What does Jehoram mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יְהוֹרָם֙ son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 5
יוֹרָֽם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 3
יְהוֹרָ֛ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 2
יְהוֹרָ֨ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 2
וִֽיהוֹרָ֖ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
יוֹרָ֣ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
יוֹרָ֖ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
וְיוֹרָם֩ son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
יוֹרָ֑ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
יוֹרָ֨ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
יְהוֹרָ֣ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
לְיוֹרָ֥ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1
יְהוֹרָ֗ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
יְהוֹרָ֥ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
וִיהוֹרָ֣ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
יְהוֹרָ֧ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. 1
לְיוֹרָ֖ם son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal. / son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 1years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter. / a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith. / son of Toi 1

Definitions Related to Jehoram

H3088


   1 son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal.
   2 son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 12 years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter.
   3 a priest in the reign of Jehoshaphat.
   Additional Information: Jehoram or Joram = “Jehovah is exalted”.
   

H3141


   1 son of king Jehoshaphat of Judah and himself king of Judah for 8 years; his wife was the wicked Athaliah who was probably the instigator for his returning the nation of Judah to the worship of Baal.
   2 son of king Ahab of the northern kingdom of Israel and king of Israel himself for 12 years; he was murdered by Jehu on the plot of land for which his father had murdered Naboth thus fulfilling the prophecy of Elijah to the very letter.
   3 a Levite in the time of David and an ancestor of Shelomith.
   4 son of Toi, king of Hamath.
   Additional Information: Joram = “Jehovah is exalted”.
   

Frequency of Jehoram (original languages)

Frequency of Jehoram (English)

Dictionary

People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jehoram
Jehoram (je-hô'ram), whom Jehovah has exalted. 1. The son and successor of Jehoshaphat, king of Judah. He reigned eight years, three of which he was associated with his father, though some suppose that he reigned eight years alone. He married Athahah, the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel; and, through her influence, all the brothers of the king were murdered, and the gross idolatries of the Phœnicians were introduced into the kingdom of Judah. The Edomites revolted, and made themselves independent. The Philistines on one side, and the Arabians on the other, ravaged the country, and even Jerusalem and the royal palace. Jehoram was at length smitten with a malignant dysentery. He died miserably, and was denied the honors of a royal burial. He is also called Joram. 2 Kings 8:16; 2 Kings 8:21; 2 Kings 8:24; 2 Chronicles 21:2. One of the priests. 2 Chronicles 17:8. 3. See Joram.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jehoram
JEHORAM , in the shorter form JORAM , is the name of two kings in the OT.
1. Jehoram of Israel was a son of Ahab ( 2 Kings 3:1 ), and came to the throne after the brief reign of his brother Ahaziah. The first thing that claimed his attention was the revolt of Moab. This he endeavoured to suppress, and with the aid of Jehoshaphat of Judah he obtained some successes. But at the crisis of the conflict the king of Moab sacrificed his son to his god Chemosh. The result was that the invading army was discouraged, and the allies retreated without having accomplished their purpose ( 2 Kings 3:4 ff.). It is probable that the Moabites assumed the offensive, and took the Israelite cities of whose capture Mesha boasts. The prophet Elisha was active during the reign of Jehoram, and it is probable that the siege of Samaria, of which we have so graphic an account in 2 Kings 6:1-33 ; 2 Kings 7:1-20 , also belongs to this period. Jehoram engaged in the siege of Ramoth-gilead, and was wounded there. The sequel in the revolt of Jehu is well known. See Jehu.
2. Jehoram of Judah , son of Jehoshaphat, came to the throne during the reign of the other Jehoram in Israel. He was married to Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel. All that the history tells us is that he walked in the ways of the kings of Israel, and that Edom revolted successfully from Judah in his time. In endeavouring to subdue this revolt Jehoram was in great danger, but with a few of his men he cut his way through the troops that surrounded him ( 2 Kings 8:16-24 ).
3. A priest sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the Law ( 2 Chronicles 17:8 ).
H. P. Smith.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Jehoram
(jih hoh' ruhm) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh is exalted.” Alternate form of Joram. See Joram .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jehoram
("exalted by Jehovah"), JEHORAM or JORAM.
1. Son of Ahab, king of Israel. Succeeded his brother Ahaziah who had no son, 896 B.C., and died 884 B.C. Jehoram, king of Judah, had two accessions recorded in Scripture, and an earlier one not recorded, but conjectured by Usher;
(1) probably when Jehoshaphat went from his kingdom to Ramoth Gilead battle in his 17th year (2 Kings 3:1);
(2) when he retired from the administration, making his son joint king, in his 23rd year (2 Kings 8:16 margin);
(3) at Jehoshaphat's death, in his 25th year. (2 Chronicles 21:1; 1 Kings 22:50 margin)
Thus, the accession of Jehoram king of Israel in Jehoshaphat's 18th year synchronized with
(1) the second year after the first accession (2 Kings 1:17), and
(2) the fifth year before the second accession, of Jehoram king of Judah (2 Kings 8:16).
For the last year of his reign he synchronized with Ahaziah, Joram's son, slain along with him by Jehu (2 Kings 9). There was a close alliance between Judah and Israel, begun by Ahab his father with Jehoshaphat and continued by himself. With Judah (whose territory Moab had invaded, 2 Chronicles 20, and so provoked Jehoshaphat) and Edom as allies, Jehoram warred against Mesha, who had since Ahaziah's reign (2 Kings 1:1) withheld the yearly tribute due to Israel, "100,000 lambs and the wool of 100,000 rams" (Keil) (2 Kings 3; Isaiah 16:1). The allies would have perished for want of water in their route S. of the Dead Sea, then northwards through Edom and the rocky valley Ahsy which separates Edom from Moab, but for Elisha who had a regard for Jehoshaphat, and brought water to fill the wady Ahsy miraculously from God; the water was collected for use in (Jeremiah 14:3) the ditches made by his direction. (See DIBON; ELISHA.)
Rain fell probably in the eastern mountains of Edom far away from Israel, so that they perceived neither the wind which precedes the rain nor the rain itself; and this at the time of the morning "meat offering" to mark the return of God's favor in connection with sacrifice and prayer to Him. The reddish earth of the ditches colored the water, gleaming in the rising sun, and seemed blood to Moab, who supposed it to indicate a desperate conflict between the three kings. Edom's late attempt at rebellion (2 Chronicles 21:8) made the Moabites' supposition probable; and remembering how their own joint expedition against Judah with Ammon and Edom (20) had ended in mutual slaughter, they naturally imagined the same issue to the confederacy against themselves. After smiting the cities, telling the trees, stopping the wells, and marring the land, the allies pressed the king of Moab sore in his last stronghold Kir Haraseth, the citadel of Moab (Isaiah 15:1), now Kerak, on a steep chalk rock above the deep valley, wady Kerak, which runs westward into the Dead Sea.
Failing to break through the besiegers to the king of Edom, from whom he expected least resistance, he offered his firstborn son a burnt offering to Chemosh. (See CHEMOSH.) So there ensued "great wrath against Israel"; Israel's driving him to such an extremity brought on Israel some of the guilt of the human sacrifice offered. Their conscience and superstitious feelings were so roused (probably a divine sign visibly accompanying this feeling) that they gave up the siege and the subjugation of Moab. The Dibon stone records probably the victories of Mesha subsequent to this, though the allies' circuitous route S.E. of the Dead Sea, instead of directly E. across Jordan, may have resulted from Mesha's successes already in the latter quarter. Jehoram fell into Jeroboam's sin of worshipping Jehovah under the calf symbol, which every Israelite king regarded as a political necessity, but not into his father's and mother's Baal idolatry; nay, he removed Baal's statue (2 Kings 3:2-3).
Jehoshaphat's influence produced a compromise on both sides, to the spiritual good of neither, as always happens in compromises between the world and the church. Baal worship outlived such half hearted religious efforts. How could it be otherwise, when Jezebel lived throughout his reign, as whole-hearted for false gods as her son was half hearted for the true God! (2 Kings 9:30; 2 Kings 10:18 ff; 2 Kings 3:13). However, Jehoram's removal of Baal's statue seems to have drawn Elisha to him, so that the prophet was able to offer the Shunammite woman to speak to the king in her behalf (2 Kings 4:13). As Elisha spoke so sternly to him in 2 Kings 3:14, the removal of the Baal statue may have been subsequent to, and the consequence of, Jehoram's witnessing the deliverance of himself and his two allies, wrought through Jehovah's prophet in chapter 3.
