What does Jehoiakim mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יְהוֹיָקִ֣ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 6
יְהוֹיָקִ֥ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 4
יְהוֹיָקִ֑ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 4
יְהוֹיָקִ֤ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 3
לִיהוֹיָקִ֥ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 3
יְהֽוֹיָקִים֙ son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 2
יְהוֹיָקִ֖ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 2
יְהוֹיָקִֽים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 2
יְהוֹיָקִ֧ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 2
יְהוֹיָקִ֥ם son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 1
יְה֣וֹיָקִ֔ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 1
לִיהוֹיָקִ֨ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 1
אָחִ֔יו brother. 1
יְהוֹיָקִ֔ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 1
יְהוֹיָקִ֛ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 1
יְ֠הוֹיָקִים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 1
יְהוֹיָקִים֙ son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 1
יְהֽוֹיָקִ֜ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 1
לִיהוֹיָקִ֧ים son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 1years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects. 1

Definitions Related to Jehoiakim

H3079


   1 son of Josiah and the third from the last king of Judah; subject vassel of Nebuchadnezzar who reigned for 11 years before he died a violent death either in combat or by the hands of his own subjects.
   Additional Information: Jehoiakim = “Jehovah raises up”.
   

H251


   1 brother.
      1a brother of same parents.
      1b half-brother (same father).
      1c relative, kinship, same tribe.
      1d each to the other (reciprocal relationship).
      1e (fig.
      ) of resemblance.
      

Frequency of Jehoiakim (original languages)

Frequency of Jehoiakim (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Jehoiakim
(jih hoy' uh kihm) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh has caused to stand.” Son of Josiah who succeeded Jehoahaz as king of Judah (609-597). Jehoiakim was a throne name given to him by Pharaoh Neco of Egypt, who deposed his brother Jehoahaz. His original name had been Eliakim (2 Kings 23:34 ). He and his predecessor on the throne were brothers, sons of Josiah. He reigned for eleven years. At the beginning of his reign, Judah was subject to Egypt. Probably in 605 B.C., however, Babylon defeated Egypt. Jehoiakim, who apparently had been content to be a vassal of Egypt, transferred his allegiance to Babylon, but rebelled after three years. At his death he was succeeded by his son Jehoiachin. See Israel ; Chronology of Biblical Period.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jehoiakim
JEHOIAKIM or ELIAKIM ("whom El, God, established") at first; 25 years old at his accession. Second son of Josiah and Zebudah, daughter of Pedaiah of Rumah (Arumah in Manasseh, near Shechem? Judges 9:41); Johanan was the oldest son. Raised to the throne by Pharaoh Necho, who named him Jehoiakim (whom Jehovah establishes), having deposed Jehoahaz, the people's nominee, his younger brother. (See JEHOAHAZ.) Pharaoh bound Jehoiakim to exact tribute from Judah, for Josiah's having taken part with Babylon against him: one talent of gold and 100 talents of silver (40,000 British pounds). So "Jehoiakim valued ('taxed') the land to give the money to Pharaoh ... he exacted the silver and gold of every one according to his valuation" ("taxation"): 2 Kings 23:33-34; Jeremiah 22:10-12; Ezekiel 19:4. In Jehoiakim's fourth year Necho suffered his great defeat from Babylon at Carehemish, wherein he lost his possessions between Euphrates and the Nile, and returned no more to Judaea; so that Josiah's death was not unavenged (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2).
The change of Jehoiakim's name marked his vassalage (Jeremiah 22:18-192; Ezra 5:14; Daniel 1:7). The names were often from the pagan gods of the conqueror. In this case not so; the pagan kings Pharaoh and Nebuchadnezzar made Jehoiakim and Zedekiah ("Jehovah's righteousness") confirm their covenant of subjection with the seal of Jehovah's name, the Jews' own God, by whom they had sworn fealty. Jehoiakim reigned 11 years, doing evil throughout, as his forefathers before him. "His eyes and heart were only for covetousness, shedding innocent blood, oppression, and violence" (Jeremiah 22:13-17). "He built his house by unrighteousness and wrong, using his neighbour's service without wages," using his people's forced labour to build himself a splendid palace, in violation of Leviticus 19:13; Deuteronomy 24:14-15; compare Micah 3:10; Habakkuk 2:9; James 5:4.
God will repay those who repay not their neighbour's work. His "abominations which he did, and that which was found in him," are alluded to 2 Chronicles 36:6. God finds all that is in the sinner (Jeremiah 17:11; Jeremiah 23:24). Sad contrast to his father Josiah, who "did justice, and it was well with him." Nebuchadnezzar from Carchemish marched to Jerusalem, and fettered him as Pharaoh Necho's tributary, in the third (Dan 1) or fourth year of his reign (the diversity being caused by reckoning Jehoahaz' reign as a year, or not), intending to take him to Babylon; bat afterward for the sake of his former ally Josiah, his father, restored him as a vassal. At this time Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, were taken to Babylon. Three years subsequently Jehoiakim rebelled with characteristic perfidy, sacrificing honour and truth in order to spend the tribute on his own costly luxuries (Jeremiah 22:13-17). Nebuchadnezzar, not able in person to chastise him, sent marauding "bands" of Chaldaeans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites (2 Kings 24:1-7).
Ammon had seized on Gad's territory, upon Israel's exile, and acted as Nebuchadnezzar's agent to scourge Judah (Jeremiah 49:1-2; Ezekiel 25:3). Jehovah was the primary sender of these scourges (rebellion against Nebuchadnezzar, after promising fealty, was rebellion against God: Jeremiah 27:6-8; Ezekiel 17:16-19), not only for Jehoiakim's sins but for those of his forefather Manasseh, in whose steps he trod, and the "innocent blood which Jehovah would not pardon." Jeremiah (1618651174_66) foretold "concerning Jehoiakim, they shall not lament for him, Ah, my brother! or Ah, my sister!" (his queen, the lamentation of blood relatives for a private individual) nor, "Ah, lord; ah, his glory (the public lamentations of subjects for a king; alas, his majesty), he shall be buried with the burial of an ass, drawn and cast forth beyond the gates of Jerusalem"; again, Jeremiah 36:30, "he shall have none to sit (i.e. firmly established and continuing) upon the throne of David (for his son Jeconiah's reign of three months is counted as nothing, and Zedekiah was not his son but uncle); his dead body shall be cast out in the day to the heat, and in the night to the frost." (See JECONIAH.)
Jehoiakim was probably slain in a battle with Nebuchadnezzar's Chaldean and other "bands," and had no burial; possibly his own oppressed subjects slew him, and "cast out" his body to conciliate his invaders. Nor is this inconsistent with "Jehoiakim slept with his fathers" (2 Kings 24:6); it simply expresses his death, not his burial with his royal ancestors (Psalms 49:16); "slept with his fathers" and "buried with his fathers" are found distinct (2 Kings 15:38; 2 Kings 16:20). He reigned 11 years. Early in his reign (Jeremiah 26:1-20, etc.) Jehoiakim showed his vindictive malice against Jehovah's prophets. Urijah, son of Shemaiah, of Kirjath Jearim, prophesied against Jerusalem and Judah in the name of Jehovah thereupon Jehoiakim sought to kill him; he fled to Egypt, but Jehoiakim sent Elnathan of Achbor, and men with him, who brought Urijah back from Egypt, the Egyptian king allowing his vassal Jehoiakim to do so. Jehoiakim "slew him with the sword, and cast his dead body into the graves of the common people," instead of burial in the cemetery of the prophets (Matthew 23:29).
Jehoiakim gained by it only adding sin to sift, as the argument of the elders in Jeremiah's behalf implies, the notorious prostration of the state at the time intimating that heavier vengeance would ensue if Jeremiah too, as was threatened, should be slain. By God's retribution in kind Jehoiakim's own body fared as he had treated Urijah's body. 1 Esdras 1:42 speaks of "his uncleanness and impiety." His intense selfishness and indifference to the people's sufferings appear in his lavish expenditure upon building palaces for himself at the very time the people were overwhelmed with paying heavy tribute to Pharaoh (Jeremiah 22:13-18). His crowning impiety, which had no parallel in Jewish history, was his cutting up, and burning in the fire before him, the written roll of Jeremiah's inspired prophecies (Jeremiah 36). Jeremiah being "shut up," i.e. prevented by fear of the king, sent Baruch to read them to the people assembled out of Judah to the Lord's house on the fasting day.
"In the fifth year of Jehoiakim they (the princes) proclaimed a fast to all the people," or (Michaelis) "all the people proclaimed a fast"; in either reading Jehoiakim had no share in appointing it, but chose this season of all seasons to perpetrate such an audacious act. On hearing of the roll, Jehoiakim sent Jehudi his ready tool to fetch it from Elishama the scribe's chamber; for sinners fleeing from God yet, by an involuntary instinct, seek to hear His words against them. Then, as often as Jehudi read three or four columns of the long roll, Jehoiakim cut the parts read consecutively, until all was destroyed. Yet he and his servants "were not afraid," a contrast even to the princes who "were afraid both one and other when they had heard all the words"; a still sadder contrast to his father Josiah whose "heart was tender," and who "rent his clothes" on hearing the words of the law just found (2 Kings 22:11; 2 Kings 22:13; 2 Kings 22:19-20).
