What does Governor mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
ἡγεμόνος a leader of any kind 5
פַּחַ֣ת governor. 4
ἡγεμόνι a leader of any kind 4
ἡγεμὼν a leader of any kind 4
שַׂר־ prince 4
הִפְקִ֥יד to attend to 2
ἡγεμόνα a leader of any kind 2
פַּחַ֧ת governor. 2
הַתִּרְשָׁ֙תָא֙ Tirshatha—governor. 2
הִפְקִ֤יד to attend to 1
הִפְקִ֨יד to attend to 1
הִפְקִ֧יד to attend to 1
ἐθνάρχης an ethnarch 1
פָקִ֥יד commissioner 1
הַשַּׁלִּ֣יט having mastery 1
פַּחַ֤ת governor. 1
הַתִּרְשָׁ֛תָא Tirshatha—governor. 1
הַתִּרְשָׁ֜תָא Tirshatha—governor. 1
וַיַּפְקֵ֣ד to attend to 1
לְפֶחָתֶ֗ךָ governor. 1
פַּחַ֨ת governor. 1
פֶחָ֖ה governor. 1
ἡγεμονεύοντος to be leader 1
הַפֶּחָה֙ governor. 1
הַפֶּ֖חָה governor. 1
פֶּחָם֮ governor. 1
פַּחַ֖ת governor. 1
הַפֶּחָ֔ה governor. 1
פַּֽחַת־ governor. 1
וּנְצִ֥יב set over 1
וּמֹֽשְׁלוֹ֙ to rule 1
מֹשֵׁ֖ל to rule 1
הַתִּרְשָׁ֡תָא Tirshatha—governor. 1

Definitions Related to Governor

G2232


   1 a leader of any kind, a guide, ruler, prefect, president, chief, general, commander, sovereign.
      1a a “legatus Caesaris”, an officer administering a province in the name and with the authority of the Roman emperor.
         1a1 the Governor of a province.
      1b a procurator, an officer who was attached to a proconsul or a proprietor and had charge of the imperial revenues.
         1b1 in causes relating to these revenues he administered justice.
         In the smaller provinces also, which were so to speak appendages of the greater, he discharged the functions of Governor of the province; and such was the relation of the procurator of Judaea to the Governor of Syria.
      1c first, leading, chief.
      1c of a principal town as the capital of the region.
      

H8269


   1 prince, ruler, leader, chief, chieftain, official, captain.
      1a chieftain, leader.
      1b vassal, noble, official (under king).
      1c captain, general, commander (military).
      1d chief, head, overseer (of other official classes).
      1e heads, princes (of religious office).
      1f elders (of representative leaders of people).
      1g merchant-princes (of rank and dignity).
      1h patron-angel.
      1i Ruler of rulers (of God).
      1j warden.
      

H6347


   1 Governor.
   

H6485


   1 to attend to, muster, number, reckon, visit, punish, appoint, look after, care for.
      1a (Qal).
         1a1 to pay attention to, observe.
         1a2 to attend to.
         1a3 to seek, look about for.
         1a4 to seek in vain, need, miss, lack.
         1a5 to visit.
         1a6 to visit upon, punish.
         1a7 to pass in review, muster, number.
         1a8 to appoint, assign, lay upon as a charge, deposit.
      1b (Niphal).
         1b1 to be sought, be needed, be missed, be lacking.
         1b2 to be visited.
         1b3 to be visited upon.
         1b4 to be appointed.
         1b5 to be watched over.
      1c (Piel) to muster, call up.
      1d (Pual) to be passed in review, be caused to miss, be called, be called to account.
      1e (Hiphil). 1e1 to set over, make overseer, appoint an overseer. 1e2 to commit, entrust, commit for care, deposit.
      1f (Hophal).
         1f1 to be visited.
         1f2 to be deposited.
         1f3 to be made overseer, be entrusted.
      1g (Hithpael) numbered.
      1h (Hothpael) numbered.
   2 musterings, expenses.
   

H6346


   1 Governor.
   

H8660


   1 Tirshatha—Governor.
      1a a title used by the Persian Governor in Judea.
         1a1 Nehemiah used this title.
         

H7989


   1 having mastery, domineering, master.
      1a having mastery.
         1a1 ruler (subst).
      1b domineering, imperious.
      

G2230


   1 to be leader, to lead the way.
   2 to rule, command.
      2a of a province, to be Governor of a province.
      2b said of a proconsul, of a procurator.
      

H4910


   1 to rule, have dominion, reign.
      1a (Qal) to rule, have dominion.
      1b (Hiphil).
         1b1 to cause to rule.
         1b2 to exercise dominion.
         

H5333


   1 set over, something placed, pillar, prefect, garrison, post.
      1a pillar.
      1b prefect, deputy.
      

H6496


   1 commissioner, deputy, overseer, officer.
   

G1481


   1 an ethnarch, one set over a people as ruler, but without the authority and name of a king.
   

Frequency of Governor (original languages)

Frequency of Governor (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Governor
Heb. nagid, a prominent, conspicuous person, whatever his capacity: as, chief of the royal palace (2 Chronicles 28:7 ; Compare 1 Kings 4:6 ), chief of the temple (1 Chronicles 9:11 ; Jeremiah 20:1 ), the leader of the Aaronites (1 Chronicles 12:27 ), keeper of the sacred treasury (26:24), captain of the army (13:1), the king (1 Samuel 9:16 ), the Messiah (Daniel 9:25 ).
Heb. nasi, raised; exalted. Used to denote the chiefs of families (Numbers 3:24,30,32,35 ); also of tribes (2:3; 7:2; 3:32). These dignities appear to have been elective, not hereditary.
Heb. pakid, an officer or magistrate. It is used of the delegate of the high priest (2 Chronicles 24:11 ), the Levites (Nehemiah 11:22 ), a military commander (2 Kings 25:19 ), Joseph's officers in Egypt (Genesis 41:34 ).
Heb. shallit, one who has power, who rules (Genesis 42:6 ; Ezra 4:20 ; Ecclesiastes 8:8 ; Daniel 2:15 ; 5:29 ).
Heb. aluph, literally one put over a thousand, i.e., a clan or a subdivision of a tribe. Used of the "dukes" of Edom (Genesis 36 ), and of the Jewish chiefs (Zechariah 9:7 ).
Heb. moshel, one who rules, holds dominion. Used of many classes of rulers (Genesis 3:16 ; 24:2 ; 45:8 ; Psalm 105:20 ); of the Messiah (Micah 5:2 ); of God (1 Chronicles 29:12 ; Psalm 103:19 ).
Heb. sar, a ruler or chief; a word of very general use. It is used of the chief baker of Pharaoh (Genesis 40:16 ); of the chief butler (40:2, etc. See also Genesis 47:6 ; Exodus 1:11 ; Daniel 1:7 ; Judges 10:18 ; 1 Kings 22:26 ; 20:15 ; 2 Kings 1:9 ; 2 Samuel 24:2 ). It is used also of angels, guardian angels (Daniel 10:13,20,21 ; 12:1 ; 10:13 ; 8:25 ).
Pehah, whence Pasha , I.e., friend of the king; adjutant; governor of a province ( 2 Kings 18:24 ; Isaiah 36:9 ; Jeremiah 51 :: 57 ; Ezekiel 23:6,23 ; Daniel 3:2 ; Esther 3 :: 12 ), or a perfect (Nehemiah 3:7 ; 5:14 ; Ezra 5:3 ; Haggai 1:1 ). This is a foreign word, Assyrian, which was early adopted into the Hebrew idiom (1 Kings 10:15 ).
The Chaldean word Segan Is applied to the governors of the Babylonian satrapies ( Daniel 3:2,27 ; 6:7 ); the prefects over the Magi (2:48). The corresponding Hebrew word Segan Is used of provincial rulers ( Jeremiah 51:23,28,57 ); also of chiefs and rulers of the people of Jerusalem (Ezra 9:2 ; Nehemiah 2:16 ; 4:14,19 ; 5:7,17 ; 7:5 ; 12:40 ). In the New Testament there are also different Greek words rendered thus.
Meaning an ethnarch (2 Corinthians 11:32 ), which was an office distinct from military command, with considerable latitude of application.
The procurator of Judea under the Romans (Matthew 27:2 ). (Compare Luke 2:2 , where the verb from which the Greek word so rendered is derived is used.)
Steward (Galatians 4:2 ).
Governor of the feast (John 2:9 ), who appears here to have been merely an intimate friend of the bridegroom, and to have presided at the marriage banquet in his stead.
A director, i.e., helmsman; Lat. gubernator, (James 3:4 ).
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Governor
GOVERNOR . This word represents various Heb. and Gr. words, technical and non-technical. In Genesis 42:6 (Joseph, cf. 41:40) it is probably the Ta-te , the second after the king in the court of the palace; cf. 1 Kings 18:3 , Daniel 2:48 for similar offices. It frequently represents an Assyr. [1] word, pechah , used of Persian satraps in general ( Esther 3:12 ; Esther 8:8 ), and of Assyrian generals ( 2 Kings 18:24 , cf. 1 Kings 20:24 ). It is applied particularly to Tattenai, the governor of the large Persian province of which Judæa was a sub-district ( Ezra 5:3 ; Ezra 6:6 etc., cf. Nehemiah 2:7 ). It is also, like tirshatha (wh. see), applied to the subordinate governor of Judæa ( Ezra 5:14 [2] 6:7 [3], Haggai 1:1 ; Haggai 1:14 [4]). The first passage shows that the subordinate pechah was directly appointed by the king.
In the NT the word usually represents Gr. hçgemôn , and is used of Pontius Pilate ( Luke 3:1 etc.), of Felix ( Acts 23:26 ), and of Festus ( Acts 26:30 ). The proper title of these governors was ‘ procurator ’ (Tac. Ann . xv. 44), of which originally eparchos and then epitropos were the Gr. equivalents. Josephus, however, uses hçgemôn , as well as these words, for the governor of Judæa, so that there is no inaccuracy in its employment by NT writers. But, being a general word, it does not help us to decide the nature of the ‘governorship’ of Quirinius ( Luke 2:2 ). The procurator, originally a financial official, was appointed directly by the Emperor to govern provinces, such as Thrace, Cappadocia, and Judæa, which were in a transitional state, being no longer ruled by subject kings, but not yet fully Romanized, and requiring special treatment. The procurator was in a sense subordinate to the legate of the neighbouring ‘province,’ e.g. Cappadocia to Galatia, Judæa to Syria; but except in emergencies he had full authority, military, judicial, and financial. In 1 Peter 2:14 the word is specially appropriate to any provincial governor, as ‘sent’ by the Emperor. In 2 Corinthians 11:32 it represents ‘ ethnarch ,’ a word apparently used originally of the ruler of a nation ( ethnos ) living with laws of its own in a foreign community; but as applied to Aretas it may mean no more than petty king. In Galatians 4:2 it means ‘ steward ’ (RV [5] ), the ‘tutor’ controlling the ward’s person, the steward his property (Lightfoot, ad loc. ). In James 3:4 RV [5] has ‘steersman.’ The ‘ governor of the feast ’ ( John 2:8 , RV [5] ‘ruler’) was probably a guest, not a servant, chosen to control and arrange for the feast; It is doubtful whether he is to be identified with the ‘friend of the bridegroom’ or best man.
C. W. Emmet.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Government Governor
(1) The term ‘government’ occurs twice in the Authorized Version of the NT, in neither case with reference to civil government. In the first passage, 1 Corinthians 12:28, it occurs in the plural, being a translation of the Greek κυβερνήσεις, which, like the English ‘government,’ is a metaphor from steersmanship (see following article). In the second passage, 2 Peter 2:10 (cf. Judges 1:8), the word appears to be abstract, but to have an implicit reference to the domination of angels (see article Dominion).
(2) The word ‘governor’ occurs many times in the NT. In nearly every passage it is a translation of ἡγεμών or some word connected with it. This word is the most general term in this connexion in the Greek language (=Lat. prœses). This can be seen in two ways. In the first place, in Mark 13:9 (and parallels) and 1 Peter 2:13 the word is coupled with ‘kings’ (emperors), and the two words together include all the Gentile authorities before whom the followers of Jesus will have to appear. In the second place, the term, or its cognates, is used with reference to authorities of such diverse status as the Emperor Tiberius (Luke 3:1), the legate P. Sulpicius Quirinius (Luke 2:3, a special deputy of consular rank sent by the Emperor Augustus in an emergency to have temporary rule over the great province of Syria), and the successive procurators of the small and unimportant province of Judaea , Pontius Pilate and Felix; for 2 Corinthians 11:33 see Ethnarch. It was in accordance with Greek genius to avoid specific titles and to use general terms, and to the Oriental the king (emperor) dwarfed everyone else. The procurator (agent) was really a servant of the Emperor’s household, never of higher rank than equestrian, and belonged to the lowest class of governor. He is never called by his own (Greek) name (ἐπίτροπος) except in a variant reading of Luke 3:1.
A. Souter.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Governor
GOVERNOR.—The word ‘governor’ (ἡγεμών, Lat. praeses, dux) is a comprehensive term, being the only Greek word which includes every class of provincial governor under the Roman empire. The following officials, for instance, are included under this title:—(1) Governors of Senatorial Provinces, namely, pro consulibus who are ex-consuls, and pro consulibus who are ex-praetors. The former class ruled the governmental spheres of duty, Asia and Africa; the latter all other provinces which by the arrangement between Augustus and the Senate in 27 b.c. were put under the authority of that body, such as Sicily, Macedonia, Achaia. (2) Governors of Imperial Provinces, namely, legati Augusti pro practoribus who are ex-consuls; legati Augusti pro practoribus who are ex-praetors; procuratores; praefecti Acgypti, etc. Examples of Imperial provinces are Syria, the Gauls (except Narbonensis), Judaea, and Egypt. These governors were all accountable to the Emperor, being put in charge of his provinces, but were by no means of equal rank. The legati were always members of the Senate, but the others were of the lower rank of equites. It was to this class that Pilate belonged (Matthew 27, 28; see under Procurator, Pilate). Every senator, being a member of the same class as the Emperor himself, was a possible rival to him; those of inferior rank were practically in the position of his servants.
Governors of provinces had certain powers of jurisdiction delegated to them, which it is now impossible accurately to define. These were embodied in mandata given to them before setting out. They were also, of course, influenced by the traditions of the province to which they were going. They administered the law with a competence and a justice which have never been surpassed. As the provinces had an appeal from their decisions to the Senate in the case of Senatorial provinces, and to the Emperor in the case of Imperial, it was dangerous for a governor to go against the strongly expressed wish of the subjects of Rome. A procurator, for example, could be cast aside by the Emperor and ruined for life, without the slightest chance of redress.
Governors were commonly changed annually. The emperor Tiberius, however, retained many governors for a number of years in one position, and he also instituted the custom of payment of definite salaries to such, thus doing away with the necessity for plunder in order to recoup themselves. The Roman system was sufficiently elastic to permit the appointment of officers for special service and the suspension of the regular order of things. It was probably under an arrangement of this kind that P. Sulpicius Quirinius was ‘governor of Syria’ (Luke 2:2) in a.d. 6–9 (Ramsay, Was Christ Born at Bethlehem? ch. xi.), in order to carry on a campaign against the Homonadenses, and leave the ordinary governor free for civil duties. See art. Birth of Christ.
In Matthew 10:18, Mark 13:9, and Luke 21:12 ‘kings’ are coupled with ‘governors.’ The reference here is to ‘client-kings’ of the Roman empire (such as Herod) as well as the ordinary governors. The territory ruled by such kings was part of the imperium Romanum in the fullest sense of that term. In other words, the Romans had suzerainty over these kingdoms; but they left them under the rule of their kings until they were sufficiently civilized to become ordinary provinces under ordinary governors. Then they were taken over. In Luke 21:12 the ‘kings’ are mentioned before the ‘governors.’ If this change is not accidental, it would appear that St. Luke wished βασιλεῖς to be understood in the sense of ‘emperors,’ a sense quite in accordance with the Greek. The plural need be no difficulty, as it was the common practice for emperors to have their successors invested with the imperatorial powers, while they themselves were still alive and active.
Literature.—H. F. Pelham, Outlines of Roman History, hk. v. ch. iii.; J. B. Bury, A History of the Roman Empire, ch. vi.; A. H. J. Greenidge, Roman Public Life, ch. xi.; for the regular course of an administrative career, see R. Cagnat, Cours d’Epigraphie Latine3 [1] (1898, with Supplement 1904), pp. 86–155; Schürer, HJP [2] i. ii. 43–48.
Alex. Souter.
Webster's Dictionary - Relay Governor
A speed regulator, as a water-wheel governor, embodying the relay principle.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Governor of the Feast
The word is ἀρχιτρίκλινος,lit. 'head of three couches.' Three couches were set round the dining table, leaving the fourth side for the access of the servants: hence the president or ruler of a feast. John 2:8,9 .
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Governor
There are ten Hebrew words thus translated, signifying any ruler, captain, viceroy, etc., that was set over the people. The term is also so used in the N.T. except the following:
1. ἐθνάρχης 'governor of a nation,' an ethnarch, as the ruler of Damascus was called. 2 Corinthians 11:32 .
2. εὐθύνων, 'one who directs, guides,' used of the 'steersman of a ship.' James 3:4 .
3. ἡγεμών, the procurator of Judaea. Matthew 27:2 ; Luke 20:20 , etc.
4. οἰκονόμος, 'manager of a house, steward.' Galatians 4:2 .
King James Dictionary - Governor
GOV'ERNOR, n. He that governs, rules or directs one invested with supreme authority. The Creator is the rightful governor of all his creatures.
1. One who is invested with supreme authority to administer or enforce the laws the supreme executive magistrate of a state, commmunity, corporation or post. Thus, in America, each state has its governor Canada has its governor. 2. A tutor one who has the care of a young man one who instructs him and forms his manners. 3. A pilot one who steers a ship. James 3 . 4. One possessing delegated authority. Joseph was governor over the land of Egypt. Obadiah was governor over Ahab's house. Damascus had a governor under Aretas the king.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Governor
Governor. Various Hebrew terms are thus translated: thus it is used to designate certain provincial officers of the Assyrian, Babylonian, Median and Persian empires. The original word is pechah, probably akin to the modern pacha. Several of these governors presided over districts on the western side of the Euphrates, Nehemiah 2:7; Nehemiah 2:9; and they were inferior to the satraps, or king's lieutenants. Ezra 8:36. In the New Testament the Roman procurator of Judea is called the "governor," e.g., Matthew 27:2; Matthew 27:11; Matthew 27:14; a kindred word being used to describe the authority of Tiberius, Luke 3:1, where our version has "reign." The "governor" of a marriage-feast was the bridegroom's friend, who took charge of the entertainment, John 2:8-9. The "governor" of Damascus would seem to have been the ethnarch who held the place as the king's lieutenant or vassal. 2 Corinthians 11:32. The "governors" of a minor were the trustees of his property, R. V. "stewards." Galatians 4:2. The "governor "of a ship was the steersman. See R. V., James 3:4.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Governor
Judea having been reduced into a province by the Romans, they sent governors thither, who were subject not only to the emperors, but also to the governors of Syria, whereof Judea made a part.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Governor
In the Authorized Version this one English word is the representative of no less than ten Hebrew and four Greek words.
The chief of a tribe or family.
A ruler in his capacity of lawgiver and dispenser of justice.
A ruler consider especially as having power over the property and persons of his subjects. (Genesis 24:2 ; Joshua 12:2 ; Psalm 100:20 ) The "governors of the people," in (2 Chronicles 23:20 ) appear to have been the king's body-guard; cf. (2 Kings 11:19 )
A prominent personage, whatever his capacity. It is applied to a king as the military and civil chief of his people, ( 2 Samuel 5:2 ; 6:21 ; 1 Chronicles 29:22 ) to the general of an army, (2 Chronicles 32:21 ) and to the head of a tribe. (2 Chronicles 19:11 ) It denotes an officer of high rank in the palace, the lord high chamberlain. (2 Chronicles 28:7 ) It is applied in (1 Kings 10:15 ) to the petty chieftains who were tributary to Solomon, (2 Chronicles 9:14 ) to the military commander of the Syrians, (1 Kings 20:24 ) the Assyrians, (2 Kings 18:24 ; 23:8 ) the Chaldeans, (Jeremiah 51:23 ) and the Medes. (Jeremiah 51:38 ) Under the Persian viceroys, during the Babylonian captivity, the land of the Hebrews appears to have been portioned out among "governors" (pachoth ) inferior in rank to the satraps, ( Ezra 8:30 ) like the other provinces which were under the dominion of the Persian king. (Nehemiah 2:7,9 ) It is impossible to determine the precise limits of their authority or the functions which they had to perform. It appears from (Ezra 6:8 ) that these governors were intrusted with the collection of the king's taxes; and from (Nehemiah 5:18 ; 12:26 ) that they were supported by a contribution levied upon the people, which was technically termed "the bread of the governor" comp. (Ezra 4:14 ) They were probably assisted in discharging their official duties by A council. (Ezra 4:7 ; 6:6 ) The "governor" beyond the river had a judgment-seat beyond Jerusalem, from which probably he administered justice when making a progress through his province. (Nehemiah 3:7 ) At the time of Christ Judea was a Roman province, governed by a procurator (governor) appointed by Rome.

