What does Hezekiah mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
חִזְקִיָּ֖הוּ 12th king of Judah 15
חִזְקִיָּ֑הוּ 12th king of Judah 12
חִזְקִיָּ֔הוּ 12th king of Judah 10
חִזְקִיָּ֙הוּ֙ 12th king of Judah 9
יְחִזְקִיָּ֣הוּ 12th king of Judah 7
יְחִזְקִיָּ֙הוּ֙ 12th king of Judah 5
יְחִזְקִיָּ֔הוּ 12th king of Judah 5
יְחִזְקִיָּ֖הוּ 12th king of Judah 5
חִזְקִיָּ֣הוּ 12th king of Judah 5
יְחִזְקִיָּ֗הוּ 12th king of Judah 4
חִזְקִיָּ֛הוּ 12th king of Judah 4
חִזְקִיָּ֗הוּ 12th king of Judah 4
יְחִזְקִיָּ֜הוּ 12th king of Judah 4
חִזְקִיָּ֧הוּ 12th king of Judah 2
חִזְקִיָּ֤הוּ 12th king of Judah 2
חִזְקִיָּ֥הוּ 12th king of Judah 2
יְחִזְקִיָּ֥הוּ 12th king of Judah 2
חִזְקִיָּ֜הוּ 12th king of Judah 2
יְחִזְקִיָּ֖ה 12th king of Judah 2
חִזְקִיָּהוּ֒ 12th king of Judah 2
חִזְקִיָּֽהוּ 12th king of Judah 1
ἑζεκίαν the twelfth king of Judah. 1
לִֽיחִזְקִיָּ֖ה 12th king of Judah 1
לְחִזְקִיָּ֣הוּ 12th king of Judah 1
חִזְקִיָּ֖ה 12th king of Judah 1
לְחִזְקִיָּ֖ה 12th king of Judah 1
חִזְקִיָּ֬ה 12th king of Judah 1
חִזְקִיָּ֑ה 12th king of Judah 1
חִזְקִיָּ֨הוּ 12th king of Judah 1
לְחִזְקִיָּ֑ה 12th king of Judah 1
חִזְקִיָּ֜ה 12th king of Judah 1
חִזְקִיָּ֔ה 12th king of Judah 1
חִזְקִיָּ֣ה 12th king of Judah 1
חִזְקִיָּ֗ה 12th king of Judah 1
ἑζεκίας the twelfth king of Judah. 1
חִזְקִיָּ֥ה 12th king of Judah 1
לִֽיחִזְקִיָּ֛הוּ 12th king of Judah 1
יְחִזְקִיָּֽהוּ 12th king of Judah 1
לִֽיחִזְקִיָּ֖הוּ 12th king of Judah 1
יְחִזְקִיָּ֛הוּ 12th king of Judah 1
יְחִזְקִיָּ֡הוּ 12th king of Judah 1
יְחִזְקִיָּ֤הוּ 12th king of Judah 1
יְחִזְקִיָּ֨הוּ 12th king of Judah 1
יְחִזְקִיָּ֥הֽוּ 12th king of Judah 1
וְחִזְקִיָּ֛ה 12th king of Judah 1
וִֽיחִזְקִיָּ֙הוּ֙ son of king Ahaz by Abi or Abijah and the 12th king of Judah; his reign was characterised by his godly conduct; reigned for 29 years. 1

Definitions Related to Hezekiah

H2396


   1 12th king of Judah, son of Ahaz and Abijah; a good king in that he served Jehovah and did away with idolatrous practices.
   2 great-great-grandfather of Zephaniah the prophet.
   3 son of Neariah, a descendant of David.
   4 head of a family of returning exiles in the time of Nehemiah.
   Additional Information: Hezekiah or Hizkiah or Hizkijah = “Jehovah is my strength”.
   

G1478


   1 the twelfth king of Judah.
   Additional Information: Hezekiah = “the might of Jehovah”.
   

H3169


   1 son of king Ahaz by Abi or Abijah and the 12th king of Judah; his reign was characterised by his godly conduct; reigned for 29 years.
   2 head of a family of returning exiles in the time of Nehemiah.
   3 an Ephraimite in the time of Ahaz.
   Additional Information: Hezekiah or Jehizkiah = “Jehovah has made strong”.
   

Frequency of Hezekiah (original languages)

Frequency of Hezekiah (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Hezekiah
Son and successor of Ahaz as king of Judah (716/15–687/86 B.C.) Hezekiah began his reign when he was twenty-five years old. At this time in history, the nation of Assyria had risen to power. Hezekiah's reign can best be understood against the background of Assyria's military activities during the years Hezekiah served as king of Judah. When Ahaz succeeded Jotham as king of Judah, he began pro-Assyrian policies by making Judah a vassal to Assyria. Ahaz's political involvements with Assyria brought idolatry and paganism into the Temple (2 Kings 16:7-20 ).
Hezekiah began his reign by bringing religious reform to Judah. Hezekiah was not willing to court the favor of the Assyrian kings. The Temple in Jerusalem was reopened. The idols were removed from the Temple. Temple vessels that had been desecrated during Ahaz's reign were sanctified for use in the Temple. The sacrifices were initiated with singing and the sounds of musical instruments. The tribes in the Northern Kingdom (Israel) had been subjected to Assyrian dominance. Hezekiah invited the Israelites to join in the celebration of the Passover in Jerusalem. Places of idol worship were destroyed. Hezekiah even destroyed the bronze serpent Moses had erected in the wilderness (Numbers 21:4-9 ) so the people would not view the bronze serpent as an object of worship. Hezekiah organized the priests and Levites for the conducting of religious services. The tithe was reinstituted. Plans were made to observe the religious feasts called for in the Law.
In 711 B.C., just a few years after Hezekiah had become king, Sargon II of Assyria captured Ashdod. Hezekiah anticipated the time when he would have to confront Assyrian armies. Hezekiah fortified the city of Jerusalem and organized an army. Knowing that a source of water was crucial, Hezekiah constructed a tunnel through solid rock from the spring of Gihon to the Siloam pool. The city wall was extended to enclose this important source of water.
Isaiah warned Hezekiah not to become involved with Assyria (Isaiah 20:1-6 ). The critical time for Hezekiah came in 705 B.C. when Sennacherib became king of Assyria. From Hezekiah, Sennacherib obtained a heavy tribute of silver and gold.
In 701 B.C., Hezekiah became seriously ill (Isaiah 38:1-21 ). Isaiah warned the king to prepare for his approaching death, but Hezekiah prayed that God would intervene. God answered by promising Hezekiah fifteen more years of life and deliverance of Jerusalem from Assyria (Isaiah 38:4-6 ).
In the meantime, Sennacherib had besieged Lachish. Aware that Hezekiah had trusted God for deliverance, Sennacherib sent messengers to the Jerusalem wall to urge the people to surrender. Sennacherib boasted of having conquered 46 walled cities and having taken 200,000 captives. Sennacherib's messengers taunted that God would not come to Judah's defense. Hezekiah, dressed in sackcloth and ashes, went to the Temple to pray. He also called for Isaiah, the prophet. Isaiah announced that Sennacherib would “hear a rumour” and return to his own land where he would die by the sword (2 Kings 19:7 ).
Hezekiah's faith and physical recovery brought him recognition from the surrounding nations (2 Chronicles 32:33 ). The Babylonian leader, Merodachbaladan, even congratulated Hezekiah on his recovery. Hezekiah hosted this Babylonian leader at a reception, but Isaiah met this event with a warning that succeeding generations would be subjected to Babylonian captivity (Isaiah 39:1-8 ).
Sennacherib destroyed the city of Babylon in 689 B.C. He then marched toward Egypt. Hoping to ward off any interference from Judah, Sennacherib sent letters to Hezekiah ordering him to surrender (Isaiah 37:9-38 ). Hezekiah took the letters to the Temple and prayed for God's help. From Isaiah came the message that Sennacherib would not prevail. In fact, Sennacherib's army was destroyed in a miraculous way (2 Kings 19:35-37 ). In 681 B.C., Sennacherib was killed by two of his sons as had been predicted by Isaiah in 701 B.C. Hezekiah died in 687/86 B.C. Manasseh, his son, succeeded him, although Manasseh had become co-regent with Hezekiah about 696 B.C.
The Gospel of Matthew lists Hezekiah in the genealogy of Jesus (Matthew 1:9-10 ).
Gary Hardin
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Hezekiah
Whom Jehovah has strengthened.
Son of Ahaz (2 Kings 18:1 ; 2 Chronicles 29:1 ), whom he succeeded on the throne of the kingdom of Judah. He reigned twenty-nine years (B.C. 726-697). The history of this king is contained in 2 Kings 18:20 , Isaiah 3639-39 , and 2 Chronicles 2932-32 . He is spoken of as a great and good king. In public life he followed the example of his great-granfather Uzziah. He set himself to abolish idolatry from his kingdom, and among other things which he did for this end, he destroyed the "brazen serpent," which had been removed to Jerusalem, and had become an object of idolatrous worship (Numbers 21:9 ). A great reformation was wrought in the kingdom of Judah in his day (2 Kings 18:4 ; 2 Chronicles 29:3-36 ). On the death of Sargon and the accession of his son Sennacherib to the throne of Assyria, Hezekiah refused to pay the tribute which his father had paid, and "rebelled against the king of Assyria, and served him not," but entered into a league with Egypt (Isaiah 30 ; 31 ; 36:6-9 ). This led to the invasion of Judah by Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:13-16 ), who took forty cities, and besieged Jerusalem with mounds. Hezekiah yielded to the demands of the Assyrian king, and agreed to pay him three hundred talents of silver and thirty of gold (18:14).
But Sennacherib dealt treacherously with Hezekiah (Isaiah 33:1 ), and a second time within two years invaded his kingdom (2 Kings 18:17 ; 2 Chronicles 32:9 ; Isaiah 36 ). This invasion issued in the destruction of Sennacherib's army. Hezekiah prayed to God, and "that night the angel of the Lord went out, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians 185,000 men." Sennacherib fled with the shattered remnant of his forces to Nineveh, where, seventeen years after, he was assassinated by his sons Adrammelech and Sharezer (2 Kings 19:37 ). (See SENNACHERIB .)
The narrative of Hezekiah's sickness and miraculous recovery is found in 2Kings 20:1, 2 Chronicles 32:24 , Isaiah 38:1 . Various ambassadors came to congratulate him on his recovery, and among them Merodach-baladan, the viceroy of Babylon (2 Chronicles 32:23 ; 2 Kings 20:12 ). He closed his days in peace and prosperity, and was succeeded by his son Manasseh. He was buried in the "chiefest of the sepulchres of the sons of David" (2 Chronicles 32:27-33 ). He had "after him none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor any that were before him" (2 Kings 18:5 ). (See ISAIAH .)
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hezekiah
HEZEKIAH. 1 . One of the most prominent kings of Judah. He came to the throne after his father Ahaz, about b.c. 714. The assertions that Samaria was destroyed in his sixth year and that Sennacherib’s invasion came in his fourteenth year are inconsistent ( 2 Kings 18:10 ; 2 Kings 18:13 ). The latter has probability on its side, and as we know that Sennacherib invaded Palestine in 701 the calculation is easily made.
Politically Hezekiah had a difficult task. His father had submitted to Assyria, but the vassalage was felt to be severe. The petty kingdoms of Palestine were restive under the yoke, and they were encouraged by the Egyptians to make an effort for independence. There was always an Egyptian party at the court of Jerusalem, though at this time Egypt was suffering from internal dissensions. In the East the kingdom of Babylon under Merodach-baladan was also making trouble for the Assyrians. Hezekiah seems to have remained faithful to the suzerain for some years after his accession, but when, about the time of Sennacherib’s accession (705), a coalition was formed against the oppressor he joined it. We may venture to suppose that about this time he received the embassy from Merodach-baladan (2 Kings 20:12 ff., Isaiah 39:1 ff.), which was intended to secure the co-operation of the Western States with Babylon in the effort then being made. Isaiah, as we know from his own discourses, was opposed to the Egyptian alliance, and apparently to the whole movement. The Philistines were for revolt; only Padi, king of Ekron, held out for his master the king of Assyria. For this reason Hezekiah invaded his territory and took him prisoner. If, as the Biblical account seems to intimate ( 2 Kings 18:8 ), he incorporated the conquered land in his own kingdom, the gain was not for a long time. In 701 Sennacherib appeared on the scene, and there was no possibility of serious resistance. The inscriptions tell us that the invaders captured forty-six walled towns, and carried 200,000 Judahites into slavery. The Egyptian (some suppose it to be an Arabian) army made a show of coming to the help of its allies, but was met on the border and defeated. Hezekiah was compelled to release the captive Padi, who returned to his throne in triumph. Sennacherib was detained at Lachish by the stubborn resistance of that fortress, and could send only a detachment of his troops to Jerusalem. With it went an embassy, the account of which may be read in 2 Kings 18:1-37 ; 2 Kings 19:1-37 and Is 36, 37. The laconic sentence: ‘Hezekiah sent to the king of Assyria at Lachish, saying: I have offended; that which thou puttest on me will I bear’ ( 2 Kings 18:14 ) shows that abject submission was made. The price of peace was a heavy one three hundred talents of silver and thirty talents of gold. To pay it, all the gold and silver that could be found was gathered together, even the Temple doors ( 2 Kings 18:16 ) being stripped of their precious metal.
In our accounts we read of a great destruction which came upon the Assyrian army (2 Kings 19:35 , Isaiah 37:36 ). Whether Sennacherib was not satisfied with the submission of Hezekiah, or whether a second campaign was made which the historian has confused with this one, is not yet certainly known. There was a second expedition of Sennacherib’s to the west some years later than the one we have been considering. At that time, it may be, the pestilence broke out and made the army too weak for further operations. It is clear that the people of Jerusalem felt that they had had a remarkable deliverance. Hezekiah’s sickness is dated by the Biblical writer in the time of this invasion, which can hardly be correct if the king lived fifteen years after that experience.
The account of Hezekiah’s religious reforms is more sweeping than seems probable for that date. There seems no reason to doubt, however, that he destroyed the brazen serpent, which had been an object of worship in the Temple (2 Kings 18:4 ). The cleansing of the country sanctuaries from idolatry, under the influence of Isaiah, may have been accomplished at the same time. The expansions of the Chronicler ( 2 Chronicles 29:1-36 ff.) must be received with reserve.
2. An ancestor of the prophet Zephaniah ( Zephaniah 1:1 ), possibly to be identified with the king of the same name. 3. Head of a family of exiles who returned, Ezra 2:16 = Nehemiah 7:21 (cf. Nehemiah 10:17 ).
H. P. Smith.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Hezekiah
("strength of Jehovah".)
1. Twelfth king of Judah; son of the unbelieving Ahaz and Abi or Abijah; ascended the throne at the age of 25 in 726 B.C. Of his faithfulness it is written (2 Kings 18:5) "he trusted in the Lord God of Israel, so that after him was none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor any that were before him, for he clave to the Lord, and departed not from following Him but kept His commandments." Probably his mother, being daughter of Zechariah "who had understanding in the visions of God" (2 Chronicles 26:5), was pious, and her influence counteracted the bad example of his father. In the very first year and first month of his reign the Lord put it "in his heart to make a covenant with the Lord God of Israel" (2 Chronicles 29), so he opened and repaired the doors of the Lord's house which had been "shut up," and charged the Levites not to be negligent but to "sanctify" the house and "carry forth the filthiness out of the holy place," and to light the lamps, to burn incense, and to offer burnt offerings as in former times; all which, to the shame and disaster of Judah, had latterly been neglected.
They did so, and moreover sanctified all the vessels which Ahaz had "cast away in his transgression." Then an atonement was made for the kingdom, the sanctuary, and Judah, with a sin offering of seven bullocks, seven rams, seven lambs, and seven he-goats; then followed the burnt offering, while "the Levite singers sang with the words of David and Asaph the seer, and the trumpets sounded." The priests were too few to flay the burnt offerings which the congregation "of a free heart" brought in; therefore the Levites helped them "until the other priests had sanctified themselves, for the Levites were more upright in heart to sanctify themselves than the priests." So "Hezekiah rejoiced that God had prepared the people, for the thing was done suddenly." Then followed the Passover, in the second month, "because the priests had not sanctified themselves sufficiently, neither had the people gathered themselves together to Jerusalem," so as to keep it in the regular month (Numbers 9:10-11; compare Exodus 12:6; Exodus 12:18).
Hezekiah by letter invited not only Judah, but also Ephraim and Manasseh, to it: "Ye children of Israel, turn again unto the Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, and He will return to the remnant of you, escaped out of the hand of the king of Assyria." The majority "laughed the messengers to scorn; nevertheless, divers of Asher, Manasseh, and Zebulun (Ephraim and Issachar also) humbled themselves and came to Jerusalem." Also "in Judah the hand of God was to give them one heart to do the commandment of the king by the word of the Lord" (2 Chronicles 30:2; 2 Chronicles 30:12; 2 Chronicles 30:18; 1 Samuel 6:4-5; Jeremiah 32:39). Owing to the want of priests several were not duly cleansed and sanctified, yet did eat the Passover; but Hezekiah prayed for them, "the good Lord pardon every one that prepareth his heart to seek God, though he be not cleansed according to the purification of the sanctuary."
So "the Lord hearkened to Hezekiah and healed the people." "And Hezekiah spoke comfortably unto all the Levites that taught the good knowledge of the Lord," assuring them of God's pardon upon their "making confession to the Lord God" for the people, so that "the whole assembly took counsel and kept other seven days with gladness." "So there was great joy in Jerusalem, for since Solomon's time there was not the like ... and the priests blessed the people ... and their prayer came up to the Lord's holy place, even unto heaven." Next, all Israel present went out to break the images, cut down the groves, and throw down the high places and altars out of all Judah and Benjamin, in Ephraim also and Manasseh, until they had utterly destroyed them all. (See ASHTORETH; Asheerah.) "Hezekiah also broke in pieces the brazen serpent that Moses made," for previously "Israel did burn intense to it, and he called it Nehushtan" (piece of brass, nothing better: 2 Kings 18:4); a practical condemnation of "relics" when superstitiously venerated.
Yet in spite of the warning the brazen serpent was reverenced by professing Christians in the church of Ambrose at Milan! (Prideaux, Connex., 1:19). The Passover must have been five or six years later than the purification of the temple, which was in Hezekiah's first year; for it was not until the sixth year of Hezekiah that the king of Assyria took Samaria (ver. 9-10); its fall prepared many in Israel to accept humbly Hezekiah's invitation (2 Chronicles 30:6; 2 Chronicles 30:9). Hezekiah also provided for the maintenance of the priests and Levites by commanding the payment of tithes; he ordered also their courses of service, and "in every work that he began in the service of the house of God, and in the law, and in the commandments, to seek his God, he did it with all his heart and prospered": a good motto for Christians (Colossians 3:23).
Isaiah the prophet was the great supporter of Hezekiah in his pious efforts; but not without opposition from drunken scoffers, who asked "whom shall he (Isaiah) teach knowledge? them that are weaned from the milk?" i.e., does he take us for babes just weaned, that he presumes to teach us? (Isaiah 28:9) "for precept upon precept, line upon line, here a little and there a little," i.e., for he is constantly repeating the same thing as if to little children, and as one teaching young beginners how to make the strokes of a letter and join line to line; the scorners imitated Isaiah's stammering like repetitions, in Hebrew tsaw latsar, qaw laqaw. The simplicity of divine teaching offends proud scorners (2 Kings 5:11-12; 1 Corinthians 1:23); but children in knowledge needed to be spoken to in children's language (Matthew 13:13). Isaiah replies, You will have a sterner teacher with stammering and foreign speech to convict you of unbelief (Isaiah 28).
Ahaz the former king's counselors recommended worldly alliances and compromises of principle for political expediency, instead of Isaiah's counsel to rest on Jehovah alone. Shebna was one of these half hearted, self indulgent, and ostentatious officers at court. His father's name is not given, though his office is," the scribe" (2 Kings 18:18; 2 Kings 19:2); whereas the fathers of Eliakim and Joah, with Shebna, are named. The reason appears quite incidentally in Isaiah 22:15, "Say unto Shebna ... this treasurer over the house (prefect of the palace), What hast thou here? and whom hast thou here, that thou hast hewed thee out a sepulchre here?" i.e. as being a foreigner (his name is un-Hebrew like, he was probably a Syrian brought from abroad to Ahaz' court) thou hast no paternal burying place or kindred here.
He was degraded; but (probably upon his repentance) the lower yet honourable office of "scribe" or secretary of state was given him, and in that office he is mentioned as if faithful (Isaiah 37:2, etc.), so that the sentence of exile and humiliation, "tossed like a ball into a large country, and there the chariots of his glory becoming the shame of his lord's house," was apparently reversed, though Jewish tradition says he was tied to the horses' tails by the enemy to whom he designed to betray Jerusalem, but who thought he mocked them. (See ELIAKIM.) It is possible that, unwarned by the past, he relapsed into treachery, and then were fulfilled Isaiah's prophetic threats, which but for his relapse would have been averted, and which were temporarily suspended.
Hezekiah recovered from the Philistines all the cities which his father Ahaz had lost, namely, of "the low country and the S. of Judah, Bethshemesh, Ajalon, Gederoth, Shocho, Timnah, Gimzo" with their dependent villages, "the Lord having brought Judah low because Ahaz had made Judah naked, and transgressed sore against the Lord" (2 Chronicles 28:18-19). "Hezekiah smote them even unto Gaza (Gaza and Gath alone remained to them: Josephus, Ant. 9:13, section 3), from the tower of the watchmen to the fenced city" (2 Kings 18:8). This was foretold by Isaiah (Isaiah 14:29-30): "Rejoice not thou, whole Palestina, because the God of him that smote thee (Uzziah, 2 Chronicles 26:6) is broken (namely, under Ahaz), for out of the serpent's (as Uzziah was regarded by the Philistines) root shall come forth a cockatrice," an adder, to the Philistines, Hezekiah; "and the firstborn of the poor (the poorest) shall feed" in safety, instead of constant alarms of Philistine invasions.
Hezekiah bore for a time the yoke of tribute imposed by the Assyrian Tiglath Pileser on Ahaz (2 Kings 16:7); but having spent much on the Philistine war, trusting in the aid of Egypt, be now ventured to withhold payment from Assyria. Shalmaneser had begun, and Sargon had just terminated, the siege of Samaria (Isaiah 20:1; Isaiah 20:4; Isaiah 20:6; 2 Kings 17:6; 2 Kings 17:24; 2 Kings 18:7; 2 Kings 18:7; 2 Kings 18:9-10 "THEY took it," 11). Sargon moreover removed some of the Israelites to "the cities of the Medes"; the Scripture herein being confirmed by Assyrian monuments which mention his seizing and annexing several Median cities, to which Assyrian policy would of course transplant distant colonists. Light years subsequent to Samaria's fall, in Hezekiah's fourteenth year, Sennacherib, in the third year of his reign according to Assyrian records, undertook his first expedition against Judah. In the interval between Samaria's fall and this invasion Tyre's gallant resistance under their king Elulaeus had forced the Assyrians to retire after a five years' siege.
Hezekiah had used this interval to "stop the waters of the fountains without the city, stopping the upper watercourse (rather 'spring head') of Gihon (i.e. the spring source of the Kedron stream, Nachal being the valley E. of the city, Ge the valley W. and S. of the city), and bringing it straight down to the W. side of the city of David" (i.e into the valley separating mount Moriah and Zion from the upper city (2 Chronicles 32:3-4; 2 Chronicles 32:13; 2 Chronicles 32:30): Zion must therefore have lain on the N. not on the S.W. of the city, so that the water brought to the W. of it should be inside not outside the city); also building up the broken wall (using the materials of the houses which they broke down for the purpose), and raising it up to the towers, and another wall without, and repairing Millo in the city of David, and making darts and shields in abundance. Hezekiah also "gathered together the waters of the lower pool," i.e. brought into the city by subterranean passages in Zion rock the waters from the fountain which supplied the lower pool (Isaiah 22:9-11; Isaiah 7:3; 2 Kings 20:20).
