What does Inquisition mean in the Bible?

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Inquisition, Canonical
(Latin: inquirere, to investigate)
The preliminary inquiry that must be made according to canon law into any accusation against a cleric before admonishing or putting him on trial. Should the investigation justify further judicial procedure, an auditor is appointed to collect testimony for as well as against the accused. Precaution mus:t be taken against publicity and for the proper hearing of the one under investigation.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Inquisition, the
May be said to have arisen in the 12th century during the ravages of the anti-social sect, the Albigenses, whose doctrines and practises would have destroyed any community. The ordinary episcopal powers were unable to cope with the evil, while the populace took the matter into their own hands and put many of the heretics to death. The remedy for these evils on both sides was the establishment of a special tribunal, the Papal, or Roman Inquisition (1230, final form). It was a system of ecclesiastical courts for trying and punishing heresy, with jurisdiction over Catholics and fallen away Catholics alone.
In many points of its procedure, it was far in advance of the times and represented more the modern than the medieval courts. The reformation of the heretic was first sought; by admonitions or slight punishments the heretic was urged to give up his heresy. Many did. Only the relapsed or contumelious heretics were at length found guilty of heresy. The Church's part ended here; the condemned were turned over to the civilgovernment for the punishment provided in the civillaw.
The fact that the secular law prescribed death must be accepted with the realization that in the eyes of the people and the governments of those days, heresy was anarchy and high treason, and such it was in the then constitution of society. It must also be borne in mind that the criminal codes of the times were more cruel than those of our day. Leniency in criminal codes is of very recent origin; the criminal codes of France and England had about one hundred capital offenses down to the time of the French Revolution.
Like all institutions that have a human character abuses were bound to creep in. Most of these abuses occurred in the Spanish Inquisition. But even these have been grossly exaggerated. In Spain the evil was in large measure due to the great influence which the civilpower had in the administration of the Inquisition. The Inquisition has been made a bugbear for Protestants. There were faults in its workings, such must be expected, but it did tremendous good in saving the Latin Countries from anarchy. There have been few things in history about which more falsehood has been written. The methods of the Inquisition must be judged in the light of its own times and not in view of modern ideas.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Canonical Inquisition
(Latin: inquirere, to investigate)
The preliminary inquiry that must be made according to canon law into any accusation against a cleric before admonishing or putting him on trial. Should the investigation justify further judicial procedure, an auditor is appointed to collect testimony for as well as against the accused. Precaution mus:t be taken against publicity and for the proper hearing of the one under investigation.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Familiars of the Inquisition
Persons who assist in apprehending such as are accused, and carrying them to prison. They are assistants to the inquisitor, and called familiars, because they belong to his family. In some provinces of Italy they are call cross bearers; and in others the scholars of St. Peter the martyr; and wear a cross before them on the outside garment. They are properly bailiffs of the inquisition: and the vile office is esteemed so honourable, that noblemen in the kingdom of Portugal have been ambitious of belonging to it. Nor is this surprising, when it is considered that Innocent III. granted very large indulgencies and privileges to those familiars; and that the same plenary indulgence is granted by the pope to every single exercise of this office, as was granted by the Laternan council to those who succoured the Holy Land. When several persons are to be taken up at the same time, these familiars are commanded to order matters that they may know nothing of one another's being apprehended; and it is related, that a father and his three sons and three daughters, who lived together in the same house, were carried prisoners to the inquisition without knowing any thing of one another's being there till seven years afterwards, when they that were alive were released by an act of faith.
See art. ACT OF FAITH.
King James Dictionary - Inquisition
INQUISI'TION, n. s as z. L. inquisitio,inquiro. See Inquire.
1. Inquiry examination a searching or search. Psalms 9 2. Judicial inquiry official examination inquest. The justices in eyre had it formerly in charge to make inquisition concerning them by a jury of the county.
