What does Goat mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
וּשְׂעִ֥יר hairy. / he-goat 6
הַשָּׂעִ֔יר hairy. / he-goat 4
גְּדִ֖י kid 3
עִזִּ֖ים female goat 2
עִזִּֽים female goat 2
עֵ֖ז female goat 2
הַשָּׂעִ֥יר hairy. / he-goat 2
שְׂעִ֤יר hairy. / he-goat 2
שְׂעִ֣יר hairy. / he-goat 2
צְפִיר־ he-goat. 1
וְהַ֨צָּפִ֔יר he-goat. 1
וּצְפִ֥יר he-goat. 1
וְהַצָּפִ֥יר he-goat. 1
ἔριφον a kid 1
שְׂעִיר־ hairy. / he-goat 1
וְשָׂעִ֖יר hairy. / he-goat 1
עֵ֥ז female goat 1
וְהַשָּׂעִ֗יר hairy. / he-goat 1
הַשָּׂעִיר֮ hairy. / he-goat 1
הַשָּׂעִיר֙ hairy. / he-goat 1
עֵ֛ז female goat 1
עֵז֙ female goat 1
בָעִזִּֽים female goat 1
וְדִישֹׁ֖ן a clean animal 1
הַגְּדִ֣י kid 1
גְּדִ֣י kid 1
גְּדִ֥י kid 1
גְּדִ֤י kid 1
הַגְּדִ֔י kid 1
גְּדִֽי־ kid 1
הָֽעִזִּים֙ female goat 1
וָעֵ֖ז female goat 1
הָעִזִּ֖ים female goat 1
וְעֵ֥ז female goat 1
הָֽעִזִּ֗ים female goat 1
הָעִזִּים֙ female goat 1
עִזִּ֔ים female goat 1
עִזִּים֙ female goat 1
וְאַקּ֥וֹ wild goat. 1
תָ֑יִשׁ he-goat. 1

Definitions Related to Goat

H8163


   1 hairy.
   2 he-Goat, buck.
      2a as sacrificial animal.
      2b satyr, may refer to a demon possessed Goat like the swine of Gadara (Mt. 8:30–32).
                                 

H1423


   1 kid, young male Goat.
   

H5795


   1 female Goat, she-Goat, Goat, kid.
   

H6842


   1 he-Goat.
   

H8495


   1 he-Goat.
   

H689


   1 wild Goat.
   

H1788


   1 a clean animal,.
      1a pygarg, a kind of antelope or gazelle.
      1b perhaps mountain Goat.
      1c perhaps an extinct animal, exact meaning unknown.
      

G2056


   1 a kid, a young Goat.
   

Frequency of Goat (original languages)

