower in punishing the worldly, that His longsuffering may lead them to repentance (1 Corinthians 11:30; 1 Corinthians 11:32; Romans 2:4).
The worldly prophet showed much sentimentality at his death, laying his carcass in his own grave, and exclaiming "Alas! my brother." Balaam like (Numbers 23:10), desiring at death to lie with the man of God, he utters no self reproach, though having caused his death. Jeroboam unwarned by his visitation "returned not from his evil way," "ordaining whosoever would (1 Kings 13:33-34; 2 Chronicles 11:15) priests, for the high places, the devils, and the calves" (the gods worshipped in these houses in the high places being called "demons" or devils (literally, goats, from the Egyptian goat-shaped god Mendes or Pan) from their nature, and calves from their form; Leviticus 17:7, "evil spirits of the desert" (Speaker's Commentary, seiriym ; 1 Corinthians 10:20-21). So it "became sin unto his house, to cut it off." (See ABIJAH; AHIJAH, on the death of the former, Jeroboam's son, and the prophecy of the latter against Jeroboam).
Rehoboam's son Abijah defeated Jeroboam, and gained for a time Bethel, Jeshanah, and Ephraim. "Because the children of Judah relied upon the Lord God of their fathers," "God delivered (2 Chronicles 13) the Israelites into their hand." Jeroboam never recovered strength again; and the Lord struck him (by a special visitation, 1 Samuel 25:38), and he died after a 22 years' reign, and "slept with his fathers," i.e. was buried in his ancestral tomb. Nadab, or Nebat from his grandfather's name, succeeded. Jeroboam's master stroke of policy recoiled on himself. The brand rests eternally on him that he "sinned and made Israel to sin." Rejecting Jehovah's will, he was no longer king by the will of God, but a successful usurper, whose example others followed. The son whose throne Jeroboam was at such pains to secure permanently fell with all Jeroboam's house before Baasha.
2. Jeroboam II, Joash's son, fourth of Jehu's dynasty. In Jehoahaz' reign Jehovah gave Israel promise of a "saviour" from Syria who "had made Israel like the dust by threshing" (2 Kings 13:4-5).(See JEHOAHAZ.) Jeroboam was that saviour, fulfilling the further prophecy of Jonah that Jeroboam should "restore the coast of Israel from the entering in of Hamath unto the sea of the plain" (2 Kings 14:23-29). (See JONAH.) Jeroboam took Syria's capital, Damascus (Amos 1:3-5; Amos 6:14; where Amos warns Israel not to exult in having just taken Hamath, for that shall be the foe's starting point to afflict you: contrast 1 Kings 8:65), and Hamath, and restored the tribes E. of Jordan (1 Chronicles 5:17-22; 2 Kings 13:5). Assyria's depression from 800 to 750 B.C., according to their inscriptions, harmonizes with Scripture that then Jeroboam II. in Israel, and Uzziah in Judah, were able to enlarge their borders. The long period of prosperity thus given was a respite which should have led Israel to repentance.
When they repented not, speedy and final judgment followed. The calf worship, as an engine of state policy, still remained at Bethel. The priest there, Amaziah, alleged before Jeroboam (Amos 7:9-13), "Amos hath conspired against thee in the midst of the house of Israel," exaggerating Amos' prophecy, "I will rise against the house of Jeroboam with the sword," as if he had said, "Jeroboam shall die by the sword." (See AMAZIAH.) Jeroboam seems not to have heeded Amaziah through awe of Jehovah's prophet. In all ages the ungodly have accused witnesses against the national sin as guilty of treason: as Elijah and Jeremiah 1 Kings 18:17; Jeremiah 37:13-14; John 19:12 the Antitype, John 11:48-50 political expediency being the plea for persecution; Acts 17:6-7; Acts 24:5, Paul. After reigning 41 years he was buried in state and entombed with the kings of Israel. Amaziah's expression, "the land is not able to bear all Amos' words," implies a critical state of the country, which eventuated in actual anarchy for some time after Jeroboam's death.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jeroboam
Two kings of Israel had the name Jeroboam. Both of them ruled over the northern part of the divided kingdom, but they were separated in time by more than a hundred years and they belonged to different dynasties.
Jeroboam the son of Nebat
The books of Kings consistently condemn Jeroboam the son of Nebat, the man who led the northern tribes to break away from the Davidic rule. But the chief reason they condemn him is religious rather than political; for Jeroboam established his own religion in the north in opposition to the Levitical system that was based on the Jerusalem temple (1 Kings 15:34; 1 Kings 16:19; 1 Kings 22:52; 2 Kings 10:31; 2 Kings 14:24; 2 Kings 23:15). This false religion, set up by Jeroboam and followed by other kings, was the reason God destroyed the northern kingdom and sent the people into captivity (2 Kings 17:21-23).
From his youth Jeroboam was capable and hard-working. Solomon was so impressed with the young man that he put him in charge of the Ephraim-Manasseh workforce (1 Kings 11:28). The ambitious Jeroboam cleverly used his position to gain a following among his fellow northerners, in opposition to the southerner Solomon, whose policies he found oppressive. From the prophet Ahijah, Jeroboam learnt that God would punish Solomon by splitting his kingdom and giving ten tribes to Jeroboam. When Solomon tried to kill Jeroboam, Jeroboam escaped to Egypt, where he remained till the end of Solomon’s reign (1 Kings 11:29-40).
As soon as Solomon was dead, Jeroboam returned from Egypt and led a rebellion (930 BC). The northern tribes readily crowned Jeroboam their king, in opposition to Solomon’s son, Rehoboam. Rehoboam still reigned in Jerusalem, but only over Judah and its neighbouring tribe, Benjamin (1 Kings 12:1-20).
Jeroboam made his capital in Shechem, but later shifted it a few kilometres north to Tirzah (1 Kings 12:25; 1 Kings 14:17; cf. 1 Kings 15:21; cf. 1 Kings 15:33). He was wary of the attraction that Jerusalem still held, fearing that if his people went there for religious ceremonies they might transfer their allegiance to Rehoboam. He therefore decided to set up his own independent religion. He built shrines at the towns of Bethel (near his southern border) and Dan (near his northern border), complete with his own order of priests, sacrifices and feasts. His religion attempted to combine the worship of Yahweh with Canaanite religion (1 Kings 12:26-33). A bold announcement of judgment by a prophet from Judah showed plainly that God would not accept this new religion (1 Kings 13:1-10). Ahijah repeated the announcement of judgment (1 Kings 14:1-18).
During his twenty-two years reign Jeroboam fought against the Judean kings, Rehoboam and Abijam (1 Kings 15:6-7). His costly loss to Abijam was a final demonstration to him that God would not help one who had broken away from the Davidic dynasty and the Levitical priesthood (2 Chronicles 13:2-20).
Jeroboam the son of Joash
This Jeroboam is usually referred to as Jeroboam II, to distinguish him from the person who established the breakaway northern kingdom. Jeroboam II was one of Israel’s most powerful and prosperous kings, but religiously he was no better than the first Jeroboam. He ruled from 793 to 752 BC (2 Kings 13:13; 2 Kings 14:23-24).
At that time Syria had declined in power and Assyria was concerned with struggles far removed from Palestine. Jeroboam II was therefore able to strengthen his kingdom without interference from hostile neighbours. He brought territorial expansion and economic growth on a scale not seen in Israel since the days of David and Solomon (2 Kings 14:25-28). The prosperity, however, brought with it greed, injustice and exploitation that the prophets Amos and Hosea condemned fearlessly (Amos 1:1; Amos 2:6-8; Amos 3:15; Amos 4:1; Amos 5:10-12; Amos 6:4-6; Hosea 1:1; Hosea 4:1-2; Hosea 4:17-18; Hosea 6:8-9; Hosea 12:7-8; see AMOS; HOSEA).
Just as one prophet earlier had forecast the expansion of Israel’s territory, so another now forecast God’s judgment throughout that territory (2 Kings 14:25; Amos 6:14). Jeroboam would be killed and eventually Israel would go into captivity (Amos 7:9-11).

Sentence search

Nebat - Father of Jeroboam i. The constant designation of Jeroboam i. as ‘ben-Nebat’ is probably the usage of a writer later than Jeroboam ben-Joash
Jeroboam - Jeroboam had an interesting rise to power. During Solomon's reign Ahijah, a prophet from Shiloh, confronted Jeroboam, tore his own coat into twelve pieces, and gave ten of them to Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:29-39 ). Ahijah interpreted this as God's pledge that Jeroboam would become king over ten of the twelve tribes. Upon Solomon's death, Jeroboam learned that the tribes would assemble at Shechem to make Solomon's son Rehoboam their king. Seizing upon the people's resentment toward Solomon's high-handed policies, Jeroboam led the ten tribes to revolt against the house of David. They then crowned Jeroboam king. The inspired biblical writers did not consider Jeroboam a good king. All the following northern kings suffered the biblical writers' condemnation because they walked in the ways of Jeroboam, encouraging worship at Dan and Bethel (see for example 1Kings 15:26,1 Kings 15:34 ; 1Kings 16:19,1 Kings 16:31 ). Jeroboam also instituted new worship practices at his temples (1 Kings 12:25-33 ), intentionally making Israelite worship different from that in Jerusalem, though claiming to worship the same God with the same worship traditions. Prophetic warnings failed to move Jeroboam (1 Kings 13:1-14:20 ). He managed to restore prosperity and territory to a weak nation but continued the religious practices of Jeroboam I and thus met condemnation from the biblical writers. Jeroboam basically restored the boundaries of David's empire, reaching even into Syria
Jeroboam - Two kings of Israel had the name Jeroboam. ...
Jeroboam the son of Nebat...
The books of Kings consistently condemn Jeroboam the son of Nebat, the man who led the northern tribes to break away from the Davidic rule. But the chief reason they condemn him is religious rather than political; for Jeroboam established his own religion in the north in opposition to the Levitical system that was based on the Jerusalem temple (1 Kings 15:34; 1 Kings 16:19; 1 Kings 22:52; 2 Kings 10:31; 2 Kings 14:24; 2 Kings 23:15). This false religion, set up by Jeroboam and followed by other kings, was the reason God destroyed the northern kingdom and sent the people into captivity (2 Kings 17:21-23). ...
From his youth Jeroboam was capable and hard-working. The ambitious Jeroboam cleverly used his position to gain a following among his fellow northerners, in opposition to the southerner Solomon, whose policies he found oppressive. From the prophet Ahijah, Jeroboam learnt that God would punish Solomon by splitting his kingdom and giving ten tribes to Jeroboam. When Solomon tried to kill Jeroboam, Jeroboam escaped to Egypt, where he remained till the end of Solomon’s reign (1 Kings 11:29-40). ...
As soon as Solomon was dead, Jeroboam returned from Egypt and led a rebellion (930 BC). The northern tribes readily crowned Jeroboam their king, in opposition to Solomon’s son, Rehoboam. ...
Jeroboam made his capital in Shechem, but later shifted it a few kilometres north to Tirzah (1 Kings 12:25; 1 Kings 14:17; cf. ...
During his twenty-two years reign Jeroboam fought against the Judean kings, Rehoboam and Abijam (1 Kings 15:6-7). ...
Jeroboam the son of Joash...
This Jeroboam is usually referred to as Jeroboam II, to distinguish him from the person who established the breakaway northern kingdom. Jeroboam II was one of Israel’s most powerful and prosperous kings, but religiously he was no better than the first Jeroboam. Jeroboam II was therefore able to strengthen his kingdom without interference from hostile neighbours. Jeroboam would be killed and eventually Israel would go into captivity (Amos 7:9-11)
Nebat - Father of Jeroboam, first king of Israel. He is mentioned in scripture only to distinguish his son, there being two kings named Jeroboam
Ahijah - The first was when he told Jeroboam that God would divide Solomon’s kingdom and give ten of the twelve tribes to Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:28-38; see Jeroboam). ...
Jeroboam, however, ignored Ahijah’s command to walk in the ways of God (1 Kings 11:38), and this resulted in the second incident involving Ahijah. Jeroboam wanted Ahijah’s help, but, knowing that Ahijah was angry with him, he sent his wife disguised as someone else (1 Kings 14:1-5). Ahijah was aware of Jeroboam’s trick, and announced that he would not escape God’s judgment
Zereda - Native place of Jeroboam I
Nebat - The father of Jeroboam, (1 Kings 11:26) from Nubai, that beholds
Shishak - Shishak at the beginning of his reign received the fugitive Jeroboam, 1 Kings 11:40; and it was probably at the instigation of Jeroboam that he attacked Rehoboam
Zeruah - The mother of Jeroboam ( 1 Kings 11:26 ; 1 Kings 12:24 b)
Zeruah - Mother of Jeroboam who became the first king of Israel
Ahijah the shilonite - After Solomon's death, he prophesied that the northern ten tribes would secede from the Davidic dynasty ruled by the Kings of Judah and crown Jeroboam as their king. He later prophesied that Jeroboam and his family�s royal dynasty would be annihilated as punishment for Jeroboam's sinful ways
Nebat - Sight; aspect, the father of Jeroboam, the king of Israel (1 Kings 11:26 , etc
Zeruah - Stricken, mother of Jeroboam, the first king of the ten tribes (1 Kings 11:26 )
Zeru'ah - (full breasted ), the mother of Jeroboam the son of Nebat
Zeruah - ” Mother of King Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:26 )
Zeruah - Mother of Jeroboam (1 Kings 12:24)
Ephrain - City with its 'towns' or hamlets, taken by Abijah from Jeroboam
Jeroboam - Jeroboam is the name of two kings of Israel. Jeroboam I . The design came to the knowledge of Solomon, and Jeroboam fled to Egypt. When the refusal of Rehoboam threw the tribes into revolt, Jeroboam appeared as leader, and was made king ( 1 Kings 11:26 ff. Jeroboam was a warlike prince, and hostilities with Judah continued throughout his reign. His religious measures have received the reprobation of the Biblical writers, but they were intended by Jeroboam to please the God of Israel. Jeroboam II
Jeshanah - City taken from Jeroboam by Abijah
Jeroboam - And all Jeroboam's great talents, and all his great services, and all his great prospects, and all his great temptations, and all his great sins-all happened to him for ensamples; and they are all written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come. ...
