What does Gideon mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
גִּדְע֔וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 7
גִּדְע֗וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 6
גִּדְעוֹן֙ youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 3
גִּדְע֥וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 3
גִּדְע֜וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 2
גִּדְע֑וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 2
וְגִדְע֣וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 2
וּלְגִדְעֽוֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 2
γεδεών a of the judge of Israel who delivered them from the Midianites. 1
גִדְע֖וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
גִדְעֽוֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
לְגִדְע֥וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
גִדְע֜וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
גִדְע֔וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
גִּדְעוֹן֩ youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
גִ֠דְעוֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
גִדְע֗וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
גִּדְע֖וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
גִּדְע֤וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1
וּלְגִדְע֗וֹן youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites 1

Definitions Related to Gideon

H1439


   1 youngest son of Joash of the Abiezrites, fifth judge of Israel who led the Israelites against the Midianites.
   Additional Information: Gideon = “hewer”.
   

G1066


   1 a of the judge of Israel who delivered them from the Midianites.
   Additional Information: Gideon = “the cutter down”.
   

Frequency of Gideon (original languages)

Frequency of Gideon (English)

Dictionary

Chabad Knowledge Base - Gideon
Fifth of the Judges, judged the Israelites for forty years (1067-1027 BCE). Leading an army of 300 men, he caused the 135,000-strong occupying Midianite army to panic and flee. Also known as Jerubbaal.
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Gideon
Called also Jerubbaal (Judges 6:29,32 ), was the first of the judges whose history is circumstantially narrated (Judges 6-8 ). His calling is the commencement of the second period in the history of the judges. After the victory gained by Deborah and Barak over Jabin, Israel once more sank into idolatry, and the Midianites (q.v.) and Amalekites, with other "children of the east," crossed the Jordan each year for seven successive years for the purpose of plundering and desolating the land. Gideon received a direct call from God to undertake the task of delivering the land from these warlike invaders. He was of the family of Abiezer (Joshua 17:2 ; 1 Chronicles 7:18 ), and of the little township of Ophrah (Judges 6:11 ). First, with ten of his servants, he overthrew the altars of Baal and cut down the asherah which was upon it, and then blew the trumpet of alarm, and the people flocked to his standard on the crest of Mount Gilboa to the number of twenty-two thousand men. These were, however, reduced to only three hundred. These, strangely armed with torches and pitchers and trumpets, rushed in from three different points on the camp of Midian at midnight, in the valley to the north of Moreh, with the terrible war-cry, "For the Lord and for Gideon" (Judges 7:18 , RSV). Terror-stricken, the Midianites were put into dire confusion, and in the darkness slew one another, so that only fifteen thousand out of the great army of one hundred and twenty thousand escaped alive. The memory of this great deliverance impressed itself deeply on the mind of the nation (1 Samuel 12:11 ; Psalm 83:11 ; Isaiah 9:4 ; 10:26 ; Hebrews 11:32 ). The land had now rest for forty years. Gideon died in a good old age, and was buried in the sepulchre of his fathers. Soon after his death a change came over the people. They again forgot Jehovah, and turned to the worship of Baalim, "neither shewed they kindness to the house of Jerubbaal" (Judges 8:35 ). Gideon left behind him seventy sons, a feeble, sadly degenerated race, with one exception, that of Abimelech, who seems to have had much of the courage and energy of his father, yet of restless and unscrupulous ambition. He gathered around him a band who slaughtered all Gideon's sons, except Jotham, upon one stone. (See OPHRAH .)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Gideon
(gihd ih uhn) Personal name meaning, “one who cuts to pieces.” The fifth major judge of twelfth century Israel. He was also called Jerubbaal and was the son of Joash of the tribe of Manasseh. He judged for forty years (Judges 6:11-8:35 ). See Jerubaal.
Gideon was given the task of delivering the Israelites from the Midianites and Amalekites, desert nomads who repeatedly raided the country. Their use of the camel allowed them to ride in, destroy crops, take plunder, and then escape back into the desert with such speed the Israelites could not catch them. Gideon was not a willing volunteer. Although he knew the will of God, twice he laid out the fleece in what seems an effort to avoid the will of God by imposing impossible conditions. God met his conditions both times and then set out the strategy that would guarantee victory for Israel.
To reduce their number, two tests were given to the 32,000 men in Gideon's army. This was done that Israel could not claim victory by any other means than continued dependence upon God. Those who were afraid and those who knelt down to get a drink of water were sent home. The remaining 300 were given pitchers, torches, and trumpets, and placed around the Midianite encampment. The strategy was one of terror: at Gideon's signal the pitchers were broken, the torches then became visible, and the trumpets sounded, giving the enemy the impression they were surrounded. They took flight, their leaders were killed, and the Midianite oppression was brought to an end.
The hero of faith (Hebrews 11:32 ) ended life on a sad note. He angrily punished Succoth and Penuel for not helping in his war against the Midianite kings (Judges 8:1-17 ). He refused the people's offer to crown him king, testifying that only God was King (Judges 8:22-23 ), but he ordered the people to give him their golden earrings, taken as war spoil from the Ishmaelites. He made a worship symbol, an ephod, out of it and led his people astray with it (Judges 8:24-27 ). His family did not follow his God (Judges 8:33 ). See Camel ; Judge; Midianites.
Darlene R. Gautsch
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Gideon
He that bruises or breaks; a destroyer
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Gideon
("a hewer"), i.e. warrior, or the hewer down of Baal (Isaiah 10:33). Of Manasseh; youngest son of Joash, of the Abiezrite family at Ophrah (Judges 6:11; Judges 6:15). Fifth of the judges of Israel, called by the angel of the Lord to deliver Israel from the seven years' yoke of the Midianite hosts, which like swarming locusts consumed all their produce except what they could hide in caves and holes (Judges 6:2; Judges 6:5-6; Judges 6:11). There they fled, and "made" artificial caves besides enlarging natural caves for their purpose, God permitting them to be brought so low that their extremity might be His opportunity. Midian had long before with Moab besought Balaam to curse Israel, and through his counsel, by tempting Israel to whoredom with their and the Moabite women, had brought a plague on Israel, and had then by God's command been smitten sorely by Israel (Numbers 25:17-18; Numbers 31:1-16, etc.).
But now after 200 years, in renewed strength, with the Amalekite and other plundering children of the E. they were used as God's instrument to chastise His apostate people. Crossing Jordan from the E. they spread themselves from the plain of Jezreel to the sea coast of Gaza. Affliction led Israel to crying in prayer. Prayer brought first a prophet from Jehovah to awaken them to a sense of God's grace in their former deliverances and of their own apostasy. Next the Angel of Jehovah came. i.e. Jehovah the Second Person Himself. Former judges, Othniel, Ehud, Barak, had been moved by the Spirit of God to their work; but to Gideon alone under a terebinth in Ophrah, a town belonging to Joash, Jehovah appeared in person to show that the God who had made theophanies to the patriarchs was the same Jehovah, ready to save their descendants if they would return to the covenants.
His second revelation was in a dream, commanding him to overthrow his father's altar to Baal and to erect an altar to Jehovah and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the Asherah ("grove") or idol goddess of nature, probably a wooden pillar (Deuteronomy 16:21). (See ASHTORETH) In the first revelation Jehovah acknowledged Gideon, in the second He commanded Gideon to acknowledge Him. As God alone, Jehovah will not be worshipped along with Baal (1 Kings 18:21; Ezekiel 20:39). Gideon at the first revelation was knocking out (habat ) with a stick wheat in the winepress, sunk in the ground or hewn in the rock to make it safe from the Midianites; for he did not dare to thresh upon an open floor or hardened area in the open field, but like poor gleaners (Ruth 2:17) knocked out the little grain with a stick. The address, "Jehovah is with thee thou mighty man," seemed to Gideon, ruminating on the Midianite oppression which his occupation was a proof of, in ironical and sad contrast with facts.
"If Jehovah be with us why is all this befallen us?" alluding to Deuteronomy 31:17. But God's words guarantee their own accomplishment. JEHOVAH (no longer under His character. "Angel of Jehovah," but manifested as JEHOVAH) replied, "Go in this thy might (the might now given thee by ME, Isaiah 40:29), and thou shalt save Israel from the hand of the Midianites; have not I sent thee?" Then followed the requested "sign," the Angel of the Lord with the end of the staff in His hand consuming with fire Gideon's "offering" (minchah ), not a strict sacrifice but a sacrificial gift), the kid and unleavened cakes (compare Genesis 18, the theophany to Abraham very similar). Compare and contrast the conduct of the angel and the acceptance of Manoah's sacrifice in Judges 13:20. Gideon in gratitude built an altar and called it "Jehovah Shalom," a pledge of "Jehovah" being now at "peace" with Israel again (Jeremiah 29:11; Jeremiah 33:16).
The "second" in age of Joash's bullocks, "seven years old," was appointed in the dream for an offering to Jehovah, to correspond to Midian's seven years' oppression because of Israel's apostasy. Gideon with ten servants overthrew Baal's altar and Asherah in the night, for he durst not do it in the day through fear of his family and townsmen. Joash, when required to bring out his son to die for the sacrilege, replied, "Will ye plead for Baal? .... he that will plead for him shall be put, to death himself, let us wait until the morning (not 'shall be put to death while it is yet morning') and see whether Baal, if he be a god, will plead for himself." So Gideon got the surname "Jerubbaal," "Let Baal fight," i.e. vindicate his own cause on the destroyer of his altar; and as the Jews in contempt changed Baal in compounds to besheth, "Jerubbesheth," "Let the shameful idol light." Then the Spirit of God "clothed" Gideon as his coat of mail (1 Chronicles 12:18; 2 Chronicles 24:20; Luke 24:49; Isaiah 61:10).
His own clan the Abiezrites, Manasseh W. of Jordan, Zebulun, and Naphtali followed him. At his prayer the sign followed, the woolen fleece becoming saturated with dew while the earth around was dry, then the ground around being wet while the fleece was dry. Dew symbolizes God's reviving grace: Israel was heretofore the dry fleece, while the nations around were flourishing; now she is to become filled with the Lord's vigor, while the nations around lose it. The fleece becoming afterward dry while the ground around was wet symbolizes Israel's rejection of the gospel while the Gentile world is receiving the gracious dew. Afterward Israel in its turn shall be the dew to the Gentile world (Micah 5:7). Gideon pitched on a height at the foot of which the fountain Harod ("the spring of trembling," now perhaps Ain Jahlood) sprang (2 Samuel 23:25). Midian pitched in the valley of Jezreel (Judges 6:33).
The timid were first thinned out of Gideon's army (Deuteronomy 20:8). In Judges 7:3, "whosoever is fearful let him return from mount Gilead," as they were then W. of Jordan, the mount in eastern Palestine cannot be meant; but the phrase was a familiar designation of the Manassites. To take away still further all attribution of the victory to man not God, the army was reduced to 300 by retaining those alone whose energy was shown by their drinking what water they lifted with their hands, not delaying to kneel and drink (compare as to Messiah Psalms 110:7). Then followed Gideon's going with Phurah his servant into the Midianite host, and hearing the Midianite's dream of a barley cake overturning the tent, that being poor men's food, so symbolizing despised Israel, the "tent" symbolizing Midian's nomadic life of freedom and power. The Moabite stone shows how similar to Hebrew was the language of Moab, and the same similarity to the Midianite tongue appears from Gideon understanding them.
Dividing his 300 into three attacking columns, Gideon desired them in the beginning of the middle watch, i.e. at midnight (this and the morning watch dividing the night into three watches in the Old Testament), after him to blow the trumpets, break the pitchers, and let the lamps in their left hand previously covered with. the pitchers (a type of the gospel light in earthen vessels, 2 Corinthians 4:6-7), suddenly flash on the foe, and to cry "the sword of Jehovah and of Gideon," and to stand without moving round about the Midianite camp. A mutual slaughter arose from panic among the Midianites (a type of Christ's final overthrow of antichrist, Isaiah 9:4-7), each trumpet holder seeming to have a company at his back. The remnant fled to the bank of the Jordan at Abelmeholah, etc. (See ABELMEHOLAH.)
Then the men of Asher, Naphtali, and all Manasseh, who had been dismissed, returned to join in the pursuit. Gideon requested Ephraim to intercept the fleeing Midianites at the waters of Bethbarah and Jordan, namely, at the tributary streams which they would have to cross to reach the Jordan. A second fight ensued there, and they slew Oreb (the raven) and Zeeb (the wolf). Conder (Palestine Exploration, July, 1874, p. 182) observes that the nomadic hordes of Midian, like the modern Beni Suggar and Ghazawiyeh Arabs, come up the broad and fertile valley of Jezreel; their encampment lay, as the black Arab tents do now in spring, at the foot of the hill March (Nebi Dahy) opposite to the limestone knoll on which Jezreel (Zer'ain) stands. The well Harod, where occurred the trial which separated 300 men of endurance from the worthless rabble, was the Ain Jalud, a fine spring at the foot of mount Gilboa, issuing blue and clear from a cavern, and forming a pool with rushy banks and a pebbly bottom, 100 yards long.