Frequency of Goat (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Goat
Heb. 'ez, the she-goat (Genesis 15:9 ; 30:35 ; 31:38 ). This Hebrew word is also used for the he-goat (Exodus 12:5 ; Leviticus 4:23 ; Numbers 28:15 ), and to denote a kid (Genesis 38:17,20 ). Hence it may be regarded as the generic name of the animal as domesticated. It literally means "strength," and points to the superior strength of the goat as compared with the sheep.
Heb. 'attud, only in plural; rendered "rams" (Genesis 31:10,12 ); he-goats (Numbers 7:17-88 ; Isaiah 1:11 ); goats (Deuteronomy 32:14 ; Psalm 50:13 ). They were used in sacrifice (Psalm 66:15 ). This word is used metaphorically for princes or chiefs in Isaiah 14:9 , and in Zechariah 10:3 as leaders. (Compare Jeremiah 50:8 .)
Heb. gedi, properly a kid. Its flesh was a delicacy among the Hebrews (Genesis 27:9,14,17 ; Judges 6:19 ).
Heb. sa'ir, meaning the "shaggy," a hairy goat, a he-goat (2 Chronicles 29:23 ); "a goat" (Leviticus 4:24 ); "satyr" (Isaiah 13:21 ); "devils" (Leviticus 17:7 ). It is the goat of the sin-offering (Leviticus 9:3,15 ; 10:16 ).
Heb. tsaphir, a he-goat of the goats (2 Chronicles 29:21 ). In Daniel 8:5,8 it is used as a symbol of the Macedonian empire.
Heb. tayish, a "striker" or "butter," rendered "he-goat" (Genesis 30:35 ; 32:14 ).
Heb. 'azazel (q.v.), the "scapegoat" (Leviticus 16:8,10,26 ).
There are two Hebrew words used to denote the undomesticated goat:, Yael , Only in plural mountain goats ( 1 Samuel 24:2 ; Job 39:1 ; Ps.104:18). It is derived from a word meaning "to climb." It is the ibex, which abounded in the mountainous parts of Moab. And 'Akko , Only in Deuteronomy 14:5 , the wild goat. Goats are mentioned in the New Testament in Matthew 25:32,33 ; Hebrews 9:12,13,19 ; 10:4 . They represent oppressors and wicked men (Ezekiel 34:17 ; 39:18 ; Matthew 25:33 ).
Several varieties of the goat were familiar to the Hebrews. They had an important place in their rural economy on account of the milk they afforded and the excellency of the flesh of the kid. They formed an important part of pastoral wealth (Genesis 31:10,12;32:14 ;; 1 Samuel 25:2 ).
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Goat
Goat. There are many varieties of the goat; four were most likely known to the Hebrews: 1. The domestic Syrian long-eared breed, with horns rather small and variously bent; the ears longer than the head, and pendulous; hair long, often black. 2. The Angora, or rather Anadolia breed of Asia Minor, with long hair, more or less fine. 3. The Egyptian goat, with small spiral horns, long brown hair, and very long ears. 4. A goat of Upper Egypt without horns, having the nasal bones singularly elevated, the nose contracted, with the lower jaw protruding the incisors. Genesis 15:9. Several words are used in Hebrew for this animal. Goats constituted a large part of Hebrew flocks; for the milk and the flesh were articles of food. Genesis 27:9; 1 Samuel 25:2; Proverbs 27:27. As clean animals they were used in sacrifice, Exodus 12:5; Hebrews 9:13; and their hair was manufactured into a thick cloth. Of this, one of the coverings of the tabernacle was made, Exodus 25:4; Exodus 26:7; and it was on this material that in all probability Paul was employed. Acts 18:3. There is a Hebrew word also which occurs four times, rendered thrice "wild goats." 1 Samuel 24:2; Job 39:1; Psalms 104:18, and once "roe," R. V. "doe," Proverbs 5:19. This, there can be little doubt, is the ibex, which is specially formed for climbing, its forelegs being shorter than the hinder. The word translated "devils," R. V. "he-goats," in Leviticus 17:7; 2 Chronicles 11:15, is one of the ordinary terms for a goat, signifying hairy. This animal is sometimes introduced in Scripture symbolically, as in Daniel 8:5; Daniel 8:21; comp. Matthew 25:32-33.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Scape-Goat
SCAPE-GOAT . See Azazel, Atonement [1].
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Goat
The well-known animal, regarded as clean under the Levitical economy, and having a large place in the sacrifices. Goats formed an important item in the property of the patriarchs. In Daniel's prophecy of the kingdoms, that of Greece was comparedto a 'rough he goat,' but with a notable horn between his eyes. Daniel 8:5,8,21 . The goats, in the sessional judgement of the living nations, represent the lost, in contrast to the saved, who are compared to sheep. Matthew 25:32,33 . THE WILD GOATSwere larger animals and lived on the mountains. 1 Samuel 24:2 ; Job 39:1 ; Psalm 104:18 .
Webster's Dictionary - Billy Goat
A male goat.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Goat
See Animals in the Bible.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Wild Goat
See Animals .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Goat
1. Wild goat, yeliym , the ibex of ancient Moab.
2. The goat deer, or else gazelle, aqow .
3. The atuwd , "he goat", the leader of the flock; hence the chief ones of the earth, leaders in mighty wickedness; the ram represents headstrong wantonness and offensive lust (Isaiah 14:9; Zechariah 10:3; compare Matthew 25:32-33; Ezekiel 34:17). As the word "shepherds" describes what they ought to have been, so "he goats" what they were; heading the flock, they were foremost in sin, so they shall be foremost in punishment. In Song of Solomon 4:1 the hair of the bride is said to be "as a flock of goats that appear from mount Gilead," alluding to the fine silky hair of some breeds of goat, the angora and others. Amos (Amos 3:12) speaks of a shepherd "taking out of the mouth of the lion a piece of an ear," alluding to the long pendulous ears of the Syrian breed. In Proverbs 30:31 a he goat is mentioned as one of the "four things comely in going," in allusion to the stately march of the leader of the flock.
4. Sair , the goat of the sin-offering (Leviticus 9:3), "the rough hairy goat" (Daniel 8:21). Sa'ir is used of devils (Leviticus 17:7), "the evil spirits of the desert" (Isaiah 13:21; Isaiah 34:14).
5. Αzazeel , "the scape-goat" (Leviticus 16:8; Leviticus 16:10; Leviticus 16:26 margin) (See ATONEMENT, DAY OF.) The "he goat" represented Graeco-Macedonia; Caranus, the first king of Macedon, was in legend led by goats to Edessa, his capital, which he named "the goat city." The one-horned goat is on coins of Archclaus king of Macedon, and a pilaster of Persepolis. So Daniel 8:5.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Goat
GOAT.—See Animals, p. 63b.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Goat, Scape
See ATONEMENT and ATONEMENT, DAY OF.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Scape-Goat
See ATONEMENT and ATONEMENT, DAY OF.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Goat
GOAT . (1) ‘çz , used generically, both sexes, Genesis 30:35 , Exodus 12:5 , Ezra 6:17 etc. (2) tsâphîr (root ‘to leap’), ‘he-goat,’ 2 Chronicles 29:21 , Ezra 8:35 , Daniel 8:5 ; Daniel 8:8 . (3) sâ‘îr (root ‘hairy’), usually a he-goat, e.g. Daniel 8:21 ‘rough goat’; se‘îrah , Leviticus 5:6 ‘she-goat’; se‘îrîm , tr. [1] ‘devils’ 2 Chronicles 11:15 , ‘satyrs’ Isaiah 13:21 ; Isaiah 34:14 . See Satyr. (4) ‘attûd , only in pl. ‘attûdîm , ‘he-goats’ Genesis 31:10 ; Genesis 31:12 , AVm [2] and RV [3] ‘chief ones’ Isaiah 14:8 , but RVm [4] ‘he-goats.’ (5) tayîsh , ‘he-goat,’ Proverbs 30:31 etc. In NT eriphos, eriphion , Matthew 25:32-33 ; tragos , Hebrews 9:12-13 ; Hebrews 9:19 ; Hebrews 10:4 . Goats are among the most valued possessions of the people of Palestine. Nabal had a thousand goats ( 1 Samuel 25:2 ; see also Genesis 30:33 ; Genesis 30:35 ; Genesis 32:14 etc.). They are led to pasture with the sheep, but are from time to time separated from them for milking, herding, and even feeding ( Matthew 25:32 ). Goats thrive on extraordinarily bare pasturage, but they do immeasurable destruction to young trees and shrubs, and are responsible for much of the barrenness of the hills. Goats supply most of the milk used in Palestine ( Proverbs 27:27 ); they are also killed for food, especially the young kids ( Genesis 27:9 , Judges 6:19 ; Judges 13:15 etc.). The Syrian goat ( Capra mambrica ) is black or grey, exceptionally white, and has shaggy hair and remarkably long ears. Goat’s hair is extensively woven into cloaks and material for tents ( Exodus 26:7 ; Exodus 36:14 ), and their skins are tanned entire to make water-bottles. See Bottle.
Wild goat . (1) yâ‘çl (cf. proper name Jael ), used in pl. ye’çlîm , 1 Samuel 24:2 , Psalms 104:18 , and Job 39:1 . (2) ’akkô , Deuteronomy 14:5 . Probably both these terms refer to the wild goat or ibex, Capra beden , the beden or ‘goats of Moses’ of the Arabs. It is common on the inaccessible cliffs round the Dead Sea, some of which are known as jebel el-beden , the ‘mountains of the wild goats’ (cf. 1 Samuel 24:2 ). The ibex is very shy, and difficult to shoot. Though about the size of an ordinary goat, its great curved horns, often 3 feet long, give it a much more imposing appearance.
E. W. G. Masterman.
King James Dictionary - Goat
GOAT, n. An animal or quadruped of the genus Capra. The horns are hollow, turned upwards, erect and scabrous. Goats are nearly of the size of sheep, but stronger, less timid and more agile. They delight to frequent rocks and mountains, and subsist on scanty coarse food. The milk of the goat is sweet, nourishing and medicinal, and the flesh furnishes provisions to the inhabitants of countries where they abound.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Goat
This animal was one of the clean beasts, and used in the Jewish church both for food and sacrifice. (Leviticus 16:5) and the veil of the tabernacle was made of the hair of the goat. (Exodus 25:4) But in the after ages of the church, the goat became figurative of the ungodly. And, perhaps, this arose from the calves and devils (literally goats), which Jeroboam set up for idol worship. (See 2 Corinthians 11:14-15) Hence the Lord is represented by the prophet, as punishing the goats; that is, the worshippers of those dunghill idols. (Zechariah 10:3) Hence also another prophet exclaims, "Hell from beneath is moved for thee, to meet thee at thy coming; it stirreth up the dead for thee, even all the chief ones of the earth;" The margin of the Bible hath it, even all the great goats of the earth; meaning the princes and great men. (Isaiah 14:9) Hence our blessed Lord, in describing the solemn events of the last day, describes the wicked and ungodly as goats on his left hand, destined for destruction. (Matthew 25:33)
I have been more particular on this subject, in order to explain wherefore it is, that as the goat was by the Lord's own appointment of the clean beasts both for good and sacrifice, that the Lord Jesus and his servant should make the goat a figure, or emblem, of the reprobate, and as distinguished from the sheep of his fold. And this the account of the goat set up as an idol by Jeroboam, and sacrificed to by the people in direct opposition to the God of Israel, very fully explains.
While I am upon this subject of the goat, it may not be unacceptable to the pious reader, to say a few words on the very striking ceremony appointed by the Lord of the scape goat on the great day of atonement. I need not describe the ceremony itself, for the reader will find a full account thereof, Leviticus 16:1-34. There is somewhat most wonderfully interesting when this service of the scape goat is considered with an eye to Christ. The high priest laying both his hands on the head of the beast, and making a confession over him of all the iniquities of the children of Israel, with all their transgressions in all their sins, as if transferring both the sin and guilt from themselves to another; certainly this had no meaning but in reference to the Lord Jesus Christ; and certainly, beheld in allusion to him, the whole service becomes plain and obvious. The Suretyship of Christ is hereby most blessedly shadowed forth; and both the law of God and the justice of God in that Suretyship evidently satisfied. Indeed, the type falls short of the thing itself in one point; for the scape goat was altogether passive in the act, but Christ, in his voluntary surrender of himself, manifested a willing offering. On the part of God the Father, the type, and the thing signified by the type, became one and the same. For though it is out of any creature's power, to make a transfer of sin to another, yet it is not beyond the sovereignty and prerogative of God. And when the Lord Jesus, at the call of God, stood up from everlasting as the covenant Head of his people, his voluntary offering gave efficacy to the whole. In this he undertook to answer for all their sins, and to do away the whole of their guilt and pollution by the sacrifice of himself. Hence JEHOVAH is represented by the prophet, as "laying upon him the iniquity of us all." (Isaiah 53:6) And Jesus is no less represented as saying, "Lo, I come to do thy will, O God." (Psalms 40:7-8)
I would just ask the reader, whether such a view doth not bring comfort to the soul, in thus beholding the transfer of sin, with all its defilement, taken from our poor nature, and put upon the person of Christ. How blessed must it have been in God the Holy Ghost, to have had the representation made of it in an age so distant from the thing itself, as if to testify the Lord's approbation of it in the people's safety. Though the Scriptures are silent upon it, yet the history of the scape goat among the Jews, has handed down by tradition the account, which is not uninteresting. It is said, that when the two goats were led into the inner court of the temple and presented to the high priest, according to the Lord's appointment of casting lots, (Leviticus 16:8) the scape goat, or as the margin of the Bible expresseth it, the Azazel, had then a fillet, or a narrow piece of scarlet, fastened to its head, which soon became white. And hence the prophet is supposed to allude when saying, "though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool." (Isaiah 1:18) The scape goat was then sent away, by the hand of some fit man, or as the margin of the Bible hath it, by a man of opportunity, into the wilderness. Some of the Jews say, that the edge of the wilderness had a precipice where the Azazel fell over, and was dashed to pieces. But the "wilderness which no man went through, and none inhabited," carried with it the same idea, that "the iniquity of Israel when, sought for, there should be none; and the sins of Judah, and they should not be found." (Jeremiah 50:20) When the Lord puts away sin, in Scripture language it is said, "that he remembers it no more." (Hebrews 8:12 with Jeremiah 31:34)
Vine's Expository Dictionary of OT Words - Goat-Demons
Śâ‛ı̂yr (שָׂעִר, Strong's #8163), “goat-demons; goat-idols.” This word occurs 4 times in biblical Hebrew. In its first biblical appearance, the word represents “goat-demons” (some scholars translate it “goat-idols”): “And they shall no more offer their sacrifices unto devils [1], after whom they have gone a whoring” (Lev. 17:7). This passage demonstrates that the word represents beings that were objects of pagan worship. Worship of these “demons” persisted long in the history of Israel, appearing under Jeroboam I (929-909 B.C.), who “… ordained him priests for the high places, and for the devils [2], and for the calves which he had made” (2 Chron. 11:15). In this instance, śâ‛ı̂yr represents idols that Jeroboam had manufactured. Josiah’s revival probably involved the breaking down of the high places of the goat-demons (2 Kings 23:8).
Webster's Dictionary - Jaal Goat
A species of wild goat (Capra Nubiana) found in the mountains of Abyssinia, Upper Egypt, and Arabia; - called also beden, and jaela.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Goat
עז . There are other names or appellations given to the goat, as,
1. חשופּ? , 1 Kings 20:27 , which means the ram-goat, or leader of the flock.
2. עתודים , a word which never occurs but in the plural, and means, the best prepared, or choicest of the flock; and metaphorically princes, as, Zechariah 10:3 , "I will visit the goats, saith the Lord," that is, I will begin my vengeance with the princes of the people. "Hell from beneath is moved for thee, to meet thee at thy coming; it stirreth up the dead for thee, even all the great goats of the earth," Isaiah 14:9 ; all the kings, all the great men. And Jeremiah, speaking of the princes of the Jews, says, "Remove out of the midst of Babylon, and be as the he-goats before the flocks," Jeremiah 1, 8.
3. צפיר , a name for the goat, of Chaldee origin, and found only in Ezra 6:17 ; Ezra 8:35 ; Daniel 8:5 ; Daniel 8:21 .
4. עזאזל , from עז , a goat, and אזל , to wander about, Leviticus 16:8 , "the scape-goat."
5. שער , hairy, or shaggy, whence שעירים , "the shaggy ones." In Leviticus 17:7 , it is said, "And they shall no more offer their sacrifices unto devils," ( seirim, "hairy ones,") "after whom they have gone a whoring." The word here means idolatrous images of goats, worshipped by the Egyptians. It is the same word that is translated satyrs, in Isaiah 13:21 ; where the LXX render it δαιμονια , demons. But here they have ματαιοις , to vain things or idols, which comes to the same sense. What gives light to so obscure a passage is what we read in Maimonides, that the Zabian idolaters worshipped demons under the figure of goats, imagining them to appear in that form, whence they called them by the names of seirim; and that this custom, being spread among other nations, gave occasion to this precept. In like manner we learn from Herodotus, that the Egyptians of Mendes held goats to be sacred animals, and represented the god Pan with the legs and head of that animal. From those ancient idolaters the same notion seems to have been derived by the Greeks and Romans, who represented their Pan, their fauns, satyrs, and other idols, in the form of goats: from all which it is highly probable, that the Israelites had learned in Egypt to worship certain demons, or sylvan deities, under the symbolical figure of goats. Though the phrase, "after whom they have gone a whoring," is equivalent in Scripture to that of committing idolatry, yet we are not to suppose that it is not to be taken in a literal sense in many places, even where it is used in connection with idolatrous acts of worship. It is well known that Baal-peor and Ashtaroth were worshipped with unclean rites, and that public prostitution formed a grand part of the worship of many deities among the Egyptians, Moabites, Canaanites, &c.
The goat was one of the clean beasts which the Israelites might both eat and offer in sacrifice. The kid, גדי , is often mentioned as a food, in a way that implies that it was considered as a delicacy. The אקו , or wild goat, mentioned Deuteronomy 14:5 , and no where else in the Hebrew Bible, is supposed to be the tragelaphus, or "goat-deer." Schultens conjectures that this animal might have its name, ob fugacitatem, from its shyness, or running away. The word יעל , occurs 1 Samuel 24:3 ; Job 39:1 ; Psalms 104:18 ; Proverbs 5:19 : and various have been the sentiments of interpreters on the animal intended by it. Bochart insists that it is the ibex, or "rock-goat." The root whence the name is derived, signifies to ascend, to mount; and the ibex is famous for clambering, climbing, and leaping, on the most craggy precipices. The Arab writers attribute to the jaal very long horns, bending backward; consequently it cannot be the chamois. The horns of the jaal are reckoned among the valuable articles of traffic, Ezekiel 27:15 . The ibex is finely shaped, graceful in its motions, and gentle in its manners. The female is particularly celebrated by natural historians for tender affection to her young, and the incessant vigilance with which she watches over their safety; and also for ardent attachment and fidelity to her mate.
Webster's Dictionary - Jemlah Goat
The jharal.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Goat
A well-known animal, resembling the sheep, but covered with hair instead of wool. Large flocks of them were kept by the Jews, Genesis 27:9 1 Samuel 25:2 2 Chronicles 17:11 . They were regarded as clean for sacrifice, Exodus 12:5 Leviticus 3:12 Numbers 15:27 ; and their milk and the young kids were much used for food, Deuteronomy 14:4 Judges 6:19 Proverbs 27:27 Luke 15:29 . The common leather bottles were made of their skins. Several kinds of goats were kept in Palestine: one kind having long hair, like the Angora, and another, long and broad ears. This kind is probably referred to in Amos 3:12 , and is still the common goat of Palestine.
Herodotus says, that at Mendes, in Lower Egypt, both the male and female goat were worshipped. The heathen god Pan was represented with the face and thighs of a goat. The heathen paid divine honors also to real goats, as appears in the table of Isis. The abominations committed during the feast of these infamous deities cannot be told.
WILD GOATS are mentioned in 1 Samuel 24:2 Job 39:1 Psalm 104:18 . This is doubtless the Ibex, or mountain goat, a large and vigorous animal still found in the mountains in the peninsula of Sinai, and east and south of the Dead Sea.
These goats are very similar to the bouquetin or chamois of the Alps. They feed in flocks of a score or two, wit one of their number acting as a sentinel. At the slightest alarm, they are gone in an instant, darting fearlessly over the rocks, and falling on their horns from a great height without injury. Their horns are two or three feet long, and are sold by the Arabs for knife-handles, etc. For SCAPEGOAT , see EXPIATION .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Goat, Scape
[1]
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Goat
There appear to be two or three varieties of the common goat, Hircus agagrus , at present bred in Palestine and Syria, but whether they are identical with those which were reared by the ancient Hebrews it is not possible to say. The most marked varieties are the Syrian goat( Capra mammorica, Linn.) and the Angora goat ( Capra angorensis , Linn.), with fine long hair. As to the "wild goats," ( 1 Samuel 24:2 ; Job 39:1 ; Psalm 104:18 ) it is not at all improbable that some species of ibex is denoted.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Goat
GOAT.—See Animals, p. 63b.

