What does Greek Church mean in the Bible?

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Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greek Church
Comprehends in its bosom a considerable part of Greece, the Grecian Isles, Wallachia, Moldavia, Egypt, Abyssinia, Nubia, Libya, Arabia, Mesopotamia, Syria, Cilicia, and Palestine, which are all under the jurisdiction of the patriarchs of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem. If to these we add the whole of the Russian empire in Europe, great part of Siberia in Asia, Astracan, Casan, and Georgia, it will be evident that the Greek church has a wider extent of territory than the Latin, with all the branches which have sprung from it; and that it is with great impropriety that the church of Rome is called by her members the Catholic or universal church. That in these widely distant countries the professors of Christianity are agreed in every minute article of belief, it would be rash to assert; but there is certainly such an agreement among them, with respect both to faith and to discipline, that they mutually hold communion with each other, and are, in fact, but one church. It is call the Greek church, in contradistinction to the Latin or Romish church; as also the Eastern, in distinction from the Western church.
We shall here present the reader with a view of its rise, tenets, and discipline. I. Greek church, rise and separation of. The Greek church is considered as a separation from the Latin. In the middle of the ninth century, the controversy relating to the procession of the Holy Ghost (which) had been started in the sixth century) became a point of great importance, on account of the jealousy and ambition which at that time were blended with it. Photius, the patriarch of Jerusalem, having been advanced to that see in the room of Ignatius, whom he procured to be deposed, was solemnly excommunicated by pope Nicholas, in a council held at Rome, and his ordination declared null and void. The Greek Emperor resented this conduct of the pope, who defended himself with great spirit and resolution . Photius, in his turn, convened what he called an aecumenical council, in which he pronounced sentence of excommunication and deposition against the pope and got it subscribed by twenty-one bishops and others, amounting in number to a thousand. This occasioned a wide breach between the sees of Rome and Constantinople.
However, the death of the emperor Michael, and the deposition of Photius, subsequent thereupon, seem to have restored peace; for the emperor Basil held a council at Constantinople in the year 869, in which entire satisfaction was given to Pope Adrian; but the schism was only smothered and suppressed a while. The Greek church had several complaints against the Latin; particularly it was thought a great hardship for the Greeks to subscribe to the definition of a council according to the Roman form, prescribed by the pope, since it made the church of Constantinople dependent on that of Rome, and set the pope above an aecumenical council; but, above all, the pride and haughtiness of the Roman court gave the Greeks a great distaste; and as their deportment seemed to insult his imperial majesty, it entirely alienated the affections of the emperor Basil. Towards the middle of the eleventh century, Michael Cerularius, patriarch of Constantinople, opposed the Latins, with respect to their making use of unleavened bread in the eucharist, their observation of the sabbath, and fasting on Saturday, charging them with living in communion with the Jews. To this pope Leo IX. replied; and, in his apology for the Latins, declaimed very warmly against the false doctrine of the Greeks, and interposed at the same time, the authority of his see. He likewise, by he legates, excommunicated the patriarch in the church of Santa Sophia, which gave the last shock to the reconciliation attempted a long time after, but to no purpose; for from that time the hatred of the Greeks to the Latins, and of the Latins to the Greeks, became insuperable, insomuch that they have continued ever since separated from each other's communion.
II. Greek church, tenets of. The following are some of the chief tenets held by the Greek church:
They disown the authority of the pope, and deny that the church of Rome is the true Catholic church. They do not baptize their children till they are three, four, five, six, ten, nay, sometimes eighteen years of age: baptism is performed by trine immersion. They insist that the sacrament of the Lord's supper ought to be administered in both kinds, and they give the sacrament to children immediately after baptism. They grant no indulgences, nor do they lay any claim to the character of infallibility, like the church of Rome. They deny that there is any such place as purgatory; notwithstanding they pray for the dead, that God would have mercy on them at the general judgment. They practise the invocation of saints; though, they say, they do not invoke them as deities, but as intercessors with God. They exclude confirmation, extreme unction, and matrimony, out of the seven sacraments. They deny auricular confession to be a divine precept, and say it is only a positive injunction of the church. They pay no religious homage to the eucharist. They administer the communion in both kinds to the laity, both in sickness and in health, though they have never applied themselves to their confessors; because they are persuaded that a lively faith is all which is requisite for the worthy receiving of the Lord's supper. They maintain that the Holy Ghost proceeds only from the Father, and not from the Son. they believe in predestination. They admit of no images in relief or embossed work, but use paintings and sculptures in copper or silver. They approve of the marriage of priests, provided they enter into that state before their admission into holy orders. They condemn all fourth marriages. They observe a number of holy days, and keep four fasts in the year more solemn than the rest, of which the fast in Lent, before Easter, is the chief. They believe the doctrine of consubstantiation, or the union of the body of Christ with the sacrament bread.
