What does Jeremiah mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יִרְמְיָ֖הוּ the major prophet 30
יִרְמְיָ֔הוּ the major prophet 20
יִרְמְיָ֙הוּ֙ the major prophet 14
יִרְמְיָ֗הוּ the major prophet 11
יִרְמְיָ֥הוּ the major prophet 9
יִרְמְיָ֣הוּ the major prophet 9
יִרְמְיָ֑הוּ the major prophet 7
יִרְמְיָ֛הוּ the major prophet 4
יִרְמְיָ֤הוּ the major prophet 4
יִרְמְיָֽהוּ the major prophet 3
יִרְמְיָהוּ֮ the major prophet 3
יִרְמְיָ֣ה the major prophet 3
יִרְמְיָ֥ה the major prophet 3
יִרְמְיָ֜הוּ the major prophet 3
יִרְמְיָ֑ה the major prophet 2
יִרְמְיָ֖ה the major prophet 2
ἰερεμίου the son of Hilkiah of the priests that were in Anathoth. 2
יִרְמְיָ֧הוּ the major prophet 1
לְיִרְמְיָ֣הוּ the major prophet 1
ἰερεμίαν the son of Hilkiah of the priests that were in Anathoth. 1
לְיִרְמְיָ֑הוּ the major prophet 1
יִרְמְיָֽה the major prophet 1
לְיִרְמְיָ֖ה the major prophet 1
וְיִרְמְיָֽה the major prophet 1
בְּיִרְמְיָ֔הוּ the major prophet 1
יִרְמְיָ֔ה the major prophet 1
וְיִרְמְיָ֕הוּ the major prophet 1
וְיִרְמְיָ֜הוּ the major prophet 1
וְיִרְמְיָ֑הוּ the major prophet 1
וְיִרְמְיָ֣הוּ the major prophet 1
בְּיִרְמְיָ֖הוּ the major prophet 1
יִרְמְיָ֧ה the major prophet 1
؟ יִרְמְיָ֔הוּ the major prophet 1
יִרְמִיָ֣ה the major prophet 1
וְיִרְמְיָ֨ה the major prophet 1
וְיִרְמְיָ֤ה the major prophet 1
יָשׁ֗וּב to return 1

Definitions Related to Jeremiah

H3414


   1 the major prophet, son of Hilkiah of the priestly family in Anathoth; author of the prophetic book bearing his name.
   2 a man of Libnah and father of Hamutal the wife of king Josiah.
   3 a Gadite who joined David at Ziklag.
   4 a Manassehite, one of the mighty men of valour of the Transjordanic half tribe of Manasseh.
   5 a Gadite and warrior of David.
   6 a warrior of David.
   7 a priest who joined Nehemiah in the covenant ceremony.
   8 a priest also in the time of Nehemiah; maybe same as 7.
   9 father of Jaazaniah the Rechabites.
   Additional Information: Jeremiah = “whom Jehovah has appointed”.
   

H7725


   1 to return, turn back.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to turn back, return.
            1a1a to turn back.
            1a1b to return, come or go back.
            1a1c to return unto, go back, come back.
            1a1d of dying.
            1a1e of human relations (fig).
            1a1f of spiritual relations (fig).
               1a1f1 to turn back (from God), apostatise.
               1a1f2 to turn away (of God).
               1a1f3 to turn back (to God), repent.
               1a1f4 turn back (from evil).
            1a1g of inanimate things.
            1a1h in repetition.
      1b (Polel).
         1b1 to bring back.
         1b2 to restore, refresh, repair (fig).
         1b3 to lead away (enticingly).
         1b4 to show turning, apostatise.
      1c (Pual) restored (participle).
      1d (Hiphil) to cause to return, bring back.
         1d1 to bring back, allow to return, put back, draw back, give back, restore, relinquish, give in payment.
         1d2 to bring back, refresh, restore.
         1d3 to bring back, report to, answer.
         1d4 to bring back, make requital, pay (as recompense).
         1d5 to turn back or backward, repel, defeat, repulse, hinder, reject, refuse.
         1d6 to turn away (face), turn toward.
         1d7 to turn against.
         1d8 to bring back to mind.
         1d9 to show a turning away.
            1d10 to reverse, revoke.
      1e (Hophal) to be returned, be restored, be brought back.
      1f (Pulal) brought back.
      

G2408


   1 the son of Hilkiah of the priests that were in Anathoth.
   He was called very young (B.
   C.
            626) to the prophetic office, and prophesied 42 years.
            He probably died in Egypt.
            Additional Information: Jeremiah = “whom Jehovah has appointed”.
            

Frequency of Jeremiah (original languages)

Frequency of Jeremiah (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jeremiah
(Hebrew: possibly, whom Jehovah appoints)
Prophet. He was the son of Helcias (Jeremiah 1), of a priestly race of Anathoth, a little village of the tribe of Benjamin. He was raised In love and respect for Jewish traditions, and studied with care the utterances of previous prophets, in particular the oracles of Isaias and Micheas. By temperament sensitive and timid, Jeremias became otherwise when there was question of carrying God's message to men; menaces, insults, and torments meant nothing; he became "a fortified city and a pillar of iron, and a wall of brass." It was in the 13th year of the reign of Josias, that the word of God came to Jeremias. Under this king, the activity of Jeremias was moderate, because the piety of Josias held in check the hatred of the enemies of the prophet. Yet the persecutions of his compatriots (II, 21), and of his relatives (12,6), menaced his life, and he fixed his definite abode at Jerusalem. Unfortunately, Josias was followed by three unworthy sons, weakling rulers on the throne of David. During the three months reign of Joachaz, Jeremias reproved the luxury of the royal house (22). King Joakim forgot the God of his fathers and plunged into all sorts of impieties and disorders. It was in such circumstances that Jeremias, yielding to the inspiration of God, placed himself in the court of the Temple, and announced its destruction (26). These words produced a tumult. The priests and false prophets seized him, crying, "Let him be put to death." Happily, Jeremias was saved through the intervention of Ahicam. With the invasion of Nabuchodonosor, Jeremias pronounced the famous prophecy of the 70 years of captivity (25). Then he received the order to write all that God had revealed to him, since the time of Josias, in a volume, and to have it read on the solemn day by his disciple Baruch. But Joakim, enraged, threw the volume into a fire, and imprisoned Jeremias and Baruch (36). Under Sedecias, Jeremias suffered continual persecutions (38). He tried to return to his native land but was seized, accused of treason, and again imprisoned. With the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, Nabuchodonosor gave Jeremias the choice of going to Babylon, or remaining at Jerusalem. Jeremias preferred to live in the midst of the Holy City. There, over its ruins, he chanted his immortal Lamentations; but the remnant of the Jews fled to Egypt, dragging Jeremias with them. At Daphne, pious tradition says, he was stoned to death for the prediction of God's wrath. It was a fit ending to a life of self-sacrifice. His whole life was a living prophecy of the sufferings of Christ. Like Christ, Jeremias continued to intercede for the Jews; truly, "this is he that prayeth much for the people, and for all the holy city, Jeremias the prophet of God" (2Machebees 15). The prophecy or Book of Jeremias, was probably put together by Baruch. There are 52 chapters. The Lamentations or Songs, five in number, after the manner of the Psalms or Proverbs, bewail the sorrows of the Holy City. Some portions of them are sung at the Tenebrae in Holy Week, as they express the sorrows of the Church over Christ's Passion, the enormity of sin, and the need of penance.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah
(jehr ih mi' uh) Personal name meaning, “may Yahweh lift up,” “throw,” or “found.” 1. The head of a clan of the tribe of Manasseh in East Jordan (1 Chronicles 5:24 ). 2 . Three soldiers of David's army at Ziklag (1Chronicles 12:4,1Chronicles 12:10,1 Chronicles 12:13 ). 3 . The father-in-law of King Josiah of Judah (640-609 B.C.) and grandfather of the Kings Jehoahaz [1] (2 Kings 23:31 ) and Zedekiah (597-586 B.C.) (2 Kings 24:18 ; Jeremiah 52:1 ). 4 . A representative of the sect of the Rechabites (Jeremiah 35:3 ). 5 . Three priests or heads of priestly families in the times of Zerubbabel about 537 B.C. (Nehemiah 12:1 ,Nehemiah 12:1,12:12 ) and Nehemiah about 455 B.C. (Nehemiah 10:2 ; Nehemiah 12:34 ).
Other persons by the name of Jeremiah are referred to in Hebrew inscriptions from Lachish and Arad about 700 B.C. and in a number of ancient Jewish seals. The Bible has a short form of the name seventeen times and a long form 121 times. Both forms are applied to the prophet. Inscriptions use the longer form.
Jeremiah, the prophet The Bible tells us more about personal experiences of Jeremiah than of any other prophet. We read that his father's name was Hilkiah, a priest from Anathoth (Jeremiah 44:1-300 ). He was called to be a prophet in the thirteenth year of King Josiah (627/6 B.C.) (Jeremiah 1:2 ). He was active under the Kings Jehoahaz-Shallum (609 B.C.) (Jeremiah 22:11 ), Jehoiakim (609-587 B.C.) (Jeremiah 1:3 ; Jeremiah 22:18 ; Jeremiah 26:1 ; Jeremiah 35:1 ; Jeremiah 36:1 , Jeremiah 36:9 ), Jehoiachin/Jeconiah/Coniah (597 B.C.) (Jeremiah 22:24 ; Jeremiah 24:1 ; Jeremiah 27:20 ; Jeremiah 28:3 ; Jeremiah 29:2 ; Jeremiah 37:1 ), and Zedekiah (597-586 B.C.) (Jeremiah 1:3 ; Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 27:1-12 ; Jeremiah 28:1 ; Jeremiah 32:1 ; Jeremiah 34:2 ; Jeremiah 37-38 ; Jeremiah 39:4 ; Jeremiah 52:7 ). When Jerusalem was destroyed by the Babylonians in 587 B.C., Jeremiah moved to Mizpah, the capital of Gedaliah, the newly appointed Jewish governor of the Babylonian province of Judah (Jeremiah 40:5 ). When Gedaliah was assassinated (Jeremiah 41:1 ), Jeremiah was deported to Egypt against his will by Jewish officers who had survived the catastrophes (Jeremiah 42:1-43:7 ). In Egypt he continued to preach oracles against the Egyptians (Jeremiah 43:8-13 ) and against his compatriots (Jeremiah 32:365 ).
Jeremiah is depicted as living in constant friction with the authorities of his people, religious (priests Jeremiah 20:1-6 ; prophets Jeremiah 2:1-251 ; or both Jeremiah 26:1 ), political (kings Jeremiah 21-22 ; Jeremiah 36-38 ), or all of them together (Jeremiah 1:18-19 ; Jeremiah 2:26 ; Jeremiah 8:1 ), including Jewish leaders after the Babylonian invasion (Jeremiah 42:1-43:13 ). Still his preaching emphasized a high respect for prophets whose warning words could have saved the people if they had listened (Jeremiah 7:25 ; Jeremiah 26:4 ; Jeremiah 29:17-19 ; Jeremiah 35:13 ). He trusted in the promise of ideal future kings (Jeremiah 23:5 ; Jeremiah 33:14-17 ). He recommended national surrender to the rule of the Babylonian Empire and called Nebuchadnezzar, Babylon's emperor and Judah's most hated enemy, the “servant of the Lord” (Jeremiah 25:9 ; Jeremiah 27:6 ). He even incited his compatriots to desert to the enemy (Jeremiah 21:8 ). He was accused of treason and convicted (Jeremiah 37:11 ; Jeremiah 38:1-6 ), and yet the most aggressive oracles against Babylon are attributed to him (50–51). Enemies challenged his prophetic honesty and the inspiration of his message (Jeremiah 43:1-3 ; Jeremiah 28:1 ; Jeremiah 29:24 ), and yet kings and nobles sought his advice (Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 37:3 ; Jeremiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 42:1 ).
He constantly proclaimed God's judgment upon Judah and Jerusalem, and yet he was also a prophet of hope, proclaiming oracles of salvation, conditioned (Jeremiah 3:22-4:2 ) or unconditioned (30–31; Jeremiah 1:5 ; Jeremiah 33:6 ; Jeremiah 34:4 ). God forbade him to intercede for his people (Jeremiah 7:16 ; Jeremiah 11:14 ; Jeremiah 14:11 ; compare Jeremiah 15:1 ); yet he interceded (Jeremiah 14:7-9 ,Jeremiah 14:7-9,14:19-22 ). God ordered him to live without marriage and family (Jeremiah 16:2 ). He had to stay away from the company of merrymakers (Jeremiah 15:17 ) and from houses of feasting (Jeremiah 16:8 ). He complained to and argued with God (Jeremiah 12:1-17 ), complaining about the misery of his office (Jeremiah 20:7-18 ). At the same time he sang hymns of praise to his God (Jeremiah 20:13 ).
Jeremiah's call came in the thirteenth year of King Josiah, about 627/6 B.C. (Jeremiah 1:2 ; Jeremiah 25:3 ; compare Jeremiah 36:2 ). Josiah remains however, the only Jewish king contemporary with Jeremiah to and about whom no word is spoken in the whole book. No concrete reference appears to any of the dramatic changes of national liberation and religious reformation within the last eighteen years of Josiah's reign (2 Kings 22:1-23:30 ). The words of the call narrative: “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, I appointed you as a prophet to the nations” (1618417536_1 NIV), may suggest that the date of Jeremiah's call and birth is one and the same. In this case his prophetic activity must have begun many years later, but again with uncertain date.
The Book of Jeremiah
1. Origin This second longest book of the Bible, next to the Psalms, is the only one of the Old Testament that tells us some details of its origin. According to Jeremiah 36:1-26 , Baruch had written a first version at the dictation of Jeremiah. The scroll was read first in public, and then again for the state officials and for the king. King Jehoiakim burnt it piece by piece. Jeremiah therefore dictated a second and enlarged edition of the first book to Baruch (Jeremiah 36:32 ). Additional references to Jeremiah's own writing activity (Jeremiah 30:2 ; Jeremiah 51:60 ; compare Jeremiah 25:13 ) forbids the identification of the scroll of Jeremiah 36:32 with the present form of the biblical book.
2. Structure and Content The book may be subdivided into the following main sections:
I. Call narrative and Visions (Jeremiah 1:1-19 )
II. Prophecies and Visions (1618417536_50:14 )
III. Stories about Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26:1-45:5 )
IV. Oracles Against Foreign nations (Jeremiah 25:15-38 ; Jeremiah 46:1-51:64 )
V. Historical epilogue (Jeremiah 52:1-34 )
VI. Oracles on the restoration of Israel (Jeremiah 30:1-31:40 )
This structure is not based on chronology as seen above. Nor is it based on form. The so-called confessions of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 11:18-23 ; Jeremiah 12:1-6 ; Jeremiah 15:10-21 ; Jeremiah 17:14-18 ; Jeremiah 18:19-23 ; Jeremiah 20:7-13 ,Jeremiah 20:7-13,20:14-18 ) are scattered through Jeremiah 11-20 . Oracles of hope (Jeremiah 30-31 ) interrupt the stories about Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26-45 ). Words against kings (Jeremiah 21:11-22:30 ) and against prophets (Jeremiah 23:9-40 ) appear to be independent collections. The complex nature of the structure is further complicated by evidence from the earliest Greek translation. There the oracles against foreign nations are in a different order and appear immediately after Jeremiah 25:13 rather than at Jeremiah 46:1 . This and other evidence suggests a long and complicated process of collection of the Jeremiah materials into a book. Traditional scholarly theories have tried to attribute poetic oracles to Jeremiah, stories about the prophet to Baruch, and prose sermons to a later editor who used the Book of Jeremiah to exemplify and teach the theology of the Book of Deuteronomy. Such theories are much too simplistic and must be discarded. Aside from the stories of the scroll's destruction, expansion, and recopying (Jeremiah 36:1 ), we do not know all the processes through which God led to produce His inspired Book of Jeremiah.
3. Text of the Book The earliest Greek version of Jeremiah, dating back to pre-Christian centuries, is more than 12.5% shorter than the Hebrew text. Only a few longer sections are missing (Jeremiah 33:14-26 ; Jeremiah 39:4-13 ). The Greek text rather uses less titles and epithets, and single words and verses are missing throughout the book. More than 2700 words of the Hebrew text do not have Greek equivalents. Fragments of Hebrew manuscripts from Qumran show that a longer and a shorter Hebrew text existed side-by-side in the time of Jesus. This confirms that the development of the Book of Jeremiah continued for centuries. Growing agreement among Jeremiah Bible students suggests that the shorter text represents an older stage of development.
4. The Message Theologically, the Book of Jeremiah stimulates the search for the will of God in moments when all the institutions and religious representatives normally in charge of administrating His will are discredited. Neither the Davidic monarchy (Jeremiah 21:1-22:30 ), nor prophets and priests (Jeremiah 23:9-40 ), nor the cultic institutions of the Temple (Jeremiah 7:1-34 ; Jeremiah 26:1-9 ) could help the people to prevent impending calamities; nor could they detect that inconspicuous apostasy that mixes up the little aims of personal egoism (Jeremiah 2:29-37 ; Jeremiah, Theology of
To state the theology of a book is to offer a synthesis of the material from a theological rather than historical angle of vision. A theology of Jeremiah is derived by observing the structure of the book, its genres (e.g., judgment oracles, laments), the traditions on which it draws (e.g., covenant), its vocabulary (e.g., turn, sub ), its "characters" (God, Israel, nations, the prophet), and the religious/social agenda of the time (i.e., a threat on Judah from the northern foe and subsequent siege). To determine a theology of the book one asks in essence, "What convictions drive this book?"
The structure of the Book of Jeremiah, much debated, may be sketched in envelope fashion by chapters as follows:
A. God's Personal Message to Jeremiah (1) B. Speeches Warning of Disaster (2-10) C. Stories of Prophet Wrestling with People and God (11-20) D. Disputation with Kings and Prophets (21-29) E. The Book of Comfort (30-33) D1. Disputation with Kings (34-38) C1. Stories of a Sacked City and the Aftermath (39-45) B1. Oracles against Nations (46-51) A1. Appendix: Historical Documentation (52) A fresh approach to the theology of Jeremiah is by means of a two-directional grid: (1) the book's chiastic structure and (2) the "characters" within the book. Our discussion proceeds via the chiastic couplets.
The Dynamic of a History of Salvation (chaps. 2-10 = B; 46-51 = B1) . The first major section, leaving aside chapter 1, contains speeches and is matched by the oracles against nations. The theological rubric in which the sermons and the oracles are cast is the history of both salvation and judgment. The section begins in a review mode: "I remember …
[1] you loved me and followed me through the desert" (2:2). The recital, alternately of God's actions and Israel's response, is capsulized in 2:21: "I had planted you like a choice vine… How then did you turn against me into a corrupt, wild vine?" God's salvific actions include the "exodus" (2:6; 7:22) and Israel's "entry into a fertile land" (2:7; 3:19; 7:7). God's judgment on the "corrupt, wild vine" will include disintegration and dislocation.
The indisputable lordship of God over history is poignantly made through the repeated designation (more than eighty times) of God as "the Lord of hosts" (NIV "God Almighty"). This title, associated closely with verdicts of judgment (thirty times), is liberally sprinkled in the oracles against the nations. World history, as well as redemptive history, proceeds under the eye of the cosmic commander-in-chief.
God: Benevolent, Angry, and Pained . Yahweh, the God of Israel is magnanimous but just. God is solicitous. "How gladly would I treat you like sons and give you a desirable land" (3:19). Despite Judah's gross evils, the Holy One of Israel will not forsake his people (51:5). A succinct characterization of God is given in 9:24: God delights in steadfast love, justice, and righteousness.
Because of the people's sin, however, and the departure from the "ancient paths" (6:16), God is about to act with anger and fury (7:20). Warnings and exhortations are cast in graphic pictures of coming devastation of Judah by enemy forces, primarily the foe from the north (5:15-17; 6:22-26; 7:32-8:3; 8:13-14,17; 9:20-22; 10:18) and also in scenarios of cosmic catyclism not unlike the prospects of atomic destruction (4:23-26). God is also angry with nations (50:21; 51:25). These scenes of judgment are driven by God's anger, which "burns like a fire" (4:4,8). One of several terms for anger, ‘ap , is found twenty-four times in Jeremiah—more often than in any other biblical book. Forty-two different passages in Jeremiah speak of God's anger. The tradition of God's anger against evil reaches far back (cf. Exodus 32:10 ). This anger is not wrath on a rampage but a holy anger, for the nexus between sin and punishment is unambiguous (4:18; 51:6).
It would be totally wrong, however, to conclude that Jeremiah's God is nothing but harsh. It is especially in chapters 2-3 that the pain of God surfaces, and in the context of rejection, as of a spouse in a marriage: "Does a maiden forget her jewelry, a bride her wedding ornaments? Yet my people have forgotten me, days without number" (2:32). The tradition of God's pain over a people's sin reaches back to the flood, if not earlier (Genesis 6:6 ). Expressive of his own pain and God's, the prophet sobs over the waywardness of the people (8:21-9:2). The pathos is echoed by Jeremiah: "O my anguish, my anguish! I writhe in pain" (4:19).
The People of God: Violating the First Commandment and More! The Temple Sermon pinpoints Judah's sin. Other speeches cite her ungrateful response to a gracious God. She has rebelled (2:8,29). Most repugnant of all is her sin of idolatry (7:9), the exchange of other "gods" for the true God (2:11). This monstrous evil, described classically in chapter 10, is contrary to the first commandment. Descriptions of God as great, "the true God, " "the living God, the eternal King, " "the Maker of all things, " "the Portion of Jacob, " and the "Lord of hosts" ("Lord Almighty" NIV; vv. 6-7,10, 12-13,16) alternate with the sarcastic description of senseless, worthless, perishable idols (vv. 8-9,11, 14-15). Further, God charges his people with deceit and insensitivity to injustice (5:23-29). A poll of the citizenry shows that there is no one with integrity (5:1-9; cf. 9:3-6). Back of the indictments of adultery (lusty stallions, each neighing for another man's wife, 5:8; 3:2-3; 7:9), stealing, and murder (7:9), lie the Ten Commandments. A sinful people is characterized as two sisters, "ever-turning" Israel and apostate Judah ("faithless Israel" and "unfaithful Judah, 3:11). Urgings toward repentance, a concept that is deepened, are many. Sub ("turn" or "return" in the sense of repent) is a verbal trademark of the book.
Nations Destined for Judgment and Salvation . The oracles against the nations do not so much present the case for punishment as they do the certainty and nature of God's judgment. Significantly, Egypt, with a history of oppression, heads this roll call of nations. She will flee like a hissing serpent (46:22), and Moab, because of pride (48:29), will be emptied like jars (48:12). A sword will come against Babylon (50:35-38) for her wrongdoing to Israel (51:24). Surprisingly, there are also bald, unconditional announcements of restoration for Egypt (46:26b), Moab (48:47), Ammon (49:6), and Elam (49:39).
The Dynamic of Covenant (chaps. 11-20 = C; 39-45 = C1) . The next block of material, together with its complementary section in the latter half of the book, moves to stories about Jeremiah personally, especially his "inner life" (chaps. 11-20 = C) and national events (chaps. 39-45 = C1). The theological matrix for this block is primarily covenant, a subject introduced at the outset: "Cursed is the man who does not obey the terms of this covenant" (11:3).
A fundamental understanding beginning with Moses and continuing in Jeremiah was that covenant differed from contract. Covenant was a matter of divine initiative, not mutual negotiation. In covenant, loyalty to a person was the critical factor; in a contract performance of set stipulations was central. Failure in a covenant relationship was a failure in interpersonal relationships, and not alone failure in adhering to a set of requirements. Moses warned against breaking the covenant (Deuteronomy 28:15-68 ). For Jeremiah a broken covenant was a reality; covenant curses such as loss of land were imminent. The nexus between wrongdoing and retribution was clear: "I am going to bring … disaster … because they were stiff-necked and would not listen to my words" (19:15; cf. 15:4; 40:3).
The Prophetic Ministry: Pathos and Conflict . Jeremiah, in contrast to Moses, an earlier covenant mediator, was involved more in the dissolution of the covenant than in its institution (1:10; but cf. 24:6). A perspective on the pain of this task is given in the seven laments (1:18-23; 12:1-6 [2]; 15:10-12,15-21; 17:14-18; 18:18-23; 20:7-13). Like prophets before him, Jeremiah's personal life was far from untouched by his role. He was not to marry (16:1). An intercessory role in behalf of his people was forbidden him (11:14; 14:11). The task of uprooting and tearing down institutions and misguided theologies (1:10; 7:1-15) brought tears, misery, and depression (9:1-2a; 15:15-18). Like Elijah (1 Kings 19:4 ), Jeremiah would rather die than continue (20:14-18).
Jeremiah, like other servants of God, was divinely called (1:4-10; cf. Moses, Exodus 3:1-14 ; Isaiah 6 ). Like others, his call put in him conflict-filled situations. In Jeremiah's self-disclosing laments, quite unparalleled in prophetic literature, one glimpses the discomfort that prophetic role brought him. Confused, he asks about justice (12:1c). Pained, beset with hostility, he blurts, "Remember me and care for me" (15:15; cf. Baruch, 45:3). Angry and frustrated, he protests, "O Lord, you deceived me, " for his role set him in tension even with God (20:7-13).
Israel and Judah: Disloyal Covenant Partners . Loyalty in covenant is demonstrated in obedience. God's people have been disobedient. "Obey" (sama [18:12; cf. 44:16; 17:9,23). In brief, Israel and Judah have "broken the covenant" (11:10). Consequences will follow. A trio of disasters—sword, famine, and plague—to which is added exile, surfaces frequently, in whole or in part (14:12,16, 18; 15:2; 16:4; 44:12-13,27).
A God of Persistence, Integrity, and Freedom . God is depicted not as an umpire who upon determining that the covenant is broken heartlessly announces the punishment. On the contrary, God coaxes his fickle covenant partner to keep the covenant intact. Symbolic actions are a marked feature in chapters 11-20. Two of these, one about a belt and another about a jar, symbolize an evil portent of ruin (13:9; 19:11; cf. 43:8-13). God employs every means—verbal appeals (11:4), warnings (15:7), and sign-acts—to mend a covenant that is breaking.
These two narrative sections (chaps. 11-20,39-45) underscore a fundamental conviction: that which God announces, he fulfills. The frequent threats in chapters 10-20 are reported as fulfilled in the narrative of Babylon's siege of Jerusalem and deportation of her citizenry (esp. 39:1-9). Nebuzaradan, a Babylonian commander, articulates the theology of God's integrity succinctly: "The Lord your God decreed this disaster for this place. And now the Lord has brought it about; he has done just as he said he would" (40:2-3; cf. 44:29).
Yet God was not bound, as another sign-act makes clear, even with a covenant virtually shattered, to proceed with implementing the covenant consequences (18:1-12). Prophecy about the future is conditional; it is not the announcement of a fated destiny. The declaration in Section E is that God is free to initiate a new covenant (31:31-34). God is and remains free.
The Dynamics of an Agenda for Justice (chaps. 21-29 = D; 34-38 = D1) . The overriding theological concern in the disputations of Sections D and D1 is justice: "Administer justice every morning" (21:11). The biblical concept of justice involves much more than fairness. It includes compassion for those marginalized and powerless, such as victims of oppression, aliens, widows, and orphans (21:12; 22:3). Justice, the fundamental requirement for political life, is a topic that surfaces sharply in the royal roll call (22:10-23:6). In building an ostentatious palace at the expense of the poor and needy, Jehoiakim failed to do justice (22:13-17). In the section's counterpart (chaps. 34-38 = D1), the same concern for justice appears in the story of Zedekiah's freeing and then reenslaving the slaves (34:1-22). A fundamental conviction is that God is tenacious about justice.
Integrity, part of the justice agenda, is the forefront issue in the indictment against another leadership group, the prophets. A key word in this section is seqer [23:14). Hananiah is a case in point (chap. 28; cf. 23:16,25-40; 27:16). Prophets lack integrity; they commit adultery. Ahab and Zedekiah are examples (29:23; cf. 23:14). Any misuse of power, whether by kings or prophets, is altogether counter to "justice, " a matter of "doing the right."
The Prophetic Role: Confrontation . The episodes in these sections are mostly about encounters of confrontation and disputation with leaders. Already clear in the exchanges of Samuel and Saul centuries earlier is the understanding that the call to be a prophet includes confronting public leaders. Standing over the king, given Israel's hierarchy, is the prophet who in the name of God calls the king to account (1:10). In the two sections, evil has faces: Jehoiachim (22:13-19; 36:1-33), Zedekiah (34:8-22), Hananiah (28:1- 17), Ahab and Zedekiah (29:20-23), Shemaiah (29:24-32). The prophet names the evil in the lives of these "dignitaries, " and calls down the consequent punishment. One of the functions of prophets is to identify the shape of evil in a society irrespective of consequences (26:11,20-23; 37:16; 38:4,6-9).
People: Free to Choose, but Responsible . An anthropology that holds to the individual's freedom of moral choice is basic to the book, but is highlighted in this section. Early in the section Zedekiah is presented with options: "See, I am setting before you the way of life and the way of death" (21:8). This theme of choice for both Israel and other nations is made visual in the symbolic action of Jeremiah's wearing the yoke (27:1-15). The theme of choice, accompanied by persuasion (even threats) to choose the good (22:4-5; 25:5-6), surfaces climactically in the final meeting of Jeremiah with Zedekiah (38:20-21). As always, the nexus between choice and destiny is forthrightly stated: to choose the way of disobedience is to be doomed to destruction (21:8-9; 25:8-9; 27:4-6; 38:17-18); to obey is to live (26:13; 35:15).
God: Not Infinitely Patient but Nevertheless Gracious . God pleads for the people not to listen to counterfeit messages (27:16; 29:8-9). Patiently God has dispatched prophets "again and again" (25:4). But God's patience has a limit, which is reached when people and especially leaders reject his communication. Jehoiakim burns the written word (chap. 36). Zedekiah silences the oral word by incarcerating Jeremiah (37:16-38:9). God's patience is exhausted (36:31). A key word, "burn, " in chapters 37-38 recurs in the historical record (39:8).
Beyond judgment lies hope. God's intention is not destruction. His plans for his people are to give them "a hope and a future" (29:11). God remains accessible (29:13). He will watch over the exiles, give them a heart to know him (24:7), and return them from exile to their land (24:6; cf. 23:5-6).
The Dynamics of Hope (chaps. 30-33 = E) . The Book of Comfort (chaps. 30-33) occupies a strategic place in the larger book in two ways. The book's chiastic structure puts these four chapters in a pivotal position. Seen as introductory to the second half of the book, these chapters may be compared with the speeches that introduce the first half of the book. The pivotal section takes up, as might be expected, all the threads of the book, but one—hope—dominates. The motivation for words of hope, unlike the judgment speeches, is without rationale other than God's willing: "I have loved you with an everlasting love" (31:3; 33:11; cf. Deuteronomy 7:7-8 ).
The Saving God . Saving history (cf. Jeremiah 2-10 ) meets us here. Echoes of the judgment, even allusion to God's anger, have not disappeared (30:23-24; 31:2; 32:28-29), but the promised salvation lies beyond the exile. God will create a new thing on the earth: his people will be enamored of God (31:22, a likely interpretation of a difficult text). The theme of the little "book, " announced in the opening verses, is restoration: a people spiritually restored to God, a people physically restored to the land (30:3,3a is better rendered "bring about the restoration of my people Israel"). A spiritually restored people will be intent on the worship of Yahweh instead of idols (30:9,17; 31:6). Geographically a deported people will be returned from exile to their own land (30:10; 31:8-9,16). The message is exhilarating: "There is hope for your future" (31:17).
Israel: A Covenant People . Just as other sections (chaps. 11-20,39-51) turned on covenant, especially covenant curses, so that theme is featured here. Echoes of sin and the fracturing of the earlier covenant remain (30:14; cf. 32:30-35). The concentration of the covenant formula, variously worded, points to a new reality: "I will be your God; you shall be my people" (30:22; 31:1,33; 32:38). The remarkable announcement of a new covenant moves beyond the broken covenant (31:31-34). By his initiative God sets in place a covenant both like and unlike the earlier Sinai covenant. The goal of bondedness remains; the means for achieving that bondedness between people and God is forgiveness and the placing of God's law in people's hearts. It is as though with renewed energy God commits himself to covenant (31:35-37; 33:19-21).
Justice for All . The subject of justice, highlighted in surrounding chapters (21-29,34-38), also brackets the enlarged Book of Comfort (30:11; 33:15). God will do right by his people (30:11). God's intention is unchanged: he will "rejoice in doing them [3] good, and will assuredly plant them in this land" (32:41). If doing justice means to pay attention to the oppressed, then God, fully committed to justice, has swung into action because Israel had become known as "an outcast … for whom no one cares" (30:17). God will do right by Israel's enemies, too. Those who oppress and plunder will be exiled (30:16,20). In the future time God will establish the righteous Branch (Messiah) who will do "what is just and right in the land"; so the banner over the land will read, "The Lord Our Righteousness" (33:15-16).
The central chapters (30-33) gather up the theology of the book. They offer a synoptic view of God, of Israel (past and future), of nations, and of the prophet, who, caught in the mystification of purchasing land when Jerusalem is besieged, is given and then gives a word of ultimate hope.
Elmer A. Martens
See also Israel ; Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy
Bibliography . A. R. Diamond, The Confessions of Jeremiah in Context: Scenes of Prophetic Drama ; R. B. Chisholm, Jr., A Biblical Theology of the Old Testament, pp. 341-59; J. P. Hyatt, IB, pp. 784-87; G. McConville, Judgment and Promise: The Message of Jeremiah ; R. E. Manahan, Grace ThJ, 1 (1980): 77-96; E. A. Martens, Reflection and Projection, pp. 83-97; T. W. Overholt, The Threat of Falsehood: A Study in the Theology of the Book of Jeremiah ; T. M. Raitt, A Theology of Exile: Judgment and Deliverance in Jeremiah and Ezekiel ; C. R. Seitz, Theology in Conflict: Reactions to the Exile in the Book of Jeremiah ; J. A. Thompson, The Book of Jeremiah ; J. Unterman, From Repentance to Redemption: Jeremiah's Thought in Transition ; W. A. VanGemeren, Interpreting the Prophetic Word ; G. von Rad, Old Testament Theology .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jeremiah
Jeremiah (jĕr-e-mî'ah), whom Jehovah setteth up or appointeth. 1. The distinguished prophet, son of Hilkiah, a priest of Anathoth. Jeremiah 1:1-6. He was called to assume the prophetic office when a youth, and on that account declined it: but God promised him grace and strength sufficient for his work. He prophesied under Josiah, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, and Zedekiah; and for some time during the exile. During the course of his predictions, Jerusalem was in a distracted and deplorable condition, and the prophet was calumniated, imprisoned, and often in danger of death. Jeremiah expressly foretold that the captivity would endure for 70 years; he also predicted the return of the people to their own country. He appears to have stood high in the estimation of Nebuchadnezzar. Jeremiah 39:11-14. Towards the close of his life he was carried into Egypt against his will, by the Jews who remained in Judea after the murder of Gedaliah, where he probably died. Jeremiah is called "Jeremy," Matthew 2:17 A. V., and "Jeremias," Matthew 16:14 A. V. The name Jeremy, in Matthew 27:9-10, is probably an error of the transcribers for Zechariah. The ft. V. reads Jeremiah in all these places. Canon Cook says of Jeremiah: "His character is most interesting. We find him sensitive to a most painful degree, timid, shy, hopeless, desponding, constantly complaining, and dissatisfied with the course of events, but never flinching from duty.... Timid in resolve, he was unflinching in execution; as fearless when he had to face the whole world as he was dispirited and prone to murmuring when alone with God. Judged by his own estimate of himself, he was feeble, and his mission a failure; really, in the hour of action and when duty called him, he was in very truth 'a defenced city and an iron pillar, and brazen walls against the whole land.' Jeremiah 1:18. He was a noble example of the triumph of the moral over the physical nature." There are eight persons of this name mentioned in the Scriptures.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jeremiah (2)
Jeremiah, Book of. This prophecy embraces a period of upwards of 40 years, between b.c. 628 and b.c. 586. It relates to the judgments that were to come upon the people for their gross idolatry and corruption; to the restoration which awaited them, whenever they would repent of and forsake their sins; and to the glory which would arise on the church in future times. Melancholy, tender sensibility, and a tone of grief, are the distinguishing characteristics of Jeremiah's style. The several prophecies may be arranged thus: I. The introduction, chap. 1. II. Reproofs of the sins of the Jews, consisting of seven sections—a, Jeremiah 2:1-37, b. 3-6, c. 7-10, d. 11-13, e. Jeremiah 14:1 to Jeremiah 17:18, f. Jeremiah 17:19-20, g. 21-24. III. A general review of the heathen nations, and also of the people of Israel, consisting of two sections—a. 46-49, which may have been transposed, b. 25, and an historical appendix in three sections—a. 26, b. 27, c. 28, 29. IV. Two sections picturing the hopes of brighter times—a. 30, 31, b. 32, 33, to which is added an historical appendix in three sections—a. Jeremiah 34:1-7, b. Jeremiah 34:8-22, c. 35. V. The conclusion, in two sections—a. 36, b. 45. Added some time afterwards—a. 37-39, b. 40-43, c. Jeremiah 46:13-26. The fifty-second chapter of Jeremiah is nearly the same with 2 Kings 24:18 to 2 Kings 25:30. Both were mainly drawn from the same sources. The order of the prophecies of Jeremiah, from chap. 21:15 to the end of the book, is different in the Septuagint version from that of the Hebrew text; for those prophecies which, in the Hebrew, occupy the last place—46-51—are found in the Greek translation after chap. 2 Kings 25:14, and in a different order. In some editions of the Septuagint the chapters are as in the Hebrew.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jeremiah
Exaltation of the Lord
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah, Book of
This prophecy commenced in the thirteenth year of Josiah, B.C. 629, and extended beyond the destruction of Jerusalem. The great captivity was in B.C. 599, when Zedekiah was left in Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, and Jerusalem was not destroyed until B.C. 588, eleven years after. Great efforts were made by the prophet to bring Zedekiah to the fear of the Lord. What especially marks the spirit of the prophet personally is sorrow . It was a grief to him to see Judah departing from Jehovah, and to be obliged to predict the judgement of God upon them, the people he loved; added to which he actually suffered from the hand of those whom he sought to help. A similar sorrow is seen in the Lord Jesus respecting Jerusalem, and in Paul respecting the church. In some instances Jeremiah's parables were acted , so as the more forcibly to impress the careless people. The prophecies are not arranged chronologically, but there is doubtless a divine reason why that order is not followed. In the LXX the order of the chapters differs widely from that in the Hebrew and the A.V., but it is not known what led to the difference. The LXX appears to have been made from a faulty copy, or the text was misunderstood by the translators, for there are many deviations from the Hebrew. The phrase 'the Lord saith' is omitted sixty-four times, with other omissions — in all about one-eighth of the whole.
Jeremiah 1 . Jeremiah is established in his office, to which he had been sanctified from his birth as prophet to the nations, Israel having been set in the midst of the Gentiles as the direct centre of God's government in the earth. He was in great fear, but was assured of God's presence. He saw a rod of an almond tree (which is the first tree to blossom) signifying that God would hasten to perform what He said. The prophet also saw a seething pot, and its face towards the north, answering to Chaldea.
Jeremiah 2 — Jeremiah 6 This section is an appeal to Jerusalem, with exhortations to repentance, and warnings as to what had befallen Israel. It was given in the days of Josiah, when there had been a reformation, but they had not turned to God with the whole heart: backsliding Israel had justified herself more than treacherous Judah. Jeremiah 3:6,11 .
Jeremiah 7 — Jeremiah 10 . This section is respecting the temple. The people boasted of possessing the temple, but there was insincerity and idolatry. Touching exhortations are made, and judgements declared.
Jeremiah 11 — Jeremiah 12 The responsibility of the people is pressed: they had entered into covenant with God, yet they had gone into idolatry, so that the Lord asks, "What hath my beloved [1] to do in mine house?" Judgement must follow; but here and there future blessings are spoken of. There is deep grief that judgements are needed. Jeremiah 12:14 shows the prophet's office against the nations — "mine evil neighbours."
Jeremiah 13 . The destruction of the pride of Jerusalem is foretold under the figure of a marred girdle which Jeremiah had buried, the great sorrow being that though as a girdle cleaves to the loins of a man, the Lord had caused all Israel to cleave to Him for His glory, yet they had left Him: compare Luke 19:41 . [2] The parable of the bottles of wine follows, with exhortations to repent of the abominations.
Jeremiah 14 , Jeremiah 15 . A grievous famine occurred: the Lord would not be interceded with for them, yet Jeremiah takes up the sin of the people, and acknowledges it; but the answer (Jeremiah 15 ) is terrible. The false prophets were no excuse: they were utterly rejected. Jeremiah, though he loved the people, was hated by them. He had stood before the people for the Lord, who now identified him with the remnant. It should be well with them. Meanwhile Jehovah's words were the joy of his heart. Jehovah would deliver him.
Jeremiah 16 , Jeremiah 17 . The prophet is told to take no wife: the children of the place should only come to death: compare Matthew 12:46,50 . God would drive them out of the land, but there was mercy in store for the future. The prophet was mocked by the people: he had to call them to the observance of the Sabbath.
Jeremiah 18 — Jeremiah 20 . God was the potter and the people were the clay: He could do as He pleased with them, or with any nation — either pull down or build up; but they determined to walk after their own devices. He would fulfil His word concerning them. The people laid plots against Jeremiah: he was put in the stocks, and smitten by Pashur, upon whom a doom was denounced. Jeremiah bemoaned his lot.
Jeremiah 21 : — Jeremiah 24 . When Nebuchadnezzar came against Jerusalem, Zedekiah sent to the prophet to know whether the Lord would appear for them. Jeremiah had to utter the dreadful news that God would Himself fight against them. To the people it was said that if they would surrender to the king of Babylon they should live; if not, they should die. They were exhorted to repentance, and the prophecies against Shallum, Jehoiakim, and Coniah are detailed. Woe to the shepherds, but there was a day of blessing coming, when the true Son of David, the righteous Branch and King, should reign and prosper. A lamentation was made against the false prophets. The people carried away with Jeconiah to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar are compared to good figs; but those left in the land under Zedekiah to bad ones.
Jeremiah 25 gives a summary of God's judgements by Nebuchadnezzar, with a seventy years' captivity for Judah: then Babylon and all the nations that surrounded Palestine should come under God's judgements, but judgement begins with the city called by God's name.
Jeremiah 26 . In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim, Jeremiah exhorted to repentance, but the priests and prophets demanded his death. The princes however protected him, and the elders reminded the people that Hezekiah did not put Micah to death. To this it was apparently responded that Jehoiakim had putthe prophet Urijah to death. Ahikam however shielded Jeremiah.
Jeremiah 27 . Most probably the name Jehoiakim in Jeremiah 27:1 should be Zedekiah; but it may be that the prophecy was given to Jeremiah in the daysof Jehoiakim though not related till the days of Zedekiah. The king is exhorted to submit to the king of Babylon.
Jeremiah 28 . Hananiah prophesies falsely, and is opposed by Jeremiah, who foretells his death.
Jeremiah 29 . Jeremiah wrote to the captives in Babylon, urging them to make themselves homes there, and God would bring them back at the end of the seventy years. The false prophets are condemned.
Jeremiah 30 , Jeremiah 31 . The captives should surely return; but these chapters apply to the future, and this restoration will be after the 'time of Jacob's trouble,' a tribulation such as has never been cf. Matthew 24 ; Mark 13 . The new covenant blessings concern both Judah and Israel. God will appear for them, and the restoration will be full and complete with universal blessing.
Jeremiah 32 , Jeremiah 33 . Jeremiah was put in prison by Zedekiah,but he bought a field in token of his assurance of the captives' return. In Jeremiah 33 the prophecy goes on to the future, when the Lord Jesus will appear as the Branch of righteousness, and the successor of David. Jeremiah 33:15 .
Jeremiah 34 . All who had Hebrew bondservants had made a covenant with Zedekiah, and had set them free, but afterwards they again made bondmen of them. This is denounced by Jeremiah and its punishment foretold.
Jeremiah 35 . The faithfulness of the Rechabites is held up as a worthy example: God would bless them and their posterity.
Jeremiah 36 . Jeremiah caused Baruch to write his prophecy against Jerusalem in a roll. On this being read to king Jehoiakim he burnt it, and sought to arrest the prophet and Baruch; but God hid them. Another roll was obtained and the prophecies re-written.
Jeremiah 37 — Jeremiah 39 . The taking of Jerusalem was at hand. Jeremiah was about to leave the city, but was arrested, beaten, and put into prison. Zedekiah gave him some relief; but on foretelling the fall of the city he was put into a dungeon, where he sank in the mire. He was delivered by Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian, on whom a blessing was pronounced. The city was taken. Zedekiah was captured by the Chaldeans; his sons were slain before his eyes, and he himself was blinded and taken to Babylon. Jeremiah was protected by Nebuchadnezzar.
Jeremiah 40 — Jeremiah 45 . These chapters give the history of the remnant left in the land under Gedaliah, Jeremiah being with them. Gedaliah was murdered by Ishmael, sent by the king of the Ammonites, and the people were carried away. They were however rescued by Johanan, and Jeremiah was requested to inquire of God for them, the people promising obedience. God bade them abide in the land; but they, refusing to obey, went into Egypt, carrying Jeremiah with them. There they persistently practised idolatry, though warned by Jeremiah. The end of Jeremiah is not recorded.
Jeremiah 46 — Jeremiah 51 . Judgements are pronounced against the various nations that had been in contact with Israel. God had used some of them as His instruments; but their pride, malice, and cruelty had afterwards to be punished. Judgements were to fall upon Egypt, the Philistines, Moab, the Ammonites, Edom, Damascus, Kedar, Elam, and Babylon. The prophecy against Babylon was written in a book, and given to Seraiah, 'a quiet prince,' to carry to Babylon, to be read there; then he was to bind a stone to the book and cast it into the Euphrates. Babylon was to be desolate for ever.
Babylon has a special place in the prophecy of Jeremiah: Israel and Judah had been unfaithful, and the government of the world was entrusted to Babylon; but Babylon failed and its destruction was the setting free of Judah to return to their land. This was a sort of type of the judgement of the last empire in a future day when Israel will be fully restored and blessed. This is foreshadowed in some places, as in Jeremiah 50:17-20 , which speaks of both Judah and Israel being pardoned. Jeremiah 51 : closes with "Thus far are the words of Jeremiah."
Jeremiah 52 is historical and nearly the same as 2 Kings 24:18 - 2 Kings 25:30 .
The prophet's name occurs in the N.T. in Matthew 2:17 ; Matt.16:14; Matt.27:9 under the forms of JEREMIAS and JEREMY.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah
1. Man of Libnah, whose daughter Hamutal was the wife of Josiah. 2 Kings 23:31 ; 2 Kings 24:18 ; Jeremiah 52:1 .
2. Head of a family in the tribe of Manasseh. 1 Chronicles 5:24 .
3. One who resorted to David at Ziklag. 1 Chronicles 12:4 .
4,5. Two of the Gadites who resorted to David at Ziklag. 1 Chronicles 12:10,13 .
6. Son of Hilkiah, priest of Anathoth: the writer of the Book of Jeremiah. His history is contained in his prophecy. He was carried to Egypt by the rebellious Jews and his end is not recorded. 2 Chronicles 35:25 ; 2 Chronicles 36:12,21,22 ; Ezra 1:1 ; Jeremiah 1 — Jeremiah 51 .
7. Priest who sealed the covenant. Nehemiah 10:2 ; Nehemiah 12:1,12,34 .
8. Father of Jaazaniah a Rechabite. Jeremiah 35:3 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jeremiah
JEREMIAH. 1. A warrior of the tribe of Gad, fifth in reputation ( 1 Chronicles 12:10 ). 2. The tenth in reputation ( 1 Chronicles 12:13 ) of the same Gadite band. 3. A bowman and slinger of the tribe of Benjamin ( 1 Chronicles 12:4 ). 4. The head of a family in E.Manasseh ( 1 Chronicles 5:24 ). 5. A Jew of Libnah, whose daughter, Hamutal or Hamital, was one of the wives of Josiah, and mother of Jehoahaz ( Jeremiah 39:1-18 ) and Zedekiah ( 2 Kings 24:18 , Jeremiah 52:1 ). 6. The son of Habazziniah and father of Jaazaniah, the head of the Rechabites ( Jeremiah 35:3 ) in the time of the prophet Jeremiah 7:1-34 . A priest who returned with Zerubbabel ( Nehemiah 12:1 ). His name was given to one of the twenty-two courses of priests ( Ezra 2:38-39 , Nehemiah 7:39-42 ; Nehemiah 12:13 ). 8. A priest who sealed the covenant ( Nehemiah 10:2 ) and took part in the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem ( Nehemiah 12:34 ). 9. The prophet. See next article.
JEREMIAH
1. The times . Jeremiah the prophet was born towards the close of Manasseh’s long and evil reign ( c [1] . b.c. 696 641), the influence of which overshadowed his life ( Jeremiah 15:4 , 2 Kings 23:26 ). He prophesied under Josiah and his sons from the year 626 to the fall of Jerusalem in b.c. 586 ( 2 Kings 1:2 f.), and for some short time after this until he vanishes from sight amongst the fugitive Jews in Egypt (chs. 40 44).
Through Josiah’s minority (see Josiah) the ethnicizing régime of Manasseh continued; Jeremiah’s earliest preaching (chs. 2 6), and the prophecies of his contemporary Zephaniah (wh. see), reveal a medley of heathen worships in Jerusalem, gross oppression and profligacy, insolence and insensibility characterizing both court and people. Meanwhile an international crisis is approaching. The giant power of Asshur, which for a century had dominated Israel’s world, is in rapid decline, and is threatened by the new Median State on its eastern border; Nahum (wh. see) had already celebrated Nineveh’s downfall in his splendid verses. The Assyrian capital was saved for the time by the irruption of the Scythian nomads (Ezekiel’s Gog and Magog), who were swarming southwards from the Oxus plains and over the Caucasus passes. These hordes of wild horsemen overran Western Asia for a generation, leaving a lasting horror behind them. Nineveh avoided capture by the Medes in 625 only at the expense of seeing her lands wasted and her dependencies stripped from her. The war-cloud of the Scythian invasion overhangs the sky of Zephaniah, and of Jeremiah at the outset of his ministry. The territory of Judah seems, after all, to have escaped the Scythian deluge, which swept to the borders of Egypt. The nomad cavalry would reach with difficulty the Judæan highlands; and if Josiah, coming of age about this time, showed a bold front against them and saved his country from their ravages, we can account for the prestige that he enjoyed and used to such good purpose. At the same date, or even earlier, the Assyrian over-lordship had been renounced; for we find Josiah exercising independent sovereignty. It was not as the vassal of Nineveh, but in the assertion of his hereditary rights and as guardian of the old territory of Israel, that he challenged Pharaoh-necho, who was attempting to seize the lost western provinces of Assyria, to the fatal encounter of Megiddo in the year 608 ( 2 Kings 22:2 ; 2 Kings 23:15-20 , 2 Chronicles 35:20 ). The Pharaoh pointedly calls him ‘thou king of Judah,’ as if bidding him keep within his bounds ( 2 Chronicles 35:21 ). Jeremiah praises Josiah, in contrast to his son, as an upright and prosperous king, good to the poor and commending his religion by his rule ( Jeremiah 22:15-17 ).
The great event of Josiah’s reign was the reformation effected by him in its eighteenth year (b.c. 621), upon the discovery of ‘the book of the law’ in the Temple (2 Kings 22:8 to 2 Kings 23:25 ; see Deuteronomy). So far as concerned outward religion, this was a drastic and enduring revolution. Not merely the later idolatries imported from the East under the Assyrian supremacy, but also the indigenous rites of Molech and the Baalim were abolished. Above all, an end was put to the immemorial cultus of the local ‘high places,’ at which the service of Jehovah had been corrupted by mixture with that of the Canaanite divinities. Worship was centralized at the royal Temple of Jerusalem; and the ‘covenant’ with Jehovah made by king and people there in the terms of Deuteronomy, followed by the memorable Passover feast, was designed to inaugurate a new order of things in the life of the people; this proved, in fact, a turning-point in Israel’s history. However disappointing in its immediate spiritual effects, the work of Josiah and his band of reformers gave the people a written law-book and a definitely organized religious system, which they carried with them into the Exile to form the nucleus of the OT Scriptures and the basis of the later Judaism.
The fall of Josiah in battle concluded the interval of freedom and prosperity enjoyed by Judah under his vigorous rule. For three years the country was subject to the victorious Pharaoh, who deposed and deported Shalum-Jehoahaz, the national choice, replacing him on the throne of Judah by his brother Eliakim-Jehoiakim. The great battle of Carchemish (605), on the Euphrates, decided the fate of Syria and Palestine; the empire of Western Asia, quickly snatched from Egypt, passed into the strong hands of the Chaldæan king Nebuchadrezzar, the destined destroyer of Jerusalem. From this time ‘Babylon’ stands for the tyrannous and corrupting powers of the world; she becomes, for Scripture and the Church, the metropolis of the kingdom of Satan, as ‘Jerusalem’ of the kingdom of the saints. The Chaldæan empire was a revival of the Assyrian, less brutal and destructive, more advanced in civilization, but just as sensual and sordid, and exploiting the subject races as thoroughly as its predecessor. The prophecies of Habakkuk (chs. 1 and 2) reveal the intense hatred and fear excited by the approach of the Chaldæans; the ferocity of Nebuchadrezzar’s troops was probably aggravated by the incorporation with them of Scythian cavalry, large bodies of which still roamed south of the Caspian. The repeated and desperate revolts made by the Judæans are accounted for by the harshness of Nebuchadrezzar’s yoke, to escape which Tyre endured successfully a thirteen years’ siege. His enormous works of building (see Habakkuk 2:12-13 ) must have involved crushing exactions from the tributaries.
Jehoiakim, after Carchemish, transferred his allegiance to Babylon. For three years he kept faith with Nebuchadrezzar, and then apparently without allies or reasonable hope of support rebelled (2 Kings 24:1 ). Jehoiakim was a typical Eastern despot, self-willed, luxurious, unprincipled, oppressive towards his own people, treacherous and incompetent in foreign policy. Jeremiah denounces him vehemently; the wonder is that he did not fall a victim to the king’s anger, like his disciple Uriah ( Jeremiah 26:20-24 ; Jeremiah 36:26-30 ; Jeremiah 22:13-19 ). The revived national faith in Jehovah, which had rested on Josiah’s political success, was shaken by his fall; the character of the new king, and the events of his reign, furthered the reaction. A popular Jehovist party existed; but this was the most dangerous factor in the situation. Its leaders the prophet Hananiah amongst them ( Jeremiah 28:1-17 ) preached out of season Isaiah’s old doctrine of the inviolability of Zion; even after the capture of Jerusalem in 597 and the first exile, ‘the prophets’ promised in Jehovah’s name a speedy re-instatement. The possession of the Temple and the observance of the Law, they held, bound Jehovah to His people’s defence. The fanaticism thus excited, of which the Jewish race has given so many subsequent examples, brought about the second, and fatal, rupture with Babylon.
Nebuchadrezzar showed a certain forbearance towards Judah. On Jehoiakim’s first revolt, in 601, he let loose bands of raiders on the Judæan territory (2 Kings 24:2 ; cf. Jeremiah 12:9 ; Jeremiah 12:14 ); four years later be marched on the capital. Jehoiakim died just before this; his youthful son Jehoiachin (called also Jeconiah and Coniah ) surrendered the city, and was carried captive, with the queen-mother and the élite of the nobles and people, to Babylon, where he lived for many years, to be released upon Nebuchadrezzar’s death in 561 ( 2 Kings 24:6-17 ; 2 Kings 25:27-30 , Jeremiah 22:24-30 ).
The reign of Mattaniah-Zedekiah, raised to the throne by Nebuchadrezzar, was in effect a repetition of that of his elder brother. Zedekiah failed through weakness more than through wickedness; he sought Jeremiah’s advice, but lacked decision to follow it. Early in his reign a conspiracy was on foot in Palestine against the Chaldæans, which he was tempted to join (Jeremiah 27:1-11 ; see RVm [2] on Jeremiah 27:1 ). The Judæans, instead of being cowed by the recent punishment, were eager for a rising; public opinion expressed itself in Hananiah’s contradiction to Jeremiah’s warnings (ch. 28). The same false hopes were exciting the exiles in Babylon (ch. 29). Nebuchadrezzar, aware of these movements, summoned Zedekiah to Babylon ( Jeremiah 51:59 ); the latter was able, however, to clear himself of complicity, and returned to Jerusalem. At last Zedekiah yielded to the tide; he broke his oaths of allegiance to Nebuchadrezzar conduct sternly condemned by Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 17:11-21 ) as well as by Jeremiah and the Jewish people were launched on a struggle almost as mad as that which it undertook with Rome 650 years later. The siege of Jerusalem was stubbornly prolonged for two years (588 586). The Egyptians under the new and ambitious Pharaohhophra (Apries, 588 569), effected a diversion of the Chaldæan troops ( Jeremiah 37:5-10 , Ezekiel 17:15 ); but, as often before, Pharaoh proved ‘a broken reed to those who trusted in him.’ Reduced by famine, Jerusalem was stormed, Zedekiah being captured in his attempt to escape, and meeting a pitiable death ( 2 Kings 25:1-7 ). This time Nebuchadrezzar made an end of the rebels. Jerusalem was razed to the ground; the survivors of the siege, and of the executions that followed, were carried into exile. A remnant, of no political importance, was left to till the ground; the bulk of these, after the tragic incidents related in 2 Kings 23:31 ; Jeremiah 40:1-16 ; Jeremiah 41:1-18 ; Jeremiah 42:1-22 ; Jeremiah 43:1-13 , fled to Egypt. Jeremiah, who had in vain resisted this migration, was carried with the runaways; he had the distress of seeing his companions relapse into open idolatry, protesting that they had fared better when worshipping ‘the queen of heaven’ than under the national Jehovah. Jewish tradition relates that he died at the hands of his incensed fellow-exiles. The prophet’s prediction that the sword of Nebuchadrezzar would follow the fugitives, was fulfilled by the Chaldæan invasion of Lower Egypt in the year 569, if not earlier than this. The Babylonian empire lasted from b.c. 605 to 538, a little short of the ‘70 years’ assigned to it, in round numbers, by Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 25:11 ; Jeremiah 29:10 ).
2. The man . The Book of Jeremiah is largely autobiographical. The author became, unconsciously, the hero of his work. This prophet’s temperament and experience have coloured his deliverances in a manner peculiar amongst OT writers. His teaching, moreover, marks an evolution in the Israelite religion, which acquires a more personal stamp as its national framework is broken up. In Jeremiah’s life we watch the spirit of revelation being driven inwards , taking refuge from the shipwreck of the State in the soul of the individual. Jeremiah is the prophet of that ‘church within the nation,’ traceable in its beginnings to Isaiah’s time, to which the future of revealed religion is henceforth committed. This inner community of heart-believers survived the Exile; it gave birth to the Bible and the synagogue.
Jeremiah was a native of Anathoth, a little town some 3 1 / 2 miles N. E.from Jerusalem, perched high on the mountain-ridge and commanding an extensive view over the hills of Ephraim and the Jordan valley, towards which his memory often turned (Jeremiah 4:15 ; Jeremiah 7:14-15 ; Jeremiah 12:5 ; Jeremiah 31:4-5 ; Jeremiah 31:18 ; Jeremiah 49:19 ). Jeremiah had no mere Judæan outlook; the larger Israel was constantly in his thoughts. His father was ‘Hilkiah [3], of the priests that were in Anathoth in the land of Benjamin’ ( 2 Kings 1:1 ); but he does not show, like the contemporary priest-prophet Ezekiel, the sacerdotal mind. Anathoth had been the settlement of Abiathar, the last high priest of Eli’s house, who was banished thither by Solomon ( 1 Kings 2:26 ); Jeremiah may have been a scion of this deposed line. His mission brought him, probably at an early period, into conflict with ‘the men of Anathoth,’ who sought his life ( 1 Kings 11:18-23 ). His attempt to visit Anathoth during the last siege of Jerusalem, and the transaction between himself and his cousin over the field at Anathoth ( Jeremiah 32:6 ff., Jeremiah 37:11-14 ), go to show that he was not entirely cut off from friendly relations with his kindred and native place.
Jeremiah’s call (ch. 1) in b.c. 626 found him a diffident and reluctant young man, not wanting in devotion, but shrinking from publicity, and with no natural drawing towards the prophetic career; yet he is ‘set over the nations, to pluck up and to break down, and to build and to plant’! Already there begins the struggle between the implanted word of Jehovah and the nature of the man, on which turns Jeremiah’s inner history and the development of his heroic character, all things considered, the noblest in the OT. His ministry was to be a long martyrdom. He must stand as ‘a fenced city and an iron pillar and brazen walls against the whole land,’ a solitary and impregnable fortress for Jehovah. The manner of his call imports an intimacy with God, an identification of the man with his mission, more close and complete than in the case of any previous prophet (see Jeremiah 1:5 ; Jeremiah 1:9 ). No intermediary not even ‘the spirit of Jehovah,’ no special vehicle or means of prophetical incitement, is ever intimated in his case: simply ‘the word of Jehovah came to’ him. He conceives the true prophet as ‘standing in Jehovah’s council, to perceive and hear his word’ ( Jeremiah 23:18 ; cf. Isaiah 50:4 ). So that he may be in person, as well as in word, a prophet of the coming tribulation, marriage is forbidden him and all participation in domestic life ( Jeremiah 16:1-13 ), a sentence peculiarly bitter to his tender and affectionate nature. Jeremiah’s imagination was haunted by his lost home happiness ( Jeremiah 7:34 ; Jeremiah 16:9 ; Jeremiah 25:10 ; Jeremiah 33:11 ). Endowed with the finest sensibilities, in so evil a time he was bound to be a man of sorrows.
Behind the contest waged by Jeremiah with kings and people there lay an interior struggle, lasting more than twenty years. So long it took this great prophet to accept with full acquiescence the burden laid upon him. We may trace through a number of self-revealing passages, the general drift of which is plain notwithstanding the obscurity of some sentences and the chronological uncertainty, Jeremiah’s progress from youthful consecration and ardour, through moods of doubt and passionate repugnance, to a complete self-conquest and settled trust (see, besides chs. 1, 11, 16 already cited, Jeremiah 31:1-409 to Jeremiah 9:2 ; Jeremiah 15:10-11 and Jeremiah 15:15-21 ; Jeremiah 17:14-18 ; Jeremiah 18:18-23 ; Jeremiah 20:1-18 ; Jeremiah 26:1-24 ; Jeremiah 30:1-24 ; 1618417536_21 ; Jeremiah 32:1-44 ). The discipline of Jeremiah may be divided into four stages, following on his supernatural call: ( a ) the youthful period of fierce denunciation, b.c. 626 621; ( b ) the time of disillusion and silence, subsequent to Josiah’s reforms, 621 608; ( c ) the critical epoch, 608 604, opened by the fall of Josiah at Megiddo and closing in the fourth year of Jehoiakim after the battle of Carchemish and the advent of Nebuchadrezzar, when the paroxysm of the prophet’s soul was past and his vision of the future grew clear; ( d ) the stage of full illumination, attained during the calamities of the last days of Jerusalem.