"He also made a ditch between the two walls for the water of the old pool," i.e. the lower pool's water he diverted to a new tank in the city between the two walls. His words too cheered the hearts of his captains and people, being the language of faith: "there be more with us than with him; with him is an arm of flesh, but with us is the Lord our God to fight our battles." So "the people rested themselves upon his words." (See JERUSALEM.) Sennacherib undertook two expeditions against Judah. In the first he took all Judah's fenced cities, and Hezekiah sent saying, "I have offended; return from me, that which thou puttest upon me I will bear"; and "the king of Assyria appointed 300 talents of silver, and 30 talents of gold."
The monuments confirm this Scripture statement: "because Hezekiah king of Judah would not submit, I took 46 of his strong fenced cities ... and from these, as spoil, 200,150 people, with horses, asses, camels, oxen, and sheep; and Hezekiah himself I shut up in Jerusalem, like a bird in a cage, building towers round the city to hem him in, and raising banks of earth against the gates .... Then Hezekiah sent out to me the chiefs with 30 talents of gold and 800 talents of silver ... by way of tribute." The patriotism of the Hebrew historian (2 Kings 18) suppresses the ravages, advance on the capital, and the siege; but Isaiah (2 Kings 10:28-32; 2 Kings 22:1-14; 2 Kings 22:2 Kings 24; 2 Kings 29) more vividly than even Sennacherib's annalist, notices all. In the main facts there is a singular agreement between the sacred and the secular records, the variation in the number of talents of silver being probably due to the Hebrew recording the number appointed as permanent tribute, the Assyrian the whole that was actually carried off. The inscriptions record that Ekron had submitted to Hezekiah and delivered their king Padi up to him because of his adherence to Assyria.
Sennacherib recovered Padi from Jerusalem and seated him again on the throne. Hezekiah's sickness must have occurred just before Sennacherib's expedition, for God assures him (Isaiah 38:6), "I will deliver thee and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria, and I will defend this city," in the 14th year of Hezekiah's reign. Moreover, 15 years was the addition promised by God to his life, which added to the 14 years would give 29 years, the actual number of years in all that he reigned. His sickness was owing to an inflammatory carbuncle and abscess. Having then no heir, he shrank from death with a fear scarcely worthy of a believer. God granted his earnest prayer; "afore Isaiah had gone out into the middle court the word of the Lord came to him," i.e. when he had just left Hezekiah and Hezekiah was in the act of praying, after having heard God's message, "thou shalt die."
God hears while His children are yet speaking (Isaiah 65:24; Psalms 32:5; Daniel 9:21). Our wishes, when gratified, often prove curses. Three years afterward Hezekiah had a son, Manasseh, the chief cause of God's wrath against Judah and of the overthrow of the kingdom (2 Kings 23:26-27). God gave Hezekiah as a sign of recovery the recession of the shadow ten degrees on Ahaz's (See DIAL, an obelisk in the midst of the court, the shadow of which could be seen by Hezekiah from his sick chamber, falling on the successive steps ascending to his palace. Hezekiah composed a thanksgiving hymn for his, recovery, based on the psalms of David, which he had restored to liturgical use in the temple. The beginning rests on Psalms 102:2, the first half of verse 11 on Psalms 27:13 (chedel ), "the world" or age soon ceasing, is from chaadal "to cease"; usually written cheled , this transitory world, Psalms 49:1); verse 18 on Psalms 6:5; Psalms 30:9; the beginning of verse 20 on Psalms 70:1. (See HEPHZIBAH.)
Hezekiah did not disbelieve in a future state, but regarded the disembodied state as one wherein men cannot declare the praises of God before men, it is as to this world an unseen land of stillness, the living alone can praise God on earth. That the true view was at the time held of the blessedness of the sleeping saints Isaiah 57:1-2 proves. A cake of figs was the instrument used for the cure; God can make effectual the simplest means. Sennacherib's object in his second expedition was Egypt, Hezekiah's ally. Hence with the great body of his army he advanced toward Egypt by S.W. Palestine, and did not himself approach Jerusalem; this was two years after the former invasion. The Assyrian annals are silent as to Sennacherib's second expedition in the fifth year of his reign, which began by his "treacherously" (Isaiah 33:1) attacking Lachish, and which ended in the destruction recorded in 2 Kings 19:35; for, unlike the faithful Jewish historians, they never record any of their monarch's disasters. (See LACHISH.)
But the disaster is tacitly deducible in the Assyrian records from the discontinuance subsequently of expeditions by Sennacherib westward further than Cilicia. The Assyrians did not resume aggression upon southern Syria and Egypt until the close of Esarhaddon's reign. Moreover the Egyptian priests told Herodotus, from their records, that, a century and a half before Cambyses, Sennacherib led a host of Assyrians and Arabs to the Egyptian border where king Sethos met them near Pelusium on the E. of the Nile; and that swarms of field mice ate the Assyrians' quivers, bowstrings, and shield thongs in the night, so in the morning, they fled, and multitudes fell, having no arms to defend themselves. Sethos erected a monument, a man in stone with a mouse in his hand, and the inscription, "Look on me and learn to reverence the gods." The mouse symbolized ruin (2 Chronicles 30:23); the story arose out of this symbolical statue, not the statue out of the literal story.
Sennacherib, according to Assyrian inscriptions, which mention the 22nd year of his reign, lived about 17 years after the invasion and was slain by his two sons. Isaiah, while disapproving of trust in Egypt, regarded the voluntarily offered aid of the tall and warlike Ethiopians as providential (Isaiah 18:1-2; Isaiah 18:7). "Ho (not Woe!) to the land of the winged bark," or else "to the land of the clanging sound of wings" (i.e. armies). To Ethiopia Isaiah announces the overthrow of Sennacherib the common foe, and desires the Ethiopian ambassadors, then at Jerusalem, to carry the tidings to their people. See TIRHAKAH'S coming forth to encounter Sennacherib created a diversion in favor of Judaea. In the former invasion Sennacherib in his first, expedition inflicted a decisive blow on the united forces of Egypt and Ethiopia at Altagu (possibly the Eltekon of Joshua 15:59); but now he was forced to raise the siege of Pelusium by Tirhakah, and send an imperious letter to Hezekiah by Rabshakeh, whose sneers at his religious reforms in removing the high places (2 Kings 18:22-32) and flattering promises in fluent Hebrew to the people favor the idea that he was a renegade Jew.
Hezekiah's simple childlike faith appears in his spreading the foe's insolent, letter before the Lord. His faith received an immediate answer of peace; 185,000 were slain by the angel of the Lord in the "night," perhaps by "the plague that, walketh in darkness" (2 Kings 19:35, with which Isaiah 37:36 undesignedly accords, "when they arose early in the morning".) In this second expedition, according to Jehovah's word, Sennacherib did not "come before the city with shields, nor cast a bank against it" (Isaiah 37:33); whereas in the first he shut Hezekiah up as a "bird in a cage" also "raising banks of earth against the gates." It is possible Rabshakeh took the army with him from Jerusalem to Libnah on the borders of Egypt (ver. 8), and that the destruction occurred there, which accords with the Egyptian story to Herodotus above; the Lord's words "he shall not shoot an arrow there, nor come before it with shields" seem corrupted into the Egyptian legend of the mice gnawing the bowstrings and shield straps.
In Sennacherib's account of his wars with Hezekiah, inscribed with cuneiform characters in the hall of the palace of Koyunjik built by him (140 ft. long by 120 ft. wide), wherein the Jewish physiognomy of the captives is discernible, after mentioning the capture of the 200,150 Jews he adds, "then I prayed unto God," the only instance of God's name in an inscription without a pagan adjunct. On returning to Nineveh Sennacherib, according to Tobit 1:18, revenged himself on the Jews then in his power; but that apocryphal book makes him die 55 days afterward, whereas 17 years elapsed: see above. In Isaiah 39, an embassy from Merodach Baladan to Hezekiah is recorded. He congratulated Hezekiah on his recovery, and sent also a present. About this time precisely it was that Babylon had revolted from Assyria, and set up an independent kingdom. Scripture calls him "king of Babylon," though both before and after him Babylon was subject to Assyria.
This is an undesigned coincidence of Scripture with secular history, confirming the truth of the former. The Assyrian inscriptions say he reigned twice, and that Sennacherib in his first year expelled him and set up Belib in his stead. Probably he recovered the Babylonian kingdom when Sennacherib was weakened by his disaster in Judea, and sent the embassy not merely to congratulate Hezekiah on his recovery but mainly to court Hezekiah's alliance, as having like himself cast off the Assyrian yoke. Hence arose Hezekiah's excessive attention to his ambassadors. But how had Hezekiah such a store of precious things? Either the transaction was before Hezekiah's straits when he had to cut off the gold from the doors and pilla
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Hezekiah
HEZEKIAH.—One of the kings of Judah, mentioned in Mt.’s (Matthew 1:9 f.) genealogy of our Lord.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hezekiah, King of Judah
Son and successor of Ahaz. Hezekiah "did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, according to all that David his father did." He trusted in the Lord God of Israel, so that there was none like him before or after. He reigned from B.C. 727 to 698.
Hezekiah began his reign by opening the doors of the house of the Lord, which was cleansed and repaired by the priests and Levites. Then he called the rulers, and sacrifices were offered as sin offerings for the kingdom and the sanctuary, and for Judah; songs were sung, and the king and all present bowed themselves and worshipped. He proposed to all Israel and Judah to come to the house of the Lord at Jerusalem to keep the Passover, and invitations were sent to all the tribes to turn to the Lord and to come and keep it. Though his messengers were in general mocked, there was a remnant that responded to the king's invitation. Such was the joy that after the seven days of unleavened bread they kept other seven days with gladness.
What naturally followed this worship was the removal of all signs of idolatry. Because the people had burnt incense to the brazen serpent, he brake it in pieces calling it 'a piece of brass.' He clave to the Lord, and the Lord was with him, and prospered him whithersoever he went.
The unfaithfulness of Ahaz had given the Assyrians a footing in Immanuel's land, against which Hezekiah rebelled, but afterwards submitted to pay tribute. Sennacherib required complete submission, and the Assyrians came with a great host against Jerusalem. Their general not only reviled Hezekiah, but spoke against God, comparing Him with the gods of the nations which the Assyrians had conquered. Hezekiah rent his clothes, covered himself with sackcloth, and went into the house of the Lord. God wrought deliverance. There was a rumour of opposition elsewhere, and the general departed. Of the Assyrians 185,000 were slain in one night: Sennacherib returned to Nineveh and was subsequently killedby two of his own sons.
We next read of Hezekiah's sickness, when Isaiah was sent to tell him to set his house in order, for he should die. Hezekiah wept sore and prayed for his life, and it was prolonged fifteen years. Though he had witnessed a great deliverance of the Lord, his faith was weak and he asked for a sign. God made the shadow go back ten degrees on the dial of Ahaz. But Hezekiah rendered not to the Lord according to the benefit done to him, for his heart was lifted up, therefore there was wrath upon him and upon Judah and Jerusalem. Yet, on Hezekiah humbling himself with the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the wrath came not in his days.
Hezekiah had great riches; and when Berodach-baladan, king of Babylon, sent ambassadors to him with a present, for they heard that he had been sick, and to inquire of the wonder that had been done in the land (doubtless the shadow going back ten degrees), Hezekiah showed them all his riches; and then he had to hear the sorrowful tidings that all he had shown them should be carried into Babylon, and his sons should be made eunuchs in the palace of the king of Babylon. Hezekiah piously resigned himself to the will of Jehovah. We read that God had "left him, to try him, that he might know all that was in his heart." It was pride; but God was gracious, and Hezekiah seemed to have the consciousness that God would give him peace and truth in his days. 2 Kings 18 - 2 Kings 20 ; 2 Chronicles 29 - 2 Chronicles 32 ; Isaiah 36 — Isaiah 39 ; Jeremiah 26:18,19 ; Hosea 1:1 ; Micah 1:1 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hezekiah
1. Son of Neariah, of the royal house of Judah. 1 Chronicles 3:23 .
2. Ancestor of Ater whose descendants returned from exile. Ezra 2:16 ; Nehemiah 7:21 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Hezekiah
Hezekiah. (hĕz'e-kî'ah), whom God strengthens. A good king of Judah, who succeeded his Hither Ahaz about 726 b.c., and died about 698 b.c. For his history see 2 Kings 18:1-37; 2 Kings 19:1-37; 2 Kings 20:1-21; 2 Chronicles 29:1-36; 2 Chronicles 30:1-27; 2 Chronicles 31:1-21; 2 Chronicles 32:1-33. Compare Isaiah 36:1-22; Isaiah 37:1-38; Isaiah 38:1-22. He tried to restore the worship of Jehovah, removing "high places," and destroying the brazen serpent; consult 2 Chronicles 28:22-25; for the final deportation of the Ten Tribes see 2 Kings 17:1-41; 2 Kings 18:9-12; and for his revolt against the Assyrians compare 2 Kings 18:1-37; 2 Chronicles 32:1-33. Hezekiah's payment of tribute is noted in 2 Kings 18:13-16. Assyrian annals of Sennacherib discovered at Nineveh agree with this account. A second invasion seems to have followed when Sennacherib, Isaiah 30:1-7, returned, Isaiah 33:1. Then came Sennacherib's letters from Lachish and Libnah, the destruction of a great part of his army, and the retreat of the rest to Assyria, in answer to Hezekiah's prayer. Compare Isaiah 31:8-9; Isaiah 37:33-37. Hezekiah's sickness, humiliation, and prolongation of life 15 years in peace, and the prediction that Babylon, then feeble and friendly, would one day carry his descendants into captivity are noticed in Old Testament history, Isaiah 39:1-8; Micah 4:10. Hezekiah collated the Proverbs of Solomon. Proverbs 25:1. The prophecies of Hosea and Micah were delivered partly in his reign; compare Jeremiah 26:17-19; and Nahum was perhaps his contemporary.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Hezekiah
King of Judah, the son of Ahaz and Abi. His name is striking, Hezek and Jah, signifying the strength of the Lord. We have his history 2 Kings 18:1-37; 2 Kings 19:1-37; 2 Kings 20:1-21. And so very important was the life of this prince considered, to form a part in the records of the church, that the Holy Ghost directed the prophet Isaiah to give it again in his prophetical writings. (See Isaiah 36:1-22; Isaiah 37:1-38; Isaiah 38:1-22; Isaiah 39:1-8) The miraculous effect wrought on the sun-dial, in confirmation of the Lord's promise to Hezekiah, is an evident testimony of the Lord's favour to this prince. Hezekiah's hymn is beautiful, Isaiah 38:10-20.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Hezekiah
king of Judah, was the son of Ahaz, and born in the year of the world 3251. At the age of five-and-twenty he succeeded his father in the government of the kingdom of Judah, and reigned twenty-nine years in Jerusalem, namely, from the year of the world 3277 to 3306, 2 Kings 18:1-2 ; 2 Chronicles 29:1 . The reign of his father Ahaz had been most unpropitious for his subjects. A war had raged between the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, in which Pekah, king of Israel, overthrew the army of Ahaz, destroying a hundred and twenty thousand of his men; after which he carried away two hundred thousand women and children as captives into his own country; they were, however, released and sent home again, at the remonstrance of the Prophet Oded. As idolatry had been established in Jerusalem and throughout Judea, by the command of Ahaz, and the service of the temple either intermitted, or converted into an idolatrous worship, the first object of his son Hezekiah, on his accession to the throne, was to restore the regal worship of God, both in Jerusalem and throughout Judea. He cleansed and repaired the temple, and held a solemn passover. He improved the city, repaired the fortifications, erected magazines of all sorts, and built a new aqueduct. In the fourth year of his reign, Salmanezer, king of Assyria, invaded the kingdom of Israel, took Samaria, and carried away the ten tribes into captivity, replacing them by different people sent from his own country. But Hezekiah was not deterred by this alarming example from refusing to pay that tribute to the Assyrians which had been imposed on Ahaz: this brought on the invasion of Sennacherib, in the fourteenth year of the reign of Hezekiah, of which we have a very particular account in the writings of the Prophet Isaiah, who was then living, Isaiah 36.
Immediately after the termination of this war, Hezekiah "was sick unto death," owing, as the sacred historian strongly intimates, to his heart being improperly elevated on occasion of this miraculous deliverance, and not sufficiently acknowledging the hand of God in it. 2 Kings 20; Isaiah 38. Isaiah was sent to bid him set his house in order, for he should die and not live. Hezekiah had instant recourse to God by prayer and supplications for his recovery; and the prophet had scarcely proceeded out of the threshold, when the Lord commanded him to return to Hezekiah, and to say to him, "Thus saith the Lord, I have heard thy prayer, and I have seen thy tears; I will heal thee: on the third day thou shalt go up to the house of the Lord, and I will add unto thy days fifteen years." And to confirm to him the certainty of all these tokens of the divine regard, the shadow of the sun on the dial of Ahaz, at his request, went backward ten degrees. After his recovery, he composed an ode of thanksgiving to the God of all his mercies, which the Prophet Isaiah has recorded in his writings, Isaiah 38:10-11 . Yet, as an instance of human fickleness and frailty, we find Hezekiah, with all his excellencies, again forgetting himself, and incurring the divine displeasure. The king of Babylon having been informed of his sickness and recovery, sent ambassadors to congratulate him on his restoration: an honour with which the heart of Hezekiah was greatly elated; and, to testify his gratitude, he made a pompous display to them of all his treasures, his spices, and his rich vessels: and concealed from them nothing that was in his palace. In all this the pride of Hezekiah was gratified; and to humble him, Isaiah was sent to declare to him that his conduct was displeasing to God, and that a time should come when all the treasures of which he had made so vain a display should be removed to Babylon, and even his sons be made eunuchs to serve in the palace of the king of Babylon. Hezekiah bowed submissively to the will of God, and acknowledged the divine goodness toward him, in ordaining peace and truth to continue during the remainder of his reign. He accordingly passed the latter years of his life in tranquillity, and contributed greatly to the prosperity of his people and kingdom. He died in the year of the world 3306, leaving behind him a son, Manasseh, who succeeded him in the throne: a son every way unworthy of such a father.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Hezekiah
At the time of Hezekiah’s accession to Judah’s throne, his country was in a sad condition. The policies of Ahaz had left Judah economically weak, politically dominated by Assyria, and religiously corrupted through false religions (see AHAZ).
Upon becoming king, Hezekiah set out on the bold task of strengthening the nation’s economy, overthrowing Assyrian domination, and reforming Judah’s religion. This latter achievement won him praise as being Judah’s greatest king to that time (2 Kings 18:1-8).
Religious reforms
The prophets of Hezekiah’s time (he reigned from 716 to 687 BC) were Hosea, Isaiah and Micah. Hosea was by this time very old (cf. Hosea 1:1), Isaiah was very influential around the palace (Isaiah 1:1; Isaiah 38:1) and Micah was preaching with such authority that the king was taking good notice of him (Micah 1:1; Jeremiah 26:17-19). Yet none of the prophets records Hezekiah’s reforms. Perhaps this was because the prophets were more concerned with the spiritual attitudes of people than with the revised procedures for temple worship.
Hezekiah began his reforms by assembling the priests and Levites and telling them plainly that neglect of the temple and its services was the reason for God’s anger with Judah (2 Chronicles 29:1-11). He then sent them to cleanse and rededicate the temple. The common people responded to his reforms with such enthusiasm that the temple officials were unable to cope with all the sacrifices (2 Chronicles 29:12-36).
After this, Hezekiah arranged a great Feast of Passover and Unleavened Bread (2 Chronicles 30:1-12). He insisted, however, that before joining in the festival, people ceremonially cleanse themselves and remove all traces of false religion from Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 30:13-22).
Having cleansed Jerusalem of false religion, Hezekiah then cleansed the country areas (2 Chronicles 31:1). His desire was that the nation as a whole follow the religious order laid down by Moses and developed by David. He therefore organized the priests and Levites according to David’s plan, and arranged for their proper financial support through the orderly payment and distribution of the people’s tithes and offerings (2 Chronicles 31:2-19). Some of Hezekiah’s leading officials made a collection of Solomon’s proverbs to instruct the people further (Proverbs 25:1).
Political achievements
Assyrian influence in Palestine was at its peak during the time of Hezekiah. In the early part of his reign Assyria conquered the northern kingdom Israel and carried the people into captivity (722 BC; 2 Kings 17:6; 2 Kings 18:9-12). Meanwhile in the south, Hezekiah was busy strengthening Judah’s independence. He improved its economy, increased its agricultural production, fortified its defences and improved Jerusalem’s water supply (2 Chronicles 32:27-30). He then revolted against Assyria by refusing to pay further tribute (2 Kings 18:7).
As expected, Assyria sent its army to attack Judah, but Hezekiah had prepared Judah well and had equipped Jerusalem to withstand the siege (2 Kings 18:13; 2 Chronicles 32:1-6). He had also made a defence agreement with Egypt that he hoped would guarantee success. Isaiah opposed this dependence on Egypt. Judah’s need was for quiet faith in God, not for military help from a foreign country (Isaiah 30:1-3; Isaiah 30:15; Isaiah 31:1; Isaiah 31:3; Isaiah 31:5; Isaiah 31:8).
The Assyrian attack was far more damaging to Jerusalem than Hezekiah had expected. Even when the Assyrians had forced Hezekiah to pay them large amounts of money, they did not retreat. They were preparing to crush Jerusalem completely (2 Kings 18:14-37). On two occasions Hezekiah went in great distress to the temple to ask God’s help, and on both occasions Isaiah brought God’s reassuring answer (2 Kings 19:1-7; 2 Kings 19:14-34). The outcome was that God intervened and dramatically overthrew the Assyrians (2 Kings 19:35-37).
Hezekiah had at one time become so sick that it appeared he would die. In answer to his prayers, God extended his life by fifteen years, enabling him to lead Judah through its period of conflict with Assyria (2 Kings 20:1-11). In gratitude to God, Hezekiah wrote a song of praise for his recovery (Isaiah 38:9-22).
Throughout this period Babylon was increasing in power and was looking for allies to help it conquer Assyria. An illness of Hezekiah gave the Babylonians the opportunity to visit him, in the hope of persuading him to join them against Assyria. Hezekiah was easily persuaded. He was very anti-Assyrian and very proud that his achievements for Judah had attracted Babylon’s admiration (2 Kings 20:1-13; 2 Chronicles 32:24-25; 2 Chronicles 32:31). Once again Isaiah condemned Hezekiah’s willingness to enter into foreign alliances, for it would result in conquest by the allied nation (2 Kings 20:14-19). Hezekiah repented of his wrongdoing and completed his reign with Judah’s independence still intact (2 Chronicles 32:26).

Sentence search

Hezekiah - ) Hezekiah began his reign when he was twenty-five years old. Hezekiah's reign can best be understood against the background of Assyria's military activities during the years Hezekiah served as king of Judah. ...
Hezekiah began his reign by bringing religious reform to Judah. Hezekiah was not willing to court the favor of the Assyrian kings. Hezekiah invited the Israelites to join in the celebration of the Passover in Jerusalem. Hezekiah even destroyed the bronze serpent Moses had erected in the wilderness (Numbers 21:4-9 ) so the people would not view the bronze serpent as an object of worship. Hezekiah organized the priests and Levites for the conducting of religious services. , just a few years after Hezekiah had become king, Sargon II of Assyria captured Ashdod. Hezekiah anticipated the time when he would have to confront Assyrian armies. Hezekiah fortified the city of Jerusalem and organized an army. Knowing that a source of water was crucial, Hezekiah constructed a tunnel through solid rock from the spring of Gihon to the Siloam pool. ...
Isaiah warned Hezekiah not to become involved with Assyria (Isaiah 20:1-6 ). The critical time for Hezekiah came in 705 B. From Hezekiah, Sennacherib obtained a heavy tribute of silver and gold. , Hezekiah became seriously ill (Isaiah 38:1-21 ). Isaiah warned the king to prepare for his approaching death, but Hezekiah prayed that God would intervene. God answered by promising Hezekiah fifteen more years of life and deliverance of Jerusalem from Assyria (Isaiah 38:4-6 ). Aware that Hezekiah had trusted God for deliverance, Sennacherib sent messengers to the Jerusalem wall to urge the people to surrender. Hezekiah, dressed in sackcloth and ashes, went to the Temple to pray. ...
