What does Jacob mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
יַעֲקֹ֖ב son of Isaac 44
יַעֲקֹ֔ב son of Isaac 44
יַעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 28
יַעֲקֹֽב son of Isaac 25
יַעֲקֹב֙ son of Isaac 18
יַעֲקֹ֗ב son of Isaac 17
ἰακὼβ was the second son of Isaac. / the father of Joseph 15
יַעֲקֹ֣ב son of Isaac 14
יַֽעֲקֹ֔ב son of Isaac 14
ἰακώβ was the second son of Isaac. / the father of Joseph 12
יַעֲקֹ֜ב son of Isaac 12
יַעֲקֹ֛ב son of Isaac 9
יַעֲקֹ֥ב son of Isaac 7
לְיַעֲקֹ֔ב son of Isaac 7
לְיַעֲקֹ֖ב son of Isaac 6
לְיַעֲקֹֽב son of Isaac 5
יַֽעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 4
יַעֲקֹב֒ son of Isaac 4
יַֽעֲקֹב֙ son of Isaac 4
לְיַעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 4
לְיַעֲקֹב֙ son of Isaac 4
יַעֲקֹ֤ב son of Isaac 4
לְיַֽעֲקֹב֙ son of Isaac 3
יַ֝עֲקֹ֗ב son of Isaac 3
לְיַֽעֲקֹ֔ב son of Isaac 3
וּֽלְיַעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 3
בְּיַעֲקֹ֔ב son of Isaac 3
וּֽלְיַעֲקֹֽב son of Isaac 3
וּֽלְיַעֲקֹב֙ son of Isaac 3
יַעֲקֹ֨ב son of Isaac 2
וְיַעֲקֹ֗ב son of Isaac 2
יַעֲקֹ֣ב ׀ son of Isaac 2
בְּיַעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 2
יַ֠עֲקֹב son of Isaac 2
؟ יַעֲקֹ֗ב son of Isaac 2
וְיַעֲקֹ֖ב son of Isaac 2
וְיַעֲקֹב֙ son of Isaac 2
וּֽלְיַעֲקֹ֖ב son of Isaac 2
יַעֲקוֹב֩ son of Isaac 1
וְיַעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 1
יַעֲק֛וֹב son of Isaac 1
יַעֲק֗וֹב son of Isaac 1
וְיַעֲקֹ֥ב son of Isaac 1
בְּֽיַעֲקֹ֗ב son of Isaac 1
בְּיַעֲקֹ֣ב son of Isaac 1
בְּיַעֲקֹב֙ son of Isaac 1
יַעֲק֑וֹב son of Isaac 1
בְּיַעֲקֹ֤ב ׀ son of Isaac 1
מִֽיַּעֲקֹ֗ב son of Isaac 1
(יַעֲקֹֽב) son of Isaac 1
מִֽיַּעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 1
לְיַעֲקֹ֣ב son of Isaac 1
בְיַעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 1
וְ֝יַעֲקֹ֗ב son of Isaac 1
יַֽעֲק֔וֹב son of Isaac 1
לְּיַעֲקֹֽב‪‬ son of Isaac 1
מִֽיַּעֲקֹב֙ son of Isaac 1
וְיַעֲקֹ֞ב son of Isaac 1
אֵלָ֑יו to 1
וַיֹּ֣אמֶר to say 1
וַיָּבֹא֙ to go in 1
שָׂהֲדוּתָ֑א the mound of stones raised as witness between Jacob and Laban 1
וְיַֽעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 1
--יַעֲקֹ֖ב son of Isaac 1
---וְיַעֲקֹ֖ב son of Isaac 1
יַעֲקֹב֮ son of Isaac 1
בְּיַֽעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 1
לְיַעֲקֹ֥ב son of Isaac 1
יַעֲקֹ֧ב son of Isaac 1
! יַֽעֲקֹ֑ב son of Isaac 1
וְיַעֲקֹ֣ב son of Isaac 1
: יַעֲקֹ֗ב son of Isaac 1
: יַֽעֲקֹ֔ב son of Isaac 1
לְיַעֲקֹ֤ב son of Isaac 1
יַֽעֲקֹ֣ב son of Isaac 1
וַיִּשְׁמַ֗ע to hear 1

Definitions Related to Jacob

H3290


   1 son of Isaac, grandson of Abraham, and father of the 12 patriarchs of the tribes of Israel.
   Additional Information: Jacob = “heel holder” or “supplanter”.
   

G2384


   1 was the second son of Isaac.
   2 the father of Joseph, the husband of Mary.
   Additional Information: Jacob = “heel-catcher or supplanter”.
   

H559


   1 to say, speak, utter.
      1a (Qal) to say, to answer, to say in one’s heart, to think, to command, to promise, to intend.
      1b (Niphal) to be told, to be said, to be called.
      1c (Hithpael) to boast, to act proudly.
      1d (Hiphil) to avow, to avouch.
      

H3026


   1 the mound of stones raised as witness between Jacob and Laban, called by Jacob in Hebrew ‘Galeed’.
   Additional Information: Jegar-sahadutha = “witness heap”.
   

H935


   1 to go in, enter, come, go, come in.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to enter, come in.
         1a2 to come.
            1a2a to come with.
            1a2b to come upon, fall or light upon, attack (enemy).
            1a2c to come to pass.
         1a3 to attain to.
         1a4 to be enumerated.
         1a5 to go.
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to lead in.
         1b2 to carry in.
         1b3 to bring in, cause to come in, gather, cause to come, bring near, bring against, bring upon.
         1b4 to bring to pass.
      1c (Hophal).
         1c1 to be brought, brought in.
         1c2 to be introduced, be put.
         

H8085


   1 to hear, listen to, obey.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to hear (perceive by ear).
         1a2 to hear of or concerning.
         1a3 to hear (have power to hear).
         1a4 to hear with attention or interest, listen to.
         1a5 to understand (language).
         1a6 to hear (of judicial cases).
         1a7 to listen, give heed.
            1a7a to consent, agree.
            1a7b to grant request.
         1a8 to listen to, yield to.
         1a9 to obey, be obedient.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be heard (of voice or sound).
         1b2 to be heard of.
         1b3 to be regarded, be obeyed.
      1c (Piel) to cause to hear, call to hear, summon.
      1d (Hiphil).
         1d1 to cause to hear, tell, proclaim, utter a sound.
         1d2 to sound aloud (musical term).
         1d3 to make proclamation, summon.
         1d4 to cause to be heard.
   2 sound.
   

Frequency of Jacob (original languages)

Frequency of Jacob (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Berzelius, Johan Jacob
(1779-1848) Chemist. Founded an electro-chemical theory, innovated the system of chemical nomenclature and notation designated by his name, drew up a table of atomic weights, discovered cerium, selenium, and thorium, advanced Dalton's atomic theory, and verified Dalton's law of multiple proportions.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Jacob
The son of Isaac and Rebecca, third great patriarch of the chosen people, and the immediate ancestor of the twelve tribes of Israel. He secured through a ruse the blessing which Isaac intended for Esau, and thus was confirmed Jacob's possession of the birthright, his struggle for which had begun before his birth. He fled to Haran, the dwelling place of Laban, his maternal uncle, serving 14 years for Laban's daughter Rachel. He finally departed secretly for Chanaan. After stopping at Bethel and Ephrata (Genesis 35), he came to Hebron where he dwelt quietly, leaving it only to rejoin his son Joseph in Egypt, and to spend his last days in the land of Gessen.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Jacob
(jay' cuhb) Personal name built on the Hebrew noun for “heel” meaning, “he grasps the heel” or “he cheats, supplants” (Genesis 25:26 ; Genesis 27:36 ). Original ancestor of the nation of Israel and father of the twelve ancestors of the twelve tribes of Israel (Genesis 25:1Exodus 25:1—1:5 ). He was the son of Isaac and Rebekah, younger twin brother of Esau, and husband of Leah and Rachel (Genesis 25:21-26 ; Genesis 29:21-30 ). God changed his name to Israel (Genesis 32:28 ; Genesis 49:2 ). Texts from Ugarit and Assyria have persons named Jacob, but these are not Israelites. Their name is often connected with one of their gods, becoming Jacob-el or Jacob-baal. In such a form, it probably means “may El protect.” The Old Testament knows only one Jacob. No one else received the patriarch's name.
Between the Testaments other Jews received the name Jacob; the one New Testament example is the father of Joseph and thus the earthly grandfather of Jesus (Matthew 1:16 ). Jacob stands as a strong witness that the God who made all the people of the earth also worked in Israel's history, calling the patriarchs to a destiny He would fulfill even when they least deserved it.
Jacob in Genesis Jacob's story occupies half the Book of Genesis. Living up to his name, Jacob bargained for Esau's birthright. See Birthright . Parental partiality fostered continuing hostility between Esau, the hunter beloved of his father, and Jacob, the quiet, settled, integrated person
favored by his mother. The tensions between brothers seemed to threaten the fulfillment of the divine promise.
Esau's thoughtlessness lost him his birthright and allowed Jacob to have material superiority. Nevertheless, Isaac intended to bestow the blessing of the firstborn upon Esau. The oracle Rebekah received (Genesis 25:23 ) probably encouraged her to counter Isaac's will and to gain the blessing for her favorite son by fraud. The blessing apparently conveyed the status of head of family apart from the status of heir. To his crass lies and deception, Jacob even approached blasphemy, using God's name to bolster his cause, “Because the Lord your God granted me success” (Genesis 29:1-3023 NRSV). The father's blindness deepened the pathos. The blind father pronounced the blessing he could never recall. Jacob became the bearer of God's promises and the inheritor of Canaan. Esau, too, received a blessing, but a lesser one. He must serve Jacob and live in the less fertile land of Edom, but his day would come ( Genesis 27:40 ). The split between brothers became permanent. Rebekah had to arrange for Jacob to flee to her home in Paddan-aram to escape Esau's wrath (Genesis 27:46-28:1 ).
At age 40, Jacob fled his home to begin his life as an individual. Suddenly, a lonely night in Bethel, interrupted by a vision from God, brought reality home. Life had to include wrestling with God and assuming responsibility as the heir of God's promises to Abraham (Genesis 28:10-22 ). Jacob made an oath, binding himself to God. Here is the center of Jacob's story; all else must be read in light of the Bethel experience.
In Aram with his mother's family, the deceiver Jacob met deception. Laban tricked him into marrying poor Leah, the elder daughter, before he got his beloved Rachel, the younger. Fourteen years he labored for his wives (1619112868_5 ). Six more years of labor let Jacob return the deception and gain wealth at the expense of his father-in-law, who continued his deception, changing Jacob's wages ten times (Genesis 31:7 ,Genesis 31:7,31:41 ) Amid the family infighting, both men prospered financially, and Jacob's family grew. Eventually he had twelve children from four women (Genesis 29:31-30:24 ).
Intense bargaining ensued when Jacob told Laban he wanted to follow God's call and return to the land of his birth. Supported by his wives, who claimed their father had cheated them of their dowry (Genesis 31:15 ), Jacob departed while Laban and his sons were away in the hills shearing sheep. Starting two days later, Laban and his sons could not overtake Jacob until they reached Gilead, 400 miles from Haran.
Laban complained that he had not had an opportunity to bid farewell to his daughters with the accustomed feast. More importantly, he wanted to recover his stolen gods (Genesis 31:30 ,Genesis 31:30,31:32 ). These gods were small metal or terra-cotta figures of deities. See Terraphim. Without the images, his family lost the magical protection which he thought the gods provided from demons and disasters. Since no fault could be found in Jacob's conduct in Haran, all Laban could do was to suggest a covenant of friendship. Laban proposed the terms as (1) never ill-treating his daughters, (2) never marrying any other women, and (3) establishing the site of the covenant as a boundary neither would cross with evil intent. Jacob was now head of his own household. He was ready to climb to a higher plane of spiritual experience.
As Jacob approached the Promised Land, a band of angels met him at Mahanaim (Genesis 32:1-2 ). They probably symbolized God's protection and encouragement as he headed southward to meet Esau for the first time in twenty years. Esau's seemingly hostile advance prompted a call for clear evidence of God's guarding. Shrewdly, Jacob sent an enormous gift to his brother and divided his retinue into two groups. Each group was large enough to defend itself or to escape if the other was attacked. To his scheme Jacob added prayer. He realized that it was ultimately God with whom he must deal. When all had crossed the Jabbok River, Jacob met One who wrestled with him until daybreak (Genesis 32:1 ).
The two struggled without one gaining advantage, until the Opponent dislocated Jacob's hip. Jacob refused to release his Antagonist. Clinging to Him, he demanded a blessing. This would not be given until Jacob said his name. By telling it, Jacob acknowledged his defeat and admitted his character. The Opponent emphasized His superiority by renaming the patriarch. He became Israel, the one on whose behalf God strives. He named the place Peniel (face of God), because he had seen God face to face and his life had been spared (Genesis 32:30 ).
Jacob's fear of meeting Esau proved groundless. Seemingly, Esau was content to forget the wrongs of the past and to share his life. As two contrary natures are unlikely to live long in harmony, Jacob chose the better course turning westward to the Promised Land. Esau headed to Seir to become the father of the Edomites. The twins did not meet again until their father's death (Genesis 35:27-29 ).
From Succoth, Jacob traveled to Shechem, where he built an altar to God. The son of the city ruler raped Jacob's daughter, Dinah. Jacob's sons demanded that the Shechemites be circumcised before any intermarriages were permitted. The leading citizens followed the king in the request. They hoped to absorb the Hebrews' wealth and property into their own. While the men of Shechem were recovering from surgery and unable to defend themselves, Simeon and Levi killed them to avenge their sister. Jacob condemned their actions, but had to leave Shechem.
From Shechem, he returned to Bethel. Once again he received the patriarchal promises. Losses and grief characterized this period. The death of his mother's nurse (Genesis 35:8 ; Genesis 24:59 ) was followed by the death of his beloved wife Rachel while giving birth to Benjamin at Ephrath (Genesis 35:19 ; Genesis 48:7 ). About the same time Reuben forfeited the honor of being the eldest son by sexual misconduct (Genesis 35:22 ). Finally, the death of Jacob's father, who had been robbed of companionship with both sons, brought Jacob and Esau together again at the family burial site in Hebron.
Although Genesis 37-50 revolve around Joseph, Jacob is still the central figure. The self-willed older sons come and go at his bidding.
Descent to Egypt When severe famine gripped Canaan, Jacob and his sons set out for Egypt. At Beer-sheba Jacob received further assurance of God's favor (Genesis 46:1-4 ). Jacob dwelt in the land of Goshen until his death. Jacob bestowed the blessing not only upon his favorite son Joseph, but also upon Joseph's two oldest sons, Ephraim and Manasseh. He was finally laid to rest at Hebron in the cave Abraham had purchased (Genesis 50:12-14 ).
Four New Testament passages recall events in his life. The woman at the well in Sychar declared to Jesus that Jacob provided the well (John 4:12 ). Stephen mentioned the famine and Jacob's journey to Egypt in the course of his defense before the Sanhedrin (Acts 7:8-16 ). Paul presented
Jacob as an example of the sovereign choice of God and of the predestination of the elect (Romans 9:10-13 ). The writer of Hebrews held up Jacob as one of the examples of active faith (Hebrews 11:9 ,Hebrews 11:9,11:20-22 ).
Jacob's Character Throughout the narrative a persistent faith in the God of the fathers shines through. Jacob's life was a story of conflict. He always seemed to be running from someone or something—from Esau, from Laban, or from famine in Canaan. His life, like that of all Israelites, was a checkered history of rebellion and flight.
Jacob is no ideal. Jacob's better nature struggled with his sinful self. What raised Jacob above himself was his reverent, indestructible longing for the salvation of his God.
Jacob's Religion As the religion of Israel and thus the roots of Christianity claim to derive from the patriarchs, it is necessary to attempt to understand Jacob's spiritual life. See God of the Fathers .
Jacob's religion was consistent with the beliefs and practices of his fathers. He received instruction from Isaac concerning the history of Abraham, covenant, and the great promises. Jacob encountered God at Bethel at the moment of greatest need in his life. He was fleeing from home to distant unknown relatives. A secondhand religion would not do. Jacob's dream was
his firsthand encounter with God. The threefold promise of land, descendants, and a blessing to all nations were personalized for him. Jacob saw in the vision the majesty and glory of God. At Bethel Jacob worshiped God and vowed to take Yahweh as his God.
At Peniel, Jacob wrestled face-to-face with God. He saw how weak he was before God. It taught him the value of continued prayer from one who is helpless. Jacob emerged from Peniel willing to let his life fall into God's control. He was wounded but victorious. God gave him a crippled body but a strengthened faith. It was a new Jacob—Israel—who hobbled off to meet Esau. He had learned obedience through suffering.
Theological Significance God did not chose Jacob because of what he was but because of what he could become. His life is a long history of discipline, chastisement, and purification by affliction. Not one of his misdeeds went unpunished. He sowed deception and reaped the same, first from Laban and then from his own sons.
Jacob's story is a story of conflict. The note of conflict is even heard before his birth (Genesis 25:22-23 ). However, in the midst of the all-too-human quarrels over family and fortune, God was at work protecting and prospering His blessed.
With the other patriarchs God acted directly, but with Jacob God seemed to be withdrawn at times. Yet, God was no less at work. He worked through unsavory situations and unworthy persons. Even in Jacob's web of conflict and tragedy, God's hand guided, though half-hidden.
Gary D. Baldwin
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jacob
(See ESAU; ISAAC.) ("supplanter", or "holding the heel".) Esau's twin brother, but second in point of priority. Son of Isaac, then 60 years old, and Rebekah. As Jacob "took his brother by the heel (the action of a wrestler) in the womb" (Hosea 12:3), so the spiritual Israel, every believer, having no right in himself to the inheritance, by faith when being born again of the Spirit takes hold of the bruised heel, the humanity, of Christ crucified, "the Firstborn of many brethren." He by becoming a curse for us became a blessing to the true Israel; contrast Hebrews 12:16-17. Jacob was a "plain," i.e. an upright man, steady and domestic, affectionate, so his mother's favorite: Genesis 25:24, etc., "dwelling in tents," i.e. staying at home, minding the flocks and household duties; not, like Esau, wandering abroad in keen quest of game, "a man of the field," wild, restless, self indulgent, and seldom at home in the tent.
Having bought the birthright from Esau, he afterward, at Rebekah's instigation, stole the blessing which his father intended for Esau, but which God had appointed to him even when the two sons were yet unborn; "the elder shall serve the younger" (Genesis 25:23; Genesis 27:29; Malachi 1:3; Romans 9:12). His seeking a right end by wrong means (Genesis 27) entailed a life-long retribution in kind. Instead of occupying the first place of honour in the family he had to flee for his life; instead of a double portion, he fled with only the staff in his hand. It was now, when his schemes utterly failed, God's grace began to work in him and for him, amidst his heavy outward crosses. If he had waited in faith God's time, and God's way, of giving the blessing promised by God, and not unlawfully with carnal policy foiled Isaac's intention, God would have defeated his father's foolish purpose and Jacob would have escaped his well deserved chastisement.
The fear of man, precautions cunning, habitual timidity as to danger, characterize him, as we might have expected in one quiet and shrewd to begin with, then schooled in a life exposed to danger from Esau, to grasping selfishness from Laban, and to undutifulness from most of his sons (Genesis 31:15; Genesis 31:42; Genesis 34:5; Genesis 34:30; Genesis 43:6; Genesis 43:11-12). Jacob's grand superiority lay in his abiding trust in the living God. Faith made him "covet earnestly the best gift," though his mode of getting it (first by purchase from the reckless, profane Esau, at the cost of red pottage, taking ungenerous advantage of his brother's hunger; next by deceit) was most unworthy.
When sent forth by his parents to escape Esau, and to get a wife in Padan Aram, he for the first time is presented before us as enjoying God's manifestations at Bethel in his vision of the ladder set up on earth, and the top reaching heaven, with "Jehovah standing above, and the angels of God ascending and descending (not descending and ascending, for the earth is presupposed as already the scene of their activity) on it," typifying God's providence and grace arranging all things for His people's good through the ministry of "angels" (Genesis 28; Hebrews 1:14). When his conscience made him feel his flight was the just penalty of his deceit God comforts him by promises of His grace.
Still more typifying Messiah, through whom heaven is opened and also joined to earth, and angels minister with ceaseless activity to Him first, then to His people (John 14:6; Revelation 4:1; Acts 7:56; Hebrews 9:8; Hebrews 10:19-20). Jacob the man of guile saw Him at the top of the ladder; Nathanael, an Israelite without guile, saw Him at the bottom in His humiliation, which was the necessary first step upward to glory. John 1:51; "hereafter," Greek "from now," the process was then beginning which shall eventuate in the restoration of the union between heaven and earth, with greater glory than before (Revelation 5:8; Revelation 21:1 - 22:21). Then followed God's promise of (1) the land and (2) of universal blessing to all families of the earth "in his seed," i.e. Christ; meanwhile he should have
(1) God's presence,
(2) protection in all places,
(3) restoration to home,
(4) unfailing faithfulness (Genesis 28:15; compare Genesis 28:20-21).
Recognizing God's manifestation as sanctifying the spot, he made his stony pillow into a pillar, consecrated with oil (See BETHEL), and taking up God's word he vowed that as surely as God would fulfill His promises (he asked no more than "bread and raiment") Jehovah should be his God, and of all that God gave he would surely give a tenth to Him; not waiting until he should be rich to do so, but while still poor; a pattern to us (compare Genesis 32:10). Next follows his seven years' service under greedy Laban, in lieu of presents to the parents (the usual mode of obtaining a wife in the East, Genesis 24:53, which Jacob was unable to give), and the imposition of Leah upon him instead of Rachel; the first installment of his retributive chastisement in kind for his own deceit. Kennicott suggested that Jacob served 14 years for his wives, then during 20 years he took care of Laban's cattle as a friend, then during six years he served for wages (Genesis 31:38; Genesis 31:41).
"One (zeh ) 20 years I was with thee (tending thy flocks, but not in thy house); another (zeh ) 20 years I was for myself in thy house, serving thee 14 years for thy two daughters, and six years for thy cattle." The ordinary view that he was only 20 years old in Padan Aram would make him 77 years old in going there; and as Joseph, the second youngest, was born at the end of the first 14 years, the 11 children born before Benjamin would be all born within six or seven years, Leah's six, Rachel's one, Bilhah's two, and Zilpah's two. It is not certain that Dinah was born at this time. Zebulun may have been borne by Leah later than Joseph, it not being certain that the births all followed in the order of their enumeration, which is that of the mothers, not that of the births. Rachel gave her maid to Jacob not necessarily after the birth of Leah's fourth son; so Bilhah may have borne Dan and Naphtali before Judah's birth.
Leah then, not being likely to have another son, probably gave Zilpah to Jacob, and Asher and Naphtali were born; in the beginning of the last of the seven years probably Leah bore Issachar, and at its end Zebulun. But in the view of Kennicott and Speaker's Commentary Jacob went to Laban at 57; in the first 14 years had sons, Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah by Leah; Dan and Naphtali by Bilhah; in the 20 years (Genesis 35:38) next had Gad and Asher by Zilpah, Issachar and Zebulun by Leah, lastly Dinah by Leah and Joseph by Rachel; then six years' service for cattle, then flees from Padan Aram where he had been 40 years, at 97. In Jacob's 98th year Benjamin is born and Rachel dies. Joseph at 17 goes to Egypt, at 30 is governor. At 130 Jacob goes to Egypt (Genesis 46:1); dies at 147 (Genesis 47:28).
The assigning of 40, instead of 20, years to his sojourn with Laban allows time for Er and Onan to be grown up when married; their strong passions leading them to marry, even so, at an early age for that time. The common chronology needs some correction, since it makes Judah marry at 20, Er and Onan at 15. On Jacob desiring to leave, Laban attested God's presence with Jacob. "I have found by experience (Hebrew "by omens from serpents," the term showing Laban's paganness: Genesis 30:19; Genesis 30:32) that the Lord hath blessed me for thy sake." Jacob then required as wages all the speckled and spotted sheep and goats, which usually are few, sheep in the East being generally white, the goats black or brown, not speckled.
With characteristic sharpness Jacob adopted a double plan of increasing the wages agreed on. Peeling rods of (Gesenius) storax ("poplar"), almond ("hazel"), and plane tree ("chesnut") in strips, so that the dazzling white wood of these trees should appear under the dark outside, he put them in the drinking troughs; the cattle consequently brought forth spotted, speckled young, which by the agreement became Jacob's. Thus by trickery he foiled Laban's trickery in putting three days' journey between his flock tended by Jacob and Jacob's stipulated flock of spotted and speckled goats and brown put under the care of his sons. Secondly, Jacob separated the speckled young, which were his, so as to be constantly in view of Laban's one-colored flock. Moreover he adopted the trick with the rods only at the copulation of the strong sheep, namely, at the summer copulation not the autumn; for lambs conceived in spring were thought stronger.
Laban changed the terms frequently ("ten times") when he saw Jacob's success, but in vain. Jacob accounted to his wives for his success by narrating his dream, which he had at the time the cattle conceived (Genesis 31:10). This dream was at the beginning of the six years. "God hath taken away your father's cattle and given them to me." God's command to Jacob to return was in a dream at the close of the six years (Genesis 31:11-13; in 12 translated leaped for "leap," and were for "are".) In the latter God states the true cause of his success; not his trickery, but "I have seen all that Laban doeth unto thee": the repetition of "in a dream" twice implies two dreams. Jacob's polygamy was contrary to the original law of paradise (Genesis 2:23-24; Matthew 19:5). Leah was imposed on him when he had designed to marry Rachel only, and the maids were given him by his wives to obtain offspring.
The times of ignorance, when the gospel had not yet restored the original standard, tolerated evils which would be inexcusable now. Jealousies were the result of polygamy in Jacob's case, as was sure to happen. The most characteristic scene of Jacob's higher life was his wrestling until break of day (compare Luke 6:12) with the Angel of Jehovah, in human form, for a blessing. "By his strength he had power with God, yea he had power over the Angel and prevailed, he wept and made supplication unto Him" (Hosea 12:3-4). So He received the name Israel, "contender with God," a pattern to us (Matthew 11:12; Matthew 15:22; Revelation 3:21; Luke 13:24). (See ISRAEL.) His "strength" was conscious weakness constraining him, when his thigh was put out of joint and he could put forth no effort of his own, to hang upon Him; teaching us the irresistible might of conscious weakness hanging on Almighty strength (Job 23:6; Isaiah 27:5; Isaiah 40:29-31; 2 Corinthians 12:9-10).
"I will not let Thee go except Thou bless me" is a model prayer (Genesis 32:26). Tears (recorded by Hosea under an independent Spirit of revelation) and supplications were his weapons; type of Messiah (Hebrews 5:7). The vision of the two encampments of angels on either side of him prepared him for the vision of the Lord of angels. (See MAHANAIM.) Thus he saw, "they that be with us (believers) are more than they that be with" our enemies (2 Kings 6:16-17). Wrestling first with God, we can victoriously wrestle with Satan (Ephesians 6:12). Jacob like David felt "what time I am afraid, I will trust in Thee" (Psalms 56:3-4; Psalms 56:11; 1 Samuel 30:6).
His is one of the earliest prayers on record (Genesis 32:7; Genesis 32:9-12). He pleads as arguments (compare Isaiah 43:26), first God's covenant keeping character to the children of His people, "O God of my father Abraham and Isaac"; next, His word and promises (Isaiah 31:3; Isaiah 31:13), "the Lord which saidst unto me, Return ... and I will deal well with thee"; next, his own unworthiness, "I am not worthy of the least of all the mercies," etc. (compare Isaiah 28:20-22); next the petition itself, "deliver me ... from Esau," appealing to God's, known pity for the helpless, "I fear him lest he ... smite ... the mother with the children"; again falling back on God's own word, "Thou saidst, I will surely do thee good, and make thy seed as the sand of the sea;" etc. The present, artfully made seem larger by putting a space between drove and drove, and each driver in turn saying, "they be thy servant Jacob's, ... a present unto my lord Esau," was calculated by successive appeals to impress the impulsive elder brother (Matthew 5:25).
Having left Canaan in guilt, now on his return Jacob must re-enter it with deep searchings of heart and wrestlings with God for the recovery of that sinless faith which he had forfeited by deceit and which lays hold of the covenant. Jacob is made to know he has more to fear from God's displeasure than from Esau's enmity Once that he stands right with God he need not fear Esau. There followed therefore the wrestling "alone" with Jehovah (compare Matthew 14:23; Mark 1:35); his being named "Israel"; and his asking God's name, to which the only reply was, God "blessed him there." Blessing is God's name, i.e. the character wherein He reveals Himself to His people (Exodus 34:5-7). Jacob called the place Peniel, "the face of God." Next Jacob came to Succoth, then crossed Jordan, and near Shechem bought his only possession in Canaan, the field whereon he tented, from the children of Hamer, Shechem's father, for 100 kesita, i.e. ingots of silver of a certain weight.
The old versions translated "lambs," an ancient standard of wealth before coinage was practiced. For "Shalem, a city of Shechem," translated with Samaritan Pentateuch, "Jacob came in peace to the city of Shechem," though there is still a Salim E. of Nablus (Shechem). His settlement here in the N. instead of with his father in the S. at Beersheba may have been to avoid collision with Esau and to make an independent settlement in the promised land. It seems to have been in a time of his temporary religious declension after his escape from Esau through God's interposition. Undue intercourse with the Canaanites around ended in Dinah's fall and the cruel retribution by Simeon and Levi, which so imperiled his position among the surrounding Canaanites, and which so deeply affected him (Genesis 33:17; Genesis 33:19; Genesis 34; Genesis 49:5-6).
It is true he erected an altar, Εl Εlohe Ιsrael , claiming God as his own "the God of Israel." Still God saw need for calling him to a personal and domestic revival. Jacob understood it so, and called his household to put away their strange gods (namely, Rachel's stolen teraphim and the idols of Shechem, which was spoiled just before), their earrings (used as idolatrous phylacteries), and uncleanness; and then proceeded to perform what he had vowed so long ago, namely, to make the stone pillar God's house (Genesis 28:22). When thus once more he sought peace with God "the terror of God was upon the cities around" (compare Joshua 2:9). They made no attempt such as Jacob feared to avenge the slaughter of the Shechemites. Reaching Bethel once more after 40 years, where he had seen the heavenly ladder, he has a vision of God confirming his name "Israel" and the promise of nations springing from him, and of his seed inheriting the land; He therefore rears again the stone pillar to Εl Shaddai , "God Almighty," the name whereby God had appeared to Abram also when He changed his name to Abraham.
Then followed the birth of Benjamin, which completed the tribal twelve (Genesis 35). The loss of his favorite son Joseph was his heaviest trial, his deceit to Isaac now being repaid by his sons' cruel deceit to himself. Tender affection for wife and children was his characteristic (Genesis 37:33-35; Genesis 42:36; Genesis 45:28). By special revelation at Beersheba (Genesis 46) allaying his fears of going to Egypt, which Isaac had been expressly forbidden to do (Genesis 26:2), he went down. This marks the close of the first stage in the covenant and the beginning of the second stage. Leaving Canaan as a family, Israel returned as a nation.
In Egypt the transformation took place; the civilization, arts, and sciences of Egypt adapted it well for the divine purpose of training Israel in this second stage of their history; Jacob and his family, numbering 70, or as Stephen from Septuagint reads, 75 souls (Acts 7:14), according as Joseph's children only or his grandchildren also are counted. Jacob's sons' wives are not reckoned in the 70 persons, only the unmarried daughter Dinah and a granddaughter. In the number are included, according to Hebrew usage, some who were still "in the loins of their fathers." Benjamin's (then only 24) ten sons were probably born in Egypt subsequently. So Pharez' two sons and Asher's two grandsons by Beriah. In the genealogy those named are the heads of tribes and of famiLies. At 130 Jacob blessed Pharaoh and termed his life a "pilgrimage" of days "few and evil" (47; Hebrews 11:9; Hebrews 11:13). The catalog of ills includes his sufferings:
(1) from Esau,
(2) Laban,
(3) maiming by the Angel,
(4) Dinah's violation and Simeon and Levi's cruelty,
(5) loss of Joseph,
(6) Simeon's imprisonment,
(7) Benjamin's departure,
(8) Rachel's death,
(9) Reuben's incest.
All these seemed "against" him, but all was for him, because God was for him (Romans 8:28; Romans 8:31; Romans 8:37; Genesis 42:36). His true grandeur and sublimity burst forth at his latter end; his triumphant and grateful review of life," God, before whom my fathers did walk, the God which fed me all my life long unto this day, the Angel which redeemed me from all evil, bless the lad!" His blessing Joseph's sons was an act of "faith" (Hebrews 11:21), "leaning upon the top of his staff," an additional fact brought out by Paul (adopting Septuagint), as he worshipped on his bed (Genesis 47:31; Genesis 48:2); the staff symbolized his "pilgrim" spirit seeking the heavenly city (Genesis 32:10). Faith adapted him to receive prophetic insight into the characters and destiny of Ephraim and Manasseh respectively, as also of his other representatives.
He anticipates the future as present, saying "I have given to thee (Joseph's descendants) above thy brethren (Ephraim was the chief tribe of the N.) one portion of that land which I in the person of my descendants (Joshua and Israel) am destined to take with sword and bow from the Amorites" (Genesis 48:22). In Genesis 49:28 his prophecy as to his several sons and the tribes springing from them is called a "blessing" because, though a portion was denunciatory, yet as a whole all were within the covenant of blessing, but with modifications according to their characteristics. What already was gave intimation to the spirit of prophecy in Jacob of what would be. His prophecy of Shiloh's coming in connection with Judah's ceasing to have the sceptre and a lawgiver more accurately defined the Messianic promise than it had been before.
The general promise of "the seed" sprung from Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob he now limits to Judah. His faith in "bowing on his bed" after Joseph promised to bury him in Canaan (Genesis 47:29-30) consisted in his confidence of God's giving Canaan to his seed, and he therefore earnestly desired to be buried there. Epistle to Hebrew omits his last blessing on his 12 sons, because Paul "plucks only the flowers by his way and leaves the whole meadow to his hearers" (Delitzsch). His secret and true life is epitomized in "I have waited for Thy salvation, O Lord" (Genesis 49:18). At 147 he died, and his body was embalmed and after a grand state funeral procession buried with his fathers in the cave of Machpelah before Mamre (Genesis 1).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jacob
JACOB. 1. Son of Isaac and Rebekah. His name is probably an elliptical form of an original Jakob’el , ‘God follows’ ( i.e. ‘rewards’), which has been found both on Babylonian tablets and on the pylons of the temple of Karnak. By the time of Jacob this earlier history of the word was overlooked or forgotten, and the name was understood as meaning ‘one who takes by the heel, and thus tries to trip up or supplant’ ( Genesis 25:26 ; Genesis 27:36 , Hosea 12:3 ). His history is recounted in Genesis 25:21 to Genesis 50:13 , the materials being unequally contributed from three sources. For the details of analysis see Dillmann, Com ., and Driver, LOT [1] 3 , p. 16. P [2] supplies but a brief outline; J [3] and E [4] are closely interwoven, though a degree of original independence is shown by an occasional divergence in tradition, which adds to the credibility of the joint narrative.
Jacob was born in answer to prayer (Genesis 25:21 ), near Beersheba; and the later rivalry between Israel and Edom was thought of as prefigured in the strife of the twins in the womb ( Genesis 25:22 f., 2Es 3:16 ; Esther 6:8-10 Esther 6:8-10 , Romans 9:11-13 ). The differences between the two brothers, each contrasting with the other in character and habit, were marked from the beginning. Jacob grew up a ‘quiet man’ ( Genesis 25:27 RVm [5] ), a shepherd and herdsman. Whilst still at home, he succeeded in overreaching Esau in two ways. He took advantage of Esau’s hunger and heedlessness to secure the birthright, which gave him precedence even during the father’s lifetime ( Genesis 43:33 ), and afterwards a double portion of the patrimony ( Deuteronomy 21:17 ), with probably the domestic priesthood. At a later time, after careful consideration ( Genesis 27:11 ff.), he adopted the device suggested by his mother, and, allaying with ingenious falsehoods ( Genesis 27:20 ) his father’s suspicion, intercepted also his blessing. Isaac was dismayed, but instead of revoking the blessing confirmed it ( Genesis 27:33-37 ), and was not able to remove Esau’s bitterness. In both blessings later political and geographical conditions are reflected. To Jacob is promised Canaan, a well-watered land of fields and vineyards ( Deuteronomy 11:14 ; Deuteronomy 33:28 ), with sovereignty over its peoples, even those who were ‘brethren’ or descended from the same ancestry as Israel ( Genesis 19:37 f., 2 Samuel 8:12 ; 2 Samuel 8:14 ). Esau is consigned to the dry and rocky districts of Idumæa, with a life of war and plunder; but his subjection to Jacob is limited in duration ( 2 Kings 8:22 ), if not also in completeness ( Genesis 27:40 f., which points to the restlessness of Edom).
Of this successful craft on Jacob’s part the natural result on Esau’s was hatred and resentment, to avoid which Jacob left his home to spend a few days (Genesis 27:44 ) with his uncle in Haran. Two different motives are assigned. JE [6] represents Rebekah as pleading with her son his danger from Esau; but P [2] represents her as suggesting to Isaac the danger that Jacob might marry a Hittite wife ( Genesis 27:46 ). The traditions appear on literary grounds to have come from different sources; but there is no real difficulty in the narrative as it stands. Not only are man’s motives often complex; but a woman would be likely to use different pleas to a husband and to a son, and if a mother can counsel her son to yield to his fear, a father would be more alive to the possibility of an outbreak of folly. On his way to Haran, Jacob passed a night at Bethel (cf. Genesis 13:3 f.), and his sleep was, not unnaturally, disturbed by dreams; the cromlechs and stone terraces of the district seemed to arrange themselves into a ladder reaching from earth to heaven, with angels ascending and descending, whilst Jehovah Himself bent over him ( Genesis 28:13 RVm [5] ) with loving assurances. Reminded thus of the watchful providence of God, Jacob’s alarms were transmuted into religions awe. He marked the sanctity of the spot by setting up as a sacred pillar the boulder on which his head had rested, and undertook to dedicate a tithe of all his gains. Thence forward Bethel became a famous sanctuary, and Jacob himself visited it again ( Genesis 35:1 ; cf. Hosea 12:4 ).
Arrived at Haran, Jacob met in his uncle his superior for a time in the art of overreaching. By a ruse Laban secured fourteen years’ service (Genesis 29:27 , Hosea 12:12 , Jdt 8:26 ), to which six years more were added, under an ingenious arrangement in which the exacting uncle was at last outwitted ( Genesis 30:31 ff.). At the end of the term Jacob was the head of a household conspicuous even in those days for its magnitude and prosperity. Quarrels with Laban and his sons ensued, but God is represented as intervening to turn their arbitrary actions ( Genesis 31:7 ff.) to Jacob’s advantage. At length he took flight whilst Laban was engaged in sheep-shearing, and, re-crossing the Euphrates on his way home, reached Gilead. There he was overtaken by Laban, whose exasperation was increased by the fact that his teraphim , or household gods, had been taken away by the fugitives, Rachel’s hope in stealing them being to appropriate the good fortune of her fathers. The dispute that followed was closed by an alliance of friendship, the double covenant being sealed by setting up in commemoration a cairn with a solitary boulder by its side ( Genesis 31:45 f., Genesis 31:52 ), and by sharing a sacrificial meal. Jacob promised to treat Laban’s daughters with special kindness, and both Jacob and Laban undertook to respect the boundary they had agreed upon between the territories of Israel and of the Syrians. Thereupon Laban returned home; and Jacob continued his journey to Canaan, and was met by the angels of God ( Genesis 32:1 ), as if to congratulate and welcome him as he approached the Land of Promise.
Jacobs next problem was to conciliate his brother, who was reported to be advancing against him with a large body of men (Genesis 32:6 ). Three measures were adopted. When a submissive message elicited no response, Jacob in dismay turned to God, though without any expression of regret for the deceit by which he had wronged his brother, and proceeded to divide his party into two companies, in the hope that one at least would escape, and to try to appease Esau with a great gift. The next night came the turning-point in Jacob’s life. Hitherto he had been ambitious, steady of purpose, subject to genuine religious feeling, but given up almost wholly to the use of crooked methods. Now the higher elements in his nature gain the ascendency; and henceforth, though he is no less resourceful and politic, his fear of God ceases to be spoilt by intervening passions or a competing self-confidence. Alone on the banks of the Jabbok ( Wady Zerka ), full of doubt as to the fate that would overtake him, he recognizes at last that his real antagonist is not Esau but God. All his fraud and deceit had been pre-eminently sin against God; and what he needed supremely was not reconciliation with his brother, but the blessing of God. So vivid was the impression, that the entire night seemed to be spent in actual wrestling with a living man. His thigh was sprained in the contest; but since his will was so fixed that he simply would not be refused, the blessing came with the daybreak ( Genesis 49:2-271 ). His name was changed to Israel , which means etymologically ‘God perseveres,’ but was applied to Jacob in the sense of ‘Perseverer with God’ ( Hosea 12:3 f.). And as a name was to a Hebrew a symbol of nature ( Isaiah 1:26 ; Isaiah 61:3 ), its change was a symbol of a changed character; and the supplanter became the one who persevered in putting forth his strength in communion with God, and therefore prevailed. His brother received him cordially ( Isaiah 33:4 ), and offered to escort him during the rest of the journey. The offer was courteously declined, ostensibly because of the difference of pace between the two companies, but probably also with a view to incur no obligation and to risk no rupture. Esau returned to Seir; and Jacob moved on to a suitable site for an encampment, which received the name of Succoth, from the booths that were erected on it ( Isaiah 33:17 ). It was east of the Jordan, and probably not far from the junction with the Jabbok. The valley was suitable for the recuperation of the flocks and herds after so long a journey; and it is probable, from the character of the buildings erected, as well as from the fact that opportunity must be given for Dinah, one of the youngest of the children ( Isaiah 30:21 ), to reach a marriageable age ( Isaiah 34:2 ff.), that Jacob stayed there for several years.
After a residence of uncertain length at Succoth, Jacob crossed the Jordan and advanced to Shechem , where he purchased a plot of ground which became afterwards of special interest. Joshua seems to have regarded it as the limit of his expedition, and there the Law was promulgated and Joseph’s hones were buried ( Joshua 24:25 ; Joshua 24:32 ; cf. Acts 7:16 ); and for a time it was the centre of the confederation of the northern tribes ( 1 Kings 12:1 , 2 Chronicles 10:1 ). Again Jacob’s stay must not be measured by days; for he erected an altar ( 2 Chronicles 33:20 ) and dug a well ( John 4:6 ; John 4:12 ), and was detained by domestic troubles, if not of his own original intention. The troubles began with the seduction or outrage of Dinah; but the narrative that follows is evidently compacted of two traditions. According to the one, the transaction was personal, and involved a fulfilment by Shechem of a certain unspecified condition; according to the other, the entire clan was involved on either side, and the story is that of the danger of the absorption of Israel by the local Canaanites and its avoidance through the interposition of Simeon and Levi. But most of the difficulties disappear on the assumption that Shechem’s marriage was, as was natural, expedited, a delight to himself and generally approved amongst his kindred ( Genesis 34:19 ). That pressing matter being settled, the question of an alliance between the two cians, with the sinister motives that prevailed on either side, would be gradually, perhaps slowly, brought to an issue. There would be time to persuade the Shechemites to consent to be circumcised, and to arrange for the treacherous reprisai. Jacob’s part in the proceedings was confined chiefly to a timid reproach of his sons for entangling his household in peril, to which they replied with the plea that the honour of the family was the first consideration.
The state of feeling aroused by the vengeance executed on Shechem made it desirable for Jacob to continue his journey. He was directed by God to proceed some twenty miles southwards to Bethel. Before starting, due preparations were made for a visit to so sacred a spot. The amulets and images of foreign gods in the possession of his retainers were collected and huried under a terebinth (Genesis 35:4 ; cf. Joshua 24:26 , Judges 9:6 ). The people through whom he passed were smitten with such a panic by the news of what had happened at Shechem as not to interfere with him. Arrived at Bethel, he added an altar ( Genesis 35:7 ) to the monolith he had erected on his previous visit, and received in a theophany, for which in mood he was well prepared, a renewal of the promise of regal prosperity. The additional pillar he set up ( Genesis 35:14 ) was probably a sepulchral stele to the memory of Deborah (cf. Genesis 35:20 ), dedicated with appropriate religious services; unless the verse is out of place in the narrative, and is really J [3] ’s version of what E [4] relates in Genesis 28:18 . From Bethel Jacob led his caravan to Ephrath, a few miles from which place Rachel died in childbirth. This Ephrath was evidently not far from Bethel, and well to the north of Jerusalem ( 1 Samuel 10:2 f., Jeremiah 31:15 ); and therefore the gloss ‘the same is Bethlehem’ must be due to a confusion with the other Ephrath ( Ruth 4:11 , Micah 5:2 ), which was south of Jerusalem. The next stopping-place was the tower of Eder ( Genesis 35:21 ) or ‘the flock’ a generic name for the watch-towers erected to aid in the protection of the flocks from robbers and wild beasts. Genesis 4:8 applies a similar term to the fortified southern spur of Zion. But it cannot he proved that the two allusions coalesce; and actually nothing is known of the site of Jacob’s encampment, except that it was between Ephrath and Hebron. His journey was ended when he reached the last-named place ( Genesis 35:27 ), the home of his fathers, where he met Esau again, and apparently for the last time, at the funeral of Isaac.
From the time of his return to Hebron, Jacob ceases to be the central figure of the Biblical narrative, which thenceforward revolves round Joseph. Among the leading incidents are Joseph’s mission to inquire after his brethren’s welfare, the inconsolable sorrow of the old man on the receipt of what seemed conclusive evidence of Joseph’s death, the despatch of his surviving sons except Benjamin to buy corn in Egypt (cf. Acts 7:12 ff.), the bitterness of the reproach with which he greeted them on their return, and his belated and despairing consent to another expedition as the only alternative to death from famine. The story turns next to Jacob’s delight at the news that Joseph is alive, and to his own journey to Egypt through Beersheha, his early home, where he was encouraged by God in visions of the night ( Genesis 46:1-7 ). In Egypt he was met by Joseph, and, after an interview with the Pharaoh, settled in the pastoral district of Goshen ( Genesis 47:6 ), afterwards known as ‘the land of Rameses’ (from Rameses ii. of the nineteenth dynasty), in the eastern part of the Delta ( Genesis 47:11 ). This migration of Jacob to Egypt was an event of the first magnitude in the history of Israel ( Deuteronomy 26:5 f., Acts 7:14 f.), as a stage in the great providential preparation for Redemption. Jacob lived in Egypt seventeen years ( Genesis 47:28 ), at the close of which, feeling death to be nigh, he extracted a pledge from Joseph to bury him in Canaan, and adopted his two grandsons, placing the younger first in anticipation of the pre-eminence of the tribe that would descend from him ( Genesis 48:19 , Hebrews 11:21 ). To Joseph himself was promised, as a token of special affection, the conquered districts of Shechem on the lower slopes of Gerizim ( Genesis 48:22 , John 4:5 ). Finally, the old man gathered his sons about him, and pronounced upon each in turn a blessing, afterwards wrought up into the elaborate poetical form of 1619112868_54 . The tribes are reviewed in order, and the character of each is sketched in a description of that of its founder. The atmosphere of the poem in regard alike to geography and to history is that of the period of the judges and early kings, when, therefore, the genuine tradition must have taken the form in which it has been preserved. After blessing his sons, Jacob gave them together the directions concerning his funeral which he had given previously to Joseph, and died ( Genesis 49:33 ). His body was embalmed, convoyed to Canaan by a great procession according to the Egyptian custom, and buried in the cave of Machpeiah near Hebron ( Genesis 50:13 ).
Opinion is divided as to the degree to which Jacob has been idealized in the Biblical story. If it be remembered that the narrative is based upon popular oral tradition, and did not receive its present form until long after the time to which it relates, and that an interest in national origins is both natural and distinctly manifested in parts of Genesis, some idealization may readily he conceded. It may be sought in three directions in the attempt to find explanations of existing institutions, in the anticipation of religious conceptions and sentiments that belonged to the narrator’s times, and in the investment of the reputed ancestor with the characteristics of the tribe descended from him. All the conditions are best met by the view that Jacob was a real person, and that the incidents recorded of him are substantially historical. His character, as depicted, is a mixture of evil and good; and his career shows how, by discipline and grace, the better elements came to prevail, and God was enabled to use a faulty man for a great purpose.
2 . Father of Joseph, the husband of Mary ( Matthew 1:15 f.).
R. W. Moss.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Jacob
See Israel
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Jacob
JACOB.—1. According to the genealogical list in Matthew, Jacob (Ἰακώβ) is the father of Joseph the husband of Mary (Matthew 1:15-16).
2. One of the reputed progenitors of the Jewish nation. Apart from the reference to Jacob’s well (πηγὴ τοῦ Ἰακώβ, see next art.), in John 4:6, and his place in the genealogies of Matthew and Luke (Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34), Jacob is mentioned in the Gospels only as one of the three patriarchs (Matthew 8:11 ‘Many shall come from the east and the west; and shall sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob …’ cf. Luke 13:28 f., Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37 ‘I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’). These three were grouped from early times (Exodus 2:24; Exodus 3:6; Exodus 3:15-16, Leviticus 26:42, 1 Kings 18:36, 2 Kings 13:23, Jeremiah 33:26, 1 Chronicles 29:18, 2 Chronicles 30:6), and occupied a place apart in Jewish thought. According to the Rabbis, they alone were entitled to be called אָבוֹח ‘fathers.’ To them was traced not only the origin of the nation, but also the beginning of true worship. As a descendant of these three, a Jew might claim nobility and a special relationship to God. This claim was recognized as וְכוּח אָבוֹח ‘righteousness of the fathers,’ and was based on Exodus 32:13. It was denounced by John the Baptist (see Abraham, and cf. Matthew 3:9, Luke 3:8), and it figured prominently in the conflicts between Jesus and the Pharisees (cf. John 8:33; John 8:37). Apparently in the time of Jesus it was liable to be abused, and on this account later Rabbis refused to lay stress upon it, declaring it no longer valid. In Rabbinic literature, Jacob is recognized as the most important of the three patriarchs (cf. Leviticus 26:42). He prevails with God (Genesis 32:28). He names the sanctuary the house of God (Genesis 28:22), and, in contrast to Abraham the father of Ishmael, and Isaac the father of Esau, Jacob inherits the promise in his children (49).
Literature.—A most suggestive analysis of the character of Jacob, and a full discussion of the problems of the narrative in Genesis, including the names ‘Jacob’ and ‘Israel,’ is given by Driver in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ii. 526–535; cf. also Stanley, Jewish Church, i. pp. 46–66; Gore, Studia Biblica, iii. 37 f.; Ph. Berger, ‘La Signification Historique des Noms des Patriarches Hébreux’ in Mémoires de la Société Linguistique, vi. 150.
G. Gordon Stott.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Arcadelt, Jacob
(c.1514-c.1575) Composer, born Netherlands; died probably Paris. He went to Rome, 1539, where he directed the boys' choir at Saint Peter's, and from 1540-1549 sang in the papal choir. Six books of his madrigals appeared at Venice, 1538-1556, and three books of Masses and other sacred compositions, in Paris, 1557. As a musician of the Netherland school his influence helped to found the 16th-century Italian school.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jacob
Son of Isaac and Rebekah. Though a twin, he is called 'the younger,' being born after Esau. Before the children were born it was said, "the elder shall serve the younger." The promises made by God to Abraham were thus confirmed to Jacob, as they had been to Isaac. When they grew up, Esau became a hunter, whereas Jacob was a peaceful man, dwelling in tents. Isaac loved Esau, and Rebekah loved Jacob. The typical character of these three patriarchs has been described thus: "In general, Abraham is the root of all promise, and the picture of the life of faith; Isaac is a type of the heavenly Man, who receives the church; and Jacob represents Israel as heir of the promises according to the flesh." The difference may be seen by comparing Genesis 22:17 ('stars ' and 'sand'), with Genesis 26:4 ('stars' only), and Genesis 28:14 ('dust of the earth' only).
Though Jacob was heir of the promises, and valued God's blessing in a selfish manner, he sought it not by faith, but tried in an evil and mean way to obtain it: first in buying the birthright when his brother was at the point of death; and then, in obtaining the blessing from his father by lying and deceit: a blessing which would surely have been his in God's way if he had waited: cf. Genesis 48:14-20 .
Jacob had then to become a wanderer; but God was faithful to him, and spoke to him, not openly as to Abraham, but in a dream. The ladder reaching to heaven, and the angels ascending and descending on it, showed that he on earth was the object of heaven's care. The promises as to the land being possessed by his descendants, and all nations being blessed in his Seed, were confirmed to him, with this difference that in connection with the latter promise it says "in thee and in thy seed ," because it includes the earthly blessings to his seed in the millennium. God also said He would keep Jacob wherever he went, and bring him back to the promised land. Jacob called the place Beth-el, saying that it was the house of God, and the gate of heaven. It is figurative of Israel's position, not in heaven, but the 'gate' is theirs. He made a vow that if God would bless him and bring him back in peace, Jehovah should be his God. This was not the language of faith.
Jacob, who had tricked his brother, was treated in a similar way by Laban, and Leah was given to him as wife instead of Rachel, though he had Rachel, the one he loved, afterwards. He had not learnt to trust God, but used subtle ways to increase his possessions; and he also was dealt with in a like manner, having his wages changed 'ten times.' But God was watching over him and bade him return to the land of his fathers; and when Laban pursued after him, God warned him in a dream not to speak to Jacob either good or bad. They made a covenant together, and each went his way.
Immediately afterwards the angels of God met Jacob, and he recognised them as 'God's host.' Then he had to meet Esau, and doubtless conscience smote him, for he was greatly alarmed. He prayed to God for help, yet was full of plans, sending presents to appease his brother, and
dividing his people into two bands, so that if one of them were smitten, the other might escape. When he was alone God took him in hand: a 'man' (called 'the angel' in Hosea 12:4 ) wrestled with him. He was lamed, yet he clung, and in faith said, "I will not let thee go, except thou bless me." He was accounted a victor, and his name was changed from Jacob to ISRAEL: "for as a prince hast thou power with God and with men, and hast prevailed." God did not yet make known His name to him.
God protected him from Esau, as He had from Laban: they kissed each other and wept. He then feigned that he would follow Esau to Seir, but turned aside to Shechem, where he bought the portion of a field, thus settling down for his own ease in the midst of the Canaanites, instead of going to Beth-el, God's house, from whence he had started. His peace was soon disturbed by his daughter Dinah going to see the daughters of the land, and being dishonoured, which was avenged by the slaughter of the Shechemites by his sons Simeon and Levi, bringing Jacob into great fear.
God used this humiliating sorrow to discipline Jacob, and recover him to his true calling. He therefore bade Jacob go to Beth-el, and make an altar there. This disclosed a sad state of things: he had to meet God, and must purify himself, and his household must put away their strange gods. He built an altar and called it, 'El-beth-el;' 'the God of Bethel.' God renewed His promises and revealed Himself to Jacob as GOD ALMIGHTY.
Jacob loved Joseph more than all his other sons, which caused them to hate Joseph; they also hated him for the communications given to him through dreams, and eventually sold him to the Ishmeelites. Again Jacob was dealt with deceitfully; his sons pretended that they had found Joseph's coat stained with blood, and Jacob was greatly distressed. But God was watching and overruling all for good. When Jacob and his household arrived in Egypt, he as a prince of God blessed Pharaoh king of Egypt. He lived in Egypt seventeen years, and died at the good old age of 147.
Jacob at the close of his life rose up to the height of God's thoughts, and by faith blessed the two sons of Joseph, being led of God to cross his hands, and gave the richest blessing to Ephraim. Then, as a true prophet of God, he called all his sons before him, and blessed them, with an appropriate prophecy as to the historical future of each (considered under each of the sons' names). He fell asleep, and his body was embalmed and carried into Palestine to lie with those of Abraham and Isaac.
Jacob being named ISRAEL led to his descendants being called the CHILDREN OF ISRAEL. They are however frequently addressed as 'JACOB,' or 'house of Jacob,' as if they had not preserved the higher character involved in the name of 'Israel,' but must be addressed by the natural name of their forefather, Jacob. Genesis 25 — Genesis 49 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jacob
