What does Horse mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἵππος a horse. 5
כְּס֥וּס swallow 3
וְס֖וּס swallow 2
ס֖וּס swallow 2
ס֣וּס swallow 2
הַסּ֔וּס swallow 2
ס֥וּס swallow 2
ἵππου a horse. 2
הַסּ֗וּס swallow 1
סוּס֙ swallow 1
לַסּ֣וּס swallow 1
הַ֭סּוּס swallow 1
הַסּ֣וּס swallow 1
לַ֭סּוּס swallow 1
ס֗וּס swallow 1
הַסּוּסִ֗ים swallow 1
וָסֽוּס swallow 1
כַּסּ֥וּס swallow 1
לַ֝סּ֗וּס swallow 1
הַסּוּסִים֙ swallow 1
וָס֖וּס swallow 1
ס֔וּס swallow 1
הַסּוּס֙ swallow 1
וְהַסּ֗וּס swallow 1
וְס֗וּס swallow 1
הַסּוּסִ֖ים swallow 1
כַּסּ֣וּס ׀ swallow 1
וְס֣וּס swallow 1
וְסוּס֙ swallow 1

Definitions Related to Horse

G2462


   1 a Horse.
   

H5483


   1 swallow, swift.
   2 Horse.
      2a chariot horses.
      

Frequency of Horse (original languages)

Frequency of Horse (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Horse
Four-legged animal used for transportation and in war. The horse was probably first domesticated by nomads of Central Asia as long ago as 4,000 years. Babylonians began using horses in battle. Military victories such as those of Genghis Khan or Alexander the Great would have been impossible without horses. When the Exodus occurred, Pharaoh's army was outfitted with horses and chariots (Exodus 14-15 ). Herodutus reported the use of horses by the Persians in their postal system 3,000 years ago.
David captured chariots from the Syrians and destroyed most of them, but reserved one hundred (2 Samuel 8:3-4 ). In so doing, he disobeyed God and introduced their use to Israel. David's son, Solomon, multiplied their numbers to strengthen the defense of his country, building chariot cities (1 Kings 9:19 ). In Megiddo what appears to be stalls and feeding troughs from King Ahab's time have been discovered. These were sufficient for about 450 horses.
The horse was used for war by Syrians (1 Kings 20:20 ), the Philistines (2 Samuel 1:6 ), the Medes and Persians (Jeremiah 50:42 ), and the Romans (Acts 23:23 ,Acts 23:23,23:32 ). By contrast, and as a sign of the peacefulness of the Messiah's kingdom, Jesus rode into Jerusalem upon an ass, not a horse (John 12:12-15 ).
Considerable opposition to the horse arose in Israel, seeing horses as symbols of pagan luxury and dependence on physical power for defense. Prophets condemned trusting in horses rather than the Lord for victory (Isaiah 31:1 ; Ezekiel 17:15 ). Yet, horses became so common in Jerusalem that a royal palace near the city had a special horse gate (2 Chronicles 23:15 ) and a gate of the city was also called the Horse Gate (Jeremiah 31:40 ; Nehemiah 3:28 ).
Horses are often used as symbols of swiftness (Jeremiah 4:13 ), strength (Job 39:19 ), and sure-footedness (Isaiah 63:13 ). The most detailed description of a horse is found in Job 39:19-25 . In prophecy horses also play an important role as in Joel 2:4-5 and Revelation 6:1-8 where four horses of different colors are associated with different tragedies. See Animals ; Megiddo .
C. Dale Hill
Holman Bible Dictionary - Horse Gate
Gate on east side of city wall of Jerusalem near the Temple. Jeremiah promised its rebuilding (Jeremiah 31:40 ), and the priests under Nehemiah rebuilt it (Nehemiah 3:28 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Horse-Gate
A gate in the wall of Jerusalem, at the west end of the bridge, leading from Zion to the temple (Nehemiah 3:28 ; Jeremiah 31:40 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Horse
Always referred to in the Bible in connection with warlike operations, except Isaiah 28:28 . The war-horse is described Job 39:19-25 . For a long period after their settlement in Canaan the Israelites made no use of horses, according to the prohibition, Deuteronomy 17:16 . David was the first to form a force of cavalry (2 Samuel 8:4 ). But Solomon, from his connection with Egypt, greatly multiplied their number (1 Kings 4:26 ; 10:26,29 ). After this, horses were freely used in Israel (1 Kings 22:4 ; 2 Kings 3:7 ; 9:21,33 ; 11:16 ). The furniture of the horse consisted simply of a bridle (Isaiah 30:28 ) and a curb (Psalm 32:9 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Horse-Leech
Occurs only in Proverbs 30:15 (Heb. 'alukah); the generic name for any blood-sucking annelid. There are various species in the marshes and pools of Palestine. That here referred to, the Hoemopis, is remarkable for the coarseness of its bite, and is therefore not used for medical purposes. They are spoken of in the East with feelings of aversion and horror, because of their propensity to fasten on the tongue and nostrils of horses when they come to drink out of the pools. The medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis), besides other species of leeches, are common in the waters of Syria.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Horse
HORSE . The Israelites must have been acquainted with horses in Egypt ( Genesis 47:17 ), and it is evident, too, from the Tell el-Amarna correspondence that horses were familiar animals in Palestine at an early period; but it would appear that the children of Israel were slow in adopting them. Throughout the OT up to the Exile they appear only as war-horses; the ass, the mule, and the camel were the beasts for riding and burden-bearing. Even for warlike purposes horses were only slowly adopted, the mountainous regions held by the Israelites being unsuitable for chariot warfare. David commenced acquiring chariots ( 2 Samuel 8:4 ), and Solomon greatly added to their numbers, obtaining horses for them from Musri [1] in N. Syria and Kue , in Cilicia ( 1 Kings 10:28 , 2 Chronicles 1:16 [2]). Horses were obtained also from Egypt ( Isaiah 31:1 ; Isaiah 31:3 , Ezekiel 17:15 ). Some of the references may be to hired horsemen. The kings of Israel were warned against multiplying horses ( Deuteronomy 17:16 ). Trust in horses is put in antithesis to trust in the Lord ( Isaiah 30:16 , Psalms 20:7 ; Psalms 33:17 ). Before the reforms of Josiah, horses sacred to the sun were kept in the Temple ( 2 Kings 23:11 ; cf. 2 Kings 11:16 ). The appearance of the war-horse seems to have made a deep impression ( Job 39:19-25 , Jeremiah 47:3 , Nahum 3:2 etc.). After the Exile horses were much more common: the returning Jews brought 736 horses with them ( Nehemiah 7:68 ). Horses were fed on barley and tibn (chopped straw) in Solomon’s time as in Palestine to-day ( 1 Kings 4:28 ). Although the breeding of horses has become so intimately associated with our ideas of the Arabs, it would seem that during the whole OT period horses were unknown, or at least scarce, in Arabia. The equipment of horses is mentioned in the Bible the bit and bridle ( Psalms 32:9 , Proverbs 26:3 ), bells of the horses ( Zechariah 14:20 ), and ‘precious clothes for chariots’ ( Ezekiel 27:20 ). In OT times they were apparently unshod ( Isaiah 5:28 ).
E. W. G. Masterman.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Horse-Gate
HORSE-GATE . See Jerusalem, p. 439 b .
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Horse-Leech
HORSE-LEECH ( ‘aluqah , cf. Arab. [1] ‘alaqeh ). The horse-leech ( Hœmopis sanguisuga ) and the medicinal leech ( Hirudo medicinalis ) are very common in Palestine and are the cause of much trouble, even sickness and death, to man and beast. They abound in many springs, streams, and pools, and lodge themselves, while still small, in the mouths of those drinking. Thence they not infrequently find their way to the pharynx, and even larynx, where they live and grow for many months. They cause frequent hæmorrhages, and, if not removed, lead to progressive anæmia and death. Their voracious appetite for blood, possibly referred to in Proverbs 30:15 , is well illustrated by their habits as internal parasites. It is probable, however, that the reference here is not to the leech of common life, but to the mythological vampire, the ghul of the Arabs.
E. W. G. Masterman.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Horse
In Scripture used for war-like purposes, not agriculture (except in treading out grain for threshing, Isaiah 28:28, where for "horsemen" translated "horses".) Job's magnificent description refers to the war horse (Isaiah 39:19-25), "hast thou clothed his neck with thunder?" i.e. with the power of inspiring terror. Rather "with majesty" (Umbreit), "with quivering mane" (Maurer). The Greek connection between mane (fobee ) and terror (fobos ) favors A.V. which is more poetic. "Canst thou make him afraid (rather 'make him spring') as a grasshopper?" So in Joel 2:4 war horses are compared to locusts. Their heads are so like that the Italian for "locust" is cavaletta, "little horse." "The glory of his nostrils is terrible: he paweth in the valley and rejoiceth in strength, he goeth on," etc.; "he swalloweth the ground with fierceness," i.e. draws it in fierce impatience toward him with his hoof, as if he would "swallow" it.
"Neither believeth he (for joy) that it is the sound of the trumpet," rather "he will not stand still at the sound." "He saith among the trumpets, Ha, ha!" his mettlesome neighing expressing his eagerness for battle, which "he smelleth," snuffeth, i.e. discerneth, "the thunder (i.e. thundering voice) of the captains." (See CHARIOT.) The donkey is the emblem of peace. The bride is compared to "a company of horses in Pharaoh's chariots" (Song of Solomon 1:9), namely, in ardor and beauty (Song of Solomon 1:4, "run"; Song of Solomon 1:5, "comely"), and in forming "a company" militant, orderly, and numerous (Revelation 19:7; Revelation 19:14). The qualities which seemed preeminent in the enemy Pharaoh's hosts at the Red Sea really belonged to Israel. Maurer translated "I compare thee to my mare in chariots of (i.e. received from) Pharaoh," but the plural "chariots" requires the collective sense "a company of horses."
The "cutting off of the horse from Jerusalem" prophetically symbolizes the cessation of war (Zechariah 9:10). Not the horse's speed or utility but his "strength" is his characteristic in Scripture (Psalms 33:17). Two names are used in Hebrew, both Persian in origin: sus from Susa, and parash from Pares. The sus was of stronger make, used for the war chariot; the parash more for riding. Perhaps in Exodus 14:9 "horsemen" mean "chariot riders." Certainly no Egyptian monument represents horsemen. Translated in 1 Kings 4:26, "forty (rather 'four,' a copyist's error, as 2 Chronicles 9:25 proves. Also 1400 chariots suit 4000 horses, two horses for each chariot and a reserve horse: 2 Chronicles 1:14; 1 Kings 10:26) thousand chariot horses and twelve thousand riding (i.e. cavalry) horses"; Ezekiel 27:14, "with (chariot) horses and riding horses" (KJV "horsemen".)
Isaiah 21:7, "a chariot with a couple of horsemen"; rather "a cavalcade of horsemen riding in pairs." In 1 Kings 4:28; Esther 8:14; Micah 1:13, rekesh "dromedary"; rather "a courser," a "racehorse," for such purposes as the royal post. In 1 Kings 10:28-29, the sense seems that the Egyptians regularly brought horses to a mart in S. Palestine (Septuagint and Vulgate name the mart in their translation), of the Hebrew Koa. In A. V. Mi-Kveh is translated "linen yarn") and handed them to the king's dealers at a fixed price, 150 shekels for one horse, 600 for a chariot, including its two draught horses and one reserve horse. In Genesis 12:15 horses are not mentioned among the possessions which Abram acquired during his sojourn in Egypt. But in Genesis 47:17 they stand foremost among the Egyptians' possessions. In later times, the greater contact of Egypt with Canaanite and Arab nomads' accounts for the introduction of horses.
The camel, one of Abram's possessions in Egypt, is not mentioned in Joseph's time nor on the Egyptian monuments. Their early possession of the desert of Sinai makes it certain they knew and must have used the camel there, "the ship of the desert," but they avoid mentioning it as being unclean. Saddles were not used until a late period. Horses' hoofs hard "as flint" were a good point in days when shoeing was unknown (Isaiah 5:28). White horses were emblematic of victory (Revelation 6:2; Revelation 19:11; Revelation 19:14). Horses were consecrated to the sun, since that luminary was supposed to drive a fiery chariot through the sky (2 Kings 23:11). They were driven in procession to meet the rising sun.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Horse
Emblem in art associated with
Saint Edward the Martyr who is depicted on horseback with his knights
Saint George on horseback against the dragon
Saint Hippolytus as the instrument of his martyrdom
Saint Hubert who hunted from horseback
Saint Martin of Tours, who was a cavalry soldier
Saint Medardus
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Horse
The horse was used among the Israelites only for war, either in chariots or for what is now called cavalry; but its use betokened failure in confidence on the Lord: see Hosea 14:3 . They had been forbidden to multiply horses, Deuteronomy 17:16 ; and at first they hamstrung the horses, and burnt the chariots of the Canaanites. Joshua 11:6,9 . David, however, after the defeat of Hadadezer, reserved 100 horses for chariots. 2 Samuel 8:4 . (See a description of the war-horse in Job 39:19-25 .) Solomon had 40,000 stalls of horses for his chariots and 12,000 horsemen. 1 Kings 4:26 .
Symbolically the horse represents careering imperial power, in general providentially controlled. In the early part of Zechariah the prophet had visions of horses of different colours, they are called spirits of the heavens, and as such they acted in the four great Gentile empires described by Daniel. When these are further spoken of, the red horses are not named, for the Chaldean empire had passed away when Zechariah saw the vision. Zechariah 1:8 ; Zechariah 6:1-7 .
In the Revelation also there are horses and riders thereon, representing the powers engaged in the providential course of God's dealings. Revelation 6:1-8 ; cf. Revelation 9:7,9,17 . In Revelation 19 the Lord Jesus, the Faithful and True, comes forth on a white horse, to make war in righteousness. Revelation 19:11-21 . See REVELATION.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Horse
In the NT, as in the OT, the horse is always the war-horse, never the gentle, domesticated creature beloved by the modern Arab. Asses, mules, and camels were the beasts used by the Jews in common life, both for riding and burden-bearing.
(1) When Christian art depicts the conversion of St. Paul, it usually represents him as falling from an affrighted horse to the earth. The narrative in Acts does not state that he was riding at all, but it seems probable that as the emissary of the High Priest, engaged on important and urgent business (Acts 9:1 f.), he would not make a journey of 150 miles on foot. His task and his spirit were warlike-he was breathing threatening and slaughter-and he may have taken a small troop of horsemen with him. Strict Pharisees, however, never rode on horseback, and it is at least as likely that he and his companions were mounted on asses or mules.
(2) When St. Paul was arrested in Jerusalem, and had to be taken beyond the reach of conspirators, he was escorted to Caesarea by a company of 70 horsemen (Acts 23:23; Acts 23:32). These cavalry, which had been temporarily assisting the Roman garrison in Judaea , had their headquarters at Caesarea. Josephus makes repeated reference to an ala of Sebastian and Caesarean horsemen that was attached to the auxiliary cohorts (see Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. tr. of GJV).] i. ii. [1] 52). The single cohort which was stationed in Jerusalem all the year round was apparently re-inforced at the time of the Passover by cavalry and infantry from Caesarea.
(3) St. James (James 3:2 f.) uses the bridling of the horse, whose ‘whole body’ is thereby turned at the rider’s pleasure, to illustrate the complete self-control which a man achieves by merely bridling his lips. It is generally true that if the tongue does not utter the angry word, the hand does not grasp the sword, the feet do not run to evil and make haste to shed blood.
(4) The horse is conspicuous in the symbolism of the Apocalypse (15 references). Like the fiery steed in Job (Job 39:19-25), he goes forth to meet the armed men, and smells the battle from afar. Whether he belongs to the Church militant, or to some worldly power, or to the under world, he is always the war-horse-always ‘prepared unto battle’ or ‘running to battle’ (Revelation 9:7; Revelation 9:9). He is familiar with ‘the sounds of chariots’ (Revelation 9:9). When he appears, we expect to see the rider’s drawn sword (Revelation 19:21); we are not surprised at the sight of blood; and in one gruesome scene the deep pools of gore come up to the horses’ bridles (Revelation 14:20). A white horse represents victory, a red horse carnage, a black horse famine, and a pale horse death (Revelation 6:2-8). One victorious trooper carries a bow (Revelation 6:2); he is the light-armed Parthian, whose shafts were so dreaded by the Romans-‘fidentemque fuga Parthum versisque sagittis’ (Virg. Georg. iii. 31). A host of fiendish mounted horses, 200,000,000 strong, armed with breastplates of red, blue, and yellow (of fire and hyacinth and brimstone, Revelation 9:17), are more like the steeds of those heavy-armed Parthians who appeared at Carrhae ‘with their helmets and breastplates flashing with flame … and the horses equipped with mail of brass and iron’ (Plut. Crassus, 24). But these fiend-horses are monsters, which have the heads of lions, and breathe fire and smoke and brimstone (cf. Wisdom of Solomon 11:18; Virg. aen. vii. 281). Against the armies of earth and Hades Christ comes forth from the opened heavens sitting on a white horse, and all His followers ride on white horses and are clad in white uniform (Revelation 19:11; Revelation 19:14). The combined forces of evil make war in vain against this Rider and His horsemen (Revelation 19:19), who are, in the phrase of a later time, Knights of the Holy Ghost.
James Strahan.
Webster's Dictionary - Sea Horse
(1):
A fabulous creature, half horse and half fish, represented in classic mythology as driven by sea dogs or ridden by the Nereids. It is also depicted in heraldry. See Hippocampus.
(2):
The walrus.
(3):
Any fish of the genus Hippocampus.
Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Horse
Psalm 32:9 (a) This is a warning that the believer should use good judgment, think for himself, and not be just as an animal that must be guided by another.
Psalm 33:17 (b) This is a type of any human resource in which people trust for deliverance instead of in the living GOD.
Jeremiah 12:5 (c) This is a peculiar type - the footmen represent ordinary Christians living ordinary Christian lives. They make the unsaved man weary and he wishes to get away from their influence and company. The horses represent Christians who have come to full growth even perhaps those who have already been taken to Heaven. If the weak Christian wearies the sinner, how much more will those Christians who have been made like CHRIST and have been brought into perfect manhood and full stature for GOD? The sinner would not be able to stand their presence at all.
The horses in Zechariah 1,6 probably represent great movements wrought by GOD in dealing with men.
Zechariah 6:2 (b) The red horse - a type of the destructive power of war. (See also Revelation 6:4).
Zechariah 6:3 (b) The black horse - represents world-wide famine which naturally follows great wars both international and internal. (See also Revelation 6:5). Each person receives his food by weight.
Zechariah 6:3 (b) Bay horse - probably represents the scourge of pestilence and disease which follows upon the famine that follows the war. (See also Revelation 6:8).
Zechariah 6:3 (b) The white horse - probably represents a man-made peace which will be forced upon the world by the antichrist under the guise of religion and righteousness. It will be a false peace which will not stand. (See also Revelation 6:2).
Revelation 19:11 (b) The white horse - typical of the great power which the Lord JESUS will exhibit in righteousness and justice when He comes forth from Heaven as the Almighty Conqueror.
Webster's Dictionary - Shire Horse
One of an English breed of heavy draft horses believed to be descended largely from the horses used in war in the days of heavy armor. They are the largest of the British draft breeds, and have long hair on the back of the cannons and fetlocks. Brown or bay with white on the face and legs is now the commonest color.
King James Dictionary - Horse
HORSE, n. hors.
1. A species of quadrupeds of the genus Equus, having six erect and parallel fore-teeth in the upper jaw, and six somewhat prominent in the under jaw the dog teeth are solitary, and the feet consist of an undivided hoof. The horse is a beautiful animal, and of great use for draught or conveyance on his back. Horse, in English, is of common gender, and may comprehend the male and female. 2. A constellation. 3. Cavalry a body of troops serving on horseback. In this sense, it has no plural termination. We say, a thousand horse, a regiment of horse. 4. A machine by which something is supported usually a wooden frame with legs. Various machines used in the arts are thus called. 5. A wooden machine on which soldiers ride by way of punishment sometimes called a timber-mare. 6. In seamen's language, a rope extending from the middle of a yard to its extremity, to support the sailors while they loose, reef or furl the sails, also, a thick rope extended near the mast for hoisting a yard or extending a sail on it. To take horse to set out to ride on horseback.
1. To be covered, as a mare. HORSE, To mount on a horse.
1. To carry on the back. The keeper, horsing a deer.
2. To ride astride as ridges horsed. 3. To cover a mare, as the male.
Webster's Dictionary - White Horse
A large mass of tough sinewy substance in the head of sperm whales, just above the upper jaw and extending in streaks into the junk above it. It resembles blubber, but contains no oil. Also, the part of the head in which it occurs.
Webster's Dictionary - Rear-Horse
(n.) A mantis.
Webster's Dictionary - Rocking-Horse
(n.) The figure of a horse, mounted upon rockers, for children to ride.
Webster's Dictionary - One-Horse
(1):
(a.) Drawn by one horse; having but a single horse; as, a one-horse carriage.
(2):
(a.) Second-rate; inferior; small.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Horse-Leech
Horse-leech, the adherer. A well-known kind of worm very common in all the stagnant waters of Palestine. Proverbs 30:15. It fastens itself within the nostrils or mouths of animals as they drink, and will suffer itself to be nearly torn in two before relaxing its hold. Its thirst for blood—never satisfied till its body is completely filled—may illustrate the insatiable cravings of lust, avarice, and cruelty.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Horse
Horse. This most valuable animal was first domesticated in the East, and was probably brought by those who emigrated westward from Asia into Arabia and Egypt. No mention is made of horses as forming any part of the possessions of the patriarchs; nor are any noticed among the presents Abraham received from the kings of Egypt and Gerar. Genesis 12:16; Genesis 20:14. The horse was probably not in those early times used except for military purposes; indeed we find scarcely an allusion in Scripture to its employment for the farm or any ordinary domestic service. Once the horse is said to tread out some species of corn, Isaiah 28:28; but it is a war-horse, strong and fierce, that is poetically described in Job 39:19-25.