But we must go back to the first beginning of Jeroboam's great temptations and great transgressions. It was King Solomon's many and terrible falls from godliness and from virtue that first set such a fatal snare before Jeroboam's feet. And it was amid all the terrible oppression and suffering of that day that Jeroboam rose so fast and so high in Solomon's service. Jeroboam's outstanding talents in public affairs, his skilful management of men, his great industry, and his great loyalty, as was thought, all combined to bring the son of Nebat under Solomon's royal eye, till there was no trust too important, and no promotion too high for young Jeroboam. And then, to crown it all, as time went on Satan more and more entered into Jeroboam's heart. And Jeroboam allowed Satan in his heart, and listened to Satan speaking in his heart, 'You are a greatly talented man. Jeroboam, you love your widowed mother. Play the man, then, but a little longer, and your mother will live to hear the cry of the people before she dies, this so sweet cry to her ears, Long live King Jeroboam!' And Jeroboam kept all these things and pondered them in his heart. ...
All this time, Ahijah the prophet, with those terrible eyes of his, was sleeplessly watching both the fast-coming fall of Solomon, as well as the immense industry and steady rise of Jeroboam. Ahijah's eyes, like a flame of fire, saw, naked and open, all that was hidden so deep in Jeroboam's heart; and he heard, as with God's own ears, all that Satan said to Jeroboam in his heart. Ahijah watched Jeroboam at his work, and he saw, till he could not be silent, that Jeroboam was fast undermining the walls of Jerusalem in his heart, all the time that he was receiving praise and promotion for building those walls up with his hands. 'Lay down thy plummet,' said Ahijah in hot anger to Jeroboam one day-'lay down thy measuring line, and come out to the potter's field with me. ' And Jeroboam laid down his building and came out after Ahijah, Then Ahijah suddenly turned and stripped off his new garment that was upon Jeroboam, and tore it up into twelve pieces, and said, 'Thus and thus hast thou torn up the kingdom of Solomon in thine heart. And Ahijah thrust the ten torn pieces upon Jeroboam and departed. And Jeroboam returned to his work on the wall of Jerusalem with his heart all in a flame. And it came to pass that when Solomon heard of all that, Solomon turned to be against Jeroboam. And Solomon eyed Jeroboam as Saul had eyed David, and as we all eye those gifted men who are fast rising to push us out of our seat. And just as David fled to Ramah from the javelin of Saul, so Jeroboam fled to Egypt from the same weapon of Solomon. And not Joseph, and not Moses himself, rose so fast and so high in Egypt as Jeroboam rose. Jeroboam was a born king and statesman; and both Israel and Egypt, both heaven and earth, confessed it to be so. And if only Jeroboam had tarried the Lord's leisure, and had kept his heart clean and humble, Jeroboam would soon have been king over all Israel, he and his sons, till the Messiah came Himself to sit down on David's undivided throne. In their utter exasperation and despair the oppressed people at last took the strong and desperate step of sending a secret embassy to Egypt to beseech Jeroboam to return and deliver them from their miseries. And Jeroboam left Egypt at once, and came back with the Hebrew ambassadors. And, whatever may have been in Jeroboam's heart, no fault at all can be found with the words of his ultimatum to Rehoboam. ' But Rehoboam was demented enough to answer Jeroboam and the people with this insolence: 'My father chastised you with whips, but I will chastise you with scorpions. And Jeroboam was made king over the ten tribes that day. Had Jeroboam on the day of his coronation, and henceforth, but taken Ahijah home to be his counsellor, Jeroboam had ability enough, and divine right enough, to have built up Israel into a great kingdom for God and for himself. But Jeroboam never loved Ahijah. And thus it was that Satan still kept his place in Jeroboam's heart, and was still Jeroboam's counsellor in all the affairs of the state, and in all the affairs of the family, till Jeroboam's great fall, from which he and his people never recovered, came about in this way. And as they did so Jeroboam began to fear lest, in their worship together, Judah and Israel should both so return to the Lord together, that the breach in the kingdom would be healed, and he and his son cast out of his rebellious throne. The fact is, we have here before us in black and white, to this day, the very identical words that Jeroboam at that time spake in his heart. ' Whereupon Jeroboam took counsel, and made two unclean idols of gold, and said. It is too much for you to go up to Jerusalem; behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt, You are not to suppose that Jeroboam was so stupid as to believe what he said and did that day. He knew well, also, how party spirit and ill-will had all along prevailed between Samaria and Jerusalem; and, the bad man that he was, Jeroboam deliberately set himself to traffic, and to establish his throne, in the sensuality, in the stupidity, and in the ill-will of his hoodwinked subjects. ...
But, happily for us all, there is nothing in God's name to usward that is more sure and more true than is His long suffering, and His immense patience, and the many calls to repentance that He sends us before He finally casts us off, And? lest Jeroboam should lose himself through his fear and hate at Ahijah, God actually condescended to set the old and faithful prophet aside and to send a new prophet to Jeroboam: a prophet whose eyes had not yet read Jeroboam's heart, and against whom Jeroboam could have taken up no umbrage. Unless we both know ourselves and hate ourselves, we shall be certain both to hate and put away from us the preacher who tells us to our faces what is in our heart, as Jeroboam hated and put away Ahijah; which hatred of Jeroboam at him was all the time one of Ahijah's surest seals, both to himself and to Jeroboam, that he was a true prophet of the heart-searching God. ...
With all that, Jeroboam was not a common man. And Jeroboam's sins were not the sins of a common man. All who divide, and keep divided, nations, and churches, and families, and friends in order to make a name, or a living, or a party, or just a despite for themselves out of such divisions, they are the true seed of Jeroboam. But common and mean men are not incapacitated and shut out by their commonness and meanness from sharing in Jeroboam's royal sin. So Jeroboam, who sinned and who made Israel to sin, though dead, yet speaketh
Jesh'Anah - (old ), a town which, with its dependent villages, was one of the three taken from Jeroboam by Abijah
Ahijah - A prophet and chronicler of the times of Solomon and Jeroboam, 1 Kings 11:29 2 Chronicles 9:29 . He notified Jeroboam of the separation of Israel from Judah, and of the foundation of his house-the ruin of which he afterwards foretold, 1 Kings 14:1-14
Nebat - Father of Jeroboam, an Ephrathite, or Ephraimite, of Zereda in the Jordan valley
ne'Bat - (aspect ), the father of Jeroboam, ( 1 Kings 11:26 ; 12:2,15 ) etc
Israel, Kingdom of - List of kings: Jeroboam, Nadab, Baasa, Ela, Zambri, Amri, Achab, Ochozias, Joram, Jehu, Joachaz, Joas, Jeroboam II, Zacharias, Sellum, Manahem, Phaceia, Phacee, Osee
Kingdom of Israel - List of kings: Jeroboam, Nadab, Baasa, Ela, Zambri, Amri, Achab, Ochozias, Joram, Jehu, Joachaz, Joas, Jeroboam II, Zacharias, Sellum, Manahem, Phaceia, Phacee, Osee
Abijah - the son of Jeroboam, the first king of the ten tribes, who died very young, 1 Kings 14:1 , &c. The Rabbins reproach this monarch with neglecting to destroy the profane altar which Jeroboam had erected at Bethel; and with not suppressing the worship of the golden calves there after his victory over that prince
Abijah (Abijam) - However, he was not as bad as his contemporary in Israel, Jeroboam, who had set up an official rival religion in the northern kingdom. When Abijah went to war with Jeroboam, he presumed God would give him victory because his kingdom was based on the Davidic dynasty and the Levitical priesthood (2 Chronicles 13:1-12). He did, in fact, defeat Jeroboam, not because God was in any way obliged to help him, but because his soldiers fought in an attitude of genuine reliance on God (2 Chronicles 13:13-22)
Jorai - Among those "reckoned by genealogies" in the days of Jotham king of Judah and Jeroboam II of Israel (1 Chronicles 5:13; 1 Chronicles 5:17)
Baasha - He conspired against and killed his immediate predecessor Nadab, the son of Jeroboam I (1 Kings 15:27 ). Furthermore, he exterminated the entire line of Jeroboam (1 Kings 15:29 )
Baasha - the son of Ahijah, commander-in-chief of the armies belonging to Nadab, the son of Jeroboam, king of Israel. And, to secure himself in his usurpation, he massacred all the relatives of his predecessor; which barbarous action proved the accomplishment of the prophecy denounced against the house of Jeroboam by Ahijah, the prophet, 1 Kings 14:1 , &c
Nadab - Son of Jeroboam I. Nadab did evil in the sight of the Lord; and with him perished his children and the race of Jeroboam, as God had foretold, 1 Kings 15:25-30
Ahijah - Prophet called the Shilonite, who foretold to Jeroboam that he should be king over ten of the tribes. God revealed to him that the wife of Jeroboam was coming in disguise to know if their son Abijah would live, and Ahijah had to tell her the dire judgements that should fall upon Jeroboam and his house
Israel - (ihz' ray ehl) Name of Northern Kingdom after Jeroboam led the northern tribes to separate from the southern tribes and form a separate kingdom (1 Kings 12:1 )
Jeshanah - A town taken from Jeroboam by Abijah ( 2 Chronicles 13:19 )
Abijah - A son of Jeroboam I. See Jeroboam. He made war against Jeroboam, king of Israel, for the purpose of getting back the kingship of the ten tribes, and defeated him, with a loss of 500,000 men. He began to reign in the eighteenth year of Jeroboam, and was succeeded by his son Asa in the twentieth year of Jeroboam, so that he reigned only a part of three years
Clad - ...
Jeroboam had clad himself with a new garment
Jeroboam - —Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin. There was another Jeroboam, the son of Jehoash
Zechariah, king of israel - 607 BCE) Ascended to the throne after the death of his father, King Jeroboam II
Nebat - ” Father of Jeroboam I (1 Kings 11:26 ; 1Kings 12:2,1 Kings 12:15 )
Ephrain - A city of Israel which, with its dependent villages, Abijah and the men of Judah took from Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:19)
Iddo - It is probable that he likewise wrote some prophecies against Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, 2 Chronicles 9:29 , wherein part of Solomon's life was included. Josephus, and many others after him, are of opinion that it was Iddo who was sent to Jeroboam, while he was at Bethel, and was there dedicating an altar to the golden calves; and that it was he who was killed by a lion, 1 Kings 13
Jeroboam - Jeroboam (jĕr'o-bô'am), whose people are many. Solomon attempting to arrest Jeroboam, caused his night into Egypt. Jeroboam married Ano, the elder sister of the Egyptian queen Tahpenes, and returned to Shechem, where took place the conference with Rehoboam, and the final revolt which ended in the elevation of Jeroboam to the throne of the northern kingdom. Jeroboam was at constant war with the house of Judah, and in a battle with Abijah was defeated, and soon after died in the 22d year of his reign, 2 Chronicles 13:20, and was buried in his ancestral sepulchre. Jeroboam II
Zereda - The fortress, a city on the north of Mount Ephraim; the birthplace of Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:26 )
Jeroboam - " When Solomon was building Millo, and was closing the gap (not "the breaches," for no hostile attack had been made since David had fortified the city, 2 Samuel 5:9), long afterwards called Tyropreon, separating Zion from Moriah and Ophel, so as to bring the temple mount within the city wall, and so complete the fortification of the city of David, he found Jeroboam able and energetic in "doing the work" (margin, 1 Kings 11:28), so he made him overseer over all "the hoary work" of the house of Joseph. ...
Events moved on, in God's providence, steadily toward the appointed end: Jeroboam of Ephraim over an army of Ephraimite work. Naturally, Jeroboam became their king, and they wreaked their vengeance on Adoniram the collector in chief of taxes for those hated works. Solomon suppressed the rebellion, and Jeroboam fled to Egypt. Ahijah the prophet of Shiloh had previously met Jeroboam by the way, and drawn him aside into the field, and in Jehovah's name intimated that Jeroboam should have ten tribes, and the house of David one, for the apostasy of Solomon and the people, vividly symbolizing the fact as already accomplished in God's counsel by tearing His new (answering to the youthful vigour of the kingdom) four grainered garment into twelve pieces, and giving him ten. ...
As two, not merely one, remained, the numbers are symbolical not arithmetical, ten expressing completeness and totality (1 Kings 12:20), "they made Jeroboam king over all Israel. ) Ahijah's words, "thou shalt reign according to all that thy soul desireth," imply Jeroboam already in heart aspired to the throne before his overt rebellion. God gave no promise of permanence to Jeroboam as He did to the house of David, simply "if thou wilt walk in My ways I will build thee a sure house. " Jeroboam fulfilled not the condition, and so his house was extirpated at his son's death (1 Kings 15:25-31). Ahijah's prophecy did not justify Jeroboam's attempt. ...
God had expressly said, "I will make Solomon prince all the days of his life"; so that Jeroboam had no pretext from Ahijah for rebellion, and Solomon would have justly slain him had he not escaped to Shishak or Sheshonk of Egypt. Sheshonk having dethroned the Pharaoh whose daughter Solomon had married, had naturally espoused Jeroboam's cause. At Solomon's death the Israelites called Jeroboam out of Egypt, for they had been longing for a less theocratic and more worldly kingdom, impatient already of submission to the royal house appointed by Jehovah (2 Samuel 20). Israel, having the right of making king whomsoever God chose (2 Samuel 2:4; 2 Samuel 5:3; 1 Chronicles 29:22), assembled to Shechem (Nablus now) for that purpose, the ancient place of national assembly in Ephraim (Joshua 24:1), and more suited than Jerusalem to their design of transferring the government to Jeroboam. Jeroboam, having formerly superintended Ephraim in the works of Solomon at Jerusalem in building Mille and repairing the city of David (1 Kings 11:27), could readily suggest calumnies from his own professed experience. ...
Jeroboam as their spokesman, begged of Rehoboam a reduction of their tribute and heavy service, due no doubt to Solomon's maintaining such splendour and erecting magnificent buildings. "...
Then they "made Jeroboam king over all Israel. ...
Rome compared the Protestant reformation to Jeroboam's secession; but it is she who breaks the unity of the faith by representing the one God underimages, in violation of the second commandment; paving the way to violating the first, as Jeroboam's sin prepared the way for Baal worship. Borrowing Aaron's words concerning his calf, Jeroboam insinuated that his calf worship was no new religion, but a revival of their fathers' primitive one in the desert, sanctioned by the first high priest: "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt" (Exodus 32:4; Exodus 32:8). Jeroboam transferred the feast of tabernacles from the legal seventh to the eighth month ("the month which he had devised of his own heart," 1 Kings 11:33; see Colossians 2:23, "will worship"), his pretext being the later ripening of the vintage in the N. ...
