What does Grace mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
χάρις grace. / good will 48
χάριν grace. / good will 31
χάριτος grace. / good will 27
χάριτι grace. / good will 20
חֵ֥ן favour 3
חֵ֖ן favour 3
חֵן֙ favour 3
χάριτί grace. / good will 2
חֵ֤ן favour 2
חֵ֑ן favour 1
יֻחַ֤ן to be gracious 1
חֵ֣ן favour 1
חֵ֭ן favour 1
חֵ֜ן favour 1
חֵֽן favour 1
וְ֝חֵ֗ן favour 1
κεχαριτωμένη to make graceful. / to peruse with grace 1
χάρισμα a favour with which one receives without any merit of his own. / the gift of divine grace. / the gift of faith 1
χάριτα grace. / good will 1
תְחִנָּ֜ה favour 1

Definitions Related to Grace

G5485


   1 Grace.
      1a that which affords joy, pleasure, delight, sweetness, charm, loveliness: Grace of speech.
   2 good will, loving-kindness, favour.
      2a of the merciful kindness by which God, exerting his holy influence upon souls, turns them to Christ, keeps, strengthens, increases them in Christian faith, knowledge, affection, and kindles them to the exercise of the Christian virtues.
   3 what is due to Grace.
      3a the spiritual condition of one governed by the power of divine Grace.
      3b the token or proof of Grace, benefit.
         3b1 a gift of Grace.
         3b2 benefit, bounty.
   4 thanks, (for benefits, services, favours), recompense, reward.
   

H2580


   1 favour, Grace, charm.
      1a favour, Grace, elegance.
      1b favour, acceptance.
      

H2603


   1 to be gracious, show favour, pity.
      1a (Qal) to show favour, be gracious.
      1b (Niphal) to be pitied.
      1c (Piel) to make gracious, make favourable, be gracious.
      1d (Poel) to direct favour to, have mercy on.
      1e (Hophal) to be shown favour, be shown consideration.
      1f (Hithpael) to seek favour, implore favour.
   2 to be loathsome.
   

H8467


   1 favour, supplication, supplication for favour.
      1a favour.
      1b supplication for favour.
      

G5487


   1 to make graceful.
      1a charming, lovely, agreeable.
   2 to peruse with Grace, compass with favour.
   3 to honour with blessings.
   

G5486


   1 a favour with which one receives without any merit of his own.
   2 the gift of divine Grace.
   3 the gift of faith, knowledge, holiness, virtue.
   4 the economy of divine Grace, by which the pardon of sin and eternal salvation is appointed to sinners in consideration of the merits of Christ laid hold of by faith.
   5 Grace or gifts denoting extraordinary powers, distinguishing certain Christians and enabling them to serve the church of Christ, the reception of which is due to the power of divine Grace operating on their souls by the Holy Spirit.
   

Frequency of Grace (original languages)

Frequency of Grace (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Grace
Of form or person (Proverbs 1:9 ; 3:22 ; Psalm 45:2 ).
Favour, kindness, friendship (Genesis 6:8 ; 18:3 ; 19:19 ; 2 Timothy 1:9 ).
God's forgiving mercy (Romans 11:6 ; Ephesians 2:5 ).
The gospel as distinguished from the law (John 1:17 ; Romans 6:14 ; 1 Peter 5:12 ).
Gifts freely bestowed by God; as miracles, prophecy, tongues (Romans 15:15 ; 1 Corinthians 15:10 ; Ephesians 3:8 ).
Christian virtues (2 Corinthians 8:7 ; 2 Peter 3:18 ).
The glory hereafter to be revealed (1 Peter 1:13 ).
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Grace, Means of
But in popular language the expression is used in a wider sense to denote those exercises in which we engage for the purpose of obtaining spiritual blessing; as hearing the gospel, reading the Word, meditation, self-examination, Christian conversation, etc.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Meals, Grace at
(Latin: gratios, thanksgiving)
Prayers said before and after meals, a custom common to all Christians. The prayers implore the divine blessing upon the food and upon those who are to partake of it, and express gratitude to God for the food, which is His gift.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Miracle of Grace
A conversion from ignorance to faith, from sinfulness to holiness, from doubt to certainty, due not to natural causes at least principally, but to the operation of God's particular and unmerited assistance. It is improperly called a miracle; it is rather a remarkable change in a soul's career wrought by a peculiar and special intervention of God, quite distinct from His general providence and liberality.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Fullness of Grace
Abundance or superabundance of sanctifying grace or interior holiness, predicated by Sacred Scripture of Our Lord, of Saint Stephen, of the Apostles, and of Our Blessed Lady. As applied to Mary, the Mother of God, it is a fullness intermediate between that peculiar to Christ, and that of all the angels and saints. Granting Christ's obvious and necessary superiority, we may assume with Suarez that Mary's sanctifying grace transcends by far the combined sanctity of all other creatures.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Inward Grace
Any gratuitous gift of God, which perfects the recipient in the supernatural order. Among such graces are enumerated the indwelling of the Holy Spirit and His gifts, sanctifying grace and the infused virtues, all actual graces, and in general any supernatural help or adornment received either in the soul itself or in its faculties.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Sanctifying
The free gift of God establishing the soul in the way of justification and holiness. Its intimate nature is beyond mere human analysis, but judging by its effects, we are justified in regarding it as a physical adornment of the soul, permanent in its essence, incompatible with grievous sin, recreating the soul as a new nature competent to act supernaturally and meritoriously. It is habitual grace regarded under one aspect - the real interior sanctification which enriches the soul and makes it permanently holy in the sight of God.
Chabad Knowledge Base - Grace after meals
The blessings of thanksgiving after a meal that included bread
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Election of Grace
The Scripture speaks (1) of the election of individuals to office or to honour and privilege, e.g., Abraham, Jacob, Saul, David, Solomon, were all chosen by God for the positions they held; so also were the apostles. (2) There is also an election of nations to special privileges, e.g., the Hebrews (Deuteronomy 7:6 ; Romans 9:4 ). (3) But in addition there is an election of individuals to eternal life (2 Thessalonians 2:13 ; Ephesians 1:4 ; 1 Peter 1:2 ; John 13:18 ). The ground of this election to salvation is the good pleasure of God (Ephesians 1:5,11 ; Matthew 11:25,26 ; John 15:16,19 ). God claims the right so to do (Romans 9:16,21 ).
It is not conditioned on faith or repentance, but is of soverign grace (Romans 11:4-6 ; Ephesians 1:3-6 ). All that pertain to salvation, the means (Ephesians 2:8 ; 2 Thessalonians 2:13 ) as well as the end, are of God (Acts 5:31 ; 2 Timothy 2:25 ; 1 Corinthians 1:30 ; Ephesians 2:5,10 ). Faith and repentance and all other graces are the exercises of a regenerated soul; and regeneration is God's work, a "new creature."
Men are elected "to salvation," "to the adoption of sons," "to be holy and without blame before him in love" (2 Thessalonians 2:13 ; Galatians 4:4,5 ; Ephesians 1:4 ). The ultimate end of election is the praise of God's grace (Ephesians 1:6,12 ). (See PREDESTINATION .)
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Grace
This word hath a variety of meanings in the word of God, as it relates to the divine power, and as it relates to man. When we speak of grace in relation to God, it hath a vast comprehension of meaning. The whole gospel is called the grace of God. And the application of it, in any individual instance of its saving power, is called "the grace of God. By grace ye are saved (saith the apostle,) through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God." (Ephesians 2:8) The grace of God is free, like the light, or the dew of heaven. Grace acts from itself to itself; nothing of human power, Or merit, disposing to it, nor of unworthiness keeping from it. So that every thing by Christ is grace; and to suppose any one pre-disposing act in the creature, or any merit in the creature, would altogether alter and destroy the very property of grace. (See Romans 11:6) What is meant by grace in man, means altogether favour and affection. Thus Joseph found grace; that is, favour in the sight of his master. (Genesis 39:4. So Abraham, Genesis 18:1-3. The case is similar in the case of Lydia, Acts 16:15)
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Grace at Meals
A short prayer, imploring the divine blessing on our food, and expressive of gratitude to God for supplying our necessities. The propriety of this act is evident from the divine command, 1 Thessalonians 5:18 . 1 Corinthians 10:31 . 1 Timothy 4:5 . From the conduct of Christ, Mark 8:6-7 . From reason itself; not to mention that it is a custom practised by most nations, and even not neglected by heathen themselves. The English, however, seem to be very deficient in this duty. As to the manner in which it ought to be performed, as Dr. Watts observes, we ought to have a due regard to the occasion, and the persons present; the neglect of which hath been attended with indecencies and indiscretions. Some have used themselves to mutter a few words with so low a voice, as though by some secret charm they were to consecrate the food alone, and there was no need of the rest to join with them in the petitions. Others have broke out into so violent a sound, as though they were bound to make a thousand people hear them.
Some perform this part of worship with so slight and familiar an air, as though they had no sense of the great God to whom they speak: others have put on an unnatural solemnity, and changed their natural voice into so different and awkward a tone, not without some distortions of countenance, that have tempted strangers to ridicule. It is the custom of some to hurry over a single sentence or two, and they have done, before half the company are prepared to lift up a thought to heaven. And some have been just heard to bespeak a blessing on the church and the king, but seem to have forgot they were asking God to bless their food, or giving thanks for the food they have received. Others, again, make a long prayer, and, among a multitude of other petitions, do not utter one that relates to the table before them. The general rules of prudence, together with a due observation of the custom of the place where we live, would correct all these disorders, and teach us that a few sentences suited to the occasion, spoken with an audible and proper voice, are sufficient for this purpose, especially is any strangers are present. Watts's Works. oct. edit. vol. 4: p. 160. Law's Serious Call, p. 60.
Seed's Post. Ser. p. 174.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Grace: Triumphant Over Trial
In one place near the Hospice of St. Bernard, I met with a curious natural conservatory. The under surface of the snow having been melted by the warmth of the soil, which in Alpine regions is always markedly higher than that of the air, was not in contact with it. A snowy vault was thus formed, glazed on the top with thin plates of transparent ice; and here grew a most lovely cushion of the Aretia Helvetica, covered with hundreds of its delicate rosy flowers, like a miniature hydrangea blossom. The dark color of the soil favored the absorption of heat; and, prisoned in its crystal cave, this little fairy grew and blossomed securely from the very heart of winter, the unfavorable circumstances around all seeming so many ministers of good, increasing its strength, and enhancing its loveliness.'
This delightful little sketch of nature by Mr. Hugh Macmillan may be paralleled in the kingdom of grace; for in the cold shade of poverty, protected from a thousand temptations by that very scant, and in the centre of sinful society, stimulated to a bolder confession by the surrounding opposition, we have met with the rarest specimens of grace. Where every influence appeared to be deadly, the most vigorous spiritual life has been produced.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Corruptions: Overcome by Grace
My gardeners were removing a large tree which grew near a wall, and as it would weaken the wall to stub up the roots, it was agreed that the stump should remain in the ground. But how were we to prevent the stump from sprouting, and so disarranging the gravel-walk. The gardener's prescription, was, to cover it with a layer of salt. I mused awhile, and thought that the readiest way to keep down my eversprouting corruptions in future would be to sow them well with the salt of grace. O Lord, help me so to do.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Doctrines of Grace
Our forefathers were very fond of clipping their plants and training their flowers into quaint and grotesque forms; so that we read of great guns wrought in rosemary and sweet briers. He would have been very foolish who would have trembled at cannons which only shot forth flowers and darted perfume. Let the poor trembler who is sincerely seeking Jesus, rest assured that the seemingly dreadful doctrines of election and predestination are not one whit more terrible, and are far more sweetly fragrant.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Grace
Payson, when dying, expressed himself with great earnestness respecting the grace of God as exercised in saving lost men, and seemed particularly affected that it should be bestowed on one so ill-deserving as himself. 'Oh, how sovereign! Oh, how sovereign! Grace is the only thing that make us like God. I might be dragged through heaven, earth, and hell, and I should be still the same sinful, polluted wretch, unless God himself should renew and cleanse me.'
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Growth in Grace
See GRACE.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Christ: Riches of His Grace
Sir Richard Whittington entertained King Henry V. at the Guildhall with unparalleled magnificence. The braziers in the hall were supplied with logs of rare, sweet-scented wood for fuel; but they burned with a far more delicious fragrance when the noble citizen bringing forth the king's bonds for the repayment of the large sum of £60,000 (equal to £900,000 now), thrust them into the blazing fire, saying, that he was too happy thus to discharge the king's obligations. When the handwriting which was against us is put away, we receive a choice mercy indeed. That blessed fire of Christ's most fragrant sufferings hath consumed all his people's sins; this is royal bounty with an emphasis.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Grace
There are various senses in which this word is used in Scripture; but the general idea of it, as it relates to God, is his free favour and love. As it respects men, it implies the happy state of reconciliation and favour with God wherein they stand, and the holy endowments, qualities, or habits of faith, hope, love, &c., which they possess. Divines have distinguished grace into common or general, special or particular. Common grace, if it may be so called, is what all men have; as the light of nature and reason, convictions of conscience, &c., Romans 2:4 . 1 Timothy 4:10 . Special grace is that which is peculiar to some people only; such as electing, redeeming, justifying, pardoning, adopting, establishing, and sanctifying grace, Romans 8:30 . This special grace is by some distinguished into imputed and inherent: imputed grace consists in the holiness, obedience, and righteousness of Christ, imputed to us for our justification; inherent grace is what is wrought in the heart by the Spirit of God in regeneration.
Grace is also said to be irresistible, efficacious, and victorious; not but that there are in human nature, in the first moments of conviction, some struggles, opposition, or conflict; but by these terms we are to understand, that, in the end, victory declares for the grace of the Gospel. There have been many other distinctions of grace; but as they are of too frivolous a nature, and are now obsolete, they need not a place here. Growth in grace is the progress we make in the divine life. It discovers itself by an increase of spiritual light and knowledge; by our renouncing self, and depending more upon Christ; by growing more spiritual in duties; by being more humble, submissive, and thankful; by rising superior to the corruptions of our nature, and finding the power of sin more weakened in us; by being less attached to the world, and possessing more of a heavenly disposition. M'Laurin's Essays, essay 3.; Gill's Body of Div. vol. 1: p. 118.; Doddridge's Lec., part 8: prop. 139.; Pike and Hayward's Cases of Conscience; Saurin on 1 Corinthians 9:26-27 . vol. 4:; Booth's reign of Grace.
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Growth in Grace
We have the likenesses of our boys taken on every birthday, and twelve of the annual portraits are now framed in one picture, so that we see them at a glance from their babyhood to their youth. Suppose such photographic memorials of our own spiritual life had been taken and preserved, would there be a regular advance, as in these boys, or should we still have been exhibited in the perambulator? Have not some grown awhile, and then suddenly dwarfed? Have not others gone back to babyhood? Here is a wide field for reflection.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Novena of Grace
A novena made in honor of Saint Francis Xavier, which owes its origin to the saint himself, who promised Father Mastrilli, S.J., in 1633, that
"all who would earnestly ask his intercession with God for nine days in honor of his canonization would infallibly experience the effects of his great power in heaven and would realize whatever they asked that would contribute to their salvation."
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Transformations of Grace
A short time ago the manufacturers of lighting gas were puzzled to know how to dispose of the coal-tar left in the retorts. A more useless, nauseous substance was hardly known to exist. Chemistry came to the rescue, and to-day not less than thirty-six marketable articles are produced from this black, vile, sticky slime: solvents, oils, salts, colours, flavours. You eat a bit of delicious confectionery, happily unconscious that the exquisite taste which you enjoy so keenly comes from coal-tar; you buy at the druggist's a tiny phial of what is labelled 'Otto of Roses,' little dreaming that the delicious perfume is wafted, not from 'the fields of Araby,' but from the foul gas retort.
Christianity is a moral chemistry. Well wet e it for nations if it held a higher place among their social economics. Tarsaving is all well enough, but soul-saving is better. Grace transforms a villain into an honest man, a harlot into a holy woman, a thief into a saint. Where fetid exhalations of vice alone ascended, prayer and praise are to be found; where moral miasmata had their lair, righteousness and temperance pitch their tent. 1very sort of good thing is produced by godliness, and that too in hearts once reeking with all manner of foulness. Should not this stay every persecuting hand, hush every railing tongue, and incite every sanctifted spirit to continued and increasing energy.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Grace
GRACE (from Lat. gratia [1], through the Fr. grace ). Of the three meanings assigned to this word in the Eng. Dict . (1) ‘pleasingness,’ (2) ‘favour,’ (3) ‘thanks’ (the sense of favour received) (1) and (2) belong to the Eng. Bible; (3) attaches to the equivalent Gr. charis , where it is rendered ‘thank(s)’ or ‘thankfulness’ ( Hebrews 12:28 RVm [2] .). The specific Biblical use of ‘grace’ comes under the second of the above significations; it is prominent in the NT. The OT usage requires no separate treatment. (2) is the primary meaning of the Hebrew original, rendered ‘favour’ almost as often as ‘grace’; but (1) of the Greek charis , which at its root signified the gladdening, joy-bringing . Hence the correspondence between the common Greek salutation chaire ( te ) or chairein (‘Joy to you!’) and the Christian charis (‘Grace to you!’) is more than a verbal coincidence.
1. Of the sense charm, winsomeness (of person, bearing, speech, etc.) a usage conspicuous in common Greek, and personified in the Charites , the three Graces of mythology the prominent instances in the OT are Psalms 45:2 (‘Grace is poured on thy lips’) and probably Zechariah 4:7 ; add to these Proverbs 1:9 ; Proverbs 3:22 ; Proverbs 4:9 ; Proverbs 22:11 ; Proverbs 31:30 (‘favour’). The same noun occurs in the Heb. of Proverbs 5:10 ; Proverbs 11:16 , and Ecclesiastes 10:12 , Proverbs 17:8 , under the adjectival renderings ‘pleasant,’ ‘gracious,’ ‘precious,’ and in Nahum 3:4 (‘well-favoured’). For the NT, ‘grace’ is charm in Luke 4:22 , Colossians 4:8 ; in Ephesians 4:28 there may be a play on the double sense of the word. Charm of speech is designated by charis in Sir 20:18 ; Sir 21:10 ; Sir 37:21 , in the Apocrypha. in James 1:11 ‘grace of the fashion’ renders a single Greek word signifying ‘fair-seemingness,’ quite distinct from charis .
2. The OT passages coming under (2) above, employ ‘grace’ chiefly in the idiom ‘to find grace ( or favour),’ which is used indifferently of favour in the eyes of J″ [3] ( Genesis 6:8 ) or of one’s fellow-men ( Genesis 39:4 ), and whether the finder bring good ( Genesis 39:4 ) or ill ( Genesis 19:19 ) desert to the quest. With this broad application, ‘grace’ means good-will, favourable inclination towards another of the superior (king, benefactor, etc.) or one treated as such by courtesy, to the inferior shown on whatever ground. In the Eng. NT, ‘favour’ is reserved for this wide sense of charis ; see Luke 1:30 ; Luke 2:52 , Acts 2:47 ; Acts 7:10 ; Acts 7:46 ; Acts 25:3 : ‘grace’ has the same meaning in Luke 2:40 , Acts 4:33 , Zechariah 12:10 is the one instance in which ‘grace’ in the OT approximates to its prevalent NT import; but the Heb. adj. for gracious , and the equivalent vb., are together used of J″ [3] , in His attitude towards the sinful, more than twenty times, associated often with ‘merciful,’ etc.; see. e.g. , Exodus 33:19 ; Exodus 34:6 , Psalms 77:9 ; Psalms 103:8 , Joel 2:13 , Jonah 4:2 . The character in God which the OT prefers to express by mercy , signifying His pitiful disposition towards man as weak and wretched, the NT in effect translates into ‘grace,’ as signifying His forgiving disposition towards man as guilty and lost.
3. Christianity first made grace a leading term in the vocabulary of religion. The prominence and emphasis of its use are due to St. Paul, in whose Epp. the word figures twice as often as in all the NT besides. ‘Grace’ is the first word of greeting and the last of farewell in St. Paul’s letters; for him it includes the sum of all blessing that comes from God through Christ: ‘grace’ the source, ‘peace’ the stream. In the Gospels, the Johannine Prologue (vv. 14 17: contrasted with ‘law,’ and co-extensive with ‘truth’) supplies the only example of ‘grace’ used with the Pauline fulness of meaning. This passage, and the Lukan examples in Acts ( Acts 6:3 ; Acts 11:23 ; Acts 13:43 ; Acts 14:8 ; Acts 15:11 ; Acts 20:24 ; Acts 20:32 ), with the kindred uses in Hebrews 1:1-14 , Hebrews 1:2 Peter., Jude, 2 Jn., Rev., may be set down to the influence of Paulinism on Apostolic speech. There is little in earlier phraseology to explain the supremacy in the NT of this specific term; a new experience demanded a new name. ‘Grace’ designates the principle in God of man’s salvation through Jesus Christ . It is God’s unmerited, unconstrained love towards sinners, revealed and operative in Christ. Titus 2:11-14 , interpreted by Romans 5:1 to Romans 6:23 , is the text which approaches nearest to a definition; this passage shows how St. Paul derived from God’s grace not only the soul’s reconciliation and new hopes in Christ ( Romans 5:1-11 ), but the whole moral uplifting and rehabilitation of human life through Christianity. St. Paul’s experience in conversion gave him this watchword; the Divine goodness revealed itself to the ‘chief of sinners’ under the aspect of ‘grace’ ( 1 Corinthians 15:9 f., 1 Timothy 1:13-16 ). The spontaneity and generosity of God’s love felt in the act of his salvation, the complete setting aside therein of everything legal and conventional (with, possibly, the added connotation of charm of which charis is redolent), marked out this word as describing what St. Paul had proved of Christ’s redemption; under this name he could commend it to the world of sinful men; his ministry ‘testifies the gospel of the grace of God’ ( Acts 20:24 ). Essentially, grace stands opposed to sin ; it is God’s way of meeting and conquering man’s sin ( Romans 5:20 f., Romans 6:1 ff., Romans 6:15 ff.): He thus effects ‘the impossible task of the Law’ ( Romans 7:7 to Romans 8:4 ). The legal discipline had taught St. Paul to understand, by contrast, the value and the operation of the principle of grace; he was able to handle it with effect in the legalist controversy. Grace supplies, in his theology, the one and sufficient means of deliverance from sin, holding objectively the place which faith holds subjectively in man’s salvation ( Ephesians 2:8 , Titus 2:11 ). Formally, and in point of method, grace stands opposed to ‘ the law ,’ ‘which worketh wrath’ ( Romans 3:19-26 ; Romans 4:15 , Galatians 2:15-21 ; Galatians 5:4 ); it supersedes the futile ‘works’ by which the Jew had hoped, in fulfilling the Law, to merit salvation ( Romans 4:2-8 ; Romans 11:6 , Galatians 2:16-20 , Ephesians 2:8 f.). Grace excludes, therefore, all notion of ‘debt’ as owing from God to men, all thought of earning the Messianic blessings ( Romans 4:4 ) by establishing ‘a righteousness of one’s own’ ( Romans 10:3 ); through it men are ‘justified gratis ’ ( Romans 3:24 ) and ‘receive the gift of righteousness’ ( Romans 5:17 ). In twenty-two instances St. Paul writes of ‘the grace of God ’ (or ‘his grace’); In fifteen, of ‘the grace of Christ ’ (‘the Lord Jesus Christ,’ etc.). Ten of the latter examples belong to salutation-formulæ (so in Revelation 22:21 ), the fullest of these being 2 Corinthians 13:14 , where ‘the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ’ is referred to ‘the love of God’ as its fountain-head; In the remaining five detached instances the context dictates the combination ‘grace of Christ’ (‘our Lord,’ etc.), Rom 5:15 , 2 Corinthians 8:9 ; 2 Corinthians 12:9 , Galatians 1:6 , 1 Timothy 1:14 (also in 2 Peter 3:16 ). In other NT writings the complement is predominantly ‘of God’; 1 Peter 5:10 inverts the expression ‘the God of all grace.’ Once in 2 Thessalonians 1:12 grace is referred conjointly to God and Christ . Christ is the expression and vehicle of the grace of the Father, and is completely identified with it (see John 1:14 ; John 1:17 ), so that God’s grace can equally be called Christ’s ; but its reference to the latter is strictly personal in such a passage as 2 Corinthians 8:9 . A real distinction is implied in the remarkable language of Romans 5:15 , where, after positing ‘the grace of God’ as the fundamental ground of redemption, St. Paul adds to this ‘the gift in grace, viz. the grace of the one man Jesus Christ ,’ who is the counterpart of the sinful and baleful Adam: the generous bounty of the Man towards men , shown by Jesus Christ, served an essential part in human redemption.
Cognate to charis , and charged in various ways with its meaning, is the vb. rendered (RV [5] ) to grant in Acts 27:24 , Galatians 3:18 , Philippians 1:29 , Philippians 1:22 , give in Philippians 2:9 , freely give in Romans 8:32 , 1 Corinthians 2:12 , and (with ‘wrong’ or ‘debt’ for object, expressed or implied) forgive in Luke 7:42 f., 2 Corinthians 2:7 ; 2Co 2:10 ; 2 Corinthians 12:13 , Ephesians 4:32 , Colossians 2:13 ; Colossians 3:18 .
There are two occasional secondary uses of ‘grace,’ derived from the above, in the Pauline Epp.: it may denote ( a ) a gracious endowment or bestowment , God’s grace to men taking shape in some concrete ministry (so Ephesians 4:7 , in view of the following context, and perhaps Galatians 2:9 ; cf. Acts 7:10 ) for charis in this sense charisma ( charism ) is St. Paul’s regular term, as in 1 Corinthians 12:4 etc.; and ( b ) a state of grace , God’s grace realized by the recipient ( Romans 5:2 , 2 Timothy 2:1 ).
G. G. Findlay.
Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Grace
The word "grace" in biblical parlance can, like forgiveness, repentance, regeneration, and salvation, mean something as broad as describing the whole of God's activity toward man or as narrow as describing one segment of that activity. An accurate, common definition describes grace as the unmerited favor of God toward man. In the Old Testament, the term that most often is translated "grace, " is hen [1]; in the New Testament, it is charis [2].
The Old Testament . The word hen [1] occurs around sixty times in the Old Testament. There are examples of man's favor to man, but the theological concept of importance to us is the grace of God demonstrated toward man. The term occurs most often in the phrase favor "in your (i.e., God's) sight" or "in the eyes of the Lord." This assumes the notion of God as a watchful master or king, with the one who is finding favor, a servant, an employee, or perhaps a soldier.
The concept first occurs in Genesis 6:8 . Noah finds "favor in the eyes of the Lord." The context is that the Lord was grieved at "how great man's wickedness on the earth had become" (Genesis 6:5 ). This statement about the Lord's antipathy toward man is followed by his promise that he will wipe humankind from the face of the earth, that is, completely destroy him, because of his anger at their condition. Noah is then described as having found favor in the eyes of the Lord. The themes of judgment and salvation, in which the vast majority of humankind are condemned to destruction, while God finds favor on a few (Noah and his family), reoccurs often in connection with the idea of grace. Hence, concepts of election, salvation, mercy, and forgiveness are all linked in this first illustration of grace in the Old Testament. Interestingly, the rest of the references to favor in Genesis all describe favor in the eyes of man (e.g., Jacob begging Esau's favor, 32:5; 33:8,10, 15).
Crucial among the Old Testament passages on the unmerited favor of God is the conversation between Moses and God recorded in Exodus 33 . There, in the space of six verses, Moses is said to have found favor with God five times, hen [1] being translated either "find favor" or "be pleased with." At the beginning of the chapter, Moses goes into the tent of meeting, while the pillar of cloud stands at the entrance to the tent, and the people of Israel stay outside, worshiping (v. 10). The Lord speaks to Moses "face to face, s a man speaks with his friend." In the passage, the conversation between Moses and the Lord has to do specifically with the favor that God shows to Moses, and Moses requests that God demonstrate that favor toward him. Moses begins by reminding God that he has called Moses to lead these people, but that God has not let him know whom he will send with Moses. The statement echoes the original conversation between Moses and God at the burning bush in chapter 3, where God promises to send Aaron with Moses to help him get the people out of Egypt. Here, the Lord promises only that his "Presence" will go with Moses, and that he will give him rest (v. 14). Moses has just stated that he knows God's name (another echo of chap. 3), and that he has found favor with God; he requests that God teach him his ways, so that he may "know you and continue to find favor with you" (v. 13). Moses demonstrates his humble dependence upon the grace of God by affirming that if God's Presence does not go up with them, he does not want to be sent, because he knows they will fail (v. 15). But he asks the reasonable question, "How will anyone know that you are pleased with me and with your people unless you go with us?" (v. 16). God promises to go with him in the next verse because "I am pleased with you and I know you by name" (v. 17).
Moses then makes one of the most remarkable requests of God ever made in Scripture, asking God to "show me your glory." Just as remarkable is that God answers his request positively. He promised to "cause all my goodness to pass in front of you" and that he will proclaim his name "Yahweh" in Moses' presence. He then makes a statement that is connected with grace throughout Scripture, one that Paul will quote in the context of election in Romans 9 : "I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion." This is a remarkable example of the unconditional and full character of the grace of God. God holds very little back, only telling Moses that he "cannot see my face, for no one may see me and live." Even this is an act of unconditional and full grace in that God has withheld from Moses what would destroy him. The passage closes with the strange instruction that God will cause his "glory" to pass by, Moses being hid in a cleft in a rock and covered with the hand of God until the glory has passed by. Then God will remove his hand and allow Moses to see the back of his glory, but not his face. Again, this protective, gracious act of God emphasizes the extent to which God is willing to go with his faithful servant to show his favor toward him.
Moses again speaks of finding favor with the Lord in Numbers 11:4-17 . When the people of Israel complain at having only manna and not any meat, Moses cries out to the Lord in an apparently sincere state of vexation at the burden of judging this entire people by himself: "I cannot carry all these people by myself; the burden is too heavy for me. If this is how you are going to treat me, put me to death right now—if I have found favor in your eyesand do not let me face my own ruin" (vv. 14-15). Without questioning his integrity or his strength of character, God immediately gives Moses a solution to his problem by appointing seventy of the elders of Israel to help him carry the burden of the people, "so that you will not have to carry it alone" (v. 17).
At the same time, God even answers the question that Moses has not asked: What about meat for the complaining people? God instructs Moses that he will give them meat for the month, though he will give them more meat than they want, as the story makes clear. The fact that the Lord brings judgment upon the people, however, does not vitiate the point of God's favor toward Moses in this passage. He still Acts as a sovereign who gives complete, unmerited favor to his servant.
God's favor sometimes extends to the fact that he will wait upon man as if he were his servant. Gideon, when called by God to lead Israel against Midian, asks God to wait while he goes to get his offering to set before him (Judges 6:17 ). As with Moses, the statement is in the context of the promise of the Lord to be "with you, and you will strike down all the Midianites together" (Judges 6:16 ). When Gideon actually brings the offering that he has prepared, God shows his grace beyond what Gideon has asked by giving him instructions on where to place it and how to arrange it, then creating a supernatural fire that consumes the meat and the bread. After he disappears, Gideon realizes that he has seen the "angel of the Lord" and, interestingly, makes reference to the fact that he has seen him "face to face, " recalling the passage in Exodus. God shows his grace one more time by assuring Gideon that although he is afraid since he has seen the angel of the Lord face to face, he is not going to die (Judges 6:23 ).
Samuel, too, finds favor in the eyes of the Lord (1 Samuel 2:26 ). Here, the boy Samuel is described as growing in stature and in favor, not only with the Lord, but also with men. This verse is quoted, of course, in the New Testament, using the heavily theologically weighted term charis [ Luke 2:52 ). It is significant because it is a description of the growth of a child in the favor of God. The child cannot earn that favor since he is merely a child. Thus, God's grace toward those whom he loves grows in its extensiveness, as the child grows. This is perhaps no less important because of Samuel's unique relationship to salvation history. He is the last of the judges and is the transitional figure between the period of the judges and the period of the kings in Israel's history, as John the Baptist is in the New Testament between the Old Testament prophets and the New Testament evangelists.
Remarkably, the life of David is devoid of references to finding favor in the eyes of the Lord, though often he finds favor in the eyes of men, or requests such favor (1 Samuel 16:22 ; 20:3,29 , etc. ). One reference, however, is striking, especially in light of the dearth of references elsewhere. As David flees the city of Jerusalem after hearing that Absalom has been crowned king in Hebron, he takes the ark with him. A particularly faithful servant named Ittai, the Gittite, has declared his faithfulness to David, even though David has given him leave to go back and spare himself potential death by association with David. The procession continues into the desert, where it stops so that they can offer sacrifices with the ark in their midst. Then the king tells Zadok the priest to take the ark back into the city because he knows it belongs in the temple of the Lord. In a remarkable display of trust in God and in his sovereignty, David says that if he finds favor in the Lord's eyes, then God will bring him back. But if he does not, then David is ready; as he puts it, "Let him do to me whatever seems good to him" (2 Samuel 15:26 ). David recognizes that the unmerited favor of God has to do with God's choice, not his. Grace in the Old Testament is just as much an act of the sovereign will of God as is grace in the New Testament.
The last prominent example of grace in the Old Testament is found in the Book of Esther. Of course, the book does not speak of God's favor at all, but Esther's humility in seeking the favor of the king has always been understood as a pointer toward human responsibility to humbly accept the grace of God. Esther finds favor in the eyes of the king and is rewarded with the freedom of her people (5:1-8; 7:3; 8:5-8).
Only a few references close out the notion of grace in the Old Testament, but they are significant. Ezra in his notable prayer to God when he finds that the people have intermarried with foreigners against God's will (Ezra 9 ), states that God has been gracious to the people of Israel "for a brief moment, " in doing two things. The first is that he has left the people of Israel a remnant. The remnant is a sign that God's gracious favor bestowed upon Israel in the covenant continues on even in times of great disobedience and/or destruction among the Israelites, though this is the only reference to the remnant in the context in which hen [1] is used in the Old Testament.
God has also given them "a firm place in his sanctuary, and so our God gives light to our eyes and a little relief in our bondage" (Ezra 9:8 ). Here is a reference to the grace that is shown the people in the giving of the temple and the light that it brings to Israel. But in the context of the Book of Ezra, this may also be a reference to the grace shown by God in giving Israel the Law, since the reading of the Law and the confession of the sin of the people on the basis of that reading is so important to this book.
Another crucial reference is found in Jeremiah 31 . The famous passage about the new covenant (vv. 31-34) is enough of a statement about the grace of God on its own, but it is linked to the hen [1] of God by the occurrence of that word in 31:2. Introducing the same passage with the phrase "at that time, " an echo of the beginning of the covenant passage in 31:31, God says that "the people who survive the sword will find grace in the desert; I will come to give rest to Israel." Here is a promise of the grace of God given to the people when they are given the new covenant. The new covenant, of course, is a promise that God will be their God, and they will be his people, with the Law written upon their hearts and present in their minds, and the gracious promise that all God's people will know him. From the least of them to the greatest, they will be forgiven their wickedness, and God will remember their sins no more.
The New Testament . Grace in the New Testament is largely encompassed by the use of the word charis [ Matthew 20:1-16 ) and the parable of the great supper (Luke 14:16-24 ).
While the idea of grace can be said to be largely a Pauline one, there are references to it in John and Luke as well. John describes Jesus as "full of grace and truth" and speaks of his people receiving grace upon grace from the fullness of his grace (John 1:16 ). In one of the most important theological statements about grace in Scripture, John says that the Law, a good thing, was given through Moses; the better things of grace and truth came through Jesus Christ (John 1:17 ).
When we turn to the writings of Luke, we find that Jesus is described as having the grace of God upon him (Luke 2:40 ) and as growing in grace with God and man (Luke 2:52 ). Many more references to grace are found in the Book of Acts. Luke makes a strong association between grace and power, especially in the early chapters (4:33; 6:8; 11:23). Grace is found without qualifier (18:27) and in the phrases "message of his grace" (14:3), "grace of God" (14:26), "grace of our Lord Jesus" (15:11), "grace of the Lord" (15:40). The distinction between these phrases does not seem acute, and therefore the basic synonymity between them points to an intention on Luke's part to make a statement about the deity of Christ. Again, these phrases often seemed to be linked with the power of God to create spiritual life and to sustain Christians. This grace is, as in the Old Testament passages, an unmerited favor, but now a new aspect of power in the Spirit has been added to it.
The concept of grace is most prominently found in the New Testament in the epistles of Paul. The standard greeting in the Greek ancient world generally involved the verb charein . Paul's greeting, however, was unique, combining the Hebrew greeting, shalom [7] (eirene in Greek) with the word charis [2]. This in itself is enough to note that Paul is thinking and not simply reacting as he writes his greeting.
The fact that he sometimes uses grace in his benedictions as well, which clearly are intentional, indicates that his greetings are to be taken with some seriousness. For instance, the benediction in 1 Corinthians 16:23 , coming just after his dramatic plea to the Lord to come, demonstrates a strong belief in the grace of God. In the salutation of the letter (1:3), one gets a greeting that follows on from a strongly worded theological statement about sanctification and calling (1:2) and that leads into a statement about grace in 1:4 demonstrating the theological import Paul intends. A similar seriousness could be argued about the other salutations in Paul's letters.
Overwhelmingly in the letters of Paul God is the subject of grace. He gives it freely and without merit. Hence the many different phrases connected with grace: the grace of God (Romans 5:15 ), the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ (Romans 3:23-24 ), and the like. Sometimes this is explicitly stated, as in Ephesians 4:7 : "to each one of us grace has been given as Christ apportioned it."
Interestingly, Paul sometimes mentions the gift of grace from God using alongside it language that speaks of human responsibility. So in Romans 15:16 , Paul speaks of "the grace God gave me to be a minister of Christ Jesus to the Gentiles, with the priestly duty of proclaiming the gospel of God." Grace, then, is the power with which the human being then performs his or her gifted task. This is even more clearly seen in Paul's self-defense in Galatians. In one of the most truly dialectic passages in Scripture, Paul proclaims that he has died, yet lives, yet not he but Christ lives, yet he lives in the body by faith. He then argues that in living "by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me, " that he is not "setting aside the grace of God" (2:20-21). Only an argument that Paul was too dependent upon works in his life would create the argument that he was not setting aside the grace of God in his understanding of the sanctified Christian life.
Grace can be such a forceful thought for Paul that he sometimes anthropomorphizes it. Hence, in 1 Corinthians 15:10 , in the midst of an emotional defense of his apostleship despite the fact that he had persecuted the church of God, Paul says that he is what he is by the grace of God. He then goes on to compare himself to others who had worked among the community, the other apostles, and declares that he worked harder than all of them. In order that this statement might not seem boastful, Paul follows it up by saying "yet not I, but the grace of God that was with me." Though this grace is said to be God's grace, it nevertheless is said to be "with him, " and working harder than the other apostles, and is tantamount to equating the grace of God with the Holy Spirit.
In Ephesians 1:6 Paul speaks of the "glorious grace" of God, which should garner our praise. Of course, once again, Paul is not expecting us to praise an abstract comment, but he is thinking of the grace of God working so mightily in his life that it becomes a metonymy for God. The highly rhetorical character of the passage in which this verse is found (1:3-14) helps explain the power of this statement. The point is that Paul was so saturated with the notion of grace in his writing that he thought of it as an essential, if not the essential attribute of God.
Grace is most often associated in Paul with other terms having to do with salvation. We see it related to election (Ephesians 1:3-6 ), to the gospel (2Col 4:15; Colossians 1:5-6 ), explicitly to justification (Romans passim, esp. 3:23-26; Ephesians 2:8-9 ), and most often to sanctification (Romans 5:2,21 ; 6:1,14 , 15 ; 2Col 12:9; Ephesians 2:10 ; Titus 2:11-14 ). It is even used with the human subject in speaking of the collection for Jerusalem as a work of grace.
In connecting grace to election Paul sees God as electing us before the creation of the world for the purpose of holiness and blamelessness (Ephesians 1:4 ). He predestined us to be adopted as sons into the family of God (Ephesians 1:5 ). All of this elective work is so that we might "praise his glorious grace." In other words, election and grace go hand in hand because of their free character. We can do nothing to deserve them.
This is the essential connection also with the gospel. In one of Paul's passages about the suffering that a minister of Christ undergoes, he speaks of faith and continuing in ministry "because we know that the one who raised the Lord Jesus from the dead will also raise us with Jesus and present us with you in his presence" (2 Corinthians 4:14 ). Paul sees this as the benefit of not only the Corinthians but also all who receive his ministry, so that "the grace that is reaching more and more people may cause thanksgiving to overflow to the glory of God. Therefore we do not lose heart" (vv. 15-16). Grace thus renews Paul's inward spirit and assures him of glory in the afterlife (vv. 16-17). Hence, Paul's ministry is not one that he always does joyfully or motivated by his own power, but rather motivated by faith that God is working in the present and will reward him in the eschaton.
In the same way, he links the grace of God with the gospel in Colossians 1:5-6 . The word of truth, the gospel, is bearing fruit and growing at the present time "just as it has been doing among you since the day you heard it and understood God's grace in all its truth" (v. 6). The parallel descriptions of "gospel" and "grace" as "truth" link the two as synonyms in the passage. This grace is therefore the "hope that is stored up for [5] in heaven" (v. 5), presumably something God is doing in heaven for them, and hence free from merit.
Perhaps the most dominant metaphor with which grace is associated is the legal metaphor of justification. We see the two linked in two very important passages in which grace is used in Paul. 2 Corinthians 13:14 states quite clearly that all have fallen short of the glory of God and are "justified freely by his grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus." Here, while the language of the slave market may be implied in the use of the word "redemption, " and that of the cultus in the use of the phrase "sacrifice of atonement" in the next verse, the strongest linking with grace in this passage is with the word "justified" in verse 24. Hence the unmerited favor of God buys us legal freedom from our sin and cancels the sentence of guilt the judge has had to declare in order "to be just and the one who justified those who have faith in Jesus" (v. 26). It is interesting to note that the next thought of Paul is: "where, then, is boasting? It is excluded" (v. 27), again emphasizing that grace is free and not the work of man.
In Ephesians 2:8-9 Paul states the free character of grace perhaps even more explicitly, now not using the language of justification but simply of salvation. We are told that we have been saved "by grace" but "through faith." Grace is seen here as the means by which we are saved, a free gift; faith is seen as the mechanism by which that salvation or grace is appropriated. Paul must then go on to argue that even faith is "not by works so that no one can boast" (v. 9).
This does not mean that Paul keeps grace separate from works in sanctification, for he goes right on to speak of us being God's workmanship created in Christ Jesus to do good works (v. 10). Similarly, grace is seen as being in the midst of our present Christian life. In Romans 5:2 Paul speaks of gaining "access by faith into this grace in which we now stand" and in 5:21 of grace reigning "through righteousness to bring eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord." While all of this is in the context of the grace of God as a gift versus the Law of God as a work, nevertheless grace is viewed as reigning even as we live the life we are supposed to live in Christ. Hence the argument of Romans 6 that we are not to go on sinning so that grace may increase, but we are to "count [10] dead to sin but alive to God in Christ Jesus for sin shall not be [11] master, because [12] are not under law, but under grace" (vv. 11-14). The key metaphor used in this chapter to describe this "work" of sanctification is "offer." Hence we are not to "offer the parts of [11] body to sin as instruments of wickedness, " but rather offer ourselves to God, "as those who have been brought from death to life" (v. 13). This is done as slaves, offering ourselves in obedience to him (v. 16).
Even the suffering of the present Christian life is linked to the grace that God gives us. In Paul's famous statement about the thorn in his flesh (2 Corinthians 12:7-10 ), he speaks of asking three times that this thorn be taken from him, only to receive the answer "my grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness." Here grace is equated with the power to live the Christian life and to do ministry in the name of Christ. So Paul delights even in the hardships of that ministry. In a similar way, the whole of the Christian life is linked to grace in Titus 2:11-14 . This grace "teaches us to say No' to ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright and godly lives in this present age, while we wait for the blessed hope." Here we see both the ethic of the Christian life (saying no and living uprightly) and the thought of the Christian life (the blessed hope) combined under the reign of grace.
Finally, grace is associated strongly with the gifts of the Spirit. This is true of the list of gifts in Ephesians 4:3-11 corporately to the church and the gifts given to individuals within the church for its edification ( Romans 12:4-8 ;
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Grace
1. General meaning and presuppositions
(a) Divine prevenience and generosity.-Grace is a theistic idea. It emerges inevitably in the progress of religious thought and practice with the idea of God’s separateness from man (cf. in India, Brahmanism; in Greece, Orphism). It deepens in character and content in the growing sense of separateness, with the concurrent conviction, ever deepening in intensity, of the Divine goodness in sustaining fellowship with man (cf. in Israel, Hebraism, Judaism). It attains perfect form in Christianity, whose Founder exhibits a personal life so dependent on and penetrated by God as to reach absolute maturity simply through the Divine power immanent within it-the ceaseless sense, possession, and operation of the Divine Spirit. Irresistibly the soul’s interior experience of that fellowship postulates a realm of Divine prevenience and generosity. Generally the postulate embraces three features: the priority of God, His self-donation to man, His regard and care for man’s salvation-all making emphatic the givenness of man’s best life, the Divine action inviting his. Grace is thus a purely religious affirmation expressing the soul’s assurance that God’s goodness is the beginning, medium, and end of its life. Here God is not simply a great First Cause: first in time, foremost in space; He is rather the background and dynamic force of man’s inner being, and, for its sake, of all created being; enfolding and comprehending it, giving it its origin, reason of existence, unity, completeness, final end; the envelope of the whole by which the parts do their best and issue in their most fruitful results, so that the soul is a harmony of linked forces,* [1] Divine and human. Here, too, the soul’s blessedness is not simply the gift of God. The soul’s life is through Himself-‘His very self and essence all-Divine.’† [2] Its various stages, the growing process of His grace, do not depend, nay, disappear when made to depend, on merely mental reference to His acts, or on merely self-originating impulses. Such attachment of the human to the Divine is too superficial. The inadequacy of man’s spirit to work out its own perfection is irremediable. Salvation is only secure in utter and entire dependence on the Divine Life, distinct from man’s, the life which precedes and from which proceeds all his capacity for good: in which, truly, ‘we live and move and have our being.’
(b) The Christian experience.-The apostolic doctrine of grace presupposes the distinctive Christian experience. The NT teaching falls into three groups: Synoptic, Pauline, Johannine. The first reproduces the most immediately and literally faithful picture of Christ’s sayings; the second and third present the earliest impressive developments of His sayings in individual realization, and are rich in exposition and explanation of the subjective apprehension and appropriation of Divine grace. It is the process in man’s activity that is detailed more than the analysis of the attribute in God. Between the two types we are conscious of marked contrasts, not only in their form but in the substance and mode. Along with a deep underlying unity of fundamental thought, it is true to say that the consciousness of the apostles is not identical with the consciousness of Christ. Christ is not repeated in them.‡ [3] The teaching of both is the direct transcript of their spiritual history; but their spiritual constitution is so radically different that their teaching is bound to have radical differences. ‘He spoke as the sinless Son of God; they wrote from the standpoint of regenerated men.’§ [4] The principle of sin alters the whole position. The view-points for estimating grace increase. Thus it is that while Christ speaks little, if at all, of grace, it is a central conception of the apostles. Therefore also, while grace is in both, it is ‘in Christ’ in a vitally intimate way such as cannot be predicated of the apostles except ‘through Christ.’ It is ‘the grace of Christ,’ as ‘of God’; not the grace of the apostles, whose it is only ‘by his grace.’
Again we have to note in Christ’s case no trace of that separateness of the human from the Divine Spirit in their communion and inter-operation in the relationship of grace, which is so clear in the case of the apostles, a distinction of which they are so confident that they claim a special illumination and infusion of supernatural light and energy in this experience. Christ’s mediation of grace to them is basic. It differentiates their doctrine not only from Christ’s, but from all ethnic and prophetic ideas. The apostles are neither mere seekers after God, nor simply seers or servants or interpreters of God: they are sons, the bearers of Himself;| [5] and the immensely richer experience is reflected in the ampler refinement of their idea of grace and its more commanding place in their system. Nor should we fail to observe that the term ‘grace’ denotes a new economy in human history. Primarily it signifies a fresh advance of the human spirit under the impetus of new Divine redemptive force. That fact implies a fresh out-flow of energy from God and a fresh uplift of the world’s life; man is ‘a new creation,’* [6] the world ‘a new earth’;† [3]4 there is revealed a new stage in the fulfilment of the eternal purpose. Grace here has cosmic significance. Sin is over-ruled for good in the whole world-order as it is in the individual Christian heart. History, like the soul, is transformed through Christ. The initial and controlling causes of that whole vast change are discovered to the primitive Christian perception in a great surprise of God’s forgiveness, pronounced and imparted by Christ, and made effective for regeneration by a force none other than, not inferior to, His Holy Spirit. Thereby a new era is inaugurated-the dispensation of ‘the gospel of the grace of God.’‡ [5] Grace, then, comprises three specific moments: a supernatural energy of God, a mystical and moral actuation of man, an immanent economy of Spirit.
(c) Essential characteristics.-Grace, accordingly, is erroneously regarded when defined as a substance or force or any sort of static and uniform quantum. It is ‘spirit and life,’ and as such its characteristics are personality, mutuality, individuality. The experience of grace is that of ‘a gracious relationship’§ [2] 468 ff.] between two persons, in which the proper nature of either in its integrity and autonomy is never at all invaded. The mode is not impersonal or mechanical. The blessing is not an influx so much as response to an influence; a gift yet a task; a mysterious might overpowering, but not with power, rather with persuasion; the renewal of the entire disposition through implicit trust in God’s goodness and by the diligent exercise of the powers of Spirit, ever latent and now let loose, with which He enables and quickens. It is not only an awakening of the moral self into more active freedom: it is first the conscious springing up and growth of a new life, sudden or gradual and wondrous, from immersion in the mystic bath,|| [10] 60 ff.] fed by the heavenly streams, whose cleansing power, if before unknown, is not alien, and invests the finite life with the sense of infinite worth and imperishable interest-a sense welcomed as native and as needful for the life’s predestined end. The process is easily intelligible, yet readily liable to misunderstanding. The traditional doctrine, Catholic and Protestant, in its anxiety to safeguard both the mystical and moral constituents of the experience, has tended towards two grave defects-the separation of the two which in reality are one, and the confusion of the mystical with the magical.¶ [11] Grace then becomes a material quantity, instead of spiritual quality. Psychologically a person is only insomuch as he is living, growing. Man is, as he lives in God; and his capture** [12] and surrender are achieved not in a thing but in a person, and not to a thing but to the One Person, whose right to claim him and renew his life consists precisely in this, that He is Himself absolutely, infinitely, and actually what man is derivatively, finitely, and potentially. Thus the act which binds man to God does so for growth and enhancement of life. All that comes from the living God is worked out by living souls, and is ever living and enlivening; it is as varied and individual as the variety of individuals concerned.
The apostles were Hebraic, and no true Hebrew could misinterpret this. To the Fathers it was so familiar. The covenant-relation was the central truth of their religion. Its very essence was this mutualness of religious communion. Vital godliness hinged on two realities-the Divine Being willing to be gracious, and the no less ready response man must make to Him. For God and man to come together, both must be individually active. To God’s willingness to help, man comes with his willingness to be helped. To God’s desire to forgive, man comes with a penitent mind. By mutual love, the love of God to man meeting the love of man to God, the two are reconciled. Complete surrender (religion) brings with it growing individuality and independence (morality). Herein, further, let us note, rests the explanation of two conspicuous facts in the life of grace-the fact, viz., that the inspiration of grace is neither infallible nor irresistible;* [13] and the fact of the splendid out-burst of fresh forms of goodness. The Church in her materialistic moods has been prone to forget both. The Apostolic Age is so rich spiritually just because so sensible of both. ‘We have this treasure in earthen vessels’ is the precise counterpart of the psalmist’s ‘the spirit of man is the candle of the Lord.’ It is never forgotten that while the Divine Life is the milieu of the human, the human is the medium of the Divine, its assimilative capacity adequate only to the present need, not to the ultimate reality;† [14] while its readiness to receive is never in vain in any event or circumstance or relation of life. The human spirit may appropriate only within limits; but the indefinite variety of limits alone bounds the operation of grace. Grace is all-sufficient; the ‘fruits of the Spirit’ correspond to its plenitude.
2. Specific redemptive content.-In seeking to analyze the contents of grace, we have no lack of material. What grace is to be seen in the spiritual personality it produces. The Apostolic Letters furnish a complete, typical description, of rare intensity and lucidity, of two such personalities of the loftiest order-St. Paul and St. John, and we possess abundant parallel records of Christian sanctity of every later age, to verify our conclusions. The letters are not so much doctrinal systems as a sort of journal intime of soaring, searching spirits: autobiographies of spirit, ‘confessions’ of what the writers saw and heard and knew of ‘the mystery of Christ.’‡ [15] As Christ ‘witnessed’ of Himself, the apostles ‘witness’ of Christ. Their witness is offered in two distinct types-the predominantly ethical and the predominantly contemplative-neither of which has ever failed to recur constantly in subsequent history. It may therefore be taken as comprehensive and normative. It is, moreover, offered with a minimum reference to the material through which it has operated-the psycho-physical organism and temperament in which the gracious working has developed itself.§ [3]5 The scaffolding has been taken down, and the building is disclosed unencumbered with immaterial detail. From that fact we may trust in the apostles,’ balance of mind and credibility, since the very richness of their spiritual vision points to an unusually large Subconscious life of ‘the natural man’ and its insurgent impulses, not easy to subdue, yet which, instead of dominating, is so exquisitely kept in place as to become a chief instrument and material of their life’s worth and works. Regarding our data in this light, what do we find?-At once a continuity of experience and an identity of essential fact.
(a) Supernatural principle of life.-To begin with, we find the life of grace to be constituted by the supernatural principle, and to be an indivisible entity. The life of the believer is by a new birth from above,* [17] translating men into a new position before God and a new disposition to sustain it.† [13] That is the consentient testimony of the apostles, as of the saints, of the first and of every age.‡ [19] 118, 322, 521.] Grace is initially regeneration, the work of God’s Spirit, ‘whereby we are renewed in the whole man and are enabled more and more to die daily unto sin and to live unto righteousness.’§ [20] Apostolic and saintly biography shows that this condition may have different levels and values in different natures, and even in the same nature at different times. It shows also that the maintenance of that condition means a constant and immense effort, a practically unbroken grace-getting and ever-growing purity in conflict with the insistent lower self. But the characteristic general fact of renewal remains, as something constant and inalienable-in its inferior planes as a fight against the devil; in its higher, a struggle with lower self, stimulated and impelled by God’s illumination working in and upon the soul: constant and inalienable so long as the soul keeps turning towards the Light. For the grace of conversion|| [21] is the concomitant of regeneration. Conversion is an act of the soul made possible by the Spirit, and should be as continuous as an act as regeneration is as a work.¶ [22] This experience, which on one side is regeneration and on the other is conversion, is one which leaves the soul different for ever from what it was before; yet not in such wise as to prevent the soul itself living on, or as to raise the soul above its limitations and failings, so that it will not fall from grace, and will be kept from sin. But the endeavour to keep from fall and lapse is now on a larger and deeper scale, on a higher plane, on a new vantage-ground. It is always attended by the clear consciousness of the effort being ‘in God,’ ‘in Christ,’ and as wholly their work as the soul’s.
This double consciousness of Divine and human action, nevertheless, does not divide the soul. On the contrary, the more deeply it proceeds, the more does the soul wake up and fuse itself into single vital volition to cast off what is inconsistent with its growing self and to mould what remains into better consistency. The soul as the subject of grace is not an automaton but a person, and the two actions are but two moments of one motion whose activities are not juxtaposed but interpenetrate in an organic unity.** [Note: * Cf. " translation="">Grace
Grace makes itself equally at home in the palace and the cottage. No condition necessitates its absence, no position precludes its flourishing. One may compare it in its power to live and blossom in all places to the beautiful blue-bell of Scotland, of which the poetess sings::
'No rock is too high, no vale too low, For its fragile and tremulous form to grow: It crowns the mountain With azure bells, And decks the fountain In forest dells. It wreathes the ruin with clusters grey, Bowing and smiling the livelong day.'
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Means of Grace: Their Disuse a Sad Loss
My Aeolian harp is not sounding and yet a fine fresh wind is blowing in at the window. Why hear I not its soft mystic strains? I remember, it was put away in the lumber room and some of its strings are broken. There is a gracious revival in the church, and believers are greatly refreshed by the visitations of God's Spirit, but I am in a sadly worldly unbelieving condition. May it not be because I neglect private prayer, and have not been regular at the prayer-meeting; my family concerns and business cares have kept my heart in the lumber room, and my soul has lost her first love? Yes, these are the reasons. Lord, tune my heart, and I will again seek the places where the heavenly wind of thy Spirit blows graciously and refreshingly. How can I bear to be silent when thy daily mercies are all around me singing of thy love?
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Novena of
A novena made in honor of Saint Francis Xavier, which owes its origin to the saint himself, who promised Father Mastrilli, S.J., in 1633, that
"all who would earnestly ask his intercession with God for nine days in honor of his canonization would infallibly experience the effects of his great power in heaven and would realize whatever they asked that would contribute to their salvation."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Efficacious
A special grant of Almighty God by which a soul incapable by its own natural resources of placing a certain action positively conducive to eternal salvation, is endowed with new powers, becomes an adequate principle for eliciting the act in question, and without being forced by the pressure of God's grace, freely but infallibly performs the salutary action which God by His help prompted and made possible.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Habitual
A supernatural quality infused by God into the soul at the moment of justification, perfecting the soul in a supernatural way, establishing it in justice and sanctity, making it a sharer in the Divine Nature, truly constituting it an adopted son of God with a title to eternal life, and consecrating it as a living temple of the Most High God. By habitual grace, a free gift of God, the soul is privileged to enter on a state of friendship with God, which is of its nature permanent, but may be broken temporarily or forever by the abuse of free will and the introduction of sin. Cherished and guarded in the soul it is an unfailing pledge of everlasting life with God.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Habitual Grace
A supernatural quality infused by God into the soul at the moment of justification, perfecting the soul in a supernatural way, establishing it in justice and sanctity, making it a sharer in the Divine Nature, truly constituting it an adopted son of God with a title to eternal life, and consecrating it as a living temple of the Most High God. By habitual grace, a free gift of God, the soul is privileged to enter on a state of friendship with God, which is of its nature permanent, but may be broken temporarily or forever by the abuse of free will and the introduction of sin. Cherished and guarded in the soul it is an unfailing pledge of everlasting life with God.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Inward
Any gratuitous gift of God, which perfects the recipient in the supernatural order. Among such graces are enumerated the indwelling of the Holy Spirit and His gifts, sanctifying grace and the infused virtues, all actual graces, and in general any supernatural help or adornment received either in the soul itself or in its faculties.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, External
Any providential fact or event which by its moral influence helps rational creatures on their way to heaven. Such a grace is Holy Scripture, the preaching of the Gospel, the life of Christ and of the saints, and in general any fact or event whatever, in so far as under the providence of God it is calculated to exert a moral influence towards the attainment of salvation.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, Diocese of
Comprises the northeast portion of the island of Newfoundland, and Labrador. Erected on February 29, 1856 as the diocese of Harbour Grace, a suffragan of Saint John's. The name was changed to the diocese of Harbour Grace-Grand Falls on February 22, 1958, and then to the diocese of Grand Falls on October 30, 1964.
Catholic-Hierarchy.Org
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace of God And Favor of the Apostolic See, by th
Formula used after a bishop's name in official documents to express that his office is from God and his designation to it from the Vicar of Christ.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Gratuitous
The grace of God, actual or habitual is a created supernatural entity, beyond the scope of man's attainment, outside the limits of human exigencies. It is wholly and entirely within God's power to dispense or withhold. Good works cannot merit it; the most persistent natural desires cannot obtain it. In the present providence of God, we are privileged to receive and use it, simply because God's liberality and Christ's redemption have come to the support of our natural helplessness for its attainment.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gratuitous Grace
The grace of God, actual or habitual is a created supernatural entity, beyond the scope of man's attainment, outside the limits of human exigencies. It is wholly and entirely within God's power to dispense or withhold. Good works cannot merit it; the most persistent natural desires cannot obtain it. In the present providence of God, we are privileged to receive and use it, simply because God's liberality and Christ's redemption have come to the support of our natural helplessness for its attainment.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Pilgrimage of
The name of a religious uprising in northern England, 1536, led by Robert Aske. Its purpose was the restoration of the Catholic religion and the reestahlishment of the religious orders in their confiscated abbeys. It was successful at first, but after the arrest and execution of the leaders and four abbots, it was easily suppressed.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Controversies on
These bear upon the reconciliation of grace with free will. The chief theological systems involved are: Augustinianism, Thomism, Molinism, Congruism, and Syncretism. Augustinianism and Thomism hold that grace derives its efficacy from its own intrinsic nature (ab intrinseco), the former ascribing it to a moral and the latter to a physical influence of grace upon the free will. Molinism and Congruism teach that grace is efficacious extrinsically (ab extrinseco), deriving its efficacy from the free will prepared and assisted by grace. Congruism, however, explicitly postulates that the grace be congruous (congrua), that is, adapted to the nature and circumstances of the recipient. For the infallibility of the connection of grace with the consent of the free will, both fall back upon God's foreknowledge through the scientia media. Syncretism defends the intrinsic efficacy of grace for difficult actions, and extrinsic for such as are less difficult.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Grace,
chen, χάρις. The favour and graciousness shown by God to guilty man. It stands in contrast to law, John 1:17 ; Galatians 5:4 ; also to works and to desert or reward, Romans 4:4 ; Romans 11:6 ; 'by grace ye are saved.' Ephesians 2:5,8 . The grace of God is vouchsafed to the saints all along the way: we find nearly all the Epistles commence and end with the invocation of grace on the churches: whereas when individuals are addressed MERCYis added. 1 Timothy 1:2 ; 2 Timothy 1:2 ; Titus 1:4 ; 2 John 3 . The different aspects of grace and mercy have been thus set forth: "Grace refers more to the source and character of the sentiment; mercy to the state of the person who is its object, Grace may give me glory; mercy contemplates some need in me. Mercy is great in the greatness of the need; grace in the thought of the person exercising it."
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace
(Latin: gratia, favor)
In its widest meaning, the term signifies any gratuitous gift of God to a rational creature, the bestowal of which is motivated by divine benevolence, whether the gift be natural or supernatural, internal or external to the recipient. In its strict and ordinary sense, however, grace is a supernatural gift of God's beneficence, gratuitously bestowed upon a rational creature (angel or man), for the ultimate purpose of fitting the recipient for life eternal. It may be inward or external, as is explained under these titles: Inward grace is either actual or habitual, according as it consists in a transitory help conferred for the performance of a good act, or in an abiding perfection elevating the recipient in a manner to a divine plane of being. This latter is usually called sanctifying grace, because of its formal effect on the recipient. Its very presence sanctifies him, makes him holy, a child of God, and an heir of heaven. Sanctifying grace is always accompanied by the infused virtues and the gifts of the Holy Ghost, both of which share in the general nature of supernatural grace. They are permanent perfections of the recipient's spiritual faculties" intellect and will, bearing a somewhat similar relation to sanctifying grace as the natural faculties and their dispositions bear to the soul. Hence by sanctifying grace, and its concomitant gifts, the recipient is in a manner constituted a supernatural nature, a complete radical principle of salutary action. In reference to its origin, a distinction is made between the grace of God and the grace of Christ. All grace comes indeed from God, but since the fall every grace bestowed upon human beings is based on the merits of Christ. Before the fall Adam received grace directly from God, without reference to the Saviour of mankind; and so did the angels whilst they were oh probation. But now we, the children of the fallen Adam, receive grace only through Christ Our Lord. Grace is so necessary that without it we cannot do anything for life eternal. Hence the words of Christ: "Without me you can do nothing" (John 15). See also:
actual grace
antecedent grace
efficacious grace
external grace
fullness of grace
habitual grace
sufficient grace
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Actual
A supernatural gift from Almighty God, I, received in the human intellect or will, accidentally perfecting these faculties and enabling them to elicit acts xplicitly related to eternal life. Because the power hus received is above and beyond all natural exigencies, it is correctly called supernatural; because it lacks permanence and is granted by God solely to assist and strengthen the natural faculty while it is in operation, it is correctly called actual.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Antecedent Grace
An illumination of the intellect, or an inspiration of the will, due partially to the vital activities of these faculties, partly to Divine intervention in the mind's natural process. Both the illumination and inspiration transcend in intrinsic worth the natural good thoughts and desires of man, by reason of the dignifying influence of God's assisting activity in the eliciting of the thought or desire. The antecedence in question is relative to the subject's deliberation. Consequently antecedent grace is the gift of God, preceding, ennobling, and elevating man's mental actions.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Grace, Antecedent
An illumination of the intellect, or an inspiration of the will, due partially to the vital activities of these faculties, partly to Divine intervention in the mind's natural process. Both the illumination and inspiration transcend in intrinsic worth the natural good thoughts and desires of man, by reason of the dignifying influence of God's assisting activity in the eliciting of the thought or desire. The antecedence in question is relative to the subject's deliberation. Consequently antecedent grace is the gift of God, preceding, ennobling, and elevating man's mental actions.
King James Dictionary - Grace
GRACE, n. L. gratia, which is formed on the Celtic Eng. agree, congruous, and ready. The primary sense of gratus, is free, ready, quick, willing, prompt, from advancing.
1. Favor good will kindness disposition to oblige another as a grant made as an act of grace. Or each, or all, may win a lady's grace.
2. Appropriately, the free unmerited love and favor of God, the spring and source of all the benefits men receive from him. And if by grace,then it is no more of works. Romans 11
3. Favorable influence of God divine influence or the influence of the spirit, in renewing the heart and restraining from sin. My grace is sufficient for thee. 2 Corinthians 12
4. The application of Christ's righteousness to the sinner. Where sin abounded, grace did much more abound. Romans 5
5. A state of reconciliation to God. Romans 5:2 . 6. Virtuous or religious affection or disposition, as a liberal disposition, faith, meekness, humility, patience, &c. proceeding from divine influence. 7. Spiritual instruction, improvement and edification. Ephesians 4:29 . 8. Apostleship, or the qualifications of an apostle. Ephesians 3.8 . 9. Eternal life final salvation. 1 Peter 1:13 . 10. Favor mercy pardon. Bow and sue for grace
With suppliant knee.
11. Favor conferred. I should therefore esteem it a great favor and grace.
12. Privilege. To few great Jupiter imparts this grace.
13. That in manner, deportment or language which renders it appropriate and agreeable suitableness elegance with appropriate dignity. We say, a speaker delivers his address with grace a man performs his part with grace. Grace was in all her steps.
Her purple habit sits with such a grace
On her smooth shoulders.
14. Natural or acquired excellence any endowment that recommends the possessor to others as the graces of wit and learning. 15. Beauty embellishment in general, whatever adorns and recommends to favor sometimes, a single beauty. I pass their form and every charming grace.
16. Beauty deified among pagans, a goddess. The graces were three in number, Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne, the constant attendants of Venus. The loves delighted, and the graces played.
17. Virtue physical as the grace of plants. Not used. 18. The title of a duke or an archbishop, and formerly of the king of England, meaning your goodness or clemency. His Grace the Duke of York. Your Grace will please to accept my thanks. 19. A short prayer before or after meat a blessing asked, or thanks rendered. 20. In music, graces signifies turns, trills and shakes introduced for embellishment. Day in grace, in theology, time of probation, when an offer is made to sinners.
Days in grace, in commerce, the days immediately following the day when a bill or note becomes due, which days are allowed to the debtor or payor to make payment in. In Great Britain and the United States the days of grace are three, but in other countries more the usages of merchants being different.
GRACE, To adorn to decorate to embellish and dignify.
Great Jove and Phoebus graced his noble line.
And hail, ye fair, of every charm possess'd,
Who grace this rising empire of the west.
1. To dignify or raise by act of favor to honor. He might at his pleasure grace or disgrace whom
he would in court.
2. To favor to honor. 3. To supply with heavenly grace.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Baptismal Grace
Sanctifying grace conferred in Baptism, inasmuch as it gives the recipient a right to special help from God to enable him to observe the commandments and so follow Christ worthily. Baptismal innocence is the state of the soul as the result of Baptism, a state which many saints are believed to have preserved until death.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Grace
Grace is unmerited favor. It is God's free action for the benefit of His people. It is different than Justice and Mercy. Justice is getting what we deserve. Mercy is not getting what we deserve. Grace is getting what we do not deserve. In grace we get eternal life, something that, quite obviously, we do not deserve. But because of God's love and kindness manifested in Jesus on the Cross, we receive the great blessing of redemption.
Grace is God's Riches At Christ's Expense. Grace rules out all human merit. It is the product of God that is given by God, because of who He is not because of who we are. It is the means of our salvation (Ephesians 2:8-9). We are no longer under the Law, but under grace (Romans 6:14). (See 1 Corinthians 15:11; Romans 5:2; Rom 5:15-20; 2 Corinthians 12:9; and 2 Corinthians 9:8).
CARM Theological Dictionary - Common Grace
The grace of God given to the creation as a whole. God still allows the sun to shine upon the unsaved. He feeds them, allows them to work, and have joy. It is common grace that "restrains" the wrath of God until a later time. It is in special grace that salvation is given to the Christians.
CARM Theological Dictionary - Means of Grace
This is associated with sacramental theology. A means of grace is a manner in which the Lord imparts grace to a believer as he partakes in the sacrament. A sacrament is a visible manifestation of the word. The bread and wine in the Lord's Supper are considered sacraments in that they are visible manifestations of the covenant promise of our Lord: "In the same way, after the supper he took the cup, saying, 'This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which is poured out for you.'" (Luke 22:20). Generally, the means of grace are considered to be the Gospel, baptism, and the Lord’s Supper. The Catholic church has seven total: baptism, confirmation, communion, penance, extreme unction, holy orders, and matrimony.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Means of Grace
Denote those duties we perform for the purpose of improving out minds, affecting our hearts, and of obtaining spiritual blessings; such as hearing the Gospel, reading the Scriptures, self-examination, meditation, prayer, praise, Christian conversation, &c. The means are to be used without any reference to merit, but solely with a dependence on the Divine Being; nor can we ever expect happiness in ourselves, nor be good exemplars to others, while we live in the neglect of them. It is in vain to argue that the divine decree supercedes the necessity of them, since God has as certainly appointed the means as the end. Besides, he himself generally works by them, and the more means he thinks proper to use, the more he displays his glorious perfections. Jesus Christ, when on earth, used means: he prayed, he exhorted, and did good, by going from place to place. Indeed, the systems of nature, providence, and grace, are all carried on by means. The Scriptures abound with exhortations to them, Matthew 5:1-48 : Romans 12:1-21 : and none but enthusiasts or immoral characters ever refuse to use them.
Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Irresistible Grace
See GRACE.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Actual Grace
A supernatural gift from Almighty God, I, received in the human intellect or will, accidentally perfecting these faculties and enabling them to elicit acts xplicitly related to eternal life. Because the power hus received is above and beyond all natural exigencies, it is correctly called supernatural; because it lacks permanence and is granted by God solely to assist and strengthen the natural faculty while it is in operation, it is correctly called actual.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - External Grace
Any providential fact or event which by its moral influence helps rational creatures on their way to heaven. Such a grace is Holy Scripture, the preaching of the Gospel, the life of Christ and of the saints, and in general any fact or event whatever, in so far as under the providence of God it is calculated to exert a moral influence towards the attainment of salvation.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Grace
This word is understood in several senses: for beauty, graceful form, and agreeableness of person, Proverbs 1:9 ; Proverbs 3:22 . For favour, friendship, kindness, Genesis 6:8 ; Genesis 18:3 ; Romans 11:6 ; 2 Timothy 1:9 . For pardon, mercy, undeserved remission of offences, Ephesians 2:5 ; Colossians 1:6 . For certain gifts of God, which he bestows freely, when, where, and on whom, he pleases; such are the gifts of miracles, prophecy, languages, &c, Romans 15:15 ; 1 Corinthians 15:10 ; Ephesians 3:8 , &c. For the Gospel dispensation, in contradistinction to that of the law, Romans 6:14 ; 1 Peter 5:12 . For a liberal and charitable disposition, 2 Corinthians 8:7 . For eternal life, or final salvation, 1 Peter 1:13 . In theological language grace also signifies divine influence upon the soul; and it derives the name from this being the effect of the great grace or favour of God to mankind. Austin defines inward actual grace to be the inspiration of love, which prompts us to practise according to what we know, out of a religious affection and compliance. He says, likewise, that the grace of God is the blessing of God's sweet influence, whereby we are induced to take pleasure in that which he commands, to desire and to love it; and that if God does not prevent us with this blessing, what he commands, not only is not perfected, but is not so much as begun in us. Without the inward grace of Jesus Christ, man is not able to do the least thing that is good. He stands in need of this grace to begin, continue, and finish all the good he does, or rather, which God does in him and with him, by his grace. This grace is free; it is not due to us: if it were due to us, it would be no more grace; it would be a debt, Romans 11:6 ; it is in its nature an assistance so powerful and efficacious, that it surmounts the obstinacy of the most rebellious human heart, without destroying human liberty. There is no subject on which Christian doctors have written so largely, as on the several particulars relating to the grace of God. The difficulty consists in reconciling human liberty with the operation of divine grace; the concurrence of man with the influence and assistance of the Almighty. And who is able to set up an accurate boundary between these two things? Who can pretend to know how far the privileges of grace extend over the heart of man, and what that man's liberty exactly is, who is prevented, enlightened, moved, and attracted by grace?
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Efficacious Grace
A special grant of Almighty God by which a soul incapable by its own natural resources of placing a certain action positively conducive to eternal salvation, is endowed with new powers, becomes an adequate principle for eliciting the act in question, and without being forced by the pressure of God's grace, freely but infallibly performs the salutary action which God by His help prompted and made possible.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Grace
Favor, mercy. Divine grace is the free and undeserved love and favor of God towards man as a sinner, especially as exhibited in the plan of redemption through Jesus Christ, John 1:17 3:16 Romans 3:24-26 . It is only by the free grace of god that we embrace the offers of mercy, and appropriate to ourselves the blessings graciously purchased by redeeming blood.
The "GRACE OF GOD," spontaneous, unmerited, self-directed, and almighty, is the source of the whole scheme of redemption, Romans 11:6 2 Timothy 1:9 . With it are united "the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ," who gave himself for sinners; and that of "the Spirit of grace," by whom alone the grace offered by the Father and purchased by the Son is effectually applied. Thus 2 Peter 3:18 , is traced up to the grace of God as its only source; and the gospel of Christ and the work of the spirit-both pure graceare its only channels of communication. Hence also all the fruits and blessings of the gospel are termed graces, 2 Corinthians 8:7 Philippians 1:7 ; not only regeneration, pardon, enlightenment, sanctification, etc., but miraculous, official, and prophetic gifts, the peculiar traits of Christian character, and everlasting salvation, 1 Peter 1:13 . In Galatians 5:4 , "grace" means God's plan of salvation by his mercy, not by our works.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - William Grace
Philanthropist and merchant, born Cork, Ireland, 1832; died New York, New York, 1904. To his activities is largely due the commercial development of western South America. In 1880,1884, he was elected mayor of New York, the first Catholic to fill that office. He took an active part in succoring the famine-stricken Irish in 1879, and in 1897 founded at New York the Grace Institute to give free tuition in clerical work, dress-making, and housekeeping to women and girls.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sanctifying Grace
The free gift of God establishing the soul in the way of justification and holiness. Its intimate nature is beyond mere human analysis, but judging by its effects, we are justified in regarding it as a physical adornment of the soul, permanent in its essence, incompatible with grievous sin, recreating the soul as a new nature competent to act supernaturally and meritoriously. It is habitual grace regarded under one aspect - the real interior sanctification which enriches the soul and makes it permanently holy in the sight of God.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Grace
1. General meaning and presuppositions
(a) Divine prevenience and generosity.-Grace is a theistic idea. It emerges inevitably in the progress of religious thought and practice with the idea of God’s separateness from man (cf. in India, Brahmanism; in Greece, Orphism). It deepens in character and content in the growing sense of separateness, with the concurrent conviction, ever deepening in intensity, of the Divine goodness in sustaining fellowship with man (cf. in Israel, Hebraism, Judaism). It attains perfect form in Christianity, whose Founder exhibits a personal life so dependent on and penetrated by God as to reach absolute maturity simply through the Divine power immanent within it-the ceaseless sense, possession, and operation of the Divine Spirit. Irresistibly the soul’s interior experience of that fellowship postulates a realm of Divine prevenience and generosity. Generally the postulate embraces three features: the priority of God, His self-donation to man, His regard and care for man’s salvation-all making emphatic the givenness of man’s best life, the Divine action inviting his. Grace is thus a purely religious affirmation expressing the soul’s assurance that God’s goodness is the beginning, medium, and end of its life. Here God is not simply a great First Cause: first in time, foremost in space; He is rather the background and dynamic force of man’s inner being, and, for its sake, of all created being; enfolding and comprehending it, giving it its origin, reason of existence, unity, completeness, final end; the envelope of the whole by which the parts do their best and issue in their most fruitful results, so that the soul is a harmony of linked forces,* [1] Divine and human. Here, too, the soul’s blessedness is not simply the gift of God. The soul’s life is through Himself-‘His very self and essence all-Divine.’† [2] Its various stages, the growing process of His grace, do not depend, nay, disappear when made to depend, on merely mental reference to His acts, or on merely self-originating impulses. Such attachment of the human to the Divine is too superficial. The inadequacy of man’s spirit to work out its own perfection is irremediable. Salvation is only secure in utter and entire dependence on the Divine Life, distinct from man’s, the life which precedes and from which proceeds all his capacity for good: in which, truly, ‘we live and move and have our being.’
(b) The Christian experience.-The apostolic doctrine of grace presupposes the distinctive Christian experience. The NT teaching falls into three groups: Synoptic, Pauline, Johannine. The first reproduces the most immediately and literally faithful picture of Christ’s sayings; the second and third present the earliest impressive developments of His sayings in individual realization, and are rich in exposition and explanation of the subjective apprehension and appropriation of Divine grace. It is the process in man’s activity that is detailed more than the analysis of the attribute in God. Between the two types we are conscious of marked contrasts, not only in their form but in the substance and mode. Along with a deep underlying unity of fundamental thought, it is true to say that the consciousness of the apostles is not identical with the consciousness of Christ. Christ is not repeated in them.‡ [3] The teaching of both is the direct transcript of their spiritual history; but their spiritual constitution is so radically different that their teaching is bound to have radical differences. ‘He spoke as the sinless Son of God; they wrote from the standpoint of regenerated men.’§ [4] The principle of sin alters the whole position. The view-points for estimating grace increase. Thus it is that while Christ speaks little, if at all, of grace, it is a central conception of the apostles. Therefore also, while grace is in both, it is ‘in Christ’ in a vitally intimate way such as cannot be predicated of the apostles except ‘through Christ.’ It is ‘the grace of Christ,’ as ‘of God’; not the grace of the apostles, whose it is only ‘by his grace.’
Again we have to note in Christ’s case no trace of that separateness of the human from the Divine Spirit in their communion and inter-operation in the relationship of grace, which is so clear in the case of the apostles, a distinction of which they are so confident that they claim a special illumination and infusion of supernatural light and energy in this experience. Christ’s mediation of grace to them is basic. It differentiates their doctrine not only from Christ’s, but from all ethnic and prophetic ideas. The apostles are neither mere seekers after God, nor simply seers or servants or interpreters of God: they are sons, the bearers of Himself;| [5] and the immensely richer experience is reflected in the ampler refinement of their idea of grace and its more commanding place in their system. Nor should we fail to observe that the term ‘grace’ denotes a new economy in human history. Primarily it signifies a fresh advance of the human spirit under the impetus of new Divine redemptive force. That fact implies a fresh out-flow of energy from God and a fresh uplift of the world’s life; man is ‘a new creation,’* [6] the world ‘a new earth’;† [7] there is revealed a new stage in the fulfilment of the eternal purpose. Grace here has cosmic significance. Sin is over-ruled for good in the whole world-order as it is in the individual Christian heart. History, like the soul, is transformed through Christ. The initial and controlling causes of that whole vast change are discovered to the primitive Christian perception in a great surprise of God’s forgiveness, pronounced and imparted by Christ, and made effective for regeneration by a force none other than, not inferior to, His Holy Spirit. Thereby a new era is inaugurated-the dispensation of ‘the gospel of the grace of God.’‡ [8] Grace, then, comprises three specific moments: a supernatural energy of God, a mystical and moral actuation of man, an immanent economy of Spirit.
(c) Essential characteristics.-Grace, accordingly, is erroneously regarded when defined as a substance or force or any sort of static and uniform quantum. It is ‘spirit and life,’ and as such its characteristics are personality, mutuality, individuality. The experience of grace is that of ‘a gracious relationship’§ [9] 468 ff.] between two persons, in which the proper nature of either in its integrity and autonomy is never at all invaded. The mode is not impersonal or mechanical. The blessing is not an influx so much as response to an influence; a gift yet a task; a mysterious might overpowering, but not with power, rather with persuasion; the renewal of the entire disposition through implicit trust in God’s goodness and by the diligent exercise of the powers of Spirit, ever latent and now let loose, with which He enables and quickens. It is not only an awakening of the moral self into more active freedom: it is first the conscious springing up and growth of a new life, sudden or gradual and wondrous, from immersion in the mystic bath,|| [10] 60 ff.] fed by the heavenly streams, whose cleansing power, if before unknown, is not alien, and invests the finite life with the sense of infinite worth and imperishable interest-a sense welcomed as native and as needful for the life’s predestined end. The process is easily intelligible, yet readily liable to misunderstanding. The traditional doctrine, Catholic and Protestant, in its anxiety to safeguard both the mystical and moral constituents of the experience, has tended towards two grave defects-the separation of the two which in reality are one, and the confusion of the mystical with the magical.¶ [3] Grace then becomes a material quantity, instead of spiritual quality. Psychologically a person is only insomuch as he is living, growing. Man is, as he lives in God; and his capture** [12] and surrender are achieved not in a thing but in a person, and not to a thing but to the One Person, whose right to claim him and renew his life consists precisely in this, that He is Himself absolutely, infinitely, and actually what man is derivatively, finitely, and potentially. Thus the act which binds man to God does so for growth and enhancement of life. All that comes from the living God is worked out by living souls, and is ever living and enlivening; it is as varied and individual as the variety of individuals concerned.
The apostles were Hebraic, and no true Hebrew could misinterpret this. To the Fathers it was so familiar. The covenant-relation was the central truth of their religion. Its very essence was this mutualness of religious communion. Vital godliness hinged on two realities-the Divine Being willing to be gracious, and the no less ready response man must make to Him. For God and man to come together, both must be individually active. To God’s willingness to help, man comes with his willingness to be helped. To God’s desire to forgive, man comes with a penitent mind. By mutual love, the love of God to man meeting the love of man to God, the two are reconciled. Complete surrender (religion) brings with it growing individuality and independence (morality). Herein, further, let us note, rests the explanation of two conspicuous facts in the life of grace-the fact, viz., that the inspiration of grace is neither infallible nor irresistible;* [13] and the fact of the splendid out-burst of fresh forms of goodness. The Church in her materialistic moods has been prone to forget both. The Apostolic Age is so rich spiritually just because so sensible of both. ‘We have this treasure in earthen vessels’ is the precise counterpart of the psalmist’s ‘the spirit of man is the candle of the Lord.’ It is never forgotten that while the Divine Life is the milieu of the human, the human is the medium of the Divine, its assimilative capacity adequate only to the present need, not to the ultimate reality;† [14] while its readiness to receive is never in vain in any event or circumstance or relation of life. The human spirit may appropriate only within limits; but the indefinite variety of limits alone bounds the operation of grace. Grace is all-sufficient; the ‘fruits of the Spirit’ correspond to its plenitude.
2. Specific redemptive content.-In seeking to analyze the contents of grace, we have no lack of material. What grace is to be seen in the spiritual personality it produces. The Apostolic Letters furnish a complete, typical description, of rare intensity and lucidity, of two such personalities of the loftiest order-St. Paul and St. John, and we possess abundant parallel records of Christian sanctity of every later age, to verify our conclusions. The letters are not so much doctrinal systems as a sort of journal intime of soaring, searching spirits: autobiographies of spirit, ‘confessions’ of what the writers saw and heard and knew of ‘the mystery of Christ.’‡ [1] As Christ ‘witnessed’ of Himself, the apostles ‘witness’ of Christ. Their witness is offered in two distinct types-the predominantly ethical and the predominantly contemplative-neither of which has ever failed to recur constantly in subsequent history. It may therefore be taken as comprehensive and normative. It is, moreover, offered with a minimum reference to the material through which it has operated-the psycho-physical organism and temperament in which the gracious working has developed itself.§ [16] The scaffolding has been taken down, and the building is disclosed unencumbered with immaterial detail. From that fact we may trust in the apostles,’ balance of mind and credibility, since the very richness of their spiritual vision points to an unusually large Subconscious life of ‘the natural man’ and its insurgent impulses, not easy to subdue, yet which, instead of dominating, is so exquisitely kept in place as to become a chief instrument and material of their life’s worth and works. Regarding our data in this light, what do we find?-At once a continuity of experience and an identity of essential fact.
(a) Supernatural principle of life.-To begin with, we find the life of grace to be constituted by the supernatural principle, and to be an indivisible entity. The life of the believer is by a new birth from above,* [17] translating men into a new position before God and a new disposition to sustain it.† [17] That is the consentient testimony of the apostles, as of the saints, of the first and of every age.‡ [19] 118, 322, 521.] Grace is initially regeneration, the work of God’s Spirit, ‘whereby we are renewed in the whole man and are enabled more and more to die daily unto sin and to live unto righteousness.’§ [20] Apostolic and saintly biography shows that this condition may have different levels and values in different natures, and even in the same nature at different times. It shows also that the maintenance of that condition means a constant and immense effort, a practically unbroken grace-getting and ever-growing purity in conflict with the insistent lower self. But the characteristic general fact of renewal remains, as something constant and inalienable-in its inferior planes as a fight against the devil; in its higher, a struggle with lower self, stimulated and impelled by God’s illumination working in and upon the soul: constant and inalienable so long as the soul keeps turning towards the Light. For the grace of conversion|| [21] is the concomitant of regeneration. Conversion is an act of the soul made possible by the Spirit, and should be as continuous as an act as regeneration is as a work.¶ [22] This experience, which on one side is regeneration and on the other is conversion, is one which leaves the soul different for ever from what it was before; yet not in such wise as to prevent the soul itself living on, or as to raise the soul above its limitations and failings, so that it will not fall from grace, and will be kept from sin. But the endeavour to keep from fall and lapse is now on a larger and deeper scale, on a higher plane, on a new vantage-ground. It is always attended by the clear consciousness of the effort being ‘in God,’ ‘in Christ,’ and as wholly their work as the soul’s.
This double consciousness of Divine and human action, nevertheless, does not divide the soul. On the contrary, the more deeply it proceeds, the more does the soul wake up and fuse itself into single vital volition to cast off what is inconsistent with its growing self and to mould what remains into better consistency. The soul as the subject of grace is not an automaton but a person, and the two actions are but two moments of one motion whose activities are not juxtaposed but interpenetrate in an organic unity.** [23] Spirit and spirit can be each within the other†† [20] -a favourite idea of the apostles.‡‡ [25] In St. John the same thought is ever present under the categories of life, light, knowledge, love.§§ [Note: § " translation="">John 4:14; " translation="">John 5:21-29; " translation="">John 6:35; " translation="">John 6:40; " translation="">John 6:44; " translation="">John 10:10; " translation="">John 12:50; " translation="">John 14:10; " translation="">John 15:1; " translation="">John 15:5; " translation="">John 17:3; " translation="">John 17:23,
The American Church Dictionary and Cycopedia - Grace
The word "grace" means a special favor, and is applied tothe whole obedience, merit, Passion and Death of our Lord and thebenefits that flow from them,—justification, wisdom, sanctification,Redemption. The Church, which is the Body of Christ, is called theKingdom of Grace, for in it we become members of Christ andpartakers of His grace and heavenly benediction. The Sacraments, aswell as other ordinances, are called "means of grace," because theyare the appointed instrumentalities whereby God gives grace to Hisfaithful people, to help them in living faithfully and in obtainingSalvation.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Grace
There is much in the Bible about grace, partly because there is much in the Bible about sin. Grace is the undeserved favour of God. People repeatedly sin and rebel against God, yet God in his grace is still ready to forgive them when they repent (Exodus 34:6; Romans 5:20).
Saved by God’s grace
The only way people have ever been forgiven their sin and saved from condemnation is by God’s grace, and they receive this salvation through faith (Ephesians 2:8). People have never been saved through obeying the law or offering sacrifices (Romans 3:24-26; Galatians 3:17-22). (Concerning the purpose of Old Testament regulations given to Israel see COVENANT; LAW; SACRIFICE.)
So much is grace a characteristic of God that the Bible calls him the God of grace (1 Peter 5:10; see also LOVE; MERCY). He chooses to save people because of his sovereign grace alone, not because of their good works (Luke 7:36-50; Ephesians 1:5-6; see ELECTION). Many of the stories that Jesus told illustrate God’s grace (e.g. Matthew 18:23-34; Matthew 20:1-16; Romans 11:6; Luke 14:16-24; Luke 15:11-32), but Jesus himself is the greatest demonstration of God’s grace (John 1:14). He demonstrated that grace not only by the way he lived (John 1:17; 2 Corinthians 8:9), but particularly by his death on the cross (Romans 3:24-25; Galatians 2:21; Hebrews 2:9).
Through Jesus’ death, God can forgive freely all who repent of their sins and trust in him. More than that, God brings them into a right relationship with himself and declares them righteous (Romans 3:23-24; Romans 4:5; Romans 5:2; 1 Corinthians 1:4; Titus 2:11; Titus 3:4-5). (For further discussion on God’s work of grace through the death and resurrection of Jesus see FORGIVENESS; JUSTIFICATION; PROPITIATION; RECONCILIATION.)
God’s grace in the lives of believers
Although salvation is a gift of God’s grace and not a reward for good works, that is no reason for Christians to ignore good works. They are not free to live as they like or sin as they like. God’s grace continues to work in their lives, giving them the inner power to discipline themselves, to do good, to endure suffering and to triumph over temptation (Romans 6:14-15; 2 Corinthians 12:9; 2 Timothy 2:1; Titus 2:11-14; see FREEDOM; GOOD WORKS). They can carry out their Christian service properly only because God in his grace has given them the ability to do so (Romans 12:6).
God exercised his grace towards believers before they were born. That same grace operates continually towards them throughout life and will continue to be active towards them throughout the ages to come (Galatians 1:15; Romans 5:2; Romans 5:21; Ephesians 2:7; 1 Timothy 1:12-16).
Paul’s practice was to begin and end his letters by speaking of the grace of God, or the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ. In this way he indicated that he was always conscious that the believer’s whole life is lived in the atmosphere of God’s grace (Romans 1:7; Romans 16:20; 1 Corinthians 1:3; 1 Corinthians 16:23; Galatians 1:3; Galatians 6:18).
Charles Spurgeon's Illustration Collection - Will: Not Violated by Grace
When we see a casket wrenched open, the hinges torn away, or the clasp destroyed, we mark at once the hand of the Theif; but when we observe another casket deftly opened with a master-key, and the sparkling contents revealed, we note the hand of the Owner. Conversion is not, as some suppose, a violent opening of the heart by grace, in which will, reason, and judgment are all ignored or crushed. This is too barbarous a method for him who comes not as a plunderer to his prey, but as a possessor to his treasure. In conversion, the Lord who made the human heart deals with it according to its nature and constitution. His key insinuates itself into the wards; the will is not enslaved but enfranchised; the reason is not blinded but enlightened, and the whole man is made to act with a glorious liberty which it never knew till it fell under the restraints of grace.