The water is sweet, though slightly tasting of sulphur, and there is ample space for gathering a great number of men. Concealed by the folds of the rolling ground the 300 crept down to Midian's camp in the valley. The Midianite host fled to Bethshittah (the modern village Shatta), in Zererath (a district connected with Zerthan or Zeretan, a name still appearing in Ain Zahrah, three miles W. of Beisan), and to the border of Beth Meholah (wady Maleh), a course directly down the main road to Jordan and Beisan. Thus, Midian fled ten or fifteen miles toward the Jordan. A systematic advance followed. Messengers went S. two days' journey to Ephraim; the lower fords of Jordan at Bethbarah were taken (Bethabara of the New Testament). Meantime Gideon, having cleared the Bethshan valley of Midianites, crossed at the southern end of Succoth (now Makhathet Abu Sus), and continued the pursuit along the eastern bank.
The Midianites followed the right bank S. toward Midian, intending to cross near Jericho. Here the men of Ephraim met them and executed Oreb and Zeeb, and sent their heads to Gideon "on the other side." Thus, "the Raven's Peak" and "the Wolf's Den" seem identical with Ash el Ghorab and Tuweil el Dhiab. Gideon's victory over self was still greater than that over Midian; by a soft answer he turned aside Ephraim's proud and unreasonable wrath at his not summoning them at the first: "is not the gleaning of grapes of Ephraim (their subsequent victory over the fleeing Midianites) better than the vintage of Abiezer?" than my first victory over them (Isaiah 10:26; Proverbs 15:1; Proverbs 16:32). Contrast the unyielding temper of Jephthah (Judges 12:1, etc.). Then followed the churlish unpatriotic cowardice of Succoth and Penuel, in answer to his request for provisions, through fear of Midian and disbelief of God's power to make victorious so small and so "faint" a force as Gideon's 300.
Coming unexpectedly on the host which thought itself "secure" amidst their Bedouin countrymen at Karkor, in a third battle he defeated them and slew Zebah and Zalmunnah the two kings (emirs) after battle, in just retribution for their having slain his kingly brothers in cold blood at Tabor; then he taught by corporal punishment with thorns the elders of Succoth to know their error, and beat down the tower of Penuel. Of 120,000 Midianites only 15,000 survived. Declining the proffered kingdom because Jehovah was their king, Gideon yet made a gorgeous jeweled ephod with the golden rings the Israelites had got as booty, besides the ornaments (verse 21, golden crescents or little moons), and collars (ear pendants), and purple raiment, and collars about their camels' necks.
The ephod had the breast-plate (choshen ) and Urim and Thummim. Gideon "kept" it in his city Ophrah; wearing the breast-plate, he made it and the holy 'lot his means of obtaining revelations from Jehovah whom he worshipped at the altar. His sin which became a "snare" (means of ruin) to him and his house was his usurping the Aaronic priesthood, and drawing off the people from the one lawful sanctuary, the center of theocratic unity, and so preparing the way for the relapse to Baal warship at his death.
But his unambitious spirit is praiseworthy; he, the great Baal fighter, "Jerubbaal," instead of ambitiously accepting the crown, "went and dwelt in his own house" quietly, and died "in a good old age," having secured for his country "quietness" for 40 years, leaving, besides 70 sons by wives, a son by a concubine, Abimelech, doomed to be by ambition as great a curse to his country as his father was in the main a blessing.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Gideon
(Γεδεών)
Gideon was a man of valour who, according to Judges 6-8, received a visit from Jahweh’s messenger, overturned the altar of Baal, saved Israel from the hand of Midian, chastised the men of Succoth, and finally refused a crown. He is merely named in Hebrews (Hebrews 11:32) among the ancients who wrought great deeds by faith, time failing the author to recount the achievements of all his heroes.
James Strahan.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Gideon
GIDEON . The son of Joash, a Manassite; he dwelt in Ophrah, a place hitherto unidentified, which belonged to the clan of the Abiezrites. Gideon has also the names of Jerubbaal ( Judges 6:32 ) and Jerubbesheth ( 2 Samuel 11:21 ). After the victory of the Israelites, under the guidance of Deborah, over the Canaanites, the land had rest for forty years (an indefinite period). Apostasy from Jahweh again resulted in their being oppressed, this time by the neighbouring Bedouin tribes, the Midianites and Amalekites. The underlying idea is that, since the Israelites did not exclusively worship their national God, He withdrew His protection, with the result that another nation, aided by its national god, was enabled to overcome the unprotected Israelites. A return to obedience, and recognition of Jahweh the national God, ensures His renewed protection; relief from the oppressor is brought about by some chosen instrument, of whom it is always said that Jahweh is ‘with him’; this is also the case with Gideon ( Judges 6:18 ).
The sources of the story of Gideon, preserved in Judges 6:1 to Judges 8:35 , offer some difficult problems, upon which scholars differ considerably; all that can be said with certainty is that the narrative is composite, that the hand of the redactor is visible in certain verses ( e.g. Judges 6:20 , Judges 7:6 , Judges 8:22-23 ), and that the sources have not always been skilfully combined; this comes out most clearly in Judges 7:24 to Judges 8:3 , which breaks the continuity of the narrative. Disregarding details, the general outline of the history of Gideon is as follows:
Introduction , Judges 6:1-10 : For seven years the Israelites suffered under the Midianite oppression; but on their ‘crying unto the Lord’ a prophet is sent, who declares unto them the reason of their present state, viz. that it was the result of their having forsaken Jahweh and served the gods of the Amorites.* [1]
The call of Gideon , Judges 6:11-14 : The ‘Angel of the Lord’ appears to Gideon and tells him that the Lord is with him, and that he is to free Israel from the Midianite invasion. Gideon requires a sign: he brings an offering of a kid and unleavened cakes, the Angel touches these with his staff, whereupon fire issues from the rock on which the offering lies and consumes it. Gideon is now convinced that it was the ‘Angel of the Lord’ who had been speaking to him, and at Jahweh’s † [2] command he destroys the altar of Baal in Ophrah and builds one to Jahweh, to whom he also offers sacrifice. This act embitters Gideon’s fellow-townsmen against him; they are, however, quieted down by the boldness and shrewdness of Gideon’s father.
Gideon’s victory , Judges 7:23 Judges 7:23 , Judges 8:4-14 : Allegiance to Jahweh being thus publicly acknowledged, the Israelites are once more in a position to assert their political independence; so that when the Midianites again invade their land, Gideon raises an army against them, being moreover assured by the miracle of the dew on the fleece that he will be victorious. At the command of Jahweh his army is twice reduced, first to ten thousand men, and then to three hundred. At the command of Jahweh again, he goes with his servant, Purah, down to the camp of the Midianites, where he is encouraged by overhearing a Midianite recounting a dream, which is interpreted by another Midianite as foreshadowing the victory of Gideon. On his return to his own camp Gideon divides his men into three companies; each man receives a torch, an earthen jar, and a horn; at a given sign, the horns are blown, the jars broken, and the burning torches exposed to view, with the result that the Midianites flee in terror. Gideon pursues them across the Jordan; he halts during the pursuit, both at Succoth and at Penuel, in order to refresh his three hundred followers; in each case food is refused him by the inhabitants; after threatening them with vengeance on his return, he presses on, overtakes the Midianite host, and is again victorious; he then first punishes the inhabitants of Succoth and Penuel, and next turns his attention to the Midianite chiefs, Zebah and Zalmunna. From this part of the narrative it would seem that Gideon’s attack upon the Midianites was, in part, undertaken owing to a blood-feud; for, on his finding out that the murderers of his brethren at Tabor were these two Midianite chiefs, he slays them in order to avenge his brethren.
The offer of the kingship , Judges 8:22-28 : On the Israelites offering to Gideon and his descendants the kingship, Gideon declines it on theocratic grounds, but asks instead for part of the gold from the spoil taken from the Midianites; of this he makes an image ( ephod ), which he sets up at Ophrah, and which becomes the cause of apostasy from Jahweh. The narrative of Gideon’s leadership is brought to a close by a reference to his offspring, and special mention of his son Abimelech; after his death, we are told, the Israelites ‘went a whoring after the Baalim.’
In the section Judges 8:22-35 there is clearly a mixing-up of the sources; on the one hand Israel’s apostasy is traced to the action of Gideon, on the other this does not take place until after his death. Again, the refusal of the kingship on theocratic grounds is an idea which belongs to a much later time; moreover, Gideon’s son, Abimelech, became king after slaying his father’s legitimate sons; it is taken for granted ( Judges 9:2 ) that there is to be a ruler after Gideon’s death. This, together with other indications, leads to the belief that in its original form the earliest source gave an account of Gideon as king .
The section Judges 7:24 to Judges 8:3 is undoubtedly ancient; it tells of how the Ephraimites, at Gideon’s command, cut off part of the fugitive Midianite host under two of their chiefs, Oreb and Zeeb, whom the Ephraimites slew. When the victorious band with Gideon joins hands with the Ephraimites, the latter complain to Gideon because he did not call them to attack the main body of the enemy; Gideon quiets them by means of shrewd flattery. This section is evidently a fragment of the original source, which presumably went on to detail what further action the Ephraimites took during the Midianite campaign; for that the Midianite oppression was brought to an end by this one battle it is impossible to believe.* [3]
W. O. E. Oesterley.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gideon
Son of Joash, of the tribe of Manasseh, one of the judges of Israel. An angel of the Lord appeared to him while he was threshing wheat to hide it from the Midianites, and said, "The Lord is with thee, thou mighty man of valour." Thus addressed, the true though weak faith that was in Gideon was manifested, and he said to the Lord, "If the Lord be with us, why is all this befallen us? And where be all his miracles which our fathers told us of ?" Jehovah added, "Go in this thy might, and thou shalt save Israel from the hand of the Midianites: have not I sent thee?" Gideon pleaded that his family was poor, and that he was the least in his father's house. He was further encouraged. The first thing he was bid to do was to throw down the altar of Baal, and erect an altar to Jehovah, and offer an offering thereon. Gideon obeyed, but he did it by night, for he feared to do it by day. The men of the city desired his death, but his father protected him, saying, Let Baal plead for himself, and symbolically named Gideon JERUBBAAL, 'Let Baal plead.' In 2 Samuel 11:21 it is JERUBBESHETH, 'Let the shameful thing plead,' meaning the same, without mentioning the name of Baal: cf. Jeremiah 11:13 ; Hosea 9:10 .
Obedience led to strength: the Spirit of the Lord came upon him, and he blew a trumpet, and sent messengers to the tribes of Manasseh, Asher, Zebulun, and Naphtali. But his small though true faith wanted a sign from God that He would save Israel by him. God graciously responded by the moisture and then by the dryness of the fleece of wool. God declared that Gideon's followers were too many: they would take the glory to themselves, and say, "mine own hand hath saved me." So he bade all that were fearful and afraid to return, and more than two-thirds went back, leaving but 10,000: proving that the mass of the people were unfit to fight the battles of the Lord. Still the people were too many, and they are tested at the water: those that fell on their knees to drink were sent away, and only three hundred men remained, those who had lapped a little water from the hand, as satisfied with a hasty refreshment.
God then told Gideon to go down to the host, for He had delivered it into his hand; but if he was afraid, he could first go with his servant and hear what the enemy said. He was still faint-hearted and therefore went to listen, and there he heard himself compared to 'a cake of barley bread,' but that God would deliver Midian into his hand. Gideon at once arranged his men into three companies, each man having a trumpet, and a lamp inside a pitcher. When they reached the camp, the trumpets were blown, and the pitchers broken. The Midianites were dismayed and some of them in the confusion and terror killed one another, and the others fled, pursued by the tribes before named, and by Ephraim. Ephraim proudly found fault with Gideon for not calling them to the battle at first; but a modest answer appeased their wrath. The conquest was complete, and the men of Succoth and Penuel were punished for not aiding Gideon with bread when he was faint.
