What does Humility mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ταπεινοφροσύνῃ the having a humble opinion of one’s self. / a deep sense of one’s (moral) littleness. / modesty 3
πραΰτητι mildness of disposition 2
ταπεινοφροσύνην the having a humble opinion of one’s self. / a deep sense of one’s (moral) littleness. / modesty 2
ταπεινοφροσύνης the having a humble opinion of one’s self. / a deep sense of one’s (moral) littleness. / modesty 2
עֲנָוָֽה humility 2
πραΰτητα mildness of disposition 1
וְעַנְוָה־ humility 1
עֲ֭נָוָה humility 1
עֲנָוָ֔ה humility 1

Definitions Related to Humility

G5012


   1 the having a humble opinion of one’s self.
   2 a deep sense of one’s (moral) littleness.
   3 modesty, Humility, lowliness of mind.
   

H6038


   1 Humility, meekness.
   

G4240


   1 mildness of disposition, gentleness of spirit, meekness.
   

H6037


   1 Humility, meekness.
      1a Humility, meekness.
      1b condescension.
      

Frequency of Humility (original languages)

Frequency of Humility (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Humility
A personal quality in which an individual shows dependence on God and respect for other persons.
Old Testament The Old Testament connects the quality of humility with Israel's lowly experience as slaves in Egypt—a poor, afflicted, and suffering people (Deuteronomy 26:6 ). The Hebrew word translated as humility is similar to another Hebrew word meaning “to be afflicted.” In Old Testament thought, humility was closely associated with individuals who were poor and afflicted ( 2 Samuel 22:28 ).
What God desires most is not outward sacrifices but a humble spirit (Psalm 51:17 ; Micah 6:8 ). Such a humble spirit shows itself in several ways: (1) a recognition of one's sinfulness before a holy God (Isaiah 6:5 ); (2) obedience to God (Deuteronomy 8:2 ); and (3) submission to God (2 Kings 22:19 ; 2 Chronicles 34:37 ).
The Old Testament promised blessings to those who were humble: (1) wisdom (Proverbs 11:2 ); (2) good tidings (Isaiah 61:1 ); and (3) honor (Proverbs 15:33 ).
The experience of many kings indicated that those who humble themselves before God will be exalted (1 Kings 21:29 ; 2 Kings 22:19 ; 2 Chronicles 32:26 ; 2Chronicles 33:12;2 Chronicles 19:1 ). Those who do not humble themselves before God will be afflicted (2 Chronicles 33:23 ; 2 Chronicles 36:12 ). The pathway to revival is the way of humility (2 Chronicles 7:14 ).
New Testament Jesus Christ's life provides the best example of what it means to have humility (Matthew 11:29 ; 1 Corinthians 4:21 ; Philippians 2:1-11 ). Jesus preached and taught often about the need for humility (Matthew 23:12 ; Mark 9:35 ; Luke 14:11 ; Luke 18:14 ). He urged those who desired to live by Kingdom standards to practice humility (Matthew 18:1 ; Matthew 23:12 ).
The person with humility does not look down on others (Matthew 18:4 ; Luke 14:11 ). Humility in the New Testament is closely connected with the quality of “meekness” (Matthew 5:5 ). While God resists those who are proud, He provides grace for the humble (James 4:6 ). Primary in the New Testament is the conviction that one who has humility will not be overly concerned about his or her prestige (Matthew 18:4 ; Matthew 23:12 ; Romans 12:16 ; 2 Corinthians 11:7 ).
Paul believed that quality relationships with other people, especially those who had erred spiritually, hinged on the presence of meekness or humility (1 Corinthians 4:21 ; Galatians 6:1 ; 2 Timothy 2:25 ). The New Testament affirms, as does the Old Testament, that God will exalt those who are humble and bring low those who are proud (Luke 1:52 ; James 4:10 ; 1 Peter 5:6 ). The Greek world abhorred the quality of meekness or humility, but the Christian community believed these qualities were worthy (2 Corinthians 10:18 ; Colossians 3:12 ; Ephesians 4:2 ).
Gary Hardin
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Humility
A prominent Christian grace (Romans 12:3 ; 15:17,18 ; 1 Corinthians 3:5-7 ; 2 co 3:5 ; Philippians 4:11-13 ). It is a state of mind well pleasing to God (1 Peter 3:4 ); it preserves the soul in tranquillity (Psalm 69:32,33 ), and makes us patient under trials (Job 1:22 ). Christ has set us an example of humility (Philippians 2:6-8 ). We should be led thereto by a remembrance of our sins (Lamentations 3:39 ), and by the thought that it is the way to honour (Proverbs 16:18 ), and that the greatest promises are made to the humble (Psalm 147:6 ; Isaiah 57:15 ; 66:2 ; 1 Peter 5:5 ). It is a "great paradox in Christianity that it makes humility the avenue to glory."
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Humility
A disposition of mind wherein a person has a low opinion of himself and his advantages. It is a branch of internal worship, or of experimental religion and godliness. It is the effect of divine grace operating on the soul, and always characterises the true Christian. The heathen philosophers were so little acquainted with this virtue, that they had no name for it: what they meant by the word we use, was meanness and baseness of mind. To consider this grace a little more particularly, it may be observed,
1.That humility does not oblige a man to wrong the truth, or himself, by entertaining a meaner or worse opinion of himself than he deserves.—
2.Nor does it oblige a man, right or wrong, to give every body else the preference to himself. A wise man cannot believe himself inferior to the ignorant multitude; nor the virtuous man that he is not so good as those whose lives are vicious.—
3.Nor does it oblige a man to treat himself with contempt in his words or actions: it looks more like affectation than humility, when a man says such things in his own dispraise as others know, or he himself believes, to be false: and it is plain, also, that this is often done merely as a bait to catch the praises of others.
Humility consists,
1.In not attributing to ourselves any excellence or good which we have not.—
2.In not over-rating any thing we do.—
3.In not taking an immoderate delight in ourselves.—
4.In not assuming more of the praise of a quality or action than belongs to us.—
5.In an inward sense of our many imperfections and sins.—
6.In ascribing all we have and are to the grace of God.
True humility will express itself,
1.By the modesty of our appearance. The humble man will consider his age, abilities, character, function, &c. and act accordingly.—
2.By the modesty of our pursuits. We shall not aim at any thing above our strength, but prefer a good to a great name.—
3.It will express itself by the modesty of our conversation and behaviour: we shall not be loquacious, obstinate, forward, envious, discontented, or ambitious.
The advantages of humility are numerous:
1.It is well pleasing to God, 1 Peter 3:4 .—
2.It has great influence on us in the performance of all other duties, praying, hearing, converse, &c.—
3.It indicates that more grace shall be given, James 4:6 . Psalms 25:9
4.It preserves the soul in great tranquility and contentment, Psalms 69:32 ; Psalms 33:1-22
5.It makes us patient and resigned under afflictions, Job 1:22
6.It inables us to exercise moderation in every thing.
To obtain this excellent spirit we should remember,
1.The example of Christ, Philippians 2:6-8
2.That heaven is a place of humility, Revelation 5:8
3.That our sins are numerous, and deserve the greatest punishment, Lamentations 3:39
4.That humility is the way to honour, Proverbs 16:18
5.That the greatest promises of good are made to the humble, Is. 57: 15, 56: 2. 1 Peter 5:5 . Psalms 147:6 . Matthew 5:5 .
Grove's Mor. Phil. vol. 2: p. 286; Evan's Christian Temper, vol. 1: ser. 1; Watts on Humility; Baxter's Christian Directory, 5: 1. p. 496; Hale's Cont. p. 110; Gill's Body of Div. p. 151, vol. 3: Walker's Ser. 4: ser. 3.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Humility And Cheerpulness
Observe the peculiar characters of the grass which adapt it especially for the service of man, are its apparent humility and cheerfulness. Its humility, in that it seems created only for lowest service, appointed to be trodden on, and fed upon. Its cheerfulness, in that it seems to exult under all kinds of violence and suffering. You roll it, and it is the stronger the next day; you mow it, and it multiplies its shoots, as if it were grateful; you tread upon it, and it only sends up richer perfume. Spring comes, and it rejoices with all the earth, glowing with variegated flame of flowers, waving in soft depth of fruitful strength. Winter comes, and though it will not mock its fellow plants by growing then, it will not pine and mourn, and turn colourless or leafless as they. It .is always green, and is only the brighter and gayer for the hoarfrost.'
So Ruskin poetically writes of the grass; should it not be thus with believers? Their flesh is like to grass for perishing, it were well if their spirits were like to grass for humility and cheerfulness in service.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Humility (2)
The whole Roman language, even with all the improvements of the Augustan age, does not afford so much as a name for humility (the word from whence we borrow this, as is well known, bearing in Latin a quite different meaning), no, nor was one found in all the copious language of the Greeks, till it was made by the great Apostle.–John Wesley.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Humility (2)
The whole Roman language, even with all the improvements of the Augustan age, does not afford so much as a name for humility (the word from whence we borrow this, as is well known, bearing in Latin a quite different meaning), no, nor was one found in all the copious language of the Greeks, till it was made by the great Apostle.–John Wesley.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Humility
Wise men know their own ignorance and are ever ready to learn. Humility is the child of knowledge. Michael Angelo was found by the Cardinal Earnese walking in solitude amid the ruins of the Coliseum, and when he expressed his surprise, the great artist answered, 'I go yet to school that I may continue to learn.' Who among us can after this talk of finishing our education? We have need to learn of all around us. He must be very foolish who cannot tell us something; or more likely we must be more foolish not to be able to learn of him.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Humility
A moral virtue which restrains the inordinate appetite for high things. Its foundation is the knowledge of ourselves and of our relations to God. The former recognizes our natural weakness, checking presumption; and our defects and sins, forbidding self-exaltation over others. The latter acknowledges our subjection to God's law and His providence, inclining to submission to creatures for God's sake. Thus humility is necessary for salvation. "Unless you become as little children you shall not enter the Kingdom of Heaven" (Matthew 18).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Humility
HUMILITY . Trench defines ‘humility’ as the esteeming of ourselves small, inasmuch as we are so; the thinking truly, and because truly, therefore lowlily, of ourselves. Alford, Ellicott, Salmond, Vincent, and many others agree. It is an inadequate and faulty definition. A man may be small and may realize his smallness, and yet be far from being humble. His spirit may be full of envy instead of humility. He may be depressed in spirit because he sees his own meanness and general worthlessness, and yet he may be as rebellious against his lot or his constitutional proclivities as he is clearly cognizant of them. Low-mindedness is not lowly-mindedness. The exhortation of Philippians 2:3 does not mean that every man ought to think that everybody else is better than himself in moral character, or in outward conduct, or in natural or inherited powers. That would be impossible in some cases and untruthful in many others. It is not an exhortation to either an impossibility or an untruthfulness. A better definition of the Christian grace of humility is found in the union of highest self-respect with uttermost abandon of sacrifice in service. A man who knows his own superior worth and yet is willing to serve his inferiors in Christian love is a humble man. The classic example in the NT is John 13:3-15 . The Lord, knowing that the Father had given all things into His hands, and that He came forth from God and would go again unto God, knowing His incomparable superiority to every one in that company, was yet so meek and lowly in heart, so humble in spirit and ready for service, that He girded Himself with a towel and washed the disciples’ feet. The consciousness of His own transcendent worth was in no respect inconsistent with His humility. Genuine humility leads the strong to serve the weak. It never underestimates its own worth, but in utter unselfishness it is ready to sacrifice its own claims at any moment for the general good. Genuine humility loses all its self-conceit but never loses its self-respect. It is consistent with the highest dignity of character and life. Hence we may rightly call the Incarnation the Humiliation of Christ. He stood at the head of the heavenly hierarchies. He was equal with God. There was no dignity in the universe like unto His. Yet He humbled Himself to become a man. He made Himself of no reputation. He came not to be ministered unto, but to minister. He was the servant of all. There was no humility in the universe like unto His. He never forgot His dignity. When Pilate asked Him if He were a king, He answered that He was. He stood in kingly majesty before the mob, in kingly serenity before the magistrates; He hung as King upon the cross. Yet He never forgot His humility. Being found in fashion as a man, He humbled Himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. St. Paul exhorts, ‘Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus’ ( Philippians 2:5-11 ). God giveth grace to all who are thus humble ( James 4:6 ).
When Augustine was asked, ‘What is the first article in the Christian religion?’ he answered, ‘Humility.’ And they said, ‘What is the second?’ and he said, ‘Humility.’ And they said, ‘What is the third?’ and he said the third time, ‘Humility.’ Pascal said: ‘Vanity has taken so firm a hold on the heart of man, that a porter, a hodman, a turn-spit, can talk greatly of himself, and is for having his admirers. Philosophers who write of the contempt of glory do yet desire the glory of writing well, and those who read their compositions would not lose the glory of having read them. We are so presumptuous as that we desire to be known to all the world; and even to those who are not to come into the world till we have left it. And at the same time we are so little and vain as that the esteem of five or six persons about us is enough to content and amuse us.’
D. A. Hayes.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Humility
HUMILITY.—This virtue or grace distinguished the leaders of OT history like Abraham and Moses (Luke 22:24-27,5 Numbers 12:3), and was inculcated by the prophets as a chief duty (Micah 6:8). It belongs even to the earlier revelation of God’s character (‘that humbleth himself,’ Psalms 113:6), and is the key to man’s communion with Him (Isaiah 57:15). In Judaism and the Rabbinical literature we meet with a variety of examples and maxims enforcing the truth that ‘God is the highest type of humility.’ These anticipations prepare us for the new and enlarged conception of humility which rills the NT, and was embodied in the teaching, example, and character of Jesus Christ. The moral quality of our Saviour’s personality lies here (Matthew 11:29), and on this foundation of astonishing humility, exemplified on the cross, St. Paul bases his great ethical appeal (Philippians 2:5 ff.). It may be claimed that the gospel alone has popularized humility, but the temper of Christ’s disciples in every age proves that it is an excellence of rare and difficult attainment.
i. Use and meaning of the word.—The noun (ταπεινοφροσύνη, Heb. עַנִוָה, Vulgate humilitas, Germ. Demut) does not occur till it is employed commonly in the NT (Lightfoot on Philippians 2:3); it is ‘a birth of the Gospel’ (Trench, Syn. of the NT, § 42). In contrast to the low and servile sense attaching to it in classical writings, humility in the LXX Septuagint, Apocr. [1] , and NT becomes the designation ‘of the noblest and most necessary of all virtues’ (Cremer’s Lex.). It rests on a lowly and unpretending view of one’s self, and is opposed to the workings of the ambitious spirit (μεγαλοφροσύνη, ὑψηλοφροσύνη). The term refers mainly to inward character, and sometimes to outward condition. Of humility as the animating principle of Christian character, Jesus Himself was the great example, being ‘lowly in heart’ (Matthew 11:29), not merely in appearance like the professional religious leaders of the time. Pharisaism is the deadly enemy of humility or the religion of healthy-mindedness. The moral temper that inspired Christ’s life and service is echoed by St. Paul, when he singles out the motive that prompted his labours (‘serving the Lord with all lowliness of mind,’ Acts 20:19). Elsewhere humility is enjoined, along with kindred graces, as the means of averting unholy disputes and of promoting co-operation in the Church and among the members of the Christian society (Matthew 18:4; Matthew 23:12, Ephesians 4:2, Philippians 2:3, Colossians 3:12). An exceptional use of the term occurs in Colossians 2:18; Colossians 2:23, where the Apostle guards his readers against the counterfeit of this virtue (‘a voluntary humility’). In some instances the humble are viewed in the light of their earthly condition, which God may wonderfully raise and alter (Luke 1:52), and which, notwithstanding its indignities and trials, should be borne submissively and cheerfully (James 1:9). This class of sufferers corresponds to the afflicted and meek of the OT (עָנִי, עִנִו), and would he numerous among the peasantry or fellahîn of an oppressed and lawless country (Hatch, Essays in Biblical Greek, s.v.). The ‘poor in spirit’ spoken of in the first of the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:3, cf. Luke 6:20) are probably best understood as placed in such circumstances. In agreement with this, Ritschl (op. cit. infra) defines ταπεινοφροσύνη as ‘that temper inclining to the service of God which accepts resignedly an oppressed and wretched condition.’ The term, therefore, as one of deep import, is freshly coined in the NT.
ii. Contrast between Greek and Christian Ethics.—The rise of this grace creates an epoch. ‘Humility is a vice with heathen moralists, but a virtue with Christian apostles’ (Lightfoot on Colossians 2:18). In particular, it marks the opposition to the Greek idea of ‘high-mindedness’ (art. ‘Ethics,’ by H. Sidgwick in Ency. Brit.9 [2] ), and the advance in ethical sentiment and the standard of judgment due to Christianity. A presentiment of the Christian virtue may be met with in Greek writers (see examples in Neander’s Church History, vol. i. p. 26 [3], and in Trench, NT Syn.), but their use of ταπεινός in any noble sense is rare. The Greeks undoubtedly had their distinguishing qualities, but this was not one of them.
Cf. interesting note of conversation in Morley’s Life of Gladstone, iii. p. 466. ‘Mr. G.—I admit there is no Greek word of good credit for the virtue of humility. J. M.—τατεινοτης? But that has an association of meanness. Mr. G.—Yes; a shabby sort of humility. Humility as a sovereign grace is the creation of Christianity.’
Greek Ethics, as expressed and systematized by Aristotle, the ancient master of moral analysis and definition, fostered pride, the genius of later Stoicism, and regarded the humble as contemptible, mean-spirited, and without force or aspiration. Aristotle’s picture of the ‘great-souled’ man and his exaggerated sense of self-importance have a certain air of loftiness (μεγαλοψυχία), but fall below the standard which obliges the Christian to recognize his duty to others, and to treat with consideration those who are intellectually and socially inferior. The conception of humility, therefore, as it controls the Christian, lies outside the system of Aristotle (see Nic. Ethiopic bk. iv. ch. 3 [4]). This difference between Greek and Christian ideas of greatness and humility is fundamental, and the change was brought about by Christ’s revelation of the character of God. Of Aristotle’s great-souled man it is said—‘his movements are slow, his voice is deep, and his diction stately’ (Grant, vol. ii. p. 77, note). This measured efflorescence of pride reappears in Christ’s portraiture of the Pharisee in the temple; but the Publican, the opposite and acceptable type, shows how influential, in Christian experience, is the thought of God, and how closely connected are humility, prayer, and confession of sin. In accordance with Augustine’s well-known saying (quoted by Calvin, Institutio, bk. ii. ch. 2), humility comes first, second, third, and always, among the precepts of the Christian religion, and it marks the cleavage between Greek and Christian ideals. The magnificent figure drawn by the Greek philosopher disappears, and, instead, Christ presents the image of the little child (Matthew 18:2).
iii. Our Lord’s example and teaching
1. The great saying which goes to the root of the matter—‘I am meek and lowly in heart’ (Matthew 11:29), has been variously interpreted (see art. by Herrmann, mentioned below), and even called in question as authentic. Martinean asks—‘What meek and lowly soul was ever known to set itself forth as such and commend its own humility as the model for others?’ and adds, ‘did a Saviour bear such testimony of himself, his testimony would not be true’ (Seat of Authority in Religion2 [2] , p. 583). But the mode of speaking Christ adopted and the claim He put forward would not really seem incongruous in a ‘Teacher of Israel’ (Bruce, Expos. Gr. Test. note ad loc.); and, besides, the objection reads a false tone into the original utterance, and ignores the special nature of Christ’s consciousness. Our Lord was more than a ‘meek and lowly soul,’ and had reason for presenting Himself as a model and a winning type to humanity. His humility clothed and concealed His essential dignity, and in speaking as He did He was conscious at the same time of standing in a unique relation to God (Matthew 11:27, cf. John 13:3). Indeed, the union on Christ’s part of ‘unbounded personal pretensions’ with an unconscious humility that regarded His importance to the world as ‘an objective fact with which his own opinion of himself had nothing to do’ (Ecce Homo, ch. 15) is undeniable, and reminds us that majesty and meekness were the two poles of His mysterious yet harmonious character. Christ’s humility, however, does not rest on a phrase, but was carried out in the lowly setting of His earthly life. His cradle in the manger at Bethlehem and His subjection in the home at Nazareth, His quiet entrance, at the hands of the Baptist, on public life, His restraint in the use of His supernatural powers, and His dislike of consequent honour and fame, His frequent periods of retirement, His choice of followers and friends, His sympathies with little children and humble suppliants (Mark 10:13-16; Mark 7:24-30), His appreciation of the smallest offering and the simplest service (Luke 21:1-4, Matthew 10:42), and, finally, His submission to the experiences concentrated in the week of His Passion and Crucifixion, all attest the consistency of His character as One who was ‘meek and lowly in heart,’ and who, at every step of His career, plainly and profoundly ‘humbled himself’ (Philippians 2:8).