Sentence search

Paseng - ) The wild or bezoar Goat. See Goat
Chamal - ) The Angora Goat. See Angora Goat, under Angora
Oatskin - ) Made of the skin of a Goat. ) The skin of a Goat, or leather made from it
Goat - Wild Goat, yeliym , the ibex of ancient Moab. The Goat deer, or else gazelle, aqow . The atuwd , "he Goat", the leader of the flock; hence the chief ones of the earth, leaders in mighty wickedness; the ram represents headstrong wantonness and offensive lust (Isaiah 14:9; Zechariah 10:3; compare Matthew 25:32-33; Ezekiel 34:17). As the word "shepherds" describes what they ought to have been, so "he Goats" what they were; heading the flock, they were foremost in sin, so they shall be foremost in punishment. In Song of Solomon 4:1 the hair of the bride is said to be "as a flock of Goats that appear from mount Gilead," alluding to the fine silky hair of some breeds of Goat, the angora and others. In Proverbs 30:31 a he Goat is mentioned as one of the "four things comely in going," in allusion to the stately march of the leader of the flock. Sair , the Goat of the sin-offering (Leviticus 9:3), "the rough hairy Goat" (Daniel 8:21). Αzazeel , "the scape-goat" (Leviticus 16:8; Leviticus 16:10; Leviticus 16:26 margin) (See ATONEMENT, DAY OF. ) The "he Goat" represented Graeco-Macedonia; Caranus, the first king of Macedon, was in legend led by Goats to Edessa, his capital, which he named "the Goat city. " The one-horned Goat is on coins of Archclaus king of Macedon, and a pilaster of Persepolis
Oatsucker - the European species (Caprimulgus Europaeus); - so called from the mistaken notion that it sucks Goats. The European species is also Goat-milker, Goat owl, Goat chaffer, fern owl, night hawk, nightjar, night churr, churr-owl, gnat hawk, and dorhawk
Goat-Demons - Śâ‛ı̂yr (שָׂעִר, Strong's #8163), “goat-demons; Goat-idols. In its first biblical appearance, the word represents “goat-demons” (some scholars translate it “goat-idols”): “And they shall no more offer their sacrifices unto devils [1], after whom they have gone a whoring” ( Goat-demons (2 Kings 23:8)
Doe - See ‘ Wild Goat , s. Goat
Chamois - Not the well-known mountain Goat of southern Europe, but probably a variety of wild sheep, resembling a Goat, and still found in Arabia Petraea, Deuteronomy 14:5
Goat - 'ez, the she-goat (Genesis 15:9 ; 30:35 ; 31:38 ). This Hebrew word is also used for the he-goat (Exodus 12:5 ; Leviticus 4:23 ; Numbers 28:15 ), and to denote a kid (Genesis 38:17,20 ). It literally means "strength," and points to the superior strength of the Goat as compared with the sheep. 'attud, only in plural; rendered "rams" (Genesis 31:10,12 ); he-goats (Numbers 7:17-88 ; Isaiah 1:11 ); Goats (Deuteronomy 32:14 ; Psalm 50:13 ). sa'ir, meaning the "shaggy," a hairy Goat, a he-goat (2 Chronicles 29:23 ); "a Goat" (Leviticus 4:24 ); "satyr" (Isaiah 13:21 ); "devils" (Leviticus 17:7 ). It is the Goat of the sin-offering (Leviticus 9:3,15 ; 10:16 ). tsaphir, a he-goat of the Goats (2 Chronicles 29:21 ). tayish, a "striker" or "butter," rendered "he-goat" (Genesis 30:35 ; 32:14 ). ), the "scapegoat" (Leviticus 16:8,10,26 ). ...
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There are two Hebrew words used to denote the undomesticated Goat:, Yael , Only in plural mountain Goats ( 1 Samuel 24:2 ; Job 39:1 ; Deuteronomy 14:5 , the wild Goat. Goats are mentioned in the New Testament in Matthew 25:32,33 ; Hebrews 9:12,13,19 ; 10:4 . ...
Several varieties of the Goat were familiar to the Hebrews
Kid - [1]
Scapegoat - Leviticus 16:8-26 ; RSV, "the Goat for Azazel" (q. ), the name given to the Goat which was taken away into the wilderness on the day of Atonement (16:20-22). The priest made atonement over the scapegoat, laying Israel's guilt upon it, and then sent it away, the Goat bearing "upon him all their iniquities unto a land not inhabited. "The Goat was conducted to a mountain named Tzuk, situated at a distance of ten Sabbath days' journey, or about six and a half English miles, from Jerusalem. At this place the Judean desert was supposed to commence; and the man in whose charge the Goat was sent out, while setting him free, was instructed to push the unhappy beast down the slope of the mountain side, which was so steep as to insure the death of the Goat, whose bones were broken by the fall. The reason of this barbarous custom was that on one occasion the scapegoat returned to Jerusalem after being set free, which was considered such an evil omen that its recurrence was prevented for the future by the death of the Goat" (Twenty-one Years' Work in the Holy Land)
Aran - The name denotes ‘a wild Goat,’ and Dishan ‘an antelope’ or ‘gazelle’; while Seir the ancestor is ‘the he-goat
Uzzah - Strength; Goat
Billy Goat - A male Goat
Gaza - Strong; a Goat
Azazel - The scape-goat
Oot - ) A Goat
Kid - A young Goat. KID, or 1 To bring forth a young Goat
Kid - * For KID see Goat ...
Caprigenous - ) Of the Goat kind
Goat - GOAT
Zibiah - The Lord dwells; deer; Goat
Azmaveth - Strong death; a he-goat
Oatlike - ) Like a Goat; Goatish
ja-a'Lah - (wild Goat )
Goat - GOAT
Jaala - Ascending; a little doe or Goat
Oatish - ) Characteristic of a Goat; Goatlike
Satyr - Mentioned in Greek mythology as a creature composed of a man and a Goat, supposed to inhabit wild and desolate regions. The Hebrew word is rendered also "goat" (Leviticus 4:24 ) and "devil", i. , an idol in the form of a Goat (17:7; 2 Chronicles 11:15 )
Goat - There appear to be two or three varieties of the common Goat, Hircus agagrus , at present bred in Palestine and Syria, but whether they are identical with those which were reared by the ancient Hebrews it is not possible to say. The most marked varieties are the Syrian Goat( Capra mammorica, Linn. ) and the Angora Goat ( Capra angorensis , Linn. As to the "wild Goats," ( 1 Samuel 24:2 ; Job 39:1 ; Psalm 104:18 ) it is not at all improbable that some species of ibex is denoted
Ibex - A species of wild Goat with large curved horns, native to high mountain areas. The precise identity of the animal (whether Goat or antelope) is uncertain
Scape-Goat - SCAPE-GOAT
Capriform - ) Having the form of a Goat
Gaddiel - Goat of God; the Lord my happiness
Capriped - ) Having feet like those of a Goat
Capra - ) A genus of ruminants, including the common Goat
Caprine - ) Of or pertaining to a Goat; as, caprine gambols
Oral - ) An Indian Goat antelope (Nemorhedus goral), resembling the chamois
Oral - ) An Indian Goat antelope (Nemorhedus goral), resembling the chamois
Azazel - (Leviticus 16:8,10,26 , Revised Version only here; rendered "scape-goat" in the Authorized Version). But when we remember that the two Goats together form a type of Christ, on whom the Lord "laid the iniquity of us all," and examine into the root meaning of this word (viz. , "separation"), the interpretation of those who regard the one Goat as representing the atonement made, and the other, that "for Azazel," as representing the effect of the great work of atonement (viz. The one Goat which was "for Jehovah" was offered as a sin-offering, by which atonement was made. But the sins must also be visibly banished, and therefore they were symbolically laid by confession on the other Goat, which was then "sent away for Azazel" into the wilderness. It was important that the result of the sacrifices offered by the high priest alone in the sanctuary should be embodied in a visible transaction, and hence the dismissal of the "scape-goat. As the Goat "for Jehovah" was to witness to the demerit of sin and the need of the blood of atonement, so the Goat "for Azazel" was to witness to the efficacy of the sacrifice and the result of the shedding of blood in the taking away of sin
Aran - Wild Goat, a descendant of Seir the Horite (Genesis 36:28 )
Angola - ) A fabric made from the wool of the Angora Goat
Kid - See Goat, and (for Exodus 23:19 ) Magic, p
Goat - Goat . (2) tsâphîr (root ‘to leap’), ‘he-goat,’ 2 Chronicles 29:21 , Ezra 8:35 , Daniel 8:5 ; Daniel 8:8 . (3) sâ‘îr (root ‘hairy’), usually a he-goat, e. Daniel 8:21 ‘rough Goat’; se‘îrah , Leviticus 5:6 ‘she-goat’; se‘îrîm , tr. ‘attûdîm , ‘he-goats’ Genesis 31:10 ; Genesis 31:12 , AVm [4] ‘he-goats. ’ (5) tayîsh , ‘he-goat,’ Proverbs 30:31 etc. Goats are among the most valued possessions of the people of Palestine. Nabal had a thousand Goats ( 1 Samuel 25:2 ; see also Genesis 30:33 ; Genesis 30:35 ; Genesis 32:14 etc. Goats thrive on extraordinarily bare pasturage, but they do immeasurable destruction to young trees and shrubs, and are responsible for much of the barrenness of the hills. Goats supply most of the milk used in Palestine ( Proverbs 27:27 ); they are also killed for food, especially the young kids ( Genesis 27:9 , Judges 6:19 ; Judges 13:15 etc. The Syrian Goat ( Capra mambrica ) is black or grey, exceptionally white, and has shaggy hair and remarkably long ears. Goat’s hair is extensively woven into cloaks and material for tents ( Exodus 26:7 ; Exodus 36:14 ), and their skins are tanned entire to make water-bottles. ...
Wild Goat . Probably both these terms refer to the wild Goat or ibex, Capra beden , the beden or ‘goats of Moses’ of the Arabs. It is common on the inaccessible cliffs round the Dead Sea, some of which are known as jebel el-beden , the ‘mountains of the wild Goats’ (cf. Though about the size of an ordinary Goat, its great curved horns, often 3 feet long, give it a much more imposing appearance
Longhorn - ) A long-horned animal, as a cow, Goat, or beetle
Scapegoat - Scapegoat. See Goat and Atonement
Kid - ) A young Goat. ) A kind of leather made of the skin of the young Goat, or of the skin of rats, etc. ) To bring forth a young Goat
Yean - ) To bring forth young, as a Goat or a sheep; to ean
Ashima - The idol of Hamath, introduced by the Hamathites, the colonists planted in Samaria by Esarhaddon king of Assyria (2 Kings 17:24; 2 Kings 17:30; Ezra 4:2; Ezra 4:10); represented as a Goat with short hair, answering to the Egyptian form of the Greek god Pan, to whom the Goat was sacred
Goat - Goat, n. Goats are nearly of the size of sheep, but stronger, less timid and more agile. The milk of the Goat is sweet, nourishing and medicinal, and the flesh furnishes provisions to the inhabitants of countries where they abound
Scapegoat - Leviticus 16:8 (b) The Goats in this story represent two aspects of the sacrifice of the Lord JESUS. The live Goat which became the scapegoat is a picture of the Saviour living in glory with the marks of Calvary upon Him, having taken away the sin of the world, and having died at Calvary for our sins. The dead Goat represents CHRIST at Calvary, giving up His life for us
Satyr - ...
In mythology, a sylvan deity or demi-god, represented as a monster, half man and half Goat, having horns on his head, a hairy body, with the feet and tail of a Goat
Beden - It is probably the wild Goat of the Bible
Jaala - A wild she-goat, one of the Nethinim, whose descendants returned from the Captivity (Nehemiah 7:58 )
Chikara - ) The Goat antelope (Tragops Bennettii) of India
a'Ran - (wild Goat ), a Horite, son of Dishan and brother of Uz
Caprid - ) Of or pertaining to the tribe of ruminants of which the Goat, or genus Capra, is the type
Angora - ) A city of Asia Minor (or Anatolia) which has given its name to a Goat, a cat, etc
Hircinous - ) Goatlike; of or pertaining to a Goat or the Goats. ) Of a strong Goatish smell
Mazame - ) A Goatlike antelope (Haplocerus montanus) which inhabits the Rocky Mountains, frequenting the highest parts; - called also mountain Goat
Kid - Translation of one of several Hebrew words referring to a young Goat
Scapegoat - The one of the two buck Goats presented before the Lord on the Day of Atonement, chosen by lot to be the emissary Goat, not sacrificed for sin, as his companion, but let go into the wilderness, symbolic of carrying the iniquities of the Chosen People into an uninhabited land; or, as some interpret the emissary Goat to mean the evil spirit, symbolic of turning back on the evil spirit the sins which he instigated (Leviticus 8)
Borachte - , made of the skin of a Goat or other animal
Markhoor - ) A large wild Goat (Capra megaceros), having huge flattened spiral horns
Long-Horned - ) Having a long horn or horns; as, a long-horned Goat, or cow; having long antennae, as certain beetles (Longicornia)
Jaal Goat - A species of wild Goat (Capra Nubiana) found in the mountains of Abyssinia, Upper Egypt, and Arabia; - called also beden, and jaela
Faun - The fauns are usually represented as half Goat and half man
Chamois - An animal of the Goat kind, whose skin is made into soft leather, called shammy
Reyhound - (See under "GOAT")
Scapegoat - On the Day of Atonement, when the high priest went once a year into the holy of holies to offer sacrifices for the sins of his family and for all the people, two Goats were brought before him. ” This Goat was slain as a sin offering, and its blood was sprinkled on the cultic objects to help cleanse the altar, the sanctuary, and the tent of meeting from defilements of the past year. ...
The second Goat was said to be “for Azazel. ” The word Azazel is usually interpreted to mean “the Goat of removal,” or scapegoat. By laying his hands on the Goat's head, the priest transferred the sins of the people to it and then had the Goat led away into the desert, picturing the removal of the sins. The Goat is led to that area and thrown to its death from a cliff. ...
Although the scapegoat is not mentioned by name in the New Testament, Hebrews 10:3-17 contrasts sanctification through the sacrifice of Christ with the blood of bulls and Goats which can never take away sins
Jharal - ) A wild Goat (Capra Jemlaica) which inhabits the loftiest mountains of India
Mohair - ) The long silky hair or wool of the Angora Goat of Asia Minor; also, a fabric made from this material, or an imitation of such fabric
Goat - Goat. There are many varieties of the Goat; four were most likely known to the Hebrews: 1. The Egyptian Goat, with small spiral horns, long brown hair, and very long ears. A Goat of Upper Egypt without horns, having the nasal bones singularly elevated, the nose contracted, with the lower jaw protruding the incisors. Goats constituted a large part of Hebrew flocks; for the milk and the flesh were articles of food. There is a Hebrew word also which occurs four times, rendered thrice "wild Goats. "he-goats," in Leviticus 17:7; 2 Chronicles 11:15, is one of the ordinary terms for a Goat, signifying hairy