Israel desired Gideon to rule over them, but he refused, saying, "The Lord shall rule over you." He requested of the army the golden earrings taken from the enemy. With these he made an ephod, and placed it in his city, and all Israel went in idolatry after it, and it became a snare to Gideon and his house. Alas, the man of faith, who had thrown down the altar of Baal, was now led astray with a golden ephod! A memorial of God's intervention is not present faith in the God who has intervened. The time of victory is a time of peculiar danger, when many being off their guard have fallen. During the life-time of Gideon Israel dwelt in peace during forty years, but at his decease the people turned to idols and were ungrateful to the house of Gideon. Judges 6:11Judges 8:35 . He is called GEDEONin Hebrews 11:32 , where his faith is spoken of.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Gideon
Gideon (gĭd'e-on), he that cuts down. youngest son of Joash, whose family lived at Ophrah, Judges 6:15, in the territory of Manasseh, near Shechem. He was the fifth and greatest recorded judge of Israel. He had sons, Judges 6:11; Judges 8:22; and was called by an angel to be a deliverer of Israel. Judges 6:1-40. Clothed by the Spirit of God, Judges 6:34; comp. 1 Chronicles 12:18, he blew a trumpet and was joined by Zebulun, Naphtali and even the reluctant Asher. Strengthened by a double sign from God, he reduced his army by the usual proclamation. Deuteronomy 20:1; Deuteronomy 20:8. By a second test at "the spring of trembling" he further reduced the number of his followers to 300. Judges 7:5. ff, The midnight attack upon the Midianites, their panic, and the rout and slaughter that followed, are told in Judges 7:1-25. The memory of this splendid deliverance took deep root in the national traditions. 1 Samuel 12:11; Psalms 83:11; Isaiah 9:4; Isaiah 10:26; Hebrews 11:32. After this there was a peace of forty years, Judges 8:29-31. He refused the crown. Judges 8:23.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Gideon
See Jerubbaal
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Gideon
the son of Joash, of the tribe of Manasseh; the same with Jerubbaal, the seventh judge of Israel. He dwelt in the city of Ophra, and was chosen by God in a very extraordinary manner to deliver the Israelites from the oppression of the Midianites, under which they had laboured for the space of seven years. See Judges 6:14-27 ; Judges 8:1-24 , &c.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Gideon
(Hebrew: hewer)
One of the greater judges of Israel. His father, Joas, lived at Ephra, and was of the family of Abiezer and tribe of Manasses. Gedeon was sent by God to deliver Israel, which had forsaken Yahweh, and after destroying the altar of Baal, routed the Israelite enemies, the Madianites, with 300 men. His peaceful judgeship lasted 40 years.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Gideon or Jerubbaal
Of the tribe of Manasseh, a valiant and prudent judge of Israel, particularly the eastern and northern tribes, B. C. 1249 to 1209. He resided in Ophrah, east of the Jordan, a region often ravaged in harvest-time by the wandering tribes on its eastern border. Being called of God to deliver his people, and encouraged by signs from heaven, he defeated the Midiantites, and caused Israel to dwell in safety for many years. In punishing the refractory cities Succoth and Penuel, and the fratricides Zeba and Zalmunna- in soothing the jealousy of the Ephraimites, and in declining the crown offered him by the Jews, he evinced those qualities which made him a successful judge. In the matter of the golden ephod, however, he fell into a sin and a snare; for this memorial of the wonders God had wrought became ere long an object of idolatrous veneration, Judges 8:35 1 Samuel 12:11 Hebrews 11:32 .
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Gideon
Among the enemies that attacked Israel during the time of the judges were the Midianites. Their yearly raids devastated Israel (Judges 6:1-6), and when the people cried to God for help, he chose Gideon to save them. Gideon at first found it difficult to believe that God had chosen him for this task, but his faith was strengthened when an offering he prepared for God was miraculously burnt up (Judges 6:11-24).
Israel was in bondage to the worship of Baal. Therefore, if the people were to claim God’s help, they had first of all to destroy the false religions. In Gideon’s home town of Ophrah, Gideon’s father was caretaker of the local Baal shrine, but when Gideon began his reformation, his father became the first convert. Others in the town were hostile (Judges 6:25-32).
This hostility did not last, for when Gideon called the people to battle, the people of his own clan (and therefore probably of his own town) were the first to respond. Others soon followed their example and Gideon was able to assemble a fighting force. Still uncertain of himself, Gideon twice asked God for miraculous signs to confirm that he was the one God had chosen (Judges 6:33-40).
God allowed Gideon only three hundred men to launch the attack, to impress upon him the need for total trust in God for success (Judges 7:1-8; Hebrews 11:32-33). Gideon’s faith was greatly strengthened when he discovered, by secretly visiting the enemy’s camp, that the Midianites were in the grip of an unnatural fear (Judges 7:9-15).
When the Midianites were awoken in the middle of the night by a terrifying noise and found themselves surrounded by Israelite soldiers, panic broke out. Some of the Midianites unknowingly attacked each other in the confusion, and others fled in fear. The larger Israelite force then swept in upon them (Judges 7:16-25).
Upon discovering that the Midianite kings had escaped across the Jordan, Gideon set out after them. He eventually captured them, but before executing them, he punished the leaders of one Israelite town for earlier refusing to help him and his soldiers (Judges 8:1-21).
Gideon was now a national hero. To his credit he rejected the people’s invitation to become their king (for God alone was their king), but he foolishly celebrated his victory over Midian by making a visible symbol of the invisible God. He may have had good intentions, but he opened the way for idolatry. Soon Gideon, his family and the people as a whole had returned to their former idolatrous ways (Judges 8:22-28).

Sentence search

Gedeon - (gehd' ih uhn) KJV transliteration of Greek for Gideon in Hebrews 11:32 . See Gideon
Jerubbaal - ” Another name for Gideon (Judges 6:32 ). See Gideon
Gideoni - Same as Gideon
Jerubbaal - Alternative name for Gideon
Zebah - A Midianite king, mentioned together with Zalmunna , who was killed by Gideon as the result of blood-revenge ( Judges 8:18-21 ); both kings had, however, been previously overcome in battle by Gideon, who championed the Israelites against their Midianite oppressors. Gideon commands Jether, his eldest son, to slay them, but being only a youth he is afraid; so the kings ask Gideon himself to kill them; he does so, and takes the crescents from the necks of their camels. This last action may conceivably Imply a kindly remembrance of the kings on the part of Gideon, for from Judges 8:19 it would seem that it was only reluctantly, and from a sense of duty, that he slew them
Gedeon - Hebrews 11:32 : same as Gideon
Abi-e'Zer - ) He was the ancestor of the great judge Gideon. [1] ...
One of David's mighty men
Jerubbaal - See Gideon
Jerubbaal - Name, signifying 'Let Baal plead,' given to Gideon,q
Zalmunna And Zebah - Midianitish kings, defeated and slain by Gideon, Judges 8:5
Jerubbesheth - Name, signifying 'Let the shameful thing plead,' given to Gideon,q
Jerub'Besheth - (contender with the shame ), a name of Gideon
Zalmunna - One of the two kings (kings, malkeey as distinguished from the princes, sareey ) slain by Gideon for having slain Gideon's brothers in cold blood (Judges 8:18; Judges 8:5; Judges 8:12; Judges 8:26). (See Gideon
Gideon - Their yearly raids devastated Israel (Judges 6:1-6), and when the people cried to God for help, he chose Gideon to save them. Gideon at first found it difficult to believe that God had chosen him for this task, but his faith was strengthened when an offering he prepared for God was miraculously burnt up (Judges 6:11-24). In Gideon’s home town of Ophrah, Gideon’s father was caretaker of the local Baal shrine, but when Gideon began his reformation, his father became the first convert. ...
This hostility did not last, for when Gideon called the people to battle, the people of his own clan (and therefore probably of his own town) were the first to respond. Others soon followed their example and Gideon was able to assemble a fighting force. Still uncertain of himself, Gideon twice asked God for miraculous signs to confirm that he was the one God had chosen (Judges 6:33-40). ...
God allowed Gideon only three hundred men to launch the attack, to impress upon him the need for total trust in God for success (Judges 7:1-8; Hebrews 11:32-33). Gideon’s faith was greatly strengthened when he discovered, by secretly visiting the enemy’s camp, that the Midianites were in the grip of an unnatural fear (Judges 7:9-15). ...
Upon discovering that the Midianite kings had escaped across the Jordan, Gideon set out after them. ...
Gideon was now a national hero. Soon Gideon, his family and the people as a whole had returned to their former idolatrous ways (Judges 8:22-28)
Phurah - The steward of Gideon, (Judges 7:10-11) derived from Parah, to bear
Jehovah Shalom - ) Gideon so-called his altar of thanksgiving (not sacrifice) in Ophrah, to commemorate the angel of Jehovah's salutation, "Peace be unto thee"; where rather judgment for national backslidings was to have been expected, and when he himself had feared death, as having seen the angel of Jehovah. Jehovah's assurance of "peace" confirmed His previous announcement that Gideon would conquer Midian and deliver Israel
Zererath - Place in or toward which the Midianites fled before Gideon
Zeeb - Prince of Midian, slain by Gideon
Jerubbesheth - , idol, a surname also of Gideon (2 Samuel 11:21 )
Tabbath - Place near the Jordan whither the Midianites fled when defeated by Gideon
Karkor - Gideon and three hundred Israelite men conducted their second surprise attack on the Midianites at Karkor. According to Judges 8:10-11 , Zebah and Zalmunna, two Midianites leaders, were encamped at Karkor with fifteen thousand troops when Gideon attacked and routed them
Zebah - One of the twoMidianite kings who were defeated and slain by Gideon
Gideon - Gideon . Gideon has also the names of Jerubbaal ( Judges 6:32 ) and Jerubbesheth ( 2 Samuel 11:21 ). A return to obedience, and recognition of Jahweh the national God, ensures His renewed protection; relief from the oppressor is brought about by some chosen instrument, of whom it is always said that Jahweh is ‘with him’; this is also the case with Gideon ( Judges 6:18 ). ...
The sources of the story of Gideon, preserved in Judges 6:1 to Judges 8:35 , offer some difficult problems, upon which scholars differ considerably; all that can be said with certainty is that the narrative is composite, that the hand of the redactor is visible in certain verses ( e. Disregarding details, the general outline of the history of Gideon is as follows:...
Introduction , Judges 6:1-10 : For seven years the Israelites suffered under the Midianite oppression; but on their ‘crying unto the Lord’ a prophet is sent, who declares unto them the reason of their present state, viz. ]'>[1] ...
The call of Gideon , Judges 7:24 : The ‘Angel of the Lord’ appears to Gideon and tells him that the Lord is with him, and that he is to free Israel from the Midianite invasion. Gideon requires a sign: he brings an offering of a kid and unleavened cakes, the Angel touches these with his staff, whereupon fire issues from the rock on which the offering lies and consumes it. Gideon is now convinced that it was the ‘Angel of the Lord’ who had been speaking to him, and at Jahweh’s †
Gideon’s victory , Judges 7:23 Judges 7:23 , Judges 8:4-14 : Allegiance to Jahweh being thus publicly acknowledged, the Israelites are once more in a position to assert their political independence; so that when the Midianites again invade their land, Gideon raises an army against them, being moreover assured by the miracle of the dew on the fleece that he will be victorious. At the command of Jahweh again, he goes with his servant, Purah, down to the camp of the Midianites, where he is encouraged by overhearing a Midianite recounting a dream, which is interpreted by another Midianite as foreshadowing the victory of Gideon. On his return to his own camp Gideon divides his men into three companies; each man receives a torch, an earthen jar, and a horn; at a given sign, the horns are blown, the jars broken, and the burning torches exposed to view, with the result that the Midianites flee in terror. Gideon pursues them across the Jordan; he halts during the pursuit, both at Succoth and at Penuel, in order to refresh his three hundred followers; in each case food is refused him by the inhabitants; after threatening them with vengeance on his return, he presses on, overtakes the Midianite host, and is again victorious; he then first punishes the inhabitants of Succoth and Penuel, and next turns his attention to the Midianite chiefs, Zebah and Zalmunna. From this part of the narrative it would seem that Gideon’s attack upon the Midianites was, in part, undertaken owing to a blood-feud; for, on his finding out that the murderers of his brethren at Tabor were these two Midianite chiefs, he slays them in order to avenge his brethren. ...
The offer of the kingship , Judges 8:22-28 : On the Israelites offering to Gideon and his descendants the kingship, Gideon declines it on theocratic grounds, but asks instead for part of the gold from the spoil taken from the Midianites; of this he makes an image ( ephod ), which he sets up at Ophrah, and which becomes the cause of apostasy from Jahweh. The narrative of Gideon’s leadership is brought to a close by a reference to his offspring, and special mention of his son Abimelech; after his death, we are told, the Israelites ‘went a whoring after the Baalim. ’...