2. Passing from Christ’s example, the main lines of His teaching are two
(1) Humility in relation to God, or the Law of Grace.—We are introduced here to the most powerful among the motives to humility, and to a relation deeper than any that influences us in the society of our fellow-men. In Wendt’s language—‘Humility is the conscious lowliness we feel before God in view of His superabundant love and holy majesty, and in contrast to our own unworthiness, guilt, and entire dependence on His grace’ (The Teaching of Jesus, vol. i. p. 341, note [3]). We cannot therefore exaggerate our worth or assert our claims before God: the part we play is that of ‘unprofitable servants’ who, after all their performances, should be filled neither with the sense of merit nor the spirit of boasting (Luke 17:10). In the parable, which is a gem of teaching on this point, Jesus enforces on us the duty of humility towards God, the need of genuine self-abasement and confession of sin, as we see and feel our unworthiness in the Divine presence (Luke 18:9-14). He represents God as turning away from the shallow and sounding words of the Pharisee, but giving His mercy freely to the penitent publican who could not look up. For, as a fine Jewish saying puts it, ‘While God despises what is broken among the animals, He loves in man a broken heart.’ This is a fundamental law of the Kingdom of heaven and the indispensable condition of grace: ‘for every one that exalteth himself shall be humbled, but he that humbleth himself shall be exalted’ (cf. Proverbs 3:34; 1 Peter 5:5).
Prof. Dowden, in writing of Milton’s view of the intercourse between God and the soul, remarks—‘There are two humilities—that which bows and that which soars, the humility of a servant who looks down, the humility of a son who gazes up. Milton’s humility invigorates itself in the effort to ascend. He would not prostrate himself in the presence of material symbols, but would enter as a glad child into the courts of heaven’ (Puritan and Anglican, p. 167). This is the humility that Christ welcomes, and that makes religion not stiff and heavy with ceremonial, but simple, reverent, glad, and pleasing to God. On no other terms is grace given or fellowship with God possible. ‘Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall in nowise enter therein’ (Luke 18:17).
(2) Humility in relation to men, or the Law of Service.—While it is true that humility ‘is not primarily concerned with our relation to other men, but with our relation to God, and springs from an intellectually true view of that relation’ (Illingworth, Christian Character, 1905, p. 27), yet its importance in regulating men’s ordinary conduct and intercourse did not escape Christ’s notice. His striking lessons on this subject were called for at the time, and are far from being exhausted, for it is still true that ‘the really humble man is as great in the moral world as he is rare’ (Bruce, Expos. Gr. Test. on Matthew 18:4).
(a) The child, the unconscious type of humility (Matthew 18:1-4, Mark 9:33-37).—This was Christ’s object-lesson on the question that caused frequent heartburning among the disciples, ‘Who then is greatest?’ etc. Their assimilation of their Master’s mind proceeded slowly. As He went on absorbed in the thought of His approaching cross, His followers walked behind and stirred each other’s worst passions by raising questions of place and precedence. At their next interview the Master of men set a child in the midst of His disciples, and shamed them out of their unworthy temper. This is our Lord’s rebuke of pride, rivalry, and ambition in their thousand forms, His reversal of our ordinary and selfish ideas of greatness, and His warning against the world’s spirit of exclusiveness, intolerance, and class distinctions. The truly great is he who considers the claims of others and is slow to give offence (Matthew 18:6), and who on all occasions appears simple, teachable, unpretending, indifferent to questions of rank and superiority, and willing to humble himself ‘as this little child.’ It is only the childlike heart that is capable of knowing God (Matthew 11:25), and of finding the way into His kingdom. This image has stamped itself on the mind of Christendom, and this pattern of greatness is still fresh. Human character is once for all taught to mould itself after this original and lovely type. Christ first saw the hatefulness and unworkableness of a world without a child!
(b) The servant, the practical example of humility (Matthew 20:20-28; Matthew 23:1-12, Mark 10:35-45, 1618164902_86 John 13:1-17).—This ideal of service was presented on two distinct occasions: the one when the sons of Zebedee came forward with their request for the leading places in the Kingdom; and the other when the same love of dignity, and the jealous exclusion of each other’s claims, gave rise to the strife that marred the Last Supper. In rebuking this spirit, Christ had in view not merely the mistaken tendencies of His disciples, who were already fired by the promise of individual ‘thrones’ (Luke 22:30) dear to the Israelitish imagination, but also the popular and prevailing standards of the time. The rulers of the Gentiles aimed at supremacy, and, in the exercise of a harsh authority, delighted to ‘lord it over them’; and equally the scribes and Pharisees, in their fondness for places and titles of honour, coveted influence and recognition as the ‘great ones’ of Jewish society. Christ required a new standard and line of conduct from His followers. ‘Not so shall it be among you.’ Henceforth, greatness lies in conformity to a higher than the heathen or Jewish type: ‘but whosoever would become great among you shall be your minister,’ etc. The principle of this law is not impersonal, but personal; the seat of authority in the Christian religion and in Christian morals is Christ: ‘even as the Son of Man came,’ etc. (Matthew 20:28). Finally, in one concrete act, Christ gave an illustration of the great principle He enunciated, when, at the Passover meal, He rose and ‘took a towel and girded himself,’ and washed the disciples’ feet. This astonishing incident left an ineffaceable impression (1 Peter 5:5), and warranted the literal saying: ‘I am in the midst of you as he that serveth’ (Luke 22:27). Such an ideal and example of service have slowly effected a revolution in the moral sentiment and practice of mankind. We may add, if Christ’s setting forth of the child was evidence of His originality as a teacher, the substitution of the servant for the ruler was a no less striking proof of the uniqueness of His insight and methods.
‘It is one of the achievements of Jesus that He introduced into the world a new ideal of greatness, such an ideal as men had never dreamed of’ (D. Smith, The Days of His Flesh, 1905, p. 442. Cf. Herrmann in art. below: ‘Im NT ist ohne Zweifel der Eindruck wiedergegehen dass Jesus in dieser Beziehung seinen Jüngern etwas vollig Neues gegeben hat’).
Some ideals are too airy and remote to come into touch with actual experience and practice, but Christ’s Law of Service is capable of daily realization, and is within the reach of every one. It is open to all to do some simple deed of kindness, helpfulness, and self-denial, and no action inspired by Christ-like love and humility will pass unnoticed or unrewarded by the gracious Master and great Servant of all (Matthew 25:40).
iv. Characteristics and Relationships.—A few further points of general and practical interest are suggested by this subject, and may be briefly touched on.
1. Humility and character.—In ordinary experience, humility is related to sin and penitence, and marks the feeling of unworthiness in the light of the illimitable moral ideal. In presence of the holy revelation of the Son of God, conscience becomes sensitive, and the sense of guilt, as in the case of Peter (Luke 5:8), weighs men down. ‘This, however, is not one of the essential conditions of humility, for we know that humility was also an element in Christ’s character’ (Ritschl). The greatness of the Baptist was rooted in his humility and utter freedom from jealousy (John 3:27; John 3:30), and this grace has been the soil and safety of saints ever since. Keble treated others with a ‘humbling humility’ (Lock’s Life, p. 233. Cf. MacEwen’s Life of Cairns, p. 600: ‘The first personal impression that he made on all who met him was one of wonder at his humility’). The child, to which Christ pointed, represents humility as part of the essence and permanence of Christian character, and remains an immortal type, preserving the wonder and bloom of the moral world.
2. Humility and kindred virtues.—No Christian grace is isolated or thrives alone. Humility is ‘part of a great moral whole. Instead of proscribing, it promotes the growth of virtues unlike yet not unfriendly to itself’ (Liddon on ‘Humility and Action’ in University Sermons). Thus it is closely connected with Truth, for humility or confession that does not rest on the recognition of facts is insincere and worthless. It is inspired by Love; ministering love appears always in the guise of humility. Meekness rests on humility as its foundation (Trench), and Patience expresses along with humility the practical virtue of the Christian religion, especially called for and tested in the world (Ritschl).
3. Humility and self-consciousness.—It has been the tendency of certain schools of theology and piety to make humility the result of self-contemplation, arrived at by the soul’s reaction upon itself. This gives rise to artificial and extreme methods of discipline, and misses the healthy objectivity of the life that forgets self in the consideration and service of others (see Herrmann’s art. for vigorous criticism of this tendency and ideal of asceticism, derived from Angustine and Bernard. Cf. Harnack’s History of Dogma [3], vi. p. 10, note). Humility is ‘the eye which sees everything except itself’ (quoted in Ritschl). Work and the school of life are the best discipline of humility, as of the other virtues.
‘We are to respect our responsibilities,’ wrote Mr. Gladstone, ‘not ourselves. We are to respect the duties of which we are capable, but not our capabilities simply considered. There is to be no complacent self-contemplation, beruminating upon self. When self is viewed, it must always be in the most intimate connexion with its purposes’ (Morley’s Life, i. 214).
On the other hand, the externalizing of humility and the danger of parading it in rules and ceremonies that lead to self-humiliation must equally be avoided. Christ and His Apostles discountenanced all needless self-consciousness and show of virtue (Matthew 6:1 ff., Colossians 2:23. Cf. Ritschl: ‘Even in ascetic forms of worship there is no particular form of expression necessary to humility’).
4. Humility and individuality.—This virtue is not to be cultivated to the neglect of manliness or at the expense of loyalty to religious and moral principle (Matthew 10:32). Christ honours the spirit of energy and enterprise in us, and blames the hiding of our talents and the misuse of our opportunities through diffidence or cowardice (Matthew 25:14 ff.). The manly and energetic character of the centurion, as shown in his faith, was doubtless as pleasing to Jesus as the soldier’s reverence and humbleness of address (Luke 7:6). Humility or the fear of God should banish all unworthy fear. Christ’s unflinching exposure of the scribes and Pharisees (Matthew 23) calls us to be courageous in adherence to truth and righteousness, and in view of evil and opposition, however powerful. It was a wholesome saying of the Rabbis: ‘The disciple of the wise should have sufficient pride to stand in defence of the Law he represents.’ Self-assertion has therefore its legitimate sphere, and the ‘salt’ of individuality in religion and in society should in nowise be lost. There is the danger, however, of exaggerating our own view and importance: ‘it always needs much grace to see what other people are, and to keep a sense of moral proportion’ (Denney, Expos.
King James Dictionary - Humility
HUMIL'ITY, n. L. humilitas.
1. In ethics, freedom from pride and arrogance humbleness of mind a modest estimate of one's own worth. In theology, humility consists in lowliness of mind a deep sense of one's own unworthiness in the sight of God, self-abasement, penitence for sin, and submission to the divine will. Before honor is humility. Proverbs 15
Serving the Lord with all humility of mind. Acts 20
2. Act of submission. With these humilities they satisfied the young king.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Humbleness of Mind, Humility
1: ταπεινοφροσύνη (Strong's #5012 — Noun Feminine — tapeinophrosune — tap-i-nof-ros-oo'-nay ) "lowliness of mind" (tapeinos, see A, above, under HUMBLE, and phren, "the mind"), is rendered "humility of mind" in Acts 20:19 , AV (RV, "lowliness of mind"); in Ephesians 4:2 , "lowliness;" in Philippians 2:3 , "lowliness of mind;" in Colossians 2:18,23 , of a false "humility;" in Colossians 3:12 , AV, "humbleness of mind," RV, "humility;" 1 Peter 5:5 , "humility." See LOWLINESS.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sisters of the Holy Humility of Mary
A religious congregation founded by Mlle. Poitier under the direction of Father John J. Begel at Dom-martin-sous-Amance, France in 1855 for the education of poor children. In 1864 the entire community with Father Begel came to the United States at the invitation of Bishop Rappe of Cleveland, and settled near New Bedford, Massachusetts. The congregation has includes academies, schools, hospitals, an orphanage, a home for crippled children, and one for working boys. The mother-house is at Villa Maria, Pennsylvania.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Humility
The opposite of pride, in its nature and in the degree of its prevalence. It is often extolled in the Bible, Proverbs 15:33 16:19 ; and the Savior especially exalts it, Matthew 18:4 , and ennobles and endears it by his own example, John 13:4-17 Philippians 2:5-8 . Every created being, however holy, should possess it; but in the character of the sinful sons of men it should become a fundamental and allpervading trait, to continue forever.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Humility
HUMILITY.—This virtue or grace distinguished the leaders of OT history like Abraham and Moses (Genesis 18:27, Numbers 12:3), and was inculcated by the prophets as a chief duty (Micah 6:8). It belongs even to the earlier revelation of God’s character (‘that humbleth himself,’ Psalms 113:6), and is the key to man’s communion with Him (Isaiah 57:15). In Judaism and the Rabbinical literature we meet with a variety of examples and maxims enforcing the truth that ‘God is the highest type of humility.’ These anticipations prepare us for the new and enlarged conception of humility which rills the NT, and was embodied in the teaching, example, and character of Jesus Christ. The moral quality of our Saviour’s personality lies here (Matthew 11:29), and on this foundation of astonishing humility, exemplified on the cross, St. Paul bases his great ethical appeal (Philippians 2:5 ff.). It may be claimed that the gospel alone has popularized humility, but the temper of Christ’s disciples in every age proves that it is an excellence of rare and difficult attainment.
i. Use and meaning of the word.—The noun (ταπεινοφροσύνη, Heb. עַנִוָה, Vulgate humilitas, Germ. Demut) does not occur till it is employed commonly in the NT (Lightfoot on Philippians 2:3); it is ‘a birth of the Gospel’ (Trench, Syn. of the NT, § 42). In contrast to the low and servile sense attaching to it in classical writings, humility in the LXX Septuagint, Apocr. [1] , and NT becomes the designation ‘of the noblest and most necessary of all virtues’ (Cremer’s Lex.). It rests on a lowly and unpretending view of one’s self, and is opposed to the workings of the ambitious spirit (μεγαλοφροσύνη, ὑψηλοφροσύνη). The term refers mainly to inward character, and sometimes to outward condition. Of humility as the animating principle of Christian character, Jesus Himself was the great example, being ‘lowly in heart’ (Matthew 11:29), not merely in appearance like the professional religious leaders of the time. Pharisaism is the deadly enemy of humility or the religion of healthy-mindedness. The moral temper that inspired Christ’s life and service is echoed by St. Paul, when he singles out the motive that prompted his labours (‘serving the Lord with all lowliness of mind,’ Acts 20:19). Elsewhere humility is enjoined, along with kindred graces, as the means of averting unholy disputes and of promoting co-operation in the Church and among the members of the Christian society (Matthew 18:4; Matthew 23:12, Ephesians 4:2, Philippians 2:3, Colossians 3:12). An exceptional use of the term occurs in Colossians 2:18; Colossians 2:23, where the Apostle guards his readers against the counterfeit of this virtue (‘a voluntary humility’). In some instances the humble are viewed in the light of their earthly condition, which God may wonderfully raise and alter (Luke 1:52), and which, notwithstanding its indignities and trials, should be borne submissively and cheerfully (James 1:9). This class of sufferers corresponds to the afflicted and meek of the OT (עָנִי, עִנִו), and would he numerous among the peasantry or fellahîn of an oppressed and lawless country (Hatch, Essays in Biblical Greek, s.v.). The ‘poor in spirit’ spoken of in the first of the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:3, cf. Luke 6:20) are probably best understood as placed in such circumstances. In agreement with this, Ritschl (op. cit. infra) defines ταπεινοφροσύνη as ‘that temper inclining to the service of God which accepts resignedly an oppressed and wretched condition.’ The term, therefore, as one of deep import, is freshly coined in the NT.
ii. Contrast between Greek and Christian Ethics.—The rise of this grace creates an epoch. ‘Humility is a vice with heathen moralists, but a virtue with Christian apostles’ (Lightfoot on Colossians 2:18). In particular, it marks the opposition to the Greek idea of ‘high-mindedness’ (art. ‘Ethics,’ by H. Sidgwick in Ency. Brit.9 [2] ), and the advance in ethical sentiment and the standard of judgment due to Christianity. A presentiment of the Christian virtue may be met with in Greek writers (see examples in Neander’s Church History, vol. i. p. 26 [3], and in Trench, NT Syn.), but their use of ταπεινός in any noble sense is rare. The Greeks undoubtedly had their distinguishing qualities, but this was not one of them.
Cf. interesting note of conversation in Morley’s Life of Gladstone, iii. p. 466. ‘Mr. G.—I admit there is no Greek word of good credit for the virtue of humility. J. M.—τατεινοτης? But that has an association of meanness. Mr. G.—Yes; a shabby sort of humility. Humility as a sovereign grace is the creation of Christianity.’
Greek Ethics, as expressed and systematized by Aristotle, the ancient master of moral analysis and definition, fostered pride, the genius of later Stoicism, and regarded the humble as contemptible, mean-spirited, and without force or aspiration. Aristotle’s picture of the ‘great-souled’ man and his exaggerated sense of self-importance have a certain air of loftiness (μεγαλοψυχία), but fall below the standard which obliges the Christian to recognize his duty to others, and to treat with consideration those who are intellectually and socially inferior. The conception of humility, therefore, as it controls the Christian, lies outside the system of Aristotle (see Nic. Ethiopic bk. iv. ch. 3 [4]). This difference between Greek and Christian ideas of greatness and humility is fundamental, and the change was brought about by Christ’s revelation of the character of God. Of Aristotle’s great-souled man it is said—‘his movements are slow, his voice is deep, and his diction stately’ (Grant, vol. ii. p. 77, note). This measured efflorescence of pride reappears in Christ’s portraiture of the Pharisee in the temple; but the Publican, the opposite and acceptable type, shows how influential, in Christian experience, is the thought of God, and how closely connected are humility, prayer, and confession of sin. In accordance with Augustine’s well-known saying (quoted by Calvin, Institutio, bk. ii. ch. 2), humility comes first, second, third, and always, among the precepts of the Christian religion, and it marks the cleavage between Greek and Christian ideals. The magnificent figure drawn by the Greek philosopher disappears, and, instead, Christ presents the image of the little child (Matthew 18:2).
iii. Our Lord’s example and teaching
1. The great saying which goes to the root of the matter—‘I am meek and lowly in heart’ (Matthew 11:29), has been variously interpreted (see art. by Herrmann, mentioned below), and even called in question as authentic. Martinean asks—‘What meek and lowly soul was ever known to set itself forth as such and commend its own humility as the model for others?’ and adds, ‘did a Saviour bear such testimony of himself, his testimony would not be true’ (Seat of Authority in Religion2 [2] , p. 583). But the mode of speaking Christ adopted and the claim He put forward would not really seem incongruous in a ‘Teacher of Israel’ (Bruce, Expos. Gr. Test. note ad loc.); and, besides, the objection reads a false tone into the original utterance, and ignores the special nature of Christ’s consciousness. Our Lord was more than a ‘meek and lowly soul,’ and had reason for presenting Himself as a model and a winning type to humanity. His humility clothed and concealed His essential dignity, and in speaking as He did He was conscious at the same time of standing in a unique relation to God (Matthew 11:27, cf. John 13:3). Indeed, the union on Christ’s part of ‘unbounded personal pretensions’ with an unconscious humility that regarded His importance to the world as ‘an objective fact with which his own opinion of himself had nothing to do’ (Ecce Homo, ch. 15) is undeniable, and reminds us that majesty and meekness were the two poles of His mysterious yet harmonious character. Christ’s humility, however, does not rest on a phrase, but was carried out in the lowly setting of His earthly life. His cradle in the manger at Bethlehem and His subjection in the home at Nazareth, His quiet entrance, at the hands of the Baptist, on public life, His restraint in the use of His supernatural powers, and His dislike of consequent honour and fame, His frequent periods of retirement, His choice of followers and friends, His sympathies with little children and humble suppliants (Mark 10:13-16; Mark 7:24-30), His appreciation of the smallest offering and the simplest service (Luke 21:1-4, Matthew 10:42), and, finally, His submission to the experiences concentrated in the week of His Passion and Crucifixion, all attest the consistency of His character as One who was ‘meek and lowly in heart,’ and who, at every step of His career, plainly and profoundly ‘humbled himself’ (Philippians 2:8).
2. Passing from Christ’s example, the main lines of His teaching are two
(1) Humility in relation to God, or the Law of Grace.—We are introduced here to the most powerful among the motives to humility, and to a relation deeper than any that influences us in the society of our fellow-men. In Wendt’s language—‘Humility is the conscious lowliness we feel before God in view of His superabundant love and holy majesty, and in contrast to our own unworthiness, guilt, and entire dependence on His grace’ (The Teaching of Jesus, vol. i. p. 341, note [3]). We cannot therefore exaggerate our worth or assert our claims before God: the part we play is that of ‘unprofitable servants’ who, after all their performances, should be filled neither with the sense of merit nor the spirit of boasting (Luke 17:10). In the parable, which is a gem of teaching on this point, Jesus enforces on us the duty of humility towards God, the need of genuine self-abasement and confession of sin, as we see and feel our unworthiness in the Divine presence (Luke 18:9-14). He represents God as turning away from the shallow and sounding words of the Pharisee, but giving His mercy freely to the penitent publican who could not look up. For, as a fine Jewish saying puts it, ‘While God despises what is broken among the animals, He loves in man a broken heart.’ This is a fundamental law of the Kingdom of heaven and the indispensable condition of grace: ‘for every one that exalteth himself shall be humbled, but he that humbleth himself shall be exalted’ (cf. Proverbs 3:34; 1 Peter 5:5).