Sentence search

Grace - In its strict and ordinary sense, however, Grace is a supernatural gift of God's beneficence, gratuitously bestowed upon a rational creature (angel or man), for the ultimate purpose of fitting the recipient for life eternal. It may be inward or external, as is explained under these titles: Inward Grace is either actual or habitual, according as it consists in a transitory help conferred for the performance of a good act, or in an abiding perfection elevating the recipient in a manner to a divine plane of being. This latter is usually called sanctifying Grace, because of its formal effect on the recipient. Sanctifying Grace is always accompanied by the infused virtues and the gifts of the Holy Ghost, both of which share in the general nature of supernatural Grace. They are permanent perfections of the recipient's spiritual faculties" intellect and will, bearing a somewhat similar relation to sanctifying Grace as the natural faculties and their dispositions bear to the soul. Hence by sanctifying Grace, and its concomitant gifts, the recipient is in a manner constituted a supernatural nature, a complete radical principle of salutary action. In reference to its origin, a distinction is made between the Grace of God and the Grace of Christ. All Grace comes indeed from God, but since the fall every Grace bestowed upon human beings is based on the merits of Christ. Before the fall Adam received Grace directly from God, without reference to the Saviour of mankind; and so did the angels whilst they were oh probation. But now we, the children of the fallen Adam, receive Grace only through Christ Our Lord. Grace is so necessary that without it we cannot do anything for life eternal. See also: ...
actual Grace
antecedent Grace
efficacious Grace
external Grace
fullness of Grace
habitual Grace
sufficient Grace
Raceless - Grace, n. ) Wanting in Grace or excellence; departed from, or deprived of, divine Grace; hence, depraved; corrupt
Grace, Controversies on - These bear upon the reconciliation of Grace with free will. Augustinianism and Thomism hold that Grace derives its efficacy from its own intrinsic nature (ab intrinseco), the former ascribing it to a moral and the latter to a physical influence of Grace upon the free will. Molinism and Congruism teach that Grace is efficacious extrinsically (ab extrinseco), deriving its efficacy from the free will prepared and assisted by Grace. Congruism, however, explicitly postulates that the Grace be congruous (congrua), that is, adapted to the nature and circumstances of the recipient. For the infallibility of the connection of Grace with the consent of the free will, both fall back upon God's foreknowledge through the scientia media. Syncretism defends the intrinsic efficacy of Grace for difficult actions, and extrinsic for such as are less difficult
Aggrace - ) Grace; favor. ) To favor; to Grace
Grace - When we speak of Grace in relation to God, it hath a vast comprehension of meaning. The whole gospel is called the Grace of God. And the application of it, in any individual instance of its saving power, is called "the Grace of God. By Grace ye are saved (saith the apostle,) through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God. " (Ephesians 2:8) The Grace of God is free, like the light, or the dew of heaven. Grace acts from itself to itself; nothing of human power, Or merit, disposing to it, nor of unworthiness keeping from it. So that every thing by Christ is Grace; and to suppose any one pre-disposing act in the creature, or any merit in the creature, would altogether alter and destroy the very property of Grace. (See Romans 11:6) What is meant by Grace in man, means altogether favour and affection. Thus Joseph found Grace; that is, favour in the sight of his master
Grace - Grace, n. Favor good will kindness disposition to oblige another as a grant made as an act of Grace. Or each, or all, may win a lady's Grace. And if by Grace,then it is no more of works. My Grace is sufficient for thee. Where sin abounded, Grace did much more abound. Bow and sue for Grace ...
With suppliant knee. I should therefore esteem it a great favor and Grace. To few great Jupiter imparts this Grace. We say, a speaker delivers his address with Grace a man performs his part with Grace. Grace was in all her steps. ...
Her purple habit sits with such a Grace ...
On her smooth shoulders. Natural or acquired excellence any endowment that recommends the possessor to others as the Graces of wit and learning. I pass their form and every charming Grace. The Graces were three in number, Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne, the constant attendants of Venus. The loves delighted, and the Graces played. Virtue physical as the Grace of plants. His Grace the Duke of York. Your Grace will please to accept my thanks. In music, Graces signifies turns, trills and shakes introduced for embellishment. Day in Grace, in theology, time of probation, when an offer is made to sinners. ...
Days in Grace, in commerce, the days immediately following the day when a bill or note becomes due, which days are allowed to the debtor or payor to make payment in. In Great Britain and the United States the days of Grace are three, but in other countries more the usages of merchants being different. ...
Grace, To adorn to decorate to embellish and dignify. ...
Great Jove and Phoebus Graced his noble line. ...
And hail, ye fair, of every charm possess'd, ...
Who Grace this rising empire of the west. He might at his pleasure Grace or disgrace whom ...
he would in court. To supply with heavenly Grace
Grace - The word "grace" means a special favor, and is applied tothe whole obedience, merit, Passion and Death of our Lord and thebenefits that flow from them,—justification, wisdom, sanctification,Redemption. The Church, which is the Body of Christ, is called theKingdom of Grace, for in it we become members of Christ andpartakers of His Grace and heavenly benediction. The Sacraments, aswell as other ordinances, are called "means of Grace," because theyare the appointed instrumentalities whereby God gives Grace to Hisfaithful people, to help them in living faithfully and in obtainingSalvation
Final Perseverance - The preservation of the state of Grace until death. It is perfect if baptismal innocence is not lost; but this is not necessary, since Grace lost by mortal sin can be regained. The power of perseverance is the sum total of all the spiritual means at man's disposal to continue in Grace, provided he cooperates. Actual final perseverance implies two elements: the faithful, continual use of the means of Grace; and the condition that the person die in the state of Grace. The Council of Trent calls it a special Divine gift, because it is neither included in sanctifying Grace, nor is it the result of the power of perseverance. Practically it is a series of efficacious Graces. It is not God's Grace alone, nor the human will alone, but a combination of both, God's benign, continual providence, guiding, protecting, assisting, and man's faithful cooperation with Divine Grace
Raced - ) Endowed with Grace; beautiful; full of Graces; honorable. ) of Grace...
Raced - ) Endowed with Grace; beautiful; full of Graces; honorable. ) of Grace...
Favor, Favored - A — 1: χάρις (Strong's #5485 — Noun Feminine — charis — khar'-ece ) denotes (a) objectively, "grace in a person, graciousness," (b) subjectively, (1) "grace on the part of a giver, favor, kindness," (2) "a sense of favor received, thanks. " It is rendered "favor" in Luke 1:30 ; 2:52 ; Acts 2:47 ; 7:10,46 ; 24:27 ; 25:9 , RV (for AV, "pleasure"); Acts 25:3 ; see more fully under Grace. ...
B — 1: χαριτόω (Strong's #5487 — Verb — charitoo — khar-ee-to'-o ) akin to A, to endow with charis, primarily signified "to make Graceful or gracious," and came to denote, in Hellenistic Greek, "to cause to find favor," Luke 1:28 , "highly favored" (marg. , "endued with Grace"); in Ephesians 1:6 , it is translated "made . , "graced"); it does not here mean to endue with Grace. Grace implies more than favor; Grace is a free gift, favor may be deserved or gained
Grace, - It stands in contrast to law, John 1:17 ; Galatians 5:4 ; also to works and to desert or reward, Romans 4:4 ; Romans 11:6 ; 'by Grace ye are saved. The Grace of God is vouchsafed to the saints all along the way: we find nearly all the Epistles commence and end with the invocation of Grace on the churches: whereas when individuals are addressed MERCYis added. The different aspects of Grace and mercy have been thus set forth: "Grace refers more to the source and character of the sentiment; mercy to the state of the person who is its object, Grace may give me glory; mercy contemplates some need in me. Mercy is great in the greatness of the need; Grace in the thought of the person exercising it
Grace - There is much in the Bible about Grace, partly because there is much in the Bible about sin. Grace is the undeserved favour of God. People repeatedly sin and rebel against God, yet God in his Grace is still ready to forgive them when they repent (Exodus 34:6; Romans 5:20). ...
Saved by God’s Grace...
The only way people have ever been forgiven their sin and saved from condemnation is by God’s Grace, and they receive this salvation through faith (Ephesians 2:8). )...
So much is Grace a characteristic of God that the Bible calls him the God of Grace (1 Peter 5:10; see also LOVE; MERCY). He chooses to save people because of his sovereign Grace alone, not because of their good works (Romans 11:6; Ephesians 1:5-6; see ELECTION). Many of the stories that Jesus told illustrate God’s Grace (e. Matthew 18:23-34; Matthew 20:1-16; Luke 7:36-50; Luke 14:16-24; Luke 15:11-32), but Jesus himself is the greatest demonstration of God’s Grace (John 1:14). He demonstrated that Grace not only by the way he lived (John 1:17; 2 Corinthians 8:9), but particularly by his death on the cross (Romans 3:24-25; Galatians 2:21; Hebrews 2:9). (For further discussion on God’s work of Grace through the death and resurrection of Jesus see FORGIVENESS; JUSTIFICATION; PROPITIATION; RECONCILIATION. )...
God’s Grace in the lives of believers...
Although salvation is a gift of God’s Grace and not a reward for good works, that is no reason for Christians to ignore good works. God’s Grace continues to work in their lives, giving them the inner power to discipline themselves, to do good, to endure suffering and to triumph over temptation (Romans 6:14-15; 2 Corinthians 12:9; 2 Timothy 2:1; Titus 2:11-14; see FREEDOM; GOOD WORKS). They can carry out their Christian service properly only because God in his Grace has given them the ability to do so (Romans 12:6). ...
God exercised his Grace towards believers before they were born. That same Grace operates continually towards them throughout life and will continue to be active towards them throughout the ages to come (1 Timothy 1:12-16; Romans 5:2; Romans 5:21; Ephesians 2:7; Galatians 1:15). ...
Paul’s practice was to begin and end his letters by speaking of the Grace of God, or the Grace of the Lord Jesus Christ. In this way he indicated that he was always conscious that the believer’s whole life is lived in the atmosphere of God’s Grace (Romans 1:7; Romans 16:20; 1 Corinthians 1:3; 1 Corinthians 16:23; Galatians 1:3; Galatians 6:18)
Fall of Adam - Since by the Grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that Grace is termed his fall
Adam, Fall of - Since by the Grace of original justice Adam was elevated to a supernatural state, his loss of that Grace is termed his fall
Racious - ) Produced by divine Grace; influenced or controlled by the divine influence; as, gracious affections. ) Abounding in beauty, loveliness, or amiability; Graceful; excellent. ) Abounding in Grace or mercy; manifesting love,. or bestowing mercy; characterized by Grace; beneficent; merciful; disposed to show kindness or favor; condescending; as, his most gracious majesty
Common Grace - The Grace of God given to the creation as a whole. It is common Grace that "restrains" the wrath of God until a later time. It is in special Grace that salvation is given to the Christians
Grace - Grace is unmerited favor. Grace is getting what we do not deserve. In Grace we get eternal life, something that, quite obviously, we do not deserve. ...
Grace is God's Riches At Christ's Expense. Grace rules out all human merit. We are no longer under the Law, but under Grace (Romans 6:14)
Grace - Divine Grace is the free and undeserved love and favor of God towards man as a sinner, especially as exhibited in the plan of redemption through Jesus Christ, John 1:17 3:16 Romans 3:24-26 . It is only by the free Grace of god that we embrace the offers of mercy, and appropriate to ourselves the blessings graciously purchased by redeeming blood. ...
The "GRACE OF GOD," spontaneous, unmerited, self-directed, and almighty, is the source of the whole scheme of redemption, Romans 11:6 2 Timothy 1:9 . With it are united "the Grace of our Lord Jesus Christ," who gave himself for sinners; and that of "the Spirit of Grace," by whom alone the Grace offered by the Father and purchased by the Son is effectually applied. Thus 2 Peter 3:18 , is traced up to the Grace of God as its only source; and the gospel of Christ and the work of the spirit-both pure Graceare its only channels of communication. Hence also all the fruits and blessings of the gospel are termed Graces, 2 Corinthians 8:7 Philippians 1:7 ; not only regeneration, pardon, enlightenment, sanctification, etc. In Galatians 5:4 , "grace" means God's plan of salvation by his mercy, not by our works
Grace - Divines have distinguished Grace into common or general, special or particular. Common Grace, if it may be so called, is what all men have; as the light of nature and reason, convictions of conscience, &c. Special Grace is that which is peculiar to some people only; such as electing, redeeming, justifying, pardoning, adopting, establishing, and sanctifying Grace, Romans 8:30 . This special Grace is by some distinguished into imputed and inherent: imputed Grace consists in the holiness, obedience, and righteousness of Christ, imputed to us for our justification; inherent Grace is what is wrought in the heart by the Spirit of God in regeneration. ...
Grace is also said to be irresistible, efficacious, and victorious; not but that there are in human nature, in the first moments of conviction, some struggles, opposition, or conflict; but by these terms we are to understand, that, in the end, victory declares for the Grace of the Gospel. There have been many other distinctions of Grace; but as they are of too frivolous a nature, and are now obsolete, they need not a place here. Growth in Grace is the progress we make in the divine life. 4:; Booth's reign of Grace
Ungracious - ) Not gracious; showing no Grace or kindness; being without good will; unfeeling. ) Having no Grace; Graceless; wicked
Hananeel - Grace
Jehohanan - Grace
Elhanan - Grace
Grace - This word is understood in several senses: for beauty, Graceful form, and agreeableness of person, Proverbs 1:9 ; Proverbs 3:22 . In theological language Grace also signifies divine influence upon the soul; and it derives the name from this being the effect of the great Grace or favour of God to mankind. Austin defines inward actual Grace to be the inspiration of love, which prompts us to practise according to what we know, out of a religious affection and compliance. He says, likewise, that the Grace of God is the blessing of God's sweet influence, whereby we are induced to take pleasure in that which he commands, to desire and to love it; and that if God does not prevent us with this blessing, what he commands, not only is not perfected, but is not so much as begun in us. Without the inward Grace of Jesus Christ, man is not able to do the least thing that is good. He stands in need of this Grace to begin, continue, and finish all the good he does, or rather, which God does in him and with him, by his Grace. This Grace is free; it is not due to us: if it were due to us, it would be no more Grace; it would be a debt, Romans 11:6 ; it is in its nature an assistance so powerful and efficacious, that it surmounts the obstinacy of the most rebellious human heart, without destroying human liberty. There is no subject on which Christian doctors have written so largely, as on the several particulars relating to the Grace of God. The difficulty consists in reconciling human liberty with the operation of divine Grace; the concurrence of man with the influence and assistance of the Almighty. And who is able to set up an accurate boundary between these two things? Who can pretend to know how far the privileges of Grace extend over the heart of man, and what that man's liberty exactly is, who is prevented, enlightened, moved, and attracted by Grace?...
Growth in Grace - See Grace
Favour of God - See Grace
Irresistible Grace - See Grace
Mercy - See Grace
Grace - Grace (from Lat. Grace ). The specific Biblical use of ‘grace’ comes under the second of the above significations; it is prominent in the NT. (2) is the primary meaning of the Hebrew original, rendered ‘favour’ almost as often as ‘grace’; but (1) of the Greek charis , which at its root signified the gladdening, joy-bringing . Hence the correspondence between the common Greek salutation chaire ( te ) or chairein (‘Joy to you!’) and the Christian charis (‘Grace to you!’) is more than a verbal coincidence. ) a usage conspicuous in common Greek, and personified in the Charites , the three Graces of mythology the prominent instances in the OT are Psalms 45:2 (‘Grace is poured on thy lips’) and probably Zechariah 4:7 ; add to these Proverbs 1:9 ; Proverbs 3:22 ; Proverbs 4:9 ; Proverbs 22:11 ; Proverbs 31:30 (‘favour’). For the NT, ‘grace’ is charm in Luke 4:22 , Colossians 4:8 ; in Ephesians 4:28 there may be a play on the double sense of the word. in James 1:11 ‘grace of the fashion’ renders a single Greek word signifying ‘fair-seemingness,’ quite distinct from charis . The OT passages coming under (2) above, employ ‘grace’ chiefly in the idiom ‘to find Grace ( or favour),’ which is used indifferently of favour in the eyes of J″
There are two occasional secondary uses of ‘grace,’ derived from the above, in the Pauline Epp. : it may denote ( a ) a gracious endowment or bestowment , God’s Grace to men taking shape in some concrete ministry (so Ephesians 4:7 , in view of the following context, and perhaps Galatians 2:9 ; cf. ; and ( b ) a state of Grace , God’s Grace realized by the recipient ( Romans 5:2 , 2 Timothy 2:1 )
Pelagianism - Pelagius, of whom little is known, began the spread of his false doctrines at Rome, c405 His teachings might be summarized as follows: God did not give Adam immortality, nor did Adam need Grace to avoid sin. As to Grace, man does not need this gift, because the will of itself can avoid sin and merit heaven. "Grace" is God's gift of a free will. Pelagius later admitted the existence of a Grace independent of the will; but its function was not to begin but only to perfect good works. This Grace is merited by man
Hanes - Banishment of Grace
Hanan - Full of Grace
Hen - Grace; quiet; rest
Beth-Haran - House of Grace
Benhanan - Son of Grace
Gihon - Valley of Grace
Oodship - ) Favor; Grace
State of Salvation - By Holy Baptism we are admitted into Christ'sChurch, His Kingdom of Grace, which in the Church Catechism isdeclared to be a "State of Salvation," i. , a Christiancondition in which it is quite certain the salvation of God iswithin our reach and in which as we are responsive to all itsovertures of Grace we may grow into the likeness of God's dearSon. Our final salvation is dependent on our continuance in thisstate of Salvation by God's Grace unto our life's end
Hannathon - The gift of Grace
Henadad - Grace of the beloved
Hanani - My Grace; my mercy
Oodlyhood - ) Goodness; Grace; goodliness
Eltekeh - Of Grace or mercy
Antinomianism - It is the unbiblical practice of living without regard to the righteousness of God, using God's Grace as a license to sin, and trusting Grace to cleanse of sin. In other words, since Grace is infinite and we are saved by Grace, then we can sin all we want and still be saved. Paul speaks against the concept of antinomianism in Romans 6:1-2: "Are we to continue in sin that Grace may abound? May it never be! How shall we who died to sin still live in it?". We are not to use the Grace of God as a means of sin
Hanniel - Grace or mercy of God
Disgracious - ) Wanting Grace; unpleasing; disagreeable
Favour - —See Grace and Graciousness
Hananiah - Grace; mercy; gift of the Lord
Joanna - Grace or gift of the Lord
Racing - ) of Grace...
Racing - ) of Grace...
Elon-Beth-Hanan - The house of Grace or mercy
Molinism - Term used to designate one of the theological systems which purpose to reconcile Grace with free will. It seeks the ultimate solution of the difficulty in the free created will, but precisely as prepared and assisted by Divine Grace. For the infallibility of the connection of Grace with the consent of the free will, it falls back upon God's foreknowledge through the scientia media, a mediate (not an immediate) knowledge
Honestation - ) The act of honesting; Grace; adornment
John - The Grace or mercy of the Lord
Mayim achronim - Hand washing before the Grace after Meals
Grace - The word "grace" in biblical parlance can, like forgiveness, repentance, regeneration, and salvation, mean something as broad as describing the whole of God's activity toward man or as narrow as describing one segment of that activity. An accurate, common definition describes Grace as the unmerited favor of God toward man. In the Old Testament, the term that most often is translated "grace, " is hen [1]; in the New Testament, it is charis [2]. There are examples of man's favor to man, but the theological concept of importance to us is the Grace of God demonstrated toward man. The themes of judgment and salvation, in which the vast majority of humankind are condemned to destruction, while God finds favor on a few (Noah and his family), reoccurs often in connection with the idea of Grace. Hence, concepts of election, salvation, mercy, and forgiveness are all linked in this first illustration of Grace in the Old Testament. Moses demonstrates his humble dependence upon the Grace of God by affirming that if God's Presence does not go up with them, he does not want to be sent, because he knows they will fail (v. He then makes a statement that is connected with Grace throughout Scripture, one that Paul will quote in the context of election in Romans 9 : "I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion. " This is a remarkable example of the unconditional and full character of the Grace of God. " Even this is an act of unconditional and full Grace in that God has withheld from Moses what would destroy him. When Gideon actually brings the offering that he has prepared, God shows his Grace beyond what Gideon has asked by giving him instructions on where to place it and how to arrange it, then creating a supernatural fire that consumes the meat and the bread. God shows his Grace one more time by assuring Gideon that although he is afraid since he has seen the angel of the Lord face to face, he is not going to die (Judges 6:23 ). Thus, God's Grace toward those whom he loves grows in its extensiveness, as the child grows. Grace in the Old Testament is just as much an act of the sovereign will of God as is Grace in the New Testament. ...
The last prominent example of Grace in the Old Testament is found in the Book of Esther. Of course, the book does not speak of God's favor at all, but Esther's humility in seeking the favor of the king has always been understood as a pointer toward human responsibility to humbly accept the Grace of God. ...
Only a few references close out the notion of Grace in the Old Testament, but they are significant. Here is a reference to the Grace that is shown the people in the giving of the temple and the light that it brings to Israel. But in the context of the Book of Ezra, this may also be a reference to the Grace shown by God in giving Israel the Law, since the reading of the Law and the confession of the sin of the people on the basis of that reading is so important to this book. 31-34) is enough of a statement about the Grace of God on its own, but it is linked to the hen [1] of God by the occurrence of that word in 31:2. Introducing the same passage with the phrase "at that time, " an echo of the beginning of the covenant passage in 31:31, God says that "the people who survive the sword will find Grace in the desert; I will come to give rest to Israel. " Here is a promise of the Grace of God given to the people when they are given the new covenant. Grace in the New Testament is largely encompassed by the use of the word charis [ Matthew 20:1-16 ) and the parable of the great supper (Luke 14:16-24 ). ...
While the idea of Grace can be said to be largely a Pauline one, there are references to it in John and Luke as well. John describes Jesus as "full of Grace and truth" and speaks of his people receiving Grace upon Grace from the fullness of his Grace (John 1:16 ). In one of the most important theological statements about Grace in Scripture, John says that the Law, a good thing, was given through Moses; the better things of Grace and truth came through Jesus Christ (John 1:17 ). ...
When we turn to the writings of Luke, we find that Jesus is described as having the Grace of God upon him (Luke 2:40 ) and as growing in Grace with God and man (Luke 2:52 ). Many more references to Grace are found in the Book of Acts. Luke makes a strong association between Grace and power, especially in the early chapters (4:33; 6:8; 11:23). Grace is found without qualifier (18:27) and in the phrases "message of his Grace" (14:3), "grace of God" (14:26), "grace of our Lord Jesus" (15:11), "grace of the Lord" (15:40). This Grace is, as in the Old Testament passages, an unmerited favor, but now a new aspect of power in the Spirit has been added to it. ...
The concept of Grace is most prominently found in the New Testament in the epistles of Paul. ...
The fact that he sometimes uses Grace in his benedictions as well, which clearly are intentional, indicates that his greetings are to be taken with some seriousness. For instance, the benediction in 1 Corinthians 16:23 , coming just after his dramatic plea to the Lord to come, demonstrates a strong belief in the Grace of God. In the salutation of the letter (1:3), one gets a greeting that follows on from a strongly worded theological statement about sanctification and calling (1:2) and that leads into a statement about Grace in 1:4 demonstrating the theological import Paul intends. ...
Overwhelmingly in the letters of Paul God is the subject of Grace. Hence the many different phrases connected with Grace: the Grace of God (Romans 5:15 ), the Grace of our Lord Jesus Christ (2 Corinthians 13:14 ), and the like. Sometimes this is explicitly stated, as in Ephesians 4:7 : "to each one of us Grace has been given as Christ apportioned it. "...
Interestingly, Paul sometimes mentions the gift of Grace from God using alongside it language that speaks of human responsibility. So in Romans 15:16 , Paul speaks of "the Grace God gave me to be a minister of Christ Jesus to the Gentiles, with the priestly duty of proclaiming the gospel of God. " Grace, then, is the power with which the human being then performs his or her gifted task. He then argues that in living "by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me, " that he is not "setting aside the Grace of God" (2:20-21). Only an argument that Paul was too dependent upon works in his life would create the argument that he was not setting aside the Grace of God in his understanding of the sanctified Christian life. ...
Grace can be such a forceful thought for Paul that he sometimes anthropomorphizes it. Hence, in 1 Corinthians 15:10 , in the midst of an emotional defense of his apostleship despite the fact that he had persecuted the church of God, Paul says that he is what he is by the Grace of God. In order that this statement might not seem boastful, Paul follows it up by saying "yet not I, but the Grace of God that was with me. " Though this Grace is said to be God's Grace, it nevertheless is said to be "with him, " and working harder than the other apostles, and is tantamount to equating the Grace of God with the Holy Spirit. ...
In Ephesians 1:6 Paul speaks of the "glorious Grace" of God, which should garner our praise. Of course, once again, Paul is not expecting us to praise an abstract comment, but he is thinking of the Grace of God working so mightily in his life that it becomes a metonymy for God. The point is that Paul was so saturated with the notion of Grace in his writing that he thought of it as an essential, if not the essential attribute of God. ...
Grace is most often associated in Paul with other terms having to do with salvation. It is even used with the human subject in speaking of the collection for Jerusalem as a work of Grace. ...
In connecting Grace to election Paul sees God as electing us before the creation of the world for the purpose of holiness and blamelessness (Ephesians 1:4 ). All of this elective work is so that we might "praise his glorious Grace. " In other words, election and Grace go hand in hand because of their free character. Paul sees this as the benefit of not only the Corinthians but also all who receive his ministry, so that "the Grace that is reaching more and more people may cause thanksgiving to overflow to the glory of God. Grace thus renews Paul's inward spirit and assures him of glory in the afterlife (vv. ...
In the same way, he links the Grace of God with the gospel in Colossians 1:5-6 . The word of truth, the gospel, is bearing fruit and growing at the present time "just as it has been doing among you since the day you heard it and understood God's Grace in all its truth" (v. The parallel descriptions of "gospel" and "grace" as "truth" link the two as synonyms in the passage. This Grace is therefore the "hope that is stored up for [9] in heaven" (v. ...
Perhaps the most dominant metaphor with which Grace is associated is the legal metaphor of justification. We see the two linked in two very important passages in which Grace is used in Paul. Romans 3:23-24 states quite clearly that all have fallen short of the glory of God and are "justified freely by his Grace through the redemption that came by Christ Jesus. " Here, while the language of the slave market may be implied in the use of the word "redemption, " and that of the cultus in the use of the phrase "sacrifice of atonement" in the next verse, the strongest linking with Grace in this passage is with the word "justified" in verse 24. 27), again emphasizing that Grace is free and not the work of man. ...
In Ephesians 2:8-9 Paul states the free character of Grace perhaps even more explicitly, now not using the language of justification but simply of salvation. We are told that we have been saved "by Grace" but "through faith. " Grace is seen here as the means by which we are saved, a free gift; faith is seen as the mechanism by which that salvation or Grace is appropriated. ...
This does not mean that Paul keeps Grace separate from works in sanctification, for he goes right on to speak of us being God's workmanship created in Christ Jesus to do good works (v. Similarly, Grace is seen as being in the midst of our present Christian life. In Romans 5:2 Paul speaks of gaining "access by faith into this Grace in which we now stand" and in 5:21 of Grace reigning "through righteousness to bring eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. " While all of this is in the context of the Grace of God as a gift versus the Law of God as a work, nevertheless Grace is viewed as reigning even as we live the life we are supposed to live in Christ. Hence the argument of Romans 6 that we are not to go on sinning so that Grace may increase, but we are to "count [10] dead to sin but alive to God in Christ Jesus for sin shall not be [11] master, because [12] are not under law, but under Grace" (vv. ...
Even the suffering of the present Christian life is linked to the Grace that God gives us. In Paul's famous statement about the thorn in his flesh (2 Corinthians 12:7-10 ), he speaks of asking three times that this thorn be taken from him, only to receive the answer "my Grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness. " Here Grace is equated with the power to live the Christian life and to do ministry in the name of Christ. In a similar way, the whole of the Christian life is linked to Grace in Titus 2:11-14 . This Grace "teaches us to say No' to ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright and godly lives in this present age, while we wait for the blessed hope. " Here we see both the ethic of the Christian life (saying no and living uprightly) and the thought of the Christian life (the blessed hope) combined under the reign of Grace. ...
Finally, Grace is associated strongly with the gifts of the Spirit
Devenustate - ) To deprive of beauty or Grace
Sacrament - Theologically a sacrament is a sensible sign, instituted by Christ, to signify and produce Grace. The essentials of a sacrament are: ...
an external rite,
significative and productive of Grace, and
Divine institution. These rites did not produce Grace of themselves, they roused faith and other dispositions which contributed to win from God the infusion of Grace. As God, He is the principal cause of them, since God alone can give to a material rite the power to produce Grace; Christ as Man instituted them and also gives them their efficacy from His merits and death. ...
Efficacy of the Sacraments ...
Protestants teach that sacraments do not give Grace; their purpose is to rouse faith, so that fiduciary faith, not the sacrament, is the medium of Grace and heavenly gifts. The Council of Trent teaches that the sacraments produce Grace ex opere operato, that is, from Divine institution they are instrumental causes of Grace. Hence the sacramental rite, independent of the faith, merits, or worthiness of the minister, confers Grace when the recipient places no obstacle. If a sacrament is received without the necessary dispositions, it gives no Grace. However, theologians teach that when the evil disposition is removed, then the sacrament revives and gives Grace. ...
Matter and Form ...
The sacrament is composed of two elements ...
matter, the determinable element, and
form, words which determine the matter
Both together signify and produce Grace. ...
Division of the Sacraments ...
Baptism and Penance are called sacraments of the dead because their primary purpose is to remit sin and to confer spiritual life through sanctifying Grace; the other sacraments are called sacraments of the living, because they increase Grace already existing in the soul. This division is not absolute, for at times a sacrament of the dead simply gives an increase of Grace; at times a sacrament of the living, e. ...
Effects ...
They produce sanctifying Grace or increase it and they give sacramental Grace, i. ,the right to actual Graces granted by God at opportune times in order that the obligations imposed by the sacrament may be faithfully fulfilled. ,supernatural attrition for the sacraments of the dead; a state of Grace for the sacraments of the living
Bedeck - ) To deck, ornament, or adorn; to Grace
Hanameel - The Grace that comes from God; gift of God
Overgrace - ) To Grace or honor exceedingly or beyond desert
Indwelling of the Holy Ghost - A special, abiding presence of the Holy Ghost in the soul of the just, based upon the inexistence of sanctifying Grace. When this Grace is produced in the soul, the three Persons of the Blessed Trinity come to dwell therein in a special manner (John 14)
Grand Falls, Newfoundland, Diocese of - Erected on February 29, 1856 as the diocese of Harbour Grace, a suffragan of Saint John's. The name was changed to the diocese of Harbour Grace-Grand Falls on February 22, 1958, and then to the diocese of Grand Falls on October 30, 1964
Harbour Grace, Newfoundland, Diocese of - Erected on February 29, 1856 as the diocese of Harbour Grace, a suffragan of Saint John's. The name was changed to the diocese of Harbour Grace-Grand Falls on February 22, 1958, and then to the diocese of Grand Falls on October 30, 1964
Augustinism - Term used sometimes to designate the entire group of philosophical doctrines of Saint Augustine, but often used exclusively to designate his explanation reconciling the theories of the Fall, Grace, and free will in the solution of the problem of freedom and Grace, i
Jansenism - ) The doctrine of Jansen regarding free will and divine Grace
Mense - ) To Grace
Thomaism - with respect to predestination and Grace
Birkat hamazon - Grace after meals, the blessings of thanksgiving after a meal that included bread ...
d.g. - = Dei gratia (by the Grace of God) - or - = Deo gratias (thanks be to God) ...
Divine Nature, Partakers of - (Latin: consortes divinæ naturæ) Phrase found in 2 Peter 1, by which Saint Peter expresses the excellence of the state of Grace. Christian Grace imparts to us a sublime share in God's own life. This marvelous life of Grace is the prelude and means of the eternal life of glory where the blessed see God face to face and love Him in bliss
Joanna - (Luke 8:3) Her name signifies, the gift or Grace of God
Elon Beth Hanan - ("oak of the house of Grace"
Antinomians - Strictly, those opposed to the inculcation of good works from a perverted view of the doctrines of Grace; but the term is also falsely applied to those who know themselves free through the death of Christ fromthe law as given by Moses. One has but to read carefully the epistle to the Galatians to see that for Gentile believers to place themselves under the law is to fall from Grace; and Paulexhorted them to be as he was, for he was (though a Jew by birth) as free from the law by the death of Christ as they were as Gentiles. For a godly walk the Christian must walk in the Spirit, and Grace teaches that, "denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly in this present world. On the other hand, there have been, and doubtless are, some who deny good works as a necessary fruit of Grace in the heart: Grace, as well as everything else, has been abused by man
Semipelagianism - The doctrines first put forward by Cassian, Abbot of Saint Victor at Marseilles, and which amounted to a compromise between the Augustinian explanation of Grace and that held by the Pelagians. According to Cassian and his followers ...
God's Grace sometimes awaits man's free cooperation
the beginning of faith is in one's power
salvation, always supposing the assistance of Grace, depends finally upon one's own will
there is no such thing as predestination ante proevisa merita
grace is given to all, or when denied is withheld because God foresees one's evil use of it
These opinions became popular in southern Gaul and were defended by Vincent of Lerins and others
Amazing - ) Causing amazement; very wonderful; as, amazing Grace
Unusual - ) Not usual; uncommon; rare; as, an unusual season; a person of unusual Grace or erudition
Beirach - �); the stage in the Passover seder at which the Grace After Meals is recited ...
Ahinoam - ("brother of Grace", i. "graceful". Beauty was David's snare; the children consequently had more of outward than inward Grace
Means of Grace - A means of Grace is a manner in which the Lord imparts Grace to a believer as he partakes in the sacrament. Generally, the means of Grace are considered to be the Gospel, baptism, and the Lord’s Supper
Expectative - , an expectative Grace
Mayyim acharonim - "after-waters," used to wash the fingertips after a meal, in preparation for Grace after Meals
Kos shel brachah - "cup of blessing"); the cup of wine over which the Grace after Meals has been recited ...
Goodliness - Beauty of form Grace elegance
Johanan - (2 Kings 25:23) His name is compounded of Chanan, Grace; and Jah, the Lord
jo'Nam - (gift or Grace of God ), the form given to JONAN in the Revised Version of (Luke 3:30 )
Han'Iel - (grace of God ), one of the sons of Ulla of the tribe of Asher
Brand - It refers to Joshua who, in his natural state, was fit only for the burning of hell; but by the Grace of GOD was saved from that condition and position and was made a priest of GOD. This is sovereign Grace
Uncomely - Not comely wanting Grace as an uncomely person uncomely dress uncomely manners
Pelagians - He, with his friend Celestius, travelled to Rome, where they resided very early in the fifth century, and opposed with warmth certain received notions respecting original sin, and the necessity of divine Grace. " Pelagius is charged also with having maintained, "that it is possible for men, provided they fully employ the powers and faculties with which they are endued, to live without sin;" and though he did not deny that external Grace, or the doctrines and motives of the Gospel, are necessary, yet he is said to have rejected the necessity of internal Grace, or the aids of the divine Spirit. The Pelagian controversy, which began with the doctrines of Grace and original sin, was extended to predestination, and excited continual discord and division in the church. In their concluding observations they say, "From all these remarks a judgment may easily be formed at what an immense distance our sentiments stand from the dogmatical assertions of the Pelagians and Semi- Pelagians on the Grace of God in the conversion of man. Pelagius, in the first instance, attributed all things to nature: but we acknowledge nothing but Grace. When Pelagius was blamed for not acknowledging Grace, he began indeed to speak of it, but it is evident that by Grace he understood the power of nature as created by God, that is, the rational will: but by Grace we understand a supernatural gift. Pelagius, when afterward pressed with passages of Scripture, also admitted this supernatural Grace; but he placed it solely in the external teaching of the law: though we affirm that God offers his word to men, yet we likewise affirm that he inwardly causes the understanding to believe. Subsequently Pelagius joined to this external Grace that by which sins are pardoned: we acknowledge not only the Grace by which sins are forgiven, but also that by which men are assisted to refrain from the commission of sin. In addition to his previous concessions Pelagius granted, that the Grace of Christ was requisite beside the two kinds which he had enumerated; but he attributed it entirely to the doctrine and example of Christ that we are aided in our endeavours not to commit sin: we likewise admit that the doctrine and example of Christ afford us some aid in refraining from sin, but in addition to their influence we also place the gift of the Holy Spirit with which God endues us, and which enlightens our understandings, and confers strength and power upon our will to abstain from sinning. Pelagius admitted Grace,—but it has been a question with some whether he meant only illumination, or, beside this, a power communicated to the will;—he admitted Grace, but he did this only to show that by means of it man can with greater ease act aright: we, on the contrary, affirm that Grace is bestowed, not that we may be able with greater ease to act aright, (which is as though we can do this even without Grace,) but that Grace is absolutely necessary to enable us to act at all aright. Pelagius asserted, that man, so far from requiring the aid of Grace for the performance of good actions, is, through the powers implanted in him at the time of his creation, capable of fulfilling the whole law, of loving God, and of overcoming all temptations: we, on the contrary, assert that the Grace of God is required for the performance of every act of piety. Pelagius declared, that by the works of nature man renders himself worthy of Grace: but we, in common with the church universal, condemn this dogma. When Pelagius afterward himself condemned this tenet, he understood by Grace, partly natural Grace, which is antecedent to all merit, and partly remission of sins, which he acknowledged to be gratuitous; but he added, that through works performed by the powers of nature alone, at least through the desire of good and the imperfect longing after it, men merit that spiritual Grace by which they are assisted in good works: but we declare, that men will that which is good on account of God's prevenience or going before them by his Grace, and exciting within them a longing after good; otherwise Grace would no longer be Grace, because it would not be gratuitously bestowed, but only on account of the merit of man
Ascend - Psalm 24:3 (c) This action represents the progress of the Christian as he grows in Grace, godliness and usefulness
Well-Spoken - ) Speaking well; speaking with fitness or Grace; speaking kindly
Molinist - ) A follower of the opinions of Molina, a Spanish Jesuit (in respect to Grace); an opposer of the Jansenists
Fullness of Grace - Abundance or superabundance of sanctifying Grace or interior holiness, predicated by Sacred Scripture of Our Lord, of Saint Stephen, of the Apostles, and of Our Blessed Lady. Granting Christ's obvious and necessary superiority, we may assume with Suarez that Mary's sanctifying Grace transcends by far the combined sanctity of all other creatures
Grace - Payson, when dying, expressed himself with great earnestness respecting the Grace of God as exercised in saving lost men, and seemed particularly affected that it should be bestowed on one so ill-deserving as himself. 'Oh, how sovereign! Oh, how sovereign! Grace is the only thing that make us like God
Pulchritude - ) That quality of appearance which pleases the eye; beauty; comeliness; Grace; loveliness
Acceptably - ...
Let us have Grace whereby we may serve God acceptably
Opus Operatum - A technical phrase used by theologians since the 13th century to signify that the sacraments produce Grace of themselves, apart and distinct from the Grace dependent upon the intention of the person conferring the sacrament; the latter effect is designated by the phrase ex opere operantis
Arminianism - There are five main tenets of Arminianism: 1) God elects or reproves on the basis of foreseen faith or unbelief, 2) Christ died for all men and for every man, although only believers are saved, 3) Man is so depraved that divine Grace is necessary unto faith or any good deed, 4) This Grace may be resisted, 5) Whether all who are truly regenerate will certainly persevere in the faith is a point which needs further investigation
ex Opere Operato - A technical phrase used by theologians since the 13th century to signify that the sacraments produce Grace of themselves, apart and distinct from the Grace dependent upon the intention of the person conferring the sacrament; the latter effect is designated by the phrase ex opere operantis
Raceful - ) Displaying Grace or beauty in form or action; elegant; easy; agreeable in appearance; as, a Graceful walk, deportment, speaker, air, act, speech
Melisma - ) A Grace or embellishment
e'Lon-Beth'-Hanan - (oak of the house of Grace ) is named with two Danite towns as forming one of Solomon's commissariat districts
Rainbow - Genesis 9:13 (a) Our Lord gives this emblem as a proof of His Grace and mercy. So none of us ever see all the Grace of GOD for our lives, all His goodness and mercy, and all the perfect plan He has for us. The complete bow tells us that in the next life we shall see and understand all the goodness of GOD to us, all His Grace in dealing with us, all His measureless mercy which preserved us. ...
Revelation 10:1 (a) Since the rainbow appears around the head of this mighty angel just before the judgments begin, it is to tell us that Grace always appears before wrath, and GOD's goodness provides a remedy from the dire results of rebellion
Beth-Hanan - (behth-hay' nan) Place name meaning, “house of Grace
jo'Nan - (perhaps a contraction of Johnana, gift or Grace of God ), son of Eliakim, in the genealogy of Christ
Mercy - (Compare with justice and Grace. "Let us therefore draw near with confidence to the throne of Grace, that we may receive mercy and may find Grace to help in time of need" (Hebrews 4:16)
Efficacy - The atonement is efficacious Grace in action
an'na - (grace ), a "prophetess" in Jerusalem at the time of our Lord's Presentation in the temple
Hen'Adad - (grace of Hadad ), the head of a family of the Levites who took a prominent part in the rebuilding of the temple
Post Communion - The name given to that portion of the CommunionOffice which is read after all have communicated, and is the givingof thanks for the Grace received
Womanly - ) In the manner of a woman; with the Grace, tenderness, or affection of a woman
Dispensation, Dispensationalism - In the Scofield Reference Bible a dispensation is "a period of time during which man is tested in respect of obedience to some specific revelation of the will of God" Dispensationalism says that God uses different means of administering His will and Grace to His people. Scofield says there are seven dispensations: of innocence, of conscience, of government, of promise, of law, of Grace, and of the kingdom
Earnest - Thus, the earnest of the Spirit (the Spirit itself being the earnest) is that measure of Grace vouchsafed here which shall be augmented and ripened into the fulness of Grace hereafter
Handwriting - The "blotting out the handwriting" is the removal by the Grace of the gospel of the condemnation of the law which we had broken
Sacerdotalism - Also, the teaching that Grace is administered through the one so ordained
Gracious - is now used only in an active sense = ‘bestowing Grace,’ ‘showing favour. ‘a woman of Grace,’ that is, of attractive appearance and manner; Luke 4:22 ‘the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth,’ lit. ]'>[3] , ‘words of Grace,’ that is, says Plummer, ‘winning words’; he adds, ‘the very first meaning of charis is comeliness, winsomeness
Semi-Pelagians - That God did not dispense his Grace to one more than another, in consequence of predestination, 1:e. That the Grace purchased by Christ, and necessary to salvation, was offered to all men. That man, before he received Grace, was capable of faith and holy desires. That man was born free, and was, consequently, capable of resisting the influences of Grace, or of complying with its suggestion
Acciaccatura - ) A short Grace note, one semitone below the note to which it is prefixed; - used especially in organ music
Race - ) Graceful and beautiful females, sister goddesses, represented by ancient writers as the attendants sometimes of Apollo but oftener of Venus. ) A petition for Grace; a blessing asked, or thanks rendered, before or after a meal. ) Ornamental notes or short passages, either introduced by the performer, or indicated by the composer, in which case the notation signs are called Grace notes, appeggiaturas, turns, etc. ) A play designed to promote or display Grace of motion. Called also Grace hoop or hoops. ) To supply with heavenly Grace. ) To add Grace notes, cadenzas, etc
Race - ) Graceful and beautiful females, sister goddesses, represented by ancient writers as the attendants sometimes of Apollo but oftener of Venus. ) A petition for Grace; a blessing asked, or thanks rendered, before or after a meal. ) Ornamental notes or short passages, either introduced by the performer, or indicated by the composer, in which case the notation signs are called Grace notes, appeggiaturas, turns, etc. ) A play designed to promote or display Grace of motion. Called also Grace hoop or hoops. ) To supply with heavenly Grace. ) To add Grace notes, cadenzas, etc
Merit - ...
Merit in Catholic theology includes the above notions along with the doctrine of supernatural Grace, which is the principle of supernatural life and of all supernatural merit. Christ strictly merited eternal life for all men in the sense that He merited all the supernatural helps (graces) which man needs to work out for himself his supernatural destiny. Hence, man can now, in virtue of the merits of Christ and with the help of His Graces, strictly merit before God a supernatural reward in the form of the beatific vision. Supernatural merit before God may be defined as a free act elevated by Grace, performed in the service of God and deserving of a supernatural reward. Two principles cooperate in every meritorious act; the free will of man, and supernatural Grace. He must also be in a state of friendship with God (sanctifying Grace). Besides, his act must be a positive act elicited by the free will and supernatural Grace and wholly pleasing to God and based on a motive founded on faith. To merit less strictly (de congruo), the same conditions are required except that a man need not necessarily be in the state of friendship with God (sanctifying Grace). The just man can then merit strictly eternal life, an increase of sanctifying Grace and of glory in heaven. The man in sin can less strictly merit, through works of penance assisted by Grace, actual Graces and justification through sanctifying Grace
Chantry - , the chantry of Grace Church,New York
Halo - In Christian art, a glow of light or an ornamented circle often shown around the head of the Saviour or of a saint, symbolizing holiness, the light of Grace
Beautify - ) To make or render beautiful; to add beauty to; to adorn; to deck; to Grace; to embellish
Hanniel - HANNIEL (‘grace of God’)
Beautify - ...
To make or render beautiful to adorn to deck to Grace to add beauty to to embellish
Jansenist - ) A follower of Cornelius Jansen, a Roman Catholic bishop of Ypres, in Flanders, in the 17th century, who taught certain doctrines denying free will and the possibility of resisting divine Grace
Moralist - The reflecting mind will be reminded of those admirable characters which are occasionally met with, in which everything of good repute and comely aspect may be seen, but true religion, that sweet ethereal perfume of Grace, is wanting; if they had but love to God, what lovely beings they would be, the best of the saints would not excel them, and yet that fragrant Grace they do not seek, and after every effort we may make for their conversion, they remain content without the one thing which is needful for their perfection. O that the Lord would impart to them the mystic sweetness of his Grace by the Holy Spirit! ...
...
Sharu'Hen - (refuge of Grace ), a town named in ( Joshua 19:6 ) only among those which were in Jadah to Simeon
Terminist - ) One of a class of theologians who maintain that God has fixed a certain term for the probation of individual persons, during which period, and no longer, they have the offer to Grace
Decorum - ) Propriety of manner or conduct; Grace arising from suitableness of speech and behavior to one's own character, or to the place and occasion; decency of conduct; seemliness; that which is seemly or suitable
Works, Good - The old objection against the doctrine of salvation by Grace, that it does away with the necessity of good works, and lowers the sense of their importance (Romans 6 ), although it has been answered a thousand times, is still alleged by many. And more than this, if the Grace of God is most clearly displayed in the salvation of the vilest of men, then the worse men are the better. The gospel of salvation by Grace shows that good works are necessary. They are the fruits of the Spirit (Titus 2:10-12 ), and thus spring from Grace, which they illustrate and strengthen in the heart. ...
Good works of the most sincere believers are all imperfect, yet like their persons they are accepted through the mediation of Jesus Christ (Colossians 3:17 ), and so are rewarded; they have no merit intrinsically, but are rewarded wholly of Grace
Aquitaine, Prosper of, Saint - Here his teachings on Grace and free will were opposed by the monks of Marseilles and neighborhood. Prosper unceasingly combated semi-Pelagianism, his most important prose work, On the Grace of God and Free Will, refuting Collator (c
Gracious - Proceeding from divine Grace as a person in a gracious state. Renewed or implanted by Grace as gracious affections. Excellent Graceful becoming
Unction - Kings, prophets, and priests were anointed, in token of receiving divine Grace
Ornament - ) That which embellishes or adorns; that which adds Grace or beauty; embellishment; decoration; adornment
Al hanissim - �and for the miracles�); the opening phrase of a passage included in the daily prayers and the Grace after meals on Chanukah and Purim, thankfully acknowledging the miracles G-d wrought on those days...
Dead, Sacraments of the - They are so named because from Divine institution, their primary purpose is to remit grave sin, either original or actual, and to confer sanctifying Grace on those who are spiritually dead from sin
Braided, Braiding - Christian women were instructed that good works and spiritual Grace were more important than outward appearances (1 Timothy 2:9 ; 1 Peter 3:3 )
Hart - Or STAG, a species of deer, clean by the Levitical law, Deuteronomy 12:15 , and celebrated for its elegance, agility, and Grace, Song of Song of Solomon 2:9 Isaiah 35:6
Sacraments of the Dead - They are so named because from Divine institution, their primary purpose is to remit grave sin, either original or actual, and to confer sanctifying Grace on those who are spiritually dead from sin
Rephidim - An encampment of Israel in the wilderness, Exodus 17:1 remarkable for the murmurings of the people Grace in giving them water
Deform - ) To render displeasing; to deprive of comeliness, Grace, or perfection; to dishonor
Baal-Hanan - Lord of Grace
Flour - His life was pure Grace, pure love, pure holiness and pure beauty
Chesed - "kindness or Grace"); used to refer to the Divine attribute (sefira) which parallels the abovementioned human qualities and thus is associated with the dispersion of G-dly light and energy to lower levels of existence
Sacramental - The name signifies that the article blessed has some resemblance to a sacrament, inasmuch as it is a means of Grace; but a sacramental differs from a sacrament in this, that the latter always produces Grace directly when there is no obstacle on the part of the recipient, while the former produces it only indirectly, by causing devotion in the mind of the user
Jedidiah - This, following on the great sin of David with Bathsheba, is a remarkable instance of how Grace can abound over sin
Enoch - (Hebrews 11:5) Oh! for Grace thus to walk, and thus to have communion with God in Christ!...
Works, Covenant of - Entered into by God with Adam as the representative of the human race (Compare Genesis 9:11,12 ; 17:1-21 ), so styled because perfect obedience was its condition, thus distinguishing it from the covenant of Grace
Apollo - , and was represented as the model of manly Grace and beauty; - called also Phebus
Wantonness - The tumults threatened to abuse all acts of Grace, and turn them into wantonness
Demoiselle - ) The Numidian crane (Anthropoides virgo); - so called on account of the Grace and symmetry of its form and movements
Deflour - ) To take away the prime beauty and Grace of; to rob of the choicest ornament
Justification - As a habit it is the continued possession of sanctlfying Grace. The removal of sin and the infusion of Grace constitute one and the same act
Life - Spiritual life consists in our being in the favour of God, influenced by a principle of Grace. God, influenced by a principle of Grace, and living dependent on him
Hananiah - The word signifies the Grace or gift of the Lord, from Chen or Chanan, Grace; and Jah, the Lord
Benefit, Benefactor - ...
3: χάρις (Strong's #5485 — Noun Feminine — charis — khar'-ece ) "grace," is once rendered "benefit," 2 Corinthians 1:15 ; it stresses the character of the "benefit," as the effect of the gracious disposition of the benefactor. See ACCEPTABLE , FAVOR , Grace , LIBERALITY , PLEASURE , THANK
Gospel - The revelation of the Grace of God to fallen man through a mediator. It is called the Gospel of his Grace, because it flows from his free love, Acts 20:24 . The Gospel of the kingdom, as it treats of the kingdoms of Grace and glory
Molinists - A sect in the Romish church who follow the doctrine and sentiments of the Jesuit Molina, relating to sufficient and efficacious Grace. He taught that the operations of divine Grace were entirely consistent with the freedom of the human will; and introduced a new kind of hypothesis to remove the difficulties attending the doctrines of predestination and liberty, and to reconcile the jarring opinions of Augustines, Thomists, Semi-Pelagians, and other contentious divines. He affirmed that the decree of predestination to eternal glory was founded upon a previous knowledge and consideration of the merits of the elect; that the Grace, from whose operation these merits are derived, is not efficacious by its own intrinsic power only, but also by the consent of our own will, and because it is administered in those circumstances in which the Deity, by that branch of his knowledge which is called scientia media, foresees that it will be efficacious
Hope - One of the three theological virtues infused into the soul together with sanctifying Grace and having God as its primary object. It makes us desire eternal life or the possession of God and gives us the confidence of receiving the Grace necessary to arrive at this possession. Since the virtue of hope is based on God's power, goodness, and fidelity to His promises, it must be sure and unshakable in the sense that God will certainly offer us the means necessary for the attainment of eternal life and that if we employ our free-will to cooperate with the Grace of God we shall certainly be saved. Hence, we alone can make hope void by our wilful refusal to work with the proffered Grace of God
Bow (Rainbow) - The rainbow tells of His mercy and Grace which is now to be everlasting in its duration. The reason for this is that no one on earth has ever seen or known all the fullness of GOD's Grace and mercy. The rainbow is a testimony, a proclamation of the Grace and goodness of GOD toward evil men. It is around GOD's Throne - not any other throne because He only is the author of Grace, mercy and peace
Linen - The wool represents GOD's Grace. By this picture GOD condemns the mixture of Grace and works in the matter of making the robe to wear for eternity. We are not saved by Grace, and then kept by works. We are not saved partly by Grace, and partly by works
Commonwealth - Gentiles are declared to be strangers, outside the community of Israel; having no promises and no hope, and being without God in the world: fit objects for the Grace of God
Sin, Sense of - It is a realization that we are in a fallen state, and that without God's Grace we cannot overcome temptation, avoid sin, or perform the least supernatural act
Sense of Sin - It is a realization that we are in a fallen state, and that without God's Grace we cannot overcome temptation, avoid sin, or perform the least supernatural act
Leanness - In Scripture, want of Grace and spiritual comfort
Hesed - (hee' ssehd) Personal name meaning “grace” or “covenant love
Daniel, Gabriel - He wrote on the questions of probabilism and Grace but is best known for his refutation of Pascal's "Provincial Letters" and for his great history of France
Clumsy - ) Without skill or Grace; wanting dexterity, nimbleness, or readiness; stiff; awkward, as if benumbed; unwieldy; unhandy; hence; ill-made, misshapen, or inappropriate; as, a clumsy person; a clumsy workman; clumsy fingers; a clumsy gesture; a clumsy excuse
Gabriel Daniel - He wrote on the questions of probabilism and Grace but is best known for his refutation of Pascal's "Provincial Letters" and for his great history of France
Father - By Grace, however, He lovingly pardons us, adopts us as sons, and destines us to share in the life and beatitude of His only-begotten Son, Jesus Christ. This adoption is effected through sanctifying Grace, a Divine quality or supernatural habit infused into the soul by God, which blossoms into the vision of glory in life eternal
Father, God the - By Grace, however, He lovingly pardons us, adopts us as sons, and destines us to share in the life and beatitude of His only-begotten Son, Jesus Christ. This adoption is effected through sanctifying Grace, a Divine quality or supernatural habit infused into the soul by God, which blossoms into the vision of glory in life eternal
God the Father - By Grace, however, He lovingly pardons us, adopts us as sons, and destines us to share in the life and beatitude of His only-begotten Son, Jesus Christ. This adoption is effected through sanctifying Grace, a Divine quality or supernatural habit infused into the soul by God, which blossoms into the vision of glory in life eternal
Amyraldism - A name given by some writers to the doctrine of universal Grace, as explained and asserted by Amyraldus or Moses. Those who embraced this doctrine were called Universalists; though it is evident they rendered Grace universal in words, but partial in reality
Conversion - " (John 16:7-15) And to remark the wonderful operations of his Grace under those several branches of his almighty power, by which he gives the fullest discoveries of our worthlessness, and the glorious manifestations of Jesus's Grace, and fulness, and suitability, these are among the highest instructions the souls of men can attain in the present life
Preparation - And it is very blessed when a child of God feels this predisposing Grace, and is conscious of being led on and carried through every duty. From the first awakenings of Grace until Grace is consummated in glory, the whole preparations of the heart, and the answer of the tongue, is from the Lord. And when the soul of a poor sinner hath been first prepared of the Lord, by regenerating, illuminating, convincing, and converting Grace, and is thus brought into an union with Christ, all the subsequent acts of Grace, in the goings forth of the soul upon the person, blood and righteousness of Christ, sweet preparing and disposing work of God the Holy Ghost. How blessedly the church sings to this note of praise, for the preparing and disposing Grace of the Spirit, when she cried out: "Or ever I was aware, my soul made me like the chariots of Amminadib!" (Song of Song of Solomon 6:12) As if she had said, before I had the least apprehension of the mercy, my Lord my Husband made me willing, by the swift manifestations of his love, and the awakenings of his Grace in my heart, as rapid as the chariot wheels of a princely people
Luke, Gospel of - Grace to man — 'to the Jew first, and also to the Greek,' as Paul expresses it — is the key-note of Luke's gospel. ...
The Gospel of Luke sets the Lord before us in the character of Son of man, revealing God in delivering Grace among men. Hence the present operation of Grace and its effect are more referred to, and even the present time prophetically, not the substitution of other dispensations, as in Matthew, but of saving, heavenly Grace. At first no doubt (and just because He is to be revealed as Man, and in Grace to men), He is presented (in a prefatory part in which there is the most exquisite picture of the godly remnant) to Israel, to whom He had been promised, and in relationship with whom He came into this world; but afterwards this gospel presents moral principles which apply to man generally whosoever he may be, whilst yet manifesting Christ, for the moment, in the midst of that people. This power of God in Grace is displayedin various ways in its application to the wants of men. ...
After the transfiguration ( Luke 9 ), which is recounted earlier, as to the contents of the gospel, than by the other evangelists, we find the judgement of those who rejected the Lord, and the heavenly character of the Grace which, because it is Grace, addresses itself to the nations, to sinners, without any particular reference to the Jews, overturning the legal principles according to which the latter pretended to be, and as to their external standing were originally called at Sinai to be, in connection with God. They will be accomplished in Grace and were to be laid hold of by faith. He often brings a mass of facts into one short general statement, and then expatiates at length on some isolated fact, where moral principles and Grace are displayed
New - Faith is like a new birth; Grace acts like a new leaven; the Christian compared with the pagan is like a new man, in contrast with the old
Hannathon - (han nuh' thahn) Place name meaning, “grace
Awkward - ) Wanting dexterity in the use of the hands, or of instruments; not dexterous; without skill; clumsy; wanting ease, Grace, or effectiveness in movement; ungraceful; as, he was awkward at a trick; an awkward boy
Holy Souls - The souls of the departed dying in the Grace of God, but still, for certain faults, in purgatory
Hellenism - ) The type of character of the ancient Greeks, who aimed at culture, Grace, and amenity, as the chief elements in human well-being and perfection
Souls, Holy - The souls of the departed dying in the Grace of God, but still, for certain faults, in purgatory
Visage - ...
Love and beauty still that visage Grace
Grace - -Grace is a theistic idea. Grace is thus a purely religious affirmation expressing the soul’s assurance that God’s goodness is the beginning, medium, and end of its life. ’]'>[2] Its various stages, the growing process of His Grace, do not depend, nay, disappear when made to depend, on merely mental reference to His acts, or on merely self-originating impulses. -The apostolic doctrine of Grace presupposes the distinctive Christian experience. The first reproduces the most immediately and literally faithful picture of Christ’s sayings; the second and third present the earliest impressive developments of His sayings in individual realization, and are rich in exposition and explanation of the subjective apprehension and appropriation of Divine Grace. The view-points for estimating Grace increase. Thus it is that while Christ speaks little, if at all, of Grace, it is a central conception of the apostles. Therefore also, while Grace is in both, it is ‘in Christ’ in a vitally intimate way such as cannot be predicated of the apostles except ‘through Christ. ’ It is ‘the Grace of Christ,’ as ‘of God’; not the Grace of the apostles, whose it is only ‘by his Grace. ’...