While Jeroboam stood in person to burn incense, or rather to burn the sacrificial portions of the flesh, upon the altar of Bethel, usurping the priest's office, a man of God out of Judah, impelled by (1 Kings 13:2; Hebrew in; Haggai 1:13) the word of Jehovah, Iddo according to Josephus ( Jeroboam attempting to seize the prophet had his hand dried up, and was only restored upon the prophet's intercession. ...
Failing by violence, Jeroboam tried to win the prophet by favors; asking him home to refresh himself with food and offering him a present. Jeroboam unwarned by his visitation "returned not from his evil way," "ordaining whosoever would (
1 Kings 13:33-34; 2 Chronicles 11:15) priests, for the high places, the devils, and the calves" (the gods worshipped in these houses in the high places being called "demons" or devils (literally, goats, from the Egyptian goat-shaped god Mendes or Pan) from their nature, and calves from their form; Leviticus 17:7, "evil spirits of the desert" (Speaker's Commentary, seiriym ; 1 Corinthians 10:20-21). " (See ABIJAH; AHIJAH, on the death of the former, Jeroboam's son, and the prophecy of the latter against Jeroboam). ...
Rehoboam's son Abijah defeated Jeroboam, and gained for a time Bethel, Jeshanah, and Ephraim. " Jeroboam never recovered strength again; and the Lord struck him (by a special visitation, 1 Samuel 25:38), and he died after a 22 years' reign, and "slept with his fathers," i. Jeroboam's master stroke of policy recoiled on himself. The son whose throne Jeroboam was at such pains to secure permanently fell with all Jeroboam's house before Baasha. Jeroboam II, Joash's son, fourth of Jehu's dynasty. ) Jeroboam was that saviour, fulfilling the further prophecy of Jonah that Jeroboam should "restore the coast of Israel from the entering in of Hamath unto the sea of the plain" (2 Kings 14:23-29). ) Jeroboam took Syria's capital, Damascus (Amos 1:3-5; Amos 6:14; where Amos warns Israel not to exult in having just taken Hamath, for that shall be the foe's starting point to afflict you: contrast 1 Kings 8:65), and Hamath, and restored the tribes E. , according to their inscriptions, harmonizes with Scripture that then Jeroboam II. The priest there, Amaziah, alleged before Jeroboam (Amos 7:9-13), "Amos hath conspired against thee in the midst of the house of Israel," exaggerating Amos' prophecy, "I will rise against the house of Jeroboam with the sword," as if he had said, "Jeroboam shall die by the sword. ) Jeroboam seems not to have heeded Amaziah through awe of Jehovah's prophet. Amaziah's expression, "the land is not able to bear all Amos' words," implies a critical state of the country, which eventuated in actual anarchy for some time after Jeroboam's death
Jeroboam - On a certain day, as Jeroboam was going out of Jerusalem into the country, having a new cloak wrapped about his shoulders, the Prophet Ahijah met him in a field where they were alone, and seizing the cloak of Jeroboam, he cut it into twelve pieces, and then addressing him, said, "Take ten of them to thyself; for thus saith the Lord, I will divide and rend the kingdom of Solomon, and will give ten tribes to thee. Whether it were that the promises thus made by Ahijah prompted Jeroboam to aim at taking their accomplishment into his own hands, and, with a view to that, began to solicit the subjects of Solomon to revolt; or whether the bare information of what had passed between the prophet and Jeroboam, excited his fear and jealousy, it appears evident that the aged monarch took the alarm, and attempted to apprehend Jeroboam, who, getting notice of what was intended him, made a precipitate retreat into Egypt, where he remained till the death of Solomon. Jeroboam fixed his residence at Shechem, and there fortified himself; he also rebuilt Penuel, a city beyond Jordan, putting it into a state of defence, in order to keep the tribes quiet which were on that side Jordan, 1 Kings 12:1-25 . ...
But Jeroboam soon forgot the duty which he owed to God, who had given him the kingdom; and thought of nothing but how to maintain himself in the possession of it, though he discarded the worship of the true God. At that instant a prophet, who had come, divinely directed, from Judah to Bethel, accosted Jeroboam and said, "O altar, altar, thus saith the Lord, A child shall be born to the house of David, Josiah by name; and upon thee shall he sacrifice the priests of the high places who now burn incense upon thee: he shall burn men's bones upon thee. Jeroboam, incensed at this interference of the prophet, stretched out his hand and commanded him to be seized; but the hand which he had stretched out was instantly paralyzed, and he was unable to draw it back again. Jeroboam now solicited his prayers that his hand might be restored to him. Jeroboam then entreated him that he would accompany him to his own house, and accept a reward; but he answered, "Though thou shouldst give me the half of thine house, I would not go with thee, nor will I taste any thing in this place, for the Lord hath expressly forbidden me to do so," 1 Kings 13:1-10 . But notwithstanding this manifest indication of the displeasure of Heaven, it failed of recovering Jeroboam from his impious procedure. This was the sin of Jeroboam's family, and it was the cause of its utter extirpation. Some time after his accession to the throne of Israel, his favourite son Abijah fell sick, and, to relieve his parental solicitude, Jeroboam instructed his wife to disguise herself, and in that state to go and consult the Prophet Ahijah concerning his recovery. This was the same prophet who had foretold to Jeroboam that he should be king of Israel. He was now blind through old age; but the prophet was warned of her approach, and, before she entered his threshold, he called her by name, told her that her son should die, and then, in appalling terms, denounced the impending ruin of Jeroboam's whole family, which shortly after came to pass. After a reign of two-and-twenty years, Jeroboam died, and Nadab, his son, succeeded to the crown, 1 Kings 13:33-34 ; 1 Kings 14:1-20 . Jeroboam, the second of that name, was the son of Jehoash, king of Israel
Eth-Baal - ” King of Sidon and father of Jezebel (1 Kings 16:31 ), who married Jeroboam II, king of Israel (793-753 B
Nadab (1) - NADAB was king of Israel two years or parts of years after his father Jeroboam i
Beth'Zur - (house of rock ) a town in the mountains of Judah, built by Jeroboam, ( Joshua 15:58 ; 2 Chronicles 11:7 ) now Beit-zur
Baasha - He was an officer of the army under Nadab, son of Jeroboam I. The execution of the whole house of Jeroboam followed
So - This was a return to the policy that had been successful in the reign of Jeroboam I
Gibbethon - A town of Dan; given to the Kohathites, Joshua 19:44; Joshua 21:23; held by the Philistines in the reigns of Jeroboam, Nadab, Baasha, Elah, Zimri, and Omri
Jonas - The period of his ministry is determined by its connection with the reign of Jeroboam II (783-743 BC), practically coinciding with the era of decline in the Assyrian Empire which came between the two powerful rulers, Adadnirari III (810-782 BC) and Theglathphalasar III (745-728 BC). Consequently we can account for much in Jonas's career: that he could foretell the victories of Jeroboam; that he could speak of the grandeur of Ninive as past; that he could preach to a nation once proud, now crushed
Zer'Eda - (the fortress ) the native place of Jeroboam
Zereda(h) - Site in Ephraim of the home of Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:26 ), possibly identified as Ain Seridah iin the wadi Deir Ballut in western Samaria
Jehohanan - Jehovah-granted, Jeroboam II
Rehoboam - The northern tribes revolted and made the rebel Jeroboam their king. He continued the pagan ways which Solomon had allowed (1 Kings 14:21-24 ) and fought against Jeroboam and Shishak of Egypt
Goat-Demons - Worship of these “demons” persisted long in the history of Israel, appearing under Jeroboam I (929-909 B. In this instance, śâ‛ı̂yr represents idols that Jeroboam had manufactured
Beth-Aven - But after Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin, set up his golden calves there, the pious among the Israelites called it Beth-aven; meaning, the house of iniquity; for it was no longer proper to call it Beth-el, the house of God
Jeshanah - ” City that King Abijah of Judah captured from Jeroboam of Israel about 910 B
Abijah - Son of Jeroboam, the first king of Israel. In war with Jeroboam he gained a signal victory, 2 Chronicles 13:1-22 ; yet he followed the evil example of his father
Shi'Shak, - Shishak at the beginning of his reign received the fugitive Jeroboam, (1 Kings 11:40 ) and it was probably at the instigation of Jeroboam that he attacked Rehoboam
Jadon - 1), Jadon was the name of the man of God sent from Judah to Jeroboam ( 1 Kings 13:1-34 )
Gibbethon - As bordering on the Philistines, it was soon seized by them, probably when Jeroboam drove all the Levites from northern Israel to Judah
Pekahiah - The record tells us nothing about him except that he displeased Jahweh by walking in the sins of Jeroboam i
Hosea - (a) (7th century BCE) A contemporary of Isaiah, Amos and Micah, he prophesied during the reign of King Jeroboam II
Rehoboam - We have his history at large from 1 Kings 11:43, where it begins, to the rebellion against him by Jeroboam, where it ends in his death, 1 Kings 14:31
Zemaraim - Also a MOUNT on which the prophet Abijah stood in addressing Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:4); in the hilly part of Ephraim, extending into Benjamin's territory
Hosea - Jeroboam II
Men'Ahem - His reign, which lasted ten years, is briefly recorded in ( 2 Kings 15:14-22 ) He maintained the calf-worship of Jeroboam
Iddo - A prophet of Judah, who prophesied against Jeroboam, and wrote the history of Rehoboam and Abijah, 2 Chronicles 9:29 12:15 13:22
Peniel or Penuel - It was restored by Jeroboam I, 1 Kings 12:25
Jeshishai - A part of the transjordanic tribes came temporarily under his dominion in the period of disorder in Israel after the death of Jeroboam II This caused his registration of the Gadites
Amos - He prophesied, however, concerning Israel, at Bethel, in the days of Uzziah, king of Judah, and Jeroboam II, king of Israel, about B. Their temporary prosperity under Jeroboam led to gross idolatry, injustice, and corruption; for which sins he denounces the judgments of God upon them: but he closes with cheering words of consolation
Zemaraim - Here the armies of Abijah and Jeroboam engaged in a bloody battle, which issued in the total defeat of the king of Israel, who never "recovered strength again," and soon after died
Hamath - This city was taken by the kings of Judah, and afterward retaken by the Syrians, and recovered from them by Jeroboam the Second, 2 Kings 14:28
Zachariah - King of Israel succeeded his father Jeroboam 2,773 B
Jeshanah - One of the three towns taken from Jeroboam by Abijah (2 Chronicles 13:19)
Golden Calf - The latter reference states that Jeroboam I constructed at Bethel and Dan two golden bulls, which were probably meant to represent the pedestals of God's throne. All other references to this subject in the Bible (Deuteronomy 9:16 ,Deuteronomy 9:16,9:21 ; 2 Kings 10:29 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 2 Chronicles 11:15 ; 2 Chronicles 13:8 ; Nehemiah 9:18 ; Psalm 106:19 ; Acts 7:41 ) have in view either the incident involving Aaron or the one involving Jeroboam I. See Aaron ; Bethel ; Bull ; Dan ; Exodus ; Jeroboam I; Moses ; Yahweh
Baasha - Son of Ahijah, of Issachar, first of the second dynasty of kings of the ten tribes' northern kingdom, which supplanted Jeroboam's dynasty (1 Kings 15:27). " Though the instrument of God's vengeance on the seed of Jeroboam who both "sinned and made Israel to sin," "leaving not to Jeroboam any that breathed," he walked in the same sinful way. Therefore, the word of Jehovah came to Jehu son of Hanani: "Forasmuch as I exalted thee out of the dust (which implies that he was of low origin), and made thee prince over My people Israel; and thou hast walked in the way of Jeroboam, and hast made My people Israel to sin . ...
As he conspired against king Nadab, son of Jeroboam, who was besieging the Philistine town of Gibbethon, and slew all Jeroboam's seed, so Zimri, a servant, conspired against Baasha's son, Elah, and slew all Baasha's house, "leaving him not one of his kinsfolk or of his friends. An incidental notice explains it (1 Kings 12:26): "Jeroboam said in his heart, Now shall the kingdom return to the house of David if this people go up to do sacrifice in the house of Jehovah at Jerusalem. For the Levites left their suburbs and their possession, and came to Judah and Jerusalem: for Jeroboam and his sons had east them off from executing the priest's office unto the Lord
Aven - , "the house of vanity" (4:15), on account of the golden calves Jeroboam had set up there (1 Kings 12:28 )
Tirzah - Pleasant, Song of Song of Solomon 6:4 , a city of the Canaanites, Joshua 12:24 , and afterwards of the tribe of Manasseh or Ephraism; and the royal seat of the kings of Israel from the time of Jeroboam to the reign of Omri, who built the city of Samaria, which then became the capital of this kingdom, 1 Kings 15:21,33 16:6,23 2 Kings 15:14,16
Hose'a - Jeroboam II was on the throne, and Israel was at the height of its earthly splendor
Abi'Jah - He endeavored to recover the kingdom of the Ten Tribes, and made war on Jeroboam. 3]'>[1] ...
Son of Jeroboam I
Jeho'Ahaz - Jehoahaz maintained the idolatry of Jeroboam; but in the extremity of his humiliation he besought Jehovah, and Jehovah gave Israel a deliverer --probably either Jehoash, vs. (2 Kings 13:23 ) and 2 Kings 13:25 Or Jeroboam II
e'Phra-in - (hamlet ), a city of Israel which Judah captured from Jeroboam
Abijah - ; Hales, 973); in the 18th year of Jeroboam I of Israel (1 Kings 14:31; 2 Chronicles 12:16). He endeavored to recover the ten tribes to Judah, and made war on Jeroboam. His speech on mount Zemaraim in mount Ephraim, before the battle, urged on Jeroboam the justice of his cause, that God had given the kingdom to David and his sons forever "by a covenant of salt," and that Judah had the regular temple service and priesthood, whereas Israel had made golden calves their idols, and had cast out the priests; therefore "fight not ye against the Lord God of your fathers, for ye shall not prosper" (2 Chronicles 13). 400,000 men are assigned to Abijah's army, 800,000 to Jeroboam's, of whom 500,000 fell. Son of Jeroboam I, "in whom alone of Jeroboam's house some good thing was found toward the Lord God of Israel" (1 Kings 14:13); therefore, he alone was permitted to go down to the grave in peace. Jeroboam had sent his wife in disguise with a present to the prophet (See AHIJAH (see)
Zachariah - Son of Jeroboam II, fourteenth king of Israel. Did evil in the sight of Jehovah as his fathers, worshipping Jeroboam's calves
Depart - Jehu departed not from the sins of Jeroboam
Jeroboam (1) - On the division of the kingdom, Jeroboam was made king of the ten tribes. Jeroboam is charged with doing evil above all that had been before him, and his doings became a proverb. For Israel to sin "as Jeroboam the son of Nebat," was a mark of consummate wickedness
Satyr - ” Jeroboam I (926-909 B. Here idols in the forms of goats may be intended as parallel to the famous calves Jeroboam built
Jerobo'am - (1 Kings 11:29-40 ) The attempts of Solomon to cut short Jeroboam's designs occasioned his flight into Egypt. After a year's longer stay in Egypt, during which Jeroboam married Ano, the elder sister of the Egyptian queen Tahpenes, he returned to Shechem, where took place the conference with Rehoboam [1], and the final revolt which ended in the elevation of Jeroboam to the throne of the northern kingdom. Jeroboam was at constant war with the house of Judah, but the only act distinctly recorded is a battle with Abijah, son of Rehoboam, in which he was defeated. (1 Kings 14:20 ) ...
