What does Hospitality mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
φιλοξενίαν love to strangers 1
φιλοξενίας love to strangers 1

Definitions Related to Hospitality

G5381


   1 love to strangers, Hospitality.
   

Frequency of Hospitality (original languages)

Frequency of Hospitality (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Hospitality
To entertain or receive a stranger (sojourner) into one's home as an honored guest and to provide the guest with food, shelter, and protection. This was not merely an oriental custom or good manners but a sacred duty that everyone was expected to observe. Only the depraved would violate this obligation.
Hospitality probably grew out of the needs of nomadic life. Since public inns were rare, a traveler had to depend on the kindness of others and had a right to expect it. This practice was extended to every sojourner, even a runaway slave (Deuteronomy 23:16-17 ) or one's arch enemy.
Hospitality was regarded as a sacred obligation by the ancient Greeks and Romans, one that was approved by Zeus, the god and protector of strangers. The Egyptians claimed it as a meritorious deed in life. For the Bedouins, it was an expression of righteousness. The word is not used in the Old Testament, but its elements are recognizable: Abraham and the three visitors (Genesis 18:1-8 ), Lot and the two angels (Genesis 19:1-8 ), Abraham's servant at Nahor (Genesis 24:17-33 ), Reuel and Moses (Exodus 2:20 ), Manoah and the angel (Judges 13:15 ), Elijah and the widow of Zarephath (1 Kings 17:10-11 ), and Elisha and the Shunammite woman (2 Kings 4:8-11 ).
The Pentateuch contains specific commands for the Israelites to love the strangers as themselves (Leviticus 19:33-34 ; Deuteronomy 10:18-19 ), and to look after their welfare (Deuteronomy 24:17-22 ). The reason for practicing hospitality was that the Israelites themselves were once strangers in the land of Egypt. Some acts of hospitality were rewarded, the most notable of which was Rahab's (Joshua 6:22-25 ; Hebrews 11:31 ; James 2:25 ). Breaches of hospitality were condemned and punished, such as those of Sodom (Genesis 19:1-11 ) and Gibeah (Judges 19:10-25 ). The only exception was Jael who was praised for killing Sisera (Judges 4:18-24 ).
Hospitality seemed to form the background of many details in the life of Jesus and the early church (Matthew 8:20 ; Luke 7:36 ; Luke 9:2-5 ; Luke 10:4-11 ). It was to be a characteristic of bishops and widows (1 Timothy 3:2 ; 1 Timothy 5:10 ; Titus 1:8 ) and a duty of Christians (Romans 12:13 ; 1 Peter 4:9 ). It was a
natural expression of brotherly love (Hebrews 13:1-2 ; 1 Peter 4:8-9 ) and a necessary tool of evangelism. Furthermore, one might even entertain angels or the Lord unawares (Hebrews 13:2 ; Matthew 25:31-46 ). Both the Didache, which contained early Christian instructions, and rabbinic literature provided guidelines for guests' behavior and their duration of stay. Guests were enjoined to act appropriately, to observe the rules of etiquette, and to avoid presuming upon their hosts. See Sojourner; Strangers.
Lai Ling Elizabeth Ngan
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Hospitality
A — 1: φιλοξενία (Strong's #5381 — Noun Feminine — philoxenia — fil-on-ex-ee'-ah ) "love of strangers" (philos, "loving," xenos, "a stranger"), is used in Romans 12:13 ; Hebrews 13:2 , lit. "(be not forgetful of) hospitality." See ENTERTAIN , Note.
B — 1: φιλόξενος (Strong's #5382 — Adjective — philoxenos — fil-ox'-en-os ) "hospitable," occurs in 1 Timothy 3:2 ; Titus 1:8 ; 1 Peter 4:9 .
Note: For xenodocheo, 1 Timothy 5:10 , see STRANGER , B.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Hospitality
Hospitality.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Hospitality
Kindness exercised in the entertainment of strangers. This virtue, we find, is explicitly commanded by, and makes a part of the morality of the New Testament. Indeed, that religion which breathes nothing but charity, and whose tendency is to expand the heart, and call forth the benevolent exertions of mankind, must evidently embrace this practice.
If it be asked, of whom is this required? it is answered, that the principle is required of all, though the duty itself can only be practised by those whose circumstances will admit of it. Dr. Stennet, in his discourse on this subject (Domestic Duties, ser. 10, ) justly observes, "that hospitality is a species of charity to which every one is not competent. But the temper from which it proceeds, I mean a humane, generous, benevolent temper, that ought to prevail in every breast. Some are miserably poor, and it is not to be expected that their doors should be thrown open to entertain strangers; yet the cottage of a peasant may exhibit noble specimens of hospitality. Here distress has often met with pity, and the persecuted an asylum. Nor is there a man who has a house to sleep in, but may be benevolent to strangers.
But there are persons of certain characters and stations, who are more especially obliged to it: as particularly magistrates and others in civil offices, who would forfeit the esteem of the public, and greatly injure their usefulness, were they not to observe the rites of hospitality. Ministers also, and such Christians as are qualified by their particular offices in the church, and their affluent circumstances, may be eminently useful in this way. The two grand virtues which ought to be studied by every one, in order that he may have it in his power to be hospitable, are, industry and economy. But it may be asked again, to whom is this duty to be practised? The answer is, to strangers: but here it is necessary to observe, that the term strangers hath two acceptations. It is to be understood of travellers, or persons who come from a distance, and with whom we have little or no acquaintance; and more generally of all who are not of our house strangers, as opposed to domestics.
Hospitality is especially to be practised to the poor: they who have no houses of their own, or possess few of the conveniences of life, should occasionally be invited to our houses, and refreshed at our tables, Luke 14:1-35 . Hospitality also may be practised to those who are of the same character and of the same community with ourselves. As to the various offices of hospitality, and the manner in which they should be rendered, it must be observed, that the entertainments should be plentiful, frugal, and cordial. Genesis 18:6 ; Genesis 18:8 . John 12:3 . Luke 15:17 . The obligations to this duty arise from the fitness and reasonableness of it; it brings its own reward, Acts 20:35 . It is expressly commanded by God, Leviticus 25:35 ; Leviticus 25:38 . Luke 15:19 ; Luke 14:13-14 . Romans 12:1-21 : Hebrews 13:1-2 . 1 Peter 4:9 . We have many striking examples of hospitality on divine record: Abraham, Genesis 18:1 ; Genesis 18:8 . Lot, Genesis 19:1 ; Genesis 19:3 . Job 31:17 ; Job 31:22 . Shunamite, 2 Kings 4:1-44 . The hospitable man mentioned in Judges 19:16 ; Judges 19:21 . David, 2 Samuel 6:19 . Obadiah, 1 Kings 18:1-46 . Nehemiah, Nehemiah 5:17-18 . Martha, Luke 10:38 . Mary, Matthew 26:6 ; Matthew 26:13 . The primitive Christians, Acts 2:45-46 . Priscilla and Aquila, Acts 18:26 . Lydia, Acts 16:15 , &c. &c. Lastly, what should have a powerful effect on our minds, is the consideration of divine hospitality.
God is good to all, and his tender mercies are over all his works. His sun shines and his rain fall on the evil as well as the good. His very enemies share of his bounty. He gives liberally to all men, and upbraids not; but especially we should remember the exceeding riches of his grace, in his kindness towards us through Christ Jesus. Let us lay all these considerations together, and then ask ourselves whether we can find it in our hearts to be selfish, parsimonious, and inhospitable?"
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hospitality
HOSPITALITY . In the life of the East there are no more attractive features than those that centre in the practice of hospitality. The virtue of hospitality ranked high in the ancient Orient, and the laws regulating its observance hold undisputed sway in the desert still. The pleasing picture of the magnanimous sheik, bidding strangers welcome to his tent and to the best he owns ( Genesis 18:1-33 ), is often repeated to this hour in the Arabian wilderness. It was to Lot’s credit and advantage that he had preserved this virtue amid the corruptions of Sodom ( Genesis 19:2 ff.). To shirk an opportunity for its exercise was shameful ( Judges 19:15 ; Judges 19:18 ). A man’s worth was illustrated by his princely hospitality ( Job 31:31 f.). Jesus sent forth the Twelve ( Matthew 10:9 f.), and the Seventy ( Luke 10:4 ff.), relying on the hospitality of the people. Its exercise secured His blessing; woe threatened such as refused it. The Samaritans’ churlish denial of hospitality to Jesus excited the wrath of His disciples ( Luke 9:53 ). The guest had a right to expect certain attentions ( Luke 7:44 ff.). The practice of hospitality distinguished those on the right from those on the left hand ( Matthew 25:35 ; cf. Matthew 10:40 , John 13:20 ). It is commended by precept ( Romans 12:13 ; Romans 12:20 , 1 Timothy 3:2 etc.), and also by example ( Hebrews 13:2 ).
Hospitality was highly esteemed amongst other ancient peoples. In Egypt its practice was thought to favour the soul in the future life. By kindness to strangers the Greeks secured the approval of Zeus Xenios, their protector. For the Romans hospitality was a sacred obligation.
In its simplest aspect, hospitality is the reception of the wayfarer as an honoured guest, providing shelter and food. In the ancient, as indeed for the most part in the modern, Orient, men journey only under necessity. Travel for purposes of pleasure and education is practically unknown. Save in cities, therefore, and in trading centres along the great highways, there was little call for places of public entertainment. Villages probably always contained what is called the medâfeh properly madyafah a chamber reserved for guests, whose entertainment is a charge upon the whole community. From personal experience the present writer knows how solicitous the humblest villagers are for the comfort and well-being of their guests. If the chief man in a village be well off, he greatly adds to his prestige by a liberal display of hospitality.
In the desert, every tent, however poor its owner, offers welcome to the traveller. In the master’s absence the women receive the guests, and according to their means do the honours of the ‘house of hair.’ It is the master’s pride to be known as a generous man; any lack of civility or of kindness to a guest meets severe reprobation. In the guest’s presence he calls neither his tent, nor anything it contains, his own. During his sojourn the visitor is owner. The women bake bread; the master slays a ‘sacrifice,’ usually a lamb, kid, or sheep, which is forthwith dressed, cooked, and served with the bread. The proud son of the wilds has high ideas of his own dignity and honour; but he himself waits upon his guest, seeking to gratify with alacrity his every wish. If his visitors are of superior rank he stands by them (Genesis 18:8 ), and in any case sits down only if they invite him. The safety and comfort of the guests are the first consideration; many place them before even the honour of wife and daughter ( Genesis 19:8 , Judges 19:24 ; cf. Lane, Mod. Egyp . 297). If a guest arrives after sunset he is entitled only to shelter, as the host might then be unable to prepare a meal creditable to himself. If food is offered, it is of the host’s goodwill ( Luke 11:5 ff.). The guest, careful of the host’s honour, will indicate that more than he requires has been provided by leaving a portion in the dish.
The open hand, as the token of a liberal heart, wins the respect and esteem of the Arabs. Leadership does not of necessity descend from father to son. Right to the position must be vindicated by wisdom, courage, dignity, and not least by generous hospitality. For the niggard in this regard there is nothing but contempt. It is a coveted distinction to be known as a ‘coffee sheik,’ one who without stint supplies his visitors with the fragrant beverage.
The Arabs are sometimes charged with want of gratitude; justly, as it seems from our point of view. But what seems ingratitude to us may be due simply to the influence of immemorial custom, in a land where the necessities of life are never sold, but held as common good, of which the traveller may of right claim a share. The ‘right of a guest’ may be taken, if not freely offered. The man who refuses covers himself with perpetual shame. The guest enjoys only his right ; therefore no thanks mingle with his farewell.
The right, however, is limited. ‘Whoever,’ says the Prophet, ‘believes in God and the day of resurrection must respect his guest; and the time of being kind to him is one day and one night; and the period of entertaining him is three days; and if after that he does it longer, he benefits him more: but it is not right for the guest to stay in the house of his host so long as to incommode him’ (Lane, Arabian Society in the Middle Ages , 143). After three days, or, some say, three days and four hours, the host may ask if he proposes to honour him by a longer stay. The guest may wish to reach some point under protection of the tribe. If so, he is welcome to stay; only, the host may give him work to do. To remain while refusing to do this is highly dishonourable. But the guest may go to another tent at the expiry of every third day, thus renewing his ‘right,’ and sojourn with the tribe as long as is necessary.
Hospitality involves protection as well as maintenance. ‘It is a principle alike in old and new Arabia that the guest is inviolable’ (W. R. Smith, Kinship 2 , 48). That this provision applies to enemies as well as to friends shows the magnanimity of the desert law. Every stranger met in the open is assumed to be an enemy: he will owe his safety either to his own prowess or to fear that his tribe will exact vengeance if he is injured. But the stranger who enters the tent is daif Ullah , the guest whom God has sent, to be well entreated for His sake. In an enemy’s country one’s perils are over when he reaches a tent, and touches even a tent peg. A father’s murderer may find sure asylum even in the tent of his victim’s son. When he has eaten of the host’s bread, the two are at once bound as brothers for mutual help and protection. It is said that ‘there is salt between them.’ Not that literal salt is required. This is a term covering milk, and indeed food of any kind. A draught of water taken by stealth, or even against his will, from a man’s dish, serves the purpose. When protection is secured from one, the whole tribe is bound by it (W. R. Smith, RS [1] 2 76).
