What does Jericho mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יְרִיחֽוֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 8
ἰεριχὼ a noted city 5
יְרֵחֽוֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 5
יְרִיח֖וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 5
יְרֵח֑וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 5
יְרֵח֖וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 4
יְרִיח֔וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 4
יְרֵח֔וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 2
בִֽירֵח֔וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 2
ἰεριχώ a noted city 2
לִֽירִיחוֹ֙ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 2
יְרִיחֹ֑ה a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְרִיחוֹ֙ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
בִּֽירִיחוֹ֮ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
לִֽירִיח֖וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
מִֽירִיח֗וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
וִֽירִיחוֹ֙ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
בִּירִיחוֹ֒ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְ֠רִיחוֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְרִיחוֹ֒ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְרִיח֑וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְרֵח֛וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְרִיח֥וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְרִיח֜וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְרֵח֥וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
מִירִיח֛וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְרֵחוֹ֮ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
בִּֽירִיחוֹ֙ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
יְרֵחוֹ֒ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
בִּירִיח֑וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1
בִּֽירִיח֔וֹ a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 1

Definitions Related to Jericho

H3405


   1 a city 5 miles (8 km) west of the Jordan and 7 miles (11. 5 km) north of the Dead Sea and the first city conquered by the Israelites upon entering the promised land of Canaan.
   Additional Information: Jericho = “its moon”.
   

G2410


   1 a noted city, abounding in balsam, honey, cyprus, myrobalanus, roses and other fragrant products.
   It was near the north shore of the Dead Sea in the tribe of Benjamin, between Jerusalem and the Jordan River.
   Additional Information: Jericho = “place of fragrance”.
   

Frequency of Jericho (original languages)

Frequency of Jericho (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Jericho
(jee rih' koh) Place name meaning “moon.” Apparently the oldest city in the world and the first city Israel conquered under Joshua. Jericho is situated in the lower Jordan Valley, which, according to Genesis 13:10 , “was well watered everywhere like the garden of the Lord.” The Old Testament town lies beneath tell es-Sultan near one of Palestine's strongest springs. New Testament Jericho, founded by Herod the Great, was about one and one half miles southward in the magnificent wadi Qelt. The spring, ain es-Sultan, issues some 30,000 cubit feet of water daily which falls about 160 feet in the first mile of its course down many channels to the Jordan River six miles away, irrigating about 2,500 acres. The combination of rich alluvial soil, the perennial spring, and constant sunshine made Jericho an attractive place for settlement. Only about 6.4 inches of rain fall there per year (mostly between November and February), and the average temperature for January Isaiah 59 F, while it Isaiah 88 F for August. Jericho is about 740 feet below sea level (accounting for its warm climate) but well above the Dead Sea eight miles southward which at 1,300 feet below sea level marks the earth's lowest point. Thus Jericho could be called “city of palms” (Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 1:16 ; Judges 3:3 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 ) and has plenty of palm trees today.
Jericho was an oasis situated in a hot plain, living in its own world with no major settlement in sight, and lying between the two focal points of Jerusalem and Amman in the mountains to the west and east. It is mentioned in the Bible usually in association with some movement from one side of the Jordan to another—the Israelite invasion, when Ehud takes tribute to the Moabite king, when David sends envoys to the king of Ammon, when Elijah and Elisha cross the Jordan, or when Zedekiah attempts to escape the Babylonians.
In New Testament times Jericho was famous for its balm (an aromatic gum known for its medicinal qualities). This along with its being the winter capital made it a wealthy city. When Jesus was hosted by Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10 ), it was probably in one of Jericho's finest houses. Its sycamore trees were quite valuable. Such a city could expect to have its share of beggars, as the Gospels tell us (Matthew 20:29-34 ; Mark 10:46-52 ; Luke 18:35-43 ).
The archaeology of Jericho is closely associated with the name of Kathleen Kenyon, an Oxford University scholar who excavated there between 1952-1959. The earliest recognizable building on the site dates apparently (based on radiocarbon dating) from about 9250 B.C., a time marking the change from the Paleolithic to the Mesolithic period in Palestine. By 8,000 B.C. a walled town (the world's earliest) of about ten acres had been built. About 6000 B.C. pottery appeared in Jericho. About 4000 B.C. a period of abandonment began, but by 3300 B.C. Jericho was coming into her own again into what Kenyon calls the “Proto-Urban” age. Jericho came to have solid defense ramparts and walls. From about 2200-2000 B.C. the mound of Jericho was a campsite rather than a town, when some 346 excavated tombs show its occupants to be from various tribal units. From about 1400 to possibly slightly after 1300 B.C. Jericho was a small settlement. The town at Joshua's time was small and may have used some of its earlier walls for its defenses. Thus more critical scholars underline the conflict between archaeological data and the biblical conquest narrative, while more conservative scholars have recently tried to redate the archaeological evidence or deny that tell es-Sultan is biblical Jericho without giving a satisfactory alternative. See Archaeology; Conquest; Joshua .
Karen Joines
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Jericho
JERICHO was situated in the valley of the Jordan, about 5 miles west of the river and about 6 north of the Dead Sea. The distance between Jerusalem and Jericho was about 17 miles. The immediate vicinity enjoyed the advantage of abundant springs (2 Kings 2:19-22), and showed great fertility. It was the ‘city of palms’ (Deuteronomy 34:3, 2 Chronicles 28:15), and Josephus gives an enthusiastic account of the abundance and variety of its products (BJ iv. viii. 2, 3).
The Jericho which was destroyed by Joshua was a considerable town, characterized by the wealth of its inhabitants and the strength of its fortifications (Joshua 6, 7). The rebuilding of the city is described in 1 Kings 16:34, but the place is referred to at earlier dates (Joshua 18:21, 2 Samuel 10:5, 1 Chronicles 19:5). A school of prophets was established at Jericho (2 Kings 2:5), and it was from Jericho that Elijah and Elisha went down to Jordan. Other references are found in 2 Chronicles 28:15, 2 Kings 25:5, Jeremiah 39:5, Ezra 2:34, Nehemiah 3:2; Nehemiah 7:36.
In the time of our Lord, Jericho was a large and important town. Antony granted the revenues of Jericho and the surrounding district to Cleopatra, and these were farmed from her by Herod the Great. Afterwards Herod received Jericho by gift from Augustus, and erected a citadel, which he called Cypros, above the town. He also built within the city a palace, in which he died. This palace was rebuilt by Herod Archelaus after it had been burned down by Simon during the troubles which followed upon the death of Herod the Great (Josephus Ant. xvii. x. 6 and xiii. 1). After the deposition of Herod Archelaus as tetrarch of Judaea, Jericho was held directly by the Roman procurator, who farmed out its revenues.
Modern Jericho (er-Riha) is a miserable village of 300 inhabitants; the forest of palms has entirely disappeared, and only here and there can traces of the former fertility of the district be seen. The exact site of the Canaanite Jericho does not correspond with that of the modern village, and probably there were two towns, a little apart from one another, which, during the prosperity of the Roman occupation, may have been united by continuous building.
By tradition, Jericho has been closely associated with the Baptism of Jesus and the Temptation. The site of Bethany or Bethabara (wh. see), however, cannot be fixed with certainty, and some (e.g. Conder) maintain that the ford east from Jericho cannot be the place, but rather a ford farther north, lying east from Cana of Galilee. The traditional scene of the Temptation is a mountain called from this association Quarantania, lying to the west of Jericho. But the uncertainty of the scene of the Baptism and the vagueness of the phrase ‘the wilderness’ (Matthew 4:1 ||) make this a matter of tradition only.
From Jericho to Jerusalem there are three roads. The central one of these is the most direct, and was that used by pilgrims going from Galilee to Jerusalem, who took the circuitous route in order to avoid entering Samaria. It is an extremely arduous path, and wayfarers were much exposed to the attacks of robbers, who easily found secure concealment among the bare and rugged hills which it traversed: a fact which gives vividness to the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30). This road was that which Jesus took on His last journey to Jerusalem. After the raising of Lazarus, Jesus and His disciples withdrew ‘into a city called Ephraim’ (John 11:54). (On its site see art. Ephraim). From this place Jesus could see the pilgrim bands from Galilee going down to Jericho on their way to Jerusalem. And in all probability, when ‘the Passover was nigh at hand,’ He joined one of these bands, and so paid that visit to Jericho with which the names of Bartimaeus and Zacchaeus are associated. See artt. Bartimaeus and Zacchaeus.* [1]
Literature.—Stanley, SP [2] ch. vii. pp. 305, 316; G. A. Smith, HGHL [3] 264, 268, 493, 496; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, artt. ‘Jericho, ‘Ephraim,’ ‘Bethabara’; Farrar, Life of Christ, ii. 178–186.
Andrew N. Bogle.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jericho
Jericho (jĕr'i-kô), city of the moon, or place of fragrance. A city of Benjamin, situated in the valley of the Jordan, on the west side of that river, and north of its entrance into the Dead sea. Joshua 2:1-3; 1 Kings 16:34. It was also called the City of Palm-trees. Deuteronomy 34:3; Judges 1:16. As Jericho was the first city that was taken, on the west of the Jordan, the ban was laid on all the property in it. Joshua burned the city with fire, and pronounced a solemn curse upon the person who, at any succeeding period, should build its walls or set up its gates. Joshua 4:13; which was executed upon Hiel, 533 years afterward. 1 Kings 16:33-34. Previous to this, however, the city had been rebuilt, but not upon its ancient foundations. Judges 3:13; 2 Samuel 10:5; 2 Kings 2:4-5. The more ancient city was probably in the neighborhood of the beautiful fountain, which is apparently the same whose waters Elisha healed. 2 Kings 2:18-22. The later Jericho appears to have occupied the site of the miserable and filthy village, Er-Riha, nearly two miles from the fountain. Ezra 2:34; Nehemiah 3:2; Matthew 19:1; Matthew 20:29-34; Mark 10:1; Mark 10:46; Mark 10:52; Luke 18:35-43; Luke 19:1-10. Riha lies almost desert; and even that "one solitary palm tree" which Dr. Robinson saw is gone. The inhabitants are a feeble and licentious race. The road between Jerusalem and Jericho still retains its ancient character for scenes of assault and robbery. Luke 10:30.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jericho
His moon; his month; his sweet smell
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jericho, Plains of
The part of the Jordan valley between the riverand the mountains near Jericho. 2 Kings 25:5 ; Jeremiah 39:5 ; Jeremiah 52:8 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jericho
The strongly fortified city that was the first to be taken by Israel when entering the land. The spies had been sheltered there by Rahab the harlot, from whom they heard that the terror of Israel had fallen upon the inhabitants. The city and all therein was accursed, and was to be utterly destroyed, except the silver, and gold, and vessels of brass and iron, which were consecrated to the Lord: typical of the power of Satan in the world that stops the progress of the Christian: he must count it all as accursed, though God may use such things by consecrating them to Himself.
The capture of the city was altogether of God, after it had been compassed six days by the people, accompanied by the ark and the priests blowing the trumpets: in that way they proclaimed the rights of the Lord of all the earth to the land, while Jericho was the fortress of the enemy. On the seventh day, after being compassed seven times (double type of perfection) the priests blowing their trumpets, the people shouted, and the walls of the city fell down. The city was destroyed and all that had life was put to the sword, except Rahab and those she had with her sheltered under the scarlet line. Joshua 2:1-22 ; Joshua 6 ; Hebrews 11:30 . A curse was pronounced upon the man who should re-build the city. This was verified when Hiel built it. 1 Kings 16:34 .
Jericho was allotted to Benjamin, Joshua 18:21 ; but later was taken possession of by Eglon the king of Moab. It is designated 'the city of palm trees.' Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 1:16 ; Judges
3:13; 2 Chronicles 28:15 . Afterwards 'sons of the prophets' dwelt there: they said that the situation of the city was 'pleasant,' but the water was bad. It was Elisha's first miracle, he cast in salt and the water was healed. It was the ministration of the heavenly blessing in the place of the curse. 2 Kings 2:18-22 . Some who returned from exile are described as 'children of Jericho.' Ezra 2:34 ; Nehemiah 7:36 .
But little more is known of Jericho until Antony gave its palm groves and balsam gardens to Cleopatra; from her the place was rented by Herod the Great, who had a palace there, and it was there he died. It was burned down soon after, but was rebuilt by Archelaus. This was the city visited by the Lord, when He lodged with Zacchaeus and cured the blind men. Matthew 20:29 ; Mark 10:46 ; Luke 18:35 ; Luke 19:1 .
The Ain es Sultan, 31 52' N, 35 27' E , is held to be the fountain healed by Elisha, and the ruins around mark the site of the ancient city, five miles from the Jordan; but this is not the site of the Jericho of N.T. times, which may or may not agree with the situation of the miserable village of Eriha, which is sometimes called Jericho: it is a mile and a half S.E. of the ancient site.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jericho
JERICHO . A city situated in the Jordan valley about 5 miles from the north end of the Dead Sea, now represented by the miserable village of er-Rîha . It was the first city conquered by the Israelites after their passage of the Jordan. The course of events, from the sending of the spies to the destruction of Achan for infraction of the tabu on the spoil, is too well known to need repetition here (see Joshua 1:1-18 ; Joshua 2:1-24 ; Joshua 3:1-17 ; Joshua 4:1-24 ; Joshua 5:1-15 ; Joshua 6:1-27 ; Joshua 7:1-26 ). A small hamlet remained on the site, belonging to Benjamin ( Joshua 18:21 ), which was insignificant enough for David’s ambassadors to retire to, to recover from their insulting treatment by Hanun ( 2 Samuel 10:5 , 1 Chronicles 19:5 ). The city was re-founded by Hiel, a Bethelite, who apparently endeavoured to avert the curse pronounced by Joshua over the site by sacrificing his sons ( 1 Kings 16:34 ). A college of prophets was shortly afterwards founded here ( 2 Kings 2:4 ), for whose benefit Elisha healed its bitter waters ( 2 Kings 2:18 ). Hither the Israelites who had raided Judah, in the time of Ahaz, restored their captives on the advice of the prophet Oded ( 2 Chronicles 28:15 ). Here the Babylonians finally defeated Zedekiah, the last king of Judah, and so destroyed the Judahite kingdom ( 2 Kings 25:5 , Jeremiah 39:5 ; Jeremiah 52:8 ). Bacchides, the general of the Syrians in the Maccabæan period, captured and fortified Jericho ( 1Ma 9:50 ); Aristobulus also took it (Jos. [1] Ant . XIV. i. 2). Pompey encamped here on his way to Jerusalem ( ib. XIV. iv. 1). Its inhabitants, whom the great heat of the Ghôr had deprived of fighting strength, fled before Herod ( ib. XIV. xv. 3) and Vespasian ( BJ IV. viii. 2). In the Gospels Jericho figures in the stories of Bartimæus ( Matthew 20:29 , Mark 10:46 , Luke 18:35 ), Zacchæus ( Luke 19:1 ), and the Good Samaritan ( Luke 10:30 ).
The modern er-Rîha is not exactly on the site of ancient Jericho, which is a collection of mounds beside the spring traditionally associated with Elisha. The Roman and Byzantine towns are represented by other sites in the neighbourhood. Ancient aqusducts, mills, and other antiquities are numerous, as are also remains of early monasticism.
The site, though unhealthy for man, is noted for its fertility. Josephus ( BJ IV. viii. 3) speaks of it with enthusiasm. Even yet it is an important source of fruit supply. The district round Jericho is the personal property of the Sultan.
R. A. S. Macalister.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Jericho
Luke 10:30 (c) In this passage, Jerusalem represents the place of Christian privileges and Jericho represents the way of the world. The verse presents this trip as a path downward.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jericho
The name means, his moon—from Jareac. This is the famous city before whose walls the Lord manifested such a miracle of grace to Israel, in causing them to fall to the ground at the blasting of the rams' horns. (See Joshua 6:1-27) It was situated about seven leagues from Jerusalem, and about two from the river Jordan, (Joshua 18:20-21) and was called by Moses the city of palm trees; and, no doubt, in point of pleasantness, must have been a lovely place. (See Deuteronomy 34:3) But we find, in the after days of Israel's history, the barrenness of Jericho spoken of, (2 Kings 2:18-22) See Elisha. There is somewhat particularly striking concerning Jericho being cursed by Joshua before the Lord, and yet that Rahab the harlot should be of this city, concerning whom such blessed things are spoken of in Scripture. (See on the one hand, Joshua 6:26 compared with 1 Kings 16:34; and on the other, see Joshua 2:1-24 with Hebrews 11:31) If the reader will be at the trouble to count the period between Joshua's curse on Jericho, and the rebuilding of Jericho by Hiel the Bethelite, he will find that near five hundred and thirty-seven years had passed between the one and the other. The Hebrews paid great respect to the Cherem, that is, the curse of Joshua. This anathema was carefully remembered by them; and, no doubt, when Hiel in defiance of it began to build Jericho, the pious believers among the Hebrews felt indignant at the daring attempt, and marked the issue in the event that followed on Hiel's two sons.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jericho
was a city of Benjamin, about seven leagues from Jerusalem, and two from the Jordan, Joshua 18:21 . Moses calls it the city of palm trees, Deuteronomy 34:3 , because of palm trees growing in the plain of Jericho. Josephus says, that in the territory of this city were not only many palm trees, but also the balsam tree. The valley of Jericho was watered by a rivulet which had been formerly salt and bitter, but was sweetened by the Prophet Elisha, 2 Kings 2:19 . Jericho was the first city in Canaan taken by Joshua, Joshua 2:1-2 , &c. He sent thither spies, who were received by Rahab, lodged in her house, and preserved from the king of Jericho. Joshua received orders to besiege Jericho, soon after his passage over Jordan, Joshua 6:1-3 , &c. God commanded the Hebrews to march round the city once a day for seven days together. The soldiers marched first, probably out of the reach of the enemies' arrows, and after them the priests, the ark, &c. On the seventh day, they marched seven times round the city; and at the seventh, while the trumpets were sounding, and all the people shouting, the walls fell down. The rabbins say, that the first day was our Sunday, and the seventh the Sabbath day. During the first six days, the people continued in profound silence; but on the seventh Joshua commanded them to shout. Accordingly they all exerted their voices, and the wall being overthrown, they entered the city, every man in the place opposite to him. Jericho being devoted by God, they set fire to the city, and consecrated all the gold, silver, and brass. Then Joshua said, "Cursed be the man before the Lord who shall rebuild Jericho." About five hundred and thirty years after this, Hiel, of Bethel, undertook to rebuild it; but he lost his eldest son, Abiram, at laying the foundations, and his youngest son, Segub, when he hung up the gates. However, we are not to imagine that there was no city of Jericho till the time of Hiel. There was a city of palm trees, probably the same as Jericho, under the Judges, Judges 3:13 . David's ambassadors, who had been insulted by the Ammonites, resided at Jericho till their beards were grown, 2 Samuel 10:4 . There was, therefore, a city of Jericho which stood in the neighbourhood of the original Jericho. These two places are distinguished by Josephus. After Hiel of Bethel had rebuilt old Jericho, no one scrupled to dwell there. Our Saviour wrought miracles at Jericho.
According, to Pococke, the mountains to which the absurd name of Quarantania has been arbitrarily given, are the highest in all Judea; and he is probably correct; they form part of a chain extending from Scythopolis into Idumea. The fountain of Elisha he states to be a soft water, rather warm; he found in it some small shell fish of the turbinated kind. Close by the ruined aqueduct are the remains of a fine paved way, with a fallen column, supposed to be a Roman milestone. The hills nearest to Jerusalem consist, according to Hasselquist, of a very hard limestone; and different sorts of plants are found on them, in particular the myrtle, the carob tree, and the turpentine tree; but farther toward Jericho they are bare and barren, the hard limestone giving way to a looser kind, sometimes white and sometimes grayish, with interjacent layers of a reddish micaceous stone, saxum purum micaceum. The vales, though now bare and uncultivated, and full of pebbles, contain good red mould, which would amply reward the husbandman's toil. Nothing can be more savage than the present aspect of these wild and gloomy solitudes, through which runs the very road where is laid the scene of that exquisite parable, the good Samaritan, and from that time to the present, it has been the haunt of the most desperate bandits, being one of the most dangerous in Palestine. Sometimes the track leads along the edges of cliffs and precipices, which threaten destruction on the slightest false step; at other times it winds through craggy passes, overshadowed by projecting or perpendicular rocks. At one place the road has been cut through the very apex of a hill, the rocks overhanging it on either side. Here, in 1820, an English traveller, Sir Frederick Henniker, was attacked by the Arabs with fire-arms, who stripped him naked, and left him severely wounded: "It was past mid-day, and burning hot," says Sir Frederick; "I bled profusely; and two vultures, whose business it is to consume corpses, were hovering over me. I should scarcely have had strength to resist, had they chosen to attack me."
