What does Jehoiachin mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יְהוֹיָכִ֥ין king of Judah 3
יְהוֹיָכִ֣ין king of Judah 3
דֹד֖וֹ beloved 1
יְהוֹיָכִ֤ין king of Judah 1
יְהוֹיָכִ֖ין king of Judah 1
יְהוֹיָכִ֣ן king of Judah 1
יוֹיָכִֽין king of Judah 1
רֹאשׁ֙ head 1
וְשִׁנָּ֕א to change 1
וְשִׁנָּ֕ה to repeat 1

Definitions Related to Jehoiachin

H3078


   1 king of Judah, son of Jehoiakim, and the next to last king of Judah before the Babylonian captivity; kingship lasted for 3 months and 10 days before he surrendered to Nebuchadnezzar who took him to Babylon and imprisoned him for 36 years when he was finally released.
   Additional Information: Jehoiachin = “Jehovah establishes”.
   

H1730


   1 beloved, love, uncle.
      1a loved one, beloved.
      1b uncle.
      1c love (pl.
      abstract).
      

H8132


   1 to change, alter.
      1a (Qal) to change.
      1b (Piel) to change, alter.
      1c (Pual) to be changed.
      

H3112


   1 king of Judah, son of Jehoiakim, and the next to last king of Judah before the Babylonian captivity; kingship lasted for 3 months and 10 days before he surrendered to Nebuchadnezzar who took him to Babylon and imprisoned him for 36 years when he was finally released.
   Additional Information: Jehoiachin = “Jehovah establishes”.
   

H7218


   1 head, top, summit, upper part, chief, total, sum, height, front, beginning.
      1a head (of man, animals).
      1b top, tip (of mountain).
      1c height (of stars).
      1d chief, head (of man, city, nation, place, family, priest).
      1e head, front, beginning.
      1f chief, choicest, best.
      1g head, division, company, band.
      1h sum.
      

H8138


   1 to repeat, do again, change, alter.
      1a (Qal) to change.
      1b (Niphal) to be repeated.
      1c (Piel) to change, alter.
      1d (Hithpael) to disguise oneself.
      

Frequency of Jehoiachin (original languages)

Frequency of Jehoiachin (English)