The king's want of faith, yet mixed with recognition of God's exclusive omnipotence, appears in his answer to the Syrian king's command that he should heal Naaman of his leprosy, "Am I God to kill and to make alive, that this man," etc. (2 Kings 5:7; Deuteronomy 32:39); his unbelief ignored the existence of God's prophet in Israel. The miraculous cure deepened his respect for Elisha. The prophet again and again saved Jehoram by warning him of the position of the Syrian camp (2 Kings 6:8-12; compare Luke 12:3). Blinding, and then leading the Syrian hosts sent to surround him in Dothan, into the midst of Samaria, he checked Jehoram who would have smitten them ("wouldest thou smite those whom thou hast taken captive with thy sword?" Surely not. Much less those taken not in open battle, but by a device, combined with mental blindness sent by God), and caused him instead to set bread and water, "great provision" (2 Kings 6:22-23), before them, and then to send them home, the effect being that love melted the enemy's heart, and Syrian "bands" (i.e. flying bodies), reverencing God's power, for long ceased to harass Israel (Romans 12:20).
Abatement of the divine scourge, apparently, brought with it carnal security to Jehoram. Then followed a divinely sent regular war. Benhadad besieged Samaria; a terrible famine ensued. The tale of a mother who had slain her child for food, and complained of another mother having hidden hers contrary to agreement, roused Jehoram to rend his clothes; then appeared the hair sackcloth of mourning penitence "within" (mibaait ), a bore sign without the real repentance of heart, as his threat of murdering Elisha proves, Romans 12:31. The prophet probably had advised holding out, and promised deliverance if they humbly sought Jehovah (Jonah 3:6). Jehoram thought that by his sackcloth he had done his part; when God's help did not yet come, Jehoram vented his impatience on the prophet, as if Elisha's zeal for Jehovah against Baal was the cause of the calamity. (See ELISHA.)
Elisha, by deferring the entrance of the executioner, gave time for Jehoram's better feelings to work. He stayed the execution in person, then complained despairingly of the evil as "from Jehovah," as if it were vain to "wait still further for Jehovah." Elisha's prophecy of immediate plenty, and its fulfillment to the letter (2 Kings 7), restored the friendly relations between Jehoram and him (2 Kings 8:4). Jehoram's conversation with Gehazi about Elisha's great works and his raising the dead lad, and the Shunammite woman's return at that very time, occurred probably while the prophet was at Damascus prophesying to Hazael his coming kingship (2 Kings 8). Similarly Herod was curious about our Lord's miracles, and heard John Baptist gladly (Luke 9:9; Luke 23:8; Mark 6:14; Mark 6:20). A fascination draws bad men, in spite of themselves, toward God's servants, though it be only to hear their own condemnation. The revolution in Syria seemed an opportunity to effect his father's project, to recover Ramoth Gilead.
Jehoram accordingly, in concert with Ahaziah of Judah, his nephew, seized it. Jehoram was wounded, and returned to Jezreel to be healed. Jehu his captain was left at Ramoth Gilead to continue the war with Hazael. But Jehu, with characteristic haste, immediately after Elisha had anointed him, set out for Jezreel and with an arrow slew Jehoram and threw his body on the very plot of ground which by falsehood and murder Ahab had dispossessed Naboth of, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy (1 Kings 21:19; 1 Kings 21:22). Lord A. C. Hervey considers the seven years' famine (2 Kings 8:1) foretold to the Shunammite to be the same as that in 2 Kings 4:38. It ended on the same year as Jehoram died, after 12 years' reign, therefore it must have begun in his sixth year. As the Shunammite's child must have been at least three years old when raised again, Elisha's acquaintance with her must have been four or five years sooner, bringing us to Jehoram's second year; so that Elisha's presence with the three allied kings (2 Kings 3) must have been in Jehoram's first year.
Lord Hervey thinks Elijah was not translated until the sixth year of Jehoram, whereas Elisha began ministering in the first year of Jehoram. Thus Elijah's writing to Jehoram of Judah (2 Chronicles 21:12) was addressed to him in Elijah's lifetime. He did not begin reigning until the fifth year of Jehoram of Israel (2 Kings 8:16), thus 2 Kings 1:17 will belong to the narrative in 2 Kings 2. He thinks the 25 distinct years assigned to Jehoshaphat a mistake, that 22 is the real number, three being added for the three last years of Asa his father, when incapacitated by disease in the feet he devolved the kingly duties on Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 16:12). Three years were then added, to Ahab's reign to make the whole number of years of the kings of Israel tally with the whole number of the years of the kings of Judah, unduly lengthened by the three added to Jehoshaphat's reign.
2. JEHORAM, son of Jehoshaphat, succeeded at the age of 32 and reigned 892 to 884 B.C. Married Athaliah, Ahab's daughter, the reflex of her wicked mother Jezebel; he yielded himself up to the evil influences of his wife instead of following the example of his pious father. His first act as a king was to murder his six brothers, though his father had provided for them independently of him so as to avert collision (2 Chronicles 21:1-4); also several "princes of Israel." Not only did he set up idolatrous high places, but "caused Jerusalem to commit fornication and compelled Judah thereto" (2 Chronicles 21:11). Elisha's prophetic writing threatened him with great plagues to his people, children, wives, and goods, and disease of the bowels so that they should fall out, because of his apostasy and murder of his brethren who were "better than himself" (2 Chronicles 12-15, 18-19). (ELIJAH.)
All this came to pass. Edom, heretofore tributary to Jehoshaphat, made a king over themselves (1 Kings 22:47; 2 Kings 3:9; 2 Samuel 8:14) and revolted; and only by a night surprise did Jehoram extricate himself at Zair (2 Kings 8:20-22, for which the copyist in 2 Chronicles 21:9 has "with his princes"), in Edom, from "the Edomites who compassed him in." Libnah a fenced city (2 Kings 19:8) also revolted, probably as being given by Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 21:3) to one of those sons whom Jehoram had murdered. The great reason was God's anger" because he had forsaken the Lord God of his fathers." Then those surrounding peoples, upon whom the fear of the Lord had been in Jehoshaphat's days so that they made no war, nay even gave presents and tribute to him, as the Philistines and the Arabians (2 Chronicles 17:10-11) near the Ethiopians, now were stirred up by the Lord against Jehoram.
They carried away his substance from his house, his sons, and wives, so that there was never a son left him save Jehoahaz (Ahaziah) the youngest (God for the sake of His covenant with David still leaving" a light to him and to his sons for ever": 2 Chronicles 21:7; 2 Samuel 7:12-13; Psalms 132:17), a retribution in kind for the murder of his father's sons. An incurable disease of the bowels after two years' agony caused his death. He died "without being desired," i.e. unregretted (Jeremiah 22:18). No burning of incense was made for him, and his body though buried in the city of David was excluded from the sepulchres of the kings. The undesigned propriety of the same names appearing as they would naturally do in the allied royal houses of Judah and Israel, e.g. Jehoram and Ahaziah, confirms the truth of the sacred history.
3. A priest in the time of Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 17:8).
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jehoram
Exaltation of the Lord
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jehoram
See JORAM.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jehoram
Son of Jehosaphat. (2 Kings 3:2-3) The meaning of the name is, exaltation of the Lord; from Ram, exaltation; and Jah, the Lord.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Joram or Jehoram
1. Son of Ahab king of Israel, succeeded his older brother Ahaziah in the throne, B. C. 896, and reigned twelve years. He discontinued the worship of Baal, but followed the "sin of Jeroboam." During his reign, the Moabites revolted. Joram secured the aid of Jehoshaphat king of Judah, and after receiving for his allies' sake a miraculous deliverance from drought, defeated the Moabites with great slaughter. Not long after he was involved in war with Ben-hadad king of Syria, and Hazael his successor; and in this time occurred the miraculous deliverance of Samaria from siege and famine, and also various miracles of Elisha, including the healing of Naaman. Joram was wounded in a battle with Hazael, and met his death, in the suburbs of Ramoth-gilead, by the hand of Jehu his general. His body was thrown into the field of Naboth at Jezreel, and with him perished the race of Ahab, 1 Kings 21.18-29 ; 2 Kings 1.17 ; 3.1 ; 6.9 .
2. The son and successor of Jehoshaphat king of Judah. He reigned with his father, from B. C. 889, four years, and four years alone; in all eight years. Unhappily he was married to Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, whose evil influence did much to render his reign a curse to the land. He slew his own brothers, five in number, and seized their possessions. He also introduced Phoenician idols and their worship into Judah. The divine wrath was shown in leaving him unaided under a successful revolt of the Edomites, and repeated invasions of the Philistines and Arabians. His country, the city, and his own household were ravaged, his body was afflicted with a frightful dysenteric illness, and after death a burial in the royal sepulchres was denied him, 2 Kings 8:16-24 2 Chronicles 21:1-20 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jehoram
See JORAM.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jehoram
Jehovah-exalted.