Again we have to note in Christ’s case no trace of that separateness of the human from the Divine Spirit in their communion and inter-operation in the relationship of Grace, which is so clear in the case of the apostles, a distinction of which they are so confident that they claim a special illumination and infusion of supernatural light and energy in this experience. Christ’s mediation of Grace to them is basic. ]'>[5] and the immensely richer experience is reflected in the ampler refinement of their idea of Grace and its more commanding place in their system. Nor should we fail to observe that the term ‘grace’ denotes a new economy in human history. Grace here has cosmic significance. Thereby a new era is inaugurated-the dispensation of ‘the gospel of the Grace of God. ]'>[5] Grace, then, comprises three specific moments: a supernatural energy of God, a mystical and moral actuation of man, an immanent economy of Spirit. -Grace, accordingly, is erroneously regarded when defined as a substance or force or any sort of static and uniform quantum. The experience of Grace is that of ‘a gracious relationship’§ [11] Grace then becomes a material quantity, instead of spiritual quality. Herein, further, let us note, rests the explanation of two conspicuous facts in the life of Grace-the fact, viz. , that the inspiration of Grace is neither infallible nor irresistible;* [22] This experience, which on one side is regeneration and on the other is conversion, is one which leaves the soul different for ever from what it was before; yet not in such wise as to prevent the soul itself living on, or as to raise the soul above its limitations and failings, so that it will not fall from Grace, and will be kept from sin. The soul as the subject of Grace is not an automaton but a person, and the two actions are but two moments of one motion whose activities are not juxtaposed but interpenetrate in an organic unity
Order, Ionic - The frieze is ornamented with a continuous band and mouldings are distinguished by delicacy and Grace
Ionic Order - The frieze is ornamented with a continuous band and mouldings are distinguished by delicacy and Grace
Maistre, Xavier de - He was the author of a few charming booklets, written with artless Grace and spontaneous wit: "Voyage autour de ma Chambre," "Le leprenx de la Cite d' Aoste," and "La Jeune Siberienne
Babe - Hebrews 5:13 (a) This is typical of the child of GOD who has not grown in Grace through the years, but must be fed on the simplest things of the Scriptures because he cannot understand the deep things of GOD
Synergists - Hence this name was given to those in the sixteenth century who denied that God was the sole agent in the conversion of sinful man, and affirmed that man co-operated with divine Grace in the accomplishment of this salutary purpose
Synergism - Cults are synergistic in that they teach that God's Grace combined with our efforts are what makes forgiveness of sins possible
Dexterity - ) Readiness and Grace in physical activity; skill and ease in using the hands; expertness in manual acts; as, dexterity with the chisel
Liberalism - The result is often a denial of essential biblical doctrines such as the Trinity, the deity of Christ, His virgin birth, His resurrection, and salvation by Grace
Illuminati (1) - The name was occasioned by a ceremony in the baptism of adults, which consisted in putting a lighted taper in the hand of the person baptized, as a symbol of the faith and Grace he had received in the sacrament
Hannah - Hannah (hăn'nah), Grace
Lightness - ) The state, condition, or quality, of being light or not heavy; buoyancy; levity; fickleness; nimbleness; delicacy; Grace
Crown - Psalm 103:4 (a) This is the blessed gift of GOD's lovingkindness and tender mercy resting upon the subject of His Grace. ...
Proverbs 4:9 (b) Here is a description of the blessing which comes upon one who uses wisdom in his living and Grace in his actions
Henadad - (hehn' uh dad) Personal name meaning, “grace of Hadad (the god)
Deep Things: Understood by Experienced Men - To open up the hidden preciousness of the promises, we need a mine of experience, and to gain this last a man needs an inexhaustible mine of Grace
Congruity - ) That, in an imperfectly good persons, which renders it suitable for God to bestow on him gifts of Grace
Perseverance - ) Continuance in a state of Grace until it is succeeded by a state of glory; sometimes called final perseverance, and the perseverance of the saints
Ur - Sweet thought to the believer! It is JEHOVAH'S Grace, and not man's deserts, even in the instance of an Abraham, that is the sole cause of salvation
Elha'Nan - (the Grace of God )
Inward Grace - Among such Graces are enumerated the indwelling of the Holy Spirit and His gifts, sanctifying Grace and the infused virtues, all actual Graces, and in general any supernatural help or adornment received either in the soul itself or in its faculties
Elegancy - ) The state or quality of being elegant; beauty as resulting from choice qualities and the complete absence of what deforms or impresses unpleasantly; Grace given by art or practice; fine polish; refinement; - said of manners, language, style, form, architecture, etc
Grace, Inward - Among such Graces are enumerated the indwelling of the Holy Spirit and His gifts, sanctifying Grace and the infused virtues, all actual Graces, and in general any supernatural help or adornment received either in the soul itself or in its faculties
Baptismal Grace - Sanctifying Grace conferred in Baptism, inasmuch as it gives the recipient a right to special help from God to enable him to observe the commandments and so follow Christ worthily
Deformity - ) Anything that destroys beauty, Grace, or propriety; irregularity; absurdity; gross deviation from order or the established laws of propriety; as, deformity in an edifice; deformity of character
Box-Tree - It is used as an emblem of the abiding Grace and prosperity of the church of God
Charm - Human Grace and attractiveness; magic objects intended to ward off evil; and a method used to prevent poisonous snakes from biting. God also gives such Grace to the afflicted (Proverbs 3:34 ). Generally the term means to find favor or acceptance from another person (Genesis 6:8 ; Genesis 32:8 ), but English translations use Grace or favor rather than charm as the translation at these points
Charity - Charity, unlike natural virtues, is not acquired through frequent repetition of the same acts, but is infused with sanctifying Grace; hence it is sometimes used to signify this Grace
Covenant - The covenants which more especially relate to the human race, are generally called the covenant of works and the covenant of Grace. The covenant of Grace is generally defined to be that which was made with Christ, as the second Adam, and in him with all the elect as his seed, Isaiah 42:1-6 . This covenant was broken by Adam's eating of the forbidden fruit, whereby he and his posterity were all subject to ruin, Genesis 3:1-24 : Romans 5:12 ; Romans 5:19 ; and without the intervention of the divine Grace and mercy, would have been lost for ever, Romans 3:23 . ...
The Divine Being, foreseeing this, in infinite wisdom and unspeakable compassion planned the covenant of Grace; by virtue of which his people are reinstated in the blessings of purity, knowledge, and felicity, and that without a possibility of any farther defalcation. The covenant of Grace. Some divines make a distinction between the covenant of redemption and that of Grace; the former, they say, was made with Christ in eternity; the latter with believers in time. Others object to this, and suppose it a needless distinction; for there is but one covenant of Grace, and not two, in which the head and members are concerned; and, besides, the covenant of Grace, properly speaking, could not be made between God and man; for what can man restipulate with God, which is in his power to do or give him, and which God has not a prior right unto? Fallen man has neither inclination to yield obedience, nor power to perform it. promises of Grace and glory made to them in him, Titus 1:2 . Divine as to its origin, springing entirely from free Grace, Romans 11:5-6 . In the covenant of Grace he appears as infinitely merciful, adjudging life to the elect sinner, agreeably to his wisdom and justice. In the covenant of works there was no mediator: the covenant of Grace has a mediator, Christ. In the covenant of Grace the same condition is proposed, but to be performed by a mediator. In the covenant of Grace the man in covenant is considered as believing; eternal life being given as the merit of the mediator, out of free Grace, which excludes all boasting. The covenant of Grace consists not of conditions, but of promises: the life to be obtained; faith, by which we are made partakers of Christ; perseverance, and, in a word, the whole of salvation, are absolutely promised. The special end of the covenant of works was the manifestation of the holiness, goodness, and justice of God; but the special end of the covenant of Grace, is the praise of the glory of his Grace, and the revelation of his unsearchable and manifold wisdom. The covenant of works was only for a time, but the covenant of Grace stands sure for ever. The administration of the covenant of Grace. ...
The covenant of Grace, under the Old Testament, was exhibited by promises, sacrifices, types, ordinances, and prophecies. Under the New it is administered in the preaching of the Gospel, baptism, and the Lord's supper; in which Grace and salvation are held forth in more fulness, evidence, and efficacy to all nations, 2 Corinthians 3:6-18
Self-Conceit: Its Danger - Grant, most gracious God, that I may never hold so high an opinion of my own spiritual health as to prevent my being in very deed full of thy Grace and fear! ...
...
Beauty - ) A particular Grace, feature, ornament, or excellence; anything beautiful; as, the beauties of nature. ) An assemblage or Graces or properties pleasing to the eye, the ear, the intellect, the aesthetic faculty, or the moral sense
Nourishment - Instruction, or that which promotes growth in attainments as nourishment and growth in Grace
Appoggiatura - ) A passing tone preceding an essential tone, and borrowing the time it occupies from that; a short auxiliary or Grace note one degree above or below the principal note unless it be of the same harmony; - generally indicated by a note of smaller size, as in the illustration above
Just, Justice - In the Grace of God, justice fell upon His Son so that mercy would fall upon us
Tawdry - ) Very fine and showy in colors, without taste or elegance; having an excess of showy ornaments without Grace; cheap and gaudy; as, a tawdry dress; tawdry feathers; tawdry colors
Lordship - ) The state or condition of being a lord; hence (with his or your), a title applied to a lord (except an archbishop or duke, who is called Grace) or a judge (in Great Britain), etc
ep'Aphras - (lovely ), a fellow laborer with the apostle Paul, mentioned ( Colossians 1:7 ) as having taught the Colossian church the Grace of God in truth, and designated a faithful minister of Christ on their behalf
Apostle - The name given toour Lord's twelve commissioned disciples who were thus made "theoriginal fountain of ministerial authority and capacity pouringforth twelve streams, and from whom were to flow all the branchesof that river whose streams should make glad the city of Godby carrying to it the blessings of His Grace
Grace - -Grace is a theistic idea. Grace is thus a purely religious affirmation expressing the soul’s assurance that God’s goodness is the beginning, medium, and end of its life. ’]'>[2] Its various stages, the growing process of His Grace, do not depend, nay, disappear when made to depend, on merely mental reference to His acts, or on merely self-originating impulses. -The apostolic doctrine of Grace presupposes the distinctive Christian experience. The first reproduces the most immediately and literally faithful picture of Christ’s sayings; the second and third present the earliest impressive developments of His sayings in individual realization, and are rich in exposition and explanation of the subjective apprehension and appropriation of Divine Grace. The view-points for estimating Grace increase. Thus it is that while Christ speaks little, if at all, of Grace, it is a central conception of the apostles. Therefore also, while Grace is in both, it is ‘in Christ’ in a vitally intimate way such as cannot be predicated of the apostles except ‘through Christ. ’ It is ‘the Grace of Christ,’ as ‘of God’; not the Grace of the apostles, whose it is only ‘by his Grace. ’...
Again we have to note in Christ’s case no trace of that separateness of the human from the Divine Spirit in their communion and inter-operation in the relationship of Grace, which is so clear in the case of the apostles, a distinction of which they are so confident that they claim a special illumination and infusion of supernatural light and energy in this experience. Christ’s mediation of Grace to them is basic. ]'>[5] and the immensely richer experience is reflected in the ampler refinement of their idea of Grace and its more commanding place in their system. Nor should we fail to observe that the term ‘grace’ denotes a new economy in human history. Grace here has cosmic significance. Thereby a new era is inaugurated-the dispensation of ‘the gospel of the Grace of God. ]'>[8] Grace, then, comprises three specific moments: a supernatural energy of God, a mystical and moral actuation of man, an immanent economy of Spirit. -Grace, accordingly, is erroneously regarded when defined as a substance or force or any sort of static and uniform quantum. The experience of Grace is that of ‘a gracious relationship’§ [11] Grace then becomes a material quantity, instead of spiritual quality. Herein, further, let us note, rests the explanation of two conspicuous facts in the life of Grace-the fact, viz. , that the inspiration of Grace is neither infallible nor irresistible;* [13]0 This experience, which on one side is regeneration and on the other is conversion, is one which leaves the soul different for ever from what it was before; yet not in such wise as to prevent the soul itself living on, or as to raise the soul above its limitations and failings, so that it will not fall from Grace, and will be kept from sin. The soul as the subject of Grace is not an automaton but a person, and the two actions are but two moments of one motion whose activities are not juxtaposed but interpenetrate in an organic unity
Extreme Unction - A Sacrament of the New Law, instituted by Jesus Christ, in which the sick who are seriously ill,by the anointing with holy oil, and by the prayer of the priest, receive the Grace of God for the good of their souls and often also for the good of their bodies. Its minister is a priest; the recipient must be illfrom sickness, and in a state of Grace, though from its secondary end it can also act as a sacrament of the dead and remit mortal sin
Quicken - To make alive in a spiritual sense to communicate a principle of Grace to. To revive to cheer to reinvigorate to refresh by new supplies of comfort or Grace
Unction, Extreme - A Sacrament of the New Law, instituted by Jesus Christ, in which the sick who are seriously ill,by the anointing with holy oil, and by the prayer of the priest, receive the Grace of God for the good of their souls and often also for the good of their bodies. Its minister is a priest; the recipient must be illfrom sickness, and in a state of Grace, though from its secondary end it can also act as a sacrament of the dead and remit mortal sin
Will: Not Violated by Grace - Conversion is not, as some suppose, a violent opening of the heart by Grace, in which will, reason, and judgment are all ignored or crushed. His key insinuates itself into the wards; the will is not enslaved but enfranchised; the reason is not blinded but enlightened, and the whole man is made to act with a glorious liberty which it never knew till it fell under the restraints of Grace
Sacrament - (ssac' ruh mehnt) an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual Grace. Later, Christians extended the use of the term to preaching, the Lord's Supper, foot washing, blessing, marriage, ordination, and any other rite seen as a channel of divine Grace into the heart and life of the believer. The theological issue which most divided Christians was whether the divine Grace was conveyed simply by a correct performance of the rite or whether the recipient must have an active faith and make a personal response to the power of God's spirit. It is not, however, an automatic or mechanical transmission of divine Grace
Living Waters - ...
(2) The life of Grace on earth leading to life everlasting in heaven, "
Master of the Sentences - Lombard wrote a treatise on Ireland and for a time presided over the "Congregatio de Auxiliis" which examined into the Jesuit and Dominican controversy on Grace
Frankfort, Council of - Convened, 794, "by the Grace of God, authority of the pope, and command of Charlemagne
Zeal - As a Christian Grace, it must be grounded on right principles and directed to right ends (Galatians 4:18 )
Hyperdulia - Recognizing the unique dignity to which God raised her and the fulness of Grace conferred on her, both supereminent, she
Lombard, Peter - Lombard wrote a treatise on Ireland and for a time presided over the "Congregatio de Auxiliis" which examined into the Jesuit and Dominican controversy on Grace
Manifold - Exhibited or appearing at divers times or in various ways applied to words in the singular number as the manifold wisdom of God, or his manifold Grace
Green - This color denotes that through Christ is born the hope of salvation, and that after the winter, which preceded Christ's coming, the green springtime of Grace has begun for souls
Carpenter - It demonstrates the real manhood He had taken in Grace
Hanun - He is a type of those who, refusing the proffered Grace of God, will suffer by His judgements
Comeliness - It signifies something less forcible than beauty, less elegant than Grace, and less light than prettiness
Joy of God - In the subjects of his Grace, Psalms 147:11
Impeccability - The state of a person who cannot sin; or a Grace, privilege, or principle, which puts him out of a possibility of sinning
Pelagian - ) A follower of Pelagius, a British monk, born in the later part of the 4th century, who denied the doctrines of hereditary sin, of the connection between sin and death, and of conversion through Grace
Eunice - Paul; for when that Apostle came to Lystra, he found there Eunice and Timothy, already far advanced in Grace and virtue
Waters, Living - ...
(2) The life of Grace on earth leading to life everlasting in heaven, "
Sentences, Master of the - Lombard wrote a treatise on Ireland and for a time presided over the "Congregatio de Auxiliis" which examined into the Jesuit and Dominican controversy on Grace
Han'Nah - (grace ), one of the wives of Elkanah, and mother of Samuel
Form, Sacramental - The form is composed of words pronounced by the minister over the matter, thereby determining the matter and raising it to the dignity of a sacramental sign, capable of giving Grace from the institution of Christ; e
Infused Virtue - , prudence or temperance, but is caused, or given, or poured into our souls from above and is therefore supernatural, like faith, hope, charity, and also the natural virtues, when sanctifying Grace is given to us in order to practise them more easily and perfectly
Hen (Person) - Hebrew word for “grace, favor” used as either a proper name or a title (meaning “favored one”) of Josiah son of Zephaniah (Zechariah 6:14 ; compare Zechariah 6:10 ) if the present Hebrew text is original
Dulcinists - He taught that the law of the Father, which had continued till Moses, was a law of Grace and wisdom; but that the law of the Holy Ghost, which began with himself in 1307, was a law entirely of love, which would last to the end of the world
Augustinian - Augustine, maintain that Grace by its nature is effectual absolutely and creatively, not relatively and conditionally
Meekness - 1 Corinthians 10 ...
Meekness is a Grace which Jesus alone inculcated, and which no ancient philosopher seems to have understood or recommended
Grace, Efficacious - A special grant of Almighty God by which a soul incapable by its own natural resources of placing a certain action positively conducive to eternal salvation, is endowed with new powers, becomes an adequate principle for eliciting the act in question, and without being forced by the pressure of God's Grace, freely but infallibly performs the salutary action which God by His help prompted and made possible
Grace, External - Such a Grace is Holy Scripture, the preaching of the Gospel, the life of Christ and of the saints, and in general any fact or event whatever, in so far as under the providence of God it is calculated to exert a moral influence towards the attainment of salvation
Translation - The memory of the authors of it under the Grace of the Holy Ghost is truly blessed, and proves that Scripture, "the righteous shall be in everlasting remembrance
Effectual - ...
According to the gift of the Grace of God given me by the effectual working of his power
External Grace - Such a Grace is Holy Scripture, the preaching of the Gospel, the life of Christ and of the saints, and in general any fact or event whatever, in so far as under the providence of God it is calculated to exert a moral influence towards the attainment of salvation
Apprehend - " (Philippians 3:12) that is, if by faith, I may be enabled to lay hold of Christ Jesus, as the Lord by Grace hath laid hold of me
Justify - The act of God's free Grace, whereby he freely pardons the sinner, and justifies him in Christ notwithstanding all his own unworthiness and transgressions; delivering him both from the guilt of sin, the dominion of sin, and the punishment due to sin; accepting him in Christ, and thus blessing him in and through the finished salvation of Jesus Christ our Lord
Annunciation, the - The supposed time of the visit of the angel Gabriel to Mary when he announced God's purpose of Grace towards her
Efficacious Grace - A special grant of Almighty God by which a soul incapable by its own natural resources of placing a certain action positively conducive to eternal salvation, is endowed with new powers, becomes an adequate principle for eliciting the act in question, and without being forced by the pressure of God's Grace, freely but infallibly performs the salutary action which God by His help prompted and made possible
Sacramental Form - The form is composed of words pronounced by the minister over the matter, thereby determining the matter and raising it to the dignity of a sacramental sign, capable of giving Grace from the institution of Christ; e
Virtue, Infused - , prudence or temperance, but is caused, or given, or poured into our souls from above and is therefore supernatural, like faith, hope, charity, and also the natural virtues, when sanctifying Grace is given to us in order to practise them more easily and perfectly
Glorify - God is said to be glorified, when we honour him in his word, his attributes, his perfections, and in all his dispensations, both in nature, providence and Grace. In this view of giving glory to God is included all that self-abasement becoming poor lost creatures, and ascribing the whole of redemption to sovereign, free, and unmerited Grace. In short, in every way, and by every means, we may be said to glorify JEHOVAH when Christ, as the Christ of God, is exalted as the only Saviour of a lost world; and the soul lies low at the footstool of the throne of Grace, ascribing "salvation only to God and the Lamb. ...
But beside this glorifying God actively, there is another method by which the Lord is said to be glorified by his creatures passively; namely, when under suited impressions of his goodness the soul lies passive, and comes to receive, and not to give; and from the Lord's Grace thereby to minister to the Lord's glory. ...
When God in Christ gives out of his fulness mercy, pardon, Grace, yea, imparts of himself the suited supply to the wants of the millions of his people, this is to his glory. And if poor needy creatures had but such views of the clemency of heaven, they would see what encouragement it gives to faith, to be always looking up to God's free bounty in Christ, to receive from his fulness, and Grace for Grace. When a poor believing soul can say, it is the glory and perfection of a God in Christ to be laying out upon his redeemed of his infinite and inexhaustible fulness; and Christ in God is as much glorified by my poor heart, when passively receiving from his Grace bestowed upon me, as when I actively praise him with joyful lips, when by his Holy Spirit he enables me to bring my poor boon of love and thankfulness. " (Colossians 2:9) But what angels or men can describe this? And in Christ's ministry, offices, character, work, and relations in the accomplishment, who shall undertake to set forth the glory of the Father in the Son, and the glory of the Son by the Father, through the efficient operation of God the Holy Ghost?...
I will only add, that it forms a part of that glory which all the persons of the GODHEAD are concerned in, and will be loved, and praised, and adored for, to all eternity by the church, when the church is glorified and made everlastingly happy, from her union with her glorious Head Christ Jesus, and brought home through a life of Grace here, to a life of unspeakable nearness, felicity, and glory in Christ Jesus hereafter, and to rest in the uninterrupted enjoyment of it for evermore
Mercy Seat - The veil of the temple being rent, God has come out in Grace, and man in the person of Christ has gone in, and the Christian is exhorted to come at all times boldly to the throne of Grace that he may find Grace to help in time of need
Ark - As such, the ark became both a symbol of a faith on the part of Noah and a symbol of Grace on the part of God (Genesis 6:8 ,Genesis 6:8,6:22 ). ...
The ark was also a symbol of God's Grace. As such, it came to be understood as a symbol of His Grace and mercy (Hebrews 11:7 ). The ark as symbol of both faith and Grace teaches the importance of obedience. Noah's obedience allowed him to experience that Grace. There, however, the ark was not a symbol of the Grace of the gods but of their folly and faulty planning. These details may be of interest, but are of far less significance than the message of the biblical ark itself as testimony to God's unmerited Grace
Kingdom of God - Not only a place or goal to be attained, but an influence under which our minds come when we are one with Christ and acting under His ideals; the sway of Grace, in our hearts; the rule of God in the world, Thy kingdom come; the place where God reigns; the goal at which we have to aim; the Church, which exercises this influence, administers the sacraments as a means of this Grace, upholds even in persecution the laws of God, tabernacles the Body and Blood of His Divine
Kingdom of Heaven - Not only a place or goal to be attained, but an influence under which our minds come when we are one with Christ and acting under His ideals; the sway of Grace, in our hearts; the rule of God in the world, Thy kingdom come; the place where God reigns; the goal at which we have to aim; the Church, which exercises this influence, administers the sacraments as a means of this Grace, upholds even in persecution the laws of God, tabernacles the Body and Blood of His Divine
Assurance: Excellence of - Believe me, the life of Grace is no dead level, it is not a fen country, a vast flat. Such dwellers in the lowlands of unbelief are for ever doubting, fearing, troubled about their interest in Christ, and tossed to and fro; but there are other believers, who, by God's Grace, have climbed the mountain of full assurance and near communion, their place is with the eagle in his eyrie, high aloft; they are like the strong mountaineer, who has trodden the virgin snow, who has breathed the fresh, free air of the Alpine regions, and therefore his sinews are braced, and his limbs are vigorous; these are they who do great exploits, being ...
God, Kingdom of - Not only a place or goal to be attained, but an influence under which our minds come when we are one with Christ and acting under His ideals; the sway of Grace, in our hearts; the rule of God in the world, Thy kingdom come; the place where God reigns; the goal at which we have to aim; the Church, which exercises this influence, administers the sacraments as a means of this Grace, upholds even in persecution the laws of God, tabernacles the Body and Blood of His Divine
Election - In theology, divine choice predetermination of God, by which persons are distinguished as objects of mercy, become subjects of Grace, are sanctified and prepared for heaven. There is a remnant according to the election of Grace
Amyraldism - a name given by some writers to the doctrine of universal Grace, as explained and asserted by Amyraldus, or Moses Amyraut, and his followers, among the reformed in France, toward the middle of the seventeenth century. Those who embraced this doctrine were called Universalists, although, it is evident that they rendered Grace universal in words, but partial in reality, and are chargeable with greater inconsistencies than the Supralapsarians
Heaven, Kingdom of - Not only a place or goal to be attained, but an influence under which our minds come when we are one with Christ and acting under His ideals; the sway of Grace, in our hearts; the rule of God in the world, Thy kingdom come; the place where God reigns; the goal at which we have to aim; the Church, which exercises this influence, administers the sacraments as a means of this Grace, upholds even in persecution the laws of God, tabernacles the Body and Blood of His Divine
Monsignor - All ecclesiastical dignitaries, with the exception of cardinals, such as patriarchs, archbishops, bishops and persons attached to the pontifical household, have a right to this title, though in English speaking countries usage calls for the more specific forms of address, "Your Grace" and "Your Lordship" for archbishops and bishops respectively
Modesty - The supernatural virtue rises higher, infusing into the regularity of carriage a spiritual beauty that makes evident the Grace of the soul
Forgiveness of Sins - Only God can forgive sin, since He alone can infuse sanctifying Grace by which sin is expelled
Mercy - Mercy is also a Christian Grace (Matthew 5:7 ; 18:33-35 )
Heaven - Who,' saith an old divine, 'chides a servant for taking away the first course at a feast when the second consists of far greater delicacies?' Who then can feel regret that this present world passeth away, when he sees that an eternal world of joy is coming? The first course is Grace, but the second is glory, and that is as much better as the fruit is better than the blossom
Elegant - ) Very choice, and hence, pleasing to good taste; characterized by Grace, propriety, and refinement, and the absence of every thing offensive; exciting admiration and approbation by symmetry, completeness, freedom from blemish, and the like; Graceful; tasteful and highly attractive; as, elegant manners; elegant style of composition; an elegant speaker; an elegant structure
Scythian - Happily such a one has the same reception as the most cultivated: such is the Grace of God
Dignity - ) Quality suited to inspire respect or reverence; loftiness and Grace; impressiveness; stateliness; - said of //en, manner, style, etc
Sanctification - ) the act of God's Grace by which the affections of men are purified, or alienated from sin and the world, and exalted to a supreme love to God; also, the state of being thus purified or sanctified
Sins, Forgiveness of - Only God can forgive sin, since He alone can infuse sanctifying Grace by which sin is expelled
Saviour - A title of Our Lord, arising from the fact that He sacrificed His life to atone for the sins of men and so won for sinful men Grace and access to God
Original Sin - As father of the human race, he was endowed with immortality, with reason and will in perfect control of the lower appetites, and with Divine Grace enabling him to know and serve God in a manner far beyond the capacity of his natural powers, and therefore in a state above nature: the supernatural state. Now the loss or privation of Divine Grace, the chief consequence of sin, means the privation of the supernatural goodness to which God destined us, and therefore it is called our original stain or sin. Original sin does not so corrupt our natural powers as to render them incapable of natural virtues: it deprives us of the Grace needed for virtues beyond our natural powers
Avenger, Avenger of Blood - With the Christian it is quite different: having been dealt with in Grace, he must act also in Grace towards others. Now it is the day of Grace; but there is a day of vengeance coming for those that "know not God, and that obey not the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ
Sin, Original - As father of the human race, he was endowed with immortality, with reason and will in perfect control of the lower appetites, and with Divine Grace enabling him to know and serve God in a manner far beyond the capacity of his natural powers, and therefore in a state above nature: the supernatural state. Now the loss or privation of Divine Grace, the chief consequence of sin, means the privation of the supernatural goodness to which God destined us, and therefore it is called our original stain or sin. Original sin does not so corrupt our natural powers as to render them incapable of natural virtues: it deprives us of the Grace needed for virtues beyond our natural powers
Fulness - ...
Of Christ (John 1:16 ), the superabundance of Grace with which he was filled
Palm - The palm tree gives shade and fruit, and hence is emblematic of God's protection and Grace
Affliction: Overruled to Promote Joy - Grace, by its matchless art, has often turned the heaviest of our trials into occasions for heavenly joy
Texts: Memorable - One looks with interest on that ancient stone at Kingston-upon-Thames, upon which so many Saxon kings were crowned, but far more reverent is the gaze we fix upon those texts of Scripture whereby (through God's Grace) many have been made kings unto our God
Greyhound - Proverbs 30:31, margin, "girt in the loins," referring to the slenderness of its body at the loins, as if tightly girt for Grace and swiftness in running, so that it is classed among the "things which go well
Add - 2 Peter 1:5 (b) This figure describes the growth in Grace of the Christian who learns to know the ways of GOD as described in this passage. When any person is born again, then he changes his ways, his practices and his thoughts so that there may be in his life the Graces given by the Spirit, and the knowledge of heavenly things that GOD desires to give to each of His children
Emerald - ...
Revelation 4:3 (c) This complete rainbow was given this color to typify the eternal character of GOD's Grace and the everlasting nature of GOD's covenant of mercy
Firebrand - Instead of this, GOD sent mercy, goodness and Grace many times so that He saved them, instead of destroying them
Anna - Anna, whose name means “grace,” was the daughter of Phanuel of the tribe of Asher
Mercy - For David, speaking of Grace, and pleading for it before the Lord, saith, as an argument and plea for receiving it, There is mercy (that is, there is Jesus) with thee
Jegarsahadutha - Such will be the everlasting separation in every instance of nature, where our affinities are not new-formed in Grace
Nuts - But the great point intended from it is, to denote the Grace and condescension in Christ, to visit his churches, and to take notice of the Graces he himself hath planted in them
Regeneration - In theology, new birth by the Grace of God that change by which the will and natural enmity of man to God and his law are subdued, and a principle of supreme love to God and his law, or holy affections, are implanted in the heart
Lydia - " She was led by the Grace of God to receive the gospel with joy; and having been baptized, with her household, constrained Paul and his fellow-laborers to make her house their home while at Philippi, Acts 16:14,40
Jansen, Cornelis - For years he had been occupied with a work, originating in his intercourse with du Verger, on Saint Augustine's doctrine of Grace, which was not published until after hill death. In 1641 the "Augustinus," as it was called, was prohibited by the Holy See, and its five heretical propositions concerning Grace were solemnly condemned in 1653
Jansenius, Cornelis - For years he had been occupied with a work, originating in his intercourse with du Verger, on Saint Augustine's doctrine of Grace, which was not published until after hill death. In 1641 the "Augustinus," as it was called, was prohibited by the Holy See, and its five heretical propositions concerning Grace were solemnly condemned in 1653
Reign - ...
Romans 5:21 (a) This word is used to show how that GOD's Grace is more powerful and more evident than sin. That great incoming tide represents the wonderful Grace of GOD
Consolation - And it is most blessed to the souls of the truly regenerate, in whose hearts the Lord graciously carrieth it on by his inward spiritual refreshments, to watch and observe how the tendencies of his Grace are made towards them. And by this continual process of Grace, he doth what the apostle prayed he might do for the church, as the apostle prayed he might do for the church, as "the God of hope, fill the soul with all joy and peace in believing, that they might abound in hope, through the power of the Holy Ghost
Legalist - He is ignorant of the grand scheme of salvation by free Grace: proud of his own fancied righteousness, he submits not to the righteousness of God; he derogates from the honour of Christ, by mixing his own works with his; and, in fact, denies the necessity of the work of the Spirit, by supposing that he has ability in himself to perform all those duties which God has required. Such is the character of the legalist; a character diametrically opposite to that of the true Christian, whose sentiment corresponds with that of the apostle, who justly observes, "By Grace are ye saved through faith, and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God
Mansard, Nicolas Francois - His best works are Maison Lafitte and the plan for the abbey church of Val-de-Grace which he executed, on a smaller scale, in the chapel of the Chateau de Fresnes
Lincoln, England, Diocese of - In 1536 occurred the "Pilgrimage of Grace," an armed protest against religious changes
New Testament - "The covenant of Grace is called new; it succeeds to the old broken covenant of works
Nicolaitanes - They were seemingly a class of professing Christians, who sought to introduce into the church a false freedom or licentiousness, thus abusing Paul's doctrine of Grace (Compare 2 Peter 2:15,16,19 ), and were probably identical with those who held the doctrine of Baalam (q
Sovereignty of God - This attribute is evidently demonstrated in the systems of creation, providence, and Grace; and may be considered as absolute, universal, and everlasting, Daniel 4:35
Nicolas Mansard - His best works are Maison Lafitte and the plan for the abbey church of Val-de-Grace which he executed, on a smaller scale, in the chapel of the Chateau de Fresnes
Perfecting - 2 Corinthians 7:1 (a) This refers to the growth in Grace and godliness of the child of GOD
Hail Mary - ...
Hail Mary! Full of Grace, the Lord is with you
Harder - ...
Ezekiel 3:9 (a) GOD gave to His servant, the prophet, needed Grace to face his enemies with a calm, quiet, peaceful countenance
Effusion - ) The act of pouring out; as, effusion of water, of blood, of Grace, of words, and the like
Application - Accordingly it is by this application of the merits of Christ that we are to be justified and entitled to Grace and glory
Uncovenanted - ) Not having entered into relationship with God through the appointed means of Grace; also, not promised or assured by the divine promises or conditions; as, uncovenanted mercies
Unction - ) Divine or sanctifying Grace
Ephra - The Lord, he saith, will give them Pheer for Epher; that is, beauty for ashes; meaning the blessed change wrought by Grace in the soul, when from sin they are brought to salvation in the Lord Jesus Christ
Gate - "Salvation will God appoint for walls and bulwarks;" meaning, that all rests upon this bottom, in a way of Grace, mercy, and salvation
Jerubbaal - Alas! what is the best of men, if for a moment acting without the influence of Grace!...
Sins Against the Holy Spirit - They are ...
despair of one's salvation
presumption of God's mercy
impugning the known truths of faith
envy of another's spiritual good
obstinacy in sin
final impenitence
Although no sin is absolutely unpardonable, those who sin against the Holy Ghost stubbornly resist the influence of Grace and do not wish to repent
Dispensation - In the Patriarchal, Mosaic, and Christian dispensations, God has commenced, enlarged, and perfected his revelation of himself and his Grace to this world, Ephesians 1:10 Colossians 1:25
Unction - Divine or sanctifying Grace
Joseph Barsabas - 39) to have drunk deadly poison without hurt, by our Lord's Grace
Law - ...
'Law' may be considered as a principle in contrast to 'grace,' in which sense it occurs in the N. "The doers of [2] law shall be justified," Romans 2:13 ; but if, on the other hand, salvation be "by Grace, then is it no more of works: otherwise Grace is no more Grace. " The believer is "justified freely by his Grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus
Justice, Original - This primitive state before the Fall included the gift of sanctifying Grace, exemption from concupiscence, bodily immortality, habitual infused science, and the non-necessity of suffering
Original Justice - This primitive state before the Fall included the gift of sanctifying Grace, exemption from concupiscence, bodily immortality, habitual infused science, and the non-necessity of suffering
Matilda Von Hackeborn-Wippra, Saint - The "Book of Special Grace," composed by Saint Gertrude and another sister, has had many editions
Mechtilde, Saint - The "Book of Special Grace," composed by Saint Gertrude and another sister, has had many editions
Mariscotti, Hyacintha, Saint - After a frivolous youth and disappointment in love, she entered Saint Bernardine's convent, Viterbo, where for ten years she lived in unbefitting luxury; then, touched by Grace, she repented and gave herself up to a life of charity and intense mortification, nursing the plague-stricken and establishing the Sacconi, or Oblates of Mary, for the relief of the poor and aged
Hyacintha Mariscotti, Saint - After a frivolous youth and disappointment in love, she entered Saint Bernardine's convent, Viterbo, where for ten years she lived in unbefitting luxury; then, touched by Grace, she repented and gave herself up to a life of charity and intense mortification, nursing the plague-stricken and establishing the Sacconi, or Oblates of Mary, for the relief of the poor and aged
Rue - In the middle ages the priests used bunches of rue wherewith to sprinkle holy water, from whence Shakespeare uses the term "herb of Grace" (Rich
Spiritual Warmth: How to Maintain it - Keep in motion and action: stirring up the Grace and gift of God that is in you
Abound - Where sin abounded, Grace did much more abound
Grace, Gratuitous - The Grace of God, actual or habitual is a created supernatural entity, beyond the scope of man's attainment, outside the limits of human exigencies
Gratuitous Grace - The Grace of God, actual or habitual is a created supernatural entity, beyond the scope of man's attainment, outside the limits of human exigencies
Embalm - ...
Virtue alone, with lasting Grace, ...
Embalms the beauties of the face
Sickle - GOD permits sinners to run their course, produce their evil fruit, and then He cuts them off, and the day of Grace is ended
Ahin'o-am - (brother of Grace , i
Surety - Christ is the "surety of a better testament;" that is, in the glorious and complete covenant of Grace he engages to meet all the claims of the divine law against his people, that they may be absolved, and enriched with all covenant blessing, Hebrews 7:22
Reprobate - Abandoned in sin lost to virtue or Grace
Sanctification - In an evangelical sense, the act of God's Grace by which the affections of men are purified or alienated from sin and the world, and exalted to a supreme love to God
Martha - 38-42 , does not imply that she was a stranger to renewing Grace
William Grace - He took an active part in succoring the famine-stricken Irish in 1879, and in 1897 founded at New York the Grace Institute to give free tuition in clerical work, dress-making, and housekeeping to women and girls
Ordain, Ordination - The act of setting apart to the Sacred Ministryand whereby the Grace of Orders is conferred
Salutation - Paul never opened his letters with this greeting; instead, the apostle fused the Greek word for the typical Hebrew blessing, “Peace” (einrene), with the noun form of the Greek blessing, “Grace” (charis), to yield the distinctly Christian salutation: “Grace and Peace” (charis kai eirene). By such a subtle change in the form of Greek letter writing, Paul was able to invoke the range of apostolic blessings found in Jesus: mercy from God (“grace”) and eternal well-being from God's presence (“peace”)
Contentment - In the NT the Grace of contentment is expressly brought before us. The Apostle’s self-sufficiency was of a very different kind (see Philippians 4:13 ), for it rested on that great promise of Christ, ‘My Grace is sufficient ( arkei ) for thee’ ( 2 Corinthians 12:9 ). Christian contentment comes not from a Stoic narrowing of our desires, but from the sense of being filled with the riches of Christ’s Grace
Mary Magdalene - And what is more remarkable, the Holy Ghost is particular to tell the church this, in the same moment he speaks of the mercy; for so the sweet and gracious words run" Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary, Magdalene, out of whom he cast seven devils;"Did the kind compassionate, Lord mean to say by this condescending act of Grace, that there he will be most gracious where Satan hath been most, cruel? Did he thereby mean to intimate to all his disciples, that the poor lamb of his fold shall have, the softest lying down in his bosom, whom the prowling wolf hath most torn and worried with his claws? Oh! that every deeply-exercised follower of the Lord Jesus would frequently think of this; and, as often as this Magdalene riseth to their recollection, would behold the Lord Jesus in this unequalled act of mercy, that "where sin abounded, Grace doth much more abound; that as sin hath reigned unto death, so might Grace reign through righteousness unto eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord?" (Romans 5:21)...
Naaman - " This was not the acceptance of a compromise, but setting Naaman in the path of liberty and peace, the sense of Grace was not to be enfeebled in his soul. Sin has no dominion over those under Grace. The whole story is a beautiful instance of the Grace of God going out to a heathen; the faith of the little maid who, though in captivity, did not forget the prophet of Jehovah, and who sought the welfare of those among whom her lot was cast, is also an interesting feature
Kingdom of Christ - Every thing in Grace here, and glory to all eternity, are his to bestow upon his people. " So that to speak of this kingdom of the Lord Jesus Christ in a comprehensive manner, he hath universal, unceasing, unchanging, and everlasting supremacy, in the kingdom of Grace here, and glory to all eternity. How beautifully doth the apostle speak of the privilege of all the happy subjects of this kingdom, when he saith, "wherefore, we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have Grace whereby we may serve God acceptably, with reverence and godly fear
Benediction - Hence benediction is the act of saying Grace before or after meals. Hence, in the Romish church, benediction was used to denote the sign of the cross, made by a bishop or prelate, from an idea that it conferred some Grace on the people. " The great Christian benediction is, "The Grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God the Father, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with you always
Epistle - Paul dictated his to an amanuensis, authenticating them with his autograph at the close, wherewith be wrote the salutation "grace be with thee," or "the Grace of our Lord Jesus Christ," etc. Peter's closing salutation is "peace be with you"; as Paul's is "grace," etc. John after Paul's death takes up his closing benediction, "the Grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all," at the end of Revelation. ...
In the beginning of most of Paul's epistles "grace and peace" are his opening greeting; in the pastoral epistles concerning ministers "mercy" is added, "grace, mercy, and peace" (1 and 2 Timothy and Titus), for ministers of all men most need mercy (1 Corinthians 7:25; 2 Corinthians 7:1)
Grace: Triumphant Over Trial - Hugh Macmillan may be paralleled in the kingdom of Grace; for in the cold shade of poverty, protected from a thousand temptations by that very scant, and in the centre of sinful society, stimulated to a bolder confession by the surrounding opposition, we have met with the rarest specimens of Grace
Access - This, in Scripture language, means, the drawing nigh to a throne of Grace, and having a nearness, and audience with God in Christ. He is our peace, our cause, both of access and acceptance: for it is "to the praise of the glory of JEHOVAH'S Grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the Beloved
Acceptable Year of the Lord - " The vengeance will be executed for the deliverance of Israel in a coming day; but when our Lord spoke there was the fullest Grace for his hearers: it was the acceptable year of Jehovah. But the Grace vouchsafed by the Lord brought lasting blessings for their souls
Scorn - Surely he scorneth the scorner but he giveth Grace to the lowly. This my long suff'rance and my day of Grace, those who neglect and scorn, shall never taste
Baptism, Holy - The Grace conferred in Holy Baptismis threefold, (1) Regeneration, or the New Birth (See REGENERATION);(2) Admission into the Spiritual Kingdom, or the Holy CatholicChurch, and (3) The forgiveness of all our sins, for in the NiceneCreed we confess, "I acknowledge one Baptism for the Remissions ofsins. These cover "the WholeDuty of Man," and it is by the use of the Means of Grace withdiligent Prayer that he is enabled to keep them and to grow intothe likeness of Christ, whose member he is because incorporatedinto Him by Holy Baptism
Anna - Grace, an aged widow, the daughter of Phanuel
Habitual Sin - This state, considered as destroying the due order of man to God, is habitual sin or guilt (reatus culpae); considered as depriving the soul of the beauty of Grace, it is a stain (macula peccati)
Prophet, the - He was the perfect exponent of God's mind to the Jews (Acts 3:22 ; Acts 7:37 ), and the proclaimer of God's Grace to a guilty world
Arminianism - He opposed Calvin's doctrines of predestination, election, the teaching that Christ died for the elect only, and that Grace benefits only the elect
Shewbread - GOD does not give by measure according to the riches of His Grace
Mount Horeb - ) Here the Lord seemed to stand, as if to intimate that the law was given by Moses, "but Grace and truth came by Jesus Christ
Anna - Anna (ăn'nah), Grace, a prophetess, daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher
Lordship - The state of quality of being a lord hence, a title of honor given to noblemen, except to dukes, who have the title of Grace
Face - To see him "face to face," is to enjoy his presence, Genesis 32:30 Numbers 14:14 Deuteronomy 5:4 , and have a clear manifestation of his nature and Grace, 1 Corinthians 13:12
Sin, Habitual - This state, considered as destroying the due order of man to God, is habitual sin or guilt (reatus culpae); considered as depriving the soul of the beauty of Grace, it is a stain (macula peccati)
Jerusalem - It hath nothing to do with Grace, as some have improperly concluded, as if Jerusalem had outlived her day of Grace, and, therefore, could find no mercy from the Lord; and all sinners, in like manner, might outlive their day also. But what have those expressions to do with the doctrine that some men raise out of it, as if Jesus had limited a day of Grace to individuals, and that men might outlive that day, and then the saving means of Grace would be hidden from their eyes! Surely, there is not a syllable in the whole passage to justify or give countenance to such a doctrine. It is Jerusalem's day, not the Lord's day of Grace. " (Psalms 110:3) And this secures the day of Grace to all whom the Father hath given to the Son; for Jesus saith, "of all thou hast given me I have lost none. " (John 17:12) So that this holds good respecting the gift of Grace to all generations of the church; but in temporals, like Jerusalem, the Lord's judgments may, and the Lord's judgments will follow and overthrow nations, where the gospel is preached and rejected. And while the Lord knoweth them that are his, and will save them by his Grace, the nations who reject Christ, nationally considered, must perish
Mortification - A natural form of mortification is used by anyone who labors long hours to be successful; supernatural mortification aims at progress in virtue and the possession of God and depends on sanctifying Grace
Orange, Council of - Its deliberations were against the errors of the Semi-Pelagians concerning original sin, Grace, and predestination
Grace, Sanctifying - It is habitual Grace regarded under one aspect - the real interior sanctification which enriches the soul and makes it permanently holy in the sight of God
Inner Life of Mary - The supernatural life which Mary led on earth, particularly her advancement in Grace and wisdom, in her intimate union with Jesus, her Divine Son, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity
Conversation - Oh, wretch that I am! Is this to have my speech seasoned with Grace? O Lord, forgive me! Some humbling thoughts for the above in prayer
Godliness: no Burden to True Saints - ' The outward forms of godliness are as burdensome to an unregenerate man as was the crown to the princess; but let him be born again and so made a possessor of the good things of divine Grace, and they will sit easily enough upon his head, as his glory and delight
Hannah - (han' nuh) Personal name meaning, “grace
Petrojoannites - His opinions were, that he alone had the knowledge of the true sense wherein the apostles preached the Gospel; that the reasonable soul is not the form of man; that there is no Grace infused by baptism; and that Jesus Christ was pierced with a lance on the cross before he expired
Favour - ’ For the theology of the word see Grace
Rent - Now that CHRIST had died for sin, and for sins, and for sinners, GOD could come out in Grace and kindness to offer salvation to every living person
Position: no Barrier to Grace - Grace makes itself equally at home in the palace and the cottage
Veracity of God - " He is true in and of himself; he truly and really exists; he is the true and living God: all his perfections are true and real; truth is essential to him; it is pure and perfect in him; it is the first and original in him; he is the fountain of truth: all his works in creation, providence, and Grace, are according to truth
Gregory of Valencia - In 1598, he was sent to Rome to vindicate the teachings of Molina on Grace and free will
Mephibosheth - 2 Samuel 9:6 (c) This interesting person has been taken as a type of all those whose walk is imperfect, their way of life is crooked, but they heard the call of the Lord, came to Him, were forgiven, were brought into His family, and their crooked feet were hidden under the table of His bounty, Grace and mercy
Iconium - Multitudes of Jews and Greeks believed the word of God's Grace, and the apostles wrought many signs and wonders there
Marsh - The story of GOD's Grace is not permitted
Heir - Believers are by Grace made sons through Christ, hence heirs, heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ
Antecedent Grace - Consequently antecedent Grace is the gift of God, preceding, ennobling, and elevating man's mental actions
Grace, Antecedent - Consequently antecedent Grace is the gift of God, preceding, ennobling, and elevating man's mental actions
Vocation - ) The bestowment of God's distinguishing Grace upon a person or nation, by which that person or nation is put in the way of salvation; as, the vocation of the Jews under the old dispensation, and of the Gentiles under the gospel
Freedom - FREE, FREEDOM...
The Scriptures considering our whole nature by the fall under the vassalage of sin and Satan, represent our deliverance from both by Grace under the character of spiritual freedom
Baal-Berith - But what covenant? Was Israel so far gone in idolatry, as not only to set up an idol, but to insult JEHOVAH in his gracious covenant? To what an awful state is our nature reduced by the fall! Into what an awful apostacy may, and will, every man sink, void of Grace! Reader, turn to that sweet covenant promine, Jeremiah 32:40
Legal - ) According to the law of works, as distinguished from free Grace; or resting on works for salvation
Rue - ) A perennial suffrutescent plant (Ruta graveolens), having a strong, heavy odor and a bitter taste; herb of Grace
Spirit - The inclination is similarly expressed; hence we have a spirit of Grace and of supplication, Zechariah 12:10, a spirit of infirmity, Luke 13:11
Salutation - ...
(2) Characteristic opening of the Epistles of the Apostles, wishing those addressed "Grace and the peace of God," and also of the letters of popes and bishops
Valencia, Gregory of - In 1598, he was sent to Rome to vindicate the teachings of Molina on Grace and free will
Sanctifying Grace - It is habitual Grace regarded under one aspect - the real interior sanctification which enriches the soul and makes it permanently holy in the sight of God
Shape - Grace shap'd her limbs, and beauty deck'd her face
Incarnation - That act of Grace whereby Christ took our human nature into union with his Divine Person, became man
Covenant - God’s promises originated in his sovereign Grace alone, and those who received those promises could do nothing but accept his directions. ...
Through one man to the world...
From the time of the earliest recorded covenant (God’s covenant with Noah, and with the human race through him), features of Grace are prominent. The covenant originated in God’s Grace and depended upon God’s Grace for its fulfilment. The rainbow was the sign, or witness, that sealed the covenant (Genesis 6:18; Genesis 9:8-17; see Grace). This plan again was based on a covenant that originated in God’s Grace. ...
Abraham, however, had a responsibility to respond to God’s Grace, and his response would determine whether he would enjoy the covenant benefits. Those who responded to God’s Grace by being circumcised kept the covenant; those who did not were cut off from it. ...
God, in his sovereign Grace, had saved the people of Israel from bondage in Egypt and taken them into a close relationship with himself. Grace was again the basis of God’s covenant dealings (Exodus 2:24; Exodus 3:16; Exodus 4:22; Exodus 6:6-8; Exodus 15:13; Exodus 19:4-6; Exodus 20:2). ...
All this ceremonial procedure emphasized once more that the covenant with Israel, following the covenant with Abraham, was based on divine Grace, not human effort (Galatians 3:17-18). ...
Like the former covenants, the new covenant originates in the sovereign Grace of God (Romans 3:24; Romans 5:15-21; Ephesians 2:8-9; Titus 3:5). But if people are to enjoy that life-giving relationship with God which is the covenant’s central blessing, they must respond to God’s Grace in faith and obedience (Galatians 3:14; Hebrews 5:9; 1 Peter 1:2). Covenant Grace is fully revealed, and the blessings that flow from it are eternal (Hebrews 10:16-18; Hebrews 13:20)
Kindness - But the exceeding wealth of His Grace is shown unto us in kindness toward us in Christ Jesus ( Ephesians 2:7 ). It is God’s mercy and God’s love and God’s Grace flowing through time and through eternity, as broad as the race, as deep as man’s need, as long as man’s immortality
Grain of Wheat - Now, just as according to the law of nature the grain of wheat, under the penalty of remaining alone to rot, be trampled upon, or eaten, must die, that is, sacrifice all that it hides within itself in support of the life that develops within it under the influence of sun and rain, so too must Jesus, according to the law of Grace, suffer and die, that is, sacrifice all that He possesses according to the natural order in order that mankind may be redeemed, souls saved, honor and glory given to God. The same law holds good for all men; to encourage us we have Christ's promise of a great reward and assurance of the Grace He merited for us
Impute, to, - ...
In 2 Corinthians 5:19 the aspect in which Christ came to earth was that of Grace. God was in Christ reconciling the world to Himself, and not imputing to men their offences; but, alas, they refused the Grace, and put Him to death
Ebenezer - And should the Lord give him also a right view of the subject, he will discover that the mercy was not confined to the days of Samuel, but in all ages of the church, the faithful can, and do, find causes daily to set up their Ebenezers, "to the praise of the glory of his Grace, who maketh them accepted in the Beloved. " Even in the moment of writing do I find cause to set up the Ebenezer of the morning, "hitherto hath the Lord helped!" And, reader, what a sweet additional thought is it, in the full assurance of faith, to refresh the soul, that he who hath hitherto helped, and doth help, will help, through Grace, in life, and in glory, to all eternity
Key - I should not think it necessary to notice this, the thing is so familiar, were it not that the Lord Jesus hath condescended to use the figure with reference to his Grace and power. What a sweet thought for all his redeemed to cherish! He it is that opens his church, opens the mouth of his ministers and the souls of his saints, opens the opportunities of ordinances, and gives blessings to ordinances, and the several means of Grace upon earth, and finally; fully, and completely opens an entrance for all his redeemed into his everlasting kingdom in heaven
Throne - , Hebrews 4:16 , "the throne of Grace," i. , from which Grace proceeds; Hebrews 8:1 ; 12:2 ; Revelation 1:4 ; 3:21 (2nd part); 4:2 (twice); 5:1; frequently in Rev
Salutation - ...
The Greek salutation answers to the national characteristic, "joy," and outward Gracefulness (Genesis 43:27 margin; Exodus 18:7 margin). "Grace and peace" is Paul's opening salutation in his epistles to churches, but in his three pastoral epistles, Timothy and Titus, "grace, mercy, and peace"; for ministers of all men most need "mercy" for their ministry (2 Corinthians 4:1; 1 Corinthians 7:25; 1 Timothy 1:16). Paul added to the epistles written by an amanuensis the salutation with his own hand, "grace" to all (1 Corinthians 16:21-23; Colossians 4:18; 2 Thessalonians 3:17-18)
Kindness - In this sense, kindness was distinct from mercy or compassion which was more of an emotion and from Grace which was not as closely associated with covenant keeping. In time, however, the concepts of kindness, mercy, and Grace intermingled. In this situation God's kindness always has an aspect of freedom (Exodus 33:19 ) and mingles with mercy and Grace. The kindness God has shown us through Christ is equivalent to his Grace and embodies the fullness of salvation (Ephesians 2:7 )
Chronicles, Books of the - John goes back to the 'beginning,' when the Eternal Word was with God: the Chronicles go back to the beginning of man's history: "Adam, Sheth, Enosh," in order to develop that history in the chosen line of promise and Grace. It is evident from 1 Chronicles 6:15 and 2 Chronicles 36:22,23 that they date after the captivity of Judah, the writer compiling the records of the chosen line according to Grace Grace which restored them from their captivity. Therefore more is said of David, and of his preparations and pattern for the Temple, and the history of David's line is traced, with which the mercies of God for Israel were connected in the aspect of Grace and of the blessing and ways of God with that people
Onesimus - The Lord, who by his providence brought Onesimus to Paul, made this interview prosperous by his Grace; and those visits ended, by the Lord's blessing, in the epistle Paul sent by him to his master Philemon relates those interesting circumstances. How truly blessed doth the epistle open, after subscribing himself as the prisoner of the Lord, in praying that Grace and peace to Philemon might flow from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ! And how blessedly doth the apostle close his letter, in a similar prayer, that the Grace of the Lord Jesus Christ might be with his spirit! Amen. I beg yet more to remark the abundant Grace of God the Holy Ghost, in causing such a blessed fragment of his sacred word to have been recorded and handed down in his church. Was it thought an object of everlasting moment thus to preserve in the book of God the history of a poor fugitive, and to let the church know that, in the instance of this slave, the Lord's Grace outruns even all our undeservings? Was it indeed meant to shew in this, as well as in a thousand and ten thousand other instances, that "where sin aboundeth Grace doth much more abound?"...
What a precious example is held forth in this epistle to ministers of the word of God, to parents, masters of families, and all that are interested in the care and government of incautious youth, to feel what Paul felt, and to take an earnest concern in the recovery of transgression of every description and character! Did Paul count this runaway servant a brother, yea, his son, and speak of him as his own bowels, with what affection ought the ties of the minister and his people, the parent and his children, the master and his servant, to be felt and acknowledged in all the circumstances of life! How tenderly the same great apostle elsewhere recommends those gracious principles as the common actions of the christian! "Put on therefore (saith the apostle) as the elect of God, holy and beloved, bowels of mercies, kindness, humbleness of mind, meekness, long-suffering, forbearing one another, and forgiving one another; if any man have a quarrel against any, even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye
Despair - (Latin: desperare; to lose hope) ...
Psychologically, the passion contrary to hope; morally, the abandonment of all hope of salvation or of the means required for it; not merely an anxiety about one's future state, or fear that one may be lost, but a deliberate yielding to the conviction that human nature cannot cooperate with God's Grace, that one's sins are unpardonable, or that Almighty God has cast one away
Dispensation - ) These were so many stages in God's unfolding of his purpose of Grace toward men
Hypocrites: Season For - After this fashion revivals, of necessity, develop hypocrites, yet who would deplore the shower because of the snails, and who would rail at 'times of refreshing' because mere pretenders are excited to make a base profession of a Grace to which they are strangers? ...
...
Corruptions: Overcome by Grace - I mused awhile, and thought that the readiest way to keep down my eversprouting corruptions in future would be to sow them well with the salt of Grace
Glory - The glory of God is the manifestation of the divine perfections in creation, providence, and Grace
Tithe - ...
In the NT there is no command to tithe a tenth (since we are not under law but Grace)
Self-Examination: Its Right Offices - Yet a barometer has its uses, and so have evidences of Grace
Omorrah - ...
Deuteronomy 32:32 (a) The Lord applies this terrible name to the nation of Israel when they turned away from His love and Grace to worship idols, and to live in sin
Habit - It is a very great aid in the performance of virtuous actions and a fatal influence in evil-doing, though there is no evil habit that, with divine Grace, cannot be resisted and corrected
Cummin - Certainly there are many such truths to be found in all good teaching and preaching, but these are not to replace the Gospel of GOD's Grace
Thessalonia - ) It was to the church of the Thessalonians he sent those two blessed Epistles, which through Grace are in all the churches
Mammon - Every corruption of our nature may be called the mammon of unrighteousness, and as such is set forth by it as hostile to a state of Grace
Experiment - 467: ‘We have known, indeed, some holy souls, which out of the generall precepts of piety, and their own happy experiments of God’s mercy, have, through the Grace of God, grown to a great measure of perfection this way; which yet might have been much expedited and compleated, by those helps which the greater illumination and experience of others might have afforded them