To ( a ) belongs the teaching recorded in chs. 2 6, subject to the modifications involved in condensing from memory discourses uttered 20 years before. Here Jeremiah is on the same ground as Zephaniah. He strongly recalls Hosea, whose love for ‘Ephraim’ he shares, and whose similitude of the marriage-union between Jehovah and Israel supplies the basis of his appeals. Judah, he insists, has proved a more faithless bride than her northern sister; a divorce is inevitable. Ch. 5 reflects the shocking impression made by Jeremiah’s first acquaintance with Jerusalem; in ch. 6 Jehovah’s scourge in the first instance the Scythians is held over the city. With rebukes mingle calls to repentance and, more rarely, hopes of a relenting on the people’s part ( Jeremiah 3:21-25 ; in other hopeful passages critics detect interpolation). Jeremiah’s powerful and pathetic preaching helped to prepare the reformation of 621. But as the danger from the northern hordes passed and Josiah’s rule brought new prosperity, the prophet’s vaticinations were discounted; his pessimism became an object of ridicule.
( b ) Jeremiah’s attitude towards Josiah’s reformation is the enigma of his history. The collection of his prophecies made in 604 (see chs. 1 12), apart from the doubtful allusion in Jeremiah 11:1-8 , ignores the subject; Josiah’s name is but once mentioned, by way of contrast to Jehoiakim, in Jeremiah 22:13-19 . From this silence we must not infer condemnation; and such passages as Jeremiah 7:22-23 and Jeremiah 8:8 do not signify that Jeremiah was radically opposed to the sacrificial system and to the use of a written law. We may fairly gather from Jeremiah 11:1-8 , if not from Jeremiah 17:19-27 (the authenticity of which is contested), that Jeremiah commended the Deuteronomic code. His writings in many passages show a Deuteronomic stamp. But, from this point of view, the reformation soon showed itself a failure. It came from the will of the king, not from the conscience of the people. It effected no ‘circumcision of the heart,’ no inward turning to Jehovah, no such ‘breaking up of the fallow ground’ as Jeremiah had called for; the good seed of the Deuteronomic teaching was ‘sown among thorns’ ( Jeremiah 4:3-4 ), which sprang up and choked it. The cant of religion was in the mouths of ungodly men; apostasy had given place, in the popular temper, to hypocrisy. Convinced of this, Jeremiah appears to have early withdrawn, and stood aloof for the rest of Josiah’s reign. Hence the years 621 608 are a blank in the record of his ministry. For the time the prophet was nonplussed; the evil he had foretold had not come; the good which had come was a doubtful good in his eyes. He could not support, he would not oppose, the work of the earnest and sanguine king. Those twelve years demonstrated the emptiness of a political religion. They burnt into the prophet’s soul the lesson of the worthlessness of everything without the law written on the heart .
( c ) Josiah’s death at Megiddo pricked the bubble of the national religiousness; this calamity recalled Jeremiah to his work. Soon afterwards he delivered the great discourse of Jeremiah 7:1 to Jeremiah 8:3 , which nearly cost him his life (see ch. 26). He denounces the false reliance on the Temple that replaced the idolatrous superstitions of 20 years before, thereby making ‘the priests and the prophets,’ to whose ears the threat of Shiloh’s fate for Zion was rank treason, from this time his implacable enemies. The post-reformation conflict now opening was more deadly than the pre-reformation conflict shared with Zephaniah. A false Jehovism had entrenched itself within the forms of the Covenant, armed with the weapons of fanatical self-righteousness. To this phase of the struggle belong chs. 7 10 (subtracting the great interpolation of Jeremiah 9:23 to Jeremiah 10:16 , of which Jeremiah 10:1-16 is surely post-Jeremianic); so, probably, most of the matter of chs. 14 20, identified with the ‘many like words’ that were added to the volume of Jeremiah burnt by Jehoiakim in the winter of 604 ( Jeremiah 36:27-32 ).
The personal passages of chs. 15, 17, 18, 20 belong to this decisive epoch (608 605, between Megiddo and Carchemish). The climax of Jeremiah’s inward agony was brought about by the outrage inflicted on him by Pashhur, the Temple overseer (ch. 20), when, to stop his mouth, the prophet was scourged and put in the stocks. He breaks out,’ O Jehovah, thou hast befooled me, and I have been befooled!’ and ends by ‘cursing the day of his birth’ (Jeremiah 20:7-18 ). Jehovah has used His almighty power to play with a weak, simple man, and to make him a laughing-stock! Jehovah’s word is ‘a fire in his bones’; he is compelled to speak it, only to meet ridicule and insult! His warnings remain unfulfilled, and God leaves him in the lurch! He desires nothing but the people’s good; yet they count him a traitor, and put down his terrifying visions to malignity! This last reproach cut Jeremiah to the heart; again and again he had repelled it ( Jeremiah 15:10 ; Jeremiah 17:16 ; Jeremiah 18:20 ). The scene of ch. 20 was Jeremiah’s Gethsemane. It took place not long before the crisis of ‘the fourth year of Jehoiakim,’ the occasion when the roll of doom was prepared (ch. 36) which was read to the people and the king, and when, after the battle of Carchemish, Nebuchadrezzar was hailed as Jehovah’s servant and executioner (ch. 25). At this juncture the conclusive breach with Jehoiakim came about, when the faithless king, by running his knife through Jeremiah’s book, severed the ties which had bound prophecy to the secular throne of David since Samuel’s day. Recalling at this date his misgivings and inward fightings against God, the prophet virtually tells us that they are past. From the years 605 4 he marches with firm step to the goal; he sees the end of God’s kingdom, and the way. Jeremiah is at last equal to his office, ready ‘to pluck up and to break down the nations, and to build and to plant.’ Master of himself, he is master of the world.
( d ) Chs. 30 33 ( Jeremiah 33:14-26 are wanting in the LXX [4] ; the remainder of 33, along with Jeremiah 32:16-44 , lies under grave critical suspicion) contain a distinct ‘word of Jehovah,’ committed to a separate ‘book.’ This is ‘the Book of the Future of Israel and Judah’ (Duhm), and the crown of Jeremiah’s life-work. Like the Christian prophet who wrote the Epistle to the Hebrews, Jeremiah fled to the ideal and eternal from the horrors of the national downfall; as the earthly Zion sinks, the image of God’s true city rises on his soul. The long foreseen catastrophe has arrived; Jeremiah meets it bravely, for ‘days are coming,’ Jehovah tells him, ‘when I will restore the captivity of my people Israel and Judah, and I will cause them to return to the land of their fathers’ ( Jeremiah 30:3 ff.). The prophet adds deeds to words: he takes the opportunity of buying, before witnesses, a field at Anathoth offered during the siege by his cousin Hanameel, in token that ‘houses and fields and vineyards shall yet again be bought in this land’ ( Jeremiah 32:15 ). But the restoration means something far better than recovery of the land; it will be a spiritual renovation, a change of heart going deeper than Josiah’s renewal of the old covenant. ‘They shall be my people,’ Jehovah promises, ‘and I will be their God; and I will give them one heart and one way, that they may fear me for ever.… And I will make an everlasting covenant with them, and I will put my fear in their hearts ’ ( Jeremiah 32:38-39 ; Jeremiah 32:31-44 of this disputed chapter are full of Jeremianic traits). The announcement of the ‘new covenant’ in ch. Jeremiah 31:31-34 is the kernel of the ‘Book of the Future’; this is Jeremiah’s greatest contribution to the progress of the Kingdom of God. This passage touches the high-water mark of OT prophecy; it was appropriated by the Lord Jesus at the Last Supper, and supplied the basis of the NT doctrine of salvation (see Hebrews 10:14-18 ). To deprive Jeremiah of the New-Covenant oracle (as B. Duhm, e.g. , would do) is to remove the top-stone of his life’s edifice; it is to make his rôle one of ‘plucking up and breaking down,’ with no commensurate ‘building and planting’ ( Jeremiah 1:10 ) upon the desolated site. Jeremiah had read first in his own heart the secret thus conveyed to Israel. The mission which he had borne for long as a painful yoke, he learnt to rest in with entire contentment. He is able to say, ‘I delight to do thy will, O my God; yea, thy law is within my heart’; and he prophesies that, under the new covenant, every man shall say this.
Jeremiah’s style and powers as a writer have been underestimated; better justice
Chabad Knowledge Base - Jeremiah ben abba
(4th century) Talmudic sage, born in [1] but emigrated to Tiberias, Israel, where he diligently studied under Rabbis Abahu and Zeira. His hairsplitting questions irked his colleagues, once even prompting his expulsion from the study hall. Whenever the Talmud writes, "In Israel, they said..." it is a reference to Rabbi Jeremiah.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Jeremiah
(a) (5th century BCE) A contemporary of Zephaniah and Huldah, son of the High Priest Hilkiah. His melancholy prophecies concerning the forthcoming destruction of the first Holy Temple and the Babylonian exile were viewed by many as treasonous, and resulted in his incarceration. Authored the book of the Tanach that bears his name, as well as the Books of Kings and Lamentations. (b) A common Jewish name.
Jeremiah, the Book of: The book of Tanach containing Jeremiah's prophecies, many of which concern the destruction of the holy Temple.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Jeremiah
THE most exquisite sensibility of soul was Jeremiah's singular and sovereign distinction above all the other Hebrew prophets. It was Jeremiah's life-long complaint to his mother that she had borne him, a man with such an unearthly sensibility of soul, into a world so out of joint for such souls. Such another child for sensibility of soul was not born of woman until the Virgin Mary brought forth the Man of Sorrows Himself. Those men of Cæsarea Philippi showed their own sensibility of soul when some said John the Baptist; some, Elias; but they would have it that Jesus of Nazareth was none other than Hilkiah's son, come back again with his broken heart. Woe is me, my mother, that thou hast borne me the man that I am! Is it nothing to you, all ye that pass by? Behold, and see if there be any sorrow like unto my sorrow.
Jeremiah was far and away the most spiritually-minded of all the prophets. Howbeit that was not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual. That is to say, it was the inborn, original, and unparalleled sensibility of Jeremiah's mind and heart that the Lord took up and turned to His own service both in the preaching of this prophet and in the production of this book, which stands to this day second only to the Psalms as the most spiritual book in the Old Testament. Some other prophets stand in time and in place nearer to the New Testament; but it is only in time and in place. No prophet of them all stands in reality so near to Jesus Christ. Jeremiah is the true forerunner of our Lord. Even Isaiah himself, evangelical as he is, still retains some of the shadowy and unspiritual elements of that imperfect economy in his prophecy. The restored kingdom of David and Solomon still haunts Isaiah's heart, and it still shapes and colours some of the finest pictures of his imperial imagination. But Jeremiah has nothing of that decayed economy either in himself or in his book. Jeremiah's extraordinary inwardness, and depth, and absolutely pure spirituality, have all combined to deliver both himself and his book from all those apocalyptic, secular, and unspiritual interpretations which have so infested the other prophets. Neither Peter nor the mother of Zebedee's children, could accuse Jeremiah of having misled them in one word of his, in any chapter of his, concerning the coming Kingdom of the Messiah. And more and more as his ministry went on, Jeremiah strove with all his might to draw both the hearts and the imaginations of his people not only off all alliance with the kingdoms that were around them, but also off the too pictorial Kingdom of the Messiah that had been hung up before them. And, for his pains, Jeremiah was cast into prison again and again, and was maltreated as only the offscourings of the city were maltreated. But his consolation and his hope always lay in that noble doctrine of the Kingdom of God, which he had been honoured to have revealed to him, and which he had preached for forty years at such a price. The depth, the purity, the beauty, the absolute heavenliness of his doctrine were the reward and the joy of his heart, let his fellow-citizens and his fellow-prophets and priests do to him what they pleased. Jeremiah was of all the prophets of the Old Testament the supreme prophet of the human heart. 'The heart is my haunt,' says Wordsworth. And again, 'My theme is no other than the heart of man.' But in an infinitely deeper sense than that, Jeremiah was the prophet of God to the human heart. Jeremiah would have nothing from his hearers and readers but their heart. Let other prophets negotiate and send embassies as they pleased; Jeremiah, in season and out of season, for a long lifetime, laid siege to the hearts of his hearers. The cure of all your famines, he cried, and all your plagues, and all your defeats, and all your captivities-the cause and the cure of them all is in your own heart: in the heart of each inhabitant of Jerusalem and each captive in Babylon. And your prophets who say Peace, peace!-like Law, he called all such preachers so many dancing-masters; and, like Leighton, he called them so many mountebanks, till they smote him, and imprisoned him in the dungeon, and put his feet in the stocks.
And this is the true way still to preach, even at the same price; if only we had been born of our mothers to preach like Jeremiah. If only we had something of his sensibility, and spirituality, and knowledge of the heart. The salvation of our hearers must always begin with our own salvation: and it must go on to perfection with our perfection. And we cannot be the salvation to any perfection either of ourselves or of our people unless we have a pervading, and prevailing, and increasing sensibility of what salvation is, and what the want of it is. He who has-I will not say a full sensibility of the evil of sin, for he would go mad if he had-but a true beginning of such sensibility, he has the making of a true minister of Jesus Christ in him; otherwise he has not, and should at once go to make his bread in some more lawful calling. 'They will be thankful for your telling them the particular times when the gospels were writ: for explaining the word Euroclydon, or anathema maranatha; they will be glad of such useless instruction; but if you touch upon such subjects as really concern them in a high degree, such subjects as try the state and way of their lives, these religious people cannot bear to be thus instructed.' Yes, morning lectures on Euroclydon: evidences of Christianity; defences and debates round and round the subject: whole cartloads of Bampton, and all like lectures: they are all so much lost time and strength in the pulpit. They have their place elsewhere, and among those who get any good from them, but they would get all that good, and would not need it any more, if we had taught them some real sensibility for spiritual things. It is Jeremiah's sensibility and spirituality that both preachers and hearers need, and then we would both have the evidence in ourselves. Speak to your hearer's heart and you will soon undermine his head. All his lofty imaginations, with all his high thoughts, will lie all around him as soon as he lies in the dust himself; but not till then, with all your artillery. Young preachers, with your great life still before you, study your own heart day and night. Watch every beat, and flutter, and creep of your own heart day and night. Seek sensibility of heart above all Latin, and Greek, and Hebrew: above all logic, and style, and delivery. Add all these things, and everything else, to sensibility of heart: but one thing is needful if you would not be a castaway in the end. Were you spiritually-sensible preachers you would soon get inside your people's hearts, and you would hold your people's hearts to the end. Deep answers to deep. And if one here and another there should smite you as Pashur smote Jeremiah, say to him, 'The Lord hath not called thy name Pashur, but Magor-missabib,' and go on with your heart-searching and heart-sanctifying preaching to other people. And your sensibility of heart and mind once well begun will grow till your name is as famous as you could wish it to be where fame and name is alone worth working for. With ever-increasing sensibility preach every day to them the meekness, and the humility, and the spirituality, and the obedience, and the whole mind of Christ, and you will surely see Christ formed in your people before you are compelled to bequeath your pulpit to your successor. And oh, believe me, the shame and the remorse of having to hand over your pulpit, and you only beginning to preach! And it all lies in a true and a timely sensibility, and in saying, The heart is my haunt, till you know the heart, and can preach to it to some purpose. Return, thou backsliding Israel, saith the Lord, and I will give you pastors after mine own heart, which shall feed you with knowledge and understanding.
Nazianzen says somewhere that Jeremiah was both by nature and by grace the most inclined to pity of all the prophets. Which is just to say over again that he was the most sensitive and the most spiritual. Take natural sensibility and supernatural spirituality together, and you will have the most exquisite sympathy and the most perfect pity possible. There is nothing like the Lamentations of Jeremiah in the whole world again. There has been plenty of sorrow in every age, and in every land; but such another preacher and author as Jeremiah, with such a heart for sorrow, has never again been born. Dante comes next to Jeremiah, and we know that Jeremiah was that great exile's favourite prophet. Both prophet and poet were full to all the height and depth of their great hearts of the most thrilling sensibility; while, at the same time, they were both high towers, and brazen walls, and iron pillars against all unrighteousness of men. And they wire alike in this also, that, just because of their combined strength, and sternness, and sensibility, no man in their day sympathised with them. They made all men's causes of suffering and sorrow their own, till all men hated them, and put a price on their heads. 'There is nothing in all Scripture,' says Isaac Williams, 'so eloquent of love and sorrow and consolation as the 31st and 33rd chapters of Jeremiah. No words can be found in any language of such touching beauty as all that strain.' So surely does natural sensibility, when it is steeped in the Spirit of God, become the most perfect pity and the most exquisite sympathy.
In an unaccountably silly passage in his Life of Erasmus, Froude actually prints it that 'Erasmus, like all men of real genius, had a light and elastic nature.' That senseless and impossible passage came back to my mind as I read this melancholy book of this man of real genius. And this also came to my mind out of North's Plutarch: 'Aristotle has a place where he says that the wisest men be ever melancholy, as Socrates, Plato, and Hercules were.' And I have read somewhere also on this matter that 'merely to say man is to say melancholy.' I wish it were. At any rate, to say 'man endued by nature with sufficient sensibility, and then by grace with sufficient spiritual sympathy,' is to say the most profoundly melancholy of men. 'O hear me,' says the profoundly intellectual and equally spiritual Jacob Behmen in a comforting passage. 'Hear me, for I know well myself what melancholy is! I also have lodged all my days in the melancholy inn!' As Jeremiah lodged also. And how could it have been done otherwise? In such a land: in such a city: among such a people with such a past and with such a present, and doing their best to make their future as bad as their past and their present-it was enough to make the glorified on their thrones melancholy. Jeremiah's inconsolable melancholy was the mark and the measure of his greatness both as a man and as a prophet. It was a divine melancholy that made his head waters and his eyes a fountain of tears. 'Tears gain everything,' says Santa Teresa in her autobiography. No: not everything,-much; but not everything. Tears, when bitter enough, and in secret enough, always gain forgiveness indeed, which is almost everything, and is on the way to everything. But while such tears will always avail under grace to blot out the past, they have no power to bring back the past. Nor do they bring in the sure future so much as one day before its time. All Jeremiah's tears did not keep back the Chaldeans for a single day's march. But his tears softened his heart and bowed his head till he was able to go out to meet the Chaldeans, and almost to welcome them to Jerusalem in the name of God. Neither his tears, nor his prayers, nor his resignations, nor his submissions, shortened by a single hour the seventy years' captivity. But his tears did far better for himself at least. They softened his heart to the very core. They perfected what both nature and grace had so well begun. For they made him not only an evangelical prophet, but an all but New Testament apostle. Jeremiah's tears were such that they gained the Holy Ghost for him before the Holy Ghost was given, and before Christ was glorified. Till Santa Teresa is amply justified when she says that tears gain everything. And till I am justified in saying that Jeremiah at any rate was not a man of a light and elastic nature.
'Oh that I had in the wilderness a lodging-place of wayfaring men; that I might leave my people, and go from them!' The loneliness of a man's heart among his own people is one of the heaviest crosses that any man has to take up. Jeremiah, to borrow one of his own bitter words, had plenty of 'familiars' among his own people, but he had very few friends. And his familiars watched for his halting and rejoiced over it, and said, Report, said they, and we will report it. Had Jeremiah had a friend among all his familiars, that solitary friend would have proved himself such by refusing to report it. 'He has fallen away to the Chaldeans,' was the report made among his familiars. But Jeremiah had no friend who would take the risk to understand and to defend his friend. And it was among such familiars, and in the lack of such friends, that Jeremiah sighed the sigh that has been taken up and sighed so often since that day: 'O that I might leave my people!' Jeremiah never was a married man. And it was as well that he was not. Men, and especially ministers, of much sensibility, and spiritualtiy, and sympathy, and melancholy are not made to be married. A helpmeet for Jeremiah was not to be found in all the house of Israel. If his Master had seen it good for His servant to have a wife and children, He would have made Jeremiah's second self, and would have brought her to him till Jeremiah's melancholy would for the time have been somewhat abated. But whether it was that the Lord saw that His servant's sensibility was too exquisite, and his melancholy too extreme, or whatever it was, the Lord said to His servant, 'Thou shalt not take thee a wife, neither shalt thou have sons and daughters in this place.' And thus it was that what a sensitive and melancholy minister takes home and tells only to his wife, when he has a wife who is his friend, and not merely his familiar, all that Jeremiah took and told to God. Till his whole book before us is one long confidence, and conversation, and debate, and remonstrance; and, again, one long submission, and silence, and surrender, and service of God. And till he is home now where all men are friends, and where the familiars of Jerusalem, with their watching and their reporting, do not enter.
And, then, all that made Jeremiah the red-hot preacher that we still feel him to this day to have been. We see with what a fiery sensibility he both prepares and delivers his sermons. At one time we hear him groaning over his text as he stands beside the potter at his wheel, while the potter mars his vessel and casts it away. At another time he does not preach for many weeks. He is away at the Euphrates learning how to illustrate and enforce his next sermon, and he preaches it over and over to himself as he sees in the sand the footprints of his captive people. Another Sabbath morning he takes his elders out to the valley beyond the city, and dashes an earthen vessel to pieces before their amazed and angry eyes, and that is all the sermon they get that morning. A preacher-like a great preacher of our own land-to 'terrify even the godly.' A preacher for his familiars to take him and speak to him. And so they did, and almost succeeded. Pashur, the chief governor, was deputed on one occasion to tame, as we say, Jeremiah's pulpit. And of such sensibility and melancholy was the prophet at the visit of Pashur that the thing was almost done. Till the prophet appeared all of a sudden with a yoke of wood on his neck in his former pulpit next Sabbath, and with this apology to Pashur, and with this autobiographic introduction to his sermon that day: 'Then I said, I will not make mention of Him, or speak any more in His name. But His word was in my heart as a burning fire shut up in my bones, and I was weary with forbearing, and I could not stay.' I suppose every preacher with any fire in his bones has a Pashur or two among his governors. A familiar or two who say among themselves, Report, and we will report it. But I do not read that Jeremiah spake as he was moved by Pashur, the governor. Let Pashur preach himself if Jeremiah has too much sensibility, and spirituality, and sympathy, and melancholy for him. And let Jeremiah go on and preach out all the fire that God has kindled in his prophet's bones. 'I could have used a more adorned style,' says John Bunyan, in his Grace Abounding, 'but I dared not. God did not play in tempting me; neither did I play when the pangs of hell gat hold on me. Wherefore I may not play in relating those pangs, but be plain and simple, and lay down the thing just as it was.'
Lo! this man's brow, like to a title-page,Foretells the nature of a tragic volume.Thou tremblest, and the whiteness in thy cheekIs apter than thy tongue to tell thine errand.When Jesus came into the coasts of Cæsarea Philippi, He asked His disciples, saying, Whom do men say that I the Son of Man am? And they said, Some say that thou art John the Baptist; some, Elias; and others, Jeremias.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jeremiah
The mournful prophet so called. A man famous in his day and generation as the Lord's servant, and his memory ever blessed in the church through all ages. His name, it should seem, is a compound—from Ram, exaltation; and Jah, the Lord. The pronoun prefixed makes it, my exalted in the Lord. And exalted indeed he was in the Lord's strength, though continually buffeted and by men. It is blessed to read his prophecy, and under the Holy Ghost's teachings to enter into the spirit of this man's writings.
I beg the reader to behold, with suited attention, the account given of him in the first chapter. We find him ordained to the ministry before his birth. And who that reads this account of the servant, but must be struck with full conviction of what is said of his Master, called from the womb of eternity, and set up from everlasting to be JEHOVAH'S servant, to bring Jacob again to him. (See Isaiah 49:1-26 throughout, and Proverbs 8:12-36) What a decided proof and conviction by the way doth this afford, that if Jeremiah was ordained a prophet to the church before he was formed in the belly, surely the glorious Head of that church, and that church in him, was set up, and Christ in all his offices and characters ordained the Lord God of the prophets before all worlds. (Colossians 1:15-18) It should seem from the date of the prophet's commission, when the word of the Lord first came to him, namely, in the thirtieth year of Josiah's reign, that Jeremiah could not be above fourteen years of age when he preached his first sermon. And what a sermon it is! (See Jeremiah 2:1-37; Jeremiah 3:1-25; Jeremiah 4:1-31 etc.) But what may not a child preach when God the Holy Ghost hath ordained him? Oh, that more of that blessed voice was heard in this our day, which was heard by the church in Paul's day! (See Acts 13:1-4) It was the lot of Jeremiah to live in an age when the nation was given up to daring impiety, and rebellion against God. Faithfulness at such a time, could not fail of bringing upon the poor preacher the hatred and indignation of all of a contrary way of thinking to himself. We have the relation of the persecution frequently raised against him, in several parts of his writings. The opposition made to him by the false prophet Hananiah, and the sequel of that awful event is recorded at large, Jeremiah 28:1-17. (See Hananiah.) Blessed is the memory of Jeremiah, and will be in the churches to the latest generation. The Lord ordain many such, if it be his holy will, from the womb! There are several of this name in Scripture. (See 2 Kings 24:18. See also 1 Chronicles 5:24. Two of the name of Jeremiah in David's army. 1 Chronicles 12:4; 1Ch 12:10; 1Ch 12:13)
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Lamentations of Jeremiah
This book shows the compassion and interest God has in the afflictions of His people, and that these are not lessened even when the afflictions have been brought about by Himself because of their sins. It is declared of the Lord that "in all their affliction he was afflicted," Isaiah 63:9 ; and this was seen when the Lord was on earth in His weeping over Jerusalem. Jeremiah had a like spirit and lamented over the calamities that had fallen upon his beloved people and their city Jerusalem. He appealed to the passers by: could they see such sorrow, caused by an affliction sent by Jehovah in His fierce wrath, and be unmoved by it? Lamentations 1:12 . Then he adds that Jehovah in these dealings was righteous, for they had rebelled against His commandments.
Lamentations 3 . The prophet details his personal sufferings: they were like the sympathetic sufferings of Christ spoken of elsewhere; but in Lamentations 3:22 the prophet remembers the mercies of Jehovah, and expresses his hope in Him. Because of His compassions they were not consumed; and it was good to wait and hope. Jehovah will not cast off for ever, and He does not afflict willingly. The prophet then calls for repentance and a turning to Jehovah. He has confidence that God hears, and he asks for the destruction of their enemies.
Lamentations 4 . Jeremiah as in the presence of Jehovah spreads out all the humiliating reverses that had fallen upon them, mentioning separately the Nazarites, the prophets, the priests, and the people; and then he foretells that God's wrath should pass also unto Edom, who had doubtless rejoiced at the calamities of Jerusalem. He could add that the punishment of the daughter of Zion was accomplished, she should no more be carried away.
Lamentations 5 . An affecting appeal is made to God. All had been confessed, and hope in God had been expressed; yet the afflictions pressed heavily upon the prophet. His last words are: "Turn thou us unto thee, O Lord, and we shall be turned; renew our days as of old. But thou hast utterly rejected us: thou art very wroth against us."
The composition of the Lamentations is uncommon. The first four chapters are arranged in alphabetical order and the chapters contain 22 verses each, the number of letters in the Hebrew alphabet, except that Lamentations 3 has 22 stanzas of three verses, making in all 66. In Lamentations 1 , Lamentations 2 , and Lamentations 4 , verse 1 begins with A; verse 2 with B, and so on, as in some of the Psalms. In Lamentations 3 each verse in a stanza begins with the same letter, thus verses 1,2,3 begin with A; verses 4,5,6 with B, and so on to the end. The prayer in Lamentations 5 : is not alphabetical. In the Hebrew Bible the 'Lamentations' form a part of the Hagiographa (Holy Writings), and is placed between Ruth and Ecclesiastes. In the Jewish Liturgy this book was appointed to be repeated on the Fast of the ninth of Ab (fifth month), to commemorate the destruction of the city and the temple by the Chaldeans and also by the Romans.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jeremiah
The Prophet Jeremiah was of the sacerdotal race, being, as he records himself, one of the priests that dwelt at Anathoth, in the land of Benjamin, a city appropriated out of that tribe to the use of the priests, the sons of Aaron, Joshua 21:18 , and situate, as we learn from St. Jerom, about three miles north of Jerusalem. Some have supposed his father to have been that Hilkah, the high priest, by whom the book of the law was found in the temple in the reign of Josiah: but for this there is no better ground than his having borne the same name, which was no uncommon one among the Jews; whereas, had he been in reality the high priest, he would doubtless have been mentioned by that distinguishing title, and not put upon a level with priests of an ordinary and inferior class. Jeremiah appears to have been very young when he was called to the exercise of the prophetical office, from which he modestly endeavoured to excuse himself by pleading his youth and incapacity; but being overruled by the divine authority, he set himself to discharge the duties of his function with unremitted diligence and fidelity during a period of at least forty-two years, reckoning from the thirteenth year of Josiah's reign. In the course of his ministry he met with great difficulties and opposition from his countrymen of all degrees, whose persecution and ill usage sometimes wrought so far upon his mind, as to draw from him expressions, in the bitterness of his soul, which many have thought hard to reconcile with his religious principles; but which, when duly considered, may be found to demand our pity for his unremitted sufferings, rather than our censure for any want of piety and reverence toward God. He was, in truth, a man of unblemished piety and conscientious integrity; a warm lover of his country, whose misery he pathetically deplores; and so affectionately attached to his countrymen, notwithstanding their injurious treatment of him, that he chose rather to abide with them, and undergo all hardships in their company, than separately to enjoy a state of ease and plenty, which the favour of the king of Babylon would have secured to him. At length, after the destruction of Jerusalem, being carried with the remnant of the Jews into Egypt, whither they had resolved to retire, though contrary to his advice, upon the murder of Gedaliah, whom the Chaldeans had left governor in Judea, he there continued warmly to remonstrate against their idolatrous practices, foretelling the consequences that would inevitably follow. But his freedom and zeal are said to have cost him his life; for the Jews at Tahpanhes, according to tradition, took such offence at him that they stoned him to death. This account of the manner of his end, though not absolutely certain, is at least very probable, considering the temper and disposition of the parties concerned. Their wickedness, however, did not long pass without its reward; for, in a few years after, they were miserably destroyed, by the Babylonian armies which invaded Egypt according to the prophet's prediction, Jeremiah 44:27-28 .
The idolatrous apostasy, and other criminal enormities of the people of Judah, and the severe judgments which God was prepared to inflict upon them, but not without a distant prospect of future restoration and deliverance, are the principal subject matters of the prophecies of Jeremiah; excepting only the forty-fifth chapter, which relates personally to Baruch, and the six succeeding chapters, which respect the fortunes of some particular Heathen nations. It is observable, however, that though many of these prophecies have their particular dates annexed to them, and other dates may be tolerably well conjectured from certain internal marks and circumstances, there appears much disorder in the arrangement, not easy to be accounted for on any principle of regular design, but probably the result of some accident or other, which has disturbed the original order. The best arrangement of the chapters appears to be according to the list which will be subjoined; the different reigns in which the prophecies were delivered were most probably as follows: The first twelve chapters seem to contain all the prophecies delivered in the reign of the good King Josiah. During the short reign of Shallum, or Jehoahaz, his second son, who succeeded him, Jeremiah does not appear to have had any revelation. Jehoiakim, the eldest son of Josiah, succeeded. The prophecies of this reign are continued on from the thirteenth to the twentieth chapter inclusively; to which we must add the twenty-second, twenty-third, twenty-fifth, twenty-sixth, thirty-fifth and thirty-sixth chapters, together with the forty-fifth, forty- sixth, forty-seventh, and most probably the forty-eighth, and as far as the thirty-fourth verse of the forty-ninth chapter. Jeconiah, the son of Jehoiakim, succeeded. We read of no prophecy that Jeremiah actually delivered in this king's reign; but the fate of Jeconiah, his being carried into captivity, and continuing an exile till the time of his death, were foretold early in his father's reign, as may be particularly seen in the twenty-second chapter. The last king of Judah was Zedekiah, the youngest son of Josiah. The prophecies delivered in his reign are contained in the twenty-first and twenty-fourth chapters, the twenty-seventh to the thirty-fourth, and the thirty-seventh to the thirty-ninth inclusively, together with the last six verses of the forty-ninth chapter, and the fiftieth and fifty-first chapters concerning the fall of Babylon. The siege of Jerusalem, in the reign of Zedekiah, and the capture of the city, are circumstantially related in the fifty-second chapter; and a particular account of the subsequent transactions is given in the fortieth to the forty-fourth inclusively. The arrangement of the chapters, alluded to above, is here subjoined: 1-20, 22, 23, 25, 26, 35, 36, 45, 24, 29-31, 27, 28, 21, 34, 37, 32, 33, 38, 39, from the fifteenth to the eighteenth verse, 39, from the first to the fourteenth verse, 40-44, 46, and so on.
The prophecies of Jeremiah, of which the circumstantial accomplishment is often specified in the Old and New Testament, are of a very distinguished and illustrious character. He foretold the fate of Zedekiah, Jeremiah 34:2-5 ; 2 Chronicles 36:11-21 ; 2 Kings 25:5 ; Jeremiah 52:11 ; the Babylonish captivity, the precise time of its duration, and the return of the Jews. He describes the destruction of Babylon, and the downfall of many nations, Jeremiah 25:12 ; Jeremiah 9:26 ; Jeremiah 25:19-25 ; Jeremiah 42:10-18 ; Jeremiah 46, and the following chapters, in predictions, of which the gradual and successive completion kept up the confidence of the Jews for the accomplishment of those prophecies, which he delivered relative to the Messiah and his period, Jeremiah 23:5-6 ; Jeremiah 30:9 ; Jeremiah 31:15 ; Jeremiah 32:14-18 ; Jeremiah 33:9-26 . He foreshowed the miraculous conception of Christ, Jeremiah 31:22 , the virtue of his atonement, the spiritual character of his covenant, and the inward efficacy of his laws, Jeremiah 31:31-36 ; Jeremiah 33:8 . Jeremiah, contemplating those calamities which impended over his country, represented, in the most descriptive terms, and under the most impressive images, the destruction that the invading enemy should produce. He bewailed, in pathetic expostulation, the shameless adulteries which had provoked the Almighty, after long forbearance, to threaten Judah with inevitable punishment, at the time that false prophets deluded the nation with the promises of "assured peace," and when the people, in impious contempt of "the Lord's word," defied its accomplishment. Jeremiah intermingles with his prophecies some historical relations relative to his own conduct, and to the completion of those predictions which he had delivered. The reputation of Jeremiah had spread among foreign nations, and his prophecies were deservedly celebrated in other countries. Many Heathen writers also have undesignedly borne testimony to the truth and accuracy of his prophetic and historical descriptions.
As to the style of Jeremiah, says Bishop Lowth, this prophet is by no means wanting either in elegance or sublimity, although, generally speaking, inferior to Isaiah in both. His thoughts, indeed, are somewhat less elevated, and he is commonly more large and diffuse in his sentences; but the reason of this may be, that he is mostly taken up with the gentler passions of grief and pity, for the expression of which he has a peculiar talent. This is most evident in the Lamentations, where those passions altogether predominate; but it is often visible also in his prophecies, in the former part of the book more especially, which is principally poetical: the middle parts are chiefly historical; but the last part, consisting of six chapters, is entirely poetical, and contains several oracles distinctly marked, in which this prophet falls very little short of the lofty style of Isaiah. But of the whole book of Jeremiah it is hardly the one half which I look upon as poetical.
Jeremiah survived to behold the sad accomplishment of all his darkest predictions. He witnessed all the horrors of the famine, and, when that had done its work, the triumph of the enemy. He saw the strong holds of the city cast down, the palace of Solomon, the temple of God, with all its courts, its roofs of cedar and of gold, levelled to the earth, or committed to the flames; the sacred vessels, the ark of the covenant itself, with the cherubim, pillaged by profane hands. What were the feelings of a patriotic and religious Jew at this tremendous crisis, he has left on record in his unrivalled elegies. Never did city suffer a more miserable fate, never was ruined city lamented in language so exquisitely pathetic. Jerusalem is, as it were, personified, and bewailed with the passionate sorrow of private and domestic attachment; while the more general pictures of the famine, the common misery of every rank, and age, and sex, all the desolation, the carnage, the violation, the dragging away into captivity, the remembrance of former glories, of the gorgeous ceremonies and the glad festivals, the awful sense of the divine wrath heightening the present calamities, are successively drawn with all the life and reality of an eye-witness. They combine the truth of history with the deepest pathos of poetry.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Lamentations of Jeremiah
This book was formerly annexed to his prophecies, though it now forms a separate book. Josephus, and several other learned men, have referred them to the death of Josiah; but the more common opinion is, that they were applicable only to some period subsequent to the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. But though it be allowed that the Lamentations were primarily intended as a pathetic description of present calamities, yet while Jeremiah mourns the desolation of Judah and Jerusalem during the Babylonian captivity, he may be considered as prophetically painting the still greater miseries they were to suffer at some future time: this seems plainly indicated by his referring to the time when the punishment of their iniquity shall be accomplished, and they shall no more be carried into captivity, Lamentations 4:22 . The Lamentations are written in metre, and consist of a number of plaintive effusions, composed after the manner of funeral dirges. They seem to have been originally written by the author as they arose in his mind, and to have been afterward joined together as one poem. There is no regular arrangement of the subject, or disposition of the parts: the same thought is frequently repeated with different imagery, or expressed in different words. There is, however, no wild incoherency, or abrupt transition; the whole appears to have been dictated by the feelings of real grief. Tenderness and sorrow form the general character of these elegies; and an attentive reader will find great beauty in many of the images, and great energy in some of the expressions. This book of Lamentations is divided into five chapters; in the first, second, and fourth, the prophet speaks in his own person, or by an elegant and interesting personification introduces the city of Jerusalem as lamenting her calamities, and confessing her sins; in the third chapter a single Jew, speaking in the name of a chorus of his countrymen, like the Coryphaeus of the Greeks, describes the punishment inflicted upon him by God, but still acknowledges his mercy, and expresses some hope of deliverance; and in the fifth chapter, the whole nation of the Jews pour forth their united complaints and supplications to almighty God.
Every chapter, with the exception of the third, contains twenty-two verses, corresponding in number with the letters of the Hebrew alphabet; and each verse commences with a different letter, the first with aleph, the second with beth, the third with gimel, &c. The third chapter, consisting of sixty- six verses, has three verses together beginning with the same letter, the following three with the next letter, &c. This peculiarity may be seen in Psalm cxix; the first eight verses in which commence with aleph, the next eight with beth, &c, till the whole alphabet has been consecutively taken. This mode of versification, which has some distant resemblance to the modern acrostic style, seems to have been employed by the Hebrews in some of their elegiac poetry, perhaps to assist the memory.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Lamentations of Jeremiah
Lamentations of Jeremiah. Contents— The lamentations are an elegaic poem on the destruction of Jerusalem and Judah by Nebuchadnezzar. The book consists of five separate poems, each complete in itself. The poetical form of this composition is a very elaborate alphabetical structure. The first four chapters are acrostics, like Psalms 25:1-22; Psalms 34:1-22; Psalms 37:1-40; Psalms 119:1-176, etc.—that is, every verse begins with a letter of the Hebrew alphabet in regular order. Chaps. 1, 2, and 4 contain 22 verses each, according to the number of Hebrew letters. The third chapter has three successive verses beginning with the same letter, making 66 verses in all. It soothed the weary years of the Babylonian exile, and afterward kept up a lively remembrance of the days of the deepest humiliation. On the ninth day of the month of Ab (July) it was read, year by year, with fasting and weeping, to commemorate the national misery and the final deliverance. The author is not named anywhere in the Bible, and the book is not quoted in the New Testament; but general tradition assigns the composition to Jeremiah, and this is the prevailing opinion.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Lamentations of Jeremiah
An elegiac poem, composed by the prophet on occasion of the destruction of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar. The first two chapters principally describe the calamities of a the sieges of Jerusalem; the third deplores the persecution which Jeremiah himself had suffered; and fourth adverts to the ruin and desolation of the city and temple, and the misfortune of Zedekiah; and the fifth is a kind of form of prayer for the Jews in their captivity. At the close, the prophet speaks of the cruelty of the Edomites, who had insulted Jerusalem in her misery, and threatens them with the wrath of God, B. C. 586.
The first four chapters of the Lamentations are in the acrostic form; every verse beginning with a letter of the Hebrew alphabet, in regular order. The first, second, and fourth chapters contain twentytwo verses each, according to the letters of the alphabet; the third chapter has three successive verses beginning with the same letter, making sixty-six in all. Moreover, all the verses in each chapter are nearly of the same length. The fifth chapter is not acrostic. See 2 Chronicles 35:25 ; and never was a subject more worthy of tears, nor treated with more tender and affecting sentiments. One would think, as it has often been said, that every letter was written with a tear, and every word was the sob of a broken heart. Yet he does not forget that a covenant God still reigns.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah, the Book of
In the chronological order of its several predictions and divine messages, is somewhat difficult of arrangement; but may be divide, by a natural and sufficiently accurate method, in to four general sections, containing severally the prophecies uttered in the reigns of Josiah, Jehoiakim, Zedekiah, and Gedaliah. The last chapter of the book appears to have been added, perhaps by Ezra; it is taken almost verbatim from 2 Kings 24:18-20 25:1-30 . See Jeremiah 51:64 .
Jeremiah wrote also the book of LAMENTATIONS, in which he utters the most plaintive and pathetic sentiments over the calamities of his people. See LAMENTATIONS.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah
One of the chief prophets of the Old Testament, prophesied under Josiah, Jehoiakim, and Zedekiah, and also after the captivity of the latter. He was born at Anathoth, of the race of the priests, and was destined of God to be a prophet, and consecrated for that object before his birth, Jeremiah 1:1,5 . At an early age he was called to act as a prophet, B. C. 628, in the thirteenth year of King Josiah. This good king no doubt cooperated with him to promote the reformation of the people; but the subsequent life of the prophet was full of afflictions and persecutions. Jehoiakim threw his prophetic roll into the fire, and sought his life. Zedekiah was kindly instructed by him, and warned of the woes impending over his guilty people, and of their seventy years' captivity, but to no purpose. The fidelity of the prophet often endangered his life, and he was in prison when Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar. That monarch released him, and offered him a home in Babylon; but he chose to remain with the remnant of the Jews, and was carried by them before long into Egypt, B. C. 586, still faithfully advising and reproving them till he died. For forty-two years he steadfastly maintained the cause of truth and of God against his rebellious people. Though naturally mild, sensitive, and retiring, he shrank from no danger when duty called; threats could not silence him, nor ill usage alienate him. Tenderly compassionate to his infatuated countrymen, he shared with them the woes, which he could not induce them to avert from their own heads.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah, Book of
Consists of twenty-three separate and independent sections, arranged in five books. I. The introduction, ch. 1. II. Reproofs of the sins of the Jews, consisting of seven sections,
ch. 2;
ch. 3-6;
ch. 7-10;
ch. 11-13;
ch. 14-17:18;;
ch 17:19-ch. 20;
ch. 21-24. III. A general review of all nations, in two sections,
ch. 46-49;
ch. 25; with an historical appendix of three sections,
ch. 26;
ch. 27;
ch. 28,29. IV. Two sections picturing the hopes of better times,
ch. 30,31;
ch. 32,33; to which is added an historical appendix in three sections,
ch. 34:1-7;
ch 34:8-22;
ch. 35. V. The conclusion, in two sections,
ch. 36;
ch. 45. In Egypt, after an interval, Jeremiah is supposed to have added three sections, viz., ch. 37-39; 40-43; and 44.
The principal Messianic prophecies are found in 23:1-8; 31:31-40; and 33:14-26.
Jeremiah's prophecies are noted for the frequent repetitions found in them of the same words and phrases and imagery. They cover the period of about 30 years. They are not recorded in the order of time. When and under what circumstances this book assumed its present form we know not.
The LXX. Version of this book is, in its arrangement and in other particulars, singularly at variance with the original. The LXX. omits 10:6-8; 27:19-22; 29:16-20; 33:14-26; 39:4-13; 52:2,3,15,28-30, etc. About 2,700 words in all of the original are omitted. These omissions, etc., are capricious and arbitrary, and render the version unreliable.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah
Raised up or appointed by Jehovah.
A Gadite who joined David in the wilderness (1 Chronicles 12:10 ).
A Gadite warrior (1 Chronicles 12:13 ).
A Benjamite slinger who joined David at Ziklag (1 Chronicles 12:4 ).
One of the chiefs of the tribe of Manasseh on the east of Jordan (1 Chronicles 5:24 ).
The father of Hamutal (2 Kings 23:31 ), the wife of Josiah.
One of the "greater prophets" of the Old Testament, son of Hilkiah (q.v.), a priest of Anathoth (Jeremiah 1:1 ; 32:6 ). He was called to the prophetical office when still young (1:6), in the thirteenth year of Josiah (B.C. 628). He left his native place, and went to reside in Jerusalem, where he greatly assisted Josiah in his work of reformation (2 Kings 23:1-25 ). The death of this pious king was bewailed by the prophet as a national calamity (2 Chronicles 35:25 ). During the three years of the reign of Jehoahaz we find no reference to Jeremiah, but in the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim the enmity of the people against him broke out in bitter persecution, and he was placed apparently under restraint (Jeremiah 36:5 ). In the fourth year of Jehoiakim he was commanded to write the predictions given to him, and to read them to the people on the fast-day. This was done by Baruch his servant in his stead, and produced much public excitement. The roll was read to the king. In his recklessness he seized the roll, and cut it to pieces, and cast it into the fire, and ordered both Baruch and Jeremiah to be apprehended. Jeremiah procured another roll, and wrote in it the words of the roll the king had destroyed, and "many like words" besides (Jeremiah 36:32 ).
He remained in Jerusalem, uttering from time to time his words of warning, but without effect. He was there when Nebuchadnezzar besieged the city (Jeremiah 37:4,5 ), B.C. 589. The rumour of the approach of the Egyptians to aid the Jews in this crisis induced the Chaldeans to withdraw and return to their own land. This, however, was only for a time. The prophet, in answer to his prayer, received a message from God announcing that the Chaldeans would come again and take the city, and burn it with fire (37:7,8). The princes, in their anger at such a message by Jeremiah, cast him into prison ((37:15-38:13).). He was still in confinement when the city was taken (B.C. 588). The Chaldeans released him, and showed him great kindness, allowing him to choose the place of his residence. He accordingly went to Mizpah with Gedaliah, who had been made governor of Judea. Johanan succeeded Gedaliah, and refusing to listen to Jeremiah's counsels, went down into Egypt, taking Jeremiah and Baruch with him (Jeremiah 43:6 ). There probably the prophet spent the remainder of his life, in vain seeking still to turn the people to the Lord, from whom they had so long revolted (44). He lived till the reign of Evil-Merodach, son of Nebuchadnezzar, and must have been about ninety years of age at his death. We have no authentic record of his death. He may have died at Tahpanhes, or, according to a tradition, may have gone to Babylon with the army of Nebuchadnezzar; but of this there is nothing certain.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Lamentations of Jeremiah
Title. --The Hebrew title of this book, Ecah , is taken, like the titles of the five books of Moses, from the Hebrew word with which it opens. Author. --The poems included in this collection appear in the Hebrew canon with no name attached to them, but Jeremiah has been almost universally regarded as their author. Date. --The poems belong unmistakably to the last days of the kingdom, or the commencement of the exile, B.C. 629-586. They are written by one who speaks, with the vividness and intensity of an eye-witness, of the misery which he bewails. Contents. --The book consists of five chapter, each of which, however, is a separate poem, complete in itself, and having a distinct subject, but brought at the same time under a plan which includes them all. A complicated alphabetic structure pervades nearly the whole book. (1) Chs. 1,2,4 contain twenty-two verses each, arranged in alphabetic order, each verse falling into three nearly balanced clauses; ch. ( Lamentations 2:19 ) forms an exception, as having a fourth clause. (2) Ch. 3 contains three short verses under each letter of the alphabet, the initial letter being three times repeated. (3) Ch. 5 contains the same number of verses as chs. 1,2,4, but without the alphabetic order. Jeremiah was not merely a patriot-poet, weeping over the ruin of his country; he was a prophet who had seen all this coming, and had foretold it as inevitable. There are perhaps few portions of the Old Testament which appear to have done the work they were meant to do more effectually than this. The book has supplied thousands with the fullest utterance for their sorrows in the critical periods of national or individual suffering. We may well believe that it soothed the weary years of the Babylonian exile. It enters largely into the order of the Latin Church for the services of passion-week. On the ninth day of the month of Ab (July-August), the Lamentations of Jeremiah were read, year by year, with fasting and weeping, to commemorate the misery out of which the people had been delivered.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah
("exalted of Jehovah") (Jerome); ("appointed of Jehovah") (Gesenius); ("Jehovah throws") (Hengstenberg); compare Jeremiah 1:10.
1. Son of Hilkiah, a priest in Anathoth of Benjamin; not the high priest Hilkiah who discovered the book of the law in Josiah's reign (2 Kings 22:8), for Jeremiah's father is not designated as "the priest" or "the high priest." Moreover, the Anathoth priests were of the line of Abiathar, who was deposed by Solomon (1 Kings 2:26-35). Thenceforward the high priesthood was in Eleazar's and Zadok's line. The independent history (2 Chronicles 35:25; 2 Chronicles 36:12; 2 Chronicles 36:21) mentions his "lamentation for Josiah," Zedekiah's "not humbling himself before Jeremiah the prophet speaking from the mouth of Jehovah," and the Babylonian captivity "to fulfill Jehovah's word by the mouth of Jeremiah until the land had enjoyed her sabbaths, for as long as she lay desolate she kept sabbath to fulfill threescore and ten years" (Jeremiah 37:12-2141; Jeremiah 25:9-12; Jeremiah 26:6-7; Jeremiah 29:10).
In 629 B.C., the 13th of Josiah's reign, while a mere youth at Anathoth, three miles from Jerusalem (Jeremiah 1:2), "the word of Jehovah came to him" just as manhood was opening out to him, calling him to lay aside his natural sensitiveness and timid self distrust, and as Jehovah's minister, by the might of Jehovah's efficacious word, to "root out ... throw down, build and plant." "Before thou camest forth out of the womb I sanctified and ordained thee a prophet unto the nations." To his pleas of childlike inability to speak (as Moses, Exodus 3:11-12; Exodus 4:10-12; and Isaiah, Isaiah 6:5-8), Jehovah opposes His mission and His command: "thou shalt go to all that I shall send thee, and whatsoever I command thee thou shalt speak." To his fear of men's faces Jehovah declares "I am with thee to deliver thee." Touching Jeremiah's mouth (as Isaiah's; compare Jesus' touch, Matthew 9:21-29), Jehovah put His words in the prophet's mouth, so that the prophetic word became divinely efficient to produce its own fulfillment; even as the Word was the efficient cause of creation.
Jeremiah must have at first exercised his office in contemplation rather than action, for he is not mentioned in connection with Josiah's reforms, or the great Passover held in the 18th year of his reign, five years subsequent to Jeremiah's call. It is from the prophetess Huldah, not from him, that the godly king sought counsel. Yet he must have warmly sympathized with this great revival. Indications of affinity or friendship with some of the actors in it occur in the sameness of names: Jeremiah's father bearing the name of Hilkiah, Josiah's high priest; his uncle that of Shallum, Huldah's husband (Jeremiah 32:7; compare 2 Kings 22:14); Ahikam, Jeremiah's protector (Jeremiah 26:24), was also the fellow worker with Huldah in the revival; moreover Maaseiah, governor of Jerusalem, sent by Josiah as ally of Hilkiah in repairing the temple (2 Chronicles 34:8), was father of Neriah, the father of both Baruch and Seraiah, Jeremiah's disciples (Jeremiah 36:4; Jeremiah 51:59).
The finding of the book of the law, the original temple copy (See HILKIAH) exercised a palpable effect on his later writings. (Compare Jeremiah 11:3-5 with Deuteronomy 7:12; Deuteronomy 4:20; Jeremiah 34:8-22,; Jeremiah 3:16-18 with Deuteronomy 15:12; Deuteronomy 32:18 with Exodus 20:6; Exodus 32:21 with Exodus 6:6). He saw that the reformation was but a surface one, and would not ensure the permanent peace which many anticipated from it (Jeremiah 7:4), for while "the temple" was restored the spirit of apostasy still prevailed, so that even Israel seemed just in comparison with what Judah had become (Jeremiah 3:11), a seeker of the truth was scarcely to be found, and self seeking was the real aim, while "the prophets prophesy falsely, the priests hear rule by their means, and God's people (!) love to have it so" (Jeremiah 5:1; Jeremiah 5:31).
Five years after his call to prophesy the book of the law was found in the temple by Hilkiah (2 Kings 22:8; 2 Kings 23:25); then Jeremiah in Jehovah's name proclaimed, "Hear ye this covenant, and speak (it in your turn to others, namely,) unto the men of Judah and Jerusalem." Next Jehovah commanded Jeremiah to take a prophetic tour, proclaiming the covenant through the cities of Judah, as well as in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 11:1-2; Jeremiah 11:6). Apparently, he lived at first in Anathoth, repairing thence from time to time to prophesy in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 2:2), until the enmity of his townsmen and even his brethren, because of his godly faithfulness (Jeremiah 11:18-21; Jeremiah 12:6), drove him to Jerusalem. He knew not of their plotting against his life until Jehovah revealed it. His personal experiences were providentially ordered to qualify him to be the type in his own person, as well as the prophet, of Messiah (compare Isaiah 53:7).
So His brethren, and the Nazarenes His townsmen, treated Christ (Luke 4:24-29; John 1:11; John 7:5; Psalms 69:8). By Jehovah's direction Jeremiah was to have neither wife or children (Jeremiah 16:2), in order to symbolize the coming of calamities on Judea so severe that the single state (contrary to the natural order) would be preferable to the married (1 Corinthians 7:8; 1 Corinthians 7:26; 1 Corinthians 7:29; Matthew 24:19; Luke 23:29). Eighteen years after his first call king Josiah died. During this period, when others thought evil distant, the vision of the almond tree, the emblem of wakefulness, showed Jeremiah that evil was hastening, and the seething pot that it should come from the N., namely, the Babylonians entering into the Holy Land from the N. by way of Hamath (Jeremiah 1:11-15). (See ALMOND.)
Jeremiah, like Isaiah (Isaiah 30:1-7), foresaw that the tendency of many to desire an alliance with Egypt, upon the dissolution of the Assyrian empire whose vassal Manasseh was, would end in sorrow (Jeremiah 2:18): "what hast thou to do in the way of (with going down to) Egypt? to drink the waters of Sihor (to seek hosts as allies from the Nile land)?" Josiah so far molded his policy according to Jeremiah's counsel; but he forgot that it was equally against God's will for His people to lean upon Assyrian or Babylonian "confidences" as upon Egyptian (Jeremiah 36 - 37); so taking the field as ally of Assyria and Babylon against the Egyptian Pharaoh Necho he fell (2 Kings 23:29). Josiah's death was one of his bitterest sorrows (Jeremiah 22:10; Jeremiah 22:15-16), the remembrance of his righteous reign intensified the pain of witnessing the present injustice of his successors.
Jeremiah composed the funeral dirge which "the singing men and women in their lamentations" used at the anniversary kept subsequently as an ordinance in Israel (2 Chronicles 35:20-25). Jeremiah had also inward conflicts. Like Asaph (Psalm 73) he felt perplexed at the prosperity of the wicked (Jeremiah 12:1-4) plotters at Anathoth against his life (Jeremiah 11:19-21), to which Jehovah replies that even worse is before him at Jerusalem: "if thou hast run with the footmen (the Anathoth men), and they have wearied thee, then how canst thou contend with horses (the men of Jerusalem)? And if (it is only) in a land of peace thou trustest (so the Hebrew is), then how wilt thou do in the swelling of Jordan?" Or else, if in the plain country alone thou art secure, how wilt thou do "in the pride (the wooded banks, the lair of beasts: Zechariah 11:3; 2 Kings 6:2 compare Proverbs 24:10) of Jordan?"
Jeremiah sensitively shrank from strifes, yet the Holy Spirit enabled him to deliver his message at the certain cost of rousing enmity and having his sensitiveness wounded (Jeremiah 15:10). His nature said, "I will not make mention of Him, nor speak any more in His name; but (the Spirit made him feel) His word was in mine heart as a burning fire shut up in my bones, and I was weary with forbearing" (Jeremiah 20:9). In Jeremiah 22:11-12 Jeremiah foretold that Josiah's son, Shallum or Jehoahaz who reigned but three months and was carried to Egypt by Pharaoh Necho, should never return. (See JEHOAHAZ.) On Jehoiakim's accession idolatry returned, combined with the worship of Jehovah; and priests, prophets, and people soon brought Jeremiah before the authorities, urging that he should be put to death for denouncing evil against the temple and the city (Jeremiah 26:7-11).
This he had done in Jeremiah 7:12-14; Jeremiah 7:8-9. and more summarily in Jeremiah 26:1-2; Jeremiah 26:6, at the feast of tabernacles, when the law was commanded to be read, or at either of the other two great feasts, before the people of "all the cities of Judah," assembled for worship "in the court of Jehovah's house"; he "diminished not a word" through fear of offending. The "princes," including doubtless some of Josiah's counselors or their sons, interposed in his behalf (Jeremiah 27:7), appealing to Micah's case, who had uttered a like prophecy in Hezekiah's reign with impunity; adding the implication which they durst not express, that though Urijah who prophesied similarly was brought back from his flight into Egypt, and slain by Jehoiakim, yet that the notorious prostration of the state showed that evil, not good, is the result of such persecutions.
So Ahikam his friend, the former officer of good Josiah (2 Kings 22:12; 2 Kings 22:14), saved him from death; however Jeremiah deemed it prudent not to appear in public then. (See AHIKAM.) In Jehoakim's (and see BARUCH; JEHUDI.) fifth year Jeremiah escaped his violence by the Lord's hiding him and Baruch (Jeremiah 36:27-32), after the king had destroyed the prophetic roll of prophecies for the 23 years past of Jeremiah's ministry, which Jeremiah was commanded to write in Jehoiakim's fourth year, and which in the fifth Baruch, having first written them, read to the people assembled on the fast. (See JEHOIAKIM.) Jeremiah had shown his prophetic prescience by opposing as delusive what as a patriot he would have desired, the hopes cherished of his country's independence of Babylon (Jeremiah 27:1; Jeremiah 27:6-8): "thus saith Jehovah of hosts, I have made the earth ... and now have I given all these lands into the hands of Nebuchadnezzar ... My servant ... and all nations shall serve him, and his son's son, until the very time of his land come."
So in Jehoiakim's fourth year Judah's hopes from Egypt were crushed by Nebuchadnezzar's defeat of Pharaoh Necho at Carchemish (Jeremiah 46:2, a prophecy uttered shortly before the event). Jeremiah had in this year foretold that not Judah alone, but all nations should be subject to Babylon for 70 years, having to drink God's wine cup of fury, and then Babylon itself should be made "perpetual desolations" (Jeremiah 25:8-38). Hence, the Rechabites (See JEHONADAB) were constrained at this time to take refuge within Jerusalem through fear of the Chaldees. Jeremiah's own ascetic spirit was instinctively attracted to them, famed as they were for their abstemious, pilgrim, devout, and idolatry abhorring walk. The occurrence of the name Jeremiah among them, and their ready admission into the temple, mark previous association with Jeremiah and the priests.
Jeremiah made their filial obedience to their earthly father a condemnation of Judah's disobedience to their heavenly Father (Jeremiah 35). (In Jeremiah 45, concerning an individual, subjoined to his prophecies concerning nations, though belonging to the time just after (Jeremiah 36) the close of Jehoiakim's reign, Jeremiah, in Jeremiah 18-19 (probably in Jeconiah's reign), by the symbols of the remaking by the potter of the marred vessel, and of the breaking of the bottle in the valley of Hinnom, sets forth God's absolute power over His creatures to give reprobates to destruction, and to raise others instead of the people who prove unfaithful to His election (Jeremiah 1:14-18; Isaiah 64:8; Romans 9:20-21). (See BARUCH.) The potter's field significantly was the purchase with the price of reprobate Judas' treachery (Matthew 27:9-10, which quotes Zechariah 11:12-13 as Jeremiah's because Zechariah rests on Jeremiah; compare Psalms 2:8-9; Revelation 2:27).
Pashur, chief governor in the Lord's house, in consequence smote and put him in the stocks (Jeremiah 20:2); when liberated, he renewed his prophecy against the city, denouncing Pashur as about to become Magor Missabib, "terror round about." Then he gave way to complaints of God, but to God, as if God had deceived him; but God had promised (Jeremiah 1:19), not that he should escape suffering, but that God would deliver him out of it; he even, like Job (Job 3:3-11), in impatience cursed his day of birth, but better feelings prevailed soon, and he records his deep depression (Isaiah 45:9) after his believing thanksgiving only to show how great was his deliverance (Jeremiah 1:11-13). In the three months' reign of Jehoiachin, Jeconiah, or Coriah (the omission of the Jah marking his severance from Jehovah), Jeremiah prophesied the carrying away of the king and the queen mother Nehushta, daughter of Elnathan (Jeremiah 13:18; Jeremiah 22:24-30; 2 Kings 24:6; 2 Kings 24:8; 2 Kings 24:12; 2 Kings 24:15).
In this reign Jeremiah gave the symbolical prophecy of the girdle on his loins taken to the Euphrates, and hidden in a hole of the rock (Jeremiah 13:1-7). Some symbolical acts of prophets, being scarcely possible, probable, or decorous, existed only in spiritual vision; when possible and proper, they were often materialized by outward performance. The act, even when only internal, vivified the naked statement of prophetic truth. A journey twice of 200 miles to the Euphrates may have been taken only in the spiritual world wherein the seer moved (compare Jeremiah 19:1; Jeremiah 19:10; Jeremiah 27:2-3; Isaiah 20:2). Nebuchadnezzar was evidently acquainted with him, but whether it was by an actual journey of Jeremiah to Babylon is uncertain (Jeremiah 39:11). In spite of the warning given in Jeconiah's case, Zedekiah set at naught Jeremiah's words and revolted.
So in his ninth year, tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar began the siege of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 39:1). Zedekiah in the tenth year, through Jehucal and Zephaniah, begged Jeremiah, "pray for us," as the issue between Nebuchadnezzar and Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) was at that time as yet undecided. In consequence of fear the Jews obeyed the law by temporarily emancipating their bondservants at, the end of seven years, but on the remission of the siege again enslaved them (Jeremiah 34). Jeremiah therefore foretold that Zedekiah and his princes should be given up to their enemies (Jeremiah 32:2-5). Yet he foretold the sure repossession of Judaea by the Jews, by redeeming his uncle Hanameel's field in due form; just as at Rome the ground whereon Hannibal was encamped was put up for sale and found a purchaser. Pharaoh's advance caused the Chaldeans to withdraw temporarily from besieging Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:1-5).
Jeremiah warned the king that the Chaldeans would return and burn the city with fire. Therefore Zedekiah shut him up in the court of the prison. Jeremiah himself tried to escape to his native place, Anathoth of Benjamin; but Irijah arrested him at the gate of Benjamin on the charge of desertion to the Chaldeans. Then the princes smote and imprisoned him in the house of Jonathan the scribe. It was a pit (dungeon) with vaulted cells ("cabins") round the sides. After many days in the dungeon Zedekiah the king took him out, and inquired secretly (compare John 3:2; John 5:44; John 12:43; John 19:38), "is there any word from Jehovah?" Jeremiah without regard to his earthly interests (contrast Jeremiah 6:14; Isaiah 30:10; Ezekiel 13:10) foretold Zedekiah's being delivered up to Nebuchadnezzar, and begged not to be left to "die" in Jonathan's house.
