What does Hymenaeus mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ὑμέναιος a heretic 2

Definitions Related to Hymenaeus

G5211


   1 a heretic, one of the opponents of the apostle Paul.
   Additional Information: Hymenaeus = “belonging to marriage”.
   

Frequency of Hymenaeus (original languages)

Frequency of Hymenaeus (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Hymenaeus
(hi' meh nee' uhss) Personal name of the Greek god of marriage. Name of a fellow worker of Paul whose faith weakened and whose life-style changed, leading Paul to deliver him to Satan (1 Timothy 1:20 ). That probably means Paul led the church to dismiss Hymenaeus from the membership to purify the church, remove further temptation from the church, and to lead Hymenaeus to restored faith, repentance, and renewed church membership. Along with Philetus, Hymenaeus taught that the resurrection had already occurred (2 Timothy 2:17-18 ). See Gnosticism . Compare 1 Corinthians 5:1 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hymenaeus
HYMENÆUS . A heretical Christian associated with Alexander in 1 Timothy 1:19 f., and with Philetus in 2 Timothy 2:17 f., though some have considered that two different persons are meant. These false teachers ‘made shipwreck concerning the faith’; their heresy consisted in denying the bodily resurrection, saying that the resurrection was already past apparently an early form of Gnosticism which, starting with the idea of matter being evil, made the body an unessential part of our nature, to be discarded as soon as possible. In the former passage St. Paul says that he ‘delivered’ the offenders ‘unto Satan, that they might be taught not to blaspheme’; he uses a similar phrase of the incestuous Corinthian ( 1 Corinthians 5:5 ), there also expressing the purpose of the punishment, the salvation of the man’s spirit. The phrase may mean simple excommunication with renunciation of all fellowship, or may include a miraculous infliction of disease, or even of death. Ramsay suggests that it is a Christian adaptation of a pagan idea, when a person wronged by another, but unable to retaliate, consigned the offender to the gods and left punishment to be inflicted by Divine power.
A. J. Maclean.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Hymenaeus
"Having put away a good conscience," and so "concerning faith having made shipwreck" (for when one's faith does not better his morals, his moral defects will corrupt his faith), therefore "delivered (by Paul) to Satan to learn not to blaspheme" (1 Timothy 1:20). "Erred concerning the truth, saying that the resurrection is past already, overthrowing the faith of some" (2 Timothy 2:17-18). Satan is lord of all outside the church (Acts 26:18); he, by God's permission, afflicts saints and executes wrath on the disobedient (1 Corinthians 5:5; 2 Corinthians 12:7; Ephesians 4:27; Job 1:2). Paul, as an infallible apostle, had powers not transmitted to fallible successors (2 Corinthians 10:8; Matthew 18:17-18).
His sentence pronounced at Rome took effect on Hymenaeus at Ephesus, in the form of some bodily sickness (so Acts 5:5; Acts 5:10; Acts 13:11; 1 Corinthians 11:30), that he should learn not to blaspheme. (See EXCOMMUNICATION.) Hymenaeus after excommunication was probably restored in the interim between 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy, and troubled the church again. Gnosticism, or the pretension to extraordinary spiritual knowledge above what is written, was Hymenaeus' heresy, in concert first with Alexander, afterwards with Philetus.
The Gnostics (2 Peter 3:16) "wrested Paul's words" (Romans 6:4; Ephesians 2:6; Colossians 2:12) as though the resurrection was merely the spiritual raising of souls from the death of sin (John 5:24-25). The difficulties of the resurrection (Acts 17:32; Acts 26:8), the supposed evil inherent in matter, and the disparagement of the body, tended to this error (Colossians 2:23). Paul confutes this by showing that, besides the raising of the soul now from the death of sin, there shall be also hereafter a raising of the saint's body from the grave (John 5:28-29), as the fruit of JESUS' bodily resurrection (1 Corinthians 15).
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hymenaeus