To understand this we must remember (1) that in Arabia all recognition of mutual rights and duties rests upon kinship. Those outside the kin may be dealt with according to each man’s inclination and ability. (2) Kinship is not exclusively a matter of birth. It may be acquired. When men eat and drink together, they renew their blood from the one source, and to that extent are partakers in the same blood. The stranger eating with a clansman becomes ‘kinsman’ to all the members of the clan, as regards ‘the fundamental rights and duties that turn on the sanctity of kindred blood’ (Wellhausen, Reste Arab. [2] Heid . 119f.; W. R. Smith, RS [1] 2 273 n. [4] ). This sanctity may be traced to the ancient belief that the clan god shared its life, and when an animal was slain for food took part in the common meal. The clan’s friends were therefore the god’s friends, whom to injure was to outrage the deity. That the slaughter of the victim was a religions act involving the whole kin is borne out ( a ) by the fact that when an animal is slain all have an undisputed right to come to the feast; ( b ) by the name dhabîhah , ‘sacrifice,’ still applied to it. The present writer was once entertained in the camp of a rather wild and unkempt tribe. His attendants supped with the crowd. Fearing this might not be agreeable to a European, the chief’s son, who presided in his father’s absence, with innate Arab courtesy, asked him to cup with him in the sheik’s tent. Bringing in a portion of the flesh, the youth repeatedly remarked, as if for the stranger’s re-assurance, edh-dhabîhah wâhideh , ‘the slaughtering sacrifice is one’; i.e. the tribesmen and he ate from the same victim.
The bond thus formed was temporary, holding good for 36 hours after parting. By frequent renewal, however, it might become permanent. ‘There was a sworn alliance between the Lihyân and the Mostalic: they were wont to eat and drink together’ ( RS [1] 2 270 f.). A man may declare himself the dakhîl from dakhala , ‘to enter,’ i.e. to claim protection of a powerful man, and thus pass under shelter of his name even before his tent is reached. Whoever should injure him then would have to reckon with the man whose name he had invoked. The rights of sanctuary associated with temples, and until recently with certain churches, originated in an appeal to the hospitality of the local deity. The refugee’s safety depended on the respect paid to the god. Joab would have been safe had he not outlawed himself in this regard ( 1 Kings 2:31 ff.). Jael’s dastard deed could be approved only in the heat of patriotic fanaticism ( Judges 4:17 ; Judges 5:24 ).
In OT times it can hardly be said that inns in the later sense existed. The ordinary traveller was provided for by the laws of hospitality. The mâtôn of Genesis 42:27 etc. was probably nothing more than a place where caravans were accustomed to halt and pass the night. A building of some kind may be intended by the ‘lodge of wayfaring men’ in the wilderness ( Jeremiah 9:2 ). For gçrûth ( Jeremiah 41:17 ) we should probably read gidrôth , ‘folds’ (cf. Jos. [6] Ant . X. ix. 5). Great changes were wrought by Greek and Roman influence, and there can be no doubt that in NT times, especially in the larger centres of population, inns were numerous and well appointed. The name pandocheion = Arab. [2] funduq , shows that the inn was a foreign importation. Those on the highways would in some respects resemble the khâns of modern times, and the buildings that stood for centuries on the great lines of caravan traffic, before the sea became the highway of commerce. These were places of strength, as well as of entertainment for man and beast. Such was probably the inn of the Good Samaritan ( Luke 10:34 ), identified with Khân Hadrûr , on the road to Jericho. The inns would be frequented by men of all nationalities and of all characters. Rabbinical references show that their reputation was not high. It was natural that Christians should, for their own safety, avoid the inn, and practise hospitality among themselves ( 1 Peter 4:9 etc.).
In Luke 2:7 ‘inn’ ( katatuma ) probably means, as it does in Mark 14:14 and Luke 22:11 , the guest-chamber in a private house. Such guest-chambers were open freely to Jews visiting Jerusalem at the great feasts ( Aboth R. Nathan , cap. 34). It is reasonable to suppose that they would be equally open on an occasion like the registration, requiring the presence of such numbers. If Joseph and Mary, arriving late, found the hoped-for guest-chamber already occupied, they might have no resort but the khân , where, in the animal’s quarters, Jesus was born.
In modern Palestine hotels are found only at important places on the most popular routes of travel.
W. Ewing.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Hospitality
The law as to strangers and the poor encouraged it (Leviticus 19:33-34; Leviticus 25:14-15; Leviticus 25:23, etc.; Deuteronomy 15:7). Exemplified in Abraham, Genesis 18; Lot, Genesis 19; Reuel, Exodus 2:20; Manoah, Judges 13:15; the old man of Gibeah (its inhospitality is instanced as a sign of how lost to all right feeling its people were), Judges 19:17-21. The Lord Jesus illustrates it in the good Samaritan, promises to reward it, and regards its exercise toward His disciples as being towards Himself, and will count it as one proof of the love whose crowning joy shall be the invitation, "Come ye blessed of My Father," etc. (Luke 10:30-37; Matthew 10:42; Matthew 25:43). The apostles urge the duty (Romans 12:13; 1 Timothy 5:10; 1 Timothy 3:2; Titus 1:8; Hebrews 13:2; 1 Peter 4:9).
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Hospitality
Hospitality plays no small role in the realm of biblical ethics. Biblical admonitions exhorted the Israelites and the early Christians to practice this virtue. Its practice characterized Abraham (Genesis 18:2-8 ) and the church leaders (1 Timothy 3:2 ; Titus 1:8 ). And, as hospitality is an attribute of God, one finds its images in the biblical proclamation of the relationship between God and the covenant people.
Hospitality in the ancient world focused on the alien or stranger in need. The plight of aliens was desperate. They lacked membership in the community, be it tribe, city-state, or nation. As an alienated person, the traveler often needed immediate food and lodging. Widows, orphans, the poor, or sojourners from other lands lacked the familial or community status that provided a landed inheritance, the means of making a living, and protection. In the ancient world the practice of hospitality meant graciously receiving an alienated person into one's land, home, or community and providing directly for that person's needs.
Some forms of hospitality toward nonforeign strangers appear to have been commonly practiced among the nations of the biblical world. There appears to have been some decline in hospitality from the period of the Old Testament to that of the New Testament, since hospitality is omitted from later Greco-Roman virtue lists. In its literature, Israel alone seems to have included the foreign sojourner along with those other alienated persons who were to receive care: the widow, the orphan, and the poor. Although the narratives of the patriarchal period advocate receiving the foreigner/stranger at least on a temporary basis (Genesis 18-19 ), landed Israel showed some ambivalence toward foreign strangers by favorably distinguishing the sojourner, who made some allegiance to the Israelite community of faith, from the foreigner, who might represent some threat to cultic purity. For the early church, hospitality remained an important expression of lovingkindness, one that received support in the teaching of Jesus (Matthew 25:31-46 ; Luke 10:30-37 ; 14:16-24 ; 16:19-31 ).
Hospitality took several forms. Acts of hospitality included the humble and gracious reception of travelers into one's home for food, lodging, and protection (Genesis 18:2-8 ; 19:1-8 ; Job 31:16-23,31-32 ), permitting the alienated person to harvest the corners of one's fields (Leviticus 19:9-10 ; Deuteronomy 24:19-22 ; Ruth 2:2-17 ), clothing the naked (Isaiah 58:7 ; Ezekiel 18:7,16 ), tithing food for the needy (Deuteronomy 14:28-29 ; 26:1-11 ), and including the alien in religious celebrations (Exodus 12:48-49 ; Deuteronomy 16:10-14 ).
The hospitable act of the communal meal possesses great symbolic significance. In the ancient world, to share food with someone was to share life. Such a gesture of intimacy created a bond of fellowship. Hence, God's meal with the elders of Israel (Exodus 24:1-11 ), Jesus' meals with tax collectors and sinners (Luke 11:37 ; 15:1 ; 19:5-6 ), the Lord's Supper (Mark 14:17-26 ), Jesus' postresurrection meals (Luke 24:30-31,40-43 ; John 21:12-13 ; cf. Acts 1:4 ; 10:41 ), Peter's meal with Gentiles (Acts 10:48-11:3 ), and the common meal of the early Christians (Acts 2:42-47 ) communicated a powerful message of intimacy and unity.
The Old Testament. Israel as Guest, God as Host . Old Testament teaching identifies the Israelites as alienated people who are dependent on God's hospitality (Psalm 39:12 ; see also Hebrews 11:13 ). God graciously received the alienated Israelites and met their needs, redeeming them from Egypt and feeding and clothing them in the wilderness (Exodus 16 ; Deuteronomy 8:2-5 ), bringing them as sojourners into God's own land (Leviticus 25:23 ), where God offered them health, long life, peace, and fertility (Deuteronomy 11 ). In a figurative sense, table fellowship is offered during meals of peace offerings and religious feasts where part of the sacrifice is offered to God and the rest is eaten by the sacrificer or community (Leviticus 7:11-18 ; 23Psalm 23:5; Proverbs 9:1-6 ; Isaiah 25:6 ). Indeed, God serves as host to humanity as the one who provides food and clothing for all (Genesis 1:29-30 ; 2:9 ; 3:21 ; Psalm 104:10-15 ; 136:25 ). God particularly cares for the alienated person (Exodus 22:22-24 ; Deuteronomy 10:17-18 ; Psalm 145:14-16 ; Ezekiel 34:11-313 ).
Israel as Host . Old Testament teaching also expected the Israelites to practice hospitality and serve as hosts, treating human life with respect and dignity. Hospitality is an act of righteous, godly behavior. When the angels journeyed to Sodom and Gomorrah in search of a righteous man, only Lot and his family were set apart to be saved. Lot was deemed righteous by the fact that he alone imitated Abraham's behavior of hospitality (Genesis 19:1-8 ; 18:2-8 ). Besides presenting the model of Abraham, the Old Testament specifically commanded hospitality. As Israel received the loving care of Yahweh, so Israel was to love and care for the alienated person (Exodus 23:9 ; Leviticus 19:33-34 ; Deuteronomy 10:19 ; Isaiah 58:6-10 ).
God as Guest . Another theme possibly provided an incentive for hospitality: God might be the guest. God or the angel of the Lord at times unexpectedly appeared in the person of the stranger (Genesis 18:1,10 ; 19:1 ; Judges 6:11-24 ; 13:2-23 ).
The New Testament. Jesus as Guest . Symbolically Jesus came as an alien figure to "tabernacle" in a world that did not recognize or receive him (John 1:10-14 ). He continues after his resurrection to offer himself as guest (Revelation 3:20 ). On a literal level, Jesus' itinerant ministry placed him in dependence on the hospitality of others (Luke 9:58 ; 10:38 ). In his capacity as guest, Jesus bound himself to the lost, sharing table fellowship with tax collector, "sinner, " and Pharisee alike (Mark 2:15 ; Luke 14:1 ; 19:1-10 ). Jesus equates himself with the needy alienated person (Matthew 25:31-46 ).
Jesus as Host . Jesus, the guest, also becomes the host who receives an alienated world. The Old Testament allusions in the feeding of the 5,000 (Mark 6:30-44 ) reveal the identity of Jesus. Taking the role of host to the multitude, Jesus is portrayed as one like Yahweh, who fed the people in the wilderness (Exodus 16 ); as one like the prophets of Yahweh, who fed his disciples and had food left over (2 Kings 4:42-44 ); as one like the coming Davidic shepherd, who would care for his flock in the wilderness (1619113583_29 ). In the institution of the Lord's Supper, Jesus not only serves as host, washing the disciples' feet (John 13:3-5 ) and directing the meal, but becomes the spiritually sustaining "meal" itself (Mark 14:12-26 ; see also John 6:30-40 ; 1 Corinthians 10:16-17 ). Identifying himself with the symbolic elements of the Passover meal, Jesus associated his body with the bread of affliction that was offered to all who were hungry and needy, and he associated his blood with the third cup of wine, the cup of redemption. Moreover, by halting the meal before the traditional fourth cup, Jesus anticipates his role as eschatological host, when he will drink again at the messianic banquet celebrating the consummation of the kingdom of God (Isaiah 25:6 ; Matthew 8:11 ; Luke 14:15 ; Revelation 19:9 ). In postresurrection appearances the disciples perceive the identity of Jesus when he takes the role of host (Luke 24:13-35 ; John 21:1-14 ).
Christians as Guests . As persons originally alienated from God, Christians are invited to respond to Jesus as host in the celebration of the Eucharist and in anticipation of the eschatological messianic feast. Those who confess Jesus as Christ become aliens and strangers in the world (John 15:18-19 ; 1 Peter 1:1 ; 2:11 ). The audience of 1Peter apparently suffered social ostracism because of their Christian confession (4:12-16), but in turn they received divine hospitality as members of the "household of God" (4:17; 2:9-10; Ephesians 2:19 ; Philippians 3:20 ). Itinerant Christian ministers and refugees often found themselves in need of sympathetic hosts (Romans 16:1-2,23 ; 1 Corinthians 16:10-11 ; Titus 3:13-14 ; Philippians 22 ; 3 John 5-8 ).
Christians as Hosts . As in the Old Testament, righteous behavior in the New Testament includes the practice of hospitality. One finds the commands to act hospitably in the context of other expressions of love (Romans 12:9-21 , ; esp. vv. 13,20; Hebrews 13:1-3 ; 1 Peter 4:8-11 ; 3 John 5-8 ). In a general sense, Christians now serve as co-hosts with Christ to a world consisting of those who are "excluded from the citizenship in Israel and foreigners to the covenants of the promise" (Ephesians 2:12 ). Certainly, held up before the Christian is the model of Jesus, who serves as host to an alienated world, who commended hospitality in his teaching, and who himself is encountered as one receives the alienated person (Matthew 10:40 ; 25:31-46 ).