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Horse
Sûs (סוּס, Strong's #5483), “horse.” Cognates of this word appear in Ugaritic, Akkadian, Egyptian, and Syriac. It appears in biblical Hebrew about 138 times and in all periods.The first biblical appearance of sûs is in Gen. 47:17: “And they brought their cattle unto Joseph: and Joseph gave them bread in exchange for horses, and for the flocks, and for the cattle of the herds, and for the asses.…” In the second quarter of the second millennium the chariot became a major military weapon and “horses” a very desirable commodity. This was the time of Joseph. It was not until the end of the second millennium that a rudimentary cavalry appeared on the battlefield. In the period of the eighth-century prophets and following, “horses” became a sign of luxury and apostasy (Isa. 2:7; Amos 4:10) inasmuch as Israel’s hope for freedom and security was to be the Lord: “But he [1] shall not multiply horses to himself, nor cause the people to return to Egypt, to … multiply horses …” (Deut. 17:16).
The “horses” of God are the storm clouds with which he treads upon the sea (Hab. 3:15).
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Horse
סוס . Horses were very rare among the Hebrews in the early ages. The patriarchs had none; and after the departure of the Israelites from Egypt, God expressly forbade their ruler to procure them: "He shall not multiply horses to himself, nor cause the people to return to Egypt, to the end that he should multiply horses: forasmuch as the Lord hath said, Ye shall henceforth return no more that way," Deuteronomy 17:16 . As horses appear to have been generally furnished by Egypt, God prohibits these,
1. Lest there should be such commerce with Egypt as might lead to idolatry.
2. Lest the people might depend on a well appointed cavalry, as a means of security, and so cease from trusting in the promised aid and protection of Jehovah.
3. That they might not be tempted to extend their dominion by means of cavalry, and so get scattered among the surrounding idolatrous nations, and thus cease in process of time, to be that distinct and separate people which God intended they should be, and without which the prophecies relative to the Messiah could not be known to have their due and full accomplishment. In the time of the Judges we find horses and war chariots among the Canaanites, but still the Israelites had none; and hence they were generally too timid to venture down into the plains, confining their conquests to the mountainous parts of the country. In the reign of Saul, it would appear, that horse breeding had not yet been introduced into Arabia; for, in a war with some of the Arabian nations, the Israelites got plunder in camels, sheep, and asses, but no horses. David's enemies brought against him a strong force of cavalry into the field; and in the book of Psalms the horse commonly appears only on the side of the enemies of the people of God; and so entirely unaccustomed to the management of this animal had the Israelites still continued, that, after a battle, in which they took a considerable body of cavalry prisoners, 2 Samuel 8:4 , David caused most of the horses to be cut down, because he did not know what use to make of them. Solomon was the first who established a cavalry force.
Under these circumstances, it is not wonderful that the Mosaic law should take no notice of an animal which we hold in such high estimation. To Moses, educated as he was in Egypt, and, with his people, at last chased out by Pharaoh's cavalry, the use of the horse for war and for travelling was well known; but as it was his object to establish a nation of husbandmen, and not of soldiers for the conquest of foreign lands, and as Palestine, from its situation, required not the defence of cavalry, he might very well decline introducing among his people the yet unusual art of horse breeding. Solomon, having married a daughter of Pharaoh, procured a breed of horses from Egypt; and so greatly did he multiply them, that he had four hundred stables, forty thousand stalls, and twelve thousand horsemen, 1 Kings 4:26 ; 2 Chronicles 9:25 . It seems that the Egyptian horses were in high repute, and were much used in war. When the Israelites were disposed to place too implicit confidence in the assistance of cavalry, the prophet remonstrated in these terms: "The Egyptians are men, and not God, and their horses are flesh, not spirit,"
Isaiah 31:3 .
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Horse-Leech
עלוקה , from a root which signifies to adhere, stick close, or hang fast, Proverbs 30:15 . A sort of worm that lives in water, of a black or brown colour, which fattens upon the flesh, and does not quit it till it is entirely full of blood. Solomon says, "The horse-leech hath two daughters, Give, give." This is so apt an emblem of an insatiable rapacity and avarice, that it has been generally used by different writers to express it. Thus Plautus makes one say, speaking of the determination to get money, "I will turn myself into a horse-leech, and suck out their blood;" and Cicero, in one of his letters to Atticus, calls the common people of Rome horse-leeches of the treasury. Solomon, having mentioned those that devoured the property of the poor as the worst of all the generations which he had specified, proceeds to state the insatiable cupidity with which they prosecuted their schemes of rapine and plunder. As the horse-leech had two daughters, cruelty and thirst of blood, which cannot be satisfied, so the oppressor of the poor has two dispositions, rapacity and avarice, which, never say they have enough, but continually demand additional gratifications.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Horse-Leech,
Heb. 'alukah , occurs once only, viz. ( Proverbs 30:16 ) There is little doubt that 'alukah denotes some species of leech, or rather is the generic term for any blood-sucking annelid.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Horse
The most striking feature in the biblical notices of the horse is the exclusive application of it to warlike operations; in no instance is that useful animal employed for the purposes of ordinary locomotion or agriculture, if we except (Isaiah 28:28 ) The animated description of the horse in (Job 39:19-25 ) applies solely to the war-horse. The Hebrews in the patriarchal age, as a pastoral race, did not stand in need of the services Of the horse, and for a long period after their settlement in Canaan they dispensed with it, partly in consequence of the hilly nature of the country, which only admitted of the use of chariots in certain localities, (Judges 1:19 ) and partly in consequence to the prohibition in (17:16) which would be held to apply at all periods. David first established a force of cavalry and chariots, (2 Samuel 8:4 ) but the great supply of horses was subsequently effected by Solomon through his connection with Egypt. (1 Kings 4:26 ) Solomon also established a very active trade in horses, which were brought by dealers out of Egypt and resold, at a profit, to the Hittites. With regard to the trappings and management of the horse we have little information. The bridle was placed over the horse's nose, (Isaiah 30:28 ) and a bit or curb is also mentioned. (2 Kings 19:28 ; Psalm 32:9 ; Proverbs 26:3 ; Isaiah 37:29 ) In the Authorized Version it is incorrectly given "bridle," with the exception of (Psalm 32:1 ) ... Saddles were not used until a late period. The horses were not shod, and therefore hoofs are hard "as flint," (Isaiah 5:28 ) were regarded as a great merit. The chariot-horses were covered with embroidered trappings (Ezekiel 27:20 ) Horses and chariots were used also in idolatrous processions, as noticed in regard to the sun. (2 Kings 23:11 )
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Horse
1: ἵππος (Strong's #2462 — Noun Masculine — hippos — hip'-pos ) apart from the fifteen occurrences in the Apocalypse, occurs only in James 3:3 ; in the Apocalypse "horses" are seen in visions in Revelation 6:2,4,5,8 ; 9:7,9,17 (twice); 14:20; 19:11,14,19,21; otherwise in Revelation 18:13 ; 19:18 .

Sentence search

One-Horse - ) Drawn by one Horse; having but a single Horse; as, a one-horse carriage
Thiller - ) The Horse which goes between the thills, or shafts, and supports them; also, the last Horse in a team; - called also thill Horse
Palfrey - ) A saddle Horse for the road, or for state occasions, as distinguished from a war Horse. ) A small saddle Horse for ladies
Bayard - ) Properly, a bay Horse, but often any Horse. Commonly in the phrase blind bayard, an old blind Horse
Tattersall's - ) A famous Horse market in London, established in 1766 by Richard Tattersall, also used as the headquarters of credit betting on English Horse races; hence, a large Horse market elsewhere
Cockhorse - ) A child's rocking-horse. ) A high or tall Horse. ) Lifted up, as one is on a tall Horse
Caparison - ) An ornamental covering or housing for a Horse; the harness or trappings of a Horse, taken collectively, esp. ) To cover with housings, as a Horse; to harness or fit out with decorative trappings, as a Horse
Montoir - ) A stone used in mounting a Horse; a Horse block
Dextrer - ) A war Horse; a destrer. ) A war Horse
Waler - ) A Horse imported from New South Wales; also, any Australian Horse
Bucephalus - ) The celebrated war Horse of Alexander the Great. ) Hence, any riding Horse
Checkrein - ) A short rein looped over the check hook to prevent a Horse from lowering his head; - called also a bearing rein. ) A branch rein connecting the driving rein of one Horse of a span or pair with the bit of the other Horse
Withers - ) The ridge between the shoulder bones of a Horse, at the base of the neck. of Horse
Amble - ) To move somewhat like an ambling Horse; to go easily or without hard shocks. ) A movement like the amble of a Horse. ) A peculiar gait of a Horse, in which both legs on the same side are moved at the same time, alternating with the legs on the other side. ) To go at the easy gait called an amble; - applied to the Horse or to its rider
Amble - ) To move somewhat like an ambling Horse; to go easily or without hard shocks. ) A movement like the amble of a Horse. ) A peculiar gait of a Horse, in which both legs on the same side are moved at the same time, alternating with the legs on the other side. ) To go at the easy gait called an amble; - applied to the Horse or to its rider
Horseback - HorseBACK, n. The state of being on a Horse the posture of riding on a Horse. ...
I saw them salute on Horseback
Unhorse - ) To throw from a Horse; to cause to dismount; also, to take a Horse or Horses from; as, to unhorse a rider; to unhorse a carriage
Hippopotamus - a Horse, and a river. The river-horse, an animal that inhabits the Nile and other rivers in Africa. This animal resembles a hog rather than a Horse, and was named perhaps from his neighing voice
Mane - ) The long and heavy hair growing on the upper side of, or about, the neck of some quadrupedal animals, as the Horse, the lion, etc. of Horse
Tunny - On the American coast it is called Horse mackerel. of Horse mackerel, under Horse
Horse - Horse, n. The Horse is a beautiful animal, and of great use for draught or conveyance on his back. Horse, in English, is of common gender, and may comprehend the male and female. Cavalry a body of troops serving on Horseback. We say, a thousand Horse, a regiment of Horse. To take Horse to set out to ride on Horseback. Horse, To mount on a Horse. To ride astride as ridges Horsed
Countertime - ) The resistance of a Horse, that interrupts his cadence and the measure of his manege, occasioned by a bad Horseman, or the bad temper of the Horse
Neigh - To utter the voice of a Horse, expressive of want or desire to whinny. The voice of a Horse a whinnying
Canon Bone - The shank bone, or great bone above the fetlock, in the fore and hind legs of the Horse and allied animals, corresponding to the middle metacarpal or metatarsal bone of most mammals. See Horse
Single-Foot - ) An irregular gait of a Horse; - called also single-footed pace. ) To proceed by means of the single-foot, as a Horse or other quadruped
Nag - ) A small Horse; a pony; hence, any Horse
Whinny - ) To utter the ordinary call or cry of a Horse; to neigh. ) The ordinary cry or call of a Horse; a neigh
Formality: Habits of Worthless - That honored servant of Christ, Richard Knill, notes in his journal the following amusing incident of the force of habit, as exemplified in his Horse. My Horse and gig were seen constantly on the rounds; and my Horse at last knew where to stop as well as I did. Captain Page, a godly man, who was staying with us until a ship was ready to take him to the Cape, one morning requested me to lend him my Horse and gig to take him to the city. The captain was driving officer-like, when the Horse stopped suddenly, and nearly threw him out. ' They started again, and soon the Horse stopped suddenly, and the captain was nearly out as before. By doing this he came near my schools, and again and again the Horse stopped. When he got home, he said, 'I am glad that I have returned without broken bones, but never will I drive a religious Horse again. ' ...
Persons who go to places of worship from mere habit and without entering into the devotions of the service, may here see that their religion is only such as a Horse may possess, and a Horse's religion will never save a man
Pastern - ) The part of the foot of the Horse, and allied animals, between the fetlock and the coffin joint. of Horse. ) A shackle for Horses while pasturing
Colt - COLT is applied in the Bible not to the young Horse, but to the young ass, and once ( Genesis 32:15 ) to the young camel. Outside the Bible it is not applied to the young of any animal but the Horse
Plater - ) A Horse that runs chiefly in plate, esp. selling-plate, races; hence, an inferior race Horse
Caballo - ) A Horse
Susi - Horse; swallow; moth
Hipparion - ) An extinct genus of Tertiary mammals allied to the Horse, but three-toed, having on each foot a small lateral hoof on each side of the main central one. It is believed to be one of the ancestral genera of the Horse family
Prance - ) To spring or bound, as a Horse in high mettle. ) To ride on a prancing Horse; to ride in an ostentatious manner
Foal - ) The young of any animal of the Horse family (Equidae); a colt; a filly. ) To bring forth young, as an animal of the Horse kind
Mule, - a hybrid animal, the offspring of a Horse and an ass. "The mule is smaller than the Horse, and is a remarkably hardy, patient, obstinate, sure-footed animal, living, ordinarily, twice as long as a Horse
Biga - ) A two-horse chariot
Hippotomy - ) Anatomy of the Horse
Encolure - ) The neck of Horse
Jibber - ) A Horse that jibs
Horse - Horse. No mention is made of Horses as forming any part of the possessions of the patriarchs; nor are any noticed among the presents Abraham received from the kings of Egypt and Gerar. The Horse was probably not in those early times used except for military purposes; indeed we find scarcely an allusion in Scripture to its employment for the farm or any ordinary domestic service. Once the Horse is said to tread out some species of corn, Isaiah 28:28; but it is a war-horse, strong and fierce, that is poetically described in Genesis 12:16
Cronet - ) The coronet of a Horse
Pannade - ) The curvet of a Horse
Trappures - ) Trappings for a Horse
Tuscor - ) A tush of a Horse
Allop - ) To move or run in the mode called a gallop; as a Horse; to go at a gallop; to run or move with speed. ) To ride a Horse at a gallop. ) A mode of running by a quadruped, particularly by a Horse, by lifting alternately the fore feet and the hind feet, in successive leaps or bounds
Crupper - ) To fit with a crupper; to place a crupper upon; as, to crupper a Horse. ) A leather loop, passing under a Horse's tail, and buckled to the saddle to keep it from slipping forwards. ) The buttocks or rump of a Horse
Horse-Gate - Horse-GATE
Rouncy - ) A common hackney Horse; a nag
Jennet - ) A small Spanish Horse; a genet
Sisera - That sees a Horse or a swallow
Courser - ) A swift or spirited Horse; a racer or a war Horse; a charger
Horseman - ba'al parash, "master of a Horse. " The "horsemen" mentioned Exodus 14:9 were "mounted men", i. (See Horse
Riderless - ) Having no rider; as, a riderless Horse
Ambler - ) A Horse or a person that ambles
Balky - ) Apt to balk; as, a balky Horse
Equine - ) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a Horse
Cheval - ) A Horse; hence, a support or frame
Shoulder-Shotten - ) Sprained in the shoulder, as a Horse
Yawd - ) A jade; an old Horse or mare
Rackabones - a Horse
Torril - ) A worthless woman; also, a worthless Horse
Ambler - ) A Horse or a person that ambles
Jurel - ) A yellow carangoid fish of the Atlantic and Gulf coasts (Caranx chrysos), most abundant southward, where it is valued as a food fish; - called also hardtail, Horse crevalle, jack, buffalo jack, skipjack, yellow mackerel, and sometimes, improperly, Horse mackerel
Hippocampus - ) A fabulous monster, with the head and fore quarters of a Horse joined to the tail of a dolphin or other fish (Hippocampus brevirostris), - seen in Pompeian paintings, attached to the chariot of Neptune. ) A genus of lophobranch fishes of several species in which the head and neck have some resemblance to those of a Horse; - called also sea Horse
Hackney - ) A Horse for riding or driving; a nag; a pony. ) A Horse or pony kept for hire. ) To devote to common or frequent use, as a Horse or carriage; to wear out in common service; to make trite or commonplace; as, a hackneyed metaphor or quotation
Chamfron - ) The frontlet, or head armor, of a Horse
Crib-Biter - ) A Horse that has the habit of cribbing
Shabrack - ) The saddlecloth or housing of a cavalry Horse
Footcloth - ) Formerly, a housing or caparison for a Horse
Barebacked - ) Having the back uncovered; as, a barebacked Horse
Uffaw - ) A loud burst of laughter; a Horse laugh
Hippogriff - ) A fabulous winged animal, half Horse and half griffin
Brills - ) The hair on the eyelids of a Horse
Caple - ) A Horse; a nag
Broken-Winded - ) Having short breath or disordered respiration, as a Horse
Broncho - ) A native or a Mexican Horse of small size
Equus - ) A genus of mammals, including the Horse, ass, etc
Wither-Wrung - ) Injured or hurt in the withers, as a Horse
Tangun - ) A piebald variety of the Horse, native of Thibet
Restiff - ) A restive or stubborn Horse
Jossa - ) A command to a Horse, probably meaning "stand still
Lademan - ) One who leads a pack Horse; a miller's servant
Sallenders - ) An eruption on the hind leg of a Horse
Bathorse - ) A Horse which carries an officer's baggage during a campaign
Ridable - ) Suitable for riding; as, a ridable Horse; a ridable road
Poitrel - ) The breastplate of the armor of a Horse
Hippopathology - ) The science of veterinary medicine; the pathology of the Horse
Zebrinny - ) A cross between a male Horse and a female zebra
Zebrule - ) A cross between a male zebra and a female Horse
Pontlevis - ) The action of a Horse in rearing repeatedly and dangerously
Cavort - ) To prance ostentatiously; - said of a Horse or his rider
Caballine - ) Of or pertaining to a Horse
Pacer - ) One who, or that which, paces; especially, a Horse that paces
Esculic - ) Pertaining to, or obtained from, the Horse-chestnut; as, esculic acid
Hippobosca - ) A genus of dipterous insects including the Horsefly or Horse tick
Fourfooted - Quadruped having four feet as the Horse and the ox
Deer-Neck - ) A deerlike, or thin, ill-formed neck, as of a Horse
Wire-Heel - ) A disease in the feet of a Horse or other beast
Unbear - ) To remove or loose the bearing rein of (a Horse)
Mettlesome - ) Full of spirit; possessing constitutional ardor; fiery; as, a mettlesome Horse
Water Deck - A covering of painting canvas for the equipments of a dragoon's Horse
Tarpan - ) A wild Horse found in the region of the Caspian Sea
Wind-Sucker - ) A Horse given to wind-sucking...
Off - Most distant as the off Horse in a team
Ash'Penaz - (horse-nose ), the master of the eunuchs of Nebuchadnezzar
Bombylious - ) Buzzing, like a bumblebee; as, the bombylious noise of the Horse fly
Hippolith - ) A concretion, or kind of bezoar, from the intestines of the Horse
Pseudo-Monocotyledonous - ) Having two coalescent cotyledons, as the live oak and the Horse-chestnut
Roughshod - ) Shod with shoes armed with points or calks; as, a roughshod Horse
Rataplan - ) The iterative sound of beating a drum, or of a galloping Horse
Dobbin - ) An old jaded Horse
High-Strung - ) Strung to a high pitch; spirited; sensitive; as, a high-strung Horse
Astraddle - ) In a straddling position; astride; bestriding; as, to sit astraddle a Horse
Rocking-Horse - ) The figure of a Horse, mounted upon rockers, for children to ride
Ibber - ) A balky Horse
Jards - ) A callous tumor on the leg of a Horse, below the hock
Montrue - ) That on which anything is mounted; a setting; hence, a saddle Horse
Hard-Mouthed - ) Not sensible to the bit; not easily governed; as, a hard-mouthed Horse
Scatch - ) A kind of bit for the bridle of a Horse; - called also scatchmouth
Dennet - ) A light, open, two-wheeled carriage for one Horse; a kind of gig
Trout-Colored - ) White, with spots of black, bay, or sorrel; as, a trout-colored Horse
Racker - ) A Horse that has a racking gait
Logy - ) Heavy or dull in respect to motion or thought; as, a logy Horse
Keratogenous - ) Producing horn; as, the keratogenous membrane within the horny hoof of the Horse
Lariat - one with a noose; - used as a lasso for catching cattle, Horses, etc. , and for picketing a Horse so that he can graze without wandering. ) To secure with a lariat fastened to a stake, as a Horse or mule for grazing; also, to lasso or catch with a lariat
Paviin - ) A glucoside found in species of the genus Pavia of the Horse-chestnut family
Testiere - ) A piece of plate armor for the head of a war Horse; a tester
Bleyme - ) An inflammation in the foot of a Horse, between the sole and the bone
Croupade - ) A leap in which the Horse pulls up his hind legs toward his belly
Finnikin - ) A variety of pigeon, with a crest somewhat resembling the mane of a Horse
Fleetness - ) Swiftness; rapidity; velocity; celerity; speed; as, the fleetness of a Horse or of time
Barded - ) Accoutered with defensive armor; - said of a Horse
Zain - ) A Horse of a dark color, neither gray nor white, and having no spots
Crup - ) See Croup, the rump of a Horse
Canuck - ) A small or medium-sized hardy Horse, common in Canada
Bobtail - ) An animal (as a Horse or dog) with a short tail
Hayrake - ) A rake for collecting hay; especially, a large rake drawn by a Horse or Horses
Bareback - ) On the bare back of a Horse, without using a saddle; as, to ride bareback
Alloway - ) A small Horse of a breed raised at Galloway, Scotland; - called also garran, and garron
Enet - ) A small-sized, well-proportioned, Spanish Horse; a jennet
Precrural - ) Situated in front of the leg or thigh; as, the precrural glands of the Horse
White-Foot - ) A white mark on the foot of a Horse, between the fetlock and the coffin
Laminitis - ) Inflammation of the laminae or fleshy plates along the coffin bone of a Horse; founder
Canter - ) To cause, as a Horse, to go at a canter; to ride (a Horse) at a canter
Lather - ) To form lather, or a froth like lather; to accumulate foam from profuse sweating, as a Horse. ) Foam from profuse sweating, as of a Horse
Harness - ) Originally, the complete dress, especially in a military sense, of a man or a Horse; hence, in general, armor. ) The equipment of a draught or carriage Horse, for drawing a wagon, coach, chaise, etc. ) To dress in armor; to equip with armor for war, as a Horseman; to array. ) To make ready for draught; to equip with harness, as a Horse
Curtal - ) A Horse with a docked tail; hence, anything cut short
Pung - ) A kind of plain sleigh drawn by one Horse; originally, a rude oblong box on runners
Water Radish - A coarse yellow-flowered plant (Nasturtium amphibium) related to the water cress and to the Horse-radish
Manageable - ) Such as can be managed or used; suffering control; governable; tractable; subservient; as, a manageable Horse
Aubin - ) A broken gait of a Horse, between an amble and a gallop; - commonly called a Canterbury gallop
Cavally - ) A carangoid fish of the Atlantic coast (Caranx hippos): - called also Horse crevalle
Chak - ) To toss up the head frequently, as a Horse to avoid the restraint of the bridle
Plaguy - ) Vexatious; troublesome; tormenting; as, a plaguy Horse
Singletree - ) The pivoted or swinging bar to which the traces of a harnessed Horse are fixed; a whiffletree
Ebrillade - ) A bridle check; a jerk of one rein, given to a Horse when he refuses to turn
Rein - ) The strap of a bridle, fastened to the curb or snaffle on each side, by which the rider or driver governs the Horse. ) To govern or direct with the reins; as, to rein a Horse one way or another
Chest Founder - A rheumatic affection of the muscles of the breast and fore legs of a Horse, affecting motion and respiration
Bobtailed - ) Having the tail cut short, or naturally short; curtailed; as, a bobtailed Horse or dog; a bobtailed coat
Backband - ) The band which passes over the back of a Horse and holds up the shafts of a carriage
Esculin - ) A glucoside obtained from the Aesculus hippocastanum, or Horse-chestnut, and characterized by its fine blue fluorescent solutions
High-Stepper - ) A Horse that moves with a high step or proud gait; hence, a person having a proud bearing
Estrapade - ) The action of a Horse, when, to get rid of his rider, he rears, plunges, and kicks furiously
Alloping - ) Going at a gallop; progressing rapidly; as, a galloping Horse
White-Face - ) A white mark in the forehead of a Horse, descending almost to the nose; - called also white-blaze
Full-Blooded - ) Of pure blood; thoroughbred; as, a full-blooded Horse
Pinto - , a pied or "painted" Horse
Jadish - ) Vicious; ill-tempered; resembling a jade; - applied to a Horse
Koulan - ) A wild Horse (Equus, / Asinus, onager) inhabiting the plants of Central Asia; - called also gour, khur, and onager
Mustang - ) The half-wild Horse of the plains in Mexico, California, etc
Horse - The Horse was probably first domesticated by nomads of Central Asia as long ago as 4,000 years. Babylonians began using Horses in battle. Military victories such as those of Genghis Khan or Alexander the Great would have been impossible without Horses. When the Exodus occurred, Pharaoh's army was outfitted with Horses and chariots (Exodus 14-15 ). Herodutus reported the use of Horses by the Persians in their postal system 3,000 years ago. These were sufficient for about 450 Horses. ...