Oat - the domestic Goat (C
Oatee - ) A part of a man's beard on the chin or lower lip which is allowed to grow, and trimmed so as to resemble the beard of a Goat
Oat - the domestic Goat (C
Antelope - ) One of a group of ruminant quadrupeds, intermediate between the deer and the Goat
Parchment - ) The skin of a lamb, sheep, Goat, young calf, or other animal, prepared for writing on
Zeuzerian - The Goat moth is an example
ja-a'la - (wild she-goat )
Sheepskin - 1: μηλωτή (Strong's #3374 — Noun Feminine — melote — may-lo-tay' ) from melon, "a sheep or Goat," occurs in Hebrews 11:37
Shammy - ) A soft, pliant leather, prepared originally from the skin of the chamois, but now made also from the skin of the sheep, Goat, kid, deer, and calf
Egophony - ) The sound of a patient's voice so modified as to resemble the bleating of a Goat, heard on applying the ear to the chest in certain diseases within its cavity, as in pleurisy with effusion
Satyr - The word is sair , which signifies 'hairy one,' and hence a 'he Goat. ' It is translated 'goat' and 'kid' many times. The word is translated 'satyr' in Isaiah 13:21 ; Isaiah 34:14 , both passages referring to places brought to utter desolation, so that they are inhabited by wild beasts, owls, and perhaps 'wild Goats' are intended; or that the desolation would be such that men would shun them as if haunted by unearthly beings
Jael - Jael (jâ'el), a wild Goat
Yakin - Its head and neck resemble those of the ox, and its tail is like that of the Goat
Scapegoat - ) A Goat upon whose head were symbolically placed the sins of the people, after which he was suffered to escape into the wilderness
Jarah - (jay' ruh) Personal name meaning, “goat
Zimran - The name is derived from zemer , ‘mountain-sheep or -goat,’ this animal having doubtless been the totem of the clan
Bear - Its food is seeds, fruits, and roots, to which it occasionally adds a Goat or sheep
Goat - Several kinds of Goats were kept in Palestine: one kind having long hair, like the Angora, and another, long and broad ears. This kind is probably referred to in Amos 3:12 , and is still the common Goat of Palestine. ...
Herodotus says, that at Mendes, in Lower Egypt, both the male and female Goat were worshipped. The heathen god Pan was represented with the face and thighs of a Goat. The heathen paid divine honors also to real Goats, as appears in the table of Isis. ...
WILD GoatS are mentioned in 1 Samuel 24:2 Job 39:1 Psalm 104:18 . This is doubtless the Ibex, or mountain Goat, a large and vigorous animal still found in the mountains in the peninsula of Sinai, and east and south of the Dead Sea. ...
These Goats are very similar to the bouquetin or chamois of the Alps. For SCAPEGOAT , see EXPIATION
Bezoar - ) A calculous concretion found in the intestines of certain ruminant animals (as the wild Goat, the gazelle, and the Peruvian llama) formerly regarded as an unfailing antidote for poison, and a certain remedy for eruptive, pestilential, or putrid diseases
Joelah - (joh ee' luh) Personal name meaning, “female mountain Goat
Goat - (Leviticus 16:5) and the veil of the tabernacle was made of the hair of the Goat. (Exodus 25:4) But in the after ages of the church, the Goat became figurative of the ungodly. And, perhaps, this arose from the calves and devils (literally Goats), which Jeroboam set up for idol worship. (See 2 Corinthians 11:14-15) Hence the Lord is represented by the prophet, as punishing the Goats; that is, the worshippers of those dunghill idols. (Zechariah 10:3) Hence also another prophet exclaims, "Hell from beneath is moved for thee, to meet thee at thy coming; it stirreth up the dead for thee, even all the chief ones of the earth;" The margin of the Bible hath it, even all the great Goats of the earth; meaning the princes and great men. (Isaiah 14:9) Hence our blessed Lord, in describing the solemn events of the last day, describes the wicked and ungodly as Goats on his left hand, destined for destruction. (Matthew 25:33)...
I have been more particular on this subject, in order to explain wherefore it is, that as the Goat was by the Lord's own appointment of the clean beasts both for good and sacrifice, that the Lord Jesus and his servant should make the Goat a figure, or emblem, of the reprobate, and as distinguished from the sheep of his fold. And this the account of the Goat set up as an idol by Jeroboam, and sacrificed to by the people in direct opposition to the God of Israel, very fully explains. ...
While I am upon this subject of the Goat, it may not be unacceptable to the pious reader, to say a few words on the very striking ceremony appointed by the Lord of the scape Goat on the great day of atonement. There is somewhat most wonderfully interesting when this service of the scape Goat is considered with an eye to Christ. Indeed, the type falls short of the thing itself in one point; for the scape Goat was altogether passive in the act, but Christ, in his voluntary surrender of himself, manifested a willing offering. Though the Scriptures are silent upon it, yet the history of the scape Goat among the Jews, has handed down by tradition the account, which is not uninteresting. It is said, that when the two Goats were led into the inner court of the temple and presented to the high priest, according to the Lord's appointment of casting lots, (Leviticus 16:8) the scape Goat, or as the margin of the Bible expresseth it, the Azazel, had then a fillet, or a narrow piece of scarlet, fastened to its head, which soon became white. " (Isaiah 1:18) The scape Goat was then sent away, by the hand of some fit man, or as the margin of the Bible hath it, by a man of opportunity, into the wilderness
Chimera - ) A monster represented as vomiting flames, and as having the head of a lion, the body of a Goat, and the tail of a dragon
Capricorn - ) A southern constellation, represented on ancient monuments by the figure of a Goat, or a figure with its fore part like a fish
Roe - ...
The Hebrew word ('ayyalah) in Proverbs 5 :: 19 thus rendered (RSV, "doe"), is properly the "wild she-goat," the mountain Goat, the ibex
Zimran - (zihm' ran) Personal name meaning, “celebrated in song, famous” or “mountain Goat
Goat - There are other names or appellations given to the Goat, as,...
1. חשופּ? , 1 Kings 20:27 , which means the ram-goat, or leader of the flock. עתודים , a word which never occurs but in the plural, and means, the best prepared, or choicest of the flock; and metaphorically princes, as, Zechariah 10:3 , "I will visit the Goats, saith the Lord," that is, I will begin my vengeance with the princes of the people. "Hell from beneath is moved for thee, to meet thee at thy coming; it stirreth up the dead for thee, even all the great Goats of the earth," Isaiah 14:9 ; all the kings, all the great men. And Jeremiah, speaking of the princes of the Jews, says, "Remove out of the midst of Babylon, and be as the he-goats before the flocks," Jeremiah 1, 8. צפיר , a name for the Goat, of Chaldee origin, and found only in Ezra 6:17 ; Ezra 8:35 ; Daniel 8:5 ; Daniel 8:21 . עזאזל , from עז , a Goat, and אזל , to wander about, Leviticus 16:8 , "the scape-goat. " The word here means idolatrous images of Goats, worshipped by the Egyptians. What gives light to so obscure a passage is what we read in Maimonides, that the Zabian idolaters worshipped demons under the figure of Goats, imagining them to appear in that form, whence they called them by the names of seirim; and that this custom, being spread among other nations, gave occasion to this precept. In like manner we learn from Herodotus, that the Egyptians of Mendes held Goats to be sacred animals, and represented the god Pan with the legs and head of that animal. From those ancient idolaters the same notion seems to have been derived by the Greeks and Romans, who represented their Pan, their fauns, satyrs, and other idols, in the form of Goats: from all which it is highly probable, that the Israelites had learned in Egypt to worship certain demons, or sylvan deities, under the symbolical figure of Goats. ...
The Goat was one of the clean beasts which the Israelites might both eat and offer in sacrifice. The אקו , or wild Goat, mentioned Deuteronomy 14:5 , and no where else in the Hebrew Bible, is supposed to be the tragelaphus, or "goat-deer. Bochart insists that it is the ibex, or "rock-goat
Roe, Roebuck - ]'>[1] ‘ doe ’; see ‘Wild Goat’ in art. Goat
Jael - (jay' uhl) Personal name meaning, “mountain Goat
Sin Offering - The victim was a ram instead of a female sheep or Goat. ) The later Jews, instead of setting the scape-goat free in the wilderness, led it to a high precipice called Sook ("narrow") and dashed it down. This was done to avoid the recurrence of what once occurred, namely, the scape-goat came back to Jerusalem, which was thought a bad omen. ...
A tabernacle was erected at every space of 2,000 cubits, to evade the law of the Sabbath day's journey, for they led the scape-goat out on the Sabbath; after eating bread and drinking water the conductor of the Goat could go on to the next tabernacle; ten stages were thus made between Seek and Jerusalem, in all six and a half miles to el Muntar, from whence the conductor caught the first sight of the great desert. Beside the well probably was the tenth tabernacle, to which he returned after precipitating the Goat, and where he sat until sundown, when he might return to Jerusalem
Chamois - It has been suggested that the animal specified is the aoudad, the mountain sheep; others judge the wild Goat to be referred to
Satyr - ) A sylvan deity or demigod, represented as part man and part Goat, and characterized by riotous merriment and lasciviousness
Satyr - A fabled creature of Greek mythology, part man and part Goat, and supposed to be the deity of forests and rural places. margin reads "he Goats," comp
Parchment - pergamena purgo The skin of a sheep or Goat dressed or prepared and rendered fit for writing on
Satyr - (sa'tyr or sat'yr ), a sylvan deity or demigod of Greek mythology, represented as a monster, part man and part Goat. ( Isaiah 13:21 ; 34:14 ) The Hebrew word signifies "hairy" or "rough," and is frequently applied to "he-goats
Scapegoat - The safest and best interpretation is, that the Goat itself symbolically bore away the sins of God's people from His presence and remembrance, Psalm 103:12
Day of Atonement - The priest cast lots over two Goats. The other was presented alive as a scapegoat (Leviticus 16:5 ,Leviticus 16:5,16:7-10 ,Leviticus 16:7-10,16:20-22 ). The blood of the Goat used as the sin offering was sprinkled like that of the bull to make atonement for the sanctuary (Leviticus 16:15 ). The mixed blood of the bull and Goat were applied to the horns of the altar to make atonement for it (Leviticus 16:18 ). The high priest confessed all of the people's sins over the head of the live Goat which was lead away and then released in the wilderness (Leviticus 16:21-22 ). The bodies of the bull and Goat used in the days' ritual were burnt outside the camp (Leviticus 16:27-28 ). 1618454588_79 uses the picture of the bull and Goat burned outside the camp as an illustration of Christ's suffering outside Jerusalem's city walls
Atonement, the Day of - Having bathed his person and dressed himself entirely in the holy white linen garments, he brought forward a young bullock for a sin offering, purchased at his own cost, on account of himself and his family, and two young Goats for a sin offering, with a ram for a burnt offering, which were paid for out of the public treasury, on account of the people. He then presented the two Goats before the Lord at the door of the tabernacle and cast lots upon them. The best modern scholars agree that it designates the personal being to whom the Goat was sent, probably Satan. This Goat was called the scapegoat . After various sacrifices and ceremonies the Goat upon which the lot " For Jehovah " had fallen was slain and the high priest sprinkled its blood before the mercy-seat in the same manner as he had done that of the bullock. The purification of the holy of holies and of the holy place being thus completed, the high priest laid his hands upon the head of the Goat on which the lot " For Azazel " had fallen and confessed over it all the sins of the people. The Goat was then led, by a man chosen for the purpose, into the wilderness, into "a land not inhabited," and was there let loose. ...
The scapegoat. But respecting the meaning of the scapegoat we have no such light to guide us, and the subject is one of great doubt and difficulty. If we keep in view that the two Goats are spoken of as parts of one and the same sin offering, we shall not have much difficulty in seeing that they form together but one symbolical expression; the slain Goat setting forth the act of sacrifice, in giving up its own life for others "to Jehovah;" and the Goat which carried off its load of sin "for complete removal" signifying the cleansing influence of faith in that sacrifice
Night-Hawk - ‘Night-hawk’ is merely another name for the familiar night-jar or Goat-sucker ( Caprimulgus ), of which three species are known in Palestine
Kid - נדי , the young of the Goat. ( See Goat. No people in the world is more straitened than the Abyssinians with respect to the necessaries of life: a little juwarry bread, a small quantity of fish, an adequate supply of Goat's and camel's milk, and a kid on very particular occasions, constitute the whole of their subsistence. A fountain of pure water rises near the summit, which the inhabitants called Engedi, "the fountain of the Goat," because it is hardly accessible to any other creature
Jalam - (jay' luhm) Personal name meaning, “their ibex or mountain Goat” or “he is hidden or dark
Gabriel - Champion of God, used as a proper name to designate the angel who was sent to (Daniel 8:16 ) to explain the vision of the ram and the he-goat, and to communicate the prediction of the seventy weeks (Daniel 9:21-27 )
Sackcloth - A garment of coarse material fashioned from Goat or camel hair worn as a sign of mourning or anguish, also marked by fasting and sitting on an ash heap (Isaiah 58:5 )