One who had made shipwreck of faith. Paul, in his apostolic authority, had delivered him and Alexander unto Satan that they might learn not to blaspheme. He is also mentioned with Philetus, as having erred concerning the truth, saying that the resurrection had passed already (probably allegorising it), and had overthrown the faith of some. 1 Timothy 1:20 ; 2 Timothy 2:17 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Hymenaeus
Hymenaeus is a heretic mentioned in 1 Timothy 1:20 in conjunction with Alexander (q.v. [1] ) as one who had made shipwreck of the faith and, therefore, had been delivered to Satan. He is also mentioned in 2 Timothy 2:17 in conjunction with Philetus as teaching a doctrine which ate into the body of the Church like a gangrene-the doctrine that the resurrection was past already. Nothing further is known of the three teachers mentioned in the two texts, and their sole importance to the student lies in the nature of their doctrine. It came from the masters of Gnosticism, who from Simon Magus onwards had taught the inferior or evil character of matter, in opposition to the fathers of the Catholic Church, who assigned to the world a sacramental character. According to Irenaeus (adv. Haer. ii. xxxi. 2), the followers of Simon and Carpocrates taught that ‘the resurrection from the dead was simply an acquaintance with that truth which they proclaimed.’ Tertullian (de Res. Carn. xix.) charged his adversaries with alleging that even death itself was to be understood in a spiritual sense, since death was not the separation of body and soul, but ignorance of God, by reason of which man is dead to God, and is not less buried in error than he would be in the grave.
‘Wherefore that also must be held to be the resurrection, when a man is re-animated by access to the truth, and having dispersed the death of ignorance, and being endowed with new life by God, has burst forth from the sepulchre of the old man, even as the Lord likened the Scribes and Pharisees to “whited sepulchers” (Matthew 23:27). Whence it follows that they who have by faith attained to the resurrection are with the Lord after they have once put Him on in their baptism.’
The ground for this spiritualizing of death is given in a homily of Valentinus quoted by Clement Alex. (Strom. iv. 13):
‘Ye are originally immortal, and children of aeonian life, and ye willed that death should be your portion, that you might exhaust it and consume it, so that death might die in you and through you. For, when you release the world, you yourselves are not undone, but are lords over creation and over all corruption.’
According to Clement, Basilides also held that a ‘saved race’ had come down from above in order to remove death, and that the origin of this death was to be sought in the Demiurge. And a little later in the same chapter Clement tells us that the followers of Valentinus called the Catholics ‘psychical,’ as did the ‘Phrygians,’ the implication being that the Catholics thought, when death was mentioned, of the death of the body, and the Gnostics of the death of the soul. A further implication is that the moment of regeneration, or of passing through the third gate, overshadowed in the Gnostic mind the incident of physical death, as not merely giving a change of status, but as being an actual admission into the Divine world, and therefore into a world over which physical death had no jurisdiction. With this should be compared the passage in Revelation 20:5-6 which speaks of ‘the first resurrection’ and of the blessed and holy state of him who had part in it. ‘It is “the souls” of the martyrs that St. John sees alive; the resurrection is clearly spiritual and not corporeal’ (H. B. Swete, Apocalypse of St. John2, 1907, p. 266). In agreement with this we have John 5:21, which says that both Father and Son quicken the dead and raise them up; and v. 24, which declares that he who has come to put his trust in the Son hath passed out of death into life. (The clause which refers the resurrection to the last day in John 6:40; John 6:44; John 6:54 may be suspected, with J. Kreyenbühl [2], to be an interpolation.)
The delivering of Hymenaeus and Alexander to Satan is to be understood as an excommunication from the fold of grace and safety, and a consequent transition into the world outside the Church where Satan has his throne-the world of suffering, disease, and death. It is not impossible that ‘Hymenaeus’ is an ironical nickname denoting that the bearer was one who shared the Gnostic dislike of marriage, or else scoffing at the Gnostic doctrine of the mystic marriage of the soul with the spirit. Cf. Antipas, Balaam, Nicolaitans.
W. F. Cobb.

