What does Hallelujah mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἁλληλουϊά praise ye the Lord 4

Definitions Related to Hallelujah

G239


   1 praise ye the Lord, Hallelujah.
   

Frequency of Hallelujah (original languages)

Frequency of Hallelujah (English)

Dictionary

Holman Bible Dictionary - Hallelujah
(hal lih lyoo jah) Exclamation of praise that recurs frequently in the Book of Psalms meaning, “Praise Yahweh!” In particular, Psalm 146-150 sometimes are designated the Hallelujah Psalms. In the Psalms God is praised for His power, His wisdom, His blessings, and the liberation of His people. See Psalm 146-150 .
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Hallelujah
Praise ye Jehovah, frequently rendered "Praise ye the LORD," stands at the beginning of ten of the psalms (106,111-113,135,146-150), hence called "hallelujah psalms." From its frequent occurrence it grew into a formula of praise. The Greek form of the word (alleluia) is found in Revelation 19:1,3,4,6 .
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Hallelujah
‘Hallelujah,’ ‘Praise ye Jahweh,’ is used as a doxology in some OT Psalms, e.g. Psalms 104:35; Psalms 105:45. In the song of the redeemed (Revelation 19:1-7) It appears as a triumphant acclamation at the Wedding Feast of the Lamb. In later Christian use it was attached to the Paschal Feast as among the Jews to the Passover. If the Odes of Solomon may be ascribed to an early date (see article Hymns), we may quote the frequent use of ‘Hallelujah’ at the end of these hymns as a mark of the joyousness of early Christian worship. Tertullian (On Prayer, xxvii.) quotes its use with certain psalms, after the Jewish manner, said or sung by the whole congregation.
A. E. Burn.
Webster's Dictionary - Hallelujah
(n. & interj.) Praise ye Jehovah; praise ye the Lord; - an exclamation used chiefly in songs of praise or thanksgiving to God, and as an expression of gratitude or adoration.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Hallelujah
Praise the Lord
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Hallelujah
(Hebrew: praise ye Yahveh)
An ejaculation, which motivates or sums up an act of praise of God. It is found at the end of Psalms 105,106, inclusively; also in the beginning of Psalms 106, in the beginning of 111 to 113 inclusively; at the end of 115,117, inclusively; in the beginning of Psalms 85 and in the beginning and at the end of Psalms 147,150, inclusively. From very early times the liturgy of the Church used this term to express glad praise of God.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Hallelujah
HALLELUJAH . A Hebrew expression, used liturgically in Hebrew worship as a short doxology, meaning ‘praise ye Jah.’ With one exception ( Psalms 106:1-482 ) it occurs only at the beginning or the end of psalms, or both: at the beginning only in Psalms 111:1-10 ; Psalms 112:1-10 ; at the beginning and end in 1618387795_29 ; Psalms 113:1-9 ; Psalms 135:1-21 ; Psalms 146:1-10 ; Psalms 147:1-20 ; Psalms 148:1-14 ; Psalms 149:1-9 ; Psalms 150:1-6 ; at the end only in Psalms 104:1-35 ; Psalms 105:1-45 ; Psalms 115:1-18 ; Psalms 116:1-19 ; Psalms 117:1-2 .
In the LXX [1] , however, the Gr. (transliterated) form of the expression occurs only at the beginning of psalms as a heading , and this would seem to be the more natural usage. The double occurrence in the Heb. text may in some cases he explained as due to accidental displacement (the heading of the following psalm being attached to the conclusion of the previous one).