Satyrs - to the evil spirits of the desert, literally, "shaggy Goats," hence applied to an object of pagan worship or a demon dwelling in the desert (2 Chronicles 11:15; Isaiah 13:21; Isaiah 34:14). At Mendes in Lower Egypt the Goat was worshipped with foul rites
Lamb - The young of the sheep, and also the kid of the Goat, Exodus 12:5 , Christ is the Lamb of God, John 1:29 , as being the accepted sacrifice for human sin
Satyr - (ssa' tihr) A hairy, demonic figure with the appearance of a Goat, translating a Hebrew term otherwise translated, “hairy” or “male Goat. Some have even interpreted the scapegoat rites (Leviticus 16:20-22 ) as sending Israel's sins back to their author, a desert demon with a different name from that translated, “satyr. Here idols in the forms of Goats may be intended as parallel to the famous calves Jeroboam built
Gabriel - ” The heavenly messenger who interpreted to Daniel the meaning of the vision of the ram and the Goat
Sackcloth - 1: σάκκος (Strong's #4526 — Noun Masculine — sakkos — sak'-kos ) "a warm material woven from Goat's or camel's hair," and hence of a dark color, Revelation 6:12 ; Jerome renders it saccus cilicinus (being made from the hair of the black Goat of Cilicia; the Romans called it cilicium); cp
Chamois - The Syriac has "the mountain Goat
Moire - ) Originally, a fine textile fabric made of the hair of an Asiatic Goat; afterwards, any textile fabric to which a watered appearance is given in the process of calendering
Gabriel - He was sent to the Prophet Daniel, to explain to him the visions of the ram and Goat, and the mystery of the seventy weeks, which had been revealed to him, Daniel 8:15 ; Daniel 9:21 ; Daniel 11:1 , &c
Ulai - Ulai (û'lâi or û'la-î), strong water? A river of Susiana, on whose banks Daniel saw his vision of the ram and he-goat
Goat - Goats formed an important item in the property of the patriarchs. In Daniel's prophecy of the kingdoms, that of Greece was comparedto a 'rough he Goat,' but with a notable horn between his eyes. The Goats, in the sessional judgement of the living nations, represent the lost, in contrast to the saved, who are compared to sheep. THE WILD GoatSwere larger animals and lived on the mountains
Gabriel - The angel who was sent to Daniel to explain the vision he had seen of the ram and the he-goat, and to reveal to him the prophecy of the Seventy Weeks
Atonement, Day of - Having bathed, and dressed, not in his robes "for glory and beauty" (Exodus 28), but in the white linen garments symbolizing the holiness required for admission into God's presence (Hebrews 12:14), he brought a bullock fern sin offering, and a ram for a burnt offering, at his own cost, to otter for himself and his priestly family; and two Goats for a sin offering, and a ram for a burnt offering, at the public cost, to offer for the people. ...
Then he presented the two Goats before the Lord at the tabernacle door, and cast lots upon them, implying that Christ's sacrifice was "by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God" (Acts 2:23; Acts 4:28); on one was written "For Jehovah;" on the other "For Azazel. " The Goat "for Jehovah" was then slain, and its blood sprinkled as the bullock's. Then the high priest laid his hands upon the head of the Goat "for Azazel," confessing over it all the sins of the people. The two Goats constitute one offering: the slain one typifying Jesus' vicarious bearing of our sin's penalty, death; the scape-goat the complete removal of our sin out of sight to where no witness will rise in judgment against us. In Leviticus 16:10; Leviticus 16:26, instead of "the Goat for the scape-goat," which is tautology, translate "the Goat for complete sending away" (from the Arabic root 'azal, "to remove completely. Many think Azazel to be the devil, to whom, as the source of sin, "the entirely separate one," the scape-goat, with its lead of sin taken of from the congregation, was sent to the wilderness (the abode of evil spirits) to be given up to, as sin and the wicked shall be hereafter (Revelation 20:14-15; Matthew 25:41; Luke 16:20): entirely separated from God. ...
But both Goats were presented before Jehovah" as consecrated to Him (Leviticus 16:7); and both alike in color, height, and value, form but two parts of one complex act of atonement; the one alone could not in the nature of things have expressed the whole truth. The one "for Jehovah," by its death, expresses Christ's life sacrificed instead of our forfeited lives; the "goat for complete sending away" expresses the blessed effect of that sacrifice, "as far as the E. so far hath lie removed our transgressions from us" (Psalms 103:12); the slain Goat expresses "Christ was delivered for our offenses," so that in believing union with Him we are dead to sin, and to the law as a condemning power, and to death; the living Goat expresses "Christ rose again for our justification" (Romans 4:25), so that we live by union with His resurrection life, sin being utterly put away in proportion as that life works in us (John 14:19; Romans 6; Colossians 3). After the live Goat was sent away, the high. They who took away the flesh, and the man who had led away the living Goat, had to bathe and to wash their clothes afterward. The additional burnt offerings (Numbers 29:7-11) were a young bullock, a ram, seven lambs, and a young Goat. He went four times into the holiest (which are all regarded as the one "once" entering, Hebrews 9:7):...
(1) with the censer and incense;...
(2) with the bullock's blood;...
(3) with the Goat's blood;...
(4) after offering the evening sacrifice, to bring out the censer and plate which had held the incense; compare Leviticus 16:12; Leviticus 16:14-15. ...
The lots were at first of boxwood, latterly of gold, put into an urn, into which he put both his hands and took out a lot in each, while the two Goats stood before him, one on the right, the other on the left; the lot in each hand belonged to the corresponding position: when the lot "for Azazel" was in the right, it was a good omen. He then tied a tongue shaped piece of scarlet cloth on the scape-goat
u'la-i - (pure water ) is mentioned by Daniel, ( Daniel 8:2,16 ) as a river near to Susa, where he saw his vision of the ram and the he-goat
Gabriel - Thus, Gabriel explains to Daniel the appalling prophecy concerning the ram and he-goat, and cheers him with the prophecy of Messiah's advent within the "70 weeks," in answer to his prayer; and in New Testament announces to Zacharias the glad tidings of the birth of John the forerunner, and of Messiah Himself to the Virgin (Luke 1:19; Luke 1:26)
Fallow-Deer - Deuteronomy 14:5 (RSV, "Wild Goat"); 1 Kings 4:23 (RSV, "roebucks")
Kid - The young of the Goat
Doe - Ya'aalah refers to the female ibex or mountain Goat ( Proverbs 5:19 ), the mate of the ibex, Capra nubiana or Capra sinaitica ( Psalm 104:18 )
Mercy Seat - Before the exile, when the high priest entered the holy of holies on the Day of Atonement, he sprinkled with his finger towards the oracle the blood of the bullock and of the he-goat offered in sacrifice on that day (Leviticus 16)
Parchment - " The writing material was prepared from the skin of the sheep or Goat
Jael - Mountain-goat, the wife of Heber the Kenite (Judges 4:17-22 )
Satyr - word sâ‘îr means primarily ‘he-goat,’ but the plur. ]'>[3] ‘ he-goats ’; in Isaiah 13:21 ; Isaiah 34:14 EV [3]5 ‘he-goats
Mercy-Seat - It has been conjectured that the censer (thumiaterion, meaning "anything having regard to or employed in the burning of incense") mentioned in Hebrews 9:4 was the "mercy-seat," at which the incense was burned by the high priest on the great day of atonement, and upon or toward which the blood of the Goat was sprinkled ( Leviticus 16:11-16 ; Compare Numbers 7:89 and Exodus 25:22 )
Roe - Υaalah , "chamois" (Proverbs 5:19) or ibex, the female of the wild Goat
Fat - Apparently, as to the fat, this refers to that "of ox, or of sheep, or of Goat," the animals of sacrifice, and to the fat of any animal that died of itself, or was torn of beasts
Lamb - The young of the sheep, though the original word means also the kid or young of the Goat; and by the Jewish law it is expressly provided that the sacrifice at the passover might be a lamb, either of the sheep or Goat
Bottle - The eastern bottle is made of a Goat or kid skin, stripped off without opening the belly; the apertures made by cutting off the tail and legs are sewed up, and, when filled, it is tied about the neck. We learn from Homer, that they were in common use among the Greeks at the siege of Troy; for, with a view to an accommodation between the hostile armies, the heralds carried through the city the things which were necessary to ratify the compact, two lambs, and exhilarating wine, the fruit of the earth, in a bottle of Goat skin:...
"Αρνε δυω , και οινον ευφρονα , καρπον αρουρης ,...
‘Ασκω εν αιγειω . This kind was usually made of Goat skins
Lots - Nay, we find the Lord himself appointing the casting lots for the scape Goat, Leviticus 16:8
Wander - They wandered about in sheep-skins and Goat-skins
Grecia, Greece - Again it is compared to a he-goat that touched not the ground, also marking the speed of its progress. "The rough Goat is the king of Grecia: and the great horn that is between his eyes is the first king
Feasts And Festivals of Israel - According to Exodus 12 , on the evening of the 14th of the first month (Abib; later called Nisan), the Israelites gathered in family units to sacrifice a yearling sheep or Goat. Following the stipulations in Leviticus (the two lists differ slightly), this included burnt offerings of seven male lambs, one bull, and two rams, followed by a sin offering of one Goat and a fellowship offering of two lambs. He cast lots over two Goats; one would be sacrificed and the other became the "scapegoat" (the Goat for azazel [12]). He sacrificed the one Goat for the sin of the people and sprinkled some of its blood on the ark. He then came out of the tent and cleansed the altar with the blood of the bull and the Goat. He then put his hands on the head of the scapegoat and confessed the sins of the people over it. An appointed man then took the scapegoat out into the wilderness and released it; he had to wash his clothes and bathe before he could return to the camp. The bull and Goat that had been sacrificed were to be burned entirely. ...
The real heart of the ceremony, however, and the real point of controversy, is in sacrifice of one Goat and the release of the scapegoat. First, what is the meaning of the Goat "for azazel [12]"? Second, what does this ceremony say about the Israelite concept of atonement?...
Several interpretations of the Goat for azazel [12] have been proposed. A common interpretation is that azazel [12] is a Goat-demon of the desert. Those who hold to this interpretation generally argue that the Israelites sent the Goat to azazel [12] to placate the demon. ...
Another interpretation is that azazelx is a cliff from which the Goat would be thrown. Others, similarly, take azazel [12] to mean "destruction" and thus understand the Goat for azazel [12] to be a Goat that will be destroyed. Either interpretation is possible, but if the Goat was simply to be killed in the wilderness one might have expected the text to use more conventional language. ...
A traditional interpretation, however, that is still worthy of acceptance is azazel [12] is the "scapegoat, " that is, a Goat to be sent away. This interpretation is found in the Vulgate (capro emissario ) and the Septuagint (apopompaio ), and is based on taking azazel [12] as a combination of ez [23] ("goat") and azal [24] ("depart"). As such, azazel [12] is a technical term for a Goat taken out and released in ritual fashion. Verse 8 thus speaks of one Goat for (i. , as a sacrifice to) Yahweh and one Goat for (i. , to serve as) the scapegoat. The meaning of the ritual of releasing the scapegoat can only be determined in the context of Israel's understanding of atonement
Bottle - These skins of the domestic animals, in particular of the Goat, were used not only, as we have seen, for wine, but for water ( Genesis 21:14 ), milk ( Judges 4:19 ), oil, and other liquids
God: Love of - The forms of men shall be as they had never been; The blasted groves shall lose their fresh and tender green; The birds of the thicket shall end their pleasant song, And the nightingale shall cease to chant the evening long; The kine of the pasture shall feel the dart that kills, And all the fair white flocks shall perish from the hills; The Goat and antlered stag, the wolf and the fox, The wild boar of the wood, and the chamois of the rocks, And the strong and fearless bear, in the trodden dust shall lie; And the dolphin of the sça, and the mighty whale shall die, And realms shall be dissolved, and empires be no more; And they shall bow to death, who ruled from shore to shore; ...
And the great globe itself (so the holy writings tell), With the rolling firmament, where the starry armies dwell, Shall melt with fervent heat: they shall all pass away, Except the love of God, which shall live and last for aye
Sheep - tsôn , ‘small cattle,’ such as sheep and Goats, Genesis 4:2 etc. ; a single sheep or Goat, Exodus 22:1 . , a sheep or Goat; collectively, like 1, in Isaiah 7:25 etc. Sheep are usually pastured with Goats except when the land is too rocky and harren for the former
Alexander - He is alluded to in Daniel 7:6 8:4-7 , under the figures of a leopard with four wings, and a one-horned he-goat, representing the swiftness of his conquests and his great strength
Gabriel - Gabriel is sent to explain to Daniel the meaning of the vision of the ram and the he-goat; in Daniel 9:21 ff
Skin - ) The hide of an animal, separated from the body, whether green, dry, or tanned; especially, that of a small animal, as a calf, sheep, or Goat
ja'el - (mountain Goat ), the wife of Heber the Kenite