The modern village of Jericho is described by Mr. Buckingham as a settlement of about fifty dwellings, all very mean in their appearance, and fenced in front with thorny bushes, while a barrier of the same kind, the most effectual that could be raised against mounted Arabs, encircles the town. A fine brook flows by it, which empties itself into the Jordan; the nearest point of that river is about three miles distant. The grounds in the immediate vicinity of the village, being fertilized by this stream, bear crops of dourra, Indian corn, rice, and onions. The population is entirely Mohammedan, and is governed by a sheikh: their habits are those of Bedouins, and robbery and plunder form their chief and most gainful occupation. The whole of the road from Jerusalem to the Jordan, is held to be the most dangerous in Palestine; and indeed, in this portion of it, the very aspect of the scenery is sufficient, on the one hand, to tempt to robbery and murder, and, on the other, to occasion a dread of it in those who pass that way. One must be amid these wild and gloomy solitudes, surrounded by an armed band, and feel the impatience of the traveller who rushes on to catch a new view at every pass and turn; one must be alarmed at the very tramp of the horses' hoofs rebounding through the caverned rocks, and at the savage shouts of the footmen, scarcely less loud than the echoing thunder produced by the discharge of their pieces in the valleys; one must witness all this upon the spot, before the full force and beauty of the admirable story of the good Samaritan can be perceived. Here, pillage, wounds, and death would be accompanied with double terror, from the frightful aspect of every thing around. Here, the unfeeling act of passing by a fellow creature in distress, as the priest and Levite are said to have done, strikes one with horror, as an act almost more than inhuman. And here, too, the compassion of the good Samaritan is doubly virtuous, from the purity of the motive which must have led to it, in a spot where no eyes were fixed on him to draw forth the performance of any duty, and from the bravery which was necessary to admit of a man's exposing himself, by such delay, to the risk of a similar fate to that from which he was endeavouring to rescue his fellow creature.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jericho
A city of Benjamin, Joshua 16:7 18:21 , about eighteen miles east north east of Jerusalem, and seven miles from the Jordan. It was the first city in Canaan taken by Joshua, who being miraculously aided by the downfall of its walls, totally destroyed it, sparing only Rahab and her household, and pronounced a curse upon the person who should ever rebuild it, which was more than five hundred years afterwards fulfilled on Hiel, Joshua 6:26 1 Kings 16:34 . Meanwhile a new Jericho had been built on some neighboring site, Judges 3:3 2 Samuel 10:5 . Jericho was also called the "city of palm-trees," Deuteronomy 34:3 Judges 1:16 , and became afterwards flourishing and second in importance only to Jerusalem. It contained a school of the prophets, and as the residence of Elisha, 2 Kings 2:4,18 . Here also Christ healed two blind men, Matthew 20:29-34 , and forgave Zaccheus, Luke 19:2-8 .
The site of Jericho has usually been fixed at Rihah, a mean and foul Arab hamlet of some two hundred inhabitants. Recent travellers, however, show that the probably location of Jericho was two mile west of Rihah, at the mouth of Wady Kelt, and where the road from Jerusalem comes into the plain. The city destroyed by Joshua may have been nearer to the fountain of Elisha, supposed to be the present Ain es-Sultan, two miles northwest of Rihah. On the west and north of Jericho rise high limestone hills, one of which, the dreary Quarantana, 1,200 or 1,500 feet high, derives its name from the modern tradition that it was the scene of our Lord's forty days' fast and temptation. Between the hills and the Jordan lies "the plain of Jericho," Joshua 4:13 , over against "the plains of Moab" east of the river. It was anciently well watered and amazingly fruitful. It might easily be made so again, but now lies neglected, and the palmtrees, balsam, and honey, for which it was once famous, have disappeared.
The road from Jericho to Jerusalem ascends through narrow and rocky passes amid ravines and precipices. It is an exceedingly difficult and dangerous route, and is still infested by robbers, as in the time of the good Samaritan, Luke 10:30-34 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jericho
Place of fragrance, a fenced city in the midst of a vast grove of palm trees, in the plain of Jordan, over against the place where that river was crossed by the Israelites (Joshua 3:16 ). Its site was near the 'Ain es-Sultan, Elisha's Fountain (2 Kings 2:19-22 ), about 5 miles west of Jordan. It was the most important city in the Jordan valley (Numbers 22:1 ; 34:15 ), and the strongest fortress in all the land of Canaan. It was the key to Western Palestine. This city was taken in a very remarkable manner by the Israelites (Joshua 6 ). God gave it into their hands. The city was "accursed" (Heb. herem, "devoted" to Jehovah), and accordingly (Joshua 6:17 ; Compare Leviticus 27:28,29 ; Deuteronomy 13:16 ) all the inhabitants and all the spoil of the city were to be destroyed, "only the silver, and the gold, and the vessels of brass and of iron" were reserved and "put into the treasury of the house of Jehovah" (Joshua 6:24 ; Compare Numbers 31:22,23,50-54 ). Only Rahab "and her father's household, and all that she had," were preserved from destruction, according to the promise of the spies (Joshua 2:14 ). In one of the Amarna tablets Adoni-zedec (q.v.) writes to the king of Egypt informing him that the 'Abiri (Hebrews) had prevailed, and had taken the fortress of Jericho, and were plundering "all the king's lands." It would seem that the Egyptian troops had before this been withdrawn from Palestine.
This city was given to the tribe of Benjamin (Joshua 18:21 ), and it was inhabited in the time of the Judges (Judges 3:13 ; 2 Samuel 10:5 ). It is not again mentioned till the time of David (2 Samuel 10:5 ). "Children of Jericho" were among the captives who returned under Zerubbabel Ezra 2:34 ; Nehemiah 7:36 ). Hiel (q.v.) the Bethelite attempted to make it once more a fortified city (1 Kings 16:34 ). Between the beginning and the end of his undertaking all his children were cut off.
In New Testament times Jericho stood some distance to the south-east of the ancient one, and near the opening of the valley of Achor. It was a rich and flourishing town, having a considerable trade, and celebrated for the palm trees which adorned the plain around. It was visited by our Lord on his last journey to Jerusalem. Here he gave sight to two blind men (Matthew 20:29-34 ; Mark 10:46-52 ), and brought salvation to the house of Zacchaeus the publican (Luke 19:2-10 ).
The poor hamlet of er-Riha, the representative of modern Jericho, is situated some two miles farther to the east. It is in a ruinous condition, having been destroyed by the Turks in 1840. "The soil of the plain," about the middle of which the ancient city stood, "is unsurpassed in fertility; there is abundance of water for irrigation, and many of the old aqueducts are almost perfect; yet nearly the whole plain is waste and desolate...The climate of Jericho is exceedingly hot and unhealthy. This is accounted for by the depression of the plain, which is about 1,200 feet below the level of the sea."
There were three different Jerichos, on three different sites, the Jericho of Joshua, the Jericho of Herod, and the Jericho of the Crusades. Er-Riha, the modern Jericho, dates from the time of the Crusades. Dr. Bliss has found in a hollow scooped out for some purpose or other near the foot of the biggest mound above the Sultan's Spring specimens of Amorite or pre-Israelitish pottery precisely identical with what he had discovered on the site of ancient Lachish. He also traced in this place for a short distance a mud brick wall in situ, which he supposes to be the very wall that fell before the trumpets of Joshua. The wall is not far from the foot of the great precipice of Quarantania and its numerous caverns, and the spies of Joshua could easily have fled from the city and been speedily hidden in these fastnesses.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Jericho
JERICHO was situated in the valley of the Jordan, about 5 miles west of the river and about 6 north of the Dead Sea. The distance between Jerusalem and Jericho was about 17 miles. The immediate vicinity enjoyed the advantage of abundant springs (2 Kings 2:19-22), and showed great fertility. It was the ‘city of palms’ (Deuteronomy 34:3, 2 Chronicles 28:15), and Josephus gives an enthusiastic account of the abundance and variety of its products (BJ iv. viii. 2, 3).
The Jericho which was destroyed by Joshua was a considerable town, characterized by the wealth of its inhabitants and the strength of its fortifications (Joshua 6, 7). The rebuilding of the city is described in 1 Kings 16:34, but the place is referred to at earlier dates (Joshua 18:21, 2 Samuel 10:5, 1 Chronicles 19:5). A school of prophets was established at Jericho (2 Kings 2:5), and it was from Jericho that Elijah and Elisha went down to Jordan. Other references are found in 2 Chronicles 28:15, 2 Kings 25:5, Jeremiah 39:5, Ezra 2:34, Nehemiah 3:2; Nehemiah 7:36.
In the time of our Lord, Jericho was a large and important town. Antony granted the revenues of Jericho and the surrounding district to Cleopatra, and these were farmed from her by Herod the Great. Afterwards Herod received Jericho by gift from Augustus, and erected a citadel, which he called Cypros, above the town. He also built within the city a palace, in which he died. This palace was rebuilt by Herod Archelaus after it had been burned down by Simon during the troubles which followed upon the death of Herod the Great (Josephus Ant. xvii. x. 6 and xiii. 1). After the deposition of Herod Archelaus as tetrarch of Judaea, Jericho was held directly by the Roman procurator, who farmed out its revenues.
Modern Jericho (er-Riha) is a miserable village of 300 inhabitants; the forest of palms has entirely disappeared, and only here and there can traces of the former fertility of the district be seen. The exact site of the Canaanite Jericho does not correspond with that of the modern village, and probably there were two towns, a little apart from one another, which, during the prosperity of the Roman occupation, may have been united by continuous building.
By tradition, Jericho has been closely associated with the Baptism of Jesus and the Temptation. The site of Bethany or Bethabara (wh. see), however, cannot be fixed with certainty, and some (e.g. Conder) maintain that the ford east from Jericho cannot be the place, but rather a ford farther north, lying east from Cana of Galilee. The traditional scene of the Temptation is a mountain called from this association Quarantania, lying to the west of Jericho. But the uncertainty of the scene of the Baptism and the vagueness of the phrase ‘the wilderness’ (Matthew 4:1 ||) make this a matter of tradition only.
From Jericho to Jerusalem there are three roads. The central one of these is the most direct, and was that used by pilgrims going from Galilee to Jerusalem, who took the circuitous route in order to avoid entering Samaria. It is an extremely arduous path, and wayfarers were much exposed to the attacks of robbers, who easily found secure concealment among the bare and rugged hills which it traversed: a fact which gives vividness to the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30). This road was that which Jesus took on His last journey to Jerusalem. After the raising of Lazarus, Jesus and His disciples withdrew ‘into a city called Ephraim’ (John 11:54). (On its site see art. Ephraim). From this place Jesus could see the pilgrim bands from Galilee going down to Jericho on their way to Jerusalem. And in all probability, when ‘the Passover was nigh at hand,’ He joined one of these bands, and so paid that visit to Jericho with which the names of Bartimaeus and Zacchaeus are associated. See artt. Bartimaeus and Zacchaeus.* [1]
Literature.—Stanley, SP [2] ch. vii. pp. 305, 316; G. A. Smith, HGHL [3] 264, 268, 493, 496; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, artt. ‘Jericho, ‘Ephraim,’ ‘Bethabara’; Farrar, Life of Christ, ii. 178–186.
Andrew N. Bogle.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jericho
Numbers 22:1; Joshua 2:1-3; Joshua 2:5; Deuteronomy 2:34-35; Joshua 3:16. From a root "fragrance," or "the moon" (yareach ), being the seat of Canaanite moon worship, or "broad" from its being in a plain bounded by the Jordan. Jericho is to the W., opposite where Israel crossed the Jordan under Joshua, at six miles' distance. It had its king. Walls enclosed it, and its gate was regularly shut, according to eastern custom, when it was dark. Its spoil included silver, gold, vessels of iron and brass (Joshua 6:19), cast in the same plain of Jordan where Solomon had his foundry (1 Chronicles 4:17). The "Babylonian garment" (Joshua 7:21) betokens its commerce with the East. Joshua's two spies lodged in Rahab's house upon the wall; and she in reward for their safety received her own preservation, and that of all in her house, when Joshua burned the city with fire, and slew man and beast, as all had been put under the ban. The metals were taken to the treasury of the sanctuary (Joshua 6:17-19; Joshua 6:21-25).
Other towns had their inhabitants only slain, as under the divine ban (Deuteronomy 7:2; Deuteronomy 20:16-17; 2 Kings 2:18-221), while the cattle and booty fell to the conquerors. Jericho's men, cattle, and booty were all put under the ban, as being the first town of Canaan which the Lord had given them. They were to offer it as the firstfruits, a sign that they received the whole land as a fief from His hand. The plain was famed for palms and balsams, whence Jericho is called "the city of palms" (Deuteronomy 34:3; Judges 1:16; Judges 3:13; 2 Chronicles 28:15). The town stood, according to some, N. of the poor village Riha, by the wady Kelt. However, modern research places it a quarter of a mile from the mountain Quarantana (the traditional scene of Christ's temptation), at the fountain of Elisha. This accords with Joshua 16:1, "the water of Jericho," and Josephus mentions the fount and the mountain near (B. J., 4:8, section 2-3). Traces of buildings occur S. of the fountain. Its site was given to Benjamin (Joshua 18:21).
It is mentioned in David's time as a town (2 Samuel 10:5). Joshua's curse therefore was not aimed against rebuilding the town, which the Benjamites did, but against its miraculously overthrown walls being restored, against its being made again a fortress. See HIEL in Ahab's ungodly reign incurred the curse (1 Kings 16:34). Elisha "healed the waters" of the fountain, called also Ain es Sultan (1618884468_31), half an hour N.W. of Riha, in the rainy season forming a brook, which flows through the wady Kelt into the Jordan. Here myrobalanum, acacias, figtrees, etc., stand where once grew Jericho's famous palms. In its plains Zedekiah was overtaken by the Chalaeans (2 Kings 25:5; Jeremiah 39:5). Robbers still infest the road from Jerusalem down (a steep descent) to Jericho, as when Jesus spoke the parable of the good Samaritan (Luke 10:30); Pompey undertook to destroy their strongholds not long before. Moreover, some of the courses of priests lived at Jericho, which harmonizes with the mention of the priest and Levite returning that way from Jerusalem.
From mount Pisgah, the peak near the town Nebo, on its western slope (Deuteronomy 34:1), Moses looked "over against Jericho." Jericho strategically was the key of the land, being situated at the entrance of two passes through the hills, one leading to Jerusalem the other to Ai and Bethel. "By faith the walls of Jericho fell down, after they were compassed about seven days" (whereas sieges often last for years) (Hebrews 11:30). Trumpets, though one were to sound for ten thousand years, cannot throw down walls; but faith can do all things (Chrysostom). Six successive days the armed host marched round the city, the priests bearing the ark, as symbol of His presence, in the middle between the armed men in front and the rereward or rearguard, and seven priests sounding seven ramshorn (rather Jubilee) trumpets, the sign of judgment by "the breath of His mouth"; compare the seven trumpets that usher in judgments in Revelation, especially Revelation 11:13; Revelation 11:15.
On the seventh day they compassed Jericho seven times, and at the seventh time the priests blew one long blast, the people shouted, and the wall fell flat. Even though volcanic agency, of which traces are visible in the Jordan valley, may have been employed, the fall was no less miraculous; it would prove that the God of revelation employs His own natural means in the spiritual world, by supernatural will ordering the exact time and direction of those natural agencies to subserve His purposes of grace to His people, and foreannouncing to them the fact, and connecting it with their obedience to His directions: so in the Egyptian plagues. The miracle wrought independently of all conflict on their part at the outset marked that the occupation of the whole Holy Land was to be by His gift, and that it was a, fief held under God at His pleasure. Under Elisha a school of prophets resided at Jericho.
(2 Kings 2:5; 2 Kings 4:1; 2 Kings 6:1-2; 2 Kings 5:24, for "tower" translated "the hill" before the city: Keil). Of "children of Jericho" 345 returned from Babylon (Ezra 2:34). They helped to rebuild the wall (Nehemiah 3:2; Nehemiah 7:36). Archelaus in our Lord's days had irrigated the plain and planted it with palms. Herod the Great had previously founded a new town (Phasaelis) higher up the plain. The distinction between the new and the old towns may solve the seeming discrepancy between Matthew (Matthew 20:30), who makes the miracle on the blind to be when Jesus was leaving Jericho, and Luke, who says it was when Jesus was come nigh unto Jericho (Luke 18:35).
The Lord Himself, in whose genealogy Rahab the harlot is found, here was guest of Zacchaeus the publican, a lucrative office in so rich a city as the Roman Jericho was. The tree that Zacchaeus climbed was the fig mulberry or tree fig. The Lord's visit to Bethany appropriately follows His parable of the good Samaritan who relieved the man robbed between Jerusalem and Jericho, for Jesus was then traveling from Jericho to Jerusalem, and Bethany was only a little way short of Jerusalem (Luke 10:25; Luke 10:38; John 11:1). James and John's proposal to call fire down upon the Samaritans who would not receive Him in an earlier stage of the journey suggested probably His choosing a Samaritan to represent the benefactor in the parable, a tacit rebuke to their un-Christlike spirit (Luke 9:51-56).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jericho
The ancient town of Jericho was destroyed and rebuilt many times, though sometimes the rebuilt town was beside, rather than on top of, the ruins of the former town. The present town of Jericho, the Old Testament town destroyed by Joshua, and the New Testament town visited by Jesus all occupied different sites, though these sites are within a kilometre or so of each other.
One reason for this constant settlement of Jericho was the presence there of a good spring of water. This ensured a constant supply of fresh water and made the place such an oasis that people called Jericho the city of palm trees (Deuteronomy 34:3). The town was located in a flat area of the Jordan Valley. To the east a small plain dropped away into the Jordan River, and to the west barren hills rose up to the central highlands.
Archaeological evidence indicates that Jericho was in existence in 8000 BC. Its first mention in the Bible concerns events about 1240 BC, when the Israelites under Joshua approached Canaan from the plains of Moab, crossed the Jordan River and conquered Jericho in their first battle in Canaan (Numbers 22:1; Joshua 2; Joshua 3; Joshua 4; Joshua 5; Joshua 6).
Joshua announced a curse over Jericho, and for the next few hundred years no one dared rebuild the town properly, though some sort of settlement still existed there (Joshua 6:26; Judges 3:13; 2 Samuel 10:5). When a man named Hiel later rebuilt the city, he suffered the punishment announced by Joshua (1 Kings 16:34; cf. Joshua 6:26). A school for young prophets was located at Jericho in the time of Elijah and Elisha (2 Kings 2:4-5; 2 Kings 2:15-22).
There were further destructions and rebuildings of Jericho over the following centuries. The town was still in existence in New Testament times, having been rebuilt by Herod the Great. The narrow road that descended from Jerusalem through wild and rocky country to Jericho was dangerous because of bandits (Luke 10:30).
Jesus visited Jericho on his final journey to Jerusalem, and may have passed through the town on other occasions. Among those who benefited from Jesus’ visit were some blind beggars and a well known tax collector (Matthew 20:29-34; Luke 18:35-43; Luke 19:1-11).

Sentence search

Beth-Hoglah - In the Jericho plain. Now the large spring called ‘Ain Hajlah , ‘partridge spring,’ south-east of Jericho
Bartimae'us - (son of Timeus ), a blind beggar of Jericho who, ( Mark 10:46 ) ff. , sat by the wayside begging as our Lord passed out of Jericho on his last journey to Jerusalem
City of Palm Trees - Probably to be identified with a site near Jericho where the Kenites lived (Judges 1:16 ; see Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 3:13 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 ). Jericho itself lay in ruins from the time of the conquest until the time of Ahab. See Jericho
Jericho - The ancient town of Jericho was destroyed and rebuilt many times, though sometimes the rebuilt town was beside, rather than on top of, the ruins of the former town. The present town of Jericho, the Old Testament town destroyed by Joshua, and the New Testament town visited by Jesus all occupied different sites, though these sites are within a kilometre or so of each other. ...
One reason for this constant settlement of Jericho was the presence there of a good spring of water. This ensured a constant supply of fresh water and made the place such an oasis that people called Jericho the city of palm trees (Deuteronomy 34:3). ...
Archaeological evidence indicates that Jericho was in existence in 8000 BC. Its first mention in the Bible concerns events about 1240 BC, when the Israelites under Joshua approached Canaan from the plains of Moab, crossed the Jordan River and conquered Jericho in their first battle in Canaan (Numbers 22:1; Joshua 2; Joshua 3; Joshua 4; Joshua 5; Joshua 6). ...
Joshua announced a curse over Jericho, and for the next few hundred years no one dared rebuild the town properly, though some sort of settlement still existed there (Joshua 6:26; Judges 3:13; 2 Samuel 10:5). A school for young prophets was located at Jericho in the time of Elijah and Elisha (2 Kings 2:4-5; 2 Kings 2:15-22). ...
There were further destructions and rebuildings of Jericho over the following centuries. The narrow road that descended from Jerusalem through wild and rocky country to Jericho was dangerous because of bandits (Luke 10:30). ...
Jesus visited Jericho on his final journey to Jerusalem, and may have passed through the town on other occasions
en-Shemesh - of En-rogel, on the way to Jericho. It is believed to be the spring on the Jericho road E
Jericho - JERICHO was situated in the valley of the Jordan, about 5 miles west of the river and about 6 north of the Dead Sea. The distance between Jerusalem and Jericho was about 17 miles. ...
The Jericho which was destroyed by Joshua was a considerable town, characterized by the wealth of its inhabitants and the strength of its fortifications (Joshua 6, 7). A school of prophets was established at Jericho (2 Kings 2:5), and it was from Jericho that Elijah and Elisha went down to Jordan. ...
In the time of our Lord, Jericho was a large and important town. Antony granted the revenues of Jericho and the surrounding district to Cleopatra, and these were farmed from her by Herod the Great. Afterwards Herod received Jericho by gift from Augustus, and erected a citadel, which he called Cypros, above the town. After the deposition of Herod Archelaus as tetrarch of Judaea, Jericho was held directly by the Roman procurator, who farmed out its revenues. ...
Modern Jericho (er-Riha) is a miserable village of 300 inhabitants; the forest of palms has entirely disappeared, and only here and there can traces of the former fertility of the district be seen. The exact site of the Canaanite Jericho does not correspond with that of the modern village, and probably there were two towns, a little apart from one another, which, during the prosperity of the Roman occupation, may have been united by continuous building. ...
By tradition, Jericho has been closely associated with the Baptism of Jesus and the Temptation. Conder) maintain that the ford east from Jericho cannot be the place, but rather a ford farther north, lying east from Cana of Galilee. The traditional scene of the Temptation is a mountain called from this association Quarantania, lying to the west of Jericho. ...