Prof. Dowden, in writing of Milton’s view of the intercourse between God and the soul, remarks—‘There are two humilities—that which bows and that which soars, the humility of a servant who looks down, the humility of a son who gazes up. Milton’s humility invigorates itself in the effort to ascend. He would not prostrate himself in the presence of material symbols, but would enter as a glad child into the courts of heaven’ (Puritan and Anglican, p. 167). This is the humility that Christ welcomes, and that makes religion not stiff and heavy with ceremonial, but simple, reverent, glad, and pleasing to God. On no other terms is grace given or fellowship with God possible. ‘Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall in nowise enter therein’ (Luke 18:17).
(2) Humility in relation to men, or the Law of Service.—While it is true that humility ‘is not primarily concerned with our relation to other men, but with our relation to God, and springs from an intellectually true view of that relation’ (Illingworth, Christian Character, 1905, p. 27), yet its importance in regulating men’s ordinary conduct and intercourse did not escape Christ’s notice. His striking lessons on this subject were called for at the time, and are far from being exhausted, for it is still true that ‘the really humble man is as great in the moral world as he is rare’ (Bruce, Expos. Gr. Test. on Matthew 18:4).
(a) The child, the unconscious type of humility (Matthew 18:1-4, Mark 9:33-37).—This was Christ’s object-lesson on the question that caused frequent heartburning among the disciples, ‘Who then is greatest?’ etc. Their assimilation of their Master’s mind proceeded slowly. As He went on absorbed in the thought of His approaching cross, His followers walked behind and stirred each other’s worst passions by raising questions of place and precedence. At their next interview the Master of men set a child in the midst of His disciples, and shamed them out of their unworthy temper. This is our Lord’s rebuke of pride, rivalry, and ambition in their thousand forms, His reversal of our ordinary and selfish ideas of greatness, and His warning against the world’s spirit of exclusiveness, intolerance, and class distinctions. The truly great is he who considers the claims of others and is slow to give offence (Matthew 18:6), and who on all occasions appears simple, teachable, unpretending, indifferent to questions of rank and superiority, and willing to humble himself ‘as this little child.’ It is only the childlike heart that is capable of knowing God (Matthew 11:25), and of finding the way into His kingdom. This image has stamped itself on the mind of Christendom, and this pattern of greatness is still fresh. Human character is once for all taught to mould itself after this original and lovely type. Christ first saw the hatefulness and unworkableness of a world without a child!
(b) The servant, the practical example of humility (Matthew 20:20-28; Matthew 23:1-12, Mark 10:35-45, Luke 22:24-27, John 13:1-17).—This ideal of service was presented on two distinct occasions: the one when the sons of Zebedee came forward with their request for the leading places in the Kingdom; and the other when the same love of dignity, and the jealous exclusion of each other’s claims, gave rise to the strife that marred the Last Supper. In rebuking this spirit, Christ had in view not merely the mistaken tendencies of His disciples, who were already fired by the promise of individual ‘thrones’ (Luke 22:30) dear to the Israelitish imagination, but also the popular and prevailing standards of the time. The rulers of the Gentiles aimed at supremacy, and, in the exercise of a harsh authority, delighted to ‘lord it over them’; and equally the scribes and Pharisees, in their fondness for places and titles of honour, coveted influence and recognition as the ‘great ones’ of Jewish society. Christ required a new standard and line of conduct from His followers. ‘Not so shall it be among you.’ Henceforth, greatness lies in conformity to a higher than the heathen or Jewish type: ‘but whosoever would become great among you shall be your minister,’ etc. The principle of this law is not impersonal, but personal; the seat of authority in the Christian religion and in Christian morals is Christ: ‘even as the Son of Man came,’ etc. (Matthew 20:28). Finally, in one concrete act, Christ gave an illustration of the great principle He enunciated, when, at the Passover meal, He rose and ‘took a towel and girded himself,’ and washed the disciples’ feet. This astonishing incident left an ineffaceable impression (1 Peter 5:5), and warranted the literal saying: ‘I am in the midst of you as he that serveth’ (Luke 22:27). Such an ideal and example of service have slowly effected a revolution in the moral sentiment and practice of mankind. We may add, if Christ’s setting forth of the child was evidence of His originality as a teacher, the substitution of the servant for the ruler was a no less striking proof of the uniqueness of His insight and methods.
‘It is one of the achievements of Jesus that He introduced into the world a new ideal of greatness, such an ideal as men had never dreamed of’ (D. Smith, The Days of His Flesh, 1905, p. 442. Cf. Herrmann in art. below: ‘Im NT ist ohne Zweifel der Eindruck wiedergegehen dass Jesus in dieser Beziehung seinen Jüngern etwas vollig Neues gegeben hat’).
Some ideals are too airy and remote to come into touch with actual experience and practice, but Christ’s Law of Service is capable of daily realization, and is within the reach of every one. It is open to all to do some simple deed of kindness, helpfulness, and self-denial, and no action inspired by Christ-like love and humility will pass unnoticed or unrewarded by the gracious Master and great Servant of all (Matthew 25:40).
iv. Characteristics and Relationships.—A few further points of general and practical interest are suggested by this subject, and may be briefly touched on.
1. Humility and character.—In ordinary experience, humility is related to sin and penitence, and marks the feeling of unworthiness in the light of the illimitable moral ideal. In presence of the holy revelation of the Son of God, conscience becomes sensitive, and the sense of guilt, as in the case of Peter (Luke 5:8), weighs men down. ‘This, however, is not one of the essential conditions of humility, for we know that humility was also an element in Christ’s character’ (Ritschl). The greatness of the Baptist was rooted in his humility and utter freedom from jealousy (John 3:27; John 3:30), and this grace has been the soil and safety of saints ever since. Keble treated others with a ‘humbling humility’ (Lock’s Life, p. 233. Cf. MacEwen’s Life of Cairns, p. 600: ‘The first personal impression that he made on all who met him was one of wonder at his humility’). The child, to which Christ pointed, represents humility as part of the essence and permanence of Christian character, and remains an immortal type, preserving the wonder and bloom of the moral world.
2. Humility and kindred virtues.—No Christian grace is isolated or thrives alone. Humility is ‘part of a great moral whole. Instead of proscribing, it promotes the growth of virtues unlike yet not unfriendly to itself’ (Liddon on ‘Humility and Action’ in University Sermons). Thus it is closely connected with Truth, for humility or confession that does not rest on the recognition of facts is insincere and worthless. It is inspired by Love; ministering love appears always in the guise of humility. Meekness rests on humility as its foundation (Trench), and Patience expresses along with humility the practical virtue of the Christian religion, especially called for and tested in the world (Ritschl).
3. Humility and self-consciousness.—It has been the tendency of certain schools of theology and piety to make humility the result of self-contemplation, arrived at by the soul’s reaction upon itself. This gives rise to artificial and extreme methods of discipline, and misses the healthy objectivity of the life that forgets self in the consideration and service of others (see Herrmann’s art. for vigorous criticism of this tendency and ideal of asceticism, derived from Angustine and Bernard. Cf. Harnack’s History of Dogma [3], vi. p. 10, note). Humility is ‘the eye which sees everything except itself’ (quoted in Ritschl). Work and the school of life are the best discipline of humility, as of the other virtues.
‘We are to respect our responsibilities,’ wrote Mr. Gladstone, ‘not ourselves. We are to respect the duties of which we are capable, but not our capabilities simply considered. There is to be no complacent self-contemplation, beruminating upon self. When self is viewed, it must always be in the most intimate connexion with its purposes’ (Morley’s Life, i. 214).
On the other hand, the externalizing of humility and the danger of parading it in rules and ceremonies that lead to self-humiliation must equally be avoided. Christ and His Apostles discountenanced all needless self-consciousness and show of virtue (Matthew 6:1 ff., Colossians 2:23. Cf. Ritschl: ‘Even in ascetic forms of worship there is no particular form of expression necessary to humility’).
4. Humility and individuality.—This virtue is not to be cultivated to the neglect of manliness or at the expense of loyalty to religious and moral principle (Matthew 10:32). Christ honours the spirit of energy and enterprise in us, and blames the hiding of our talents and the misuse of our opportunities through diffidence or cowardice (Matthew 25:14 ff.). The manly and energetic character of the centurion, as shown in his faith, was doubtless as pleasing to Jesus as the soldier’s reverence and humbleness of address (Luke 7:6). Humility or the fear of God should banish all unworthy fear. Christ’s unflinching exposure of the scribes and Pharisees (Matthew 23) calls us to be courageous in adherence to truth and righteousness, and in view of evil and opposition, however powerful. It was a wholesome saying of the Rabbis: ‘The disciple of the wise should have sufficient pride to stand in defence of the Law he represents.’ Self-assertion has therefore its legitimate sphere, and the ‘salt’ of individuality in religion and in society should in nowise be lost. There is the danger, however, of exaggerating our own view and importance: ‘it always needs much grace to see what other people are, and to keep a sense of moral proportion’ (Denney, Expos. Gr. Test. on Romans 12:3). In the adaptation of the Christian Church to society, and to reconcile conflicting interests, it requires humility ‘to adjust men in due order for the purposes of life’ (T. B. Strong’s Christian Ethics, Bampton Lect. 1895, p. 127).
5. Humility and science.—Christ’s interview with Nicodemus teaches that the assumption of knowledge (‘we know,’ John 3:2) may cover only ignorance and confusion. The ‘wise and understanding’ (Matthew 11:25) receive no new light: self-satisfied pride and prejudice are the foes of spiritual enlightenment and intellectual advance. The true student and investigator of nature must still feel, like Newton, that, notwithstanding his progress and attainments, the great ocean of truth lies undiscovered before him. Docility, not dogmatism, is the mark of the inquirer, and the means of intellectual development. In this important and ever-changing region of science, R. H. Hutton has well observed that humility ‘means the docility of learners towards a teacher infinitely above them,’ and that it requires wisdom to see the true relations between different kinds of knowledge, and to keep physical knowledge from being turned to a false and dangerous use in the sphere of moral truth. Here also the master of truth and knowledge must take the place of a servant, and illustrate his greatness by his humility—‘and science is humble only when it uses its knowledge and its ignorance alike to help other men and not to lord it over them’ (Essay on ‘The Humility of Science’ in Aspects of Religious and Scientific Thought, 1901). So manifold is the function of this indispensable and crowning grace.
Literature.—Besides works above named, Grimm-Thayer’s Lex.; Moulton-Geden’s Concord. to Greek Test.; art. ‘Humility in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible vol. ii.; Herrmann in PRE [8] 3 [2] (‘Demut, Demutig’—an art. characteristic in its Ritschlian standpoint and criticism); E. Schreiber, art. in Jewish Encyc. 1904 (interesting and suggestive); B. Weiss, Bib. Theol. of NT, pp. 116, 117, and Ritschl, The Christian Doctrine of Justif. and Reconcil. ch. ix. § 65 (both in Clark’s translation); A. B. Bruce, Training of the Twelve, chs. xiv. xxi.; Professor J. Seth, A Study of Ethical Principles4 [2] , p. 264; Rothe, Sermons (‘The Humility of the Lord’—Clark’s translation); Liddon, Some Words of Christ (‘True Greatness’); Church, Cathed. and Univ. Sermons (‘the Condescension of our Lord’); Dante, Purgatory, Cantos 10–12; R. Browning’s exquisite little poem, ‘Humility’ (Asolando); Kip. ling’s Recessional.
W. M. Rankin.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Humility
The words ‘humility’ and ‘humble’, which are from the same basic word, have a variety of meanings. In some cases they are associated with ideas of poverty or affliction (1 Samuel 2:8; Psalms 37:11; Psalms 37:14; Isaiah 29:19; Philippians 4:12; James 1:9), in others with ideas of embarrassment or shame (Isaiah 53:3; Isaiah 53:8; Acts 8:33; 2 Corinthians 9:4; 2 Corinthians 11:7; 2 Corinthians 12:21; Philippians 3:21; James 1:10). Their most common usage, however, is in relation to attitudes of modesty, selflessness, gentleness, grace, meekness and forbearance. Humility in this sense is one of the virtues most pleasing to God. Its opposite, pride, is one of the evils most hateful to him (Numbers 12:3; Proverbs 6:16-17; Daniel 5:22-23; Micah 6:8; James 4:6; 1 Peter 5:5; see PRIDE).
Jesus Christ is the great example of humility. In an act of total self-denial, the eternal Son of God humbled himself to the extent of taking human form and in the end dying to save sinners (Philippians 2:5-11). He was never boastful and never acted in a way that advanced his own interests. Always he submitted to his Father’s will, so that he not only served God but also served those among whom he lived (Matthew 12:19-20; Matthew 20:28; John 5:30-32).
Just as Jesus humbled himself in living and dying for sinners, so sinners must humble themselves in repenting of their sins if they are to receive God’s forgiveness. God gives sinners no cause to boast in anything they might achieve. They can do nothing but acknowledge how helpless they are before God and humbly accept God’s mercy (2 Chronicles 7:14; 2 Chronicles 12:6-7; 2 Chronicles 34:27; Luke 18:9-14; Romans 3:27; Romans 10:3). Humility characterized Christ’s kingship (Matthew 21:5), and only through humility can anyone enter his kingdom (Matthew 18:1-4).
Christians have a responsibility to develop humility in their lives. It is part of the life to which God has called them (Ephesians 4:1-2; Colossians 3:12), it is a characteristic of life in God’s kingdom (Matthew 20:20-27) and it is the product of the Spirit’s work in the life of the individual (Galatians 5:23). If they are to learn humility, they must be willing to take the lowest place and serve others (Luke 22:24-27; John 13:3-17). Such humility will help produce genuine fellowship in the church. It will prevent Christians from competing with each other to see who is the greatest among them (Mark 9:33-37; Romans 12:16; 2 Corinthians 10:12; Galatians 6:3; Ephesians 4:2; Philippians 2:3).
Those who look for status and praise may gain what they seek, but their reward will be short-lived (Matthew 6:1-5; Matthew 6:16). God exalts those who humble themselves, but humbles those who exalt themselves (Proverbs 3:34; Proverbs 15:33; Proverbs 18:12; Isaiah 2:11; Isaiah 5:15; Matthew 23:12; Luke 1:48-53 : James 4:10; 1 Peter 5:6).

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Voluntary - 6) is rendered "(in a) voluntary (humility)," present participle, i. , "being a voluntary (in Humility)," AV marg. , "of his own mere will (by Humility)," en, "in," being rendered as instrumental; what was of one's own mere will, with the speciousness of Humility, would mean his being robbed of his prize
Humbleness of Mind, Humility - 1: ταπεινοφροσύνη (Strong's #5012 — Noun Feminine — tapeinophrosune — tap-i-nof-ros-oo'-nay ) "lowliness of mind" (tapeinos, see A, above, under HUMBLE, and phren, "the mind"), is rendered "humility of mind" in Acts 20:19 , AV (RV, "lowliness of mind"); in Ephesians 4:2 , "lowliness;" in Philippians 2:3 , "lowliness of mind;" in Colossians 2:18,23 , of a false "humility;" in Colossians 3:12 , AV, "humbleness of mind," RV, "humility;" 1 Peter 5:5 , "humility
Gentleness - See Humility; MEEKNESS
Humility - In theology, Humility consists in lowliness of mind a deep sense of one's own unworthiness in the sight of God, self-abasement, penitence for sin, and submission to the divine will. Before honor is Humility. Proverbs 15 ...
Serving the Lord with all Humility of mind
c.h.m. - = Congregation of the Humility of Mary ...
h.m. - = Sisters of the Humility of Mary ...
Humility - ...
Old Testament The Old Testament connects the quality of Humility with Israel's lowly experience as slaves in Egypt—a poor, afflicted, and suffering people (Deuteronomy 26:6 ). The Hebrew word translated as Humility is similar to another Hebrew word meaning “to be afflicted. ” In Old Testament thought, Humility was closely associated with individuals who were poor and afflicted ( 2 Samuel 22:28 ). The pathway to revival is the way of Humility (2 Chronicles 7:14 ). ...
New Testament Jesus Christ's life provides the best example of what it means to have Humility (Matthew 11:29 ; 1 Corinthians 4:21 ; Philippians 2:1-11 ). Jesus preached and taught often about the need for Humility (Matthew 23:12 ; Mark 9:35 ; Luke 14:11 ; Luke 18:14 ). He urged those who desired to live by Kingdom standards to practice Humility (Matthew 18:1 ; Matthew 23:12 ). ...
The person with Humility does not look down on others (Matthew 18:4 ; Luke 14:11 ). Humility in the New Testament is closely connected with the quality of “meekness” (Matthew 5:5 ). Primary in the New Testament is the conviction that one who has Humility will not be overly concerned about his or her prestige (Matthew 18:4 ; Matthew 23:12 ; Romans 12:16 ; 2 Corinthians 11:7 ). ...
Paul believed that quality relationships with other people, especially those who had erred spiritually, hinged on the presence of meekness or Humility (1 Corinthians 4:21 ; Galatians 6:1 ; 2 Timothy 2:25 ). The Greek world abhorred the quality of meekness or Humility, but the Christian community believed these qualities were worthy (2 Corinthians 10:18 ; Colossians 3:12 ; Ephesians 4:2 )
Humbleness - The state of being humble or low Humility meekness
Meeken - ) To make meek; to nurture in gentleness and Humility
Servant of the Servants of God - Title used by the pope to express with Humility his obligations to all who serve God
Lowliness - ) The state or quality of being lowly; Humility; humbleness of mind
Humility - Humility . Trench defines ‘humility’ as the esteeming of ourselves small, inasmuch as we are so; the thinking truly, and because truly, therefore lowlily, of ourselves. His spirit may be full of envy instead of Humility. A better definition of the Christian grace of Humility is found in the union of highest self-respect with uttermost abandon of sacrifice in service. The consciousness of His own transcendent worth was in no respect inconsistent with His Humility. Genuine Humility leads the strong to serve the weak. Genuine Humility loses all its self-conceit but never loses its self-respect. There was no Humility in the universe like unto His. Yet He never forgot His Humility. ...
When Augustine was asked, ‘What is the first article in the Christian religion?’ he answered, ‘Humility. ’ And they said, ‘What is the second?’ and he said, ‘Humility. ’ And they said, ‘What is the third?’ and he said the third time, ‘Humility
Humility - HUMILITY. In Judaism and the Rabbinical literature we meet with a variety of examples and maxims enforcing the truth that ‘God is the highest type of Humility. ’ These anticipations prepare us for the new and enlarged conception of Humility which rills the NT, and was embodied in the teaching, example, and character of Jesus Christ. The moral quality of our Saviour’s personality lies here (Matthew 11:29), and on this foundation of astonishing Humility, exemplified on the cross, St. It may be claimed that the gospel alone has popularized Humility, but the temper of Christ’s disciples in every age proves that it is an excellence of rare and difficult attainment. In contrast to the low and servile sense attaching to it in classical writings, Humility in the LXX Septuagint, Apocr. Of Humility as the animating principle of Christian character, Jesus Himself was the great example, being ‘lowly in heart’ (Matthew 11:29), not merely in appearance like the professional religious leaders of the time. Pharisaism is the deadly enemy of Humility or the religion of healthy-mindedness. Elsewhere Humility is enjoined, along with kindred graces, as the means of averting unholy disputes and of promoting co-operation in the Church and among the members of the Christian society (Matthew 18:4; Matthew 23:12, Ephesians 4:2, Philippians 2:3, Colossians 3:12). An exceptional use of the term occurs in Colossians 2:18; Colossians 2:23, where the Apostle guards his readers against the counterfeit of this virtue (‘a voluntary Humility’). ‘Humility is a vice with heathen moralists, but a virtue with Christian apostles’ (Lightfoot on Colossians 2:18). —I admit there is no Greek word of good credit for the virtue of Humility. —Yes; a shabby sort of Humility. Humility as a sovereign grace is the creation of Christianity. The conception of Humility, therefore, as it controls the Christian, lies outside the system of Aristotle (see Nic. This difference between Greek and Christian ideas of greatness and Humility is fundamental, and the change was brought about by Christ’s revelation of the character of God. This measured efflorescence of pride reappears in Christ’s portraiture of the Pharisee in the temple; but the Publican, the opposite and acceptable type, shows how influential, in Christian experience, is the thought of God, and how closely connected are Humility, prayer, and confession of sin. 2), Humility comes first, second, third, and always, among the precepts of the Christian religion, and it marks the cleavage between Greek and Christian ideals. Martinean asks—‘What meek and lowly soul was ever known to set itself forth as such and commend its own Humility as the model for others?’ and adds, ‘did a Saviour bear such testimony of himself, his testimony would not be true’ (Seat of Authority in Religion2 [2] , p. His Humility clothed and concealed His essential dignity, and in speaking as He did He was conscious at the same time of standing in a unique relation to God (Matthew 11:27, cf. Indeed, the union on Christ’s part of ‘unbounded personal pretensions’ with an unconscious Humility that regarded His importance to the world as ‘an objective fact with which his own opinion of himself had nothing to do’ (Ecce Homo, ch. Christ’s Humility, however, does not rest on a phrase, but was carried out in the lowly setting of His earthly life. Passing from Christ’s example, the main lines of His teaching are two...