Alexander - , son of Philip, king of Macedon; not named, but described prophetically: "an he-goat" )symbol of ogility, the Graeco-Macedonian empire) coming from the W. on the face of the whole earth and not touching the ground (implying the incredible swiftness of his conquests); and the Goat had A NOTABLE HORN (Alexander) between his eyes, and he came to the ram that had two horns (Media and Persia, the second great world kingdom, the successor of Babylon; under both Daniel prophesied long before the rise of the Macedon-Greek kingdom) standing before the river (at the river Granicus Alexander gained his first victory over Darius Codomanus, 334 B. ) and ran unto him in the fury of his power, moved with choler against him (on account of the Persian invasions of Greece and cruelties to the Greeks), and smote the ram and broke his two horns; and there was no power in the ram to stand before him; but he cast him down to the ground and stamped upon him, and there was none that could deliver the ram out of his hand: therefore the he-goat waxed very great, and when he was strong the great horn was broken, and for it came up four notable ones toward the four winds of heaven" (Daniel 8:5-8). ...
The "he-goat" answers to the "leopard" (Daniel 7:6) whose "wings" similarly marked the winged rapidity of the Greek conquest of Persia. " Alexander's natural brother, Philip Aridaeus, and his two sons Alexander AEgus and Hercules, in 15 months were murdered; "and for it the he-goat came up four notable ones, toward the four winds of heaven": Seleucus in the E
Animals - Sheep, Goats, and other domesticated animals are also included under the designation of cattle (Genesis 1:24 ; John 4:12 ). Goat A Goat was a hollow-horned ruminant with long, floppy ears, usually covered with long, black hair. ...
One type of Goat mentioned in the Bible has been identified as the Syrian or Mamber Goat. Domesticated long before the biblical era, the Goat in biblical times probably had long ears and backward-curving horns. A Goat (called a scapegoat) was selected at random once a year on the Day of Atonement to bear symbolically the sins of the nation of Israel (Leviticus 16:10-22 ). The skin of the Goat was used to make garments, musical instruments, and water bottles; Goat hair was woven into fabrics (Exodus 26:7 ). Goats are extremely destructive to vegetation and thereby contribute to erosion, as they tear plants out of the soil. Some of the earliest drawings available depict Goats eating on trees. Sheep nd Goats grazed in the same pasture, but it was necessary to separate the herds because the male Goat was often hostile toward the sheep (Matthew 25:32 ). Today, Goats are found in colors of black, gray, brown, white, and a variety of patterns and mixtures. SHEEP A sheep is a stocky animal, larger than a Goat, but has no beard. ANTELOPE A fleet-footed animal with horns and about the size of a donkey, the antelope has a mane on the underside of its neck that makes it look like a large Goat. ...
Disagreement exists about the translation of badger's skin in Exodus 25:5 ; Exodus 26:14 (badger, KJV; Goat, RSV; sea cows, NIV; porpoise, NAS; fine leather, TEV, NRSV). In biblical times the bear was a threat to vineyards and to herds of sheep and Goats (1 Samuel 17:34-35 ). The skin of the dugong is mentioned as a covering for the tabernacle (Exodus 25:5 ; KJV has badger's skins NAS, porpoise; NIV, sea cows; RSV, Goat; NRSV, fine leather). IBEX The ibex resembles a Goat. The ibex has been identified as the wild Goat of the Bible (1 Samuel 24:2 ; Psalm 104:18 ). Isaiah illustrated the serene peace of God's kingdom as creating the seemingly impossible occurrence of a leopard lying down with the Goat (Isaiah 11:6 )
Ulai - A river near Shushan, by the banks of which Daniel saw the vision of the ram and the he Goat (Daniel 8:2; Daniel 8:16)
Holy of Holies - The high priest entered into this inner recess only once a year, on the Day of Atonement, to offer incense and the blood of the bullock and of the Goat destined to atone for himself, his house, and the people
Bottle - These are made of Goatskins. The great leathern bottles are made of the skin of a he-goat, and the small ones, that serve instead of a bottle of water on the road, are made of a kid's skin
Badger - Others think it is the stag Goat, of the antelope kind, called thacasse , related perhaps to tachash , to be seen on Egyptian monuments
Beard - ) The long hairs about the face in animals, as in the Goat
He - He is sometimes prefixed to the names of animals to designate the male kind, as a he-goat, a he-bear
Pentecost - They then offered the first fruits of the wheat harvest, which was then completed; beside which, they presented at the temple seven lambs of that year, one calf, and two rams for a burnt-offering; two lambs for a peace-offering; and a Goat for a sin-offering, Leviticus 23:15-16 ; Exodus 34:22 ; Deuteronomy 16:9-10
Atonement, Day of - He next selected two he-goats and a ram for the people’s offerings, and proceeded to ‘cast lots upon the two Goats; one lot for J″ [2] ‘scapegoat,’ see Azazel). The Goat on which the lot ‘for J″ Day of Atonement - The more important parts of the ceremony were, briefly, as follows:—...
(a) The high priest procured and brought before the Tent a bullock as a sin-offering for himself, and two Goats upon which lots were cast, one being destined as a sin-offering for the people, and the other to be ‘for Azazel. He then came out and sacrificed the Goat for the people, and, re-entering the Holy of Holies, sprinkled its blood before the mercy-seat. He next sprinkled the blood of each animal on the altar of incense in the Holy Place; and, lastly, he sprinkled the mingled blood of bullock and Goat on the brazen altar in the outer court. ...
(b) The Goat for Azazel was then brought near. The two Goats were intended figuratively to represent one and the same being, who, though sacrificed, was yet living, and able to carry away the sins of the people. 7:6) this thought was afterwards emphasized by the regulation that the Goats must resemble each other as closely as possible. ...
(d) The skin, flesh, and dung of the bullock and the Goat, whose blood had made atonement, were burnt outside the camp. ...
(c) The high priest entered ‘in the blood of another’ (Hebrews 9:25)—‘with the accompaniment of [4] the blood of Goats and calves’: Christ, with His own blood, Hebrews 9:12. ...
(f) It has been said above that the Goat ‘for Azazel’ (Authorized Version ‘scape-goat’) was considered figuratively to be the same animal as the Goat that was sacrificed. There is no distinct reference to the scape-goat in Hebrews, but a possible allusion occurs in Hebrews 9:28, where the writer quotes Isaiah 53:12 (6)
Engedi - ("fountain of the kid or Goat". "The wilderness of Engedi" is explained as" the rocks of the wild Goats" (1 Samuel 24:4)
Engedi - (ehn' geh dih) Place name meaning, “place of the young Goat
Sheep - ) Τsown means sheep"; ayil , the full-grown "ram," used for the male of other ruminants also; rachel , the adult "ewe"; kebes (masculine), kibsah (feminine), the half grown lamb; seh , "sheep" or paschal "lamb"; char , "young ram"; taleh , "sucking lamb"; 'atod (Genesis 31 "ram") means "he-goat"; imrin , "lambs for sacrifice
Loose - One Goat died for the sins of the people, and in Leviticus 16:21, another Goat lived for the salvation of the people. CHRIST at Calvary is represented by the dead bird or the dead Goat. CHRIST on the Throne, as our Advocate with the Father, is represented by the living bird and the living Goat
Earnest - The related Hebrew term appears in Genesis 38:17 , where Judah promised to send Tamar a young Goat and she asked for a pledge to hold until she received the promised animal
Washing - The clothes of him who led away the scape-goat, and of the priest who offered the red heifer, were washed (Leviticus 16:26; Numbers 19:7)
Badger Skins - The translation of “goatskin” (RSV) also fails on the grounds that the word used is not a normal word for Goat
Pan - He is usually represented as having the head and trunk of a man, with the legs, horns, and tail of a Goat, and as playing on the shepherd's pipe, which he is said to have invented
Azazel - ]'>[1] of the desert spirit to whom one of the two Goats was sent, laden with the sins of the people, in the ritual of the Day of Atonement ( Leviticus 16:8 ; Leviticus 16:10 ; Leviticus 16:26 RV [4] designation scapegoat ( i. the Goat that is allowed to escape, which goes back to the caper emissarius of the Vulgate) obscures the fact that the word Azazel is a proper name in the original, and in particular the name of a powerful spirit or demon supposed to inhabit the wilderness or ‘solitary land’ ( Leviticus 16:22 RV Expiation - ...
See Goat
Pan - He is usually represented as having the head and trunk of a man, with the legs, horns, and tail of a Goat, and as playing on the shepherd's pipe, which he is said to have invented
Tabernacles, Feast of - A very large number of offerings is ordained; on each of the first 7 days 2 rams and 14 Iambs, and a Goat as a sin-offering; and successively on these days a diminishing number of bullocks: 13 on the 1st day, 12 on the 2nd, and so on till the 7th, when 7 were to be offered. On the 8th day the special offerings were 1 bullock, 1 ram, 7 lambs, and a Goat as a sin-offering
Sheep - Ts'on is a collective term for small domesticated animals, particularly sheep and Goats. Seh is an individual member of the collective ts'on , one sheep or Goat. The shepherd's separating his ts'on into sheep and Goats illustrates the final judgment (Matthew 25:1 )
Fat - Josephus says, Moses forbids only the fat of oxen, Goats, sheep, and their species. This agrees with Leviticus 7:23 : "Ye shall eat no manner of fat, of ox, or of sheep, or of Goat
Darius - Thus were verified the prophecies of Daniel, Daniel 8:1-27 , who had foretold the enlargement of the Persian monarchy, under the symbol of a ram, butting with its horns westward, northward, and southward, which nothing could resist; and its destruction by a Goat having a very large horn between his eyes, (Alexander the Great,) coming from the west, and overrunning the world without touching the earth
Souls: Care For - That armful of grass would feed his Goat, or help to fill the cottage loft with winter fodder for the cow
Horn - The "notable horn" of the "he Goat" (Daniel 8:5) is Alexander the Great who on coins is represented with horns
Macedonia - ...
This power was foretold by Daniel, Daniel 8:3-8 , under the symbol of a Goat with one horn; and it is worthy of note that ancient Macedonian coins still exist, bearing that national symbol
Demon - Sair signifies 'rough, hairy,' and specially a he-goat: hence "a Goat-shaped deity, which was idolatrously worshipped
Hands, Laying on of - On the day of atonement Aaron laid his hands upon the head of the scapegoat, and confessed over it all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and it was sent away into the wilderness to signify the putting away of the sins confessed over the Goat
Travelling - First went the sheep and Goat herds, each with their flocks in divisions, according as the chief of each family directed; then followed the camels and asses, loaded with the tents, furniture, and kitchen utensils; these were followed by the old men, women, boys, and girls, on foot. Their flocks of sheep and Goats were about five thousand, besides a great number of camels, horses, and asses
Laying on of Hands - It may have been a transferal of sin, such as happened when the high priest confessed the sins of Israel over the head of a Goat on the Day of Atonement (Leviticus 16:21-22); or it may have been a transferal of good, such as happened when a father passed on his blessing to his children (Genesis 48:14-16; cf
Expiation - On that day, to other prescribed sacrifices were to be added another ram for a burnt offering, and another Goat, the most eminent of the sacrifices for a sin offering, whose blood was to be carried by the high priest into the inner sanctuary, which was not done by the blood of any other victim, except the bullock, which was offered the same day as a sin offering for the family of Aaron. On the day appointed for this general expiation, the priest is commanded to offer a bullock and a Goat, as sin offerings, the one for himself, and the other for the people; and, having sprinkled the blood of these in due form before the mercy seat, to lead forth a second Goat, denominated "the scape-goat;" and, after laying both his hands upon the head of the scapegoat, and confessing over him all the iniquities of the people, to put them upon the head of the Goat, and to send the animal, thus bearing the sins of the people, away into the wilderness; in this manner expressing, by an action which cannot be misunderstood, that the atonement, which, it is affirmed, was to be effected by the sacrifice of the sin offering, consisted in removing from the people their iniquities by this translation of them to the animal. For it is to be remarked, that the ceremony of the scape-goat is not a distinct one: it is a continuation of the process, and is evidently the concluding part and symbolical consummation of the sin offering: so that the transfer of the iniquities of the people upon the head of the scape-goat, and the bearing them away into the wilderness, manifestly imply, that the atonement effected by the sacrifice of the sin offering consisted in the transfer and consequent removal of those iniquities. Afterward, he received from the princes of the people two Goats for a sin offering, and a ram for a burnt offering, to be offered in the name of the whole nation. The lot determined which of the two Goats should be sacrificed, and which set at liberty. Then he came out a second time, and, beside the altar of burnt offerings, killed the Goat which the lot had determined to be the sacrifice. The blood of this Goat he carried into the most holy sanctuary, and sprinkled it seven times between the ark and the vail, which separated the holy from the sanctuary: from thence he returned into the court of the tabernacle, and sprinkled both sides of it with the blood of the Goat. After this, the high priest came to the altar of burnt offerings, wetted the four horns of it with the blood of the Goat and young bullock, and sprinkled it seven times with the same blood. The sanctuary, the court, and the altar, being thus purified, the high priest directed the Goat which was set at liberty by the lot to be brought to him. He put his hand on the Goat's head, conf
Divination - It was thus also that the scape-goat was determined (Leviticus 16:8-10 )