The Horse was used for war by Syrians (1 Kings 20:20 ), the Philistines (2 Samuel 1:6 ), the Medes and Persians (Jeremiah 50:42 ), and the Romans (Acts 23:23 ,Acts 23:23,23:32 ). By contrast, and as a sign of the peacefulness of the Messiah's kingdom, Jesus rode into Jerusalem upon an ass, not a Horse (John 12:12-15 ). ...
Considerable opposition to the Horse arose in Israel, seeing Horses as symbols of pagan luxury and dependence on physical power for defense. Prophets condemned trusting in Horses rather than the Lord for victory (Isaiah 31:1 ; Ezekiel 17:15 ). Yet, Horses became so common in Jerusalem that a royal palace near the city had a special Horse gate (2 Chronicles 23:15 ) and a gate of the city was also called the Horse Gate (Jeremiah 31:40 ; Nehemiah 3:28 ). ...
Horses are often used as symbols of swiftness (Jeremiah 4:13 ), strength (Job 39:19 ), and sure-footedness (Isaiah 63:13 ). The most detailed description of a Horse is found in Job 39:19-25 . In prophecy Horses also play an important role as in Joel 2:4-5 and Revelation 6:1-8 where four Horses of different colors are associated with different tragedies
Founder - ) A lameness in the foot of a Horse, occasioned by inflammation; closh. ) To cause internal inflammation and soreness in the feet or limbs of (a Horse), so as to disable or lame him. ) To fall; to stumble and go lame, as a Horse
Carryall - ) A light covered carriage, having four wheels and seats for four or more persons, usually drawn by one Horse
Thick Wind - A defect of respiration in a Horse, that is unassociated with noise in breathing or with the signs of emphysema
Orohippus - ) A genus of American Eocene mammals allied to the Horse, but having four toes in front and three behind
Malanders - ) A scurfy eruption in the bend of the knee of the fore leg of a Horse
Jackman - ) One wearing a jack; a Horse soldier; a retainer
Longe - ) The training ground for a Horse
Cribbing - ) A vicious habit of a Horse; crib-biting. The Horse lays hold of the crib or manger with his teeth and draws air into the stomach with a grunting sound
Colt - ) The young of the equine genus or Horse kind of animals; - sometimes distinctively applied to the male, filly being the female. ) To Horse; to get with young
Saccade - ) A sudden, violent check of a Horse by drawing or twitching the reins on a sudden and with one pull
Sitfast - ) A callosity with inflamed edges, on the back of a Horse, under the saddle
Favel - ) A Horse of a favel or dun color
Roach-Backed - ) Having a back like that of roach; - said of a Horse whose back a convex instead of a concave curve
Mesohippus - ) An extinct mammal of the Horse family, but not larger than a sheep, and having three toes on each foot
Cariole - ) A small, light, open one-horse carriage...
(3):...
(n
Pesade - ) The motion of a Horse when, raising his fore quarters, he keeps his hind feet on the ground without advancing; rearing
Dappled - ) Marked with spots of different shades of color; spotted; variegated; as, a dapple Horse
Sidebone - ) A morbid growth or deposit of bony matter and at the sides of the coronet and coffin bone of a Horse
Fractious - ) Apt to break out into a passion; apt to scold; cross; snappish; ugly; unruly; as, a fractious man; a fractious Horse
Motorize - ) To substitute motor-driven vehicles, or automobiles, for the Horses and Horse-drawn vehicles of (a fire department, city, etc
Trave - ) A wooden frame to confine an unruly Horse or ox while shoeing
Jolt - ) To cause to shake with a sudden up and down motion, as in a carriage going over rough ground, or on a high-trotting Horse; as, the Horse jolts the rider; fast driving jolts the carriage and the passengers
Alisanders - ) A name given to two species of the genus Smyrnium, formerly cultivated and used as celery now is; - called also Horse parsely
Calade - ) A slope or declivity in a manege ground down which a Horse is made to gallop, to give suppleness to his haunches
Pliohippus - ) An extinct genus of Horses from the Pliocene deposits. Each foot had a single toe (or hoof), as in the common Horse
Sisera - (Judges 4:1-24;Judges 5:1-31) Some derive his name from Susraah, to see an Horse
Short-Jointed - ) Having short intervals between the joints; - said of a plant or an animal, especially of a Horse whose pastern is too short
Mollebart - ) An agricultural implement used in Flanders, consisting of a kind of large shovel drawn by a Horse and guided by a man
Miohippus - ) An extinct Miocene mammal of the Horse family, closely related to the genus Anhithecrium, and having three usable hoofs on each foot
Wind-Sucking - ) A vicious habit of a Horse, consisting in the swallowing of air; - usually associated with crib-biting, or cribbing
Horse-Leech - Solomon says, "The Horse-leech hath two daughters, Give, give. Thus Plautus makes one say, speaking of the determination to get money, "I will turn myself into a Horse-leech, and suck out their blood;" and Cicero, in one of his letters to Atticus, calls the common people of Rome Horse-leeches of the treasury. As the Horse-leech had two daughters, cruelty and thirst of blood, which cannot be satisfied, so the oppressor of the poor has two dispositions, rapacity and avarice, which, never say they have enough, but continually demand additional gratifications
Mule - A mixed animal, the offspring of a Horse and an ass. A mule is smaller than a Horse, and has long ears, though not so long as those of an ass. It is a remarkably hardy, patient, obstinate, surefooted animal, lives twice as long as a Horse, and is much more easily and cheaply fed. So also in the Alps, they are used by travelers among the mountains, where a Horse would hardly be able to pass with safety
Pale - 1: χλωρός (Strong's #5515 — Adjective — chloros — khlo-ros' ) "pale green," is translated "pale" (of a Horse) in Revelation 6:8 , symbolizing death
Bucker - ) A Horse or mule that bucks
Crapaudine - ) An ulcer on the coronet of a Horse
ha, ha - The war-horse answers the trumpet with Ha, Ha: he is ready
Demivolt - ) A half vault; one of the seven artificial motions of a Horse, in which he raises his fore legs in a particular manner
Windgall - ) A soft tumor or synovial swelling on the fetlock joint of a Horse; - so called from having formerly been supposed to contain air
Cart - A carriage with two wheels, fitted to be drawn by one Horse, or by a yoke of oxen, and used in husbandry or commercial cities for carrying heavy commodities. In Great Britain, carts are usually drawn by Horses. In America, Horse-carts are used mostly in cities, and ox-carts in the country
Runaway - ; as, runaway soldiers; a runaway Horse. of a Horse or teams; as, there was a runaway yesterday
Rider - One who is borne on a Horse or other beast, or in a vehicle. One who breaks or manages a Horse
Perissodactyla - ) A division of ungulate mammals, including those that have an odd number of toes, as the Horse, tapir, and rhinoceros; - opposed to Artiodactyla
Unhitch - ) To free from being hitched, or as if from being hitched; to unfasten; to loose; as, to unhitch a Horse, or a trace
Charger - A Horse used for attack
Centaur - ) A fabulous being, represented as half man and half Horse
Unsaddle - ) To throw from the saddle; to unhorse. ) To strip of a saddle; to take the saddle from, as a Horse
Falcade - ) The action of a Horse, when he throws himself on his haunches two or three times, bending himself, as it were, in very quick curvets
Barbary - Hence: A Barbary Horse; a barb
Totalizator - ) A machine for registering and indicating the number and nature of bets made on Horse races, as in Australia and South Africa
Rogginess - ) Tenderness or stiffness in the foot of a Horse, which causes him to move in a hobbling manner
Lampas - ) An inflammation and swelling of the soft parts of the roof of the mouth immediately behind the fore teeth in the Horse; - called also lampers
Botfly - ) A dipterous insect of the family (Estridae, of many different species, some of which are particularly troublesome to domestic animals, as the Horse, ox, and sheep, on which they deposit their eggs. A common species is one of the botflies of the Horse (Gastrophilus equi), the larvae of which (bots) are taken into the stomach of the animal, where they live several months and pass through their larval states
Froth - ) To throw up or out spume, foam, or bubbles; to foam; as beer froths; a Horse froths. ) To cover with froth; as, a Horse froths his chain
Crestfallen - ) Having the crest, or upper part of the neck, hanging to one side; - said of a Horse
Hazar-Susah - Village of the Horse, the same as Sansannah, one of Solomon's "chariot cities" (Joshua 15:31 ; 2 Chronicles 1:14 ), a depot in the south border of Judah
Capellet - ) A swelling, like a wen, on the point of the elbow (or the heel of the hock) of a Horse, caused probably by bruises in lying down
Saddle-Backed - ) Having a low back and high neck, as a Horse
Loper - , a Horse that lopes
Horse - In the NT, as in the OT, the Horse is always the war-horse, never the gentle, domesticated creature beloved by the modern Arab. Paul, it usually represents him as falling from an affrighted Horse to the earth. His task and his spirit were warlike-he was breathing threatening and slaughter-and he may have taken a small troop of Horsemen with him. Strict Pharisees, however, never rode on Horseback, and it is at least as likely that he and his companions were mounted on asses or mules. Paul was arrested in Jerusalem, and had to be taken beyond the reach of conspirators, he was escorted to Caesarea by a company of 70 Horsemen (Acts 23:23; Acts 23:32). Josephus makes repeated reference to an ala of Sebastian and Caesarean Horsemen that was attached to the auxiliary cohorts (see Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. ) uses the bridling of the Horse, whose ‘whole body’ is thereby turned at the rider’s pleasure, to illustrate the complete self-control which a man achieves by merely bridling his lips. ...
(4) The Horse is conspicuous in the symbolism of the Apocalypse (15 references). Whether he belongs to the Church militant, or to some worldly power, or to the under world, he is always the war-horse-always ‘prepared unto battle’ or ‘running to battle’ (Revelation 9:7; Revelation 9:9). When he appears, we expect to see the rider’s drawn sword (Revelation 19:21); we are not surprised at the sight of blood; and in one gruesome scene the deep pools of gore come up to the Horses’ bridles (Revelation 14:20). A white Horse represents victory, a red Horse carnage, a black Horse famine, and a pale Horse death (Revelation 6:2-8). A host of fiendish mounted Horses, 200,000,000 strong, armed with breastplates of red, blue, and yellow (of fire and hyacinth and brimstone, Revelation 9:17), are more like the steeds of those heavy-armed Parthians who appeared at Carrhae ‘with their helmets and breastplates flashing with flame … and the Horses equipped with mail of brass and iron’ (Plut. But these fiend-horses are monsters, which have the heads of lions, and breathe fire and smoke and brimstone (cf. Against the armies of earth and Hades Christ comes forth from the opened heavens sitting on a white Horse, and all His followers ride on white Horses and are clad in white uniform (Revelation 19:11; Revelation 19:14). The combined forces of evil make war in vain against this Rider and His Horsemen (Revelation 19:19), who are, in the phrase of a later time, Knights of the Holy Ghost
Bidet - ) A small Horse formerly allowed to each trooper or dragoon for carrying his baggage
Currycomb - ) A kind of card or comb having rows of metallic teeth or serrated ridges, used in currying a Horse
Saurel - Called also skipjack, and Horse mackerel
Flea-Bitten - ) White, flecked with minute dots of bay or sorrel; - said of the color of a Horse
Buckeye - ) A name given to several American trees and shrubs of the same genus (Aesculus) as the Horse chestnut
Blinder - ) One of the leather screens on a bridle, to hinder a Horse from seeing objects at the side; a blinker
Chaunter - ) A deceitful, tricky dealer or Horse jockey
Hough, to - To lame a Horse and render it useless by cutting the sinews of the hind leg, called the hamstring
Pachydermata - ) A group of hoofed mammals distinguished for the thickness of their skins, including the elephant, hippopotamus, rhinoceros, tapir, Horse, and hog
Dogcart - ) A light one-horse carriage, commonly two-wheeled, patterned after a cart
Walk-Over - ) In racing, the going over a course by a Horse which has no competitor for the prize; hence, colloquially, a one-sided contest; an uncontested, or an easy, victory
Tipster - for use in gambling upon the probable outcome of events, as Horse races
Remount - ) The opportunity of, or things necessary for, remounting; specifically, a fresh Horse, with his equipments; as, to give one a remount
Thill - ) One of the two long pieces of wood, extending before a vehicle, between which a Horse is hitched; a shaft
Hough - The Horse taken by David from the Syrians were thus disabled, Joshua 11:6,9 ; 2 Samuel 8:4
ba'Jith - (the Horse ), referring to the "temple" of the false gods of Moab, as opposed to the "high places" in the same sentence
Rocker - ) A play Horse on rockers; a rocking-horse
Kick - KICK, To strike with the foot as, a Horse kicks a servant a man kicks a dog. ...
KICK, To practice striking with the foot or feet as a Horse accustomed to kick
Archippus - Master of the Horse, a "fellow-soldier" of Paul's (Philippians 1:2 ), whom he exhorts to renewed activity (Colossians 4:17 )
Cursorial - ) Adapted to running or walking, and not to prehension; as, the limbs of the Horse are cursorial
Charger - ) A Horse for battle or parade
Neigh - The loud, prolonged cry of a Horse used as a figure of approaching battle (Jeremiah 8:16 ) or of unbridled sexual desire (Jeremiah 5:8 ; Jeremiah 13:27 ; Jeremiah 50:11 )
Pirouette - ) The whirling about of a Horse
Pupipara - It includes the sheep tick, Horse tick, and other parasites
Welsher - ) One who cheats at a Horse race; one who bets, without a chance of being able to pay; one who receives money to back certain Horses and absconds with it
Trammeled - ) Having blazes, or white marks, on the fore and hind foot of one side, as if marked by trammels; - said of a Horse
Roarer - ) A Horse subject to roaring
Turfy - ) Of or pertaining to the turf, or Horse racing
Archip'Pus - (master of the Horse ), a Christian teacher in Colossae, ( Colossians 4:17 ) called by St
Horse - The Horse was used among the Israelites only for war, either in chariots or for what is now called cavalry; but its use betokened failure in confidence on the Lord: see Hosea 14:3 . They had been forbidden to multiply Horses, Deuteronomy 17:16 ; and at first they hamstrung the Horses, and burnt the chariots of the Canaanites. David, however, after the defeat of Hadadezer, reserved 100 Horses for chariots. (See a description of the war-horse in Job 39:19-25 . ) Solomon had 40,000 stalls of Horses for his chariots and 12,000 Horsemen. ...
Symbolically the Horse represents careering imperial power, in general providentially controlled. In the early part of Zechariah the prophet had visions of Horses of different colours, they are called spirits of the heavens, and as such they acted in the four great Gentile empires described by Daniel. When these are further spoken of, the red Horses are not named, for the Chaldean empire had passed away when Zechariah saw the vision. ...
In the Revelation also there are Horses and riders thereon, representing the powers engaged in the providential course of God's dealings. In Revelation 19 the Lord Jesus, the Faithful and True, comes forth on a white Horse, to make war in righteousness
Bots - ) The larvae of several species of botfly, especially those larvae which infest the stomach, throat, or intestines of the Horse, and are supposed to be the cause of various ailments
Hamshackle - ) To fasten (an animal) by a rope binding the head to one of the fore legs; as, to hamshackle a Horse or cow; hence, to bind or restrain; to curb
Forehand - ) All that part of a Horse which is before the rider
Trotter - ) One that trots; especially, a Horse trained to be driven in trotting matches
Willful - ) Governed by the will without yielding to reason; obstinate; perverse; inflexible; stubborn; refractory; as, a willful man or Horse
Mercies (Temporal): an Argument - If the Lord has enriched you in temporals, though you have not feared him, have you not every reason to expect that he will do as well for you in spirituals, if you ask him to do so? You call at a friend's house on Horseback; he takes your Horse into the stable, and is remarkably attentive to it; the creature is well groomed, well housed, well fed; you are not at all afraid that you will be shut out, there is surely a warm place in the parlour for the rider, where the Horse is so well accommodated in the stable. Now, your body, which we may liken to the Horse, has enjoyed temporal prosperity in abundance, and surely the Lord will take care of your soul if you seek his face! Let your prayer be,' My God, my Father, be my guide
Blain - ) A bladder growing on the root of the tongue of a Horse, against the windpipe, and stopping the breath
Susi - (ssyoo' ssi) A personal name meaning, “my Horse
Quercitin - ) A yellow crystalline substance, occurring quite widely distributed in the vegetable kingdom, as is apple-tree bark, Horse-chestnut leaves, etc
Light-Horseman - ) A soldier who serves in the light Horse
Coronary Cushion - A cushionlike band of vascular tissue at the upper border of the wall of the hoof of the Horse and allied animals
Buggy - ) A light one Horse two-wheeled vehicle
Appui - ) The mutual bearing or support of the hand of the rider and the mouth of the Horse through the bit and bridle
Coacher - ) A coach Horse
Pedigree - ) A record of the lineage or strain of an animal, as of a Horse
Pony - ) A small Horse
Horse - The Horses represent Christians who have come to full growth even perhaps those who have already been taken to Heaven. ...
The Horses in Zechariah 1,6 probably represent great movements wrought by GOD in dealing with men. ...
Zechariah 6:2 (b) The red Horse - a type of the destructive power of war. ...
Zechariah 6:3 (b) The black Horse - represents world-wide famine which naturally follows great wars both international and internal. ...
Zechariah 6:3 (b) Bay Horse - probably represents the scourge of pestilence and disease which follows upon the famine that follows the war. ...
Zechariah 6:3 (b) The white Horse - probably represents a man-made peace which will be forced upon the world by the antichrist under the guise of religion and righteousness. ...