Hezekiah's faith and physical recovery brought him recognition from the surrounding nations (2 Chronicles 32:33 ). The Babylonian leader, Merodachbaladan, even congratulated Hezekiah on his recovery. Hezekiah hosted this Babylonian leader at a reception, but Isaiah met this event with a warning that succeeding generations would be subjected to Babylonian captivity (Isaiah 39:1-8 ). Hoping to ward off any interference from Judah, Sennacherib sent letters to Hezekiah ordering him to surrender (Isaiah 37:9-38 ). Hezekiah took the letters to the Temple and prayed for God's help. Hezekiah died in 687/86 B. Manasseh, his son, succeeded him, although Manasseh had become co-regent with Hezekiah about 696 B. ...
The Gospel of Matthew lists Hezekiah in the genealogy of Jesus (Matthew 1:9-10 )
Ezekias - Grecized form of Hezekiah (Matthew 1:9,10 )
Chizkiyahu - Hezekiah, one of the last righteous kings of the first temple period...
Rab'Shakeh - one of the officers of the king of Assyria sent against Jerusalem in the reign of Hezekiah. [1] (B
Shebna - He was in the court of Hezekiah
Ismachiah - A Levite in the time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Hena - City Sennacherib, king of Assyria, captured prior to threatening Hezekiah and Jerusalem in 701 B. Sennacherib used the historical example to brag and to persuade Hezekiah not to rely on God for protection against Sennacherib
Ezekias - The Greek form of Hezekiah, in the genealogy of the Lord Jesus
a'bi, - mother of King Hezekiah, (2 Kings 18:2 ) written ABIJAH in (2 Chronicles 29:1 )
Hizkijah - Modern translations usually use Hezekiah
Hizkiah - ]'>[1] Hezekiah)
Abi - ” Mother of King Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:2 )
Hezekiah, King of Judah - Hezekiah "did that which was right in the sight of the Lord, according to all that David his father did. ...
Hezekiah began his reign by opening the doors of the house of the Lord, which was cleansed and repaired by the priests and Levites. ...
The unfaithfulness of Ahaz had given the Assyrians a footing in Immanuel's land, against which Hezekiah rebelled, but afterwards submitted to pay tribute. Their general not only reviled Hezekiah, but spoke against God, comparing Him with the gods of the nations which the Assyrians had conquered. Hezekiah rent his clothes, covered himself with sackcloth, and went into the house of the Lord. ...
We next read of Hezekiah's sickness, when Isaiah was sent to tell him to set his house in order, for he should die. Hezekiah wept sore and prayed for his life, and it was prolonged fifteen years. But Hezekiah rendered not to the Lord according to the benefit done to him, for his heart was lifted up, therefore there was wrath upon him and upon Judah and Jerusalem. Yet, on Hezekiah humbling himself with the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the wrath came not in his days. ...
Hezekiah had great riches; and when Berodach-baladan, king of Babylon, sent ambassadors to him with a present, for they heard that he had been sick, and to inquire of the wonder that had been done in the land (doubtless the shadow going back ten degrees), Hezekiah showed them all his riches; and then he had to hear the sorrowful tidings that all he had shown them should be carried into Babylon, and his sons should be made eunuchs in the palace of the king of Babylon. Hezekiah piously resigned himself to the will of Jehovah. " It was pride; but God was gracious, and Hezekiah seemed to have the consciousness that God would give him peace and truth in his days
Merodach-Baladan - " One bearing this name sent ambassadors to Hezekiah (B. (See Hezekiah
Hezekiah - HEZEKIAH
Abi - Abi (â'bî), father, progenitor, mother of King Hezekiah, 2 Kings 18:2; written Abijah in 2 Chronicles 29:1
Ismachiah - A Levite, set over the offerings, tithes, and dedicated things in the time of king Hezekiah
Hezekiah - At the time of Hezekiah’s accession to Judah’s throne, his country was in a sad condition. ...
Upon becoming king, Hezekiah set out on the bold task of strengthening the nation’s economy, overthrowing Assyrian domination, and reforming Judah’s religion. ...
Religious reforms...
The prophets of Hezekiah’s time (he reigned from 716 to 687 BC) were Hosea, Isaiah and Micah. Yet none of the prophets records Hezekiah’s reforms. ...
Hezekiah began his reforms by assembling the priests and Levites and telling them plainly that neglect of the temple and its services was the reason for God’s anger with Judah (2 Chronicles 29:1-11). ...
After this, Hezekiah arranged a great Feast of Passover and Unleavened Bread (2 Chronicles 30:1-12). ...
Having cleansed Jerusalem of false religion, Hezekiah then cleansed the country areas (2 Chronicles 31:1). Some of Hezekiah’s leading officials made a collection of Solomon’s proverbs to instruct the people further (Proverbs 25:1). ...
Political achievements...
Assyrian influence in Palestine was at its peak during the time of Hezekiah. Meanwhile in the south, Hezekiah was busy strengthening Judah’s independence. ...
As expected, Assyria sent its army to attack Judah, but Hezekiah had prepared Judah well and had equipped Jerusalem to withstand the siege (2 Kings 18:13; 2 Chronicles 32:1-6). ...
The Assyrian attack was far more damaging to Jerusalem than Hezekiah had expected. Even when the Assyrians had forced Hezekiah to pay them large amounts of money, they did not retreat. On two occasions Hezekiah went in great distress to the temple to ask God’s help, and on both occasions Isaiah brought God’s reassuring answer (2 Kings 19:1-7; 2 Kings 19:14-34). ...
Hezekiah had at one time become so sick that it appeared he would die. In gratitude to God, Hezekiah wrote a song of praise for his recovery (Isaiah 38:9-22). An illness of Hezekiah gave the Babylonians the opportunity to visit him, in the hope of persuading him to join them against Assyria. Hezekiah was easily persuaded. Once again Isaiah condemned Hezekiah’s willingness to enter into foreign alliances, for it would result in conquest by the allied nation (2 Kings 20:14-19). Hezekiah repented of his wrongdoing and completed his reign with Judah’s independence still intact (2 Chronicles 32:26)
Cononiah - Levite who had the care of the offerings, tithes, and dedicated things in the time of Hezekiah
Shi'Phi - (abundant ), a Simeonite, father of Ziza, a prince of the tribe in the time of Hezekiah
Shecaniah - Priest in the time of Hezekiah
Rabshakeh - Chief of the princes, the name given to the chief cup-bearer or the vizier of the Assyrian court; one of Sennacherib's messengers to Hezekiah. He and the other envoys returned to their master and reported that Hezekiah and his people were obdurate, and would not submit
Mahath - ...
...
Another Kohathite Levite, of the time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:12 )
al'Lon - (an oak ) a Simeonite, ancestor of Ziza, a prince of his tribe in the reign of Hezekiah ( 1 Chronicles 4:37 ) (B
Cononi'ah - (appointed by the Lord ), a Levite, ruler of the offerings and tithes in the time of Hezekiah
Berodach-Baladan - The king of Babylon who sent a friendly deputation to Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:12 )
Tartan - "
One of Sennacherib's messengers to Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:17 )
Ismachi'ah - (whom Jehovah upholds ), a Levite who was one of the overseers of offerings during the revival under King Hezekiah
Ismachi'ah - (whom Jehovah upholds ), a Levite who was one of the overseers of offerings during the revival under King Hezekiah
Imnah - A Levite in the time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:14 )
ma'Hath - (1 Chronicles 6:35 ) ...
Also a Kohathite, in the reign of Hezekiah
Sennacherib - He invaded Syria and Palestine in the fourteenth year of Hezekiah's reign. Hezekiah owned that he had offended, and paid to him a tribute of three hundred talents of silver and thirty talents of gold. He says he captured forty-six fenced cities, and the fortresses and villages round about them belonging to Hezekiah the Jew, and carried away 200,150 souls, and horses, mules, asses, camels, oxen, and sheep without number, etc. He shut up Hezekiah in his house at Jerusalem like a bird in a cage. ...
On Sennacherib's second invasion, he sent insulting and impious messages to Hezekiah, who apparently was again trusting in Egypt
Ismachiah - ” Priest and administrator in the Temple under Cononiah and Shimei when Hezekiah was king of Judah (2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Mahath - Son of Amasai, a Kohathite, in the time of Hezekiah
Shecaniah - A priest under Hezekiah; distributed the priests' daily portion; those on duty and those off duty alike received (2 Chronicles 31:15-19)
im'Nah - ) ...
Kore ben-Imnah, the Levite, assisted in the reforms of Hezekiah
re'Zeph - (a hot stone ), one of the places which Sennacherib mentions, in his taunting message to Hezekiah, as having been destroyed by his predecessor
Haz'Ezon-ta'Mar - ( Genesis 14:7 ) The name occurs in the records of the reign of Hezekiah
Nehushtan - Of copper; a brazen thing a name of contempt given to the serpent Moses had made in the wilderness (Numbers 21:8 ), and which Hezekiah destroyed because the children of Israel began to regard it as an idol and "burn incense to it. " The lapse of nearly one thousand years had invested the "brazen serpent" with a mysterious sanctity; and in order to deliver the people from their infatuation, and impress them with the idea of its worthlessness, Hezekiah called it, in contempt, "Nehushtan," a brazen thing, a mere piece of brass (2 Kings 18:4 )
Shebna - Hezekiah, whose treasurer or prefect, of the palace Shebna was (Isaiah 22:15); also see Eliakim. (See Hezekiah; ELIAKIM
Nehushtan - Brazen, a name given by Hezekiah king of Judah to the brazen serpent that Moses had set upon the wilderness, Numbers 21:8 , and which had been preserved by the Israelites to that time. The superstitious people having made an idol of this serpent, Hezekiah caused it to be burned, and in derision have it the name of Nehushtan, a mere piece of brass, 2 Kings 18:4
Hezeki'ah - Hezekiah was one of the three most perfect kings of Judah. When the kingdom of Israel had fallen, Hezekiah invited the scattered inhabitants to a peculiar passover, which was continued for the unprecedented period of fourteen days. (2 Chronicles 29:30,31 ) At the head of a repentant and united people, Hezekiah ventured to assume the aggressive against the Philistines and in a series of victories not only rewon the cities which his father had lost, (2 Chronicles 28:18 ) but even dispossessed them of their own cities except Gaza, (2 Kings 18:8 ) and Gath. (2 Kings 18:7 ) Instant war was imminent and Hezekiah used every available means to strengthen himself. (2 Kings 18:13-162 ) Hezekiah's prayer for longer life is heard. (2 Kings 20:4 ) An embassy coming from Babylon ostensibly to compliment Hezekiah on his convalescence, but really to form an alliance between the two powers, is favorably received by the king, who shows them the treasures which he had accumulated. (2 Kings 20:17 ) The two invasions of Sennacherib occupy the greater part of the scripture records concerning the reign of Hezekiah. " Hezekiah only lived to enjoy for about one year more his well-earned peace and glory. (1 Chronicles 3:23 ) ...
The same name, though rendered in the Authorized Version HIZKIAH , is found in (Zephaniah 1:1 ) ...
Ater of Hezekiah
Hephzibah -
The wife of Hezekiah and mother of king Manasseh (2 Kings 21:1 )
Tartan - The title of an Assyrian officer sent to Hezekiah
Joah - Scribe under King Hezekiah about 715-686 B. Levite who helped cleanse the Temple under King Hezekiah about 715 B
Nehush'Tan - (a thing of brass ), the name by which the brazen serpent made by Moses in the wilderness, ( Numbers 21:9 ) was worshipped in the time of Hezekiah. (2 Kings 18:4 ) It is evident that our translators by their rendering "and he called it Nehushtan" understood that the subject of the sentence is Hezekiah and that when he destroyed the brazen serpent he gave it the name Nehushtan "a brazen thing" in token of his utter contempt
Shebna - Treasurer to Hezekiah
Nehushtan - Name of contempt given by Hezekiah to the brazen serpent, when he destroyed it because the Israelites burnt incense to it
Heph'zi-Bah - ( Isaiah 62:4 ) ...
The queen of King Hezekiah and the mother of Manasseh
Sennacherib - 705), in the 23year of Hezekiah. Among these was Hezekiah, who had entered into an alliance with Egypt against Assyria. His own account of this invasion, as given in the Assyrian annals, is in these words: "Because Hezekiah, king of Judah, would not submit to my yoke, I came up against him, and by force of arms and by the might of my power I took forty-six of his strong fenced cities; and of the smaller towns which were scattered about, I took and plundered a countless number. From these places I took and carried off 200,156 persons, old and young, male and female, together with horses and mules, asses and camels, oxen and sheep, a countless multitude; and Hezekiah himself I shut up in Jerusalem, his capital city, like a bird in a cage, building towers round the city to hem him in, and raising banks of earth against the gates, so as to prevent escape. Then upon Hezekiah there fell the fear of the power of my arms, and he sent out to me the chiefs and the elders of Jerusalem with 30 talents of gold and 800 talents of silver, and divers treasures, a rich and immense booty. ) Hezekiah was not disposed to become an Assyrian feudatory. Sennacherib sent envoys to try to persuade Hezekiah to surrender, but in vain. ) He next sent a threatening letter ( 2 Kings 19:10-14 ), which Hezekiah carried into the temple and spread before the Lord
Nahath - Levite in the days of Hezekiah
Ismachiah - A person in the days of Hezekiah, to whom the king intrusted the offerings of the temple
zi'za -
Son of Shiphi, a chief of the Simeonites in the reign of Hezekiah
Joahaz - Father of a scribe under Hezekiah about 715 B
Hephzibah - Wife of Hezekiah and mother of Manasseh
Merodachbaladan - King of Babylon who sent letters and a present to Hezekiah when he heard that he had been sick. Hezekiah was glad of this, but it was accepting the friendship of the world, to which as a result his posterity would be captives
Elizaphan - Numbers 3:30; his descendants took a lead in religion under David and Hezekiah (1 Chronicles 15:8; 2 Chronicles 29:13)
Shechani'ah - ) ...
A priest in the reign of Hezekiah
Shechani'ah - ) ...
A priest in the reign of Hezekiah
Sennacherib - 700, Sennacherib turned his arms toward the west, attacked Sidon, and finally marched against Hezekiah, king of Judah. There can be no doubt that the record which he has left of his campaign against "Hiskiah" in his third year is the war with Hezekiah so briefly touched in 2 Kings 18:13-16. Hezekiah had revolted, and claimed the protection of Egypt. Sennacherib therefore attacked Egypt, and from his camp at Lachish and Libnah he sent an insulting letter to Hezekiah at Jerusalem. In answer to Hezekiah's prayer the Assyrians lost, in a single night, by some awful manifestation of divine power, 185,000 men! The camp immediately broke up; the king fled
Shecaniah - ” Priest in Jerusalem during the days of Hezekiah
Jehuel - Levite who helped cleanse the Temple under Hezekiah
Rabshakeh - Rabshakeh was sent by Sennacherib, king of Assyria, to summon Hezekiah to surrender Jerusalem, 2 Kings 18:17-18 ; 2 Kings 19:4 ; Isaiah 36
Shecaniah - ” Priest in Jerusalem during the days of Hezekiah
Mini'Amin -
A Levite in the reign of Hezekiah
Hezekiah - As idolatry had been established in Jerusalem and throughout Judea, by the command of Ahaz, and the service of the temple either intermitted, or converted into an idolatrous worship, the first object of his son Hezekiah, on his accession to the throne, was to restore the regal worship of God, both in Jerusalem and throughout Judea. But Hezekiah was not deterred by this alarming example from refusing to pay that tribute to the Assyrians which had been imposed on Ahaz: this brought on the invasion of Sennacherib, in the fourteenth year of the reign of Hezekiah, of which we have a very particular account in the writings of the Prophet Isaiah, who was then living, Isaiah 36. ...
Immediately after the termination of this war, Hezekiah "was sick unto death," owing, as the sacred historian strongly intimates, to his heart being improperly elevated on occasion of this miraculous deliverance, and not sufficiently acknowledging the hand of God in it. Hezekiah had instant recourse to God by prayer and supplications for his recovery; and the prophet had scarcely proceeded out of the threshold, when the Lord commanded him to return to Hezekiah, and to say to him, "Thus saith the Lord, I have heard thy prayer, and I have seen thy tears; I will heal thee: on the third day thou shalt go up to the house of the Lord, and I will add unto thy days fifteen years. Yet, as an instance of human fickleness and frailty, we find Hezekiah, with all his excellencies, again forgetting himself, and incurring the divine displeasure. The king of Babylon having been informed of his sickness and recovery, sent ambassadors to congratulate him on his restoration: an honour with which the heart of Hezekiah was greatly elated; and, to testify his gratitude, he made a pompous display to them of all his treasures, his spices, and his rich vessels: and concealed from them nothing that was in his palace. In all this the pride of Hezekiah was gratified; and to humble him, Isaiah was sent to declare to him that his conduct was displeasing to God, and that a time should come when all the treasures of which he had made so vain a display should be removed to Babylon, and even his sons be made eunuchs to serve in the palace of the king of Babylon. Hezekiah bowed submissively to the will of God, and acknowledged the divine goodness toward him, in ordaining peace and truth to continue during the remainder of his reign
Mahath - A Levite in the time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Shim'ri - ) ...
A Kohathite Levite in the reign of Hezekiah
Miniamin - Levite in the days of Hezekiah
a'Siel -
A Simeonite whose descendant Jehu lived in the reign of Hezekiah
Merodach-Baladan - Merodach-baladan sent envoys to King Hezekiah of Judah (Isaiah 39:1 ; 2 Kings 20:12-13 ), who inventoried the palace treasures. See Babylon ; Hezekiah ; Sargon ; Sennacherib
Imnah - A Levite in the time of King Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:14 )
Wills - ) Ahithophel's giving charge concerning his house (2 Samuel 17:23), and the recommendation to Hezekiah to "give charge concerning" his, are of the nature of a will (2 Kings 20:1); the first distinctly recorded case is that of Herod
Conaniah - A Levite who had charge of the tithes and offerings in the time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:12-13 )
Shebna(h) - ” Royal scribe (2Kings 18:18,2 Kings 18:37 ; 2 Kings 19:2 ; Isaiah 36:3 ,Isaiah 36:3,36:22 ; Isaiah 37:2 ) and “comptroller of the household” (Isaiah 22:15 REB) under King Hezekiah about 715 B
Boil - (Rendered "botch" in Deuteronomy 28:27,35 ), an aggravated ulcer, as in the case of Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:7 ; Isaiah 38:21 ) or of the Egyptians (Exodus 9:9,10,11 ; Deuteronomy 28:27,35 )
Shimri - Levite in time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:13 )
na'Hath - (1 Chronicles 6:26 ) ...
A Levite in the reign of Hezekiah
Eliel - ...
...
One of the overseers of the offerings in the reign of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Berodach Baladan - (bih roh' dach bal' uh dan) King of Babylon who wrote Hezekiah, king of Judah (2 Kings 20:12 )
Conduit - We read that Hezekiah by means of a pool and a conduit brought water into Jerusalem
Miniamin - Levite in the time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:15 )
Rabsaris - ' It was the title of one who accompanied the Assyrian army when it was sent against Hezekiah
Rab-Shakeh - Chief butler or cup-bearer, an officer sent from Lachish by Sennacherib king of Assyria, to summon Hezekiah to surrender; which message he delivered in a most audacious and insolent manner
Mero'Dach-Bal'Adan - (worshipper of Baal ) is mentioned as king of Babylon in the days of Hezekiah both in the second hook of Kings, ch. There is some doubt as to the time at which he went his ambassadors to Hezekiah, for the purpose of inquiring as to the astronomical marvel of which Judea had been the scene, (2 Chronicles 32:31 ) but it appears to have been B
Tirhakah - (See Hezekiah; SO; ESARHADDON. Naturally he helped Hezekiah of Judah against their common enemy Sennacherib, who threatened, Egypt. 10:1-3) represent Sennacherib to have advanced to Pelusium; here Tirhakah, the ally of Sethos, the king priest of Lower Egypt, and of Hezekiah, forced Sennacherib to retire, His acquisition of the throne of Egypt seems subsequent to his accession to the Ethiopian throne, and to the diversion which he made in favor of Hezekiah against Sennacherib
Azaziah - One of the overseers in the time of Hezekiah
Rabshakeh - An officer—the chief butler or cupbearer—who was sent with Rab-saris, the chief of the eunuchs, and Tartan, messengers of the king of Assyria, to Hezekiah, summoning him, in the most indecent and blasphemous manner, to surrender his capital
Azaziah - Overseer among the priests under Hezekiah (715-686 B
Conaniah - Levite in charge of collecting Temple offerings under King Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:12 )
Jehaleleel - Levite whose son helped King Hezekiah purify the Temple (2 Chronicles 29:12 )
Gihon - Hezekiah stopped the upper water-course of Gihon, and Manasseh built a wall on the west side of Gihon
ab'di - ) ...
The father of Kish, a Merarite, in the reign of Hezekiah
Dial, Sun-Dial - Hezekiah asked that the shadow might go backward ten degrees, and this took place on the dial of Ahaz. The same thing may not have occurred elsewhere, as it was simply to strengthen the faith of Hezekiah, nor is it necessary to suppose that the motion of the earth was reversed
Jimna(h) - A Levite under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:14 , spelled Imnah by English translations)
Spices - Spices were stored by Hezekiah in his treasure-house (2 Kings 20:13 ; Isaiah 39:2 )
Rabmag - Assyrian Rab-mugi, "chief physician," "who was attached to the king (Jeremiah 39:3,13 ), the title of one of Sennacherib's officers sent with messages to Hezekiah and the people of Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17-19:13 ;; Isaiah 36:12-37:13 )) demanding the surrender of the city
Rezeph - ), and which the Assyrians used as a warning to king Hezekiah of Judah in 701 B
Maonites - These Maonites are perhaps the Meunites attacked by Hezekiah (1 Chronicles 4:41 ) and Uzziah (2 Chronicles 26:7 ), a band of marauding Arabs from south of the Dead Sea in the vicinity of Ma'an
a'Ter - (Ezra 2:42 ; Nehemiah 7:45 ) ...
The children of ATER OF Hezekiah to the number of 98 returned with Zerubbabel, (Ezra 2:16 ; Nehemiah 7:21 ) and were among the heads of the people who signed the covenant with Nehemiah
Amasa'i, - (1 Chronicles 15:24 ) ...
Another Kohathite, in the reign of Hezekiah
Rab'Saris -
An officer of the king of Assyria sent up with Tartan and Rabshakeh against Jerusalem in the time of Hezekiah
ne-Ari'ah - ) ...
A son of Ishi, and one of the captains of the 500 Simeonites who in the days of Hezekiah, drove out the Amalekites from Mount Seir
Shiloah, Waters of - It differs from the Shiloah Tunnel Hezekiah built (2 Kings 20:20 )
Crane - Isaiah 38:14 (a) Hezekiah uses this word to illustrate the emptiness of his heart and the loneliness of his spirit when he was on his sick bed
Manasseh - There was another Manasseh, son of Hezekiah, whose history we have, 2 Kings 20:1-21; 2Ki 21:1-26...
Jehizkiah - Variant Hebrew spelling of Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:10 ; Isaiah 1:1 ; 1 Chronicles 4:41 ; 2 Chronicles 28:27-33:3 )
Hezekiah - " So "Hezekiah rejoiced that God had prepared the people, for the thing was done suddenly. ...
Hezekiah by letter invited not only Judah, but also Ephraim and Manasseh, to it: "Ye children of Israel, turn again unto the Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, and He will return to the remnant of you, escaped out of the hand of the king of Assyria. Owing to the want of priests several were not duly cleansed and sanctified, yet did eat the Passover; but Hezekiah prayed for them, "the good Lord pardon every one that prepareth his heart to seek God, though he be not cleansed according to the purification of the sanctuary. "...
So "the Lord hearkened to Hezekiah and healed the people. " "And Hezekiah spoke comfortably unto all the Levites that taught the good knowledge of the Lord," assuring them of God's pardon upon their "making confession to the Lord God" for the people, so that "the whole assembly took counsel and kept other seven days with gladness. ) "Hezekiah also broke in pieces the brazen serpent that Moses made," for previously "Israel did burn intense to it, and he called it Nehushtan" (piece of brass, nothing better: 2 Kings 18:4); a practical condemnation of "relics" when superstitiously venerated. The Passover must have been five or six years later than the purification of the temple, which was in Hezekiah's first year; for it was not until the sixth year of Hezekiah that the king of Assyria took Samaria (ver. 9-10); its fall prepared many in Israel to accept humbly Hezekiah's invitation (2 Chronicles 30:6; 2 Kings 22:1-141). Hezekiah also provided for the maintenance of the priests and Levites by commanding the payment of tithes; he ordered also their courses of service, and "in every work that he began in the service of the house of God, and in the law, and in the commandments, to seek his God, he did it with all his heart and prospered": a good motto for Christians (Colossians 3:23). ...