Grecia - Greece was certainly intended by the Prophet Daniel under the symbol of the single-horned Goat; and it is probable that when he calls Greece Chittim, he spoke the language of the Hebrew nation, rather than that of the Persian court
Leviticus - Then two Goats were brought, and one chosen for sacrifice. The priest then took the other Goat, the scapegoat, and confessed the sin of the people with his hands over the Goat, symbolically passing the sin of the people to the Goat. Then the Goat was taken into the wilderness, a significant symbol of the removal of the sin of the people
Name - A name may be attached to an individual only, and is then proper or appropriate, as John, Thomas, London, Paris or it may be attached to a species, genus, or class of things, as sheep, Goat, horse, tree, animal, which are called common names, specific or generic
Burnt Offering - It was to be brought of the offerer's own free will, and slain by himself, after he had laid his hands on its head, to mark it as his representative; a young bullock, or he Goat, era turtle dove, or pigeon (if the person was poor), not to be divided in offering it
Ram - 15:9, where God told Abram: “Take me a heifer of three years old, and a she Goat of three years old, and a ram of three years old, and a turtledove, and a young pigeon
Euphrates - It is not well adapted for navigation, yet light vessels go up about one thousand miles, and the modern steam-boat which now ascends from the ocean, meets the same kind of Goat-skin floats on which produce was rafted down the river thousands of years ago
Chief - Attud is a ram or he-goat and is used metaphorically for a chief or leader ( Isaiah 14:9 ; Zechariah 10:3 )
Darius - Thus were verified the prophecies of Daniel, viii, who had foretold the destruction of the Persian monarchy, under the symbol of a ram, which butted with its horns westward, northward, and southward, and which nothing could resist; but a Goat which had a very large horn between his eyes, and which denoted Alexander the Great, came from the west, and overran the world without touching the earth; springing forward with impetuosity, the Goat ran against the ram with all his force, attacked him with fury, struck him, broke his two horns, trampled him under foot, and no one could rescue the ram
Festivals - Next he sacrificed a male Goat as a sin offering for the people. Then he took another Goat, called the “scapegoat” (for “escape Goat”), laid his hands on its head, confessed over it the sins of Israel, and then released it into the desert where it symbolically carried away the sins of the people (Leviticus 16:8 ,Leviticus 16:8,16:10 ). The remains of the sacrificial bullock and male Goat were taken outside the city and burned, and the day was concluded with additional sacrifices
Leviticus - Exodus 10:16-20 (on the Goat of the sin-offering) is a later addition, and gives an interesting illustration of the way in which it was sought to reconcile differences in the older laws (cf. Thus the sin-offering for the congregation is a bullock in Leviticus 3:14 instead of the Goat of Leviticus 9:15 and Numbers 15:24 ; and the high priest’s sin-offering ( Numbers 15:3-12 ) is more elaborate than that in Numbers 9:8-11 and Numbers 29:10-14 ; Leviticus 5:1-13 (examples of unintentional sins which require a sin-offering, and mitigations for the case of those who cannot afford a lamb or a Goat) has suffered change, since Leviticus 5:2-3 evidently break the connexion between Leviticus 5:1 and Leviticus 19:20-22 . If Leviticus 17:1-6 were ever in force while the Israelites inhabited Palestine, the order requiring every Goat, sheep, or ox which was slaughtered to be brought to the Jerusalem Temple practically made it illegal to kill these animals
Atonement - ...
The same is used with the two Goats. The sins were seen on the sinless Goat, and expiation was made in respect of those sins. The how is not said here, but it is by the two Goats making really one, because the object was to show that the sins were really laid upon it (that is, on Christ), and the sins carried away out of sight, and never to be found. Clearly the Goat was not the person interested, nor was it merely done upon it as the place. The expiation referred to them as thus laid on the Goat. ...
A word may be added as to the comparison made between the two birds, Leviticus 14:4-7 , and the two Goats, Leviticus 16:7-10 . There was no laying sins on the bird let free, as on the Goat: it was identified with the slain one, and then let go
Animal - Of the Goat kind; a he-goat, a she-goat, or kid, Leviticus 22:24
Offering - Of animals only tame ones were used, as oxen, Goats, and sheep, and the dove. Sin-offerings were presented by the high priest for personal offences, for national sins, and on the great day of atonement, when he confessed the sins of the whole nation with his hand on the scapegoat's head, and the Goat was driven off into the wilderness
Hunting - ...
Among the animals hunted for food were the gazelle, the hart, the roebuck, and the wild Goat (Deuteronomy 12:15 ; Deuteronomy 12:22 ; Deuteronomy 14:5 etc
Taxes - ) Each Israelite paid a half shekel as "atonement money" for the service of the tabernacle, the morning and evening sacrifice, the incense, wood, shewbread, red heifers, scape-goat, etc
Animals - Israelites raised cattle, sheep and Goats extensively throughout their land, and these provided them with food products and materials for clothing (Numbers 32:1; 2 Chronicles 26:10; Proverbs 27:26-27). ...
There were many other animals which, though wild, were not fierce, such as the hart, gazelle, roebuck, wild Goat, ibex, antelope, rock badger, rabbit, hare and porcupine
Shushan - Here also Daniel had the vision of the ram with two horns, and the Goat with one horn, &c, in the third year of Belshazzar's reign
Meats - Among domestic animals they only ate the cow, the sheep, and the Goat; the hen and pigeon, among domestic birds; beside several kinds of wild animals
Shushan - Here Daniel had the vision of the ram and he-goat, in the third year of Belshazzar, Daniel 8:1-27
Lift - The Goat gives the fox a lift
Pergamum - It is said that king Eumenes, the founder of the library, invented the use of this preparation of sheep-skin or Goat-skin for the purposes of writing
Atonement - In one place atonement is also provided for an animal, the scapegoat used in the atonement rituals found in Leviticus 16 . Goats, sheep, and birds are listed among the acceptable animals to be sacrificed, but there were also grain, oil, and drink offerings. Five characteristics relating to the ritual of the Day of Atonement are worthy of note because they are generally true of atonement as it is found throughout Scripture: (1) the sovereignty of God in atonement; (2) the purpose and result of making atonement; (3) the two Goats emphasize two different things, and the burning another, about the removal of sin; (4) that Aaron had to make special sacrifice for himself; (5) the comprehensive quality of the act. His sovereignty is further emphasized by the fact that the lot is used to choose which Goat will be sacrificed and which Goat will serve as the scapegoat. The sacrificial death of the first Goat showed clearly that the offense of sin requires the punishment of death (Ezekiel 18:4 ). The sending of the second Goat into the wilderness with the sins laid on the top of its head emphasizes that sin will be removed from the person and the community "as far as the east is from the west" (Psalm 103:12 ). The Old Testament sacrifices are shown to be but shadows of the real sacrifice of Christ on the cross by the fact of Aaron's sinfulness; an imperfect high priest cannot offer a true sacrifice, just as the blood of bulls and Goats could never truly pay for the offense of human sin or substitute for the shedding of human blood
Sacrifice And Offering - ...
The animal for this sacrifice could be a young bull, lamb, Goat, turtledove, or young pigeon; but it had to be a perfect and complete specimen. This consisted of the sacrifice of a bull, cow, lamb, or Goat that had no defect. A leader of the people had to bring a male Goat, while anyone else sacrificed a female Goat or a lamb
House - Tents were made of Goat hair and were suitable to nomadic life
Cattle - Goats also formed a part of the pastoral wealth of Palestine (Genesis 15:9 ; 32:14 ; 37:31 ). Goat's hair was used for making tent cloth (Exodus 26:7 ; 36:14 ), and for mattresses and bedding (1 Samuel 19:13,16 ). (See Goat
Alexander the Great - , where the kingdom of Media and Persia is compared to a ram, Greece is compared to a he Goat, with a great horn, which is its first king, Alexander, Daniel 8:21
Meats - The Jews were also forbidden to kill a cow and its calf in the same day; or a sheep, or Goat, and its young one, at the same time
Alexander - commonly called the Great, son and successor of Philip, king of Macedon, is denoted in the prophecies of Daniel by a leopard with four wings, signifying his great strength, and the unusual rapidity of his conquests, Daniel 7:6 ; and by a one-horned he-goat running over the earth so swiftly as not to touch it, attacking a ram with two horns, overthrowing him, and trampling him under foot, without any being able to rescue him, Daniel 8:4-7 . The he-goat prefigured Alexander; the ram, Darius Codomannus, the last of the Persian kings
Bed - ...
The bedding ordinarily in use among Orientals now is, doubtless, much the same as it was in Christ’s day: a mat made of rushes or straw to be laid down first; sheep or Goat skins, or a quilt stuffed with hair or vegetable fibre, or both, to lie upon; and a covering consisting often only of the ‘cloak,’ or outer garment, of the poor man, but sometimes in summer of some light stuff in addition, or in winter of skins, or some heavier quilted stuff
Atonement, Day of - For the congregation two Goats were taken for a sin offering, and a ram for a burnt offering. On the two Goats the lot was cast, and the one on whom the lot fell was for Jehovah, and was offered as a sin offering. The other, after being presented before the Lord, was brought forth: on him Aaron laid both his hands and confessed over him "all the iniquities of the children of Israel and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the Goat," Leviticus 16:21 , which was then sent away into the wilderness, a land of forgetfulness. In the two Goats we have the two sides of atonement, namely, that which meets the character and holiness of God, and that which meets the need of the sinner as to the removal of his sins. ...
* Note there is no scapegoat for the priestly family: they belong to the inside, where God is glorified. In connection with them prominence is given to the scapegoat aspect — sins remembered no more
Persia, Persians - The same chapter (Daniel 8:6,7 ) speaks of a he-goat that rushed upon the ram and smote it and cast it to the ground and stamped upon it; and none could deliver it
Sacrifice - ...
The sacrifices of offerings of meal or liquors, which were offered for sin, were in favor of the poorer sort, who could not afford to sacrifice an ox or Goat or sheep, Leviticus 5:10-13 . ...
Offerings, in which they set at liberty a bird or a Goat, were not strictly sacrifices, because there was no shedding of blood, and the victim remained alive
Passover And Feast of Unleavened Bread - The prince is to offer a bullock as a sin-offering for himself and the people, and a he-goat on each of the 7 days, as well as 7 bullocks and 7 rams daily, with other offerings of meal and oil. On each of the 7 days two bullocks, a ram, and 7 lambs (with special offerings of meal and oil) are to be sacrificed, and a Goat for a sin-offering
Grecians - " Daniel (Daniel 8:5; Daniel 8:21; Daniel 11:3) foretold the rise of Alexander the Great, "the great horn between the eyes of the rough Goat" which "came from the W
Food - sheep and Goats, and ‘the herd. ’...
The flesh of the Goat , and especially of the’ kid of the Goats,’ was more relished by the Hebrews than by the present inhabitants of Palestine, by whom the Goat is reared chiefly for its milk. From the females of the herd and of the flock ( Deuteronomy 32:14 ), especially from the she-goat ( Proverbs 27:27 ), probably also from the milch-camel ( Genesis 32:15 ), came the supply of milk and its preparations, butter and cheese , for which see Milk. Leviticus 3:17 ) is the taboo imposed upon certain specified portions of the intestinal fat of the three sacrificial species, the ox, the sheep, and the Goat ( Leviticus 3:3 ff; Leviticus 7:22 ff
Isaac - So the slain Goat and the scape-goat jointly on the day of atonement represented Christ's death and
Rock - Rocks were the haunt of the eagle ( Job 39:28 ), of the wild Goat (v
Atonement - The ceremony of the scapegoat also took place on this day. Two Goats were set apart, one of which was sacrificed to the Lord, while the other, the Goat for complete separation, was chosen by lot to be set at liberty
Animals - Of smaller cattle, Goats and sheep are mentioned. ...
Goats (ἔριφος, ἐρίφιον, lit. ‘kid,’ a meaning retained in Luke 15:29; in LXX Septuagint the word = ‘goat’ as well as ‘kid’) appear only in the picture of the Last Judgment (Matthew 25:32 f. The point of the contrast lies in the colour rather than the character of the animals, the sheep being pure white, while the Goats are covered with long jet-black hair. So in the Song of Solomon (Song of Solomon 4:1) the locks of the beloved are compared to ‘a flock of Goats that appear from Mt. ’ The Son of Man shall separate all the nations ‘as a shepherd separateth the sheep from the Goats,’ and the simile is quite true to pastoral life. 89) says that sheep and Goats pasture together, but never trespass on each other’s domains; they are folded together, but they do not mix; they may be seen to enter the fold in company, but once inside they are kept separate. ...
The Syrian Goat, Capra mambrica, is the most common breed in Palestine. Flocks of Goats are most frequent in hilly districts from Hebron to Lebanon, where their habit of browsing on young trees tends to deforest the country. ’ There is no other direct mention of the Goat in the Gospels, though the wine-bottles (ἀσκοί) referred to in Matthew 9:17 (| Mark 2:22, Luke 5:37 f. ) were doubtless made of Goat-skin
Flood, the - The clean animals were doubtless only four in number: the ox, the sheep, the Goat,and the pigeon — those offered in sacrifice; the distinction between clean and unclean animals for food was made long after