His natural shrinking from death (Jeremiah 37:20) makes his spiritual firmness the more remarkable; ready to die rather than swerve from duty. Zedekiah committed him to the court of the prison (the open space occupied by the guard, Jeremiah 32:2, where his friends had access to him: Jeremiah 32:12; 1618417536_3), and commanded bread to be supplied to him until all in the city was spent (Psalms 37:19; Isaiah 33:16). Honest reproof sometimes gains more favor than flattery (Proverbs 28:23). Zedekiah again sent Pashur and Zephaniah to Jeremiah to inquire of him, and received the reply that submission to the Chaldees is the only way of life (Jeremiah 21:1-9; Jeremiah 38:2 ff); and then the princes accused Jeremiah of weakening the hands of the warriors by such words, and the weak prince left. Jeremiah in their hand, saying "the king cannot do anything against you."
So they cast him into Malchiah's dungeon, or cistern emptied of its water during the siege, the mire alone remaining (compare Zechariah 9:11 and the Antitype, Psalms 69:2; Psalms 69:14). An Ethiopian stranger, the eunuch Ebedmelech, saved the prophet whom his own countrymen tried to destroy. (See EBEDMELECH.) "Old cast clouts and rags" were used to raise him up (compare spiritually 1 Corinthians 1:27-29). Zedekiah again secretly consulted Jeremiah, taking him to the third or N. entry of the outer or inner temple court. Fear of the mocking of the Jewish deserters deterred him from following the prophet's counsel, that he should go forth to the Chaldees; by refusing he brought on himself, as Jeremiah foretold, the mocking not only of the deserters but even of his own concubines. Jeremiah stayed in the court of the prison until Jerusalem was taken. Nebuchadnezzar directed Nebuzaradan, and he gave him liberty to stay with the remnant or go to Babylon, and added "victuals and a reward."
Notwithstanding the wrongs he had received from his countrymen for 40 years, as a true patriot he stayed with the Jews under Gedaliah, the son of his friend Ahikam (Jeremiah 39-40). After Gedaliah's murder by Ishmael, Johanan first consulted Jeremiah as to going to Egypt with a foregone conclusion, then carried Jeremiah, in spite of the prophet's warning, to Egypt (Jeremiah 41-43). (See GEDALIAH; ISHMAEL; JOHANAN.) At Tahpanhes he foretold Egypt's overthrow (Jeremiah 43:8-13), and tradition says he was stoned there (Pseudo Epiphanius; compare Hebrews 11:37). The Jews expected his reappearing as the forerunner of Messiah (Matthew 16:14), "that prophet" (John 1:21). He in a true sense did forerun Messiah, foreseeing to his own "sweet" comfort (Jeremiah 34:14) not only His conception by a "virgin," but His kingdom, first spiritual, whereby He is "the Lord our righteousness" (Jeremiah 23:5-6), making the "new covenant," "remembering our sin no more," and "writing His law in our hearts" (Jeremiah 31:22; Jeremiah 31:31-34; Hebrews 8:8-12; Hebrews 10:16-17), then visible in Jerusalem, Judah, and Israel, in the last days (Jeremiah 33:6-26; Jeremiah 31:26).
Jeremiah wrote too an epistle to the exiles at Babylon, carried away with Jeconiah (Jeremiah 29), similar in form and style to the New Testament epistles, advising them to settle quietly in Babylon and pray for its peace, for the captivity must last 70 years. The portion of the nation remaining in Judah Jeremiah saw by the Spirit was the worst (Jeremiah 24), and would fare the worst. Early in Jehoiakim's reign (Jeremiah 27:1) he had by symbolic yokes foretold Nebuchadnezzar's subjugation of Judah, etc. But the Syriac and Arabic versions make it likely "Zedekiah" ought to be read; so Jeremiah 27:3; Jeremiah 27:12; Jeremiah 27:28:1. The false prophet Hananiah broke the yokes of wood; but Jehovah declared yokes of iron should be substituted, and that Hananiah should die; he accordingly died the seventh month of the same year. Jeremiah took advantage of the embassy sent by Zedekiah to send his letter to the captives (Jeremiah 29).
Even among the captives at Babylon were false prophets, Ahab, Zedekiah, and Shemaiah (the writer to Zephaniah at Jerusalem that he should imprison Jeremiah as "mad"), who held out delusive hopes of a speedy return. Therefore, Jeremiah announces their doom. Six whole years before Jerusalem's fall Jeremiah wrote the prophecy of Babylon's own doom, for Seraiah to take to Babylon when he went there on behalf of Zedekiah (margin, Jeremiah 51:59-64), and therewith to console the captives. The Jews say, "the spirit of Jeremiah dwelt afterward in Zechariah"; Matthew (Jeremiah 27:9) therefore quotes the words of Zechariah as Jeremiah's. His protests against the priests and prophets answer to our Lord's against the scribes and Pharisees (Matthew 23); his lamentations over his doomed country correspond to the Saviour's tears over Jerusalem.
The picture of his sufferings in Lamentations 1:12 is antitypically realized in Messiah alone. The subjective and the elegiac elements preponderate in him. His Hebrew is tinged, as was to be expected, with Chaldaism. Sheshach (which, on the Kabalistic system of making the last letter of the Hebrew alphabet express the first, would be Babel) is supposed to prove his using that mystic system (Jeremiah 25:26); but in Jeremiah 51:41 there can be no design of concealment, for he mentions expressly Babylon; the word is rather from Shech the Babylonian goddess, during whose feast Cyrus took the city. Pathos and sympathy with the suffering are his characteristics. As Ezekiel views the nation's sins as opposed to righteousness, so Jeremiah as productive of misery. Ezekiel is as marked by firmness as Jeremiah is by delicate sensitiveness. His heaping of phrase on phrase, and repeating of stereotyped forms, are due to his affected feelings; but in the rhythmical parts, and against foreign nations, he is concise, sublime, and energetic. Division.-The various parts are prefaced by the formula, "The word which came to Jeremiah from Jehovah." Notes of time mark other divisions more or less historical. In the poetical parts there are 23 sections, divided into strophes of seven or nine verses, market by "Jehovah said also unto me. "The five books thus are:
I. Introduction: Jeremiah 1.
II. Reproofs of the Jews, seven sections, Jeremiah 2-24:
(1) Jeremiah 2;
(2) Jeremiah 3-4;
(3) Jeremiah 7-10,
(4) Jeremiah 11-13,
(5) Jeremiah 14-17,
(6) Jeremiah 18-20,
(7) Jeremiah 21-24.
III. Review of all nations, in two sections:
(1) Jeremiah 46-49.
(2) Jeremiah 25.
IV. Historical appendix, in three sections:
(1) Jeremiah 34:1-7,
(2) Deuteronomy 27:26
(3) Jeremiah 35.
V. Conclusion,
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah, the Book of
(See JEREMIAH.).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jeremiah
Among the Old Testament prophets, Jeremiah is the one who reveals more personal details than anyone else. Like all the prophets he declared his opposition to false religious practices, wrong social behaviour and foolish government policies, but above all his writings display the unhappiness that was a feature of much of his life. This unhappiness resulted partly from his unpopularity with the community in general, but his greatest distress came from a feeling that God had been unfair to him.
We can understand Jeremiah’s problems only as we see them against the background of conditions in Judah as set out in his book. Since the messages and events detailed in the book are not in chronological order, the following outline of events may help towards an understanding of the man and his work.
Forty years of preaching
Jeremiah began his prophetic work in 627 BC, the thirteenth year of the reign of Josiah, king of Judah (Jeremiah 1:1-2). Josiah had carried out sweeping reforms, firstly to remove all the idolatrous and immoral practices that had become deeply rooted in Judah over the previous generations, then to re-establish the true worship of Yahweh (2 Kings 22; 2 Kings 23:1-25). Jeremiah saw that in spite of the king’s good work, little had changed in people’s hearts. Judah was heading for terrible judgment. (Jeremiah Chapters 1-6, and possible parts of Chapters 7-20, seem to belong to the early period of Jeremiah’s preaching.)
Meanwhile to the north, Babylon was growing in power, and with its conquest of Assyria in 612 BC, it established itself as the leading nation in the region. When Egypt, the leading nation to Judah’s south, decided to challenge Babylon, Josiah tried to stop the Egyptians from passing through Palestine and was killed in battle (609 BC; 2 Kings 23:28-30). Considering itself now the master of Judah, Egypt removed Jehoahaz, the new Judean king, and made his older brother Jehoiakim king instead (2 Kings 23:31-37).
Jehoiakim was a cruel and ungodly ruler. He opposed Jeremiah because of his condemnation of Judah’s sins and his forecasts of its destruction (Jeremiah 22:13-19; Jeremiah 26:1-6; Jeremiah 26:20-24; Jeremiah 36). (Much of Jeremiah Chapters 7-20, along with Chapters 22, 23, 25, 26, 35, 36 and 45, belong to the time of Jehoiakim.)
When Babylon conquered Egypt at the Battle of Carchemish in 605 BC (Jeremiah 39:13-14), it thereby gained control of Judah and took selected Jerusalemites captive to Babylon (Daniel 1:1-6). When Jehoiakim later tried to become independent of Babylon, the Babylonian army, under Nebuchadnezzar, besieged Jerusalem. Jehoiakim died during the siege, and three months later his son and successor Jehoiachin surrendered. Jehoiachin and most of the useful people were then taken captive to Babylon. The Babylonians appointed Zedekiah, another brother of Jehoiakim, as the new king (597 BC; 2 Kings 24:8-17).
Jeremiah and Zedekiah were constantly in conflict. Jeremiah assured Zedekiah that Babylon’s overlordship was God’s judgment on Judah for its sin. Judah should therefore accept its punishment and submit to Babylon. To resist would only bring invasion, siege, starvation, bloodshed and captivity (2 Kings 24:18-20; Jeremiah 21:1-10; Jeremiah 24; Jeremiah 27:12-22; Jeremiah 28:12-14).
The opponents of Jeremiah assured Zedekiah that with the help of Egypt he could overthrow Babylonian rule. Foolishly, Zedekiah followed their advice instead of Jeremiah’s, and brought upon Judah a long and devastating siege. In the end Babylon destroyed the city and its temple, and took the king, along with all remaining useful citizens, into foreign captivity (587 BC; 2 Kings 25:1-21; Jeremiah 32:1-5; Jeremiah 32:28-29; Jeremiah 33:1-5; Jeremiah 37:16-17; Jeremiah 38:17-18; Jeremiah 39:1-10). (The parts of Jeremiah that deal largely with the reign of Zedekiah are Chapters 21, 24, 27-34, 37-39 and 52.)
On more than one occasion during this long crisis Jeremiah was imprisoned (Jeremiah 32:2; Jeremiah 37:15; Jeremiah 37:20-21; Jeremiah 38:1-6; Jeremiah 38:13; Jeremiah 38:28). Upon conquering the city, the victorious Babylonians released him and gave him full freedom to decide where he would like to live, Babylon or Judah. Jeremiah decided to stay in Judah. The Babylonians placed him under the protection of Gedaliah, the Jewish governor whom they had appointed over the Judeans left in the land (2 Kings 25:22; Jeremiah 46:2; Jeremiah 40:4-6).
Sadly, Gedaliah was murdered by some Judeans who were still opposed to Babylon (2 Kings 25:25; Jeremiah 40:13-16; Jeremiah 41). The remaining Judeans then fled for safety to Egypt, taking an unwilling Jeremiah with them (2 Kings 25:26; Jeremiah 42; Jeremiah 43:1-7). Jeremiah warned that they would not escape God’s punishment by fleeing to Egypt, but, as always, the people refused to heed the message (Jeremiah 43:8-13; Jeremiah 44). The Bible records nothing further of Jeremiah’s life, though one tradition says that the Judeans in Egypt later stoned him to death. (The period of Gedaliah’s governorship and the Judeans’ flight to Egypt is dealt with in Jeremiah Chapters 40-44.)
Jeremiah’s personal life
From the book of Jeremiah we learn much about the prophet’s personal life. It appears that he was only about twenty years of age when he began his prophetic preaching (1:6). Apparently he never married (16:2) and for much of his life he had few friends (20:7). His family opposed him (12:6) and the people of his home town plotted to kill him (11:19,21). The common people of Jerusalem cursed him (15:10), false prophets ridiculed him (28:10-11; 29:24-28), priests stopped him from entering the temple (36:5) and the civil authorities plotted evil against him (36:26; 38:4-6).
In addition to being imprisoned, Jeremiah was at times flogged (20:2; 37:15) and often threatened with death (11:21; 26:7-9; 38:15). On occasions, however, certain people in positions of influence gained protection for him against his persecutors (26:24; 38:7-13; 40:5-6).
There can be no doubt that Jeremiah loved his people and his country (8:18-22; 9:1-2; 14:19-22). It almost broke his heart to have to announce his country’s overthrow and urge his countrymen to submit to the enemy (4:19-22; 10:17-21; 14:17-18; 17:16-17). He was deeply hurt when people accused him of being a traitor (37:13; 38:1-6), for his great longing was that the people heed his warnings and so avoid the threatened destruction (7:5-7; 13:15-17; 26:16-19; 36:1-3).
Jeremiah wished for peace, but he knew there could be no peace as long as the people continued in their sin. The false prophets, on the other hand, assured the people of peace, knowing that messages that pleased the hearers brought good financial rewards (6:13; 8:11). Jeremiah knew that the people’s hopes would be disappointed, but this gave him no satisfaction, only greater distress (7:1-15; 14:13-18; 23:9).
Although it hurt Jeremiah to have to announce judgments on his own people, he did it faithfully as God’s messenger (20:8-10). When the people responded with hatred and violence (11:19; 18:18), Jeremiah complained to God bitterly. He accused God of being unfair in giving him a cruel reward for his devoted loyalty (12:1-4; 15:10-12,17-18; 20:14-18). God rebuked Jeremiah for his self-pity, though he also strengthened him to meet further troubles. As long as Judah remained faithless, Jeremiah could expect opposition (12:5-6).
These experiences emphasized to Jeremiah the importance of an individual’s personal relationship with God. Those who sincerely sought God found him; those who had no personal fellowship with God did not know him, no matter how outwardly religious they might have been (23:21-22). Jeremiah looked beyond the captivity to a day when there would be a new covenant between God and his people. This would be a covenant characterized not by a community’s conformity to religious laws, but by an individual’s personal relationship with God (31:31-34).
Outline of the book
The first six chapters of the book deal with the main features of Jeremiah’s early ministry: his call to be a prophet (1:1-19); his denunciation of Judah for its unfaithfulness, idolatry and immorality (2:1-3:5); his demand for true, inward repentance (3:6-4:4); and his warning of the coming destruction of Jerusalem (4:5-6:30).
Chapters 7-20 record incidents and messages which, in general, demonstrate the sinful condition of Judah and, in particular, Jerusalem. Three topics are prominent in this section. The first concerns Judah’s widespread sin and its certain punishment (7:1-8:17; 11:1-23; 16:1-17:13). The second concerns the approaching judgment on the capital city, Jerusalem (8:18-10:25; 13:1-15:9; 18:1-20:6). The third concerns Jeremiah’s inner conflicts and his complaints to God (12:1-17; 15:10-21; 17:14-27; 20:7-18).
After this come five chapters of warnings. There are warnings to rulers, such as Zedekiah (21:1-10; 24:1-10), kings in general (21:11-22:9), Jehoahaz (Shallum), Jehoiakim and Jehoiachin (Coniah) (22:10-30). There are additional warnings to lying prophets (23:9-40), and messages concerning God’s control over the destinies of nations (23:1-8; 25:1-38).
Prophecies of captivity and return (Chapters 26-36) include a warning to the Jerusalemites to submit to Babylon or be destroyed (26:1-28:17); an assurance to those already in exile that there is no hope for an immediate return to Jerusalem (29:1-32); the promise of a new age after the nation’s restoration (30:1-33:26); and guarantees that though treachery and rebellion will be punished, fidelity will be rewarded (34:1-36:32).
A unit of eight chapters then traces events in chronological sequence from the final siege of Jerusalem to the settlement of the Jews in Egypt: Jeremiah’s imprisonment and rescue (37:1-38:28); the fall of Jerusalem (39:1-18); the appointment of Gedaliah and his brutal assassination (40:1-41:18); the migration to Egypt (42:1-43:7); and Jeremiah’s message to the Jews in Egypt (43:8-44:30). An earlier message for Jeremiah’s secretary, Baruch, is also recorded (45:1-5).
Finally there is a collection of messages for foreign nations: Egypt (46:1-28), Philistia (47:1-7), Moab and Ammon (48:1-49:6), Edom (49:7-22), Damascus, Kedar, Hazor and Elam (49:23-39), and Babylon (50:1-51:64). An historical appendix details matters relating to the fall of Jerusalem (52:1-34).

Sentence search

Kareah - ” Father of Johanan and Jonathan during the time of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 40:8 ,Jeremiah 40:8,40:13 ,Jeremiah 40:13,40:15-16 ; Jeremiah 41:11 ,Jeremiah 41:11,41:13-14 ,Jeremiah 41:13-14,41:16 ; Jeremiah 42:1 ,Jeremiah 42:1,42:8 ; Jeremiah 43:2 ,Jeremiah 43:2,43:4-5 ; spelled Careah in 2 Kings 25:23 , KJV)
Court of the Prison - An open court in the Jerusalem palace reserved for the detention of prisoners during the day of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 32:8 ,Jeremiah 32:8,32:12 ; Jeremiah 33:1 ; Jeremiah 37:21 ; Jeremiah 38:6 ,Jeremiah 38:6,38:13 ,Jeremiah 38:13,38:28 ; Jeremiah 39:14-15 )
Jeremiah - ) (2 Kings 24:18 ; Jeremiah 52:1 ). A representative of the sect of the Rechabites (Jeremiah 35:3 ). ...
Other persons by the name of Jeremiah are referred to in Hebrew inscriptions from Lachish and Arad about 700 B. ...
Jeremiah, the prophet The Bible tells us more about personal experiences of Jeremiah than of any other prophet. We read that his father's name was Hilkiah, a priest from Anathoth (Jeremiah 1:1 ). ) (Jeremiah 1:2 ). ) (Jeremiah 22:11 ), Jehoiakim (609-587 B. ) (Jeremiah 1:3 ; Jeremiah 22:18 ; Jeremiah 26:1 ; Jeremiah 35:1 ; Jeremiah 36:1 , Jeremiah 36:9 ), Jehoiachin/Jeconiah/Coniah (597 B. ) (Jeremiah 22:24 ; Jeremiah 24:1 ; Jeremiah 27:20 ; Jeremiah 28:3 ; Jeremiah 1:1-191 ; Jeremiah 37:1 ), and Zedekiah (597-586 B. ) (Jeremiah 1:3 ; Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 27:1-12 ; Jeremiah 28:1 ; Jeremiah 32:1 ; Jeremiah 15:10-217 ; Jeremiah 37-38 ; Jeremiah 39:4 ; Jeremiah 52:7 ). , Jeremiah moved to Mizpah, the capital of Gedaliah, the newly appointed Jewish governor of the Babylonian province of Judah (Jeremiah 40:5 ). When Gedaliah was assassinated (Jeremiah 41:1 ), Jeremiah was deported to Egypt against his will by Jewish officers who had survived the catastrophes (Jeremiah 42:1-43:7 ). In Egypt he continued to preach oracles against the Egyptians (Jeremiah 43:8-13 ) and against his compatriots (Jeremiah 44:1-30 ). ...
Jeremiah is depicted as living in constant friction with the authorities of his people, religious (priests Jeremiah 20:1-6 ; prophets Jeremiah 28:1 ; or both Jeremiah 26:1 ), political (kings Jeremiah 21-22 ; Jeremiah 36-38 ), or all of them together (Jeremiah 1:18-19 ; Jeremiah 2:26 ; Jeremiah 8:1 ), including Jewish leaders after the Babylonian invasion (Jeremiah 42:1-43:13 ). Still his preaching emphasized a high respect for prophets whose warning words could have saved the people if they had listened (Jeremiah 7:25 ; Jeremiah 26:4 ; Jeremiah 29:17-19 ; Jeremiah 35:13 ). He trusted in the promise of ideal future kings (Jeremiah 23:5 ; Jeremiah 33:14-17 ). He recommended national surrender to the rule of the Babylonian Empire and called Nebuchadnezzar, Babylon's emperor and Judah's most hated enemy, the “servant of the Lord” (Jeremiah 25:9 ; Jeremiah 27:6 ). He even incited his compatriots to desert to the enemy (Jeremiah 39:4-13 ). He was accused of treason and convicted (Jeremiah 37:11 ; Jeremiah 38:1-6 ), and yet the most aggressive oracles against Babylon are attributed to him (50–51). Enemies challenged his prophetic honesty and the inspiration of his message (Jeremiah 43:1-3 ; Jeremiah 28:1 ; Jeremiah 29:24 ), and yet kings and nobles sought his advice (Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 37:3 ; Jeremiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 42:1 ). ...
He constantly proclaimed God's judgment upon Judah and Jerusalem, and yet he was also a prophet of hope, proclaiming oracles of salvation, conditioned (Jeremiah 3:22-4:2 ) or unconditioned (30–31; Jeremiah 32:36 ; Jeremiah 33:6 ; Jeremiah 34:4 ). God forbade him to intercede for his people (Jeremiah 7:16 ; Jeremiah 11:14 ; Jeremiah 14:11 ; compare Jeremiah 15:1 ); yet he interceded (Jeremiah 14:7-9 ,Jeremiah 14:7-9,14:19-22 ). God ordered him to live without marriage and family (Jeremiah 16:2 ). He had to stay away from the company of merrymakers (Jeremiah 15:17 ) and from houses of feasting (Jeremiah 46:1-517 ). He complained to and argued with God (Jeremiah 12:1-17 ), complaining about the misery of his office (Jeremiah 20:7-18 ). At the same time he sang hymns of praise to his God (Jeremiah 20:13 ). ...
Jeremiah's call came in the thirteenth year of King Josiah, about 627/6 B. (Jeremiah 1:2 ; Jeremiah 25:3 ; compare Jeremiah 36:2 ). Josiah remains however, the only Jewish king contemporary with Jeremiah to and about whom no word is spoken in the whole book. The words of the call narrative: “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, I appointed you as a prophet to the nations” (Jeremiah 1:5 NIV), may suggest that the date of Jeremiah's call and birth is one and the same. ...
The Book of Jeremiah...
1. According to Jeremiah 36:1-26 , Baruch had written a first version at the dictation of Jeremiah. Jeremiah therefore dictated a second and enlarged edition of the first book to Baruch (Jeremiah 36:32 ). Additional references to Jeremiah's own writing activity (Jeremiah 30:2 ; Jeremiah 51:60 ; compare Jeremiah 25:13 ) forbids the identification of the scroll of Jeremiah 36:32 with the present form of the biblical book. Prophecies and Visions (Jeremiah 2:1-25:14 )...
III. Stories about Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26:1-45:5 )...
IV. Oracles Against Foreign nations (Jeremiah 25:15-38 ; 1618417536_54:64 )...
V. Historical epilogue (Jeremiah 52:1-34 )...
VI. Oracles on the restoration of Israel (Jeremiah 30:1-31:40 )...
This structure is not based on chronology as seen above. The so-called confessions of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 11:18-23 ; Jeremiah 12:1-6 ; 1618417536_82 ; Jeremiah 17:14-18 ; Jeremiah 18:19-23 ; Jeremiah 20:7-13 ,Jeremiah 20:7-13,20:14-18 ) are scattered through Jeremiah 11-20 . Oracles of hope (Jeremiah 30-31 ) interrupt the stories about Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26-45 ). Words against kings (Jeremiah 21:11-22:30 ) and against prophets (Jeremiah 23:9-40 ) appear to be independent collections. There the oracles against foreign nations are in a different order and appear immediately after Jeremiah 25:13 rather than at Jeremiah 46:1 . This and other evidence suggests a long and complicated process of collection of the Jeremiah materials into a book. Traditional scholarly theories have tried to attribute poetic oracles to Jeremiah, stories about the prophet to Baruch, and prose sermons to a later editor who used the Book of Jeremiah to exemplify and teach the theology of the Book of Deuteronomy. Aside from the stories of the scroll's destruction, expansion, and recopying (Jeremiah 36:1 ), we do not know all the processes through which God led to produce His inspired Book of Jeremiah. Text of the Book The earliest Greek version of Jeremiah, dating back to pre-Christian centuries, is more than 12. Only a few longer sections are missing (Jeremiah 33:14-26 ; Jeremiah 21:8 ). This confirms that the development of the Book of Jeremiah continued for centuries. Growing agreement among Jeremiah Bible students suggests that the shorter text represents an older stage of development. The Message Theologically, the Book of Jeremiah stimulates the search for the will of God in moments when all the institutions and religious representatives normally in charge of administrating His will are discredited. Neither the Davidic monarchy (Jeremiah 21:1-22:30 ), nor prophets and priests (Jeremiah 23:9-40 ), nor the cultic institutions of the Temple (Jeremiah 7:1-34 ; Jeremiah 26:1-9 ) could help the people to prevent impending calamities; nor could they detect that inconspicuous apostasy that mixes up the little aims of personal egoism (Jeremiah 2:29-37 ; Neriah - Jeremiah 51:59; Jeremiah 32:12 NERI, Jeremiah 36:4; Jeremiah 43:3
Nethaniah - The father of Ishmael the murderer of Gedaliah ( 2 Kings 25:23 ; 2 Kings 25:25 , Jeremiah 40:8 ; Jeremiah 40:14-15 ; Jeremiah 41:1 f. , Jeremiah 41:6 f. , Jeremiah 41:9-10 ff. , Jeremiah 41:15 f. , Jeremiah 41:18 ). The father of Jehudi ( Jeremiah 36:14 )
Magor Missabib - ) The name given by Jeremiah (Jeremiah 20:3) to Pushut when he smote and put him into the stocks for prophesying against Jerusalem. The phrase is frequent in Jeremiah, as Jeremiah 6:25; Jeremiah 20:10; Jeremiah 46:5; Jeremiah 49:29; Lamentations 2:22; elsewhere only Psalms 31:13
Baruch - Son of Neriah, An interesting character, as related to us in the prophecy of Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 32:1-44; Jeremiah 36:1-32; Jeremiah 43:1-13; Jeremiah 45:1-5) His name is derived from Barach, to bless
Merathaim, the Land of - "of double rebellion", namely, the double captivity inflicted on Israel by Chaldoea (Jeremiah 50:21); referring also to Babylon's general accumulated rebellions against God (Jeremiah 50:17-20, especially Jeremiah 50:18), "Babylon, Assyria," (Jeremiah 50:33; Jeremiah 50:24; Jeremiah 50:29) "striven against Jehovah, proud against
Nehelamite - A title from the father or the country, Shemaiah (Jeremiah 29:24; Jeremiah 29:31-32). Ηalam means a "dream"; Jeremiah glances at the "dreamer" scornfully (Jeremiah 29:8)
Shaphan - ) 2 Kings 22:3; 2 Kings 22:12; Jeremiah 29:8; Jeremiah 36:10-12; Jeremiah 39:14; Jeremiah 40:5; Jeremiah 40:9; Jeremiah 40:11; Jeremiah 41:2; Jeremiah 43:6; Ezekiel 8:11. Ahikam was Jeremiah's friend; hence Gemariah gives the prophet and Earuch a friendly warning to hide, and intercedes that Jehoiakim should not burn the roll (Jeremiah 36:12; Jeremiah 36:19; Jeremiah 36:25)
Nebuzaradan - He told Jeremiah, when he released him from his chains, that God had brought all this destruction upon Jerusalem because they had sinned against Jehovah, and had not obeyed His voice. He gave Jeremiah liberty to go where he pleased. 2 Kings 25:8-20 ; Jeremiah 39:9-14 ; Jeremiah 40:1 ; Jeremiah 41:10 ; Jeremiah 43:6 ; Jeremiah 52:12-30
Neigh - The loud, prolonged cry of a horse used as a figure of approaching battle (Jeremiah 8:16 ) or of unbridled sexual desire (Jeremiah 5:8 ; Jeremiah 13:27 ; Jeremiah 50:11 )
Neriah - ” Father of two men who assisted Jeremiah: Baruch the scribe (Jeremiah 32:12 ; Jeremiah 36:4-19 ) and Seraiah the quartermaster (Jeremiah 51:59 )
Noph - (nahf) Variant form of Moph, the Hebrew term for Memphis (Isaiah 19:13 ; Jeremiah 2:16 ; Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 ,Jeremiah 46:14,46:19 ; Ezekiel 30:13 ,Ezekiel 30:13,30:16 )
Hanamel - Jeremiah’s cousin, the son of his uncle Shallum ( Jeremiah 32:7-9 ; Jeremiah 32:12 ; Jeremiah 32:44 )
Anathoth - A Levitical city in Benjamin, Joshua 21:18; 1 Chronicles 6:60; the birthplace of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 1:1; Jeremiah 11:21; Jeremiah 11:23; Jeremiah 32:7-9; on the route of the Assyrians, Isaiah 10:30; some of its people returned with Zerubbabel, Ezra 2:23; Nehemiah 7:27
Jezaniah - Jeremiah 40:8; Jeremiah 42:1; apparently identical with Azariah, son of Hoshaiah (Jeremiah 43:2). Associated with Johanan in the flight to Egypt, in spite of God's warning by Jeremiah
Baruch - (bay' ryooch) The son of Neriah who served as Jeremiah's scribe and friend. He helped Jeremiah purchase a field from the prophet's cousin Hanameel and used the purchase as a symbol of hope (Jeremiah 32:12 ). Baruch, whose name means “blessed,” served Jeremiah as an amanuensis or scribe. He appears, moreover, to have had a close personal association with the prophet and to have exercised a significant influence in the ministry of Jeremiah. He wrote down Jeremiah's preaching and read it to the king's counselors who took it to the king. Jehoiakim burned it, but Jeremiah dictated it again (Jeremiah 36:1 ). Jeremiah was even accused of being a mere instrument of Baruch's enmity (Jeremiah 43:3 ). The prophet counseled Baruch to place his confidence wholly in the Lord and not to seek great things for himself (Jeremiah 45:1 ). See Jeremiah
Backsliding - Term used by the prophets to describe Israel's faithlessness to God (Isaiah 57:17 RSV; Jeremiah 3:14 ,Jeremiah 3:14,3:22 ; Jeremiah 8:5 ; Jeremiah 31:22 ; Jeremiah 49:4 ; Hosea 11:7 ; Hosea 14:4 )
Jehucal - A courtier sent by king Zedekiah to entreat for the prayers of Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 37:3 f. ); called in Jeremiah 38:1 Jucal
Gemariah - He vainly sought to deter king Jehoiakim from burning the roll ( Jeremiah 36:10-12 ; Jeremiah 36:25 ). A son of Hilkiah who carried a letter from Jeremiah to the captives at Babylon ( Jeremiah 29:3 )
Gedaliah - 2 Kings 25:22; Jeremiah 40:5. He was a friend of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 40:6; a party headed by Ishmael slew him. Jeremiah 41:2
Irijah - ” Army captain who accused Jeremiah of treason and turned him over to the authorities for punishment (Jeremiah 37:13 ) about 586 B. Apparently Jeremiah was going to inspect the field he had bought in Anathoth (Jeremiah 32:9 ). Since he had been preaching about ultimate victory for Babylon over Jerusalem, Irijah thought Jeremiah was trying to escape Jerusalem and join the Babylonian army, then retreating from Jerusalem. Both Irijah and Jeremiah thought they were serving God. History proved Jeremiah correct
Zedekiah - His reign was evil; he did not humble himself before the prophet Jeremiah, and profaned the name of Jehovah by breaking his oath to the king of Babylon. ...
Zedekiah was many times warned by Jeremiah against his course, and was advised to submit to Babylon; but for this Jeremiah was persecuted by the princes of Judah. Two prophecies respecting him are remarkable: one that he shall speak with the king of Babylon, and "his eyes shall behold his eyes," Jeremiah 32:4 ; and the other that "he shall be brought to Babylon, yet shall he not see it, though he shall die there. 2 Kings 24:17,20 ; 2 Kings 25:2,7 ; 1 Chronicles 3:15 ; 2 Chronicles 36:10,11 ; Jeremiah 52:1-11 ; Jeremiah 21:1-7 ; Jeremiah 24:8 ; Jeremiah 27:3,12 ; Jeremiah 28:1 ; Jeremiah 29:3 ; Jeremiah 32:1-5 ; Jeremiah 34:2-21 ; Jeremiah 37 — Jeremiah 39 ; Jeremiah 44:30 ; Jeremiah 49:34 ; Jeremiah 51:59 ; Jeremiah 1:3 . Jeremiah 29:21,22 . Jeremiah 36:12
Malchiah - A priest, the father of Pashhur ( Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 38:1 ), same as Malchijah of 1 Chronicles 9:12 , Nehemiah 11:12 . A member of the royal family, to whom belonged the pit-prison into which Jeremiah was let down ( Jeremiah 38:6 )
ba'Ruch -
Son of Neriah, the friend, (Jeremiah 32:12 ) amanuensis, (Jeremiah 26:4-32 ) and faithful attendant of Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 36:10 ) ff. (Jeremiah 51:59 ) Baruch 1:1 , and of distinguished acquirements. His enemies accused him of influencing Jeremiah in favor of the Chaldaeans, (Jeremiah 43:3 ) cf. By the permission of Nebuchadnezzar he remained with Jeremiah at Mizpeh, Jos. (Jeremiah 43:6 ) Nothing is known certainly of the close of his life
Baruch - Son of Neriah, the son of Mahseiah and brother of Seraiah ( Jeremiah 51:59 ); known from Jeremiah 36:1-32 ; Jeremiah 45:1-5 ; Jeremiah 32:12-16 ; Jeremiah 43:3 ; Jeremiah 43:8 ; by Jeremiah’s side in the conflict with Jehoiakim (b. ‘Baruch’ the scribe, named in Jeremiah 36:26 along with ‘Jeremiah the prophet,’ is already the recognized attendant and amanuensis of the latter; he seems to have rendered the prophet over twenty years of devoted service. He belonged to the order of ‘princes,’ among whom Jeremiah had influential friends ( Jeremiah 26:16 ; Jeremiah 36:25 ); Baruch’s rank probably secured for Jeremiah’s objectionable ‘roll’ (ch. When he cast in his lot with Jeremiah, Baruch made a heavy sacrifice; he might have ‘sought great things’ for himself, and is warned against his natural ambition ( Jeremiah 45:3-5 ). The promise that Baruch’s ‘life shall be given’ him ‘for a prey’ wherever he goes, placed where it is ( Jeremiah 45:5 ), suggests that he survived his master, to act as his literary executor. The Book of Jeremiah (see art
Shelemiah - ...
...
Father of one of those who accused Jeremiah to Zedekiah (Jeremiah 37:3 ; 38:1 ). ...
...
Father of a captain of the ward (Jeremiah 37:13 ). ...
...
Jeremiah 36:14
Nehelam, Nehelamite - (neh hehl' uhm, neh heh' law mite) Either a family name or a reference to the home of the false prophet Shemaiah (Jeremiah 29:24 ,Jeremiah 29:24,29:31-32 ). The name is perhaps a play on the Hebrew word for dreamer (compare Jeremiah 23:25 ,Jeremiah 23:25,23:32 )
Zephaniah - Son of Maaseiah the priest in Jerusalem in the time of Zekediah the king and Jeremiah the prophet ( Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 29:25 ; Jeremiah 29:29 ; Jeremiah 37:3 ). On the occasion of the final overthrow of Jerusalem he was put to death at Riblah ( Jeremiah 52:24 ff
Ebed-Melech - (ç'bed-mç'lek), (thing's servant, an Ethiopian eunuch in the service of King Zedekiah, through whose interference Jeremiah was released from prison. Jeremiah 38:7 ff; Jeremiah 39:15-16
Jehoiakim - At the same time he built himself luxurious royal buildings, forcing people to work in his selfish projects without payment (Jeremiah 22:13-19). ...
Conflict with Jeremiah...
The chief opponent of Jehoiakim was the prophet Jeremiah, who had begun his preaching earlier, in the reign of Josiah (Jeremiah 1:1-3). At the beginning of Jehoiakim’s reign, Jeremiah announced God’s judgment on the sinful kingdom (Jeremiah 26:1-6). This brought opposition from the palace (Jeremiah 26:10-11), but Jeremiah escaped unharmed. Jehoiakim was angry at his preaching and executed him (Jeremiah 26:20-24). ...
Jeremiah warned that because of the idolatry of the king and his people, God would send the Babylonians against Jerusalem in judgment (Jeremiah 25:1-9). In returning to Babylon, the conquerors took with them selected captives from the leading families of Jerusalem (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2; Daniel 1:1-4). ...
At God’s direction, Jeremiah wrote down all the prophecies of the previous twenty-three years. The king defiantly burnt the scroll, and tried unsuccessfully to arrest Jeremiah and Baruch (Jeremiah 36:1-26). Jeremiah then rewrote the scroll, with additions, and gave some encouragement to the frightened Baruch (Jeremiah 36:27-32; Jeremiah 45). In depending upon foreign nations to support his rebellion, he met further opposition from Jeremiah (Jeremiah 2:18; Jeremiah 2:36). No one mourned his death, and his body was thrown on the garbage dump outside Jerusalem, as if it were the carcass of an unclean animal (2 Chronicles 36:6; Jeremiah 22:18-19; Jeremiah 36:30)
Pashur - Jeremiah 20:1-6. Smote and put in the stocks Jeremiah for foretelling Jerusalem's desolation. On the following day Jeremiah, when brought out of the stocks, foretold that he should be not Pashur but Magor-Missabib, a terror to himself and his friends; he and all in his house, and all his friends to whom he had "prophesied lies" (Jeremiah 5:31; Jeremiah 18:18), should go into captivity and die in Babylon. Jeremiah 21:1; Jeremiah 21:9; Jeremiah 38:1-2; Jeremiah 38:6; 1 Chronicles 24:9; 1 Chronicles 24:14; Nehemiah 11:12. He was sent by Zedekiah to consult Jeremiah on the issue of Nebuchadnezzar's threatened attack, and received a reply foreboding Judah's overthrow. Subsequently, after the respite caused by Pharaoh Hophra had ended and the Chaldees returned to the siege, Pashur was one who besought the king to kill Jeremiah for weakening the hands of the men of war by dispiriting prophecies, and who cast the prophet into the pit of Malchiah. Jeremiah 38:1
Coniah - CONIAH ( Jeremiah 22:24 ; Jeremiah 22:28 ) = Jehoiachin (wh
Tah'Panhes, Tehaph'Nehes, Tahap'Anes, - a city of Egypt, mentioned in the time of the prophets Jeremiah and Ezekiel. " (Jeremiah 43:7 ) The Jews in Jeremiah's time remained here. (Jeremiah 44:1 ) It was an important town, being twice mentioned by the latter prophet with Noph or Memphis. (Jeremiah 2:16 ; 46:14 ) Here stood a house of Pharaoh-hophra before which Jeremiah hid great stones. (Jeremiah 43:8-10 )
Shelemiah - Jeremiah 36:14 . Son of Abdeel: he was ordered by Jehoiakim to arrest Baruch and Jeremiah. Jeremiah 36:26 . Jeremiah 37:3 ; Jeremiah 38:1 . Jeremiah 37:13
Gash - In modern translations to cut the skin as a sign of mourning (Jeremiah 41:5 ; Jeremiah 47:5 ; Jeremiah 48:37 ) or in the worship of pagan dieties (1 Kings 18:28 )
Shelemiah - (Jeremiah 37:3 ). Father of the captain of the guard who arrested Jeremiah (Jeremiah 37:13 ). Ancestor of an official of King Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:14 ). ) ordered to arrest Jeremiah and from whom God hid Jeremiah (Jeremiah 36:26 )
Gedaliah - He was joined by Jeremiah, and apparently ruled well; but he was treacherously murdered by Ishmael of Judah, who, according to Josephus (2 Kings 25:22-25 ; Jeremiah 39:14 ; Jeremiah 40:5-16 ; Jeremiah 41:1-18 ; Jeremiah 43:6 . Son of Pashur and one of the princes who caused Jeremiah to be cast into a dungeon. Jeremiah 38:1
Tahpanhes - ” City in the Nile Delta near the eastern border of Egypt (Jeremiah 2:16 ). Jeremiah 46:14 perhaps relates to one of these incidents. Following the destruction of Jerusalem and continuing unrest in Judah, a large group of Jews took Jeremiah with them and fled to Tahpanhes ( Jeremiah 43:7 ; Jeremiah 44:1 ). Jeremiah argued against the move (Jeremiah 42:19 ), warning that Nebuchadrezzar would again reach Tahpanhes (Jeremiah 46:14 )
Irijah - 'Captain of the ward' at Jerusalem who arrested Jeremiah. Jeremiah 37:13,14
Ephai - EPHAI or OPHAI in the Ketib or original text (Jeremiah 40:8; Jeremiah 40:13). Ishmael kille these "captains of the forces" left in Judah with Gedaliah, the governor appointed by the Babylonians (Jeremiah 41:3)
Gedali'ah - (God is my greatness ), son of Ahikam (Jeremiah's protector, ( Jeremiah 26:24 ) and grandson of Shaphan the secretary of King Josiah. 588, Nebuchadnezzar departed from Judea, leaving Gedaliah with a Chaldean guard, (Jeremiah 40:5 ) at Mizpah to govern the vinedressers and husbandmen, (Jeremiah 52:16 ) who were exempted from captivity. Jeremiah jointed Gedaliah; and Mizpah became the resort of Jews from various quarters. (Jeremiah 40:6,11 ) He was murdered by Ishmael two months after his appointment
Zedekiah - Others who bore the name Zedekiah were a prophet in the court of Ahab (2 Kings 24:10-1712; 1 Kings 2:24), an administrator in the government of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:12), a son of Jehoiakim (1 Chronicles 3:16) and a false prophet among the Jewish captives in Babylon (Jeremiah 29:21-23). Little is known of the early part of Zedekiah’s reign, except that in his fourth year he paid a visit to Babylon (Jeremiah 51:59). Jeremiah, who had been bringing God’s message to Judah for more than thirty years, opposed this policy. He advised the people to submit to Babylon, and so at least soften the judgment that was to fall upon them (2 Kings 24:18-20; 2 Chronicles 36:11-14; Jeremiah 27:1; Jeremiah 27:12-15). As a result he brought upon Jerusalem the besieging armies of Babylon (2 Kings 24:20 b; 25:1; Jeremiah 32:1-2). When he asked Jeremiah to pray that God would remove the Babylonians, Jeremiah replied that God would not remove them. Jeremiah advised that it would be better to surrender and be taken captive to Babylon than to resist and die in the siege (Jeremiah 21:1-10). He also warned Zedekiah of the judgment to fall on him personally (Jeremiah 34:1-7). ...
When Egypt came to Jerusalem’s aid, Babylon lifted the siege temporarily, but Jeremiah warned Zedekiah that Babylon would return and crush both Egypt and Judah (Jeremiah 37:1-10). ...
Back in Jerusalem, the pro-Egypt party accused Jeremiah of being a traitor and had him imprisoned. The weak Zedekiah easily gave in to Jeremiah’s opponents (Jeremiah 37:15; Jeremiah 38:5-6), but then was just as easily persuaded by a friend of Jeremiah to change his mind (Jeremiah 38:7-10). Zedekiah had secret meetings with Jeremiah in the hope of receiving better news, but Jeremiah merely repeated his former announcements (Jeremiah 37:16-21; Jeremiah 38:14-28). ...
After eighteen months of siege, the Babylonian army broke through the walls of Jerusalem (2 Kings 25:1-4; Jeremiah 39:1-3)
New Gate - A gate of the Jerusalem Temple (Jeremiah 26:10 ; Jeremiah 36:10 ), which should perhaps be identified with the Upper Gate Jothan built (2 Kings 15:35 ) and/or with the Upper Benjamin Gate (Jeremiah 20:2 )
Hananiah - A false prophet and contemporary with Jeremiah. Jeremiah 28:3. Jeremiah 28:17
Ebedmelech - He aided Jeremiah and God sent word to him that he should be delivered from death at the taking of Jerusalem. Jeremiah 38:7-12 ; Jeremiah 39:16-18
Jeremiah - ("exalted of Jehovah") (Jerome); ("appointed of Jehovah") (Gesenius); ("Jehovah throws") (Hengstenberg); compare Jeremiah 1:10. Son of Hilkiah, a priest in Anathoth of Benjamin; not the high priest Hilkiah who discovered the book of the law in Josiah's reign (Jeremiah 11:3-568), for Jeremiah's father is not designated as "the priest" or "the high priest. The independent history (Jeremiah 36:27-32; Jeremiah 7:8-986; 2 Chronicles 36:21) mentions his "lamentation for Josiah," Zedekiah's "not humbling himself before Jeremiah the prophet speaking from the mouth of Jehovah," and the Babylonian captivity "to fulfill Jehovah's word by the mouth of Jeremiah until the land had enjoyed her sabbaths, for as long as she lay desolate she kept sabbath to fulfill threescore and ten years" (Jeremiah 27:7; Jeremiah 25:9-12; Jeremiah 26:6-7; Jeremiah 29:10). , the 13th of Josiah's reign, while a mere youth at Anathoth, three miles from Jerusalem (Jeremiah 26:7-115), "the word of Jehovah came to him" just as manhood was opening out to him, calling him to lay aside his natural sensitiveness and timid self distrust, and as Jehovah's minister, by the might of Jehovah's efficacious word, to "root out . " Touching Jeremiah's mouth (as Isaiah's; compare Jesus' touch, Matthew 9:21-29), Jehovah put His words in the prophet's mouth, so that the prophetic word became divinely efficient to produce its own fulfillment; even as the Word was the efficient cause of creation. ...
Jeremiah must have at first exercised his office in contemplation rather than action, for he is not mentioned in connection with Josiah's reforms, or the great Passover held in the 18th year of his reign, five years subsequent to Jeremiah's call. Indications of affinity or friendship with some of the actors in it occur in the sameness of names: Jeremiah's father bearing the name of Hilkiah, Josiah's high priest; his uncle that of Shallum, Huldah's husband (Jeremiah 32:7; compare 2 Kings 22:14); Ahikam, Jeremiah's protector (Jeremiah 26:24), was also the fellow worker with Huldah in the revival; moreover Maaseiah, governor of Jerusalem, sent by Josiah as ally of Hilkiah in repairing the temple (2 Chronicles 34:8), was father of Neriah, the father of both Baruch and Seraiah, Jeremiah's disciples (Jeremiah 36:4; Jeremiah 51:59). (Compare 1618417536_7 with Deuteronomy 7:12; Deuteronomy 4:20; Deuteronomy 27:26; Jeremiah 34:14 with Deuteronomy 15:12; Deuteronomy 32:18 with Exodus 20:6; Exodus 32:21 with Exodus 6:6). He saw that the reformation was but a surface one, and would not ensure the permanent peace which many anticipated from it (Jeremiah 7:4), for while "the temple" was restored the spirit of apostasy still prevailed, so that even Israel seemed just in comparison with what Judah had become (Jeremiah 3:11), a seeker of the truth was scarcely to be found, and self seeking was the real aim, while "the prophets prophesy falsely, the priests hear rule by their means, and God's people (!) love to have it so" (Jeremiah 1:11-13; Jeremiah 5:31). ...
Five years after his call to prophesy the book of the law was found in the temple by Hilkiah (2 Kings 22:8; 2 Kings 23:25); then Jeremiah in Jehovah's name proclaimed, "Hear ye this covenant, and speak (it in your turn to others, namely,) unto the men of Judah and Jerusalem. " Next Jehovah commanded Jeremiah to take a prophetic tour, proclaiming the covenant through the cities of Judah, as well as in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 11:1-2; Jeremiah 11:6). Apparently, he lived at first in Anathoth, repairing thence from time to time to prophesy in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 2:2), until the enmity of his townsmen and even his brethren, because of his godly faithfulness (Jeremiah 11:18-21; Jeremiah 12:6), drove him to Jerusalem. By Jehovah's direction Jeremiah was to have neither wife or children (Jeremiah 16:2), in order to symbolize the coming of calamities on Judea so severe that the single state (contrary to the natural order) would be preferable to the married (1 Corinthians 7:8; 1 Corinthians 7:26; 1 Corinthians 7:29; Matthew 24:19; Luke 23:29). During this period, when others thought evil distant, the vision of the almond tree, the emblem of wakefulness, showed Jeremiah that evil was hastening, and the seething pot that it should come from the N. by way of Hamath (Jeremiah 1:11-15). )...
Jeremiah, like Isaiah (Isaiah 30:1-7), foresaw that the tendency of many to desire an alliance with Egypt, upon the dissolution of the Assyrian empire whose vassal Manasseh was, would end in sorrow (Zechariah 11:12-132): "what hast thou to do in the way of (with going down to) Egypt? to drink the waters of Sihor (to seek hosts as allies from the Nile land)?" Josiah so far molded his policy according to Jeremiah's counsel; but he forgot that it was equally against God's will for His people to lean upon Assyrian or Babylonian "confidences" as upon Egyptian (Jeremiah 36 - 37); so taking the field as ally of Assyria and Babylon against the Egyptian Pharaoh Necho he fell (2 Kings 23:29). Josiah's death was one of his bitterest sorrows (Jeremiah 22:10; Jeremiah 22:15-16), the remembrance of his righteous reign intensified the pain of witnessing the present injustice of his successors. ...
Jeremiah composed the funeral dirge which "the singing men and women in their lamentations" used at the anniversary kept subsequently as an ordinance in Israel (2 Chronicles 35:20-25). Jeremiah had also inward conflicts. Like Asaph (Psalm 73) he felt perplexed at the prosperity of the wicked (Jeremiah 12:1-4) plotters at Anathoth against his life (Jeremiah 11:19-21), to which Jehovah replies that even worse is before him at Jerusalem: "if thou hast run with the footmen (the Anathoth men), and they have wearied thee, then how canst thou contend with horses (the men of Jerusalem)? And if (it is only) in a land of peace thou trustest (so the Hebrew is), then how wilt thou do in the swelling of Jordan?" Or else, if in the plain country alone thou art secure, how wilt thou do "in the pride (the wooded banks, the lair of beasts: Zechariah 11:3; 2 Kings 6:2 compare Proverbs 24:10) of Jordan?"...
Jeremiah sensitively shrank from strifes, yet the Holy Spirit enabled him to deliver his message at the certain cost of rousing enmity and having his sensitiveness wounded (Jeremiah 15:10). His nature said, "I will not make mention of Him, nor speak any more in His name; but (the Spirit made him feel) His word was in mine heart as a burning fire shut up in my bones, and I was weary with forbearing" (Jeremiah 20:9). In Jeremiah 22:11-12 Jeremiah foretold that Josiah's son, Shallum or Jehoahaz who reigned but three months and was carried to Egypt by Pharaoh Necho, should never return. ) On Jehoiakim's accession idolatry returned, combined with the worship of Jehovah; and priests, prophets, and people soon brought Jeremiah before the authorities, urging that he should be put to death for denouncing evil against the temple and the city (1618417536_7). ...
This he had done in Jeremiah 7:12-14; 1618417536_8. and more summarily in Jeremiah 26:1-2; Jeremiah 26:6, at the feast of tabernacles, when the law was commanded to be read, or at either of the other two great feasts, before the people of "all the cities of Judah," assembled for worship "in the court of Jehovah's house"; he "diminished not a word" through fear of offending. The "princes," including doubtless some of Josiah's counselors or their sons, interposed in his behalf (Jeremiah 26:16), appealing to Micah's case, who had uttered a like prophecy in Hezekiah's reign with impunity; adding the implication which they durst not express, that though Urijah who prophesied similarly was brought back from his flight into Egypt, and slain by Jehoiakim, yet that the notorious prostration of the state showed that evil, not good, is the result of such persecutions. ...
So Ahikam his friend, the former officer of good Josiah (2 Kings 22:12; 2 Kings 22:14), saved him from death; however Jeremiah deemed it prudent not to appear in public then. ) fifth year Jeremiah escaped his violence by the Lord's hiding him and Baruch (2 Chronicles 35:25), after the king had destroyed the prophetic roll of prophecies for the 23 years past of Jeremiah's ministry, which Jeremiah was commanded to write in Jehoiakim's fourth year, and which in the fifth Baruch, having first written them, read to the people assembled on the fast. ) Jeremiah had shown his prophetic prescience by opposing as delusive what as a patriot he would have desired, the hopes cherished of his country's independence of Babylon (Jeremiah 27:1; Jeremiah 27:6-8): "thus saith Jehovah of hosts, I have made the earth . "...
So in Jehoiakim's fourth year Judah's hopes from Egypt were crushed by Nebuchadnezzar's defeat of Pharaoh Necho at Carchemish (Jeremiah 46:2, a prophecy uttered shortly before the event). Jeremiah had in this year foretold that not Judah alone, but all nations should be subject to Babylon for 70 years, having to drink God's wine cup of fury, and then Babylon itself should be made "perpetual desolations" (Jeremiah 25:8-38). Jeremiah's own ascetic spirit was instinctively attracted to them, famed as they were for their abstemious, pilgrim, devout, and idolatry abhorring walk. The occurrence of the name Jeremiah among them, and their ready admission into the temple, mark previous association with Jeremiah and the priests. ...
Jeremiah made their filial obedience to their earthly father a condemnation of Judah's disobedience to their heavenly Father (Jeremiah 35). (In Jeremiah 45, concerning an individual, subjoined to his prophecies concerning nations, though belonging to the time just after (Jeremiah 36) the close of Jehoiakim's reign, Jeremiah, in Jeremiah 18-19 (probably in Jeconiah's reign), by the symbols of the remaking by the potter of the marred vessel, and of the breaking of the bottle in the valley of Hinnom, sets forth God's absolute power over His creatures to give reprobates to destruction, and to raise others instead of the people who prove unfaithful to His election (Isaiah 45:9; Isaiah 64:8; Romans 9:20-21). ) The potter's field significantly was the purchase with the price of reprobate Judas' treachery (Matthew 27:9-10, which quotes 1618417536_13 as Jeremiah's because Zechariah rests on Jeremiah; compare Psalms 2:8-9; Revelation 2:27). ...
Pashur, chief governor in the Lord's house, in consequence smote and put him in the stocks (Jeremiah 20:2); when liberated, he renewed his prophecy against the city, denouncing Pashur as about to become Magor Missabib, "terror round about. " Then he gave way to complaints of God, but to God, as if God had deceived him; but God had promised (Jeremiah 1:19), not that he should escape suffering, but that God would deliver him out of it; he even, like Job (Job 3:3-11), in impatience cursed his day of birth, but better feelings prevailed soon, and he records his deep depression (Jeremiah 1:14-18) after his believing thanksgiving only to show how great was his deliverance (Jeremiah 5:1). In the three months' reign of Jehoiachin, Jeconiah, or Coriah (the omission of the Jah marking his severance from Jehovah), Jeremiah prophesied the carrying away of the king and the queen mother Nehushta, daughter of Elnathan (Jeremiah 1:20; Jeremiah 22:24-30; 2 Kings 24:6; 2 Kings 24:8; 2 Kings 24:12; 2 Kings 24:15). ...
In this reign Jeremiah gave the symbolical prophecy of the girdle on his loins taken to the Euphrates, and hidden in a hole of the rock (Jeremiah 13:1-7). A journey twice of 200 miles to the Euphrates may have been taken only in the spiritual world wherein the seer moved (compare Jeremiah 19:1; Jeremiah 19:10; Jeremiah 27:2-3; Isaiah 20:2). Nebuchadnezzar was evidently acquainted with him, but whether it was by an actual journey of Jeremiah to Babylon is uncertain (Jeremiah 39:11). In spite of the warning given in Jeconiah's case, Zedekiah set at naught Jeremiah's words and revolted. ...
So in his ninth year, tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar began the siege of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 39:1). Zedekiah in the tenth year, through Jehucal and Zephaniah, begged Jeremiah, "pray for us," as the issue between Nebuchadnezzar and Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) was at that time as yet undecided. In consequence of fear the Jews obeyed the law by temporarily emancipating their bondservants at, the end of seven years, but on the remission of the siege again enslaved them (Jeremiah 34). Jeremiah therefore foretold that Zedekiah and his princes should be given up to their enemies (Jeremiah 32:2-5). Pharaoh's advance caused the Chaldeans to withdraw temporarily from besieging Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:1-5). ...
Jeremiah warned the king that the Chaldeans would return and burn the city with fire. Jeremiah himself tried to escape to his native place, Anathoth of Benjamin; but Irijah arrested him at the gate of Benjamin on the charge of desertion to the Chaldeans. After many days in the dungeon Zedekiah the king took him out, and inquired secretly (compare John 3:2; John 5:44; John 12:43; John 19:38), "is there any word from Jehovah?" Jeremiah without regard to his earthly interests (contrast Jeremiah 34:8-22,; Isaiah 30:10; Ezekiel 13:10) foretold Zedekiah's being delivered up to Nebuchadnezzar, and begged not to be left to "die" in Jonathan's house. ...
His natural shrinking from death (Jeremiah 37:20) makes his spiritual firmness the more remarkable; ready to die rather than swerve from duty. Zedekiah committed him to the court of the prison (the open space occupied by the guard, Jeremiah 32:2, where his friends had access to him: 1 Corinthians 1:27-29; Jeremiah 37:12-21), and commanded bread to be supplied to him until all in the city was spent (Psalms 37:19; Isaiah 33:16). Zedekiah again sent Pashur and Zephaniah to Jeremiah to inquire of him, and received the reply that submission to the Chaldees is the only way of life (Jeremiah 21:1-9; Jeremiah 38:2 ff); and then the princes accused Jeremiah of weakening the hands of the warriors by such words, and the weak prince left. Jeremiah in their hand, saying "the king cannot do anything against you. ) "Old cast clouts and rags" were used to raise him up (compare spiritually Jeremiah 32:12). Zedekiah again secretly consulted Jeremiah, taking him to the third or N. Fear of the mocking of the Jewish deserters deterred him from following the prophet's counsel, that he should go forth to the Chaldees; by refusing he brought on himself, as Jeremiah foretold, the mocking not only of the deserters but even of his own concubines. Jeremiah stayed in the court of the prison until Jerusalem was taken. "...
Notwithstanding the wrongs he had received from his countrymen for 40 years, as a true patriot he stayed with the Jews under Gedaliah, the son of his friend Ahikam (Jeremiah 39-40). After Gedaliah's murder by Ishmael, Johanan first consulted Jeremiah as to going to Egypt with a foregone conclusion, then carried Jeremiah, in spite of the prophet's warning, to Egypt (Jeremiah 41-43). ) At Tahpanhes he foretold Egypt's overthrow (Jeremiah 43:8-13), and tradition says he was stoned there (Pseudo Epiphanius; compare Hebrews 11:37). He in a true sense did forerun Messiah, foreseeing to his own "sweet" comfort (Jeremiah 31:26) not only His conception by a "virgin," but His kingdom, first spiritual, whereby He is "the Lord our righteousness" (Jeremiah 23:5-6), making the "new covenant," "remembering our sin no more," and "writing His law in our hearts" (Jeremiah 31:22; Jeremiah 31:31-34; Hebrews 8:8-12; Hebrews 10:16-17), then visible in Jerusalem, Judah, and Israel, in the last days (Jeremiah 33:6-26; Jeremiah 3:16-18). ...
Jeremiah wrote too an epistle to the exiles at Babylon, carried away with Jeconiah (Jeremiah 29), similar in form and style to the New Testament epistles, advising them to settle quietly in Babylon and pray for its peace, for the captivity must last 70 years. The portion of the nation remaining in Judah Jeremiah saw by the Spirit was the worst (Jeremiah 24), and would fare the worst. Early in Jehoiakim's reign (Jeremiah 27:1) he had by symbolic yokes foretold Nebuchadnezzar's subjugation of Judah, etc. But the Syriac and Arabic versions make it likely "Zedekiah" ought to be read; so Jeremiah 27:3; Jeremiah 27:12; Jeremiah 27:28:1. Jeremiah took advantage of the embassy sent by Zedekiah to send his letter to the captives (Jeremiah 29). ...
Even among the captives at Babylon were false prophets, Ahab, Zedekiah, and Shemaiah (the writer to Zephaniah at Jerusalem that he should imprison Jeremiah as "mad"), who held out delusive hopes of a speedy return. Therefore, Jeremiah announces their doom. Six whole years before Jerusalem's fall Jeremiah wrote the prophecy of Babylon's own doom, for Seraiah to take to Babylon when he went there on behalf of Zedekiah (margin, Jeremiah 51:59-64), and therewith to console the captives. The Jews say, "the spirit of Jeremiah dwelt afterward in Zechariah"; Matthew (Jeremiah 27:9) therefore quotes the words of Zechariah as Jeremiah's. Sheshach (which, on the Kabalistic system of making the last letter of the Hebrew alphabet express the first, would be Babel) is supposed to prove his using that mystic system (Jeremiah 25:26); but in Jeremiah 51:41 there can be no design of concealment, for he mentions expressly Babylon; the word is rather from Shech the Babylonian goddess, during whose feast Cyrus took the city. As Ezekiel views the nation's sins as opposed to righteousness, so Jeremiah as productive of misery. Ezekiel is as marked by firmness as Jeremiah is by delicate sensitiveness. -The various parts are prefaced by the formula, "The word which came to Jeremiah from Jehovah. Introduction: Jeremiah 1. Reproofs of the Jews, seven sections, Jeremiah 2-24:...
(1) Jeremiah 2;...
(2) Jeremiah 3-4;...
(3) Jeremiah 7-10,...
(4) Jeremiah 11-13,...
(5) Jeremiah 14-17,...
(6) Jeremiah 18-20,...
(7) Jeremiah 21-24. Review of all nations, in two sections:...
(1) Jeremiah 46-49. ...
(2) Jeremiah 25. Historical appendix, in three sections:...
(1) Jeremiah 34:1-7,...
(2) Jeremiah 6:14...
(3) Jeremiah 35
Sheshach - Jeremiah 25:26; Jeremiah 51:41; i. Slaves ruled their master, and one called zogan in each house in royal garments ruled the rest (Jeremiah 51:39; Jeremiah 51:57; Isaiah 21:5). Cyrus during it took Babylon; thus Jeremiah prophesies the concomitants of the capture. But in Jeremiah 51:41 concealment cannot have been Jeremiah's object, for he mentions "Babylon" (Jeremiah 51:42)
Tahpanhes - A city on the Tanitic branch of the Nile, in lower Egypt, and called Tahapanes and Tehaphnehes, Ezekiel 30:18; possibly the Hanes of Isaiah 30:4; Jeremiah 2:16; Jeremiah 43:7-9; Jeremiah 44:1; Jeremiah 46:14. Jeremiah, after the murder of Gedaliah, was taken to this place, and Pharaoh had a palace built or restored there, made of bricks In a brick-kiln. Jeremiah 2:16
Jezaniah - (Jeremiah 40:8 ). Jezaniah was one of the captains who refused to believe Jeremiah's prophecy calling the people to remain in Judah. Rather, he helped carry Jeremiah into Egypt (Jeremiah 42-43 ). In Jeremiah 43:2 the name is Azariah, which may be the correct reading in Jeremiah 4:1 rather than Jezaniah
Ahikam - In Jehoiakim's subsequent reign Ahikam successfully pleaded for Jeremiah before the princes and elders, that he should not be given to the people to be put to death for his fearless warnings (Jeremiah 26:16-24). God rewarded Ahikam by the honor put upon Gedaliah, his son, by Nebuchadnezzar's making him governor over the cities of Judah, and committing Jeremiah' to him, when the Babylonians took Jerusalem (Jeremiah 40:5; Jeremiah 39:14)
Iri - Son of Shelemiah, "captain of the ward"; met Jeremiah at the Jerusalem "gate of Benjamin," accused him of deserting to the Chaldees, and brought him to the princes (Jeremiah 37:13-14). The death of Hananiah Iri's grandfather, for false prophecy, was foretold by Jeremiah; the grandson now takes his revenge (Jeremiah 28:16)
Magor-Missabib - (may' gahr-mihss ssay' bihb) Name meaning “terror on every side” which Jeremiah gave to Pashur the priest after the latter had the prophet beaten and put in stocks (Jeremiah 20:3 ). The earliest Greek translation lacks the words “on every side,” prompting some interpreters to conclude the words were added in imitation of the full phrase at Jeremiah 6:25 ; Jeremiah 20:10
Jaaz-Aniah -
The son of Jeremiah, and one of the chief Rechabites (Jeremiah 35:3 ). ...