Sentence search

Governor - The Creator is the rightful Governor of all his creatures. Thus, in America, each state has its Governor Canada has its Governor. Joseph was Governor over the land of Egypt. Obadiah was Governor over Ahab's house. Damascus had a Governor under Aretas the king
Overnor General - A Governor who has lieutenant or deputy Governors under him; as, the Governor general of Canada, of India
Callieres, Louis Hector de - (1646-1705) 13th Governor of New France, born Cherbourg, France. Appointed Governor of Montreal 1684, at the request of the Sulpicians, he aided Frontenac in saving New France from the Iroquois, and succeeded him as Governor, 1698
Louis de Callieres - (1646-1705) 13th Governor of New France, born Cherbourg, France. Appointed Governor of Montreal 1684, at the request of the Sulpicians, he aided Frontenac in saving New France from the Iroquois, and succeeded him as Governor, 1698
Cyrenius - Or Publius Sulpitius QUIRINUS, according to his Latin appellation, Governor of Syria, Luke 2:2 . According to history, Quirinus was not properly Governor of Syria till some years after this date; and the only census of that time mentioned by secular historians took place when Christ was eight or ten years old. The passage in Luke may be translated, "This enrolment took place first under Cyrenius Governor of Syria
Tirshatha - A Governor
Deputy - Governor of a district. proconsul, one who acted as Governor of a Roman province with consular power
Tetrarch - Governor of a fourth part
Pahath-Moab - (pay' hath-moh' ab) Title meaning, “governor of Moab. ” A family of returned Exiles likely descended from the Hebrew Governor of Moab in the time of David (2 Samuel 8:2 ; Ezra 2:6 ; Ezra 8:4 ; Ezra 10:30 ; Nehemiah 7:11 ; Nehemiah 10:14 )
Steersman - * For STEERSMAN see Governor, B, Note ...
Overnorship - ) The office of a Governor
Legate - ) An official assistant given to a general or to the Governor of a province. ) Under the emperors, a Governor sent to a province
Rectoral - ) Pertaining to a rector or Governor
Geber - ” Solomon's district Governor for Gilead beyond the Jordan (1 Kings 4:19 ) was the son of Uri. The district Governor over Ramoth-gilead was Ben-geber or the son of Geber
Praetorian Guard - (pray taw' ih uhn) Roman imperial bodyguard or troops assigned to a Roman provincial Governor (Philippians 1:13 NAS, RSV). In the Gospels and Acts the term refers to the palace of a provincial Governor
Castellan - ) A Governor or warden of a castle
Ruler of the Feast - See Governor, Meals, 6
le Moyne, Charles (2) - (1656-1729) Governor of Three Rivers and Montreal
Adelantado - ) A Governor of a province; a commander
Ethnarch - ) The Governor of a province or people
Ubernatorial - ) Pertaining to a Governor, or to government
Tirshatha - The Persian Governor of Judea is so called (Ezra 2:63 ; Nehemiah 7:65,70 ). Nehemiah is called by this name in Nehemiah 8:9 ; 10:1 , and the "governor" (pehah) in 5:18
Chih Tai - A Chinese Governor general; a tsung tu (which see)
le Moyne, Joseph - Governor of Rochefort, France
le Moyne, Charles (2) (3) - Governor of Montreal
Boroughmaster - ) The mayor, Governor, or bailiff of a borough
Moodir - ) The Governor of a province in Egypt, etc
Governor - Governor. Several of these Governors presided over districts on the western side of the Euphrates, Nehemiah 2:7; Nehemiah 2:9; and they were inferior to the satraps, or king's lieutenants. In the New Testament the Roman procurator of Judea is called the "governor," e. " The "governor" of a marriage-feast was the bridegroom's friend, who took charge of the entertainment, John 2:8-9. The "governor" of Damascus would seem to have been the ethnarch who held the place as the king's lieutenant or vassal. The "governors" of a minor were the trustees of his property, R. The "governor "of a ship was the steersman
Deputy - In Esther 8:9 ; 9:3 (RSV, "governor") it denotes a Persian prefect "on this side" i. , the Governor of a Roman province holding his appointment from the senate. The appointment of a Governor to the former was in the hands of the senate, and he bore the title of proconsul (Gr. The appointment of a Governor to the latter was in the hands of the emperor, and he bore the title of propraetor (Gr
Caimacam - ) The Governor of a sanjak or district in Turkey
Majordomo - (Latin: major, elder; domus, house) ...
The chief Governor of the papal household, formerly Prefect of the Apostolic Palace, whose principal office is to supervise religious functions at which the pope and his court assist, to draw up nominations to court offices or posts of honor in the Vatican, and to act as Governor of the Conclave during a vacancy
Tetrarch - Literally the Governor over a fourth part of a province, but also applied to the Governor of any small province
Reelect - ) To elect again; as, to reelect the former Governor
ci-Devant - ) Former; previous; of times gone by; as, a ci-devant Governor
Relay Governor - A speed regulator, as a water-wheel Governor, embodying the relay principle
le Moyne, Jean-Baptiste - French Governor of Louisiana and founder of New Orleans
Satrap - ) The Governor of a province in ancient Persia; hence, a petty autocrat despot
Dynast - ) A ruler; a Governor; a prince
Zebul - Governor of Shechem for Abimelech while the latter was absent
Tirshatha - (always written with the article), the title of the Governor of Judea under the Persians, perhaps derived from a Persian root signifying stern, severe, is added as a title after the name of Nehemiah, ( Nehemiah 8:9 ; 10:1 ) and occurs also in three other places. In the margin of the Authorized Version (Ezra 2:63 ; Nehemiah 7:65 ; 10:1 ) it is rendered "governor
Ailleboust, Louis d', Sieub de Coulanges - Third Governor of Canada, born France; died Montreal, Canada, 1660. He was associated in the foundation of Montreal, and in 1648 became Governor-General of Canada
Harmost - ) A Governor or prefect appointed by the Spartans in the cities subjugated by them
Sostratus - The Governor of the citadel at Jerusalem under Antiochus Epiphanes ( 2Ma 4:27 (28), 29)
Toparch - ) The ruler or principal man in a place or country; the Governor of a toparchy
Beglerbeg - ) The Governor of a province of the Ottoman empire, next in dignity to the grand vizier
Eparch - ) In ancient Greece, the Governor or perfect of a province; in modern Greece, the ruler of an eparchy
Tabeel - A Persian Governor of Samaria, who joined others in the attempt to prevent the rebuilding of Jerusalem (Ezra 4:7 )
Khedive - ) A Governor or viceroy; - a title granted in 1867 by the sultan of Turkey to the ruler of Egypt
Lord - Applied to God, the supreme Governor and disposer of all things
Tsung tu - A viceroy or Governor-general, the highest provincial official in China, with civil and military authority over one or more provinces
Sergius Paulus - Proconsul or Governor of the isle of Cyprus, was converted under the ministry of Paul, A
Chancellor - One who has judicial authority, literally, a "lord of judgement;" a title given to the Persian Governor of Samaria (Ezra 4:8,9,17 )
Leonard Calvert - (1607-1647) Founder of Maryland and first proprietary Governor, brother of Cecilius Calvert, born England; died Maryland. In 1643 the Governor went to England and upon his return, 1644, found the colony torn by disturbances resulting from the civilwar in England
Montmagny, Charles Huault de - Second French Governor of Canada; born France; died Saint Christopher, in the Antilles, c1651He was educated by the Jesuits, joined the Order of Malta, 1622, and fought against the Moslems and corsairs of Africa. He reached Quebec, 1636, to replace Champlain as Governor, and at once set about improving the fortifications and plans of the city
Calvert, Leonard - (1607-1647) Founder of Maryland and first proprietary Governor, brother of Cecilius Calvert, born England; died Maryland. In 1643 the Governor went to England and upon his return, 1644, found the colony torn by disturbances resulting from the civilwar in England
Charles Montmagny - Second French Governor of Canada; born France; died Saint Christopher, in the Antilles, c1651He was educated by the Jesuits, joined the Order of Malta, 1622, and fought against the Moslems and corsairs of Africa. He reached Quebec, 1636, to replace Champlain as Governor, and at once set about improving the fortifications and plans of the city
Pahath-Moab - Governor of Moab, a person whose descendants returned from the Captivity and assisted in rebuilding Jerusalem (Ezra 2:6 ; 8:4 ; 10:30 )
Kareah - Bald, the father of Johanan and Jonathan, who for a time were loyal to Gedaliah, the Babylonian Governor of Jerusalem (Jeremiah 40:8,13,15,16 )
Achiacharus - ACHIACHARUS , the nephew of Tobit, was Governor under Sarchedonus = Esarhaddon ( Tob 1:21 etc
Tirshatha - The official title of the Persian Governor of Judaea (Ezra 2:63; Nehemiah 7:65; Nehemiah 7:70); applied to Nehemiah (Nehemiah 8:9; Nehemiah 10:1); also to Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:63). " Ρecheh (our pasha ) is the title of Nehemiah in Nehemiah 12:26; Haggai 1:1; Haggai 2:2; Ezra 5:3; implying Governor of a province less than a satrapy
Publius - The chief man, or Governor, of Melita (Malta) when Paul was shipwrecked
Dey - ) The Governor of Algiers; - so called before the French conquest in 1830
Altham, John - He accompanied Governor Leonard Calvert to Maryland, 1633, and established the first chapel there
Durbar - ) An audience hall; the court of a native prince; a state levee; a formal reception of native princes, given by the Governor general of India
Tatnai - A Governor of Samaria under Darius, whose administration was characterized by great justice and moderation towards the Jews, Ezra 5:1-6:22 , B
Zebul - A Governor of the city of Shechem, who labored adroitly to preserve the city for Abimelech his master, the son of Gideon, Judges 9:1 - 57
Baalis - He caused the assassination of Gedaliah, then Governor of Judah, Jeremiah 40:14 ; 41:1 - 10
Taxing - (Luke 2:2 ; RSV, "enrolment"), "when Cyrenius was Governor of Syria," is simply a census of the people, or an enrolment of them with a view to their taxation. ) was Governor of Cilicia and Syria both at the time of our Lord's birth and some years afterwards
Helkias - He is mentioned in Esther 1:8 Esther 1:8 = 2 Chronicles 35:8 as a Governor of the Temple, subscribing handsomely to Josiah’s great Passover; in Esther 8:1 Esther 8:1 (cf. Ezra 7:1 ) as the great-grandfather of Ezra; and in Bar 1:7 as father of Joakim, who was Governor of the Temple in the reign of Zedekiah
Bey - ) A Governor of a province or district in the Turkish dominions; also, in some places, a prince or nobleman; a beg; as, the bey of Tunis
Overness - ) A female Governor; a woman invested with authority to control and direct; especially, one intrusted with the care and instruction of children, - usually in their homes
Tetrarch - ) A Roman Governor of the fourth part of a province; hence, any subordinate or dependent prince; also, a petty king or sovereign
Sherif - The Grand Shereef is the Governor of Mecca
Macron - Surname of Ptolemy ( 1Ma 3:38 , 2Ma 4:45 ), who was Governor of Cyprus ( 2Ma 10:12 f
Jewess - Drusilla, the wife of Felix the Roman Governor, was a Jewess (Acts 24:24 )
Baalis - He hired Ishmael to slay Gedaliah who had been appointed Governor over the cities of Judah
Cadillac, Antoine de la Mothe - He was recalled to France; appointed Governor of Louisiana in 1712, deposed in 1776, and sentenced to the Bastille. After his release he was appointed Governor of Castelsarrasin, and regained possession of his Detroit property
Shebna - A major-domo or palace-governor of king Hezekiah, against whom is directed one of the recorded utterances of Isaiah ( Isaiah 22:15-25 ). see) to the post of palace-governor ( 2 Kings 18:18 ; 2 Kings 18:26-27 ; 2 Kings 19:2 = Isaiah 36:3 ; Isaiah 36:11 ; Isaiah 37:2 )
Zemstvo - the power of the noble landowners was increased, the peasants allowed only to elect candidates from whom the Governor of the province nominated the deputy, and all acts of the zemstvo subjected to the approval of the Governor
Tetrarch - A Roman Governor of the fourth part of a province a subordinate prince
Fast of gedaliah - fast on the third of Tishrei, commemorating the assassination of Gedaliah ben Achikam, Governor of the First Jewish Commonwealth in the Holy Land; after this assassination, Jewish autonomy came to an end ...
Azrikam - Governor of Ahaz's house; slain by Zichri, a mighty man of Ephraim (2 Chronicles 28:7)
Tattenai - (tat' teh nehi) Contemporary of Zerubbabel, Governor of the Persian province “across the (Euphrates) River,” which included Palestine (Ezra 5:3 ,Ezra 5:3,5:6 ; Ezra 6:6 ,Ezra 6:6,6:13 )
Pub'Lius, - the chief man --probably the Governor-of Melita, who received and lodged St
Proconsul - ) An officer who discharged the duties of a consul without being himself consul; a Governor of, or a military commander in, a province
Lieutenant - Esther 3:12 ; 8:9 ; 9:3 ; Ezra 8:36 ), a Governor or viceroy of a Persian province having both military and civil power
Khan - ) A king; a prince; a chief; a Governor; - so called among the Tartars, Turks, and Persians, and in countries now or formerly governed by them
Residencia - ) In Spanish countries, a court or trial held, sometimes as long as six months, by a newly elected official, as the Governor of a province, to examine into the conduct of a predecessor
Agrippa ii. - 48) invested him with the office of superintendent of the Temple of Jerusalem, and made him Governor (A. He was afterwards raised to the rank of king, and made Governor over the tetrarchy of Philip and Lysanias (Acts 25:13 ; 26:2,7 )
Elect - ) To select or take for an office; to select by vote; as, to elect a representative, a president, or a Governor. ) Chosen to an office, but not yet actually inducted into it; as, bishop elect; Governor or mayor elect
Beg - In the Turkish dominions, a Governor of a town or country more particularly, the lord of a sangiac or banner. Every province is divided into seven sangiacs or banners, each of which qualifies a bey and these are commanded by the Governor of the province, called begler-beg or lord of all the beys
Baalis - (bay' uh lihss) Personal name of king of Ammon who sent Ishmael to kill Geduliah, Governor of Judah immediately after Babylon captured Jerusalem and sent most of Judah's citizens into the Exile (Jeremiah 40:14 )
Ark And Dove - Names of the vessels in which the first colonists arrived in Maryland, March 25, 1634, under the leadership of Leonard Calvert, as Governor, and the spiritual direction of the Jesuit chaplains Andrew White and John Altham
Ephai - Ishmael kille these "captains of the forces" left in Judah with Gedaliah, the Governor appointed by the Babylonians (Jeremiah 41:3)
Publius - the Governor of Melita, Acts 28:7-9
Sisinnes - The Governor of Cœle-Syria and Phœnicia under Darius ( 1Es 6:3 ; Esther 6:7 Esther 6:7 ; 1Es 6:27 ; 1E Esther 7:1 )
Baalis - He hired Ishmael to slay Gedaliah, who was appointed by the king of Babylon Governor over the cities of Judah (Jeremiah 40:14)
Eparchy - ) A province, prefecture, or territory, under the jurisdiction of an eparch or Governor; esp
Nabob - ) A deputy or viceroy in India; a Governor of a province of the ancient Mogul empire
Pretorium - ) The official residence of a Governor of a province; hence, a place; a splendid country seat
Abilene - Of this place Lysanias was Governor in the fifteenth year of Tiberius, Luke 3:1
Sanballat - the Governor of the Cuthites or Samaritans, and an enemy to the Jews
Deputy - ]'>[2] ‘governor’) as tr. See Governor. ]'>[1] ‘governor’) as tr
Pahathmoab, - Governor of Moab
Ephai - ” Father of men who joined Ishmael in revolt against and murder of Gedaliah, the Governor of Judah after Babylon captured and destroyed Jerusalem in 586 B
Sha'Phan - ) He appears on an equality with the Governor of the city and the royal recorder
Arbitrator - ) One who has the power of deciding or prescribing without control; a ruler; a Governor
Zerahiah - Descendant of Pahath-Moab (“governor of Moab”) and father of Eliehoenai (Ezra 8:4 )
Guise, Claude - He expelled the invading Anabaptist bands from Lorraine, 1525; and was later made Governor of Burgundy
Shogun - ) A title originally conferred by the Mikado on the military Governor of the eastern provinces of Japan
Ruler - ) One who rules; one who exercises sway or authority; a Governor
Felix, Antonius - 52; but this contradicts Tacitus, who makes Cumanus Governor of Galilee and Felix of Samaria simultaneously; and this suits Acts 24:10 (‘many years’). He is described by Tacitus as a very bad and cruel Governor. Acts 26:25 , Luke 1:3 ), a title given him as Governor, but more properly confined to those of equestrian rank
Candidate - ) One who offers himself, or is put forward by others, as a suitable person or an aspirant or contestant for an office, privilege, or honor; as, a candidate for the office of Governor; a candidate for holy orders; a candidate for scholastic honors
Shaphan - His grandson Gedaliah was Governor of Judea (25:22)
Proconsul - , shows the accuracy of Luke in giving this title to the Governor of places to whom it belonged
Procurator - ) A Governor of a province under the emperors; also, one who had charge of the imperial revenues in a province; as, the procurator of Judea
Gedaliah - The Governor of Judæa, appointed by Nebuchadnezzar after its subjection
Seraiah - (2 Samuel 8:17; 1 Chronicles 4:14; 1Ch 4:35; Jeremiah 52:21) The name seems to be compound-of Sera, or Shera, to govern—and Jah: hence, it means the Lord is my Governor
Argenson, Pierre de Voyer, Viscount d' - (1626-1710) Fifth Governor-General of Canada. As councillor of State and Governor of Canada (1657-1661), D'Argenson advised the French king to grant self-government to the Canadian colonists
Originate - ) To take first existence; to have origin or beginning; to begin to exist or act; as, the scheme originated with the Governor and council
Governor - Governor . It is applied particularly to Tattenai, the Governor of the large Persian province of which Judæa was a sub-district ( Ezra 5:3 ; Ezra 6:6 etc. see), applied to the subordinate Governor of Judæa ( Ezra 5:14 [2] 6:7 [3], Haggai 1:1 ; Haggai 1:14 [4]). The proper title of these Governors was ‘ procurator ’ (Tac. Josephus, however, uses hçgemôn , as well as these words, for the Governor of Judæa, so that there is no inaccuracy in its employment by NT writers. But, being a general word, it does not help us to decide the nature of the ‘governorship’ of Quirinius ( Luke 2:2 ). In 1 Peter 2:14 the word is specially appropriate to any provincial Governor, as ‘sent’ by the Emperor. ’ The ‘ Governor of the feast ’ ( John 2:8 , RV Lentulus, Publius - A fictitious person, said to have been Governor of Judea before Pontius Pilate, and to have written a letter to the Roman Senate descriptive of Christ
Nehemiah - The Tirshatha or Governor under the Persian king; a well known faithful character in the church after the return of the people from Babylon
Lys'Ias Clau'Dius, - Paul from the hands of the infuriated mob at Jerusalem, and sent him under a guard to Felix, the Governor or proconsul of Caesarea
Johanan - ...
...
Son of Careah, one of the Jewish chiefs who rallied round Gedaliah, whom Nebuchadnezzar had made Governor in Jerusalem (2 Kings 25:23 ; Jeremiah 40:8 ). He afterwards pursued the murderer of the Governor, and rescued the captives (41:8,13,15,16)
Lamberville, Jacques de - He labored in the Iroquois missions from 1675 until his death, baptizing Catherine Tekakwitha, and assisting his brother Jean to pacify the Iroquois, who were aroused by Governor de la Barre's campaign
Jacques de Lamberville - He labored in the Iroquois missions from 1675 until his death, baptizing Catherine Tekakwitha, and assisting his brother Jean to pacify the Iroquois, who were aroused by Governor de la Barre's campaign
Abilene - Lysanias was Governor or tetrarch of this province
Cyrenius - (ci ree' nih uhss) The Roman official mentioned in Luke 2:2 as the Governor of Syria when the birth of Jesus took place. Throughout his varied career, Quirinius served as consul of Rome, military leader, tutor to Gaius Caesar, and legate (governor). ...
Luke's reference to Quirinius as Governor during the nativity has caused some scholars to question Lucan historical accuracy
Maaseiah - King Ahaz's son, slain by Zichri the "mighty man" of Ephraim in Pekah's invasion of Judah (2 Chronicles 28:7), connected officially with the "governor of the city" (2 Chronicles 18:25; 1 Kings 22:26). Governor of Jerusalem under Josiah; superintended the restoration of the temple (2 Chronicles 34:8)
Pilate - So unjust in his judgment, while acting as the Governor of Judea, that in the very moment he pronounced sentence of death upon the Lord Jesus Christ, he solemnly declared his innocency; and in confirmation of our Lord's holiness and his own guilt, took water nod washed his hands before the people in token of the deed. He was Governor of Judea, under the Emperor Tiberius
Tetrarch, - properly the sovereign or Governor of the fourth part of a country
Paphos - The capital of the island of Cyprus, and therefore the residence of the Roman Governor
Zebul - Habitation, the Governor of Shechem under Abimelech (Judges 9:28-452 )
Neballat - ” The name perhaps derives from Nabu-uballit, the personal name of an Assyrian Governor of Samaria
Satrap(y) - (ssa' trap ee) A political office in the Persian Empire comparable to Governor
Great, Herod the - He became Governor of Galilee and in 40 B
Herod the Great - He became Governor of Galilee and in 40 B
Bacchides - Governor of Mesopotamia under Demetrius Soter; sent to establish Alcimus (wh
Proconsul - 1: ἀνθύπατος (Strong's #446 — Noun Masculine — anthupatos — anth-oo'-pat-os ) from anti, "instead of," and hupatos, "supreme," denotes "a consul, one acting in place of a consul, a proconsul, the Governor of a senatorial province" (i. , Quirinius in Syria, Luke 2:2 ): see Governor , A, No
Pashur -
The son of Immer (probably the same as Amariah, Nehemiah 10:3 ; 12:2 ), the head of one of the priestly courses, was "chief Governor [1] of the temple" (Jeremiah 20:1,2 ). At this time the Nagid , Or "governor," of the temple was Seraiah the high priest ( 1 Chronicles 6:14 ), and Pashur was his Paqid , Or "deputy
Jacques de Brisay - Governor of New France, born Denonville, France, 1638; died 1710. Owing to the opposition of Governors Dongan of New York and Andros of New England, his efforts were in the main unsuccessful, and he was replaced by De Frontenac in 1689
Pilot - Ancient pilots steered by positioning a side rudder which was an oversized oar pivoted in a slanting position near the vessel's stern (James 3:4 ; KJV, Governor)
Crates - A deputy left in charge of the citadel at Jerusalem (Acra) when the regular Governor, Sostratus, was summoned to Antioch by Antiochus Epiphanes, in consequence of a dispute with the high priest Menelaus ( 2Ma 4:29 )
Ethnarch - ETHNARCH is a Greek word translated by ‘governor’ in 2 Corinthians 11:32
Regent Diamond - It is so called from the Duke of Orleans, Regent of France, to whom it was sold in 1717 by Pitt the English Governor of Madras (whence also called the Pitt diamond), who bought it of an Indian merchant in 1701
de'Mas - (governor of the people ), most probably a contraction from Demetrius or perhaps from Demarchus, a companion of St
Quirinius - —Luke 2:2 Authorized Version , ‘And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was Governor of Syria’ is better rendered in Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 , ‘This was the first enrolment made when Quirinius was Governor of Syria. Census it will be seen that this statement probably means that this was the first occasion of an enrolment of this nature, an enrolment of population by households as distinct from a rating-enrolment in reference to property, and that it took place during the Governorship of Quirinius in Syria. Lardner’s method of solving the difficulty is to interpret the verse thus: ‘This was the first census of Cyrenius, who (afterwards) was Governor of Syria,’ St. Luke taking pains to distinguish, according to this view, between the two enrolments, and giving the information that Quirinius was the man who at a later time became Governor of Syria. Zumpt (Commentatio de Syria Romanorum provincia ab Cesare Augusto ad Titum Vespasianum) has shown that Quirinius seems to have been Governor of Syria on two occasions; and this clue has been followed up by independent studies of Ramsay (Was Christ born at Bethlehem?). Still the problem is not solved by this discovery, though secular as well as sacred history must share the difficulty: for it happens that we know who were Governors of that province for the whole period prior to Herod’s death in b. As we know that Augustus had a rule that no Governor of a province should hold that office for less than three or more than five years, the whole period from b. 12 to 4 is covered, and there is no room to place the Governorship of Quirinius at the time required. He cannot have been Governor before b. 12, for he was then consul at Rome; and even if it were of any service, we cannot place him later, for he became tutor of Caius Caesar and Governor of Asia; so that there is a difficulty in fixing his earlier period of holding office in Syria, if, indeed, he was twice Governor. A better solution of the problem is to reckon that the Governorship of which St. There is therefore, to say the least, no unlikelihood that while Varus, who had no military renown, was left as the ordinary Governor to administer the internal affairs of the province, Quirinius was appointed an extraordinary Governor in charge of the military operations in the same region, with the title of legatus, or more specifically of dux. Inasmuch as the Greek equivalent in the case of either civil or military Governor is ἡγεμών, St. Luke would be justified in saying, as he does, that the first enrolment was made ‘when Quirinius was acting as Governor’ (ἡγεμονεύοντος Κυρηνίου). The likelihood of there being two simultaneous Governors, one for military the other for civil affairs, in the same province, is supported by parallel instances adduced by Ramsay (op. ...
Another theory in explanation of the passage about Quirinius is that he was neither civil nor military Governor, but merely one of the commissioners appointed to take the enrolment throughout the whole Roman world, the district for which he was responsible being Syria. 19) states that the census at the time of Christ’s birth was taken by Saturninus, not Quirinius, and thus seems to correct the narrative; but that must be merely because he knew that the enrolment had been decided upon during the civil Governorship of Saturninus: he cannot have meant that it was actually accomplished then; for that would be utterly inconsistent with the date he elsewhere (adv
Tenter - ) A kind of Governor
Syracuse - It became the residence of the Governor of Sicily under Roman government
Falkland Islands - Crown colony of the British Empire, in the South Atlantic, about 300 miles east of the Strait of Magellan, administered by a Governor assisted by an executive and a legislative council
Malvinas - Crown colony of the British Empire, in the South Atlantic, about 300 miles east of the Strait of Magellan, administered by a Governor assisted by an executive and a legislative council
Azrikam - Governor of the house of king Ahaz: he was slain when the Israelites and Syrians invaded the land
Executive - ) An impersonal title of the chief magistrate or officer who administers the government, whether king, president, or Governor; the governing person or body
Tirshatha - In the margin it reads 'governor. This is confirmed by the Hebrew word (pechah), used for the title of Nehemiah in Nehemiah 12:26 , and elsewhere for the Persian Governors
Alexander Viii, Pope - Son of the Chancellor of the Republic of Venice, he became Governor of Terni, Rieti, and Spoleto, auditor of the Rota for 14 years, cardinal, bishop of Brescia, cardinal-datary, and pope
Dorothea, Virgin Martyr - ...
She was a young girl of Caesarea in Cappadocia, famed so widely for Christian piety that when the Governor Fabricius, Sapricius, or Apricius arrived he had her brought before him and tortured. She converted them; whereupon the Governor put them to death in a boiling cauldron. The Governor, insulted and enraged, ordered her head to be cut off
Roman Empire - The ruler of a senatorial province is "proconsul," and of an imperial province a "governor. " Thus Cyrenius was Governor of Syria. Pilate, Felix, and Festus are spoken of as "governors," that is, procurators, of Judæa
Nehemiah - Nehemiah was made tirshatha = "governor" of Judea, under Artaxerxes Longimanus. He is also called the pechah, whence the modern pasha, a Governor of a province. Nehemiah was Governor of Jerusalem twelve years, Nehemiah 5:14-19; and then returned to the Persian court, where he remained "certain days. After nine or ten months he returned to Jerusalem, as Governor, the second time; and corrected the abuses which had crept in during his absence
Shealtiel - ” Father of Zerubbabel, the Governor of Jerusalem under the Persian regime following the Exile (Ezra 3:2 , Nehemiah 12:1 ; Haggai 1:1 )
Kavanagh, Edward - He was a member of the commission which negotiated preliminaries of the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, and Governor of Maine for nine months after the resignation of Fairfield
Tattenai - The name of the Governor of Cœle-Syria and Phœnicia under Darius Hystaspis ( Ezra 5:3 ; Ezra 5:6 ; Ezra 6:6 ; Ezra 6:13 )
Zebul - see), who was left by him as Governor of Shechem
Trachonitis - At the time Jesus began his public ministry, the Governor of Trachonitis was Philip, a son of Herod the Great (Luke 3:1)
Publius - The word here rendered "chief man" (protos) is supposed by some to be properly a Maltese term, the official title of the Governor
Commandery - ) A district under the administration of a military commander or Governor