III. Greek church, state and discipline of. Since the Greeks became subject to the Turkish yoke, they have sunk into the most deplorable ignorance, in consequence of the slavery and thraldom under which they groan; and their religion is now greatly corrupted. It is, indeed, little better than a heap of ridiculous ceremonies and absurdities. The head of the Greek church is the patriarch of Constantinople, who is chosen by the neighbouring archbishops and metropolitans, and confirmed by the emperor or grand vizier. He is a person of great dignity, being the head and director of the Eastern church. The other patriarchs are those of Jerusalem, Antioch, and Alexandria. Mr. Tournefort tells us, that the patriarchates are now generally set to sale, and bestowed upon those who are the highest bidders. The patriarchs, metropolitans, archbishops, and bishops, are always chosen from among the caloyers, or Greek monks. The next person to a bishop among the clergy, is an archimandrite, who is the director of one or more convents, which are called mandren; then comes the abbot, the arch-priest, the priest, the deacon, the under-deacon, the chanter, and the lecturer. The secular clergy are subject to no rules, and never rise higher than high-priest. The Greeks have few nunneries, but a great many convents of monks, who are all priests; and (students excepted) obliged to follow some handicraft employment, and lead a very austere life.
The Russians adhere to the doctrine and ceremonies of the Greek church, though they are now independent of the patriarch of Constantinople. The Russian church, indeed, may be reckoned the first, as to extent of empire; yet there is very little of the power of vital religion among them. The Roskolniki, or, as they now call themselves, the Starovertzi, were a sect that separated from the church of Russia, about 1666: they affected extraordinary piety and devotion, a veneration for the letter of the Holy Scriptures, and would not allow a priest to administer baptism who had that day tasted brandy. They harboured many follies and superstitions, and have been greatly persecuted; but, perhaps, there will be found among them "some that shall be counted to the Lord for a generation." Several settlements of German Protestants have been established in the Wolga. The Moravians also have done good in Livonia, and the adjacent isles in the Baltic under the Russian government.
See Mocheim, Gregory, and Hawies's Church History; King's Rites and Ceremonies of the Greek Church in Russia; The Russian Catechism; Secret Memoirs of the court of Petersburgh; Tooke's History of Russia; Ricaut's State of the Greek Church; Enc. Brit.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Greek Church
A term very commonly misapplied, in referring to the 17 Orthodox Churches, or even to all the Eastern Churches. Properly, it belongs only to the schismatic church of modern Greece, or at most to the very few Eastern Churches whose members are mainly Greeks (Greece, Constantinople, Cyprus).
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Greek Church
As the Gospel spread in the first ages both east and west, the first Christian churches were so denominated. From the languages respectively used in their devotions, they were also called the Greek and Latin or Roman churches. For the first seven centuries these churches preserved a friendly communion with each other, notwithstanding they disagreed as to the time of keeping Easter, and some other points. But about the middle of the eighth century, disputes arose, which terminated in a schism, that continues to this day. It arose out of a controversy respecting the use of images in the churches. It happened that at this time both churches were under prelates equally dogmatical and ambitious. The patriarch of Constantinople insisted on putting down the use of all images and pictures, not only in his own church, but at Rome also, which the pope resented with equal violence and asperity. They mutually excommunicated each other; and the pope of Rome excommunicated not only the patriarch of Constantinople, but the emperor also. The controversy respecting images engendered another, no less bitter, respecting the procession of the Holy Ghost both from the Father and the Son, which the Greeks flatly denied, and charged the Romans with interpolating the word filioque into the ancient creeds. These controversies occupied the eighth and ninth centuries, after which some intervals of partial peace occurred; but in the eleventh century, the flame broke out afresh, and a total separation took place. At that time, the Patriarch Michael Cerularius, who was desirous to free himself from the papal authority, published an invective against the Latin church, and accused its members of maintaining various errors. Pope Leo retorted the charge, and sent legates from Rome to Constantinople. The Greek patriarch refused to see them; upon which they excommunicated him and his adherents, publicly, in the church of St. Sophia, A.D. 1054. The Greek patriarch excommunicated those legates, with all their adherents and followers, in a public council; and procured an order of the emperor for burning the act of excommunication which they had pronounced against the Greeks. Thus the separation was completed, and at this day a very considerable part of the world profess the religion of the Greek or eastern church. The Nicene and Athanasian creeds, with the exception of the words above-mentioned, are the symbols of their faith.