Jeroboam II
Pekah - His conduct was evil; he maintained the sinful worship set up by Jeroboam I
Zimri (1) - The characterization of Zimri, as one who caused Israel to sin by following in the ways of Jeroboam, is due to the author’s desire to pronounce judgment on all the kings of the Northern Kingdom ( 1 Kings 16:9-20 )
Zemaraim - Mountain in the territory of Ephraim where Abijah rebuked Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:4 )
Baasha - It was according to the word of the Lord by the prophet Ahijah, that the seed of Jeroboam should be entirely destroyed, because of his wickedness; but Baasha was no better, and his posterity fell under a like judgement
Shishak - King of Egypt, to whom Jeroboam fled for protection from Solomon
Zachariah - Son of Jeroboam II. Most chronologers assume an interregnum of eleven years between Jeroboam's death and Zachariah's accession, b
Baasha - He exterminated the whole race of Jeroboam, as had been predicted, 1 Kings 14:7-14 ; but by his bad conduct and idolatry incurred God's indignation, ...
1 Kings 15:1-16:7,12
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
975...
Jeroboam,...
Ahijah. [1]...
841...
Joash,...
839...
Amaziah,...
825...
Jeroboam II
Abijah - His address to "Jeroboam and all Israel," before encountering them in battle, is worthy of being specially noticed (2Chronicles 13:5-12). ...
A son of Jeroboam, the first king of Israel. The prophet, though blind with old age, knew the wife of Jeroboam as soon as she approached, and under a divine impulse he announced to her that inasmuch as in Abijah alone of all the house of Jeroboam there was found "some good thing toward the Lord," he only would come to his grave in peace
Ahijah - He met outside of Jerusalem in the way, and foretold to, Jeroboam, the transfer of ten tribes to him from Solomon, for Solomon's idolatries, by the symbolic action of rending the garment on him into twelve pieces, of which he gave ten to Jeroboam. Further he assured him from God of "a sure house, such as He had built for David," if only Jeroboam would "walk in God's ways," as David did. Jeroboam fled from Solomon to Shishak, king of Egypt, where he stayed until Solomon died. The other prophecy of his (1 Kings 14:6-16) was given to Jeroboam's wife, who in disguise consulted him as to her son Abijah's recovery. ...
Though blind with age he detected her, and announced that as Jeroboam had utterly failed in the one condition of continuance in the kingdom rent from David's house, which his former prophecy had laid down, namely, to keep God's commandments heartily as David did, Jeroboam's house should be taken away "as dung"; but that in reward for the good there was found in Abijah toward God, he alone should have an honorable burial (compare Isaiah 57:1-2), but that "Jehovah would smite Israel as a reed shaken in the water, and root up and scatter Israel beyond the river," Euphrates
Abijah - He began to reign in the eighteenth year of Jeroboam, king of Israel (B. "There waswarbetween Abijah and Jeroboam," and Abijah by a patriotic address to Israel sought to recover the ten tribes. God smote Jeroboam and all Israel, and there fell 500,000 chosen men of Israel. Abijah also took the cities of Bethel, Jeshanah and Ephrain; and Jeroboam was not able to recover strength all the days of Abijah. Son of Jeroboam I
Zachariah -
Son of Jeroboam II
Ephraim, Tribe of - Jeroboam (3Kings 11) became leader of the ten tribes of the north, and after the schism, the history of the tribe of Ephraim is absorbed in that of the north
Calf - Jeroboam, in his days, made two calves, (See 1 Kings 12:26-28)...
Tribe of Ephraim - Jeroboam (3Kings 11) became leader of the ten tribes of the north, and after the schism, the history of the tribe of Ephraim is absorbed in that of the north
Zachari'ah -
Son of Jeroboam II. Most chronologers assume an interregnum of eleven years between Jeroboam's death and Zachariah's accession
Baasha - In so doing he brought the house of Jeroboam to an end as foretold by one of God’s prophets
Rehobo'am - Jeroboam was made king of the northern tribes. [1] An expedition to reconquer Israel was forbidden by the prophet Shemaiah, (1 Kings 12:21 ) still during Rehoboam's lifetime peaceful relations between Israel and Judah were never restored
Rehoboam - Benjamin was reckoned along with Judah, and these two tribes formed the southern kingdom, with Jerusalem as its capital; while the northern ten tribes formed themselves into a separate kingdom, choosing Jeroboam as their king. (See Jeroboam . ), one of the kings of Egypt of the Assyrian dynasty, stirred up, no doubt, by Jeroboam his son-in-law, made war against him. "There was war between Rehoboam and Jeroboam all their days
Jeroboam (2) - "He departed not from all the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat
Nadab - Son of Jeroboam, king of Israel
Ahijah - A prophet who dwelt in Shiloh, in the reign of the first Jeroboam
Calf - ...
The golden calves of Jeroboam were erected by him, one at each extreme of his kingdom, that the ten tribes might be prevented from resorting to Jerusalem to worship, and thus coalescing with the men of Judah, 1 Kings 12:26-29 . Jeroboam is scarcely ever mentioned in Scripture without the brand upon him, "who made Israel to sin," 2 Kings 17:21
Jeroboam - The conduct of Rehoboam favoured the designs of Jeroboam, and he was accordingly proclaimed "king of Israel" (1 Kings 12 :: 1-20 ). ...
...
...
Jeroboam II. He followed the example of the first Jeroboam in keeping up the worship of the golden calves (2 Kings 14:24 ). In all other passages it is Jeroboam the son of Nebat that is meant
Jonah - He flourished in or before the reign of Jeroboam II
Shishak - Jeroboam fled to him ( 1 Kings 11:40 ), and he plundered Jerusalem in the fifth year of Rehoboam ( 1 Kings 14:25 , 2 Chronicles 12:2 )
Jonah - He exercised his ministry very early in the reign of Jeroboam II
Zachariah - Son and successor of Jeroboam 2, king of Israel
Iddo - A seer who had 'visions' against Jeroboam
Amos - He prophesied concerning Israel, in the days of Uzziah, king of Judah, and Jeroboam the Second, king of Israel, about b
Abijah - Son of Jeroboam, first king of the Northern Kingdom Israel. Abijah followed the sins of Rehoboam (1 Kings 15:3 ) but still maintained proper worship in Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 13:10 ), and God gave him victory over Jeroboam of Israel (2 Chronicles 13:15-20 )
Calf - ...
Ages after this, Jeroboam, king of Israel, set up two idol calves, one at Dan, and the other at Bethel, that he might thus prevent the ten tribes from resorting to Jerusalem for worship (1 Kings 12:28 ). This sin of Jeroboam is almost always mentioned along with his name (2 Kings 15:28 etc
Nadab - The son and successor of Jeroboam I
a'Mos - 808 for he lived in the reigns of Uzziah king of Judah and Jeroboam king of Israel; but his ministry probably took place at an earlier date, perhaps about the middle of Jeroboam's reign Nothing is known of the time or manner of his death
id'do - ) ...
A seer whose "visions" against Jeroboam incidentally contained some of the acts of Solomon
Dan - Here Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, set up one of his golden calves, 1 Kings 12:29 ; and the other at Bethel
Penuel - Jeroboam I built (perhaps rebuilt or fortified) the city (1 Kings 12:25 )
lo-Ammi - " The three children symbolize successive generations:...
(1) Jezreel represents the dynasty of Jeroboam I, ending with Jehu's shedding the blood of the last of the line at Jezreel;...
(2) Lo-ruhamah, a daughter, represents the effeminate period which followed;...
(3) Loammi, a son, represents Jeroboam II's vigorous dynasty, which however brought no revival of religion; still Israel was not God's people really, and so should be no longer so in name but cast away
Menahem - He then, proceeding "from Tirzah" (2 Kings 15:16) where Israel's main army was posted, smote Tiphsach (Thapsacus on the Euphrates), Israel's northeastern border city under Solomon (1 Kings 4:24), restored by Jeroboam II (2 Kings 14:25; 2 Kings 14:28), but having probably revolted again during the anarchy at his death. In religion "he departed not all his days from the sins of Jeroboam who made Israel to sin
Abijah - Beyond this, the Book of Kings tells us only that he reigned three years, that he walked in the sins of his father, and that he had war with Jeroboam, king of Israel. A son of Jeroboam I
Libya - He supported Jeroboam I in establishing the kingdom of Israel in 922 B
Penuel - Jeroboam rebuilt it
Lachish - It was one of the Canaanitish cities which was subdued by Joshua and included in Judah; fortified by Jeroboam
Calf, Golden - Among the measures taken by Jeroboam I. With this end in view, perhaps also with the subsidiary purpose of reconciling the priesthood of the local sanctuaries to the new order of things, Jeroboam set up two golden ‘calves,’ one at Bethel and the other at Dan, the two most important sanctuaries, geographically and historically, in his realm ( 1 Kings 12:26-33 , 2 Chronicles 11:14 f. Of the workmanship of Jeroboam’s ‘calves,’ as of that of Aaron, it is impossible to speak with certainty. ...
With regard to the religious significance of this action on the part of Jeroboam, it is now admitted on all hands that the bulls are to be recognized as symbols of J″ [2] as the sin wherewith Jeroboam made Israel to sin ( 1 Kings 14:18 ; 1 Kings 15:26 etc
Tirzah - It was the residence of Jeroboam i
Amaziah - An idolatrous priest of the golden calf at Bethel, in the reign of Jeroboam II
Calf - Some centuries later Jeroboam set up golden calves at Dan and Bethel, which thus became and long continued to be centres of unhallowed worship. For example, Aaron proclaimed "a feast to the Lord," Exodus 32:5; and Jeroboam, we may fairly believe, never hoped to keep his subjects from resorting to Jerusalem, by at once setting up a god in downright opposition to Jehovah
Israel, Kingdom of - --The prophet Ahijah of Shiloh, who was commissioned in the latter days of Solomon to announce the division of the kingdom, left one tribe (Judah) to the house of David, and assigned ten to Jeroboam. ( 1 Kings 12:25 ) Subsequently Tirzah became the royal residence, if not the capital, of Jeroboam (1 Kings 14:17 ) and of his successors. Jeroboam had not sufficient force of character in himself to make a lasting impression on his people. Baasha, in the midst of the army at Gibbethon, slew the son and successor of Jeroboam; Zimri, a captain of chariots, slew the son and successor of Baasha; Omri, the captain of the host, was chosen to punish Zimri; and after a civil war of four years he prevailed over Tibni, the choice of half the people. Jehoash also turned the tide of war against the Syrians; and Jeroboam II
Tirza - Jeroboam chose it for his residence, and he removed to it from Shechem, which at first he made the capital of his kingdom
Netophah - The Targum (1 Chronicles 2:54; Ruth 4:20; Ecclesiastes 3:11) states that they slew the guards whom Jeroboam stationed on the roads to Jerusalem, to intercept the firstfruits from the villages to the temple. The fast on the 23rd Sivan, still in the Jewish calendar, commemorates Jeroboam's opposition
Shishak i - ) This expedition of the Egyptian king was undertaken at the instigation of Jeroboam for the purpose of humbling Judah
Nadab - Nadab succeeded his father Jeroboam I, founder and first king of northern Israel (1 Kings 14:20-15:31 )
Ahijah - The same prophet declared to Jeroboam, that he would usurp the kingdom, 1 Kings 11:29 , &c; and, about the end of Jeroboam's reign, he also predicted the death of Abijah, the only pious son of that prince, as is recorded 1 Kings 14:2 , &c
Nadab - Nadab succeeded his father Jeroboam I, founder and first king of northern Israel (1 Kings 14:20-15:31 )
Jehoahaz - He reigned seventeen years, and followed the evil ways of the house of Jeroboam
Jerubbaal - ) Judges 6:32 translated, "they (not Joash, but one, for the townsmen generally) called him Jeroboam, saying, Let Baal fight against him, because he hath thrown down his altar
Hamath - After Solomon’s death it regained its independence, but it again came briefly under Israelite control during the reign of Jeroboam II (2 Kings 14:25)
Israel, Kingdom of - Rehoboam, the son and successor of Solomon, was scarcely seated on his throne when the old jealousies between Judah and the other tribes broke out anew, and Jeroboam was sent for from Egypt by the malcontents (12:2,3). Rehoboam fled to Jerusalem (1 Kings 12:1-18 ; 2 Chronicles 10 ), and Jeroboam was proclaimed king over all Israel at Shechem, Judah and Benjamin remaining faithful to Solomon's son. ...
The authorized priests left the kingdom in a body, and the priesthood established by Jeroboam had no divine sanction and no promise; it was corrupt at its very source
Nadab - ...
...