Rodney K. Duke
See also Ethics
Bibliography . G. Downey, ATR 47 (1965): 3-15; R. K. Duke, "Toward an Understanding of Hospitality in the Old Testament"; J. H. Elliot, A Home for the Homeless: A Sociological Exegesis of 1Peter, Its Situation and Strategy ; K. L. Gibble, Brethren Life and Thought 26 (1981): 184-88; R. B. Herron, Word and World 6 (1986): 76-84; R. Jewett, Letter to Pilgrims: A Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews ; D. Kellermann, TDOT, 2:439-49; J. Koenig, New Testament Hospitality: Partnership with Strangers as Promise and Mission ; A. J. Malherbe, Social Aspects of Early Christianity ; B. J. Malina, Social-Scientific Criticism of the New Testament and Its Social World, pp. 171-94; J. B. Mathews, "Hospitality and the New Testament Church: An Historical and Exegetical Study"; P. Parker, The Company of Strangers: Christians and the Renewal of America's Public Life ; F. A. Spina, The Word of the Lord Shall Go Forth: Essays in Honor of David Noel Freedman in Celebration of His Sixtieth Birthday, pp. 321-25; G. Staehlin, TDNT, 5:1-36; R. A. Wright, "Establishing Hospitality in the Old Testament: Testing the Tool of Linguistic Pragmatics."
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hospitality
This was a striking feature of oriental life, as seen practised by Abraham in Genesis 18:2-8 , and it continues in these days to a partial extent. It is enforced in the N.T. as a duty among Christians. Romans 12:13 ; 1 Timothy 3:2 ; Titus 1:8 ; 1 Peter 4:9 . The fact is mentioned that by exercising hospitality "some have entertained angels unawares." Hebrews 13:2 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Hospitality
HOSPITALITY.—This marked Oriental virtue prevailed in Palestine in Christ’s day. Our Lord assumes its exercise, rather than directly enjoins it. His Apostles, later, however, prescribed hospitality as a reflexion of the Christ spirit (Romans 12:13, 1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8, Hebrews 13:2; 1 Peter 4:9), even towards an enemy (Romans 12:20). Because of the widespread prevalence of hospitality, inns (wh. see) were comparatively few; and even in khans or places of lodgment for strangers there were unfurnished rooms which were at the disposal of travellers, without cost. The innkeeper or host usually received remuneration for such extra service as the stranger might require, as in a case like that of the wounded man cared for at the Samaritan’s expense (Luke 10:35). Since Jesus Himself ‘had not where to lay his head’ (Matthew 8:20), He depended much upon the hospitality of the friendly disposed, as of Andrew and Peter at Capernaum (Matthew 8:14), and of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus at Bethany (John 11:1-5); and frequently accepted the hospitality of house-holders (Matthew 26:6, Luke 5:29; Luke 7:36 ff; Luke 19:5). On occasions of the great feasts at Jerusalem, guest-chambers were freely put at the disposal of visiting worshippers (Mark 14:14). When the Master sent out the Seventy, they were to take no purse, but to rely upon the hospitality of the people of the towns into which they might go (Luke 10:4 ff.); a blessing being left with the hospitable (Luke 10:6), while a woe is pronounced upon the inhospitable city (Luke 10:10-12). Christ said of His messengers that those who received them were in truth receiving Him (John 13:20). So incensed were two of His disciples at being refused entertainment in a Samaritan village, that they would have called down fire from heaven to destroy the people. But this spirit Jesus rebuked (Luke 9:52-56). The spirit of hospitality was manifested in giving not only lodging and food, but also water for the feet (Luke 7:44, cf. John 13:5); a servant usually unloosing and taking charge of the sandals (Luke 3:16). Sometimes a kiss characterized the hospitable reception (Luke 7:45).
The emphasis that Jesus laid upon the virtue of hospitality may be discovered in His description of the Last Judgment, in which the righteous are commended because ‘I was a stranger and ye took me in’ (Matthew 25:35). See also art. Inn.
Literature.—Thomson, LB [1] , passim; Edersheim, Sketches of Jewish Social Life; Trumbull, Oriental Social Life; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, s.v.
E. B. Pollard.
King James Dictionary - Hospitality
HOSPITAL'ITY, n. L. hospitalitas. The act or practice of receiving and entertaining strangers or guests without reward, or with kind and generous liberality.
A bishop--must be given to hospitality. 1 Timothy 3
Hospitality I have found as universal as the face of man.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Hospitality
The apostles strongly recommended this virtue to the church. "Use hospitality one to another without grudging," saith Peter, (1 Peter 4:9) And Paul begged the Hebrews," (Hebrews 13:2) not to be forgetful"to entertain strangers, for thereby, he said, some had entertained angels unawares? alluding very probably, to the case of Abraham and Lot, as related Genesis 18:3 and Genesis 19:2. And Moses commanded the same gracious conduct, upon another account: "Love ye the stranger, for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt." (Deuteronomy 10:19) But how infinitely higher are the motives enforced in the consideration, that Jesus, the heavenly stranger, came to visit us in our ruined state, and so journeyed among us as a wayfaring man for a little space, that we might dwell with him for ever! And how blessed also, on the other hand, is the consideration, that when this divine Samaritan, as a stranger, passed by, and saw our whole nature robbed and plundered by the great enemy of souls, he took us up, and brought us to the inn of his church and ordinances, and hath there commanded us to be well taken care of until his second coming, when he will recompense every minute act of kindness shewn us for his sake! Such views of Jesus enforce hospitality indeed, in the highest extent, and compel by a motive of the most persuasive nature. The "cup of cold water" given in the name and for the sake of a disciple, cannot be given unnoticed, neither pass unrewarded. Jesus hath already left it upon record, what he will say in that day when he cometh to be glorified in his saints, and to be admired in all that believe me in; naked, and ye clothed me; I was sick, and ye visited me; I was in prison, and ye came unto me."And when the conscious sense of the littleness of services, and the unworthiness of the doer, shall make the souls of Christ's people exclaim,"Lord, when saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in; or naked, and clothed thee; or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee? The Lord Jesus will graciously explain the seeming impossibility in manifesting, before a congregated world, the oneness between himself and his redeemed. "Verily I say unto you, Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me." (Matthew 25:34-40)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Hospitality
Instances of ancient hospitality occur frequently in the Old Testament. So in the case of Abraham, Genesis xviii, where he invites the angels who appeared in the form of men to rest and refreshment, "And he stood by them under the tree, and they did eat." "Nothing is more common in India," says Mr. Ward, "than to see travellers and guests eating under the shade of trees. Even feasts are never held in houses. The house of a Hindoo serves for the purposes of sleeping and cooking, and of shutting up the women; but is never considered as a sitting or a dining room." "On my return to the boat," says Belzony, "I found the aga and all his retinue seated on a mat, under a cluster of palm trees, close to the water. The sun was then setting, and the shades of the western mountains had reached across the Nile, and covered the town. It is at this time the people recreate themselves in various scattered groups, drinking coffee, smoking their pipes, and talking of camels, horses, asses, dhourra, caravans, or boats." "The aga having prepared a dinner for me," says Mr. Light, "invited several of the natives to sit down. Water was brought in a skin by an attendant, to wash our hands. Two fowls roasted were served up on wheaten cakes, in a wooden bowl, covered with a small mat, and a number of the same cakes in another: in the centre of these were liquid butter, and preserved dates. These were divided, broken up, and mixed together by some of the party, while others pulled the fowls to pieces: which done, the party began to eat as fast as they could: getting up, one after the other, as soon as their hunger was satisfied." "Hospitality to travellers," says Mr. Forbes, "prevails throughout Guzerat: a person of any consideration passing through the province is presented, at the entrance of a village, with fruit, milk, butter, fire wood, and earthen pots for cookery; the women and children offer him wreaths of flowers. Small bowers are constructed on convenient spots, at a distance from a well or lake, where a person is maintained by the nearest villages, to take care of the water jars, and supply all travellers gratis. There are particular villages, where the inhabitants compel all travellers to accept of one day's provisions: whether they be many or few, rich or poor, European or native, they must not refuse the offered bounty."
"So when angelic forms to Syria sent
Sat in the cedar shade, by Abraham's tent, A spacious bowl th' admiring patriarch fills
With dulcet water from the scanty rills;
Sweet fruits and kernels gathers from his hoard, With milk and butter piles the plenteous board; While on the heated hearth his consort bakes Fine flour well kneaded in unleavened cakes,
The guests ethereal quaff the lucid flood, Smile on their hosts, and taste terrestrial food;
And while from seraph lips sweet converse spring, They lave their feet, and close their silver wings. DARWIN.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Hospitality
Is regarded by all oriental nations as one of the highest virtues. The following notices by modern travellers serve to illustrate very striking many passages of Scripture. Thus De la Roque says, "We did not arrive at the foot of the mountain till after sunset, and it was almost night when we entered the plain; but as it was full of villages, mostly inhabited by Maronites, we entered into the first we came to, to pass the night there. It was the priest of the place who wished to receive us; he gave us a supper under the trees before his little dwelling. As we were at the table, there came by a stranger, wearing a whit turban, who after have saluted the company, sat himself down to the table without ceremony, ate with us during some time, and then went away, repeating several times the name of God. They told us it was some traveller who no doubt stood in need of refreshment, and who had profited by the opportunity, according to the custom of the East, which is to exercise hospitality at all times and towards all persons." This reminds us of the guests of Abraham, Genesis 18:1-33 , of the conduct of Job, Job 31:17 , and of the frankness with which the apostles of Christ were to enter into a man's house after a salutation, and there to continue "eating and drinking such things as were set before them," Luke 10:7 . The universal prevalence of such customs, and of the spirit of hospitality, may help to explain the indignation of James and John against certain rude Samaritans, Luke 9:52-56 , and also the stern retribution exacted for the crime of the men of Gibeah, Judges 19:1 ; 20:48 .
Says Niebuhr, "the hospitality of the Arabs has always been the subject of praise; and I believe that those of the present day exercise this virtue no less than their ancestors did. When the Arabs are at table, they invite those who happen to come, to eat with them, whether they are Christians or Mohammedas, gentle or simple. In the caravans, I have often seen with pleasure a mule-driver press those who passed to partake of his repast; and though the majority politely excused themselves, he gave, with an air of satisfaction, to those who would accept of it, a portion of his little meal of bread and dates; and I was not a little surprised when I saw, in Turkey, rich Turks withdraw themselves into corners, to avoid inviting those who might otherwise have sat at table with them."
We ought to notice here also the obligations understood to be contracted by the intercourse of the table. Niebuhr says, "When a Bedaween sheik eats bread with strangers, they may trust his fidelity and depend on his protection. A traveller will always do well therefore to take an early opportunity of securing the friendship of his guide by a meal." This brings to recollection the complaint of the psalmist, Psalm 41:9 , penetrated with the deep ingratitude of one whom he describes as having been his own familiar friend, in whom he trusted, "who did eat of my bread, even he hath lifted up his heel against me."
Beautiful pictures of primitive hospitality may be found in Genesis 18:1-19:38 Exodus 2:20 Judges 13:15 19:1-9 . The incidents of the first two narratives may have suggested the legends of the Greeks and Romans, which represent their gods as sometimes coming to them disguised as travellers, in order to test their hospitality, etc., Hebrews 13:2 .
The primitive Christians considered one principal part of their duty to consist in showing hospitality to strangers, Romans 12:13 1 Timothy 5:10 ; remembering that our Savior had said, whoever received those belonging to him, received himself; and that whatever was given to such a one, though but a cup of cold water, should not lose it reward, Matthew 10:40-42 25:34-45 . They were, in fact, so ready in discharging this duty, that the very heathen admired them for it. They were hospitable to all strangers, but especially to those of the household of faith. Believers scarcely ever traveled without letters of communion, which testified the purity of their faith, and procured them a favorable reception wherever the name of Jesus Christ was known. Indeed, some supposed that the two minor epistles of John may be such letters of communion and recommendation.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Hospitality
Hospitality was regarded by most nations of the ancient world as one of the chief virtues. The Jewish laws respecting strangers (Leviticus 19:33,34 ) and the poor, (Leviticus 23:14 ) seq. Deuteronomy 15:7 And concerning redemption ( Leviticus 25:23 ) seq., etc. are framed in accordance with the spirit of hospitality. In the law compassion to strangers is constantly enforced by the words "for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt." (Leviticus 19:34 ) And before the law, Abraham's entertainment of the angels, (Genesis 18:1 ) seq., and Lot's, (Genesis 19:1 ) are in exact agreement with its precepts, and with modern usage. Comp. (Exodus 2:20 ; Judges 13:15 ; 19:17,20,21 ) In the New Testament hospitality is yet more markedly enjoined; and in the more civilized state of society which then prevailed, its exercise became more a social virtue than a necessity of patriarchal life. The good Samaritan stands for all ages as an example of Christian hospitality. The neglect of Christ is symbolized by inhospitality to our neighbors. (Matthew 25:43 ) The apostles urged the Church to "follow after hospitality," (Romans 12:13 ) cf. 1 Timothy 5:10 To remember Abraham's example, ( Hebrews 13:2 ) to "use hospitality one to another without grudging," (1 Peter 4:9 ) while a bishop must be a "lover of hospitality (Titus 1:8 ) cf. 1 Timothy 3:2 The practice of the early Christians was in accord with these precepts. They had all things in common, and their hospitality was a characteristic of their belief. In the patriarchal ages we may take Abraham's example as the most fitting, as we have of it the fullest account. "The account," says Mr. Lane, "of Abraham's entertaining the three angels related in the Bible, presents a perfect picture of the manner in which a modern Bedawee sheikh receives travellers arriving at his encampment." The Oriental respect for the covenant of bread and salt, or salt alone, certainly sprang from the high regard in which hospitality was held.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Hospitality
HOSPITALITY.—This marked Oriental virtue prevailed in Palestine in Christ’s day. Our Lord assumes its exercise, rather than directly enjoins it. His Apostles, later, however, prescribed hospitality as a reflexion of the Christ spirit (Romans 12:13, 1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8, Hebrews 13:2; 1 Peter 4:9), even towards an enemy (Romans 12:20). Because of the widespread prevalence of hospitality, inns (wh. see) were comparatively few; and even in khans or places of lodgment for strangers there were unfurnished rooms which were at the disposal of travellers, without cost. The innkeeper or host usually received remuneration for such extra service as the stranger might require, as in a case like that of the wounded man cared for at the Samaritan’s expense (Luke 10:35). Since Jesus Himself ‘had not where to lay his head’ (Matthew 8:20), He depended much upon the hospitality of the friendly disposed, as of Andrew and Peter at Capernaum (Matthew 8:14), and of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus at Bethany (John 11:1-5); and frequently accepted the hospitality of house-holders (Matthew 26:6, Luke 5:29; Luke 7:36 ff; Luke 19:5). On occasions of the great feasts at Jerusalem, guest-chambers were freely put at the disposal of visiting worshippers (Mark 14:14). When the Master sent out the Seventy, they were to take no purse, but to rely upon the hospitality of the people of the towns into which they might go (Luke 10:4 ff.); a blessing being left with the hospitable (Luke 10:6), while a woe is pronounced upon the inhospitable city (Luke 10:10-12). Christ said of His messengers that those who received them were in truth receiving Him (John 13:20). So incensed were two of His disciples at being refused entertainment in a Samaritan village, that they would have called down fire from heaven to destroy the people. But this spirit Jesus rebuked (Luke 9:52-56). The spirit of hospitality was manifested in giving not only lodging and food, but also water for the feet (Luke 7:44, cf. John 13:5); a servant usually unloosing and taking charge of the sandals (Luke 3:16). Sometimes a kiss characterized the hospitable reception (Luke 7:45).