Son of Toi, king of Hamath, sent by his father to congratulate David on the occasion of his victory over Hadadezer (2 Samuel 8:10 ).
A Levite of the family of Gershom (1 Chronicles 26:25 ).
A priest sent by Jehoshaphat to instructruct the people in Judah (2 Chronicles 17:8 ).
The son of Ahab and Jezebel, and successor to his brother Ahaziah on the throne of Israel. He reigned twelve years, B.C. 896-884 (2 Kings 1:17 ; 3:1 ). His first work was to reduce to subjection the Moabites, who had asserted their independence in the reign of his brother. Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, assisted Jehoram in this effort. He was further helped by his ally the king of Edom. Elisha went forth with the confederated army (2 Kings 3:1-19 ), and at the solicitation of Jehoshaphat encouraged the army with the assurance from the Lord of a speedy victory. The Moabites under Mesha their king were utterly routed and their cities destroyed. At Kir-haraseth Mesha made a final stand. The Israelites refrained from pressing their victory further, and returned to their own land. Elisha afterwards again befriended Jehoram when a war broke out between the Syrians and Israel, and in a remarkable way brought that war to a bloodless close (2 Kings 6:23 ). But Jehoram, becoming confident in his own power, sank into idolatry, and brought upon himself and his land another Syrian invasion, which led to great suffering and distress in Samaria (2 Kings 6:24-33 ). By a remarkable providential interposition the city was saved from utter destruction, and the Syrians were put to flight (2 Kings 7:6-15 ).
Jehoram was wounded in a battle with the Syrians at Ramah, and obliged to return to Jezreel (2 Kings 8:29 ; 9:14,15 ), and soon after the army proclaimed their leader Jehu king of Israel, and revolted from their allegiance to Jehoram (2 Kings 9 ). Jehoram was pierced by an arrow from Jehu's bow on the piece of ground at Jezreel which Ahab had taken from Naboth, and there he died (2 Kings 9:21-29 ).
The eldest son and successor of Jehoshaphat, king of Judah. He reigned eight years (B.C. 892-885) alone as king of Judah, having been previously for some years associated with his father (2 Chronicles 21:5,20 ; 2 Kings 8:16 ). His wife was Athaliah, the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel. His daughter Jehosheba was married to the high priest Jehoiada. He sank into gross idolatry, and brought upon himself and his kingdom the anger of Jehovah. The Edomites revolted from under his yoke, and the Philistines and the Arabians and Cushites invaded the land, and carried away great spoil, along with Jehoram's wives and all his children, except Ahaziah. He died a painful death from a fearful malady, and was refused a place in the sepulchre of the kings (2 Kings 8:16-24 ; 2 Chronicles 21 ).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Joram, Jehoram
1. Son and successor of Jehoshaphat, king of Judah: he reigned eight years, B.C. 892-885. He, as of the seed of David, formed an unholy alliance by marrying Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel. He put to death his six brothers, and established Baal worship at Jerusalem. He was punished by the Philistines and Arabians taking possession of his treasures, and carrying his wives and children into captivity. He was warned as to his course by 'a writing' from the prophet Elijah (which was doubtless written some time before, 2 Chronicles 21:12 ), foretelling that God would smite His people with a great plague; the king's disease should be such that his bowels should fall out; and it was thus that he miserably died. 1 Kings 22:50 ; 2 Kings 1:17 ; 2 Kings 8:16-29 ; 2 Kings 11:2 ; 2 Kings 12:18 ; 1 Chronicles 3:11 ; 2 Chronicles 21:1-20 ; 2 Kings 8:16-293 ; Matthew 1:8 .
2. Son of Ahab and Jezebel. He succeeded his brother Ahaziah, king of Israel, and reigned twelve years, B.C. 896-884. He wrought evil in the sight of the Lord, but put away the image of Baal that his father had made. The king of Moab revolted against him, and he asked Jehoshaphat king of Judah to go with him to punish the Moabites. These two kings, with the king of Edom, assembled their armies, but there was no water to drink. They then appealed to Elisha for help, but he said that except Jehoshaphat had been there he would not have looked upon Joram. A miracle was wrought and there was abundance of water. God also gave them a great victory over the Moabites, which led the king of Moab to offer his eldest son as a burnt offering to his god, and the Israelites departed.
The time however was approaching for God's judgement on the house of Ahab. Joram and Ahaziah king of Judah went against the Syrians in Ramoth-gilead. There Joram was wounded, and he returned to Jezreel to be healed, leaving his army at Ramoth-gilead. In the meantime a prophet, sent by Elisha, visited the camp and anointed Jehu to be king of Israel, with instructions to smite the house of Ahab totally. Jehu being proclaimed king, he hastily drove to Jezreel to fulfil his mission and Joram, as he fled before Jehu, was killed by an arrow. 2 Kings 1:17 ; 2 Kings 3:1-25 ; 1619165769_37 ; 2 Kings 9:14-26,29 ; 2 Chronicles 22:5-7 .
3. Son of Toi king of Hamath. 2 Samuel 8:10 . Apparently the same as HADORAM in 1 Chronicles 18:10 .
4. Son of Jeshaiah, a Levite. 1 Chronicles 26:25 .
5. Priest, who was sent by Jehoshaphat to teach the people. 2 Chronicles 17:8 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jehoram
Judah and Israel each had a king named Jehoram (often shortened to Joram). Judah’s Jehoram was the son of the good king Jehoshaphat (1 Kings 22:50). However, he himself was wicked. He married Athaliah, daughter of the Israelite king Ahab and his Baalist wife Jezebel, and introduced the Baalism of Jezebel into Judah (2 Kings 8:16-18; 2 Chronicles 21:4-6). To make sure no one stopped him doing as he pleased, he killed all likely rivals. Because of his wickedness, Elijah assured him of a horrible death (2 Chronicles 21:11-15). During his reign Edom and Philistia broke free from Judah’s rule (2 Chronicles 21:8), and Arab raiders plundered Judah with much success (2 Chronicles 21:16-17). In one attack they killed most of the royal family (2 Chronicles 22:1). Jehoram died a horrible death as predicted, and no one regretted his departure (2 Chronicles 21:18-20).
Israel’s Jehoram (often called Joram, to avoid confusion) was brother-in-law to Judah’s Jehoram. He was the second son of Ahab and Jezebel, and became king when his older brother Ahaziah died as a result of an accident (2 Kings 3:1-332; 2 Kings 1:2; 2 Kings 1:17; 2 Kings 3:1). Though not as devoted to Baal as his parents, he remained in conflict with Elisha, the prophet who led God’s opposition to Baal (1619165769_4; 2 Kings 3:13; 2 Kings 6:30-31). When wounded in battle with Syria, Joram returned to his summer palace in Jezreel to recover. There he was assassinated by his army commander Jehu, who then seized the throne and began a violent anti-Baal purge (2 Kings 8:28-29; 2 Kings 9:14-26).

Sentence search

Joram - See Jehoram
Jehoram - Jehoram , in the shorter form JORAM , is the name of two kings in the OT. Jehoram of Israel was a son of Ahab ( 2 Kings 3:1 ), and came to the throne after the brief reign of his brother Ahaziah. The prophet Elisha was active during the reign of Jehoram, and it is probable that the siege of Samaria, of which we have so graphic an account in 2 Kings 6:1-33 ; 2 Kings 7:1-20 , also belongs to this period. Jehoram engaged in the siege of Ramoth-gilead, and was wounded there. Jehoram of Judah , son of Jehoshaphat, came to the throne during the reign of the other Jehoram in Israel. In endeavouring to subdue this revolt Jehoram was in great danger, but with a few of his men he cut his way through the troops that surrounded him ( 2 Kings 8:16-24 )
Shehari'ah - (dawning of Jehovah ), a Benjamite, son of Jehoram
Ibne'Iah - (whom Jehovah will build up ), son of Jehoram, a Benjamite
Jaresi'ah - (whom Jehovah nourishes ),a Benjamite, one of the Bene-Jehoram
jo'Ram - (2 Kings 8:16,25,28,29 ; 9:14,17,21-23,29 ) [1] ...
Son of Jehosphaphat; king of Judah. (2 Kings 8:21,23,24 ; 1 Chronicles 3:11 ; 2 Chronicles 22:5,7 ; Matthew 1:8 ) [2] ...
A priest in the reign of Jehoshaphat
Ahaziah - ...