3. Examination discussion. 4. In some catholic countries, a court or tribunal established for the examination and punishment of heretics. This court was established in the twelfth century by father Dominic, who was charged by pope Innocent III. with orders to excite catholic princes and people to extirpate heretics.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Inquisition
In the church of Rome, a tribunal, in several Roman Catholic countries, erected by the popes for the examination and punishment of heretics. This court was founded in the twelfth century, under the patronage of pope Innocent, who issued out orders to excite the Catholic princes and people to extirpate heretics, to search into their number and quality, and to transmit a faithful account thereof to Rome. Hence they were called inquisitors, and gave birth to this formidable tribunal, call the Inquisition. That nothing might be wanting to render this spiritual court formidable and tremendous, the Roman pontiffs persuaded the European princes, and more especially the emperor Frederick II. and Lewis IX. king of France, not only to enact the most barbarous laws against heretics, and to commit to the flames, by the ministry of public justice, those who were pronounced such by the inquisitors, but also to maintain the inquisitors in their office, and grant them their protection in the most open and solemn manner. The edicts to this purpose issued out by Frederick II. are well known; edicts sufficient to have excited the greatest horror, and which rendered the most illustrious piety and virtue incapable of saving from the cruellest death such as had the misfortune to be disagreeable to the inquisitors.
These abominable laws were not, however, sufficient to restrain the just indignation of the people against those inhuman judges, whose barbarity was accompanied with superstition and arrogance, with a spirit of suspicion and perfidy; nay, even with temerity and imprudence. Accordingly, they were insulted by the multitude in many places, were driven in an ignominious manner out of some cities, and were put to death in others; and Conrad, of Marpurg, the first German inquisitor who derived his commission from Gregory IX. was one of the many victims that were sacrificed on this occasion to the vengeance of the public, which his incredible barbarities had raised to a dreadful degree of vehemence and fury. This diabolical tribunal takes cognizance of heresy, Judaism, Mahometanism, sodomy, and polygamy; and the people stand in so much fear of it, that parents deliver up their children, husbands their wives, and masters their servants, to its officers, without daring in the least to murmur. The prisoners are kept for a long time, till they themselves turn their own accusers, and declare the cause of their imprisonment, for which they are neither told their crime, nor confronted with witnesses.
As soon as they are imprisoned, their friends go into mourning, and speak of them as dead, not daring to solicit their pardon, lest they should be brought in as accomplices. When there is no shadow of proof against the pretended criminal, he is discharged, after suffering the most cruel tortures, a tedious and dreadful imprisonment, and the loss of the greatest part of his effects. The sentence against prisoners is pronounced publicly, and with extraordinary solemnity. In Portugal they erect a theatre capable of holding three thousand persons, in which they place a rich altar, and raise seats on each side, in the form of an amphitheatre. There the prisoners are placed, and over against them is a high chair, whither they are called one by one to hear their doom from one of the inquisitors. These unhappy persons know what they are to suffer by the clothes they wear that day; those who appear in their own clothes are discharged on paying a fine; those who have a santo benito, or strait yellow coat without sleeves, charged with St. Andrew's cross, have their lives, but forfeit all their effects; those who have the resemblance of flames made of red serge sewed upon their santo benito, without any cross, are pardoned, but threatened to be burnt if ever they relapse; but, those who, besides those flames, have on their santo benito their own picture surrounded with devils, are condemned to expire in the flames.
The inquisitors, who are ecclesiastics, do not pronounce the sentence of death, but form and read an act, in which they say, that the criminal, being convicted of such a crime, by his own confession, is with much reluctance, delivered to the secular power, to be punished according to his demerits: and this writing they give to the seven judges, who attend at the right side of the altar, and immediately pass sentence. For the conclusion of this horrid scene, see ACT OF FAITH. We rejoice however, to hear, that in many Roman Catholic countries, the inquisition is not shut. May the God of mercy and love prevent its ever being employed again!
See Baker's History of the Inquisition; and Limborch's History of the Inquisition, translated by Chandler; a View of the Inquisition in Portugal in Geddes's Tracts; Lavalle's History of the Inquisition.