Chancellor - English translations vary in the way they render the title, but it apparently refers to political administration rather than to military command and represents a high official but not the highest provincial office, that of Governor
Sheshbazzar - ) "Prince" (ha-nasi , the Jewish term for head of the tribe) and "governor" (pechah , the Persian Cyrus appointing him) of Judah
Viceroy - ) The Governor of a country or province who rules in the name of the sovereign with regal authority, as the king's substitute; as, the viceroy of India
Julius - A centurion of the cohort of Augustus, to whom Festus, Governor of Judea, committed Paul to be conveyed to Rome
Edward Kavanagh - He was a member of the commission which negotiated preliminaries of the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, and Governor of Maine for nine months after the resignation of Fairfield
Judgement-Hall - It was the official residence of Pilate the Governor in Jerusalem
John of Struma - From Albano he fled to Tusculum where he prostrated himself before Pope Alexander, who forgave him, 1178, and later appointed him Governor of Benevento
Dongan, Thomas - Second Earl of Limerick, colonial Governor of New York, born County Kildare, Ireland, 1634; died London, England, 1715
Town Clerk - At Ephesus ( Acts 19:35 ) the clerk feared that he would have to account to the Roman Governor for the irregularly constituted assembly
Throne - It denotes the seat of the high priest in 1 Samuel 1:9 ; 4:13 , and of a provincial Governor in Nehemiah 3:7 and Psalm 122:5
Presidency - ) One of the three great divisions of British India, the Bengal, Madras, and Bombay Presidencies, each of which had a council of which its Governor was president
Guiana, British - Colony of the British Empire, South America, administered by a Governor and an executive council; area, 89,480 square miles
Struma, John of - From Albano he fled to Tusculum where he prostrated himself before Pope Alexander, who forgave him, 1178, and later appointed him Governor of Benevento
pa'Hath-mo'ab - (governor of Moab ), head of one of the chief houses of the tribe of Judah
Apollonius - A Governor of Cœle-Syria and Phœnicia under Seleucus IV. A Governor of Cœle-Syria who fought against the Jews (b
Felix - As Roman Governor of Judea from AD 52 to 60, Felix had some influence on Jewish affairs in Palestine. In due course Felix returned to Rome, leaving the next Governor to deal with the matter as best he could (Acts 24:27; Acts 25:1-5)
Overnor - ) One who governs; especially, one who is invested with the supreme executive authority in a State; a chief ruler or magistrate; as, the Governor of Pennsylvania
Ahikam - He was father of Gedaliah whom Nebuchadnezzar made Governor of the land
Antipatris - Paul was brought in his way to the Governor of Judea at Caesarea, Acts 23:31
Robinson, George Frederick Samuel - He was Governor-General and Viceroy of India in 1880
Tirshatha - ]'>[1] pechah or ‘ Governor ,’ of which it may be the Persian equivalent, and apparently represents a plenipotentiary appointed for a special mission
Praetorium - Later it became also the official residence and administration centre of the provincial Governor (Matthew 27:27; Mark 15:16; Acts 23:10; Acts 23:35; Acts 25:6; Acts 25:13-14)
Geruth - ” Fugitives stopped there near Bethlehem on their way to Egypt fleeing from Ishmael, who had killed Gedaliah, whom Babylon had appointed Governor of Judah after the fall of Jerusalem in 586 B
Tertullus - Tertullus was the prosecutor opposing Paul before Felix, the Roman Governor of Judea
Ambrose Shea - As Governor of the Bahama Islands from 1887 to 1895 he initiated the sisal fiber industry, organized a public bank, and laid the Bahamas-Florida cable
Bough - Genesis 49:22 (a) This is a picture of the blessed and fruitful influence of Joseph in the life of all nations when he was Governor of Egypt
Alexander, Saint - He converted by a miracle the Governor of Edessa, Saint Rabulas
Shea, Ambrose - As Governor of the Bahama Islands from 1887 to 1895 he initiated the sisal fiber industry, organized a public bank, and laid the Bahamas-Florida cable
Trespass - The Mosaic law required a trespasser not only to make satisfaction to the person injured, but by an offering at the altar to reconcile himself to the divine Governor, Leviticus 5:1-19 ; 6:1-7 ; Psalm 51:4
Caesarea Philippi - It was given the additional name Philippi in honour of Herod Philip, the provincial Governor in whose territory it was located (cf
Governor - GOVERNOR. —The word ‘governor’ (ἡγεμών, Lat. praeses, dux) is a comprehensive term, being the only Greek word which includes every class of provincial Governor under the Roman empire. The following officials, for instance, are included under this title:—(1) Governors of Senatorial Provinces, namely, pro consulibus who are ex-consuls, and pro consulibus who are ex-praetors. (2) Governors of Imperial Provinces, namely, legati Augusti pro practoribus who are ex-consuls; legati Augusti pro practoribus who are ex-praetors; procuratores; praefecti Acgypti, etc. These Governors were all accountable to the Emperor, being put in charge of his provinces, but were by no means of equal rank. ...
Governors of provinces had certain powers of jurisdiction delegated to them, which it is now impossible accurately to define. As the provinces had an appeal from their decisions to the Senate in the case of Senatorial provinces, and to the Emperor in the case of Imperial, it was dangerous for a Governor to go against the strongly expressed wish of the subjects of Rome. ...
Governors were commonly changed annually. The emperor Tiberius, however, retained many Governors for a number of years in one position, and he also instituted the custom of payment of definite salaries to such, thus doing away with the necessity for plunder in order to recoup themselves. Sulpicius Quirinius was ‘governor of Syria’ (Luke 2:2) in a. ), in order to carry on a campaign against the Homonadenses, and leave the ordinary Governor free for civil duties. ...
In Matthew 10:18, Mark 13:9, and Luke 21:12 ‘kings’ are coupled with ‘governors. ’ The reference here is to ‘client-kings’ of the Roman empire (such as Herod) as well as the ordinary Governors. In other words, the Romans had suzerainty over these kingdoms; but they left them under the rule of their kings until they were sufficiently civilized to become ordinary provinces under ordinary Governors. In Luke 21:12 the ‘kings’ are mentioned before the ‘governors
Bowing - Abraham "bowed himself to the people of the land" (Genesis 23:7 ); so Jacob to Esau (Genesis 33:3 ); and the brethren of Joseph before him as the Governor of the land (Genesis 43:28 )
Amon (2) - Governor of the city under Ahab (1 Kings 22:26)
Salamis - We have a most interesting record concerning the apostles' success in this island, in being instrumental to the conversion of the deputy Governor, and the opposition they met with from Elymas the sorcerer
Caiaphas, Joseph - Appointed high priest by the Governor Valerius Gratus, A
Annas - 6 by Quirinius, Governor of Syria
Pahath-Moab - The word has been read to mean ‘governor of Moab,’ and referred to a dominion once exercised over Moab
Severus, Septimius - Legate of the fourth legion on the Euphrates and later Governor of Upper Pannonia
Septimius Severus - Legate of the fourth legion on the Euphrates and later Governor of Upper Pannonia
Salamis - Paul's visit was signalized by the miracle wrought on Elymas, and by the conversion of the Governor, Sergius Paulus, Acts 13:5-12
Julia - Centurion of "Augustus' band" (a detachment probably of the emperor's praetorian body guards, attached to the Roman Governor at Caesarea); had charge of Paul from Caesarea to Rome (Acts 27:1; Acts 27:3)
Frontenac, Louis de Buade, Count of - (1622-1698) Governor of New France, born Paris, France; died Quebec, Canada
la Valette, Jean Parisot de - Entering this military order in early youth, he distinguished himself in the struggle against the Barbary pirates and in 1537 was made Governor of Tripoli
John the Almsgiver, Saint - The son of the Governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the death of his wife
Joannes Eleemosynasius, Saint - The son of the Governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the death of his wife
Joannes Misebicors, Saint - The son of the Governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the death of his wife
Misebicors, Joannes, Saint - The son of the Governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the death of his wife
Jean Parisot de la Valette - Entering this military order in early youth, he distinguished himself in the struggle against the Barbary pirates and in 1537 was made Governor of Tripoli
Shebna - , comptroller or Governor of the palace
Jezaniah - Army captain loyal to Gedaliah, the Governor Babylon appointed over Judah immediately after Babylon destroyed Jerusalem and took the Jewish leaders into Exile about 586 B
Tatnai - Gift, a Persian Governor (Heb. This Hebrew title Pehah Is given to Governors of provinces generally
Sosthenes - Safe in strength, the chief ruler of the synagogue at Corinth, who was seized and beaten by the mob in the presence of Gallio, the Roman Governor, when he refused to proceed against Paul at the instigation of the Jews (Acts 18:12-17 )
Zaphnath-Paaneah - " Brugsch interprets it as "governor of the district of the place of life", i
Louis de Buade, Count of Frontenac - (1622-1698) Governor of New France, born Paris, France; died Quebec, Canada
Melita - Its chief officer (under the Roman Governor of Sicily) appears from inscriptions to have had the precise title which Luke uses
Captain of the Temple - Pashhur (“chief Governor in the house of the Lord,” Jeremiah 20:1 ) and Seraiah (“ruler of the house of God,” Nehemiah 11:11 ) held this office in the Old Testament times
Ahikam - God rewarded Ahikam by the honor put upon Gedaliah, his son, by Nebuchadnezzar's making him Governor over the cities of Judah, and committing Jeremiah' to him, when the Babylonians took Jerusalem (Jeremiah 40:5; Jeremiah 39:14)
Regent - ) One who rules or reigns; a Governor; a ruler
Guam - Dependency of the United States, in the Mariana Archipelago, northern Pacific, under the jurisdiction of the United States Navy Department, with the naval commander acting as Governor
Almsgiver, John the Saint - The son of the Governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the death of his wife
Sanballat - A Horonite, who seemed to act as a Governor under the Persian king when Nehemiah returned from exile to rebuild Jerusalem
Apphianus, or Appianus, or Amphianus, m - , a son of rich parents at "Pagae" (probably Araxas) in Lycia, educated in the schools of Berytus, who being not twenty years old interrupted the Governor at Caesarea when sacrificing, by an exhortation to desist from idolatry, and was, after horrible tortures—e
Governor - ἐθνάρχης 'governor of a nation,' an ethnarch, as the ruler of Damascus was called
Eleemosynasius, Joannes, Saint - The son of the Governor of Cyprus, he entered the religious life at the death of his wife
Hall - 1: αὐλή (Strong's #833 — Noun Feminine — aule — ow-lay' ) "a court," most frequently the place where a Governor dispensed justice, is rendered "hall" in Mark 15:16 ; Luke 22:55 , AV (RV, "court")
Province - The right of any Roman citizen to appeal from a provincial Governor to the emperor meets us as asserted by St. ( Acts 25:11 ) In the council of (Acts 25:12 ) we recognize the assessors who were appointed to take part in the judicial functions of the Governor
Census - ” This “first census” was taken by Cyrenius, the Governor of Syria (Luke 2:1-5 ). This passage has presented problems in that: one, there is no specific record of such a census outside the Lukan account and two, the date of Cyrenius's Governorship (A. However, Luke's account is consistent with Roman practices, and such a census could well have been ordered by Cyrenius functioning as a military Governor alongside the political Governor Sentius Saturnius around 6 B
Innocent Xii, Pope - He was Governor of Perugia, nuncio to Poland and Vienna, cardinal-priest, Bishop of Faenza, and Archbishop of Naples
Hall - , "common hall;" RSV, "palace") it refers to the proetorium or residence of the Roman Governor at Jerusalem
Agrippa i. - The Roman emperor Caligula made him Governor first of the territories of Philip, then of the tetrarchy of Lysanias, with the title of king ("king Herod"), and finally of that of Antipas, who was banished, and of Samaria and Judea
Tetrarch - This title originally signified the Governor of the fourth part of a country
Drusilla - (dryoo ssihl' luh) Wife of Felix, the Roman Governor of Judea who heard Paul's case
Jehiel (2) - their tutor or Governor
Tetrarch - Properly Governor of the fourth part of a larger province and kingdom, i
Pocket Veto - " Also, an analogous retention of a bill by a State Governor
Deputy - In NT times ‘proconsul’ was the name given to the Governor of a senatorial province-that is, a province under the supervision of the Roman Senate, which appointed the Governors
Antonio de Sedella - He became a Capuchin friar, was sent to Louisiana as commissary of the Inquisition in 1779, but was deported by Governor Miro for fear of an uprising
Amon - The Governor of Samaria in the time of Ahab
az'Rikam - ) ...
Governor of the house, or prefect of the palace, to King Ahaz, who was slain by Zichri, an Ephraimite hero, in the successful invasion of the southern kingdom by Pekah king of Israel
re'Hum - " (Ezra 4:8,9,17,23 ) He was perhaps a kind of lieutenant-governor of the province under the king of Persia
Tetrarch - This title originally signified the Governor of the fourth part of a country
Tobiah - This Tobiah is called "the servant," or "slave," in some parts of Nehemiah; probably because he was of a servile condition, However, he was of great consideration in the land of the Samaritans, of which he was Governor with Sanballat. He maintained a correspondence by letter with this party against the interest of Nehemiah 6:17-19 ; but that prudent Governor, by his wisdom and moderation, defeated all their machinations
Governor - (Genesis 24:2 ; Joshua 12:2 ; Psalm 100:20 ) The "governors of the people," in (2 Chronicles 23:20 ) appear to have been the king's body-guard; cf. (Jeremiah 51:38 ) Under the Persian viceroys, during the Babylonian captivity, the land of the Hebrews appears to have been portioned out among "governors" (pachoth ) inferior in rank to the satraps, ( Ezra 8:30 ) like the other provinces which were under the dominion of the Persian king. It appears from (Ezra 6:8 ) that these Governors were intrusted with the collection of the king's taxes; and from (Nehemiah 5:18 ; 12:26 ) that they were supported by a contribution levied upon the people, which was technically termed "the bread of the Governor" comp. (Ezra 4:7 ; 6:6 ) The "governor" beyond the river had a judgment-seat beyond Jerusalem, from which probably he administered justice when making a progress through his province. (Nehemiah 3:7 ) At the time of Christ Judea was a Roman province, governed by a procurator (governor) appointed by Rome
Aretas - The king of Arabia Petræa at the time the Governor of Damascus attempted to apprehend Paul
John Sarkander, Blessed - The Protestants, therefore, accused him of bringing the enemy into the country, put him on trial, and tortured him when he refused to reveal what Lobkowitz, the Governor of Moravia, had confessed to him
Satraps - The satrap was the Governor of a whole province, and be held the position of a vassal king
Ahikam - He was the son of Shaphan, the royal secretary, and the father of Gedaliah, Governor of Judea after the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians (2 Kings 25:22 ; Jeremiah 40:5-16 ; 43:6 )
Praetorium - It appears that it was the official residence of the Roman Governor, which would favor the palace location
Hong Kong - Former Crown colony of the British Empire, at the mouth of the Canton River, China, administered by a Governor assisted by an executive and a legislative council
Aretas - Vitellius, Governor of Syria was ordered to take Aretas dead or alive; but Tiberius died before this was accomplished
Palace - In Philippians 1:13 the word is πραιτώριον, 'the court of the praetor,' or Governor, or perhaps 'the praetorian guard,' from which Paul's keepers were taken
Tetrarch - A — 1: τετραρχής (Strong's #5076 — Noun Masculine — tetraarches | tetrarches — tet-rar'-khace ) denotes "one of four rulers" (tetra, "four," arche, "rule"), properly, "the Governor of the fourth part of a region;" hence, "a dependent princeling," or "any petty ruler" subordinate to kings or ethnarchs; in the NT, Herod Antipas, Matthew 14:1 ; Luke 3:19 ; 9:7 ; Acts 13:1
Sarkander, John, Blessed - The Protestants, therefore, accused him of bringing the enemy into the country, put him on trial, and tortured him when he refused to reveal what Lobkowitz, the Governor of Moravia, had confessed to him
Samos - The Romans wrote to the Governor in favor of the Jews in the time of Simon Maccabaeus
Samoa - The American islands are administered by a commandant-governor appointed by the President of the United States, and a local assembly
Hana'ni - (Ezra 10:20 ) ...
A brother of Nehemiah, (Nehemiah 1:2 ) who was made Governor of Jerusalem under Nehemiah
Branch - ...
After the Jews’ return from their Babylonian captivity, the name ‘branch’ was used in relation to Zerubbabel, the Jewish Governor in Jerusalem
Nehemiah - As Governor of Jerusalem and author of a book, Nehemiah is an important character in the biblical record of Israel’s reconstruction after the captivity in Babylon. But the city wall remained in ruins, and only when Nehemiah came to Jerusalem as Governor in 445 BC was it rebuilt. ...
Most of the book of Nehemiah seems to have come from the personal records that Nehemiah kept during his Governorship of Jerusalem. Nehemiah had two periods as Governor of Jerusalem, an earlier period lasting twelve years and a later period of unknown length (Nehemiah 5:14; Nehemiah 13:6-7). ...
Summary of Nehemiah’s book...
Nehemiah first became Governor as a result of a visit to Persia by some Jews from Jerusalem. It was probably at this time that Nehemiah was appointed Governor
Marguerite Bourgeoys, Venerable - A member in Troyes of the lay confraternity attached to the Congregation de Notre Dame, founded in Lorraine by Saint Peter Fourier, 1598, she volunteered to go to Canada in 1653 with Paul de Chomedey de Maisonneuve, the Governor of Montreal, and opened a free school there in 1657
Sheshbazzar - King Cyrus of Persia apparently appointed Sheshbazzar Governor of restored Judah and supplied his company of people with provisions and many of the treasures which the Babylonians had taken from Jerusalem
Marie de Macmahon - He had a military career of 20 years in Algeria, participated in the Crimean War, in the Italian War brought about the victory of Magenta (1859), and was created Marshal and Duke of Magenta on the field of battle, and Governor General of Algeria; participated in Franco-Prussian War; led the army to Sedan where Napoleon III capitulated
Eliakim - In his office as Governor of the palace of Hezekiah he succeeded Shebna (Isaiah 22:15-25 )
Rector - ) A ruler or Governor
Annas - 7 by Cyrenius, or Quirinus, Governor of Syria
Drusilla - When Felix came as Governor of Judea, he persuaded her to abandon her husband and her religion, and become his wife
Concise Chronological Table of Bible History - ...
444...
Nehemiah appointed Governor. ...
432...
Nehemiah again Governor at Jerusalem. ...
Antipater made Governor of Judæa by Cæsar
Elect - To select or take for an office or employment to choose from among a number to select or manifest preference by vote or designation as, to elect a representative by ballot or viva voce to elect a president or Governor. Chosen, but no inaugurated, consecrated or invested with office as bishop elect emperor elect Governor or mayor elect
Ituraea - ” Region over which Herod Philip was Governor when John the Baptist began his public ministry (Luke 3:1 )
Regulator - (b) The Governor of a steam engine
Rudder - : That which resembles a rudder as a guide or Governor; that which guides or governs the course
Auxerre, Germain of, Saint - After marrying and practising law with success in Rome, Germain returned to Gaul as a provincial Governor, where, against his will, he was given the tonsure by Saint Amator, Bishop of Auxerre
Bonds - The Apostle Paul was subjected to private bonds by Felix, the Roman Governor, who "commanded a centurion to keep him, and to let him have liberty, and that he should forbid none of his acquaintance to minister, or come unto him,"...
Acts 24:23
Germain of Auxerre, Saint - After marrying and practising law with success in Rome, Germain returned to Gaul as a provincial Governor, where, against his will, he was given the tonsure by Saint Amator, Bishop of Auxerre
Las Casas, Bartolome de - Abandoning the practise of law, 1510, he was ordained a secular priest, and went with the Spanish Governor, Ovando, to the Antilles, where he endeavored to improve the condition of the Indians; in 1519 he established a post at Cumana, Venezuela
Casaus, Bartolome - Abandoning the practise of law, 1510, he was ordained a secular priest, and went with the Spanish Governor, Ovando, to the Antilles, where he endeavored to improve the condition of the Indians; in 1519 he established a post at Cumana, Venezuela
Gallio - Achaia was a senatorial province under Claudius, and the Governor of such a province was called a "proconsul
Bithynia - , under one Governor
Bartolome Casaus - Abandoning the practise of law, 1510, he was ordained a secular priest, and went with the Spanish Governor, Ovando, to the Antilles, where he endeavored to improve the condition of the Indians; in 1519 he established a post at Cumana, Venezuela
Bartolome de Las Casas - Abandoning the practise of law, 1510, he was ordained a secular priest, and went with the Spanish Governor, Ovando, to the Antilles, where he endeavored to improve the condition of the Indians; in 1519 he established a post at Cumana, Venezuela
Gedaliah - Son of Ahikam: he was made Governor over those left in the land, with a Chaldean guard, by Nebuchadnezzar
Territory - ) In the United States, a portion of the country not included within the limits of any State, and not yet admitted as a State into the Union, but organized with a separate legislature, under a Territorial Governor and other officers appointed by the President and Senate of the United States
Amon - Governor of Samaria when Jehoshaphat was king of Judah, who followed orders from the king of Israel and put the prophet Micaiah in prison (1 Kings 22:26 )
Obadiah - the prophet is thought to have been the same as the Governor of Ahab's house, 1 Kings 18:3 , &c; and some are of opinion, he was that Obadiah whom Josiah made overseer of the works of the temple, 2 Chronicles 34:12
Zerubbabel - He was the Governor of Judæa
Baptist, Peter, Saint - In 1593 he was sent by the Governor of the Philippines to negotiate with the emperor of Japan
Junipero Serra, Blessed - Difficulties with the military Governor compelled Serra to appeal to the viceroy, who decided in his favor
Council - Spoken of counsellors who sat in public trials with the Governor of a province (Acts 25:12 )
Maaseiah - He was Governor (Heb
Jaazaniah - Member of party led by Ishmael who opposed Gedaliah after the Babylonians made him Governor over Judah following their destruction of Jerusalem in 587 B
Cyprus - At Paphos, they found Bar-Jesus, a false prophet, with Sergius Paulus, the Governor: Paul struck Bar-Jesus with blindness; and the proconsul embraced Christianity
Serra, Junipero, Blessed - Difficulties with the military Governor compelled Serra to appeal to the viceroy, who decided in his favor
Procurator - Such a man was in an entirely different position from an ordinary Governor of a province, who would be a member of the Senate, still a privileged body, and might be of as good as, or of better blood than, the Emperor himself. Sometimes these would take over the command of a province on the occasion of the death or absence of the real Governor. They are to be distinguished from the procuratores who were actually set over provinces as Governors. Only Imperial provinces were thus governed, and only the less important of these (see Governor, Province). Such Governors had a lower status than the finance procurators in other provinces. In the more important Imperial provinces the financial procurators acted ordinarily with the Governors in the supervision of building and also in the settlement of boundary disputes, but also sometimes independently. In the ordinary Civil Court (Recorder’s Court, Court of Common Pleas) they had a jurisdiction like that of other Governors, and in later times at least they could appoint a guardian to a ward (tutoris datio). The procurator of Judaea appears to have stood in a special position of dependence under the Governor of the Imperial province of Syria. Vitellius, the Governor of Syria (Josephus, Ant. 2), with the command that he should appear before the Emperor in Rome, and a provisional Governor appointed for Judaea . A similar experience fell to the lot of later procurators of Judaea , Felix and Cumanus, at the hands of Ummidius Quadratus, Governor of Syria. But it has been pointed out that both these Governors had a wider command than Syria, extending in fact over the neighbouring provinces as well
Aretas - 2 Corinthians 11:32; "in Damascus the Governor ethnarch) under Aretas the king kept the city of the Damascenes with a garrison, desirous to apprehend me; and through a window in a basket was I let down by the wall, and escaped his hands. ...
But Tiberius, at Antipas' entreaty, commanded Vitellius, Governor of Syria, to take Aretas dead or alive
Government Governor - ...
(2) The word ‘governor’ occurs many times in the NT. The procurator (agent) was really a servant of the Emperor’s household, never of higher rank than equestrian, and belonged to the lowest class of Governor
Nehemiah - Nehemiah explained it all to the king, and obtained his permission to go up to Jerusalem and there to act as Tirshatha , Or Governor of Judea. He remained in Judea for thirteen years as Governor, carrying out many reforms, notwithstanding much opposition that he encountered ( Nehemiah 13:11 ). Probably he remained at his post as Governor till his death (about B. Nehemiah was the last of the Governors sent from the Persian court. Judea after this was annexed to the satrapy of Coele-Syria, and was governed by the high priest under the jurisdiction of the Governor of Syria, and the internal government of the country became more and more a hierarchy
Throne - Though a throne and royal dignity seem to be correlatives, or terms that stand in reciprocal relation to each other, yet the privilege of sitting on a throne has been sometimes granted to those that were not kings, particularly to some Governors of important provinces. We read of the throne of the Governor of this side the river; the throne, in other words, of the Governor for the king of Persia of the provinces belonging to that empire on the west of the Euphrates. So D'Herbelot tells us that a Persian monarch of aftertimes gave the Governor of one of his provinces permission to seat himself in a gilded chair, when he administered justice; which distinction was granted him on account of the importance of that post, to which the guarding a pass of great consequence was committed. " To which he adds, that this privilege was granted to the Governor of this province, as being the place through which the northern nations used to make their way into Persia; on which account, also, a mighty rampart or wall was raised there
Joseph the Son of Jacob - The king was so impressed that he made Joseph the administrator of the famine relief program, and then Governor of all Egypt (Genesis 41:1-45; Acts 7:9-10). ...
Governor of Egypt...
At the time of his appointment as Governor, Joseph was thirty years of age (Genesis 41:46). Meanwhile Joseph continued as Governor, and his economic policies saved Egypt from disaster (Genesis 47:13-26)
Flavius Claudius Julianus - In 355 he was presented to the army as Caesar and he married Helena, sister of the Emperor Constantius, who was his cousin, and was sent as Governor to Gaul
Julian the Apostate - In 355 he was presented to the army as Caesar and he married Helena, sister of the Emperor Constantius, who was his cousin, and was sent as Governor to Gaul
Julianus, Flavius Claudius - In 355 he was presented to the army as Caesar and he married Helena, sister of the Emperor Constantius, who was his cousin, and was sent as Governor to Gaul
Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maximianus Herculius - The intensity of his persecution of Christians seems to have varied, but he conducted a vigorous persecution in the western provinces of which he was Governor, and certainly had people martyred for their faith
John Capistran, Saint - He received his degree of Doctor of Laws at Perugia, was affiliated with the Ghibelline party, appointed Governor of Perugia under King Ladislaus of Naples, and imprisoned by Malatesta who was at war with Perugia
Montcalm, Louis Joseph Gozon, Marquis de - Against the odds of discordant relations with Governor Vaudreuil, Bigot's dishonesty, apathy of the French court, impoverished condition of the colony and army, and disproportionate resources of the enemy, Montcalm was heroically faithful to duty
Aretas - Aretas, taking advantage of this supineness, seems to have made an incursion and got possession of Damascus, over which he appointed a Governor or ethnarch, who, A
Capistran, John, Saint - He received his degree of Doctor of Laws at Perugia, was affiliated with the Ghibelline party, appointed Governor of Perugia under King Ladislaus of Naples, and imprisoned by Malatesta who was at war with Perugia
Louis Gozon - Against the odds of discordant relations with Governor Vaudreuil, Bigot's dishonesty, apathy of the French court, impoverished condition of the colony and army, and disproportionate resources of the enemy, Montcalm was heroically faithful to duty