Dictionary

Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jehoiachin
("appointed by Jehovah, or he whom Jehovah establishes or fortifies" (Keil).) JECONIAH, CONIAH. Son of Jehoiakim and Nehushta; at 18 succeeded his father, and was king of Judah for three months and ten days; 20th king from David. In 2 Chronicles 36:9 his age is made "eight" at his accession, so Septuagint, Vulgate. But a few Hebrew manuscripts, Syriac and Arabic, read "eighteen" here also; it is probably a transcriber's error. The correctness of eighteen, not eight, is proved by Ezekiel 19:5-9, where he appears as "going up and down among the lions, catching the prey, devouring men, knowing the widows" (margin) of the men so devoured; unless Jehoiakim is meant. The term "whelp" appears to apply more to his son Jehoiachin, who moreover answers better to the description of the mother (Judah) "taking another of her whelps, and making him a young lion."
Lord A. C. Hervey prefers "eight," from Matthew 1:11. "Josias begat Jechonias and his brethren about the time they were carried away to Babylon," fixing his birth to the time of Nebuchadnezzar's invasion (2 Kings 24:1), namely, three years after Jehoiakim's accession, and eight before his reign ended and Jehoiachin succeeded; but Matthew's language hardly justifies this; Jeremiah's language implies Jehoiachin was a "man," and capable of having a "child" (2 Kings 22:28; 2 Kings 22:30). Jerusalem was an easy prey to Nebuchadnezzar at this time, Judah having been wasted for three or four years by Chaldaean, Ammonite, and Moabite bands, sent by Nebuchadnezzar (as Jehovah's executioner of judgment) in consequence of Jehoiakim's rebellion. Egypt, after its defeat at Carchemish by Nebuchadnezzar, could not interpose (2 Kings 23:7-17).
After sending his servants (generals distinct from the Chaldaean and other bands) to besiege Jerusalem, Nebuchadnezzar in person came (2 Chronicles 36:10 margin) at the turn of the year, i.e. spring, in the eighth year of his reign, counting from the time that his father transferred the command of the army against Necho to him (so that his first coincides with the fourth of Jehoiakim, Jeremiah 25:1). Jehoiachin seeing the impossibility of resistance made a virtue of necessity by going out to Nebuchadnezzar, he, the queen mother (who, as the king was only 18, held chief power; Jeremiah 13:18 undesignedly coincides with and confirms the history, "Say unto the king and to the queen, Humble yourselves," etc.), servants, princes, and eunuchs (margin).
Nebuchadnezzar, after Jehoiakim's rebellion (notwithstanding his agreement at Nebuchadnezzar's first advance to be his vassal) (2 Kings 24:1; Daniel 1:1), would not trust his son Jehoiachin, but carried him away, the queen mother, his wives, chamberlains, and all the men of might, 7,000, and 1,000 crafts. men and smiths; fulfilling Jeremiah's prophecy (Jeremiah 22:24, etc.), He had already taken at the first siege of Jerusalem in Jehoiakim's third year part of the vessels of God's house (Daniel 1:1-2; 2 Chronicles 36:7) and put them in the house of his god in Babylon, namely, the smaller vessels of solid gold, basins, goblets, knives, tongs, etc., which Cyrus restored (Ezra 1:7, etc.). Now he cut the gold off (not "cut in pieces," 2 Kings 24:13) the larger vessels which were plated, the altar of burnt offering, the table of shewbread, and the ark, so that at the third conquest of Jerusalem under Zedekiah there were only the large brazen vessels of the court remaining, beside a few gold and silver basins and firepans (2 Kings 25:13-17).
Nebuchadnezzar also carried off the treasures of Jeconiah's house (2 Kings 24:13), "as Jehovah had spoken" to Hezekiah long before (Jeremiah 29:27-32; Jeremiah 15:13; Jeremiah 17:3; Jeremiah 29:2). The inhabitants carried off were the best not only in means but in character. In 2 Kings 24:14 they are said to be 10,000; the details are specified in 2 Kings 24:15-16; "none remained save the poorest sort of the people of the land," having neither wealth nor skill to raise war, and therefore giving Nebuchadnezzar no fear of rebellion. The "princes" (satire) are the king's great court officials; "the mighty men of valor" (gibbowrey hachail , "mighty men of wealth," same Hebrew as Numbers 36:8-99) are men of property, rather than prowess: 2 Kings 15:14. In 2 Kings 15:16 "men of might" (anshey hachail ) may mean the same, but nowsh is a low man; I think therefore it means "men of the army," as in Ezekiel 37:10, and is defined by "all that were strong and apt for war," 7,000.
The craftsmen (masons, smiths, and carpenters) and locksmiths (including weapon makers, hamasgeer ), were 1,000; so the "princes" or king's officials, "the mighty men of wealth," and "the mighty of the land" (uley haarets ), i.e. heads of tribes and families found in Jerusalem (including the nation's spiritual heads, priests and prophets, with Ezekiel: Jeremiah 29:1; Ezekiel 1:1) must have been 2,000, to make up the "ten thousand." In Jeremiah 52:28 the number is 3,023, but that was the number carried away "in the seventh year," "in the eighth year" of Nebuchadnezzar the 10,000 were carried away. The 1,000 "craftsmen" may be exclusive of the 10,000. Evidently, the 4,600 in all mentioned (Jeremiah 52:30) as carried away do not include the general multitude and the women and children (Jeremiah 52:15; Jeremiah 39:9; 2 Kings 25:11), for otherwise the number would be too small, since the numbers who returned were 42,360 (Ezra 2; Nehemiah 7).
Jehoiachin wore prison garments for 36 years, until at the death of Nebuchadnezzar, having been for a time sharer of his imprisonment (Jeremiah 52:31-34), "in the 12th month, the 25th day of the month (in 2 Kings 25:27 'the 27th,' the day when the decree for his elevation, given on the 25th, was carried into effect) lifted up the head of Jehoiachin (compare Genesis 40:13-20; Psalms 3:3; Psalms 27:6), and brought him forth out of prison, and spoke kindly unto him, and set his throne above the throne of the kings that were with him in Babylon, and changed his prison garments (for royal robes; compare Zechariah 3:1-5; Luke 15:22), and he did continually eat bread before him all the days of his life (compare 2 Samuel 9:13); and there was a continual diet given him of the king of Babylon, every day its portion (compare margin 1 Kings 8:59) until the day of his death." (See EVIL-MERODACH.)