...
A Maachathite (2 Kings 25:23 ; Jeremiah 40:8 ; 42:1 ). He is also called Azariah (Jeremiah 43:2 )
Jeremias - (jehr ih mi' uhss) KJV transliteration of Greek for Jeremiah (Matthew 16:14 ). See Jeremiah
Habaziniah - Ancestor of Jaazaniah, chief of the Rechabites in the time of Jeremiah. Jeremiah 35:3
Jehoiachin - Jeremiah gives his name in Jeremiah 24:1 , Jeremiah 27:20 , Jeremiah 28:4 , Jeremiah 29:2 as Jeconiah , and in Jeremiah 22:28 Jeremiah 22:28 , Jeremiah 37:1 as Coniah
Maaseas - The grandfather of Baruch ( Bar 1:1 ) = Mahseiah of Jeremiah 32:12 ; Jeremiah 51:59
Mad'Men - (dunghill ), a place in Moab, threatened with destruction in the pronunciations of Jeremiah. ( Jeremiah 48:2 )
Pashur - ' He struck Jeremiah and put him in the stocks. Jeremiah said to him that the Lord had called his name MAGOR-MISSABIB, 'fear round about' margin . Jeremiah 20:1-6 . Son of Melchiah or Malchiah: he with others advised Zedekiah to put Jeremiah to death. Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 38:1 . Jeremiah 38:1
Nehelamite - An epithet applied to Shemaiah, a false prophet who opposed Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 29:24 ; Jeremiah 29:31-32 )
Nebuzar-Adan - He managed the siege of Jerusalem, and made himself master of the city, while his sovereign was at Riblah in Syria, 2 Kings 25; Jeremiah 39; Jeremiah 40; Jeremiah 52
Ebed-Melech - ennuch, by whom Jeremiah was released from the pit-prison ( Jeremiah 38:7 ff; Jeremiah 39:15 ff
Magormissabib - Symbolical name given by God through Jeremiah to Pashur the priest who had beaten him and placed him in the stocks. Jeremiah 20:1-3 . ' The same Hebrew is translated 'fear on every side' in Jeremiah 20:10 . Jeremiah 20:6
Zephaniah - Priest whom King Zedekiah sent asking Jeremiah to pray for the nation threatened by Nebuchadrezzar of Babylon (Jeremiah 21:1-7 ; Jeremiah 37:3 ). He reported false prophecy from Babylon to Jeremiah (Jeremiah 29:24-32 ). When Jerusalem fell, the priest was executed (Jeremiah 52:24-27 )
Shelemi'ah - (Jeremiah 37:3 ) ...
The father of Irijah, the captain of the ward who arrested Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 37:13 ) (B. (Jeremiah 36:14 ) ...
Son of Abdeel; one of those who received the orders of Jehoiakim to take Baruch and Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 36:26 ) (B
Anathoth - City assigned to the priests in the territory of Benjamin, where Abiathar the high priest had his own 'fields,' and where Jeremiah was born: its inhabitants persecuted the prophet. Joshua 21:18 ; 1 Kings 2:26 ; 1 Chronicles 6:60 ; Ezra 2:23 ; Nehemiah 7:27 ; Nehemiah 11:32 , Isaiah 10:30 ; Jeremiah 1:1 ; Jeremiah 11:21,23 ; Jeremiah 29:27 ; Jeremiah 32:7-9
Ahikam - A person who rescued Jeremiah, when It was proposed to give him into the hands of the people, to be put to death. 2 Kings 22:12-14; 2 Kings 25:22; Jeremiah 26:24; Jeremiah 39:14...
Mahseiah - Grandfather of Baruch and Seraiah ( Jeremiah 32:12 ; Jeremiah 51:52 ); called in Bar 1:1 Maaseas
Abdeel - Father of Shelemiah ( Jeremiah 36:26 ), one of those ordered by Jeboiakim to arrest Jeremiah and Baruch
Tahapanes, Tahpanhes, Tehaphnehes - City in Lower Egypt, where Pharaoh had a house, and whither in disobedience the people of Judah fled after the murder of Gedaliah, taking Jeremiah and Baruch with them. Jeremiah prophesied that the king of Babylon should set his throne in that city and smite the land of Egypt. Jeremiah 2:16 ; Jeremiah 43:7-9 ; Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 ; Ezekiel 30:18 . ' This agrees with Jeremiah 43:6 , which says that the king's daughters were carried to Tahpanhes by Johanan
Jeremiah, Book of - In some instances Jeremiah's parables were acted , so as the more forcibly to impress the careless people. ...
Jeremiah 1 . Jeremiah is established in his office, to which he had been sanctified from his birth as prophet to the nations, Israel having been set in the midst of the Gentiles as the direct centre of God's government in the earth. ...
Jeremiah 2 — Jeremiah 6 This section is an appeal to Jerusalem, with exhortations to repentance, and warnings as to what had befallen Israel. Jeremiah 3:6,11 . ...
Jeremiah 7 — Jeremiah 10 . ...
Jeremiah 11 — Jeremiah 12 The responsibility of the people is pressed: they had entered into covenant with God, yet they had gone into idolatry, so that the Lord asks, "What hath my beloved [1] to do in mine house?" Judgement must follow; but here and there future blessings are spoken of. Jeremiah 12:14 shows the prophet's office against the nations — "mine evil neighbours. "...
Jeremiah 13 . The destruction of the pride of Jerusalem is foretold under the figure of a marred girdle which Jeremiah had buried, the great sorrow being that though as a girdle cleaves to the loins of a man, the Lord had caused all Israel to cleave to Him for His glory, yet they had left Him: compare Luke 19:41 .
Jeremiah 14 , Jeremiah 15 . A grievous famine occurred: the Lord would not be interceded with for them, yet Jeremiah takes up the sin of the people, and acknowledges it; but the answer (Jeremiah 15 ) is terrible. Jeremiah, though he loved the people, was hated by them. ...
Jeremiah 16 , Jeremiah 17 . ...
Jeremiah 18 — Jeremiah 20 . The people laid plots against Jeremiah: he was put in the stocks, and smitten by Pashur, upon whom a doom was denounced. Jeremiah bemoaned his lot. ...
Jeremiah 21 : — Jeremiah 24 . Jeremiah had to utter the dreadful news that God would Himself fight against them. ...
Jeremiah 25 gives a summary of God's judgements by Nebuchadnezzar, with a seventy years' captivity for Judah: then Babylon and all the nations that surrounded Palestine should come under God's judgements, but judgement begins with the city called by God's name. ...
Jeremiah 26 . In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim, Jeremiah exhorted to repentance, but the priests and prophets demanded his death. Ahikam however shielded Jeremiah. ...
Jeremiah 27 . Most probably the name Jehoiakim in
Jeremiah 27:1 should be Zedekiah; but it may be that the prophecy was given to Jeremiah in the daysof Jehoiakim though not related till the days of Zedekiah. ...
Jeremiah 28 . Hananiah prophesies falsely, and is opposed by Jeremiah, who foretells his death. ...
Jeremiah 29 . Jeremiah wrote to the captives in Babylon, urging them to make themselves homes there, and God would bring them back at the end of the seventy years. ...
Jeremiah 30 , Jeremiah 31 . ...
Jeremiah 32 , Jeremiah 33 . Jeremiah was put in prison by Zedekiah,but he bought a field in token of his assurance of the captives' return. In Jeremiah 33 the prophecy goes on to the future, when the Lord Jesus will appear as the Branch of righteousness, and the successor of David. Jeremiah 33:15 . ...
Jeremiah 34 . This is denounced by Jeremiah and its punishment foretold. ...
Jeremiah 35 . ...
Jeremiah 36 . Jeremiah caused Baruch to write his prophecy against Jerusalem in a roll. ...
Jeremiah 37 — Jeremiah 39 . Jeremiah was about to leave the city, but was arrested, beaten, and put into prison. Jeremiah was protected by Nebuchadnezzar. ...
Jeremiah 40 — Jeremiah 45 . These chapters give the history of the remnant left in the land under Gedaliah, Jeremiah being with them. They were however rescued by Johanan, and Jeremiah was requested to inquire of God for them, the people promising obedience. God bade them abide in the land; but they, refusing to obey, went into Egypt, carrying Jeremiah with them. There they persistently practised idolatry, though warned by Jeremiah. The end of Jeremiah is not recorded. ...
Jeremiah 46 — Jeremiah 51 . ...
Babylon has a special place in the prophecy of Jeremiah: Israel and Judah had been unfaithful, and the government of the world was entrusted to Babylon; but Babylon failed and its destruction was the setting free of Judah to return to their land. This is foreshadowed in some places, as in Jeremiah 50:17-20 , which speaks of both Judah and Israel being pardoned. Jeremiah 51 : closes with "Thus far are the words of Jeremiah. "...
Jeremiah 52 is historical and nearly the same as 2 Kings 24:18 - 2 Kings 25:30
Jeremy - (jehr' eh mee) KJV transliteration for Greek spelling of Jeremiah, the prophet (Matthew 2:17 ; Matthew 27:9 ). See Jeremiah
Gemariah - Jeremiah 29:3. The son of Shaphan, from whose chamber Baruch read to the people the roll of Jeremiah's prophecies. Jeremiah 36:10-12; Jeremiah 36:25
Heath - A shrubby, evergreen plant of the heather family, used by the KJV (Jeremiah 17:6 ; Jeremiah 48:6 ). Various translations have been offered: juniper (NAS); bush (NIV); shrub (NRSV, Jeremiah 17:6 ). At Jeremiah 40:8 , the RSV and TEV follow Aquila's Greek translation in substituting wild ass for the plant name
Shelemiah - The father of Jehucal or Jucal ( Jeremiah 37:3 ). The father of Irijah ( Jeremiah 37:13 ). Ancestor of Jehudi ( Jeremiah 36:14 ). Son of Abdeel ( Jeremiah 36:26 )
Gemariah - He carried a letter from Jeremiah to the exiles (Jeremiah 29:3 ). Son of Shaphan, the court scribe, who had a room in the Temple, where Baruch read from Jeremiah's sermons to the congregation (Jeremiah 36:10 ). Later, Gemariah sought to keep the king from burning Jeremiah's scroll (Jeremiah 36:25 )
Ahikam - He also served under Jehoiakim and shielded Jeremiah from death when he prophesied against the nation. Jeremiah 26:24 ; Jeremiah 40:5-16 ; Jeremiah 41:1-16
Hananiah - ...
Grandfather of the captain who arrested Jeremiah (Jeremiah 37:13 ). ...
Jeremiah 36:12 . ...
Nehemiah 3:30 ...
A priest, son of Jeremiah ( Nehemiah 12:12 ). ...
A false prophet contemporary with (Jeremiah 28:3,17 )
Brigandine - Jeremiah 46:4; Jeremiah 55:3; sirion , a coat of mail, or scale armor, worn by the light troops called brigands
Brigandine - KJV translation at Jeremiah 46:4 ; Jeremiah 51:3
Jehucal - Son of Shelemiah; a prince sent by Zedekiah to consult and ask Jeremiah's prayers (Jeremiah 37:3; Jeremiah 38:1-4)
Mahseiah - ” Grandfather of the scribe Baruch (Jeremiah 32:12 ; Jeremiah 51:59 )
Irijah - A captain who arrested Jeremiah on the charge of intending to desert to the Chaldæans ( Jeremiah 37:13-14 )
Hamutal - Daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah, and wife of king Josiah. 2 Kings 23:31 ; 2 Kings 24:18 ; ...
Jeremiah 52:1
Hanam'e-el - (whom God graciously gave ), son of Shallum and cousin of Jeremiah. ( Jeremiah 32:7,8,9,12 ) and comp
Ethio'Pian, - properly "Cushite," (Jeremiah 13:23 ) used of Zerah, (2 Chronicles 14:9 ) (8), and Ebed-melech. (Jeremiah 38:7,10,12 ; 39:16 )
Igdaliah - ” Ancestor of the prophets whose chamber in the Temple Jeremiah used to test the Rechabites loyalty to their oath not to drink wine (Jeremiah 35:4 ). See Jeremiah ; Rechabites
Sheshach - (sshee' sshach) Code word Jeremiah used to indicate Babylon (Jeremiah 25:26 ; Jeremiah 51:41 )
Tahapenes - It is spoken of by the prophet Jeremiah. Tradition will have it, that Jeremiah was buried there. (See Jeremiah 43:1-13 throughout
Jehucal - He is also called Jucal (Jeremiah 38:1 ). He was one of the two persons whom Zedekiah sent to request the prophet Jeremiah to pray for the kingdom (Jeremiah 37:3 ) during the time of its final siege by Nebuchadnezzar
Habazziniah - The grandfather of Jaazaniah, one of the Rechabites who were put to the proof by the prophet Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 35:3 )
Horonaim - ” Prominent town in Moab upon which Isaiah (Isaiah 15:5 ) and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 48:3 ,Jeremiah 48:3,48:5 ,Jeremiah 48:5,48:34 ) pronounced laments, warning of coming destruction
Jehovah-Tsidkenu - (jeh hoh' vuh-tssihd kee' nyoo) Hebrew name meaning “The Lord [1] our righteousness” (Jeremiah 23:6 ; Jeremiah 33:16 , margin). The name is applied to a future Davidic king who would lead his people to do what is right and thus bring peace (Jeremiah 23:6 ) and to the restored city of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 33:16 )
Elishama - According to tradition, father of Nethaniah and grandfather of Ishmael, "of the seed royal" at the captivity (2 Kings 25:25; Jeremiah 41:1). Jeremiah 36:12; Jeremiah 36:20-21. Jeremiah 36:5
Pelatiah - Judean prince who offered “wicked counsel,” perhaps appealing to Egypt for help in a revolt against the Babylonians (Ezekiel 11:1 ,Ezekiel 11:1,11:13 ; compare Jeremiah 27:1-3 ; Jeremiah 37:5 ,Jeremiah 37:5,37:7 ,Jeremiah 37:7,37:11 )
Pashur - The son of Immer, a priest and a chief officer in the temple; he violently opposed the prophet Jeremiah, and persecuted him even with blows and confinement in the stocks; but all recoiled on his own head, Jeremiah 20:1-6 . The son of Malchiah, an enemy of Jeremiah, and active in securing his imprisonment, Jeremiah 21:1 ; 38:1-6
Michaiah - A young prince at the court of Jehoiakim, who communicated to the king's counselors the solemn warnings of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 36:11 - 13
Lebkamai - (Leb kaw may) Transliteration of Hebrew meaning “heart of those rising against me” (Jeremiah 51:1 ). Cryptic term Jeremiah used to refer to Babylon as Israel's enemy. ” See Babylon ; Chaldea; Jeremiah
Jehudi - JEHUDI (generally = ‘a Jew,’ but appears to be a proper name in Jeremiah 36:14 ; Jeremiah 36:21 ; Jeremiah 36:23 ). An officer of Jehoiakim, at whose summons Baruch read to the princes of Judah the roll of Jeremiah’s prophecies, and who was afterwards himself employed to read the roll to the king
Jehoiachin - 2 Kings 24:6-15 ; 2 Kings 25:27 ; 2 Chronicles 36:8,9 ; Jeremiah 52:31 ; Ezekiel 1:2 . He is called JECONIAH in 1 Chronicles 3:16 17 ; Esther 2:6 ; Jeremiah 24:1 ; Jeremiah 27:20 ; Jeremiah 28:4 (where his return from Babylon is falsely prophesied of); Jeremiah 29:2 . He is also called CONIAH in Jeremiah 22:24,28 ; Jeremiah 37:1 , and JECHONIAS in Matthew 1:11,12
Baruch - The secretary of the prophet Jeremiah, and who was of a distinguished Jewish family. Jeremiah 32:12. His friendship for Jeremiah was strong and constant. At his dictation Baruch wrote Jeremiah's prophecies. Jehovah, however, repeated the prophecies to Jeremiah, with some additions, and Baruch wrote them a second time. Baruch was falsely accused of influencing Jeremiah in favor of the Chaldæans, and they were both imprisoned until the capture of Jerusalem, b. Jeremiah 43:6; Jeremiah 7:2
Baruch - He was the faithful friend of Jeremiah. he wrote down, from the lips of Jeremiah, all the divine messages to that prophet, and subsequently read them to the people, and again to certain princes. Baruch wrote it down a second time as before, with some additions, Jeremiah 36:1 - 32 . ...
He is supposed by some to have accompanied his brother Seraiah to Babylon, with the predictions of Jeremiah respecting that city, Jeremiah 51:59-64 . He afterwards shared the persecution of the prophet, was imprisoned with him, and forced to go to Egypt with the rebellious Jews, Jeremiah 43:1-13 . After the death of Jeremiah, the rabbins say, he returned to Babylon
Hananiah - Prophet from Gibeon who opposed Jeremiah by promising immediate deliverance from Babylon. Jeremiah could combat this false prophecy only by telling the people to wait until they saw it fulfilled in history (Jeremiah 28:8-9 ). Jeremiah could not even oppose Hannaniah when he tried to embarrass Jeremiah by breaking the symbolic yoke Jeremiah was wearing (Jeremiah 28:10-11 ). Only later did Jeremiah receive a countering word from God to oppose Hananiah (Jeremiah 28:12-17 ). Father of Zedekiah, a court official, in time of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 36:12 ). Grandfather of captain of guard who arrested Jeremiah as he left Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:13 )
Baruch - ) Neriah's son, Jeremiah's (Jeremiah 32:12; Jeremiah 36:4-32) steadfast attendant and amanuensis; brother to Seraiah, of princely family (Jeremiah 51:59) and position. He was the friend to whom Jeremiah in prison entrusted the papers of the purchase of his uncle's field at Anathoth, the year before Jerusalem's destruction, to assure the Jews of the certainty of their return from Babylon. He wrote out Jeremiah's prophecies against the Jews and other nations, and, while the prophet was shut up, i. prevented coming forward, read them before the people; in consequence of which king Jehoiakim sought to kill him and Jeremiah, but the Lord hid them. Azariah and Johanan after the capture of the city, when Jeremiah warned them against going to Egypt, said: "Baruch setteth thee on against us for to deliver us into the hand of the Chaldeans. "...
On, the former occasion Baruch yielded to despondency; and as Paul subjoins epistles to individuals after epistles to churches, so Jeremiah subjoins a prophecy concerning Baruch after the prophecies and histories concerning the Jews and their kings: "Thus saith the Lord the God of Israel, unto thee, O Baruch. " How striking, that Jeremiah (Jeremiah 12:1-5; Jeremiah 15:10-18; Jeremiah 15:45), who once was so desponding himself, is enabled to minister counsel to Baruch falling into the same error. Baruch was carried with Jeremiah by Johanan into Egypt (Jeremiah 43:6)
Pastor - KJV translation of Hebrew term for shepherd in Jeremiah 2:8 ; Jeremiah 3:15 ; Jeremiah 10:21 ; Jeremiah 12:10 ; Jeremiah 22:22 ; Jeremiah 23:1-2 ). Modern translations generally substituted shepherd for pastor except at Jeremiah 2:8 (leader, NIV; ruler, NAS, NRSV). The background of the term lies in the biblical image of the people of God as God's flock (Jeremiah 23:1-4 ; Ezekiel 34:1-16 ; Luke 12:32 ; John 10:16 )
Pashhur - A son of Malchiah, a prince of Judæa in the time of Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 21:1 ), who was opposed to the prophet ( Jeremiah 38:1-13 ). Perhaps he is the father of Gedaliah ( Jeremiah 38:1 ), and likely identical with Pashhur, mentioned in 1 Chronicles 9:12 , Nehemiah 11:12 , as the ancestor of Adalah. The son of Immer, a Temple official and priest, who caused Jeremiah to be beaten and put in the stocks after he had predicted the fall of Jerusalem. ‘staying on every side’) but Magormissabib (‘terror [1] round about’), and added that he would die in Babylon ( Jeremiah 20:1-6 ). Perhaps he was the father of Gedaliah ( Jeremiah 38:1 ). The father of the Gedaliah mentioned in Jeremiah 38:1 , and may be either 1 or 2 , or neither
Gemariah -
The son of Shaphan, and one of the Levites of the temple in the time of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:10 ; 2 Kings 22:12 ). Baruch read aloud to the people from Gemariah's chamber, and again in the hearing of Gemariah and other scribes, the prophecies of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 36:11-20 ), which filled him with terror. ...
...
The son of Hilkiah, who accompanied Shaphan with the tribute-money from Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar, and was the bearer at the same time of a letter from Jeremiah to the Jewish captives at Babylon (Jeremiah 29:3,4 )
Hammelech - (ham' meh lehch) According to KJV, personal name meaning, “the king” (Jeremiah 36:26 ; Jeremiah 38:6 )
Mattan - Father of Shephatiah, a contemporary of Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 38:1 )
Gemariah - He was present at the reading of Jeremiah's prophecy, and begged the king not to burn the roll. Jeremiah 36:10-12,25 . Son of Hilkiah: he was sent by Zedekiah to Babylon with a letter from Jeremiah unto the captives taken by Nebuchadnezzar. Jeremiah 29:3
Ahikam - Ahikam protected Jeremiah when King Jehoiakim wanted to kill the prophet (Jeremiah 26:24 ). Later, his son also protected Jeremiah (Jeremiah 39:14 )
Azur - Prophet whose son Hananiah withstood Jeremiah. Jeremiah 28:1
je'Hucal - (able ), son of Shelemiah; one of two persons sent by King Zedekiah to Jeremiah to entreat his prayers and advice. ( Jeremiah 37:3 ) (B
Pash'ur - (1 Chronicles 9:12 ; 24:9 ; Nehemiah 11:12 ; Jeremiah 21:1 ; 38:1 ) In the time of Nehemiah this family appears to have become a chief house, and its head the head of a course. (Jeremiah 38:1 ) (B. ) He was sent, with others, by Zedekiah to Jeremiah at the time when Nebuchudnezzar was preparing his attack upon Jerusalem. (Jeremiah 21:1 ) . Again somewhat later Pashur joined with several other chief men in petitioning the king that Jeremiah might be put to death as a traitor. (Jeremiah 38:4 ) ...
Another person of this name, also a priest, and "chief governor of the house of the Lord," is mentioned in (Jeremiah 20:1 ) He is described as "the son of Immer. In the reign of Jehoiakim he showed himself as hostile to Jeremiah as his namesake the son of Malchiah did afterward, and put him in the stocks by the gate of Benjamin. For this indignity to God's prophet Pashur was told by Jeremiah that his name was changed to Magor-missabib (terror on every side ) and that he and all his house should be carried captives to Babylon and there die. ( Jeremiah 20:1-6 ) (B
Anathoth - It was the birthplace of the prophet Jeremiah, Jeremiah 1:1 ; 32:7 . It's people, however, rejected his words, and sought his life, Jeremiah 11:21
Horonaim - ) Gave their name to a town of Moab (Isaiah 15:5; Jeremiah 48:3; Jeremiah 48:5; Jeremiah 48:34)
Gedaliah - Like his father, he honored and befriended Jeremiah, Jeremiah 40:5 . He began the administration of his government at Mizpeh with wisdom, but in two months was treacherously murdered by one Ishmael, 2 Kings 25:22-26 Jeremiah 39:14 40:5-41:18
Malchiah - Nehemiah 11:12; Jeremiah 38:1. Son of Hammelech, or "of the king" into whose dungeon Jeremiah was cast (Jeremiah 38:6). Jerahmeel also is called "son of Hammeleeh" or "the king" (Jeremiah 36:26), and Joash (1 Kings 22:26), and Maaseiah (2 Chronicles 28:7)
Hiss - In the Old Testament an army or nation hissed at their enemy's city or land that suffered defeat or disaster (Jeremiah 19:8 ). Most often the reference is to astonishment at the fate of Israel, Jerusalem, or the Temple lying in ruins (1 Kings 9:8 ; Jeremiah 18:16 , Jeremiah 19:8 ; Lamentations 2:15-16 ). ...
Other nations and cities were also the objects of hissing: Edom (Jeremiah 49:17 ); Babylon (Jeremiah 50:13 ); Tyre (Ezekiel 27:36 ); and Nineveh (Zephaniah 2:15 )
Baruch - Son of Neriah, and faithful secretary to Jeremiah. He was eventually carried with Jeremiah into Egypt. Jeremiah 32:12-16 ; Jeremiah 36:4-32 ; Jeremiah 43:3,6 ; Jeremiah 45:1,2 . Apocrypha, though its professed author is Baruch, the friend and secretary of Jeremiah. It ends with an Epistle of Jeremiah to those who were to be led captive into Babylon, warning them against the idols they would find there
Hanameel - Whom God has graciously given, the cousin of Jeremiah, to whom he sold the field he possessed in Anathoth, before the siege of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 32:6-12 )
Hamu'Tal - (akin to the dew ), daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah; one of the wives of King Josiah. ( 2 Kings 23:31 ; 24:18 ; Jeremiah 52:1 ) (B
Cushite - A eunuch under King Zedekiah who helped Jeremiah escape from a cistern into which the king had had him thrown (Jeremiah 38:6-12 ; Jeremiah 39:16 )
Jehucal - ” Messenger King Zedekiah sent to ask Jeremiah to pray for him as he began to rule. (Jeremiah 37:3 ). Jucal in Jeremiah 38:1 is probably a shortened form of the same name
Ebed-Melech - ” An Ethiopian eunuch in the service of King Zedekiah of Judah (Jeremiah 38:7 ). When Jeremiah was imprisoned in a cistern used as a dungeon, Ebed-melech was responsible for the prophet's rescue. As a result of his faith in the Lord, he received the promise recorded in Jeremiah 39:15-18
Horonaim - It is mentioned in Isaiah 15:5 , Jeremiah 48:3 ; Jeremiah 48:5 ; Jeremiah 48:34 , and also on the Moabite Stone (11
Noon - Noon is frequently associated with death and destruction (2 Samuel 4:5 ; 1 Kings 20:16 ; 2 Kings 4:20 ; Psalm 91:6 ; Jeremiah 6:4 ; Jeremiah 15:8 ; Jeremiah 20:16 ; Zephaniah 2:4 )
Horse Gate - Jeremiah promised its rebuilding (Jeremiah 31:40 ), and the priests under Nehemiah rebuilt it (Nehemiah 3:28 )
Habaziniah - ” Grandfather of Jaazaniah, the Rechabite leader Jeremiah tested with wine (Jeremiah 35:3 )
e'Bed-me'Lech - (a king's servant ), an Ethiopian eunuch in the service of King Zedekiah, through whose interference Jeremiah was released from prison. ( Jeremiah 38:7 ) ff
Jaazaniah - Called JEZANIAH in Jeremiah 40:8 ; Jeremiah 42:1 . A Rechabite, son of Jeremiah: he refused to drink wine, and was blessed for his obedience to his forefathers. Jeremiah 35:3
Gemariah - In his apartment Baruch read aloud the prophecies of Jeremiah; and he, with others, secured a second and more public reading, and brought the roll to be read to the king, who cause it to be burned, Jeremiah 36:1-32 . He was also the bearer of a letter in which Jeremiah warned the captive Jews against false prophets who promised them a speedy return, Jeremiah 29:3,4
Elnathan - Jehoiakim's ready tool for evil, in fetching the prophet Urijah out of Egypt to be killed (Jeremiah 26:22-23); one of the king's council when Jeremiah's roll was burned (Jeremiah 36:12; Jeremiah 36:25); he interceded with the king not to burn it
Heifer - The heifer was used in agriculture ( Judges 14:18 , Jeremiah 50:11 , Hosea 10:11 ), and in religious ritual ( Genesis 15:9 , 1 Samuel 16:2 , Numbers 19:2 f. Israel is compared to a heifer in Hosea 4:16 , and so is Egypt in Jeremiah 46:20 , and Chaldæa in Jeremiah 50:11
Jeremiah - Among the Old Testament prophets, Jeremiah is the one who reveals more personal details than anyone else. ...
We can understand Jeremiah’s problems only as we see them against the background of conditions in Judah as set out in his book. ...
Forty years of preaching...
Jeremiah began his prophetic work in 627 BC, the thirteenth year of the reign of Josiah, king of Judah (Jeremiah 1:1-2). Jeremiah saw that in spite of the king’s good work, little had changed in people’s hearts. (Jeremiah Chapters 1-6, and possible parts of Chapters 7-20, seem to belong to the early period of Jeremiah’s preaching. He opposed Jeremiah because of his condemnation of Judah’s sins and his forecasts of its destruction (Jeremiah 22:13-19; Jeremiah 26:1-6; Jeremiah 26:20-24; Jeremiah 36). (Much of Jeremiah Chapters 7-20, along with Chapters 22, 23, 25, 26, 35, 36 and 45, belong to the time of Jehoiakim. )...
When Babylon conquered Egypt at the Battle of Carchemish in 605 BC (Jeremiah 46:2), it thereby gained control of Judah and took selected Jerusalemites captive to Babylon (Daniel 1:1-6). ...
Jeremiah and Zedekiah were constantly in conflict. Jeremiah assured Zedekiah that Babylon’s overlordship was God’s judgment on Judah for its sin. To resist would only bring invasion, siege, starvation, bloodshed and captivity (2 Kings 24:18-20; Jeremiah 21:1-10; Jeremiah 24; Jeremiah 27:12-22; Jeremiah 28:12-14). ...
The opponents of Jeremiah assured Zedekiah that with the help of Egypt he could overthrow Babylonian rule. Foolishly, Zedekiah followed their advice instead of Jeremiah’s, and brought upon Judah a long and devastating siege. In the end Babylon destroyed the city and its temple, and took the king, along with all remaining useful citizens, into foreign captivity (587 BC; 2 Kings 25:1-21; Jeremiah 32:1-5; Jeremiah 32:28-29; Jeremiah 33:1-5; Jeremiah 37:16-17; Jeremiah 38:17-18; Jeremiah 39:1-10). (The parts of Jeremiah that deal largely with the reign of Zedekiah are Chapters 21, 24, 27-34, 37-39 and 52. )...
On more than one occasion during this long crisis Jeremiah was imprisoned (Jeremiah 32:2; Jeremiah 37:15; Jeremiah 37:20-21; Jeremiah 38:1-6; Jeremiah 38:13; Jeremiah 38:28). Jeremiah decided to stay in Judah. The Babylonians placed him under the protection of Gedaliah, the Jewish governor whom they had appointed over the Judeans left in the land (2 Kings 25:22; Jeremiah 39:13-14; Jeremiah 40:4-6). ...
Sadly, Gedaliah was murdered by some Judeans who were still opposed to Babylon (2 Kings 25:25; Jeremiah 40:13-16; Jeremiah 41). The remaining Judeans then fled for safety to Egypt, taking an unwilling Jeremiah with them (2 Kings 25:26; Jeremiah 42; Jeremiah 43:1-7). Jeremiah warned that they would not escape God’s punishment by fleeing to Egypt, but, as always, the people refused to heed the message (Jeremiah 43:8-13; Jeremiah 44). The Bible records nothing further of Jeremiah’s life, though one tradition says that the Judeans in Egypt later stoned him to death. (The period of Gedaliah’s governorship and the Judeans’ flight to Egypt is dealt with in Jeremiah Chapters 40-44. )...
Jeremiah’s personal life...
From the book of Jeremiah we learn much about the prophet’s personal life. ...
In addition to being imprisoned, Jeremiah was at times flogged (20:2; 37:15) and often threatened with death (11:21; 26:7-9; 38:15). ...
There can be no doubt that Jeremiah loved his people and his country (8:18-22; 9:1-2; 14:19-22). ...
Jeremiah wished for peace, but he knew there could be no peace as long as the people continued in their sin. Jeremiah knew that the people’s hopes would be disappointed, but this gave him no satisfaction, only greater distress (7:1-15; 14:13-18; 23:9). ...
Although it hurt Jeremiah to have to announce judgments on his own people, he did it faithfully as God’s messenger (20:8-10). When the people responded with hatred and violence (11:19; 18:18), Jeremiah complained to God bitterly. God rebuked Jeremiah for his self-pity, though he also strengthened him to meet further troubles. As long as Judah remained faithless, Jeremiah could expect opposition (12:5-6). ...
These experiences emphasized to Jeremiah the importance of an individual’s personal relationship with God. Jeremiah looked beyond the captivity to a day when there would be a new covenant between God and his people. ...
Outline of the book...
The first six chapters of the book deal with the main features of Jeremiah’s early ministry: his call to be a prophet (1:1-19); his denunciation of Judah for its unfaithfulness, idolatry and immorality (2:1-3:5); his demand for true, inward repentance (3:6-4:4); and his warning of the coming destruction of Jerusalem (4:5-6:30). The third concerns Jeremiah’s inner conflicts and his complaints to God (12:1-17; 15:10-21; 17:14-27; 20:7-18). ...
A unit of eight chapters then traces events in chronological sequence from the final siege of Jerusalem to the settlement of the Jews in Egypt: Jeremiah’s imprisonment and rescue (37:1-38:28); the fall of Jerusalem (39:1-18); the appointment of Gedaliah and his brutal assassination (40:1-41:18); the migration to Egypt (42:1-43:7); and Jeremiah’s message to the Jews in Egypt (43:8-44:30). An earlier message for Jeremiah’s secretary, Baruch, is also recorded (45:1-5)
Zedekiah - He did evil in the sight of the Lord, committing the same crimes as Jehoiakim, 2 Kings 24:18-20 ; 2 Chronicles 36:11-13 ; and regarded not the menaces of the Prophet Jeremiah, from the Lord; but hardened his heart. By these messengers Jeremiah sent a letter to the captives at Babylon, Jeremiah 29:1-23 . Four years afterward, either Zedekiah went thither himself, or at least he sent thither; for the Hebrew text may admit either of these interpretations, Jeremiah 51:59 ; Bar_1:1 ; Jeremiah 32:12 . It was a sabbatical year, in which the people should set their slaves at liberty, according to the law, Exodus 21:2 ; Deuteronomy 15:1-2 ; Deuteronomy 15:12 ; Jeremiah 34:8-10 . Some time afterward, Pharaoh Hophrah, king of Egypt, marched to assist Zedekiah, Jeremiah 37:3-5 ; Jeremiah 37:10 . In the mean while, the people of Jerusalem, as if freed from the fear of Nebuchadnezzar, retook the slaves whom they had set at liberty, which drew upon them great reproaches and threatenings from Jeremiah 34:11 ; Jeremiah 34:22 . During the siege Zedekiah often consulted Jeremiah, who advised him to surrender, and pronounced the greatest woes against him if he should persist in his rebellion, Jeremiah 37:3 ; Jeremiah 34:4-5 ; Jeremiah 21. In the eleventh year of Zedekiah, on the ninth day of the fourth month, (July,) Jerusalem was taken, 2 Kings 25:2-4 ; Jeremiah 39:2-3 ; Jeremiah 52:5-7 . The king of Chaldea, reproaching him with his perfidy, caused all his children to be slain before his face, and his eyes to be put out; then loading him with chains of brass, he ordered him to be sent to Babylon, 2 Kings 25:4-7 ; Jeremiah 32:4-7 ; Jeremiah 52:4-11 . Thus were accomplished two prophecies which seemed contradictory: one of Jeremiah, who said that Zedekiah should see and yet not see, Nebuchadnezzar with his eyes, Jeremiah 32:4-5 ; Jeremiah 34:3 ; and the other of Ezekiel 12:13 , which intimated that he should not see Babylon, though he should die there. Jeremiah had assured him that he should die in peace; that his body should be burned, as those of the kings of Judah usually were; and that they should mourn for him, saying," Ah, lord!" Jeremiah 37:10
Gedaliah - Jeremiah 26:24). ...
Gedaliah set up his headquarters at Mizpah, north of Jerusalem, and with Jeremiah’s support followed a policy of submission to Babylon. He took no action against Judah’s anti-Babylonian military leaders who had managed to escape the Babylonian army, but encouraged them, and other Judeans who had fled for safety, to return and settle around Mizpah (2 Kings 25:23-24; Jeremiah 40:5-12). That did not stop Ishmael from murdering him, along with all the Judean officials and Babylonian supervisors at Gedaliah’s headquarters (2 Kings 25:25; Jeremiah 40:13-16; Jeremiah 41:1-3). That started a sequence of events that resulted in the rest of the Judeans fleeing to Egypt (Jeremiah 41:4-1815; 1618417536_4; Jeremiah 42; Jeremiah 43). The first was a musician in the time of David (1 Chronicles 25:3; 1 Chronicles 25:9), the second an ancestor of the prophet Zephaniah (Zephaniah 1:1), the third an official in Jerusalem who opposed Jeremiah (Jeremiah 38:1-6), and the fourth a priest in the time of Ezra (Ezra 10:18)
Hilkiah - ...
This was also the name of the fathers of Jeremiah and Eliakim, 2 Kings 18:18 ; Jeremiah 1:1
Baruch -
The secretary of the prophet (Jeremiah 32:12 ; 36:4 ). To him Jeremiah dictated his prophecies regarding the invasion of the Babylonians and the Captivity. These he read to the people from a window in the temple in the fourth year of the reign of Jehoiakim, king of Judah (Jeremiah 36 ). During the siege of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, he was the keeper of the deed of purchase Jeremiah had made of the territory of Hanameel (Jeremiah 32:12 ). Being accused by his enemies of favouring the Chaldeans, he was cast, with Jeremiah, into prison, where he remained till the capture of Jerusalem (B
Shaphan - His family for two following generations played a worthy part as servants of Jehovah, and friends of the prophet Jeremiah: the Ahikam of 2 Kings 22:12-14 (= 2 Chronicles 34:20-22 ) and Jeremiah 26:24 , the Gemariah of Jeremiah 36:12 ; Jeremiah 36:25 , and Elasah ( Jeremiah 29:3 ) were Shaphan’s sons; the Micaiah of Jeremiah 36:11-12 , and Gedaliah (wh
Tahpanhes - border, near Pelusium, of which it was the outpost; therefore soon reached from Palestine by Johanan (Jeremiah 43:7; Jeremiah 43:9). Of the same materials, Jeremiah foretells, should the substructure of Nebuchadnezzar's throne be built, implying that Nebuchadnezzar's throne should be raised on the downfall of Pharaoh's throne: Jeremiah 46:14, "publish in Migdol (E. ); here Jews were dwelling (Jeremiah 44:1). In Jeremiah 2:16 "the children of Noph (Memphis, the capital) and Tahapanes" (with which the Jews came most in contact) represent the Egyptians generally, who under Pharaoh Necho slew the king of Judah, Josiah, at Megiddo, and deposed Jehoahaz for Eliakim or Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:29-30; 2 Kings 23:33-35)
Beth-Gamul - ” City in Moab on which Jeremiah announced judgment (Jeremiah 48:23 )
Reins - The "kidneys"; the supposed seat of the desires and affections (Psalms 7:9; Psalms 26:2; Jeremiah 11:20; Jeremiah 17:10; Job 19:27)
ma'Gor-Mis'Sabib - by Jeremiah to Pashur the priest when he smote him and put him in the stocks for prophesying against the idolatry of Jerusalem. ( Jeremiah 20:3 )
Bozrah - Jeremiah proclaimed doom on Bozrah (Jeremiah 49:13 ,Jeremiah 49:13,49:22 ), as did Amos (Jeremiah 1:12 ). See Jeremiah 48:24 )
Jeremiah - 2 Kings 23:31 ; 2 Kings 24:18 ; Jeremiah 52:1 . Son of Hilkiah, priest of Anathoth: the writer of the Book of Jeremiah. 2 Chronicles 35:25 ; 2 Chronicles 36:12,21,22 ; Ezra 1:1 ; Jeremiah 1 — Jeremiah 51 . Jeremiah 35:3
Ishtar - The goddess is perhaps the “Queen of heaven” of Jeremiah 7:18 ; Jeremiah 44:17-19 ,Jeremiah 44:17-19,44:25 ; Ezekiel 8:14
Magor-Missabib - A nickname given ( Jeremiah 20:8 ) by Jeremiah to Pashhur, chief officer in the Temple, who had caused Jeremiah to be beaten and put in the stocks as a false prophet
Wound - ...
Jeremiah 10:19 (a) The prophet felt that the sorrows he was undergoing because he was true to GOD were making a wound in his life. (See also Jeremiah 15:18; Jeremiah 30:12; Micah 1:9; Nahum 3:19)
Fan, Fanner - Isaiah 30:24 ; Jeremiah 4:11 . It is also used symbolically for the judgements of God, Isaiah 41:16 ; Jeremiah 15:7 ; Jeremiah 51:2 ; and for the discriminating power of the testimony of the Lord Jesus
Ahikam - He afterwards nobly befriended the prophet Jeremiah, Jeremiah 26:24 ; 39:14
Topheth - gate" (Jeremiah 19:2). ) Infamous by the immolation in it of children to Moloch (2 Kings 23:10; Isaiah 30:33; Jeremiah 7:31-32; Jeremiah 19:2; Jeremiah 19:6; Jeremiah 19:11). In Kings and Jeremiah the article precedes, "the Topheth" In Isaiah 30:33 it is Τophteh , "tabret grove," as tupim in Isaiah 30:32 is "tabrets. " Jeremiah (Jeremiah 7:32; Jeremiah 19:6) makes it prophetically "the valley of slaughter," i. the scene, no longer of slaughter of innocents (Jeremiah 19:4), but of the Jewish men who so richly deserved their fate
Jeremiah (2) - Jeremiah, Book of. Melancholy, tender sensibility, and a tone of grief, are the distinguishing characteristics of Jeremiah's style. Reproofs of the sins of the Jews, consisting of seven sections—a, Jeremiah 2:1-37, b. Jeremiah 14:1 to Jeremiah 17:18, f. Jeremiah 17:19-20, g. Jeremiah 34:1-7, b. Jeremiah 34:8-22, c. Jeremiah 46:13-26. The fifty-second chapter of Jeremiah is nearly the same with 2 Kings 24:18 to 2 Kings 25:30. The order of the prophecies of Jeremiah, from Nethaniah - Father of Jehudi sent to Baruch by the princes of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:14 ). Father of Ishmael who killed Gedaliah (2 Kings 25:23-25 ; Jeremiah 40:8 ,Jeremiah 40:8,40:14-16 ;Jeremiah 40:14-16;41:1 )
Kerioth - A city of Moab, named in Jeremiah 48:24 ; Jeremiah 48:41 , Amos 2:2 , and in line 13 of the Moabite Stone. More is to be said for Kerioth being the same as Kir-heres of Isaiah 16:11 and of Jeremiah 48:31 ; Jeremiah 48:36
Goah - ” A place, apparently on the west side of Jerusalem, where Jeremiah promised the walls would be restored after the Babylonian destruction (Jeremiah 31:39 )
Mattan - Father of Shephatiah, a contemporary of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 38:1 )
Benjamin Gate - A gate of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 37:13 ; Jeremiah 38:7 )
Jezaniah - A Judahite military officer who joined Gedaliah at Mizpah ( Jeremiah 40:8 ). He is called in 2 Kings 25:23 Jaazaniah, and is apparently to be identified also with Azariah of Jeremiah 43:2
Ebed-Melech - This man is spoken of with honourable testimony in Scripture, for his service to the prophet Jeremiah. (See Jeremiah 38:7-13)...
No - (Nahum 3:8) And Jeremiah and Ezekiel both speak of this city. (Jeremiah 46:25; Ezekiel 30:14, etc
Nebushasban - He was one of those whom the king sent to release Jeremiah from prison in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 39:13 )
Gareb - Hill in Jerusalem marking point of city wall which Jeremiah promised would be rebuilt (Jeremiah 31:39 )
Jehudi - The princes' ready tool in fetching Baruch to read Jeremiah's (Jeremiah 36:14; Jeremiah 36:21-23) denunciations; then employed by Jehoiakim to bring and read the roll, which the king cut and burned
Beth-Meon - ” City in Moab on which Jeremiah pronounced judgment (Jeremiah 48:23 )
Negushta - Wife of Jehoiakim, and mother of the young king Jechoniah, with whom she was probably associated in the government, as she is in the reproaches of Jeremiah, 2 Kings 24:8 ; Jeremiah 13:18 ; 29:2
Mire - , Jeremiah 38:6 (twice), of the "mire" in the dungeon into which Jeremiah was cast
Sheshach - A cryptic name of Babel, found in the received text of Jeremiah 25:26 ; Jeremiah 51:41 . The word is, however, no part of the original text of Jeremiah, being a conceit of later editors
Nergal-Sharezer - see), who, with Nebuzaradan and Nebushazban, released Jeremiah from prison ( Jeremiah 39:3 ; Jeremiah 39:13 )
Fortress - (See also Psalm 18:2; Psalm 31:3; Psalm 71:3; Psalm 91:2; Psalm 144:2; Jeremiah 16:19). ...
Jeremiah 6:27 (a) GOD promised to Jeremiah that he would be a strong and fearless witness which his enemies could not overcome
North Country, Land of the North - The source or region from which dangerous foes were to come upon Palestine (so in Jeremiah 6:22 ; Jeremiah 10:22 , Zechariah 6:6 ; Zechariah 6:8 ). The regions to which the people of Israel or Judah had been exiled, and whence they were to be restored (so in Jeremiah 3:18 ; Jeremiah 16:16 ; Jeremiah 23:8 ; Jeremiah 31:8 , Zechariah 2:6 ). Northern Syria (so Jeremiah 46:10 )
Ephai - Described in Jeremiah 40:8 (Gr 47:8) as ‘the Netophathite,’ whose sons were amongst the ‘captains of the forces’ who joined Gedaliah at Mizpah, and were murdered along with him by Ishmael ( Jeremiah 41:3 )
Zephaniah - Jewish tradition says that Zephaniah had as his colleagues Jeremiah, labouring in the thoroughfares and market places, and Huldah the prophetess in the college in Jerusalem. ...
In Zephaniah 1:8, "I will punish the king's children" must refer to coming judgments on the foreseen idolatries of the younger members of the royal family (Jeremiah 22:19; Jeremiah 39:6; 2 Kings 23:31-32-36-37; 2 Chronicles 36:5-6; 2 Kings 20:18). Sent by Zedekiah to consult Jeremiah (Jeremiah 21:1). Appealed to by Shemaiah in a letter from Babylon to punish Jeremiah with imprisonment and the stocks for declaring the captivity would be long (Jeremiah 29:25-26; Jeremiah 29:29). Zephaniah read the letter to Jeremiah. This fact and Shemaiah's upbraiding Zephaniah for want of zeal against Jeremiah imply that Zephaniah was less prejudiced against Jeremiah than the others. This was the reason for the king's choosing him as messenger to the prophet (Jeremiah 37:3). Slain by Nebuchadnezzar as an accomplice in Zedekiah's rebellion (Jeremiah 52:24; Jeremiah 52:27). Jeremiah 52:3
Jeconiah - Shortened, by omitting JAH, into CONIAH (Jeremiah 27:20; Jeremiah 22:24)
Nebuzaradan - " "Captain of the guard," literally, "chief of the slaughterers"; next to the royal person (2 Kings 25:8-18; Jeremiah 39:9-13). Visited Jerusalem four years later, and took away more captives (Jeremiah 52:30). By Nebuchadnezzar's direction, Nebuzaradan "looked well to Jeremiah," gave him his choice of going to Babylon or staying, then sent him with victuals and a present, to be protected by Gedaliah the governor left over Judah, after having first told the Jews "Jehovah hath done according as He hath said, because ye have sinned against Jehovah" (Jeremiah 39:11-14; Jeremiah 40:2-5). The pagan knew, through Jeremiah, it was Jehovah's doing; compare the prophecy, Deuteronomy 29:24-25
Queen of Heaven - Goddess that women in Judah worshiped to ensure fertility and material stability (Jeremiah 7:18 ; Jeremiah 44:17 ). Forms of worship included making cakes (possibly in her image as in molds found at Mari), offering drink offerings, and burning incense (Jeremiah 44:25 ). Archaeologists have uncovered many images of nude goddesses from Israelite sites, showing why Jeremiah protested against such worship
Jeremiah, the Book of - (See Jeremiah
Gate Between the Two Walls - Zedekiah and his sons were captured by the Babylonians after escaping through this gate (2 Kings 25:4 ; Jeremiah 39:4 ; Jeremiah 52:7 )
Husbandman - The substitutions of the RSV are typical; plowman (Isaiah 61:5 ); farmer (2 Chronicles 26:10 ; Jeremiah 14:4 ; Jeremiah 31:24 ; Jeremiah 51:23 ; Amos 5:16 ); tiller of the soil (Genesis 9:20 ; Joel 1:11 )
Gedaliah - ...
One of the Jewish nobles who conspired against Jeremiah (Jeremiah 38:1 ). ...
The son of Ahikam, and grandson of Shaphan, secretary of king Josiah (Jeremiah 26:24 ). After the destruction of Jerusalem (see 2 Kings 25:22 ; Jeremiah 40:5 ; 52:16 ). Ishmael, however, at the head of a party of the royal family, "Jewish irreconcilables", rose against him, and slew him and "all the Jews that were with him" (Jeremiah 41:2,3 ) at Mizpah about three months after the destruction of Jerusalem
Hoshaiah - The father of Jezaniah ( Jeremiah 42:1 ), or Azariah ( Jeremiah 43:2 )
Buz - A land in eastern Arabia (Jeremiah 25:23 ) which Jeremiah condemned
Abdeel - ) commanded to arrest Baruch, Jeremiah's scribe, and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 36:26 )
Micaiah - We meet with another Micaiah or Michaiah, son of Gemariah, in the days of Jeremiah. (See Jeremiah 36:11, etc
Nehelamite - Nehalmi, signifies dreamer; so that it is probable that Shemaiah, the Nehelamite, spoken of by Jeremiah, might mean the dreamer. (Jeremiah 29:24)...
Hananeel - A kinsman of Jeremiah, from whom the prophet bought a piece of ground before the captivity, and had the legal record made, in token of his prophetic assurance that his people would return to their possessions, Jeremiah 32:6-12
Zedekiah - (See Jeremiah. ) Youngest son of Josiah and Hamutal (Jeremiah 1:3; Jeremiah 37:1), brother to Jehoahaz (2 Kings 24:17-18; 2 Kings 23:31). It was through the anger of Jehovah against Judah that Zedekiah was given up to his own rebellious devices, "stiffening his neck and hardening his heart from turning unto the Lord God of Israel" who warned him by Jeremiah; like Pharaoh of old (2 Chronicles 36:12-13), he would "not humble himself" (Jeremiah 38:5; Jeremiah 39:1-7; Jeremiah 52:1-11; and Jeremiah 21; 24; 27; 28; 29; 32; 33; 34; 37; 38). ...
In Jeremiah 27:1 read "Zedekiah" for "Jehoiakim" with Syriac, Arabic, and one of Kennicott's manuscripts (compare Jeremiah 27:3; Jeremiah 27:12; and Jeremiah 28:1, "in the fourth year . But Jeremiah symbolized the futility of the attempt by sending "yokes" back by the ambassadors. Hananiah, who broke the yoke off Jeremiah's neck, died that year according to the Lord's sentence by Jeremiah. But evidently (Jeremiah 27-28) Zedekiah had been secretly plotting before, in his fourth year; in that year he had gone to Babylon to allay Nebuchadnezzar's suspicion (Jeremiah 51:59), and also sent messengers to Babylon (Jeremiah 37:5-11; Jeremiah 34:21; Ezekiel 17:13-20). Zedekiah disregarded Jehovah's words by Jeremiah, notwithstanding the warning given in Jeconiah's punishment. Still while the issue between the Chaldaeans and Pharaoh Hophra was undecided, he sent begging Jeremiah, Pray now unto the Lord our God for us. ...
Nebuchadnezzar on learning Zedekiah's treachery had sent a Chaldaean army which reduced all Judaea except Jerusalem, Lachish, and Azekah (Jeremiah 34). So God by Jeremiah gave the enslavers a "liberty" (Jeremiah 34:17) fatal to them, manumission from God's free service (Psalms 119:45; John 8:36; 2 Corinthians 3:17), to pass under the bondage of the sword, pestilence, and famine. ...
Then followed Jeremiah's attempt to escape to his native place and his arrest. " Zedekiah showed his sense of Jeremiah's faithfulness by ordering bread to be given him out of the bakers' street until all the bread in the city was spent (Proverbs 28:23; Psalms 37:19). However, in consequence of his prophesying death to those that remained in the city and life to those who should go forth to the Chaldaeans, who had returned to the siege in the tenth month of Zedekiah's ninth year (Jeremiah 52:4), Jeremiah was again imprisoned. Again Jeremiah told him his only hope was in going forth to the Chaldaeans. Jeremiah told him in reply that, by not going forth, he should bring burning upon the city, and upon himself the very evil he feared if he went forth, ignominious treatment from not only the deserters but the very women of the palace (Jeremiah 38). So afraid was Zedekiah of his princes that he imposed on Jeremiah a subterfuge, concealing the real purpose of his interview from the princes. The terrible concomitants of a siege soon followed (Jeremiah 38:9), so that mothers boiled and ate the flesh of their own infants (Lamentations 4:5; Lamentations 4:8; Lamentations 4:10) and the visage of their nobles was blacker than coal, their skin clave to their bones and became withered. He was taken for judgment to Riblah at the upper end of Lebanon; there Nebuchadnezzar first killed his sons before his eyes, then caused the eyes of Zedekiah to be "dug out" (Jeremiah 39; Jeremiah 52:4-11). ...
Thus were fulfilled the seemingly inconsistent prophecies, "his eyes shall behold his eyes," Jeremiah 32:4, and Ezekiel 12:13 "he shall not see Babylon, though he shall die there. He probably died before Evil Merodach, successor of Nebuchadnezzar, treated kindly Jehoiachin in the 37th year of his captivity, 26 years after the fall of Jerusalem; for no mention is made of him (Jeremiah 52:31). Jeremiah (Jeremiah 29:21-22; Jeremiah 29:25) denounces him for adultery and lying prophecies, buoying up the captives with delusive promises of a speedy restoration. One of the princes assembled in the scribes' chamber when Micaiah announced that Baruch had read Jeremiah's words to the people (Jeremiah 36:12). He was not much better than his father, who died by God's visitation (Jeremiah 28:10-17)
Hananiah - The ‘lying prophet,’ son of Azzur the prophet, a Gibeonite, who was condemned by Jeremiah, in the reign of Zedekiah, for prophesying falsely. Jeremiah 27:2 ) from Jeremiah’s neck and breaking it, with the words, ‘Thus saith the Lord: Even so will I break the yoke of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon within two full years from off the neck of all the nations’ ( Jeremiah 28:11 ). In reply Jeremiah declares this prophecy to be false, and that because Hananiah has made the people to trust in a lie, he will die within the year. The words of Jeremiah come to pass: Hananiah dies in the seventh month ( Jeremiah 28:17 ). Father of Zedekiah, one of the princes of Judah ( Jeremiah 36:12 ). Grandfather of Irijah, who assisted Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 37:13 ). A priest, head of the house of Jeremiah, who returned with Nehemiah from Babylon ( Nehemiah 12:12 )
Mingled People - KJV term for foreigners who are perhaps of mixed race and are associated with a dominant population (Jeremiah 25:20 ,Jeremiah 25:20,25:24 ; Jeremiah 50:37 ; Ezekiel 30:5 )
Medicine - The prophet Jeremiah twice observes that when God brings His judgements upon a people, no medicine will cure them. Jeremiah 30:13 ; Jeremiah 46:11
Hanameel - ” Uncle of Jeremiah from whom the prophet bought the field in Anathoth (Jeremiah 32:7-12 ). Jeremiah's act symbolized God's long-range plans to restore the people to the land after Exile
ke'Rioth - ...
A city of Moab, named by Jeremiah only, (Jeremiah 48:24 )
Elea'Leh - ( Numbers 32:3,37 ) By Isaiah and Jeremiah it is mentioned as a Moabite town. (Isaiah 15:4 ; 16:9 ; Jeremiah 48:34 )
Kir-Hareseth - ” Known by various names in various texts and various versions of the Old Testament: Kir-Hareseth (2 Kings 3:25 ; Isaiah 16:7 ), Kir-Haraseth (2 Kings 3:25 KJV), Kir-Heres ( Isaiah 16:11 ; Jeremiah 6:22-263 ,Jeremiah 48:31,48:36 ), and Kirharesh (Isaiah 16:11 KJV). Isaiah (Isaiah 15:1 ; Isaiah 16:7 ,Isaiah 16:7,16:11 ) and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 48:31 ,Jeremiah 48:31,48:36 ) prophesied that Kir-Hareseth was no match for the power of God. Kir-Hareseth was destroyed by the Babylonians whom the prophets described as God's instrument of punishment (see Jeremiah 4:5-31 ; Jeremiah 6:1-8 , 1618417536_22 ; Jeremiah 25:1-14 )
Leaf - There are numerous allusions to leaves, their flourishing, their decay, and their restoration (Leviticus 26:36 ; Isaiah 34:4 ; Jeremiah 8:13 ; Daniel 4:12,14,21 ; Mark 11:13 ; 13:28 ). The fresh leaf is a symbol of prosperity (Psalm 1:3 ; Jeremiah 17:8 ; Ezekiel 47:12 ); the faded, of decay (Job 13:25 ; Isaiah 1:30 ; 64:6 ; Jeremiah 8:13 ). ...
Leaf of a book (Jeremiah 36:23 ), perhaps a fold of a roll
Malchiah, Malchijah - 1 Chronicles 9:12 ; Nehemiah 11:12 ; Jeremiah 38:1 . Called MELCHIAHin Jeremiah 21:1 . Son of Hammelech, into whose dungeon Jeremiah was cast. Jeremiah 38:6
Frankincense - Frankincense is in six passages ( Isaiah 43:23 ; Isaiah 60:6 ; Isaiah 66:3 , Jeremiah 6:20 ; Jeremiah 17:26 ; Jeremiah 41:5 ) mistranslated in AV Roll - Hence we are told that the prophet Jeremiah was commanded to take the roll of a book, and write all the words which the Lord had said unto him concerning Israel and Judah; and that Baruch wrote upon a roll, from the mouth of Jeremiah, all the words of the Lord. (Jeremiah 36:1, etc. See also Jeremiah 15:16)...
Tahapanes - Jeremiah 2:16 , or Tahpanhes, Jeremiah 43:7,9 , or Tegaphnehes, Ezekiel 30:18 , the name of an Egyptian city, for which the Seventy put Taphne, and the Greek historians Daphne. To this city Johanan and many of the Jews retired, after the destruction of Jerusalem by the Chaldeans, taking with them the prophet Jeremiah, Jeremiah 43:7-9 44:1
Delaiah - Interceded that king Jehoiakim would not burn Jeremiah's prophetic roll, but in vain (Jeremiah 36:12; Jeremiah 36:25)
Brigandine - ’ The word is used in Jeremiah 46:4 ; Jeremiah 51:3 (RV Wallow - Jeremiah 6:26 (b) This type represents the attitude of deep humility before GOD because of sin. (See also Jeremiah 25:34)
Achbor - 2 Kings 22:12,14 ; Jeremiah 26:22 ; Jeremiah 36:12 : called ABDON, the son of Micah, in 2 Chronicles 34:20
Pathros - The NIV translates the term; other translations transliterate (Isaiah 11:11 ; Jeremiah 44:1 ,Jeremiah 44:1,44:15 ; Ezekiel 29:14 ; Ezekiel 30:14 )
Ebed-Melech - An Ethiopian servant of king Zedekiah, who was instrumental in saving the prophet Jeremiah from famishing in a filthy dungeon, and was therefore preserved when Jerusalem was taken by Nebuzaradan, Jeremiah 38:7-13 ; 39:15-18
Jehu'di - (a Jew ), son of Nethaniah, a man employed by the princes of Jehoiakim's court to fetch Baruch to read Jeremiah's denunciation, ( Jeremiah 36:14 ) and then by the king to fetch the volume itself and read it to him. (Jeremiah 36:21,23 ) (B
Jeremiah - Jeremiah. A Jew of Libnah, whose daughter, Hamutal or Hamital, was one of the wives of Josiah, and mother of Jehoahaz ( 2 Kings 23:31 ) and Zedekiah ( 2 Kings 24:18 , Jeremiah 52:1 ). The son of Habazziniah and father of Jaazaniah, the head of the Rechabites ( Jeremiah 35:3 ) in the time of the prophet Jeremiah 7:1-34 . ...
Jeremiah...
1. Jeremiah the prophet was born towards the close of Manasseh’s long and evil reign ( c
Through Josiah’s minority (see Josiah) the ethnicizing régime of Manasseh continued; Jeremiah’s earliest preaching (chs. The war-cloud of the Scythian invasion overhangs the sky of Zephaniah, and of Jeremiah at the outset of his ministry. Jeremiah praises Josiah, in contrast to his son, as an upright and prosperous king, good to the poor and commending his religion by his rule ( Jeremiah 22:15-17 ). Jeremiah denounces him vehemently; the wonder is that he did not fall a victim to the king’s anger, like his disciple Uriah ( Jeremiah 26:20-24 ; Jeremiah 36:26-30 ; Jeremiah 22:13-19 ). Its leaders the prophet Hananiah amongst them ( Jeremiah 28:1-17 ) preached out of season Isaiah’s old doctrine of the inviolability of Zion; even after the capture of Jerusalem in 597 and the first exile, ‘the prophets’ promised in Jehovah’s name a speedy re-instatement. On Jehoiakim’s first revolt, in 601, he let loose bands of raiders on the Judæan territory (Jeremiah 20:7-18 ; cf. Jeremiah 12:9 ; Jeremiah 12:14 ); four years later be marched on the capital. Jehoiakim died just before this; his youthful son Jehoiachin (called also Jeconiah and Coniah ) surrendered the city, and was carried captive, with the queen-mother and the élite of the nobles and people, to Babylon, where he lived for many years, to be released upon Nebuchadrezzar’s death in 561 ( 2 Kings 24:6-17 ; 2 Kings 25:27-30 , Jeremiah 22:24-30 ). Zedekiah failed through weakness more than through wickedness; he sought Jeremiah’s advice, but lacked decision to follow it. Early in his reign a conspiracy was on foot in Palestine against the Chaldæans, which he was tempted to join (Jeremiah 27:1-11 ; see RVm [2] on Jeremiah 27:1 ). The Judæans, instead of being cowed by the recent punishment, were eager for a rising; public opinion expressed itself in Hananiah’s contradiction to Jeremiah’s warnings (ch. Nebuchadrezzar, aware of these movements, summoned Zedekiah to Babylon ( Jeremiah 51:59 ); the latter was able, however, to clear himself of complicity, and returned to Jerusalem. At last Zedekiah yielded to the tide; he broke his oaths of allegiance to Nebuchadrezzar conduct sternly condemned by Ezekiel ( Ezekiel 17:11-21 ) as well as by Jeremiah and the Jewish people were launched on a struggle almost as mad as that which it undertook with Rome 650 years later. The Egyptians under the new and ambitious Pharaohhophra (Apries, 588 569), effected a diversion of the Chaldæan troops ( Jeremiah 37:5-10 , Ezekiel 17:15 ); but, as often before, Pharaoh proved ‘a broken reed to those who trusted in him. A remnant, of no political importance, was left to till the ground; the bulk of these, after the tragic incidents related in Jeremiah 39:1-18 ; Jeremiah 40:1-16 ; 1618417536_56 ; Jeremiah 42:1-22 ; Jeremiah 43:1-13 , fled to Egypt. Jeremiah, who had in vain resisted this migration, was carried with the runaways; he had the distress of seeing his companions relapse into open idolatry, protesting that they had fared better when worshipping ‘the queen of heaven’ than under the national Jehovah. 605 to 538, a little short of the ‘70 years’ assigned to it, in round numbers, by Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 25:11 ; Jeremiah 29:10 ). The Book of Jeremiah is largely autobiographical. In Jeremiah’s life we watch the spirit of revelation being driven inwards , taking refuge from the shipwreck of the State in the soul of the individual. Jeremiah is the prophet of that ‘church within the nation,’ traceable in its beginnings to Isaiah’s time, to which the future of revealed religion is henceforth committed. ...