The emphasis that Jesus laid upon the virtue of hospitality may be discovered in His description of the Last Judgment, in which the righteous are commended because ‘I was a stranger and ye took me in’ (Matthew 25:35). See also art. Inn.
Literature.—Thomson, LB [1] , passim; Edersheim, Sketches of Jewish Social Life; Trumbull, Oriental Social Life; Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, s.v.
E. B. Pollard.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Hospitality
Most people in Bible times recognized that they had a responsibility to practise hospitality. The custom was to welcome both friends and strangers and to give them food, water and other provisions to make them comfortable (Genesis 18:1-8; Genesis 24:32; Exodus 2:20; Deuteronomy 10:18-19; Deuteronomy 23:4; Judges 13:15; Judges 19:16-21; 2 Kings 4:8; Job 31:32; Luke 7:44-45; Acts 9:43; Acts 16:15). A mark of special honour was to wash the guest’s feet or to anoint the head with oil (Psalms 23:5; Luke 7:37-38; Luke 7:44-46). Hosts were responsible to protect all those who stayed with them (Genesis 19:1-11; Judges 19:22-23).
God’s people must be ready always to practise hospitality to those in need, whether close friends or people they have never seen before. And they must do so without expecting anything in return. Those who fail in this matter are in danger of God’s chastisement (Isaiah 58:7; Matthew 25:31-46; Luke 14:12-14; Romans 12:13; Galatians 6:10; Hebrews 13:2; 1 Peter 4:9). Church leaders in particular should be an example to the rest of the church by their hospitality (1 Timothy 3:2; 3 John 1:5-6). If Christians have not practised generous hospitality to others, they are in no position to call upon the church for financial support when they themselves are in need (1 Timothy 5:9-10).
Christians have a special duty to give hospitality to travelling preachers and teachers of God’s Word (Romans 16:23; 1 Corinthians 9:4-5; Titus 3:13-14; Philem 22; 3 John 1:5-8). They should give no hospitality at all to those who are false teachers (2 John 1:9-11).

Sentence search

Hospitality - Hospitality
Inn - See Hospitality
Hospitality - Hospitality was regarded by most nations of the ancient world as one of the chief virtues. are framed in accordance with the spirit of Hospitality. (Exodus 2:20 ; Judges 13:15 ; 19:17,20,21 ) In the New Testament Hospitality is yet more markedly enjoined; and in the more civilized state of society which then prevailed, its exercise became more a social virtue than a necessity of patriarchal life. The good Samaritan stands for all ages as an example of Christian Hospitality. The neglect of Christ is symbolized by inhospitality to our neighbors. (Matthew 25:43 ) The apostles urged the Church to "follow after Hospitality," (Romans 12:13 ) cf. 1 Timothy 5:10 To remember Abraham's example, ( Hebrews 13:2 ) to "use Hospitality one to another without grudging," (1 Peter 4:9 ) while a bishop must be a "lover of Hospitality (Titus 1:8 ) cf. They had all things in common, and their Hospitality was a characteristic of their belief. " The Oriental respect for the covenant of bread and salt, or salt alone, certainly sprang from the high regard in which Hospitality was held
Hospitality - ...
A bishop--must be given to Hospitality. 1 Timothy 3 ...
Hospitality I have found as universal as the face of man
Hachnassat orchim - �bringing in guests�); Hospitality ...
Guest, Guest-Chamber - See Hospitality
Xenodochy - ) Reception of strangers; Hospitality
Host - —See (1) Angels; (2) Hospitality, Inn, Invitation
Shobi - Showed Hospitality to David when fleeing from Absalom
Entertained - Received with Hospitality, as a guest amused pleased and engaged kept in the mind retained
Hospitality - Most people in Bible times recognized that they had a responsibility to practise Hospitality. ...
God’s people must be ready always to practise Hospitality to those in need, whether close friends or people they have never seen before. Church leaders in particular should be an example to the rest of the church by their Hospitality (1 Timothy 3:2; 3 John 1:5-6). If Christians have not practised generous Hospitality to others, they are in no position to call upon the church for financial support when they themselves are in need (1 Timothy 5:9-10). ...
Christians have a special duty to give Hospitality to travelling preachers and teachers of God’s Word (Romans 16:23; 1 Corinthians 9:4-5; Titus 3:13-14; Philem 22; 3 John 1:5-8). They should give no Hospitality at all to those who are false teachers (2 John 1:9-11)
Scambler - ) A bold intruder upon the Hospitality of others; a mealtime visitor
Proxene - ) An officer who had the charge of showing Hospitality to those who came from a friendly city or state
Hospitality - HOSPITALITY. His Apostles, later, however, prescribed Hospitality as a reflexion of the Christ spirit (Romans 12:13, 1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8, Hebrews 13:2; 1 Peter 4:9), even towards an enemy (Romans 12:20). Because of the widespread prevalence of Hospitality, inns (wh. Since Jesus Himself ‘had not where to lay his head’ (Matthew 8:20), He depended much upon the Hospitality of the friendly disposed, as of Andrew and Peter at Capernaum (Matthew 8:14), and of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus at Bethany (John 11:1-5); and frequently accepted the Hospitality of house-holders (Matthew 26:6, Luke 5:29; Luke 7:36 ff; Luke 19:5). When the Master sent out the Seventy, they were to take no purse, but to rely upon the Hospitality of the people of the towns into which they might go (Luke 10:4 ff. The spirit of Hospitality was manifested in giving not only lodging and food, but also water for the feet (Luke 7:44, cf. ...
The emphasis that Jesus laid upon the virtue of Hospitality may be discovered in His description of the Last Judgment, in which the righteous are commended because ‘I was a stranger and ye took me in’ (Matthew 25:35)
Hospitality - HOSPITALITY. His Apostles, later, however, prescribed Hospitality as a reflexion of the Christ spirit (Romans 12:13, 1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8, Hebrews 13:2; 1 Peter 4:9), even towards an enemy (Romans 12:20). Because of the widespread prevalence of Hospitality, inns (wh. Since Jesus Himself ‘had not where to lay his head’ (Matthew 8:20), He depended much upon the Hospitality of the friendly disposed, as of Andrew and Peter at Capernaum (Matthew 8:14), and of Mary, Martha, and Lazarus at Bethany (John 11:1-5); and frequently accepted the Hospitality of house-holders (Matthew 26:6, Luke 5:29; Luke 7:36 ff; Luke 19:5). When the Master sent out the Seventy, they were to take no purse, but to rely upon the Hospitality of the people of the towns into which they might go (Luke 10:4 ff. The spirit of Hospitality was manifested in giving not only lodging and food, but also water for the feet (Luke 7:44, cf. ...
The emphasis that Jesus laid upon the virtue of Hospitality may be discovered in His description of the Last Judgment, in which the righteous are commended because ‘I was a stranger and ye took me in’ (Matthew 25:35)
Cosher - ) To treat with Hospitality; to pet
Prytaneum - ) A public building in certain Greek cities; especially, a public hall in Athens regarded as the home of the community, in which official Hospitality was extended to distinguished citizens and strangers
Heel, Lifted His - Jesus applied the expression to Judas, who accepted Jesus' Hospitality but then plotted His arrest (John 13:18 )
Christmas - ) An annual church festival (December 25) and in some States a legal holiday, in memory of the birth of Christ, often celebrated by a particular church service, and also by special gifts, greetings, and Hospitality
Hospitality - Hospitality plays no small role in the realm of biblical ethics. And, as Hospitality is an attribute of God, one finds its images in the biblical proclamation of the relationship between God and the covenant people. ...
Hospitality in the ancient world focused on the alien or stranger in need. In the ancient world the practice of Hospitality meant graciously receiving an alienated person into one's land, home, or community and providing directly for that person's needs. ...
Some forms of Hospitality toward nonforeign strangers appear to have been commonly practiced among the nations of the biblical world. There appears to have been some decline in Hospitality from the period of the Old Testament to that of the New Testament, since Hospitality is omitted from later Greco-Roman virtue lists. For the early church, Hospitality remained an important expression of lovingkindness, one that received support in the teaching of Jesus (Matthew 25:31-46 ; Luke 10:30-37 ; 14:16-24 ; 16:19-31 ). ...
Hospitality took several forms. Acts of Hospitality included the humble and gracious reception of travelers into one's home for food, lodging, and protection (Genesis 18:2-8 ; 19:1-8 ; Job 31:16-23,31-32 ), permitting the alienated person to harvest the corners of one's fields (Leviticus 19:9-10 ; Deuteronomy 24:19-22 ; Ruth 2:2-17 ), clothing the naked (Isaiah 58:7 ; Ezekiel 18:7,16 ), tithing food for the needy (Deuteronomy 14:28-29 ; 26:1-11 ), and including the alien in religious celebrations (Exodus 12:48-49 ; Deuteronomy 16:10-14 ). Old Testament teaching identifies the Israelites as alienated people who are dependent on God's Hospitality (Psalm 39:12 ; see also Hebrews 11:13 ). Old Testament teaching also expected the Israelites to practice Hospitality and serve as hosts, treating human life with respect and dignity. Hospitality is an act of righteous, godly behavior. Lot was deemed righteous by the fact that he alone imitated Abraham's behavior of Hospitality (Genesis 19:1-8 ; 18:2-8 ). Besides presenting the model of Abraham, the Old Testament specifically commanded Hospitality. Another theme possibly provided an incentive for Hospitality: God might be the guest. On a literal level, Jesus' itinerant ministry placed him in dependence on the Hospitality of others (Luke 9:58 ; 10:38 ). The audience of 1Peter apparently suffered social ostracism because of their Christian confession (4:12-16), but in turn they received divine Hospitality as members of the "household of God" (4:17; 2:9-10; Ephesians 2:19 ; Philippians 3:20 ). As in the Old Testament, righteous behavior in the New Testament includes the practice of Hospitality. Certainly, held up before the Christian is the model of Jesus, who serves as host to an alienated world, who commended Hospitality in his teaching, and who himself is encountered as one receives the alienated person (Matthew 10:40 ; 25:31-46 ). Duke, "Toward an Understanding of Hospitality in the Old Testament"; J. Koenig, New Testament Hospitality: Partnership with Strangers as Promise and Mission ; A. Mathews, "Hospitality and the New Testament Church: An Historical and Exegetical Study"; P. Wright, "Establishing Hospitality in the Old Testament: Testing the Tool of Linguistic Pragmatics
Shunem - Also where a Shunammite showed Hospitality to Elisha
Nob - A city of priests, in Benjamin, near Jerusalem; its inhabitants were once put to the sword by command of Saul, for their Hospitality to David, 1 Samuel 21:2 ; 22:9-23 ; Nehemiah 11:32 ; Isaiah 10:32
Lover - ...
2: φιλόξενος (Strong's #5382 — Adjective — philoxenos — fil-ox'-en-os ) "loving strangers" (xenia, "hospitality"), translated "a lover of Hospitality" in Titus 1:8 , AV (RV, "given to h. See Hospitality
Profuse - ) Pouring forth with fullness or exuberance; bountiful; exceedingly liberal; giving without stint; as, a profuse government; profuse Hospitality
Hospitality - ...
Hospitality probably grew out of the needs of nomadic life. ...
Hospitality was regarded as a sacred obligation by the ancient Greeks and Romans, one that was approved by Zeus, the god and protector of strangers. The reason for practicing Hospitality was that the Israelites themselves were once strangers in the land of Egypt. Some acts of Hospitality were rewarded, the most notable of which was Rahab's (Joshua 6:22-25 ; Hebrews 11:31 ; James 2:25 ). Breaches of Hospitality were condemned and punished, such as those of Sodom (Genesis 19:1-11 ) and Gibeah (Judges 19:10-25 ). ...