After Ahaziah’s death, his brother Jehoram (or Joram) became king of Israel (2 Kings 1:17). Their sister Athaliah had married the Judean king (Jehoshaphat’s son), whose name also was Jehoram. Through the Judean Jehoram and his wife Athaliah, the Baalism of Ahab and Jezebel spread to Judah. When Jehoram of Judah died, his son Ahaziah came to the throne (840 BC; 2 Chronicles 21:1; 2 Chronicles 21:5-6; 2 Chronicles 22:1-2). He had gone to visit his uncle, Jehoram of Israel, who had been wounded in battle, and got caught in Jehu’s anti-Baal revolution (2 Chronicles 22:5-9; cf
Bid'Kar - e, one who stabs ), Jehu's "captain," originally his fellow officer, ( 2 Kings 9:25 ) who completed the sentence on Jehoram, son of Ahab
Jehoram - Judah and Israel each had a king named Jehoram (often shortened to Joram). Judah’s Jehoram was the son of the good king Jehoshaphat (1 Kings 22:50). Jehoram died a horrible death as predicted, and no one regretted his departure (2 Chronicles 21:18-20). ...
Israel’s Jehoram (often called Joram, to avoid confusion) was brother-in-law to Judah’s Jehoram
Bidkar - Fellow officer and afterwards Jehu's captain; he executed the sentence on Joram, or Jehoram, son of Ahab, by casting him into the field of Naboth
Joram - (See Jehoram
Joram - ...
...
Jehoram, the son and successor of Jehoshaphat on the throne of Judah (2 Kings 8:24 )
Jeho'Ram - After reproving Jehoram, Elisha, for Jehoshaphat's sake, inquired of Jehovah, and received the promise of an abundant supply of water, and of a great victory over the Moabites; a promise which was immediately fulfilled. A little later, when war broke out between Syria and Israel, we find Elisha befriending Jehoram; but when the terrible famine in Samaria arose, the king immediately attributed the evil to Elisha, and determined to take away his life. and Jehoram appears to have returned to friendly feeling toward Elisha. (2 Kings 8:4 ) It was soon after these vents that the revolution in Syria predicted by Elisha took place, giving Jehoram a good opportunity of recovering Ramoth-gilead from the Syrians. Jehoram was wounded in battle, and obliged to return to Jezreel to be healed of his wounds. (2 Kings 8:29 ; 9:14,15 ) jehu and the army under his command revolted from their allegiance to Jehoram, (2 Kings 9:1 ) . and hastily marching to Jezreel, surprised Jehoram, wounded and defenseless as he was. Jehoram, going out to meet him, fell pierced by an arrow from Jehu's bow on the very plot of ground which Ahab had wrested from Naboth the Jezreelite; thus fulfilling to the letter the prophecy of Elijah. (1 Kings 21:29 ) With the life of Jehoram ended the dynasty of Omri
Mesha - A king of Moab who refused to pay tribute to Jehoram, king of Israel. Jehoram determined to punish him; but Mesha made the horrible sacrifice of his eldest son to some idol god, openly upon the wall, in sight of the Israelites, who fearing that they might incur the anger of God by having given occasion to a human sacrifice, retreated to their own country
Jehosheba - Jehovah-swearing, the daughter of Jehoram, the king of Israel
Bidkar - He executed the concluding doom pronounced by Jehovah on Ahab's son's son (1 Kings 21:29), Jehoram, by casting his body into Naboth's plat, after Jehu had pierced him with an arrow
Joram - See Jehoram ( 1 and 2 )
Jehoram - ("exalted by Jehovah"), Jehoram or JORAM. Jehoram, king of Judah, had two accessions recorded in Scripture, and an earlier one not recorded, but conjectured by Usher;...
(1) probably when Jehoshaphat went from his kingdom to Ramoth Gilead battle in his 17th year (2 Kings 3:1);...
(2) when he retired from the administration, making his son joint king, in his 23rd year (2 Kings 8:16 margin);...
(3) at Jehoshaphat's death, in his 25th year. (2 Chronicles 21:1; 1 Kings 22:50 margin)...
Thus, the accession of Jehoram king of Israel in Jehoshaphat's 18th year synchronized with...
(1) the second year after the first accession (2 Kings 1:17), and...
(2) the fifth year before the second accession, of Jehoram king of Judah (2 Kings 8:16). With Judah (whose territory Moab had invaded, 2 Chronicles 20, and so provoked Jehoshaphat) and Edom as allies, Jehoram warred against Mesha, who had since Ahaziah's reign (2 Kings 1:1) withheld the yearly tribute due to Israel, "100,000 lambs and the wool of 100,000 rams" (Keil) (2 Kings 3; Isaiah 16:1). Jehoram fell into Jeroboam's sin of worshipping Jehovah under the calf symbol, which every Israelite king regarded as a political necessity, but not into his father's and mother's Baal idolatry; nay, he removed Baal's statue (2 Kings 3:2-3). However, Jehoram's removal of Baal's statue seems to have drawn Elisha to him, so that the prophet was able to offer the Shunammite woman to speak to the king in her behalf (2 Kings 4:13). As Elisha spoke so sternly to him in 2 Kings 3:14, the removal of the Baal statue may have been subsequent to, and the consequence of, Jehoram's witnessing the deliverance of himself and his two allies, wrought through Jehovah's prophet in chapter 3. The prophet again and again saved Jehoram by warning him of the position of the Syrian camp (2 Kings 6:8-12; compare Luke 12:3). Blinding, and then leading the Syrian hosts sent to surround him in Dothan, into the midst of Samaria, he checked Jehoram who would have smitten them ("wouldest thou smite those whom thou hast taken captive with thy sword?" Surely not. ...
Abatement of the divine scourge, apparently, brought with it carnal security to Jehoram. The tale of a mother who had slain her child for food, and complained of another mother having hidden hers contrary to agreement, roused Jehoram to rend his clothes; then appeared the hair sackcloth of mourning penitence "within" (mibaait ), a bore sign without the real repentance of heart, as his threat of murdering Elisha proves, 2 Samuel 7:12-13. Jehoram thought that by his sackcloth he had done his part; when God's help did not yet come, Jehoram vented his impatience on the prophet, as if Elisha's zeal for Jehovah against Baal was the cause of the calamity. )...
Elisha, by deferring the entrance of the executioner, gave time for Jehoram's better feelings to work. " Elisha's prophecy of immediate plenty, and its fulfillment to the letter (2 Kings 7), restored the friendly relations between Jehoram and him (2 Kings 8:4). Jehoram's conversation with Gehazi about Elisha's great works and his raising the dead lad, and the Shunammite woman's return at that very time, occurred probably while the prophet was at Damascus prophesying to Hazael his coming kingship (2 Kings 8). ...
Jehoram accordingly, in concert with Ahaziah of Judah, his nephew, seized it. Jehoram was wounded, and returned to Jezreel to be healed. But Jehu, with characteristic haste, immediately after Elisha had anointed him, set out for Jezreel and with an arrow slew Jehoram and threw his body on the very plot of ground which by falsehood and murder Ahab had dispossessed Naboth of, fulfilling Elijah's prophecy (1 Kings 21:19; 1 Kings 21:22). It ended on the same year as Jehoram died, after 12 years' reign, therefore it must have begun in his sixth year. As the Shunammite's child must have been at least three years old when raised again, Elisha's acquaintance with her must have been four or five years sooner, bringing us to Jehoram's second year; so that Elisha's presence with the three allied kings (2 Kings 3) must have been in Jehoram's first year. ...
Lord Hervey thinks Elijah was not translated until the sixth year of Jehoram, whereas Elisha began ministering in the first year of Jehoram. Thus Elijah's writing to Jehoram of Judah (2 Chronicles 21:12) was addressed to him in Elijah's lifetime. He did not begin reigning until the fifth year of Jehoram of Israel (2 Kings 8:16), thus 2 Kings 1:17 will belong to the narrative in 2 Kings 2. Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat, succeeded at the age of 32 and reigned 892 to 884 B. Edom, heretofore tributary to Jehoshaphat, made a king over themselves (1 Kings 22:47; 2 Kings 3:9; 2 Samuel 8:14) and revolted; and only by a night surprise did Jehoram extricate himself at Zair (2 Kings 8:20-22, for which the copyist in 2 Chronicles 21:9 has "with his princes"), in Edom, from "the Edomites who compassed him in. " Libnah a fenced city (2 Kings 19:8) also revolted, probably as being given by Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 21:3) to one of those sons whom Jehoram had murdered. " Then those surrounding peoples, upon whom the fear of the Lord had been in Jehoshaphat's days so that they made no war, nay even gave presents and tribute to him, as the Philistines and the Arabians (2 Chronicles 17:10-11) near the Ethiopians, now were stirred up by the Lord against Jehoram. Jehoram and Ahaziah, confirms the truth of the sacred history
Jehoram - Jehoshaphat, king of Judah, assisted Jehoram in this effort. Elisha afterwards again befriended Jehoram when a war broke out between the Syrians and Israel, and in a remarkable way brought that war to a bloodless close (2 Kings 6:23 ). But Jehoram, becoming confident in his own power, sank into idolatry, and brought upon himself and his land another Syrian invasion, which led to great suffering and distress in Samaria (2 Kings 6:24-33 ). ...