Sentence search

Torment - basanos (Matthew 4:24 ), the "touch-stone" of justice; hence Inquisition by torture, and then any disease which racks and tortures the limbs
Sephardic - ) Of, pertaining to, or designating, the Jews (the Sephardim, also called Spanish or Portuguese Jews) descended from Jewish families driven from Spain by the Inquisition
Searching - Exanination severe Inquisition
Inquisition, the - The remedy for these evils on both sides was the establishment of a special tribunal, the Papal, or Roman Inquisition (1230, final form). Most of these abuses occurred in the Spanish Inquisition. In Spain the evil was in large measure due to the great influence which the civilpower had in the administration of the Inquisition. The Inquisition has been made a bugbear for Protestants. The methods of the Inquisition must be judged in the light of its own times and not in view of modern ideas
Sanbenito - , and worn by persons who had been examined by the Inquisition and were brought forth for punishment at the auto-da-fe
Cross-Bearer - Cross-bearers also denote certain officers in the Inquisition, who make a vow before the Inquisitors, or their vicars, to defend the Catholic faith, though with the loss of fortune and life
Diligent - The judges shall make diligent Inquisition
Innocent x, Pope - He was a cardinal-priest, a member of the congregations of the Council of Trent, the Inquisition, and Jurisdiction and Immunity
Andras Van Wesele - The statement that he was hampered by ecclesiastical authority and the Inquisition is erroneous, as is the charge that the Church was opposed to anatomy
Andreas Vesal - The statement that he was hampered by ecclesiastical authority and the Inquisition is erroneous, as is the charge that the Church was opposed to anatomy
Andreas Vesalius - The statement that he was hampered by ecclesiastical authority and the Inquisition is erroneous, as is the charge that the Church was opposed to anatomy
Vesal, Andreas - The statement that he was hampered by ecclesiastical authority and the Inquisition is erroneous, as is the charge that the Church was opposed to anatomy
Vesalius, Andreas - The statement that he was hampered by ecclesiastical authority and the Inquisition is erroneous, as is the charge that the Church was opposed to anatomy
Sin: Punishment of - What a diabolical invention was the 'Virgin's kiss,' once used by the fathers of the Inquisition! The victim was pushed forward to kiss the image, when, lo, its arms enclosed him in a deadly embrace, piercing his body with a hundred hidden knives
Congregation - The term has been also used for assemblies of cardinals appointed by the pope for the discharge of certain functions, after the manner of our offices and courts; such as the congregation of the Inquisition, the congregation of rites of alms, &c
Inquisition - The justices in eyre had it formerly in charge to make Inquisition concerning them by a jury of the county
Familiars of the Inquisition - They are properly bailiffs of the Inquisition: and the vile office is esteemed so honourable, that noblemen in the kingdom of Portugal have been ambitious of belonging to it. When several persons are to be taken up at the same time, these familiars are commanded to order matters that they may know nothing of one another's being apprehended; and it is related, that a father and his three sons and three daughters, who lived together in the same house, were carried prisoners to the Inquisition without knowing any thing of one another's being there till seven years afterwards, when they that were alive were released by an act of faith
Antonio de Sedella - He became a Capuchin friar, was sent to Louisiana as commissary of the Inquisition in 1779, but was deported by Governor Miro for fear of an uprising
Inquisition - Hence they were called inquisitors, and gave birth to this formidable tribunal, call the Inquisition. We rejoice however, to hear, that in many Roman Catholic countries, the Inquisition is not shut. May the God of mercy and love prevent its ever being employed again! ...