In the section Judges 8:22-35 there is clearly a mixing-up of the sources; on the one hand Israel’s apostasy is traced to the action of Gideon, on the other this does not take place until after his death. Again, the refusal of the kingship on theocratic grounds is an idea which belongs to a much later time; moreover, Gideon’s son, Abimelech, became king after slaying his father’s legitimate sons; it is taken for granted ( Judges 9:2 ) that there is to be a ruler after Gideon’s death. This, together with other indications, leads to the belief that in its original form the earliest source gave an account of Gideon as king . ...
The section Judges 7:24 to Judges 8:3 is undoubtedly ancient; it tells of how the Ephraimites, at Gideon’s command, cut off part of the fugitive Midianite host under two of their chiefs, Oreb and Zeeb, whom the Ephraimites slew. When the victorious band with Gideon joins hands with the Ephraimites, the latter complain to Gideon because he did not call them to attack the main body of the enemy; Gideon quiets them by means of shrewd flattery
Zalmunna - One of the two Midianite kings who were defeated and slain by Gideon
Tabbath - A place to which the Midianites fled in the battle of Gideon
Abimelech - ...
Abimelech (son of Gideon): Son of Gideon, native of Shechem
Zererath - One point in the flight of Midian from Gideon, probably the same as ZEREDATHAH
Phurah - (See Gideon
Kar'Kor - (foundation ), the place in which Zebah and Zalmunna were again routed by Gideon, ( Judges 8:10 ) must have been on the east of Jordan
Bethshitta - ") Whither the Midianites fled after their overthrow by Gideon (Judges 7:22)
Zebul - A governor of the city of Shechem, who labored adroitly to preserve the city for Abimelech his master, the son of Gideon, Judges 9:1 - 57
Lappeth - When Gideon's army came to the water side, some drank of it with the hand quickly, to be ready without delay to follow Gideon; while the thousands of fainthearted, that were sent away, stooped down to drink with so much tardiness and ceremony as to show that then- hearts were not with Gideon in his contemplated enterprise
Beth-Shit'Tah - (home of the acacia ), one of the spots to which the flight of the host of the Midianites extended after their discomfiture by Gideon
Jehovah-Shalom - Jehovah send peace, the name which Gideon gave to the altar he erected on the spot at Ophrah where the angel appeared to him (Judges 6:24 )
ze'Bah - and Zalmun'na ( deprived of protection ), the two "kings" of Midian who commanded the great invasion of Palestine, and who finally fell by the hand of Gideon himself. Here they sere reposing their with 15,000 men, a mere remnant of their huge horde, when Gideon overtook them. The people fled in dismay, and Gideon captured the two kings and brought them to his native village, Ophrah where he slew them because they had killed his brothers
Zalmunna - ” King of Midian captured and killed by Gideon (Judges 8:1-21 ; Psalm 83:11 )
Zalmunna - One of the two kings of Midian whom the "Lord delivered" into the hands of Gideon
Gideon - " Thus addressed, the true though weak faith that was in Gideon was manifested, and he said to the Lord, "If the Lord be with us, why is all this befallen us? And where be all his miracles which our fathers told us of ?" Jehovah added, "Go in this thy might, and thou shalt save Israel from the hand of the Midianites: have not I sent thee?" Gideon pleaded that his family was poor, and that he was the least in his father's house. Gideon obeyed, but he did it by night, for he feared to do it by day. The men of the city desired his death, but his father protected him, saying, Let Baal plead for himself, and symbolically named Gideon JERUBBAAL, 'Let Baal plead. God declared that Gideon's followers were too many: they would take the glory to themselves, and say, "mine own hand hath saved me. ...
God then told Gideon to go down to the host, for He had delivered it into his hand; but if he was afraid, he could first go with his servant and hear what the enemy said. Gideon at once arranged his men into three companies, each man having a trumpet, and a lamp inside a pitcher. Ephraim proudly found fault with Gideon for not calling them to the battle at first; but a modest answer appeased their wrath. The conquest was complete, and the men of Succoth and Penuel were punished for not aiding Gideon with bread when he was faint. ...
Israel desired Gideon to rule over them, but he refused, saying, "The Lord shall rule over you. With these he made an ephod, and placed it in his city, and all Israel went in idolatry after it, and it became a snare to Gideon and his house. During the life-time of Gideon Israel dwelt in peace during forty years, but at his decease the people turned to idols and were ungrateful to the house of Gideon
Zebah - Zebah and Zalmunna were their kings slain by Gideon at Karkor, high up on the Hauran, where they had fled by the ford further to the N. Their murder of his brothers (three at least, as not the dual but plural is used) at Tabor was what, in spite of hunger and faintness, especially stimulated Gideon to such keenness in the pursuit
Jerubba'al, - (contender with Baal ), the surname of Gideon, which he acquired in consequence of destroying the altar of Baal, when his father defended him from the vengeance of the Abiezrites
Oreb, the Rock of - The place where Gideon slew Oreb after the defeat of the Midianites (Judges 7:25 ; Isaiah 10:26 )
Jerubbaal - Contender with Baal; or, let Baal plead, a surname of Gideon; a name given to him because he destroyed the altar of Baal (Judges 6:32 ; 7:1 ; 8:29 ; 1 Samuel 12:11 )
Zebah - Man-killer, or sacrifice, one of the two kings who led the vast host of the Midianites who invaded the land of Israel, and over whom Gideon gained a great and decisive victory (Judges 8 ). Zebah and Zalmunna had succeeded in escaping across the Jordan with a remnant of the Midianite host, but were overtaken at Karkor, probably in the Hauran, and routed by Gideon. The kings were taken alive and brought back across the Jordan; and confessing that they had personally taken part in the slaughter of Gideon's brothers, they were put to death (Compare 1 Samuel 12:11 ; Isaiah 10:26 ; Psalm 83:11 )
Abelmeholah - Near this place Gideon defeated the Midianites, Judges 7:22 ; and here Elisha was born, 1 Kings 19:16
Jehovah-Shalom - ” Name Gideon gave to the altar he built at Ophrah (Judges 6:24 )
Penuel - Gideon after Succoth mounted to Penuel (Judges 8:5-8. ) (See Gideon. ) The men of Penuel, like those of Succoth, as living on the great army route between Canaan and the East, would not help Gideon through fear of Midian's vengeance. ...
Hence arose Jeroboam's need of rebuilding the tower which Gideon had broken down long before, and which lay due E
Oreb - Raven, a prince of Midian, who, being defeated by Gideon and put to straits, was slain along with Zeeb (Judges 7:20-25 )
Tabbath - ” Site in the mountains of Gilead east of the Jordan where Gideon ended his pursuit of the Midianites (Judges 7:22 ), identified with modern Ras Abu Tabat northwest of Pakoris
Oreb - Prince of Midian: he invaded Israel, but was defeated by Gideon, and slain at the ROCK OREB — this occurrence apparently giving to the rock its name
Ophrah - " A city of Manasseh, 6 miles south-west of Shechem, the residence of Gideon (Judges 6:11 ; 8:27,32 ). This thing "became a snare" to Gideon and his house. After Gideon's death his family resided here till they were put to death by Abimelech (Judges 9:5 )
Penuel - The men of this place refused to succour Gideon and his little army when they were in pursuit of the Midianites (Judges 8:1-21 ). On his return, Gideon slew the men of this city and razed its lofty watch-tower to the ground
Jehovah-Shalom - Jehovah of peace, or prosperity, the name given by Gideon to an altar which he built in the place where the Angel-Jehovah had appeared to him, and saluted him by saying "Peace be unto thee," Judges 6:24
Moreh, Hill of - Place where the Midianites encamped before they were attacked by Gideon
o'Reb - (raven ), one of the chieftains of the Midianite host which invaded Israel, and was defeated and driven back by Gideon
Karkor - Here Gideon overtook and routed a fugitive band of Midianites under Zeba and Zalmunna, whom he took captive
Beth-Shittah - ” Battle scene when Gideon and his 300 men defeated the Midianites (Judges 7:22 )
Bedan - Judge of Israel, between Gideon and Jephthah, mentioned in 1 Samuel 12:11 ; but not found in the book of Judges
Zebul - ” Resident of Shechem who was a follower of Abimelech, son of Gideon
Jeho'Vah-Sha'Lom - " The altar erected by Gideon in Orphrah was so called in memory of the salutation addressed to him by the angel of Jehovah, "Peace be unto thee
Pillar, Plain of the, - or rather "oak of the pillar" (that being the real signification of the Hebrew word elon ), a tree which stood near Shechem and at which the men of Shechem and the house of Millo assembled to crown Abimelech the son of Gideon
Zererah - (zehr' eh ruh) Site on the route by which the defeated Midianites fled from Gideon (Judges 7:22 ; KJV, Zereath); possibly a variant rendering of Zarethan (Joshua 3:16 ; 1 Kings 4:12 ; 1 Kings 7:46 ) or of Zeredah (2 Chronicles 4:17 )
Lap (Verb) - Gideon was to separate those who drank by cupping water in their hands and then lapping it up, still keeping watch, from those who knelt down to drink
Gaal - He joined the Shechemites when revolting against Aimelech, son of Gideon, inflamed their passions, and led them to battle, but was defeated, and excluded from the city
Succoth - It was an important town during the time of Gideon. Its leaders were punished by Gideon for not helping him in a campaign against the Midianites (Judges 8:5-7 ,Judges 8:5-7,8:13-16 )
a'Bel-Meho'Lah - (meadow of the dance ), in the northern pat of the Jordan valley, ( 1 Kings 4:12 ) to which the routed Bedouin host fled from Gideon, (Judges 7:22 ) Here Elisha was found at his plough by Elijah returning up the valley from Horeb
Bedan - In 1 Samuel 12:11 the name of this judge stands between Jerubbaal, or Gideon, and Jephthah, but probably it is a copyist's error for Barak
be'er - (Numbers 21:16-18 ) This is possibly the BEER-ELIM of (Isaiah 15:8 ) ...
A place to which Jotham, the son of Gideon, fled for fear of his brother Abimelech
Karkor - Where Gideon finally dispersed the remains of Zebah and Zalmunna's host (Judges 8:10-11), E
Abiezer - Oldest son of Gilead, descendant of Manasseh; head of a leading family, of which were Joash and Gideon (Judges 6:11-24; Judges 6:34; Judges 8:2). Gideon soothed the wounded vanity of Ephraim when upbraiding him for not having called in their aid against Midian, saying "Is not the grape of Ephraim better than the vintage of Abiezer?" (Joshua 17:2
Moreh, the Hill of - ), where Gideon overthrew the Midianites (Judges 7:1-12 )
Harod - Palpitation, a fountain near which Gideon and his army encamped on the morning of the day when they encountered and routed the Midianites (Judges 7 )
Harod - A well, or more correctly a spring, near which Gideon encamped, and at which apparently he tested his army by their manner of drinking the water
Gilead, Mount - A mount occupied by Gideon before he attacked the Midianites and Amalekites
Harod - A spring by which Gideon encamped, and where probably the trial of the army by their mode of drinking was made
Abelmeholah - To the border of this place Gideon pursued the Midianites
Mid'Ian - After a lapse of some years, the Midianites appear again as the enemies of the Israelites, oppressing them for seven years, but are finally defeated with great slaughter by Gideon. [1] The Midianites are described as true Arabs, and possessed cattle and flocks and camels as the sand of the seashore for multitude. The spoil taken in the war of both Moses and of Gideon is remarkable
Jezreel (2) - There Barak and Gideon triumphed; Deborah sung her war song; Saul and Jonathan fell near by, on the mountains of Gilboa; here king Josiah was mortally wounded by the Egyptians. It is the valley of Jezreel proper; the battle-field where Gideon triumphed and Saul and Jonathan were overthrown
Jerubbaal - (See Gideon. " When Baal did Gideon, no harm the title Jerub-Baal, the" Baal fighter," became an honourable one
Jogbehah - ” City east of the Jordan where Gideon defeated Zeba and Zalmunna, kings of Midian (Judges 8:11 )
Joash - The father of Gideon ( Judges 6:11 etc
Ophrah - A town of Manesseh where Gideon resided; and where after his death his ephod was superstitiously adored, Judges 6:11-24 ; 8:27
Oreb, And Zeeb - Raven and wolf, two Midianite chiefs, captured after the victory of Gideon, and slain at the spots whither they had fled, and which were afterwards called in memory of them "the rock of Oreb" and the wine- press or cellar of Zeeb, Judges 7:25
be'Dan -
Mentioned in (1 Samuel 12:11 ) as a judge of Israel between Jerubbaal (Gideon) and Jephthah
Bedan - Chronologically Barak should precede Gideon, but the order cannot be pressed (cf
Abel-Meholah - To its neighborhood fled the Midianites routed by Gideon (Judges 7:22)
Zebah - ” He and Zalmunna were Midianite kings that Gideon captured and killed because they had killed Gideon's brothers (Judges 8:4-21 ; see Psalm 83:11 ; Isaiah 9:4 ; Isaiah 10:26 )
Abiezer - Great-grandson of Manasseh, Numbers 26:29,30 , and founder of the family to which Gideon belonged, Joshua 17
Baal-Berith - Covenant lord, the name of the god worshipped in Shechem after the death of Gideon (Judges 8:33 ; 9:4 )
Zeeb - The wolf, one of the two leaders of the great Midianite host which invaded Israel and was utterly routed by Gideon
Abel-Meholah - Gideon fought the Midianites in the territory of Issachar west of the Jordan (Judges 7:22 )
Peniel or Penuel - A town beyond the Jordan, and near the Jabbok; defended by a strong tower, which Gideon broke down because the men of Penuel refused to aid him against the Midianites, Judges 8:8-17
ha'Rod - (fear ) , The well of, a spring by which Gideon and his great army encamped on the morning of the day which ended in the rout of the Midianites
Ephod - The breast-plate, with its twelve precious stones, gave an importance to the ephod which led to its adoption in the idolatries of Gideon and Micah (Judges 8:27; Judges 17:5; Judges 18:14). ...