2. The principal points which distinguish the Greek church from the Latin, are as follows: they maintain that the Holy Ghost proceeds from the Father only, and not from the Father and Son. They disown the authority of the pope, and deny that the church of Rome is the only true catholic church. They do not affect the character of infallibility, and utterly disallow works of supererogation, and indulgences. They admit of prayers and services for the dead, as an ancient and pious custom; but they will not admit the doctrine of purgatory, nor determine any thing dogmatically concerning the state of departed souls. In baptism they practice triune immersion, or dip three times; but some, as the Georgians, defer the baptism of their children till they are three, four, or more years of age. The chrism, or baptismal unction, immediately follows baptism. This chrism, solemnly consecrated on Maunday Thursday, is called the unction with ointment, and is a mystery peculiar to the Greek communion, holding the place of confirmation in that of the Roman: it is styled, "the seal of the gift of the Holy Ghost." They administer the Lord's Supper in both kinds, dipping the bread in the cup of wine, in which a small portion of warm water is also inserted. They give it both to the clergy and laity, and to children after baptism. They exclude confirmation and extreme unction out of the number of sacraments; but they use the holy oil, which is not confined to persons in the close of life, like extreme unction, but is administered, if required, to all sick persons. Three priests, at least, are required to administer this sacrament, each priest, in his turn, anointing the sick person, and praying for his recovery. They deny auricular confession to be a divine command; but practice confession attended with absolution, and sometimes penance. Though they believe in transubstantiation, or rather consubstantiation, they do not worship the elements. They pay a secondary kind of adoration to the virgin and other saints. They do not admit of images or figures in bas- relief, or embossed work; but use paintings and silver shrines. They admit matrimony to be a sacrament, and celebrate it with great formality. Their secular clergy, under the rank of bishops, are allowed to marry once, and laymen twice; but fourth marriages they hold in abomination. They observe a great number of holy days, and keep four fasts in the year more solemn than the rest, of which Good Friday as the chief.
3. The service of the Greek church is too long and complicated to be particularly described in this work; the greater part consists in psalms and hymns. Five orders of priesthood belong to the Greek church; namely, bishops, priests, deacons, sub-deacons, and readers; which last includes singers, &c. The episcopal order is distinguished by the titles of metropolitan, archbishops, and bishops. The head of the Greek church, the patriarch of Constantinople, is elected by twelve bishops, who reside nearest that famous capital. This prelate calls councils by his own authority to govern the church. The other patriarchs are those of Jerusalem, Antioch, and Alexandria, all nominated by the patriarch of Constantinople, who enjoys a most extensive jurisdiction. For the administration of ecclesiastical affairs, a synod, convened monthly, is composed of the heads of the church resident in Constantinople. In this assembly the patriarch of Constantinople presides, with those of Antioch and Jerusalem, and twelve archbishops. In regard to discipline and worship, the Greek church has the same division of the clergy into regular and secular, the same spiritual jurisdiction of bishops and their officials, the same distinction of ranks and offices, with the church of Rome.
4. The Greek church comprehends a considerable part of Greece, the Grecian isles, Wallachia, Moldavia, Egypt, Abyssinia, Nubia, Lybia, Arabia, Mesopotamia, Syria, Cilicia, and Palestine; Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem; the whole of the Russian empire in Europe; great part of Siberia in Asia, Astrachan, Casan, and Georgia.
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Greek Church
A name often used for the EASTERN CHURCH (which see).

Sentence search

Anagnostes - The epistle-reader in the Greek Church
Catabasion - ) A vault under altar of a Greek Church
Hesychast - ) One of a mystical sect of the Greek Church in the fourteenth century; a quietist
Prothesis - ) A credence table; - so called by the Eastern or Greek Church
Anastasimatarion - A Greek Church book, containing the text with music of the various compositions sung during the Sunday Offices
Reek Calendar - (1):...