See Baker's History of the Inquisition; and Limborch's History of the Inquisition, translated by Chandler; a View of the Inquisition in Portugal in Geddes's Tracts; Lavalle's History of the Inquisition
Presentment - ) The notice taken by a grand jury of any offence from their own knowledge or observation, without any bill of indictment laid before them, as, the presentment of a nuisance, a libel, or the like; also, an Inquisition of office and indictment by a grand jury; an official accusation presented to a tribunal by the grand jury in an indictment, or the act of offering an indictment; also, the indictment itself
Sixtus iv, Pope - Reformed the Inquisition
Giordano Bruno - Imprisoned by the Roman Inquisition, he was tried, condemned, and burned at the stake for his violent denunciations of religion and abuse of the Catholic Church
Immuration - These have upon occasion been sold and exhibited as "walled-up nuns," or "victims of the Inquisition
Act of Faith - (Auto da Fe, ) in the Romish church, is a solemn day held by the Inquisition for the punishment of heretics, and the absolution of the innocent accused. The Auto da Fe may be called the last act of the Inquisitorial tragedy: it is a kind of gaol-delivery, appointed as often as a competent number of prisoners in the Inquisition are convicted of heresy, either by their own voluntary or extorted confession, or on the evidence of certain witnesses. Each prisoner is attended with a familiar of the Inquisition; and those to be burnt have also a Jesuit on each hand, who are continually preaching to them to abjure. After a sermon made up of encomiums of the Inquisition, and invectives against heretics, a priest ascends a desk near the scaffold, and, having taken the abjuration of the penitent recites the final sentence of those who are to be put to death, and delivers them to the secular arm, earnestly beseeching at the same time the secular power not to touch their blood, or put their lives in danger!!! The prisoners, being thus in the hands of the civil magistrate, are presently loaded with chains, and carried first to the secular gaol, and from thence, in an hour or two, brought before the civil judge; who, after asking in what religion they intend to die, pronounces sentence on such as declare they die in the communion of the church of Rome, that they shall be first strangled, and then burnt to ashes; or such as die in any other faith, that they be burnt alive. Let us however, rejoice that the time is coming when the demon of Persecution shall be banished out of this our world, and the true spirit of benevolence and candour pervade the universe; when none shall hurt or destroy, but the earth be filled with the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea! ...
See Inquisition
Beghards - Censured by pope, bishops, and Inquisition, they remained obstinate
Antonio Rosmini-Serbati - His ontology and natural theology and his Trattato della Coscienza were severely criticized and 40 of his propositions were condemned by the Congregation of the Inquisition in 1887
Rosmini-Serbati, Antonio - His ontology and natural theology and his Trattato della Coscienza were severely criticized and 40 of his propositions were condemned by the Congregation of the Inquisition in 1887
Domenis, Marco Antonio de - He finally came into conflict with the Inquisition, was declared a relapsed heretic, and was confined in the Castle of Sant' Angelo, where he died
Marco Antonio de Dominis - He finally came into conflict with the Inquisition, was declared a relapsed heretic, and was confined in the Castle of Sant' Angelo, where he died
Miguel de Molinos - Accused of pernicious teachings by the Jesuits and Dominicans, the Inquisition ordered his books to be examined, but acquitted him
Molinos, Miguel de - Accused of pernicious teachings by the Jesuits and Dominicans, the Inquisition ordered his books to be examined, but acquitted him
Galilei, Galileo - In answer to those who claim that the condemnation of Galileo by the Inquisition shows that the Church was opposed to the progress of science, it must be understood that neither Paul III nor Urban VIII condemned his teachings ex cathedra, and that the Inquisition is powerless to make a dogmatic decree
Galileo Galilei - In answer to those who claim that the condemnation of Galileo by the Inquisition shows that the Church was opposed to the progress of science, it must be understood that neither Paul III nor Urban VIII condemned his teachings ex cathedra, and that the Inquisition is powerless to make a dogmatic decree