Isaiah the prophet was the great supporter of Hezekiah in his pious efforts; but not without opposition from drunken scoffers, who asked "whom shall he (Isaiah) teach knowledge? them that are weaned from the milk?" i. ...
Hezekiah recovered from the Philistines all the cities which his father Ahaz had lost, namely, of "the low country and the S. "Hezekiah smote them even unto Gaza (Gaza and Gath alone remained to them: Josephus, 2 Kings 18:8): "Rejoice not thou, whole Palestina, because the God of him that smote thee (Uzziah, 2 Chronicles 26:6) is broken (namely, under Ahaz), for out of the serpent's (as Uzziah was regarded by the Philistines) root shall come forth a cockatrice," an adder, to the Philistines, Hezekiah; "and the firstborn of the poor (the poorest) shall feed" in safety, instead of constant alarms of Philistine invasions. ...
Hezekiah bore for a time the yoke of tribute imposed by the Assyrian Tiglath Pileser on Ahaz (2 Kings 16:7); but having spent much on the Philistine war, trusting in the aid of Egypt, be now ventured to withhold payment from Assyria. Light years subsequent to Samaria's fall, in Hezekiah's fourteenth year, Sennacherib, in the third year of his reign according to Assyrian records, undertook his first expedition against Judah. ...
Hezekiah had used this interval to "stop the waters of the fountains without the city, stopping the upper watercourse (rather 'spring head') of Gihon (i. Hezekiah also "gathered together the waters of the lower pool," i. In the first he took all Judah's fenced cities, and Hezekiah sent saying, "I have offended; return from me, that which thou puttest upon me I will bear"; and "the king of Assyria appointed 300 talents of silver, and 30 talents of gold. "...
The monuments confirm this Scripture statement: "because Hezekiah king of Judah would not submit, I took 46 of his strong fenced cities . and from these, as spoil, 200,150 people, with horses, asses, camels, oxen, and sheep; and Hezekiah himself I shut up in Jerusalem, like a bird in a cage, building towers round the city to hem him in, and raising banks of earth against the gates . Then Hezekiah sent out to me the chiefs with 30 talents of gold and 800 talents of silver . The inscriptions record that Ekron had submitted to Hezekiah and delivered their king Padi up to him because of his adherence to Assyria. Hezekiah's sickness must have occurred just before Sennacherib's expedition, for God assures him (Isaiah 38:6), "I will deliver thee and this city out of the hand of the king of Assyria, and I will defend this city," in the 14th year of Hezekiah's reign. when he had just left Hezekiah and Hezekiah was in the act of praying, after having heard God's message, "thou shalt die. Three years afterward Hezekiah had a son, Manasseh, the chief cause of God's wrath against Judah and of the overthrow of the kingdom (1618449046_49). God gave Hezekiah as a sign of recovery the recession of the shadow ten degrees on Ahaz's (See DIAL, an obelisk in the midst of the court, the shadow of which could be seen by Hezekiah from his sick chamber, falling on the successive steps ascending to his palace. Hezekiah composed a thanksgiving hymn for his, recovery, based on the psalms of David, which he had restored to liturgical use in the temple. )...
Hezekiah did not disbelieve in a future state, but regarded the disembodied state as one wherein men cannot declare the praises of God before men, it is as to this world an unseen land of stillness, the living alone can praise God on earth. Sennacherib's object in his second expedition was Egypt, Hezekiah's ally. In the former invasion Sennacherib in his first, expedition inflicted a decisive blow on the united forces of Egypt and Ethiopia at Altagu (possibly the Eltekon of Joshua 15:59); but now he was forced to raise the siege of Pelusium by Tirhakah, and send an imperious letter to Hezekiah by Rabshakeh, whose sneers at his religious reforms in removing the high places (2 Kings 18:22-32) and flattering promises in fluent Hebrew to the people favor the idea that he was a renegade Jew. ...
Hezekiah's simple childlike faith appears in his spreading the foe's insolent, letter before the Lord. ) In this second expedition, according to Jehovah's word, Sennacherib did not "come before the city with shields, nor cast a bank against it" (Isaiah 37:33); whereas in the first he shut Hezekiah up as a "bird in a cage" also "raising banks of earth against the gates. ...
In Sennacherib's account of his wars with Hezekiah, inscribed with cuneiform characters in the hall of the palace of Koyunjik built by him (140 ft. In Isaiah 39, an embassy from Merodach Baladan to Hezekiah is recorded. He congratulated Hezekiah on his recovery, and sent also a present. Probably he recovered the Babylonian kingdom when Sennacherib was weakened by his disaster in Judea, and sent the embassy not merely to congratulate Hezekiah on his recovery but mainly to court Hezekiah's alliance, as having like himself cast off the Assyrian yoke. Hence arose Hezekiah's excessive attention to his ambassadors. But how had Hezekiah such a store of precious things? Either the transaction was before Hezekiah's straits when he had to cut off the gold from the doors and pilla
Merodach Baladan - Warred with Sargon and Sennacherib successively, having thrown off allegiance to them; so naturally drawn to Hezekiah who also had cast off the Assyrian yoke. Hezekiah's display was to show his ability to support a war. Old Testament) thinks his embassy after Hezekiah's sickness, if in 713 B. as the Hebrew numbers make it (the 14th year of Hezekiah; Isaiah 38:5; 2 Kings 18:13), was in his first reign (721-709 B. (See BABEL; BABYLON; Hezekiah. Hincks suggests reasonably that "Sennacherib" should be omitted after "king of Assyria" (2 Kings 18:13), Sargon reigning "in the 14th year of Hezekiah. " Thus, Hezekiah's sickness and the embassy of Merodach Baladan would be at this time, in the first reign of Merodach Baladan
Sennach'Erib, - 700, Sennacherib turned his arms toward the west, chastised Sidon, and, having probably concluded a convention with his chief enemy finally marched against Hezekiah, king of Judah. " ( 2 Kings 18:13 ) There can be no doubt that the record which he has left of his campaign against "Hiskiah" in his third year is the war with Hezekiah so briefly touched in vs. Hezekiah had again revolted, and claimed the protection of Egypt. Sennacherib therefore attacked Egypt, and from his camp at Lachish and Libnah he sent an insulting letter to Hezekiah at Jerusalem. In answer to Hezekiah's prayer an event occurred which relieved both Egypt and Judea from their danger
Rab-Shakeh - ]'>[1] officer, who with the Tartan and the Rab-saris was sent by Sennacherib to Hezekiah to demand the surrender of Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 18:1-37 f
Mattaniah - ...
...
A Levite who assisted in purifying the temple at the reformation under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:13 )
Joah - ) or chronicler to King Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:18,26,37 )
Sennacherib - King Hezekiah prayed for deliverance, and that night all the Assyrian soldiers – hundreds of thousands of them – were killed by an angel of G-d
a'di-el - (1 Chronicles 4:36 ) He took part in the murderous raid made by his tribe upon the peaceable Hamite shepherds of the valley of Gedor in the reign of Hezekiah
Zim'Mah - ...
Father of ancestor of Joab, a Gershonite in the reign of Hezekiah
Abia Abiah or Abijah - Mother of King Hezekiah
Reph'Aiah -
The sons of Rephaiah appear among the descendants of Zerubbabel in (1 Chronicles 3:21 ) ...
A Simeonite chieftain in the reign of Hezekiah
ko're - ) ...
Son of Imnah, a Levite in the reign of Hezekiah
Joah - Son of Asaph and an officer in the household of Hezekiah
mi'Cah - Micah exercised the prophetical office during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, giving thus a maximum limit of 59 years, B. 756-697, from the accession of Jotham to the death of Hezekiah, and a minimum limit of 16 years, B. 742-726, from the death of Jotham to the accession of Hezekiah
Rab-Saris - An officer sent with Rabshakeh and Tartan, to summon Hezekiah, 2 Kings 18:17 Jeremiah 39:3
Jerimoth - ...
...
A Levite, one of the overseers of the temple offerings (2 Chronicles 31:13 ) in the reign of Hezekiah
Hezekiah - Hezekiah. ...
Politically Hezekiah had a difficult task. Hezekiah seems to have remained faithful to the suzerain for some years after his accession, but when, about the time of Sennacherib’s accession (705), a coalition was formed against the oppressor he joined it. For this reason Hezekiah invaded his territory and took him prisoner. Hezekiah was compelled to release the captive Padi, who returned to his throne in triumph. The laconic sentence: ‘Hezekiah sent to the king of Assyria at Lachish, saying: I have offended; that which thou puttest on me will I bear’ ( 2 Kings 18:14 ) shows that abject submission was made. Whether Sennacherib was not satisfied with the submission of Hezekiah, or whether a second campaign was made which the historian has confused with this one, is not yet certainly known. Hezekiah’s sickness is dated by the Biblical writer in the time of this invasion, which can hardly be correct if the king lived fifteen years after that experience. ...
The account of Hezekiah’s religious reforms is more sweeping than seems probable for that date
Hezekiah - On the death of Sargon and the accession of his son Sennacherib to the throne of Assyria, Hezekiah refused to pay the tribute which his father had paid, and "rebelled against the king of Assyria, and served him not," but entered into a league with Egypt (Isaiah 30 ; 31 ; 36:6-9 ). Hezekiah yielded to the demands of the Assyrian king, and agreed to pay him three hundred talents of silver and thirty of gold (18:14). ...
But Sennacherib dealt treacherously with Hezekiah (Isaiah 33:1 ), and a second time within two years invaded his kingdom (2 Kings 18:17 ; 2 Chronicles 32:9 ; Isaiah 36 ). Hezekiah prayed to God, and "that night the angel of the Lord went out, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians 185,000 men. ) ...
The narrative of Hezekiah's sickness and miraculous recovery is found in 2Kings 20:1, 2 Chronicles 32:24 , Isaiah 38:1
Rabshakeh - The official who dealt with Hezekiah spoke for the Assyrian king much as would an ambassador
Corruption - Isaiah 38:17 (b) Hezekiah is comparing hell to a place of seething rottenness, filled with terrible wickedness, from which he has been graciously delivered
Elizaphan - Father of certain Levites that assisted Hezekiah in cleansing the temple
Kehushtan - Hezekiah, perceiving that the people had been in the habit of paying a superstitious reverence to it, broke it up
Tartan - ]'>[1] officers, one of whom was sent by Sargon to Ashdod ( Isaiah 20:1 ), while the other, with the Rab-saris and the Rab-shakeh , was sent by Sennacherib to demand from Hezekiah the surrender of Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 18:17 )
Gihon - Hezekiah made an aqueduct from it ( 2 Chronicles 32:30 )
Mattaniah - Descendant of Asaph in the time of Hezekiah
Isaiah - He exercised the functions of his office during the reigns of Uzziah (or Azariah), Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah (1:1). He lived till the fourteenth year of Hezekiah, and in all likelihood outlived that monarch (who died B. So long as Ahaz reigned, the kingdom of Judah was unmolested by the Assyrian power; but on his accession to the throne, Hezekiah (B. Hezekiah was reduced to despair, and submitted to the Assyrians (2 Kings 18:14-16 ). Isaiah on that occasion encouraged Hezekiah to resist the Assyrians (37:1-7), whereupon Sennacherib sent a threatening letter to Hezekiah, which he "spread before the Lord" (37:14). " The remaining years of Hezekiah's reign were peaceful (2 Chronicles 32:23,27-29 )
Dial - ...
The dial was of such a size and so placed that Hezekiah, when convalescent, could witness the miracle from his chamber; probably "in the middle court," the point where Isaiah turned back to announce to Hezekiah God's answer to his prayer (2 Kings 20:4; 2 Kings 20:9; Isaiah 38:21-22)
Kore - Son of Imnah, the Levite, keeper of the eastern gate, and appointed by Hezekiah to receive the freewill offerings and distribute them among the priests (2 Chronicles 31:14 )
Isa'Iah, - The Hebrew name signifies Salvation of Jahu (a shortened form of Jehovah), He prophesied concerning Judah and Jerusalem in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, ( Isaiah 1:1 ) covering probably 758 to 698 B
Adrammelech - The king returning to Nineveh, after his unhappy expedition made into Judea against king Hezekiah, was killed by his two sons, Adrammelech and Sharezer, while at his devotions in the temple of his god Nisroch, Isaiah 37:38 ; 2 Kings 19
Azazi'ah - (1 Chronicles 27:20 ) ...
One of the Levites in the reign of Hezekiah, who had charge of the tithes, and dedicated things in the temple
Shebna - Tender youth, "treasurer" over the house in the reign of Hezekiah, i
Amasai - ...
...
The father of a Levite, one of the two Kohathites who took a prominent part at the instance of Hezekiah in the cleansing of the temple (2 Chronicles 29:12 )
Jehizkiah - JEHIZKIAH or Hezekiah
Merodach-Baladan - He sent ambassadors to Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 32:31, about b
Amariah - Head of one of the 24 courses of priests which bore his name under David, Hezekiah, and Nehemiah (1 Chronicles 24:14 Nehemiah or Immer; 2 Chronicles 31:15; Nehemiah 10:3; Nehemiah 12:2; Nehemiah 12:13)
Ambassador - Eliakim, Shebna, and Josh, the servants of king Hezekiah, were called "ambassadors of peace
Eliakim - The master of the household of Hezekiah, and one of the commissioners appointed to treat with the king of Assyria
jo'ah -
The son of Asaph,a nd chronicler or keeper of the records to Hezekiah
Kish - ...
...
A Levite in the time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:12 )
Zachariah - ...
...
The father of Abi, who was the mother of Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:2 )
Beth-Eden - An Assyrian representative bragged about conquering Beth-Eden, urging Hezekiah to surrender about 701 B
Rabsaris - Hezekiah and Zedekiah each rebelled against the Assyrian rule and withheld tribute payment
Shebna - A major-domo or palace-governor of king Hezekiah, against whom is directed one of the recorded utterances of Isaiah ( Isaiah 22:15-25 )
Gemariah - The son of Hilkiah, sent to Babylon by King Hezekiah with tribute money for Nebuchadnezzar
Jozabad - Levite in the days of Hezekiah 2 Chronicles 31:13
Jehiel - Levite who helped purify the Temple under King Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:14 ) according to ancient Bible translations and scribal note; the written Hebrew text has Jehuel. Later, under Hezekiah possibly the same Jehiel served as an overseer in the Temple (2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Gihon - " Hezekiah stopped its upper source, at some distance off, at a higher level (2 Chronicles 32:30), and "brought it straight down to the W. of the tombs of the kings (probably the "upper pool," 2 Kings 18:17; Isaiah 7:3; Isaiah 36:2, and "upper watercourse of Gihon" stopped by Hezekiah) to the pool of Bethesda. It is suggested that the city of David was on the eastern hill, so Hezekiah by bringing it W
Hizkiah - Abbreviated form in Hebrew for Hezekiah and used as alternate spelling of the king's name (2 Kings 18:1 ; Proverbs 25:1 )
Amasai - Levite, father of Mahath, who helped purify the Temple under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:12 )
Rezeph - A city mentioned in the message of the Rabshakeh of Sennacherib to Hezekiah ( 2 Kings 19:12 , Isaiah 37:12 )
Millo - It was rebuilt by Solomon (1 Kings 9:15,24 ; 11:27 ) and repaired by Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 32:5 )
Asaph - A recorder of King Hezekiah, 2 Kings 18:18 Isaiah 36:3 ...
3
Nehushtan - (nih huhssh' tan) Name of a “brazen serpent” destroyed by King Hezekiah as part of an attempt to reform Judah's life and worship (2 Kings 18:4 )
Eliel - A Levite in time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Millo - A part of ancient Jerusalem, though afterwards said to be 'built' by Solomon; it was repaired by Hezekiah
Mil'lo - ( 2 Samuel 5:9 ; 1 Chronicles 11:8 ) Its repair or restoration was one of the great works for which Solomon raised his "levy," (1 Kings 9:15,24 ; 11:27 ) and it formed a prominent part of the fortifications by which Hezekiah prepared for the approach of the Assyrians
Pelati'ah - ) ...
One of the captains of the marauding band of Simeonites who in the reign of Hezekiah made an expedition to Mount Seir and smote the Amalekites
Asai'ah -
A prince of one of the families of the Simeonites in the reign of Hezekiah
Micah, Book of - The superscription to this book states that the prophet exercised his office in the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah. If we reckon from the beginning of Jotham's reign to the end of Hezekiah's (B. 759-698), then he ministered for about fifty-nine years; but if we reckon from the death of Jotham to the accession of Hezekiah (B
Adrammelech - Son of Sennacherib, king of Assyria, Isaiah 37:38 ; 2 Kings 19:37 , who, upon returning to Nineveh after his fatal expedition against Hezekiah, was killed by his two sons, Adrammelech and Sharezer, through fear, according to Jewish tradition, of being sacrificed to his idol Nisroch
Sepharva'im - (the two Sipparas ) is mentioned by Sennacherib in his letter to Hezekiah as a city whose king had been unable to resist the Assyrians
Asaph - ...
...
The "recorder" in the time of Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:18,37 )
Ekron - 702, when Sennacherib set free its king, imprisoned by Hezekiah in Jerusalem, according to the Assyrian record
Mehunims - They are again mentioned in 1 Chronicles 4:41 (RSV), in the reign of King Hezekiah, as a Hamite people, settled in the eastern end of the valley of Gedor, in the wilderness south of Palestine
Eliakim - In his office as governor of the palace of Hezekiah he succeeded Shebna (Isaiah 22:15-25 )
Amariah - ...
One of the high priests in the time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:15 )
Dragon Well - The Dragon Well has been identified with the Gihon spring, the main water source during the time of Hezekiah, the Siloam pool which was fed by the Gihon, the En-rogel spring located 210 meters south of the confluence of the Hinnom and Kidron valleys, or with a spring along the east side of the Tyropoeon Valley which has since dried up
Michmas - Isaiah refers to it in connection with the invasion of Sennacherib in the reign of Hezekiah
Ivory - ‘Beds of ivory,’ such as are mentioned in Amos 6:4 , were, according to a cuneiform inscription, included in the tribute paid by Hezekiah to Sennacherib
Jerimoth - One of the Levites who had charge of the dedicated things in the time of Hezekiah
Gihon - Hezekiah stopped the upper water-courses of Gihon and brought the water down to the west side of the city of David
Mehu'Nims, the, - Another notice of the Mehunims in the reign of Hezekiah (cir
Sennacherib - Hezekiah, king of Judah, having refused to pay him tribute, though he afterward submitted, he invaded Judea with a great army, took several forts, and after repeated, insolent, and blasphemous messages, besieged Jerusalem; but his army being suddenly smitten with a pestilence, which cut off a hundred and eighty-five thousand in a single night, he returned to Nineveh, where he was murdered in the temple of Nisroch by his sons Adrammelech and Sharezer, and was succeeded by his other son, Esar-haddon, 2 Kings 19:7 ; 2 Kings 19:13 ; 2 Kings 19:37
Jeshua - ...
...
A Levite appointed by Hezekiah to distribute offerings in the priestly cities (2 Chronicles 31:15 )
Dial - The causing the shadow upon it to go back ten degrees, to assure king Hezekiah of his recovery from sickness, was probably effected not by arresting and turning backwards the revolution of the earth, but by a miraculous refraction of the sun's rays, observed only in Judea, though the fame of it reached Babylon, 2 Chronicles 32:31
Azariah - Chief priest of the house of Zadok, in Hezekiah's reign, who appointed chambers in the house of the Lord for storing the tithes and offerings, on which were dependent the attendance of the priests at the temple services (Nehemiah 10:35-39; Nehemiah 12:27-80; Nehemiah 12:44-47; 2 Chronicles 31:10-13). Hebrew name of (See ABEDNEGO (Daniel 1:6-19; Daniel 1:3); of the seed royal of Judah; fulfilling the prophecy to Hezekiah (Isaiah 39:5-7); famed for beauty, wisdom, above all faithfulness unto death, and for his miraculous deliverance from the furnace. Several others: 1 Chronicles 6:36 = Ezra, 1 Chronicles 9:11; Nehemiah 3:23-24; Nehemiah 8:7; 2 Chronicles 29:12; 2 Chronicles 28:12; compare Jeremiah 43:2; Nehemiah 12:32-33; 1 Chronicles 2:38-39; Azariah whose name proves that the genealogy in 1 Chronicles 2:36-41 was made in Hezekiah's reign, for Azariah (1 Chronicles 2:38) appears from 2 Chronicles 23:1; 2 Chronicles 24:1, to have been captain when Joash was seven years old, i. After Azariah in that genealogy are six generations, ending with Elishama; and from Joash to Hezekiah also six; therefore Elishama was contemporary with Hezekiah
Sennacherib - Hezekiah king of Judah having shaken off the yoke of the Assyrians, by which Ahaz his father had suffered under Tigloth-pileser, Sennacherib marched an army against him, and took all the strong cities of Judah. Hezekiah, seeing he had nothing left but Jerusalem, which he perhaps found it difficult to preserve, sent ambassadors to Sennacherib, then besieging and destroying Lachish, to make submission. Hezekiah entreated the Lord, who sent a destroying angel against the Assyrian army, and slew in one night 185,000 men. In this region he came in conflict with an Egyptian army, sent in aid of King Hezekiah; this host he defeated and drove back. The inscription then proceeds to say, "Hezekiah king of Judah, who had not submitted to my authority, forty-six of his principal cities, and fortresses and villages dependant upon them, of which I took no account, I captured, and carried away their spoil. He does not profess to have taken Jerusalem itself, but to have carried away Hezekiah's family, servants, and treasures, with a tribute of thirty talents of gold and eight hundred talents of silver. The three hundred talents of silver mentioned in Scripture may have been all that was given in money, and the five hundred additional claimed in the Ninevite record may include the temple and palace treasures, given by Hezekiah as the price of peace
Lachish - In the reign of Hezekiah, Sennacherib took Lachish, and while he was quartered there Hezekiah sent messengers to him to make terms ( 2 Kings 18:13-17 )
Nahum - Nahum prophesied before the destruction of Nineveh, which he predicts, and probably in the reign of Hezekiah
Mehunim - During the reign of Hezekiah (727-698 B
Dedication, Feast of the - (1) That of Solomon's temple (1 Kings 8:2 ; 2 Chronicles 5:3 ); (2) the dedication in the days of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29 ); and (3) the dedication of the temple after the Captivity (Ezra 6:16 )
Asher - They are honorably mentioned in the history of David, 1 Chronicles 12:36 , and of Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 30:11
Wills - The case of houses in walled towns was different, and there can be no doubt that they must, in fact, have frequently been bequeathed by will, (Leviticus 25:30 ) Two instances are recorded in the Old Testament under the law of the testamentary disposition, (1) effected in the case of Ahithophel, (2 Samuel 17:23 ) (2) recommended in the case of Hezekiah
Asaiah - A leader of tribe of Simeon who helped drive out people of Ham from pastures of Gedor when Hezekiah was king of Judah (715-686 B
Asahel - A subordinate collector of offerings and tithes in the reign of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:18 )
Uzziel - Son of Jeduthun, a Levite: he helped to cleanse the temple in the days of Hezekiah
Brazen Serpent - The brazen serpent was long preserved, as a memorial of the gracious miracle wrought in connection with it; but being regarded as an object of worship, it was broken to pieces by king Hezekiah, as Nehushtana mere piece of brass, 2 Kings 18:4
Jer'Imoth - ) ...