Revelation 19:11 (b) The white Horse - typical of the great power which the Lord JESUS will exhibit in righteousness and justice when He comes forth from Heaven as the Almighty Conqueror
Horse - The most striking feature in the biblical notices of the Horse is the exclusive application of it to warlike operations; in no instance is that useful animal employed for the purposes of ordinary locomotion or agriculture, if we except (Isaiah 28:28 ) The animated description of the Horse in (Job 39:19-25 ) applies solely to the war-horse. The Hebrews in the patriarchal age, as a pastoral race, did not stand in need of the services Of the Horse, and for a long period after their settlement in Canaan they dispensed with it, partly in consequence of the hilly nature of the country, which only admitted of the use of chariots in certain localities, (Judges 1:19 ) and partly in consequence to the prohibition in (17:16) which would be held to apply at all periods. David first established a force of cavalry and chariots, (2 Samuel 8:4 ) but the great supply of Horses was subsequently effected by Solomon through his connection with Egypt. (1 Kings 4:26 ) Solomon also established a very active trade in Horses, which were brought by dealers out of Egypt and resold, at a profit, to the Hittites. With regard to the trappings and management of the Horse we have little information. The bridle was placed over the Horse's nose, (Isaiah 30:28 ) and a bit or curb is also mentioned. The Horses were not shod, and therefore hoofs are hard "as flint," (Isaiah 5:28 ) were regarded as a great merit. The chariot-horses were covered with embroidered trappings (Ezekiel 27:20 ) Horses and chariots were used also in idolatrous processions, as noticed in regard to the sun
Chestnut - ) One of the round, or oval, horny plates on the inner sides of the legs of the Horse, and allied animals. ) The Horse chestnut (often so used in England)
Dromedary - It is distinguished from the camel only as a trained saddle-horse is distinguished from a cart-horse
Curry - ) To dress the hair or coat of (a Horse, ox, or the like) with a currycomb and brush; to comb, as a Horse, in order to make clean
Bit - The metal bar fastened to the muzzle end of the Horse's bridle. The bit is inserted in the Horse's mouth between the teeth and is used to control the Horse. Some bits from the biblical period have spikes which would have stuck in the side of the Horse's mouth when the reins were applied; the pain made the Horse more responsive to the rider's commands
Jaw - They are compared to a Horse. GOD's power controls them as a driver controls the Horse by the bit and the bridle
Manage - of a Horse; management; administration. ) To train in the manege, as a Horse; to exercise in graceful or artful action
Hobbler - ) One who by his tenure was to maintain a Horse for military service; a kind of light Horseman in the Middle Ages who was mounted on a hobby
Albicore - One species (Orcynus thynnus), common in the Mediterranean and Atlantic, is called in New England the Horse mackerel; the tunny
Larrikin - ) A rowdy street loafer; a rowdyish or noisy ill-bred fellow; - variously applied, as to a street blackguard, a street Arab, a youth given to Horse-play, etc
Javelin - A sort of spear about five feet and a half long, the shaft of which was of wood, but pointed with steel used by Horse or foot
Chaise - It is usually drawn by one Horse
Greyhound - This is literally 'girt in the loins,' and reads in the margin 'horse. It probably refers to a girded warhorse as something that 'goes well,' and is comely or stately in its going
Escapade - ) The fling of a Horse, or ordinary kicking back of his heels; a gambol
Watt - An English Horse power is approximately equal to 746 watts
Washy - ) Not firm or hardy; liable to sweat profusely with labor; as, a washy Horse
Volante - The body is in front of the axle; the driver rides on the Horse
Brisket - ) That part of the breast of an animal which extends from the fore legs back beneath the ribs; also applied to the fore part of a Horse, from the shoulders to the bottom of the chest
Poster - ) A post Horse
Barbed - ) Accoutered with defensive armor; - said of a Horse
Footrope - ) The rope rigged below a yard, upon which men stand when reefing or furling; - formerly called a Horse
Ballotade - ) A leap of a Horse, as between two pillars, or upon a straight line, so that when his four feet are in the air, he shows only the shoes of his hind feet, without jerking out
Ambrel - ) The hind leg of a Horse. ) A stick crooked like a Horse's hind leg; - used by butchers in suspending slaughtered animals
Hunter - A Horse used in the chase
Scot - ) A name for a Horse
Horse - The war-horse is described Job 39:19-25 . For a long period after their settlement in Canaan the Israelites made no use of Horses, according to the prohibition, Deuteronomy 17:16 . After this, Horses were freely used in Israel (1 Kings 22:4 ; 2 Kings 3:7 ; 9:21,33 ; 11:16 ). The furniture of the Horse consisted simply of a bridle (Isaiah 30:28 ) and a curb (Psalm 32:9 )
Dismount - ) To alight from a Horse; to descend or get off, as a rider from his beast; as, the troops dismounted. ) To throw or remove from a Horse; to unhorse; as, the soldier dismounted his adversary
Troop - ) Specifically, a small body of cavalry, light Horse, or dragoons, consisting usually of about sixty men, commanded by a captain; the unit of formation of cavalry, corresponding to the company in infantry. Formerly, also, a company of Horse artillery; a battery
Querl - ) A coil; a twirl; as, the qwerl of hair on the fore leg of a blooded Horse
Roggy - ) Moving in a hobbling manner, owing to ten der feet; - said of a Horse
Ringer - ) A Horse that is not entitled to take part in a race, but is fraudulently got into it
Sea Horse - (1):...
A fabulous creature, half Horse and half fish, represented in classic mythology as driven by sea dogs or ridden by the Nereids
Fraxin - ) A colorless crystalline substance, regarded as a glucoside, and found in the bark of the ash (Fraxinus) and along with esculin in the bark of the Horse-chestnut
Equitant - ) Mounted on, or sitting upon, a Horse; riding on Horseback
Tchick - ) A slight sound such as that made by pressing the tongue against the roof of the mouth and explosively sucking out the air at one side, as in urging on a Horse
Tittup - ) To behave or move in a lively or restless manner, as an impatient Horse; to caper; to prance; to frisk
Thoroughbred - ) Bred from the best blood through a long line; pure-blooded; - said of stock, as Horses. ) A thoroughbred animal, especially a Horse
Tacky - ) An ill-conditioned, ill-fed, or neglected Horse; also, a person in a like condition
Lope - ) To move with a lope, as a Horse
Lunge - ) To cause to go round in a ring, as a Horse, while holding his halter
Cataphract - ) Defensive armor used for the whole body and often for the Horse, also, esp. ) A Horseman covered with a cataphract
Bullet - ) The fetlock of a Horse
Torsion Meter - An instrument for determining the torque on a shaft, and hence the Horse power of an engine, esp
Sagittary - ) A centaur; a fabulous being, half man, half Horse, armed with a bow and quiver
Harness - Armor the whole accouterments or equipments of a knight or Horseman originally perhaps defensive armor, but in a more modern and enlarged sense, the furniture of a military man,or offensive, as a casque, cuirass,helmet, girdle, sword,buckler, &c. The furniture of a draught Horse, whether for a wagon, coach, gig, chaise, &c. H`ARNESS, To dress in armor to equip with armor for war, as a Horseman. To put on the furniture of a Horse for draught. Harness the Horses
Trot - ) To cause to move, as a Horse or other animal, in the pace called a trot; to cause to run without galloping or cantering. ) The pace of a Horse or other quadruped, more rapid than a walk, but of various degrees of swiftness, in which one fore foot and the hind foot of the opposite side are lifted at the same time
Tout - ) To act as a tout; to tout, or give a tip on, a race Horse. ) To spy out information about, as a racing stable or Horse. ) To spy out the movements of race Horses at their trials, or to get by stealth or other improper means the secrets of the stable, for betting purposes. ) One who gives a tip on a race Horses for an expected compensation, esp. ) One who secretly watches race Horses which are in course of training, to get information about their capabilities, for use in betting. ) To give a tip on (a race Horse) to a better with the expectation of sharing in the latter's winnings
Ride - To be carried on Horseback, or on any beast, or in any vehicle. We ride on a Horse, on a camel, in a coach, chariot, wagon, &c. To manage a Horse well. To sit on, so as to be carried as, to ride a Horse. An excursion on Horseback or in a vehicle. A saddle Horse
Hoof - A cleft hoof as of neat cattle (Exodus 10:26 ; Ezekiel 32:13 ); hence also of the Horse, though not cloven (Isaiah 5:28 )
Bellyband - ) A band that passes under the belly of a Horse and holds the saddle or harness in place; a girth
Charbon - ) A very contagious and fatal disease of sheep, Horses, and cattle. ) A small black spot or mark remaining in the cavity of the corner tooth of a Horse after the large spot or mark has become obliterated
Mint - One of the trifles which were tithed; primarily, perhaps, peppermint ( Mentha piperita ), but including also allied plants, such as the Horse mint, ( M
Racer - , a race Horse
Moon-Eye - ) A eye affected by the moon; also, a disease in the eye of a Horse
Wind-Broken - ) Having the power of breathing impaired by the rupture, dilatation, or running together of air cells of the lungs, so that while the inspiration is by one effort, the expiration is by two; affected with pulmonary emphysema or with heaves; - said of a Horse
Hame - ) One of the two curved pieces of wood or metal, in the harness of a draught Horse, to which the traces are fastened. They are fitted upon the collar, or have pads fitting the Horse's neck attached to them
Pate - In fortification, a kind of platform resembling what is called a Horse shoe
Mint - The Horse mint, M
Tit - ) A small Horse
Moringa - One species (Moringa pterygosperma) is the Horse-radish tree, and its seeds, as well as those of M
Fetlock - ) The cushionlike projection, bearing a tuft of long hair, on the back side of the leg above the hoof of the Horse and similar animals
Ungula - ) A section or part of a cylinder, cone, or other solid of revolution, cut off by a plane oblique to the base; - so called from its resemblance to the hoof of a Horse
Ladino - ) A cunningly vicious Horse
Plunge - ) To pitch or throw one's self headlong or violently forward, as a Horse does. ) Heavy and reckless betting in Horse racing; hazardous speculation. ) The act of pitching or throwing one's self headlong or violently forward, like an unruly Horse
Calk - ) To furnish with calks, to prevent slipping on ice; as, to calk the shoes of a Horse or an ox. ) To wound with a calk; as when a Horse injures a leg or a foot with a calk on one of the other feet. ) A sharp-pointed piece of iron or steel projecting downward on the shoe of a Horse or an ox, to prevent the animal from slipping; - called also calker, calkin
Capriole - ) A leap that a Horse makes with all fours, upwards only, without advancing, but with a kick or jerk of the hind legs when at the height of the leap
Raker - ) A machine for raking grain or hay by Horse or other power
Jaw - They resemble a Horse shoe
Hack - ) To ride or drive as one does with a hack Horse; to ride at an ordinary pace, or over the roads, as distinguished from riding across country or in military fashion. ) A Horse, hackneyed or let out for common hire; also, a Horse used in all kinds of work, or a saddle Horse, as distinguished from hunting and carriage Horses
Cultivator - , a triangular frame set with small shares, drawn by a Horse and by handles
Sansannah - A town in the Negeb or south country (Joshua 15:31), also called Ηazar Susah or Susim , "horse court," i. "depot of Horses" (Joshua 19:5, compare 1 Chronicles 4:31). of Gaza, the first resting place for Horses from Gaza to Egypt
Foretop - , a tuft or lock of hair which hangs over the forehead, as of a Horse
Mire - ) To cause or permit to stick fast in mire; to plunge or fix in mud; as, to mire a Horse or wagon
Loftily - A Horse carries his head loftily
Horseman - A rider on a Horse. This association of Horsemen with armed forces perhaps sparked the use of the four riders of Revelation 6:2-8 as symbols of military conquest, war, economic injustice, and death and Hades
Aver - ) A work Horse, or working ox
Hades - In Revelation it is referred to as a creature on a Horse (Revelation 6:8)
Roofing - ) The wedging, as of a Horse or car, against the top of an underground passage
Thoroughpin - ) A disease of the hock (sometimes of the knee) of a Horse, caused by inflammation of the synovial membrane and a consequent excessive secretion of the synovial fluid; - probably so called because there is usually an oval swelling on each side of the leg, appearing somewhat as if a pin had been thrust through
Barb - ) The Barbary Horse, a superior breed introduced from Barbary into Spain by the Moors. ) Armor for a Horse. ) Paps, or little projections, of the mucous membrane, which mark the opening of the submaxillary glands under the tongue in Horses and cattle. ) A bit for a Horse
Horse-Leech - Horse-LEECH ( ‘aluqah , cf. The Horse-leech ( Hœmopis sanguisuga ) and the medicinal leech ( Hirudo medicinalis ) are very common in Palestine and are the cause of much trouble, even sickness and death, to man and beast
Cornet - A company of cavalry a troop of Horse. The cornet of a Horse coronet is the lowest part of his pastern, that runs round the coffin and is distinguished by the hair that joins and covers the upper part of the hoof
Ancestor - ) An earlier type; a progenitor; as, this fossil animal is regarded as the ancestor of the Horse
Bluefish - On the New Jersey and Rhode Island coast it is called the Horse mackerel, in Virginia saltwater tailor, or skipjack
Missing - My Horse is missing my pen or my book is missing
Rat-Tail - ) An excrescence growing from the pastern to the middle of the shank of a Horse
Skimmington - ) A word employed in the phrase, To ride Skimmington; that is to ride on a Horse with a woman, but behind her, facing backward, carrying a distaff, and accompanied by a procession of jeering neighbors making mock music; a cavalcade in ridicule of a henpecked man
Thyrsus - ) A species of inflorescence; a dense panicle, as in the lilac and Horse-chestnut
Wheeler - ) A wheel Horse
Override - ) To ride too much; to ride, as a Horse, beyond its strength
Outsider - ) A Horse which is not a favorite in the betting
Bean - Those most usually cultivated in Syria are the white Horse-bean, faba rotunda oblonga, and the kidney-bean, phaseolis minimus, fructu viridi ovato, called by the natives masch
Horsemen - 1: ἱππεύς (Strong's #2460 — Noun Masculine — hippeus — hip-yooce' ) "a Horseman," is used in the plural in Acts 23:23,32 . ...
2: ἱππικός (Strong's #2461 — Adjective — hippikos — hip-pee-kon' ) an adjective signifying "of a Horse" or "of Horsemen, equestrian," is used as a noun denoting "cavalry," in Revelation 9:16 , "horsemen," numbering "twice ten thousand times ten thousand," RV
Bridle - ) To put a bridle upon; to equip with a bridle; as, to bridle a Horse. ) The head gear with which a Horse is governed and restrained, consisting of a headstall, a bit, and reins, with other appendages
Neck - It is equivalent to the expression we use about the Horse, who "takes the bit in his teeth. " The Horse refuses to be guided by the driver
Bridle - The instrument with which a Horse is governed and restrained by a rider consisting of a head-stall, a bit, and reins, with other appendages, according to its particular form and uses. Bowline bridles are short legs or pieces of rope, running through iron thimbles,by which the bowline attaches to different places on the leech or edge of a large sail ...
BRI'DLE, To put on a bridle as, to bridle a Horse
Entle - ) Not wild, turbulent, or refractory; quiet and docile; tame; peaceable; as, a gentle Horse. ) To make kind and docile, as a Horse
Corner - Corner-teeth of a Horse, the foreteeth between the middling teeth and the tushes, two above and two below, on each side of the jaw, which shoot when the Horse is four years and a half old
Kick - , to strike backward, as a Horse does, or to have a habit of doing so. ) To strike, thrust, or hit violently with the foot; as, a Horse kicks a groom; a man kicks a dog
Leap - ) To cause to leap; as, to leap a Horse across a ditch. ) To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a Horse
Heavenward - My Horse invariably comes home in less time than he makes the journey out
Ass - asinus), smaller than the Horse, and having a peculiarly harsh bray and long ears
Cocktail - ) A Horse, not of pure breed, but having only one eighth or one sixteenth impure blood in his veins
Valuable - ) Having value or worth; possessing qualities which are useful and esteemed; precious; costly; as, a valuable Horse; valuable land; a valuable cargo
Flounder - ) To fling the limbs and body, as in making efforts to move; to struggle, as a Horse in the mire, or as a fish on land; to roll, toss, and tumble; to flounce
Bolter - : (a) A Horse which starts suddenly aside
Equipment - ; for carrying on business); Horse equipments; infantry equipments; naval equipments; laboratory equipments
Grape - In the manege, grapes signifies mangy tumors on the legs of a Horse
Hind - Backward pertaining to the part which follows in opposition to the fore part as the hind legs of a quadruped the hind toes the hind shoes of a Horse the hind part of an animal
Rebound - ) To bound again or repeatedly, as a Horse
Rowel - ) To insert a rowel, or roll of hair or silk, into (as the flesh of a Horse). , passed through the flesh of Horses, answering to a seton in human surgery. ) A little flat ring or wheel on Horses' bits
Moose - The adult male is about as large as a Horse, and has very large, palmate antlers
Trappings - Ornaments of Horse furniture
Greyhound - ) render it "war-horse
Mustard - Thomson has seen it there as tall as the Horse and his rider, and the ground near the Sea of Galilee is often "gilded over with its yellow flowers
Mash - A mixture for a Horse
Halter - ) A rope or strap, with or without a headstall, for leading or tying a Horse
Rape - ) A mangy tumor on the leg of a Horse
Roaring - ) An affection of the windpipe of a Horse, causing a loud, peculiar noise in breathing under exertion; the making of the noise so caused
Reasy - ) Affected with the disease called grease; as, the heels of a Horse
Rape - ) A mangy tumor on the leg of a Horse
Dope - ) To administer a stimulant to (a Horse) to increase his speed. ) Any preparation, as of opium, used to stupefy or, in the case of a race Horse, to stimulate. ) Information concerning the previous performances of race Horses, or other facts concerning them which may be of assistance in judging of their chances of winning future races; sometimes, similar information concerning other sports
Bit - The iron part of a bridle which is inserted in the mouth of a Horse,and its appendages, to which the reins are fastened. ...
BIT, To put a bridle upon a Horse to put the bit in the mouth
Hazar-Susah - (hay' zahr-ssyoo' ssuh) Place name meaning, “encampment of a Horse
Medardus, Saint - Represented with an eagle's wings spread over his head to protect him from rain and also with a Horse at his side
Mule - A quadruped of a mongrel breed,usually generated between an ass and a mare, sometimes between a Horse and a she-ass
Neigh - Jeremiah 5:8 (a) The Horse calls for his mate for he wishes companionship and association
Hippopotamus - Called also zeekoe, and river Horse
Plug - ) A worthless Horse
Filler - ) A thill Horse
Trestle - ) A movable frame or support for anything, as scaffolding, consisting of three or four legs secured to a top piece, and forming a sort of stool or Horse, used by carpenters, masons, and other workmen; also, a kind of framework of strong posts or piles, and crossbeams, for supporting a bridge, the track of a railway, or the like
Regiment - ) A body of men, either Horse, foot, or artillery, commanded by a colonel, and consisting of a number of companies, usually ten
Calico - ) Made of, or having the appearance of, calico; - often applied to an animal, as a Horse or cat, on whose body are large patches of a color strikingly different from its main color
Croup - ) The hinder part or buttocks of certain quadrupeds, especially of a Horse; hence, the place behind the saddle
Colt - The young of the equine genus of animals or Horse kind
Hippolytus, Saint - Racked and scourged, he was finally tied to the tail of a Horse and dragged to death
Tramway - ) A railway laid in the streets of a town or city, on which cars for passengers or for freight are drawn by Horses; a Horse railroad
Horse-Leech - Horse-leech, the adherer
Jockey - ) A professional rider of Horses in races. ) A dealer in Horses; a Horse trader
Posts - Special messengers in the East, sent on occasions of importance, when they rode swiftly, and in many cases with fresh Horses or dromedaries awaiting them at convenient distances, Esther 8:10-14 . Footrunners were also employed, 2 Samuel 18:22-27 ; and experienced runners will tire down and outrun a Horse on long journeys
Mount - ) A Horse. ) To get up on anything, as a platform or scaffold; especially, to seat one's self on a Horse for riding. ) To place one's self on, as a Horse or other animal, or anything that one sits upon; to bestride. ) To cause to mount; to put on Horseback; to furnish with animals for riding; to furnish with Horses
Bully - ) Fine; excellent; as, a bully Horse
Carts - The CHARIOT was drawn by Horses. There are scarcely any roads in Syria and Palestine, so that Horse carriages are almost unknown
Curvet - ) A particular leap of a Horse, when he raises both his fore legs at once, equally advanced, and, as his fore legs are falling, raises his hind legs, so that all his legs are in the air at once
Beans - The beans mentioned in the Bible (2 Samuel 17:28 ; Ezekiel 4:9 ) were the Horse or broad bean
Greyhound - Gesenius understands Proverbs 30:31 "a war Horse with ornamental trappings girt on its loins
Pannier - ) A bread basket; also, a wicker basket (used commonly in pairs) for carrying fruit or other things on a Horse or an ass...
(2):...
(n
Overwork - ) To work beyond the strength; to cause to labor too much or too long; to tire excessively; as, to overwork a Horse
Flick - ) To whip lightly or with a quick jerk; to flap; as, to flick a Horse; to flick the dirt from boots
Excellent - Being of great value or use, applied to things remarkable for good properties as excellent timber an excellent farm an excellent Horse excellent fruit
Gravel - To hurt the foot of a Horse, by gravel lodged under the shoe
Vicious - ) Not well tamed or broken; given to bad tricks; unruly; refractory; as, a vicious Horse
Turf - ) Race course; Horse racing; - preceded by the
Megrim - ) A sudden vertigo in a Horse, succeeded sometimes by unconsciousness, produced by an excess of blood in the brain; a mild form of apoplexy
Less - ) Smaller; not so large or great; not so much; shorter; inferior; as, a less quantity or number; a Horse of less size or value; in less time than before
Fling - ) To throw; to wince; to flounce; as, the Horse began to kick and fling. ) A cast from the hand; a throw; also, a flounce; a kick; as, the fling of a Horse
Travel - To move, walk or pass, as a beast, a Horse, ox or camel. A Horse travels fifty miles in a day a camel twenty
Mitanni - The people had many advanced technologies, including Horse-drawn chariots
Horseleech - Leeches are abundant in Palestine, and the Horseleech may simply refer to a large species that would settle on a Horse's foot if placed in the water where they abound. A Horse has been known, in drinking, to get a leech into its mouth, which immediately began to suck its blood
Whim - ) A large capstan or vertical drum turned by Horse power or steam power, for raising ore or water, etc
Ruck - ) The common sort, whether persons or things; as, the ruck in a Horse race
Greyhound, - " Various are the opinions as to what animal "comely in going" is here intended Some think "a leopard," others "an eagle," or "a man girt with armor," or "a zebra," or "a war-horse girt with trappings
Behemoth - ...