Hospitality seemed to form the background of many details in the life of Jesus and the early church (Matthew 8:20 ; Luke 7:36 ; Luke 9:2-5 ; Luke 10:4-11 )
Hospitality - 10, ) justly observes, "that Hospitality is a species of charity to which every one is not competent. Some are miserably poor, and it is not to be expected that their doors should be thrown open to entertain strangers; yet the cottage of a peasant may exhibit noble specimens of Hospitality. ...
But there are persons of certain characters and stations, who are more especially obliged to it: as particularly magistrates and others in civil offices, who would forfeit the esteem of the public, and greatly injure their usefulness, were they not to observe the rites of Hospitality. ...
Hospitality is especially to be practised to the poor: they who have no houses of their own, or possess few of the conveniences of life, should occasionally be invited to our houses, and refreshed at our tables, Luke 14:1-35 . Hospitality also may be practised to those who are of the same character and of the same community with ourselves. As to the various offices of Hospitality, and the manner in which they should be rendered, it must be observed, that the entertainments should be plentiful, frugal, and cordial. We have many striking examples of Hospitality on divine record: Abraham, Genesis 18:1 ; Genesis 18:8 . Lastly, what should have a powerful effect on our minds, is the consideration of divine Hospitality
Barzillai - A Gileadite, distinguished for his Hospitality and liberality towards David during the revolt of Absalom
Eating - The rites of Hospitality were held sacred; and to this day, among the Arabs, a fugitive is safe for the time, if he gains the shelter of even an enemy's tent. The abuse of Hospitality was a great crime, Psalm 41:9
Hospitality - The fact is mentioned that by exercising Hospitality "some have entertained angels unawares
Hospitable - Inviting to strangers offering kind reception indicating Hospitality
Barzil'la-i -
A wealthy Gileadite who showed Hospitality to David when he fled form Absalom
Hospitality - "(be not forgetful of) Hospitality
Guest - —Hospitality was, and to a large extent still is, one of the chief virtues of Oriental life. The practice of ages has invested the guest with a peculiar sacredness: a breach of Hospitality is an almost unheard of disgrace. Underlying this ready Hospitality of the East is the idea that every stranger is daif Ullah, ‘the guest of God. ...
In the Gospels, however, it is not the free Hospitality of the nomad desert life that meets us, but the more restricted Hospitality of the town, of meals and banquets. ), not, as it seems, with the purest motives of Hospitality. ...
It should be noted here that the request of Jesus to the Samaritan woman, ‘Give me to drink’ (John 4:7), was virtually, according to Eastern ideas, a claim on her Hospitality, and in ordinary circumstances it would have been recognized and responded to at once. Her astonishment at the request reminds us that between Jew and Samaritan there was no recognition of the law of Hospitality (cf. ‘Guest,’ ‘Hospitality,’ ‘Host’; Encyc. ‘Hospitality’; Vigouroux, Dict
Geruth - (gee' rewth) Part of a place name meaning, “hospitality” (Jeremiah 41:17 ) translated differently—KJV: “habitation of Chimham”; NAS, NRSV: “Geruth Chimham”; REB: “Kimham's holding
Hearth - ) The house itself, as the abode of comfort to its inmates and of Hospitality to strangers; fireside
Little Saint Bernard - The Canons Regular of Saint Augustine, in charge of the institutions, are renowned for the Hospitality and aid they used to extend to travelers of the Great and Little Saint Bernard mountains, named for the founder of the monasteries
Great Saint Bernard - The Canons Regular of Saint Augustine, in charge of the institutions, are renowned for the Hospitality and aid they used to extend to travelers of the Great and Little Saint Bernard mountains, named for the founder of the monasteries
Publius - His Hospitality to Christ's servant was rewarded (compare Hebrews 13:2) in the cure of his father's bloody flux by Paul
Entertain - " See Hospitality
Enterprise - ) To treat with Hospitality; to entertain
Washing the Hands And Feet - (Exodus 30:19,21 ) It held a high place, however, among the rites of Hospitality. (1 Samuel 25:41 ; Luke 7:38,44 ; John 13:5-14 ; 1 Timothy 5:10 ) Such a token of Hospitality is still occasionally exhibited in the East
Hospitality - They told us it was some traveller who no doubt stood in need of refreshment, and who had profited by the opportunity, according to the custom of the East, which is to exercise Hospitality at all times and towards all persons. The universal prevalence of such customs, and of the spirit of Hospitality, may help to explain the indignation of James and John against certain rude Samaritans, Luke 9:52-56 , and also the stern retribution exacted for the crime of the men of Gibeah, Judges 19:1 ; 20:48 . ...
Says Niebuhr, "the Hospitality of the Arabs has always been the subject of praise; and I believe that those of the present day exercise this virtue no less than their ancestors did. " ...
Beautiful pictures of primitive Hospitality may be found in Genesis 18:1-19:38 Exodus 2:20 Judges 13:15 19:1-9 . The incidents of the first two narratives may have suggested the legends of the Greeks and Romans, which represent their gods as sometimes coming to them disguised as travellers, in order to test their Hospitality, etc. ...
The primitive Christians considered one principal part of their duty to consist in showing Hospitality to strangers, Romans 12:13 1 Timothy 5:10 ; remembering that our Savior had said, whoever received those belonging to him, received himself; and that whatever was given to such a one, though but a cup of cold water, should not lose it reward, Matthew 10:40-42 25:34-45
Mnason - As an "elder" Mnason was "given to Hospitality" (1 Timothy 3:2)
Entertainment - ) That which entertains, or with which one is entertained; as: (a) Hospitality; hospitable provision for the wants of a guest; especially, provision for the table; a hospitable repast; a feast; a formal or elegant meal
Kindness - Charity, Hospitality, attentions to the wants of others, &c
Hospitality - Hospitality . In the life of the East there are no more attractive features than those that centre in the practice of Hospitality. The virtue of Hospitality ranked high in the ancient Orient, and the laws regulating its observance hold undisputed sway in the desert still. A man’s worth was illustrated by his princely Hospitality ( Job 31:31 f. ), relying on the Hospitality of the people. The Samaritans’ churlish denial of Hospitality to Jesus excited the wrath of His disciples ( Luke 9:53 ). The practice of Hospitality distinguished those on the right from those on the left hand ( Matthew 25:35 ; cf. ...
Hospitality was highly esteemed amongst other ancient peoples. For the Romans Hospitality was a sacred obligation. ...
In its simplest aspect, Hospitality is the reception of the wayfarer as an honoured guest, providing shelter and food. If the chief man in a village be well off, he greatly adds to his prestige by a liberal display of Hospitality. Right to the position must be vindicated by wisdom, courage, dignity, and not least by generous Hospitality. ...
Hospitality involves protection as well as maintenance. The rights of sanctuary associated with temples, and until recently with certain churches, originated in an appeal to the Hospitality of the local deity. The ordinary traveller was provided for by the laws of Hospitality. It was natural that Christians should, for their own safety, avoid the inn, and practise Hospitality among themselves ( 1 Peter 4:9 etc
Mercurius - Mythology represented Mercurius as having once visited Phrygia with Jupiter his father, and having been refused Hospitality by all except Baucis and Philemon, two old peasants (Ovid, Jael - Some have wantonly traduced the character of Jael, and charged her with a breach of Hospitality in slaughtering one who fled to her for protection, and especially as she had taken Sisera into her haram. But to both of these I answer, it becomes no breach of Hospitality to destroy the known foes of God
Home - Thus in the Pastoral Epistles the bishop must be husband of one wife, given to Hospitality, ruling well his own house, having his children in subjection; for ruling his family well leads to his ruling his flock well; a test of his having trained his children well is that they believe, and are not accused of riot and are not unruly (1 Timothy 3:1-5, Titus 1:6). Hospitality is closely connected with the idea of ‘home. Instances of Hospitality are common in the apostolic writings. Peter (Acts 10:6), Lydia at Philippi shows Hospitality to St. With the last passage contrast the want of Hospitality shown by Diotrephes in 3 John 1:9 f. ...
The duty of showing Hospitality is insisted on in the case of a ‘bishop’ in 1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8 (he is to be φιλόξενος), and in the case of a widow in 1 Timothy 5:10 (ἐξενοδόχησεν); and Christians in general are bidden to ‘pursue’ (Romans 12:13) and ‘not to forget’ (Hebrews 13:2) love unto strangers (φιλοξενία), to be ‘lovers of strangers’ (φιλόξενοι, 1 Peter 4:9), i. See, further, article Hospitality
Maon - Nabal, who foolishly refused Hospitality to David, was a resident of Maon (1 Samuel 25:2 )
Gaius or Caius - ...
The third epistle of John is addressed "to the well-beloved Gaius;" whose character for Hospitality comports well with that of 2
Courteous, Courteously - , "friendly," or, more fully, "with friendly thoughtfulness" (philos, "friend," phren, "the mind"), is found in Acts 28:7 , of the Hospitality showed by Publius to Paul and his fellow-shipwrecked travelers
Phygelus - In the Acts of Paul and Thecla, Demas and Hermogenes are named as Paul’s fellow-travellers, full of hypocrisy, when he fled from Antioch to Iconium and enjoyed the Hospitality of Onesiphorus
Stranger - 1, above, and dechomai, "to receive"), occurs in 1 Timothy 5:10 , RV, "(if) she hath used Hospitality to strangers," AV, "(if) she have lodged strangers. ...
C — 1: φιλοξενία (Strong's #5381 — Noun Feminine — philoxenia — fil-on-ex-ee'-ah ) "love of strangers," occurs in Romans 12:13 , "hospitality," and Hebrews 13:2 , RV, "to show love unto strangers," AV, "to entertain strangers
Little Sisters of the Poor - The constitutions are based on the Rule of Saint Augustine, and the sisters take a vow of Hospitality
Dish - To offer a person a choice piece of food from the common dish was a special sign of Hospitality
Goliards - Wandering students and clerks, in Europe, during the 12th and 13th centuries, who demanded Hospitality in monasteries and castles, and paid with songs, jugglery, and buffoonery
Golias - Wandering students and clerks, in Europe, during the 12th and 13th centuries, who demanded Hospitality in monasteries and castles, and paid with songs, jugglery, and buffoonery
Gaius - He was a person noted for his strong faith, exemplary life, generous Hospitality and sincere love (3 John 1:1-6)
Cooking - Few animals were slaughtered except for purposes of Hospitality or festivity
Receipt - ) Reception, as an act of Hospitality
Laban - His prompt Hospitality towards Abraham's servant shows a heart disposed by the Lord in answer to prayer; but why he took the lead instead of Bethuel, his father, is not revealed
Jael - Besides this, the life or honor of Jael may have been in danger, or her feelings of Hospitality may have been overpowered by a sudden impulse to avenge the oppressed Israelites, with whom she was allied by blood
Anointing - (Concerning the everyday eastern custom of anointing the heads of visitors and guests see Hospitality. ...
Concerning the practice of anointing in relation to such things as burial, massaging, healing and showing Hospitality, see OIL; SPICES
Oscott - Under the presidency of Bishop Wiseman, 1840-1847, the college gave Hospitality to many English clergymen brought into the church by the Oxford Movement, among them, Newman
Oods - It refers also to the temporal possessions, such as money, the Hospitality of the home, and other such things, which also should be invested for the glory of GOD
Inn - " Inns, in our sense of the term were, as they still are, unknown in the East, where Hospitality is religiously practiced
John, the Second And Third Epistles of - The third epistle was written for the purpose of commending to the kindness and Hospitality of Caius some Christians who were strangers in the place where he lived
Wayfaring Men - In those days the voluntary exhibition of Hospitality to one who stood in need of it was highly honourable. The glory of an open-hearted and generous Hospitality continued even after public inns or caravanserais were erected, and continues to this day. Buckingham in his "Travels among the Arab Tribes," says, "A foot passenger could make his way at little or no expense, as travellers and wayfarers of every description halt at the sheikh's dwelling, where, whatever may be the rank or condition of the stranger, before any questions are asked him as to where he comes from, or whither he is going, coffee is served to him from a large pot always on the fire; and a meal of bread, milk, oil, honey, or butter, is set before him, for which no payment is ever demanded or even expected by the host, who, in this manner, feeds at least twenty persons on an average every day in the year from his own purse; at least, I could not learn that he was remunerated in any manner for this expenditure, though it is considered as a necessary consequence of his situation, as chief of the community, that he should maintain this ancient practice of Hospitality to strangers
Chamber - The proverbial Hospitality of the Jews would make such provision necessary, and especially at Jerusalem, in festival seasons, when every house in the city was the stranger's home
Hospitality - "Use Hospitality one to another without grudging," saith Peter, (1 Peter 4:9) And Paul begged the Hebrews," (Hebrews 13:2) not to be forgetful"to entertain strangers, for thereby, he said, some had entertained angels unawares? alluding very probably, to the case of Abraham and Lot, as related Genesis 18:3 and Genesis 19:2. " (Deuteronomy 10:19) But how infinitely higher are the motives enforced in the consideration, that Jesus, the heavenly stranger, came to visit us in our ruined state, and so journeyed among us as a wayfaring man for a little space, that we might dwell with him for ever! And how blessed also, on the other hand, is the consideration, that when this divine Samaritan, as a stranger, passed by, and saw our whole nature robbed and plundered by the great enemy of souls, he took us up, and brought us to the inn of his church and ordinances, and hath there commanded us to be well taken care of until his second coming, when he will recompense every minute act of kindness shewn us for his sake! Such views of Jesus enforce Hospitality indeed, in the highest extent, and compel by a motive of the most persuasive nature
Inn - ...