A Levite in the reign of Hezekiah
Bath, Bathing - The "pools," such as that of Siloam and Hezekiah, (2 Kings 20:20 ; Nehemiah 3:15,16 ; Isaiah 22:11 ; John 9:7 ) often sheltered by porticos, (John 5:2 ) are the first indications we have of public bathing accommodation
Gihon - Before Sennacherib's arrival, Hezekiah plugged the aqueduct and dug his famous water tunnel (2 Kings 20:20 ; 2 Chronicles 32:30 ). See Eden ; Hezekiah ; Jerusalem ; Kidron Valley ; Siloam ; Water
Hezekiah - Hezekiah. Hezekiah's payment of tribute is noted in 2 Kings 18:13-16. Then came Sennacherib's letters from Lachish and Libnah, the destruction of a great part of his army, and the retreat of the rest to Assyria, in answer to Hezekiah's prayer. Hezekiah's sickness, humiliation, and prolongation of life 15 years in peace, and the prediction that Babylon, then feeble and friendly, would one day carry his descendants into captivity are noticed in Old Testament history, Isaiah 39:1-8; Micah 4:10. Hezekiah collated the Proverbs of Solomon
Micah - He prophesied under Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, for about fifty years, if with some we reckon from near the beginning of the reign of Jotham, to the last year of Hezekiah B
Sennacherib - Ashkelon and Ekron were captured, and Hezekiah had to restore Padi to the throne of Ekron after keeping him some time in prison. The Egyptians and their allies who had moved to support Hezekiah were defeated at Eltekeh. Hezekiah seems to have attempted to bribe him to retreat, sending immense tribute to Sennacherib while he was besieging Lachish
Hilkiah - Father of Eliakim, who was in charge of the household of King Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:18 )
Rab-Saris - ]'>[1] official who was sent by Sennacherib to Hezekiah to demand the surrender of Jerusalem ( 2 Kings 18:17 )
Asaph - Father of Joah recorder to Hezekiah
Hezekiah - (See Isaiah 36:1-22; Isaiah 37:1-38; Isaiah 38:1-22; Isaiah 39:1-8) The miraculous effect wrought on the sun-dial, in confirmation of the Lord's promise to Hezekiah, is an evident testimony of the Lord's favour to this prince. Hezekiah's hymn is beautiful, Isaiah 38:10-20
Amariah - One of the Levites in the time of Hezekiah
a'Saph - ) ...
The father or ancestor of Joah, the chronicler to the kingdom of Judah in the reign of Hezekiah, (2 Kings 18:18,37 ; Isaiah 36:3,22 ) probably the same as the preceding
Gihon - Hezekiah covered it over, and brought its waters by a subterranean channel into the city, 2 Chronicles 32:3,30 33:14
as'Ahel - ) ...
A Levite in the reign of Hezekiah, who had charge of the tithes and dedicated things in the temple
Lemuel - Not, as Hitzig guessed, elder brother to Agur, king of an Arab tribe in Massa, on the borders of Palestine, and both sprung from the Simeonites who drove out the Amalekites from Mount Seir under Hezekiah, as if Lemuel were an older form of Nemuel, or Jemuel, Simeon's oldest son
Millo - So Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 32:5)
Eliakim - ” The son of Hilkiah who was in charge of the household of King Hezekiah of Judah (2 Kings 18:18 )
Posts, - When Hezekiah proclaimed a Passover for all Israel he sent letters of invitation by 'runners' from city to city
Mer'Ari, Mer'Arites - (Joshua 21:7 ; 34-40 ; 1 Chronicles 6:63 ; 77-81 ) In the days of Hezekiah the Merarites were still flourishing
Joz'Abad - (1 Chronicles 12:20 ) ...
A Levite in the reign of Hezekiah
Jehiel - ...
...
One of the Levites of the family of Heman who assisted Hezekiah in his work of reformation (2 Chronicles 29:14 )
Ahaz - Both in Kings and Chronicles it states that Ahaz was 20 years old when he began to reign, and he reigned 16 years; Hezekiah his son was 25 years old when he succeeded Ahaz. Apparently there is an error in the ages given: either Ahaz was older, or Hezekiah was not so old, for he would have been born when his father was 11 years of age
na'Hum - (McClintock and Strong come to the conclusion that Nahum was a native of Galilee that at the captivity of the ten tribes he escaped into Judah, and prophesied in the reign of Hezekiah, 726-698. ( Nahum 1:12 ; 2:8,13 ; 3:16-17 ) It is most probable that Nahum flourished in the latter half of the return of Hezekiah, and wrote his prophecy either in Jerusalem or its neighborhood
Serpent, Fiery - ) This "brazen serpent" was preserved by the Israelites till the days of Hezekiah, when it was destroyed ( 2 Kings 18:4 )
Jerimoth - An overseer of Temple treasury under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:13 )
Ahaz - 740-724), and was succeeded by his son Hezekiah
Eliel - An overseer of Temple offerings among the Levites (2 Chronicles 31:13 ) under King Hezekiah (715-686 B
Eliel - Levite in the time of Hezekiah, 'overseer' of the offerings
Serpent, Brazen - The brazen serpent was preserved among the Israelites down to the time of Hezekiah; who, being informed that the people paid a superstitious worship to it, had it broken in pieces, and by way of contempt gave it the name of Nehushtan, that is to say, a brazen bauble or trifle, 2 Kings 18:4
Tirhakah - This prince, at the head of a powerful army, attempted to relieve Hezekiah, when attacked by Sennarcherib, 2 Kings 19:9 , but the Assyrian army was routed before he came up, Isaiah 37:19 , B
Eli'el - ) ...
A Levite in the time of Hezekiah; one of the overseers of the offerings made in the temple
Bronze Serpent - There, in the account of King Hezekiah's purging of the Temple, the Bible tells of the destruction of this symbol. Hezekiah wanted to purify Temple worship. This explains why the Israelites revered it, why Hezekiah (probably ancient Judah's best king) contemptuously called it “a serpent-shaped piece of bronze,” and why he destroyed it. See Moses ; Wilderness ; Atonement ; Hezekiah
Abijah - The mother of King Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 29:1
Recorder - The next recorder mentioned is Joah, in the reign of Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:18,37 ; Isaiah 36:3,22 )
Manasseh, King of Judah - No sooner had he established his power than he began a program of demolishing all the reforms that his father Hezekiah had introduced
Micah - The sixth of the minor prophets, is called the Morashite, from his birthplace Moresheh, in the territory of Gath, westward from Jerusalem, He prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, b
Eliakim - The son of Hilkiah, he who was ‘over the household’ of king Hezekiah, and one of the three who represented the king during the interview with Sennacherib’s emissaries ( 2 Kings 18:18 , Isaiah 36:3 )
Conduit - The "conduit of the upper pool" (Isaiah 7:3 ) was formed by Hezekiah for the purpose of conveying the waters from the upper pool in the valley of Gihon to the west side of the city of David (2 Kings 18:17 ; 20:20 ; 2 Chronicles 32:30 )
Scribe - Thus when the king of Assyria sent to Hezekiah a blasphemous message and letter, we are told that then came out to the messengers Eleakim, which was over the household, and Shebna the scribe, and Josh the recorder
Bed - Hence Hezekiah is said to turn his face to the wall when he prayed, that is, from his attendants
Ahaz - , Ahaz was 20 years old when he ascended the throne, he must have been the father of Hezekiah when eleven years of age
Asaph - The father of Joan, recorder to King Hezekiah
Haran - Haran was ravaged by the Assyrians in the time of Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:12 ; Isaiah 37:12
Shemai'ah - ) ...
A descendant of Jeduthun the singer who lived in the reign of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:14 ) ...
One of the sons of Adonikam who returned with Ezra. ) ...
A Levite in the reign of Hezekiah
Maon, Maonites - , the Maonites (called Meunim in this passage) were, in the reign of Hezekiah, driven out of their pasture land by the Simeonites
Dial - It was on the "dial of Ahaz" that the miraculous sign given to Hezekiah for bis recovery from sickness showed itself
Conduit - In a marvelous engineering feat, Hezekiah had workmen start at both ends and meet in the middle to construct a water tunnel connecting Gihon Spring and the Pool of Siloam (2 Kings 20:20 ; 2Chronicles 32:2-4,2 Chronicles 32:30 )
Nahum - The best interpreters adopt Jerome's opinion, that he foretold the destruction of Nineveh in the time of Hezekiah, after the war of Sennacherib in Egypt mentioned by Berosus
Hosea - He prophesied for a long time, from Uzziah to Hezekiah, about 785-725 B
Sennacherib - (See Hezekiah: ASSYRIA; NINEVEH. )...
Hezekiah's sickness was in his 14th year, but Sennacherib's expedition in his 27th, which ought to be substituted for the copyist's error "fourteenth. He took Ekron, which had submitted to Hezekiah and had delivered its king Padi up to him; Sennacherib reseated Padi on his throne. He shut up Hezekiah, (building towers round Jerusalem), who then submitted and paid 30 talents of gold and 800 of silver
Azari'ah - (2 Chronicles 28:12 ) ...
A Kohathite, father of Joel, in the reign of Hezekiah. ) ...
A Merarite, son of Jehalelel, in the time of Hezekiah. (2 Chronicles 29:12 ) ...
The high priest in the days of Hezekiah
Isaiah, the Book of - Consists of prophecies delivered (Isaiah 1 ) in the reign of Uzziah (1-5), (2) of Jotham (6), (3) Ahaz ((7-14:28),), (4) the first half of Hezekiah's reign (14:28-35), (5) the second half of Hezekiah's reign (36-66). 762) to the last year of Hezekiah (B. He may, however, have survived Hezekiah, and may have perished in the way indicated above. ...
Four chapters are historical (36-39), relating to the times of Hezekiah
Pool - ...
The following are some of the principal pools mentioned in Scripture: pool of Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:20 ), upper and lower pools of Gihon (Isaiah 7:3 ; Isaiah 22:9 ), old pool (Isaiah 22:11 ), King's pool at Jerusalem (Nehemiah 2:14 ), pool of Bethesda (John 5:2 ,John 5:2,5:4 ,John 5:4,5:7 ), and pool of Siloam (John 9:7 ,John 9:7,9:11 )
Proverbs, Book of - ...
...
Containing proverbs of Solomon "which the men of Hezekiah, the king of Judah, collected" (ch
Asahel - A Levite under Hezekiah, the king of Judah following Ahaz
Ahaz - Ahaz, whose name means “he has grasped,” was the son and successor of Jotham as king of Judah and the father of Hezekiah
Ambassador - Ambassadors came from Babylon to visit Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 32:31 ; and from the king of Egypt to Josiah
Nehushtan - We find, by what is said of Hezekiah's destroying it, that the Israelites had preserved it, and brought it with them into Canaan. But what a sad delusion must they have fallen into in setting it up for an object of worship, and burning incense to it! (See Numbers 21:6 compared with John 3:14) The name Nehushtan is from Nachash, serpent; so that by Hezekiah calling it not Nachash, but Nehushtan, he meant to shew by the alteration his contempt of it as an idol
Gihon - On the occasion of the approach of the Assyrian army under Sennacherib, Hezekiah, in order to prevent the besiegers from finding water, "stopped the upper water course of Gihon, and brought it straight down to the west side of the city of David" ( 2 Chronicles 32:30 ; 33:14 ). This inscription was executed in all probability by Hezekiah's workmen. If the "waters of Shiloah that go softly" (Isaiah 8:6 ) refers to the gentle stream that still flows through the tunnel into the Pool of Siloam, then this excavation must have existed before the time of Hezekiah
Amalek, Amalekites - In the days of Hezekiah the rest of the Amalekites were smitten by the sons of Simeon. ...
We thus find that Amalek was the first to attack Israel, and continued an enemy ever ready to molest them when they were weak even until the days of Hezekiah, and they are found in the hostile confederacy at the close of their history: an apt type of Satan as the enemy of God's people
Zephani'ah - His pedigree is traced to his fourth ancestor, Hezekiah, (Zephaniah 1:1 ) supposed to be the celebrated king of that name
Courses - This arrangement was re-established by Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:2 ); and afterwards the four sacerdotal courses which are said to have returned from the Captivity were re-divided into the original number of twenty-four by (Ezra 6:18 )
Ivory - Hezekiah was credited with giving Sennacherib tribute in 701 B
Azariah - ...
...
High priest in the days of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:10-13 )
Manasseh - ) who was a son of Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:21 )
Asaph - Father of court official under King Hezekiah (715-686 B
Zabad - in proof that this genealogy ends in the time of Hezekiah
So - Smith's deciphering) married the sister of Tirhakah who helped Hezekiah against Sennacherib; at Sabaku's death Tirhakah succeeded, Sabaku's son being set aside
Amariah - Priest under Hezekiah responsible for distributing resources from Jerusalem Temple to priests in priestly cities outside Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 31:15 )
Jesh'ua - ) ...
One of the Levites in the reign of Hezekiah
Proverb, the Book of - Proverbs 25:1-29:27 are proverbs of Solomon collected under the direction of King Hezekiah
Jesh'ua - ) ...
One of the Levites in the reign of Hezekiah
Mich'Mas - In the invasion of Sennacherib in the reign of Hezekiah, it is mentioned by Isaiah
la'Chish - (2 Chronicles 11:9 ) In the reign of Hezekiah it was one of the cities taken by Sennacherib
Brazen Serpent - When this superstition began, it is difficult to determine; but the best account is given by the Jewish rabbi, David Kimchi, in the following manner: From the time that the kings of Israel did evil, and the children of Israel followed idolatry, till the reign of Hezekiah, they offered incense to it; for it being written in the law of Moses, "Whoever looketh upon it shall live," they fancied they might obtain blessings by its mediation, and therefore thought it worthy to be worshipped. But Hezekiah thought fit to take it quite away, when he abolished other idolatry, because in the time of his father they adored it as an idol; and though pious people, among them accounted it only as a memorial of a wonderful work, yet he judged it better to abolish it, though the memory of the miracle should happen to be lost, than suffer it to remain, and leave the Israelites in danger to commit idolatry hereafter with it
Proverbs - One portion of the book, from the twenty-fifth chapter to the end of the twenty-ninth, was compiled by the men of Hezekiah, as appears from the title prefixed to it. Eliakim, Shebna, Josh, Isaiah, Hosea, and Micah, personages of eminence and worth, were contemporary with Hezekiah; but whether these or others executed the compilation, it is now impossible to determine. Both collections, however, being made at so early a period, is a satisfactory evidence that the Proverbs are the genuine production of Solomon, to whom they are ascribed; for, from the death of Solomon to the reign of Hezekiah, according to the Bible chronology, was a period of two hundred and forty-nine years, or, according to Dr. Hales, two hundred and sixty- five years; too short a space to admit of any forgery or material error, as either must have been immediately detected by the worthies who flourished during the virtuous reign of Hezekiah
Isaiah - , and exercised the prophetical office some sixty years, under the three following monarchs, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, Isaiah 1:1 . In Isaiah 24:1-35:10 , which would seem to belong to the time of Hezekiah, the prophet appears to look forward in prophetic vision to the times of the exile and of the Messiah. Isaiah 36:1-39:8 gives a historical account to Sennacherib's invasion, and of the advice given by Isaiah to Hezekiah. ...
Some commentators have proposed to divide the book of Isaiah chronologically into three parts, as if composed under the three kings, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah
Micah - Micah prophesied in the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah somewhere between 756 and 697 B. ...
His earlier prophecies under Jotham and Ahaz were collected and written out as one whole under Hezekiah. Probably the book was read before the assembled king and people on some fast or festival, as certain elders quoted to the princes and people assembled against Jeremiah (Jeremiah 26:18) Exodus 34:6-7,7 "Micah the Morasthite in the days of Hezekiah, and spoke to all the people of Judah, Thus saith the Lord of hosts, Zion shall be plowed like a field, and Jerusalem shall become heaps, and the mountain of the house as the high places of a forest. Did Hezekiah put him . ...
Shalmaneser and Sargon took Samaria in the sixth year of Hezekiah (722 B
Micah, Book of - ), and Hezekiah (715-686 B. Jeremiah 26:17-18 refers to Micah as prophesying during the time of Hezekiah. Hezekiah, king of Judah, instituted many reforms that caused the Assyrian king, Sennacherib, to respond with force. As for Hezekiah, Sennacherib says, “Himself I made a prisoner in Jerusalem, his royal residence, like a bird in a cage. See Ahaz ; Assyria; Israel ; Hezekiah ; Jerusalem ; Prophet; Samaria
Hephzibah - " As the prophets naturally mould their prophecies in a form suggested by the facts of the day, Hezekiah's marriage to Hephzibah, Manasseh's mother (2 Kings 21:1), would obviously suggest itself. " The marriage of Hezekiah moreover was at a late period of his reign, after his sickness and recovery described in Isaiah 38. ...
Indeed Hezekiah's desire of life in that sickness was mainly because, being childless then, he was leaving no successor to the kingdom (Josephus); to which God's words may refer, "set thine house in order," i. 62, concerning Hephzibah would be just at the time of Hezekiah's marriage to her; his reign in all being 29 years, the marriage was after the 14th year and before the 12th year preceding Hezekiah's death, i
Kish - He assisted in cleansing the Temple during the time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:12 )
Table of Kings And Prophets in Israel And Judah - ...
730...
Hoshea,...
726...
Hezekiah,...
Nahum
Mattani'ah - (1 Chronicles 25:4,16 ) ...
A descendant of Asaph the Levite minstrel, who assisted in the purification of the temple in the reign of Hezekiah
Lachish - Sennacherib was at Lachish when Hezekiah begged peace. Thence he sent his first message to Hezekiah by Rabshakeh, and then having left Lachish to war against Libnah, from the latter sent again (2 Kings 18:14; 2 Kings 18:17; 2 Kings 19:8)
Manasseh - The western Manasseh, of which only a few glimpses are visible in the later history of Israel, always showed itself on the right side; as, for instance, in the cases of Asa, 2 Chronicles 15:9; Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 30:1; 2 Chronicles 30:11; 2 Chronicles 30:18, and Josiah, 2 Chronicles 34:6; 2 Chronicles 9:2. Son and successor of Hezekiah, king of Judah, ascended the throne at the age of twelve years, b
Judas the Galilaean - Judas the Galilaean, a Zealot leader at the time of the census under Quirinius, was probably the son of Hezekiah (Josephus, Ant. Herod, while representing his father, had captured and summarily executed Hezekiah with a number of his followers without having recourse to the Sanhedrin or Hyrcanus (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) i. ’ The death of Hezekiah apparently left Judas at the head of a movement against Roman rule similar to that of Mattathias and his body of revolutionaries against the Syrians
Temptation - We read of the temptation of Joseph (Genesis 39 ), of David (2 Samuel 24 ; 1 Chronicles 21 ), of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 32:31 ), of Daniel (Daniel 6 ), etc
Brass - It was afterwards carried by the Jews into Canaan, and preserved by them till the time of Hezekiah, who caused it to be at length destroyed because it began to be viewed by the people with superstitious reverence (2 Kings 18:4 )
Conduit - Hezekiah stopped the "upper watercourse of Gihon," and brought it down straight to the W. He thinks the lately discovered subterranean conduit in the city to be a branch from Hezekiah's watercourse
Nahum, Book of - Others, however, think that his prophecies are to be referred to the latter half of the reign of Hezekiah (about B
Siloam - Siloam was the pool created by Hezekiah's tunnel which diverted the waters of Shiloah from the Siloam Spring to a point less vulnerable to the Assyrian enemy. Hezekiah's inscription preserved on the tunnel wall describes the meeting of tunnel builders boring through rock from each end of the tunnel. ...
The pool, created by Hezekiah and known by Jesus is still a source of water today
Asaph - The father of Joah, the ‘recorder’ or chronicler at the court of Hezekiah ( 2 Kings 18:18 ; 2 Kings 18:37 etc
Gaza - It was held afterwards by Solomon, 1 Kings 4:24 (where it is called AZZAH, as it is also in Deuteronomy 2:23 and Jeremiah 25:20 ); but had to be taken again by Hezekiah
Shalmaneser - Hezekiah king of Judah successfully resisted him, 2 Kings 18:7 : but he appears to have ravaged Moab, Isaiah 10:9,15,16,23 ; and is said in Josephus to have conquered Phoenicia, with the exception of insular Tyre, which he besieged in vain for five years
Kidron or Cedron - In this valley and in that of Hinnom, at their confluence, kings Asa, Josiah, and Hezekiah destroyed the idols and abominations by which Jerusalem was defiled, 1 Kings 15:13 2 Kings 23:4,6,12 2 Chronicles 29:16
Zechariah - The father of Abi or Abijah, the mother of king Hezekiah ( 2 Kings 18:2 , 2 Chronicles 29:1 ). A reforming Asaphite under Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 29:13 )
Amalekites - A remnant, however, escaped and subsided afterwards; David defeated them on several occasions, 1 Samuel 27:8 30:1 2 Samuel 8:12 ; and they were finally blotted out by the Simeonites, in the time of Hezekiah, 1 Chronicles 4:43 , thus fulfilling the prediction of Balaam, Numbers 24:20
Zephaniah -
The son of Cushi, and great-grandson of Hezekiah, and the ninth in the order of the minor prophets
Amaziah - ...
...
The father of Joshah, one of the Simeonite chiefs in the time of Hezekiah (1 Chronicles 4:34 )
Amariah - Zephaniah 1:1 , great-grandfather of the prophet Zephaniah, and son of a Hezekiah who may be the king. 2 Chronicles 31:16 , a Levite, a gate-porter, in Hezekiah’s time
Pearl - ...
The godly love even the sharp rebuke which heals their souls (Proverbs 15:31; Psalms 141:5; Job 13:23; Isaiah 39:8, Hezekiah; the Virgin, John 2:4-5; Galatians 2:14; 2 Peter 3:16
Manasseh - The son and impious successor of the good Hezekiah, king of Judah
Prov'Erbs, Book of - 25-29, which, according to the superscription, professes to be collection of Solomon's proverbs, consisting of single sentences, which the men of the court of Hezekiah copied out. All that can be said of the first is that he was an unknown Hebrew sage, the son of an equally unknown Jakeh, and that he lived after the time of Hezekiah
Kedron - Also under Hezekiah all the impurities removed from the temple were cast into the Kedron (2 Chronicles 29:16; 2 Chronicles 30:14). The "valley" of Kedron is in Hebrew called nachal , "wady," including both valley and stream, whereas the valley of Hinnom is called ge' ; so that the "brook" (nachal ) which Hezekiah "stopped running through the midst of the land" (2 Chronicles 32:4) was Kedron
Assyria, History And Religion of - Hezekiah of Judah was tempted to join in the Ashdod rebellion, but Isaiah warned against such action (Isaiah 18:1 ). He sent emissaries to Hezekiah in Jerusalem (2 Kings 20:12-19 ; Isaiah 39:1 ), apparently as part of preparations for a concerted anti-Assyrian revolt. A number of states in Phoenicia and Palestine were also in rebellion, led by Hezekiah of Judah. , he reasserted control over the city-states of Phoenicia, sacked Joppa and Ashkelon, and invaded Judah where Hezekiah had made considerable military preparations (2 Kings 20:20 ; 2Chronicles 32:1-8,2 Chronicles 32:30 ; Isaiah 22:8-11 ). During the siege of Lachish, an Assyrian army was sent against Jerusalem where Hezekiah was “made a prisoner like a bird in a cage. ” Three of Sennacherib's dignitaries attempted to negotiate the surrender of Jerusalem (2 Kings 18:17-37 ), but Hezekiah continued to hold out with the encouragement of Isaiah (2Kings 19:1-7,2 Kings 19:20-35 ). In the end, the Assyrian army withdrew, and Hezekiah paid an enormous tribute (2 Kings 18:14-16 ). The Assyrian account claims a victory over the Egyptian army and mentions Hezekiah's tribute but is rather vague about the end of the campaign. Certainly, Sennacherib suffered a major setback, for Hezekiah was the only ruler of the revolt to keep his throne
Pharaoh - ...
References to ten pharaohs can be clearly distinguished in the Old Testament: the Pharaoh of Abraham, Genesis 12:10-20 ; of Joseph, Genesis 39-50 ; of the Oppression, Exodus 1:1 ; of the Exodus, Exodus 2:23-15:19 ; of 1 Chronicles 4:18 ; of Solomon, 1 Kings 3-11 ; of Rehoboam, called Shishak, king of Egypt, 1 Kings 14:25 ; of Hezekiah and Isaiah, 2 Kings 18:21 ; Isaiah 36:1 ; of Josiah, 2 Kings 23:29 ; of Jeremiah 44:30 and Ezekiel 29:1-16
Abijah - Mother of King Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:1 ) and thus a powerful political influence
Jozabad - A supervisor of Temple treasures under Hezekiah about 715 B
Benaiah - In 2 Chronicles 31:13 , one of the overseers who assisted in the collection of contributions in the house of the Lord during the reign of Hezekiah
Humble - 1 Peter 5 ...
Hezekiah humbled himself for the pride of his heart
Bena'Iah - (2 Chronicles 20:14 ) ...
