What does Huguenots mean in the Bible?

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Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Huguenots
An appellation given by way of contempt to the reformed or protestant Calvinists of France. the name had its rise in 1560, but authors are not agreed as to the origin and occasion thereof. Some derive it from the following circumstance:
One of the gates of the city of Tours is called the gate of Fourgon, by corruption from feu Heugon, 1: e. the late Hugon. This Hugon was once count of Tours, according to Eginhardus in his life of Charles the Great, and to some other historians. He was, it seems, a very wicked man, who by his fierce and cruel temper made himself dreadful, so that after his death he was supposed to walk about in the night time, beating all those he met with: this tradition the judicious Thuanas has not scrupled to mention in his history. Davila and other historians pretend that the nickname of Huguenots was first given to the French Protestants, because they used to meet in the night time in subterraneous vaults near the gate of Hugon; and what seems to countenance this opinion is, that they were first called by the name of Huguenots at this city of Tours. Others assign a more illustrious origin to this name, and say that the leaguers gave it to the reformed, because they were for keeping the crown upon the head of the present line descended from Hugh Capet; whereas they were for giving it to the house of Guise, as descended from Charles the Great.
Others again derive it from a French and faulty pronunciation of the German word edignossen, signifying confederates; and originally applied to that valiant part of the city of Geneva, which entered into an alliance with the Swiss cantons, in order to maintain their liberties against the tyrannical attempts of Charles III. duke of Savoy. These confederates were called Eignots; whence Huguenots. The persecution which they have undergone has scarce its parallel in the history of religion. During the reign of Charles IX. and on the 24th of August, 1572, happened the massacre of Bartholomew, when seventy thousand of them throughout France were butchered with circumstances of aggravated cruelty.
See PERSECUTION. In 1598, Henry IV. passed the famous edict of Nantz, which secured to the Protestants the free exercise of their religion. This edict was revoked by Lewis XIV. their churches were then razed to the ground, their persons insulted by the soldiers, and, after the loss of innumerable lives, fifty thousand valuable members of society were driven into exile. In Holland they built several places of worship, and had among them some distinguished preachers.
Among others were Superville, Dumont, Dubosc, and the eloquent Saurin; the latter of whom, in one of his sermons (ser. 9. vol. 5:) makes the following fine apostrophe to that tyrant Lewis XIV. by whom they were driven into exile: "And thou, dreadful prince, whom I once honoured as my king, and whom I yet respect as a scourge in the hand of Almighty God, thou also shalt have a part in my good wishes! These provinces, which thou threatenest, but which the arm of the Lord protects; this country, which thou fillest with refugees, but fugitives animated with love; those walls, which contain a thousand martyrs of thy making, but whom religion renders victorious, all these yet resound benedictions in thy favour. God grant the fatal bandage that hides the truth from thine eyes may fall off! May God forget the rivers of blood with which thou hast deluged the earth, and which thy reign hath caused to be shed!
May God blot out of his book the injuries which thou hast done us; and while he rewards the sufferers, may he pardon those who exposed us to suffer! O, may God, who hath made thee to us, and to the whole church, a minister of his judgments, make thee a dispenser of his favours an administrator of his mercy!"
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Huguenots
(German: Eidgenossen, confederates, popularized under the influence of the name Hugues, from Besançon Hugues, a Protestant leader)
Term used in a popular sense after 1560 to designate the French Protestants of the 16th and 17th centuries. Their sect, which received its organization and form from Calvin, gained a foothold in France where the Faith had been weakened by the Western Schism, the growth of Gallicanism, the Pragmatic Sanction (1438), and the opposition to the Holy League of Pope Julius II. They provoked serious opposition, which abated, 1535, when Calvin championed their cause, only to break out again as a result of more stringent laws, 1540. They held a national synod, 1559, and gradually increased in strength under the leadership of d' Andelot, Admiral Coligny, and Henry of Navarre. The last-named secured for them the free exercise of their religion by the Edict of Nantes, 1598. Not content with liberty, they sought to become a political and even a military power, and were disloyal to France. Their power was crushed, 1628, when La Rochelle surrendered, and they lost their political and religious freedom when Louis XIV revoked the Edict, 1685. They fled to England, South Africa, America, and the Netherlands.

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Alais, Peace of - Treaty, signed 1629 between the royal forces and the Huguenots of France by which the wars of religion were ended. The Edict of Nantes was renewed, an amnesty was granted, and the cities taken from the Huguenots
Dragonnade - Name of the plan of king Louis XIV to use dragoons to force French Huguenots back to Catholicism
Refugees - ...