Jacob (jâ'kob), supplanter. The second son of Isaac and Rebekah. He was born with Esau probably at the well of Lahairoi, about b.c. 1837. His history is related in the latter half of the Book of Genesis. He bought the birthright from his brother Esau, and afterward acquired the blessing intended for Esau by practicing a well-known deceit on Isaac. Genesis 25:21-34; Genesis 27:1-40. Jacob, in mature years, was sent from the family home to avoid his brother, and to seek a wife among his kindred in Padanaram. As he passed through Bethel, God appeared to him. After the lapse of 21 years he returned from Padan-aram with two wives, two concubines, eleven sons and a daughter, and large property. He escaped from the angry pursuit of Laban, from a meeting with Esau, and from the vengeance of the Canaanites provoked by the murder of Shechem; and in each of these three emergencies he was aided and strengthened by the interposition of God, and in sign of the grace won by a night of wrestling with God his name was changed at Jabbok into Israel. Deborah and Rachel died before he reached Hebron; Joseph, the favorite son of Jacob, was sold into Egypt eleven years before the death of Isaac; and Jacob had probably reached his 130th year when he went thither. He was presented to Pharaoh and dwelt for 17 years in Rameses and Goshen, and died in his 147th year. His body was embalmed, carried with great care and pomp into the land of Canaan, and deposited with his fathers, and his wife Leah, in the cave of Machpelah. Gen. chs. 27 to 50. The example of Jacob is quoted by the first and the last of the minor prophets. Besides the frequent mention of his name in conjunction with the names of the other two patriarchs, there are distinct references to the events in the life of Jacob in four books of the New Testament—John 1:51; John 4:5; John 4:12; Acts 7:12-15; Romans 9:11-13; Hebrews 11:21; Hebrews 12:16.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jacob (2)
Jacob's Well. See Sychar.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Baumgartner, Gallus Jacob
(1797-1869) Statesman; born Altstätten, Switzerland; died Saint Gall. As chief magistrate of Saint Gall he labored to reorganize the Swiss confederation somewhat on the lines of the United States. Influenced by Josephinism, he first advocated state control of the Church, but the plundering of the monasteries in 1841 by his political associates changed his views and he came over to the policy of his former opponents. Through his efforts was erected the See of Saint Gall. Retiring from politics in 1864 he devoted himself to local history and wrote a work on Saint Gall.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Jacob
(a) (1653-1506 BCE) Third of the Patriarchs, son of Rebecca and Isaac. A studious man, he incurred his twin brother Esau’s wrath when he deceptively received Isaac’s blessings. He fled to Padan Aram where he married Leah and Rachel. He fathered the Twelve Tribes and Dinah. He returned to Canaan but lived his final years in Egypt, where he went to be with his son Joseph, viceroy of Egypt. He’s buried in the Cave of Machpelah in Hebron. (b) A common Jewish name.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Jacob
Genesis 25:26 (c) This is a type, throughout his life, of the Christian who, though he fails and falls, quickly builds an altar, brings the Lamb of GOD by faith, and hides under Calvary and the precious blood for every sin. Though Jacob often wandered, he returned to GOD at once. He wanted to know GOD. He wrestled during the season with GOD. He gave liberally to GOD. GOD is "the God of Jacob." (See also Genesis 49:24, and other places).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Albright, Jacob
A religious movement of the German community in Pennsylvania which was organized in 1803 under the leadership of Jacob Albright. Arminian in doctrine, they closely adhere to the articles of faith of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Their government is congregational. Foreign missionary work is carried on in Japan, China, Germany, Switzerland, Russia, and Canada.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Jacob
That supplants
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jacob
The ever-memorable name of the ever-memorable person, concerning whom it hath pleased God the Holy Ghost to say so much throughout the whole Scripture. His name signifies a supplanter; but after the memorable scene at Jabbock, when Jacob wrestled with the angel and pevailed, the Lord himself changed his name to Israel, a prince. (See Genesis 32:27-28) For his history I refer to the book of Genesis, from Genesis 15:1-21 to the end.
Whyte's Dictionary of Bible Characters - Jacob
BE SURE YOUR SIN WILL FIND YOU OUT
THERE was no Old Testament saint of them all who, first and last, saw more of the favour and forgiveness of God than Jacob. And yet, with all that, the great sins of Jacob's youth and the great sinfulness of Jacob's heart both found him out every day he lived down to the day of his death. Of Jacob, and of Rebekah his mother, it may truly be said, Thou, O Lord, wast a God that forgavest them, though Thou tookest vengeance on their inventions. It is part of Moses' subtlety, as Philo calls it, to tell us how much more Rebekah loved Jacob than she loved Esau, whom Isaac loved; and then, to go on to give us two examples, and two examples only, of that love. The first example of Rebekah's motherly love is seen when she dresses up Jacob in Esau's clothes, and drills him into the very tones of Esau's voice, as also into all Esau's hearty huntsman's ways in the house, till she has rehearsed her favourite son Jacob into a finished and perfect supplanter. And then, her second love is seen in the terror and in the haste with which she ships off Jacob to Haran lest Esau in his revenge should send one of his shafts through the supplanter's heart. All that stands in Moses, and much more like that, both in and after Moses; and yet here are we, down in the days of the New Testament, still dressing up our daughters, and emigrating our sons, as if we had been the first fathers and mothers in all the world to whom God had said, I will give thee thy wages.
Esau had been all up and down the whole country round about a hundred times. That bold and cunning hunter would be days and weeks away from home when the season came round for the venison to be on the hills. But Jacob had never been out of sight of his mother's tent-pole till now. The fugitive spent his first night in a herdman's hut, and his second night in the hut of a friendly native of the land; but after that all his nights were spent in the open air. And the first of Jacob's open-air nights is a night to be remembered, as we say. Poor Jacob! This is the beginning of the visitation of the iniquity of the fathers upon the children to the third and fourth generation. A Syrian ready to perish, were it not that man's extremity is God's opportunity. And were it not that Jacob, and all his true seed, are known to themselves and to us by the hundred and sixteenth psalm: 'The sorrows of death compassed me, and the pains of hell gat hold upon me; I found trouble and sorrow. I was brought low, and He helped me.' And he took of the stones of that place and put them for his pillows, and lav down in that place to sleep. And he dreamed. God spake in divers manners in those early days. Jacob dreamed that night because Rebekah had neither a Bible nor a Pilgrim's Progress, nor a hymn-book, to put into his scrip beside his bread and his dates and his oil. No; nor, worst of all, a good example. Still, she may forget her sucking child that she should not have compassion on the son of her womb, yet will God not forget him. And thus it was that Jacob dreamed as he did dream his first night away from home. How dreadful is this place! Jacob had been taught to feel and to say how dreadful was that place where his father's altar was built; and those places where God had come down to talk with Adam, and Abel, and Noah, and Abraham, and Hagar. But Jacob had no idea that God was at Luz, or would ever come down to talk with him there. And, then, more than that, there was this. God's presence, God's holiness, but above all God's great grace, will always make the place dreadful to a great sinner. Dreadful, with a solemnising, awful, overwhelming dread that there is no other word for. How dreadful did all Jacob's life of sin look at Luz! He had had his own thoughts about himself, and about his mother, and about his father, and about his brother all these last three days across the wilderness. But it was not till that morning at Luz that Jacob learned to say: Against Thee, Thee only, have I sinned! How dreadful did his past life look now, as it lay naked and open under that gate of heaven and that shining ladder! The lasting lesson of that best of all mornings to Jacob is memorably preserved to us and to our children in our Second Paraphrase; and as we sing or say to God that noble piece we still reap into our own hearts the first sheaf out of the rich harvest of Jacob's life. We always read that chapter and sing that paraphrase on the Sabbath night before we emigrate another of the sons of Jacob; but, alas! too late; for by that time our family worship, like Isaae's that night, is but locking the stable door after the steed is stolen.
What a down-come it was from the covenant-heights of Bethel to the cattle-troughs of Haran! What a cruel fall from the company of ascending and descending angels into the clutches of a finished rogue like Laban! Jacob had been all but carried up of angels from Bethel and taken into an inheritance incorruptible and undefiled; but, instead of that, he is taken down to Padan-arain, where he is cheated out of his wages, and cheated out of his wife, and cheated, and cheated, and cheated again, ten times cheated, and that too by his own mother's brother, till cheating came out of Jacob's nostrils, and stank in his eyes, and became hateful as hell to Jacob's heart. We say that Greek sometimes meets Greek. We say that diamond sometimes cuts diamond. We calculate the length of handle his spoon would need to have who sups with the devil. We speak about the seller being sold. And we quote David to the effect that to the froward God will show Himself froward; and Paul to the same effect, that as a man soweth so shall he reap. Yes. Other people had been cheating their fathers and their brothers all these years as well as Rebekah and Jacob. Other little boys had been taking prizes in the devil's sly school besides Rebekah's favourite son. Laban, Rebekah's brother, and bone of her bone, had been making as pious speeches at Bethuel's blind bedside as ever Jacob made at Isaac's. And now that the actors are all ready, and the stage is all built, and the scenery is all hung up, all the world is invited in to see the serio-comedy of the Syrian biter bit, or Rebekah's poor lost sheep shorn to the bone by the steely shears of Shylock her brother. 'What is this that thou hast done unto me? Wherefore hast thou so beguiled me?'-Jacob appealed and remonstrated in his sweet, injured, salad innocence. Jacob had never seen or heard the like of it in his country. It shocked terribly and irrecoverably Jacob's inborn sense of right and wrong; it almost shook down Jacob's whole faith in the God of Bethel. And so still. We never see what wickedness thore is in lies, and treachery, and cheatery, and injury of all kinds till we are cheated, and lied against and injured. ourselves. We will sit all our days and speak against our brother till some one comes and reports to us what they say who sit and speak against us. And then the whole blackness and utter abominableness of detraction and calumny and slander breaks out upon us, till we cut out our tongue rather than ever again so employ it. It was Jacob's salvation that he fell into the hands of that cruel land-shark, his uncle Laban. Jacob's salvation somewhat nearer now than when he believed at Bethel; but, all the same, what is bred in the bone is not got clean rid of in a day. It were laughable to a degree, if it were not so sad, to see Jacob, after all his smart, still peeling the stakes of poplar, and chestnut, and hazel where the cattle came to drink, till it came about that all the feebler births in the cattle-pens were Laban's and all the stronger were Jacob's. And till Laban had to give it up and to confess himself completely outwitted; and till he piously and affectionately proposed a covenant at Mizpah, saying, This pillar be witness that I will not pass over it to harm thee, nor thou to harm me.
Before we leave Laban and his enfeebled cattle, we take some excellent lessons away with us. And one of those excellent lessons is a lesson in the most perfect English style. The whole Laban episode is rich in gems of composition and expression. The Master of expression himself falls far below Moses more than once in these chapters. The prince in the Tempest is wine and water compared with Jacob. Even Burns has it better than Shakespeare:
The man that lo'es his mistress weelNae travel makes him weary.But this is still better than either: 'Jacob served seven years for Rachel, and they seemed to him but a few days, for the love he had to her.' And there are other gems of the pen scattered lavishly about this same passage quite as good as that. Only, we are in quest tonight of better gems than gems of English, beautiful and rare and precious as they are.
We may emigrate our sons to the gold-fields of South Africa, or to the cattle-ranches of America or Australia, and they may make such a fortune there as to be able to come home after we are no more, and build in the West-end, and educate their children in this capital of learning. But as long as Esau lives, as long as that man or that woman lives whom our son supplanted so long ago, he will build his house over a volcano, and will travel home to it with a trembling heart. And Jacob's heart often trembled and often stood still all the way of the wilderness from Haran to the Jabbok. Your son will send home secret instructions to some old class-fellow who is now at the top of the law to effect a peace, if not forgiveness and reconciliation, at any price. And so did Jacob. Jacob took a great herd of Laban's whitest cattle: goats, and camels, and kine, and everything he could think of, and sent herd after herd on beforehand so as to quench the embers of his brother's wrath. We have a like instance in that Highlander who, on hearing Robert Bruce inveighing in the High Kirk against those sins of which he knew himself to have been guilty, came up to the great preacher and said, 'I'se gie thee twenty cows to gree God and me.' But, to Jacob's consternation, Esau never looked at those lowing, snow-white herds, but put on his armour in silence, and came posting north at the head of four hundred men. When Jacob's scouts returned and told him alt that, he was in absolute desperation. Had he been alone it would have been easy. But, with all these women and children, and with all these cattle and other encumbrances, was there ever a man taken in such a cruel trap! But he had still one whole night to count on before Esau could be at the Jabbok. And here is his prayer that night, preserved word for word to us his sons; his instant prayer after the scouts came back: 'l am not worthy of the least of all the mercies, and of all the truth, which Thou hast showed to Thy servant: for with my staff I passed over this Jordan; and now I am become these twl bands. Deliver me, I pray Thee, from the hand of my brother Esau, lest he smite me, and the women with.the children.' That is a fine sentence about the staff. It is points like that in a prayer and in a psalm that touch and take captive both God and man. That staff at the first had been a birthday gift from his twin-brother Esau. The cunning hunter had cut it out of the wood one day, and had carried home his snares and his venison slung over it on his shoulder. When he saw that Jacob envied it, Esau smoothed the stout branch better, and straightened it out, and carved E. and J. into a true lover's knot under the handle of it, and laid it beside Jacob's lentil dish on the morning of their double birthday. That staff felt like so much lead when Jacob took it into his hand to run from home; but he would need it, and, though it sometimes burned his hand to a red-hot cinder, somehow he never could throw it away. That staff stood sentinel over its dreaming master at Bethel, and with its help he waded the Jordan, and sprang the Jabbok, till he laid it down to water Rachel's sheep in Padan-arain. Jacob and his staff were a perfect proverb in Padan-aram. They were never found separated. Jacob never felt alone when he had his staff in his hand; and many a time he was overheard talking to it, and it to him. And now, at the return to Jabbok, with that staff he made his prayer and praise to God, as if it had been some sacred instrument of a priest which had power with God. And, no doubt, we all have a staff, or a pen, or a ring, or book, or a Bible, or something or other that has gone with us through all our banishments, migrations, ups and downs in life, and when our hearts are soft and our prayers come upon us we again take that old companion by the hand. You will have a blue old cloak, like Newman's, or a. brown old plaid that you bought while yet you were in your mother's house,-I have one,-and you feel sure that you could pit that old plaid with a story hanging at every single thrum and tassel of it, against Jacob's so-travelled staff any day. You will give orders that that old wrap is to be your winding-sheet; and you will wear it, with all its memories of judgment and of mercy, under your wedding garment in heaven. 'With my staff I passed over this Jordan, and now I am become these two bands.'
And he took them and sent them over the brook, and sent over all that he had. And when the night fell upon him Jacob was left alone. But now, who can tell how near Esau may be by this time! That cunning, cruel, revengeful man! Till, as the darkness fell so obscure, every plunge of the Jabbok, and every roar of the storm, made Jacob feel the smell of Esau's coat and the blow of his hairy hand. Whether in the body, Jacob to the day of his death could never tell; or whether out of the body, Jacob could never tell; but such a night of terror and of battle no other man ever spent. It was Esau, and it was not Esau. It was God, and it was not God. It was both God and Esau; till Jacob to the day of his death could never tell Who the terrible Wrestler really was Just before the morning broke, with one last wrench Jacob was left halt and lame for life. When, as if from the open heaven, he was baptized of the gracious Wrestler into a new name. For as He departed and the morning broke, the mysterious Han said to Jacob as he lay prostrate at His feet, Thou art henceforth no longer Jacob, but Israel, for as a prince thou hast power with God and with men, and hast prevailed.
Jacob's new name is a great surprise to us. We would never have called Jacob a prince. There are many other names and titles and epithets we would have given to this overtaken son of Isaac and Rebekah; this broken brother of Esau, whose sins have so found him out. But God proclaims Jacob ever after the Jabbok none of our names, but a prince. And for this reason. Prayer, such prayer as Jacob prayed that night, is the princeliest act any man can possibly perform. The noblest, the grandest, the boldest, the most magnificent act a human being can perform on this earth is to pray; to pray, that is, as Jacob prayed at Peniel. No man is a prince with God all at once; no, nor after many years. Few men-one here and another there-ever come to any princeliness at all, either in their prayers or in anything else. Jacob had twenty years, and more, of sin and of sorrow, of remorse and of repentance, of gratitude for such a miraculous past, and of beaten-back effort after a better life, and then, to crown all, he had that unparalleled night of fear and prayer at the Jabbok; a night's work such that even the Bible has nothing else like it till our Lord's night in Gethsemane,-and it is only after all that, and far more than Moses with all his honesty and all his subtlety has told us,-it is only then that Jacob is proclaimed of God a prince with God. You must understand that prayer, to be called prayer, is not what you hear people all about you calling prayer. That is not prayer. Jacob's thigh was out of joint, and our Lord's sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling to the ground. Prayer is colossal work. There were giants in those days. Prayer takes all our heart, and all our soul, and all our strength, and all our mind, and all our life, sleeping and waking. Prayer is the princeliest, the noblest, the most unearthly act on this side heaven. Only pray, then; only Pray aright, and enough, and it will change your whole nature as it changed Jacob's. Till, from the meanest, the falsest, the most treacherous, the most deceitful, the most found-out, and the most miserable of men, it will make you also a very prince with God and with men. Happy is he that hath the God of Jacob for his help!
Webster's Dictionary - Jacob
(n.) A Hebrew patriarch (son of Isaac, and ancestor of the Jews), who in a vision saw a ladder reaching up to heaven (Gen. xxviii. 12); - also called Israel.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jacob
Son of Isaac and Rebekah. Though a twin, he is called 'the younger,' being born after Esau. Before the children were born it was said, "the elder shall serve the younger." The promises made by God to Abraham were thus confirmed to Jacob, as they had been to Isaac. When they grew up, Esau became a hunter, whereas Jacob was a peaceful man, dwelling in tents. Isaac loved Esau, and Rebekah loved Jacob. The typical character of these three patriarchs has been described thus: "In general, Abraham is the root of all promise, and the picture of the life of faith; Isaac is a type of the heavenly Man, who receives the church; and Jacob represents Israel as heir of the promises according to the flesh." The difference may be seen by comparing Genesis 22:17 ('stars ' and 'sand'), with Genesis 26:4 ('stars' only), and Genesis 28:14 ('dust of the earth' only).
Though Jacob was heir of the promises, and valued God's blessing in a selfish manner, he sought it not by faith, but tried in an evil and mean way to obtain it: first in buying the birthright when his brother was at the point of death; and then, in obtaining the blessing from his father by lying and deceit: a blessing which would surely have been his in God's way if he had waited: cf. Genesis 48:14-20 .
Jacob had then to become a wanderer; but God was faithful to him, and spoke to him, not openly as to Abraham, but in a dream. The ladder reaching to heaven, and the angels ascending and descending on it, showed that he on earth was the object of heaven's care. The promises as to the land being possessed by his descendants, and all nations being blessed in his Seed, were confirmed to him, with this difference that in connection with the latter promise it says "in thee and in thy seed ," because it includes the earthly blessings to his seed in the millennium. God also said He would keep Jacob wherever he went, and bring him back to the promised land. Jacob called the place Beth-el, saying that it was the house of God, and the gate of heaven. It is figurative of Israel's position, not in heaven, but the 'gate' is theirs. He made a vow that if God would bless him and bring him back in peace, Jehovah should be his God. This was not the language of faith.
Jacob, who had tricked his brother, was treated in a similar way by Laban, and Leah was given to him as wife instead of Rachel, though he had Rachel, the one he loved, afterwards. He had not learnt to trust God, but used subtle ways to increase his possessions; and he also was dealt with in a like manner, having his wages changed 'ten times.' But God was watching over him and bade him return to the land of his fathers; and when Laban pursued after him, God warned him in a dream not to speak to Jacob either good or bad. They made a covenant together, and each went his way.
Immediately afterwards the angels of God met Jacob, and he recognised them as 'God's host.' Then he had to meet Esau, and doubtless conscience smote him, for he was greatly alarmed. He prayed to God for help, yet was full of plans, sending presents to appease his brother, and
dividing his people into two bands, so that if one of them were smitten, the other might escape. When he was alone God took him in hand: a 'man' (called 'the angel' in Hosea 12:4 ) wrestled with him. He was lamed, yet he clung, and in faith said, "I will not let thee go, except thou bless me." He was accounted a victor, and his name was changed from Jacob to ISRAEL: "for as a prince hast thou power with God and with men, and hast prevailed." God did not yet make known His name to him.
God protected him from Esau, as He had from Laban: they kissed each other and wept. He then feigned that he would follow Esau to Seir, but turned aside to Shechem, where he bought the portion of a field, thus settling down for his own ease in the midst of the Canaanites, instead of going to Beth-el, God's house, from whence he had started. His peace was soon disturbed by his daughter Dinah going to see the daughters of the land, and being dishonoured, which was avenged by the slaughter of the Shechemites by his sons Simeon and Levi, bringing Jacob into great fear.
God used this humiliating sorrow to discipline Jacob, and recover him to his true calling. He therefore bade Jacob go to Beth-el, and make an altar there. This disclosed a sad state of things: he had to meet God, and must purify himself, and his household must put away their strange gods. He built an altar and called it, 'El-beth-el;' 'the God of Bethel.' God renewed His promises and revealed Himself to Jacob as GOD ALMIGHTY.
Jacob loved Joseph more than all his other sons, which caused them to hate Joseph; they also hated him for the communications given to him through dreams, and eventually sold him to the Ishmeelites. Again Jacob was dealt with deceitfully; his sons pretended that they had found Joseph's coat stained with blood, and Jacob was greatly distressed. But God was watching and overruling all for good. When Jacob and his household arrived in Egypt, he as a prince of God blessed Pharaoh king of Egypt. He lived in Egypt seventeen years, and died at the good old age of 147.
Jacob at the close of his life rose up to the height of God's thoughts, and by faith blessed the two sons of Joseph, being led of God to cross his hands, and gave the richest blessing to Ephraim. Then, as a true prophet of God, he called all his sons before him, and blessed them, with an appropriate prophecy as to the historical future of each (considered under each of the sons' names). He fell asleep, and his body was embalmed and carried into Palestine to lie with those of Abraham and Isaac.
Jacob being named ISRAEL led to his descendants being called the CHILDREN OF ISRAEL. They are however frequently addressed as 'JACOB,' or 'house of Jacob,' as if they had not preserved the higher character involved in the name of 'Israel,' but must be addressed by the natural name of their forefather, Jacob. Genesis 25 — Genesis 49 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jacob
the son of Isaac and Rebekah. He was the younger brother of Esau, and a twin. It was observed, that at his birth he held his brother Esau's heel, and for this reason was called Jacob, Genesis 25:26 , which signifies "he supplanted." Jacob was of a meek and peaceable temper, and loved a quiet pastoral life; whereas Esau was of a fierce and turbulent nature, and was fond of hunting. Isaac had a particular fondness for Esau; but Rebekah was more attached to Jacob. The manner in which Jacob purchased his brother's birthright for a mess of pottage, and supplanted him by obtaining Isaac's blessing, is already referred to in the article ESAU.
The events of the interesting and chequered life of Jacob are so plainly and consecutively narrated by Moses, that they are familiar to all; but upon some of them a few remarks may be useful. As to the purchase of the birthright, Jacob appears to have been innocent so far as any guile on his part, or real necessity from hunger on the part of Esau, is involved in the question; but his obtaining the ratification of this by the blessing of Isaac though agreeable, indeed, to the purpose of God, that the elder should serve the younger, was blamable as to the means employed. The remarks of Dr. Hales on this transaction implicate Isaac also:—Thirty-seven years after, when Jacob was seventy-seven years old, according to Abulfaragi, and Isaac a hundred and thirty-seven, when he was old, and his sight had failed, and he expected soon to die, his partiality for Esau led him to attempt to set aside the oracle, and the cession of Esau's birthright to Jacob, by conferring on him the blessing of Abraham, in reward for bringing him savoury venison to eat, before his death. In this design, however, he was disappointed by the artifice of Rebekah, who dressed her favourite Jacob in his brother's clothes, and made him personate Esau, and thereby surreptitiously obtained for him the blessing: "Let people serve thee, and nations bow down to thee: be lord over thy brethren, and let thy mother's sons bow down to thee: cursed be every one that curseth thee, and blessed be he that blesseth thee," Genesis 27:1-29 . It is remarkable that, notwithstanding the agitation of Isaac, when "he trembled very exceedingly," at the detection of the fraud, he did not attempt to rescind the blessing, nor transfer it to Esau; but, on the contrary, confirmed it on Jacob: "Yea, and he shall be blessed." His wishes were overruled and controlled by that higher power which he vainly endeavoured to counteract; and that he spoke as the Spirit gave him utterance, appears from his prediction respecting Esau's family: "And it shall come to pass, when thou shalt have the dominion, that thou shalt break thy brother's yoke from off thy neck," Genesis 27:40 ; which was fulfilled in the days of Jehoram, king of Judah, when "the Edomites revolted from under the dominion of Judah, and made themselves a king unto this day," 2 Chronicles 21:8-10 .
According to this view, all the parties were more or less culpable; Isaac, for endeavouring to set aside the oracle which had been pronounced in favour of his younger son; but of which he might have an obscure conception; Esau, for wishing to deprive his brother of the blessing which he had himself relinquished; and Rebekah and Jacob, for securing it by fraudulent means, not trusting wholly in the Lord. That their principal object, however, was the spiritual part of the blessing, and not the temporal, was shown by the event. For Jacob afterward reverenced Esau as his elder brother, and insisted on Esau's accepting a present from his hand in token of submission Genesis 33:3-15 . Esau also appears to have possessed himself of his father's property during Jacob's long exile. But though the intention of Rebekah and Jacob might have been free from worldly or mercenary motives, they ought not to have done evil that good might come. And they were both severely punished in this life for their fraud, which destroyed the peace of the family, and planted a mortal enmity in the breast of Esau against his brother: "Is he not rightly named Jacob?" a supplanter; "for he hath supplanted me these two times: he took away my birthright, and lo, now he hath taken away my blessing. The days of mourning for my father are at hand; then will I slay my brother Jacob,"
Genesis 27:36-41 . And there can be little doubt of his intention of executing his threat, when he came to meet him on his return, with such an armed force as strongly alarmed Jacob's fears, had not God changed the spirit of Esau into mildness, so that "he ran to meet Jacob, and fell on his neck, and they wept," Genesis 33:4 . Rebekah, also, was deprived of the society of her darling son, whom "she sent away for one year," as she fondly imagined, "until his brother's fury should turn away," Genesis 27:42-44 ; but whom she saw no more; for she died during his long exile of twenty years, though Isaac survived, Genesis 35:27 . Thus was "she pierced through with many sorrows." Jacob, also, had abundant reason to say, "Few and evil have been the days of the years of my pilgrimage,"
Genesis 47:9 . Though he had the consolation of having the blessing of Abraham voluntarily renewed to him by his father, before he was forced to fly from his brother's fury, Genesis 28:1-4 , and had the satisfaction of obeying his parents in going to Padanaram, or Charran, in quest of a wife of his own kindred, Genesis 28:7 ; yet he set out on a long and perilous journey of six hundred miles and upward, through barren and inhospitable regions, unattended and unprovided, like a pilgrim, indeed, with only his staff in his hand Genesis 32:10 . And though he was supported with the assurance of the divine protection, and the renewal of the blessing of Abraham by God himself, in his remarkable vision at Bethel, and solemnly devoted himself to his service, wishing only for food and raiment, and vowing to profess the worship of God, and pay tithe unto him should he return back in peace, Genesis 28:10-22 ; yet he was forced to engage in a tedious and thankless servitude of seven years, at first for Rachel, with Laban, who retaliated upon him the imposition he had practised on his own father; and substituted Leah, whom he hated, for Rachel, whom he loved; and thereby compelled him to serve seven years more; and changed his wages several times during the remainder of his whole servitude of twenty years; in the course of which, as he pathetically complained, "the drought consumed him by day, and the frost by night, and the sleep departed from his eyes," in watching Laban's flocks, Genesis 31:40 ; and at last he was forced to steal away, and was only protected from Laban's vengeance, as afterward from Esau's, by divine interposition. Add to these his domestic troubles and misfortunes; the impatience of his favourite wife, "Give me children, or I die;" her death in bearing her second son, Benjamin; the rape of his daughter Dinah; the perfidy and cruelty of her brothers, Simeon and Levi, to the Shechemites; the misbehaviour of Reuben; the supposed death of Joseph, his favourite and most deserving son:—these were, all together, sufficient to have brought down his gray hairs with sorrow to the grave, had he not been divinely supported and encouraged throughout the whole of his pilgrimage. For the circumstances which led Jacob into Egypt, see JOSEPH .
When Jacob, at the invitation of Joseph, went down to Egypt, Joseph introduced his father to his royal master; and the patriarch, in his priestly character, blessed Pharaoh, and supplicated the divine favour for the king. The venerable appearance and the pious demeanour of Jacob led the monarch to inquire his years; to which he replied, "The days of the years of my pilgrimage are a hundred and thirty years: few and evil have the days of the years of my life been; and I have not attained unto the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage." This answer of the patriarch was not the language of discontent, but the solemn reflection of a man who had experienced a large share of trouble, and who knew that the whole of human life is indeed but "a vain show," Genesis 47:1-10 .
Jacob spent the remainder of his days in tranquillity and prosperity, enjoying the society of his beloved child seventeen years. The close of his life was a happy calm, after a stormy voyage. The patriarch, perceiving that his dissolution was near, sent for Joseph, and bound him by a solemn promise to bury him with his fathers in Canaan. Shortly after this, Jacob was taken ill, and it being reported to Joseph, he hastened to the bedside of his father, taking with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim. On hearing that his son was come, Jacob exerted all his strength, and sat up in his bed to receive him, and to impart that blessing which, in the spirit of prophecy, he was commissioned to bequeath. He next blessed the infant children of Joseph; but, as he placed his hands upon their heads, he crossed them, putting his right upon Ephraim the younger, and his left upon Manasseh the elder. Joseph wished to correct the mistake of his father, but Jacob persisted, being guided by a divine impulse; and he gave to each of the lads a portion in Israel, at the same time declaring that the younger should be greater than the elder, Genesis 48:22 . When this interview was ended, Jacob caused all his sons to assemble round his dying bed, that he might inform them what would befall them in the last days, Genesis 49:1-2 . Of all the predictions which he pronounced with his expiring breath, the most remarkable and the most interesting is that relating to Judah: "The sceptre shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until Shiloh come; and unto him shall the gathering of the people be," Genesis 49:10 . One grand personage was in the mind of the patriarch, as it had been in the contemplation of his predecessors, even the illustrious Deliverer who should arise in after ages to redeem his people, and bring salvation to the human race. The promised Seed was the constant object of faithful expectation; and all the patriarchal ordinances, institutions, and predictions, had an allusion, positive or incidental, to the Messiah. Hitherto the promise was confined generally to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, that from them the glorious blessing should arise; but now, under the divine direction, the dying patriarch fortels in what tribe, and at what period, the great Restorer shall come. The sovereign authority was to continue in the possession of Judah, till from that tribe Shiloh should appear, and then the royalty must cease. This was fulfilled; for the tribe of Judah possessed legislative power till the time of Christ, and from that period the Jewish people have neither had dominion nor priesthood. Jesus Christ, therefore, must either be the true Shiloh, or the prophecy has failed; for the Jews cannot prove that they have had any thing like temporal power since his crucifixion. When they were so clamorous for the execution of Jesus, and Pilate told them to take the law into their own hands, they shrunk fearfully from the proposal, and acknowledged their slavish state by saying, "It is not lawful for us to put any man to death," John 18:31 . Here, then, we have a glorious proof of the veracity of Scripture, and an incontestible evidence of the truth of our religion.
When Jacob had finished blessing his sons, he charged them to bury him in the cave of Machpelah, with Abraham and Isaac, and, "gathering his feet into the bed, he yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his people,"
Genesis 49:33 . Joseph, having closed the eyes of his father, and wept over him, commanded the physicians to embalm the body. After a general mourning of seventy days, he solicited the king's permission to go with the remains of Jacob into Canaan, to which Pharaoh consented; and with Joseph went up all the state officers and principal nobility of Egypt, so that when they came to the place of interment, the Canaanites were astonished, and said, "This is a grievous mourning to the Egyptians," Genesis 50:1-11 .
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jacob
Son of Isaac and Rebekah, and twin-brother to Esau. As at his birth he held his brother's heel, he was called Jacob, that is, the heelholder, one who comes behind and catches the heel of his adversary, a supplanter, Genesis 25:26 . This was a king of predictive intimation of his future conduct in life. Jacob was meek and peaceable, living a shepherd life at home. Esau was more turbulent and fierce, and passionately fond of hunting. Isaac was partial to Esau, Rebekah to Jacob. Jacob having taken advantage of his brother's absence and his father's infirmity to obtain the blessing of the birthright, or primogeniture, was compelled to fly into Mesopotamia to avoid the consequences of his brother's wrath, Genesis 27:1-28:22 . On his journey the Lord appeared to him in a dream, (see Genesis 28:10 , etc. His subsequent days, which he calls "few and evil," were clouded with many sorrows, yet amid them all he was sustained by the care and favor of God. On his solitary journey of six hundred miles into Mesopotamia, and during the toils and injuries of this twenty years' service with Laban, God still prospered him, and on his return to the land of promise inclined the hostile spirits of Laban and of Esau to peace. On the border of Canaan the angels of God met him, and the God of angels wrestled with him, yielded him the blessing, and gave him the honored name of Israel. But sore trials awaited him: his mother was no more; his sister-wives imbittered his life with their jealousies; his children Dinah, Simeon, Levi and Reuben filled him with grief and shame; his beloved Rachel and his father were removed by death; Joseph his favorite son he had given up as slain by wild beasts; and the loss of Benjamin threatened to bring his gray hairs with sorrow to the grave. But the sunset of his life was majestically calm and bright. For seventeen years, he enjoyed in the land of Goshen a serene happiness: he gave a dying blessing in Jehovah's name to his assembled sons; visions of their future prosperity rose before his eyes, especially the long line of the royal race of Judah, culminating in the glorious kingdom of Genesis 24:1-50 . His name is found in the New Testament, illustrating the sovereignty of God and the power of faith, Romans 9:13 Hebrews 11:9,21 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Jacob
One who follows on another's heels; supplanter, (Genesis 25:26 ; 27:36 ; Hosea 12:2-4 ), the second born of the twin sons of Isaac by Rebekah. He was born probably at Lahai-roi, when his father was fifty-nine and Abraham one hundred and fifty-nine years old. Like his father, he was of a quiet and gentle disposition, and when he grew up followed the life of a shepherd, while his brother Esau became an enterprising hunter. His dealing with Esau, however, showed much mean selfishness and cunning (Genesis 25:29-34 ). When Isaac was about 160 years of age, Jacob and his mother conspired to deceive the aged patriarch (Genesis 27 ), with the view of procuring the transfer of the birthright to himself. The birthright secured to him who possessed it (1) superior rank in his family (Genesis 49:3 ); (2) a double portion of the paternal inheritance (Deuteronomy 21:17 ); (3) the priestly office in the family (Numbers 8:17-19 ); and (4) the promise of the See d in which all nations of the earth were to be blessed (Genesis 22:18 ).
Soon after his acquisition of his father's blessing (Genesis 27 ), Jacob became conscious of his guilt; and afraid of the anger of Esau, at the suggestion of Rebekah Isaac sent him away to Haran, 400 miles or more, to find a wife among his cousins, the family of Laban, the Syrian (28). There he met with Rachel (29). Laban would not consent to give him his daughter in marriage till he had served seven years; but to Jacob these years "seemed but a few days, for the love he had to her." But when the seven years were expired, Laban craftily deceived Jacob, and gave him his daughter Leah. Other seven years of service had to be completed probably before he obtained the beloved Rachel. But "life-long sorrow, disgrace, and trials, in the retributive providence of God, followed as a consequence of this double union."
At the close of the fourteen years of service, Jacob desired to return to his parents, but at the entreaty of Laban he tarried yet six years with him, tending his flocks (31:41). He then set out with his family and property "to go to Isaac his father in the land of Canaan" (Genesis 31 ). Laban was angry when he heard that Jacob had set out on his journey, and pursued after him, overtaking him in seven days. The meeting was of a painful kind. After much recrimination and reproach directed against Jacob, Laban is at length pacified, and taking an affectionate farewell of his daughters, returns to his home in Padanaram. And now all connection of the Israelites with Mesopotamia is at an end.
Soon after parting with Laban he is met by a company of angels, as if to greet him on his return and welcome him back to the Land of Promise (32:1,2). He called the name of the place Mahanaim, i.e., "the double camp," probably his own camp and that of the angels. The vision of angels was the counterpart of that he had formerly seen at Bethel, when, twenty years before, the weary, solitary traveller, on his way to Padan-aram, saw the angels of God ascending and descending on the ladder whose top reached to heaven (28:12).
He now hears with dismay of the approach of his brother Esau with a band of 400 men to meet him. In great agony of mind he prepares for the worst. He feels that he must now depend only on God, and he betakes himself to him in earnest prayer, and sends on before him a munificent present to Esau, "a present to my lord Esau from thy servant Jacob." Jacob's family were then transported across the Jabbok; but he himself remained behind, spending the night in communion with God. While thus engaged, there appeared one in the form of a man who wrestled with him. In this mysterious contest Jacob prevailed, and as a memorial of it his name was changed to Israel (wrestler with God); and the place where this occured he called Peniel, "for", said he, "I have seen God face to face, and my life is preserved" (32:25-31).
After this anxious night, Jacob went on his way, halting, mysteriously weakened by the conflict, but strong in the assurance of the divine favour. Esau came forth and met him; but his spirit of revenge was appeased, and the brothers met as friends, and during the remainder of their lives they maintained friendly relations. After a brief sojourn at Succoth, Jacob moved forward and pitched his tent near Shechem (q.v.), 33:18; but at length, under divine directions, he moved to Bethel, where he made an altar unto God (35:6,7), and where God appeared to him and renewed the Abrahamic covenant. While journeying from Bethel to Ephrath (the Canaanitish name of Bethlehem), Rachel died in giving birth to her second son Benjamin (35:16-20), fifteen or sixteen years after the birth of Joseph. He then reached the old family residence at Mamre, to wait on the dying bed of his father Isaac. The complete reconciliation between Esau and Jacob was shown by their uniting in the burial of the patriarch (35:27-29).
Jacob was soon after this deeply grieved by the loss of his beloved son Joseph through the jealousy of his brothers (37:33). Then follows the story of the famine, and the successive goings down into Egypt to buy corn (42), which led to the discovery of the long-lost Joseph, and the patriarch's going down with all his household, numbering about seventy souls (Exodus 1:5 ; Deuteronomy 10:22 ; Acts 7:14 ), to sojourn in the land of Goshen. Here Jacob, "after being strangely tossed about on a very rough ocean, found at last a tranquil harbour, where all the best affections of his nature were gently exercised and largely unfolded" (Genesis 48 ). At length the end of his checkered course draws nigh, and he summons his sons to his bedside that he may bless them. Among his last words he repeats the story of Rachel's death, although forty years had passed away since that event took place, as tenderly as if it had happened only yesterday; and when "he had made an end of charging his sons, he gathered up his feet into the bed, and yielded up the ghost" (49:33). His body was embalmed and carried with great pomp into the land of Canaan, and buried beside his wife Leah in the cave of Machpelah, according to his dying charge. There, probably, his embalmed body remains to this day (50:1-13). (See HEBRON .)
The history of Jacob is referred to by the prophets ( Hosea 12:3,4,12 ) and (Malachi 1:2 ). In Micah 1:5 the name is a poetic synonym for Israel, the kingdom of the ten tribes. There are, besides the mention of his name along with those of the other patriarchs, distinct references to events of his life in Paul's epistles ( Romans 9:11-13 ; Hebrews 12:16 ; 11:21 ). See references to his vision at Bethel and his possession of land at Shechem in John 1:51 ; 4:5,12 ; also to the famine which was the occasion of his going down into Egypt in Acts 7:12 (See LUZ ; BETHEL .)
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jacob
Events relating to a child’s birth often influenced parents in their choice of a name for the child. Isaac and Rebekah gave the second of their twin sons the name Jacob (meaning ‘to hold the heel’) because at the birth the baby Jacob’s hand took hold of the heel of the first twin, Esau (Genesis 25:24-26). When the two boys grew to adulthood, Jacob proved to be true to his name when he again took hold of what belonged to his brother, by cunningly taking from him the family birthright and the father’s blessing (Genesis 27:36).
From the beginning God made it clear that he had chosen Jacob, not Esau, as the one through whom he would fulfil his promises to Abraham. But that was no excuse for Jacob’s trickery (Genesis 25:23; Malachi 1:2; Romans 9:10-13).
The line of descent from Abraham through Isaac and Jacob was the line God used to produce the nation that became his channel of blessing to the whole world (Genesis 28:13-14). To the generations that followed, God was known as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Genesis 50:24; Exodus 3:6; Deuteronomy 1:8; Matthew 22:32; Acts 3:13). The nation descended from Jacob was commonly called Israel (after Jacob’s alternative name; Genesis 32:28), though in poetical writings it was sometimes called Jacob (Numbers 23:21; Isaiah 2:5; Genesis 28:1-5; Malachi 3:6; Romans 11:26).
Building for the future
Jacob was a selfishly ambitious young man who was determined to become powerful and prosperous. By ruthless bargaining he took from Esau the right of the firstborn to become family head and receive a double portion of the inheritance (Genesis 25:27-34; see FIRSTBORN). Later, by lies and deceit, he gained his father’s blessing This confirmed the benefits of the birthright, in relation to both the family and the nation that was to grow out of it (Genesis 27:1-29; see BLESSING). (Concerning the lesser blessings given to the elder brother see ESAU.)
To escape his brother’s anger, Jacob fled north. His excuse was that he was going to Paddan-aram to look for a wife among his parent’s relatives (Genesis 27:41-46; Isaiah 43:28). Before Jacob left Canaan, God graciously confirmed the promise given to Abraham, and assured Jacob that one day he would return to Canaan (Genesis 28:10-22).
It was twenty years before Jacob returned. In Paddan-aram he fell in love with Rachel, younger daughter of his uncle Laban, and agreed to work seven years for Laban as the bride-price for Rachel. Laban tricked Jacob by giving him Leah, the elder daughter, instead. He then agreed to give Rachel as well, but only after Jacob agreed to work another seven years as the extra bride-price (Genesis 29:1-30).
Upon completion of the second seven years, Jacob decided to work an additional six years. His purpose was to build up his personal flocks of sheep and goats, which he considered to be compensation for Laban’s repeated trickery. There was a constant battle, as two cunning dealers tried to outdo each other (Genesis 30:25-43; Genesis 31:41).
During these twenty years Jacob also built a large family. Leah produced several sons, but Rachel remained childless. Rachel therefore gave her maid to Jacob, so that through the maid he might produce sons whom Rachel could adopt as her own. Not to be outdone, Leah did the same. Finally Rachel produced a son, Joseph, and he became Jacob’s favourite (Genesis 29:31-35; Genesis 30:1-24). When at last Jacob and his family fled from Laban, Laban pursued them. In the end Jacob and Laban marked out a boundary between them and made a formal agreement not to attack each other again (Genesis 31).
A changed man
As he headed for Canaan, Jacob knew that if he was to live in safety he would have to put things right with Esau. Esau by this time had established a powerful clan (Edom) in neighbouring regions to the south-east. Jacob was beginning to learn humility such as he had not known before and cried to God for help (Genesis 32:1-12).
God taught Jacob, through a conflict he had one night with a special messenger from God, that his proud self-confidence had to be broken if he was really to receive God’s blessing. The crisis in Jacob’s life was marked by God’s gift to him of a new name, Israel, ‘an overcomer with God’ (Genesis 32:13-32). Jacob began to change. He humbled himself before Esau and begged his forgiveness, with the result that instead of further tension and conflict between the two brothers there was friendship and cooperation (Genesis 33:1-17).
Jacob then crossed the Jordan into Canaan, where he demonstrated his faith in God’s promises by buying a piece of land. He at least now had permanent possession of part of the land God had promised to him and his descendants (Genesis 33:18-20). At Bethel God renewed his promises (Genesis 35:1-15; cf. Genesis 28:13-22). As if to emphasize that this occupancy of Canaan was by God’s grace alone, the writer of Genesis includes two shameful stories that show the unworthiness of Jacob’s family to receive God’s blessings (Genesis 34; Genesis 38). The only son of Jacob to be born in Canaan was the youngest, Benjamin (Genesis 35:16-26).
The family moved south to Hebron to be with the aged Isaac in his last few years (Genesis 35:27-28). It seems that Jacob remained there while his sons took his flocks from place to place looking for pastures (Genesis 37:14-17). Out of these circumstances came the dramatic sequence of events recorded in the long story of Joseph (see JOSEPH THE SON OF JACOB). The outcome of that story was that Jacob and all his family moved south through Beersheba and settled in Egypt (Genesis 46:1-7; Genesis 46:26).
Jacob lived in Egypt seventeen years (Genesis 47:28). Before he died, he raised Joseph’s two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, to the same status as his own sons (Genesis 48:1-6). This was because he had given Joseph the birthright that the eldest son had lost (1 Chronicles 5:1-2; cf. Genesis 35:22). Now Joseph, through his two sons, would receive twice the inheritance of the other sons (Genesis 48:14-16; Genesis 49:26). Jacob then announced his blessing on all his sons in turn (Genesis 49:1-27; Hebrews 11:21). By insisting that his sons bury him in Canaan, he expressed his faith that Canaan would become the land of his descendants (Genesis 47:29-31; Genesis 49:28-33; cf. Genesis 46:4). His sons carried out his wish (Genesis 50:12-13).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Judah, Son of Jacob
Fourth son of Jacob, Judah soon established himself in the family as one who had genuine leadership qualities (Genesis 29:31-35; Genesis 37:25-27; Genesis 43:1-10; Genesis 44:14-34; Genesis 46:28). Concerning his own sons he wanted to establish a strong family to carry on his name and inheritance (Genesis 38:1-10). He himself, however, proved to be morally weak and an easy victim of sexual temptation (Genesis 38:11-30).
Jacob saw clearly that Judah’s tribe would become the leading tribe in the Israelite nation. It would conquer foreign enemies and rule over its brother tribes (Genesis 49:8-12). Out of it came the great king David and finally the Messiah Jesus (Matthew 1:3; Matthew 1:6; Matthew 1:16). (See also JUDAH, TRIBE AND KINGDOM.)
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Jacob
JACOB.—1. According to the genealogical list in Matthew, Jacob (Ἰακώβ) is the father of Joseph the husband of Mary (Matthew 1:15-16).
2. One of the reputed progenitors of the Jewish nation. Apart from the reference to Jacob’s well (πηγὴ τοῦ Ἰακώβ, see next art.), in John 4:6, and his place in the genealogies of Matthew and Luke (Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34), Jacob is mentioned in the Gospels only as one of the three patriarchs (Matthew 8:11 ‘Many shall come from the east and the west; and shall sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob …’ cf. Luke 13:28 f., Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37 ‘I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’). These three were grouped from early times (Exodus 2:24; Exodus 3:6; Exodus 3:15-16, Leviticus 26:42, 1 Kings 18:36, 2 Kings 13:23, Jeremiah 33:26, 1 Chronicles 29:18, 2 Chronicles 30:6), and occupied a place apart in Jewish thought. According to the Rabbis, they alone were entitled to be called אָבוֹח ‘fathers.’ To them was traced not only the origin of the nation, but also the beginning of true worship. As a descendant of these three, a Jew might claim nobility and a special relationship to God. This claim was recognized as וְכוּח אָבוֹח ‘righteousness of the fathers,’ and was based on Exodus 32:13. It was denounced by John the Baptist (see Abraham, and cf. Matthew 3:9, Luke 3:8), and it figured prominently in the conflicts between Jesus and the Pharisees (cf. John 8:33; John 8:37). Apparently in the time of Jesus it was liable to be abused, and on this account later Rabbis refused to lay stress upon it, declaring it no longer valid. In Rabbinic literature, Jacob is recognized as the most important of the three patriarchs (cf. Leviticus 26:42). He prevails with God (Genesis 32:28). He names the sanctuary the house of God (Genesis 28:22), and, in contrast to Abraham the father of Ishmael, and Isaac the father of Esau, Jacob inherits the promise in his children (49).
Literature.—A most suggestive analysis of the character of Jacob, and a full discussion of the problems of the narrative in Genesis, including the names ‘Jacob’ and ‘Israel,’ is given by Driver in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ii. 526–535; cf. also Stanley, Jewish Church, i. pp. 46–66; Gore, Studia Biblica, iii. 37 f.; Ph. Berger, ‘La Signification Historique des Noms des Patriarches Hébreux’ in Mémoires de la Société Linguistique, vi. 150.
G. Gordon Stott.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Joseph the Son of Jacob
The story of Joseph is among the best known in the Bible. It spreads over more than a dozen chapters of Genesis and shows how God was fulfilling his promises to Abraham.
God had promised Canaan to Abraham and his descendants, but those descendants would be able to take possession of it only when they had sufficient numbers to do so. First of all, therefore, they had to develop as a nation, and the story of Joseph shows how this became possible. It recounts the events that led to their migration to Egypt and their subsequent growth and development. Although, after Joseph’s death, they suffered a period of slavery, in due course they left Egypt and took possession of Canaan (cf. Genesis 15:13-16).
From Canaan to Egypt
Joseph was Jacob’s eleventh son but, being Rachel’s firstborn, he soon became Jacob’s favourite (Genesis 30:22-24; Genesis 33:1-7). By the time Joseph was seventeen, his brothers so hated him that they decided to get rid of him. They sold him to traders who took him to Egypt, though they told their father that a wild animal had killed him (Genesis 37).
In spite of his blameless behaviour, Joseph ended up in prison. Because of his good conduct, he was given a position of responsibility that proved to be of benefit to the other prisoners, but he waited in vain for anyone to help him (Genesis 39; Genesis 40). When at last someone told the king of Joseph’s wisdom, Joseph warned the king of a coming famine and advise him how to deal with it. The king was so impressed that he made Joseph the administrator of the famine relief program, and then governor of all Egypt (Genesis 41:1-45; Acts 7:9-10).
Governor of Egypt
At the time of his appointment as governor, Joseph was thirty years of age (Genesis 41:46). He married an Egyptian and they produced two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:47-52).
Egypt alone had made preparations for the famine, with the result that people came from everywhere to buy food. Among these were Joseph’s brothers. Although Joseph recognized them, they did not recognize him (Genesis 41:53-57; Genesis 42:1-8).
To see if his brothers had changed for the better over the years, Joseph cleverly arranged a striking sequence of events. He worked them into a trap from which they could have easily escaped by sacrificing their brother Benjamin, who was their father’s new favourite. But they refused to forsake Benjamin (Genesis 42:9-38; Genesis 43; Genesis 44). Joseph, satisfied that his brothers had experienced a genuine change of heart, told them who he was. He then sent wagons to Canaan to bring Jacob and all his family to Egypt (Genesis 45; Genesis 46; Acts 7:11-14).
Joseph arranged for all Jacob’s family to settle in Goshen in the Nile Delta. There, separated from the Egyptians, they could multiply and develop without their culture or religion being corrupted by the Egyptians (Genesis 47:1-12). Meanwhile Joseph continued as governor, and his economic policies saved Egypt from disaster (Genesis 47:13-26).
Later events
Before Jacob died, he raised the two sons of Joseph, Manasseh and Ephraim, to equal status with the brothers of Joseph. Manasseh and Ephraim would therefore become heads of tribes in Israel. Joseph, by receiving two tribes instead of one, received the inheritance of the firstborn (Genesis 48; Genesis 49:22-26; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2).
When Jacob died, Joseph’s brothers feared he might now have revenge against them. Joseph was saddened by such mistrust and reassured his brothers that he would continue to look after them (Genesis 50:1-21).
Joseph lived over ninety years in Egypt, but he still believed that Canaan was the land his people would one day possess. Before he died he showed his faith in God’s promises by leaving instructions that when the people of Israel eventually moved to Canaan, they take his remains with them (Genesis 50:22-26; Exodus 13:19; Hebrews 11:22). His descendants buried his bones at Shechem, in the tribal area of Ephraim (Joshua 24:32).