From Jericho to Jerusalem there are three roads. From this place Jesus could see the pilgrim bands from Galilee going down to Jericho on their way to Jerusalem. And in all probability, when ‘the Passover was nigh at hand,’ He joined one of these bands, and so paid that visit to Jericho with which the names of Bartimaeus and Zacchaeus are associated. * Jericho - JERICHO was situated in the valley of the Jordan, about 5 miles west of the river and about 6 north of the Dead Sea. The distance between Jerusalem and Jericho was about 17 miles. ...
The Jericho which was destroyed by Joshua was a considerable town, characterized by the wealth of its inhabitants and the strength of its fortifications (Joshua 6, 7). A school of prophets was established at Jericho (2 Kings 2:5), and it was from Jericho that Elijah and Elisha went down to Jordan. ...
In the time of our Lord, Jericho was a large and important town. Antony granted the revenues of Jericho and the surrounding district to Cleopatra, and these were farmed from her by Herod the Great. Afterwards Herod received Jericho by gift from Augustus, and erected a citadel, which he called Cypros, above the town. After the deposition of Herod Archelaus as tetrarch of Judaea, Jericho was held directly by the Roman procurator, who farmed out its revenues. ...
Modern Jericho (er-Riha) is a miserable village of 300 inhabitants; the forest of palms has entirely disappeared, and only here and there can traces of the former fertility of the district be seen. The exact site of the Canaanite Jericho does not correspond with that of the modern village, and probably there were two towns, a little apart from one another, which, during the prosperity of the Roman occupation, may have been united by continuous building. ...
By tradition, Jericho has been closely associated with the Baptism of Jesus and the Temptation. Conder) maintain that the ford east from Jericho cannot be the place, but rather a ford farther north, lying east from Cana of Galilee. The traditional scene of the Temptation is a mountain called from this association Quarantania, lying to the west of Jericho. ...
From Jericho to Jerusalem there are three roads. From this place Jesus could see the pilgrim bands from Galilee going down to Jericho on their way to Jerusalem. And in all probability, when ‘the Passover was nigh at hand,’ He joined one of these bands, and so paid that visit to Jericho with which the names of Bartimaeus and Zacchaeus are associated. * Zacch us - A Jew—a tax-collector at or near Jericho. When Jesus was passing through Jericho on his last journey to Jerusalem, Zacchæus was anxious to see him
Naarath - (nay' uh rath) KJV form of Naarah, a city in the tribal territory of Ephraim just north of Jericho (Joshua 16:7 ). Suggested sites include Ain Duq, khirbet el Nayash about five miles northeast of Jericho, and tell el-Jishr
Hiel - The name of a certain Bethelite who in the days of Ahab fortified Jericho, and possibly sacrificed his two sons to appease the gods of the disturbed earth ( 1 Kings 16:34 ). Some obscure event is here applied as a comment on the curse on Jericho pronounced by Joshua
Hiel - ” Man from Bethel who rebuilt Jericho at the price of the life of two of his sons (1 Kings 16:34 ), fulfilling the divine curse Joshua issued when he destroyed Jericho (Joshua 7:26 )
Bartimaeus - ) A blind beggar of Jericho, who had his sight restored by Christ as He was going out of the town (Mark 10:46); Luke (Luke 18:35; Luke 19:1; Luke 19:5) describes the cure as Christ was entering Jericho the day before. Probably the beggar, with the persevering faith which characterized him, applied to Jesus first as He was entering Jericho, and renewed his petition the next day, as Jesus was leaving Jericho. " Matthew (Matthew 20:29-34) describes it, as Jesus was going from Jericho; and mentions two blind men. ...
Probably Bartimaeus, after applying on the day of Jesus' entry into Jericho, was joined by the second blind man while Jesus was passing the night with Zacchaeus; so both shared in the cure on Christ's leaving Jericho
Jericho - Jericho is situated in the lower Jordan Valley, which, according to Genesis 13:10 , “was well watered everywhere like the garden of the Lord. New Testament Jericho, founded by Herod the Great, was about one and one half miles southward in the magnificent wadi Qelt. The combination of rich alluvial soil, the perennial spring, and constant sunshine made Jericho an attractive place for settlement. Jericho is about 740 feet below sea level (accounting for its warm climate) but well above the Dead Sea eight miles southward which at 1,300 feet below sea level marks the earth's lowest point. Thus Jericho could be called “city of palms” (Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 1:16 ; Judges 3:3 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 ) and has plenty of palm trees today. ...
Jericho was an oasis situated in a hot plain, living in its own world with no major settlement in sight, and lying between the two focal points of Jerusalem and Amman in the mountains to the west and east. ...
In New Testament times Jericho was famous for its balm (an aromatic gum known for its medicinal qualities). When Jesus was hosted by Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10 ), it was probably in one of Jericho's finest houses. ...
The archaeology of Jericho is closely associated with the name of Kathleen Kenyon, an Oxford University scholar who excavated there between 1952-1959. pottery appeared in Jericho. Jericho was coming into her own again into what Kenyon calls the “Proto-Urban” age. Jericho came to have solid defense ramparts and walls. the mound of Jericho was a campsite rather than a town, when some 346 excavated tombs show its occupants to be from various tribal units. Jericho was a small settlement. Thus more critical scholars underline the conflict between archaeological data and the biblical conquest narrative, while more conservative scholars have recently tried to redate the archaeological evidence or deny that tell es-Sultan is biblical Jericho without giving a satisfactory alternative
Bethelite - The designation of Hiel who rebuilt Jericho
Jerechu - JERECHU ( 1Es 5:22 ) = Ezra 2:34 , Nehemiah 7:36 Jericho
Palm Trees, the City of - The name given to Jericho (q
Naaran - Boyish, juvenile, a town in Ephraim between Bethel and Jericho (1 Chronicles 7:28 )
Bartimaeus - The blind beggar of Jericho, to whom the Lord gave sight
Zacchaeus - Pure, a superintendant of customs; a chief tax-gather (publicanus) at Jericho (Luke 19:1-10 ). "The collection of customs at Jericho, which at this time produced and exported a considerable quantity of balsam, was undoubtedly an important post, and would account for Zacchaeus being a rich man. " Being short of stature, he hastened on before the multitude who were thronging about Christ as he passed through Jericho on his way to Jerusalem, and climbed up a sycamore tree that he might be able to see him. At Er-riha (Jericho) there is a large, venerable looking square tower, which goes by the traditional name of the House of Zacchaeus
Achan - The son of Carmi, who disobeyed the strict charge of the Lord, and purloined some of the spoils of Jericho which were doomed to destruction. He was discovered by lot, and stoned with all his family in the valley of Achor, north of Jericho, Joshua 6:18 ; 7:1-26
na'Arath - It appears to have lain between Ataroth and Jericho, in the Jordan valley: Eusebius and Jerome speak of it as if well known to them --"Naorath, a small village of the Jews, five miles from Jericho
Palms, City of - An alternate name for Jericho (Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 1:16 ; Judges 3:13 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 )
Bethelite - ), who rebuilt Jericho and experienced the curse pronounced long before (1 Kings 16:34 )
Jer'Icho - Jericho is first mentioned as the city to which the two spies were sent by Joshua from Shittim. (Joshua 18:21 ) and from this time a long interval elapses before Jericho appears again upon the scene. Its second foundation under Hiel the Bethelite is recorded in (1 Kings 16:34 ) Once rebuilt, Jericho rose again slowly into consequence. (2 Kings 25:5 ; Jeremiah 39:5 ) In the return under Zerubbabel the "children of Jericho," 345 in number, are comprised. If he did not make Jericho his habitual residence, he at last retired thither to die, and it was in the amphitheater of Jericho that the news of his death was announced to the assembled soldiers and people by Salome. Thus Jericho was once more "a city of palms" when our Lord visited it. Finally, between Jerusalem and Jericho was laid the scene of his story of the good Samaritan. The site of ancient (the first) Jericho is placed by Dr. (The village identified with Jericho lies a mile and a half from the ancient site, and is called Riha
Rahab - Operated an inn located in the walls of the city of Jericho. When Joshua sent two spies to survey Jericho in anticipation of the Israelites’ impending invasion of Canaan, they stayed at her inn
Senaah - of Jericho
Abiram - ...
The eldest son of Hiel the Bethelite, who perished prematurely in consequence of his father's undertaking to rebuild Jericho (1Kings 16:34), according to the words of (Joshua 6:26 ). (See Jericho )
a'Chan - (troubler ), an Israelite of the tribe of Judah, who, when Jericho and all that it contained were accursed and devoted to destruction, secreted a portion of the spoil in his tent. For this sin he was stoned to death with his whole family by the people, in a valley situated between Ai and Jericho, and their remains, together with his property, were burnt
Quarantania - A mountain some 1,200 feet high, about 7 miles north-west of Jericho, the traditional scene of our Lord's temptation (Matthew 4:8 )
Beth-Gilgal - ]'>[1] ‘house of Gilgal’), perhaps identical with Gilgal to the east of Jericho
Pisgah - A mountain over against Jericho
Jericho, Plains of - The part of the Jordan valley between the riverand the mountains near Jericho
Rams' Horns - These, as trumpets, are mentioned only at the taking of Jericho, though doubtless they were used at other times
Jericho - Meanwhile a new Jericho had been built on some neighboring site, Judges 3:3 2 Samuel 10:5 . Jericho was also called the "city of palm-trees," Deuteronomy 34:3 Judges 1:16 , and became afterwards flourishing and second in importance only to Jerusalem. ...
The site of Jericho has usually been fixed at Rihah, a mean and foul Arab hamlet of some two hundred inhabitants. Recent travellers, however, show that the probably location of Jericho was two mile west of Rihah, at the mouth of Wady Kelt, and where the road from Jerusalem comes into the plain. On the west and north of Jericho rise high limestone hills, one of which, the dreary Quarantana, 1,200 or 1,500 feet high, derives its name from the modern tradition that it was the scene of our Lord's forty days' fast and temptation. Between the hills and the Jordan lies "the plain of Jericho," Joshua 4:13 , over against "the plains of Moab" east of the river. ...
The road from Jericho to Jerusalem ascends through narrow and rocky passes amid ravines and precipices
a'Chor, Valley of - ( Joshua 7:24,26 ) On the northern boundary of Judah, (Joshua 15:7 ) near Jericho
Achan - In Joshua 7:1 , a Judahite whose theft of a portion of the spoil from Jericho brought divine displeasure and military defeat on the Israelite army. After the battle of Ai, the Lord told Joshua the reason for Israel's defeat was that the ban concerning the spoil of Jericho had been violated (Joshua 7:11 )
Hiel - The Bethelite of Jericho. I refer the reader to those two passages in Scripture, for the short but striking account of this man, whose boldness, in face of the curse Joshua pronounced, led him to so daring an act as that of building Jericho, and whose rashness the Lord so fully punished, in conformity to his servant's prediction
Naarath - Girl, a town on the boundary between Ephraim and Benjamin (Joshua 16:7 ), not far probably from Jericho, to the north (1 Chronicles 7:28 )
Segub - The youngest son of Hiel who rebuilt Jericho
Achor - Valley of, between Jericho and Ai
Adummim - The red ones, a place apparently on the road between Jericho and Jerusalem, "on the south side of the torrent" Wady Kelt, looking toward Gilgal, mentioned Joshua 15:7 ; 18:17 . It was nearly half-way between Jerusalem and Jericho, and now bears the name of Tal-at-ed-Dumm
Shit'Tim - " it was "in the Arboth-moab, by Jordan-Jericho," (Numb 22:1; 26:3; 31:12; 33:48,49 That is to say, it was in the Arabah or Jordan valley, opposite Jericho
Hazezon Tamar - ) Perhaps this was "the city of palm trees" (Judges 1:16) (though Jericho is generally called so: Deuteronomy 34:3), from which the Kenites, the tribe of Moses' father-in-law, went into the wilderness of Judah with the children of Judah. Thus, Balaam standing on a height opposite Jericho, and seeing the western shore of the Dead Sea to Engedi, appropriately speaks of the Kenite as having fixed his "nest" in the cliff there (Numbers 24:21)
Achor - Guthe identifies it with the plain south of Jericho, between the mountains on the west, and Jordan and the Dead Sea on the east. of Jericho, probably formed the boundary between Judah and Benjamin
Abel-Shittim - A town six or seven miles distant from the east bank of the Jordan, opposite to Jericho. The spies whom Joshua sent to Jericho went from Shittim
Bartim us - A blind man whose sight was restored by our Lord, when in the neighborhood of Jericho. According to some writers, our Lord healed one of these (as in Luke) on entering Jericho, and another (Bartimeus, as in Mark) on leaving it; and Matthew has, with characteristic brevity in recording miracles, combined both these in one
Seirath - Woody district; shaggy, a place among the mountains of Ephraim, bordering on Benjamin, to which Ehud fled after he had assassinated Eglon at Jericho (Judges 3:26,27 )
se'Gub -
The youngest son of Hiel the Hethelite who rebuilt Jericho
Bartimaeus - Son of Timaeus, one of the two blind beggars of Jericho (Mark 10:46 ; Matthew 20:30 )
Jericho - (See Deuteronomy 34:3) But we find, in the after days of Israel's history, the barrenness of Jericho spoken of, (2 Kings 2:18-22) See Elisha. There is somewhat particularly striking concerning Jericho being cursed by Joshua before the Lord, and yet that Rahab the harlot should be of this city, concerning whom such blessed things are spoken of in Scripture. (See on the one hand, Joshua 6:26 compared with 1 Kings 16:34; and on the other, see Joshua 2:1-24 with Hebrews 11:31) If the reader will be at the trouble to count the period between Joshua's curse on Jericho, and the rebuilding of Jericho by Hiel the Bethelite, he will find that near five hundred and thirty-seven years had passed between the one and the other. This anathema was carefully remembered by them; and, no doubt, when Hiel in defiance of it began to build Jericho, the pious believers among the Hebrews felt indignant at the daring attempt, and marked the issue in the event that followed on Hiel's two sons
Elisha - The event I refer to, is that of his healing the waters of Jericho. (See 2 Kings 2:19-22) The reader will not forget, that Jericho is the city Joshua cursed before the Lord. (See Joshua 6:26 with 1 Kings 16:34) There evidently appears from this history, the tokens of divine displeasure upon Jericho in the days of Elisha. But I humbly conceive, if by the naughtiness of the water of Jericho, barrenness was induced among the females, there was somewhat in this analogous to the Lord's appointment in Israel concerning the waters of Jealousy. (See Numbers 5:23-31) That the barrenness mentioned of Jericho referred to the sterility of the women, or their miscarriages, which is the same thing in effect, I have no doubt. " It appears then, that amidst all the pleasantness of Jericho, which abounded with palm trees (and, indeed, on that account was called the city of palm trees,) (See 2 Chronicles 28:15) there was still a certain somewhat, unfavourable to that which to the children of Israel (looking forward to the types that the promised seed would be in their lot), was among the most distressing of all calamities, the want of children. This was the state of Jericho. " I have thought it worthwhile to enter into the particulars of this interesting account, concerning the barrenness at Jericho healed by the cruse of salt cast into the spring of the waters, by way of introducing an infinitely more interesting observation on the subject itself. The barrenness of Jericho is healed, and children are born, even in Jericho, when Christ's cruse of grace is applied. A Rahab and harlot is found in Jericho; and Æthiopia, and Seba, and the multitude of isles, shall stretch forth their hands unto God
Bethphage - (Hebrew: house of unripe figs) Village on Mount Olivet, near the road from Jerusalem to Jericho (Luke 19), from which began Our Lord's triumphant entry into Jerusalem (Matthew 21)
Bartimaeus - A blind man whom Jesus, on His way to the last Passover, healed at the gate of Jericho as He was leaving the city, according to Mt. ( Mark 10:46 ), who condense the story of what befell at Jericho; as He approached, according to Lk
Emek-Keziz - A place apparently in the Jordan Valley near Jericho
Jericho - Luke 10:30 (c) In this passage, Jerusalem represents the place of Christian privileges and Jericho represents the way of the world
Jericho - Jericho is to the W. Jericho's men, cattle, and booty were all put under the ban, as being the first town of Canaan which the Lord had given them. The plain was famed for palms and balsams, whence Jericho is called "the city of palms" (Deuteronomy 34:3; Judges 1:16; Judges 3:13; 2 Chronicles 28:15). This accords with Joshua 16:1, "the water of Jericho," and Josephus mentions the fount and the mountain near (B. , stand where once grew Jericho's famous palms. Robbers still infest the road from Jerusalem down (a steep descent) to Jericho, as when Jesus spoke the parable of the good Samaritan (Luke 10:30); Pompey undertook to destroy their strongholds not long before. Moreover, some of the courses of priests lived at Jericho, which harmonizes with the mention of the priest and Levite returning that way from Jerusalem. ...
From mount Pisgah, the peak near the town Nebo, on its western slope (Deuteronomy 34:1), Moses looked "over against Jericho. " Jericho strategically was the key of the land, being situated at the entrance of two passes through the hills, one leading to Jerusalem the other to Ai and Bethel. "By faith the walls of Jericho fell down, after they were compassed about seven days" (whereas sieges often last for years) (Hebrews 11:30). ...
On the seventh day they compassed Jericho seven times, and at the seventh time the priests blew one long blast, the people shouted, and the wall fell flat. Under Elisha a school of prophets resided at Jericho. Of "children of Jericho" 345 returned from Babylon (Ezra 2:34). The distinction between the new and the old towns may solve the seeming discrepancy between Matthew (Matthew 20:30), who makes the miracle on the blind to be when Jesus was leaving Jericho, and Luke, who says it was when Jesus was come nigh unto Jericho (Luke 18:35). ...
The Lord Himself, in whose genealogy Rahab the harlot is found, here was guest of Zacchaeus the publican, a lucrative office in so rich a city as the Roman Jericho was. The Lord's visit to Bethany appropriately follows His parable of the good Samaritan who relieved the man robbed between Jerusalem and Jericho, for Jesus was then traveling from Jericho to Jerusalem, and Bethany was only a little way short of Jerusalem (Luke 10:25; Luke 10:38; John 11:1)
a'Tad - (thorn ), The threshing-floor of, called also Abel-mizraim, ( Genesis 50:10,11 ) afterwards called Beth-hogla, and known to have lain between the Jordan and Jericho, therefore on the west side of Jordan
Achan - Pocketed some of the spoils of Jericho -- despite Joshua’s instructions to take nothing
Rahab - ...
A woman in Jericho...
Before Joshua opened his attack on Canaan, he sent two men to spy out the first city they would meet, Jericho. In Jericho the men met Rahab, a prostitute whose house was attached to the city wall. She protected the spies from the local authorities, and in return asked protection for herself and her family when the Israelites attacked Jericho (Joshua 2:1-14; Hebrews 11:31). As a result the Israelites preserved her and her family when Jericho fell, and accepted them into Israel as part of the nation (Joshua 2:15-24; Joshua 6:17; Joshua 6:22-25; James 2:25)
Beth-Hoglah - The Ain Hajla, "fount of Hoglah," on the road from Jericho, near the Jordan, marks the site
Naaran, Naarath - Some early writers place it five miles from Jericho, and some identify it with ruins at el Aujah et Tahtani, 31 57' N, 35 28' E
Beth-Arabah - A place in the Jericho plain, apparently north of Beth-hoglah, in the ‘wilderness
Beth-Hog'la - (Joshua 18:19,21 ) A magnificent spring and a ruin between Jericho and the Jordan still bear the names of Ainhajala
Cherith - The popular identification of Cherith with the Wady Kelt between Jerusalem and Jericho is unwarranted
Nahaliel - A station in the journey from the Arnon to Jericho ( Numbers 21:19 ), either Wâdy Waleh , a N
Segub - Died when Hiel set up the gates of accursed Jericho, as Joshua foretold (Joshua 6:26; 1 Kings 16:34)
hi'el - (God liveth ), a native of Bethel, who rebuilt Jericho in the reign of Ahab, ( 1 Kings 16:34 ) (B
Nimrah - It has been identified with the Nahr Nimrin, at one of the fords of Jordan, not far from Jericho
Beth-Hoglah - It is probably modern Ain Hajlah four miles southeast of Jericho
Seirath - ...
Where Ehud fled after murdering Eglon, and gathered Israel to attack the Moabites at Jericho
Jes'ui - (even, level ), the son of Asher, whose descendants the Jesuites were numbered in the plains of Moab at the Jordan of Jericho
Jericho - Moses calls it the city of palm trees, Deuteronomy 34:3 , because of palm trees growing in the plain of Jericho. The valley of Jericho was watered by a rivulet which had been formerly salt and bitter, but was sweetened by the Prophet Elisha, 2 Kings 2:19 . Jericho was the first city in Canaan taken by Joshua, Joshua 2:1-2 , &c. He sent thither spies, who were received by Rahab, lodged in her house, and preserved from the king of Jericho. Joshua received orders to besiege Jericho, soon after his passage over Jordan, Joshua 6:1-3 , &c. Jericho being devoted by God, they set fire to the city, and consecrated all the gold, silver, and brass. Then Joshua said, "Cursed be the man before the Lord who shall rebuild Jericho. However, we are not to imagine that there was no city of Jericho till the time of Hiel. There was a city of palm trees, probably the same as Jericho, under the Judges, Judges 3:13 . David's ambassadors, who had been insulted by the Ammonites, resided at Jericho till their beards were grown, 2 Samuel 10:4 . There was, therefore, a city of Jericho which stood in the neighbourhood of the original Jericho. After Hiel of Bethel had rebuilt old Jericho, no one scrupled to dwell there. Our Saviour wrought miracles at Jericho. The hills nearest to Jerusalem consist, according to Hasselquist, of a very hard limestone; and different sorts of plants are found on them, in particular the myrtle, the carob tree, and the turpentine tree; but farther toward Jericho they are bare and barren, the hard limestone giving way to a looser kind, sometimes white and sometimes grayish, with interjacent layers of a reddish micaceous stone, saxum purum micaceum. "...