Annas - 7, in his 37th year, to the high priesthood by Quirinius, the imperial Governor of Syria; obliged to give way to Ismael by Valerius Gratus, procurator of Judaea, in the beginning of Tiberius' reign, A
Petition - ) To make a prayer or request to; to ask from; to solicit; to entreat; especially, to make a formal written supplication, or application to, as to any branch of the government; as, to petition the court; to petition the Governor
Pashur - Son of Immer, 'chief Governor in the house of the Lord
Prince, Princess - nasi , 'one raised up'; this is translated also 'ruler, Governor, captain, and chief. In Daniel these same are called achashdarpenayya , 'chief Governors
Apostate, Julian the - In 355 he was presented to the army as Caesar and he married Helena, sister of the Emperor Constantius, who was his cousin, and was sent as Governor to Gaul
Gozon, Louis Joseph, Marquis de Montcalm - Against the odds of discordant relations with Governor Vaudreuil, Bigot's dishonesty, apathy of the French court, impoverished condition of the colony and army, and disproportionate resources of the enemy, Montcalm was heroically faithful to duty
Shaphan - Sent by king Josiah, With the Governor of the city and the recorder, to Hilkiah to take account of the money collected for repairing the temple
Province - The Jews had their "governor" (tirsbatha' ), of their own race (Ezra 2:63; Nehemiah 5:14; Nehemiah 8:9), subject to the "satrap" (pathath ) of the provinces W
Palace - " Then it was applied to "the council of army officers;" then to "the official residence of the Governor of a province;" finally, to "the imperial bodyguard. , "the Governor's house;" RV, "palace," see marg. " ...
"In the Gospels the term denotes the official residence in Jerusalem of the Roman Governor, and the various translations of it in our versions arose from a desire either to indicate the special purpose for which that residence was used on the occasion in question, or to explain what particular building was intended. But whatever building the Governor occupied was the Praetorium
Town-Clerk - In cities like Ephesus, which were the headquarters of a Roman Governor, the town-clerk appears to have acted also as a kind of intermediary between the proconsul (with his staff) and the municipal authorities. The assemblies could be held only with the permission of the Governor, who was an Imperial official (cf. A decree passed by the assembly required the confirmation of the Governor before it could become law
Artaxerxes - In the twentieth year of Artaxerxes Longimanus, Nehemiah was sent to Jerusalem as Governor, Nehemiah 2:1 ; 5:14
Thrace - 163) as saving Gorgias, the Governor of Idumæa under Antiochus Epiphanes, from capture
Deputy - The supreme Governor of the provinces left by the emperors, still under the Roman senate (Acts 13:7; Acts 19:38, plural for singular)
Straight - 1, is used of the directing of a ship by the steersman, James 3:4 (see Governor , B, Note); metaphorically, of making "straight" the way of the Lord, John 1:23
Artaxerxes - He granted Nehemiah's request to go to Judah (Nehemiah 2:5-6 ), making him Governor of Judah (Nehemiah 5:14 )
Felix - One of the freedmen of the Emperor Claudius, and by him appointed to be procurator or Governor of Judaea, A
Province - : Any political division of the Dominion of Canada, having a Governor, a local legislature, and representation in the Dominion parliament
Pahath Moab - ("governor of Moab"
Appeal to Caesar - There are cases, however, where Roman citizens in Africa were refused the right of appeal and were crucified by Galba, the Governor of the province
Appellatio - The Sempronian law secured this privilege to the Roman citizens, that they could not be capitally convicted, but by the suffrage of the people; and in whatever provinces they happened to reside, if the Governor showed a disposition to condemn them to death, to scourge, or deprive them of their property, they had liberty to appeal from his jurisdiction to the judgment of the people
Theophilus - OEcumenius concludes from thence that he was Governor or intendant of some province, because such a personage had generally the title of "most excellent" given to him
Astyages - ...
ASTYAGES, otherwise called Ahasuerus in the Greek, Daniel 9:1 , or Cyaxares in Xenophon, or Apandus in Ctesias, was appointed by his father Cyaxares Governor of Media, and sent with Nabopolassar, king of Babylon, against Saracus, otherwise called Chynaladanus, king of Assyria
Ptol'Emee, - ...
The son of Agesarchus, a Megalopolitan, surnamed Macron, 2 Maccabees 10:12 , who was Governor of Cyprus during the minority of Ptolemy Philometor
Amon - A Governor of Samaria
Simon - ...
Descendant of Juda (1Paralipomenon 4)
Simon, surnamed Thasi, brother of Judas Machabeus (1Machabees 2)
Simon of the tribe of Benjamin; Governor of the Temple (2Machabees 3)
Simon who is called Peter, the Apostle (Matthew 4)
Simon the Cananean, the Apostle (Matthew 10)
one of the relatives of Our Lord, identified erroneously with the preceding (Matthew 13)
Simon the leper, a resident of Bethany (Matthew 26)
a Pharisee at whose house the penitent woman washed the feet of Jesus (Luke 7)
Simon the Cyrenean, who helped Our Lord carry the Cross (Matthew 27)
the father of Judas (John 6)
Simon Magus, a magician in the time of the Apostles (Acts 8)
Simon the tanner, a Christian of Joppe, in whose house Peter had the vision commanding him to receive the Gentiles into the faith (Acts 10)
Simon called Niger, a Christian living at Antioch in the time of the Apostles (Acts 13)
Bahia - Thome de Sousa, first Governor of Brazil, arrived at Bahia in 1549 with six Jesuits, the first to come to the New World, and two days later the first Mass was said there
Linen - , 2 Samuel 6:14 ; SHESH, worn by Joseph when Governor of Egypt, Genesis 41:42 , and by the virtuous woman in Proverbs 31:22 , (see SILK ;) and BUTZ, of which the veil of the temple and David's outer mantle were made, ...
1 Chronicles 15:27 2 Chronicles 2:14 3:14 5:12
Famine - The most remarkable one was that of seven years in Egypt, while Joseph was Governor, Genesis 41:1-57
Annas - 7 by Quirinus, the imperial Governor of Syria, but was obliged by Valerius Gratus, procurator of Judea, to give way to Ismael, son of Phabi, at the beginning of the reign of Tiberius, A
Hall - In Matthew 27:27 Authorized Version has ‘the soldiers of the Governor took Jesus into the common hall’ (a circumlocution for πραιτώριον). The Authorized Version renders αὐλή by ‘palace’ in Matthew 26:3; Matthew 26:58; Matthew 26:69, Mark 14:54; Mark 14:66, Luke 11:21, John 18:15, when the reference is to the place where the Governor dispensed justice; by ‘fold’ in John 10:1; John 10:16 of the place where the sheep were kept at night; and by ‘court’ in Revelation 11:2, as designating the court of the temple
Zechariah - Like his contemporary Haggai, Zechariah begins with exhorting the Jews to proceed in the rebuilding of the temple; he promises them the aid and protection of God, and assures them of the speedy increase and prosperity of Jerusalem; he then emblematically describes the four great empires, and foretels the glory of the Christian church when Jews and Gentiles shall be united under their great High Priest and Governor, Jesus Christ, of whom Joshua the high priest, and Zerubbabel the Governor, were types; he predicts many particulars relative to our Saviour and his kingdom, and to the future condition of the Jews
Pilate or Pontius Pilate - Pilate became odious both to the Jews and to the Samaritans for the severity and cruelty of his administration, Luke 13:1 ; and being accused by the latter before Vitellius, the Governor of Syria, he was removed from his office and sent to Rome to answer to their accusations before the emperor. When Jesus had been condemned by the high priest and the Sanhedrin, he was brought before Pilate the Governor, without whose consent he could not be executed
Pilate, Pontius - (pi' luhte, pahn' shuhss) Roman Governor of Judea remembered in history as a notorious anti-Semite and in Christian creeds as the magistrate under whom Jesus Christ “suffered” (1 Timothy 6:13 ). The New Testament refers to him as “governor,” while other sources call him “procurator” or “prefect” (an inscription found in Caesarea in 1961). When the Samaritans complained to Vitellius, the Governor of Syria, Pilate was ordered to Rome to account for his actions to the emperor and is not mentioned again in reliable contemporary sources
Johannes Bessarion - From 1450 to 1455, as Governor of Bologna, he calmed internal factionism, restored the university, and promoted classical studies
Bessarion, Johannes - From 1450 to 1455, as Governor of Bologna, he calmed internal factionism, restored the university, and promoted classical studies
Durandus, William, the Elder - He was elected Bishop of Mende, Narbonne, and was papal Governor of Romagna and Ancona
Ancient - Hence: A Governor; a ruler; a person of influence
Shaphan - see), whom the Chaldæans made Governor of Judæa after the Captivity of 586 b
Lucy, Saint - This largess stirred the greed of the unworthy youth to whom Lucy had been unwillingly betrothed, and he denounced her to Paschasius, the Governor of Sicily
Sin: Aroused by the Law - A contended citizen of Milan, who had never passed beyond its walls during the course of sixty years, being ordered by the Governor not to stir beyond its gates, became immediately miserable, and felt so powerful an inclination to do that which he had so
Chushan-Rishathaim - Cush of double wickedness, or Governor of two presidencies, the king of Mesopotamia who oppressed Israel in the generation immediately following Joshua (Judges 3:8 )
ex - Ex-, prefixed to names implying office, station, condition, denotes that the person formerly held the office, or is out of the office or condition now; as, ex-president, ex-governor, ex-mayor, ex-convict
Judaea - 6, and was governed by a procurator, who was subject to the Governor of Syria
Procurator - "governor"; Greek heegemoon in New Testament, more strictly epitropos
Nehemiah - He was made Governor of Judea, upon his own application, by Artaxerxes Longimanus; and his book, which in the Hebrew canon was joined to that of Ezra, gives an account of his appointment and administration through a space of about thirty-six years to A
William Durandus the Elder - He was elected Bishop of Mende, Narbonne, and was papal Governor of Romagna and Ancona
Mizpah or Mizpeh - It was fortified by Asa as a defense against Israel, 1 Kings 15:22 , was the residence of the Governor, under Nebuchadnezzar, Jeremiah 40:6 , and was reoccupied after the captivity, Nehemiah 3:19
Praeto'Rium - (in the Revised Version translated palace ,) ( Matthew 27:27 ; John 18:28,33 ; 19:3 ) the headquarters of the Roman military Governor, wherever he happened to be
Magistrate - 1: στρατηγός (Strong's #4755 — Noun Masculine — strategos — strat-ay-gos' ) besides its application to "the captain of the Temple" (see CAPTAIN), denotes "a magistrate or Governor," Acts 16:20,22,35,36,38
Apocalypse - It is full of prophetic grandeur, and awful in its hieroglyphics and mystic symbols: seven seals opened, seven trumpets sounded, seven vials poured out; mighty antagonists and hostile powers, full of malignity against Christianity, and for a season oppressing it, but at length defeated and annihilated; the darkened heaven, tempestuous sea, and convulsed earth fighting against them, while the issue of the long combat is the universal reign of peace and truth and righteousness-the whole scene being relieved at intervals by a choral burst of praise to God the Creator, and Christ the Redeemer and Governor. It exhibits his glory as Redeemer and Governor, and describes that deep and universal homage and praise which the "Lamb that was slain" is forever receiving before the throne
Jeshua - A clan related to the Pahath-moab or Governor of Moab, some of whose members returned from Exile with Zerubbabel (Ezra 2:6 ). Father of Exer, the Jewish Governor of the district of Mizpah under Persian rule (Nehemiah 3:19 )
Province - The "province" mentioned in Acts 23:34 ; 25:1 was assigned to the jurisdiction of an eparchos, "a prefect or Governor" (cp. Governor, POCONSUL)
Enroll, Enrollment - " Luke's accuracy has been vindicated, as against the supposed inconsistency that as Quirinius was Governor of Syria in A. At the time mentioned by Luke, Cilicia, of which Quirinius was Governor, was separated from Cyprus and joined to Syria. His later direct Governorship of Syria itself accounts for the specific inclusion of, and reference to, his earlier connection with that province
Joshua the Son of Jehozadak - Chief among those who returned were the Governor Zerubbabel and the high priest Joshua (or Jeshua) the son of Jehozadak (or Jozadak) (Ezra 2:1-2). When, in anticipation of this Messiah, the Jews conducted a coronation ceremony, the person they should have crowned was Zerubbabel, for he was not only Governor but also a Davidic prince in the line of the Messiah (Matthew 1:6; Matthew 1:12; Matthew 1:16)
Sergius Paulus - coast of Cyprus is dated ‘in the pro-consulship of Paulus,’ who is probably the same Governor. Elymas was evidently a powerful exponent of a subtle theosophical system; and as a man of unusual intelligence, with a religious bent, the Governor encouraged the presence and enjoyed the company of such scientists and philosophers. The Governor listened to their message with such evident pleasure and approval that the jealousy of Elymas was roused, and lie tried to dissuade his patron from hearing them. ’ The Governor of Cyprus was a notable convert
Gallio - He was the elder brother of Seneca the philosopher, to whose influence at court he may have owed his Governorship. Gallio came to Corinth, the residence of the Governor, during the time of St. ]'>[1] Angered by the conversion of prominent members of the synagogue, the Jews took advantage of the new Governor’s arrival to lay a charge against St. Gallio being Governor of Achaia, his judgment would become a precedent and would have far-reaching influence. The casual glimpse we get of him in Acts 18:12-17 shows him in a favourable light as Governor
Nebuzaradan - By Nebuchadnezzar's direction, Nebuzaradan "looked well to Jeremiah," gave him his choice of going to Babylon or staying, then sent him with victuals and a present, to be protected by Gedaliah the Governor left over Judah, after having first told the Jews "Jehovah hath done according as He hath said, because ye have sinned against Jehovah" (Jeremiah 39:11-14; Jeremiah 40:2-5)
Nazareth - The Crusaders made it a bishopric; it is now the seat of a Turkish lientenant-governor
Throne - "The throne of the Governor" in Nehemiah 3:7 is his official house where his throne was, on or near the city wall
Sanballat - ” According to the Elephantine Papyri from the reign of Darius I, Sanballat was Governor of Samaria around 407 BC. Papyri from Wadi Daliyeh appear to indicate two later Sanballats also served as Governors of Samaria
Andrew, Saint - He is supposed to have preached in Cappadocia, Galatia, Bithynia, Scythia (Russia), Byzantium, Thrace, Macedonia, Thessaly, and Achaia, where he was crucified on an X-shaped or Saint Andrew's cross by the Roman Governor, AEgeas
Caiaphas - " Caiaphas had no power to inflict the punishment of death, and therefore Jesus was sent to Pilate, the Roman Governor, that he might duly pronounce the sentence against him (Matthew 27:2 ; John 18:28 )
Attributes of God - ; relative ones are such as agree with him in time, with some respect to his creatures, as Creator, Governor, Preserver, Redeemer, &c
Annas - He was appointed by Quirinus, Governor of Syria, a
Judae'a, - 6, and was governed by a procurator, who was subject to the Governor of Syria
Jehoiachin - When, after Persia’s conquest of Babylon in 539 BC, the Jews were released and returned to Jerusalem, a grandson of Jehoiachin, Zerubbabel, became their Governor (1 Chronicles 3:17; Ezra 3:2; Haggai 1:1; Matthew 1:12)
Pilate - In the Roman government of Palestine, the regions of Judea and Samaria were governed by procurators, or Governors, sent out from Rome. This may have contributed to the hatred that existed between Pilate and Herod Antipas, the Governor of Galilee (Luke 23:6-12). Only the Roman Governor could authorize execution
Gerizim - Manasseh, the grandson of Eliashib, the high priest, and brother to Jaddus, high priest of the Jews, having been driven from Jerusalem in the year of the world 3671, and not enduring patiently to see himself deprived of the honour and advantages of the priesthood, Sanballat, his father-in- law, addressed himself to Alexander the Great, who was then carrying on the siege of Tyre; and having paid him homage for the province of Samaria, whereof he was Governor, he farther offered him eight thousand of his best troops, which disposed Alexander to grant what he desired for his son-in- law, and for many other priests, who being married, as well as he, contrary to the law, chose rather to forsake their country than their wives, and had joined Manasseh in Samaria. The temple of Gerizim subsisted some time after the worship of Jupiter was introduced into it; but it was destroyed by John Hircanus Maccabaeus, and was not rebuilt till Gabinius was Governor of Syria; who repaired Samaria, and called it by his own name
Nehemiah - He was accordingly sent thither as Governor, in the twentieth year of Artaxerxes, about 444 B. ...
The enmity of the Samaritans, under which the colony had formerly suffered, was now increased; and under Sanballat, the Governor of the country, they cast all possible hindrances in the way of the Jews
Caesar - Luke wrote (Luke 3:1): ‘Pontius Pilate being Governor of Judaea,’ with the tetrarchs for Galilee, Ituraea, and Abilene, desiring to mark the period in the reign of Tiberius Caesar when ‘the word of God came to John in the wilderness. While Varus, the Governor of Syria, was engaged in quelling serious outbreaks of rebellion in Jerusalem, the sons of Herod were in Rome waiting the decision of Augustus as to their conflicting claims. His territory was put under direct Roman rule, becoming a part of the province of Syria, with a Roman of equestrian rank for its Governor. 6, on the occasion of the great census, while Quirinius was Governor of Syria, which is referred to in Acts 5:37. Officers of state collected it, the procurator for the tax in the case of Judaea being also the Governor, Pilate. The whole attitude of Jesus towards Caesar, not only in the question of the tribute, but throughout the trial before Pilate, must have entirely disarmed the Roman Governor of any fear that He was, or ever had been, a rival of Caesar’s
Nehemi'ah - Having received his appointment as Governor of Judea, he started upon his journey, being under promise to return to Persia within a given time. On his very first arrival, as Governor, Sanballat and Tobiah had given unequivocal proof of their mortification at his appointment; but when the restoration was seen to be rapidly progressing, their indignation knew no bounds. He refused to receive his lawful allowance as Governor from the people, in consideration of their poverty, during the whole twelve years that he was in office but kept at his own charge a table for 150 Jews, at which any who returned from captivity were welcome
Ananias - He was sent as a prisoner to Rome by Quadratus, the Governor of Syria, and Jonathon was appointed in his place; but being discharged by the emperor Claudius, he returned to Palestine, and Jonathon being murdered through the treachery of Felix, Ananias appears to have performed the functions of the high priest as a substitute, until Ishmael was appointed by Agrippa
John of Austria, Don - The great victory of Lepanto, Greece, when 35,000 Turks were slain and 15,000 Christian slaves freed, inspired Don Juan to work for his own and Christianity's establishment in non-Christian countries, but he was thwarted by the jealous Philip, and made Governor-general of the Netherlands, 1576, only to encounter the opposition of William of Orange, all-powerful there
Nebraska - In the former city a church was erected, 1856, on land donated by Governor Alfred Cumming, the first Mass having been said in his house
Jaazaniah - "Son of the Maacathite," a "captain of the forces" who accompanied Johanan in waiting on Gedaliah, the Governor over the Jewish remnant after the capture of Jerusalem, and afterward in rescuing them from Ishmael, and in going to Egypt in spite of the Lord's prohibition (2 Kings 25:23; Jeremiah 41:11; Jeremiah 43:4-5)
Hanani - ; afterward made Governor of Jerusalem under Nehemiah (Nehemiah 1:2; Nehemiah 7:2)
Seraiah - Army officer who reported to Gedaliah when he was named Governor immediately after the fall of Jerusalem in 586 B
Maaseiah - Governor of Jerusalem in Josiah's reign
Austria, John of, Don - The great victory of Lepanto, Greece, when 35,000 Turks were slain and 15,000 Christian slaves freed, inspired Don Juan to work for his own and Christianity's establishment in non-Christian countries, but he was thwarted by the jealous Philip, and made Governor-general of the Netherlands, 1576, only to encounter the opposition of William of Orange, all-powerful there
Lord - ) One who has power and authority; a master; a ruler; a Governor; a prince; a proprietor, as of a manor
School - The office nearly answered to that of a Governor or tutor, Galatians 4:2-3, who constantly attends his pupil, teaches him, and forms his manners
Felix - A Roman Governor of Judea; originally a slave, but manumitted and promoted by Claudius Caesar, from whom he received the name of Claudius
Festus, Portius - The Governor gave him another hearing during a congratulatory visit of king Agrippa, in order to make out a statement to be forwarded with him to Rome
Judgment Hall - 2:14, section 8) represents the Roman Governor as sometimes residing in Herod's palace, and setting up his judgment seat in front of it
Perverting - Accordingly, the leaders of the Sanhedrin lay aside the charge of blasphemy, which really weighed with themselves, but of which they knew Pilate could take no cognizance, and they bring Jesus before the Roman Governor as a political offender, guilty of setting Himself and others in opposition to the ruling power of Rome
Herod - ...
The most prominent family member and ruler was Herod, son of Antipater who had been appointed Governor of Idumea by Alexandra Salome, the Maccabean queen who ruled Palestine 78-69 B. With the permission of the Romans, Antipater left his son Phasael as Prefect of Jerusalem and his second son, Herod, Governor of Galilee. His final one designated Archelaus to succeed him as king of Judea (Matthew 2:22 ), another son Antipas to be tetrarch (governor) of Galilee and Perea, and another son Philip as tetrarch of the Northeastern Districts. The Romans banished Archelaus after a ten-year rule, and the kingdom was then transformed into an Imperial Province of the Roman Empire with Coponius as the first procurator (governor). He built Caesarea Philippi and was Governor of the Northeastern districts of Iturea, Gaulinitis, Trachonitis, and Decapolis. Most scholars do not believe that he was the same person as the Governor of the northeastern districts
Theater - A large central area was reserved for the local Governor or ruler
Inform - Tertullus informed the Governor against Paul
Communication - The house received a communication from the Governor, respecting the hospital
Galileans - Not long after this time, Judea, which was a Roman province, was added, for civil purposes, to Syria, over which Quirinus was Governor
Architriclinus - " This office is mentioned, John 2:8-9 , upon which Theophylact remarks: "That no one might suspect that their taste was vitiated by having drunk to excess, so as not to know water from wine, our Saviour orders it to be first carried to the Governor of the feast, who certainly was sober; for those who on such occasions are intrusted with this office, observe the strictest sobriety, that they may be able properly to regulate the whole
Thessalonica - When Emilius Paulus, after his conquest of Macedonia, divided the country into four districts, this city as made the capital of the second division, and was the station of a Roman Governor and questor
Pretorium - A name given in the gospels to the house in which dwelt the Roman Governor of Jerusalem, Mark 15:16
Ruler - ...
Notes: (1) In Mark 13:9 ; Luke 21:12 , AV, hegemon, "a leader, a Governor of a province," is translated "ruler" (RV, "governor")
Zerubbabel - The original leader of the Jews was Sheshbazzar (Ezra 1:8; Ezra 5:14), but his leadership was soon replaced by the joint leadership of the Governor Zerubbabel and the high priest Joshua (Ezra 2:2; Haggai 1:1). He was entitled to the throne of Israel, but since Israel was still under Persian rule, he could be no more than Governor
Procurator (2) - ...
Certain of the smaller Imperial provinces (see under Governor) were put under procurators as Governors, to whom the Emperor delegated administrative and military functions. The word ‘procurator’ is not used in the NT, but the participle of the verb (ἐπιτροπεύοντος) occurs as a variant in Luke 3:1 to ἡγεμονεύοντος, a more general term applicable to all Governors of provinces, and even to the Emperor himself. Governor
New York, State of - The Onondaga mission was restored in 1702, but the enforcing of penal laws against Catholics, inaugurated in 1700 by Governor Bellomont of New York, led to the final abandonment of Jesuit-missions in 1709. The first priests to reside in New York City were the English Jesuits, Father Thomas Harvey, Father Henry Harrison, and Father Charles Gage, the first of whom came over in 1683 with the Catholic Governor, Thomas Dongan, appointed by the Duke of York. Mass was first offered in a chapel made available by the Governor at Fort James, just south of the Bowling Green, the present site of the custom house
Kir - The Governor of this province joined Cyrus the Persian in the overthrow of the Babylonian Empire in 539 B
Amon - A Governor of Samaria ( 1 Kings 22:26 )
Pashur - A priest, Immer's son, of the 16th order (1 Chronicles 9:12), "chief Governor in the house of the Lord
Procurator - The Greek agemon , rendered "governor" in the Authorized Version, is applied in the New Testament to the officer who presided over the imperial province of Judea
Ancyra, Seven Martyrs of - When the persecution was determined upon, Theotecnus, a magician, a philosopher and pervert from Christianity, was dispatched as Governor to Galatia to root out Christianity
Tiberius - ...
The author of the name, Christ, in the reign of Tiberias was visited with capital punishment by the Governor Pontius Pilate
Ambrose, Saint - (Greek: immortal) ...
(340-397) Father and Doctor of the Church, bishop of Milan, born in Gaul, his father being Prefect of Gaul (modern France, Britain, Spain, and part of Africa), Ambrose distinguished himself as a lawyer and as consular Governor of Liguria and Æmilia, with residence in Milan
Gabbatha - Let the reader figure to himself this gabbatha, with a seat for the Governor to sit above the people, and probably separated by railing
Judges - It seemed to have been but the mere shadow of authority; for the whole substance was taken into possession by the Roman Governor
City - It is peculiarly called his, because he hath founded it and built it, and dwells in it, and is the Governor of it, and grants to the citizens the privileges and immunities of it
Praetorium - Each prætor, on completing his year of office, went as Governor to a province, and his official residence was called ‘prætorium’; then any house distinguished by size and magnificence, esp
Captain - ...
2: στρατηγός (Strong's #4755 — Noun Masculine — strategos — strat-ay-gos' ) originally the commander of an army (from stratos, "an army," and ago, "to lead"), came to denote "a civil commander, a Governor" (Latin, duumvir), the highest magistrate, or any civil officer in chief command, Acts 16:20,22,35,36,38 ; also the "chief captain" of the Temple, himself a Levite, having command of the Levites who kept guard in and around the Temple, Luke 22:4,52 ; Acts 4:1 ; 5:24,26
Jephthah - Jephthah accepted only after the tribal elders had agreed to his conditions, which were that after he had defeated the enemy, he would remain their leader and rule them as a civil Governor (Judges 11:4-10)
Otho - The historians are unanimous that he was an excellent Governor
Governor - , friend of the king; adjutant; Governor of a province ( 2 Kings 18:24 ; Isaiah 36:9 ; Jeremiah 51 :: 57 ; Ezekiel 23:6,23 ; Daniel 3:2 ; Esther 3 :: 12 ), or a perfect (Nehemiah 3:7 ; 5:14 ; Ezra 5:3 ; Haggai 1:1 ). ...
...
The Chaldean word Segan Is applied to the Governors of the Babylonian satrapies ( Daniel 3:2,27 ; 6:7 ); the prefects over the Magi (2:48). ...
...
Governor of the feast (John 2:9 ), who appears here to have been merely an intimate friend of the bridegroom, and to have presided at the marriage banquet in his stead
Sheshbazzar - The same fact is stated in Ezra 5:14 ; Ezra 5:16 , where Sheshbazzar is designated ‘the Governor’ ( pechâh ), and is also said to have laid the foundations of the Temple (cf. It was quite in accordance with the policy of the Persians to appoint a Jew to act as Governor in Jerusalem, while the name Sheshbazzar , being of Bab. This theory is made more probable by the fact that Zerubbabel succeeded to the Governorship as early as the reign of Darius Hystaspis, b
Joseph - Stephen’s address before the Sanhedrin reference is made to Joseph’s being sold by his brothers, God’s presence with him in Egypt, his promotion to be Governor of the land, his manifestation of himself to his brethren, his invitation to his father and all his kindred to migrate to Egypt (Acts 7:9-14), and finally, at a much later date, the rise of a Pharaoh who ‘knew not Joseph’ (7:18). Though he was an Egyptian Governor, speaking the Egyptian language, and married to an Egyptian wife, he was at heart an unchanged Hebrew, and his dying eyes beheld the land from which he had been exiled as a boy, the homeland of every true Israelite