A Levite in the time of Hezekiah
Ahaz - ) Son of Jotham; ascended the throne of Judah in his 20th year (2 Kings 16:2), a transcriber's error for 25th year; as read in the Septuagint, Syriac, and Arabic (2 Chronicles 28:1); for otherwise Hezekiah his son would be born when Ahaz was 11 years old. ...
It is an undesigned propriety in Isaiah 7, and therefore a mark of truth, that the place of meeting was the pool; for there it was we know, from the independent history in Chronicles, that Hezekiah his son, subsequently in Sennacherib's invasion, with much people stopped the waters without the city to cut off the enemy's supply (2 Chronicles 32:3-5). Zechariah, the same history tells us (2 Kings 18:2), was father of Abi, Ahaz's wife, mother of Hezekiah. He adopted the Babylonian sun dial (which he probably erected in the temple, perhaps in "the middle court," where Isaiah saw it and gave its shadow as a sign to Hezekiah), becoming acquainted with it through the Assyrians (2 Kings 20:11; 2 Kings 20:4; 2 Kings 20:9)
Pentateuch - ...
But, long previous to the captivity, two particular examples, deserving peculiar attention, occur in the Jewish history, of the public and solemn homage paid to the sacredness of the Mosaic law as promulgated in the Pentateuch; and which, by consequence, afford the fullest testimony to the authenticity of the Pentateuch itself: the one in the reign of Hezekiah, while the separate kingdoms of Judah and Israel still subsisted; and the other in the reign of his great grandson Josiah, subsequent to the captivity of Israel. "And Hezekiah," says the sacred narrative, "rejoiced, and all the people, that God had prepared the people; for the thing was done suddenly," 2 Chronicles 29:36 ; immediately on the king's accession to the throne, on the first declaration of his pious resolution. At this time Hoshea was king of Israel, and so far disposed to countenance the worship of the true God, that he appears to have made no opposition to the pious zeal of Hezekiah; who, with the concurrence of the whole congregation which he had assembled, sent out letters and made a proclamation, not only to his own people of Judah, 2 Chronicles 30:1 , "but to Ephraim and Manasseh and all Israel, from Beersheba even unto Dan, that they should come to the house of the Lord at Jerusalem, to keep the passover unto the Lord God of Israel; saying, Ye children of Israel, turn again to the Lord God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and he will return to the remnant of you who are escaped out of the hands of the kings of Assyria; and be not ye like your fathers and your brethren, which trespassed against the Lord God of their fathers, who therefore gave them up to desolation as ye see. ...
Now, can we conceive that such an attempt as this could have been made, if the Pentateuch containing the Mosaic code had not been as certainly recognised through the ten tribes of Israel as in the kingdom of Judah? The success was exactly such as we might reasonably expect if it were so acknowledged; for, though many of the ten tribes laughed to scorn and mocked the messengers of Hezekiah, who invited them to the solemnity of the passover, from the impious contempt which through long disuse they had conceived for it
Prophets - Hosea, under Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, and under Jeroboam II And his successors, kings of Israel. Micah, under Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah. 758, and Hezekiah died B. Nahum, in the latter part of the reign of Hezekiah, and after the expedition of Sennacherib
Tithe - In the days of Hezekiah one of the first results of the reformation of religion was the eagerness with which the people brought in their tithes (2 Chronicles 31:5,6 )
Eden - ...
...
Son of Joah, and one of the Levites who assisted in reforming the public worship of the sanctuary in the time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:12 )
Shimei - Two Levites under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:14 ; 2 Chronicles 31:12-13 )
Herd - Hezekiah and Uzziah, when the land was less disturbed by hostile inroads, revived cattle tending which had previously declined (2 Chronicles 26:10; 2 Chronicles 32:28-29)
Cistern - ...
Hezekiah stopped the water supply outside Jerusalem at the invasion of Sennacherib, while within there was abundant water (2 Chronicles 32:3-4)
Zion - Hezekiah brought his aqueduct (2 Chronicles 22:30; 2 Chronicles 33:14) from Gihon, the Virgin's fountain, to the western side of the city of David (which is thus Ophel)
Siloah, Siloam - The letters are ancient, which has led to the supposition that the passage was made in the days of Hezekiah, who made alterations in the watercourses
Copy - The men of Hezekiah copied certain proverbs of Solomon
Jeshua - A Levite in the time of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 31:15 )
Abijah - Wife of Ahaz, and mother of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 29:1 ), named Abi in 2 Kings 18:2
Abijah - 4 The mother of Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 29:1 : also called Abi in 2 Kings 18:2
Chaldeans - In the reign of king Hezekiah, B
Josiah - Son of Amon and great-grandson of Hezekiah, a pious king of Judah, who introduced great reforms in the temple worship, and in the religious character of the nation in general
Judea - The amalgamation began when Jeroboam's idolatry drove the godly of northern Israel to Judah, again it took place under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 30-33)
Babylon - ...
During the reign of Hezekiah, envoys from Babylon came to Jerusalem (2 Kings 20:12-19 ). The postexilic reader would have seen the roots of the destruction of Jerusalem in the foolish pride of Hezekiah and in the greed of Babylon
Manasseh - MANASSEH, the fifteenth king of Judah, and son and successor of Hezekiah, was twelve years old when he began to reign, and reigned fifty- five years, 2 Kings 20:21 ; 2 Kings 21:1-2 ; 2 Chronicles 33:1-2 , &c. He did evil in the sight of the Lord; worshipped the idols of the land of Canaan; rebuilt the high places that his father Hezekiah had destroyed; set up altars to Baal; and planted groves to false gods
Zephaniah, Book of - His ancestry is traced back four generations to a man named Hezekiah. Some scholars think Hezekiah was the king of Judah by that name who reigned in the late eighth century during the ministry of Isaiah (2 Kings 18-20 ). Other scholars note that the name Hezekiah was quite common and that the ancestor is not identified as king
Assyria - Hezekiah had been tributary; but on his revolting Sennacherib took the fenced cities of Judah, and then Hezekiah sent him the treasures of his own house and the house of the Lord. Hezekiah humbled himself before God, and the angel of the Lord smote of the Assyrians 185,000. In Sennacherib's own account he says, "Hezekiah himself I shut up like a bird in a cage in Jerusalem, his royal city . " The above date would clash with the date of Hezekiah, but it is probable that Sennacherib was co-regent with his father some nine years before he reigned alone
Letter - King Hezekiah of Judah sent letters by couriers ordering that the Passover be kept (2 Chronicles 30:1-6 ). The king of Assyria sent a threatening letter to Hezekiah (2 Kings 19:8-14 ). The king of Babylon sent Hezekiah letters and presents (2 Kings 20:12 )
David, City of - ...
Both Hezekiah (2Chronicles 32:5,2 Chronicles 32:30 ) and Manasseh strengthened the defenses of the city of David, concerned especially with the water supply provided by the Gihon spring (2 Chronicles 33:14 )
Sargon - 711 an Assyrian army was sent against Palestine, where Merodach-baladan had been intriguing and had drawn Hezekiah into the conspiracy
Siloam, Pool of - ...
Some have argued that the inscription was cut in the time of Solomon; others, with more probability, refer it to the reign of Hezekiah
Birth - 2 Kings 19:3 (b) The figure is used to describe the great distress of Hezekiah and the people of Jerusalem when they were surrounded by their enemies
Zebulun - And when Hezekiah invited all the tribes to come to Jerusalem to keep the Passover, 'divers' of Zebulun humbled themselves and responded to the call
Jeiel - Levite who helped Hezekiah purify the Temple (2 Chronicles 29:13 )
Zebulun - And when Hezekiah invited all the tribes to come to Jerusalem to keep the Passover, 'divers' of Zebulun humbled themselves and responded to the call
Verecundus - ), Azariah, Hezekiah, Habakkuk, and Deborah, the prayer of Manasseh, and the thanksgiving of Jonah
High Places - Hezekiah and Josiah removed them utterly, as opposed to the letter of the law and mostly to the spirit of it too (2 Kings 18:4; 2 Kings 23:5 margin; 2 Chronicles 34:3). So rooted was the practice that the removal of the high places was made by Rabshakeh a taunt against Hezekiah as if it were an impious innovation against Jehovah's honour; evidently he knew that the act had provoked the enmity of a considerable party among the Jews
Azariah - A Levite whose son Joel helped cleanse the Temple under Hezekiah, king of Judah (715-686) (2 Chronicles 29:12-19 ). Chief priest under King Hezekiah who rejoiced with the king over the generous tithes and offerings of the people (2 Chronicles 31:10-13 )
Manasseh - ...
When Hezekiah invited the twelve tribes to join him in keeping a passover to Jehovah, certain of the tribe of Manasseh humbled themselves and went to Jerusalem. King of Judah: he was son of Hezekiah and father of Amon
Manasseh - ...
MANASSEH , son of Hezekiah, reigned longer than any king of his line fifty-five years, according to our sources ( 2 Kings 21:1 ). His reign was remarkable for the religious reaction against the reforms which had been made by Hezekiah. The record ( 2 Kings 21:2-9 ) is that he built again the altars which Hezekiah had destroyed, and erected altars for Baal, and made an ashçrah , as Ahab king of Israel had done, and that he worshipped the host of heaven and served them. The ashçrah was a well-known accompaniment of the altars of Jahweh down to the time of Hezekiah
Tribute - The heavy tribute paid by Hezekiah to Sennacherib about 701 B
Gaza or Azzah - It yielded allegiance to David and Solomon, recovered its liberty in the reigns of Jotham and Ahaz, but was reconquered by Hezekiah, 2 Kings 18:8
Benaiah - A Levite overseer of offerings, under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:13)
Jeshua - Priest under Hezekiah (715-686 B
Brick - ...
Reference may also be made to the use of clay as a writing material, which was introduced into Palestine from Babylonia, and, as we now know, continued in use in certain quarters till the time of Hezekiah at least
Isaiah - Isaiah prophesied under Uzziah, receiving the divine call in the last year of that monarch's reign, Isaiah 6:1-13; and under the succeeding kings, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah
Isaiah (2) - 36-39 are concerned with Sennacherib's invasion and episodes in the life of Hezekiah
Zechariah - Grandfather of Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:2 )
Alliance - Sennacherib assumes that this will be the policy of Hezekiah ( 2 Kings 18:21 ; 2 Kings 18:24 )
jo'el - ) ...
A Kohathite Levite in the reign of Hezekiah
Tithes - Hezekiah rectified the abuse (2 Chronicles 31:5; 2 Chronicles 31:12; 2 Chronicles 31:19); also Nehemiah after the return from Babylon (Nehemiah 10:38-39; Nehemiah 13:5; Nehemiah 13:12; Nehemiah 12:44). Azariah the high priest told Hezekiah: "since the people began to bring the offerings into the house of the Lord we have bad enough to eat, and have left plenty, for the Lord hath blessed His people, and that which is left is this great store" (2 Chronicles 31:10)
Psalms, Book of, - to have been compiled in the reign of King Hezekiah. , the interest of which centers in the times of Hezekiah stretches out, by its last two psalms, to the reign of Manasseh: it was probably compiled in the reign of Josiah. The reign of Hezekiah is naturally rich in psalmody, Psal 46,73,75,76 connect themselves with the resistance to the supremacy of the Assyrians and the divine destruction of their host. In date of actual composition they commence before the times of Hezekiah
Shemaiah - Levite in time of Hezekiah about 715 B
Kohathites - Mahath and Joel of the Kohathites helped in the purification of Israel's worship during the time of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:12 )
Azariah - High priest in the reign of Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 3:10 ; 2 Chronicles 3:13 )
Azariah - Priest of the family of Zadok in the time of Hezekiah
Serpents - Hezekiah destroyed a true and most sacred relic; Rome, on the contrary, fabricates false relics and adores them
Ahaz - His son and successor Hezekiah soon began a vigorous reformation of Judah (2 Kings 18:1-6)
Isaiah - Moreover, in the reigns of Ahaz and Hezekiah Israel and Judah came into conflict with the Asiatic empires. (See AHAZ; Hezekiah. ...
(3) Isaiah 10:5 - Isaiah 12 to the first 15 years of Hezekiah's reign probably. ...
(6) Isaiah 28-33 concern Ephraim's overthrow, Judah's impious folly, the danger of the league with Egypt, their straits and deliverance from Assyria; Isaiah 28 before the sixth year of Hezekiah, when Israel fell; the rest before his 14th year of reign. The prophet further announced to Hezekiah that all his treasures which he had ostentatiously shown to the Babylonian ambassadors should be carried off to that very land, and his descendants be made eunuchs in the Babylonian king's palace, the world on which Judah rested instead of on God being made her scourger. The mellowness of tone in the second part implies that it was the ripe fruit of his old age, some time after the beginning of Hezekiah's last 15 years. Moreover, Isaiah's reproof of the prevailing neglect of the temple worship, and his allusion to the slaying of children in the valleys (Isaiah 57:5), and mention of Hephzibah (Hezekiah's wife) in Isaiah 62:4, all accord with the times of Isaiah. ...
This and such allusions as that to the stopping of the water fountains outside the city, the display of Hezekiah's treasure, all accord with Isaiah's prophesying under Hezekiah. The Chronicles are not classed so, and therefore can hardly be their composition, but probably Ezra's, gathered from the public records and historical monographs of the prophets (as Isaiah's life of Uzziah and of Hezekiah: 2 Chronicles 26:22; 2 Chronicles 32:32). They were collected by Isaiah himself in the close of Hezekiah's reign. " That Isaiah served Hezekiah appears implied in 2 Chronicles 32:32
Ethiopia - The most influential of these Ethiopian pharaohs was Taharqa (biblical Tirhakah), who rendered aid to Hezekiah of Judah during the Assyrian invasion of Sennacherib in 701 B
Poetry - Several odes of great poetical beauty are found in the historical books of the Old Testament, such as the song of Moses (Exodus 15 ), the song of Deborah (Judges 5 ), of Hannah (1 Samuel 2 ), of Hezekiah (Isaiah 38:9-20 ), of Habakkuk (Habakkuk 3 ), and David's "song of the bow" (2 Samuel 1:19-27 )
Gath - Hezekiah, after Uzziah, conquered Philistia (2 Kings 18:8; Isaiah 14:29-81)
High Place - Hezekiah and Josiah zealously destroyed the high places, which included the buildings thereon and the idols connected therewith
Swallow - ...
Isaiah 38:14 (a) Hezekiah uses the mournful sounds of the swallow to illustrate the sadness of his own heart
Zechariah - Father of Abijah or Abi, Hezekiah's mother (2 Chronicles 29:1). One of Asaph's family who joined in purifying the temple under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:13). ...
Now 2 Kings 18 informs us that the mother of Hezekiah, son of Ahaz, was Abi daughter of Zechariah; hence it appears Ahaz was Zechariah's son in law; Isaiah naturally chose him as the other of the two witnesses
Shimei - A Levite, of the sons of Heman; took part in the purification of the temple under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:14). , under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:12-13)
Zechari'ah - ) ...
The father of Abijah or Abi, Hezekiah's mother. (2 Chronicles 29:1 ) ...
One of the family of Asaph in the reign of Hezekiah. ) He may have been the Levite of the same name who in the reign of Hezekiah assisted in the purification of the temple
Nineveh - Not only do we find mention made of Jehu, Menehem, Hezekiah, Omri, Hazael, etc. , and of various cities in Judea and Syria; but we discover Sennacherib's own account of his invasion of Palestine, and of the amount of tribute which king Hezekiah was forced to pay him; also pictures representing his capture of Lachish, 2 Kings 18:14 , and his officers, perhaps the railing Rabshakeh himself, presenting Jewish captives to the king, etc
Isaiah - ) until the last years of Hezekiah (716-687) or the early years of Manasseh (687-642). The prophet lived during the reigns of the Judean kings Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, Hezekiah, and perhaps the first years of Manasseh. when the city of Ashdod rebelled against Assyria, Isaiah assumed the garb of a captive for three years calling on Hezekiah not to take the fatal step of joining the rebellion. No doubt he was instrumental in influencing Hezekiah to reject the seditious plot (Isaiah 20:1-6 ). Isaiah soundly castigated Hezekiah for entertaining the seditious Babylonian princelet whose real purpose was to secure military aid for a rebellion in south Babylonia in an effort to overthrow Sennacherib (Isaiah 39:1 ). ...
The Historical Appendage With the exception of Isaiah 38:9-21 , an original thanksgiving song of Hezekiah after a severe illness, the rest of Isaiah 36-39 duplicates 2 Kings 18:13-20:19
Judah, Kingdom of - ) For a century and a half this vassalage lasted, with occasional periods of independence, as under the godly Hezekiah and Josiah. (See Hezekiah; JOSIAH. But, after Hezekiah, Manasseh's enormous wickedness so provoked Jehovah that the piety of his grandson Josiah, Amon's son, could procure only a respite
Philistines - These hostilities did not cease till the time of Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:8 ), when they were entirely subdued
Chaldea - " "Chaldees" is a mistranslation of the Hebrew Kasdim , Kasdim being the Old Testament name of the Babylonians, while the Chaldees were a tribe who lived on the shores of the Persian Gulf, and did not become a part of the Babylonian population till the time of Hezekiah
Gaza - Hezekiah “smote the Philistines, even unto Gaza” as he tried to re-establish Judah's independence (2 Kings 18:8 ) about 705-704 B
Firstfruits - Times of apostasy brought a neglect of this duty; the restoration of the offering of both kinds was a leading point in the reformation under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 31:5; 2 Chronicles 31:11), and under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 10:35; Nehemiah 10:37; Nehemiah 12:44)
Apries - Early in the year following, Nebuchadnezzar marched against Hezekiah; but as other nations of Syria had shaken off their obedience, he first reduced them to their duty, and toward the end of the year besieged Jerusalem, 2 Kings 25:5 ; 2 Chronicles 36:17 ; Jeremiah 39:1 ; Jeremiah 52:4
Serpent - ...
It is worthy of farther remark, in confirmation, that the church all along considered the word (Nechash,) which is rendered in our translation serpent, to have been uniformly connected with the idea of this beast; for we find, in the days of Hezekiah, that in his removing the brazen serpent which Moses had made, and calling it not immediately (Nechash,) but Nehushtan, thus playing upon the word, but still preserving the idea of the thing itself the good old king plainly, proved what the judgement of the church concerning it was in his day. Hezekiah saw that Israel had idolized the type, and forgotten the thing signified, therefore in removing it, and calling it Nehushtan, he aimed to direct the minds of the people from the type and shadow to him it was intended to prefigure
Isaiah, Book of - He prophesied in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, all kings of Judah. From the closing years of Uzziah to the death of Hezekiah would be from about B. treat of Hezekiah and Sennacherib. Hezekiah's personal history is appended to this, as figurative of the nation's sense of the judgement of God upon them, leading to repentance and recovery, and inward or moral deliverance
Proverbs, the Book of - "Hezekiah" directed his pious "men" (perhaps Isaiah, Micah, Shebna, and Joah: 2 Kings 18:18) to supplement the collection with a series of proverbs of Solomon, not included in the collection by the royal author (Proverbs 25:1; compare Sirach 47:14; Sirach 47:17). The bringing forth of God's word from obscurity fitly accompanied the reformation by pious Hezekiah, as in the case of Josiah's reformation (2 Chronicles 31:21; 2 Chronicles 31:29-30). ...
(3) Proverbs 25-29, consisting of single sentences, are the selection of Hezekiah's men. The third division, namely, of Hezekiah's men, is marked by the interrogation "seest thou?" (Proverbs 26:12; Proverbs 29:20. A cautious and mournful tone is thought to mark the language as to rulers, instead of the joy and reverence of the middle and older division; the, state of the nation under Hezekiah at the close of the eighth century B
Seraphim - The brazen serpent, Nehushtan , which was removed from the Temple by Hezekiah, was a relic probably connected with the popular mythical conception, and it may have suggested the seraphim of the heavenly palace to Isaiah’s mind
Shimei, Shimeites - A Levite who took part in the cleansing of the Temple under Hezekiah, probably identical with one mentioned later as having charge of the tithes and oblations ( 2 Chronicles 29:14 ; 2 Chronicles 31:12-13 )
Taxes - The Assyrian and Egyptian conquerors imposed heavy taxes on the Israelite and Jewish kings, Mendhem, Hoshea, Hezekiah, Josiah (2 Kings 15:20; 2 Kings 17:4; 2 Kings 18:14; 2 Kings 23:35)
Merari, Merarites - (4) They took part in the cleansing of the Temple under Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 29:12 ; 2 Chronicles 29:14 )
Zephaniah - The omission of the designation "king," or "king of Judah," is against the notion that the "Hizkiah" means king Hezekiah (compare Proverbs 25:1; Isaiah 38:9)
Kings - We elsewhere read that Shemaiah the prophet, and Iddo the seer, wrote the Acts of Rehoboam, 2 Chronicles 12:15 ; that Jehu wrote the Acts of Jehoshaphat, 2 Chronicles 20:34 ; and Isaiah those of Uzziah and Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 26:22 ; 2 Chronicles 32:32
Hebrew Language - ...
The period, from the age of Moses to that of David, has been considered the golden age of the Hebrew language, which declined in purity from that time to the reign of Hezekiah or Manasseh, having received several foreign words, particularly Aramean, from the commercial and political intercourse of the Jews and Israelites with the Assyrians and Babylonians. In the interval between the reign of Hezekiah and the Babylonish captivity, the purity of the language was neglected, and so many foreign words were introduced into it, that this period has not ineptly been designated its iron age
Pharaoh - The Pharaoh to whom king Hezekiah was allied in his war with Sennacherib
Assyria - Sennacherib of Assyria come into Judah with a powerful army in the reign of Hezekiah, but was miraculously defeated
Shemaiah - A Levite of the family of Jeduthun, engaged in purifying the Temple under Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 29:14 )
Asher, Aser - When Hezekiah proclaimed a solemn passover and sent invitations to the cities of Israel as well as to Judah, though many laughed the messengers to scorn, divers of Asher humbled themselves and came to Jerusalem
Josiah - The Passover was then celebrated, as in the days of his great predecessor, Hezekiah, with unusual magnificence
Baal - The reform movement of Hezekiah was reversed when Manasseh became king (2 Kings 21:2-16 ), as he reinstated Baal worship, along with worship of Assyrian gods and other gods
Alliances - Hezekiah was tempted to lean on Egypt against the Assyrian Sennacherib (Isaiah 30:2), and Tirhakah of Ethiopia did make a diversion in his favor (2 Kings 19:9)
Captivity - It was in the ninth year of Hoshea, king of Israel and the sixth of Hezekiah that Samaria was taken by the Assyrians after a three years' siege: this would be B
Abijah - Wife of Ahaz, and mother of good Hezekiah; perhaps a descendant of the Zechariah slain between the temple and the altar (2 Chronicles 24:21; 2 Chronicles 26:5; 2 Chronicles 29:1); certainly daughter of Zechariah, probably the one through whom Uzziah sought God
Gershon, Gershonites - (5) They took part in the cleansing of the Temple under Hezekiah ( 2 Chronicles 29:12 f
Weaving - " Hezekiah says, "I have cut off like a weaver my life," Isaiah 38:12
Pharaoh - Tirhakah, king of Ethiopia and Egypt, in the time of Hezekiah, B
Pharaoh - In the time of Sennacherib and Hezekiah, Tirhakah or some earlier king of the Ethiopian Dynasty would be on the throne
Prayer - Hezekiah prayed in the spirit of the Psalms. ...
So Moses (Numbers 11:2; Numbers 12:13; Numbers 21:7); Samuel (1 Samuel 7:5; 1 Samuel 12:19; 1 Samuel 12:23); David (2 Samuel 24:17-18); Hezekiah (2 Kings 19:15-19); Isaiah (Isaiah 19:4; 2 Chronicles 32:20); Asa (2 Chronicles 14:11); Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 20:6-12); Daniel (Daniel 9:20-21). Prayer for individuals is rarer: Hannah (1 Samuel 1:12), Hezekiah (Matthew 24:20), Samuel for Saul (1 Samuel 15:11; 1 Samuel 15:35). ...