(1) Humility in relation to God, or the Law of Grace. —We are introduced here to the most powerful among the motives to Humility, and to a relation deeper than any that influences us in the society of our fellow-men. In Wendt’s language—‘Humility is the conscious lowliness we feel before God in view of His superabundant love and holy majesty, and in contrast to our own unworthiness, guilt, and entire dependence on His grace’ (The Teaching of Jesus, vol. In the parable, which is a gem of teaching on this point, Jesus enforces on us the duty of Humility towards God, the need of genuine self-abasement and confession of sin, as we see and feel our unworthiness in the Divine presence (Luke 18:9-14). Dowden, in writing of Milton’s view of the intercourse between God and the soul, remarks—‘There are two humilities—that which bows and that which soars, the Humility of a servant who looks down, the Humility of a son who gazes up. Milton’s Humility invigorates itself in the effort to ascend. This is the Humility that Christ welcomes, and that makes religion not stiff and heavy with ceremonial, but simple, reverent, glad, and pleasing to God. ...
(2) Humility in relation to men, or the Law of Service. —While it is true that Humility ‘is not primarily concerned with our relation to other men, but with our relation to God, and springs from an intellectually true view of that relation’ (Illingworth, Christian Character, 1905, p. ...
(a) The child, the unconscious type of Humility (Matthew 18:1-4, Mark 9:33-37). Christ first saw the hatefulness and unworkableness of a world without a child!...
(b) The servant, the practical example of Humility (Matthew 20:20-28; Matthew 23:1-12, Mark 10:35-45, Luke 22:24-27, John 13:1-17). It is open to all to do some simple deed of kindness, helpfulness, and self-denial, and no action inspired by Christ-like love and Humility will pass unnoticed or unrewarded by the gracious Master and great Servant of all (Matthew 25:40). Humility and character. —In ordinary experience, Humility is related to sin and penitence, and marks the feeling of unworthiness in the light of the illimitable moral ideal. ‘This, however, is not one of the essential conditions of Humility, for we know that Humility was also an element in Christ’s character’ (Ritschl). The greatness of the Baptist was rooted in his Humility and utter freedom from jealousy (John 3:27; John 3:30), and this grace has been the soil and safety of saints ever since. Keble treated others with a ‘humbling Humility’ (Lock’s Life, p. 600: ‘The first personal impression that he made on all who met him was one of wonder at his Humility’). The child, to which Christ pointed, represents Humility as part of the essence and permanence of Christian character, and remains an immortal type, preserving the wonder and bloom of the moral world. Humility and kindred virtues. Humility is ‘part of a great moral whole. Instead of proscribing, it promotes the growth of virtues unlike yet not unfriendly to itself’ (Liddon on ‘Humility and Action’ in University Sermons). Thus it is closely connected with Truth, for Humility or confession that does not rest on the recognition of facts is insincere and worthless. It is inspired by Love; ministering love appears always in the guise of Humility. Meekness rests on Humility as its foundation (Trench), and Patience expresses along with Humility the practical virtue of the Christian religion, especially called for and tested in the world (Ritschl). Humility and self-consciousness. —It has been the tendency of certain schools of theology and piety to make Humility the result of self-contemplation, arrived at by the soul’s reaction upon itself. Humility is ‘the eye which sees everything except itself’ (quoted in Ritschl). Work and the school of life are the best discipline of Humility, as of the other virtues. ...
On the other hand, the externalizing of Humility and the danger of parading it in rules and ceremonies that lead to self-humiliation must equally be avoided. Ritschl: ‘Even in ascetic forms of worship there is no particular form of expression necessary to Humility’). Humility and individuality. Humility or the fear of God should banish all unworthy fear
Humility - HUMILITY. In Judaism and the Rabbinical literature we meet with a variety of examples and maxims enforcing the truth that ‘God is the highest type of Humility. ’ These anticipations prepare us for the new and enlarged conception of Humility which rills the NT, and was embodied in the teaching, example, and character of Jesus Christ. The moral quality of our Saviour’s personality lies here (Matthew 11:29), and on this foundation of astonishing Humility, exemplified on the cross, St. It may be claimed that the gospel alone has popularized Humility, but the temper of Christ’s disciples in every age proves that it is an excellence of rare and difficult attainment. In contrast to the low and servile sense attaching to it in classical writings, Humility in the LXX Septuagint, Apocr. Of Humility as the animating principle of Christian character, Jesus Himself was the great example, being ‘lowly in heart’ (Matthew 11:29), not merely in appearance like the professional religious leaders of the time. Pharisaism is the deadly enemy of Humility or the religion of healthy-mindedness. Elsewhere Humility is enjoined, along with kindred graces, as the means of averting unholy disputes and of promoting co-operation in the Church and among the members of the Christian society (Matthew 18:4; Matthew 23:12, Ephesians 4:2, Philippians 2:3, Colossians 3:12). An exceptional use of the term occurs in Colossians 2:18; Colossians 2:23, where the Apostle guards his readers against the counterfeit of this virtue (‘a voluntary Humility’). ‘Humility is a vice with heathen moralists, but a virtue with Christian apostles’ (Lightfoot on Colossians 2:18). —I admit there is no Greek word of good credit for the virtue of Humility. —Yes; a shabby sort of Humility. Humility as a sovereign grace is the creation of Christianity. The conception of Humility, therefore, as it controls the Christian, lies outside the system of Aristotle (see Nic. This difference between Greek and Christian ideas of greatness and Humility is fundamental, and the change was brought about by Christ’s revelation of the character of God. This measured efflorescence of pride reappears in Christ’s portraiture of the Pharisee in the temple; but the Publican, the opposite and acceptable type, shows how influential, in Christian experience, is the thought of God, and how closely connected are Humility, prayer, and confession of sin. 2), Humility comes first, second, third, and always, among the precepts of the Christian religion, and it marks the cleavage between Greek and Christian ideals. Martinean asks—‘What meek and lowly soul was ever known to set itself forth as such and commend its own Humility as the model for others?’ and adds, ‘did a Saviour bear such testimony of himself, his testimony would not be true’ (Seat of Authority in Religion2 [2] , p. His Humility clothed and concealed His essential dignity, and in speaking as He did He was conscious at the same time of standing in a unique relation to God (Matthew 11:27, cf. Indeed, the union on Christ’s part of ‘unbounded personal pretensions’ with an unconscious Humility that regarded His importance to the world as ‘an objective fact with which his own opinion of himself had nothing to do’ (Ecce Homo, ch. Christ’s Humility, however, does not rest on a phrase, but was carried out in the lowly setting of His earthly life. Passing from Christ’s example, the main lines of His teaching are two...
(1) Humility in relation to God, or the Law of Grace. —We are introduced here to the most powerful among the motives to Humility, and to a relation deeper than any that influences us in the society of our fellow-men. In Wendt’s language—‘Humility is the conscious lowliness we feel before God in view of His superabundant love and holy majesty, and in contrast to our own unworthiness, guilt, and entire dependence on His grace’ (The Teaching of Jesus, vol. In the parable, which is a gem of teaching on this point, Jesus enforces on us the duty of Humility towards God, the need of genuine self-abasement and confession of sin, as we see and feel our unworthiness in the Divine presence (Luke 18:9-14). Dowden, in writing of Milton’s view of the intercourse between God and the soul, remarks—‘There are two humilities—that which bows and that which soars, the Humility of a servant who looks down, the Humility of a son who gazes up. Milton’s Humility invigorates itself in the effort to ascend. This is the Humility that Christ welcomes, and that makes religion not stiff and heavy with ceremonial, but simple, reverent, glad, and pleasing to God. ...
(2) Humility in relation to men, or the Law of Service. —While it is true that Humility ‘is not primarily concerned with our relation to other men, but with our relation to God, and springs from an intellectually true view of that relation’ (Illingworth, Christian Character, 1905, p. ...
(a) The child, the unconscious type of Humility (Matthew 18:1-4, Mark 9:33-37). Christ first saw the hatefulness and unworkableness of a world without a child!...
(b) The servant, the practical example of Humility (Matthew 20:20-28; Matthew 23:1-12, Mark 10:35-45, Luke 22:24-27, John 13:1-17). It is open to all to do some simple deed of kindness, helpfulness, and self-denial, and no action inspired by Christ-like love and Humility will pass unnoticed or unrewarded by the gracious Master and great Servant of all (Matthew 25:40). Humility and character. —In ordinary experience, Humility is related to sin and penitence, and marks the feeling of unworthiness in the light of the illimitable moral ideal. ‘This, however, is not one of the essential conditions of Humility, for we know that Humility was also an element in Christ’s character’ (Ritschl). The greatness of the Baptist was rooted in his Humility and utter freedom from jealousy (John 3:27; John 3:30), and this grace has been the soil and safety of saints ever since. Keble treated others with a ‘humbling Humility’ (Lock’s Life, p. 600: ‘The first personal impression that he made on all who met him was one of wonder at his Humility’). The child, to which Christ pointed, represents Humility as part of the essence and permanence of Christian character, and remains an immortal type, preserving the wonder and bloom of the moral world. Humility and kindred virtues. Humility is ‘part of a great moral whole. Instead of proscribing, it promotes the growth of virtues unlike yet not unfriendly to itself’ (Liddon on ‘Humility and Action’ in University Sermons). Thus it is closely connected with Truth, for Humility or confession that does not rest on the recognition of facts is insincere and worthless. It is inspired by Love; ministering love appears always in the guise of Humility. Meekness rests on Humility as its foundation (Trench), and Patience expresses along with Humility the practical virtue of the Christian religion, especially called for and tested in the world (Ritschl). Humility and self-consciousness. —It has been the tendency of certain schools of theology and piety to make Humility the result of self-contemplation, arrived at by the soul’s reaction upon itself. Humility is ‘the eye which sees everything except itself’ (quoted in Ritschl). Work and the school of life are the best discipline of Humility, as of the other virtues. ...
On the other hand, the externalizing of Humility and the danger of parading it in rules and ceremonies that lead to self-humiliation must equally be avoided. Ritschl: ‘Even in ascetic forms of worship there is no particular form of expression necessary to Humility’). Humility and individuality. Humility or the fear of God should banish all unworthy fear. In the adaptation of the Christian Church to society, and to reconcile conflicting interests, it requires Humility ‘to adjust men in due order for the purposes of life’ (T. Humility and science. Hutton has well observed that Humility ‘means the docility of learners towards a teacher infinitely above them,’ and that it requires wisdom to see the true relations between different kinds of knowledge, and to keep physical knowledge from being turned to a false and dangerous use in the sphere of moral truth. Here also the master of truth and knowledge must take the place of a servant, and illustrate his greatness by his Humility—‘and science is humble only when it uses its knowledge and its ignorance alike to help other men and not to lord it over them’ (Essay on ‘The Humility of Science’ in Aspects of Religious and Scientific Thought, 1901). ‘Humility in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible vol. 264; Rothe, Sermons (‘The Humility of the Lord’—Clark’s translation); Liddon, Some Words of Christ (‘True Greatness’); Church, Cathed. Browning’s exquisite little poem, ‘Humility’ (Asolando); Kip
Matthew - The apostle and evangelist, or, as he himself in great Humility writes, Matthew the publican, than, Matthew 10:3
Toah - (toh' uh) Personal name perhaps meaning, “humility
Humble Access, Prayer of - The name given to the beautiful prayeroffered in great Humility just before the Consecration in the HolyCommunion, beginning, "We do not presume," etc
Humbly - In a humble manner with modest submissiveness with Humility
Humility - That Humility does not oblige a man to wrong the truth, or himself, by entertaining a meaner or worse opinion of himself than he deserves. Nor does it oblige a man to treat himself with contempt in his words or actions: it looks more like affectation than Humility, when a man says such things in his own dispraise as others know, or he himself believes, to be false: and it is plain, also, that this is often done merely as a bait to catch the praises of others. ...
Humility consists, ...
1. ...
True Humility will express itself, ...
1. ...
The advantages of Humility are numerous: ...
1. That heaven is a place of Humility, Revelation 5:8 ...
3. That Humility is the way to honour, Proverbs 16:18 ...
5. 1; Watts on Humility; Baxter's Christian Directory, 5: 1
Humility - The words ‘humility’ and ‘humble’, which are from the same basic word, have a variety of meanings. Humility in this sense is one of the virtues most pleasing to God. ...
Jesus Christ is the great example of Humility. Humility characterized Christ’s kingship (Matthew 21:5), and only through Humility can anyone enter his kingdom (Matthew 18:1-4). ...
Christians have a responsibility to develop Humility in their lives. If they are to learn Humility, they must be willing to take the lowest place and serve others (Luke 22:24-27; John 13:3-17). Such Humility will help produce genuine fellowship in the church
Humility And Cheerpulness - Observe the peculiar characters of the grass which adapt it especially for the service of man, are its apparent Humility and cheerfulness. Its Humility, in that it seems created only for lowest service, appointed to be trodden on, and fed upon. ' ...
So Ruskin poetically writes of the grass; should it not be thus with believers? Their flesh is like to grass for perishing, it were well if their spirits were like to grass for Humility and cheerfulness in service
Contentment - Contentment, without external honor, is Humility
Wallow - Jeremiah 6:26 (b) This type represents the attitude of deep Humility before GOD because of sin
Vainly - Humility teaches us not to think vainly nor vauntingly of ourselves
Humility - Christ has set us an example of Humility (Philippians 2:6-8 ). It is a "great paradox in Christianity that it makes Humility the avenue to glory
Desolation - Marked by sadness, fear, despondency, agitation, scruples, an inclination towards earthly pleasures, it is sometimes permitted by God as a trial, lesson of Humility, or punishment for lukewarmness
Ashes - In the language of Scripture, ashes are sometimes spoken of to denote great Humility and contrition of heart
Downwards - ) From a higher to a lower condition; toward misery, Humility, disgrace, or ruin
Crave - ) To ask with earnestness or importunity; to ask with submission or Humility; to beg; to entreat; to beseech; to implore
Lay Confession - Although lay confession was highly commended by theologians of that epoch as an act of Humility and of penance, it was not regarded as possessing the sacramental efficacy of confession made to a priest
Profession - Yet not ostnetatiously, but with Humility and meekness
Cringe - ) To draw one's self together as in fear or servility; to bend or crouch with base Humility; to wince; hence; to make court in a degrading manner; to fawn
Modesty - ) The quality or state of being modest; that lowly temper which accompanies a moderate estimate of one's own worth and importance; absence of self-assertion, arrogance, and presumption; Humility respecting one's own merit
Humility (2) - The whole Roman language, even with all the improvements of the Augustan age, does not afford so much as a name for Humility (the word from whence we borrow this, as is well known, bearing in Latin a quite different meaning), no, nor was one found in all the copious language of the Greeks, till it was made by the great Apostle
Humility (2) - The whole Roman language, even with all the improvements of the Augustan age, does not afford so much as a name for Humility (the word from whence we borrow this, as is well known, bearing in Latin a quite different meaning), no, nor was one found in all the copious language of the Greeks, till it was made by the great Apostle
Handmaid, Handmaiden - These words often refer in scripture to a female slave, as applied to Hagar the Egyptian, Genesis 25:12 ; but were also used by women themselves as a term of Humility, as when Hannah spake to Jehovah and to Eli, 1 Samuel 1:11,16,18 ; as Abigail to David, 1 Samuel 25:24-41 ; and by Mary and Elizabeth as handmaids of the Lord
Meekness - In an evangelical sense, Humility resignation submission to the divine will, without murmuring or peevishness opposed to pride, arrogance and refractoriness
Crouch - ) To bend, or cause to bend, as in Humility or fear
Smooth - 1: λεῖος (Strong's #3006 — Adjective — leois — li'-os ) "smooth," occurs in Luke 3:5 , figurative of the change in Israel from self-righteousness, pride and other forms of evil, to repentance, Humility and submission
Beggar - One who supplicates with Humility a petitioner but in this sense rarely used, as the word has become a term of contempt
Beggar - ) One who begs; one who asks or entreats earnestly, or with Humility; a petitioner
Humility - Thus Humility is necessary for salvation
Temper - Evans's Practical Discourses on the Christian Temper; and the various articles, LOVE, PATIENCE, Humility, FORTITUDE, &c
Aherne, Cornelius - A man of profound learning, his Humility and distaste for popular acclaim deterred him from any display of his knowledge
John Cantius, Saint - Renowned for his Humility and charity, and the practise of mortification, many miracles are ascribed to him
Cantius, John, Saint - Renowned for his Humility and charity, and the practise of mortification, many miracles are ascribed to him
Progress: Measure of - Should we not all cast overboard our log? There are various ways by which with readiness we may measure our progress: our prayers, our labours, our patience, our faith, our communion with God, our Humility, may all serve as logs by which to measure our sailing pace
Feet - " (Proverbs 6:13) The sense is, by motions of his feet he conveyed somewhat indecent and unbecoming "To leave off the sandals from the feet," was an indication of sorrow, and of great Humility. (Exodus 3:5) To sit at the feet of another, implied Humility. Never surely, was there an instance of equal Humility. But Jesus, who hath all things, and is himself infinitely superior to all things, is unequalled in Humility
Humility - Humility is the child of knowledge
Irony - ...
A mode of speech expressing a sense contrary to that which the speaker intends to convey as, Nero was a very virtuous prince Pope Hildebrand was remarkable for his meekness and Humility
Seraphim - ( Isaiah 6:2 ) They are described as having each of them three pairs of wings, with one of which they covered their faces (a token of Humility); with the second they covered their feet (a token of respect); while with the third they flew
Cantalice, Felix of, Saint - In his Humility and simplicity, Felix styled himself the "Ass of the Capuchins
Falconieri, Alexis, Saint - Deeming himself unworthy of Holy Orders, Alexis embraced a life of poverty and Humility, soliciting donations for the community in the streets of his native city
Self-Knowledge - and is of the greatest utility, as it is the spring of self-possession, leads to Humility, steadfastness, charity, moderation, self-denial, and promotes our usefulness in the world
Contentment - It arises from the inward disposition, and is the offspring of Humility, and of an intelligent consideration of the rectitude and benignity of divine providence (Psalm 96:1,2 ; 145 ), the greatness of the divine promises (2 Peter 1:4 ), and our own unworthiness (Genesis 32:10 ); as well as from the view the gospel opens up to us of rest and peace hereafter (Romans 5:2 )
Alexis Falconieri, Saint - Deeming himself unworthy of Holy Orders, Alexis embraced a life of poverty and Humility, soliciting donations for the community in the streets of his native city
Epistles of Saint Peter - The first abounds with admonitions to lead a Christian life, outlining the duties of subjects to the emperor, of slaves towards masters, of wives and husbands, mutual charity, patience, and Humility
Profound - ) Bending low, exhibiting or expressing deep Humility; lowly; submissive; as, a profound bow
the Wedding Guest Who Sat Down in the Lowest Room - No man can humiliate you and clothe you with shame if you are always clothed with Humility. Put on the sackcloth of Humility immediately and always. "Yea, all of you be clothed with Humility; for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble. "...
Only, there is Humility and Humility. And the best kind of Humility is that kind which Thomas Shepard, so far as I know, was the first to call "evangelical Humility. Hear then, what this master in Israel says:-"Evangelical Humility is the sense that a Christian man has of his own utter insufficiency, utter despicableness, and utter odiousness: with an always answerable frame of heart. This Humility is peculiar to the true saints. The very essence of evangelical Humility consists in such Humility as becomes a man in himself exceeding sinful but now under a dispensation of grace. Whether they are to be men of all literature, or men of one book only, and that the ledger, see to it that they mix all their books with Humility. I will not quarrel with your choice for them if only you mix it well with Humility. "All our Humility on earth will come to its head in heaven," says Samuel Rutherford
Shoe - ...