Heavily - Why looks your Grace so heavily to day? ...
4
Faith - It is the means by which the Grace of God is accounted to the believer who trusts in the work of Jesus on the cross (Ephesians 2:8)
Tail - ...
Isaiah 7:4 (a) Here is another description of GOD's contempt for the two nations who by GOD's Grace were unable to hurt Israel because He was protecting them
Trophy - ) Any evidence or memorial of victory or conquest; as, every redeemed soul is a trophy of Grace
Earnest - The apostle, speaking of the wonderful gifts of God's Grace, saith, "Now he that hath wrought us for the self same thing is God, who hath also given unto us the earnest of the Spirit
Adoption - In the figurative use of the term by the sacred writers it implies that relation which we sustain to God, when, by his Grace, we are converted from sin to holiness
jo-an'na - (grace or gift of God ) (in Revised Version spelled JOANAN )
Keys, Power of - A phrase used in reference to the disciplineof the Church which our Lord has intrusted to the Bishops andPastors of the Flock as "ministers and stewards of His Grace
Incarnation - By it we understand the true nature of God, the atonement, forgiveness, Grace, etc. Since we are saved by Grace through faith (Ephesians 2:8-9) it is essential that our object of faith be accurate
Election of Grace - ...
It is not conditioned on faith or repentance, but is of soverign Grace (Romans 11:4-6 ; Ephesians 1:3-6 ). Faith and repentance and all other Graces are the exercises of a regenerated soul; and regeneration is God's work, a "new creature. The ultimate end of election is the praise of God's Grace (Ephesians 1:6,12 )
Jesting - 13), ‘he who is in the mean is a man of Graceful wit, and the disposition Graceful wit (εὐτραπελία); the excess ribaldry, and the person ribald; he who is in defect a clown, and the habit clownishness. This was a characteristic of the Athenians, whom Pericles praised as ‘qualified to act in the most varied ways and with the most Graceful versatility’ (εὐτραπέλως People - " (Deuteronomy 7:6) And it is wonderful to observe how distinguishing the Grace of God is manifested towards them. They are given of the Father to the Son, and set apart in the counsel and purpose of God from all eternity; they are the object of Jesus's love before all worlds; and they are brought; under the anointings of God the Holy Ghost, with pepeculiar marks of his love during the whole of their eventful pilgrimage-state, from the first dawnings of Grace unto the fulness of glory
Throne - ...
Hebrews 4:16 (a) Grace does rule and reign in the heart of GOD, and the lives of His people. There is power in that Grace, power to forgive and forget, power to overcome temptation and to be conquerors in the Name of the Lord
Lord's Supper - In it Christians may expect and should seek to receive of the fullness of Christ, Grace for Grace, 2 Corinthians 1:21,22 Ephesians 4:15,15 ; while those who partake heedlessly incur great guilt, and may look for chastisement, 1 Corinthians 11:20-34
Peter - As a faithful servant of Jesus how very eminent Peter stands forth to observation; for who among the apostles so zealous, so attached to his Lord, as Peter? And that such an one should fall from his integrity, even to the denial of his Lord, what caution doth it teach to the highest servants of Jesus! But when we have paid all due attention to those striking particularities in the life of Peter, the most blessed and most important instruction the life of this apostle exhibits, is in the display of that sovereign Grace of Jesus manifested in Peter's recovery. Oh, how blessedly hath the Holy Ghost taught, in this man's instance, the vast superiority of God's Grace over man's undeservings! However great our unworthiness, the Lord's mercies are greater. "Where sin aboundeth, Grace doth much more abound; that as sin hath reigned unto death, so might Grace reign through righteousness unto eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord
Baal - The Lord sets himself therefore to bring them back, and in opening to them the prospects of salvation, shews how he will bring them under afflictions, in wilderness dispensations, and then having hedged their way up with thorns, compels them, by his Grace, to return to him their first lover. The reader will have a full apprehension of the Grace and loving kindness of the Lord in this ordination, when he is told, that as the word Baal, Lord; or Baali, my lord, was a general name to imply lordship, or sovereignty: the Lord JEHOVAH had been considered as Israel's Baal, to distinguish him from the nations' Baal around. Was there ever an instance of such rich Grace and condescension and love?...
I beg the reader to pause over it, and ponder it well. ) Surely, nothing can be wanting to give the most finishing testimony to the Grace that is in Christ Jesus
Gracious, To Be; Show Favor - ...
Chên (חֵן, Strong's #2580), “favor; Grace. 6:8: “But Noah found Grace in the eyes of the Lord. A person’s speech may be characterized by “graciousness”: “He that loveth pureness of heart, for the Grace of his lips the king shall be his friend” ( Jansenists - A sect of the Roman Catholics in France who followed the opinions of Jansenius (bishop of Ypres, and doctor of divinity of the universities of Louvain and Douay, ) in relation to Grace and predestination. In the year 1640, the two universities just mentioned, and particularly father Molina and father Leonard Celsus, thought fit to condemn the opinions of the Jesuits on Grace and free will. Augustine, and wrote a treatise on Grace which he entitled Augustinus. the affair of Jansenism began to be more warmly controverted, and gave birth to a great number of polemical writings concerning Grace; and what occasioned some mirth, were the titles which each party gave to their writings: one writer published the Torch of St. In the state of corrupted nature, we are incapable of resisting inward Grace. The Semi-pelagians admitted the necessity of an inward preventing Grace for the performance of each particular act, even for the beginning of faith; but they were heretics in maintaining that this Grace was of such a nature that the will of man was able either to resist or obey it. In the year 1652, the pope appointed a congregation for examining into the dispute relative to Grace
Backsliding - In instances of apostasy when one spurns the Grace of God by renouncing the blessings of the covenant, there is no possibility of repentance for sin, only a divine sealing unto the day of judgment (Hebrews 6:4-6 ; 10:26-31 ). , one who is regenerated by God and justified by Grace through faith) fall again under the dominion of sin? Reformed theologians have maintained that the sinner redeemed by Grace has been delivered once-for-all from bondage to sin. For such (elect) individuals, consequently, backsliding does not entail a fall from Grace, whereby one is placed once more under sin's dominion. The Grace of perseverance is one of the benefits of Christ's atoning sacrifice for our sins. The cure for backsliding is found in the abiding love and mercy of God who remains faithful to his promise of Grace in Christ Jesus, whose righteousness and salvation is apprehended through true faith and repentance. Hoekema, Saved by Grace ; J
Adoption - This forms a most interesting word in Scripture, in the use that is made of it, in allusion to the state of adoption and Grace, into which true believers are received by their union with Christ. (Isaiah 44:3; Isa 59:21; Ezekiel 37:5-14; Zechariah 14:1-21) It is most blessed, when we consider the privileges of adoption, and know in ourselves that we are made, though Grace, the happy partakers of it. Hence they are regenerated, illuminated; justified, sanctified, and made partakers of Grace here, to be made partakers of glory hereafter
Conscience - His sin was in his culpable neglect to enlighten his conscience by all the means in his power, and to purify it by divine Grace. A terrible array of conscientious errors and persecutions, which have infested and afflicted the church in all ages, warns us of our individual need of perfect light and sanctifying Grace. A "weak," or irresolute and blind conscience, 1 Corinthians 8:7 ; a "defiled" conscience, the slave of a corrupt heart, Titus 1:15 Hebrews 10:22 ; and a "seared" conscience, 1 Timothy 4:2 , hardened against the law and the gospel alike, unless changed by Grace, will at length become an avenging conscience, the instrument of a fearful and eternal remorse
Hagar - From thence we learn, that the whole of those transactions respecting Sarah and Hagar was an allegory, or figure, of the covenants; the one of bondage in nature, the other of freedom by Grace. But taught by divine instruction, from this beautiful allegory we learn the vast importance of being found belonging to a covenant of Grace, and not with the bond-woman under the law of works. As the subject is so very highly interesting, I venture to persuade myself, that it will not be tedious to the reader, neither, under Grace, will it be unprofitable to consider it yet a little more particularly. " The everlasting hatred of nature to Grace was then strikingly set forth, by the mocking of the bond-woman's son. A faith, like Ishmael's, of nature, but not, like Isaac's, of Grace. But what a blessed thing it is, when by a true saving Grace we are led to know our birthright, and as sweetly to enjoy it
Herald - 2 Timothy 1:9-11 outlines Paul's gospel as the good news that God has given Grace by sending Christ who abolished death and brought life
Justina, Saint - Justina was a Christian whose virginity was threatened by the magician Cyprian, but the Grace of God was so strong in her that she was able to resist his spells by making the sign of the cross
Oil, Olive - It represents the copious outpouring of sacramental Grace which gives strength to the soul as oil does to the body
Olive Oil - It represents the copious outpouring of sacramental Grace which gives strength to the soul as oil does to the body
Molina, Luis de - Molina's chief work is the "Concordia," concerned with the problem of reconciling Grace and free will
Character - The sacramental character marks the soul as distinct from those who have it not; as obliged to perform certain duties; as conformed to the image of God; as disposed for God's Grace
Enhakkore - " Samson cried to Jehovah ("God of Grace"), and Elohim ("God of nature") split the hollow place at Lehi, so that water came out of it, as at Horeb and Kadesh (Exodus 17:6; Numbers 20:8; Numbers 20:11), and the fountain was called "the fount of him who cried in Lehi
Doctrines: Ultra-Calvinistic - Grace is preached but duty denied
Gospel: Duty of Spreading it - Shall we who have found honey in the rock Christ Jesus, be less considerate of o; fellow men than wasps are of their fellow insects? Ought we not rather like the Samaritan woman to hasten to tell t good news? Common humanity should prevent one of them from concealing the great discovery which Grace has enable us to make
Forgiveness of Sin - The sinner is by this act of Grace for ever freed from the guilt and penalty of his sins
Luis de Molina - Molina's chief work is the "Concordia," concerned with the problem of reconciling Grace and free will
Passive Prayer - It is a mere inflexibility of the soul, to which the feeblest impulse of Grace gives motion
Supper - It is typical of the fulness of Grace set forth in our Lord Jesus Christ, to enjoy which Israel were first invited, and afterwards the poor and outcast were compelled to come and taste in God's house
Muzzle - The first is that we are to know that the servant of GOD, which is represented by the ox, should be free to tell the story of GOD's Grace in his own way, and not be hindered by any rules or regulations of men
Pihahiroth - The memorable spot where the Lord displayed his Grace to Israel
Corn - The manna is rather heavenly Grace for wilderness circumstances
Growth - Advancement progress improvement as growth in Grace or piety
Winnowing - It is now a day of Grace, a sowing time, but the harvest will come, and the winnowing will surely follow
Maschil - Christians are exhorted to be "teaching and admonishing one another in psalms, and hymns, and spiritual songs, singing with Grace in your hearts to the Lord
Absolution - In this view it is innocent; and although any private Christian has a right to declare and pronounce the same doctrine to his neighbour, the official publication of the Grace of the Gospel is the public duty of its ministers in the congregation, since they are Christ's "Ambassadors
Mulberry Tree - For when the Lord calls to trial, he gives to his people a Grace suited to support
Leviticus - 1-7, the laws of offerings; 8-10, the consecration of Aaron and his family; 11-15, the laws concerning that which is clean and that which is unclean; 16, the atonement as the sum-total of all means of Grace; 17-20, the separation of Israel from heathendom in food, marriage, etc
Hitherto - * Notes: (1) The phrase Heos arti, "until now," is rendered "hitherto" in John 16:24 , AV, and RV; in John 5:17 , RV, "even until now," which more definitely express the meaning that the AV, "hitherto;" the rest of the Father and the Son having been broken by man's sin, they were engaged in the accomplishment of their counsels of Grace with a view to redemption
Mercy: Continual - ' 'I give you Grace upon Grace, but there's more to follow
Breeches - We are not to confess that we are saved by Grace but kept by works. There are those religions which teach that we are saved by Grace, but we are kept saved by works
Achor - (Hosea 2:15) In this sweet chapter, the Lord is following up his rich promises of Grace, in return for Israel's repeated ingratitude and rebellion. But Grace shall triumph
Greeting - ...
Paul transformed the customary greeting charein into an opportunity for sharing the faith, substituting “grace [1] to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ” (Romans 1:7 ; 1 Corinthians 1:3 ; 2 Corinthians 1:2 ; Galatians 1:3 ; Ephesians 1:2 ; Philippians 1:2 ; Titus 1:4 ). In Paul's opening greeting these terms always occur in this order, witnessing to the truth that peace cannot be experienced apart from the prior experience of God's Grace. The simplest is “Grace be with you” (Colossians 4:18 ; 1 Timothy 6:21 ; Titus 3:15 ; Hebrews 13:25 ). Some of the most familiar benedictions used in Christian worship come from such closing greetings: “The Grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the communion of the Holy Ghost” (2 Corinthians 13:14 ); “Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great shepherd of the sheep make you perfect in every good work to do his will
Humility - It is the effect of divine Grace operating on the soul, and always characterises the true Christian. To consider this Grace a little more particularly, it may be observed, ...
1. In ascribing all we have and are to the Grace of God. It indicates that more Grace shall be given, James 4:6
Oil - The supply of Grace comes not from a dead reservoir of oil, but through living "olive trees. " Ordinances and ministers are channels, not the Grace itself; Zechariah 4:14, "anointed ones," Hebrew sons of oil; Isaiah 5:1, "very fruitful hill," Hebrew "horn of the son of oil. " The Lord Jesus has the fullness of Grace from the double olive tree of the Holy Spirit, so as to be at once our priest and king; He is the tree, ministers the branches, "emptying the golden oil out of themselves" for the supply of the church and to the glory of the Author of Grace
Covenant - For so the apostle was commissioned by the Holy Ghost, to inform the church concerning that eternal life which was given us, he saith, in Christ Jesus, "before the world began?" (Titus 1:2; 2 Timothy 1:9) So that this everlasting covenant becomes the bottom and foundation in JEHOVAH'S appointment, and security of all Grace and mercy for the church here, and of all glory and happiness hereafter, through the alone person, work, blood-shedding, and obedience of the Lord Jesus Christ. (Ephesians 1:4) And from this appointment, before all worlds, result all the after mercies in time, by which the happy partakers of such unspeakable Grace and mercy are regenerated, called, adopted, made willing in the day of God's power, and are justified, sanctified, and, at length, fully glorified, to the praise of JEHOVAH'S Grace, who hath made them accepted in the Beloved. But the whole purport, plan, design and Grace, originating as it did in the purposes of JEHOVAH from all eternity, had all the properties in it of an everlasting covenant; and Christ always, and from all eternity, "was considered the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world
Holy Ghost - (2 Corinthians 13:14) And it is most blessed to every child of God, when brought into the fellowship and communion of the Holy Ghost, to discover how that almighty Comforter opens a communication between Christ and the soul, and keeps it open by the exercises of his Grace; so that, while the person of the Father, or the Son, is coming forth to bless the soul, he draws forth and leads out the actings of the soul's faith and love upon the glorious persons of the GODHEAD, and gives "a joy unspeakable and full of glory. ...
And, indeed, the beautiful order in the covenant of Grace, and the economy of redemption, makes it necessary so to be. For, as the whole Three persons of the GODHEAD all concurred in the vast design, and all guaranteed to each other concerning the several offices in the departments of Grace, so it became essential, that in the carrying on and completing the work, each almighty person should be engaged in it in his own specific office and character. And thus the church is taught to give equal and undivided praise and glory to the united source of all her mercies, in the Father's love, the Son's Grace, and the Spirit's fellowship. From the first awakenings of Grace in the heart, until Grace is consummated in glory, believers are taught to look to that Holy and eternal Spirit, for his leadings and influences in and through all. But having already swollen this article beyond the usual limits, I must close these observations with only praying that holy and eternal Teacher in the church of the Lord Jesus, to grant some sweet and precious token of his Grace and power, by setting his seal in the heart both of the writer and reader, that the truth of his ministry may be known, and felt, and adored, to his glory, and to our comfort and joy
Contentment - Believers are content to know the Father (John 14:8-9 ) and depend on His Grace (2 Corinthians 12:9-10 ; compare 2 Corinthians 9:8-11 )
Devotions, Popular - Various prayers and pious practises, whether in common at Church or in private, in honor of: the Blessed Trinity; Our Divine Lord, His Holy Infancy, His Holy Name, His Five Wounds, His Passion, His Sacred Heart, His Presence in the Holy Eucharist; the Holy Ghost; the Angels Guardian, Saint Michael; the Blessed Virgin, under her various titles as Help of Christians, Mediatrix of Divine Grace, Queen of the Holy Rosary; and of certain saints, Joseph, Anne, Monica, Benedict, Francis of Assisi, Anthony of Padua, Dominic, Francis Xavier, Aloysius, Rita, Teresa of Jesus, each treated in the article under these several titles; for the souls in Purgatory and for a Happy Death (Bona Mars)
Living Creatures - They are supposed to represent mercy, as distinguished from justice, mercy in its various instrumentalities, and especially as connected with the throne of God, the "throne of Grace
Death: Desired by Few - Burckhardt states, that although the Arabs are strict predestinarians, yet when the plague visited Medina, many of the townsmen fled to the desert, alleging as an excuse that although the distemper was a messenger from heaven sent to call them to a better world, yet being conscious of their own unworthiness, and that they did not merit this special mark of Grace, they thought it more advisable to decline it for the present, and make their escape from the town
Self-Knowledge - To obtain it, there should be watchfulness, frequent and close attention to the operations of our own minds, regard had to the opinions of others, conversation, reading the Scriptures, and dependence on divine Grace
Ordinances of the Gospel - ...
See these different articles; also MEANS OF Grace
Puffery: Spiritual - God's real works of Grace are too sublime to need the arts of puffery to publish them
Allant - ) To handle with Grace or in a modish manner; as, to gallant a fan
Holiness - Subjective holiness in rational creatures consists essentially in sanctifying Grace (separation from sin, possession of virtue)
Disgrace - DISGRACE, n. dis and Grace. A state of being out of favor disfavor disesteem as, the minister retired from court in disgrace. Cause of shame as, to turn the back to the enemy is a foul disgrace every vice is a disgrace to a rational being. DISGRACE, ...
1. To put out of favor as, the minister was disgraced. To bring to shame to dishonor to sink in estimation as a cause as, men often boast of actions which disgrace them
Pretty - ) Pleasing by delicacy or Grace; attracting, but not striking or impressing; of a pleasing and attractive form a color; having slight or diminutive beauty; neat or elegant without elevation or grandeur; pleasingly, but not grandly, conceived or expressed; as, a pretty face; a pretty flower; a pretty poem
Dew - ...
Hosea 14:5 (a) Here GOD compares Himself and His ministration of Grace to the "dew of the morning
Congratulate - See Grace
Health - Salvation or divine favor, or Grace which cheers God's people
Covenant Theology - made between God and Adam, and the Covenant of Grace between the Father and the Son where the Father promised to give the Son the elect and the Son must redeem them
Charity - considered as a Christian Grace, ought in our translation, in order to avoid mistake, to have been translated love
Diseases - On the ground of obedience they failed to attain freedom from diseases, but their Messiah healed them all in Grace
Satisfaction - All supernaturally good works performed by one in the state of Grace possess satisfactory value
Righteousness - It is the wonder of Grace that as the righteous guardian of the law, he can acquit the unrighteous
Sentences, Book of the - The first book treats of God and the Trinity, Providence, predestination, and evil; the second, or creation, the angels, the fall, Grace, and sin; the third, of the Incarnation, Redemption, the virtues, and commandments; the fourth, of the Sacraments and the four last things
Resist - God resisteth the proud, but giveth Grace to the humble
Visible - Virtue made visible in outward Grace
Neck - The freedom from all other bondage, which is conferred and naturalized by the Grace of Christ, is conditioned by the yoke of service to Him (Matthew 11:29-30)
Providence - Hence when we speak of the Lord's government, either in the kingdoms of nature or Grace, we say, the Lord by his providence hath ordered all things in heaven and in earth. Both providence and Grace are creatures of God; and however the Lord is carrying on his merciful purposes of redemption by both to his church and people, yet to give glory to either, instead of glorifying the Author of either, is to overlook the loveliness of the Lord in the loveliness of his creatures, and to place secondary things in the stead of the first. Whereas we ought to say, to use somewhat like the form of the apostle James, "If the Lord will, we shall live by his providence and Grace
Abundance, Abundant, Abundantly, Abound - ...
A — 2: περισσεία (Strong's #4050 — Noun Feminine — perisseia — per-is-si'-ah ) "an exceeding measure, something above the ordinary," is used four times; Romans 5:17 , "of abundance of Grace;" 2 Corinthians 8:2 , "of abundance of joy;" 2 Corinthians 10:15 , of the extension of the Apostle's sphere of service through the practical fellowship of the saints at Corinth; in James 1:21 it is rendered, metaphorically, "overflowing," AV "superfluity," with reference to wickedness. In this sense it is used also of consolation, 2 Corinthians 1:5 ; of the effect of a gift sent to meet the need of saints, 2 Corinthians 9:12 ; of rejoicing, Philippians 1:26 ; of what comes or falls to the lot of a person in large measure, as of the Grace of God and the gift by the Grace of Christ, Romans 5:15 ; of the sufferings of Christ, 2 Corinthians 1:5 . ...
(c) "to be abundantly furnished, to abound in a thing," as of material benefits, Luke 12:15 ; Philippians 4:18 of spirtual gifts; 1 Corinthians 14:12 , or "to be pre-eminent, to excel, to be morally better off," as regards partaking of certain meats; 1 Corinthians 8:8 , "are we the better;" "to abound" in hope, Romans 15:13 ; the work of the Lord, 1 Corinthians 15:58 ; faith and Grace, 2 Corinthians 8:7 ; thanksgiving, Colossians 2:7 ; walking so as to please God, Philippians 1:9 ; 1 Thessalonians 4:1,10 ; of righteousness, Matthew 5:20 ; of the Gospel, as the ministration of righteousness, 2 Corinthians 3:9 , "exceed. , to provide a person richly so that he has "abundance," as of spiritual truth, Matthew 13:12 ; the right use of what God has entrusted to us, 25:29; the power of God in conferring Grace, 2 Corinthians 9:8 ; Ephesians 1:8 ; to "make abundant" or to cause to excel, as of the effect of Grace in regard to thanksgiving, 2 Corinthians 4:15 ; His power to make us "to abound" in love, 1 Thessalonians 3:12 . 1, signifies "to abound exceedingly," Romans 5:20 , of the operation of Grace; 2 Corinthians 7:4 , in the Middle Voice, of the Apostle's joy in the saints. ...
B — 3: πλεονάζω (Strong's #4121 — Verb — pleonazo — pleh-on-ad'-zo ) from pleion, or pleon, "more" (greater in quantity), akin to pleo, "to fill," signifies, (a) intransitively, "to superabound," of a trespass or sin, Romans 5:20 ; of Grace, Romans 6:1 ; 2 Corinthians 4:15 ; of spiritual fruit, Philippians 4:17 ; of love, 2 Thessalonians 1:3 ; of various fruits, 2 Peter 1:8 ; of the gathering of the manna, 2 Corinthians 8:15 , "had . 3, signifying "to abound exceedingly," is used in 1 Timothy 1:14 , of the Grace of God
Thought - To bring the mind into a habit of thinking as we ought to think, there should by a constant dependence on and imploring of divine Grace; an increasing acquaintance with the sacred Scriptures; and improvement of every opportunity of serious conversation; a constant observance of the works of God in creation, providence, and Grace; and, lastly, a deep sense of the realities of an eternal world as revealed in the word of God
Examination of Conscience -
A petition for Grace to know and detest one's sins.
A resolution to amend, a petition for God's assisting Grace, and finally an Our Father
Examination of Self -
A petition for Grace to know and detest one's sins.
A resolution to amend, a petition for God's assisting Grace, and finally an Our Father
Sacrament - Hill, are conceived in the church of Rome to consist of matter, deriving, from the action of the priest in pronouncing certain words, a divine virtue, by which Grace is conveyed to the soul of every person who receives them. This act was called, in the language of the schools, opus operatum, the work done independently of any disposition of mind attending the deed; and the superiority of the sacraments of the New Testament over the sacraments of the Old was thus expressed, that the sacraments of the Old Testament were effectual ex opere operantis, from the piety and faith of the persons to whom they were administered; while the sacraments of the New Testament convey Grace, ex opere operato, from their own intrinsic virtue, and an immediate physical influence upon the mind of him who receives them. It gives men the hope of receiving, by the use of a charm, the full participation of the Grace of God, although they continue to indulge that very large class of sins, to which the accommodating morality of the church of Rome extends the name of venial; and yet it makes this high privilege entirely dependent upon the intention of another, who, although he performs all the outward acts which belong to the sacrament, may, if he chooses, withhold the communication of that physical virtue, without which the sacrament is of none avail. This doctrine, like all other parts of the Socinian system, represents religion in the simple view of being a lesson of righteousness, and loses sight of that character of the Gospel, which is meant to be implied in calling it a covenant of Grace. The greater part of Protestants, therefore, following an expression of the Apostle, Romans 4:11 , when he is speaking of circumcision, consider the sacraments as not only signs, but also seals, of the covenant of Grace. For, while they hold that the sacraments yield no benefit to those upon whom the signs employed in them do not produce the proper moral effect, they regard these signs as intended to represent an inward invisible Grace, which proceeds from him by whom they are appointed, and as pledges that that Grace will be conveyed to all in whom the moral effect is produced. Hence, that any rite may come up to our idea of a sacrament, we require in it, not merely a vague and general resemblance between the external matter which is the visible substance of the rite, and the thing thereby signified, but also words of institution, and a promise by which the two are connected together: and hence we reject five of the seven sacraments that are numbered in the church of Rome, because in some of the five we do not find any matter without which there is not that sign which enters into our definition of a sacrament; and in others we do not find any promise connecting the matter used with the Grace said to be thereby signified, although upon this connection the essence of a sacrament depends
Will - "In his primitive condition as he came out of the hands of his Creator, man was endowed with such a portion of knowledge, holiness, and power, as enabled him to understand, esteem, consider, will, and to perform the true good, according to the commandment delivered to him: yet none of these acts could he do, except through the assistance of divine Grace. When he is made a partaker of this regeneration, or renovation, since he is delivered from sin, he is capable of thinking, willing, and doing that which is good, but yet not without the continued aids of divine Grace. " Such were the sentiments of the often misrepresented Arminius on this subject; to which is only to be added, to complete the Scriptural view, that a degree of Grace to consider his ways, and to return to God, is through the merit of Christ vouchsafed to every man. Even we, whose minds are enlightened by the pure precepts of the Gospel, and urged by the motives which it suggests, must still be convinced of our weakness and depravity, and confess, in the words of the tenth article, that "we have no power to do good works pleasant and acceptable to God, without the Grace of God preventing us, that we may have a good will, and working with us when we have that good will. " The necessity of divine Grace to strengthen and regulate our wills, and to cooperate with our endeavours after righteousness, is clearly asserted in the New Testament: "They that are in the flesh cannot please God," Romans 8:8 . These texts sufficiently prove that we stand in need both of a prevenient and of a cooperating Grace. " And Cyprian says, "We pray day and night that the sanctification and enlivening, which springs from the Grace of God, may be preserved by his protection. Nicholls, after quoting many authorities to show that the doctrine of divine Grace always prevailed in the catholic church, adds, "I have spent, perhaps, more time in these testimonies than was absolutely necessary; but whatever I have done is to show that the doctrine of divine Grace is so essential a doctrine of Christianity, that not only the Holy Scriptures and the primitive fathers assert it, but likewise that the Christians could not in any age maintain their religion without it,—it being necessary, not only for the discharge of Christian duties, but for the performance of our ordinary devotions. " And this seems to have been the opinion of the compilers of our excellent liturgy, in many parts of which both a prevenient and a cooperating Grace is unequivocally acknowledged; particularly in the second collect for the evening service; in the fourth collect at the end of the communion service; in the collect for Easter day; in the collect for the fifth Sunday after Easter; in the collects for the third, ninth, seventeenth, nineteenth, and twenty-fifth Sundays after Trinity. This assistance of divine Grace is not inconsistent with the free agency of men: it does not place them under an irresistible restraint, or compel them to act contrary to their will. It is, however, impossible to ascertain the precise boundary between our natural efforts and the divine assistance, whether that assistance be considered as a cooperating or a prevenient Grace. We may rest assured that he will, by the communication of his Grace, varied often as to power and distinctness, help our infirmities, invigorate our resolutions, and supply our defects. The joint agency of God and man, in the work of human salvation, is pointed out in the following passage: "Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling; for it is God that worketh in you both to will and to do of his good pleasure," Php_2:12-13 ; and therefore we may assure ourselves that free will and Grace are not incompatible, though the mode and degree of their cooperation be utterly inexplicable, and though at different times one may appear for a season to overwhelm the other. This doctrine has, however, been the subject of much dispute among Christians: some sects contend for the irresistible impulses of Grace, and others reject the idea of any influence of the divine Spirit upon the human mind. The former opinion seems irreconcilable with the free agency of man, if held as the constant unvarying mode in which he carries on his work in the soul of man, and the latter contradicts the authority of Scripture; "and therefore," says Veneer, "let us neither ascribe nothing to free will, nor too much; let us not, with the defenders of irresistible Grace, deny free will, or make it of no effect, not only before, but even under, Grace; nor let us suffer the efficacy of saving Grace, on the other hand, to be swallowed up in the strength and freedom of our wills; but, allowing the government or superiority to the Grace of God, let the will of man be admitted to be its handmaid, but such a one as is free, and freely obeys; by which, when it is freely exerted by the admonitions of prevenient Grace, when it is prepared as to its affections, strengthened and assisted as to its powers and faculties, a man freely and willingly cooperates with God, that the Grace of God be not received in vain. " "All men are also to be admonished," observes Cranmer, in his "Necessary Doctrine," "and chiefly preachers, that in this high matter they, looking on both sides, so temper and moderate themselves, that they neither so preach the Grace of God that they take away thereby free will, nor on the other side so extol free will, that injury be done to the Grace of God. " And Jortin remarks: "Thus do the doctrine of divine Grace and the doctrine of free will or human liberty unite and conspire, in a friendly manner, to our everlasting good
Promise - To write about promise in all its relations would involve the discussion of prophecy, the preparation for the coming of Christ, the manifestation of the Grace of God, etc. ...
(2) They are employed with special reference to the promises of God, out of which arose the economy of Grace as it is set forth in all the variety of its blessing in the NT. Particular emphasis is laid on the fact that the promise is of Grace, and not of works of the law; ‘for this cause it is of faith, that it might be according to Grace; to the end that the promise may be sure to all the seed; not to that only which is of the law, but to that also which is of the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all’ (Romans 4:16). The term ‘promise’ is itself a witness to the spontaneity of the Grace of God
Graciousness - expression, and renders ‘wondered at the words of Grace. Of the youthful John we read in Luke 2:40 ‘the Grace of God was upon him,’ and of the child Jesus (Luke 2:52) that He ‘advanced in favour ((Revised Version margin) ‘grace’) with God and men. The only other passage in the Gospels where the word occurs is in the prologue to the Fourth Gospel, where it is found three times (John 1:14; John 1:16-17), and is rendered in each case ‘grace. ’ See Grace. See Grace. ‘Grace’ and ‘Gracious’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible
Nature - Nature and Grace. Most frequently, however, man’s natural condition, moral and spiritual, is, in the NT, contrasted with his experience in a state of Grace. Paul had an altogether persuasive and beautiful word for the supernatural, which he was never weary of using, and which the Church should count one of her chief treasures-the Grace of God’ (J. Watson, The Doctrines of Grace, London, 1900, p. Paul says to the Ephesians: ‘we were by nature children of wrath, even as the rest’ (2:3), he associates himself with those who before they were quickened and became partakers of Grace were ‘dead in trespasses and sins. Paul explains what it is to be ‘saved by Grace. ’ His teaching agrees with the statement in 2 Peter 1:4 that the promises of Grace are given in order that men who inherit a sinful nature may ‘become partakers of a divine nature
Fellowship - ...
...
Of saints with one another, in duties (Romans 12:5 ; 1 Corinthians 12:1 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:17,18 ); in ordinances (Hebrews 10:25 ; Acts 2:46 ); in Grace, love, joy, etc
Freely - Gratuitously of free will or Grace, with out purchase or consideration
Graft - Paul's illustration (Romans 11:17-24 ) portrays the incomprehensible Grace of God who does what no farmer would do—break off cultivated limbs (representing descendants of Israel) to graft in wild limbs (representing Gentile believers)
Wit - make to know we do you to wit of the Grace of God
Charismata - Saint Paul enumerates most of them in 1 Corinthians 12: the word of wisdom, the word of knowledge, faith, the Grace of healing, the working of miracles, prophecy, the discerning of spirits, the gift of tongues, interpretation of speeches, and the charismata of apostles, prophets, doctors, helps, governments
Chasuble - Putting it on the priest says: ...
"Lord, who didst say, My yoke is sweet and My burden light, grant that I may so bear it as to obtain Thy Grace
Holiness - It does not consist in knowledge, talents, nor outward ceremonies of religion, but hath its seat in the heart, and is the effect of a principle of Grace implanted by the Holy Spirit, Ephesians 2:8 ; Ephesians 2:10
Corruptions: Strengthened by Habit - We must not wonder if the severest processes of affliction should be tried upon us, if the pick-axe is used instead of the spade, that our stony places may yet yield soil for the plants of Grace and holiness
Conversion: a Complete Surrender - Thus when a sinner parleys with his Savior he would fain have a little of the honor of his salvation, he would save alive some favorite sin, he would fain amend the humbling terms of Grace–but there is no help for it, Jesus will be all in all, and the sinner must be nothing at all
Partition - CHRIST JESUS unites us by the Grace of GOD, and the work of the Holy Spirit
Grace, Habitual - By habitual Grace, a free gift of God, the soul is privileged to enter on a state of friendship with God, which is of its nature permanent, but may be broken temporarily or forever by the abuse of free will and the introduction of sin
Habitual Grace - By habitual Grace, a free gift of God, the soul is privileged to enter on a state of friendship with God, which is of its nature permanent, but may be broken temporarily or forever by the abuse of free will and the introduction of sin
Fishers - These fishers are men who, with the story of GOD's Grace and love, are raised up in those happy surroundings where the Holy Spirit is Lord, is recognized and is trusted
Happiness - Fortuitous elegance unstudied Grace
Covenant - We receive eternal blessings from the covenant of Grace
Justification - In theology, remission of sin and absolution from guilt and punishment or an act of free Grace by which God pardons the sinner and accepts him as righteous, on account of the atonement of Christ
Saving - That secures everlasting salvation as saving Grace
Confirmation - An ordinance of the Church, sacramental in characterand Grace conferring. " Its chief Grace is the seven-fold gift of the Holy Ghostby means of which we are sealed, made firm or strong, and equipped"manfully to fight under Christ's banner against sin, the worldand the devil
Mercy - That which comes nearest to it is Grace. Grace favor
Chariot - "There can be no doubt, but that this is designed to speak of the Lord Jesus Christ, whose chariot of love, founded in himself, both in his GODHEAD and manhood, whose acts of Grace, are richer than gold and silver, and whose whole heart is full of love to his beloved Jerusalem. Hence, the church in return, feeling all her affections awakened by Grace, to the love of Jesus, cries out in an holy rapture of joy and delight," Or ever I was aware, my soul made me like the chariots of Ammi-nadib?' (Song of Song of Solomon 6:12)...
See Amminadib...
Faith - Faith in Christ is a Grace wrought in the heart by the Holy Spirit, whereby we receive Christ as our Savior, our Prophet, Priest, and King, and love and obey him as such. ...
True faith is an essential Grace, and a mainspring of Christian life
Olive Tree - (Psalms 128:3) And Paul in a beautiful figure, represents the state of conversion from nature to Grace by the change from the olive tree which is wild, by nature, to that of a true olive tree, which is planted by Grace
Sanctification - That work of God's Grace, by which we are renewed after the image of God, set apart for his service, and enabled to die unto sin and live unto righteousness. the surety-righteousness of christ imputed is our justifying righteousness; but the Grace of God implanted is the matter of our sanctification. Yet justification and sanctification are inseparably connected in the promise of God, Romans 8:1-39 ; in the covenant of Grace, Hebrews 8:10 ; in the doctrines and promises of the Gospel, Acts 5:31 ; and in the experience of all true believers, 1 Corinthians 6:11
Temptation - " (Revelation 3:19) But this is not as if to see how those whom Jesus loves will improve the trials and temptations by which he is exercising their gifts and Graces; for if this were the case it would be to make the event of his Grace to depend upon their use or abuse of the mercies given them, and instead of a covenant of his Grace, render their final hope dependent upon a covenant of their good works. Not so the Grace of God which bringeth salvation
Baxterians - He taught that God had elected some, whom he is determined to save, without any foresight of their good works; and that others to whom the Gospel is preached have common Grace, which if they improve, they shall obtain saving Grace, according to the doctrine of Arminius. Baxter maintains that there may be a certainty of perseverance here, and yet he cannot tell whether a man may not have so weak a degree of saving Grace as to lose it again. Grace eventually worketh in them true faith, repentance, conversion, and union with Christ as his living members
Remonstrants - They are also called Arminians, because they maintained the doctrines respecting predestination and Grace, which were embraced and defended by James Harmenson or Arminius, an eminent Protestant divine, and a native of Holland, who was born in 1560, and died in 1609. The result of his inquiries on this, and other subjects connected with it, was, that, thinking the doctrine of Calvin with respect to free will, predestination, and Grace, too severe, he expressed his doubts respecting them in the year 1591, and at length adopted the religious system of those who extend the love of God, and the merits of his Son, to all mankind. The distinguishing tenets of the Remonstrants may be said to consist chiefly in the different light in which they view the subjects of the five points, or in the different explanation which they give to them, and comprised in the five following articles: predestination, universal redemption, the operation of Grace, the freedom of the will, and perseverance. They believe that God, having an equal regard for all his creatures, sent his Son to die for the sins not of the elect only, but of the whole world; that no mortal is rendered finally unhappy by an eternal and invincible decree, but that the misery of those who perish arises from themselves; and that, in this present imperfect state, believers, if not vigilant, may, through the force of temptation, and the influence of Satan, fall from Grace, and sink into final perdition
Justification (2) - The actual positive recognition of the righteousness of the righteous is said in Psalms 62:12 to depend on the Divine Grace; the latter term, however, is practically synonymous with righteousness in its beneficent aspect (Psalms 33:5, Psalms 36:6-7, Psalms 96:13 Psalms 145:17). The idea of Grace which qualifies the legalism of the OT sinks altogether into the background. ...
It is finally to be observed that, both in the OT and in the Rabbinic theology, righteousness before God and justification, whether looked for from the Divine Grace or on the ground of human merit, are religious ideas. ), of which the principle on God’s side is Grace (χάρις). As proceeding from the Divine Grace, justification by faith is totally opposed to justification by works, which depends on merit (Romans 4:4). It is the method by which the Grace of God is subjectively appropriated. But as correlative to Grace, or the free love of God, faith is psychologically trust, a believing ‘on God’ (Romans 4:24). ...
The revelation of the Divine Grace which awakens faith takes place, according to St. Christ’s death was the work of the Divine Grace in that God ordained it as an expiatory sacrifice for sin, Christ dying instead of sinners, that in the act of justification He might not appear indulgent of sin (Romans 3:25; cf. Christ’s resurrection is also included in the revelation by which God’s Grace to sinners is made known (Romans 4:25; Romans 8:34; Romans 10:9, 1 Corinthians 15:17), but St. ...
It is to be observed, finally, that justification requires for its complete explanation both sides of the correlation, Grace and faith, which in St. Paul says that God was in Christ, not imputing to men their trespasses, which last phrase is synonymous with ‘justifying men’; so that here justification is associated with the objective side, or the revelation of Grace (cf. Evidently, then, Grace and faith are so organically related that the one implies the other, and is properly understood only through its correlative. In fact, in justification the Law is transcended by Grace, which reckons faith for righteousness (Romans 4:4-5). Paul does not mean that faith is a work, and that Grace simply reckons the work of faith instead of the works of the Law. With the Apostle, as we have seen, faith is not a work, but a receiving; not a second principle of justification over against Grace, but simply the reflex of Divine Grace in man. Grace therefore sees in faith simply this reflex of itself, and in justifying the sinner by faith in reality justifies on the ground of itself (cf. It is not based on anything in the believer—not even on his faith, which comes into view only so far as the Divine Grace is reflected in it. Paul’s language is determined by this form in which he found the problem of acceptance with God stated; his meaning simply is that God accepts the sinner on the ground of His mere Grace, apart from all question of merit. that justification is the act of God as Judge, but adoption His act as Father, falls to the ground as soon as it is remembered that justification is really an extra-judicial judgment, proceeding from the Divine Grace (Ritschl, Justification and Reconciliation3 [2] ’, iii. Faith now conies into view, not simply as the reflexion of Grace, but in its psychological nature as trust, including the submission of the will to God; and the practical effects of justification appear as the unfolding of this trust in its various aspects. Paul expresses by saying that, for the believer, ‘There is now no condemnation’ (Romans 8:1), or that he is not under law, but under Grace (Romans 6:15). Paul means that the Christian religion is a religion not of law, but of Grace
Furness Abbey - Shortly after the visit of royal commissioners to Furness, 1535, accusations were brought against the monks implicating them in the Pilgrimage of Grace, and in 1537 they were forced to surrender their abbey to the Crown
Guardian - The basic thrust of Paul's message is clear: Before experiencing of God's Grace in Christ, the believers' lives were lives of slavery (Luke 4:3 ,Luke 4:3,4:8 )
Judgment, Particular - Souls of those who die in the state of sanctifying Grace will be saved
Humility - A prominent Christian Grace (Romans 12:3 ; 15:17,18 ; 1 Corinthians 3:5-7 ; 2 co 3:5 ; Philippians 4:11-13 )
Roe - ghazal), permitted for food (Deuteronomy 14:5 ; Compare Deuteronomy 12:15,22 ; 15:22 ; 1 Kings 4:23 ), noted for its swiftness and beauty and Grace of form (2 Samuel 2:18 ; 1 Chronicles 12:8 ; Song of Solomon 2:9 ; 7:3 ; 8:14 )
Goodness of God - Viewed generally, it is benevolence; as exercised with respect to the miseries of his creatures it is mercy, pity, compassion, and in the case of impenitent sinners, long-suffering patience; as exercised in communicating favour on the unworthy it is Grace
Divine Goodness: Unceasing - All the volumes which record the doings of divine Grace are but part f a series to be continued
Danger: of the Christian - The enlightened Christian sees himself to be like a traveller, standing on the narrow summit of a lofty ridge; on the right hand and on the left are gulfs unfathomable, yawning for his destruction; if it were not that by divine Grace his feet are like hinds' feet, so that he is able to stand upon his high places, he would long ere this have fallen to his eternal destruction
Holy Ghost, Gifts of the - The operations of Grace and the sanctification of souls appropriated to the Holy Ghost as works of God's goodness and love
Pitcher - ...
Lamentations 4:2 (b) Israel should have been a golden viol full of the precious promises of GOD, and rich in the experiences of GOD's Grace
Abbey, Furness - Shortly after the visit of royal commissioners to Furness, 1535, accusations were brought against the monks implicating them in the Pilgrimage of Grace, and in 1537 they were forced to surrender their abbey to the Crown
Hart - ...
Isaiah 35:6 (a) Isaiah uses this type to show the great Grace and power of GOD in making a poor, lost, helpless sinner to rejoice in a new-found Saviour, and in His forgiveness
Vial - The lesson we learn is that the wrath of GOD is just as precious and valuable as His mercy and Grace
Gospel - ...
The history of the birth, life, actions, death, resurrection, ascension and doctrines of Jesus Christ or a revelation of the Grace of God to fallen man through a mediator, including the character, actions, and doctrines of Christ, with the whole scheme of salvation, as revealed by Christ and his apostles
High Places - Some of the kings of Israel, though going a good way in a spirit of reform, had not courage enough, or wanted the Grace, to abolish those places of idol-worship
Access - It is used three times, (a) Romans 5:2 , of the "access" which we have by faith, through our Lord Jesus Christ, into Grace; (b) Ephesians 2:18 , of our "access" in one Spirit through Christ, unto the Father; (c) Ephesians 3:12 , of the same "access," there said to be "in Christ," and which we have "in confidence through our faith in Him
Elihu - In several sentences he beautifully expresses his faith in the pardoning and restoring Grace of God towards sinners, Job 33:23,24,27-30 , passages in probably the oldest book of the Bible in the very spirit of the parable of the prodigal son
Gifts of the Holy Ghost - The operations of Grace and the sanctification of souls appropriated to the Holy Ghost as works of God's goodness and love
Tributary - He, to Grace his tributary gods-- ...
2
Unlifted - " Judaism does not recognize the vanishing of the glory of the Law as a means of life, under God's Grace in Christ
Sacrament of Penance - Sins forgiven in a previous confession may be made again the matter of absolution, since the soul can always receive the Grace which would remit such sins if they were still present. The principal effect of a worthy reception of Penance is the forgiveness of sin by the infusion of sanctifying Grace. Being primarily ordained to take away mortal sin and to restore the life of Grace to those who are spiritually dead, Penance is a sacrament of the dead. Those who are in the state of Grace when they approach the sacred tribunal receive therefrom an increase of sanctifying Grace. Penance also confers a claim to actual Graces necessary to retain God's friendship; frequently, too, it gives peace of conscience and joy of spirit
Minister - How forcibly it calls to our mind the Saviour's favourite imagery, in which he compares the Grace which he bestows on all who diligently seek it, to 'living water;' and how much that old man is like the faithful preacher of the word, who, having filled his vessel at the well, wears himself out by continually bearing the burden of the Lord, and crying, 'Water! water!' amid crowds of sinners, who must drink or die. In its excellence, continuance and naturalness, this well might be a fair picture of the Grace of our Lord Jesus, but it fails to set him forth from its poverty of supply, He has a redundance, an overflow, an infinite fulness, and there is no possibility-of his being exhausted by the draughts made upon him, even though ten thousand times ten thousand should come with a thirst as deep as the abyss. Humility is always a profitable Grace; pride is always as useless as it is foolish. Only by bowing our minds to the utmost before the Lord, can we expect to receive his mercy, for he promises Grace unto the humble in that same verse which foretells his resistance of the proud. If there be Grace anywhere, contrite hearts will get it. The lower we can fall, the sooner will the springing water of Grace reach us, and the more completely shall we be filled with it. May the Lord send to our happy land more simple gospel, more Christ-exalting doctrine, more free-grace teaching, more distinct testimony to atoning blood and eternal love. Meanwhile, having recorded the prayer, we resolve, by divine Grace, to cry more loudly than ever, 'Acqua! Acqua!' ...
Hosea - On the subject of his marriage with Gomer,...
(See Gomer)...
some have thought, that this was a parable, and only intended by the Lord in a figurative way, to shew the Lord's Grace to his adulterous Israel and Judah. What Grace, mercy, love, and condescension in the Lord marrying our adulterous nature! What blessedness is set forth in that betrothing nature, for ever! What sweet views of Jesus doth this man's writings give concerning his recoveries of his people under all their backslidings, and departures, and rebellions, and ingratitude! Surely, it is impossible for any enlightened eye to read the records of the prophet, and not perceive the Saviour in almost every chapter and verse, from beginning to end, And how blessed was it and gracious in God the Holy Ghost, in those distant ages from Christ, when the prophecy of Hosed was delivered; and how blessed and gracious now in our day, upon whom "the ends of the world are come;" that this man's ministry should be made instrumental to comfort and refresh both, concerning the glorious person, love, Grace, and mercy of our Lord Jesus Christ
Elect - God's "grace was given in Christ Jesus (to the elect) before the world began" (2 Timothy 1:9). Its source is God's Grace, independent of any goodness foreseen in the saved (Ephesians 1:4-5; Romans 9:11; Romans 9:18; Romans 11:5). ...
The election being entirely of Grace, not for our foreseen works (Romans 11:6), the glory all redounds to God
Ship - From the beautiful simplicity of style, as well as the evident marks of Grace in which it is written, I take for granted that it was first in use in that glorious period, when the pure doctrines of the gospel were as much known and valued as they are now forgotten or despised. ...
"Shipped by he Grace of God, in good order, and well conditioned, in and upon the good Ship called the. and now riding at anchor in the river Thames, and by God's Grace bound for
Decree - ‘The purpose of God according to election’ (ἡ κατʼ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις τοῦ θεοῦ, Romans 9:11) is to stand, not of works but of His own sovereign Grace who calls them that believe. God’s eternal decree depends upon the counsel of His own will, for it is ‘not according to our works but according to his own purpose (κατὰ ἴδιαν πρόθεσιν) and Grace given in Christ Jesus before times eternal’ that ‘he saved us and called us with a holy calling’ (2 Timothy 1:9). Whilst the decrees of God are ‘his eternal purpose whereby he foreordains whatsoever comes to pass,’ yet He accomplishes His ends by the means proper thereto, and even when men are moved by Divine Grace to embrace the gospel offer, they do so in the exercise of their liberty as free agents
Predestination - God has "predestinated" believers "unto the adoption of sons by Jesus Christ to Himself, according to the good pleasure of His will, to the praise of the glory of His Grace. in it being "the praise of the glory of His Grace" (Ephesians 1:6; Ephesians 1:12; Ephesians 1:14). All pride on man's part is excluded; all is of God's unmerited Grace
Kedar - " (Psalms 120:5) The expression is figurative, meaning, that in this world a child of God finds himself not at home, nor those with whom he sojourns favourable to the promotion of the work of Grace in the heart; and hence the soul goes lean from day to day, and to her own view appears wretched and black, like the tents of Kedar. On the other hand, the covenant of promise full of Grace and mercy, giving as it doth, a joy and peace in believing to the soul, lightens the countenance, and makes the child of God comely. Considered in nature, we are black as the tents of Kedar; viewed in Grace, comely as the curtains of Solomon; and still going humble and softly all our days, from the consciousness of the remains of indwelling corruption; still taking comfort in the assurance, that we are "beautiful as Tirzah, comely as Jerusalem, and terrible as an army of banners
Decree - ‘The purpose of God according to election’ (ἡ κατʼ ἐκλογὴν πρόθεσις τοῦ θεοῦ, Romans 9:11) is to stand, not of works but of His own sovereign Grace who calls them that believe. God’s eternal decree depends upon the counsel of His own will, for it is ‘not according to our works but according to his own purpose (κατὰ ἴδιαν πρόθεσιν) and Grace given in Christ Jesus before times eternal’ that ‘he saved us and called us with a holy calling’ (2 Timothy 1:9). Whilst the decrees of God are ‘his eternal purpose whereby he foreordains whatsoever comes to pass,’ yet He accomplishes His ends by the means proper thereto, and even when men are moved by Divine Grace to embrace the gospel offer, they do so in the exercise of their liberty as free agents
Abounding - Yet he employs the same term in Romans 6:1 of the ‘abounding of Grace,’ and in Philippians 4:17 of the fruit of Christian giving. His favourite term, however, is περισσεύω (in one case ὑπερπερισσεύω, ‘overflow,’ Romans 5:20), whether he is speaking of the Grace of God (Romans 5:15), the sufferings of Christ (2 Corinthians 1:5), or the Christian spirit that finds expression in liberality (2 Corinthians 8:7; 2 Corinthians 9:8), contentment (Philippians 4:12; Philippians 4:18), hope (Romans 5:15), service (1 Corinthians 15:58). ‘How many hired servants of my father’s have bread enough and to spare’ [1] with ‘the Grace of God, which is by one man, Jesus Christ, hath abounded unto many’ [2], and many other passages. The normal type of Christian is not reached till his nature is flooded with the Grace of God, and he in turn is lifted into a condition which is characterized by an abounding increase of hope, Grace, love, good works, and fruitfulness of character. ‘Therefore, as ye abound in (everything), see that ye abound in this Grace also’ (2 Corinthians 8:7) expresses one of his favourite forms of appeal
Perseverance of the Saints - It, moreover, follows from a consideration of (1) the immutability of the divine decrees (Jeremiah 31:3 ; Matthew 24:22-24 ; Acts 13:48 ; Romans 8:30 ); (2) the provisions of the covenant of Grace (Jeremiah 32:40 ; John 10:29 ; 17:2-6 ); (3) the atonement and intercession of Christ (Isaiah 53:6,11 ; Matthew 20:28 ; 1 Peter 2:24 ; John 11:42 ; 17:11,15,20 ; Romans 8:34 ); and (4) the indwelling of the Holy Ghost (John 14:16 ; 2 co 1:21,22 ; 5:5 ; Ephesians 1:14 ; 1 John 3:9 )
Boanerges - Grace subsequently corrected this zeal without knowledge, making James the willing martyr (Acts 12) and John the apostle of gentleness and love
Marriage - In a scriptural sense, the union between Christ and his church by the covenant of Grace
Augsburgh or Augustan Confession - The leading doctrines of this confession are, the true and essential divinity of the Son of God; his substitution, and vicarious sacrifice; and the necessity, freedom, and efficacy of Divine Grace
Access - Thus the saving Grace and lofty privileges of the Gospel are equally bestowed upon true believers of all nations
Loins - , bracing up oneself so as to maintain perfect sincerity and reality as the counteractive in Christian character against hypocrisy and falsehood; (3) of girding the "loins" of the mind, 1 Peter 1:13 , RV, "girding," suggestive of the alertness necessary for sobriety and for setting one's hope perfectly on "the Grace to be brought
Matthew - He does not dissemble his former profession; thus exalting the Grace of Christ which raised him to the apostleship
Regeneration - Dogmatically, the rebirth by which we become sons of God (John 3), identified with initial justification and sanctifying Grace
Riches - ...
The riches of God, his fullness of wisdom, power, mercy, Grace and glory, Ephesians 1,2 or the abundance supplied by his works
Supernatual Adoption - ,of our God-given and godlike life by virtue of this adoption which is the result of sanctifying Grace
Vocation - Among divines, a calling by the will of God or the bestowment of God's distinguishing Grace upon a person or nation, by which that person or nation is put in the way of salvation as the vocation of the Jews under the old dispensation, and of the Gentiles under the gospel
Full - A — 1: πλήρης (Strong's #4134 — Adjective — pleres — play'-race ) denotes "full," (a) in the sense of "being filled," materially, Matthew 14:20 ; 15:37 ; Mark 8:19 (said of baskets "full" of bread crumbs); of leprosy, Luke 5:12 ; spiritually, of the Holy Spirit, Luke 4:1 ; Acts 6:3 ; 7:55 ; 11:24 ; Grace and truth, John 1:14 ; faith, Acts 6:5 ; Grace and power, Acts 6:8 ; of the effects of spiritual life and qualities, seen in good works, Acts 9:36 ; in an evil sense, of guile and villany, Acts 13:10 ; wrath, Acts 19:28 ; (b) in the sense of "being complete," "full corn in the ear," Mark 4:28 ; of a reward hereafter, 2 John 1:8
Gift - Paul is a servant of the gospel by the gift of God's Grace (Ephesians 3:7 ). ...
In general, in Scripture the word "gift" has three senses: gifts men give to men; sacrificial offerings presented to God; and gifts God gives to men, especially in connection with salvation, righteousness, and his Grace
Publican - " (Matthew 18:17)...
It is very blessed and encouraging to discover that with all this odiousness of character, we find a Matthew and a Zaccheus eminently distingushed as partakers of the Grace in Christ Jesus. Such indeed are the proper Grace, Lord seems to delight in giving tokens of its distinguishing power
Spikenard - What so humble, low, despised, and overlooked as Jesus, though the plant of renown? (Ezekiel 34:29) "There was no beauty that we should desire him"—and yet what fragrancy, like the sweet incense of his blood and righteousness, to perfume the persons and offerings of his people? So his church; what more contemptible in the eyes of the great ones of the earth?—or his gospel, what more despised and set at nought? Yet how lovely, and how fragrant, in the view of Jesus! Hear what Jesus saith,"How fair is thy love, my sister, my spouse; how much better is thy love than wine, and the smell of thine ointments than all spices!" (Song of Song of Solomon 4:10) Oh, for Grace to echo back to such matchless Grace—While the king sitteth at his table—while his Grace and the influences of his Holy Spirit, are calling forth into lively exercise those blessed principles he himself hath planted in my heart—"my spikenard sendeth forth the smell thereof
Salt - It is typical of freshness and savour in a Christian, his heart being maintained in the sense of Grace, the loss of which nothing else can supply. ...
The Christian's speech should be with Grace, seasoned with salt (Colossians 4:6 ), not characterised by asperity, nor lacking unction, and yet morally wholesome in its character
Weakness - Yet weakness is the very point at which God reveals his power and Grace (1 Corinthians 1:27 ; 2 Corinthians 12:9 ). Weakness facilitates dependence on God, cultivates the appropriation of Grace, and ascribes all glory and credit to God (2 Corinthians 12:7-12 )
Heaven - In the immensity of his GODHEAD, and the ubiquity of his nature and essence, he is every where; and, consequently, that place is heaven where JEHOVAH'S presence, in Grace, and favour, and glory, is manifested. Sweetly doth David speak of the blessed work of assurance and Grace in the soul respecting heaven, and in that assurance describes the suited preparation for it
Gomer - We see in it God's Grace amidst all our undeservings; and that "where sin hath abounded Grace doth much more abound
Mount Samaria - What unnumbered discoveries of Grace have distressed sinners found in those encouraging words of Jesus! The constraint upon the Lord Jesus to go there to seek and save this sinner, the unprepared, unconscious state of her mind at the time, the tender waitings of Jesus to the hour of her arrival at the well, for he was first there, the tenderness and compassion in all that he said and manifested towards her, his condescension in abiding with the Samaritans two whole days, and the effects wrought upon the hearts of many of the people, as well as this poor woman; these, with numberless other incidents which are found in Christ's visit to Samaria, must always make the very name interesting to the heart of a believer, and especially when the same saving Grace which wrought upon this woman's mind hath taken place in ours, so that we can hold out the invitation concerning Christ to others, which she did to her countrymen: "Come, see a man which told me all things that ever I did; is not this the Christ!" (Read the whole relation, John 4:1-42
Fulness - The fulness of Christ is the superabundance of Grace with which he was filled: "Of his fulness have all we received," John 1:16 . ) Grace in others is by participation, as the moon hath her light from the sun, rivers their waters from the fountain: but in Christ all that perfection and influence which we include in that term is originally, naturally, and of himself. The saints cannot communicate their Graces to others, whereas the gifts of the Spirit are in Christ as a head and fountain, to impart them to his members
Marcus, Surnamed Eremita - All is of Grace, which is given τελεία in baptism, and afterwards in measure proportioned to our obedience. ...
(4) ἀπόκρισις πρὸς τοὺς ἀποροῦντας περὶ τοῦ θείου βαπτίσματος , an important treatise on the doctrine of baptism, states distinctly that by the Grace of baptism original sin is put away and the baptized are in exactly the condition Adam was before the fall
Sacrament - The word came to be usedfor those ordinances of the Christian Church possessing an "outwardsign" and conveying an "inward Grace. " Thus the Church Catechismtreating of the two Sacraments "generally necessary to salvation,that is to say, Baptism and the Supper of the Lord," defines asacrament as being an outward and visible sign ordained by Christ,of an inward and spiritual Grace given by Him as its accompaniment. Forexample, if a man would be saved he must receive Holy Baptism andHoly Communion where these Sacraments are to be had; but for hissalvation it is not necessary that he should be married, or ordainedto the Sacred Ministry, and yet Marriage and Ordination arethoroughly sacramental in character in that they are Graceconferring, and therefore, in her book of Homilies the Church callsthem Sacraments, The great English divines generally take thisposition in regard to the Sacraments and the Sacramental Systemof the Church