The son and successor of Jeroboam, the king of Israel (1 Kings 14:20 )
Medeba - Jeroboam II again secured control of the city of Israel (2 Kings 14:25 )
Hamath - Its king, Toi, blessed David for his victory over Zobah, 2 Samuel 8:9-12; Solomon extended his kingdom to Hamath, 1 Kings 8:65; 2 Chronicles 8:4, and built store-cities in that region; afterward the city and country became independent, but were again subdued by Jeroboam II
Amos - He tells us that his prophecy was given in the days of Uzziah king of Judah and of Jeroboam II, son of Joash, king of Israel, two years before the earthquake; or at least began at that time
Ordain - Jeroboam ordained a feast in the eighth month
Bethel - No doubt the ancient sanctity of the place led Jeroboam to choose Bethel as the site of the rival shrine, which he hoped might counteract the influence of the house of the Lord at Jerusalem ( 1 Kings 12:26 ff. At Bethel, Jeroboam was denounced by the man of God out of Judah ( 1 Kings 13:19 ). It was one of the towns taken from Jeroboam by Abijah king of Judah ( 2 Chronicles 13:19 )
Rehoboam - But Ephraim's reason for desiring Shechem for the place of coronation was their intention to rebel; so they made Jeroboam the spokesman of their complaints. (See Jeroboam. Solomon in Ecclesiastes 2:19 expresses his misgiving as to Rehoboam, "who knoweth whether the man after me shall be a wise man or a fool?" His folly was overruled by Jehovah to perform His prophecy by Ahijar unto Jeroboam. (See AHIJAR; Jeroboam. " So God sent Shishak, Jeroboam's ally, with 1,200 chariots and 60,000 horsemen, to punish him, in the fifth year of his reign (1 Kings 11:40; 1 Kings 14:25-28; 2 Chronicles 12:2-4, etc. (See Jeroboam
Ephraim - Jeroboam I was an Ephraimite (1 Kings 12:25 )
Menahem - The period following the death of Jeroboam II in 753 B
Tirzah - It became one of the early capitals of Israel when Jeroboam I established his residence there (1 Kings 14:17 ) and continued as the capital until Omri built Samaria (1 Kings 16:23-24 )
Lebo-Hamath - Whatever its precise location, Lebo-hamath represented the northern boundary of Canaan promised to Israel (Numbers 13:21 ; compare Ezekiel 48:1 ), not conquered by Joshua (Joshua 13:5 ; Judges 3:3 ), controlled by David (1 Chronicles 13:5 ) and Solomon (1 Kings 8:65 ), and restored to Israel by Jeroboam II about 793-753 B
Calves, Golden - Similarly, Jeroboam placed calves in Dan and Bethel for the Northern Kingdom to use in its worship of Yahweh (1 Kings 12:28 ) so the people would not have to go to Jerusalem, the southern capital, to worship
Tirzah - A city in the land of Judaea, belonging to Ephraim, and from the days of Jeroboam, King of Israel, to the reign of Omri, Tirzah was the royal city and the King's residence
Rehoboam - Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who had headed a sedition against Solomon, and had been compelled, toward the close of his reign, to take refuge in Egypt, as soon as he heard that this prince was dead, returned into Judea, and came to the assembly of the people of Shechem
Calf - It is plain from Aaron's proclaiming a fast to Jehovah, ...
Exodus 32:4 , and from the worship of Jeroboam's calves being so expressly distinguished from that of Baal, 2 Kings 10:28-31 , that both Aaron and Jeroboam meant the calves they formed and set up for worship to be emblems of Jehovah. As for Jeroboam, after he had, for political reasons, 1 Kings 12:27 , &c, made a schism in the Jewish church, and set up two calves in Dan and Bethel, as objects of worship, he is scarcely ever mentioned in Scripture but with a particular stigma set upon him: "Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin
Amaziah - A priest of the golden calf at Bethel, who denounced the prophet Amos to Jeroboam, and sought to banish him into Judah for his fidelity, Amos 7:10-17
Ahi'ah - (1 Kings 4:3 ) ...
A prophet of Shiloh, (1 Kings 14:2 ) hence called the Shilonite, (1 Kings 11:29 ) of whom we have two remarkable prophecies extant, the one in (1 Kings 11:30-39 ) addressed to Jeroboam, announcing the rending of the ten tribes from Solomon; the other in (1 Kings 14:6-16 ) in which he foretold the death of Abijah, the king's son, who was sick, and the destruction of Jeroboam's house on account of the images which he had set up
Rehoboam - Under his reign the ten tribes revolted, and formed the kingdom of Israel under Jeroboam
Shishak - Shishak early in his reign received Jeroboam the political exile, fleeing from Solomon, Jeroboam's enemy, toward whom Shishak would feel only jealousy, having no He of affinity as the Pharaoh of the previous dynasty had. Shishak went to settle his protege, Jeroboam, in his northern kingdom, where he was endangered from the Levitical (2 Chronicles 11:13) and the Canaanite towns in northern Israel not being in his hands; these Shishak reduced and banded over to him. ; and allowed him to retain Judah, lest Jeroboam should become strong
Etam - Rehoboam probably feared attack from Egypt, which had sheltered Jeroboam, king of Israel (2 Chronicles 10:2 )
Iddo - A "seer" whose "visions against Jeroboam the son of Nebat" contained notices of Solomon's life (2 Chronicles 9:29). Tradition identifies him with the "man of God" who denounced Jeroboam's calf altar at Bethel (1 Kings 13), which 2 Chronicles 9:29 favors; also with Oded which resembles his name (2 Chronicles 15:1)
Ahijah - We have on record two of his remarkable prophecies, 1Kings 11:31-39, announcing the rending of the ten tribes from Solomon; and 1Kings 14:6-16, delivered to Jeroboam's wife, foretelling the death of Abijah the king's son, the destruction of Jeroboam's house, and the captivity of Israel "beyond the river. " Jeroboam bears testimony to the high esteem in which he was held as a prophet of God (1Kings 14:2,3)
Tirzah (2) - The royal residence of the kings of Israel from Jeroboam to Omri, who removed the capital to Samaria (1 Kings 14:17; 1 Kings 15:21; 1 Kings 16:6; 1 Kings 16:17-18); Baasha was buried here
Ephron - ) took from King Jeroboam of Israel (926-909 B
ha'Math - About three-quarters of a century later Jeroboam the Second "recovered Hamath
Amos - This was within the latter half of the reign of Jeroboam II, 783-743 B. This fits well with the period when Jeroboam was enjoying the fruits of his victories
Aram - After him it was lost, except perhaps under Jeroboam II
Shechem - Shechem became famous as a Levite city, and a city of refuge, and still later as the capital of the ten tribes under Jeroboam
Shallum - Smote Zachariah, son of Jeroboam II, openly before the people (showing that their sympathies were with him), and seized the kingdom (2 Kings 15:9-10), thereby fulfilling the prophecy that Jehu's dynasty should last only to the fourth generation (2 Kings 10:30)
Ahijah - A prophet from Shiloh who tore his clothes in twelve pieces and gave ten to Jeroboam to signal God's decision to divide the kingdom after Solomon's death (1 Kings 11:29-39 ). Later when Jeroboam's son fell sick, the blind prophet recognized Jeroboam's wife through God's word. He announced the end of Jeroboam's reign and of his dynasty (1 Kings 14:1-18 ; 1 Kings 15:29 )
Hamath, Hemath - On the death of Solomon it appears to have gained its independence, for it was recovered by Jeroboam II
Maacah or Maachah - The portion of Manesseh beyond Jordan reached to this country, like that of Og king of Bashan, Deuteronomy 3:13,14 ; but it does not appear to have become subject to Israel, Joshua 12:4-6 13:13 , except during the reign of David, Solomon, and Jeroboam II
Shishak - ...
Jeroboam having secured the friendship of Shishak, his territories were not invaded, 1 Kings 11:40 14:25,26 2 Chronicles 12:2-9
Israelites - Ephraim, the leading tribe among the ten, seems to have shown an early spirit of rivalry towards Judah; Joshua had belonged to Ephraim, the ark had long rested within its borders at Shiloh, and Jeroboam was also an Ephraimite
Calf, Golden - After the secession of the ten northern tribes, Jeroboam, with a view to turn his new subjects away from the temple of Jerusalem, and at the same time to cater to their naturalistic propensities, set up golden calves at Dan and Bethel (3Kings 12)
Golden Calf - After the secession of the ten northern tribes, Jeroboam, with a view to turn his new subjects away from the temple of Jerusalem, and at the same time to cater to their naturalistic propensities, set up golden calves at Dan and Bethel (3Kings 12)
Ambush - Jeroboam, king of Israel (926-909 B
Amaziah - He was a priest who lived in Bethel during the reign of Jeroboam II of Israel
Tribe - Then ten of the tribes of Israel revolted from the house of David, and received for their king Jeroboam, the son of Nebat; and only the tribes of Judah and Benjamin continued under the government of Rehoboam. Jeroboam the son of Nebat substituted the worship of golden calves for the worship of the true God; which was the occasion of the ten tribes forsaking the temple of the Lord
Ahijah - , 1 Kings 12:15 , 2 Chronicles 10:15 , a prophet of Shiloh, who foretold the division of the kingdom and the elevation of Jeroboam. Subsequently he predicted the death of Jeroboam’s son ( 1 Kings 14:2 ff
Calf - It was certainly for this reason that the bull was chosen as the symbol of Jahweh by Aaron (Acts 7:41) and Jeroboam (B
Cake - "Cracknels," a kind of crisp cakes, were among the things Jeroboam directed his wife to take with her when she went to consult Ahijah the prophet at Shiloh (1 Kings 14:3 )
Penuel - Jeroboam fortified Penuel (1 Kings 12:25. ...
Hence arose Jeroboam's need of rebuilding the tower which Gideon had broken down long before, and which lay due E
Dan - It was an idolatrous city even then, and was afterwards the seat of one of the golden calves of Jeroboam, 1 Kings 12:28 Amos 8:14
Jonah - Being ordered of God to prophesy against Ninevah, probably in or before the reign of Jeroboam 2, which begun 825 B
Osee, Book of - The introductory verses record that he carried on his ministry during the reigns of the Judean kings Ozias, Joathan, Achaz and Ezechias; and in the days of Jeroboam II the son of Joas, king of Israel. Assuming that Jeroboam commenced his reign in 783 B
Hosea, Book of - The introductory verses record that he carried on his ministry during the reigns of the Judean kings Ozias, Joathan, Achaz and Ezechias; and in the days of Jeroboam II the son of Joas, king of Israel. Assuming that Jeroboam commenced his reign in 783 B
Hosea, Book of - 1), though it describes Hosea’s life and teaching before the death of Jeroboam ii. The hand of a Jewish editor (and in this case a somewhat late one) is perhaps clearest in the title ( Hosea 1:1 ), for Hosea, a citizen of the Northern Kingdom and addressing himself to the North, would scarcely date his prophecy by kings of the Southern Kingdom of Judah, nor would a contemporary be likely to equate the days of Uzziah and his successors with the days of Jeroboam, since Uzziah himself outlived Jeroboam
Divided Kingdom - God chose Jeroboam, son of Nebat, to lead the rebellion of the northern tribes after the death of Solomon (1 Kings 11:26-40 )
Josiah - He ascended the throne at the early age of eight years, and before his eighteenth year he had cut off and destroyed all the idols of the land, with their temples, groves, and monuments; and had ransacked the sepulchres of the idolatrous priests, and burned their bones upon the altars, in accordance with the prophecy of the man of God, announced in the presence of Jeroboam 326 years before Josiah was born
Hamath - Jeroboam ii
Bethel - After Solomon, it became a seat of gross idolatry; Jeroboam choosing it as the place for one of his golden calves, from the sacredness previously attached to it, 1 Kings 12:29
Kings, 1 And 2 - Most of the responsibility for the sins of Israel is placed on Jeroboam, the first king of Israel (2 Kings 17:21-23 ; see 1 Kings 15:30 ). ...
One of Jeroboam's faults lay in instituting the worship in a place other than Jerusalem. After the two kingdoms split, Jeroboam could not maintain the integrity of his own kingdom and allow the people of the Northern Kingdom to worship at the Temple of Jerusalem, the capital of the Southern Kingdom. As a solution to his problem, Jeroboam established places of worship at Dan and Bethel (1 Kings 12:26-29 ). ...
To complicate matters, Jeroboam made two golden calves for the people to worship (1 Kings 12:28 ). Thus, Jeroboam violated two of the most important principles of Deuteronomy: the worship of God only and only in the Temple of Jerusalem (Deuteronomy 12-13 ). To emphasize the fact that Jeroboam was responsible for Israel's sin and ultimate downfall, many of the subsequent kings of Israel are condemned because they did not depart from the sins of Jeroboam (1 Kings 15:34 ; 1Kings 16:2,1Kings 16:19,1Kings 16:26,1 Kings 16:31 ; 1 Kings 22:52 ; 2 Kings 3:3 ; 2Kings 10:29,2 Kings 10:31 ; 2Kings 13:2,2Kings 13:6,2 Kings 13:11 ; 2 Kings 14:24 ; 2Kings 15:9,2Kings 15:18,2 Kings 15:24 )
Solomon - ...
The rebellion against Solomon was led by a young man from the north, Jeroboam. Solomon had recognized Jeroboam’s abilities earlier, and put him in charge of a large portion of the workforce from the northern tribes (1 Kings 11:28). When Solomon felt that Jeroboam was gaining support among the northerners, he tried to kill him, but Jeroboam escaped to the safety of Egypt (1 Kings 11:29-32; 1 Kings 11:40). After Solomon’s death, Jeroboam returned to Israel and successfully lead a breakaway rebellion (1 Kings 12:2-4; 1 Kings 12:16-20)
Hosea - Began prophesying in the last years of Jeroboam II, contemporary with Uzziah; ended at the beginning of Hezekiah's reign. ...