As a liturgical heading the term served to mark off certain well-defined groups of psalms which were probably intended in the first instance for synagogue use, and may once have existed as an independent collection. With the exception of Psalms 135:1-21 , these groups (in the Heb. text) are three in number, viz. 104 106; 111 113, 115 117; and 146 150. But in the LXX [1] a larger number of psalms is so distinguished, and the consequent grouping is more coherent, viz. 105 107; 111 119 (135 136); 146 150. In the synagogue liturgy the last-mentioned group (146 150). together with 135 136, has a well-defined place in the daily morning service, forming an integral part of the great ‘Benediction of Song’ (in certain parts of the early Church, also, it was customary to recite the ‘Hallelujah’ psalms daily).
The ‘Hallel’ (Psalms 113:1-9 ; Psalms 114:1-8 ; Psalms 115:1-18 ; Psalms 116:1-19 ; Psalms 117:1-2 ; Psalms 118:1-29 ), which forms a liturgical unit in the synagogue liturgy, is the most complete example of ‘Hallelujah’ psalms in collected form. (In the LXX [1] , notice all the individual psalms of this group are headed ‘ Alleluia ’).
All the psalms referred to exhibit unmistakable marks of late composition, which would accord with their distinctively synagogal character. Like other Jewish liturgical terms ( e.g. ‘Amen’), ‘Hallelujah’ passed from the OT to the NT (cf. Revelation 19:1-7 ), from the Jewish to the Christian Church (cf. esp. the early liturgies), and so to modern hymnody. Through the Vulgate the form ‘ Alleluia ’ has come into use. The AV [4] and RV [5] , however, render ‘Praise ye the Lord.’
G. H. Box.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hallelujah
See ALLELUIA.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Hallelujah
See Allelujah
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Hallelujah
In the New Testament, ALLELUIAH, Praise ye Jehovah. This word occurs at the beginning and at the end of many psalms. It was also sung on solemn days of rejoicing, as an expression of joy and praise, and as such it has been adopted in the Christian church, and is still used in devotional psalmody, Revelation 19:1,3,4,6 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Hallelujah
(praise ye the Lord ). [1]
Vine's Expository Dictionary of NT Words - Hallelujah
1: ἁλληλουϊά (Strong's #239 — N/A — hallelouia — al-lay-loo'-ee-ah ) signifies "Praise ye Jah." It occurs as a short doxology in the Psalms, usually at the beginning, e.g., Psalm 111 ; 112 , or the end, e.g., Psalm 104 ; 105 , or both, e.g., Psalm 106 ; 135 (where it is also used in ver. 3), Psalm 146 ; 147 ; 148 ; 149 ; 150 . In the NT it is found in Revelation 19:1,3,4,6 , as the keynote in the song of the great multitude in heaven. "Alleluia," without the initial "H," is a misspelling.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Hallelujah
A Hebrew word, meaning "Praise the Lord"; same asALLELUIA (which see).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Hallelujah
Originally the word ‘hallelujah’ was a combination of parts of two Hebrew words, meaning ‘praise’ and ‘Jehovah’ (‘Yahweh’). It has been transliterated into Greek and English as ‘hallelujah’ and means ‘praise the Lord’. It was used mainly to open or close hymns of praise in public worship (Psalms 106:1; Psalms 106:48; Psalms 112:1; Psalms 113:1; Psalms 115:18; Psalms 146:1; Psalms 146:10; Psalms 147:1; Psalms 147:20; Psalms 150; Revelation 19:1; Revelation 19:3-4; Revelation 19:6; see also PRAISE).