The large amount of gold used by Gideon on his ephod was not the material of it, but the means wherewith he completed it; including the breast-plate (choshen ), the 12 precious stones, and the two for the shoulders, the gold thread throughout, and gold braid, and gold twist chains fastening the breast-plate upon the ephod, and lastly the price of the labor (Exodus 28:6-30). (See Gideon
Gideon - Gideon received a direct call from God to undertake the task of delivering the land from these warlike invaders. These, strangely armed with torches and pitchers and trumpets, rushed in from three different points on the camp of Midian at midnight, in the valley to the north of Moreh, with the terrible war-cry, "For the Lord and for Gideon" (Judges 7:18 , RSV). Gideon died in a good old age, and was buried in the sepulchre of his fathers. Gideon left behind him seventy sons, a feeble, sadly degenerated race, with one exception, that of Abimelech, who seems to have had much of the courage and energy of his father, yet of restless and unscrupulous ambition. He gathered around him a band who slaughtered all Gideon's sons, except Jotham, upon one stone
Lapping - The three hundred men that went with Gideon thus employed their hands and lapped the water out of their hands (Judges 7:7 )
Jeezer - ) Keil distinguishes them, for the family sprung from Jeezer holds the first place among Manassite families, but Abiezer the son of Mathit's sister held no such eminence; from him came Gideon (Judges 6:15) who says "my family is poor (margin my thousand is meanest) in Manasseh
Lean - Judges 8:2 (a) By this figure Gideon was telling the men of Ephraim that they had reaped a greater harvest by capturing Oreb and Zeeb than he had obtained in capturing or killing the rest of the army
Lean - Judges 8:2 (a) By this figure Gideon was telling the men of Ephraim that they had reaped a greater harvest by capturing Oreb and Zeeb than he had obtained in capturing or killing the rest of the army
Baal-Berith - (bay' uhl-beerihth) In Judges 8:33 , a Canaanite deity whom the Israelites began to worship following the death of Gideon
Gideon - (Γεδεών)...
Gideon was a man of valour who, according to Judges 6-8, received a visit from Jahweh’s messenger, overturned the altar of Baal, saved Israel from the hand of Midian, chastised the men of Succoth, and finally refused a crown
Abieezer - From his family Gideon sprang (Joshua 17:2 ; Compare Judges 6:34 ; 8:2 )
Succoth - The princes of this city churlishly refused to afford help to Gideon and his 300 men when "faint yet pursuing" they followed one of the bands of the fugitive Midianites after the great victory at Gilboa. After overtaking and routing this band at Karkor, Gideon on his return visited the rulers of the city with severe punishment
Wool - Gideon used a piece of wool to determine God's will for his life (Judges 6:35-40 )
Jerubbaal - One of the names of Gideon: he was so called for destroying the grove of that idol Baal-Jerub, meaning, that he destroys
Abiezer - Abiezer became a family name: Gideon blew a trumpet, and Abiezer was gathered after him
Manoah - In the prediction of his son's birth and achievements, we see the Angel of the covenant, who appeared to Abraham, Gideon, etc
Secure - Thus, Judges 8:11 ‘Gideon smote the host, for the host was secure
Jehovah-Shalom - " It was ascribed to the Lord by Gideon, in the prospect of conquering Midian
Ophrah - City in Manasseh, the native place of Gideon
Abiezer - He was the ancestor of the great judge Gideon
Gideon - Former judges, Othniel, Ehud, Barak, had been moved by the Spirit of God to their work; but to Gideon alone under a terebinth in Ophrah, a town belonging to Joash, Jehovah appeared in person to show that the God who had made theophanies to the patriarchs was the same Jehovah, ready to save their descendants if they would return to the covenants. (See ASHTORETH) In the first revelation Jehovah acknowledged Gideon, in the second He commanded Gideon to acknowledge Him. Gideon at the first revelation was knocking out (habat ) with a stick wheat in the winepress, sunk in the ground or hewn in the rock to make it safe from the Midianites; for he did not dare to thresh upon an open floor or hardened area in the open field, but like poor gleaners (Ruth 2:17) knocked out the little grain with a stick. The address, "Jehovah is with thee thou mighty man," seemed to Gideon, ruminating on the Midianite oppression which his occupation was a proof of, in ironical and sad contrast with facts. "Angel of Jehovah," but manifested as JEHOVAH) replied, "Go in this thy might (the might now given thee by ME, Isaiah 40:29), and thou shalt save Israel from the hand of the Midianites; have not I sent thee?" Then followed the requested "sign," the Angel of the Lord with the end of the staff in His hand consuming with fire Gideon's "offering" (minchah ), not a strict sacrifice but a sacrificial gift), the kid and unleavened cakes (compare Genesis 18, the theophany to Abraham very similar). Gideon in gratitude built an altar and called it "Jehovah Shalom," a pledge of "Jehovah" being now at "peace" with Israel again (Jeremiah 29:11; Jeremiah 33:16). Gideon with ten servants overthrew Baal's altar and Asherah in the night, for he durst not do it in the day through fear of his family and townsmen. " So Gideon got the surname "Jerubbaal," "Let Baal fight," i. " Then the Spirit of God "clothed" Gideon as his coat of mail (1 Chronicles 12:18; 2 Chronicles 24:20; Luke 24:49; Isaiah 61:10). Gideon pitched on a height at the foot of which the fountain Harod ("the spring of trembling," now perhaps Ain Jahlood) sprang (2 Samuel 23:25). ...
The timid were first thinned out of Gideon's army (Deuteronomy 20:8). Then followed Gideon's going with Phurah his servant into the Midianite host, and hearing the Midianite's dream of a barley cake overturning the tent, that being poor men's food, so symbolizing despised Israel, the "tent" symbolizing Midian's nomadic life of freedom and power. The Moabite stone shows how similar to Hebrew was the language of Moab, and the same similarity to the Midianite tongue appears from Gideon understanding them. ...
Dividing his 300 into three attacking columns, Gideon desired them in the beginning of the middle watch, i. the pitchers (a type of the gospel light in earthen vessels, 2 Corinthians 4:6-7), suddenly flash on the foe, and to cry "the sword of Jehovah and of Gideon," and to stand without moving round about the Midianite camp. Gideon requested Ephraim to intercept the fleeing Midianites at the waters of Bethbarah and Jordan, namely, at the tributary streams which they would have to cross to reach the Jordan. Meantime Gideon, having cleared the Bethshan valley of Midianites, crossed at the southern end of Succoth (now Makhathet Abu Sus), and continued the pursuit along the eastern bank. Here the men of Ephraim met them and executed Oreb and Zeeb, and sent their heads to Gideon "on the other side. Gideon's victory over self was still greater than that over Midian; by a soft answer he turned aside Ephraim's proud and unreasonable wrath at his not summoning them at the first: "is not the gleaning of grapes of Ephraim (their subsequent victory over the fleeing Midianites) better than the vintage of Abiezer?" than my first victory over them (Isaiah 10:26; Proverbs 15:1; Proverbs 16:32). Then followed the churlish unpatriotic cowardice of Succoth and Penuel, in answer to his request for provisions, through fear of Midian and disbelief of God's power to make victorious so small and so "faint" a force as Gideon's 300. Declining the proffered kingdom because Jehovah was their king, Gideon yet made a gorgeous jeweled ephod with the golden rings the Israelites had got as booty, besides the ornaments (verse 21, golden crescents or little moons), and collars (ear pendants), and purple raiment, and collars about their camels' necks. Gideon "kept" it in his city Ophrah; wearing the breast-plate, he made it and the holy 'lot his means of obtaining revelations from Jehovah whom he worshipped at the altar
Joash -
A contracted form of Jehoash, the father of Gideon (Judges 6:11,29 ; 8:13,29,32 )
Jether - Son of the judge Gideon who refused his father's command to kill enemy military leaders (Judges 8:20 )
Abimelech - ) There was also an Abi-Cmeleeh the son of Gideon
Abimelech - It was the name also of one of the sons of Gideon, who became a judge of Israel, Judges 9; and of the Jewish high-priest, who gave Goliah's sword, which had been deposited in the tabernacle, and part of the shew bread to David, at the time this prince was flying from Saul, 1 Samuel 21:1
Jether - Eldest son of Gideon ( Judges 8:20 )
Baal-Berith - Judges 8:33; Jdg 9:4 This dunghill god was made the idol of the children of Israel, after the death of Gideon
ab'Don - (1 Chronicles 8:23 ) ...
First-born son of Jehiel, son of Gideon
Heres - ]'>[1] ) ‘the ascent of Heres’ is mentioned as the spot from which Gideon returned after the defeat of Zebah and Zalmunna
Zebulun - Militarily, the tribe distinguished itself in the struggles to possess the land, fighting faithfully in the armies of Deborah and Barak, and Gideon (Judges 4:6 ; Judges 6:35 )
Duke - Latimer calls Gideon a duke, and Wyclif uses this title of Christ, as in his Works (iii
Armaged'Don - ( Revelation 16:16 ) The scene of the struggle of good and evil is suggested by that battle-field, the plain of Esdraelon, which was famous for two great victories, of Barak over the Canaanites and of Gideon over the Midianites; and for two great disasters, the deaths of Saul and Josiah
Penuel - Penuel is mentioned also in the history of Gideon, as a place with a strong tower or castle which Gideon destroyed ( Judges 8:8-9 ; Judges 8:17 ); it may be inferred from this passage that Penuel was a little E. But to each of these identifications there are grave objections: as regards Merrill’s site, it is expressly declared by other travellers that the banks of the Jabbok for many miles above Tulûl edh-Dhahab are on both sides so lofty and precipitous as to afford no way for either the Midianites or Gideon to pass along them (see ExpT Jotham - The youngest son br Gideon, Judges 9:5, who escaped from the massacre of his brethren
Succoth - The elders of the city were punished by Gideon for not helping him when he was faint in pursuing the Midianites
Purple - Among the spoils taken from the Midianites under Gideon was "purple raiment that was on the kings," and it is used as a symbol of royalty
Bethabara - To this place Gideon sent a party to secure the passage of the river, previous to his attack on the Midianites, ...
Judges 7:24
jo'Tham -
The youngest son of Gideon, (Judges 9:5 ) who escaped from the massacre of his brethren
Lamp - (Exodus 30:7,8 ) ...
A torch or flambeau, such as was carried by the soldiers of Gideon. This would, in form at least, answer to the lamps within pitchers of Gideon
Midian, Mtdianites - ...
The next we hear of the Midianites is in the period of the Judges, when they invaded the territory of central Palestine in hordes, and were put to rout by Gideon and his three hundred men (Judges 6:1-40 ; 1618064831_69 ; Judges 8:1-35 ). At the time of Gideon the Midianites were led by two chiefs, whose names J Lamp - ...
...
A torch carried by the soliders of Gideon (Judges 7:16,20 )
Heres - ” A mountain pass over which Gideon traveled in returning from his battle with the Midianites (Judges 8:13 ). ” Location of Gideon's pass is not known, though some scholars now locate it as the Ascent of Horus which leads to tell Deir Alla east of the Jordan
Abiezer - His descendants formed one of the smallest clans belonging to the Gileadite branch of the tribe of Manasseh, the best known member of which was Gideon
Barak - Like Gideon, and in a sense Samson, he is an illustration of the words in Hebrews 11:34 , 'Out of weakness were made strong
Shalman - ]'>[1] version seems to think of the slaughter of Zalmunna by Gideon ( Judges 9:1-57 )
Abiezer - The territory was famous for grape production (Judges 8:2 ; Samaritan, Ostraca) and was home of the judge Gideon (Judges 6:11 , Judges 6:24 , Judges 6:34 ; Judges 8:32 )
Dew - Gideon filled a basin with the dew which fell on a fleece of wool, Judges 6:38
Brier - Judges 8:7,16: "Gideon said, I will tear your flesh with the thorns of the wilderness and with briers
Harod - ” Place where God led Gideon to test his troops to reduce their numbers before fighting Midian (Judges 7:1 )
Cake - ...