Neonomians - "The new covenant of Grace which, through the medium of Christ's death, the Father made with men, consists according to this system, not in our being justified by faith, as it apprehends the righteousness of Christ, but in this, that God, abrogating the exaction of perfect legal obedience, reputes or accepts of faith itself, and the imperfect obedience of faith, instead of the perfect obedience of the law, and graciously accounts them worthy of the reward of eternal life. By both this and the fifth head it appears that all boasting is excluded, and we are saved by free Grace. Yet such is the Grace of the Gospel, that it promiseth in and by Christ a freedom from the curse, forgiveness of sin, and eternal life, to every sincere believer: which promise God with certainly perform, notwithstanding the threatening of the law. Williams maintains the conditionality of the covenant of Grace; but admits, with Dr. Owen, who also uses the term condition, that "Christ undertook that those who were to be taken into this covenant should receive Grace enabling them to comply with the terms of it, fulfil its conditions, and yield the obedience which God required therein. regenerating) Grace, by which we are enabled to perform the condition, be absolutely given. Is faith, or any other Grace or act of ours, any atonement for sin, satisfaction to justice, meriting qualification, or any part of that righteousness for which we are justified at God our Creator's bar. Nor whether the Gospel be a law that allows sin, when it accepts such Graces as true, though short of perfection, to be the conditions of our personal interest in the benefits purchased by Christ. God in christ thereby commandeth sinners to repent of sin, and receive Christ by a true operative faith, promising that thereupon they shall be united to him, justified by his righteousness, pardoned, and adopted; and that, persevering in faith and true holiness, they shall be finally saved; also threatening that if any shall die impenitent, unbelieving, ungodly, rejecters of his Grace, they shall perish without relief, and endure sorer punishments than if these offers had not been made to them?...
2. Do the gospel promises of benefits to certain Graces, and its threats that those benefits shall be withheld and the contrary evils inflicted for the neglect of such Graces, render those Graces the condition of our personal title to those benefits?...
This they deny, and I affirm, " &c. But those who first engaged in the controversy, though they allowed the encouragement to repent and believe to arise merely from the Grace of the Gospel, yet considered the formal obligation to do so as arising merely from the moral law, which, requiring supreme love to God, requires acquiscence in any revelation which he shall at any time make known
Philemon, Epistle to - He speaks, therefore, with that peculiar Grace of humility and courtesy which has, under the reign of Christianity, developed the spirit of chivalry and what is called 'the character of a gentleman,' certainly very little known in the old Greek and Roman civilization" (Dr
Lessius, Leonard - His first writing Theses theologicæ (1586), provoked a violent controversy over his doctrine of efficacious Grace and biblical inspiration
Leonard Lessius - His first writing Theses theologicæ (1586), provoked a violent controversy over his doctrine of efficacious Grace and biblical inspiration
Christ: Trophies of His Power - Poor miserable superstition all of it, and yet what a reminder to the believer in Jesus as to his duty and his privilege! Having pleaded at the feet of Jesus, we have found salvation; have we remembered to record this wonder of his hand? If we hung up memorials of all his matchless Grace, what crutches, and bandages, and trophies of every sort should we pile together! Temper subdued, pride humbled, unbelief slain, sin cast down, sloth ashamed, carelessness rebuked
Nimbus - In the course of centuries the idea became more prominent that a nimbus must be given to God, and as a symbol of the Grace of God it was given to the saints
Life: Explains Religion - Show by your life what Grace can do
Petition - ) A formal written request addressed to an official person, or to an organized body, having power to grant it; specifically (Law), a supplication to government, in either of its branches, for the granting of a particular Grace or right; - in distinction from a memorial, which calls certain facts to mind; also, the written document
Eat - ...
John 6:50 (a) The Lord describes the appropriation of Himself, His love, His words, and His Grace, as the act of eating
Predestinate - " (Ephesians 1:5) Hence it will follow, that all the purposes of God in Christ concerning redemption are first formed in the Lord Jesus, and then the church in him; and hence the church is represented as saying: with one voice, (2 Timothy 1:9) "Who hath saved us, and called us with an holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and Grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began
Shushan - And what is the sense of both, bearing the same name, but a confirmation of all the precious truths contained in the charter and covenant of Grace! They are the same in name, in likeness, in pursuits, desires, affections; but then let it never be forgotten it is wholly on Christ's account
Anna - (Hebrew: Grace) ...
(1) The pious and patient mother of Samuel
Anathema - A person preaching any gospel except the gospel of Grace promising justification through faith alone should be under the curse, that is anathema (Galatians 1:8-9 )
Mount Amana - ) meaning from the fellowship of the evil, which is like the ferocity of beasts, to the sweet communion of Jesus, in his love, and Grace, and favour
Counsellor - Wonderful Counsellor! give thy people Grace to listen to thy gracious and divine teaching, "and to buy of thee gold tried in the fire
Conversion - Conversion, considered theologically, consists in a renovation of the heart and life, or a being turned from sin and the power of Satan unto God, Acts 26:18 ; and is produced by the influence of divine Grace upon the soul
Aaron - The stability of Moses was dependent upon the fact, that he was sustained by sovereign Grace in communion with the thoughts of God: while Aaron below fell in with the thoughts of the people. Their appointment stood, showing how marvellously God's Grace abounds over sin, and that none are chosen because of their inherent goodness. Their excuse was that he had married an Ethiopian woman (sign of the same sovereign Grace that goes out to Gentiles who have no claim to it)
Repentance - ...
As regards man, repentance is the necessary precursor of his experience of Grace on the part of God. Two motives for repentance are presented in scripture: the goodness of God which leads to repentance (Romans 2:4 ) and coming judgement, on account of which God now commands all men to repent (Acts 17:30,31 ); but it is distinctly of His Grace and for His glory that this door of return to Him is granted (Acts 11:18 ) in that He has approached man in Grace and by His glad tidings, consequent on His righteousness having been secured in the death of Christ
Justification - Grace, according to Luther, is known in personal relationship with Christ (Com. To receive such Grace is to be justified. ‘That which truly justifies the heart is Grace, which is daily created and poured into our hearts’ (J. Grace on this view is a Divine substance,† [4] ex opere operato imparted, increased by man’s aid, dependent on faith and good works as co-ordinate in worth, all part and parcel of the same idea, ‘the infusion of Grace’-the novel feature in Catholic dogma. Catholic dogma, equally with Protestant, safeguards the Divine initiative and the work of Christ, but neither the honour of Christ nor individual assurance, since, concerning the former, Christ, though His righteousness is available for our salvation, is not regarded as indwelling in us as our Righteousness; and, concerning the latter, the organized machinery of means of Grace brings in all the elements of uncertainty, leaving the doctrine unsatisfactory in the most crucial point, Luther’s is a purely religious conception, vastly deeper within its limits than the other, comprising not only pardon of sin and escape from the Divine wrath, but peace of conscience and assurance of salvation. Nor are the Catholic formulae adequate to the profoundly spiritual and final representations in apostolic experience of the acts and operations of Grace in the believing heart through the instrumentality of Christ’s Person and Spirit. The OT cry, ‘How is man just with God?’ is deepened in the NT: ‘How is God gracious?’ and ‘How are we sure of His Grace?’ That again is the problem of fellowship with God-the most engrossing of modern quests. ...
What is the origin?-the Divine graciousness† [7] (Luther) or Divine Grace (Catholic); a ‘reckoning righteous,’ or a ‘making righteous’‡ Free Will Baptists - " Accepting the five points of Arminianism as opposed to the five points of Calvinism, they declare, in a confession of faith of 18 articles that Christ "freely gave Himself a ransom for all, tasting death for every man"; that "God wants an to come to repentance"; and that "all men, at one time or another, are found in such capacity as that, through the Grace of God, they may be eternally saved
Mercy-Seat - It is compared to the throne of Grace (Hebrews 9:5 ; Ephesians 2:6 )
Affliction: Increased With Our Strength - The affliction which is suitable for a babe in Grace would little serve the young man, and even the well-developed man needs severer trials as his strength increases
Rebecca - Paul uses this tradition as illustrating a mysterious principle which he observed in the operation of Divine Grace
Revival: Absence And Presence of - Converts raised in the hot-bed of excitement soon droop and die if the spiritual temperature of the church falls below summer heat: what are these worth compared with the hardy children of divine Grace, whose inward life will continue in enduring vigour when all around is dead! Yet we do not desire to see the revival spirit droop among us, for even the evergreens of our garden delight in a warmer season, for then they send forth their shoots and clothe themselves with new leaves; and thus it will be seen that the best of the saints are all the better for the holy glow of the 'times of refreshing
Barren, Barrenness - The barrenness of Sarai, Rebekah, and Rachel (the mothers of the Israelite nation) is significant in that their ability to finally bare children is a sign of the Grace and favor of God toward His elect people
Preaching: Fruit And Flowers - Fit emblems these two famous trees of two ministries, both admired, but not equally to be prized; the ministry of oratory, luxuriant in metaphor and poetry, and the ministry of Grace, abounding in sound teaching and soul saving-energy
Lip - Thus JEHOVAH takes to himself the sovereignty of this work, when he saith, (Isaiah 57:19) "I create the fruit of the lips" Hence the church is represented as speaking the effusions of the heart, when she saith; "So will we render thee the claves of our lips" (Hosea 14:2) And hence, when commending the beauties of Jesus, she saith; "his lips are like lilies, dropping sweet smelling myrrh:" (Song of Song of Solomon 5:13) meaning, that so sweet and fragrant are Christ's words, his gospel of salvation, and his tokens of Grace, so refreshing to the soul of a poor sinner conscious of the want of it; that as lilies, they charm and afford a sweet smelling savour, by which all the spiritual senses are ravished and made glad
Stranger - Gentiles are also called 'strangers' from the covenants of promise ( Ephesians 2:12 ), showing that the covenants made with Israel did in no wise embrace the Gentiles, though God's Grace at all times extended to them
Honest - To adorn to Grace
Calvinism - It is completely undeserved by Man and is not based on anything God sees in man (Ephesians 1:1-11), 3) Limited atonement: that Christ did not bear the sins of every individual who ever lived, but instead only bore the sins of those who were elected into salvation (John 10:11; Joh 10:15), 4) Irresistible Grace: that God's call to someone for salvation cannot be resisted, 5) Perseverance of the saints: that it is not possible to lose one's salvation (John 10:27-28)
Galatia - The plan of justification by Christ is so plainly and beautifully set forth in that Epistle, that we have daily reason to adore the riches of Grace for the mercy
Curse - And the apostle's hymn of praise becomes the hymn of every regenerated believer, that "as sin hath reigned unto death, even so doth Grace reign through righteousness unto eternal life, by Jesus Christ our Lord
Jesus Christ - Hence the Hebrews call him, Jehoshuah, or Joshua, or Joshuah, he who shall save; and as Christ means, anointed of JEHOVAH, the Sent, the Sealed of the Father; full of Grace and truth; both names together carry this blessed meaning with them, Jesus Christ the Saviour of the world by the anointing of JEHOVAH to all the purposes, of salvation
Ulai - (Daniel 8:16) When we consider what is said of the voice of the Lord God, walking in the garden in the cool of the day, Genesis 3:8; when we mark the same Grace manifested upon many occasions during the Old Testament dispensation, 1 Samuel 3:4; 1 Kings 19:9; and when we call to mind, the numberless sweet and gracious tokens of the Lord Jesus, manifested to his servants in the early ages, before he openly tabernacled in substance of our flesh: may we not venture to suppose this voice to have been Him, who in after ages openly tabernacled among us? I only humbly propose the question
Levi - It was sovereign Grace
Barren - The circumstances of Sarah and Hagar, which Isaiah no doubt had in mind, are applied by the Apostle to the contrast between the works of the Law and the promise by Grace
Gentiles - Since the promulgation of the gospel, the true religion has been extended to all nations; God, who had promised by his prophets to call the Gentiles to the faith, with a superabundance of Grace, having fulfilled his promise; so that the Christian church is composed principally of Gentile converts, the Jews being too proud of their privileges to acknowledge Jesus Christ as their Messiah and Redeemer
Baptists, Free Will - " Accepting the five points of Arminianism as opposed to the five points of Calvinism, they declare, in a confession of faith of 18 articles that Christ "freely gave Himself a ransom for all, tasting death for every man"; that "God wants an to come to repentance"; and that "all men, at one time or another, are found in such capacity as that, through the Grace of God, they may be eternally saved
Reformed Episcopal Church - The Reformed Episcopal Church is in close relation with the Liturgical Free Churches, of England, and accepts the Apostles' Creed, the, Divine institution of the sacraments of Baptism; and the Lord's Supper, and the doctrines of Grace, substantially as set forth in the Thirty-nine Articles for the Protestant Episcopal Church
Ephesians, Epistle to the - The first part of it is a grateful discourse upon the vast scheme of divine Grace, and blessings flowing from it
Race - All have sinned and are under the judgment of God, but all can be saved through accepting the salvation that God in his Grace offers (Romans 2:9-10; Romans 3:19; Romans 3:23-24). Salvation is solely by God’s Grace, and people accept it by faith (Isaiah 1:16-20; Luke 3:6-8; Luke 11:32; John 8:39; John 8:44; Romans 9:30-32; Ephesians 2:8; see REMNANT)
Predestination - ) ...
Hodge has well remarked that, "rightly understood, this doctrine (1) exalts the majesty and absolute sovereignty of God, while it illustrates the riches of his free Grace and his just displeasure with sin. ...
It enforces upon us the essential truth that salvation is entirely of Grace
Tamar (2) - ) Beauty is a snare unless Grace accompany and guard it (Proverbs 31:30). ) Amnon availed himself of this to effect his design, as if he wished to see the exquisite Grace with which she baked before his eyes
Bruise - He would not hinder any believer who was struggling in Grace and usefulness. ...
Luke 4:18 (a) This is a type of the injury caused by sin in the lives of men and which would be healed and mended by the wonderful Grace and power of the Lord JESUS CHRIST
Baptism - The chief effects of this sacrament are: ...
the impression of a character or seal by which we are incorporated with Christ (Galatians 3; 1 Corinthians 6); ...
regeneration and remission of original sin (and actual if necessary), as well as punishment due to sin, and infusion of sanctifying Grace (with its gifts). Baptism of desire (flaminis) and of blood (sanguinis) are called such analogically, in that they supply the remission of sin and the regenerative Grace, but not the character; the former presupposes perfect charity or love of God (therefore implicitly the desire for the sacrament), while the latter is simply martyrdom for the sake of Christ or His Church
Dew - " (Song of Song of Solomon 5:2) Hence, the resurrection of his people by Grace, as hereafter to glory, is said to be "as the dew of herbs, and the earth shall cast out her dead. " Hence, the doctrines of Grace are said to be of the same refreshing quality as the dew
Salt - He eliminates from it the bitterness of sarcasm and adds to it the essential Grace of Christianity. If the new meaning of the metaphor is to be determined by the context in which it is employed-‘walk in wisdom,’ ‘let your speech be always with Grace’-salt becomes the symbol of a rare combination of virtues. A spiritual wisdom and Christian Grace, at once quickening the gifts of Nature and hallowing the charms of culture, are to replace pagan wit as the savour of that human intercourse which is the feast of reason and the flow of souls
Kindness - This is true not only in English (kindness, goodness, mercy, pity, love, Grace, favor, compassion, gentleness, tenderness, etc. Nevertheless, although distinctions are not consistent, kindness (like goodness, love) tends to cover a broad range of meaning, with mercy and Grace being progressively narrower. ...
It is manifest in what is called "common Grace
Titus, Epistle to - Then follows a summary of Christianity as a practical power in man, by the teaching of Grace. The Grace of God that carries salvation for all has appeared, teaching how a Christian is to live, awaiting the blessed hope and appearing of the glory of the great God and Saviour Jesus Christ, who died to redeem such from all lawlessness, and to purify to Himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works. Matthew 19:28 ), and renewal of the Holy Spirit, which He had richly poured out upon them through Jesus Christ their Saviour (the 'renewal' is more than new birth, it is the Spirit's active energy in the believer), that, having been justified by His Grace, they should become heirs according to the hope of eternal life
Miracle - And perhaps it is not among the smallest instances of Christ's personal glory and Grace, from the actions of miracles, that the Lord Jesus in all he wrought testified his personal love and mercy to his people. Sweet thought to the believer! Jesus's person, and Jesus's Grace, give a softening and a I converting blessing to all our states and circumstances. And what an argument of the most persuasive nature ariseth therefrom to look unto him under every exercise, and to wait his Grace in every dispensation
Beer-la-Hai-Roi - And how blessedly did the Lord, that led Hagar there, and present before her such testimonies of his watchful care over all, give her Grace also, to eye the Lord's hand in the Lord's appointment. Hagar perceived the Lord's Grace in all. That precious Redeemer, always beforehand with his people, and going before them in all his providences, as well as in all his Grace, hath been at length manifested to the soul, in the close of some trying dispensation, as having been all the while present, appointing all, regulating all, watching over all, and giving a sweet and precious finish in his sanctifying blessing on the providence to all; though to our timid and unwatchful hearts, he hath been supposed by us as absent, and inattentive to our distress
Elect - (Matthew 24:31; Romans 11:5; Titus 1:1) And what endears this sovereign act of Grace the more is, that it is all in, and for, Christ. (Ephesians 1:4) The Scriptures uniformly declaring while in the very moment of establishing the truth itself, that it is all of free Grace, no merit, no pretensions of merit here or hereafter, becoming in the least instrumental to this distinguishing mercy, but wholly resulting from the sovereign will and purpose of the Lord. Think what a glorious, blessed Almighty Lord the christian's Lord is! Well might the apostle Peter, under the deep impression of this sacred truth made upon his heart, cry out with holy rapture, "Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through the sanctification of the Spirit unto obedience, and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ, Grace unto you, and peace be multiplied
Manna - ...
The manna is typical of Christ Himself, the vessel of God's good pleasure, and of heavenly Grace here on earth — the heavenly One in the midst of earthly circumstances. He is this heavenly Grace now for His own, so that Grace is ministered to them for the wilderness journey
Jansenists - That there are divine precepts which good men, notwithstanding their desire to observe them, are, nevertheless, absolutely unable to obey; nor has God given them that measure of Grace which is essentially necessary to render them capable of such obedience. That no person, in this corrupt state of nature, can resist the influence of divine Grace, when it operates upon the mind. That the Semi-Pelagians err greatly, in maintaining that the human will is endowed with the power of either receiving or resisting the aids and influences of preventing Grace
Orders, Holy - (Latin: ordo, rank) ...
A sacrament of the New Law, instituted by Christ, by which spiritual power is given and Grace is conferred for the performance of sacred duties. Three orders are of Divine institution, the episcopate, the priesthood, and the diaconate, and produce Grace ex opere operato. The effects of the diaconate and of the major orders are the supernatural effects proper to a sacrament: ...
the increase of sanctifying Grace as befits a sacrament of the living
sacramental Grace, i. ,the right to actual Graces so that the Divine Office and its obligations can be rightly fulfilled
an indelible character imprinted on the soul (according to the more common opinion, each of the above orders im- prints a new character on the soul, distinct one from the other)
the bestowal of spiritual power, enabling the recipient to discharge the sacred offices, i
Holy Orders - (Latin: ordo, rank) ...
A sacrament of the New Law, instituted by Christ, by which spiritual power is given and Grace is conferred for the performance of sacred duties. Three orders are of Divine institution, the episcopate, the priesthood, and the diaconate, and produce Grace ex opere operato. The effects of the diaconate and of the major orders are the supernatural effects proper to a sacrament: ...
the increase of sanctifying Grace as befits a sacrament of the living
sacramental Grace, i. ,the right to actual Graces so that the Divine Office and its obligations can be rightly fulfilled
an indelible character imprinted on the soul (according to the more common opinion, each of the above orders im- prints a new character on the soul, distinct one from the other)
the bestowal of spiritual power, enabling the recipient to discharge the sacred offices, i
Predestination - -Election and predestination belong to the purpose of Grace cherished in the Divine mind from all eternity; and as far as salvation is concerned they are the expression of the entire dependence of sinful man upon the Grace of God from the beginning to the end. Romans 8:29; 1 Peter 1:20) belongs to the same purpose of Grace, and is spoken of by St. That God has foreordained particular persons from all eternity to salvation and eternal life, that He has provided for them the means to that salvation in the work of Christ and the gracious ministry of the Holy Spirit, and that He bestows upon them Grace to persevere to the end, is especially the teaching of St. ‘All that which the Father giveth me shall come unto me’ is, as the older divines would have put it, an article in the Covenant of Redemption between the Father and the Son in the counsels of eternity; ‘and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out’ is an article in the Covenant of Grace wherein the offer of a free and a full salvation is made to all (John 6:37). Paul here reposes such confidence is the sovereignty of a God of Grace and faithfulness; and he is confident that He who began a good work in him and his fellow-believers ‘will perfect it until the day of Jesus Christ’ (Philippians 1:6). The Divine choice rested upon them and took effect in them not because of their merits or attainments, not because God foresaw in them a holiness and a faith marking them out as recipients of eternal favour and blessing, but ‘according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of the glory of his Grace. Whatever the grounds of God’s predestinating purpose, they did not lie in any merits or qualifications of theirs, for they were called ‘not according to their works, but according to his own purpose and Grace before the world began’ (2 Timothy 1:9). Election is a spontaneous act of God’s favour and Grace, uncalled for by anything in the objects of it moving Him thereto. The issue of glory for the saints proceeds from God’s predestinating purpose ‘according to the good pleasure of his will’ and without any foresight of merit on their part; the issue of destruction for the wicked proceeds from the rejection of offered Grace and their persistence in transgression and sin. Underlying all his exhortations to holiness, and all his presentations of gospel privilege and blessing, there is the assumption of the freedom of the human will to avail itself of offered Grace or to refuse it, to put forth effort or to remain inactive. Whilst the kindling of the Divine life in the soul through the exercise of faith in Christ is of sovereign Grace (Ephesians 2:8), the increase and fruitfulness of the Divine life through prayer and service depends upon the same Grace, as St. It is He who, through the Holy Spirit, by the use of the means of Grace, quickens into spiritual life men who are dead in trespasses and sins. In Christian experience there is the conviction of this gracious influence which has been beforehand with us in showing us the guilt of sin and leading us to Christ for salvation, but there is also the consciousness of moral responsibility, requiring from us the constant exercise of faith and the diligent use of all the means of Grace. To have a well-grounded persuasion, through the fruit of the Spirit and the evidences of the new life, that one is of the number of those whom God foreknew and foreordained to be conformed to the image of His Son, cannot fail on the one hand to fill one with gratitude and humility, and on the other to stimulate one to the pursuit of holiness and all the Graces of the Christian life
Romans, Letter to the - The gospel is for all people equally, because all are sinners under God’s judgment and they can be saved only by God’s Grace (Romans 1:16; Romans 2:9-11; Romans 3:9; Romans 3:23-24; Romans 10:12; Romans 11:32; Romans 15:8-9). ...
The chief emphasis in Paul’s exposition is that people are put right with God – justified, declared righteous – solely through God’s Grace, and they receive this divine blessing by faith (see FAITH; Grace; JUSTIFICATION). Even when saved by Grace through faith, believers are still dependent on God for victory over sin. All people are sinners (3:1-20), and therefore if God is to declare anyone righteous, it must be entirely by his Grace. Believers have confidence because of what God has done for them through Christ (5:1-11); they no longer fear the power of sin, because God’s Grace is always sufficient to overcome it (5:12-21)
Predestination - God's purpose is one of love and Grace (Deuteronomy 7:6-8 ; Isaiah 41:8-9 ), above all because in love he predestined what should come to pass in his plan to save and to restore sinful humanity through Christ (Ephesians 1:5 ). " This implies that all that is in God's good purpose for us, individually or as part of the people of God, is by God's initiative and thus is a work of Grace, something that we could never instigate or deserve ( Deuteronomy 9:4-6 ; 2 Timothy 1:9 ). On certain things Scripture is clear: (1) we all, because of our sinfulness, deserve only God's condemnation; (2) our salvation is entirely because of God's Grace and God's initiative; (3) the dominant emphasis is not on the fact that some are chosen by God and some are not, but on what is the purpose of God for those chosen: "to be conformed to the likeness of his Son" (Romans 8:29 ), or, "adoption as his children through Jesus Christ to the praise of his glorious Grace" (Ephesians 1:5-6 ; NRSV ). What, then, should be said of Paul's argument in Romans 9-11 ? In those chapters much is said in positive terms of God's purpose, Grace offered in turn to Jews and to Gentiles. Much also is said of human responsibility in the rejection of God's Grace on the part of many in Israel and thus their failure to obtain God's salvation
Death: of a Believer - Lyford being desired, a little before his death, to let his friends know in what condition his soul was, and what his thoughts were about that eternity to which he seemed very near, he answered with a cheerfulness suitable to a believer and a minister, 'I will let you know how it is with me;' and then, stretching out a hand that was withered and consumed with age and sickness: 'Here is,' said he 'the grave, the wrath of God, and devouring flames, the just punishment of sin, on the one side; and here am I, a poor sinful soul, on the other side; but this is my comfort, the covenant of Grace which is established on so many sure promises, has saved me from all
Devil - Adorned at his creation with sanctifying Grace, he sinned by pride, and with many other heavenly spirits was denied the' beatific vision
Anne, Saint - (Hebrew: Grace) ...
Traditional name of the wife of Joachim and mother of the Blessed Virgin
Activity: a Help to Courage - ' When the Lord gives his servants Grace to follow out their convictions as soon as they feel them, then they act courageously
Earnest of the Spirit: the Pledge of Heaven - The God of all Grace has given to his people all the perfections of heaven to be their heritage for ever, and the earnest of his Spirit is to them the blessed token that all things are theirs
Frame - Are our frames dark and uncomfortable? they should humble us, but not discourage us; they should quicken us, but not obstruct us in our application for necessary and suitable Grace; they should make us see our own emptiness, but not make us suspect the fulness of Christ; they should make us see our own unworthiness, but not make us suspect the willingness of Christ; they should make us see our own weakness, but not cause us to suspect the strength of Christ; they should make us suspect our own hearts, but not the firmness and freeness of the promises
Salutation - The concluding salutation consisted generally of the term "I salute," accompanied by a prayer for peace or Grace
Man: Natural State of - I too might have said: Where are his ears?'...
Man, until sovereign Grace opens his ears, is deaf to the heavenly harmonies of the love of God in Christ Jesus, although these are the ravishment of angels and the wonder of eternity
Administration - dispensation distribution exhibition as the administration of justice, of the sacrament, or of Grace
Flock - Paul commended the shepherds to God and to the word of His Grace
Asleep - His very body will be raised and will be reunited with his circle of loved ones whom he knew on earth, and who were saved by Grace
Respect - It means therefore distinguishing Grace; hence it is said, "the Lord had respect unto Abel and his offering; but unto Cain and his offering he had no respect?" (Genesis 4:4-5) We are told elsewhere the cause, in that Abel offered his offering by faith in Christ, Cain did not
Reprobate - It is they that have gone on to harden their heart, and they are left in that hardness of heart; for God doth not give Grace to bring them out of it, therefore they are given over, or given up, in being left alone to this state of reprobation
Proverbs - (Matthew 13:14) But such was the Grace of Jesus to his disciples, that when he was alone he expounded and explained all things unto them
Creature - Great princes thus, when favorites they raise, to justify their Grace, their creatures praise
Book - " (Philippians 4:3; Revelation 20:12) It is our happiness to have all that it behoves us to know, concerning the book of life, in the copy of it of the Bible, which becomes indeed, in the proclamation of Grace it contains, "the book of life
Moses - It is Jesus alone that can do this; "The law was given by Moses, but Grace and truth came by Jesus Christ
Kadesh-Barnea - Here also was the memorable rebellion of Israel concerning water; and here the Lord's Grace notwithstanding that rebellion
Milk - Milk is regarded as such a necessary article of sustenance that it is associated with wine to prefigure that which Grace now supplies, without money and without price, and which will be supplied to Israel in a future day
Mercy Seat - The mercy seat also represents our approach to God through Christ; we come to the "throne of Grace;" which is only a variation of the term "mercy seat
Comforter - His presence was accompanied by signal triumphs of Grace, and made amends for the absences of Christ
Salt of the Earth - In Saint Mark this parable is a rebuke for their quarrels over precedence; in Saint Matthew and Saint Luke it is a warning to remain true to their vocation by correspondence to Christ's teaching and Grace, which alone will give them the authority and spiritual force necessary to imbue others with the true spirit of Jesus
Samson - The sins of Samson brought him in great disgrace and misery; but Grace and faith triumphed in the end, Hebrews 11:32
Rahab - ...
The penitent publican and sinner are always welcome to Christ; and many such a one, through the renovating power of Grace, will shine gloriously in heaven, while the unbelieving moralist will perish in his sins
Translate - Happy is your Grace, ...
That can translate the stubbornness of fortune ...
Into so quiet and so sweet a style
Wrought - His mind was wrought upon by divine Grace
Convert, Conversion - Divine Grace is the efficient cause, human agency the responding effect
Rewards - But they are added, in the aboundings of love and Grace, as an encouragement amid the dangers and difficulties of the way
Arminians - Arminius had been educated in the opinions of Calvin; but, thinking the doctrine of that great man with regard to free will, predestination, and Grace, too severe, he began to express his doubts concerning them in the year 1591; and, upon farther enquiry, adopted the sentiments of those whose religious system extends the love of the Supreme Being and the merits of Jesus Christ to all mankind. That this divine Grace, or energy of the Holy Ghost, begins and perfects every thing that can be called good in man, and, consequently, all good works are to be attributed to God alone; that, nevertheless, this Grace is offered to all, and does not force men to act against their inclinations, but may be resisted and rendered ineffectual by the perverse will of the impenitent sinner. That God gives to the truly faithful who are regenerated by his Grace, the means of preserving themselves in this state. The first Arminians, indeed, had some doubt with respect to the closing part of this article; but their followers uniformly maintain "that the regenerate may lose true justifying faith, fall from a state of Grace, and die in their sins
Faith - Divine faith is a supernatural act and therefore requires the Grace of God. This Grace is given to all adults who do not place any obstacle in its way
Assurance - This infallible assurance, which believers may attain unto as to their own personal salvation, is founded on the truth of the promises (Hebrews 6:18 ), on the inward evidence of Christian Graces, and on the testimony of the Spirit of adoption (Romans 8:16 ). Believers, moreover, are exhorted to go on to something beyond what they at present have when they are exhorted to seek the Grace of full assurance (Hebrews 10:22 ; 2 Peter 1:5-10 ). The attainment of this Grace is a duty, and is to be diligently sought
Apostasy - ' This is the apostasy which reviles the Spirit of Grace and despises the Son of God and crucifies the Man of Sorrows anew" (p. With respect to temporal blessing in the land of promise, restoration of Israel to divine favor after covenant breaking was always a consequence of divine Grace and mercy, not because of meritorious works on Israel's part
Meekness - manu assuetus, used to the hand; which alludes to the taming and reclaiming of creatures wild by nature, and bringing them to be tractable and familiar, James 3:7-8 : so where the Grace of meekness reigns, it subdues the impetuous disposition, and learns it submission and forgiveness. That such give evidence of their being under the influence of divine Grace, and shall enjoy the divine blessing, Is
Daniel, the Stylite - The following is his prayer before he began his life on the pillar: "I yield Thee glory, Jesus Christ my God, for all the blessings which Thou hast heaped upon me, and for the Grace which Thou hast given me that I should embrace this manner of life. Accept, then, my object; strengthen me that I finish this painful course; give me Grace to end it in holiness
Mount Nebo - And is it not so with all the objects of faith? Jesus himself, when beheld by faith, is made lovely indeed to the eye of Grace; but to the carnal "there is no beauty that we should desire him. Oh! for Grace then in lively exercise in views more bright and clear than the Pisgah sights from mount Nebo, to set the Lord always before us, and daily to walk by faith in the closest communion and fellowship with the Father and with his Son Jesus Christ, till the Lord shall take us home to himself in everlasting fruition, that "where he is, there we may be also
Lot, Lots - 25, AV, "part" (the RV follows those which have topos, "place"); Acts 8:21 ; it is also used like kleronomia, "an inheritance," in Acts 26:18 , of what God has in Grace assigned to the sanctified; so Colossians 1:12 ; in 1 Peter 5:3 it is used of those the spiritual care of, and charge over, whom is assigned to elders, RV, "the charge allotted to you" (plural, lit. , by its being "allotted" to them, not by acquiring it for themselves, but by Divine Grace (an act independent of human control, as in the casting of "lots")
Rich (And Forms) - ...
Proverbs 8:18 (c) Here we see a type of all the virtues and Graces given by the Lord to His children to adorn society, bless the church, and bring honor and glory to GOD. ...
Proverbs 10:22 (a) In this is described those who are filled with faith, zeal, earnestness, vision, as well as the Graces of the Spirit of GOD. He wants us to be abundantly supplied with Grace, mercy, peace, faith, hope, love and all those other sweet Graces of Heaven which He entrusts to those who are good stewards of the manifold Grace of GOD. He has an abundance of Grace. He never is bankrupt in any Grace
Pardon - It is an act of free Grace, Psalms 51:1 . It is the prerogative of God alone to forgive, Mark 2:7 ; the first cause of which is his own sovereign Grace and mercy, Ephesians 1:7 . ...
See Grace, MERCY
Works - Because sinners cannot save themselves, they must rely on the Grace of God, not on their own works (Ephesians 2:8-9 ; Titus 3:4-7 ). Sinners are accepted as righteous before God on the basis of God's Grace through faith in Christ, not on the basis of their own works (Romans 3:27 ; Romans 4:2-6 ). Although true believers are accepted into God's eternal kingdom by Grace through faith, God will condemn those whose profession is proved false by their evil works (Matthew 7:21-23 )
Circumcision - ...
It was a sign and seal of the covenant of Grace as well as of the national covenant between God and the Hebrews. The covenant with Abraham was a dispensation or a specific form of the covenant of Grace, and circumcision was a sign and seal of that covenant. But the truth embodied in both ordinances is ever the same, the removal of sin, the sanctifying effects of Grace in the heart
Towel - )...
We shall have a more lively idea of this most interesting scene, as well as the wonderful Grace and condescension of the Almighty Redeemer in this act of his, if we attend to what was the custom of the dress among those eastern people in the days of our Lord. " (See John 13:3) Let the soul of all his redeemed take encouragement to come to him from such displays of unequalled Grace and love. Did Jesus, I would, methinks, have every poor sinner say, did Jesus not think it unbecoming of him then to wash poor fishermen's feet? And will he reject the humble cries of poor sinners now? Yea, will he not delight to receive them? Is he not become more glorious to our view, from becoming so gracious to our need? Precious Lord, I would say for myself and reader, give each of us Grace to be everlastingly beholding thee into his most lovely portrait girded with thy towel; and the lower thou comest down to suit the wants of our souls, be thou the higher exalted in our hearts, and live and reign there for ever!...
Morning - His love, his Grace, his salvation, all are as "a morning without a cloud. So that from the first dawn of Grace in their hearts until that Grace is consummated in glory, the Lord Jesus is a sun that no more goeth down, a morning without a cloud; for he not only giveth light, but is himself their light, and their God, their glory
Hate - All the claims of nature are, for the most part, unfavourable to the pursuits of Grace. Hence, therefore, if my own body becomes a rebel, and an enemy to my own soul, so that I cannot do the things I would, certainly I hate it; and if I hate my own flesh, from the opposition it is continually making to a life of Grace, in the same sense, and upon the same account, I must, and do hate all the opposers of the divine life, be they who they may, or what they may. And since every thing in nature is hostile to a life of Grace, so that my own corrupt heart is a much greater enemy to my soul's enjoyment in Christ, than either the world, or the powers of darkness, I do hate all, and every tie of nature, yea, and my own life also, in every degree, and by every way in which they are found to oppose, or run counter, to the pursuit of the soul in her desires after the Lord Jesus Christ
Perseverance - The perseverance of the saints is their continuance in a state of Grace to a state of glory. It is argued, from the work of the Spirit, which is to communicate Grace and strength equal to the day, Philippians 1:6 . If, indeed, divine Grace were dependent on the will of man, if by his own power he had brought himself into a state of Grace, then it might follow that he might relapse into an opposite state when that power at any time was weakened; but as the perseverance of the saints is not produced by any native principles in themselves, but by the agency of the Holy Spirit, enlightening, confirming, and establishing them, of course, they must persevere, or otherwise it would be a reflection on this Divine agent, Romans 8:9 . To which it is answered, that this doctrine, like many others, may be abused, by hypocrites, but cannot be so by those who are truly serious, it being the very nature of Grace to lead to righteousness, Tit
Hanani - (huh nay' ni) Personal name meaning, “my Grace” or a shortened form of “Yahweh is gracious
Mortal Sin - It deprives one of sanctifying Grace and thus prevents one from acquiring merit or sharing in the satisfying merits of the Church
Death - ,a privation of sanctifying Grace; and eternal death, i
Frequent Communion - Though Holy Communion is not absolutely necessary for salvation, yet without the reception of its Graces it would be difficult to resist grave temptations and avoid mortal sin for any length of time. The proper disposition as indicated by Pope Pius X requires nothing beyond the state of Grace (freedom from mortal sin) and a right and pious intention in communicating, e
Gospel - " It is termed "the gospel of the Grace of God" ( Acts 20:24 ), "the gospel of the kingdom" (Matthew 4:23 ), "the gospel of Christ" (Romans 1:16 ), "the gospel of peace (Ephesians 6:15 ), "the glorious gospel," "the everlasting gospel," "the gospel of salvation" (Ephesians 1:13 )
Self: Watchfulness Over - Their workhouse, or their actions, wherein they retail to others for God's glory the Grace entrusted to them; teaching the ignorant, comforting the poor, visiting the sick, eta
Evidence - Evidences of Grace are those dispositions and acts which prove a person to be in a converted state; such as an enlightened understanding; love to God and his people; a delight in God's word; worship and dependence on him; spirituality of mind; devotedness of life to the service of God, &c
Holiness of God - By his Grace, which influences the subjects of it to be holy, Titus 2:10 ; Titus 2:12
Adoption - An act of God's Grace by which he brings men into the number of his redeemed family, and makes them partakers of all the blessings he has provided for them
Latin - Where Greek was allowed in court pleadings, it was, so to speak, an act of Grace on the judge’s part, and there can be little doubt that, e
Pit - ...
Psalm 88:6 (b) Since this was written by the sons of Korah, whose father went down to hell alive, therefore, it may be that these sons are indicating that they too should have been punished by GOD, but instead were saved by His Grace
Body - ...
Ephesians 1:23 (a) The body is used here in the sense that all the members of the body of CHRIST, those who are saved by Grace, belong to one another
Calling - ...
1 Corinthians 7:20 (c) The word here evidently refers to the kind of business in which the person was engaged when he was saved by Grace
Evangelist, - One who evangelises, or preaches the glad tidings of the Grace of God unto salvation
Scripture - It is in short a God-inspired and infallible revelation to man, and especially to those who are by Grace in relationship with Him
Call - ...
...
God calls with respect to men when he designates them to some special office (Exodus 31:2 ; Isaiah 22:20 ; Acts 13:2 ), and when he invites them to accept his offered Grace (Matthew 9:13 ; 11:28 ; 22:4 )
Hannah - HANNAH (‘grace’)
Sprinkle - So in the death of CHRIST He is telling us figuratively that in every nation, and among all peoples He will sprinkle the Blood of His Son on hearts and lives to make them His own children, and to save them by His Grace
Elihu - The purport of Elihu's address is that God acts in Grace and blessing to deliver man from evil, and to chastise and break him down
Means of Grace - Indeed, the systems of nature, providence, and Grace, are all carried on by means
Archibishop - His Grace of Canterbury is the first peer of England, and the next to the royal family, having precedence of all dukes, and all great officers of the crown
Bounty, Bountifully - ...
3: ἁδρότης (Strong's #100 — Noun Feminine — charis — had-rot'-ace ) "grace," is rendered, "bounty" in 1 Corinthians 16:3 , RV, (AV, "liberality"), by metonymy for a material gift
Blasphemy Against the Holy Ghost - However these questions may be answered, certain it is that when one can ridicule religion and its ordinances, when he can make sport with the work of the Holy Ghost in the human heart, when he can persist in a willful disbelief of the Gospel, and cast contempt upon Christianity and "the ministration of the Spirit," he is going to a fearful extremity of guilt, and provoking the final withdrawment of divine Grace
Sin, Mortal - It deprives one of sanctifying Grace and thus prevents one from acquiring merit or sharing in the satisfying merits of the Church
Reconcile - ...
Some figures monstrous and misshap'd appear, considered singly, or beheld too near which but proportion'd to their light and place, due distance reconciles to form and Grace
Sacrament - By that church, the meaning of the word sacrament is declared to be "an outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual Grace given unto us, ordained by Christ himself, as a means whereby we receive the same, and a pledge to assure us thereof. "...
Accorcing to this definition, baptism and the Lord's supper are certainly sacraments, for each consists of an outward and visible sign of what is believed to be an inward and spiritual Grace, both were ordained by Christ himself, and in the reception of each does the Christian solemnly devote himself to the service of his divine Master
Reward - God saves sinners solely by his Grace and gives eternal life as a free gift, not as a reward for personal effort (Romans 6:23; Ephesians 2:8-9; see FAITH). ...
God’s rewards are therefore evidences of his immeasurable Grace
Olive (Tree) - Some think that these two trees represent Moses and Elijah, Moses the lawgiver, and Elijah the Grace giver. ...
All are saved by Grace
Impossibility - There is also an impotence of faith which is content to allow impossibility in the sphere of Grace. But the range of impossibility in the world of nature and in the sphere of Grace is narrowed to evanescence by the faith of the Christian disciple
Shepherds - But circumcised shepherds, and sacrificing shepherds, to the God of Abraham, when the cause of covenant Grace and mercy was discovered, would have done then as it hath ever since done in the church of Jesus, stirred up the natural hatred of the heart against the chosen seed. They dwell alone in the purpose, council, will, and love of God the Father, the Grace and favour of Christ, and the anointings quickenings, and fellowship of God the Holy Ghost
Flax - ...
The tearing up of the flax from its native soil, its exposure to the scorching sun, its being torn by the comb's long teeth, and sunk in the water with stones attached, so as ultimately to be transfigured into raiment white as snow, illustrate how the Christian is prepared for Grace and glory through long and varied afflictions now. The believer is the lamp (Greek, Matthew 5:15; John 5:35), his conscience enlightened by the Holy Spirit is the wick; "smoking "means dimly burning, smoldering, the flame not extinct; "bruised" in himself, but having some spark lighted from above, Christ will supply such a one with Grace as with oil, and will not stifle the little flame
Flourish - To grow in Grace and in good works to abound in the consolations of religion. To embellish with the flowers of diction to adorn with rhetorical figures to Grace with ostentatious eloquence to set off with a parade of words
Zerubbabel - In Zechariah 4 this son of David is taken as a type of Christ, the promised Son of David, who will be the cause in a yet future day of the temple being built with shoutings, of "Grace, Grace unto it
Zion, Sion, Mount Zion - It represents the intervention of sovereign Grace in the person of God's elect king, when Israel were utterly helpless, and the ark had been given into the hands of the enemy. In scripture Zion never means the church: it always signifies blessing on earth, and is specially in connection with Israel, when the ultimate blessing of the nations will be through Israel; nevertheless Christians now enter into its spiritual import as being under the reign of Grace while here on earth
Election, - Were it not for election, and the prevailing Grace that follows it, not one would be saved. Christ died for all, and the gospel is proclaimed to all, Romans 3:22 ; Hebrews 2:9 ; but alas, except for the election and Grace of God, none would respond
Heritage - " (Psalms 94:5) See some other sweet Scriptures to this amount: (Joel 2:17; Micah 7:14-18; Isaiah 58:14)...
But when the reader hath duly pondered the blessed thought of beholding the Lord and his fulness as the heritage of his people, and his people as his heritage of delight, both in nature, providence, and Grace, there is one thought more the subject of heritage proposeth to the meditation that ought not to be forgotten, The customs and manners of the eastern world differ so widely in many points from ours, that unless due attention be had to them we lose much of the sense and spirit of the things spoken of. Jesus hath adopted them as his, both by his Father's gift, and by his own purchase, and by the conquests of his Grace; nothing therefore, can dispossess their undoubted right in Jesus and his fulness as their heritage for ever. He lives to put them into possession: and this they have not by reversion, but by present inheritance, here by Grace through faith, and hereafter in glory. And though too often, like the prodigal in the parable, we waste and abuse the bounties of our heritage, yet, like him, the eye of our God and Father is always on the look-out for our return, and when by Grace brought back, as he was, we are graciously received, and made happy in the pardoning mercy and love of our Father
Neonomianism - One opinion is, that the new covenant of Grace which, through the medium of Christ's death, the Father made with men, consists, according to this system, not in our being justified by faith, as it apprehends the righteousness of Christ; but in this, that God, abrogating the exaction of perfect legal obedience, reputes or accepts of faith itself, and the imperfect obedience of faith, instead of the perfect obedience of the law, and graciously accounts them worthy of the reward of eternal life. Is faith, or any other Grace or acts of ours, any atonement for sin, satisfaction to justice, meriting qualification, or any part of that righteousness for which we are justified at God our Creator's bar. Nor whether the Gospel be a law that allows sin, when it accepts such Graces as true, though short of perfection, to be the conditions of our personal interest in the benefits purchased by Christ. Is the Gospel a law in this sense; namely, God in Christ thereby commandeth sinners to repent of sin, and receive Christ by a true operative faith, promising that thereupon they shall be united to him, justified by his righteousness, pardoned, and adopted; and that, persevering in faith and true holiness, they shall be finally saved; also threatening that if any shall die impenitent, unbelieving, ungodly, rejecters of his Grace, they shall perish without relief, and endure sorer punishments than if these offers had not been made to them?...
2. Do the Gospel promises of benefits to certain Graces, and its threats that those benefits shall be withheld, and the contrary evils inflicted for the neglect of such Graces, render these Graces the condition of our personal title to those benefits? This they deny, and I affirm," &c. But those who first engaged in the controversy, though they allowed the encouragement to repent and believe to arise merely from the Grace of the Gospel, yet considered the formal obligation to do so as arising merely from the moral law, which, requiring supreme love to God, requires acquiescence in any revelation which he shall at any time make known
Spirituality - As in the Old Testament, spirituality does not imply that one is to flee this world to find God, but that one must find God and grow in Grace in this world, even discovering avenues (i. It requires divine Grace (first and always) and deliberate human cooperation. This is simplicity, and it requires the Grace of God and our response of total sacrifice and the transformation of our minds (Romans 12:1-2 ). So, they are means to an endlike a balloon angioplasty that opens up our spiritual arteries to receive and circulate divine Grace. They put us in a condition whereby God's Grace can really work on us. It has been called "sanctifying" or "habitual" Grace because it is not just a momentary help, but a vital source of holiness. ...
On the way to this conformation to Christ's image we will experience continuing struggle (Romans 7:15-25 ); but we also will continually experience God's Grace, for through Christ we are "more than conquerors" (2 Corinthians 5:17 ; 8:37 ), something that should manifest itself in every aspect of the Christian's existence as the one who calls us remains faithful to complete what he began in us (Philippians 1:6 )
Elisha - ...
Elisha's first miracle was healing the waters at Jericho, the cursed city, by means of salt in a new cruse: type of the purifying power of Grace. His mission was Grace as from an ascended one; the waters were permanently healed, and the ground was no longer barren. Elisha had come as it were from heaven, into which Elijah had entered, and he came in Grace, and if this was despised, judgement must follow, as it will be with Israel by-and-by. Elisha was sought for, and he boldly told Jehoram to go to the gods of his father and mother: if Jehoshaphat had not been there he would not have helped them, nevertheless there was Grace for them. This was Grace extending beyond the land, even to their enemies. ...
The Syrians had now to learn a lesson of the power of the God of Israel, but still in Grace. As we have seen, Elisha's mission was Grace, and his history to the end is stamped with the power of life
Esau - In the history of those two brothers, we have enough to answer and silence all cavils respecting distinguishing Grace from God's own testimony. ) But while this doctrine concerning distinguishing Grace is fully displayed in the history of Jacob and Esau from those Scriptures, there is one point more relating to Esau which deserves to be particularly considered, and the more so, from the misapprehension of many respecting it. (2 Corinthians 7:10) The former, like Esau's, is wholly from nature the latter, Paul describes, is from Grace
Reed - ...
A "bruised reed" (Isaiah 42:3 ; Matthew 12:20 ) is an emblem of a believer weak in Grace
Zephani'ah - The chief characteristics of this book are the unity and harmony of the composition, the Grace, energy and dignity of its style, and the rapid and effective alternations of threats and promises
Bells - Sacramentals of the Church, blessed with religious rites, and used to remind men of religion and of God, thereby increasing His Grace in their souls
Desertion - Neglect of duty, improper views of Providence, self-confidence, a worldly spirit, lukewarmness of mind, inattention to the means of Grace, or open transgression, may be considered as leading to this state
Priests: Superstitious Reverence of - ' ...
How few steps would land Tractarians in the same degradation! Their priests are the channels of Grace to them, from them they receive regeneration and absolution, and from their hands they receive the god of bread whom they adore and eat
Schools (2) - Catechize the children, let the whole population be taught; especially let the gospel be brought to bear on the rising generation, and by God's Grace John Bull will be free, and his first effort will be to toss the priests and make them fly aloft like Sancho Panza in the blanket
Providence: Rightly Places us - Providence, which arranged your surroundings, appointed them so that, all things being considered, you are in the position in which you can best display the wisdom and the Grace of God
Sorrow: Benefit of - Better far for the seed to pass intO the earth and die, than to lie in the sunshine and produce no fruit; and even thus for thee the future in its sorrow shall be as a sowing in a fertile land; tears shall moisten thee, Grace shall increase within tjee, and thou shalt grow up in the likeness of thy Lord unto perfection of holiness, to be such a flower of God's own planting as even angels shall delight to gaze upon in the day of thy transplanting to celestial soil
Alien - In scripture, one who is a stranger to the church of Christ, or to the covenant of Grace
Anna - Hannah , which means ‘grace’)
Hammer - The Lord Himself makes each living stone a part of the building, and then He brings us together to form the local church made up of sinners already saved by Grace
Lodge - Isaiah 1:8 (a) The lesson to be learned from this type is that the people of Israel had forsaken the gardens of GOD, the flowers and fruits of GOD's love and Grace, and preferred to dwell among the pleasures of this world
Banner - There is the banner of His power and also of His love, and also of His sufficiency, and also of His Grace
Publicans - " But God's Grace was for all, and Matthew was called from his office of publican to be one of the apostles
Hart - The former is the male stag, one of the most Graceful and beautiful of all animals. It was clean by the Levitical law, Deuteronomy 12:15; Deuteronomy 14:5, and the Grace and agility of its motions are alluded to in Song of Solomon 2:9; Isaiah 35:6
Gibeon - Were the Gibeonites in those instances a type of the salvation of the Gentile church, brought in by sovereign Grace into the privileges of Christ Jesus? Was this nation set apart in those early ages of the church, by way of shewing Christ's interest in his people, in being "a light to lighten the Gentiles, as well as the glory of his people Israel?" I do not decide upon the subject; I only ask the interesting question
Gospel - And so infinitely important and interesting is it in the eyes of all men that are made partakers of its saving Grace, that the very feet of them that are commissioned to preach it are said to be beautiful
Mount Amalek - )...
Behold, reader, in the history of Esau's race, and their bitter enmity against the seed of Jacob, the type of that unceasing and everlasting war which takes place between nature and Grace, between the children of the bondwoman and the children of the free
Gomorrha - " (Revelation 21:8)...
Had there been ten righteous men in Sodom and Gomorrha, the Lord's Grace would have been manifested in the salvation of the place
Eli - We see in him a decided proof of the great danger of consulting the feelings of nature, rather than obeying the precepts of Grace
Lascivious, Lasciviousness - 1: ἀσέλγεια (Strong's #766 — Noun Feminine — aselgeia — as-elg'-i-a ) denotes "excess, licentiousness, absence of restraint, indecency, wantonness;" "lasciviousness" in Mark 7:22 , one of the evils that proceed from the heart; in 2 Corinthians 12:21 , one of the evils of which some in the church at Corinth had been guilty; in Galatians 5:19 , classed among the works of the flesh; in Ephesians 4:19 , among the sins of the unregenerate who are "past feeling;" so in 1 Peter 4:3 ; in Jude 1:4 , of that into which the Grace of God had been turned by ungodly men; it is translated "wantonness" in Romans 13:13 , one of the sins against which believers are warned; in 2 Peter 2:2 , according to the best mss
Chasten, Chastening, Chastise, Chastisement - A — 1: παιδεύω (Strong's #3811 — Verb — paideuo — pahee-dyoo'-o ) primarily denotes "to train children," suggesting the broad idea of education (pais, "a child"), Acts 7:22 ; 22:3 ; see also Titus 2:12 , "instructing" (RV), here of a training gracious and firm; Grace, which brings salvation, employs means to give us full possession of it; hence, "to chastise," this being part of the training, whether (a) by correcting with words, reproving, and admonishing, 1 Timothy 1:20 (RV, "be taught"); 2 Timothy 2:25 , or (b) by "chastening" by the infliction of evils and calamities, 1 Corinthians 11:32 ; 2 Corinthians 6:9 ; Hebrews 12:6,7,10 ; Revelation 3:19
Repentance - But the true gospel repentance, or "repentance unto life," is sorrow for sin, grief for having committed it, and a turning away from it with abhorrence, accompanied with sincere endeavors, in reliance on God's Grace and the influences of the Holy Spirit, to live in humble and holy obedience to the commands and will of God
Gifts - The same word is also applied to the offerings required by the law, Deuteronomy 16:17 Matthew 5:23,24 ; to the blessings of the gospel and eternal life, which are preeminently gifts, Acts 8:20 ; to the Christian Grace, for the same reason, Ephesians 4:8,11 ; and to the miraculous endowments of the apostles, 1 Corinthians 12:1-14:40
Sick, Communion of the - The state of Grace is required in the sick as the proper disposition of soul
Cup - In a figurative sense, a cup is spoken of as filled with the portion given to one by divine providence, Psalm 11:6 16:5 ; with the blessings of life and of Grace, Psalm 23:5 ; with a thank-offering to God, Exodus 29:40 Psalm 116:13 ; with liquor used at idolatrous feasts, 1 Corinthians 10:21 ; with love-potions, Revelation 17:4 ; with sore afflictions, Psalm 65:8 Isaiah 51:17 ; and with the bitter draught of death, which was often caused by a cup of hemlock or some other poison, Psalm 75:8
Election - The idea of election, as expressive of God’s method of accomplishing His purpose for the world in both providence and Grace, though (as befits the character of the Bible as peculiarly ‘the history of redemption’) especially in Grace, goes to the heart of Scripture teaching. It is strongly insisted on, therefore, that the reason of election is not anything in the object itself ( Romans 9:11 ; Romans 9:16 ); the ground of the election of believers is not in their holiness or good works, or even in fides prœvisa , but solely in God’s free Grace and mercy ( Ephesians 1:1-4 ; holiness a result, not a cause). They are ‘made a heritage, having been foreordained according to the purpose of him who worketh all things after the counsel of his will’ ( Ephesians 1:11 ); or, as in an earlier verse, ‘according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of the glory of his Grace’ ( Ephesians 1:6 ). Election goes deeper than Grace even into the sphere of nature. It cannot, therefore, be that in so great a matter as a soul’s regeneration (see Regeneration), and the translating of it out of the darkness of sin into the light and blessing of Christ’s Kingdom ( Acts 26:18 , Colossians 1:12-13 , 1 Peter 2:9-10 ), the change should not be viewed as a supreme triumph of the Grace of God in that soul, and should not be referred to an eternal act of God, choosing the individual, and in His love calling him in His own good time into this felicity. ...
On this experiential basis Calvinist and Arminian may be trusted to agree, though it leaves the speculative question still unsolved of how precisely God’s Grace and human freedom work together in the production of this great change. Start from the Divine side, and the work of salvation is all of Grace; start from the human side, there is responsibility and choice. The elect, on any showing, must always be those in whom Grace is regarded as effecting its result; the will, on the other hand, must be freely won; but this winning of the will may be viewed as itself the last triumph of Grace God working in us to will and to do of His good pleasure (Philippians 2:13 , Hebrews 13:20-21 )
Prosper, Saint, a Native of Aquitaine - Some time between 420 and 427 John Cassian put forth in his Collationes a doctrine concerning Grace and free will contrary to that taught by St. To this letter are subjoined in some editions a series of so-called decisions of the apostolic see concerning Grace and free will, which, however, cannot be regarded as authentic. Those who adopted it, he says, believe that mankind has sinned in Adam, and that without God's Grace there can be no salvation for any one. But before the creation of the world God foreknew who would believe and be saved, and predestined them to His kingdom, being called by Grace and worthy of being chosen and of going out of life sound in faith. They also think that men can by their own merit, by praying, beseeching, knocking, attain that state of Grace in which we are born anew unto Christ. They also deny that the merits of saints proceed from divine Grace, and that the number of the elect can be either increased or diminished, and they assert that the only way in which a man is called either to repentance or to progress in holiness is by the exercise of his own free will. They thus place obedience before Grace, and the first step towards salvation in him who is to be saved, not in Him Who saves. He therefore begs Augustine to explain (a ) how Christian faith can escape division through these disputes; (b ) how free will can be independent of prevenient Grace; (c ) whether God's foreknowledge is absolute and complete; (d ) whether foreknowledge depends in any way on human purpose, and whether there can be any good which does not proceed from God; (e ) how those who despair of their own election can escape carelessness of life. The line of argument against Pelagian or semi-Pelagian views is much the same as in the letter to Augustine, but he also mentions the cases of Cornelius and Lydia as instances of persons who had been led by God's Grace into the way of eternal life, and as not by any means favouring the Pelagian theory. —The longest is the poem de Ingratis, a term by which he describes those who teach erroneous doctrine about Grace, viz
Tabernacle - " (Colossians 2:10) Founded in his marvellous person, the church hath her Tabernacle in Christ Jesus, her resting place, her sure portion for Grace here, and glory for ever. " And by virtue of Christ's human nature, to which his whole body, the church, is united; all, and every individual member, the weakest and humblest, as well as the strongest and the highest, have their completeness in the justifying righteousness of his person to bear them up, and bring them on before JEHOVAH, in Grace here, and to bear them home, and bring them in before JEHOVAH in his three-fold character of person, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, in glory for evermore
Romans, Epistle to the - He shows that salvation is all of Grace, and only of Grace
Sifting - It is of the essence of the ways of God with men alike in providence and Grace. Readier and rougher means of Grace have their earlier day; this is a delicate, even final, means of dealing with the finest of the wheat
Union to Christ - That act of divine Grace by which we are joined to Christ; and is considered, ...
1. 17; Flavel's Method of Grace, ser