Matthew 3:11 (c) These are literal shoes, but symbolical of the Spirit of Humility in doing the least and lowliest things for another
Abase - , tapeinos, "lowly," tapeinois, "humiliation," and tapeinophrosune, "humility
Avellino, Andrew, Saint - Renowned for his zeal for strict religious discipline and for his Humility and piety, he was commissioned by his superior to found houses at Milan and Piacenza, and held the post of superior at several convents
Andrew Avellino, Saint - Renowned for his zeal for strict religious discipline and for his Humility and piety, he was commissioned by his superior to found houses at Milan and Piacenza, and held the post of superior at several convents
Dog, - (Job 30:1 ) Then also, as now troops of hungry and semi-wild dogs used to wander about the fields and the streets of the cities, devouring dead bodies and other offal, (1 Kings 14:11 ; 21:19,23 ; 22:38 ; Psalm 59:6 ) and thus became so savage and fierce and such objects of dislike that fierce and cruel enemies are poetically styled dogs in (Psalm 22:16,20 ) moreover the dog being an unclean animal, (Isaiah 66:3 ) the epithets dog, dead dog, dog's head, were used as terms of reproach or of Humility in speaking of one's self
Meekness - A personality trait of gentleness and Humility, the opposite of which is pride. See Humility ; Patience ; Pride ; Poor; Spiritual Gifts
John Colombini, Blessed - Thereafter he was distinguished for Humility, meekness, and liberality to the poor, culminating in his dividing among them all his possessions
Philemon, Epistle to - He speaks, therefore, with that peculiar grace of Humility and courtesy which has, under the reign of Christianity, developed the spirit of chivalry and what is called 'the character of a gentleman,' certainly very little known in the old Greek and Roman civilization" (Dr
Sardonyx - The black was regarded as typifying Humility, the white chastity, and the red modesty or martyrdom
Prostrate - ) To throw down, or cause to fall in Humility or adoration; to cause to bow in humble reverence; used reflexively; as, he prostrated himself
Epistle to the Romans - In the Epistle he dwells on the justification of mankind through faith in Christ, the sinfulness of the world, the meaning and fruits of justification, why Israel failed to come unto the law of justice, what faith is, and why it is essential, and its fruits, viz:, Humility, obedience, unity, and charity
Romans, Epistle to the - In the Epistle he dwells on the justification of mankind through faith in Christ, the sinfulness of the world, the meaning and fruits of justification, why Israel failed to come unto the law of justice, what faith is, and why it is essential, and its fruits, viz:, Humility, obedience, unity, and charity
Margaret Mary Alacoque, Saint - Having vowed to consecrate herself to the religious life, she entered the Visitation Convent at Paray, where she was distinguished for obedience, Humility, and love of suffering
Dog - Hazael's words, "Thy servant which is but a dog" (2 Kings 8:13 ), are spoken in mock Humility=impossible that one so contemptible as he should attain to such power
Job - Job is represented as a chieftain of immense wealth and high rank, blameless in all the relations of life, subjected to special trials, which he endured with Humility, and finally was rewarded by marked blessings and great prosperity
Alacoque, Margaret Mary, Saint - Having vowed to consecrate herself to the religious life, she entered the Visitation Convent at Paray, where she was distinguished for obedience, Humility, and love of suffering
Pelagianism - Therefore, there is no need of redemption and the crucifixion of Jesus is merely a supreme example of love, Humility, obedience, and sacrifice
Nicarete, a Lady of Nicomedia - Her Humility and self-distrust would never allow her to become a deaconess, and she declined the office of lady superior of the consecrated virgins when Chrysostom earnestly pressed it on her
Meekness - In the Bible, meekness is so closely linked with Humility, gentleness and kindness that the reader may have difficulty distinguishing between them. (See also Humility
Footwashing - In this context the statement of John the Baptist that he was unworthy to untie the sandal (to wash the feet) of the One coming after him (Mark 1:7 ) indicates great Humility. Martin Luther criticized ecclesiastical authorities who washed feet as an act of Humility and then demanded greater Humility in return
Devotion to the Pure Heart of Mary - Devotion to the pure Heart of Mary was inspired by the love of that Heart for God and man, and also, from the desire to honor the Immaculate Heart which was a symbol of all that was purest and best, of all heroic virtue, of charity, of purity, of Humility
Holy Name, the - The 18th Canon of the English Church (1604) gives the meaningof this custom as follows: "When in time of Divine Service the LordJesus shall be mentioned, due and lowly reverence shall be doneby all persons present, as it hath been accustomed, testifying bythese outward ceremonies and gestures their inward Humility,Christian resolution, and due acknowledgment that the Lord JESUSCHRIST, the true and Eternal Son of God, is the only Saviour of theworld, in whom alone all mercies, graces and promises of God tomankind, for this life and the life to come, are fully and whollycomprised
Foot - Most of the metaphorical or figurative usages are connected with the idea of the feet as the lowest part of the body, opposed to the head; hence falling at a man’s feet, as the extreme of reverence or Humility, kissing the feet ( Luke 7:38 ), sitting at the feet, as the attitude of the pupil ( Luke 10:39 , Acts 22:3 ). The lesson is not merely one of Humility (cf. Besides the lesson of Humility, there is also the symbolism of purification
Inconsistencies - But what are those pictures in the Russian churches, many of them made to stand out in relief with solid plates of gold and silver? Why, these are pictures of the Virgin or of her Son, as the case may be, and your anti-idolatrous Greek bows before these with voluntary Humility
Tenor - Does not the whole tenor of the divine law positively require Humility and meekness to all men? ...
2
Greatness of God - Humility, Job xlii 5, 6
Desertion - As all things, however, are under the divine control, so even desertion, or, as it is sometimes expressed in Scripture, "the hidings of God's face, " may be useful to excite Humility, exercise faith and patience, detach us from the world, prompt to more vigorous action, bring us to look more to God as the fountain of happiness, conform us to his word, and increase our desires for that state of blessedness which is to come
Pride - " The imperfection of our nature, our scanty knowledge, contracted powers, narrow conceptions, and moral inability, are strong motives to excite us to Humility. ...
See Humility
Children And Dogs - Faith, Humility, and persevering prayer, however, such as that of this woman, merit better treatment than that accorded to the ordinary run of men, and to her, the whelp, was thrown a large crumb from the delicacies the children actually failed to appreciate
Sandals, Shoes - Shoes were also removed as evidence of Humility in the presence of kings
Quietness - It indicates Humility, modesty, and sobriety of mind
Washing the Hands And Feet - (Genesis 18:4 ; 19:2 ; 24:32 ; 43:24 ; Judges 19:21 ) It was a yet more complimentary act, betokening equally Humility and affection, if the host himself performed the office for his guest
James, Son of Zebedee - This raised the indignation of the other disciples; but the Lord taught them all a lesson of Humility: He Himself had come to minister and to give His life a ransom for many
Seraphim - Each had three sets of wings: with one pair he covered his face, in token of reverence; with another he covered his feet, in token of Humility; andwith the third he flew to accomplish his mission
Feeling - ) Any state or condition of emotion; the exercise of the capacity for emotion; any mental state whatever; as, a right or a wrong feeling in the heart; our angry or kindly feelings; a feeling of pride or of Humility
Ascetical Theology - It expounds, in the degree proper to this mode of life, the Christian virtues of poverty, chastity, obedience, Humility, mortification, charity, etc
Sanctification - Sanctification comprehends all the graces of knowledge, faith, repentance, love, Humility, zeal, patience, &c, and the exercise of them in our conduct toward God or man:...
Galatians 5:22-24 ; 1 Peter 1:15-16 ; Matthew 5:6-7
Theology, Ascetical - It expounds, in the degree proper to this mode of life, the Christian virtues of poverty, chastity, obedience, Humility, mortification, charity, etc
Paul, Conversion of Saint - We find him described by two names, Saul and Paul, thefirst being Hebrew, relating to his Jewish origin and the otherLatin, assumed by him, as some think, at his conversion, as an actof Humility, styling himself less than the least of all saints
Down - ) From a higher to a lower position, literally or figuratively; in a descending direction; from the top of an ascent; from an upright position; to the ground or floor; to or into a lower or an inferior condition; as, into a state of Humility, disgrace, misery, and the like; into a state of rest; - used with verbs indicating motion. ) In a low or the lowest position, literally or figuratively; at the bottom of a decent; below the horizon; of the ground; in a condition of Humility, dejection, misery, and the like; in a state of quiet
Temptation - They may be wisely permitted to show us our weakness, to try our faith, to promote our Humility, and to learn us to place our dependence on a superior power: yet we must not run into them, but watch and pray; avoid sinful company: consider the love, sufferings, and constancy of Christ, and the awful consequences of falling a victim to them
Gentleness - As Yahweh's representative, the messianic king comes in Humility and gentleness (Zechariah 9:9 ). Let believers clothe themselves "with compassion, kindness, Humility, gentleness and patience" (Colossians 3:12 )
Bull - ) A grotesque blunder in language; an apparent congruity, but real incongruity, of ideas, contained in a form of expression; so called, perhaps, from the apparent incongruity between the dictatorial nature of the pope's bulls and his professions of Humility
Devotion - Among these may be reckoned a profound Humility in the sight of God, a high veneration for his presence and attributes, an ardent zeal for his worship and honour, a constant imitation of our Saviour's divine example, a diffusive charity for men of all denominations, a generous and unwearied self-denial, a total resignation to Providence, an increasing esteem for the Gospel, with clearer and firmer hopes of that immortal life which it has brought to light
Doctrine - Thus the idea of God's sovereignty excites submission; his power and justice promote fear; his holiness, Humility and purity; his goodness, a ground of hope; his love excites joy; the obscurity of his providence requires patience; his faithfulness, confidence
Creep - ) To move or behave with servility or exaggerated Humility; to fawn; as, a creeping sycophant
Lowliness - Meekness and Humility
Stoics - But egotism and pride are at the root, whereas Humility is at the foundation of Christianity
Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius - There are other great directive meditations: the Two Standards, the Three Classes of Men, and the Three Modes of Humility; and the second week culminates in the election of a state of life, or of methods of amending the one already adopted
Stagirus, Friend of Chrysostom - Nilus highly commends his piety, Humility, and contrition, but uses language which indicates that his attacks did not entirely pass away (Nilus, Epp
David - in His Races - Your meekness, and your Humility, and your industry, and so on, proceeds the incomparable Puritan preacher, must spring up, not only out of your constitution and your temperament; it must spring up out of your heart, as your heart is more and more softened, and tamed, and humbled, and sweetened by the grace of God and by the indwelling Spirit of Christ, Many a man, the sometime President of Magdalene is continually warning us, may live and die a model and a praise of 'civil virtues,' who never all his days comes within sight of the first principles of gospel holiness. ...
I was always exceedingly pleased with that saying of Chrysostom, says Calvin, 'The foundation of our philosophy is Humility. So if you ask me concerning the graces of the Christian character, I would answer firstly, secondly, and thirdly, and for ever, Humility. ' And thus it is that God sets open His school for teaching us Humility every day. Humility is the grace of graces for us sinners to learn. And so with Humility, which is harder to learn than the best Greek accent. You must go to all the schools, and put yourself under all the disciplines that the great experts practise, if you would put on true Humility. ...
Once let David, or any other man, begin to taste the heavenly sweetness of true Humility over against pride, and over against rebellion, and over against retaliation, and he will become positively enamoured and intoxicated with his humiliations. Nay, things that would seem to you to have nothing in the world to do either with my past sins or with my present sinfulness-let me have David's holy instinct, let me lay down David's holy rule, to look at everything of that kind that comes to me as so many divine calls and divinely opened doors to a deeper Humility. Graces also grow by what they feed on; and Humility grows by deliberately dieting itself on such humiliations as these, both human and divine. And evangelical Humility grows by being fed, and by feeding itself on evangelical humiliations
Decrees of God - ...
This doctrine ought to produce in our minds "humility, in view of the infinite greatness and sovereignty of God, and of the dependence of man; confidence and implicit reliance upon wisdom, rightenousness, goodness, and immutability of God's purpose
Religion - 1: θρησκεία (Strong's #2356 — Noun Feminine — threseia — thrace-ki'-ah ) signifies "religion" in its external aspect (akin to threskos, see below), "religious worship," especially the ceremonial service of "religion;" it is used of the "religion" of the Jews, Acts 26:5 ; of the "worshiping" of angels, Colossians 2:18 , which they themselves repudiate (Revelation 22:8,9 ); "there was an officious parade of Humility in selecting these lower beings as intercessors rather than appealing directly to the Throne of Grace" (Lightfoot); in James 1:26,27 the writer purposely uses the word to set in contrast that which is unreal and deceptive, and the "pure religion" which consists in visiting "the fatherless and widows in their affliction," and in keeping oneself "unspotted from the world
Meekness - He shared their Humility that they might share His glory
Capernaum - Here he healed the centurion’s palsied servant ( Matthew 8:5-13 , Luke 7:2-10 ), provided the half-shekel for the Temple tribute ( Matthew 17:24 ), taught in the synagogue ( Mark 1:21 , Luke 4:31 , John 6:59 ), performed many miracles ( Mark 1:23 to Mark 2:12 , Luke 4:33-41 ), taught Humility to the disciples ( Mark 9:33 ), healed a nobleman’s son by a word from Cana ( John 4:46 )
Maid, Maiden - Both terms are used as expressions of deep Humility ( Ruth 3:9 ; 1 Samuel 25:24-31 ; 1 Samuel 28:21 ; 2 Samuel 14:6 ; 1Kings 1:13,1 Kings 1:17 )
Poverty - ; is attended with submission to the divine will; contentment in our situation; meekness and forbearance as to others, and genuine Humility as to ourselves
Paul as a Pastor - All united to a Humility, and an intimacy, and a confidingness, that always carry captive to Paul the hearts of all men who have hearts. And hence his stateliness, and hence his high seriousness, and hence his unparalleled Humility, and hence his overpowering authority, and hence his whole, otherwise unaccountable, life, pastoral and all. There was a colossal pride in Paul, and at the same time a prostrate Humility, such that they had never seen anything like it in any other man; a submissiveness and a self-surrender to all men, such that, as those three years went on, taught to all the teachable men among them far more for their own character and conduct than all his inspired preaching. ...
"And with all Humility of mind. " Evangelical Humility, as Jonathan Edwards so splendidly treats it, lay deep down like a foundation-stone under all Paul's attainments as a saint of God and as an apostle of Jesus Christ. Till, whatever other gifts and graces a minister may be lacking in, it is impossible for him to lack Humility. With all Humility of mind, says Paul to the assembled elders of Ephesus. Humility of all kinds, he means; and drawn out of all experiences; and shown to all sorts of people. Till, both for a garment of office, and for a grace of character, a minister is clothed from head to foot with spiritual and evangelical Humility. And, with all your preaching, and with all your pastoral work performed like Paul's, in intention and in industry at least, you also will surely be able, with great Humility as well as with great assurance of faith, to bid your people goodbye, and your kirk-session, saying-And now, brethren, I commend you to God, and to the word of His grace, which is able to build you up, and to give you an inheritance among all them which are sanctified
Matthew, Gospel of Saint - The 28 chapters of the Gospel may be divided according to the following topics Jesus is proven the Messias in His ancestry, birth, and infancy (1-2); He is shown to be the Messias in the preparation for the public ministry (3-4); He manifests Himself as the Messias in public life, being teacher and legislator (5-7), wonder-worker (8-9), founder of the Kingdom of Goa (10-25); He is shown to be the Messias in the Humility of His sufferings and the glory of His Resurreetion (26-28)
Sto'Ics - The ethical system of the Stoics has been commonly supposed to have a close connection with Christian morality; but the morality of stoicism is essentially based on pride, that of Christianity on Humility; the one upholds individual independence, the other absolute faith in another; the one looks for consolation in the issue of fate, the other in Providence; the one is limited by Periods of cosmical ruin, the other is consummated in a personal resurrection
Child - ...
Children are also spoken of as representing simplicity and Humility (Matthew 19:13-15 ; Mark 10:13-16 ; Luke 18:15-17 )
Contentment - Contentment arises not from a man's outward condition, but from his inward disposition, and is the genuine offspring of Humility, attended with a fixed habitual sense of God's particular providence, the recollection of past mercies, and a just estimate of the true nature of all earthly things Motives to contentment arise from the consideration of the rectitude of the Divine government, Psalms 97:1-2
Washing - The Lord Jesus by washing His disciples' feet taught our need of His cleansing, and His great Humility whereby that cleansing was effected (compare 1 Samuel 25:41; 1 Timothy 5:10)
Abigail - As soon as she met David, she impressed him with her beauty, Humility, praise, and advice (1 Samuel 25:32-33 )
Copy - Copy the Savior in his Humility and obedience
Express - A downcast eye or look may express Humility, shame or guilt
Gospel of Saint Matthew - The 28 chapters of the Gospel may be divided according to the following topics Jesus is proven the Messias in His ancestry, birth, and infancy (1-2); He is shown to be the Messias in the preparation for the public ministry (3-4); He manifests Himself as the Messias in public life, being teacher and legislator (5-7), wonder-worker (8-9), founder of the Kingdom of Goa (10-25); He is shown to be the Messias in the Humility of His sufferings and the glory of His Resurreetion (26-28)
Towel - And then with that unequalled Humility which distinguished the Lord of life and glory, washing his disciples' feet and wiping them with the towel wherewith he was girded. Was there ever an instance of Humility like this? and at a time, it should be remembered, also, Jesus knew that "all things were given into his hand as Mediator, the Sovereign of heaven and earth
Pride - (See also BOASTING; Humility; HYPOCRISY
Calf - ...
Leviticus 9:2-3 (c) This may be taken as a type of JESUS in His youth and His Humility
Indulgence - The following paraphrase well presents the contrast between the asceticism which "practically treats the body as an enemy, and the Pauline view which treats it as a potential instrument of a righteous life:" ordinances, "which in fact have a specious look of wisdom (where there is no true wisdom), by the employment of self-chosen acts of religion and Humility (and) by treating the body with brutality instead of treating it with due respect, with a view to meeting and providing against over-indulgence of the flesh" (Parry, in the Camb
Marcus, Surnamed Eremita - 905, preceded by two disquisitions on the author by Gallandius and Fessler, are:...
(1) περὶ νόμου πνευματικοῦ , a collection of short aphorisms, inculcating especially the duties of Humility and constant prayer
Pride (2) - An elementary attribute in the Christian conception of character is Humility. The Incarnation was itself the most transcendent exhibition of Humility. In His definite teaching our Lord laid especial stress on the virtues of Humility and lowliness of mind as fundamental requisites in His loyal followers. ’ The distinction is clear between this pardonable and highly useful feeling—a feeling which may be accompanied with real Humility—and a haughtiness of spirit, a contemptuous looking down on others, a selfish glorying in one’s own superiority. See also Humility, Meekness
Thorn in the Flesh - In 2 Corinthians 12:7 Paul referred to “a thorn in the flesh,” “a messenger of Satan,” given him by God to ensure his Humility following a profound experience of “visions,” “revelations,” and “ascent into the third heaven
Triumphal Entry - Christ did not enter Jerusalem upon a war horse of conquest but upon a colt representing Humility
Pride - It is the opposite of Humility, the proper attitude one should have in relation to God
Predestination - ...
In the case of the believer who has the witness in himself, this doctrine at once deepens his Humility and elevates his confidence to the full assurance of hope" (Outlines)
Franciscans - Francis, through an excessive Humility, would not suffer the monks of his order to be called fratres, 1:e. In 1287, Matthew, of Aqua Sparta, being elected general of the order, discouraged the ancient discipline of the Franciscans, and indulged his monks in abandoning even the appearance of poverty; and this conduct inflamed the indignation of the spiritual or austere Franciscans; so that, from the year 1290, seditions and schisms arose in an order that had been so famous for its pretended disinterestedness and Humility
Boasting - Humility is defined as the absence of arrogance and boasting and is characterized by submission to God's will. The absence of self-exaltation and the attitude of Humility place one in a position of being blessed by God (Isaiah 66:2 )
Barzillai - The Humility, also, of that Old Testament hero is already our New Testament Humility in its depth and sweetness and beauty. A perfect and a finished courtesy has always its roots struck deep down into Humility; which Humility, again, has its roots struck deep down into the grace of God. Yea, all of you be clothed with Humility, for God resisteth the proud and giveth grace to the humble. Humility and courtesy are the court manners of the kingdom of heaven
Bow - ) An inclination of the head, or a bending of the body, in token of reverence, respect, civility, or submission; an obeisance; as, a bow of deep Humility
Heal - ...
Jeremiah 3:22 (a) This is a promise from GOD that He will repair the damage that has been done by and in Israel when they return to the Lord their GOD, and in Humility walk again with Him
Ashes - ...