Herodians - ...
The same coalition appears at the close of Christ's ministry: "the Pharisees sent unto Him their disciples with the Herod" as "spies, feigning themselves just men, that they might take hold of His words, that so they might deliver Him unto the power and authority of the Governor" (Matthew 22:15-16; Mark 12:13; Luke 20:20). With flattering words to Him as "not accepting the person of any" (by which compliment they "tempted" Him to pronounce against Caesar) they asked "Is it lawful for us to give tribute to Caesar?" designing if He said "no" to give Him up to the Roman Governor, if "yes" to stir up the people against Him as violating the law (Deuteronomy 17:15)
Claudius - 44, the emperor again reduced Judea into a province, and sent Cuspius Fadus to be Governor. Paul being brought to Cesarea, where Felix usually resided, was well treated by this Governor, who permitted his friends to see him, and render him services, hoping the Apostle would procure his redemption by a sum of money
Crucifixion - When the Jews wanted to get rid of Jesus, they knew that if they accused him to the Roman Governor of treason, they could call for his crucifixion (Luke 23:1-2; Luke 23:20-21). ...
Jesus’ trial, before both the Jewish Council and the Roman Governor, ignored many of the normal procedures, and was contrary to all accepted standards of justice (Matthew 26:57-68; Matthew 27:11-31; see SANHEDRIN; PILATE). )...
Crucifixion was carried out in a public place outside the city (Matthew 27:31; Matthew 27:33; Matthew 27:39; John 19:20; Hebrews 13:12), though the trial took place inside the city, usually at the Governor’s headquarters (Matthew 27:27; see PRAETORIUM)
Bar-Jesus - The presence of an influential exponent of such a current religious and philosophical system in the train of the comites of a Roman Governor was quite natural; nor is there any need to suppose that Sergius Paulus (who was ‘a man of understanding’) was dominated by the Magian in any other sense than that Bar-Jesus had considerable influence and credit with his patron-on influence he was able to turn to his own private advantage. Hearing of Barnabas and Paul as travelling teachers in the island, the Governor, a highly educated man, interested in science and philosophy, invited them to his court. He took steps to minimize the effect and to retain the Governor’s interest in himself and his system. Amongst Jewish surroundings Paul’s Jewish name ‘Saul’ was used naturally; but ‘by a marvellous stroke of historic brevity’ (Ramsay, 83) the author sets forth by a formula how in the court of the Roman Governor, when the Apostle challenged the system represented by Bar-Jesus, he stood forth as Paul the Roman citizen, a freeborn member of that Greek-Roman world to which he carried his universal gospel
Prince - (Exodus 2:16) So the word is sometimes rendered Governor
Gallio - Sosthenes, the chief ruler of the synagogue, was beaten by the Greeks before Gallio's seat of justice; but this Governor did not concern himself about it
Pash'ur - (Jeremiah 38:4 ) ...
Another person of this name, also a priest, and "chief Governor of the house of the Lord," is mentioned in (Jeremiah 20:1 ) He is described as "the son of Immer
Gedaliah - They then appointed Gedaliah, son of a former Jerusalem official, Governor over those Judeans who remained in the land (2 Kings 25:22; cf
Massachusetts - Moreover Governor John Hancock attended Mass in honor of the Bishop
Johanan - He led the effort against Ishmael, who had assassinated Gedaliah, the Governor Babylon appointed over Judah
Prince - , leaders) in Matthew 2:6 : see Governor , A, No
Templars - In every nation they had a particular Governor, called Master of the Temple, or of the militia of the temple
Maaseiah - Governor of Jerusalem under Josiah ( 2 Chronicles 34:8 )
Zealot - But in AD 6 the Romans replaced Archelaus with a Governor sent out from Rome, and Judea for the first time came under direct Roman rule (cf. ...
In AD 66, bitter at the mismanagement of Jewish affairs by the corrupt Governors of Judea, the Zealots led an open rebellion against Rome
Maaseiah - Governor of Jerusalem during the reign of Josiah (2 Chronicles 34:8 )
Zerubbabel - Under the urging of Haggai (Haggai 1:1 ,Haggai 1:1,1:12-15 ; Haggai 2:1 ,Haggai 2:1,2:20 ) and Zechariah (Zechariah 4:6-10 ), Zerubabel, now Governor (Haggai 1:1 ) in place of Sheshbazzar (Ezra 5:14 ), resume the task (Ezra 5:1-2 ), completed in 515 B
Obadiah - The Governor of Ahab's house
Authorities - It does not seem possible to say precisely what powers are intended, but in the Gospel passage (where the wording is peculiar to Luke) it is probable that the Sanhedrin and the Roman procurator of Judaea would be included, while in the Titus Epistle the reference is to all those set in authority over the people-the Emperor, the Governor and his suite, as well as the local magistrates
Ishmael - Soon after, he returned and assassinated Gedaliah the Governor and many others; but was obliged to flee for his life, Jeremiah 40:1-41:18
Bahamas - Colony of the British Empire, in the British West Indies, administered by a Governor and commander-in-chief, assisted by an executive council, a legislative council, and a representative assembly; area, 4,404 square miles
Tarsus - It was the privilege of such cities that they were governed by their own laws and magistrates, and were not subjected to tribute, to the jurisdiction of a Roman Governor, nor to the power of a Roman garrison, although they acknowledged the supremacy of the Roman people, and were bound to aid them against their enemies
Jeho'Vah - While Elohim exhibits God displayed in his power as the creator and Governor of the physical universe, the name Jehovah designates his nature as he stands in relation to man, as the only almighty, true, personal, holy Being, a spirit and "the father of spirits," ( Numbers 16:22 ) comp
Lord's Prayer, - (1) Filial reverence : God is addressed not as the great unknown, not as the unsearchable Governor, but as a father, the most intelligible, attractive and transforming name
Judea - 6, Judaea was ruled by a procurator subject to the Governor of Syria; he resided at Caesarea on the coast
Pamphilus, Presbyter of Caesarea - ...
In 307 Pamphilus was committed to prison by Urbanus, the persecuting Governor of the city, and for two years was closely confined, cheered by the companionship of his second self, Eusebius (Hieron. Pamphilus sealed his life-long confession of his Master with his blood—"the centre of a brave company, among whom he shone out as the sun among the stars"—in 309, when Firmilianus had succeeded Urbanus as Governor
Joseph - They sold Joseph for a slave, for twenty pieces of silver, and he was carried down into Egypt, and from the pit and the prison he arose, by divine favour, to be Governor over the whole land. But our Joseph was not only sold for thirty pieces of silver, but at length crucified and slain, and from the grave which he made with the wicked and with the rich in his death, by his resurrection and ascension, at the right hand of power, he is become the universal and eternal Governor both of heaven and earth. And though like the brethren of Joseph, little do we at first know, that the Lord of the country is our brother, though in the first awakenings of spiritual want the Governor may seem with us, as Joseph did to them, to speak roughly; yet when the whole comes to be opened tour view, and Jesus is indeed discovered to be Lord of all the land, how, like Joseph's brethren, are we immediately made glad, and eat and drink at his table with him, forgetting all past sorrow in present joy, and partaking of that "bread of life, of which whosoever eateth shall live forever!" Such, among many other striking particularities, are the incidents in the history of the patriarch Joseph, which are highly typical of Christ
Prince (2) - Otherwise it is almost invariably translated ‘governor,’ and, in particular, is used to denote the Roman Governor or procurator. there is a close correspondence between the ‘princes’ (ἡγεμόνες) of Micah 5:6 a and the ‘governor’ (ἡγούμενος) of Micah 5:6 b
New York, City of - , had been hospitably received by Governor Kieft, Dutch Governor of New York. Thomas Dongan, Catholic Governor of New York enacted, 1683, the first law establishing religious liberty passed in New York, and, 1685, the first Catholic educational institution in New York State, the New York Latin School, was established by the Jesuits Father Thomas Harvey, Father Henry Harrison, and Father Charles Gage. The law enacted by Governor Dongan was nullified by the New York Assembly, 1691, and a Bill of Rights passed which excluded Catholics from its provisions; in 1711, another law was passed barring Catholics from office and from franchise
Ananias - Quadratus, Governor of Syria, coming into Judaea, on the rumours which prevailed among the Samaritans and Jews, sent the high priest Ananias to Rome, to vindicate his conduct to the emperor. Paul was sent by the tribune to Caesarea, that Felix, Governor of the province, might take cognizance of the affair. ...
The Apostle's prediction that God would smite Ananias, was thus accomplished: Albinus, Governor of Judaea, being come into that country, Ananias found means to gain him by presents; and Ananias, by reason of this patronage, was considered as the first man of his nation. When any of their companions fell into the hands of the Governors of the province, and were about to be executed, they failed not to seize some domestic or relation of the high priest Ananias, that he might procure the liberty of their associates, in exchange for those whom they detained
Simon - , who suggested to Apollonius, the Governor, to plunder it ( 2M Malachi 3:4 )
Tertullus - He seeks to conciliate the judge by flattering, if not very truthful, allusions to his actions as Governor, particularly to his having established peace in the province (v
Hoshea - Sargon, who came to the throne just before the surrender, had no desire to experiment with more vassal kings, and set an Assyrian Governor over the wasted province
Macedonia - The province at that time included Thessaly, and stretched across to the Adriatic; but Philippi was a colony, not subject to the Governor of the province, and Thessalonica was also a ‘free city,’ with the right of appointing its own magistrates
Degrees, Songs of - The temple was completed under Zerubbabel the Governor and Joshua the high priest, with the help of the prophets Haggai and Zechariah (Ezra 5:1-2; Ezra 6:14)
Mizpah - After the destruction of Jerusalem it became the centre from which Gedaliah, the Governor appointed by Babylon, administered the scattered remains of the former kingdom (2 Kings 25:23; 2 Kings 25:25; Jeremiah 40:6-16; Jeremiah 41)
Beersheba - Till recently the site was deserted by all but Bedouin; now a modern town has sprung up, built from the ruins of the ancient structures, and has been made the seat of a sub-governor
Darius - The prophets Haggai and Zechariah encouraged the people to go on with the work, and when Tattenai, the Persian Governor of Syria, demanded their authority, they alleged a decree of Cyrus. He too appointed Governors in Babylon (cf
Mizpah, Mizpeh - The city was rebuilt by Asa king of Judah, and, after the destruction of Jerusalem, Gedaliah the Governor established himself there
Demetrius - 217), he sent Origen to the Roman Governor of Arabia, at the Governor's earnest invitation ( ib
Mel'Ita - Its chief officer (under the Governor of Sicily) appears from inscriptions to have had the title of protos Melitaion , or Primus Melitensium and this is the very phrase which Luke uses
Lord - A master a person possessing supreme power and authority a ruler a Governor
Pashur - His name is derived from Pashah, to spread; but from his enmity to the people of God while Governor in the land, and his cruelty upon the person of the prophet Jeremiah, the prophet called him Magor-missabib, which the margin of the Bible renders fear round about
Eating - None of the company begin to eat until that the Governor or master of the feast hath broken bread, and craved a blessing. Was not this with an eye to Christ, the bread of life? (John 6:48) A cup is usually washed at the close of the entertainment, and is filled with wine, when the Governor or master of the feast saith, elevating it to the view of the whole company, "Let us bless him, of whose benefits we have been partaking
Roman Empire - The New Testament writers invariably designate the Governors of senatorial provinces by the correct title anthupatoi , proconsuls. ( Acts 13:7 ; 18:12 ; 19:38 ) For the Governor of an imperial province, properly styled "legatus Caesaris," the word hegemon (governor) is used in the New Testament
Prince - ‘chieftain,’ ‘ruler,’ ‘king,’ ‘governor,’ ‘noble,’ ‘deputy. ’ It is applied to the Governor of the palace ( 2 Chronicles 28:7 ), the keeper of the treasury ( 1 Chronicles 26:24 ), the chief of the Temple ( 1 Chronicles 9:11 , 2 Chronicles 31:13 ); also to the chief of a tribe ( 2 Chronicles 19:11 ), the son of a king ( 2 Chronicles 11:22 ), the king himself ( 1 Samuel 25:30 ), the high priest ( Daniel 9:25 ), and is occasionally in AV Nehemiah - Here, in consequence of a report that reaches him regarding the ruined condition of Jerusalem and its people, Nehemiah is, on his own initiative, appointed Governor ( pechah ) of the province of Judæa by the king. Rawlinson proposed to place the Dedication 12 years later, in Nehemiah’ s second Governorship. ...
How long exactly Nehemiah’s first Governorship lasted, and for how great an interval he was absent from Jerusalem, are uncertaio. ’ On the whole it seems probable that Nehemiah 5:14 means that during the twelve years Nehemiah, though absent on court duty, was actually Governor, ruling by deputies; and that in the 32nd year of the king’s reign he again secured leave of absence, and came to Jerusalem (b. 404 358), and suppose that Nehemiah was Governor for the 12 years 384 372, and again at a later period
Zerubbabel - ...
At Babylon he bore the Babylonian or Persian name Shesh-bazzar, being Governor or tirshatha there (Nehemiah 8:9; Nehemiah 10:1; Ezra 1:8-11; Ezra 5:14-16; Nehemiah 7:65). Sheshbazzar laid the foundation of the temple (Zechariah 4:6-10,), answering to Zerubbabel (Zechariah 4:9); "governor of Judah" (Haggai 1:1; Haggai 1:14; Haggai 2:2). Tatnai, Governor on this side the river, and Shethar Boznai and their companions interrogated them, "who hath commanded you to build this house?
Judgments of God - Thus this wicked man, who condemned Christ for fear of disobliging the Romans, was ignominiously turned out of his office by the Roman Governor, whom he had sought to oblige. Flaccus was Governor of Egypt near the time of our Saviour's death, and a violent persecutor of the Jews. Catullus was Governor of Libya about the year seventy-three. About the same time, Saturnius, Governor of Africa, persecuted the Christians and put several of them to death. Aemilian, Governor of Egypt, about two hundred and sixty-three, was a virulent persecutor of the church of Christ. About the same time, Urbanus, Governor of Palestine, who had signalized himself by tormenting and destroying the disciples of Jesus, met with his due reward; for almost immediately after the cruelties committed, the divine vengeance overtook him. Firmilianus, another persecuting Governor met with the same fate
New Jersey - The first priests to visit the scattered Catholics of northern New Jersey were two Jesuits, Father Thomas Harvey and Father Charles Gage, who had come from England in 1682 with Governor Thomas Dongan of New York
New Mexico - In 1692, however, the missions began to be restored under the Governor, Antonio de Vargas, assisted by Father Francisco Corvera and several associates
Megiddo - ...
The site of Megiddo may now be considered as proved to be Tell el-Mutesellim (‘Hill of the Governor’), a great mound about 4 miles N
Eliakim - As Joseph over Pharaoh's palace, Azrikam "governor of Ahaz' house" (2 Chronicles 28:7); chamberlain, treasurer, prefect of the palace (Genesis 41:40), chief minister
Ishmael - A prince of the royal family of Judah, who murdered the Governor Gedaliah, with several of the Hebrews and Chaldeans who were attached to him
Hananiah - Governor of ‘the castle,’ who, together with Hanani, was appointed by Nehemiah to the ‘charge over Jerusalem’ ( Nehemiah 7:2 )
Seal, Sealing - ...
The seal of a Governor was worn by him, or carried about his person in the most secure manner possible
ma-Ase'Iah - (2 Chronicles 28:7 ) ...
The Governor of Jerusalem in the reign of Josiah
Haggai - There they began to establish a new community under the leadership of the Governor Zerubbabel and the high priest Joshua (Ezra 1:1-4; Ezra 2:1-2)
Probus, Sextus Anicius Petronius - Ambrose, then a young advocate, as one of his council, and afterwards appointed him Governor of Liguria and Aemilia with the rank of consular
Galba - 31 or 32 he was for one year legatus pro praetore (governor) of the province of Aquitania (S. Having been thereafter appointed legatus pro praetore prouinciœ Germaniœ Superioris (governor of S. His last ordinary promotion was to the Governorship of the province of Hispania Tarraconensis, which he held for eight years, from a
Passover, the - The Governor broke one of the cakes of unleavened bread, and gave thanks. The Governor rehearsed Psalm 115 , Ps
Achaia - ‘Proconsul’ (ἀνθύπατος, Acts 18:12) was therefore the Governor’s correct official title at the time of St. ...
‘In gratitude for the recognition which his artistic contributions had met with in the native land of the Muses … [1] declared the Greeks collectively to be rid of Roman government, free from tribute, and, like the Italians, subject to no Governor. ]'>[2] ), where the Governor had his official residence
Caesarea - ‘In the demonstration of the Spirit and of power,' the mighty advocate for the Christian faith had before ‘reasoned of righteousness, temperance, and judgment to come,' till the Roman Governor, Felix, trembled as he spoke. The judge had trembled before his prisoner; and now a second occasion offered, in which, for the admiration and the triumph of the Christian world, one of the bitterest persecutors of the name of Christ, and a Jew, appeals, in the public tribunal of a large and populous city, to all its chiefs and its rulers, its Governor and its king, for the truth of his conversion founded on the highest evidence
Trajan - Young Trajan served as military tribune under his father, who was Governor of the important province Syria, in the year 76. After a period of inaction he was, at the election of Nerva as Emperor in 96, appointed Governor of the mountainous part of Germany (provincia Germania Superior), to secure a new frontier to the Empire, taking in the Agri Decumates (modern Schwarzwald, Black Forest). Plinius Caecilius Secundus, Governor of the province Bithynia-Pontus about 111-113
Zerubbabel - He was the leader of one of the bands that returned from the Captivity ( Ezra 2:2 , Nehemiah 7:7 ), and was at one time pechah or ‘governor’ of Judah ( Zechariah 3:8-1070 etc
Jebus - ) In Zechariah 9:7 "Ekron (shall be) as a Jebusite," the sense is, Even the ignoble remnant of the Jews shall be sacred to "our God" and "as a Governor in Judah," whereas Philistine "Ekron" shall be a tributary bond servant "as a Jebusite," in the servile position to which Solomon consigned them (1 Kings 9:20-21)
Lawyer - Paul’s prosecutors before the Roman Governor Felix (Acts 24:1 ff
Captain - Rendered "chief," Genesis 40:2 ; 41:9 ; rendered also "prince," Daniel 1:7 ; "ruler," Judges 9:30 ; "governor,' 1 Kings 22:26
Josh'ua - ) ...
A Governor of the city who gave his name to a gate of Jerusalem
Artaxerxes - His other significant decision in favour of the Jerusalem Jews came in the twentieth year of his reign, when he appointed Nehemiah Governor and gave him full imperial support to rebuild and secure the city (Nehemiah 2:1-8)
Lawyer - Paul’s prosecutors before the Roman Governor Felix (Acts 24:1 ff
Opposition - Though the Roman Governor fully realized that this opposition was dictated by envy, and that Christ was innocent of any thought of treason against the Roman government, yet he was afraid, from motives of personal interest, to give a decision in accordance with his convictions
Census - A "taxing" under Cyrenius, Governor of Syria, is recorded Luke 2:1; a disturbance caused by one Judas of Galilee "in the days of the taxing" is referred to in Acts 5:37. ...
Zumpt moreover has recently brought to light the interesting fact that, owing to Cilicia when separated from Cyprus being joined to Syria Quirinus as Governor of Cilicia was also Governor of Syria; his subsequent special connection with Syria caused his earlier and briefer one to be thus specified. The word "first" too is to be noticed: "this taxing," ordered by Augustus just before Jesus' birth, was interrupted by the Jews' bitter opposition, and "was first carried into effect" when Cyrenius was Governor of Syria; grammatically the Greek expresses, "this taxing took place as a first one while Cyrenius was Governor of Syria" (Ellicott)
Banquet - When the assembly was nearly full, the Governor of Kashan, a man of humble mien, although of considerable rank, came in and seated himself at the lowest place; when the master of the house, after numerous expressions of welcome, pointed with his hand to an upper seat in the assembly, to which he desired him to move, and which he accordingly did. ...
The entertainment was conducted by a symposiarch, or Governor of the feast. Such, we have reason to believe, was the Governor of the feast at the marriage in Cana of Galilee, which our Lord honoured with his presence. The term αρχιτρικλινος literally signifies the Governor of a place furnished with three beds; and he acted as one having authority; for he tasted the wine before he distributed it to the company, which, it is universally admitted, was one of the duties of a symposiarch. Neither the name nor the act accords with the character and situation of a guest; he must, therefore, have been the symposiarch, or Governor of the feast
Roman Law - The representative and executor of Roman law in the Gospels is, of course, Pontius Pilate, who served as the Roman procurator, or Governor, of Judea during the years A. In modern-day terminology, Pilate was a “military Governor” overseeing a province known as a seed-bed of rebellion. While Roman citizens possessed the right of appeal to Caesar, provincial subjects had little to protect them against abuses of the life and death power wielded by proconsuls and lesser Governors such as Pilate. ...
Roman Governors normally looked to a number of detailed statutes to define major offenses or felonies against persons, society, and government. In any case involving a peregrinus , a Roman Governor such as Pilate would have been free to proceed based upon his imperium and his own good judgment. Following the cognitio , the Governor would then render his verdict in the form of a sentence to a particular punishment
Pilate - Complaint was made to Vitellius, the legatus of Syria, who seems at this time to have had authority over the Governor of Judæa. ...
Except at the times of the great feasts the Governors usually stayed at Cæsarea; but Pilate was probably present with reinforcements to repress any disorder during the Passover, and had his headquarters in the fortress known as the Tower of Antonia, which adjoined the Temple on the N. In the main it was a great benefit, but it enabled the provincials to intimidate a weak Governor. But the province ranked only as a ‘minor imperial province’; its Governor was a procurator, not a legatus or prœfectus , and to control the difficult elements in the population he had only 3000 troops, quartered usually at Cæsarea, besides small detachments used to garrison Jerusalem and Sebaste. The Governor usually went up to Jerusalem for the Passover time, but he must have felt that in face of a sudden national movement he would be powerless; and it is no small testimony to Roman powers of administration that for 60 years the series of procurators in Judæa managed to postpone more serious conflicts
Province - Prouincia is in fact ‘a sphere of duty,’ whether that be in an office or court, like that of the urban praetor at Rome, or that of a Governor of a vast district. From Cicero’s letters we learn much of the details of his own government of the province Cilicia, where he was Governor in the year 51-50 b. For the Imperial period we have the correspondence between Pliny, Governor of Bithynia-Pontus, and the Emperor Trajan (c. For the most part, no doubt, the conditions in the provinces were the same in both periods, with the exception that in the later period extortion by Governors was for various reasons much less frequent. The king was subordinate to the Governor of the province Syria. A definite allowance (salarium) was now given to Governors of provinces, and this must have lessened extortion somewhat. The legions in the Imperial provinces had their own military commanders (legatus legionis) apart from the Governors. One of the secrets of Rome’s success was that her Governors were always content to let well alone
Islands, Philippine - Republic in the Malay Archipelago, administered by a Governor-general appointed by the President of the United States and a local legislature. The natives, attracted by the zealous lives of these priests were converted to Christianity in great numbers, and the missionaries were an active influence of peace, upholding the cause of the people against the injustices of the civilgovernors
Oregon - Here another distinguished convert, the Honerable Peter Burnett, later the first American Governor of California, was baptized by Reverend P de Vos, S
Lebanon - ...
The Lebanon range is now inhabited by a population of about 300,000 Christians, Maronites, and Druses, and is ruled by a Christian Governor
Banquet - At private banquets the master of the house presided; but on public occasions a "governor of the feast" was chosen (John 2:8 )
Syria, Syrian - ...
The only Governor of Syria mentioned in the New Testament is Cyrenius, q
Ruler - The word ‘ruler,’ however, generally represents ἄρχων or some derived word, and the general idea behind ἄρχων is that of a magistrate of a city, whereas ἡγεμών, suggests rather a Governor of a country (see Government). In Romans 13:3 magistrates (and possibly also Governors and the Emperor) are referred to
Hoshea (2) - " Sargon in the Assyrian inscriptions thus writes: "Samaria I looked at, I captured; 27,280 men (or families) who dwelt in it I carried away; I appointed a Governor over them, and continued the tribute of the former people": like Julius Caesar's memorable "I came, I saw, I conquered
Dog - my soul (literally, my unique one, unique in its preciousness) from the Jewish rabble; as "deliver My soul from the sword" is Messiah's cry for deliverance from the Roman soldiery and Governor
Sumer - Political power was held by the free citizens of the city and a Governor, called ensi
Innocents - They quoted to him the words of Micah (Micah 5:2), who speaks of the Governor ruling Israel, who is to come out of Bethlehem in Judah, the city of David
Stoics - Their distinguishing tenets were, that God is underived, incorruptible, and eternal; possessed of infinite wisdom and goodness: the efficient cause of all the qualities and forms of things; and the constant preserver and Governor of the world: That matter, in its original elements, is also underived and eternal; and is by the powerful energy of the Deity impressed with motion and form: That though God and matter subsisted from eternity, the present regular frame of nature had a beginning originating in the gross and dark chaos, and will terminate in a universal conflagration, that will reduce the world to its pristine state: That at this period all material forms will be lost in one chaotic mass; and all animated nature be reunited to the Deity: That from this chaotic state, however, the world will again emerge by the energy of the efficient principle; and gods, and men, and all forms of regulated nature be renewed and dissolved, in endless succession: And that after the revolution of the great year all things will be restored, and the race of men will return to life
Caiaphas - ...
Two years after this, Vitellus, Governor of Syria, coming to Jerusalem at the passover, was received very magnificently by the people
Common, Commonly - ...
(4) In Matthew 27:27 , what the AV describes as "the common hall," is the praetorium, RV, "palace," the official residence of the Governor of a Province (marg
Peraea - Manasseh was made Governor after the disaster to Cestius (II
Joshua - Governor of the city of Jerusalem in the days of Josiah
Hasmonean - Maccabee was the nickname given to the early warriors, and Hasmonean, a variant to Asmoneus the great-grandfather of Mattathias, was used as a reference for the sons and grandchildren of Mattathias who would rule as Governors, kings, and queen of ancient Palestine. Indeed, it was Simon who initially assumed the office of high priest and combined it with his role as Governor/general of Judea. ...
His son, John Hyrcanus I, succeeded Simon and continued to hold dual offices of Governor and high priest
Pontus - In the preceding year the kingdom ceased to exist, and part of it was incorporated in the Roman Empire under the name Pontus, and this district henceforth constituted one-half of the combined province Bithynia-Pontus, which was put under one Governor. At that time the younger Pliny was Governor of the province Bithynia-Pontus, and addressed inquiries to the Emperor Trajan on the manner in which Christians ought to be treated by the administration
Malachi - He supported or followed up the Governor Nehemiah in the restoration of the national polity civil and religious, as Haggai and Zechariah previously had supported Joshua the high priest and Zerubbabel the civil Governor in building the temple, Malachi (Zechariah 1:10; Zechariah 3:1-10) presupposes the temple already built. The Jews were now in Jerusalem (Malachi 2:11); the Persian "governor" (pechah , pasha' ; Malachi 1:8) was there, the altar (Malachi 1:7) and temple rebuilt (Malachi 2:13; Malachi 3:1), the sacrifices and feasts celebrated (Malachi 1:13-14; Malachi 2:3)