Jeremiah was a native of Anathoth, a little town some 3 1 / 2 miles N. from Jerusalem, perched high on the mountain-ridge and commanding an extensive view over the hills of Ephraim and the Jordan valley, towards which his memory often turned (Jeremiah 4:15 ; Jeremiah 7:14-15 ; Jeremiah 12:5 ; Jeremiah 31:4-5 ; Jeremiah 31:18 ; Jeremiah 49:19 ). Jeremiah had no mere Judæan outlook; the larger Israel was constantly in his thoughts. Anathoth had been the settlement of Abiathar, the last high priest of Eli’s house, who was banished thither by Solomon ( 1 Kings 2:26 ); Jeremiah may have been a scion of this deposed line. His attempt to visit Anathoth during the last siege of Jerusalem, and the transaction between himself and his cousin over the field at Anathoth ( Jeremiah 32:6 ff. , Jeremiah 37:11-14 ), go to show that he was not entirely cut off from friendly relations with his kindred and native place. ...
Jeremiah’s call (ch. 626 found him a diffident and reluctant young man, not wanting in devotion, but shrinking from publicity, and with no natural drawing towards the prophetic career; yet he is ‘set over the nations, to pluck up and to break down, and to build and to plant’! Already there begins the struggle between the implanted word of Jehovah and the nature of the man, on which turns Jeremiah’s inner history and the development of his heroic character, all things considered, the noblest in the OT. The manner of his call imports an intimacy with God, an identification of the man with his mission, more close and complete than in the case of any previous prophet (see Jeremiah 1:5 ; Jeremiah 1:9 ). He conceives the true prophet as ‘standing in Jehovah’s council, to perceive and hear his word’ ( Jeremiah 23:18 ; cf. So that he may be in person, as well as in word, a prophet of the coming tribulation, marriage is forbidden him and all participation in domestic life ( Jeremiah 16:1-13 ), a sentence peculiarly bitter to his tender and affectionate nature. Jeremiah’s imagination was haunted by his lost home happiness ( Jeremiah 7:34 ; Jeremiah 16:9 ; Jeremiah 25:10 ; Jeremiah 32:38-394 ). ...
Behind the contest waged by Jeremiah with kings and people there lay an interior struggle, lasting more than twenty years. We may trace through a number of self-revealing passages, the general drift of which is plain notwithstanding the obscurity of some sentences and the chronological uncertainty, Jeremiah’s progress from youthful consecration and ardour, through moods of doubt and passionate repugnance, to a complete self-conquest and settled trust (see, besides chs. 1, 11, 16 already cited, Jeremiah 8:18 to Jeremiah 9:2 ; Jeremiah 15:10-11 and Jeremiah 15:15-21 ; Jeremiah 17:14-18 ; Jeremiah 18:18-23 ; Jeremiah 20:1-18 ; Jeremiah 26:1-24 ; Jeremiah 30:1-24 ; Jeremiah 31:1-40 ; Jeremiah 32:1-44 ). The discipline of Jeremiah may be divided into four stages, following on his supernatural call: ( a ) the youthful period of fierce denunciation, b. Here Jeremiah is on the same ground as Zephaniah. 5 reflects the shocking impression made by Jeremiah’s first acquaintance with Jerusalem; in ch. With rebukes mingle calls to repentance and, more rarely, hopes of a relenting on the people’s part ( Jeremiah 3:21-25 ; in other hopeful passages critics detect interpolation). Jeremiah’s powerful and pathetic preaching helped to prepare the reformation of 621. ...
( b ) Jeremiah’s attitude towards Josiah’s reformation is the enigma of his history. 1 12), apart from the doubtful allusion in Jeremiah 11:1-8 , ignores the subject; Josiah’s name is but once mentioned, by way of contrast to Jehoiakim, in Jeremiah 22:13-19 . From this silence we must not infer condemnation; and such passages as Jeremiah 7:22-23 and Jeremiah 8:8 do not signify that Jeremiah was radically opposed to the sacrificial system and to the use of a written law. We may fairly gather from Jeremiah 11:1-8 , if not from Jeremiah 17:19-27 (the authenticity of which is contested), that Jeremiah commended the Deuteronomic code. It effected no ‘circumcision of the heart,’ no inward turning to Jehovah, no such ‘breaking up of the fallow ground’ as Jeremiah had called for; the good seed of the Deuteronomic teaching was ‘sown among thorns’ ( Jeremiah 4:3-4 ), which sprang up and choked it. Convinced of this, Jeremiah appears to have early withdrawn, and stood aloof for the rest of Josiah’s reign. ...
( c ) Josiah’s death at Megiddo pricked the bubble of the national religiousness; this calamity recalled Jeremiah to his work. Soon afterwards he delivered the great discourse of Jeremiah 7:1 to Jeremiah 8:3 , which nearly cost him his life (see ch. 7 10 (subtracting the great interpolation of Jeremiah 9:23 to Jeremiah 10:16 , of which Jeremiah 10:1-16 is surely post-Jeremianic); so, probably, most of the matter of chs. 14 20, identified with the ‘many like words’ that were added to the volume of Jeremiah burnt by Jehoiakim in the winter of 604 ( Jeremiah 36:27-32 ). The climax of Jeremiah’s inward agony was brought about by the outrage inflicted on him by Pashhur, the Temple overseer (ch. Jehovah has used His almighty power to play with a weak, simple man, and to make him a laughing-stock! Jehovah’s word is ‘a fire in his bones’; he is compelled to speak it, only to meet ridicule and insult! His warnings remain unfulfilled, and God leaves him in the lurch! He desires nothing but the people’s good; yet they count him a traitor, and put down his terrifying visions to malignity! This last reproach cut Jeremiah to the heart; again and again he had repelled it ( Jeremiah 15:10 ; Jeremiah 17:16 ; Jeremiah 18:20 ). 20 was Jeremiah’s Gethsemane. At this juncture the conclusive breach with Jehoiakim came about, when the faithless king, by running his knife through Jeremiah’s book, severed the ties which had bound prophecy to the secular throne of David since Samuel’s day. Jeremiah is at last equal to his office, ready ‘to pluck up and to break down the nations, and to build and to plant. 30 33 ( Jeremiah 33:14-26 are wanting in the LXX [4] ; the remainder of 33, along with Jeremiah 32:16-44 , lies under grave critical suspicion) contain a distinct ‘word of Jehovah,’ committed to a separate ‘book. ’ This is ‘the Book of the Future of Israel and Judah’ (Duhm), and the crown of Jeremiah’s life-work. Like the Christian prophet who wrote the Epistle to the Hebrews, Jeremiah fled to the ideal and eternal from the horrors of the national downfall; as the earthly Zion sinks, the image of God’s true city rises on his soul. The long foreseen catastrophe has arrived; Jeremiah meets it bravely, for ‘days are coming,’ Jehovah tells him, ‘when I will restore the captivity of my people Israel and Judah, and I will cause them to return to the land of their fathers’ ( Jeremiah 30:3 ff. The prophet adds deeds to words: he takes the opportunity of buying, before witnesses, a field at Anathoth offered during the siege by his cousin Hanameel, in token that ‘houses and fields and vineyards shall yet again be bought in this land’ ( Jeremiah 32:15 ). … And I will make an everlasting covenant with them, and I will put my fear in their hearts ’ ( 1618417536_31 ; Jeremiah 32:31-44 of this disputed chapter are full of Jeremianic traits). Jeremiah 31:31-34 is the kernel of the ‘Book of the Future’; this is Jeremiah’s greatest contribution to the progress of the Kingdom of God. To deprive Jeremiah of the New-Covenant oracle (as B. , would do) is to remove the top-stone of his life’s edifice; it is to make his rôle one of ‘plucking up and breaking down,’ with no commensurate ‘building and planting’ ( Jeremiah 1:10 ) upon the desolated site. Jeremiah had read first in his own heart the secret thus conveyed to Israel. ...
Jeremiah’s style and powers as a writer have been underestimated; better justice
Assayer - According to modern versions of Jeremiah 6:27 , the calling of Jeremiah was to be an assayer of the people. Modern versions, however, seem to make the best sense of the Hebrew text (see the entire context; Jeremiah 6:27-30 )
Burst - ...
Jeremiah 2:20 (b) Here is a figure to represent GOD's delivering hand for Israel from her enemies, the Assyrians. (See also Jeremiah 30:8; Nahum 1:13). ...
Jeremiah 5:5 (b) Here is the story of the great men of Israel who refused to bow to the law of GOD and threw off the yoke of the Lord that they might be joined to idols
Stocks - Jeremiah was subjected to this punishment. Jeremiah 20:2,3 . Jeremiah 29:26
Achbor - A courtier under Josiah, son of Micaiah ( 2 Kings 22:12 ; 2 Kings 22:14 ), and father of Elnathan ( Jeremiah 26:22 om. ]'>[1] , Jeremiah 36:12 )
Ahikam - Later he used his influence to protect Jeremiah from the violence of the populace during the reign of Jehoiakim ( Jeremiah 26:24 )
Hilkiah - So also the father of Jeremiah was called by this name, (Jeremiah 1:1) and the son of Amaziah
Iri'Jah - (seen by the Lord ), son of Shelemiah, a captain in the ward, who met Jeremiah in the gate of Jerusalem called the "gate of Benjamin" accused him of being about to desert to the Chaldeans; and led him back to the princes. ( Jeremiah 37:13,14 ) (B
lu'Hith - (made of tables or boards ), The ascent of, a place in Moab, occurs only in ( Isaiah 15:5 ) and the parallel passage of Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 48:5 ) In the days of Eusebius and Jerome it was still known, and stood between Areopolis (Rabbath-moab) and Zoar
Pashur - paqid nagid, meaning "deputy governor"]'>[1] of the temple" (Jeremiah 20:1,2 ). " Enraged at the plainness with which Jeremiah uttered his solemn warnings of coming judgements, because of the abounding iniquity of the times, Pashur ordered the temple police to seize him, and after inflicting on him corporal punishment (forty stripes save one, Deuteronomy 25:3 ; Compare 2 Corinthians 11:24 ), to put him in the stocks in the high gate of Benjamin, where he remained all night. On being set free in the morning, Jeremiah went to Pashur (Jeremiah 20:3,5 ), and announced to him that God had changed his name to Magor-missabib, i. " The punishment that fell upon him was probably remorse, when he saw the ruin he had brought upon his country by advising a close alliance with Egypt in opposition to the counsels of (Jeremiah 20:4-6 ). ...
...
A priest sent by king Zedekiah to Jeremiah to inquire of the Lord (1 Chronicles 24:9 ; Jeremiah 21:1 ; 38:1-6 )
Tahpanhes - TAHPANHES ( Jeremiah 2:16 ; Jeremiah 43:7 ff; Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 , Ezekiel 30:18 ( Tehaphnehes ), in Jdt 1:9 AV Johanan - He would not however listen to Jeremiah and remain in the land, but headed the remnant in going to Egypt, where they practised idolatry. 2 Kings 25:23 ; Jeremiah 40:8-16 ; Jeremiah 41:11-16 ; Jeremiah 42:1-8 ; Jeremiah 43:2,4,5
Jackal - For a city or nation to be made the haunt or lair of jackals is for it to be utterly destroyed (Isaiah 13:22 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Jeremiah 9:11 ; Jeremiah 10:22 ; Jeremiah 49:33 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ; Jeremiah 51:37 ; Lamentations 5:18 ; Malachi 1:3 )
Gall - (herb) A bitter, poisonous herb (perhaps Citrullus colocynthis ), the juice of which is thought to be the “hemlock” poison Socrates drank Gall was frequently linked with wormwood (Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; Jeremiah 23:15 ; Lamentations 3:19 ; Amos 6:12 ) to denote bitterness and tragedy. Modern speech translations generally translate the Hebrew word for gall in light of the context of the passage (poisonous growth, Deuteronomy 29:18 NRSV; poisonous water, Jeremiah 8:14 ; Jeremiah 9:5 ; Jeremiah 23:15 NRSV; poison, Amos 6:12 NRSV)
Anathoth - It was also the home of Jeremiah the prophet, who may have been a priest in the rejected line of Abiathar (Jeremiah 1:1 ). Though Jeremiah was opposed and threatened by the citizens of Anathoth (Jeremiah 11:21-23 ) he purchased a field there from his cousin Hanameel in obedience to the word of the Lord to symbolize ultimate hope after Exile (Jeremiah 32:6-15 )
Gall - (herb) A bitter, poisonous herb (perhaps Citrullus colocynthis ), the juice of which is thought to be the “hemlock” poison Socrates drank Gall was frequently linked with wormwood (Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; Jeremiah 23:15 ; Lamentations 3:19 ; Amos 6:12 ) to denote bitterness and tragedy. Modern speech translations generally translate the Hebrew word for gall in light of the context of the passage (poisonous growth, Deuteronomy 29:18 NRSV; poisonous water, Jeremiah 8:14 ; Jeremiah 9:5 ; Jeremiah 23:15 NRSV; poison, Amos 6:12 NRSV)
Ben-Hinnom - Jeremiah announced God's judgment on the valley because of such practices (Jeremiah 19:1-15 ). The valley would be renamed, “valley of slaughter” (Jeremiah 19:6 ). The sin of the valley gave God reason to bring the Babylonians to destroy Jerusalem (Jeremiah 32:35 )
Potter's Field - " Nothing is found in Jeremiah corresponding to the words quoted; but there is something similar in Zechariah 11:12,13 . Jeremiah is said to havespoken the words; the reference therefore may be to something he had said, and not to what he had written. Or it is possible that as the Jews anciently placed Jeremiah at the beginning of the Book of the Prophets (Ezekiel, Isaiah, and the twelve minor prophets following), 'Jeremiah' may have been a sort of heading for the whole
Jeremias - Jeremiah the prophet
Heifer - 'eglah, (Deuteronomy 21:4,6 ; Jeremiah 46:20 ). Untrained to the yoke (Hosea 10:11 ); giving milk (Isaiah 7:21 ); ploughing (Judges 14:18 ); treading out grain (Jeremiah 50:11 ); unsubdued to the yoke an emblem of Judah (Isaiah 15:5 ; Jeremiah 48:34 )
Michaiah - (See GEMARIAH; BARUCH; Jeremiah. ) (Jeremiah 36:11-14). On hearing all the Lord's words, through Jeremiah, read by Baruch Michaiah went down to the king's house, into the scribe's chamber where sat all the princes, and declared unto them all the words
Hoshama - In Jehoiachin's capture by Nebuchadnezzar his mother and wives are mentioned, but not his sons (2 Kings 24:12; 2 Kings 24:15), and he is doomed to be "childless" in Jeremiah 22:30. Either there is confusion of the genealogies in 1 Chronicles 3, or, as Matthew 1:12 says "Jeconias begat Salathiel," by "childless" Jeremiah means he should have no lineal heir to the throne, as Jeremiah adds, "no man of his seed shall prosper
ja-Azani'ah - (Jeremiah 41:11 ; 43:4,5 ) (B. ) ...
A Rechabite, son of Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 35:3 ) (B
Maul - In Jeremiah 51:20 translated "maul" for "battle axe. " So Jeremiah 50:23 Babylon "the hammer of the whole earth," i
ty'Rus - This form is employed in the Authorized Version of the books of Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Hosea (Joel has "Tyre"), Amos and Zechariah, as follows: (Jeremiah 25:22 ; 27:3 ; 47:4 ; Ezekiel 26:2,3,4,7,15 ; 27:2,3,8,32 ; 28:2,12 ; 29:18 ; Hosea 9:13 ; Amos 1:9,10 ; Zechariah 9:2,3 )
Sarsechim - ” Often seen as copyist's change from Nebushasban (Jeremiah 39:13 ). (Jeremiah 39:3 )
Pathros - Place situate in Egypt, probably a part of Upper Egypt, where there were many Jews who set Jeremiah at defiance. Jeremiah 44:1,15
Hammelech - ]'>[2] of Jeremiah 36:26 ; Jeremiah 38:6 , but there is little doubt that the rendering ought to be ‘the king,’ as in RV Elnathan - 2 Kings 24:8 ; Jeremiah 26:22 ; Jeremiah 36:12,25
Hammelech - The word is considered by some not to be a proper name, but to signify 'the king,' reading 'Jerahmeel, the king's son,' and 'Malchiah, the king's son,' Jeremiah 36:26 ; Jeremiah 38:6 ; as in the margin and the R
Hanameel - Son of Shallum, and cousin of Jeremiah the prophet, of whom, when Jerusalem was besieged by the Chaldeans, the prophet bought a field, as a token that Jehovah would surely fulfil His word that houses, fields, and vineyards would be possessed again in that land. Jeremiah 32:7-15
Habaziniah - Head of the Rechabites (Jeremiah 35:3)
Zedekiah - The twentieth and last king of Judah, son of Josiah and Hamutal, and uncle to Jeconiah his predecessor, 2 Kings 24:17,19 Jeremiah 52:1 . Compare Jeremiah 29:16-19 34:1-22 38:5 Ezekiel 17:12,14,18 . In the ninth year of his reign, he revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, trusting to the support of Pharaoh-hophra king of Egypt, which proved ineffectual, and despising the faithful remonstrance's of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 37:2,5,7-10 . Zedekiah was taken and carried to Nebuchadnezzar, then at Riblah, in Syria, who reproached him with his perfidy, caused his children to be slain before his face and his own eyes to be put out; and then loading him with chains of brass, he ordered him to be sent to Babylon, 2 Kings 25:1-30 Jeremiah 39:1-18 52:1-34 Ezekiel 19:1-14 . All these events remarkably fulfilled the predictions of Jeremiah and Ezekiel, in the chapters preciously referred to. Compare also, with respect to Zedekiah's blindness, Jeremiah 34:3 Ezekiel 12:13 . Another false prophet, denounced by Jeremiah, Jeremiah 29:21,22
Dungeon - Jeremiah was put into a pit, and he sank in the mire. Jeremiah 38:6-13 ; Lamentations 3:53,55
Shaphan - A scribe or secretary under King Josiah, to whom he read from the newly found autograph roll of the book of the law, 2 Kings 22:12 ; Jeremiah 29:3 ; 36:10 ; Ezekiel 8:11 . The father of Ahikam, 2 Kings 22:12 ; 25:22 ; Jeremiah 26:24
Prophets, False - " Jeremiah 23:16 . There were three that opposed Jeremiah to his face — Hananiah, Ahab, and Zedekiah. Jeremiah 28:1 ; Jeremiah 29:21
Gilead - Hence the hill upon which it was erected, was called Mount Gilead, Song of Solomon 4:1 ; Song of Solomon 6:5 ; Jeremiah 50:19 . The Scripture speaks of the balm of Gilead, Jeremiah 8:22 ; Jeremiah 46:11 ; Jeremiah 51:8
Madmen - An unknown place in Moab, Jeremiah 48:2
Jer'Emy, - the prophet Jeremiah
Hoshaiah - Father of Jewish leader who lead delegation requesting Jeremiah's prayer support (Jeremiah 42:1 ) and then rejected Jeremiah's word from God (Jeremiah 43:2 )
Merathaim - Jeremiah (Jeremiah 50:21 ) announced God's judgment on the land
Uphaz - (yoo' faz) Unidentified source of fine gold (Jeremiah 10:9 ; Daniel 10:5 ) or else a term for fine gold. Uphaz is possibly a copyist's change for Ophir at Jeremiah 10:9 as indicated by early versions
Winterhouse - A part of a palace or a separate home of the rich that is heated and thus warmer than the rest of the house (Jeremiah 36:22 ), or built in a warmer part of the country. Amos spoke of the destruction of the winterhouse because of Israel's sin against God (Jeremiah 3:15 )
Lance, Lancet - The former only Jeremiah 50:1-46 ; Jeremiah 52:1-34 , RV Back - Jeremiah 18:17 (a) This represents the attitude of GOD in refusing to answer or to come to their help when idolatrous Israel was in trouble. ...
Jeremiah 32:33 (a) The word is used here to describe the attitude of Israel in refusing to listen to GOD or to bow to His commands
Cankerworm - The same original word is rendered "caterpillar" in Psalms 105:34; Jeremiah 51:14; Jeremiah 51:27
Seraiah - The name of six persons, alluded to in the following passages: 2 Samuel 8:17 ; 2 Kings 25:18 ; Ezra 7:1 ; Jeremiah 36:26 ; 40:8 ; 51:59 . " He bore to the Jews in Babylon a message from the prophet Jeremiah
Sheshach - (Jeremiah 25:26 ), supposed to be equivalent to Babel (Babylon), according to a secret (cabalistic) mode of writing among the Jews of unknown antiquity, which consisted in substituting the last letter of the Hebrew alphabet for the first, the last but one for the second, and so on. This is supposed to be confirmed by a reference to Jeremiah 51:41 , where Sheshach and Babylon are in parallel clauses. (See Streane's Jeremiah, l
Heath - Hebrew aroer , arar ; Arabic dnax ; the Juniper sabina or Juniper savin with small scale-like leaves, close to the stem, a gloomy looking bush on a sterile soil, symbolizing "the man that trusteth in man and maketh flesh his arm, and whose heart departeth from the Lord" (Jeremiah 17:6); the Hebrew means "naked"; such is he whose defense is other than Jehovah, a shrub in a barren soil, contrasted with the "tree spreading out her roots by the river," i. the man that trusteth in Jehovah (Jeremiah 17:7-8; compare Jeremiah 48:6, margin)
Bel - Similarly, Jeremiah prophesied shame coming on Bel (Jeremiah 50:2 ). Bel would have to spit out the nations he had swallowed up (Jeremiah 51:44 )
Miphkad Gate - Suggested meanings include: inspection (NAS, NIV); muster (REB, NRSV); or prison (compare Jeremiah 52:11 ). If the Miphkad Gate is a city gate, it is perhaps identical with the Benjamin Gate (Jeremiah 37:13 ; Jeremiah 38:7 ; Zechariah 14:10 ), located at the northernmost point on the east wall (perhaps identical with the Gate of the Guard, Nehemiah 12:39 )
Bozrah - Genesis 36:33 , a city of Edom, Isaiah 34:6 63:1 , and the region around it, Jeremiah 49:13,22 . It is associated with Terman, and with the Red sea, Jeremiah 49:20-22 Amos 1:12 . Bozrah of Moab, Jeremiah 48:24 , may be the same place with this, or perhaps with Bezer
Chemosh - Judges 10:6; Judges 11:30-31; Judges 11:39), but Chemosh was powerless to save them from the judgment of God (Jeremiah 48:7; Jeremiah 48:13; Jeremiah 48:46; see MOAB)
Sheshak - (sshee' sshak) NAS spelling of Sheshach (Jeremiah 51:41 )
Goah - An unknown locality near Jerusalem ( Jeremiah 31:39 )
Jeremy - Jeremiah the prophet
Bruit - Rumor or report, Jeremiah 10:22 Nahum 3:19
Brigandine - (Jeremiah 46:4 ) elsewhere "habergeon," or "coat of mail
Gedaliah - Son of Ahikam, who saved Jeremiah from death (Jeremiah 26:24); grandson of Shaphan, Josiah's secretary, whom the king sent to inquire concerning the book of Jehovah' s law recently found (2 Kings 22:12; 2 Kings 22:14). ), to govern the cities of Judah and the farmers and vinedressers, who were allowed to remain in the land (Jeremiah 39:10; Jeremiah 39:14; Jeremiah 40:5-6; Jeremiah 40:11; Jeremiah 52:16). of Jerusalem, with a Chaldean guard (Jeremiah 41). ...
Jeremiah, when given his choice by Nebuzaradan where he should dwell, attached himself to Gedaliah, who was joined also by a promiscuous multitude of "men, women, and children, and of the poor of the land"; also by Ishmael of the blood royal, Johanan and Jonathan, Seraiah, the sons of Ephai, Jezaniah, and their men; also by the Jews who had been driven to Moab, Ammon, and Edom, but who now with reassured confidence began to gather, as formerly, "wine and summer fruits. "...
Even reverence for the temple, though in ruins, revived under him; and men from Shechem, Shiloh, and Samaria came with their offerings and badges of mourning for the destruction of the Lord's house and the holy city (Jeremiah 41:5). His death is commemorated in the Jewish calendar as a national calamity; and many Jews under Johanan, fearing Babylon's vengeance, fled to Egypt, forcing Jeremiah with them (Jeremiah 41:18). Son of Pashur; one of the princes who caused Jeremiah's imprisonment (Jeremiah 38:1, etc
Beth-Diblathaim - ” Town in Moab on which Jeremiah prophesied judgment (Jeremiah 48:22 )
Hammer - Besides its ordinary sense, used for any overwhelming power, earthly (Jeremiah 50:23, "the hammer of the whole earth," Babylon, as Martel, "little hammer," was a title of the Frank king) or spiritual (Jeremiah 23:29, "is not My word like a hammer that breaketh the rock in pieces?"
Bel - ]'>[2] with Merodach, ‘the younger Bel,’ the tutelary god of Babylon ( Jeremiah 50:2 ; Jeremiah 51:44 , Isaiah 46:1 , Bar 6:41 )
Jehovah-Tsidkenu - ]'>[1] our righteousness,’ Jeremiah 23:6 ; Jeremiah 33:16 )
Nim'Rim - ( Isaiah 15:6 ) and Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 48:34 ) We should perhaps look for the site of Nimrim in Moab proper, i
Seraiah - He was put to death, with other distinguished captives, by order of Nebuchadnezzar at Riblah, 2 Kings 25:18 ; 2 Kings 25:21 , Jeremiah 52:24 ; Jeremiah 52:27 . One of ‘the captains of the forces’ who joined Gedaliah at Mizpah ( 2 Kings 25:23 , Jeremiah 40:8 ). One of those sent to apprehend Jeremiah and Baruch ( Jeremiah 36:26 ). Son of Neriah and brother of Baruch ( Jeremiah 51:59-64 )
Kidney - When the word is used figuratively of humans, KJV usually translates the term as “reins” (for example, Jeremiah 12:2 ; Revelation 2:23 ); NRSV uses “mind” (Revelation 2:23 ), “heart” (Job 19:27 ; Psalm 7:9 ; Psalm 16:7 , Psalm 73:21 ; Jeremiah 12:2 ), “vitals” (Lamentations 3:13 ), “soul” (Proverbs 23:16 ), or “inward parts” (Psalm 139:13 ; but see Job 16:13 ). ...
The kidneys are often associated with the heart as constituting the center of human personality (Psalm 7:9 ; Psalm 26:2 ; Jeremiah 11:20 ; Jeremiah 17:10 ; Jeremiah 20:12 ; Revelation 2:23 ). The kidneys were also used figuratively as the source of the knowledge and understanding of the moral life (Psalm 16:7 ; Jeremiah 12:2 )
Seraiah - 2 Kings 25:18 ; 1 Chronicles 6:14 ; Jeremiah 52:24 . 2 Kings 25:23 ; Jeremiah 40:8 . Son of Azriel: he was ordered by Jehoiakim to seize Baruch and Jeremiah. Jeremiah 36:26 . Son of Neriah: to him was committed by Jeremiah a roll 'written against Babylon,' to be read at Babylon, and then with a stone tied to it, he was to cast it into the Euphrates; and to declare, "Thus shall Babylon sink. " Jeremiah 51:59-64
Hananiah - Jeremiah 36:12 . Son of Azur and the false prophet who withstood Jeremiah. Jeremiah denounced his prophecy as a lie: he should die within a year, which took place in the seventh month. Jeremiah 28 . Jeremiah 37:13 . A priest of the family of Jeremiah
Hammer - ...
Hammers were used in cutting stone (1 Kings 6:7 ), working common and precious metals (Isaiah 41:7 ; Isaiah 44:12 ), and for woodworking (Jeremiah 10:4 ). A hammer-like weapon was also used in battle (Jeremiah 51:20 “shatterer” NAS margin; Ezekiel 9:2 “shattering weapon”). God's word is pictured as a hammer (Jeremiah 23:29 ). Babylon is mocked as a hammer whose strength has failed (Jeremiah 50:23 )
Queen of Heaven - ) (Jeremiah 7:18; Jeremiah 44:17-25). In Jeremiah 44:19 Maurer translated "did we form her image. " Babylon, Israel's instrument of sin, was in righteous retribution made Israel's punishment (Jeremiah 2:19)
Rahel - (ray hehl) KJV alternate form of Rachel (Jeremiah 31:15 )
Sarsechim - One of Nebuchadnezzar's generals at Jerusalem's capture (Jeremiah 39:3)
Abdeel - Servant of God, (Jeremiah 36:26 ), the father of Shelemiah
Beth-me'on - (Jeremiah 48:23 ) A contracted form of Beth-baal-meon
si'Hor - " In Jeremiah the identity of Shihor with the Nile seems distinctly stated. ( Jeremiah 2:18 ) The stream mentioned in (1 Chronicles 13:5 ) is possibly that of the Wadi l' Areesh
Wormwood - The Old Testament prophets pictured wormwood as the opposite of justice and righteousness (Amos 5:7 ; Jeremiah 23:15 ). Revelation describes as wormwood one of the blazing stars which brings destruction (Jeremiah 8:10-11 )
Immer - with Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 20:1 )
Pekod - (pee' kahd) Hebrew for “punishment” or “judgment” which plays on the name Puqadu, an Aramean tribe inhabiting the area east of the mouth of the Tigris (Jeremiah 50:21 ; Ezekiel 23:23 ). Pekod formed part of the Babylonian Empire in the time of Jeremiah and Ezekiel
Hanani'ah - 595, Hananiah withstood Jeremiah the prophet, and publicly prophesied in the temple that within two years Jeconiah and all his fellow captives with the vessels of the Lord's house, should be brought back to Jerusalem. (Jeremiah 28:1 ) . Hananiah corroborated his prophecy by taking from off the neck of Jeremiah the yoke which he wore by divine command. (Jeremiah 27:1 ) . But Jeremiah was bidden to go tell Hananiah that for the wooden yokes which he had broken he should make yokes of iron, so firm was the dominion of Babylon destined to he for seventy years. The prophet Jeremiah added to this rebuke the prediction of Hananiah's death, the fulfillment of which closes the history of this false prophet. ...
Grandfather of Irijah, the captain of the ward at the gate of Benjamin who arrested Jeremiah on the charge of deserting to the Chaldeans. (Jeremiah 37:13 ) (B. ...
Head of the priestly course of Jeremiah in the days of Joiakim
Melchiah - (mehl ki' uh) KJV alternate form of Malchijah (Jeremiah 21:1 )
Baalis - King of Ammon in time of Gedaliah ( Jeremiah 40:14 )
ga'Reb, the Hill, - in the neighborhood of Jerusalem, named only in (Jeremiah 31:39 )
Ahikam - He was the son of Shaphan, the royal secretary, and the father of Gedaliah, governor of Judea after the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians (2 Kings 25:22 ; Jeremiah 40:5-16 ; 43:6 ). On one occasion he protected Jeremiah against the fury of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 26:24 ). It was in the chamber of another son (Germariah) of Shaphan that Baruch read in the ears of all the people Jeremiah's roll
Madmen - The name occurs only in Jeremiah 48:1-47 [2], where there is a characteristic word-play: gam Madmçn tiddômî , ‘also, O Madmen, thou shalt be brought to silence’ (LXX Balm - tzŏrî, tĕsrî), occurs in Genesis 37:25; Genesis 43:11; Jeremiah 8:22; Jeremiah 46:11; Jeremiah 51:8; Ezekiel 27:17
Mig'Dol - ...
A Migdol is spoken of by Jeremiah and Ezekiel. (Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6 ) In the prophecy of Jeremiah the Jews in Egypt are spoken of as dwelling at Migdol. (Jeremiah 44:1 ) It seems plain, from its being spoken of with Memphis, and from Jews dwelling there, that this Midgol was an important town
Lamentations, Book of - ), claims that Jeremiah is the author of Lamentations. Factors which favor authorship by Jeremiah are the antiquity of the tradition associating him with the book, the similarity in tone between Lamentations and portions of Jeremiah's book (Jeremiah 8-9 ;Jeremiah 8-9;14-15 ), and a similar perspective in Lamentations and Jeremiah as to the cause of the fall of Jerusalem (for example, Lamentations 1:2-18 ; Lamentations 2:14 ; Lamentations 4:13-17 ; Jeremiah 2:18 ; Jeremiah 14:7 ; Jeremiah 16:10-12 ; Jeremiah 23:11-40 ; Jeremiah 37:5-10 ). Lamentations 1:21-22 and Lamentations 3:59-66 appear to be incongruent with Jeremiah's conviction that the Babylonians were functioning as God's instrument of judgment ( Jeremiah 20:4-5 ). Lamentations 4:17 suggests that the author was expecting help from the Egyptians, a perspective which Jeremiah strongly opposed ( Jeremiah 37:5-10 ). The view of Zedekiah, Judah's last king, in Lamentations 4:20 is also quite different from that found regarding him in Jeremiah 24:8-10 . The evidence tends to favor the opinion that Lamentations was written by someone other than Jeremiah; however, Jeremianic authorship is not —impossible
Bruit - A rumour or report (Jeremiah 10:22 , RSV "rumour;" Nahum 3:19 )
Goath - A lowing, a place near Jerusalem, mentioned only in Jeremiah 31:39
See Thing Pot - A vessel for boiling provisions in (Job 41:20 ; Jeremiah 1:13 )
Tahapanes - (tuh ha' puh neez) KJV alternate form of Tahpanhes (Jeremiah 2:16 )
Morasthite - (moh rass' thite) Resident of Moresheth (Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 1:1 )
Niter - (Ni' tuhr) KJV term for lye (Proverbs 25:20 ; Jeremiah 2:22 )
Jonadab - The son of Rechab,; (Jeremiah 35:6) derived from Nadab, a prince
Min'ni - (division ), ( Jeremiah 51:27 ) already noticed as a portion of Armenia
Zedekiah - He was the third son of Josiah, and his mother's name was Hamutal, the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah, and hence he was the brother of Jehoahaz (2 Kings 23:31 ; 24:17,18 ). The prophet Jeremiah was his counsellor, yet "he did evil in the sight of the Lord" (2 Kings 24:19,20 ; Jeremiah 52:2,3 ). The kingdom was at that time tributary to Nebuchadnezzar; but, despite the strong remonstrances of Jeremiah and others, as well as the example of Jehoiachin, he threw off the yoke of Babylon, and entered into an alliance with Hophra, king of Egypt. 588) to Babylon (2 Kings 25:1-7 ; 2 Chronicles 36:12 ; Jeremiah 32:4,5 ; 34:2,3 ; 39:1-7 ; 52:4-11 ; Ezekiel 12:12 ), where he remained a prisoner, how long is unknown, to the day of his death. Only a small number of vinedressers and husbandmen were permitted to remain in the land (Jeremiah 52:16 ). Gedaliah, with a Chaldean guard stationed at Mizpah, ruled over Judah (2 Kings 25:22,24 ; Jeremiah 40:1,2,5,6 ). ...
...
The son of Hananiah, a prince of Judah in the days of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:12 )
Jeremiah - Jeremiah (jĕr-e-mî'ah), whom Jehovah setteth up or appointeth. Jeremiah 1:1-6. Jeremiah expressly foretold that the captivity would endure for 70 years; he also predicted the return of the people to their own country. Jeremiah 39:11-14. Jeremiah is called "Jeremy," Matthew 2:17 A. reads Jeremiah in all these places. Canon Cook says of Jeremiah: "His character is most interesting. ' Jeremiah 1:18
Nebuzaradan - "The captain of the guard," in rank next to the king, who appears prominent in directing affairs at the capture of Jerusalem (2 Kings 25:8-20 ; Jeremiah 39:11 ; 40:2-5 ). He showed kindness toward Jeremiah, as commanded by Nebuchadnezzar (40:1)
Rab-Mag - (rab' mag) Title of the Babylonian official Nergal-Sharezer (Jeremiah 39:3 ,Jeremiah 39:3,39:13 )
Rabsaris - One of Nebuchadnezzar's princes at the taking of Jerusalem under Zedekiah (Jeremiah 39:3; Jeremiah 39:13); probably a title of Nebushasban, i
Hyena - Jeremiah 12:9, "speckled bird. " But Septuagint "the hyena," in parallelism to the "lion" in Jeremiah 12:8; tsabuwa the Arabic word for hyena corresponds
Buz - Elihu, one of the friends of Job ( Job 32:2 ), is called a Buzite , and may have belonged to a tribe of that name against which judgments are denounced by Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 25:23 )
Mixed Multitude - The term is used for those foreigners who joined with the Israelites in the Exodus from Egypt (Exodus 12:38 ), who became associated with the people of Judah during the Exile (Nehemiah 13:3 ), or who were associated with the Egyptians (Jeremiah 25:20 ) or Babylonians (Jeremiah 50:37 )
Abarim - Jeremiah called Jerusalem to cross to Abarim and lament because her allies had been defeated (Jeremiah 22:20 )
Ahi'Kam - ( 2 Kings 22:12-14 ) In the reign of Jehoiakim he successfully used his influence to protect the prophet Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 26:24 ) He was the father of Gedaliah
Jeremi'as, - the Greek form of the name of Jeremiah the prophet
Madmen - , a Moabite town threatened with the sword of the Babylonians (Jeremiah 48:2 )
Misgab - ) In Moab Jeremiah 48:1), "the high land of Moab
Jahazah - An alternate KJV form of Jahaz (Joshua 21:36 ; Jeremiah 48:21 )
Azur - (ay' zuhr) KJV spelling (Jeremiah 28:1 ; Ezekiel 11:1 ) for Azzur
Clout - KJV translation in Jeremiah 38:11-12 for Hebrew word meaning, “tattered clothes, rags
Black - “Black” is also used figuratively to describe mourning (Job 30:28 ; Jeremiah 4:28 ; Jeremiah 8:21 ; Jeremiah 14:2 ), a visionless day (Micah 3:6 ), the abode of the dead (Job 3:5 ; Jude 1:13 ), and the treachery of Job's friends (Job 6:16 )
Teman - City of area associated with this clan (Jeremiah 49:7 ,Jeremiah 49:7,49:20 ; Ezekiel 25:13 ; Amos 1:12 ; Obadiah 1:9 ; Habakkuk 3:3 ). To others the linkage with Dedan (Jeremiah 49:7 ; Ezekiel 25:13 ) suggests Tema on the Arabian peninsula
Isles - Jeremiah 25:22, "the isles which are beyond the sea. Cyprus and Mediterranean coasts (Jeremiah 2:10; Numbers 24:24; Jeremiah 47:4 margin, "the isle of Caphtor," i
Memphis - It continued to be an important city up till the time of its conquest by Alexander the Great in 332 BC (Isaiah 19:13; Jeremiah 44:1; Jeremiah 46:14; Jeremiah 46:19; Ezekiel 30:13; Hosea 9:6)
Marduk - The prophets mocked Marduk and his worshipers as products of human craftsmen who would lead Babylon to defeat and exile (Isaiah 46:1 ; Jeremiah 50:2 ,Jeremiah 50:2,50:38 ; Jeremiah 51:47 )
Bald - (See also Jeremiah 47:5; Isaiah 15:2; Ezekiel 7:18). ...
Jeremiah 16:6 (b) This is a type of despair in sorrow for which there is no remedy. ...
Jeremiah 48:37 (b) This represents great sorrow and deep grief; the loss of the hair being used as a type of long, weary lamenting
Gomorrah - One of the five cities in the vale of Siddim, Genesis 14:1-11; destroyed for its wickedness, Genesis 18:20; Genesis 19:24; Genesis 19:28; made a warning by Moses, Deuteronomy 29:23; Deuteronomy 32:32; referred to by Isaiah 1:9-10; by Jeremiah 23:14; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; by Amos 4:11; by Zephaniah 2:9 : by our Saviour, Matthew 10:15; Mark 6:11, A
Fire (Kindle) - (See also Jeremiah 15:14; (See also Jeremiah 17:4). (See also Isaiah 10:16; Isaiah 42:25; Jeremiah 6:1; Jeremiah 11:16; Jeremiah 17:27; Jeremiah 21:14; Lamentations 4:11; Ezekiel 20:47; Ezekiel 24:10; Hosea 8:14; Amos 2:5). ...
Jeremiah 43:12 (a) Here we find a splendid type of GOD's power to punish all His enemies and especially those particular enemies which are mentioned in each of the following passages: Jeremiah 49:27; Jeremiah 50:32; Ezekiel 30:8, Ezekiel 30:14, Ezekiel 30:16; Ezekiel 39:6; Amos 1:4, Amos 1:14; Amos 2:2
Shephelah - It was a fertile region, suitable for growing fruit trees and raising sheep and cattle (Joshua 10:40; Judges 1:9; 2 Chronicles 9:27; 2 Chronicles 26:10; Jeremiah 17:26; Jeremiah 32:44)
Fountain Gate - The gate is possibly identical with the “gate between the two walls” (2 Kings 25:4 ; Jeremiah 39:4 ; Jeremiah 52:7 )
Ink, Inkhorn - Jeremiah caused Baruch to write in a book with ink the denunciations against Israel and Judah. Jeremiah 36:18
Diana - She was worshipped in Palestine, Jeremiah 7:18 ; Jeremiah 44:17-18
Kir-Haraseth - ; or Kir-heres (kir-hç'res), Jeremiah 48:31; Jeremiah 48:36; or simply Kir of Moab, Isaiah 15:1
Diet - ]'>[1] , apart from Sir 30:25 , where it signifies ‘food,’ this word occurs only in Jeremiah 52:34 , where RV Azur - Jeremiah 28:1
Cabin - Jeremiah 37:16 (a) This is really a dungeon or a prison cell for prisoners
ra'ma, - (Matthew 2:15 ) referring to (Jeremiah 31:15 ) It is the Greek form of Ramah
Jehonathan - Scribe whose house King Zedekiah transformed into prison where he jailed Jeremiah (Jeremiah 37:15 ), a place Jeremiah did not like (Jeremiah 37:20 ; Jeremiah 38:26 )
Bozrah - BOZRAH, from a root "restrain," a sheepfold, Septuagint version of Jeremiah 49:22. of the Dead Sea (Jeremiah 48:21-24), enumerated among the cities of Moab. The Bozrah of Edom on the mountains (Jeremiah 49:13) and Edom's other cities are to be "perpetual wastes"; but the Bozrah of Moab "in the plain" is to be restored "in the latter days" (Jeremiah 48:47). Others identify this Bozrah with the Roman Bostra in Bashan, 60 miles from Heshbon, containing magnificent remains; Jeremiah's including the cities "far and near' may favor this view; but Jeremiah 48:21, "in the plain," seems to mark it among the other Moabite cities
no, no-Amon - Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 46:25 ), Ezekiel (Jeremiah 30:14-15 ,Jeremiah 30:14-15,30:16 ), and Nahum (Jeremiah 3:8 ) were well aware of its prominence
Topheth - Topheth (tô'feth), and once Tophet (tô'fet), place of burning, first applied to a deep part of the "valley of the son of Hinnom, Jeremiah 7:31, "by the entry of the east gate. " Jeremiah 19:2. 2 Kings 23:10; Isaiah 30:33; Jeremiah 7:31-32; Jeremiah 19:6; Jeremiah 19:11-14
Cistern - The prophet Jeremiah was imprisoned in the cistern of Malchijah, King Zedekiah's son, (Jeremiah 38:6 NAS). In Jeremiah 14:1 , the pagan gods were symbolized as broken cisterns that could not hold water. Cisterns also served as convenient dumping places for corpses (Jeremiah 41:7 ,Jeremiah 41:7,41:9 )
Virgin - (See also Isaiah 37:22; Jeremiah 14:17; Jeremiah 18:13; Jeremiah 31:4). ...
Jeremiah 46:11 (a) Again our Lord speaks in derision of the evil nation of Egypt which was living in wickedness and sin, and was held up to ridicule by the GOD of Israel
Luhith - Made of boards, a Moabitish place between Zoar and Horonaim (Isaiah 15:5 ; Jeremiah 48:5 )
Goath - (goh' ath) KJV and REB transliteration of Hebrew in Jeremiah 31:39 for Goah
Nergalsharezer - Captain of Nebuchadnezzar's army, (Jeremiah 39:3) A compound name, Ner, light-Shar, prince-Abzar, treasure
Holon - City of Moab that Jeremiah condemned (Jeremiah 48:21 )
Leopard - Its fierceness (Isaiah 11:6 ), its watching for its prey (Jeremiah 5:6 ), its swiftness (Habakkuk 1:8 ), and the spots of its skin (Jeremiah 13:23 ), are noticed
Shephatiah - ...
...
One of the princes who urged the putting of Jeremiah to death (Jeremiah 38:1-4 )
Merodach - (mihr oh' dak) Hebrew form of Marduk, the chief god of Babylon, also called Bel, corresponding to the Semitic Baal or “Lord” (Jeremiah 50:2 ). Merodach is an element in the names of the Babylonian kings Merodach-baladan (2 Kings 20:12 ; Isaiah 39:1 ) and Evil-Merodach (2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31 )
Neigh - Jeremiah 5:8 (a) The horse calls for his mate for he wishes companionship and association. (See also Jeremiah 13:27)
Anathoth - It was the home of Abiathar ( 1 Kings 2:26 ) and of Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 1:1 ); re-occupied after the exile ( Nehemiah 7:27 ; Nehemiah 10:19 )
Gemari'ah - He was one of the nobles of Judah, and had a chamber int he house of the Lord, from which Baruch read Jeremiah's alarming prophecy in the ears of all the people, B. (Jeremiah 36:1 ) . ...
Son of Hilkiah, was made the bearer of Jeremiah's letter to the captive Jews. (Jeremiah 29:3 ) (B
Zedekiah - He and another, named Ahab , are denounced by Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 29:21-23 ) for gross immorality as well as for falsely prophesying a speedy restoration from Babylon. Son of Hananiah, one of the princes in the reign of Jehoiakim ( Jeremiah 36:12 )
Axe - Hebrew kardom , "sharp"; large, for telling trees (Judges 9:48; Jeremiah 46:22); garzen , "cutting", as "hatchet" from "hack," securis from seco ; barzel ,"iron " garzen sometimes means the "adze. For "axe" in Isaiah 44:12 margin; Jeremiah 10:3, ma'atzad , others trans. Μappeetz (Jeremiah 51:20), "battle axe," a heavy mace or maul, whence Charles Martel was designated
Clay - Used for making pottery in Palestine (Jeremiah 18:2; Jeremiah 18:6). It may have been with clay our Lord's tomb, and the earthen vessel with the proofs of Jeremiah's purchase, were sealed (Matthew 27:66; Jeremiah 32:14)
Memphis - " Isaiah 19:13; Jeremiah 2:16; Jeremiah 44:1; Ezekiel 30:13; Ezekiel 30:16. Its overthrow was distinctly predicted by the Hebrew prophets; Isaiah 19:13; Jeremiah 46:19; and it never recovered from the blow inflicted upon it by Cambyses, 525 b
Bozrah - Jeremiah 49:22 ). A Moabite city denounced by Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 48:24 ), and also unknown
Balm - Jeremiah 8:22 (b) This ointment is a figure of GOD's mercy and loving kindness toward His people. ...
Jeremiah 46:11 (a) Here we understand that there will come a time when GOD's healing ointment of His Word will not avail to mend the wounds of those who deliberately turn away from GOD. ...
Jeremiah 51:8 (a) We understand by this that GOD does have healing remedies even for His enemies, though they do not want His lovely provision for the needs of their hearts
Hananiah - A false prophet, in the days of Jeremiah, whose history, though short, is so very striking and awful, that the Holy Ghost hath been pleased to appoint a whole chapter in the writings of Jeremiah to record it; as if the Lord the Spirit intended it to be frequently read in the church. The chapter is the twenty-eighth of Jeremiah's (Jeremiah 28:1-17) prophecy
Zedekiah - He and another, named Ahab , are denounced by Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 29:21-23 ) for gross immorality as well as for falsely prophesying a speedy restoration from Babylon. Son of Hananiah, one of the princes in the reign of Jehoiakim ( Jeremiah 36:12 )
Queen of Heaven - (Jeremiah 7:18 ; 44:17,25 ), the moon, worshipped by the Assyrians as the receptive power in nature
Tanhumeth - Consolation, a Netophathite; one of the captains who supported Gedaliah (2 Kings 25:23 ; Jeremiah 40:8 )
Marshal - Akkadian loan word for commander of troops (Jeremiah 51:27 NAS, NRSV; captain, KJV; commander, NIV, REB)
Battle-Axe - Applied metaphorically (Jeremiah 51:20 ) to Cyrus, God's instrument in destroying Babylon
Cabin - KJV translation of Hebrew word appearing only in Jeremiah 37:16 and meaning vault, cellar, or prison cell
Azzah - KJV translation or spelling of Gaza (Deuteronomy 2:23 ; 1 Kings 4:24 ; Jeremiah 25:20 )
Steel - Jeremiah 15:12 (b) This is a type of the great strength and power of the northern kingdom
Jehudi - The servant of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, (Jeremiah 36:14) His name signifies, the Lord is my praise
Beth-Diblatha'im - (house of fig-cakes ), a town of Moab, ( Jeremiah 48:22 ) apparently the place elsewhere called ALMON-DIBLATHAIM
Prison - The same word ( bôr ) is found in Exodus 12:29 and Jeremiah 37:16 in the expression rendered by AV [1] ‘dungeon’ and ‘dungeon house’ respectively; also alone in Jeremiah 38:8 , Zechariah 9:11 . ...
The story of Jeremiah introduces us to a variety of other places of detention, no fewer than four being named in Jeremiah 37:15-16 , although one, and perhaps two, of these are later glosses. The first ‘prison’ of Jeremiah 37:15 EV
Jeremiah had already had experience of an irksome form of detention, when placed in the stocks (Jeremiah 20:2 ; cf. ]'>[2] ‘prison house’), while Jeremiah 29:26 associates with the stocks (so RV Beard - This is in contrast to Romans and Egyptians who preferred clean shaven faces and to other desert nomads and others living in Palestine who often clipped or cut their beards (on the latter see Jeremiah 9:26 ; Jeremiah 25:23 ; Jeremiah 49:32 ). To have one's beard shaved was an insult (2 Samuel 10:4-5 ; Isaiah 50:6 ) or used as a sign by the prophets of coming destruction (Isaiah 7:20 ; Isaiah 15:2 ; Jeremiah 41:5 ; Jeremiah 48:37 ; Ezekiel 5:1 )
Sebam - In all the other passages ( Numbers 32:38 , Joshua 13:11 , Isaiah 16:8-9 , Jeremiah 48:32 ) the name appears in the fem, form Sibmah . The ‘vine of Sibmah’ is mentioned by Isaiah and Jeremiah as one of the possessions of Moab on which destruction was to fall
Evil-Merodach - Merodach's man, the son and successor of Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon (2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31,34 ). " He was murdered by Nergal-sharezer=Neriglissar, his brother-in-law, who succeeded him (Jeremiah 39:3,13 )
Madmen (1) - A town of Moat, whose doom Jeremiah (Jeremiah 48:2) foretells
Fornication - It frequently means a forsaking of God or a following after idols ( Isaiah 1:2 ; Jeremiah 2:20 ; Ezekiel 16 ; Hosea 1:2 ; 2:1-5 ; Jeremiah 3:8,9 )
Tophet - (toh' feht) Name for a place in the Hinnom Valley outside Jerusalem derived from Aramaic or Hebrew meaning, “fireplace,” but altered by Hebrew scribes to mean “shameful thing” because of the illicit worship carried on there (Jeremiah 7:31-32 ; KJV, “Tophet”). Child sacrifice was practiced at Tophet, leading the prophet to declare a slaughter of people there when God would come in vengeance (Jeremiah 19:6-11 )
Baker's Street - Zedekiah promised Jeremiah, whom he had imprisoned, that he would have food for as long as bread was available on baker's street (Jeremiah 37:21 )
Achbor - Father of Elnathan, whom Jehoiakim sent to bring back prophet Uriah from Egypt to execute him (Jeremiah 26:22 ). Compare Jeremiah 36:12
Merathaim - Double rebellion, probably a symbolical name given to Babylon (Jeremiah 50:21 ), denoting rebellion exceeding that of other nations
Nebuchadrezzar - Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 21:2,7 ; 22:25 ; 24:1 , etc
Diblathaim - Two cakes, a city of Moab, on the east of the Dead Sea (Numbers 33:46 ; Jeremiah 48:22 )
Pathros - (Isaiah 11:11; Jeremiah 44:1) Perhaps derived from Path, mouth,—and Raphos, water
Jehoiakim - On the death of his father his younger brother Jehoahaz (=Shallum, Jeremiah 22:11 ), who favoured the Chaldeans against the Egyptians, was made king by the people; but the king of Egypt, Pharaoh-necho, invaded the land and deposed Jehoahaz (2 Kings 23:33,34 ; Jeremiah 22:10-12 ), setting Eliakim on the throne in his stead, and changing his name to Jehoiakim. ...
After this the king of Egypt took no part in Jewish politics, having been defeated by the Chaldeans at Carchemish (2 Kings 24:7 ; Jeremiah 46:2 ). In the year after this, Jeremiah caused his prophecies to be read by Baruch in the court of the temple. The words displeased him, and taking the roll from the hands of Baruch he cut it in pieces and threw it into the fire (Jeremiah 36:23 ). They cruelly harassed the whole country (Compare Jeremiah 49:1-6 ). 599 (Jeremiah 22:18,19 ; 36:30 )
Hilkiah - Father of Jeremiah the prophet (Jeremiah 1:1 ). Father of Gemariah, who was an emissary from Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon (Jeremiah 29:3 )
Rab-Saris - ]'>[2] officials, one of whom is recorded to have been present at the capture of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, while the other is mentioned among the officials who ordered the release of Jeremiah after the capture of the city ( Jeremiah 39:3 ; Jeremiah 39:13 )
Bond - Used figuratively to speak of the bonds of wickedness or sin (Isaiah 58:6 ; Luke 13:16 ; Acts 8:23 ), of affliction and judgment (Isaiah 28:22 ; Isaiah 52:2 ; Jeremiah 30:8 ; Nahum 1:13 ), the authority of kings (Job 12:18 ; Psalm 2:3 ), the obligation to keep the covenant (Jeremiah 2:20 ; Jeremiah 5:5 ; see Colossians 2:14 ), the bonds of peace and love (Ephesians 4:3 ; Colossians 3:14 ), and the bonds of an evil woman (Ecclesiastes 7:26 )
Balm - At times the reference seems to be to Balanites aegyptiaca Delile—a small shrub that still grows in North Africa and exudes a sticky resin used for medicinal purposes ( Genesis 37:25 ; Jeremiah 8:22 ; Jeremiah 46:11 ; Jeremiah 51:8 )
Nebuzar-a'Dan - ( Jeremiah 39:11 ) He seems to have quitted Judea when he took down the chief people of Jerusalem to his master at Riblah. (Jeremiah 52:30 ) Nebuchadnezzar in his twenty-third year made a descent on the regions east of Jordan, including the Ammonites and Moabites, who escaped when Jerusalem was destroyed. (Jeremiah 52:30 )
Shemaiah - ...
...
A false prophet who opposed Jeremiah (Jeremiah 29:24-32 ). ...
...
The father of Urijah the prophet (Jeremiah 26:20 ). ...
...
The father of a prince in the reign of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:12 )
Prison - In some cases there were official state prisons (Genesis 39:20; 2 Kings 17:4; Mark 6:17; Acts 12:4; Acts 16:24), though in other cases a prisoner may have been locked in the soldiers’ barracks at the palace (Jeremiah 32:2), dropped into an old disused well (Jeremiah 38:6), or kept under guard in a private house (Acts 28:16; Acts 28:30). Often the prison conditions were bad (Jeremiah 37:18-20), the food poor (2 Chronicles 18:26) and the treatment cruel (Judges 16:21; Judges 16:25; Jeremiah 52:11; Ezekiel 19:9)
Jahaz - JAHAZ (in 1 Chronicles 6:78 , Jeremiah 48:21 Jahzah ). Isaiah ( Isaiah 15:4 ) and Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 48:21 ; Jeremiah 48:34 ) refer to it as in the possession of Moab
Jehoiachin - The Babylonians then plundered Judah’s treasures and took Jehoiachin captive to Babylon, along with the royal family, palace officials and most of Judah’s best people (2 Kings 24:8-16; Esther 2:6; Jeremiah 22:24-30; Jeremiah 24:1; Jeremiah 27:20; Jeremiah 29:2)
Sith - ‘Sith,’ that is ‘since,’ occurs in Jeremiah 15:7 and other places; while ‘sithence’ occurs in 2Es 10:14
East Gate - (Jeremiah 19:2 ), properly the Potter's gate, the gate which led to the potter's field, in the valley of Hinnom
Cage - (Jeremiah 5:27), rather "a trap" with decoy birds in it
ah! - An exclamation of sorrow or regret (Psalm 35:25 ; Isaiah 1:4,24 ; Jeremiah 1:6 ; 22:18 ; Mark 15:29 )
Sheshach - A poetical name for Babylon, signifying, as some judge, house or court of the prince, Jeremiah 25:26 ; 51:41
Jehovah-Tzideknu - Jehovah our righteousness, a name given to the Savior, and through him to his church, Jeremiah 23:6 ; 33:16
Hananel - Jeremiah predicted its rebuilding in the day of the Lord to come (Jeremiah 31:38 ; compare Zechariah 14:10 )
Middle Gate - A city gate of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 39:3 ). Jeremiah 33:14 ; Nehemiah 3:3 ; Zephaniah 1:10 )
Kerioth - ” A fortified city of Moab (Jeremiah 48:24 ,Jeremiah 48:24,48:41 ; Amos 2:2 , KJV has Kirioth)
Cabin - ]'>[3] ) in which Jeremiah was confined ( Jeremiah 37:16 )
Lodge - Jeremiah longed to escape to a wayfarer's desert lodge to avoid his people's sinfulness (Jeremiah 9:2 )
Jehoiakim - When Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar, this prince was also taken and put to death, and his body thrown into the common sewer, according to the prediction of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 22:18-19
Ashkenaz - In 1 Chronicles 1:6; Jeremiah 51:27 it is called Ashchenaz. Son of Gomer, Genesis 10:3, of the family of Japhet, and the probable ancestor of those who inhabited the country of the same name, Jeremiah 51:27, lying along the eastern and southeastern shore of the Black Sea
Pen - The ancient pen was a stylus of hardened iron, Jeremiah 17:1 , sometimes pointed with diamond, for writing on hard substances, like metallic plates; when waxen tablets were used, the stylus had one end made broad and smooth, for erasing errors, 2 Kings 21:13 . For parchment, cloth, and similar substances, a reed pen was used, or a fine hair pencil, with ink, Judges 5:14 Job 19:24 Isaiah 8:1 Jeremiah 36:23 3 John 1:13
Whelp - A lion's cub, used figuratively in the Old Testament (see Genesis 49:9 ; Jeremiah 51:38 ; Nahum 2:11 )
Vermilion - A brilliant red color, resembling scarlet, Jeremiah 22:14 ; Ezekiel 23:14
Seraiah - ...
...
A Netophathite (Jeremiah 40:8 ), a chief priest of the time of Zedekiah. Jeremiah took advantage of the occasion, and sent with Seraiah a word of cheer to the exiles in Babylon, and an announcement of the doom in store for that guilty city. The roll containing this message (Jeremiah 50:1-8 ) Seraiah was to read to the exiles, and then, after fixing a stone to it, was to throw it into the Euphrates, uttering, as it sank, the prayer recorded in Jeremiah 51:59-64 . Jeremiah 51:59 is rendered in the Revised Version, "Now Seraiah was chief chamberlain," instead of "was a quiet prince," as in the Authorized Version
Fountain - bor , 'pit, well:' translated 'fountain' only in Jeremiah 6:7 . ' This is rendered 'spring' in Proverbs 25:26 ; Jeremiah 51:36 ; Hosea 13:15 . It is used for the 'fountain of blood,' Mark 5:29 ; the 'fountain of life,' as applied to Jehovah for Israel, Psalm 36:9 ; the 'fountain of tears,' Jeremiah 9:1 ; the 'fountain of living waters. ' Jeremiah 2:13 ; Jeremiah 17:13 ; Revelation 7:17 ; Revelation 21:6
Tanhumeth - captains who joined Gedaliah at Mizpah ( 2 Kings 25:23 , Jeremiah 40:8 )
Azzah - The right designation of the Philistine city (Deuteronomy 2:28; 1 Kings 4:24; Jeremiah 25:20)
Abjects - (Compare Jeremiah 18:18
Kirioth - Probably the same as KERIOTH in Jeremiah 48:24,41
go'Ath - (lowing ), a place apparently in the neighborhood of Jerusalem, and named, in connection with the hill Gareb, only in ( Jeremiah 31:39 )
Maaseiah - ...
...
The father of the priest Zephaniah (Jeremiah 21:1 ; 37:3 ). ...
...
The father of the false prophet Zedekiah (Jeremiah 29:21 ). Maase'iah, refuge is Jehovah, a priest, the father of Neriah (Jeremiah 32:12 ; 51:59 )
Johanan - ...
...
Son of Careah, one of the Jewish chiefs who rallied round Gedaliah, whom Nebuchadnezzar had made governor in Jerusalem (2 Kings 25:23 ; Jeremiah 40:8 ). He warned Gedaliah of the plans of Ishmael against him, a warning which was unheeded (Jeremiah 40:13,16 ). He and his associates subsequently fled to Tahpanhes in Egypt (43:2,4,5), taking Jeremiah with them
Jaazaniah - His name has a slightly different spelling in Jeremiah 40:8 . The same abbreviated Hebrew name belonged to a Rechabite whom Jeremiah used as an example of faithful obedience to God (Jeremiah 35:3 )
Rechabites - , the Rechabites took refuge from Nebuchadnezazar in Jerusalem (Jeremiah 35:1 ). At that point, the Lord commanded Jeremiah to take them to the Temple and give them wine to drink. Jeremiah contrasted their faithfulness to the commandments of their ancestor with the faithlessness of the people of Judah to the Lord
Clay - This word is used of sediment found in pits or in streets (Isaiah 57:20 ; Jeremiah 38:60 ), of dust mixed with spittle (John 9:6 ), and of potter's clay (Isaiah 41:25 ; Nahum 3:14 ; Jeremiah 18:1-6 ; Romans 9:21 ). Clay was used for sealing (Job 38:14 ; Jeremiah 32:14 )
Zoar - The southern division of the Dead Sea (apparently of comparatively recent formation), abounding with salt, and throwing up bitumen, and its shores producing sulphur and nitre, answers to the valley of Siddim, "full of slime pits,"; Jeremiah 49:18; Jeremiah 50:40; Zephaniah 2:9; 2 Peter 2:6). ...
Jeremiah 48:34)
Pit - ...