God, in sparing and at last elevating him, rewarded his having surrendered to Nebuchadnezzar, which was God's will (Jeremiah 38:17; Jeremiah 27:6-12; compare 2 Kings 24:12). In the fourth year of his uncle Zedekiah (so called by Nebuchadnezzar instead of Mattaniah), false prophets encouraged the popular hope of the return of Jehoiachin to Jerusalem (Jeremiah 28:4).(See HANANIAH.) But God's oath made this impossible: "as I live, though Coniah were the signet (ring seal, Song of Solomon 8:6; Haggai 2:23) upon My right hand, yet would I pluck thee thence." "Is this man Coniah a despised broken idol? (he was idolized by the Jews). Is he a vessel wherein is no pleasure?" Jeremiah hereby expresses their astonishment that one from whom they expected so much should be now so utterly east aside. Contrast the believer, 2 Timothy 2:21; compare as to Israel Hosea 8:8, to which Romans 9:20-23 gives the answer.
Jeremiah (Jeremiah 22:28) mentions distinctly "his seed," therefore "childless" in Jeremiah 22:30 means having no direct lineal heir to the throne. One of his sons was Zedekiah (Zidkijah), distinct in name and fact from Zedekiah (Zidkijahu), Jeconiah's uncle, whose succession after Jehoiachin would never cause him to be called "his son" (1 Chronicles 3:16). This Zedekiah is mentioned separately from the other sons of Jehoiachin, Assir and Salathiel, because probably he was not led to Babylon as the other sons, but died in Judea (Keil). In Luke 3:27 Shealtiel (Salathiel) is son of Neri of the lineage of David's son Nathan, not Solomon. Probably Assir left a daughter, who, according to the law of heiresses (Numbers 37:8; 1618420225_33), married a man of a family of her paternal tribe, namely, Neri descended from Nathan. Shealtiel is called Assir's "son" (1 Chronicles 3:17), i.e. grandson.
So "Jechonias (it is said Matthew 1:12) begat Salathiel," i.e. was his forefather. Jecamiah Assir, as often occurs in genealogies, is skipped in Matthew. (See JECAMIAH); GENEALOGIES.) A party of the captives at Babylon also, through the false prophets, expected restoration with Jehoiachin and Nebuchadnezzar's overthrow. This accounts for the Babylonian king inflicting so terrible a punishment (compare Daniel 3), roasting to death Ahab (Jeremiah 29:4-9; Jeremiah 29:21-23; 2 Kings 20:17). Ezekiel dates his prophecies by Jehoiachin's captivity, the latest date being the 27th year (Ezekiel 1:2; Ezekiel 29:17; Ezekiel 40:1). The Apocrypha (Baruch 1:3, and the History of Susanna) relates dubious stories. about Jehoiachin. Kish, Mordecai's ancestor, was carried away with Jehoiachin (Esther 2:6).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jehoiachin
Jehoiachin (je-hoi'a-kĭn), whom Jehovah has appointed. Jeconiah, 1 Chronicles 3:17; Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24; Jeconias, R. V. "Jechoniah." Matthew 1:12. Son and successor of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, b.c. 598. 2 Kings 24:8. In his brief reign Nebuchadnezzar besieged Jerusalem and carried the king and royal family, the chief men of the nation, and great treasures, unto Babylon. 2 Kings 24:6-16. Jehoiachin merited this punishment. Jeremiah 22:24-30. For 37 years he was a captive, but Evil-merodach liberated him and made him share the royal bounty and be head of all the captive kings in Babylon.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jehoiachin
Preparation
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jehoiachin
Son and successor of Jehoiakim king of Judah. According to 2 Kings 24:8 he began to reign when he was eighteen years of age, but 2 Chronicles 36:9 says 'eight years' (one being apparently an error of the copyist). He reigned but three months, B.C. 599, when Jerusalem was taken by Nebuchadnezzar, and the great captivity of Judah was accomplished. Jehoiachin was carried to Babylon and kept in prison thirty-six years; on the accession of Evil-merodach, B.C. 561, he was released from prison and exalted above the other captive kings, and he ate bread before the king all the days of his life. 2 Kings 24:6-15 ; 2 Kings 25:27 ; 2 Chronicles 36:8,9 ; Jeremiah 52:31 ; Ezekiel 1:2 . He is called JECONIAH in 1 Chronicles 3:16 17 ; Esther 2:6 ; Jeremiah 24:1 ; Jeremiah 27:20 ; Jeremiah 28:4 (where his return from Babylon is falsely prophesied of); Jeremiah 29:2 . He is also called CONIAH in Jeremiah 22:24,28 ; Jeremiah 37:1 , and JECHONIAS in Matthew 1:11,12 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jehoiachin
JEHOIACHIN , king of Judah, ascended the throne when Nebuchadrezzar was on the march to punish the rebellion of Jehoiakim. On the approach of the Chaldæan army, the young king surrendered and was carried away to Babylon ( 2 Kings 24:8 ff.). His reign had lasted only three months, but his confinement in Babylon extended until the death of Nebuchadrezzar thirty-seven years. Ezekiel, who seems to have regarded him as the rightful king of Judah even in captivity, pronounced a dirge over him ( 2 Kings 19:1 ff.). At the accession of Evil-merodach he was freed from durance, and received a daily allowance from the palace ( Matthew 1:11-12 f.). Jeremiah gives his name in Jeremiah 24:1 , Jeremiah 27:20 , Jeremiah 28:4 , Jeremiah 29:2 as Jeconiah , and in Jeremiah 22:28 Jeremiah 22:28 , Jeremiah 37:1 as Coniah . In 1Es 1:43 he is called Joakim , in Bar 1:3 ; Bar 1:9 Jechonias , and in 2 Kings 25:27 Jechoniah .
H. P. Smith.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jehoiachin