Sentence search

Philetus - See Hymenaeus
Hymeneus - (hi' meh nee' uhss) KJV spelling of Hymenaeus
Hymenaeus - That probably means Paul led the church to dismiss Hymenaeus from the membership to purify the church, remove further temptation from the church, and to lead Hymenaeus to restored faith, repentance, and renewed church membership. Along with Philetus, Hymenaeus taught that the resurrection had already occurred (2 Timothy 2:17-18 )
Philetus - Coupled with Hymenaeus as "erring" (missing the aim: estocheesan ), and holding that "the resurrection is past already" (2 Timothy 2:17), as if it were merely the spiritual raising of souls from the death of sin: perverting Romans 6:4; Ephesians 2:6; Colossians 2:12; compare 1 Corinthians 15:12, etc. (See Hymenaeus
Philetus - Amiable, with Hymenaeus, at Ephesus, said that the "resurrection was past already" (2 Timothy 2:17,18 )
Philetus - One mentioned with Hymenaeus as having taught that the resurrection was already past (probably allegorising it) by whom the faith of some had been overthrown
Hymenaeus - ...
His sentence pronounced at Rome took effect on Hymenaeus at Ephesus, in the form of some bodily sickness (so Acts 5:5; Acts 5:10; Acts 13:11; 1 Corinthians 11:30), that he should learn not to blaspheme. ) Hymenaeus after excommunication was probably restored in the interim between 1 Timothy and 2 Timothy, and troubled the church again. Gnosticism, or the pretension to extraordinary spiritual knowledge above what is written, was Hymenaeus' heresy, in concert first with Alexander, afterwards with Philetus
Phile'Tus - (beloved ) was possibly a disciple of Hymenaeus, with whom he is associated in ( 2 Timothy 2:17 ) and who is named without him in an earlier epistle
Alexander - ...
...
A coppersmith who, with Hymenaeus and others, promulgated certain heresies regarding the resurrection (1 Timothy 1:19 ; 2 Timothy 4:14 ), and made shipwreck of faith and of a good conscience
Hymenaeus - Hymenaeus is a heretic mentioned in 1 Timothy 1:20 in conjunction with Alexander (q. )...
The delivering of Hymenaeus and Alexander to Satan is to be understood as an excommunication from the fold of grace and safety, and a consequent transition into the world outside the Church where Satan has his throne-the world of suffering, disease, and death. It is not impossible that ‘Hymenaeus’ is an ironical nickname denoting that the bearer was one who shared the Gnostic dislike of marriage, or else scoffing at the Gnostic doctrine of the mystic marriage of the soul with the spirit
Alexander - A Christian convert and teacher, who along with Hymenaeus (q. Paul’s words-a reference which seems to indicate a bitter personal hostility between the two men, as well as controversial disputes on matters of doctrine which might rather connect him with 4, the associate of Hymenaeus
Excommunication - Paul individually did the same with Hymenaeus and Alexander
Timothy, the Second Epistle to - The Hymenaeus of 2 Timothy 2:17 is probably the Hymenaeus at Ephesus (1 Timothy 1:20); also "Alexander the coppersmith" (2 Timothy 4:14) seems to be the Alexander put forward by the Jews to clear themselves, not to befriend Paul, in the riot at Ephesus (Acts 19:33-34)
Alexander - excommunicated, because he withstood the apostle, and made shipwreck of faith and of good conscience, and even blasphemed, with Hymenaeus
Discipline - That the sentence is reformatory is confirmed by the fact that Paul ends the pronouncement in 1 Corinthians 5:5 with the express intent that the offender's spirit may be "saved in the day of the Lord"; similarly, 1 Timothy 1:20 notes that "Hymenaeus and Alexander were handed over to Satan to be taught not to blaspheme
Timothy, First And Second, Theology of - In 2 Timothy 2:17-18 , Paul even names two who have done this, Hymenaeus and Philetus, and states the heresy they were preaching