Authors are divided in opinion as to the animal intended in scripture by this anme some supposing it to be an ox, others, an elephant and Bochart labors to prove it the hippopotamus, or river Horse
Roadster - ) A Horse that is accustomed to traveling on the high road, or is suitable for use on ordinary roads
Room - ) To tend or care for, or to curry or clean, as a, Horse. ) A boy or young man; a waiter; a servant; especially, a man or boy who has charge of Horses, or the stable
Room - ) To tend or care for, or to curry or clean, as a, Horse. ) A boy or young man; a waiter; a servant; especially, a man or boy who has charge of Horses, or the stable
Mule - ) A hybrid animal; specifically, one generated between an ass and a mare, sometimes a Horse and a she-ass
Wince - ) To kick or flounce when unsteady, or impatient at a rider; as, a Horse winces
Mussel - under Byssus), and the larger, or Horse, mussel (Modiola modiolus), inhabiting the shores both of Europe and America, are edible
Curb - , a chain or strap attached to the upper part of the branches of a bit, and capable of being drawn tightly against the lower jaw of the Horse. ) A swelling on the back part of the hind leg of a Horse, just behind the lowest part of the hock joint, generally causing lameness
Couple - We cannot call a Horse and an ox a couple, unless we add a generic term. Of a Horse and ox feeding in a pasture, we should say, a couple of animals
Hazarsusah - ("horse village"); belonging to Simeon, in southern Judah (Joshua 19:5; 1 Chronicles 4:31); possibly made a depot for Horses in the trade with Egypt in Solomon's time; the name may be changed from some ancient name, as the import of Horses was prohibited, and not practiced until David's and Solomon's time
Mire - We say, a Horse, an ox or a carriage is mired, when it has sunk deep into mud and its progress is stopped
Sire - ) The male parent of a beast; - applied especially to Horses; as, the Horse had a good sire
Drench - ) To cause to drink; especially, to dose by force; to put a potion down the throat of, as of a Horse; hence
Foam - A Horse foams at the mouth when violently heated
Knee - ) In the Horse and allied animals, the carpal joint, corresponding to the wrist in man
Toe - The fore part of the hoof of a Horse, and of other hoofed animals
Wagon - A vehicle moved on four wheels, and usually drawn by Horses used for the transportation of heavy commodities. In America, light wagons are used for the conveyance of families, and for carrying light commodities to market, particulary a very light kind drawn by one Horse
Handsome - ) Agreeable to the eye or to correct taste; having a pleasing appearance or expression; attractive; having symmetry and dignity; comely; - expressing more than pretty, and less than beautiful; as, a handsome man or woman; a handsome garment, house, tree, Horse
Mint - The species commonly grown in Palestine is Horse-mint (M
Scripture: Versus System - The one is the Horse standing in the street in harness, feeding indeed, but on the contents of a bag tossed up and down; the other, the same animal in a large, fine meadow, where he lies down in green pastures, and feeds beside the still waters
Blossom - ) The color of a Horse that has white hairs intermixed with sorrel and bay hairs; - otherwise called peach color
Fourchette - ) The frog of the hoof of the Horse and allied animals
Black - The kingdom of the Medes and Persians is described as a chariot with 'black' Horses, Zechariah 6:2,6 ; and in the Revelation, in the third seal a rider on a 'black' Horse betokens scarcity
Favorite - ) The competitor (as a Horse in a race) that is judged most likely to win; the competitor standing highest in the betting
Shy - ) To start suddenly aside through fright or suspicion; - said especially of Horses. ) A sudden start aside, as by a Horse
Volt - ) A circular tread; a gait by which a Horse going sideways round a center makes two concentric tracks
Ray - ) An animal or thing of gray color, as a Horse, a badger, or a kind of salmon
Jib - ) To move restively backward or sidewise, - said of a Horse; to balk
Ray - ) An animal or thing of gray color, as a Horse, a badger, or a kind of salmon
Rein - The strap of a bridle, fastened to the curb or snaffle on each side, by which the rider of a Horse restrains and governs him
Lade - We lade a Horse or other beast with corn
Dock - ) A case of leather to cover the clipped or cut tail of a Horse. ) to cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a Horse
Lend - To let for hire or compensation as, to lend a Horse or gig. We lend money upon interest, but never lend a coach or Horse for a compensation
Same - We say, the Horse of one country is the same animal as the Horse of another country
Horse - In Scripture used for war-like purposes, not agriculture (except in treading out grain for threshing, Isaiah 28:28, where for "horsemen" translated "horses". ) Job's magnificent description refers to the war Horse (Isaiah 39:19-25), "hast thou clothed his neck with thunder?" i. "Canst thou make him afraid (rather 'make him spring') as a grasshopper?" So in Joel 2:4 war Horses are compared to locusts. Their heads are so like that the Italian for "locust" is cavaletta, "little Horse. The bride is compared to "a company of Horses in Pharaoh's chariots" (Song of Solomon 1:9), namely, in ardor and beauty (Song of Solomon 1:4, "run"; Song of Solomon 1:5, "comely"), and in forming "a company" militant, orderly, and numerous (Revelation 19:7; Revelation 19:14). received from) Pharaoh," but the plural "chariots" requires the collective sense "a company of Horses. "...
The "cutting off of the Horse from Jerusalem" prophetically symbolizes the cessation of war (Zechariah 9:10). Not the Horse's speed or utility but his "strength" is his characteristic in Scripture (Psalms 33:17). Perhaps in Exodus 14:9 "horsemen" mean "chariot riders. " Certainly no Egyptian monument represents Horsemen. Also 1400 chariots suit 4000 Horses, two Horses for each chariot and a reserve Horse: 2 Chronicles 1:14; 1 Kings 10:26) thousand chariot Horses and twelve thousand riding (i. cavalry) Horses"; Ezekiel 27:14, "with (chariot) Horses and riding Horses" (KJV "horsemen". )...
Isaiah 21:7, "a chariot with a couple of Horsemen"; rather "a cavalcade of Horsemen riding in pairs. " In 1 Kings 4:28; Esther 8:14; Micah 1:13, rekesh "dromedary"; rather "a courser," a "racehorse," for such purposes as the royal post. In 1 Kings 10:28-29, the sense seems that the Egyptians regularly brought Horses to a mart in S. Mi-Kveh is translated "linen yarn") and handed them to the king's dealers at a fixed price, 150 shekels for one Horse, 600 for a chariot, including its two draught Horses and one reserve Horse. In Genesis 12:15 Horses are not mentioned among the possessions which Abram acquired during his sojourn in Egypt. In later times, the greater contact of Egypt with Canaanite and Arab nomads' accounts for the introduction of Horses. Horses' hoofs hard "as flint" were a good point in days when shoeing was unknown (Isaiah 5:28). White Horses were emblematic of victory (Revelation 6:2; Revelation 19:11; Revelation 19:14). Horses were consecrated to the sun, since that luminary was supposed to drive a fiery chariot through the sky (2 Kings 23:11)
Nails, Holy - Saint Ambrose and others record that Saint Helena had one nail converted into a crown for Constantine and another one into a bridle for his Horse
Legion - The largest division of the Roman army, of which it was, in order and armament, the miniature; 6,000 foot, with a body of Horse
Breeching - ) That part of a harness which passes round the breech of a Horse, enabling him to hold back a vehicle
Aspirate - ) To pronounce with a breathing, an aspirate, or an h sound; as, we aspirate the words Horse and house; to aspirate a vowel or a liquid consonant
Car - ) A small vehicle moved on wheels; usually, one having but two wheels and drawn by one Horse; a cart
Holy Nails - Saint Ambrose and others record that Saint Helena had one nail converted into a crown for Constantine and another one into a bridle for his Horse
Adrammelech - Adrammelech was represented as a peacock or a mule; Anammelech as a pheasant or a Horse
Entire - ) Not gelded; - said of a Horse
Hinder - ) Of or belonging to that part or end which is in the rear, or which follows; as, the hinder part of a wagon; the hinder parts of a Horse
Rease - ) An inflammation of a Horse's heels, suspending the ordinary greasy secretion of the part, and producing dryness and scurfiness, followed by cracks, ulceration, and fungous excrescences. ) To affect (a Horse) with grease, the disease
Rising - ) More than; exceeding; upwards of; as, a Horse rising six years of age
Raffle - ) To dispose of by means of a raffle; - often followed by off; as, to raffle off a Horse
Overn - ) To regulate; to influence; to direct; to restrain; to manage; as, to govern the life; to govern a Horse
Thrush - In the Horse it is in the frog
Lend - ) To let for hire or compensation; as, to lend a Horse or gig
Leap - To spring or rise from the ground with both feet, as man, or with all the feet, as other animals to jump to vault as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a Horse. To spring or move suddenly as, to leap from a Horse
Chair - ) A vehicle for one person; either a sedan borne upon poles, or two-wheeled carriage, drawn by one Horse; a gig
Blanket - ) A heavy, loosely woven fabric, usually of wool, and having a nap, used in bed clothing; also, a similar fabric used as a robe; or any fabric used as a cover for a Horse
Corinthian - , a man of means who drives his own Horse, sails his own yacht, or the like
Flounce - ) To throw the limbs and body one way and the other; to spring, turn, or twist with sudden effort or violence; to struggle, as a Horse in mire; to flounder; to throw one's self with a jerk or spasm, often as in displeasure
Ravel - ) To hurt or lame (a Horse) by gravel lodged between the shoe and foot
Blossom - This word is used to denote the color of a Horse, that has his hair white,but intermixed with sorrel and bay hairs otherwise, peach-colored
Beg - Each beg has the command of a certain number of spahis, or Horse, denominated ...
timariots
Gentle - Tame peaceable not wild, turbulent or refractory as a gentle Horse or beast
Ravel - ) To hurt or lame (a Horse) by gravel lodged between the shoe and foot
Bridle - "The primitive bridle was simply a loop on the halter-cord passed round the lower jaw of the Horse
Lunette - ) A half Horseshoe, which wants the sponge. ) A piece of felt to cover the eye of a vicious Horse
Worry - ) To feel or express undue care and anxiety; to manifest disquietude or pain; to be fretful; to chafe; as, the child worries; the Horse worries
Pace - ) To move quickly by lifting the legs on the same side together, as a Horse; to amble with rapidity; to rack. ) Manner of stepping or moving; gait; walk; as, the walk, trot, canter, gallop, and amble are paces of the Horse; a swaggering pace; a quick pace
Tread - ) Manner or style of stepping; action; gait; as, the Horse has a good tread. ) A bruise or abrasion produced on the foot or ankle of a Horse that interferes
Horse - Horses were very rare among the Hebrews in the early ages. The patriarchs had none; and after the departure of the Israelites from Egypt, God expressly forbade their ruler to procure them: "He shall not multiply Horses to himself, nor cause the people to return to Egypt, to the end that he should multiply Horses: forasmuch as the Lord hath said, Ye shall henceforth return no more that way," Deuteronomy 17:16 . As Horses appear to have been generally furnished by Egypt, God prohibits these,...
1. In the time of the Judges we find Horses and war chariots among the Canaanites, but still the Israelites had none; and hence they were generally too timid to venture down into the plains, confining their conquests to the mountainous parts of the country. In the reign of Saul, it would appear, that Horse breeding had not yet been introduced into Arabia; for, in a war with some of the Arabian nations, the Israelites got plunder in camels, sheep, and asses, but no Horses. David's enemies brought against him a strong force of cavalry into the field; and in the book of Psalms the Horse commonly appears only on the side of the enemies of the people of God; and so entirely unaccustomed to the management of this animal had the Israelites still continued, that, after a battle, in which they took a considerable body of cavalry prisoners, 2 Samuel 8:4 , David caused most of the Horses to be cut down, because he did not know what use to make of them. To Moses, educated as he was in Egypt, and, with his people, at last chased out by Pharaoh's cavalry, the use of the Horse for war and for travelling was well known; but as it was his object to establish a nation of husbandmen, and not of soldiers for the conquest of foreign lands, and as Palestine, from its situation, required not the defence of cavalry, he might very well decline introducing among his people the yet unusual art of Horse breeding. Solomon, having married a daughter of Pharaoh, procured a breed of Horses from Egypt; and so greatly did he multiply them, that he had four hundred stables, forty thousand stalls, and twelve thousand Horsemen, 1 Kings 4:26 ; 2 Chronicles 9:25 . It seems that the Egyptian Horses were in high repute, and were much used in war. When the Israelites were disposed to place too implicit confidence in the assistance of cavalry, the prophet remonstrated in these terms: "The Egyptians are men, and not God, and their Horses are flesh, not spirit,"...
Isaiah 31:3
Notable - They bore two or three charges from the Horse with notable courage
Pegasus - ) A winged Horse fabled to have sprung from the body of Medusa when she was slain
Tram - ) A car on a Horse railroad
Martingal - ) A strap fastened to a Horse's girth, passing between his fore legs, and fastened to the bit, or now more commonly ending in two rings, through which the reins pass. It is intended to hold down the head of the Horse, and prevent him from rearing
Muzzle - ) The projecting mouth and nose of a quadruped, as of a Horse; a snout
Stumbling - "...
In the grand description which Isaiah gives, Isaiah 63:13 , of God "with his glorious arm" leading his people through the Red Sea, it is said, "That led them through the deep, as a Horse in the wilderness, that they should not stumble;" that is, who preserved them from falling amidst the numerous inequalities in the bed of the sea, caused in some instances by deep cavities, and in others by abrupt intervening rocks. The figure is a very natural one, especially in the east, where the Arabs and Tartars are famed for their dexterity in the management of even bad Horses. " Speaking of the Tartar, an accredited courier of the Turkish government, under whose guidance he travelled in disguise across the desert from Aleppo to Mosul, he says, "One day, after riding about four miles from a caravansera, at which we had changed our cattle, I found that a most execrably bad Horse had fallen to my lot. I therefore desired the interpreter to inform him, that as he had at Aleppo agreed to change Horses with me as often as I pleased, I should consider our agreement infringed if he did not comply, and would write to the consul at Aleppo to that effect. —'Why do you not, then,' said I, interrupting him, ‘why do you not perform your promise by changing Horses, when you are convinced in your conscience (if you have any) that it was part of our agreement?'— ‘Once for all, I tell you,' interrupted he, ‘I will not give up this Horse. There is not,' said he gasconadingly, ‘there is not a Mussulman that ever wore a beard, not to talk of a wretched Frank, who should get this Horse from under me. I was however mistaken: he snatched the reins out of my hand, and caught hold of them collected close at the Horse's jaw, then began to flog my Horse and to spur his own, till he got them both into full speed: nor did he stop there, but continued to belabour mine with his whip and to spur his own, driving headlong over every impediment that came in our way, till I really thought he had run mad, or designed to kill me. Several times I was on the point of striking him with my whip, in order to knock him off his Horse; but as often patience providentially came in to my assistance, and whispered to me to forbear, and see it out. His Horse carried him clear over all; and though mine was every minute stumbling and nearly down, yet, with a dexterity inexpressible and a vigour altogether amazing, he kept him up by the bridle, and, I may say, carried him gallantly over every thing. At all this I was very much astonished; and, toward the end, as much pleased as astonished; which he perceiving, cried out frequently and triumphantly, ‘Behold, Frank, behold!' and at last, drawing in the Horses, stopping short, and looking me full in the face, he exclaimed, ‘Frank, what say you now?' For some time I was incapable of making him any answer, but continued surveying him from head to foot as the most extraordinary savage I had ever beheld; while he stroked his whiskers with great self-complacency and composure, and nodded his head every now and then, as much as to say, ‘Look at me! Am I not a very capital fellow?' We alighted on the brow of a small hill, whence was to be seen a full and uninterrupted prospect of the country all round. Now it was our misfortune this morning to get a very bad Horse. Should we meet with a band of those Curds, what could we do but fly? And if you, Frank, rode this Horse, and I that, we could never escape; for I doubt you could not keep him up from falling under ME , as I did under YOU
Bridle - Mahsom' signifies a muzzle or halter or bridle, by which the rider governs his Horse ( Bat - The two commonest are the Horse-shoe bat ( Rhinolophus ferrum equinum ) and the long-eared bat ( Plecotus auritus )
Pillar - ) The center of the volta, ring, or manege ground, around which a Horse turns
Skew - ) To start aside; to shy, as a Horse
Leer - ) Destitute of a rider; and hence, led, not ridden; as, a leer Horse
Behemoth - ) The Egyptian, Coptic, pehemout , "the water ox," Hebraized; our "river Horse", hippopotamus. " Job cannot have been a Hebrew, or he would not adduce Jordan, where there were no river Horses. Jehovah's first discourse (Job 38-39) was limited to land animals and birds; this second discourse requires therefore the animal classed with the crocodile to be amphibious, as the river Horse
Twitch - ) A stick with a hole in one end through which passes a loop, which can be drawn tightly over the upper lip or an ear of a Horse
Frog - ) The triangular prominence of the hoof, in the middle of the sole of the foot of the Horse, and other animals; the fourchette
Bargain - ) To transfer for a consideration; to barter; to trade; as, to bargain one Horse for another
Sell - ) A saddle for a Horse
Jade - ) A mean or tired Horse; a worthless nag
Kind - ) Gentle; tractable; easily governed; as, a Horse kind in harness
Tackle - ) To fasten or attach, as with a tackle; to harness; as, to tackle a Horse into a coach or wagon
Lop - To let fall to flap as, a Horse lops his ears
Boar - Richard Coeur de Lion encountered one, ran him through with a lace, and while the animal was still endeavoring to gore his Horse, leaped over him, and slew him with his sword
Bucket - ) To ride (a Horse) hard or mercilessly
Cadence - ) Harmony and proportion in motions, as of a well-managed Horse
Sheer - ) To decline or deviate from the line of the proper course; to turn aside; to swerve; as, a ship sheers from her course; a Horse sheers at a bicycle
Manger - A feeding trough used for cattle, sheep, donkeys, or Horses. Archaeologists have discovered stone mangers in the Horse stables of Ahab at Megiddo
Hog - ) To cut short like bristles; as, to hog the mane of a Horse
Thunder - ...
Job 39:19 (b) The type is used to illustrate man's helplessness, either to give strength to the Horse, or power to the elements
Dress - ) To break and train for use, as a Horse or other animal. ) To adjust; to put in good order; to arrange; specifically: (a) To prepare for use; to fit for any use; to render suitable for an intended purpose; to get ready; as, to dress a slain animal; to dress meat; to dress leather or cloth; to dress or trim a lamp; to dress a garden; to dress a Horse, by currying and rubbing; to dress grain, by cleansing it; in mining and metallurgy, to dress ores, by sorting and separating them
Describe - The poet describes the Trojan Horse
Barb - Anciently, armor for Horses formerly, barbe or barde. A Horse from Barbary, of which it seems to be a contraction
Blaze - A white spot on the forehead or face of a Horse, descending nearly to the nose
Trammel - ) A kind of shackle used for regulating the motions of a Horse and making him amble
Jog - ) To cause to jog; to drive at a jog, as a Horse
Mule - A...
mongrel kind of quadruped, between the Horse and the ass
Less - Smaller not so large or great as a less quantity or number a Horse of less size or value
Venture - ) To put or send on a venture or chance; as, to venture a Horse to the West Indies
Weapons - See Arms and Armor ; Chariots ; Horse
Excuses - ' 'Oh,' said the bishop, 'I perceive you allude to my having been to the Duchess of S: 's party, but I give you my word that I was never in the same room with the dancers!' 'My lord,' responded the clergy man, 'my Horse and I are getting old, and we are never in the same field with the hounds
Mustard - " It reached as high as the Horses' heads of the travelers Irby and Mangles, and as Horse and rider in the rich plain of Akbar according to Dr
Bishop - ) To make seem younger, by operating on the teeth; as, to bishop an old Horse or his teeth
Homology - ) Correspondence or relation in type of structure in contradistinction to similarity of function; as, the relation in structure between the leg and arm of a man; or that between the arm of a man, the fore leg of a Horse, the wing of a bird, and the fin of a fish, all these organs being modifications of one type of structure
Arrest - ) A scurfiness of the back part of the hind leg of a Horse; - also named rat-tails
Broken - ) Subjugated; trained for use, as a Horse
Mule - This was probably a swift Horse on which despatches were sent
Collar - A part of a harness for the neck of a Horse or other beast, used in draught
Defraud - A man of fortune who permits his son to consume the season of education in hunting, shooting, or in frequenting Horse-races, assemblies, &c
Vault - ) The bound or leap of a Horse; a curvet
Warble - ) A small, hard tumor which is produced on the back of a Horse by the heat or pressure of the saddle in traveling. ) A small tumor produced by the larvae of the gadfly in the backs of Horses, cattle, etc
Large - ) Exceeding most other things of like kind in bulk, capacity, quantity, superficial dimensions, or number of constituent units; big; great; capacious; extensive; - opposed to small; as, a large Horse; a large house or room; a large lake or pool; a large jug or spoon; a large vineyard; a large army; a large city
Ostrich - The speed of this fowl in running exceeds that of the fleetest Horse
Horse - Horse . The Israelites must have been acquainted with Horses in Egypt ( Genesis 47:17 ), and it is evident, too, from the Tell el-Amarna correspondence that Horses were familiar animals in Palestine at an early period; but it would appear that the children of Israel were slow in adopting them. Throughout the OT up to the Exile they appear only as war-horses; the ass, the mule, and the camel were the beasts for riding and burden-bearing. Even for warlike purposes Horses were only slowly adopted, the mountainous regions held by the Israelites being unsuitable for chariot warfare. David commenced acquiring chariots ( 2 Samuel 8:4 ), and Solomon greatly added to their numbers, obtaining Horses for them from Musri [1] in N. Horses were obtained also from Egypt ( Isaiah 31:1 ; Isaiah 31:3 , Ezekiel 17:15 ). Some of the references may be to hired Horsemen. The kings of Israel were warned against multiplying Horses ( Deuteronomy 17:16 ). Trust in Horses is put in antithesis to trust in the Lord ( Isaiah 30:16 , Psalms 20:7 ; Psalms 33:17 ). Before the reforms of Josiah, Horses sacred to the sun were kept in the Temple ( 2 Kings 23:11 ; cf. The appearance of the war-horse seems to have made a deep impression ( Job 39:19-25 , Jeremiah 47:3 , Nahum 3:2 etc. After the Exile Horses were much more common: the returning Jews brought 736 Horses with them ( Nehemiah 7:68 ). Horses were fed on barley and tibn (chopped straw) in Solomon’s time as in Palestine to-day ( 1 Kings 4:28 ). Although the breeding of Horses has become so intimately associated with our ideas of the Arabs, it would seem that during the whole OT period Horses were unknown, or at least scarce, in Arabia. The equipment of Horses is mentioned in the Bible the bit and bridle ( Psalms 32:9 , Proverbs 26:3 ), bells of the Horses ( Zechariah 14:20 ), and ‘precious clothes for chariots’ ( Ezekiel 27:20 )
Attaint - ) A blow or wound on the leg of a Horse, made by overreaching
Blaze - ) A white spot on the forehead of a Horse
Breathe - ) To suffer to take breath, or recover the natural breathing; to rest; as, to breathe a Horse
Click - The sounds are four in number, and are called cerebral, palatal, dental, and lateral clicks or clucks, the latter being the noise ordinarily used in urging a Horse forward
Near - Next to one opposed to off as the near Horse or ox in a team
Fillet - In the manege, the loins of a Horse, beginning at the place where the hinder part of the saddle rests
Far - ) The more distant of two; as, the far side (called also off side) of a Horse, that is, the right side, or the one opposite to the rider when he mounts
Hire - ) To grant the temporary use of, for compensation; to engage to give the service of, for a price; to let; to lease; - now usually with out, and often reflexively; as, he has hired out his Horse, or his time
Hire - To procure from another person and for temporary use, at a certain price, or for a stipulated or reasonable equivalent as, to hire a farm for a year to hire a Horse for a day to hire money at legal interest
Rear - ) To rise up on the hind legs, as a Horse; to become erect
Medium - ) Having a middle position or degree; mean; intermediate; medial; as, a Horse of medium size; a decoction of medium strength
Anti-Libanus - The Greeks give this name to that chain of mountains east of Libanus, which, properly speaking, forms, together with Libanus, but one ridge of mountains, extending from north to south, and afterward from south to north, in the shape almost of a Horse shoe, for the space of about fourscore leagues
Running - ) trained and kept for running races; as, a running Horse
Large - Big of great size bulky as a large body a large Horse or ox a large mountain a large tree a large ship
Weary - It should be observed however that this word expresses less than tired, particularly when applied to a beast as a tired Horse
Horses - The finest description of the war-horse ever written is found in one of the most ancient books, Job 39:19-25 . Horses were common in Egypt, Genesis 47:17 50:9 Song of Song of Solomon 1:9 ; but the Jews were at first forbidden to go there for them, Deuteronomy 17:16 , or the keep any large number, Joshua 11:6 2 Samuel 8:4 . Horses were sometimes consecrated to idols, 2 Kings 23:11 , and were often used as symbols of angelic and earthly powers, under the control of God, 2 Kings 2:11 6:15-17 Zechariah 1:8 6:2-6 Revelation 2:18:13
Place - Usually, in Horse racing only the first three Horses are placed officially. In betting, to win a bet on a Horse for place it must, in the United States, finish first or second, in England, usually, first, second, or third
Far - More or most distant of the two as the far side of a Horse. But the drivers of teams in New England generally use off as the off side, or off Horse or ox
Chariotry - ...