Even Elnathan, who had been his tool against Urijah, recoiled from this, and interceded with Jehoiakim not to burn the roll; but he would not hear, nay even commanded his minions to apprehend Baruch and Jeremiah: but the Lord hid them (Psalms 31:20; Psalms 83:3; Isaiah 26:20). Judicial blindness and reprobation! The roll was rewritten, not one word omitted, and with awful additions (Hebrews 4:12-137; Acts 9:5; Acts 5:39; Revelation 22:19); his body should be exposed to the sun's "heat," even as he had exposed the roll to be burnt by the heat of the fire. Sinners only gain additional punishment by fighting with God's word, which is a sharp sword; they cut themselves, when trying to cut it. Compare the rewriting of the law's two tables (Exodus 34:15-16; Exodus 31:18; Exodus 34:1-23; Deuteronomy 31:9). The two-edged sword of God's Spirit converts the humble and tender as Josiah, draws out the latent hatred of the ungodly as J. (2 Corinthians 2:15-16; 1618651174_32). Jehoiakim reigned from 609 B.C. to 598 B.C.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jehoiakim
Jehoiakim (je-hoi-a-kĭm), whom Jehovah sets up. Called Eliakim, son of Josiah and king of Judah. After deposing Jehoahaz, Pharaoh-necho set Eliakim, his elder brother, upon the throne, and changed his name to Jehoiakim. For four years Jehoiakim was subject to Egypt, when Nebuchadnezzar, after a short siege, entered Jerusalem, took the king prisoner, and bound him in fetters to carry him to Babylon. Jehoiakim became tributary to Nebuchadnezzar, but after three years broke his oath of allegiance and rebelled against him. 2 Kings 24:1. Nebuchadnezzar sent against him numerous bands of Chaldeans, with Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites, 2 Kings 24:2, and who cruelly harassed the whole country. Either in an engagement with some of these forces, or else by the hand of his own oppressed subjects, Jehoiakim came to a violent end in the eleventh year of his reign. His body was cast out ignominiously on the ground, and then was dragged away and buried "with the burial of an ass," without pomp or lamentation, "beyond the gates of Jerusalem." Jeremiah 22:18-19; Jeremiah 36:30. All the accounts we have of Jehoiakim concur in ascribing to him a vicious and irreligious character. 2 Kings 23:37; 2 Kings 24:9; 2 Chronicles 36:5. The reign of Jehoiakim extends from b.c. 609 to b.c. 698, or, as some reckon, 599.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jehoiakim
Avenging
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jehoiakim
Name given by Pharaoh-Necho, to ELIAKIM son of Josiah king of Judah, whom he made king in the room of Jehoahaz his brother. He reigned from B.C. 610 to 599. 2 Kings 23:34-36 . He was at first tributary to Egypt; but Egypt being defeated by Assyria at Carchemish, B.C. 606, he became tributary to Babylon. Nebuchadnezzar visited Jerusalem, bound Jehoiakim in chains to carry him to Babylon, but apparently altered his plans and left him at Jerusalem as a vassal; or, if he carried him to Babylon, allowed him to return. 2 Chronicles 36:5-8 ; Daniel 1:2 . After three years Jehoiakim revolted and God sent against him bands of the Chaldees, the Syrians, the Moabites, and the Ammonites to destroy Judah on account of their wickedness. 2 Kings 24:1-5 .
Jehoiakim was warned many times, but he resented the admonitions, and put Urijah the prophet to death. In the fourth year of his reign, Jeremiah wrote in a book his prophecies against Judah and Israel, which were read in the Lord's house; but when tidings of this reached the king he sent for the book, heard it read, and then cut it in pieces and burnt it. He ordered the arrest of Jeremiah and of Baruch who had written the book; but the Lord hid them. God declared he would punish him, and said, "He shall be buried with the burial of an ass, drawn and cast forth beyond the gates of Jerusalem:" his end is not recorded. Jeremiah 22:18,24 ; Jeremiah 26:21-23 ; Jeremiah 36:9-32 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jehoiakim
JEHOIAKIM , whose original name was Eliakim , was placed upon the throne of Judah by Pharaoh-necho, who deposed the more popular Jehoabaz. His reign of eleven years is not well spoken of by Jeremiah. The religious abuses which had been abolished by Josiah seem to have returned with greater strength than ever. At a time when the kingdom was impoverished by war and by the exactions of Egypt, Jehoiakim occupied himself in extravagant schemes of building to be carried out by forced labour ( 2 Kings 23:24 to 2 Kings 24:7 ). Things were so had that in the fourth year of his reign Jeremiah dictated to Baruch a summary of all his earlier discourses, and bade him read it in public as though to indicate that there was no longer any hope. The king showed his contempt for the prophetic word by burning the roll. Active persecution of the prophetic party followed, in which one man at least was put to death. Jeremiah’s escape was due to powerful friends at court ( Jeremiah 22:13-19 ; Jeremiah 36:1-26 ; Jeremiah 26:20-24 ). It was about the time of the burning of the Book of Jeremiah that the Egyptian supremacy was ended by the decisive battle of Carchemish. The evacuation of Palestine followed, and Jehoiakim was obliged to submit to the Babylonians. His heart, however, was with the Pharaoh, to whom he owed his elevation. After three years he revolted from the Babylonian rule. Nebuchadrezzar thought to bring him into subjection by sending guerilla bands to harry the country, but as this did not succeed, he invaded Judah with an army of regulars. Before he reached Jerusalem, Jehoiakim died, and the surrender which was inevitable, was made by his son. Whether Jeremiah’s prediction that the corpse of the king should be denied decent burial was fulfilled is not certain.
H. P. Smith.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jehoiakim
or ELIAKIM, the brother and successor of Jehoahaz, king of Judah, was advanced to the throne by Pharaoh-Necho, king of Egypt, A.M. 3395, 2 Kings 23:34 . He reigned eleven years in Jerusalem, and did evil in the sight of the Lord. When Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar, this prince was also taken and put to death, and his body thrown into the common sewer, according to the prediction of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 22:18-19 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jehoiakim
On the death of his father his younger brother Jehoahaz (=Shallum, Jeremiah 22:11 ), who favoured the Chaldeans against the Egyptians, was made king by the people; but the king of Egypt, Pharaoh-necho, invaded the land and deposed Jehoahaz (2 Kings 23:33,34 ; Jeremiah 22:10-12 ), setting Eliakim on the throne in his stead, and changing his name to Jehoiakim.
After this the king of Egypt took no part in Jewish politics, having been defeated by the Chaldeans at Carchemish (2 Kings 24:7 ; Jeremiah 46:2 ). Palestine was now invaded and conquered by Nebuchadnezzar. Jehoiakim was taken prisoner and carried captive to Babylon (2 Chronicles 36:6,7 ). It was at this time that Daniel also and his three companions were taken captive to Babylon (Daniel 1:1,2 ).
Nebuchadnezzar reinstated Jehoiakim on his throne, but treated him as a vassal king. In the year after this, Jeremiah caused his prophecies to be read by Baruch in the court of the temple. Jehoiakim, hearing of this, had them also read in the royal palace before himself. The words displeased him, and taking the roll from the hands of Baruch he cut it in pieces and threw it into the fire (Jeremiah 36:23 ). During his disastrous reign there was a return to the old idolatry and corruption of the days of Manasseh.
After three years of subjection to Babylon, Jehoiakim withheld his tribute and threw off the yoke (2 Kings 24:1 ), hoping to make himself independent. Nebuchadnezzar sent bands of Chaldeans, Syrians, and Ammonites (2 Kings 24:2 ) to chastise his rebellious vassal. They cruelly harassed the whole country (Compare Jeremiah 49:1-6 ). The king came to a violent death, and his body having been thrown over the wall of Jerusalem, to convince the beseieging army that he was dead, after having been dragged away, was buried beyond the gates of Jerusalem "with the burial of an ass," B.C. 599 (Jeremiah 22:18,19 ; 36:30 ). Nebuchadnezzar placed his son Jehoiachin on the throne, wishing still to retain the kingdom of Judah as tributary to him.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jehoiakim
Or ELIAKIM, second son of Josiah, brother and successor of Jehoahaz or Shallum, king of Judah, for whom he was substituted by the king of Egypt. He was king during eleven years of luxury, extortion, and idolatry. In the third year, Nebuchadnezzar carried to Babylon a part of his princes and treasures. A year after, his allied the Egyptians were defeated on the Euphrates; yet he despised the warnings of Jeremiah, and cast his book into the fire. At length he rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar, but was defeated and ingloriously slain, B. C. 599,2 Kings 23:34 24:6 2 Chronicles 36:4-8 Jeremiah 22:1-30 26:1-24 36:1-32 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jehoiakim
Undoubtedly Jehoiakim was one of Judah’s worst kings. When his father Josiah was killed in battle with Pharaoh Necho (609 BC), the people of Judah made one of Josiah’s younger sons king in preference to the older Jehoiakim (2 Chronicles 35:20-25; 2 Chronicles 36:1-2). Pharaoh Necho, considering himself the master of Judah, replaced the people’s choice with his own. His choice was Jehoiakim (also known as Eliakim) (2 Chronicles 36:3-5).
In order to raise the large amount of money that Pharaoh Necho demanded each year from Judah, Jehoiakim taxed his people heavily (2 Kings 23:35). At the same time he built himself luxurious royal buildings, forcing people to work in his selfish projects without payment (Jeremiah 22:13-19).
Conflict with Jeremiah
The chief opponent of Jehoiakim was the prophet Jeremiah, who had begun his preaching earlier, in the reign of Josiah (Jeremiah 1:1-3). At the beginning of Jehoiakim’s reign, Jeremiah announced God’s judgment on the sinful kingdom (Jeremiah 26:1-6). This brought opposition from the palace (Jeremiah 26:10-11), but Jeremiah escaped unharmed. Another prophet, however, did not. Jehoiakim was angry at his preaching and executed him (Jeremiah 26:20-24).
Jeremiah warned that because of the idolatry of the king and his people, God would send the Babylonians against Jerusalem in judgment (Jeremiah 25:1-9). This judgment began in 605 BC, the year in which Babylon conquered Egypt at Carchemish and so replaced it as Judah’s overlord. In returning to Babylon, the conquerors took with them selected captives from the leading families of Jerusalem (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2; Daniel 1:1-4).
