What does Hara mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
וְהָרָא֙ a place of exile in Assyria. 1

Definitions Related to Hara

H2024


   1 a place of exile in Assyria.
   Additional Information: Hara = “mountain land”.
   

Frequency of Hara (original languages)

Frequency of Hara (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Hara
(hay' ruh) Place name of uncertain meaning. City or region in northern Mesopotamia where, according to 1 Chronicles 5:26 , the Assyrians under Tiglath-pileser settled some of the exiles from east of the Jordan in the Northern Kingdom in 734 B.C. The name does not occur in the parallel passages (1 Kings 17:6 ; 1 Kings 18:11 ). The scribe copying Chronicles may have copied part of the Hebrew word for either Habor or for river a second time in a way later generations made into the name Hara. The accounts in 1Kings place the exile to these cities in 722 B.C.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Hara
1 Chronicles 5:26. Pul and Tiglath Pileser carried the men of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh away to Hara while most were taken to Habor. The name may be akin to Aria and Aryans, the Greek for Media and the Medes. Probably HARAN, the Mesopotamian city whither Abram came from Ur, where he received his second call from God, and where his brother Nahor's children settled (Genesis 11:31; Genesis 24:10; Genesis 27:43; Genesis 25:20) in Padan Aram or the low and beautiful region at the foot of the hills below mount Masius, between the Khabour and the Euphrates. (See ABRAHAM.) Here still is a town bearing the old name Harran, whose people retained until lately the Chaldean language and idols; upon the Belilk (in ancient times, Bilichus), an affluent of the Euphrates. Called Charran Acts 7:2; Acts 7:4. The scene of Crassus' defeat. At our Lord's time in Abgarus' kingdom of Edessa.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Hara
A hill; showing forth
Chabad Knowledge Base - Yetzer Hara
(lit. �the evil inclination�); the human inclination to do evil, rooted in the physical nature of man.
Webster's Dictionary - Hara-Kiri
(n.) Suicide, by slashing the abdomen, formerly practiced in Japan, and commanded by the government in the cases of disgraced officials; disembowelment; - also written, but incorrectly, hari-kari.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hara
Place to which some of the captives of Israel were carried. 1 Chronicles 5:26 . It is not included in the parallel passage in 2 Kings 17:6 , and may in Chronicles signify 'hill country.'
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hara
HARA . Mentioned in 1 Chronicles 5:26 as one of the places to which Israelites were deported by the king of Assyria on the capture of Samaria. But in the corresponding accounts ( 2 Kings 17:6 ; 2 Kings 18:11 ) Hara is not mentioned, and most probably the name ‘Hara’ in 1 Chronicles 5:26 is due to a corruption of the text. There is much to be said for the suggestion that the original text read hârç Mâdai , ‘mountains of Media,’ corresponding to the cities of Media of the parallel passages (LXX [1] ‘the Median mountains’); and that Mâdai dropped out of the text, and hârç , ‘mountains of,’ was changed to the proper name Hara .
L. W. King.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Kein ayin Hara
"An evil eye should not be cast upon him."
Kein Ayin Hara ("no evil eye"): (Yiddish) �No evil eye!" Customarily added after praising another; expressing the wish that the evil eye should not affect the individual discussed.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Hara
1 Chronicles 5:26 , probably a mountainous region in the northern part of Media.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Ayin Hara
Evil Eye.