The Julian calendar, used in the Greek Church
Euchology - ) A formulary of prayers; the book of offices in the Greek Church, containing the liturgy, sacraments, and forms of prayers
Apodosis - (Greek apo, back; didomi, give) ...
The last day on which prayers in commemoration of a feast are said in the Greek Church
Ablution - In the Greek Church, public washing of recently-baptized persons
Menaion - ) A work of twelve volumes, each containing the offices in the Greek Church for a month; also, each volume of the same
Uniate - ) A member of the Greek Church, who nevertheless acknowledges the supremacy of the Pope of Rome; one of the United Greeks
Horologion - In the Greek Church, office book corresponding to part of the Roman Breviary, giving the choir part of the different antiphons for the various feast days of the year
Artoklasia - (Greek: artos, bread; klao, break) ...
Concluding service of Vespers in the Greek Church, in which five loaves of bread, a measure of wine, and a measure of oil are incensed and blessed
Aer - (Greek: air) ...
The largest and outermost covering of chalice and paten in the Greek Church; so named either from lightness of the material, or because held high in the air during the Creed
Diaconicum - In the Greek Church; connotes: ...
(1) The annex to a basilica where altar-supplies are kept
Liturgy, Apostle in - Name given, in the Greek Church, to the Epistle of the Mass, which is invariably of Apostolic origin and never taken from the Old Testament, and also to the book containing the epistles and antiphons for every Sunday and feast-day
Exarch - ) A viceroy; in Ravenna, the title of the viceroys of the Byzantine emperors; in the Eastern Church, the superior over several monasteries; in the modern Greek Church, a deputy of the patriarch , who visits the clergy, investigates ecclesiastical cases, etc
Apostle in Liturgy - Name given, in the Greek Church, to the Epistle of the Mass, which is invariably of Apostolic origin and never taken from the Old Testament, and also to the book containing the epistles and antiphons for every Sunday and feast-day
Iberians - Their tenets are said to be the same with those of the Greek Church; which see
Deprecatory - The form of absolution in the Greek Church is deprecative, thus expressed...
May God absolve you; whereas in the Latin church it is declarative...
I absolve you
Pope - ) A parish priest, or a chaplain, of the Greek Church
Androna - Anciently it was the custom for the men and women to have separate apartments in places of worship, where they performed their devotions asunder, which method is still religiously observed in the Greek Church
Trisagion - ,"Thrice Holy," but it is not used in the Greek Church for the samething, but is the title of the respond used in the Reproaches andother services, namely, "Holy God, Holy and Mighty, Holy andImmortal, have mercy upon us
Armenian - ) An adherent of the Armenian Church, an organization similar in some doctrines and practices to the Greek Church, in others to the Roman Catholic
Breviary - ) A book containing the daily public or canonical prayers of the Roman Catholic or of the Greek Church for the seven canonical hours, namely, matins and lauds, the first, third, sixth, and ninth hours, vespers, and compline; - distinguished from the missal
Church, Greek or Eastern - ...
See article Greek Church
Communicating - Those of the reformed and of the Greek Church communicate under both kinds; those of the Romish only under one
Chasuble - In the Greek Church the chasuble is a large round mantle
Acolouthia - (Greek: sequence) ...
The arrangement of the Divine Office in the Greek Church, beginning with Little Vespers before sunset and Greater Vespers after it; the Orthros (Greed: dawn), in two parts, corresponding to Matins and Lauds of the Roman Rite, is said at midnight; little Hours are said during the day and the Office closes with the Apodeipnon (Greek: after-supper service) as the Roman does with Complin
Orthodox Church - ...