At God’s direction, Jeremiah wrote down all the prophecies of the previous twenty-three years. After his secretary Baruch read them in the temple, the city leaders became so disturbed that they read them to Jehoiakim. The king defiantly burnt the scroll, and tried unsuccessfully to arrest Jeremiah and Baruch (Jeremiah 36:1-26). Jeremiah then rewrote the scroll, with additions, and gave some encouragement to the frightened Baruch (Jeremiah 36:27-32; Jeremiah 45).
Conflict with Babylon
After submitting to Babylon’s overlordship for three years, Jehoiakim rebelled by refusing to pay further tribute (2 Kings 24:1). In depending upon foreign nations to support his rebellion, he met further opposition from Jeremiah (Jeremiah 2:18; Jeremiah 2:36). Babylon did not attack Jerusalem immediately, but encouraged other countries within its empire to raid Judah and so gradually weaken it (2 Kings 24:2-4).
In due course Babylon attacked Jerusalem (597 BC). Jehoiakim was taken captive and chained ready to be sent to Babylon, but he died before the journey began. No one mourned his death, and his body was thrown on the garbage dump outside Jerusalem, as if it were the carcass of an unclean animal (2 Chronicles 36:6; Jeremiah 22:18-19; Jeremiah 36:30).

Sentence search

Jehudi - The princes' ready tool in fetching Baruch to read Jeremiah's (Jeremiah 36:14; Jeremiah 36:21-23) denunciations; then employed by Jehoiakim to bring and read the roll, which the king cut and burned. (See Jehoiakim
Jehoiakim - Jehoiakim (je-hoi-a-kĭm), whom Jehovah sets up. After deposing Jehoahaz, Pharaoh-necho set Eliakim, his elder brother, upon the throne, and changed his name to Jehoiakim. For four years Jehoiakim was subject to Egypt, when Nebuchadnezzar, after a short siege, entered Jerusalem, took the king prisoner, and bound him in fetters to carry him to Babylon. Jehoiakim became tributary to Nebuchadnezzar, but after three years broke his oath of allegiance and rebelled against him. Either in an engagement with some of these forces, or else by the hand of his own oppressed subjects, Jehoiakim came to a violent end in the eleventh year of his reign. All the accounts we have of Jehoiakim concur in ascribing to him a vicious and irreligious character. The reign of Jehoiakim extends from b
Joiakim - Contracted from "Jehoiakim
Nehushta - Wife of Jehoiakim king of Judah
Jeho-i'Akim - After deposing Jehoahaz, Pharaoh-necho set Eliakim, his elder brother, upon the throne, and changed his name to Jehoiakim, B. For four years Jehoiakim was subject toi Egypt, when Nebuchadnezzar, after a short siege, entered Jerusalem, took the king prisoner, bound him in fetters to carry him to Babylon, and took also some of the precious vessels of the temple and carried them to the land of Shinar. Jehoiakim became tributary to Nebuchadnezzar after his invasion of Judah, and continued so for three years, but at the end of that time broke his oath of allegiance and rebelled against him. Either in an engagement with some of these forces or else by the hand of his own oppressed subjects Jehoiakim came to a violent end in the eleventh year of his reign. " (Jeremiah 22:18,19 ; 36:30 ) All the accounts we have of Jehoiakim concur in ascribing to him a vicious and irreligious character. (2 Kings 23:37 ; 24:9 ; 2 Chronicles 36:5 ) The reign of Jehoiakim extends from B
Zebudah - Given, the wife of Josiah and mother of Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:36 )
Jehudi - Son of Nethaniah, and an attendant at the court of Jehoiakim
Zebu'Dah - (bestowed ), wife of Josiah and mother of King Jehoiakim
Zarakes - Called in 1Es 1:38 brother of Joakim or Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and said to have been brought up out of Egypt by him. d and r , of Zedekiah , who was a brother of Jehoiakim ( 2 Kings 24:17 )
Joiakim - (Whom Jehovah has set up) = Jehoiakim, a high priest, the son and successor of Jeshua (Nehemiah 12:10,12,26 )
Jehudi - The servant of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, (Jeremiah 36:14) His name signifies, the Lord is my praise
Joakim - The name is spelt Jehoiakim in canon. King Jehoiakim ( 1Es 1:37-42 , Bar 1:3 ). Jehoiachin, son of Jehoiakim, who is erroneously called Joakim in 1Es 1:43
Jehoiakim - Undoubtedly Jehoiakim was one of Judah’s worst kings. When his father Josiah was killed in battle with Pharaoh Necho (609 BC), the people of Judah made one of Josiah’s younger sons king in preference to the older Jehoiakim (2 Chronicles 35:20-25; 2 Chronicles 36:1-2). His choice was Jehoiakim (also known as Eliakim) (2 Chronicles 36:3-5). ...
In order to raise the large amount of money that Pharaoh Necho demanded each year from Judah, Jehoiakim taxed his people heavily (2 Kings 23:35). ...
Conflict with Jeremiah...
The chief opponent of Jehoiakim was the prophet Jeremiah, who had begun his preaching earlier, in the reign of Josiah (Jeremiah 1:1-3). At the beginning of Jehoiakim’s reign, Jeremiah announced God’s judgment on the sinful kingdom (Jeremiah 26:1-6). Jehoiakim was angry at his preaching and executed him (Jeremiah 26:20-24). After his secretary Baruch read them in the temple, the city leaders became so disturbed that they read them to Jehoiakim. ...
Conflict with Babylon...
After submitting to Babylon’s overlordship for three years, Jehoiakim rebelled by refusing to pay further tribute (2 Kings 24:1). Jehoiakim was taken captive and chained ready to be sent to Babylon, but he died before the journey began
Michaiah - A young prince at the court of Jehoiakim, who communicated to the king's counselors the solemn warnings of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 36:11 - 13
Nehush'ta - (brass ), the daughter of Elnathan of Jerusalem, wife of Jehoiakim and mother of Jehoiachin, kings of Judah
Zebidah - ” Daughter of Pedaiah of Rumah and the mother of King Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:36 ; “Zebudah,” KJV)
Jakim - ...
...
Margin in Matthew 1:11 means Jehoiakim
Zebidah - The mother of Jehoiakim ( 2 Kings 23:36 )
Jokim - (joh' kihm) Short form of personal name Jehoiakim meaning, “Yah has established or delivered
Jehoiakim - JEHOIAKIM or ELIAKIM ("whom El, God, established") at first; 25 years old at his accession. Raised to the throne by Pharaoh Necho, who named him Jehoiakim (whom Jehovah establishes), having deposed Jehoahaz, the people's nominee, his younger brother. ) Pharaoh bound Jehoiakim to exact tribute from Judah, for Josiah's having taken part with Babylon against him: one talent of gold and 100 talents of silver (40,000 British pounds). So "Jehoiakim valued ('taxed') the land to give the money to Pharaoh . In Jehoiakim's fourth year Necho suffered his great defeat from Babylon at Carehemish, wherein he lost his possessions between Euphrates and the Nile, and returned no more to Judaea; so that Josiah's death was not unavenged (2 Kings 24:7; Jeremiah 46:2). ...
The change of Jehoiakim's name marked his vassalage (Genesis 41:45; Ezra 5:14; Daniel 1:7). In this case not so; the pagan kings Pharaoh and Nebuchadnezzar made Jehoiakim and Zedekiah ("Jehovah's righteousness") confirm their covenant of subjection with the seal of Jehovah's name, the Jews' own God, by whom they had sworn fealty. Jehoiakim reigned 11 years, doing evil throughout, as his forefathers before him. Three years subsequently Jehoiakim rebelled with characteristic perfidy, sacrificing honour and truth in order to spend the tribute on his own costly luxuries (Jeremiah 22:13-17). Jehovah was the primary sender of these scourges (rebellion against Nebuchadnezzar, after promising fealty, was rebellion against God: Jeremiah 27:6-8; Ezekiel 17:16-19), not only for Jehoiakim's sins but for those of his forefather Manasseh, in whose steps he trod, and the "innocent blood which Jehovah would not pardon. " Jeremiah (Jeremiah 22:18-19) foretold "concerning Jehoiakim, they shall not lament for him, Ah, my brother! or Ah, my sister!" (his queen, the lamentation of blood relatives for a private individual) nor, "Ah, lord; ah, his glory (the public lamentations of subjects for a king; alas, his majesty), he shall be buried with the burial of an ass, drawn and cast forth beyond the gates of Jerusalem"; again, Jeremiah 36:30, "he shall have none to sit (i. )...
Jehoiakim was probably slain in a battle with Nebuchadnezzar's Chaldean and other "bands," and had no burial; possibly his own oppressed subjects slew him, and "cast out" his body to conciliate his invaders. Nor is this inconsistent with "Jehoiakim slept with his fathers" (2 Kings 24:6); it simply expresses his death, not his burial with his royal ancestors (Psalms 49:16); "slept with his fathers" and "buried with his fathers" are found distinct (2 Kings 15:38; 2 Kings 16:20). ) Jehoiakim showed his vindictive malice against Jehovah's prophets. Urijah, son of Shemaiah, of Kirjath Jearim, prophesied against Jerusalem and Judah in the name of Jehovah thereupon Jehoiakim sought to kill him; he fled to Egypt, but Jehoiakim sent Elnathan of Achbor, and men with him, who brought Urijah back from Egypt, the Egyptian king allowing his vassal Jehoiakim to do so. Jehoiakim "slew him with the sword, and cast his dead body into the graves of the common people," instead of burial in the cemetery of the prophets (Matthew 23:29). ...