This seems to the present writer a mistaken inference, arising partly from exaggerated notions of Oriental Hospitality, and partly from attributing to the 1st cent. The customary Hospitality of the East (see Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible, s. ‘Gast’ in Hamburger’s RE) may, of course, be a reason why inns in the modern sense of the word should be less needed than in Western countries; but the statement that ‘the warm commendations of Hospitality in the NT show that even in the Roman period the buildings set apart for strangers to lodge in were of a simple character in Palestine’ (Encyc. 394a) that the motive of this urging of Hospitality was the desire to preserve Christian converts from the corrupting influences among which they would be thrown at the public inns. ...
Numerous passages are cited from the Talmud to prove the extent to which Hospitality prevailed among the Jews; but this traditional virtue was probably more praised than practised in the 1st century. 128); but what if the Jew came at some other time than at one of the great national feasts? What if a Samaritan came? Moreover, there was a large population of heathen; and even if Jewish habits of Hospitality to Jews were equal in practice to the theory, no provision was made for the Gentile. ...
Did Jesus Himself ever enter or stay at inns? It is usually assumed that His disciples always provided Hospitality for Him. The words, ‘the Son of Man hath not where to lay his head’ (Matthew 8:20, Luke 9:58), suggest that Hospitality was not always forthcoming
Barzillai - The sacred writer is at particular pains to tell us the whole of that truly Highland Hospitality with which Barzillai replenished the king's camp at Mahanaim. ...
And, then, there can be no doubt about Barzilla's Highland Hospitality. Highland Hospitality is a proverb of honour among us; and Barzilla's Hospitality was the same proverb in the whole after history of Israel. But it is not great lords only like Barzillai of Rogelim and Machir of Lodebar and Shobi of Rabbah who are summoned to show Hospitality. No class of men could be poorer than were the bishops of Paul's day, and yet the apostle enjoins Titus and Timothy to ordain no man who is not given to Hospitality. But the truth is, true Highland Hospitality is in the mind and in the heart of the host and hostess. A poor widow's hut will show you Highland Hospitality in the way she comes out and offers you a drink of milk or even of water. Does not Aristotle himself tell us that a munificently-minded man is seen as well in his present of a ball or a top or a picture to a little child as in a temple or a sacrifice or a banquet to a God? And has not a Greater than Aristotle told us that the widow's mite will be extolled for its splendid munificence wherever His munificent gospel is preached? Hospitality and munificence and magnanimity are in the mind and in the heart, and it is the mind and the heart that are accepted and acknowledged of God. And thus it is that Hospitality, with its present blessedness and its everlasting rewards, is not a matter of wealth or poverty, any more than it is of race or region
Murmuring - ...
In 1 Peter 4:9 (‘using Hospitality one to another without murmuring’) the reference appears to be to the grumbling against the obligation, imposed by Church tradition, of mutual Hospitality among Christians (cf
la Fontaine, Jean de - From 1672 to 1693 he enjoyed the Hospitality of Mme de la Sabliere, and published his second Collection of Fables (Books VII-XI)
Jean de la Fontaine - From 1672 to 1693 he enjoyed the Hospitality of Mme de la Sabliere, and published his second Collection of Fables (Books VII-XI)
Gaius - He was evidently a man of position and means (the greeting from him immediately precedes that from Erastus, ‘the treasurer of the city’), whether his Hospitality took the form of keeping open house for Christians and Christian visitors like the Apostle at Corinth or of allowing the Christians to meet for common worship and edification under his roof. He is described as ‘the beloved’ (ὁ ἀγαπητός), and is commended for his Hospitality (v
Feast - As a mark of Hospitality (Genesis 19:3 ; 2 Samuel 3:20 ; 2 Kings 6:23 ); on occasions of domestic joy (Luke 15:23 ; Genesis 21:8 ); on birthdays (Genesis 40:20 ; Job 1:4 ; Matthew 14:6 ); and on the occasion of a marriage (Judges 14:10 ; Genesis 29:22 )
Milk - Still offered in Hospitality to the passing stranger, as by Abraham, Genesis 18:8
Saint Barnabas Society, the - In many instances the society is instrumental in finding Catholic friends for those who by heroically following the call of conscience have forfeited former friendships, one of the trials of most converts; it helps to educate the children of married convert clergymen, and arranges temporary Hospitality for whole families
Hospitality - Instances of ancient Hospitality occur frequently in the Old Testament. " "Hospitality to travellers," says Mr
Salt - To eat salt with one is to partake of his Hospitality, to derive subsistence from him; and hence he who did so was bound to look after his host's interests (Ezra 4:14 , "We have maintenance from the king's palace;" A
Tryphaena - It is unlikely, therefore, that the work of these women was limited to practical benevolence, such as showing Hospitality (see article Persis)
Laban - Hospitality was the virtue of his age and country
Family - By practising Hospitality and helping the needy, parents will encourage their children to have a generous attitude to those outside the family (Romans 12:13; 1 Timothy 5:10; James 1:26-27; 1 John 3:17; see GOOD WORKS; Hospitality)
House - They should use their houses to practise Hospitality at all times – not just in entertaining friends, but in providing generous help and friendship to the lonely, the poor and the needy (Isaiah 58:7; Matthew 25:35; Hebrews 13:2; see Hospitality)
Sodom - At its summit and base are blocks of stone, of which the Arabs say: "a people once dwelt there, to whom travelers came seeking Hospitality; but the people did to them a horrible deed, wherefore the Almighty in anger rained down stones, and destroyed them from off the face of the earth
Tokens - They called these church letters, which were a kind of tesserae hospitales, [1] by which the Christians of all quarters of the world were brought into connection, epistolae, or literae formatae, [2] γραμματα τετυπωμενα , because, in order to avoid forgery, they were made after a certain schema, (τυπος , forms, ) or else, epistolae communicatoriae, [3] γραμματα κοινωνικα , because they contained a proof that those who brought them were in the communion of the church, as well as that the bishops, who mutually sent and received such letters, were in connection together by the communion of the church; and afterward these church letters, epistolae clericae, were divided into different classes, according to the difference of their purposes
Sisera - Jael, Heber's wife, received him into her tent with apparent Hospitality, and "gave him butter" (i
Anoint - ...
...
Anointing was also an act of Hospitality (Luke 7:38,46 )
Manger - Hospitality, ad fin
Wash - ...
1 Timothy 5:10 (b) This type represents any gracious Hospitality rendered by a godly hostess to her Christian guest
Jael - Where an act is clearly the execution of God's righteous judgement, it rises altogether above what would be justifiable under ordinary circumstances of Hospitality or of warfare
Use - , DECEIT, DESPITEFULLY, Hospitality, REPETITIONS
Brotherly Love - Hebrews 13:1-2 connects it with “hospitality to strangers,” 1 Peter 1:22 with being pure, and 2 Peter 1:7 has it in a checklist of virtues which Christians should possess. See Love ; Hospitality ; Ethics
Salt - ]'>[7] Hospitality, by which a traveller in the desert, and even an enemy, if he has once partaken of an Arab’s Hospitality, has a right to his host’s protection; since this ‘ordinance of salt’ as it is termed, is valid only for a limited period (see Jaussen. On the other hand, the obligations which the partaking of one’s Hospitality imposes on a guest are emphasized in the words of Ezra 4:14 ‘because we eat the salt of the palace’ (RV Diotrephes - For whereas in the 2nd Epistle of John corruption of doctrine is spoken of as disqualifying one from the Hospitality of the church, in this 3rd Epistle no hint is given of erroneous doctrine; but only of Diotrephes' "love of preeminence
Inn - See Hospitality ; House
Salt - As one of the most essential articles of diet, salt symbolized Hospitality; as an antiseptic, durability, fidelity and purity
Urbanus - Paul’s Epistles the only other use of συνεργός in the NT is 3 John 1:8, where Hospitality to Christians is commended,’ that we may be fellow-workers with the truth
Lodge, Lodging - 4, denotes (a) "hospitality, entertainment," Philemon 1:22 ; (b) by metonymy, "a place of entertainment, a lodging-place," Acts 28:23 (some put Philemon 1:22 under this section)
Hair - The Hebrews like other nations of antiquity, anointed the hair profusely with ointments, which were generally compounded of various aromatic ingredients, (Ruth 3:3 ; 2 Samuel 14:2 ; Psalm 23:6 ; 92:10 ; Ecclesiastes 9:8 ) more especially on occasions of festivity or Hospitality
Theotimus, Bishop of Tomi - Adopting strict asceticism for himself, he kept a liberal table for the savage Goths and Huns who visited Tomi as the great central market of the province, endeavouring by Hospitality, gifts, and courteous treatment to prepare them to receive the Gospel
Jael - On his defeat by the Israelites, Sisera fled to the tent of Jaei, a spot which was doubly secure to the fugitive, on account both of intertribal friendship and of the rules of Oriental Hospitality
Banquet - The idea of Hospitality ran deep in the thought of those in the Near East (Genesis 18:1-8 ; Luke 11:5-8 )
Mean - ) Penurious; stingy; close-fisted; illiberal; as, mean Hospitality
Salt, Saltness - To eat of a person's "salt" and so to share his Hospitality is still regarded thus among the Arabs
Wallet - Christ’s Apostles were to go unencumbered on their special mission (Matthew 10:10, Mark 6:8, Luke 9:3; Luke 10:4), trusting to Hospitality, and the providing care of their Master
Heliodorus, Bishop of Altinum - Heliodorus went on to Jerusalem, where he enjoyed the Hospitality of Florentius, who, having devoted himself to the ascetic life, employed his wealth in the entertainment of pilgrims (Hieron
Daniel, the Stylite - " In his last will to his disciples, after commending them to the common Father of all, and to the Saviour Who died for them, Daniel bade them "hold fast humility, practise obedience, exercise Hospitality, keep the fasts, observe the vigils, love poverty, and above all maintain charity, which is the first and great commandment; avoid the tares of the heretics; separate never from the church your mother: if you do these things your righteousness shall be perfect
Food - Under these restrictions the Hebrews were permitted the use of animal food: they availed themselves of it in the exercise of Hospitality or at festivals of a religious, public or private character
Persis - ’ It is therefore impossible to regard the work of Persis and of the other women as limited to practical benevolence, such as the showing of Hospitality
Invitation - This is one of the reasons why He clothed so many of His doctrines in parables and figures centred in the idea of Hospitality. In the earliest times, the laws of Hospitality were specially sacred; strangers were made heartily welcome at the door of the patriarch’s tent (Luke 7:41-508 cf. At a still later period, when the community was settled in towns and cities, an elaborate code of manners grew up, both as to giving and receiving Hospitality. It was a sign of His insight and wisdom as well as of His broad sympathies, that in a community so eminently sociable as that in which He moved, He should make such free use of the machinery of Hospitality for His Messianic purpose, and devise many parables and illustrations drawn from the customs of the day, and from the etiquette that ruled the relations of hosts and guests, from the highest circles of life to the lowest. The central idea of Hospitality is that one gives freely what the many receive and enjoy ‘without money and without price
Sheep - To kill a sheep or lamh for a stranger’s meal is one of the first acts of Bedouin Hospitality
Nought - ...
B — 1: δωρεάν (Strong's #1432 — Adjective — dorean — do-reh-an' ) "freely, as a gift," is translated "for nought" in Galatians 2:21 , RV (AV, "in vain"); in 2 Thessalonians 3:8 , in a denial by the Apostle that he lived on the Hospitality of others at Thessalonica
Food - Under these restrictions the Hebrews were permitted the free use of animal food: generally speaking they only availed themselves of it in the exercise of Hospitality or at festivals of a religious, public or private character
Fulgentius (4) Ferrandus, , Disciple And Companion of Ruspe - Ferrandus received the Hospitality of St
Stranger - Moses inculcated and enforced by numerous and by powerful considerations, as well as by various examples of benevolent Hospitality, mentioned in the book of Genesis, the exhibition of kindness and humanity to strangers
Philippians, Epistle to the, - Paul not only by the Hospitality of Lydia, the deep sympathy of the converts, and the remarkable miracle which set a seal on his preaching, but, also by the successful exercise of his missionary activity after a long suspense, and by the happy consequences of his undaunted endurance of ignominies which remained in his memory, (Philippians 1:30 ) after the long interval of eleven years
Bishop - In 1 Timothy 3:1-7 qualifications were given for a “bishop”: reputation, marital status, character traits, Hospitality, teaching ability, non-drunkenness, attitude toward money, responsible parenthood, and length of time as a Christian
Nahash - Yet we read Nahash's son Shobi (2 Samuel 17:27-29) was one of the three trans-jordanic chieftains who rendered munificent Hospitality to David in his hour of need, at Mahanaim, near Jabesh Gilead, when fleeing from Absalom
Ruler - ...
4: πολιτάρχης (Strong's #4173 — Noun Masculine — politarches — pol-it-ar'-khace ) "a ruler of a city" (polis, "a city," archo, "to rule"), "a politarch," is used in Acts 17:6,8 , of the magistrates in Thessalonica, before whom the Jews, with a mob of market idlers, dragged Jason and other converts, under the charge of showing Hospitality to Paul and Silas, and of treasonable designs against the emperor
Lydia - Her generous disposition, manifested in her pressing offer of Hospitality to the Apostle, may perhaps be reflected in the frequency and liberality with which the Philippian Church contributed to the Apostle’s wants (Philippians 4:15-16)
House - This house must have a right foundation, JESUS CHRIST:...