Murder, Ritual - The charge of ritual murder has been discredited by papal Bulls, including those of Pope Innocent IV, Pope Gregory I, Pope Martin V, and Pope Paul III, and the Inquisition refused to give credence to such a charge when a case was referred to it by Pope Benedict XIV
Familiar - In the court of Inquisition, a person who assists in apprehending and imprisoning the accused
Ritual Murder - The charge of ritual murder has been discredited by papal Bulls, including those of Pope Innocent IV, Pope Gregory I, Pope Martin V, and Pope Paul III, and the Inquisition refused to give credence to such a charge when a case was referred to it by Pope Benedict XIV
Maria of Jesus - It was condemned by the Roman Inquisition in 1681, and by the Sorbonne in 1696; the Spanish Inquisition had previously pronounced in its favor
Agreda, Maria de - It was condemned by the Roman Inquisition in 1681, and by the Sorbonne in 1696; the Spanish Inquisition had previously pronounced in its favor
Baronius, Cesare - After the appearance of the 11th volume, containing a treatise on the Sicilian monarchy proving the papacy's claim to the suzerainty of Naples and Sicily as prior to that of Spain, the whole work was condemned by the Spanish Inquisition
Aragon - To check the invasion of Albigensian heretics the Inquisition was introduced into Spain by Jaime I the Conqueror who recovered Valencia from the Moors, 1238
Secundus, Bishop of Tigisis - Optatus says that amid the uproar of mutual incrimination [1] Purpurius of Limata taxed Secundus with tradition, because, instead of leaving his post of duty before the Inquisition, he remained until dismissed in safety, which would not have been the case unless he had purchased his safety by act of surrender
Preadamite - He was apprehended by the Inquisition in Flanders, and very roughly used, though in the service of the dauphin
Liberalism - Liberalism was condemned by the Church, explicitly and in detail in the encyclical and syllabus of Pius IX, 1864, in the Vatican Council, 1870, in the encyclicals of Leo XIII, in the allocution of Pius X, 1907, and in the decree of the Congregation of the Inquisition, 1907
Possess, Possession - " ...
B — 3: περιποίησις (Strong's #4047 — Noun Feminine — peripoiesis — per-ee-poy'-ay-sis ) "an obtaining, an Inquisition," is translated "(God's own) possession" in Ephesians 1:14 , RV, which may mean "acquisition," AV, "purchased possession;" 1 Peter 2:9 , RV, "God's own possession," AV, "a peculiar (people)
Simeon (1) - His retreat at Pella would save him from the Inquisition after descendants of the royal line of David made by Vespasian according to Eusebius (H
Middle Ages - " ...
Among the founders of these Ages, as Rand ranks them in his work on this subject, are men like, ...
Ambrose
Augustine of Hippo
Boethius
Cassiodorus
Gregory I, Saint
Jerome, Saint
Lactantius
Prudentius
There were great popes, ...
Adrian I
Agapetus I, Saint
Gregory I, Saint
Gregory II, Saint
Gregory V
Hormisdas, Saint
John VIII
John X
John XIII
Leo III, Saint
Leo IV, Saint
Sylvester II
Symmachus
Among the kings were ...
Alfred the Great
Charlemagne
Charles Martel
Edmund the Martyr, Saint
Edward the Confessor, Saint
Edward the Martyr, Saint
Heraclius
Justinian I
the Ottos
William the Conqueror
Among the churchmen were, ...
Alcuin, Saint
Aldhelm, Saint
Anschar, Saint
Becket
Bede
Columba, Saint
Gregory of Tours, Saint
Hugh of Cluny
Isidore of Seville, Saint
John Scotus
Peter Damian
Roger Bacon
Institutions owing to this period are feudalism in transition, guilds, markets, military orders, chivalry, Crusades, pilgrimages, bridge-and road-building brotherhoods, troubadours, wandering scholars, universities, Inquisition, and the perfection of the liturgy
Fratricelli - There are authentic records, from which it appears, that no less than 2000 persons were burnt by the Inquisition, from the year 1318 to the time of Innocent VI
Ages, Middle - " ...
Among the founders of these Ages, as Rand ranks them in his work on this subject, are men like, ...
Ambrose
Augustine of Hippo
Boethius
Cassiodorus
Gregory I, Saint
Jerome, Saint
Lactantius
Prudentius
There were great popes, ...
Adrian I
Agapetus I, Saint
Gregory I, Saint
Gregory II, Saint
Gregory V
Hormisdas, Saint
John VIII
John X
John XIII
Leo III, Saint
Leo IV, Saint
Sylvester II
Symmachus
Among the kings were ...
Alfred the Great
Charlemagne
Charles Martel
Edmund the Martyr, Saint
Edward the Confessor, Saint
Edward the Martyr, Saint
Heraclius
Justinian I
the Ottos
William the Conqueror
Among the churchmen were, ...