The son of Jehoiakim. This is the man whom the prophet had it in commission from the Lord to write childless. (Jeremiah 22:24-30) His name is also a compound, signifying from the root to prepare, that the Lord would prepare. But how seldom do we find, notwithstanding the striking names given by the Hebrews to their children, that they answered to them. In what sense Jehoiachiu was written childless, I cannot determine; somewhat different from natural things it must have been, for certain it is, that he had several sons. (See 1 Chronicles 3:17-18) But what the sentence referred to besides, I know not. I should have thought it had respect to the promised seed, and that the writing this man childless might have been in other words to say, the Messiah shall not be in his family. For this was the great desire of all the tribes of Israel; and for the accomplishment of which they all earnestly longed for a numerous progeny of children. But this was so far from being the case, that in the generations of the Lord Jesus Christ after the flesh, we find his son Salathiel enumerated. (See Matthew 1:12) Some have thought, that the expression childless meant in relation to his kingdom, that he should have no successor in his family to sit upon the throne. And if this be the meaning, it was literally fulfilled; for Salathiel was born in Babylon, and so was his son Zorobabel. (See Matthew 1:13) But here I leave the subject.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jehoiachin
otherwise called Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 , and Jeconiah, 1 Chronicles 3:17 , the son of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and grandson of Josiah. He ascended the throne, and reigned only three months. It seems he was born about the time of the first Babylonish captivity, A.M. 3398, when Jehoiakim, or Eliakim, his father, was carried to Babylon. Jehoiakim returned from Babylon, and reigned till A.M. 3405, when he was killed by the Chaldeans, in the eleventh year of his reign; and was succeeded by this Jehoiachin, who reigned alone three months and ten days; but he reigned about ten years in conjunction with his father. Thus 2 Kings 24:8 , is reconciled with 2 Chronicles 36:9 . In the former of these passages, he is said to have been eighteen when he began to reign, and in Chronicles only eight; that is, he was only eight when he began to reign with his father, and eighteen when he began to reign alone. He was a bad man, and did evil in the sight of the Lord, Jeremiah 22:24 . The time of his death is uncertain; and the words of the Prophet Jeremiah, Jeremiah 22:30 , are not to be taken in the strictest sense; since he was the father of Salathiel and others, 1 Chronicles 3:17-18 ; Matthew 1:12 .
Holman Bible Dictionary - Jehoiachin
(jih hoy' uh kin) Personal name meaning, “Yahweh establishes.” In 2 Kings 24:6 , the son and successor of Jehoiakim as king of Judah. He was eighteen years old when he came to the throne late in 598 B.C., and he reigned for three months in Jerusalem before being taken into captivity by Nebuchadrezzar of Babylon. The prominence in the account of his reign of his mother Nehushta suggests that she may have wielded considerable influence during the time that her son was in office. Jehoiachin evidently was a throne name taken at the time of accession to the kingship. Jehoiachin's original name seems to have been Jeconiah or Coniah. He retained the title “king of Judah” even in Exile, but he never returned to Judah to exercise rule there. Nevertheless, he was ultimately released from prison by Evil-merodach of Babylon and accorded some honor in the land of his captivity (2 Kings 25:27-30 ). See Israel ; Chronology of the Biblical Period .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jehoiachin
Son and successor of Jeohiakim, king of Judah, B. C. 509, reigned three months, and was then carried away to Babylon, where he was imprisoned for thirty-six years, and then released and favored by Evil-merodach, 2 Kings 24:6-16 25:27 2 Chronicles 3:9,10 . In this last passage he is said to have been eight years old at the commencement of his reign. If the text has not here been altered from eighteen years, as it stands in the first passage, we may conclude that he reigned ten years conjointly with his father. He is also called Coniah, and Jeconiah, 1 Chronicles 3:16 Jeremiah 27:20 37:1 . The prediction in Jeremiah 22:30 , signified that no son of his should occupy the throne, 1 Chronicles 3:17,18 Matthew 1:12 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jehoiachin
Succeeded his father Jehoiakin (B.C. 599) when only eight years of age, and reigned for one hundred days (2 Chronicles 36:9 ). He is also called Jeconiah (Jeremiah 24:1 ; 27:20 , etc.), and Coniah (22:24; 37:1). He was succeeded by his uncle, Mattaniah = Zedekiah (q.v.). He was the last direct heir to the Jewish crown. He was carried captive to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar, along with the flower of the nobility, all the leading men in Jerusalem, and a great body of the general population, some thirteen thousand in all (2 Kings 24:12-16 ; Jeremiah 52:28 ). After an imprisonment of thirty-seven years (Jeremiah 52:31,33 ), he was liberated by Evil-merodach, and permitted to occupy a place in the king's household and sit at his table, receiving "every day a portion until the day of his death, all the days of his life" (52:32-34).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jehoiachin
At the time of Babylon’s attack on Jerusalem in 597 BC, the Judean king Jehoiakim died and was succeeded by his eighteen year old son Jehoiachin (also known as Jeconiah, or Coniah). After three months resistance, Jehoiachin surrendered (2 Kings 24:6; 2 Kings 24:8; 2 Kings 24:12). The Babylonians then plundered Judah’s treasures and took Jehoiachin captive to Babylon, along with the royal family, palace officials and most of Judah’s best people (2 Kings 24:8-16; Esther 2:6; Jeremiah 22:24-30; Jeremiah 24:1; Jeremiah 27:20; Jeremiah 29:2). One of the captives was Ezekiel (Ezekiel 1:1-2).
In 561 BC a new Babylonian king released Jehoiachin from prison and treated him with special favour. To the captive Jews this was a sign of hope that one day they would all be released (2 Kings 25:27-30). When, after Persia’s conquest of Babylon in 539 BC, the Jews were released and returned to Jerusalem, a grandson of Jehoiachin, Zerubbabel, became their governor (1 Chronicles 3:17; Ezra 3:2; Haggai 1:1; Matthew 1:12).