Sentence search

Gid hanasheh - (sciatic nerve): Consumption of the sciatic nerve is biblically forbidden, to commemorate Jacob�s victory over an angel after they wrestled all night. The angel dislodged Jacob�s sciatic nerve
Jegarsahadutha - Aramaic name given by Laban to the heap of stones raised as a witness between him and Jacob, which Jacob called GALEED, both signifying 'cairn of witness
Jegar-Sahadutha - ) The Aramaic or Chaldee name given by the Syrian Laban to the stone heap commemorating his compact with Jacob, whereon they ate together. Galeed, "a witness heap," the Hebrew name given by Jacob. hard rocky region, and Jacob made the word by a slight change to mark a crisis in his history (Genesis 31:44-55)
Rachel - When Jacob went to Paddan-aram to find a wife, he met and fell in love with Rachel, the younger daughter of his uncle, Laban. Jacob worked seven years for Laban as payment for Rachel, but when the wedding day came, Laban deceived Jacob by giving him the older daughter, Leah, instead. After the wedding festivities he gave Rachel also to Jacob, but made Jacob work for him an extra seven years as payment for her. ...
While Leah produced several sons for Jacob, Rachel remained childless. She then gave her maid to Jacob, so that the maid might bear sons whom Rachel could adopt as her own. Jacob already had ten sons and a daughter by the time Rachel gave birth to her first son, Joseph (Genesis 29:31-35; Genesis 30:1-24). ...
Although Laban had enriched himself through his daughters’ bride price (Jacob’s years of hard work), he now planned to exclude them from the inheritance, in favour of his sons. This made Rachel so angry that when Jacob and his family left Paddan-aram for Canaan, she took her father’s idols with her. Laban never regained his idols, but Jacob made sure that Rachel did not keep them once the family entered Canaan (Genesis 31:34-35; Genesis 35:1-4). ...
Rachel died when giving birth to Benjamin, the only son of Jacob born in Canaan
Leah - Jacob took her to wife through a deceit of her father (Genesis 29:23 ). She bore to Jacob six sons (32-35), also one daughter, Dinah (30:21). She accompanied Jacob into Canaan, and died there before the time of the going down into Egypt (Genesis 31 ), and was buried in the cave of Machpelah (49:31)
Naphtali - My wrestling, the fifth son of Jacob. When Jacob went down into Egypt, Naphtali had four sons (Genesis 46:24 )
Jacob - Isaac and Rebekah gave the second of their twin sons the name Jacob (meaning ‘to hold the heel’) because at the birth the baby Jacob’s hand took hold of the heel of the first twin, Esau (Genesis 25:24-26). When the two boys grew to adulthood, Jacob proved to be true to his name when he again took hold of what belonged to his brother, by cunningly taking from him the family birthright and the father’s blessing (Genesis 27:36). ...
From the beginning God made it clear that he had chosen Jacob, not Esau, as the one through whom he would fulfil his promises to Abraham. But that was no excuse for Jacob’s trickery (Genesis 25:23; Malachi 1:2; Romans 9:10-13). ...
The line of descent from Abraham through Isaac and Jacob was the line God used to produce the nation that became his channel of blessing to the whole world (Genesis 28:13-14). To the generations that followed, God was known as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob (Genesis 50:24; Exodus 3:6; Deuteronomy 1:8; Matthew 22:32; Acts 3:13). The nation descended from Jacob was commonly called Israel (after Jacob’s alternative name; Genesis 32:28), though in poetical writings it was sometimes called Jacob (Numbers 23:21; Isaiah 2:5; Isaiah 43:28; Malachi 3:6; Romans 11:26). ...
Building for the future...
Jacob was a selfishly ambitious young man who was determined to become powerful and prosperous. )...
To escape his brother’s anger, Jacob fled north. Before Jacob left Canaan, God graciously confirmed the promise given to Abraham, and assured Jacob that one day he would return to Canaan (Genesis 28:10-22). ...
It was twenty years before Jacob returned. Laban tricked Jacob by giving him Leah, the elder daughter, instead. He then agreed to give Rachel as well, but only after Jacob agreed to work another seven years as the extra bride-price (Genesis 29:1-30). ...
Upon completion of the second seven years, Jacob decided to work an additional six years. ...
During these twenty years Jacob also built a large family. Rachel therefore gave her maid to Jacob, so that through the maid he might produce sons whom Rachel could adopt as her own. Finally Rachel produced a son, Joseph, and he became Jacob’s favourite (Genesis 29:31-35; Genesis 30:1-24). When at last Jacob and his family fled from Laban, Laban pursued them. In the end Jacob and Laban marked out a boundary between them and made a formal agreement not to attack each other again (Genesis 31). ...
A changed man...
As he headed for Canaan, Jacob knew that if he was to live in safety he would have to put things right with Esau. Jacob was beginning to learn humility such as he had not known before and cried to God for help (Genesis 32:1-12). ...
God taught Jacob, through a conflict he had one night with a special messenger from God, that his proud self-confidence had to be broken if he was really to receive God’s blessing. The crisis in Jacob’s life was marked by God’s gift to him of a new name, Israel, ‘an overcomer with God’ (Genesis 32:13-32). Jacob began to change. ...
Jacob then crossed the Jordan into Canaan, where he demonstrated his faith in God’s promises by buying a piece of land. As if to emphasize that this occupancy of Canaan was by God’s grace alone, the writer of Genesis includes two shameful stories that show the unworthiness of Jacob’s family to receive God’s blessings (Genesis 34; Genesis 38). The only son of Jacob to be born in Canaan was the youngest, Benjamin (Genesis 35:16-26). It seems that Jacob remained there while his sons took his flocks from place to place looking for pastures (Genesis 37:14-17). Out of these circumstances came the dramatic sequence of events recorded in the long story of Joseph (see JOSEPH THE SON OF Jacob). The outcome of that story was that Jacob and all his family moved south through Beersheba and settled in Egypt (Genesis 46:1-7; Genesis 46:26). ...
Jacob lived in Egypt seventeen years (Genesis 47:28). Jacob then announced his blessing on all his sons in turn (Genesis 49:1-27; Hebrews 11:21)
James - Same as Jacob
Laban - Laban again appears as the host of his nephew Jacob at Haran. Jacob married Rachel and Leah, daughters of Laban, serving for them 20 to 40 years. But Laban's conduct toward his nephew shows from what source Jacob inherited his tendency to sharp dealing. Nothing is said of Laban after Jacob parted from him
Jacob - Texts from Ugarit and Assyria have persons named Jacob, but these are not Israelites. Their name is often connected with one of their gods, becoming Jacob-el or Jacob-baal. ” The Old Testament knows only one Jacob. ...
Between the Testaments other Jews received the name Jacob; the one New Testament example is the father of Joseph and thus the earthly grandfather of Jesus (Matthew 1:16 ). Jacob stands as a strong witness that the God who made all the people of the earth also worked in Israel's history, calling the patriarchs to a destiny He would fulfill even when they least deserved it. ...
Jacob in Genesis Jacob's story occupies half the Book of Genesis. Living up to his name, Jacob bargained for Esau's birthright. Parental partiality fostered continuing hostility between Esau, the hunter beloved of his father, and Jacob, the quiet, settled, integrated person...
favored by his mother. ...
Esau's thoughtlessness lost him his birthright and allowed Jacob to have material superiority. To his crass lies and deception, Jacob even approached blasphemy, using God's name to bolster his cause, “Because the Lord your God granted me success” (Genesis 27:20 NRSV). Jacob became the bearer of God's promises and the inheritor of Canaan. He must serve Jacob and live in the less fertile land of Edom, but his day would come ( Genesis 27:40 ). Rebekah had to arrange for Jacob to flee to her home in Paddan-aram to escape Esau's wrath (Genesis 27:46-28:1 ). ...
At age 40, Jacob fled his home to begin his life as an individual. Jacob made an oath, binding himself to God. Here is the center of Jacob's story; all else must be read in light of the Bethel experience. ...
In Aram with his mother's family, the deceiver Jacob met deception. Six more years of labor let Jacob return the deception and gain wealth at the expense of his father-in-law, who continued his deception, changing Jacob's wages ten times (Genesis 31:7 ,Genesis 31:7,31:41 ) Amid the family infighting, both men prospered financially, and Jacob's family grew. ...
Intense bargaining ensued when Jacob told Laban he wanted to follow God's call and return to the land of his birth. Supported by his wives, who claimed their father had cheated them of their dowry (Genesis 31:15 ), Jacob departed while Laban and his sons were away in the hills shearing sheep. Starting two days later, Laban and his sons could not overtake Jacob until they reached Gilead, 400 miles from Haran. Since no fault could be found in Jacob's conduct in Haran, all Laban could do was to suggest a covenant of friendship. Jacob was now head of his own household. ...
As Jacob approached the Promised Land, a band of angels met him at Mahanaim (Genesis 32:1-2 ). Shrewdly, Jacob sent an enormous gift to his brother and divided his retinue into two groups. To his scheme Jacob added prayer. When all had crossed the Jabbok River, Jacob met One who wrestled with him until daybreak (Genesis 32:1 ). ...
The two struggled without one gaining advantage, until the Opponent dislocated Jacob's hip. Jacob refused to release his Antagonist. This would not be given until Jacob said his name. By telling it, Jacob acknowledged his defeat and admitted his character. ...
Jacob's fear of meeting Esau proved groundless. As two contrary natures are unlikely to live long in harmony, Jacob chose the better course turning westward to the Promised Land. ...
From Succoth, Jacob traveled to Shechem, where he built an altar to God. The son of the city ruler raped Jacob's daughter, Dinah. Jacob's sons demanded that the Shechemites be circumcised before any intermarriages were permitted. Jacob condemned their actions, but had to leave Shechem. Finally, the death of Jacob's father, who had been robbed of companionship with both sons, brought Jacob and Esau together again at the family burial site in Hebron. ...
Although Genesis 37-50 revolve around Joseph, Jacob is still the central figure. ...
Descent to Egypt When severe famine gripped Canaan, Jacob and his sons set out for Egypt. At Beer-sheba Jacob received further assurance of God's favor (Genesis 46:1-4 ). Jacob dwelt in the land of Goshen until his death. Jacob bestowed the blessing not only upon his favorite son Joseph, but also upon Joseph's two oldest sons, Ephraim and Manasseh. The woman at the well in Sychar declared to Jesus that Jacob provided the well (John 4:12 ). Stephen mentioned the famine and Jacob's journey to Egypt in the course of his defense before the Sanhedrin (Acts 7:8-16 ). Paul presented...
Jacob as an example of the sovereign choice of God and of the predestination of the elect (Romans 9:10-13 ). The writer of Hebrews held up Jacob as one of the examples of active faith (Hebrews 11:9 ,Hebrews 11:9,11:20-22 ). ...
Jacob's Character Throughout the narrative a persistent faith in the God of the fathers shines through. Jacob's life was a story of conflict. ...
Jacob is no ideal. Jacob's better nature struggled with his sinful self. What raised Jacob above himself was his reverent, indestructible longing for the salvation of his God. ...
Jacob's Religion As the religion of Israel and thus the roots of Christianity claim to derive from the patriarchs, it is necessary to attempt to understand Jacob's spiritual life. ...
Jacob's religion was consistent with the beliefs and practices of his fathers. Jacob encountered God at Bethel at the moment of greatest need in his life. Jacob's dream was...
his firsthand encounter with God. Jacob saw in the vision the majesty and glory of God. At Bethel Jacob worshiped God and vowed to take Yahweh as his God. ...
At Peniel, Jacob wrestled face-to-face with God. Jacob emerged from Peniel willing to let his life fall into God's control. It was a new Jacob—Israel—who hobbled off to meet Esau. ...
Theological Significance God did not chose Jacob because of what he was but because of what he could become. ...
Jacob's story is a story of conflict. ...
With the other patriarchs God acted directly, but with Jacob God seemed to be withdrawn at times. Even in Jacob's web of conflict and tragedy, God's hand guided, though half-hidden
Rebecca - 1554 BCE) Second of the four Matriarchs, wife of Isaac, mother of Jacob and Esau. ” Orchestrated Jacob’s obtaining Isaac’s blessings
Serah - According to the Midrash, she softly delivered the news to her grandfather Jacob that Joseph was still alive. " Jacob greatly appreciated this and blessed her with longevity
Esau - Son of Isaac and Rebecca; elder twin brother of Jacob (Genesis 25:24-26 ; Genesis 27:1 ,Genesis 27:1,27:32 ,Genesis 27:32,27:42 ; 1 Chronicles 1:34 ); father of the Edomite nation (Genesis 26:1 ; Deuteronomy 2:4-29 ; Malachi 1:2-3 ). The second born twin, Jacob, father of the nation Israel, held Esau's heel at birth (Genesis 25:22-26 ); thus depicting the struggle between the descendants of the two which ended when David lead Israel in the conquest of Edom (2 Samuel 8:12-14 ; 1 Chronicles 18:13 ; compare Numbers 24:18 ). From the first Jacob sought to gain advantage over Esau (Hosea 12:3 ). Jacob was the favorite of his mother Rebecca. ...
As a famished returning hunter, Esau, lacking self-control, sold his birthright to Jacob for food (Genesis 25:30-34 ). Thus, the lineage became Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Rebecca devised a deception whereby Jacob received this blessing (Genesis 27:1-30 ). ...
Esau blamed Jacob for all his problems failing to realize that the character flaw revealed in his selling of his birthright followed him all of his life. ...
Years later the two brothers were reconciled when Jacob returned from Mesopotamia. As Jacob neared Palestine, he made plans for confronting his wronged brother and allaying his anger. Esau, with an army of 400, surprised Jacob, his guilty brother, and received him without bitterness (Genesis 33:4-16 )
la'Ban - (Genesis 24:10,29-60 ; 27:43 ; 29:5 ) The next time Laban appears in the sacred narrative it is as the host of his nephew Jacob at Haran. (Genesis 29:13,14 ) [1] Jacob married Rachel and Leah, daughters of Laban, and remained with him 20 years, B. But Laban's dishonest and overreaching practice toward his nephew shows from what source Jacob inherited his tendency to sharp dealing. Nothing is said of Laban after Jacob left him
Ephraim - The first indication of the superiority of Ephraim over his elder brother, Manasses, is seen in the blessing given by their grandfather Jacob (Genesis 48). Using the power given to him by Divine promises, Jacob adopts as his sons, Manasses and Ephraim, in order that these might form not two branches of the same tribe, but two distinct tribes. Jacob gives the preference to the younger, by placing his right hand over the head of Ephraim
Israel - This is the name which the angel gave Jacob, after having wrestled with him all night at Mahanaim, or Peniel, Genesis 32:1-2 ; Genesis 32:28-30 ; Hosea 12:4 . By the name of Israel is sometimes understood the person of Jacob, sometimes the whole people of Israel, the whole race of Jacob; sometimes the kingdom of Israel, or ten tribes, distinct from the kingdom of Judah; and finally, the spiritual Israel, the true church of God
Benjamin - the youngest son of Jacob and Rachel, who was born, A. Jacob, being on his journey from Mesopotamia, as he was proceeding southward with Rachel in the company, Genesis 35:16-17 , &c, the pains of child-bearing came upon her, about a quarter of a league from Bethlehem, and she died after the delivery of a son, whom, with her last breath, she named Benoni, that is, "the son of my sorrow;" but soon afterward Jacob changed his name, and called him Benjamin, that is, "the son of my right hand
Patriarch - to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as ancestors of the Israelites, and to the twelve sons of Jacob
Laban - He had several sons ( Genesis 30:35 , Genesis 31:1 ), and was father-in-law and uncle of Jacob. We meet him next at Haran entertaining Jacob ( Genesis 29:13-14 ), who had escaped from his brother Esau. The details of the transactions between Laban and Jacob for the fourteen years while the nephew served the uncle for his two daughters need not be recounted here (see chs. At the end of the period Jacob was not only husband of Leah and Rachel and father of eleven sons, but also the owner of very many flocks and herds. As Laban was reluctant to part with Jacob, regarding his presence as an assurance of Divine blessing, the departure took place secretly, while Laban was absent shearing his sheep. Jacob removed his property across the Euphrates, while Rachel took with her the teraphim or household gods of the family. When Laban pursued after them and overtook them at Mount Gilead ( Genesis 31:32 ), he did no more than reproach Jacob for his stealthy flight and for his removal of the teraphim , and finally made a covenant of peace by setting up a cairn of stones and a pillar; these served as a boundary-stone between the Aramæans and the Hebrews, which neither were to pass with hostile intent to the other. ...
In character Laban is not pleasing, and seems to reflect in an exaggerated form the more repulsive traits in the character of his nephew Jacob; yet be shows signs of generous impulses on more than one occasion, and especially at the final parting with Jacob
Patriarch - This term is usually applied to (1) the antediluvian fathers of the human race; (2) the three great progenitors of Israel Abraham, Isaac, Jacob (see sep. ); (3) in the NT it is extended to the sons of Jacob ( Acts 7:8-9 ), and to David ( Acts 2:29 )
Jacob - " The promises made by God to Abraham were thus confirmed to Jacob, as they had been to Isaac. When they grew up, Esau became a hunter, whereas Jacob was a peaceful man, dwelling in tents. Isaac loved Esau, and Rebekah loved Jacob. The typical character of these three patriarchs has been described thus: "In general, Abraham is the root of all promise, and the picture of the life of faith; Isaac is a type of the heavenly Man, who receives the church; and Jacob represents Israel as heir of the promises according to the flesh. ...
Though Jacob was heir of the promises, and valued God's blessing in a selfish manner, he sought it not by faith, but tried in an evil and mean way to obtain it: first in buying the birthright when his brother was at the point of death; and then, in obtaining the blessing from his father by lying and deceit: a blessing which would surely have been his in God's way if he had waited: cf. ...
Jacob had then to become a wanderer; but God was faithful to him, and spoke to him, not openly as to Abraham, but in a dream. God also said He would keep Jacob wherever he went, and bring him back to the promised land. Jacob called the place Beth-el, saying that it was the house of God, and the gate of heaven. ...
Jacob, who had tricked his brother, was treated in a similar way by Laban, and Leah was given to him as wife instead of Rachel, though he had Rachel, the one he loved, afterwards. ' But God was watching over him and bade him return to the land of his fathers; and when Laban pursued after him, God warned him in a dream not to speak to Jacob either good or bad. ...
Immediately afterwards the angels of God met Jacob, and he recognised them as 'God's host. " He was accounted a victor, and his name was changed from Jacob to ISRAEL: "for as a prince hast thou power with God and with men, and hast prevailed. His peace was soon disturbed by his daughter Dinah going to see the daughters of the land, and being dishonoured, which was avenged by the slaughter of the Shechemites by his sons Simeon and Levi, bringing Jacob into great fear. ...
God used this humiliating sorrow to discipline Jacob, and recover him to his true calling. He therefore bade Jacob go to Beth-el, and make an altar there. ' God renewed His promises and revealed Himself to Jacob as GOD ALMIGHTY. ...
Jacob loved Joseph more than all his other sons, which caused them to hate Joseph; they also hated him for the communications given to him through dreams, and eventually sold him to the Ishmeelites. Again Jacob was dealt with deceitfully; his sons pretended that they had found Joseph's coat stained with blood, and Jacob was greatly distressed. When Jacob and his household arrived in Egypt, he as a prince of God blessed Pharaoh king of Egypt. ...
Jacob at the close of his life rose up to the height of God's thoughts, and by faith blessed the two sons of Joseph, being led of God to cross his hands, and gave the richest blessing to Ephraim. ...
Jacob being named ISRAEL led to his descendants being called the CHILDREN OF ISRAEL. They are however frequently addressed as 'JACOB,' or 'house of Jacob,' as if they had not preserved the higher character involved in the name of 'Israel,' but must be addressed by the natural name of their forefather, Jacob
Jacob - " The promises made by God to Abraham were thus confirmed to Jacob, as they had been to Isaac. When they grew up, Esau became a hunter, whereas Jacob was a peaceful man, dwelling in tents. Isaac loved Esau, and Rebekah loved Jacob. The typical character of these three patriarchs has been described thus: "In general, Abraham is the root of all promise, and the picture of the life of faith; Isaac is a type of the heavenly Man, who receives the church; and Jacob represents Israel as heir of the promises according to the flesh. ...
Though Jacob was heir of the promises, and valued God's blessing in a selfish manner, he sought it not by faith, but tried in an evil and mean way to obtain it: first in buying the birthright when his brother was at the point of death; and then, in obtaining the blessing from his father by lying and deceit: a blessing which would surely have been his in God's way if he had waited: cf. ...
Jacob had then to become a wanderer; but God was faithful to him, and spoke to him, not openly as to Abraham, but in a dream. God also said He would keep Jacob wherever he went, and bring him back to the promised land. Jacob called the place Beth-el, saying that it was the house of God, and the gate of heaven. ...
Jacob, who had tricked his brother, was treated in a similar way by Laban, and Leah was given to him as wife instead of Rachel, though he had Rachel, the one he loved, afterwards. ' But God was watching over him and bade him return to the land of his fathers; and when Laban pursued after him, God warned him in a dream not to speak to Jacob either good or bad. ...
Immediately afterwards the angels of God met Jacob, and he recognised them as 'God's host. " He was accounted a victor, and his name was changed from Jacob to ISRAEL: "for as a prince hast thou power with God and with men, and hast prevailed. His peace was soon disturbed by his daughter Dinah going to see the daughters of the land, and being dishonoured, which was avenged by the slaughter of the Shechemites by his sons Simeon and Levi, bringing Jacob into great fear. ...
God used this humiliating sorrow to discipline Jacob, and recover him to his true calling. He therefore bade Jacob go to Beth-el, and make an altar there. ' God renewed His promises and revealed Himself to Jacob as GOD ALMIGHTY. ...
Jacob loved Joseph more than all his other sons, which caused them to hate Joseph; they also hated him for the communications given to him through dreams, and eventually sold him to the Ishmeelites. Again Jacob was dealt with deceitfully; his sons pretended that they had found Joseph's coat stained with blood, and Jacob was greatly distressed. When Jacob and his household arrived in Egypt, he as a prince of God blessed Pharaoh king of Egypt. ...
Jacob at the close of his life rose up to the height of God's thoughts, and by faith blessed the two sons of Joseph, being led of God to cross his hands, and gave the richest blessing to Ephraim. ...
Jacob being named ISRAEL led to his descendants being called the CHILDREN OF ISRAEL. They are however frequently addressed as 'JACOB,' or 'house of Jacob,' as if they had not preserved the higher character involved in the name of 'Israel,' but must be addressed by the natural name of their forefather, Jacob
Levi - (Hebrew: attached to) ...
Third son of Jacob, by Lia (Genesis 29). With his brother Simeon he cruelly avenged the humiliation of their sister Dina (Genesis 34), for which they were severely rebuked by Jacob (Genesis 34,49)
Laban - Later, Jacob fled to his uncle Laban's house after stealing the blessing from Esau. Laban agreed to give his daughter, Rachel, as payment for Jacob's seven years of labor. However, Laban deceived Jacob making him marry the older daughter, Leah. After Jacob worked an additional seven years, Laban allowed him to marry Rachel (Genesis 29:15-30 ). See Jacob
Leah - ” Older daughter of Laban (Genesis 29:16 ) and Jacob's first wife. Jacob had asked for the younger Rachel's hand but was tricked into marrying Leah. Leah bore six sons to Jacob (Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun) and a daughter (Dinah). Her handmaid, Zilpah, bore two sons to Jacob (Gad, Asher), which by the law of that day were officially Leah's. When Jacob returned to Palestine from Padan-aram, Leah and her children were placed in front of Rachel and Joseph, evidently to absorb any violence from Esau, Jacob's brother
Laban - Later, Jacob fled to his uncle Laban's house after stealing the blessing from Esau. Laban agreed to give his daughter, Rachel, as payment for Jacob's seven years of labor. However, Laban deceived Jacob making him marry the older daughter, Leah. After Jacob worked an additional seven years, Laban allowed him to marry Rachel (Genesis 29:15-30 ). See Jacob
Israelites - Descendants of the patriarch Jacob, or Israel
Dan - Son of Jacob and Bilhah, fifth of the Twelve Tribes
Gad - Son of Jacob and Zilpah, seventh of the Twelve Tribes
Israelite - A descendant of Israel or Jacob a Jew
Benjamin - (Hebrew: son of my right hand) Youngest son of Jacob, and preferred with Joseph above all the other sons. Pressed by famine, Jacob would not send Benjamin with his brethren into Egypt, to seek grain, but consented when Joseph refused to give the grain unless the brothers were accompanied by Benjamin, to whom he was very devoted (Genesis 42,43)
Dinah - ” The daughter of Jacob and Leah (Genesis 30:21 ). See Jacob ; Leah ; Shechem; Patriarchs
Patriarchs - This name is given to the ancient fathers, chiefly those who lived before Moses, as Adam, Lamech, Noah, Shem, &c, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, the sons of Jacob, and heads of the tribes
Reuben - Behold a son!, the eldest son of Jacob and Leah (Genesis 29:32 ). It was he also who pledged his life and the life of his sons when Jacob was unwilling to let Benjamin go down into Egypt. After Jacob and his family went down into Egypt (46:8) no further mention is made of Reuben beyond what is recorded in ch 49:3,4
Rachel - ” Younger daughter of Laban, the second wife and cousin of Jacob, and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin. ...
In flight from his brother, Esau, Jacob met her when Rachel brought the sheep to water. See Jacob
Galeed - The name which, according to Genesis 31:47 , was given by Jacob to the cairn erected on the occasion of the compact between him and Laban. The respective proceedings of Jacob and of Laban are uncertain, for the narrative is not only of composite origin, but has suffered through the introduction of glosses into the text. It is pretty certain that we should read ‘Laban’ instead of ‘Jacob’ in Genesis 31:45
Isaac - —Named (1) in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34; (2) in such collocations as ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Matthew 8:11), ‘see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Luke 13:28), ‘the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob’ (Matthew 22:32, Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37)
Isaac - —Named (1) in our Lord’s genealogy, Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34; (2) in such collocations as ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Matthew 8:11), ‘see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Luke 13:28), ‘the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob’ (Matthew 22:32, Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37)
Rebekah - Isaac and Rebekah were without children for twenty years, but then Rebekah gave birth to twin sons, Esau and Jacob (Genesis 25:20-26). She was determined that nothing would prevent Jacob from receiving the blessing (Genesis 27:6-29). ...
When Esau plotted to kill Jacob, Rebekah thought out another scheme, this time to protect Jacob. Again she deceived Isaac, this time by persuading him that the reason Jacob should go north was to find a wife among her people (Genesis 27:41-46; Genesis 28:1-5)
Ephraim - His grandfather Jacob elevated him and his brother Manasseh to the status of progenitors of tribes within the nation of Israel. Though he was the younger of the brothers, Jacob foresaw that his descendants would be the greater of the two
Leah - Being the mother of six of Jacob’s twelve sons, Leah had an important role as one of the mothers of the Israelite nation (Genesis 30:1-19; Genesis 35:23). She was not the wife Jacob chose for himself, and the ill-feeling between her and Jacob’s chosen wife Rachel created many difficulties in Jacob’s household. (For details see Jacob; RACHEL
Leah - (See Jacob; LABAN
Leah - The wife of Jacob
Rebekah - She was a woman of personal attractions and became the wife of Isaac, to whom late in life she bore Esau and Jacob. Of her sons, Jacob was Rebekah's favorite; and she persuaded him to obtain his father's blessing by fraud. In consequence Jacob had to flee from his brother's wrath; and it is probable that Rebekah saw her best-loved son no more
Eleloheisrael - The name given by Jacob to the altar he erected near Shechem. God had just before altered his name into Israel, 'a prince of God;' Jacob connected the blessing involved in this name with a piece of land he bought, instead of with God's house at Bethel, and calls the altar he had erected 'God, the God of Israel
Esau - Foolishly he sold his birthright to his ruthless twin, Jacob (Genesis 25:29-34; Hebrews 12:16). Esau tried to gain this blessing ahead of Jacob, but again Jacob’s cunning defeated him (Genesis 27:1-29). Overcome with misery and anger, Esau tried to kill Jacob, but Jacob found out and escaped (Genesis 27:30-38; Genesis 27:41-45; Hebrews 12:17). ...
Although God’s purpose was that his promises to Abraham and Isaac be fulfilled through Jacob and not Esau, that did not excuse either of them for their disgraceful behaviour (Genesis 25:23; Romans 9:10-13). When Jacob returned to Canaan after twenty years, Esau went to meet him. Fearful of what might happen, Jacob begged Esau’s mercy, but Esau responded with such generous forgiveness that the dreaded meeting turned into a happy reunion (Genesis 32:1-21; Genesis 33:1-16)
Edomite - ) One of the descendants of Esau or Edom, the brother of Jacob; an Idumean
Asher - (a) Son of Jacob and Zilpah, eighth of the Twelve Tribes
Avot - Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, from whom the entire Jewish nation descended; the husbands of the Matriarchs
Rebekah - A daughter of Bethuel, and sister of Laban in Mesopotamia, who became the wife of Isaac, and twenty years afterwards the mother of Jacob and Esau. Through her partiality for Jacob, she was tempted into the use of unjustifiable means to secure for him the inheritance, not having faith to leave to God the fulfilment of his own purposes, Genesis 25:22,23 . Her deceit led to disastrous results: Jacob fled from home; and when he returned from Mesopotamia twenty years afterwards, his mother lay buried in the cave of Machpelah, Genesis 24:1-28:22 49:31
Esau - The son of Isaac, and twin brother of Jacob, Genesis 25:1-34 . He was the elder of the two, and was therefore legally the heir, but sold his birthright to Jacob. We have an account of his ill-advised marriages, Genesis 26:34 ; of his loss of his father's chief blessing, and his consequent anger against Jacob, Genesis 27:1-46 ; of their subsequent reconciliation, Genesis 32:1-33:20 ; and of his posterity, Genesis 36:1-43
Patriarchs - The: Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, from whom the entire Jewish nation descended; the husbands of the Matriarchs
Simeonites - Descendants of Simeon, the son of Jacob
Cave of machpelah - The cave in Hebron, Israel, wherein are buried Adam, Eve, Abraham, Sara, Isaac, Rebecca, Jacob and Leah
Charan - Former residence of Abraham�s family; where Jacob met and married his wives and lived for 20 years
Jaakobah - Heel-catcher, a form of the name Jacob, one of the descendants of Simeon (1 Chronicles 4:36 )
Jacob - JACOB. According to the genealogical list in Matthew, Jacob (Ἰακώβ) is the father of Joseph the husband of Mary (Matthew 1:15-16). Apart from the reference to Jacob’s well (πηγὴ τοῦ Ἰακώβ, see next art. ), in John 4:6, and his place in the genealogies of Matthew and Luke (Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34), Jacob is mentioned in the Gospels only as one of the three patriarchs (Matthew 8:11 ‘Many shall come from the east and the west; and shall sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob …’ cf. , Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37 ‘I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’). In Rabbinic literature, Jacob is recognized as the most important of the three patriarchs (cf. He names the sanctuary the house of God (Genesis 28:22), and, in contrast to Abraham the father of Ishmael, and Isaac the father of Esau, Jacob inherits the promise in his children (49). —A most suggestive analysis of the character of Jacob, and a full discussion of the problems of the narrative in Genesis, including the names ‘Jacob’ and ‘Israel,’ is given by Driver in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ii
Jacob - JACOB. According to the genealogical list in Matthew, Jacob (Ἰακώβ) is the father of Joseph the husband of Mary (Matthew 1:15-16). Apart from the reference to Jacob’s well (πηγὴ τοῦ Ἰακώβ, see next art. ), in John 4:6, and his place in the genealogies of Matthew and Luke (Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34), Jacob is mentioned in the Gospels only as one of the three patriarchs (Matthew 8:11 ‘Many shall come from the east and the west; and shall sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob …’ cf. , Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37 ‘I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’). In Rabbinic literature, Jacob is recognized as the most important of the three patriarchs (cf. He names the sanctuary the house of God (Genesis 28:22), and, in contrast to Abraham the father of Ishmael, and Isaac the father of Esau, Jacob inherits the promise in his children (49). —A most suggestive analysis of the character of Jacob, and a full discussion of the problems of the narrative in Genesis, including the names ‘Jacob’ and ‘Israel,’ is given by Driver in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible ii
Laban - Jacob, one of the sons of this marriage, fled to the house of Laban, whose daughters Leah and Rachel (ch. (See Jacob
Laban - Later he gave his own daughters, Leah and Rachel, to be wives of Isaac’s son, Jacob (Genesis 28:2; Genesis 29:15-30). Laban’s deceit of Jacob in the marriage arrangements began a long contest of trickery between the two, as each tried to outdo the other. (For details see Jacob
e'Sau - (hairy ), the eldest son of Isaac, and twin-brother of Jacob. " He was much loved by his father, and was of course his heir, but was induced to sell his birthright to Jacob. Mention of his unhappy marriages may be found in (Genesis 26:34 ) The next episode in the life of Esau is the loss of his father's covenant blessing, which Jacob secured through the craft of his mother, and the anger of Esau, who vows vengeance. Later he marries a daughter of Ishmael, (Genesis 28:8,9 ) and soon after establishes himself in Mount Seir, where he was living when Jacob returned from Padan-aram rich and powerful, and the two brothers were reconciled
Simeonites - (ssihm' ee oh nitess) People of the tribe of Simeon, the second son of Jacob and Leah (Genesis 29:33 )
Gad - (Hebrew: fortune, luck) ...
Patriarch, seventh son of Jacob (Genesis 35). They were a war-like race whose valor is highly praised in the parting blessing of Moses (Deuteronomy 33), and in the prophecy of Jacob (Genesis 49)
Dowry - The suitor's payment to the father for the wife (Genesis 24:53, Isaac; Genesis 29:18, Jacob; Genesis 34:12, Shechem)
Serah - Abundance; princess, the daughter of Asher and grand-daughter of Jacob (Genesis 46:17 ); called also Sarah (Numbers 26:46 ; RSV, "Serah")
Esau - Son of Isaac and Rebecca, and twin brother of Jacob. The most important events of his life are intimately connected with the life of Jacob. See Jacob
Rebek'ah - ) For nineteen years she was childless: then Esau and Jacob were born, the younger being the mother's companion and favorite. (Genesis 25:19-28 ) Rebekah suggested the deceit that was practiced by Jacob on his blind father. She directed and aided him in carrying it out, foresaw the probable consequence of Esau's anger, and prevented it by moving Isaac to send Jacob away to Padan-aram, (Genesis 27:1 ) . (Genesis 26:7 ) It has been conjectured that she died during Jacob's sojourn in Padan-aram
Ben'Jamin -
The youngest of the children of Jacob. This was by Jacob changed into Benjamin. ( Genesis 35:16,18 ) Until the journeys of Jacob's sons and Jacob himself into Egypt we hear nothing of Benjamin
Galeed - Heap of witness, the name of the pile of stones erected by Jacob and Laban to mark the league of friendship into which they entered with each other (Genesis 31:47,48 ). This was the name given to the "heap" by Jacob
Jacob - Though Jacob often wandered, he returned to GOD at once. GOD is "the God of Jacob
Leah - The elder daughter of Laban, given to Jacob as wife through the artifice of her father. She was 'tender eyed,' and not as beautiful as Rachel; but she was blessed of God in bearing to Jacob six sons and one daughter, and was thus the mother of the heads of the important tribes of Reuben, Levi, and Judah, as well as of Simeon, Issachar, and Zebulun
Heli - Probably the brother of Jacob, Mary's father (Luke 3:23)
Shiloh - ) A word used by Jacob on his deathbed, and interpreted variously, as "the Messiah," or as the city "Shiloh," or as "Rest
ja'Cob - (Jacob did not obtain the blessing because of his deceit, but in spite of it. That which was promised he would have received in some good way; but Jacob and his mother, distrusting God's promise, sought the promised blessing in a wrong way, and received with it trouble and sorrow. ) Jacob, in his 78th year, was sent from the family home to avoid his brother, and to seek a wife among his kindred in Padan-aram. Deborah and Rachel died before he reached Hebron; Joseph, the favorite son of Jacob, was sold into Egypt eleven years before the death of Isaac; and Jacob had probably exceeded his 130th year when he went tither. The example of Jacob is quoted by the first and the last of the minor prophets. Besides the frequent mention of his name in conjunction with the names of the other two patriarchs, there are distinct references to the events in the life of Jacob in four books of the New Testament - ( John 1:51 ; 4:5,12 ; Acts 7:12,16 ; Romans 9:11-13 ; Hebrews 11:21 ; 12:16 )
Rachel - The beautiful daughter of Laban, for whom Jacob served seven years, which seemed to him but a few days, because of his great love for her. When the time was expired Jacob was cheated by Laban, and Leah was given him instead. She was at first childless, and foolishly said to Jacob, "Give me children, or else I die"; for which she was duly rebuked by her husband. Jacob set up a pillar at her grave
Zilpah - The maid of Leah, who became the secondary wife of Jacob, and the mother of Gad and Asher, Genesis 29:24 ; 30:9-13
el-Elo'he-is'Rael - (God, the God of Israel ), the name bestowed by Jacob on the altar which he erected facing the city of Shechem
Shalem - In Genesis 33:13 we read ‘Jacob (on his return from Haran) came to Shalem a city of Shechem’ (RV Dinah - Daughter of Jacob by Leah, Genesis 30:21 , his only daughter named in Scripture. While the family were sojourning near Shalem, she heedlessly associated with the Canaanitish maidens, and fell a victim to the seductive arts of Shechem, a young prince of the land; but was perfidiously and savagely avenged by Simeon and Levi, her full brothers, to the great grief of Jacob their father, Genesis 34:1-31 49:5,7
Naphtali - (a) Son of Jacob and Bilhah, sixth of the Twelve Tribes
Jegar-Sahadutha - Heap of witness, a Chaldee name, equivalent to Galeed in Hebrew, both marking the scene of the covenant between Jacob and Laban, Genesis 31:47
Zebulun - Dwelling, the sixth and youngest son of Jacob and Leah (Genesis 30:20 )
Ashbel - ” Son of Benjamin, grandson of Jacob, and original ancestor of Ashbelite clan (Genesis 46:21 )
Israel (Personal Name) - ” Name God gave Jacob after he wrestled with the divine messenger (Genesis 32:28 ). Afterwards, Jacob was a changed person, limping on a damaged thigh, with new food regulations, and with a new experience of God that influenced the way he lived. Thus Jacob's experience at the Jabbok became the foundation for the nation of God's chosen people
Dinah - Judged; vindicated, daughter of Jacob by Leah, and sister of Simeon and Levi (Genesis 30:21 ). She was seduced by Shechem, the son of Hamor, the Hivite chief, when Jacob's camp was in the neighbourhood of Shechem. Jacob makes frequent reference to this deed of blood with abhorrence and regret (Genesis 34:30 ; 49:5-7 ). She is mentioned among the rest of Jacob's family that went down into Egypt (Genesis 46:8,15 )
el-Elohe-Israel - "The mighty God of Israel," who had just shown His infinite might in saving Jacob (whose name was by God changed to Israel, because by prayer he had might with this mighty God and had prevailed) from Esau his deadly foe. Jacob so called the altar he built on the spot before Shechem, already consecrated by Abram (Genesis 12:7; Genesis 33:19-20)
Patriarch - It is usually applied to the progenitors of the Israelites, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and the sons of Jacob, or to the heads of families before the flood as the antediluvian patriarchs
Leah - The elder daughter of Laban, and the first wife of Jacob, though less beloved than her sister Rachel. She had, through life, the remembrance of the deceit by which her father had imposed her upon Jacob. She was the mother of seven children, among whom were Reuben- Jacob's firstborn-and Judah, the ancestor of the leading tribe among the Jews, of the royal line, and of our Lord, Genesis 29:16-35 ; 30:1 - 21
Dinah - (a) Daughter of Jacob and Leah
el-Bethel - God of Bethel, the name of the place where Jacob had the vision of the ladder, and where he erected an altar (Genesis 31:13 ; 35:7 )
Jahmai - ” Grandson of Issachar, great grandson of Jacob, and clan leader in tribe of Issachar (1 Chronicles 7:2 )
Shechem (2) - (See HAMOR; DINAH; Jacob
Abel-Mizraim - The scene of the mourning for Jacob ( Genesis 50:11 )
Sepulchre - This was the "cave of the field of Machpelah," where also Abraham and Rebekah and Jacob and Leah were burried (79:29-32). In Acts 7:16 it is said that Jacob was "laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought for a sum of money of the sons of Emmor the father of Sychem. " In this way the purchase made by Abraham is not to be confounded with the purchase made by Jacob subsequently in the same district
Rebecca - (Ῥεβέκκα)...
Rebecca, the wife of Isaac, received a Divine oracle before the birth of her twin sons, Esau and Jacob, foretelling her that she would be the mother of two nations or peoples, of whom the elder would serve the younger (Romans 9:10-12, from Genesis 25:24-26). Even within the family of Abraham, to whom the promises were given, God more than once made choice, rejecting Ishmael and accepting Isaac, loving Jacob and hating Esau (Romans 9:7; Romans 9:13). See Jacob and Esau
Esau - (Hebrew: hairy) ...
The eldest son of Isaac and Rebecca and twin-brother of Jacob. In a moment of hunger he exchanged his birthright for a mess of pottage which Jacob had prepared. Preparatory to giving his parting blessing to his son, Isaac bade him procure with his hunting the meat for a savory dish; during Esau's absence Jacob, on the advice of his mother, impersonated his brother by covering his neck and hands with the hide of kids
Laban - In his dealings with Jacob, Laban was scheming and unscrupulous. This was met by craft on Jacob's part, and would doubtless have led to a serious conflict, had not God warned Laban not to speak to Jacob either good or bad. After Jacob had rehearsed all the wrongs and hardships he had endured during the twenty years he had served Laban, they made a covenant together and separated amicably
Levi - The third son of Jacob and Leah. When Jacob blessed his sons, a curse was pronounced on their cruelty, and it is added "I will divide them in Jacob and scatter them in Israel
Laban - His character is shown in the gladness with which he gave his sister Rebekah in marriage to the only son of his rich uncle, Abraham, Genesis 24:30,50 ; and in his deceitful and exacting treatment of Jacob his nephew and son-inlaw, against which Jacob defended himself by cunning as well as fidelity. When the prosperity of the one family and the jealousy of the other rendered peace impossible, Jacob, at the command of God, secretly departed, to go to Canaan
Shechem - Stephen’s address we read that Jacob and the fathers were carried over unto Shechem and laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought of the sons of Hamor in Shechem (Acts 7:16). Jacob was buried at Machpelah (Genesis 50:13), which Abraham bought from the sons of Heth (23). Jacob himself bought ground from the children of Hamor, and in it Joseph was buried (Joshua 24:32). Here Jacob established his residence for some time, and his people entered into the closest relations with the natives. A well, said to have been dug by his orders, was in existence in Christ’s day, and here at Jacob’s well our Lord had His famous interview with the Samaritan woman (John 4)
Esau - Genesis 25:25 (c) This is a type of the flesh and the life of selfishness in contrast with Jacob and the life of faith
Zilpah - Handmaid of Leah, by whom Jacob became father of Gad and Asher
Bilhah - Rachel's handmaid, given by her to Jacob her husband, as a concubinary wife, that, through her she might have a son, Genesis 30:3-4 , &c
Hamor - ) From them Jacob bought for 100 kesita (i. Abraham bought only a burying place, Jacob a dwelling place, which long after was also Joseph's burial place (Joshua 24:32) referred to by Stephen (Acts 7:16). "Jacob and our fathers were carried over into Sychem and laid in a sepulchre that Abraham bought . ...
Stephen with elliptical brevity sums up from six chaps, of Old Testament in one sentence the double purchase (by Abraham from Ephron the Hittite, Genesis 23; and by Jacob from the children of Hamor), the double burial place (Abraham's cave of Machpelah and Jacob's ground near Shechem), and the double burial (of Jacob in the cave of Machpelah, and of Joseph in the ground at Shechem), just because the details were familiar to both himself and the Jewish council; not, as rationalism objects, because he was ignorant of or forgot the historical facts so notorious from the Old Testament
Jacob - Jacob (jâ'kob), supplanter. Jacob, in mature years, was sent from the family home to avoid his brother, and to seek a wife among his kindred in Padanaram. Deborah and Rachel died before he reached Hebron; Joseph, the favorite son of Jacob, was sold into Egypt eleven years before the death of Isaac; and Jacob had probably reached his 130th year when he went thither. The example of Jacob is quoted by the first and the last of the minor prophets. Besides the frequent mention of his name in conjunction with the names of the other two patriarchs, there are distinct references to the events in the life of Jacob in four books of the New Testament—John 1:51; John 4:5; John 4:12; Acts 7:12-15; Romans 9:11-13; Hebrews 11:21; Hebrews 12:16
Laban (2) - Ungenerously, he took 14 years of Jacob his nephew's service, when Jacob had covenanted with him for seven only; he tried to retain his labour without paying his labour's worth (Genesis 31). very frequently, Numbers 14:22) he changed his wages when constrained to remunerate him; and as a covetous master made Jacob accountable for all of the flock that were stolen or torn. Jacob, during the absence of Laban, sheep-shearing, stole away with his family and flocks, crossing the Euphrates for the W. ...
His daughters felt they had no longer inheritance or interest in their father's house, as Laban had sold them, as if strangers, to Jacob for his service, and took all the profit of that service to himself, virtually, said they, "devouring our money" (Genesis 31:14-16), i. consuming the property brought to him by Jacob's service for us. Laban then, suppressing in silence what had been his design really, pretended that his displeasure was only at Jacob's secret departure and the theft of his gods (Genesis 31:5; Genesis 31:7; Genesis 31:9; Genesis 31:13; Genesis 31:16; Genesis 31:24; Genesis 31:26-27; Genesis 31:29; Genesis 31:42), and that otherwise he would have "sent him away with songs, tabret, and harp. ...
When about to make merchandise of his own kinsman, he said to Jacob at their first meeting "surely thou art my bone and my flesh. " (On the length of Jacob's service, 40 years probably, Jacob Laban imposed at the first seven years' close the unattractive Leah on him instead of the younger Rachel whom he loved and for whom he had served. (See Jacob. ) Yet he was shrewd enough to appreciate the temporal prosperity which Jacob's presence by his piety brought with it, but he had no desire to imitate his piety (Genesis 30:27), and finally, when foiled by God in his attempts to overreach and rob Jacob, Laban made a covenant with him, of which the cairn was a memorial, called by Laban, JEGAR SAHADUTHA, and by Jacob Galeed and Mizpah; it was also to be the bound beyond which neither must pass to assail the other. )...
Unscrupulous duplicity and acquisitiveness and hypocritical craft in Laban were overruled to discipline Jacob whose natural character had much of the same elements, but without the hypocrisy, and restrained by genuine grace. Laban was overmatched by Jacob's shrewdness, and restrained from doing him real hurt by God's interposition
Atad - A Canaanite, at whose threshing-floor a solemn mourning was held over the remains of Jacob, on their way from Egypt to Hebron, Genesis 50:10,11
Laban - He employed his son-in-law Jacob for twenty years and was a notoriously unscrupulous and dishonest individual
Onan - He died before the going down of Jacob and his family into Egypt
Embalming - This specifically Egyptian (non-Israelitish) method of treating dead bodies is mentioned in Scripture only in the cases of Jacob and Joseph ( Genesis 50:2 f
Jabbok - A brook on the other side Jordan, rendered memorable from being near the spot where Jacob wrestled with the angel, (Genesis 32:22-24) The name signifies to make empty
Juda - He was a son of Jacob by Lia. On the second journey to Egypt he persuaded Jacob to consent to the departure of Benjamin, for whom he pleaded before Joseph after the incident of the cup, thus forcing Joseph to reveal his identity
Jabbok - ” River near which Jacob wrestled through the night with God (Genesis 32:22 ). See Jacob
Joseph - (a) (1562-1452 BCE) Son of Jacob and Rachel, eleventh of the Twelve Tribes. As the oldest son of his favored wife, Jacob loved him dearly and gave him preferential treatment, causing Joseph's brothers to envy him and sell him into slavery
Eri - ” A son of Gad and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:16 )
Jegar-Sahadutha - The name said to have been given by Laban to the cairn erected on the occasion of the compact between him and Jacob ( Genesis 31:47 )
Mattan - The father of Jacob in the genealogy of Christ
el-Bethel - The name which Jacob is said to have given to the scene of his vision on his way back from Paddau-aram, Genesis 35:7 (P el-Beth'el - (the God of Bethel ), the name which Jacob is said to have bestowed on the place at which God appeared to him when he was flying from Esau
Patriarchs, the - Israel's founding fathers—Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and the twelve sons of Jacob (Israel). The promises made to Abraham established the concept of a people descended through Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, who would be in a special historical and spiritual relationship with God. Esau grew up to be a hunter, while Jacob followed the more sedentary life-style of his father by supervising the family's flocks and herds, moving with them when it was necessary to find fresh pasture (Genesis 25:27 ). Isaac unfortunately provoked sibling rivalry by favoring Esau above Jacob. The former brought his father tasty venison, whereas Jacob's culinary expertise seems only to have extended to preparing lentil soup (Genesis 25:28-29 ). In a moment of desperate hunger, Esau traded his birthright for some of Jacob's soup, thereby transferring to his brother a double portion of Isaac's estate as well as other rights. ...
In old age, Isaac's sight failed; and, when it became apparent that Esau might inherit the extra birthright provision after all, Rebekah conspired with her favorite son Jacob to deceive Isaac into blessing him rather than Esau. To escape his vengeance Jacob fled to Mesopotamia on his father's instructions. Jacob later encountered the family of Laban, son of Nahor, and in due course married two of Laban's daughters. After some years absence Jacob finally returned to Mamre, where his father was living, and along with Esau buried him when he died aged 180 years. ...
The life of Jacob, the last of the three great patriarchs, was marked by migrations, as had been the case with his ancestors. Although he lived successively at Shechem (Genesis 33:18-20 ), Bethel Genesis 35:6-7 ), and Hebron (Genesis 35:27 ), Jacob was basically a resident alien who did not have a capital city. ...
Jacob's title as supplanter was fulfilled most noticeably in his dealings with his twin brother Esau. ...
The deception which Jacob perpetrated upon his father and Esau made Jacob afraid of his brother for many years. Ironically, Jacob himself was the victim of deception by Laban of Nahor, a stubborn and greedy men. ...
Jacob's relationships with his wives were complicated when Leah gave birth to a total of six sons and a daughter (Genesis 30:20-21 ), whereas Rachel remained childless for years. The situation improved slightly for Rachel when Jacob, following Abraham's example, had two sons by Bilhah, Rachel's maid (Genesis 30:3-8 ). Not to be outdone, Leah also gave her handmaid Zilpah to Jacob, and she bore him two sons. Finally, Rachel conceived and bore Jacob a son named Joseph, who as a son of Jacob's old age was to become his favorite. ...
By this time Jacob's flocks had increased as well as his family. Meanwhile Laban's two daughters felt that they, as well as their husband Jacob, were being treated badly by Laban (Genesis 31:15 ), and all of them plotted to leave Paddan-Aram quietly. God intervened in a night vision, and a restrained Laban made a covenant of peace with Jacob. ...
Perhaps the greatest crisis in Jacob's adult life was that of his reconciliation with Esau (Genesis 32:1 ). When Jacob finally met his brother, he observed all the traditional courtesies and was reunited with Esau in a tearful greeting. Esau accepted Jacob's gift after the usual denial of need and offered to escort Jacob home. Jacob declined and moved to Succoth, an ancient settlement in Transjordan where he stayed for a time before moving to more permanent quarters in Shechem (Genesis 33:18 ). ...
Just before Isaac's death, God appeared again to Jacob (Genesis 35:9 ) and renewed the promise of his new name. Jacob resided in Canaan thereafter, and only left when a famine overtook the land. Jacob and his sons were invited to live in Egypt by Joseph. As his life drew to a close Jacob, like his father Isaac, became blind; but he blessed his sons by means of a spoken last will and testament, after which he died peacefully. Despite his apparent materialism, Jacob was a person of deep spirituality who, like Abraham, was esteemed highly by his pagan neighbors. Jacob trusted the God whom he had seen at Peniel to implement the covenant promises through him; and when he died, he left behind a clearly burgeoning nation. See Jacob . All such dates do not allow time for the patriarchal traditions to have developed and make it impossible for Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob to be fitted realistically into an already-known chronology
Patriarch - A name employed in the New Testament with reference to Abraham (Hebrews 7:4 ), the sons of Jacob (Acts 7:8,9 ), and to David (2:29). This name is generally applied to the progenitors of families or "heads of the fathers" (Joshua 14:1 ) mentioned in Scripture, and they are spoken of as antediluvian (from Adam to Noah) and post-diluvian (from Noah to Jacob) patriachs. But the expression "the patriarch," by way of eminence, is applied to the twelve sons of Jacob, or to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Atad - Place near the Jordan, where Joseph, his brethren, and the Egyptians made great lamentation at the burial of Jacob
Simeon - Son of Jacob, by Leah
Shalem - This is judged to be not a proper name, but that the passage should read, Jacob came 'safely' to the city of Shechem
Galeed - The name given by Jacob to the heap of stones raised to witness the covenant made between him and Laban
Abel-Mizraim - This name was given at the floor of Atad, on the occasion of the funeral of Jacob
ha'Mor - (an ass ), a Hivite who at the time of the entrance of Jacob on Palestine was prince of the land and city of Shechem
Integrity - Several Old Testament characters are designated persons of integrity: Noah ( Genesis 6:9 ); Abraham (Genesis 17:1 ); Jacob (Genesis 25:27 ); Job (Job 1:1 ,Job 1:1,1:8 ; Job 2:3 ); and David (1 Kings 9:4 ). Inclusion of Jacob is surprising since he is better known for his deceit (Genesis 27:5-27 ; Genesis 30:37-43 ; Genesis 33:13-17 ). English translators describe Jacob as a plain (KJV), peaceful (NAS), or quiet man (NRSV, NIV, REB)
el-Elohe-Israel - ” The name Jacob gave altar he set up in land he bought near Shechem (Genesis 33:20 )
Zebulun - Son of Jacob and Leah
Battle Axe - It is referred metaphorically to Jacob as God's weapon to break the nations into pieces
Zilpah - Leah's handmaid, given by Laban (Genesis 29:24) and by Leah to Jacob, who by her begat Gad and Asher (Genesis 30:9-13; Genesis 35:26; Genesis 37:2; Genesis 46:18)
el-Elohe-Israel - The name bestowed by Jacob on the altar which he erected facing the city of Shechem
Bil'Hah - (timid, bashful ), handmaid of Rachel, ( Genesis 29:29 ) and concubine of Jacob, to whom she bore Dan and Naphtali
Haggi - Son of Gad and grandson of Jacob and thus original ancestor of clan of Haggites (Genesis 46:16 ; Numbers 26:15 )
Arod - ”...
Arodi (Genesis 46:16 ) or Arod (Numbers 26:17 ) was son of Gad and grandson of Jacob
Rachel - (Hebrew: a ewe) ...
Laban's younger daughter and favorite wife of Jacob (Genesis 29-31)
Issachar - (Hebrew: reward) ...
Ninth son of Jacob, fifth son of Lia. The character of the tribe is told in the words of Jacob (Genesis 49), satisfied with the richness of its territory, through which passed numerous caravans, the tribe of Issachar thought only of its own well-being; and so, rendering itself subordinate to strangers, found slavery (rest) preferable to liberty
Guile - Jacob dressed in his brother's clothes with the goatskins on his arms and neck is Scripture's best-known illustration of guile (Genesis 27:35 ; KJV, subtilty; modern translations, deceitfully). Jesus perhaps had this image of Jacob (Israel) in mind when pronouncing Nathanael “an Israelite indeed in whom is no guile” (John 1:47 ; compare John 1:51 with Genesis 28:12 )
Ephraim - The first incident recorded regarding him is his being placed, along with his brother Manasseh, before their grandfather, Jacob, that he might bless them (48:10; Compare 27:1). The intention of Joseph was that the right hand of the aged patriarch should be placed on the head of the elder of the two; but Jacob set Ephraim the younger before his brother, "guiding his hands wittingly
Shalem - Rather "Jacob came in peace to the city of Shechem. between Shechem and the Jordan valley where at Succoth Jacob was just before (Genesis 33:17). Moreover, if Shalem were Salim, Jacob's well and Joseph's tomb would have to be removed from their appropriate traditional site to a spot further E
Leah - By her father Laban's deceit she was married to Jacob; she bore him six sons and a daughter, but seems to have been ever painfully sensible that her husband's affections were given mainly to her sister Rachel. She willingly accompanied Jacob into Canaan, Genesis 31:1-55; and there she died, when, is not stated, but it was before the family of Israel went down into Egypt, and she was buried in the cave of Machpelah
Jacob - BE SURE YOUR SIN WILL FIND YOU OUT...
THERE was no Old Testament saint of them all who, first and last, saw more of the favour and forgiveness of God than Jacob. And yet, with all that, the great sins of Jacob's youth and the great sinfulness of Jacob's heart both found him out every day he lived down to the day of his death. Of Jacob, and of Rebekah his mother, it may truly be said, Thou, O Lord, wast a God that forgavest them, though Thou tookest vengeance on their inventions. It is part of Moses' subtlety, as Philo calls it, to tell us how much more Rebekah loved Jacob than she loved Esau, whom Isaac loved; and then, to go on to give us two examples, and two examples only, of that love. The first example of Rebekah's motherly love is seen when she dresses up Jacob in Esau's clothes, and drills him into the very tones of Esau's voice, as also into all Esau's hearty huntsman's ways in the house, till she has rehearsed her favourite son Jacob into a finished and perfect supplanter. And then, her second love is seen in the terror and in the haste with which she ships off Jacob to Haran lest Esau in his revenge should send one of his shafts through the supplanter's heart. But Jacob had never been out of sight of his mother's tent-pole till now. And the first of Jacob's open-air nights is a night to be remembered, as we say. Poor Jacob! This is the beginning of the visitation of the iniquity of the fathers upon the children to the third and fourth generation. And were it not that Jacob, and all his true seed, are known to themselves and to us by the hundred and sixteenth psalm: 'The sorrows of death compassed me, and the pains of hell gat hold upon me; I found trouble and sorrow. Jacob dreamed that night because Rebekah had neither a Bible nor a Pilgrim's Progress, nor a hymn-book, to put into his scrip beside his bread and his dates and his oil. And thus it was that Jacob dreamed as he did dream his first night away from home. How dreadful is this place! Jacob had been taught to feel and to say how dreadful was that place where his father's altar was built; and those places where God had come down to talk with Adam, and Abel, and Noah, and Abraham, and Hagar. But Jacob had no idea that God was at Luz, or would ever come down to talk with him there. How dreadful did all Jacob's life of sin look at Luz! He had had his own thoughts about himself, and about his mother, and about his father, and about his brother all these last three days across the wilderness. But it was not till that morning at Luz that Jacob learned to say: Against Thee, Thee only, have I sinned! How dreadful did his past life look now, as it lay naked and open under that gate of heaven and that shining ladder! The lasting lesson of that best of all mornings to Jacob is memorably preserved to us and to our children in our Second Paraphrase; and as we sing or say to God that noble piece we still reap into our own hearts the first sheaf out of the rich harvest of Jacob's life. We always read that chapter and sing that paraphrase on the Sabbath night before we emigrate another of the sons of Jacob; but, alas! too late; for by that time our family worship, like Isaae's that night, is but locking the stable door after the steed is stolen. ...
What a down-come it was from the covenant-heights of Bethel to the cattle-troughs of Haran! What a cruel fall from the company of ascending and descending angels into the clutches of a finished rogue like Laban! Jacob had been all but carried up of angels from Bethel and taken into an inheritance incorruptible and undefiled; but, instead of that, he is taken down to Padan-arain, where he is cheated out of his wages, and cheated out of his wife, and cheated, and cheated, and cheated again, ten times cheated, and that too by his own mother's brother, till cheating came out of Jacob's nostrils, and stank in his eyes, and became hateful as hell to Jacob's heart. Other people had been cheating their fathers and their brothers all these years as well as Rebekah and Jacob. Laban, Rebekah's brother, and bone of her bone, had been making as pious speeches at Bethuel's blind bedside as ever Jacob made at Isaac's. 'What is this that thou hast done unto me? Wherefore hast thou so beguiled me?'-Jacob appealed and remonstrated in his sweet, injured, salad innocence. Jacob had never seen or heard the like of it in his country. It shocked terribly and irrecoverably Jacob's inborn sense of right and wrong; it almost shook down Jacob's whole faith in the God of Bethel. It was Jacob's salvation that he fell into the hands of that cruel land-shark, his uncle Laban. Jacob's salvation somewhat nearer now than when he believed at Bethel; but, all the same, what is bred in the bone is not got clean rid of in a day. It were laughable to a degree, if it were not so sad, to see Jacob, after all his smart, still peeling the stakes of poplar, and chestnut, and hazel where the cattle came to drink, till it came about that all the feebler births in the cattle-pens were Laban's and all the stronger were Jacob's. The prince in the Tempest is wine and water compared with Jacob. But this is still better than either: 'Jacob served seven years for Rachel, and they seemed to him but a few days, for the love he had to her. And Jacob's heart often trembled and often stood still all the way of the wilderness from Haran to the Jabbok. And so did Jacob. Jacob took a great herd of Laban's whitest cattle: goats, and camels, and kine, and everything he could think of, and sent herd after herd on beforehand so as to quench the embers of his brother's wrath. ' But, to Jacob's consternation, Esau never looked at those lowing, snow-white herds, but put on his armour in silence, and came posting north at the head of four hundred men. When Jacob's scouts returned and told him alt that, he was in absolute desperation. When he saw that Jacob envied it, Esau smoothed the stout branch better, and straightened it out, and carved E. into a true lover's knot under the handle of it, and laid it beside Jacob's lentil dish on the morning of their double birthday. That staff felt like so much lead when Jacob took it into his hand to run from home; but he would need it, and, though it sometimes burned his hand to a red-hot cinder, somehow he never could throw it away. Jacob and his staff were a perfect proverb in Padan-aram. Jacob never felt alone when he had his staff in his hand; and many a time he was overheard talking to it, and it to him. brown old plaid that you bought while yet you were in your mother's house,-I have one,-and you feel sure that you could pit that old plaid with a story hanging at every single thrum and tassel of it, against Jacob's so-travelled staff any day. And when the night fell upon him Jacob was left alone. But now, who can tell how near Esau may be by this time! That cunning, cruel, revengeful man! Till, as the darkness fell so obscure, every plunge of the Jabbok, and every roar of the storm, made Jacob feel the smell of Esau's coat and the blow of his hairy hand. Whether in the body, Jacob to the day of his death could never tell; or whether out of the body, Jacob could never tell; but such a night of terror and of battle no other man ever spent. It was both God and Esau; till Jacob to the day of his death could never tell Who the terrible Wrestler really was Just before the morning broke, with one last wrench Jacob was left halt and lame for life. For as He departed and the morning broke, the mysterious Han said to Jacob as he lay prostrate at His feet, Thou art henceforth no longer Jacob, but Israel, for as a prince thou hast power with God and with men, and hast prevailed. ...