Pilate - " The procurator was generally a Roman knight, acting under the Governor of a province as collector of the revenue, and judge in cases arising under it. But Pontius Pilate had full military and judicial authority in Judas, as being a small province attached to the larger Syria; he was responsible to the Governor of Syria. 6), Subinus, Coponius, Ambivius, Rufus, Valerius Gratus, and Pontius Pilate successively were Governors (Josephus, Governors (Josephus, Governors to bring their wives into the provinces having been rejected (Tacitus, Governor of Syria, and sent to Rome to answer before Caesar
Leo Xiii, Pope - As civilgovernor of Benevento he stamped out brigandage and reformed the system of taxation. As Governor of Perugia, he reformed the educational system and established a savings bank and loan system to help the workers
Dispersion - Forty years after Peter's martyrdom, Pliny, Roman Governor of Pontus and Bithynia, writing to the emperor Trajan, says: "the contagion (Christianity) has seized not only cities, but the smaller towns and country, so that the temples are nearly forsaken and the sacred rites intermitted
Artaxerxes - Artaxerxes Longimanus, who was noted among the Persian kings for wisdom and right feeling, sanctioned Nehemiah's going as civil Governor
Bithynia - In the 2nd century Pliny the Younger, its Governor, wrote the letter still extant to the emperor Trajan: "in the case of those Christians who were brought before me I adopted this method
Samaritan Pentateuch - Besides the Pentateuch in Phoenician characters, there is another in the language which was spoken at the time that Manasseh, first high priest of the temple of Gerizim, and son-in-law of Sanballat, Governor of Samaria, under the king of Persia, took shelter among the Samaritans
Lycaonia - 64 by Pompey, the north part was added to Galatia, the south-east to Cappadocia, and the west was added to the Roman Empire, to be administered by the Governor of the Roman province Cilicia
Vitellius - After having superintended various public works, he was sent by Galba to northern Germany as Governor
Shiloh - Now the lawgiver is departed, and the sceptre also; for they have no law, nor king, nor Governor
Forty Martyrs, the - The emperor having ordained that the military police of the cities should offer sacrifices, the Governor called upon these forty to comply
Constantius i, Flavius Valerius, Emperor - Distinguished by ability, valour, and virtue, Constantius became Governor of Dalmatia under the emperor Carus, who was prevented by death from making him his successor
Tax Taxing Taxation - The Jews had also to defray the charges of the Governor by supplying his table, and by a money payment
Judas - In company with one Sadoc, he attempted to excite a sedition among the Jews, but was destroyed by Quirinus, or Cyrenius, at that time Governor of Syria and Judea, Acts 5:37
pi'Late - No previous Governor had ventured on such an outrage
God - ( Genesis 17:1 ; 28:3 ; Exodus 6:3 ) The etymology is uncertain, but it is generally agreed that the primary idea is that of strength, power of effect , and that it properly describes God in that character in which he is exhibited to all men in his works, as the creator, sustainer and supreme Governor of the world
Petrus, Bishop of Apamea - The first formal complaint against him was made before count Eutychianus, Governor of the province, by the clergy of Apamea, substantiated by their affidavits ( ib
Aretas - The belated expedition which Vitellius, Governor of Syria, at Tiberius’ command, led against Petra, had only got as far as Jerusalem, when the tidings of the Emperor’s death (a. In recalling this fact he mentions a detail (2 Corinthians 11:32) which the writer of Acts omits, namely, that it was the Governor (ἐθνάρχης) under Aretas the king who-doubtless at the instigation of the Jews-guarded the city to take him
Malachi, Theology of - , the Jewish remnant led by Zerubbabel the Governor was able to complete the rebuilding of the temple by 515 b. When Nehemiah came to Judah as Governor in 445 b. Since several of these sins are mentioned in Malachi, the book may have been written while Nehemiah was Governor or after he returned to Persia in 433 b
Government - Under the Persians Judah was a subdistrict of the great province west of the Euphrates and subject to its Governor ( Ezra 5:3 ). It had also its local Governor ( Nehemiah 5:14 ), with a measure of local independence ( Ezra 10:14 ); we read, too, of a special official ‘at the king’s hand in all matters concerning the people’ ( Nehemiah 11:24 ). 142, Simon is declared to be ‘high priest, captain, and Governor for ever’ ( 1618835933_46 ). The title ‘ethnarch’ (see Governor) is used of him and other high priests
Cyprus - Cyprus had been an imperial province, and governed by the emperor's "lieutenants"; but the emperor transferred it to the senate, and so Luke accurately designates its Governor, as under the senate, "proconsul," anthupatos (Dion Cassius, 53:12; 54:4)
Darius - Some are of opinion that the name "Darius" is simply a name of office, equivalent to "governor," and that the "Gobryas" of the inscriptions was the person intended by the name
Mizpah, Mizpeh - At Mizpah Gedaliah, who had been appointed Governor of the province, sought to encourage those who had remained behind (Jeremiah 40:1 )
Master - gubernare, ‘govern’), ‘governor
Joshua - A Governor of the city who gave his name to a gate of Jerusalem, 2 Kings 23:8, in the reign of Josiah, b
Felix - At the second Paul, before Felix and Drusilla, Felix's Jewish wife, who was curious to "hear him concerning the faith of Christ," so reasoned of "righteousness and temperance (both of which Felix outraged as a Governor and a man, having seduced from her husband) and judgment to come" that Felix "trembled" before his prisoner, but deferred repentance, saying, "when I have a convenient season I will call for thee
San Francisco, California, City of - Burnett, who became the first American Governor of California and was later Justice of the Supreme Court of California and president of the Pacific Bank of San Francisco;
Charles Warren Stoddard, author and journalist;
Garret W
Mock, Mocker, Mocking - The word is used (a) prophetically by the Lord, of His impending sufferings, Matthew 20:19 ; Mark 10:34 ; Luke 18:32 ; (b) of the actual insults inflicted upon Him by the men who had taken Him from Gethsemane, Luke 22:63 ; by Herod and his soldiers, Luke 23:11 ; by the soldiers of the Governor, Matthew 27:29,31 ; Mark 15:20 ; Luke 23:36 ; by the chief priests, Matthew 27:41 ; Mark 15:31
Jehoshaphat - Others dealt solely with civil matters, and these were under the control of the chief Governor (2 Chronicles 19:4-11)
Master - gubernare, ‘govern’), ‘governor
Trial of Jesus - They fabricated three additional charges against Jesus which would be of concern to a Roman Governor (Luke 23:2 ). ...
When Herod returned Jesus to Pilate, the Roman Governor announced that he still found Jesus innocent of charges of treason
Darius - Codomanus offered himself for the combat, and overcame the challenger, and was made Governor of Armenia. While he was preparing for this conflict, Bessus, Governor of Bactria, and Narbazanes, a grandee of Persia, seized him, loaded him with chains, forced him into a covered chariot, and fled, carrying him with them toward Bactria
Tiberius - ]'>[1] Tiberius’ first consulship was passed in Rome in 13, and in the next year he succeeded Agrippa as Governor of Pannonia, where he conducted campaigns in 11 and 10. A serious disagreement between Germanicus and Piso, the Governor of Syria, was followed by the death of the former on 10th October 19. In 26 Tiberius finally left Rome, and from this date the office of praefectus urbi (governor of Rome) became a permanent institution of the Empire. Vitellius, Governor of Syria
Nero - Iulius Vindex, Governor of Gallia Lugudunensis, with whom Galba, the Governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, allied himself. Vindex was defeated by Verginius Rufus, Governor of Southern Germany, but Galba became Emperor. Real progress was made under the Governorship of Suetonius Paulinus, who in 61 captured Mona (Anglesey). The new Governor of Cappadocia, Lucius Caesennius Paetus, proved incompetent, and his army had to capitulate
God - The name of the Creator and the supreme Governor of the universe
Judah - When Judah's exiles returned from Babylon, Zerubbabel was Governor of Judah; Tattenai, satrap of Abarnaharah or Beyond the River; and Ushtannu, satrap of Babylon and Abarnaharah
Interpreter - The church of Christ now, which those sons of Israel then represented, when standing before our Governor, do not always know, that our Almighty Joseph knows, hears, and regards all; and yet, while carrying on his many offices, how often doth he commune with his people, both with and without mediums! Well might John behold him with his many crowns upon his head; for surely every office of his, in every individual sinner saved by him, demands a new crown of glory
King, - The word is applied in the Bible to God as the sovereign and ruler of the universe, and to Christ the Son of God as the head and Governor of the Church
Haggai - and established the kingdom of Persia, the Hebrews came under a Persian Governor. Then Darius appointed Zerubbabel as Governor with the specific responsibility of resuming work on the Temple, begun earlier by Shesh-bazzar
Pilate - The evangelists call him Governor, though in reality he was nothing more than procurator of Judea, not only because Governor was a name of general use, but because Pilate, in effect, acted as one, by taking upon him to judge in criminal matters, as his predecessors had done, and as other procurators in the small provinces of the empire, where there was no proconsul, constantly did
Sanhedrin - Generally, the Roman Governor allowed the Sanhedrin considerable autonomy and authority
Quirinius - ’ The first statement is probably true, but it is likely that the second is what the author meant, because it is certain that a census took place during the Governorship of Syria by Quirinius (a. Further, we have ancient authority that the Governor of Syria from b. Mommsen considered that the most probable period for his earlier Governorship was b
Meshach - " Daniel, when promoted to be chief Governor over all the wise men of Babylon and ruler over the whole province, remembered his three friends (contrast Genesis 40:23; Ecclesiastes 9:15-16; Amos 6:6); and at his request the king set them over the affairs of the province of Babylon (Daniel 2:48-49)
Lydda - It was captured and burned by the Syrian Governor, Cestius Gallus, on his march to Jerusalem (a
Census - It has been proved that Cyrenius (Quirinius) was twice Governor of Syria, which removes all difficulty as to the date of the census in Luke 2:1-5
Claudia - ) and the father of the Claudia who had adopted the name (cognomen) Rufina from Pomponia the wife of Aulus Plautins, the Roman Governor of Britain (a
Habibus, Deacon, Martyr at Edessa - Hereupon, Habib went to Edessa and presented himself privately to Theotecnus, the head of the Governor's household. Habib, believing that cowardice would endanger his eternal salvation, persisted in surrender, and was led before the Governor
Honor - The troops honored the Governor with a salute
Zerub'Babel - " It is probable that he was in the king of Babylon's service, both from his having, like Daniel and the three children, received a Chaldee name, Sheshbazzar, and from the fact that he was appointed by the Persian king to the office of Governor of Judea
Account - " See CHIEF , COUNT , ESTEEM , Governor , JUDGE , RULE , SUPPOSE THINK
Damascus - 635; became a provincial capital of the Turkish empire, 1516; and is now the residence of a Turkish Governor
Daniel - Here Daniel soon displayed his prophetic gifts in interpreting a dream of Nebuchadnezzar, by whom he was made Governor of Babylon, and head of the learned and priestly class
Jeremiah - He accordingly went to Mizpah with Gedaliah, who had been made Governor of Judea
Sarbelius, a Edessan Martyr - The Acts then relate how the Governor Licinius brought Sarbelius before him and commanded him to sacrifice
Zechariah, Theology of - ), references to Joshua the high priest and Zerubbabel the Davidic Governor, encouragement to rebuild the temple, and a mixture of oracles and visions. Since he was a Davidic descendant (son of the last king of Judah, Jehoiachin) he was qualified to be the first Governor. Zerubbabel, Sheshbazzar's nephew and Jehoiachin's grandson, became the second Governor. Together Haggai and Zechariah joined in common cause to encourage Zerubbabel, the Davidic Governor, and Joshua, the Zadokite high priest, to complete this important building project (Zechariah 4:9 ). And Zerubbabel did serve as God's signet ring by carrying out divine plans in his capacity as Governor of Judah
Pilate - He was in a position of subordination to the Governor of the province of Syria, but the exact nature of the subordination is not known. Thus in Jerusalem the Sanhedrin retained many judicial functions; death sentences, however, had to be confirmed by the Governor, and were carried out under his supervision (John 18:31; Josephus Ant. They were therefore compelled to resort to the Governor’s power. He was not of the stuff of which heroes are made, though doubtless in many respects a competent Governor. So many were put to death that the Samaritans appealed to Vitellius, the then Governor of the province of Syria. The Governor ordered Pilate to Rome, to appear before the Emperor’s council
Title on the Cross - With reference to (1) Westcott (on John 19:19) remarks: ‘The Roman Governor found expression to the last for the bitterness which had been called out in him by the opposition of the Jews … the heathen Governor completed the unwilling testimony of the Jewish priest’ (John 11:49 f
Nero - , was appointed by Nero to conduct the campaign, and the Governor of Syria and the other officials and client-princes in the neighbourhood of Armenia were instructed to co-operate with him. It was in his reign that the justly aroused rebellion under Boudicca (better known by the incorrect form Boadicea) in East Anglia was crushed, after terrible massacres by the Britons, by the Governor Suetonius Paulinus (60)
Arabia - Paul relates how ‘the Governor’ (ὁ ἐθνάρχης) of Damascus ‘under Aretas the king’ was foiled in the attempt, probably made at the instigation of the Jews, to put him under arrest soon after his conversion (2 Corinthians 11:32 f. 106 the Governor of Syria, Aulus Cornelius Palma, broke up the dominion of the Nabataean kings, and constituted the Roman province of Arabia, while Damascus was added to Syria
Thecla - They also advised him to bring Paul before Castelius the Governor on the charge of teaching "the new doctrine of the Christians," which (they assured him) would ensure his execution. Paul being called on by the Governor for his defence delivered a speech not answering the specific charge of Thamyris but declaring his gospel message and pleading his mission from God. The Governor committed him to prison until it was convenient to hear him more attentively. Paul was immediately dragged again before the Governor pursued by the multitude with the cry "He is a sorcerer! Away with him!" Thecla was summoned likewise and followed him exultingly to the tribunal. Baffled and enraged the Syriarch brought her before the Roman Governor who condemned her to be cast to wild beasts; committing her meanwhile to the care of Tryphaena a widow lady (afterwards described as a queen and kinswoman of the emperor) who having lately lost her daughter Falconilla found comfort in the charge of the condemned maiden who converted her to Christ. After a series of marvellous escapes from the beasts Thecla interrogated by the Governor made profession of her faith: "I am a handmaid of the living God and I believe in His Son in Whom He is well pleased; and therefore it is that none of the beasts hath touched me
Gibeon - Fleeing from justice, Ishmael, the murderer of the Babylonian-appointed “governor” Gedaliah, was overtaken at Gibeon (Jeremiah 41:1 )
Rabbah - Nebuchadnezzar attacked Ammon because of Baalis their king having instigated Ishmael to slay Gedaliah the Chaldaean Governor (Jeremiah 40:14)
Malachi - He was joined in 445 BC by another Jew from Persia, Nehemiah, who became Judea’s new Governor (Nehemiah 2:1-8)
Jailor - The person so designated occupied the position of supreme authority as Governor of the prison (cf
Sosthenes - Paul was that ‘the Greeks, who always hated the Jews, took advantage of the marked snub which the Governor had inflicted on them, to seize and beat Sosthenes, who had been appointed to replace Crispus as Archisynagogos,’-a ‘piece of “Lynch law,” which probably seemed to him [2] to be a rough sort of justice’ (Ramsay, St
Bond - 85]'>[2], where the Governor of Egypt ordered the bond to be ‘crossed out’ [3])
High - The Governor made himself merry with his high and threatening language
Aceldama - Had the Sanhedrim foreseen such a thing, no doubt they would have been beforehand with Joseph and Nicodemus, and prevailed upon the Governor to deny
Court - If the population grew, the king or Governor often decided to enclose the new quarter by surrounding it with a wall and incorporating the section into the existing city, in order to protect the population from bandits and warriors
Praetorium - prœtorium, which originally meant the tent of the commander of an army, and then the official residence of a provincial Governor; other senses, such as that of the Imperial bodyguard or even of a spacious country house, were gradually acquired
Revela'Tion of st. John, - He is also a fellow sufferer with those whom he addresses, and the authorized channel of the most direct and important communication that was ever made to the Seven Churches of Asia, of which churches John the apostle was at that time the spiritual Governor and teacher
Josephus, Catholicos of Armenia - , and the Governor of Armenia was an Armenian Christian Vasag, prince of the Siounians (442–452)
Praetorium - prœtorium, which originally meant the tent of the commander of an army, and then the official residence of a provincial Governor; other senses, such as that of the Imperial bodyguard or even of a spacious country house, were gradually acquired
Jews - He was called "the prince of Judah," and was appointed their Governor by Cyrus, and with his permission carried back a part of the gold and silver vessels which Nebuchadnezzar had taken out the temple of Jerusalem. But it was in the reign of Artaxerxes Longimanus, called in Scripture Ahasuerus, that Ezra obtained his commission, and was made Governor of the Jews in their own land, which government he held thirteen years: then Nehemiah was appointed with fresh powers, probably through the interest of Queen Esther; and Ezra applied himself solely to correcting the canon of the Scriptures, and restoring and providing for the continuance of the worship of God in its original purity. Though this second temple, or, as it is sometimes called, the temple of Zerubbabel, who was at that time Governor of the Jews, was of the same size and dimensions as the first, or Solomon's temple, yet it was very inferior to it in splendour and magnificence; and the ark of the covenant, the Shechinah, the holy fire upon the altar, the Urim and Thummim, and the spirit of prophecy, were all wanting to this temple of the remnant of the people. Judea continued subject to the kings of Persia about two hundred years; but it does not appear that it had a separate Governor after Nehemiah. From his time it was included in the jurisdiction of the Governor of Syria, and under him the high priest had the chief authority. Luke called Cyrenius, president of Syria, to reduce the countries over which Archelaus had reigned, to the form of a Roman province; and appointed Coponius, a Roman of the equestrian order, to be Governor, under the title of procurator of Judea, but subordinate to the president of Syria. He died in the seventh year of his reign, and left a son called also Agrippa, then seventeen years old; and Claudius, thinking him too young to govern his father's extensive dominions, made Cuspus Fadus Governor of Judea. It was this younger Agrippa, who was also called king, before whom Paul pleaded at Caesarea, which was at that time the place of residence of the Governor of Judea. Several of the Roman Governors severely oppressed and persecuted the Jews; and at length, in the reign of Nero, and in the government of Florus, who had treated them with greater cruelty than any of his predecessors, they openly revolted from the Romans
Census - ‘This was the first enrolment made when Quirinius was Governor of Syria. This was quite different from the fiscal statistics compiled annually under the direction of the provincial Governors of the Roman Empire, papers dealing with which have also been found. The tense of ἁπογράφεσθαι rather signifies that a census of this nature on the household-enrolment principle was to be the practice, this being the first occasion of its being ordered; which precisely tallies with the following verse when rightly rendered, ‘This was the first enrolment made at the time when Quirinius was Governor of Syria
Evil - To others the question concerning the origin of evil appeared so intricate and difficult, that, finding themselves unequal to the solution of it, they denied either that there is any God at all, or, at least, any author or Governor of the world. And thus all sorts of evils have entered into the world, without any diminution to the infinite goodness of its Creator and Governor
Crete - Under the Romans it became part of a double province Crete with Cyrene, under a Governor with the title “proconsul,” who ruled the island and the opposite coast of North Africa from the Roman capital Gortyna
Temple, the Second - On the invitation of Zerubbabel, the Governor, who showed them a remarkable example of liberality by contributing personally 1,000 golden darics (probably about ,000), besides other gifts, the people with great enthusiasm poured their gifts into the sacred treasury (Ezra 2 )
Banquets - A "governor of the feast" was appointed (John 2:8-9)
Zechariah, Book of - They settled in Jerusalem under the leadership of the Governor Zerubbabel and the high priest Joshua, and set about rebuilding the city and the temple (Ezra 1:1-4; Ezra 2:1-2)
Gaza - New Gaza (ἡ νέα Γάζα) was built by Gabinius, Governor of Syria (Jos
Spies - So Luke 20:20 tells how the chief priests and scribes watched and ‘sent forth spies, which feigned themselves to be righteous, that they might take hold of his speech, so as to deliver him up to the rule and to the authority of the Governor
Magistrate - The former term is the more general of the two, but an examination of the two passages suggests that ἀρχαί is an allusion to magistrates, while ἐξονσίαι is rather a reference to Governors, if indeed we can distinguish words which had long been used by Greek-speaking Jews of the world of spirits. So in the provinces the Governor had to try the most important cases, both civil and criminal, while ordinary cases were doubtless left to the judicial machinery already in existence in the province
Ishmael - He treacherously slew Gedaliah, whom the king of Babylon had made Governor over the cities of Judah, and all the Jews that were with him in Mizpah
Anger (Wrath) of God - ’ Moreover, God is righteous , a moral Governor and lawgiver, demanding obedience and punishing transgression of His commands
Euthymius (4), Abbat in Palestine - In 428 the church of his laura was consecrated by Juvenal, the first patriarch of Jerusalem, accompanied by the presbyter Hesychius and the celebrated Passarion, Governor of a monastery in Jerusalem
Daniel the Prophet - He made Daniel ruler over the whole of Babylon and chief Governor over all the wise men of Babylon
Bouddhists - They suppose, however, that there is always some superior deity, who has attained to this elevation by religious merit; but they do not regard him as the Governor of the world
Philippi - ]'>[1] Serjeants ), but also a jurisdiction independent of that of the Governor of the province
Porphyrius, Patriarch of Antioch - 18, 404, sentencing all who refused communion with Arsacius, Theophilus, and Porphyry to be expelled from the churches, and instructing the Governor of the province to forbid their holding meetings elsewhere (Soz
Nehemiah, Theology of - He continually requests that God remember his faithful Acts during his Governorship. Courageously the Governor faces them with the wrongs they have done. He disdains to take his legal right as Governor to require a subsidy from the people for his official expenses. He did not consider common labor beneath his dignity as a Governor, but diligently applied himself to the work on the wall (5:16)
Vespasian - Cestius Gallus, Governor of Syria, after a short success against Jerusalem, was forced to retire. The precise status conferred upon Vespasian is uncertain; he was to co-operate with Licinius Mucianus, the competent but ambitious Governor of Syria. The charm of Titus had brought the two erstwhile jealous Governors into friendly relations; so that it may be said that Titus got the Empire for his father. of Commagene revolted from Rome, but was defeated and captured by the Governor of Syria, Caesennius Paetus. Julius Agricola, later the Governor of Britain. It was probably in the same year that Agricola’s period as Governor of Britain began; before its end he had almost destroyed the Ordovices and recovered the island Mona (probably Anglesey) for the Romans
Judah - For when in the hall of Pilate Jesus stood before the Governor, and the Governor asked him, saying, "Art thou the king of the Jews?" Jesus acknowledged it, and said unto him, Thou sayest. Out of Machir came down Governors, and out of Zebulon they that handle the Shebeth of the Scribes. The Governors of Machir, and the pen of the writer of Zebulon, are put in parallel rank of equal dignity and importance
Catholic Indian Missions of the United States - These continued, although destroyed and restored several times until 1704 when Governor Moore and the Lower Creeks utterly demolished all the southeastern missions
Gate - "All complaints," says Host, "are brought, in the first instance, to the cadi, or Governor, who, for that purpose, passes certain hours of the day in the gate of the city, partly for the sake of the fresh air, and partly to see all those who go out; and, lastly, to observe a custom which has long prevailed, of holding judgment there
Daniel - He soon became known for his skill in the interpretation of dreams (1:17; 2:14), and rose to the rank of Governor of the province of Babylon, and became "chief of the Governors" (Chald
Nehemiah, the Book of - Nehemiah was Governor for 12 years (Nehemiah 12:14), then in Artaxerxes' 32nd year returned to his post as "cupbearer"; he "at the end of days" (margin, so 1 Samuel 27:7 "a full year," margin "a year of days") after a full year obtained leave to return; "all this time," namely, a year, Nehemiah was not at Jerusalem, and Eliashib introduced the abuses (Nehemiah 13:1; Nehemiah 13:4-6 ff)
si'Mon - ) ...
A "governor of the temple" in the time of Seleucus Philopator, whose information as to the treasures of the temple led to the sacrilegious attach of Heliordorus
Lord's Day - Writing to the emperor Trajan at the beginning of the second century, Pliny the Younger, Governor of Bithynia, reported that in compliance with Trajan's edict against seditious assemblies, he had ordered that no group, including the Christians, could meet at night
Guard - ...
In the Republican days the cohors praetoria, or cohortes praetoriœ, formed the bodyguard of the praetor or propraetor, who was Governor of a province with military powers
Herod the Great - His father having aided Caesar in his war with Egypt was rewarded by being made procurator of all Judaea, and he made his son Herod, then only fifteen years of age, Governor of Galilee
Meals - (Isaiah 28:1 ) The regulation of the feast was under the superintendence of a special officer, (John 2:8 ) (Authorized Version "governor of the feast"), whose business it was to taste the food and the liquors before they were placed on the table, and to settle about the toasts and amusements; he was generally one of the guests, Sirach 32:1,2 , and might therefore take part in the conversation
Captivity - He was succeeded as Governor by Nehemiah, who labored faithfully and successfully to reform the people
Province - During the Republic the Governors of these provinces were appointed by the Roman senate from among their own number, generally after a period of service as prætor or consul, as the case might be. Few resisted the temptation to recoup themselves at the expense of the long-suffering provincials, and the vast sums acquired by an extortionate Governor in his one year’s Governorship may be estimated from the fact that Cicero, a just and honest man, acquired £18,000 during his tenure of the province Cilicia. On that day it was arranged that those provinces which were peaceful and did not require the presence of an army should be under the control of the senate, who would appoint their Governors; while the disturbed provinces that did require the presence of an army were to be under the Emperor himself, who was generalissimo of all the forces of the State. The period of senatorial Governorships was one year, that of Imperial indefinite
Captivity - He was succeeded as Governor by Nehemiah, who labored faithfully and successfully to reform the people, and many of the good fruits of his labors remained until the time of Christ