(3) Βor , "a pit or cistern once full of water, now empty", with miry clay beneath (Psalms 40:2; Zechariah 9:11); used as dungeon wherein the captive has no water or food; so Jeremiah (Jeremiah 38:6; Jeremiah 38:9), Isaiah 51:14; hence symbolizing "the dishonored grave of the once haughty transgressor", with the idea of condign [2] punishment in the unseen world, shadowed forth by the ignominious state of the body (Ezekiel 31:14; Ezekiel 31:16; Ezekiel 32:18; Ezekiel 32:24)
False Prophet - The pages of the Old Testament are filled with men and women who fit the description of a false prophet given in Jeremiah 14:14 (NAS): “The prophets are prophesying falsehood in My name. ” Other examples are in Jeremiah 23:21-33 and Zechariah 10:2 . They suffered the destruction of their cities (Jeremiah 7:14-16 ; Jeremiah 23:39 ). ...
Israel could not always distinguish between the true and the false prophet as seen in 1 Kings 22:1 ; Jeremiah 28:1 . The prophet could only say, wait and see whose prophecy proves true in history (Deuteronomy 18:22 ; 1 Kings 22:28 ; Jeremiah 29:9 ). The tests of a prophet are: 1) Do their predictions come true (Jeremiah 28:9 )? 2 ) Does the prophet have a divine commission (Jeremiah 29:9 )? 3 ) Are the prophecies consistent with Scripture (2 Peter 1:20-21 ; Revelation 22:18-19 )? 4 ) Do the people benefit spiritually from the prophet's ministry (Jeremiah 23:13-14 ,Jeremiah 23:13-14,23:32 ; 1 Peter 4:11 )?...
Punishments for false prophets were just as severe in the New Testament as they were in the Old
Jeremiah - ), a priest of Anathoth (Jeremiah 1:1 ; 32:6 ). During the three years of the reign of Jehoahaz we find no reference to Jeremiah, but in the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim the enmity of the people against him broke out in bitter persecution, and he was placed apparently under restraint (Jeremiah 36:5 ). In his recklessness he seized the roll, and cut it to pieces, and cast it into the fire, and ordered both Baruch and Jeremiah to be apprehended. Jeremiah procured another roll, and wrote in it the words of the roll the king had destroyed, and "many like words" besides (Jeremiah 36:32 ). He was there when Nebuchadnezzar besieged the city (Jeremiah 37:4,5 ), B. The princes, in their anger at such a message by Jeremiah, cast him into prison ((37:15-38:13). Johanan succeeded Gedaliah, and refusing to listen to Jeremiah's counsels, went down into Egypt, taking Jeremiah and Baruch with him (Jeremiah 43:6 )
Archer - The phrase "breaking the bow" (Hosea 1:5 ; Jeremiah 49:35 ) is equivalent to taking away one's power, while "strengthening the bow" is a symbol of its increase (Genesis 49:24 ). The Persian archers were famous among the ancients (Isaiah 13:18 ; Jeremiah 49:35 ; 50:9,14,29,42
Pottery - The potter's wheel is mentioned by (Jeremiah 18:3 ). See also 1 Chronicles 4:23 ; Psalm 2:9 ; Isaiah 45:9 ; 64:8 ; Jeremiah 19:1 ; Lamentations 4:2 ; Zechariah 11:13 ; Romans 9:21
Bodyguard - Members of a king's bodyguard mentioned in the Bible include: David (1 Samuel 22:14 ; 1 Samuel 28:2 ), Benaiah ben Jehoiada (2 Samuel 23:23 ), Potiphar (Genesis 37:36 ), Nebuzaradan (2 Kings 25:8 ; Jeremiah 39:9-13 ; Jeremiah 52:12-16 ), and Arioch (Daniel 2:14 )
Land of Hus - (Asitus in Jeremiah 25) The home of Job (Job 1), situated north of the Sabeans and west of Chaldea, near the great desert
Kareah - Bald, the father of Johanan and Jonathan, who for a time were loyal to Gedaliah, the Babylonian governor of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 40:8,13,15,16 )
Hus, Land of - (Asitus in Jeremiah 25) The home of Job (Job 1), situated north of the Sabeans and west of Chaldea, near the great desert
Igdaliah - A ‘man of God,’ father of Hanan, whose name is mentioned in connexion with Jeremiah’s interview with the Rechabites ( Jeremiah 35:4 )
Nitre - Jeremiah 2:22 (b) This is an alcohol used to remove grease and stains but it could not remove the marks of sin
Cabins - Only in Jeremiah 37:16 (RSV, "cells"), arched vaults or recesses off a passage or room; cells for the closer confinement of prisoners
Irijah - (Jeremiah 37:13) His name means, the fear of the Lord; from Jarah, to fear; and Jah, the Lord
pe'Kod - ( Jeremiah 50:21 ; Ezekiel 23:23 ) Authorities are undecided as to the meaning of the term
Jehudi - He was sent by the princes to invite Baruch to read Jeremiah's roll to them (Jeremiah 36:14,21 )
Jehoiakim - His reign of eleven years is not well spoken of by Jeremiah. Things were so had that in the fourth year of his reign Jeremiah dictated to Baruch a summary of all his earlier discourses, and bade him read it in public as though to indicate that there was no longer any hope. Jeremiah’s escape was due to powerful friends at court ( Jeremiah 22:13-19 ; Jeremiah 36:1-26 ; Jeremiah 26:20-24 ). It was about the time of the burning of the Book of Jeremiah that the Egyptian supremacy was ended by the decisive battle of Carchemish. Whether Jeremiah’s prediction that the corpse of the king should be denied decent burial was fulfilled is not certain
Apostasy - ...
Old Testament The Old Testament speaks of “falling away” in terms of a person's deserting to a foreign king (2 Kings 25:11 ; Jeremiah 37:13-14 ; Jeremiah 39:9 ; Jeremiah 52:15 ). Associated ideas, however, include the concept of religious unfaithfulness: “rebellion” (Joshua 22:22 ); “cast away” (2 Chronicles 29:19 ); “trespass” (2 Chronicles 33:19 ); and “backslidings” (Jeremiah 2:19 ; Jeremiah 8:5 ). NAS uses “apostasy” in Jeremiah 8:5 and Hosea 14:4 with the plural in Jeremiah 2:19 ; Jeremiah 5:6 ; Jeremiah 14:7 . This is defined simply as forsaking God, not fearing Him (Jeremiah 2:19 ). Such action was sin, for which the people had to ask forgiveness (Jeremiah 14:7-9 ) and repent (Jeremiah 8:4-7 )
Jeremi'ah - " ( Jeremiah 1:1 )
History. ( Jeremiah 14:13 ; 23:7 ) As the danger from the Chaldeans became more threatening, the persecution against Jeremiah grew hotter. The people sought his life; then follows the scene in (Jeremiah 19:10-13 ) he was set, however, "as a fenced brazen wall," ch. (Jeremiah 15:20 ) and went on with his work, reproving king and nobles and people. The danger which Jeremiah had so long foretold at last came near. The approach of an Egyptian army, and the consequent departure of the Chaldeans, made the position of Jeremiah full of danger, and he sought to effect his escape from the city; but he was seized and finally thrown into a prison-pit to die, but was rescued. (Jeremiah 32:6-9 ) At last the blow came. 586, by the Chaldeans, we find Jeremiah receiving better treatment; but after the death of Gedaliah, the people, disregarding his warnings, took refuge in Egypt, carrying the prophet with them. " (Jeremiah 43:10 ) After this all is uncertain, but he probably died in Egypt. --Canon Cook says of Jeremiah, "His character is most interesting. ( Jeremiah 1:18 ) he was a noble example of the triumph of the moral over the physical nature
Jeremi'ah - " ( Jeremiah 1:1 )
History. ( Jeremiah 14:13 ; 23:7 ) As the danger from the Chaldeans became more threatening, the persecution against Jeremiah grew hotter. The people sought his life; then follows the scene in (Jeremiah 19:10-13 ) he was set, however, "as a fenced brazen wall," ch. (Jeremiah 15:20 ) and went on with his work, reproving king and nobles and people. The danger which Jeremiah had so long foretold at last came near. The approach of an Egyptian army, and the consequent departure of the Chaldeans, made the position of Jeremiah full of danger, and he sought to effect his escape from the city; but he was seized and finally thrown into a prison-pit to die, but was rescued. (Jeremiah 32:6-9 ) At last the blow came. 586, by the Chaldeans, we find Jeremiah receiving better treatment; but after the death of Gedaliah, the people, disregarding his warnings, took refuge in Egypt, carrying the prophet with them. " (Jeremiah 43:10 ) After this all is uncertain, but he probably died in Egypt. --Canon Cook says of Jeremiah, "His character is most interesting. ( Jeremiah 1:18 ) he was a noble example of the triumph of the moral over the physical nature
Zephani'ah - ...
The son of Maaseiah, (Jeremiah 21:1 ) and sagan or second priest in the reign of Zedekiah. ) He succeeded Jehoida, ( Jeremiah 29:25,26 ) and was probably a ruler of the temple, whose office it was, among others, to punish pretenders to the gift of prophecy. (Jeremiah 29:29 ) On the capture of Jerusalem he was taken and slain at Riblah. (Jeremiah 52:24,27 ; 2 Kings 25:18,21 ) ...
Father of Josiah, 2, (Zechariah 6:10 ) and of Hen, according to the reading of the received text of (Zechariah 6:14 )
Hophra - Jeremiah 44:30 ; the Egyptian Wahebrç, Apries of Herodotus, fourth king of the 26th Dyn. , is also referred to as Pharaoh in Jeremiah 37:8 ; Jeremiah 37:7 ; Jeremiah 37:11 , Ezekiel 29:3 etc
Seraiah - (2 Kings 25:18 ; 1 Chronicles 16:14 ; Jeremiah 52:24 ). ) sent to Babylon with instructions from himself and from Jeremiah (Jeremiah 51:59-64 ). (2 Kings 25:23 ; compare Jeremiah 40:8 )
Fish-Hooks - Were used for catching fish (Amos 4:2 ; Compare Isaiah 37:29 ; Jeremiah 16:16 ; Ezekiel 29:4 ; Job 41:1,2 ; Matthew 17:27 )
Malcham - ) Another form of Milcom and Moloch, the idol of Moab and Ammon (Zephaniah 1:5; Jeremiah 49:1-3; Amos 1:15)
Bel - The Aramaic form of Baal, the national god of the Babylonians (Isaiah 46:1 ; Jeremiah 50:2 ; 51:44 )
Hamutal - Daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah, wife of king Josiah, mother of Jehoahaz and Mattaniah or Zedekiah (2 Kings 23:31; 2 Kings 24:18)
Samgar Nebo - One of the prince generals commanding the army that took Jerusalem (Jeremiah 39:3)
Minni - A kingdom summoned to a war against Babylon, with Ararat and Ashchenaz, Jeremiah 51:27 ; supposed to denote Armenia, or a portion of it
Parched Places - Expression some translations (KJV, NIV, NRSV) use for arid land (Jeremiah 17:6 )
Queen of Heaven, - (Jeremiah 7:18 ; 45:17,18,19,25 ) is the moon Ashtaroth or Astarte to whom worshiped as Hebrew women offered cakes in the streets of Jerusalem
Wormwood - WORMWOOD ( la‘ăn âh , Deuteronomy 29:18 , Proverbs 5:4 , Jeremiah 9:16 ; Jeremiah 23:16 , Lamentations 3:15-16 , Amos 5:7 ; Amos 6:12 Michaiah - Member of a leading family in Jeremiah's time (Jeremiah 36:11 ,Jeremiah 36:11,36:13 ); 5
Jaazaniah - A Judæan, one of the military commanders who came to Mizpah to give in their allegiance to Gedaliah ( 2 Kings 25:23 = Jeremiah 40:8 Jezaniah ). A chieftain of the clan of the Rechabites ( Jeremiah 35:3 )
Brute - Jeremiah 10:8 (b) This describes the lusts and fleshly desires of a worldly people. ...
Jeremiah 51:17 (b) This indicates that man's whole thought and desire is for earthly things
Island - 'i, "dry land," as opposed to water) occurs in its usual signification (Isaiah 42:4,10,12,15 , Compare Jeremiah 47:4 ), but more frequently simply denotes a maritime region or sea-coast (Isaiah 20:6 , RSV," coastland;" 23:2,6; Jeremiah 2:10 ; Ezekiel 27:6,7 )
Africa - Other African nations mentioned in the Bible are Libya (2 Chronicles 12:3; 2 Chronicles 16:8; Daniel 11:43), Put (Jeremiah 46:9; Ezekiel 30:5; Ezekiel 38:5; Nahum 3:9), and Lud (Jeremiah 46:9; Ezekiel 30:5)
Wormwood, - Jeremiah 9:15 ; Jeremiah 23:15 . Jeremiah, in lamenting over the condition of Israel, compared it to being drunk with wormwood
Branch - Spreading branches can symbolize fruitfulness and prosperity (Genesis 49:22 ; Job 8:16 ; Psalm 80:11 ), while withered, burnt, or cut branches symbolize destruction (Job 8:16 ; Isaiah 9:14 ; Jeremiah 11:16 ; Ezekiel 15:2 ). “Branch” or “shoot” is often used as a symbol for a present or coming king of Israel (Isaiah 11:1 ; Jeremiah 23:5 ; Jeremiah 33:15 ; Zechariah 3:8 ; Zechariah 6:12 )
Hilkiah - Priest of Anathoth and father of the prophet Jeremiah. Jeremiah 1:1 . Jeremiah 29:3
Johanan - 2 Kings 25:23 , Jeremiah 40:8 to Jeremiah 43:5 , the son of Kareah, chief of ‘the captains of the forces,’ who after the fall of Jerusalem joined Gedaliah at Mizpah. After the murder of Gedaliah he pursued Ishmael and the other conspirators, recovered the captives, and, in spite of the protest of Jeremiah, carried them to Egypt
Jehoiachin - He is also called Jeconiah (Jeremiah 24:1 ; 27:20 , etc. He was carried captive to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar, along with the flower of the nobility, all the leading men in Jerusalem, and a great body of the general population, some thirteen thousand in all (2 Kings 24:12-16 ; Jeremiah 52:28 ). After an imprisonment of thirty-seven years (Jeremiah 52:31,33 ), he was liberated by Evil-merodach, and permitted to occupy a place in the king's household and sit at his table, receiving "every day a portion until the day of his death, all the days of his life" (52:32-34)
Heshbon - But the city was doomed to destruction in the divine judgment that was to fall upon Moab (Isaiah 15:1; Isaiah 15:4; Isaiah 16:8; Jeremiah 48:1-2; Jeremiah 48:45; Jeremiah 49:3)
Prison, Prisoners - The experience of Jeremiah, however, provides the most interesting glimpses of prisons and prison life. The royal prisons were apparently not large, as the one in which Jeremiah was initially placed was a converted private house (Jeremiah 37:15 ). He was confined to an underground dungeon (Jeremiah 37:16 ), perhaps a converted cistern. Jeremiah later was placed under house arrest in the “court of the guard” (Jeremiah 37:20-21 ). There, he was available for consultation with the king (Jeremiah 38:14 ,Jeremiah 38:14,38:28 ), able to conduct business (Jeremiah 32:2-3 ,Jeremiah 32:2-3,32:6-12 ), and able to speak freely (Jeremiah 38:1-4 ). Because the latter enraged the princes, Jeremiah was confined for a time to a muddy cistern in the “court of the guard” (Jeremiah 38:4-13 ). In Israel, prophets were jailed for denouncing royal policy (2 Chronicles 16:10 ), predicting ill of the king (1 Kings 22:26-27 ), and suspected collaboration with the enemy (Jeremiah 37:11-15 ). In some cases, prisoners were restrained and tortured by the stocks or collar (2 Chronicles 16:10 ; Jeremiah 29:26 )
Potter - Potter, Jeremiah 18:2; Lamentations 4:2, and pottery are frequently alluded to in Scripture, showing that the art was known at an early period
Head-Bands - kishshurim), properly girdles or belts for the waist (Isaiah 3:20 , RSV, "sashes;" Jeremiah 2:32 , rendered "attire", i
Samgar-Nebo - Be gracious, O Nebo! or a cup-bearer of Nebo, probably the title of Nergal-sharezer, one of the princes of Babylon (Jeremiah 39:3 )
Bellows - Occurs only in Jeremiah 6:29 , in relation to the casting of metal
Refiner - The process of refining metals is referred to by way of illustrations in Isaiah 1:25 ; Jeremiah 6:29 ; Zechariah 13:9 ; Malachi 3:2,3
Sentry - Government official with responsibility for guarding a prison (Acts 5:23 ; Acts 12:6 ) or possibly a captain over such a guard (Jeremiah 37:13 )
Penknife - Mentioned only in Jeremiah 36:23
be-er-Laha'i-Roi - ( Jeremiah 6:7 ) between Kadesh and Bered, in the wilderness
Heath - (Jeremiah 17:6 ) was some species of juniper, probably the savin, a dwarf, stunted juniper which grows in the most sterile parts of the desert
Kedar - Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 49:28 ) counts them among the ‘sons of the East,’ and in Jeremiah 2:10 refers to them as symbolic of the East, as he does to Citium in Cyprus as symbolic of the West. Jeremiah alludes also ( Jeremiah 49:29 ) to their nomadic life, to their sheep, camels, tents, and curtains
Jehoiakim - In the fourth year of his reign, Jeremiah wrote in a book his prophecies against Judah and Israel, which were read in the Lord's house; but when tidings of this reached the king he sent for the book, heard it read, and then cut it in pieces and burnt it. He ordered the arrest of Jeremiah and of Baruch who had written the book; but the Lord hid them. Jeremiah 22:18,24 ; Jeremiah 26:21-23 ; Jeremiah 36:9-32
Jeremiah - (See Isaiah 49:1-26 throughout, and Proverbs 8:12-36) What a decided proof and conviction by the way doth this afford, that if Jeremiah was ordained a prophet to the church before he was formed in the belly, surely the glorious Head of that church, and that church in him, was set up, and Christ in all his offices and characters ordained the Lord God of the prophets before all worlds. (Colossians 1:15-18) It should seem from the date of the prophet's commission, when the word of the Lord first came to him, namely, in the thirtieth year of Josiah's reign, that Jeremiah could not be above fourteen years of age when he preached his first sermon. And what a sermon it is! (See Jeremiah 2:1-37; Jeremiah 3:1-25; Jeremiah 4:1-31 etc. ) But what may not a child preach when God the Holy Ghost hath ordained him? Oh, that more of that blessed voice was heard in this our day, which was heard by the church in Paul's day! (See Acts 13:1-4) It was the lot of Jeremiah to live in an age when the nation was given up to daring impiety, and rebellion against God. The opposition made to him by the false prophet Hananiah, and the sequel of that awful event is recorded at large, Jeremiah 28:1-17. ) Blessed is the memory of Jeremiah, and will be in the churches to the latest generation. Two of the name of Jeremiah in David's army
Horse-Gate - A gate in the wall of Jerusalem, at the west end of the bridge, leading from Zion to the temple (Nehemiah 3:28 ; Jeremiah 31:40 )
Merathaim - MERATHAIM ( Jeremiah 50:21 )
Fornication - Also spiritual unfaithfulness to the Lord, Israel's and the church's husband (Ezekiel 16; Jeremiah 2; Hosea 1; Revelation 17:4)
Uphaz - Jeremiah 10:9 ; Daniel 10:5 ; supposed according to some ancient versions to be the same as OPHIR,q
Baalis - He caused the assassination of Gedaliah, then governor of Judah, Jeremiah 40:14 ; 41:1 - 10
Bake - Reference to baking is found in (Leviticus 26:26 ; 1 Samuel 8:13 ; 2 Samuel 13:8 ; Jeremiah 7:18 ; 37:21 ; Hosea 7:4-7 )
Swallow - ‘âgûr ( Isaiah 38:14 , Jeremiah 8:7 ). ]'>[2] ( Isaiah 38:14 , Jeremiah 8:7 ), ‘swallow’ instead of ‘ crane ’ (AV Bozrah - This place is mentioned by the prophets in later times (Isaiah 34:6 ; Jeremiah 49:13 ; Amos 1:12 ; Micah 2:12 ). ...
...
A Moabite city in the "plain country" (Jeremiah 48:24 ), i
Migdol - Mentioned also in Jeremiah 44:1; Jeremiah 46:14; Ezekiel 29:10, "I will make Egypt desolate from Migdol (in the extreme N
Kedar - It is the name for the nomadic tribes of Arabs, the Bedouins generally (Isaiah 21:16 ; 42:11 ; 60:7 ; Jeremiah 2:10 ; Ezekiel 27:21 ), who dwelt in the north-west of Arabia. The Kedarites suffered at the hands of Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 49:28,29 )
Execration - The term appears in the KJV twice (Jeremiah 42:18 ,Jeremiah 42:18,44:12 ), both times in reference to the fate of the remnant who disobeyed God's word and sought safety in Egypt
Urijah - Prophet who joined Jeremiah in preaching against Jerusalem. He was, however, captured, returned to Jerusalem, and executed (Jeremiah 26:20-23 )
Queen - ); Maachah (1 Kings 15:13); 2 Kings 10:13, Jezebel; Jehoiachin's mother (2 Kings 24:12; Jeremiah 13:18; Jeremiah 29:2)
Nergal - The name is also an element in the name of the Babylonian official Nergal-sharezar (Jeremiah 39:3 ,Jeremiah 39:3,39:13 )
Painting - ' Jeremiah 22:14 . "Thou rentest thy face with painting" in Jeremiah 4:30 is 'enlarging the eyes
Jerah'me-el - ) ...
Son of Hammelech, who was employed by Jehoiakim to make Jeremiah and baruch prisoners, after the had burnt the roll of Jeremiah's prophecy. (Jeremiah 36:26 ) (B
Jeremiah - The Prophet Jeremiah was of the sacerdotal race, being, as he records himself, one of the priests that dwelt at Anathoth, in the land of Benjamin, a city appropriated out of that tribe to the use of the priests, the sons of Aaron, Joshua 21:18 , and situate, as we learn from St. Jeremiah appears to have been very young when he was called to the exercise of the prophetical office, from which he modestly endeavoured to excuse himself by pleading his youth and incapacity; but being overruled by the divine authority, he set himself to discharge the duties of his function with unremitted diligence and fidelity during a period of at least forty-two years, reckoning from the thirteenth year of Josiah's reign. Their wickedness, however, did not long pass without its reward; for, in a few years after, they were miserably destroyed, by the Babylonian armies which invaded Egypt according to the prophet's prediction, Jeremiah 44:27-28 . ...
The idolatrous apostasy, and other criminal enormities of the people of Judah, and the severe judgments which God was prepared to inflict upon them, but not without a distant prospect of future restoration and deliverance, are the principal subject matters of the prophecies of Jeremiah; excepting only the forty-fifth chapter, which relates personally to Baruch, and the six succeeding chapters, which respect the fortunes of some particular Heathen nations. During the short reign of Shallum, or Jehoahaz, his second son, who succeeded him, Jeremiah does not appear to have had any revelation. We read of no prophecy that Jeremiah actually delivered in this king's reign; but the fate of Jeconiah, his being carried into captivity, and continuing an exile till the time of his death, were foretold early in his father's reign, as may be particularly seen in the twenty-second chapter. ...
The prophecies of Jeremiah, of which the circumstantial accomplishment is often specified in the Old and New Testament, are of a very distinguished and illustrious character. He foretold the fate of Zedekiah, Jeremiah 34:2-5 ; 2 Chronicles 36:11-21 ; 2 Kings 25:5 ; Jeremiah 52:11 ; the Babylonish captivity, the precise time of its duration, and the return of the Jews. He describes the destruction of Babylon, and the downfall of many nations, Jeremiah 25:12 ; Jeremiah 9:26 ; Jeremiah 25:19-25 ; Jeremiah 42:10-18 ; Jeremiah 46, and the following chapters, in predictions, of which the gradual and successive completion kept up the confidence of the Jews for the accomplishment of those prophecies, which he delivered relative to the Messiah and his period, Jeremiah 23:5-6 ; Jeremiah 30:9 ; Jeremiah 31:15 ; Jeremiah 32:14-18 ; Jeremiah 33:9-26 . He foreshowed the miraculous conception of Christ, Jeremiah 31:22 , the virtue of his atonement, the spiritual character of his covenant, and the inward efficacy of his laws, Jeremiah 31:31-36 ; Jeremiah 33:8 . Jeremiah, contemplating those calamities which impended over his country, represented, in the most descriptive terms, and under the most impressive images, the destruction that the invading enemy should produce. Jeremiah intermingles with his prophecies some historical relations relative to his own conduct, and to the completion of those predictions which he had delivered. The reputation of Jeremiah had spread among foreign nations, and his prophecies were deservedly celebrated in other countries. ...
As to the style of Jeremiah, says Bishop Lowth, this prophet is by no means wanting either in elegance or sublimity, although, generally speaking, inferior to Isaiah in both. But of the whole book of Jeremiah it is hardly the one half which I look upon as poetical. ...
Jeremiah survived to behold the sad accomplishment of all his darkest predictions
Cushi - Ancestor of a royal official under King Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:14 )
Hananeel - It is mentioned also in Jeremiah 31:38 ; Zechariah 14:10
Rabsaris - Chief of the Heads, one of the three officers whom Sennacherib sent from Lachish with a threatening message to Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17 ; Jeremiah 39:3,13 )
Beth-Diblathaim - In Jeremiah 48:22 mentioned with Dibon and Nebo; the next camp to Dibon before Nebo ( Numbers 33:48 f
Beaten Silver - Thin sheets of silver produced by hammering and used to overlay objects of lesser value such as the wooden core of an idol (Jeremiah 10:6-10 )
Rabmag - (Jeremiah 39:3) The word is compounded of Rab and Magi—the chief of the magi, or wise men
ah, Aha - ) Psalm 35:25 ; Psalm 40:15 ; Isaiah 44 :16; Jeremiah 22:18 ; Ezekiel 25:3 , etc
Igdali'ah - (whom Jehovah makes great ), a prophet or holy man --"the man of God" --named once only, ( Jeremiah 36:4 ) as the father of Hanan
Nebuzaradan - A general of king Nebuchadnezzar, and his agent in the sacking and destruction of Jerusalem, 1 Kings 22:53 ; Jeremiah 39:9 ; 40:1 ; 52:12-30
Overpass - KJV term (Jeremiah 5:28 ) meaning either “surpass” previous limits or bounds (NAS, NIV, RSV, TEV) or else “passover” in the sense of overlook (NAS margin, REB)
Kare'ah - ( Jeremiah 40:8,13,15,16 ; 41:11,13,14,16 ; 42:1,8 ; 43:2,4,5 ) (B
Mis'Gab - ( Jeremiah 48:1 ) It appears to be mentioned also in (Isaiah 25:12 ) thorough there rendered in the Authorized Version "high fort
Beth-Hac'Cerem - ( Nehemiah 3:14 ; Jeremiah 6:1 ) A beacon station near Tekoa, supposed to be the Frank Mountain , a few miles southeast of Bethlehem
Mor'Asthite, the, - It occurs twice -- (Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 1:1 ) --each time as the description of the prophet Micah
Hammer - pattish, used by gold-beaters (Isaiah 41:7 ) and by quarry-men (Jeremiah 23:29 ). Metaphorically of Babylon (Jeremiah 50:23 ) or Nebuchadnezzar. mappets, rendered "battle-axe" in Jeremiah 51:20
On - Egyptian place name meaning, “city of the pillar,” called in Greek Heliopolis or “city of the sun” and in Hebrew as Beth-shemesh, “city of the sun” (Jeremiah 43:13 ) and Aven. Speaking in Egypt, Jeremiah warned that God would destroy On and its worship (Jeremiah 43:13 )
Bones - The “shaking of bones” denoted fear (Job 4:14 ) or sadness (Jeremiah 23:9 ). The “burning of the bones” indicated grief and depression (Psalm 102:3 ; Lamentations 1:13 ) and the feeling of Jeremiah when he tried to refrain from proclaiming God's message (Jeremiah 20:9 )
Ramah - Ramah was the point at which Jeremiah parted from the exiles who were being carried away to Babylon (Jeremiah 40:1), and he associated it with Rachel in the passage (Jeremiah 31:15) which is quoted by the First Evangelist
Malchijah - Prince of Judah in Jeremiah's time, probably the father of Pashur (Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 38:1 ,Jeremiah 38:1,38:6 ); 4
Milcom - Jeremiah described past accomplishments attributed to Milcom, but in a play on Judges 11:24 , he announced destruction and captivity for Milcom (Jeremiah 49:1 ,Jeremiah 49:1,49:3 NRSV, NAS, REB; compare NIV, TEV)
Elishama - The father of Nethaniah, and grandfather of Ishmael, ‘of the seed royal,’ who killed Gedaliah at the time of the Exile ( 2 Kings 25:25 , Jeremiah 41:1 ). A scribe or secretary to Jehoiakim ( Jeremiah 36:12 ; Jeremiah 36:20-21 )
Chaldaea, Chaldaeans - Kasdim is generaliy rendered ‘Chaldees’ ( Genesis 11:28 ), and in Jeremiah 50:10 ; Jeremiah 51:24 ; Jeremiah 24:5 ; Jeremiah 25:12 , and often, is used for ‘Babylonian
Jehoiachin - otherwise called Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 , and Jeconiah, 1 Chronicles 3:17 , the son of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and grandson of Josiah. He was a bad man, and did evil in the sight of the Lord, Jeremiah 22:24 . The time of his death is uncertain; and the words of the Prophet Jeremiah, Jeremiah 22:30 , are not to be taken in the strictest sense; since he was the father of Salathiel and others, 1 Chronicles 3:17-18 ; Matthew 1:12
Arpad - A Syrian city, associated with Hamath, 2 Kings 18:34 ; 19:1-37 ; Isaiah 10:9 ; 36:19 and with Damascus, Jeremiah 49:23
Crane - KJV translation of the Hebrew word in Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7
Mibzar - Compare "the strong city" (mibzar ), Psalms 108:10l 9:9; Jeremiah 49:16
Scent - Jeremiah 48:11 (b) This word is used to describe the unsavory attitude of wicked people
Arpad - A town or region in Syria, near Hamath, 2 Kings 18:34; Isaiah 10:9, dependent on Damascus, Jeremiah 49:23
Chimham - He may have received from David the place near Bethlehem called Chimham, Jeremiah 41:17
Maaseiah - A priest in the time of Zedekiah ( Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 29:25 ; Jeremiah 35:4 ; Jeremiah 37:3 ). The father of the false prophet Zedekiah ( Jeremiah 29:21 )
Maaseiah - Father of false prophet Zedekiah (Jeremiah 29:21 ). Father of the priest Zephaniah (Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 29:25 ; Jeremiah 37:3 ). Temple doorkeeper (Jeremiah 35:4 )
Seraiah - The high priest under king Zedekiah; taken by Nebuzaradan, captain of the Babylonian guard, and slain at Riblah (2 Kings 25:18; 1 Chronicles 6:14; Jeremiah 52:24). Son of Tanhumeth the Netophathite; came to the Babylonian viceroy Gedaliah to Mizpah, who promised security to the Jews who should dwell in the land, serving the king of Babylon (2 Kings 25:23; Jeremiah 40:8). Neriah's son, Baruch's brother (Jeremiah 51:59; Jeremiah 51:61). Jeremiah gave a special copy of the prophecy to Seraiah where with to console the Jews in their Babylonian exile. Seraiah was not one of the courtiers hostile to God's prophets, but quiet and docile, ready to execute Jeremiah's commission, notwithstanding the risk
Shallum - 1 Chronicles 3:15 ; Jeremiah 22:11,12 . The margin of 1 Chronicles 3:15 identifies Johanan with Jehoahaz, but Jeremiah 22:11,12 shows it was Shallum who reigned under the name of Jehoahaz. Father of Hanameel and uncle of Jeremiah. Jeremiah 32:7 . Jeremiah 35:4
Leopard - נמר Song of Solomon 4:8 ; Isaiah 11:6 ; Jeremiah 5:6 ; Jeremiah 13:23 ; Hosea 13:7 ; Habakkuk 1:8 ; Daniel 7:6 ; παρδαλις , Revelation 13:2 ; Sir_28:23 . Probably, these animals were numerous in Palestine; as we find places with a name intimating their having been the haunts of leopards: Nimrah, Numbers 32:3 ; Beth-Nimrah, Numbers 32:36 ; Joshua 13:27 ; and "waters of Nimrim," Isaiah 15:6 ; Jeremiah 48:34 ; and "mountains of leopards," Song of Solomon 4:8 . Jeremiah 5:6 , mentions the artful ambuscades of this animal; and in Jeremiah 13:23 , alludes to his spots: "Can a Cushite change his skin; or a leopard his spots? Then may ye prevail with them to do good who are habituated to do evil;" and Habakkuk 1:8 , refers to its alertness
Kings, the Books of - There are some portions of them and of Jeremiah that are almost identical, e. , 2 Kings 24:18-25 and Jeremiah 52 ; 39:1-10 ; 40:7-41:10 . There are also many undesigned coincidences between Jeremiah and Kings (2 Kings 2123-23 and Jeremiah 7:15 ; 15:4 ; 19:3 , etc. ), and events recorded in Kings of which Jeremiah had personal knowledge. These facts countenance in some degree the tradition that Jeremiah was the author of the books of Kings
Birth - ...
The birth of a child was a time of rejoicing, especially the birth of a son (Ruth 4:13-14 ; Jeremiah 20:15 ; Luke 1:14 ,Luke 1:14,1:57-58 ; Luke 2:13-14 ; John 16:21 ). If life became unbearable, one might be moved to curse the day of birth (Job 3:3 ; Jeremiah 20:14 ). There will be pangs, agony, cries, gasping, and panting (Isaiah 13:8 ; Isaiah 42:14 ; Jeremiah 6:24 ; Jeremiah 13:21 ; Jeremiah 22:23 ; Jeremiah 30:6 ; Jeremiah 48:41 ; Jeremiah 49:24 ; Jeremiah 50:43 ; John 16:21 ; Revelation 12:2 )
Baruch - He had a brother of the name of Seraiah, who occupied an important station in the court of King Zedekiah; but he himself adhered to the person of the Prophet Jeremiah, and was his most steady friend, though his attachment to him drew on himself several persecutions and much ill treatment. 3398, Jeremiah having been thrown into prison, the Lord commanded him to commit to writing all the prophecies that he had delivered until that time. He at the same time gave orders to have both Baruch and Jeremiah seized; but the hand of Providence concealed them from his fury. ...
Jeremiah was instructed a second time to commit his prophecies to writing; and Baruch wrote them as before, with the addition of several others which were not contained in the former book. In the fourth year of the reign of Zedekiah, Baruch went to Babylon, carrying with him a long letter from Jeremiah, in which the Prophet foretold the judgments that should come upon Babylon, and promised the Jews, who were then captives in that country, that they should again be restored to their own land. The latter were exceedingly affected at hearing Jeremiah's letter read to them, and returned an answer to their brethren at Jerusalem. After his return to Jerusalem, Baruch continued his constant attendance on Jeremiah; and when Jerusalem was besieged by Nebuchadnezzar, and Jeremiah thrown into prison, Baruch also was confined with him: but when the city had surrendered, Nebuzaraddan showed him much kindness, granted him his liberty, and permitted him to go with Jeremiah wherever he chose. ...
The remnant of the people who had been left in Judea under the care of Gedaliah, having adopted the resolution of going into Egypt, and finding that Jeremiah opposed their taking that journey, threw the blame upon Baruch; insinuating that the latter had influenced the Prophet to declare against it. They were, however, both of them at last compelled to follow the people into Egypt, where Jeremiah soon afterward died; on which Baruch retired to Babylon, where the rabbins say he also died in the twelfth year of the captivity, Jeremiah 36-43
Morashtite - A gentilic adjective used to designate the prophet Micah ( Micah 1:1 , Jeremiah 26:18 ), probably derived from Moresheth-gath (wh
Brigandine - (Jeremiah 46:4 ; 51:3 ), an obsolete English word denoting a scale coat of armour, or habergeon, worn by light-armed "brigands
Moresheth-Gath - Possession of the wine-press, the birthplace of the prophet (Micah 1:14 ), who is called the "Morasthite" (Jeremiah 26:18 )
Horonaim - Two caverns, a city of Moab to the south of the Arnon, built, apparently, upon an eminence, and a place of some importance (Isaiah 15:5 ; Jeremiah 48:3,5,34 )
Jeremai - (jehr' ih mi) Personal name, abbreviated form of Jeremoth or Jeremiah
Sea of Jazer - (Jeremiah 48:32 ), a lake, now represented by some ponds in the high valley in which the Ammonite city of Jazer lies, the ruins of which are called Sar
Merodach - Merodach (me-rô'dak, or mĕr'o-dak), death, Jeremiah 50:2, identical with the Babylonian Bel or Belus the term being probably at first a mere epithet of the god
Necho - KJV used the hyphenated form Pharoah-Necho at Jeremiah 46:2
Kolaiah - The father of the false prophet Ahab ( Jeremiah 29:21 )
Jehovah-Tsidkenu - Jehovah our rightousness, rendered in the Authorized Version, "The LORD our righteousness," a title given to the Messiah (Jeremiah 23:6 , marg
Cage - The term so rendered in (Jeremiah 5:27 ) is more properly a trap in which decoy birds were placed
Graving Tool - A sharp implement used to finish shaping the rough form of a statue cast from a mold (Exodus 32:4 ) or used for engraving tablets with writing (Jeremiah 17:1 )
Ludim - They are associated (Jeremiah 46:9 ) with African nations as mercenaries of the king of Egypt
Baalis - King of the Ammonites at the time of the Babylonian captivity (Jeremiah 40:14 )
She'Shach - (from the goddess Shach , reduplicated) is a term which occurs only in ( Jeremiah 25:26 ; 51:41 ) where it is evidently used as a synonym for either Babylon or Babylonia
Riblah - (2 Kings 25:6; Jeremiah 52:9) If from Rub, it means quarrel
Megilloth - The children of Israel were used to call five books, namely, Ecclesiastes, Solomon's Song, Ruth, Esther, and the Lamentations of Jeremiah, by this name, which means a roll, or volume
Nebushasban - (Jeremiah 39:13) A compound word, principally having a regard to the idol of Babylon, Nebo
Uphaz - A region producing fine gold, Jeremiah 10:9 Daniel 10:5
Beth-Haccerem - Conjectured to be the Frank mountain, between Tekoa and Bethlehem, Nehemiah 3:14 ; Jeremiah 6:1
Just Branch - God says: "I will raise up to David a just branch: and a king shall reign, and shall be wise: and shall execute judgment and justice in the earth" (Jeremiah 23). " The ideal king of the future will be characterized by justice and deserves to bear the name "The Lord our just one" (Jeremiah 23)
Cushi, Cushite - The word Cûshî occurs with the article in Numbers 12:1 , 2 Samuel 18:21 ; without the article in Jeremiah 36:14 , Zephaniah 1:1 . It is borne by (1) the great-grandfather of Jehudi, the latter one of Jehoiakim’s courtiers ( Jeremiah 36:14 ); (2) the father of the prophet Zephaniah ( Zephaniah 1:1 )
Rab-Mag - The title of Nergal-sharezer , a Babylonian official present at the taking of Jerusalem ( Jeremiah 39:3 ; Jeremiah 39:13 )
Ephraim, Mount - They were intersected by well-watered, fertile valleys, referred to in Jeremiah 50:19 . This region is also called the "mountains of Israel" (Joshua 11:21 ) and the "mountains of Samaria" (Jeremiah 31:5,6 : Amos 3:9 )
Jerahmeel - Son of Hammelech (Hebrew, “the king” and so translated by modern versions), who was one of a group whom King Jehoiakim sent to arrest Baruch and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 36:26 ); but the Lord showed He has more power than human rulers by hiding His faithful servants from the king
Meni - Knobel identifies Gad with the sun, Meni with the moon, men, mene in Greek; "the queen of heaven" (Jeremiah 7:18; Jeremiah 44:17-18)
Bellows - The term is used only in Jeremiah 6:29 . God appointed Jeremiah as the assayer of His people to test their purity
Ashkelon - One of the five cities of the Philistines by the sea and ten miles north of Gaza; taken by Judah, Judges 1:18; visited by Samson; Judges 14:19; and its destruction predicted in Jeremiah 47:5; Jeremiah 47:7; Amos 1:8; Zechariah 9:5; Zephaniah 2:7
Jeremiah, the Book of - See Jeremiah 51:64 . ...
Jeremiah wrote also the book of LAMENTATIONS, in which he utters the most plaintive and pathetic sentiments over the calamities of his people
Stock - The trunk of a tree, Job 14:8 , or a reproachful name for the idols carved out of it, Jeremiah 2:27 ; Hosea 4:12 . Stocks were frequently erected in market places, that the insults of the populace might be added to the pain of confinement, Job 13:27 ; Jeremiah 20:2
Path'Ros - ( Genesis 10:13,14 ; 1 Chronicles 1:12 ) Pathros is mentioned in the prophecies of Isaiah, (Isaiah 11:11 ) Jeremiah (Jeremiah 44:1,15 ) and Ezekiel
Nitre - Mention of this substance is made in (Proverbs 25:20 ) --"and as vinegar upon nitre"--and in (Jeremiah 2:26 ) The article denoted is not that which we now understand by the term nitre i. This explains the passage in Jeremiah
Uphaz - A supposed country or region mentioned in Jeremiah 10:9 , Daniel 10:5 , as a source of gold
Hamutal - Kinsman of the dew, the daughter of Jeremiah of Libnah, wife of king Josiah, and mother of king Jehoahaz (2 Kings 23:31 ), also of king Zedekiah (2 Kings 24:18 )
Leaves - Leaves of a roll (Jeremiah 36:23)
Nebushasban - ” High official of Nebuchadrezzar involved in the fall of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 39:13 )
Mero'Dach - (death ), ( Jeremiah 50:2 ) identical with the famous Babylonian Bel or Belus, the word being probably at first a mere epithet of the god, which by degrees superseded his proper appellation
Heath - Supposed to be the Juniper, a low tree found in desert and rocky places, and thus contrasted with a tree growing by a water-course, Jeremiah 17:5-8 ; 48:6
Kir-Har'Aseth - (brick fortress ), ( 2 Kings 3:25 ) Kir-ha'resh, ( Isaiah 16:11 ) Kir-har'es, ( Jeremiah 48:31,36 ) These four names are all applied to one place, probably KIR OF MOAB, which see
e'Pha-i - ( Jeremiah 40:8 ; 41:3 ) comp
Jerahmeel - ...
...
Son of Hammelech (Jeremiah 36:26 )
Jehoiachin - "Josias begat Jechonias and his brethren about the time they were carried away to Babylon," fixing his birth to the time of Nebuchadnezzar's invasion (2 Kings 24:1), namely, three years after Jehoiakim's accession, and eight before his reign ended and Jehoiachin succeeded; but Matthew's language hardly justifies this; Jeremiah's language implies Jehoiachin was a "man," and capable of having a "child" (2 Kings 22:28; 2 Kings 22:30). spring, in the eighth year of his reign, counting from the time that his father transferred the command of the army against Necho to him (so that his first coincides with the fourth of Jehoiakim, Jeremiah 25:1). Jehoiachin seeing the impossibility of resistance made a virtue of necessity by going out to Nebuchadnezzar, he, the queen mother (who, as the king was only 18, held chief power; Jeremiah 13:18 undesignedly coincides with and confirms the history, "Say unto the king and to the queen, Humble yourselves," etc. men and smiths; fulfilling Jeremiah's prophecy (Jeremiah 22:24, etc. ...
Nebuchadnezzar also carried off the treasures of Jeconiah's house (2 Kings 24:13), "as Jehovah had spoken" to Hezekiah long before (2 Kings 20:17; Jeremiah 15:13; Jeremiah 17:3; Jeremiah 29:2). heads of tribes and families found in Jerusalem (including the nation's spiritual heads, priests and prophets, with Ezekiel: Jeremiah 29:1; Ezekiel 1:1) must have been 2,000, to make up the "ten thousand. " In Jeremiah 52:28 the number is 3,023, but that was the number carried away "in the seventh year," "in the eighth year" of Nebuchadnezzar the 10,000 were carried away. Evidently, the 4,600 in all mentioned (Jeremiah 52:30) as carried away do not include the general multitude and the women and children (Jeremiah 52:15; Jeremiah 39:9; 2 Kings 25:11), for otherwise the number would be too small, since the numbers who returned were 42,360 (Ezra 2; Nehemiah 7). ...
Jehoiachin wore prison garments for 36 years, until at the death of Nebuchadnezzar, having been for a time sharer of his imprisonment (Jeremiah 52:31-34), "in the 12th month, the 25th day of the month (in 2 Kings 25:27 'the 27th,' the day when the decree for his elevation, given on the 25th, was carried into effect) lifted up the head of Jehoiachin (compare Genesis 40:13-20; Psalms 3:3; Psalms 27:6), and brought him forth out of prison, and spoke kindly unto him, and set his throne above the throne of the kings that were with him in Babylon, and changed his prison garments (for royal robes; compare Zechariah 3:1-5; Luke 15:22), and he did continually eat bread before him all the days of his life (compare 2 Samuel 9:13); and there was a continual diet given him of the king of Babylon, every day its portion (compare margin 1 Kings 8:59) until the day of his death. )...
God, in sparing and at last elevating him, rewarded his having surrendered to Nebuchadnezzar, which was God's will (Jeremiah 38:17; Jeremiah 27:6-12; compare 2 Kings 24:12). In the fourth year of his uncle Zedekiah (so called by Nebuchadnezzar instead of Mattaniah), false prophets encouraged the popular hope of the return of Jehoiachin to Jerusalem (Jeremiah 28:4). Is he a vessel wherein is no pleasure?" Jeremiah hereby expresses their astonishment that one from whom they expected so much should be now so utterly east aside. ...
Jeremiah (Jeremiah 22:28) mentions distinctly "his seed," therefore "childless" in Jeremiah 22:30 means having no direct lineal heir to the throne. This accounts for the Babylonian king inflicting so terrible a punishment (compare Daniel 3), roasting to death Ahab (Jeremiah 29:4-9; Jeremiah 29:21-23; Jeremiah 29:27-32)
Dedan - Jeremiah pronounced judgment against the Arabian tribes (Jeremiah 25:23 ), perhaps looking to Nebuchadnezzar's raid in Arabia in 599-598 B. Jeremiah warned merchants from Dedan working or staying in Edom to flee the country because God was bringing judgment on it (Jeremiah 49:8 )
Shal'Lum - (1 Chronicles 3:15 ; Jeremiah 22:11 ) [1] (B. (Nehemiah 3:12 ) ...
The uncle of Jeremiah, (Jeremiah 32:7 ) perhaps the same as 2. ...
Father or ancestor of Maaseiah (Jeremiah 35:4 ) perhaps the same as 9
Fan - ...
Jeremiah 4:11 (a) This is not a constructive wind, as when the chaff is fanned out from the wheat, but it is a destructive wind to increase the damage, as when a wind causes the fire to scatter through the forest or to spread from house to house. ...
Jeremiah 15:7 (b) This represents the great power of GOD's destructive wrath. ...
Jeremiah 51:2 (a) The process of punishment is reversed in this Scripture and the enemies of the Jews are being punished themselves. (See Jeremiah 51:1)
Memphis - It is called NOPH in Jeremiah and Ezekiel. Isaiah 19:13 ; Jeremiah 2:16 ; Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14,19 ; Ezekiel 30:13,16
Roads And Travel - ’ In Jeremiah 18:15 ‘ bypaths ’ (RV Hophra - 591-572) in the time of Zedekiah, king of Judah (Jeremiah 37:5 44:30 ; Ezekiel 29:6,7 )
Nehelamite - The name given to a false prophet Shemaiah, who went with the captives to Babylon (Jeremiah 29:24,31,32 )
Servitude - Hard labor done by servants or conscripted workers (Genesis 47:21 ; 2 Chronicles 10:4 ; Nehemiah 5:18 ; Jeremiah 28:14 ; Lamentations 1:3 )
Diamond - Jeremiah 17:1 (a) This is a figure of the indelible record which sin makes upon the pages of GOD's book, and upon the heart, soul and life of the wicked person
Charmers - Psalm 58:4,5 ; Ecclesiastes 10:11 ; Jeremiah 8:17 , persons very common throughout India and Egypt, who claim to have the faculty of catching, taming, and controlling serpents, even the most venomous
Azriel - Father of Seraiah ( Jeremiah 36:26 )
Passage - Used in the plural, (Jeremiah 22:20 ) probably to denote the mountain region of Abarim on the east side of Jordan
Curtain - “Curtain” is often used synonymously with “tent” (Song of Song of Solomon 1:5 ; Isaiah 54:2 ; Jeremiah 4:20 ; Jeremiah 10:20 ; Jeremiah 49:29 ; Habakkuk 3:7 )
Soap - ]'>[2] ‘ sope ’) only in Jeremiah 2:22 (washing of the person) and Malachi 3:2 (operations of the fuller). As in Jeremiah 2:22 nether (AV Stocks - The prophet Jeremiah was confined in the first sort, (Jeremiah 20:2 ) which appears to have been a common mode of punishment in his day, (Jeremiah 29:26 ) as the prisons contained a chamber for the special purpose, termed "the house of the pillory
Measure - " (b) Mad, Job 11:9 ; Jeremiah 13:25 , elsewhere "garment. (e) Mishpat, Jeremiah 30:11 , elsewhere "judgment. " (b) Ammah, Jeremiah 51:13 , usually "cubit
Nergal-Sharezer - " Two are mentioned (Jeremiah 39:3; Jeremiah 39:13) as accompanying Nebuchadnezzar at the capture of Jerusalem, and as releasing Jeremiah: one has the title (for it is not a distinct person) Rubmag, "chief priest
Gemariah - From his chamber in the Lord's house Baruch read Jeremiah's threatening prophecy in the people's hearing (Jeremiah 36). Son of Hilkiah, the high priest who found the book of the law in the Lord's house, and showed it to Shaphan (2 Kings 22:8); sent by king Zedekiah on an embassy to Nebuchadnezzar; entrusted by Jeremiah with a letter to the captives in Babylon. Inheriting from his father, like the former Gemariah, some regard for sacred things (Jeremiah 29:1-3)
Wormwood - Jeremiah 9:15 (b) This is certainly a description of the bitterness which comes into the soul of those who refuse to worship the Lord, and who reject His Word. (See also Jeremiah 23:15). ...
Lamentations 3:15 (b) By this we understand the great depression of spirit, and the bitterness of soul which was experienced by Jeremiah, the prophet, when he was so cruelly rejected by Israel
Zephaniah - A priest, high in the sacred order, during the troublous times of king Zedekiah, who often communicated with Jeremiah by his agency. He was among the captives slain by the king of Babylon at Riblah, 2 Kings 25:18-21 Jeremiah 21:1 29:25,29 37:3 52:24-27 . His style and manner are like those of Jeremiah, during whose early years they were contemporary
Balm - A product of Gilead ( Genesis 37:25 ; Genesis 43:11 ), celebrated for its healing properties ( Jeremiah 8:22 ; Jeremiah 46:11 ; Jeremiah 51:8 ), and an important article of commerce ( Ezekiel 27:17 )
Rechabites - Scripture acquaints us, Jeremiah 35:2-11 , that Jonadab son of Rechab, in the time of Jehu king of Israel; laid an injunction on his posterity not to drink wine, not to build houses, not to plant vineyards, to have no lands, and to dwell in tents all their lives. During this siege, Jeremiah received orders from the Lord to invite them into the temple, and to offer them wine to drink. They refused to partake of it; and their fidelity to their father's injunction was a severe reproof to the Jews; and the divine promise concerning the perpetuity of the family, Jeremiah 35:19 , was undoubtedly fulfilled, though it may now be impossible to distinguish temm, as some profess to do, among the tribes of Central Arabia
Hilki'ah - ) ...
A priest of Anathoth, father of the prophet Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 1:1 ) (B. (Jeremiah 29:3 ) (B
Fan - A winnowing shovel by which grain was thrown up against the wind that it might be cleansed from broken straw and chaff (Isaiah 30:24 ; Jeremiah 15:7 ; Matthew 3:12 )
Beth-Gamul - Camel-house, a city in the "plain country" of Moab denounced by the prophet (Jeremiah 48:23 ); probably the modern Um-el-Jemal, near Bozrah, one of the deserted cities of the Hauran
Beth-Diblathaim - House of two cakes of figs, a city of Moab, upon which (Jeremiah 48:22 ) denounced destruction
Tower of the Furnaces - It was probably so named from its contiguity to the "bakers' street" (Jeremiah 37:21 )
Chuldah - A prophetess, descendant of Joshua and Rahab, contemporary of Zephaniah and Jeremiah
Huldah - A prophetess, descendant of Joshua and Rahab, contemporary of Zephaniah and Jeremiah
Hewed - Jeremiah 2:13 (b) By this figure we understand that Israel had planned schemes and programs for pleasure and profit which omitted GOD, and which were contrary to GOD's Word and GOD's will
Swallow - The well-known bird of passage, which is so common both in our country, in Europe, and in the East, Psalm 84:3 ; Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7
Unaccustomed - Jeremiah 31
Fast - (Compare Jeremiah 52:6,7 . ) ...
...
The fast of the fifth month, kept on the ninth of Ab (Compare Numbers 14:27 ), to commemorate the burning of the city and temple (Jeremiah 52:12,13 ). ...
...
The fast of the seventh month, kept on the third of Tisri (Compare 2 Kings 25 ), the anniversary of the murder of Gedaliah (Jeremiah 41:1,2 ). ...
...
The fast of the tenth month (Compare Jeremiah 52:4 ; Ezekiel 33:21 ; 2 Kings 25:1 ), to commemorate the beginning of the siege of the holy city by Nebuchadnezzar. ...
...
1 Samuel 7:6 ; ...
2 Chronicles 20:3 ; ...
Jeremiah 36:6-10 ; ...
Nehemiah 9:1 . ...
In the lapse of time the practice of fasting was lamentably abused (Isaiah 58:4 ; Jeremiah 14:12 ; Zechariah 7:5 )
Potter - Matthew believes that this incident of the purchase of the field happened in fulfilment of Zechariah 11:12-13; which he reads as a prediction, and ascribes to Jeremiah. This may be a mere slip due to the mention in the Book of Jeremiah of the potter’s house (Jeremiah 18:2) and the Potsherd Gate (Jeremiah 19:2), just as in Jeremiah 27:1 Jehoiakim is a slip for Zedekiah. 1638) supposed, Jeremiah may actually have been the author of these chapters
Vine - Special mention is made in the Bible of the vines of Eshcol, Numbers 13:24; Numbers 32:9, of Sibmah, Heshbon, and Elealeh, Isaiah 16:8-10; Jeremiah 48:32, and of Engedi. Isaiah 5:2; Isaiah 5:4; Jeremiah 2:21; Hosea 10:1. Judges 9:27; Isaiah 16:10; Jeremiah 25:30. The grapes were gathered with shouts of joy by the "grape gatherers," Jeremiah 25:30, and put into baskets. See Jeremiah 6:9. " The vineyard, which was generally on a bill, Isaiah 5:1; Jeremiah 31:5; Amos 9:13, was surrounded by a wall or hedge in order to keep out the wild boars
Potter - Matthew believes that this incident of the purchase of the field happened in fulfilment of Zechariah 11:12-13; which he reads as a prediction, and ascribes to Jeremiah. This may be a mere slip due to the mention in the Book of Jeremiah of the potter’s house (Jeremiah 18:2) and the Potsherd Gate (Jeremiah 19:2), just as in Jeremiah 27:1 Jehoiakim is a slip for Zedekiah. 1638) supposed, Jeremiah may actually have been the author of these chapters
Conversation - Communication between two or more people (Jeremiah 38:27 in modern translations) or personal conduct or behavior in KJV's now obsolete use of the term ( Psalm 37:14 ; Galatians 1:13 ; James 3:3 )
North Country - Most of the invading armies entered Palestine from the north (Isaiah 41:25 ; Jeremiah 1:14,15 ; 50:3,9,41 ; 51:48 ; Ezekiel 26:7 )
Nimrim, Waters of - The stream of the leopards, a stream in Moab (Isaiah 15:6 ; Jeremiah 48:34 ); probably the modern Wady en-Nemeirah, a rich, verdant spot at the south-eastern end of the Dead Sea
Gareb - ...
...
A hill near Jerusalem (Jeremiah 31:39 ), probably the hill of lepers, and consequently a place outside the boundary of the city
Birthstool - The same Hebrew word (obnayim) is also translated as “potter's wheel” (Jeremiah 18:3 )
Beth-Gamul - BETH-GAMUL ( Jeremiah 48:23 )
Armoury - In Jeremiah 50:25 it is otsar , signifying 'treasury
Cistern - Jeremiah 2:13 (b) It is a type of human provision and self-made supplies for satisfaction, comfort, and preservation substituted for trust in the living GOD who is the source of all blessing
Arpad - A city of Syria north-west of Aleppo ( 2 Kings 18:34 ; 2 Kings 19:13 , Isaiah 10:9 ; Isaiah 36:19 ; Isaiah 37:13 , Jeremiah 49:28 )
Geruth-Chimham - GERUTH-CHIMHAM ( Jeremiah 41:17 )
Speckled - Jeremiah 12:9 (a) As a speckled bird was a subject of attack among other birds, so Israel would be a distasteful and unpleasant people, both toward GOD and toward the nations round about
Unaccustomed - Jeremiah 31:18 (a) This is a splendid picture of the sinner in his natural state
Scabbard - Jeremiah 47:6 (b) This figure is used to describe the act of GOD in stopping the outpouring of His wrath, the defeating of the enemy, and the bringing in of peace to Israel
Anathoth - A beautiful village, in the tribe of Benjamin, about three miles from Jerusalem, remarkable for being the birthplace of the prophet Jeremiah
Neriah - The father of Baruch, Jeremiah 32:12 and the son of Melchi, Luke 3:27
Kettle, - (1 Samuel 2:14 ) The Hebrew word is also rendered "basket" in (Jeremiah 24:2 ) "caldron" in (2 Chronicles 35:13 ) and "pot" in (Job 41:20 )
Lamentations - Jeremiah is in it the sufferer, not the prophet and teacher, but a sufferer speaking under the Holy Spirit. Apion) enumerated the prophetic books as thirteen, reckoning Jeremiah and Lamentations as one book, as Judges and Ruth, Ezra and Nehemiah. Jeremiah wrote "lamentations" on the death of Josiah, and it was made "an ordinance in Israel" that "singing women" should "speak" of that king in lamentation. Thus, the words originally applied to Josiah (Lamentations 4:20) Jeremiah now applies to the throne of Judah in general, the last representative of which, Zedekiah, had just been blinded and carried to Babylon (compare Jeremiah 39:5-7): "the breath of our nostrils, the anointed of Jehovah, was taken in their pits, of whom we said, Under his shadow we shall live among the (live securely in spite of the surrounding) pagan. Terse conciseness marks the style which Jeremiah suits to his theme, whereas he is diffuse in his prophecies. Jeremiah in his prophecies (Jeremiah 9:9; Jeremiah 9:16; Jeremiah 9:19; Jeremiah 7:29) has much of an elegiac character. This strong feeling, combined with almost entirely uncomplaining (Lamentations 3:26-27; Lamentations 3:33-42) resignation under God's stroke, and with turning to Him that smote Jerusalem, is just what characterizes Jeremiah's acknowledged writings. ...
The writer's distress for "the virgin daughter of his people" is common to Jeremiah (Jeremiah 14:17; Jeremiah 8:21; Jeremiah 9:1) and Lamentations (Lamentations 1:15; Lamentations 2:13). The same pathos, his "eyes running down with water" (Lamentations 1:16; Lamentations 2:11; Lamentations 3:48-49) for Zion, appears in both (Jeremiah 13:17), and the same feeling of terror on every side (Lamentations 2:22; Jeremiah 6:25; Jeremiah 46:5). What most affects the author of each is the iniquity of her prophets and priests (Lamentations 2:14; Lamentations 4:13; Jeremiah 5:30-31; Jeremiah 14:13-14). His appeal in both is to Jehovah for judgment (Lamentations 3:64-66; Jeremiah 11:20); Edom, exulting in Zion's fall, is warned that God's winecup of wrath shall pass away from Zion and be drunk by Edom (Lamentations 4:21; Jeremiah 25:15-21; Jeremiah 49:12). As a prophet Jeremiah had foretold Zion's coming doom, and had urged submission to Babylon which was God's instrument, as the only means of mitigating judgment. In our English Bible Lamentations fitly comes after the last chapters of Jeremiah describing the calamity which is the theme of sorrow in Lamentations
Ebed-Melech - ) (An oriental phrase), an Ethiopian eunuch of king Zedekiah, instrumental in Jeremiah's deliverance out of Malchiah's dungeon pit. Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian Gentile slave, did that which none of Jeremiah's own countrymen attempted in his behalf. Ebedmelech's courageous interference in Jeremiah's behalf, at a time when he might naturally fear the wrath of the princes to which even the king had to yield (Jeremiah 38:4-13; Jeremiah 39:16-18), brought deliverance not only to the prophet, but ultimately to himself as his reward from God. He might have spoken privately to the king, as being over the king's harem (Nubians being chosen for that office to the present day), but Ebed-melech "went forth out of the king's house to the gate of Benjamin," and there spoke publicly to the king, "these men have done evil in all that they have done to Jeremiah whom they have cast into the dungeon, and he is like to die for hunger in the place where he is, for there is no more bread in the city. "...