Jacob's new name is a great surprise to us. We would never have called Jacob a prince. But God proclaims Jacob ever after the Jabbok none of our names, but a prince. Prayer, such prayer as Jacob prayed that night, is the princeliest act any man can possibly perform. The noblest, the grandest, the boldest, the most magnificent act a human being can perform on this earth is to pray; to pray, that is, as Jacob prayed at Peniel. Jacob had twenty years, and more, of sin and of sorrow, of remorse and of repentance, of gratitude for such a miraculous past, and of beaten-back effort after a better life, and then, to crown all, he had that unparalleled night of fear and prayer at the Jabbok; a night's work such that even the Bible has nothing else like it till our Lord's night in Gethsemane,-and it is only after all that, and far more than Moses with all his honesty and all his subtlety has told us,-it is only then that Jacob is proclaimed of God a prince with God. Jacob's thigh was out of joint, and our Lord's sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling to the ground. Only pray, then; only Pray aright, and enough, and it will change your whole nature as it changed Jacob's. Happy is he that hath the God of Jacob for his help!...
Calcol - 1 Chronicles 2:6 makes him a grandson of Judah, the son of Jacob
Bilhah - The handmaid of Rachel, given by her to her husband Jacob when herself childless, that she might become a mother through her handmaid
Esau - On one occasion, Esau, returning from the fields greatly fatigued, desired Jacob to give him some red pottage, which he was then preparing. Jacob consented, provided Esau would sell him his birthright. The artifice of his mother, however, counteracted his purpose; and she contrived to impose upon Isaac, and to obtain the father's principal blessing for her son Jacob. Esau was indignant on account of this treachery, and determined to kill Jacob as soon as their father should die. Rebekah again interposed, and sent Jacob away to her brother Laban, with whom he might be secure. When Jacob returned, after a long absence, to his father's country, with a numerous family, and large flocks and herds, he dreaded his brother's displeasure; but they had an amicable and affectionate interview. ) The time of his death is not mentioned; but Bishop Cumberland thinks it is probable that he died about the same time with his brother Jacob, at the age of about one hundred and forty-seven years, Genesis 25-36. ) That although it was always the design of God that the blessing connected with primogeniture in the family of Abraham should be enjoyed by Jacob, and to exercise his sovereignty in changing the succession in which the promises of the Abrahamic covenant might descend; yet the conduct of Rebekah and Jacob was reprehensible in endeavouring to bring about the divine design by the unworthy means of contrivance and deceit; and they were punished for their presumption by their sufferings. It was wanton, because he, though faint, could be in no danger of not obtaining a supply of food in his father's house; and was therefore wholly influenced by his appetite, excited by the delicacy of Jacob's pottage
Isaac - In answer to their prayers, God gave them twin sons, Esau and Jacob. God declared that his covenant people would come through Jacob, though Esau also would father a nation (Genesis 25:21-26). Isaac determined to pass on the divine blessing to Esau, even though God had said it was to go to Jacob (Genesis 27:4). But Rebekah and Jacob tricked Isaac into giving the blessing to Jacob (Genesis 27:28-29). Later Isaac passed on the blessing of the Abrahamic covenant to Jacob knowingly and willingly (Genesis 28:3-4). ...
Because of the deceit over Isaac’s blessing, Esau tried to kill Jacob. Jacob escaped to Paddan-aram (Genesis 27:41; Genesis 28:1-2; Genesis 28:5). When Jacob returned more than twenty years later, there was a reunion between the two brothers (Genesis 31:38; Genesis 33:4-5)
Jahzeel - ” Son of Naphtali, grandson of Jacob, and clan leader in tribe of Naphtali (Genesis 46:24 ; Numbers 26:48 )
Macpelah - Sarah was first buried there, Genesis 23:1-20 ; and afterwards Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, with Rebekah, Leah, etc
Benjamin - (a) (1553-1438 BCE) Son of Jacob and Rachel, youngest of the Twelve Tribes. With his brother Joseph’s sale and presumed death, he assumed the status of Jacobs’s favored son
Guni - Son of Naphtali and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:24 ), thus head of the Gunite clan (Numbers 26:48 )
Ard - A son of Benjamin and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:21 )
Abel-Mizraim - " Here the Egyptians mourned seventy days for Jacob (Genesis 50:4-11 )
Heli - His relationship to Jesus is variously explained by Bible students in light of Matthew 1:16 which makes Joseph's father to be Jacob. Either Jacob and Heli are variant names of the same person, “son of” means “descendant of” as in other genealogies, or Luke preserved the genealogy of Mary rather than of Joseph
Levi -
The third son of Jacob by Leah. He and his three sons went down with Jacob (46:11) into Egypt, where he died at the age of one hundred and thirty-seven years (Exodus 6:16 )
Penuel - " Here Jacob wrestled (Genesis 32:24-32 ) "with a man" ("the angel", Hosea 12:4 . Jacob says of him, "I have seen God face to face") "till the break of day
Genesis - The general divisions of the book are as follows: ...
the creation of the world and early history of mankind (1-11), including the Fall, the promise of a Redeemer, and the Deluge; ...
the early history of the Jews (12-50), including Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph.
The Prophecy of Jacob (49) contains one of the most important Messianic prophecies in favor of the tribe of Juda, which will be the cradle of the Redeemer
Issachar - Recompense, so named by Leah his mother, Genesis 30:18 , the ninth son of Jacob, born B. The character of his posterity was foretold by Jacob and by Moses, Genesis 49:14,15 Deuteronomy 33:18,19
Scriptural Patriarchs - First there are the three great patriarchs, to whom all render special praise: Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Of Jacob sprang twelve sons, and twelve patriarchs, founders of the race of Israel
Goshen - Goshen was the territory where the family of Jacob settled in Egypt. The descendants of Jacob lived there for about four hundred years, and during that time they multiplied enormously
Mup'Pim - (serpent ), a Benjamite, and one of the fourteen descendants of Rachael who belonged to the original colony of the sons of Jacob in Egypt
el-Elohe-Isreal - Mighty one; God of Israel, the name which Jacob gave to the alter which he erected on the piece of land where he pitched his tent before Shechem, and which he afterwards purchased from the sons of Hamor (Genesis 33:20 )
Jahleel - ” A son of Zebulun and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:14 ) who became a clan leader in tribe of Zebulun (Numbers 26:26 )
Jemuel - ” Son of Simeon, grandson of Jacob, and head of clan in Israel (Genesis 46:10 ; Exodus 6:15 )
Israel - Means "prince of G-d"; Israel is (a) another name for the patriarch Jacob (b) the Jewish people (c) an Israelite - a Jew who is neither a Kohen nor a Levite (d) a common given name (e) the Land of Israel
Simeon - (a) (1567-1447 BCE) Second son of Jacob and Leah, second of the Twelve Tribes
Reuben - Eldest son of Jacob by Leah
Peniel - Name given by Jacob to the place where he saw God face to face and wrestled with Him (Genesis 32:30; compare Genesis 33:10; Judges 8:5; Judges 8:8; 1 Kings 12:25)
Dinah - Daughter of Jacob and Leah: defiled by Shechem, son of the chieftain Hamor, which led to the massacre of the Shechemites through the craftiness and cruelty of Simeon and Levi
Rachel - The daughter of Laban and wife of Jacob
Jacob - It was observed, that at his birth he held his brother Esau's heel, and for this reason was called Jacob, Genesis 25:26 , which signifies "he supplanted. " Jacob was of a meek and peaceable temper, and loved a quiet pastoral life; whereas Esau was of a fierce and turbulent nature, and was fond of hunting. Isaac had a particular fondness for Esau; but Rebekah was more attached to Jacob. The manner in which Jacob purchased his brother's birthright for a mess of pottage, and supplanted him by obtaining Isaac's blessing, is already referred to in the article ESAU. ...
The events of the interesting and chequered life of Jacob are so plainly and consecutively narrated by Moses, that they are familiar to all; but upon some of them a few remarks may be useful. As to the purchase of the birthright, Jacob appears to have been innocent so far as any guile on his part, or real necessity from hunger on the part of Esau, is involved in the question; but his obtaining the ratification of this by the blessing of Isaac though agreeable, indeed, to the purpose of God, that the elder should serve the younger, was blamable as to the means employed. Hales on this transaction implicate Isaac also:—Thirty-seven years after, when Jacob was seventy-seven years old, according to Abulfaragi, and Isaac a hundred and thirty-seven, when he was old, and his sight had failed, and he expected soon to die, his partiality for Esau led him to attempt to set aside the oracle, and the cession of Esau's birthright to Jacob, by conferring on him the blessing of Abraham, in reward for bringing him savoury venison to eat, before his death. In this design, however, he was disappointed by the artifice of Rebekah, who dressed her favourite Jacob in his brother's clothes, and made him personate Esau, and thereby surreptitiously obtained for him the blessing: "Let people serve thee, and nations bow down to thee: be lord over thy brethren, and let thy mother's sons bow down to thee: cursed be every one that curseth thee, and blessed be he that blesseth thee," Genesis 27:1-29 . It is remarkable that, notwithstanding the agitation of Isaac, when "he trembled very exceedingly," at the detection of the fraud, he did not attempt to rescind the blessing, nor transfer it to Esau; but, on the contrary, confirmed it on Jacob: "Yea, and he shall be blessed. ...
According to this view, all the parties were more or less culpable; Isaac, for endeavouring to set aside the oracle which had been pronounced in favour of his younger son; but of which he might have an obscure conception; Esau, for wishing to deprive his brother of the blessing which he had himself relinquished; and Rebekah and Jacob, for securing it by fraudulent means, not trusting wholly in the Lord. For Jacob afterward reverenced Esau as his elder brother, and insisted on Esau's accepting a present from his hand in token of submission Genesis 33:3-15 . Esau also appears to have possessed himself of his father's property during Jacob's long exile. But though the intention of Rebekah and Jacob might have been free from worldly or mercenary motives, they ought not to have done evil that good might come. And they were both severely punished in this life for their fraud, which destroyed the peace of the family, and planted a mortal enmity in the breast of Esau against his brother: "Is he not rightly named Jacob?" a supplanter; "for he hath supplanted me these two times: he took away my birthright, and lo, now he hath taken away my blessing. The days of mourning for my father are at hand; then will I slay my brother Jacob,"...
Genesis 27:36-41 . And there can be little doubt of his intention of executing his threat, when he came to meet him on his return, with such an armed force as strongly alarmed Jacob's fears, had not God changed the spirit of Esau into mildness, so that "he ran to meet Jacob, and fell on his neck, and they wept," Genesis 33:4 . " Jacob, also, had abundant reason to say, "Few and evil have been the days of the years of my pilgrimage,"...
Genesis 47:9 . For the circumstances which led Jacob into Egypt, see JOSEPH . ...
When Jacob, at the invitation of Joseph, went down to Egypt, Joseph introduced his father to his royal master; and the patriarch, in his priestly character, blessed Pharaoh, and supplicated the divine favour for the king. The venerable appearance and the pious demeanour of Jacob led the monarch to inquire his years; to which he replied, "The days of the years of my pilgrimage are a hundred and thirty years: few and evil have the days of the years of my life been; and I have not attained unto the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage. ...
Jacob spent the remainder of his days in tranquillity and prosperity, enjoying the society of his beloved child seventeen years. Shortly after this, Jacob was taken ill, and it being reported to Joseph, he hastened to the bedside of his father, taking with him his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim. On hearing that his son was come, Jacob exerted all his strength, and sat up in his bed to receive him, and to impart that blessing which, in the spirit of prophecy, he was commissioned to bequeath. Joseph wished to correct the mistake of his father, but Jacob persisted, being guided by a divine impulse; and he gave to each of the lads a portion in Israel, at the same time declaring that the younger should be greater than the elder, Genesis 48:22 . When this interview was ended, Jacob caused all his sons to assemble round his dying bed, that he might inform them what would befall them in the last days, Genesis 49:1-2 . Hitherto the promise was confined generally to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, that from them the glorious blessing should arise; but now, under the divine direction, the dying patriarch fortels in what tribe, and at what period, the great Restorer shall come. ...
When Jacob had finished blessing his sons, he charged them to bury him in the cave of Machpelah, with Abraham and Isaac, and, "gathering his feet into the bed, he yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his people,"...
Genesis 49:33 . After a general mourning of seventy days, he solicited the king's permission to go with the remains of Jacob into Canaan, to which Pharaoh consented; and with Joseph went up all the state officers and principal nobility of Egypt, so that when they came to the place of interment, the Canaanites were astonished, and said, "This is a grievous mourning to the Egyptians," Genesis 50:1-11
Abelmizraim - Meadow of the Egyptians; so called from the seven days' lamentation of Joseph and his company, on bringing up the body of Jacob from Egypt for burial, Genesis 50:10,11
Er - Oldest son of Judah and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 38:3 )
Jeshurun - A poetical name of Israel, probably derived from a root meaning to be upright, and applied to the people of God as the objects of his justifying love, which does not "behold iniquity in Jacob," Deuteronomy 32:5 33:5,26 Isaiah 44:2
Jegar-Sahadutha - Pile of testimony, the Aramaic or Syriac name which Laban gave to the pile of stones erected as a memorial of the covenant between him and Jacob (Genesis 31:47 ), who, however, called it in Hebrew by an equivalent name, Galeed (q
Bilhah - Due to her own childlessness, Rachel gave her to her husband Jacob as a concubine, hoping to rare the progeny of this union
Esau - A twin son with Jacob of Isaac and Rebekah, though Esau was actually the first-born. The first thing we read of him is the selling of his birthright to his over-reaching brother Jacob, for a mess of pottage. ...
Jacob, through want of faith in God, surreptitiously obtained the blessing of his father (who, contrary to God's election, intended it for Esau), in which Isaac said that he had made Jacob Esau's lord, and given all his brethren to be his servants. When he went to meet Jacob he was accompaniedby four hundred men. It may be God had warned Esau, as He did Laban, not to hurt Jacob; or possibly his anger may have abated: forwhen they approached, "Esau ran to meet him, and embracedhim, and fell on his neck and kissed him, and they wept. ...
In Malachi 1:2,3 Esau is referred to as having been hated by Jehovah, whereas Jacob had been loved
Nahor - A correspondence was maintained between the family of Abraham in Canaan and the relatives in the old ancestral home at Haran till the time of Jacob. When Jacob fled from Haran all intercourse between the two branches of the family came to an end (Genesis 31:55 )
Jacobites - A sect of Christians in Syria and Mesopotamia; so called, either from Jacob, a Syrian, who lived in the reign of the emperor Mauritius, or from one Jacob, a monk, who flourished in the year 550. The Jacobites are of two sects, some following the rites of the Latin church, and others continuing separated from the church of Rome
Manasseh - Manasseh was adopted by Jacob as one to receive his blessing. Jacob crossed his hands and gave that blessing to Ephraim. Jacob crossed his hands and gave that blessing to Ephraim
Patriarch - As applied to Bible characters, the term usually denotes either the forefathers of the human race or the progenitors of Israel-Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and his twelve sons. ’ In 4 Maccabees 7:19 reference is made to ‘our patriarchs Abraham, Isaac and Jacob’ (cf. In the NT the term is applied to Abraham (Hebrews 7:4), to the sons of Jacob (Acts 7:8 f
Lia - (Hebrew: weary) ...
Elder daughter of Laban, married by stratagem to Jacob who had no love for her (Genesis 29); mother of Ruben, Simeon, Levi, Juda, Issachar, Zabulon, and Dina (Genesis 29,30)
Leah - (Hebrew: weary) ...
Elder daughter of Laban, married by stratagem to Jacob who had no love for her (Genesis 29); mother of Ruben, Simeon, Levi, Juda, Issachar, Zabulon, and Dina (Genesis 29,30)
Arphaxad - From Arphaxad in a direct line proceeded Heber, Abraham, Jacob, and consequently all the people of Israel (Genesis 10)
Zil'Pah - (a trickling ), a Syrian given by Laban to his daughter Leah as an attendant, ( Genesis 29:24 ) and by Leah to Jacob as a concubine
Rebekah - " (See Jacob; ESAU. ) Jacob was her favorite because of his gentle domestic habits (Genesis 25:28). This partiality led her to the deceit practiced on Isaac to gain his blessing for Jacob (Genesis 27). ...
She saved Jacob from Esau's murderous fury by inducing Isaac to send him away to Padan Aram (Genesis 28:1-5); thus she brought on herself by the one great sin the loss of her favorite's presence for the rest of her life, for she was not alive when he returned, Isaac alone survived (Genesis 35:27). Faith in God's promise as to Jacob the younger, given before birth, prompted her to seek the blessing for him; unbelief and ignorance of God's holiness tempted her to do evil that good might come. Deborah her nurse died and was buried at Bethel on Jacob's return. ) She evidently had gone back to Padan Aram, and joined Jacob after her mistress' death
Jacob - When Isaac was about 160 years of age, Jacob and his mother conspired to deceive the aged patriarch (Genesis 27 ), with the view of procuring the transfer of the birthright to himself. ...
Soon after his acquisition of his father's blessing (Genesis 27 ), Jacob became conscious of his guilt; and afraid of the anger of Esau, at the suggestion of Rebekah Isaac sent him away to Haran, 400 miles or more, to find a wife among his cousins, the family of Laban, the Syrian (28). Laban would not consent to give him his daughter in marriage till he had served seven years; but to Jacob these years "seemed but a few days, for the love he had to her. " But when the seven years were expired, Laban craftily deceived Jacob, and gave him his daughter Leah. " ...
At the close of the fourteen years of service, Jacob desired to return to his parents, but at the entreaty of Laban he tarried yet six years with him, tending his flocks (31:41). Laban was angry when he heard that Jacob had set out on his journey, and pursued after him, overtaking him in seven days. After much recrimination and reproach directed against Jacob, Laban is at length pacified, and taking an affectionate farewell of his daughters, returns to his home in Padanaram. He feels that he must now depend only on God, and he betakes himself to him in earnest prayer, and sends on before him a munificent present to Esau, "a present to my lord Esau from thy servant Jacob. " Jacob's family were then transported across the Jabbok; but he himself remained behind, spending the night in communion with God. In this mysterious contest Jacob prevailed, and as a memorial of it his name was changed to Israel (wrestler with God); and the place where this occured he called Peniel, "for", said he, "I have seen God face to face, and my life is preserved" (32:25-31). ...
After this anxious night, Jacob went on his way, halting, mysteriously weakened by the conflict, but strong in the assurance of the divine favour. After a brief sojourn at Succoth, Jacob moved forward and pitched his tent near Shechem (q. The complete reconciliation between Esau and Jacob was shown by their uniting in the burial of the patriarch (35:27-29). ...
Jacob was soon after this deeply grieved by the loss of his beloved son Joseph through the jealousy of his brothers (37:33). Here Jacob, "after being strangely tossed about on a very rough ocean, found at last a tranquil harbour, where all the best affections of his nature were gently exercised and largely unfolded" (Genesis 48 ). ) ...
The history of Jacob is referred to by the prophets ( Hosea 12:3,4,12 ) and (Malachi 1:2 )
Hirah - A friend of Judah, the son of Jacob, whom Judah was visiting when he met Shuah, who bore three of his sons (Genesis 38:1-12 )
Esau - He sold his birthright to his younger twin Jacob
Akkub - (Another form of Jacob)
Laban - The Syrian, son of Bethuel, brother to Rebekah, and father to Rachel, whose history forms so interesting a page in Scripture from his connection with Jacob
Levi - (a) (1567-1429 BCE) Third son of Jacob and Leah, third of the Twelve Tribes
Isaac - A few years later he married Bathuel's daughter, Rebecca, whom one of his father's servants had brought from Mesopotamia and who, at an advanced age, bore him twin sons, Jacob and Esau. During his last years occurred the incident of his conferring upon Jacob the blessing which he had always intended for Esau
Machpelah - ” Burial place located near Hebron for Sarah (Genesis 23:19 ), Abraham (Genesis 25:9 ), Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob, Leah, and probably other members of the family. Jacob requested burial there before he died in Egypt, and was returned there by his sons (Genesis 49:29 ; Genesis 50:13 )
Penuel - The place where the mysterious man wrestled with Jacob. Jacob gave it this name, signifying 'face of God,' because, as he said, he had seen God face to face, and his life was preserved
di'Nah - (judged, acquitted ), the daughter of Jacob by Leah. (Genesis 34:12 ) This proposal was accepted, the sons of Jacob demanding, as a condition of the proposed union, the circumcision of the Shechemites
Dinah - The daughter of Jacob by Leah, and sister of Simeon and Levi, according to Genesis 30:21 . , where the birth stories of Jacob’s children are given, of other daughters of Jacob; but Genesis 37:35 (J
The story, like many others, introduced as episodes in the family history of Jacob, should probably receive a tribal interpretation
Mattan - ...
...
The son of Eleazar, and father of Jacob, who was the father of Joseph, the husband of the Virgin Mary (Matthew 1:15 )
Merari - Sad; bitter, the youngest son of Levi, born before the descent of Jacob into Egypt, and one of the seventy who accompanied him thither (Genesis 46:11 ; Exodus 6:16 )
Pottage - Jacob served pottage and bread to the famished Esau in return for the birthright (Genesis 25:29-34 )
Rachel - Second daughter of Laban; second – but favored – wife of Jacob
Amish - ) Of, pertaining to, or designating, the followers of Jacob Amman, a strict Mennonite of the 17th century, who even proscribed the use of buttons and shaving as "worldly conformity"
Zilpah - ” Leah's maid (Genesis 29:24 ; Genesis 46:18 ), given to Jacob as a concubine (Genesis 30:9 ; Genesis 37:2 ); mother of Gad and Asher who were regarded as Leah's sons (Genesis 30:10 ,Genesis 30:10,30:12 ; Genesis 35:26 )
Kid - As an article of food the kid is considered a dainty: it was with kids that Rebekah prepared the savoury meat as venison, wherewith Jacob deceived his father
je'Gar-Sahadu'Tha - (heap of testimony ), the Aramaean name given by Laban the Syrian to the heap of stones which he erected as a memorial of the compact between Jacob and himself
Thigh - When the “stranger” at Peniel did not prevail against Jacob, he touched Jacob in the hollow of his thigh, leaving him limping ( Genesis 32:25-32 ). Jacob escaped the struggle broken but unbowed
Whelp - Genesis 49:9 (a) This type represents Judah as the offspring of Jacob. Jacob is the lion, and Judah is his puppy. Jacob is informing us that he has imparted to Judah his own cunning, power, knowledge of GOD and ability
ra'Chel - (ewe, or sheep ), the younger of the daughters of Laban, the wife of Jacob (B. The story of Jacob and Rachel has always had a peculiar interest. The beauty of Rachel, Jacob's deep love and long servitude for her, their marriage, and Rachel's death on giving birth to Benjamin, with Jacob's grief at her loss, ( Genesis 48:7 ) makes a touching tale. ) And Jacob set a pillar upon her grave; that is the pillar of Rachel's grave unto this day
Shaul - Grandson of Jacob and son of Simeon with a Canaanite mother (Genesis 46:10 )
Booth - In such tabernacles Jacob sojourned for a season at a place named from this circumstance Succoth (Genesis 33:17 )
Bilhah - When Rachel failed to bear children to her husband Jacob, Bilhah became his concubine at Rachel's instigation
Hebrew - in the line of Jacob; an Israelite; a Jew
e'Phra-im - ) The first indication we have of that ascendancy over his elder brother Manasseh which at a later period the tribe of Ephraim so unmistakably possessed is in the blessing of the children by Jacob
e'Phra-im - ) The first indication we have of that ascendancy over his elder brother Manasseh which at a later period the tribe of Ephraim so unmistakably possessed is in the blessing of the children by Jacob
e'Phra-im - ) The first indication we have of that ascendancy over his elder brother Manasseh which at a later period the tribe of Ephraim so unmistakably possessed is in the blessing of the children by Jacob
Gal'e-ed - (the heap of witness ), the name given by Jacob to the heap which he and Laban made on Mount Gilead in witness of the masses, but sometimes found in yellowish tear-like drops
e'Phra-im - ) The first indication we have of that ascendancy over his elder brother Manasseh which at a later period the tribe of Ephraim so unmistakably possessed is in the blessing of the children by Jacob
Gal'e-ed - (the heap of witness ), the name given by Jacob to the heap which he and Laban made on Mount Gilead in witness of the masses, but sometimes found in yellowish tear-like drops
Judah, Son of Jacob - Fourth son of Jacob, Judah soon established himself in the family as one who had genuine leadership qualities (Genesis 29:31-35; Genesis 37:25-27; Genesis 43:1-10; Genesis 44:14-34; Genesis 46:28). ...
Jacob saw clearly that Judah’s tribe would become the leading tribe in the Israelite nation
Bethlehem - It was already an established settlement in the time of Jacob. Not far from the town was the place where Jacob buried his wife Rachel (Genesis 35:19-20)
Mahanaim - ) A place on the Jabbok so-called by Jacob from the two angelic hosts which appeared to him when returning from Padan Aram to Canaan. (See Jacob. ) The two may refer to Jacob's own camp and that of the angels, or rather his division of his party into two, corresponding to which were the two angelic companies, one to guard each. Jacob's two companies answer to the two heavenly ones, the face of God and the face of Esau; seeing that first prepares Jacob for seeing this; the messengers of God and those of Jacob; and the name Jabbok, i. Her strength, like Jacob's at Mahanaim, is Christ and His hosts enlisted on her side by wrestling prayer
Isaac - (a) (1713-1533 BCE) Second of the three Patriarchs, son of Abraham and Sarah, husband of Rebecca, father of Jacob and Esau
Wages - Rate of (mention only in Matthew 20:2 ); to be punctually paid (Leviticus 19:13 ; Deuteronomy 24:14,15 ); judgements threatened against the withholding of (Jeremiah 22:13 ; Malachi 3:5 ; Compare James 5:4 ); paid in money (Matthew 20:1-14 ); to Jacob in kind (Genesis 29:15,20 ; 30:28 ; 31:7,8,41 )
Meat - 806, ‘There was never any meat, except the forbidden fruit, so deare bought as this broth of Jacob
Becher - ” Son of Benjamin and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:21 )
Bucket - Numbers 24:7 (b) As a gardener waters his garden with buckets of water, so Jacob or Israel would bring blessing to every part of the earth
Leah - Oldest daughter of Laban; her father deceptively gave her hand in matrimony to Jacob, switching her for the intended bride, her younger sister Rachel
Simeon - The second son of Jacob and Leah, and head of the tribe bearing his name. He entered Egypt with Jacob, taking his six sons with him. ...
When Jacob blessed his sons he said, "Simeon and Levi are brethren; instruments of cruelty are in their habitations . Cursed be their anger, for it was fierce; and their wrath, for it was cruel: I will divide them in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel. On the division of the kingdom they nominally belonged to the ten tribes, but were completely isolated from the other nine, so that they would have had either to coalesce with the two tribes (and of this we read nothing), or, according to the prophecy of Jacob, be 'scattered in Israel
Sinew - Genesis 32:32 contains the vague reference to Jacob's “sinew” God touched, making Jacob lame, and to the food law that grew out of the incident
Bilhah - Faltering; bashful, Rachel's handmaid, whom she gave to Jacob (Genesis 29:29 )
Edar - Tower of the flock, a tower between Bethlehem and Hebron, near which Jacob first halted after leaving Bethlehem (Genesis 35:21 )
Reuben - (a) (1568-1443 BCE) Son of Jacob and Leah, eldest of the Twelve Tribes
Kesitah - ” Jacob paid 100 kesitahs for land near Shechem (Genesis 33:19 ; compare Joshua 24:32 )
Albright, Jacob - A religious movement of the German community in Pennsylvania which was organized in 1803 under the leadership of Jacob Albright
Evangelical Associations - A religious movement of the German community in Pennsylvania which was organized in 1803 under the leadership of Jacob Albright
Evangelical Church General Conference - A religious movement of the German community in Pennsylvania which was organized in 1803 under the leadership of Jacob Albright
Jacobites - Jacob Albardai, or Baradaeus, who flourished about A. 530, restored the sect, then almost expiring, to its former vigour, and modelled it anew; and hence from him they obtained the name of Jacobites
Abel-Mizraim - The place where Joseph and his company halted seven days in passing from Egypt to Canaan to bury Jacob
Samaritan Woman - A woman of Sichar, a city of Samaria, who was converted by Our Lord at the well of Jacob (John 4)
Woman, Samaritan - A woman of Sichar, a city of Samaria, who was converted by Our Lord at the well of Jacob (John 4)
Sinew - Genesis 32:32 contains the vague reference to Jacob's “sinew” God touched, making Jacob lame, and to the food law that grew out of the incident
Rachel - The younger daughter of Laban, and favourite wife of Jacob ( Genesis 29:28-30 ), who married her after her sister Leah. In the quarrel between Jacob and Laban, she, as well as Leah, took the part of Jacob ( Genesis 31:14-16 )
Hezron - Son of Reuben, grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:9 ), and original clan ancestor of Hezronites (Numbers 26:6 ). Grandson of Judah, great grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:12 ), original clan ancestor of Hezronites (Numbers 26:21 ) through whom David was born (Ruth 4:19 )
Leah - The elder daughter of Laban, married to Jacob by stratagem ( Genesis 29:21 ff. Jacob’s love for her was less than for Rachel ( Genesis 29:30 ); sometimes she is said to be hated ( Genesis 29:31 ; Genesis 29:33 ). She was buried in the cave of Machpelah before Jacob went to Egypt ( Genesis 49:31 )
Birthright - Esau transferred his "birthright" to Jacob for a paltry mess of pottage, profanely despising this last spirtual privilge, Genesis 25 ; 27 . Thus Isaac was preferred to Ishmael, Jacob to Esau, Joseph to Reuben, David to his elder brethren, Solomon to Adonijah
Jeshurun - It may represent a play on Jacob, the original Israel, known for deception
Becher - First-born; a youth, the second son of Benjamin (Genesis 46:21 ), who came down to Egypt with Jacob
Muppim - Of Benjamin, one of Rachel's 14 descendants who went down to Egypt with Jacob (Genesis 46:21)
Manasseh - His grandfather Jacob elevated him and his brother Ephraim to the status of progenitors of tribes within the nation of Israel
Job - The Talmud cites many opinions as to when Job lived, ranging from the times of Jacob until Ahasuerus
Israel - Who prevails with God, a name given to Jacob, after having wrestled with the Angel-Jehovah at Penuel
Almond - Jacob used the almond (KJV, “hazel”) as a breeding device to increase his herds (Genesis 30:37 ). Jacob sent almonds as one of the best fruits of the land to satisfy the Egyptian ruler (Genesis 43:11 )
Luz - In Genesis 28:19 it is stated that Jacob changed the name of the place of his vision from Luz to Bethel (cf. A possible solution is that Luz was the name of the old Canaanite city, and Bethel the pillar and altar of Jacob outside the city
is'Sachar - The ninth son of Jacob and the fifth of Leah. It is this aspect of the territory of Issachar which appears to be alluded to in the blessing of Jacob
le'ah - Her father took advantage of the opportunity which the local marriage rite afforded to pass her off in her sister's stead on the unconscious bridegroom, and excused himself to Jacob by alleging that the custom of the country forbade the younger sister to be given first in marriage. Jacob's preference of Rachel grew into hatred of Leah after he had married both sisters. She died some time after Jacob reached the south country in which his father Isaac lived
Israel - The name conferred on Jacob after the great prayer-struggle at Peniel (Genesis 32:28 ), because "as a prince he had power with God and prevailed. " (See Jacob . ) This is the common name given to Jacob's descendants
Levi - Levi, the third son of Jacob, had a ruthless zeal in fighting against what he thought was wrong, and this characteristic passed on to his descendants (Genesis 29:31-34; Genesis 34:25-26; Exodus 32:26-28). Jacob announced that because of his son’s violence, the descendants of Levi would be scattered in Israel (Genesis 49:5-7); but because of their zeal against idolatry in the time of Moses, God made their scattering honourable
Simeon - son of Jacob and Leah, was born A. Jacob, on his death bed, showed his indignation against Simeon and Levi for their cruelty to the Shechemites, Genesis 49:5 : "I will divide them in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel
Kirjath-Arba - The city of Arba, Arba being its founder, or the city of Four—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Adam having been buried there—is mentioned Genesis 23:2; Genesis 35:27; Joshua 14:15; Joshua 15:13; Joshua 15:54; Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:11; Judges 1:10; Nehemiah 11:25
Living Waters - (1) Spring water as contrasted with well-water, promised by Our Lord to the Samaritan woman at the well of Jacob (John 4; Isaiah 12; Jeremias 2; Ezechias 47; Zacheriah 14)
Zilpah - ]'>[1] ), and by her to Jacob as a concubine, Genesis 30:9 (J Jimna(h) - Son of Asher, grandson of Jacob, and original ancestor of clan in tribe of Asher (Genesis 46:17 ; Numbers 26:44 )
Tribe - The "twelve tribes" of the Hebrews were the twelve collections of families which sprang from the sons of Jacob
Fear of Isaac - Name or title that Jacob used in referring to God (Genesis 31:42 ; compare Genesis 31:53 ; Genesis 46:1 )
Baumgartner, Alexander - (1841-1910) Writer, son of Gallus Jacob Baumgartner, born Saint Gall, Switzerland; died Luxemburg
Hebrew - ...
One of the descendants of Eber, or Heber but particularly, a descendant of Jacob, who was a descendant of Eber an Israelite a Jew
Jochebed - One of the seventy original members of Jacob’s household that emigrated to Egypt
Jacobite - The sect is named after Jacob Baradaeus, its leader in the sixth century. ) Of or pertaining to the Jacobites
Waters, Living - (1) Spring water as contrasted with well-water, promised by Our Lord to the Samaritan woman at the well of Jacob (John 4; Isaiah 12; Jeremias 2; Ezechias 47; Zacheriah 14)
Edar, Tower of - Jacob halted there with his flocks
Padan-Aram - Padan-aram (pâ'dan-â'ram), the low highland, where Abraham got a wife for bis son Isaac, Genesis 25:20; Genesis 28:2; Genesis 28:5; Genesis 28:7, and Jacob found his wives, and where Laban lived
Lia Fail - Legend claims it to be the stone on which the patriarch Jacob pillowed his head
Seethe - ’ The past tense was sod , as Genesis 25:29 ‘Jacob sod pottage’; and the past part
Lentiles - The red pottage made by Jacob was of lentils (Genesis 25:29-34 )
Atad - Buckthorn, a place where Joseph and his brethren, when on their way from Egypt to Hebron with the remains of their father Jacob, made for seven days a "great and very sore lamentation
Hamor - He-ass, a Hivite from whom Jacob purchased the plot of ground in which Joseph was afterwards buried (Genesis 33:19 ). His son Shechem founded the city of that name which Simeon and Levi destroyed because of his crime in the matter of Dinah, Jacob's daughter (Genesis 34:20 )
Beth-Barah - It was probably the chief ford of the Jordan in that district, and may have been that by which Jacob crossed when he returned from Mesopotamia, near the Jabbok (Genesis 32:22 ), and at which Jephthah slew the Ephraimites (Judges 12:4 )
Shalem - Perfect, a place (probably the village of Salim) some 2 miles east of Jacob's well. There is an abundant supply of water, which may have been the reason for Jacob's settling at this place (Genesis 33:18-20 ). The Revised Version translates this word, and reads, "Jacob came in peace to the city of Shechem," thus not regarding it as a proper name at all
Beth - ("a fixed dwelling"); as in Genesis 33:17, "Jacob built him an house," marking his settlement after wanderings (compare 2 Samuel 7:2-6)
Jamin - Son of Simeon and grandson of Jacob, a clan leader in tribe of Simeon (Exodus 6:5 ; Numbers 26:12 )
Dowry - Jacob had no dowry to give for his wife, but he gave his services (Genesis 29:18 ; 30:20 ; 34:12 )
Kirjath-Arba - , of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Adam, who were all, as they allege, buried there
Galeed - ” Place where Jacob and his father-in-law Laban made a formal agreement or covenant determining the boundary line between their peoples and agreeing not to harm one another (Genesis 31:43-52 )
Ladder - The angels ascending and descending in Jacob's vision point to God's presence with Jacob (Genesis 28:12 )
Self-Willed - Jacob rebuked Simeon and Levi for wanton, undisciplined actions (Genesis 49:6 )
Chesnut Tree - It was known to Jacob
Face - Jacob saw God's face, and called the place Periel, "God's face" (Genesis 32:30), i
Aser - (Asher) (1) Eighth son of Jacob and Zelpha, handmaid of Lia, Jacob's wife
Asher - (Asher) (1) Eighth son of Jacob and Zelpha, handmaid of Lia, Jacob's wife
Judah - (a) (1565-1466 BCE) Fourth son of Jacob and Leah, fourth of the Twelve Tribes
a'Bel-Mizra'im - (meadow of Egypt ), the name given by the Canaanites to the floor of Atad, at which Joseph, his brothers and the Egyptians made their mourning for Jacob
Dowry - The dowry which Jacob gave for his wives was seven years' service for each
Rebecca - She became the mother of Esau and Jacob, the latter being her favorite (Genesis 25)
o'Nan - (Genesis 38:9 ) His death took place before the family of Jacob went down into Egypt
Ezer - Son of Ephraim and grandson of Jacob. Otherwise, a different Ephraim from the son of Jacob is meant, or Ephraim, the son of Jacob, entered Palestine, but the Bible did not preserve a story of his travels
Levi - Third son of Jacob and Leah (Genesis 29:34 ) and original ancestor of Israel's priests. Later, Jacob spoke harshly of Levi rather than blessing him (Genesis 49:5-7 )
Naphtali - ” Sixth son of Jacob and second son by his concubine Bilhah (Genesis 30:6-8 ). In blessing him, Jacob likened Naphtali to a hind let loose (Genesis 49:21 ), probably a reference to unbridled energy
Dan - The fifth son of Jacob, and by Bilhah, the handmaid of Rachel. Jacob, when dying, prophesied concerning Dan in these remarkable words: (Genesis 49:16-17) "Dan shall judge his people as one of the tribes of Israel
le'vi -
The name of the third son of Jacob by his wife Leah. [1] Levi, with his three sons, Gershon, Kohath and Merari, went down to Egypt with his father Jacob. (Genesis 47:11 ) When Jacob's death draws near, and the sons are gathered round him, Levi and Simeon hear the old crime brought up again to receive its sentence
Jacob - Jacob. By the time of Jacob this earlier history of the word was overlooked or forgotten, and the name was understood as meaning ‘one who takes by the heel, and thus tries to trip up or supplant’ ( Genesis 25:26 ; Genesis 27:36 , Hosea 12:3 ). ...
Jacob was born in answer to prayer (Genesis 25:21 ), near Beersheba; and the later rivalry between Israel and Edom was thought of as prefigured in the strife of the twins in the womb ( Genesis 25:22 f. Jacob grew up a ‘quiet man’ ( Genesis 25:27 RVm
Of this successful craft on Jacob’s part the natural result on Esau’s was hatred and resentment, to avoid which Jacob left his home to spend a few days (Genesis 27:44 ) with his uncle in Haran. ]'>[2] represents her as suggesting to Isaac the danger that Jacob might marry a Hittite wife ( Genesis 27:46 ). On his way to Haran, Jacob passed a night at Bethel (cf. Reminded thus of the watchful providence of God, Jacob’s alarms were transmuted into religions awe. Thence forward Bethel became a famous sanctuary, and Jacob himself visited it again ( Genesis 35:1 ; cf. ...
Arrived at Haran, Jacob met in his uncle his superior for a time in the art of overreaching. At the end of the term Jacob was the head of a household conspicuous even in those days for its magnitude and prosperity. ) to Jacob’s advantage. Jacob promised to treat Laban’s daughters with special kindness, and both Jacob and Laban undertook to respect the boundary they had agreed upon between the territories of Israel and of the Syrians. Thereupon Laban returned home; and Jacob continued his journey to Canaan, and was met by the angels of God ( Genesis 32:1 ), as if to congratulate and welcome him as he approached the Land of Promise. ...
Jacobs next problem was to conciliate his brother, who was reported to be advancing against him with a large body of men (Genesis 32:6 ). When a submissive message elicited no response, Jacob in dismay turned to God, though without any expression of regret for the deceit by which he had wronged his brother, and proceeded to divide his party into two companies, in the hope that one at least would escape, and to try to appease Esau with a great gift. The next night came the turning-point in Jacob’s life. His name was changed to Israel , which means etymologically ‘God perseveres,’ but was applied to Jacob in the sense of ‘Perseverer with God’ ( Hosea 12:3 f. Esau returned to Seir; and Jacob moved on to a suitable site for an encampment, which received the name of Succoth, from the booths that were erected on it ( Isaiah 33:17 ). ), that Jacob stayed there for several years. ...
After a residence of uncertain length at Succoth, Jacob crossed the Jordan and advanced to Shechem , where he purchased a plot of ground which became afterwards of special interest. Again Jacob’s stay must not be measured by days; for he erected an altar ( 2 Chronicles 33:20 ) and dug a well ( John 4:6 ; John 4:12 ), and was detained by domestic troubles, if not of his own original intention. Jacob’s part in the proceedings was confined chiefly to a timid reproach of his sons for entangling his household in peril, to which they replied with the plea that the honour of the family was the first consideration. ...
The state of feeling aroused by the vengeance executed on Shechem made it desirable for Jacob to continue his journey. From Bethel Jacob led his caravan to Ephrath, a few miles from which place Rachel died in childbirth. But it cannot he proved that the two allusions coalesce; and actually nothing is known of the site of Jacob’s encampment, except that it was between Ephrath and Hebron. ...
From the time of his return to Hebron, Jacob ceases to be the central figure of the Biblical narrative, which thenceforward revolves round Joseph. The story turns next to Jacob’s delight at the news that Joseph is alive, and to his own journey to Egypt through Beersheha, his early home, where he was encouraged by God in visions of the night ( Genesis 46:1-7 ). This migration of Jacob to Egypt was an event of the first magnitude in the history of Israel ( Deuteronomy 26:5 f. Jacob lived in Egypt seventeen years ( Genesis 47:28 ), at the close of which, feeling death to be nigh, he extracted a pledge from Joseph to bury him in Canaan, and adopted his two grandsons, placing the younger first in anticipation of the pre-eminence of the tribe that would descend from him ( Genesis 48:19 , Hebrews 11:21 ). After blessing his sons, Jacob gave them together the directions concerning his funeral which he had given previously to Joseph, and died ( Genesis 49:33 ). ...
Opinion is divided as to the degree to which Jacob has been idealized in the Biblical story. All the conditions are best met by the view that Jacob was a real person, and that the incidents recorded of him are substantially historical
Hamor - According to p ( Genesis 34:1-2 a, Genesis 34:4 ; Genesis 34:6 ; Genesis 34:8-10 ; Genesis 34:13-18 ; Genesis 34:20-25 (partly) Genesis 34:27-29 ), Hamor negotiates with Jacob and his sons for the marriage of Shechem and Dinah, with the object of amalgamating the two peoples; circumcision is imposed by the sons of Jacob upon the whole Hamorite tribe, and then they attack the city, slaying all the males and carrying off the whole of the spoil. ...
There is a curious fusion of traditions in Acts 7:10 , where Jacob ‘and our fathers’ are said to have been ‘laid in the tomb which Abraham bought for a money price from the sons of Emmor in Sychem. ), and Jacob was buried in it ( Genesis 50:13 )
Israel - (Hebrew: yisräël, he that striveth with God) ...
The name given to Jacob after wrestling with the Angel (Genesis 32)
Mambre, Vale of - There dwelt his posterity, and there he was buried, in the cave of Machpelah, with Sara, Jacob, Rebecca and Lia
Well - Such wells were those of Jacob and Beersheba, etc
el-Bethel - ” Either Bethel or place in or near Bethel, where Jacob built an altar to God as memorial to his previous visit to Bethel, when he had seen a vision of God (Genesis 35:7 ; compare Genesis 28:10-19 )
Ram - Hezron's second son, born in Egypt after Jacob settled there, for he is not mentioned in Genesis 46:4
Machpelah - It was near Hebron; Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob and Leah were buried there
Hamor - Prince of the Hivites and father of Shechem, of whose family Jacob bought a piece of ground in which Joseph was buried
Bani - Hence, Rachel named her son, Benoni, in her dying moments, while Jacob called him Benjamin
Sychar - A small village near Jacob's well, John 4:5. The well of Jacob is near Sychar; it is about 105 feet deep, 7½ feet in diameter, lined with stones
Vale of Mambre - There dwelt his posterity, and there he was buried, in the cave of Machpelah, with Sara, Jacob, Rebecca and Lia
el-Elohe-Israel - Upon the ‘parcel of ground’ which he had bought at Shechem, Jacob built an altar and called it El-elohe-Israel , ‘El, the god of Israel,’ Genesis 33:20 (E Dowry - Jacob purchased his wives by his services to their father, Genesis 29:18-27 ; 34:12 ; Exodus 22:16,17 ; 1 Samuel 18:25 ; Hosea 3:2
Heeney, Cornelius - On coming to the United States he engaged in business and, in association with John Jacob Astor, amassed a fortune, which he devoted to religion and charity
Left, Remain - 30:36, where it is stated that “Jacob fed the rest of Laban’s flocks. Thus, Jacob “was left alone” ( Jacob describes his son Reuben as being “preeminent in pride and pre-eminent in power” (RSV)
Ephraim - Ephraim, with his brother Manasseh, was presented by his father Joseph to Jacob on his death bed, Genesis 48:8 , &c. Jacob laid his right hand on Ephraim the younger, and his left on Manasseh the older. Joseph was desirous to change his hands, but Jacob answered, "I know it, my son; Manasseh shall be multiplied, but Ephraim shall be greater
Lie - Mention is made of the lies told by good men, as by Abraham (Genesis 12:12,13 ; 20:2 ), Isaac (26:7), and Jacob (27:24); also by the Hebrew midwives (Exodus 1:15-19 ), by Michal (1 Samuel 19:14 ), and by David (1 Samuel 20:6 )
Gera - A son of Benjamin and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:21 )
Bela - A son of Benjamin and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:21 )
Kohath - Kohath went to Egypt with Levi (his father) and Jacob (his grandfather) (Genesis 46:11 ), had a sister named Jochebed (Exodus 6:20 ), and died at the age of 133 (Exodus 6:18 )
Jabbok - Stream on the east of the Jordan, near to which the angel wrestled with Jacob
Balm, - Jacob sent a little to Joseph
Poplar, - It was probably the white poplar (Populus alba) which Jacob employed: it was 'green' in the sense of being fresh, moist
Jegarsahadutha - ) Jacob called it Galeed and Mizpah; as if he had said, let the Galeed be witness, and this Mizpah be witness, There is something very tender and interesting in this parting of natural ties never to meet again
Dinah - The daughter of Jacob and Leah
Ruben - A patriarch in the Bible, the eldest son of Jacob (Genesis 46:49)
Levite - from Levi, one the sons of Jacob
Isaac - As Isaac was the patriarch that stood between Abraham and Jacob, it may seem remarkable that so little is recorded of him, especially as the promise given to Abraham, of all nations being blessed through his seed, was confirmed to Isaac. ...
Rebekah was barren, but on Isaac beseeching the Lord, she conceived, and was told that she should be the mother of two nations, and the twinbrothers Esau and Jacob were born, Esau being the firstborn. God had said that the elder should serve the younger, but Rebekah, instead of leaving the matter in God's hands, contrived by a deceitful stratagem to get the blessing for Jacob instead of Esau the firstborn. Notwithstanding this failure we read in Hebrews 11:20 , "By faith Isaac blessed Jacob and Esau concerning things to come. He said of Jacob "Yea, and he shall be blessed. ...
The days of Isaac were 180 years: when he died his sons Esau and Jacob buried him. God is constantly referred to as the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob: it was through them the blessings to Israel flowed, and through them came the Seed — Christ — in whom all nations of the earth are being blessed
Uriel - In the lost ‘Prayer of Joseph’ he is the angel with whom Jacob wrestled, the eighth in rank from God, Jacob being the first
Judah - the son of Jacob and Leah, who was born in Mesopotamia, Genesis 29:35 . In the last prophetic blessing pronounced on him by his father Jacob, Genesis 49:8-9 , there is a promise of the regal power; and that it should not depart from his family before the coming of the Messiah
Bethel - It was visited by Abraham, Genesis 12:8; Genesis 13:3; marked by Jacob after his vision of the ladder, Genesis 28:11-19; Genesis 31:13; dwelling-place of Jacob, Genesis 35:1-8; name applied to Luz, Judges 1:22-23
Levi - The third son of Jacob by Leah, who gave him his name as trusting that her husband would, now that she had borne him three sons, be joined in affection with her. Jacob viewed their conduct with abhorrence, and, before his death, while prophetically describing the future fortunes of his sons and their posterity, uttered a solemn denunciation upon Simeon and Levi
Zebulun - Or ZABULON, Revelation 7:8 , the sixth son of Jacob and Leah, born in Mesopotamia, Genesis 30:20 . His tribe was respectable for numbers, Numbers 1:30 26:26 ; and its portion in the Holy Land accorded with the prediction of Jacob, Genesis 49:13 , extending from the Mediterranean sea at Carmel to the sea of Gemnesaret, between Issachar on the south, and Naphtali and Asher on the north and north-west, Joshua 19:10
Benjamin - The youngest son of Jacob and Rachel, Genesis 35:16-18 . Rachel died immediately after he was born, and with her last breath named him Ben-oni, the son of my sorrow; but Jacob called him Benjamin, son of my right hand
Jacob - As at his birth he held his brother's heel, he was called Jacob, that is, the heelholder, one who comes behind and catches the heel of his adversary, a supplanter, Genesis 25:26 . Jacob was meek and peaceable, living a shepherd life at home. Isaac was partial to Esau, Rebekah to Jacob. Jacob having taken advantage of his brother's absence and his father's infirmity to obtain the blessing of the birthright, or primogeniture, was compelled to fly into Mesopotamia to avoid the consequences of his brother's wrath, Genesis 27:1-28:22
Juda -
The patriarch Judah, son of Jacob (Luke 3:33 ; Hebrews 7:14 )
Peniel - The name which Jacob gave to the place in which he had wrestled with God: "He called the name of the place Peniel; (face of God), for
Luz - Here Jacob halted, and had a prophetic vision
Mahanaim - ) Here David retreated from the rebellion of Absalom, (2 Samuel 17:24) Jacob gave the name to this spot, from the angels he met there
Jacob - His name signifies a supplanter; but after the memorable scene at Jabbock, when Jacob wrestled with the angel and pevailed, the Lord himself changed his name to Israel, a prince
Manoah - So, too, he appeared to Jacob, and would not tell his mysterious name, Genesis 32:29 ; Judges 13:18 ; Isaiah 9:6 ; Luke 13:34
Elbethel - Name given by Jacob to the place of the altar which he built at Beth-el to God who appeared to him when he fled from Esau
Jacob - As Jacob "took his brother by the heel (the action of a wrestler) in the womb" (Hosea 12:3), so the spiritual Israel, every believer, having no right in himself to the inheritance, by faith when being born again of the Spirit takes hold of the bruised heel, the humanity, of Christ crucified, "the Firstborn of many brethren. Jacob was a "plain," i. If he had waited in faith God's time, and God's way, of giving the blessing promised by God, and not unlawfully with carnal policy foiled Isaac's intention, God would have defeated his father's foolish purpose and Jacob would have escaped his well deserved chastisement. Jacob's grand superiority lay in his abiding trust in the living God. Jacob the man of guile saw Him at the top of the ladder; Nathanael, an Israelite without guile, saw Him at the bottom in His humiliation, which was the necessary first step upward to glory. Next follows his seven years' service under greedy Laban, in lieu of presents to the parents (the usual mode of obtaining a wife in the East, Genesis 24:53, which Jacob was unable to give), and the imposition of Leah upon him instead of Rachel; the first installment of his retributive chastisement in kind for his own deceit. Kennicott suggested that Jacob served 14 years for his wives, then during 20 years he took care of Laban's cattle as a friend, then during six years he served for wages (Genesis 31:38; Genesis 31:41). Rachel gave her maid to Jacob not necessarily after the birth of Leah's fourth son; so Bilhah may have borne Dan and Naphtali before Judah's birth. ...
Leah then, not being likely to have another son, probably gave Zilpah to Jacob, and Asher and Naphtali were born; in the beginning of the last of the seven years probably Leah bore Issachar, and at its end Zebulun. But in the view of Kennicott and Speaker's Commentary Jacob went to Laban at 57; in the first 14 years had sons, Reuben, Simeon, Levi, and Judah by Leah; Dan and Naphtali by Bilhah; in the 20 years (Genesis 35:38) next had Gad and Asher by Zilpah, Issachar and Zebulun by Leah, lastly Dinah by Leah and Joseph by Rachel; then six years' service for cattle, then flees from Padan Aram where he had been 40 years, at 97. In Jacob's 98th year Benjamin is born and Rachel dies. At 130 Jacob goes to Egypt (Genesis 46:1); dies at 147 (Genesis 47:28). On Jacob desiring to leave, Laban attested God's presence with Jacob. " Jacob then required as wages all the speckled and spotted sheep and goats, which usually are few, sheep in the East being generally white, the goats black or brown, not speckled. ...
With characteristic sharpness Jacob adopted a double plan of increasing the wages agreed on. Peeling rods of (Gesenius) storax ("poplar"), almond ("hazel"), and plane tree ("chesnut") in strips, so that the dazzling white wood of these trees should appear under the dark outside, he put them in the drinking troughs; the cattle consequently brought forth spotted, speckled young, which by the agreement became Jacob's. Thus by trickery he foiled Laban's trickery in putting three days' journey between his flock tended by Jacob and Jacob's stipulated flock of spotted and speckled goats and brown put under the care of his sons. Secondly, Jacob separated the speckled young, which were his, so as to be constantly in view of Laban's one-colored flock. ...
Laban changed the terms frequently ("ten times") when he saw Jacob's success, but in vain. Jacob accounted to his wives for his success by narrating his dream, which he had at the time the cattle conceived (Genesis 31:10). " God's command to Jacob to return was in a dream at the close of the six years (Genesis 31:11-13; in 12 translated leaped for "leap," and were for "are". Jacob's polygamy was contrary to the original law of paradise (Genesis 2:23-24; Matthew 19:5). Jealousies were the result of polygamy in Jacob's case, as was sure to happen. The most characteristic scene of Jacob's higher life was his wrestling until break of day (compare Luke 6:12) with the Angel of Jehovah, in human form, for a blessing. Jacob like David felt "what time I am afraid, I will trust in Thee" (Psalms 56:3-4; Psalms 56:11; 1 Samuel 30:6). The present, artfully made seem larger by putting a space between drove and drove, and each driver in turn saying, "they be thy servant Jacob's, . ...
Having left Canaan in guilt, now on his return Jacob must re-enter it with deep searchings of heart and wrestlings with God for the recovery of that sinless faith which he had forfeited by deceit and which lays hold of the covenant. Jacob is made to know he has more to fear from God's displeasure than from Esau's enmity Once that he stands right with God he need not fear Esau. Jacob called the place Peniel, "the face of God. " Next Jacob came to Succoth, then crossed Jordan, and near Shechem bought his only possession in Canaan, the field whereon he tented, from the children of Hamer, Shechem's father, for 100 kesita, i. For "Shalem, a city of Shechem," translated with Samaritan Pentateuch, "Jacob came in peace to the city of Shechem," though there is still a Salim E. Jacob understood it so, and called his household to put away their strange gods (namely, Rachel's stolen teraphim and the idols of Shechem, which was spoiled just before), their earrings (used as idolatrous phylacteries), and uncleanness; and then proceeded to perform what he had vowed so long ago, namely, to make the stone pillar God's house (Genesis 28:22). They made no attempt such as Jacob feared to avenge the slaughter of the Shechemites. ...
In Egypt the transformation took place; the civilization, arts, and sciences of Egypt adapted it well for the divine purpose of training Israel in this second stage of their history; Jacob and his family, numbering 70, or as Stephen from Septuagint reads, 75 souls (Acts 7:14), according as Joseph's children only or his grandchildren also are counted. Jacob's sons' wives are not reckoned in the 70 persons, only the unmarried daughter Dinah and a granddaughter. At 130 Jacob blessed Pharaoh and termed his life a "pilgrimage" of days "few and evil" (47; Hebrews 11:9; Hebrews 11:13). What already was gave intimation to the spirit of prophecy in Jacob of what would be. ...
The general promise of "the seed" sprung from Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob he now limits to Judah
Dainties - Genesis 49:20 (b) The messages and the ministry which Asher would give to others would be of such a delightful nature, so sweet and precious to the hearers, that Jacob compares them to a specially rich and attractive food
Luz - The Canaanite name for the place in which Jacob rested and had a prophetic vision, and afterward the city of Bethel; now Beitin
Mahanaim - Two hosts, a place so named because a host of angels here met the host of Jacob, on his return from Padan-aram, Genesis 32:1-2
Zebulun - The tenth son of Jacob and the youngest son of Leah: father of the tribe bearing his name. Jacob, when he foretold what should befall his sons in the last days, said, "Zebulun shall dwell at the haven of the sea, and he shall be for an haven of ships, and his border shall be unto Zidon," Genesis 49:13 ; Zebulun is thus representative of Israel having intercourse with the Gentiles for profit. Jacob spoke of their reaching unto Zidon, and the Evangelist says, "Capernaum, which is upon the sea coast [1], in the borders of Zabulon and Nephthalim
Dan - A son of Jacob by bis concubine Bilhah, Rachel's handmaid. He shared with Ms brethren the prophetic blessing of Jacob, Genesis 49:16-17, fulfilled, perhaps, in the administration of Samson, and in the craft and stratagem which his descendants used against their enemies. Moses ere his death, like Jacob, pronounced a prophetic blessing on the tribe: "Dan is a lion's whelp: he shall leap from Bashan," Deuteronomy 33:22, fulfilled in the predatory expeditions of which one at least is recorded in their subsequent history
Zebulun - The tenth son of Jacob and the youngest son of Leah: father of the tribe bearing his name. Jacob, when he foretold what should befall his sons in the last days, said, "Zebulun shall dwell at the haven of the sea, and he shall be for an haven of ships, and his border shall be unto Zidon," Genesis 49:13 ; Zebulun is thus representative of Israel having intercourse with the Gentiles for profit. Jacob spoke of their reaching unto Zidon, and the Evangelist says, "Capernaum, which is upon the sea coast [1], in the borders of Zabulon and Nephthalim
Tribes of Israel, the - Social and political groups in Israel claiming descent from one of the twelve sons of Jacob. ...
Tribal Origins The ancestral background of “the tribes of Israel” went back to the patriarch Jacob, whose name was changed to Israel. ” According to the biblical account, the family of Jacob, from which the tribes came, originated in north Syria during Jacob's stay at Haran with Laban his uncle. Eleven of the twelve sons were born at Haran, while the twelfth, Benjamin was born after Jacob returned to Canaan. The birth of the sons came through Jacob's wives Leah and Rachel and their maids Zilpah and Bilhah. Jacob's sons through Zilpah, Leah's maid, were Gad and Asher (Genesis 30:9-13 ), while Bilhah, the maid of Rachel, bore Dan and Naphtali (Genesis 30:1-8 ). While there are details of that history that we do not clearly understand and other groups simply referred to as “a mixed multitude” (Exodus 12:38 ) that were perhaps incorporated into the nation, the central focus is always on the “tribes of Israel,” the descendants of Jacob. For that reason lists of the twelve sons of Jacob or of the tribes appear in several places in the Old Testament, though the lists vary somewhat. Some of the major lists include that of Jacob's blessing of the twelve (Genesis 49:1 ), the review of the households as the period of oppression in Egypt is introduced (Exodus 1:1-10 ), Moses' blessing of the tribes (Deuteronomy 33:1 ), and the song of Deborah (Judges 5:1 ). Reuben, the firstborn son of Jacob by his wife Leah, was in line to assume a leadership role in the family, but he forfeited that right because of an illicit affair he had with his father's concubine Bilhah (Genesis 35:22 ). The impact of this reflected in Jacob's blessing where Reuben is addressed as “unstable as water, you shall no longer excel because you went up on to your father's bed” (Numbers 32:41-428 NRSV). At the time of the migration of Jacob's family to Egypt, Reuben had four sons ( Genesis 46:8-9 ). Simeon was Jacob's second son by Leah and played a key role in the encounter Dinah had with Shechem. The radical response of the two brothers, in which they “took their swords and came against the city unawares, and killed all the males” (Genesis 34:25 ), is reflected in Jacob's blessing of the two: “Weapons of violence are their swords cursed be their anger, for it is fierce, and their wrath, for it is cruel! I will divide them in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel” (Genesis 49:5-7 NRSV). During the years of famine as the sons of Jacob traveled back and forth between Egypt and Canaan, Simeon was held hostage by Joseph at one point ( Genesis 42:24 ). Its status is best reflected in the final statement of Jacob's blessing of Simeon and Levi: “I will divide them in Jacob, and scatter them in Israel” (Judges 3:12-30 ). Levi was the third son of Jacob and Leah. Judah, the fourth son of Jacob by his wife Leah (Genesis 29:35 ), appears as a leader and a spokesman among his brothers (Genesis 37:26 ; Genesis 43:3 ; Genesis 44:16 ; compare Genesis 46:28 ). Judah was promised preeminence over the other tribes in Jacob's blessing (Genesis 49:8-12 ). Issachar was the ninth son born to Jacob, but the first of a second family he had by Leah (Genesis 30:18 ). Because the blessing of Jacob speaks of Issachar as a beast of burden and as “a slave at forced labor” ( Genesis 49:14-15 NRSV), the tribe of Issachar may have faced a variety of hardships. Zebulun was the tenth son of Jacob and the sixth and final son by his wife Leah (Genesis 30:19-20 ). The blessing of Jacob speaks of Zebulun's territory including “the shore of the sea,” presumably the Mediterranean Sea, and “his border shall be at Sidon,” (Genesis 49:13 NRSV) a city on the coast north of Mount Carmel. Joseph was the first son born to Jacob by Rachel, Jacob's favorite wife (Genesis 30:22-24 ). ...
The story of Joseph is the most eventful of the sons of Jacob. Ephraim and Manasseh were adopted by Jacob and therefore each became the father of a tribe in Israel (Genesis 48:8-20 ). While Manasseh was the older of the two, Jacob gave preference to Ephraim (Genesis 48:14 ; compare Deuteronomy 33:17 ). The Blessing of Jacob (Genesis 49:22-26 ) mentions only Joseph; the Blessing of Moses (Deuteronomy 33:13-17 ) begins with Joseph and notes Ephriam and Manasseh, the song of Deborah (Judges 5:14 ) speaks of Ephraim and Machir. Benjamin was Jacob's youngest son, born to him by Rachel, and the only son born after returning to Palestine from Haran (Genesis 35:16-20 ). The blessing of Jacob refers to them as a “ravenous wolf” (Genesis 49:27 NRSV). Dan was the fifth son of Jacob and the first of two sons by Bilhah, Rachel's maid (Genesis 30:5-8 ). Naphtali was the sixth son of Jacob and younger full-blooded brother of Dan (Genesis 30:6-8 ). Gad was the seventh son of Jacob and the first of two sons by Zilpah, the maid of Leah (Genesis 30:9-11 ). According to the blessing of Jacob the tribe of Gad perhaps experienced numerous raids (Genesis 49:19 ) especially from groups like the Ammonites as reflected in the story of Jephthah (Judges 11:1 ). Asher was the eighth son of Jacob, the second son by Zilpah and the younger full-blooded brother of Gad (Genesis 30:9-13 )
Naphtali - The sixth son of Jacob, by Bilhah, Rachel's handmaid. Jacob said, "Naphtali is a hind let loose, he giveth goodly words," graceful and eloquent
Generation - " 5:1, "The book of the generations," means a family register, or history of Adam 37:2, "The generations of Jacob" = the history of Jacob and his descendants 7:1, "In this generation" = in this age
Benjamin - ” The second son Rachel bore to Jacob. His father Jacob, however, did not let that name stand. Benjamin's appetite for territory may be seen in Jacob's blessing (Genesis 49:27 )
Rebecca, Rebekah - ...