The modern village of Jericho is described by Mr
Abelmizraim - It lay in the plain of Jericho, between that city and the Jordan
Naaran - Probably NAARATH or Naarah, a southern landmark of Ephraim (Joshua 16:7), between Ataroth and Jericho, in one of the torrent beds leading down from the Bethel highlands to the Jordan valley
Water - The heat of summer and many mouths of drought necessitated also appliances for storing and conveying water; and remains still exist of the (See POOLS of Solomon situated near Bethlehem, and of the aqueduct near Jericho which was constructed by the Romans
Bartimaeus - (bahr tih mawee' uhss) or BARTIMEUS (KJV) Blind beggar on highway near Jericho who asked Jesus for mercy despite crowd's efforts to silence him
Ascent of Blood - The steep road from Jericho to Jerusalem, so called, according to Jerome, from the deeds of the brigands who infested t (cf
Hiel - God liveth, a Bethelite, who rebuilt Jericho in despite of the woe denounced five hundred years before, Joshua 6:26
Jericho - ) writes to the king of Egypt informing him that the 'Abiri (Hebrews) had prevailed, and had taken the fortress of Jericho, and were plundering "all the king's lands. "Children of Jericho" were among the captives who returned under Zerubbabel Ezra 2:34 ; Nehemiah 7:36 ). ...
In New Testament times Jericho stood some distance to the south-east of the ancient one, and near the opening of the valley of Achor. ...
The poor hamlet of er-Riha, the representative of modern Jericho, is situated some two miles farther to the east. The climate of Jericho is exceedingly hot and unhealthy. " ...
There were three different Jerichos, on three different sites, the Jericho of Joshua, the Jericho of Herod, and the Jericho of the Crusades. Er-Riha, the modern Jericho, dates from the time of the Crusades
Abiram - Joshua having destroyed the city of Jericho, pronounced this curse: "Cursed be the man, before the Lord, that riseth up and buildeth this city, Jericho: he shall lay the foundation thereof in his first-born, and in his youngest son shall he set up the gates of it," Joshua 6:26 . Hiel of Bethel, about five hundred and thirty-seven years after this imprecation, having undertaken to rebuild Jericho, whilst he was laying the foundation of it, lost his eldest son, Abiram, 1 Kings 16:34 ; and Segub, the youngest, when they set up the gates of it; a remarkable instance of a prophetic denunciation fulfilled, perhaps on a person who would not credit the tradition, or the truth of the prediction
Jericho - Jericho (jĕr'i-kô), city of the moon, or place of fragrance. As Jericho was the first city that was taken, on the west of the Jordan, the ban was laid on all the property in it. The later Jericho appears to have occupied the site of the miserable and filthy village, Er-Riha, nearly two miles from the fountain. The road between Jerusalem and Jericho still retains its ancient character for scenes of assault and robbery
Segub - The youngest son of Hiel who re-built Jericho ( 1 Kings 16:34 )
Zemaraim - It is generally identified with es-Sumra to the north of Jericho
Bethpeor - of Jordan, over against Jericho; in Reuben's possession, Joshua 13:20
Beth-Arabah - It may be modern Ain el-Gharbah southeast of Jericho
Naarah - of Jericho
Shittim - The scene of the sin with the Midianites, and of its terrible punishment, Numbers 25:1-18; Numbers 31:1-12; the sending forth of the spies to Jericho; and the final preparation before crossing the Jordan
Sen'a-ah - ) The Magdal Senna of Eusebius and Jerome denotes a town seven miles north of Jericho ("Senna")
Abiram - The firstborn son of Hiel the Bethelite, who died when his father rebuilt Jericho ( 1 Kings 16:34 )
Abel-Shit'Tim - (the meadow of the acacias ), in the "plains" of Moab, on the low level of the Jordan valley, opposite Jericho
Bethnimrah - The wady Shoaib (possibly the modern form of Hobab) discharges its waters into the Jordan near a ford above Jericho. That this is the scene of John 1:28; Mark 1:5; Matthew 3:5, appears from there being abundant water, and its being near "the region round about Jordan," the CICCAR of the Old Testament, the oasis of Jericho, accessible to "Jerusalem and all Judea
Zaccheus - Just, from the Hebrew Zaccai, Nehemiah 7:14 , a worthy tax-gatherer at Jericho, who in order to see Christ took a position in a sycamore-tree, by which He was about to pass. ...
The "house of Zaccheus" now shown on the plain of Jericho is probably the remnant of a fort built in the tenth century, or even more recently
Achor - Trouble, a valley north of Jericho; so called, perhaps, from the troubles occasioned by the sin of Achan, who was here put to death, Joshua 7:26
Mount Pisgah - This is the same as Nebo, for the word Pisgah only means hill or top, from Pasag; so that Nebo, Pisgah, and Abarim, are one and the same, near mount Peor, over against Jericho, in the country of Moab
Eglon - He made Jericho his seat of government, and held his power eighteen years, but was then slain by Ehud, and his people expelled, Judges 3:12-31
Beth-Peor - , "temple of Baal-peor", a place in Moab, on the east of Jordan, opposite Jericho
Balm - It was cultivated near Jericho and the Dead Sea, in Josephus" time. " A balsamic oil, the modern "balsam of Jericho," is extracted from the kernels of the zuckum thorn bush, a kind of elaeagnus , in the region about the Dead Sea; but this cannot be the tree. The balm was so scarce, the Jericho gardens yielding but six or seven gallons yearly, that it was worth twice its weight in silver. Titus had to fight two battles near the Jericho balsam groves, to prevent the Jews destroying them in despair
Royal City - Gibeon (Joshua 10:2 ) was compared in size and strength to cities with kings, such as Ai and Jericho
Segub - Second son of Hiel, whose death during rebuilding of Jericho showed power of God's prophecy through the centuries (1 Kings 16:34 )
Beth-Merhak - No town so called is known between Jerusalem and Jericho
Nebo, Mount - It was opposite Jericho
Beth-Aram - , "mountain-house", one of the towns of Gad, 3 miles east of Jordan, opposite Jericho (Joshua 13:27 )
Mozah - ” City in Benjamin (Joshua 18:26 ), later a center for pottery production as attested by numerous vessels recovered at Jericho and tell-en-Nasbeh bearing the inscription Mozah on their handles
Bethphage - The place whence Christ, on the road from Jericho to Jerusalem, sent His disciples to fetch the ass ( Matthew 21:1 , Mark 11:1 , Luke 19:29 )
Beth-Hoglah - Robinson traced this name at a place three miles from the mouth of the Jordan, on the way to Jericho; here was a fine grove, watered by a sweet and limpid fountain the best in the valley of the Jordan
Jericho - ...
The capture of the city was altogether of God, after it had been compassed six days by the people, accompanied by the ark and the priests blowing the trumpets: in that way they proclaimed the rights of the Lord of all the earth to the land, while Jericho was the fortress of the enemy. ...
Jericho was allotted to Benjamin, Joshua 18:21 ; but later was taken possession of by Eglon the king of Moab. Some who returned from exile are described as 'children of Jericho. ...
But little more is known of Jericho until Antony gave its palm groves and balsam gardens to Cleopatra; from her the place was rented by Herod the Great, who had a palace there, and it was there he died. ...
The Ain es Sultan, 31 52' N, 35 27' E , is held to be the fountain healed by Elisha, and the ruins around mark the site of the ancient city, five miles from the Jordan; but this is not the site of the Jericho of N. times, which may or may not agree with the situation of the miserable village of Eriha, which is sometimes called Jericho: it is a mile and a half S
Adummim - A border town of Benjamin and Judah, not far from Jericho of the road to Jerusalem
Beth-Phage - House of the unripe fig, a village on the Mount of Olives, on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho (Matthew 21:1 ; Mark 11:1 ; Luke 19:29 ), and very close to Bethany
Shittim - ) "secretly" to "view" the land and Jericho (Joshua 2:1 )
Spoil - Except when forbidden by God, as in the case of Jericho, it was considered a lawful prize; and it was thus the Israelites suffered when their cities were captured by their enemies
Hiel - Native of Bethel who rebuilt Jericho in the reign of Ahab
Abiram - Son of Hiel sacrificed in foundation of rebuilt Jericho, fulfilling Joshua's warning (1 Kings 16:34 )
Adum'Mim - (the going up to ), a rising ground or pass over against Gilgal," and "on the south side of the 'torrent'" ( Joshua 15:7 ; 18:17 ) which is the position still occupied by the road leading up from Jericho and the Jordan valley to Jerusalem, on the south face of the gorge of the Wady Kelt
Acrabatene - a district of Judaea, extending between Shechem (now Napolose) and Jericho, inclining east
Rose - The rose is not mentioned in the Bible, but in the apocryphal Ecclesiasticus (Sirach 24:14), "I (wisdom) was as a rose plant in Jericho. " "The rose of Jericho" is not a rose, but the Αnastatica Ηierochuntina
Bartimeus - Son of Timeus, a blind man, to whom Christ gave sight, by the wayside near Jericho, Matthew 20. There is an apparent disagreement as to the time of the occurrence, which has led some to suppose there were two causes at different times, one as Christ entered Jericho and the other as he left it
Zacchae'us - (pure ), a tax-collector near Jericho, who, being short in stature climbed up into a sycamore tree in order to obtain a sight of Jesus as he passed through that place. " The term which designates his office -"the chief among the publicans" -is unusual, but describes him, no doubt, as the superintendent of customs or tribute in the district of Jericho, where he lived
Window - From them the spies at Jericho were let down, and Paul at Damascus (Joshua 2:15; 2 Corinthians 11:33)
Abarim - The mountain range is in Moab, east of the Dead Sea, west of Heshbon and southeast of Jericho
Beth-Nim'Rah - The name still survives in the modern Nahr Nimrim, above Jericho on the Jordan
Jericho - Jericho . Bacchides, the general of the Syrians in the Maccabæan period, captured and fortified Jericho ( 1Ma 9:50 ); Aristobulus also took it (Jos. In the Gospels Jericho figures in the stories of Bartimæus ( Matthew 20:29 , Mark 10:46 , Luke 18:35 ), Zacchæus ( Luke 19:1 ), and the Good Samaritan ( Luke 10:30 ). ...
The modern er-Rîha is not exactly on the site of ancient Jericho, which is a collection of mounds beside the spring traditionally associated with Elisha. The district round Jericho is the personal property of the Sultan
Abarim - Mountains east of the Dead Sea and the lower Jordan, "over against Jericho," within the territory of Moab and the tribe of Reuben
Beth-Jeshimoth - from opposite Jericho, on the Dead Sea
Kinah - A Kenite settlement made directly after the fall of Jericho (Judges 1:16)
Zemaraim - of Jericho, or es Sumrah (Robinson)
Adummim - ” A rocky pass on the road descending from Jerusalem to Jericho located at modern Talcat ed-damm
Abel-Shittim - Meadow of the acacias, frequently called simply "Shittim" (Numbers 25:1 ; Joshua 2:1 ; Micah 6:5 ), a place on the east of Jordan, in the plain of Moab, nearly opposite Jericho
Abel-Shittim - Identified with Ghor es-Seisaban , east of the Jordan, opposite Jericho
Abelshittim - It was nearly opposite to Jericho
a'Bel-Mizra'im - It was near Jericho, or perhaps Hebron
Cherith - ” A wadi or brook east of the Jordan River, the modern wadi Qilt south of Jericho
Pis'Gah - (32:49) with Deuteronomy 34:1 It lay on the east of Jordan contiguous to the field of Moab, and immediately opposite Jericho
Baal (2) - It is a Canaanite not Hebrew term: applied to the men of Jericho while Canaanites (Joshua 24:11), "the men (baliy , possessors, occupants) of Jericho
Cherith - It has by some been identified as the Wady el-Kelt behind Jericho, which is formed by the junction of many streams flowing from the mountains west of Jericho
Bethany - A village about 15 stadia (2910 yards or about 1⅝ mile) from Jerusalem ( John 11:18 ) on the road from Jericho, close to Bethphage and on the Mount of Olives ( Mark 11:1 , Luke 19:29 ). of the Mount of Olives beside the Jericho road
Abel-Shittim - ) In the plains of Moab, the "Arboth Moab by Jordan Jericho," on the level of the Jordan, in contrast to "the fields" on the higher land. That is to say, it was in the Arabah or Jordan valley opposite Jericho, at that part which belonged to Moab, where the streams from the eastern mountains flourished many acacias
Zemaraim -
A town of Benjamin (Joshua 18:22 ); now the ruin, rather two ruins, es-Sumrah, 4 miles north of Jericho
Hiel - , fortified) Jericho some seven hundred years after its destruction by the Israelites
Adummim - The Ascent of ( Joshua 15:7 ; Joshua 18:17 ), is the steep pass in which the road ascends from Jericho to Jerusalem
Eglon - He formed an alliance with the Ammonites and Amalekites, and took possession of Jericho, where he resided, and where he was afterward assassinated, by Ehud
ab'Arim - (regions beyond ), a mountain or range of highlands on the east of the Jordan, in the land of Moab, facing Jericho, and forming the eastern wall of the Jordan valley at that part
Adummim - The name of a dangerous or mountainous part of the road between Jerusalem and Jericho, about four miles from the latter place
Oded - Thus they conducted them to Jericho, 2 Chronicles 28:9 , etc
Rahab - When the Hebrews were encamped at Shittim, in the "Arabah" or Jordan valley opposite Jericho, ready to cross the river, Joshua, as a final preparation, sent out two spies to "spy the land. They had been exposed to danger in Jericho, and had been saved by the fidelity of Rahab the harlot, to whose house they had gone for protection. When the city of Jericho fell (6:17-25), Rahab and her whole family were preserved according to the promise of the spies, and were incorporated among the Jewish people
Zaretan - ...
The name and site did not originate from Christian tradition, for this makes the fords of Jericho the scene of John's baptisms (John 1:28). Christ could not possibly have traveled in one day (John 2:1) John 2:80 miles from the vicinity of Jericho to Cana; but He could easily have traveled 22 miles from the ford Abarah to Kerr Kenna (Cana); no place on Jordan is nearer or more accessible to Cana. If with oldest manuscripts we read "Bethany," John 1:28, the name will connect itself with Bashan and Batanaea, and the 'Abarah ford is near the hills of Bashan, whereas the Jericho fords are far away
Ai - called by the LXX, Gai, by Josephus, Aina, and by others Ajah, a town of Palestine, situate west of Bethel, and at a small distance north-west of Jericho. The three thousand men, first sent by Joshua to reduce this city, were repulsed, on account of the sin of Achan, who had violated the anathema pronounced against Jericho, by appropriating a part of the spoil. After the expiation of this offence, the whole army of Israel marched against Ai, with orders to treat that city as Jericho had been treated, with this difference, that the plunder was to be given to the army
Region Round About - In Matthew 3:5 and Luke 3:3; Luke 7:17, the populous region containing Jericho, etc
Pisgah - ), and was said to be 'over against Jericho
Abel-Shittim - a city situate in the plains of Moab, beyond Jordan, opposite to Jericho, Numbers 25:1 , &c
Nah'Shon, - His sister, Elisheba, was wife to Aaron, and his son, Salmon, was husband to Rahab after the taking of Jericho
Bethab'Ara - ( John 1:28 ) If this reading be correct, Bethabara is identical with Beth-barah (fords of Abarah ) the ancient ford of Jordan on the road to Gilead; or, which seems more likely, with Beth-nimrah, on the east of the river, nearly opposite Jericho
Balm - In the time of Josephus it was cultivated in the neighbourhood of Jericho and the Dead Sea. There is an Arab tradition that the tree yielding this balm was brought by the queen of Sheba as a present to Solomon, and that he planted it in his gardens at Jericho
Gilgal - Josephus places this Gilgal 10 furlongs from Jericho and 50 from the Jordan: Jerome had it pointed out 2 miles from Jericho
Nebo - It is a summit of the range Abarim, "over against Jericho. Travelers do not observe any very prominent summit in the rage immediately opposite Jericho; but it has not yet fully explored, Deuteronomy 32:49 34:1-12
Abiram - Hiel laid the foundation of Jericho in Abiram his first-born, and thus fulfilled the first part of the prophecy by Joshua
Eglon - King of the Moabites, who, aided by Ammon and Amalek, crossed the Jordan and captured the city of palm trees, or Jericho, and ruled over Israel eighteen years
Enshemesh - Now Ain Haud or Chot, "the well of the apostles," a mile below Bethany on the way from Jerusalem to Jericho
Abarim - , on the east of Jordan, a mountain, or rather a mountain-chain, over against Jericho, to the east and south-east of the Dead Sea, in the land of Moab
Achan, Achar - Son of Carmi, of the tribe of Judah, who on the fall of Jericho kept some of its spoil, against the express command of Jehovah, hence called 'the accursed thing,' and was stoned to death with his family, and with his possessions burned with fire
Abarim - Abarim (ăb'a-rĭm or a-bä'rim), mountains beyond, or of the fords, a range of mountains east of the river Jordan, in the land of Moab, opposite Jericho
Cherith - Robinson and several others identify it with Wady Kelt, a swift, brawling stream, 20 yards wide and three feet deep, running into the Jordan from the west, a little south of Jericho
Adummim - It lies in the road between Jerusalem and Jericho, and agrees with the parable of the good Samaritan in being a descent from Jerusalem, and was until lately a dangerous road, infested with robbers
Gil'Gal - ( Joshua 5:10 ) It was "in the east border of Jericho," apparently on a hillock or rising ground, (Joshua 5:3 ) comp. Joshua 5:9 In the Arboth-Jericho (Authorized Version "the plains"), that is, the hot depressed district of the Ghor which lay between the town and the Jordan. Gilgal near Jericho is doubtless intended
Hobab - ), and should be rendered "brother-in-law," as in the RSV His descendants followed Israel to Canaan (Numbers 10:29 ), and at first pitched their tents near Jericho, but afterwards settled in the south in the borders of Arad (Judges 1:8-11,16 )
en-Shemesh - , the "well of the apostles" about a mile east of Bethany, the only spring on the road to Jericho
Ramath-Mizpeh - It has been identified with the modern es-Salt, where the roads from Jericho and from Shechem to Damascus unite, about 25 miles east of the Jordan and 13 south of the Jabbok
Brook of the Arabah - More likely, it is either the wadi el-Qelt, flowing from Jericho to the west, or the wadi el-Kefren from the northern end of the Dead Sea flowing to the east
Abarim - Deuteronomy 32:49,50 , shows that mount Nebo was connected with Abarim and that it was 'over against Jericho' and also that it was where Moses viewed the land and died
Jehizkiah - Jehizkiah and his noble helpers shod and clothed the naked, gave them to eat and drink, and carried all the feeble on donkeys to Jericho, on their way back to Judah (2 Chronicles 28:15)
Zaccheus - ” A corrupt tax collector in first-century Jericho (Luke 19:2-9 )
Zemaraim - Some would place the town at khirbet es-Samra four miles north of Jericho
Judaea Wilderness of - The traditional scene of the temptation of Christ is in this district, on a high mountain behind Jericho, very desolate, and now infested with beasts and reptiles
Treasury - A part of the temple was called 'the treasury,' in which were kept things consecrated to Jehovah, as the gold, silver, and vessels of brass and iron captured from Jericho
Achan - A man of the tribe of Judah, who at the sacking of Jericho took, contrary to God's express command, a portion of the spoil
Bethany - A village on the eastern slope of Mount Olivet, about one and a half to two miles ("15 furlongs") east of Jerusalem, John 11:18, toward Jericho; the home of Mary and Martha, whither Jesus often went
Shittim - The name of the last encampment of the Israelites, on the east of the Jordan opposite Jericho. ), and from there Joshua sent out the spies to Jericho ( Joshua 2:1 ; Joshua 3:1 )
Beth'Any - 1 1/2 or 2 miles) from Jerusalem (John 11:18 ) on or near the usual road From Jericho to the city, (Luke 19:29 ) comp. It lies on the eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, fully a mile beyond the summit, and not very far from the point at which the road to Jericho begins its more sudden descent towards the Jordan valley
Beth'Any - 1 1/2 or 2 miles) from Jerusalem (John 11:18 ) on or near the usual road From Jericho to the city, (Luke 19:29 ) comp. It lies on the eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, fully a mile beyond the summit, and not very far from the point at which the road to Jericho begins its more sudden descent towards the Jordan valley
Arabah - The Araboth of Jericho or plains of Jericho represent the area near the Jordan once dominated by the city state of Jericho
Rahab (1) - The harlot of Jericho who received Joshua's spies. Jericho, near the fords of Jordan, would be an emporium between Phoenicia and Babylon and Egypt. Her deceiving the king of Jericho and saying they had "gone she knew not where" is not commended in Scripture, but only the faith which was the mainspring of her conduct. ) Next, she told them of the panic which Israel's advance caused among her countrymen, and obtained from them the promise that when Israel took Jericho she and her father, mother, brethren, and sisters, and all of the household, should be saved; the scarlet line by which they were let down from her window in the wall was the pledge, placed in the window. precipitously) bounding the Jericho plain on the N. Joshua faithfully kept the promise to her at the destruction of Jericho, causing the two spies to bring out Rahab and all her kindred from her house, which was under the protection of the scarlet line. Possibly the 345 "children of Jericho" were posterity of her kindred, settled in Israel (Ezra 2:34; Nehemiah 3:2). Believing knowledge of God's purpose concerning Israel and Jericho made her renounce the lower duty, patriotism, for the higher one, piety; she could only have been faithful to her country by unfaithfulness to her God
Ford - Of the numerous ‘fords’ or passages of the Jordan, two in ancient times were of chief importance: that opposite Jericho near Gilgal ( Joshua 2:7 , Judges 3:28 ), and that at Bethabara (mod
Adam (2) - Kurn Surtabeh was more than 15 miles from Jericho, which tallies with the words "very far from the city Adam
na'Ioth - In its corrected from the name signifies "habitations," and probably means the huts or dwellings of a school or college of prophets over which Samuel presided as Elisha did over those at Gilgal and Jericho
e'Hud - (Nehemiah 9:27 ) As a Benjamite he was specially chosen to destroy Eglon, who had established himself in Jericho, which was included in the boundaries of that tribe
Gilgal - A celebrated place between the Jordan and Jericho, where the Israelites first encamped, after the passage of that river; where also they were circumcised, and kept their first Passover in Canaan, Joshua 4:19 5:9,10 . According to Josephus, it lay within two miles of Jericho
Michmash - of Jerusalem; on the northern edge of the wady Suweinit, the main pass between the central highlands where Michmash stands and the Jordan valley at Jericho. ) The Philistines swarmed up from their seacoast plain, and occupied Michmash so that Saul had to retire to Gilgal near Jericho. of Michmash on the old road from Jericho into the interior, and so the first stronghold Joshua would have to overcome
Keziz - of the Jordan, between the base of the hills and the Dead Sea) is named from it; from kaatsats "to cut"; from the timber cut down in the large groves that anciently grew near Jericho and the Jordan and in the plain
Zeboim - It was probably the ravine now bearing the name Wady Shakh-ed-Dub'a, or "ravine of the hyena," north of Jericho
Beth-Jeshimoth - It is usually located at modern tell el-Azeme, twelve miles southeast of Jericho
Beth-Jeshimoth - of Jericho
Fords - There was and is still a ford constantly used near Jericho
Zeboim, Valley of - The path from Jericho to Mukhmas (Michmash) runs up a gorge called by an exactly equivalent name, Shuk ed Dubba, "ravine of the hyena" (1 Samuel 13:18)
Achor, Valley of - The valley was between Jericho and Ai, on the border of the tribe of Judah
Bethabara - or BETHBARAH, signifies in the Hebrew a place of passage, because of its ford over the river Jordan, on the east bank of which river it stood over against Jericho, Joshua 2:7 ; Joshua 3:15-16
Achor - A valley near Jericho, where Achan was stoned; and from the trouble Achan brought upon Israel it had its name
Bethany - A village on the eastern slope of the Mount Olivet, about two miles east-south-east of Jerusalem, and on the road to Jericho
Gib'Eon - (hill city ), one of the four , cities of the Hivites, the inhabitants of which made a league with Joshua, ( Joshua 9:3-15 ) and thus escaped the fate of Jericho and Ai
Harlot - The most famous harlot in the Bible is Rahab of Jericho, who saved the Israelite spies sent by Joshua to scout out the Promised Land (Joshua 2:1 ). Israel spared her and her family when they conquered and destroyed Jericho
Iim - Abarim, ("farther regions or coast regions"), namely, the hills facing Jericho, the whole upland E
Window - The spies in Jericho and Paul at Damascus were let down from the windows of houses abutting on the town wall (Joshua 2:15 ; 2 co 11:33 )
Nahshon - Salmon his son married Rahab after the fall of Jericho
Barley - The barley harvest ( Ruth 1:22 ) precedes that of wheat: it begins around Jericho as early as March, and in Jerusalem and the neighbourhood at the end of May
Geliloth - This last was probably in the neighbourhood of Tal‘ at ed-dum , a hill near the so-called ‘Inn of the Good Samaritan’ on the carriage road to Jericho
Captain - For he it was, most probably, that Joshua saw in vision, long before his incarnation, before the walls of Jericho, as captain of the Lord's host, and before whom Joshua fell on his face
Zacchaeus - The Lord Jesus had received Bartimaeus' application on the day of His entry into Jericho. (See BARTIMAEUS; Jericho . Later in His progress, when He had passed through Jericho and had healed the blind, He met Zacchaeus, chief among the publicans or tax gatherers, i. superintendent of customs and tribute in the district of Jericho famed for its balsam, and so rich. ...