Rekeb (רֶכֶב, Strong's #7393), “chariotry; chariot units; chariot Horse; chariot; train; upper millstone. ”...
In its first biblical appearance, rekeb means “chariotry”: “And there went up with him both chariotry [2] and Horsemen …” ( Horses. Next, rekeb refers to a “column” or “train of donkeys and camels”: “And he saw a chariot with a couple of Horsemen, a chariot of asses, and a chariot of camels …” ( Leviathan - ...
The following extract of a letter from an American gentleman in Manila gives a graphic view of the strength and size of the crocodile: "My last operation in the sporting line, was no less than killing a crocodile, which for a year or two before had infested a village on the borders of the lake, taking off Horses and cows, and sometimes a man. Having understood that he had killed a Horse a day or two before, and had taken him into a small river, I proceeded to the spot, accompanied by my host, closed the mouth of the river with strong nets, and attacked the huge brute with guns and spears. He had nearly the whole of the Horse in him, and the legs, with the hoofs, were taken out entire
Cut - ) A common work Horse; a gelding. ) To castrate or geld; as, to cut a Horse. ) To interfere, as a Horse
Back - ) In human beings, the hinder part of the body, extending from the neck to the end of the spine; in other animals, that part of the body which corresponds most nearly to such part of a human being; as, the back of a Horse, fish, or lobster. ) To bet on the success of; - as, to back a race Horse. ) To move or go backward; as, the Horse refuses to back
Colours - White is the colour of victory; the first rider on a white Horse (Revelation 6:2) represents a conquering secular power, probably Parthia; the second is the Faithful and True (Revelation 19:11), whose triumphant followers are clad in white uniform (Revelation 19:14). The swordsman upon the red Horse (Revelation 6:5) represents war and bloodshed; the great red dragon (Revelation 12:3) the same, probably with the added idea of fire. Black is the colour of famine; the third of the four riders in the Apocalypse, who brings dearth, goes forth on a black Horse (Revelation 6:5). The pale Horse in Revelation 6:8 has the livid hue of death. Hyacinthine (ὑακίνθινος) is one of the three colours of the breastplates of the fiendish Horse-men in Revelation 9:17
Breast - ) The fore part of the body, between the neck and the belly; the chest; as, the breast of a man or of a Horse
Centurion - In Acts 24:23 translate "the centurion," namely, the commander of the Horse who had conveyed Paul to Caesarea after the other of the two centurions had come back with the infantry (compare Acts 23:23; Acts 23:32)
Pose - ) Standing still, with all the feet on the ground; - said of the attitude of a lion, Horse, or other beast
Picket - ) A stake sharpened or pointed, especially one used in fortification and encampments, to mark bounds and angles; or one used for tethering Horses. ) To tether to, or as to, a picket; as, to picket a Horse
Rider - ) A Dutch gold coin having the figure of a man on Horseback stamped upon it. ) One who breaks or manages a Horse
Balances - In Revelation 6:5 the rider on the black Horse had a pair of balances with which to weigh out the food, showing that great scarcity will be one of God's judgements in the future
Cutter - ) A small, light one-horse sleigh
Scour - ) To purge; as, to scour a Horse
Horse - Sûs (סוּס, Strong's #5483), “horse. 47:17: “And they brought their cattle unto Joseph: and Joseph gave them bread in exchange for Horses, and for the flocks, and for the cattle of the herds, and for the asses. …” In the second quarter of the second millennium the chariot became a major military weapon and “horses” a very desirable commodity. In the period of the eighth-century prophets and following, “horses” became a sign of luxury and apostasy (Amos 4:10) inasmuch as Israel’s hope for freedom and security was to be the Lord: “But he [1] shall not multiply Horses to himself, nor cause the people to return to Egypt, to … multiply Horses …” (
Ass - The ass was used in peace as the Horse was in war; hence the appropriateness of Christ in his triumphal entry riding on an ass
Troop - Troop, in the singular, a small body or company of cavalry, light Horse or dragoons, commanded by a captain
Harden (the Heart) - ...
2 Kings 17:14 (a) Reference is made by this figure to the way that a Horse stiffens its neck so that the driver cannot guide the head to the right or to the left. The Horse usually does this when it is frightened or angry, takes the bit firmly in its teeth, stiffens the neck and then runs away out of control
Chariot - At this time, also, a considerable trade sprang up in connexion with the importation of chariots and Horses. It was not from Egypt, however, which was never a Horse-breeding country, that these were imported as stated in the corrupt text of 1 Kings 10:28 f. In the following verse a chariot from Musri is said to have cost 600 shekels of silver (see Money), and a Horse 150, hut the Gr. The Horses, two in number, were yoked to the pole. In Assyrian representations a third Horse sometimes appears, evidently as a reserve
Conversion - ) An appropriation of, and dealing with the property of another as if it were one's own, without right; as, the conversion of a Horse
Bit - ) The part of a bridle, usually of iron, which is inserted in the mouth of a Horse, and having appendages to which the reins are fastened
Hitch - ) To hook; to catch or fasten as by a hook or a knot; to make fast, unite, or yoke; as, to hitch a Horse, or a halter. ) To hit the legs together in going, as Horses; to interfere
Ashkelon - " Among the Tell Amarna tablets (see EGYPT ) are found letters or official despatches from Yadaya, "captain of Horse and dust of the king's feet," to the "great king" of Egypt, dated from Ascalon
Cob - ) A short-legged and stout Horse, esp
Irrigation - They are always established near natural supplies of water, which is made to flow from the source (either directly, or raised, when necessary, by a sakiyeh or endless chain of buckets worked by a Horse, ox, or donkey) into little channels ramifying through the garden
Ass - In the East the ass takes the place which the Horse has among European nations
Distemper - ) A morbid state of the animal system; indisposition; malady; disorder; - at present chiefly applied to diseases of brutes; as, a distemper in dogs; the Horse distemper; the horn distemper in cattle
Single - ) To take the irrregular gait called single-foot;- said of a Horse
Racket - ) A broad wooden shoe or patten for a man or Horse, to enable him to step on marshy or soft ground
Poor - ) Wanting in fat, plumpness, or fleshiness; lean; emaciated; meager; as, a poor Horse, ox, dog, etc
Trick - ) To deceive by cunning or artifice; to impose on; to defraud; to cheat; as, to trick another in the sale of a Horse
Jump - ) To cause to jump; as, he jumped his Horse across the ditch
Liberty - ) A curve or arch in a bit to afford room for the tongue of the Horse
Load - ) To lay a load or burden on or in, as on a Horse or in a cart; to charge with a load, as a gun; to furnish with a lading or cargo, as a ship; hence, to add weight to, so as to oppress or embarrass; to heap upon
George, Saint - Emblems: Horse, dragon, lance, banner, armor, shield
Theodoricus i., King of the Visigoths - In the great battle of the Mauriac plains Theodoric, who was advanced in life, fell from his Horse and was trampled to death by his own troops (A
Bolt - ) To spring suddenly aside, or out of the regular path; as, the Horse bolted. ) A sudden spring or start; a sudden spring aside; as, the Horse made a bolt
Chance - "The case of the painter, " says Chambers, "who, unable to express the foam at the mouth of the Horse he had painted, threw his sponge in despair at the piece, and by chance did that which he could not do before by design, is an eminent instance of what is called chance
Buck - ) To spring with quick plunging leaps, descending with the fore legs rigid and the head held as low down as possible; - said of a vicious Horse or mule. ) A frame on which firewood is sawed; a sawhorse; a sawbuck
Fillet - ) The loins of a Horse, beginning at the place where the hinder part of the saddle rests
Blind - A screen a cover as a blind for a window, or for a Horse
Tip - ) A hint, or secret intimation, as to the chances in a Horse race, or the like
Vice - ) A defect; a fault; an error; a blemish; an imperfection; as, the vices of a political constitution; the vices of a Horse
Firstborn - The firstling of a clean beast was offered at the temple, not to be redeemed, but to be killed; an unclean beast, a Horse, an ass, or a camel, was either redeemed or exchanged; an ass was redeemed by a lamb or five shekels; if not redeemed, it was killed, Exodus 13:2,11 , etc
Restrain - Thus we restrain a Horse by a bridle we restrain cattle from wandering by fences we restrain water by dams and dikes we restrain men from crimes and trespasses by laws we restrain young people, when we can, by arguments or counsel we restrain men and their passions we restrain the elements we attempt to restrain vice, but not always with success
Tire - To weary to fatigue to exhaust the strength by toil or labor as, to tire a Horse or an ox
Venture - To put or send on a venture or chance as, to venture a Horse to the West Indies
Ass - The ass was the animal of peace as the Horse was the animal of war; hence the appropriateness of Christ in his triumphal entry riding on an ass
Wind - ) To drive hard, or force to violent exertion, as a Horse, so as to render scant of wind; to put out of breath. ) To rest, as a Horse, in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe
Crib - ) To seize the manger or other solid object with the teeth and draw in wind; - said of a Horse
Draft - A drawing as, this Horse is good for draft
Machine - ) Any mechanical contrivance, as the wooden Horse with which the Greeks entered Troy; a coach; a bicycle
Leader - ) A Horse placed in advance of others; one of the forward pair of Horses
White - Daniel 7:9 ), Revelation 1:14 (twice); ripened grain, John 4:35 ; a stone, Revelation 2:17 , an expression of the Lord's special delight in the overcomer, the new name on it being indicative of a secret communication of love and joy; a Horse (in a vision), Revelation 6:2 ; 19:11,14 (1st part); a cloud, Revelation 14:14 ; the throne of God, Revelation 20:11
Color, Symbolic Meaning of - ...
The pale Horse of Revelation 6:8 resembles the color of the terror-stricken and corpses (cf. The Horse's color matches the work of its rider. The images of red, blood-soaked garments of God as an avenging warrior (Isaiah 63:1-6 ) and the fiery red Horse bringing slaughter through warfare (Zechariah 6:2 ; Revelation 6:4 ) describe divine retribution against evildoers (see also Joel 2:31 ; Revelation 6:12 )
Philip - Philip (fĭl'ip), lover of a Horse
Fog: a Figure of Our Partial Knowledge - A little mountain tarn, scarcely larger than a farmer's Horse-pond, expanded into a great lake whose distant shores were leagues beyond the reach of our poor optics; and as we descended into the valley of Wastwater, the rocks on one side like the battlements of heaven, and the descent on the other hand, looked like the dreadful lips of a yawning abyss; and yet when one looked back again in the morning's clear light there was nothing very dangerous in the pathway, or terrible in the rocks
Card - ) To comb with a card; to cleanse or disentangle by carding; as, to card wool; to card a Horse
Pad - ) An easy-paced Horse; a padnag. , one worn on the legs of Horses to prevent bruising
Abate - In Horsemanship, to perform well a downward motion. A Horse is said to abate, or take down his curvets, when, working upon curvets, he puts both his hind legs to the ground at once, and observes the same exactness in all the times
Beard - The beard or chuck of a Horse, is that part which bears the curb of a bridle,underneath the lower mandible and above the chin
Easy - Not jolting as, the Horse has an easy gait
Forward - Near or at the forepart in advance of something else as the forward gun in a ship, or the forward ship in a fleet the forward Horse in a team
Heel - This Horse understands the heel well
Represent - ) To portray by pictoral or plastic art; to delineate; as, to represent a landscape in a picture, a Horse in bronze, and the like
Splendor - The proud carriage of a war Horse and seeming bravery in the face of battle lead God to say “The glory of his nostrils is terrible” (Job 39:20)
Back - BACK, To mount to get upon the back sometimes perhaps to place upon the back as, to back a Horse. BACK, To move or go back as, the Horse refuses to back
Keep - ) To have in one's service; to have and maintain, as an assistant, a servant, a mistress, a Horse, etc. ) The means or provisions by which one is kept; maintenance; support; as, the keep of a Horse
Ass - The prohibition of Horses rendered the donkey the more esteemed in Israel. The ass, by its long hollow sharp-edged hoofs, is more sure footed than the flat hoofed Horse; it suffers little from thirst, and is satisfied with prickly herbs, scarcely sweats at all, and so is best suited for the arid hilly regions of western Asia. It is lowly as compared with the Horse; it symbolizes peace, as the Horse does war, and as such bore the meek and lowly yet divinely royal Savior, the Prince of peace, in His triumphal entrance into His own capital (Zechariah 9:9); the young untamed colt bearing Him quietly marks His universal dominion over nature as well as spirit
Self-Righteousness: Destroyed by Conviction of Sin - Dickens's cab-horse, which was only able to stand because it was never taken out of the shafts, was strength and beauty itself compared with my starveling hopes propped up with resolutions and regulations
Color - ) A distinguishing badge, as a flag or similar symbol (usually in the plural); as, the colors or color of a ship or regiment; the colors of a race Horse (that is, of the cap and jacket worn by the jockey)
Draught - The act of drawing as a Horse or ox fit for draught
Haman - But God, who was watching over all, caused that the king on that very night should be reminded of Mordecai's services, which resulted in Haman being compelled to take his intended victim through the city on the king's Horse, and proclaim him as the man whom the king delighted to honour
Weight - ) To load with a weight or weights; to load down; to make heavy; to attach weights to; as, to weight a Horse or a jockey at a race; to weight a whip handle
Tread - ...
To tread or tread out, to press out with the feet to press out wine or wheat as, to tread out grain with cattle or Horses. Manner of stepping as, a Horse has a good tread
Whip - To strike with a lash or sweeping cord as, to whip a Horse. An instrument for driving Horses or other teams, or for correction, consisting of a lash tied to a handle or rod
Herd - The ox was the most precious stock next to Horse and mule
Pot - ) a Horse heavily backed; a favorite
Ass - Their manners greatly resemble those of the wild Horse. Morier says, "We gave chase to two wild asses, which had so much more speed than our Horses, that when they had got at some distance, they stood still and looked behind at us, snorting with their noses in the air, as if in contempt of our endeavors to catch them
Blind - a hinged screen or shutter for a window; a blinder for a Horse
Smooth Places: Peril of - There are many such Hell Places on the road to the celestial city: smooth places of pleasure, ease, flattery, self-content, and the like; and it will be the wisest course if any pilgrim has been fond of riding the high Horse, for him to dismount at once and walk humbly with his God
Develop - ) To free from that which infolds or envelops; to unfold; to lay open by degrees or in detail; to make visible or known; to disclose; to produce or give forth; as, to develop theories; a motor that develops 100 Horse power
Age - The whole duration of a being, whether animal, vegetable, or other kind as, the usual age of man is seventy years the age of a Horse may be twenty or thirty years the age of a tree may be four hundred years
Bore - With Horsemen, a Horse bores, when he carries his nose to the ground
Brake - ) A frame for confining a refractory Horse while the smith is shoeing him; also, an inclosure to restrain cattle, Horses, etc. ) A cart or carriage without a body, used in breaking in Horses
Counter - ) The breast, or that part of a Horse between the shoulders and under the neck
Feather - ) A tuft of peculiar, long, frizzly hair on a Horse
Bell - A hollow body of metal, perforated, and containing a solid ball, to give sounds when shaken used on animals, as on Horses or hawks. To bear the bell, is to be the first or leader, in allusion to the bell-wether of a flock, or the leading Horse of a team or drove, that wears bells on his collar
Move - ) To cause to change place or posture in any manner; to set in motion; to carry, convey, draw, or push from one place to another; to impel; to stir; as, the wind moves a vessel; the Horse moves a carriage
Pot - ) a Horse heavily backed; a favorite
Post - But as this could not be practised, except in the case of general news, which it was expedient that the whole nation should be acquainted with, Cyrus, as Xenophon relates, appointed couriers and places for post Horses, building on purpose on all the high roads houses for the reception of the couriers, where they were to deliver their packets to the next, and so on. Xerxes, in his famous expedition against Greece, planted posts from the AEgean Sea to Shushan, or Susa, to send notice thither of what might happen to his army; he placed these messengers from station to station, to convey his packets, at such distances from each other, as a Horse might easily travel
Miriam - Miriam had the gift of prophecy, as she intimates, Numbers 12:2 : "Hath the Lord indeed spoken only by Moses? hath he not spoken also by us?" After the passage of the Red Sea, Miriam led the choirs and dances of the women, and sung with them the canticle, "Sing ye to the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously; the Horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea:" while Moses led the choir of men, Exodus 15:21
Judge - , between two or more parties; an umpire; as, a judge in a Horse race
Old - Advanced far in years or life having lived beyond the middle period, or rather towards the end of life, or towards the end of the ordinary term of living applied to animals or plants as an old man an old age an old camel or Horse an old tree
Camel - The speed, of the dromedary has been greatly exaggerated, the Arabs asserting that it is swifter than the Horse
Ass - A well-trained ass will get over the ground rapidly at a pace more comfortable than that of an ordinary Horse; it is also very sure-footed. A well-bred white ass fetches a higher price than a fairly good Horse
Fifth Monarchy Men - In Wood-street they repelled the trained bands, and some of the Horse guards; but Venner himself was knocked down, and some of his company slain; from hence the remainder retreated to Cripplegate, and took possession of a house, which they threatened to defend with a desperate resolution; but nobody appearing to countenance their frenzy, they surrendered after they had lost about half their number
Whale - Blumenbach mentions that a whole Horse has' been found in a shark, and Captain Basil Hall reports the taking of one in which, besides other things, he found the whole skin of a buffalo which a short time before had been thrown overboard from his ship (p
Bound - ) To make to bound or leap; as, to bound a Horse
Bottom - ) Power of endurance; as, a Horse of a good bottom
Ball - ) A large pill, a form in which medicine is commonly given to Horses; a bolus. ) To gather balls which cling to the feet, as of damp snow or clay; to gather into balls; as, the Horse balls; the snow balls
Board - ) To place at board, for compensation; as, to board one's Horse at a livery stable
Foundation - In 2 Chronicles 23:5 the ‘gate of the foundation’ is obscurs; possibly we should read ‘the Horse-gate
Scratch - ) Minute, but tender and troublesome, excoriations, covered with scabs, upon the heels of Horses which have been used where it is very wet or muddy. ) To cancel by drawing one or more lines through, as the name of a candidate upon a ballot, or of a Horse in a list; hence, to erase; to efface; - often with out
Shoe - ) To furnish with a shoe or shoes; to put a shoe or shoes on; as, to shoe a Horse, a sled, an anchor
Sit - ) To sit upon; to keep one's seat upon; as, he sits a Horse well
Mordecai - The proud Agagite had to lead him, seated on the king's Horse, through the city, and proclaim him as one whom the king delighted to honour
Cover - ) To copulate with (a female); to serve; as, a Horse covers a mare; - said of the male
Clap - To thrust or drive together to put one thing to another by a hasty or sudden motion followed by to, on or in as, to clap the hand to the mouth to clap spurs to a Horse to clap on a saddle
Try - ) To experiment with; to test by use; as, to try a remedy for disease; to try a Horse
Upon - The Horse is now upon a hard trot
Mustard - Thomson also says he has seen the wild mustard on the rich plain of Akkar as tall as the Horse and the rider. If, then, the wild plant on the rich plain of Akkar grows as high as a man on Horseback, it might attain to the same or a greater height when in a cultivated garden
Adder - ' It lies in holes or ruts and darts upon an animal passing: and this well agrees with the above text, where Dan is compared to "an adder in the path that biteth the Horse heels, so that his rider shall fall backward:" typical of apostasy and the power of Satan
Carry - To bear the head in a particular manner, as a Horse. When a Horse holds his head high, with an arching neck, he is said to carry well
Walk - He found the road so bad he was obliged to walk his Horse. The coachman walked his Horses from Woodbridge to Princeton. The slowest pace of a Horse, ox or other quadruped
Animals - When the Israelites returned to Palestine from the Babylonian captivity, they brought with them 6,720 asses (Ezra 2:67 ), about six times the number of Horses and camels they possessed. While the Horse was the primary mount for the warrior, the ass was used by those who traveled in peace. Horse A Horse was a solid-hoofed animal that was used for riding, as a war animal, and for transporting goods. ...