Sentence search

Jeconi'as, - the Greek form of Jeconiah, an altered form of Jehoiachin. [1]
Jeconiah - See Jehoiachin
Coniah - See Jehoiachin
Jechoniah - See Jehoiachin
Jeconiah - See Jehoiachin
Coniah - (coh ni' ah) See Jehoiachin
Jehoiachin - At the time of Babylon’s attack on Jerusalem in 597 BC, the Judean king Jehoiakim died and was succeeded by his eighteen year old son Jehoiachin (also known as Jeconiah, or Coniah). After three months resistance, Jehoiachin surrendered (2 Kings 24:6; 2 Kings 24:8; 2 Kings 24:12). The Babylonians then plundered Judah’s treasures and took Jehoiachin captive to Babylon, along with the royal family, palace officials and most of Judah’s best people (2 Kings 24:8-16; Esther 2:6; Jeremiah 22:24-30; Jeremiah 24:1; Jeremiah 27:20; Jeremiah 29:2). ...
In 561 BC a new Babylonian king released Jehoiachin from prison and treated him with special favour. When, after Persia’s conquest of Babylon in 539 BC, the Jews were released and returned to Jerusalem, a grandson of Jehoiachin, Zerubbabel, became their governor (1 Chronicles 3:17; Ezra 3:2; Haggai 1:1; Matthew 1:12)
Coniah - CONIAH ( Jeremiah 22:24 ; Jeremiah 22:28 ) = Jehoiachin (wh
Malchiram - Son of king Jeconiah, or Jehoiachin
Hoshama - Son or descendant of Jeconiah or Jehoiachin
Nedabi'ah - (whom Jehovah impels ) apparently one of the sons of Jeconiah or Jehoiachin, king of Judah
Coniah - Name given to Jehoiachin king of Judah, who was carried captive by Nebuchadnezzar
Jechoniah - —Also called in OT Jehoiachin and Coniah; mentioned in Matthew 1:11 f
Hosh'Ama - (whom Jehovah hears ), one of the sons of Jeconiah or Jehoiachin, the last king but one of Judah
Assir - A son of King Jeconiah (or Jehoiachin) in KJV of 1 Chronicles 3:17 , but this should probably be interpreted as a common noun, “captive,” referring to Jehoiachin (NIV, NAS, NRSV)
Salathiel, Shealtiel - Son or grandson of Jehoiachin or Jeconiah, king of Judah. ...
In Luke 3:27 , Salathiel is called the son of Neri, and this is supposed to be the true descent, and that Salathiel was the heir of Jehoiachin
Nehush'ta - (brass ), the daughter of Elnathan of Jerusalem, wife of Jehoiakim and mother of Jehoiachin, kings of Judah
Jecami'ah - (whom Jehovah gathers ), one of seven who were introduced into the royal line, on the failure of it in the person of Jehoiachin
Nehushta - Wife of king Jehoiakim and mother of Jehoiachin ( 2 Kings 24:8 )
Jeconiah - Another form of Jehoiachin king of Judah
a'Chim, - (Matthew 1:14 ) The Hebrew form of the name would be Jachin , which is a short form of Jehoiachin, the Lord will establish
Jehoiachin - Jehoiachin (je-hoi'a-kĭn), whom Jehovah has appointed. Jehoiachin merited this punishment
Nehushta - ” Mother of King Jehoiachin of Judah (2 Kings 24:8 )
Jeconiah - JECONIAH or Jehoiachin
Achim - "he will establish"), contracted from Jehoiachin
Jekamiah - Son of King Jeconiah, also called Jehoiachin, of Judah about 597 B
el'Nathan, -
The maternal grandfather of Jehoiachin, (2 Kings 24:8 ) the same with Elnathan the son of Achbor
Shena(z)Zar - ” Son of King Jehoiachin (1 Chronicles 3:18 )
Elnathan -
An inhabitant of Jerusalem, the father of Nehushta, who was the mother of king Jehoiachin (2 Kings 24:8 )
Evil-Merodach - ) who treated Jehoiachin, king of Judah, with kindness (2 Kings 25:27 )
Jecamiah - Son of King Jeconiah (Jehoiachin), the Judean king exiled by Babylon (1 Chronicles 3:18 )
Evil Merodach - He therefore cast Evil Merodach into prison, where the prince met Jehoiachin or Jeconiah, and became his friend. When Evil Merodach mounted the throne therefore he brought him out of prison, changed his prison garments, and set his throne above the throne of the kings with him in Babylon, and "Jehoiachin did continually eat bread before him all the days of his life" (Jeremiah 52:31-34)
Evil-Merodach, - EVIL-MERODACH , the Amel-Marduk of the Babylonians, son and successor of Nebuchadrezzar on the throne of Babylon ( 2 Kings 25:27-30 ), promoted Jehoiachin in the 37th year of his captivity
Evil-Merodach - His friendly treatment of Jehoiachin the captive king of Judah, in releasing him from prison and variously distinguishing him above other captives, is mentioned to his praise, 2 Kings 25:27 ; Jeremiah 52:31 - 34
Nebuchadnezzar - During the reign of Joiakim and Jehoiachin, Nebuchadnezzar exiled to Babylon many of the politically powerful Jews and members of the royal family, including Daniel and his colleagues Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah
Evil-Merodach - Influenced probably by Daniel, he showed kindness to Jehoiachin, who had been a prisoner in Babylon for thirty-seven years
Jehoiachin - The term "whelp" appears to apply more to his son Jehoiachin, who moreover answers better to the description of the mother (Judah) "taking another of her whelps, and making him a young lion. "Josias begat Jechonias and his brethren about the time they were carried away to Babylon," fixing his birth to the time of Nebuchadnezzar's invasion (2 Kings 24:1), namely, three years after Jehoiakim's accession, and eight before his reign ended and Jehoiachin succeeded; but Matthew's language hardly justifies this; Jeremiah's language implies Jehoiachin was a "man," and capable of having a "child" (2 Kings 22:28; 2 Kings 22:30). Jehoiachin seeing the impossibility of resistance made a virtue of necessity by going out to Nebuchadnezzar, he, the queen mother (who, as the king was only 18, held chief power; Jeremiah 13:18 undesignedly coincides with and confirms the history, "Say unto the king and to the queen, Humble yourselves," etc. ...
Nebuchadnezzar, after Jehoiakim's rebellion (notwithstanding his agreement at Nebuchadnezzar's first advance to be his vassal) (2 Kings 24:1; Daniel 1:1), would not trust his son Jehoiachin, but carried him away, the queen mother, his wives, chamberlains, and all the men of might, 7,000, and 1,000 crafts. ...
Jehoiachin wore prison garments for 36 years, until at the death of Nebuchadnezzar, having been for a time sharer of his imprisonment (Jeremiah 52:31-34), "in the 12th month, the 25th day of the month (in 2 Kings 25:27 'the 27th,' the day when the decree for his elevation, given on the 25th, was carried into effect) lifted up the head of Jehoiachin (compare Genesis 40:13-20; Psalms 3:3; Psalms 27:6), and brought him forth out of prison, and spoke kindly unto him, and set his throne above the throne of the kings that were with him in Babylon, and changed his prison garments (for royal robes; compare Zechariah 3:1-5; Luke 15:22), and he did continually eat bread before him all the days of his life (compare 2 Samuel 9:13); and there was a continual diet given him of the king of Babylon, every day its portion (compare margin 1 Kings 8:59) until the day of his death. In the fourth year of his uncle Zedekiah (so called by Nebuchadnezzar instead of Mattaniah), false prophets encouraged the popular hope of the return of Jehoiachin to Jerusalem (Jeremiah 28:4). One of his sons was Zedekiah (Zidkijah), distinct in name and fact from Zedekiah (Zidkijahu), Jeconiah's uncle, whose succession after Jehoiachin would never cause him to be called "his son" (1 Chronicles 3:16). This Zedekiah is mentioned separately from the other sons of Jehoiachin, Assir and Salathiel, because probably he was not led to Babylon as the other sons, but died in Judea (Keil). ) A party of the captives at Babylon also, through the false prophets, expected restoration with Jehoiachin and Nebuchadnezzar's overthrow. Ezekiel dates his prophecies by Jehoiachin's captivity, the latest date being the 27th year (Ezekiel 1:2; Ezekiel 29:17; Ezekiel 40:1). about Jehoiachin. Kish, Mordecai's ancestor, was carried away with Jehoiachin (Esther 2:6)