Jehoram was wounded in a battle with the Syrians at Ramah, and obliged to return to Jezreel (2 Kings 8:29 ; 9:14,15 ), and soon after the army proclaimed their leader Jehu king of Israel, and revolted from their allegiance to Jehoram (2 Kings 9 ). Jehoram was pierced by an arrow from Jehu's bow on the piece of ground at Jezreel which Ahab had taken from Naboth, and there he died (2 Kings 9:21-29 ). The Edomites revolted from under his yoke, and the Philistines and the Arabians and Cushites invaded the land, and carried away great spoil, along with Jehoram's wives and all his children, except Ahaziah
Ahazi'ah - (1 Kings 22:49-53 ; 2 Kings 1:1 ; 2 Chronicles 20:35-37 ) ...
Fifth king of Judah, son of Jehoram and Athaliah (daughter of Ahab), and therefore nephew of the preceding Ahaziah, reigned one year, B. Ahaziah was an idolater, and he allied himself with his uncle Jehoram king of Israel against Hazael, the new king of Syria. the two kings were, however defeated at Ramoth, where Jehoram was severely wounded. As Jehu approached the town, Jehoram and Ahaziah went out to meet him; the former was shot through the heart by Jehu, and Ahaziah was pursued and mortally wounded
Jehosheba - Daughter of Jehoram of Judah
Jehoram - Jehoram (je-hô'ram), whom Jehovah has exalted. Jehoram was at length smitten with a malignant dysentery
Mattan - She probably had brought him from Samaria to introduce the Baal worship of her father Ahab into the court of Jehoram her husband, Jehoshaphat's son (2 Chronicles 21:6; 2 Chronicles 21:13)
Joram - For one thing, both are also called Jehoram. The account of the reign of Joram (Jehoram) of Israel is found in 2 Kings 3:1
Libnah - Its inhabitants revolted against the idolatrous and cruel Jehoram, 2 Chronicles 21:10
Libnah - It revolted from Jehoram
Ahaziah - ...
The son of Joram, or Jehoram, and sixth king of Judah. He joined his uncle Jehoram, king of Israel, in an expedition against Hazael, king of Damascus; but was wounded at the pass of Gur when attempting to escape, and had strength only to reach Megiddo, where he died (2 Kings 1:18)
Jehoiada - Many do not accept the age of 132 years assigned to him, for the reason that if he lived so long, then, when he married the daughter of Jehoram, he must have been 80, while Jehoram was only 32
Ahaziah - Ahaziah of Judah was son of Jehoram and grandson of Jehoshaphat. All that we know of him is that he continued the league with Israel, and that, going to visit his uncle Jehoram in Jezreel, he was involved in his fate at the revolt of Jehu ( 2 Kings 9:27 )
Gedor - Native place of Jehoram, a Benjamite
Jehu - Jehu was captain of Jehoram, and was stationed at Ramoth-gilead to keep in check the Syrians on the east of the Jordan. ...
Jehu lost no time in fulfilling his mission; entering his chariot, he proceeded with some followers in haste to Jezreel, whither king Jehoram, being wounded, had gone to be healed. Jehoram and Ahaziah king of Judah (who had come to visit the wounded king) at once each in his own chariot issued forth to meet Jehu. Jehoram, being repulsed by Jehu, called out 'Treachery,' and attempted to flee, but an arrow from Jehu pierced his heart and he fell dead. Jehu then caused the death of seventy of the sons of Jehoram and forty-two of the 'brethren of Ahaziah' who came to salute the royal family; and slew all that remained to Ahab, his great men and his priests
Gehazi - We afterwards find him recounting to king Jehoram the wonderful deeds of Elisha, at the moment when the providence of god brought the woman of Shunem before the king, to claim the restoration of her lands, 2 Kings 8:1-6
Jehosh'Aphat - His history is to be found among the events recorded in (1 Kings 15:24 ; 2 Kings 8:16 ) or in a continuous narrative in (2 Chronicles 17:1 ; 2 Chronicles 21:3 ) He was contemporary with Ahab, Ahaziah and Jehoram. After this, perhaps, must be dated the war which Jehoshaphat, in conjunction with Jehoram king of Israel and the king of Edom, carried on against the rebellious king of Moab. 891, in the hands of his son Jehoram
Michael - Son of Jehoshaphat, murdered by his brother Jehoram 2 Chronicles 21:2,4
Ben-Hadad - The second fought with the Israelite kings Ahab and Joram (or Jehoram)
Jehoshaphat - He was contemporary with Ahab, Ahaziah, and Jehoram. 891, in the hand of his son Jehoram
me'Sha - (Genesis 10:30 ) ...
The king of Moab who was tributary to Ahab, (2 Kings 3:4 ) but when Ahab fell at Ramoth-gilead, Mesha refused to pay tribute to his successor, Jehoram. When Jehoram succeeded to the throne of Israel, one of his first acts was to secure the assistance of Jehoshaphat, his father's ally, in reducing the Moabites to their former condition of tributaries
Mesha - He was tributary to Ahab, but rebelled and suffered an entire defeat from Jehoram, Jehoshaphat, and the king of Edom
Athaliah - When Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, married Jehoram of Judah, the Baalism that Ahab and Jezebel had established in Israel spread to Judah
Benhadad - 3115, Benhadad declared war against Jehoram, the son and successor of Ahab, 2 Kings 6:8 ; but his designs were made known to Jehoram by the Prophet Elisha, and they were accordingly frustrated. He then led them into the city of Samaria, and having conducted them safely there, he prayed to God again to open their eyes, and induced Jehoram to dismiss them without violence. Jehoram, hearing of these calamities, attributed them to Elisha, and sent orders to have him put to death; but before his messengers could reach the prophet's house, he came thither himself. Elisha predicted that the next day, about the same hour, a measure of fine flour would be sold at the gate of Samaria for a shekel, which, however incredible at the moment, proved to be the case; for in the night, a general panic, supernaturally induced, pervaded the Syrian camp; they imagined that Jehoram had procured an army of Egyptians to come to his assistance, and, abandoning their horses, tents, and provisions, they all took to flight. Four lepers, whose disease did not permit them to live within the city, and being ready to perish with hunger, ventured into the Syrian camp; and finding it deserted, and at the same time abounding with all sorts of provisions, communicated the information to Jehoram
Ahaziah - Ahaziah was prevented by a fall through a lattice in his palace at Samaria from enforcing it; but Jehoram his brother subsequently attempted it. At first viceroy during his father's sickness, then king of Judah, son of Jehoram of Judah and Athaliah, Ahab's cruel daughter (2 Kings 9:29, compare 2 Kings 8:25). In 2 Chronicles 22:2, for 42 there should be, as in 2 Kings 8:26, "twenty and two years old was Ahaziah when he began to reign," for his father Jehoram was only 40 when he died (2 Chronicles 21:20). He allied himself with Jehoram of Israel, brother of the former Ahaziah (in spite of the warning God gave him in the fatal issue of the alliance of godly Jehoshaphat, his paternal grandfather, with wicked Ahab), against Hazael of Syria at Ramoth Gilead. Jehoram was wounded, and Ahaziah went to see him at Jezreel
Zebadiah - Son of Jehoram of Gedor (1 Chronicles 12:7 )
Athaliah - Strangely enough, she was chosen as the wife of Jehoram, son of the pious Jehoshaphat king of Judah
Jehoiada - He married Jehosheba, or Jehoshabeath, the daughter of king Jehoram (2 Chronicles 22:11 ), and took an active part along with his wife in the preservation and training of Jehoash when Athaliah slew all the royal family of Judah
Kir-Hareseth - ...
During the reign of Jehoram of Israel, Mesha, king of Moab, rebelled against Israel (2 Kings 3:4-27 ). Jehoram and Jehoshaphat did not have faith that Yahweh would give them victory over the people of Chemosh
Athaliah - the daughter of Omri, king of Samaria, and wife to Jehoram, king of Judah. This princess, being informed that Jehu had slain her son Ahaziah, resolved to take the government upon herself, 2 Kings 11; which that she might effect, without opposition, she destroyed all the children that Jehoram had by other wives, and all their offspring
Michael - He was murdered by his brother Jehoram
Ada'Iah - (1 Chronicles 8:13 ) ...