Evidence indicates that the Horse was introduced into the Middle East two thousand years before Christ. It is believed that the Horse originally came from Central Asia. The Horse is mentioned more than 150 times in the Bible, with the earliest reference being found in Genesis 47:17 . However, there is no indication that the Horse was in common use in Israel until the time of David and Solomon. The number of Horses owned by Solomon was as many as twelve thousand. Since the Mosaic law forbade the breeding of Horses, Solomon imported Horses from Egypt (Deuteronomy 17:16 ; 2 Chronicles 1:16 ). Likely, because of the superiority of the Horse for warfare, this law was later ignored. The ruins of Solomon's well-known Horse stables at ancient Megiddo are today marked as an historical and archeological site. MULE A mule was the result of cross-breeding of a female Horse and a male ass. They were especially good for moving heavy burdens in mountainous areas, being better than the Horse, ass, or camel. During David's reign, mules, along with Horses, were a popular riding animal for royalty (1 Kings 1:33 )
Chivalry - (French: chevalerie, Horsemanship, knighthood) ...
In its fullest sense, that aggregate of custom, discipline, ideal, and sentiment which guided the medieval gentleman's conduct both in war and peace. Only the landed gentry were able to take the field against invaders, with Horse and full equipment of armor at their own expense
Triumphal Entry - Christ did not enter Jerusalem upon a war Horse of conquest but upon a colt representing humility
Bee - In a moment the whole swarm fell on the unfortunate animals and on a fine Horse standing near
Dress - To curry, rub and comb as, to dress a Horse or to break or tame and prepare for service, as used by Dryden but this is unusual
Mount - To get on Horseback. To place one's self on Horseback as, to mount a Horse. To furnish with Horses as, to mount a troop
Action - ) Movement; as, the Horse has a spirited action
Air - ) The artificial motion or carriage of a Horse
Ball - ...
19 ...
BALL, To form into a ball, as snow on Horses' hoofs, or on the feet. We say the Horse balls, or the snow balls
Bottom - In the language of jockeys, stamina, native strength as a Horse of good bottom
Beast - ...
In a rare use of the word, it signifies a “riding animal,” such as a Horse or mule: “And I arose in the night, I and some few men with me; neither told I any man what my God had put in my heart to do at Jerusalem: neither was there any beast with me, save the beast that I rode upon” ( Heel - ) Management by the heel, especially the spurred heel; as, the Horse understands the heel well
Fast - ) Moving rapidly; quick in mition; rapid; swift; as, a fast Horse
Record - ) That which has been publicly achieved in any kind of competitive sport as recorded in some authoritative manner, as the time made by a winning Horse in a race
Carry - ) To hold the head; - said of a Horse; as, to carry well i
Frame - Any fabric or structure composed of parts united as the frame of an ox or Horse
Up - ) In a higher place or position, literally or figuratively; in the state of having arisen; in an upright, or nearly upright, position; standing; mounted on a Horse; in a condition of elevation, prominence, advance, proficiency, excitement, insurrection, or the like; - used with verbs of rest, situation, condition, and the like; as, to be up on a hill; the lid of the box was up; prices are up
Rake - ) A toothed machine drawn by a Horse, - used for collecting hay or grain; a Horserake
Step - 5:28 applies the word to the “steps” of a galloping Horse, or its hoofbeats
Master - (i) The owner of a docile brute, - especially a dog or Horse
Set - We set a price on a house, farm or Horse
Gate - Agreeably to this account, the Abbe Mariti, speaking of his admission into a monastery near Jerusalem, says, "The passage is so low, that it will scarcely admit a Horse; and it is shut by a gate of iron, strongly secured in the inside. Drummond says, that in the country about Roudge, in Syria, "the poor miserable Arabs are under the necessity of hewing their houses out of the rock, and cutting very small doors or openings to them, that they may not be made stables for the Turkish Horse, as they pass and repass. Morier says, "A poor man's door is scarcely three feet in height; and this is a precautionary measure to hinder the servants of the great from entering it on Horseback; which, when any act of oppression is intended, they would make no scruple to do
Light - A light burden for a camel, may be insupportable to a Horse. Not heavily armed, or armed with light weapons as light troops a troop of light Horse. To descend, as from a Horse or carriage with down, off, or from
Dash - ) A short, spirited effort or trial of speed upon a race course; - used in Horse racing, when a single trial constitutes the race
Bells - " But in Zechariah 14:20 metsillot , from tsalal "to strike," means flat pieces or plates of brass, like cymbals, attached as ornaments to the Horses' necks. Bells are represented attached to Horses on the walls of Sennacherib's palace at Koyunjik. "Holiness unto the Lord," inscribed on even the Horse bells, whereas formerly it was only on the plate of the high priest's miter (Exodus 28:36), marks that sanctity shall, in the coming day of the Lord, invest even the common occupations and things of life
Bow - ) An appliance consisting of an elastic rod, with a number of Horse hairs stretched from end to end of it, used in playing on a stringed instrument
Cover - The waters covered the chariots and Horsemen. A squadron of Horse covered the troops on the retreat
Fast - ...
Swift moving rapidly quick in motion as a fast Horse
Fret - Let not a saddle or harness fret the skin of your Horse
Grain - The tooth of a sea-horse,contains a curdled grain
Guard - Advanced guard, ...
Van guard, In military affairs, a body of troops, either Horse or foot, that march before an army or division, to prevent surprise, or give notice of danger
Rack - ) To amble fast, causing a rocking or swaying motion of the body; to pace; - said of a Horse
Match - ) To make or procure the equal of, or that which is exactly similar to, or corresponds with; as, to match a vase or a Horse; to match cloth
Match - ) To make or procure the equal of, or that which is exactly similar to, or corresponds with; as, to match a vase or a Horse; to match cloth
Travelling - The procession is closed by the chief of the tribe, whom they call emir and father, (emir means prince,) mounted on the very best Horse, and surrounded by the heads of each family, all on Horses, with many servants on foot. Their flocks of sheep and goats were about five thousand, besides a great number of camels, Horses, and asses. Horses and greyhounds they breed and train up for sale: they neither kill nor sell their ewe lambs
Load - To lay on a burden to put on or in something to be carried, or as much as can be carried as, to load a camel or a Horse to load a cart or wagon
Year - The Horse is ten year old
Light - ) To dismount; to descend, as from a Horse or carriage; to alight; - with from, off, on, upon, at, in. ) Not heavily armed; armed with light weapons; as, light troops; a troop of light Horse
Light - ) To dismount; to descend, as from a Horse or carriage; to alight; - with from, off, on, upon, at, in. ) Not heavily armed; armed with light weapons; as, light troops; a troop of light Horse
Traverse - ) To tread or move crosswise, as a Horse that throws his croup to one side and his head to the other
Bore - ) To shoot out the nose or toss it in the air; - said of a Horse
Black - ...
Zechariah 6:2 (b) These Horses probably represent war and famine with the terrible results of both. It may be that the black Horses represent the power of GOD in causing wars, tumults and famine to rage upon the earth. ...
Revelation 6:5 (b) This black Horse probably represents the famine and the sorrow which would prevail on the earth as a punishment for the wickedness and the evil being practiced
Feed - ) An allowance of provender given to a Horse, cow, etc
Dan - Dan shall be a serpent by the way, an adder in the path, that biteth the Horse heels, so that his rider shall fall backward
Caves - " Tavernier, in his "Travels in Persia," speaks of a grotto between Aleppo and Bir, that would hold near three thousand Horse
Train - Genesis 14 The warrior Horse here bred he's taught to train
Theodotus, Patriarch of Antioch - Joannes Moschus relates anecdotes illustrative of his meekness when treated rudely by his clergy, and his kindness on a journey in insisting on one of his presbyters exchanging his Horse for the patriarch's litter (Mosch
Dan (1) - that biteth the Horse heels, so that his rider shall fall backward," alludes primarily to Dan's local position in front of the royal Judah; so ready to meet the Horse, forbidden in Israelite warfare, with the watchword "I have waited for Thy salvation," and to fall unawares on the advancing enemy by the way Dan's mode of warfare is illustrated in its attack on the men of Laish," careless, quiet, and secure," as also in their great judge Samson's mode of attack, watching for an opportunity and striking an unlooked for, stealthy, sudden blow
Helena, Companion of Simon Magus - that Simon allegorized the story of the wooden Horse and of Helen and her torch. The wooden Horse must also have been mentioned in the earlier treatise against heresies, used by Epiphanius and Philaster, both of whom state that Simon expounded it as representing the ignorance of the nations
Georgius (43), Patron Saint of England - The addition of a Horse and a dragon to the story arose out of the imaginations of medieval writers. The Horse was added during the Frankish occupation of Constantinople as suitable, according to medieval ideas, to his rank and character as a military martyr. George was depicted on a Horse as early as 1227, according to Nicephorus Gregoras ( Hist. George mounted upon a Horse, which neighed in the most violent style whenever an enemy was about to make a successful assault upon the city. George on Horseback, regarding him as having conquered the evil one (Ephesians 3 , p
Faith (2) - was reviewing some troops upon the Place du Carrousel, in Paris; and, in giving an order, he thoughtlessly dropped the bridle upon his Horse's neck, which instantly set off on a gallop. At this moment a common soldier of the line sprang before the Horse, seized the bridle, and handed it respectfully to the emperor
Block - , usually with one or more plane, or approximately plane, faces; as, a block on which a butcher chops his meat; a block by which to mount a Horse; children's playing blocks, etc
Power - ) The rate at which mechanical energy is exerted or mechanical work performed, as by an engine or other machine, or an animal, working continuously; as, an engine of twenty Horse power
Screw - ) An unsound or worn-out Horse, useful as a hack, and commonly of good appearance
Free - ) Ready; eager; acting without spurring or whipping; spirited; as, a free Horse
Gain - To advance nearer to gain ground on with on as, a fleet Horse gains on his competitor
Prick - ) To drive a nail into (a Horse's foot), so as to cause lameness. ) To spur onward; to ride on Horseback. ) To make sharp; to erect into a point; to raise, as something pointed; - said especially of the ears of an animal, as a Horse or dog; and usually followed by up; - hence, to prick up the ears, to listen sharply; to have the attention and interest strongly engaged
Rate - Many of the Horse could not march at that rate, nor come lup soon enough
Colours - White as the colour of snow in Isaiah 1:18 , of the teeth described as milk-white ( Genesis 49:12 ), and of Horses ( Zechariah 1:8 ; Zechariah 6:3 ; Zechariah 6:6 ); also of wool ( Revelation 1:14 ) the prevailing colour of the Palestinian sheep being white (see Song of Solomon 4:2 ; Song of Solomon 6:6 ) and of garments ( Ecclesiastes 9:8 , Mark 9:3 ). Black is the colour of hair ( Song of Solomon 5:11 ‘black as a raven’), of Horses ( Zechariah 6:2 ; Zechariah 6:6 , Revelation 6:5 ), and of ink ( 2 Corinthians 3:3 ). The same word is used of the reddish-brown colour of the ‘red heifer’ of Numbers 19:1-22 , and of the chestnut Horse of Zechariah’s vision ( Numbers 1:8 , AV Ostrich - What time she lifteth up herself on high, she scorneth the Horse and his rider. The doctor's account of the ostrich becomes very explanatory of the several circumstances related concerning this bird in the book of Job The wings and feathers of the ostrich are so formed, as to be expanded at ease, that they form a kind of sail, not only from motion, but from the air, to hasten the flight; so that at any time if when feeding in the valley, or behind some rocky or sandy eminence in the deserts they are surprised, they stay not to be curiously viewed or examined, neither are the Arabs ever dexterous enough to overtake them, though mounted upon their jinse, or Horses. As the Lord hath described the ostrich, so it is found, "what time she lifteth up herself on high, she scorneth the Horse and his rider
Run - ) Specifically, of a Horse: To move rapidly in a gait in which each leg acts in turn as a propeller and a supporter, and in which for an instant all the limbs are gathered in the air under the body. ); as, to run a Horse; to run a stage; to run a machine; to run a rope through a block. ; to move by quicker action than in walking, as a person, a Horse, a dog
Mark - Any thing visible by which knowledge of something may be obtained indication as the marks of age in a Horse
Name - A name may be attached to an individual only, and is then proper or appropriate, as John, Thomas, London, Paris or it may be attached to a species, genus, or class of things, as sheep, goat, Horse, tree, animal, which are called common names, specific or generic
Move - The wind moves a ship the cartman moves goods the Horse moves a cart or carriage
Bar - ) The space between the tusks and grinders in the upper jaw of a Horse, in which the bit is placed. ) The part of the crust of a Horse's hoof which is bent inwards towards the frog at the heel on each side, and extends into the center of the sole
Blow - ) To put out of breath; to cause to blow from fatigue; as, to blow a Horse
Press - ) To drive with violence; to hurry; to urge on; to ply hard; as, to press a Horse in a race
Post - ) To travel with post Horses; figuratively, to travel in haste. ) With post Horses; hence, in haste; as, to travel post. ) To rise and sink in the saddle, in accordance with the motion of the Horse, esp
Plate - ) A very light steel racing Horsehoe. , in Horse racing, a race for a prize, the contestants not making a stake
Enter - ) To cause to go (into), or to be received (into); to put in; to insert; to cause to be admitted; as, to enter a knife into a piece of wood, a wedge into a log; to enter a boy at college, a Horse for a race, etc
Air - The word is used also to express the artificial motions or carriage of a Horse
Abaddon - ...
Elliott identifies the locusts with the Muslims; their turbans being the "crowns" (but how are these "like gold"?); they come from the Euphrates River; their cavalry were countless; their "breast-plates of fire" being their rich-colored attire; the fire and smoke out of the Horses' mouths being the Turkish artillery; their standard "horse tails"; the period, an hour, day, month, and year, 396 years 118 days between Thogrul Beg going forth Jan
Serve - ) To copulate with; to cover; as, a Horse serves a mare; - said of the male
Countenance - The face or look of a beast as a Horse of a good countenance
Heave - To swell, distend or dilate as, a Horse heaves in panting
Post - ) To travel with post Horses; figuratively, to travel in haste. ) With post Horses; hence, in haste; as, to travel post. ) To rise and sink in the saddle, in accordance with the motion of the Horse, esp
Post - ) To travel with post Horses; figuratively, to travel in haste. ) With post Horses; hence, in haste; as, to travel post. ) To rise and sink in the saddle, in accordance with the motion of the Horse, esp
Bells - "...
Bells were a part of the martial furniture of Horses employed in war. the Jewish warrior adorned his charger with these ornaments; and the prophet foretels that these in future times should be consecrated to the service of God: "In that day shall there be upon the bells of the Horses, Holiness unto the Lord. A Horse which had not been trained was by the Greeks called, "one that had never heard the noise of bells
Enter - ) To cause to go (into), or to be received (into); to put in; to insert; to cause to be admitted; as, to enter a knife into a piece of wood, a wedge into a log; to enter a boy at college, a Horse for a race, etc
Arabia - The principal animals are the Horse, famed for its form, beauty, and endurance; camels, sheep, asses, dogs, the gazelle, tiger, lynx, and monkey; quails, peacocks, parrots, ostriches; vipers, scorpions, and locusts
Behemoth - Commentators are now generally agreed that it is the hippopotamus, or river Horse, which is found only in the Nile and other great rivers of Africa
Can - A Horse can run a certain distance in a given time
Loose - With Horse and chariots rank'd in loose array
Trade - A traded with B for a Horse or a number of sheep
Cut - To interfere as a Horse, when the shoe of one foot beats off the skin of the pastern joint of another. To interfere, as a Horse
Famine - So in Revelation 6:5 scarcity, connected with the black Horse, follows on bloodshed and conquest; but a maximum price is fixed for wheat and barley, and oil and wine are untouched, so that the full horrors of famine are delayed
Report - ) To write an account of for publication, as in a newspaper; as, to report a public celebration or a Horse race
Dancing - Hence, when "Miriam the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand, and all the women went after her with timbrels and with dances," at the triumph over the enemies of God and the church at the Red sea, we are told, that she answered them in holy song—"Sing ye to the Lord, for he hath triumphed gloriously; the Horse and his rider hath he thrown into the sea
Behemoth - " The greater number of critics, however, have understood the word behemoth, in the singular number, as the peculiar name of the quadruped described, Job 40, of whatever kind or nature it may be; although they have materially differed upon this last point, some regarding it as the hippopotamus, or river Horse, and others as the elephant
Animals - ...
For transport people in Bible times used asses (Joshua 9:4; 1 Samuel 9:3; 1 Samuel 25:20; Matthew 21:2-5), camels (Genesis 24:10; Genesis 30:43; Genesis 31:17; Genesis 37:25; Isaiah 30:6) and Horses (Isaiah 28:28), though the latter were kept mainly for warfare (Leviticus 11:1-8; 1618417706_45; Isaiah 30:16; Isaiah 36:8). Mules, which combined the strength of the Horse with the endurance of the ass, sometimes played an important part in Israel’s communications (1 Kings 18:5; Ezra 2:66)
Athaliah - In vain she (who herself was the embodiment, of treason) cried "Treason!" She was hurried out, and slain at the entering of the Horse gate by the king's house. As she loved blood, blood was her own end; having lived as her mother, as her mother she died, slain at her own walls amidst the hoofs of the Horses (compare Revelation 16:5-6)
Master - It would be believed that he rather took the Horse for his subject, than his master
Matter - ...
Waller, with Sir William Balfour, exceeded in Horse, but were, upon the whole matter, equal in foot
Hades - ...
In Revelation 6:8 Hades is personified as a follower of Death upon his pale Horse
White - ...
Zechariah 1:8 (b) It is generally thought among Bible students that the white Horse represents famine in some cases, and power in other cases
Free - Ready eager not dull acting without spurring or shipping as a free Horse
Hard - The stag was too hard for the Horse
Camel - There are two distinct species of camels, having, however, the common characteristics of being "ruminants without horns, without muzzle, with nostrils forming oblique slits, the upper lip divided and separately movable and extensile, the soles of the feet horny, with two toes covered by claws, the limbs long, the abdomen drawn up, while the neck, long and slender, is bent up and down, the reverse of that of a Horse, which is arched
Whip - ) An instrument or driving Horses or other animals, or for correction, consisting usually of a lash attached to a handle, or of a handle and lash so combined as to form a flexible rod. ) To strike with a lash, a cord, a rod, or anything slender and lithe; to lash; to beat; as, to whip a Horse, or a carpet
Pride - 15:1 in the sense of “to be exalted”: “I will sing to the Lord, for He is highly exalted [1]; The Horse and its rider He has hurled into the sea (NASB). “If thou hast run with the footmen, and they have wearied thee, then how canst thou contend with Horses? and if in the land of peace, wherein thou trustedst, they wearied thee, then how wilt thou do in the swelling [2] of Jordan?” ( Change - To change a Horse, or to change hand, is to turn or bear the Horses head from one hand to the other, from the left to the right, or from the right to the left
Wind - ...
To carry the wind, in the manege, is when a Horse tosses his nose as high as his ears
Camel - The camel is thus able to go longer without food and drink than any other burden-bearing animal, and is able to traverse deserts quite unadapted to the slender foot of the Horse and the ass
Pack - ) To load with a pack; hence, to load; to encumber; as, to pack a Horse
Fly - ) A kind of light carriage for rapid transit, plying for hire and usually drawn by one Horse
Exchange - To sell is to alienate for money to exchange is to alienate one commodity for another as, to exchange Horses to exchange oxen for corn. Will you exchange Horses with me? Will you exchange your Horse for mine? ...
EXCHANGE, n. ...
Joseph gave them bread in exchange for Horses
Return - ) To bring, carry, send, or turn, back; as, to return a borrowed book, or a hired Horse
Top - ) To strike the top of, as a wall, with the hind feet, in jumping, so as to gain new impetus; - said of a Horse
Jack - ) A sawhorse or sawbuck. ) A system of gearing driven by a Horse power, for multiplying speed
First-Born - An unclean beast, a Horse, an ass, or a camel, was either redeemed or exchanged
Camel - She has not bestowed upon him the fleshiness of the ox, Horse, or elephant; but limiting herself to what is strictly necessary, has given him a long head, without ears, at the end of a long neck without flesh; has taken from his legs and thighs every muscle not immediately requisite for motion; and, in short, bestowed upon his withered body only the vessels and tendons necessary to connect its frame together
Work - See Conservation of energy, under Conservation, Unit of work, under Unit, also Foot pound, Horse power, Poundal, and Erg
Under - He would not sell the Horse under forty pounds
Mustard - Thomson says that he has seen it ‘on the rich plain of Akkâr as tall as the Horse and his rider’ (LB Zechariah, Prophecy of - A man, the angel of Jehovah, on a red Horse (the Horse is a symbol of the energy of God's providential government in the earth) stands in the shade among the myrtle trees, and there were other Horses, red, speckled, and white, as symbols of God's agency in the government of the earth: cf. If the 'red' Horse signifies Persia (having the same colour as the Horse of the angel, possibly because Persia was at that time ruling and was favouring God's people), doubtless the 'speckled' and the 'white' point to the two nations that were to succeed — the Greek and the Roman. ...
Zechariah 6:1-8 introduce the administrative spirits of God's providential government connected with the four Gentile empires as Horses: the red (Babylon), the black (Medes and Persians), the white (Greek), and the grisled and bay (Roman), the latter probably having two Horses because of the double character of its government, relics of which exist in various forms until revived again before the Lord comes to reign. "Holiness to the Lord" will be on the bells of the Horses, and all in Jerusalem will be sanctified
Base - ) The housing of a Horse
Crown - Other images indicate honor and sovereignty of those who stand on the side of God or judgment, such as the elders of 4:4,10 and the white Horse of judgment in 6:2
Locust - "...
Locusts appear in swarms extending many miles and darkening the sunlight (Joel 2:10); like Horses, so that the Italians call them "cavaletta ", "little Horse" (Joel 2:4-5; Revelation 9:7; Revelation 9:9); with a fearful noise; having no king (Proverbs 30:27); impossible to withstand in their progress; entering dwellings (Exodus 10:6; Joel 2:8-10); not flying by night (Nahum 3:17; Exodus 10:13 "morning"
Break - ) To tame; to reduce to subjection; to make tractable; to discipline; as, to break a Horse to the harness or saddle
Army - ; see Chariot, Horse)
Beat - ...