His pictures of Israelite life, the rival factions calling in Egypt and Assyria, mostly apply to the interreign after Jeroboam's death and to the succeeding reigns, rather than to his able government. In Hosea 2:8 he makes no allusion to Jehovah's restoration of Israel's coasts under Jeroboam among Jehovah's mercies to Israel. He mentions in the inscription, besides the reign of Jeroboam in Israel, the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, though his prophecies are addressed primarily to Israel and only incidentally to Judah; for all the prophets whether in Judah or Israel regarded Israel's separation from Judah, civil as well as religious, as an apostasy from God who promised the kingship of the theocracy to the line of David. His first prophecy announces the coming overthrow of Jehu's house, fulfilled after Jeroboam's death, which the prophecy precedes, in Zachariah, Jeroboam's son, who was the fourth and last in descent from Jehu, and conspired against by Shallum after a six months' reign (2 Kings 15:12). He declares throughout that a return to Jehovah is the only remedy for the evils existing and impending: the calf worship at Bethel, established by Jeroboam, must be given up (Hosea 8:5-6; Hosea 10:5; Hosea 13:2); unrighteousness toward men, the necessary consequence of impiety towards God, must cease, or sacrifices are worthless (Hosea 4:2; Hosea 6:6, based on Samuel's original maxim, 1 Samuel 15:22)
Prophets - Jonah, during the reign of Jeroboam III, king of Israel, which commenced 825 B. ; or perhaps as early as Joash, the predecessor of Jeroboam. Amos, under Uzziah king of Judah, and during the latter years of Jeroboam II, king of Israel. Hosea, under Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, and under Jeroboam II And his successors, kings of Israel
Iddo - ” A prophet whose records the chronicler refers to for more information about Solomon and Jeroboam ( 2 Chronicles 9:29 ), Rehoboam (2 Chronicles 12:15 ), and Abijah (2 Chronicles 13:22 )
Ahab - To the calf-worship introduced by Jeroboam he added the worship of Baal
Rehoboam - But his efforts were in vain, with the result that the ten northern tribes broke away from David’s dynasty and formed their own kingdom under Jeroboam (1 Kings 12:2-20). This was partly because of the good influence of a large number of priests and Levites who had fled from the north to Jerusalem rather than cooperate with Jeroboam’s idolatry (2 Chronicles 11:13-17)
Fort, Fortification - Similar, but smaller four-chambered gates were used later in the time of Ahab and Jeroboam II, attached to offsets-insets solid walls
Sama'Ria, Country of - Samaria at first included all the tribes over which Jeroboam made himself king, whether east or west of the river Jordan
Ordain - Jeroboam ordained priests for the high places, and for the devils, and for the calves which he had made
Saviour - Salvation from all kinds of danger and evil, bodily, spiritual, temporal, and eternal (Matthew 1:21; Ephesians 5:23; Philippians 3:20-21), including also the idea restorer and preserver, giver of positive life and blessedness, as well as saviour from evil (Isaiah 26:1; 2 Samuel 8:6; Isaiah 60:18; Isaiah 61:10; Psalms 118:25), deliverer, as the judges were saviours (margin Judges 3:9; Judges 3:15; Nehemiah 9:27; Jeroboam II, 2 Kings 13:5; Obadiah 1:21)
Amaziah - A priest at Bethel who sent Amos the prophet home, saying he did not have the right to prophesy against King Jeroboam II of Israel (789-746 B
Joram or Jehoram - He discontinued the worship of Baal, but followed the "sin of Jeroboam
Bashan - Some time later it lost Bashan, but regained control in the reign of Jeroboam II (2 Kings 14:25)
Solomon - ...
God then stirred up adversaries against Solomon, and by the prophet Ahijah He foretold that Jeroboam would reign over ten of the tribes. Still Solomon did not repent, but sought the life of Jeroboam
Amos - Though of Judah, he exercised his ministry in the northern kingdom, Israel; not later than the 15th year of Uzziah of Judah, when Jeroboam II. Probably Amos prophesied about the middle of Jeroboam's reign, when his conquests had been achieved (Amos 6:13-14; compare 2 Kings 14:25-27), just before Assyria's first attack on Israel, for he does not definitely name that power: Amos 1:5; Amos 8:4-5 (Hosea 10:6; Hosea 11:5). The golden calves, the forbidden representation of Jehovah, not Baal, were the object of worship in Jeroboam's reign, as being the great grandson of Jehu, who had purged out Baal worship, but retained the calves. The king's sanctuary and summer palace were at Bethel (Amos 7:13); here Amos was opposed by Amaziah for his faithful reproofs, and informed against to Jeroboam. Amos 1:1 to Amos 2:13; the sins of Syria, Philistia, Tyre, Edom, Ammon, Moab, the neighbors of Israel and Judah Amos 2:4 to Amos 6:14; Israel's own state and consequent punishment; the same coasts "from the entering in of Hamath," which Jeroboam has just recovered from Syria, shall be "afflicted," and the people carried into "captivity beyond Damascus" (Amos 5:27)
Jonah - Jeroboam II "restored the coast from the entering of Hamath unto the sea of the plain, according to the word of the Lord God of Israel which He spoke by the hand of His servant Jonah" etc. e early in Joash's reign, when Jehovah (probably by Jonah) promised deliverance from Syria, which was actually given first under Joash, in answer to Jehoahaz' prayer, then completely under Jeroboam II. ...
Hosea and Amos prophesied in the latter part of the 41 years' reign of Jeroboam II. beyond that enemy from which Jeroboam II had just delivered them, according to the prophecy of Jonah, and that they should be "afflicted from the entering in of Hamath unto the river of the wilderness" (the southern bound of Moab, then forming Israel's boundary), i. the very bounds restored by Jeroboam II, for "the river of the araba h" or "wilderness" flowed into the S. ...
Their deep reverence for their gods (as appears from their inscriptions), as well as Jonah's deliverance (which was known to them, Luke 11:30), and probably his previous prophecy which had been fulfilled, of Israel's deliverance under Jeroboam II from Syria with which Nineveh had been long warring, all made them ready to heed his message. But Jonah regarded Nineveh's destruction by God's judgment as likely to startle Israel out of its apostate security, heightened by its prosperity under Jeroboam II
Dan - ...
Following the establishment of the Israelite kingdom under David and Solomon, Jeroboam led the Northern tribes in revolt against Rehoboam (about 925 B. Excavations at Dan have uncovered the “high place” of Jeroboam along with a small horned altar, the city gate (with royal throne) and walls (12 feet thick), hundreds of pottery vessels, buildings, and inscribed objects. This city was soon taken by Ben-hadad of Aram and then recaptured by Jeroboam II in the eighth century B
Medeba - Joram and Jehoshaphat made an unsuccessful attempt to retake these cities ( 2 Kings 3:1-27 ), but Jeroboam II
Kings - The two books of Kings deal especially with the theocratic promise of 2 Samuel 7:12 : see 1 Kings 14:7-11; 1 Kings 15:29; 1 Kings 16:1-7; and treat the history from the kingly side, and show the evil of schism and the worship of idols set up for political reasons, as by Solomon, 1 Kings 11:1-43, and Jeroboam, 1 Kings 12:26
Jeroboam - ...
Jeroboam SECOND, the thirteenth king of Israel, son and successor of Joash, B
jo'Nah - ( 2 Kings 14:25 ) He flourished in or before the reign of Jeroboam II
Rehoboam - The ten tribes then revolted from Rehoboam and chose Jeroboam as their king
Bethel - One of Jeroboam's two sanctuaries for the calf worship, selected doubtless because of its religious associations (1 Kings 12-13). Abijah, king of Judah, took Bethel from Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:19), but it was soon recovered by Israel. Under Jehu, who restored the calf worship, and Jeroboam II his great grandson, Bethel comes again into prominence (2 Kings 10:29)
Hosea - Hosea began his ministry late in the reigns of Jeroboam II of Israel and Uzziah of Judah, and continued it through the reigns of succeeding kings (Hosea 1:1). ...
Corrupt society...
During the reigns of Jeroboam II and Uzziah, Israel and Judah enjoyed political stability, economic prosperity and territorial expansion greater than at any time since the days of David and Solomon (2 Kings 14:23-27; 2 Kings 15:1-2; 2 Chronicles 26:1-15)
Shechem (1) - Here, through his ill advised obstinacy, the Israelites revolted to Jeroboam, who made Shechem his capital. 27-28) placed the Dan and Bethel of Jeroboam's calves on Mounts Ebal and Gerizim. ...
(2) The Bethel of the calf was close to the palace of Jeroboam who lived in Shechem (Amos 7:13; 1 Kings 12:25). ...
(3) The southern Bethel was in Benjamin (Joshua 18:22) and would hardly have been chosen as a religious center by Jeroboam who was anxious to draw away the people from Jerusalem (1 Kings 12:28). ...
(4) The southern Bethel was taken from Jeroboam by Abijah king of Judah (2 Chronicles 13:19), whereas the calf of Bethel was not destroyed but remained standing long after (2 Kings 10:29)
Hamath - ...
The southern boundary of Hamath served as the northern boundary of Israel during the reigns of Solomon (1 Kings 8:65 ; 2 Chronicles 8:4 ) and Jeroboam II (2Kings 14:25,2 Kings 14:28 )
Rehoboam, - The brief notice that there was war between Rehoboam and Jeroboam continually is all that we are told
Joash - At his death he was succeeded on the throne by his son Jeroboam II
Megiddo - Here was found the seal of Shama’, ‘the servant of Jerohoam’ probably Jeroboam ii
Joash - He departed not from the sins of Jeroboam, the son of Nebat; nevertheless he was successful in three campaigns against the Syrians: and in one against Amaziah, king of Judah
Judah the Kingdom of - Israel under Jeroboam was signally defeated
Zechariah - He succeeded his father Jeroboam II, A
Jehu - For the whole house of Ahab shall perish, and I will make it as that of Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, and that of Baasha, the son of Ahijah. Yet, though Jehu had been the instrument in the hand of God for taking vengeance on the profane house of Ahab, we find him accused in Scripture of not entirely forsaking the sins of Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin in worshipping the golden calves, 2 Kings 10:29 ; 2 Kings 10:31 . His four descendants, who succeeded him in the throne, were Jehoahaz, Joash, Jeroboam II, and Zechariah
Kings, Books of - The ten tribes to the north broke away and formed their own kingdom (still called Israel) under the rebel leader, Jeroboam (12:1-33). ...
With the decline of Syrian power, Israel (under Jeroboam II) and Judah (under Azariah) enjoyed security and prosperity (14:23-15:7). The northern kingdom likewise declined after the death of Jeroboam II
Hamath - Jeroboam II "recovered Hamath" (2 Kings 14:25); but it was subjugated soon by Assyria (2 Kings 18:34; Amos 6:2; Amos 6:14), Who calls it "Hamath the great
Bull - ” The bull was closely associated with Baal and may have influenced Jeroboam to set up the golden bulls at Bethel and Dan (1 Kings 12:28 )
Shechem - The tribes assembled there to crown Rehoboam, and, on the division of the kingdom, it became the headquarters of Jeroboam
Zechariah - Son of Jeroboam II, who reigned over Israel for six months in the year 746 B
Gilgal - It seems to have been the place in which Jeroboam or some of the kings of Israel instituted idolatrous worship; and hence the allusions to it by the prophets, Hosea 4:15 ; Amos 4:4
Moabites - ...
At times, as in the days of Ruth, there was peace between them and Israel; but a state of hostility was far more common, as in the time of Eglon, Judges 3:12-30 ; of Saul, 1 Samuel 14:47 ; of David, 2 Samuel 8:2,12 ; of Joram and Jeroboam, 2 Kings 3:13,20 14:25
Penuel - Many years later, Penuel was fortified by Jeroboam ( 1 Kings 12:25 ); so that it must have been a place of some strategic importance
Bethel - ...
When the Israelite kingdom split into two, Jeroboam, king of the breakaway northern kingdom, set up golden idols at Dan and Bethel, the northern and southern border towns of his kingdom
Calf, Golden - The same sin was repeated by Jeroboam who was afraid of his people going up to Jerusalem to worship: he set up two calves, one in Bethel and one in Dan, and proclaimed, "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt
Ahaziah - 897-6) and did that which was evil in the sight of the Lord, it being remarked of him that he walked in the way of his mother as well as of his father and of Jeroboam
Amos - Amos was called to the prophetic office in the time of Uzziah, king of Judah, and Jeroboam, the son of Joash, king of Israel
Ahab - " He not only maintained the worship of the calves set up by Jeroboam, but, having married Jezebel, daughter of Eth-baal, king of the Zidonians, he yielded himself to her evil influence, and introduced the worship of Baal into Samaria
High Place - On the division of the kingdom, Jeroboam set up his idols and "ordained him priests for the high places, and for the devils, and for the calves which he had made
Goat - And, perhaps, this arose from the calves and devils (literally goats), which Jeroboam set up for idol worship. And this the account of the goat set up as an idol by Jeroboam, and sacrificed to by the people in direct opposition to the God of Israel, very fully explains
Idol - Perhaps a misguided King Jeroboam intended to represent Yahweh by the gold calves set up in his temples at Bethel and Dan when he led the northern tribes to secede from the kingdom inherited by Rehoboam (1 Kings 12:28-33 )
Last - The combination of “first” and “last” is an idiom of completeness: “Now the rest of the acts of Solomon, first and last, are they not written in the book of Nathan the prophet, and in the prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite, and in the visions of Iddo the seer against Jeroboam the son of Nebat?” ( Jehu - ...
In wiping out the dynasty of Ahab, Jehu was driven more by his desire for power than by his devotion to God; for he himself still worshipped at the idol shrines that Jeroboam had earlier set up (2 Kings 10:29; 2 Kings 10:31)
High Place - ...
False Worship at High Places in Israel When Jeroboam created the new kingdom of Israel after the death of Solomon, he put two golden calves at high places at Dan and Bethel (1 Kings 12:28-32 ). An unnamed man of God came to Bethel and pronounced God's curse on this high place (1 Kings 13:1-3 ), but the following kings of the Northern Kingdom of Israel followed in the ways of Jeroboam and did not remove the high places where the false gods were worshiped
Ephraim - At all events, Jeroboam the Ephraimite, who afterwards became the first king of Israel ( c the Disobedient Prophet - Bethel was built on that very spot on which their father Jacob had slept and dreamed when he was on his lonely way to Padan-aram; and it is that very heaven out of which the ladder was let down on Jacob's pillow that is today to be darkened by the unclean incense of Jeroboam's altar-fires. It was a brave step in Jeroboam to set up his false gods at Bethel, of all places in the land. And, behold, there came a man of God out of Judah by the word of the Lord unto Bethel: and Jeroboam stood by the altar to burn incense. And how Jeroboam's hand was withered that moment; how it was healed immediately at the intercession of the man of God; how Jeroboam invited the prophet to come home with him to eat and to drink and to get a reward; and how the prophet answered the king that be had the command of the Lord neither to eat bread nor to drink water in that polluted land, but to return home to Judah as soon as he had delivered his prophetic burden-all that is to be read in the thirteenth chapter of First Kings. He was wholly worthy thus far to have his name held up aloft along with the names of Samuel and Elijah themselves, for he stood up alone against Jeroboam and against all Israel and nailed the curse of God to Jeroboam's altar under the king's own eyes. Alas, my brother!...