Jehoiakim gained by it only adding sin to sift, as the argument of the elders in Jeremiah's behalf implies, the notorious prostration of the state at the time intimating that heavier vengeance would ensue if Jeremiah too, as was threatened, should be slain. By God's retribution in kind Jehoiakim's own body fared as he had treated Urijah's body. ...
"In the fifth year of Jehoiakim they (the princes) proclaimed a fast to all the people," or (Michaelis) "all the people proclaimed a fast"; in either reading Jehoiakim had no share in appointing it, but chose this season of all seasons to perpetrate such an audacious act. On hearing of the roll, Jehoiakim sent Jehudi his ready tool to fetch it from Elishama the scribe's chamber; for sinners fleeing from God yet, by an involuntary instinct, seek to hear His words against them. Then, as often as Jehudi read three or four columns of the long roll, Jehoiakim cut the parts read consecutively, until all was destroyed. ...
Even Elnathan, who had been his tool against Urijah, recoiled from this, and interceded with Jehoiakim not to burn the roll; but he would not hear, nay even commanded his minions to apprehend Baruch and Jeremiah: but the Lord hid them (Psalms 31:20; Psalms 83:3; Isaiah 26:20). Jehoiakim reigned from 609 B
Cushi - Ancestor of a royal official under King Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:14 )
Nehushta - Wife of king Jehoiakim and mother of Jehoiachin ( 2 Kings 24:8 )
Jerahmeel - Son of Hammelech and an officer of Jehoiakim
Joiakim - (joy' uh kihm) Short form of Jehoiakim meaning, “Yah has established, set up, delivered
Negushta - Wife of Jehoiakim, and mother of the young king Jechoniah, with whom she was probably associated in the government, as she is in the reproaches of Jeremiah, 2 Kings 24:8 ; Jeremiah 13:18 ; 29:2
Jeconiah - Son of Jehoiakim, last but one of Judah's kings
Abdeel - ” Abdeel's son Shelemiah was one of three attendants whom Jehoiakim (609-598 B
Jehoiakim - On the death of his father his younger brother Jehoahaz (=Shallum, Jeremiah 22:11 ), who favoured the Chaldeans against the Egyptians, was made king by the people; but the king of Egypt, Pharaoh-necho, invaded the land and deposed Jehoahaz (2 Kings 23:33,34 ; Jeremiah 22:10-12 ), setting Eliakim on the throne in his stead, and changing his name to Jehoiakim. Jehoiakim was taken prisoner and carried captive to Babylon (2 Chronicles 36:6,7 ). ...
Nebuchadnezzar reinstated Jehoiakim on his throne, but treated him as a vassal king. Jehoiakim, hearing of this, had them also read in the royal palace before himself. ...
After three years of subjection to Babylon, Jehoiakim withheld his tribute and threw off the yoke (2 Kings 24:1 ), hoping to make himself independent
Jehoiakim - Jehoiakim was a throne name given to him by Pharaoh Neco of Egypt, who deposed his brother Jehoahaz. Jehoiakim, who apparently had been content to be a vassal of Egypt, transferred his allegiance to Babylon, but rebelled after three years
Uri'Jah - He prophesied in the days of Jehoiakim, B. His retreat was soon covered; Elnathan and his men brought him up out of Egypt, and Jehoiakim slew him with the sword and cast his body forth among the graves of the common people (Jeremiah 26:20-23 )
Shelemi'ah - (Ezra 10:41 ) ...
Ancestor of Jehudi in the time of Jehoiakim. (Jeremiah 36:14 ) ...
Son of Abdeel; one of those who received the orders of Jehoiakim to take Baruch and Jeremiah
Delaiah - Interceded that king Jehoiakim would not burn Jeremiah's prophetic roll, but in vain (Jeremiah 36:12; Jeremiah 36:25)
Gemariah - He vainly sought to deter king Jehoiakim from burning the roll ( Jeremiah 36:10-12 ; Jeremiah 36:25 )
Eliakim - See Jehoiakim
Elnathan - Probably the same who tried to prevent Jehoiakim from burning the roll of Jeremiah's prophecies (Jeremiah 26:22 ; 36:12 )
Ahikam - Later he used his influence to protect Jeremiah from the violence of the populace during the reign of Jehoiakim ( Jeremiah 26:24 )
Shelemiah - Ancestor of an official of King Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:14 ). Court official whom King Jehoiakim (609-597 B
Elnathan - Son of Achbor and father of Nehushta, Jehoiakim's queen: he begged Jehoiakim not to burn the sacred roll
Jehoiachin - otherwise called Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 , and Jeconiah, 1 Chronicles 3:17 , the son of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and grandson of Josiah. 3398, when Jehoiakim, or Eliakim, his father, was carried to Babylon. Jehoiakim returned from Babylon, and reigned till A
Eliakim - The Pharaoh changed the name of Eliakim to Jehoiakim. See Jehoiakim
Jehoiakim - Jehoiakim , whose original name was Eliakim , was placed upon the throne of Judah by Pharaoh-necho, who deposed the more popular Jehoabaz. At a time when the kingdom was impoverished by war and by the exactions of Egypt, Jehoiakim occupied himself in extravagant schemes of building to be carried out by forced labour ( 2 Kings 23:24 to 2 Kings 24:7 ). The evacuation of Palestine followed, and Jehoiakim was obliged to submit to the Babylonians. Before he reached Jerusalem, Jehoiakim died, and the surrender which was inevitable, was made by his son
Jehudi - An officer of Jehoiakim, at whose summons Baruch read to the princes of Judah the roll of Jeremiah’s prophecies, and who was afterwards himself employed to read the roll to the king
Urijah - Son of Shemaiah: he prophesied against Jerusalem and the land, and then fled into Egypt, but was sent for by Jehoiakim and put to death
Delaiah - Son of Shemaiah and prince at the court of Jehoiakim
Hammelech - Jehoiakim at this time (the fifth year of his reign) had no grown up son
Pedaiah -
The father of Zebudah, who was the wife of Josiah and mother of king Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:36 )
Ahi'Kam - ( 2 Kings 22:12-14 ) In the reign of Jehoiakim he successfully used his influence to protect the prophet Jeremiah
az'Riel - ) ...
The father of Seraiah, an officer of Jehoiakim
Jehoiakim - Nebuchadnezzar visited Jerusalem, bound Jehoiakim in chains to carry him to Babylon, but apparently altered his plans and left him at Jerusalem as a vassal; or, if he carried him to Babylon, allowed him to return. After three years Jehoiakim revolted and God sent against him bands of the Chaldees, the Syrians, the Moabites, and the Ammonites to destroy Judah on account of their wickedness. ...
Jehoiakim was warned many times, but he resented the admonitions, and put Urijah the prophet to death
Necho - 2 Chronicles 36:4; Then coming to Jerusalem, he set up Eliakim, or Jehoiakim, Josiah's first-born, in his place. Carchemish was retaken by the army of the king of Babylon, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, Jeremiah 46:2; so that Necho did not retain his conquests in Syria more than four years
Rumah - The home of Pedaiah, the maternal grandfather of Jehoiakim ( 2 Kings 23:36 )
Jehudi - Jehudi read the scroll to King Jehoiakim and then cut it up and threw it into the fire about 604 B
Achbor - Father of Elnathan, whom Jehoiakim sent to bring back prophet Uriah from Egypt to execute him (Jeremiah 26:22 )
Pedaiah - Father of Zebudah the mother of Jehoiakim
Ahikam - He also served under Jehoiakim and shielded Jeremiah from death when he prophesied against the nation
Delai'ah - ) ...
Son of Shemaiah, one of the "princes" about the court of Jehoiakim
Ahikam - Ahikam protected Jeremiah when King Jehoiakim wanted to kill the prophet (Jeremiah 26:24 )
Urijah - When king Jehoiakim ordered his execution, Urijah fled to Egypt
Eliakim - His name was changed to Jehoiakim
Jerah'me-el - ) ...
Son of Hammelech, who was employed by Jehoiakim to make Jeremiah and baruch prisoners, after the had burnt the roll of Jeremiah's prophecy
Jerahmeel - Son of Hammelech (Hebrew, “the king” and so translated by modern versions), who was one of a group whom King Jehoiakim sent to arrest Baruch and Jeremiah (Jeremiah 36:26 ); but the Lord showed He has more power than human rulers by hiding His faithful servants from the king
Gemariah - The son Shaphan, a scribe of the temple in the time of Jehoiakim
Jeremiah, the Book of - In the chronological order of its several predictions and divine messages, is somewhat difficult of arrangement; but may be divide, by a natural and sufficiently accurate method, in to four general sections, containing severally the prophecies uttered in the reigns of Josiah, Jehoiakim, Zedekiah, and Gedaliah
Ahikam - On one occasion he protected Jeremiah against the fury of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 26:24 )
Beth-Haccerem - Apparently Jehoiakim (609-597) built the palace, which fits the description of Jeremiah 22:13-19
Nethaniah - Father of Jehudi sent to Baruch by the princes of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:14 )
Elnathan - The son of Achbor, the chief of those sent to Egypt to fetch Uriah, who had offended Jehoiakim by his prophecy ( Jeremiah 26:22 ff
Jehoiachin - Son and successor of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, b
Shelemiah - Son of Abdeel: he was ordered by Jehoiakim to arrest Baruch and Jeremiah
Habakkuk - He lived in the reign of Jehoiakim or of Josiah
Urijah - A faithful prophet, from Kirjathjearim in Judah, in the time of Jehoiakim
Eliakim - ...
...
The original name of Jehoiakim, king of Judah (2 Kings 23:34 )
Gemariah -
The son of Shaphan, and one of the Levites of the temple in the time of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:10 ; 2 Kings 22:12 )
Urijah - ...
...