In the manerge, a Horse beats the dust, when at each motion he does not take in ground enough with his fore legs and at curvets, when he does them too precipitately, or too low
Slip - ) To cause to slip or slide off, or out of place; as, a Horse slips his bridle; a dog slips his collar
Throne - " And Stewart observes, "We marched toward the emperor with our music playing, till we came within about eighty yards of him, when the old monarch, alighting from his Horse, prostrated himself on the earth to pray, and continued some minutes with his face so close to the earth, that, when we came up to him, the dust remained upon his nose
Ostrich - Job speaks particularly of the speed of the ostrich," She scorneth the Horse and his rider. " So Xenophon, the biographer of Cyrus, says of the ostriches of Arabia, that none could overtake them, the baffled Horsemen soon returning from the chase; and the writer of a voyage to Senegal says, "The ostrich sets off at a hard gallop; but after being excited a little, she expands her wings as if to catch the wind, and abandons herself to a speed so great, that she seems not to touch the ground
Lucius (11) - " Jovian spurred his Horse and rode away
Hand - In falconry, the foot of a hawk and in the manege, the fore-foot of a Horse. A measure of four inches a palm applied chiefly to Horses as a Horse 14 hands high
Heir - The subdivision of land by the absence of the law of primogeniture, and the equal division among sons except double to the oldest, suited a country like Palestine of hills and valleys, not admitting much Horse labour and agricultural machinery on the large scale which large farms require
Bar - In the menage, the highest part of the place in a Horse's mouth between the grinders and tusks, so that the part of the mouth which lies under and at the side of the bars, retains the name of the gum. To bar a vein, in farriery, is an operation upon the legs of a Horse, or other parts, to stop malignant humors
Roll - ) To turn over, or from side to side, while lying down; to wallow; as, a Horse rolls
Anoint, Anointing - In a papyrus document chrisis is used of "a lotion for a sick Horse" (Moulton and Milligan, Vocab
Line - ) The reins with which a Horse is guided by his driver
Colour - It is applied to milk (Genesis 49:12 ), manna (Exodus 16:31 ), snow (Isaiah 1:18 ), Horses (Zechariah 1:8 ), raiment (Ecclesiastes 9:8 ). ...
Black, applied to the hair (Leviticus 13:31 ; Song of Solomon 5:11 ), the complexion (Song of Solomon 1:5 ), and to Horses (Zechariah 6:2,6 ). ...
Red, applied to blood (2 Kings 322;22 ), a heifer (Numbers 19:2 ), pottage of lentils (Genesis 25:30 ), a Horse (Zechariah 1:8 ), wine (Proverbs 23:31 ), the complexion (Genesis 25:25 ; Song of Solomon 5:10 )
Fall - ) The act of falling; a dropping or descending be the force of gravity; descent; as, a fall from a Horse, or from the yard of ship
Bring - To cause to come to cause to proceed from a distant place, in company, or at the same time as, to bring a boat over a river to bring a Horse or carriage to bring a cargo of dry goods
Glory - It is applied to God, Psalm 148:13 ; and to the Horse
Act of Faith - ...
After the prisoners, comes a troop of familiars on Horseback; and after them the Inquisitors, and other officers of the court, on mules: last of all, the Inquisitor-general on a white Horse, led by two men with black hats and green hat-bands
Ostrich - Her excellencies, notwithstanding her seeming deficiencies, are enumerated next; "she (proudly) lifteth up herself on high (Gesenius, 'she lasheth herself' up to the course by flapping her wings), she scorneth the Horse
Strength - 33:17 applies the word to a war Horse
Inn - The baggage of a man who wishes to be completely provided, consists in a carpet, a mattress, a blanket, two sauce pans with lids contained within each other, two dishes, two plates, and a coffee pot, all of copper, well tinned, a small wooden box for salt and pepper, a round leathern table, which he suspends from the saddle of his Horse, small leathern bottles or bags for oil, melted butter, water, and brandy, if the traveller be a Christian, a tinder box, a cup of cocoa nut, some rice, dried raisins, dates, Cyprus cheese, and, above all, coffee berries, with a roaster and wooden mortar to pound them
Ara'Bia - The most noted animal is the Horse
Olive - In the larger presses, the fruit was not crushed by the aid of movable hand-stones, but by a large, massive stone wheel rotated round a central staple by an ox or Horse
Revelation, the - What are prominent are Horses and their riders, which come forth successively at the call of the four living creatures. The Horses may represent powers or forces on earth, and the riders, those who control or turn them to account. A white Horse and its rider with a bow, to whom a crown is given — imperial conquest. A red Horse and its rider, who takes peace from the earth, and they shall kill one another — the scourge of civil war. A black Horse and its rider with a balance — famine in the necessaries of life with its devastations, but a restraining 'voice' in the midst of it. A pale Horse and its rider, who kills with God's sore plagues those on a fourth part of the earth: this may be a continent. In Revelation 19:11 to Revelation 20:3 is presented a vision of the Lord coming forth in warrior judgements He is seated on a white Horse, and His saints follow with Him
Ostrich - They, when they raise themselves up for flight, "laugh at the Horse and his rider
Ass - The animal contrasted to the Horse used in the kings' military exploits after Solomon's time (1 Kings 10:26 ) in violation of Deuteronomy 17:16
Draw - ) To pull; to exert strength in drawing anything; to have force to move anything by pulling; as, a Horse draws well; the sails of a ship draw well
Head - Liberty freedom from restrain as, to give a Horse the head
Quarter - In the menage, the quarters of a Horse's foot are the sides of the coffin, between the toe and the heel. When for any disorder, one of the quarters is cut, the Horse is said to be quarter-cast
Phrygia - ...
‘In Phrygia once were gallant armies known...
In ancient time, when Otreus filled the throne,...
When godlike Migdon led his troops of Horse’...
(Hom
Fall - Rain falls from the clouds a man falls from his Horse ripe fruits fall from trees an ox falls into a pit. The act of dropping or descending from a higher to a lower place by gravity descent as a fall from a Horse or from the yard of a ship
Victory - The Lord himself, on a white Horse, rides forth to conquer (6:2)
Break - To tame to train to obedience to make tractable as, to break a Horse
Point - ) That which arrests attention, or indicates qualities or character; a salient feature; a characteristic; a peculiarity; hence, a particular; an item; a detail; as, the good or bad points of a man, a Horse, a book, a story, etc
Turn - ) To give another direction, tendency, or inclination to; to direct otherwise; to deflect; to incline differently; - used both literally and figuratively; as, to turn the eyes to the heavens; to turn a Horse from the road, or a ship from her course; to turn the attention to or from something
Fuel - In Egypt, according to Pitts, the scarcity of wood is so great, that at Cairo they commonly heat their ovens with Horse or cow dung, or dirt of the streets; what wood they have, being brought from the shores of the Black Sea, and sold by weight
Theodosius ii., Emperor - She employed masters to instruct him in Horsemanship and the use of arms, in literature, and in science. During the latter portion of his reign, terminated by a fall from his Horse July 28, 450, his sister lost her power, a comparatively healthy influence, and Theodosius fell completely under the guidance of selfish and tyrannical eunuchs
Solomon - He further enriched himself by becoming the middleman in a profitable international Horse and chariot trade (1 Kings 10:28-29)
Temperance - Soberness (σωφροσύνη) is a right balance in all things; it is the bringing of the lower part of the nature into subjection to the higher, the flesh into subjection to the spirit; it means the spirit of man, guided by the Holy Spirit of God, governing the soul or intellect; then the soul or intellect, thus sanctified, governing the flesh; and the whole man, body, soul, and spirit, kept under control, held in hand, just as a spirited Horse is held in hand by an experienced rider; moving on, not torn asunder by conflicting interests, but advancing steadily in one direction upwards and heavenwards
Set - ) To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix; as, to set a time for a meeting; to set a price on a Horse
Way - First, 'ôrach means “path” or “way” conceived as a marked-out, well-traveled course: “Dan shall be a serpent by the way, an adder in the path, that biteth the Horse heels …” ( Cast - Both chariot and Horse were cast into a dead sleep
Maronites - Even the shaiks live in the same manner, and are only distinguished from the rest by a bad peliss, a Horse, and a few slight advantages in food and lodging; they all live frugally, without many enjoyments, but also with few wants, as they are little acquainted with the inventions of luxury
Chapters - His son, Henry Stephens, was the first to record this for the reformation of posterity, in the preface to his Greek Concordance to the New Testament; in which he says, that two facts connected with it equally demand our admiration: "The first is that my father, while travelling from Paris to Lyons, finished this division of each chapter into verses, and indeed the greater part of it [2] when riding on his Horse. " It perhaps will not be unedifying to add, that this passage has yielded mankind another proof that LEARNING is not always synonymous with WISDOM: for the phrase respecting riding, which occurs in it, has furnished matter of warm dispute to literary men; some of them contending that ...
inter equitandum means, that Robert Stephens performed the greater part of his task while actually on Horseback; but others, giving a more extended construction to the expression, assert that he was engaged in this occupation only when stopping for refreshment at inns on the road
Pass - A man may pass on foot, on Horseback or in a carriage a bird and a meteor pass through the air a ship passes on or through the water light passes from the sun to the planets it passes from the sun to the earth in about eight minutes. Waller passed over five thousand Horse and foot by Newbridge
Locust - " ...
In Revelation 9:7-10 , there is a terrific description of symbolical locusts, in which they are compared to war-horses, their hair to the hair of women, etc. They likened "the head of the locust to that of the Horse; its breast to that of the lion; its feet to those of the camel; its body to that of the serpent; its tail to that of the scorpion; its antennae, if I mistake not, to the locks of hair of a virgin; and so of other parts. " In like manner, the Italians still call locusts little Horses, and the Germans hayhorses
Ptolemae'us, - He fell from his Horse in the battle and died within a few days
Temperance - Soberness (σωφροσύνη) is a right balance in all things; it is the bringing of the lower part of the nature into subjection to the higher, the flesh into subjection to the spirit; it means the spirit of man, guided by the Holy Spirit of God, governing the soul or intellect; then the soul or intellect, thus sanctified, governing the flesh; and the whole man, body, soul, and spirit, kept under control, held in hand, just as a spirited Horse is held in hand by an experienced rider; moving on, not torn asunder by conflicting interests, but advancing steadily in one direction upwards and heavenwards
Animals - The Horse is not mentioned in the Gospels, its use in the East being restricted to purposes of war. Thus the Horse becomes prominent in the military imagery of the Apocalypse. In Revelation 18:13 ‘beasts of burden’ are distinguished from Horses. Paul to Caesarea; in the NT therefore κτῆνος is clearly some ‘beast of burden’ which is not a Horse
Laws, Penal - From 1691 to 1749, the following enactments were passed and enforced: ...
Catholics were forbidden to have schools at home or to attend Catholic schools abroad
excluded from civiland military employment and from professions
forbidden to keep a Horse worth above five pounds
a Catholic landlord had to leave his estate to his children in equal shares
if the wife or oldest son became Protestant, she at once obtained separate maintenance and he received the whole estate
a Protestant's estate was given to the nearest Protestant heir
a child becoming Protestant was maintained by Chancery
Catholics were forbidden to intermarry with Protestants (1689)
no Papist could act as guardian (1689)
secular priests must be registered (1703)
no priests were admitted from abroad
priests must take an oath of abjuration (1709)
it was high treason for a priest to perform a mixed marriage, which was declared null and void (1725)
Catholics were forbidden to vote for Parliament (1727)
There was a slight relaxation of these measures in 1771, a date which marks the beginning of relief for Catholics
Exodus - In the earliest recorded response to the event Miriam sang, “Sing to the Lord, for he has triumphed gloriously; the Horse and his rider he has thrown into the sea” (Exodus 15:21 RSV)
Unicorn - He observes that this creature is represented as a "solid-ungulous animal resembling a Horse, with an elegantly shaped body, marked from the shoulders to the flanks with longitudinal stripes or bands
Sorcery - The Rabmag (" translation="">Jeremiah 39:3; " translation="">Jeremiah 39:13) was probably the (or a) chief of this tribe who may have been either the chief physician attached to the Court or, more probably, a high official charged with the care of the Horse and chariotry (see A
Ate - ...
Horse Gate Nehemiah 3:28 (c) The Christian here is called to the service of the King and to hard work for Him in His vineyard. Horses are types of work and power
Alexander - In one campaign, he subdued almost all Asia Minor; and afterward defeated, in the narrow passes which led from Syria to Cilicia, the army of Darius, which consisted of four hundred thousand foot, and one hundred thousand Horse
Go - A mill goes by water or by steam a ship goes at the rate of five knots an hour a clock goes fast or slow a Horse goes lame a fowl or a ball goes with velocity through the air
Passover - On the other hand, the unleavened cakes and the bitter herbs (now taking the form of Horse-radish) go back to primitive times. The festival commences with a sanctification; then comes the first cup of wine; the aphiḳomen (half a maẓẓah, which is reserved to be eaten at the close) is set aside; the question is asked, ‘Why is this night distinguished from all other nights?’ to which a long response is given; this is followed by the first part of Hallel (Psalms 113, 114), the second cup of wine, washing of the hands; the unleavened bread (maẓẓôth) is eaten with bitter herbs (horse-radish); next comes Hillel’s ceremony (eating a piece of Horse-radish placed between two pieces of unleavened bread); the aphiḳomen is eaten, grape after meals is said with considerable additions; then there is the third cup of wine and the opening of the door; Hallel is resumed (Psalms 115-118); Psalms 136 is recited with large expansions, followed by the fourth cup of wine and prayer for the Divine acceptance of the service; ‘Adir hu’, an impassioned song praying for the rebuilding of the Temple, brings all to a close
Clean And Unclean - The criterion would exclude the ass, Horse, dog, and beasts of prey, which are nowhere mentioned as unclean. The Horse and dog seem to have been connected with idolatrous rites ( 2 Kings 23:11 , Isaiah 66:3 ), and so perhaps were forbidden
Marriage (i.) - If her people were of the peasant class, and she was merely passing to a neighbouring village, she would be already in her bridal dress and seated upon a led Horse or mule, while in front of the procession young men and maidens individually engaged in sword-play and dancing
Hold - We hold a Horse by means of a bridle
Antiochus - He also remitted the third part of their tribute, to indemnify them for their losses in the war; he forbade the Heathens to enter the temple without being purified, and to bring into the city the flesh of mules, asses, and Horses to sell, under a severe penalty. On receiving this intelligence, the king was transported with indignation; and, threatening to make Jerusalem a grave for the Jews, commanded the driver of his chariot to urge the Horses forward, and to hasten his journey. Lysias, who governed the kingdom in the name of the young prince, led against Judea an army of one hundred thousand foot, twenty thousand Horse, and thirty elephants, 1 Maccabees 6; 2 Maccabees 13. Tryphon, thus abandoned, retired to Dora, in Phoenicia, whither Antiochus pursued him with an army of 120,000 foot, 800 Horse, and a powerful fleet
Draw - We say, the Horses draw a coach or wagon, but they drag it through mire yet draw is properly used in both cases. We say, a Horse or an ox draws well
Believe - ...
In the causative stem, 'âman means “to stand fast,” or “be fixed in one spot,” which is demonstrated by Job 39:24: “He [2] swalloweth the ground with fierceness and rage: neither believeth he that it is the sound of the trumpet
Turn - To move from a direct course or strait line to cause to deviate as, to turn a Horse from the road, or a ship from her course. To put to pasture as cattle or Horses
Genseric, King of the Vandals - 1274), Genseric was of moderate stature and lame from a fall from his Horse
Babylon - The space between the walls was filled with rubble, perhaps for a base for a protected roadway wide enough to allow Herodotus' “four-horse chariot to turn around
Arms - King Solomon caused two different sorts of shields to be made; namely, the tsinnah, (which answers to clypeus among the Latins,) such a large shield as the infantry wore, and the maginnim, or scuta, which were used by the Horsemen, and were of a much less size, 2 Chronicles 9:15-16 . Of the battle-axe we have no description in the sacred volume: it seems to have been a most powerful weapon in the hands of cavalry, from the allusion made to it by Jeremiah: "Thou art my battle-axe and weapons of war; for with thee will I break in pieces the nations, and with thee will I destroy kingdoms: and with thee will I break in pieces the Horse and his rider, and with thee will I break in pieces the chariot and his rider,"...
Jeremiah 51:20-21
Animals - A colt symbolizes peace, and so Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a colt rather than a Horse, which was associated with war
Poetry - The Horse and its rider he has hurled into the sea
Plagues of Egypt - Even in our own climate, in hot summer-seasons, when passing through narrow lanes and hedges in the country not much frequented, where insects of the winged kind increase unmolested, the Horse and his rider sometimes feel their sting, and are almost made mad
Destroy, Destruction - The armies of these nations are to be slain by the sword of the one sitting on the Horse (Revelation 19:21 )
the Importunate Widow - Are you an aurist? say He that planted the ear, shall He not hear? Are you an oculist? say He that formed the eye, shall He not see? Do you own Horses, or ride or drive, Horses? say Be ye not as the Horse, or as the mule, which have no understanding; whose mouth must be held in with bit and bridle
Babylon - And while the unconscious and reckless citizens were engaged in dancing and merriment, the river was suddenly turned into the lake, the trench, and the canals; and the Persians, both foot and Horse, so soon as the subsiding of the water permitted, entered by its channel, and were followed by the allies in array, along the dry part of the river. These were succeeded by four square masses of Persian cavalry, each consisting of ten thousand men: and to these again were added, in their order, the Median, Armenian, Hyrcanian, Caducian, and Sacian Horsemen,—all, as before, "riding upon Horses, every man in array,"—with lines of chariots, four abreast, concluding the train of the numerous hosts. Cyrus afterward reviewed, at Babylon, the whole of his army, consisting of one hundred and twenty thousand Horse, two thousand chariots, and six hundred thousand foot
Plants in the Bible - It was also used for brewing beer and as Horse and cattle fodder (1 Kings 4:28 )
Judgments of God - Some time after he came to the throne, he was taken prisoner by Sapor, king of Persia, and used like a slave and a dog; for the Persian monarch, from time to time, obliged this unhappy emperor to bow himself down, and offer him his back, on which to set his foot, in order to mount his chariot or his Horse
Entry Into Jerusalem - ]'>[6] 191) mentions that in recent times the people of Bethlehem cast their cloaks before the Horse of the consul of Damascus
Gratianus, Emperor - Only 300 Horse remained faithful
Psalms - Christ, in his incarnate state, is personated sometimes as a priest, sometimes as a king, sometimes as a conqueror; and in those Psalms in which he is introduced as a conqueror, the resemblance is very remarkable between this conqueror in the book of Psalms and the warrior on the white Horse in the book of Revelation, who goes forth with a crown on his head, and a bow in his hand, conquering and to conquer
Zechariah, the Book of - " The Angel of Jehovah the Man upon the red Horse among the myrtle trees, is apparently identical with the interpreting angel through whom Jehovah communicates with His servants (Zechariah 1:8; Zechariah 1:10-11; Zechariah 1:12). Four chariots, symbolizing the fourfold dispensations of Providence as regards the contact of the four great world powers with Judaea, come out from between the two mountains Zion and Moriah (the seat of the temple, representing the theocracy) where the Lord is (Zechariah 2:10), and from whence He sends His ministers of judgments on the pagan; the red Horses in one represent carnage; the black, sorrow and famine (Revelation 6:5-6); the white, joy and victory; the grisled or piebald, a mixed dispensation, partly prosperity, partly adversity; all alike working together for good to Israel
Kingdom Kingdom of God - Lastly, in the Apocalypse the exalted Lamb, and the Rider on the white Horse, titled ‘the Word of God,’ are called ‘King of kings and Lord of lords’ (Acts 17:14, Acts 19:18; see preceding article)
Solomon - ) (On 1 Kings 10:28, see LINEN, and on 1 Kings 10:29, see Horse. The Hittite and Syrian kings, vassals of Solomon, were supplied from Egypt with chariots and Horses through the king's merchants
Jeru'Salem - (2 Kings 25:4 ; Jeremiah 39:4 ) ...
Horse gate
Wisdom of Solomon - In 19:9 (of the Israelites in the bed of the Red Sea), ὡς γὰρ ἵπποι ἐνεμήθησαν καὶ ὡς ἀμνοὶ διεσκίρτησαν, ‘they fed like Horses and skipped like lambs,’ the author clearly did not intend ‘fed’; from Isaiah 63:13 as explained by Kimchi it would seem that the original had øöå, ‘they ran’ (used of Horses in Joel 2:4, Amos 6:12), misread -. Kimchi’s words are, ‘just like the Horse which runs (-) in the desert where there is no stone nor mud whereon he can stumble, so the Israelites were able to run (-) on that sea-bed
Jerusalem - Horse gate
Baruch, Apocalypse of - 4); or the story of Manasseh, who was cast into the brazen ‘horse’ (i
Ephraim (4) the Syrian - Shortly afterwards swarms of mosquitoes and Horse-flies made the Horses and elephants unmanageable, and Sapor withdrew his forces lest he should bring upon himself heavier chastisement
Palestine - The domesticated animals are the camel, cow, buffalo (only in the Jordan Valley), sheep, Horse, donkey, swine (only among Christians), and domestic fowl
Jerusalem - ...
(6) Horse gate (Nehemiah 3:28)
Palesti'na - Of domestic animals we need only mention the Arabian or one-humped camel, the ass, the mule and the Horse, all of which are in general use
Jerusalem - They seem to have been, in order, the Horse-gate the East-gate , the gate Hammiphkad (‘the appointed’?), after which came the corner of the wall
Augustinus, Aurelius - He tells us that the "best set" among them were given to brutal Horse-play, directed especially against shy freshmen; but although he associated with these "eversores," he took no part in their wild doings
Christ in Jewish Literature - The corpse, however, was discovered, and dragged before the queen at the tail of a Horse
Christ in Modern Thought - An ideal relation without personality has been likened to a painted Horse which you cannot ride; and when the abstraction of the metaphysician interwoven in the universe is offered to us as the object of Christian belief, one who feels anything of the burdens and problems of life will turn away like Jacobi, little caring to know of a God who made the eye but sees not, the understanding but neither knows nor wills
Theodoretus, Bishop of Cyrrhus - was killed by a fall from his Horse, and the imperial dignity passed to the resolute hands of the orthodox Pulcheria and her soldier-husband Marcian