A priest, son of Jehoram
Jehoahaz - In 2 Chronicles 21:17 , the son and successor of Jehoram as king of Judah (841 B
Jehoahaz -
The youngest son of Jehoram, king of Judah (2 Chronicles 21:17 ; 22:1,6,8,9 ); usually Ahaziah (q
Gibeon - Near it Joshua commanded the sun to stand still, Joshua 10:12-13; Isaiah 28:21; the city was given to Benjamin and to the Levites, Joshua 18:25; Joshua 21:17; it was the scene of a notable battle, 2 Samuel 2:12-24; 2 Samuel 20:8-10; of the hanging of seven of Saul's sons, 2 Samuel 21:1-6; the tabernacle was set up at Gibeon, 1 Chronicles 16:39; and Solomon offered great sacrifices there, 1 Kings 3:4-5; 1 Kings 9:2; 2 Chronicles 1:3; 2 Chronicles 1:13; Jehoram recovered captives at Gibeon, Jeremiah 41:12-16; its people helped to rebuild the walls of Jerusalem after the captivity, Nehemiah 3:7; Nehemiah 7:25; Ezra 2:20, margin
Athali'ah - (afflicted of the Lord ) daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, married Jehoram the son of Jehoshaphat king of Judah and introduced into that kingdom the worship of Baal
Athaliah - Daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, married Jehoshaphat's son Jehoram, king of Judah. By her influence Jehoram was led to walk in the way of the kings of Israel, like as did the house of Ahab (2 Chronicles 21:6). Ahaziah's youngest son Jonah alone escaped her murderous hand, secreted by Jehosheba, his aunt, daughter of Jehoram (probably not by Athaliah, but another wife) and wife of the priest Jehoiada (2 Chronicles 22:11-12)
je'hu - (2 Kings 9:25 ) In the reigns of Ahaziah and Jehoram, Jehu rose to importance. Jehoram, who was lying ill in Jezreel, came out to meet him, as it happened on the fatal field of Naboth. (2 Kings 9:24 ) Jehu himself advanced to the gates of Jezreel and fulfilled the divine warning on Jezebel as already on Jehoram
Jehiel - Son of Jehoshaphat, slain by Jehoram
Athaliah - 18), wife of Jehoram king of Judah
Ahaziah - The son and successor of Jehoram as king of Judah (2 Kings 8:25 )
Diseases - The pious Jews recognized the hand of God in sending them, Psalm 39:9-11 90:3-12 ; and in many cases special diseases were sent in punishment of particular sins, as Abimelech, Gehazi, Jehoram, Uzziah, Miriam, Herod, the Philistines, etc
Mesha - 2 Kings 3:4 sets the revolt in the reign of Jehoram (849-842 B. Jehoram, Omri's grandson, might thus be the “son” of Omri of the Moabite stone. Jehoram's reign, however, ended five years before the fortieth anniversary of the earliest date of Omri's oppression of Moab
Mesha - 2 Kings 3:4 sets the revolt in the reign of Jehoram (849-842 B. Jehoram, Omri's grandson, might thus be the “son” of Omri of the Moabite stone. Jehoram's reign, however, ended five years before the fortieth anniversary of the earliest date of Omri's oppression of Moab
Athaliah - She was married to Jehoram, king of Judah; and, when her son Ahaziah was slam by Jehu, she destroyed the rest of the royal family except Joash, an infant, who was concealed in the temple by his aunt Jehosheba (most likely not Athaliah's daughter), the wife of Jehoiada the high priest
Elisha - The pupil and successor of Elijah, a prophet of Israel during the reign of Jehoram, Jehu, Jehoahaz, and Joash, B
mi'Chael - (1 Chronicles 27:18 ) ...
One of the sons of Jehoshaphat who were murdered by their elder brother, Jehoram
Jeho'Ahaz - ...
The name given, (2 Chronicles 21:17 ) to Ahaziah, the youngest son of Jehoram king of Judah
Ahaziah - Otherwise Jehoahaz, or Azariah, king of Judah, son of Jehoram and Athaliah; he succeeded his father B
Mesha - " (See Jehoram, JEHOSHAPHAT, ELISHA, ENGEDI, CHEMOSH, on the confederacy against Mesha and the superstitions indignation raised against Israel because of their reducing him to such desperation that he sacrificed his own son (Micah 6:7), so that the allies departed to their own land
Athaliah - She was the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, and was married to Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat
Jehoshaphat - The alliance was cemented by the marriage of the crown prince Jehoram to Ahab’s daughter Athaliah ( 2 Kings 8:18 )
Ibleam - Jehu, in his coup against Jehoram, king of Israel, also mortally wounded Ahaziah, king of Judah, near Ibleam (2 Kings 9:27 )
Obadiah, Book of - There are on record the account of four captures of Jerusalem, (1) by Shishak in the reign of Rehoboam (1 Kings 14:25 ); (2) by the Philistines and Arabians in the reign of Jehoram (2 Chronicles 21:16 ); (3) by Joash, the king of Israel, in the reign of Amaziah (2 Kings 14:13 ); and (4) by the Babylonians, when Jerusalem was taken and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar (B
Athaliah - Wife of Jehoram, king of Judah, and mother of Ahaziah, king of Judah
Arabians - So did Jehoshaphat, 2 Chronicles 17:11 ; but in the days of Jehoram they attacked him, plundered his house, and carried away his wives and some of his sons, 2 Chronicles 21:17 ; 2 Chronicles 22:1
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
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Joram,...
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Jehoram,...
Eliezer
Mesha - After the death of Ahab at Ramoth-Gilead, Mesha shook off the yoke of Israel; but on the ascension of Jehoram to the throne of Israel, that king sought the help of Jehoshaphat in an attempt to reduce the Moabites again to their former condition
Jehiel - Son of King Jehoshaphat slain by his brother King Jehoram when the latter ascended to the throne (2 Chronicles 21:1-4 )
Libnah - It revolted from Judah at the same time as Edom, in the reign of Jehoram, Jehoshaphat's son, "because he had forsaken the Lord God of his fathers" (2 Kings 8:22; 2 Chronicles 21:10-11). Its remoteness from the capital, which Jehoram had corrupted into idolatry, and the presence of the sacred ministers in it, made its people desire separation from the idolaters; hence its revolt, as the scripture quoted implies
Ramoth-Gilead, Ramoth in Gilead - It was in the administrative district of Solomon’s lieutenant Ben-geber ( 1 Kings 4:13 ); the scene of Ahab’s last fight with the Syrians ( 1 Kings 22:1-53 , 2 Chronicles 18:1-34 ) and of another battle with them fought by Ahab’s son Jehoram, where he was wounded ( 2 Kings 8:28-29 , 2 Chronicles 22:5 ); the place where Elisha’s messenger anointed Jehu ( 2 Kings 9:1 ff
Jehoshaphat - But, the alliance involved a marriage between Jehoshaphat's son Jehoram and Ahab's daughter Athaliah
Jehu - During the progress of a war against the Syrians, who were becoming more and more troublesome to Israel, in a battle at Ramoth-gilead Jehoram, the king of Israel, had been wounded; and leaving his army there, had returned to Jezreel, whither his ally, Ahaziah, king of Judah, had also gone on a visit of sympathy with him (2 Kings 8:28,29 ). He then with a chosen band set forth with all speed to Jezreel, where, with his own hand, he slew Jehoram, shooting him through the heart with an arrow (9:24)
Idumaeans - Edom was for a long time a vassal of the kingdom of Judah, but again revolted, and after a straggle got its independence in the reign of Jehoram
Elijah - He lived in the time of Jehoram, to whom he sent a letter of warning (Compare 1 Chronicles 28:19 ; Jeremiah 36 ), and acted as a prophet in Judah; while the Tishbite was a prophet of the northern kingdom. It may be supposed either that Elijah anticipated the character of Jehoram, and so wrote the warning message, which was preserved in the schools of the prophets till Jehoram ascended the throne after the Tishbite's translation, or that the translation did not actually take place till after the accession of Jehoram to the throne (2 Chronicles 21:12 ; 2 Kings 8:16 ). The events of 2 Kings 2 may not be recorded in chronological order, and thus there may be room for the opinion that Elijah was still alive in the beginning of Jehoram's reign
Benhadad - Benhadad again besieged Samaria in the reign of Jehoram, causing a great famine, but God made the Syrians flee when no man pursued, leaving plentiful provisions for His people
Jehoshaphat - ...