A prophet of Kirjath-jearim in the reign of Jehoiakim, king of Judah (Jeremiah 26:20-23 )
Elishama - Scribe or secretary of Jehoiakim
Jeremiah - One of the chief prophets of the Old Testament, prophesied under Josiah, Jehoiakim, and Zedekiah, and also after the captivity of the latter. Jehoiakim threw his prophetic roll into the fire, and sought his life
Zedekiah - Son of Hananiah, one of the princes in the reign of Jehoiakim ( Jeremiah 36:12 )
Pedaiah - Maternal grandfather of King Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:36 )
Zedekiah - Son of Hananiah, one of the princes in the reign of Jehoiakim ( Jeremiah 36:12 )
Elish'Ama - (2 Kings 25:25 ; Jeremiah 41:1 ) ...
Scribe of King Jehoiakim
Meshullam - A son of Ezra, head of a priestly house during the time of Jehoiakim was high priest (Nehemiah 12:13 ). Another head of a priestly house when Jehoiakim was high priest; son of Ginnethon (Nehemiah 12:16 )
Jeremi'ah, Book of - "There can be little doubt that the book of Jeremiah grew out of the roll which Baruch wrote down at the prophet's mouth in the fourth year of Jehoiakim. 1-21, including prophecies from the thirteenth year of Josiah to the fourth of Jehoiakim; ch
Eber - Head of priestly family of Amok (Nehemiah 12:20 ) in days of Jehoiakim (609-597 B
Branch - The "highest branch" in Ezekiel 17:3 represents Jehoiakim the king
Pedaiah - ‘Of Rumah,’ father of Zehudah the mother of Jehoiakim ( 2 Kings 23:35 )
Taxes, Taxation, Taxing - Jehoiakim taxed the land in order to be able to pay the demands of Pharaoh, king of Egypt
Kirjath-Jearim - The prophet Urijah, who was put to death by Jehoiakim, Jeremiah 26:20, was born here, and after the captivity the people of the city returned in numbers to it
Esther, the Book of - It has been ascribed to Ezra, to a high-priest name Jehoiakim, and to Mordecai
Uriah - His denunciations against Judah and Jerusalem in the style of Jeremiah aroused the wrath of king Jehoiakim. Uriah fled to Egypt, was seized and slain by order of Jehoiakim, and was buried in the common graveyard ( Jeremiah 26:20-23 )
Jerahmeel - One of the three men ordered by Jehoiakim to arrest Jeremiah and Baruch ( Jeremiah 36:26 ). ’ He was a scion of the royal house, but not necessarily a child of Jehoiakim
Necho or Pharaoh-Necho - Then coming to Jerusalem, he set up Eliakim, or Jehoiakim, in his place, and exacted the payment of one hundred talents of silver and one talent of gold. Jeremiah 46:2 , acquaints us that Carchemish was retaken by Nabopolassar king of Babylon, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim king of Judah; so that Necho did not retain his conquests in Syria more than four year, 2 Kings 23:29-24:7 2 Chronicles 35:20-36:6
Shaphan - Ahikam was Jeremiah's friend; hence Gemariah gives the prophet and Earuch a friendly warning to hide, and intercedes that Jehoiakim should not burn the roll (Jeremiah 36:12; Jeremiah 36:19; Jeremiah 36:25)
Eli'Akim - " (Isaiah 22:21 ) ...
The original name of Jehoiakim king of Judah
Jeho-i'Achin - (whom Jehovah has appointed ), son of Jehoiakim, and for three months and ten days king of Judah
Baruch - Jehoiakim burned it, but Jeremiah dictated it again (Jeremiah 36:1 )
Neco - ) of the 26th dynasty of Egypt whose forces killed Josiah in battle ( 2 Kings 23:29-35 ; 2 Chronicles 35:20-24 ) and who installed Jehoiakim as king of Judah in his place (2 Kings 23:34-35 )
Eliakim - The name of king Josiah’s son, who reigned after him; Pharaoh-necho changed his name to Jehoiakim ( 2 Kings 23:34 )
Elishama - A scribe or secretary to Jehoiakim ( Jeremiah 36:12 ; Jeremiah 36:20-21 )
Jehoahaz - Jehoiakim, or Eliakim his brother, was made king in his room
Jehoiachin - ” In 2 Kings 24:6 , the son and successor of Jehoiakim as king of Judah
Baruch - prevented coming forward, read them before the people; in consequence of which king Jehoiakim sought to kill him and Jeremiah, but the Lord hid them. Jehoiakim having destroyed the first roll, Baruch wrote again the same words with many additions
Baruch - These he read to the people from a window in the temple in the fourth year of the reign of Jehoiakim, king of Judah (Jeremiah 36 )
Tahpanhes - In Jeremiah 2:16 "the children of Noph (Memphis, the capital) and Tahapanes" (with which the Jews came most in contact) represent the Egyptians generally, who under Pharaoh Necho slew the king of Judah, Josiah, at Megiddo, and deposed Jehoahaz for Eliakim or Jehoiakim (2 Kings 23:29-30; 2 Kings 23:33-35)
Gemariah - Gemariah had some fear of God and moral courage, for he, with Elnathan and Delaiah, interceded with king Jehoiakim not to burn the roll; but he would not hear them
Jehoiachin - Son and successor of Jehoiakim king of Judah
Jehoiachin - JEHOIACHIN , king of Judah, ascended the throne when Nebuchadrezzar was on the march to punish the rebellion of Jehoiakim
Baruch - These he read before the princes, who rehearsed them to Jehoiakim, the king, having previously placed the writing in one of the offices of the temple
Baruch - These last took the book, and soon made known its contents to king Jehoiakim, who impiously destroyed it
Rechabites - This they continued to observe for above three hundred years; but in the last year of Jehoiakim king of Judah, Nebuchadnezzar coming to besiege Jerusalem, the Rechabites were forced to take refuge in the city, though still lodging in tents
Elishama - A royal scribe under King Jehoiakim (609-597 B
Shemaiah - ...
...
The father of a prince in the reign of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:12 )
Jehoahaz - Pharaoh-necho sent him a prisoner loaded with chains into Egypt, and there he died, Jeremiah 22:11-12, and his brother Jehoiakim became king in his stead
Jehoiachin - At the time of Babylon’s attack on Jerusalem in 597 BC, the Judean king Jehoiakim died and was succeeded by his eighteen year old son Jehoiachin (also known as Jeconiah, or Coniah)
Captivities of Judah - The captivities of Judah are generally reckoned four: the first, in the year of the world 3398, under King Jehoiakim, when Daniel and others were carried to Babylon; the second, in the year of the world 3401, and in the seventh year of the reign of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried three thousand and twenty-three Jews to Babylon; the third, in the year of the world 3406, and in the fourth of Jehoiachin, when this prince, with part of people, was sent to Babylon; and the fourth in the year 3416, under Zedekiah, from which period begins the captivity of seventy years, foretold by the Prophet Jeremiah
Maaseiah - Son of Shallum, and a door-keeper in the time of Jehoiakim
Jehoahaz - But Pharaoh-necho, who had obtained possession of all Syria, regarded his coronation as an act of assumption, deposed him in favour of his brother Jehoiakim, and carried him away to Egypt, where he died ( 2 Kings 23:34 )
Jehoahaz - , in preference to his two elder brothers, Johanan and Jehoiakim (1 Chronicles 3:15; Jeremiah 22:11; 2 Kings 23:30-31; 2 Kings 23:36; 2 Chronicles 36:2). Jehoahaz, or Shallum, was born of the same mother as Zedekiah, namely, Hamutal; so they are put together, whereas Jehoiakim was son of Zebudah. The people set up Jehoahaz out of order; Johanan is never after mentioned; the pagan Pharaoh set up Jehoiakim; Nebuchadnezzar Zedekiah. Eliakim would readily act as his vassal, as owing his elevation to the throne, under the name Jehoiakim to Necho. The people, feeling Jehoiakim's heavy taxation for the tribute to Egypt (2 Kings 23:35), lamented for their favorite in spite of his faults
Habakkuk - In his place the Egyptians set up Josiah's son, Jehoiakim. Unlike his father, Jehoiakim was a petty tyrant. Over the next ten or eleven years, Jehoiakim tried to play the Babylonians off against the Egyptians until he finally exhausted the patience of Nebuchadnezzar. That same year, Jehoiakim died, leaving his son, Jehoiachin, to become Nebuchadnezzar's prisoner when Jerusalem fell in 597 B. The first question, Why does violence rule where there should be justice (Habakkuk 1:2-5 ) expressed the prophet's sense of dismay, either about conditions within his own land caused by Jehoiakim, or by the oppression of weak countries by stronger powers
Whelp - ...
Ezekiel 19:5 (a) The whelp mentioned in this verse was the king of Israel whose name was Jehoiakim
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
Habakkuk...
610...
Jehoiakim,...
Zephaniah
Book - He wrote a “book” on the disasters that were to befall Jerusalem, but the “book” was torn up and burned in the fireplace of King Jehoiakim (Jer. When the “book” had been confiscated and burned, Jeremiah wrote another scroll and had another “book” written with a strong condemnation of Jehoiakim and his family: “Then took Jeremiah another roll, and gave it to Baruch the scribe, the son of Neriah; who wrote therein from the mouth of Jeremiah all the words of the book which Jehoiakim king of Judah had burned in the fire: and there were added besides unto them many like words” ( Jeremiah - Considering itself now the master of Judah, Egypt removed Jehoahaz, the new Judean king, and made his older brother Jehoiakim king instead (2 Kings 23:31-37). ...