Lucianus, Priest of Antioch, Martyr - Lucian became afterwards more conservative, and during Diocletian's persecution he encouraged the martyrs to suffer courageously, but escaped himself till Theotecnus was appointed Governor of Antioch, when he was betrayed by the Sabellian party, seized and forwarded to Nicomedia to the emperor Maximinus, where, after delivering a speech in defence of the faith, he was starved for many days, tempted with meats offered to idols, and finally put to death in prison, Jan
Porphyrius, Bishop of Gaza - The bishops reached Majuma, the port of Gaza, on May 1, and were followed in ten days by a commissioner named Cynegius, accompanied by the Governor and a general officer with a large body of troops, by whom the imperial orders for the destruction of the temples were executed
Valerianus, Emperor - They came before the Governor and declared themselves Christians
Exile - After the second deporation, Gedeliah was appointed Governor of Judah by the Babylonians but was assassinated (2 Kings 24:25 ). Jews loyal to the Davidic tradition assassinated Gedaliah, the Governor (2 Kings 25:25 )
Meals - A "governor of the feast" (architriklinos , the Greek sumposiarchees , the Latin magister convivii ) superintended, tasting the food and liquors, and settling the order and rules of the entertainment (John 2:8)
Reform - He refused to be made a king, or a Governor, or a judge, or to be involved in any way, however remotely, in political revolution
Alexandrians - The Governor Flaccus issued an edict in which he termed the Jews of Alexandria ‘strangers,’ thus depriving them of the rights of citizenship which they had enjoyed for centuries
New Testament - ...
6 Quirinis (Cyrenius) Governor of Syria the second time...
Archelaus banished, and Judaea made a province of Syria
Feasts - Sometimes very large numbers were present, Esther 1:3,5 Luke 14:16-24 ; and on such occasions a "governor of the feast" was appointed, whose social qualities, tact, firmness, and temperance fitted him to preside, John 2:8
Daniel - ...
Daniel was made by Nebuchadnezzar, Governor of Babylonia and president of the Babylonian "wise men," not to be confounded with the later Persian magi. a Governor over a province, instead of its being left under the native kings (2 Kings 25:23)
Domitian - The Governor of Mœsia, Oppius Sabinus, was defeated and killed. Probably about the end of 89 Domitian triumphed over the Dacians and the Germans, whose Governor, L
Nehemiah - Artaxerxes, "according to the good hand of Nehemiah's God upon him," granted him leave to go to Jerusalem for a time, and letters to the provincial Governors beyond the Euphrates to convey him forward, and to Asaph to supply timber for the palace gates, etc. As "governor" (pechah , also tirshatha' ) he had an escort of cavalry, and so reached Jerusalem, where he stayed inactive three days, probably the usual term for purification after a journey. Nehemiah also remedied the state of debt and bondage of many Jews by forbidding usury and bond service, and set an example by not being chargeable all the twelve years that he was Governor, as former Governors had been, on the Jews; "so did not I," says he, "because of the fear of God" (Nehemiah 5). Then Shemaiah, suborned by Sanballat, tried to frighten him to flee into the temple, where he was detained by a vow (1 Samuel 21:7), in order to delay the work and give an appearance of conscious guilt on the part of Nehemiah; but neither he nor the prophetess Noadiah could put him in fear, "should such a man as I (the Governor who ought to animate others) flee!" Fearing God (Nehemiah 6:9; Nehemiah 6:14; Nehemiah 5:15) I have none else to fear (Isaiah 28:16)
Occupations And Professions in the Bible - Joseph was a Governor ( Genesis 42:6 ) of Egypt. Where a military presence was necessary, a Governor ( Matthew 27:2 ), or procurator , was used. The New Testament names only three men employed as Governors in Palestine, although there were more: Pontius Pilate, Felix, and Festus. See Rome; Governor
Atonement - The atonement for sin made by the death of Christ, is represented in the Christian system as the means by which mankind may be delivered from the awful catastrophe of eternal death; from judicial inflictions of the displeasure of a Governor, whose authority has been contemned, and whose will has been resisted, which shall know no mitigation in their degree, nor bound to their duration. ...
This end it professes to accomplish by means which, with respect to the Supreme Governor himself, preserve his character from mistake, and maintain the authority of his government; and with respect to man, give him the strongest possible reason for hope, and render more favourable the condition of his earthly probation. It is a principle therefore already laid down, that the authority of God must be preserved; but it ought to be remarked, that in that kind of administration which restrains evil by penalty, and encourages obedience by favour and hope, we and all moral creatures are the interested parties, and not the divine Governor himself, whom, because of his independent and all- sufficient nature, our transgressions cannot injure
Pilate, Pontius - 36 the Governor of Syria brought serious accusations against Pilate, and he was banished to Vienne in Gaul, where, according to tradition, he committed suicide
Sin - It is "not a mere violation of the law of our constitution, nor of the system of things, but an offence against a personal lawgiver and moral Governor who vindicates his law with penalties
Thieves - 17:19, section 8; 20:8, section 10), and gave trouble to each successive Roman Governor (Josephus, B
Damascus, Damascenes - The two versions of the story can be reconciled by supposing that the Governor turned out the garrison and set a watch at the instigation of influential Jews, who represented St
Ship - "The Governor" in James 3:4 is the "helmsman" (kuberneetees ; the "owner" was naukleeros )
Chief, Chiefest, Chiefly - See ACCOUNT , COUNT , ESTEEM , Governor , JUDGE , SUPPOSE , THINK
Mourning - The Governor of the city had died the very morning of Dr
Roman Law in the nt - It is therefore a good test of accuracy in a historical writer to examine whether he names the Roman Governor rightly in any given incident (see below). )...
Some imperatorial provinces were governed by procurators, such as Judaea (when it was not a dependen kingdom) and Cappadocia, though Judaea was not perhaps strictly a ‘province’; the Governor of Egypt was called a prefect. 1, though this word is used generally of Roman Governors
Against the decisions of both Governors and kings there lay an appeal to the Emperor. ), and it gave them an appeal from a death sentence by a provincial Governor (Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) iv
Government - Despite the widespread influence of the priests over the community, secular government was under the control of the Governor (ensi ), who not surprisingly came into conflict periodically with the temple priesthood. The law was administered by the civil Governor and his deputy, and numerous tablets recovered from levels dating from about 2500 b. Since Palestine was part of the Persian Empire, it fell under the jurisdiction of the provincial Governor who oversaw "Beyond the River" (Ezra 5:6 ). he did so as the Governor and established the city as the capital of Judah
High Priest - ...
In the early postexilic period, the high priest Joshua is presented as the equal of the Davidic Governor Zerubabbel (Haggai 1:1 ,Haggai 1:1,1:12 ,Haggai 1:12,1:14 ; Haggai 2:2 ,Haggai 2:2,2:4 ). Both high priest and Governor shared in the rebuilding of the Temple (Ezra 3:1 ; Ezra 6:9-15 ; Haggai 1-2 )
King - ( e ) The officer who was ‘over the tribute’ ( 2 Samuel 20:24 ) seems to have superintended the forced labour and the collecting of the taxes, ( f ) The Governor of the royal household, the royal steward or High Chamberlain, seems to have held an important position in the days of the later monarchy ( Isaiah 36:3 ; Isaiah 36:22 ; Isaiah 22:15 ). ]'>[2] ‘officers,’ 1 Samuel 8:15 ), the ‘governor of the city’ ( 1 Kings 22:26 )
Judaea - Under Persian rule the land of Judah was designated as a province of the Empire, and was administered by a Governor, who resided at Jerusalem (Ezra 5:8; Ezra 5:14, Nehemiah 11:3, Haggai 1:1; Haggai 1:14). From this date it was administered by a Governor or procurator, who was chosen from the equestrian order
Herod - At the age of twenty-five he was made by his father Governor of Galilee, and distinguished himself by the suppression of a band of robbers, with the execution of their leader, Hezekiah, and several of his comrades. In the civil war between the republican and Caesarian parties, Herod joined Cassius, and was made Governor of Coelo-Syria; and when Mark Antony arrived victorious in Syria, Herod and his brother found means to ingratiate themselves with him, and were appointed as tetrarchs in Judea; but in a short time an invasion of Antigonus, who was aided by the Jews, obliged Herod to make his escape from Jerusalem, and retire first to Idumea, and then to Egypt
Judaea - Under Persian rule the land of Judah was designated as a province of the Empire, and was administered by a Governor, who resided at Jerusalem (Ezra 5:8; Ezra 5:14, Nehemiah 11:3, Haggai 1:1; Haggai 1:14). From this date it was administered by a Governor or procurator, who was chosen from the equestrian order
Paul - The chief captain, Claudius Lysias determined to send him to Caesarea to Felix, the Governor or procurator of Judea. From thence a smaller detachment conveyed him to Caesarea, where they delivered up their prisoner into the hands of the Governor. The Governor before whom he was now to be tried, according to Tacitus and Josephus, was a mean and dissolute tyrant. The unprincipled Governor had good reason to seek to ingratiate himself with the Jews; and to please them, be handed over Paul, as an untried prisoner, to his successor, Festus. The Jewish prince Agrippa arrived with his sister Bernice on a visit to the new Governor
Tiglath-Pileser - Arabian prince, was made Governor on the Musrian border
Covenant - In this covenant, ...
...
The contracting parties were (a) God the moral Governor, and (b) Adam, a free moral agent, and representative of all his natural posterity (Romans 5:12-19 )
Ezra - In Nehemiah 8, Ezra "the priest, the scribe," 13 years later reappears in charge of the spiritual interests of the people, as Nehemiah, the tirshatha or Governor, of their political interests, the two acting in harmonious cooperation (Nehemiah 12:26)
Cyprus - Luke rightly describes the Governor as a proconsul
Ishmael - It is probable that Ishmael resented Nebuchadnezzar’s appointment of Gedaliah as Governor of Judæa ( Jeremiah 40:5 ) instead of some member of the ruling family, and considered him as unpatriotic in consenting to represent an alien power
Genesis - But God was controlling the affairs of his people, and through a series of remarkable events, Joseph eventually became Governor over Egypt
Lucianus, a Famous Satirist - Luckily he had a guard of two soldiers with him, sent by his friend the Governor of Cappadocia (a proof of Lucian's importance at this time), or he would have fared badly at the hands of the attendants of Alexander. Peregrinus, however, was set at liberty by the Governor of Syria, a man of learning and a lover of philosophy, who withal well knew the folly of the man, and that he would willingly have suffered death for the sake of that glory and reputation which he would have acquired by it
Master - ...
A — 7: κυβερνήτης (Strong's #2942 — Noun Masculine — kubernetes — koo-ber-nay'-tace ) "the pilot or steersman of a ship," or, metaphorically, "a guide or Governor" (akin to kubernao, "to guide:" Eng
Resurrection of Christ - People of this character, would they have dared to resist the authority of the Governor? ...
Would they have undertaken to oppose the determination of the Sanhedrim, to force a guard, and to elude, or overcome, soldiers armed and aware of danger? If Jesus Christ were not risen again (I speak the language of unbelievers, ) he had deceived his disciples with vain hopes of his resurrection
Tiberias - ’ Of late, however, the place is improving somewhat, having become the seat of a Turkish kaimakan, or Governor
Ephraim - Mount Ephraim , Heb, har Ephraîm , is the name given to that part of the central range of Western Palestine occupied by Ephraim, corresponding in part to the modern Jebel Nâblus the district under the Governor of Nâblus
Oil - Zechariah 4:14 uses this word to refer to Joshua the high priest and Zerubbabel the Governor as "the two who are anointed (lit
Primacy - Peter no where appears intermeddling as a judge or Governor paramount in such cases; yet where he doth himself deal with heretics and disorderly persons, he proceedeth not as a pope decreeing; but as an apostle, warming, arguing and persuading against them
Caligula - The Governor of Egypt, with ill-timed zeal, required them to set up statues of Gaius in their synagogues. 40 the Jews of Alexandria sent an embassy to the Emperor to get the Governor’s decree rescinded
Ezra, Book of - 538, issued an edict permitting the exiles to return; of the latter about 40,000 availed themselves of the opportunity and returned to Judæa under Joshua the high priest and Zerubbabel, a member of the royal Davidic family, who was appointed Governor ( pechah ) by Cyrus (b
Greece - There was a province of Achaia, but never of Hellas, Such cities as Athena and Sparta were spared the humiliation of being placed under the fasces of a Roman Governor and having to pay tribute to Rome. The Roman Governor could always make his voice heard in their councils, and a rescript from him brooked no delay in obedience
God - Thus the Governor of the province “Beyond the River” (i. So also Cyrus instructed Sheshbazzar, the Governor, that the “house of God be builded” in Jerusalem (Ezra 5:15)
Memphis - ...
"Menes" in hieroglyphics is written as the founder of Memphis on the roof of the Rameseum near Gournon in western Thebes, at the head of the ancestors of Rameses the Great; the earliest mention of the name is on a ruined tomb at Gizeh, "the royal Governor Menes," a descendant probably of the first Menes, and living under the fifth dynasty
Persia - Nehemiah may have been the first Governor of the province of Yehud (Judah)
Syria - ...
New Testament In New Testament times, Judea was made part of a procuratorship within the larger Roman province of Syria (Matthew 4:24 ), the latter being ruled by a Governor (Luke 2:2 )
Circumcision - The Egyptian priests probably adopted the rite when Joseph was their Governor and married to the daughter of the priest of On
Haggai, Theology of - Through their effective preaching, Zerubbabel the Governor and Joshua the high priest were able to complete the "second temple" by 515 b
Agrippa - Festus, Governor of Judea, coming to his government, A
Harvest - It was another custom among the Jews to set a confidential servant over the reapers, to see that they executed their work properly, that they had suitable provisions, and to pay them their wages: the Chaldees call him rab, the master, ruler, or Governor of the reapers
jo'Seph - Pharaoh at once appointed Joseph not merely Governor of Egypt, but second only to the sovereign, and also gave him to wife Asenath, daughter of Potipherah priest of On (Hieropolis), and gave him a name or title, Zaphnath-paaneah (preserver of life)
Augustus (2) - The Syrian Governor is named with the view of fixing the date, as was the custom in those days. Theophilus, as a Roman official, would have access to the list of provincial Governors, and must have at once understood the exact period meant. The Syrian Governors in the period of b. 4 is the generally accepted year of Herod’s death, the possibility of a Governorship of Quirinius at the time of the execution of the decree of Caesar Augustus is thereby excluded. Luke as to the name of the Governor of Syria, supports none the less the fact that there was a census earlier than the famous one of a. The evidence in favour of an earlier as well as later Governorship of Quirinius is now admitted to be so strong, that Mommsen and others have fully accepted it. 5, are we to find room for his earlier Syrian Governorship? It must be between Saturninus and Varus, or as a contemporary of the one or the other. In the history of Josephus we have a singular confirmation of this twofold Governorship. Why might not Quirinius have been the military Governor, while Saturninus was the civil administrator? In view of the progress of discovery in recent years, may we not hope that some additional fragment of the Tiburtine inscription will be found, and definitely settle the much debated question as to the historical accuracy of St. Augustus also bestowed great care on the selection of his legates, closely watched over their administration, and made it all but impossible for a corrupt Governor to escape swift punishment
Rome And the Roman Empire - Senatorial provinces were created, over which the senate had jurisdiction and to which they appointed Governors or proconsuls. Pontius Pilate was such a procurator or Governor over Judea (Luke 3:1 ). In this year Pontius Pilate was appointed Governor of Judea, a post he held until A
Rufus - —Luke 20:20 παραδοῦναι αὐτὸν τῇ ἀρχῇ καὶ τῇ ἐξουσίᾳ τοῦ ἡγεμόνος, ‘to deliver him up to the rule and to the authority of the Governor’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 )—ἀρχή = principatus, ἐξουσία = magistratus or munus (Stephanus, Thesaurus, ed. —Matthew 2:6 ‘And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda, art not the least among the princes of Juda: for out of thee shall come a Governor, that shall rule (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘be shepherd of’) my people Israel’ (ὅστις ποιμανεῖ τὸν λαόν μου τὸν Ἰσραήλ)
Assyria - The last of the ancient Assyrian kings was Sardanapalus, who was besieged in his capital by Arbaces, Governor of Media, in concurrence with the Babylonians. Arbaces retained the supreme authority, and nominated Governors in Assyria and Babylon, who were honoured with the title of kings, while they remained subject and tributary to the Persian monarchs. The Assyrian Governor gradually enlarged the boundaries of his kingdom, and was succeeded by Tiglath-pileser, Salmanasar, and Sennacherib, who asserted and maintained their independence
Rufus - —Luke 20:20 παραδοῦναι αὐτὸν τῇ ἀρχῇ καὶ τῇ ἐξουσίᾳ τοῦ ἡγεμόνος, ‘to deliver him up to the rule and to the authority of the Governor’ (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 )—ἀρχή = principatus, ἐξουσία = magistratus or munus (Stephanus, Thesaurus, ed. —Matthew 2:6 ‘And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda, art not the least among the princes of Juda: for out of thee shall come a Governor, that shall rule (Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘be shepherd of’) my people Israel’ (ὅστις ποιμανεῖ τὸν λαόν μου τὸν Ἰσραήλ)
Ahaz - ...
Pekah slew 120,000 valiant men of Judah in one day, "because they had forsaken the Lord God of their fathers"; Zichri of Ephraim slew the king's son Maaseiah, and Azrikim the Governor of his house, and Elkanah next to the king
Roman Empire - ...
In the New Testament we find such notices of Roman dominion as the Jews recognizing Caesar as sole king (John 19:15); Cyrenius "governor of Syria" (Luke 2:2); Pontius Pilate, Felix, and Festus, "governors," i
Crucifixion - It is not likely that in ordinary circumstances the Jews would induce a Roman Governor to pay any attention to the law of Deuteronomy 21:22 f
Galatia - Galatia, as a province, means all these territories together, under one Roman Governor, and the inhabitants of such a province, whatever their race, were, in conformity with invariable Roman custom, denominated by a name etymologically connected with the name of the province
Lebanon - ...
Politically the Lebanon rejoices in a freer and better government than any other part of Syria, as, since the massacres of 1860, a Christian Governor, appointed with the approval of the European Powers, rules on behalf of the Sultan
Alexander - A kinsman of Annas the high priest (Acts 4:6); supposed the same as Alexander the alabarch (governor of the Jews) at Alexandria, brother of Philo-Judaeus, an ancient friend of the emperor Claudius
Manaen (2) - As Antipater, Herod’s father, was only a military Governor, the prediction seemed absurd
Damascus - see), the Governor, by being lowered in a basket over the wall ( Acts 9:25 , 2 Corinthians 11:32-33 ), and hither he returned after his Arabian retirement ( Galatians 1:17 )
Ammon, Ammonites - ’...
After the destruction of Jerusalem, Baalis, king of Ammon, sent a man to assassinate Gedaliah, whom Nebuchadnezzar had made Governor of Judah (Jeremiah 40:14 )
Samaritans - Manasseh, unwilling to surrender his wife, fled to Samaria; and many others in the same circumstances, and with similar disposition, went and settled under the protection of Sanballat, Governor of Samaria
Nebuchadnezzar - Having been successful, he marched against the Governor of Phoenicia, and Jehoiakim king of Judah, tributary of Necho king of Egypt
Luke, Gospel of - He was brought before the Jewish leaders (22:54-71), then before the Roman Governor (23:1-25), and afterwards taken outside the city and crucified (23:26-56)
Ezra, the Book of - The second (Ezra 7-10) is that of the priest Ezra and the Governor Nehemiah, aided by the prophet Malachi. Ezra the priest took charge of the inner restoration, by purging out paganism and bringing back the law; Nehemiah the Governor did the outer work, restoring the city and its polity
Ireland - The following year the Free State was formally constituted a dominion and a constitution was formed by which Ireland is ruled by a Governor-general appointed by Britain, an executive council, and a legislature of two houses
Tarsus - ), Tarsus became the headquarters of the Roman Governor, but it lost this honour when Augustus formed the great joint-province of Syria-Cilicia-Phœnice (probably in 27 b
Matthew, Gospel of - After the Last Supper in Jerusalem and a time of prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane (26:20-46), he was arrested, condemned by the Jewish Council, handed over to the Roman Governor and crucified (26:47-27:66)
Lord's Day, the - 112), the Roman Governor Pliny the Younger notes that Christians assembled before daylight "on an appointed day" (Epistle 10:96), undoubtedly Sunday
Laodicea - When Flaccus, Roman Governor of Asia (62 b
Jew, Jewess - Thus Eunice, the mother of Timothy (Acts 16:1), was a Jewess who had married a Greek, while Drusilla, the wife of Felix the Governor of Syria (Acts 24:24), is also described as a Jewess
Alexander - Passing through Palestine, he was informed that the Samaritans, in a general insurrection, had killed Andromachus, Governor of Syria and Palestine, who had come to Samaria to regulate some affairs
Gardens - The garden belonging to the Governor of Eleus, a Turkish town on the western border of the Hellespont, which Dr
Sanhedrim - Others, however, maintain that the Jews had still the power of life and death; but that this privilege was restricted to crimes committed against their law, and depended upon the Governor's will and pleasure. Petau fixes the beginning of the sanhedrim to the period when Gabinius was Governor of Judea, by whom were erected tribunals in the five cities of Judea, namely, Jerusalem, Gadara, Amathus, Jericho, and Sephoris
Appoint, Appointed - , a servant over a household, Matthew 24:45,47 ; 25:21,23 ; Luke 12:42,44 ; a judge, Luke 12:14 ; Acts 7:27,35 ; a Governor, Acts 7:10 ; man by God over the work of His hands, Hebrews 2:7
Psalms, the Book of - ...
These invaluable sacred songs exhibit the sublimest conceptions of God, as the creator, preserver, and Governor of the universe; to say nothing of the prophetical character of many of them, and their relation to the Messiah and the great plan of man's redemption
Sanhedrin - , consisting of Levites, priests, and heads of the families, with two chief members-the high priest to decide the religious, the Governor of Judah to decide the monarchical, matters-cannot be adduced as proof of the Mosaic origin of the Sanhedrin, as does D. The Sanhedrin seems to have played a political rôle in the quarrel between Alexandra’s two sons, when Gabinius, the Roman Governor of Syria in 57 b. As Governor of Galilee, Josephus appointed seven judges for each town and a Sanhedrin of seventy for the whole province (Jos
Peter Epistles of - When Pliny became Governor of Bithynia he soon found himself in conflict with the Christians, of whom he put a number to death, or, if Roman citizens, held them for transportation to Rome. Moreover, by a correct and cautious mode of conduct they may hope to gain the favour of the Governor who is thought capable of giving praise to them that do well (1 Peter 2:14), while even their accusers may be silenced and put to shame by the Christians’ good manner of life in Christ (1 Peter 2:15, 1 Peter 3:16). Under the immediately preceding Governors little attention had been paid to the internal affairs of the province, which was in a wretched state generally. The Governor had shown a disposition to investigate the charges, and if Christians would only take care always to be found innocent they might hope for favours from the courts and at the same time put their accusers to confusion. Many items in the letter are admirably suited to the early days of Pliny’s Governorship, previous to his appeal to Trajan and the issuance of the Emperor’s rescript. ...
From the standpoint of the persecutions, the advantage would seem to be with a date shortly before the rescript of Trajan and during the early days of Pliny’s Governorship
Gratianus, Emperor - The Governor received him with protestations of loyalty, and took a solemn oath on the Gospels not to hurt him. ...
Gratian was amiable and modest—in fact too modest to be a good Governor in these rough times
Thessalonica - It was the residence of the provincial Governor, but in ordinary circumstances he exercised no civic authority
Jehoiada - " The high priest was "chief Governor in the house of Jehovah"; then the second priest; then the 24 "governors of the sanctuary and of the house of God" (Jeremiah 20:1; 1 Chronicles 24:5)
Egypt - ’ The 355 idols of the temple, to which divine honours were daily paid, fall prostrate, and are broken in pieces; and Affrodosius, the Governor of the town, coming with an army, at sight of the ruined idols worships the child Jesus, and all the people of the city believe in God through Jesus Christ
Providence - We cannot, indeed, conceive God acting as the Governor of the world at all, unless his government were to extend to all the events that happen
Elijah - Elijah under the full direction of the Lord came forth from his mysterious retreat, and showed himself to Obadiah, the Governor of Ahab's house, who was engaged in searching the land for provender
Aetius, Arian Sect Founder And Head - He was accused to the Governor, whom Procopius had placed in the island, of favouring the cause of Valens, A
Alexandria - Ptolemy Soter, one of Alexander's captains, who, after the death of this monarch, was first Governor of Egypt, and afterward assumed the title of king, made this city the place of his residence, about B
Nebuchadnezzar the Great - Nebuchadnezzar, having been successful, marched against the Governor of Phenicia, and Jehoiakim, king of Judah, who was tributary to Necho, king of Egypt
Rome, - There is no sufficient proof that the word "praetorium" was ever used to designate the emperors palace, though it is used for the official residence of a Roman Governor
Elijah - Elijah under the full direction of the Lord came forth from his mysterious retreat, and showed himself to Obadiah, the Governor of Ahab's house, who was engaged in searching the land for provender
John, Gospel of - From there he was taken to the Roman Governor (18:28-40), humiliated before the people (19:1-16), crucified (19:17-30) and buried (19:31-42)
Egypt - ’ The 355 idols of the temple, to which divine honours were daily paid, fall prostrate, and are broken in pieces; and Affrodosius, the Governor of the town, coming with an army, at sight of the ruined idols worships the child Jesus, and all the people of the city believe in God through Jesus Christ
Herod - )...
In the end Antipater won Rome’s appointment as Governor of Judea, with his two sons in the top positions beneath him
Trial-at-Law - The over-seas provinces, on the other hand, were subject to the unfettered imperium of the Governor. A wise Governor respected the customary laws of his province, allowing minor offences to be tried before the local courts, and even in graver crimes directing the proceedings of the national councils with a view to securing full Roman justice, rather than suppressing their former prerogatives. Though the provincials had no direct appeal against the arbitrary acts of an unjust Governor like Verres, they could successfully impeach him before the Roman courts, and secure his condemnation and recall
Dates (2) - ...
(b) The enrolment under Quirinius (Luke 2:2 αὔτη ἠ ἀπογραφὴ πρώτη ἐγένετο ἡγεμονεύοντος τῆς Συρἰας Κυρηνίου, ‘this enrolment took place for the first time when Quirinius was Governor of Syria’; cf. And his, indeed, might be the name wanting in a mutilated inscription, describing an official who was twice Governor of Syria under Augustus. But Saturninus was Governor b
Christianity - With Pagans the authority of moral rules was either the opinion of the wise, or the tradition of the ancient, confirmed, it is true, in some degree, by observation and experience; but to us, they are given as commands immediately issuing from the supreme Governor, and ratified as his by the most solemn and explicit attestations. Among the proselytes to Christianity we find Nicodemus, and Joseph of Arimathea, members of the senate of Israel; Jairus, a ruler of the synagogue; Zaccheus, the chief of the publicans at Jericho; Apollos, distinguished for eloquence; Paul, learned in the Jewish law; Sergius Paulus, Governor of the island of Cyprus; Cornelius, a Roman captain; Dionysius, a judge and senator of the Athenian areopagus; Erastus, treasurer of Corinth; Tyrannus, a teacher of grammar and rhetoric at Corinth; Publius, Governor of Malta; Philemon, a person of considerable rank at Colosse; Simon, a noted sophist in Samaria; Zenas, a lawyer; and even the domestics of the emperor himself