He subsequently joined Jehoram, king of Israel, in a war against the Moabites, who were under tribute to Israel. Soon after this Jehoshaphat died, after a reign of twenty-five years, being sixty years of age, and was succeeded by his son Jehoram (1 Kings 22:50 )
Elisha - 855 798), and during this period four monarchs, Jehoram, Jehu, Jehoahaz, and Joash, sat on the throne of Israel (2 Kings 3:1 ff; cf. In our canonical Book of Kings, the larger part of Elisha’s activities is placed within the reign of Jehoram ( 2 Kings 3:1 ff; cf. His address to Jehoram of Israel. This change of attitude on the part of the prophet may be due to the fact that Jehoram attempted to do away with Baal worship ( 2 Kings 3:2 ); but Elisha has not forgotten the doom pronounced upon the house of Ahab by Elijah
Samaria - Jehoram attempted a feeble and half-hearted reform, destroying Ahab’s Baal-pillar, though retaining the calf-worship ( 2 Kings 3:2 ) and the ashçrah ( 2 Kings 13:5 )
Samaria - In the days of Jehoram it was again besieged by Ben-hadad, and the famine became so great that they were on the point of capitulating when some lepers brought word that the enemy had fled, and abundance of provision was to be found in the camp
Philistines - They maintained their independence till David subdued them, 2 Samuel 5:17 8:1-18 , from which time they continued in subjection to the kings of Judah, down to the reign of Jehoram, son of Johoshaphat, when they revolted, 2 Chronicles 21:16 . Jehoram made war against them, and probably reduced them to obedience; for it is observed that they revolted again from Uzziah, who kept them under his sway using his whole reign, 2 Chronicles 26:6-7
Moab And the Moabite Stone - 2 Kings 3:1 describes a military campaign undertaken by King Jehoram of Israel and supported by King Jehoshaphat of Judah which penetrated Moab proper and culminated in a siege of Kir-hareseth. Later, when Jehoram followed Ahaziah to the throne of Israel and attempted to restore Israelite control over Mesha, he was unsuccessful (2 Kings 3:1 ). See Kir-hareseth ; Arnon River; Transjordan ; King Mesha; Ruth ; Jehoram (of Israel); Jehoshaphat
Hazael - ...
Hazael having murdered Benhadad became king, and fought with Ahaziah king of Judah, and Jehoram of Israel, for Ramoth Gilead (2 Kings 8:28). ...
Joash saved Jerusalem only by "sending to Hazael all the hallowed things that Jehoshaphat, Jehoram, and Ahaziah his fathers had dedicated, and his own hallowed things, and all the gold in the treasures of the house of the Lord, and in the king's house" (2 Kings 12:18)
Zechariah - Son of Jehoshaphat the king whom his brother Jehoram killed upon becoming king (2 Chronicles 21:2-4 )
Azariah - Son of Jehoram, 2 Chronicles 22:6 : also called AHAZIAH,q
Ahaziah - Son of Jehoram and Athaliah, daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, therefore nephew of the above
Ahaziah - AHAZIAH, king of Judah, the son of Jehoram and Athaliah
Jehoshaphat - ; and his son Jehoram married Athaliah, the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel (2 Chronicles 22:2-3; 2 Chronicles 22:7-8; 2 Chronicles 22:10). (See Jehoram; ATHALIAH. To avert the foreseen evil consequences of his alliance he appointed Jehoram, his firstborn, king in his lifetime, and gave gifts and fenced eries to his other sons; but no human precautions can avert. (See Jehoram
Arm - Elsewhere, the word represents the shoulder: "And Jehu drew a bow with his full strength, and smote Jehoram between his arms …" (2 Kings 9:24)
Jehu - Later he was general of the army, and commanded in the operations at Ramoth-gilead in the absence of king Jehoram
Jehu - However, he did not hesitate to leave the battle and head west for Jezreel, where the Israelite king Jehoram (or Joram) was recovering from wounds received in battle (2 Kings 8:28-29; 2 Kings 9:1-2; 2 Kings 9:14; 2 Kings 9:16)
Elijah - Previously, it is supposed, he had written the letter which, eight years afterwards, announced to king Jehoram his approaching sickness and death, 2 Chronicles 21:12-19
Joash - Joash, to redeem himself from the difficulties of a siege, and from the danger of being plundered, took what money he could find in the temple, which had been consecrated by Ahaziah his father, Jehoram his grandfather, and himself, and gave the whole to Hazael
Jezebel - She survived Ahab 14 years, and still as queen mother exercised an evil influence in the courts of her sons Ahaziah and Joram of Israel, and in that of her daughter Athaliah's husband Jehoram (2 Chronicles 21:6; 2 Chronicles 22:2)
Philistim - ...
They continued in subjection to the Kings of Judah down to the reign to Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat, about two hundred and forty-six years, when they revolted from Jehoram, 2 Chronicles 21:16 . Jehoram made war against them, and probably reduced them to his obedience again; because it is observed in Scripture, that they revolted again from Uzziah, who kept them to their duty during his whole reign, 2 Chronicles 26:6-7
Elisha - We next read of his predicting a fall of rain when the army of Jehoram was faint from thirst (2 Kings 3:9-20 ); of the multiplying of the poor widow's cruse of oil (4:1-7); the miracle of restoring to life the son of the woman of Shunem (4:18-37); the multiplication of the twenty loaves of new barley into a sufficient supply for an hundred men (4:42-44); of the cure of Naaman the Syrian of his leprosy (5:1-27); of the punishment of Gehazi for his falsehood and his covetousness; of the recovery of the axe lost in the waters of the Jordan (6:1-7); of the miracle at Dothan, half-way on the road between Samaria and Jezreel; of the siege of Samaria by the king of Syria, and of the terrible sufferings of the people in connection with it, and Elisha's prophecy as to the relief that would come (2 Kings 6:24-7:2 )
Ben-Hadad - ) After Ahab's death, Moab having revolted from Ahaziah and Jehoram, successive kings of Israel (2 Kings 1:1; 2 Kings 1:6-7), Ben-Hadad took advantage of Israel's consequent weakness, and after having been baffled several times by Elisha besieged Samaria a second time so straitly that mothers gave their own sons to be eaten, a horror similar to what occurred in later times in Titus' siege of Jerusalem
Ahab - At a later date Ahab entered into alliance with Judah, giving his daughter Athaliab in marriage to Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat ( 2 Kings 8:18 )
Ahab - He frequently consulted with Yahweh's prophets (1Kings 20:13-14,1Kings 20:22,1 Kings 20:28 ; 1Kings 22:8,1 Kings 22:16 ), used the divine name in naming his children (Ahaziah, Jehoram, and Athaliah) and did not interfere with the execution of the priests of Baal after the contest on Mt
Moab - ) His first, step was, he secured the cooperation of Ammon and others enumerated in Psalms 83:8-7, in an invasion of Judah, which was before Jehoshaphat's alliance with Ahaziah (2 Chronicles 20:1-35), therefore still earlier than the invasion of Moab by the confederate kings of Edom, Israel (Jehoram, Ahaziah's son), and Judah (2 Kings 3). (See JEHOSHAPHAT; Jehoram; ELISHA; EDOM. Then followed the joint invasion of Moab by Jehoshaphat of Judah, Jehoram of Israel, and the king of Edom (2 Kings 3)
Elisha - Elisha was at that time in the camp; and seeing Jehoram, the king of Israel, he said, "What have I to do with thee? get thee to the prophets of thy father, and to the prophets of thy mother. Jehoram, king of Israel, imputing to Elisha these calamities, sent a messenger to cut off his head
Chronology of the Biblical Period - ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
Samaria - " ...