Judges 7:13 (b) This cake represents Gideon and his weak, little army of three hundred men
Gerizim - It should seem, that Gerizim was very near to Shechem; for Jotham, the son of Gideon, addressed the people of that city from it
Armageddon - For an exposition of the apostle's meaning, the reader must be referred to commentaries; it will be sufficient here to say that there is an allusion to that great battle-field where Barak and Gideon conquered, Judges 4:1-24; Judges 5:19; Judges 6:33; Judges 7:1-25; where Saul and Josiah fell, 1 Samuel 29:1; 1 Samuel 31:1-13; 2 Samuel 4:4; 2 Chronicles 35:20-24; the plain of Esdraelon, on the southern border of which Megiddo stood
Penuel - The city was destroyed by Gideon because its inhabitants refused him provisions while he pursued the Midianites (Judges 8:8-9 ,Judges 8:8-9,8:17 )
Succoth - Gideon tore the flesh of the principal men of Succoth with thorn and briars, because they returned him a haughty answer when pursuing the Midianites, Judges 8:5
Oph'Rah - ...
More fully, OPHRAH OF THE ABIEZRITES, the native place of Gideon (Judges 6:11 ) and the scene of his exploits against Baal, ver
Midian, Midianites - Gideon drove them out and killed their leaders (Judges 6-8 ). See Amalekites; Baal-peor ; Gideon ; Ishmaelites; Jethro ; Kenites
Penuel - Five hundred years later the place is mentioned, the men of which would not give supplies to Gideon
Jotham - The youngest son of Gideon, who escaped the massacre of his brethren by Abimelech, and afterwards boldly and prophetically denounced the Shechemites in the beautiful parable of the bramble and the other trees
Jezreel, Valley of - It was the scene of the signal victory gained by the Israelites under Gideon over the Midianites, the Amalekites, and the "children of the east" (Judges 6:3 )
Ophrah - to a member of a sept of the tribe of Manasseh ( Joshua 17:2 ), was the native village of Gideon
Moreh, - of the position occupied by Gideon, in the direction of the camp of the Midianites. Taking the narrative as it stands, the Midianites ‘pitched in the valley of Jezreel’ ( Judges 6:33 ), while Gideon held the lower spurs of Gilboa towards Jezreel
Ophrah - This was the place where Gideon saw the angel, erected an altar, and where he was buried
Dream - The most remarkable instances of this are recorded in the history of Jacob (Genesis 28:12 ; 31:10 ), Laban (31:24), Joseph (37:9-11), Gideon (Judges 7 ), and Solomon (1 Kings 3:5 )
Salem - Hence when Gideon was visited by the angel under the oak at Ophrah, at the close of the interview he built an altar unto the Lord, and called it Jehovah Shalom—that is, as the margin of the Bible renders it, the Lord send peace
Ophrah - This Ophrah was the home of Gideon
Ephod - The ephod of Gideon is remarkable for having become the occasion of a new kind of idolatry to the Israelites, Judges 8:27 . Some authors are of opinion that this ephod, as it is called, was an idol; others, that it was only a trophy in memory of the signal victory obtained by Gideon, and that the Israelites paid a kind of divine worship to it; so that Gideon was the innocent cause of their idolatry, in like manner as Moses had been in making the brazen serpent, which was afterward worshipped
Oreb And Zeeb - ’ Associated with the invasion put down by Gideon, these two princes were killed by the men of Ephraim, who rose at Gideon’s suggestion and intercepted the princes and their followers at the river Jordan
Moreh - Hill in tribal territory of Issachar where Gideon reduced his troops by testing the way they drank water (Judges 7:1 )
Harod - see), where Gideon tested his men ( Judges 7:1 ), and which was probably the site of Saul’s camp before his fatal battle with the Philistines ( 1 Samuel 29:1 )
Captivity - Six captivities are reckoned during the government by judges: the first, under Chushanrishathaim, king of Mesopotamia, which continued about eight years; the second, under Eglon, king of Moab, from which the Jews were delivered by Ehud; the third, under the Philistines, from which they were rescued by Shamgar; the fourth, under Jabin, king of Hazor, from which they were delivered by Deborah and Barak; the fifth, under the Midianites, from which Gideon freed them; and the sixth, under the Ammonites and Philistines, during the judicatures of Jephthah, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon, Eli, Samson, and Samuel
Gideon - ...
Gideon was given the task of delivering the Israelites from the Midianites and Amalekites, desert nomads who repeatedly raided the country. Gideon was not a willing volunteer. ...
To reduce their number, two tests were given to the 32,000 men in Gideon's army. The strategy was one of terror: at Gideon's signal the pitchers were broken, the torches then became visible, and the trumpets sounded, giving the enemy the impression they were surrounded
Clothe - 6:34, where the stative form of the verb may be translated, “The spirit of the Lord clothed itself [3] with Gideon. ” The idea seems to be that the Spirit of the Lord incarnated Himself in Gideon and thus empowered him from within
Activity: a Help to Courage - First thoughts are best in the service of God, they are like Gideon's men that lapped. Second thoughts come up timorously and limpingly, and incite us to make provision for the flesh, they are like those men whom Gideon discarded because they went down on their knees to drink, they took things too leisurely to be fit for the Lord's battles
Midian - But they were severely defeated by Gideon (Judges 6, 7), and are soon after lost to history
Gid'Eon - When the angel appeared, Gideon was threshing wheat with a flail in the wine-press, to conceal it from the predatory tyrants. After this begins the second act of Gideon's life. (1 Samuel 12:11 ; Psalm 83:11 ; Isaiah 9:4 ; 10:26 ; Hebrews 11:32 ) After this there was a peace of forty years, and we see Gideon in peaceful possession of his well-earned honors, and surrounded by the dignity of a numerous household
Test - The first occurrence is in the story of Gideon, where 10,000 are “being tested” and only 300 are chosen to fight with Gideon against the Midianites: “And the Lord said unto Gideon, The people are yet too many; bring them down unto the water, and I will try them for thee there …” ( Reign - Neither was it right nor natural for Abimelech to rule over Israel, and to destroy the family of Gideon
Zebulun, Tribe of - It responded, however, readily to the summons of Gideon (6:35), and afterwards assisted in enthroning David at Hebron (1 Chronicles 12:33,40 )
Oreb - ) Prince of Midian defeated by Gideon (Judges 7:25; Judges 8:3)
Tabor - The brothers of Gideon, each of whom "resembled the children of a king," were murdered here by Zebah and Zalmunna
Zebulun - They were entangled with the Phoenicians on the west, Judges 1:30 Isaiah 8:22 , and took part with Barak and Gideon in the defense of the country against its oppressors, Judges 4:10 5:18 6:35
Abimelech - A son of Gideon by a concubine, made himself king of Shechem after his father's death, and slew his father's seventy sons on one stone, only Jotham the youngest being left
Jezreel - The valley was important militarily as a battle site for Deborah (Judges 4-5 ), Gideon (Judges 6-7 ), Saul (2 Samuel 4:1 ), Jehu (2 Kings 9-10 ), and Josiah (2 Kings 22:1 )
Gideon - Gideon (gĭd'e-on), he that cuts down
Abimelech - Son of Gideon by a Shechemite concubine
Jotham - The book of Judges records the story of Jotham the son of Gideon. After Gideon’s death, another son, Abimelech, killed his brothers and, with the help of some worthless men from Shechem, established himself ‘king’. Jotham, who was the only one of Gideon’s sons to escape the massacre, told a parable to warn the Shechemites of the trouble they had brought upon themselves (Judges 9:1-21)
Hook - Might not the "thorns" be the instrument of chastising him, just as it was that used by Gideon upon the elders of Succoth (Judges 8:7; Judges 8:16)? In Ezekiel 40:43 the "hooks" are "fastened" in the walls to hang the meat from for roasting, or else to hang up animals to flay them
Midian - Later, Midian recovered, became a powerful nation, and oppressed the Hebrews, but were miraculously defeated by Gideon
Judges - Fifth judge: Gideon—40 years; sixth judge: Abimelech—3 years; seventh judge: Tola—23 years; eighth judge: Jair—22 years
Thistles And Thorns - Eli Smith, visiting the plain where Gideon once threatened to tear the flesh of the princes of Succoth with thorns and briers, noticed such plants there of remarkable size, some of the thistles rising above his head on horseback, Judges 8:7
Esdraelon - Here Deborah and Barak routed the hosts of Jabin and Sisera (Judges 4:1-24 ), and here Gideon defeated the Midianites (7)
Sisera - So in the case of Gideon, Samson, Jephthah, God in approving their faithful zeal in executing His will gives no sanction to the alloy of evil which accompanied their faith (Hebrews 11:32)
Ruth - This was probably about the time of Gideon, B
Succoth - Gideon also, after crossing the Jordan in his pursuit of the Midianites, passed Succoth, and afterwards ‘went up’ to Penuel ( Judges 8:5 ; Judges 8:8 ). Nor does the geographical position of Deir ‘Allâ seem to agree with the narrative of either Jacob or Gideon
Midian - (On Israel's oppression by Midian (Judges 6-8), and deliverance, see Gideon. The defeat by Gideon was so decisive that Midian never afterward appears in arms against Israel; symbolizing Messiah's, Israel's, and the church's final triumph over the world: Isaiah 9:4; Habakkuk 3:7 "the curtains (tents) of Midian tremble. ...
In their next raids on Palestine in Gideon's days they appear as nomads with countless camels
Midian, Midianites - ...
During the time of the judges, because the Israelites had sinned against the Lord, He 'delivered them into the hand of Midian seven years;' but when, being greatly oppressed, they cried unto the Lord, He raised up Gideon and there was a great slaughter of the Midianites, 'so that they lifted up their heads no more' against Israel
Abim'Elech - ) ...
Son of the judge Gideon by his Shechemite concubine
Esdra-e'Lon - This is the "valley of Jezreel" proper --the battle-field on which Gideon triumphed, and Saul and Jonathan were overthrown
Abimelech - Son of Gideon, the judge of Israel (Judges 8:31 )
Esdraelon - Here Gideon gained his great victory over the Midianites (Judges 7:1-25 )
Barley - In the Midianite's dream Gideon was regarded as a mere vile barley cake, yet it is just such whom God chooses to overthrow the mighty (Judges 7:13; 1 Corinthians 1:27)
Barley - In Judges 7:13 Gideon hears himself compared to a cake of barley bread: he would not have heard this had he not been afraid, Judges 7:10 ; but it the more showed him whose hand must give the victory
Dew - The excess of moisture in the air then gently ‘falls as dew on the tender herb,’ and sometimes so copiously as to sustain the life of many plants which would otherwise perish during the rainless season; or even, as in the case of Gideon, to saturate a fleece of wool ( Judges 6:38 )
Concubine - Gideon had a concubine (Judges 8:31 )
Judges - Fifth judge: Gideon; 40 years
Ephod - ...
During the time of Israel’s unfaithfulness in the period of the judges, Gideon made a golden ephod that soon became an object of idolatrous worship (Judges 8:26-27)
Ephod - A strange deviation from the above was the ephod which Gideon made of the gold, the ornaments, and the purple raiment taken from the Midianites, after which all Israel went astray, and which became a snare to Gideon and his house
Ephod - A strange deviation from the above was the ephod which Gideon made of the gold, the ornaments, and the purple raiment taken from the Midianites, after which all Israel went astray, and which became a snare to Gideon and his house
Judges, Theology of - The accounts of the major judges (Othniel, Ehud, Deborah, Gideon, Jephthah, and Samson) are among the most familiar stories in the Bible. ...
Gideon the farmer (6:1-8:35) is slow to recognize and respond to God's call for him to lead Israel; three miracles are required to convince this reluctant champion. Although Gideon earns the sobriquet "Jerub-baal" ("Let Baal contend [1]" — 6:32), he himself eventually succumbs to false worship that leads Israel astray (8:22-27). After the great battle when Gideon's three hundred prevail over a far greater number through faithful obedience, Gideon seems to forget the whole point of the exercise (7:2) and calls up his reserves, an army of 32,000 (7:3,24). Beyond the victory God had promised and given, Gideon pursues a personal vendetta (8:10-21). ...