Rainbow - Notwithstanding, therefore, what some men tell us of the physical causes by which the rainbow, they say, is produced, yet still I desire to look at it as the result of higher purposes in Grace, and to behold it in every renewed view as the sweet and glorious token JEHOVAH hangs out in the heavens of JEHOVAH'S covenant in Christ. Men who study nature may see God in the works of nature; and they who study providences may see God in the works of his providences; but they who study the works of Grace; when taught of God, will discover Christ in the whole of those great designs, and behold the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ!...
Lattice - But such was my Lord's Grace towards me, (saith the church) that from hence, as the most open place of communication, he shewed himself to me. Though Jesus might be said to stand behind our wall; that is, perhaps, through a vail of flesh, to manifest himself to his people while on earth, and to look forth at the windows of his Grace; that is, when in the ordinances of his word he doth distinguish himself to them otherwise than he doeth to the world; yet, through those lattices, he makes known what he is, and what his love to his people is, and ever will be, until the shadows flee away, and the day break of the everlasting morning shineth in upon the soul, and the sun of his redeemed ariseth no more to go down, neither the moon to withdraw his shining, but the Lord himself becometh their everlasting light, and their God their glory
Ephesians, Book of - ...
“Grace be to you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ” (Ephesians 1:2 ) is in all of Paul's epistles. It is always in that order, Grace and peace. Grace is the work of the Father by which salvation from sin comes. Peace is the condition of the believer's heart after Grace has done its work. They are in that order because there can be no peace in the heart until Grace has done its work. A refrain “to the praise of the glory of His Grace” repeats itself after each section, each with a slight variation. This power can come to persons who were dead in sin but are saved by Grace, being raised up with Christ to participate in His rule but also to live out of Grace in the good works God has planned for His people to do. This good news is a mystery, a mystery God calls people to share with other people through His Grace and a mystery which allows all people to approach God in confidence and freedom. As usual, Paul concluded his letter with a benediction, praying for peace, love, faith, and Grace for his beloved readers. Live under God's benediction of peace, love, faith, and Grace (Ephesians 6:23-24 )
Trust - Only the revelation of His Grace can call forth and ground faith in God. The essential characteristic of faith is indeed receptivity; but it is a mistake to suppose that the trustful yielding of self to God is anything more or other than the opening of the heart and life to His influence and control through the overmastering revelation of the Grace of Christ. ...
So long as the revelation of God’s Grace was not yet complete in the sending forth of His Son and then of the Spirit of His Son (Galatians 4:4-6), faith could not rise to its full measure. ...
Since the sovereign Grace of God manifested in Jesus Christ is the only ground of our assurance, we must place no confidence in the flesh (Philippians 3:3 ff. And when by His Grace our heart is set free from self-condemnation, our communion with God may be unbroken. Thereby he experiences a present Grace and rejoices in the sure hope of the glory of God (Romans 5:1-2). Out of the richness of the Grace of this fellowship he can know that all things work together for his good, that is, for his salvation, and he is persuaded that nothing can separate him from the love of God which is in Christ. In every condition he proves the sufficiency of Christ’s Grace (e. ’ Moreover, the Grace of our fellowship works zeal in service (1 Corinthians 15:10). Because he knows the Grace of Christ he can gladly accept his own lot in life, and ‘in the patience of hope and the labour of love’ serve and wait and watch (Luke 12:35-36, 2 Corinthians 5:9-10). It is our part to make sure of our union with Christ, and then to see that we receive not the Grace of God in vain (2 Corinthians 6:1)
Samuel - The preciousness of the Lord's words, in this period of the church, when open visions were for a time suspended; the special Grace shewn to Samuel in a season of general depravity, and when even the sons of Eli, who were priests of the Lord, were given up to a state of daring impiety end uncleanness; the childhood of Samuel, so particularly noted in the history, as if to encourage the youthful part of the Lord's people to be found waiting on the Lord in ordinances; all these, and more to the same purport, which this relation of the call of Samuel brings forward, would furnish much observation for improvement. This is what the Scriptures call preventing Grace; hence David, in a degree of holy rapture, cries out, The God of my mercy shall prevent me; that is, shall be before hand with me in all my need. Such are the marks of distinguishing Grace in all ages of the church. Who can mark the properties of distinguishing Grace in their own case and circumstances without having the heart melted into the fullest sense of affection?"Lord "Lord how is it (said the astonished disciple) that thou wilt manifest thyself unto us and not unto the world
Garden - " (Galatians 4:26; John 10:16; Ephesians 4:4-5; Eph 5:30) And what endears the whole, and renders it most blessed is, that Christ the glorious Head, to whom the whole body is united, supplies all, justifies all, sanctifies all, and is himself the all of life and strength, and the portion to his people, in Grace here, and glory hereafter. As first a garden is an enclosure, separated and fenced round; so the church stands in the midst of the world's wide wilderness, gathered from it by sovereign Grace. Jesus hath bought it with his blood; the Father hath given it to Christ by Grace; and the Holy Ghost hath made it Christ's, by the sealing act of covenant faithfulness. " (Matthew 15:13) Fourthly, in a garden there are great varieties of plants and shrubs, and fruit-trees and flowers; so in Christ's church the fruits of the Spirit appear in a beautiful and regular order, some by the exercise of one Grace, and others by another, but "all these worketh that one and the self-same Spirit, dividing to every man severally as he will. " (Isaiah 27:3) And how, through pruning dispensations weeding out the remains of indwelling corruption in the heart, and by the digging round and nourishing the Graces of her Lord's own planting, doth Jesus keep alive and cause to flourish the several circumstances of his church and people
Pleroma - ) to expound pleroma as referring to ‘the whole treasure of Divine Grace’ with which the Son of God was endowed. A suggestive parallel to these Pauline sayings is furnished by John 1:16 , ‘of his fulness we all received, and Grace for Grace. ...
( c ) To individual believers as well as to His Church Christ imparts the plenitude of His Grace. Ephesians 4:13 gives the measure of the stature of the ‘full grown’ Christian; it is nothing less than the fulness which belongs to Christ, by which is meant ‘the full possession on our side of that which Christ has to impart the embodiment in us, the members, of the Graces and qualities which are in Him the Head’ (Salmond, EGT Foreknowledge - ...
In the remainder of the references given above it is the Divine foreknowledge which is in the mind of the Apostle, the object or objects being not facts or things but persons-these persons being objects of favourable regard-and the theme under consideration being some aspect of the Divine purpose of Grace towards men. ’ And he notes the pregnant sense of ‘know’ in such passages as Jeremiah 1:5, ‘Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee’; Isaiah 49:1, ‘The Lord hath called me from the womb; from the bowels of my mother hath he made mention of my name’; and Exodus 33:12 (spoken of Moses), ‘I know thee by name, and thou hast found Grace in my sight’ (cf. Paul ‘foreknowledge’ is the first link in the chain of the Divine purpose of Grace, the first step in the spiritual history of the believer (Romans 8:29, οὔς προέγνω), ‘foreordination’ the second, ‘effectual calling’ the third, ‘justification’ the fourth, ‘glory’ the fifth and last. Those whom God foreknew as His own of sovereign Grace, He also foreordained to be conformed to the image of His Son; but St. According the teaching of the two apostles already referred to, the Divine foreknowledge represents the first step in the scheme of redemption, marking out the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world which taketh away the sin of the world, and the first movement of Grace in the heart of God towards those who shall be saved
Feasts - The feast of Trumpets of the New Moon; the feasts of Expiation, or, as the Jews called it, Chippur; that is, pardon; because on this day it was considered, that an act of Grace took place from heaven, for the cleansing the sins and infirmities of all the people through the year. " (Isaiah 52:3)...
I think it highly proper, before I dismiss this article concerning the Jewish feasts, to remark to the reader, the distinguishing privilege we enjoy in the Christian church, in having all in one the sum and substance of every feast in the person, work, Grace, and glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. " (Revelation 20:5) And is not God the Holy Ghost glorified and honoured in the Christian sabbath, at the renewal of the sacred day, in that then is celebrated his first open and visible display of his love and mercy over the church, when at Pentecost he came down upon the people? Doth not every regenerated child of God here also, as in the other instances, testify, that it is by the sovereignty of his power and Grace, he is quickened to a new and spiritual life, and now waits again on the Lord, in his holy ordinance of the sabbath, for the renewing of the Holy Ghost to be shed on him abundantly, through Jesus Christ our Lord? (Titus 3:5-6)...
Surely, these are very clear and incontestible evidences of the true commemoration of the Christian sabbath, when, in the observance, special and distinct acts of praise and honour, are given to each glorious person of the GODHEAD, as they are represented to us in the Scriptures of truth, in the several character-offices of their divine agency. And thus while each and every one hath the special and distinct acts of praise given to them, for the special acts of Grace and mercy shewn to the church in Christ, the whole form one and the same glorious object of adoration, love, and praise, as the eternal undivided JEHOVAH, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, both to the church on earth, and in heaven, to all eternity. And when at his house, at his table, at his ordinances, in his word, in every promise, and by every providence, the soul is kept alive by Grace in him, the feast is not at stated periods only, but continual
Conversion - Conversion is made possible by the goodness and Grace of God. ...
The Causes of Conversion The cause of conversion is the sovereign Grace and mercy of God. That finished work is the result of God's Grace. Whatever means and methods God uses to influence individuals—the preaching and teaching of truth, the prayers of the church, the circumstances of life—are the result of God's Grace. ...
The Conditions of Conversion If conversion is the result of Grace on God's part, it is the result of repentance and faith on a person's part. Faith is receiving the Grace God revealed through the Person and work of His Son
Rain - And the same in the moral and spiritual world, all comes from the same course in the Lord's own sovereignty and goodness; for as the sun the natural world is the first and predisposing cause, so in the moral and spiritual world it is the Sun of righteousness, from his divine operation on the hearts of his people, which brings forth the showers of Grace, and induceth all the blessed effects which follow in their lives and conversation. And as in nature, so in Grace, the Lord sends showers of Grace upon his inheritance when they are weary, from the blessed cause he here assigns: I will say to them, Thou art my people; and they shall say, Thou art my God?...
We hear often mention made in the Scriptures concerning the first rain, and the latter rain, in their season, (Deuteronomy 11:14) —and, no doubt, there was somewhat particularly suited and seasonable in both. And he will discover also, that that little word if is in italics, to intimate that it is not in the original; and therefore the coming of the Lord as the morning, is not made to depend upon our ifs, but is the sole result or, his own free Grace. And surely no thing can be more beautiful and lovely in the promise of Jesus coming to his people, both in the early and latter manifestations of his Grace, than in the resemblance here made of it to the genial influences of the early and the latter rain. His goings forth are prepared as the morning of eternity, and in the morning of time, his first manifestations in Grace, and in all the after seasons of his love, when visiting his people. And while he protects from wrath, he com forts with his refreshments of Grace; and is not only a covert from the wind, but like rivers of water to the soul, which satisfy the thirsty desires, as travellers in a desert when they find a sweet spring in the way
Hippo, Augustine of, Saint - For 34 years he wrote and preached against the heresies of the times; becoming renowned as a philosopher, a theologian, and especially as the Doctor of Grace
Admiration - (Psalms 17:7) So that it is marvellous, and it is to the admiration of his people and of all that look on, when the Lord by his Grace distinguisheth them from others
Dove - (Song of Song of Solomon 2:14) And the comparison is certainly very just; for as the dove in nature is a very beautiful, and clean, and affectionate creature, so the church in Grace, when washed in Christ's blood, and justified in Christ's righteousness, and made comely from the comeliness her Lord hath put upon her, is all-glorious within, and hath no spot, or blemish, but is without blame before Jesus in love
Willows - Spiritually it is thus made manifest to us that in using the means of Grace the believer thrives (Isaiah 44:4)
Tamar - Was this intentional to set forth the Grace of JEHOVAH and the unparralleled condescension of the Lord Jesus? Who shall answer the question? Who shall explain the subject? One thing is certain; as every thing in redemption is mysterious, so in our exercises on mysteries the lowest humbleness of opinion becomes the highly-favoured objects of such unheard of mercy Lord! I would say for myself and reader, "thy way is in the sea: and thy path in the great waters, and thy footsteps are not known
Lebanon - " (Song of Song of Solomon 4:15) And the idea is as beautiful as the figure is just and correct: for as the cold flowing waters which descend from the mountain of Lebanon refresh the earth, and cool the hot climate, and are very copious, and run with rapidity; so the Grace of God in Christ Jesus, like the water of life, runs freely, graciously, and abundantly, to make "glad the city of God
Ananias - He was a high priest of Israel, and is a type of one who gains great ascendancy in a religious organization, but is an enemy of Grace, is opposed to JESUS as Lord, and seeks to turn men's hearts away from the Truth into a false religion
Health - ...
Isaiah 58:8 (a) This is a description of the healthy, holy and godly person who fulfills the description found in verse Isaiah 58:7 and so reveals the fact to others that he is growing in Grace and in the knowledge of GOD and in usefulness
Vine - In his person, blood, and righteousness, the church finds an Eshcol, a cluster of all divine perfections, all suited Grace, all glory
Augustine of Hippo, Saint - For 34 years he wrote and preached against the heresies of the times; becoming renowned as a philosopher, a theologian, and especially as the Doctor of Grace
Confirmation - In the defense and confirmation of the gospel, ye are all partakers of my Grace
Labadists - Among other things, he maintained that God might and did, on certain occasions, deceive men; that the faithful ought to have all things in common; that there is no subordination or distinction of rank in the true church; that in reading the Scriptures greater attention should be paid to the internal inspiration of the Holy Spirit than to the words of the text; that the observation of Sunday was a matter of indifference; that the contemplative life is a state of Grace and union with God, and the very height of perfection
Moriah - " And the bruises of Jesus, when it pleased JEHOVAH to put him to grief, while they affect in contemplation the heart of the redeemed, yet, like sweet dropping myrrh, they distil all spiritual blessings in a fragrancy most refreshing and delightful, in pardon, mercy, peace, Grace, faith and all the blessings of the covenant
Cock - For as Peter heard the first crowing of the cock without the least emotion, so do men hear the word of God, when unaccompanied with Grace, untouched and unconcerned
Chosen of God - We find this, act of special Grace in JEHOVAH, as it concerns the person of Christ and his people in him, so often in the Scripture, and as it is so important, I have thought a reference to some of the more prominent texts would not be unacceptable, in a work of this kind
Sanctification - that work of God's Grace by which we are renewed after the image of God, set apart for his service, and enabled to die unto sin and live unto righteousness. Sanctification comprehends all the Graces of knowledge, faith, repentance, love, humility, zeal, patience, &c, and the exercise of them in our conduct toward God or man:...
Galatians 5:22-24 ; 1 Peter 1:15-16 ; Matthew 5:6-7
Solomon - Some think that he received the Grace of final repentance
Joha'Nan - (gift or Grace of God )
Regeneration - A baptizedChristian may repeatedly fall from Grace, and by repentance, byamendment of life and by forgiveness he may be again restored,(this is Conversion), but he cannot be said to be again regeneratewithout a grievous misapprehension of the language of the Bible anda total departure from the Doctrine of the Primitive Church
Maria of Jesus - Concepcionistas...
C/ Vozmediano, 27...
42100 Ágreda (Soria), SPAIN ...
Works The Mystical City of God, the Divine History of the Virgin Mother of God (abridged) ...
Readings Not only was the Word conceived before all these by eternal generation from the Father, but His temporal generation from the Virgin Mother full of Grace, had already been decreed and conceived in the divine mind. Before the Second Coming of Christ, Mary must, more than ever, shine in mercy, might and Grace in order to bring unbelievers into the Catholic Faith
Olive - Emblem of Judah's adoption of God by Grace (Jeremiah 11:16; Romans 11:17), also of joy and prosperity. The tree was shaken to get the remnant left after the general gathering (by "beating," Deuteronomy 24:20), Isaiah 24:13; image of Israel's "remnant according to the election of Grace
Judaizers - Peter's actions are viewed by Paul as a serious compromise of the gospel of salvation by Grace through faith alone, lending support to the position that sought to impose Jewish ceremonial law on the Gentiles. Insisting that "Unless you are circumcised … you cannot be saved" (Acts 15:1 ), these "believers who belonged to the party of the Pharisees" (Acts 15:5 ) posed a serious threat to the gospel of Grace and the uNIVersality of the Christian mission
Agreda, Maria de - Concepcionistas...
C/ Vozmediano, 27...
42100 Ágreda (Soria), SPAIN ...
Works The Mystical City of God, the Divine History of the Virgin Mother of God (abridged) ...
Readings Not only was the Word conceived before all these by eternal generation from the Father, but His temporal generation from the Virgin Mother full of Grace, had already been decreed and conceived in the divine mind. Before the Second Coming of Christ, Mary must, more than ever, shine in mercy, might and Grace in order to bring unbelievers into the Catholic Faith
Servant - (So Gentiles, though aliens, bought with the blood of Christ, have all the privilege of Grace. The effects of sin were in the world, and God did not introduce Christianity in order to set the world right; but, while shedding light upon everything, and proclaiming Grace to all, God's purpose was "to take out of the nations a people for his name
Feet - And let any man, and every man, determine the point for himself: When is Jesus most lovely, most dear, and precious? Is it not when he is most condescending? Suppose the Lord Jesus were to wash my feet, as he did Peter's, would not such an act of Grace overwhelm my poor heart with love? Yea, would not the Lord Jesus be the more exalted to my view and in my esteem when in his matchless Grace he had been most condescending? How sweet are such views of Jesus!...
Righteousness - In man also it is the opposite of lawlessness or sin, 1 John 3:4-7 ; but it is plainly declared of man that, apart from a work of Grace in him, "there is none righteous, no, not one. Hence Grace is established on the foundation of righteousness
Feast of the Immaculate Conception - This was a singular privilege and Grace of God, granted in view of the merits of Jesus Christ. By her conception is meant not the act or part of her parents in it, nor the formation of her body, nor the conception of Christ later in her own womb; from the moment her soul was created and infused into her body, it was free from original sin and filled with sanctifying Grace. She had at least the Graces of the first Eve before the Fall and more. It is in accord with the texts of Scripture (Genesis 3), "I will put enmities between thee [1] and the woman, and thy seed and her seed"; (Luke 1), "Hail, full of Grace
Immaculate Conception - This was a singular privilege and Grace of God, granted in view of the merits of Jesus Christ. By her conception is meant not the act or part of her parents in it, nor the formation of her body, nor the conception of Christ later in her own womb; from the moment her soul was created and infused into her body, it was free from original sin and filled with sanctifying Grace. She had at least the Graces of the first Eve before the Fall and more. It is in accord with the texts of Scripture (Genesis 3), "I will put enmities between thee [1] and the woman, and thy seed and her seed"; (Luke 1), "Hail, full of Grace
Immaculate Conception, Feast of the - This was a singular privilege and Grace of God, granted in view of the merits of Jesus Christ. By her conception is meant not the act or part of her parents in it, nor the formation of her body, nor the conception of Christ later in her own womb; from the moment her soul was created and infused into her body, it was free from original sin and filled with sanctifying Grace. She had at least the Graces of the first Eve before the Fall and more. It is in accord with the texts of Scripture (Genesis 3), "I will put enmities between thee [1] and the woman, and thy seed and her seed"; (Luke 1), "Hail, full of Grace
Ruth - Trial and Tragedy Seemed to Offer Little Hope for God's Redeeming Grace (Ruth 1:1-22 ). The “emptiness” of Naomi's return to Judah provided the transition to God's Grace by means of Ruth (Ruth 1:19-22 ). In More Ways Than One, God Took a Potential Scandal and Made It the Way of Grace (Ruth 3:1-18 )
Name - All his gracious revelations in the person of his dear Son, his Grace, love, wisdom, mercy, and the whole constellation of glories manifested in Christ and by Christ; and so running through the whole kingdoms of nature, and providence, and Grace, and glory; so much, and infinitely more, is included in this one view of the glorious and fearful name of The Lord Thy God. " (Exodus 23:13) And hence we find, in after-ages of the church, the Lord again interposing with his Grace on this occasion, and saying: "And it shall be at that day, saith the Lord, that thou shalt call me Ishi, and shalt call me no more Baali; for I will take away the names of Baalim out of her mouth
Obed-Edom - What was it then, that prompted the mind of this pious faithful Gittite to receive the ark of God under such alarming circumstances? What was it, but thy Grace almighty Lord, that taught him to rejoice in thee and thy favour, while others were trembling under thy judgments? Oh! the blessedness of' distinguishing Grace, which makes that to thy people "a savour of life unto life," whilst to others it becomes"a savour of death unto death. Oh! for Grace, therefore, that while the ark of God, the Christ of God, is shut out of such numberless houses in this adulterous and sinful generation, many an Obed-edom may yet be found in our British Israel to welcome the Lord Jesus to their hearts, and he, and he alone, be formed there the hope of glory
Perseverance - Augustine, who, impelled by his predestinarian idea, explicitly affirmed a ‘donum perseverantiae’ to the justified, a supernatural gift of Grace to the elect by which they are kept indefectible. All who are predestinated receive the Divine Grace, are born again of the Spirit, shall certainly persevere to the end, and can never fall away either totally or finally from the state of Grace. While condemning Pelagianism in asserting that the justified cannot persevere without a special help of God, but with it can, it yet makes the power of perseverance to reside in the human will co-operative with Divine Grace. The Divine gift, while wholly of God’s Grace, is neither irresistible nor indefectible: it may be lost not only partially and temporarily but totally and finally. Lost Grace may be restored. The one certainty open to the saint is the obligation to the steadfast use of the whole ensemble of spiritual means whereby the human will is enabled to persevere unto the end and so be preserved in the state of Grace. In their view there is no hint of a dual causality of the soul’s life of Grace. For Grace and faith are ‘lively’-vital: they have moral energy impelling to action, not repose. It is that the Divine Grace besetting man’s heart, when turned to Him, engirds and subdues every interior faculty and quality (Philippians 3:21), implanting in each the dynamic of Divine affection unto constant, increasing ethical issue, ‘working mightily unto every good word and work. The steady tendency of religion is towards holiness; the Grace of God in Christ is wholly regulated by the inner purpose to make good men. The Graces of His character, mental and emotional, are reproduced in them by His might (Colossians 1:9-11), and confirmed in them by communion with Him (Colossians 2:6 f. He further is the earnest of the ultimate inheritance (Ephesians 1:14) in the hope of which He keeps the saved life in actual obedience and growth in Grace. That vindication of their standing in Grace is never absent from the apostolic assurance. Saintly experience is not all in one mould, but all differences, however great, may serve to manifest the power and the plenitude of the sanctifying Spirit of Grace, the innumerable varieties corroborating one another, and in their cumulative effect enhancing the impression made by each
Gospel - She is saved by divine Grace alone (55:1-7). Grace depends for its exercise upon the inability of its objects (Luke 14:12-14 ). Paul's gospel is both a witness to an expression of God's Grace (Acts 20:24 ; Colossians 1:5-6 ), power (Romans 1:16 ; 1Col 1:17-25), and glory (2Col 4:4-6; 1 Timothy 1:11 ). ...
The gospel offers salvation "through the Grace of our Lord Jesus" (Acts 15:11 ). Paul testifies "to the gospel of God's Grace" (Acts 20:24 ). The gospel is a witness to God's Grace. Yet in the place where God deals justly with sins, he shows Grace to sinners. The gospel is a channel of God's Grace
Calling - a term in theology, which is taken in a different sense by the advocates and the impugners of the Calvinistic doctrine of Grace. Thus they are saved, and called with a holy calling, not according to their works, but according to the divine purpose and Grace which was given them in Christ Jesus before the world began, 2 Timothy 1:9 . Paul refers, Romans 1:5-6 : "By whom we have received Grace and Apostleship, for obedience to the faith among all nations, for his name;" that is, to publish his Gospel, in order to bring all nations to the obedience of faith; "among whom ye are also the CALLED of Jesus Christ;" you at Rome have heard the Gospel, and have been invited to salvation in consequence of this design. This promulgation of the Gospel, by the personal ministry of the Apostle, under the name of calling, is also referred to in Galatians 1:6 : "I marvel that ye are so soon removed from him that called you into the Grace of Christ," obviously meaning, that it was he himself who had called them, by his preaching, to embrace the Grace of Christ. "Who hath saved us and called us with a holy calling; not according to our works, but according to ms own purpose and Grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began; but is now made manifest by the appearing of our Saviour Jesus Christ," 2 Timothy 1:9-10 . The great instrument of bringing men to "love God" is the Gospel; they are, therefore, called, invited by it, to this state and benefit; the calling being obeyed, they are justified; and being justified, and continuing in that state of Grace, they are glorified. Nothing, however, is here said to favour the conclusion, that many others who were called by the Gospel, but refused, might not have been justified and glorified as well as they; nothing to distinguish this calling into common and effectual: and the very guilt which those are every where represented as contracting who despised the Gospel calling, shows that they reject a Grace which is sufficient, and sincerely intended, to save them
Covenant - ...
The views which have been given furnish the ground upon which we defend that established language which is familiar to our ears, that there are only two covenants essentially different, and opposite to one another, the covenant of works, made with the first man, intimated by the constitution of human nature to every one of his posterity, and having for its terms, "Do this and live;" —and the covenant of Grace, which was the substance of the Abrahamic covenant, and which entered into the constitution of the Sinaitic covenant, but which is more clearly revealed, and more extensively published in the Gospel. This last covenant, which the Scriptures call new in respect to the mode of its dispensation under the Gospel, although it is not new in respect of its essence, has received, in the language of theology, the name of the covenant of Grace, for the two following obvious reasons: because, after man had broken the covenant of works, it was pure Grace or favour in the Almighty to enter into a new covenant with him; and, because by the covenant there is conveyed that Grace which enables man to comply with the terms of it. But, although there are mutual stipulations, the covenant retains its character of a covenant of Grace, and must be regarded as having its source purely in the Grace of God
Kingly Office of Christ - ...
Christ's mediatorial kingdom may be regarded as comprehending, (1) his kingdom of power, or his providential government of the universe; (2) his kingdom of Grace, which is wholly spiritual in its subjects and administration; and (3) his kingdom of glory, which is the consummation of all his providential and gracious administration
Eve - " And again, "That wife that is of God's making by special Grace, and of God's bringing by special providence, is likely to prove a helpmeet to her husband
Naaman - God's sovereign Grace, going beyond Israel and its many lepers to heal the Gentile Naaman, Jesus makes to be His justification for His not doing as many miracles in His own country as He had done in Capernaum, an earnest of the kingdom of God passing from Israel to the Gentiles; Luke the physician (Luke 4:23-27) appropriately is the evangelist who alone records it
First Fruits - The first fruits of the Spirit, are such communications of his Grace on earth, as fully assure us of the full enjoyment of God in heaven, Romans 8:23
Corruptions: Seen Even in Solitude - Neither publicity nor solitude avails anything until Grace prevails with us
Experience: Boasting of Its Depth - Be this last my experience: to go so deep as to reach the springs of everlasting love, and find all my poor doings and efforts totally submerged, because the blessed fountains of Grace have broken in upon me, covering all the mire, and rock, and earth of my poor, naturally evil heart
Thanksgiving - They should be particularly thankful that God, in his love, has chosen them (2 Thessalonians 2:13-14), made them sharers in his Grace (1 Corinthians 1:4), equipped them with faith, hope and love (Colossians 1:3-5), and given them a part in the service of the gospel (2 Corinthians 1:11; Philippians 1:4-5)
Affliction: an Incentive to Zeal - So, when our troubles are many we are often by Grace made courageous in serving our God; we feel that we have nothing to live for in this world, and we are driven, by hope of the world to come, to exhibit zeal, self-denial, and industry
Transformations of Grace - Grace transforms a villain into an honest man, a harlot into a holy woman, a thief into a saint
Quench - ...
Isaiah 42:3 (a) The word indicates that our lovely Lord would not hinder any believer who is struggling to make progress, to grow in Grace, and to become more useful
Building - It refers to the gathering together of those who are saved by Grace, washed in the blood of the Lamb, redeemed by power, and are actually and truly the children of GOD
Singing - "In psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with Grace in your hearts to the Lord
Favor - ) A kind act or office; kindness done or granted; benevolence shown by word or deed; an act of Grace or good will, as distinct from justice or remuneration
Apostolic Signatura - Originally a double Signatura, it was divided in 1492 into two distinct Signaturas, one of Grace, and one of justice
Kid - All of His ministry, all of His work, all of His Grace is for each individual believer
Temple - Every child of GOD like every piece of the temple in some way represents the majesty, the glory, the beauty, and the usefulness into which we have been called by His Grace
Spoil - ...
(NOUN)...
Song of Solomon 2:15 (a) The picture presented here represents those little sins, habits and conditions which are called "foxes," and which hinder the Christian from growing in Grace and from bearing fruit for GOD
Infants - This has nothing in it contrary to the perfections of God, or to any declaration of the Holy Scriptures; and it is highly agreeable to all those passages which affirm where sin hath abounded, Grace hath much more abounded
Comforter - His presence was accompanied by signal triumphs of Grace, and made amends for the absence of Christ
Signatura, Apostolic - Originally a double Signatura, it was divided in 1492 into two distinct Signaturas, one of Grace, and one of justice
Disciples - It denoted (1) all who believed in Him, though they remained where He had found them, pursuing their former avocations, yet rendering no small service to His cause by confessing their allegiance and testifying to His Grace (cf
Testify - To testify the gospel of the Grace of God
Pearl - (Revelation 21:21) And indeed it is very blessed to eye Jesus under all the loveliness of everything we meet with in the whole compass of creation, both in the kingdoms of nature, providence, Grace, and glory
Call, Called, Calling - Paul are ‘the elect’ from all eternity, and their ‘calling’ through the gospel and the means of Grace is the realization in time of God’s purpose with them from eternity: ‘that he might make known the riches of his glory upon vessels of mercy which he afore prepared unto glory, even us whom he also called not from the Jews only but also from the Gentiles’ (Romans 9:24). ‘The calling’ (ἡ κλῆσις) is ‘not of works’ but of the sovereign Grace of God (Romans 9:11), ‘who saved us and called us with a high calling (ἁγίᾳ κλήσει), not according to our works, but according to His own purpose and Grace, which was given in Christ Jesus before times eternal’ (2 Timothy 1:9). Paul associates with it; for, if he is ‘a called apostle’ (Romans 1:1), the particulars of his call, which was his conversion, are given when he tells how it pleased God to separate him from his mother’s womb and to call him by His Grace and to reveal His Son in him (Galatians 1:15-16). Paul and the apostolic writers generally have in view exercises upon those who are the subjects of it a Grace and a power which are of the Holy Spirit, who, in the words of the Westminster Divines, ‘convincing us of our sin and misery, enlightening our minds in the knowledge of Christ, and renewing our wills, doth persuade and enable us to embrace Jesus Christ, freely offered to us in the Gospel’ (Shorter Catechism, 31)
Reckon, Reckoning - 3); in Romans 4:3,5,6,9,11,22-24 , of "reckoning" faith for righteousness, or "reckoning" righteousness to persons, in all of which the RV uses the verb "to reckon" instead of the AV "to count or to impute;" in Romans 4:4 the subject is treated by way of contrast between Grace and debt, which latter involves the "reckoning" of a reward for works; what is owed as a debt cannot be "reckoned" as a favor, but the faith of Abraham and his spiritual children sets them outside the category of those who seek to be justified by self-effort, and, vice versa, the latter are excluded from the Grace of righteousness bestowed on the sole condition of faith; so in Galatians 3:6 (RV, "was reckoned," AV, "was accounted"); since Abraham, like all the natural descendants of Adam, was a sinner, he was destitute of righteousness in the sight of God; if, then, his relationship with God was to be rectified (i
Shepherd - He received them as the gift of his Father, and he hath purchased them with his blood; so that every tye of nature, interest, property, and Grace, endears them to Christ. Jesus knows all sheep, he calleth them all by name, his eye is always upon them, and his heart full of love towards them; he knows how helpless, poor, and prone to wandering they are; and he hath a suited Grace for every one and for all
Head - All the persons of the GODHEAD engaged in this plan of Grace, and set the wheels agoing from all eternity; and hence God the Father is called the God and Father"of our Lord Jesus Christ, of whom the whole family, in heaven and earth, is named. He is the source of life, of light, of salvation, of Grace here, and glory forever
Oil - "...
And what a blessed thought it is, that as the holy oil was poured on the head of Aaron, the great high priest of the Jewish dispensation, which ran down to the skirts of his clothing, so God the Holy Ghost anointed Jesus, our great and almighty High Priest, to whom Aaron was but the shadow, with "the oil of joy and gladness above and for his fellows;" yea, the Spirit was not given by measure unto him, for in him all fulness dwelleth? And Christ and his church being one and the same, he the glorious Head, and they his members, of "his fulness do we all receive, and Grace or Grace
Trespass - 17, a contrast in the nature and the effects); Romans 5:16 , where "of many trespasses" expresses a contrast of quantity; the condemnation resulted from one "trespass," the free gift is "of (ek, expressing the origin, and throwing stress upon God's justifying Grace in Christ) many trespasses;" Romans 5:17 , introducing contrast between legal effects and those of Divine Grace; Romans 5:18 , where the RV, "through one trepass," is contrasted with "one act of righteousness;" this is important, the difference is not between one man's "trespass" and Christ's righteousness (as AV), but between two acts, that of Adam's "trespass" and the vicarious death of Christ; Romans 5:20 Pelagianism And Pelagius - Augustine, who had read it, declared that it dwelt almost entirely upon the power and capacity of nature, only referring most cursorily to divine Grace, and leaving it doubtful whether by Grace Pelagius meant only the forgiveness of sins and the teaching and example of Christ, or that influence of the Spirit of God which corresponds to Grace proper and is an inward inspiration. In the second book Augustine argued that the first man might have lived without sin by the Grace of God and his own free will; that as a matter of fact no living man is wholly free from sin, for no man wills all that he ought, to do, owing to his ignorance of what is right or his want of delight in doing it; that the only man absolutely without sin is Christ, the God-man and Mediator. They had, however, been powerfully impressed by the arguments of Augustine on the nature of Christian Grace, and forwarded him a book of Pelagius, to which they requested a detailed answer. It affirmed it possible to live without sin by the Grace or help of God. But the Grace thus recognized was the natural endowment of free will, itself the gift of God, though sometimes the conception of it was enlarged so as to include the knowledge of right conveyed by the Law. The bishop quoted the scriptural instances of Abraham, who was bidden "to walk before God and be perfect," and of Zacharias and Elizabeth, who were described as "walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the law blameless," as affording a primâ facie justification of Pelagius, and argued, If Pelagius said that man could fulfil the commands of God without the aid of God, his doctrine would be wicked and worthy of condemnation, but as he maintained that man could be free from sin not without the aid of God, to deny this position would be to deny the efficacy of divine Grace. Orosius proceeded to anathematize the notion of such a denial of Grace, and, seeing that John was unwilling to admit a charge of heresy against Pelagius, appealed to another tribunal. It was alleged that he had disparaged the Grace of N. He explained that though he might have admitted the abstract possibility of sinlessness in man yet he had never maintained that there had existed any man who had remained sinless from infancy to old age but that a man on his conversion might continue without sin by his own efforts and the Grace of God though still liable to temptation and those who held an opposite opinion he begged leave to anathematize not as heretics but as fools. The bishops were satisfied with this acknowledgment that man by the help of God and by Grace can be with. Granting that the synods of Jerusalem and Diospolis might have been justified in the acquittal of Pelagius on the ground of his explanations, evasions, and disclaimers of responsibility for some of the positions alleged, they called attention to the continued prevalence of doctrines which affirmed the sufficiency of nature for the avoidance of sin and fulfilment of the commandments of God (thus virtually superseding the need of divine Grace), and which denied the necessity of baptism in the case of infants, as the way of obtaining deliverance from. They demanded that Pelagius should be summoned to Rome and examined afresh, to see whether he acknowledged Grace in the full scriptural sense. They specially marked some passages in Pelagius, from which they thought Innocent must inevitably conclude that Pelagius allowed no other Grace than the nature with which God had originally endowed man. He laid before Zosimus a confession of his faith, which, after a minute and elaborate exposition of the chief articles of the Catholic faith, dealt with the controverted doctrines of Grace. A strong protest was made against the views that the Grace of God by which we are justified through Jesus Christ avails only for the forgiveness of past sin and not for aid against the commission of sin, or that Grace is only the revelation of the will of God and not an inspiring principle of righteousness, or that Grace only enables us to do more easily what God commands
Chastisement - 2), But it saved him from being ‘exalted overmuch’ and became a means of such abundant Grace that he was led positively to glory in his weakness. This same Grace of God, which brings salvation to all who receive it, does not always appear in gentle instruction, but sometimes takes the form of stern chastisement; in a word, whatever means is necessary for the perfect redemption of the soul, that means will Grace employ (see Titus 2:11 ff
Jonah - It was the same with Israel: they could not bear Grace being shown to the Gentiles: cf. In like manner the obduracy of the Jews only opened the door wider for Grace to go to the Gentiles. God's clemency greatly displeased Jonah, and he was very angry; what would become of his reputation? In his prayer he repeated what he had at first said to himself about the Grace of God
More - 5, above), is translated "more (grace)" (RV marg. , "a greater Grace"). See Grace (at end)
Arminianism - The Calvinists held that God had elected a certain portion of the human race to eternal life, passing by the rest, or rather dooming them to everlasting destruction; that God's election proceeded upon no prescience of the moral principles and character of those whom he had thus predestinated, but originated solely in the motions of his free and sovereign mercy; that Christ died for the elect only, and therefore that the merits of his death can avail for the salvation of none but them; and that they are constrained by the irresistible power of divine Grace to accept of him as their Saviour. They maintain that God has elected those only who, according, not to his decree, but to his foreknowledge, and in the exercise of their natural powers of self-determination, acting under the influence of his Grace, would possess that faith and holiness to which salvation is annexed in the Gospel scheme. They hold, that Christ died for all men in the literal and unrestricted sense of that phrase; that his atonement is able, both from its own merit, and from the intention of him who appointed it, to expiate the guilt of every individual; that every individual is invited to partake of the benefits which it has procured; that the Grace of God is offered to make the will comply with this invitation, but that this Grace may be resisted and rendered ineffectual by the sinner's perversity. Whether true believers necessarily persevered, or whether they might fall from their faith, and forfeit their state of Grace, was a question which Arminius left in a great measure unresolved, but which was soon determined by his followers in this additional proposition, that saints may fall from the state of Grace, in which they are placed by the operation of the Holy Spirit. This, indeed, seems to follow as a corollary, from what Arminius maintained respecting the natural freedom and corruption of the will, and the resistibility of divine Grace. If a man hold that good works are necessary to justification; if he maintain that faith includes good works in its own nature; if he reject the doctrine of original sin; if he deny that divine Grace is requisite for the whole work of sanctification; if he speak of human virtue as meritorious in the sight of God; it is very generally concluded, that he is an Arminian. They admit, that our justification originates solely in the Grace of God. They adopted views of the corruption of man, of justification, of the righteousness of Christ, of the nature of faith, of the province of good works, of the necessity and operations of Grace, that are quite contrary to those which he had entertained and published. That this divine Grace or energy of the Holy Ghost begins and perfects every thing that can be called good in man, and consequently all good works are to be attributed to God alone; that, nevertheless, this Grace is offered to all, and does not force men to act against their inclinations, but may be resisted and rendered ineffectual by the perverse wills of impenitent sinners. That God gives to the truly faithful, who are regenerated by his Grace, the means of preserving themselves in this state; and though the first Arminians made some doubt with respect to the closing part of this article, their followers uniformly maintain, that the regenerate may lose true justifying faith, forfeit their state of Grace, and die in their sins
Sanctification - No one may presume on God's Grace in sanctification. Sanctification, therefore, is exclusively the work of God in Grace (Leviticus 21:8 ; Ezekiel 20:12 ; Hebrews 2:11 ; Jude 1 ). Believers under both the old and new covenants are sanctified the same wayby Grace through faith. Many Israelites were unsanctified personally because they presumed that their calling to be a redemptive nation guaranteed God's sanctifying Grace. The singular means of God's sanctifying Grace is Jesus Christ: "We have been made holy through the sacrifice of the body of Jesus Christ once for all" (Hebrews 10:10 ). God's method is Grace. They appeal to such verses as, "you are not under law, but under Grace" (Romans 6:14 b). Its purpose for believers, however, is to guide them to where Grace is leading them. In short, legalism is substituting law for Grace, achievement for faith. ...
Though God sanctifies by Grace, human beings are responsible to appropriate God's Grace by faith . Faith is "the" means of sanctifying Grace. Providence is God's superintendence over every detail of life so that a believer will always have a way to grow in Grace
Methodical Mental Prayer - This calls for remote preparation of the subject matter, and for preludes which help to fix the mind and imagination and petition for an appropriate Grace
Meditation - This calls for remote preparation of the subject matter, and for preludes which help to fix the mind and imagination and petition for an appropriate Grace
Bethesda - Ganneau identifies with the church of Anne, mother of Mary, Beit Hanna, really actually Bethesda, "house of Grace
Dull - civ), "Bradus differs from the words with which it is here brought into comparison, in that no moral fault or blame is necessarily involved in it; so far indeed is it from this, that of the three occasions on which it is used in the NT two are in honor; for to be 'slow' to evil things, to rash speaking, or to anger ( James 1:19 , twice), is a Grace, and not the contrary
to'Bit, Book of, - Almost every family relation is touched upon with natural Grace and affection
Devotion - "Wherever the vital and unadulterated spirit of Christian devotion prevails, its immediate objects will be to adore the perfections of God; to entertain with reverence and complacence the various intimations of his pleasure, especially those contained in holy writ; to acknowledge our absolute dependence on and infinite obligations to him; to confess and lament the disorders of our nature, and the transgressions of our lives; to implore his Grace and mercy through Jesus Christ; to intercede for our brethren of mankind; to pray for the propagation and establishment of truth, righteousness, and peace, on earth; in fine, to long for a more entire conformity to the will of God, and to breathe after the everlasting enjoyment of his friendship
Professors (Mere): Have no Changes - Artificial piety, like flowers in wax, droops not in the hour of drought, but the fair lily of true Grace hangs its head if the rain of heaven be denied
Quail - Psalms 105:40 connects the quail with the manna , and therefore refers to Exodus 16:13, the first sending of quails, the psalm moreover referring to God's acts of Grace
Betrothal - The forgiving love and Grace of God for his adulterous people is demonstrated by Hosea buying back his adulterous wife and restoring her to his home and protection (Hosea 2:19-20 )
Robe - to those who, coming as lost sinners to GOD by JESUS CHRIST, are saved by Grace, and washed white in the Blood of the Lamb
Mercury - The statue of the god by Praxiteles in the Heraion at Olympia conceived him as possessing peculiar beauty and Grace, which accords ill with the traditional portrait of the Apostle
God, Presence of - The frequent remembrance of the presence of God, especially His ordinary presence and His presence by Grace, is a traditionally fruitful religious practise
Renew - His is the gracious work to renew the mind of every sinner, when by his Grace he makes willing in the day of his power
Covenant, the New - From which we gather that though the making of this covenant with Israel is still future, the principle of it, namely, that of sovereign Grace, is that on which God is now acting as setting forth the terms on which He is with His people, the Lord Jesus being the Mediator, through whom allthe blessing is secured
Repentance - These observations may be sufficient to mark the very different features of both, and under Grace enable any one to understand the vast distinction
Shoes - Under Grace a standing is found, the shoes were put on the prodigal, he was welcome and at home
Sprinkling - Death became the means of God accomplishing His purposes of Grace
Covenant - ...
The covenant of Grace, is that by which God engages to bestow salvation on man, upon the condition that man shall believe in Christ and yield obedience to the terms of the gospel
Fat - Abounding in spiritual Grace and comfort
Access - Such access is actually experienced by those who express personal trust in Jesus and rely on divine Grace
Paradise - But the coming city shall combine all that was excellent of the first Eden, with the perfect polity that rests on Christ the chief corner stone, in which symmetry, Grace, power, and the beauty of holiness shall shine for ever
Litany - Before the last review of the common prayer, the litany was a distinct service by itself, and used sometimes after the morning prayer was over; at present it is made one office with the morning service, being ordered to be read after the third collect for Grace, instead of the intercessional prayers in the daily service
Firkin - ‘It is His first miraculous sign … it must become the type of the fulness of Grace and joy and strength which the only-begotten Son brings to the earth’ (Godet on John 2:6)
Hagar - " The Christian is not under the law nor in the flesh; but is free, under Grace
Gadarenes - What higher proofs can be needed to mark distinguishing Grace! What an act of mercy had Jesus wrought, not only to the poor demoniac, but to the whole country, in delivering them from his violence and outrage, while under possession of the devil
Cup - Hence, the Psalmist speaking of the blessings of Grace in the Lord Jesus, calls them, the cup of salvation
Jehovah-Jireh - " (Genesis 22:14) And the general acceptation of the words in the esteem of believers is, that the Lord will do by all of that character as he did by Abraham, and in every critical moment manifest his Grace towards them, in proof that he doth both see and provide for them
New Birth - is a term commonly used to convey concisely the truth brought out in the beginning of John 3 , namely, that a man's origin spiritually must be of God's work in him if he is to come under the moral sway of God in Grace
Heal - ...
A large number of the uses of râphâ' express the “healing” of the nation—such “healing” not only involves God’s Grace and forgiveness, but also the nation’s repentance
Jonah - It is highly instructive, as showing that the providential government of God extends to all heathen nations, and that his Grace has never been confined to his covenant people
Flax - He will not break a reed already bruised and ready to be broken, nor extinguish a flickering, dying lamp, just ready to expire; that is, he will not oppress his humble and penitent followers, but cherish the feeblest beginnings of true Grace
Juliana, Mother of the Virgin Demetrias - 418), arguing that all the virtues of Demetrias were from the Grace of God
Remnant - It is of God's Grace that any are enabled to be stedfast to the original truth and calling during a general apostasy from it
Fall of Man - God has thought fit to allow evil to exist in order that he may have a platform for showing his mercy, Grace, and compassion. But by permitting evil, mysterious as it seems, God's works of Grace, mercy, and wisdom in saving sinners have been wonderfully manifested to all his creatures
Elect, Elected, Election - ...
The source of their "election" is God's Grace, not human will, Ephesians 1:4,5 ; Romans 9:11 ; 11:5 . according to election" is virtually equivalent to "the electing purpose;" in Acts 11:5 , the "remnant according to the election of Grace" refers to believing Jews, saved from among the unbelieving nation; so in Acts 11:7 ; in Acts 11:28 , "the election" may mean either the "act of choosing" or the "chosen" ones; the context, speaking of the fathers, points to the former, the choice of the nation according to the covenant of promise. Believers are to give "the more diligence to make their calling and election sure," by the exercise of the qualities and Graces which make them fruitful in the knowledge of God, 2 Peter 1:10
Predestination - ...
People receive eternal life, not because of their efforts to earn it, but because God in his Grace gives it to them freely. Those who accept it, however, realize that only God’s Grace has drawn them to the Saviour and given them the eternal life that God has prepared for them (John 6:37; John 6:40; John 6:44; Matthew 8:17; John 17:2; Acts 13:48; 1 Thessalonians 5:9)
Salvation - But regardless of whatever picture the Bible uses, it emphasizes constantly that salvation is solely by God’s Grace, and that people receive it through faith and repentance (Acts 5:31; Acts 16:30-31; Acts 20:21; 1 Corinthians 1:21; Ephesians 2:8-9; Titus 3:3-7; see FAITH; Grace; REPENTANCE)
Gift, Giving - Since gifts might be required by custom, law, or force, modifiers are sometimes used to specify gifts given voluntarily: “willing” or freewill offerings or gifts (Exodus 35:29 ); free gift or “gift by Grace” (Romans 5:15-17 ; Romans 6:23 ); bountiful gift not motivated by covetousness (2 Corinthians 9:5 ). Paul spoke of God's giving the ministry of reconciliation (2 Corinthians 5:18 ), authority for building up the church (2 Corinthians 10:8 ), and Grace for sharing the gospel with the Gentiles (Ephesians 3:8 )
Favor - There is also a close association among favor, Grace, and mercy, which are sometimes used to translate the same Hebrew and Greek words (such as hen [ Genesis 6:8 ; Exodus 33:12-13 ), receive favor and honor from the Lord (Psalm 84:11 ). Wolf...
See also Grace ...
Bibliography
Rain - ...
Psalm 72:6 (a) We see here a picture of the delightful effects of the Grace of GOD, the kindness of our Lord, and the beneficent influence of His presence upon the drooping heart and the weary soul. The Lord gives dying Grace to those who are dying
Lamp - Oh, what unknown influence doth the Holy Ghost manifest in the hearts of those he makes his temple! (1 Corinthians 6:19) what light, what Grace, what information, what comfort, the Lord the Spirit imparts! Oh, ye ransomed of the Lord, who know the infinite preciousness his Grace, see that ye"grieve not the Holy Spirit of God, whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption!" (Ephesians 4:30) I cannot dismiss the subject of the sacred lamps of the temple, emblems as they were of the light of the Spirit, without one observation more, namely, that it should seem, the perpetual, use of them was designed to keep alive the remembrance of his unceasing, presence, who is the light of his people
Build - Those who heard him speak grew in Grace as a building grows under the hand of the workman. ...
Galatians 2:18 (b) This is a reference to the growth in Grace and knowledge, as well as in fellowship and service which these people enjoyed to whom Paul preached
Sardis - the few Graces which in thy spiritual slumber are not yet extinct, but "ready to die"; so that Sardis was not altogether "dead. "They have not defiled their garments," so "they shall walk (the best attitude for showing Grace to advantage) with Me in white, for they are worthy," namely, with Christ's worthiness "put on them" (Revelation 7:14; Ezekiel 16:14). The state of Grace now, and that of glory hereafter, harmonize
Nation - ...
The word ‘am, “people, nation,” suggests subjective personal interrelationships based on common familial ancestry and/or a covenantal union, while gôy suggests a political entity with a land of its own: “Now therefore, I pray thee, if I have found Grace in thy sight, show me thy way, that I may know thee, that I may find Grace in thy sight: and consider that this nation is thy people” ( Accept, Accepted, Acceptable - ...
D — 2: χάρις (Strong's #5485 — Noun Feminine — charis — khar'-ece ) "grace," indicating favor on the part of the giver, "thanks" on the part of the receiver, is rendered "acceptable" in 1 Peter 2:19,20 . See BENEFIT , FAVOR , Grace , LIBERALITY , PLEASURE , THANK
Law - Some have argued from certain passages of Scripture that this law is no longer binding upon Christians; that they "are not under the law, but under Grace," Romans 6:14,15 7:4,6 Galatians 3:13,25 5:18 ; and the perversion of these passages leads men to sin and perish because Grace abounds
Soul of the Church - This formal principle, or Soul, is made up of the supernatural internal gifts of faith, hope, and charity, sanctifying Grace, and the other virtues and gifts of the Holy Ghost. ...
From the 16th century, the Catholic theologians expressed more definitely the theological doctrine of the distinction between the Soul and the Body of the Church, in this formula: the Body comprehends the visible element or the visible society, to which one belongs by the external profession of the Catholic Faith, by participation in the sacraments, and by submission to legitimate pastors; and the Soul comprehends the invisible element or the invisible society, to which one belongs in virtue of the fact that one possesses the interior gifts of Grace
Pentecost - And after his ascension and return to glory we have the visible manifestation of God the Holy Ghost on the day of Pentecost, to carry on and render effectual the great purposes of redemption in the hearts of the people by his almighty Grace and power. So that there is a beautiful order in the design and execution of the work itself, as well as Grace and mercy in the dispensation. ...
The day of Pentecost therefore opens with the manifestation of the Holy Ghost in his sevenfold gifts and Graces. Hitherto the kingdom of Grace had been supplied with the occasional effusions of the Spirit on the church, as the sacred purposes of JEHOVAH'S will required. When we know him as Jesus described him, the Spirit of truth to guide into all truth; the Witness to our spirits that we are the children of God; the Glorifier of Jesus; the Comforter of the soul; the Spirit of Grace, of supplication, and prayer; the Helper of our infirmities; the Spirit of wisdom and knowledge in the revelation of Christ Jesus in a word, the great and sovereign minister in the church and heart of all his people, from the first quickenings of Grace, until Grace be consummated in eternal glory
Augustine - Monica's importunate prayers to heaven followed the aberrations of her Graceless son, when he settled at Carthage as a teacher of rhetoric; when he removed to Rome, and lodged with a Manichee;—and when he finally settled at Milan as professor of rhetoric. The unrestricted capability of men's own free will is amply sufficient for all these things, and therefore no necessity exists for asking of God those things which we are able of ourselves to obtain; the gifts of Grace being only necessary to enable men to do that more easily and completely which yet they could do themselves though more slowly and with greater difficulty; and that they are perfectly free creatures," in opposition to all the current notions of predestination and reprobation. Before the age in which he lived, the early fathers held what, in the language of systematic theology, is termed the synergestic system, or the needfulness of human cooperation in the works of holiness; but though the freedom of the will was not considered by them as excluding or rendering unnecessary the Grace of God, yet much vagueness is perceptible in the manner in which they express themselves, because they had not examined the subject with the same attention as the theologians by whom they were succeeded. But as soon as Pelagius broached his errors, the attention of Christians was naturally turned to the investigation of the doctrine of Grace. Augustine on this subject, which soon became those of the great body of the Christian church, admitted the necessity of divine Grace, or the influence of the Holy Spirit, for our obedience to the law of God. He ascribed the renovation of our moral constitution wholly to this Grace, denied all cooperation of man with it for answering the end to be accomplished, and represented it as irresistible. He also affirmed that the virtue of baptism is not in the water; that the ministers of Christ perform the external ceremony, but that Christ accompanies it with invisible Grace; that baptism is common to all, whilst Grace is not so; and that the same external rite may be death to some, and life to others. The opinion of the Franciscans out of Scotus and Bernard, mentioned in the council of Trent, seems to be the true opinion; for they make the sacraments to be effectual, ‘because God gives them effectus regulariter concomitantes,' [6] and to contain Grace no otherwise than as an effectual sign; and that Grace is received by them as an investiture by a ring or staff, which is obsignando, [9] the use of this sacrament toties quoties [10] must needs confer Grace, it seems it were necessary to let them communicate, and the oftener the better, to the intent they might be stronger in Grace: which opinion, though St. Augustine with himself: — "The heresy of Pelagius being suppressed, the catholic doctrine in that point became more settled and confirmed by the opposition; such freedom being left to the will of man, as was subservient unto Grace, cooperating in some measure with those heavenly influences. ' For, otherwise, it appears to be his opinion, that man was not merely passive in all the acts of Grace which conduced to glory, according to the memorable saying of his, so common in the mouths of all men, ‘He who first made us without our help will not vouchsafe to save us at last without our concurrence. Augustine denied that the cooperation of man is at all exerted to produce the renewal of our nature; but, when the renewal had been produced, he admitted that there was an exercise of the will combined with the workings of Grace. ' Nothing can be plainer than that the writer of these passages admitted the liberty of the human will, and the necessity of our own exertions in conjunction with divine Grace. Speaking of Grace he says, ‘That we may will God works without us; but when we will, and so will as to do, he co-works with us; yet unless he either works that we may will, or co-works when we do will, we are utterly incapable of doing any thing in the good works of piety
Communion - Flowing again from this common participation in Christ there was a common participation in the Holy Spirit, for it is from the love of God as manifested in the Grace of Christ that there results that ‘communion of the Holy Ghost’ which is the strongest bond of unity and peace ( 2Co 13:14 ; cf. The right hands of communion given to Paul and Barnabas were not only a recognition of Grace received in common, but mutual pledges of an Apostolic service to the circumcision on the one hand and the heathen on the other ( Galatians 2:9 ). The communion of the human and the Divine is a mutual activity, which may be summed up in the two words Grace and faith . For Grace is the spontaneous and unstinted Divine giving as revealed and mediated by Jesus Christ, while faith in its ideal form is the action of a soul which, receiving the Divine Grace, surrenders itself without any reserve unto the Lord
Jesus, the Lord - " For thirty years He led a life of lowly retirement, but the references of scripture to this period show that He grew up under the eye of God in the perfection of manhood, and yet in conscious Sonship to the Father, the vessel of the Grace and wisdom of God. In the power of the Spirit (John the Baptist's preparatory ministry having closed through his imprisonment by Herod) He now commenced the marvellous ministry of divine words and works of Grace and power which is presented to us in the four gospels. ...
In Luke He is Son of man, yet altogether of a new order of manhood, the vessel of Grace for man in the like circumstances of sin and sorrow. ...
In John He is the Word, the Light and Revelation of God, but He became flesh and tabernacled here, full of Grace and truth; and, as the only begotten Son who is in the bosom of the Father, He fully declared God, whom no man had seen at any time. As sent to do the will of God, He received all that came to Him, drawn by the Grace of the Father
Exodus, Book of - This is followed by Elim — the ministry of Grace. God gave them bread from heaven, typical of the heavenly Grace in Christ, the bread of life, to sustain the believer in life to God, during the wilderness. Here there was a change: up to this all had been Grace, but now the people were put under law, and not knowing themselves they said, "All that the Lord hath spoken we will do
Faith - Faith in Christ, or saving faith is that principle wrought in the heart by the Divine Spirit, whereby we are persuaded that Christ is the Messiah; and possess such a desire and expectation of the blessings he has promised in his Gospel, as engages the mind to fix its dependence on him, and subject itself to him in all the ways of holy obedience, and relying solely on his Grace for everlasting life. That it is the first and principal Grace: it stands first in order, and takes the precedence of other Graces, Mark 16:16 . It cannot be finally lost as to the Grace of it, Philippians 1:6