In the days of Jehoram this Benhadad again laid siege to Samaria, during which the city was reduced to the direst extremities
Epistle - "A writing came to Jehoram from Elijah" (2 Chronicles 21:12)
Azariah - Son of Jehoram, king of Judah (852-841) according to 2 Chronicles 22:6 , but the correct name is probably Ahaziah as in 2 Kings 8:29
Idumea - It is probable, however, that he reigned only in East Edom, 1 Kings 22:47 2 Chronicles 20:36 ; for Edom south of Judea continued subject to the kings of Judah till the reign of Jehoram, against who it rebelled, 2 Chronicles 21:8 , in fulfillment of the second part of Isaac's prophecy, Genesis 27:40
Judah, Kingdom of - The alliance bore deadly fruit under his murderous son Jehoram, his grandson Ahaziah, and the bloody queen mother Athaliah, Ahab's daughter and Jehoram's wife (2 Chronicles 21-22). (See Jehoram; AHAZIAH; ATHALIAH
Elisha - ), Jehoram or Joram (852 B
Jehoshaphat - Jehoshaphat died after a reign of twenty-five years, and was buried in the royal sepulchre; and his son, Jehoram, reigned in his stead
Edom - When Judah weakened during the reign of Jehoram, Edom regained its independence (2 Kings 8:20-22)
Elisha - Jehoshaphat king of Judah joined with Jehoram king of Israel, and the king of Edom, to attack Moab; but they had no water. Elisha was sought for, and he boldly told Jehoram to go to the gods of his father and mother: if Jehoshaphat had not been there he would not have helped them, nevertheless there was grace for them
Baal (1) - It was laid aside for Jeroboam's calves, under Jehoram, Ahab's son (2 Kings 3:2), and under Jehu (2 Kings 10:28); but for the most part prevailed until the Lord in vengeance removed the ten tribes from their land (2 Kings 17:16)
Israel - Baasha murdered Jeroboam's son and successor; and his own son and successor was slain by Zimri; Zimri was killed by Omri, and after a civil war of four years with Tibni, Omri became king and reigned with his successors forty-five years, ending with Jehoram the son of Ahab
Moab, Moabites - Ahaziah succeeded Ahab, but it was not he that attacked Moab: his reign (called two years) and the beginning of the reign of Jehoram, would give Mesha time to strengthen himself against Israel and attack some of the outlying cities
Hand - 21:16, the word means “border”: “Moreover the Lord stirred up against Jehoram the spirit of the Philistines, and of the Arabians, that were near [5] the Ethiopians
Israel, Kingdom of - The princes of his house cultivated an alliance with the king of Judah which was cemented by the marriage of Jehoram and Athaliah
Zechariah - Son of Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 21:2), slain by Jehoram
High Place - This policy may have made it easier for his son Jehoram to build new high places which caused the people of Judah to worship other gods (2 Chronicles 21:11 )
Urim And Thummim - The oracles of the Lord were thenceforth delivered by the prophets; as by Ahijah to Jeroboam 1 Kings 11:29 ; by Shemaiah to Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:22 ; by Elijah to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 21:17-29 ; by Michaiah to Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 1 Kings 22:7 ; by Elisha to Jehoshaphat and Jehoram, 2 Kings 3:11-14 ; by Isaiah to Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:6-34 ; 2 Kings 20:1-11 ; by Huldah to Josiah, 2 Kings 22:13-20 ; by Jeremiah to Zedekiah, Jeremiah 32:3-5 , &c
Israel, History of - ...
During the ninth century the Omride dynasty was established in Israel, beginning with Omri (876-869) and concluding with Jehoram (849-842). He successfully overthrew King Jehoram (ending the Omride dynasty) and instigated a violent anti-Baalistic purge in Israel. Not only did Jehoram of Israel die; so, too, did Queen Jezebel, many of the Baal worshipers, and King Ahaziah of Judah, who just happened to visit his kin in Israel during the year of his coronation!...
This struggle against Baalism was a key factor in the emergence of Israel and Judah's prophetic movement during the second half of the eighth century
Dibon - Hence, he was ready to ally himself to Ahaziah (2 Chronicles 20:85); then to Jehoram and Edom against Moab
Damascus - In the reign of Jehoram, the Syrian general Naaman came to be cleansed of leprosy ( 2 Kings 5:1-27 ), and Elisha’s directions led to his famous depreciating comparison of the muddy Jordan with the clear-flowing Abanah and Pharpar (v
Moab, Moabites - , Jehoram, Ahab’s successor, undertook, with the aid of Jehoshaphat and the king of Edom, to reduce Moab once more, and almost succeeded, The country was overrun, the capital besieged and reduced to great extremity, when the king of Moab sacrificed to Chemosh his firstborn son on the city wall in sight of both armies ( 2 Kings 3:27 )
Tomb - Two more of these kings--Jehoram and Joash --were buried also in the city of David "but not in the sepulchres of the kings
Edom - It is probable, however, that he reigned only in east Edom; for Edom south of Judea continued subject to the kings of Judah, till the reign of Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat, against whom it rebelled, 2 Chronicles 21:8 . Jehoram attacked Edom, but did not subdue it
Jehoiada - Married, king Jehoram's daughter, sister of king Ahaziah, on whose death by Jehu's hands the queen mother Athaliah slew all the seed royal; but Jehosheba stole Joash the youngest son, and with her husband hid him in the house of God six years. Otherwise he would be 95 at Joash's accession, supposing him to live 35 of Joash's 40 years of reign, which is improbable; fifteen years before, when Jehoram was 32 (whose daughter he married), he would have been 80 (2 Chronicles 21:5; 2 Chronicles 22:1; 2 Chronicles 22:12)
Elijah - But upon closer search into Scripture it is an undesigned propriety that he avoids the land of the king whose one grand error was his marrying his son Jehoram to Athaliah, Ahab's and Jezebel's daughter, at least as early as the sixth or seventh year of Jehoshaphat and the tenth or eleventh of Ahab (Blunt's Undesigned Coincidences); thereby he became so closely allied to the ungodly Ahab that at the Ramoth Gilead expedition he said to the latter, "I am as thou art, my people as thy people" (1 Kings 22:4). The dogs should lick his blood "in the place" where they licked Naboth's (fulfilled on his son Jehoram, Ahab's repentance causing judgment to be deferred); Jezebel and Ahab's posterity should be (what Orientals regard with especial horror) the food of dogs and birds (1 Kings 21:19-24). Hervey's view Jehoram
Chronology of the Old Testament - Yet we are told that Ahaziah, who followed Ahab after his death, came to the throne in the seventeenth year of Jehoshaphat, and in addition that Ahaziah’s brother Jehoram, who could be crowned only after the two years’ reign assigned to the latter, succeeded in the eighteenth of Jehoshaphat (1 Kings 22:41 ; 1 Kings 22:51 , 2 Kings 3:1 )
Philistia - Under Jehoram they invaded Judah (2 Chronicles 21:16-17)
Oracles - Other examples, although the word oracle is not used, include Elijah's word to Ahab ( 1 Kings 21:17-19 ) and Elisha's word to Jehoram (2 Kings 3:13-20 )
Elijah - He also answered Jehoshaphat's question (2 Kings 3:11 ) and sent a letter to Jehoram (2 Chronicles 21:12-15 )
Jerusalem - ...
The fourth siege of Jerusalem was in the reign of Jehoram, Jehoshaphat's son. Like Jehoram he was excluded from the royal sepulchres, whereas Jehoiada, his subject, was honoured with burial there
Jacob - " His wishes were overruled and controlled by that higher power which he vainly endeavoured to counteract; and that he spoke as the Spirit gave him utterance, appears from his prediction respecting Esau's family: "And it shall come to pass, when thou shalt have the dominion, that thou shalt break thy brother's yoke from off thy neck," Genesis 27:40 ; which was fulfilled in the days of Jehoram, king of Judah, when "the Edomites revolted from under the dominion of Judah, and made themselves a king unto this day," 2 Chronicles 21:8-10
Tombs - Jehoram is said to have been "buried with his fathers in the city of David" (2 Kings 8:24), yet "not in the sepulchres of the kings" (2 Chronicles 21:20); Josephus ( Moab - The reign of Ahaziah was too short to make war with them; but Jehoram, son of Ahab, and brother to Ahaziah, having ascended the throne, thought of reducing them to obedience
Diseases - ...
King Jehoram died with a painful intestinal disorder (2 Chronicles 21:18-20 )
Kings, Books of - … And the rest of the acts of Jehoshaphat and the mighty deeds which he did are they not written in the Book of Annals of the kings of Judah?… And Jehoshaphat slept with his fathers, and was buried in the city of David, and Jehoram his son reigned in his stead’ ( 1 Kings 22:41-43 ; 1 Kings 22:45 ; 1 Kings 22:50 )
Jeru'Salem - The city was taken by the Philistines and Arabians in the reign of Jehoram, B
Jerusalem - The city was taken by the Philistines and Arabians in the reign of Jehoram, b
Create, Creation - , Ahaziah, Joash, and Amaziah between Joram/Jehoram and Uzziah/Azariah in 1:8-9; Elisha - ...
Joram, in language identical with his mother Jezebel's threat against Elijah (1 Kings 19:2; 2 Kings 6:31), makes Elisha the scape-goat of the national calamity, as though his late act in leading the blinded Syrians to Samaria and glorifying Jehovah above Baal were the cause, or suspecting it was by Elisha's word of prayer, as it was by Elijah's formerly (1 Kings 17), that the famine came (See Jehoram); "God do so and more also to me, if the head of Elisha shall stand on him this day
Jerusalem - The royal house was again pillaged by a coalition of Philistines and Arabs ( 2 Chronicles 21:16 ) in the time of Jehoram