Jecamiah - One of seven, apparently sons of Neri, of Nathan's line (as was Salathiel, Luke 3:27), introduced into the royal line when Jehoiachin had no child who succeeded to the throne (1 Chronicles 3:17-18)
Evilmerodach - In his first year he had compassion upon Jehoiachin king of Judah, who had been in prison thirty-seven years, raised him to honour, and appointed him to sit at his own table for the rest of his life
Hoshama - Son of Jehoiachin, or Jeconiah (1 Chronicles 3:18). In Jehoiachin's capture by Nebuchadnezzar his mother and wives are mentioned, but not his sons (2 Kings 24:12; 2 Kings 24:15), and he is doomed to be "childless" in Jeremiah 22:30
Ezekiel - He was carried into captivity with Jehoiachin, about B
Mor'Deca-i - [1] Three things are predicated of Mordecai in the book of Esther: (1) That he lived in Shushan; (2) That his name was Mordecai, son of Jair, son of Shimei, son of Kish the Benjamite who was taken captive with Jehoiachin; (3) That he brought up Esther
Queen - The term is applied to Maachah, (1 Kings 15:13 ; 2 Chronicles 16:16 ) and to Jezetiel, (2 Kings 10:13 ) and to the mother of Jehoiachin or Jeconiah, (Jeremiah 13:18 ) compare 2 Kings 24:12 ; Jere 29:2
Elnathan - The father of Nehushta, the mother of Jehoiachin ( 2 Kings 24:8 )
Sheshbazzar - If so, he was a son of Jehoiachin and uncle of Zerubbabel
Zedekiah - A prophet deported to Babylon with Jehoiachin
Jehoiakim - At his death he was succeeded by his son Jehoiachin
Chebar - Nebuchadnezzar had planted many of the captives taken with Jehoiachin there (2 Kings 24:15)
Zedekiah - A prophet deported to Babylon with Jehoiachin
Zerubbabel - ” The grandson of King Jehoiachin (taken to Babylon in the first Exile in 597 B. by Nebuchadnezzar; 2 Kings 24:10-17 ) and the son of Shealtiel (Ezra 3:2 ), second son of Jehoiachin (1 Chronicles 3:16-17 )
Mattaniah - King Zedekiah's (Jehovah's justice) original name, changed when Nebuchadnezzar put him on the throne instead of his nephew Jehoiachin (2 Kings 24:17)
Joakim - Jehoiachin, son of Jehoiakim, who is erroneously called Joakim in 1Es 1:43
Esther - At the death of her father and mother she was adopted by her cousin Mordecai, the descendant of a Jew who had been carried away captive with Jehoiachin
Jeho-i'Achin - ( 2 Kings 24:10,11 ) In a very short time Jehoiachin surrendered at discretion; and he, and the queen-mother, and all his servants, captains and officers, came out and gave themselves up to Nebuchadnezzar, who carried them, with the harem and the eunuchs, to Babylon
Jehoiachin - Jehoiachin evidently was a throne name taken at the time of accession to the kingship. Jehoiachin's original name seems to have been Jeconiah or Coniah
Zedekiah - His original name was Mattaniah; but when Nebuchadnezzar placed him on the throne as the successor to Jehoiachin he changed his name to Zedekiah. The kingdom was at that time tributary to Nebuchadnezzar; but, despite the strong remonstrances of Jeremiah and others, as well as the example of Jehoiachin, he threw off the yoke of Babylon, and entered into an alliance with Hophra, king of Egypt
Nergal-Sharezer - ...
Intemperance, lawlessness, and his elevation of Jehoiachin above the other kings at Babylon, disgusted the Babylonians, so that they deposed Evil Merodach
Jehoiachin - Jehoiachin was carried to Babylon and kept in prison thirty-six years; on the accession of Evil-merodach, B
Jehoiachin - Jehoiachin , king of Judah, ascended the throne when Nebuchadrezzar was on the march to punish the rebellion of Jehoiakim
Ezekiel - " He was probably carried away captive with Jehoiachin (1:2; 2 Kings 24:14-16 ) about B. His prophetic call came to him "in the fifth year of Jehoiachin's captivity" (B
Jeremi'ah - During the reigns of Jehoiakim and Jehoiachin, B. First Jehoiakim, and afterwards his successor Jehoiachin, were carried into exile, 2 Kings 24 ; but Zedekiah, B. The king and his princes shared the fate of Jehoiachin
Jeremi'ah - During the reigns of Jehoiakim and Jehoiachin, B. First Jehoiakim, and afterwards his successor Jehoiachin, were carried into exile, 2 Kings 24 ; but Zedekiah, B. The king and his princes shared the fate of Jehoiachin
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
599...
Jehoiachin,...
100 days
Jehoiachin - 3405, when he was killed by the Chaldeans, in the eleventh year of his reign; and was succeeded by this Jehoiachin, who reigned alone three months and ten days; but he reigned about ten years in conjunction with his father
Nebuchadrezzar - For his relations with Judah, see Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, Zedekiah, Gedaliah
Kings, First And Second Books of, - It must be remembered that the division between the books of Kings and Samuel is equally artificial, and that in point of fact the historical books commencing with Judges and ending with 2Kings present the appearance of one work, giving a continuous history of Israel from the time of Joshua to the death of Jehoiachin. , the liberation of Jehoiachin from his prison at Babylon --and a still further extension to Jehoiachin's death, the time of which is not known, but which was probably not long after his liberation
Zedekiah - The last king of Judah, the son of Josiah, and the uncle of Jehoiachin
Ezekiel - He is reputed to have been murdered in Babylon, and his tomb, said to have been built by Jehoiachin, is shown, a few days' journey from Bagdad
Prison - Jehoiachin was in prison in Babylon
Kings, the Books of - 561, the date of the last chapter (2 Kings 25 ), when Jehoiachin was released from captivity by Evil-merodach, and B
Jeremiah - He prophesied under Josiah, Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, and Zedekiah; and for some time during the exile
Judah the Kingdom of - Tiglath-pileser distressed Judah during the reign of Ahaz, 2 Chronicles 28:20; Sennacherib's host of 185,000 men was destroyed by the angel of the Lord in Hezekiah's reign, 2 Chronicles 32:21; 2 Kings 19:35; Manasseh was carried away captive into Babylon, 2 Chronicles 33:11 : Jehoiachin was also made captive; Zedekiah rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar, and was defeated, his sons slain before his eyes, and he made captive; Jerusalem was taken in b
Jehoiakim - Nebuchadnezzar placed his son Jehoiachin on the throne, wishing still to retain the kingdom of Judah as tributary to him
Zedekiah - He was the son of Josiah, and uncle to Jehoiachin his predecessor, 2 Kings 24:17 ; 2 Kings 24:19 . When Nebuchadnezzar took Jerusalem, he carried Jehoiachin to Babylon, with his wives, children, officers, and the best artificers in Judea, and put in his place his uncle Mattaniah, whose name he changed into Zedekiah, and made him promise, with an oath, that he would continue in fidelity to him, A
Zedekiah - Son of Jeconiah, or Jehoiachin, king of Judah