Jehoiakim was a cruel and ungodly ruler. (Much of Jeremiah Chapters 7-20, along with Chapters 22, 23, 25, 26, 35, 36 and 45, belong to the time of Jehoiakim. When Jehoiakim later tried to become independent of Babylon, the Babylonian army, under Nebuchadnezzar, besieged Jerusalem. Jehoiakim died during the siege, and three months later his son and successor Jehoiachin surrendered. The Babylonians appointed Zedekiah, another brother of Jehoiakim, as the new king (597 BC; 2 Kings 24:8-17). There are warnings to rulers, such as Zedekiah (21:1-10; 24:1-10), kings in general (21:11-22:9), Jehoahaz (Shallum), Jehoiakim and Jehoiachin (Coniah) (22:10-30)
Nebuchadrezzar - For his relations with Judah, see Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, Zedekiah, Gedaliah
Seraiah - Son of Azriel: he was ordered by Jehoiakim to seize Baruch and Jeremiah
Zedekiah - Son either of Jehoiakim or Jeconiah (1 Chronicles 3:16 ), the Hebrew text being unclear at this point
Hananiah - Father of Zedekiah a prince in the reign of Jehoiakim
Jerahmeel - Hammelech's son sent by king Jehoiakim to apprehend Baruch and Jeremiah, "but the Lord hid them" (Jeremiah 36:26; Psalms 31:20; Psalms 83:3; Isaiah 26:20)
Seraiah - ...
...
A priest of the days of Jehoiakim (Nehemiah 12:1,12 )
Necho ii - On his return march he deposed Jehoahaz, who had succeeded his father Josiah, and made Eliakim, Josiah's eldest son, whose name he changed into Jehoiakim, king
Jehoiachin - The son of Jehoiakim
Splendor - The basic significance of “splendor and majesty” with overtones of superior power and position is attested in the application of this word to kings: “Therefore thus saith the Lord concerning Jehoiakim the son of Josiah king of Judah; They shall not lament for him, saying, Ah my brother! or, Ah sister! they shall not lament for him, saying, Ah lord! or, Ah his glory!” ( Zedekiah - Others who bore the name Zedekiah were a prophet in the court of Ahab (1 Kings 2:11; 1 Kings 2:24), an administrator in the government of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 27:12-1550), a son of Jehoiakim (1 Chronicles 3:16) and a false prophet among the Jewish captives in Babylon (Jeremiah 29:21-23)
Jeremiah - During the three years of the reign of Jehoahaz we find no reference to Jeremiah, but in the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim the enmity of the people against him broke out in bitter persecution, and he was placed apparently under restraint (Jeremiah 36:5 ). In the fourth year of Jehoiakim he was commanded to write the predictions given to him, and to read them to the people on the fast-day
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - Nebuchadnezzar, having been successful, marched against the governor of Phenicia, and Jehoiakim, king of Judah, who was tributary to Necho, king of Egypt. He took Jehoiakim, and put him in chains in order to carry him captive to Babylon; but afterward left him in Judea, on condition of paying a large tribute. Jehoiakim, king of Judah, continued three years, in fealty to King Nebuchadnezzar; but being then weary of paying tribute, he threw off the yoke. The king of Chaldea sent troops of Chaldeans, Syrians, Moabites, and Ammonites, who harassed Judea during three of four years, and at last Jehoiakim was besieged and taken in Jerusalem, put to death, and his body thrown to the birds of the air, according to the predictions of Jeremiah. See Jehoiakim
Pash'ur - In the reign of Jehoiakim he showed himself as hostile to Jeremiah as his namesake the son of Malchiah did afterward, and put him in the stocks by the gate of Benjamin
Jeremiah, Book of - They were exhorted to repentance, and the prophecies against Shallum, Jehoiakim, and Coniah are detailed. In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim, Jeremiah exhorted to repentance, but the priests and prophets demanded his death. To this it was apparently responded that Jehoiakim had putthe prophet Urijah to death. Most probably the name Jehoiakim in Jeremiah 27:1 should be Zedekiah; but it may be that the prophecy was given to Jeremiah in the daysof Jehoiakim though not related till the days of Zedekiah. On this being read to king Jehoiakim he burnt it, and sought to arrest the prophet and Baruch; but God hid them
Baruch - Son of Neriah, the son of Mahseiah and brother of Seraiah ( Jeremiah 51:59 ); known from Jeremiah 36:1-32 ; Jeremiah 45:1-5 ; Jeremiah 32:12-16 ; Jeremiah 43:3 ; Jeremiah 43:8 ; by Jeremiah’s side in the conflict with Jehoiakim (b
Nebuchadnezzar - Took Jerusalem in the third year of Jehoiakim, and "carried into the land of Shinar, to the house of his god (Merodach), part of the vessels of the house of God" (Daniel 1:1-2; 2 Chronicles 36:6). The fourth year of Jehoiakim coincided with the first of Nebuchadnezzar (Jeremiah 25:1). The deportation from Jerusalem was shortly before, namely, in the end of Jehoiakim's third year; with it begins the Babylonian captivity, 605 B. Jehoiakim after three years of vassalage revolted, in reliance on Egypt (2 Kings 24:1). In the seventh year of his reign he marched thence against Jerusalem; it surrendered, and Jehoiakim fell, probably in battle. (See Jehoiakim. ) Jehoiakim after a three months' reign was carried away to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar with the princes, warriors, and craftsmen, and the palace treasures, and Solomon's gold vessels cut in pieces, at his third advance against Jerusalem (2 Kings 24:8-16)
Nebuchadnezzar - Thus the remark, "In his days Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, came up, and Jehoiakim became his servant three years," 2 Kings 24:1, is easily explained. The rebellion of Jehoiakim, entered upon, probably, because Nebuchadnezzar was carrying on wars in other parts of Asia, took place b
Jeremi'ah - During the reigns of Jehoiakim and Jehoiachin, B. First Jehoiakim, and afterwards his successor Jehoiachin, were carried into exile, 2 Kings 24 ; but Zedekiah, B
Baruch - In the reign of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, A. The latter sent Jehudi to fetch the book; which being brought, Jehoiakim commanded it to be read in his presence, and in the presence of his nobles who surrounded him
Jeremi'ah - During the reigns of Jehoiakim and Jehoiachin, B. First Jehoiakim, and afterwards his successor Jehoiachin, were carried into exile, 2 Kings 24 ; but Zedekiah, B
Zedekiah - ...
In 1 Chronicles 3:15 Johanan is oldest, then Jehoiakim, Zedekiah is third in order, Shallum fourth, because Jehoiakim and Zedekiah reigned longer, namely, 11 years each; therefore Shallum, though king before Jehoiakim, is put last; on the other hand Zedekiah and Shallum were both sons of Hamutal, therefore put together. ...
In Jeremiah 27:1 read "Zedekiah" for "Jehoiakim" with Syriac, Arabic, and one of Kennicott's manuscripts (compare Jeremiah 27:3; Jeremiah 27:12; and Jeremiah 28:1, "in the fourth year
Zedekiah - ...
...
The son of Hananiah, a prince of Judah in the days of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 36:12 )
Jeremiah - He prophesied under Josiah, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, and Zedekiah; and for some time during the exile
Zedekiah - He did evil in the sight of the Lord, committing the same crimes as Jehoiakim, 2 Kings 24:18-20 2 Chronicles 36:11-13
Dan'Iel - (Daniel 1:4 ) He was taken to Babylon in "the third year of Jehoiakim" (B
ma-Ase'Iah - (2 Chronicles 34:8 ) ...
The son of Shallum, a Levite of high rank in the reign of Jehoiakim
Uriah - Prophesied, as Jeremiah did, against the land and Jerusalem, so that the king sought to kill him; he escaped to Egypt; thence Elnathan brought him, and Jehoiakim killed him with the sword and cast his body among the graves of the common people (Jeremiah 26:20-23). His case was made a plea for not killing Jeremiah, as the notorious condition of the state showed that his murder did no good to Jehoiakim, but only added sin to sin and provoked God's vengeance
Captivity - Under Jehoiakim, in his third year, b. In the last year of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried 3023 Jews to Babylon; or rather, under Jehoiachin, when this prince also was sent to Babylon, in the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, b
Captivity - Under Jehoiakim, in his third year, B. In the last year of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried 3,023Jews to Babylon; or rather, under Jehoiachin, when this prince also was sent to Babylon, that is, in the seventh and eighth years of Nebuchadnezzar, B
Nebuchadnezzar - Having been successful, he marched against the governor of Phoenicia, and Jehoiakim king of Judah, tributary of Necho king of Egypt. He took Jehoiakim, and put him in chains to carry him captive to Babylon; but afterwards he left him in Judea, on condition of his paying a large annual tribute. Jehoiakim king of Judah continued three years in fealty to Nebuchadnezzar, and then revolted; but after three or four years, he was besieged and taken in Jerusalem, put to death, and his body thrown to the birds of the air according to the predictions of Jeremiah, Jeremiah 22:1-30
Band, Army - God sent against Jehoiakim “units” from the Babylonian army—“bands of the Chaldees, and bands of the Syrians, and bands of the Moabites, and bands of the children of Ammon …” (2 Kings 24:2)
Potter - This may be a mere slip due to the mention in the Book of Jeremiah of the potter’s house (Jeremiah 18:2) and the Potsherd Gate (Jeremiah 19:2), just as in Jeremiah 27:1 Jehoiakim is a slip for Zedekiah
Daniel - He was taken to Babylon in "the third year of Jehoiakim," and trained for the king's service
Hanani'ah - (2 Chronicles 26:11 ) ...