With 30 men to guard against the princes' opposition, and by means of torn clothes and worn garments ("cast clouts and rotten rags," for God chooses weak things to confound the mighty, 1 Corinthians 1:27-29), he raised Jeremiah up from the pit. Trust in God generates fearlessness of man and brings true safety for eternity, and often even here (Jeremiah 39)
Memphis - The Egyptian name Menfi (in Hebrew Noph , Isaiah 19:13 , Jeremiah 2:16 ; Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 ; Jeremiah 46:19 , Ezekiel 30:13 ; Ezekiel 30:16 ; once Moph , Hosea 9:5 ), was apparently taken from that of the palace and pyramid of Pepy 1. ]'>[1] at Jeremiah 46:15 ‘Why did Apis flee from thee?’) was worshipped at Memphis as sacred to Ptah (Hephaestus), the principal god of the city
Hearth - A depression in a floor, sometimes bricked to retain heat (Jeremiah 36:23 ), used for cooking food (Isaiah 30:14 ). Elsewhere modern translations substituted other terms: furnace (NRSV), oven (REB), or glowing embers (NIV) at Ezekiel 43:15-165 ; brazier (REB, NAS, NRSV) or firepot (NIV) at Jeremiah 36:22-23 ; blazing pot (NRSV), brazier (REB), or firepot (NAS, NIV) at Zechariah 12:6
Madmen (2) - Hence arose the contemptuous sneer as to Jesus (John 10:20), "He hath a devil and is mad"; also the designation "mad fellow" applied to the prophet who anointed Jehu (2 Kings 9:11), and to Jeremiah (Jeremiah 29:26), and to Paul (Acts 26:24-25)
Dungeon - Like the Roman inner prison (Acts 16:24 ), it consisted of a deep cell or cistern (Jeremiah 38:6 ). Under the later kings imprisonment was frequently used as a punishment (2 Chronicles 16:10 ; Jeremiah 20:2 ; 32:2 ; 33:1 ; 37:15 ), and it was customary after the Exile (Matthew 11:2 ; Luke 3:20 ; Acts 5:18,21 ; Matthew 18:30 )
Bridge - , to connect the parts of Babylon together (Jeremiah 51:31-32; Jeremiah 50:38)
Beth-Haccerem - ” City used to signal that enemies approached from the north (Jeremiah 6:1 ). Apparently Jehoiakim (609-597) built the palace, which fits the description of Jeremiah 22:13-19
Rachel - Jeremiah 31:15 refers to her weeping over children being taken in Exile. Matthew ( Jeremiah 2:18 ) cited Jeremiah's reference of weeping in connection with Herod's order to kill male children under two
Hananeel, Tower of - A breach reaching from it to the "gate of the corner" (2 Kings 14:13; 2 Chronicles 26:9) Jeremiah foretells (Jeremiah 31:38) shall be "rebuilt to Jehovah," and "not thrown down any more for ever
Hanameel - Son of Shallum, Jeremiah's cousin, from whom the prophet in prison bought a field in Anathoth while Jerusalem was being besieged by the Chaldeans, as a token to assure the Jews that a time of security would hereafter come when their land would once more be a safe possession (Jeremiah 32:7-12; Jeremiah 32:44)
Crane - In Isaiah 38:14 and Jeremiah 8:7 sûs or sîs is rendered in AV Elnathan - The son of Achbor, the chief of those sent to Egypt to fetch Uriah, who had offended Jehoiakim by his prophecy ( Jeremiah 26:22 ff. ); and one of those who had entreated the king not to burn the roll ( Jeremiah 36:25 )
Jehoiachin - Jeconiah, 1 Chronicles 3:17; Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24; Jeconias, R. Jeremiah 22:24-30
Shephatiah - Son of Mattan: one of the princes who urged the king to put Jeremiah to death. Jeremiah 38:1
Phut - In the time of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 46:9 , Phut was under the obedience of Necho, king of Egypt
Nebo - There was a city of the Reubenites called Nebo, (Numbers 32:38) —and according to Jeremiah, in his days the Moabites had it in possession. (Jeremiah 48:1-47) There was also a city of Judah of this name in the days of Ezra and Nehemiah
Dedan - District mentioned in Jeremiah 25:23 ; Jeremiah 49:8 ; Ezekiel 25:13
Zoar - It was one of the landmarks which Moses saw from Pisgah, Deuteronomy 34:3, and it appears to have been known in the time of Isaiah, Isaiah 15:5, and Jeremiah. Jeremiah 48:34
Urijah - He confirmed the predictions of Jeremiah against Judah; and having fled to Egypt for refuge from the enraged king, and been sent back by Pharaoh-necho on demand, he was wickedly slain and dishonorably buried, Jeremiah 26:20-23
Branch - This arose from the Israelite expectation that the Messiah was to come from the ‘tree’ of David’s dynasty (Jeremiah 23:5; Jeremiah 33:15; cf
Battlement - In Jeremiah 5:10 , it denotes the parapet of a city wall
uz, the Land of - Where Job lived (1:1; Jeremiah 25:20 ; Lamentations 4:21 ), probably somewhere to the east or south-east of Palestine and north of Edom
Baalis - (bay' uh lihss) Personal name of king of Ammon who sent Ishmael to kill Geduliah, governor of Judah immediately after Babylon captured Jerusalem and sent most of Judah's citizens into the Exile (Jeremiah 40:14 )
Lamentation - ) A book of the Old Testament attributed to the prophet Jeremiah, and taking its name from the nature of its contents
Cockatrice - An old English word of obscure origin, used by our translators to designate the Hebrew Tzepha, or Tsiphoni, a serpent of a highly venomous character, Isaiah 14:29 59:5 Jeremiah 8:17
Shephatiah - The name of seven distinguished Jews, alluded to in the following passages: 2 Samuel 3:4 1 Chronicles 12:5 27:16 2 Chronicles 21:2 Ezra 2:4,57 Nehemiah 11:4 Jeremiah 38:1
Queen of Heaven - An object of worship to the people of Jerusalem ( Jeremiah 7:16-20 ) and the Jewish exiles in Egypt ( Jeremiah 44:15-30 ). The Massoretes evidently took the first word as m e le’kheth (‘work,’ ‘creation’) supposing that the silent aleph (’) had been omitted and considered the expression a synonym for ‘Host of Heaven’ ( ts e bhâ’ hash-shâmayîm , Jeremiah 8:2 ; Jeremiah 19:13 , Zephaniah 1:5 , Deuteronomy 4:19 ; Deuteronomy 17:3 etc
Zephaniah - 641-610), and was contemporary with Jeremiah, with whom he had much in common. ...
...
...
The son of Maaseiah, the "second priest" in the reign of Zedekiah, often mentioned in Jeremiah as having been sent from the king to inquire (Jeremiah 21:1 ) regarding the coming woes which he had denounced, and to entreat the prophet's intercession that the judgment threatened might be averted (Jeremiah 29:25,26,29 ; 37:3 ; 52:24 )
Heshbon - , Jeremiah 48:2 ; Jeremiah 48:34 f. Jeremiah 49:3 , which appears to make Heshbon an Amorite city, is probably corrupt (cf. Driver, Book of the Prophet Jeremiah )
Ethiopians - Without being black they may have been the darkest of any people known to the Israelites, as the question is asked: "Can the Ethiopian change his skin?" Jeremiah 13:23 . It was an Ethiopian who befriended Jeremiah and drew him out of the pit, for which his life was spared. Jeremiah 38:7,10,12 ; Jeremiah 39:16
Pekod - Probably a place in Babylonia (Jeremiah 50:21 ; Ezekiel 23:23 )
Bowels - "My bowels are troubled for him," namely, with tender yearnings of compassionate love (Jeremiah 31:20; Isaiah 63:15; Hosea 11:8; Philippians 2:1)
Gebim - Cisterns, (rendered "pits," Jeremiah 14:3 ; "locusts," Isaiah 33:4 ), a small place north of Jerusalem, whose inhabitants fled at the approach of the Assyrian army (Isaiah 10:31 )
Kolaiah - The father of the false prophet, Ahab (Jeremiah 29:21-23 )
Misgab - (mihss' gab) KJV, REB transliteration of the Hebrew for height used as a proper place name (Jeremiah 48:1 )
Battle-ax - Jeremiah 51:20 (a) GOD uses this figure to describe the great armies of Babylon
Memphis - (Isaiah 19:13; Jeremiah 44:1; Jer 46:14; Hosea 9:6) It is derived from Moph, signifying by the mouth
Beth-Nimrah - Numbers 32:3,36 ; Joshua 13:27 , and Nimrim, Isaiah 15:6 ; Jeremiah 48:34 ; a town in Gad, a little east of the Jordan, on a watercourse leading, from near Ramoth-Gilead, southwest into that river
Imagery - Some images for God are inanimate: stone (Genesis 49:24 ); fortress (2 Samuel 22:2 ); fountain of living waters (Jeremiah 2:13 ). Other images of God are personal: father (Isaiah 5:2-7 ); husband (Hosea 2:16 ); shepherd (Psalm 23:1 ); judge, lawgiver, and king (Isaiah 33:22 ); teacher (Isaiah 28:26 ); healer (Jeremiah 30:17 ); warrior (Exodus 15:1 ,Exodus 15:1,15:3 ); farmer (Malachi 1:6 ). The Old Testament pictures God's people as: a faithless wife (Jeremiah 3:20 ); a wild vine (Jeremiah 2:21 ); a wild donkey in heat (Jeremiah 2:24 ); God's beloved (Jeremiah 11:15 ); God's bride (Jeremiah 2:2 ); God's servant (Jeremiah 30:10 ); and God's son (Hosea 11:1 )
Pavilion - In Jeremiah 43:10 it probably denotes the canopy suspended over the judgement-seat of the king
Mephaath - of Amen, in the "downs" (mishor ), the modern Belka (Jeremiah 48:21)
Rechab - ...
...
The father of Jehonadab, who was the father of the Rechabites (2 Kings 10:15,23 ; Jeremiah 35:6-19 )
Baalis - He hired Ishmael to slay Gedaliah, who was appointed by the king of Babylon governor over the cities of Judah (Jeremiah 40:14)
Sea of Jazer - Body of water connected with town of Jazer (Jeremiah 48:32 ) but unknown to modern Bible students
Shephatiah - (2 Samuel 3:4; 1 Chronicles 4:8; 1Ch 7:5; 2 Chronicles 21:2; Jeremiah 38:1) The name is a compound of Shaphat, judgment-and Jah, Lord
Caph'Tor, Caph'Torim - (a crown ), thrice mentioned as the primitive seat of the Philistines, (2:23; Jeremiah 47:4 ; Amos 9:7 ) who are once called Caphtorim
Shiloh - Also, Jeremiah warned Jerusalem that it might suffer the same destructive fate as Shiloh (1 Samuel 7:12 ). ...
Centuries later, Jeremiah used Shiloh and the tabernacle as illustrations to warn Jerusalem that it was not safe merely because it housed the Temple (Jeremiah 7:12-14 ). Hearing the same message again, the people sought to kill Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26:6-9 ). Jeremiah mentioned some men from Shiloh as late as 585 B. (Jeremiah 41:5 ), indicating some occupation at that time
Ambush - Compare Jeremiah 51:12 )
Measuring Line - References to a measuring line point to the restoration of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 31:39 ; Zechariah 2:1 ; compare Ezekiel 47:3 )
Dromedary - Jeremiah 2:23 (a) Israel is compared to this animal as she takes her own way through a desert land, independent of all other things
Circumcision - Jeremiah 4:4 (b) Here is a type which compares the physical circumcision with the spiritual act of reckoning one's self dead unto sin and of laying aside the desires of the flesh
Jaaziniah - We meet with this name several times in the Bible, (2 Kings 25:23; Jeremiah 35:3; Ezekiel 8:11 and Ezekiel 11:1) The name itself is a compound of Jazen and Jah, the Lord will hear
Reprobate - Rejected as not enduring the test of worthiness, Jeremiah 6:30
Ludim - Descendants of Mizraim, Genesis 10:13 , dwelling in Africa, probably near Ethiopia; they were famous bowmen, Isaiah 66:19 , and are mentioned as soldiers with the Ethiopians, Libyans, and Tyrians, Jeremiah 46:9 ; Ezekiel 27:10 ; 30:5
ar'Pad - (Jeremiah 49:23 ) No trace of its existence has yet been discovered
Sera'Iah - (2 Kings 25:18 ; 1 Chronicles 6:14 ; Jeremiah 52:24 ) (B. (2 Kings 25:23 ; Jeremiah 40:8 ) ...
The son of Kenaz and brother of Othniel. (Jeremiah 51:59,61 ) He went with Zedekiah to Babylon in the fourth year of his reign
Jahaz - Jeremiah issued a similar warning (Jeremiah 48:34 ; compare Jeremiah 48:21 )
Refiner - He who reduced the metal to fluid by heat and solvents, as borax, alkali or lead (Isaiah 1:25; Jeremiah 6:29), to remove the dross. But the fiery ordeal only hardens the reprobate (Jeremiah 5:3; Isaiah 9:10). Translated for "tower" and "fortress" (Jeremiah 6:27), "I have set thee for an assayer and explorer," separating the metal from the dross "among My people
Nebo - A city of Reuben, Numbers 32:38 , taken by the Moabites, who held it in the time of Jeremiah, Isaiah 15:2 Jeremiah 48:1 . The extensive prevalence of this worship among the Chaldeans and Assyrians, is evident from the many compound proper names occurring in the Scriptures, of which this word forms part; as Nebuchadnezzar, Nebuzaradan, Nebushasban, Jeremiah 39:9,13 ; and also in the classics, as Naboned, Nabonassar, Nabopolassar, etc
Pestilence - The disease, whatever its nature, is not rarely associated with war and its consequences (Jeremiah 24:10; Jeremiah 29:17; Jeremiah 34:17, Ezekiel 6:11 etc
Flask - At Jeremiah 19:1 (RSV) refers to an earthenware water jar or jug. The vessel perhaps had a narrow neck making it impossible to mend ( Jeremiah 19:10 )
Plow - Plowing served as an image of sin (Proverbs 21:4 ; Hosea 10:13 ) and of repentance (Jeremiah 4:3 ; Hosea 10:11 ). Plowing served as a picture of oppression (Psalm 129:3 ) and destruction (Jeremiah 26:18 ; Micah 3:12 ) but also of expectation of reward (1 Corinthians 9:10 )
Cistern - The rendering of a Hebrew word Bor , Which means a receptacle for water conveyed to it; distinguished from Beer , Which denotes a place where water rises on the spot ( Jeremiah 2:13 ; Proverbs 5:15 ; Isaiah 36:16 ), a fountain. ) Empty cisterns were sometimes used as prisons ( Jeremiah 38:6 ; Lamentations 3:53 ; Psalm 40:2 ; 69:15 )
Glory - As God is the saints' glory (Jeremiah 2:11), so they are His glory (Jeremiah 13:11; Isaiah 62:3)
Street - Particular trades gathered in certain quarters, as "the bakers' street" (Jeremiah 37:21). Chuts is a "narrow street" (Proverbs 5:16; Jeremiah 5:1) in contrast to the "broad street", rechob
Man of od - ...
We shall see this in the list that follows:...
Moses, the Model of Intercession Jeremiah 15:1...
The Angel of the Lord, Model of Sufficiency Judges 13:6...
The Pre-existent CHRIST, Model of Justice1Sa2:27...
Samuel, Model of Understanding1Sa9:6...
Shemaiah, Model of Counsel1Ki12:22...
Elijah, Model of Faithfulness1Ki17:18...
Elisha, Model of Kindness2Ki4:7...
Ahijah, Model of Severity2Ki23:16...
David, Model of Praise2Ch8:14...
Isaiah, Model of Spirituality2Ch25:7...
Igdaliah, Model of Consecration Jeremiah 35:4...
Timothy, Model of Holiness1Ti6:11...
You, the Saint of GOD, Model of Godliness2Ti3:17...
Sihor - In Jeremiah 2:18 Israel is warned against seeking the waters of the Nile; that is, trusting in Egypt instead of in God: cf. Jeremiah 2:36
Dibon - It afterward returned to Moab, Isaiah 15:2; Jeremiah 48:18; Jeremiah 48:22; now called Dhîbân, about 12 miles east of the Dead Sea and 3 miles north of the Arnon
Leaf, Leaves - (Jeremiah 17:8 ) The ungodly, on the other hand, are "as an oak whose leaf fadeth. ...
Leaves of a book or roll occurs in this sense only in (Jeremiah 36:23 ) The Hebrew word (literally doors ) would perhaps be more correctly translated columns
Jehonadab - Jeremiah 35:1 relates a meeting between the prophet and Rechabites, who cited the teaching of their ancestor Jehonadab (who in Jeremiah is called Jonadab)
Jehoiakim - A year after, his allied the Egyptians were defeated on the Euphrates; yet he despised the warnings of Jeremiah, and cast his book into the fire. 599,2 Kings 23:34 24:6 2 Chronicles 36:4-8 Jeremiah 22:1-30 26:1-24 36:1-32
Eglath-Shelishiyah - EGLATH-SHELISHIYAH occurs in an ancient oracle against Moab, which is quoted in Isaiah 15:5 and Jeremiah 48:34 . ]'>[4] in Jeremiah 48:34 and AVm Magor-Missabib - Fear on every side, (Jeremiah 20:3 ), a symbolical name given to the priest Pashur, expressive of the fate announced by the prophet as about to come upon him
Hammelech - The king's, the father of Jerahmeel, mentioned in Jeremiah 36:26
Kettle - The same Hebrew word (dud, "boiling") is rendered also "pot" (Psalm 81:6 ), "caldron" (2 Chronicles 35:13 ), "basket" (Jeremiah 24:2 )
Alarm - A particular quivering sound of the silver trumpets to give warning to the Hebrews on their journey through the wilderness (Numbers 10:5,6 ), a call to arms, or a war-note (Jeremiah 4:19 ; 49:2 ; Zephaniah 1:16 )
Nebo-Sarsekim - (nee' boh-ssahr' sseh kihm) NIV form of the name of a Babylonian official (Jeremiah 39:13 )
Ach'Bor - (Genesis 36:38,39 ; 1 Chronicles 1:49 ) ...
Son of Michaiah, a contemporary of Josiah, (2 Kings 22:12,14 ; Jeremiah 26:22 ; 36:12 ) called ABDON in (2 Chronicles 34:20 ) (B
a'Zur, - (Jeremiah 28:1 ) ...
Father of Jaazaniah, one of the princes of the people against whom Ezekiel was commanded to prophesy
Rab-Mag - A general officer of Nebuchadnezzar's army, at the taking of Jerusalem, Jeremiah 39:3
Footmen or Runners - The speed and endurance of some of these couriers is almost beyond belief, Jeremiah 42:5
Migdol - A tower, a frontier town in Northern Egypt towards the Red Sea, Jeremiah 44:1 ; 46:14 ; Ezekiel 29:10 ; 30:6
Chemosh - The national god of the Moabites, and of the Ammonites, worshipped also under Solomon at Jerusalem, Numbers 21:29 ; Judges 11:24 ; 1 Kings 11:7 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ; Jeremiah 48:7
Pekod - ]'>[1] Pukûdu , a people settled in Lower Babylonia, possibly of Aramæan race ( Ezekiel 23:23 , Jeremiah 50:21 )
Kir'Ioth - (two cities ), a place in Moab the palaces of which were threatened by Amos with destruction by fire, ( Amos 2:2 ) unless indeed the word means simply "the cities," which is probably the case also in (Jeremiah 48:4 )
Jachin And Boaz - Each was eighteen cubits high and twelve in circumference (Jeremiah 52:21,23 ; 1 Kings 7:17-21 )
Shallum - ...
...
A Levite porter (1 Chronicles 9:19,31 ; Jeremiah 35:4 ). ...
...
The uncle of the prophet Jeremiah (Jeremiah 32:7 ). ...
...
A son of king Josiah (1 Chronicles 3:15 ; Jeremiah 22:11 ), who was elected to succeed his father on the throne, although he was two years younger than his brother Eliakim
Backsliding - This is the sort of backsliding that Old Testament Israel was often guilty of, and is more correctly called apostacy (Jeremiah 2:19; Jeremiah 5:6; Jeremiah 8:5; Jeremiah 15:6; Hosea 11:7; cf
Moresheth-Gath - It was probably the birth-place of the prophet Micah ( Micah 1:1 , Jeremiah 26:18 ), and must have been in the Shephçlah
Misgab - Height, a town of Moab, or simply, the height=the citadel, some fortress so called; or perhaps a general name for the highlands of Moab, as some think (Jeremiah 48:1 )
Host of Heaven - When the Jews fell into idolatry they worshipped these (Deuteronomy 4:19 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 21:3,5 ; 23:5 ; Jeremiah 19:13 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ; Acts 7:42 )
Arm - Used to denote power (Psalm 10:15 ; Ezekiel 30:21 ; Jeremiah 48:25 )
Minni - A people named in Jeremiah 51:27 along with the Armenians (‘Ararat’) and Scythians (‘Ashkenaz’) as coming assailants of Babylon
Wing - The word is most often used figuratively: of God's help (Ruth 2:12 ), of God's judgment (Jeremiah 48:40 ), of strength to return from Exile (Isaiah 40:31 )
Tzephaniah - 5th century BCE) A contemporary of Jeremiah, he prophesied shortly before the destruction of the first Holy Temple
Bruit - Jeremiah 10:22 (b) Here is a comparison of the great judgment of Israel to the roaring of falling waters
Array - Jeremiah 43:12 (a) When Nebuchadnezzar conquered Egypt and added it to his magnificent kingdom, GOD speaks of it as though the king had put on another and expensive garment
Hissing - Jeremiah 19 ...
Lamentations - the Book of: The book of Tanach authored by Jeremiah, lamenting the destruction of the Holy Temple, the suffering the Jews experienced at that time, and the ensuing exile
Mill - , Jeremiah 52:11 , "grinding house" (lit
Lamentation - In the plural, a book of Scripture, containing the lamentations of Jeremiah
Elasah - The son of Shaphau, who, along with Gemariah the son of Hilkiah, carried a message from king Zedekiah to Babylon ( Jeremiah 29:3 )
Baal-Meon - In Reuben beyond the Jordan, Numbers 32:38 ; called also Bethmeon, Jeremiah 48:23 , and Beth-baal-meon, Joshua 13:17
el'Nathan, - (Jeremiah 26:22 ; 36:12,25 ) ...
The name of three persons, apparently Levites, in the time of Ezra
Reins - (Psalm 7:9 ; 26:2 ; Jeremiah 11:20 ; 17:10 ), etc
Beard - Possibly the Israelites retained the hair between the ear and eye, which the Arabs shaved away (Jeremiah 9:26 margin; Jeremiah 25:23; Jeremiah 49:32; compare Herodotus, 3:8). It was shaved in mourning (Isaiah 15:2; Jeremiah 41:5; Jeremiah 48:37)
Rain - Geshem , "violent rain" or generically "the early and latter rain" (Jeremiah 5:24; Joel 2:23). Υoreh , "the early rain of autumn"; malkosh , "the latter rain of spring" (Proverbs 16:15; Job 29:23; Jeremiah 3:3; Hosea 6:3; Zechariah 10:1). God claims as His peculiar prerogative the sending or withholding of rain, which He made dependent on the obedience or disobedience of Israel (Leviticus 26:3-5; Leviticus 26:19; Deuteronomy 11:13-15; Deuteronomy 28:23-24; Jeremiah 3:3; Jeremiah 5:24; Jeremiah 14:22)
Lamentations - The poems deal with the people’s suffering during the siege and in the days immediately after, when the Babylonians ruled over the few Judeans who remained in the country round about (2 Kings 25:1-26; Jeremiah 40; Jeremiah 41). ...
Although Jeremiah is often assumed to be the writer of Lamentations, the book does not say who wrote it. Whoever the author was, he must have lived in the time of Jeremiah, for he was in Jerusalem during the siege that led to the collapse of the city. (For events surrounding the fall of Jerusalem see Jeremiah
Madmen - (mad mehn) A name meaning “Dung pit,” applied to a city of Moab (Jeremiah 48:2 ). Jeremiah's dirge perhaps refers to Asshurbanipal's suppression of a Moabite revolt in 650 B
Lismore, Australia, Diocese of - Jeremiah Doyle (1887-1909) was the first bishop
Merodach - Death; slaughter, the name of a Babylonian god, probably the planet Mars (Jeremiah 50:2 ), or it may be another name of Bel, the guardian divinity of Babylon
Uphaz - Probably another name for Ophir (Jeremiah 10:9 )
Tanhumeth - ” Father of Seraiah, a captain of forces remaining with Gedaliah in Judah following the deportation of Babylon (2 Kings 25:23 ; Jeremiah 40:8 )
Elasah - He took charge of Jeremiah's letter to the captives (Jeremiah 29:3)
Mephaath - A city of Reuben ( Joshua 13:18 ); assigned to the Levites ( Joshua 21:37 , 1 Chronicles 6:79 ); a Moabite city in Jeremiah 48:21
Zephaniah - 5th century BCE) A contemporary of Jeremiah, he prophesied shortly before the destruction of the first Holy Temple
Almon-Diblathaim - identical with Beth-diblathaim ( Jeremiah 48:22 )
Dwelling - Jeremiah 49 ...
1
Adamant, - Though once translated 'diamond,' Jeremiah 17:1 , it is used symbolically of extreme hardness, 'harder than a flint
Potter - Frequent mention is made of the potter in Scripture, Jeremiah 18:3 ; Sir_38:29-30
Hananiah - A false prophet of Gibeon, who for his impious hardihood was overtaken with speedy death, according to the word of God, Jeremiah 28:15-17
Sihor - In Isaiah 23:3 and Jeremiah 2:18 , this name must necessarily be understood of the Nile
Captivities of Israel - Jeremiah is equally express: "The house of Judah shall walk with the house of Israel; and they shall come together out of the north, to the land which I have given for an inheritance to their fathers," Jeremiah 3:18 . See also Jeremiah 31:7-9 ; Jeremiah 31:16-17 ; Jeremiah 31:20 ; Jeremiah 16:15 ; Jeremiah 49:2 , &c; Zechariah 9:13 ; Zechariah 10:6 ; Zechariah 10:10 ; Micah 2:12
Dragon - The name of some unknown creature inhabiting desert places and ruins (Job 30:29 ; Psalm 44:19 ; Isaiah 13:22 ; 34:13 ; 43:20 ; Jeremiah 10:22 ; Micah 1:8 ; Malachi 1:3 ); probably, as translated in the Revised Version, the jackal (q. Some great sea monster (Jeremiah 51:34 )
Baldness - With the Jews artificial baldness was a sign of mourning (Isaiah 22:12 ; Jeremiah 7:29 ; 16:6 ); it also marked the conclusion of a Nazarite's vow (Acts 18:18 ; 21:24 ; Numbers 6:9 ). It is often alluded to (Micah 1:16 ; Amos 8:10 ; Jeremiah 47:5 )
Shephathiah - Son of Mattan; urged Zedekiah to put Jeremiah to death, as weakening the hands of the men of war, by foretelling life to those who would go forth to the Chaldaeans and death to those who should remain in the city (Jeremiah 38:1)
Ashkenaz - Mentioned by Jeremiah (Jeremiah 51:27) in connection with Ararat and Minni, so that their locality then must have been the Armenan highland
Tahapanes - ), and settled there for a time (Jeremiah 2:16 ; 43:7 ; 44:1 ; 46:14 ). Petrie, "the ceremony described by Elnathan - He was the member of King Jehoiakim's advisory staff who brought the prophet Uriah back to the king from Egypt for punishment (Jeremiah 26:22-23 ). He tried to prevent the king from burning Baruch's scroll of Jeremiah's preaching (Jeremiah 36:12-26 )
Rod, Staff - Rod designates a straight, slender stick growing on (Jeremiah 1:11 ) or cut from (Genesis 30:37-41 ) a tree. Rods and staffs were also used as symbols of prophetic (Exodus 4:2-4 ; Exodus 7:8-24 ; Judges 6:21 ), priestly (Numbers 17:1-10 ), and royal (Genesis 49:10 NRSV; Judges 5:14 NRSV; Jeremiah 48:17 ; Revelation 2:27 ) office
Shephati'ah - (Nehemiah 11:4 ) ...
One of the princes of Judah who counselled Zedekiah to put Jeremiah in the dungeon. (Jeremiah 38:1 ) (B
Kir-Heres - (kuhr-hee' rehss) Believed to be an alternate spelling of Kir-Hareseth found in Isaiah 16:11 ; Jeremiah 48:31 ,Jeremiah 48:31,48:36
Gall - (1) rôsh , some very bitter plant, Deuteronomy 29:18 , Lamentations 3:19 ; ‘water of gall,’ Jeremiah 8:14 ; Jeremiah 9:16 ; tr
Calf - Calves were also used in sacrificial settings (Leviticus 9:2-3 ; Jeremiah 34:18 ; compare Genesis 15:9-10 ). A calf symbolized the bullish Gentile armies (Psalm 68:30 ) and Egyptian mercenary soldiers (Jeremiah 46:21 )
Arpad - Jeremiah noted Arpad's confusion as he pronounced doom on Damascus (Jeremiah 49:23 )
Medicine - Jeremiah 30:13 (a) The Scriptures are used as a type in this place because they heal the broken heart, they mend the wounds that sin makes, they bind up the bruises that are incurred in wandering away from GOD's path. ...
Jeremiah 46:11 (a) The many means and methods used by Israel to help in their troubles and...
sorrows are described by this type
Jeremy - The form in which the name of the prophet Jeremiah appears in both AV [2] has Jeremiah
Branch - Beside the more general symbolical meaning, the term "branch" is sometimes specifically applied to the Messiah, as in Jeremiah 23:5; Jeremiah 33:15, where the promise runs that, from David's royal stock, a branch of righteousness, a righteous descendant, shall spring
Elish'Ama - (2 Kings 25:25 ; Jeremiah 41:1 ) ...
Scribe of King Jehoiakim. (Jeremiah 36:12,20,21 ) (B
Dove - In their wild state doves generally build their nests in the clefts of rocks, but when domesticated "dove-cots" are prepared for them (Song of Solomon 2:14 ; Jeremiah 48:28 ; Isaiah 60:8 ). The dove was placed on the standards of the Assyrians and Babylonians in honour, it is supposed, of Semiramis (Jeremiah 25:38 ; Vulg. , "fierceness of the dove;" Compare Jeremiah 46:16 ; 50:16 )
Malchijah - A priest, the father of Pashhur ( 1 Chronicles 9:12 , Nehemiah 11:12 ), same as Malchiah of Jeremiah 21:1 ; Jeremiah 38:1 . Jeremiah 38:3
Jaazaniah - "Son of the Maacathite," a "captain of the forces" who accompanied Johanan in waiting on Gedaliah, the governor over the Jewish remnant after the capture of Jerusalem, and afterward in rescuing them from Ishmael, and in going to Egypt in spite of the Lord's prohibition (2 Kings 25:23; Jeremiah 41:11; Jeremiah 43:4-5). Jeremiah 35:3
Chaff - Jeremiah 23:28; "What is the chaff to the wheat?" God answers the objection, What must we do when lies are spoken as truths and prophets oppose prophets? Do as you would with wheat mixed with chaff; do not reject the wheat, because of the chaff mixed with it, but bring both to the test of "My word" (Jeremiah 23:27; Jeremiah 23:29); so discriminate as to what to reject, and what to keep
Gall - ראש , something excessively bitter, and supposed to be poisonous, Deuteronomy 29:18 ; Deuteronomy 32:32 ; Psalms 69:21 ; Jeremiah 8:14 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; Jeremiah 23:15 ; Lamentations 3:19 ; Hosea 10:4 ; Amos 6:12
Dragon - ]'>[2] ‘jackals,’ Isaiah 13:22 ; Isaiah 34:13 ; Isaiah 35:7 , Job 30:29 , Psalms 44:19 , Jeremiah 10:22 ; Jeremiah 49:33 . The same term, tannîn , is also applied metaphorically to Pharaoh ( Psalms 74:13 , Isaiah 51:9 ; and thus perhaps refers to the crocodile), and to Nebuchadnezzar ( Jeremiah 51:34 )
Fortified Cities - At the end of the monarchy, Jeremiah reported that the Babylonians had conquered all the fortified cities of Judah except Lachish and Azekah (Jeremiah 34:6-7 ). At times of imminent danger, much of the populace from the surrounding area might find protection in a fortified city (Jeremiah 4:5 ; Jeremiah 8:14 )
Branch - words rendered by our ‘branch’ may be gathered from the following list of passages, in each of which a different term is used: Genesis 40:10 , Exodus 25:33 , Numbers 13:23 , Isaiah 16:8 ; Isaiah 27:10 , Jeremiah 11:16 , Zechariah 4:12 , Psalms 104:12 , Job 15:32 ; Job 18:16 . We have the same English term at Jeremiah 23:5 ; Jeremiah 33:15 , where another word, tsemach , is a title of the Messiah, intimating that this ‘shoot’ should arise out of ‘the low estate’ of the restored remnant. Zechariah 3:8 ; Zechariah 6:12 , following Jeremiah, actually makes Tsemach a proper name
Kidneys - ’ And, in fact, in the passages now cited the terms ‘reins’ and ‘heart’ are often parallel: Psalms 7:9 ; Psalms 16:7 ; Psalms 26:2 ; Psalms 73:21 , Proverbs 23:16 , Jeremiah 11:20 ; Jeremiah 12:2 ; Jeremiah 17:10 ; Jeremiah 20:12 , Wis 1:6 , 1Ma 2:24 , Revelation 2:23
Beard - Shaving the beard, or cutting it off, was a sign of the deepest degradation, Isaiah 15:2; Jeremiah 41:5, hence the threatening in Isaiah 7:20 was full of significance. See Jeremiah 9:26; Jeremiah 25:23; Jeremiah 49:32
Chaldeans - ...
The Chaldeans were originally a warlike people, who at first inhabited the Carduchian or Koordish mountains north of Assyria and Mesopotamia, Jeremiah 50:17 . His son Nebuchadnezzar invaded Palestine, as foretold by Jeremiah and Habakkuk, Ezra 5:12 Jeremiah 39:5 . He was succeeded by his son Evil-merodach, 2 Kings 25:27 Jeremiah 52:31
Jeremi'ah, Book of - "There can be little doubt that the book of Jeremiah grew out of the roll which Baruch wrote down at the prophet's mouth in the fourth year of Jehoiakim. (Jeremiah 36:2 ) Apparently the prophets kept written records of their predictions, and collected into larger volumes such of them as were intended for permanent use. Prophecies delivered at various times, directed mainly to Judah, or connected with Jeremiah's personal history. (Jeremiah 25:13,14 ) evidently marks the conclusion of a series of prophecies; and that which follows, ch. (Jeremiah 25:15-38 ) the germ of the fuller predictions in chs. The history of the last two years before the capture of Jerusalem, and of Jeremiah's work int hem and in the period that followed
Kidron, Brook of - Ravine 20 miles long, east of Jerusalem near the Mount of Olives (2 Kings 15; 3Kings 2; Jeremiah 31)
Azekah - A town in the tribe of Judah, about fifteen miles south-west of Jerusalem; mentioned in the narratives of Joshua and Saul, Joshua 10:10 ; 1 Samuel 17:1 ; taken by Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 34:7 , but afterwards repeopled by the Jews, Nehemiah 11:30
Quo Vadis - Title of the celebrated Polish novel by Henryk Sienkiewicz in 1895, translated into English by Jeremiah Curtin
Cedron, Brook of - Ravine 20 miles long, east of Jerusalem near the Mount of Olives (2 Kings 15; 3Kings 2; Jeremiah 31)
Buz - ...
...
A district in Arabia Petrea (Jeremiah 25:23 )
Basilisk - (In RSV, Isaiah 11:8 ; 14:29 ; 59:5 ; Jeremiah 8:17 ), the "king serpent," as the name imports; a fabulous serpent said to be three spans long, with a spot on its head like a crown
Beth Baal Meon - Contracted into Been (Numbers 32:3; Numbers 32:38), Bethmeon in Jeremiah 48:23
Minni - Lower or lesser Armenia (Jeremiah 51:27)
Reins - " The "reins" and the "heart" are often mentioned together, as denoting the whole moral constitution of man (Psalm 7:9 ; 16:7 ; 26:2 ; 139:13 ; Jeremiah 17:10 , etc
Temanites - The Temanites were renowned for their wisdom (Job 2:11 ; compare Jeremiah 49:7 )
Swift - Jeremiah mentions the swift (Luke 8:7 NAS, NIV)
Ashchenaz - A son of Gomer (Genesis 10:3 ) and original ancestor of people called kingdom of Ashkenaz (Jeremiah 51:27 )
Cage - kelub', Jeremiah 5:27 , marg
Jehoahaz - (2 Kings 13:1) and Jehoahaz, or Shallum; son of Josiah, king of Judah, (Jeremiah 22:11) The name is a compound, signifying, from Achaz, a possession of the Lord
Elealeh - Isaiah 15:4; Isaiah 16:9; Jeremiah 48:34; now el-Aʾal, "the high," one mile northeast of Heshbon
Merodach - An idol of the Babylonians, representing probably the planet Mars, Jeremiah 50:2
Tema - It is associated with Dedan, Isaiah 21:14 ; Jeremiah 25:23 , and was famous for its caravans, Job 6:19
Whither Goest Thou! - Title of the celebrated Polish novel by Henryk Sienkiewicz in 1895, translated into English by Jeremiah Curtin
Nehel'Amite, the, - (Jeremiah 29:24,31,32 ) The name is no doubt formed from that either of Shemaiah's native place or the progenitor of his family which of the two is uncertain
Jehoiakim - he exacted the silver and gold of every one according to his valuation" ("taxation"): 2 Kings 23:33-34; Jeremiah 22:10-12; Ezekiel 19:4. In Jehoiakim's fourth year Necho suffered his great defeat from Babylon at Carehemish, wherein he lost his possessions between Euphrates and the Nile, and returned no more to Judaea; so that Josiah's death was not unavenged (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2). "His eyes and heart were only for covetousness, shedding innocent blood, oppression, and violence" (Jeremiah 22:13-17). God finds all that is in the sinner (Jeremiah 17:11; Jeremiah 23:24). Three years subsequently Jehoiakim rebelled with characteristic perfidy, sacrificing honour and truth in order to spend the tribute on his own costly luxuries (Jeremiah 22:13-17). ...
Ammon had seized on Gad's territory, upon Israel's exile, and acted as Nebuchadnezzar's agent to scourge Judah (Jeremiah 49:1-2; Ezekiel 25:3). Jehovah was the primary sender of these scourges (rebellion against Nebuchadnezzar, after promising fealty, was rebellion against God: Jeremiah 27:6-8; Ezekiel 17:16-19), not only for Jehoiakim's sins but for those of his forefather Manasseh, in whose steps he trod, and the "innocent blood which Jehovah would not pardon. " Jeremiah (Jeremiah 22:18-19) foretold "concerning Jehoiakim, they shall not lament for him, Ah, my brother! or Ah, my sister!" (his queen, the lamentation of blood relatives for a private individual) nor, "Ah, lord; ah, his glory (the public lamentations of subjects for a king; alas, his majesty), he shall be buried with the burial of an ass, drawn and cast forth beyond the gates of Jerusalem"; again, Jeremiah 36:30, "he shall have none to sit (i. Early in his reign (Jeremiah 26:1-20, etc. ...
Jehoiakim gained by it only adding sin to sift, as the argument of the elders in Jeremiah's behalf implies, the notorious prostration of the state at the time intimating that heavier vengeance would ensue if Jeremiah too, as was threatened, should be slain. " His intense selfishness and indifference to the people's sufferings appear in his lavish expenditure upon building palaces for himself at the very time the people were overwhelmed with paying heavy tribute to Pharaoh (Jeremiah 22:13-18). His crowning impiety, which had no parallel in Jewish history, was his cutting up, and burning in the fire before him, the written roll of Jeremiah's inspired prophecies (Jeremiah 36). Jeremiah being "shut up," i. ...
Even Elnathan, who had been his tool against Urijah, recoiled from this, and interceded with Jehoiakim not to burn the roll; but he would not hear, nay even commanded his minions to apprehend Baruch and Jeremiah: but the Lord hid them (Psalms 31:20; Psalms 83:3; Isaiah 26:20)
Johanan - (See GEDALIAH ISHMAEL Jeremiah. ) Johanan consulted the prophet that Jehovah, Jeremiah's God, might show the Jewish remnant "the way wherein to walk, and the thing to do" (Jeremiah 42); imitating pious Hezekiah's request for Isaiah's intercession (Isaiah 37:4), "lift up thy prayer for the remnant that is left. " Johanan had already determined to go to Egypt whether it were God's will or not, but he wished if possible to have God's sanction (Jeremiah 42:20; compare 1 Kings 22:13-14). Jeremiah reminds Johanan and his company that Jehovah is their God as well as his (wholehearted obedience is therefore their part: Exodus 19:5-6; 1 Corinthians 6:19-20); and that He will pray, and whatsoever Jehovah shall answer he will declare, "keeping nothing back" (Acts 20:20). While he was declaring God's will that they should stay where they were, Jeremiah saw indications, in their countenance and manner, of disinclination to fulfill what they had so solemnly engaged. But Johanan and his party charged Jeremiah with false prophecy (though their city and temple in ruins attested his truth), as if he were instigated by Baruch so as to deliver them up to the Chaldees. All they gained by forcing Jeremiah and Baruch to accompany them to Egypt was that Jeremiah there under the Spirit foretold their doom and that of Pharaoh upon whom they trusted instead of God
Elnathan - Probably the same who tried to prevent Jehoiakim from burning the roll of Jeremiah's prophecies (Jeremiah 26:22 ; 36:12 )
Raisin Cakes - Hosea 3:1 (NRSV) links raisin cakes with the worship of pagan deities (compare Jeremiah 7:18 )
Keren-Happuch - The name is indicative of beautiful eyes, from the dye made of antimony, used to tinge the eyelashes ( 2 Kings 9:30 , Jeremiah 4:30 )
Runners - Runners performed two basic functions, as messengers (2Chronicles 30:6,2 Chronicles 30:10 ; Esther 3:13 ; Jeremiah 51:31 ) and royal body guards (1 Samuel 8:11 ; 1 Samuel 22:17 ; 2 Samuel 15:1 ; 1 Kings 1:5 ; 2 Kings 10:25 ; 2 Kings 11:4 )
Charmer - In Psalm 58:5 ; Jeremiah 8:17 the allusion is to those who can charm serpents, probably by soft and gentle sounds
Chimham - 40 the Hebrew reads CHIMHAN , as in the margin); Jeremiah 41:17
Seraiah - (2 Samuel 8:17; 1 Chronicles 4:14; 1Ch 4:35; Jeremiah 52:21) The name seems to be compound-of Sera, or Shera, to govern—and Jah: hence, it means the Lord is my governor
Unshod - Jeremiah 2:25 (b) The Lord is inviting His people to be well equipped for the journey through life
Jazer - It lay some fifteen miles north of Heshbon, near a small stream, Numbers 1:1-36:13 32:1 Joshua 21:39 1 Chronicles 26:31 Jeremiah 48:32
Kedar - The people of Kedar lived in tents, kept flocks of sheep and goats, and dealt shrewdly in various trading activities (Psalms 120:5; Isaiah 60:7; Jeremiah 49:28-29; Ezekiel 27:21; see ARABIA)
Swallow - sis (Isaiah 38:14 ; Jeremiah 8:7 ), the Arabic for the swift, which "is a regular migrant, returning in myriads every spring, and so suddenly that while one day not a swift can be seen in the country, on the next they have overspread the whole land, and fill the air with their shrill cry. In Isaiah 38:14 and Jeremiah 8:7 the word thus rendered ('augr) properly means "crane" (as in the RSV)
Hemlock - rosh (Hosea 10:4 ; rendered "gall" in Deuteronomy 29:18 ; 32:32 ; Psalm 69:21 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; 23:15 ; "poison," Job 20:16 ; "venom," Deuteronomy 32:33 ). ), Deuteronomy 29:18 , Text 17; Proverbs 5:4 ; Jeremiah 9:15 ; 23:15
Hyena - All the scriptural references concern judgment on foreign nations (Babylon or Edom) which are left desolate (Isaiah 13:22 ; Isaiah 34:14 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ). ” The REB identifies this animal with the jackal (so NAS Jeremiah 50:39 )
Jug - NIV uses jug in three passages: a water jug (1Samuel 26:11-12,1 Samuel 26:16 ; KJV, bottle; NRSV, jar); an oil jug (1Kings 17:12,1Kings 17:14,1 Kings 17:16 ; KJV, RSV, cruse; NRSV, jug); and an unspecified container (Jeremiah 48:12 ; KJV, bottle; RSV, jar). At Jeremiah 13:12 the RSV translation “jar” is preferred (NIV, skin)
Pestilence - Old Testament writers understood pestilence to be sent by God (Exodus 9:15 ; Jeremiah 15:2 ; Habakkuk 3:5 ; Amos 4:10 ), sometimes by means of a destroying angel (2 Samuel 24:16 ; 1 Chronicles 21:15 ). Earnest prayer averted pestilence (1 Kings 8:37 ); fasting and sacrifice without repentence did not (Jeremiah 14:12 )
Gaza - Gaza was peopled by the descendants of Ham, Genesis 10:19; by the Anakim, Joshua 11:22; given to Judah, Joshua 15:47; the scene of Samson's exploits, Judges 16:1-31; under Solomon's rule and called Azzah, 1 Kings 4:24; smitten by Egypt, Jeremiah 47:1; Jeremiah 47:5; prophesied against, Amos 1:6-7; Zephaniah 2:4; Zechariah 9:5; noticed in New Testament only in Acts 8:26; a chief stronghold of paganism and the worship of the god Dagon
Amon - Egyptian god whose worship center at Thebes Jeremiah threatened with divine destruction (Jeremiah 46:25 )
Elihu - A native of Buz, Genesis 22:21 , which was probably a city of Edom, Jeremiah 25:23 , perhaps Bozrah, Jeremiah 49:7,8,13
Molech - ” Such a meaning is possible in some passages ( Leviticus 18:21 ; Leviticus 20:3-5 ; 2 Kings 23:10 ; Jeremiah 32:35 ). ” Leviticus 20:5 condemns those who “commit whoredom with Molech” (see also Leviticus 18:21 ; Leviticus 20:3-5 ; 2 Kings 23:10 ; Jeremiah 32:35 ). ...
In times of apostasy some Israelites, apparently in desperation, made their children “go through the fire to Molech” (Leviticus 18:21 ; Leviticus 20:2-5 ; 2 Kings 23:10 ; compare 2 Kings 17:31 ; Jeremiah 7:31 ; Jeremiah 19:5 ; Jeremiah 32:35 ). ...
The practice of offering children as human sacrifice was condemned in ancient Israel, but the implication is clear in the Old Testament that child—sacrifice was practiced by some in Israel (2 Kings 21:6 ; 2 Kings 23:10 ; 2 Chronicles 28:3 ; Psalm 106:38 ; Jeremiah 7:31 ; Jeremiah 19:4-5 ; Ezekiel 16:21 ; Ezekiel 23:37 ,Ezekiel 23:37,23:39 )
Pottery - The wheel or horizontal lathe was a wooden disc, placed on another larger one, and turned by hand or worked by a treadle (Jeremiah 18:3); on the upper he molded the clay into shape (Isaiah 45:9); the vessel was then smoothed, glazed, and burnt. ...
Emblem of man's brittle frailty, and of God's potter-like power to shape our ends as He pleases (Psalms 2:9; Isaiah 29:16; Isaiah 30:14; Jeremiah 19:11; Lamentations 4:2). As Isaiah 40:3 and Malachi 3:1 are thrown together in Mark 1:2-3; also Isaiah 62:11 and Zechariah 9:9 in Matthew 21:4-5; and Isaiah 8:14; Isaiah 28:16 in Romans 9:33; so Jeremiah 18:3-6; Jeremiah 18:19, and Zechariah 11:12-13 in Matthew 27:9. Matthew presumes his reader's full knowledge of Scripture, and merges the two human sacred writers, Jeremiah and Zechariah, in the one voice of the Holy Spirit speaking by them
Zedeki'ah - of the events of his reign given in ( 2 Kings 24:17 ; 2 Kings 25:7 ) and, with some trifling variations in (Jeremiah 39:1-7 ; 52:1-11 ) together with the still shorter summary in (1 Chronicles 38:10 ) etc. ; and also in Jeremiah 22 , 24 , 27-29 , 32 , 34 , 37-38 and ( Ezekiel 16:11-21 ) From these it is evident that Zedekiah was a man not so much bad at heart as weak in will. The mention of this event in the Bible though indisputable, is extremely slight, and occurs only in (Jeremiah 37:5-11 ; 34:21 ) and Ezekiel 17:15-20 But Josephus (x. ( Jeremiah 34:7 ) Called away for a time by an attack from Pharaoh and the Egyptians, on the tenth day of the tenth month of Zedekiah's ninth year the Chaldeans were again before the walls. (Jeremiah 52:4 ) From this time forward the siege progressed slowly but surely to its consummation, The city was indeed reduced to the last extremity. The bread had for long been consumed, (Jeremiah 38:9 ) and all the terrible expedients had been tried to which the wretched inhabitants of a besieged town are forced to resort in such cases. (Jeremiah 29:21,22 ) He was denounced in the letter of Jeremiah for having, with Ahab the son of Kolaiah, buoyed up the people with false hopes, not for profane and flagitious conduct. ) ...
The son of Hananiah, one of the princes of Judah in the time of Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 38:12 ) (B
Adamant - It is used for cutting or writing upon glass and other hard substances, Jeremiah 17:1
Mattan - ...
...
The father of Shephatiah (Jeremiah 38:1 )
Adamant - It is an emblem of firmness in resisting adversaries of the truth (Zechariah 7:12 ), and of hard-heartedness against the truth (Jeremiah 17:1 )
Nebushasban - chief of the priests (Jeremiah 39:13)
Baal-Meon - Lord of dwelling, a town of Reuben (Numbers 32:38 ), called also Beth-meon (Jeremiah 48:23 ) and Beth-baal-meon (Joshua 13:17 )
Destroyer - An invading army (Isaiah 49:17 ; Jeremiah 22:7 ) or a supernatural agent of God's judgment (Exodus 12:23 ; Hebrews 11:28 ), often termed an angel (2 Samuel 24:15-16 ; 2 Kings 19:35 ; Psalm 78:49 )
Minni - (mihn' ni) People inhabiting the mountainous area south of Lake Urmia northeast of the Tigris-Euphrates valley (Jeremiah 51:27 )
Zimran - ” Son of Abraham and Keturah and ancestor of an Arabian tribe (Genesis 25:2 ; 1 Chronicles 1:32 ), possibly identified with Zabram, located somewhere west of Mecca on the Red Sea, and with Zimri (Jeremiah 25:25 )
Uncover - (See also Jeremiah 49:10)
Elealeh - A town of the Amorites, near Heshbon their capital, assigned to the tribe of Reuben, Numbers 32:3,37 , and long afterwards threatened as a city of Moab, Isaiah 15:4 ; 16:9 ; Jeremiah 48:34
Girdle - 'ezor, something "bound," worn by prophets (2 Kings 1:8 ; Jeremiah 13:1 ), soldiers (Isaiah 5:27 ; 2 Samuel 20:8 ; Ezekiel 23:15 ), Kings (Job 12:18 ). The common girdle was made of leather (2 Kings 1:8 ; Matthew 3:4 ); a finer sort of linen (Jeremiah 13:1 ; Ezekiel 16:10 ; Daniel 10:5 ). They were variously fastened to the wearer (Mark 1:6 ; Jeremiah 13:1 ; Ezekiel 16:10 )
Gall - Jeremiah 8:14, "water of gall," i. opium, Jeremiah 9:15; Jeremiah 23:15
Eunuch - ' Jeremiah 29:2 ; Daniel 1:3-18 ; Acts 8:27 . Ebed-melech who befriended Jeremiah was a eunuch in the house of Zedekiah. Jeremiah 38:7-13
Shallum - King Josiah's fourth son in order, according to 1 Chronicles 3:15; Jeremiah 22:11; by birth third son (See JEHOAHAZ. Jeremiah's uncle (Jeremiah 32:7); perhaps the same as Shallum, Huldah's husband. Jeremiah 35:4
Idol - (Jeremiah 12:1 ; Jeremiah 19:1 ) . (Jeremiah 4:26 ) on festival days
Rechabites - When compelled to dwell in Jerusalem for fear of the Chaldeans and Syrians, Jeremiah called them together and offered them wine; but they refused to drink any, and gave the above explanation. ...
God instructed Jeremiah to hold up the obedience of the Rechabites as an example to the men of Judah. Jeremiah 35:1-19
Noph - " The prophets often speak of this city, and foretel the miseries it was to suffer from the kings of Chaldea and Persia, Isaiah 19:13 ; Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 ; Jeremiah 46:19 ; Hosea 9:6 ; Ezekiel 30:13 ; Ezekiel 30:16
Heath - ערער , Jeremiah 17:6 ; Jeremiah 48:6 . In Jeremiah 48:6 , the original word is ערוער , which the Septuagint translators have read ערוד , for they render it ονος αγριος , wild ass; and, as this seems best to agree with the flight recommended in the passage, it is to be preferred
mo'Lech - Molech was the lord and master of the Ammonites; their country was his possession, ( Jeremiah 49:1 ) as Moab was the heritage of Chemosh; the princes of the land were the princes of Malcham. (Jeremiah 49:3 ; Amos 1:15 ) His priests were men of rank, (Jeremiah 49:3 ) taking precedence of the princes
Idol - word denotes 'vanity,' Jeremiah 14:22 ; 18:15 ; 'thing of nought,' Leviticus 19:4 , marg. Jeremiah calls the idol a 'scarecrow' ('pillar in a garden,' Jeremiah 10:5 , marg
Craft Workers - Among the crafts workers mentioned in the Bible are metal-workers (Exodus 31:3-4; Isaiah 44:12; Isaiah 54:16; Jeremiah 10:9; 2 Timothy 4:14), carpenters (2 Samuel 5:11; Isaiah 44:13; Mark 6:3), wood-carvers (Exodus 31:5; 1 Kings 6:32), stone-workers (2 Samuel 5:11; 1 Kings 6:7), jewellers (Exodus 28:11; Exodus 31:5), potters (Isaiah 41:25; Jeremiah 18:1-4), spinners and weavers (Exodus 35:25; Job 7:6; Isaiah 19:9), dyers (Exodus 26:1; 2 Chronicles 2:7; Acts 16:14), tanners (Exodus 26:14; Matthew 3:4; Acts 9:43) and tent-makers (Genesis 4:20; Acts 18:3). Tools that these craft workers used are also mentioned occasionally (Genesis 4:22; 1 Samuel 13:20; 1 Kings 6:7; 1 Kings 7:9; 2 Kings 6:5; Isaiah 41:7; Jeremiah 23:29)
Eunuch - It is interesting to note that the group of scholars who rendered Jeremiah for the AV [2] adhered to ‘eunuch’ throughout: unhappily the Revisers have spoiled the symmetry by conforming Jeremiah 52:25 to 2 Kings 25:19 . ...
The kings of Israel and Judah imitated their powerful neighbours in employing eunuchs (1) as guardians of the harem (2 Kings 9:32 , Jeremiah 41:16 ); Esther 1:12 ; Esther 4:4 are instances of Persian usage; (2) in military and other important posts ( 1Sa 8:15 , 1 Kings 22:9 , 2Ki 8:6 ; 2 Kings 23:11 ; 2 Kings 24:12 ; 2Ki 24:15 ; 2 Kings 25:19 , 1 Chronicles 28:1 , 2 Chronicles 18:8 , Jeremiah 29:2 ; Jeremiah 34:19 ; Jeremiah 38:7 ; cf
Baal (1) - ba’al , Judges 2:13 , Jeremiah 11:13 etc. Such an animistic conception is evident from the fact that they were worshipped in high places and in groves, where such rites as prophecy ( Jeremiah 22:13 ), fornication ( Jeremiah 7:9 ), self-mutilation ( 1 Kings 18:28 ), and child-sacrifice ( Jeremiah 19:5 ) were practised under the guidance of kemârim or idolatrous priests ( Zephaniah 1:4 ). Under the influence of such prophecies the Israelites abandoned the use of Baal for Jahweh , and in later times developed so great an antipathy to this word that later revisers substituted bôsheth (‘shameful thing’), not only wherever Ba’al occurred for the Canaanitish deities ( Hosea 9:10 , Jeremiah 3:24 ; Jeremiah 11:13 ), but also, forgetful of its former application to Jahweh, in some of the above names (see Ishbosheth), supposing them to allude to local gods
Kings, the Books of - He describes in the same phrase the beginning, character, and close of each reign (1 Kings 11:43; 1 Kings 14:8; 1 Kings 14:20; 1 Kings 14:31; 1 Kings 15:3; 1 Kings 15:8; 1 Kings 15:11-24; 1 Kings 15:26; 1 Kings 15:34; Jeremiah 46:1-12; 1 Kings 22:51; Jeremiah 37:7-8; 1 Kings 16:19; 1 Kings 11:19-20; 1 Kings 16:30; 2 Kings 3:2-3; 2 Kings 8:24; 2 Kings 10:29; 2 Kings 10:31; 2 Kings 12:3; 2 Kings 13:2; 2 Kings 13:9; 2 Kings 13:11; 2 Kings 14:3; 2 Kings 14:29; 2 Kings 15:3, etc. Assyrian and Chaldee forms occur, found in Jeremiah, but not found in the earlier historical books (Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel): eekoh for 'eekow (2 Kings 6:13); 'akilah , "meat" (1 Kings 19:8); 'almugim ((1 Kings 10:11, 12); 'omnowt , "pillars" (2 Kings 18:16); ura'owt , "stalls" (1 Kings 4:26); barbuwrim , "fowls" (1 Kings 4:23); gahar , "stretch" ((1 Kings 18:42); 'apheer for 'eepheer ((1 Kings 20:38, 41); gub , "husbandman" (2 Kings 25:12); galom , "wrap" (2 Kings 2:8); dobrot , "floats" (1 Kings 5:9);Ζif (1 Kings 6:1; 1 Kings 6:37); chapha' , "act secretly" (2 Kings 17:9); yatsiah , "chamber" (1 Kings 6:5-6; 1 Kings 6:10) ma'abeh , "clay" (1 Kings 7:46); nada' , "drive" (2 Kings 17:21); neshiy , "debt" (2 Kings 4:7); sar , "heavy" (1 Kings 20:43; 1 Kings 21:4-5); pharbar , "suburbs" (2 Kings 23:11); qab , "measure" (2 Kings 6:25); qabal , "before" (2 Kings 15:10); tabanowt , "camp" (2 Kings 6:8); kothereth "chaptier", mezammerot "snuffers", both in Kings, Chronicles, and Jeremiah; mekonah , "base", in Ezra also. 15, section 1) makes him to be Jeremiah. Probably Jeremiah died in Egypt and hardly lived until 66 years after his call to prophesy, i. Our author was doubtless acquainted with the prophecies of Jeremiah. , and Jeremiah 52, are both extracts from a fuller account of Jerusalem's fall. Jeremiah 52 was probably written by someone else, as Jeremiah having recorded the history in the proper place (Jeremiah 39:40) was not likely to repeat it over again. ...
But in favor of Jeremiah's authorship is the fact that certain words are used only in Kings and in Jeremiah: baqbuq , "cruse" (1 Kings 14:3; Jeremiah 19:1; Jeremiah 19:10); yagab , "husbandman" (2 Kings 25:12; Jeremiah 52:16); chabah , "hide" (1 Kings 22:25; Jeremiah 49:10); 'awar , "to blind" (2 Kings 25:7; Jeremiah 39:7). The frequent reference to the Pentateuch accords with the interest Jeremiah was sure to feel in the discovery under Josiah of the temple copy (Jeremiah 11:3-5 compare Deuteronomy 27:26; Jeremiah 32:18-21 compare Exodus 20:6; Exodus 6:6 Jeremiah 34:14 compare Deuteronomy 15:12). Jeremiah's prophecies and Kings shed mutual light on one another and have undesigned coincidences: 2 Kings 25:1-3, compare Jeremiah 38:1-9; Jeremiah 39:1-7; 2 Kings 25:11-12; 2 Kings 25:18-21, compare Jeremiah 39:10-14; Jeremiah 40:1-5; 2 Kings 24:13; 2 Kings 25:13, compare Jeremiah 27:18-20; Jeremiah 28:3-6; 2 Kings 24:14 compare Jeremiah 24:1; Jeremiah 24:2 Kings 21-23; compare Jeremiah 7:15; Jeremiah 15:4; Jeremiah 19:3. ...
The absence of mention of Jeremiah in Kings, though he was so prominent in the reigns of the last four kings, is just what we might expect if Jeremiah be the author of Kings. The mention of Seraiah and Zephaniah as slain by Nebuchadnezzar (2 Kings 25:18) accords with Jeremiah 21:1; Jeremiah 29:25-29, wherein Zephaniah appears as of the faction that opposed Jeremiah and was headed by priests and false prophets. Compare also 2 Kings 24:2; 2 Kings 24:7 with Jeremiah 25:9; Jeremiah 25:20-21; 1 Kings 22:53; 1 Kings 22:43. Contemporary prophets, as Isaiah, with Ahaz and Hezekiah, Jeremiah with Jehoiakim and Zedekiah, elucidate the histories of Kings just as the epistles of New Testament are commentaries on Acts
Caterpiller - In Psalm 105:34 ; Jeremiah 51:14,27 the word is yeleq, and is elsewhere translated CANKERWORM, q
Jeremiah ben abba - " it is a reference to Rabbi Jeremiah
Trim - Jeremiah 2:33 (b) This expression is used to describe the preparations which men make to obtain that which they desire
Lees - Jeremiah 48:11 (b) These refer to the sins of Moab
Jahaz - In Isaiah 15:4 , and Jeremiah 48:21 , it appears as again in the hands of the Moabites
Palmer-Worm - This old English term, meaning pilgrim-worm, is used in Jeremiah 1:4 2:25 Amos 4:9 , like "canker-worm" and "caterpillar," for the locust in one of another of its various species or transitions
Shephatiah - A contemporary of Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 38:1 )
Perseverance of the Saints - It, moreover, follows from a consideration of (1) the immutability of the divine decrees (Jeremiah 31:3 ; Matthew 24:22-24 ; Acts 13:48 ; Romans 8:30 ); (2) the provisions of the covenant of grace (Jeremiah 32:40 ; John 10:29 ; 17:2-6 ); (3) the atonement and intercession of Christ (Isaiah 53:6,11 ; Matthew 20:28 ; 1 Peter 2:24 ; John 11:42 ; 17:11,15,20 ; Romans 8:34 ); and (4) the indwelling of the Holy Ghost (John 14:16 ; 2 co 1:21,22 ; 5:5 ; Ephesians 1:14 ; 1 John 3:9 )
Kiriathaim - The Moabites controlled the city during the Exile (Jeremiah 48:1 ,Jeremiah 48:1,48:23 ; Ezekiel 25:9 )
Siege - Deuteronomy 28:53-57 described the horrible actions to which siege leads (compare Jeremiah 19:9 ). One response was to “gather up your goods and flee the country” (Jeremiah 10:17 REB)
Weapon - (See Jeremiah 50:25). ...