Confession of sin, and the pleading God's past mercies as a ground of future mercies, characterize the seven (the perfect number) prayers given in full in the Old Testament: of David (2 Samuel 7:18; 2 Samuel 7:29), Solomon (2 Chronicles 6), Hezekiah (2 Kings 19), Jeremiah (Jeremiah 32:16), Daniel (Daniel 9:3), Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1; Nehemiah 9)
Hosea - Began prophesying in the last years of Jeroboam II, contemporary with Uzziah; ended at the beginning of Hezekiah's reign. He mentions in the inscription, besides the reign of Jeroboam in Israel, the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, though his prophecies are addressed primarily to Israel and only incidentally to Judah; for all the prophets whether in Judah or Israel regarded Israel's separation from Judah, civil as well as religious, as an apostasy from God who promised the kingship of the theocracy to the line of David. the first inroad against Hoshea whose reign began only four years before Hezekiah's, accords with the inscription which extends his prophesying to the reign of Hezekiah (2 Kings 17:1; 2 Kings 17:3; 2 Kings 18:9)
Burial - Hezekiah was buried in the mount of the sepulchres of the sons of David; "and all Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem did him honour at his death" (2 Chronicles 32:33 )
Encampment - So late as Hezekiah the temple was called "the tents of Jehovah" (1618449047_8; Psalms 78:28; compare "a great host like the host of God" applied to David's adherents, 1 Chronicles 12:22)
Zechariah - ...
...
The father of Abijah, who was the mother of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:1 )
Ark - Hezekiah, seeking divine aid against the Assyrians, called on the "God of Israel, enthroned between the cherubim" (2 Kings 19:15 )
Hananiah - Ruler of the palace (as Eliakim "over the house" of Hezekiah) along with Hanani, Nehemiah's brother, at Jerusalem
Micah, Book of - Hezekiah the king, however, heeded Micah’s warnings
Beer-Sheba - This idiom also served to show the extent of the reforms of three southern kings: Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 19:4 , “Beer-sheba to mount Ephraim”), Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 30:5 , “Beer-sheba even to Dan”), and Josiah (2 Kings 23:8 , “from Geba to Beer-sheba”)
Abijah - Daughter of Zechariah and mother of Hezekiah 2 Chronicles 29:1 : contracted into ABI in2Kings 18:2
Complete - Hezekiah, on the other hand, protested: “… I have walked before thee in truth and with a perfect heart” (2 Kings 20:3)
Court - Jerusalem gradually extended its size westward; at the time of Hezekiah, it had grown into a large city
Gaza - It recovered its liberty in the reigns of Jotham and Ahaz, and was reconquered by Hezekiah, 2 Kings 18:8
Isaiah - Concerning his family and descent, nothing certain has been recorded, except what he himself tells us, Isaiah 50:1 , namely, that he was the son of Amos, and discharged the prophetic office "in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah," who successively flourished between A. But the tradition of the Jews, which has been adopted by most Christian commentators, that he was put to death by Manasseh, is very uncertain; and Aben Ezra one of the most celebrated Jewish writers, is rather of opinion that he died before Hezekiah; which Bishop Lowth thinks most probable. It is, however, certain, that he lived at least to the fifteenth or sixteenth year of Hezekiah; which makes the least possible term of the duration of his prophetic office to be about forty-eight years
Epistle - Hezekiah had a system of couriers or posts to transmit his letters in various quarters; the plan especially prevalent in Persia (2 Chronicles 30:6; 2 Chronicles 30:10; Esther 8:10; Esther 8:14)
Psalms - ...
"It is presumed that these several collections were made at times of high religious life: the first, probably, near the close of David's life; the second in the days of Solomon; the third by the singers of Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 20:19 ); the fourth by the men of Hezekiah (29,30,31); and the fifth in the days of Ezra
Gaza - ...
Hezekiah gave the decisive blow to the Philistines, "even unto Gaza and the borders thereof, from the tower of the watchmen to the fenced city" (2 Kings 18:8)
Siloam, the Pool of - Into Siloam probably Hezekiah led by a subterranean aqueduct down the Tyropoeon valley the waters on the other side of the city when "he stopped the upper watercourse of Gihon and brought it straight down to the W
Cedron - And God the Holy Ghost was graciously pleased to make Cedron again memorable, as typical of the Lord Jesus Christ, when Asa, Hezekiah, and Josiah, burnt and destroyed the idols of the land, and cast the accursed things of the groves into this brook
Philistines - During the unfortunate reign of Ahaz, the Philistines made great havoc in the territory of Judah; but his son and successor Hezekiah again subdued them, 2 Chronicles 28:18 2 Kings 18:8
Chronicles, the Books of - For this end, the Chronicles give a summary history of David, introduced by the closing scene of Saul's life, and of the succeeding kings, especially of some of the greatest and best kings who built or restored the temple, abolished corruption, and established the services in due order, as Jehoshaphat, Hezekiah, Josiah, etc. At 1 Chronicles 9:35 begins Saul's genealogy, taken from the tables drawn up in Hezekiah's reign (for 14 generations from Jonathan to Azel correspond to the 14 from David to Hezekiah); then the history of (mainly) Judah's kings follows, and of the events down to the end of the book of Ezra, which suit the patriotic purpose of the compiler. Thus, Sheshan's (1 Chronicles 2:34-41) ends with a generation contemporary with Hezekiah. ) in David's or Solomon's time; that of the sons of Azel (1 Chronicles 8:38) in Hezekiah's time; that of the sons of Zerubbabel in Ezra's time (1 Chronicles 3:19-24). Iddo's "book concerning genealogies and the prophet Shemaiah's words," for Rehoboam's acts (2 Chronicles 12:15); "the book of the kings of Israel and Judah" (2 Chronicles 25:26; 2 Chronicles 27:7; 2 Chronicles 32:32; 2 Chronicles 33:18), "the sayings of the seers" (2 Chronicles 33:19, choza ), for many subsequent reigns; "the words of Jehu the son of Hanani" (2 Chronicles 20:34), for Jehoshaphat's reign; "the vision of the prophet Isaiah" (2 Chronicles 26:22; 2 Chronicles 32:32), for Uzziah's and Hezekiah's reigns. Hezekiah's reformation and Passover; riches (2 Chronicles 29-31)
Proselytes - ...
Under the kings strangers rose to influential positions: Doeg the Edomite (1 Samuel 21:7), Uriah the Hittite (2 Samuel 11:3), Araunah the Jebusite (2 Samuel 24:23), Zelek the Ammonite (2 Samuel 23:37), Ithmah the Moabite (1 Chronicles 11:46, the law in Deuteronomy 23:3 forbidding an Ammonite or Moabite to enter the congregation to the tenth generation does not forbid their settlement in Israel, the law must have been written in times long before David whose great grandmother was Ruth the Moabtress), Ittai the Gittite (2 Samuel 15:19), Shebna the secretary of state under Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:37; Isaiah 22:15), Ebedmelech the Ethiopian under Zedekiah (Jeremiah 38:7), the Cherethites and Pelethites. ) Hezekiah's triumph over Sennacherib was followed by many bringing gifts: unto Jehovah to Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 32:23); this suggested the prophecy in Psalm 87 that Rahab (Egypt) and Babylon (whose king Merodach Baladan had sent a friendly embassy to Hezekiah), Philistia, Tyre, and Ethiopia should be spiritually born (Psalms 51:5; Psalms 51:10; Psalms 22:31; Isaiah 66:8; John 3:3; John 3:5; both Old and New Testament teach the need of the new birth) in Jerusalem as proselytes
Altar - It was removed by Ahaz (2 Kings 16:14 ), and "cleansed" by Hezekiah, in the latter part of whose reign it was rebuilt
Uriah - Uriah probably succeeded Azariah, high priest under Uzziah, and preceded the Azariah under Hezekiah
Kohath, Kohathites - (5) Under Hezekiah they took part in the cleansing of the Temple ( 2 Chronicles 29:12 ; 2 Chronicles 29:14 )
Passover - We see an example of this postponed passover under Hezekiah, 2 Chronicles 30:2-3 , &c
Jerusalem - of the city an abundant waterspring existed, the outflow of which was stopped probably by Hezekiah, and the water conducted underground to reservoirs within the city. ...
The pool of Hezekiah is within, near the Jaffa gate, which receives the overflow of Birket Mamilla. ) Hezekiah "in the first year of his reign" "suddenly," i. (See Hezekiah on this and Sennacherib's invasion. )...
Hezekiah stopped the outflow of the source of the Kedron N
Kings, First And Second, Theology of - The author of Kings is also concerned about recording the occasions when the temple treasury was appropriated for war indemnity, whether by foreigners (Shiskak, 1 Kings 14:25-28 ; and Nebuchadnezzar 2 Kings 24:13 ; 25:13-17 ) or Judeans (Asa, 1 Kings 15:18 ; Jehoash 2 Kings 12:18 ; 14:14 ; and Hezekiah, 2 Kings 18:16 ). The prophet Isaiah is the most important character behind the scenes in the tense struggle with the Assyrians during Hezekiah's reign. When Hezekiah falters in the face of crisis, it is Isaiah who stands firm (2 Kings 19 ). Although the nation of Judah was expected to learn from its northern neighbor's disaster, the high places, Asherim, and male prostitutes continued to exist (1 Kings 14:22-24 ), and Hezekiah had to replace them (2 Kings 18:22 )
Philistia - a more deadly adder, namely, Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:8), "and the firstborn of the poor (i. " Hezekiah had Egypt for his ally in resisting Assyria, possibly also in subduing the Philistines. Sennacherib took Ashkelon, and gave part of Hezekiah's land as a reward to Ashdod, Gaza, and Ekron for their submission (Rawlinson 1:477)
Serpent - Preserved as a relic, whether on the spot of its first erection or elsewhere the brazen serpent, called by the name of Nehushtan , became an object of idolatrous veneration, and the zeal of Hezekiah destroyed it with the other idols of his father
Amalekites - ), "Beginning of the pagan (was) Amalek, and its end (shall be) destruction" (even to the perishing, under Saul, David, and finally Hezekiah, 1 Chronicles 4:42-43)
Fathers - ...
The fathers praised are Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Israel, Moses, Aaron, Phinehas, Joshua, Caleb, the Judges, Samuel, Nathan, David, Solomon, Elijah, Elisha, Hezekiah, Isaiah, Josiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Job, the Twelve, Zerubbabel, Joshua the priest, Nehemiah
Micah, Book of - He prophesied during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, and was thus contemporary with Isaiah and Hosea
Intercession - Hezekiah took Sennacherib's letter to the Temple and opened it before God, praying for deliverance from the Assyrians (Isaiah 37:14-20 )
Baal (1) - ...
Baal worship also in Judah found entrance under Ahaz (2 Chronicles 28:2-3), but was suppressed by Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:4)
Stretch Out - Hezekiah remarked: “It is a light thing for the shadow to go down ten degrees …” (2 Kings 20:10), to grow longer
Day - The hour- watch or dial, otherwise called the sun-dial, is mentioned in the reign of King Hezekiah, 2 Kings 20:9-10 ; Isaiah 38:8
Assyr'ia, as'Shur, - He invaded the kingdom of Judea in the reign of Hezekiah
Passover - Numbers at Hezekiah's Passover partook "otherwise than it was written," "not cleansed according to the purification of the sanctuary" (Numbers 9:5-10). Hezekiah prayed for the unpurified partakers: "the good Jehovah pardon every one that prepareth his heart to seek God . "...
Hezekiah presumes that those out of Ephraim coming to the Passover were sincere in seeking Jehovah the God of their fathers, though they had been unable to purify themselves in time for the Passover. Hezekiah kept the Passover as "the little passover" in the second month, for "they could not keep it" at the regular time, "because the priests had not sanctified themselves sufficiently, neither had the priests gathered themselves to Jerusalem. " They kept other seven days beside the first seven,...
(1) because Hezekiah had given so many beasts that there was more than they could use during the ordinary seven days;...
(2) so many priests bad sanctified themselves as to be able to carry on the altar services with such numerous sacrifices
Immanuel - The rest of the chapter does not refer to Christ, but to the troubles of the reign of Ahaz; is it legitimate to tear half a dozen words from their context, and apply them arbitrarily to an event happening generations after? ( b ) It is suggested that the maiden is the wife of Ahaz and that her son is Hezekiah, the king of whom Isaiah rightly had such high hopes; or ( c ) that she is the ‘prophetess,’ the wife of Isaiah himself. The chronological difficulty would seem to be fatal to ( b ), Hezekiah being almost certainly several years old in 735; and ( c ) makes the sign merely a duplication of that given in Isaiah 8:3
Simeon - Seir, in the time of Hezekiah apparently, and there secured permanent possessions
Backsliding - In the speech of Hezekiah, the Chronicler highlights Israel's history as a lengthy period of disobedience
Esther, Theology of - (The Chronicler describes the destruction of the Amalekites later during the reign of Hezekiah [1], but the writer of Esther believes that they did not come to a complete end
Nimrod - Thus nahash, the brazen "serpent" in the wilderness, was called by Hezekiah, in contempt, nehushtan, "a piece of brass," when he broke it in pieces, because it was perverted into an object of idolatrous worship by the Jews, 2 Kings 18:4
How the Prophetic Gift Was Received - Between Solomon and Hezekiah intervened some two hundred years, during which the voice of prophecy was silent
Deuteronomy - ...
Hezekiah is the first king of whom we learn that he attempted to remove the high places (2 Kings 18:14 ). What impelled Hezekiah was a religious, not a political, motive. Probably a body of reformers framed their code in Hezekiah’s later years
Song of Solomon - An ancient rabbinic tradition (Baba Bathra 15a) attributes the Song to Hezekiah and his scribes (compare Song of Solomon 4:1-784 )
High Place - Only Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:3-4 ) and Josiah (2 Kings 23:4-15 ) had the courage to destroy the high places in the land of Judah
Manasseh - ...
...
...
The only son and successor of Hezekiah on the throne of Judah
Tithe, Tithing - Hezekiah oversaw a restoration of obedience to God during which so much was given in tithes and offerings that rooms had to be prepared in the house of the Lord (2 Chronicles 31:10-11 )
Psalms - Hezekiah's "writing" (miktab ) alludes probably to David's miktam (a "secret," or "song of deep import"), Psalm 56; 57 titles, for it was he who restored David's psalms to their liturgical use in the temple (2 Chronicles 29:30). Hence Hezekiah's prayer (Isaiah 38) and Jonah's thanksgiving are excluded as too personal. ) To the time of the overthrow of Sennacherib's host under Hezekiah belong Psalm 46; Psalm 75; Psalm 76; Psalm 87. (See Hezekiah. The only times of such additions were those of religious revivals, namely, under Jehoshaphat, Hezekiah, and Josiah (to whose reign probably belong Psalm 77; Psalm 92; Psalm 100; this series has the common theme, Jehovah's manifestation for His people's comfort and their foes' confusion). Psalm 42; Psalm 43; Psalm 84; Psalm 86 (according to Hengstenberg, as occurring in the midst of Korahitic psalms though superscribed with David's name), refer to Absaiom's rebellion; Psalm 44 on the invasion of the Edomites (2 Samuel 8:13; 1 Chronicles 18:12; 1 Kings 11:15-16); Psalm 49 of general import; Psalm 45 on King Messiah's marriage to Israel and the church, in Solomon's time; Psalm 47; Psalm 48; Psalm 83, in Jehoshaphat's time; Psalm 46; Psalm 87, refer to Sennacherib's host overthrown before Jerusalem, in Hezekiah's reign; Psalm 85; Psalm 88; Psalm 89, before the Babylonian captivity. Thrupp (Smith's Bible Dictionary) maintains that as Psalm 73-83 do not all proceed from Asaph, but from members of the choir which he founded, so the psalms in Books III, IV, V, inscribed with the name of David, were written by his royal representatives for the time being (Hezekiah, Josiah, Zerubbabel, etc
Ascension of Isaiah - This narrates how in the twenty-sixth year of his reign Hezekiah called Manasseh to receive accounts of visions which he had seen (1:1, 2). After Hezekiah’s death, Manasseh, as foretold, forsakes the service of God and serves Satan, whereupon Isaiah withdraws first to Bethlehem and then to the desert with his companions (2:1-11). In the twentieth year of Hezekiah, Isaiah, in the presence of the king, when speaking in the Holy Spirit, is taken up in mind (cf. Isaiah returns to his body and binds Hezekiah to secrecy concerning the vision. ...
(c) The Testament of Hezekiah, a Christian Apocalypse (3:13b-4:18). As Charles observes: ‘that such a work was incorporated in the Ascension might also be inferred from 1:2b-5a, which describe the contents of Hezekiah’s vision
Diseases - ...
Isaiah 38:1 relates the story of the very serious illness of King Hezekiah. ...
The illness of Hezekiah was treated by applying a poultice of figs (Isaiah 38:21 ). Hezekiah almost certainly had some type of acute bacterial infection of the skin
Jerusalem - Hezekiah (715-686 B. the Assyrian general Sennacherib destroyed most of the cities of Judah and shut up King Hezekiah “like a bird in a cage
Babylon, History And Religion of - , Babylon and other nations, including Judah under King Hezekiah, rebelled from Assyrian domination. It is probably in this context that he sent emissaries to Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:12-19 ; Isaiah 39:1 )
Kings, 1 And 2 - ...
Of the kings of Judah, only Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:3-7 ) and Josiah (2 Kings 22:2 ) were praised without reservation because they adhered to these two principles. Manasseh negated the reforms of his father, Hezekiah, and actively promoted the worship of foreign gods
Nahum (2) - Hezekiah's time was that in which trust in Jehovah and the observance of the temple feasts prevailed as they did not before or after. Nahum in Elkosh of Galilee was probably among those of northern Israel, after the deportation of the ten tribes, who accepted Hezekiah's earnest invitation to keep the Passover at Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 30). The correspondence of sentiments in Nahum with those of Isaiah and Hezekiah implies he wrote when Sennacherib was still besieging and demanding the surrender of Jerusalem (Nahum 1:2 ff, with 2 Kings 19:14-15; Nahum 1:7 with 2 Kings 18:22; 2 Kings 19:19; Nahum 1:9-11; 2 Chronicles 32:7-8; Nahum 1:9; Nahum 1:11 with 2 Kings 19:22; 2 Kings 19:27-28; Nahum 1:14 with 2 Kings 19:6-7; Nahum 1:15 and Nahum 2:1-2 with 2 Kings 19:32-33; Nahum 2:13, "the voice of thy messengers shall no more be heard," namely, Rabshakeh the bearer of Sennacherib's haughty message, with 2 Kings 19:22-23)
Manasseh (1) - Many out of Manasseh were among the penitents coming southwards to Judah, and joining in the spiritual revivals under Asa (2 Chronicles 15:9), Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 30:1; 2 Chronicles 30:10-11; 2 Chronicles 30:18; 2 Chronicles 31:1), and Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:6-9)
Exaltation - Sennacherib of Assyria threatened Hezekiah and the God of Judah (2 Kings 19:22 ), but God humiliated Sennacherib by destroying most of his army
Hell - In the Old Testament time, when as yet Christ had not "abolished death and brought life and immortality to light through the gospel" (Isaiah 38:9-20), death and the intermediate state represented by Hades suggested thoughts of gloom (as to Hezekiah, 2 Timothy 1:10), lit up however with gleams of sure hope from God's promises of the resurrection (Psalms 16:10-11; Psalms 17:15; Isaiah 26:19; Hosea 13:14; Daniel 12:2)
Ointment - Solomon received an annual payment of perfume as tribute from his subjects (1 Kings 10:25 ); the queen of Sheba brought many costly spices as gifts to Solomon (1 Kings 10:2 ); Hezekiah, king of Judah, included valuable perfumed ointment and spices as part of his treasure (2 Kings 20:13 ; Isaiah 39:2 )
Hosea - He prophesied in the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, and of Jeroboam king of Israel
Zephaniah, Theology of - The book perhaps also underscores Zephaniah's piety by showing his genealogy of four generations going back to Hezekiah (1:1), another godly king of Judah, who was also an ancestor of Josiah
Idolatry, - Under Hezekiah a great reform was inaugurated, that was not confined to Judah and Benjamin, but spread throughout Ephraim and Manasseh
Urim And Thummim - The oracles of the Lord were thenceforth delivered by the prophets; as by Ahijah to Jeroboam 1 Kings 11:29 ; by Shemaiah to Rehoboam, 1 Kings 12:22 ; by Elijah to Ahab, 1 Kings 17:1 ; 1 Kings 21:17-29 ; by Michaiah to Ahab and Jehoshaphat, 1 Kings 22:7 ; by Elisha to Jehoshaphat and Jehoram, 2 Kings 3:11-14 ; by Isaiah to Hezekiah, 2 Kings 19:6-34 ; 2 Kings 20:1-11 ; by Huldah to Josiah, 2 Kings 22:13-20 ; by Jeremiah to Zedekiah, Jeremiah 32:3-5 , &c
Philistines - In this Hezekiah of Judah took part by imprisoning Padi, the Philistine king of Ekron, who remained faithful to Sennacherib
Philis'Tines - Later when the Philistines, joined by the Syrians and Assyrians, made war on the kingdom of Israel, Hezekiah formed an alliance with the Egyptians, as a counterpoise to the Assyrians, and the possession of Philistia became henceforth the turning-point of the struggle between the two great empires of the East
Kings, the Books of - The third period, from thence, in Hezekiah's reign, until Judah's captivity in Babylon, 722-560 B. The second period (1 Kings 12:1-2 Kings 10) comprises three stages:...
(1) the enmity at first between Judah and Israel from Jeroboam to Omri, 1 Kings 12:1-16:28;...
(2) the intermarriage between the royal houses of Israel and of Judah, under Ahab, down to the destruction of both kings, Joram of Israel and Ahaziah of Judah, by Jehu, 1 Kings 16:29-2 Kings 10;...
(3) the renewal of hostilities, from Jehu's accession in Israel and Athaliah's usurpation in Judah to Israel's captivity in Hezekiah's sixth year, 1 Kings 11-17. But Ahaz' impiety (though counteracted in part by godly Hezekiah) and especially Manasseh's awful blood. Hezekiah's purification of the temple, Josiah's Passover (2 Chronicles 29 - 31:35). The names of Omri, Mesha, Jehu, Menahem, Hoshea, Hezekiah, are deciphered in inscriptions of campaigns of Tiglath Pileser, Sargon, Sennacherib, and Esarhaddon. Contemporary prophets, as Isaiah, with Ahaz and Hezekiah, Jeremiah with Jehoiakim and Zedekiah, elucidate the histories of Kings just as the epistles of New Testament are commentaries on Acts
Serpent - On the death of Ahaz, Isaiah delivers this prophecy, threatening them with a more severe chastisement from the hand of Hezekiah, the grandson of Uzziah, by whose victorious arms they had been reduced to sue for peace; which he accomplished, when "he smote the Philistines, even unto Gaza, and the borders thereof," 2 Kings 18:8 . Uzziah, therefore, must be meant by the rod that smote them, and by the serpent from whom should spring the fiery flying serpent, that is, Hezekiah, a much more terrible enemy than even Uzziah had been. It became, therefore, the favourite symbol of kings; and was employed by the prophet, to symbolize the great and good Hezekiah, with strict propriety
Jerusalem - Several conduits are mentioned in the OT: the ‘conduit of the upper pool, in the highway of the fuller’s field ’ ( Isaiah 7:3 ), which has not been identified; the conduit whereby Hezekiah ‘brought the waters of Gihon straight down on the west side of the city of David,’ also referred to as the ‘conduit’ whereby he ‘brought water into the city’ ( 2 Kings 20:20 , 2 Chronicles 32:30 ), is probably to be identified with the Siloam tunnel, famous for its (unfortunately undated) Old Hebrew inscription. Hezekiah still further prepared Jerusalem for the struggle which he foresaw from the advancing power of Assyria, and to him, as is generally believed, is due the engineering work now famous as the Siloam Tunnel , whereby water was conducted from the spring in the Kidron Valley outside the walls to the reservoir at the bottom of the Tyropœon inside them. By another gift from the apparently inexhaustible royal and sacred treasures, Hezekiah endeavoured to keep Sennacherib from an attack on the capital ( 2 Kings 18:13 ); but the attack, threatened by insulting words from the emissaries of Sennacherib, was finally averted by a mysterious calamity that befell the Assyrian army ( 2 Kings 19:35 ). 39) Hezekiah attempted to strengthen his position
Chronicles, Theology of - Jehoshaphat, Ahaz, Hezekiah, and Josiah are explicitly compared to David and Solomon (17:3; 28:1; 29:2; 34:2-3). They could abandon the forms of Yahweh worship (Ahaz and Manasseh) or restore them (Hezekiah and Josiah)
Chronology - ; Ahaz' 16 years begin at 718; Hezekiah's 29 begin at 702; Manasseh's 55 begin at 673; Amon's two begin at 618; Josiah's 31 begin at 616; Jehoiakim's 11 begin at 585. The Apis tablets of Egypt prove the synchronism of Josiah and Pharaoh Necho; also they demonstrate that of Hezekiah and Tirhakah. The Bible puts Rehoboam 249 years before Hezekiah, i
Earth, Land - ...