Job 42:6 (a) Job not only sat in actual ashes, but those mentioned in this passage represent also his feeling of great Humility and shame
Philadelphia - Poverty tended to Humility; conscious of weakness Philadelphia leant on Christ her strength (2 Corinthians 12:9); so she "kept His word," and when tested did "not deny His name
Daniel, the Stylite - " In his last will to his disciples, after commending them to the common Father of all, and to the Saviour Who died for them, Daniel bade them "hold fast Humility, practise obedience, exercise hospitality, keep the fasts, observe the vigils, love poverty, and above all maintain charity, which is the first and great commandment; avoid the tares of the heretics; separate never from the church your mother: if you do these things your righteousness shall be perfect
Christ - Hence they were scandalized at the outward appearance, the Humility, and seeming weakness of our Savior
Value - A man is apt to value his own performances at too high a rate he is even disposed to value himself for his Humility
the Woman Who Took Leaven And Hid it in Three Measures of Meal - On the other hand, Humility, that is to say disesteem of a man's self, is so much good leaven hidden in a good man's heart. These are the words of well-known master in Israel,-"Humility does not consist in having a worse opinion of ourselves than we deserve, or in abasing ourselves lower than we really are. But as all virtue is founded in truth, so Humility is founded in a true and just sense of our weakness, misery, and sin. So much so, that he who rightly feels and lives in this sense of his condition lives in Humility. I will not insist on what you call introspection, but I for one both feel and confess the truth of His words when my Lord says to me-Preacher, Beware! lest having discoursed so beautifully on Humility to others, you yourself, through your self-esteem, should be a castaway from the kingdom of God. Or he got some promotion, or praise, or reward, that you had not Humility and love enough to stomach
Corinthians, Second Epistle to the - "Human weakness, spiritual strength, the deepest tenderness of affection, wounded feeling, sternness, irony, rebuke, impassioned self-vindication, Humility, a just self-respect, zeal for the welfare of the weak and suffering, as well as for the progress of the church of Christ and for the spiritual advancement of its members, are all displayed in turn in the course of his appeal
Micah - The style of Micah is nervous, concise, and elegant, often elevated, and poetical, but sometimes obscure from sudden transitions of subject; and the contrast of the neglected duties of justice, mercy, Humility, and piety, with the punctilious observance of the ceremonial sacrifices, affords a beautiful example of the harmony which subsists between the Mosaic and Christian dispensations, and shows that the law partook of that spiritual nature which more immediately characterizes the religion of Jesus
Example - Here we see piety without superstition, and morality without ostentation; Humility without meanness, and fortitude without temerity; patience without apathy, and compassion without weakness; zeal without rashness, and beneficience without prodigality
Patience - The specific feature of Christian patience is that believers exercise it in a spirit of love, joy, Humility and forgiveness (1 Corinthians 13:4; 1 Corinthians 13:7; Colossians 1:11; Colossians 3:12-13; cf
Andreas Samosatensis of Samosata - Theodoret speaks of Andreas with much affection and esteem, praising his Humility and readiness to help the distressed (Theod
Affliction - They wean from the world; work submission; produce Humility; excite to diligence; stir up to prayer; and conform us to the divine image
Hair - Hence, perhaps, the long hair of the Nazirites was to indicate Humility and subjection
Ass - I have thought it worth while, to stop the reader in this place, in order to make an observation or two on the condescension of the Lord Jesus, respecting his use of this animal, in the unequalled Humility of our Lord's character
Messenger - There would have required no notice of the office of a messenger, by way of explaining the nature of it, being perfectly well understood, and it not been that our Lord Jesus Christ, when becoming our Redeemer, condescended to submit to this office also; but as the Lord Jesus, in his unequalled Humility, vouchsafed to be the servant and messenger of JEHOVAH, every motive of affection and duty demands our attention to behold Jesus in this most gracious character
Sarah - Had meekness, and Humility, and resignation, and the blotting-out of herself, but grown apace with her disappointment, that would have hid Sarah from all her temptations, and it would at the same time have hastened the lifting off of her cross. And thus it was that what looked like a perfect miracle of Humility in Sarah, was really an act of exasperated pride. But your Humility has not stood its very last test till you are despised in our eyes also every day. The truest Humility is attained; the truest Humility is ascertained, and certified, and sealed only by humiliations being heaped upon it from without; from above, from beneath, and from all around. And, had Sarah's Humility been a true and a genuine Humility; had her ostentatious sacrifice of herself not had its secret roots in a deep and a cruel pride; she would have opened her heart to all Hagar's contempt
Philippians, Letter to the - ...
Paul encourages the Philippian believers to be united (1:27-30) and to have the same Humility and concern for others as Christ had (2:1-11)
Galilee - In Galilee our Lord delivered the Sermon on The Mount, and the discourses on 'The Bread of Life,' on 'Purity,' on 'Forgiveness,' and on 'Humility
Sanctification - Humility, Job 42:5 ; Job 6:1-30 :...
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Finger - Suppose David in that psalm had reference to the great Humility and awe with which the lowest servants approach their lord, the expressions of his soul in that sweet psalm would strike the mind as if thus speaking: "Unto thee lift I up mine eyes, O thou that dwellest in the heavens
Prize - " ...
After reviewing the arguments pro and con Gifford takes the latter to be the right meaning, as conveying the purpose of the passage "to set forth Christ as the supreme example of Humility and self-renunciation
Jephthah, Jephthae - ' Jephthah suffered severely through his rash vow, and he had not wisdom and Humility to appease the anger of Ephraim
Nebuchadnezzar - And I would like to share with you tonight the great lesson in Humility and in obedience that I have been led to learn out of Nebuchadnezzar. Let every father, and mother, and nurse, and tutor, and school-master read and lay to heart, as they shall answer for it, William Law's eighteenth chapter, in which he shows 'How the education which men receive in their youth makes the doctrine of Humility so difficult to be practised all their after-days. As I read of Nebuchadnezzar's Humility, and makeableness, and teachableness in Daniel's hands I am amazed at the boldness of the young Belteshazzar, and still more at the behaviour of his mighty master. When I put myself into Nebuchadnezzar's place, when I recall my own temper and my own conduct, I honour Nebuchadnezzar, and I cannot cease from wondering that the king of Babylon has not been far more made of as a pattern of Humility and meekness both under the dispensations of God and under the doctrines of Daniel. But, then, on the other hand, if any man has come to this, that he would fain, if it were possible, put on Humility before both God and man, then let that man pray without ceasing. Enough prayer will work all possible Humility into the proudest heart
Seraphim - With one pair of wings they hover around Jehovah’s throne; and with the other two they cover their faces and their feet, actions symbolical of Humility and adoration
Apollos - His Humility and teachableness in submitting, with all his learning, to the teaching of Aquila and even of Priscilla (a woman), his fervency and his power in Scripture, and his determinably staying away from where his well deserved popularity might be made a handle for party zeal, are all lovely traits in his Christian character
Regeneration - The evidence of it are, conviction of sin, holy sorrow, deep Humility, knowledge, faith, repentance, love, and devotedness to God's glory
Firstborn - ...
The "church of the firstborn" lives in Humility, gratitude, and awe (vv
Obedience - ...
True obedience means imitating God in holiness, Humility, and love (1 Peter 2:13-14 ; John 13:34 ; Philippians 2:5-8 )
Meekness - Most modern versions replace the noun "meekness" by "gentleness" or "humility, " largely as a result of the pejorative overtones of weakness and effeminacy now associated with meekness
Foot - " Our Savior, after his last supper, gave a striking lesson of Humility, by washing his disciples' feet, John 13:5-6,8 , though the eighth verse shows that he had also a deeper meaning
Liturgy - Every act of the Liturgy has its symbolical meaning; there is the spirit of adoration and Humility in the genuflections and bows, the spirit of supplication and exultation in the elevation of hands, the spirit of Christian unity in the salutations of the priest to the people, as in Orate Fratres
Call, Calling - It also observed, that though a man cannot convert himself, yet he has a power to do some things that are materially good, though not good in all those circumstances that accompany or flow from regeneration: such were Ahab's Humility, 1 Kings xxi 29; Nineveh's repentance, Jeremiah 3:5 ; and Herod's hearing of John, Mark 6:20
Repentance - the evidences of repentance are, faith, Humility, prayer, and obedience, Zechariah 12:10
Favor - Such acceptance was not automatic, however, for the offerer had to have an attitude of repentance and Humility (cf
Kenosis - The best example of selfless love and Humility of which Paul was aware was the example of Jesus Christ
Grace - Virtuous or religious affection or disposition, as a liberal disposition, faith, meekness, Humility, patience, &c
Acceptance - Micah summed up the terms of acceptance in Amos 6:6-8 , “What doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?” The proper attitude of Humility is as important as right action (Psalm 51:16-17 ; 1 Peter 5:5-6 )
Pride - ...
The majority of the uses of gâ'ôn are negative in that they connote human “pride” as an antonym for Humility ( Saul - That is real Humility; and Humility is the root of all the graces, both natural and supernatural. It is but fair and just to set Saul's silence that day down to Humility and modesty. If all that is not to be set down to Saul's Humility, self-command, and magnanimity, not to say piety, then Saul's character is obscure indeed. We would have had no hesitation in setting all that down to the best motives had it not been that all his future so terribly belied all such modesty, Humility, self-command, magnanimity, and piety
Sermon on the Mount - Life in God’s kingdom is characterized by Humility, love, righteousness, mercy, sincerity, and dependence on God
Eagle - In the law the fostering mother is the eagle, God manifesting His power and sternness mingled with tenderness in bringing His people out of Egypt with a mighty hand and outstretched arm; in the gospel the fostering mother is the hen (Matthew 23:37), Christ coming in grace, Humility, and obedience unto death (Bochart)
Greatness - When the disciples asked who is the greatest in the kingdom, Jesus answered by bringing a child into their midst and declaring that even admission into the kingdom depended on a similar attitude of Humility (Matthew 18:1-4 )
Arsenius - His Humility was worthy of a follower of Anthony
Affection - Now, in order to ascertain whether our affections are excited in a spiritual manner, we must enquire whether that which moves our affections be truly spiritual, whether our consciences be alarmed, and our hearts impressed; whether the judgment be enlightened, and we have a perception of the moral excellency of divine things; and lastly, whether our affections have a holy tendency and produce the happy effects of obedience to God, Humility in ourselves, and justice to our fellow creatures
Dorcas - Peter, who was present at the raising of Jairus’ daughter, should follow the method of his Master, while we see how, with the Humility of Elijah or Elisha (1 Kings 17:20, 2 Kings 4:33), he does not at first speak the word of power but kneels down in prayer
Melania, a Roman Lady - 377, properly 375), she was such a wonderful example of virtues, and especially of Humility, that she received the name of Thecla
Philosophy - This insisted on some obsolete Jewish practices, inculcated ‘a voluntary Humility and worshipping of angels’ (Colossians 2:16-18), and was concerned with fables and genealogies, knowledge ‘falsely so called,’ and asceticism (1 Timothy 1:4; 1 Timothy 4:1-4; 1 Timothy 4:7; 1 Timothy 6:20, Titus 1:14; Titus 3:9)
Peter, First, Theology of - The secret to a good and happy life comes from living with other members of the church in harmony, love, and Humility, not from societal recognition or personal achievement (3:8-12). Younger men must submit to these elders, and all Christians must live in Humility toward each other (5:5-7), especially before God, who gives honor at the appropriate time, when they will inherit the fullness of their salvation (1:4-5)
Poor (Person), Weak (Person) - ...
‘Ani is also related to the word ‘anawah, “humility, gentleness. ‘Anaw appears almost exclusively in poetical passages and describes the intended outcome of affliction from God, namely “humility
Peter - He had a great deal of genuine human nature, but divine grace did its full work, and overruled even his faults for his advancement in Humility and meekness
Titus, Epistle to - The believers were to treat all persons with consideration and Humility
Grafting - He exhorts the Gentiles to Humility, because God in His goodness has done for them in the spiritual sphere a thing which they had no reason to expect, since it, according to Sanday-Headlam, never, according to Ramsay, very seldom, is done in the natural
Walk - 33:15), in Humility ( Euthymius (4), Abbat in Palestine - In 420 Euthymius erected a laura, like that of Pharan, on the road from Jerusalem to Jericho, where he would see inquirers on Saturdays and Sundays, and his advice was always given with captivating sweetness and Humility
Meek, Meekness - It is that temper of spirit in which we accept His dealings with us as good, and therefore without disputing or resisting; it is closely linked with the word tapeinophrosune [1], and follows directly upon it, Ephesians 4:2 ; Colossians 3:12 ; cp
Meekness (2) - To use the words of Gregory of Nyssa, Humility is ‘the mother of meekness. ’ Humility and meekness are kindred virtues; hence they are often mentioned together (Ephesians 4:2, Colossians 3:12, cf. Humility is the soul’s attitude induced by a proper sense of one’s creaturely weakness, ignorance, and unworthiness in presence of the Most High; meekness is the attendant disposition, born of Humility, which constrains the soul to bow without complaining before the will of God in the hard and perplexing experiences of life
Redeem, Redemption, Redeemer - It points to a new relationship to God, the dynamic of a new life, God's leniency in the past, and the call for Humility for the future
Decrees of God - Humility
Necessity - So far from its being inimical to happiness, they suppose there can be no solid true happiness without the belief of it; that happiness without the belief of it; that it inspires gratitude, excites confidence, teaches resignation, produces Humility, and draws the soul to God
Philemon, the Epistle to - Yet all this doeth he, not with force as if he had a right thereto, but strippeth himself of his right and thus enforceth Philemon to forego his right also: even as Christ did for us with God the Father; for Christ also stripped Himself of His right and by love and Humility enforced (?) the Father to lay aside His wrath and power and to take us to His grace for the sake of Christ, who lovingly pleadeth our cause and with all His heart layeth Himself out for us; for we are all His Onesimi
Foot - Humility and defilement
Philip the Apostle - Instead of going direct to Jesus, he first tells his fellow townsman Andrew (a mark of Humility and discreet reverence), who had been the first to come to Jesus; then both together tell Jesus
Head - Wagging the head expressed derision (Mark 15:29 ), but bowing the head was a sign of Humility (Isaiah 58:5 )
Delight - We should not, on the other hand, delight in false Humility or religion (Colossians 2:18 )
Capernaum - Jesus' teaching Humility by a child occurred here (Mark 9:33-36)
Mark, John - If the young man was the writer, awakened out of sleep by the noise near his house of men proceeding to seize the Savior, then going forth hastily in a linen cloth only, and being an eye witness of Jesus' apprehension and suspected of being His follower, though not so then but afterward, he would look back on this as the most interesting circumstance of his life; though, like John, in Humility he describes without mentioning himself by name
Colosse - Paul assures them, that since he had heard of their faith in Christ Jesus, and of their love to all Christians, he had not ceased to return thanks to God for them, and to pray that they might increase in spiritual knowledge, and abound in every good work; he describes the dignity of Christ, and declares the universality of the Gospel dispensation, which was a mystery formerly hidden, but now made manifest; and he mentions his own appointment, through the grace of God, to be the Apostle of the Gentiles; he expresses a tender concern for the Colossians and other Christians of Phrygia, and cautions them against being seduced from the simplicity of the Gospel, by the subtlety of Pagan philosophers, or the superstition of Judaizing Christians; he directs them to set their affections on things above, and forbids every species of licentiousness; he exhorts to a variety of Christian virtues, to meekness, veracity, Humility, charity, and devotion; he enforces the duties of wives, husbands, children, fathers, servants, and masters; he inculcates the duty of prayer, and of prudent behaviour toward unbelievers; and after adding the salutations of several persons then at Rome, and desiring that this epistle might be read in the church of their neighbours the Laodiceans, he concludes with a salutation from himself, written, as usual, with his own hand
Jesus Christ - No words can describe that character in which such firmness and gentleness, such dignity and Humility, such enthusiasm and calmness, such wisdom and simplicity, such holiness and charity, such justice and mercy, such sympathy with heaven and with earth, such love to God and love to man blended in perfect harmony
Mephibosheth - His deformity, added to the depression of Saul's family, produced in him an abject fear and characteristic Humility which are expressed in a manner sad to read of when one remembers the bygone greatness of Saul's house
Thieves - ...
The place on Christ's right hand in the kingdom, desired by Zebedee's sons, was reserved for the penitent thief, first in the kingdom of suffering, then in the kingdom of glory, His case proves that a man is justified by faith without the deeds of the law, yet not by a dead faith, for his faith evidenced its vitality by confession of sin and of Christ crucified, by faithful reproof of the scorner if haply he too might be led to repent, by Humility, and by hope in the Saviour looking beyond present pain to the eternal state; also that baptism is only "generally "necessary to salvation, a baptized man may be lost and an unbaptized man may be saved; the baptism of blood supplied the place of the outward sign of regeneration (Hilary, de Trin
Wisdom - Godly wisdom, by contrast, is characterized by Humility, uprightness and a concern for others (Proverbs 8:12-16; Proverbs 10:8; Proverbs 11:2; Isaiah 5:21; James 3:13-18)
Lily - Nothing surely could be more suited, to denote the unequalled Humility of the Son of God, than the figure of the lily, which loves the retired, low, and obscure spot of the valley
Zacchaeus - ...
What a contrast to his joy, Humility, and faith was the murmuring of the self-righteous bystanders, "He is gone to be guest with a sinner," self invited, not merely as before eating with such by special invitation! (Luke 15:2; Luke 5:29-30) a further loving condescension
Despise - (3) If the connexion with Matthew 18:1-4 is original, the young are not to be ‘despised,’ because the childlike disposition is the true way to eternal life; the Humility which is essential for entering into the Kingdom of heaven has its symbol in the consciousness of weakness and imperfection that belongs to children, who are therefore not to be ‘despised’ but ‘received’ (cf
Feet (2) - In washing the feet of the disciples Jesus inculcates lessons of Humility, mutual service, and the need of daily cleansing from sin (John 13:5-14)
Sermon on the Mount - 13); Humility as a mark of the community (18:1-19:1); and the end-times (chaps. 30) is explicated in the discourse on the Humility and faith of children (18:1-5)
Zephaniah, Book of - A purified remnant will worship Him in Humility and with joy (Zephaniah 3:11-13 )
Michal - Saul's pride and disregard of Jehovah caused his rejection, as now the same sins cause the rejection of Michal; just as, on the contrary, David's Humility and piety toward Jehovah brought him honor before Jehovah
Repentance - For the prophets, such a turning or conversion was not just simply a change within a person; it was openly manifested in justice, kindness, and Humility ( Micah 6:8 ; Amos 5:24 ; Hosea 2:19-20 )
Age, Old (the Aged) - Qualifications for the office of elder included a righteous lifestyle, monogamy, and Humility
Honour - Eadie’s translation and interpretation seem to us the best: ‘Which things, having indeed a show of wisdom in superstition, Humility, and corporeal austerity, not in anything of value, are for, or minister to, the gratification of the flesh
Ambition - For Christianity demands Humility (Matthew 5:3 etc
Moses - Though naturally liable to anger and impatience, he so far subdued himself as to be termed the meekest of men, Numbers 12:3 ; and his piety, Humility, and forbearance, the wisdom and vigor of his administration, his unfailing zeal and faith in God, and his disinterested patriotism are worthy of all imitation
Phar'Isees, - (Matthew 6:2,6,16 ; 23:5,6 ; Luke 14:7 ) Indeed the whole spirit of their religion was summed up not in confession of sin and in Humility, but in a proud self righteousness at variance with any true conception of man's relation to either God or his fellow creatures
Romans, Theology of - Jew and Gentile believers are on the same footing within the church and are brought to the level of Humility. Paul's theological argument is now complete on the negative side and his boasting and strife-ridden Roman audience of Jewish and Gentile Christians are properly brought down from pride to Humility. ...