Church of Cyprus
Church of Greece (Modern)
Church of Mount Sinai
Greek Church in Australia
Greek Church in Western Europe (headquarters in London)
Greek Orthodox Church in the United States
Independent Greek Orthodox Church in America
Patriarchate of Alexandria (Egypt)
Patriarchate of Antioch (Syria)
Patriarchate of Constantinople
Patriarchate of Jerusalem
Patriarchate of Moscow (Russia; largest of all Eastern Churches)
Patriarchate of Poland
Patriarchate of Rumania
Patriarchate of Serbia
Russian Church (Czarist: headquarters in Serbia)
The Living Church (Russia; new)
The majority of them have become national churches, governed by a Holy Directing Synod and absolutely independent upon the state
Falling Asleep of Mary - A title in the Greek Church for the feast of the Assumption
Jerusalem, Cosmas of - Among the best representatives of later Greek classical hymnology, especially of the liturgical chants known as "Canons," his hymns are in general use in the Orthodox Greek Church, which commemorates him, October 14,
Filioque - They are not found in the originalCreed as used in the Greek Church, but were added by the ThirdCouncil of Toledo, A
Hagiopolltes - Among the best representatives of later Greek classical hymnology, especially of the liturgical chants known as "Canons," his hymns are in general use in the Orthodox Greek Church, which commemorates him, October 14,
Eras'Tus - (Romans 16:23 ) According to the traditions of the Greek Church, he was first treasurer to the church at Jerusalem, and afterwards bishop of Paneas
Greek Church - If to these we add the whole of the Russian empire in Europe, great part of Siberia in Asia, Astracan, Casan, and Georgia, it will be evident that the Greek Church has a wider extent of territory than the Latin, with all the branches which have sprung from it; and that it is with great impropriety that the church of Rome is called by her members the Catholic or universal church. It is call the Greek Church, in contradistinction to the Latin or Romish church; as also the Eastern, in distinction from the Western church. Greek Church, rise and separation of. The Greek Church is considered as a separation from the Latin. The Greek Church had several complaints against the Latin; particularly it was thought a great hardship for the Greeks to subscribe to the definition of a council according to the Roman form, prescribed by the pope, since it made the church of Constantinople dependent on that of Rome, and set the pope above an aecumenical council; but, above all, the pride and haughtiness of the Roman court gave the Greeks a great distaste; and as their deportment seemed to insult his imperial majesty, it entirely alienated the affections of the emperor Basil. Greek Church, tenets of. The following are some of the chief tenets held by the Greek Church:...
They disown the authority of the pope, and deny that the church of Rome is the true Catholic church. Greek Church, state and discipline of. The head of the Greek Church is the patriarch of Constantinople, who is chosen by the neighbouring archbishops and metropolitans, and confirmed by the emperor or grand vizier. ...
The Russians adhere to the doctrine and ceremonies of the Greek Church, though they are now independent of the patriarch of Constantinople. ...
See Mocheim, Gregory, and Hawies's Church History; King's Rites and Ceremonies of the Greek Church in Russia; The Russian Catechism; Secret Memoirs of the court of Petersburgh; Tooke's History of Russia; Ricaut's State of the Greek Church; Enc
Most Holy Directing Synod - This council, which was adopted by the Greek Church in 1833, is considered a more democratic system of government, though scarcely in harmony with the strict monarchy of the Church Fathers, than the autocratic rule of the patriarch
Emmaus - The Greek Church place it at Kuriet el Enab (Abu Ghosh)
Holy Synod - This council, which was adopted by the Greek Church in 1833, is considered a more democratic system of government, though scarcely in harmony with the strict monarchy of the Church Fathers, than the autocratic rule of the patriarch
Margaret, Saint - She is called Marina in the Greek Church
Protestant - and the Diet of Spires, in 1529, against the Reformers, and appealed to a general council; - now used in a popular sense to designate any Christian who does not belong to the Roman Catholic or the Greek Church
Armenia - The modern Armenian Church resembles strongly the Greek Church, and is sadly debased and corrupt
Hormisdas, Pope Saint - As pope he opened his pontificate by receiving into communion the last adherents of the Laurentian Schism, and then devoted himself to reunion with the Greek Church, while condemning Acacianism and Monophysitism
Patriarchs - As to the name of patriarch given to the Greek Church in modern times, this is altogether fanciful, and not derived from any authority in Scripture
Espousal - In the Greek Church at the present time there arestill two different offices, viz
Feast of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary - " It was first mentioned in a hymn composed by Saint Romanus, an ecclesiastical lyrist of the Greek Church; adopted by the Roman Church in the 17th century
Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Feast of the - " It was first mentioned in a hymn composed by Saint Romanus, an ecclesiastical lyrist of the Greek Church; adopted by the Roman Church in the 17th century
Maccabees, Books of the - ...
The third does not hold a place in the Apocrypha, but is read in the Greek Church
Tabular Statement - The following table will show the correctness of this remark:...
Population under Christian governments ...
387, 788, 000 Population under Mohammedan governments...
72, 000, 000 Population under Heathen governments...
-277, 212, 000...
Total 737, 000, 000...
Those under Christian governments are thus divided:...