See Huguenots
Fulcran, Saint - Buried in the cathedral of Lodeve, his body was burned by the Huguenots, 1572
Bergerac, Peace of - Truce formed between Catholics and Huguenots in France confirmed by the Edict of Poitiers, 1577
Nantes, Edict of - Term applied to an order issued, 1598, by Henry IV of France, which provided for the reestablishment of the Catholic religion in that country, the restoration of church property and rights, and for the free exercise of their religion by the Huguenots, eligibility to public office, state subsidies for their schools and churches, and representation in the Parliament of Paris. The religious peace which resulted came to an end after the death of Henry, 1610, when the Huguenots abused; their political power and attempted a revolution which was subdued chiefly through the efforts of Cardinal Richelieu
Edict of Nantes - Term applied to an order issued, 1598, by Henry IV of France, which provided for the reestablishment of the Catholic religion in that country, the restoration of church property and rights, and for the free exercise of their religion by the Huguenots, eligibility to public office, state subsidies for their schools and churches, and representation in the Parliament of Paris. The religious peace which resulted came to an end after the death of Henry, 1610, when the Huguenots abused; their political power and attempted a revolution which was subdued chiefly through the efforts of Cardinal Richelieu
League, the - Political and religious organization formed by the French Catholics in the 16th century to protest against the encroachments of the Huguenots and to prevent the accession of the Protestant Henry de Navarre to the throne. The equivocal attitude of the frivolous Henry III, the extraordinary advantages granted to the Huguenots by the Edict of Beaulieu (1576), e. A local league was started in 1576 at Peronne, one of the towns ceded to the Huguenots; the general league in which not only the nobility and the clergy, but also the people participated, was organized in Paris in 1585, with a Council of 16 members
Chambre Ardente - This name was given, some say, because the place where the commission sat was lighted exclusively by torches, while others see in it a reference to the severity displayed by this court towards the Huguenots
Ardente, Chambre - This name was given, some say, because the place where the commission sat was lighted exclusively by torches, while others see in it a reference to the severity displayed by this court towards the Huguenots
John Regis, Saint - Gifted with a marvelous talent for missions, he labored for the conversion of the Huguenots, assisted the needy, and aided in the rescue of wayward women
Regis, John Francis, Saint - Gifted with a marvelous talent for missions, he labored for the conversion of the Huguenots, assisted the needy, and aided in the rescue of wayward women
Mamertus, Saint - His remains were burned at Orleans by the Huguenots
Medici, Catherine de' - The period was one of conflict between the Huguenots under the Prince de Conde and the Admiral de Coliguy, and the Catholics led by the House of Guise
Catherine de' Medici - The period was one of conflict between the Huguenots under the Prince de Conde and the Admiral de Coliguy, and the Catholics led by the House of Guise
Auxerre, Germain of, Saint - His relics which were at Auxerre, were dispersed by the Huguenots, 1567
Germain of Auxerre, Saint - His relics which were at Auxerre, were dispersed by the Huguenots, 1567
Hubert, Saint - Relics elevated at Liege, transferred to Amdain monastery, dispersed by the Huguenots, 1568
Huguenots - Davila and other historians pretend that the nickname of Huguenots was first given to the French Protestants, because they used to meet in the night time in subterraneous vaults near the gate of Hugon; and what seems to countenance this opinion is, that they were first called by the name of Huguenots at this city of Tours. These confederates were called Eignots; whence Huguenots
Saint Augustine, Florida, City of - The slaughter of Ribault and the settlers at Fort Caroline on September 20, established Spanish supremacy over French Huguenots in the New World
Hugh the Great, Saint - Relics dispersed by the Huguenots, 1574
Great, Hugh the, Saint - Relics dispersed by the Huguenots, 1574
Pacification - This pacification was but of short continuance; for Charles perceiving a general insurrection of the Huguenots, revoked the said edicts in September, 1568, forbidding the exercise of the Protestant religion, and commanding all the ministers to depart the kingdom in fifteen days. ...
See Huguenots, and PERSECUTION
Methodist - The popish Methodists were those polemical doctors who arose in France about the middle of the seventeenth century, in opposition to the Huguenots, or Protestants
Richelieu, Armand Jean du Plessis, Duke of - The war against the Huguenots ended by the capture of La Rochelle, after a memorable siege conducted by Richelieu in person; in his fight against the princes he frustrated several plots and had some of the leaders put to death (Montmorency, Cinq-Mars, De Thou); in his struggle against the House of Austria he supported Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden, and during the French period of the Thirty Years War (1635-1643) had several armies fighting against the Austro-Spanish troops; although the war brought unspeakable miseries upon several French provinces, especially Artois and Lorraine, the cardinal persisted despite even the pleadings of Saint Vincent de Paul
Economics - To him and his followers are due the abuses of modern capitalism, starting with the Huguenots and Puritans of Holland, England, and America
Persecution - Whether they are Hebrew prophets or Christian martyrs-Albigenses, Pilgrim Fathers, or Huguenots-the struggle is at bottom of the same nature, and for the same ideal