Messalians - They denied that the Sacraments give Grace and declared that the only spiritual power is prayer
Filthy, the - They denied that the Sacraments give Grace and declared that the only spiritual power is prayer
Natural Law - The due regulation of our free actions in conformity with its prescriptions secures their right ordering in which consists the natural perfection of our rational nature, and which at the same time constitutes a necessary condition for supernatural perfection, for, according to Saint Thomas, "Just as Grace presupposes nature, the Divine Law presupposes the natural law
Law, Natural - The due regulation of our free actions in conformity with its prescriptions secures their right ordering in which consists the natural perfection of our rational nature, and which at the same time constitutes a necessary condition for supernatural perfection, for, according to Saint Thomas, "Just as Grace presupposes nature, the Divine Law presupposes the natural law
Mediator - Such a mediator must be at once divine and human, divine, that his obedience and his sufferings might possess infinite worth, and that he might possess infinite wisdom and knowlege and power to direct all things in the kingdoms of providence and Grace which are committed to his hands (Matthew 28:18 ; John 5:22,25,26,27 ); and human, that in his work he might represent man, and be capable of rendering obedience to the law and satisfying the claims of justice (Hebrews 2:17,18 ; 4:15,16 ), and that in his glorified humanity he might be the head of a glorified Church (Romans 8:29 )
Prince - All his reigns in nature, providence, Grace, and glory, set him forth as the Prince of Peace, the universal Lord and emperor in heaven and in earth
Man - As Adam's incarnation was the crowning miracle of nature, so Christ's incarnation is the crowning miracle of Grace; He represents man before God, as man represents nature, not by ordinary descent but by the extraordinary operation of the Holy Spirit
Religion - 1: θρησκεία (Strong's #2356 — Noun Feminine — threseia — thrace-ki'-ah ) signifies "religion" in its external aspect (akin to threskos, see below), "religious worship," especially the ceremonial service of "religion;" it is used of the "religion" of the Jews, Acts 26:5 ; of the "worshiping" of angels, Colossians 2:18 , which they themselves repudiate (Revelation 22:8,9 ); "there was an officious parade of humility in selecting these lower beings as intercessors rather than appealing directly to the Throne of Grace" (Lightfoot); in James 1:26,27 the writer purposely uses the word to set in contrast that which is unreal and deceptive, and the "pure religion" which consists in visiting "the fatherless and widows in their affliction," and in keeping oneself "unspotted from the world
Catechism - TheCatechism, as set forth in the Prayer Book, shows five generaldivisions, (1) The Christian Covenant; (2) The Christian Faith;(3) The Christian Duty; (4) The Christian Prayer or Worship, and(5) The Christian Sacraments or Means of Grace
Nicolaitans - The Nicolaitans abused Paul's doctrine of the Grace of God into lasciviousness; such seducers are described as followers of Balsam, also in 2 Peter 2:12-13; 2 Peter 2:15-19; Judges 1:4; Judges 1:7-8; Judges 1:11 ("the son of Bosor" for Beor, to characterize him as "son of carnality": bosor "flesh")
Rahab, Rachab - Their insertion exalts the Grace that superabounds over all sin
Thanksgiving - Early Christians expressed thanks: for Christ's healing ministry (Luke 17:16 ); for Christ's deliverance of the believer from sin (Romans 6:17-18 ; Romans 7:25 ); for God's indescribable gift of Grace in Christ (2 Corinthians 9:14-15 ; 1 Corinthians 15:57 ; compare Romans 1:21 ); and for the faith of fellow Christians (Romans 1:8 )
Adelphians - They denied that the Sacraments give Grace and declared that the only spiritual power is prayer
Sopater - It has been conjectured that all the persons referred to in Acts 20:4 were delegates of their respective communities appointed ‘in the matter of this Grace’ (2 Corinthians 8:19)
Man (the Good): Beneficial Influence of - His surroundings are all against him, the soil in which he grows is hostile to Grace, yet he not only lives on, but luxuriates
Poverty - Poverty of spirit, consists in an inward sense and feeling of our wants and defects; a conviction of our wretched and forlorn condition by nature; with a dependence on divine Grace and mercy for pardon and acceptance, Matthew 5:3
Water - " And he is described as quickening the marshy ground; cleansing, refreshing, comforting, cooling, and strengthening the souls of his people, by the continued streams of his Grace
Babylon - ...
Revelation 17:5 (b) This is plainly a type of the great false religious systems of the world, particularly Romanism, which knew nothing of the Grace of GOD, nor the Blood of CHRIST, nor the personal ministry of the Holy Spirit
Pharisees - Probably such men as Gamaliel, Nicodemus, and Saul were men of a different stamp, though all needed the regenerating power of Grace to give them what they professed to seek
Demand - In French, demander generally signifies simply to ask, request, or petition, when the answer or thing asked for, is a matter of Grace or courtesy
Hardening - Paul confines his thought when he insists on the sovereignty of God as manifested in the election of Grace ( Romans 9:18 ); but having vindicated the absolute freedom of the Divine action, the Apostle proceeds to show that the Divine choice is neither arbitrary nor unjust
Humble - God resisteth the proud, but giveth Grace to the humble
Incomprehensibility of God - the dispensation of his Grace, Ephesians 3:8
Euchites - They denied that the Sacraments give Grace and declared that the only spiritual power is prayer
Adelphians - They denied that the Sacraments give Grace and declared that the only spiritual power is prayer
Amorites - The low state of Jerusalem (Judah) by nature is described by stating her origin, her father being an Amorite and her mother a Hittite, but God in Grace had compassion upon her in her degradation, and raised her into great glory; though, alas, she was shamefully unfaithful
Foundation - So that he, and he alone, in the purposes of JEHOVAH, gives certainty to all that is included in redemption, for Grace here and glory to all eternity
Girdle - "Wherefore (saith one of the apostles,) gird up the loins of your mind; be sober, and hope to the end; for the Grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ
Apostasy - It is not a Christian falling into some sin, from which Grace can recover him; but a definite relinquishing of Christianity
Leprosy - Some persons were smitten with leprosy as a direct judgement from God, as were Miriam (though she in Grace was subsequently cured), Gehazi, and Amaziah; in the case of Gehazi the disease was to descend also to his seed
Cloud - The rain cloud promised hope for the crops and thus symbolized Grace and life (Proverbs 16:15 )
Tread - He thought she trod the ground with greater Grace
Messalians - They denied that the Sacraments give Grace and declared that the only spiritual power is prayer
Law - ...
God’s covenant with Israel...
In his Grace God made a covenant with Abraham to make his descendants into a great nation and to give them Canaan as their national homeland (Genesis 17:1-8). Everything arose out of the sovereign Grace of God (Exodus 2:24; Exodus 3:16; Exodus 6:6-8). But if the people were to enjoy the blessings of that covenant, they had to respond to God’s Grace in faithful obedience. ...
Under the new covenant people still have to respond to God’s covenant Grace with obedience, but the expression of that obedience has changed. Under the old covenant, as under the new, they were saved only through faith in the sovereign God who, in his Grace, forgave them and accepted them. The law therefore showed up human sin; but when sinners acknowledged their sin and turned in faith to God, God in his Grace forgave them (Romans 3:19-20; Romans 3:31; Romans 5:20; Romans 7:7; Galatians 3:11; Acts 15:19-210). ...
Christians are not under law but under Grace
Leviticus - Privilege and duty, Grace conferred and Grace inwrought, go hand in hand. ...
(4) The day of atonement, the summing up of all means of Grace for the nation and the church, annually. Aaron's "holding his peace" under the stroke is a marvelous exhibition of Grace; yet his not eating the sin offering in the holy place shows his keen paternal anguish which excused his violation of the letter of the law in Moses' judgment
Supralapsarians - The decree of the end respecting some is either subordinate to their eternal happiness, or ultimate, which is more properly the end, the glory of God; and if both are put together, it is a state of everlasting communion with God, for the glorifying of the riches of his Grace. ...
The decree of the means includes the decree to create men to permit them to fall, to recover them out of it through redemption by Christ, to sanctify them by the Grace of the Spirit, and completely save them; and which are not to be reckoned as materially many decrees, but as making one formed decree; or they are not to be considered as subordinate, but as co-ordinate means, and as making up one entire complete medium; for it is not to be supposed that God decreed to create man, that he might permit him to fall, in order to redeem, sanctify, and save him; but he decreed all this that he might glorify his Grace, mercy, and justice. And they add to this, that if God first decreed to create man, and suffered him to fall, and then out of the fall chose some to Grace and glory, he must decree to create man without an end, which is to make God to do what no wise man would; for when a man is about to do any thing, he proposes an end, and then contrives and fixes on ways and means to bring about that end
Giving - Paul associates the liberality of the Christians of Corinth and this Grace of God (2 Corinthians 9:15), he is true to the mind of Christ. The Grace of Christ had come near to him, and he, in that high fellowship, could not but be gracious. All tender ministries are the expression of a Divine compassion, ‘the exceeding Grace of God in you’ (2 Corinthians 9:14). Giving, thus exercised, becomes a ‘means of Grace,’ by which the heart is cleansed (Luke 11:41; a suggestive rendering of this saying is given in Expositor, II
Abba - For if it was so specially confined, among the people of the East, to the children of a family; and Jesus and his people in him, are enjoined to use it on this account; can any thing more strikingly prove their relationship? And I cannot but express my hope, that if the reader of this Poor Man's Concordance, is enabled, by Grace, to see his own personal privilege herein, and can enter into a proper apprehension of the word, in this most endearing view, he will be led to discover the sweetness and blessedness of it, and from henceforth adopt it, in all his approaches to the throne of God in Christ. And I think it worthy of yet farther remark, that there is a beautiful sameness between the first cry of nature, in the infancy of our being, and this language of Grace when the souls of believers are first born to God. ) And it must be truly said, that before the cry of the soul, in the new birth of Grace, goes forth in Abba, or Ammah, the apprehending union, interest, and relationship in Christ with his church, had been settled long before, even from all eternity. And under such high encouragement and authority, I confess, that I feel a disposition, upon every occasion, to adopt it, considering it the peculiar privilege of all true believers in Christ, to bring it into constant use, whenever they draw nigh to a throne of Grace
Merciful, Mercy - Grace describes God's attitude toward the law-breaker and the rebel; mercy is His attitude toward those who are in distress. ]'>[1] ...
"In the order of the manifestation of God's purposes of salvation Grace must go before mercy . From this it follows that in each of the Apostolic salutations where these words occur, Grace precedes mercy, 1 Timothy 1:2 ; 2 Timothy 1:2 ; Titus 1:4 (in some mss. With regard to his sin, an expiation is necessary, consistently with God's holiness and for His righteousness' sake, and that expiation His Grace and love have provided in the atoning sacrifice of His Son; man, himself a sinner, justly exposed to God's wrath (John 3:36 ), could never find an expiation
Manuscripts, Illuminated - More Grace is shown in the treatment of figures
Free Will - Against the Protestant Reformers, the Council of Trent has solemnly condemned those who affirm that the free will of man was lost through the sin of Adam and those also who maintain that God's Grace removes freedom from the human will
Gethsemane - I would desire Grace, that by faith I might often visit Gethsemane; and while traversing the hallowed ground, call to mind, that here it was Jesus entered upon that soul-conflict with the powers of darkness, which, when finished, completed the salvation of his people
Branch - " Perfect purity and Grace were wrapped up under the root's seemingly unattractive scales
Dispensation - 1: οἰκονομία (Strong's #3622 — Noun Feminine — oikonomia — oy-kon-om-ee'-ah ) primarily signifies "the management of a household or of household affairs" (oikos, "a house," nomos, "a law"); then the management or administration of the property of others, and so "a stewardship," Luke 16:2-4 ; elsewhere only in the Epistles of Paul, who applies it (a) to the responsibility entrusted to him of preaching the Gospel, 1 Corinthians 9:17 (RV, "stewardship," AV, "dispensation"); (b) to the stewardship commited to him "to fulfill the Word of God," the fulfillment being the unfolding of the completion of the Divinely arranged and imparted cycle of truths which are consummated in the truth relating to the Church as the Body of Christ, Colossians 1:25 (RV and AV, "dispensation"); so in Ephesians 3:2 , of the Grace of God given him as a stewardship ("dispensation") in regard to the same "mystery;" (c) in Ephesians 1:10 ; 3:9 , it is used of the arrangement or administration by God, by which in "the fullness of the times" (or seasons) God will sum up all things in the heavens and on earth in Christ
Remission, Remit - 1 a matter of Grace
Self-Discipline - Although Christians are not under the law, they are under Grace (Romans 6:14)
Fortitude - The noble cause in which the Christian is engaged; the glorious Master whom he serves; the provision that is made for his security; the illustrious examples set before him; the approbation of a good conscience; and the grand prospect he has in view, are all powerful motives to the exercise of this Grace
Bourignonists - She believed also that man is perfectly free to resist or receive divine Grace; that God is ever unchangeable love towards all his creatures, and does not inflict any arbitrary punishment; but that the evils they suffer are the natural consequence of sin; that religion consists not in outward forms of worship nor systems of faith, but in an entire resignation to the will of God
Habits: Destructive Power of - Divine Grace can save the wretch from his unhappy condition, but if he be destitute of that, his remorseful agonies will but make him more hopelessly the slave of his passions
Philemon - Greetings of Grace and Peace (1-3)...
II
Illuminated Manuscripts - More Grace is shown in the treatment of figures
Envy - God's response to the sinful longings of the human heart is to give more Grace (James 4:6 )
Godhead - He reveals Himself as abounding in Grace, lovingkindness, and truth (Exodus 34:6-7 )
Book of Life - The book of life is the heavenly record (Luke 10:20 ; Hebrews 12:23 ) written by God before the foundation of the world (Revelation 13:8 ; Revelation 17:8 ) containing the names of those who are destined because of God's Grace and their faithfulness to participate in God's heavenly kingdom
Religious Life: Not Mere Imitation - True Grace, like a truly soldierly spirit, guides its possessor as emergencies arise, but that mimicry of religion which only follows precedents is to be despised
Dew - ...
On the other hand its gentle, silent, benignant influence, diffusing itself over the parched ground, represents the blessed effect of God's word and God's Grace (Deuteronomy 32:2); also brotherly love (Psalms 133:3), the "dew of Hermon (i
Patience of God - He is called the God of patience, not only because he is the author and object of the Grace of patience, but because he is patient or long suffering in himself, and towards his creatures
Communion (2) - It is founded upon union with him, and consists in a communication of divine Graces from him, and a return of devout affections to him. and be found in the use of all the means of Grace, Psalms 27:4
Zarephath - This Evangelist—apparently the only Gentile-Christian NT writer—seizes as does no other upon the thought that the boundless Grace of God has been extended in certain typical cases to remote Gentiles, even to the superseding and exclusion of those who were of the stock of Abraham and dwelt within the Holy Land
Drink - To salute in drinking to invite to drink by drinking first as, I drink to you Grace
Longsuffering - Longsuffering is, therefore, a conspicuous Grace in the ideal Christian character ( 2 Corinthians 6:5 , Ephesians 4:2 , Colossians 3:12 , 1 Thessalonians 5:14 , 2 Timothy 3:10 ; 2 Timothy 4:2 ); it is viewed as an evidence of Divine strengthening ( Colossians 1:11 ), as a manifestation of love ( 1 Corinthians 13:4 ), and as a fruit of the Spirit ( Galatians 5:22 )
Bridle - The speech should always be with Grace, seasoned with salt
Field - Teachers who teach GOD's Gospel of Grace sometimes think they can succeed in their ministry while teaching in a group where the Word of GOD is denied, and the Gospel is perverted
Strange - ...
Isaiah 28:21 (a) GOD is a GOD of mercy and Grace, but He is also a GOD of wrath and judgment
Gifts in the Church - ) Another list is given in 1 Corinthians 12 , where the word is χάρισμα, 'grace, favour
Bottle - (Matthew 9:17) A beautiful figure this, of the precious wine of the gospel, which must not be put into the old skin of our dried nature, but into the new heart of Grace
Eve - (Genesis 2:23) There is a very great beauty and wisdom in the contrivance, as well as Grace and favour in the Lord's ordination in peopling the earth
Adam - For so the charter of Grace, at the creation, expressed it: "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness
Jericho - This is the famous city before whose walls the Lord manifested such a miracle of Grace to Israel, in causing them to fall to the ground at the blasting of the rams' horns
Boaz - (See Matthew 1:5-6) I beg the reader not to overlook the Grace of the Lord Jesus in this wonderful relation
Golden Candlesticks - And when in the gospel church we behold seven candlesticks and the Lord Jesus in the discover that from the coming of Christ, when having finished redemption-work he returned to glory, he sent down the Holy Ghost in his seven-fold gifts to illumine the whole church of God with the revelation of his Grace: so that the gracious office of the Holy Ghost in his unceasing agency is very blessedly set forth
Philemon, Epistle to - Paul does not ask for the freedom of Onesimus, but that he may now be received in Grace as a brother, indeed, be received as the apostle's 'own bowels
Nazareth - The people wondered at His gracious words, but they said, "Is not this Joseph's son?" When He told them that no prophet is accepted in his own country, and proceeded to speak of the Grace of God having gone out to the Gentiles in O
Covenant - The Old Covenant, from which we name the first part of the Bible the Old Testament, is the covenant of works; the New Covenant, or New Testament, is that of Grace
Bull - It is used chiefly in matters of justice or of Grace
Nicodemus - (See Luke 23:51-52 with John 19:38-39) It is very blessed thus to trace the progress of Grace, and to prove the truth of that sweet Scripture, "the path of the just is as the shining light, that shineth more and more unto a perfect day
Dispensations - Accordingly, we read in the works of theological writers of the various dispensations of religion; that of the patriarchs, that of Moses, and that of Christ, called the dispensation of Grace, the perfection and ultimate object of every other
Reconciliation - '...
By the death of the Lord Jesus on the cross, God annulled in Grace the distance which sin had brought in between Himself and man, in order that all things might, through Christ, be presented agreeably to Himself
Just - Pleaseth your lordship ...
To meet his Grace,just distance 'tween our armies? ...
3
Will, Free - Against the Protestant Reformers, the Council of Trent has solemnly condemned those who affirm that the free will of man was lost through the sin of Adam and those also who maintain that God's Grace removes freedom from the human will
Tempt - God, being holy and desirous of men's holiness, does not thus tempt them, James 1:13 ; but he makes trial of them, to prove, exercise, and establish their Graces, Genesis 22:1 James 1:2-3 . Men tempt God by presumptuously experimenting on his providence or his Grace, or by distrusting him, Exodus 17:2,7 Isaiah 7:12 Matthew 4:7 Acts 5:9 15:10
Vary - While fear and anger, with alternate Grace, pant in her breast, and vary in her face
Covenant - The principal covenants are the covenant of works --God promising to save and bless men on condition of perfect obedience --and the covenant of Grace , or God's promise to save men on condition of their believing in Christ and receiving him as their Master and Saviour
Boasting - They can only receive it as a gift that God gives freely to those who trust in his Grace
Rich, Riches, Richly, Rich Man - , of its manifestation in Grace towards believers); Romans 11:33 , of His wisdom and knowledge; Ephesians 1:7 ; 2:7 , "of His Grace;" Ephesians 1:18 , "of the glory of His inheritance in the saints;" Ephesians 3:8 , "of Christ;" Philippians 4:19 , "in glory in Christ Jesus," RV; Colossians 1:27 , "of the glory of this mystery
Man - Jesus’ testimony to the Fatherhood of God, including the care and bounty in Providence as well as the Grace in Redemption, has as its counterpart His estimate of the absolute worth of the human soul (see Matthew 10:30 ; Matthew 16:26 , Luke 10:20 ; Luke 10:15 ). Paul’s doctrine of man’s adoption by faith in God’s Grace does not contradict the teaching of Jesus
Blameless - God alone has the power and right to accuse the believer and pronounce condemnation, but through his Grace and power he renders the believer blameless in his sight. The characteristic of blamelessness thus should define the believer's private and public life as a reflection of the transforming work of God's Grace in salvation
Aquila And Priscilla - Paul visited Jerusalem; there Apollos, the eloquent Alexandrian, profited greatly from their ripe Christian experience, and learnt, from one or both of them, the secret of power in ministering the gospel of Grace ( Acts 18:26 ff. The last NT reference to this devoted pair shows that they returned to Ephesus ( 2 Timothy 4:19 ); their fellowship with Timothy would, doubtless, tend to his strengthening ‘in the Grace that is in Christ Jesus’ (21)
Tares - ...
I do not presume to speak decidedly on any subject but such as God the Holy Ghost hath been pleased most clearly to reveal; and therefore what the eastern writers have said on the article of tares, I only venture to relate, as the matter appears in their account, leaving the reader to his own conclusions under the Grace of God. ...
I would only beg to add a short observation upon the subject, and just to say, under this view, how mistaken must be the notion of those, who fancy that when our Lord said, Let both grow together until the harvest, that this was meant to say, perhaps the tares if continued under the means of Grace might become good corn
Attraction - One feature of this will be the more easy and quick perception of fresh beauties and glories in the fourfold Gospel of Christ, the acquisition of Grace upon Grace (Matthew 11, Mark 10, Luke 15, John 9)
Mordecai - ) Oh, for Grace to be found faithful amidst all the Hamans and Agagites of the present day! Oh, that the Lord would raise up, in this sense, many faithful Mordecais from the midst of our British Israel!...
Reader, let us not turn away from this history of Mordecai and Haman, until that we have taken one instruction more. ) Is it indeed so, and is this the case? Ah, wretched, wretched Haman! what a representation you afford of the state of a heart of malignity! what a portrait of human life in all its highest characters void of Grace! One baleful passion is enough, like the dye of crimson, or of scarlet, to tinge and give a colouring to the whole heart
Cloud - For is not the church the same? Is not Jesus's love to it the same? And doth he not go before it now in the pillar of cloud by day, and follow it in the pillar of fire by night, to guide, to bless, to protect, yea, himself to be the very supply to it, through all the eventful journies of its wilderness state, from the Succoth of the beginning of the spiritual life, even to Jordan, the river of natural death opening to glory? What though the cloud, in the miraculous movements of it as to Israel, is not seen, yet the Lord of the cloud, in his presence, Grace, and love, is sensibly known and enjoyed. " (2 Corinthians 3:18) We have the outer displays of the divine presence, in ordinances, and means of Grace, and the blessed Scriptures of truth, like Israel's cloud
Blasphemy - But as if that none of his children might make a mistake concerning it, with that tenderness and Grace which distinguished his character, the Lord Jesus mercifully set forth in what the peculiar degree of the sin consisted. Their distresses and their fears are, lest they should come short of the Grace of God
Kingdom of Christ of Heaven - ; 2, the condition of things Christ came to explain, Luke 1:33; Acts 1:3, and to bring on earth, Matthew 3:1-17,41; 1619112984_9 Christ's rule over Israel, Matthew 21:13; Matthew 4:1-25, the rule that God offered or committed to Israel, Matthew 21:43; 1 Chronicles 17:14; 1 Chronicles 5:1-26, the state of things in the history of the church during the conflict on earth of the so-called kingdom of Grace, preparatory to the kingdom of glory, Matthew 13:1-58; Matthew 6:1-34, Christ's rule in spiritual and eternal righteousness over the redeemed earth, Revelation 12:10, in contrast with the world-powers, Daniel 7:18; then the kingdom will destroy and take the place of the four monarchies, Daniel 7:1-28, and have its glorious manifestation; 7, the visible glory of Christ, Matthew 16:28; Matthew 8:1-34, the rule of God the Father over earth and heaven, Matthew 6:10; Matthew 9:1-38, the heavenly state. The disciples went everywhere preaching the word of Grace, 1 Thessalonians 2:12, and persuading men to enter the kingdom by faith and holiness
Kingdom of God - ; 2, the condition of things Christ came to explain, Luke 1:33; Acts 1:3, and to bring on earth, Matthew 4:17; Matthew 3:1-17, Christ's rule over Israel, Matthew 21:13; Matthew 4:1-25, the rule that God offered or committed to Israel, Matthew 21:43; 1 Chronicles 17:14; 1 Chronicles 5:1-26, the state of things in the history of the church during the conflict on earth of the so-called kingdom of Grace, preparatory to the kingdom of glory, Matthew 13:1-58; Matthew 6:1-34, Christ's rule in spiritual and eternal righteousness over the redeemed earth, Revelation 12:10, in contrast with the world-powers, Daniel 7:18; then the kingdom will destroy and take the place of the four monarchies, Daniel 7:1-28, and have its glorious manifestation; 7, the visible glory of Christ, Matthew 16:28; Matthew 8:1-34, the rule of God the Father over earth and heaven, Matthew 6:10; Matthew 9:1-38, the heavenly state. The disciples went everywhere preaching the word of Grace, 1 Thessalonians 2:12, and persuading men to enter the kingdom by faith and holiness
Kingdom of Heaven - ; 2, the condition of things Christ came to explain, Luke 1:33; Acts 1:3, and to bring on earth, Matthew 4:17; Matthew 3:1-17, Christ's rule over Israel, Matthew 8:1-34,; Matthew 4:1-25, the rule that God offered or committed to Israel, Matthew 21:43; 1 Chronicles 17:14; 1 Chronicles 5:1-26, the state of things in the history of the church during the conflict on earth of the so-called kingdom of Grace, preparatory to the kingdom of glory, Matthew 13:1-58; Matthew 6:1-34, Christ's rule in spiritual and eternal righteousness over the redeemed earth, Revelation 12:10, in contrast with the world-powers, Daniel 7:18; then the kingdom will destroy and take the place of the four monarchies, Daniel 7:1-28, and have its glorious manifestation; 7, the visible glory of Christ, Matthew 16:28; Matthew 21:13 the rule of God the Father over earth and heaven, Matthew 6:10; Matthew 9:1-38, the heavenly state. The disciples went everywhere preaching the word of Grace, 1 Thessalonians 2:12, and persuading men to enter the kingdom by faith and holiness
Presbytery - On the other hand, it may have been no more than a commendation of Timothy to the Grace of God for strength and guidance in his new work as a missionary, analogous thus to the action of the prophets and teachers of Antioch in the case of Barnabas and Saul ( Acts 13:1-3 ). Paul without doubt received a consecrating Grace from the hands both of Ananias and of those prophets and teachers of the Church at Antioch, but he claimed to be an Apostle ‘not from men, neither through man, but through Jesus Christ and God the Father who raised him from the dead’ ( Galatians 1:1 )
Gospel - It is called the gospel of God, or the gospel of the Grace of God, to emphasize that it originates in God and his Grace (Acts 20:24; Romans 15:16; 1 Thessalonians 2:2; 1 Thessalonians 2:8; 1 Timothy 1:11)
Rejoice - Romans 5:2 ; Revelation 19:7 ); their prospect of reward, Matthew 5:12 ; the obedience and godly conduct of fellow believers, Romans 16:19 , RV, "I rejoice" (AV, "I am glad"); 2 Corinthians 7:7,9 ; 13:9 ; Colossians 2:5 ; 1 Thessalonians 3:9 ; 2 John 1:4 ; 3 John 1:3 ; the proclamation of Christ, Philippians 1:18 ; the gospel harvest, John 4:36 ; suffering with Christ, Acts 5:41 ; 1 Peter 4:13 ; suffering in the cause of the gospel, 2 Corinthians 13:9 (1st part); Philippians 2:17 (1st part); Colossians 1:24 ; in persecutions, trials and afflictions, Matthew 5:12 ; Luke 6:23 ; 2 Corinthians 6:10 ; the manifestation of Grace, Acts 11:23 ; meeting with fellow believers, 1 Corinthians 16:17 , RV, "I rejoice;" Philippians 2:28 ; receiving tokens of love and fellowship, Philippians 4:10 ; the "rejoicing" of others, Romans 12:15 ; 2 Corinthians 7:13 ; learning of the well-being of others, 2 Corinthians 7:16 . Isaiah 51:2 ), the word is applied to the effects of the gospel, in that the progeny of Grace would greatly exceed the number of those who had acknowledged allegiance to the Law; Grace and faith are fruitful, law and works are barren as a means of salvation; in Revelation 12:12 , it is used in a call to the heavens to "rejoice" at the casting out of Satan and the inauguration of the Kingdom of God in manifestation and the authority of His Christ; in Revelation 18:20 , of a call to heaven, saints, apostles, prophets, to "rejoice" in the destruction of Babylon
Gilgal - And the rule of divine Grace is first to give, then to require; so first He showed His Grace to Abraham by leading him to Canaan and giving the promises, then enjoined circumcision; also He did not give the law to Israel at Sinai until first He had redeemed them from Egypt, and thereby made them willing to promise obedience. So now He did not require the renewal of circumcision, the covenant sign of subjection to the law (Galatians 5:3), until He had first showed His Grace in giving them victory over Og and Sihon, and in making a way through Jordan, a pledge that He would fulfill all His promises and finally give them the whole land
Bethesda - The Bethesdas of the gospel we still have, in the several ordinances and means of Grace. Our Lord Jesus doth not limit his Grace to our Bethesdas, or ordinances, but he worketh without them, (as in the instance of the poor man at the Jewish Bethesda) or with them, as seemeth best to his infinite wisdom, and for the display of his Grace
Law of Moses - This theory is however opposed to scripture, which says, "sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under Grace. Scripture does not say a word about the Christian being ruled by law; but it says that Grace teaches him how to walk (Titus 2:11,12 ), and because he is under Grace sin will not have dominion over him
Romans, Theology of - Accordingly, the theology of Romans is seen to cut both ways in realistic exposition of God's holy nature: God is the God of Grace to those who accept the gift of the Son in faith, and the holy God of wrath to sinners who reject the gift of the Son; to those who join the family, life; to those who reject the family, judgment. Believers cannot presume upon God's Grace and act like the devil; hence Paul can warn his readers like the writer to the Hebrews (6:4-12; 10:19-39) that better things are expected of them than to act inappropriately as followers of Christ. In him the Law is perfectly kept through his active obedience; in his passive obedience on the cross divine wrath is propitiated, turned into Grace. The Abraham of faith is therefore to be seen as the father of both Gentile and Jew—of the Jew because David personifies the Grace and faith principle operative in the Mosaic period (vv. God is always the God of Grace and of holiness, and faith is always "faith that works, " that evinces behavior appropriate to faith (hence, there is no conflict between Paul's emphasis on faith and James 2:18-26 , since each emphasizes one pole of the equation ). The far greater work of Christ the second Adam is a righteous work of Grace and life (v. Christians cannot continue in sin that Grace may abound (v. Whether it is Jacob over Esau, Moses over Pharaoh, or now the Gentiles over Paul's own kind, it is by God's sovereign Grace that even a remnant is saved. God has not totally rejected Israel; Paul himself is evidence to the contrary, as were the seven thousand who did not bow the knee to Baal in the Old Testament, which attests the graciousness of God; and even now "there is a remnant chosen by Grace" (11:5). If Israel's present default means Grace for the Gentiles, "how much greater riches will their fullness bring" (11:12). So moved is Paul by his own theological argument against his earlier doubts and misgivings, that he breaks into a doxology that sings the praises of the inscrutable God of Grace, who is sovereign and from whom, through whom, and to whom are all things. At the same time Paul exhorts the Roman believers to live within the civil structure of common Grace as agents of light in a world of darkness (13:1-14)
Expiation, Propitiation - Some scholars would see both ideas present in the word hilasmos , so that God in Grace initiated the sacrifice of Jesus to provide covering and forgiveness for human sin but that He also received the sacrifice which satisfied His anger and justice. Such a system could easily forget its basis in God's Grace shown in the Exodus and in His commands providing the system. ...
In the Old Testament, the note of Grace is clearly present. Both Old and the New Testaments proclaim that only God's Grace opens the door to salvation
Justice - Justice then is very close to love and Grace. Justice is Grace received and Grace shared (2 Corinthians 9:8-10 ). “The righteousness of God” represents God in Grace bringing into the community of God through faith in Christ those who had been outside of the people of God (particularly in Romans but compare also Ephesians 2:12-13 )
Mediator - Christ, then, having thus "humbled himself, and become obedient to death, even the death of the cross; God, also, hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name;" hath commanded us to pray in his name; constituted him man's advocate and intercessor; distributes his Grace only through him, and in honour of his death; hath given all things into his hands; and hath committed all judgment unto him; "that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow," and "that all men should honour the Son even as they honour the Father," Php_2:8-10 ; John 3:35 ; John 5:22-23 . ...
There is an essential connection between the mediation of our Lord and the covenant of Grace. " The word μεσιτης literally means "a person in the middle," between two parties; and the fitness of there being a Mediator of the covenant of Grace arises from this, that the nature of the covenant implies that the two parties were at variance. ...
If a mediator be essential to the covenant of Grace, and if all who have been saved from the time of the first transgression were saved by that covenant, it follows that the Mediator of the new covenant acted in that character before he was manifested in the flesh. The Socinians, who consider Jesus as a mere man, having no existence till he was born of Mary, necessarily reject the doctrine now stated: and the church of Rome, although they admit the divinity of our Saviour, yet, by the system which they hold with regard to the mediation of Christ, agree with the Socinians in throwing out of the dispensations of the Grace of God that beautiful and complete unity which arises from their having been conducted by one person. As that nature did not exist till he was born of Mary, they do not think it possible that he could exercise the office of Mediator under the Old Testament; and as they admit that a mediator is essential to the covenant of Grace, they believe that those who lived under the Old Testament, not enjoying the benefit of his mediation, did not obtain complete remission of sins. But if Christ acted as the Mediator of the covenant of Grace from the time of the first transgression, this system becomes wholly unnecessary; and we may believe, according to the general strain of Scripture, and what we account the analogy of faith, that all who "died in faith," since the world began, entered immediately after death into that "heavenly country which they desired
Humility - —This virtue or Grace distinguished the leaders of OT history like Abraham and Moses (Genesis 18:27, Numbers 12:3), and was inculcated by the prophets as a chief duty (Micah 6:8). Elsewhere humility is enjoined, along with kindred Graces, as the means of averting unholy disputes and of promoting co-operation in the Church and among the members of the Christian society (Matthew 18:4; Matthew 23:12, Ephesians 4:2, Philippians 2:3, Colossians 3:12). —The rise of this Grace creates an epoch. Humility as a sovereign Grace is the creation of Christianity. Passing from Christ’s example, the main lines of His teaching are two...
(1) Humility in relation to God, or the Law of Grace. In Wendt’s language—‘Humility is the conscious lowliness we feel before God in view of His superabundant love and holy majesty, and in contrast to our own unworthiness, guilt, and entire dependence on His Grace’ (The Teaching of Jesus, vol. ’ This is a fundamental law of the Kingdom of heaven and the indispensable condition of Grace: ‘for every one that exalteth himself shall be humbled, but he that humbleth himself shall be exalted’ (cf. On no other terms is Grace given or fellowship with God possible. The greatness of the Baptist was rooted in his humility and utter freedom from jealousy (John 3:27; John 3:30), and this Grace has been the soil and safety of saints ever since. —No Christian Grace is isolated or thrives alone. There is the danger, however, of exaggerating our own view and importance: ‘it always needs much Grace to see what other people are, and to keep a sense of moral proportion’ (Denney, Expos
Lutherans - In commenting upon the celebrated Book of Sentences, a work once not much less revered than the Scriptures themselves, the disciples of Lombard never failed to improve every hint which tended to degrade the Grace of God and exalt the pride of man. ...
The case of Cornelius, whose prayers and alms are said to have ascended up for a memorial before God, was often quoted, by the advocates of the church of Rome, to prove the merit of works before the reception of Grace; to prove the human will capable, by its own inherent rectitude, of deserving the favour and approbation of Heaven. The Lutherans, on the other hand, contended, that the argument supported not the conclusion drawn from it, and was therefore irrelevant; that the works of Cornelius were not the causes but the effects of Grace; and that this is sufficiently apparent from the context, in which he is described as "a devout man, who feared God and prayed continually. For such a purpose they asserted that Grace was necessary, to operate upon his will in its primary determinations, and to cooperate with it in its ultimate acts. According, then, to the system under consideration, the favour of God in this life, and his beatific vision in the life to come, are both attainable by personal merit; the former by congruous, as it was termed, the latter by condign; the one without, the other with, the assistance of Grace. They stated, that we may so prepare ourselves for Grace as to become entitled to it congruously, not as to a debt which in strict justice God is bound to pay, but as to a grant which it is congruous in him to give, and which it would be inconsistent with his attributes to withhold. "By the bare observance of my holy order," exclaimed the secluded devotee, "I am able not solely to obtain Grace for myself, but, by the works which I then may do, can accumulate merit sufficient both to supply my own wants and those of others; so that I may sell the superabundance of my acquired treasure. Under what denomination, then, could he class them, except under that of sinful? a denomination which he the more readily adopted because, even among his adversaries themselves, the words SIN and Grace, as he remarked, were in general immediately opposed to each other. It was not against any conceived deficiency in the quality of our virtue that they argued, but against its supposed competency, whether wrought in or out of Grace, with greater or less degrees of purity, to effect that which the oblation of Christ alone accomplishes. They represented it as an effect produced by the infusion of divine Grace into the mind; not as a consequent to a well spent life, but as preceding all remunerable obedience, as the intervening point between might and day, the gloom of a guilty and the light of a self-approving conscience; or, in other words, and to adopt their own phraseology, as the exact boundary where merit of congruity ends and where merit of condignity begins, the infallible result of a previous disposition on our part, which never fails of alluring from on high that supernatural quality which, being itself love, renders the soul beloved. He, they argued, who, having disobeyed the laws of Heaven, is desirous of returning into that state of acceptance from which he has fallen, must not expect free forgiveness; but previously by unfeigned sorrow of heart deserve the restoration of Grace, and, with it, the obliteration of his offences. So far he can proceed by that operation of the mind which they denominated ATTRITION, and which, being within the sphere of his natural powers, they regarded as congruous piety meritorious of justification as a preparation of the soul more or less necessary to receive and merit justifying Grace. However, to accomplish this remaining object, nothing more is wanting than a continuation, to a sufficient intensity, of that compunction of heart which is now denominated CONTRITION, Grace supplying the defects of nature, and enabling penitential merit not only to justify, but to obtain exemption from punishment of every species. Under the pretext, therefore, of relieving the throbbing breast from its apprehensions, they had recourse to numerous inventions for propping the insecure fabric of penitential hope; asserting, among other extravagancies, that the sacraments are in themselves efficacious by virtue of their own operation, exclusively of all merit in the recipient; and that the sacrament of the altar, in particular, acts so powerful in this respect as to communicate Grace not only to those who partake of it, but to others from whom it is received by substitution, provided its operation be not hindered by confessedly flagrant immorality. Nor by the sacraments alone, but by every good external work, as well as internal disposition, was justifying Grace supposed to be merited congruously, and satisfaction for sin to be made condignly
Oils, Holy - Oil, because it is a food and a remedy, is symbolic of spiritual nourishment and curing; because it gives light, it signifies the light of Grace; because it may be used as a liniment, it denotes the giving of strength
Esther - There must have been a singular Grace and charm in her aspect and manners, since 'she obtained favour in the sight of all them that looked upon her' (Esther 2:15 )
Ceremonies of Baptism - A white cloth, placed on the head, symbolizes sanctifying Grace; this is a survival of the white baptismal robe of ancient times
Matthew - But Matthew is not ashamed to own his identity with "the publican" in order to magnify Christ's Grace (Matthew 9:9), and in his catalogue of the apostles (Matthew 10:3)
Diotrephes - A Judaizer, who opposed the missionaries when preaching Grace to the Gentiles, see 3 John 1:7
Boldness (Holy): Congruous With the Gospel - Blush to preach of a dying Savior? Apologize for talking of the Son of God condescending to be made man, that he might redeem us from all iniquity? Never! Oh! by the Grace of God let us purpose, with
Iconium - " The Lord attested "the word of His Grace," moreover, with "signs and wonders done by their hands," while "they abode long time speaking boldly in the Lord
Diligence - What a wealth of minor good, as we may think it to be, might be shaken down into the interstices of ten years' work, which might prove to be as precious in result, by the Grace of God, as the greater works of the same period
Thanksgiving - Spiritual; such as the Bible, ordinances, the Gospel and its blessings; as free Grace adoption, pardon, justification, calling, &c. Its antiquity: it existed in Paradise before Adam fell, and therefore prior to the Graces of faith, repentance, &c. Its sphere of operation: being far beyond many other Graces which are confined to time and place. This will be in exercise for ever, when other Graces will not be necessary, as faith, repentance, &c
Firstfruits - Not only were the Israelites to be mindful that the land of Canaan was the Lord's possession and that they had only the rights of tenants (Leviticus 25:23 ), but they were also to be aware that the fertility of Canaan's soil was not due to one of the Baals but rather to the Lord's gift of Grace
Flock - John 10:11-18 ), who has made his people the objects of his saving Grace and heirs of all the covenant promises (Micah 7:14 )
Rainbow - ...
They discouraged (Ḥagiga, 16a) the study of a mysterious phenomenon which was to them a sacrament or covenant of Divine Grace
Dispensation - In this dispensation the Gospel or covenant of Grace is revealed more perfectly and plainly than ever before; not in obscure expressions, in types and carnal metaphors, but in its own proper form and language
Hard - ) Not easy or agreeable to the taste; stiff; rigid; ungraceful; repelling; as, a hard style. ) Rigid in the drawing or distribution of the figures; formal; lacking Grace of composition
Holy Oils - Oil, because it is a food and a remedy, is symbolic of spiritual nourishment and curing; because it gives light, it signifies the light of Grace; because it may be used as a liniment, it denotes the giving of strength
Minister - ...
He that ministereth seed to the sower--2 Corinthians 9 ...
That it may minister Grace to the hearers
Will - When man was created, he had liberty and power to do what was pleasing in the sight of God; but by the fall, he lost all ability of will to any spiritual good; nor has he any will to that which is good until divine Grace enlightens the understanding and changes the heart
Flourish - ) To make ornamental strokes with the pen; to write Graceful, decorative figures. ) To embellish with the flowers of diction; to adorn with rhetorical figures; to Grace with ostentatious eloquence; to set off with a parade of words
Vineyard - If one Sunday-school teacher is teaching her class the true Gospel of salvation by Grace alone, and the teacher in the next class is teaching salvation by morals or forgiveness by merit, then there is little expectation of gathering a crop for GOD
Fowl - ...
Acts 10:12 (b) These birds represent unclean people who were saved by Grace, washed in the Blood of the Lamb, and thereby made fit to live in Heaven
Language - But what a decided proof is this, among may, of the overruling power of God to cause good to spring out of evil, that as sin induced a confusion of languages, Grace rendered this very confusion a means for the greater display of the riches of mercy in the confirmation of the truth of the gospel; for by the confusion at Babel, and the diversity of languages that followed, what a blessed opportunity was thereby afforded, when at the day of Pentecost, the poor, ignorant, and unlearned disciples of Jesus gave testimony of the truth by conversing with the greatest fluency in no less than fifteen different languages to the different nations of the earth then assembled at Jerusalem
Lamech - I should hope, therefore, that Lamech's hopes of his son Noah were on the church's account, and had an eye to the covenant of Grace
Confession - What Grace for the believer to be able from the heart to confess Him now! To Him be the glory for evermore!...
Stumbling Block, - Any who through Grace receive the gospel become Christians and are merged in the church
Eight - ...
1 Peter 3:20 (c) The eight souls in the ark represented a new manifestation of GOD's Grace, a new exhibition of His terrible judgment, and a new message to the world
Exercise - ) Exertion for the sake of training or improvement whether physical, intellectual, or moral; practice to acquire skill, knowledge, virtue, perfectness, Grace, etc
Beauty - An assemblage of Graces, or an assemblage of properties in the form of the person or any other object, which pleases the eye. A particular Grace, feature or ornament any particular thing which is beautiful and pleasing as the beauties of nature
Vail, Veil - Redemption has been wrought, and God is made known in full Grace, and the believer can go into His presence
Hazael - (See 2 Kings 13:3-7) Oh, what an awful representation doth his history afford of the sin and iniquity lurking in the human heart! In the whole nature of man it must be the same, for the seeds of sin are alike in all; and that they do not ripen and bear the like deadly fruit in all, is wholly owing to the preventing and restraining Grace of God
Mercy-Seat - And how can a soul come short of salvation that acts faith upon the infinite merits of God the Son's righteousness, and the infinite faithfulness of God the Father's Grace?...
See Propitiation
Babel - )...
I cannot forbear adding one short, but I hope not unprofitable observation, by way of noting the wonderful Grace and overruling power of God
Bether - And how do the best of saints, in the present day, and they who enjoy most of the Redeemer's presence and Grace, still long for the full manifestation of his person, and the coming of that great day, when he will come "to be glorified in his saints, and to be admired in all that believe
Minister, Serve - The first time it is used in the Hebrew Bible is in the story of Joseph as he becomes the slave of Potiphar: “And Joseph found Grace in his sight, and he served [1] him …” ( Fear - The law is so called, because it is the object, the cause, and the rule of the Grace of holy fear
Day - The Day of Grace supervenes, during which the church is being called out
Vocation - The glory of God, who is supremely wise, good, merciful, just, and powerful, is so luminously displayed in this communication both of his Grace and glory, as deservedly to raise into rapturous admiration the minds of angels and of men, and to employ their loosened tongues in celebrating the praises of Jehovah, Revelation 4:8-11 ; Revelation 5:8-10
Jubilee - Isaiah clearly refers to this peculiar and important festival, as foreshadowing the glorious dispensation of gospel Grace, Isaiah 61:1,2 Luke 4:17-21
Passage - What passage had you? We had a passage of twenty five days to Havre de Grace, and of thirty eight days from England
Baptism, Ceremonies of - A white cloth, placed on the head, symbolizes sanctifying Grace; this is a survival of the white baptismal robe of ancient times
God - It puts a voice into the mute lips of creation; and not only reveals God in his works, but illustrates his ways in providence, displays the glories of his character, his law, and his Grace, and brings man into true and saving communion with him
Sanctify - It is a progressive work of divine Grace upon the soul justified by the love of Christ
Pashur - (See Jeremiah 20:1-6) I pause over the name and character of this man just to remark the blessedness of all times in the church, when the Lord is pleased to give to his exercised people precious testimonies to his truth over and above the Grace he manifests to their own hearts
Call - Their existence as God’s people is the work of the sovereign God who, in his Grace and mercy, has called them and saved them (1 Corinthians 1:2; 1 Corinthians 1:26; Colossians 3:15; 2 Thessalonians 2:14; 2 Timothy 1:9)
Wealth: Involves Danger - Is it one of the advantages of wealth to have one's abode polished till all comfort vanishes, and the very floor is as smooth and dangerous as a sheet of ice, or is this merely an accidental circumstance typical of the dangers of abundance? Observation shows us that there is a fascination in wealth which renders it extremely difficult for the possessors of it to maintain their equilibrium; and this is more especially the case where money is suddenly acquired; then, unless Grace prevent, pride, affectation, and other mean vices stupify the brain with their sickening fumes, and he who was respectable in poverty
Baxterianism - And accordingly he will not judge any at last according to the mere law of works, but as they have obeyed or not obeyed his...
conditions or terms of Grace. God the Father and Christ the Mediator hath freely, without any prerequisite condition on man's part, enacted a law of Grace of universal extent, in regard of its tenor, by which he giveth, as a deed or gift, Christ himself, with all his following benefits which he bestoweth: (as benefactor and legislator;) and this to all alike, without excluding any; upon condition they believe and accept the offer. Christ hath given faith to none by his law or testament, though he hath revealed that to some he will, as benefactor and Dominus Absolutus, [9] give that Grace which shall infallibly...
produce it; and God hath given some to Christ that he might prevail with them accordingly; yet this is no giving it to the person, nor...
hath he in himself ever the more title to it, nor can any lay claim to it as their due. Ward differed from Amyraut, Martinius, and others of that school, on the topic of baptismal regeneration; and, as the subjects of baptism, according to the sentiments of the two former, are invested with invisible Grace, and are regenerated in virtue of the ordinance when canonically performed, such divines far more easily disposed of their baptized converts in the ranks of strict predestination, than the others could who did not hold those sentiments. After all the refined distinctions which Baxter employed to render the theory of common and special Grace plausible and popular, the real meaning of the inventors was frequently elicited when such a question as this was asked, "Have any men in the world Grace sufficient to repent and believe savingly who do not?" After asserting that he knows nothing about the matter, the reply of Baxter is, "If we may conjecture upon probabilities, it seemeth most likely that there is such a sufficient Grace, or power, to repent and believe savingly, in some that use it not, but perish. " "This,"...
says one of Baxter's apologists, "seems to me very inexplicable!" and in the same light it will be viewed by all who recollect that this "sufficient Grace or power" is that "portion of special Grace which never fails to accomplish its design,—the salvation of the individual on whom it is bestowed!" Baxter's celebrated "Aphorisms of Justification," published in 1649
Temperance - From the NT point of view the Grace of ‘self-control’ is the result of the Holy Spirit’s indwelling; it is the Spirit-controlled personality alone that is ‘strengthened with power’ ( Ephesians 3:18 ; cf. ‘Self-control,’ in its widest sense, as including mastery over all tempers, appetites, and passions, has a prominent place in two NT lists of the Christian Graces. In Galatians 5:23 , ‘self-control’ closes the list of the Graces which are all ‘the fruit of the Spirit,’ just as ‘drunkenness and revellings’ close the list of ‘the works of the flesh’ ( Galatians 5:21 ). Those who are ‘led by the Spirit’ ( Galatians 5:18 ), who ‘live by the Spirit’ and ‘by the Spirit also walk’ ( Galatians 5:25 ) attain, in its perfection, the Grace of complete ‘self-control
Partake, Partaker - , with the Gospel, as cooperating in its activity; the AV misplaces the "with" by attaching it to the superfluous italicized pronoun "you;" Philippians 1:7 , "partakers with (me of Grace)," RV, and AV marg. ; not as AV text, "partakers (of my Grace);" Revelation 1:9 , "partaker with (you in the tribulation, etc
Church: Her Glory in Tribulation - ' It was a fair vision to gaze upon, and reminded us 'of the mystic rainbow, which the seer of Patmos beheld, which was round about the throne, for it strikes us that it was seen by John as a complete circle, of which we see but the half on earth; the upper arch of manifest glory we rejoice to gaze upon, but the lower and foundation arch of the eternal purpose, upon which the visible display of Grace is founded, is reserved for our contemplation in another world. Her sons and daughters are led to the slaughter, and her blood is cast abroad, like the foam of the waters, but onward she dashes with irresistible energy, fearing no leap of peril; and then it is that the eternal God glorifies her with the rainbow of his everlasting Grace, makes the beauty of her holiness to shine forth, and, in the patience of the saints, reveals a heavenly radiance, which all men behold with astonishment
Humility - A better definition of the Christian Grace of humility is found in the union of highest self-respect with uttermost abandon of sacrifice in service. God giveth Grace to all who are thus humble ( James 4:6 )
Titus, Epistle to - The basis of godly living is “the Grace of God that brings salvation” ( 1 Timothy 2:11 NIV). Evidence of receiving God's Grace and salvation is a transformation of one's life
Pelagians - That the Grace of God is given according to our merits. That this Grace is not granted for the performance of every moral act; the liberty of the will and information in points of duty being sufficient
Testament - Oh, for Grace then to prove the Lord's will in it. Oh, for to lay claim to all the legacies contained in it! Am I married to the Lord, and hath Jesus bethrothed me to him for ever? Am I gathered out of nature's darkness, and become a child of God by adoption and by Grace? It is said, If any man be in Christ, he is a new creature
Carry - to promote, advance, or help forward to continue as, to carry on a design to carry on the administration of Grace. ...
Grace will carry a man through all difficulties
Spirit - This indwelling Spirit is the gift of Grace, of adoption-the Holy Spirit poured into our hearts-which emboldens us to call God "Abba, my Father. ...
We "grieve" the Spirit of God by withstanding his holy inspirations, the impulses of his Grace; or by living in a lukewarm and incautious manner; by despising his gifts, or neglecting them; by abusing his favors, either out of vanity, curiosity, or indifference
Freedom - This is an act of God’s supreme Grace that has as its basis the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ (Luke 4:17-19; John 8:36; Romans 7:4-6; Romans 8:2; Hebrews 2:14-15). They have been saved by God’s Grace so that they might be free from sin, not so that they might fall under sin’s power again (Romans 6:6-14; Galatians 5:13; 1 Peter 2:16; 2 Peter 2:19)
Plagues of Egypt - It may not be unacceptable to the readers of this work to have brought before them in one short view the account of the plagues of Egypt, in order to take into a comprehensive manner the judgment of God over the Egyptians, while manifesting Grace to his Israel. (Exodus 8:20-32) And I beg him also to observe how the Lord, concerning this plague, called upon both the Egyptians and the Israelites to observe the tokens of his discriminating Grace over his people; for we are told that the Lord marked the land of Goshen, where Israel dwelt, that no swarm of flies should be there. ...
In this we mark also distinguishing Grace to some of the servants of Pharaoh. And as when Israel went up afterwards with an high hand out of Egypt, a mixed multitude went with them, were not these such as Grace had marked for the Lord's own? May we not consider them as types of the Gentile church given to the Lord Jesus, as well as the Jewish church? (Isaiah 49:6)...
The eighth plague is introduced by the Lord with bidding Moses, the man of God, to remark to Israel that the Lord had hardened the heart of Pharaoh purposely, that he might set forth his love to Israel in shewing these signs and wonders before them. The Lord delights in distinguishing Grace, and the Lord delights that his people should know the proofs of it also. And though in our present twilight of knowledge our greatest researches go but a little way, yet certain it is, the destruction of Egypt, the hardening of Pharaoh's heart, and the heart of his people, and the delivery of Israel, all pointedly preached the same solemn truth, as it is the whole, tenor of revelation to declare, that the distinguishing Grace of God is the sole cause wherefore Israel is saved and the Egyptians destroyed
Humility - —This virtue or Grace distinguished the leaders of OT history like Abraham and Moses (Genesis 18:27, Numbers 12:3), and was inculcated by the prophets as a chief duty (Micah 6:8). Elsewhere humility is enjoined, along with kindred Graces, as the means of averting unholy disputes and of promoting co-operation in the Church and among the members of the Christian society (Matthew 18:4; Matthew 23:12, Ephesians 4:2, Philippians 2:3, Colossians 3:12). —The rise of this Grace creates an epoch. Humility as a sovereign Grace is the creation of Christianity. Passing from Christ’s example, the main lines of His teaching are two...
(1) Humility in relation to God, or the Law of Grace. In Wendt’s language—‘Humility is the conscious lowliness we feel before God in view of His superabundant love and holy majesty, and in contrast to our own unworthiness, guilt, and entire dependence on His Grace’ (The Teaching of Jesus, vol. ’ This is a fundamental law of the Kingdom of heaven and the indispensable condition of Grace: ‘for every one that exalteth himself shall be humbled, but he that humbleth himself shall be exalted’ (cf. On no other terms is Grace given or fellowship with God possible. The greatness of the Baptist was rooted in his humility and utter freedom from jealousy (John 3:27; John 3:30), and this Grace has been the soil and safety of saints ever since. —No Christian Grace is isolated or thrives alone. There is the danger, however, of exaggerating our own view and importance: ‘it always needs much Grace to see what other people are, and to keep a sense of moral proportion’ (Denney, Expos. So manifold is the function of this indispensable and crowning Grace
Sacraments - The vagueness of prevailing notions is illustrated by Augustine’s remark that ‘signs pertaining to things Divine are called sacraments,’ and by his well-known definition of a sacrament as ‘the visible form of an invisible Grace. The Council of Trent defined the nature of a sacrament more closely, by laying it down that not all signs of sacred things have sacramental value, and that visible forms are sacraments only when they represent an invisible Grace and become its channels. The Reformed doctrine, on the other hand, maintains that though they are Divinely appointed channels of the heavenly Grace, their benefits to the recipient are contingent upon subjective spiritual conditions, and above all upon the exercise of faith in Christ Himself
Barnabas - )...
The latter must be wrong; for there could be no difficulty about preaching to Greek speaking Jews), and the news reached Jerusalem, the church there sent Barnabas to Antioch; "who when he came, and had seen the Grace of God, was glad and exhorted (in consonance with his surname, "son of exhortation") them all, that with purpose of heart they would cleave unto the Lord" (Acts 11:22-24). )...
Instead of narrow Jewish jealousy at "God s Grace" being extended to non-Judaized Gentiles, being "full of the Holy Spirit," be was "glad," and sought Saul as one specially commissioned to evangelize the Gentiles (Acts 26:17; Acts 22:17-21). But in consequence of Barnabas desiring to take with them John Mark, his sister's son, and Paul opposing it because of Mark's desertion at Pamphylia in the previous journey, so sharp a contention arose that they separated; and while Paul, with Silas, "being recommended by the brethren unto the Grace of God" (which marks their approval of Paul's course) "went through Syria and Cilicia confirming the churches," Barnabas took Mark with him to Cyprus, his native island
Lord's Supper - An outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual Grace; an oath, by which we bind our souls with a bond unto the Lord. A communicating ordinance: blessings of Grace are here commuicated to us. When coming from it, we should admire the condescensions of divine Grace; watch against the snares of Satan, and the allurements of the world; rejoice in the finished work of Christ, depend upon the gracious influence of the Spirit, that we may keep up a sense of the divine favour, and be longing for heaven, where we hope at last to join the general assembly of the first-born
Assurance - Assurance of final salvation must stand or fall with the doctrine of personal unconditional election, and is chiefly held by divines of the Calvinistic school; and that nothing is an evidence of a state of present salvation but so entire a persuasion as amounts to assurance in the strongest sense, might be denied upon the ground that degrees of Grace, of real saving Grace, are undoubtedly mentioned in Scripture. In support of this view, the following remarks may be offered:—...
If it is the doctrine of the inspired records, that man is by nature prone to evil, and that in practice he violates that law under which as a creature he is placed, and is thereby exposed to punishment;—if also it is there stated, that an act of Grace and pardon is promised on the conditions of repentance toward God, and faith in our Lord Jesus Christ;—if that repentance implies consideration of our ways, a sense of the displeasure of Almighty God, contrition of heart, and consequently trouble and grief of mind, mixed, however, with a hope inspired by the promise of forgiveness, and which leads to earnest supplication for the actual pardon of sin so promised, it will follow from these premises—either,...
1
Love to God - When it regards him relatively, it fixes upon the ceaseless emanations of his goodness to us all in the continuance of the existence which he at first bestowed; the circumstances which render that existence felicitous; and, above all, upon that "great love wherewith he loved us," manifested in the gift of his Son for our redemption, and in saving us by his Grace; or, in the forcible language of St. Paul, upon "the exceeding riches of his Grace in his kindness to us through Christ Jesus. The love of God is a fruit of the Holy Spirit; that is, it is implanted by him only in the souls which he has regenerated; and as that which excites its exercise is chiefly, and in the first place, a sense of the benefits bestowed by the Grace of God in our redemption, and a well grounded persuasion of our personal interest in those benefits, it necessarily presupposes our reconciliation to God through faith in the atonement of Christ, and that attestation of it to the heart by the Spirit of adoption
Fellowship - ...
First, the fact and experience of Christian fellowship only exists because God the Father through Jesus Christ, the Son, and by/in the Spirit has established in Grace a relation (a "new covenant") with humankind. Perhaps the clearest theological use of koinonia [1] is in 1 John 1:3-6 , where we read that when we walk in the light truly our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son, Jesus Christ and that this relation of Grace has profound implications for daily living. ...
Paul also points to a fellowship in the Spirit (2 Corinthians 13:14 ; Philippians 2:1 ), a dynamic experience that is inextricably related to receiving the love of the Father and the Grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the Son. , 8:23) koinonos [3] is used in the plural of the recipients of the Grace of deification in 2 Peter 1:4 , where Christians are said to be partakers of the divine nature