Twenty years after her marriage Rebecca became the mother of twin-sons, Esau and Jacob. The latter whom God said should be the first, was her favourite son; but she lacked faith, and did not wait for the promised blessing to fall upon Jacob in God's time, but sought it in her own cunning way
Naphtali - The sixth son of Jacob, by Bilhah, Rachel's handmaid, Genesis 30:8 . The patriarch Jacob, when he gave his blessing, said, as it is in the English Bible, "Naphtali is a hind let loose; he giveth goodly words," Genesis 49:21
Bowing - Abraham "bowed himself to the people of the land" (Genesis 23:7 ); so Jacob to Esau (Genesis 33:3 ); and the brethren of Joseph before him as the governor of the land (Genesis 43:28 )
Ramath-Mizpeh - This was the Mizpeh where Jacob and Laban made a covenant, "Mizpeh of Gilead," called also Galeed and Jegar-sahadutha
Sychar - ” A village in Samaria where Jacob's well is located (John 4:5-6 ). Jacob bought the parcel of land from “the children of Hamor, Shechem's father” (Genesis 33:19 )
Rachel - A well-known and interesting name in the Bible, the beloved wife of the patriarch Jacob, and daughter of Laban
Issachar - the fifth son of Jacob and Leah, Genesis 30:14-18
Raamses, Rameses - District in Goshen in Lower Egypt, east of the Nile, in which Jacob and his descendants were placed, and in which they built a treasure city of the same name for Pharaoh
Hamor - From the children of Hamor, Jacob purchased a parcel of land on which he erected an altar. Later the remains of Joseph, Jacob's son, were buried on this parcel of land (Joshua 24:32 )
Jacob's Well - See Jacob ; Sychar
Chestnut Tree - Genesis 30:37, from which Jacob pilled rods to set before the flock
Verschorists - A sect that derived its denomination from Jacob Verschoor, a native of Flushing, who in the year 1680, out of a perverse and heterogeneous mixture of the tenets of Cocceius and Spinosa produced a new form of religion, equally remarkable for its extravagance and impiety
Flint - God made Jacob to suck oil out of the flinty rock
Padan, Padanaram - A cultivated district in Mesopotamia, in which was the city of Nahor, to which Terah and his family migrated from Ur of the Chaldees; and from whence Rebekah, Leah, and Rachel, the wives of Isaac and Jacob, were obtained
ja'Cob's Well, - It was probably dug by Jacob whose name it bears
Ash'er, - Apocrypha and New Testament, A'ser ( blessed ), the eighth son of Jacob, by Zilpah, Leah's handmaid
Ladder - The comforting vision of the heavenly ladder shown to the fugitive Jacob, assured him of the omnipresent providence of God, and of his communication of all needed good to his people in the desert of this world, Hebrews 1:14
Hebron - On the death of Sara, his wife, he bought there the cave of Machpelah as a burial-place for her, Isaac, Jacob and himself
Paddan-Aram - Later, Abraham sent his steward to Paddan-Aram to seek a wife for Isaac (Genesis 24:1-9 ), and Jacob fled there and married into Laban and Rebekah's branch of the patriarchal family (Genesis 28:2-5 )
Ash'er, - Apocrypha and New Testament, A'ser ( blessed ), the eighth son of Jacob, by Zilpah, Leah's handmaid
Hebron - City and district in which Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob dwelt, about twenty-two miles south of Jerusalem. There also Sarah died, and was buried in the cave of Machpelah, as were also Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Rebekah, and Leah
Hardeneth - Jacob and Esau had lived their lives, and2000 years had passed by before GOD said, "Jacob have I loved, and Esau have I hated
Asher - One of the sons of Jacob, by Zilpah. Hence, Jacob, when adying, declared that "the bread of Asher should be fat
Issachar - The son of Jacob, by Leah. " If the sense of this passage (as most of the other blessings Jacob when a-dying bequeathed to his children are) be spiritual, there is much of Jesus, and his person and salvation in it
Tribes - The twelve sons of Jacob were heads of families, and each family a tribe. The two sons of Joseph were adopted by Jacob in place of Joseph
Manas'Seh - He was placed after his younger brother, Ephraim, by his grandfather Jacob, when he adopted them into his own family, and made them heads of tribes. Whether the elder of the two sons was inferior in form or promise to the younger, or whether there was any external reason to justify the preference of Jacob, we are not told
Manas'Seh - He was placed after his younger brother, Ephraim, by his grandfather Jacob, when he adopted them into his own family, and made them heads of tribes. Whether the elder of the two sons was inferior in form or promise to the younger, or whether there was any external reason to justify the preference of Jacob, we are not told
Mourn - Abraham mourned for Sarah (Genesis 23:2 ); Jacob for Joseph (37:34,35); the Egyptians for Jacob (50:3-10); Israel for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ), for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ), and for Samuel (1 Samuel 25:1 ); David for Abner (2 Samuel 3:31,35 ); Mary and Martha for Lazarus (John 11 ); devout men for Stephen (Acts 8:2 ), etc. For Jacob it was seventy days (Genesis 50:3 ); for Aaron (Numbers 20:29 ) and Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8 ) thirty days; and for Saul only seven days (1 Samuel 31:13 )
Isaac - ...
Isaac married Rebekah (Genesis 24:1 ), who bore him twin sons, Esau and Jacob (Genesis 25:21-28 ). Isaac was deceived into giving Jacob his blessing and priority over Esau (Genesis 27:1 ). ...
Though less significant than Abraham and Jacob, Isaac was revered as one of the Israelite patriarchs (Exodus 3:6 ; 1 Kings 18:36 ; Jeremiah 33:26 )
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - ...
Mary, the mother of Jesus, was in all probability the daughter of Jacob, and first cousin to Joseph her husband. Thus: Matthan or Matthat Father of Jacob, Heli Jacob Father of Mary = Jacob'e heir was (Joseph) Heli Father of Joseph JESUS, called Christ
Hebrew - Hence it is applied to Abraham's descendants through Isaac and Jacob in distinction to the name of Israelites (from the name of Israel given to Jacob), which is their covenant name, the name of promise. In scripture the name is not applied to any except to Abraham and his descendants, and only to those who descended through Isaac and Jacob, to the exclusion of the children of Ishmael and Esau. The above characteristic was doubtless subsequently lost, and nothing seen in it but the natural descent from Abraham through Isaac and Jacob; the same persons being mostly called Israelites
Rebekah - Sarah, Rachel, Hannah), was at first barren, but in answer to Isaac’s prayer Jacob and Esau were born ( Genesis 25:24-26 ). ...
The destiny of Jacob, her favourite son, was strongly influenced by his strong-minded mother. She was the author of the treacherous plan by which Jacob deprived Esau of his father’s blessing (Genesis 27:1-46 ). Rebekah died before Jacob’s return from Haran, and her burial at Machpelah is mentioned in Genesis 49:31 . The death and burial of Deborah, the nurse of Rebekah, who had followed her from Haran ( Genesis 24:59 ), are reported to have taken place after Jacob had returned to Canaan ( Genesis 35:8 ). ‘Upon me be thy curse, my son’ (Genesis 27:13 ), is her answer to Jacob when he fears that a curse will fall on his deception
Dan Name - (Hebrew: to rule or judge) ...
(1) Son of Jacob and Bala (Genesis 30), ancestor of the tribe of the same name
Bethbarah - ) Grove supposes Bethbarah to be the ford Jacob crossed in returning from Mesopotamia, and at which Jephthah slew the Ephraimites
Luz - ) Luz was originally the city, Bethel the pillar and altar of Jacob; in Genesis 12:8 it is called Bethel by anticipation (Genesis 28:19), after Ephraim's conquest the town Bethel arose
Dearth - In the days of Abram there was a "famine in the land" (Genesis 12:10 ), so also in the days of Jacob (47:4,13)
Gera - descendant, of Benjamin; enumerated in the list when Jacob went into Egypt (Genesis 46:21); son of Bela (1 Chronicles 8:3, where probably but one Gera is genuine); in the loins of his grandfather Benjamin then, but not actually born until after the going to Egypt and before Jacob's death
Ephraim, Tribe of - By virtue of its origin, and the promises made by Jacob (Genesis 48) this tribe had an extraordinary development: in population, riches, and power, and for this reason became jealous of the spiritual supremacy of the tribe of Juda
Herd, Herdsman - All the sons of Jacob were introduced to Pharaoh as shepherds, and men whose trade had been to feed cattle
Gad - The seventh son of Jacob, and the first-born of Zilpah, Leah's handmaid
Jab'Bok - (Numbers 21:24 ; 2:37; 3:16) It was on the south bank of the Jabbok that the interview took place between Jacob and Esau, (Genesis 32:22 ) and this river afterward became, toward its western part, the boundary between the kingdoms of Sihon and Og
Reuben - Reuben (reu'ben), behold a son: The eldest son of Jacob and Leah
Tribe of Ephraim - By virtue of its origin, and the promises made by Jacob (Genesis 48) this tribe had an extraordinary development: in population, riches, and power, and for this reason became jealous of the spiritual supremacy of the tribe of Juda
ko'Hath - Of the personal history of Kohath we know nothing, except that he came down to Egypt with Levi and Jacob, (Genesis 46:11 ) that his sister was Jochebed, (Exodus 6:20 ) and that he lived to the age of 133 years
Peni'el - (face of God ) the name which Jacob gave to the place in which he had wrestled with God: "He called the name of the place 'face of El,' for I have seen Elohim face to face
Esau - " Jacob took hold of his twin brother in the womb when the latter was coming out first, from whence he got his name = supplanter (Hosea 12:3). ...
"Rebekah loved Jacob" as "a plain man," i. " Esau's recklessness of spiritual and future privileges, and care only for the indulgence of the moment, caused him to sell his birthright for Jacob's red pottage, made of lentils or small beans, still esteemed a delicacy in the East. )...
Jacob took an ungenerous and selfish advantage, which the Scripture does not sanction, and distrusting Esau's levity required of him art oath. Unbelieving levity must have all its good things now (1 Corinthians 15:32); faith says with Jacob "I have waited for Thy salvation, O Lord" (Genesis 49:18; compare Luke 16:25). By feigning to be Esau, Jacob, at his mother's suggestion, stole the father's blessing which God would have secured to him without guile and its retributive punishment, had he waited in simple faith. Isaac too erred through carnal partiality, which he sought to stimulate by eating his favorite's venison, determining to give to Esau the blessing in spite of the original divine intimation, "the elder shall serve the younger," and in spite of Esau's actual sale of the birthright to Jacob, and though Esau had shown his unworthiness of it by taking when he was forty years of age two Hittite wives from among the corrupt Canaanites, to his father's and mother's grief. His "tears" were no proof of true repentance, for immediately after being foiled in his desire he resolved to murder Jacob! He wept not for his sin, but for its penalty. Rebekah, hearing of the vengeful design of Esau against her favorite son, by recalling to Isaac's remembrance Esau's ill judged marriage secured the father's consent to Jacob's departure from the neighborhood of the daughters of Heth to that of his own kindred, and at the same time the confirmation of the blessing (Genesis 27:46; Genesis 28:1). ...
Soon after he began to drive the Horites out of mount Seir; and by the return of Jacob 29 years after, Esau was there with armed retainers and abundant wealth. It was not however until after his father's death that he permanently left Canaan, according to Isaac's blessing, to Jacob, his wives and family then first accompanying him (Genesis 35:29; Genesis 36:6). Esau was moved by God in answer to Jacob's wrestling prayer to lay aside revenge and meet his brother with embraces, kisses, and tears (Proverbs 16:7). Jacob however, wisely fearing any collision which might revive the old grudge, declined accompanying Esau, but expressed a hope one day to visit mount Seir; his words," I will lead on softly . Then Esau, by this time seeing that Jacob's was the birthright blessing and the promised land, withdrew permanently to his appointed lot, mount Seir (Genesis 32:3; Deuteronomy 2:5-12)
Bethel - Name, signifying 'house of God,' given to the place where God first appeared to Jacob in a dream. God thus gave to Jacob the apprehension that the house of God on earth — the gate of heaven — was to be connected with him and his seed, and afterwards God acknowledged the place and the name, saying, "I am the God of Beth-el," Genesis 31:13 . To take Jacob out of a false position God bade him go up to Beth-el and dwell there, and Jacob felt he must take no idols there, so he told his household to put away the strange gods from among them, to be clean, and to change their garments
Brother - ” Laban called his cousin Jacob an 'âch: “And Laban said unto Jacob, Because thou art my brother, shouldest thou therefore serve me for nought?” ( Jacob described himself as an 'âch of Rachel’s father ( Jacob said unto them [3], My brethren, whence be ye?”...
The word 'âch sometimes represents someone or something that simply exists alongside a given person or thing: “And surely your blood of your lives will I require; at the hand of every beast will I require it, and at the hand of … every man’s brother will I require the life of man” ( Gad - The first is one of Jacob's sons, which he had by Zilpah, Leah's handmaid, (Genesis 30:11) and she called his name Gad, which signifies armed; and, therefore, in the margin of our Bibles it is marked a troop, or company. " [2] (Isaiah 65:11) The dying patriarch Jacob blessing his sons, made a memorable prophecy concerning Gad: "A troop" (said Jacob) "shall overcome him, but he shall overcome at the last. Troops of lusts, troops of corruptions, troops from hell, and troops from the world, may, and will, bring the poor exercised soul too often under: yet the victory is still on the side of Jacob's seed. The praying seed of Jacob, at length come off as the prevailing Israel; for they must overcome "by the blood of the Lamb," and be more than conquerors through his grace making them so
Simeon - Historically, the most important was Simeon the son of Jacob, for he was father of the tribe of Simeon. ...
In the Old Testament...
Simeon was the second eldest of Jacob’s twelve sons (Genesis 35:22-23). He and the next son, Levi, were the cause of the ruthless massacre of the men of Shechem, an incident that Jacob deeply regretted (Genesis 34:25; Genesis 34:30). When Jacob blessed his sons before his death, he recalled the violence of Simeon and Levi, and prophesied that their descendants would be scattered in Israel (Genesis 49:5-7)
Shechem - When Jacob returned to Palestine, Hamor the Hivite was its king. This is thought to clash with Genesis 33:19 , which speaks of Jacob buying it. But nothing is said in the latter passage about a sepulchre: Jacob bought a piece of ground to spread his tent in
Birthright - Jacob, having bought Esau's birthright, acquired a title to the particular blessing of his dying father; and, accordingly, he had consigned to him the privilege of the covenant which God made with Abraham, that from his loins the Messiah should spring; a prerogative which descended to his posterity. Reuben forfeited the blessings of his birthright, as we see by the express declaration of his father Jacob, in his benediction of his children, Genesis 49:1 , &c, for the crime of incest with his father's concubine, on account of which his tribe continued all along in obscurity; while the priesthood was conferred on Levi, the government on Judah, and the double portion on Joseph, to descend to their respective tribes. Thus the patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, offered sacrifices, and were priests as well as kings in their respective families, Genesis 12:7-8 ; Genesis 13:18 ; Genesis 17:7 ; Genesis 26:25 ; Genesis 31:54 ; Genesis 35:7
Isaac - Apparent discrepancies in the story, such as that Isaac, on his deathbed ( Genesis 27:1 ; Genesis 27:41 ), blessed Jacob, and yet did not die until many years afterwards ( Genesis 35:27 ), are evidently due to original differences of tradition, which later editors were not careful to remove. For many years the couple were childless; but at length Isaac’s prayers were heard, and Rebekah gave birth to the twins, Esau and Jacob. He appears next as a decrepit and dying man ( Genesis 27:1 ; Genesis 27:41 ), whose blessing, intended for Esau ( Genesis 25:28 , Genesis 27:4 ), was diverted by Rebekah upon Jacob. To protect Jacob from his brother’s resentment Isaac sent him away to obtain a wife from his mother’s kindred in Paddan-aram ( Genesis 28:2 ), and repeated the benediction. The next record belongs to a period twenty-one years later, unless the paragraph ( Genesis 35:27-29 ) relates to a visit Jacob made to his home in the interval. Jacob considered piety and reverent awe as specially characteristic of his father ( Genesis 31:42 ; Genesis 31:53 , where ‘the Fear of Isaac’ means the God tremblingly adored by him)
Genesis, Book of - From Isaac spring Jacob and Esau: Jacob obtains his two wives Rachel and Leah, and with them and their maids he begets the heads of the twelve tribes, who are to possess the land as promised to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. After exercises with God, Jacob is called Israel. Jacob blesses his twelve sons, dies, and is buried in Canaan; and Joseph, before he died, being sure that God would visit them and bring them out of the land, bade them carry up his bones from Egypt. See ABRAHAM, ISAAC, Jacob, JOSEPH
Bersabee - This locality is the cradle of the Hebrew race, connected with memories of Agar, Ismael, and Abraham (Genesis 21), of Isaac (Genesis 26), Jacob who was born there, and his sons (Genesis 28,46)
Koch, Heinrich Hermann Robert - Studied medicine under Jacob Henle at the University of Göttingen
Nut - Sent as a present to Joseph in Egypt from Jacob in Canaan (Genesis 43:11)
Beersheba - This locality is the cradle of the Hebrew race, connected with memories of Agar, Ismael, and Abraham (Genesis 21), of Isaac (Genesis 26), Jacob who was born there, and his sons (Genesis 28,46)
Galeed - ) A Hebrew name given by Jacob to the heap which he and Laban reared on mount Gilead, a memorial of their brotherly covenant (Genesis 31:47-48). The memorial heap marked the crisis in Jacob's life when he became severed from his Syrian kindred, and henceforth a sojourner in, and heir of, Canaan
Cart - The same word, agalah , is translated 'wagons,' which were sent from Egypt to bring Jacob and his family, Genesis 45:19 ; and used for the carrying of parts of the tabernacle, Numbers 7:3 , where they are called 'covered wagons,' but which some prefer to call 'litter-wagons
Succoth - Here Jacob built a house for himself and booths for his cattle
Lentils - The red pottage which Jacob prepared and for which Esau sold his birthright was made from them
Embalming - Joseph gave orders for the embalming of the body of his father Jacob, Genesis 50:1-2 ; and Moses informs us that the process took up forty days
Hate - "Jacob have I loved, and Esau have I hated;" that is, have deprived of the privileges of his primogeniture, through his own profanity; and visited him with severe judgment on account of his sins
Mourning - And still more, in that of the patriarch Jacob, Seven days the funeral halted at the threshing-floor of Atad
Asher - The eighth son of Jacob
Robert Koch - Studied medicine under Jacob Henle at the University of Göttingen
Heinrich Koch - Studied medicine under Jacob Henle at the University of Göttingen
Poplar - The poplar may easily have furnished Jacob with white rods
Paarai - There was a tradition among the Rabbins, as it is related by Jerome in his questions on Genesis, that Arbe, the original name of Hebron, was so called because it means four, and Adam, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were buried there
Patriarchs - The title is chiefly confined to the heads of families before the law; for when we speak of the patriarchs without particularizing by name it is generally understood of those before the flood, and afterwards confined to the persons and families of Abraham, Issac, Jacob, and their tribe
Vow - ) For instances (See Jacob (Genesis 28:20-22 with Genesis 31:13; Genesis 35:1-4). (See Jacob
Machpelah - That cave became the burial-place of Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, Jacob and Leah. It is thought to be possible that the embalmed body of Jacob may still be preserved in the cave, as Egyptian mummies have been found of as early a date
Abel-Mizraim - ) The threshingfloor of Atad; so called by the Canaanites, because it was the chief scene of the funeral laments of Joseph and his Egyptian retinue for Jacob (Genesis 50:4-11). of Jordan; but Genesis 50:13 plainly shows it was not till after the mourning at Abel-Mizraim that "Jacob's sons carried him into the land of Canaan. " The phrase, "Joseph spake unto the house of Pharaoh" implies that Pharaoh and his estates in council decreed a state funeral for Jacob, in which the princes, nobles, and chief men of Egypt, with their pomp of chariots and equipages, took part. These having been completed at Atad, Jacob's sons proceeded alone to the cave of Machpelah, the final burying place of his embalmed body
Issachar - The ninth son of Jacob, and the fifth of Leah. When Jacob blessed his sons he said, "Issachar is a strong ass, couching down between two burdens, and he
Laban - Compelled, at length, to pay Jacob wages, he changes them ten times, and, in the spirit of a crafty, griping worldling, makes him account for whatever of the flock was torn of beasts or stolen, whether by day or night. When Jacob flies from this iniquitous service with his family and cattle, Laban still pursues and persecutes him, intending, if his intentions had not been overruled by a mightier hand, to send him away empty, even after he had been making, for so long a period, so usurious a profit of him
Mesopotamia - Here Abraham and Sarah were born, and the wives of Isaac, and Jacob, and most of the sons of Jacob, the heads of the twelve tribes
Judah - The fourth son of Jacob and Leah, born in Mesopotamia, B. The dying benediction of Jacob foretells the superior power and prosperity of the family of Judah, and their continuance as chief of the Jewish race until the time of Christ, Genesis 49:8-12 . Though not the firstborn, Judah soon came to be considered as the chief of Jacob's children, and his tribe was the most powerful and numerous
Beersheba - Abraham, Hagar, Isaac, Jacob and the sons of Jacob all at some time either lived in or passed through Beersheba (Genesis 21:14; Genesis 22:19; Genesis 26:23; Genesis 28:10; Genesis 46:1-5)
Naphtali - Son of Jacob by Bilhah. " (Genesis 49:21) This prophetical blessing of Jacob hath not been regarded in terms equal to its importance, according to my apprehension; and yet the Holy Ghost seems to have called up the attention of the church to it, upon various occasions, in his holy word. ...
I am the more inclined to those discoveries of Jesus, in the view of Naphtali, because in my apprehension of the subject, Moses, the man of God, in his dying benediction concerning Naphtali, confirmed what Jacob in his dying moments had before said concerning him. " And to whom are we to look for any, or for all the tribes of Israel in the possession of the divine favour, and so satisfied with it? Of whom, among the sons of Jacob, can it be said with truth, "that they are full of the blessing of the Lord," unless we first behold him in whom it hath "pleased the Father that all fulness should dwell," and from him, and in him, and by him, all the seed of Israel "are justified and shall glory?" Surely it is blessed first to eye Christ as possessing and being the cause of the true Naphtali's portion, and then, by virtue of an union with him, and interest in him, to behold those blessings flowing in upon his inheritance
Hushim - Son of Dan and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:23 )
Pillow - KJV and REB described the rock on which Jacob rested his head as a pillow (Genesis 28:11 ,Genesis 28:11,28:18 )
Fallow Ground - The central thrust of the prophetic message is clear: the nation Israel, “Jacob”, is to return to Yahweh by “cultivating” the covenant values of righteousness and steadfast love
Elioenai - A grandson of Benjamin and thus great grandson of Jacob (1 Chronicles 7:8 )
Beriah - Son of Asher and grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:17 )
Mesopotamia - Isaac's wife came from thence, and Jacob served Laban there
Dew - Isaac, blessing Jacob, wished him the dew of heaven, which fattens the fields, Genesis 27:28
Zebulun - One of the sons of Jacob, and of Leah
Jabbok - Penuel, where Jacob wrestled with the Angel, was a fording-place of the Jabbok, Genesis 32:32
Naphtali - Fifth son of Jacob, and second of Bilhah. Naphtali and his four sons entered Egypt with Jacob, and nothing further is recorded of him personally. When Jacob prophetically announced to the tribes that which should befall them in the last days, he said, "Naphtali is a hind let loose: he giveth goodly words," Genesis 49:21 ; it is the remnant of Israel as the vessel of testimony
Isaac - At 40 Isaac married his cousin, Rebekah, daughter of Bethuel, Nahor's son, by whom at 60 he had twin sons, Esau and Jacob. The mother loved the steady, quiet Jacob. As he lived 43 years afterward, to see Jacob return from Mesopotamia, he probably was now dangerously sick; hence, loathing ordinary food, he longed to have "savoury meat such as he loved. " Isaac's unexpected prolongation of life probably deterred Esau from his murderous purpose against Jacob for having stolen his blessing. ...
He reverenced his father amidst all his wildness, and finally joined with Jacob in paying the last mark of respect at his father's grave, even as Isaac and Ishmael had met at Abraham's Burial. Isaac's carnal partiality and Rebekah's tortuous policy eventuated in their being left in their old age by both children, Esau disappointed and disinherited, Jacob banished to a long and distant servitude; the idols of God's children becoming their scourges, in order to bring them back to Himself (1 Corinthians 11:32; Jeremiah 2:19). Isaac lived to see Jacob whom he had sent with his blessing (for faith at last prevailed over his partiality, and he gave Jacob the blessing of Abraham, Genesis 28:1; Genesis 28:4) to seek a wife in Padan-aram return with a large family to him at Hebron (Genesis 35:27),...
Before he died at 180; the longest lived of the three patriarchs, the least migratory, the least prolific, and the least favored with revelations. His blessing Jacob and Esau "even (Greek) concerning things to come," as if they were actually present, and not merely concerning things present, is quoted (Hebrews 11:20) as evidencing his faith; as similar dying charges evidenced Jacob's and Joseph's faith. ), unlike Abraham and Jacob, of tender affections, he was a man of suffering rather than action; having the divine favor so markedly that Abimelech and his officers said, "we saw certainly that the Lord was with thee" (Genesis 26:28). ...
As Abraham foreshadows the unsettled early history of the nation, and Jacob their commercial unwarlike later course, so Isaac their intermediate days of peace and separation from the nations in their fertile land of promise. As Abraham is associated with morning prayer, and Jacob associated with night prayer, so Isaac with evening prayer (Genesis 19:27; Genesis 28:11; Genesis 28:32; Genesis 24:63)
Peniel - A spot remarkable in Scripture from the vision of Jacob. And who was it Jacob saw, and with whom did he wrestle? If JEHOVAH, in his threefold character of person, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, how could this be, who is said to be invisible? If "no man hath seen God at any time," if, as JEHOVAH declared to Moses, (Exodus 33:20) "There shall no man see me and live," who could this be whom the patriarch Jacob saw, conversed and wrestled with; but the Lord Jesus? Him whom though no man hath seen God at any time, yet "the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him. "He took his brother by the heel (said Hosea, speaking of Jacob) in the womb, and by his strength he had power with God; yea, he had power over the angel, and prevailed. " (Hosea 12:3; Hos 12:5)...
The history of Jacob, in this very interesting transaction, I am not at present engaged in: it is Jacob's Lord that we are now seeking after. " And yet we are told, (Genesis 32:24) that it was a man which wrestled with Jacob until the breaking of the day. " And observe the prophet doth not say an angel, but the angel, thus particularizing and defining one identical person; and we well know that Christ is often called the "angel of the covenant," (Malachi 3:1; Acts 7:30-31) Indeed the patriarch Jacob himself, in another period of his life, called him by this name
Peor - But before he went he gave expression to that wonderful prediction regarding the future of this mysterious people, whose "goodly tents" were spread out before him, and the coming of a "Star" out of Jacob and a "Sceptre" out of Israel (24:14-17)
Asher - The eighth son of Jacob and second of Zilpah, Genesis 30:13 35:26
Kiriath-Arba - Others point to the nearby cave of Machpelah where, according to Jewish tradition, Adam, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were buried—thus, “city of four
Dan - the fifth son of Jacob, Genesis 30:1-6 . Of Jacob's blessing Dan, see Genesis 49:16-17
Penuel - Site on River Jabbok northeast of Succoth where Jacob wrestled with the stranger (Genesis 32:24-32 ; compare Hosea 12:4 )
Succoth - A spot in the valley of the Jordan and near the Jabbok, where Jacob set up his tents on his return from Mesopotamia, Genesis 33:17
Asher - The tribe of Asher was descended from Jacob through his maid Zilpah (Genesis 30:12-13)
Catholic Latin Literature - The drama, an outgrowth of Church liturgy, included such writers as ...
Andreas Fabricius
Beccadelli
Bruni
Cornelius Crocus
Cornelius Laurimanus
Dati
De Loches
Filelfo
Hannardus Gamerius
Holonius
Jacob Locher
Johann von Kitzcher
Levin Brecht
Mussato
Poggio
Reuchlin
Wimpfeling
Among the poets of this period may be mentioned: ...
Adam Widl
Famian Strada
Hieronymus Petrucci
Hosschius
Jacob Masen
Johannes Dantiscus
John Bissel
John Salmon
Nicola Avancini
Nicolaus Copernicus
Robert Bellarmine
Sarbiewski
Simon Rettenbacher
Tarquinius Galuzzi
Vida
The writers of the neo-Latin epic included: ...
Saint Alcuin
Saint Aldhelm
Saint Boniface
Saint Columbanus
Saint Thomas More
Venerable Bede
Balde
Dante Alighieri
Flodoard
Hildebert of Tours
Hroswitha
John of Salisbury
Maffeo Vegio
Marbod
Petrarch
Sadolet
Theodulf the Goth
Venantius Fortunatus
Walafrid Strabo
the five Ekkehards
the four Notkers
Pillar - Jacob set up a pillar on Rachel's grave as a memorial to her (Genesis 35:20 ). Jacob set up a pillar following his dream (Genesis 28:18 ) and again when God spoke to him at Bethel (Genesis 35:9-15 ) as memorials of God's revelation
Regem Melech - " The allusion is to God's words to Jacob, "go up to Bethel" (Genesis 28:19; Genesis 35:1). ...
Jacob's "house of God" consisted as yet of but a pillar first and an altar afterward (Genesis 28:17-18; Genesis 28:22; Genesis 36:1; Genesis 36:7); so the house of God at the time of Regem Melech consisted merely of an altar, and congregation, and priests favored with God's presence in worship at it. God, as in Jacob's case, could bless the obedient at the bore altar before the temple was reared. But many sent to Jehovah's house, not like Jacob at Bethel but as the apostate Israelites to the calf at Bethel, with no spirit of true obedience
Aramean - (ar uh mee' an) consisted of the loose confederation of towns and settlements spread over what is now called Syria as well as in some parts of Babylon from which Jacob and Abraham came (Deuteronomy 26:5 ). Deuteronomy 26:5 contains what has become an important confession for Jews—”A wandering Aramean was my father” (RSV)—which claims Aramean lineage for Jacob and by extension for Abraham
i'Saac - When forty years old he married Rebekah his cousin, by whom, when he was sixty, he had two sons, Esau and Jacob. After the deceit by which Jacob acquired his father's blessing Isaac sent his son to seek a wife in Padan-aram; and all that we know of him during the last forty-three years of his life in that he saw that GOD , with a large and prosperous family, return to him at Hebron
Isaac - The partiality of the mother for Jacob, and of the father for Esau, led to unhappy jealousies, discord, sin, and long separations between the brothers, though all were overruled to accomplish the purposed of God. At the age of one hundred and thirty-seven, Isaac blessed Jacob and sent him away into Mesopotamia
Jacob's Well - It was dug by Jacob, and hence its name, in the "parcel of ground" which he purchased from the sons of Hamor (Genesis 33:19 ). "Unfortunately, the well of Jacob has not escaped that misplaced religious veneration which cannot be satisfied with leaving the object of it as it is, but must build over it a shrine to protect and make it sacred
Staff - In Hebrews 11:21, ‘Jacob … worshipped [1] upon the top of his staff. ’ There is no difficulty of interpretation if the Septuagint is followed: Jacob may have stood up to receive the oath of Joseph. Equally it may be said that there is no difficulty if the bed or couch had an end which might be called its ‘head,’ and that Jacob leaned upon it
Burial - Rachel died, and was buried near Ephrath; "and Jacob set a pillar upon her grave" (16-20). Jacob, when charging his sons to bury him in the cave of Machpelah, said, "There they buried Abraham and Sarah his wife; there they buried Isaac and Rebekah his wife; and there I buried Leah" (49:31). In compliance with the oath which he made him swear unto him (47:29-31), Joseph, assisted by his brethren, buried Jacob in the cave of Machpelah (50:2,13). At the Exodus, Moses "took the bones of Joseph with him," and they were buried in the "parcel of ground" which Jacob had bought of the sons of Hamor (Joshua 24:32 ), which became Joseph's inheritance (Genesis 48:22 ; 1 Chronicles 5:1 ; John 4:5 )
Israel in Egypt - When Joseph was in power, Jacob and his whole household settled in the land: there they multiplied and became a great nation. A much shorter period is implied in Genesis 15:16 , which says of Israel in Egypt that "in the fourth generation they shall come hither again;" and if we turn to Exodus 6:16-20 we find exactly four generations, thus:...
Jacob's son Levi. ...
Or, if we start with Levi, who entered with Jacob, there was ample time for Moses to have had a son, as he was eighty years old at the Exodus. ...
Age of Abraham when Isaac was born 100...
" " Abraham, when the promise was given 75...
25...
" " Israel when Jacob was born 60...
" " Jacob when he stood before Pharaoh 130...
" " Sojourn of Israel in Egypt 215...
430...
If then this be the correct period, how does it agree with Genesis 15:13 and Exodus 12:40 ? In Genesis 15:13 and Acts 7:6 , nothing is said about Egypt : "Thy seed shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs. It is better to take the four hundred and thirty years as including the sojourn of Abraham (after the promise), and of Isaac, and of Jacob, though strictly speaking Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were not 'children of Israel
Embalming - The embalming of Jacob and Joseph was according to the Egyptian custom, which was partially followed by the Jews (2 Chronicles 16:14 ), as in the case of king Asa, and of our Lord (John 19:39,40 ; Luke 23:56 ; 24:1 )
Issachar - ” Ninth son of Jacob, the fifth borne by Leah (Genesis 30:18 )
Wages - Paid by Laban to Jacob in kind (Genesis 29:15; Genesis 29:20; Genesis 30:28; Genesis 31:7-8; Genesis 31:41; "I served 14 years for thy two daughters, and six years for thy cattle"
Succoth - Jacob dwelt there upon his return to Canaan (Genesis 33:17 )
Hivites - Jacob, on his return to Palestine, found Shechem occupied by the Hivites
Israel - The name given to Jacob after his wrestling with the angel at Peniel
Goshen - Here it was Jacob and his children dwelt, when brought down into Egypt
is'Rael -
The name given, (Genesis 32:28 ) to Jacob after his wrestling with the angel, (Hosea 12:4 ) at Peniel
Aven - It appears, however, highly probable, by the behaviour of Pharaoh to Joseph and Jacob, and especially by Joseph's care to preserve the land to the priests, Genesis 47:22-26 , that the true religion prevailed in Egypt in his time; and it is incredible that Joseph should have married the daughter of the priest of On, had that name among the Egyptians denoted only the material light; which, however, no doubt they, like all the rest of the world, idolized in after times, and to which we find a temple dedicated among the Canaanites, under this name, Joshua 7:2
Abel-Misraim - the floor of Atad, beyond the river Jordan, where Joseph, his brethren, and the Egyptians mourned for the death of Jacob, Genesis 50:11
Succoth - An ancient town on the journey of Jacob from Padan-aram
Jacob's Well - JACOB’S WELL. In the fork of these roads is Jacob’s Well (Bir Yâkûb), where Jesus, being wearied with His journey,—it was about the hour of noon,—sat down and rested (John 4:6). ...
The well is described (John 4:5) as in the neighbourhood of ‘a city of Samaria called Sychar, near to the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son Joseph. ’ This parcel of ground (χωρίον) is evidently the plot referred to in Genesis 33:18-19 as lying ‘before’ (or ‘to the east of’) Shechem, which Jacob purchased from the native Shechemites for 100 kesîtahs. It is nowhere recorded that Jacob dug a well here; but the fact had become a matter of common and well-established belief by the time of Jesus, and no serious doubt has since been raised as to the origin or locality of the well. The traditional sites of Jacob’s Well and Joseph’s Tomb (a little to the N. ...
In John 4:6 the well is called πηγὴ (‘fountain’) τοῦ Ἰακώβ: in John 4:11 the woman refers to it as τὸ φρέαρ (‘the cistern or pit’) which Jacob gave. ʼ The neighbouring springs were ‘heavy’ (or hard), being strongly impregnated with lime, while Jacob’s Well contained ‘lighter’ (or softer) water, ‘cool, palatable, and refreshing’ (G. ]'>[4] ...
If the uniform tradition as to the well’s origin be correct, probably the incomer Jacob sank this ‘deep’ pit to avoid collision with the natives among whom be settled
Shechem - )...
Abraham’s grandson, Jacob, upon returning to Canaan from Paddan-aram, bought land in Shechem and settled there with his family and flocks (Genesis 33:18-19). When a conflict arose with some of the local inhabitants, Jacob’s sons massacred the men of Shechem and plundered the town (Genesis 34). Jacob and his family then moved elsewhere, though at times they still pastured their flocks near Shechem (Genesis 35:1-4; Genesis 37:12). Joseph’s bones were later buried at Shechem in a field that Jacob had given to Joseph (Genesis 48:22; Joshua 24:32; John 4:5-6)
Obadiah - ...
Prophecy of, contains a general accusation of Edom, and an account of the prosperity of Zion when Jacob should return from his captivity and Esau be discomfited
Teraphim - Jacob (Genesis 35:2 ) disposed of such religious artifacts before returning to Bethel
Diviner's Oak - The tree is perhaps that associated with Abraham (Genesis 12:6 ), Jacob (Genesis 35:4 ), and Joshua (Joshua 24:26 )
Jabbok - Across this stream Jacob sent his family, and here his wrestling for a blessing occurred
Worms - In blessing Israel Jehovah said, "Fear not, thou worm Jacob," Isaiah 41:14 ; and the Lord, to indicate the low estate in which He was, said, "I am a worm and no man
Gilead - the name given to the monument erected by Laban and Jacob, in testimony of a mutual covenant and agreement, Genesis 31:47-48
Wheat - In the days of Jacob this grain was already so much cultivated in Mesopotamia that "wheat harvest" denoted a well-known season
Rachel - Ewe or sheep, Ruth 4:11 , the younger sister of Leah, daughter of Laban, and the chosen wife of Jacob, though her sister was favored with more children
Ger'Izim - [1] According to the traditions of the Samaritans it was here that Abraham sacrificed Isaac, that Melchizedek met the patriarch, that Jacob built an altar, and at its base dug a well, the ruins of which are still seen
Week - Noah's waiting other "seven days" (Genesis 8:10), and Laban's requiring Jacob to fulfill Leah's "week," i. celebrate the marriage feast for a week with Leah (Genesis 29:27), are explicit allusions to this division of time (compare Judges 14:12); also Joseph's mourning for Jacob seven days (Genesis 50:10)
Beersheba - Hence Jacob was sent away ( Genesis 28:10 ), and returned and sacrificed on his way to Egypt ( Genesis 46:1 ). It was an important holy place: here Abraham planted a sacred tree ( Genesis 21:33 ), and theophanies were vouchsafed to Hagar ( Genesis 21:17 ), to Isaac ( Genesis 26:24 ), to Jacob ( Genesis 46:2 ), and to Elijah ( 1 Kings 19:5 )
Obadiah, Book of - Edom (Esau) is characterised in scripture by his deadly hatred to his 'brother Jacob,' Obadiah 10 . the house of Jacob shall be a fire, and the house of Joseph a flame, and the house of Esau for stubble
Jerahmeel - ]'>[3] is an abbreviated form, like Jacob for Jacob-el , or the Yarkhamu found in a Babylonian list of Hammurabi’s time
Gad - was the name of the son of Jacob and Zilpah, Leah's servant, Genesis 30:9-11 . Leah, Jacob's wife, gave him also Zilpah, that by her she might have children. Jacob, blessing Gad, said, "A troop shall overcome him, but he shall overcome at the last,"...
Genesis 49:19 ; and Moses, in his last song, mentions Gad as "a lion which teareth the arm with the crown of the head," &c, Deuteronomy 33:20-21
ju'Dah - (praised, celebrated ), the fourth son of Jacob and the fourth of Leah. So too it is Judah who is sent before Jacob to smooth the way for him in the land of Goshen
Bethel - " It was expressly so named by Jacob, when he had the vision of the heavenly ladder, on his way from his father at Beersheba to Harsh (Genesis 28:19; Genesis 31:13). "Jacob called the name of that place Bethel, but the name of that city was called Luz at the first" (Joshua 16:1-2). The naming of Bethel Jacob repeated more publicly on his return home, 20 years later, with his family purified of idols, when God again appeared to him, and confirmed his change of name to Israel (Genesis 35:1-15; Genesis 32:28). Bethel still abounds in stones such as Jacob used for his pillow and afterward for a sanctuary
Esau - The elder brother of Jacob, who despised the blessing, and was rejected. ) But while this doctrine concerning distinguishing grace is fully displayed in the history of Jacob and Esau from those Scriptures, there is one point more relating to Esau which deserves to be particularly considered, and the more so, from the misapprehension of many respecting it. And if the reader looks attentively to what the Apostle hath said concerning his repentance, he will next discover, that Esau's repentance was not in respect to the promised blessing, in spiritual things conveyed to Jacob, but mere temporal possessions. Jacob was made Esau's lord, and Esau himself, by selling his birthright, had consented to it; of this he repented, and sought it carefully with tears, to prevail upon his father Isaac to call it back, hoping the known partiality of the father to him would prevail over his natural feelings
Benjamin - The youngest son of Jacob by Rachel, and the only full brother of Joseph ( Genesis 30:22 f. He alone of Jacob’s sons was native-born. ]'>[3] , however ( Genesis 35:22-26 ), gives Paddan-aram as the birth-place of all Jacob’s children. Jacob changed this ill-omened name to the more auspicious one Benjamin , which is usually interpreted ‘son of my right hand,’ the right hand being the place of honour as the right side was apparently the lucky side (cf. Pressed by a famine, his ten brothers went down to Egypt, and Jacob, solicitous for his welfare, did not allow Benjamin to accompany them; but Joseph made it a condition of his giving them corn that they should bring him on their return. ]'>[7] ) gave surety for his safe return, Jacob yielded. ]'>[3] ( Genesis 46:21 ) makes him, when he entered Egypt, the father of ten sons, that is more than twice as many as Jacob’s other sons except Dan, who had seven. In the Blessing of Jacob ( Genesis 49:27 ) a fierce and warlike character is ascribed to Benjamin
Mahanaim - A town east of the Jordan, named by Jacob
Earrings - Before returning to Bethel, Jacob got his family to put away their foreign gods and earrings (Genesis 35:2-4 )
High Place - It was on a mountain in Gilead that Laban and Jacob offered sacrifices (31:54)
Moreh - Under the same "oak" Jacob hid his household's idols (Genesis 35:4)
Dream - The most remarkable instances of this are recorded in the history of Jacob (Genesis 28:12 ; 31:10 ), Laban (31:24), Joseph (37:9-11), Gideon (Judges 7 ), and Solomon (1 Kings 3:5 )
Salem - (Psalms 76:2) There was a Shalem also in the country of the Shechemites, were Jacob in his travels came
Tribe - ) A family, race, or series of generations, descending from the same progenitor, and kept distinct, as in the case of the twelve tribes of Israel, descended from the twelve sons of Jacob
Haran - It was the early home of Rebekah, and Jacob afterward resided there with Laban
Levi - The third son of Jacob and Leah, born in Mesopotamia; and father of three sons, and of Jochebed the mother of Moses, Genesis 29:34 Exodus 6:16-20 . The tribe of Levi was, according to Jacob's prediction, scattered over all Israel, having no share in the cities in the portions of other tribes
Issachar - The fifth son of Leah, born after Gad and Asher, the sons of Zilpah, and the ninth of Jacob’s sons ( Genesis 30:18 [4] , because Leah ‘hired’ Jacob from Rachel with Reuben’s mandrakes; E [5] , because she gave Zilpah to Jacob. The references in the Blessing of Jacob ( Genesis 49:1-33 ) would indicate that during the early monarchy Issachar lost both its martial valour and its independence
Canaan (2) - The land of Canaan was called the land of Israel, 1 Samuel 13:19, because it was occupied by the descendants of Jacob or Israel; the holy land, Zechariah 2:12; the land of promise, Hebrews 11:9, because it was promised to Abraham and his posterity as their possession; the land of Judah, Jeremiah 39:10, because Judah was the leading tribe; the land of the Hebrews, Genesis 40:15, or the descendants of Eber, an ancestor of Abraham. ; Isaac, Jacob, and the patriarchs made their home there. It was left by Jacob because of the famine; searched by the twelve spies, Numbers 13:2; Viewed by Moses, Deuteronomy 32:49; conquered by Joshua, Joshua 11:23; divided by lot among the twelve tribes, Joshua 13:7; a king of the country was slain by Deborah and Barak, Judges 4:24
Joseph - (Hebrew: may God add) ...
Patriarch, eleventh son of Jacob, first-born of Rachel, immediate ancestor of the tribes of Manasses and Ephraim
Day's Journey - Laban in hot pursuit of Jacob, and the Hebrew host in the wilderness, may be taken to represent the extremes in this matter of a ‘day’s journey’ (reff
Levites - The descendants of Levi, the third son of Jacob by Lia
Chemistry - ...
Catholics ...
Jean Antoine Chaptal
Michel Eugene Chevreul
Henri Etienne Sainte-Claire-Deville
Jean Baptiste Dumas
Antoine Laurent Lavoisier
Theophrastus Paracelsus
Louis Pasteur
Pierre Joseph Pelletier
Theophile Jules Pelouze
Louis Jacques Thénard
Louis Nicolas Vauquelin
Other Christian Chemists ...
Johan Jacob Berzelius
Robert Boyle
John Dalton
Sir Humphry Davy
Charles Friedel
Martin Heinrich Klaproth
Justus von Liebig
William Henry Perkins
Joseph Priestley
William Ramsey
Ira Remsen
Christian Friedrich Schonbein
Charles Adolphe Wurtz
Judah - Praise, the fourth son of Jacob by Leah
Blessing - Jacob and Moses gave dying blessings prophetical of the character and history of the several tribes (Genesis 49; Deuteronomy 33)
Atad - ) A trodden space for threshing, beyond Jordan, where Joseph and his brethren and the Egyptian retinue made for seven days "great and very sore lamentation" over the body of Jacob, whence the Canaanites called the place Abel Mizraim, "the mourning of the Egyptians
Bilhah - Rachel having no children gave Bilhah to her husband Jacob, who by the latter had two sons, Dan and Naphtali (Genesis 30:1-8; Genesis 35:25; Genesis 46:25; 1 Chronicles 7:13). Reuben, Jacob's firstborn, defiled her, and was therefore deprived of the birthright, which was given to the sons of Joseph (Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:4; 1 Chronicles 5:1)
Rameses (ra'Amses) - )...
Rameses was located in that part of the Nile Delta where the family of Jacob had originally settled (Genesis 47:11). This was the region from which Jacob’s multitude of descendants set out on their flight from Egypt over four hundred years later (in 1280 BC; Exodus 12:37)
Zebulun - The tribe of Zebulun was descended from the sixth son of Jacob and Leah (Genesis 30:19-20). Jacob’s blessing of this tribe indicated it would inherit part of Canaan’s coastal region, but the territory it actually occupied was a few kilometres inland, in the hill country that rose from the coastal plain
Moreh - Jacob buried there the foreign gods his family had brought from Haran (Genesis 35:4 )
Simeon - One of Jacob's twelve sons, the second by Leah (Genesis 29:33 ). See Jacob ; Tribes of Israel
Bilhah - ]'>[1] )), and by her to Jacob as a concubine ( Genesis 30:3-4 (JE Awake - Jacob awaked out of sleep
Sanctuary - The psalmist celebrates this in one of the loftiest strains of sacred poetry: "When" (Psalms 114:1-8) "Israel came out of Egypt, the house of Jacob from a people of strange language, Judah was his sanctuary, and Israel his dominion
Israel - -Or more properly, as it is rendered, Ishrael, the name given to Jacob by the Lord himself, on his wrestling with God in prayer and prevailing
Jews - Blessed be God, there is a promise concerning them, which all the faithful in Christ Jesus long to see fulfilled: "The Redeemer shall come to Zion, and unto them that turn from transgression in Jacob, saith the Lord
Overlay, Spy - The meaning in this context is “to watch” with a purpose, that of seeing that the covenant between Laban and Jacob was kept
Mourn - 37:34: “And Jacob … mourned for his son many days
Forget - 27:45, when Rebekah urges Jacob to flee his home until Esau “forget that which thou hast done to him
Haran - Here, after leaving Ur, Abraham dwelt till is father Terah died; and to this old homestead Isaac sent for a wife, and Jacob fled from the wrath of Esau, Genesis 11:31,32 ; 12:5 ; 24:1-67 ; 27:43 ; 28:10 ; 29:4
Balaam - His seer's vision showed him a glorious star and a mighty scepter to rise out of Jacob
Jehovah - See Exodus 3:14 , I AM THAT I AM, the meaning of which see under the article Exodus 6:3 , God says, "I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty; but by my name Jehovah was I not known to them;" yet the appellation Jehovah appears to have been known from the beginning, Genesis 4:2
Luz - The most probable conclusion is that the two places were, during the times preceding the conquest, distinct, Luz being the city and Bethel the pillar and altar of Jacob that after the destruction of Luz by the tribe of Ephraim the town of Bethel arose
Pillar - So also Jacob set up a pillar over Rachel's grave
Gad - The seventh son of Jacob, and the first of Zilpah, Leah's maid. Jacob in blessing his sons said of Gad, "A troop shall overcome him: but he shall overcome at the last
Birthright - Esau transferred his birthright to Jacob for a paltry mess of pottage, profanely setting at nought what was the spiritual privilege connected with it, the being progenitor of the promised Messiah (Genesis 25:33; Hebrews 12:16-17). Thus Isaac is preferred to Ishmael, Jacob to Esau, Joseph to Reuben, David to his elder brothers
Benjamin - The youngest son of Jacob, by Rachel. How many Rachels have there been since, who in wrestling or wishing to take the government out of Lord's hands, have done it to their sorrow! Jacob, though his love to Rachel was unbounded, (see Genesis 29:18-20) yet he would not suffer the child to retain the name of Benoni, but changed it to Benjamin, which is, the son of my right hand, from Ben, son; and jamin, the right hand
Succoth - A place first mentioned in Genesis 33:17 , where it is said to have been so called because Jacob, on his return from Haran to Canaan, halting at it after his wrestling with the angel at Penuel, built there ‘booths’ (Heb. Jacob came from Mizpah (see No. The rest of Jacob’s route would be consistent and intelligible, if Mahanaim (his last halting-place before Penuel, Genesis 32:2 ) were (say) at Deir ‘Allâ, 4 miles N. Nor does the geographical position of Deir ‘Allâ seem to agree with the narrative of either Jacob or Gideon
Shechem - See Jacob, Hamor. The place in which Jacob for a while established himself ( Genesis 33:18 , John 4:12 ). ’ It was evidently a place of sanctity: there was a great oak (or terebinth) here no doubt a sacred tree where Jacob hid his teraphim ( Genesis 35:4 ), and under which Joshua gave his parting address to the elders ( Joshua 24:1-33 ). ...
In or near the town are shown ‘Jacob’s well,’ which, as already said, is not improbably authentic; and a shrine covering the traditional ‘tomb of Joseph,’ the genuineness of which is perhaps less unassailable
Naming - The last son of Jacob and Rachel received a name from each parent; Jacob altering the name Rachel gave (Genesis 35:18 ). Jacob was named “the supplanter” for “he took hold on Esau's heel” (Genesis 25:26 )
Esau - As the prophet Malachi (Malachi 1:2-3) has it, ‘Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated. The first part of the oracle runs, ‘Two nations are in thy womb, and two peoples shall be separated from thy bowels’ (Genesis 25:23); and the Prophet’s words are, ‘Was (or ‘is,’ Revised Version margin) not Esau Jacob’s brother? saith the Lord: yet I (have) loved Jacob; but Esau (have) I hated, and made his mountains a desolation, and gave (given) his heritage to the jackals of the wilderness. Since Jacob-in the prophetic words which were so dear to them-had been loved and Esau hated, it was clear to them that they were the objects of a peculiar Divine favour
Answer - 35:3 Jacob tells his household, “And let us arise, and go up to Bethel; and I will make there an altar unto God, who answered me in the day of my distress. , where this “answering” is recorded, it is quite clear that God initiated the encounter and that, although He spoke with Jacob, the emphasis is on the vision of the ladder and the relationship with God that it represented. …” In a similar sense, Jacob proposed that Laban give him all the spotted and speckled sheep of the flock, so that “my righteousness [3] answer Esau - Jacob, his brother, had many faults, but Jacob inherited the blessing because after all is said he had eyes and a heart for the unseen and the spiritual. ...
In that extraordinary solidity of style, in which Moses sometimes surpasses Dante himself, we have Isaac and Esau and Jacob set before us to the life in six or seven verses. 'And Jacob sod pottage; and Esau came from the field, and he was faint. And Esau said to Jacob, Feed me, I pray thee, with that same red pottage; for I am faint. And Jacob said, Sell me this day thy birthright. And Esau said, Behold, I am at the point to die; and what profit shall this birthright do to me? And Jacob said, Swear to me this day; and he sware unto him; and he sold his birthright unto Jacob. Then Jacob gave Esau bread and pottage of lentils, and he did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way. ' This was not the first time that Esau and Jacob had exchanged words about that birthright. Isaac knew, Rebekah knew, and Jacob knew; and Jacob had for long been eyeing his brother for a fit opportunity. It had for a long time back been marrow to Jacob's bones to hear Esau jesting so openly about his birthright over his venison and his wine; jesting and being jested about the covenant blessing. 'As much as you are able to eat, Esau! and anything else you like to name, to boot; only, say that you toss me today your worthless birthright,' said Jacob. ...
What with the purpose of God according to election, and that purpose communicated to Rebekah when she went to inquire of the Lord; what with Isaac's love for Esau because he did eat of his venison; what with Rebekah's retaliatory love for Jacob; what with Esau's increasing levity and profanity, and Jacob's increasing subtlety; what with Esau's defiant Canaanite marriage; and now, to crown all, Isaac's old age, blindness, and fast-approaching end-what with all that, that was as unhappy a house as was at that moment on the face of this unhappy earth. The decayed life, and the still more decayed faith, of Abraham's only son Isaac; the cunning and treachery of Rebekah, the bride he had brought into his mother Sarah's tent in love; Jacob, the too willing tool of his cunning mother's chicanery and lies; the pitiful imposition perpetrated upon the blind old epicure; and, then, reprobate Esau's unavailing cry of remorse and revenge. We have all been baptized for a future far greater, and far more full of blessing, than that future which fell either to Esau or to Jacob
Mesopotamia - From this region Isaac obtained his wife Rebecca (Genesis 24:10,15 ), and here also Jacob sojourned (28:2-7) and obtained his wives, and here most of his sons were born (35:26; 46:15)
Corn - "Plenty of corn" was a part of Issac's blessing conferred upon Jacob (Genesis 27:28 ; Compare Psalm 65:13 )
Meonenim, the Oak of - That where under Jacob hid the strange gods and talisman earrings of his household was close by Shechem (Genesis 35:4), the same where Abram built his first altar in Palestine (Genesis 12:6); here also Joshua, alluding to the patriarch Jacob's address and the original idolatry of Israel's forefathers, urges the people similarly to "put away the strange gods," etc
Simeon -
The second son of Jacob by Leah (Genesis 29:33 )
Stone - ...
Stones were set up to commemorate remarkable events, as by Jacob at Bethel (Genesis 28:18 ), at Padan-aram (35:4), and on the occasion of parting with Laban (31:45-47); by Joshua at the place on the banks of the Jordan where the people first "lodged" after crossing the river (Joshua 6:8 ), and also in "the midst of Jordan," where he erected another set of twelve stones (4:1-9); and by Samuel at "Ebenezer" (1 Samuel 7:12 )
Machpelah - ) The sepulchers of Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob, and Leah are shown on the mosque floor; but the real sepulchers are in the cave below the floor; the cave opens to the S
Ephraim - He was adopted by his grandfather Jacob and given precedence over his brother Manasseh (Genesis 48:14 )
Haran - Jacob went there and married (Genesis 28:10 ; Genesis 29:4 )
Birthright - Esau forfeited his birthright to his brother Jacob for the sake of a meal of lentil stew and bread (Genesis 25:29-34 )
Near - And Jacob went near to Isaac his father
Concubine - The immediate cause of concubinage might be gathered from the conjugal histories of Abraham and Jacob (Genesis 1630;30 )
Birth-Right - Jacob when dying said of Reuben "Thou art my firstborn, my might, and the beginning of my strength, the excellency of dignity, and the excellency of power
Bow - Hence, the dying patriarch, when blessing Joseph, speaks of "his bow abiding in strength, because his arms were made strong by the hands of the mighty God of Jacob
Bullock - 32:15), which tells us that among the gifts Jacob sent to placate Esau were “ten bulls
Haran - Thither it was likewise that Jacob repaired to Laban, when he fled from Esau, Genesis 27:43 ; Genesis 28:10
Mount Seir - ) But what makes Seir an interesting subject to the Lord's people is, that here it was Jacob, in his return from Mesopotamia, had those soul-exercises which we read of Genesis 32:3-20
Goshen - The name of the tract of country in Egypt which was inhabited by the Israelites from the time of Jacob to that of Moses
Concubine - On cause of concubinage is shown in the history of Abraham and Jacob, Genesis 16:16
Mizpah or Mizpeh - A town in Gilead, Hosea 5:1 ; so named from the stone-heap cast up by Jacob and Laban, Genesis 31:49 ; supposed by many to be the place mentioned in the history of Jephthah, Judges 10:17 11:11,29,34
Naph'Tali - (wrestling ), the fifth son of Jacob; the second child name to him by Bilhah, Rachel's slave
Issachar - " He was Jacob's ninth son, and was born in Padan-aram (comp 28:2). ...
The prophetic blessing pronounced by Jacob on Issachar corresponds with that of Moses (Genesis 49:14,15 ; Compare Deuteronomy 33:18,19 )
Issachar - Nothing is known of the man Issachar apart from the fact that he was the fifth son that Leah bore to Jacob (Genesis 30:17-18)
Ephraim - A grandson of Jacob, and the brother of Manasseh, the first-born of Joseph by Asenath, the daughter of Potiphera, priest of On ( Genesis 41:50 f. In the Blessing of Jacob ( Genesis 49:22 ) there may be a play upon the name when Joseph, who there represents both Ephraim and Manasseh, is called ‘a fruitful bough. ]'>[4] ) tells an interesting story of how Jacob adopted his Egyptian grandsons, Ephraim and Manasseh, into his own family, and at the same time, against the remonstrances of Joseph, conferred the blessing of the firstborn upon Ephraim hence Ephraim’s predestined superiority in later history. Contrary to what we should have expected from the Blessing of Jacob, Ephraim, according to P
The appearance of Joseph in the Blessing of Jacob, with no mention of his sons, who according to J [4] had been adopted as Jacob’s own, and were therefore entitled on this important occasion to like consideration with the others, points to a traditional echo of the early days in the land when Ephraim and Manasseh were still united
Bethel - Here Jacob, on his way from Beersheba to Haran, had a vision of the angels of God ascending and descending on the ladder whose top reached unto heaven (28:10,19); and on his return he again visited this place, "where God talked with him" (35:1-15), and there he "built an altar, and called the place El-beth-el" (q. To this second occasion of God's speaking with Jacob at Bethel, (Hosea 12:4,5 ) makes reference
Machpelah - " Here were laid the bodies of Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, Jacob and Leah (Genesis 23:19 ; 25:9 ; 49:31 ; 50:13 ). Here it may be that the body of Jacob, which was embalmed in Egypt, is still preserved (much older embalmed bodies have recently been found in the cave of Deir el-Bahari in Egypt, see PHARAOH ), though those of the others there buried may have long ago mouldered into dust
Benjamin -
The younger son of Jacob by Rachel (Genesis 35:18 ). It has been inferred by some from the words of Jacob (Genesis 49:27 ) that the figure of a wolf was on the tribal standard
Name - Abram becomes Abraham; Sarai, Sarah; Jacob, Israel. (See ABRAM; Jacob; ISRAEL
Chariot - The first mention of the chariot is when Joseph, as a mark of distinction, was placed in Pharaoh's second state chariot (Genesis 41:43 ); and the next, when he went out in his own chariot to meet his father Jacob (46:29). Chariots formed part of the funeral procession of Jacob (50:9)
Sechem - SICHEM, SYCHEM, or SHECHEM, called also Sychar in the New Testament afterward Neapolis, and in the present day Nablous, Naplous, Napolose, and Naplosa, (for it is thus variously written,) a city of Samaria, near the parcel of ground which Jacob bought of Hamor, the father of Shechem, and gave to his son Joseph. Here Joseph's bones were brought out of Egypt to be interred; and on the same piece of ground was the well called Jacob's well, at which our Saviour sat down when he had the memorable conversation with the woman of Samaria, John 4, which caused her, and many other inhabitants of Sechem, or Sychar, as it is there called, to receive him as the Messiah. Upon the hills around flocks and herds were feeding, as of old; nor in the simple garb of the shepherds of Samaria was there any thing repugnant to the notions we may entertain of the appearance presented by the sons of Jacob. " The celebrated well called Jacob's well, but which, with the inhabitants of Sechem, is known by the name of Bir Samaria, or the "Well of Samaria," is situated about half an hour's walk east of the town
Dreams - He showed Jacob the mysterious ladder in a dream, Genesis 28:12-13 ; and in a dream an angel suggested to him a means of multiplying his flocks, Genesis 31:11-12 , &c. Joseph was favoured very early with prophetic dreams, whose signification was easily discovered by Jacob, Genesis 37:5
Zebulun - the sixth son of Jacob and Leah, Genesis 30:20 . Moses acquaints us with no particulars of his life; but Jacob, in his last blessing, said of Zebulun, "Zebulun shall dwell at the haven of the sea; and he shall be for a haven of ships; and his border shall be unto Zidon," Genesis 49:13
Penuel - of Jordan, and near the Jabbok, at which Jacob wrestled with the angel ( Genesis 32:24 ff. ‘Face of God,’ because Jacob said, ‘I have seen God face to face , and yet my life is preserved
e'Dom, Idumae'a - The name Edom was given to Esau, the first-born son of Isaac and twin brother of Jacob, when he sold his birthright to the latter for a meal of lentil pottage. --Esau's bitter hatred to his brother Jacob for fraudulently obtaining his blessing appears to have been inherited by his latest posterity
Paulus Edessenus - of this collection as corrected by his famous successor Jacob—dated in the lifetime of that prelate (a. The Jacobites, however, cannot have regarded him as a renegade, for he is commemorated in their calendar on Aug. of Edessa, Interpreter of Books," a title likewise given to Jacob of Edessa
Reuben - The firstborn of Jacob and of Leah, and head of one of the twelve tribes. Jacob, when blessing his sons, said, "Reuben, thou art my firstborn, my might, and the beginning of my strength, the excellency of dignity, and the excellency of power: unstable as water, thou shalt not excel; because thou wentest up to thy father's bed; then defiledst thou it
Bethel - ‘house of God’) by Jacob, after he had a remarkable dream that made him feel he was in the dwelling place of God. From that time on, God was, to Jacob, ‘the God of Bethel’
Ephraim (1) - As regards Ephraim himself, he was doubly blessed:...
(1) in being made, as well as Manasseh, a patriarchal head of a tribe, like Jacob's immediate sons (Genesis 48:5); as Judah received the primary birthright (Reuben losing it by incest, Simeon and Levi by cruelty), and became the royal tribe from whence king David and the Divine Son of David sprang, so Ephraim received a secondary birthright and became ancestor of the royal tribe among the ten tribes of Israel (Genesis 49:3-10; Genesis 49:22-26). ...
(2) Ephraim the younger was preferred to Manasseh the elder, just as Jacob himself was preferred before the elder Esau. Jacob wittingly guided his hands so as to lay his right on Ephraim and his left on Manasseh, notwithstanding Joseph's remonstrance; saying, "Manasseh shall be great, but his younger brother shall be greater than he, and his seed shall become a multitude of nations. " Jacob called to mind God's promise at Luz, "I will make thee fruitful," a Hebrew word related to Ephraim and to Ephrath, the scene of the death of his darling wife, Ephraim's grandmother (Genesis 35:11; Genesis 35:16; Genesis 48:4; Genesis 48:7; Genesis 48:13-19). Ephraim was about 21 when Jacob blessed him, for he was born before the seven years' famine, and Jacob came to Egypt toward its closing years, and lived 17 years afterward (Genesis 47:28). Ephraim made by Jacob in privileges the firstborn of Joseph's offspring; the singular 'bullock' being used collectively for all Joseph's offspring, and expressing their strength) is his glory. "...
Whereas Jacob dwelt on Joseph's trials, and prophetically the severe wars of his descendants, in which God would strengthen them as He had strengthened Joseph, Moses looks onward to their final triumph and peaceful enjoyment of all precious things in their land. In it were Shechem, Jacob's original settlement, "his parcel of ground" and well; Ebal and Gerizim, the mounts of cursing and blessing; and Shiloh, the seat of the sanctuary until the time of Eli
Grief And Mourning - Jacob mourned for Joseph, thinking he was dead. “And Jacob rent his clothes, and put sackcloth upon his loins, and mourned for his son many days;b3he refused to be comforted; and he said, For I will go down into the grave unto my son mourning. The Egyptians mourned for Jacob 70 days (Genesis 50:3 )
Dinah - ) Jacob's daughter by Leah. Jacob in reproving them lays stress only on the dangerous consequences of their crime, "ye have troubled me to make me to stink among the inhabitants of the land . round about them, and they did not pursue after the sons of Jacob. "...