As the man of God from Judah so nobly refuses Jeroboam's royal hospitality, I am reminded of Lord Napier. Only, they had their domiciles and their doles from Jeroboam's bounty on the strict condition that they kept at home and kept silence. What a day it has been! And what a man of God we have seen! Till they told him all that we are told about Jeroboam, and his altar, and the man of God from Judah, and his cry that shook down the altar, and the king's withered hand, and the prayer of the man of God, and the king's hospitality, and the man of God's refusal of the king's hospitality. Who knows what good might have come of it had he, God's acknowledged prophet, been seen sitting in the place of honour at the royal table? Had he not been somewhat short, and sharp, and churlish after his great battle with Jeroboam's altar? Stern men have often been known to soften and secretly repent of their too-ascetical self-denial
Zechariah - Son of Jeroboam II
Shechem - Rehoboam was appointed king in Shechem (1 Kings 12:1,19 ), but Jeroboam afterwards took up his residence here
Bethel - At the division of the kingdom Beth-el fell to Israel, and Jeroboam set up there one of the golden calves to prevent the Israelites going to Jerusalem to worship
Tribute - Yet, afterward, toward the end of his reign, he imposed a tribute upon them, and made them work at the public buildings, 1 Kings 5:13-14 ; 1 Kings 9:15 ; 1 Kings 11:27 ; which much alienated their minds from him, and sowed the seeds of that discontent which afterward appeared in an open revolt, by the rebellion of Jeroboam, the son of Nebat; who was at first indeed obliged to take shelter in Egypt
False Worship - The temples built by Jeroboam, son of Nebat, the first king of Israel (the Northern Kingdom) after its break from the Jerusalem-centered Kingdom of Judah, were probably dedicated to such worship. When these temples were established in Bethel and Dan, Jeroboam the King “made two calves of gold, and said unto them, It is too much for you to go up to Jerusalem: behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt” (1 Kings 12:28 )
Idolatry, - (1 Kings 12:26-33 ) The successors of Jeroboam followed in his steps, till Ahab. (2 Kings 23:5 ) Beast-worship, as exemplified in the calves of Jeroboam, has already been alluded to of pure hero-worship among the Semitic races we find no trace
Shemaiah - The prophet who with Ahijah encouraged the revolution of the ten tribes from Jeroboam
Calf Worship - Jeroboam's calves, which his exile in Egypt familiarized him with, and which he subsequently set up at Dan and Bethel similarly, were not set up to oppose Jehovah's worship, but to oppose His worship by Jeroboam's subjects at Jerusalem, lest they should thereby be alienated from him (1 Kings 12:26-29). It was notorious that it was Jehovah who delivered Israel out of Egypt; and, like Aaron, Jeroboam says of the calves, thereby identifying them with Jehovah, "Behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt
Megiddo - Five years into Jeroboam I's reign, (about 920 B
Shechem - Here Rehoboam alienated the Northern Kingdom by his overhearing speech ( 1 Kings 12:1 ), and Jeroboam for a time was established here ( 1 Kings 12:25 )
Alliances - Shishak's invasion of Rehoboam's kingdom was probably due to Shishak's alliance with Jeroboam of Israel (2 Chronicles 12; 1 Kings 14:25, etc
je'hu - The remaining twenty-seven years of his long reign are passed over in a few words, in which two points only are material: --He did not destroy the calf-worship of Jeroboam:-- The transjordanic tribes suffered much from the ravages of Hazael
Amos - ...
Characteristics of the age...
Amos prophesied during the reigns of Jeroboam II in Israel and Azariah (or Uzziah) in Judah (Amos 1:1)
Hosea - Jeroboam II is the only Israelite king named in the title to Hosea's book, in spite of the fact that internal evidence suggests that Hosea's ministry continued from the last days of Jeroboam II to near the end of the Northern Kingdom (approximately 750-725 B. He witnessed the political chaos in Israel following the death of Jeroboam II
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - ...
The lengthy treatment of Jeroboam I shows an interest in the fulfillment of prophecy (1 Kings 11:29-40 ; 12:1-20 ). ...
Virtually all of the kings of Israel are criticized for "walking in the ways of Jeroboam" (the first king of divided Israel). The "sin" of Jeroboam (ordaining priests for high places outside of Jerusalem, 1 Kings 13:34 ) was the crucial event in the history of the northern kingdom of Israel. Jeroboam's sin and his consecration of non-Levitical clergy sealed the doom of his royal house (1 Kings 12:28-31 ; 13:33 ; 14:9 ). Jeroboam and Ahab sinfully influenced Israel so that the people copied attributes of supplanted peoples (2 Kings 17:8,11 ), served other gods (2 Kings 17:12 ), and seduced surrounding peoples (2 Kings 17:15 )
Tabernacles, Feast of - Still, the feast was kept in some way, for Jeroboam instituted its equivalent for the Northern Kingdom in the 8th month ( 1 Kings 12:32-33 )
Ben-Hadad - Jeroboam II completed Israel's deliverance, according to Jonah's prophecy (2 Kings 14:25)
Solomon - Rebellions led by the king of Edom, Rezon of Damascus, and Jeroboam, one of Solomon's own officers, indicates that Solomon's long reign was not without its turmoil
Immanuel - An earlier king of Judah, Abijah, believed that God was with his people as they faced the numerically superior army of Jeroboam
Jehu - He did not remove the golden calves, and he departed not from the sins of Jeroboam who made Israel to sin
Thirteen - ...
2ch13 - The defeat of the children of Israel by Jeroboam
Shemaiah - A prophet under Rehoboam, commissioned to charge the king and his 180,000 warriors of Judah not to fight against their brethren of Israel, but to return every man to his house, instead of striving to regain northern Israel from Jeroboam (1 Kings 12:22; 2 Chronicles 11:2), for that the severance is Jehovah's doing; so they desisted in obedience to the Lord
Gilgal - In the days of Jeroboam Gilgal was defiled with idolatry
Hero - 9:1); so also Jeroboam (1 Kings 11:28)
Damascus - This city, which at first had its own kings, was taken by David, 2 Samuel 8:5,6 ; and by Jeroboam 2 Kings 14:28
Joash - He did that which was evil in the sight of the Lord, even as Jeroboam; but when Elisha was dying Joash visited him, and wept over him, uttering the same words which Elisha had uttered as he beheld Elijah taken to heaven
Amos - The direct call from God to testify against the unrighteousness of both kingdoms had probably come to him not long before; and amidst the throng at Bethel he proclaimed his vision of Jehovah standing with a plumb-line to measure the deflection of Israel, and prepared to punish the iniquity of the house of Jeroboam II. Amos was prophesying in those years in which Uzziah and Jeroboam II. Under Jeroboam II
Chronology of the Biblical Period - ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
High Places - " The high places of Dan and Bethel were already sacred by usage; so Jeroboam found it easy to induce the people to forsake the temple and cherubim at Jerusalem for his calves in Dan and Bethel
Jonah - The hero or rather anti-hero is mentioned in 2 Kings 14:23-29 as active in the reign of Jeroboam II (about 785-745 B
Hazael - Jeroboam II still further "restored the coast of Israel from the entering in of Hamath unto the sea of the plain," according to Jonah's prophecy, through the Lord's great compassion (2 Kings 13:25; 2 Kings 14:25-27)
High Place - On the “high place,” a temple was built and dedicated to a god: "[6] made a house of high places, and made priests of the lowest of the people, which were not of the sons of Levi” (1 Kings 12:31)
Demon - Jeroboam had fallen so low as to have ordained priests for the demons (sair ) and for the calves which he had made, 2 Chronicles 11:15 ; and some had "sacrificed their sons and their daughters unto demons (shed )
Hand - ” In 1 Kings 11:31 , Jeroboam was told that the Lord was about to tear the kingdom “from the hand” of Solomon
Micaiah - The 400 prophets whom Ahab gathered together to "inquire the word of Jehovah" (1 Kings 22:5) were prophets of Jeroboam's symbolic calf worship of Jehovah not of Baal. (See Jeroboam
Dan - The story of the Danites stealing the shrine of Micah is told to account for its sanctity, which Jeroboam I
Damascus - Jeroboam also 'restored' the coast of Israel, and recovered Damascus and Hamath, according to the prophecy of Jonah
Jonah - Jonah is once spoken of elsewhere as having prophesied of events which came to pass in the days of Jeroboam 2
Kings, the Books of - The second period (1 Kings 12:1-2 Kings 10) comprises three stages:...
(1) the enmity at first between Judah and Israel from Jeroboam to Omri, 1 Kings 12:1-16:28;...
(2) the intermarriage between the royal houses of Israel and of Judah, under Ahab, down to the destruction of both kings, Joram of Israel and Ahaziah of Judah, by Jehu, 1 Kings 16:29-2 Kings 10;...
(3) the renewal of hostilities, from Jehu's accession in Israel and Athaliah's usurpation in Judah to Israel's captivity in Hezekiah's sixth year, 1 Kings 11-17. Moreover one portion (Judah, also Benjamin, Simeon, and Dan in part Israel and Judah was reserved with Jerusalem for David's seed, and should not go with the other ten tribes to Jeroboam. Jehovah promised, on condition of faithfulness, to Jeroboam too a sure house and the throne of Israel, but not for ever, only so long as the separate kingdom should last; for He added, "I will for this afflict the seed of David but not for ever" (1 Kings 11:38-39). ...
Also 2 Chronicles 29:29, "the books of Samuel the seer, Nathan the prophet, and Gad the seer," answer to "the book of the acts of Solomon" in 1 Kings 11:41, and 2 Chronicles 9:29, "the book of Nathan the prophet, the prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite, and the visions of Iddo the seer against Jeroboam
Dan (1) - ...
This probably suggested the city Dan to Jeroboam as one of the two seats of the golden calf worship (1 Kings 12:29)
Israel - ...
THE KINGDOM OF ISRAEL commenced when Jeroboam was made king, to whom it was promised that his house should be established if he followed the Lord. Baasha murdered Jeroboam's son and successor; and his own son and successor was slain by Zimri; Zimri was killed by Omri, and after a civil war of four years with Tibni, Omri became king and reigned with his successors forty-five years, ending with Jehoram the son of Ahab
Jehoahaz - His persevering in his father's sin, namely, the worship of Jeroboam's calves, and his leaving the Asherah still standing in Samaria from the time of Ahab (1 Kings 16:33), brought on Israel Jehovah's anger more than in Jehu's time; for the longer sin is persevered in, the heavier the final reckoning, an accumulated entail of guilt descends (Exodus 20:5). So "He gave Israel a saviour," not in Jehoahaz' reign, but in that of Joash and Jeroboam II his successors, who were each in turn "a saviour"; for the answer to prayer often comes when the petitioner is dead and gone (2 Kings 14:22-25)
Solomon - nothing is said of the intrigues attending his accession, his foreign marriages and idolatry, or his final troubles, even with Jeroboam. Psalms 45:1-17 ), but it was not continued; Shishak protects Jeroboam ( 1 Kings 11:40 ). The mas was the very word used of the labour in Egypt, and beneath the apparent prosperity ( 1 Kings 4:20 ; 1 Kings 4:25 ) was a growing discontent and jealousy of Judah, which broke out in the rebellion of Jeroboam. Of his actual end nothing is known; he was an ‘old man’ ( 1 Kings 11:4 ) at sixty years, but Jeroboam’s flight suggests that he could still make his authority felt
Seal, Signet - court official]'>[4] of Jeroboam
Tabernacles, Feast of - Its popularity induced Jeroboam to inaugurate his Bethel calf worship with an imitation feast of tabernacles on the 15th day of the eighth month, "which he devised of his own heart" (1 Kings 12:32-33), possibly because the northern harvest was a little later, and he wished to break off Israel from the association with Judah by having a different month from the seventh, which was the legal month
Samaria, Samaritans - Shechem had been the capital of the Northern Kingdom until Jeroboam relocated it at Tirzah
Gad (1) - In the official record in the days of Jotham king of Judah, and Jeroboam king of Israel, Gad had extended its possessions to Salcah in Bashan (1 Chronicles 5:11; 1 Chronicles 5:16-17), E
Stand - Jeroboam “ordained” (made to stand, to minister) priests in Bethel (1 Kings 12:32)
Jonah - The book takes its name from the chief person in the story, a prophet who had become known for his accurate forecast of the growth of Israel (the northern part of the divided kingdom) under Jeroboam II (2 Kings 14:23; 2 Kings 14:25)
Kings, Books of - One passage says without qualification that there was war between Rehoboam and Jeroboam all their days; another tells us how Rehoboam gathered a mighty army, but dismissed it at the word of a prophet without making war ( 1 Kings 12:21-24 ; 1 Kings 14:30 ). He did evil in the eyes of Jahweh, and he walked in the ways of Jeroboam, and in his sin by which he made Israel sin. The reason given for the condemnation which is visited on all the kings of the Northern Kingdom is that they walked in the ways of Jeroboam I
Leadership - Jeroboam, their first king, set up the calf cult at Dan and Bethel. The kings who followed Jeroboam persisted in his ungodly direction. But others fared worse, for example, Elijah with Ahab and Jezebel, Amos with Jeroboam and Amaziah, priest of the Bethel calf cult, and Jeremiah with Josiah's three reigning sons and grandson
Chronicles, the Books of - The genealogical records of Jotham and Jeroboam probably embodied from contemporary documents the details as to the Reubenites and Gadites (1 Chronicles 5:1-22). ...
Abijah's successful war with Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13)
Damascus - Jeroboam II, king of Israel (793-753), expanded Israelite influence and gained control of Damascus (2 Kings 14:28 )
Transjordan - David, Omri, Ahab, and Jeroboam II were the more successful ones
Bible, Egypt in the - , per o,a, the great house, is a generic title), Jeroboam fled from the wrath of
Damascus - Jeroboam II, Joash's son, further "recovered Damascus and Hamath, which belonged to Judah, for Israel
She'Chem - here, at this same place, the ten tribes renounced the house of David, and transferred their allegiance to Jeroboam, (1 Kings 12:16 ) under whom Shechem became for a time the capital of his kingdom
Gad - When the northern tribes revolted, Jeroboam must have found the Gadites among his staunchest supporters, for it was to Penuel in Gadite territory that he moved the capital from Shechem in Ephraim (1 Kings 12:25 )
Hosea - He prophesied in the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, and of Jeroboam king of Israel
Urim And Thummim - The oracles of the Lord were thenceforth delivered by the prophets; as by Ahijah to Jeroboam 1 Kings 11:29 ; by Shemaiah to Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:22 ; by Elijah to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 21:17-29 ; by Michaiah to Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 1 Kings 22:7 ; by Elisha to Jehoshaphat and Jehoram, 2 Kings 3:11-14 ; by Isaiah to Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:6-34 ; 2 Kings 20:1-11 ; by Huldah to Josiah, 2 Kings 22:13-20 ; by Jeremiah to Zedekiah, Jeremiah 32:3-5 , &c
Egypt in the Bible - , per o,a, the great house, is a generic title), Jeroboam fled from the wrath of
Idol, Idolatry - Jeroboam, who succeeded Solomon, set up golden calves at Dan and Bethel, and made Israel to sin
Idol - meat; Aaron's calf worship and Jeroboam's violated the second. Jeroboam's calves paved the way for Baal worship. The calves of Jeroboam and Baal's groves were the sin. ...