Acceptance - It should be noticed that in the Revised Version the adjective ‘well-pleasing’ often takes the place of the Authorized Version ‘acceptable’; and that in Ephesians 1:6 the familiar expression ‘(his Grace) wherein he hath made us accepted in the Beloved’ gives place to the more correct ‘which he freely bestowed upon us,’ etc. Unquestionably the Christian religion is a religion of Grace, as contra-distinguished from Judaism and other faiths, which are religions of Law, Salvation, according to the NT throughout (explicitly in the writings of St. By that act of faith, in virtue of which the sinner ‘accepts’ Christ and appropriates all that He is and has done, he passes from a state of condemnation into a state of Grace (Romans 8:1), and is henceforth ‘in Christ’-organically united to Him as the member is to the body (1 Corinthians 12:12 f), as the branch is to the vine (John 15:1-4). Thus our ‘works’ do not constitute our claim for acceptance with God after entering the Kingdom of Grace any more than before; but they determine our place within the Kingdom
Galatians, Letter to the - He was called to be an apostle by God, and the gospel of Grace he preached came from God, independent of the Jerusalem apostles (they even approved of it). The churches of Galatia receive Grace and peace (Galatians 1:2 ). The gospel of Grace has apostolic endorsement (Galatians 2:1-10 ). Whoever adds to the gospel of Grace is a hypocrite (Galatians 2:11-14 ). Return to legalism is to fall away from the Grace of Christ, which expresses itself in love (Galatians 5:13-6 )
Adoption - Spiritual adoption is an act of God's free Grace, whereby we are received into the number, and have a right to all the privileges of the sons of God. All the blessings of Grace are treasured up in Jesus Christ for them, Ephesians 1:3 . Having such a privilege, they "come boldly to the throne of Grace, that they may obtain mercy and find Grace to help in time of need. From the consideration of the whole of this doctrine, we may learn that adoption is an act of free Grace through Jesus Christ
Perfect Perfection - Paul’s ideal of the man of God includes his possession of every gift of Grace necessary for the discharge of the duties of the Christian calling. “Let them, therefore, be fully equipped in Grace, that so they may be reconciled to one another. ” ’ But even if the two meanings are not mutually exclusive, the primary appeal is for reconciliation, in order that the personal perfecting in Grace of the members of the Church may not be hindered. ’...
The maturity of the Christian character is evidenced by the complete and harmonious development of moral virtues and spiritual Graces; each must have its full fruition. ...
Much more than the maturity of a single Grace is implied in St. … They that by God’s Grace were perfected in love dwell in the abode of the pious
Election - -Election, in the teaching of the apostles, is the method by which God gives effect to His eternal purpose to redeem and save mankind; so that the elect are those who are marked out in God’s purpose of Grace from eternity as heirs of salvation. Through their patriarchs and their Divinely guided history, through the laws and institutions of the Mosaic economy, through tabernacle and temple, through prophets and psalmists, through their sacred Scriptures, and at length through the Incarnate Word, born of the chosen people, the world has received the knowledge of the being and spirituality of God, of the love and mercy and Grace of our Father in heaven. ...
These disclosures regarding God’s eternal purpose of Grace are continued and extended by St. Paul in the Epistle to the Ephesians, where the spiritual blessings enjoyed in such abundance by them are traced up to their election by God-‘even as he chose us in him (Christ) before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blemish before him in love: having foreordained us unto adoption as sons through Jesus Christ unto himself, according to the good pleasure of his will, to the praise of the glory of his Grace’ (Ephesians 1:4-6). The unconditional character of the Divine choice, emphasized in these statements of the Apostle, is affirmed again when, writing to Timothy, he bids him suffer for the gospel ‘according to the power of God, who saved us and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose of Grace which was given in Christ Jesus before times eternal’ (2 Timothy 1:9). Paul himself, in all the churches; and he could say: ‘At this present time also there is a remnant according to the election of Grace’ (Romans 11:5). Romans 5:8-10); (2) is a display of Divine Grace calculated to redound to the glory of God by setting forth His love and mercy towards sinful men (Ephesians 1:3-14); (3) is not conditioned upon any good foreseen in the elect, nor in any faith or merit which they may exhibit in time (Romans 9:11-13), but is ‘according to the good pleasure of his will’ (Ephesians 1:5), ‘according to his own purpose of Grace’ (2 Timothy 1:9), of God’s sovereign purpose and Grace (Romans 9:15; Romans 11:5-7); (4) is carried out ‘in Christ’ (Ephesians 1:4; Ephesians 2:10) through the elect being brought into union with Him by faith, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places (Ephesians 1:3; Ephesians 1:5); (5) issues in sanctification by the Spirit and assurance of the truth (2 Thessalonians 2:13 f
Conversion: a Radical Change - But suppose this man can be so changed, that just as freely as he was wont to curse he now delights to pray, and just as heartily as he hated religion he now finds pleasure in it, and just as earnestly as he sinned he now delights to be obedient to the Lord; ah! then, this is a wonder, a miracle which mat cannot accomplish, a marvel which only the Grace of God can work, and which gives to God his highest glory
Lambe, Alphonsus - With Seamus Grace, he was sent as a Legion of Mary envoy to South America in 1953
Names in New Testament - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, Grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
New Testament, Names in - They are: ...
Ananias, Jehovah protects
Elizabeth, worshipper of God
Gabriel, strong man of God
Gamaliel, God recompenses
Heli, Jehovah is high
Jesus, Jehovah saves
John, gift of God
Matthias, gift of Jehovah
Michael, who is like God?
Nathanael, gift of God
Timothy, honoring God
Zachary, Jehovah remembers
Zebedee, gift of God
A large class of proper names for men and women is made up of adjectives denoting personal characteristics, such as ...
Andrew, manly
Asyncritus, incomparable
Bernice, victorious
Clement (Latin), kind
Eunice, victorious
Pudens, modest
Timon (Hebrew), honorable
Zacheus, pure
Names of things, and words referring to trades or avocations were taken as proper names: ...
Andronicus, conqueror
Anna, Grace
Caiphas, oppressor
Judas, praise
Malchus, ruler
Manahen, comforter
Mary (Hebrew), bitter sea
Philip, lover of horses
Prochorus, leader of a chorus
Salome, peace
Tyrannus, tyrant
Some names seem to have been suggested by particular circumstances: ...
Cleophas, of an illustrious father
Joseph, whom the Lord adds
Mnason, he who remembers
Onesiphorus, bringer of profit
Philologus, lover of words
Sosipater, saviour of his father
Names of animals and plants are not frequent, the only example being ...
Damaris, heifer
Dorcas and Tabitha, gazelle
Susanna, lily
Rhode, rosebush
Names derived from numbers are ...
Quartus, fourth
Tertius and Tertullus, third
Names without Christian significance and probably derived from pagan mythology are: ...
Apollo, contracted form, of Apollonios, belonging to Apollo
Apollyon
Diotrephes, nourished by Jupiter
Epaphroditus, beautiful
Hermes
Hermogenes
Phebe, shining
"Bar" in a name means "son of," e
Reign - , "them that reign;" (II) metaphorically, (a) of believers, Romans 5:17 , where "shall reign in life" indicates the activity of life in fellowship with Christ in His sovereign power, reaching its fullness hereafter; 1 Corinthians 4:8 (1st part), of the carnal pride that laid claim to a power not to be exercised until hereafter; (b) of Divine Grace, Romans 5:21 ; (c) of sin, Romans 5:21 ; 6:12 ; (d) of death, Romans 5:14,17
Bestow - rendering, "the Grace of God which hath been given in the churches of Macedonia
Chaplain - In England there are forty-eight chaplains to the king, who wait four each month, preach in the chapel, read the service to the family, and to the king in his private oratory, and say Grace in the absence of the clerk of the closet
Resurrection - From the doctrines of Grace, as union, election, redemption, &c
Benediction - Hence benediction in the modern Romish church is used, in a more particular manner, to denote the sign of the cross made by a bishop or prelate as conferring some Grace on the people
Titus, Letter to - He reminds Titus that the Grace of God changes lives (2:11-15), and that Christians must demonstrate this by the way they live (3:1-7)
Mind - The implanted principle of Grace
Unction - The oil with which the sick person is anointed, represents, it is said, the Grace of God, which is poured down into the soul; and the prayer used at the time of anointing, expresses the remission of sins thereby granted to the sick person: for the prayer is this
Jeremiah - He was called to assume the prophetic office when a youth, and on that account declined it: but God promised him Grace and strength sufficient for his work
Plane Tree - (Ezekiel 31:8) But when the reader hath pondered over these beauties of nature, I beg him to observe how, in a yet far higher degree, the Holy Ghost is pleased to make use of them in setting forth the glories of Grace, when describing the Lord Jesus under the similitude of the wide spreading branches of the trees of the wood, to represent the shelter he affords to his people
Peter, Second Epistle of - Saints, knowing these things before, were not to fall from their stedfastness, but to grow in Grace and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ
Jacob - He escaped from the angry pursuit of Laban, from a meeting with Esau, and from the vengeance of the Canaanites provoked by the murder of Shechem; and in each of these three emergencies he was aided and strengthened by the interposition of God, and in sign of the Grace won by a night of wrestling with God his name was changed at Jabbok into Israel
Angel - They differ, too, in perfection of nature and of Grace
Aging - While advancing age results in diminishing strength (Ecclesiastes 12:1-8 ), God's Grace and help are ever the same (Isaiah 46:4 )
Adultery - ...
Adulterers can be forgiven (John 8:3-11 ); and once sanctified through repentance, faith, and God's Grace, they are included among God's people (1 Corinthians 6:9-11 )
Treasure - ...
2 Corinthians 4:7 (a) The treasure is the gift of eternal life, divine Grace, the knowledge of GOD, and belonging to JESUS CHRIST, the Saviour
Spring - He grows in Grace
Enoch - A bright example in those early days of how by Grace a man can have communion with God, and so please God, and be made sensible of it, thus enjoying the light of His countenance in walking with Him in a sinful world
Joachimites - The first ternary was that of men; of whom, the first class was that of married men, which had lasted during the whole period of the Father; the second was that of clerks, which lasted during the time of the Son; and the last was that of monks, wherein was to be an uncommon effusion of Grace by the Holy Spirit
Wilderness - He has to learn what he is in himself, and the God of all Grace he has to do with
Ishi - I have been from everlasting the Husband and Head of my church, in the secret transactions of covenant redemption; but in that day when I shall openly manifest myself in that character I will be called Ishi: "for my people shall know my name, therefore they shall in that day know that I am he that doth speak, behold, it is I!" (Isaiah 52:6) Reader think if of the love and tenderness of thy Jesus! Was there ever such Grace manifested as by him? Who but must love him? Who but must delight in him? Yes, Lord, I will do as thou hast said, and call thee Ishi, my Husband, my man, and also the Lord my Righteousness!...
See Ammi...
Coelestius, Heretic of Hibernian Scots - Coelestius had for some time studied law, and then become a monk, when his speculations upon the conditions of Grace and nature attracted attention, as he affirmed the leading points of what were afterwards known as the Pelagian heresy upon the fall of man and the need of supernatural assistance, in effect denying both
Alfie Lambe - With Seamus Grace, he was sent as a Legion of Mary envoy to South America in 1953
Bourignonists - The leading principles which pervade her productions are these:...
that man is perfectly free to resist or receive divine Grace; that God is ever unchangeable in love toward all his creatures, and does not inflict any arbitrary punishment, but that the evils they suffer are the natural consequences of sin; that true religion consists not in any outward forms of worship, nor systems of faith, but in immediate communion with the Deity, by internal feelings and impulses, and by a perfect acquiescence in his will
Gentile - God, who had promised by his prophets to call the Gentiles to the faith, with a superabundance of Grace, has fulfilled his promise; so that the Christian church is now composed principally of Gentile converts; and the Jews, too proud of their particular privileges, and abandoned to their reprobate sense of things, have disowned Jesus Christ, their Messiah and Redeemer, for whom, during so many ages, they had looked so impatiently
Mount Paran - Wheresoever Jesus is, as he was to Hagar, and as he was to David, when he speaks, and when he opens the eyes to see his Grace, we find near to us the well of water "springing up to everlasting life
Barnabas - Five years afterwards, the church at Jerusalem, being informed of the progress of the gospel at Antioch, sent Barnabas thither, who beheld with great joy the wonders of the Grace of God, Acts 11:20-24
Jude, Epistle of - Ungodly ones had crept in, who abused the Grace of God, and denied their only Master and Lord Jesus Christ
Light - ...
Those who turn to Christ for salvation are, by God’s Grace, transferred from a kingdom of darkness into a kingdom of light (Colossians 1:12-13; 1 Peter 2:9)
Good Works - Salvation from sin and condemnation comes not by human good works but by divine Grace, and people receive this salvation through faith (Ephesians 2:8-9; Titus 3:5-7)
Rest - But sin entered into the world by man, with all its baneful consequences; and unless God were to acquiesce in a world of sin and moral woe He must needs work in Grace
Meat - If even the earthly life is not nourished merely by the daily bread but by the divine Grace which blesses the food as means of preserving life, much less can the spiritual life be nourished by earthly food, but only by the spiritual food which a man partakes of by the Spirit of God from the true bread of life, the word of God. Sanctification consists in the operation of this spiritual food through the right use of the means of Grace for growth in holiness (Matthew 5:16; 1 Peter 2:12)
Call, Calling - ...
The means of calling is clearly stated as being through Grace (Galatians 1:6 ) and through the hearing of the gospel (2 Thessalonians 2:14 ). The starting point for the divine calling is not works but the purpose and Grace of God in Christ Jesus
Lion - When I hear or see some awful effects of his devices, on the minds of my fellow creatures and fellow sinners; oh! how powerfully doth it teach me the blessed consequences of distinguishing Grace! Doth he work his devilish purposes on others, and am I preserved from his snare? Doth he accomplish their destruction, and do I escape? Reader! think of this precious subject! How doth it exalt my Lord in the consciousness of preserving Grace! And how doth it tend to humble my soul!'...
Cloud - ’...
If for us the cloud is as a door which closes, a veil that hides (as God verily is a God that hideth Himself), this is of Grace: ‘thou canst not follow me now’ (John 13:36)—‘ye cannot bear it now’ (John 16:12). To His disciples the Law is no more a threat and fear, but is written upon the heart for honour and obedience; and God’s providence is trusted—the sheep follow, for they know His voice; and for the deep things of the soul there is a great High priest passed into the heavens, and they that know His name come boldly to the throne of Grace
Judge - I wish, while directing the reader both to the judgment that is to follow the present life, and the Judge who is to preside at the grand tribunal, to offer a short remark with an eye to the Lord Jesus Christ upon those subjects which under Grace will not fail, I hope, to be profitable. And what a beautiful order and harmony there is in this appointment as well as Grace and mercy to his people
Flock - The church is said by Jesus himself to be his sheep, which his Father hath given him, and which he hath also purchased by his blood, and made them his by the conquests of his Grace. For separated by distinguishing Grace and gathered out of the world's wide wilderness, Jesus hath pent it up, and hedged it in; so that it is for ever separated from the wolves and beasts of prey
Moon - " Probably the sacred writer, in allusion to those heavenly influences, meant to speak of yet far higher blessings in the sweet work of Grace upon the soul, when Jesus, the Sun of righteousness, brings forth the fruits of his Holy Spirit, and causeth the soul from his influence, as the moon borrows from the sun, to put forth all precious things in him. The morning in a day of Grace, though small, has then the glimmerings of divine light in the soul; yet are they the sure harbingers of sun-rising, and "mark that path of the just which shineth more and more unto a perfect day
Hardness of Heart - (Judges 16:21) And where the Lord Jesus exerciseth his Grace, his almighty work is described under the strong term of making a new heart, taking away "the heart of stone, and giving an heart of flesh; making all things new. And with Christ's sovereign Grace, he, and he alone, can make every faculty "willing in the day of his power
Redemption - "Being justified freely by his Grace, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus," Romans 3:24 . "In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his Grace," Ephesians 1:7
Nail - " And what tends to endear this view of Christ still more is, that not only all, and every thing relating to the kingdoms of nature, providence, Grace, and glory to the church at large, is so, but to every individual of that church, "the vessels of small quantity," meaning the lowest, the humblest, the least, and most inconsiderable of his people, all shall hang upon Jesus alike, "from the vessel of cups, even to all the vessels of flagons. " (John 14:19) But while their persons, and their present and eternal all are secured in him, he is himself cut off and removed when bearing their sins, and consequently their sins are cut off never more to arise against them; "for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it;" while he himself riseth again as the nail fastened in a sure place, that he may appear with all his people, whose sins he hath borne, whose persons he hath redeemed, and who are enabled by his Grace to hang all their high hopes of mercy and salvation upon him as the Lord their righteousness
Meals - Another preliminary step was the Grace or blessing, of which we have but one instance in the Old Testament -- (1 Samuel 9:13 ) --and more than one pronounced by our Lord himself in the new Testament -- Matthew 15:36 ; Luke 9:16 ; John 6:11 The mode of taking the food differed in no material point from the modern usages of the East. At the conclusion of the meal, Grace was again said in conformity with (8:10) and the hands were again washed
Cloud - ’...
If for us the cloud is as a door which closes, a veil that hides (as God verily is a God that hideth Himself), this is of Grace: ‘thou canst not follow me now’ (John 13:36)—‘ye cannot bear it now’ (John 16:12). To His disciples the Law is no more a threat and fear, but is written upon the heart for honour and obedience; and God’s providence is trusted—the sheep follow, for they know His voice; and for the deep things of the soul there is a great High priest passed into the heavens, and they that know His name come boldly to the throne of Grace
Truth (2) - ), to read ἀλήθεια as equivalent to ‘faithfulness’ or ‘rectitude,’ on the analogy of the LXX Septuagint rendering (ἔλεος καὶ ἀλήθεια) for the Hebrew original of ‘grace and truth. ‘He reigns as Himself holy and true, by the power of the truth which He reveals—truth in the conscience, truth in the heart, and truth in the mind—and over those who, through His Grace and spirit, have become fundamentally true; who stand in the eternal, abiding relationship of peace and love and holiness towards God’ (Reith, The Gospel of John, ii. And we beheld his glory, glory as of the only begotten from the Father, full of Grace and truth. … For of his fulness we have all received, even Grace upon Grace. For the law was given through Moses: Grace and truth came through Jesus Christ’ (John 1:14; John 1:16-17). Here, just as the conception of the Truth is subordinated to that of the Way in John 14:5-6, the aspect of Grace controls that of truth. OT into ‘grace,’—a change which is all the more significant that this great Pauline term never recurs in the Gospel,—but the companion idea of truth (cf
Circumcision - That the covenant with Abraham, of which circumcision was made the sign and seal, Genesis 17:7-14 , was the general covenant of Grace, and not wholly, or even chiefly, a political and national covenant, may be satisfactorily established. This covenant with Abraham, therefore, although it respected a natural seed, Isaac, from whom a numerous progeny was to spring; and an earthly inheritance provided for this issue, the land of Canaan; and a special covenant relation with the descendants of Isaac, through the line of Jacob, to whom Jehovah was to be "a God," visibly and specially, and they a visible and "peculiar people;" yet was, under all these temporal, earthly, and external advantages, but a higher and spiritual Grace embodying itself under these circumstances, as types of a dispensation of salvation and eternal life, to all who should follow the faith of Abraham, whose justification before God was the pattern of the justification of every man, whether Jew or Gentile, in all ages. " And as this rite was enjoined upon Abraham's posterity, so that every "uncircumcised man-child whose flesh of his foreskin was not circumcised on the eighth day," was to be "cut off from his people, by the special judgment of God, and that because "he had broken God's covenant," Genesis 17:14 ; it therefore follows that this rite was a constant publication of God's covenant of Grace among the descendants of Abraham, and its repetition a continual confirmation of that covenant, on the part of God, to all practising it in that faith of which it was the ostensible expression. As the covenant of Grace made with Abraham was bound up with temporal promises and privileges, so circumcision was a sign and seal of the covenant in both its parts,—its spiritual and its temporal, its superior and inferior provisions. Circumcision was practised among them all by virtue of its divine institution at first; and was extended to their foreign servants, and to proselytes, as well as to their children; and wherever the sign of the covenant of Grace was by divine appointment, there it was a seal of that covenant, to all who believingly used it; for we read of no restriction of its spiritual blessings, that is, its saving engagements, to one line of descent from Abraham only. It was a confirmation of the temporal blessings of the Abrahamic covenant, now, by a covenant of peculiarity, made over to them, while it was still recognized as a consuetudinary rite which had descended to them from their fathers, and as the sign and seal of the covenant of Grace, made with Abraham and with all his descendants without exception. Christ is made of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are justified by the law, ye are fallen from Grace. —"I testify again to every man that is circumcised, that he is a debtor to do the whole law; whosoever of you are justified by the law, ye are fallen from Grace
the Thorn in Paul's Flesh - Oh, no! you smile at our innocence, and say to us: Don't you see that the Grace and the strength of Christ are not prescribed anywhere else in Holy Scripture for epilepsy or ophthalmia? Luke was there with his balsams, and with his changes of air, and with his rests in a desert place, for all these ailments of the Apostle. But the Grace and the strength of Christ are reserved for far other thorns than Luke could extract, or even alleviate. As long as this thorn lasts and thus lacerates me, how shall I serve Thee or finish Thy work?' But his Lord compassionately overlooked and freely forgave Paul all his unbelief and all his impatience and all his foolish charges, and condescended and said to him: My Grace is sufficient for thee; for My strength is made perfect in weakness. What then is that thorn in the flesh of all God's best saints and of all Christ's best servants,-that thorn which still humbles, and humbles, and humbles them down, past all possible glorying in anything they are, or have ever been, or can ever be? Humbles the most heavenly-minded men in all the world down to death and hell, and so humbles such men only? What is it that Christ sends to stab His best servants deeper and deeper every day, and to impale them and buffet them till they are so many dead corpses rather than living and breathing and Christian men? And then on the other hand, what is that same thorn and stake and devil's fist that at every stab and stound and blow draws down the whole Grace of Jesus Christ on the sufferer, till the sanctified saint kisses his thorn, and blesses his Lord, and would not part with the one or the other for all the world? Samson offered so many sheets and so many changes of raiment to any Philistine who within seven days would declare his riddle. And after John Bunyan had reset Samson's riddle to the readers of his Grace Abounding he felt sure that his sheets and his changes of raiment were all quite safe, for, after his offer to them, he said: "The Philistines will not understand me. And as many of the children of light as shall have found out the only possible answer by this night se'ennight shall here receive, along with the Grace and strength of Christ, a change of raiment
Timothy, Epistles to - Here it is no question of God's counsels, but of His attitude toward men in Grace as the Saviour-God: cf. Christ is the one Mediator between God and men, and He gave His life a ransom for all , to be testified of in these days of Grace. Romans 1:4 ); has appeared to angels (they saw God in Christ); has been preached among the nations; has been believed on in the world; and has been received up into glory — an epitome of God's ways in Grace outside of all connected with promises to Israel, and in contrast to law. ...
After a salutation in which he desires mercy for Timothy, as well as Grace and peace, Paul thanks God, whom he had served from his forefathers with pure (not always enlightened) conscience, having Timothy in unceasing remembrance in prayer, calling to mind his unfeigned faith and that of his maternal ancestors; and he desires that Timothy would rekindle the gift that he had received by the imposition of Paul's hands, for God had given, not a spirit of cowardice, but of power, of love, and of a wise discretion. ...
God's salvation and calling according to His purposeand Grace in Christ Jesus before the ages of time, has been made manifest by the appearing of the Saviour, who has annulled death, and brought life and incorruptibility to light by the gospel — a revelation which puts the soul beyond death and its power
Remnant - ...
Since acceptance with God is not based on merit, one dimension of remnant theology is its message of God's Grace (Isaiah 1:9 ; Amos 5:15 ). It is too mechanical to think of wrath and Grace within God vying with each other for the upper hand, but given that hypothetical scenario, the message is that God's Grace triumphs in the end. Paul clarified the relationship between the remnant, those who accepted the gospel, and the larger body of unbelieving Jews, by noting: (1) that the remnant represented the ongoing activity of God with the chosen people, "a remnant chosen by Grace" (Romans 11:5 ) since it is the spiritual Israel; (2) that the function of the Jewish remnant, to which are not attached the Gentile believers, is to serve as a vehicle of retrieval or recovery for the larger Jewish community; and (3) that the exclusion of the larger is for a limited time (1619112984_11 )
Isaiah, Book of - There is also Grace in store for the latter days: Zion will be a centre of blessing, and a remnant will be saved. Jerusalem is called upon to sing: through the sure mercies of David there are blessings in store for her, and full free Grace to every one that thirsts. Christ, in the full Grace of His person, is concerned in the blessing of Israel. (nearly forty in number) show that his words applied to the times that then were; such as the condition of the people; the unprofitableness of the rites and ceremonies; and that Grace to the Gentiles had been foretold
Election - Some embraced it, and submitted to be the elect people of God, on the new ground of faith, instead of the old one of natural descent; and therefore the Apostle, Romans 11:7 , calls the believing part of the Jews, "the election," in opposition to those who opposed this "election of Grace," and still clung to their former and now repealed election as Jews and the descendants of Abraham; "But the election hath obtained it, and the rest were blinded. The individuals properly called "the elect," are they who have been made partakers of the Grace and saving efficacy of the Gospel. All who truly believe are elected; and all to whom the Gospel is sent have, through the Grace that accompanies it, the power to believe placed within their reach; and all such might, therefore, attain to the Grace of personal election
Legalism - The grounding of the law in the covenant Grace of God was never wholly forgotten (Ezra 9:5-7 ), any more than was the sense of authentic piety (Psalm 119 , passim ) or the awareness that mere performance apart from genuine piety was worthless (Proverbs 15:8-9 ; 21:3 ). However, it was easy for the law to assume independent significance and its observance to be viewed as the condition of God's Grace rather than the response to it. As holding out the hope of salvation on the basis of human effort, such works are the antithesis of God's saving Grace set forth in Christ crucified
Growth Increase - We find the word used in a theological connexion referring to the growth of individual believers in Christian character and Graces. The new creature must grow in faith, in knowledge, in Grace, in righteousness, in Christian liberality and brotherly love. Peter instructs his converts to desire the sincere milk of the word, that they ‘may grow thereby’ (1 Peter 2:2), and directly exhorts them to ‘grow in Grace and in the knowledge of our Lord and Saviour’ (2 Peter 3:18). On the other hand, this increase in Grace or Christian character is at the same time the work of God
Sanctification - Very much hath been said in the christian church respecting sanctification some making it the work of the creature, as if a man that is a polluted creature could sanctify himself; and others referring the whole work into the sovereignty and Grace of the Lord. " (John 14:19) The final perseverance of it is of the Lord; for in the covenant of Grace the charter runs thus—"I will not turn away from them to do them good, but I will put my fear in their hearts, that they shall not depart from me. Glorious Security! And finally to add no more—as the commencement of all Grace and sanctification is in God, so the consummation of all glory is in him also
Character - The secret of this spiritual environment which awakens and sustains the soul’s faculties of faith, hope, and love is Grace, in which alone they can move and have their being. The essential fact of Grace is illustrated in the teaching of Christ chiefly in the following doctrines—the Divine Fatherhood, the Divine Forgiveness, the Divine Indwelling, and the Divine Reappearing. Their view is necessary as a caution, not only against the Antinomians, who treat the fact of forgiveness as a term of logic, and argue ‘let us sin that Grace may abound,’ but also against all who preach faith as something apart from ethical enthusiasm. Yet it must be admitted that in this teaching of Grace as a redeeming power, Jesus did not simply profess to level sinners up to the virtuous. ...
(3) The third illustration of Grace through which the scattered forces of character can be regathered is the Divine Indwelling, which, although not made conspicuous in the Synoptists, is essential to the Christian conception of character. The real strength of character from the Christian point of view lies in the sense of weakness and the dependence on Grace. When room has been made for the Divine indwelling in immediate sequence to the Divine forgiveness, there may be an assurance that through Grace and with much patience the fruits of Christian character will come (Mark 4:8; Mark 4:20; Mark 4:26-29). Christian character depends on Christ’s indwelling; for its virtues, which are more appropriately termed Graces, are called ‘fruits of the Spirit,’ indicating that they are not the attainment of the old nature, but the growth of the new, according to the ‘law of the Spirit of life which is in Christ Jesus our Lord. ...
(4) There is one further contribution to the making of character in the name of Grace which belongs to the Christian revelation, viz. And taking all four aspects of the revelation of Grace through Jesus Christ together, we see that they equip His followers for that conflict with environment out of which character emerges, by giving the soul a new worth, freedom, power, and motive
Prayer - " The Holy Spirit is the great agent in the world of Grace, and without his special influence there is no acceptable prayer. Hence he is called the Spirit of Grace and of supplication: for he it is that enables us to draw nigh unto God, filling our mouth with arguments, and teaching us to order our cause before him, Zechariah 12:10 . Again: if we pray for spiritual blessings aright, that is, with an earnestness of desire which arises from a due apprehension of their importance, and a preference of them to all earthly good, who does not see that this implies such a deliverance from the earthly and carnal disposition which characterizes our degenerate nature, that an agency far above our own, however we may employ it, must be supposed? or else, if our own prayers could be efficient up to this point, we might, by the continual application of this instrument, complete our regeneration, independent of that Grace of God, which, after all, this theory brings in. It may indeed be said, that the Grace of God operates by our prayers to produce in us a state of moral fitness to receive the blessings we ask. It is therefore more properly to be considered as a condition of our obtaining that Grace by which such effects are wrought, than as the instrument by which it effects them. In fact, all genuine acts of prayer depend upon a Grace previously bestowed, and from which alone the disposition and the power to pray proceed. So it was said of Saul of Tarsus, "Behold, he prayeth!" He prayed in fact then for the first time; but that was in consequence of the illumination of his mind as to his spiritual danger, effected by the miracle on the way to Damascus, and the Grace of God which accompanied the miracle. By whatever means God may be pleased to fasten the conviction of our spiritual danger upon our minds, and to awaken us out of the long sleep of sin, that conviction must precede real prayer, and comes from the influence of his Grace, rendering the means of conviction effectual. And if it be urged, that prayer at least produces in us a fitness for the supply of spiritual strength, because it is excited by a sense of our wants, the answer is, that the fitness contended for consists in that sense of want itself which must be produced in us by the previous agency of Grace, or we should never pray for supplies
Margaret Hallahan - Give us Grace to conquer our faults, imitate her virtues and live a holy life
Gad - The praying seed of Jacob, at length come off as the prevailing Israel; for they must overcome "by the blood of the Lamb," and be more than conquerors through his Grace making them so
Copper - Seth's race was less distinguished for advancement in arts and luxuries than Cain's race, which was wise in their generation; but the truest civilization is that which develops man's moral and highest nature; in this respect Seth's descendants were far superior, walking in recognition of conscience and of the providence and Grace of God
Friendship - The genius and injunctions of the Christian religion seem also to inculcate this virtue; for it not only commands universal benevolence to men, but promotes the strongest love and friendship between those whose minds are enlightened by divine Grace, and who behold in each other the image of their Divine Master
Eternity of God - From the covenant of Grace, which is eternal, 2 Samuel 3:5
Mercy - (See also Grace; LOVE
Mufti - When the grand seignior addresses any writing to the Mufti, he gives him the following titles; "...
To the esad, the wisest of the wise; instructed in all knowledge; the most excellent of excellents; abstaining from things unlawful; the spring of virtue and true science; heir of the prophetic doctrines; resolver of the problems of faith; revealer of the orthodox articles; key of the treasures of truth; the light to doubtful allegories; strengthened with the Grace of the Supreme Legislator of Mankind, May the Most High God perpetuate thy favours
Barnabas - ’ His kindly introduction of Saul to the Christians at Jerusalem disarmed their fears ( Acts 9:27 ); his broad sympathies made him quick to recognize the work of Grace amongst the Greeks at Antioch ( Acts 11:23 ), and to discern the fitness of his gifted friend for that important sphere of service ( Acts 11:25 f
Memorial - God's covenant with his people lies behind each occasion of God's memory, whether for Grace or retribution
Israelite - The Apostle applies the term in its natural sense to himself in Romans 11:1, ‘I also am an Israelite,’ in order to show that all the members of the race have not been rejected by God, but that there is a remnant according to the election of Grace-Israelites who are Israelites indeed, not merely by outward physical connexion, but also by moral and spiritual characteristics
Kin, Kindred, Kinship - Man was created in the image of God, but he was not begotten; God-sonship is not a thing of nature, but of Grace’ (RS Hallahan, Margaret - Give us Grace to conquer our faults, imitate her virtues and live a holy life
Reed - (2 Kings 18:21) Humble believers in Christ are called bruised reeds; concerning which it is blessedly spoken of the Lord Jesus, "that he will not break the braised reed, nor quench the smoking flax"—meaning, that the tender and frail mind in the first awakenings of Grace, though it be unable of itself to stand no more than the bruised reed Jesus will not break, but support; and the warmth of affection in the regenerated soul, though it hath no flame, and only sends forth the risings like the smoke of burning flax, Jesus will not suffer to be put out
Grain - Neglect not to make use of any grain of Grace
Three - ...
- the trinity of blessing is Grace, mercy and peace
Mercy of God - ...
See Grace, PARDON; Gill's Body of Div
Chamber - (2 Kings 9:2; Mark 14:1-72) But the sweetest sense of the word chambers, in Scripture language, is in reference to those endearing views of Jesus, when he brings his church into the chambers of his Grace, to make himself known unto them, otherwise than he doeth unto the world
Gilead - And the quickness of sight in the dove, shews how much knowledge Jesus imparts by his regenerating Grace
Age, - Again, from Moses to Christ formed a definite period: "the law was given by Moses, but Grace and truth came by Jesus Christ," John 1:17 ; "the law and the prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it
Mephibosheth - David fully respected this and far exceeded it, for it was true Grace in him to bring Mephibosheth to sit at his table
Ahab - Grace had lingered over this poor idolater, for he was an Israelite; but he died impenitent, and his whole house was soon to perish
Take, Handle - On the other hand, the psalmist testifies that in His Grace, God “holds” his right hand ( ja'Cob - He escaped from the angry pursuit of Laban, from a meeting with Esau, and from the vengeance of the Canaanites provoked by the murder of Shechem; and in each of these three emergencies he was aided and strengthened by the interposition of God, and in sign of the Grace won by a night of wrestling with God his name was changed at Jabbok into Israel
Cocceians - Cocceius also taught, that the covenant made between God and the Jews was of the same nature as the new covenant by Jesus Christ; that the law was promulgated by Moses, not merely as a rule of obedience, but also as a representation of the covenant of Grace; that when the Jews had provoked the Deity by their various transgressions, particularly by the worship of the golden calf, the severe yoke of the ceremonial law was added as a punishment; that this yoke, which was painful in itself, became doubly so on account of its typical signification; since it admonished the Israelites from day to day of the imperfection of their state, filled them with anxiety, and was a perpetual proof that they had merited the righteous judgment of God, and could not expect, before the coming of the Messiah, the entire remission of their iniquities; that indeed good men, under the Mosaic dispensation, were, after death, made partakers of glory; but that, nevertheless, during the whole course of their lives they were far removed from that assurance of salvation, which rejoices the believer under the dispensation of the Gospel; and that their anxiety flowed from this consideration, that their sins, though they remained unpunished, were not yet pardoned; because Christ had not as yet offered himself up to make an atonement for them
Leviathan - After something of a desperate battle, we succeeded in driving him against the nets, where, being considerably exhausted by the wounds he had received from balls and lances, he got entangled, was dragged on shore, and the coup de Grace given to him
Mediator - The believing penitent is "accepted in the Beloved" -his person, his praises, and his prayers; and through the same Mediator alone he receives pardon, Grace, and eternal life
Christ - The unction that the prophets and the apostles speak of is the spiritual and internal unction of Grace and of the Holy Ghost, of which kings, priests, and prophets were anciently anointed, was but the figure and symbol
Unity - Unity of faith, is an equal belief of the same truths of God, and possession of the Grace of faith in like form and degree. ...
Unity of spirit, is the oneness which subsists between Christ and his saints, by which the same spirit dwells in both, and both have the same disposition and aims and it is the oneness of christians among themselves, united under the same head, having the same spirit dwelling in them, and possessing the same Graces, faith, love, hope, &c
Matter, Matters - , "in this Grace
Atonement - Whether in Old or New Testament times, forgiveness is solely by God’s Grace and sinners receive it by faith (Psalms 32:5; Psalms 51:17; Micah 7:18; Ephesians 2:8)
Infant Baptism - It becomes thus a child of Grace
Pinianus, Husband of Melania the Younger - 417) his book on Grace and original sin
Disease - Other times he may use sickness to make them more reliant on his power and Grace (2 Corinthians 12:7-10)
Unity, Church - It has given men broader views and a clearer conception ofthat kingdom of Grace, of which Christ is the Head and which is tobe the one, living witness whereby the world may be brought tobelieve that the Divine Father hath sent His Son to be the world'sSaviour
Pentateuch - In his Grace, however, he did not destroy the human race, but gave it the opportunity for a fresh start. ...
The Grace of God and the sovereign choice of God are prominent themes in the Pentateuch
Blessedness - Condition or state of being in God's Grace or favor. It is purely God's Grace
Eternal Sin - That the Grace of God should prove unavailing is indeed hard to believe, and by many the thought is rejected utterly. So every increase of light brings increased responsibility (John 3:19; John 15:22); and for self-willed deliberate refusal of the Divine Grace, refusal not in ignorance or misunderstanding but with full consciousness and choice of will so that the will itself becomes identified with evil, there can only be judgment, not because the Divine compassions fail, but because the redemption, as the Redeemer, is despised and rejected of men
Adoption - ...
Adoption symbolized for Paul God's love and Grace in accepting believers as His children, intimate members of His family. Only God's election in Grace, Christ's work in redemption, and the Spirit's work in the life of the believer bring adoption and make one a child of God
Gold - (Revelation 1:6) And as Christ's head is compared on all these, and the like accounts to gold: so his hands to rings of gold set with beryl, from the liberal manner in which he bestows gifts and Graces to his redeemed. The neck and cheeks of the church, the parts connected with the head, made comely with jewels and chains of gold, may be supposed to mean those Graces, with which her Lord hath adorned her, "more to be desired than gold, yea, than much fine gold. " And when a soul is blessed in the everlasting covenant with all spiritual blessings in Christ Jesus, there is a loveliness indeed, which is as an "ornament of Grace unto the head, and as chains about the neck. " It is said, "We will make thee borders of gold, with studs of silver;" meaning, surely, the joint work and Grace of Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, in whose joint names all true believers in Christ are baptized, and blessed upon earth, and everlastingly made happy and glorious in heaven
Fig Tree - (Luke 13:6) And the prophet, in the Old Testament dispensation, celebrated the glories of God's Grace to the church under a similar figure of his planting his vineyard with a choice vine. " (Isaiah 61:3)...
The instant withering of the barren fig tree, at Christ's command, became the emblem of what must ultimately follow all the way-side productions in nature, void of Grace, at the great day of the Lord. " (John 15:5) If this be the right sense of the passage, and the Lord Jesus meant to teach his disciples thereby, that every hedge fig tree hath no part in the church, no owner in Christ by his Father's gift or purchase, no union with him, and, consequently, no communion in his Graces, but must in the hour of decision instantly wither away; then will this parable of the barren fig tree form one testimony more to the numberless other testimonies with which the word of God abounds, that the children of the wicked one, and the children of the kingdom, are totally separate and dissimilar from everlasting, and so must continue to everlasting
Deuteronomy - In his sovereign Grace, God chose Israel to be his people, and promised them Canaan for a national homeland (Deuteronomy 7:7; Deuteronomy 8:1; Deuteronomy 9:4-5). Israel could do nothing but accept God’s Grace and promise to serve him with loving obedience (Deuteronomy 5:6-7; Deuteronomy 6:1-3; Deuteronomy 10:12-13; see COVENANT)
Invitation - ...
It is partly from this point of view that we are to understand His frequent habit of representing the gospel of Grace as God’s invitation to the soul to partake of the blessings of salvation. The presentation of the gospel as a Divine invitation throws emphasis on another of its essential features,—that it embodies a free gift of Grace from God to man. ’ Jesus in the ‘parables of Grace’ teaches us that the gospel contains something infinitely precious which is given to us, but which we could never deserve or buy. ‘The gospel is ever a gospel of Grace. Everywhere in His dealings with men we find Him acting as God’s messenger of goodwill, and urging them to respond to heavenly Grace with grateful hearts and willing service
God - He does not need to give reasons for his decisions or explanations of his actions (Psalms 115:3; Isaiah 40:13-14; Daniel 4:35; Acts 4:28; Romans 9:20-24), though in his Grace he may sometimes do so (Genesis 18:17-19; Ephesians 1:9). But, again in his Grace, he may choose people to have the honour of serving him (Psalms 105:26-27; Acts 9:15). They can do nothing but repent of their rebellion and surrender before the sovereign God, trusting solely in his Grace for forgiveness (Acts 17:30-31; Ephesians 2:8; see Grace). ...
But God is also a God of love, Grace, mercy and longsuffering, and he wants to forgive repentant sinners (Psalms 86:5; Psalms 135:6; Romans 2:4; Titus 3:4; 2 Peter 3:9; 1 John 4:16; see LOVE; PATIENCE)
Lord's Prayer, the - Hence epiousion is best translated "what is sufficient" "Give us food sufficient for the day, " remembering that the setting of the Gospel of Matthew, the Sermon on the Mount, and the Lord's Prayer (in Luke as well) is one of eschatological urgency and preparation for mission in the new exodus inaugurated by Jesus, and of traveling light; it is not a general prayer for common Grace. Accordingly, the kingdom comes as sinners ask forgiveness of the Lord by acknowledging moral and spiritual obligations, receive saving Grace by faith, and then pass along the good news of Jesus to others with a forgiving heart. They are saved by Grace through the redeeming work of Jesus alone. But they have no right to claim forgiveness for themselves if they are unwilling to forgive others, for that would undermine the purpose of the disciples' mission: as they have been forgiven by God's Grace in Jesus the Son, so they are to share the message of forgiveness with the world
Begotten - ...
But in relation to the Son of God, as the first begotten and the only begotten of the Father, full of Grace and truth, if those terms are confined to the person of the Lord Jesus in his character and office as Mediator, here all difficulty vanisheth to the proper apprehension of our mind; and under divine teaching, we are not only brought to the full conviction of the glorious truth itself, but to the full enjoyment of it, in knowing the Lord Jesus Christ in his mediatorial character, God and man in one person, the Head of union with his people, and the Head of communication also to his people, for Grace here and glory for ever. " And it is no less most blessed and interesting to behold the Son of God thus begotten of the Father, the God-man Mediator, when, for the gracious purposes of salvation, he stood up in his covenant character, that he might be both the head of union and of fulness for communication to his people in Grace, and in glory, for ever. And I beg of him farther to pause and remark with me, the wonderful Grace manifested to creatures, such as we are, in the Lord's giving such blessed manifestations of himself
Unpardonable Sin - Jesus came in the way, not only of righteousness, but of love; and of this incarnation of the Divine Grace they said again and again, ‘He hath a devil’ (Matthew 9:34, Matthew 12:24, Mark 3:22, Luke 11:15, John 7:20; John 8:48; John 8:52; John 10:20). —This does not lie in any limitation of the Grace of Christ or of the forgiving mercy of God. Once they were enlightened, but they too loved the darkness rather than the light, and so shut the light out of their hearts, and trampled under foot the Son of God, and did despite unto the Spirit of Grace. (1) Bunyan at a certain period of his religious history (see Grace Abounding, §§ 96–230) is a type of multitudes who have suffered agonies of spiritual torture through the fear that they have committed a sin for which there is no forgiveness. Such compunctions as Bunyan had are the very best proof that a man has not committed any unpardonable sin, for they are the experiences of one who, though he has not yet realized the all sufficiency of Christ’s Grace, is possessed at least of that contrite spirit which trembles at God’s word, and so may rest upon the prophet’s assurance that unto him the Lord will look (Is 66:2). ‘The Pharisees’; Bunyan, Grace Abounding; ExpT Hannah - Favour, Grace, one of the wives of Elkanah the Levite, and the mother of Samuel (1 Samuel 1 ; 2 )
Sight - And hence the charter of Grace runs in those soul-reviving words: "A new heart will I give you, and a right spirit will I put within you; ye shall be my people, and I will be your God
Empty - It is used (a) literally, Mark 12:3 ; Luke 1:53 ; 20:10,11 ; (b) metaphorically, of imaginations, Acts 4:25 ; of words which convey erroneous teachings, Ephesians 5:6 ; of deceit, Colossians 2:8 ; of a person whose professed faith is not accompanied by works, James 2:20 ; negatively, concerning the Grace of God, 1 Corinthians 15:10 ; of refusal to receive it, 2 Corinthians 6:1 ; of faith, 1 Corinthians 15:14 ; of preaching (id); and other forms of Christian activity and labor, 1 Corinthians 15:58 ; Galatians 2:2 ; Philippians 2:16 ; 1 Thessalonians 2:1 ; 3:5
Casual Security - So many of our hearers are saying, 'Oh, yes! what the preacher says is well enough, but you know we can repent whenever we like; we have power to obtain the Grace of God whenever we please; we know the way; have we not been told over and over again simply to trust Christ?–and we can do that whenever we please–we are safe enough
Redemption - What a creature never could obtain, and therefore entirely of free Grace
Hypocrisy - And so it is; for the very essence of hypocrisy lies in apt imitation and decent; in acting the part of a member of Christ without any saving Grace
Throne - His throne is therefore called a seat of mercy, a throne of Grace (Exodus 25:18; 1 Samuel 4:4; Hebrews 4:16; Hebrews 9:5; see TABERNACLE)
Ashtoreth - The "bringing out the asherah from the house of the Lord," and the "cutting down," suit such a symbol, not a Grace in our sense
Israel, Spiritual - What is certain is that God in His Grace of election opens the door to salvation by faith to all people regardless of the race or tradition out of which they come
Christianity - shall all families of the earth be blessed" (Genesis 12:3; Genesis 22:16), still awaited its fulfillment, and the law came in as the parenthesis between the promise of Grace and its fulfillment in Christ the promised "seed
Cocceians - In consequence of this general principle, he maintained that the ten commandments were promulgated by Moses, not as a rule of obedience, but as a representation of the covenant of Grace...
that when the Jews had provoked the Deity by their various transgressions, particularly by the worship of the golden calf, the severe and servile yoke of the ceremonial law was added to the decalogue, as a punishment inflicted on them by the Supreme Being in his righteous displeasure...
that this yoke, which was painful in itself, became doubly so on account of its typical signification; since it admonished the Israelites from day to day of the imperfection and uncertainty of their state, filled them with anxiety, and was a perpetual proof that they had merited the righteous displeasure of God, and could not expect before the coming of the Messiah the entire remission of their iniquities...
that indeed good men, even under the Mosaic dispensation, were immediately after death made partakers of everlasting glory; but that they were nevertheless, during the whole course of their lives, far removed from that firm hope and assurance of salvation, which rejoices the faithful under the dispensation of the Gospel...
and that their anxiety flowed naturally from this consideration, that their sins, though they remained unpunished were not pardoned; because Christ had not as yet offered himself up a sacrifice to the Father, to make an entire atonement for them
Earrings - ...
The best use made of them was that in Numbers 31:50, an offering to the Lord to "make atonement for souls"; not that our gifts can wipe away guilt, but acknowledgments of God's Grace not being offered in loving gratitude evince an unatoned state, and so a state of guilt
Trumpets, Feast of - So if we would have great measures of Grace we must rouse all our energies and aspirations, and cry mightily with trumpet voice to God
Children - So Barnabas is termed "son of consolation," expressing his predominant Grace (Acts 4:36); John and James "sons of thunder," characterized by fiery zeal (Mark 3:17)
Raiment - ...
Revelation 3:5 (b) This is typical of the beautiful, sinless character of those who are saved by Grace, walk with GOD, and are overcomers of sin and evil
Palace - The Lord JESUS breaks the chains, loosens the bonds, removes the bands, and sets the prisoner free by means of the Gospel of His Grace
Mount (And Forms) - He does not grow in Grace nor in the knowledge of the Lord JESUS
Fire (Kindle) - How careful we should be that the words we speak are full of Grace and truth
Harden (the Heart) - The heart ceases to respond to the love and the Grace, and the mind ceases to believe and obey GOD's will
Well - Many times in our lives dry, deserted valleys are changed into sweet, rich mountain tops of joy and peace, as the Grace of GOD is seen and experienced
Bands - This figure would indicate that there is no way of hindering the sinful actions of men except, of course, by the power and Grace of GOD
Camel - In Grace the new creation overcomes all difficulties
Exercise - Exertion of the body for amusement, or for instruction the habitual use of the limbs for acquiring an art, dexterity, or Grace, as in fencing, dancing, riding or the exertion of the muscles for invigorating the body
Grow - To advance to improve to make progress as, to grow in Grace, in knowledge, in piety
Timotheus, Timothy - The last word to him in his epistles is "The Lord Jesus Christ be with thy spirit: Grace be with you
Ass - And was it not meant [1] to shew, that he came to take away the defilements and uncleanness of his people? If Christ became both a sin and a curse for his people, (2 Corinthians 5:21; Galatians 3:13) might there not be somewhat significant and typical in thus riding upon a beast deemed by the law unclean? I leave the reader to his own determination on the point, under the Grace of God
Messenger - Hence to him the covenant of redemption was given; by him the whole covenant was fulfilled; in his almighty hand all the blessings resulting from the covenant are placed; and from him all must flow, in Grace here, and glory hereafter, to his whole body the church
Corban - "...
Blessed Lord! how sweetly doth thy gospel explain and enforce that unceasing precept both of nature and of Grace, and which needs no higher rewards to follow than a man's own uncorrupt feelings-"Honour thy father and thy mother, which (saith the Holy Ghost), is the first commandment with promise
Litany - At present it forms one office with the morning service, being ordered to be read after the third collect for Grace, instead of the intercessional prayers in the daily service
Dan - This thought is confirmed by Dan's name being absent from 1 Chronicles 2 - 8 (the book that records much of Grace and blessing), and being omitted also from the list of tribes from each of which twelve thousand will be sealed in a future day
Heliopolis - "They are like those of Athens for lightness, but far surpass them in vastness; they are vast and massive, like those of Thebes, but far excel them in airiness and Grace
Whitsun Day - By Proper Psalms, Proper Lessons and EucharisticScriptures, and by Proper Preface in the Communion Service, we learnhow that in the Holy Ghost and His Presence in the Church we havethe great power and renewing Grace of God made availing to us
Melania the Younger, Daughter of Publicola - Their intercourse with Augustine continued, and in answer to their questions on the Pelagian controversy he wrote his treatise On Grace and Original Sin , a
Omniscience - In the words of Luther, ‘He was full of Grace and wisdom, and able to judge upon and teach all that came before Him’ (Dorner, Person of Christ, ii
Adam - Through his death, he becomes head of a new race of people, those saved by God’s super-abundant Grace (Romans 5:14-19)
Heart - Earnest supplication for heart purifying and rectifying Grace, Psalms 19:1-14 ...
4. The improvement of our Graces, Psalms 63:5 ; Psalms 6:1-10 :...
6. Dependence on divine Grace, Psalms 86:1-17
Mercy, Merciful - ]'>[5] lies nearer to the ‘grace’ (wh. ...
(3) A third root, the noun of which is translated ‘grace’ (wh
Perfect, Perfection - ...
A key New Testament verse for understanding perfection in the Christian life is 2 Corinthians 12:9 : "But he said to me, My Grace is sufficient for you, for my power is made perfect in weakness. '" Believers are perfect to the extent that they participate in the cruciform Grace that God offers in Christ
Spirit Spiritual - The Apostle’s doctrine of salvation, with its antithesis between sin and Grace, leads him to recognize an opposition between flesh and spirit which is much more than the natural contrast between spirit and body (Romans 8:1-13). Paul was only carrying OT usage and suggestion into a region of clearer theological definition when he contrasted the soulish with the spiritual, applying the former to man as he is by nature apart from Divine Grace, and the latter to the new man in whom the Spirit of God has taken up His abode (Romans 8:9)
Grecians - " Their conversation was a new thing, a special "grace of God," tidings of which reaching the Jerusalem church constrained them to send Barnabas as far as Antioch, who "when he had seen the Grace of God was glad" and enlisted the cooperation of Paul who had been in vision already called to "bear Christ's name unto the Gentiles" (Acts 9:15)
Image - , not the essential and substantial form of them; the contrast has been likened to the difference between a statue and the shadow cast by it; (3) of the relations between God the Father, Christ, and man, (a) of man as he was created as being a visible representation of God, 1 Corinthians 11:7 , a being corresponding to the original; the condition of man as a fallen creature has not entirely effaced the "image;" he is still suitable to bear responsibility, he still has Godlike qualities, such as love of goodness and beauty, none of which are found in a mere animal; in the Fall man ceased to be a perfect vehicle for the representation of God; God's Grace in Christ will yet accomplish more than what Adam lost; (b) of regenerate persons, in being moral representations of what God is, Colossians 3:10 ; cp. Ephesians 4:24 ; (c) of believers, in their glorified state, not merely as resembling Christ but representing Him, Romans 8:29 ; 1 Corinthians 15:49 ; here the perfection is the work of Divine Grace; believers are yet to represent, not something like Him, but what He is in Himself, both in His spiritual body and in His moral character; (d) of Christ in relation to God, 2 Corinthians 4:4 , "the image of God," i
Womanliness - Peter (1 Peter 3:7), to be regulated by a recognition of the principle that their wives are ‘also joint heirs of the Grace of life. It is supremely significant that love, the Grace of the home, and not justice, the virtue of the State, is made the first and greatest commandment (Mark 12:29-31). His tenderness, gentleness, patience, and forbearance are more distinctively feminine than masculine Graces. In His resignation and obedience to His Father’s will (Matthew 11:26; Matthew 11:29) is there not a womanly rather than a manly submissiveness? The prominence He gives in the Beatitudes to the passive Graces of endurance rather than the active virtues of endeavour (Matthew 5:3-10) vindicates the distinctive excellence of womanhood. What Christ has been to and done for women throughout the history of Christendom, and what women have suffered and accomplished for His Church and Kingdom on earth, afford abundant and conclusive evidence of the womanliness of Jesus in presenting in His character all womanly Grace as well as manly virtue, and offering in His salvation what meets the deepest needs, and fulfils the loftiest hopes of womanhood in all lands and ages
Caesarius, Bishop of Arles - His vigorous denial of anything like predestination to evil has caused a difference in the honour paid to his memory, according as writers incline respectively towards the Jesuit or Jansenist views concerning divine Grace. Its statements on the subject of Grace and free agency have been justly eulogized by modern historians (see, e. The following propositions are laid down in canon 25: "This also do we believe, in accordance with the Catholic faith, that after Grace received through baptism, all the baptized are able and ought, with the aid and co-operation of Christ, to fulfil all duties needful for salvation, provided they are willing to labour faithfully
Holiness, Holy, Holily - "Sanctification" is thus the state predetermined by God for believers, into which in Grace He calls them, and in which they begin their Christian course and so pursue it. 3, as denoting that quality of "holiness" which is manifested in those who have regard equally to Grace and truth; it involves a right relation to God; it is used in Luke 1:75 ; Ephesians 4:24 , and in each place is associated with righteousness. ...
This sainthood is not an attainment, it is a state into which God in Grace calls men; yet believers are called to sanctify themselves (consistently with their calling, 2 Timothy 1:9 ), cleansing themselves from all defilement, forsaking sin, living a "holy" manner of life, 1 Peter 1:15 ; 2 Peter 3:11 , and experiencing fellowship with God in His holiness
Merit - those of God, of His Grace, and so on; and, on the other hand, from the different analogies under which, from time to time, the relation of God to men has been conceived. ...
(b) Jesus criticised the Pharisaic doctrine of reward according to strict legal merit, by teaching that the reward which God gives is not according to debt, but according to Grace. It must be ethical rather than legal; must connect itself with the conception of God’s Fatherhood, and with the idea of His free Grace, rather than with that of His strict retribution according to law; and must have regard not to external actions only, but to the inward motive. According to John 1:14-18 the Grace and truth of Christ declare the invisible God. In Romans 5:15 the Grace of Christ is equivalent to the Grace of God. the subordination of the work of Christ to the Grace of God in Romans 3:24-28)
Romans, Epistle to the - All need Grace, and none can be saved except by faith. Jesus has brought us into touch with the Grace of God. Grace must reign till the kingdom of death has become the kingdom of an undying righteousness (Romans 5:1-21 ). ...
Does this trust in the Grace of God mean that we are to continue in sin? Far from it. The fact that we are under Grace means that sin’s dominion is ended. The rejection of the Jews, by which the Grace of God has come to the Gentile, grieves him to the heart. Even now a remnant has been saved by Grace; and the present rejection of Israel must have been inteoded to save the Gentiles. In God’s Grace he has found the strength which can arrest the decay of a sinful, careless world. In God’s Grace he has found also the secret of overcoming for the man who is conscious of the awfulness of sin, and of his own inability to save his life from destruction. Paul seldom refers to the sayings of Jesus, he arrives at the mind of Christ through the gospel of the Grace of God
Calvinism - that scheme of doctrine on predestination and Grace, which was taught by Calvin, the celebrated reformer, in the early part of the sixteenth century. In the commencement of the following chapter he thus rejects the notion that predestination is to be understood as resulting from God's foreknowledge of what would be the conduct of either the elect or the reprobate: "It is a notion commonly entertained, that God, foreseeing what would be the respective merits of every individual, makes a correspondent distinction between different persons; that he adopts as his children such as he fore-knows will be deserving of his Grace; and devotes to the damnation of death others, whose dispositions he sees will be inclined to wickedness and impiety. Thus the election taught by Calvin is not the choice of some persons to peculiar Grace from the whole mass, equally deserving of punishment; (though this is a sophism;) since, in that case, the decree of reprobation would rest upon God's foreknowledge of those passed by as corrupt and guilty, which notion he rejects: "For since God foresees future events only in consequence of his decree that they shall happen, it is useless to contend about foreknowledge, while it is evident that all things come to pass rather by ordination and decree. But election is the immutable purpose of God; by which, before the foundations of the world were laid, he chose, out of the whole human race, fallen by their own fault from their