God made this tragedy the occasion of reviving Jacob's earnestness, which had declined into worldliness for a time through his settlement near Shechem (Genesis 33:17-20); reminding him of his vow to make an altar at Bethel to God, who had appeared to him there in the day of his distress when fleeing from Esau. So his family gave up their strange gods and purified themselves, and Jacob went up to Bethel and fulfilled his heretofore forgotten vow
Witness - Jacob then set up a stone pillar or heap as a further “witness” ( Jacob and Laban mentioned above, Jacob also cites God as a “witness” ( Manasseh - the eldest son of Joseph, and grandson of the patriarch Jacob, Genesis 41:50 , was born, A. " When Jacob was going to die, Joseph brought his two sons to him, that his father might give them his last blessing, Genesis 48. Jacob, having seen them, adopted them
Isaac - ...
When he was a hundred and thirty-seven years of age, and his sight had so failed him that he could not distinguish one of his sons from the other, Jacob craftily obtained from him the blessing of primogeniture. He sent Jacob into Mesopotamia, there to take a wife of his own family, Genesis 28:1-2 , and to prevent his marrying among the Canaanites as his brother Esau had done. And when Jacob returned, after a lapse of twenty years, Isaac was still living, and continued to live twenty-three years longer. He then died at the age of a hundred and eighty years, and was buried with Abraham by his sons Esau and Jacob, Genesis 35. See ESAU and See Jacob
jo'Seph -
The elder of the two sons of Jacob by Rachel. They resolved to kill him, but he was saved by Reuben, who persuaded the brothers to cast Joseph into a dry pit, to the intent that he might restore him to Jacob. Now Jacob, who had suffered also from the effects of the famine, sent Joseph's brother to Egypt for corn. On the death of Jacob in Egypt Joseph carried him to Canaan, and laid him in the cave of Machpelah, the burying-place of his fathers. His tomb is, according to tradition, about a stone's throw from Jacob's well. He espoused Mary, the daughter and heir of his uncle Jacob,a nd before he took her home as his wife received the angelic communication recorded in (Matthew 1:20 ) When Jesus was twelve years old Joseph and Mary took him with them to keep the passover at Jerusalem, and when they returned to Nazareth he continued to acct as a father to the child Jesus, and was reputed to be so indeed
Goshen -
A district in Egypt where Jacob and his family settled, and in which they remained till the Exodus (Genesis 45:10 ; 46:28,29,31 , etc
Birthright - Esau transferred his birth-right to Jacob (Genesis 25:33 )
Heber - Grandson of Asher and great grandson of Jacob (Genesis 46:17 )
Palestrina, Giovanni Pierluigi da - Said to have been a pupil of Jacob Arcadelt, he owed his training in liturgy to Saint Philip Neri
Succoth - Here Jacob (Genesis 32:17,30 ; 33:17 ), on his return from Padan-aram after his interview with Esau, built a house for himself and made booths for his cattle
Bow, Bend - Kâra‛ appears for the first time in the deathbed blessing of Jacob as he describes Judah: “… He stooped down, he couched as a lion” ( Nahor - Laban, in making a covenant with Jacob, swears by the ‘God (of Abraham and the God of Nahor’ ( Genesis 31:53 )
Wages - The earliest mention of wages is of a recompense, not in money, but in kind, to Jacob from Laban
Blow - In the verse where tâqa‛ first occurs, it is found twice: “Jacob had pitched [1] his tent in the mount: and Laban with his brethren pitched in the mount of Gilead” ( Mahanaim - The spot on the east of the Jordan where Jacob met 'the angels of God
Savor - This word refers to the “scent or smell” of a person or thing: “And he [1] came near, … and he [2] smelled the smell of his raiment …” ( Sell - 25:31: “And Jacob said, Sell me this day thy birthright
Hide - But when the prophet says, “And I will wait upon the Lord, that hideth his face from the house of Jacob …” ( Embalming - When Jacob died in Egypt, "Joseph commanded his servants, the physicians, to embalm his father, for burial in Canaan
Raiment - The perfuming of raiment with sweet-scented spices or extracts is also still a custom, which explains the smell of Jacob's raiment. A coat or robe of many colours, such as Jacob gave to Joseph, is also a mark of distinction
Beer-Sheba - At Beersheba, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob often dwelt, Genesis 21:31 ; 22:19 ; 26:33 ; 28:10 ; 46:1
Birthright - Among the sons of Jacob, Reuben the firstborn forfeited the right of the firstborn, Genesis 35:22 49:3,4 , and God gave it to Levi, Numbers 3:12,13 8:18
God of the Fathers - Each of the patriarchs apparently had a special name for God: “Fear of Isaac” (Genesis 31:42 ), “Mighty One of Jacob” (Genesis 49:24 ). God commanded Him to answer: “Yahweh, the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me to you” (Exodus 3:15 )
Monophysites - However, this sect was restored by Jacob Baradxus, an obscure monk, insomuch that when he died bishop of Edessa, A. The laborious efforts of Jacob were seconded in Egypt and the adjacent countries by Theodosius, bishop of Alexandria; and he became so famous, that all the Monophysites of the East considered him as their second parent and founder, and are to this day called Jacobites, in honour of their new chief
Ass - " (Judges 12:14) And Jacob, in his prophecy concerning Judah evidently had an eye to Christ: "Binding his foal" (said Jacob) "unto the vine, and his ass's colt unto the choice vine; he washed his garments in wine, and his clothes in the blood of grapes
Concise Chronological Table of Bible History - ...
1836...
1993...
" " Jacob. ...
1706...
1883...
Jacob moves to Egypt...
1671...
1728...
Birth of Moses
Dan - Fifth son of Jacob, and first of Bilhah, Rachel's maid. ...
When Jacob blessed his sons he said, "Dan shall judge his people, as one of the tribes of Israel
Camp - That it failed not to produce effect upon the richly endowed and poetic mind of Balaam, appears from Numbers 24:2 ; "And Balaam lifted up his eyes and he saw Israel abiding in his tents according to their tribes; and the Spirit of God came upon him, and he took up his parable and said, How goodly are thy tents, O Jacob, and thy tabernacles, O Israel! As the valleys are they spread forth, as gardens by the river side, as the trees of lign aloes which the Lord hath planted, and as cedar trees beside waters. Perhaps we may consider this spectacle as a type of the order, beauty, and glory of the true "church in the wilderness," in those happy days when God "shall not behold iniquity in Jacob, nor perverseness in Israel;" when it shall be said, "The Lord his God is with him, and the shout of a king is among them
Simeon - One of the twelve patriarches, the son of Jacob and Leah, Genesis 29:33 Exodus 6:15 . The tribes of Simeon and Levi were scattered and dispersed in Israel, in conformity with the prediction of Jacob, on account of their sacrilegious and piratical revenge of the outrage committed against Dinah their sister, Genesis 34:1-31 49:5
Election, - When Jacob and Esau were born, Jacob was elected for blessing, and his descendants as the only nation chosen by God for His special favour
Paulus, the Black - Paulus (11), surnamed The Black , Jacobite patriarch of Antioch from about the middle of 6th cent. Paul was probably then syncellus to Theodosius, the Jacobite patriarch of Alexandria, who was in nominal exile at Constantinople, but exercising full authority over the Jacobite congregations there and in Egypt. Paul's connexion with Theodosius, and his success as a disputant, marked him out for the titular see of Antioch and the patriarchate of the whole Monophysite body, then beginning to be called Jacobites, and he was consecrated by Jacob Baradaeus himself who originated the name. After a time Paul was allowed to escape, and made his way to Syria, where Jacob Baradaeus received him with great displeasure, but, after keeping him 3 years in suspense, restored him to communion, probably in 575
Rachel - ") (See Jacob; BENJAMIN. Jacob's first interview, courteous removal of the stone at the well's mouth, emotion, and kissing her in the usual mode of salutation in pastoral life in the East in those days, are simply and graphically narrated; his love to her making his seven years' service "seem but a few days"; the imposition of Leah upon him, his second term of service for her, and his receiving her in marriage. " Jacob with just anger replied, "am I in God's stead, who hath withheld from thee the fruit of the womb?" God took her at her word; she had Joseph, and in giving birth to Benjamin "died. Not until Jacob reached Bethel did he bury the strange gods under the oak by Shechem. A little way from Ephrath, which is Bethlehem, Rachel died and was buried, and Jacob set a pillar on her grave
Lord - Jacob instructed his slaves to speak to “my lord Esau” ( Jacob called his brother Esau “lord. This promise became reality through Moses, to whom God explained that He was not only the “God who exists” but the “God who effects His will”: “Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, The Lord [2] God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations. Go, and gather the elders of Israel together, and say unto them, The Lord [2] God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob, appeared unto me, saying, I have surely visited you, and seen that which is done to you in Egypt: And I have said, I will bring you up out of the affliction of Egypt unto the land of the Canaanites …” ( Joseph -
The elder of the two sons of Jacob by Rachel (Genesis 30:23,24 ), who, on the occasion of his birth, said, "God hath taken away
Jacob desiring to hear tidings of his sons, who had gone to Shechem with their flocks, some 60 miles from Hebron, sent Joseph as his messenger to make inquiry regarding them. Joseph directed his brethren to return and bring Jacob and his family to the land of Egypt, saying, "I will give you the good of the land of Egypt, and ye shall eat the fat of the land. " Accordingly Jacob and his family, to the number of threescore and ten souls, together with "all that they had," went down to Egypt. ...
Jacob at length died, and in fulfilment of a promise which he had exacted, Joseph went up to Canaan to bury his father in "the field of Ephron the Hittite" (
Genesis 47:29-31 ; 50:1-14 ). Joseph having obtained a promise from his brethren that when the time should come that God would "bring them unto the land which he sware to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob," they would carry up his bones out of Egypt, at length died, at the age of one hundred and ten years; and "they embalmed him, and he was put in a coffin" (Genesis 50:26 ). Their descendants, long after, when the Exodus came, carried the body about with them during their forty years' wanderings, and at length buried it in Shechem, in the parcel of ground which Jacob bought from the sons of Hamor (Joshua 24:32 ; Compare Genesis 33:19 )
Burial - Joseph closed his father's eyelids soon after Jacob's death (Genesis 46:4 ). It was desirable to be buried in the family tomb, so Sarah (Genesis 23:19 ), Abraham (Genesis 25:9 ), Isaac, Rebekah, Leah (Genesis 49:31 ) and Jacob (Genesis 50:13 ) were all buried in the cave of Machpelah, east of Hebron. Embalming is mentioned only in the burial accounts of Jacob and Joseph (Genesis 50:2-3 , Genesis 50:26 ) and there only because of the Egyptian setting and plans to move the bodies. Mourning for Jacob lasted seventy days (Genesis 50:3 ), while for Aaron and Moses it lasted thirty days (Numbers 20:29 ; Deuteronomy 34:5-8 )
Joseph the Son of Jacob - ...
From Canaan to Egypt...
Joseph was Jacob’s eleventh son but, being Rachel’s firstborn, he soon became Jacob’s favourite (Genesis 30:22-24; Genesis 33:1-7). He then sent wagons to Canaan to bring Jacob and all his family to Egypt (Genesis 45; Genesis 46; Acts 7:11-14). ...
Joseph arranged for all Jacob’s family to settle in Goshen in the Nile Delta. ...
Later events...
Before Jacob died, he raised the two sons of Joseph, Manasseh and Ephraim, to equal status with the brothers of Joseph. ...
When Jacob died, Joseph’s brothers feared he might now have revenge against them
Haran - It is called the "city of Nahor" (Genesis 24:10 ), and Jacob resided here with Laban (30:43)
Incest - In patriarchal times marriage to a half sister (Genesis 20:12 ) and marriage to rival sisters (Genesis 29:21-30 ) were permissible, though such marriages proved troublesome to both Abraham and Jacob
Feel - Genesis 27:12 (c) Isaac did feel his son Jacob and was deceived by his feelings
Tithe - Jacob pledged to offer God a tithe of all his possessions upon his safe return (Genesis 28:22 )
Ramoth Gilead - The spot called by Jacob in his covenant with Laban, of which the pillar and stone heap was pledge, Galeed and Mizpah
Tribe - TRIBE (φυλή) is used mostly in the special OT sense of an Israelitish tribe, composed of the descendants of one of the sons of Jacob
Inn - We read of the inn as early as Genesis 42:27 ; Genesis 43:21 , when Jacob sent to Egypt for corn
Saviour - God says, "All flesh shall know that I Jehovah am thy Saviour and thy Redeemer, the Mighty One of Jacob
Adullam - Hirah, a friend of Judah, son of Jacob, was from Adullam (Genesis 38:1 , Genesis 38:12 )
Hart - The figurative prediction of Jacob respecting Naphtali, Genesis 49:21, would be more appropriately rendered, "Naphtali is a deer roaming at large; he shooteth forth noble antlers
Mount Amalek - )...
Behold, reader, in the history of Esau's race, and their bitter enmity against the seed of Jacob, the type of that unceasing and everlasting war which takes place between nature and grace, between the children of the bondwoman and the children of the free
Behold - Thus the Lord to Jacob at Bethel, "Behold, I am with thee, and I will keep thee," etc
Brother - ...
In scripture, the term brother is applied to a kinsman by blood more remote that a son of the same parents as in the case of Abraham and Lot, Jacob and Laban
Mamre - " And in Genesis 35:27 , it is said, that "Jacob came unto Isaac his father, unto Mamre, unto the city of Arba, which is Hebron
Repentance - Such was the repentance of Juda, Matthew 27:3 ; and so it is said that Esau found "no place of repentance" in his father Isaac, although he sought it with tears, Hebrews 12:17 ; that is, Isaac would not change what he had done, and revoke the blessing given to Jacob, Genesis 27:1-46
Geshur, Geshuri, Geshurites - The word Geshur signifies bridge; and in the border of the region, where, according to the above data, we must place Geshur, between mount Hermon and the lake of Tiberias, there still exists an ancient stone bridge of four arches over the Jordan, called Jisr-Beni-Jakub, that is, the bridge of the children of Jacob
Vow - When Jacob went to Mesopotamia, he vowed to God a tenth of this substance, and his own future devotion to his service
Patriarch - In common usage the title of patriarch is assigned especially to those whose lives are recorded in Scripture previous to the time of Moses, as Adam, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob
House of God - Hence, if Jacob consecratedwith the ceremony of unction the place where God made His covenantwith him, and said of it, 'This is none other but the House of God,and this is the Gate of Heaven'; so should our churches be set apartand consecrated with sacred ceremonies making them holy to the Lord
Hebrew - ...
In time the meaning of the name ‘Hebrew’ became more restricted in that it applied only to those who were descendants of Abraham through Isaac and Jacob
Hart - So Naphtali is described by Jacob prophetically (Genesis 49:21), "a hind let loose. The Targums say he first told Jacob that Joseph was yet alive; "he giveth goodly words
Esau - The standing feature of Esau’s history is rivalry with Jacob, which is represented as even preceding the birth of the twins ( Genesis 25:22 , Hosea 12:3 ). His father’s proposed blessing was diverted by Jacob’s artifice; and, doomed to live by war and the chase ( Genesis 27:40 ), Esau resolved to recover his lost honours by killing his brother. It is at least as likely that a man of Esau’s character and habits would himself choose to live in a country of such a kind (Malachi 1:3 ); and mere legends about the brothers, as the early Targums are a witness, would not have made Esau the more attractive man, and the venerated Jacob, in comparison, timid, tricky, and full of deceits
Shiloh - One of the names of the Messiah, given by the dying patriarch Jacob under the spirit of prophecy, and to which both Jew and Gentile agree; though in the application of the name to the person of Christ they differ. Precious Lord Jesus, I would say, Art thou come indeed, to my heart, to my house, to my family? Lord, when shall the full gathering of thy people be? Haste, haste, my Beloved, and arise out of Zion, "to turn away ungodliness from Jacob; Be thou as a roe, or a young hart, upon the mountains of spices!" (See Sceptre
Asher - The eighth son of Jacob, by Zilpah, Leah’s handmaid. ]'>[1] ’s thought in the ‘Blessing of Jacob’ ( Genesis 49:20 ) and in the ‘Blessing of Moses’ ( Deuteronomy 33:24 )
Command - 32:4, Jacob “commissioned” his servants to deliver a particular message to his brother Esau. Jacob commissioned (literally, “commanded”) his sons to bury him in the cave of Machpelah ( Names - Bethel perpetuated through all Jewish history the early revelations of God to Jacob. Examples of this are Abraham, ( Genesis 17:5 ) Sarah, (Genesis 17:15 ) Israel, as the designation of the spiritual character in place of Jacob, which designated the natural character
Judah - The fourth son of Jacob and Leah, and the head of the tribe bearing his name, which signifies 'praise. When Jacob blessed his sons, the predictions show that in Judah was centred the royal line
Levi - The third son of Jacob by Leah ( Genesis 29:34
In the Blessing of Jacob (Genesis 49:5-7 ) we have one of the most important passages bearing upon the early history of this tribe and that of Simeon:...
’Simeon and Levi are brethren;...
Weapons of violence are their swords. ...
Cursed be their anger, for it was fierce;...
And their wrath, for it was cruel;...
I will divide them in Jacob,...
And scatter them in Israel. The love of the Shechemite for the daughter of Jacob points to some sort of an alliance in which the right of connubium was acknowledged, and the act of Simeon and Levi was, therefore, a barbarous repudiation of the rights of their native allies
Genesis - ...
Isaac married and produced two sons, Esau and Jacob (24:1-25:26). In accordance with God’s will, the blessing of Abraham passed to Jacob instead of to Esau. That, however, was no excuse for Jacob’s ruthlessness and deceit in obtaining the blessing (25:27-28:9). ...
Jacob moved from Canaan to Mesopotamia to obtain a wife among his parents’ relatives. ...
Troubles arose among Jacob’s twelve sons, with the result that one of them, Joseph, was sold as a slave and taken to Egypt. The result was that the whole of Jacob’s household migrated to Egypt and settled in the fertile Nile Delta (42:1-47:26). ...
In the specially marked-off area that Pharaoh had given them, Jacob’s large family could live together and multiply without being corrupted by Egyptian ideas. Jacob saw that a prosperous future lay ahead for his descendants and announced his blessings on them before he died (47:27-49:33)
Shechem (1) - ...
Here first in Canaan God appeared to Abraham (Genesis 12:6), and here he pitched his tent and built an altar under the oak or terebinth (not "plain") of Moreh; here too Jacob re-entered the promised land (Genesis 33:18-19), and "bought a parcel of a field where he had spread his tent," from the children of Hamor, Shechem's father, and bequeathed it subsequently to Joseph (Genesis 48:22; Joshua 24:32; John 4:5); a dwelling place, whereas Abraham's only purchase was a burial place. It lay in the rich plain of the Mukhna, and its value was increased by the well Jacob dug there. ) (See Jacob on the massacre by Simeon and Levi, Genesis 34. ) Under Abraham's oak at Shechem Jacob buried the family idols and amulets (Genesis 35:1-4). Probably too "the strange gods" or "the gods of the stranger" were those carried away by Jacob's sons from Shechem among the spoils (Genesis 35:2; Genesis 34:26-29). ...
The well of Jacob lies one mile and a half E. Jacob dug it deep into the rocky ground, its position indicating it was dug by one who could not rely for water on the springs so near in the valley (Ain Balata and Defneh), the Canaanites being their owners. However the phrase in Genesis 33:19, "a parcel of a field," Joshua 24:32, favors the site near Jacob's well, bechelqat hasadeh , a smooth lever open cultivated land; in Palestine there is not to be found such a dead level, without the least hollow in a circuit of two hours
Sell - "Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for a mess of pottage
Camel - Jacob readily believed the lie told to him by his ten sons about the death of Joseph
Music - After the Deluge, the first mention of music is in the account of Laban's interview with Jacob (Genesis 31:27 )
Bethuel - When Abraham's servant at the well asks Rebekah, "Is there room in thy father's house for us?" she "ran and told them of her mother's house" (not of her father's, as Rachel did when Jacob introduced himself: Genesis 29:12)
Kohath - ) Levi's second son; came down to Egypt with Levi and Jacob (Genesis 46:11)
Mahanaim - of the Jabbok, as Jacob travelling S
Embalming - Jacob and Joseph were both embalmed in Egypt, but we do not read that it was ever practised by the children of Israel
Dream - 28:12, the first occurrence, tells how Jacob “dreamed” that he beheld a ladder to heaven
Simeon - The second son of Jacob, born of Leah
Honey - In the second place the term debash applies to a decoction of the juice of the grape, which is still called dibs , and which forms an article of commerce in the East, it was this, and not ordinary bee-honey, which Jacob sent to Joseph, ( Genesis 43:11 ) and which the Tyrians purchased from Palestine
Gad - )...
Although the tribe was known as Gad (after the son of Jacob who fathered it; Genesis 30:9-11), the area where it dwelt was commonly known as Gilead
Mizpah -
A place in Gilead, so named by Laban, who overtook Jacob at this spot (Genesis 31:49 ) on his return to Palestine from Padan-aram. Here Jacob and Laban set up their memorial cairn of stones
Asher - Eighth son of Jacob by Zilpah, Leah's handmaid (Genesis 30:13). Jacob (Genesis 49:20) prophesied: "out of Asher his bread shall be fat (the fat that comes from him shall be his own bread, so fruitful shall be his soil) and he shall yield royal dainties:" fulfilled when Solomon thence supplied King Hiram's household with wheat and oil (1 Kings 5:11)
Lion - " (Psalms 148:14) There is a great beauty in the figures Jacob makes use of concerning Christ. Not content with simply speaking of him as a lion, which includes every thing in the similitude, that is royal, courageous, terrible, and full of dignity and majesty, Jacob particularizes the figure under the several characters of the lion, and the lion's whelp, and the old lion. We find, as here by Jacob, they had names for the lion's whelp, and the young lion, and the old, and the lion from "the swellings of Jordan," (Jeremiah 50:44) and the lion like men of Moab
Genealogy - ...
So Genesis 5:1, "the book of the generations of Adam," wherein his descendants are traced down to Noah; Genesis 6:9, "the generations of Noah," the history of Noah and his sons; Genesis 10:1, "the generations of the sons of Noah," Shem, Ham, and Japhet, the oldest and most precious existing ethnological record; Genesis 11:10-26 "the generations of Shem," Genesis 11:27 "the generations of Terah," Abram's father; Genesis 25:12 "the generations of Ishmael," Genesis 25:19 "the generations of Isaac"; Genesis 36:1, "the generations of Esau"; Genesis 37:2, "the generations of Jacob"; Genesis 35:22-26, "the sons of Jacob," etc. , repeated Exodus 1:1-5; also Exodus 46:8, a genealogical census of Israel when Jacob came down to Egypt; repeated in Exodus 6:16, etc. So Manasseh and Ephraim were numbered among Jacob's "sons," though only grandsons (Genesis 48:5). all Benjamin's ten sons) and great grandson's of Jacob (Hezron and Hamul, grandsons of Judah) are named, born afterward in Egypt and who came into that country in the loins of their fathers, and who there became founders of mishpachowt , i. independent families, and were therefore counted grandsons of Jacob as regards the national organization. By comprising Jacob himself with all the founders of tribes and families, the significant number 70 results; seven (expressing God's covenant relation to Israel, made up of three the divine number and four the worldwide extension number) multiplied by ten the seal of completeness; implying that these 70 comprised the whole nation of God (Exodus 1:5; Deuteronomy 10:22)
Bless - Sometimes blessings were uttered under divine inspiration, as in the case of Noah, Isaac, Jacob, and Moses (Genesis 9:26,27 ; 27:28,29,40 ; 48:15-20 ; 49:1-28 ; Deuteronomy 33 )
Naaman - One of the family of Benjamin who came down to Egypt with Jacob, as read in Genesis 46:21
Honesty - ...
Jacob claimed honesty (Genesis 30:33 ) but manipulated the breeding of Laban's flocks (1619112868_89 ). Jacob's sons repeatedly assured Joseph of their honesty (Genesis 42:11 ,Genesis 42:11,42:19 ,Genesis 42:19,42:31 ,Genesis 42:31,42:33-34 ), never guessing that their brother knew their deceptive natures all too well (Genesis 37:31-33 )
Suc'Coth -
An ancient town, first heard of in the account of the homeward journey of Jacob from Padan-aram. (Genesis 35:17 ) The name is derived from the fact of Jacob's having there put up "booths" (succoth ) for his cattle as well as a house for himself. From the itinerary of Jacob's return it seems that Succoth lay between Peniel, near the ford of the torrent Jabbok and Shechem
Alliance - A pillar was set up as a memorial of the alliance between Laban and Jacob (Genesis 31:52 )
Temple - It is called "the temple" (1 Kings 6:17 ); "the temple [1] of the Lord" (2 Kings 11:10 ); "thy holy temple" (Psalm 79:1 ); "the house of the Lord" (2 Chronicles 23:5,12 ); "the house of the God of Jacob" (Isaiah 2:3 ); "the house of my glory" (60:7); an "house of prayer" (56:7; Matthew 21:13 ); "an house of sacrifice" (2 Chronicles 7:12 ); "the house of their sanctuary" (2 Chronicles 36:17 ); "the mountain of the Lord's house" (Isaiah 2:2 ); "our holy and our beautiful house" (64:11); "the holy mount" (27:13); "the palace for the Lord God" (1 Chronicles 29:1 ); "the tabernacle of witness" (2 Chronicles 24:6 ); "Zion" (Psalm 74:2 ; 84:7 )
Election of Grace - , Abraham, Jacob, Saul, David, Solomon, were all chosen by God for the positions they held; so also were the apostles
Naaman - Came down to Egypt with Jacob
Well - —The one well mentioned in the Gospels is that of Jacob, near ancient Shechem, under the northern cliffs of Gerizim. See Jacob’s Well
Envy - Examples abound in the Bible, such as are suggested by the relations between Cain and Abel, Jacob and Esau, Rachel and Leah, Joseph and his brothers, Saul and David, Haman and Mordecai, the elder brother and the prodigal son, the Roman evangelists of Philippians 1:15 and the Apostle Paul, and many others
Israel - Genesis 32:28 (c) In that this is a new name given to Jacob, it is a type of the new relationship of the believer when he trusts CHRIST and becomes a Christian
Isaac - Isaac's life was far less stirring than that of his father Abraham, or that of his son Jacob
Zeb'Ulun - (a habitation ), the tenth of the sons of Jacob, according to the order in which their births are enumerated, the sixth and last of Leah
Tribe - Jacob having twelve sons, who were heads of so many families, which together formed a great nation, each of these families was called a tribe
Reuben - Behold, a son! The eldest son of Jacob and Leah, so-called in reference to the sentiment of his mother, "The Lord hath looked on my affliction," Genesis 29:32
Camp, Encampments - Balaam, standing on the heights of Moab, viewed the imposing spectacle with admiration and awe: "How godly are thy tents, O Jacob! the Lord his God is with him," Numbers 23:1-24:25
Ephraim - Although the youngest, he yet had the chief blessing of his grandfather Jacob, and the tribe was always more distinguished than that of Manasseh, Genesis 48:8-20 Numbers 2:18-21
Embalm - "Joseph commanded his servants the physicians to embalm his father (Jacob). The rest of Jacob's twelve sons were probably also embalmed, for their bodies "were carried over into Sychem and laid in the sepulchre" there (Acts 7:16). Embalmers were usually a distinct class; but Jacob not being an Egyptian, his body was not embalmed by the ordinary embalmers. " The dearest process (that used in Jacob's and Joseph's case) cost a silver talent (250 British pounds)
Bartholomew - Like Jacob, he wrestled alone with God in prayer under the fig tree. " "Because I said unto thee, I saw thee under the fig tree, believest thou? thou shalt see greater things than these: hereafter (from this time forth, Greek) ye (not merely thou alone, but all My disciples) shall see heaven open, and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of man," the true ladder between earth and heaven, of which that in Jacob's dream was the type (Genesis 28:12), and upon which angels delight to minister. ...
The "ascending" stands first, because the Lord was now below on earth, not above, as when Jacob saw Him; and from Him as their center they go up, and to Him they return: the communication between earth and heaven, closed by sin, is opened by Christ's making earth His home
Judah - In Genesis 29:35 , the fourth son of Jacob and the progenitor of the tribe of Judah. Genesis 49:8-12 preserves the blessing of Judah by Jacob
Machpelah - Here Sarah was buried by her husband; and subsequently Abraham himself, Isaac, Rebekah, Leah, and Jacob were laid to rest in the same spot ( Genesis 49:31 ). side are those of Abraham and Sarah; whilst at the opposite end of the enclosure are those of Jacob and Leah
Mourning - It was an occasion of studied publicity and ceremonial; so Abraham for Sarah (Genesis 23:2), Jacob for Joseph (Genesis 37:34-35), Joseph and the Egyptians for Jacob 70 days and a further period of seven (Genesis 50:3-10), Israel for Aaron 80 days (Numbers 20:29), and for Moses (Deuteronomy 34:8)
Palm - ...
(tree)...
Exodus 15:27 (c) The seventy trees probably represent the seventy descendants of Jacob who came with Jacob into Egypt ( Genesis 46:27)
Shiloh (1) - But the town Shiloh did not exist in Jacob's time, and Judah did not lose the preeminence there; nor indeed did Judah, but Moses and Aaron, lead Israel in the wilderness. "Abraham rejoiced to see Messiah's day, he saw it and was glad" (John 8:56); Jacob naturally expresses the same sure anticipation. Balaam refers to this prophecy of Jacob (Numbers 24:17; Isaiah 11:1-9; Zechariah 9:10; Ephesians 2:14; Revelation 5:5)
Tribe - Jacob having twelve sons, who were the heads of so many great families, which altogether formed a great nation; every one of these families was called a tribe. But Jacob on his death bed adopted Ephraim and Manasseh, the sons of Joseph, and would have them also to constitute two tribes of Israel, Genesis 48:5
Benjamin - The youngest son of Jacob, born in Palestine, not far from Bethlehem, after the return from Padan-aram. A prophetic blessing was pronounced by Jacob upon Benjamin
Isaac - After the death and burial of his father he took up his residence at Beer-lahai-roi (25:7-11), where his two sons, Esau and Jacob, were born (21-26), the former of whom seems to have been his favourite son (27,28). " His life was so quiet and uneventful that it was spent "within the circle of a few miles; so guileless that he let Jacob overreach him rather than disbelieve his assurance; so tender that his mother's death was the poignant sorrow of years; so patient and gentle that peace with his neighbours was dearer than even such a coveted possession as a well of living water dug by his own men; so grandly obedient that he put his life at his father's disposal; so firm in his reliance on God that his greatest concern through life was to honour the divine promise given to his race
Aram - )...
Jacob, son of Isaac and Rebekah, also went to Aram, where he obtained for himself two wives. Because Jacob had lived twenty years in Aram, and because his wives were from that region, he and his children became known as Arameans (Genesis 31:20; Genesis 31:38; Deuteronomy 26:5)
Burial - Jacob and Joseph dying in Egypt were embalmed; the Egyptians, through lack of a better hope, endeavoring to avert or delay corruption. ...
So Jacob (Genesis 49:29-32). The burial place of Sarah, Abraham, Isaac, Rebekah, Leah, and Jacob, in the field of Machpelah (Genesis 23), bought by Abraham from Ephron the Hittite, and the field bought by Jacob from Shechem's father, Hamor, where Joseph's bones were buried (Joshua 24:32), were the only fixed possessions the patriarchs had in Canaan, and the sole purchases they made there
the Angel of the Lord - And J...
EHOVAH said, "Shall I hide from Abraham the thing that I do?" Appearances of the same personage occur to Isaac and to Jacob under the name of "the God of Abraham, and of Isaac. " After one of these manifestations, Jacob says, "I have seen God face to face;"...
and at another, "Surely the Lord (JEHOVAH) is in this place. Jacob says of Bethel, where he had exclaimed, "Surely Jehovah is in this place;" "The Angel of God appeared to me in a dream, saying, I am the God of Bethel. " The Angel of the Lord appeared to Moses in a flame of fire; but this same Angel "called to him out of the bush, and said, I am the God of thy fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob; and Moses hid his face, for he was afraid to look upon God
Fathers - Among these distinguished ancestors or ‘fathers’ a group of three was early singled out for special notice—Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. God is several times described in the OT as ‘the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob’ or ‘Israel’ (Exodus 3:6; Exodus 3:16, 1 Kings 18:36, 1 Chronicles 29:18, 2 Chronicles 30:6). ’ It is assumed that Abraham, Isaac and Jacob were ‘the fathers’ par excellence
Joseph - Eleventh son of Jacob and first of Rachel. This is followed by all the descendants of Jacob being placed in a fruitful part of the country, as the nation will be gathered to the pleasant land in the millennium. ...
When Jacob prophetically blessed His sons, Joseph had a prominent place
Ramoth-Gilead, Ramoth in Gilead - That it was a place of some sanctity is probable from its name (‘the high places of Gilead’), and arguments, not altogether conclusive, have been offered in favour of its identification with Mizpeh , the place of the reconciliation of Jacob and Laban
Rod - For example, the twigs which Jacob peeled in the device recorded in Genesis 30:37 ff
Genesis - , Adam (1-3), Noah (4-9), Abraham ((10-25:18),), Isaac ((25:19-35:29),), and Jacob (36-50)
Jew - People of the southern kingdom, though Israelites by blood (since they were descended from Jacob, or Israel) were called Judeans, to distinguish them from those of the northern kingdom
Women - (Genesis 24:64,65 ) Jacob saluted Rachel with a kiss in the presence of the shepherds
Israelite - It has the particular significance, suggested by the story of Jacob in Genesis 32:28 ; Genesis 35:10 , of one belonging to the Jewish race, with special reference to the privileges conferred by God on His people: ‘whose is the adoption, and the glory, and the covenants, and the giving of the law, and the temple service, and the promises’ ( Romans 9:4 )
Bethlehem - Here Jacob buried his beloved Rachel
Jabbok - Near this brook the angel wrestled with Jacob, Genesis 32:22
Rod - This word is used sometimes for the branches of a tree: "And Jacob took him rods of green poplar, and of the hazel and chesnut tree,"...
Genesis 30:37 ; sometimes for a staff or wand: "And thou shalt take this rod in thine hand, wherewith thou shalt do signs, And Moses took the rod of God in his hand," Exodus 4:17 ; Exodus 4:20 ; or for a shepherd's crook: "And concerning the tithe of the herd, or of the flock, even of whatsoever passeth under the rod; the tenth shall be holy unto the Lord," Leviticus 27:32 ; or for a rod, properly so called, which God makes use of to correct men: "If he commit iniquity, I will chasten him with the rod of men, and with the stripes of the children of men," 2 Samuel 7:14
Oil - It is said that Jacob poured oil upon the pillar which he erected at Bethel, Genesis 28:18
Manasseh - It was far inferior to Ephraim in wealth and power, according to the prediction of Jacob, Genesis 41:50,51 48:1-22 Joshua 16:10
Shiloh - This term is used, Genesis 49:10 , to denote the Messiah, the coming of whom Jacob foretells in these words: "The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until Shiloh come; and unto him shall the gathering of the people be;" that is, until the time of Christ, Judah's self-governments as a tribe should not ceases
Dan - A son of Jacob by Bilhah, Genesis 30:3 35:25
Thing - Genesis 24 ...
And Jacob said, all these things are against me
Revive - When he saw the wagons which Joseph had sent to carry him, the spirit of Jacob their father revived
Jew - , which was the correlative of Hellenist [1], and marked a division of language subsisting within the entire body, and at the same time less expressive than Israelite , which brought out with especial clearness the privileges and hopes of the children of Jacob
Asher, Aser - Eighth son of Jacob by Zilpah,Leah's handmaid. ...
When Jacob called his sons about him to tell them what should befall them in the last days, he said of Asher, "Out of Asher his bread shall be fat, and he shall yield royal dainties. ...
In Jacob's prophecy as to this tribe there is depicted the future blessing of all Israel after the salvation of the Lord has come in, announced at the close of Dan's apostasy
Bethel - The name Bethel was first applied to the stone which Jacob set up and anointed ( Genesis 28:22 ). This may have induced Jacob to come hither on his way to the north, and again on his return from Paddan-aram
Joseph - The elder of Jacob's two sons by Rachel, Genesis 37:3, and beloved by his father. Joseph married the princess Asenath, daughter of Potipherah, priest of On; and his two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim, Genesis 41:50, whom Jacob adopted. He espoused Mary, the daughter and heir of his uncle Jacob, and before he took her home his wife received the angelic communication recorded in Matthew 1:20
Thigh - (Genesis 24:2) So in like manner Jacob caused his son Joseph to swear concerning burying him not in Egypt. Others carry the matter farther, and while supposing, as the former, that the oath had respect to this fraternity and relationship in one common covenant, they add to it a reference to the person, and the expectation of the Messiah as the head and substance of the covenant; and in confirmation of this opinion they refer to that passage, Genesis 46:26 where it is said that "all the souls which cause with Jacob into Egypt, came out of his loins," or, as the margin renders it, his thigh
Benjamin - The youngest son of Jacob by his beloved wife Rachel. In Genesis 49:27 Jacob prophesied of the tribe that it should "ravin as a wolf; in the morning he shall devour the prey, and at night he shall divide the spoil;" typical of Christ in judgement on the earth in a future day
Pride - Israel as the redeemed people, then, is considered to be an expression of God’s “majesty”: “He shall choose our inheritance for us, the excellency of Jacob whom he loved” ( Jacob, and hate his palaces: therefore will I deliver up the city with all that is therein” (Amos 6:8)
Fear - Jacob prayed: “Deliver me, I pray thee, from the hand of my brother, from the hand of Esau: for I fear him, lest he will come and smite me, and the mother with the children” ( Jacob said of Bethel: “How [1] is this place! this is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven” ( Find - Laban tells Jacob: “… If I have found favor in thine eyes, [2] …” ( Jacob for a favor that he is seeking in an abstract sense
Names - God was revealed to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, as GOD ALMIGHTY, which indicates the character in which God was pleased to be known by them: He was not known to them as JEHOVAH. He altered the names of some persons: Abram was changed to Abraham; Sarai to Sarah; Jacob to Israel; and He gave reasons why they were altered; and the Lord Jesus gave Simon the name of Peter
Can, May - 44:22, NIV)...
When yâkôl is used without another verb, the sense is “to prevail” or “to overcome,” as in the words of the angel to Jacob: “Your name will no longer be Jacob, but Israel, because you have struggled with God, and with men and have overcome” ( Benjamin - The youngest son of Jacob by his beloved wife Rachel. In Genesis 49:27 Jacob prophesied of the tribe that it should "ravin as a wolf; in the morning he shall devour the prey, and at night he shall divide the spoil;" typical of Christ in judgement on the earth in a future day
Judah - The fourth son of Jacob, by Leah. Now then, if we turn to the prophetical expressions of the dying partiarach Jacob, (Genesis 49:8) concerning Judah, we shall arrive at the full sense of both passages, Leah's, and her husband's. The same prophetic spirit that was in Jacob, leading him to the acknowledgment of Judah under one character typical of the Messiah, prompted him to speak of him under another. " Here was a confirmation to the one part of Jacob's dying prophecy, that the Shiloh should not come until the sceptre was departed from Judah-the chief priests confessed that that sceptre was departed, for they acknowledged that they had then no king but Cæsar; and, therefore, the Shiloh was come. Jacob said, that a lawgiver should not depart from between his feet until Shiloh came; and this law they proved did remain, for they contended with Pilate to enforce that law, for supposed blasphemy in the person of Christ. ...
The reader will, I hope, indulge me with one observation more concerning Judah, in respect to this memorable prophecy of his father Jacob; because I humbly conceive it is important, and every thing connected with our Lord Jesus cannot fail of being interesting to his people
Genesis, Theology of - Genesis has the following structure:...
Prologue...
Primeval History...
1:1-11:26...
Transition...
Genealogy...
11:27-32...
Threat...
The Abraham Cycle...
12:1-25:11...
Transition...
Genealogy...
24:12-18...
Threat...
The Jacob Cycle...
25:19-35:22b...
Transition...
Genealogy...
35:22c-36:40...
Threat...
The Joseph Cycle...
37:1-46:7...
Transition...
Genealogy...
46:8-27...
Resolution...
Settlement in Egypt...
46:28-50:26...
The "Primeval History" (Genesis 1:1-11:26 ) sets the stage for the whole of the book. Although the ancestors are Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and the twelve, the literary narrative concentrates on Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph. The tension is resolved with the welcome of Jacob into Egypt. Jacob is tricked into marrying Leah, sister of his beloved Rachel, and Rachel is for some time barren. Most of these are brief references to the promises given "to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob" (e. The line of the promise was narrowed to the line of Seth (Genesis 5 ), Shem (9:26-27), Abraham (12:1-3), Isaac (26:2-5), Jacob (28:10-17), and Judah (49:10). On a less complex level, Hebrews also refers to Abel, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph as examples of persevering faith (11:4-22)
Naphtali - The second son of Bilhah, Rachel’s handmaid, and the sixth son of Jacob ( Genesis 30:7 f. ]'>[2] ascribes to him four sons when Jacob and his family entered Egypt (Genesis 46:24 ). The Blessings of Jacob ( Genesis 49:21 ) and of Moses ( Deuteronomy 33:23 , ‘Satisfied with favour, and full with the blessing of Jahweh’) dwell only upon its productivity
Levi - The third son of Jacob and Leah—from whence sprung the Levites. The personal character of Jacob's son Levi, occasioned the dying patriarch to speak with displeasure concerning him. (See Genesis 49:5-7) And the prediction of this tribe being divided in Jacob, and scattered in Israel, was literally fulfilled; for we find in the settlement in Canaan, the sons of Levi had no share in the division of the land, but only certain cities among the other tribes. They shall teach Jacob thy judgments, and Israel thy law; they shall put incense before thee, and whole burnt sacrifice upon thine altar
Mahanaim - Two camps, a place near the Jabbok, beyond Jordan, where Jacob was met by the "angels of God," and where he divided his retinue into "two hosts" on his return from Padan-aram (Genesis 32:2 )
Gad - The seventh son of Jacob and the progenitor of the tribe of Gad (Genesis 30:9-11 )
Judah - The fourth son of Jacob and Leah, was born in Mesopotamia
Feet (Under) - In this passage, the sun represents Jacob, the father, the moon represents Joseph's mother, the stars represent the other brothers. For that reason in the passage before us, the Lord is identifying the woman as the one represented by those figures way back in Jacob's day
Heel - ...
Genesis 25:26 (c) Probably this may be taken as a type of the power that Jacob was to have over Esau because of the blessing which his father gave
Shepherd - The difficulties and hardships of a shepherd's life in the East may be gathered from what Jacob passed through during the time he was with Laban
Pillar - It is used for the stone that Jacob had had for a pillow, which he set up, and on which he poured oil and made his vow
Idumaeans - They perpetuated the enmity between Esau and Jacob
Hebron - A pool is still shown over which tradition says that David hung the murderers of Ishbosheth, and the tomb of Abner and Ishbosheth is also pointed out within an Arab house, and the mosque is known to conceal the noted cave of Machpelah, the burial-place of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and their wives except Rachel
Oak - Jacob buried idolatrous images under an oak, Genesis 35:4 ; and Deborah, Rebekah's nurse, was buried under one of these trees, Genesis 35:8
Vow - Jacob, going into Mesopotamia, vowed the tenth of his estate, and promised to offer it at Beth-el, to the honor of God, Genesis 28:20-22
Bethel - House of God, the name of a city west of Hai, on the confines of the tribes of Ephraim and Benjamin, Genesis 12:8 28:10-22 , and occupying the spot where Jacob slept and had his memorable dream, the name he then gave it superseding the old name Luz, Judges 1:23
Imposition of Hands - Thus Jacob blessed Ephraim and Manasses, not as a parentonly, but as a prophet
Freiburg im Breisgau, University of - Among the notable professors of this period were the Carthusian Gregorius Reisch, Jacob Locher, Henricus Loriti, and the theologians Geiler of Kaisersberg, Johann Eck, Thomas Murner, and Erasmus of Rotterdam
Haran - Nahor, Abram’s brother, settled there; hence it is called ‘the city of Nahor’ in the story of Isaac and Jacob (cf
Tithe - Abraham paid tithes to Melchizedek (Genesis 14:20 ; Hebrews 7:6 ); and Jacob vowed unto the Lord and said, "Of all that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee
Gerizim - It was probably at this time that the coffin containing the embalmed body of Joseph was laid in the "parcel of ground which Jacob bought of the sons of Hamor" (Genesis 33:19 ; 50:25 )
Almond - Jacob desired his sons ( Genesis 43:11 ) to take with them into Egypt of the best fruits of the land, almonds, etc
Mourning - In the case of Jacob it was seventy days, Genesis 50:3; of Aaron, Numbers 20:29, and Moses, Deuteronomy 34:8, thirty. A further period of seven days in Jacob's case
Preexistence of Souls - The debate in John 9:2 likely concerned the possibility of sins committed in the womb (compare God's choice of Jacob over Esau while they were still in the womb Genesis 25:23 ; Romans 9:11-13 )
Service - Jacob worked for Laban seven years for each of his wives (Genesis 29:15-30 )
Almond Tree - ...
It was almond, not hazel, rods wherewith Jacob secured the ringstraked and speckled offspring from the flocks
Bless - And Isaac called Jacob and blessed him
Music, Musicians, Musical Instruments - Laban, when chiding with Jacob for secretly leaving him, said he would have sent him away "with songs, with tabret, and with harp
Count - Who can count the dust of Jacob? Numbers 23
Altar - Abraham, Isaac and Jacob alsobuilt altars to the Lord: these would have been constructed of stoneor earth, but it is remarkable that we seldom read of their offering sacrifices on them
Abednego - In changing their names therefore, they not only designed to make them forget their beloved Jerusalem, but the yet more beloved Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Ephraim - The second son of Joseph, born in Egypt before the famine, Genesis 41:50-52, and therefore upwards of 20 at Jacob's death. Jacob adopted them as patriarchs, or heads of tribes, equally with his own sons
Repentance - Esau found no place for repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears; he could not move his father Isaac to repent of what he had done, or to recall the blessing from Jacob and confer it on himself, Hebrews 12:17 ; Matthew 3:2 ; Matthew 4:17
Gilead or Galeed - It was probably in this mountain that Jacob and Laban set up their monument, Genesis 31:45-48
Names - Compare the cases of Ishmael, Esau, and Jacob, Moses, Ichabod, etc
University of Freiburg im Breisgau - Among the notable professors of this period were the Carthusian Gregorius Reisch, Jacob Locher, Henricus Loriti, and the theologians Geiler of Kaisersberg, Johann Eck, Thomas Murner, and Erasmus of Rotterdam
Hebron - Abraham, Isaac and Jacob all lived in the region at various times, and Abraham bought a piece of ground there for a family burial place (Genesis 13:18; Genesis 18:1; Genesis 23:2; Genesis 23:17-20; Genesis 25:9; Genesis 35:27; Genesis 37:14; Genesis 50:13)
James - (jaymess) English form of Jacob, and the name of three men of the New Testament. See Jacob
Beer-Sheba - Isaac also lived in the area of Beer-sheba, and his son Jacob left there for Haran to seek a wife (Genesis 28:10 ). A crossroad to Egypt, Beer-sheba was a stopping place for Jacob many years later when he was encouraged by the Lord to continue on to Egypt where Joseph was awaiting him (Genesis 46:1-5 )
First-Born - Jacob, in the case of Reuben, his first-born, bestowed his additional portion upon Joseph, by adopting his two sons, Genesis 48:5-8 ; Deuteronomy 21:17 . ) The first-born enjoyed an authority over those that were younger, similar to that possessed by a father, Genesis 25:23 , &c; 2 Chronicles 21:3 ; Genesis 27:29 : Exodus 12:29 : which was transferred in the case of Reuben by Jacob their father to Judah, Genesis 49:8-10
Tent - The patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob dwelt in tents, Genesis 18:1 Hebrews 11:9 ; and on the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt, throughout their peregrinations until they obtained the promised land, and to some extent afterwards, they adopted the same kind of habitation. An Arab sheikh will have a number of tents, of himself, his family, servants, and visitors; as in patriarchal times Jacob had separate tents for himself, for Leah, Rachel, and their maids, Genesis 31:33 Judges 4:17
Edom, Edomites - The Israelites were conscious that the Edomites were their near kinsmen, hence the tradition that Esau and Jacob were twin brothers ( Genesis 25:24 ). The tradition that Jacob tricked Esau out of his birthright ( Genesis 27:1-46 ), and that enmity arose between the brothers, is an actual reflexion of the hostile relations of the Edomites and Israelites for which the Israelites were to a considerable degree responsible
Simeon - The second son of Jacob and Leah ( Genesis 29:33 [4] ( Genesis 37:35 ) speaks of ‘all’ Jacob’s ‘daughters,’ but their names are nowhere recorded (cf. ), connects the name, as in the case of Reuben, with Jacob’s ‘hatred’ of Leah: ‘Because Jahweh hath heard ( shâma ‘) that I am hated, etc. ...
In the Blessing of Jacob (Genesis 49:1-33 ) Simeon is coupled with Levi (wh. see) as sharing in the curse of Jacob and in the consequent dispersion of the tribe among the other tribes of Israel
Joseph - The well known son of Jacob, whose history we have in Genesis from the thirtieth chapter to the end of the book. ...
As Joseph was the beloved son of Jacob, and distinguished by his father with special tokens, of his affection, and which excited the envy of his brethren; so Christ, the beloved and only begotten son of God, by means of that distinguishing token of JEHOVAH, in setting him up, the Head of his body the church, and giving him a kingdom, in his glorious character of Mediator, called forth, as is most generally believed, that war we read of in heaven in the original rebellion of angels. Of him, indeed, might the prophecy of Jacob respecting Judah be fully applied: "Thou art he whom thy brethren shall praise: thy hand shall be in the neck of thine enemies, and thy father's children shall bow down be fore thee
Remnant - Thus Micah prophesied: “I will surely assemble them together, O Jacob, all of thee; I will surely gather the remnant of Israel …” (2:12). ” Isaiah describes the “remnant” of Israel: “And it shall come to pass in that day, that the remnant of Israel, and such as are escaped of the house of Jacob, shall no more again stay upon him that smote them; but shall stay upon the Lord, the Holy One of Israel, in truth” ( Jacob, unto the mighty God
Joseph - son of Jacob and Rachel, and brother to Benjamin, Genesis 30:22 ; Genesis 30:24 . Blunt for the veracity of the account drawn from the identity of Joseph's character, will be read with pleasure:—I have already found an argument for the veracity of Moses in the identity of Jacob's character, I now find another in the identity of that of Joseph. When the bloody garment was brought in, Jacob in his affection for him,—that same affection which, on a subsequent occasion, when it was told him that after all Joseph was alive, made him as slow to believe the good tidings as he was now quick to apprehend the sad; in this his affection for him, I say, Jacob at once concluded the worst, and "he rent his clothes and put sackcloth upon his loins, and mourned for his son many days, and all his daughters rose up to comfort him; but he refused to be comforted, and he said, For I will go down into the grave unto my son mourning. "...
Now, what were the feelings in Joseph which responded to these? When the sons of Jacob went down to Egypt, and Joseph knew them, though they knew not him; for they, it may be remarked, were of an age not to be greatly changed by the lapse of years, and were still sustaining the character in which Joseph had always seen them; while he himself had meanwhile grown out of the stripling into the man, and from a shepherd boy was become the ruler of a kingdom; when his brethren thus came before him, his question was, "Is your father yet alive?" Genesis 43:7 . JOSEPH, the husband of Mary, and reputed father of Jesus, was the son of Jacob, and grandson of Matthan, Matthew 1:15-16
Jews, Judaism - Judah initially referred to the fourth son of Jacob (Israel) by his wife, Leah. He was born in Paddan Aram before Jacob returned to Canaan (Genesis 35:23 ). ...
Later, Judah moves west to Adullam, away from the Jacob clan, where he married a Canaanite woman. When the extended family of Jacob immigrated to Egypt, Judah's family was in the retinue while he was in the advance party (Genesis 46:12,28 ). ...
The blessing of Jacob suggests the significant future role Judah's descendants were destined to play. Genesis provides hardly a hint that Judah, the fourth son of Jacob, would providentially become the conduit through which God would fulfill his promises to Abraham. Only the Blessing of Jacob hints at not only the dynasty of David but the enigmatic "Shiloh, " which has traditionally been interpreted as a prophetic reference to Christ (Genesis 49:10 ). The story of Jacob illustrates how unsearchable are God's judgments (Romans 11:33 )
Joseph - The older of Jacob's two sons by Rachel. Seventeen years old when sold into Egypt (Jacob being 108, and Isaac living 12 years afterward), 30 when made governor (Genesis 30:23-24; Genesis 37:2; Genesis 41:46), Genesis 41:39 before Jacob came into Egypt; so born 1906 B. He is called" son of Jacob's old age," as the comfort of his father's declining years, when his elder brothers by misconduct grieved their father, and Benjamin as yet was too young to minister to him. While Jacob was with the aged Isaac at Hebron his sons were tending flocks. Joseph reported their evil doings to Jacob, early manifesting moral courage and right principle under temptation (Exodus 23:2). Jacob marked his love to Joseph by giving him a "coat of many colors" (ketonet pacim ), the distinctive mark of kings' daughters who were virgins (2 Samuel 13:18), strictly a long "tunic reaching to the extremities" or ankles. Jacob probably designed hereby to give Joseph, the firstborn of Rachel who, but for Laban's trick, was his rightful first wife as she was his dearest,the primogeniture forfeited by Reuben (1 Chronicles 5:1; Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:4). Leah or else Bilhah, Rachel's handmaid, answers to the "moon," "thy mother," as Jacob to the "sun," and the 11 stars to the 11 brothers (Genesis 37:6-10). ...
He told his second dream to his father as well as to his brethren, because it affected not merely them but Jacob and his mother also. Jacob's special love shadows God's love to His Only Begotten (Matthew 3:17). Affection for his father is a trait characterizing him throughout, even as the father loved him, so that at his supposed loss through a wild beast (his sons having sent him Joseph's tunic dipped in blood) Jacob refused to be comforted. His chief inquiries long afterward were about his father (Genesis 43:7; Genesis 45:13; Genesis 45:28; Genesis 41:51), and the remembrance of "his father" was with him the strongest plea after Jacob's death, that the brothers thought they could urge for their being forgiven (Genesis 50:16-17). Jacob's cry, "I will go down into sheol unto my son," implies his belief in a future state, for he thought his son devoured by wild beasts, therefore not in the "grave. ...
Joseph's knowledge of flocks qualified him in some degree for the post, and his integrity made him trustworthy in it, so that his master felt he could safely entrust to his charge his household and all that he had, and "the Lord blessed the Egyptian's house for Joseph's sake" (as in Jacob's case, Genesis 30:27); Psalms 1:3. divine guidance led Joseph to require Benjamin, the surest way of bringing Jacob and the whole family into their Egyptian house of bondage and training. The discovery of their money alarmed both the brothers and Jacob; "all these things are against me," but see Romans 8:31. ...
At last, when want of grain forced him, Jacob gave a reluctant consent on Judah's undertaking to be surety for Benjamin. ) On the morrow, by putting his silver cup (bowl from which wine was poured into smaller cups) in Benjamin's sack, and sending his steward after them upon their leaving the city where Joseph lived, he elicited Judah's generous offer to be bondsman and so not bring his father's grey hairs with sorrow to the grave, bound up as Jacob's life was with Benjamin's
On - " Josephus reports that On was the home of Jacob on his arrival in Egypt
Deborah - She had been part of the household of Jacob, Rebekah's son
Witness - God is witness between Jacob and Laban ( Genesis 31:50 ); so Job says, ‘My witness is in heaven’ ( Job 16:19 , cf
Mizpah - The earliest mention is to a place that features in the story of Jacob where he and Laban made an agreement not to be treacherous to each other in future
Mesopotamia - A century later Jacob came on the same errand, and hence he returned with his two wives after an absence of 21 years
Messiah - As in ancient times not only the king, but also the priest and the prophet, was consecrated to his calling by being anointed, the word "Messiah" often occurs in the Old Testament in its literal sense, signifying one who has been anointed, 1 Samuel 24:6; Lamentations 4:1-22 :' 20; Ezekiel 28:14; Psalms 105:15; hut generally it has a more specific application, signifying the One who was anointed, the supreme Deliverer who was promised from the beginning, Genesis 3:15, and about whom a long series of prophecies runs through the whole history of Israel from Abram, Genesis 12:3; Genesis 22:18; Jacob, Genesis 49:10; Balaam, Numbers 24:17; Moses, Deuteronomy 18:15; Deuteronomy 18:18; and Nathan, 2 Samuel 7:16; through the psalmists and prophets, Psalms 2:1-12; Psalms 16:1-11; Psalms 22:1-31; Psalms 40:1-17; Psalms 45:1-17; Psalms 110:1-7; Isaiah 7:10-16; Isaiah 9:1-7; Isaiah 11:1-16; Isaiah 13:1-22; Isaiah 53:1-12; Isaiah 61:1-11; Jeremiah 23:5-6; Micah 5:2; Malachi 3:1-4, to his immediate precursor, John the Baptist
Asher - Eighth son of Jacob, born of Zilpah, the concubine (Genesis 30:13 ). Jacob's blessing said Asher would have rich food that he would give a king (Genesis 49:20 ), perhaps suggesting a period when the tribe would serve a foreign king
Arise - By whom shall Jacob arise? for he is small
Shalamite - Mahanaim was where the angels met Jacob (Genesis 32), the scene of his victorious wrestling in prayer with the Angel of the covenant
Mizpah, Mizpeh - The place where Jacob and Laban parted, after making a covenant and raising a heap of stones as a witness of the covenant and as a landmark between them
Pharaoh - 1715), and received into Egypt Jacob and his sons and their families
Cave - It was the burying-place of Sarah and of Abraham himself, also of Isaac, Rebekah, Leah, and Jacob (Genesis 49:31 ; 50:13 )
Gilead - Jacob fled toward Gilead, Genesis 31:21; it was conquered by Israel, Numbers 21:24; Judges 10:18; Joshua 12:2; Deuteronomy 2:36; was given to Reuben, Gad, and Manasseh, Joshua 17:6; under Jephthah it defeated the Ammonites, Judges 10:18; was a refuge for Saul's son and for David, 2 Samuel 2:9; 2 Samuel 17:22; 2 Samuel 17:24; the home of Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1; taken in part by Syria, 2 Kings 10:33; by Assyria, 2 Kings 15:25-29; referred to in the minor prophets, Hosea 6:8; Hosea 12:11; Amos 1:3; Amos 1:13; Obadiah 1:19; Micah 7:14; Zechariah 10:10
Hittites - They then occupied the southern part of the land, as Hebron, Genesis 23:3-18, extending towards Beersheba; since Esau married Hittite wives, and Isaac and Rebekah feared that Jacob might follow his example
Sheol - In the first biblical appearance of the word Jacob said that he would “go down into the grave unto my son mourning” ( Concubine - Concubines are mentioned very early in Scripture, as in the history of Abraham, Genesis 16:1-16, of Nahor, 22:24, of Jacob, 30
Teraphim - These images were probably some of the strange gods of which Jacob subsequently cleansed his household
Repetitions in Prayer - The word rabboni, for example, answering to our word Lord, he would bind himself to repeat a hundred or two hundred times, twice a day; and, accordingly, went on in the hearing of all the party; and, on his knees sometimes with his face directed steadily to heaven, and at other times bowing down to the ground, and calling out rabboni, rabboni, rabboni, rabboni, rabboni, &c, as fast as he could articulate the words after each other, like a school boy going through his task, not like a man who, praying with the heart and the understanding also, continues longer on his knees, in the rapture of devotion, whose soul is a flame of fire, enkindled by his Maker, and fixing upon his God, like Jacob, will not let him go until he bless him
Gad - Son of Jacob and Zilpah, Leah's servant, Genesis 30:11
Race - Thus all mankind are called the race of Adam the Israelites are of the race of Abraham and Jacob
Genesis - It contains an account of the creation; the primeval state and fall of man; the history of Adam and his descendants, with the progress of religion and the origin of the arts; the genealogies age, and death of the patriarchs until Noah; the general defection and corruption of mankind, the general deluge, and the preservation of Noah and his family in the ark; the history of Noah and his family subsequent to the time of the deluge; the repeopling and division of the earth among the sons of Noah; the building of Babel, the confusion of tongues, and the dispersion of mankind; the lives of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph
Tribe - A family, race or series of generations, descending from the same progenitor and kept distinct, as in the case of the twelve tribes of Israel, descended from the twelve sons of Jacob
Heir - 1), "is used of Issac and Jacob as participants with Abraham in the promises of God, Hebrews 11:9 ; of husband and wife who are also united in Christ, 1 Peter 3:7 ; of Gentiles who believe, as participants in the Gospel with Jews who believe, Ephesians 3:6 ; and of all believers as prospective participants with Christ in His glory, as recompense for their participation in His sufferings, Romans 8:17
Dan - The tribe of Dan was descended from the elder of two sons whom Rachel’s maid Bilhah bore to Jacob (Genesis 30:1-6)
Theophany - ” At Peniel, Jacob testified that he had seen God face-to-face ( Genesis 32:30 ). Jacob, sent off by Isaac to Paddan-aram, was granted a dream in which he saw the Lord (Genesis 28:12-13 )
Tribes, the Twelve - The blessing there is not so much a prophecy of their historical future, as when Jacob blessed them, but according to their relationship with God in government and blessing. Jacob
Jacob's Well - Jacob dwelt near this place, before his sons slew the inhabitants of Shechem. Upon the hills around, flocks and herds are seen feeding as of old; nor in the simple garb of the shepherds of Samaria, at this day, is there any thing repugnant to the notions we may entertain of the appearance formerly presented by the sons of Jacob. The principal object of veneration among them is Jacob's well, over which a church was formerly erected
Idumea - The true Idumaeans, or Edomites, were, as their name implies, descendants of Edom, or Esau, elder brother of Jacob, Genesis 36:6-9 . Saul was involved in war with them, 1 Samuel 14:47 ; but they continued independent till the time of David, who subdued them, in completion of Isaac's prophecy, that Jacob should rule Esau, Genesis 27:29 2 Samuel 8:14 1 Kings 11:15 1 Chronicles 18:11-13
Joseph - THE LORD WAS WITH JOSEPH...
JOSEPH, the future ruler of Egypt, was tlie late-born and the greatly-beloved son of Jacob and Rachel. Were it not that our own hearts so continually condemn us, we would turn on Jacob with indignation for his mischievous treatment of Joseph. Can Jacob have forgotten the sea of trouble into which his father's favouritism, and his mother's indulgence, cast both themselves and their children? The woful harvest of all that long past folly is still making both Jacob's life and many other lives as bitter as death to this day; and vet here is Jacob poisoning the whole of his family life also, and spoiling Joseph, just as Isaac and Rebekah had spoiled and poisoned their own and their children's lives when Jacob and Esau were still their children. We would denounce Jacob for his insane treatment of Joseph were it not that we are all ourselves repeating sins and follies every day from which we and our families have suffered for generations. The patriarchs, moved with envy, says Stephen in the Acts, sold Joseph into Egypt And Jacob, on his death-bed, when he was blessing Joseph, said of him that the archers had hated him, and had shot their arrows at him, and had sorely wounded him. 'I am the Lord God of Abraham, and of Isaac, and of Jacob thy father
She'Chem - See ( Genesis 12:6 ) At the time of Jacob's arrival here, after his sojourn in Mesopotamia, (Genesis 33:18 ; 34 ) Shechem was a Hivite city, of which Hamor, the father of Shechem, was the headman. (Genesis 33:19 ; Joshua 24:32 ; John 4:5 ) The field lay undoubtedly on the rich plain of the Mukhna , and its value was the greater on account of the well which Jacob had dug there, so as not to be dependent on his neighbors for a supply of water. It is the SYCHAR of (John 4:5 ) near which the Saviour conversed with the Samaritan woman at Jacob's well. The well of Jacob and the tomb of Joseph are still shown in the neighborhood of the town. The well of Jacob lies about a mile and a half east of the city, close to the lower road, and just beyond the wretched hamlet of Balata . ...
The son of Hamor, the chieftain of the Hivite settlement of Shechem at the time of Jacob's arrival
Worship - Thus, Jacob, fleeing away to Haran, perceived the presence of the Lord in a dream while sleeping at “a certain place,” and when he woke from his sleep, he said:...
Surely the Lord is in this place—and I did not know it! How awesome is this place! This is none other than the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven (Genesis 28:16-17 NRSV). ...