Jeremiah 51:20 (a) This type is used to describe the nation of Babylon which GOD used as an instrument for destroying other nations that were rebellious against Him, including Israel
Ahab - 3406, seduced the Jewish captives at Babylon with hopes of a speedy deliverance, and stirred them up against Jeremiah. The Lord threatened them with a public and ignominious death, before such as they had deceived; and that their names should become a curse; men wishing that their foes might be made like Ahab and Zedekiah, whom Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon roasted in the fire, Jeremiah 29:21-22
Cistern - Isaiah 36:16; Jeremiah 2:13. When dry, they might be used as a prison, Genesis 37:22; Jeremiah 38:6; the "pit" was doubtless a cistern, or a granary, as at this day; and to drink water only from one's own domestic cistern means, to content one's self with the lawful enjoyments of his own home
Jazer - Jeremiah echoed him (Jeremiah 48:32 )
Cave - Petra, in Idumea, was a city of caves, Numbers 24:21 Song of Song of Solomon 2:14 Jeremiah 49:16 Obadiah 1:3 . Natural cavities were sometimes enlarged, and artificial ones made for refuge and defense, Judges 6:2 1 Samuel 13:6 Isaiah 2:19 Jeremiah 41:9
Balm, or More Properly, Balsam - The gum or inspissated juice which exudes from the balsam-tree, the Opobalsamum, which was anciently frequent in Judea, and particularly in Gilead, Jeremiah 8:22 ; 46:11 . It is very costly, and is still in the highest esteem among the Turks and other oriental nations, both as a medicine and as a cosmetic for beautifying the complexion, Genesis 37:25 ; Jeremiah 51:8 ; Ezekiel 27:17
Jehoiachin - He is also called Coniah, and Jeconiah, 1 Chronicles 3:16 Jeremiah 27:20 37:1 . The prediction in Jeremiah 22:30 , signified that no son of his should occupy the throne, 1 Chronicles 3:17,18 Matthew 1:12
Clay - (Psalm 18:42 ; Isaiah 57:20 ; Jeremiah 38:6 ) and in the New Testament, (John 9:6 ) a mixture of sand or dust with spittle. (Job 38:14 ) Our Lord's tomb may have been thus sealed, (Matthew 27:66 ) as also the earthen vessel containing the evidences of Jeremiah's purchase. (Jeremiah 32:14 ) The seal used for public documents was rolled on the moist clay, and the tablet was then placed in the fire and baked
Lions - They had their lairs in the forests (Jeremiah 5:6 ; 12:8 ; Amos 3:4 ), in the caves of the mountains (Song of Solomon 4:8 ; Nahum 2:12 ), and in the canebrakes on the banks of the Jordan (Jeremiah 49:19 ; 50:44 ; Zechariah 11:3 ). , a "suckling"), the lion's whelp ( Genesis 49:9 ; Jeremiah 51:38 , etc. , "shaggy"), the young lion ( Judges 14:5 ; Job 4:10 ; Psalm 91:13 ; 104:21 ), a term which is also used figuratively of cruel enemies (Psalm 34:10 ; 35:17 ; 58:6 ; Jeremiah 2:15 )
Island - Modern translations sometimes replace the island or isle of the KJV with the terms coast, coastline, or coastland (compare Genesis 10:5 ; Esther 10:1 ; Psalm 97:1 ; Isaiah 11:11 ; Jeremiah 2:10 ). “Islands” frequently appears in parallel to peoples/nations (Isaiah 41:1 ; Isaiah 51:5 ; Isaiah 66:19 ; Jeremiah 31:10 ) and to the earth (Isaiah 42:4 ). Crete (the Old Testament Caphtor, Jeremiah 47:4 ; Amos 9:7 ) is an island 152 miles long located to the southeast of Greece (Titus 1:5 , Titus 1:12 ). Cyprus (home of the Old Testament Chittim, Jeremiah 2:10 ; Ezekiel 27:6 ) is an island 75 miles long located toward the eastern end of the Mediterranean (Acts 4:36 ; Acts 11:19-20 among others)
Mount - An earthwork in connexion with siegecraft ( Jeremiah 6:6 and oft
Pathros - The name generally given to Upper Egypt (the Thebaid of the Greeks), as distinguished from Matsor, or Lower Egypt (Isaiah 11:11 ; Jeremiah 44:1,15 ; Ezekiel 30:14 ), the two forming Mizraim
Swelling - Of Jordan (Jeremiah 12:5 ), literally the "pride" of Jordan (as in RSV), i
Sickle - There was also a sickle used for warlike purposes, more correctly, however, called a pruning-hook (Deuteronomy 16:9 ; Jeremiah 50:16 , marg
Wages - Rate of (mention only in Matthew 20:2 ); to be punctually paid (Leviticus 19:13 ; Deuteronomy 24:14,15 ); judgements threatened against the withholding of (Jeremiah 22:13 ; Malachi 3:5 ; Compare James 5:4 ); paid in money (Matthew 20:1-14 ); to Jacob in kind (Genesis 29:15,20 ; 30:28 ; 31:7,8,41 )
Mephaath - In Jeremiah's time the town was in Moabite hands (Jeremiah 48:21 )
Gadfly - Jeremiah 46:20 pictured Nebuchadnezzar as a gadfly attacking Egypt which was pictured as a fat heifer
Furnaces, Tower of - The “Baker's Street” (Jeremiah 37:21 ) may have passed by this tower
Azriel - Father of royal officer commanded to arrest Baruch, Jeremiah's scribe (Jeremiah 36:26 )
Charger(s) - Horses used in battle to charge or attack ( Nahum 2:3 NRSV; compare TEV, REB based on early Greek translations; compare Isaiah 31:1 ,Isaiah 31:1,31:3 ; Jeremiah 8:6 ; Revelation 6:2 )
Almon-Diblathaim - of the Arnon) and the Abarim range (Numbers 33:46-47); probably the same as Beth-Diblathaim of Moab (Jeremiah 48:22), which Mesha mentions in the famous Moabite stone as "built" by him and colonized with Moabites
Caphtor - In Jeremiah 47:4 the 'isles,' margin , may only signify 'maritime border
Post - ‘Post’ is used in 2 Chronicles 30:6 , Esther 8:14 , Job 9:25 , Jeremiah 51:31 for ‘a bearer of despatches,’ ‘a runner
Residue - Jeremiah 15
Baldness - (Leviticus 13:29 ; 2 Kings 2:23 ; Isaiah 3:24 ; 15:2 ; Jeremiah 47:5 ; Ezekiel 7:18 ) Artificial baldness marked the conclusion of a Nazarite's vow, (Numbers 6:9 ; Acts 18:18 ) and was a sign of mourning
Exile - Nebuchadnezzar, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 25:1 ), invaded Judah, and carried away some royal youths, including Daniel and his companions (B. 598 (Jeremiah 52:28 ; 2 Kings 24:12 ), in the beginning of Jehoiachin's reign (2 Kings 24:8 ), Nebuchadnezzar carried away captive 3,023 eminent Jews, including the king (2 Chronicles 36:10 ), with his family and officers (2 Kings 24:12 ), and a large number of warriors (16), with very many persons of note (14), and artisans (16), leaving behind only those who were poor and helpless. ), there was a second general deportation of Jews by Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 52:29 ; 2 Kings 25:8 ), including 832 more of the principal men of the kingdom. The entire number Nebuchadnezzar carried captive was 4,600 heads of families with their wives and children and dependants (Jeremiah 52:30 ; 43:5-7 ; 2 Chronicles 36:20 , etc. It cannot be questioned that many belonging to the kingdom of Israel ultimately joined the Jews under Ezra, Zerubbabel, and Nehemiah, and returned along with them to Jerusalem (Jeremiah 50:4,5,17-20,33-35 )
Waymark - In Jeremiah 31:21 (20) ‘the virgin of Israel’ is called on to set up waymarks and make guide-posts to mark the way for the returning exiles
Elealeh - It is not again mentioned till the time of (Isaiah 15:4 ; 16:9 ) and (Jeremiah 48:34 )
Fuller's Soap - Mention is made (Proverbs 25:20 ; Jeremiah 2:22 ) of nitre and also (Malachi 3:2 ) of soap (Heb
Senses - , Jeremiah 4:19 , "(I am pained
Reins - Psalm 7:9 ; Jeremiah 11:20 ; 17:10 ; 20:12 )
Caphtor - In Jeremiah 47:4 and in Deuteronomy 2:23 , its inhabitants are called Caphtorim (compare Genesis 10:14 )
Lance, Lancet - A weapon consisting of a long shaft with a metal head; javelin; spear (Judges 5:8 , NEB: 1 Kings 18:28 , NAS, RSV; Jeremiah 50:42 , KJV)
Mirth - Jeremiah 7 ...
Sheth - Sheth is related to shaon in the parallel "tumultuous ones," Hebrew "children of tumult" (Jeremiah 48:45); others make Sheth a Moabite king
Che'Mosh - ( Numbers 21:29 ; Jeremiah 48:7,13,46 ) In (Judges 11:24 ) he also appears as the god of the Ammonites
Heifer - The well-fed heifer was a symbol of wanton wildness, Jeremiah 46:20 50:11 Hosea 4:16
Rab-Mag, - (Jeremiah 39:3,13 ) a title borne by Nergal-sharezer, probably identical with the king called by the Greeks Neriglissar
Pity - Enemies lacked pity (Psalm 17:10 ; Psalm 69:20 ; Isaiah 13:18 ; Jeremiah 21:7 ). In judgment, God withholds pity from God's people (Jeremiah 13:14 ; Jeremiah 20:16 ; Lamentations 2:17 ; Lamentations 3:43 ; Ezekiel 5:11 )
Seventy Years - Jeremiah predicted that Judah would serve Babylon 70 years ( Jeremiah 25:11 ; compare Jeremiah 29:10 ). ...
Daniel meditated on Jeremiah's prophecy (Daniel 9:2 ) and learned that 70 weeks of years were intended (Daniel 9:24 )
Zedekiah - Prophet who promised quick hope to Exiles in Babylon (Jeremiah 29:21 ). Jeremiah pronounced God's judgment on him. Royal official in Jeremiah's day (Jeremiah 36:12 )
Ambush - Jeremiah accused his people of spiritual ambush against one another (Jeremiah 9:8 ). He also called for ambushes to defeat Babylon (Jeremiah 51:12 )
Migdol - In Jeremiah 44:1 ; Jeremiah 46:14 Migdol is mentioned with Tahpanhes and Noph (Memphis) as a habitation of the Jews, and is probably the same as No
Slander, Talebearing - ’ The expression ‘walking with slanders’ ( Jeremiah 6:28 ; cf. Jeremiah 9:4 ) is in the original identical with ‘going about as a talebearer’ ( Leviticus 19:16 , Proverbs 11:13 ; Proverbs 20:19 ; cf
Tamarisk - ]'>[8] in Jeremiah 17:6 (cf. Jeremiah 48:6 ), but probably a species of juniper is intended here
Captivity, Babylonian - They preserved their old clan relations (1 Esdras 2); had their own judges and magistrates (Jeremiah 29; Daniel 13); and some rose to positions of honor and responsibility (Daniel 1; Jeremiah 52; Esther 2)
Anathoth - It is chiefly notable, however, as the birth-place and usual residence of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 1:1 ; 11:21-23 ; 29:27 ; 32:7-9 )
Furnace - Biblical references to furnaces are mostly figurative for experiences of testing (of the Egyptian bondage, Deuteronomy 4:20 ; 1 Kings 8:51 ; Jeremiah 11:4 ; of adversity, Isaiah 48:10 ). God's stubbornly rebellious people are pictured as “rejected silver” (Jeremiah 6:30 ) and as dross, the waste product of the smelting process (Ezekiel 22:17-22 )
Malcham - The Hebrew malcam is sometimes seen as a deliberate scribal misspelling of Milcom (compare Jeremiah 49:1 ,Jeremiah 49:1,49:3 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ), the common name for the Ammonites' god (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 ; Zephaniah 1:5 ), the common name for the Ammonites' god (1Kings 11:5,1 Kings 11:33 ; 2 Kings 23:13 )
Word of od - Below are given some of the types which are used to describe the Word of GOD, which is the Bible:...
Bow Habakkuk 3:9 (a)...
Judge John 12:48 (a)...
Buckler Psalm 18:30 (a)...
Lamp, Psalm 119:105 (a)...
Fire, Jeremiah 23:29 (a)...
Laver, Exodus 30:18 (c)...
Hammer, Jeremiah 23:29 (a)...
Light, Psalm 119:105 (a)...
Meat, 1 Corinthians 3:2 (b)...
Milk, 1 Peter 2:2 (a)...
Rain, Isaiah 55:10-11 (a)...
Seed, Luke 8:11 (a)...
Shield, Psalm 91:4 (a)...
Snow, Isaiah 55:10-11 (a)...
Spoil Psalm 119:162 (a)...
Sword Ephesians 6:17 (a)...
Truth John 17:17 (a)...
Water Ephesians 5:26 (a)...
Micah 7:3 (b) Here we see the care with which wicked men seek to cover up their evil actions, and to prevent the public from seeing what they are doing
Bitter - Jeremiah 2 ...
8. Job 23; Jeremiah 6:31
Bozrah - Jeremiah 49:13; Amos 1:12; Micah 2:12; perhaps Buseireh, in the mountains of Petra, 20 miles southeast of the Dead Sea. Jeremiah 48:24
Shemaiah - A false prophet among the exiled Jews in Babylon, who opposed the prophet Jeremiah, and incurred divine judgments on himself and his family. For his name, Nehelamite, a dreamer, Jeremiah 29:24-32
Babylonian Captivity - They preserved their old clan relations (1 Esdras 2); had their own judges and magistrates (Jeremiah 29; Daniel 13); and some rose to positions of honor and responsibility (Daniel 1; Jeremiah 52; Esther 2)
Cistern, - Joseph was cast into a "pit," (Genesis 37:22 ) as was Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 38:6 )
Carmel - Mount Carmel was the only major headland on the Palestine coast (Jeremiah 46:18). The mountains had good forests and pasture lands (Isaiah 33:9; Isaiah 35:2; Jeremiah 50:19; Amos 1:2; Amos 9:3; Nahum 1:4)
Hinnom, Valley of - HINNOM, VALLEY OF (called also ‘valley of the son [1] or children [2] of Hinnom,’ and ‘the valley’ [3]). It was close to the walls of Jerusalem ‘by the entry of the gate Harsith’ ( Jeremiah 19:2 RV Hananiah - Jeremiah 36:12. Son of Azur, the prophet of Gibeon, a priests' city (Jeremiah 28). In the fourth year of Zedekiah's reign Hananiah, in opposition to Jeremiah, foretold that Jeconiah and the captives at Babylon would return with all the vessels of the Lord's house within two years. Their ambassadors had therefore come to Jerusalem, but were sent back with yokes and a divine message from Jeremiah that their several masters must submit to Nebuchadnezzar's yoke, to whom God had given these lands and the very beasts of the field, or else be punished with sword, famine, and pestilence (Jeremiah 27). ...
Hananiah broke off the yokes on Jeremiah's neck, in token of God's breaking off Nebuchadnezzar's yoke. Jeremiah said Amen, praying it might be so; but warned him that for the broken wooden yokes he should have iron yokes, adding "Hananiah, the Lord hath not sent thee, but thou makest this people trust in a lie . Jeremiah 37:13
Cuttings in the Flesh - The reference is to the practice, not confined to the Hebrews or even to their Semitic kinsfolk, of making incisions in the face, hands ( Jeremiah 48:37 ), and other parts of the body to the effusion of blood, as part of the rites of mourning for the dead (see Marks, § 4), and by a natural transition, to which the wearing of sackcloth forms a parallel, in times of national calamity. Jeremiah 16:6 ; Jeremiah 41:5 ; Jeremiah 47:5 . Jeremiah 9:26 ; Jeremiah 25:23 , where certain desert tribes are named the ‘corners clipt,’ from their habit of shaving the temples, see Hair), and to ‘mar the corners of the beard’ (cf. Jeremiah 48:37 )
Ammon - ...
Moab was probably the more civilized half of Lot's descendants; whence we read of the plentiful fields, hay, summer fruits, vineyards, presses, songs of the grape treaders, of Moab (Isaiah 15; 16; Jeremiah 48): Ammon the more fierce, plundering, Bedouin-like half; whence we read of their threat of thrusting out the right eye of all in Jabesh Gilead (1 Samuel 11:2), ripping up pregnant women in Gilead (Amos 1:13), treacherously murdering, as Ishmael, Baalis' agent, did (Jeremiah 40:14; Jeremiah 41:5-7), suspecting and insulting their ally David to their own ruin (2 Samuel 10:1-5; 2 Samuel 12:31). Ammon's one stronghold, Rabbah, "the city of: waters" (20 cities are mentioned Judges 11:33, perhaps some Moabite cities), forms a contrast to Moab's numerous towns with their "high places" (Jeremiah 48); their idol, Moloch, accordingly they worshipped in a tent, the token of nomad life, not a fixed temple or high place, such as was appropriated to the god of the more settled people Moab (Amos 5:26; Acts 7:43). Ammon seized on the cities of Gad from which Tiglath Pileser had carried the Israelites (Jeremiah 49:1-6; Zephaniah 2:8-9). Solomon's Ammonite wives seduced him to rear an altar to this "abomination," to his own hurt (Jeremiah 49:1; Jeremiah 49:3)
Shemaiah - The Nehelamite, a false prophet at Babylon, who wrote urging Zephaniah the deputy priest to show his gratitude to God for his promotion to Jehoiada's place by exercising his power in imprisoning Jeremiah as "mad" (compare 2 Kings 9:11; Matthew 21:23; Acts 26:24; John 10:20 the Antitype) and putting him in stocks, because he had recommended the Jewish captives at Babylon to build, plant, and settle there as for a long time, in opposition to those who flattered them with promises of a speedy release. Jeremiah on hearing Shemaiah's letter read by Zephaniah, who was less prejudiced against him, declared from Jehovah, "Shemaiah shall not have a man to dwell among this people, neither shall he behold the good" (namely, the future restoration from Babylon), "because he caused you to trust a lie" and "hath taught rebellion against Jehovah," namely, against God's revealed will as to the time of the restoration (Jeremiah 29:24-32, compare Jeremiah 29:10; Jeremiah 28:16). Jeremiah 26:20. Jeremiah 36:12
Lud - The people called Lud were noted archers (Isaiah 66:19 ; Compare Jeremiah 46:9 )
Cushite - ...
...
The father of Shelemiah (Jeremiah 36:14 )
Apis - RSV and TEV divide the words in Jeremiah 46:15 differently than does printed Hebrew text
East, Children of the - A common designation of the inhabitants of the Syrian desert, who were partly Aramæan and partly Arabian ( Judges 6:3 ; Judges 8:10 , Ezekiel 25:4 ; Ezekiel 25:10 , Isaiah 11:14 , Jeremiah 49:28 , Job 1:3 )
Sarsechim - ]'>[1] official ( Jeremiah 39:3 ), but the versions Nabousachar, Nabousarach, Sarsacheim suggest that the text was early corrupt
te'ma - (a desert ), the ninth son of Ishmael, ( Genesis 25:15 ; 1 Chronicles 1:30 ) whence the tribe called after him, mentioned in (Job 6:19 ; Jeremiah 25:23 ) and also the land occupied by this tribe
Arpad - (Isaiah 10:9 ; 36:19 ; 37:13 ), also Arphad, support, a Syrian city near Hamath, along with which it is invariably mentioned (2 Kings 19:13 ; 18:34 ; Isaiah 10:9 ), and Damascus (Jeremiah 49:23 )
Ebed-Melech - He interceded with the king in Jeremiah's behalf, and was the means of saving him from death by famine (Jeremiah 38:7-13 : comp 39:15-18)
Elasah - ...
...
The son of Shaphan, one of the two who were sent by Zedekiah to Nebuchadnezzar, and also took charge of Jeremiah's letter to the captives in Babylon (Jeremiah 29:3 )
Hearth - ah (Jeremiah 36:22,23 ; RSV, "brazier"), meaning a large pot like a brazier, a portable furnace in which fire was kept in the king's winter apartment
Phut - Phut is placed between Egypt and Canaan in Genesis 10:6 , and elsewhere we find the people of Phut described as mercenaries in the armies of Egypt and Tyre (Jeremiah 46:9 ; Ezekiel 30:5 ; 27:10 )
Foreknowledge of God - In the most absolute sense his knowledge is infinite (1 Samuel 23:9-13 ; Jeremiah 38:17-23 ; 42:9-22 , Matthew 11:21,23 ; Acts 15:18 )
Kerioth - ...
...
A city of Moab (Jeremiah 48:24,41 ), called Kirioth (Amos 2:2 )
Koa - ) Babylon is the land of visitation; actively, visiting with judgment Judah; passively, to be visited with judgment (Jeremiah 50:21)
Maw - ]'>[2] in Jeremiah 51:34
Quartermaster - Officer charged with receipt and distribution of rations and supplies (Jeremiah 51:59 NASB, NRSV, REB)
Booty - Includes anything that might be of value or use to the captor including persons (Numbers 31:53 ; Jeremiah 15:13 ; Ezekiel 25:7 )
Nitre - Nitre is carbonate of soda or potash; mixed with oil it was used as "soap" (borit ): Jeremiah 2:22
Elealeh - Appropriated by Moab, and named as a Moabite town by Isaiah (Isaiah 15:4; Isaiah 16:9; Jeremiah 48:34) along with Heshbon
Luhith - Isaiah mourned for Moabite refugees who would have to climb the heights of Luhith to escape the enemy taking over their country (Isaiah 15:5 ; compare Jeremiah 48:5 )
Beth-Haccherem - BETH-HACCHEREM (‘place of the vineyard’), Nehemiah 3:14 , Jeremiah 6:1
Familiar - in Jeremiah 20:10 ‘All my familiars watched for my halting’ (RV Kiriathaim - of Madeba ( Genesis 14:5 , Numbers 32:37 , Joshua 13:19 , Jeremiah 48:23 , Ezekiel 25:9 ); unidentified
Coat of Mail - The "harness" (1 Kings 22:34 ), "breastplate" (Isaiah 59:17 ), and "brigandine" (Jeremiah 46:4 ), were probably also corselets or coats of mail
Chittim - ' It points originally to Cyprus (see KITTIM); but in Jeremiah 2:10 ; Ezekiel 27:6 the 'isles of Chittim' are spoken of, so it is evident that in the Prophets other islands are associated with Cyprus
Achbor - Father of king Jehoiakim's ready tool in evil, Elnathan (Jeremiah 26:22-23); Achbor was, on the contrary, an instrument of good Josiah, to inquire the Lord's will from the prophetess Huldah
Almon-Diblathaim - It may be the same as Beth-Diblathaim in Jeremiah 48:22
Gareb - A hill near Jerusalem ( Jeremiah 31:39 )
Omnipresence - It is the quality of being present in all places at all times (Jeremiah 23:23
Lud, Ludim - The same district is called LYDIA (though the Hebrew is simply Lud) and its inhabitants, LYDIANS, in Jeremiah 46:9 ; Ezekiel 30:5
Nitre - It effervesces with vinegar, Proverbs 25:28 , and is still used in washing, Jeremiah 2:22
Cane - The true odoriferous calamus or grass came from India; and the prophets speak of it as a foreign commodity of great value, Isaiah 43:24 Jeremiah 6:20 Ezekiel 27:19
Hoshai'ah - (Jeremiah 42:1 ; 43:2 ) (B
Almond - The early blossom meant for Jeremiah that the almond watched for spring and gave the prophet a wordplay on the almond (Hebrew, shaqed ) and his task to watch (Hebrew, shoqed ) (Jeremiah 1:11 )
Ashtoreth - She was the Ishtar of the Accadians and the Astarte of the Greeks (Jeremiah 44:17 ; 1 Kings 11:5,33 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ). It was called the "queen of heaven" (Jeremiah 44:25 )
Jehoiada - Leading priest in the time of Jeremiah preceding Zephaniah (Jeremiah 29:25-26 )
Mortar - " The husk upon the grain can be bruised off it, but the mortar of trial cannot remove the fool's folly inherent by nature and habit (Jeremiah 13:23). So Ahaz (2 Chronicles 28:22), Judah (Isaiah 1:5-6; Isaiah 9:13; Jeremiah 5:3)
Beard - Beards were trimmed with the most fastidious care (2 Samuel 19:24 ), and their neglet was an indication of deep sorrow (Isaiah 15:2 ; Jeremiah 41:5 ). The custom was to shave or pluck off the hair as a sign of mourning (Isaiah 50:6 ; Jeremiah 48:37 ; Ezra 9:3 )
Gilead, Balm of - The region of Gilead abounded in spices and aromatic gums, which were exported to Egypt and Tyre (Genesis 37:25 ; Jeremiah 8:22 ; 46:11 ; Ezekiel 27:17 ). ) It may be noted that Coverdale's version reads in Jeremiah 8:22 , "There is no triacle in Galaad
Hophni And Phinehas - "Sons of Belial," who, though knowing externally and professionally, "knew not the Lord" experimentally and practically (1 Samuel 2:12, compare Jeremiah 22:16; Titus 1:16). If Eli had "restrained them" firmly when "they made themselves vile," and had Israel thoroughly amended their ways, the ark, so far from falling into the foe's hands, would have been the pledge of victory over the foe (Jeremiah 7:4; Isaiah 48:2)
Line - Elsewhere the line serves as a surveying tool for measuring a larger distance (Psalm 16:6 ; Isaiah 34:17 ; Jeremiah 31:39 ; Zechariah 1:16 ; Zechariah 2:1-2 ). The surveying image is applied both to contexts where judgment (Amos 7:17 ) and restoration (Jeremiah 31:39 ; Zechariah 1:16 ; Zechariah 2:1 ) are in view
Kedar - They may best be described as nomadic, living in tents (Psalm 120:5 ; Song of Song of Solomon 1:5 ) and raising sheep and goats (Isaiah 60:7 ; Jeremiah 49:28-29 ,Jeremiah 49:28-29,49:32 ), as well as camels, which they sold as far away as Tyre (Ezekiel 27:21 )
Neco - The resulting power vacuum encouraged the ambitious Neco to seize Gaza as a base (Jeremiah 47:1 ) for a campaign to bring Syria under his control and to bring aid to the Assyrian remnant in their struggle with the rising force of Babylon. (Jeremiah 46:2 )
Leopard - Its beautiful spotted skin ( Jeremiah 5:6 ) is from time to time brought into the towns for sale. In the names ‘waters of Nimrîm ’ (‘leopards,’ Isaiah 15:6 , Jeremiah 48:34 ) and ‘Beth- nimrah ’ (‘f
Merodach - Merodach is a Hebraized form occurring only in Jeremiah 50:2 , but the Bçl of the Apocryphal Bçl and the Dragon ( Isaiah 46:1 , Jeremiah 51:44 ) is the same deity
Beast - The word is beir, translated 'brutish' in Psalm 94:8 ; Jeremiah 10:8,14,21 ; Jeremiah 51:17
Baker - In Jerusalem there was apparently a part devoted to the bakers, for Jeremiah was to have a piece of bread out of the Bakers' street (or Bazaar, as it would now be expressed in the East) as long as the bread lasted. Jeremiah 37:21
Pathros - Isaiah (Isaiah 11:11) foretells Israel's return from Pathros (Jeremiah 44:1; Jeremiah 44:15; Ezekiel 29:14
Jehoahaz - otherwise SHALLUM, the son of Josiah, king of Judah, Jeremiah 22:11 . King Necho, at his return from the expedition against Carchemish, provoked at the people of Judah for having placed this prince upon the throne without his consent, sent for him to Riblah, in Syria, divested him of the kingdom, loaded him with chains, and sent him into Egypt, where he died, Jeremiah 22:11-12
Treasure - So they say, a treasure of corn, of wine, of oil, of honey, Jeremiah 41:8 ; treasures of gold, silver, brass, Ezekiel 28:4 ; Daniel 11:43 . Snow, winds, hail, rain, waters, are in the treasuries of God, Psalms 135:7 ; Jeremiah 51:16
Molech, Moloch, or Milcom - A king, 1 Kings 11:5,7 Acts 7:43 ; supposed also to be intended by Malcham, or "their king," in Jeremiah 49:1 Amos 1:15 Zephaniah 1:5 , the name of a heathen deity, worshipped by the Ammonites. See Leviticus 18:21 20:2 Deuteronomy 12:31 Psalm 106:37,38 Jeremiah 7:31 19:2-6 32:35
Ner'Gal-Share'Zer - (prince of fire ) occurs only in ( Jeremiah 39:3 ) and Jere 39:13 There appear to have been two persons in the name among the "princes of the king of Babylon" who accompanied Nebuchadnezzar on his last expedition against Jerusalem. In sacred Scripture he appears among the persons who, by command of Nebuchadnezzar, released Jeremiah from prison
Jirjatha'im - (Joshua 12:19 ) It existed in the time of Jeremiah, (Jeremiah 48:1,23 ) and Ezekiel
di'Bon - (Joshua 13:9,17 ) In the time of Isaiah and Jeremiah, however, it was again in possession of Moab. (Isaiah 15:2 ; Jeremiah 48:18,22 ) comp
Cup - The "cup of consolation" (Jeremiah 16:7 ) refers to the custom of friends sending viands and wine to console relatives in mourning (Proverbs 31:6 ). A "cup" is also a type of sensual allurement (Jeremiah 51:7 ; Proverbs 23:31 ; Revelation 17:4 ). We read also of the "cup of astonishment," the "cup of trembling," and the "cup of God's wrath" (Psalm 75:8 ; Isaiah 51:17 ; Jeremiah 25:15 ; Lamentations 4:21 ; Ezekiel 23:32 ; Revelation 16:19 ; Compare Matthew 26:39,42 ; John 18:11 )
Forehead - A set forehead indicates opposition, defiance, and rebellion (Jeremiah 3:3 ). The forehead is used as a very dishonorable word when read of the harlot's forehead (Jeremiah 3:3 ), indicating utter shamelessness. ...
The biblical writers used the language of metaphors to describe the shameless apostasy and faithlessness of Israel (Jeremiah 3:3 ; Ezekiel 3:8-9 )
Ecstasy - Prophetic ecstasy could be accompanied by irrational behavior (1 Samuel 19:24 ; perhaps 1 Samuel 21:15 ) leading prophets to be identified with madmen (2 Kings 9:11 ; Jeremiah 29:26 ; Hosea 9:7 ). Efforts to control such prophetic expression (Jeremiah 29:26 ) were regarded as ill-founded (Jeremiah 29:31 )
to'Pheth, - and once To'phet ( place of burning ), was in the southeast extremity of the "valley of the son of Hinnom," ( Jeremiah 7:31 ) which is "by the entry of the east gate. " (Jeremiah 19:2 ) The locality of Hinnom is to have been elsewhere. ( 2 Kings 23:10 ; Isaiah 30:33 ; Jeremiah 7:31,32 ; 19:6,11,12,13,14 ) The New does not refer to it, nor the Apocrypha
Nimrah - The name is from leopards infesting the thick wood between the inner and outer banks of the Jordan, which overflows at times into that intermediate space and drives the wild beast out of its lair (Jeremiah 49:19; Jeremiah 50:44). there is no green thing"; even the city Nimrah, whose name means "limpid waters," which came down from the mountains of Gilead near Jordan, is without water, so that herbage is gone (Jeremiah 48:34), i
Euphrates - In Scripture the Euphrates is named as one of the rivers of Eden, Genesis 2:14; called "the great river," Genesis 15:18; Deuteronomy 1:7; noted as the eastern boundary of the Promised Land, Deuteronomy 11:24; Joshua 1:4; 1 Chronicles 5:9; and of David's conquests, 2 Samuel 8:3; 1 Chronicles 18:3; of those of Babylon from Egypt, 2 Kings 24:7; is referred to in prophecy, Jeremiah 13:4-7; Jeremiah 46:2-10; Jeremiah 51:63; and in Revelation 9:14; Revelation 16:12
Shemai'ah - (Nehemiah 12:42 ) ...
A false prophet in the time of Jeremiah. (Jeremiah 29:24-32 ) ...
A Levite in the reign of Jehoshaphat. (Jeremiah 26:20 ) (B. (Jeremiah 36:12 ) (B
Images - They might be painted ( Wis 13:14 ; Wis 15:4 ), dressed up ( Jeremiah 10:9 , Ezekiel 16:18 ), crowned and armed ( Bar 6:9 ; Bar 6:15 ). ), and secured from tumbling down ( Isaiah 41:7 , Jeremiah 10:4 ). Refreshments ( Isaiah 65:11 , Jeremiah 7:18 ) and kisses ( Hosea 13:2 , 1 Kings 19:18 ) were offered to them, as well as sacrifice and incense. ancient sculptures, and Isaiah 46:7 , Jeremiah 10:5 )
Weather - The rain came in the cooler season, beginning with early rains about October and concluding with later rains about March (Deuteronomy 11:14; Jeremiah 3:3; Jeremiah 5:24; Joel 2:23; see FARMING). In the central mountains the temperature dropped to about 10 degrees in the middle of winter, but only at Mt Hermon in the far north was there usually any snow (Jeremiah 18:14; cf. He was the God of nature (Psalms 68:9-10; Psalms 104:1-30; Jeremiah 10:13)
Alien - See Jeremiah 7:6 ; Jeremiah 22:3 ; Ezekiel 22:7 ,Ezekiel 22:7,22:29 . Jeremiah does lament that God appears to be an alien (Jeremiah 14:8 )
Alien - See Jeremiah 7:6 ; Jeremiah 22:3 ; Ezekiel 22:7 ,Ezekiel 22:7,22:29 . Jeremiah does lament that God appears to be an alien (Jeremiah 14:8 )
ma-Ase'Iah - (Jeremiah 21:1 ; 29:25 ; 37:3 ) ...
Father of Zedekiah the false prophet. (Jeremiah 29:21 ) ...
One of the Levites of the second rank, appointed by David to sound "with psaltries on Alamoth. (Jeremiah 35:4 ) comp, 1 Chronicles 9:19 ...
A priest; ancestor of Baruch and Seraiah, the sons of Neriah. (Jeremiah 32:12 ; 51:59 )
Ethiopia - The region it occupied is today the northern part of Sudan (Isaiah 18:1-2; Jeremiah 13:23; Ezekiel 29:10; for map of the region see EGYPT). In later times an Ethiopian who worked in the palace of the Judean king saved the life of God’s prophet Jeremiah (Jeremiah 38:7-13; Jeremiah 39:15-18)
Nitre - It is a carbonate of soda, not saltpetre, which the word generally denotes (Jeremiah 2:22 ; RSV "lye")
Paint - Jezebel "painted her face" (2 Kings 9:30 ); and the practice of painting the face and the eyes seems to have been common (Jeremiah 4:30 ; Ezekiel 23:40 )
Ashkenaz - They are mentioned in connection with Minni and Ararat, and hence their original seat must have been in Armenia (Jeremiah 51:27 ), probably near the Black Sea, which, from their founder, was first called Axenus, and afterwards the Euxine
Sihor - (Correctly Shi'hor) black; dark the name given to the river Nile in Isaiah 23:3 ; Jeremiah 2:18
Calamus - TheΑcorus Calamus (Isaiah 43:24; Jeremiah 6:20), "sweet cane
Rabmag - Assyrian Rab-mugi, "chief physician," "who was attached to the king (Jeremiah 39:3,13 ), the title of one of Sennacherib's officers sent with messages to Hezekiah and the people of Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17-19:13 ;; Isaiah 36:12-37:13 )) demanding the surrender of the city
Kir-Haraseth - Built fortress, a city and fortress of Moab, the modern Kerak, a small town on the brow of a steep hill about 6 miles from Rabbath-Moab and 10 miles from the Dead Sea; called also Kir-haresh, Kir-hareseth, Kir-heres (Isaiah 16:7,11 ; Jeremiah 48:31,36 )
Fillets - Jeremiah 52:21 uses a different Hebrew word to refer to a measuring line used to measure the circumference of a pillar
Delaiah - ...
...
A son of Shemaiah, and one of the courtiers to whom Jeremiah's first roll of prophecy was read (Jeremiah 36:12 )
Salathiel - The probable explanation of the apparent discrepancy is that he was the son of Neri, the descendant of Nathan, and thus heir to the throne of David on the death of Jeconiah (Compare Jeremiah 22:30 )
Dough - Dough was normally leavened, given time to rise, and then kneaded before baking (Jeremiah 7:18 ; Hosea 7:4 )
Adulterer - Jeremiah 9,23
Cankerworm, - The same Hebrew word is translated CATERPILLER in Psalm 105:34 ; Jeremiah 51:14,27
Hallow - Jeremiah 17 ...
3
Gareb - (See Jeremiah 31:39) If this hill was, as it is said to have been, three miles distant from Jerusalem, it serves to give a beautiful idea of the future extensiveness of the holy city
Pathros - Isaiah 11:11 Jeremiah 44:1,15 Ezekiel 29:14 30:14 , one of the three ancient divisions of Egypt, namely, Upper or Southern Egypt, which Ezekiel speaks of as distinct from Egypt, and the original abode of the Egyptians; as indeed Ethiopia and Upper Egypt really were
Parah - The Hebrew parath , often translated Euphrates (so KJV, NAS, NRSV), may refer to the spring Ain Farah at Jeremiah 13:4-7
Wages - The law and the gospel both require the full and prompt payment of a just equivalent for all services rendered according to agreement, Leviticus 19:13 Jeremiah 22:13 James 5:4
Teman - The men of Teman, Genesis 36:34 , like others of the Edomites, had the reputation of great wisdom, Jeremiah 49:7,20 Obadiah 1:21
Rab'Saris - (Jeremiah 39:3,13 ) Rabsaris is probably rather the name of an office than of an individual
Garden - Some were large (Esther 1:5 ), the most prominent gardens being royal ones (2 Kings 25:4 ; Nehemiah 3:15 ; Jeremiah 39:4 ). An abundant supply of water was especially important (Genesis 13:10 ; Numbers 24:6 ; Isaiah 1:30 ; Isaiah 58:11 ; Jeremiah 31:12 ). ...
Uses Obviously a garden provided food for its owner (Jeremiah 29:5 ,Jeremiah 29:5,29:28 ; Amos 9:14 ), but it also served other aesthetic and utilitarian purposes. The “king's garden” in Jerusalem was located near a gate to the city that provided unobserved exit or escape (2 Kings 25:4 ; Nehemiah 3:15 ; Jeremiah 39:4 ; Jeremiah 52:7 )
Vine, - Special mention is made in the Bible of the vines of Eshcol, (Numbers 13:24 ; 32:9 ) of Sibmah, Heshbon and Elealeh (Isaiah 16:8,9,10 ; Jeremiah 48:32 ) and of Engedi. (Isaiah 6:2,4 ; Jeremiah 2:21 ; Hosea 10:1 ) It is a vine which our Lord selects to show the spiritual union which subsists between himself and his members. (Judges 8:27 ; Isaiah 16:10 ; Jeremiah 25:30 ) The grapes were gathered with shouts of joy by the "grape gatherers," (Jeremiah 25:30 ) and put into baskets. See (Jeremiah 6:9 ) They were then carried on the head and shoulders, or slung upon a yoke, to the "wine-press. " The vineyard, which was generally on a hill, ( Isaiah 5:1 ; Jeremiah 31:5 ; Amos 9:13 ) was surrounded by a wall or hedge in order to keep out the wild boars, (Psalm 80:13 ) jackals and foxes
Jehonadab - 2 Kings 10:15; 2 Kings 10:23; Jeremiah 35:8; Jeremiah 35:14; Jeremiah 35:16; Jeremiah 35:18; 1 Chronicles 2:55; "the (four) families of the scribes which dwelt at Jabez . Jeremiah (Jeremiah 35) argues, a fortiori, if earthly sons so honour their father how much more ought Judah, to whom God hath commanded "Return ye now every man from his evil way" by His prophets, "rising early and speaking," hearken to the heavenly Father; yet Judah has not done so
Vengeance - ”...
Human revenge against an enemy or enemies is demonstrated in a broad range of circumstances in the Old Testament documents (Genesis 4:23-24 ; Jeremiah 20:10 ). The motif occurs in this sense in the prayers of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 11:20 ; Jeremiah 15:15 ; Jeremiah 20:12 ) and of the psalmist (Psalm 58:10 ; Psalm 79:10 ; Psalm 94:1 ). The wrath of God was exhibited toward Babylon ( Jeremiah 51:6 ,Jeremiah 51:6,51:11 ,Jeremiah 51:11,51:36 ; Isaiah 47:3 ; Ezekiel 24:7-9 )
False Prophet - It was the Septuagint translators who introduced the term pseudoprophetes [ Jeremiah 6:13 ; 26:7-8,11 , 16 ; 27:9 ; 28:1 ; 29:1,8 ; 1 Kings 13:20-229 ). ...
False prophets prophesied lies (Jeremiah 6:13 ; 27:14 ; Zechariah 13:3 ), deceived the people with their dreams (Jeremiah 29:8 ), prophesied by the alleged authority of Baal (Jeremiah 2:8 ; 23:13 ), threatened the lives of the true prophets (Jeremiah 26:7 ), and dared to speak when they had not stood in the council of Yahweh and received a word directly from the Lord (Jeremiah 23:18 ). Typically, their prophecies promised peace when there was no peace to be had (Jeremiah 6:14 ; 8:11 ; 14:3 ; 23:17 ; 28:2,11 ; Ezekiel 13:17-234 ; Micah 3:5 ), for their visions were drawn out of their own hearts (Jeremiah 14:14 ; 23:16 ; Ezekiel 13:2-3 ; 22:28 ). ...
The fullest discussion of charges that could be brought against false prophets can be found in Jeremiah 23:9-39 . Jeremiah condemns the pseudoprophets on four grounds: (1) they are men of immoral character (v. ...
Thus it was the false prophet Hananiah who predicted in the name of "the Lord Almighty, the God of Israel" (Jeremiah 28:2 ) that the exiles would be restored to their homeland and Jehoiachin and the temple vessels returned (vv. At first, Jeremiah was startled by this apparent reversal in the revelation of God (v. This list is very similar to the four charges that Jeremiah brought in 23:9-39. ...
More often than not, the false prophets prophesied in the name of one or more false gods while they also syncretistically appealed to Yahweh's name (Jeremiah 23:13,17 , 25 ; 26:27 ). Overholt, The Threat of Falsehood: A Study in the Theology of the Book of Jeremiah ; J
Almond-Tree - Its Hebrew name signifies a watcher, and to this there is an allusion in Jeremiah 1:11
Malcam - , RSV, "their king;" Jeremiah 49:1,3 , RSV; Zephaniah 1:5 ), the national idol of the Ammonites
Espouse - It is referred to as figuratively illustrating the relations between God and his people (Jeremiah 2:2 ; Matthew 1:18 ; 2 co 11:2 )
Quiver - The Hebrew word (aspah) thus commonly rendered is found in Job 39:23 ; Psalm 127:5 ; Isaiah 22:6 ; 49:2 ; Jeremiah 5:16 ; Lamentations 3:13
Jonadab - Form used at times for Jehonadab in Jeremiah 35:1
Ghost - It is the translation of the Hebrew Nephesh_ and the Greek _pneuma , Both meaning "breath," "life," "spirit," the "living principle" ( Job 11:20 ; Jeremiah 15:9 ; Matthew 27:50 ; John 19:30 )
Stars - The eleven stars (Genesis 37:9 ); the seven (Amos 5:8 ); wandering (Jude 1:13 ); seen in the east at the birth of Christ, probably some luminous meteors miraculously formed for this specific purpose (Matthew 2:2-10 ); stars worshipped (Deuteronomy 4:19 ; 2 Kings 17:16 ; 21:3 ; Jeremiah 19:13 ); spoken of symbolically (Numbers 24:17 ; Revelation 1:16,20 ; 12:1 )
Truth - In Isaiah 59:14,15 , Jeremiah 7:28 , it means fidelity or truthfulness
Neck - Threatenings of coming judgments are represented by the prophets by their laying bands upon the people's necks (Deuteronomy 28:48 ; Isaiah 10:27 ; Jeremiah 27:2 )
Holon - A city of Moab near Heshbon ( Jeremiah 48:21 )
Roll - Volume means so (Jeremiah 36:2; Psalms 40:7; compare Deuteronomy 31:26; Ezekiel 2:9-10, where the writing "within and without" was contrary to the usage of writing only on one side, implying the fullness of the prophecy of woe
Soap - It was used of washing the body (Jeremiah 2:22 ) and of washing clothes (Malachi 3:2 )
Stocks - An instrument that secured the feet (and sometimes the neck and hands) of a prisoner (Job 13:27 ; Jeremiah 29:26 ; Acts 16:24 )
Raven - ...
Jeremiah 17:1 (a) The sins of Israel are indelibly written upon the pages of history and can never be erased or effaced from their persons
Crane - ...
Jeremiah 8:7 (a) Israel is said to know less about GOD's dealings than the crane knows about her own life
Kirjathaim - Called KIRIATHAIM in Jeremiah 48:1,23 ; Ezekiel 25:9 where it is associated with Moab, and devoted to judgement
Adamant, - the translation of the Hebrew word Shamir in ( Ezekiel 3:9 ) and Zechariah 7:12 In ( Jeremiah 17:1 ) it is translated "diamond
Adamant - The original word occurs again in Jeremiah 17:1, where it is translated "diamond," with which the writer's pen is said to be pointed
Hemlock - Hosea 10:4 Amos 6:12 , in Hebrew, ROSH, usually translated gall or bitterness, Deuteronomy 32:32 , and mentioned in connection with wormwood, Deuteronomy 29:18 Jeremiah 9:15 23:15 Lamentations 3:19
Tekoa - Jeremiah 6:1 , a city of Judah, now in ruins, situated on an extended height, twelve miles south of Jerusalem
Soap - Malachi 3:2 , Hebrew, borith, the cleanser; in Jeremiah 2:22 distinguished from nitre, which see
Phut or Put - A son of Ham, Genesis 10:6 , whose posterity are named with Cush and Ludim as serving in Egyptian armies, and as part of the host of Gog, Jeremiah 46:9 Ezekiel 27:10 30:5 38:5 Nahum 3:9
Evil-Merodach - His friendly treatment of Jehoiachin the captive king of Judah, in releasing him from prison and variously distinguishing him above other captives, is mentioned to his praise, 2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31 - 34
Raven - ...
Jeremiah 17:1 (a) The sins of Israel are indelibly written upon the pages of history and can never be erased or effaced from their persons
Health - The NRSV substituted recovery for health at Jeremiah 33:6 , though rendering the underlying Hebrew as health elsewhere (Jeremiah 8:22 ; Jeremiah 30:17 ) as in KJV
House - Reference is made to the stone (1 Kings 7:9 ; Isaiah 9:10 ) and marble (1 Chronicles 29:2 ) used in building, and to the internal wood-work of the houses (1 Kings 6:15 ; 7:2 ; 10:11,12 ; 2 Chronicles 3:5 ; Jeremiah 22:14 ). "Ceiled houses" were such as had beams inlaid in the walls to which wainscotting was fastened (Ezra 6:4 ; Jeremiah 22:14 ; Haggai 1:4 ). They were used, not only as places of recreation in the evening, but also sometimes as sleeping-places at night (1 Samuel 9:25,26 ; 2 Samuel 11:2 ; 16:22 ; Daniel 4:29 ; Job 27:18 ; Proverbs 21:9 ), and as places of devotion (Jeremiah 32:29 ; 19:13 )
Rama - (Isaiah 10:29 ) refers to it, and also Jeremiah, who was once a prisoner there among the other captives of Jerusalem when it was taken by Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 39:8-12 ; 40:1 ). Rachel, whose tomb lies close to Bethlehem, is represented as weeping in Ramah (Jeremiah 31:15 ) for her slaughtered children
Nest - (See Jeremiah 49:16; Habakkuk 2:9). ...
Jeremiah 48:28 (a) This type represents the believer who finds his home, his life, and all his affairs wholly resting in the Lord JESUS CHRIST, the Rock of Ages. ...
Jeremiah 49:16 (a) In this way the Lord describes the sinner who seeks to make for himself a comfortable place in which to live, but who omits GOD from his life
Babylon - Jeremiah 50:14 (b) Throughout chapters 50,51of this book, the actual city of Babylon is directly in view, but what is said about that city indicates clearly that it refers to the great religions and idolatries of the world which seek to depose GOD and enthrone their own philosophies. This is particularly true of Jeremiah 51:6 and Jeremiah 51:8 which evidently refer to the same situation that we find in the New Testament
Moon - Jeremiah also states that in Judah and Jerusalem cakes were made to the QUEEN OF HEAVEN, which is commonly supposed to refer to the moon, worshipped as Astarte. Jeremiah 7:18 ; Jeremiah 44:17-19,25
Nitre - נתר , Proverbs 25:20 ; Jeremiah 2:22 . Jeremiah alludes to this use of it, Jeremiah 2:22
Jeremiah - ...
THE most exquisite sensibility of soul was Jeremiah's singular and sovereign distinction above all the other Hebrew prophets. It was Jeremiah's life-long complaint to his mother that she had borne him, a man with such an unearthly sensibility of soul, into a world so out of joint for such souls. ...
Jeremiah was far and away the most spiritually-minded of all the prophets. That is to say, it was the inborn, original, and unparalleled sensibility of Jeremiah's mind and heart that the Lord took up and turned to His own service both in the preaching of this prophet and in the production of this book, which stands to this day second only to the Psalms as the most spiritual book in the Old Testament. Jeremiah is the true forerunner of our Lord. But Jeremiah has nothing of that decayed economy either in himself or in his book. Jeremiah's extraordinary inwardness, and depth, and absolutely pure spirituality, have all combined to deliver both himself and his book from all those apocalyptic, secular, and unspiritual interpretations which have so infested the other prophets. Neither Peter nor the mother of Zebedee's children, could accuse Jeremiah of having misled them in one word of his, in any chapter of his, concerning the coming Kingdom of the Messiah. And more and more as his ministry went on, Jeremiah strove with all his might to draw both the hearts and the imaginations of his people not only off all alliance with the kingdoms that were around them, but also off the too pictorial Kingdom of the Messiah that had been hung up before them. And, for his pains, Jeremiah was cast into prison again and again, and was maltreated as only the offscourings of the city were maltreated. Jeremiah was of all the prophets of the Old Testament the supreme prophet of the human heart. ' But in an infinitely deeper sense than that, Jeremiah was the prophet of God to the human heart. Jeremiah would have nothing from his hearers and readers but their heart. Let other prophets negotiate and send embassies as they pleased; Jeremiah, in season and out of season, for a long lifetime, laid siege to the hearts of his hearers. ...
And this is the true way still to preach, even at the same price; if only we had been born of our mothers to preach like Jeremiah. It is Jeremiah's sensibility and spirituality that both preachers and hearers need, and then we would both have the evidence in ourselves. And if one here and another there should smite you as Pashur smote Jeremiah, say to him, 'The Lord hath not called thy name Pashur, but Magor-missabib,' and go on with your heart-searching and heart-sanctifying preaching to other people. ...
Nazianzen says somewhere that Jeremiah was both by nature and by grace the most inclined to pity of all the prophets. There is nothing like the Lamentations of Jeremiah in the whole world again. There has been plenty of sorrow in every age, and in every land; but such another preacher and author as Jeremiah, with such a heart for sorrow, has never again been born. Dante comes next to Jeremiah, and we know that Jeremiah was that great exile's favourite prophet. 'There is nothing in all Scripture,' says Isaac Williams, 'so eloquent of love and sorrow and consolation as the 31st and 33rd chapters of Jeremiah. 'Hear me, for I know well myself what melancholy is! I also have lodged all my days in the melancholy inn!' As Jeremiah lodged also. Jeremiah's inconsolable melancholy was the mark and the measure of his greatness both as a man and as a prophet. All Jeremiah's tears did not keep back the Chaldeans for a single day's march. Jeremiah's tears were such that they gained the Holy Ghost for him before the Holy Ghost was given, and before Christ was glorified. And till I am justified in saying that Jeremiah at any rate was not a man of a light and elastic nature. Jeremiah, to borrow one of his own bitter words, had plenty of 'familiars' among his own people, but he had very few friends. Had Jeremiah had a friend among all his familiars, that solitary friend would have proved himself such by refusing to report it. But Jeremiah had no friend who would take the risk to understand and to defend his friend. And it was among such familiars, and in the lack of such friends, that Jeremiah sighed the sigh that has been taken up and sighed so often since that day: 'O that I might leave my people!' Jeremiah never was a married man. A helpmeet for Jeremiah was not to be found in all the house of Israel. If his Master had seen it good for His servant to have a wife and children, He would have made Jeremiah's second self, and would have brought her to him till Jeremiah's melancholy would for the time have been somewhat abated. ' And thus it was that what a sensitive and melancholy minister takes home and tells only to his wife, when he has a wife who is his friend, and not merely his familiar, all that Jeremiah took and told to God. ...
And, then, all that made Jeremiah the red-hot preacher that we still feel him to this day to have been. Pashur, the chief governor, was deputed on one occasion to tame, as we say, Jeremiah's pulpit. But I do not read that Jeremiah spake as he was moved by Pashur, the governor. Let Pashur preach himself if Jeremiah has too much sensibility, and spirituality, and sympathy, and melancholy for him. And let Jeremiah go on and preach out all the fire that God has kindled in his prophet's bones
Gilead - The region was also good for growing fruit and grain, and had hilly areas of forest (Numbers 32:1; Numbers 32:26; Numbers 32:36; Jeremiah 22:6; Jeremiah 50:19). It was famous for its balm, which people believed had healing properties and which they therefore used extensively in making medicines (Jeremiah 8:22; Jeremiah 46:11; Jeremiah 51:8)
Hanan - Jeremiah used their Temple chamber for his meeting with the Rechabites (Jeremiah 35:4 )
Heifer - The heifer was used as a symbol for the splendor of Egypt (Jeremiah 46:20 ) and of Babylon (Jeremiah 50:11 )
Wolf - ]'>[3] , zeeb ‘wolf’), Genesis 49:27 , Isaiah 11:6 ; Isaiah 65:25 , Jeremiah 5:6 , Ezekiel 22:27 , Habakkuk 1:8 , Zephaniah 3:8 . It is seldom seen to-day, and never goes in packs, though commonly in couples; it commits its ravages at night, hence the expression ‘wolf of the evening’ ( Jeremiah 5:6 , Zephaniah 3:3 ); it was one of the greatest terrors of the lonely shepherd ( John 10:12 ); persecutors are compared to wolves in Matthew 10:18 , Acts 20:29
Moon - They, however, fell into this idolatry, and offered incense (2 Kings 23:5 ; Jeremiah 8:2 ), and also cakes of honey, to the moon (Jeremiah 7:18 ; 44:17-19,25 )
Hilkiah - ...
The father of Gemariah (Jeremiah 29:3 ). ...
The father of the prophet (Jeremiah 1:1 )
Leopard - They cunningly lie in wait in thickets and often near villages for their prey, as distinguished from the lion's bold, open attack (Jeremiah 5:6; Hosea 13:7): "as a leopard by the way, I will observe (lie in wait for) them. " Its unalterable spots represent man's inability to change himself (Jeremiah 13:23); yet the leopard in the millennium shall "lie down with the kid" (Isaiah 11:6)
Morter - The absence of the true uniting cement answers to the false prophet's lie, "thus saith Jehovah, when He had not spoken" (Ezekiel 22:28), false assurances of peace to flatter the people into non-submission to Nebuehadnezzar (Ezekiel 21:29; Jeremiah 6:14; Jeremiah 23:16-17)
Axe - " It is also used in Jeremiah 10:3 , and rendered "axe. " The "battle-axe" (army of Medes and Persians) mentioned in Jeremiah 51:20 was probably, as noted in the margin of the Revised Version, a "maul" or heavy mace
Engrave - Engraving was frequently done with an iron pen, a stylus, sometimes with a diamond point (Job 19:24 ; Jeremiah 17:1 ). Signet rings engraved with the sign or symbol of the owner were quite common throughout the ancient world (Genesis 38:18 ; Esther 3:12 ; Jeremiah 22:24 )
Magi - Wise men, "rabmag," Jeremiah 39:3, which is used as a proper name, and properly signifies the prince Magus, or chief of the Magi. " Isaiah 44:25; Jeremiah 50:35; Daniel 2:12-27; Daniel 4:6; Daniel 4:18; Daniel 5:7-8; Daniel 5:11-12; Daniel 5:15
Locust - The image of the locust plague was also used to symbolize being overwhelmed by a large and powerful army (Judges 6:5 ; Isaiah 33:4 ; Jeremiah 46:23 ; Jeremiah 51:27 ; Joel 2:20 ; Nahum 3:15 )
Skirt - Several references to Jerusalem use this word figuratively to show her sin ( Jeremiah 13:22 ,Jeremiah 13:22,13:26 ; Lamentations 1:9 ; Nahum 3:5 )
Valley - Emech is a long, broad sweep between parallel ranges of hills ( Numbers 14:25 ; Joshua 8:13 ; Jeremiah 21:13 ). Shephelah is the low land, plain, or slope sweeping gently down from mountains ( Deuteronomy 10:1 ; Joshua 9:1 ; Jeremiah 17:26 )
Leaf, Leaves - God's providential care for the righteous is pictured by the image of a well-watered tree whose leaves do not wither (Psalm 1:3 ; compare Jeremiah 17:8 ). A tree lacking fruit with withered leaves (Jeremiah 8:13 ) symbolizes a people found lacking when God judges (compare Matthew 21:19 ; Mark 11:13 )
Arnon - Jeremiah called for a messenger to announce Moab's defeat by the Arnon (Jeremiah 48:20 )
Stocks - (1) Μahpeketh ; Jeremiah 20:2; Jeremiah 29:23, from hapak "rack"; our "pillory"; the word implies the body was bent, the arms and neck as well as the leg being confined
Branch - We find Christ spoken of, under the spirit of prophecy, by the Lord JEHOVAH, in this character by three of the prophets, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Zechariah. (Isaiah 4:2 and Isaiah 11:1; Jeremiah 23:5 and Isaiah 33:15; Zechariah 3:8) The word Branch in the original is Netzer, which signifies, a city of plants
Hinnon - The prophets Isaiah and Jeremiah both speak of this awful spot. (Isaiah 30:33; Jeremiah 7:31) And it is said, that Josiah, the good king, "defiled the place;" that is, he destroyed it for the purpose for which it had been used, by those wretched parents who had been deluded to sacrifice their children to the idol-god Molech, in this spot
Nest - They observed the home-like motive of rest and safety in the selection and construction of birds’ nests (Job 29:18, Psalms 84:3; Psalms 104:17, Jeremiah 48:28; Jeremiah 49:16)
Kir - Moab's two strongholds were Ar (mother) of Moab, the metropolis, and Kit of Moab (2 Kings 3:25) on the most elevated hill in the country (Isaiah 16:7; Isaiah 16:11; Isaiah 15:1; 2 Kings 3:25; Jeremiah 48:31; Jeremiah 48:36). "the cities"), Kartah, Kartan (Joshua 21:32; Joshua 15:25; Jeremiah 48:23-24; Jeremiah 48:41; Amos 2:2)
Spices - Some spices were grown locally, but many were imported from the East, bringing wealth to traders and to the governments who taxed them (Genesis 37:25; 1 Kings 10:2; Song of Song of Solomon 3:6; Isaiah 60:6; Jeremiah 6:20; Ezekiel 27:17; Revelation 18:11-13). Among these spices were frankincense, myrrh, galbanum, stacte, onycha, cassia, aloes, cummin, dill, cinnamon, mint, rue, mustard, balm, sweet cane, henna, nard, saffron and calumus (Genesis 37:25; Exodus 30:23-24; Exodus 30:34; Song of Song of Solomon 3:6; Song of Solomon 4:13-14; Jeremiah 6:20; Matthew 23:23; Luke 11:42; Luke 13:19). People used spices in preparing food and drinks (Song of Song of Solomon 8:2; Ezekiel 24:10; Matthew 23:23), and in making a variety of oils, medicines, cosmetics, deodorants and disinfectants (Esther 2:12; Psalms 45:8; Proverbs 7:17; Song of Song of Solomon 4:10; Song of Solomon 4:14; Song of Solomon 5:13; Jeremiah 8:22; Jeremiah 51:8; Luke 7:46; John 12:3; John 19:39)
Heal - ...
Jeremiah 3:22 (a) This is a promise from GOD that He will repair the damage that has been done by and in Israel when they return to the Lord their GOD, and in humility walk again with Him. ...
Jeremiah 17:14 (a) In this way Jeremiah expressed his great desire for the Lord to minister comfort to his heart; his spirit was sore broken by the way he had been treated by the people whom he came to help. ...
Jeremiah 30:17 (a) This is a promise from GOD that He would repair the broken-down cities, cause the ground to be fertile, restore the rains, and make Israel again a healthy and happy nation of people
Shemaiah - Jeremiah 26:20 . The Nehelamite, a false prophet, condemned by Jehovah through Jeremiah. Jeremiah 29:24-32 . Jeremiah 36:12
Desolation - Jeremiah 50
Reprobate - That which fails to meet a test and is thus rejected as unworthy or unacceptable, as impure silver (Jeremiah 6:30 ); or persons (2 Corinthians 13:5-7 ; Titus 1:16 )
Shovel - Exodus 27:3 ; Exodus 38:3 , Numbers 4:14 , 1 Kings 7:40 ; 1Ki 7:45 , 2 Kings 25:14 , 2 Chronicles 4:11 ; 2 Chronicles 4:16 , Jeremiah 52:18 , of a utensil for removing the ashes from the altar
Fillets - In Jeremiah 52:21 the rendering of a different word, Hut , meaning a "thread," and designating a measuring-line of 12 cubits in length for the circumference of the copper pillars of Solomon's temple
Teman - It was noted for the wisdom of its inhabitants (Amos 1:12 ; Obadiah 1:8 ; Jeremiah 49:7 ; Ezekiel 25:13 )
Carcass - Jeremiah 19:7 (a) A term of derision used against the people of Jerusalem who, because of their wickedness, were to fall under the sword of their enemies
Tema - South; desert, one of the sons of Ishmael, and father of a tribe so called (Genesis 25:15 ; 1 Chronicles 1:30 ; Job 6:19 ; Isaiah 21:14 ; Jeremiah 25:23 ) which settled at a place to which he gave his name, some 250 miles south-east of Edom, on the route between Damascus and Mecca, in the northern part of the Arabian peninsula, toward the Syrian desert; the modern Teyma'
Inspection Gate - The Hebrew word is related to that of Jeremiah 52:11 , so some interpreters read, “prison tower” here
Virgin - The people of the land of Zidon are thus referred to by (Isaiah 23:12 ), "O thou oppressed virgin, daughter of Zidon;" and of the people of Israel, (Jeremiah 18:13 ) says, "The virgin of Israel hath done a very horrible thing
Igdaliah - Father of Hanan, in the chamber of whose sons Jeremiah (2 Timothy 35:4) met the Rechabites; as consecrated by its association with his name, it was a fit scene for the divine communication
Ink - Ink for writing on papyrus (a plant product) was made of soot or lampblack mixed with gum arabic (Jeremiah 36:18 ; 2 Corinthians 3:3 ; 2 John 1:12 ; 3 John 1:13 )
Nimrim, the Waters of - NIMRIM, THE WATERS OF ( Isaiah 15:6 , Jeremiah 48:34 )
Pit - A hole in the ground (Exodus 21:33,34 ), a cistern for water (Genesis 37:24 ; Jeremiah 14:3 ), a vault (41:9), a grave (Psalm 30:3 )
Executioner - So Nebuzaradan (Jeremiah 39:9), and Arioch (Daniel 2:14; Mark 6:27)
Eyes, Painting of - As Jezebel did (2 Kings 9:30 margin; Jeremiah 4:30), "thou rentest (distendest, triest to make appear large or laceratest) thy eyes (margin) with painting
Wolf - Fierce (Genesis 49:27; Ezekiel 22:27; Habakkuk 1:8; Matthew 7:15); prowling in the night (Jeremiah 5:6; Zephaniah 3:3); devouring lambs and sheep (John 10:12); typifying persecutors and heretical leaders (Matthew 10:16; Matthew 7:15; Acts 20:29); hereafter about to associate peacefully with the lamb under Messiah's reign (Isaiah 11:6; Isaiah 65:25)
Waterpot - Small pitchers were used for pouring water (Luke 22:10 ; see Jeremiah 19:1 )
Bundle - 435); also in Jeremiah 10:17 RVm Agabus - Jeremiah 13:1 ff
Jaazer, Jazer - In Jeremiah 48:32 the 'sea of Jazer' is supposed to refer to a lake in the neighbourhood
Cage - Jeremiah 5:27 (b) This is a name given to a home, synagogue, or temple where Satan's deceits are housed and protected, as the church building of a cult which is anti-Christian
Astray - ...
Jeremiah 50:6 (a) This represents the path of wrong teaching into which people are led by false shepherds
Lean - ...
Jeremiah 6:9 (b) This figure represents the thorough work of the enemies of the people of Judah when they invaded the land and carried them away as prisoners
Clanging - , Psalm 47:1 ; "to wail," Jeremiah 29:2 ; in the NT, in Mark 5:38 , of wailing mourners; in 1 Corinthians 13:1 , of the "clanging" of cymbals (AV, "tinkling")
Chimham - From there they escaped to Egypt (Jeremiah 41:17 )
Jehudi - ” Messenger for Jewish leaders calling Baruch to read Jeremiah's preaching to them and then messenger of the king to get the scroll so the king could read it. Still, God preserved His prophetic word (Jeremiah 36:11-32 )
Sign - The "signs of heaven" were the movements and aspects of the heavenly bodies, from which heathen astrologers pretended to obtain revelations, Isaiah 44:25 Jeremiah 10:2
Shadow - ...
The long shadows cast by the declining sun are alluded to in Job 7:2 Jeremiah 6:4
Owl - (Job 30:29 ; Jeremiah 50:39 ) Some of these species were common in Palestine, and, as is well known, were often found inhabiting ruins
Lean - ...
Jeremiah 6:9 (b) This figure represents the thorough work of the enemies of the people of Judah when they invaded the land and carried them away as prisoners