Israel, foremost in the offense under Jeroboam and then Ahab, is first to have prophets sent as censors and seers to counteract the evil, but proving refractory is the first to be carried into captivity. ...
In the northern kingdom of Israel, from Jeroboam down to Hoshea whom Shalmaneser dethroned, no one royal reformer appeared
Jonah - His one prediction, recorded in Kings, of the extension of the kingdom of Samaria from the Orontes to the Dead Sea, is said to have been fulfilled in the reign of Jeroboam ii. Still, Jonah may be reasonably regarded as to some extent a contemporary of Jeroboam ii
le'Vites - ) The revolt of the ten tribes, and the policy pursued by Jeroboam, who wished to make the priests the creatures and instruments of the king, and to establish a provincial and divided worship, caused them to leave the cities assigned to them in the territory of Israel, and gather round the metropolis of Judah
Book(s) - ...
Also mentioned in 1,2Chronicles are books of various prophets: the “Book of Samuel the Seer” (1 Chronicles 29:29 ), the “Book of Nathan the prophet” (1 Chronicles 29:29 ; 2 Chronicles 9:29 ), the “Book of Gad the Seer” (1 Chronicles 29:29 ), the “Prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite” (2 Chronicles 9:29 ), the “Visions of Iddo the Seer against Jeroboam the Son of Nebat” (2 Chronicles 9:29 ), the “Book of Shemaiah the Prophet and Iddo the Seer” (2 Chronicles 12:15 ), the “Story of the Prophet Iddo” (2 Chronicles 13:22 ), the “Book of Jehu the Son of Hanani” (2 Chronicles 20:34 ), the “Acts of Uzziah” (2 Chronicles 26:22 ; written by Isaiah), the “Vision of Isaiah the Prophet” (2 Chronicles 32:32 ), and the “Saying of the Seers” (2 Chronicles 33:19 )
Damascus - The city of Damascus was re-taken by Jeroboam II
Ammon, Ammonites - Before the reign of Jeroboam II
Ammonites - The proximity of the Ammonites to Gilead likewise destined them to be constant enemies of the Israelites, who made claims to Gilead and actually controlled it during the reigns of certain strong kings such as David, Omri, Ahab, and Jeroboam II
Way - ” In 1 Kings 16:26 derek is used of Jeroboam’s attitude: “For he walked in all the way of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, and in his sin wherewith he made Israel to sin
Samaritans - One of these kingdoms, called Judah, consisted of such as adhered to Rehoboam and the house of David; the other retained the ancient name of Israelites, under the command of Jeroboam
Pentateuch - Jeroboam in northern Israel set up golden calves on Aaron's model, with words from Exodus 32:28, "behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of Egypt" (1 Kings 12:28). The feast in the eighth month was in imitation of that of tabernacles in the seventh month (1 Kings 12:32-38), to prevent the people going up to sacrifice at Jerusalem (1 Kings 12:27); the Levites remaining faithful to the temple, Jeroboam made priests of the lowest people
Hosea - 735 a period of rapidly advancing decay following on the success and prosperity of the reign of Jeroboam ii
Cattle - The golden calves of the wilderness were formed like an egel ( Exodus 32:4 ) as were the calves King Jeroboam placed in Bethel and Dan (1 Kings 12:28 )
Sin - So in the story of the Northern Kingdom the constant refrain meets us in each succeeding reign: ‘He cleaved unto the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, wherewith he made Israel to sin’ ( 2 Kings 3:3 ; 2 Kings 10:29 ; 2 Kings 13:2 etc. This degeneracy of the people of the Northern Kingdom during the reign of Jeroboam ii
Samaria - SAMARIA is the designation of northern Israel under Jeroboam (1 Kings 13:32; Hosea 8:5-6; Amos 3:9)
Zedekiah - 8:15, section 3) that Zedekiah denounced Micaiah as contradicting Elijah, who foretold that dogs should lick up Ahab's blood in the vineyard of Naboth of Jezreel; and defied Micaiah to wither the hand with which he smote his cheek, as the prophet from Judah had done to Jeroboam
Amos - Beginning his prophetic activity during the reign of Jeroboam II in the Northern Kingdom of Israel, Amos lived during an era that rivaled Solomon's generation in its stability and economic prosperity (2 Kings 14:23-27 )
Josiah - ) He fulfilled on the Bethel calf altar the prophecy of the man of God to Jeroboam, given three centuries before, and declaring his very name (as Isaiah did that of Cyrus ages before), but respected the prophet's sepulchre (1 Kings 13)
Tribes of Israel, the - , it was an Ephraimite named Jeroboam who led the northern tribes in their plea for leniency (1 Kings 12:1-5 ). When Rehoboam rejected their plea, the northern tribes broke their ties with the south, formed a separate kingdom (1 Kings 12:16-19 ), and selected Jeroboam as their king (1 Kings 12:20 )
Moses - Jeroboam I created a new kingdom, distinct from the Davidic kingdom centered in Jerusalem
Genealogy - Genealogies were need in reckoning Reuben and Gad, "in the days of Jotham king of: Judah (perhaps in connection with his wars against Ammon, 2 Chronicles 27:5), and of Jeroboam king of Israel" (1 Chronicles 5:17)
Prophets, the - It appears probable, whatever may be the reason, that the testimony commonly known as "the prophets" began in the time of Jeroboam 2 king of Israel, Uzziah being his contemporary in Judah
Israel, History of - ...
Israel emerged as a separate power under Jeroboam I (922-901 B. Jeroboam is most remembered, however, for his establishment of rival shrines at Dan and Bethel (1 Kings 12:1 )
Solomon - Jeroboam "lifted up his hand against the king, and fled to Shishak (of a new dynasty) of Egypt"; Rezon of Zobah on the N. (See Jeroboam; REZON; HADAD
Egypt - He gave shelter to Jeroboam when he fled from Solomon, and after Solomon's death he invaded Judaea with 1200 chariots, 60,000 horsemen, and people without number. Shashank or Shishak, the ally of Jeroboam of Israel, was conqueror of Rehoboam of Judah
Idolatry - This helps to explain the calf-worship, represented as first introduced by Aaron, and at a later period established by Jeroboam i
Hebrews - Jeroboam introduced the worship of the golden calves into Israel, which took such deep root that it was never entirely extirpated
Chronicles, i - But we read ( 2 Chronicles 13:3 ; 2 Chronicles 13:17 ) that Abijah with 400,000 men fought against Jeroboam with 800,000, and killed 500,000 of them
King - Jeroboam sacrifices in person before the altar in Bethel ( 1 Kings 12:32-33 ), and Ahaz orders a special altar to be made, and offers in person on it ( 2 Kings 16:12 )
Idol, Idolatry - ...
The erection of two golden calves at northern cult centers by Jeroboam testifies to the syncretistic worship of Yahweh and idols that marked the remainder of the Old Testament period as Israel increasingly came under the influence of the Assyrian and Babylonian religions
Deuteronomy - It may belong to the reign of Jeroboam II
David - Even the blame for the schism is shifted from Solomon to Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:6-7 )
King, Kingship - All of the kings of the north are said to have "done evil in the eyes of the Lord" because they continued the worship of the golden calves in Bethel and Dan that had been begun by the northern kingdom's first king, Jeroboam 1 (1 Kings 12:26-33 )
Idolatry - Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, who succeeded him in the greater part of his dominions, set up golden calves at Dan and Bethel
Numbers, the Book of - In Numbers 34 more territory is assigned to Israel than they permanently occupied, and less than they for a time held (namely, Damascus, in the reigns of David, Solomon, and Jeroboam II)
Galilee (2) - It was ravaged by Ben-hadad (1 Kings 15:20), probably won back by Ahab, taken again by the Aramaeans under Hazael (2 Kings 12:18; 2 Kings 13:22), and recovered by Jeroboam ii
Assyria - " It is farther argued, that God, by the Prophet Amos, in the reign of Jeroboam, about ten or twenty years before the reign of Pul, (see Amos 6:13-14 ,) threatened to raise up a nation against Israel; and that, as Pul reigned presently after the prophecy of Amos, and was the first upon record who began to fulfil it, he may be justly reckoned the first conqueror and founder of this empire
Judges, Theology of - From a point in time after the schism and the erection of golden calves at Dan and Bethel by Jeroboam, the author could in effect be saying, "Look, this is no surprise—those tribes were always prone to false worship and idolatry
Aaron - ...
Like Jeroboam's calves long after, the sin was a violation of the second rather than of the first commandment, the worship of the true God by an image (as the church of Rome teaches), rather than the adding or substituting of another god. It was an accommodation to the usages which both Israel and Jeroboam respectively had learned in Egypt
War - We suppose that this way of making war prevailed also under Joshua, the Judges, Saul, David at the beginning of his reign, the kings of Judah and Israel who were successors to Rehoboam and Jeroboam, and under the Maccabees, till the time of Simon Maccabaeus, prince and high priest of the Jews, who had mercenary troops, that is, soldiers who received pay, 1Ma_14:32
Isaiah - God had given Judah abundant prosperity during Uzziah's reign of 52 years, that His goodness might lead the people to loving obedience, just as in northern Israel He had restored prosperity daring the brilliant reign of Jeroboam II with the same gracious design. ...
Moses' general prophecy (Leviticus 26:33; Deuteronomy 28:64) had assumed more definiteness in Ahijah's specification of the direction of the exile, "beyond the river," in Jeroboam's time 1 Kings 14:15), and Amos 5:27, "beyond Damascus"; and now the place is defined, Babylon
Canaan, History And Religion of - ...
In Israel, however, the initial king, Jeroboam I (922-901 B. Regardless, the adherence to Jeroboam's shrines was for the biblical writers the mark of apostasy for Israel's kings
War, Holy War - In direct contrast are Jeroboam II's hollow victory celebrations vaunting victory by his own hand (Amos 6:13-14 )
Priest - They blew them at Jericho's overthrow (Joshua 6:4) and the war against Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:12; compare 2 Chronicles 20:21-22); 3,700 joined David (1 Chronicles 12:23; 1 Chronicles 12:27)
Jonath - He paid the advertised fare in the current Joppa coin, with the image and superscription of Jeroboam ii
Egypt - ; Solomon made a treaty with king Pharaoh and married his daughter, 1 Kings 3:1; Gezer was spoiled by Pharaoh and given to Solomon's wife, 1 Kings 9:16; Solomon brought horses from Egypt; Hadad fled thither for refuge, as did also Jeroboam, 1 Kings 10:28; 1 Kings 11:17; 1 Kings 12:2; Shishak plundered Jerusalem and made Judæa tributary, 1 Kings 14:25, and a record of this invasion and conquest has been deciphered on the walls of the great temple at Karnak, or el-Karnak
Temple of Jerusalem - At the division of the kingdoms, Jeroboam set up rival sanctuaries at Bethel and Dan which drew worshipers away from Jerusalem for two hundred years
Sin - Not all kings were so crass; many tried to serve the Lord as they chose, in forbidden manners (Jeroboam I, Jehu, and other northern kings)
Canon - ...
And in 2 Chronicles 9:29 , it is said, "Now, the rest of the acts of Solomon, first and last, are they not written in the book of Nathan the prophet, and in the prophecy of Ahijah the Shilonite, and in the visions of Iddo the seer, against Jeroboam, the son of Nebat?" Now, it is well known that none of these writings of the prophets are in the canon; at least, none of them under their names
Priests And Levites - The calves of Jeroboam were probably Canaanitish, though he probably meant them as symbols, not rivals, of Jahweh
Jerusalem - So Shishak, Jeroboam's ally, came up against Jerusalem. Asa, after overthrowing the Ethiopian Zerah who thought to spoil Jerusalem as Shishak did, brought in the sacred offerings which his father Abijah had dedicated from the war with Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:16-20), and which he himself had dedicated from the Ethiopian spoil, into the house of the Lord, silver, gold, and vessels (1 Kings 15:15; 2 Chronicles 14:12-13)
Amos, Theology of - ...
Israel, during the reign of Jeroboam II (793-753) was propelled to heights of power and prosperity unmatched since the days of David and Solomon
Canaan - At his death, ten of the tribes revolted under Jeroboam, and the country became divided into the two rival kingdoms of Judah and Israel, having for their capitals Jerusalem and Samaria
Elijah - This idolatry had been introduced by Ahab and his idolatrous wife, Ethbaal's daughter Jezebel (in violation of the first, commandment), as if the past sin of Israel were not enough, and as if it were "a light thing to walk in the sins of Jeroboam," namely, the worship of Jehovah under the symbol of a calf, in violation of the second commandment
Jews - Under Solomon they had little war: when he died, ten of the Hebrew tribes formed a kingdom of Israel, or Ephraim, for themselves, under Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, in opposition to the kingdom of Judah and Benjamin, ruled by the family of David
Possession - To these sacrifices were offered in the open field, and for their worship Jeroboam appointed priests
Archaeology And Biblical Study - ...
Among the many interesting discoveries at Samaria was a group of over sixty ostraca, probably from the time of King Jeroboam II (782-743 B
Jerusalem - After the death of Solomon, ten of the twelve tribes revolted from his successor Rehoboam, and, under Jeroboam, the son of Nebat, established a separate kingdom: so that Jerusalem, no longer the capital of the whole empire, and its temple frequented only by the tribes of Judah and Benjamin, must have experienced a mournful declension
Palestine - Under Jeroboam she had sought to conform to the secular ideas of ritual then fashionable, and had even attempted something in the way of a democratic system of government