...
a heating plant to keep the heart and soul on fire for GOD;...
a kitchen so that the food may be prepared for the soul;...
a library for the education and instruction of the mind;...
a music room to keep the heart singing;...
a parlor for Hospitality;...
a bedroom for rest;...
a bath room for cleansing;...
an attic for storage;...
and also the light of the Word and the water of the Spirit
Alms - See Alien ; Mercy; Hospitality ; and Stewardship
Salt - It is also the symbol of Hospitality; and of the fidelity due from servants, friends, guests, and officers, to those who maintain them or who receive them at their tables
Foreigner - He instructed Israelites to treat foreigners with tolerance and kindness, and to remember how they themselves felt when they were foreigners in Egypt (Exodus 23:9; Deuteronomy 24:19-22; see Hospitality)
Lydia - Her generous disposition, manifested in her pressing offer of Hospitality to the Apostle, may perhaps be reflected in the frequency and liberality with which the Philippian Church contributed to the Apostle’s wants (Philippians 4:15-16)
the Disobedient Prophet - Alas, my brother!...
As the man of God from Judah so nobly refuses Jeroboam's royal Hospitality, I am reminded of Lord Napier. The duke, the administration of whose estate was to be inquired into, was good enough to offer his lordship his ducal Hospitality for as long as the royal session of review lasted. What a day it has been! And what a man of God we have seen! Till they told him all that we are told about Jeroboam, and his altar, and the man of God from Judah, and his cry that shook down the altar, and the king's withered hand, and the prayer of the man of God, and the king's Hospitality, and the man of God's refusal of the king's Hospitality. He may have been very hungry by this time, and he may have begun to repent that he had not accepted the penitent king's Hospitality
Kenites - Also the love of tent life, Hospitality, the use of goat's milk whey, the employment of women in men's work, so that the sexes had free contact and yet the female part of the tent was inviolable (4, 5; Exodus 2:4; Numbers 25)
Lydia - First came her faith, then her leading all around her to Christ, then her and their baptismal confession, then her love evidenced in pressing Hospitality (Hebrews 13:2; 1 Peter 4:9; 1 Timothy 5:10), finally her receiving into her house Paul and Silas after their discharge from prison; she was not "ashamed of the Lord's prisoners, but was partaker of the afflictions of the gospel
Wages - It is an encouragement to His disciples to accept Hospitality, in their missionary journeys, from those to whom they have ministered in spiritual enlightenment
Bag - They were to be totally dependent on God and the Hospitality and support of God's people (compare Numbers 18:31 ; 1 Corinthians 9:3-14 )
Foot - Robinson, at Ramleh, "Our youthful host now proposed, in the genuine style of ancient oriental Hospitality, that a servant should wash our feet
Jer'Icho - (Matthew 20:30 ; Mark 10:46 ; Luke 18:35 ) Here the descendant of Rahab did not disdain the Hospitality of Zaccaeus the publican
Purse - You are going to your brethren in the neighbouring villages, and the best way to get to their hearts and their confidence is to throw yourselves upon their Hospitality
Footwashing - The initiative of the woman who was a “sinner” in washing Jesus' feet (Luke 7:37-50 ) was more than expected Hospitality
Gilead - ...
Here David found shelter and Hospitality while fleeing from Absalom (2 Samuel 17:22; 2 Samuel 17:27-29)
Gedaliah - So Ishmael, in violation of the sacred rights of Hospitality and taking advantage of the opportunity, while eating Gedaliah's "bread" at Mizpah, smote him two months after his appointment (compare Psalms 41:9)
Feet - To wash the dusty feet of guests is a rite of Hospitality (cf
Use - Use Hospitality one to another
John, the Letters of - Personal Conclusion (12-13)...
Third John is a personal letter from the elder to Gaius, who had been providing Hospitality to fellow Christians and messengers from the elder's community. Believers Should show Hospitality and Support for Visiting Believers (5-8). Pride, Gossiping, and Lack of Hospitality Bring Condemnation (9-10)
Travel (2) - ) was almost a necessity as a token of Hospitality. To refuse Hospitality to a traveller was a breach of good manners, if not, indeed, an insult to God
Toleration, Tolerance - ...
Again, though the Lord Jesus was frequently compelled to attack the Pharisees on account of their doctrines and practices, He showed them consideration by accepting their Hospitality (Luke 7:36; Luke 11:37); and He reminded His disciples, on an occasion when His enemies criticised His conduct (Luke 5:30-33), that those who preferred old ways were to be judged leniently (Luke 5:39)
Foot - ...
Washing the feet stained with the dust of the road was part of the regular duty of Hospitality ( Genesis 18:4 , Exo 30:19 , 2 Samuel 11:8 , Song of Solomon 5:3 , Luke 7:44 )
Aquila And Priscilla - Their Hospitality had a rich reward; both in private and in public they were privileged to listen to St
Phoebe - Such letters were a characteristic feature of the Apostolic Church, as were the frequent journeys which necessitated them and the generous Hospitality which they called forth. Descriptive of Phoebe’s relation to ‘many,’ presumably at Cenchreae (perhaps at Corinth also), προστάτις must mean at the least that, in a special degree made possible by her circumstances, she discharged the duties of ‘communicating to the necessities of the saints’ and of ‘pursuing Hospitality,’ which belonged to all Christians alike (Romans 12:13)
Abraham - Distinguished by his integrity, generosity, and Hospitality, he was most of all remarkable for his simple and unwavering faith, a faith that obeyed without hesitation or delay, and recoiled not from the most fearful trial ever imposed upon man, so that he is justly styled "the father of the faithful," that is, of believers
Laban (2) - It was "when he saw the earring and bracelets" given by Eliezer to Rebekah he was lavish in his professions of Hospitality, "come in thou blessed of the Lord; wherefore standest thou without?" etc
Vote - of the Bible , articles ‘Stones’ and ‘Hospitality’; Expository Times i
Anoint - A mark of respect to a guest so common that to omit it implied defective Hospitality (Luke 7:46; Psalms 23:5); Heb
Salt - Covenants were cemented by feasts and Hospitality, the viands of which were seasoned, as all foods, with salt
Brethren - Denney in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) (article ‘Brotherly Love’) points out that it found expression in two special ways-hospitality and care for persecuted Christians
Egypt - The name of the Egyptian city to which they come is said to be Sotines within the borders of Hermopolis, and there, in default of any acquaintance from whom to seek Hospitality, they take refuge in the temple, called the ‘capitol. He and His parents found Hospitality in the house of a widow, where they remained for a year, at the close of which they were expelled because of a miracle wrought by Jesus in bringing a dry and salted fish to life
Egypt - The name of the Egyptian city to which they come is said to be Sotines within the borders of Hermopolis, and there, in default of any acquaintance from whom to seek Hospitality, they take refuge in the temple, called the ‘capitol. He and His parents found Hospitality in the house of a widow, where they remained for a year, at the close of which they were expelled because of a miracle wrought by Jesus in bringing a dry and salted fish to life
Courtesy - ), the elaborate and somewhat burdensome Hospitality bestowed on friends and strangers when received as guests into a house (Luke 7:44-46), the embracings and prolonged salutations practised (Matthew 26:49, Mark 14:45; cf
Salt - It was a sacred pledge of Hospitality which they never ventured to violate
Marriage, Marry - Large Hospitality, and resentment at the refusal of an invitation, are indicated in Matthew 22:1-14
Moses - Moses saved the oppressed shepherds, whose father, the priest of Midian, invited him to live and work under the protection of the Midianite's Hospitality. In the idyllic peace of the Midianite's Hospitality, Moses took care of Jethro's sheep, fathered a child, and lived at a distance from his own people
Lot (1) - Next, Lot appears exercising that goodly Hospitality by which he" entertained angels unawares," and for which the Epistle to Hebrew (Hebrews 13:2) commends him
Bread, Bread of Presence - The giving of bread to another is a major element of Hospitality and serves as a sign of respect and concern (Genesis 14:18 ; 18:6 ; 19:3 ; Deuteronomy 23:4 ; Ruth 2:14 ; 1 Samuel 25:18 ; 28:24 ; 2 Samuel 16:1-2 )
Tithes - He solemnly professed he had done so every third and sixth year (of the septennial cycle), when instead of taking the second or vegetable tithe to the sanctuary he used it at home in charity and Hospitality (Deuteronomy 26:13-14; Deuteronomy 14:28-29)
Wine - Wine was produced on occasions of ordinary Hospitality, Genesis 14:18, and at festivals, such as marriages
Bread - It was a gravely unnatural offence to violate that law of Hospitality. ...
In travelling through Palestine and partaking of the Hospitality of the peasantry, one may notice in the bread the indentations of the pebbles, and small patches of grey ash, with here and there an inlaid attachment of singed grass or charred thorn, the result of the simple baking process
Nabal - It was the season of the year when the most churlish of men were wont to melt for the moment into Hospitality and self-enjoyment, and even Nabal held a feast in his house. Till sheer famine made David send to Nabal's feast and ask a share of his Hospitality to 'thy son David,' as he called himself in his courteous but bold message. But time passes, and there passes away with time all the Hospitality, humility, pliability, and sweetness of the churlish and obstinate man
Samuel - Samuel, who had been Divinely apprised of their coming, met them while he was on his way to worship at the high place, and after they had partaken of his Hospitality and passed the night with him, he nominated and anointed Saul as Israel’s coming king
Symbol - Various actions and relationships are symbolically indicated, such as the giving of the hand (compact), foot on the neck (conquest), bored ear (perpetual servitude), washing of the hands (innocence), bared or outstretched arm (energy), gnashing of teeth (disappointment and remorse), shaking the head (contempt and disapproval), averted face (angry repudiation), bread (hospitality), cross (suffering of Christ, and suffering for Him)
Mourning - But on our reaching the gate, it was suddenly exchanged for most hideous plaints and shrieks, which, with the feeling that we were entering a city at no time celebrated for its Hospitality, struck a very dismal impression upon my mind
Deborah - Jael apparently received Sisera in good faith, with the intention of Hospitality, but a sudden impulse may have urged her to destroy the enemy of God's people
Guest-Chamber - ‘House,’ ‘Hospitality’; Encyc
Nonnus of Panopolis - 40 (the Hospitality of Abraham); xii
Cosmetics - In New Testament times a good host displayed Hospitality by anointing guests with ointments (Luke 7:37-50 )
Rahab (1) - Her Hospitality to the spies was for their Lord's sake (Matthew 10:40-42)
Lot - When the angels arrived, Lot received them with Hospitality
Foreigner - Hospitality (philoxenos, lit
Martha - His arrival redoubled her housewifely solicitude, and it angered her when she saw her sister seated at His feet and listening to His discourse, leaving to her unaided hands the offices of Hospitality
Ethelbert, King of Kent - But since you are strangers who have come from afar, and, as I think I have observed, have desired to make us share in what you believe to be true and thoroughly good, we do not mean to hurt you, but rather shall take care to receive you with kindly Hospitality, and to afford you what you need for your support; nor do we forbid you to win over to your faith, by preaching, as many as you can
Receive, Receiving - , John 4:45 ; 2 Corinthians 7:15 ; Galatians 4:14 ; Colossians 4:10 ; by way of giving Hospitality, etc. , "to accept besides" (epi, "upon"), "to accept" (found in the papyri, of accepting the terms of a lease), is used in the sense of accepting in 3 John 1:9 ; in 3 John 1:10 , in the sense of "receiving" with Hospitality, in each verse said negatively concerning Diotrephes
Banquet - The Hospitality of the present day in the east exactly resembles that of the remotest antiquity. And such was the Hospitality of ancient Greece and Rome
Wine - It was produced on occasions of ordinary Hospitality, (Genesis 14:18 ) and at festivals, such as marriages
Virtue - ...
(e) The communistic spirit of the early Church created its own set of virtues-mutual Hospitality, contribution to the Church’s poor, the ignoring of distinction between rich and poor believers (James 2:1-4)
Water (2) - ) As a sign of Hospitality or respect (see Genesis 24:32; Genesis 43:24)
Fellowship - Fellowship, then, becomes a system of mutual help-the care of the poor and the sick, the feeding of widows and orphans, the visiting of prisoners, Hospitality, the procuring of labour for travelling workmen (Didache, xii
a'Braham - The patriarch, with true Eastern Hospitality, welcomed the strangers, and bade them rest and refresh themselves
Nations - At all periods it would be modified by the laws of Hospitality (see art
Fulness - ...
The term with such an application is a startling novelty in NT phraseology, and is an instructive example of the Hospitality of early Christian thought, of the promptitude with which it appropriated from its complex intellectual and religious environment such categories as it could convert to its own use
Apostolic Fathers - Part two gives directions concerning baptism (7), fasting and prayers (8), the eucharist (9-10), travelers who seek Hospitality (11-13), worship on the Lord's day (14), and bishops and deacons (15)
Maronites - Travellers may journey there, either by night or by day, with a security unknown in any other part of the empire, and the stranger is received with Hospitality, as among the Arabs: it must be owned, however, that the Maronites are less generous, and rather inclined to the vice of parsimony
Fulness - ...