The palm groves of Jericho and its balsam gardens (now no longer existing) were so valuable that Antony gave them as a source of revenue to Cleopatra, and Herod the Great redeemed them for his benefit. A Zaachaeus lived at Jericho at this time, father of the celebrated Rabbi Jochanan ben Zachai
ne'bo - (32:41; 34:1) It is described as in the land of Moab, facing Jericho; the head or summit of a mountain called Pisgah, which again seems to have formed a portion of the general range of Abarim. "It overlooks the mouth of the Jordan, over against Jericho," (34:1) and the gentle slopes of its sides may well answer to the "field of Zophim
ne'bo - (32:41; 34:1) It is described as in the land of Moab, facing Jericho; the head or summit of a mountain called Pisgah, which again seems to have formed a portion of the general range of Abarim. "It overlooks the mouth of the Jordan, over against Jericho," (34:1) and the gentle slopes of its sides may well answer to the "field of Zophim
Bartimaeus - —Named only in Mark 10:46-52, where he is described as a blind beggar who was cured by Jesus as He left Jericho on His last journey to Jerusalem. Mark that the miracle took place on the Lord’s departure from Jericho, speaks of two blind men as having been healed; but St. Matthew combines the cure of one blind man at the entrance into Jericho (so St. Luke) with the cure of another at the departure from Jericho (so St. Mark), or that Bartimaeus, begging at the gate, became aware of Jesus’ entrance into the city, and, seeking out a blind companion, along with him intercepted the Saviour the next day as He was leaving Jericho, and was then healed
Guest - Jesus outraged those in Jericho by being a guest at the home of Zachaeus, a well-known sinner (Luke 19:7 )
Bethphage - ("house of unripe figs"): testifying the former fertility which no longer remains; a village on the mount of Olives, on the road between Jericho and Jerusalem
Pisgah - ' Mountain in the Abarim range across the Jordan River from Jericho
Bethphage - ” A small village located on the Mount of Olives near Bethany on or near the road between Jerusalem and Jericho
Adummim - The road still passes the same way, leading up from Jericho (four miles off) and the Jordan valley to Jerusalem, eight miles distant, S
Adjure - Joshua adjured them at that time, saying, cursed be the man before the Lord, that riseth up and buildeth this city of Jericho
Achan - He rejected GOD's word about the property of Jericho which belonged to GOD, and took some of it to enrich himself
Rahab - A woman of Jericho, who received and concealed two Hebrew spies
Gilgal - ...
...
The place in "the plains of Jericho," "in the east border of Jericho," where the Israelites first encamped after crossing the Jordan (Joshua 4:19,20 )
Fort, Fortification - The oldest fortifications in Israel are at Jericho, where a Neolithic stone tower and part of a wall have been dated to 7,000 B. Beginning in the Early Bronze Age mudbrick walls, towers, and gates were built on stone foundations at Ai, Arad, Beth Yerah, Gezer, Jericho, Megiddo, and elsewhere
Wall - ...
The walls of Jericho are mentioned in Hebrews 11:30 (cf. The recent excavations of Sellin, following previous surveys of other explorers, enable us to trace the history of Jericho, both in OT times and in the time of Christ. The walls, outer and inner, of the Canaanite Jericho have now been laid bare for a considerable part of their circuit, and much insight has been gained into the life of the ancient city. The remains of the Roman or Herodian Jericho are a mile or two south of the ancient city
Jor'Dan - There were fords over against Jericho, to which point the men of Jericho pursued the spies. (Genesis 32:10 ) Jordan was next crossed, over against Jericho, by Joshua. Still Bethshan and Jericho to the west, Gerasa, Pella and Gadara to the east of it were important cities, and caused a good deal of traffic between the two opposite banks
Accursed - ...
Joshua 6:18 (c) In this passage all that was in the city of Jericho belonged to GOD
Jeshimon - of Jericho, near the Dead Sea
Rahab - The story of this woman, called a harlot, of Jericho is given in Joshua 2:1-24 . The two spies sent out by Joshua to view the Promised Land come first to the house of Rahab, in Jericho. After their pursuers have left, Rahab comes to them, professes her belief in Jahweh, and adjures them to spare her and her kinsfolk when the attack on Jericho is made; this they promise shall be done; and after arranging that a scarlet thread is to be hung from her window, in order to denote which house is to be spared when the sack of the city takes place, the two spies escape from her house by a rope ( Joshua 2:1-24 )
Zacchaeus - A ‘chief publican’ of Jericho who entertained our Lord ( Luke 19:1-10 )
Eglon - Having entered into an alliance with Ammon and Amalek, he overran the trans-Jordanic region, and then crossing the Jordan, seized on Jericho, the "city of palm trees," which had been by this time rebuilt, but not as a fortress
Sycamore - At Jericho, Zacchaeus climbed a sycomore-tree to see Jesus as he passed by (Luke 19:4 )
Achan - On the occasion of the fall of Jericho, he seized, contrary to the divine command, an ingot of gold, a quantity of silver, and a costly Babylonish garment, which he hid in his tent
Bethany - The 'house of dates,' a village on the eastern slope of the Mount of Olives, about 2 miles from Jerusalem, near the road to Jericho
Abelmizraim - The inhabitants of the land being called Canaanites also points to the west; and it is remarkable that Jerome uses a similar expression in 'trans-Jordanem,' and then states that ATAD, which is the same place, was between the Jordan and Jericho
Eglon - With Amalekites and Ammonites crossed the Jordan and took Jericho the city of palmtrees, left unwalled, and therefore an easy prey to the foe, because of Joshua's curse in destroying it 60 years before. Ehud, a young Israelite of Jericho, gained his favor by a present (or in Keil's view presented the king tribute, as in 2 Samuel 8:2; 2 Samuel 8:6, "gifts" mean), and after dismissing its bearers turned again from "the graven images," or else stone quarries, where he had temporarily withdrawn from the king's reception room, and was cordially admitted by the king into his private summer parlor or cooling apartment
Pisgah - of Jordan, near "the field of Moab, opposite Jericho. It is "over against Jericho," and the view corresponds
Engedi - This city, according to Josephus, stood near the lake of Sodom, three hundred furlongs from Jerusalem, not far from Jericho, and the mouth of the river Jordan, through which it discharged itself into the Dead Sea. Clarke has described similar retreats in the rocks near Bethlehem; others, between Jerusalem and Jericho, are mentioned by Mr
Nicolas Poussin - The Louvre has many of his canvases, among them The Finding of Moses; Eliezer and Rebecca, and The Blind Men of Jericho
Shittim - a large area in Moab directly across the Jordan from Jericho and northeast of the Dead Sea
Girgashites - ]'>[2] ], Joshua 3:10 ; Jos 24:11 , 1 Chronicles 1:14 , Nehemiah 9:8 ), affords no indication of their position, or to what branch of the Canaanites they belonged, except in two instances, namely, Genesis 10:16 , where the ‘Girgashite’ is given as the name of the fifth son of Canaan; and Joshua 24:11 , where the Girgashites would seem to have inhabited the tract on the west of Jordan, the Israelites having been obliged to cross over that river in order to fight the men of Jericho, among whom were the Girgashites
Cistern, - On the long-forgotten way from Jericho to Bethel, "broken cisterns" of high antiquity are found at regular intervals
Anathema - Thus Jericho, Joshua 6:17-21 , and Achan were accursed, Joshua 7:1-25
Ehud - After the death of Othniel the people again fell into idolatry, and Eglon, the king of Moab, uniting his bands with those of the Ammonites and the Amalekites, crossed the Jordan and took the city of Jericho, and for eighteen years held that whole district in subjection, exacting from it an annual tribute
Atad - of Jordan, as Jerome identifies it with Beth Hogla (the house of gyratory dances, or movements attendant on the funeral ceremony), known to lie between the Jordan and Jericho
Ehud - Israel's "deliverer," under God, from the Moabite Eglon who had crossed the Jordan westward, and seized Jericho, in Ehud's tribe, Benjamin (Judges 3:9; Judges 3:12-30; Nehemiah 9:27, "saviors"
Dehir - A place on the northern border of Judah, behind Jericho
Achan - the son of Carmi, of the tribe of Judah, who having taken a part of the spoils of Jericho, against the injunction of God, who had accursed or devoted the whole city, was, upon being taken by lot, doomed to be stoned to death
Ptol'Emee, - He was a man of great wealth, and being invested with the government of the district of Jericho, formed the design of usurping the sovereignty of Judea
Jordan - There were fords opposite Jericho, to which the men of Jericho pursued the spies. Jordan was next crossed, over against Jericho, by Joshua
Bethany - ...
...
A village on the south-eastern slope of the Mount of Olives ( Mark 11:1 ), about 2 miles east of Jerusalem, on the road to Jericho
Nebo (1) - As Nebo "faced Jericho," and "the ravine of Moses' burying place in Moab faced Beth-Peor," Attarus suggested by Seetzen is too far S
Wayside - —Two blind men sat by the wayside begging, as Jesus left Jericho on His way to Jerusalem (Matthew 20:30)
Bahurim - ” Village on road from Jerusalem to Jericho in tribal territory of Benjamin
Jesse - He was also a descendant of Rahab the Canaanite, of Jericho
Achan - He confesses that after the capture of Jericho he had hidden part of the spoil, the whole of which had been placed under the ban ( chçrem ), i
Salma - Salma took Rahab of Jericho to be his wife
Prophets, Sons of the - They are spoken of as being at Bethel, Jericho, and Gilgal
Thresh - Near Jericho "were no less than five such floors, all trodden by oxen, cows, and younger cattle, arranged in each case five abreast, and driven round in a circle, or rather in all directions, over the floor
Threshing - Near Jericho "were no less than five such floors, all trodden by oxen, cows, and younger cattle, arranged in each case five abreast, and driven round in a circle, or rather in all directions, over the floor
Booz - Rahab, we know, was a Canaanite of Jericho, Joshua 2:1
Balm - The so-called ‘Balm of Gilead’ of commerce, and the substance sold by the monks of Jericho to-day, this latter a product of the zakkûm tree, are neither of them serious claimants to be the genuine article
Jesse - Obed's son, father of David; sprung from the Moabitess Ruth and the Canaanite Rahab of Jericho; and from Nahshon, at the Exodus chief of Judah, and so from the great house of Pharez, through Hezron
Gilgal - A place on the east border of Jericho ( Joshua 4:19 ), where the Israelites first encamped after crossing Jordan, and which remained the headquarters of the congregation till after the rout of the northern kings at Merom ( Joshua 14:6 ). A tradition evidently suggested by the Biblical story of the fall of Jericho is recorded by Conder as having been related to him here
Josh'ua - (31:14,23) Under the direction of God again renewed, (Joshua 1:1 ) Joshua assumed the command of the people at Shittim, sent spies into Jericho, crossed the Jordan, fortified a camp at Gilgal, circumcised the people, kept the passover, and was visited by the Captain of the Lord's host. A miracle made the fall of Jericho more terrible to the Canaanites
Palm Tree - " The finest specimens of this tree grew at Jericho (Deuteronomy 34:3 ) and Engedi and along the banks of the Jordan
Abarim - " They were in the land of Moab, opposite Jericho
Nebo - A mountain of Moab "over against Jericho
Blow - It is found seven times with this meaning in the story of the conquest of Jericho ( Elisha - Many miracles also were wrought at his word; some of these were, healing the waters of Jericho; supplying the widow's cruse with oil, and the allied armies of Judah, Israel, and Edom with water; gaining a son for the woman of Shunem, and restoring him to life; healing the leprosy of Naaman; detecting and punishing Ghazi
Jes'se - His great-grandmother was Rahab the Canaanite, of Jericho
Earthquake - The destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, the stopping of the Jordan River at the time of Israel’s entrance into Canaan, and the collapse of the walls of Jericho may all have involved earthquake activity
Achan - When Jericho was cursed, with all that was in it, Achan alone, in defiance of the curse, "saw" (compare Job 31:7; Genesis 3:6; James 1:14-15), coveted, took, and hid (see Genesis 3:8; following the first sin in the same awful successive steps downward) "a Babylonian garment" (compare Revelation 17:4-5), "two hundred shekels of silver, and a wedge of gold, fifty shekels" (Joshua 7:21). The Hebrew of 1 Kings 17:24, "they brought them up unto the valley of trouble," implies this was higher ground than Gilgal and Jericho. The spoil of Jericho was the firstfruits of Canaan, sacred to Jehovah; Achan's sacrilegious covetousness in appropriating it needed to be checked at the outset, lest the sin spreading should mar the end for which Canaan was given to Israel
Josue, Book of - After crossing the Jordan and capturing Jericho the Israelites defeated the Chanaanites and divided the conquered territory among the twelve tribes
Joshua, Book of - After crossing the Jordan and capturing Jericho the Israelites defeated the Chanaanites and divided the conquered territory among the twelve tribes
se'la, - (the rock ), ( 2 Kings 14:7 ; Isaiah 16:1 ) so rendered in the Authorized Version in Judges city later (2 Chronicles 25:12 ) probably known as Petra, the ruins of which are found about two days journey north of the top of the Gulf of Akabah and three or four south from Jericho and about halfway between the southern end of the Dead Sea and the northern end of the Gulf of Akabah
Nebo - They camped in the area of Mount Nebo opposite Jericho when the Balaam incident occurred (Numbers 22-24 )
Sycamore - Τristram ("Land of Israel") found an old sycamore at the broken aqueduct of Herod's Jericho
Palm, Palm Tree, - Name given several times to Jericho because of the palms that grew there
Elimelech - The certain man, there spoken of, going down from Bethlehem-judah, the land of bread, to sojourn in Moab, the city of destruction, becomes no unapt representation of our first father, who, like the Samaritan our Lord describes, going down from Jerusalem, the holy city, to Jericho, the cursed city, fell among thieves
Mount Gerizim - The reader may find farther account of the blessings which the Lord appointed to be pronounced on mount Gerizim, Deuteronomy 27:11 and Deuteronomy 28:1-14 and the confirmation of the whole, as fulfilled by Joshua after Israel had passed over Jordan, taken Jericho and Ai, Joshua 8:33-35
Palms - Jericho was known as the city of palms (Deuteronomy 34:3 ; Judges 1:16 ; Judges 3:13 )
Spices - Balsam or balm of Gilead, Αmyris opobalsamum ; a tropical plant that grew in the plains of Jericho and the hot valleys of southern Palestine
ra'Hab, - (wide ), a celebrated woman of Jericho who received the spies sent by Joshua to spy out the land, hid them in her house from the pursuit of her countrymen, was saved with all her family when the Israelites sacked the city, and became the wife of Salmon and the ancestress of the Messiah
Rahab - was a hostess of the city of Jericho, who received and concealed the spies sent by Joshua
ra'Hab, - (wide ), a celebrated woman of Jericho who received the spies sent by Joshua to spy out the land, hid them in her house from the pursuit of her countrymen, was saved with all her family when the Israelites sacked the city, and became the wife of Salmon and the ancestress of the Messiah
Joshua - Under God's direction, Joshua 1:1, Joshua assumed the command of the people at Shittim, sent spies into Jericho, crossed the Jordan, fortified a camp at Gilgal, circumcised the people, kept the passover, and was visited by the Captain of the Lord's Host. The miraculous fall of Jericho terrified the Canaanites
Rahab - The memorable woman of the city of Jericho, of whose faith the Holy Ghost hath given such honourable testimony, Hebrews 11:31. She lived also in the accursed city of Jericho, a city devoted to destruction before the Lord, and of peculiar malignity of evil in the Lord's sight
Balsam Tree - " The whole valley of Jericho was once esteemed the most fruitful in Judea; and the obstinacy with which the Jews fought here to prevent the balsam trees from falling into the possession of the Romans, attests the importance which was attached to them. This tree Pliny describes as peculiar to the vale of Jericho, and as "more like a vine than a myrtle. "The space of the valley contains 200,000 acres, and is called Jericho
the Samaritan Who Shewed Mercy - A CERTAIN man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which stripped him of his raiment, and wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead. But the pity with this priest was, that as soon as he got his temple duties over yesterday, he forgot all that about his neighbour till he put on his gown again next Sabbath morning in Jericho. And thus it was that he was on his way down to Jericho that day when, by chance, he came on a half-dead man on the way-side. But however he set out, psalm or no psalm, and however this Samaritan was occupied as he rode down the Jericho-pass, as God would have it, Behold, there is a half-dead Jew lying in the ditch at the roadside. What do you think would be the thoughts of the half-dead Jew as he saw his own temple-kinsmen passing by on the other side, and then saw this dog of a Samaritan leaping off his mule? What would he think and say all night as he saw this excommunicated Samaritan lighting the candle to pour oil and wine into his wounds and watching all night at his bedside? That Samaritan mule hobbling down the Jericho-pass with that half-dead burden on its back always reminds me of Samuel Johnson hobbling along to Bolt Court with the half-dead streetwalker on his back and laying her down on old Mrs. Johnson did in Jericho and in London, you will yet see those two portraits and the originals of them with your own eyes, in the art-galleries of the heavenly country. Many who have their own beasts to ride upon, and who are quite able to pay their own bill to the inn-keeper and your bill also: many such stand in as much need of your love and your services of love as did that half-dead Jew on the road to Jericho. And if death and judgment overtake you walking beside your mule on the way to the inn at Jericho: or if your Lord summons you to give in your account when you are up smoothing the pillow of a half-dead enemy of yours; I would far rather take your chance of eternal life than if death and judgment overtook you still debating, however Calvinistically, about your evangelical duty. We are as it were in the inn of Jericho tonight
Willows - He says, "It fringes the Upper Jordan, dipping its wavy crown of red into the spray in the rapids under Hermon, and is nutured by the oozy marshes in the Lower Jordan nearly as far as to Jericho
Temptation - ), "a high and precipitous wall of rock, 1,200 or 1,500 feet above the plain west of Jordan, near Jericho
Plains - of Jericho into the Arabian desert, contrasting with the rugged country W
Thistles And Thorns - A petty village on the plain of Jericho is now protected against Arab horsemen by a hedge of thorny Nubk branches
Kenites - The connection with Moses explains their continued alliance with Israel, accompanying them to Jericho "the city of palm trees" (Judges 1:16; compare 2 Chronicles 28:15), thence to the wilderness of Judah, where "they dwelt among the people" (Israel), realizing Moses' promise to Hobab, whose name appears slightly altered as that of a wady opposite Jericho (Numbers 10:32)
Conquest of Canaan - The initial object of the attack was the ancient stronghold of Jericho. In response the walls of Jericho collapsed, allowing the invaders to destroy the city (Joshua 6:1 ). The reason for the failure was that Achan, one of the Israelite soldiers, had kept some booty from the invasion of Jericho—an action which violated God's orders to destroy everything in the city. See Achan ; Ai ; Exodus ; Gilgal ; Jericho ; Joshua
Jordan - The cities Bethshan and Jericho on the W. The next crossing recorded is that of Joshua over against Jericho, the river being then flooded, in harvest time in April, in consequence of the rainy season and the melting of the snow of Hermon (Joshua 3:15-16; Joshua 4:12-13; Joshua 5:10-12). The men of Jericho had pursued the spies to the fords there (Joshua 2:7), the same as those "toward Moab" where the Moabites were slain (Judges 3:28). of Jericho; but in summer it can, the water being low. John the Baptist "first" baptized at the lower ford near Jericho, where all Jerusalem and Judea resorted, being near; where too our Lord took refuge from Jerusalem, and where many converts joined Him, and from from whence He went to Bethany to raise Lazarus (John 10:39-40; John 11:1). In coincidence with Scripture, the American survey sets down three fords: that at Tarichaea, the second at the Jabbok's confluence with' Jordan, and that at Jericho. part is named "the plains of Jericho
Nimrah - from Jericho
Oded - Then they took and clothed the naked, and shod them, and gave them to eat and drink, and anointed them (oil is refreshing and herding in the sultry East), and carried all the feeble upon donkeys(compare Luke 10:34) and brought them to Jericho (Romans 12:20)
Achor - A valley in Jericho: rendered memorable from the stoning of Achan, the son of Carmi, there
Seven - Seven priests with seven trumpets went around the walls of Jericho seven days, and seven times on the seventh day
Gilgal - This Gilgal is often located at modern khirbet Mefjir, a little more than a mile east of Jericho. Others would locate it at khirbet en-Nitleh, two miles southeast of Jericho
Zacchaeus - The importance of Jericho as a trade centre, the abundance and value of whose products called forth the enthusiastic approbation of Josephus (BJ iv. ‘Jericho’ and ‘Publican’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible
Rams Horns - We read of rams-horns made use of by Joshua's army, at the command of the Lord, in the destruction of Jericho. Probably the horns made use of at the siege of Jericho were the wild bull's, from his height and size; and if not the bull's, it might be of the beef kind
Publican - Jericho, Zacchaeus' head quarters, was center of the balsam trade. ...