Jacob's response was to take the stone he had used for a pillow and to set it up as a pillar, declaring that the stone pillar would be a house of God, apparently meaning that a temple/sanctuary would be built there. Thus Jacob proposed that his personal experience of the presence of God be made available to others. Like Jacob, every true worshiper becomes aware that “The Lord is in this place!” As in the case of Jacob, the sense of presence may come in private and personal experience
Genesis - ...
New generations led by Isaac and Jacob find God continuing to lead them, to call them to be His people, and to renew His promises to them. Human trickery and deception personified in Jacob do not alter God's determination to carry out His redemptive plan. Even when crafty Jacob appears to meet his match while returning to Abraham's homeland, God leads him back to the Promised Land and back to safety. ...
Thus is established the heritage of God's people in the triad of patriarchal fathers—Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. See Creation ; Flood ; Sin ; Humanity ; Anthropology ; Earth; Image of God ; Abraham ; Isaac ; Jacob ; Joseph ; Adam and Eve ; Noah ; Names of God ; God of the Fathers
Abraham - Jesus quotes Exodus 3:6 in proof of the fact of the patriarchs’ resurrection and continued existence (Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37), inasmuch as the Divine sovereignty here asserted over Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob necessarily implies the conscious life of those who are its subjects. And, finally, to be with Abraham and his great sons, to ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 8:11), is the desire and reward of the faithful Israelite. ...
It is remarkable and suggestive that in the only notice of the patriarch Jacob that is contained in the Fourth Gospel, ch. , John 4:12, the same question is addressed by the woman of Samaria to Christ: ‘Art thou greater than our father Jacob,’—the Dispenser of the new water with its marvellous properties than the actual giver of the well? It was natural and inevitable that one of the questions that more particularly forced itself upon the attention of His contemporaries should be the relation of the Teacher, who had arisen in their midst and who claimed so great things, not only to the earlier prophets, but to the patriarchs and ancestors of the Jewish nation. Jacob
Abraham - Jesus quotes Exodus 3:6 in proof of the fact of the patriarchs’ resurrection and continued existence (Matthew 22:32 || Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37), inasmuch as the Divine sovereignty here asserted over Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob necessarily implies the conscious life of those who are its subjects. And, finally, to be with Abraham and his great sons, to ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven’ (Matthew 8:11), is the desire and reward of the faithful Israelite. ...
It is remarkable and suggestive that in the only notice of the patriarch Jacob that is contained in the Fourth Gospel, ch. , John 4:12, the same question is addressed by the woman of Samaria to Christ: ‘Art thou greater than our father Jacob,’—the Dispenser of the new water with its marvellous properties than the actual giver of the well? It was natural and inevitable that one of the questions that more particularly forced itself upon the attention of His contemporaries should be the relation of the Teacher, who had arisen in their midst and who claimed so great things, not only to the earlier prophets, but to the patriarchs and ancestors of the Jewish nation. Jacob
Illinois - ...
Catholic influence on the place-names of the state is shown in the following: ...
Assumption
Hennepin
Mount Carmel
Olivet
Saint Anne
Saint Augustine
Saint Charles
Saint David
Saint Elmo
Saint Francisville
Saint Jacob
Saint James
Saint John
Saint Joseph
Saint Libory
Saint Marie
Saint Peter
San Jose
Archdioceses, past and present, include ...
Chicago
Dioceses, past and present, include: ...
Belleville
Joliet
Peoria
Rockford
Springfield
See also: ...
patron saints index
Kabbala - Kabbalism exerted a high moral influence upon its adherents and drew to the Christian Faith such men as Riccio, Conrad, Otto, Rittangel, Jacob Franck, etc
Concubine - This in some degree palliates, though it does not justify, the concubinage of Nahor, Abraham, and Jacob
Vows - The earliest mention of a vow is that of Jacob
Witness - Jacob raised a heap of stones, "the heap of witness
Jabbok - On the southern bank of the Jabbok Jacob met Esau (Genesis 32:22)
Ephratah - Town near which Jacob buried his wife Rachel (Genesis 35:16-19 ; usually translated in English as Ephrath)
Brethren of the Lord - ( b ) They were held to be His cousins, sons of Mary, the wife of Alphœus ( Matthew 27:56 = Mark 15:40 ); ‘brother’ here implying merely kinship, as Abraham calls himself and his nephew Lot ‘brethren’ ( Genesis 13:8 ), and Laban calls Jacob, his sister’s son, his ‘brother’ ( Genesis 29:16 )
Mount - Jacob offered sacrifice on the mount or heap of stones raised for a witness between him and Laban
Wages - Still, a skilled shepherd, like Jacob, might receive a portion of the flock and thus begin his own herd (Genesis 30:32-33 ; Genesis 31:8 ; and legal texts from both Assyria and Babylonia)
Guile - The guile which characterized Jacob the Jew as well as Ulysses the Greek was indeed often admired as a national trait by which duller races could be outwitted
Wine - Genesis 49:11 (b) Jacob used this figure to describe the wonderful wealth that would accrue to Judah
Alien - The patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) were aliens in Canaan, but owned large material resources (Genesis 20:1 ; Genesis 26:3 ; Genesis 32:5 )
Coat - ...
Jacob made Joseph a coat of many colors
Field - Thus, “Esau was a cunning hunter, a man of the field; and Jacob was a plain man, dwelling in tents” ( Cleopas - according to Eusebius and Epiphanius, was brother of Joseph, both being sons of Jacob
Chronicles - The descendants of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and David, from all of whom it was predicted that the Saviour of the world should be born, are here marked with precision
Gentile - Jacob foretold that the Messiah, he who was to be sent, the Shiloh, should gather the Gentiles to himself
Naphtali - the sixth son of Jacob by Bilhah, Rachel's handmaid
Affinity - ...
It is true the patriarchs, before the law, married their sisters, as Abraham married Sarah, who was his father's daughter by another mother; and two sisters together, as Jacob married Rachel and Leah; and their own sisters, both by father and mother, as Seth and Cain
Alien - The patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob) were aliens in Canaan, but owned large material resources (Genesis 20:1 ; Genesis 26:3 ; Genesis 32:5 )
Messiah or Messias - ...
That Jesus Christ was the true MESSIAH of the Old Testament, the "Shiloh" of Jacob, the "Redeemer" of Job, the "Angel of the Covenant," is abundantly clear
na'Aman - ) ...
One of the family of Benjamin who came down to Egypt with Jacob as read in (Genesis 46:21 ) He was the son of Bela, and head of the family of the Naamites
Obadi'ah - He there speaks of the conquest of Jerusalem and the captivity of Jacob as having occurred, He probably refers to the captivity by Nebuchadnezzar, B
Beth'el - (Genesis 12:8 ; 13:3,4 ) Bethel was the scene of Jacob's vision. (Genesis 28:11-19 ; 31:13 ) Jacob lived there
Naphtali - ) Jacob's fifth son, second by Bilhah, Rachel's maid. Jacob in his dying prophecy says, "Naphtali is a hind let loose, he giveth goodly words. " The targums of Pseudo-Jonathan and Jerusalem say Naphtali first told Jacob Joseph was alive. Habakkuk 3:19, "the Lord will make my feet like hinds' feet," has in view Jacob's prophecy as to Naphtali
Levi - Jacob's third son by Leah, ("joined"), expressing her trust; "now will my husband be joined unto me, because I have borne him three sons" (Genesis 29:34). Levi joined Simeon in avenging their own full sister Dinah's wrong by treacherously slaying the Shechemites, and so incurred Jacob's curse. Jacob's moral weakness, in reproaching his sons not with the treacherous murder but with exposing him to danger ("ye have troubled me to make me to stink among the inhabitants of the land"), is faithfully delineated (Genesis 34). But Jacob does not intimate this, a proof of the genuineness of his blessing as recorded in Genesis. They shall teach Jacob Thy judgments and Israel Thy law (Leviticus 10:11), they shall present incense before Thee (in the holy place) and whole burnt offering upon Thine altar (in the court)
Tabernacle - Solomon built it and the finished structure was known as “the house,” the temple instead of the dwelling place (mishkân) In later literature mishkân is a poetic synonym for “temple”: “I will not give sleep … until I find out a place for the Lord, a habitation for the mighty God of Jacob” ( Jacob” ( Law - The word can refer to the whole of the “law”: “For he established a testimony in Jacob, and appointed a law in Israel, which he commanded our fathers, that they should make them known to their children” ( Jacob, Behold this heap, and behold this pillar, which I have cast betwixt me and thee
Transgress - ” Such a willful rebellion from a prescribed or agreed-upon path may be perpetrated against another man: “… Jacob answered and said to Laban, What is my trespass? what is my sin, that thou hast so hotly pursued after me?” ( Jacob is asking what he has done by way of violating or not keeping his responsibility (contract) with Laban
Captivity - ...
Probably none among the posterity of Jacob can now prove from which of his twelve sons they are descended. 133, a similar crushing blow fell on the Jews who had again assembled in Judea; and at this day they are scattered all over the world, yet distinct from the people among whom they dwell, suffering under the woe which unbelief has brought upon their fathers and themselves, and awaiting the time when Christ "shall turn away ungodliness from Jacob," Romans 11:25,26
Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs - -The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs consists of a series of discourses assigned to the twelve sons of Jacob, varying in theme and style, but all more or less on the same general plan-(i. -He implores his brethren and children to avoid fornication; for his own sin he was smitten with a sore disease for seven months, and would have perished but for the prayer of his father Jacob. Levi is to be freed from iniquity, and to become to God ‘a son, and a servant, and a minister of His presence,’ and light up in Jacob the light of knowledge [1] (iv. He foretells Jacob’s conquest of the Canaanites (vii. At Bethel Jacob is told in vision that Levi is to be priest; he pays tithes to God through him (ix. The Temple will be laid waste, and, but for the merits of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, all Israel would perish. 1-3), the war with Esau, who is slain by Jacob, the capture of the Edomite stronghold (ix. The patriarchs shall rise from the dead, and the twelve sons of Jacob shall reign-Levi first, Judah second, etc. In a second vision-that of the Ship of Jacob in a storm-Joseph flees in a boat, Levi and Judah keep together; at Levi’s prayer they reach land (v. Jacob on hearing these dreams concludes that Joseph is alive (vii. Israel - If countries and peoples are here personified as men, the same may be the case elsewhere: and in Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Esau, and the twelve sons of Jacob, we may be dealing not with individuals but with tribes. ( b ) Others, such as the traditions of Abraham’s connexion with various shrines, and the stories of Jacob and his sons, were developed in the land of Canaan, ( c ) Still others were learned from the Canaanites. 1500 that Jacob-el was a place-name in Palestine. In Genesis, Jacob and Israel are identified, probably because Israel had settled in the Jacob country. Jacob-Israel (Jacob, as shown above, is of Canaanitish origin; Israel was the name of the confederated clans) represents the nation Israel itself. Israel is called an Aramæan ( Deuteronomy 26:5 ), and the account of the marriage of Jacob ( Genesis 29:1-35 ; Genesis 30:1-43 ; Genesis 31:1-55 ) shows that Israel was kindred to the Aramæans. ...
The sons of Jacob are divided into four groups. Benjamin is said to have been the youngest son of Jacob, born in Palestine a long time after the others. Four sons of Jacob Dan, Naphtali, Gad, and Asher are said to be the sons of concubines
Benjamin - ("son of my right hand"), as Jacob named him; first called by his dying mother Rachel Benoni, son of my sorrow (compare Jeremiah 31:15; Matthew 2:17-18). Rachel's second son, the only son of Jacob born in Palestine (Genesis 35:16-19), on the road between Betheland Bethlehem Ephrath, near the latter (Genesis 48:7) (probably "the fertile", from parah , corresponding to the town's other name, Bethlehem, "bread-house. ...
Benjamin was only 23 or 24 years old when Jacob went down to Egypt. It is plain that the list in Genesis 46 includes those grandsons and great grandsons of Jacob born afterward in Egypt, and who in the Israelite mode of thought came into Egypt "in the loins" of their fathers (compare Hebrews 7:9-10). Hence, arises the correspondence in the main between the list given in connection with Jacob's descent to Egypt in Genesis 46, and the list taken by Moses ages afterward in Numbers 26. Its predominant characteristic of warlike tastes is foretold by Jacob (Genesis 49:27); "Benjamin shall ravin as a wolf, in the morning he shall devour the prey, and at night shall divide the spoil. Archers and slingers, generally left handed (as also Ehud was), were the chief force of the "sons of Jacob's right hand" (Judges 3:15, etc. ...
The "morning" and "night" in Jacob's prophecy mark that Benjamin, as he was in the beginning, so he should continue to the end of the Jewish state
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - genealogy ends with Matthan, Jacob, Joseph. According to this view, Joseph was really the son of Heli ( Luke 3:23 ) but the legal heir of Jacob ( Matthew 1:16 ). ]'>[9]8 , ‘Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus,’ etc. The lately discovered Sinaitic-Syriac palimpsest has ‘Jacob begat Joseph: Joseph, to whom was betrothed Mary the Virgin, begat Jesus. ), who thinks that it is not original, but derived from a variant of the ordinary text: ‘Jacob begat Joseph, to whom being betrothed the Virgin Mary bare Issachar - Leah's oldest son, Reuben, by presenting to Rachel, hired Jacob for Leah, the fruit of which intercourse was a fifth son by her, the first born after the interval from Genesis 29:35 to Genesis 30:17; the ninth son of Jacob. ) Two reasons for his name are assigned: first, because she hired Jacob by the selfdenying gift of the mandrakes; secondly, as she says "God hath given me my hire, because I have given my maiden (Zilpah, Genesis 30:9) to my husband. ...
Jacob prophetically describes the tribe, "Israel is a strong donkey crouching down between two burdens (the cattle pens or sheepfolds, Speaker's Commentary; 'the hurdles,' Keil; found only in Judges 5:16); and he saw that rest was good, and the land that it was pleasant; and bowed his shoulder to bear, and became a servant (slave) unto tribute" (Genesis 49:14-15), namely, unto the tribute imposed by the various invaders attracted to his land by the abundant crops
People - ...
Second, ‛am may signify those relatives (including women and children) who are grouped together locally whether or not they permanently inhabit a given location: “Then Jacob was greatly afraid and distressed: and he divided the people that was with him, and the flocks, and herds, and the camels, into two bands” ( Jacob (Israel) and their families: “And he said unto his people [1], Behold, the people of the children of Israel are more and mightier than we” ( Jacob is the lot of his inheritance
Wells - This was probably the reason that the shepherds of Padanaram declined the invitation of Jacob to water the flocks, before they were all assembled; either they had not the key of the lock which secured the stone, or, if they had, they durst not open it but in the presence of Rachel, to whose father the well belonged. It is ridiculous to suppose the stone was so heavy that the united strength of several Mesopotamian shepherds could not roll it from the mouth of the well, when Jacob had strength or address to remove it alone; or that, though a stranger, he ventured to break a standing rule for watering the flocks, which the natives did not dare to do, and that without opposition. It was, therefore, an office of great kindness with which Jacob introduced himself to the notice of his relations, to roll back the stone which lay upon the mouth of the well, and draw water for the flocks which Rachel tended
Shechem - A Canaanite prince, at the town of the same name, who abducted Dinah the daughter of Jacob, and was soon afterwards treacherously slain, with many of his people, by Simeon and Levi, Genesis 34:1-31 . Jacob bought a field in its neighborhood, which by way of overplus, he gave to his son Joseph, who was buried here, Genesis 48:22 Joshua 24:32 . In its vicinity was Jacob's well or fountain, at which Christ discoursed with the woman of Samaria, John 4:5 . At the foot of these mountains on the east lies the beautiful plain of Mukhna, ten miles long and a mile and a half wide; and where the valley opens on this plain, Joseph's tomb and Jacob's well are located, by the unanimous consent of Jews, Christians, and Mohammedans. Upon the hills around, flocks and herds were feeding, as of old; nor in the simple garb of the shepherds of Samaria was there any thing repugnant to the notions we may entertain of the appearance presented by the sons of Jacob. " ...
"The principal object of veneration is Jacob's well, over which a church was formerly erected
James - James (jâmez), same name as Jacob
Micah - In the first discourse (1-2) God rises in majesty to punish idolatry and send distress over Juda, to punish injustice, and none can thwart Him, and the Redemption is introduced, "I will assemble and gather together all of thee, O Jacob: I will bring together the remnant of Israel
Micheas - In the first discourse (1-2) God rises in majesty to punish idolatry and send distress over Juda, to punish injustice, and none can thwart Him, and the Redemption is introduced, "I will assemble and gather together all of thee, O Jacob: I will bring together the remnant of Israel
Sychar - ‘A city of Samaria,’ near to the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son Joseph ( John 4:5 ). ]'>[1] ) to Jacob’s Well for domestic supplies. ...
Jacob’s Well , according to unanimous and unbroken tradition, lies about half a mile to the E
Say, Utter, Affirm - David’s concluding words begin with these words: “Now these are the last words of David: The oracle of David, the son of Jesse, the oracle of the man who was raised on high, the anointed of the God of Jacob, the sweet psalmist of Israel” ( Naphtali, Tribe of - On this tribe Jacob pronounced the patriarchal blessing, "Naphtali is a hind let loose: he giveth goodly words" (Genesis 49:21 )
Memorial - Israel must remember their God as the "God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, " the "I am, " forever
Quails - "Give me children (said Rachel to Jacob) or else I die
Fat - Thus Isaac's prophetical blessings to Jacob
Birthright - The paternal blessing was also in a peculiar sense the right of the first-born, though the right itself and all the blessings of it might be forfeited or transferred, as in the case of Jacob and Esau, Genesis 25:33; Reuben and Joseph, 1 Chronicles 5:1
Serve - Jacob loved Rachel and said, I will serve thee seven years for Rachel thy youngest daughters
Dan -
The fifth son of Jacob, and the first of Bilhah, Rachel's maid
Palm (of Hand) - Jacob tells Laban that “God hath seen … the labor of my hands …” ( Jacob’s thigh was out of joint, as he wrestled with him” ( Slaughter - 31:54, where “Jacob offered sacrifice upon the mount. 26:25); of Jacob at Shechem ( Theophany - ...
God appeared to Jacob in his dream at Bethel (Genesis 28:11-19 ). It is also clear that in the events at the Jabbok ford, Jacob somehow received a revelation through an encounter with God, although neither a strict reading of the text (Genesis 32:22-32 ) nor its later interpretation by Hosea (12:3-4) demand a theophany
Pillar - Jacob at Bethel, and Moses at the bush, had real views of JEHOVAH'S glory and fulness in Christ. The manifestation made on both occasions as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, plainly shows that the covenant of redemption, in the seed of the woman, was the great and leading cause of all
Pass Over - ” This basic meaning can be used of “going over or through” a particular location to get to the other side, as when Jacob “crossed over” the Euphrates to escape Laban ( Jacob “were past
Micah, Book of - The remnant of Jacob will then be in power as a lion: horses and chariots will be destroyed; and all graven images and symbols of idolatry. He has confidence that God will perform the truth to Jacob, and the mercy to Abraham, which He had sworn to their fathers from the days of old
Nazarene - Thus Jacob when dying called his sons and said, "Gather yourselves together, that I may tell you that which shall befall you in the last days. " (Genesis 49:1) Eminently Jacob was a prophet in what he here predicted of his sons, and the glorious events he then delivered, since fulfilled, proves it. ...
The next enquiry is, which of the sacred writers is it that thus predicted Christ should be called a Nazarene? To which I answer, in type and figure; Jacob and Moses both represented this great truth in their dying testimonies concerning Joseph, the typical Nazarite of the Lord Jesus Christ. Jacob's prophecy concerning Joseph in this particular runs thus: (Genesis 49:26) "The blessings of thy father have prevailed above the blessings of my progenitors, unto the utmost bound of the everlasting hills: they shall be on the head of Joseph, and on the crown of the head of him that was separate from his brethren. " In the original the very same word for separate is used as Genesis 49:26—so that Moses as well as Jacob, declared by the type Joseph, that the great Antitype should be the Nazarite or separate from among his brethren. (Acts 22:8)...
From the whole then, I hope the reader will think with me, that God the Holy Ghost had all along a design, from the first dawn of revelation, with an eye to the Lord Jesus in this most important character; and to this end and purpose directed his servants' minds, Jacob and Moses, to point to this great Nazarite, by type and figure, in the separation of Joseph from his brethren
Stephen - Again as to Acts 7:15-16, "Jacob and our fathers were carried over into Sychem, and laid in the sepulchre that Abraham bought of Emmor," Stephen with elliptical brevity refers to six different chapters, summing up in one sentence, which none of his hearers could misunderstand from their familiarity as to the details, the double purchase (from Ephron the Hittite by Abraham, and from Hamor of Shechem by Jacob: Genesis 23:16; Genesis 33:19), the double burial place (Machpelah's cave and the ground at Shechem), and the double burial (Jacob in Machpelah's cave: Genesis 50:13, and Joseph in the Shechem ground of Jacob, Genesis 50:25; Exodus 13:19; Joshua 24:32)
Hebrews - However outlived six generations of his descendants, including Abraham himself, after whose death he was for some years the only surviving ancestor of Isaac and Jacob. His son and grandson, Isaac and Jacob followed in his steps. By a miraculous arrangement of Providence, Joseph, one of the sons of Jacob, became grand-vizier of Egypt; and in a time of famine invited his family to settle in that land. Such was the religion of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Judah, Joseph, etc
Immutability of God - He is the God who is and will be what He has already been in the past: “the Lord God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob this is my name for ever” (Exodus 3:15 )
Shepherd - Shepherding was the chief occupation of the Israelites in the early days of the patriarchs: Abraham (Genesis 12:16 ); Rachel (Genesis 29:9 ); Jacob (Genesis 30:31-40 ); Moses (Exodus 3:1 )
Micah - It crowns the whole chain of predictions respecting the several limitations of the promised seed: to the line of Shem; to the family of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob; to the tribe of Judah; and to the royal house of David, terminating in his birth at Bethlehem, "the city of David
Aramaic - The first time we meet with it in scripture is in Genesis 31:47 , where Laban called the heap of witness 'Jegar-sahadutha,' which is Chaldee; whereas Jacob gave it a Hebrew name, 'Galeed
Syria, Syrian - In connection with Rebekah the wife of Isaac, Laban (grandson of Nahor, Abraham's brother) 'the Syrian' is introduced, Genesis 25:20 ; Genesis 28:5 ; Genesis 31:20,24 ; and an Israelite, in presenting his basket of first-fruits, was instructed to confess before the Lord, "A Syrian ready to perish was my father," followed by a rehearsal of what God had done for the descendants of Jacob, and how He had brought them into the promised land
Israel, Spiritual - Israel is the name given to the descendants of Jacob and to the grouping of people in the twelve tribes coming from Jacob's sons
Mizpah - On Mount Gilead, also called Mizpeh of Gilead, Judges 11:29, and elsewhere, probably Ramoth-mizpeh, Joshua 13:26, and Ramoth-gilead, 1 Kings 4:13, and elsewhere, the place where Laban and Jacob set up a heap of stones as a witness and landmark between them
Moses - The prophet and legislator of the Hebrews and the son of Amram and Jochebed, and of the tribe of Levi, the son of Jacob
Priest - Afterwards that office devolved on the head of the family, as in the cases of Noah (Genesis 8:20 ), Abraham (12:7; 13:4), Isaac (26:25), Jacob (31:54), and Job (Job 1:5 )
Prophecy - ), and his posterity, Isaac and Jacob and their descendants (12:7; 13:14,15,17; 15:18-21; Exodus 3:8,17 ), which have all been fulfilled
Brothers - In fact, the book of Genesis addresses the difficulties of sibling rivalry, or the “brother problem”: Cain and Abel (Genesis 4:1 ); Jacob and Esau (Genesis 25-28 ); Joseph and his brothers (Genesis 37-50 )
Sceptre - It is well known that the word Shebeth, which is translated sceptre in the memorable prophecy of the dying patriarch Jacob when declaring that "the sceptre should not depart, from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until the Shiloh should come," (Genesis 49:10) is also translated, Judges 5:14, pen
Inability - Jacob could not rejoice Potiphar's wife could not in Joseph's exaltation rejoice in it
Almighty - The title 'the Almighty' without the name of God being added, occurs first in Jacob's address to his twelve sons before he died: the blessings upon Joseph were to be by "'the Almighty,' . This is plainly declared: "I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob by the name of GOD ALMIGHTY; but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them
Might - Also Micah, being filled with the Holy Spirit, said: “But truly I am full of power by the spirit of the Lord, and of judgment, and of might, to declare unto Jacob his transgression, and to Israel his sin” ( Camp - Jacob “encamped” by the Jabbok with his retinue ( Jacob’s experience with the angels
Idol - ...
...
Matztzebah, a "statue" set up (Jeremiah 43:13 ); a memorial stone like that erected by Jacob (Genesis 28:18 ; 31:45 ; 35:14,20 ), by (Joshua 4:9 ), and by Samuel (1 Samuel 7:12 )
James - (the Greek form of Jacob, supplanter )
Anointing, - Thus Jacob anointed a pillar at Bethel
Joseph - Joseph was the eleventh of twelve sons, the first by Jacob's favorite wife, Rachel. ...
As the child of Jacob's old age and Rachel's son, Joseph became the favorite and was given the famous “coat of many colors” (Genesis 37:3 ; “long robe with sleeves,” NRSV, NEB; “richly ornamented robe” NIV) by his father. Under Joseph's patronage, Jacob moved into Egypt (Genesis 46:1-47:12 ). ...
While in Egypt, Joseph became the father of two sons, Manasseh and Ephraim (Genesis 41:50-52 ), who were counted as sons of Jacob (Genesis 48:5-6 ) and whose tribes dominated the northern nation of Israel
Tribes - Conflicting opinions have been held as to how these tribal divisions arose, the traditional theory being that the different families descended from the sons of Jacob multiplied till they formed tribes. Others take the view that the history of the sons of Jacob is really a history of the various tribal communities which were combined to form the nation, and that the divisions were to a large extent geographical
Generation - Thus creation, Adam, Noah, Noah's sons, Shem, Terah, Ishmael, the sons of Ishmael, Isaac, Esau, and Jacob each provide a generation and a structural unit in the Genesis narrative. Often the aged patriarch presided over the active leadership of his sons as seen particularly in the cases of Isaac and Jacob
Hosea, Book of - In several other cases ( Hosea 5:10 ; Hosea 5:12-14 , Hosea 6:4 , Hosea 12:2 ) it is possible that the editor has pointed the original prophecies at his own people of the South by substituting ‘Judah’ where Hosea had written ‘Israel’; thus, although at present Jacob-Judah are mentioned in Hosea 12:2 , the terms ‘Jacob’ and ‘Israel,’ synonyms for the people of the Northern Kingdom, were certainly in the mind of the writer of Hosea 12:2-3 , for in Hosea 12:3 he puns on these names: ‘In the womb he Jacobed his brother, and in his manhood Israeled with God
Judah - Judah is represented as the fourth son of Leah by Jacob ( Genesis 29:35 Genealogy of Jesus Christ - Probably Matthan of Matthew is the Matthat of Luke, and Jacob and Heli were brothers; and Heli's son Joseph, and Jacob's daughter Mary, first cousins. Joseph, as male heir of his uncle Jacob, who had only one child, Mary, would marry her according to the law (Numbers 36:8)
Israel - Name given to Jacob after 'a man' had wrestled with him, to whom he clung when he was by him crippled. The twelve sons of Jacob became the heads of the twelve tribes, and they and their descendants were called the children of Israel, or simply Israel
Lie - ” The Lord told Jacob: “… The land whereon thou liest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed” ( Jacob instructed his sons as follows: “But I will lie with my fathers, and thou shalt carry me out of Egypt, and bury me in their burying place” ( Jacobus Sarugensis, Bishop of Batnae - Jacobus (13) Sarugensis, bp. According to them, Jacobus was born at Kurtom on the Euphrates, A. ) states that Jacobus was made bp. 503, Joshua Stylites tells us, Jacobus was a periodeutes or visitor of the district of Batnae, a middle rank between the episcopate and the priesthood. The Stylite adds that Jacobus composed many homilies on Scripture, psalms, and hymns; which proves his fame already established in 503. ) has charged Jacobus with Monophysitism, a charge which Assemani and Abbeloos shew to be unwarranted. The Maronites, always hostile to Nestorians and Jacobites, honour him as a saint. Had Jacobus been a Monophysite, he would have shared their fate. Jacobus of Sarug would not communicate with Paul of Antioch, because the latter confessed the two natures. Jacobus Edessenus testifies that a certain poem was falsely ascribed by the Jacobite sect to the bp. ii, "Anaphora of holy Mar Jacob the Doctor, of Batnan of Serug. to Jacobus an abbat of Edessa explaining Heb_10:26 1Jn_5:16 etc. Jacob von Sarug , Bonn, 1867). Jacobus is very fond of an allegorical treatment of O. Jacobus. Jacobus Edessenus classed the bp. Jacobi Batn
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - Matthew (Matthew 1:2-17) begins with Abraham, and traces the line in fourteen generations to David; then through Solomon in fourteen generations to Jechoniah at the time of the carrying away to Babylon: then in fourteen (or thirteen according to our present text) generations through Shealtiel and Zerubbabel to Matthan, Jacob, Joseph, and Jesus. He discusses fully the reading in Matthew 1:16, and concludes that we cannot look on the reading of the Sinaitic Syriac (‘Jacob begat Joseph; Joseph, to whom was betrothed Mary the Virgin, begat Jesus, who is called the Christ’) as containing traces of an original text. ) thinks that the Curctonian Syriac (‘Jacob begat Joseph, to whom was betrothed Mary the Virgin, who bore Jesus Christ’) represents the Greek from which the Syriac version was made more closely than does the Sinaitic. If, therefore, the compiler followed a pedigree ready to hand, he did so only as far as the step ‘Jacob begat Joseph’; and textual criticism will not help us to reconstruct the presumed original document beyond that point. ]'>[4] (‘Jacob begat Joseph, to whom being betrothed the Virgin Mary begat Jesus that is called Christ’), and also the Old Latin and Syriac versions, this point is missed, and there is little doubt that the Received Text is right. He supposed that Matthan, a descendant of Solomon, married a woman named, according to tradition, Estha, by whom he had a son Jacob. Heli died without children, and Jacob, in accordance with the levirate law, raised up seed to his brother, and begat Joseph. Thus Joseph was physically son of Jacob, legally of Heli
Covenant - ...
The gracious character of Yahweh's covenant with the patriarchs was highlighted in Yahweh's interactions with Jacob, who was chosen in spite of his covetousness (25:29-34), deception (27:19), and clever manipulations (30:31-43). ...
Yahweh God confirmed the covenant in all its aspects and ramifications with Jacob. When fleeing from Esau, Jacob was assured of these; the reassurance of Yahweh's presence was captured by the phrases "I am with you"; "I will watch over you"; "I will bring you back to the land"; "I will not leave you"; and "I will accomplish all I promise you. " With these assurances Jacob could travel, live, work, and prosper anyplace in Yahweh's cosmic kingdom, for Yahweh had repeated his determination to uphold and carry out his creation covenant and its redemptive/restorative correlate. Jacob, having a home with his Uncle Laban, enjoyed the fulfillment of the covenant mandate to be fruitful and multiply, and the fulfillment of the covenant promise of seed (29:31-30:24). Jacob was blessed with prosperity (a creation covenantal cultural reality 30:25-43; 35:23-26). When returning to the land of his fathers as Yahweh directed him (31:3) Jacob was assured of Yahweh's covenantal promise to be with him. When the time came to confront Esau, Jacob depended on Yahweh's covenantal relationship with his forbears and the promises made to them and him (32:9-12). After Jacob's wrestling with the Lord, he was named "Israel" because he overcame in his struggles (32:28; 35:10) and was blessed (32:29). Upon his return to Bethel, Yahweh God again confirmed the covenant with him, assuring Jacob he was El Shaddai and commanding him to be fruitful (35:11), confirming that nations and kings would come from him (35:11) and that he would receive land for himself and his children (35:12). When Jacob had been in the land for some time and was advised to go to Egypt, Yahweh assured him that he was not breaking covenant if he did (46:3-4)
Star (2) - If the compiler had in mind the passage in Numbers 24:17 (‘There shall come forth a star out of Jacob,’ etc. ]'>[9] a description which is based, apparently, on Numbers 24:17 :...
‘There shall come forth a star out of Jacob,...
And a sceptre shall rise out of Israel’;...
In the Targum Onkelos this is rendered:...
‘When a king shall arise out of Jacob,...
And the Messiah shall be anointed from Israel’;...
And in pseudo-Jonathan:...
‘When the mighty King of Jacob’s House shall reign,...
And the Messiah, the Power sceptre of Israel, shall be anointed. A similar Messianic application of this passage meets us in the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, where (Judah, 24 [10]) the following occurs:...
‘Over you a star shall proceed out of Jacob,...
And a man shall arise from my seed like the sun of righteousness’ (cf. 32: ‘Isaiah, another prophet, prophesying the same things by other expressions, thus spake: “There shall rise a star out of Jacob, and a blossom shall ascend from the root of Jesse,” ’ etc
Ephraim, the Tribe of - Took precedence over that of Manasseh by virtue of Jacob's blessing (Genesis 41:52 ; 48:1 ). The descendants of Joseph formed two of the tribes of Israel, whereas each of the other sons of Jacob was the founder of only one tribe
Father's House - These units might be large (Jacob's house included 66 descendants when he entered Egypt, Genesis 46:26 ). The common designations “house of Jacob” (Exodus 19:3 ; Amos 3:13 ), “house of Israel” (Exodus 40:38 ) and the unusual designation “house of Isaac” (Amos 7:16 ) all refer to the nation Israel in terms of a father's house. In patriarchal times married women were regarded as remaining part of their father's house (Genesis 31:14 ; compare Genesis 46:26 where the enumeration of Jacob's house does not include his sons' wives)
Jacob's Well - The distance from Shechem (Sychar) is no objection; for even if the Samaritan woman's coming to the well was not the result of a providential accident, the sacredness of Jacob's well and the excellence of its deep drawn water would account for her coming so far. Jacob therefore naturally provided himself with a well in his field just purchased (Genesis 33:17-19). , and consequently a large part of it lay nearer to Jacob's well than to the fountain Ain el Askar at the N. of Sychar would repair to Jacob's well rather than to Ain el Askar, which is ten minutes' walk from Jacob's well
Covenant - In the covenant Jacob made with Laban, they gathered a heap of stones to be witness between them, and "they did eat there upon the heap
Succoth - The mention of the "house" and "booths" marks that Jacob stayed there for long, in contrast to his previous pilgrim life in tents, Succoth lay on the route between Pentel on the E
Christ - Some types of CHRIST:...
Aaron, Exodus 28:2 (c)...
Adam, Genesis 5:2 (c)...
Ark, (covenant), Exodus 25:10 (c)...
Ark, (Noah's), Genesis 6:14 (c)...
Ass, Genesis 49:14 (c)...
Author, Hebrews 5:9 (c)...
Bishop, 1 Peter 2:25 (a)...
Body, 1 Corinthians 12:12 (a)...
Branch, Zechariah 3:8 (a)...
Bread, John 6:51 (a)...
Bridegroom, Matthew 25:1 (b)...
Bullock, Leviticus 1:5 (c)...
Burnt Offering, Leviticus 1:3 (b)...
Calf, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Captain, Hebrews 2:10 (a)...
Chief, Song of Solomon 5:10 (b)...
Commander, Isaiah 55:4 (b)...
Cornerstone, Isaiah 28:16 (a)...
Covert, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
David, 2 Samuel 19:10 (c)...
Day, Psalm 118:24 (b)...
Door, John 10:9 (a)...
Eagle, Revelation 4:7 (b)...
Flour, Leviticus 2:1 (c)...
Foundation, Isaiah 28:16 (b)...
Fountain, Zechariah 13:1 (b)...
Garment, Isaiah 61:10 (b), Romans 13:14...
Gate, Psalm 118:20 (b)...
Gold, Isaiah 13:12 (a)...
Headstone, Psalm 113:22 (b)...
Heir, Hebrews 1:2 (a)...
Hen, Matthew 23:37 (a)...
Hiding Place, Isaiah 32:2 (a)...
High Priest, Hebrews 4:14 (a)...
Isaac, Genesis 24:36 (c)...
Jacob, Genesis 32:28 (c)...
Jonah, Matthew 12:40 (a)...
Joseph, Genesis 37:7 (c)...
Joshua, Joshua 1:1 (c)...
Judge, Acts 17:31 (a)...
King, Psalm 2:6 (a)...
Lamb, Revelation 5:6 (a)...
Leaves, Revelation 22:2 (c)...
Light, John 8:12 (a)...
Lily of the Valleys, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Lion, Revelation 5:5 (a)...
Manna, John 6:32 (a)...
Master of the House, Luke 13:25 (b)...
Meal, 2 Kings 4:41 (c)...
Mediator (umpire), 1 Timothy 2:5 (a)...
Melchizedek, Genesis 14:18 (c)...
Merchantman, Matthew 13:45 (b)...
Owl, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Ox:, Ezekiel 1:10 (b)...
Passover, 1 Corinthians 5:7 (a)...
Peace Offering, Leviticus 3:1 (c)...
Pelican, Psalm 102:6 (a)...
Physician, Jeremiah 8:22 (c)...
Pigeon, Leviticus 12:6 (c)...
Propitiation (mercy seat), Romans 3:25 (a)...
Ram, Genesis 22:13 (a)...
Rock, Matthew 16:18 (a)...
Rock of Ages, Isaiah 26:4 (margin) (a)...
Rose of Sharon, Song of Solomon 2:1 (c)...
Root, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sabbath, Colossians 2:16-17 (b)...
Seed, Genesis 3:15 (a)...
Serpent, John 3:14 (a)...
Shepherd, John 10:11 (a)...
Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21 (a)...
Sin Offering, Leviticus 4:32 (c)...
Solomon, 1 Kings 10:13 (c)...
Sower, Matthew 13:37 (a)...
Sparrow, Psalm 102:7 (a)...
Star, Revelation 22:16 (a)...
Sun, Malachi 4:2 (a)...
Temple, John 2:19 (a)...
Thief, Revelation 3:3 (a)...
Tree, Revelation 22:2 (b)...
Trespass Offering, Leviticus 5:6 (c)...
Turtle dove, Leviticus 1:14 (c)...
Vine, John 15:5 (a)...
Worm, Psalm 22:6 (a)...
Flesh - Thus in the instance of the sons of Jacob, when some were for killing Joseph, Judah restrained from the deed, saying, "What profit is it if we slay our brother, and conceal his blood? Let not our hand be upon him, for he is our brother and our flesh
Die - ” Jacob explains to Esau that, were his livestock to be driven too hard (fast), the young among them would “die” ( Pour, Flow - 28:18, where it is said that after Jacob had slept at Bethel with his head resting on a stone, he “poured oil upon the top of it
There is - 28:16: “And Jacob awaked out of his sleep, and he said, Surely the Lord is in this place; and I knew it not
House - , Luke 10:5 ; Acts 7:10 ; 11:14 ; 1 Timothy 3:4,5,12 ; 2 Timothy 1:16 ; 4:19 , RV (AV, "household"); Titus 1:11 (plural); of a local church, 1 Timothy 3:15 ; of the descendants of Jacob (Israel) and David, e
House - , Luke 10:5 ; Acts 7:10 ; 11:14 ; 1 Timothy 3:4,5,12 ; 2 Timothy 1:16 ; 4:19 , RV (AV, "household"); Titus 1:11 (plural); of a local church, 1 Timothy 3:15 ; of the descendants of Jacob (Israel) and David, e
Reuben - Jacob's firstborn, Leah's son, born long after the marriage. Jacob on his deathbed (Genesis 49:3-4) said: "boiling over (so pachaz means) like water (on a rapid fire), thou shalt not excel" (Genesis 49:4). " Again, his offer to Jacob (Genesis 42:37) to stake his own two sons' lives for the safety of Benjamin, Joseph's surviving brother, is another trait of kindliness
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - ( Genesis 3:15 ) By degrees the area is limited: it is to come through the family of Shem, (Genesis 9:26 ) through the family of Abraham, (Genesis 12:3 ) of Isaac, (Genesis 25:18 ) of Jacob, (Genesis 28:14 ) of Judah, (Genesis 49:10 ) Balaam seems to say that it will be wrought by a warlike Israelitish King, (Numbers 24:17 ) Jacob, by a peaceful Ruler of the earth, (Genesis 49:10 ) Moses, by a Prophet like himself, i
Balaam - And he took up his parable and said, Balak hath brought me out of Aram, saying, Come, curse me Jacob, and come defy Israel. But how shall I curse, whom God hath not cursed? Or how shall I defy, whom God hath not defied? Who can count the dust of Jacob, and the number of the fourth part of Israel? Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his!' And, again, on the top of Pisgah, he takes up his parable in a way not unworthy of the place of Moses' grave: 'God is not a man, that He should lie; neither the son of man, that He should repent. Hath He said, and shall He not do it? Or, hath He spoken, and shall He not make it good? He hath not beheld iniquity in Jacob, neither hath He seen perverseness in Israel. Surely there is no enchantment against Jacob, neither is there any divination against Israel; according to this time it shall be said of Jacob and of Israel, What hath God wrought!' And on the top of Peor, that looketh toward Jeshimon, Balaam positively saw the day of Christ Himself afar off. There shall come a star out of Jacob, and a Sceptre shall rise out of Israel, and out of Jacob shall come He that shall have the dominion
Manasseh - ’ He thus brings it into relation with the story of Jacob’s wrestling with the angel ( Genesis 32:1-32 ). ‘It would appear,’ so runs the conclusion, ‘that in the original story the epithet Manasseh was a fitting title of Jacob himself, which might be borne by his worshippers as in the case of Gad. ’ But it is extremely unlikely that Jacob was originally regarded as a deity, as Luther ( ZATW Deep, the - When Jacob blessed his son Joseph with “blessings of the deep that lieth under,” he was attempting to bestow fertility on Joseph and his offspring and on their land (Genesis 49:25 ; compare Deuteronomy 33:13-17 )
Judah, Tribe of - Judah and his three surviving sons went down with Jacob into Egypt (Genesis 46:12 ; Exodus 1:2 )
Elder, Eldest - ...
A — 3: μείζων (Strong's #3187 — Adjective — meizon — mide'-zone ) "greater," the comparative degree of megas, "great," is used of age, and translated "elder" in Romans 9:12 , with reference to Esau and Jacob
Elect - ...
Exemplified in Isaac (Genesis 21:12); Abraham (Nehemiah 9:7; Haggai 2:23); the apostles (John 13:18; John 15:16; John 15:19); Jacob (Romans 9:12-13); Paul (Galatians 1:15)
Manasseh - When he and his brother Ephraim were boys, and Jacob, their grandfather, was about to die, Joseph took them into the patriarch's presence to receive his blessing
Mizpah, Mizpeh - In Gilead, Laban and Jacob made a covenant (Genesis 31:25-55 ), set up a pillar, and named it Mitzap (Genesis 31:49 )
Ship - It was among the prophecies of the dying patriarch Jacob, (Genesis 49:13) that Zebulun should dwell in "the haven of the sea, and be an haven for ships" And how distant soever this allusion may appear to some concerning the days of Christ, and the eventual dispersion of the gospel to the Gentile islands of the sea, yet from subsequent prophecies to the same amount, when illustrated by each other, I confess that I am inclined to believe that some great maritime power, such as our own, may be fairly referred to in the several prophecies to this amount
Firstfruits - The offerer added: "A Syrian (Jacob) ready to perish was my father, and he went down into Egypt," etc
Soul, Spirit - Soul is often employed to express the moral undying part of man's being, and it is used sometimes to signify the person: as "all the souls that came with Jacob into Egypt," Genesis 46:26 ; "eight souls" were saved in the ark
Face - (Psalms 34:16) So again, the patriarch Jacob, speaking to his son Joseph, said, "I had not thought to see thy face;" that is, thy person; "and lo! God hath shewed me thy seed
Choose - 21:6); “ye children of Jacob, his chosen ones” ( Ram - Consequently, as highly valuable animals, such “rams” were selected by Jacob to be part of a peace present sent to Esau ( Woman - 22:24) it appears to connote “bride” or “betrothed one”: “And Jacob said unto Laban, Give me my wife, for my days are fulfilled, that I may go in unto her
Seven - Jacob served his father-in-law Laban seven years for each of his daughters
Testament - But Jacob made the sons whom he had by his concubines heirs as well as the others, Genesis 21:8-21 ; Genesis 25:1-6 ; Genesis 49:1-27
Genealogy - The promise of the land of Canaan to the seed of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob successively, and the separation of the Israelites from the Gentile world; the expectation of Messiah as to spring from the tribe of Judah; the exclusively hereditary priesthood of Aaron with its dignity and emoluments; the long succession of kings in the line of David; and the whole division and occupations of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, occupation of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, families and houses of fathers, gave a deeper importance to the science of genealogy among the Jews than perhaps any other nation
Edom - Name given to Esau because he craved the red pottage of Jacob, Edom signifying red, Genesis 25:30 ; Genesis 36:1,8,19 ; but the name is more usually given to his tribe and the territory they possessed
Zebulun - According to OT tradition, Zebulun was the tenth son of Jacob, and the sixth of Leah ( Genesis 30:20 E
According to Genesis 46:14 , Zebulun is the progenitor of three tribal families through his three sons Sered, Elon, and Jahleel, who went down into Egypt with the other sons and grandsons of Jacob. Jacob’s Song, however, uses the same expression ( Genesis 49:13 ) as is used of Asher in Judges 5:17 , and apparently extends the border to Sidon
Adoption - ) Natural: As Pharaoh's daughter adopted Moses; Mordecai Esther; Abraham Eliezer (as a slave is often in the East adopted as son) (Genesis 15:2-3); Sarai the son to be born by Hagar, whom she gave to her husband; Leah and Rachel the children to be born of Zilpah and Bilhah, their handmaids respectively, whom they gave to Jacob their husband. Jacob adopted as his own Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, on the same footing as Reuben and Simeon, his two elder sons (Genesis 48:5)
Servant of the Lord, the - “But thou, Israel, art my servant, Jacob, whom I have chosen, the seed of Abraham my friend. Not only is He to bring judgment to all the world—He is “to bring Jacob again to him” ( Isaiah 49:5 ) and “to restore the preserved of Israel” (Isaiah 49:6 )
Gad (1) - Jacob's seventh son; Leah's maid Zilpah's firstborn; Asher's brother. Like Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, of the tribes they two alone remained shepherds still after the intervening centuries since Jacob left Canaan for Egypt
Go Down - 28:12, Jacob saw a “ladder set up on the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven: and behold the angels of God ascending and descending on it. When Jacob mourned over Joseph whom he thought to be dead, he said: “For I will go down into the grave unto my son mourning” ( Judges, Book of - ...
Age of Isaac, when Jacob was born, Genesis 25:26 60...
" Jacob when lie stood before Pharaoh 130...
" Israel in Egypt 215...
" Israel in the wilderness 40...
" To the division of the land 7...
(about 450 years)
Israel - The nation became known as Israel, after Abraham’s grandson (originally named Jacob) whose twelve sons were the fathers of the twelve tribes of Israel (Genesis 32:28; Genesis 35:22-26; Genesis 49:1; Genesis 49:28; 1 Chronicles 1:34; 1 Chronicles 2:1-2; see Jacob)
Elijah - Jacob was a prince in the passionateness of his prayer all that night at the Jabbok. What a tempest of fear, and despair, and remorse, and self-accusation, of all indeed that was within Jacob's passionate heart. Jacob's raging passions really tore him to pieces that terrible night in his prayer. Esau wrestled with wild beasts with all his passions, but Jacob wrestled with the angel. Now, let any man among ourselves henceforth pray in his prayers like Jacob and Elijah: let any man among ourselves determine to put his passions into his prayers like Jacob and Elijah, and it will make him a new man
Exodus - Those who adopt the longer term reckon thus: ...
| Years | | From the descent of Jacob into Egypt to the | death of Joseph 71 | | From the death of Joseph to the birth of | Moses 278 | | From the birth of Moses to his flight into | Midian 40 | | From the flight of Moses to his return into | Egypt 40 | | From the return of Moses to the Exodus 1 | | 430 ...
Others contend for the shorter period of two hundred and fifteen years, holding that the period of four hundred and thirty years comprehends the years from the entrance of Abraham into Canaan (see LXX. and Samaritan) to the descent of Jacob into Egypt. They reckon thus: ...
| Years | | From Abraham's arrival in Canaan to Isaac's | birth 25 | | From Isaac's birth to that of his twin sons | Esau and Jacob 60 | | From Jacob's birth to the going down into | Egypt 130 | | (215) | | From Jacob's going down into Egypt to the | death of Joseph 71 | | From death of Joseph to the birth of Moses 64 | | From birth of Moses to the Exodus 80 | | In all
Milk - The dying Jacob, speaking to his children in allusion to the times of the gospel, describes the spiritual Judah, among other distinguishing features of character, as having "his eyes red with wine, and his teeth white as milk
Shechem - Here also Jacob "bought a parcel of a field at the hands of the children of Hamor" after his return from Mesopotamia, and settled with his household, which he purged from idolatry by burying the teraphim of his followers under an oak tree, which was afterwards called "the oak of the sorcerer" (Genesis 33:19 ; 35:4 ; Judges 9:37 )
Dan -
The fifth son of Jacob
Peter - And yet we find, in the instance of Abraham and Jacob, the Lord when he changed their names seemed to express his pleasure in calling them by those names
Samaritans - The woman of Samaria said to the Lord, "Art thou greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well?" As to their religion, she spoke of 'this mountain' as the proper place to worship; but the Lordsaid, "Ye worship ye know not what: we know what we worship: for salvation is of the Jews
Jeremiah - And who that reads this account of the servant, but must be struck with full conviction of what is said of his Master, called from the womb of eternity, and set up from everlasting to be JEHOVAH'S servant, to bring Jacob again to him
Cord - ” )...
Chebel also means “the thing measured or allotted”: “For the Lord’s portion is his people; Jacob is the lot of his inheritance” ( Seir - The posterity of Esau afterward were in possession of the mountains of Seir, and Esau himself dwelt there when Jacob returned from Mesopotamia, Genesis 33:3 ; Genesis 33:14 ; Genesis 36:8-9
Father - So the Jews in our Saviour's time called Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, their fathers
Anoint - The setting up of a stone and anointing it by Jacob, as here recorded, in grateful memory of his celestial vision, probably became the occasion of idolatry, in succeeding ages, and gave rise to the erection of temples composed of shapeless masses of unhewn stone, of which so many astonishing remains are scattered up and down the Asiatic and the European world
Appearance - , "thy face"), where it is said by God of Lot, and Genesis 33:10 , where it is said by Jacob of Esau; see also Deuteronomy 10:17 ("persons"), Leviticus 19:15 ("person")
Hind - Our translators make Jacob, prophesying of the tribe of Naphtali, say, "Naphtali is a hind let loose: he giveth goodly words
Miz'Pah -
The earliest of all, in order of the narrative, is the heap of stones piled up by Jacob and Laban, (Genesis 31:48 ) on Mount Gilead, ver
Repentance - ...
But the unconditional promises of God, as made to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, are not subject to repentance
Resurrection - Job may perhaps have learnt it (Job 19:25-27 ), and when the Lord rebuked the Sadducees He taught that resurrection could be gathered inferentially from God speaking of Himself as the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob long after they were dead
Sychar - that He came ‘to a city of Samaria called Sychar, near to the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to his son Joseph: and Jacob’s well (πηγή) was there’; John 4:11 adds the information that ‘the well (φρέαρ)’ was ‘deep. ’ Jacob’s fountain, referred to here, is one of the undisputed sites of the Gospels. Now Sychar lay ‘near’ Jacob’s ground and well, and the problem is whether it should be (1) identified with Shechem, or (2) located at the little hamlet of ‘Askar, near the foot of Ebal, about a mile N. (a) Shechem could certainly be roughly described as ‘near’ Jacob’s ground, and the disciples who went to ‘the city’ to buy bread were away during the whole of the conversation, that is, for some considerable time. Συχάρ) writes to the effect that Sychar lay ‘before Neapolis, near the piece of ground which Jacob gave to his son Joseph, where Christ, according to John, held discourse with the Samaritan woman, by the fountain: it is shown to this day
Gad - ]'>[2] ); the first son of Zilpah, Leah’s handmaid, by Jacob, and full brother of Asher (‘Happy’). Leah, unlike Rachel, who was barren until after her maid had brought forth to Jacob, had already borne four sons before Zilpah was called in to help her infirmity
Word - For example, when Isaac discovered he had been deceived and wrongly gave his blessing to Jacob, he declared that his blessing had been given and Jacob “shall be blessed” (Genesis 27:33 )
Gerizim - ]'>[1] 334, note), the place where Abraham was met by Melchizedek, and also the scene of Jacob’s dream. Gerizim, is associated with the entrance of both Abraham and Jacob into the promised land (John 4:23-24; Genesis 33:18). It was near Shechem that Jacob purchased the parcel of land from the children of Hamor, on which he erected an altar, and sank a well for his family and flocks
Angels - "The angel of God" spake unto Jacob saying, "I am the God of Bethel. Jacob, in blessing the sons of Joseph, said, "The Angel which redeemed me from all evil bless the lads
Ephraim - When the aged Jacob gave his parting blessings to his family, he gave the firstborn’s blessing to Joseph instead of to Reuben (because of Reuben’s immorality with Jacob’s concubine; Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:3-4; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2). Jacob therefore raised Joseph’s two sons to the same level as Jacob’s other sons, so that Joseph’s two sons would each have his own tribe (Genesis 48:5-6)
Hebron - Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, and Jacob and Leah were buried there (Genesis 23:19 ; Genesis 25:9 ; Genesis 35:29 ; Genesis 49:31 ; Genesis 50:13 )
Altar - Mention is made of altars reared by Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Moses
Bee - The scarcity of honey (dibash ) in Egypt is implied in Jacob's thinking "a little honey" worth including in the present sent to conciliate the Egyptian viceroy (Genesis 43:11); but it was the boiled down, thickened juice of grapes, dates, etc. , which Jacob sent Joseph, and which the Tyrians brought from Palestine (Ezekiel 27:17)
Dispersion - The following table shows how the different families were dispersed: ...
| - Japheth | - Gomer | Cimmerians, Armenians | - Magog | Caucasians, Scythians | - Madal | Medes and Persian tribes | - Javan | - Elishah | Greeks | - Tarshish | Etruscans, Romans | - Chittim | Cyprians, Macedonians | - Dodanim | Rhodians | - Tubal | Tibareni, Tartars | - Mechech | Moschi, Muscovites | - Tiras | Thracians | | - Shem | - Elam | Persian tribes | - Asshur | Assyrian | - Arphaxad | - Abraham | - Isaac | - Jacob | Hebrews | - Esau | Edomites | - Ishmael | Mingled with Arab tribes | - Lud | Lydians | - Aram | Syrians | | - Ham | - Cush | Ethiopans | - Mizrain | Egyptians | - Phut | Lybians, Mauritanians | - Canaan | Canaanites, Phoenicians ...
Elect, Elected, Election - " It is used four times in Romans; in Acts 9:11 , of Esau and Jacob, where the phrase "the purpose
Inheritance - Reuben lost preeminence because of incest with Bilhah (Genesis 35:22 ; Genesis 49:4 ; 1 Chronicles 5:1 ), and Esau surrendered his birthright to Jacob (Genesis 25:29-34 ). Jacob's sons by the maidservants Bilhah and Zilpah (Genesis 30:3-13 ) inherited (Genesis 49:1 ) because those offspring were adopted by Rachel and Leah
Negeb, - The Negeb was often the scene of Abraham’s wanderings ( Genesis 12:9 ; Genesis 13:1 ; Genesis 13:8 ; Genesis 20:1 ); here Hagar was succoured by the angel ( Genesis 16:7 ; Genesis 16:14 ); Isaac ( Genesis 24:62 ) and Jacob ( Genesis 37:1 ; Genesis 46:5 ) both dwelt there; through this district passed the spies ( Numbers 13:17 ; Numbers 13:22 )
Tithe - (Genesis 14:20 ; Hebrews 7:2,6 ) ...
Jacob, after his vision at Luz, devoting a tenth of all his property to God in case he should return home in safety (Genesis 28:22 ) The first enactment of the law in respect of tithe is the declaration that the tenth of all produce, as well as of flocks and cattle belongs to Jehovah and must be offered to him that the tithe was to be paid in kind, or, if redeemed, with an addition of one fifth to its value
Servant, Service - ...
Many persons in the Old Testament are called "servants, " among them Abraham (Genesis 26:24 ), Jacob (Genesis 32:4 ), Joshua (Joshua 24:29 ), Ruth (Ruth 3:9 ), Hannah (1 Samuel 1:11 ), Samuel (1 Samuel 3:9 ), Jesse (1 Samuel 17:58 ), Uriah the Hittite (2 Samuel 11:21 ), Joab (2 Samuel 14:20 ), Isaiah (Isaiah 20:3 ), Daniel (Daniel 9:17 ), Ben-Hadad of Aram (1 Kings 20:32 ), and Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon (Jeremiah 25:9 )
Bone - ‛Etsem used with “flesh” can indicate a blood relationship: “And Laban said to [1], Surely thou art my bone and my flesh” ( Sinai - There are three divisions:...
(1) the southernmost, the neighbourhood of Sinai;...
(2) the desert of et Tih, the scene of Israel's wanderings;...
(3) the Νegeb , or "south country", the dwelling of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Camel - Jacob had camels as a portion of his wealth (30:43), as Abraham also had (24:35)
Garments - This was the garment God made of skins for Adam and Eve, and what Jacob made of many colours for Joseph
Pillars - Israel's covenant with Jehovah (Joshua 24:1-25-26), where also probably Jacob had buried the idol trinkets of his household (Genesis 35:4)
Shepherd - In its first appearance Jacob tells the shepherds: “Lo, it is yet high day, neither is it time that the cattle should be gathered together: water ye the sheep, and go and feed them” ( Jacob’s lips in Mountain Range - Jacob was fleeing from Laban toward the “mountains” where he thought to find protection
Ear-Rings - They wore ear-rings beside; for the household of Jacob, at his request, when they were preparing to go up to Bethel, gave him all the ear- rings which were in their ears, and he hid them under the oak which was by Shechem. The Indians say, they are preservatives against enchantment; upon which Chardin hazards a very probable conjecture, that the ear-rings of Jacob's family were perhaps of this kind, which might be the reason of his demanding them, that he might bury them under the oak before they went up to Bethel
Joseph - The son of Jacob and his beloved Rachel, born in Mesopotamia, Genesis 30:22-24 , B
Promise - Mesopotamia, a classic example being the one between Laban and Jacob (Genesis 31:43-55 ), when the latter was seeking his independence. Thus Jacob on his deathbed promised his twelve sons that the future would hold certain prospects for them, and according to contemporary custom this statutory declaration to each one of them gave the pronouncements legal force (Genesis 49:1-33 ). This proposition was ratified in a formal ceremony at Sinai (Exodus 24:3-8 ), and thereafter the sons of Jacob became the chosen people of God
Judah - The patriarch JUDAH; Jacob's fourth son, by Leah. Judah ("praise"), Leah having praised Jehovah for giving him; Jacob similarly refers to the meaning of Judah, "thou art he whom thy brethren shall praise" (Genesis 29:35; Numbers 2:3-90). Judah was the brethren's spokesman in prevailing on Jacob to let Benjamin go to Egypt, and he undertook to be surety for him (Genesis 43:3-10); and when Joseph's cup was found with Benjamin, professed their guilt and liability to bondservice, though actually innocent of stealing it, in order in oriental fashion to move pity. Though "the birthright was Joseph's" he was not registered as firstborn, because of Judah's prevalence on the threefold ground, Jacob's blessing, Judah's historic preeminence, and David the prince (1 Chronicles 28:4) being chosen from Judah. So, when Reuben forfeited his birthright by incest, Simeon and Levi by manslaughter, Judah the next oldest received from Jacob the best blessing of the older sons (Genesis 49:8-12). The "lion," the king of beasts, is Jacob's image for Judah; afterward it was his standard, with the motto "Rise up, Lord, let Thine enemies be scattered" (Targum in Pseudo Jonathan)
Independents - Jacob, in the year 1616. Jacob, who had fled from the persecution of bishop Bancroft, going to Holland, and having imparted his design of getting up a separate congregation, like those in Holland, to the most learned Puritans of those times, it was not condemned as unlawful, considering there was no prospect of a national reformation. Jacob, therefore, having summoned several of his friends together, and having obtained their consent to unite in church fellowship for enjoying the ordinances of Christ in the purest manner, they laid the foundation of the first independent church in England in the following way. Jacob was then chosen pastor by the suffrage of the brotherhood; and others were appointed to the office of deacons, with fasting and prayer, and imposition of hands
Reuben - The firstborn of Jacob by Leah, Genesis 29:32 (J
‘Reuben, thou wast my firstborn,...
My strength, and the first of my virility;...
Over-impetuous, exceedingly passionate,...
Seething like water, thou shalt not excel;...
For thou didst ascend thy father’s bed,...
Then cursed I my couch thou didst ascend
Micah - The third division is the appeal based on the foregoing, and the elect church's anticipation of God's finally forgiving His people's sin completely, and restoring Israel because of the covenant with Jacob and Abraham of old. The intimations concerning the birth of Messiah as a child and His reign in peace, and Jacob's remnant destroying adversaries as a "lion," but being "a dew from the Lord amidst many people" (Micah 4:9-5:5), correspond to Isaiah 7:14-16; Isaiah 9:6-7. Zacharias (Luke 1:72-73) reproduces the closing anticipation (Micah 7:16-20), "Thou wilt perform the truth to Jacob and the mercy to Abraham which Thou hast sworn unto our fathers from the days of old
Travel (2) - ); Jacob fleeing from his brother (Genesis 28:10); the Israelites going up to their sacred places, and later to the Temple at Jerusalem. Moses asked that the children of Israel should be permitted to go into the wilderness a three days’ journey (Exodus 5:3), and in Genesis 31:23 it is said that Laban pursued after Jacob a seven days’ journey
Levite - The Hebrew word for Levite (lew" ) indicates a descendant of Levi, the son of Jacob and Leah (Genesis 29:34 ). Thus, the prophecy of Jacob that Levi's descendants would be scattered throughout Israel (Genesis 49:5-7 ) was fulfilled, not as a curse but as a blessing (Exodus 32:29 ; Deuteronomy 33:8-9 )
Predestination - From the call of Abraham (Genesis 12:3 ) his descendants, in particular the progeny of Jacob/Israel, are predestined to fulfill the purpose that God has for them (Psalm 105:5-10 ). " In Genesis 25:23 a statement is made concerning the destinies of Jacob and Esau before they were born. Jacobs and H
Way - ”...
Second, this noun represents a “distance” (how far or how long) between two points: “And he set three days’ journey [4] betwixt himself and Jacob …” ( Jacob, and speakest, O Israel, My way is hid from the Lord, and [4]9 from my God?” In one passage derek signifies the overall course and fixed path of one’s life, or his “destiny”: “O Lord, I know that the way of man is not in himself: it is not in man that walketh to direct his steps” ( Farming - Abraham, Isaac and Jacob had moved around from place to place with their animals (Genesis 13:1-7; Genesis 26:14-22; Genesis 33:13), the family of Jacob had kept flocks and herds in Egypt (Genesis 47:1-6), and the people of Moses’ time had brought animals with them when they left Egypt for Canaan (Exodus 12:38; Deuteronomy 8:11-14)
Moses - On the invitation of Pharaoh (Genesis 45:17-25 ), Jacob and his sons went down into Egypt. Jacob and his retinue were accustomed to a shepherd's life, and on their arrival in Egypt were received with favour by the king, who assigned them the "best of the land", the land of Goshen, to dwell in. The descendants of Jacob were allowed to retain their possession of Goshen undisturbed, but after the death of Joseph their position was not so favourable
Shepherds - The sacred writers very often speak of kings under the name of shepherds, and compare the royal sceptre to the shepherd's crook: "He chose David also his servant, and took him from the sheep folds; from following the ewes great with young, he brought him to feed Jacob his people, and Israel his inheritance. The patriarch Jacob, though he was the son of a shepherd prince, kept the flocks of Laban, his maternal uncle; and his own sons followed the same business, both in Mesopotamia, and after his return to the land of Canaan. " From the present which Jacob made to his brother Esau, consisting of five hundred and eighty head of different sorts, we may form some idea of the countless numbers of great and small cattle which he had acquired in the service of Laban