Alcuin, Saint
Aldhelm, Saint
Anschar, Saint
Becket
Bede
Columba, Saint
Gregory of Tours, Saint
Hugh of Cluny
Isidore of Seville, Saint
John Scotus
Peter Damian
Roger Bacon
Institutions owing to this period are feudalism in transition, guilds, markets, military orders, chivalry, Crusades, pilgrimages, bridge-and road-building brotherhoods, troubadours, wandering scholars, universities, Inquisition, and the perfection of the liturgy
Antichrist - As to the cruelties of Antichrist, the persecutions that have been carried on, and the miseries to which mankind have been subject, by the power of the beast, the reader ma consult the articles Inquisition and PERSECUTION
Persecution - The Inquisition, which was established in the twelfth century against the Waldenses (...
See Inquisition) was not more effectually set to work. When the Moors conquered Spain, in the eighth century, they allowed the Christians the free exercise of their religion; but in the fifteenth century, when the Moors were overcome, and Ferdinand subdued the Moriscoes, the descendants of the above Moors, many thousands were forced to be baptised, or burnt, massacred, or banished, and the children sold for slaves; besides innumerable Jews, who shared the same cruelties, chiefly by means of the infernal courts of Inquisition. To conclude this article, Who can peruse the account here given without feeling the most painful emotions, and dropping a tear over the madness and depravity of mankind? Does it not show us what human beings are capable of when influenced by superstition, bigotry, and prejudice? ...
Have not these baneful principles metamorphosed men into infernals; and entirely extinguished all the feelings of humanity, the dictates of conscience, and the voice of reason? Alas! what has sin done to make mankind such curses to one another? Merciful God! by they great power suppress this worst of all evils, and let truth and love, meekness and forbearance universally prevail! Limborch's Introduction to his History of the Inquisition; Memoirs of the Persecutions of the Protestants in France by Lewis De Enarolles; Comber's History of the Parisian Massacre of St
Reformation - The "Indices Expurgatorii," in which they pointed out the works that they condemned, and which they declared it to be heresy and pollution to peruse, increased the desire to become acquainted with them; and although some who indulged that curiosity suffered the punishment denounced by the Inquisition against the enemies of papal superstition, there was an immense proportion which even spiritual tyranny could not reach; so that the light which had been kindled daily brightened till it shone with unclouded lustre through many of the most powerful and the most refined nations of Europe
Nicodemus - He was at the head of that Temple embassy of Inquisition, and he simply could not extricate himself from the duties, and the responsibilities, and the entanglements of his office. It was surely not so very bad in itself for Nicodemus to let himself be put at the head of that Temple embassy of Inquisition upon the Baptist
Lois And Eunice - To accustom ourselves to make such an Inquisition as that, will do this at any rate-it will teach us humility at home, and that is the beginning of all true reformation there
Roman Catholics - On resuming his government, Pope Pius VII soon restored the order of Jesuits and the Inquisition; so that the Roman Catholic religion is now reinstated in its ancient splendour and authority
Joannes, Bishop of Ephesus - Numbers were accused; the prisons teemed with victims of every rank; and a permanent Inquisition was established for their trial
Song of Songs - Castellio was driven out of Geneva by Calvin for asserting it, and Luis de Leon was thrown into prison by the Inquisition for the same cause
Achan - ...
So Joshua rose early in the morning,-Joshua, like every good soldier, was an early riser,-and he brought all Israel by their tribes, and their families, and their households, that the Lord Himself might make Inquisition, and might put His finger upon the marked man
Dream (2) - Franklin told Cabanis that the bearings and issues of political events which had baffled his Inquisition when awake were not infrequently unfolded to him in his dreams
Nestorius And Nestorianism - by Portuguese Romanists, with the aid of the Inquisition; and the object of the Anglican mission to the struggling churches of Assyria—a purely educational one—has been very seriously hindered by the political protection promised, and often afforded, by Roman Catholic powers on the one hand, and by adherents of the Orthodox Russian church on the other