Jesus, preferring a publican's house to that of any of the priests at Jericho, then said to number 12,000, marks the honour He does to Zacchaeus and drew on Him the indignation of Jewish bigots
Samaritan, the Good - He had passed through Samaria and reached Judaea, and in some town on the route, probably Jericho, He visited the synagogue,*
The road from Jericho to Jerusalem had a very evil reputation. It was the highway between the capital and the prosperous City or Palm-trees; and, moreover, since half of the officiating ‘course’ lodged at Jericho, where provision was abundant,|| Zedekiah - The king and his people endeavored to escape by night, but, the Chaldæan troops pursuing them, they were overtaken in the plain of Jericho
Herod the Great - After a troubled reign of thirty-seven years, he died at Jericho amid great agonies both of body and mind, B
Moab - In the Plains of Moab, opposite Jericho (Numbers 22:1 ; 26:63 ; Joshua 13:32 ), the children of Israel had their last encampment before they entered the land of Canaan
Kenites - The children of the Kenite, Moses' father-in-law, left Jericho, the city of palm trees, and went into the wilderness of Judah, which was to the south of Arad, and dwelt there
Seven - "Jacob's seven years' service to Laban; Pharaoh's seven fat oxen and seven lean ones; the seven branches of the golden candlestick; the seven trumpets and the seven priests who sounded them; the seven days' siege of Jericho; the seven churches, seven spirits, seven stars, seven seals, seven vials, and many others, sufficiently prove the importance of this sacred number" (see Leviticus 25:4 ; 1 Samuel 2:5 ; Psalm 12:6 ; 79:12 ; Proverbs 26:16 ; Isaiah 4:1 ; Matthew 18:21,22 ; Luke 17:4 )
Bethabara - of Jericho, within easy reach of Jerusalem
Balaam - When the Israelites were encamped on the plains of Moab, on the east of Jordan, by Jericho, Balak sent for Balaam "from Aram, out of the mountains of the east," to curse them; but by the remarkable interposition of God he was utterly unable to fulfil Balak's wish, however desirous he was to do so
Kenites - They accompanied them in their march as far as Jericho (Judges 1:16 ), and then returned to their old haunts among the Amalekites, in the desert to the south of Judah
Booty - So also in the case of Arad (Numbers 21:1-3) and Jericho, where everything was put under the cherem or curse and became the Lord's (Joshua 6:19-21)
Achan - ACHAN OF THE TRIBE OF JUDAH WAS TAKEN...
JERICHO was one of the largest and richest cities in all ancient Canaan. But for the terrible ban pronounced by Joshua, Jericho might have taken the place of Jerusalem itself as the chief city of ancient Israel. Jericho was an excellently situated and a strongly fenced city. There were great foundries of brass and iron in Jericho, with workshops also in silver and in gold. Balak's gold had long before now brought Balaam the soothsayer across the plains of Mesopotamia, and the gold and silver of Jericho had also drawn toward that city the travelling dealers in the woven work of the Babylonian looms. ...
The rich and licentious city of Jericho was doomed of God to swift overthrow and absolute extermination, but no part of the spoil, neither thread nor shoe-latchet, was to be so much as touched by Joshua or any of his armed men. Each of the twelve tribes of Israel had its own regiment, as we would say, marching and camping and entering battle under its own ensign; and thus it was that when the armies of Israel marched round Jericho on the way to their miraculous conquest of that city the standard of the tribe of Judah led the sacred host. Every single soldier in all Israel Had heard Joshua's proclamation ahout Jericho; both what his men were to do till the walls fell, and how they were to demean themselves after the city had been given of God into their hands. Who is that stealing about among the smoking ruins? Is that some soldier of Jericho who has saved himself from the devouring sword? When the night wind wakens the embers again these are the accoutrements and the movements of one of Joshua's men. For, what is the fall of Jericho to them in that tent when it has cost them the life of their husband, their father, and their master? When the door of that tent is suddenly lifted, and the face of a corpse comes in, takes a spade, and buries a strange burden in the earth in the midst of the astounded tent
Debir - ...
...
...
A place near the "valley of Achor" (Joshua 15:7 ), on the north boundary of Judah, between Jerusalem and Jericho
Bear - The instrument of punishing the 42 youths who mocked Elisha, in a wood between Jericho and Bethel, probably in winter when bears descend from the mountains to the lowlands (2 Kings 2:24)
Spies - , unknown to the people ( Joshua 2:1 ), "to view the land and Jericho" after the death of Moses, and just before the tribes under his leadership were about to cross the Jordan
Yale, Valley - biqah, 'valley or plain,' which is the word used for the valleys or plains of Aven, Jericho, Lebanon, Megiddo, Mizpeh, and Ono
Boaz - Rahab was an harlot of the city of Jericho, cursed by Joshua, (Joshua 6:26) though famous for her faith in the Lord God of Israel; and Ruth a poor outcast of Moab
Certain - And again, in the gospel, (Luke 10:30) a certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves. All men, from our first father, have left Bethlehem-judah, the land of bread, for so the name means; and Jerusalem, the holy city; and by going down to the Moabs and the Jerichos of the world, have fallen among thieves, and been left more than half dead by the great enemy of souls
Bethany - About a bow-shot from hence you pass by the place which they say was Mary Magdalene's house; and thence descending a steep hill, you come to the fountain of the Apostles, which is so called because, as the tradition goes, these holy persons were wont to refresh themselves there between Jerusalem and Jericho,—as it is very probable they might, because the fountain is close to the roadside, and is inviting to the thirsty traveller
Kid - " The village of Engedi, situate in the neighbourhood of Jericho, derives its name from the Hebrew word עין , a fountain,, and נדי , a kid
Land - Go, view the land, even Jericho
Gilgal - Place west of the Jordan, 'in the east border of Jericho,' where the Israelites encamped after passing the river. In Joshua 15:7 the border of Judah's portion 'looked toward' Gilgal, which well agrees with its being near Jericho
Gilgal - On arising ground ("hill," Joshua 5:3; Joshua 5:9) in the hot sunken Ghor between Jericho and the Jordan, one mile and a half E. of Jericho; five miles and a half W. side of wady Kelt, one mile and a third from the tower of modern Jericho (Eriha); toward the E
Olives - The views from this mount in different directions are extensive; Jerusalem on one side, on another there are the dreary hills over which the road passes to Jericho, with the northern end of the Dead Sea visible, and the mountains of Moab beyond
Adjure - Thus Joshua concerning Jericho, (Joshua 6:26
Bochim - The Angel Prince of Jehovah's host announced to Joshua at Gilgal the fall of Jericho, directly after their rolling away the reproach of Egypt by circumcision, whence the place got its name (Gilgal "rolling") (Joshua 5:2-15)
Sycomore - In Palestine it is found principally along the coast and in the low-lying plains around Jericho, and is often planted by the roadside
Bethabara - נַחַל הָעֲרְבִים Isaiah 15:7) is possibly a reminiscence of the Beth-arabah of Joshua 15:6; Joshua 15:61 in the plain of Jericho, or it may be due merely to an accidental transposition of letters. ...
The traditional site of the baptism of Christ at Makhâdet Hajlah in the Jordan Valley near Jericho, though defended by Sir Charles Wilson and others, seems to be too far south. from Jericho (see T
Jordan - Ebal and drains the district east of Shechem; and the Wady el-Kelt , by Jericho, which is sometimes identified with the brook Cherith. The most celebrated is that opposite Jericho known as Makhadet el-Hajlah , where modern pilgrims are accustomed to bathe. A temporary wooden bridge, erected by the Arabs, stands opposite Jericho. In the vicinity of Jericho, once the ‘city of palms,’ a large variety of fruits, vegetables, and other products is grown. Even in winter the days are uncomfortably warm, though the nights are cool; in summer both days and nights are torrid, especially at Jericho, where the thermometer has been known to register 130 Fahr
Good Samaritan, Parable of the - A man going down from Jerusalem to Jericho is attacked by a band of robbers who despoil him and beat him
Allotment - Benjamin included the cities of Bethel, Jericho, and Jebus, and extended to the Jordan, while Dan reached to the Mediterranean
Quail - I have met with it in the wilderness of Palestine, near the shores of the Dead Sea and the Jordan, between Jordan and Jericho, and in the deserts of Arabia Petrea
Zedekiah - The king and his people endeavored to escape by favor of the night; but the Chaldean troops pursuing them, they were over-taken in the plain of Jericho
Beth'el - Hiel the Bethelite is recorded as the rebuilder of Jericho
Crown - Some years ago archaeologists discovered in a Jericho tomb a copper headband or crown dating from about 2000 B
Foundation - The prohibition of laying a foundation for Jericho (Joshua 6:26 ) was a prohibition of rebuilding the city as a fortified site rather than of inhabiting the place
Desert - ...
Jericho, "the city of palm trees," at the lower end, and Bethshean at the upper, were especially so noted
Olives, Olivet, Mount of - The other road, from the same gate but farther south, led to Bethany and thence to Jericho
Gilgal - Gilgal was about a league from Jordan, and at an equal distance from Jericho
Mount Nebo - We are told that he saw from thence all the land of Gilead unto Dan, and all the land of Naphtali and Ephraim and Manasseh, and all the land of Judah unto the uttermost sea, together with the south and the plain of the valley of Jericho, the city of palm trees, unto Zoar
Moabites - At one period, however, it extended north as far as the Jabbok, and for a long time the region beyond the Jordan opposite Jericho retained the name of "the plains of Moab," Numbers 22:1 Deuteronomy 1:5 29:1 Deuteronomy 23:3-623
Num'Bers, - (Numbers 15:1 ; Numbers 19:22 ) ...
The history of the last year, from the second arrival of the Israelites in Kadesh till they reached "the plains of Moab by Jordan near Jericho
Bethany - Bethany was "at" the mount of Olives (Mark 11:1; Luke 19:1-29), near the usual road from Jericho to Jerusalem (Mark 10:46; Mark 11:1), close to Bethphage ("the house of figs"), frequently named with it. of the mount of Olives, a mile beyond the summit, near the point at which the road to Jericho makes a sudden descent toward the Jordan valley; a hollow, wooded with olives, almonds, pomegranates, oaks, and carobs; lying below a secondary ridge which shuts out the view of the summit of Olivet
Palmtree - ) Jericho was "the city of palmtrees" (Deuteronomy 34:3; Judges 1:16; Judges 3:13; 2 Chronicles 28:15). (See Jericho; HAZEZON TAMAR; ENGEDI; BAAL TAMAR
Forest - That "of Bethel" lay in the ravine going down to the plain of Jericho
Fire - ...
...
In war, fire was used in the destruction of cities, as Jericho (Joshua 6:24 ), Ai (8:19), Hazor (11:11), Laish (Judges 18:27 ), etc
Wilderness, Desert - of Moab, of Jericho
Bethany - Bethany became the final stop before Jerusalem just off the main east-west road coming from Jericho
Gezer - It provides a military post for the highway junction of the Via Maris and the road leading to the valley of Ajalon to Jerusalem, Jericho, and over the Jordan
Honey - Hasselquist says, that between Acra and Nazareth, great numbers of wild bees breed, to the advantage of the inhabitants; and Maundrell observes of the great plain near Jericho, that he perceived in it, in many places, a smell of honey and wax as strong as if he had been in an apiary
Olives, Mount of - Over this ridge passes the road to Bethany, the most frequented road to Jericho and the Jordan
Palm Tree - 2 3), Jericho is famous for its vast groves of palms; to-day there are but few, and these quite modern trees
Peraea - From Peræa, Simon made his ill-starred raid upon Jericho (XVII
Olives - On reaching the summit, an extensive view is obtained toward the east, embracing the fertile plain of Jericho, watered by the Jordan, and the Dead Sea, enclosed by mountains of considerable grandeur. Bethany is a small village to the east of the Mount of Olives, on the road to Jericho, not farther from Jerusalem than the pinnacle of the hill
Furniture - The excavation of ancient Jericho in the 1950s discovered a series of tombs containing both the skeletal remains of the dead and practical provisions to serve their needs in the afterlife. Furniture styles were slow to change, and the artifacts found at Jericho were probably like those used by the Israelites long after. ...
A few other artifacts from Jericho and from only a few other sites in Palestine depict other common furniture objects such as benches and stools and bronze objects
Bela - of the Dead Sea, between Jericho and the sea, as the plain was seen by Lot from the neighborhood of Bethel
Moab - ...
The territory of the Moabites, originally inhabited by the Emims, Deuteronomy 2:10, lay on the east of the Dead Sea and the Jordan, strictly on the highlands south of the Arnon; Numbers 21:13; Ruth 1:1-2; Ruth 2:6; but in a wider sense it included also the region anciently occupied by the Amorites over against Jericho, usually called the "Plains of Moab
Elias i, Bishop of Jerusalem - After a time they quitted the laura, and Elias constructed a cell at Jericho
Judea - ...
The "wilderness of Judea," in which John began to preach, and where Christ was tempted, seems to have been in the eastern part of Judah, adjacent to the Dead sea, and stretching towards Jericho, 2 Samuel 15:28
Ebal - Moses adds "over against Gilgal" (not the Gilgal near Jericho and the Jordan, first named by Joshua (Joshua 5:9), but the modern Jiljulieh, 12 miles S. , rather than on the outskirts of the country, at the Gilgal near Jericho
Jordan - Its average width is about five miles, but near Jericho it is twelve or fifteen miles. Yet the swift and swollen current was arrested in its course, opposite to Jericho; and while the waters below the city rolled on to the4 sea, those above it were miraculously stayed, and left in the river bed a wide passage for the hosts of Israel
Judea - The portion of Benjamin was situated to the north of Judah, near the centre of the kingdom, bounded on the east by the river Jordan, and containing part of Jerusalem, Jericho, Bethel, Rama, &c. The principal places in the north-east quarter of the province were Jerusalem, the capital, which was entirely destroyed in the reign of Hadrian, and replaced by a new city named AElia, a little farther north, which is now the site of the modern Jerusalem; Jericho, the city of palm trees, about nineteen miles eastward of Jerusalem, and eight from the river Jordan; Phaselis, built by Herod in memory of his brother, fifteen miles north-west of Jericho; Archelais, built by Archelaus, ten miles north of Jericho; Gophna, fifteen miles north of Jerusalem, in the road to Sichem; Bethel, twelve miles north of Jerusalem, originally called Luz; Gilgal, about one mile and a half from Jericho; Engeddi, a hundred furlongs south south-east of Jericho, near the northern extremity of the Dead Sea; Masada, a strong fortress built by Judas Maccabeus, the last refuge of the Jews after the fall of Jerusalem; Ephraim, a small town westward of Jericho; Anathoth, a Levitical town, nearly four miles north of Jerusalem
Seven - Seven trumpets, seven priests that sounded them, seven days to surround the walls of Jericho, Joshua 6:4 ; Joshua 6:6 ; Joshua 6:8
Sycamore or Sycamine - It was upon a tree of this sort that Zaccheus got up, to see our Savior pass through Jericho, Luke 19:4
Joram - ...
The word Jordan in the rôle of common noun is further proved by the expression ‘Jordan of Jericho’ (יַדְדֵּן יְדֵחוֹ), in the construct state. Phasaël and Jericho, are on the height at some distance from the river, near protecting mountains. Further south is the ruined bridge of Damieh; and lastly, near Jericho, a modern bridge, the Jisr el-Ghoranich, at the place where the mosaic map of Madaba indicates a ferry-boat. , in front of the so-called place of the Baptism at the latitude of Jericho. Gilboa and passes to Beisan; then, close to Jericho, the Wadi el-Kelt, which tradition, probably wrongly, identifies with the Cherith of the Bible. , who passed up from Jericho to the Lake of Tiberias. ...
While the northern part of the Ghôr is fertile, and more especially the environs of Beisan, it is very different in the south, near Jericho. ...
It is this district that is referred to in the passages of the OT where the ‘Jordan of Jericho’ is spoken of. It is simply ‘the Jordan in the district of Jericho
Wanderings of the Israelites - From the Red Sea their route is plainly on the east of Edom and the Salt Sea until they arrived opposite Jericho, where their wanderings ended. ...
Plains of Moab, by Jordan, near | Plains of Moab, by Jordan, near...
Jericho, Numbers 22:1 . | Jericho, Numbers 33:48
Desert - It is also translated "plains;" as "the plains of Jericho" ( Joshua 5:10 ; 2 Kings 25:5 ), "the plains of Moab" (Numbers 22:1 ; Deuteronomy 34:1,8 ), "the plains of the wilderness" (2 Samuel 17:16 )
Debir (1) - A place on the northern bound of Judah, near the valley of Achor (Joshua 15:7), between Jericho and Jerusalem (Joshua 15:7)
Kenites - ]'>[1] ), who had been invited by Moses and had doubtless accepted the invitation to he a guide to Israel in the wilderness ( Numbers 10:29-32 ), was a Kenite; and his descendants came up from Jericho with the tribe of Judah into the S
Beggar - ]'>[1] This is evident both from the references to almsgiving in the Sermon on the Mount and from the mention of beggars in connexion with places of a public character: the entrance to Jericho (Matthew 20:30 and parallels), a city through which so many pilgrims went at festival seasons, the neighbourhood of rich men’s houses (Luke 16:20), and the gates of the temple (Acts 3:2)
Palm Tree - " Jericho, in particular, was called "the city of palms," Deuteronomy 34:3 ; 2 Chronicles 28:15 ; because, as Josephus, Strabo, and Pliny have remarked, it anciently abounded in palm trees. Shaw remarks, that, though these trees are not now either plentiful or fruitful in other parts of the holy land, yet there are several of them at Jericho, where there is the conveniency they require of being often watered; where, likewise, the climate is warm, and the soil sandy, such as they thrive and delight in
Chief Parables And Miracles in the Bible - ...
Walls of Jericho fall. ...
Waters of Jericho healed
Ark of the Covenant - The walls of Jericho fell down before it, Joshua 6:4-12
Joshua - Alike in bringing the people into Canaan, in his wars, and in the distribution of the land among the tribes, from the miraculous crossing of Jordan and taking of Jericho to his last address, he was the embodiment of his new name, 'Jehovah is help
Family - This meaning determined the extent of Rahab’s family that was spared from Jericho: “… And they brought out all her kindred, and left them without the camp of Israel” ( Earthquake - Secondary quake centers are located in the Jordan Valley at Jericho and Tiberias
Bethel - From an eminence to the east almost the whole extent of the plains of Jericho is visible
Anathema - ...