Father of Zedekiah, in the reign of Jehoiakim
Potter - This may be a mere slip due to the mention in the Book of Jeremiah of the potter’s house (Jeremiah 18:2) and the Potsherd Gate (Jeremiah 19:2), just as in Jeremiah 27:1 Jehoiakim is a slip for Zedekiah
Exile - Nebuchadnezzar, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim (Jeremiah 25:1 ), invaded Judah, and carried away some royal youths, including Daniel and his companions (B
Abiathar - It may readily be due to a mere lapsus memoriae or calami, Abiathar, David’s high priest, being a much more familiar figure than his father, just as in Jeremiah 27:1 ‘Jehoiakim’ is a slip for Zedekiah
Rechabites - This was the institution of the children of Rechab; and this they continued to observe for upward of three hundred years, from the time of Jehu to that of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, when Nebuchadnezzar coming to besiege Jerusalem, the Rechabites were obliged to leave the country and take refuge in the city
Jeremiah - For three years the country was subject to the victorious Pharaoh, who deposed and deported Shalum-Jehoahaz, the national choice, replacing him on the throne of Judah by his brother Eliakim-Jehoiakim. ...
Jehoiakim, after Carchemish, transferred his allegiance to Babylon. Jehoiakim was a typical Eastern despot, self-willed, luxurious, unprincipled, oppressive towards his own people, treacherous and incompetent in foreign policy. On Jehoiakim’s first revolt, in 601, he let loose bands of raiders on the Judæan territory (2 Kings 24:2 ; cf. Jehoiakim died just before this; his youthful son Jehoiachin (called also Jeconiah and Coniah ) surrendered the city, and was carried captive, with the queen-mother and the élite of the nobles and people, to Babylon, where he lived for many years, to be released upon Nebuchadrezzar’s death in 561 ( 2 Kings 24:6-17 ; 2 Kings 25:27-30 , Jeremiah 22:24-30 ). 626 621; ( b ) the time of disillusion and silence, subsequent to Josiah’s reforms, 621 608; ( c ) the critical epoch, 608 604, opened by the fall of Josiah at Megiddo and closing in the fourth year of Jehoiakim after the battle of Carchemish and the advent of Nebuchadrezzar, when the paroxysm of the prophet’s soul was past and his vision of the future grew clear; ( d ) the stage of full illumination, attained during the calamities of the last days of Jerusalem. 1 12), apart from the doubtful allusion in Jeremiah 11:1-8 , ignores the subject; Josiah’s name is but once mentioned, by way of contrast to Jehoiakim, in Jeremiah 22:13-19 . 14 20, identified with the ‘many like words’ that were added to the volume of Jeremiah burnt by Jehoiakim in the winter of 604 ( Jeremiah 36:27-32 ). It took place not long before the crisis of ‘the fourth year of Jehoiakim,’ the occasion when the roll of doom was prepared (ch. At this juncture the conclusive breach with Jehoiakim came about, when the faithless king, by running his knife through Jeremiah’s book, severed the ties which had bound prophecy to the secular throne of David since Samuel’s day
Captivity - In Daniel 1:1-2, we find that in the third year of Jehoiakim Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem and carried away part of the temple vessels of Jehovah to the land of Shinar, to the house of his god Bel. With this first deportation in the third year of Jehoiakim (607 or 606 B. ...
Nebuchadnezzar had intended to carry Jehoiakim to Babylon (2 Chronicles 36:6-7); but Jehoiakim died before Nebuchadnezzar's intention could be effected (Jeremiah 22:18-19; Jeremiah 36:30), and
Jehoiachin - Son of Jehoiakim and Nehushta; at 18 succeeded his father, and was king of Judah for three months and ten days; 20th king from David. The correctness of eighteen, not eight, is proved by Ezekiel 19:5-9, where he appears as "going up and down among the lions, catching the prey, devouring men, knowing the widows" (margin) of the men so devoured; unless Jehoiakim is meant. "Josias begat Jechonias and his brethren about the time they were carried away to Babylon," fixing his birth to the time of Nebuchadnezzar's invasion (2 Kings 24:1), namely, three years after Jehoiakim's accession, and eight before his reign ended and Jehoiachin succeeded; but Matthew's language hardly justifies this; Jeremiah's language implies Jehoiachin was a "man," and capable of having a "child" (2 Kings 22:28; 2 Kings 22:30). Jerusalem was an easy prey to Nebuchadnezzar at this time, Judah having been wasted for three or four years by Chaldaean, Ammonite, and Moabite bands, sent by Nebuchadnezzar (as Jehovah's executioner of judgment) in consequence of Jehoiakim's rebellion. spring, in the eighth year of his reign, counting from the time that his father transferred the command of the army against Necho to him (so that his first coincides with the fourth of Jehoiakim, Jeremiah 25:1). ...
Nebuchadnezzar, after Jehoiakim's rebellion (notwithstanding his agreement at Nebuchadnezzar's first advance to be his vassal) (2 Kings 24:1; Daniel 1:1), would not trust his son Jehoiachin, but carried him away, the queen mother, his wives, chamberlains, and all the men of might, 7,000, and 1,000 crafts. ), He had already taken at the first siege of Jerusalem in Jehoiakim's third year part of the vessels of God's house (Daniel 1:1-2; Genesis 40:13-20) and put them in the house of his god in Babylon, namely, the smaller vessels of solid gold, basins, goblets, knives, tongs, etc
Ammon, Ammonites, Children of Ammon - They molested Israel with varied success until the days of Jehoiakim: 2 Kings 24:2
Daniel - Called Belteshazzar by the Chaldeans, a prophet descended from the royal family of David, who was carried captive to Babylon, when very young, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim king of Judah, B
Kings, First And Second Books of, - --There was a regular series of state annals for both the kingdom of Judah and that of Israel, which embraced the whole time comprehended in the books of Kings, or at least to the end of the reign of Jehoiakim
Prophets - Jeremiah continued to prophesy under Shallum, Jehoiakim, Jeconiah, and Zedekiah, to the taking of Jerusalem by the Chaldeans, B. Habakkuk, in Judah, near the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim, about 610 B
Molech, Moloch - But under Jehoiakim this worship revived, and continued till the Captivity
Josiah - Those of his people who later suffered under the cruel hand of his son Jehoiakim looked back with gratitude on his compassion and justice (2 Chronicles 35:25; Jeremiah 22:15-19)
Babylon, History And Religion of - At this time Jehoiakim, king of Judah, became an unwilling vassal of Babylon. A Babylonian defeat at the border of Egypt in 601 probably encouraged Jehoiakim to rebel. Jehoiakim died that same month, and his son Jehoiachin surrendered the city to the Babylonians on March 16,597 B
Daniel - At the first deportation of the Jews by Nebuchadnezzar (the kingdom of Israel had come to an end nearly a century before), or immediately after his victory over the Egyptians at the second battle of Carchemish, in the fourth year of the reign of Jehoiakim (B
Zedekiah - He did evil in the sight of the Lord, committing the same crimes as Jehoiakim, 2 Kings 24:18-20 ; 2 Chronicles 36:11-13 ; and regarded not the menaces of the Prophet Jeremiah, from the Lord; but hardened his heart
Exile - Jehoiakim, a second son of Josiah, served as king of Judah for eleven years (609-597 B. Jehoiakim died in the battle at Jerusalem
Jeremiah - ) (Jeremiah 22:11 ), Jehoiakim (609-587 B. King Jehoiakim burnt it piece by piece
Jeremiah - Jehoiakim, the eldest son of Josiah, succeeded. Jeconiah, the son of Jehoiakim, succeeded
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - The name Jehoiakim seemingly has dropped out, Josiah's son and Jeconiah's father; otherwise David would have to be counted twice to make up the second 14
Captivity - After this, in the fifth year of Jehoiakim, a great national fast was appointed (Jeremiah 36:9 ), during which the king, to show his defiance, cut up the leaves of the book of Jeremiah's prophecies as they were read to him in his winter palace, and threw them into the fire
Zephaniah, Book of - Jeremiah 26:1 shows that the practices flourished again as early as the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim (609 B
Nebuchadnezzar - ...
Three years after this, Jehoiakim, who had reigned in Jerusalem as a Babylonian vassal, rebelled against the oppressor, trusting to help from Egypt (2 Kings 24:1 )
Moab - " Moab was doomed to feel Nebuchadnezzar's heavy hand (Jeremiah 25:9-21), though for a time acting in concert with Chaldaean bands against Jehoiakim (2 Kings 24:2); but should recover after 70 years, at Babylon's fall, for righteous Lot's sake (Exodus 20:6). Moab sent messengers to Jerusalem to Zedekiah (so read for "Jehoiakim") to consult as to shaking off Nebuchadnezzar's yoke (Jeremiah 27:1-8; Jeremiah 27:10-11)
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - ]'>[1] (inserting Rahab and Ruth, and calling David ‘the king’), and agrees with 1 Chronicles 2:1-16 ; it then gives the names of the kings to Jechoniah, from 1 Chronicles 3:10-15 , but inserts ‘the [2] of Uriah’ and omits kings Abaziah, Joash, and Amaziah between Joram and Uzziah (= Azariah), and also Jehoiakim son of Josiah and father of Jechoniah (Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 ) or Jehoiachin ( 2 Chronicles 36:8 ). Perhaps, then, originally Jehoiakim ended the second division, and Jehoiachin began the third, and they became confused owing to the similarity of spelling and were written alike (as in 1 Chronicles 3:15 , Jeremiah 52:31 LXX Pharaoh - So Necho for a time ruled all Syria, "from the Euphrates to the river of Egypt," deposed Jehoahaz for Eliakim = Jehoiakim, and levied tribute (2 Kings 24:7; 2 Kings 23:31-35)
Ezekiel - His son Jehoahaz was deposed by the Egyptians after a three-months' rule and was succeeded by another son, Jehoiakim (609-598 B. During the crisis that followed, Jehoiakim died or perhaps was killed by those in his own court
Assyria - But in the third and fourth years of Jehoiakim, the successor of Josiah, the two conquerors having taken Nineveh, and finished their war in Assyria, prosecuted their conquests westward; and, leading their forces against the king of Egypt, as an invader of their right of conquest, they beat him at Carchemish, and took from him whatever he had recently taken from the Assyrians, 2 Kings 24:7 ; Jeremiah 46:2 ; "and therefore we cannot err," says Sir Isaac Newton, "above a year or two, if we refer the destruction of Nineveh, and fall of the Assyrian empire, to the third year of Jehoiakim," or the hundred and fortieth, or according to Blair, the hundred and forty-first year of Nabonassar; that is, the year B
Ammon, Ammonites - When next we hear of the Ammonites, Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon is employing them to harass the refractory Judæan king Jehoiakim ( 2 Kings 24:2 )
Habakkuk - If dated about the year 600, it falls in the reign of Jehoiakim, in the period of reaction that followed the defeat and death of Josiah at Megiddo (608)
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - In the second section the names are from 1 Chronicles 3:1-16, but Joash, Amaziah, and Azariah are omitted before Jotham, and Jehoiakim before Jechoniah (= Jehoiachin). Possibly there has been some confusion with Jehoiakim, who had three brothers (including a Zedekiah) according to 1 Chronicles 3:15; more probably the compiler has added the note, for the purpose indicated by Zahn, without regard for strict genealogical data. ; the names Jehoiakim and Eliakim are inserted between Jechoniah and Josiah as if they referred to two different persons, instead of being two names for the same man; and also Amaziah, Joash, and Ahaziah between Uzziah and Joram (see Resch, TU Moab, Moabites - ...