Captivities of Judah - The captivities of Judah are generally reckoned four: the first, in the year of the world 3398, under King Jehoiakim, when Daniel and others were carried to Babylon; the second, in the year of the world 3401, and in the seventh year of the reign of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried three thousand and twenty-three Jews to Babylon; the third, in the year of the world 3406, and in the fourth of Jehoiachin, when this prince, with part of people, was sent to Babylon; and the fourth in the year 3416, under Zedekiah, from which period begins the captivity of seventy years, foretold by the Prophet Jeremiah
Captivities of the Jews - 598, when that prophet, like Mordecai the uncle of Esther (Esther 2:6 ) accompanied Jehoiachin
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - Jeremiah (Jeremiah 22:30) declares Jeconiah, Coniah, or Jehoiachin was to be childless. after Jehoiachin, the same names occur in both lists, Salathiel and Zerubbabel taken (in Matthew) from the line of Nathan (Luke) to supply the failure of Jehoiachin's issue
Captivity - 598) marched against Jerusalem, and put Jehoiachim to death, placing his son Jehoiachin on the throne in his stead. But Jehoiachin's counsellors displeasing Nebuchadnezzar, he again a third time turned his army against Jerusalem, and carried away to Babylon a second detachment of Jews as captives, to the number of 10,000 (2 Kings 24:13 ; Jeremiah 24:1 ; 2 Chronicles 36:10 ), among whom were the king, with his mother and all his princes and officers, also Ezekiel, who with many of his companions were settled on the banks of the river Chebar (q. Mattaniah, the uncle of Jehoiachin, was now made king over what remained of the kingdom of Judah, under the name of Zedekiah (2 Kings 24:17 ; 2 Chronicles 36:10 )
Chronology of the Biblical Period - had taken King Jehoiachin and his family and many top officials to Babylon. ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
Kings, 1 And 2 - The last recorded incident in 2Kings is the release of Jehoiachin from prison by Evil-merodach in about 560 B. The Deuteronomic history was likely written shortly after the release of Jehoiachin in 560 B. ...
This hope is illustrated in 2 Kings 25:27-30 with the release of Jehoiachin from prison. Perhaps the writer was encouraging the exiles with the possibility that God would bless them again and raise Israel above all peoples ( Deuteronomy 28:1 ) just as Jehoiachin was given preference above other prisoners in captivity (2 Kings 25:28 )
Mordecai - He was carried captive, to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar, with Jehoiachin, or Jeconiah, king of Judah, A
Haggai, Theology of - The obscure reference to the signet ring is illuminated by Jeremiah 22:24 , where Zerubbabel's ancestor, Jehoiachin, is pulled off like a signet ring and handed over to Nebuchadnezzar. By making Zerubbabel "like my signet ring" the Lord may be reversing the curse against Jehoiachin, reinstating his family so that a descendant of his could again sit on the throne of Israel. Both Jeconiah—another name for Jehoiachinand Zerubbabel are included in Christ's genealogy in Matthew 1:12
Shemaiah - A prophet, called ‘the Nehelamite,’ carried into captivity at Babylon with Jehoiachin, actively engaged in opposing Jeremiah ( Jeremiah 29:24-32 )
Sheshbazzar - It has been conjectured that Sheshbazzar is identical with the Shenazzar of 1 Chronicles 3:18 , a son of Jehoiachin and uncle of Zerubbabel; and this would justify the title ‘prince of Judah’ given to him in Ezra 1:8
Captivity - 599, when Jehoiachin had reigned three months
Jeremiah - Jehoiakim died during the siege, and three months later his son and successor Jehoiachin surrendered. Jehoiachin and most of the useful people were then taken captive to Babylon. There are warnings to rulers, such as Zedekiah (21:1-10; 24:1-10), kings in general (21:11-22:9), Jehoahaz (Shallum), Jehoiakim and Jehoiachin (Coniah) (22:10-30)
Nebuchadnezzar - After his death his son Jehoiachin reigned, and against him Nebuchadnezzar, for the third time, invaded Palestine and besieged Jerusalem, and all the principal inhabitants were carried to Babylon
Zedekiah - Originally named Mattaniah; Nebuchadnezzar changed his name to Zedekiah when he deposed Zedekiah's nephew Jehoiachin. He probably died before Evil Merodach, successor of Nebuchadnezzar, treated kindly Jehoiachin in the 37th year of his captivity, 26 years after the fall of Jerusalem; for no mention is made of him (Jeremiah 52:31)
Captivity - In the last year of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried 3023 Jews to Babylon; or rather, under Jehoiachin, when this prince also was sent to Babylon, in the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, b
Captivity - In the last year of Jehoiakim, when Nebuchadnezzar carried 3,023Jews to Babylon; or rather, under Jehoiachin, when this prince also was sent to Babylon, that is, in the seventh and eighth years of Nebuchadnezzar, B
Captivity - ) A previous deportation of Jewish captives (including Ezekiel, Ezekiel 1:1-3, and Mordecai, Esther's uncle, Esther 2:6) was tint of King Jehoiachin, his princes, men of valor, and the craftsmen, 599 B. This was eight years before the deportation under Jehoiachin. Now Jehoiachin's third year was one year before Nebuchadnezzar's accession (2 Kings 23:36; 2 Kings 24:12)
Nebuchadnezzar - A third time he came against it, and deposed Jehoiachin, whom he carried into Babylon, with a large portion of the population of the city, and the sacred vessels of the temple, placing Zedekiah on the throne of Judah in his stead
Prison, Prisoners - Jehoiachin was clothed in special prison garments in Babylon (2 Kings 25:29 )
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - ]'>[1] (inserting Rahab and Ruth, and calling David ‘the king’), and agrees with 1 Chronicles 2:1-16 ; it then gives the names of the kings to Jechoniah, from 1 Chronicles 3:10-15 , but inserts ‘the [2] of Uriah’ and omits kings Abaziah, Joash, and Amaziah between Joram and Uzziah (= Azariah), and also Jehoiakim son of Josiah and father of Jechoniah (Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 ) or Jehoiachin ( 2 Chronicles 36:8 ). Perhaps, then, originally Jehoiakim ended the second division, and Jehoiachin began the third, and they became confused owing to the similarity of spelling and were written alike (as in 1 Chronicles 3:15 , Jeremiah 52:31 LXX Babylon, History And Religion of - Jehoiakim died that same month, and his son Jehoiachin surrendered the city to the Babylonians on March 16,597 B. Ultimately released from prison, Jehoiachin was treated as a king in exile (2 Kings 25:27-30 ; Jeremiah 52:31-34 )
Israel, History of - Before Nehybuchadrezzar of Babylon arrived, however, Jehoiakim died, bringing his son Jehoiachin (598-597) to the throne. Thus, Jehoiachin was taken into Exile in 597 when Nebuchadrezzar conquered Jerusalem. Many did return under the leadership of Zerubbabel, a descendant of King Jehoiachin
Ezekiel - by King Nebuchadnezzar along with King Jehoiachin and 10,000 others, including political and military leaders and skilled craftsmen (2 Kings 24:14-16 ). , the “thirtieth year” (Ezekiel 1:1 ), probably Ezekiel's age (though it has been interpreted as 30 years since the discovery of the law book in 622,30 years since Jehoiachin's imprisonment, or a system of Babylonian chronology). His son Jehoiachin (598-597 B