So in the case of Jericho the city was so devoted to destruction, and all in it, except Rahab; and the silver, gold, brass, and iron, were consecrated to Jehovah (Joshua 6:17-26)
Spiritualizing of the Parables - The traveller is Adam; Jerusalem is Paradise; Jericho is the world; the robbers are hostile demons; the Priest is the Law; the Levite is the Prophets; the Samaritan is Christ; the wounds are disobedience; the beast is the Lord’s body; the inn is the Church; the two denarii are the Father and the Son (the New and the Old Covenant, says Euthymius Zigabenus); the innkeeper is the Bishop
Ai - This would be about the same distance from Jericho
Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon - With Amalek they assisted the king of Moab against Israel, and Jericho fell into their hands
Palm-Tree - In Deuteronomy 34:3 , Jericho is called the "city of palm-trees;" and several of these trees are still found in that vicinity; but in general they are now rare in Palestine
Palm Tree - (2:8) Jericho was the city of "palm trees
Publican - This lower class are probably the men referred to in the Gospels, wherever they belong to Judaea (or Samaria), except possibly in the case of Zacchaeus, who was ἀρχιτελώνης of Jericho (Luke 19:2), and may have farmed the revenues of that important commercial centre on his own account (but see Ramsay as cited below)
City - Jericho lay on its borders, situated in an oasis of remarkable fertility, a city of palms, in striking contrast to the stony and barren region of which it was the gateway. Jericho was rich in the natural wealth of the East, but singularly poor in heroic memories. It is perhaps significant, as showing the ecclesiastical character of the population of Jerusalem, that it was a priest and a Levite who first passed the man lying wounded and bleeding on the road to Jericho (Luke 10:31 f
House - This type of construction may still be seen in the refugee camps of modern Jericho
Elisha - After Elijah's departure, Elisha returned to Jericho, and there healed the spring of water by casting salt into it (2 Kings 2:21 )
Arabah - ...
In the plural it is connected with either Jericho or Moab; the Arabah being in Jericho's case W
Ark - The ark also had a military role, leading the march of the people of Israel in the wilderness (Numbers 10:33 ), circling the walls of Jericho (Joshua 4:6 ), and going forth to battle against the Philistines (1 Samuel 4:5 )
Camel - This latter is to-day kept in considerable numbers by Turkomans settled in the Jaulan , and long caravans of these magnificent beasts may sometimes be encountered coming across the Jordan into Galilee or on the Jericho-Jerusalem road
Ammon - ...
They crossed Jordan and seized Jericho for a time (Judges 3:13)
mo'ab - (2) The more open rolling country north of the Arnon, opposite Jericho, and up to the hills of Gilead, was the "land of Moab
Musical Instruments of the Hebrews - Another drum was more like our kettledrum; and one of these, the rabbins say, was placed in the temple court to the priests to prayer, and could be heard from Jerusalem to Jericho
Joshua - ...
Joshua took the command at Shittim, sent spies to Jericho, crossed Jordan, fortified his camp at Gilgal, circumcised the people (for Israel's work was a spiritual one, and men still having the badge of fleshliness were not fit agents for the Lord's work: Joshua 10:40; Judges 5:31), kept the Passover, (after which on their eating the old grain of the land the manna ceased,) and received the assurance of Jericho's fall and God's fighting against Israel's foes from the uncreated Angel of Jehovah (Joshua 5:13-15; Joshua 6:2-5), the Captain of Jehovah's host (Matthew 26:53; Exodus 23:20-23; Revelation 19:11-14). of Jericho; but to one starting from Riha to the E. Jericho fell by miracle. (See Jericho
Sanhedrim - After the return from Babylon, it remained at Jerusalem, as it is said, to the time of the sicarii or assassins; afterward it was removed to Jamnia, thence to Jericho, to Uzzah, to Sepharvaim, to Bethsamia, to Sephoris, and last of all to Tiberias, where it continued till its utter extinction. Petau fixes the beginning of the sanhedrim to the period when Gabinius was governor of Judea, by whom were erected tribunals in the five cities of Judea, namely, Jerusalem, Gadara, Amathus, Jericho, and Sephoris
Joshua, the Book of - ...
The spies sent from Shittim to Jericho (the key of Canaan) on the same day as Joshua gave this charge to Israel had to hide three days after leaving Jericho, so that they could not have returned until the evening of the fourth day after they were sent (Joshua 2:22)
Palestine - , the only entrances to the central highlands of Judah, Benjamin, and Ephraim, from the Jordan valley; as Engedi (2 Chronicles 20:1-2; 2 Chronicles 20:16) and Adummim, the route between Jericho and Jerusalem by which Pompey advanced when he took the capital. ...
The climate of the Jordan valley is tropical and enervating, and the men of Jericho a feeble race. "The region round about Jordan" was used of the vicinity of Jericho (Matthew 3:5). ...
Hebron; "going down" to Jericho, Gaza, Egypt. The upper is a solid stone varying from white to reddish brown, with few fossils, and abounding in caverns; the strata sometimes level for terraces, oftener violently disarranged, and twisted into various forms, as on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho. The ravine from Olivet to Jericho affords an opportunity of examining the strata through which it cuts
Bethel - Hiel of Bethel rebuilt Jericho under the curse (1 Kings 16:34)
Hexapla - The fifth was found at Jericho, in the reign of Caracalla, about the year 217: and the sixth was discovered at Nicopolis, in the reign of Alexander Severus, about the year 228; lastly, Origen himself recovered part of a seventh, containing only the Psalms
Nebo - It is described as being ‘in the land of Moab over against Jericho’ and as reached from the ‘steppes of Moah’ ( Deuteronomy 34:1 )
Prophet - Such "schools" were established at Ramah, Bethel, Gilgal, Gibeah, and Jericho
Ed - , crossed Jordan to return to their eastern possessions; not the ford near Jericho, but the Damieh ford the highway from the eastern uplands to central Palestine (identified with the "city Adam"), opposite to the opening of the broad wady Far'ah, the route from Shiloh the national sanctuary to Gilead and Bashan
Robber - ...
The road from Jerusalem to Jericho, the scene of the parable of the Good Samaritan, has always had a bad name for robbers
Azariah - ), who rescued captives Pekah had taken from Judah, cared for their physical needs, and returned them to Jericho (2 Chronicles 28:5-15 )
Gibeah - ...
Jonathan smote the garrison at Geba, and the Philistines in consequence gathering a vast host drove Saul's little army before them out of Bethel and Michmash down the eastern passes to Gilgal near Jericho, in the Jordan valley; took Michmash, Saul's former quarters, and sent out plunderers N
Herod - Herod died at Jericho, b
Euthymius (4), Abbat in Palestine - In 420 Euthymius erected a laura, like that of Pharan, on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho, where he would see inquirers on Saturdays and Sundays, and his advice was always given with captivating sweetness and humility
Pilgrim (2) - The custom explains the rapidity with which news spread; the name of Jesus had become a familiar word in such places as Jericho on the main route (Luke 18:37-38)
Palestine - The Ghor is about twelve miles wide at Jericho. ...
Seven miles south of Jericho, the Jordan flows into the Dead Sea, one of the world's most unique bodies of water. Jericho is only seventeen miles further east, but it Isaiah 3,400 feet lower (900 feet below sea level), consequently having a tropical climate and very low humidity. The breezes reach Jerusalem by noon, Jericho in early afternoon, and the Transjordan plateau by midafternoon
Ephraim (1) - of Jericho), which pours a full stream into the wady Nawayimeh. From Naarath Ephraim's boundary reached Jericho, and struck into the line that forms the S
Joshua, Book of - Jericho (type of the world antagonistic to the Lord's rights ranged under Satan) was the first city taken, and the manner of its destruction showed plainly that power for conquest was really in Jehovah. When the kings in the south heard of the destruction of Jericho and Ai, they conspired together to oppose Israel
Christ, Miracles of - ...
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS ...
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life
Miracles of Christ - ...
Healing of the nobleman's son (John 4)
Cure of the mother-in-law of Peter (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 4)
Cleansing of the leper (Matthew 8; Mark 1; Luke 5)
Healing of the paralytic (Matthew 9; Mark 2; Luke 5)
Healing of the impotent man at Bethesda (John 5)
Restoring of the man with the withered hand (Matthew 12; Mark 3; Luke 6)
Healing of the centurion's servant (Matthew 8; Luke 7)
Healing of one blind and dumb (Matthew 12; Luke 11)
Healing of the woman with an issue of blood (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8)
Opening of the eyes of two blind men (Matthew 9)
Cure of the dumb man (Matthew 9)
Healing of the deaf and dumb man (Mark 7)
Opening the eyes of one blind at Bethsaida (Mark 8)
Healing the lunatic child (Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9)
Opening of the eyes of one born blind (John 9)
Restoring the woman with a spirit of infirmity (Luke 13)
Healing of the man with the dropsy (Luke 14)
Cleansing of the ten lepers (Luke 17)
Opening the eyes of the blind man near Jericho (Matthew 20; Mark 11; Luke 18)
Healing of Malchus's ear (Luke 22)
DELIVERANCE OF DEMONIACS ...
General formulas regarding the driving out of devils (Mark 1) indicate that such acts of deliverance were very numerous during Our Lord's public life
Wanderings in the Wilderness - Their request to pass through Edomite territory and to proceed along the King's Highway through Moab and into the Jordan Valley opposite Jericho was blocked by a show of military force by the king of Edom
Herod the Great - He ordered that the heads of the chief families in Judaea should be shut up in the Hippodrome at Jericho, to be put to death as soon as he expired, that there might be mourning at his death! This cruel order was not carried out
Hexapla - The fifth was found at Jericho, in the reign of Caracalla, about the year 217; and the sixth was discovered at Nicopolis, in the reign of Alexander Severus, about the year 228: lastly, Origen himself recovered part of a seventh, containing only the Psalms
Zedekiah - Zedekiah and his people endeavoured to escape by favour of the night; but the Chaldean troops pursuing them, they were overtaken in the plains of Jericho
Mount of Olives - a very ancient highway to Jericho, after traversing a deep bay* Ark - It was borne in the procession round Jericho (Joshua 6:4,6,8,11,12 )
Colour - It was a crimson thread that Rahab was to bind on her window as a sign that she was to be saved alive (Joshua 2:18 ; 6:25 ) when the city of Jericho was taken
Roads - (b) In ordinary circumstances the Jews preferred to avoid intercourse with the Samaritans, hence in going northward they took the road leading down by Jericho, over the Jordan, and up through Peraea
Prostitution - Rahab, who helped the Israelite spies at Jericho, was a harlot (Joshua 2:1 ; 6:17,22 , 25 ); she figures in the genealogy of David and Jesus (Matthew 1:5 )
Amalekites - Subsequently the Moabite Eglon, in league with Amalek, smote Israel and took Jericho; but Ehud defeated them (Judges 3:13-30)
Joshua - " And from the twenty-fifth verse of the following chapter, it appears that the book was written before the death of Rahab: "And Joshua saved Rahab the harlot alive, and her father's household, and all that she had; and she dwelleth in Israel even unto this day; because she hid the messengers which Joshua sent to spy out Jericho
Zedeki'ah - The king's party were overtaken near Jericho and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, who was then at Riblah, at the upper end of the valley of Lebanon
Joshua, Book of - ...
The overthrow of Jericho gave more examples of the religious significance of Israel’s conquest: the role of the priests and the ark, the repeated use of the symbolic number ‘seven’ in the proceedings, and the judgment that followed disobedience to God’s commands (6:1-7:26)
Elisha - of the present town of Jericho is the traditional object of the cure (Ain-es-Sultan). Elisha on the contrary frequented the haunts of civilization, Jericho (2 Kings 2:18), Samaria (2 Kings 2:25), and Dothan (2 Kings 6:13), where he had a house with "doors" and "windows" John 6:9-135; 2 Kings 4:9; 2 Kings 4:24; 2 Kings 6:32; 2 Kings 13:17). At Bethel, on his way from Jericho to Carmel (2 Kings 2:23), where he had been with Elijah (2 Kings 2:2), he was met by "young men" (narim , not "little children"), idolaters or infidels, who, probably at the prompting of Baal's prophets in that stronghold of his worship sneered at the report of Elijah's ascension: "Go up" like thy master, said they, "thou bald head" (qereach , i. On his way from Gilgal (not the one which was near Jericho, but N. During Elisha's residence at Jericho, the numbers of the sons of the prophets increasing, the place became "too strait" for them
Jordan - It enters the Jordan about 20 miles north of Jericho
Thieves - Even on the high road between Jericho and Jerusalem they assailed travelers, as the parable of the good Samaritan shows (Luke 10:30)
Benjamin - Jericho, where in early times there may have been a cult of the moon-god ( jârçach = ‘moon’), and Jerusalem are also assigned to Benjamin
Judah - Kenites, commonly supposed to be of Midianite origin, we are told in Judges 1:16 , also went up from Jericho with Judah into the Wilderness
Responsibility - One sees how this principle worked its way out in a historical setting at Jericho
Ark of God - ...
The ark accompanied them in their first victory: it was carried by the priests around Jericho
Build - Joshua cursed anyone who would rise up and rebuild Jericho, the city that God had utterly destroyed ( Mark, Gospel by - Sight is restored to blind Bartimaeus (who called Him 'Son of David') at Jericho, the city of the curse
Pound - Jericho (Luke 19:1) owed its magnificent palace to the son of Herod the Great, Archelaus, facts from whose history seem clearly drawn upon in the narrative
Moses - ), to the top of Pisgah, that is over against Jericho" (34:1), and from thence he surveys the land. "Jehovah shewed him all the land of Gilead, unto Dan, and all Naphtali, and the land of Ephraim, and Manasseh, and all the land of Judah, unto the utmost sea, and the south, and the plain of the valley of Jericho, the city of palm trees, unto Zoar" (Deuteronomy 34:2-3 ), the magnificient inheritance of the tribes of whom he had been so long the leader; and there he died, being one hundred and twenty years old, according to the word of the Lord, and was buried by the Lord "in a valley in the land of Moab, over against Beth-peor" (34:6)
Wilderness (2) - The wildernesses of Ziph and of Maon are portions of it in the south, as well as those of Engedi and Tekoa in the middle; and finally also, in the north, the rough, barren, and uninhabited district where the road runs from Jerusalem to Jericho (cf. Since the time of the Crusades, ecclesiastical tradition has contrived to localize that event in a particular, well-defined spot, and has chosen for it the wild and desolate mountain which arises almost vertically above the Fountain of Elisha, west from the oasis of Jericho
Type - ...
(Consider also Sodom and Gomorrah, Jericho, Gilgal, Assyria, Tyre
Sycamore - There seem to have been great numbers of them in Solomon's time, 1 Kings 10:27 ; and in the Talmud they are mentioned as growing in the plains of Jericho
Joshua - ...
It seems more probable that Joshua led the nation in their first assault on Palestine, that under his leadership the entry by Jericho was won, and a wedge thrust into the land by the capture of Bethel and Ai. It relates the mission of the spies to Jericho ( Joshua 2:1-9 ; Joshua 2:12-24 ), and the consequent passage of Jordan ( Joshua 3:1 ; Joshua 3:5 ; Joshua 3:10-17 , Joshua 4:1-11 a, Joshua 4:15-18 , Joshua 4:20 ). The story of the capture of Jericho and Ai (in both of which the presence of two accounts is clear) follows ( Joshua 5:13 to Joshua 6:27 , Deuteronomy 32:44 , Joshua 8:1-29 ), with the trespass of Achan
Moab - of Arnon, opposite Jericho reaching to Gilead, was more open; vast prairie-like plains broken by rocky prominences; "the land of Moab" (Deuteronomy 1:5; Deuteronomy 32:49). Eglon king of Moab, with Ammon and Amalek, smote Israel and occupied Jericho, but was slain by the Benjamite Ehud (Judges 3:12-30)
Elijah - Providence first guides the stern prophet to the brook Cherith ( Wady Kelt in the vicinity of Jericho), where the ravens supply him with food. Accompanied by his faithful follower Elisha, he passes from Bethel to Jericho, and from thence they cross the Jordan, after Elijah has parted the waters by striking them with his mantle
Salt - " So again when the prophet Elisha sweetened the waters of Jericho, he did it by casting a cruse of salt into them; and this was done by commission from the Lord, for the prophet added, "Thus saith the Lord, I have healed these waters; there shall not be from thence any more death or barren and. (Exodus 15:25) Like the cruse of salt at Jericho, though salt in its own nature will make sweet water brackish, Jesus will heal the spring, and make it wholesome
Prophets - Thus we read of the sons of the prophets that were at Bethel; and of another school at Jericho; and of the sons of the prophets at Gilgal, 2 Kings 2:3 ; 2 Kings 2:5 ; 2 Kings 4:38 . That it was usual for some of these schools, or at least for their tutors, to be endued with a prophetic spirit, appears from the relation of the prophecies concerning the ascent of Elijah, delivered to Elisha by the sons of the prophets both at Jericho and at Bethel, 2 Kings 2:3 ; 2 Kings 2:5
Black People And Biblical Perspectives - ” Bible stories became the substance of spirituals and jubilee songs: “Didn't My Lord Deliver Daniel, Then Why Not Every Man,” “Go Down Moses,” “Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho,” “Little David, Play On Your Harp,” “O Mary, Don't You Weep
Devote, Devoted - ...
The spoil of Jericho belonged solely to Yahweh
Samuel - He established a school for prophets at Ramah, and others were established later at Bethel, Jericho and Gilgal (1 Samuel 19:18-20; 2 Kings 2:3; 2 Kings 2:5; 2 Kings 4:38)
Ban - The case of Achan, after the ban and capture of Jericho, affords a striking illustration of the early ideas associated with the ban
Palm Tree - This tree abounded in the valley of the Jordan, but Jericho was specially the city of palm trees (Deuteronomy 34:3)
Manasseh (1) - of Ephraim and Manasseh, along the entire line of the Jordan, from the sea of Chinneroth to the wady Kelt not far from the Salt Sea: thus it was a triangle, its apex at Jericho, its base N
Babylon, Mystical - " Such garments passed through Jericho in the trade between the Phoenicians and Babylon (Ezekiel 27:24
City - A survival of this wide-spread custom is almost certainly to be recognized in connexion with the rebuilding of Jericho, the foundation of which was laid by Hiel the Bethelite, ‘with the loss of Abiram his first born,’ and whose gates were set up ‘with the loss of’ his youngest son, Segub ( 1 Kings 16:34 RV Ark of the Covenant - ...
The ark played a prominent role in the “holy war” narratives of the crossing of the Jordan and the conquest, of Jericho (Joshua 3-6 )
Harvest - Barley is in full ear all over the Holy Land, in the beginning of April; and about the middle of the same month, it begins to turn yellow, particularly in the southern districts; being as forward near Jericho in the latter end of March, as it is in the plains of Acre a fortnight afterward
Prophet - One we find in his lifetime at Ramah, (1 Samuel 19:19,20 ) others afterward at Bethel, (2 Kings 2:3 ) Jericho, (2 Kings 2:2,5 ) Gilgal; (2 Kings 4:38 ) and elsewhere
Ephraim - (For information about its more important towns see BETHEL; Jericho; JOPPA; SHECHEM; SHILOH
Israel - The first point of attack after crossing the Jordan was Jericho. ]'>[4] ’s account of the taking of Jericho are woven together (cf. ]'>[1] , there seem to have been at least three lines of attack: (1) that which Joshua led up the valley from Jericho to Ai and Bethel, from which the territories afterwards occupied by Ephraim and Benjamin were secured. (2) A movement on the part of the tribe of Judah followed by the Simeonites, south-westward from Jericho into the hill-country about Bethlehem and Hebron
Elijah - " At Bethel, Elijah said, "Tarry thou here, the Lord hath sent me to Jericho;" but Elisha replied, he would not forsake him. At Jericho Elijah desired him to stay; but Elisha would not leave him
Nation (2) - 30, and large slices of territory, first Samaria, Jericho, and towns in the west, and afterwards the regions between the Lebanons and the Lake of Gennesaret, and eastwards. The taxes (land and poll) were collected by State officers; but the customs were farmed to publicani such as Zacchaeus (ἀρχιτελώνης, Luke 19:2) of Jericho
Elijah - "They two went on," and came to Bethel and Jericho, and crossed the Jordan, the waters of which were "divided hither and thither" when smitten with Elijah's mantle
Ahaz - But Oded the prophet constrained them to restore the captives fed, arrayed, and shod, and the feeble mounted upon asses, to their brethren at Jericho
Mark, Gospel of - Near Jericho he healed a blind man (10:46-52)
Refuge - And on the other side, by Jericho eastward, there was Bezer in the wilderness of Ramoth in Gilead, and Golan in Bashan
Blindness (2) - ...
The story of the blind man or men at Jericho is recorded in all three Synoptics (Matthew 20:29 ff
Prophets - There were also "schools of the prophets," first mentioned in the time of Samuel, established at Gibeah, Naiotyh, Bethel, Gilgal, and Jericho, where young men were instructed in religion and prepared to guide in religious worship, 1 Samuel 10:5 19:20 2 Kings 2:3,5 4:38
Miracle - ...
Jericho taken, Joshua 6:6-20
Priest - Over and above those that were scattered in the country and took their turn there were not fewer than 24,000 stationed permanently at Jerusalem,and 12,000 at Jericho
Palm Tree - " (Song of Song of Solomon 7:7-8)...
So very highly esteemed in the eastern world was the palm tree, that Jericho, where they chiefly grew, was called by the name, "The city of palm trees
Archaeology And Biblical Study - The list includes such important places as Babylon and Ur in ancient Mesopotamia and Ai, Bethel, Hazor, Jericho, Jerusalem, Lachish, Megiddo, Shechem, and many other sites in ancient Israel. ...
Though searched for in the Jericho area, the location of Gilgal, the Israelites' camping place, remains elusive. Despite what now seems to have been unfounded claims earlier made for Jericho by John Garstang, archaeological evidence for the conquest of Jericho, Ai, and Gibeon, after excavation of the sites, remains debated
Joshua - ' And Joshua fell on his face, and said, 'What saith my Lord unto His servant?' And on the seventh day Jericho fell into Joshua's hands without sword or spear of Joshua. ...