Protestant States...
193, 624, 000 Roman Catholic States...
134, 164, 000 Russian, or Greek Church...
60, 000, 000 Total 387, 788, 000...
Almost one hundred and fifty millions belong to the British Empire
Exarch - An officer in the Greek Church, whose business it is to visit the provinces allotted to him, in order to inform himself of the lives and manners of the clergy; take cognizance of ecclesiastical causes; the manner of celebrating divine service; the administration of the sacraments, particularly confession; the observance of the canons; monastic discipline; affairs of marriages, divorces, &c
Iconoclastes - At length images were rejected by the Greek Church, which however retains pictures in churches, though her members do not worship them; but the Latin church, more corrupt, not only retained images, but made them the medium, if not the object, of their worship, and are therefore Iconoduli, or Iconolatrae, image worshippers
Accho - It has an old cathedral, and a bishop of the Greek Church
Septuagint - It was used by the Apostles and the early Christians and is still the official text of the Greek Church, both Uniat and Orthodox
Greek Church - The principal points which distinguish the Greek Church from the Latin, are as follows: they maintain that the Holy Ghost proceeds from the Father only, and not from the Father and Son. The service of the Greek Church is too long and complicated to be particularly described in this work; the greater part consists in psalms and hymns. Five orders of priesthood belong to the Greek Church; namely, bishops, priests, deacons, sub-deacons, and readers; which last includes singers, &c. The head of the Greek Church, the patriarch of Constantinople, is elected by twelve bishops, who reside nearest that famous capital. In regard to discipline and worship, the Greek Church has the same division of the clergy into regular and secular, the same spiritual jurisdiction of bishops and their officials, the same distinction of ranks and offices, with the church of Rome. The Greek Church comprehends a considerable part of Greece, the Grecian isles, Wallachia, Moldavia, Egypt, Abyssinia, Nubia, Lybia, Arabia, Mesopotamia, Syria, Cilicia, and Palestine; Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem; the whole of the Russian empire in Europe; great part of Siberia in Asia, Astrachan, Casan, and Georgia
Carpus - He is supposed by later tradition to have been one of ‘the Seventy,’ and the Greek Church honours his memory on May 26, the Roman and Syrian Churches on October 13
Menology - (Greek: men, month; loqos, discourse) ...
A collection, arranged according to the months and days of the month, of long lives of the saints of the Greek Church
Menologe - (Greek: men, month; loqos, discourse) ...
A collection, arranged according to the months and days of the month, of long lives of the saints of the Greek Church
Menologium - (Greek: men, month; loqos, discourse) ...
A collection, arranged according to the months and days of the month, of long lives of the saints of the Greek Church
Doctor - The title, doctor, is given to certain fathers of the church whose opinions are received as authorities, and in the Greek Church, it is given to a particular officer who interprets the scriptures
Armenian Church - a branch, originally, of the Greek Church, residing in Armenia. They worship in the eastern manner, by prostration; they are...
very superstitious, and their ceremonies much resemble those of the Greek Church
Raskolnik - ) One of the separatists or dissenters from the established or Greek Church in Russia
Adoption - It was introduced into the Greek Church, and afterwards among the ancient Franks
Nice - 883, when Nicholas the First was pope, they were allowed, and from that time they have stood in the Nicene creed, in all the western churches; but the Greek Church has never received them
Person - On the other hand, the Greek Church thought that the word person did not sufficiently guard against the Sabellian notion of the same individual Being sustaining three relations; whereupon each part of the church was ready to brand the other with heresy, till by a free and mutual conference in a synod at Alexandria, A
Altar - In the Greek Church, the altar proper is square, and the top should be constructed of wood, or have at least one board in it
Church - A particular number of christens, united under one form of ecclesiastical government, in one creed, and using the same ritual and ceremonies as the English church the Gallican church the Presbyterian church the Romish church the Greek Church
Bethlehem - It was a small place until after the time of Christ; was improved and its wall rebuilt by Justinian; now has about 5000 inhabitants, nearly all nominally Christians, mostly of the Greek Church
Anglican Communion, the - : The Eastern or Greek Church,the Roman Church, and the Anglican
Greece - The removal of the seat of government from Rome to Constantinople, gave a preponderance to the Grecian districts of the empire, and the ecclesiastical determinations of the Greek Church were extensively received. The Greek Church has a general resemblance to the Roman-catholic, and embraces a population of not far from fifty millions of souls, in Russia, Greece, Turkey, Syria, etc
Lent - The Christians of the Greek Church observe four Lents; the first commences on the fifteenth of November: the second is the same with our Lent: the third begins the week after Whitsuntide, and continues till the festival of St
Dionysius, Saint, Apostle of France - This is the tradition of the Greek Church, and of those of Gaul, Germany, Spain, and Italy
Copts - a name given to the Christians of Egypt who do not belong to the Greek Church, but are Monophysites, and in most respects Jacobites
Olives, Olivet, Mount of - ...