After Gideon's death, Israel again does wrong (8:33-35), and one anticipates the appearance of another judge/deliverer. But not so! Instead, Abimelek, Gideon's son by a concubine, attempts to seize power. The intertribal rivalry (8:1-9) during Gideon's time now becomes intrafamily strife and murder. In spite of the good that Gideon had done for Israel, his son becomes not a deliverer but an oppressor, not a servant to the nation but a murderer of Israelites and of his own family. Gideon serves the Deuteronomic historian as an example of abortive kingship. For it was in faith that Gideon, Barak, Jephthah, and Samson "conquered kingdoms, administered justice, and gained what was promised" (Hebrews 11:32-33 )
Judge - The only cases of direct divine appointment are those of Gideon and Samson, and the latter stood in the peculiar position of having been from before his birth ordained 'to begin to deliver Israel
Asher - Asher did provide troops for Gideon (Judges 6:35 ; Judges 7:23 ) and 40,000 for David at Hebron (1 Chronicles 12:36 )
Cave - ...
In the time of Gideon the Israelites took refuge from the Midianites in dens and caves, such as abounded in the mountain regions of Manasseh (Judges 6:2 )
Abimelech - The son of Gideon. On Gideon’s decease, Abimelech, backed by his maternal relatives, gathered a band of mercenaries, murdered his seventy half-brothers ‘on one stone,’ and was accepted as king by the mixed Canaanite and Israelite population of Shechem and the neighbourhood
Trumpet - Gideon took a trumpet in his hand, and gave every one of his people one, when he assaulted the Midianites, Judges 7:2 ; Judges 7:16
Abimelech - A son of Gideon, by his concubine, who, after the death of his father, persuaded the men of Shechem to make him king
Joash - In Judges 6:11 , the father of Gideon
Armageddon - Deborah and Barak defeated Sisera and his Canaanite army there (Judges 4-5 ), Gideon drove off the Midianites and Amalekites (Judges 6 ), Saul and the army of Israel were defeated because of their failure to trust in God (1 Samuel 31 ), and the Egyptian army under Pharaoh Neco killed Josiah, king of Judah (2 Kings 23:29 )
East - ...
Gideon and his servant understood their talk, showing that theirs was a Semitic dialect akin to the Hebrew, before it had greatly diverged from the common parent tongue
Joash - The father of Gideon
Security - ” In two passages this word is used as an adjective suggesting trust and security: “And Gideon went up … and smote the host: for the host was secure [2]” ( Esdraelon - And here the Midianites and the Amalekites, who were "like grasshoppers for multitude, and their camels without number as the sand of the sea," encamped, when they were defeated by Gideon, Judges 6
Naphtali - Under Barak, their general, they and the Zebulunites fought with distinguished bravery against the army of Jabin the younger; and at the desire of Gideon they pursued the Midianites, Judges 4:10 ; Judges 5:18 ; Judges 7:23
Midianites - Gideon was their deliverer in one such period of oppression, Judges 6:7
Joash or Jehoash - The father of Gideon, of the family of Abiezer, in Manasseh
Judges, Book of, - ...
Judgeship of Gideon
Jotham - Gideon's youngest son; escaped when his 69 brothers were killed at Ophrah by their half brother Abimelech. ) The olive, fig, and vine, the most valuable products of Palestine, represent the nobler persons like Gideon, who bear fruit to God's glory and man's good, and wish no transference to kingly positions ("to float about restless and insecure", nuwah , instead of being rooted in the soil: Judges 9:9)
Midian - But at length their armies, "like grasshoppers for multitude, with camels out of number as sand by the sea side for multitude," which had encamped in the valley of Jezreel, were miraculously defeated by Gideon, Judges 6-8
Dreams - The Midianites gave credit to dreams, as appears from that which a Midianite related to his companion; and from whose interpretation Gideon took a happy omen, Judges 7:13 ; Judges 7:15
Leontius, Priest And Martyr of Armenia - Leontius, who is everywhere mentioned with Joseph, and is usually the orator, as he is the chief inspirer, of the whole movement, delivered a fervent address before the battle (given fully by Langlois), dwelling on the examples of Phineas, Elijah, Gideon, and other famous believers in O
Sign - Gideon asks for and receives a sign that it is Jehovah who speaks with him ( Judges 6:17 ), and Saul also receives signs to confirm the words of Samuel ( 1 Samuel 10:7 )
Judges - The offer of the kingship (hereditary) to the ‘judge’ Gideon ( Judges 8:22 ff
Judges, Book of - Gideon delivers from Midian (Judges 6:1-9:57 ). ” The major judges are Ehud, Deborah (the only woman among the judges), Gideon, Jephthah, and Samson. Abimelech, the son of Gideon, attempted to establish the dynastic principle in Israel on the strength of his father's accomplishments but was unsuccessful
Ephraim, the Tribe of - Joshua the first conqueror, Gideon the greatest of the judges, and Saul the first king, belonged to one or other of the three tribes
Succoth - ) Subsequently, in Gideon's days Succoth had 77 chiefs and elders (zeqeenim , "sheikhs", i. Gideon (Judges 8:4-17) in pursuing Midian took the same course in reverse order until he reached Succoth. The men of Succoth, as living on this great army route between Canaan and the East, and having regard only to self and no concern for Israel's deliverance and no compassion for the sufferings of Gideon's gallant little band, would give no bread to their brethren lest they should incur the vengeance of Midian; nay more, they added insolence to unkindness
Gaal - The rebellion sought to combine the aboriginal Shechemites with the idolatrous Israelites against the anti-Baalite family of Gideon
Asher - A predominance of the Gentile element thus introduced would account, in a measure at least, for the non-participation of the Asherites in the war against Sisera, although they are said to have sent a contingent to the support of Gideon in his war with the Midianites ( Judges 6:35 ; Judges 7:23 ), and, according to the Chronicler, went 40,000 strong to Hebron to aid David in his struggle for the kingship ( 1 Chronicles 12:36 )
ta'Bor - (Judges 4:6-15 ) The brothers of Gideon each of whom "resembled the children of a king," were murdered here by Zebah and Zalmunna
Midianite - They were at length assailed by Gideon in that ever-memorable battle in the great plain of Esdraelon, and utterly destroyed (Jud (Judges 7 )
Manasseh - The people were powerful and brave, taking a leading part in the wars of Gideon, of Jephthah, and of David
ta'Bor - (Judges 4:6-15 ) The brothers of Gideon each of whom "resembled the children of a king," were murdered here by Zebah and Zalmunna
Judges (1) - The title ‘judge’ is not applied to three of these chieftains, namely, Ehud, Barak, and Gideon, and ‘seems not to have been found in the oldest of the author’s sources’ (Moore, Judges , p. ...
The Book of Judges itself is comprised in Judges 2:6 to Judges 16:31 ; and here it is to be noticed, first of all, that a certain artificiality is observable in the structure; the exploits of twelve men are recounted, and the idea seems to be that each represents one of the twelve tribes of Israel, thus: Judah is represented by Othniel, Benjamin by Ehud, the two halves of the tribe of Manasseh by Gideon (West) and Jair (East), Issachar by Tola, Zebulun by Elon, Naphtali by Barak, Ephralm by Abdon, Gad by Jephthah, and Dan by Samson; besides these ten there are Shamgar and Ibzan, two unimportant Judges, but against them there are the two tribes Reuben and Simeon, who, however, soon disappear; while the tribe of Levi, as always, occupies an exceptional position. (3) Gideon . Of the last there are likewise two accounts ( Judges 6:1 to Judges 8:3 and Judges 8:4-27 ), with a later addition ( Judges 8:28-35 ); some introductory words ( Judges 6:1-10 ) tell of the Midianite oppression; Judges 6:11-24 describe the call of Gideon, of which a second account is given in Judges 6:25-32 ; the invasion of the Midianites and Gideon’s preparations to resist them ( Judges 6:33-35 ) follows; and in Judges 6:36-40 the story of the sign of the fleece is told. 7 gives a detailed account of Gideon’s victory over the Midianites, and Judges 8:1-3 contaios an appendix which tells of Ephraim’s dissatisfaction with Gideon for not summoning them to repel the Midianites, and the skilful way in which Gideon pacifies them. In Judges 8:4-21 comes the second account of Gideon’s victory, the result of which is the offer to him of the kingship and his refusal thereof ( Judges 8:22-28 ); Judges 8:29-35 forms a transition to the story of Gideon’s son, Abimelech (see below). 9), though certainly belonging to the Gideon chapters (6 8) stands on a somewhat different basis, inasmuch as Abimelech is not reckoned among the judges (see following section): Abimelech is made king of Shechem (Judges 9:1-6 ); Jotham his brother, delivers his parable from Mt Genzim, and then flees (( Judges 6:7-9 ); the quarrel between Abimelech and the Shechemites ( Judges 9:22-25 ); Gaal raises a revolt among the Shechemites ( Judges 9:26-33 ); Abimelech quells the revolt ( Judges 9:34-41 ); Shechem is captured and destroyed ( Judges 9:42-45 ); its tower burned ( Judges 9:46-49 ); Abimelech’s attack Thehez, and his death ( Judges 9:50-57 ). 6 8, which combine two accounts of the history of Gideon, have a strong historical basis; they contain much ancient matter, but even in their original forms there were assuredly some portions which cannot be regarded as historical, e
Bread - So mean and contemptible, in the estimation of the numerous and well-appointed armies of Midian, was Gideon, with his handful of undisciplined militia, that he seems to have been compared to bread of this inferior quality, which may account for the ready interpretation of the dream of the Midianite respecting him: "And when Gideon was come, behold, there was a man that told a dream unto his fellow, and said, Behold, I dreamed a dream, and lo, a cake of barley bread tumbled into the host of Midian, and came unto a tent and smote it that it fell, and overturned it, that the tent lay along. And his fellow answered and said, This is nothing else save the sword of Gideon, the son of Joash, a man of Israel; for into his hand hath God delivered Midian, and all the host
Abimelech - ...
A son of Gideon (Judges 9:1 ), who was proclaimed king after the death of his father (Judges 8:33-9:6 )
jo'Ash - ...
The father of Gideon, and a wealthy man among the Abiezrites
Asher, Aser - ...
When Deborah and Barak went to the war they had to lament in their song that Asher abode by the sea coast, and came not to their aid, Judges 5:17 ; but when subsequently the Midianites and the Amalekites invaded the land Asher responded to the call of Gideon
Jordan - Higher up were the fords or passages of Bethbarah, where Gideon lay in wait for the Midianites, Judges 7:24, and where the men of Gilead slew the Ephraimites
Paran - The gold taken by Gideon from them was so enormous as to suffice for making a golden ephod (Judges 8:24-27)
Ephraim - They were angry with Gideon for not calling them to the war sooner than he did; but a soft answer appeased their wrath
Jor'Dan - Judges 3:28 Higher up where the fords or passages of Bethbarah, where Gideon lay in wait for the Midianites, ( Judges 7:24 ) and where the men of Gilead slew the Ephraimites
Ephraim - They were angry with Gideon for not calling them to the war sooner than he did; but a soft answer appeased their wrath
Joash - Father of Gideon: he defended his son when he had thrown down the altar of Baal, saying, If Baal "be a god, let him plead for himself
Judges, the Book of - Of the 13 judges, the account of six (Ehud, Deborah and Barak, Gideon, Abimelech, Jephthah, Samson) is full, that of the remaining seven very brief. In Gideon's case alone his sons' history is detailed, because it illustrates the great lesson of the book. Each only delivered one part of Israel: Shamgar the region toward Philistia; Deborah and Barak northern Israel (Judges 4:10); so Gideon (Judges 6:35), Jephthah, eastern Israel; Samson, Judah, Dan and the region adjoining Philistia. Gideon corrupted the worship of God, Samson yielded to lust, Jephthah made a rash vow and took revenge upon Ephraim. Gideon scarcely appeased Ephraim's jealousy
Abimelech - Son of Gideon by his Shechemite concubine (Judges 8:31). At Gideon's death he murdered his seventy brethren, excepting the youngest, Jotham, who hid himself, and by his mother's brethren influenced the Shechemites to make him king
Army - The bands that followed a Gideon or a Jephthah were hastily improvised levies from his own and neighbouring clans, whose members returned with their share of the spoil to their ordinary occupations when the fray was at an end
King, Kings - ...
The Israelites had no kings till Saul; having been governed, first by elders, as in Egypt; then by rulers of God's appointment, as Moses and Joshua; then by judges, as Othniel, Ehud, Gideon, Samuel; and lastly by kings, as Saul, David, Solomon
Persecution - ...