Paul now proceeds to show the continuity between the old and the new by citing Abraham as a primary example of the person of faith and Humility (4:1-25), making the point that the faith principle was operating before Abraham became technically a Jew by circumcision. As the previous eleven chapters deal with the vertical question of Humility before the all-sufficient work of Christ, Paul's final appeal focuses on faith that works horizontally both within the body of believers and beyond in the wider world of mission
Abel - That name, that name, that name, that family of names! Where are the owners of all these names? What account can I give of them? If they are not here tonight, where are they? Why are they not here, and why are they where they are? What a preacher Paul must have been, and what a pastor, and supported and seconded by what a staff of elders, since he was able to say to his assembled kirk-session in Ephesus that he was clear of the blood of all his people! What mornings to his tent-making, and to his sermons, and to his epistles; and what afternoons and evenings to Humility, and to tears, and to temptations, both publicly and from house to house! Like Samuel Rutherford, and long before his day, always at his books, always among his people, always at their sick-beds, always catechising their children, always preaching and always praying. We ministers must always appear before our people, and before God, clothed from head to foot with Humility, with a rope upon our heads, and with nothing in our bands or in our mouths but the cross of Christ and the blood of Christ, that speaketh better things than that of Abel
Philippians, the Epistle to the - Also to express Christian sympathy, and to exhort to imitation of Christ in Humility and lowly love, instead of existing dissensions, as between Euodias and Syntyche (Philippians 4:2), and to warn against Judaizers
Minister - In fine, they should be men of prudence and prayer, light and love, zeal and knowledge, courage and Humility, humanity and religion
Virtue - 2 Corinthians 5:10]'>[4]); (3) the promise of faith, reinforced by the inspiration of ancient heroes and the general exemplarship of Jesus (Hebrews 11, 12); the example of Jesus is specifically a motive for Humility (Philippians 2:5 f
Origenists - This text must be understood of Christ's human soul, because it is unusual to propound the Deity as an example of Humility in Scripture
Worship - But true worship always required right behaviour, Humility of spirit and confession of known sin
Water (2) - It taught the disciples the duty of Humility, and the need of daily cleansing from the daily defilement of sin
Greatness - And the character demanded includes, not the assertive qualities of notoriety, but the milder attributes of childlike Humility (Mark 9:34, Matthew 18:1; Matthew 18:4, Luke 9:48), and obedience to the Divine law (Matthew 5:19—a passage which has an important bearing on the relationship of the new dispensation to the old)
Faustus (11), Sometimes Called the Breton - Cherish all graces, especially obedience and Humility
Zephaniah, Theology of - Instead of abandoning God, Judah is to return to him (2:3), abandoning apathy and syncretism for Humility and right living
Isaacus, Egyptian Solitary - His charity and Humility were famous
Angels - It is therefore only a false Humility that would teach the worshipping of angels
Assurance - All such passages are perfectly consistent with deep Humility, and self-diffidence; but they are irreconcilable with a state of hostility between the parties, and with an unascertained and only hoped-for restoration of friendship and favour
David - His firmness and decision of character, his Humility, nobleness, and piety shine in his last acts, on the occasion of Adonijah's rebellion
Mind - (3) See also CAST , CHANGE , DOUBTFUL , FERVENT , FORWARDNESS , HUMBLENESS, Humility , LOWLINESS , READINESS , READY , WILLING
Jacob - Jacob was beginning to learn Humility such as he had not known before and cried to God for help (Genesis 32:1-12)
Hebrews, Letter to the - In his great Humility Christ became a human being, willingly taking a temporarily lower position than angels in order to save human beings (2:5-18)
Ahaz - What mock Humility in one who scrupled not to use God's brazen altar to divine with, and had substituted for God's altar in God's worship the pattern, which pleased his aesthetic tastes, of the idol altar at Damascus (2 Kings 16:11-15); perhaps the adoption of this pattern, an Assyrian one, was meant as a token of vassalage to Assyria, by adopting some of their religious usage's and idolatries; indeed Tiglath Pileser expressly records in the Assyrian monuments that he held his court at Damascus, and there received submission and tribute of both Pekah of Samaria and Ahaz of Judah
Fellowship - ...
The pattern of self-sacrifice and Humility, demonstrated most profoundly through Jesus' suffering on the cross (Philippians 2:5-8 ), is to mark the current life of the disciple
Legalism - The prophets in particular denounce preoccupation with the niceties of sacrificial ritual while inward obedience expressed in justice, compassion, and Humility is lacking (1 Samuel 15:22-23 ; Isaiah 1:10-20 ; Amos 2:6-8 ; 4:4-5 ; 5:21-24 ; Micah 6:6-8 )
Servant - I have another, and as I hope, a higher object for its introduction; I mean in relation to the person, work, and offices of the Lord Jesus Christ, as JEHOVAH'S servant, and the servant of his people, as set forth in these unequalled words of Humility and tenderness, and which are Jesus own, when he said
Antioch - It continued, indeed, outwardly prosperous; but superstition, secular ambition, the pride of life; pomp and formality in the service of God, in place of Humility and sincere devotion; the growth of faction, and the decay of charity; showed that real religion was fast disappearing, and that the foundations were laid of that great apostasy which, in two centuries from this time, overspread the whole Christian world, led to the entire extinction of the church in the east, and still holds dominion over the fairest portions of the west
Palm Tree - " (Revelation 7:9) I defy any man upon earth to shew the shadow of a reason wherefore the correspondence between Christ's appearance upon earth, in the day of his unequalled Humility, and the day of his supreme power and glory, should have been thus set forth, but from the one certain and unquestionable truth of his almighty power and GODHEAD, and the divinity of his mission
Linus (1) - Peter requests to be crucified head downwards desiring out of Humility not to suffer in the same way as his Master
Sedulius, 5th-Cent. Poet - The works shew a character of much Humility (cf
Little Ones - The Apostles had been disputing about their relative claims to greatness in the Kingdom of heaven; and the Lord teaches them a much needed lesson in Humility by the example of a little child. The discussion that follows in the succeeding verses is no longer an inculcation of Humility. It may be taken as exegetically certain, then, that by ‘these little ones’ our Lord does not intend to single out a certain section of His disciples,—whether the weakest in faith or the more advanced in that Humility of spirit which is the fruit of a great faith,—but means the whole body of His disciples
Lois And Eunice - To accustom ourselves to make such an inquisition as that, will do this at any rate-it will teach us Humility at home, and that is the beginning of all true reformation there. I will clothe myself with Humility as I go in and out before my house
Paul as a Controversialist - You cannot read Paul's Epistles without being constantly captivated with the extraordinary geniality, courtesy, Humility, simplicity, and loving-kindness, of Paul. It is a mark of the deepest and truest Humility to see ourselves condemned without cause, and to be silent under it
Prayer - Paul learned that petitions are sometimes denied in light of an eventual greater good: God's power displayed in Paul's Humility
Gestures - David's sitting before the Lord indicated reverence, Humility, and submission (2 Samuel 7:18 ), while the sitting down of Jesus at the right hand of God indicates finality and completion as well as power and authority
Body of Christ - For Paul, the urgent need for Humility, interdependence, and love within the Christian community is grounded in this dynamic horizontal unity between members of the body of Christ, a union that overcomes even the most imposing racial and social barriers (1 Corinthians 12:13 ; cf
Patience - Such was the apathy of the Stoics, who obstinately maintained that pain was no evil, and therefore bore it with amazing firmness, which, however, was very different from the virtue of Christian patience, as appears from the principles from which they respectively proceeded; the one springing from pride, the other from Humility
Motives - The ritual associated with the temple (sacrifices, prayer, holy days) was a legitimate expression of piety for the ancient Israelites, yet the prophets insisted that God was disgusted with the whole enterprise when the people did it without Humility and repentance (Isaiah 1:11-15 ; 29:13 ; 58:3-7 ; Amos 4:4-5 ; 5:21-24 )
Service - The Humility of service, therefore, while not lacking entirely from the word διάκονος, belongs more particularly to δοῦλος
Minister - Humility is always a profitable grace; pride is always as useless as it is foolish
Paulinus, Bishop of Nola - His letters to Delphinus and Amandus exhibit his deep Humility and cheerful humour but are chiefly remarkable for the earnest request made to both that they will offer their prayers on behalf of his deceased brother of whom he speaks with great affection but with deep regret for his neglect in spiritual matters hoping that by their prayers he may obtain some refreshment in the other world (Epp. The letters of Paulinus are generally clear and intelligible pleasing as regards style remarkable for Humility of mind an affectionate disposition and a cheerful playful humour free from all moroseness or ascetic bitterness. Of his amiable and affectionate disposition, love for his friends, profound Humility, entire abnegation of self, earnest piety, and devotion to the service of God, sufficient evidence has been given
the Pharisee - Now, while all good and true men must sometimes, at whatever cost, separate themselves from all bad men, and from all bad causes among bad men, at the same time, all good and true men will make the separation with great Humility, and will make it as short as possible. What a contrast to his former self! What Humility, what condescension, what geniality, what courtesy, what catholicity, what universal loving-kindness; in short, and in modern language, what a Christian gentleman! Coleridge says that while Luther was not perhaps such a perfect gentleman as Paul, he was almost as great a genius
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - And it takes the strongest man among us and the holiest man all his might to behave himself with Humility and with generosity to his late subordinates at such a time. A work of Humility
Predestination - To have a well-grounded persuasion, through the fruit of the Spirit and the evidences of the new life, that one is of the number of those whom God foreknew and foreordained to be conformed to the image of His Son, cannot fail on the one hand to fill one with gratitude and Humility, and on the other to stimulate one to the pursuit of holiness and all the graces of the Christian life. So shall this doctrine afford matter of praise, reverence, and admiration of God, and of Humility, diligence, and abundant consolation to all that sincerely obey the Gospel
Manifestation - And it was in accord with the Humility and kindness of her character that she should believe it might come at a small village feast to meet a temporary social need
Separation - ), mark men out for exclusion from the perfected Kingdom; while childlike Humility (Matthew 18:3), lowly acts of service (Luke 22:24-30), preparedness for all kinds of sacrifice up to that of life itself (Matthew 16:25; Matthew 16:27; Matthew 19:27-29), are sure passports to participation in its benefits
Culdees - The Popish writers themselves celebrate the piety, the purity, the Humility, and even the learning, of the Culdees; but while they were displeased with the simplicity, or what they deemed the barbarism, of their worship, they charged them with various deviations from the faith of the Catholic church
Poverty of Spirit - —(2) The idea of Humility is likewise implied
John the Baptist - John fell just before the third Passover of Christ's ministry; his disciples buried him Self denial, Humility, wherewith he disclaimed Messiahship and said he was not worthy to unloose His shoes' latchet, zeal for the Lord's honour, and holy faithfulness at all costs, were his prominent graces
Ethics - It partly accounts for that special prominence of Humility in Christian ethics which has been so often commented on from different points of view, for Humility is regarded not only as a duty enforced by the example of Christ, but also as the practical means for preserving the unity and harmonious working of the body (Philippians 2:3-5, etc
Philippians - In the context of Philippians, however, the kenosis passage is used to highlight the Humility and selfless service demonstrated by Jesus, whose example the Christian is to follow
Moses - Yet he is recognized as being "a very humble man, more humble than anyone else on the face of the earth" (Numbers 12:3 ), which has been urged commonly as a testimony to his Humility in the service of Israel's most holy God
Jesus Christ - On the way back to Capernaum he again foretold his sufferings, and exhorted the disciples to Humility, forbearance, and brotherly love
James, the General Epistle of - To those he commends Humility, patience, prayer; to these he addresses awful warnings (James 5:7-11; James 4:9; James 5:1-6)
Renunciation - In a religion which begins with the requirement of repentance and renovation of life, and which in all aspects exalts the spiritual, subordinating the temporal and earthly, nothing is more fitting than the childlike spirit; the graces of Humility, meekness, and gentleness belong to the new conception of the beautiful; while the strain of public duty requires the propelling motive of philanthropy and the ready acceptance of self-sacrifice
John the Baptist - ...
This heightened sense of the glory of Jesus was accompanied by a deepening Humility in John’s estimate of his own function as the Messiah’s forerunner
Bason - ’ The main lessons for the time were those of Humility, self-abasement, and love
Serve - ‛Ebed was used as a mark of Humility and courtesy, as in Purity (2) - In John 13:1-11 the practice of the Lord’s own Humility is taught as the means of purity in His followers: in John 15:3 He says, ‘Ye are clean because of the word that I have spoken unto you,’ with which should be compared St
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - It was illustrated by a life of holiness and Humility—that of its Founder, the Just One—in contrast with which the life of the Cynic and the Stoic sickened him. The eloquence, fervour, Humility, and devoutness of the writer will be felt to be contagious. the Jewish inference from the Humility of Christ that He was only man, and from His miraculous power that He was a magician, and not the Logos of God; the record of the darkening of the sun at the crucifixion preserved in the secret archives of the empire; the reason for the seclusion of the Lord after the resurrection, viz
Righteous, Righteousness - 1618164902_82); and partly by loving service of our brother men in all Humility (see Luke 17:5-10). Luke 18:11, Matthew 23:5-10) the very antithesis of the meekness and Humility which were to Him the essence of righteousness (Matthew 11:29; Matthew 7:1-5, Luke 17:7-10)
Peter - At the last supper Peter shrank with a mixture of Humility and self will from Jesus' stooping to wash his feet. ...
Peter's Humility and love are beautifully illustrated in his submitting to the reproach of a junior, and seemingly adopting Paul's view, and in calling him '"our beloved brother," and confirming the doctrine of "God's longsuffering being for salvation," from Paul's epistles: Romans 2:4 (2 Peter 3:15-16)
Ezra, Book of - God's work calls for faith, prayer, and Humility
Repentance (2) - The essential elements in the repentance of the Prodigal are (1) a realization of his desperate condition: ‘He came to himself’; (2) a definite mental determination to reverse his course and retrace his steps at any risk: ‘I will arise and go to my father’; (3) the decisive act of breaking away from his surroundings and going straight into the presence of his much wronged father: ‘He arose and came to his father’; (4) his absolute, abject, self-effacing Humility: ‘I am no more worthy to be called a son of thine; make me as a servant’; (5) his open, outspoken, unreserved, unqualified confession: ‘I have sinned to the very heaven, and my sin is against thee, O thou best of fathers
Poor And Poverty, Theology of - The psalms also move beyond the sphere of social poverty to speak of spiritual Humility (25:9)
Marks Stigmata - ...
Not only did the Apostle bear the physical stigmata, but he displayed also the spiritual ‘marks of Jesus’-love, gentleness, Humility, unselfishness (John 13:35, Philippians 2:5, 2 Timothy 2:24)
Intercession - ...
(a) Clement goes to the root of the troubles at Corinth when he asks that intercession should be made ‘for them that are in any transgression, that forbearance and Humility may be given them’ (Ep
Gelasius (1) i, Bishop of Rome - Gelasius, in his reply, couched in a tone of imperious Humility, utterly refuses any compromise
Discourse - But of the longer discourses with the chosen few we have the following: the Mission and Instruction of the Twelve (Matthew 10:1-42, Mark 6:7-13, Luke 9:1-6); on Humility, Offences, Forgiveness (Matthew 18:1-35, Mark 9:33-50, Luke 9:46-50); discourse on the Mount of Olives on His Second Coming and the Final Judgment (Matthew 24, 25, Mark 13, Luke 21:7-36); the Farewell Discourse and Prayer (John 14-17)
Hopkinsians - But as a particle of water is small, in comparison of a generous stream, so the man of Humility feels small before the great family of his fellow creatures
Reason - Insidious writers in the deistical controversy have pretended to adopt those sentiments of Humility and reverence, which are inseparable from true Christians, and even that total subjection of reason to faith which characterizes enthusiasts
Intercession - ...
(a) Clement goes to the root of the troubles at Corinth when he asks that intercession should be made ‘for them that are in any transgression, that forbearance and Humility may be given them’ (Ep
Consciousness - The most remarkable instance is the union of self-assertion with the most perfect Humility. The following passages are a selection: Matthew 5:11; Matthew 5:22; Matthew 5:28; Matthew 5:34; Matthew 5:39; Matthew 5:44; Matthew 7:21-22; Matthew 7:28-29 (the former verses show this ‘authority’ which astonished the multitude) Matthew 8:6; Matthew 8:10; Matthew 8:22; Matthew 10:15; Matthew 10:32-33; Matthew 10:37-39; Matthew 11:27-29 (in these passages we have the self-assertion and the Humility side by side: ‘I am meek and lowly in heart’ follows the illimitable claim of Matthew 11:27-28) Matthew 12:6-8; Matthew 12:41-42; Matthew 16:24 ff; Matthew 22:45; Matthew 25:31 ff
the Woman With the Issue of Blood - Here love runs down, and here joy in your neighbour's joy, and here sweetness of temper, and here Humility of mind, and here goodwill, and here attraction to people, and here brotherly kindness, and all the rest of that holy oil
Head - ...
Luke 7:38 (a) This is a type of great Humility for the hair of the woman is her glory
Elisha - There must have been good Divinity Halls in those days when there were fifty probationers just come out of them of such Humility, and admiration, and belief in better men than themselves
Elisha - "A great woman" (in every sense: means, largeness of heart, Humility, contentment) was his hostess, and with her husband's consent provided for him a little chamber with bed, table, stool, and candlestick, so that he might in passing always "turn in there. Elisha, to teach him Humility as the first step to any favor from God, sent a messenger, instead of coming in person to the door: "Go, wash in Jordan seven times
Mary, the Virgin - In it we see a spirit that drank deeply at the wells of Scripture, a Humility that "magnified the Lord" not self, that "rejoiced" as a sinner in "her Savior" (disproving Rome's dogma of the immaculate conception), a lively sense of gratitude at the mighty favor which the Mighty One conferred on one so low, a privilege which countless Jewish mothers had desired (Daniel 11:37, "the desire of women"), and for which all generations should count ("call") her happy (makariousin , compare Genesis 30:13), and an exemplification of God's eternal principle of abusing "the proud and exalting them of low degree," and a realization of God's faithfulness to His promises "to Abraham of mercy and help to Israel forever
Illustrations - ) is more than an illustrative example, it is as Jülicher classes it, ‘an example of the spiritual worth of Humility before God
Life - He sends poverty and wealth, Humility, and exaltation, makes paupers to be princes and princes to be paupers (1 Samuel 2:6-9 )
James, Theology of - Similarly, James' assertion that God has chosen the poor (2:5) means not that all poor people are chosen by God to be his people, but rather that God has in fact chosen many poor people precisely because their attitude of Humility and openness to the Lord enables them to have the kind of faith that God rewards
Heart - of love for God (Luke 16:19-31 Luke 10:27), for earthly or heavenly treasure (Matthew 6:19-21); of joy (John 16:22, John 2:24-257); of sorrow (John 14:1; John 16:8); of forgivingness (Matthew 18:35), purity (Matthew 5:8), Humility (Matthew 11:29); of good or evil dispositions (Matthew 12:34-35), perverse inclination (Matthew 5:28, Matthew 24:48), luxurious tastes and desires (Luke 21:34)
Matthew - "Position and epithet are indicative both of natural Humility and modesty, as well as of evangelical self-abasement
Banquet - Yet our blessed Redeemer did not refuse to give his disciples, and Judas Iscariot himself, that proof of his love and Humility
David - David was anointed when in Humility, 'keeping the sheep
Heart - of love for God (Matthew 22:37, Luke 10:27), for earthly or heavenly treasure (Matthew 6:19-21); of joy (John 16:22, Luke 24:32); of sorrow (John 14:1; John 16:8); of forgivingness (Matthew 18:35), purity (Matthew 5:8), Humility (Matthew 11:29); of good or evil dispositions (Matthew 12:34-35), perverse inclination (Matthew 5:28, Matthew 24:48), luxurious tastes and desires (Luke 21:34)
Presentation - ’ The Virgin’s Humility appears in her availing herself of this merciful provision; she disdained not to admit her poverty; we may be sure she did not (as some, thinking to exalt her, have imagined) assume a false appearance of it: even if Joseph and she had not been extremely poor before, the expenses of the journey to Bethlehem, and of living there six weeks, and the five shekels for the Child, could not have failed to make deep inroads on their purse
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - What an example of Humility was set by Christ Himself (xvi. ‘Boldness and arrogance and daring are for them that are accursed of God; but forbearance and Humility and gentleness are with them that are blessed of God’ (xxx
Hilarius (7) Pictaviensis, Saint - He is earnest in urging the study of Scripture, and lays much stress on the need of Humility and reverence for reading them with profit. Its recognition of the rights of reason as well as of faith combined with its sense of human ignorance and of our need of Humility its explanation of many difficulties and of the meaning of the terms employed; the endeavour (though not always successful) to adapt to his subject the imperfect medium of Latin its many felicitous descriptions both of the temper in which we ought and the spirit in which we ought not to approach the study of these mysteries; the mode of his appeals to Holy Scripture,—all form very striking features
Discipline - The stress on Humility and readiness to forgive on the part of the person who admonishes recalls the teaching of Jesus (Matthew 7:1-5 ; 18:21-35 )
Retribution (2) - He figures the blessedness of the Kingdom under the current image of a feast (Matthew 22:2, Luke 14:15), and He uses freely the motive of reward (Matthew 6:1-34; Matthew 10:41; Matthew 19:28, Luke 6:23; Luke 14:12); He even speaks as though it were the conscious motive of Humility (Luke 14:7-11)
Rufus - But when we look at the deeper side of the Messianic hope which it sets forth—the heart-felt longing for a true Kingdom of God, ‘the perception that that Kingdom can never be realized without a personal centre, a representative of God with man and man with God,’ who shall attain to true greatness through Humility—we see that the purpose which was in the mind of God, when He moved the prophet to write, was fulfilled in the highest sense when He sent His Son into the world, and when Jesus Christ entered, by being born and that in a low condition, on that life of humiliation that led to His exaltation to the place of power, and will finally lead to ‘all things being put under His feet
the Labourer With the Evil Eye - But, with all that, the chosen men; the truly choice spirits even among the men who are called; the men who are sincere and single in their motives; the men who are full of Humility about themselves, and about their work, and about their wages; the men who are so full of brotherly love that they have no evil eye left at their brother's good work or good wages, but who rather rejoice in all the good things that fall to their brother-labourer's lot-such men are not many even in the vineyard of heaven itself
Brotherhood (2) - So in the NT special mention is made of charity (1 John 3:17, James 2:15-16); hospitality (Hebrews 13:1, Romans 12:13); forgiveness (Colossians 3:13); truthfulness (Ephesians 4:25); mutual admonition (2 Thessalonians 3:15); a Humility that prefers others and renders even lowly service (Matthew 18:1-18, Romans 6:1 Romans 12:10, Galatians 6:15, 1 Peter 5:5 f
the Angel of the Church in Smyrna - It is a mark of the deepest and truest Humility to see ourselves condemned without cause, and to be silent under it
the Mother of Zebedee's Children - The splendid Humility of the Syrophænician woman completely overcame Him, and now He is equally overcome with the splendid shamelessness of Salome's request
James the Lord's Brother - But I remember now: we all remember now, endless instances of His goodness, His meekness, His Humility, His lowliness of mind and heart
Joseph And Mary - She saw the unparalleled grace that had come to Mary, and she had Humility and magnanimity enough to acknowledge it
Parables - He rode into Jerusalem in regal Humility on the first Psalm Sunday, calling forth Zechariah's expectation
Prudentius, Marcus (?) Aurelius Clemens Prudentius - 100), and a deep personal Humility which does not venture to contend with Symmachus (i
Rufus - But when we look at the deeper side of the Messianic hope which it sets forth—the heart-felt longing for a true Kingdom of God, ‘the perception that that Kingdom can never be realized without a personal centre, a representative of God with man and man with God,’ who shall attain to true greatness through Humility—we see that the purpose which was in the mind of God, when He moved the prophet to write, was fulfilled in the highest sense when He sent His Son into the world, and when Jesus Christ entered, by being born and that in a low condition, on that life of humiliation that led to His exaltation to the place of power, and will finally lead to ‘all things being put under His feet
Jesus Christ - It describes both his debasement and his dignity; his rejection by the Jews; his Humility, his affliction, and his agony; his magnanimity and his charity; how his words were disbelieved; how his state was lowly; how his sorrow was severe; how he opened not his mouth but to make intercession for the transgressors. His Humility is signal, amidst a splendour of qualities more than human
Perfection (of Jesus) - Jesus discerned the spiritual soundness which might underlie sins of passion, the capacity of generosity with its healing power, the quick and deep response to a gospel of forgiveness in the Humility of self-accusing hearts, the sacred soil where love grows (Luke 7:47; Luke 18:13, Matthew 21:28-32). But there His royal robe is the self-forgetting Humility of love
Nehemiah - ...