Habakkuk - That same year, Jehoiakim died, leaving his son, Jehoiachin, to become Nebuchadnezzar's prisoner when Jerusalem fell in 597 B
Nebuchadnezzar - ...
His successor, Jehoiachin, or Jeconiah, king of Judah, having revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, was besieged in Jerusalem, forced to surrender, and taken, with his chief officers, captive to Babylon; also his mother, his wives, and the best workmen of Jerusalem, to the number of ten thousand men
False Prophet - ...
Thus it was the false prophet Hananiah who predicted in the name of "the Lord Almighty, the God of Israel" (Jeremiah 28:2 ) that the exiles would be restored to their homeland and Jehoiachin and the temple vessels returned (vv
Head - It can also denote the release of someone from prison: “… Evilmerodach king of Babylon in the year that he began to reign did lift up the head of Jehoiachin king of Judah out of prison” (2 Kings 25:27)
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - ...
Jehoiachin, king of Judah, having revolted against Nebuchadnezzar, this prince besieged him in Jerusalem, and forced him to surrender. He took, also, all the vessels of gold which Solomon made for the temple, and the king's treasury, and he set up Mattaniah, Jehoiachin's uncle by his father's side, whom he named Zedekiah
Judah, Kingdom of - ...
After the reigns of the worthless Jehoahaz, set aside by Pharaoh Necho who promoted Jehoiakim, and Jehoiachin or Coniah, Zedekiah (promoted by Nebuchadnezzar) through treachery in violation of his oath brought destruction on himself and Jerusalem (588 B
Exile - His son, Jehoiachin, reigned for three months before he was exiled to Babylon (2 Kings 24:6-16 ; 2 Chronicles 36:9-10 ; Esther 2:6 ; Jeremiah 22:24-30 ;). Jehoiachin's grandson, Zerubbabel, led the first exiles back from Babylon in 538 (Ezra 2:2 ; Haggai 1:1 )
Jeremiah - ) (Jeremiah 1:3 ; Jeremiah 22:18 ; Jeremiah 26:1 ; Jeremiah 35:1 ; Jeremiah 36:1 , Jeremiah 36:9 ), Jehoiachin/Jeconiah/Coniah (597 B
Kings, the Books of - , down to the 37th year of Jehoiachin's exile and imprisonment. shedding and idolatry (the effects of which on the people the faithful Josiah could only undo externally) at last provoked God to give up Judah too to captivity; so Jehoiachin first and Zedekiah last were led away to Babylon, and Jerusalem and the temple were destroyed. The book, in happy consonance with its design, closes with Jehoiachin's elevation from the prison to the highest throne of the vassal kings at Babylon, an earnest of brighter days to the covenant people, the first ray of the dawn of God's returning favor, and of His restoring the Jews, and of His fulfilling His promise that the kingdom and seed of David shall be forever. the 37th year of Jehoiachin
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - In the second section the names are from 1 Chronicles 3:1-16, but Joash, Amaziah, and Azariah are omitted before Jotham, and Jehoiakim before Jechoniah (= Jehoiachin). But it is not clear from the OT that Jechoniah (= Jehoiachin) had any brothers, for the text of 1 Chronicles 3:16 seems suspicious
Babylon - Here the four clay tablets were found listing the rations of grain and oil for King Jehoiachin of Judah and his sons
Babylon - He raises up Jehoiachin in the 37th year of his captivity
Chronicles, the Books of - ...
For the writer of Chronicles and Ezra gives no details of Jehoiachin or Zedekiah, or what occurred in Judah after the temple was burnt; but only dwells on the spiritual lessons which Jerusalem's overthrow teaches, and proceeds at once to the return from Babylon
Ezekiel - Probably exercised the priestly office at Jerusalem before his departure in the captivity or transmigration (galut ) of Jehoiachin, which took place 11 years before the city fell (2 Kings 24:15). Called to prophesy in the fifth year of Jehoiachin's captivity (595 B. ...
But elsewhere he dates from Jehoiachin's captivity alone. This was in the fourth year of Zedekiah or of Jehoiachin's captivity; and one of the captives, Shemaiah, so far from believing, wrote back that Jeremiah should be imprisoned
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - The release of the Davidide Jehoiachin at the end of Kings serves as a subtle reminder that the covenant was still in effect; the people could be assured of their continuing election by God
Jerusalem - The second, in that of his son Jehoiachin; when all the treasures of the palace and the temple, and the remainder of the vessels of the latter which had been hidden or spared in the first capture, were carried away or destroyed, and the best of the inhabitants, with the king, led into captivity, 2 Kings 24; 2 Chronicles 36. And the third, in the reign of Zedekiah, the successor of Jehoiachin; in whose ninth year the most formidable siege which this ill fated city ever sustained, except that of Titus, was commenced
Servant of the Lord - But while the personification of the nation as the ‘servant of Jahweh’ is certain in the passages cited in § 4 , there are other passages in which most scholars in the past, and many of the present, have concluded that the title has another application that it refers prophetically to Jesus Christ, or to some individual known historically to the writer, such as Jeremiah, Jehoiachin, Zerubbabel, or the Eleazar of 2Ma 6:18-31 , or to the pious section of Israel
Jews, Judaism - The rulers of the southern kingdom continued to bear that title; the last to be called king of Judah was the captive Jehoiachin (2 Kings 25:27 )
Zechariah, Theology of - Since he was a Davidic descendant (son of the last king of Judah, Jehoiachin) he was qualified to be the first governor. Zerubbabel, Sheshbazzar's nephew and Jehoiachin's grandson, became the second governor
Kings, Books of - The latest event which it mentions is the release of king Jehoiachin from confinement, which took place in the year b
Synagogue - taken to be the work of King Jehoiachin, who was said to have had the stones and the earth brought from Jerusalem; and it was claimed to be the seat of the Shekinah like the Temple of yore, the statue erected there (against the Jewish Law) being probably a Persian symbol of the Divine Presence (Meg
Jeremiah - In the three months' reign of Jehoiachin, Jeconiah, or Coriah (the omission of the Jah marking his severance from Jehovah), Jeremiah prophesied the carrying away of the king and the queen mother Nehushta, daughter of Elnathan (Jeremiah 13:18; Jeremiah 22:24-30; 2 Kings 24:6; 2 Kings 24:8; 2 Kings 24:12; 2 Kings 24:15)
Create, Creation - 1 Chronicles 3:11-12 ]'>[7]; and Jehoiakim between Josiah and Jechoniah/Jehoiachin in 1:11; [5])
Jeremiah - Jehoiakim died just before this; his youthful son Jehoiachin (called also Jeconiah and Coniah ) surrendered the city, and was carried captive, with the queen-mother and the élite of the nobles and people, to Babylon, where he lived for many years, to be released upon Nebuchadrezzar’s death in 561 ( 2 Kings 24:6-17 ; 2 Kings 25:27-30 , Jeremiah 22:24-30 )
Babel - , who in the beginning of his reign "did lift up the head of Jehoiachin, king of Judah, out of prison" (2 Kings 25:27; Jeremiah 52:31)
Jerusalem - Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon captured and looted it, and carried away captive first Jehoiachin ( 2 Kings 24:12 ), and finally Zedekiah, the last king of Judah (ch