Sentence search

Alleluia - KJV spelling of Hallelujah in New Testament. See Hallelujah
Alleluia - See Hallelujah
Alleluia - See Hallelujah
Halleluiah - of Hallelujah...
Alleluia - * For ALLELUIA (which has been robbed of its initial aspirate) see Hallelujah
Alleluiah - See Hallelujah, the commoner form
Jah - It is often found in Hebrew compound words, as in Adonijah, Malachia, Hallelujah
Alleluia - " Sometimeswritten "Hallelujah
Alleluia - The Greek form (Revelation 19:1,3,4,6 ) of the Hebrew Hallelujah = Praise ye Jehovah, which begins or ends several of the psalms (106,111,112,113, etc
Hallelujah - Originally the word ‘hallelujah’ was a combination of parts of two Hebrew words, meaning ‘praise’ and ‘Jehovah’ (‘Yahweh’). It has been transliterated into Greek and English as ‘hallelujah’ and means ‘praise the Lord’
Jah - " It is part of the compound words "Adonijah" ("God is my Lord") and "hallelujah" ("Praise the Lord")
Hallelujah - ‘Hallelujah,’ ‘Praise ye Jahweh,’ is used as a doxology in some OT Psalms, e. If the Odes of Solomon may be ascribed to an early date (see article Hymns), we may quote the frequent use of ‘Hallelujah’ at the end of these hymns as a mark of the joyousness of early Christian worship
Hallelujah - Praise ye Jehovah, frequently rendered "Praise ye the LORD," stands at the beginning of ten of the psalms (106,111-113,135,146-150), hence called "hallelujah psalms
Hallelujah - (hal lih lyoo jah) Exclamation of praise that recurs frequently in the Book of Psalms meaning, “Praise Yahweh!” In particular, Psalm 146-150 sometimes are designated the Hallelujah Psalms
Hallelujah - Hallelujah . together with 135 136, has a well-defined place in the daily morning service, forming an integral part of the great ‘Benediction of Song’ (in certain parts of the early Church, also, it was customary to recite the ‘Hallelujah’ psalms daily). ...
The ‘Hallel’ (Psalms 113:1-9 ; Psalms 114:1-8 ; Psalms 115:1-18 ; Psalms 116:1-19 ; Psalms 117:1-2 ; Psalms 118:1-29 ), which forms a liturgical unit in the synagogue liturgy, is the most complete example of ‘Hallelujah’ psalms in collected form. ‘Amen’), ‘Hallelujah’ passed from the OT to the NT (cf
Jah - The grand Anthem hymn is called Hallel-Jah, praise the Lord, which we pronounce Hallelujah
Hymn - They probably chanted a part of the psalms which the Jews used to sing after the Passover, which they called the Halal; that is, the Hallelujah psalms
Allelujah - The beloved apostle John tells us, that in those visions he was favoured with, in seeing heaven opened, and beholding the glorified inhabitants of the New Jerusalem, he heard a great voice of much people in heaven, saying, Hallelujah. (Revelation 19:1-3) And it is worthy remark, that the five last Psalms begin and end with this expressive word, Hallelujah; as if to teach the church, that the first and great end of man is the praise of God. So that in the prospect of this never-ending eternity, we may now, by faith, mingle our Hallelujahs with theirs, until by sight we all surround together "the throne of God and the Lamb
Hymn - He recited the hymns or psalms which the Jews were used to sing after the passover; which they called the Halal; that is, the Hallelujah Psalms
Praise - Many terms are used to express this in the Bible, including “glory,” “blessing,” “thanksgiving,” and “hallelujah,” the last named being a transliteration of the Hebrew for “Praise the Lord. ” The Hebrew title of the book of Psalms (“Praises”) comes from the same root as “hallelujah” and Psalm 113-118 have been specially designated the “Hallel” (“praise”) psalms
Hallel - The word Hallel means ‘Praise,’ and the name was given on account of the oft-recurring word Hallelujah (‘Praise ye the Lord’) in these psalms
Praise - ...
The word hâlal is the source of “Hallelujah,” a Hebrew expression of “praise” to God which has been taken over into virtually every language of mankind. The Hebrew “Hallelujah” is generally translated “Praise the Lord!” The Hebrew term is more technically translated “Let us praise Yah,” the term “Yah” being a shortened form of “Yahweh,” the unique Israelite name for God. ” The Greek approximation of “Hallelujah” is found 4 times in the New Testament in the form “Alleluia” ( Hosanna - ...
The expression, which has preserved its Hebrew form (like ‘Amen’ and ‘Hallelujah’), was originally (in Hebrew) a cry addressed to God ‘ Save now ’! used as an invocation of blessing
Hosanna - In similar fashion, John transliterated "Hallelujah" in Revelation 19:1,3 , 4,6 because it had become an exclamation of praise whereas originally it was a call to praise ("Praise the Lord")
Haggai - ) first chanted the Hallelujah, the hymn of Haggai and Zechariah, in the second temple. The Hallelujah psalms belong certainly to the period after the return from Babylon
Mass - John the Baptist, at which are said three masses; that of the Innocents, at which the Gloria in excelsis and Hallelujah are omitted; and, it being a day of mourning, the altar is of a violet colour