Clean, Unclean - Cooking a kid-goat in its mother's milk (Exodus 23:19 ; 34:26 ; Deuteronomy 14:21 ) was a perverse act. ...
Israel was not to cook a Goat in its mother's milk not because it was a pagan practice, but because it was inappropriate to combine that which was a symbol of life (mother's milk) with the death of that for which it was meant to give life, especially in the context of the Festival of Tabernacles (so the context of Exodus 23:19 ) celebrating the life-giving power of Yahweh
Animals - God answers Job's complaint by speaking of the mountain Goat, lion, eagle, and the mysterious Leviathan and Behemoth (Job 39:1-41:34 ). Isaiah speaks of the day of the Lord in the following terms: "The wolf will live with the lamb, the leopard will lie down with the Goat, the calf and the lion and the yearling together; and a little child will lead them" ( Isaiah 11:6 ). In Matthew 25:31-46 Jesus' teaching hinges on the fact that sheep and Goats were often very difficult to distinguish from one another
Tabernacles, the Feast of - The special offerings of the day were a bullock a ram, seven lambs and a Goat for a sin offering
Wells And Springs - All travelers in Palestine mention the throngs of females that resort to it, with their pitchers or Goat-skins on the shoulder or head and loitering to gossip or gaily returning in companies of two or three
Jubilee - Fürst traces the word from yabal, 'strong': hence 'a he-goat, ram,' and then 'a ram's horn,' and hence 'a cry of joy, a joyful noise,' a designation of the great Jubilee feast
Forgiveness - Then, taking two Goats, Aaron is to offer onechosen by lotas a sin offering for the expiation of the sanctuary (v. 16), while over the other he is to confess all the wickedness of the sons of Israel and all their rebelliontheir sinand release this second Goat into the wilderness. The released Goat removes all wickedness. But Leviticus 16:21 stipulates that Aaron will confess over the Goat "all the wickedness and rebellion of the Israelitesall their sins"; the fact that these three terms are used in tandem to denote sin in its totality implies that otherwise unforgivable violations of the Torah were forgiven on that day
Offerings, the - Thus the priest or the whole congregation for a sin offering had to bring a bullock, but a Goat or a lamb sufficed for one of the people. " The victim might be a male of the herd, or a sheep or a Goat of the flock, or be turtle doves or young pigeons, according to the ability of the offerer, or the appreciation he had of the offering. If a person was unable to bring a Goat for a sin offering, he was allowed to bring two doves; and if he were unable to bring even these, then he might bring the tenth part of an ephah of fine flour
Sacrifices in the Old Testament - ...
BLOODY SACRIFICES ...
Consisted in the slaying of certain animals: ram (or he-lamb, or again ewe- lamb), Goat, bull (or calf, or heifer), turtle-dove, and pigeon
Old Testament, Sacrifices in the - ...
BLOODY SACRIFICES ...
Consisted in the slaying of certain animals: ram (or he-lamb, or again ewe- lamb), Goat, bull (or calf, or heifer), turtle-dove, and pigeon
Wells - Shaw, speaking of the occupation of the Moorish women in Barbary, says, "To finish the day, at the time of the evening, even at the time that the women go out to draw water, they are still to fit themselves with a pitcher or Goat skin, and tying their sucking children behind them, trudge it in this manner two or three miles to fetch water
Cattle - ...
Behemah is a general term for animals ( Exodus 9:9 ; Isaiah 30:6 ), for four-footed animals (1 Kings 4:33 ), wild animals (Deuteronomy 28:26 ; 1 Samuel 17:44 ), as well as for domestic cattle including both herds of cattle and flocks of sheep and Goats (Leviticus 1:2 ) and oxen and donkeys (Deuteronomy 5:14 ). ...
Behemah can be cattle distinguished from sheep and Goats of the flock (2 Chronicles 32:28 ). The bulls and cows played an important role in sacrifice to God, since these animals were more valuable than sheep or Goats. ...
Threma refers to a domesticated animal, usually a sheep or a Goat ( John 4:12 ). ...
KJV refers to cattle in Luke 17:7 , but the Greek term poimaino refers to the activity of a herdsman leading sheep or Goats to pasture
Abraham - Still he asked whereby should he know that his seed should possess the land, and was told to take a heifer, a she Goat, and a ram, all of three years old, a turtle dove and a young pigeon
Cloth, Clothing - The growing sedentary urban cultures preferred fabrics made from vegetable fibers such as flax and cotton and from animal fibers such as wool, Goats' hair, silk, and the limited use of other wild animals. ...
Other resources included silk, hemp, camel hair, and Goat hair. Natural tones from different breeds of animals gave some variety to fabric colors (brown and black Goats' hair; white, gray, and yellow wool)
Persia - The Parsees observe the nirang ; "rubbing the urine of a cow, she Goat, or ox over the face and hands", the second thing a Parsee does in getting up in the morning
Sacrifice - ...
Besides there were the peculiar offerings, the Passover lamb, the scape-goat, and the red heifer; also the chagigah peace offering during the Passover. ...
The five animals in Abraham's sacrifice of the covenant (Genesis 15:9) are the five alone named in the law for sacrifice: the ox, sheep, Goat, dove, and pigeon. Their need of repetition implies their intrinsic incompleteness (Hebrews 10:1-3); also "bulls" and "goats" are so much inferior to man that "it is not possible their blood could take away sins" (Hebrews 10:4)
Sin - “Iniquity” is something to be confessed: “And Aaron shall lay both his hands upon the head of the live Goat, and confess over him all the iniquities of the children of Israel …” ( Goat … and slew it, and offered it for sin
Daniel, Book of - Vision of ram, he Goat, and four horns points to passing of Persians, Medes, and of proud Greeks, one of whom will interrupt daily sacrifices of Temple for a while (Daniel 8:1-27 )
Guilt - The symbolic Levitical rite in which ‘the Goat for Azazel’ bore the guilt (EV Cooking And Heating - Meat was always available from the sheep and Goats of the flock, but the hunting of wild animals which came up from the jungle in the Jordan Valley was popular. Veal was served to Abraham's guests in Genesis 18:7 , while Gideon's guests ate Goat meat (Judges 6:19 )
Nimrod - Alexander himself, the Great, as we call him, is to Daniel but a great pushing he-goat
Tabernacle - But the altar raises its own questions: How can a bull or a sheep or a Goat die in the place of a person who has been made just a little lower than God himself (Micah 6:6-8 )? For the Old Testament believer, the solution to this enigma was, in many ways, a mystery
Lots - The decision as to which Goat should be for sacrifice to Jahweh and which to Azazel was determined by lot (Leviticus 16:8-10). This, of course, is not in harmony with Jewish practice, as seen in the selection of the Goats (Leviticus 16:8)
Abraham - ...
Hence he passes into direct covenant relation with God, confirmed by the sign of the burning lamp (compare Isaiah 62:1) passing between the divided pieces of a heifer, she Goat, and ram, and accompanied by the revelation that his posterity are to be afflicted in a foreign land 400 years, then to come forth and conquer Canaan when the iniquity of the Amorites shall be full
Demon - Other possible Old Testament references to demons include Goat idols (Leviticus 17:7 ; 2 Chronicles 11:15 ; Isaiah 13:21 ; 34:14 ), night creatures (Isaiah 34:14 ), and idols (LXX of Psalm 96:5 )
Baptism - The plural" baptisms" is used in the wider sense, all purifications by water; as of the priest's hands and feet in the laver outside before entering the tabernacle, in the daily service (Exodus 30:17-21); of the high priest's flesh in the holy place on the day of atonement (Ephesians 1:19-20); of persons ceremonially unclean (Leviticus 14; 15; Leviticus 16:26-28; Matthew 28:19-2065; Leviticus 22:4-6), a leper, one with an issue, one who ate that which died of itself, one who touched a dead body, the one who let go the scape-goat or buried the ashes of the red heifer, of the people before a religious festival (Exodus 19:10; John 11:55)
Paul as a Controversialist - "If two Goats meet each other in a narrow path above a piece of water, what do they do?" asks Luther. What then will they do, do you suppose? What would you do? Well, Nature has taught the one Goat to lie down and let the other pass over it, and then they both get to the end of the day safe and sound. " Now, Paul was always meeting Goats on narrow ledges of rock with the sea below
Jeroboam - Jeroboam unwarned by his visitation "returned not from his evil way," "ordaining whosoever would (1 Kings 13:33-34; 2 Chronicles 11:15) priests, for the high places, the devils, and the calves" (the gods worshipped in these houses in the high places being called "demons" or devils (literally, Goats, from the Egyptian Goat-shaped god Mendes or Pan) from their nature, and calves from their form; Leviticus 17:7, "evil spirits of the desert" (Speaker's Commentary, seiriym ; 1 Corinthians 10:20-21)
Leviticus, Theology of - 11-19), the single scapegoat sin offering for the whole congregation (including the priests and the people, vv. The "scapegoat" ritual, which was a different kind of "sin offering" (vv. But in this case the atonement facilitated the removal of all the iniquities of all the people of the nation by sending them away from the tabernacle and the nation on the head of the Goat into the wilderness (vv. 29-31, referring to the scapegoat ritual in vv. Apparently, it was the scapegoat ritual that "cleansed" the people, but it was the subsequent burnt offerings that "consecrated" them. The combined scapegoat and burnt offering atonement procedures purified and consecrated the people
Lots - The decision as to which Goat should be for sacrifice to Jahweh and which to Azazel was determined by lot (Leviticus 16:8-10). This, of course, is not in harmony with Jewish practice, as seen in the selection of the Goats (Leviticus 16:8)
Idol - )...
Yet Israel in all their history showed a continual tendency to adopt the idols of the neighbouring nations; in the desert they "sacrificed unto devils" (saeer , a shaggy Goat, worshipped with the foulest rites at Mendes in Lower Egypt
Magic, Divination, And Sorcery - Lots were cast in reference to the scapegoat ( Leviticus 16:8 ). Two Goats were brought, and lots were cast; one Goat was offered as a sin-offering, and the other was sent away into the wilderness
Passover - Jehovah smote the firstborn of man and beast, and so "executed judgment against all the gods of Egypt" (Exodus 12:12; Numbers 33:3-4), for every nome and town had its sacred animal, bull, cow, Goat, ram, cat, frog, beetle, etc
Priests And Levites - But by far the most important ceremonies were those connected with the great Day of Atonement, on which day alone he, and he alone, attired merely in the linen garb of the priest, entered the ‘Holy of Holies’ and sprinkled the mercy seat with the blood of a bullock as a sin-offering for himself, and that of a Goat as a sin-offering for the people ( Leviticus 16:1-34 )
Job, Theology of - But the Lord also protects the weak and vulnerable deer and mountain Goat (the prey of the lion — 39:1-4)
Novatianus And Novatianism - Ozanam explains it as a reference by the excavators of the cemetery to the prevalent Montanist doctrine, which denied the possibility of a Goat being brought back in this life
Physician - To the divinity there was the sacrifice of a Goat or ram, a cock or hen, accompanied by fervent prayer for succour
Elisha - ...
Joram, in language identical with his mother Jezebel's threat against Elijah (1 Kings 19:2; 2 Kings 6:31), makes Elisha the scape-goat of the national calamity, as though his late act in leading the blinded Syrians to Samaria and glorifying Jehovah above Baal were the cause, or suspecting it was by Elisha's word of prayer, as it was by Elijah's formerly (1 Kings 17), that the famine came (See JEHORAM); "God do so and more also to me, if the head of Elisha shall stand on him this day
Offerings And Sacrifices - "...
The first occurrence of the term "peace offering" (seblamim, NIV "fellowship offering") is in Exodus 20:24 , where the Lord refers to it along with "burnt offerings" as part of the altar law: "Make an altar of earth for me and sacrifice on it your burnt offerings and fellowship offerings , your sheep and Goats and your cattle. The burnt offering could be from the cattle (1618454588_4 ), the sheep and Goats (vv. In the scapegoat ritual the high priest was to lay both hands on the animal and confess the sins of the whole congregation in order to expressly transfer the sins to the Goat. For example, according to Deuteronomy 32:13-14 the Lord fed the people the best of the land including, among other things, the "fat" of lambs, rams, Goats, and even wheat as well as the "blood" of grapes. ...
Leviticus 16:29-34 is a summary of the intended effect of the three sin offerings on the Day of Atonement: the scapegoat sin offering cleansed the people from their sins (vv. However, the scapegoat ritual suggests that this was not the case
Offering - For example, when Jacob was on his way back home after twenty years, his long-standing guilt and fear of Esau prompted him to send a rather large “present” (bribe) of Goats, camels, and other animals ( Goat ( Possession - _...
(1) The ùÒÀòÄéøÄéí, field spirits, like satyrs, so called because of their resemblance to hairy he-goats. One of these spirits became prominent enough to receive a personal name òÂæ֤àæÇi, and to have a distinctive ritual of his own in which a Goat was offered
Tertullianus, Quintus Septimius Florens - The name and the form only made us laugh, says Tertullian; and then he retorts: "But our opponents might well have worshipped such a biformed deity: for they have dog-headed and lion-headed gods, gods with horns, gods with wings, gods Goat-limbed, fish-limbed, or serpent-limbed from the loins!"...
(b ) Tertullian turns from what Christianity was not to what it was, and the main lines of the evidences of Christianity in the 2nd cent