The term with such an application is a startling novelty in NT phraseology, and is an instructive example of the Hospitality of early Christian thought, of the promptitude with which it appropriated from its complex intellectual and religious environment such categories as it could convert to its own use
Spiritual Gifts - powers of administration); mercy and almsgiving; money, as affording opportunity for service and Hospitality; 1 Corinthians 7:7 adds the gift of continence, and Galatians 5:22 gives a list of the fruits of the Spirit, as shown in the Christian character
Furniture - In so doing, this prosperous couple displayed exceptional Hospitality, even though the furniture they supplied seems minimal to us
Elisha - Her Hospitality and the practical manifestation of gratitude on the part of the prophet form a charming picture
Dropsy - Luke alone of the Evangelists tells of Jesus being invited to partake of the Hospitality of the Pharisees and of His accepting their invitations on three different occasions: ‘to eat’ (Luke 7:36), ‘to breakfast’ (Luke 11:37), ‘to eat bread’ (Luke 14:1)
Altar - The altar being His table and the sacrifice His feast, the Hospitality of table-communion is the pledge of friendship between Him and His worshippers
Gather - A special application of this nuance is to “receive Hospitality”: “… When he went in he sat him down in a street of the city: for there was no man that took them into his house to lodging” ( Food - People ate meals together to show friendship and Hospitality (Genesis 18:6-9; Genesis 43:31-34; Mark 2:15; Luke 14:15-24), to confirm political and business agreements (Genesis 26:28-31; Genesis 31:51-54), and to demonstrate fellowship with one another and with God (Leviticus 7:13-15; Deuteronomy 14:22-27; Luke 22:30; 1 Corinthians 10:17; 1 Corinthians 10:21)
Altar - The altar being His table and the sacrifice His feast, the Hospitality of table-communion is the pledge of friendship between Him and His worshippers
Friendship - ’...
(4) Jesus placed restrictions upon friendship at the feast given by the rich Pharisee, and condemned the selfish narrowing of the acts of Hospitality. Friendship must have open doors, and recognize the larger Hospitality. Inhospitality of soul and our native bashfulness impede communion, while the sense of defect or unworthiness restricts our fellowship
Home (2) - Hospitality and entertaining are again exemplified in the ease of Levi (Luke 5:29) and of Simon the Pharisee (Luke 7:36)
Mark (John) - His duties may be assumed to have been not unlike those, mutatis mutandis, discharged by the secretary of a modern evangelistic campaign-the selection of routes, arrangement for Hospitality, interviews and general detail (but cf
Heathen - Seeing that these itinerant preachers of the gospel deem it most prudent not to accept Hospitality from ‘them that are without’ (cf
Samaria - Then He was coming from Judaea, at a season "four months before the harvest," when the Samaritans could have no suspicion of His having been at Jerusalem for devotion (John 4:8; John 4:35); so the Samaritans treated Him with civility and Hospitality, and the disciples bought food in the Samaritan town without being insulted
Clement of Rome, Epistle of - Yet in the ordinary course of things the Roman Church would soon hear of the Corinthian trouble, for communication seems to have been fairly frequent between the principal Christian communities in the early days (note the stress laid on the duty of Hospitality, i, x, xi, xii, xxxv. How blessed and marvellous are the gifts which God prepares for them that patiently await Him! If we would enjoy them, we must first have done with all bitterness and strife, vainglory and inhospitality, which are hateful to Him (xxxv. He is conscious of no incongruity in placing ‘faith’ and ‘hospitality’ side by side as equal conditions of salvation (xii. By ‘faith and Hospitality’ Rahab was saved (xii
Solomon - There was this; There was what the inspired text calls largeness of heart-very much what we would call in our day openness and breadth of mind, Hospitality and catholicity of mind, even to sympathy and symbolism with beliefs, with ways of worship, and with ways of no worship, against which it had been the divine call and whole ministry of Moses, and Aaron, and Joshua, and David to warn and to protect the children of Israel. And there is no shipwreck of faith and holiness and severe obedience in all the world that is written more for the men of our generation than just the terrible shipwreck of Solomon amid his wealth, and his wisdom, and his largeness of horizon and Hospitality of heart, even to strange women and to their strange gods, till that end came which always comes
Ahab - Compare 2 Chronicles 18:2; feasting and a display of Hospitality often seduce the godly
Judge Judging (Ethical) - They are to pronounce anathema on the proclaimer of ‘another’ gospel (Galatians 1:9), and to refuse Hospitality to a false teacher, on the ground that a welcome or salutation involves participation in his evil works (2 John 1:10 f
Augustinus, Archbaptist of Canterbury - He could not give his assent to them and leave the customs of his people, but he promised the strangers kindness and Hospitality, together with liberty to celebrate their services, and undertook that none of his subjects who might be so disposed should be prohibited from espousing their religion
Elisha - ...
A great woman at Shunem bestowed Hospitality on Elisha, and provided a chamber for his use whenever he passed that way
Timothy And Titus Epistles to - They must be men of irreproachable character, possessing self-restraint, tact, ability to control others, as shown by the control of their own family, given to Hospitality, able to teach, not youthful but fortified by experience against dangers to which such an office would expose the immature. (2) The real widows above sixty years of age and destitute who have a character for stability, Hospitality, and good works are to be enrolled for service in the Church, on whom their support must fall if their relatives are poor (" translation="">1 Timothy 5:5-7; " translation="">1 Timothy 5:9-10)
Abraham - They accepted his proffered Hospitality, and, seated under an oak-tree, partook of the fare which Abraham and Sarah provided
Covenant - ‘A covenant of salt’ (Numbers 18:19 , 2 Chronicles 13:5 ) is a perpetual covenant, the eating of salt together being a token of friendship as sealed by sacred Hospitality
Claim - ...
The claims of neighbourhood and Hospitality are frequently alluded to
Poverty (2) - That He was not without well-to-do friends, and used their Hospitality, is certain
Jehoshaphat - Ahab's demonstrative Hospitality was the bait to entice him (2 Chronicles 18:1-3)
Arrest - ); and it may well have been, as Ewald suggests, the house of Mary, that widow lady who resided in Jerusalem with her son John Mark, and showed Hospitality to the Apostles in after days (Acts 12:12)
Abram - Abraham, with true Arabian Hospitality, received and entertained them. " Such was the promise of the celestial visitant; but the guilt was universal, the ruin inevitable; and the violation of the sacred laws of Hospitality and nature, which Lot in his horror attempted to avert by the most revolting expedient, confirmed the justice of the divine sentence
Family (Jesus) - After leaving the family home, when He entered into a city, He depended on the Hospitality of His friends
Martinus, Saint, Bishop of Tours - Martin accepted the royal Hospitality but declined all personal presents
Roads And Travel - Certainly it explains the apostolic insistence on Hospitality (Romans 12:13, Hebrews 13:2, 1 Timothy 3:2, Titus 1:8, 1 Peter 4:9). By ‘hospitality’ (φιλοξενία, lit
Transportation And Travel - The private traveler had to rely on the Hospitality of towns or friends along the way (Judges 19:10-15 ; 2 Kings 4:8 )
Widows - Such an enrolled widow must have been ‘a woman of one man,’* must have brought up her family well, must have washed the disciples’ feet, shown Hospitality to strangers, done service to the oppressed
Joy (2) - He halted in the villages and at the large farms, where He received open Hospitality
Brotherhood (2) - So in the NT special mention is made of charity (1 John 3:17, Matthew 3:15,); Hospitality (1619113583_96 Romans 12:13); forgiveness (Colossians 3:13); truthfulness (Ephesians 4:25); mutual admonition (2 Thessalonians 3:15); a humility that prefers others and renders even lowly service (Matthew 18:1-18, John 13:12-17, Romans 12:10, Philippians 2:1-11, 1 Peter 5:5 f
Daniel - It was the largeness, and the expansiveness, and the Hospitality of Daniel's fine mind, all combined with his extraordinary nobility and beauty of character, that gave Daniel such an unparalleled position in the court of Chaldea, and which has gained for Daniel such a famous and such a proverbial name in all subsequent literature, Ezekiel, a contemporary prophet, has heard so much of the wisdom of Daniel, that, to a proud enemy of Israel, he exclaims in irony: Thou art wiser than Daniel! We see the popular belief about Daniel strikingly illustrated also in the Apocryphal addition that was made to the Book of Daniel by its Greek translator and editor, and which was called the story of Susannah and the judgment of Daniel, And we are gratified to read in our own tongue a tribute to the same noble tradition in Shylock's exclamation;-...
A Daniel come to judgment! yea, a Daniel!O wise young judge, how I do honour thee!The prophet Daniel became a great proficient both in penitential and in intercessory prayer also as the years went on
Judges, Theology of - In Gibeah (the hometown of Saul) his party is not shown any Hospitality by the native citizens of the town; rather a man from Ephraim finally comes to his aid
House - ...
(b) Most houses, even of the comparatively poor, have a fairly large room or rooms, often, but not always, on the first floor, to entertain guests who come unexpectedly, for Eastern Hospitality is great (see Home)
Barnabas - Instruction and example in his openness and Hospitality of mind and heart toward a suspected and a friendless man
Homosexuality - Some modern revisionists point to the subsequent Jewish tradition condemning Sodom for inhospitality and argue that the passage does not have homosexual rape in view. In this view, when the Sodomites demand to "know" Lot's visitors, they want to interrogate them, and Lot considers this breach of Hospitality as so objectionable that he offers to distract the men with sex, offering his own daughters. The later references to inhospitality in relation to Sodom are not due to a misunderstanding of the sin of Sodom on the part of the Jews, but to their habit of speaking indirectly of sexual matters out of modesty. There can be no doubt that this is fundamentally an act of violence, but the initial desire for the man coupled with the sacrifice of the concubine to avoid "such a disgraceful thing" (19:24) suggests that same-gender sex, and not only inhospitality, is seen in a very negative light
the Pharisee - He wholly lacked liberality of mind and Hospitality of heart
Philip: Deacon And Evangelist - You would be sure to seek out those who had been so touched, and you would throw yourself on their Hospitality and protection
Nature And Natural Phenomena - the many references to the law of Hospitality, and to human intercourse and social life)
Passover (i.) - It was customary to extend Hospitality to the numerous visitors
Sidonius Apollinaris, Saint - Affectionate and constant to his friends, he loved to give and receive Hospitality, and some of his most agreeable letters describe such social gatherings
Sorrow, Man of Sorrows - He is grieved at ingratitude (Luke 17:17), at lack of Hospitality (Luke 7:44), at the profanation of the Temple (Matthew 21:12), above all, at the treachery of Judas (Matthew 26:20, John 13:21)
Hebrews, Epistle to the - A few exhortations follow as to love, Hospitality, and the marriage bond
Fellowship (2) - Hence great stress is laid upon the grace of Hospitality (Hebrews 13:1-2)
Jephthah And His Daughter - Only, if the deputation had had any sense; if they had not been so many idiots; if all their tongues had not been cleaving to the roofs of their months over Jephthah's Hospitality and his daughter's devotion, they would surely have taken the upbraiding words out of his mouth
Pre-Existence of Christ - ...
While the history of primitive Christianity proves its eclectic genius, its Hospitality towards all ideas and forms of thought by which it could express its sense of the inexpressible religious value of Christ, and while there is no a priori reason to deny that it may have incidentally woven into its own web sundry hints of a pre-existent Messiah or Ideal Man, it seems impossible that the rapid Christological advance which had taken place by the time the Pauline Epistles were written can have been in any vital way influenced by the recondite speculations of apocalyptic, Rabbinical, or Hellenistic Judaism
Christian Life - The peril was shrinking from confession of Christ, a failure of παῤῥησία (Hebrews 10:19), their lack of Christian knowledge (Hebrews 6:1); on the other hand, good works are praised (Hebrews 6:10)-brotherly love, Hospitality, care for the sick and imprisoned; the great need is πίστις, not intellectual belief, but the moral assurance of a future reward-‘a better country
John the Apostle - In Luke 9:54 they are represented as desirous to call down fire from heaven to consume the Samaritan village which had refused Hospitality to their Master
Ebionism And Ebionites - 17)—and the refusal of fellowship or Hospitality to the Gentiles (cf
Marriage - Hospitality was a sacred duty; ‘he who does not invite me to his marriage will not have me to his funeral
Jesus Christ, Name And Titles of - For example, if a stranger expected Hospitality, he first had to indicate to his host what his name was
Asceticism (2) - He accepted the Hospitality of rich men and poor, He was present at meals, He contributed to the gaiety of a marriage-feast, He permitted very precious ointment to be poured upon His feet, He had a love for children, welcomed the society of women, and clearly enjoyed the domestic life of the home in Bethany
Peter, First Epistle of - In the short time that remains until the return of the Lord, Christians should live a life of self-control, exercising brotherly love, Hospitality, and spiritual gifts, 1 Peter 4:7-11
Animals - The fatted calf is contrasted with the kid, the customary repast, which Oriental Hospitality provides to this day
Rufinus of Aquileia - No one of the male sex was ever gentler, and he had the strength and calmness of one who seems to know everything"; and tells us that, in common with Melania, Rufinus exercised an unbounded Hospitality, receiving and aiding with his own funds bishops and monks, virgins and matrons
Hermas Shepherd of - 26), and, on the other hand, bishops who exercise Hospitality and are like trees sheltering sheep, receiving into their houses the servants of God at all times, and sheltering the needy and the widows in their visitation (ix
Peter Epistles of - ...
(3) As their stay upon earth, along with all earthly things, draws to a close, their chief endeavour is to cultivate the true fruits of the Spirit in daily living-sobriety, prayerfulness, mutual love, Hospitality, ministrations, and constant glorification of God (1 Peter 4:7-11)
Hieronymus, Eusebius (Jerome) Saint - ), in the winter of 378, professing his soundness in the faith, declaring that he was ready, but for illness, to depart, and begging the Hospitality of the desert till the winter was past
Neology - "And this from a professor's chair!" In like manner the miracle of feeding the five thousand in the desert is resolved into the opportune passing by of a caravan with provisions, of which the hungry multitude were allowed to partake, according to eastern Hospitality; and the Apostles were merely employed in conveying it out in baskets
Teaching of the Twelve Apostles - Our document is solicitous to provide for the due entertainment of Christian missionaries and yet to guard against the church's Hospitality being traded on by impostors or lazy persons