Moabites aided Nebuchadnezzar against Jehoiakim at the very end of the same century (2 Kings 24:2 )
Tools - A smaller version used by Jehoiakim to cut up Jeremiah's scroll (Jeremiah 36:23 ; KJV, NRSV, “penknife”; NIV, “scribe's knife”) is represented by a Hebrew word elsewhere used for razors (Numbers 6:5 ; Ezekiel 5:1 )
Scribes - In the reign of David, Seraiah, 2 Samuel 8:17 , in the reign of Hezekiah, Shebna, 2 Kings 18:18 , and in the reign of Josiah, Shaphan, 2 Kings 22:3 , are called scribes, and are ranked with the chief officers of the kingdom; and Elishama the scribe, Jeremiah 36:12 , in the reign of Jehoiakim, is mentioned among the princes
Chronology of the Biblical Period - ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
Habakkuk, Theology of - The prophet Habakkuk faced the violence and injustice of King Jehoiakim (609-597 see Jeremiah 22:13-18 ) as well as the cruel onslaught of Babylonia
King - The king was commander in chief, supreme judge, and imposer of taxes (Menahem, 2 Kings 15:19-20; Jehoiakim, 2 Kings 23:35) and levies of men (1 Kings 5:13-15)
Judah, Kingdom of - ...
After the reigns of the worthless Jehoahaz, set aside by Pharaoh Necho who promoted Jehoiakim, and Jehoiachin or Coniah, Zedekiah (promoted by Nebuchadnezzar) through treachery in violation of his oath brought destruction on himself and Jerusalem (588 B
Jerusalem - Nearly a century later, following the apostasy of Manasseh and the reforms of Josiah, Jehoiakim ascended the throne of David in Jerusalem. The prophet Jeremiah, his contemporary, early on dismissed Jehoiakim as a despot worthy of the "burial of a donkey" (Jeremiah 22:19 )
Leadership - They opposed Jehoiakim, and pled with the people on Jeremiah's behalf (Jeremiah 26:17 ). Not that this was so different from the situation just prior to Jerusalem's fallthe kings then, too, sere set up and removed at the will of foreign powers, Jehoiakim favored over his brother by Egypt and Zedekiah over his nephew by Babylon (2 Chronicles 36:3,10 )
Jeremiah, Theology of - In building an ostentatious palace at the expense of the poor and needy, Jehoiakim failed to do justice (22:13-17). Jehoiakim burns the written word (chap
Israel, History of - Jehoiakim (609-598) waged a revolt against the nation's Babylonian overlordship. Before Nehybuchadrezzar of Babylon arrived, however, Jehoiakim died, bringing his son Jehoiachin (598-597) to the throne
Kings, the Books of - Not, the national archives kept by the "recorders" or kings' remembrancers; but annals compiled by prophets from the public, yearbooks or national archives, and also from prophets' monographs, and collections of prophecies reaching in Israel to Pekah (2 Kings 15:31), and in Judah to Jehoiakim (2 Kings 24:5), the collection being worked into a book of the times of each kingdom shortly before the overthrow of Judah. Contemporary prophets, as Isaiah, with Ahaz and Hezekiah, Jeremiah with Jehoiakim and Zedekiah, elucidate the histories of Kings just as the epistles of New Testament are commentaries on Acts
Lamentations - The events probably are included under Manasseh and Josiah (2 Chronicles 33:11; 2 Chronicles 35:20-25), Jehoahaz, Jehoiakim, and Zedekiah (2 Chronicles 36:3, etc
Daniel - ) Carried to Babylon in Nebuchadnezzar's first deportation of captives, in the fourth (Jeremiah 25:1; Jeremiah 46:2) or third (Daniel 1:1 counting only complete years) year of Jehoiakim, the first of Nebuchadnezzar (acting under Nabopolassar in the last year of the latter's reign, but reigning alone not until the year after; as Daniel 2:1 proves, for after Daniel's three years' training the year is nevertheless called the "second" of Nebuchadnezzar, i
Jeremiah - ) On Jehoiakim's accession idolatry returned, combined with the worship of Jehovah; and priests, prophets, and people soon brought Jeremiah before the authorities, urging that he should be put to death for denouncing evil against the temple and the city (Jeremiah 26:7-11). The "princes," including doubtless some of Josiah's counselors or their sons, interposed in his behalf (Jeremiah 26:16), appealing to Micah's case, who had uttered a like prophecy in Hezekiah's reign with impunity; adding the implication which they durst not express, that though Urijah who prophesied similarly was brought back from his flight into Egypt, and slain by Jehoiakim, yet that the notorious prostration of the state showed that evil, not good, is the result of such persecutions. ) fifth year Jeremiah escaped his violence by the Lord's hiding him and Baruch (Jeremiah 36:27-32), after the king had destroyed the prophetic roll of prophecies for the 23 years past of Jeremiah's ministry, which Jeremiah was commanded to write in Jehoiakim's fourth year, and which in the fifth Baruch, having first written them, read to the people assembled on the fast. (See Jehoiakim. "...
So in Jehoiakim's fourth year Judah's hopes from Egypt were crushed by Nebuchadnezzar's defeat of Pharaoh Necho at Carchemish (Jeremiah 46:2, a prophecy uttered shortly before the event). (In Jeremiah 45, concerning an individual, subjoined to his prophecies concerning nations, though belonging to the time just after (Jeremiah 36) the close of Jehoiakim's reign, Jeremiah, in Jeremiah 18-19 (probably in Jeconiah's reign), by the symbols of the remaking by the potter of the marred vessel, and of the breaking of the bottle in the valley of Hinnom, sets forth God's absolute power over His creatures to give reprobates to destruction, and to raise others instead of the people who prove unfaithful to His election (Isaiah 45:9; Isaiah 64:8; 2 Chronicles 34:8). Early in Jehoiakim's reign (Jeremiah 27:1) he had by symbolic yokes foretold Nebuchadnezzar's subjugation of Judah, etc
Daniel, Theology of - In fact, whatever success [1] hand" (v
Daniel, the Book of - , 18 years before the actual destruction of Jerusalem, when Judah's independent theocracy ceased, Jehoiakim being put in fetters by Nebuchadnezzar
Chronology - ; Ahaz' 16 years begin at 718; Hezekiah's 29 begin at 702; Manasseh's 55 begin at 673; Amon's two begin at 618; Josiah's 31 begin at 616; Jehoiakim's 11 begin at 585. The former begins the 1st of Nebuchadnezzar and the 4th of Jehoiakim (606 or 607 B
Jerusalem - Within the space of sixty-six years more it was taken by Pharaoh-Necho, king of Egypt, whom Josiah, king of Judah, had opposed in his expedition to Carchemish; and who, in consequence, was killed at the battle of Megiddo, and his son Eliakim placed on the throne in his stead by Necho, who changed his name to Jehoiakim, and imposed a heavy tribute upon him, having sent his elder brother, Jehoahaz, who had been proclaimed king at Jerusalem, a prisoner to Egypt, where he died, 2 Kings 23; 2 Chronicles 35. The first, in the reign of the last mentioned king, Jehoiakim, who was sent a prisoner to Babylon, and the vessels of the temple transported to the same city, 2 Chronicles 36
Bible - King Jehoiakim alone cut a roll of Jeremiah (Jeremiah 36:23-24), and burnt it in the fire
Temple of Jerusalem - Both Hezekiah and Josiah were able to centralize worship in the Jerusalem Temple during their reforms and even recover some worshipers from the north for the Jerusalem sanctuary, but Josiah's successor, Jehoiakim, reversed all of Josiah's reforms and filled up the Temple with pagan abominations (Ezekiel 8:1 )
Egypt - Necho carrying all before him proceeded as far as Carchemish on the Euphrates, and on returning to Jerusalem he deposed Jehoahaz and carried him to Egypt (where he died), and set up his brother Eliakim in his stead, calling him Jehoiakim
Create, Creation - 1 Chronicles 3:11-12 ]'>[7]; and Jehoiakim between Josiah and Jechoniah/Jehoiachin in 1:11; [5])
Canaan - It was at this time that Jehoiakim, king of Judah, is represented by Jeremiah as sitting in his winter house, with a fire burning on the hearth before him, Jeremiah 36:22
Jews - The fate of their kings Jehoahaz, Jehoiakim, Jechoiachin, and Zedekiah, was unhappy