While he pleads his efforts, not feigning a mock Humility, he closes with "remember me, O my God, and spare me according to the greatness of Thy mercy" (Nehemiah 13:22-31), the publican's and the dying thief's prayer
James, Epistle of - , Matthew 7:7 , Mark 11:23 ), poverty ( James 2:5 , Luke 6:20 ), Humility ( James 4:10 , Matthew 23:12 ), the tree and its fruits ( James 3:11 , Matthew 7:16 ; see Salmon, Introd
Heaven, Heavens, Heavenlies - Jesus linked entrance into the kingdom of heaven to repentance (Matthew 4:17 ), Humility (5:3; 18:1-4), witness (5:10,16; 10:32; 16:19), obedience (5:19), righteousness (5:20), compassion (18:10,14; 23:13) and stewardship (19:23)
Mark, Theology of - If Jesus' other titles are interpreted in different ways by his audience, the title "Son of Man" uniquely defines Jesus' ministry in terms of both majesty and Humility
Heir Heritage Inheritance - Other conditions are meekness and Humility (1 Peter 3:9, ‘not rendering evil for evil or reviling for reviling, but contrariwise blessing; for hereunto were ye called that ye should inherit a blessing’; cf
Individuality - Nor can it ever be true Humility to surrender our individuality to any other man made like to ourselves
Shimei - He is set upon my Humility, my submissiveness, my meekness, my gentleness, my resignation, my contentment, my detachment, my self-denial, my cross, my death to sin, my death to myself, my unearthliness, my heavenly-mindedness, my conformity to Christ, and my acceptance of Him-and what a splendid use is all that to which to put all the things that otherwise would be so much against me! And David said to Abishai, and to all his servants, Let this Benjamite alone, and let him curse; for the Lord hath bidden him
Paul as the Chief of Sinners - That is to say, the holiest men are the most full of holy fear, holy penitence, holy Humility, and holy love
the Angel of the Church in Philadelphia - Cormick used to say in his Humility that had it not been for the liberality of Lady Fowlis he would never have got to College at all, and that had it not been for the leniency of some of his professors he would never have got the length of being a minister, Be that as it may, it will be to the everlasting salvation of many that Daniel Cormick was ever sent to College, was carried through his studies, and was ordained a minister
Peter - His Divine Master saw in Simon latent qualities of courage, and fidelity, and endurance, and evangelical Humility that never as yet had fully unfolded themselves amid the untoward influences round about his life
Sanballat - ' What a lamp to our feet is that sentence as we go through this world! As we travel from home and go abroad; as we see other nations with their own habits and their own manners; as we see other churches at their worship; as we read other men's books, and speeches, and newspapers, and they ours; as we encounter other men's principles, and prejudices, and habits of mind, and life and heart-what a light to our path are Butler's wise words! And till we come, in God's spirit of truth, and Humility, and love, to take every other man's place and point of view, till we look at all things, and especially at ourselves, with all other men's eyes, and ears, and hearts
Enoch - No; but it is taken when you put on Humility upon your proud heart, and fill your hot heart full of meekness, and resignation, and quietness, and contrition, and a broken, heavenly, holy heart
Barnabas - Has Paul forgotten all that he once owed to Barnabas? And why does Barnabas's so sweet and so holy Humility so fail him when he is so far on in the voyage of life? "Mariners near the shore," says Shepard, "should be on the outlook for rocks
Matthias the Successor to Judas Iscariot - " And he spake with both wisdom and Humility in so saying
Nabal - But time passes, and there passes away with time all the hospitality, Humility, pliability, and sweetness of the churlish and obstinate man
Individuality - Nor can it ever be true Humility to surrender our individuality to any other man made like to ourselves
Isaiah - He demanded social and religious righteousness practiced in Humility and faith
Marriage - ...
The husband's leadership and its authority is a God-given responsibility to be carried out in Humility
Entry Into Jerusalem - The washing of the feet, the entry, and the cleansing of the Temple, stand together as dramatic representations of the principles and ideas of the Kingdom of God; of the Humility and self-denial required in the life of the Christian; of the mixture of condescension and majesty in the manner of the King’s coming; and of the peace He gives and of the judgment that follows in His steps
Minister, Ministration - ’ Stoicism was wholly wanting in Humility, which is the very foundation of ministering love as taught by Jesus (cf
Beda, Historian - It is impossible to read the more popular writings of Bede, especially the Ecclesiastical History , without seeing that his great knowledge was coupled with the Humility and simplicity of the purest type of monasticism
Saul - ...
His magnanimity too appears in his not allowing any to be killed of those whom the people desired to slay for saying "shall Saul reign over us?" Pious Humility then breathed in his ascription of the deliverance to Jehovah, not himself (1618164902_49)
Paul's Blamelessness as a Minister - "It is a mark of the deepest and truest Humility," says a great saint, "to see ourselves condemned without cause, and to be silent under it
Paul as an Evangelical Mystic - Just go home tonight and do that deed of love, and truth, and Humility, and brotherly-kindness, and self-denial, in His name, and, already, Christ is dwelling in you, and working in you as well as in Paul
Joseph - And thus it was that Joseph's future modesty, and Humility, and self-command, and knowledge of other men's hearts, and thoughtfulness for other men's feelings and temptations, had not yet begun to come to him
Colossians, Theology of - Thus the emphasis in this false teaching falls on the Humility of ascetic practice, visions, rigors of devotion, treating the body harshly, and rules about what should not be eaten or what days should be observed (2:16-23)
Ham - If a father would pray every day to God to inspire his children with true piety, great Humility, and strict temperance, what could be more likely to make the father himself become exemplary in these virtues? How naturally would he grow ashamed of wanting such virtues as he thought necessary for his children
Ethics - ‘Obedience, patience, benevolence, purity, Humility, alienation from the world and the “flesh,” are the chief novel or striking features which the Christian ideal of practice suggests’ (Sidgwick), and they involve the conception that Christian Ethics is based on the recognition of sin, of individuality, of social demands, and of the need of heavenly assistance
Peter, the Epistles of - Chastened fervor, deep Humility, and ardent love breathe throughout
Force - And they must also follow Him in the path of Humility, self-discipline, prayer, and self-denial (Matthew 10:38; Matthew 17:19-21; Matthew 26:41, Luke 11:9-13; Luke 22:31-32; Luke 24:49, John 12:24-26; John 13:13-17; John 14:10-18; John 15:4; John 17:11-19, Acts 1:4-5)
Jeremiah - With ever-increasing sensibility preach every day to them the meekness, and the Humility, and the spirituality, and the obedience, and the whole mind of Christ, and you will surely see Christ formed in your people before you are compelled to bequeath your pulpit to your successor
Ahithophel - It was our bad temper, our bad tongue, our want of thought, our want of love, our want of patience, our want of Humility that threw this old ally and that old adviser, this able man and that rich man, into the opposite camp
Jonathan - But the piety, the Humility, the generosity, the absolutely Christ-like loyalty, tenderness, self-forgetfulness, and self-sacrifice of Jonathan-all that the son had drawn from some far higher source than from his fast-falling father Saul
Baxterianism - The rejection of all human authority and influence in religion, requires to be balanced by a very strong sense of the divine authority, to prevent its generating a state of mind more characterized by pride of intellect, and independence of spirit, than by the Humility and diffidence which are essential features in the Christian character
Unity (2) - It becomes the gospel of love that men should stand fast in one spirit with one mind (Philippians 1:27): nothing is to be done through strife or vainglory—the guard of unity is Humility (Philippians 2:3); we are to do all things without murmurings or disputings, as children of God (Philippians 2:14 f
James Epistle of - the reference in James 4:4 to the worldly-minded as μοιχαλίδες, and see 2 Corinthians 11:2), and expresses itself in Humility (James 1:10), meekness (James 1:19 f
Christ, Christology - Its effect was to link on to the traditional conception of the Messiah a series of ideas of quite a different character, including Humility, submission, vicarious suffering and death
Christian Life - The gentler virtues which found no place in pagan ethics, such as sincerity, Humility, reasonableness (Philippians 4:5), patience, meekness, brotherly love, kindness (Galatians 5:22), are united with love and temperance or self-control; while joy, peace, and thankfulness (cf
Aaron - You may rely upon it that many an Israelite whose sin had found him out had a prayer offered for him and for his case at the altar such that the penitent never knew where all the compassion, and all the sympathy, and all the Humility, and all the holiness, and all the harmlessness of his high priest came from
Parable - (10) Personality in the Kingdom: ( a ) Humility ( Matthew 18:1-4 , Luke 18:9-14 ); ( b ) sincerity ( Matthew 7:15-27 ); ( c ) usefulness ( Luke 13:3-8 ); ( d ) gratitude ( Matthew 18:28-35 , Luke 7:41-43 ); ( e ) readiness to help ( Luke 10:30-37 ); ( f ) assurance of faith ( Luke 11:5-13 ; 1618164902_81 ); ( g ) patient hope ( Mark 13:34-37 , Luke 12:35-39 )
Philanthropy - He throws into contrast with that doctrine the quick intuition of the woman, as well as the Humility of her trust as she declares that even the Gentiles have a place in the family of God
Prayer (2) - The lost son’s prayer, as planned before his return and as actually uttered, is touching in its Humility
Evil - Jacob's assertion that "my years have been few and difficult [8]" (Genesis 47:9 ) may be interpreted as either subjective, wherein the "evil" indicates suffering, or objective, as a hyperbole of Humility
Sanctify, Sanctification - Such a recognition of other lives will keep men meek (Matthew 5:5, Matthew 11:29), and will fill their hearts with Humility (Matthew 18:1-6 ||)
Sanctification - Similarly, insisting that forgiveness from unremitted guilt requires more "work" or "penance" from the supplicant is legalism masquerading as Humility
Samuel - No amount of talent; no amount of loyalty; no amount of Humility, even, can make up in the young-in young statesmen and in young churchmen-for the wisdom, and the experience, and the standing, and the influence of the aged
Character - The result of thus opening the fountains of a great deep was to be seen in a new Humility and tenderness, an unexampled moral scrupulousness and solicitude, for the pride of the natural man is overwhelmed by the sense of what be owes (Matthew 18:21-35, John 21:15-19, Galatians 2:20, Colossians 3:12-13)
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - No light is thrown upon his thaumaturgic renown by his extant writings, which are conspicuous for their philosophic tone, Humility, self-distrust, and practical sense
Jesus Christ - His temperance has not the dark shades of austerity; his meekness does not degenerate into apathy; his Humility is signal, amidst a splendour of qualities more than human; his fortitude is eminent and exemplary in enduring the most formidable external evils, and the sharpest actual sufferings
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - He was an extreme ascetic, passing his whole life in poverty, raggedness, Humility, and gentleness
Prayer - It supposes Humility, contrition, and trust, on the part of the creature; and an acknowledgment of the power and compassion of God, and of the merit of the atonement of Christ: all which are manifestly new positions, so to speak, of the circumstances of the creature, which, upon the very principle of the objection, rationally understood, must be taken into consideration
Will - The first is adapted to excite in us gratitude, faith, and Humility; the second, to awaken our caution and quicken our diligence
Herod - After the battle of Actium he gained, by a mixture of Humility and boldness at Rhodes, the favor of Octavian the conqueror, who confirmed him in the kingdom, and added several cities along with the province of Trachonitis and district of Paneas
Childhood - To be great in the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 18:1; Matthew 18:4) it was necessary to have a spirit of simplicity and Humility such as was seen in the child in whom self-regard and self-seeking had as yet no place
Paul - Very striking is the patient Humility with which Paul waited for the Lord's time, as he had already received his call to be "a chosen vessel to bear His name before the Gentiles
Birth of Christ - The combination in Mary of the deepest Humility with a firm consciousness of her own high calling and future renown is very striking
Esther - What a magnificent and unparalleled opportunity-you dare not deny it-is yours, for your self-control, for the reducing of your pride, for the extermination of your temper, for your Humility and your patience, for the forgiving of your injuries, and for hiding your hungry, broken, bleeding heart with God I And what more would you have? Yours is a circle with opportunities in it that an elect angel might well envy
Religion (2) - Every token of self-abandonment in Humility, faith, and love drew forth His admiration, whether it was the quiet confidence of the centurion (Matthew 8:5 ff
Turning - 1), and a recognition of the truth that in God’s Kingdom Humility is the real badge of greatness
Corinthians, First Epistle to the - ’ Yes, but knowledge puffeth up; without love and Humility it is nothing; besides not all have knowledge
Grace - Of course, the book does not speak of God's favor at all, but Esther's Humility in seeking the favor of the king has always been understood as a pointer toward human responsibility to humbly accept the grace of God
Slave, Slavery - Humility, obedience, patience, gentleness, resignation are cardinal virtues in a Christian
Matthew, Gospel According to - In relation to their fellow-men they were to cultivate Humility, and to suppress self-assertiveness (Matthew 18:1-14); to exercise forgiveness (Matthew 18:15; Matthew 3:3); to be slow to judge their fellows (Matthew 7:1-5); to do to others what they would have done to themselves (Matthew 18:21-35,)
Terah - It is not told in Moses, but I can well believe it, that nothing that ever happened to Abram so hastened forward his Humility, his detachment from this world, and his heavenly-mindedness, as his fall in Egypt, and all its consequences to Pharaoh and to Pharaoh's household
Announcements of Death - The contentious spirit of the Twelve at such a time occasions the object-lesson in Humility
Romans, Epistle to the - ’ A great Humility becomes us, a full recognition of the differing gifts which God bestows on us
Covenant - Abram responded in Humility and worship (17:3)
Prayer - Prostration may be sometimes used in secret prayer, under a deep and uncommon sense of sin; but kneeling is the most frequent posture; and nature seems to dictate and lead us to it as an expression of Humility, of a sense of our wants, a supplication for mercy, and adoration of and dependence on him before whom we kneel
Sinlessness - If He sinned, like the other children of Adam, but failed to be humbled and to confess His fault, this brings Him down beneath the religious heroes of the race; for what feature of religious genius is more essential than Humility? But if it was no defect, what other explanation of it can there be but sinlessness?...
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Ignatius - the Antiochene Christians]'>[6]6 There are similar protestations of Humility in Eph
Sacrifice (2) - He realizes that it is offence at His Humility and lowliness that keeps ‘the wise and prudent’ from hearing His word, and that it is love to Him that draws the poor and despised and sin-laden to the knowledge of the Father and the doing of His will
Gospels - The self-assertion of the great Example of Humility is equally great in all the Gospels, and is the great stumbling-block of all the thoughtful upholders of a purely humanitarian Christ
Ethics (2) - In the section dominated by the three predictions of His death (Mark 8:27 to Mark 10:45) we have a mass of admonitions to the disciples—concerning readiness to suffer, loyalty, courage, Humility, reverence for childhood, etc
Mental Characteristics - His Humility was profound, and has changed the estimation of this quality in the eyes of mankind
Authority in Religion - ...
His ‘Do not your alms before men, to be seen of them’ (Matthew 6:1), was designed hardly more to eradicate pride from the souls of His disciples, than it was to hearten them to throw off the incubus of a perverted public and ecclesiastical sentiment which threatened to stifle Christian Humility and Godwardness in their very birth
Forgiveness (2) - Such forgiveness of injuries was based upon two fundamental principles of Christian ethics: (a) the duty of repressing all personal resentment, closely connected with the virtues of meekness and Humility; and (b) that love to all men, including enemies, which—paradoxical as it might appear—Christ enjoined as fundamentally incumbent on all His disciples (Matthew 5:44)
Tatianus - portion both older and more divine, more full of Humility and of deep knowledge, more marked by excellence and unity than any writings claimed by the Greeks (c
Incarnation (2) - He is perfect in Humility; and yet, combined with the utmost gentleness, the most winning loveliness, there is an assertion of His own supreme importance, which is at once profound and sublime
Christ in the Middle Ages - The atoning work of Christ does not avail for human salvation unless man fills up by a life of Humility and suffering that which remained of the sufferings of Christ
Gregorius (51) i, (the Great), Bishop of Rome - He wrote to Reccared in warm congratulation, exhorting him to Humility, chastity, and mercy; thanking him for presents received, and sending in return a key from the body of St
Apostles - What were their thoughts? Were they filled with exultation? Did they infer that the Kingdom of God would immediately appear? Did they anticipate a brilliant future for themselves? Or were there those among them who reflected with Humility on their unfitness to be the generals and statesmen of the new Kingdom? Did it occur to even one of them that the choice just made was a fresh disclosure of the view taken by Jesus of the Kingdom of God and of the means by which it was to be extended?...
Who now were the objects of our Lord’s choice? With some of them we are already acquainted
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - After the departure of Arcadius Chrysostom delivered a second enthusiastic homily in praise of his piety and Humility ( Homil
Clemens Romanus of Rome - The bulk of the letter is taken up in enforcing the duties of meekness, Humility, submission to lawful authority, and but little attempt is made at the refutation of doctrinal error
Dioscorus (1), Patriarch of Alexandria - Theodoret, whose testimony in his favour cannot be suspected, declared in a letter to Dioscorus, soon after his consecration, that the fame of his virtues, and particularly of his modesty and Humility, was widely spread (Ep
Worship - The domestic relations are rendered more strong and interesting by the very habit of the attendance of families upon the sacred services of the sanctuary of the Lord; and the rich and the poor meeting together, and standing on the same common ground as sinners before God, equally dependent upon him, and equally suing for his mercy, has a powerful, though often an insensible, influence in humbling the pride which is nourished by superior rank, and in raising the lower classes above abjectness of spirit, without injuring their Humility
Synods - But this confidence, in itself just and salutary, took a false and destructive turn, when it was not constantly accompanied by the spirit of Humility and self-watchfulness, with fear and trembling; when men were not constantly mindful of the important condition under which alone man could hope to share in the fulfilment of that promise, in that divine illumination and guidance,—the condition, that they were really assembled in the name of Christ, in lively faith in him, and honest devotion to him, and prepared to sacrifice their own wills; and when the people gave themselves up to the fancy, that such an assembly, whatever might be the hearts of those who were assembled, had unalienable claims to the illumination of the Holy Spirit; for then, in the confusion and the intermixture of human and divine, men were abandoned to every kind of self-delusion; and the formula, "Spiritu Sancto suggerente," "By the suggestion of the Holy Spirit," might become a pretence and sanction for all the suggestions of man's own will
Palestine - ‘The qualities which seemed to the warriors of Clovis so magnificently Divine, the self-sacrifice, the self-denial, the resignation, the sweet Humility, are precisely the qualities the germs of which exist in the Hindu’ (Asia and Europe, 69)
Pelagianism And Pelagius - They reject the idea that the petition in the Lord's Prayer, "Forgive us our sins," is inappropriate for Christian men and can only be regarded as a prayer for others, and that it can only be used as a fictitious expression of Humility, not as a true confession of guilt