Hallel - —A technical Hebrew liturgical term, applied in Rabbinical literature to certain Psalms and psalm-pieces of praise, which characteristically have as their keynote the expression Hallelujah (‘Praise ye Jah’). 5) the Hallel (Psalms 113-118) is designated ‘Hallelujah
Mass - John the Baptist, at which are said three masses; that of the Innocents, at which the gloria in excelsis and Hallelujah are omitted, and, it being a day of mourning, the altar is of a violet colour
Boasting - " The basic meaning of the word is "to praise, " as in the English word "hallelujah, " which means "praise Jehovah
Zechariah - ...
The Hallelujah characterizes the post exile psalms, it occurs at both beginning and end of Psalms 146 to 150; these are all joyous thanksgivings, free from the lamentations which appear in the other post exile psalms
Abba - κύριε, κύριε), it is also expressed by such phrases as ναὶ ἀμήν, ‘Hallelujah, Praise the Lord,’ where the terms are different
Hymn - the ‘Hallelujah’ Psalms (105, 106, 107, 111, 112, 114, 116, 117, 118, 135, 136, 146–150). Compare with this the custom in certain parts of the early Church of reciting the “Hallelujah’ Psalms daily
Passover - The close of their devotions is generally with some of the Psalms, such as from Psalms 112:1-10, to Psalms 118:1-29, always beginning with Hallelujah
Praise - ...
The imperative of the Hebrew verb, followed by the Divine name, gives us Hallelujah , i
Psalms - "Selah" is restricted to David and his singers; but "hallelujah" is never found in his or their psalms. The five dosing the psalter begin and end with "hallelujah. the church's pilgrim ascents below, "coming up from the wilderness, leaning upon her Beloved," and her everlasting Hallelujahs, in Book V. Psalm 18 is "a great Hallelujah, with which David retires from tide theater of life
Augustinus, Archbaptist of Canterbury - By a playful interpretation of the word he was reminded of angels , delivered from wrath, with songs of Hallelujah
Hymns - ’ Thus the last words of Ode 34 lead up to the triumphant ‘Hallelujah’ which closes each hymn
Pass'Over, - In reply, an account was given of the sufferings of the Israelites in Egypt and of their deliverance, with a particular explanation of (26:5) and the first part of the Hallel (a contraction from Hallelujah ), Psal 113,114, was sung
Amen - Of these, perhaps the most familiar are the words ‘Amen’ and ‘Hallelujah
Praise (2) - in the liturgical formula חַללוּ־יָה = Hallelujah), חוֹדָה ‘give thanks’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ), בֵּרַךְ ‘bless,’ וִכֵּד ‘make melody’; rare synonyms are—שִׁבַּח’ ‘laud’ (but very frequent in Jewish liturgy), רוֹמֵם ‘exalt,’ נִּרֵּל, חִנְרִּיל ‘magnify
Hosanna - —One of the Hebrew words which (like , Hallelujah, Sabbath, Sabaoth) have passed, transliterated and not translated, from the vocabulary of the Jewish to that of the Christian Church
Heaven - And when the inhabitants of heaven are described in the Revelations as praising God, there is one word used by which their praise is expressed, namely, Hallelujah, which is Hebrew; the meaning whereof is, Praise ye the Lord
Lazarus - "...
And thus it was that scarcely had Lazarus sat down in his Father's house: he had not got his harp of gold well into his hand: he had not got the Hallelujah that they were preparing against the Ascension of their Lord well into his mouth, when the angel Gabriel came up to where he sat, all rapture through and through, and said to him: 'Hail! Lazarus: highly honoured among the glorified from among men
Music, Instruments, Dancing - Refrains (such as the “Lift up your heads, O ye gates; even lift them up, ye everlasting doors” of Psalm 24:1 ) and acclamations such as “Hallelujah” as well as divisions into strophes stand as performance clues
Passover (i.) - Meanwhile the ‘Hallel’ (Psalms 113-118) was recited, the Levites leading the song, the people repeating the first line of each Psalm and also three others of the closing Psalm, but otherwise responding ‘Hallelujah’ to each line
God - Psalms 68:4 , Exodus 15:2 ) in the word ‘Hallelujah’ and in proper names
Psalms, Theology of - These collections would have included psalms associated in the Hebrew Bible with the likes of David (3-9; 11-32; 34-41; 51-65; 68-70; 86; 101; 103; 108-110; 122; 124; 131; 133; 138-145), Solomon (72; 127), the Korahites (42; 44-49; 84-85; 87-88), and Asaph (50; 73-83); psalms of the so-called Elohistic Psalter (42-83) in which the generic term for Israel's deity, elohim [1], translated "God, " came to be substituted for his personal name, "Yahweh, " which Jews were increasingly disinclined to pronounce; the Hallelujah Psalms (105-106; 111-118; 135-136; 146-150) which usually begin and/or end with that expression of praise; and the Songs of Ascent (120-134), ostensibly sung by pilgrims on their way to celebrate the great festivals at the temple in Jerusalem
Apocrypha - ‘And all her streets shall say Hallelujah; and they shall praise him, saying, Blessed be God, which hath exalted it for ever’ (To 13:9–18)