On the northern slope of the mount is a walled garden kept by the Franciscan monks, with a few old olive trees, said to be the garden of Gethsemane, but another site is now shown by the Greek Church
Tabor (1) - The Franciscans and the Greek Church have each erected a monastery-hospice on the summit, and extensive excavations have been made, particularly by members of the former order
Procession of the Holy Ghost - The Latin church, however, has not scrupled to say that the Spirit proceeds from the Father and the Son; but the Greek Church chooses to express it thus: the Spirit proceeds from the Father by or through the Son, or he receives of the Son, Galatians 4:6
Exegesis - The post-patristic period in the Greek Church was famous chiefly for its compilations of excerpts from the Greek Fathers
Exegete - The post-patristic period in the Greek Church was famous chiefly for its compilations of excerpts from the Greek Fathers
Joannes Scholasticus, Bishop of Constantinople - To the canons of the councils of Nicaea, Ancyra, Neocaesarea, Gangra, Antioch, Ephesus, and Constantinople, already collected and received in the Greek Church, John added 89 "Apostolical Canons," the 21 of Sardica, and the 68 of the canonical letter of Basil
Athens - At present Athens is comparatively in ruins, and has a population of about 28,000 addicted to the superstitions of the Greek Church
Epaphroditus - In virtue of the designation ἀπόστολος (Philippians 2:25) the Greek Church places Epaphroditus in the same rank with Barnabas, Silas, and others; but the contest suggests the original meaning, ‘messenger
Arsenius - The Greek Church honours him as "our Father, Arsenius the Great," on May 8; the Latin, on July 19
Thom'as - The later traditions carry him farther east, His martyrdom whether in Persia or India, is said to have been occasioned by a lance, and is commemorated by the Latin Church on December 21 the Greek Church on October 6, and by the Indians on July 1
Mass - Mass of the presanctified (missa praesanctificatorum) is a mass peculiar to the Greek Church, in which there is no consecration of the elements; but, after singing some hymns, they receive the bread and wine which were before consecrated
Communion (1) - The three grand communions into which the Christian church is divided is that of the church of Rome, the Greek Church, and the Protestant church; but originally all Christians were in communion with each other, having one communion, faith, and discipline
Funeral, Rites - The funeral ceremonies of the Greek Church are much the same with those of the Latin
Sacrament - ...
Sacraments of the New Law The Council of Trent defined that Christ instituted seven sacraments: ...
Baptism
Confirmation
Holy Eucharist
Penance
Extreme Unction
Holy Orders
Matrimony
The Greek Church and Eastern sects accept that these seven are the sacraments
Greetings - In the Greek Church worshippers often kiss the skirt of the priest’s robe
Excommunication - Excommunication, in the Greek Church, cuts off the offender from all communion with the three hundred and eighteen fathers of the first council of Nice, and with the saints; consigns him over to the devil and the traitor Judas, and condemns his body to remain after death as hard as a flint or piece of steel, unless he humble himself, and make atonement for his sins by a sincere repentance
Lebbaeus - In the Synaxaries of the Greek Church (1) Judas (in Lk
Church - , were not separate or independent organisations, as in the modern idea of the Church of Rome, the Greek Church, the Church of England, and so on
Antonius - In the next century he began to be venerated as a saint by the Greek Church, and in the ninth by the Latin
Euthalius (5), Deacon of Alexandria - Euthalius introduced a system of division into all those not yet divided except the Apocalypse which spread rapidly over the whole Greek Church and has become by its presence or absence a valuable test of the antiquity of a MS
Iconoclastes - In the Greek Church, after the banishment of Irene, the controversy concerning images broke out anew, and was carried on by the contending parties, during the half of the ninth century, with various and uncertain success
Dionysius (3), Bishop of Corinth - The Greek Church counts Dionysius among martyrs, and the Menaea name the sword as the instrument of his death; but there is no authority for his martyrdom earlier than Cedrenus, i
New Testament - These must have become a standard in the Greek Church
Preaching - The next five centuries produced many pious and excellent preachers, both in the Latin and Greek Church, though the doctrine continued to degenerate. Basil, bishop of Caesarea, John Chrysostom, preacher at Antioch, and afterward patriarch, as he was called, of Constantinople, and Gregory Nazianzen, who all flourished in the fourth century, seem to have led the fashion of preaching in the Greek Church; Jerom and Augustine did the same in the Latin church