Sentence search

Hara - Hara . But in the corresponding accounts ( 2 Kings 17:6 ; 2 Kings 18:11 ) Hara is not mentioned, and most probably the name ‘Hara’ in 1 Chronicles 5:26 is due to a corruption of the text. ]'>[1] ‘the Median mountains’); and that Mâdai dropped out of the text, and hârç , ‘mountains of,’ was changed to the proper name Hara
Harikari - ) See Hara-kiri
Seppuku - ) Same as Hara-kiri
Kein ayin hara - " ...
Kein Ayin Hara ("no evil eye"): (Yiddish) �No evil eye!" Customarily added after praising another; expressing the wish that the evil eye should not affect the individual discussed
Hara - The scribe copying Chronicles may have copied part of the Hebrew word for either Habor or for river a second time in a way later generations made into the name Hara
Hara - Pul and Tiglath Pileser carried the men of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh away to Hara while most were taken to Habor. Probably HaraN, the Mesopotamian city whither Abram came from Ur, where he received his second call from God, and where his brother Nahor's children settled (Genesis 11:31; Genesis 24:10; Genesis 27:43; Genesis 25:20) in Padan Aram or the low and beautiful region at the foot of the hills below mount Masius, between the Khabour and the Euphrates
Kedesh - Tell Hara, standing out prominently to the S
Media - The former prince carried away the tribes of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh, on the east side of Jordan, to Halah, and Habor, and Hara, and to the river of Gozan
Reuben - Afterwards by Pul and Tiglath-pileser they were carried away captive unto Halah, Habor, Hara, and to the river Gozan
Captivity - The captives were carried to Halah and Habor by the river of Gozan (these same names being mentioned in 1 Chronicles 5:26 , with Hara added there)
Tiglath Pileser - "...
"Tiglath Pileser carried away the Reubenites, the Gadites, and half of Manasseh, and brought them unto Halah and Habor and Hara, and to the river Gozan
Reuben - ) Finally going a whoring after the gods of the people of the land whom God destroyed before them, Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh were first cut short by Hazael (2 Kings 10:32-33), then carried off by Pul and Tiglath Pileser, and placed about the river Khabour "in Halah, Habor, Hara, and the river Gozan" (1 Chronicles 5:26)
Manasseh (1) - ...
But because of apostasy from the God of their fathers to the gods of the people whom He destroyed before them, Manasseh was first cut short by the Syrian Hazael (2 Kings 10:32), then God stirred up the spirit of Pul and of Tiglath Pileser of Assyria to carry the eastern half of Manasseh, Reuben, and Gad captives to Halah, Habor, Hara, and the river Gozan (1 Chronicles 5:25-26)
Fall - But the cor malignum is certainly the yezer Hara of the Rabbis, regarded by Pseudo-Ezra, as well as by talmudic writers, as inherent in Adam from the first, and as the cause, not the consequence, of his fall. It is not so certain that the next statement, ‘The first man is of the earth, earthy: the second man is of heaven’ (1 Corinthians 15:47), refers only to physical origin, and does not indicate moral character. Paul assigned the yezer Hara to the unfallen Adam, as, since the reference in the ‘second man from heaven’ is not to the pre-existent Word, but to the Risen Lord, the contrast is between Adam fallen as the source of death to mankind and Christ risen as the fountain of its eternal life. If we cannot, therefore, identify the flesh with the yezer Hara of unfallen man, unless we leave in St. ” “It is characteristic at Paul’s mind,” says this writer, “to conceive religious truth under forms which are determined by personal relationship. Paul’s meaning has the great virtue of explaining his words, which involve so many difficulties when taken, as they generally have been, with too much literalness, as only a particular case of a mode of speech which is characteristic of the apostle. ...
If it be the case that, as Tennant maintains, Jewish thought assigned the cor malignum or the yezer Hara to Adam even before his Fall as well as to his descendants, and so did not teach a moral corruption of man’s action of a result of the Fall (see op
Captivity - As Pul his predecessor is named with Tiglath Pileser as having carried away Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh to Halah, Habor, Hara, and the river Gozan (1 Chronicles 5:25-26), probably Tiglath Pileser carried (740 B. An increased reverence for the law (Psalm 119 witnesses to this), and an abhorrence thenceforth of idolatry to which they once had been so prone, were among the beneficial effects of affliction on their national character
Lust - Here the stress is laid on the inwardness of morality, and the object of moral judgment is the character (καρδία), rather than bare outward actions, or the consequences of actions. The NT is thus more concerned with change of character than with the reformation by parts of the individual. The existence of an evil tendency (yezer Hara) in human nature was a problem for Judaism. ...
Similarly, and characteristically, the origin of lust is ascribed to the flesh, i. ) gives a long list of evil desires leading to death, but to him strife and envy are characteristically causative of this result, as in the case of Cain (iv. They are comprehensive and characteristic, but not necessarily exhaustive
Man - This last is characteristically Pauline, and forms St. The fact that, at its culmination, God shall be all in all (1 Corinthians 15:28) is significant of the whole character of this interpretation of life. Secondly, the whole of Christian character and conduct is related to the dominating conception of the Lord the Spirit. Paul’s teachers, but only for ascribing to them the doctrine of the yezer Hara, the evil impulse present in Adam and in successive individuals of his race, though not due to his sin (cf. The world (a characteristic Johannine term) is the realm of darkness (John 1:5; John 3:19 etc. Sin is defined in the characteristic Pauline (Hebrew) way as ‘lawlessness’ (1 John 3:4); it is a voluntary act (John 9:41), and reaches its culmination in the wilful rejection of life in Christ (John 5:40; cf. Paul, though it does not forfeit its essentially mystical character; belief in the mission of Christ marks a stage of development later than the faith of direct moral surrender to Him. The intimate relation of character and faith is further suggested by the assertion that ‘Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice’ (John 18:37), i. Paul, and one that characteristically marks St. In such life sin has no place as a fixed habit of character (1 John 5:18); sin unto death (1 John 2:19, 1 John 5:16), in fact, would show that there had been no genuine entrance into life. Of more importance than these isolated points is the general characteristic that distinguishes Hebrews, 1 Peter, and James from the Pauline (and Johannine) writings, viz
Mahometanism - Having, therefore, retired with his family, as he had done several times before, to a cave in mount Hara, he there opened the secret of his mission to his wife Khadijah; and acquainted her, that the angel Gabriel had just before appeared to him, and told him that he was appointed the apostle of God: he also repeated to her a passage which he pretended had been revealed to him by the ministry of the angel, with those other circumstances of this first appearance which are related by the Mahometan writers. ...
Khadijah received the news with great joy, swearing by Him in whose hands her soul was, that she trusted he would be the prophet of his nation; and immediately communicated what she had heard to her cousin Warakah Ebn Nawfal, who, being a Christian, could write in the Hebrew character, and was tolerably well versed in the Scriptures; and he readily came into her opinion, assuring her that the same angel who had formerly appeared unto Moses was now sent to Mahomet