Maccabees - Each made him extravagant offers, but Jonathan preferred Alexander Balas; and when the latter defeated his rival, Jonathan found himself a high priest, a prince of Syria, and military and civil Governor of Judæa (b. In May 142Samimon was able to seize the citadel, and in September 141, at a great assembly of priests and people, and princes of the people, and elders of the land, he was elected to be high priest and military commander and civil Governor of the Jews, ‘for ever until there should arise a faithful prophet
Jeremiah - Pashur, the chief Governor, was deputed on one occasion to tame, as we say, Jeremiah's pulpit. ' I suppose every preacher with any fire in his bones has a Pashur or two among his Governors. But I do not read that Jeremiah spake as he was moved by Pashur, the Governor
Preaching - The chief instruments were Nehemiah and Ezra; the former was Governor, and reformed the civil state; the latter was a scribe of the law of the God of heaven, and applied himself to ecclesiastical matters, in which he rendered the noblest service to his country, and to all posterity. The sermons delivered so affected the hearers, that they wept excessively; and about noon the sorrow became so exuberant and immeasurable, that it was thought necessary by the Governor, the preacher, and the Levites, to restrain it
Jeremiah - , Jeremiah moved to Mizpah, the capital of Gedaliah, the newly appointed Jewish Governor of the Babylonian province of Judah (Jeremiah 40:5 )
Claudius - Plautius was appointed the first Governor (43)
Peter - On one occasion the provincial Governor tried to kill him, but through the prayers of the church he escaped unharmed (Acts 12:1-17; cf
Caracalla, the Nickname of m. Aurelius Severus Antoninus Bassianus - ...
The principal authorities are Tertullian, addressing Scapula, Governor of Africa, in 211; the sober, contemporary, and apparently impartial, narrative of Herodian (bks
Samaria - And the Samaritans, being jealous of the Jews, on account of the favours that Alexander the Great had conferred on them, revolted from him, while he was in Egypt, and burned Andromachus alive, whom he had left Governor of Syria
Temple of Jerusalem - Sheshbazzar, the Governor, laid the foundation. , the work was renewed by the new Governor Zerubbabel and Jeshua the high priest at the urging of the prophets Haggai and Zechariah (Ezra 5:1-2 )
Egypt - Zedekiah had been made Governor of Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar, but he revolted and formed an alliance with Hophra. ...
When Nebuchadnezzar had destroyed Jerusalem, he left some Jews in the land under Gedaliah the Governor; but Gedaliah being slain, they fled into Egypt, taking Jeremiah with them, to Tahpanhes. The Governors mention this in their despatches, and urge Egypt to send troops to stop the invasion
Philo - His nephew Tiberius Alexander took service with the Romans, and, renouncing his Judaism, became a high official; he was Governor of Judaea before a. 48, and afterwards Governor of Egypt
Confess, Confession - It is perhaps because Timothy faces such persecution that Paul urges him to imitate his Lord's example before the Roman Governor Pontius Pilate by making "your good confession in the presence of many witnesses" (1 Timothy 6:12 ; cf
Titus (Emperor) - He has the chief credit of the reconciliation of Mucian, Governor of the province Syria, and Vespasian
Messiah - When asked by the Governor Pilate if he was a king, Jesus agreed that he was, though not the sort of king Pilate had in mind (Matthew 27:11; John 18:33-37; cf
Athens - The Governor had his residence at Corinth, and the merchant-princes had forsaken the Piraeus for Lecheum and Cenchreae
Temple - Zerubbabel, as Jewish Governor, and Joshua, the high priest, superintended the people in rebuilding the temple
Jeremiah - At length, after the destruction of Jerusalem, being carried with the remnant of the Jews into Egypt, whither they had resolved to retire, though contrary to his advice, upon the murder of Gedaliah, whom the Chaldeans had left Governor in Judea, he there continued warmly to remonstrate against their idolatrous practices, foretelling the consequences that would inevitably follow
Egypt - The native princes were no doubt hostile at heart to the Ethiopian domination: on his departure, Esarhaddon left these, to the number of 20, with Assyrian garrisons, in charge of different parts of the country; an Assyrian Governor, however, was appointed to Pelusium, which was the key of Egypt. Ashurbanipal succeeding, reinstated the Governors, and his army reached Thebes. The Assyrian Governor of Pelusium was accused of treachery with Niku (Neko), prince of Sais and Memphis, and Pekrûr of Pisapt (Goshen), and their correspondence with Tahrak was intercepted. They were all brought in chains to Nineveh, but Niku was sent back to Egypt with honour, and his son was appointed Governor of Athribis
Gregorius Thaumaturgus, Bishop of Neocaesarea - His sister needed an escort to Palestine to join her husband in his high position under the Roman Governor at Caesarea. ) in which Gregory offers his praise to the Father, and then to "the Champion and Saviour of our souls, His first-born Word, the Creator and Governor of all things, . The edict was ferocious, and, in the hands of sympathetic Governors, cruelly carried out
Government of the Hebrews - The fundamental principle, therefore, of those institutions was this,—that the true God, the Creator and Governor of the universe, and none other, ought to be worshipped. But although the Hebrew state was so constituted, that beside God, the invisible King, and his visible servant, the high priest, there was no other general ruler of the commonwealth, yet it is well known that there were rulers of a high rank, appointed at various times, called ושפט , a word which not only signifies a judge in the usual sense of the term, but any Governor, or administrator of public affairs, 1 Samuel 8:20 ; Isaiah 11:4 ; 1 Kings 3:9 . The rebuilding of Jerusalem was accomplished, and the reformation of their ecclesiastical and civil polity was effected, by the two divinely inspired and pious Governors, Ezra and Nehemiah; but the theocratic government does not appear to have been restored
Jeremiah - Indications of affinity or friendship with some of the actors in it occur in the sameness of names: Jeremiah's father bearing the name of Hilkiah, Josiah's high priest; his uncle that of Shallum, Huldah's husband (Jeremiah 32:7; compare 2 Kings 22:14); Ahikam, Jeremiah's protector (Jeremiah 26:24), was also the fellow worker with Huldah in the revival; moreover Maaseiah, Governor of Jerusalem, sent by Josiah as ally of Hilkiah in repairing the temple (Jeremiah 11:19-21), was father of Neriah, the father of both Baruch and Seraiah, Jeremiah's disciples (Jeremiah 36:4; Jeremiah 51:59). ...
Pashur, chief Governor in the Lord's house, in consequence smote and put him in the stocks (Jeremiah 20:2); when liberated, he renewed his prophecy against the city, denouncing Pashur as about to become Magor Missabib, "terror round about
City - see) was the supreme authority on all matters which, after the Roman domination, did not fall within the province of the Roman Governor
Alexandria - The Jews were under their own Governor or ‘Alabarch,’ and observed their own domestic and religious customs
Adoption - The laws, the liberties, the privileges, the relations, the provisions, and the security of this family are all sources of happiness; but especially the presence, the approbation, and the goodness of God, as the Governor thereof, afford joy unspeakable and full of glory, 1 Peter 1:8
Shepherds - The office of chief shepherd was also known among the Latins; for, in the seventh AEneid, Tyrrheus is named as Governor of the royal flocks:...
Tyrrheusque pater, cui regia parent ...
Armenta, et late custodia credita camp
Nineveh - Diodorus, also, relates that Belesis, the Governor of Babylon
Jeremiah - The Babylonians placed him under the protection of Gedaliah, the Jewish Governor whom they had appointed over the Judeans left in the land (2 Kings 25:22; Jeremiah 39:13-14; Jeremiah 40:4-6). (The period of Gedaliah’s Governorship and the Judeans’ flight to Egypt is dealt with in Jeremiah Chapters 40-44
Herod - " The Roman Governor in the first instance had sent Him to Herod as soon as he knew that He as a Galilean belonged unto Herod's jurisdiction. So Pilate's usual residence was at Caesarea, the abode of the Roman Governors of Judea (Acts 25:13 represents his losing no time in going to Caesarea to salute the new Roman Governor. , 2:15, section 1; Life, section 11) records his anxiety to stand well with the Roman Governors, Alexander in Egypt, and Gessius Florus in Judaea, in the latter case Berenice accompanying him
Preaching - ...
The chief instruments were Nehemiah and Ezra: the first was Governor, and reformed their civil state; the last was a scribe of the law of the God of heaven, and addressed himself to ecclesiastical matters, in which he rendered the noblest service to his country, and to all posterity. The sermons delivered so affected the hearers, that they wept excessively; and about noon the sorrow became so exuberant and immeasurable, that it was thought necessary by the Governor, the preacher, and the Levites, to restrain it
Paul - unto strange cities," and "breathing out threatenings and slaughter," he was on his journey to Damascus with authoritative letters from the high priest empowering him to arrest and bring to Jerusalem all such, trusting doubtless that the pagan Governor would not interpose in their behalf. "...
In going forth on his first missionary journey he was subordinate to Barnabas; but after preaching the word in Cyprus, where in the Lord's name he had smitten with blindness Elymas the sorcerer (even as he had tried to blind spiritually the Governor), and when Sergius Paulus who had sent for Barnabas and Saul believed, he thenceforth under the name Paul takes the lead
Moab - The name of the family Pahath Moab, "governor of Moab," among those returned from Babylon (Ezra 2:6), implies a former connection with Moab as ruler
Government - The chief ruler became a local Governor appointed by the foreign power as was Nehemiah, or even a foreigner as were the Roman procurators
Samaria - He avenged the cruel death of Andromachus, his Governor in CCEle-Syria, by killing many of the inhabitants of Samaria, deporting others to Shechem, and substituting Macedonian colonists, who continued to occupy the city till the time of John Hyrcanus
King, Christ as - Similarly, the Governor Pilate asked, "Are you the king of the Jews?" To which Jesus answered, "Yes, it is as you say" (Mark 15:2 )
Roman Empire - Lycia was united to Pamphylia as a province under one Governor in 43. A fresh advance was made under Nero (54-68), when Suetonius Paulinus was appointed Governor (59)
Liberty - ) we find similar references to devoted Christians (Tavias, Alce, Daphnus, ‘the wife of Epitropus’ [1], Attalus, etc
Woman (2) - Pilate, Governor though he is, neither hears nor sees anything, and even when face to face with Christ is only puzzled not convinced
Nazarene - " (Matthew 26:71) And yet more, the Roman Governor, as if constrained by an overruling power, in giving a testimony to Christ the very reverse of the ignominy he meant to put upon him, both subscribed to his regal authority, at the same time he proclaimed him the Nazarite to God; and wrote a superscription in three different languages, and put it on the cross, "Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews
Materialism - For I think it is plain enough, that the mind, though it acts under great limitations, doth, however, in many instances govern the body arbitrarily; and it is monstrous to suppose this Governor to be nothing but some fit disposition or accident, superadded, of that matter which is governed. The capacity of being governed or used can never be the Governor, applying and using that capacity
Luke, the Gospel According to - His accuracy appears in his giving exact dates (Luke 2:1-3 (See CYRENIUS and JESUS CHRIST, on the difficulty here; Cyrenius was twice Governor of Syria; Luke 3:1-2; also in his marking the two distinct sightings of Jerusalem observed by travelers in coming across Olivet; first at Luke 19:37, secondly, at
Justice - In the Roman provinces the supreme criminal jurisdiction was exercised by the Governor of the province, whether proconsul, proprætor, or procurator; no appeal was permitted to provincials from a Governor’s judgment; but Roman citizens had the right of appealing to the tribunes, who had the power of ordering the case to be transferred to the ordinary tribunals at Rome
Divination - Paul (Acts 9:17; Acts 9:27; Acts 26:16) and to Stephen (Acts 7:56), and His Spirit prohibited action (Acts 16:7), where an itinerant preacher was received as a messenger of God, or even as Christ Jesus re-incarnated (Galatians 4:14); where the Holy Spirit was a distinct living personality, where the assertion that a man was the Son of God made a Roman Governor tremble (John 19:8), and the patience of His death caused a Roman centurion to exclaim: ‘This was a Son of God’ (Matthew 27:54)
Elesbaan, a King, Hermit, And Saint of Ethiopia - 518-527), when the king of the people of Axum, being about to war against the Homeritae, sent to ask the Governor of Adulis for a copy of a certain inscription; which copy Cosmas and another monk were charged to make (Migne, Patr
Almighty - " "He setteth up one and putteth down another;" "for the kingdom is the Lord's, and he is Governor among the nations
Nation (2) - ...
These procurators (ἡγεμών in NT, ἐπίτροπος more often in Josephus) were not of senatorial or praetorian, but only of equestrian rank, and not absolutely independent of the Syrian Governor, though their dealings were mostly direct with Rome. The Jews of the Dispersion could but rarely visit the Temple, and they read the Scriptures in the Greek tongue; but in their separate communities they maintained the precepts as to Sabbath rest and clean food under the protection of Roman Governors and the Emperor (cf
God - Thus on the one hand his character of Lord or Governor is established, and on the other our duty of lowly homage and absolute obedience. Barrow, "we mean a Being of infinite wisdom, goodness, and power, the Creator and the Governor of all things, to whom the great attributes of eternity and independency, omniscience and immensity, perfect holiness and purity, perfect justice and veracity, complete happiness, glorious majesty, and supreme right of dominion belong; and to whom the highest veneration, and most profound submission and obedience are due
Julianus, Flavius Claudius, Emperor - He had hardly arrived in Asia Minor when the suspicions of Constantius were aroused by two reports brought by informers, one of treasonable proceedings at a banquet given by Africanus, the Governor of Pannonia Secunda at Sirmium, the other of the rising of Silvanus in Gaul (Jul. As a compromise he proposed that Constantius should still appoint the praetorian prefect, the chief Governor of that quarter of the empire, but that all lesser offices should be under his own administration ( ib
Lord (2) - The claim that Jesus was ‘the Christ’ had no political significance to the Gentile Governor
Christian (the Name) - ‘No real Christian,’ says the Governor, ‘can he made to do that
Henoticon, the - This opposition roused the indignation of Zeno, who issued imperative commands to Pergamius, the new prefect of Egypt, then about to sail for Alexandria, and to Apollonius the Governor, to expel John Talaia and seat Peter Mongus in his place
Sanballat - YOU must clearly understand, to begin with, that Samaria was already, even in that early day, the deadly enemy of Jerusalem, and also that Sanballat was the Governor of Samaria
Pentateuch - That writing existed ages before Moses is proved by the tomb of Chnumhotep at Benihassan, of the twelfth dynasty, representing a scribe presenting to the Governor a roll of papyrus covered with inscriptions dated the sixth year of Osirtasin II long before the Exodus
Canaanites - It is rather regarded as an act of exemplary penal justice, and, as such, consistent with the character of the moral Governor of the universe
Episcopalians - While our Lord remained upon earth, he acted as the immediate Governor of his church. But he has, in the most explicit terms, enjoined obedience to all Governors, whether civil or ecclesiastical, and whatever may be their denomination, as essential to the character of a true Christian
Mahometanism - ...
Mahhomet wrote to the same effect to the king of Ethiopia, though he had been converted before, according to the Arab writers; and to Molawkas, Governor of Egypt, who gave the messenger a very favourable reception, and sent several valuable presents to Mahomet, and among the rest two girls, one of which, named Mary, became a great favourite with him. And soon after the prophet sent 3000 men against the Grecian forces, to revenge the death of one of his ambassadors who, being sent to the Governor of Bosra on the same errand as those who went to the above-mentioned princes, was slain by an Arab of the tribe of Ghassan, at Muta, a town in the territory of Balka, in Syria, about three days journey eastward from Jerusalem, near which town they encountered
Ibas, Bishop of Edessa - The count Chaereas as civil Governor of Osrhoene, but with secret instructions from Constantinople emanating from Chrysaphius and Eutyches, was deputed to arrest and imprison him and reopen the suit
Rome, Romans - The influence of the world-power is shown by the references to the Emperor (Matthew 22:17, Mark 12:14, Luke 2:1; Luke 3:1; Luke 20:22; Luke 23:2, John 19:12), the Governor Pontius Pilate (see Pilate), the tax-gatherers (Matthew 5:46 etc. Much was left to Governors in the time of the Republic. The provinces were now much more protected against the rapacity and cruelty of Governors
Joshua - The Governor of Jerusalem in the time of Josiah ( Joshua 21:1-4289 )
Philippians, Epistle to - ‘Prætorium’ might, indeed, mean Herod’s palace, which was used as the headquarters of the Roman Governor in Cæsarea, but the words ‘in the whole Prætorium’ seem to point to the bodyguard of the Emperor, though Mommsen supposes that the conditions are best realized if the words imply that St
Jerusalem - At present, this city is included in the pashalic of Damascus, though it has a resident Turkish Governor
Predestination - To bring to pass the death of Christ He made use of the hatred of the Jews, the baseness of the betrayer, and the culpable weakness of the Roman Governor
Political Conditions - Instead, the country was made a kind of annex to the province of Syria, with a Governor (procurator) of its own, of equestrian rank, who was charged particularly with the control of the army and the finances, and with the task of turning the district into a bulwark of the Empire. 14 to the throne of the Empire, Tiberius adopted the policy of lengthening the term of service in these provincial appointments, in the hope of protecting the people from rapacity, by affording the Governors a longer period over which to spread their exactions
Sidonius Apollinaris, Saint - It was placed under a Governor named Victorius, with the title of Count, who appears at first to have behaved with real or affected moderation (Greg
Matthew, the Gospel According to - The Latinisms (fragellosas , Matthew 27:26; kodranteen , Matthew 5:26) are unlike a translation from Hebrew into Greek, for why not use the Greek terms as Luke (Luke 12:59) does, rather than Graecised Latinisms? The Latinisms are natural to Matthew, as a portitor or gatherer of port dues, familiar with the Roman coin quadrans, and likely to quote the Latin for "scourging" (fragellosas from flagellum ) used by the Roman Governor in sentencing Jesus
Time - ...
In the New Testament events are associated with the reigns of contemporary rulers (‘In the days of Herod the king’ [4], ‘in the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar, Pontius Pilate being Governor of Judaea ,’ etc
Influence - That he should have been afraid when the Jews told him that the prisoner had claimed to be the Son of God and at once sought another interview, shows that there was a mysterious influence about our Lord which made the Governor feel uncomfortable; and this fear was only increased when his question, ‘Whence art thou?’ received no answer (John 19:8 f
Solomon - And, then, with a tutor and Governor like Nathan-Judge, I pray you, betwixt me and my vineyard
Paul - His work in Corinth (the province of —Achaia) was well received and even approved, in an oblique fashion, by the Roman Governor, Gallio
Physical - He knew and taught in effect that it is with the moral order of things and God’s unerring and all-sufficient administration of it, as the moral Governor of the world, that evil and unjust men have to reckon; and therefore, in the exercise of the magnanimity alike of His love and of His justice, God dispenses to them, in common with good and just men, a full and free share of His sunshine and rain
Israel, History of - ...
The city remained defenseless until Nehemiah (appointed twice in 445,432 to be Persia's Governor in Judea) rebuilt and repaired the walls around the city
Jacob - Joseph at 17 goes to Egypt, at 30 is Governor
Living (2) - 124) justly calls attention to the richness and depth of this prophetic title as compared with modern terminology: ‘the Absolute, the Infinite, the Unconditioned, the First Cause, the Moral Governor,’ and so on (cf
Solomon - Tradition makes Nathan the prophet his instructor, Jehiel was Governor of the royal princes (1 Chronicles 27:32)
Isidorus, Archbaptist of Seville - " The Governor of the city, Sisisclus, and the treasurer Suanilanus were present
Jeru'Salem - (2 Chronicles 25:23 ; 26:9 ; Jeremiah 31:38 ; Zechariah 14:10 ) ...
Gate of Joshua, Governor of the city
Trade And Commerce - The Governors of senatorial provinces had the right to issue coins, which after a. 6 bore the portrait, not of the Governor, but of a member or members of the Imperial family
Food - The humble sparrow ( Matthew 10:29 , Luke 12:6 ) would have been beneath the dignity of a Persian Governor
Jerusalem - 4 Gate of Joshua, Governor of the city
Assumption of Moses - A powerful king of the West (Varus, Governor of Syria) invades the land, burns part of the Temple, and crucifies some of the people
Jesus Christ - Pliny, who was appointed Governor of the province of Bithynia by the emperor Trajan, in the year 103, examined and punished several Christians for their non-conformity to the established religion of the empire
Will - The natural benefits or evils arising out of moral or immoral practices are, in fact, so many rewards or punishments, exhibiting the Being who has so constituted our nature as a moral Governor
Palestine - , Herod the Great becoming sole Governor of Judæa (under Roman suzerainty) in b. Herod died shortly after Christ’s birth, and his dominions were subdivided into provinces, each under a separate ruler: but the native rulers rapidly declined in power, and the Roman Governors as rapidly advanced
Progress - Knowing this, moreover, He, in the exercise of marvellous faith and patience, left, meanwhile, the renewal of man’s social life in all its diversified forms of manifestation, in the hands, and to the times and ways, of God as the moral Governor of the world
Jerusalem - ...
(4) Of Joshua, Governor of the city (2 Kings 23:8)
Prophecy - "As God is invisible and spiritual, there was cause to fear, that, in the first and ruder ages of the world, when men were busier in cultivating the earth than in cultivating arts and sciences, and in seeking the necessaries of life than in the study of morality, they might forget their Creator and Governor; and, therefore, God maintained amongst them the great article of faith in him, by manifestations of himself; by sending angels to declare his will; by miracles, and by prophecies
Acts of the Apostles - Paul came there, and afterwards ceased to be so governed otherwise the Governor would have been a ‘proprætor
Dates - The ‘governor (ethnarch) of Aretas’ referred to by St
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - It was the capital of the province of Augustamnica Prima, and as such the seat of a "corrector" or Governor
Trial of Jesus - It was necessary for the Jewish authorities to obtain the Governor’s sanction for the execution of the death sentence, and this involved a fresh trial of the accused. A rough and honest informality marked the opening stages, at least, of the intercourse between the Roman Governor and the Galilaean prisoner
Galatia - the Roman Governor, the coloni of cities founded by the Romans, the incolae of semi-Roman towns, and the Roman historians-such terms as Galatia and Galatae, Asia and Asiani, Africa and Afri, denoted the province and the people of the province
Logos - The effort to conceive of God as absolutely transcendent had resulted in separating Him entirely from the world, of which He had yet to be regarded as the Creator and Governor
Boyhood of Jesus - a Roman Governor had been appointed over Judaea, and Roman law and justice, however defective at times, at least ensured safety for the Boy who had been sought for ten or eleven years before as an Infant
Miracle - The constitution of things was established by the Creator and Governor of the universe, and is undoubtedly the offspring of infinite wisdom, pursuing a plan for the best of purposes
Trade And Commerce - The Governors of senatorial provinces had the right to issue coins, which after a. 6 bore the portrait, not of the Governor, but of a member or members of the Imperial family
Joseph - Seventeen years old when sold into Egypt (Jacob being 108, and Isaac living 12 years afterward), 30 when made Governor (Genesis 30:23-24; Genesis 37:2; Genesis 41:46), John 5:17-20 before Jacob came into Egypt; so born 1906 B
Elijah - " Toward the close of the three and a half years of famine, when it attacked Samaria the capital, Ahab directed his Governor of the palace, the Godfearing Obadiah who had saved and fed a hundred prophets in a cave, to go in one direction and seek some grass to save if possible the horses and mules, while he himself went in the opposite direction for the same purpose
Moravians - As the Elders' Conference of each Congregation is answerable for its proceedings to the Elders' Conference of the Unity, visitations from the latter to the former are held from time to time, that the affairs of each congregation, and the conduct of its immediate Governors, may be intimately known to the supreme executive government of the whole church. At length, in 1792, by the mercy of God, and the kind interference of friends in the Dutch government, the opposition of evil- minded people was over-ruled, and leave granted to send out three missionaries, who, on their arrival, were willing, at the desire of the Governor, to go first to Bavians Kloof, about one hundred and sixty English miles east from Capetown, and there to commence their labours on the spot where George Schmidt had resided
Egypt - Moreover, in the Benihassan monuments, on the provincial Governor's tomb is represented a nomadic chief's arrival with his retinue to pay homage to the prince. The only era on Egyptian monuments distinct from the regnal year of the sovereign is on the tablet of a Governor of Tanis under Rameses II, referring back to the Hyksos, namely, the 400th year from the era of Set the Golden under the Hyksos king, Set-a-Pehti, "Set the Mighty
Jerusalem - 43, and in 40 Herod became Governor of Judæa
Forgiveness (2) - To a true believer in one God this is an axiom; there is but one Governor and there can be but one Fount of pardon
Paul - Paul was encouraged in a vision, to persevere in his exertions to convert the inhabitants of Corinth; and although he met with great opposition and disturbance from the unbelieving Jews, and was accused by them before Gallio, the Roman Governor of Achaia, he continued there a year and six months, "teaching the word of God
Persecution - If Jahweh was a moral Governor, and if, further, the national life was totally at variance with the requirements of ethical religion, the expected ‘day of Jahweh’ would be darkness and not light-disaster, not deliverance (Amos 5:18)
Ambrosius of Milan - Theodosius, hearing of this violence, had ordered that the bishop should rebuild the synagogue at his own expense, and that the rioters, who were chiefly monks, should be punished at the discretion of the local Governor
Basilides, Gnostic Sect Founder - Again another Archon arose out of the seed-mass, inferior to the first Archon, but superior to all else below except the sonship; and he likewise made to himself a son wiser than himself, and became the creator and Governor of the aerial world
Chrysostom, John, Bishop of Constantinople - The public baths were ransacked; the praetorium was attacked and the mob with difficulty repulsed, the Governor saving himself by flight through a back door, and finally the hall of judgment was stormed
Babylon - And at a later period, or about 130 years before the birth of Christ, Humerus, a Parthian Governor, who was noted as excelling all tyrants in cruelty, exercised great severities on the Babylonians; and having burned the forum and some of the temples, and destroyed the fairest parts of the city, reduced many of the inhabitants to slavery on the slightest pretexts, and caused them, together with all their households, to be sent into Media
Jerusalem - The burial place of the Jews is over the valley of Kedron, and the fees for breaking the soil afford a considerable revenue to the Governor
Justinianus i, Emperor - The resistance in Africa was broken by similar violent means, a good many bishops being deposed and imprisoned in convents, under the auspices of the metropolitan Primasius of Carthage, and by the secular arm of the Governor