Flavianus (4) i, Bishop of Antioch - The Greek Church commemorates him on Sept
Fornication - The Greek Church still regards this law of meats as binding, though the Western Church followed St
Church - : as the Romish church, Greek Church
Christ in the Middle Ages - For the Greek Church the Christology of John of Damascus, who in the 8th cent. ), that while Christ continued to be regarded by the Greek Church as the revealed wisdom of God, and stress was laid upon His prophetic office employed in the diffusion of enlightenment as embodied in the ‘orthodox faith,’ in the Latin Church He was regarded during the mediaeval time as first and foremost a King, Christianity was regarded as a means of securing power, and the hierarchy was supposed to have been appointed by Christ to occupy His place, rule in His stead, virtually to supersede Him in personal government, and to abolish any direct intercourse between Him and believers. It is evident that this great thinker, whose Fountain of Knowledge is still normative in the Greek Church, failed to gain a perfectly consistent view of the relations of the Divine and the human in the Person of Christ
Hymn - Nine of them are now sung at Lauds in the office of the orthodox Greek Church
the Man Who Went Out to Borrow Three Loaves at Midnight - Take this home with you from Father John of the Greek Church
Moravians - According to the society's own account, however, they derive their origin from the Greek Church in the ninth century, when, by the instrumentality of Methodius and Cyrillus, two Greek monks, the kings of Bulgaria and Moravia being converted to the faith, were, together with their subjects, united in communion with the Greek Church
Sabbath - Even to this day in the liturgical names for the days of the week, in both the Roman and the Greek Church, Saturday is known by its Jewish name, sabbatum, σάββατον
Sabbath - Even to this day in the liturgical names for the days of the week, in both the Roman and the Greek Church, Saturday is known by its Jewish name, sabbatum, σάββατον
Amen (2) - This in the West: in the Greek Church it was similarly required that the words of the institution should be said aloud, though the first part of the prayer was said inaudibly, so that the people might hear them and make their response
Scripture - This translation instead of the Hebrew was translated into Latin by the early Christian fathers, and is the authority in the Greek Church today
Transubstantiation - In the Greek Church it was long resisted, and, indeed, was not embraced till the seventeenth century, a time at which it might have been thought that it could not have extended the range of its influence
Church - The word is now also used to denote any particular denomination of Christians, distinguished by particular doctrines, ceremonies, &c, as the Romish church, the Greek Church, the English church, &c
Preaching - The next five centuries produced many pious and excellent preachers both in the Latin and Greek Churches, though the doctrine continued to degenerate. Basil, bishop of Caesarea, John Chrysostom, preacher at Antioch, and afterwards patriarch (as he was called) of Constantinople, and Gregory Nazianzen, who all flourished n the fourth century, seem to have led the fashion of preaching in the Greek Church: Jerom and Augustin did the same in the Latin church
Bible - , when it was thus employed by Greek Church writers in lists of the canonical books
Gregorius (14) Nazianzenus, Bishop of Sasima And of Constantinople - Did it alone remain to us, Gregory must still have been thought of as one of the four pillars of the Greek Church, and we should still read the chief traits of his personal character
Back to Christ - ...
In the theology of the Greek Church the work of Christ was summed up in His Incarnation
Clementine Literature - This is inferred from the citations of the late Greek writers (Nicephorus Callisti, Cedrenus, and Michael Glycas); and the Clementines so amended were so entirely accepted by the later Greek Church, that a Scholiast on Eusebius is quite unable to understand the charge of heresy which his author brings against them
Confession - The Greek Church has no public or established confession; but its creed, so far as can be gathered from its authorized catechisms, admits the doctrines of the Nicene and Athanasian Creeds, with the exception of the article in each concerning the procession of the Holy Spirit, which it affirms to be "from the Father only, and not from the Father and the Son