Fell flat every stone wall of it before a blast of rams' horns only blown over Jericho in the name of the Lord. But, surely, He was a soldier before Jericho, when He said to Joshua that He had come to him as Captain of the Lord's host
Plants in the Bible - This large tree usually has low-growing branches such as would have enabled the short Zacchaeus to climb one to see Jesus passing along the streets of Jericho (Luke 19:4 ). Hence, Jericho was known as the city of palm trees (Judges 1:16 )
Mining And Metals - ]'>[2], Midian [6], and Jericho [7]), it became specially plentiful in Palestine in the time of Solomon ( 1 Kings 10:14 ; 1 Kings 10:21 ), the main sources of it being Ophir ( 1 Kings 9:28 ; 1 Kings 10:11 ), Tarshish ( 1 Kings 10:22 ), and Sheba ( 1 Kings 11:2 , Psalms 72:15 )
Samuel - The schools of the prophets, thus originated, and afterwards established also at Gibeah, Bethel, Gilgal, and Jericho, exercised an important influence on the national character and history of the people in maintaining pure religion in the midst of growing corruption
Elisha - He sweetens a spring of brackish water at Jericho ( 2 Kings 2:19 ff
Elisha - Elisha smote the waters of Jordan, and divided them; and he rendered wholesome the waters of a rivulet near Jericho
Palladius, Bishop of Helenopolis - Tillemont thinks his earliest place of sojourn was with the abbat Elpidius of Cappadocia in the cavernous recesses of the mountains near Jericho (Hist
Political Conditions - Its population was prevailingly Jewish; though Antipas found an opportunity for the indulgence of his passion for building in the erection of Julias on the site of the ancient Beth-haram (Joshua 13:27), opposite Jericho. Smaller garrisons occupied Jericho, Machaerus, Samaria, and any other centre whence an important district could be commanded
Herod - Herod had him drowned at a celebration in Jericho soon after his inauguration
Joshua, the Book of - A certain city, for instance Jericho in Joshua 6:1 , was placed under the ban
Number - The seven days' grace (Genesis 7:1-10); and at the taking of Jericho (Joshua 5:13-6:20); the antitype, spiritual Babylon, shall fall at the sounding of the seventh trumpet (Revelation 11:13; Revelation 11:15; Revelation 14:8)
Punishment - When Achan broke the law by taking some of the spoil from Jericho, the whole Israelite army was defeated at Ai (Joshua 7:1-5 )
Zedekiah - Zedekiah was overtaken in the plains of Jericho
Elijah - Traversing in the close company of Elisha the spots which, however now perverted, told of certain great truths — Gilgal, of the necessity of the judgement of self, the place of circumcision — Bethel, of the faithfulness of God and the resources which are His for His own, the place where God had appeared to Jacob — Jericho, of the power of God as against all that of the enemy — they reached the Jordan through which they passed dry shod, the waters being separated hither and thither by Elijah smiting them with his mantle
Proselytes - But he could not hold land nor intermarry with Aaron's descendants (Leviticus 19:10; Leviticus 21:14), he is presumed to be in a subject condition (Deuteronomy 29:11); Hobab and the Kenites (Numbers 10:29-32; Judges 1:16), Rahab of Jericho (Joshua 6:25), and the Gibeonites as "hewers of wood and drawers of water" (Joshua 9), are instances of strangers joined to Israel
Elijah - Traversing in the close company of Elisha the spots which, however now perverted, told of certain great truths — Gilgal, of the necessity of the judgement of self, the place of circumcision — Bethel, of the faithfulness of God and the resources which are His for His own, the place where God had appeared to Jacob — Jericho, of the power of God as against all that of the enemy — they reached the Jordan through which they passed dry shod, the waters being separated hither and thither by Elijah smiting them with his mantle
Dates (2) - ‘Bethnimrah’) in holding that Beth-aimrah on the east of Jordan, opposite to Jericho, is the place meant. Beth-nimrah, now known as Nimrîn, is ‘beyond Jordan,’ τἐραν τοῦ Ἰορδάνου (John 1:28; John 3:26); it is well supplied with water, and accessible both from Jericho and Jerusalem, and may have produced the variants ‘Bethahara’ and ‘Bethany. ‘Marriage’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible), and it was quite possible for Him and His disciples to have accomplished the journey from the vicinity of Jericho to Nazareth (about 60 miles) in three or four days; so that there is no necessity to select a site for His baptism within one day’s journey of Cana
War, Holy War - The killing of everyone in Jericho and Ai, young and old, men and women in Joshua (6:21; 8:24-25) seems harsh and cruel when taken out of context. After only two cities (Jericho and Ai) are taken they proceed north into hostile territory to Shechem
Issachar - Its lot thus was of a triangular form, having its apex at Jericho and its base to the N
Ahab - Ahab was pre-eminent for luxurious tastes; his elaborately ornamented ivory palace (1 Kings 22:39; Amos 3:15), the many cities he built or restored, as Jericho (then belonging to Israel, not Judah) in defiance of Joshua's curse (1 Kings 16:34), his palace and park at Jezreel (now Zerin), in the plain of Esdraelon, his beautiful residence while Samaria was the capital, all show his magnificence
Jesus Christ - A third time he foretold his death and resurrection, and approaching Jericho healed blind men, called Zacchæus, and gave the parable of the pounds
Elisha - ...
Elisha's first miracle was healing the waters at Jericho, the cursed city, by means of salt in a new cruse: type of the purifying power of grace
Jeru'Salem - But from any other side the ascent is perpetual; and to the traveller approaching the city from the east or west it must always have presented the appearance beyond any other capital of the then known world --we may say beyond any important city that has ever existed on the earth --of a mountain city; breathing, as compared with the sultry plains of Jordan, a mountain air; enthroned, as compared with Jericho or Damascus, Gaza or Tyre, on a mountain fastness. --There appear to have been but two main approaches to the city:-- ...
From the Jordan valley by Jericho and the Mount of Olives
Titus (Emperor) - In quick succession Gadara, Peraea, western Judaea , Idumaea, and the neighbourhood of Jericho were besieged by the Romans
Diodorus, Presbyter of Antioch - His oratory is compared by Chrysostom to "a lyre" for melody, and to "a trumpet" for the power with which, like Joshua at Jericho, he broke down the strongholds of his heretical opponents
Canaan - The plain of the Mediterranean, of Esdraelon, and of Jericho, are celebrated as the scenes of many important events
Peraea - They used the fords opposite Beisan, north of Samaria, and Jericho, south of it
Poverty (2) - In accordance with this distinction, the contact of Jesus with the poor as described in the Gospels is almost confined to Judaea and Jerusalem (Matthew 19:16, Mark 10:21 the rich young ruler; Mark 12:42, Luke 21:1 the poor widow; Matthew 26:6, Mark 14:5 ‘this ointment might have been sold for much and given to the poor’; Matthew 20:30, Mark 10:46, Luke 18:35 the blind beggars outside Jericho; cf
Palestine - South of that, sheer gorges (geological faults, or the work of flooded winter-torrents) slash across the land from east to west, and open grim and sombre through precipices upon the sunken valley of the Jordan, where Jericho lies steaming in the heat, 6 miles west of the Jordan’s channel-groove, chiselled deep below the level of the valley. Jericho looks up at that mountain of Quarantania, and sees its angular and tilted platform of a summit as a black space cut out of the brilliance of a living, starry sky. From the edge He looked down on Jericho (Matthew 4:1 etc
Jerusalem - But from any other side the ascent is perpetual; and to the traveller approaching the city from the east or west it must always have presented the appearance, beyond any other capital of the then known world—we may say beyond any important city that has ever existed on the earth—of a mountain city; breathing, as compared with the sultry plains of Jordan, a mountain air; enthroned, as compared with Jericho or Damascus, Gaza, or Tyre, on a mountain fastness. From the Jordan valley by Jericho and the Mount of Olives
Elijah - Elijah was associated with the prophetic guilds in Bethel, Gilgal, and Jericho
Herod - He had summoned the chief persons among the Jews to Jericho, and caused them to be shut up in the hippodrome, or circus, and gave strict orders to his sister Salome to have them all massacred as soon as he should have drawn his last breath: "for this," said he, "will provide mourners for my funeral all over the land, and make the Jews and every family lament my death, who would otherwise exhibit not signs of concern
Jerusalem - The descent is extraordinary; Jericho, 13 miles off, is 3,624 ft. was from the Jordan plain by Jericho and mount Olivet (Luke 17:11; Luke 18:35; Luke 19:1-29; Luke 19:45; Luke 19:2 Samuel 15-16; 2 Chronicles 28:15)
Benjamin - ...
The regular road between Jericho and Jerusalem was another of these passes, the scene of the parable of the good Samaritan
Miracles - ...
Fall of Jericho's walls Joshua 6:6-25 ...
Staying of the sun and moon Joshua 10:12-14 ...
Withering and cure of Jeroboam's hand 1 Kings 13:4 - 6 ...
Multiplying the widow's oil 1 Kings 17:14-16 ...
Raising the widow's son 1 Kings 17:17-24 ...
Burning of the captains and their companies 2 Kings 1 . 10-12 ...
Dividing of Jordan by Elijah 2 Kings 2:7-8 ...
Elijah carried to heaven 2 Kings 2:11 ...
Dividing of Jordan by Elisha 2 Kings 2:14 ...
Cure of the waters of Jericho 2 Kings 2:19-22 ...
Supply of water to the army 2 Kings 3:16-20 ...
Increase of the widow's oil 2 Kings 4:2-7 ...
Raising the Shunammite's son 2 Kings 4:32-37 ...
Healing of the deadly pottage 2 Kings 4:38-41 ...
Feeding the 100 with 20 loaves 2 Kings 4:42-44 ...
Cure of Naaman's leprosy 2 Kings 5:10-14 ...
Swimming of the iron axe-head 2 Kings 6:5-7 ...
Resurrection of the dead man on touching Elisha's bones 2 Kings 13:21 ...
Return of the shadow on the dial 2 Kings 20:9-11 ...
Among the Gentiles ...
Deliverance of the three in the fiery furnace Daniel 3:19-27 ...
Deliverance of Daniel from the lions Daniel 6:16-23 ...
Jonah saved by the great fish Jonah 2:1-10 ...
In the N
Abram - He then removed to a hilly region on the north of Jericho; and as the pastures were exhausted, migrated southward, till a famine drove him into Egypt, probably the earliest, certainly the most productive, corn country of the ancient world. This intelligence being brought to Abraham, he collected the men of his tribe, three hundred and eighteen, and falling upon the kings by night, near the fountains of Jericho, he defeated them, retook the spoil, and recovered Lot
Palesti'na - North of Jericho they recede in a kind of wide amphitheatre, and the valley becomes twelve miles broad--a breadth which it thenceforward retains to the southern extremity of the Dead Sea. Its enervating influence is shown by the inhabitants of Jericho
Festivals - Later references in the Bible to the observance of the Passover are found in 1618884468_13 (the plains of Jericho near Gilgal), 2Chronicles 30:1,2Chronicles 30:3,2Chronicles 30:13, 2 Chronicles 30:15 (during the reign of Hezekiah); and 2 Kings 23:21-23 (Josiah's unique Passover)
Pottery in Bible Times - Jericho, Shagr19/|! ar ha-Golan and other sites in the Jordan Valley have provided the best examples of these early cultural developments
Hospitality - Such was probably the inn of the Good Samaritan ( Luke 10:34 ), identified with Khân Hadrûr , on the road to Jericho
Gideon - toward Midian, intending to cross near Jericho
Silence - But when the multitude rebuked the blind men who cried importunately to Him at the gate of Jericho, Jesus listened to their appeal (Matthew 20:31); and when the disciples sought to silence the mothers who brought their children to be blessed, Jesus encouraged them with one of His most striking and characteristic sayings (Matthew 19:13, Mark 10:13, Luke 18:15)
Elijah - of Jordan (or else, as many think, the wady Kelt near Jericho), beyond Ahab's reach, where the ravens miraculously fed him with "bread and flesh in the morning . border of the Ephraimite hills), Bethel, and Jericho successively, by the Lord's mission, Elijah went, giving probably parting counsels to the prophets' schools in those places
Transportation And Travel - The hilly spine of central Palestine forced the traveler to zigzag around steep ascents (such as that between Jericho and Jerusalem), or follow ridges along the hill tops (the Beth Horon route northwest of Jerusalem), or go along watersheds (Bethlehem to Mizpah)
Rome And the Roman Empire - His fourth wife, Agrippina, is mentioned on a recently discovered sarcophagus in the Goliath family cemetery on the western edge of Jericho
Numbers, Book of - The book closes with instruction as to the inheritance of daughters, so that the position belonging to each tribe should remain as allotted; ending with the words, "These are the commandments and the judgements which the Lord commanded by the hand of Moses unto the children of Israel in the plains of Moab by Jordan near Jericho
Clementine Literature - The disciples fly to Jericho, and the enemy hastens to Damascus, whither he supposes Peter to have fled in order there to make havoc of the faithful. At Jericho, James hears from Zacchaeus of the mischief being done by Simon at Caesarea, and sends Peter thither to refute him, ordering him to report to him annually, but more particularly every seven years
Reality - Prompt and warm, too, was His approval of the genuine feeling which He found struggling to assert itself in any soul, even when others condemned, as when He threw the shield of His graeiousness over Zacchaeus of Jericho (Luke 19:9), the erring woman amid her penitence (Luke 7:44-48), and Mary of Bethany in the scene of the anointing (John 12:5-7)
Salvation - On three occasions our Lord has brought out the spiritual significance of the physical salvation by calling special attention to its dependence on the exercise of faith: the woman with the issue of blood (Mark 5:34 = Matthew 9:22 = Luke 8:48), the blind man near Jericho (Mark 10:52 = Luke 18:42), one of the lepers (Luke 17:19)
Tombs - The Hebrew is translated "Joshua was by Jericho," as it must mean in Joshua 5:13; so "in" must mean in Genesis 13:18; Genesis 37:12-13; Joshua 24:32
Jews, Judaism - The one notable descendant of Judah through Zerah was Achan, who brought calamity on the Israelites when he took booty from Jericho at the time of the conquest (Joshua 7:1,18,24 )
Crucifixion - Two brigands had been crucified with Him, two of those outlaws who infested the steep road from Jericho to Jerusalem, and by their deeds of violence gave it the grim name of ‘the Ascent of Blood’ (cf
Night (2) - ‘He entered Jericho only to pass through it
Locust - The present writer has seen on both sides of the Dead Sea, and also in the neighbourhood of Jericho and Gadara, locusts at the various stages of development devastating the country and making all verdure disappear in an instant
Nehemiah - A volunteer party from the neighbouring city of Jericho took up the portion of the wall adjoining Eliashib; and next to them a man whose name we do not know
Mephibosheth - Four hundred years before, just at the same place, when the inhabitants of Gibeon heard what Joshua had done to Jericho and to Ai, they did work wilily, and went and made as if they had been ambassadors, and took old sacks upon their asses, and wine bottles old and rent and bound up, and old shoes and clouted upon their feet, and old garments upon them, and all the bread of their provisions was dry and mouldy
Locust - The present writer has seen on both sides of the Dead Sea, and also in the neighbourhood of Jericho and Gadara, locusts at the various stages of development devastating the country and making all verdure disappear in an instant
Matthew, the Gospel According to - Matthew 20: cures two blind men while going from Jericho
Maccabees - On account of his popularity, Herod had him drowned while he was bathing at Jericho, in the same year, when he had reached the age of seventeen
Diseases - Herod the Great, according to the first century Jewish historian, Josephus, spent his last days at his winter palace in Jericho, where he sought relief in hot baths from his intense suffering
Tribes of Israel, the - As the tribes entered the land, it was Achan of the tribe of Judah who was guilty of taking some of the forbidden booty or loot from Jericho (Joshua 7:1 )
Canaan, History And Religion of - Some of the best examples of cities indicating Semitic influences are Jericho, Megiddo, Byblos, and Ugarit
Miracle - the conquest of Jericho versus the defeat at Aichaps
Priest - They blew them at Jericho's overthrow (Joshua 6:4) and the war against Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:12; compare 2 Chronicles 20:21-22); 3,700 joined David (1 Chronicles 12:23; 1 Chronicles 12:27). Jerusalem and Jericho were their chief head quarters (Luke 10:30)
Prophet - He instituted theological colleges of prophets; one at Ramah where he lived (1 Samuel 19:12; 1 Samuel 19:20), another was at Bethel (2 Kings 2:3), another at Jericho (2 Kings 2:5), another at Gilgal (2 Kings 4:38, also 2 Kings 6:1)
Preaching - At Naioth, in the suburbs of Ramah, there was one where Samuel dwelt; and there was one at Jericho, and a third at Bethel, to which Elijah and Elisha often resorted
Pronunciation of Proper Names - ]'>[3] , such as Jericho, Joash, &c Israel, History of - Under the leadership of Joshua, they crossed the Jordan River and entered the “Promised Land” at Jericho
Ideal - The sinful woman in the house of Simon the Pharisee (Philippians 3:14), Zacchaeus, the grasping publican of Jericho (Luke 19:1-10), Matthew, leaving the receipt of custom to become an Apostle (Matthew 9:9 ||), may serve as examples
Antiochus - Simon Maccabaeus, prince and high priest of the Jews, being treacherously murdered by Ptolemy, his son-in-law, in the castle of Docus, near Jericho, the murderer immediately sent to Antiochus Sidetes to demand troops, that he might recover for him the country and cities of the Jews
Egypt - It is recorded that they had taken the fortress of Jericho, and were plundering 'all the king's lands
Vespasian - Proceeding to Idumaea, he left troops there, and marched by Ammaus through Samaria to Jericho, where he arrived about 24th June 68
Gospels - His route was through Samaria into Galilee from Ephraim (Luke 9:51; John 11:54) as the starting point, then along the border between Galilee and Samaria into Peraea (Luke 17:11; Luke 13:31), so by Jericho to Bethany and Jerusalem (Birks' Horae Evangel
Palestine - in the region of Jericho
Preaching - At Naioth, in the suburbs of Ramah, there was one, where Samuel dwelt; there was another at Jericho, and a third at Bethel, to which Elijah and Elisha often resorted
Judas Iscariot (2) - (1) On account of this difficulty, Cheyne conjectures that Ἱεριχωτής, ‘a man of Jericho,’ is the true reading
Money - ‘tongue’) of gold ’ which Achan appropriated from the loot of Jericho ( Joshua 7:21 ) was probably such a thin bar of gold
David - in the "habitations" of the prophets there, connected together by a wall or hedge round; a school over which Samuel presided, as Elisha did over those at Gilgal and Jericho; schools not for monastic separation from life's duties, but for mental and spiritual training with a view to greater usefulness in the world
House - The only reference to foundation sacrifice in OT is the case of Hiel the Bethelite, who sacrificed his two sons for that such is the true interpretation can now scarcely be doubted his firstborn at the re-founding of Jericho, and his youngest at the completion and dedication of the walls and gates ( 1 Kings 16:34 RV Feasts And Festivals of Israel - Priests sounded trumpets prior to the destruction of Jericho (Joshua 6:16 ), and trumpets were regularly used as a military signal (2 Samuel 2:28 )
Sanhedrin - , diminished its power by dividing the country into five districts and placing a Sanhedrin in Sepphoris and Jericho alongside of that at Jerusalem (Jos
Turning - ), in Zacchaeus the publican of Jericho (Luke 19:8 ff
Judges (1) - ...
On the other hand, the story of Ehud, Judges 3:12-30 , is a piece of genuine old history; signs of redactional work are, Indeed, not wanting at the beginning and end, but the central facts of the story, such as the Moabite oppression and the conquest of Jericho, the realistic description of the assassination of Eglon, and the defeat of the Moabites, all bear the stamp of genuineness
Samuel, First And Second, Theology of - , the role it played at the crossing of the Jordan [7]) it is not surprising that when the Israelites were defeated by the Philistines (1 Samuel 4 ) the elders requested that the ark be brought to the battlefield
Jesus Christ - After a short trip back north, taking him to the border of Galilee once more, Jesus returned by way of Jericho to Jerusalem for the last time
Boyhood - Tiberias, Jericho, Tarichaea had each a hippodrome or a stadium (Schürer, ii
Boyhood of Jesus - Jericho is quite as probable a resting-place
Work - A generation later, the conquest of Jericho is a dramatic example of trust in God's work (Joshua 6-7 )
Announcements of Death - ...
(b) Jesus uses the word ‘crucify’ before He reaches Jericho on this last journey to Jerusalem (Matthew 20:19)
Canaan - The country about Jericho was celebrated for its balsam, as well as for its palm trees; and two plantations of it existed during the last war between the Jews and the Romans for which both parties fought desperately
Canon of the New Testament - Paul’s]'>[4] Epistles, threw down even the walls of Jericho, that is all the instruments of idolatry and the doctrines of the philosophers’), 1Peter , 1 John, Revelation
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - ), and Rahab from the fate of Jericho (xii
Christianity - Among the proselytes to Christianity we find Nicodemus, and Joseph of Arimathea, members of the senate of Israel; Jairus, a ruler of the synagogue; Zaccheus, the chief of the publicans at Jericho; Apollos, distinguished for eloquence; Paul, learned in the Jewish law; Sergius Paulus, governor of the island of Cyprus; Cornelius, a Roman captain; Dionysius, a judge and senator of the Athenian areopagus; Erastus, treasurer of Corinth; Tyrannus, a teacher of grammar and rhetoric at Corinth; Publius, governor of Malta; Philemon, a person of considerable rank at Colosse; Simon, a noted sophist in Samaria; Zenas, a lawyer; and even the domestics of the emperor himself
Jerusalem - 588, the garrison, with the king, endeavoured to make their escape from the city, but were pursued and defeated by the Chaldeans in the plains of Jericho; Zedekiah taken prisoner; his sons killed before his face at Riblah, whither he was taken to the king of Babylon; and he himself, after his eyes were put out, was bound with fetters of brass, and carried prisoner to Babylon, where he died: thus fulfilling the prophecy of Ezekiel, which declared that he should be carried to Babylon, but should not see the place, though he should die there, Ezekiel 12:13