Hezekiah, when he became ill and then recovered by God's action, described his fear of being confined to the gates of Sheol
Proverbs, Book of - This latter portion divides itself into three parts: Proverbs 10 : to Proverbs 24 , the proverbs of Solomon; Proverbs 25 to Proverbs 29 , also the proverbs of Solomon, which were gathered by "the men of Hezekiah king of Judah
Heart - David walked “in uprightness of heart” (1 Kings 3:6) and Hezekiah “with a perfect heart” ( Clean, To Be - During the reform of King Hezekiah, “the priests went into the inner part of the house of the Lord, to cleanse it, and brought out all the uncleanness that they found in the temple of the Lord …” ( Proverbs, Book of - Proverbs 25:1-28 ; Proverbs 26:1-28 ; Proverbs 27:1-27 ; Proverbs 28:1-28 ; Proverbs 29:1-27 , These also are the proverbs of Solomon which the men of Hezekiah copied out
Miracle - ...
Hezekiah healed, 2 Kings 20:7
Chronicles, Books of - ...
The prosperity of Judah under Uzziah and Jotham was followed by disaster and chaos under Ahaz (25:1-28:27), but Hezekiah then sought to correct matters with wide-sweeping reforms. The Chronicler deals with Hezekiah’s religious reforms at length (29:1-31:21), but discusses his political reforms only briefly (32:1-33)
Kings, Books of - Only Judah remained in the national homeland, and with new policies under the godly Hezekiah the nation freed itself from Assyrian domination (18:1-20:21)
Tombs - ) His un-Hebrew name implies he was an alien, probably brought to court by Hezekiah's ungodly predecessor Ahaz. , eleven (David, Solomon, Rehoboam, Abijah, Asa, Jehoshaphat, Ahaziah, Amaziah, Jotham, Hezekiah, Josiah; also the good priest Jehoiada) were buried in one common subterranean receptacle in "the city of David. Hezekiah was buried "in the chiefest (highest) of the sepulchres of the sons of David" (2 Chronicles 32:33), i
Tomb - " Of all these it is merely said that they were buried in "the sepulchres of their fathers" or "of the kings" in the city of David, except of two-- Asa and Hezekiah
Scribes - In the reign of David, Seraiah, 2 Samuel 8:17 , in the reign of Hezekiah, Shebna, 2 Kings 18:18 , and in the reign of Josiah, Shaphan, 2 Kings 22:3 , are called scribes, and are ranked with the chief officers of the kingdom; and Elishama the scribe, Jeremiah 36:12 , in the reign of Jehoiakim, is mentioned among the princes
Chronology of the Biblical Period - ...
SIGNIFICANT DATES IN OLD TESTAMENT BIBLE HISTORY...
Periods of History...
Critical...
Traditional...
Patriarchs (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob)...
1700-1500...
2000...
Exodus...
1290...
1450...
Conquest...
1250...
1400...
Judges...
1200-1025...
1360-1025...
Kings...
...
...
Kings of United Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Saul...
1025-1005...
1020-1004...
David...
1005-965...
1004-965...
Solomon...
965-925...
965-931...
Kings of the Divided Kingdom...
Judah...
Israel...
Critical...
Traditional...
Rehoboam...
...
924-907...
931-913...
...
Jeroboam...
924-903...
926-909...
Abijam (Abijah)...
...
907-906...
913-910...
Asa...
...
905-874...
910-869...
...
Nadab...
903-902...
909-908...
...
Baasha...
902-886...
908-886...
...
Elah...
886-885...
886-885...
...
Zimri...
885...
885...
...
(Tibni, 1 Kings 16:21 )...
885-881...
885-880...
...
Omri...
885-873...
885-874...
Jehoshaphat...
...
874-850...
873-848...
...
Ahab...
873-851...
874-853...
...
Ahaziah...
851-849...
853-852...
Jehoram (Joram)...
...
850-843...
853-841...
...
Jehoram...
849-843...
852-841...
Ahaziah...
...
843...
841...
Athaliah...
...
843-837...
841-835...
...
Jehu...
843-816...
841-814...
Joash (Jehoash)...
...
837-796...
835-796...
...
Jehoahaz...
816-800...
814-798...
Amaziah...
...
798-767...
796-767...
...
Joash (Jehoash)...
800-785...
798-782...
Uzziah (Azariah)...
...
791-740...
792-740...
...
Jeroboam II...
785-745...
793-753...
Jotham...
...
750-742...
750-732...
...
Zechariah...
745...
753-752...
...
Shallum...
745...
752...
...
Menahem...
745-736...
752-742...
Jehoahaz I (Ahaz)...
...
742-727...
735-715...
...
Pekahiah...
736-735...
742-740...
...
Pekah...
735-732...
752-732...
...
Hoshea...
732-723...
732-723...
Hezekiah...
...
727-698...
715-686...
...
Fall of Samaria ...
722 ...
723/722 ...
Manasseh...
...
697-642...
696-642...
Amon...
...
642-640...
642-640...
Josiah...
...
639-606...
640-609...
Jehoahaz II...
...
609...
609...
Jehoiakim...
...
608-598...
609-597...
Jehoiachin...
...
598-597...
597...
Zedekiah...
...
597-586...
597-586...
Fall of Jerusalem ...
...
586 ...
586 ...
BABYLONIAN EXILE AND RESTORATION UNDER PERSIAN RULE...
Jehoiachin and leaders exiled to Babylon including Ezekiel...
597...
Jerusalem destroyed, remaining leaders exiled to Babylon...
586...
Gedaliah set over Judea...
58...
Gedaliah assassinated...
581 (?)...
Jeremiah taken with other Judeans to Egypt...
581 (?)...
Judeans deported to Babylon...
581...
Cyrus, king of Persia...
559-530...
Babylon captured...
539...
Edict allowing Jews to return to Jerusalem under Zerubbabel...
538...
Temple restoration begun but quickly halted...
538...
Cambysses, king of Persia...
530-522...
Darius, king of Persia...
522-486...
Haggai and Zechariah lead rebuilding of Temple...
520-515...
Temple completed and rededicated...
515...
Xerxes, king of Persia...
486-465...
Artaxerxes I, king of Persia...
465-424...
Ezra returns to Jerusalem and teaches the law...
458...
Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem and rebuilds the walls...
445...
NOTE: Overlapping dates of kings such as between Uzziah and Jotham result from coregencies, that is, a father installing his son as king during the father's lifetime and allowing the son to exercise royal power
Joel - Levite who helped King Hezekiah cleanse the Temple about 715 B
Tears - It can hardly have been merely such a prayer as that of Hezekiah when he turned his face to the wall and wept sore on being told that his sickness was mortal (2 Kings 20:1-3), or that of the Psalmist who, as he mingled his drink with weeping, said: ‘O my God, take me not away in the midst of my days’ (Psalms 102:9; Psalms 102:24)
Jehoiachin - ...
Nebuchadnezzar also carried off the treasures of Jeconiah's house (2 Kings 24:13), "as Jehovah had spoken" to Hezekiah long before (2 Kings 20:17; Jeremiah 15:13; Jeremiah 17:3; Jeremiah 29:2)
Poetry - Trumpets with loud hoarse note accompanied the bringing in of the ark (1 Chronicles 15:24); also at the temple's consecration (2 Chronicles 5:12); also at the restoration of temple worship under Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29:26-27); also at the founding of the second temple (Ezra 3:10). Hence several odes of the highest order are not included: Moses' songs (Exodus 15; 30), Deborah's (Judges 5), Hannah's (1 Samuel 2), Hezekiah's (Isaiah 38:9-20), Habakkuk's (Habakkuk 3), and even David's dirge over Saul and Jonathan
Josiah - ...
Josiah spared not even the high places which pious Hezekiah had left, nor those of Solomon in his apostasy, nor their priests (Chemarim), as Zephaniah 1:4 foretold; also Manasseh his grandfather's grove (Asherah) in the Lord's house (2 Kings 21:7; 2 Kings 23:6)
Leadership - Hezekiah sought the Lord with all his heart and prospered (31:21)until he became proud (32:25). Subsequent humbling postponed God's wrath during Hezekiah's time (32:26), as it did again near the end of Manasseh's wicked reign (33:9-19). Isaiah and Hezekiah worked well together, Jeremiah mourned Josiah's death, and Haggai and Zechariah collaborated with Zerubbabel to get the temple rebuilt
Moses - Only the good king Josiah and, to a lesser extent, Hezekiah matched that model
Chronology of the Old Testament - The next period, however, from Athaliah to Hezekiah, and from Jehu to the fall of Samaria, gives us greater difficulty
Issachar - ...
The last glimpse of Issachar we have is, when many of the tribe joined in Hezekiah's Passover and religious revival (2 Chronicles 30:18), though unavoidably not cleansed in legal order; for these Hezekiah prayed "the good Lord pardon every one that prepareth his heart to seek God, the Lord God of his fathers, though he be not cleansed according to the purification of the sanctuary
Genealogy - ...
Hezekiah took a census of priests and Levites according to genealogies, and apparently from 1 Chronicles 4:41; 1 Chronicles 9:1, a census also of the nation by genealogies; he had a staff of scribes for such purposes (Proverbs 25:1)
Samaria - It was besieged by Shalmaneser, king of Assyria, in the ninth year of the reign of Hoshea, king of Israel, 2 Kings 17:6 , &c, which was the fourth of Hezekiah, king of Judah
Blasphemy - This was manifestly the attempt of Rabshakeh, when he said, "Neither let Hezekiah make you trust in the Lord," (the word is Jehovah, ) "saying, Jehovah will surely deliver us
Temple of Jerusalem - Good King Hezekiah raised a hugh tribute for Sennacherib, king of Assyria, in his 701 B. Both Hezekiah and Josiah were able to centralize worship in the Jerusalem Temple during their reforms and even recover some worshipers from the north for the Jerusalem sanctuary, but Josiah's successor, Jehoiakim, reversed all of Josiah's reforms and filled up the Temple with pagan abominations (Ezekiel 8:1 )
Egypt - ...
Another king of this dynasty was Tirhakah or Taharka (the Tehrak of the monuments) who came into collision with Assyria in the 14th year of Hezekiah. Sennacherib sent a second threatening letter to Hezekiah; but God miraculously destroyed his army in the night
Hosea - ...
Placement of Hosea's ministry in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah indicates that he was a contemporary of Isaiah
Egypt - ...
In the time of Hezekiah, Egypt was conquered by Ethiopians from the Soudan, who constituted the Twenty-fifth Dynasty
Idolatry - ) which Hezekiah removed as idolatrous ( 2 Kings 18:4 )
Proverbs, Book of - For dating, Proverbs 25:1 places the copying or editing of Proverbs 25-29 in the court of Hezekiah, thus about 700 B
Covenant - Hezekiah and the people solemnly agree to reform the worship ( 2 Chronicles 29:10 ); Josiah ( 2 Kings 23:3 ) and Ezra ( Ezra 10:3 ) lead the people into a covenant to observe the Law
Mediator, Mediation - God used Nathan's prophetic word to tell David of his desire for a temple (2 Samuel 7:2-17 ) and Isaiah to calm the fears of Hezekiah about Sennacherib's threatened invasion (2 Kings 19:1-37 ; Isaiah 37:1-38 )
Redeem - 30:18, Hezekiah prays for God to “pardon” those who were not ritually prepared for the Passover
High Priest - Jehoiada in Athaliah's and Joash's reigns, Zechariah, his son Azariah in Uzziah's reign, Urijah in Ahaz's reign, and Azariah under Hezekiah. David arranged the temple service and 24 priest courses; Solomon dedicated the temple; Jehoshaphat directed Amariah and the priests as to teaching the people; Hezekiah led the reformation, and urged on Azariah; Josiah encouraged the priests in the service of the Lord's house
Golgotha - This wall, which was probably built by Hezekiah, running in a circle or curve, seems to have had no angles like the first and third, and therefore to have required no extended description. If this curve included the Pool of Hezekiah (which must surely have been within the walls), it would naturally have included also the traditional site of the Sepulchre
Weights And Measures - This talent may have been the same as the Assyrian weight, since both 2 Kings 18:14 and Sennacherib's inscriptions mention the tribute of King Hezekiah as thirty talents of silver and of gold. This may be deduced from the 1,200 cubit length mentioned in the Siloam, inscription for King Hezekiah's tunnel which has been measured to yield a cubit of this length
Babylon - About 721Merodachbaladan became king of Babylon, and in 712 he sent ambassadors to Hezekiah on hearing of his sickness
Jeremiah, Book of - The princes however protected him, and the elders reminded the people that Hezekiah did not put Micah to death
Philistim - During the unfortunate reign of Ahaz, the Philistines made great havoc in the territory of Judah; but his son and successor Hezekiah subdued them again, 2 Chronicles 28:18 ; 2 Kings 18:8
Herod - At the age of twenty-five he was made by his father governor of Galilee, and distinguished himself by the suppression of a band of robbers, with the execution of their leader, Hezekiah, and several of his comrades
Nin'Eveh - The most important inscription hitherto discovered in connection with biblical history is that upon a pair of colossal human-headed bulls from Kouyunjik, now in the British Museum, containing the records of Sennacherib, and describing, among other events, his wars with Hezekiah
Altar - Hezekiah had it "cleansed" (2 Chronicles 29:12-18) of all the uncleanness brought into it in Ahaz' reign
Feasts - Hezekiah made the revival of the national Passover a primary step in his efforts for a reformation (2 Chronicles 30:1)
Pharaoh - ...
...
Pharaoh, in whom Hezekiah put his trust in his war against Sennacherib (2 Kings 18:21 )
Death, Mortality - Men like Hezekiah could reason with God that they should go on living because no one worships God in death (Isaiah 28:18-19 )
Hymn - ’); (3) 1 Samuel 2:1-10 (‘Prayer of Haonah’); (4) Isaiah 26:9-20 (‘prayer of Isaiah’); (5) Jonah 3:5-10 (‘Prayer of Jonah’); (6) Habakkuk 3:1-19 (‘Prayer of Habakkuk’); (7) Isaiah 38:10-20 (‘Prayer of Hezekiah’); (8) The Prayer of Manasseh; (9) Daniel 3:26-30; (10) Dn 3:52–88; (11) Magnificat; (12) Nunc Dimittis; (13) Benedictus; (14) Morning Hymn (= full form of Gloria in Excelsis)
Festivals - Later references in the Bible to the observance of the Passover are found in Joshua 5:10-12 (the plains of Jericho near Gilgal), 2Chronicles 30:1,2Chronicles 30:3,2Chronicles 30:13, 2 Chronicles 30:15 (during the reign of Hezekiah); and 2 Kings 23:21-23 (Josiah's unique Passover)
Zebedee - Its chief town, Sepphoris (Dio-Caesarea),—the traditional home of the parents of Mary,—had been repeatedly taken, and immediately after the death of Herod, when the young child Jesus was safe in Egypt, it had been twice besieged and captured, once by Judas the son of Hezekiah (BJ II
King, Kingship - Even among the kings of Judah, only Hezekiah and Josiah receive unqualified approval (2 Kings 18:3-7 ; 22:2 )
Death - Those that are in Sheol have no communion with Jahweh; see the Song of Hezekiah in Isaiah 38:1-22 , and elsewhere
Music - When Hezekiah restored the temple service, which had been neglected in his predecessor's reign, "he set the Levites in the house of the Lord, with cymbals, with psalteries, and with harps, according to the commandment of David, and of Gad the king's seer, and Nathan the prophet; for so was the commandment of the Lord by his prophets," 2 Chronicles 29:25
Chronicles, Books of - Compare, for example, the reign of wicked King Ahaz with that of good King Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 28:1-4 , 2 Chronicles 29:1-11 )
Possession - The sickness of the son of the woman of Zarephath (1 Kings 17:17), Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:1), Daniel (Daniel 8:27), Jacob (Genesis 48:1), Abijah (1 Kings 14:1), is not attributed to any extra-natural cause. ‘In the Mishna it is mentioned with approval “Hezekiah put away” a Book of Healings
Ezekiel - Rabbi ben Hezekiah burned 300 jars of “midnight oil” in an attempt to harmonize the text
Egypt - The most important of these pharaohs was Taharqa, the biblical Tirhakah who rendered aid to Hezekiah (2 Kings 19:9 ; Isaiah 37:9 )
Music And Musical Instruments - The reformations under both Hezekiah and Josiah included the restoring of the musical ritual belonging to David’s time ( 2 Chronicles 29:25 ff; 2 Chronicles 35:15 )
Numbers, Book of - ( v ) The story was probably to explain the existence of the bronze serpent which Hezekiah afterwards destroyed; it is difficult to see how such a figure in bronze could have been manufactured in the desert with the rapid haste which the occasion would demand...
C
Nineveh - Sennacherib's inscription concerning Hezekiah, on two man-headed bulls from Koyunjik, is the most interesting
Priest, Priesthood - The importance of the Levites in the priestly functions of the sanctuary are well illustrated by their involvement in the reforms of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29-31 ) and Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:9 ; 35:10-15 )
Session - ” ’ Later Jewish writers seek to explain the words as referring to Abraham (Rashi), David (Aben Ezra, Mendelssohn), Hezekiah, or Zerubbabel, with regard to which interpretations see Jennings and Lowe, op
Assur - feudatories, rendering homage and tribute to the great monarch; as Menahem (2 Kings 15:19), Hoshea (2 Kings 17:4), Ahaz (2 Kings 16:8), Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:14), Manasseh (2 Chronicles 33:11); and ready therefore at the first opportunity, whether the king's death or some Assyrian disaster or the promise of some antagonistic ally, to revolt
Jews, Judaism - The history of that kingdom was marred and largely inglorious, despite the reforms of devout kings such as Hezekiah and Josiah
Pentateuch - Hezekiah kept the commandments which Jehovah commanded Moses (2 Kings 18:4; 2 Kings 18:6)
Moab - ...
It is not easy to ascertain what were the circumstances of the Moabites from this time; but Isaiah, at the beginning of the reign of King Hezekiah, threatens them with a calamity, which was to happen three years after his prediction, and which probably referred to the war that Shalmaneser, king of Assyria, made with the ten tribes and the other people beyond Jordan
Joshua - ) This brought on the attack of the five confederate kings whom he defeated at Makkedah, aided by a divinely sent hailstorm and prolongation of daylight: the condition of the air was probably rendered by God, at Joshua's believing prayer, highly refractive so as to cause the sun to be seen long after its actual descent beneath the horizon, as the fata morgana in Sicily and the arctic region; compare the recession of the sun dial shadow under Hezekiah (2 Kings 20:11)
Music, Instruments, Dancing - An Assyrian inscription, praising the victory of the Assyrian king Sennacherib over King Hezekiah of Judah, lists male and female musicians as part of the tribute carried off to Nineveh
Isaiah, Book of - Thus he says: Isaiah 49:22 ‘For Hezekiah did that which was pleasing to the Lord, and was strong in the ways of David his father, which Isaiah the prophet commanded, who was great and faithful in his vision’; Isaiah 49:23 ‘In his days the sun went backward; and he added life to the king’; Isaiah 49:24 ‘By a spirit of might be saw the end, and comforted the mourners in Sion’; Isaiah 2:2-7 ‘For ever he declared the things that should be, and hidden things before they came
Prayer - ]'>[13] 1 Kings 8:63 ) sacrifice is not mentioned! The Temple is a house of prayer); (4) Elijah’s intercession ( 1 Kings 18:36-37 ), colloquy ( 1 Kings 19:9-11 ), prayer before miracle ( 1 Kings 17:20-21 ), so also Elisha ( 2 Kings 4:33 ; 2 Kings 6:17 ); (5) Hezekiah prays in national crisis ( 2 Kings 19:15 ) and in illness ( 2 Kings 20:3 ); note his assertion of righteousness
Jerusalem - ...
A second wall, built by Jotham, Hezekiah, and Manasseh, made some changes on the southern line, and inclosed a large additional space on the north
Passover (i.) - Under Hezekiah there was a great act of observance, but in the second month, when the feast was prolonged by one week, and even the Levitically unclean were permitted to participate (2 Chronicles 30:15-23)
Temple - In the original text the gold plating was perhaps confined to the cherubim, as has just been suggested, or to these and the doors, which appear to have had a gold sheathing in the time of Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:16 )
Number - inscriptions the Moabite Stone (rather later than Ahab), and the Siloam inscription (usually ascribed to the time of Hezekiah)
Kings, Books of - The first place is given to Hezekiah and Josiah (who are classed with David), just because they did away with these ancient sanctuaries
Canaan, History And Religion of - Hezekiah (715-687 B
Messiah - ...
After the gleams of hope awakened by Hezekiah and the deliverance of Jerusalem, and after the glowing anticipations of an ideal Messianic King clothed with Divine powers, to which Isaiah in the early years of the 7th cent
Prophet - Their utterances being continued at intervals throughout their lives (as Isaiah in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah) show that they did not earn their reputation as prophets by some one happy guess or oracle, but maintained their prophetical character continuously; which excludes the probability of imposture, time often detecting fraud
Egypt - Tehrak or Tirhakah fought Sennacherib in support of Hezekiah
Israel, History of - During the rule of King Hezekiah (715-687), Isaiah was a spokesman during two political crises
Idol - In Judah several arose, Asa, Jehoshaphat, Hezekiah, Josiah
Canon of the Old Testament - Variations appear in the reasons annexed even to the Decalogue; and the priests who offered incense to the brazen serpent in the Temple in the days of Hezekiah cannot have regarded the Tables of the Law in the light of canonical Scripture
Prayer - The role of mediator in prayer was prevalent in the Old Testament (as in Abraham, Moses, David, Samuel, Amos, Solomon, Hezekiah, Elijah, Elisha, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Israel)
Cures - The priestly class were the depositaries of such medical knowledge as was possessed, although Solomon is said to have known about the use of drugs, and various references in the Talmud attribute to him a book of cures which was said to have been withdrawn from the people by Hezekiah
Jeru'Salem - Within the walls, immediately north of Zion, was the "Pool of Hezekiah
Jerusalem - ...
The Pools of Gihon, Siloam, Hezekiah, Bethesda, En-rogel, etc
Money - On the other hand, where gold is concerned, as in the case of the 30 talents which Sennacherib ‘appointed unto Hezekiah’ ( 2 Kings 18:14 ), we may with some confidence assume the gold standard common to Palestine and Assyria. In this case Hezekiah’s tribute will represent the respectable sum of £184, 500
Biblical Theology - The southern kingdom is favored with spiritual renewals under noble kings like Hezekiah and Josiah
Immanuel - If she were one of the king’s wives, then the child would be the king’s son, and the possibility of an identification with the Messiah would have to be considered, it would be possible to accept, with McCurdy, the identification of Immanuel with Hezekiah, the chronological difficulties not being altogether insuperable
Book - The letters which Rabshakeh delivered from Sennacherib to Hezekiah, are called a book
Babel - He shows his independence of Assyria in his embassy to Hezekiah; and his inquiry as to the astronomical wonder done in the land of Judah, the sun's shadow having gone back on Ahaz' dial, is characteristic of a prince of the Chaldees whose devotion to astronomy is well known
Egypt - Solomon married a Pharaoh's daughter; Tirhakah helped Hezekiah; So made a treaty with Hoshea; Pharaoh Necho was unwilling to war with Josiah; and Pharaoh Hophra (Apries) raised the Chaldaean siege of Jerusalem as Zedekiah's ally
Jerusalem (2) - side leads to a conduit which enters the city near the Jaffa Gate and empties itself into the great rock-cut pool—Birket Hammâm el-Batrak (the pool or bath of the Patriarch), commonly known as the Pool of Hezekiah
Archaeology And Biblical Study - One can demonstrate from archaeological materials that Sennacherib invaded Judah in the time of Hezekiah, but that he was a tool in the hand of the Lord can only be known from biblical assertion