Circumcision - Paul says, "By faith he sojourned in the land of promise, dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob, the heirs with him of the same promise;" but this "faith" did not respect the fulfilment of the temporal promise; for St. This covenant with Abraham, therefore, although it respected a natural seed, Isaac, from whom a numerous progeny was to spring; and an earthly inheritance provided for this issue, the land of Canaan; and a special covenant relation with the descendants of Isaac, through the line of Jacob, to whom Jehovah was to be "a God," visibly and specially, and they a visible and "peculiar people;" yet was, under all these temporal, earthly, and external advantages, but a higher and spiritual grace embodying itself under these circumstances, as types of a dispensation of salvation and eternal life, to all who should follow the faith of Abraham, whose justification before God was the pattern of the justification of every man, whether Jew or Gentile, in all ages. The spiritual promises of the covenant continued unrestricted to all the descendants of Abraham, whether by Isaac or by Ishmael; and still lower down, to the descendants of Esau as well as to those of Jacob. But over the temporal branch of the covenant, and the external religious privileges arising out of it, God exercised a rightful sovereignty, and expressly restricted them first to the line of Isaac, and then to that of Jacob, with whose descendants he entered into special covenant by the ministry of Moses. ) It might be practiced and enjoined as the sign and seal of the Mosaic covenant, which was still the Abrahamic covenant with its spiritual blessings, but with restriction of its temporal promises and special ecclesiastical privileges to the line of Jacob, with a law of observances which was obligatory upon all entering that covenant by circumcision
Names Titles And Offices of Christ - ...
Mighty One of Jacob, Isaiah 60:16
Bashan - ...
The name "Gilead," connected with the history of the patriarch Jacob (Genesis 31:47-48), supplanted "Bashan," including Bashan as well as the region originally called "Gilead," After the return from Babylon Bashan was divided into...
(1) Gaulanitis or Jaulan, the most western, on the sea of Galilee, and lake Merom, and rising to a table land 3,000 ft
Brother - "Knew her not until" does not necessarily imply he even then knew her; compare Genesis 28:15, "I will not leave thee until I have done," not meaning He would leave Jacob even then
Fear - Jacob describes the Lord as the "Fear of Isaac" his father (Genesis 31:42 ; cf
Hand - "Laying on of hands" was usual in blessing; as the Lord Jesus blessing the infants (Mark 10:16), Jacob blessing Ephraim and Manasseh (Genesis 48:14); also in laying guilt and punishment upon persons accused (Deuteronomy 13:9; Deuteronomy 17:7); also in constituting magistrates, as Moses did in appointing Joshua his successor (Numbers 27:18); also setting apart the Levites (Numbers 8:10)
Nile River - The eastern edge of the Delta is the site of the land of Goshen where Jacob/Israel and his descendents were settled
Grave - Jacob set up a pillar to mark Rachel's tomb (Genesis 35:20 )
Laying on of Hands - Just as Jacob blesses Joseph's children by the imposition of hands (Acts 6:3-6 ), so Jesus takes little children in his arms, places his hands on them, and blesses them (Mark 10:13-15 ; cf
Water - "...
In other passages of Scripture, the following are said metaphorically to be "water": God's help (Isaiah 8:6 : "the gently flowing waters of Shiloah" ); God's judgment (Isaiah 28:17 : "water will overflow your hiding place" ); man's words (Proverbs 18:4 : "The words of man's mouth are deep waters" ); man's purposes (Proverbs 20:5 : "The purposes of a man's heart are deep waters" ); an adulterous woman (Proverbs 9:17 : "Stolen water is sweet" ); and a person's posterity (Isaiah 48:1 : "Listen to this, O house of Jacob, who are called by the name of Israel and have come forth out of the line [1] of Judah" )
Arise - When Scripture says that "[1] rose up, and passed over the [2] river" ( Aphraat (Aphrahat, Farhad - Either at his baptism or consecration he adopted the name Jacob in addition to his own, and for this reason his works have sometimes been attributed to better-known namesakes
Morning - In the “morning” Jacob saw that his bride was Leah rather than Rachel ( Hear - 29:13 contains one occurrence: “And it came to pass, when Laban heard the tidings [2] of Jacob his sister’s son
Flesh - ”...
Flesh sometimes means “blood relative”: “And Laban said to him [6], Surely thou art my bone and my flesh” ( Sacrifice - 31:54: “Then Jacob offered sacrifice upon the mount, and called his brethren to eat bread: and they did eat bread, and tarried all night in the mount
Elders - When Moses was sent into Egypt to deliver Israel, he assembled the elders of Israel, and told them that the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, had appeared to him, Exodus 3:15 ; Exodus 4:29 , &c
Anointing - Thus Jacob anointed a pillar at Bethel, Genesis 31:13; and at the introduction of the Mosaic economy, the tabernacle and all its furniture were consecrated by anointing
Exodus, the, - 7 (C) If we make the 430 years to include only the bondage in Egypt, we must place the whole chronology of Abraham and the immigration of Jacob into Egypt some 200 years earlier, or else the Exodus 200 years later, or B
Mourning - In the case of Jacob it was seventy days, (Genesis 50:3 ) of Aaron, (Numbers 20:29 ) and Moses, Deuteronomy 34:8 thirty. A further period of seven days in Jacob's case
Servant of the Lord - is probably not a saying of the prophet Jeremiah’s, and in Ezekiel 37:25 ; Ezekiel 28:25 , sometimes cited as parallel, the phrase is used of an individual of the past, the patriarch Jacob, not of the nation of the present. ]'>[2] in Isaiah 49:5 is grammatically correct, it is not necessary; other grammatically correct translations are: ‘and now Jahweh that formed me to be his servant hath determined to bring back Jacob again to himself, and that Israel should be gathered to him,’ or ‘and now saith Jahweh that formed me from the womb to be his servant in that he brought Jacob again to him, and drew Israel unto him. The Hebrew is extremely awkward and questionable, but literally translated Isaiah 49:6 runs: ‘(a) lighter (thing) than thy being my servant is the raising up of the tribes of Jacob and the restoring of the preserved of Israel, and I will give thee for a light of the nations,’ etc
Simeon - ) Jacob's second son by Leah, Genesis 29:33. Levi's and Simeon's slaughter of the Shechemites (Genesis 34:25; Genesis 34:30) incurred Jacob's reproof (Genesis 49:5-7). Simeon was doomed by Jacob to be "scattered in Israel" (Genesis 49:7); its sins caused its reduction to such small numbers as found adequate territory within Judah (Joshua 19:2-9). "Just and devout, waiting (like the dying Jacob, Genesis 49:18) for the consolation of Israel" (promised in Isaiah 40), and having upon him "the Holy Spirit," who "revealed that he should not see death before he had seen the Lord's Christ. " When Jesus' parents brought Him into the temple to redeem Him as the firstborn with five shekels according to the law (Numbers 18:15), and to present Him to the Lord, Simeon took Him up in his arms, and blessing God said, "Lord, now Thou dost let Thy servant depart in peace (not a prayer, but a thanksgiving; again like Jacob, Genesis 46:30); for mine eyes (not another, Job 19:27) have seen (1 John 1:1) Thy (Isaiah 28:16; Luke 3:6) salvation: which Thou hast prepared before the face of all people (the universality of the gospel): a light to lighten the Gentiles (Isaiah 9:2), and (not only light, but also) the glory of Thy people Israel" (Isaiah 60:1-3)
Jews - (Hebrew: Yehudi) ...
A name which at first was restricted to the subjects of the Kingdom of Juda, but which after the Babylonian exile became the common name for the race descended from Jacob and for the followers of the Mosaic religion. Jacob, his grandson, during a famine moved with his family to Egypt, where his descendants in the course of about 400 years multiplied rapidly; but when persecuted by the Egyptians, they were led out of Egypt, at God's command, by Moses, who likewise organized them into a theocratic nation
Jew - The Hebrew people were descended directly from Abram, Genesis 12:1, through Isaac and Jacob, and are frequently called the "seed of Abraham," Psalms 105:6; John 8:37, or "children of Abraham," Galatians 3:7, or "children of Israel," Exodus 1:13. And so all Israel shall be saved: as it is written, There shall come out of Sion the Deliverer, and shall turn away ungodliness from Jacob
Gather - When Jacob blessed his sons, for example, he “summoned” them to him and then told them to gather around closer ( Jacob “gathered up his feet into the bed” ( Star of the Magi - ...
A somewhat more difficult question than that about the appearance of the star is, Why did the wise men connect it with the birth of a king of the Jews? The traditional answer to this question is that there had been handed down from generation to generation among the wise men of Babylon a knowledge of Balaam’s prophecy, ‘There shall come forth a star out of Jacob’ (Numbers 24:17 ), and that, when this notable star appeared, it was considered to be the herald of the appearance of a great person
Vows - Vows were made from a variety of motives: Jacob vows a vow according to which he will please Jahweh by becoming His worshipper, on condition that Jahweh will keep him safe during his journey and give him food and raiment ( Genesis 28:20-22 )
Jordan River - Jacob wrestled with his adversary at the ford of the Jabbok (Genesis 32:22-26 )
Beersheba - ) Here it was that Isaac lived when Jacob stole from his father the blessing already forfeited by Esau's profane sale of his birthright (Genesis 26:33; Genesis 26:27; Genesis 28:10). Long afterward, on Jacob's descent to Egypt, he halted there, sacrificed unto the God of Isaac, and had a vision of God encouraging him to go down
Aaron - First, Aaron was committed to the God of the “fathers”—Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (Exodus 3:1-6 )
Intermediate State - Because God says, "I am the God of Abraham, Israel and Jacob, " they are not dead, but living
Anoint - So Jacob anointed for a pillar the stone which had been his pillow at Bethel (Genesis 28:18)
Priest - Thus Cain and Abel, Noah, Abraham, Melchizedec, Job, Isaac, and Jacob, offered themselves their own sacrifices
Judas - The son of Jacob, "Judah" in R
Exodus, the - That might have satisfied their poor craven hearts,but it would not satisfy God, nor be according to His promise to Abraham,Isaac, and Jacob
Nahum - God had allowed Jacob to be disciplined and 'emptied out;' but now Nineveh must be dealt with
Dream - In the OT dreams are described somewhat in detail, especially those of Jacob (Genesis 28:10-22), of Joseph (Genesis 37:5-10), of Nebuchadrezzar (Daniel 2, 4), and of Daniel (Daniel 7)
Tithes - Abraham gave tithes of the spoils to Melchizedek, and Jacob vowed that he would give to God the tenth of all that God might give to him
Amos, Book of - The prophet interceded for Jacob, and Jehovah repented of the evil he was bringing on them; still judgement must follow
God - It is worthy observation, that the Lord speaking of himself to Moses, (Exodus 6:2-3) saith, "I am JEHOVAH: And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by the name of God Almighty (El Shaddai,) but by my name JEHOVAH was I not known to them
Manasseh - When Jacob blessed the two sons of Joseph he crossed his hands so that Ephraim the younger son should have the chief blessing
Walk - It may be used to emphasize that a certain thing occurred; Jacob went and got the kid his mother requested, in other words, he actually did the action ( Day - First, when used with ke (“as,” “like”), it can connote “first”: “And Jacob said, Sell me this day [4] thy birthright” ( Bless - Thus Jacob blessed his sons, Genesis xlix; and Moses, the children of Israel, Deuteronomy 33
Stone - Jacob and Laban raised such a monument upon Mount Gilead in memory of their covenant, Genesis 31:46
Gen'Esis - The whole of Genesis may be called the Bible of the posterity of Jacob; and the five Books of the Law were the first Bible of Israel as a nation
Balaam - A master of enchantments, he confesses "there is no enchantment (which can avail) against Jacob, neither any divination against Israel" (Numbers 23:23). Then Balaam, seeing God's determinate counsel, stopped seeking further enchantments, but looking at Israel in their beautiful order by tribes, he compares them to the rows of lign aloes and cedars by the waters, and foretells the advent of a Hebrew prince who should smite Moab and Edom (David, 2 Samuel 8, the type), and of the Messiah, the Star out of Jacob" (compare Revelation 22:16; Matthew 2, announced to the Gentile wise men from the E. ...
Jacob saw the dominion of the victorious Lion out of Judah attaining its perfection in Shiloh's (the Prince of peace) peaceful reign
Mary, the Virgin - ) Probably Matthan of Matthew is Matthat of Luke, and Jacob and Heli were brothers; and Heli's son Joseph, and Jacob's daughter Mary, were first cousins. Joseph, as male heir of his uncle Jacob who had one only child Mary, would marry her according to the law (Numbers 36:8). shall be really what the name means) the Son of the Highest, and the Lord God shall give Him the throne of His father David (not merely His throne in heaven whereon David never sat, but on Zion, Romans 4:17-218), and He shall reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of His kingdom there shi all be no end
Census - Of the 70 that went down to Egypt, after deducting Jacob, his 12 sons, Dinah, Zerah (Asher's daughter), Levi's three sons, the four grandsons of Judah and Benjamin, and those grandsons of Jacob who died without posterity, there remain at least 41 grandsons of Jacob who founded families, besides the Levites
Marriage - Possible traces in OT are the marriages of Jacob (Laban claims wives and children as his own, Genesis 31:31 ; Genesis 31:42 ), Moses ( Exodus 2:21 ; Exodus 4:18 ), Samson ( Judges 14:1-20 ; Judges 15:1-20 , Judges 16:4 ; there is no hint that he meant to take his wife home; his kid seems to be the sadac or customary present). So the Shechemites must be circumcised ( Genesis 34:15 ); Joseph’s sons born in Egypt are adopted by Jacob ( Genesis 48:5 ); Abimelech, the son of Gideon’s Shechemite concubine ( Judges 8:31 ), is a Shechemite ( Judges 9:1-5 ). Abraham, Jacob, the Judges, David, Solomon; 1 Chronicles 7:4 is evidence of its prevalence in Issachar; Elkanah ( 1 Samuel 1:1 f. Jacob married two sisters (cf. It might take the form of service ( Genesis 29:1-35 , Jacob; 1 Samuel 18:25 , David)
Pseudepigrapha - ...
The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs are patterned after Genesis 49:1 , the closing instructions of Jacob to his sons. Each of the sons of Jacob addressed his descendants, giving a brief survey of his life, with special attention to some sin or failure
Promise - We may define God's promise this way: the divine declaration or assurance made at first to Eve, Shem, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and then to the whole nation of Israel that: (1) He would be their God, (2) they would be His people, and (3) He would dwell in their midst. ...
The Promise and the Patriarchs For the fathers of Israel (Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob) we may speak of the promise in the singular even though it announced three significant elements
Malachi, Theology of - In a passage made famous by its quotation in Romans 9:13 , the Book of Malachi begins with the statement, "I have loved Jacob, but Esau I have hated" (1:2-3). In Romans Paul was dealing with election, and this helps us understand that to "love" Jacob was to choose Israel as his special people. Esau, though Jacob's twin brother, was the founder of Edom, a nation that God turned into a wasteland as he poured his wrath upon it (1:3-4)
Wages - The first definite engagement disregarding the special case of Jacob and Laban with stipulated wages is that of the Levite whom Micah hired as his domestic chaplain for 10 shekels a year, with ‘a suit of apparel’ and his ‘victuals’ ( Judges 17:10 )
Gate - "I had several times," says Jacob, "visited the Alhambra, the ancient palace and fortress of the Moorish kings: it is situated on the top of a hill, overlooking the city, and is surrounded by a wall of great height and thickness
Altar - Altars were erected by Abraham (Genesis 12:7 ; 13:4 ; 22:9 ), by Isaac (Genesis 26:25 ), by Jacob (33:20; 35:1,3), and by Moses (Exodus 17:15 , "Jehovah-nissi")
Judas the Galilaean - Of these, two-Jacob and Simon-were crucified by Tiberius Alexander the procurator (a
Southcotters - After this she gives us a long communication on Genesis 49:1-33 : wherein Jacob warns his sons of what should befall them in the last days, and which she applies to our present times
Call, Calling - ...
Third, “to call” is used very often in the sense of naming, whether of things (Genesis 1:5-30 ; day, night, heaven, earth; Genesis 2:19 , the animals), or of persons (Genesis 25:26 , Jacob; Genesis 30:6-24 , Jacob's sons), of a city (Luke 14:16-25 , the city of David), or of qualities (in Isaiah 35:8 a way and in Exodus 12:16 a day are called holy)
Firstborn - So Esau and Jacob (Genesis 25:23-33; Hebrews 12:16), Reuben (Genesis 49:3; 1 Chronicles 5:1)
Cloud - To come under its shadow (a ‘shadow,’ it would seem, of light, since it was νεφέλη φωτεινή) awoke in the disciples the dread felt by Jacob at Bethel
Teeth - Judah had a special place of blessing from GOD, and Jacob understood this
Shepherd - ...
The shepherds kept watches (plural in Greek, Luke 2:8, not "slumbering," Nahum 3:18) by turns at night, not on duty both night and day as Jacob (Genesis 31:40)
Gallery - " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:9)...
The reader will indulge me, I hope, with barely adding, that if such was the sweet result of Jesus being held by the church in the galleries of old, surely, believers now ought to take confidence and delight to detain the Lord in the galleries of ordinances; from whence, while they hold him fast by the lively actings of faith and prayer, like the wrestlings of their father Jacob of old, (See Genesis 32:26) they may be led by him into the chambers of rich communion, in the high privilege of near and familiar enjoyment of all covenant blessings
Archangel - " Hence, therefore, it is plain from this passage, that the angel before whom Joshua, as a type of the church, stood, was Christ, who is elsewhere called the angel of the covenant; (Malachi 3:1) the same as Jacob spake of
Nose - Yet, speaking figuratively, it may be said: “They shall teach Jacob thy judgments, and Israel thy law: they shall put incense before thee [1], and whole burnt sacrifice upon thine altar” ( Jacob’s anger was kindled against Rachel
Millennium - "All flesh shall know that I Jehovah am thy Saviour and thy Redeemer, the mighty One of Jacob
Hypostatical Union - From this tenet the successors of Eutyches derive the name of Monophysites; and from Jacob Baradaeus, who in the following century was a zealous and successful preacher of the system of the Monophysites, they are more commonly known by the name of Jacobites. The Monophysites, or Jacobites, are found chiefly near the Euphrates and Tigris; they are much less numerous than the Nestorians; and, although they profess to have corrected the errors which were supposed to adhere to the Eutychian heresy, they may be considered as having formed their peculiar opinions upon the general principles of that system
Shepherd - Rachel the bride of Jacob was a shepherdess, Genesis 29:6 ; his sons, the fathers of the tribes of Israel were shepherds, and so was David their king, Psalm 78:70-72
Cloud - To come under its shadow (a ‘shadow,’ it would seem, of light, since it was νεφέλη φωτεινή) awoke in the disciples the dread felt by Jacob at Bethel
Joseph - Jacob’s eleventh son, the elder of the two sons of Rachel; born in Haran. ...
With the return of Jacob to Hebron (Genesis 35:27 ) he ceases to be the central figure of the story, and Joseph takes his place. The severity of the famine in Canaan led Jacob to send all his sons except Benjamin ( Genesis 42:4 ) to buy corn in Egypt. ...
Goshen, a pastoral district in the Delta about forty miles north-east of Cairo, was selected for the new home of Jacob. ) Jacob lived in Egypt
Sepulchre - According to Genesis 50:13, Jacob was buried in Hebron; and, according to Joshua 24:32, Joseph was buried in Shechem. There is nothing to prevent our supposing that the bodies of all twelve of the sons of Jacob were removed to the Promised Land. This does not preclude the possibility of Jacob’s purchase of the field of Shechem from the sons of Hamor (Genesis 33:19, Joshua 24:32). of Jacob’s well, and the same distance almost due E. On the other hand, the Ḥarâm, or sacred area, which encloses the Cave of Machpelah in Hebron marks the place where Abraham and Sarah, Isaac and Rebekah, Jacob and Leah were buried
Naaman - Augustine's best book is his Confessions and John Bunyan's his Grace Abounding, and Jacob Behmen's his Way to Christ. Jacob bought his birthright by denying himself just a single mess of pottage. Oh, able to save to the uttermost, wash me, Saviour, or I die! 'How,' asks the disciple in Jacob Behmen's Supersensual Life, 'How shall I be able to subsist in all this anxiety and tribulation so as not to lose the eternal peace?' And the Master answers; 'If thou dost once every hour throw thyself by faith beyond all creatures into the abysmal mercy of God, into the sufferings of our Lord, and into the fellowship of His intercession, and yieldest thyself fully and absolutely thereunto, then thou shalt receive grace from above to rule over death and the devil, and to subdue hell and the world under thee
Family - In addition to his concubines a man might take several wives, and from familiar examples in the OT it seems that it was usual for wealthy and important personages to do so; Abraham, Jacob, David, Solomon, occur as instances. Reasons are given in explanation of the bigamy of Abraham ( Genesis 16:1-16 ) and of Jacob ( Genesis 29:23 )
Inheritance - That a father had power to transfer the birthright from the firstborn to another is implied in the cases of Ishmael and Isaac ( Genesis 21:10 ), Esau and Jacob ( Genesis 27:37 ), Reuben and Joseph ( Deuteronomy 21:15-1724 ), Adonijah and Solomon ( 1 Kings 1:11 ff. Moreover, the exceptions to the rule are presented as examples of a Divine election rather than a human preference (Isaac, Genesis 21:12 ; Jacob, Malachi 1:2-3 , Romans 9:13 ; Joseph, Genesis 49:24 ff
Pillar - The mazzçbâh set up by Jacob upon the grave of Rachel ( Genesis 35:20 ) was of this kind. Such, in the present form of the story for the probable original form, see § 4 below was the stone which Jacob set up and anointed at Bethel ( Genesis 28:18 ; Genesis 28:22 ; cf
Stars - Thus Balaam prophesied ‘There shall come forth a star out of Jacob’ ( Numbers 24:17 ), and this was afterwards interpreted as applying to the Epiphany star ( Matthew 2:2 ; see Star of the Magi); and so in 2 Peter 1:19 we read of the day-star arising in men’s hearts
Tribes of Israel - Simeon and Levi were ‘divided in Jacob and scattered in Israel’ ( Genesis 49:7 ) when the tribe of Benjamin arose, so that at that time there would be not 12 but only 11 tribes. 57, where he connects the ‘ Zwölf Söhne ’ (Jacob’s) ‘with the Zwölf Monaten ’), or whether it rests upon Solomon’s partition of the land into 12 divisions so that each might provision the royal household one month in the year ( 1 Kings 4:7 ), as Luther thinks ( ZATW Teach - It was the responsibility of the priests to interpret and “to teach” those things that had to do with ceremonial requirements and God’s judgments: “They shall teach Jacob thy judgments, and Israel thy law …” ( Nazareth - It was there Gabriel was sent from God to announce to the Virgin her coming conception of Him who shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever, and of whose kingdom there shall be no end (Luke 1:26-33)
Tithes - Jacob, on fleeing for safety to a distant land, promised to give God a tithe of his possessions if God brought him back safely (Genesis 28:20-22)
Tithes - Jacob after his Bethel vision vowed a tenth of all that God gave him, should God be with and keep him, and give him bread and raiment, and bring him again to his father's house in peace (Genesis 28:20-22)
Laying on of Hands - Jacob (“Israel”) blessed Ephraim and Manasseh by laying his hands on their heads (Genesis 48:13-20 ), and the Psalmist celebrated the Lord's protection as a blessing bestowed by God's having “laid thine hand upon me” (Psalm 139:5 )
Dan - According to the popular tradition, Dan was the fifth son of Jacob, and full brother of Naphtali, by Bilhah, Rachel’s handmaid ( Genesis 30:6 ; Genesis 30:8 ). Its feminine counterpart is Dinah (Jacob’s daughter by Leah), which as the name of the half-sister of Dan is probably reminiscent of some related clan that early lost its identity
Wicked - Râshâ‛, which is found about 30 times, usually means “wickedness”: “Remember thy servants, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; look not unto the stubborness of this people, nor to their wickedness, nor to their sin” ( Speak - 9:8: “The Lord sent a word into Jacob …” ( Send - The angel with whom Jacob wrestled said: “Let me go, for the day breaketh” ( Vessel - Thus Jacob said to Laban: “Whereas thou hast searched through all my stuff [1], what hast thou found of all thy household stuff [2]?” ( Behmenists - a name given to those mystics who adopted the explication of the mysteries of nature and grace, as given by Jacob Behmen
Vine - Jacob, in the blessing which he gave Judah, "Binding his foal unto the vine, and his ass's colt unto the choice vine, he washed his garments in wine, and his clothes in the blood of grapes," Genesis 49:11 ; he showed the abundance of vines that should fall to his lot
Egypt - It was in the time of the Hyksos that Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph entered Egypt. The exile of Joseph and the migration of Jacob to "the land of Goshen" occurred about 200 years later
Redeem - 48:16: “The angel which redeemed me [1] from all evil …” (KJV), means as in the NIV, “delivered me from all harm. Israel’s “Redeemer” is “the Holy One of Israel” (41:14), “the creator of Israel, your King” (43:14-15), “the Lord of hosts” (44:6), and “the mighty One of Jacob” (49:26)
Tombs - No sarcophagus or coffin or separate tomb structure for one individual; usually no pillar (but Jacob set one over Rachel, Genesis 35:20) or mound, no inscription or painting. The coffining and embalming of Joseph as a naturalized Egyptian, and the embalming of Jacob his father in Egypt, are exceptional cases. Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob, and Leah, have lain in the cave of Machpelah in the field so solemnly bought from Ephron the Hittite at Hebron, about 3,700 years (Genesis 23:4, etc. Jacob's "pillar" over Rachel was called matseqeth ; the tomb is qeber ; the "cave", mearah ; the "stone" at the mouth, golel
Jordan - " Jacob crossed and recrossed "this Jordan" (32:10)
Exodus, Book of - God threatened to destroy the people, but Moses pleaded for them, and asked God to remember Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Dan (1) - ) Jacob's fourth son, Bilhah's (maid of Rachel) first (Genesis 30:6), own brother to Naphtali. Jacob on his deathbed said, "Dan shall judge his people as one of the tribes of Israel" (Genesis 49:16), i. ) The judgeship of Samson may also be a fulfillment of Jacob's words (Judges 15:20). ...
Jacob's prophecy, "Dan shall be a serpent in the way,
Prayer - ...
"Jacob prayed to God, and God inclined the heart of his irritated brother, so that they met in peace and friendship (Genesis 32:24-30 ; 33:1-4 )
Firstborn - Reuben, although the son of Leah, the less favoured of Jacob’s two wives, was considered the firstborn, and lost the right only because of his sin ( Genesis 49:3 f. But Ishmael was allowed no share at all in the father’s property ( Genesis 21:10 ); and the superiority of Jacob over Esau (symbolizing the superiority of Israel over Edom) is described as having been foretold before their birth ( Genesis 25:23 ), and as brought about by Esau’s voluntary surrender of the birthright ( Genesis 25:29-34 )
Responsibility - Esau complained that Jacob "deceived" him and got the birthright, when in fact he had sold it to his brother (compare Genesis 27:36 ; with Genesis 25:27-34 )
Build - Laban complained to Jacob that he had not allowed him “to kiss my sons and my daughters” ( House - Bayith is also distinguished from temporary booths or huts: “And Jacob journeyed to Succoth, and built him a house, and made booths for his cattle …” ( Marriage - Jacob's two wives gave their handmaids to their husband, and thus he had four wives. God reckoned the twelve sons of these four women equally as sons of Jacob, and they became the heads of the twelve tribes
Tithes - Jacob imitated this piety of his grandfather, when he vowed to the Lord the tithe of all the substance he might acquire in Mesopotamia, Genesis 28:22
Music - The first mentioned of music in the times after the deluge is in the narrative of Laban's interview with Jacob, (Genesis 32:27 ) so that, whatever way it was preserved, the practice of music existed in the upland country of Syria, and of the three possible kinds of musical instruments two were known and employed to accompany the song
Mourning - That for Moses and Aaron was prolonged to thirty days, Numbers 20:29 Deuteronomy 34:8 ; and that for Jacob to seventy days, Genesis 50:3
Mourning (2) - The following is the prescribed prayer before meat to be used in the house of the mourner after burial:—...
‘Blessed art thou, O God our Lord, King of the universe, God of our Fathers, our Creator, our Redeemer, our Sanctifier, the Holy One of Jacob, the King of Life, who art good and doest good; the God of truth, the righteous Judge who judgest in righteousness, who takest the soul in judgment, and rulest alone in the universe, who doest in it according to His will, and all His ways are in Judgment, and we are His people and His servants, and in everything we are bound to praise Him and to bless Him, who shields all the calamities of Israel and will shield us in this calamity, and from this mourning will bring us to life and peace
Sin - Chaṭṭâ'th can refer to an offense against a man: “And Jacob was wroth, and chode with Laban: and Jacob answered and said to Laban, What is my trespass [16]? what is my sin, that thou hast so hotly pursued after me?” ( Jacob used two different words, he probably intended two different nuances. ”...
Ra’ may mean “bad” or unpleasant in the sense of giving pain or caming unhappiness: “And Jacob said unto Pharaoh, … Few and evil have the days of the years of my life been …” (
Tradition - Bethel, on the other hand, was significantly involved in the life of Jacob. It appears that traditions concerning Jacob had a very special meaning to those who worshiped at Bethel
Edom - ) Esau's surname, the firstborn of Isaac; Jacob's twin brother, who sold his birthright for the red pottage (of yellow brown lentils, dashim ; the cooking of which is still seen in Egyptian representations), from whence came his surname (Genesis 25:29-34). Esau, with his 400 armed men (Genesis 32:6), commenced driving out the Horites, and permanently settled in mount Seir after his father's death, yielding Canaan to Jacob, in accordance with his father's blessing. But in Psalms 47:4-56 "God Almighty" ('Εel Shaday ) had promised Jacob "kings shall come out of thy loins
Angels - Compare John 1:51, Greek (aparti ), "from this time forth ye shall see heaven open" (heretofore shut, against man by sin: Hebrews 9:8; Hebrews 10:19-20) "and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of man," as the antitypical Jacob's ladder, the center of communication between men and God, the redeemed and the angelic world; Jesus' miracles, of which mention immediately follows (John 2), are firstfruit of this newly opened communion of earth and heaven (Genesis 28:12-17). They rescued at Jehovah's command righteous Lot from doomed Sodom, Jacob from his murderous brother (Genesis 19; 32). Compare Genesis 24:7; Genesis 24:40 (the angelic guidance of Abraham's servant in choosing a wife for Isaac, and encouraging Jacob in his loneliness at Bethel on first leaving home, Genesis 28) with Revelation 22:9; Judges 13:16; Judges 13:22
Genesis - 12 50), which is again divided into three sections, corresponding to the lives of Abraham ( Genesis 12:1 to Genesis 25:18 ), Isaac ( Genesis 25:19-34 ), and Jacob (37 50); although in the last two periods the story is really occupied with the fortunes of Jacob and Joseph respectively
Samuel - Both the time and place, the manner and effect, no doubt became like Bethel to Jacob, so that he could say with the patriarch, "Surely the Lord is in this place, and I knew it not
Angel - Comp 19:1), to Jacob at Peniel (Genesis 32:24,30 ), to Joshua at Gilgal (Joshua 5:13,15 ), of the Angel of the Lord, were doubtless manifestations of the Divine presence, "foreshadowings of the incarnation," revelations before the "fulness of the time" of the Son of God
Mizpah - The name Laban gave to Galeed, the "heap of witness," the memorial of his covenant with Jacob, and the boundary landmark between them (Genesis 31:48-49; Genesis 31:52), "for he said, Jehovah watch between me and thee when we are absent one from another
Divination And Magic - Isaiah 2:6 accuses the house of Jacob of being “full of diviners from the east and of soothsayers like the Philistines” (NRSV)
Age, Old (the Aged) - " As Jacob approached death, his 147 years were summarized as "the years of his life" (Genesis 47:28 )
Ebal - Here too Jacob dwelt upon returning from Mesopotamia, and bought a field from the children of Hamer, father of Shethem, and built the altar El-elohe-Israel (Genesis 33:19-20). There is still a rocky amphitheatrical recess on the side of Ebal, and a corresponding one of the same dimensions on the side of Gerizim; probably formed for the accommodation of the people, when all Israel, their elders, officers, and judges, stood: half of them, the six blessing tribes, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Joseph, and Benjamin (sprung from Jacob's proper wives), over against Gerizim; and half, the six cursing tribes (four sprung from Zilpah and Bilhah, and Reuben the incestuous oldest and Zebulun the youngest) over against Ebal: with the ark and the priests and Levites in the center between the two mountains
Amos - , want of bread (Amos 4:6); "the excellency of Jacob" (Amos 6:8; Amos 8:7); "the high places of Isaac" (Amos 7:9), "the house of Isaac" (Amos 7:16); "he that createth the wind" (Amos 4:13)
Remember - Zâkar may have more specific connotations in certain circumstances: “Hear ye this, O house of Jacob, … which swear by the name of the Lord, … and make mention of the God of Israel …” ( Benjamin - Of all Jacob’s sons, the two born to Rachel were his favourites, Joseph and Benjamin. In giving his prophetic blessing on the future tribes of Israel, Jacob knew that the descendants of Joseph would be far more dominant than those of Benjamin (Genesis 49:22-27)
Bride - These customs appear to have been derived from a very remote antiquity; for when Eliezer of Damascus went to Mesopotamia to take a wife from thence unto his master's son, he disclosed the motives of his journey to the father and brother of Rebecca; and Hamor applied to Jacob and his sons, for their consent to the union of Dinah with his son Shechem. Thus, we find Shechem bargaining with Jacob and his sons for Dinah: "Let me find grace in your eyes, and what ye shall say unto me, I will give: ask me never so much dowry and gift, and I will give according as ye shall say unto me; but give me the damsel to wife," Genesis 34:2 . The patriarch Jacob, who came to Laban with only his staff, offered to serve him seven years for Rachel: a proposal which Laban accepted
Nathanael - In him the guile of Jacob the supplanter has given place to the righteousness which wins a victory with God. But there is a reference to Jacob’s dream (Genesis 28:12), suggested possibly by the place; for Bethel, Mahanaim, and the ford Jabbok all lay close to the route which Christ would take in going from Judaea to Galilee; and in the narrative in Genesis the ascending angels are mentioned first. What Jacob had dreamed was fulfilled in Jesus
Dan - First son born to Jacob by Rachel's maid Bilhah (Genesis 30:6 )
Devote, Devoted - Killing of Canaanites at Shechem was rebuked by Jacob using the same word for "trouble" Joshua did (Genesis 34:30 )
Manasseh - He and his brother Ephraim were afterwards adopted by Jacob as his own sons (48:1)
Behmenists - A name given to those mystics who adopt the explications of the mysteries of nature and grace, as given by Jacob Behmen
Covenant - Probably the covenanting parties eating together (which barah sometimes means) of the feast after the sacrifice entered into the idea; compare Genesis 31:46-47, Jacob and Laban
Tribes - Israel was divided into twelve tribes according to the twelve sons of Jacob (Genesis 35:22-26)
Devil, Satan, Evil, Demonic - In the Old Testament a primary emphasis is placed on the supremacy of and the power of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, who delivered the Hebrews from the slavery of Egypt
Astrology - ...
The Old Testament While some have asserted that the twelvefold blessing pronounced by Jacob on his sons ( Genesis 49:1-28 ) had some astrological significance, there is nowhere in the material any mention of the possible influence of heavenly bodies
Naphtali - Naphtali was the younger of two sons whom Rachel’s maid Bilhah bore to Jacob (Genesis 30:7-8)
Marriage - The bride was still completely veiled, so that the deception practiced on Jacob, Genesis 29:23, was not difficult
Lot - This detail not only recalls Abraham's nearly disastrous journey to Egypt to avoid the famine in Canaan (1619112869_3 ) but also foreshadows the journey that Jacob and his family would later make (Genesis 42-50 )—a journey that did have disastrous consequences (Exodus 1:8-14 )
Tithe, Tithing - Tithing as a tribute to God appeared later in Genesis when Jacob promised to give a tenth to God if he returned home safely (28:22)
Oil - ...
Jacob anointed his memorial pillar at Bethel with oil and thus sanctified it as "the house of God" (Genesis 28:18 ; 35:14 )
Martha - They were, like the brothers Jacob and Esau, utterly diverse in disposition and temperament
Hebrews - ’ The latter was the name of privilege and honour given to the race as the descendants of Jacob and the people of God’s choice
Blood - ...
Ezekiel 16:6 (a) This probably refers to the early days of Israel's history in the time of Abraham followed by the times of Isaac and Jacob
Chronology - ...
1836 Jacob born
Sabbath - Oh, that the Lord would hasten the time when "the Deliverer shall arise out of Zion, to turn away ungodliness from Jacob?" (Romans 11:26; Hosea 3:4-5)...
Borrow - " (Genesis 45:16-20) But it appears from their history, that when Jacob and his family went down to sojourn in "Egypt, they took their cattle and their goods with them
Set On, Set Up - In a related sense one “puts down” a distance or space between himself and someone else: “And he set three days’ journey betwixt himself and Jacob …” ( Stand - “To stand” something may be “to erect” something: “And Jacob set up a pillar …” ( Mesopotamia - To be treading that ground which Abraham trod, where Nahor the father of Rebecca lived, where holy Job breathed the pure air of piety and simplicity, and where Laban the father-in-law of Jacob resided, was to me a circumstance productive of delightful sensations
Hand - Jacob laid his hands on Ephraim and Manasseh, when he gave them his last blessing, Genesis 48:14
Abortion - It underlies God's curse of Cain (Genesis 4:10-11 ), is explained in God's covenant with Noah (Genesis 9:5-6 ), is exemplified in the lives of Jacob (Genesis 27:41-42 ; 32:11-12 ), Joseph (Genesis 37:21,22 , 27 ; 42:22 ), and Moses (1619112869_7 ), and finally is encoded as the sixth commandment (Exodus 20:13 ; Deuteronomy 5:17 ). '" This manifestation of divine blessing in the form of posterity is echoed in God's judgment upon the serpent ( Genesis 3:15 ), and continues as the heart of God's commitments to Abraham (Genesis 17:6,16 ; 21:1-2 ), Isaac (26:3-4,24), Jacob (28:14; 30:18,20; 33:5) and Israel (Deuteronomy 7:13 ); as the reward to Shiphrah and Puah, the Hebrew midwives, for their refusal to commit infanticide (Exodus 1:20-21 ); and as an assurance to wives who, being falsely accused of unfaithfulness, pass the ritual test for impurity (Numbers 5:28 ). Nowhere is this more clearly shown than in the prebirth rivalry between Jacob and Esau, and in the encounter between John and Jesus recorded in Luke's birth narrative. Jacob's struggle with Esau in the womb prophetically anticipated events later in life (Genesis 25:21-26 ), and when John the Baptist, as a fetus of six months, leapt in the presence of the newly conceived Jesus, he inaugurated his witness to the One who is to come (Luke 1:39-45 )
Death, Mortality - Jacob is gathered to his people at death, but not buried until at least seven weeks later (49:33; 50:3,10). ...
When Jacob says he is "going down" to Joseph (Genesis 37:35 ), he cannot be referring to a common burial since no one knew where Joseph's body was
Family Life And Relations - ...
Though every effort was expended to preserve the stability of the family, tensions existed, and the Bible makes no effort to conceal them (Abraham's quarrel with his nephew Lot, Genesis 13:5-8 ; Esau's hatred of Jacob, Genesis 27:41 ; and the favoritism shown Jacob by Rebekah, Genesis 25:28 ; 27:15-17 ). ...
Another effort to promote harmony in the family was the law forbidding marriage of sisters to the same husband (Leviticus 18:18 ), an obvious effort to avoid the sort of strife that had infected Jacob's household. Jacobson, The Social Background of the Old Testament ; H
Messiah - ...
The messianic seedline continued through Isaac and Jacob; Jacob prophesied that that line would continue through Judah (Genesis 49:8-12 ); the line continued through Boaz and Ruth (Ruth 4:16-22 ); and David was told that his son's throne would be established forever (2 Samuel 7:11b-16 ). Jesus proclaimed himself as the Messiah in Nazareth (Luke 4:16-22 ) and at Jacob's well to the Samaritan woman (John 4:24-25 )
King, Kingship - Jacob said that royalty would arise from the tribe of Judah (Genesis 49:10 ). The Lord God will give him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob forever; his kingdom will never end" (Luke 1:32-33 )
God - Scholars have attempted to understand the word relating it to the Akkadian shadu (“mountain”), as though “God” had either revealed His mighty power in association with mountain phenomena such as volcanic eruptions or that He was regarded strong and immutable, like the “everlasting hills” of the blessing of Jacob ( Jacob journeyed to Beer-sheba and offered sacrifices to the God of Isaac his father. Indeed, God omitted any mention of Abraham, stating that He was the God of Jacob’s father
Nimrod - But Jacob Behmen, Philo's Teutonic son, far outstrips his Hebrew father in the depth, pungency, directness, and boldness of his interpretations and his applications. Arguments, controversies, debates, disputes, even when they are true and needful, have always something of Babel in them; and they who must engage in them will have need of another and a better life outside of them, beneath them, and above them, as Jacob Behmen had
Houses - Thus Jacob addressed his undutiful son, in his last benediction: "Thou wentest up to thy father's bed,—he went up to my couch," Genesis 49:4 . And the Psalmist sware unto the Lord, and vowed unto the mighty God of Jacob, "Surely I will not come into the tabernacle of my house, nor go up into my bed, until I find out a place for the Lord," Psalms 132:3
Bible, Egypt in the - Egypt first appears in the Bible as a land of plenty, whither Abraham resorts at a time of famine (Genesis 12), and whither Jacob, in similar circumstances, sends his sons for buying wheat (Genesis 37-50)
Kiss - Such, I mean, as the tender kiss of Isaac with Jacob, when receiving his son's venison, Genesis 27:26
Manasseh (1) - Jacob adopted them as his own, though "horn in Egypt" and by an alien to Israel (Genesis 48:5; Genesis 48:9); "as Reuben and Simeon they shall be mine," i. patriarchal heads of tribes, as Jacob's immediate sons were; Manasseh and Ephraim gave their names to separate tribes
Magi - ) Balaam' s prophecy seems to have been known to them: "there shall come a star out of Jacob, and a scepter shall arise out of Israel
Damascus - because of His covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, neither east He them from His presence us yet" (2 Kings 13:23)
Edom - Specifically, they identified the Ammonites and Moabites as descendants of Lot, Abraham's nephew, but the Edomites as descendants of Esau, Jacob's brother (Genesis 19:30-36 ; Genesis 36:1 ). According to the biblical writers, enmity between Israel and Edom began already with Jacob and Esau (when the former stole the latter's birthright) and was exacerbated at the time of the Israelite Exodus from Egypt (when the Edomites refused the Israelites passage through their land)
Gentiles - ...
Solomon's prayer of dedication made clear that the door was never closed to the foreigner who wished to serve the Lord (Psalm 59:1 ), and prophetic words and some Psalms depict the nations gathering to worship the God of Jacob (Psalm 86:9 ; Psalm 102:15-17 ; Isaiah 2:2-4 ; Zephaniah 3:9-10 )
Heart - Jacob, for example, seems to have suffered in his old age from weakness of the heart; a sudden failure of its action occurred on receipt of the unexpected but joyful news of Joseph’s great prosperity ( Genesis 45:26 )
Manasseh, Tribe of - Among the tribes of Israel there were two, Ephraim and Manasseh, that took their names not from Jacob’s sons but from his grandsons. ...
When Jacob determined to give the firstborn’s blessing to Joseph instead of to Reuben (for Reuben had disqualified himself by raping one of his father’s concubines; Genesis 35:22; Genesis 49:3-4; 1 Chronicles 5:1-2), he raised Joseph’s two sons to the same status as Joseph’s brothers (Genesis 48:5-6)
Tradition - Stephen to the burial of Jacob and all his children in Sychem, to Moses’ learning ‘in all the wisdom of the Egyptians,’ and to the presence of angels at the giving of the Law (Acts 7:15 f
Ointment - Jacob anointed the pillar at Bethel, and the site where God appeared to him became a holy place (Genesis 28:18 ; Genesis 35:14 )
Land, Ground - God said the same thing to Jacob ( Genesis 28:14 ): Through what God did in Abraham's family, blessing would come to all families of the inhabited earth
Hosea - They were to study how God had dealt with Jacob. Jacob's character was reproduced in his descendants
Greatness - It is used both relatively, in passages which suggest a comparison between His powers and those of such OT heroes as Jacob (John 4:12), Jonah and Solomon (Matthew 12:41-42), and Abraham or the prophets (John 8:53); and in an absolute sense, with reference to the esteem in which He was to be held in the eyes of Jehovah (Luke 1:32)
Guest - In Matthew 8:11, Luke 13:29 the final blessedness of the Kingdom of Heaven is spoken of under the figure of a feast, at which guests from the east and the west shall sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob
Hatred - ) attributes to Jahweh: ‘Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated
Absalom - He repaired thither after four (so we ought to read instead of "forty," 2 Samuel 15:7) years, under the hypocritical pretense of a vow like that of pious Jacob (compare 2 Samuel 15:8 with Genesis 28:20-21); David alludes to the hypocrisy of the rebels in Psalms 4:5
Keep, Watch, Guard - ” When Jacob told his family about his dream, “his brethren envied him; but his father observed the saying” ( Seek - 31:39 (the first biblical occurrence of the verb) Jacob points out to Laban that regarding animals lost to wild beasts, “of my hand didst thou require it
Separate - A reciprocal separation seems to be implied in the birth of Jacob and Esau: “Two nations are in thy womb, and two manner of people shall be separated from thy bowels …” ( a'Braham - Abraham lived to see the gradual accomplishment of the promise in the birth of his grandchildren Jacob and Esau, and witnessed their growth to manhood
Hebrew Language - Jacob and Laban, it is clear, by the names they gave to the cairn, or memorial of stones, spoke two different dialects; and it is nearly equally evident, that the language of Laban was the dialect of Ur of the Chaldees, the original speech of the Hebrew race
Altar - The altar which Jacob set up at Bethel, was the stone which had served him for a pillow; Gideon sacrificed on the rock before his house
Goel - The same custom exists in Arabia, and it appears to have been alluded to by Rebecca: when she learned that Esau was threatening to kill his brother Jacob, she endeavoured to send the latter out of the country, saying, "Why should I be bereft of you both in one day?" Genesis 27:15
Wells And Springs - ...
Jacob's well, at the eastern entrance of the charming valley of Shechem, is still in existence, though now little used and often nearly dry. Wilson, in 1842, sent down with ropes a Jew named Jacob, to explore the well and recover a Bible dropped into it by Rev
Egypt in the Bible - Egypt first appears in the Bible as a land of plenty, whither Abraham resorts at a time of famine (Genesis 12), and whither Jacob, in similar circumstances, sends his sons for buying wheat (Genesis 37-50)
Idol, Idolatry - Jacob after his return from Mesopotamia, required his people to reject the strange gods from among them and also the superstitious pendants worn by them in their ears, which he hid under a terebinth near Shechem
Levite - They were descended from the third son of Jacob and formed one of the tribes of Israel (Genesis 29:31-34; see LEVI)
Israel, History of - To Isaac and Rebekah were born Jacob and Esau. Jacob, having made his way back to the region of Haran, married both Leah and Rachel, daughters of Laban, the brother of Rebekah. To Jacob and his wives were born twelve sons, who, having migrated to Egypt, became the foundation for the twelve tribes and for fulfillment of the promises originally made to Abraham
Old Testament - Jacob ben Chaim, 216 in all, concerning the consonants, except two as to the mappik. Jacob, a Babylonian Jew, having collated manuscripts in the 11th century, mention 864 different readings of vowels, accents, and makkeph , and (Song of Solomon 8:6) the division of a word. Jacob ben Chaim, a Tunisian Jew
Scripture, Unity And Diversity of - The statement in Romans 9:13 , "Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated, " is best understood in terms of an established covenant with Jacob and not with Esau
Election - Further elections narrow down this line of promise Isaac, not Ishmael; Jacob, not Esau (cf. ...
Here, however, it will naturally be asked Is there not, after all, a reason for these and similar elections in the greater congruity of the object with the purpose for which it was designed? If God chose Abraham, was it not because Abraham was the best fitted among existing men for such a vocation? Was Isaac not better fitted than Ishmael, and Jacob than Esau, to be the transmitters of the promise? This leads to a remark which carries us much deeper into the nature of election
Last Day(s), Latter Days, Last Times - For the other use Jacob summoned his sons to tell them what would happen to them "in the latter days" (Genesis 49:1 ). Before Jesus was born the angel told Mary that the child she was to bear "will reign over the house of Jacob forever; his kingdom will never end" (Luke 1:33 )
Numbers, Book of - Balaam saw in his successive visions the elect people of God, and announced their sanctification (Numbers 23:8-10 ); justification ( Numbers 23:19-24 ); acceptance and consequent blessing (Numbers 24:5-9 ); the rise of a Star out of Jacob, and the destruction of the hereditary enemies of Israel. God was about to fulfil to the children of Israel His promise made to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob in grace, which abounded over all their sin, and has abounded toward His people ever since
Sanctify - 29:23-24 the verb means “to recognize God as holy,” as the only real source of truth, and to live according to His laws: “But when he [3] seeth his children, the work of mine hands, in the midst of him, they shall sanctify my name, and sanctify the Holy One of Jacob, and shall fear the God of Israel
Blessing And Cursing - When Isaac mistakenly blessed Jacob rather than Esau, he could not recall the blessing, for it existed in history (Genesis 27:18-41 ); it had acquired an identity of its own
Child, Children - All the sons and daughters of Jacob rose up to comfort him for the loss of Joseph, but he refused to be comforted ( Genesis 37:35 )
Vine - ...
"The choicest vine" (sowreq , still in Morocco called serki , the grapes have scarcely perceptible stones; Judges 16:4 mentions a town called from this choice vine Sorek) is the line of holy patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joshua, etc
Raca - ...
RACHEL, the wife of Jacob and the mother of Joseph and Benjamin, is mentioned in Matthew 2:18, in a quotation from Jeremiah 31:15
Know, Knowledge - Jacob questioned the shepherds of Haran, "Do you know Laban?" (Genesis 29:5 )
Kill, Killing - Harag [1] for the intended killing of Joseph 37:20; mut was used in Genesis 37:18 ; also see Deuteronomy 19:1-10 ; 1 Kings 11:40 ] Jacob versus Esau [2] and Cain versus Abel [3])
Field - χώρα denotes generally a region, or district of country, as ‘the region of Trachonitis’ (Luke 3:1), ‘the country of the Gadarenes’ (Mark 5:1); χωρίον is more distinctly locative, as ‘a place called Gethsemane’ (Matthew 26:36), ‘the parcel of ground that Jacob gave to Joseph’ (John 4:5), etc
Abba - Let the reader connect this with Jacob kissing his son, and the church's call unto Christ
Firstborn - So that Jacob, when a-dying, though he set aside Reuben from the right of primogeniture, for his particular offence against his father, yet still speaks of the dignity of it
Church - He is called Jacob, and Israel
Pentateuch - At this time Hoshea was king of Israel, and so far disposed to countenance the worship of the true God, that he appears to have made no opposition to the pious zeal of Hezekiah; who, with the concurrence of the whole congregation which he had assembled, sent out letters and made a proclamation, not only to his own people of Judah, 2 Chronicles 30:1 , "but to Ephraim and Manasseh and all Israel, from Beersheba even unto Dan, that they should come to the house of the Lord at Jerusalem, to keep the passover unto the Lord God of Israel; saying, Ye children of Israel, turn again to the Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and he will return to the remnant of you who are escaped out of the hands of the kings of Assyria; and be not ye like your fathers and your brethren, which trespassed against the Lord God of their fathers, who therefore gave them up to desolation as ye see
James - ‘Ιακωβος , of the same import as Jacob
Vine - To show the abundance of vines which should fall to the lot of Judah in the partition of the promised land, Jacob, in his prophetic benediction, says of this tribe, he shall be found ...
Binding his colt to the vine, ...
And to the choice vine the foal of his ass; ...
Washing his garments in wine, ...
His clothes in the blood of the grape
Music - Laban complains that his sonin-law Jacob had left him, without giving him an opportunity of sending his family away "with mirth and with songs, with tabret and with harp
Severus Sulpicius, an Historian - A modern and exhaustive notice is by Jacob Bernays, Die Chronik des Sulp
Government of the Hebrews - The posterity of Jacob, while remaining in Egypt, maintained, notwithstanding the augmentation of their numbers, that patriarchal form of government which is so prevalent among the nomades. The posterity of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were set apart and destined to the great object of preserving and transmitting the true religion, Genesis 18:16-20 ; Genesis 17:9-14 ; Genesis 12:3 ; Genesis 22:18 ; Genesis 28:14 . But, although in many things each tribe existed by itself, and acted separately, yet in others they were united, and formed but one community: for all the tribes were bound together, so as to form one church and one civil community, not only by their common ancestors, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob; not only by the common promises which they had received from those ancestors; not only by the need in which they stood of mutual counsel and assistance; but also by the circumstance that God was their common King, and that they had a common tabernacle for his palace, and a common sacerdotal and Levitical order for his ministers
Money - Jacob paid 100 kesitahs for a field at Shalem (Genesis 23:18-19 margin); Chald
Phoenice - Abram originally spoke the language of Ur of the Chaldees, Aramaic, as did Laban (Genesis 11:31; Genesis 31:47); but soon his descendants, as Jacob, spoke the Canaanite or Phoenician Hebrew as their own tongue, compare Deuteronomy 26:5
Praise - A psalmist, captivated by the reality of God's choice of Jacob, exhorts, "Sing praise" (Psalm 135 ; cf
Repentance - A great prophecy/ promise is given in the Book of Isaiah: "The Redeemer will come to Zion, to those in Jacob who repent of their sins" (59:20)
Thankfulness, Thanksgiving - The families of Isaac and Jacob contended over God's blessing rather than thanking him for it
Israel - Generally the idea of privilege is associated with the use of the word, just as ‘Israel’ was originally the name of special privilege given by God to Jacob, the great ancestor of the race (Genesis 32:28; Genesis 35:10)
Betrothal - At the same time it is clear that when a woman was designated (ועד Exodus 21:8-9) by the head of her family as the future wife of another man, there was paid over by the prospective bridegroom a certain sum of money (or service, as in the case of Jacob), and a contract which was inviolable was then entered into (Genesis 34:12, Exodus 22:17)
Iniquity - 23:21: “He hath not beheld iniquity in Jacob, neither hath he seen perverseness in Israel: the Lord his God is with him, and the shout of a king is among them
Marriage - So Laban says to Jacob, respecting Leah, "Fulfill her week," Genesis 29:27
Chronology of the Biblical Period - ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
God - So one is not surprised to find him walking in the garden, addressing Adam and Eve, laying out plans to save a morally debased world, covenanting with Abraham, intervening on Moriah to spare Isaac's life, speaking to Jacob in a dream, and preserving Joseph in a foreign and hostile environment in order to procure his will for the people he had chosen to bear his name in the world. With the introduction of the patriarchs of Israel (Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob), God became known as the "God Almighty, " El Shaddai ( Genesis 17:1 ; 28:3 ; 35:11 ; 48:3 ; 49:25 ; Exodus 6:3 ; Amos 5:18-2075 ), and less frequently "God everlasting" (El Olam ), "God of seeing" (El Roi ), and "God most high, " El Elyon ( Genesis 21:33 ; 16:13 ). He is also called the "Shield of Abraham" (Genesis 15:1 ), the "Kinsman of Isaac" (Job 38:1-428 ), and the "Mighty One of Jacob" (Genesis 49:24 ). " And Exodus 3:15 equates I am with the God of the fathers: "The Lord the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacobhas sent me to you
Offering - For example, when Jacob was on his way back home after twenty years, his long-standing guilt and fear of Esau prompted him to send a rather large “present” (bribe) of goats, camels, and other animals ( Jacob directed his sons to “carry down the man a present” ( Jacob rose up early in the morning, and took the stone that he had put for his pillows, and set it up for a pillar, and poured oil upon the top of it” (1619112869_6)
Samson - Like Abraham and Sarah, like Isaac and Rebekah, like Jacob and Rachel, like Hannah, like Zacharias and Elizabeth, and like many more, it was as it were by a special and immediate act of creative power that Manoah and his wife got Samson their son at the hand of God. …'I am weary of my life!' said Rebekah to Isaac over the marriage of Esau, and in terror of a like marriage of Jacob
Word - It was the same Word that appeared to Abraham in the plain of Mamre, that was seen of Jacob at Bethel, to whom Jacob made his vow, and acknowledged as God, saying, "If God will be with me, and will keep me in this way that I go, then shall the Lord be my God," Genesis 28:20-21
Violence - Jacob describes the swords of Simeon and Levi as "weapons of violence" (Genesis 49:5 ), an apparent reference to their killing the Shechemites (Genesis 34 )
Jewels, Jewelry - The earrings buried by Jacob under the oak near Schechem may have been amulets ( Genesis 35:4 )
Appear, Appearance - God appeared to Abram (Genesis 12:7 ), Isaac (Genesis 26:2 ), and Jacob (Genesis 28:12-17 ), promising that their descendants were chosen by him
Esther, Book of - 391); Jacob of Edessa ( c Servant of the Lord - In 41:8-9 the servant is called "Israel" or "Jacob, " the "descendants of Abraham my friend
Remember, Remembrance - "I will remember my covenant with Jacob and my covenant with Abraham" (Leviticus 26:42 )
Samaria - The Pentateuch was their sole code; for their copy they claimed an antiquity and authority above any Jewish manuscript Jewish renegades joined them; hence they began to claim Jewish descent, as the Samaritan woman (John 4:12) says "Jacob our father
Moses - When God spake of consuming all the people, and making a great nation of Moses, he besought God to turn from His anger, urging what a reproach it would be forthe Egyptians to say that He had led them out only to slay them; and he reminded God of what He had sworn to His servants Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Elijah - Traversing in the close company of Elisha the spots which, however now perverted, told of certain great truths — Gilgal, of the necessity of the judgement of self, the place of circumcision — Bethel, of the faithfulness of God and the resources which are His for His own, the place where God had appeared to Jacob — Jericho, of the power of God as against all that of the enemy — they reached the Jordan through which they passed dry shod, the waters being separated hither and thither by Elijah smiting them with his mantle
Proselytes - Considering that the end justified the means, the scribes "compassed sea and land to make one proselyte," yet, when made, the Jews despised the proselyte as a "leprosy cleaving (in perversion of Isaiah 14:1) to the house of Jacob"; "no wise man would trust a proselyte to the 24th generation" (Jalkuth, Ruth f
Righteous, To Be - In Jacob’s proposal to Laban, Jacob used the word tsedâqâh to indicate the relationship
Marriage - (Psalm 19:5 ; Joel 2:16 ) The bride was still completely veiled, so that the deception practiced on Jacob, (Genesis 29:23 ) was not difficult
Priest - Cain and Abel, Noah, Abraham, and Job, Abimelech and Laban, Isaac and Jacob offered personally their own sacrifices
Elijah - Traversing in the close company of Elisha the spots which, however now perverted, told of certain great truths — Gilgal, of the necessity of the judgement of self, the place of circumcision — Bethel, of the faithfulness of God and the resources which are His for His own, the place where God had appeared to Jacob — Jericho, of the power of God as against all that of the enemy — they reached the Jordan through which they passed dry shod, the waters being separated hither and thither by Elijah smiting them with his mantle
Number - There were two great lights; men frequently had two wives (Lamech, Jacob, Elkanah); two sons (Abraham, Isaac, Joseph); two daughters (Lot, Laban, Saul). ; fourteen generations ( Matthew 1:17 ); 70 descendants of Jacob ( Exodus 1:5 ); 70 years’ captivity, etc
Election - This conviction resonates through every layer of Old Testament literature from the early awareness of Israel as “the people of Yahweh” through the Psalms (Psalm 147:19-20 , “He sheweth his word unto Jacob, his statutes and his judgments unto Israel
Dress - Jacob hereby marked Joseph, the firstborn of his darling Rachel, as successor to the primogeniture, birthright, and priesthood as head of the family, which Reuben by incest had forfeited (1 Chronicles 5:1 confirms this)
Number Systems And Number Symbolism - Jacob worked a complete cycle of years for Rachel; then, when he was given Leah instead, he worked an additional cycle of seven (Genesis 29:15-30 )
Remnant - 1-4,10b); still there is a glimmer of hope: "I will not totally destroy the house of Jacob" (v
Moses - ...
Moses is so strongly interwoven with the religious tradition involving God's plan for human salvation through Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and ultimately the Davidic Messiah, and attested to as an authoritative figure for Hebrew culture even in the New Testament period, that he could not possibly have been an invention or a fictional character used as an object of religious or social propaganda
Agriculture - While the patriarchs were in Canaan, they led a pastoral life, and little attended to tillage; Isaac and Jacob indeed tilled at times (Genesis 26:12; Genesis 37:7), but the herdsmen strove with Isaac for his wells not for his crops
Isaiah, Book of - Jehovah reasons with Jacob and Jesurun: cf
Bosom - ]'>[2] reading of Luke 7:36, which Authorized Version renders ‘sat down to meat’) with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven
Africanus, Julius - Luke are omitted by Africanus) having died childless, his uterine brother Jacob, Matthan's son, took his wife and raised up seed to him; so that the offspring Joseph was legally Heli's son as stated by St. Luke, but naturally Jacob's son as stated by St. Lastly we may notice his statement that there were still in his time remains of Jacob's terebinth at Shechem Gen_35:4 held in honour; and that Jacob's tent had been preserved in Edessa until struck by lightning in the reign of the emperor Antoninus (Elagabalus ?)
Covenant - In this manner, Abimelech, the Philistine, confirmed the covenant with Isaac, and Jacob with his father Laban, Genesis 26:26-31 ; Genesis 31:44-46 ; Genesis 31:54
Burial - This was a custom of immemorial antiquity; for the patriarch Jacob had no sooner yielded up his spirit, than his beloved Joseph, claiming for once the right of the first-born, "fell upon his face and kissed him
Idol - ...
(10) timahuh "similitude," "form "(Deuteronomy 4:12-19, where Moses forbids successively the several forms of Gentile idolatry: ancestor worship, as that of Terah (Joshua 24:2), Laban (Genesis 31:19; Genesis 31:30; Genesis 31:32), and Jacob's household (Genesis 35:2-4), to guard against which Moses' sepulchre was hidden; hero worship and relic worship (Judges 8:27; Judges 17:4; 2 Kings 18:4); nature worship, whether of the lower animals as in Egypt, or of the heavenly bodies, the sun, moon, and stars, as among the Persians). ...
The Phoenicians anointed stones (often aerolites, as that "which fell down from Jupiter," sacred to Diana of Ephesus, Acts 19:35) to various gods, like the stone anointed by Jacob (Genesis 28:18; Genesis 28:22) at Bethel, called therefore Baetylia (compare also Genesis 31:45). In Genesis 35:2, Jacob's charge to "his household and to all that were with him Put away the strange gods ('the gods of the foreigner,' the Canaanites) among you, and be clean and change your raiment," it seems surprising that idols should have had place in his household. Rachel had stolen Laban's images (teraphim ) without Jacob's knowledge (Genesis 31:32); perhaps not for worship but for their gold and silver, to balance what was withheld by him from her. " Moreover the sons of Jacob had just before (Genesis 30:34) carried away all the spoils of Shechem's city, and among them doubtless their gold and silver idols
Prayer - ...
The prototype of this wrestling or conflict with God is the story of Jacob in Genesis 32:22-32 . Jacob engages God with a perseverance that refuses to let go until Jacob's desire is met
Living (2) - The woman of Samaria was familiar with the expression, and her question was quite natural and appropriate, ‘Art thou greater than our father Jacob?’ ‘Here is an ordinary man offering to supply better water, spring water, in the place where the patriarch Jacob had been obliged to content himself with building a cistern and drinking cistern water’ (Wendt, St. The water in Jacob’s Well (wh
Surname - ]'>[3] Similar changes are recorded of Abram, Joseph, Jacob, Solomon, Daniel, Pashhur, Tophet, and even of Jahweh Himself
Predestination - ...
In a discussion of election and predestination, questions about Jacob and Esau (Romans 9:13 ) arise, as do questions about God “hardening Pharaoh's heart” (Romans 9:17-18 )
Covenant - The covenant with Abraham ( Genesis 15:18 ; Genesis 17:2-21 ) was confirmed in its promise to Isaac and Jacob ( Exodus 2:24 , Leviticus 26:42 , Psalms 105:9 f
Honor - Laban’s sons complained that “Jacob hath taken away all that was our father’s; and of that which was our father’s hath he gotten all this [4]” ( Assyria - The Assyrian king, in the might of his power, subjected the ten tribes, and carried multitudes of them into the far east; he pa