The Lord, too, in his righteous indignation, raised up adversaries against his backsliding people, against Abimelech for his murder of his seventy brothers, sons of Gideon (Judges 9:22-25 ); against Solomon for his sin (1 Kings 11:14,23 ); against rebellious Israel (2 Kings 17:7-20 ); and against Judah (Jeremiah 20:4 ) and Babylon for their wicked, ungodly Acts (Jeremiah 25:12-14 ). The Bible gives examples of good people pursuing and persecuting others (Judges 8:16 , ; Gideon against the men of Succoth, to teach them a lesson Mark 9:38-41 , ; the disciples, in prejudice, opposing a brother witnessing to God's power )
Naphtali - So they helped Gideon against Midian (Judges 6:35; Judges 7:23)
Sam'Son - The divine inspiration which Samson shared with Othniel, Gideon and Jephthah assumed in him the unique form of vast personal strength, inseparably connected with the observance of his vow as a Nazarite: "his strength was in his hair
Spiritual Gifts - Examples of this are: Bezaleel, who was given the gift of craftsmanship (Exodus 31:2-3 ); Othniel, who was equipped to be a judge (Judges 3:9-10 ); Gideon, who was given military skills (Judges 6:34 ); Samson, who was given physical strength (Judges 14:6 ,Judges 14:6,14:19 ); Saul, who was given political skills (1 Samuel 10:6 ); and Micah, who was given prophetic gifts (Micah 3:8 )
High Place - Before the temple was built, Solomon worshiped the Lord at the great bâmâh of Gideon (1 Kings 3:4)
Palm (of Hand) - ” Gideon complained to the Angel of the Lord that “now the Lord hath forsaken us, and delivered us into the hands [1] of the Midianites” ( Amalekites - ...
Next we find them leagued with Midian (Judges 6:3; Judges 6:7), and defeated by Gideon: Balaam's prophecy (Numbers 24:20 Heb
Jephthah - There follows then an episode which recalls Judges 8:1-3 ; the Ephraimites resent not having been called by Jephthah to fight against the Ammonites, just as they resented not being called by Gideon to fight against the Midianites; in the present case, however, the matter is not settled amicably; a battle follows, in which Jephthah is again victorious; the Ephraimites flee, but are intercepted at the fords of Jordan, and, being recognized by their inability to pronounce the ‘sh’ in the word Shibboleth , are slain
Grace - Gideon, when called by God to lead Israel against Midian, asks God to wait while he goes to get his offering to set before him (Judges 6:17 ). When Gideon actually brings the offering that he has prepared, God shows his grace beyond what Gideon has asked by giving him instructions on where to place it and how to arrange it, then creating a supernatural fire that consumes the meat and the bread. After he disappears, Gideon realizes that he has seen the "angel of the Lord" and, interestingly, makes reference to the fact that he has seen him "face to face, " recalling the passage in Exodus. God shows his grace one more time by assuring Gideon that although he is afraid since he has seen the angel of the Lord face to face, he is not going to die (Judges 6:23 )
Amalekites - Under the judges, the Amalekites, in conjunction with the Midianites, invaded the land of Israel; when they were defeated by Gideon, Judges 6:7
King - The judges in the period subsequent to the settlement seem, with the possible exception of Gideon ( Judges 8:22 ), to have been little more than local or tribal heroes, carrying on guerilla warfare against their neighbours. It was a fixed idea in ancient Israel that the office of the kingship passed from father to son, as the judgeship passed from Gideon to his sons ( Judges 9:2 ), or from Samuel to his sons ( 1 Samuel 8:1 )
Angel - They appear to rebuke idolatry (1618064831_39 ), to call Gideon (Judges 6:11,12 ), and to consecrate Samson (13:3)
Ruth - In a famine under the judges (whether caused by Eglon's occupation of Judah, or under Gideon, Judges 6:3-4, or in Eli's time) Elimelech and Naomi migrated to Moab, where Ruth married Mahlon their son
Levi - For the altar-service alone priests were not necessary, as we see in the case of Gideon and Manoah
Fig (Tree) - Gideon was the fig tree
Judges - This was the case particularly with respect to Othniel, Ehud, and Gideon. This Godwin infers from Gideon's refusing to take upon him the perpetual government of Israel, as being inconsistent with the theocracy
Black People And Biblical Perspectives - The miraculous battles of Joshua, Gideon, Samson, and David were inspiring to them
Bread - ...
Judges 7:13 (b) This cake of barley bread represents Gideon who, though weak and lacking in military skill, would win a great victory for Israel and for GOD
Judges, Book of - ...
From the Exodus to the crossing the Jordan 40 }...
From the Jordan to the division of the land 7 }...
Rest under Joshua and the Elders Judges 2:7 12 }...
Oppression by the king of Mesopotamia Judges 3:8 8 } ...
Othniel judge Judges 3:11 40 } About 338 years -...
Oppression by the Moabites Judges 3:14 18 } ...
Ehud and Shamgar Judges 3:30 80 } the 300 years...
Oppression by king Jabin Judges 4:3 20 } ...
Deborah and Barak Judges 5:31 40 } in round...
Oppression by the Midianites Judges 6:1 7 } ...
Gideon Judges 8:28 40 } numbers...
Abimelech Judges 9:22 3 } ...
Tola Judges 10:2 23 } of...
Jair Judges 10:3 22 } ...
} Judges 11:26 ...
In the West
Judges - ...
These extraordinary judges, raised by God, the temporal as well as spiritual King of Israel, as His vicegerents, between Joshua and the kings were 13: Othniel, Ehud, Shamgar, Deborah and Barak, Gideon, Abimelech (an usurper), Tola, Jair Jephtha, Ibzan, Elon, Abdon (Bedan 1 Samuel 12:11), Samson. The judges ruled more continuously from Gideon's time; his sons are regarded as his natural successors (Judges 9:1-3); so Samuel's sons (1 Samuel 8:1; 1 Samuel 7:15), he ruled until his death; so too Eli (Judges 4:18)
Victory - the angel of the Lord's similar words to Gideon in Judges 6:12 )
Manasseh (1) - Gideon, the greatest of the judges, and one whose son all but established hereditary monarchy in their line, and Jephthah, were samples of their warriors
She'Chem - (Joshua 24:1,25 ) After the death of Gideon, Abimelech, his bastard son, induced the Shechemites to revolt from the Hebrew commonwealth and elect him as king
Fire - Other examples of fire as the expression of God's acceptance of offerings are those of Gideon (Judges 6:19-24 ) and of the father and mother of Samson (Judges 13:15-20 )
Seek - 18:10-: “And when they inquired [2] and asked [3], they said, Gideon the son of Joash hath done this thing
Thorn - We should hardly think Gideon went far to seek these plants
Altar - The altar which Jacob set up at Bethel, was the stone which had served him for a pillow; Gideon sacrificed on the rock before his house
Idol, Idolatry - Gideon, after he had been favored by God with a miraculous deliverance, made an ephod, which ensnared the Israelites in unlawful worship, Judges 8:27
Kill, Killing - Gideon destroyed Peniel and its people when they refused his aid (Judges 8:17 ); Saul thought about killing Samuel (1 Samuel 16:2 ), and was successful in having the priests of Nob slain (1 Samuel 22:17 ); Jezebel killed the prophets of Yahweh (Numbers 35:31-3331 ; cf
War - Such were Joshua, Caleb, Gideon, Jephthah, Samson, David, Josiah, and the Maccabees, whose names alone are their own sufficient encomiums. The war shout in Judges 7:20 , was as follows, "The sword of the Lord and of Gideon
Sign - Such signs often authenticated God's special call (of Moses, Exodus 3:12 ; Exodus 4:8 ; of Gideon, Judges 6:17 ; of Saul, 1 Samuel 10:2-9 )
Sign - ...
Judges 6:17 (a) GOD saw the genuine desire of Gideon to really know His will and therefore granted him the evidence he requested
Poor (Person), Weak (Person) - ...
When Gideon challenged the Lord’s summoning him to deliver Israel, he emphasized that his clan was too weak to do the job: “And he said unto him, Oh my Lord, wherewith shall I save Israel? behold, my family is poor in Manasseh …” ( Violence - ...
The Former Prophets also link violence with murder in the Gideon narrative, when the narrator refers to the murder of Abimelech's brothers as "violence" (Judges 9:5,24 )
Ephraim (1) - So toward Gideon, Jephthah and David (Judges 8:1; Judges 12:1; 2 Samuel 19:41-43)
Jewels, Jewelry - The camels of the Midianite kings slain by Gideon wore crescents and decorated collars around their necks (Judges 8:21 ,Judges 8:21,8:26 )
Solomon - Now for the first time a worship was publicly set up amongst the people of the Lord which was not simply irregular or forbidden, like that of Gideon (Judges 8:27 ), or the Danites (Judges 18:30,31 ), but was downright idolatrous
Tribes of Israel, the - Perhaps Gideon is the most familiar of the descendants of Manasseh (Judges 6:12-15 ). Gideon defeated the Midianites with a small band of men (Judges 6-7 )
Oracles - Although anyone could seek a word from God and many, such as Gideon or Abraham, received an oracle directly; these divine communications usually came through either priests, prophets, or prophetesses
Names of God - This was the name of the altar that Gideon built at Ophrah signifying that God brings well-being not death to His people
Jordan - Lot, for example, is said to have chosen ‘all the circle of the Jordan’ because ‘it was well watered everywhere’ ( Genesis 13:10 ); Joshua and all Israel crossed over the Jordan on dry ground ( Joshua 3:17 ); Ehud seized the fords of the Jordan against the Moabites, cutting off their retreat ( Judges 3:28 ); Gideon, Jephthah, David, Elijah, and Elisha were all well acquainted with the Jordan; Naaman the Syrian was directed to go wash in the Jordan seven times, that his leprosy might depart from him ( 2 Kings 5:10 )
Government - Gideon and Abimelech), though Samuel is able to delegate his authority to his sons ( 1 Samuel 8:1 )
Jordan - ...
Higher up were the fords Bethbarah or Bethabara (house of passage), where Gideon intercepted the fleeing Midianites (Judges 7:24) and the Gileadites slew the Ephraimites (Judges 12:6), probably the place also of Jacob's crossing
Jephthah - " Jephthah did not show Gideon's magnanimity in dealing with their perversity. Herein Gideon was superior, for "he that is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city" (Proverbs 16:32)
Destroy, Destruction - When Gideon destroyed the altar of Baal, his father pointed out to its defenders Baal's inability to stop the desecration of a structure sacred to him (Judges 6:28-32 )
the Ethiopian Eunuch - " Bunyan also tells us that when he was beginning to read his Bible he much preferred the adventures of Joshua and Samson and Gideon to Isaiah or Paul
Pentateuch - Gideon recognizes the theocracy, as Moses ordained (Judges 8:22-23; Exodus 19:5-6; Deuteronomy 17:14; Deuteronomy 17:20; Deuteronomy 33:5)
Dress - Thus, to give but a few illustrations, it is the ‘ garment ’ with which Noah’s nakedness was covered in Genesis 9:23 , and the ‘ clothes ’ in which the Hebrews bound up their kneading-troughs ( Exodus 12:34 ); it is the ‘garment’ of Gideon in Judges 8:25 , and the ‘ raiment ’ of Ruth ( Ruth 3:3 ); just as the himation of NT is not only the ‘ cloke ’ of Matthew 5:40 , but the ‘clothes’ of Matthew 24:18 (but RV Miracle - Although no miracle, per se, occurs as Gideon fights the Midianites, the confusion that causes his enemies to slay each other, despite the small number of opposing forces, is equally attributed to the Lord's direct intervention (Judges 7 )
Israel, History of - Over them divinely designated Judges emerged, men like Gideon and Samson, and one woman, Deborah
Old Testament - A specimen of corrections from the Qeri in conjunction with the Septuagint is Isaiah 9:3, "its" for "not"; but the difficulty of the reading favors the text, "Thou hast multiplied the nation and (soon after) not increased the joy"; for the increase of the true Israel by Gentile converts to Christianity was soon followed by the growth of corruption and antichrist; but he in turn is to be destroyed, as Midian was by Gideon, to the "joy" of the elect nation
Holy Spirit - Four judges are so characterized (Othniel Judges 3:10 ; Gideon 6:34; Jephthah 11:29; Samson 14:19; cf
Offerings And Sacrifices - , Gideon in Judges 6:24-27 , ; the Benjamites in Judges 21:3-4 , ; Samuel in 1 Samuel 7:8-10 , ; David in 2 Samuel 24:25 , ; and Elijah in 1 Kings 18:23-24,30 , 36-39 )
Prophet, Prophetess, Prophecy - Thus, Gideon delivered Israel from the hand of the Midianites, acting on rather detailed instructions from the Lord as to how he was to effect such a deliverance, much as a true prophet would receive revelation from God (Judges 7:2-8 )