What does Genealogy mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
הַמִּתְיַחְשִׂ֖ים (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically 2
ἀγενεαλόγητος one whose descent there is no record of 1
לְתֹלְדֹתָ֖יו descendants 1
הַיַּ֙חַשׂ֙ genealogy. 1
וּלְהִתְיַחֵ֗שׂ genealogy. 1
הִתְיַחֵ֤שׂ genealogy. 1
לְהִתְיַחֵ֑שׂ (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically 1
וְהִתְיַחְשָׂ֑ם (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically 1
הִתְיַחְשָׂ֣ם (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically 1
γενέσεως source 1
הִתְיַחְשָׂ֔ם (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically 1
וְהִתְיַחְשָׂ֣ם (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically 1
בְּהִתְיַחֵ֖שׂ (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically 1
לְהִתְיַחֵ֖שׂ (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically 1
וְהִתְיַחְשָׂ֖ם (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically 1
וְזַרְעָ֔ם seed 1
תּוֹלְדֹ֖ת descendants 1

Definitions Related to Genealogy

H3187


   1 (Hithpael) to reckon genealogically, enrol on a Genealogy, enrol, be enrolled.
   

H8435


   1 descendants, results, proceedings, generations, genealogies.
      1a account of men and their descendants.
         1a1 genealogical list of one’s descendants.
         1a2 one’s contemporaries.
         1a3 course of history (of creation etc).
      1b begetting or account of heaven (metaph).
      

H2233


   1 seed, sowing, offspring.
      1a a sowing.
      1b seed.
      1c semen virile.
      1d offspring, descendants, posterity, children.
      1e of moral quality. 1e1 a practitioner of righteousness (fig.
         ).
      1f sowing time (by meton).
      

H3188


   1 Genealogy.
   

G1078


   1 source, origin.
      1a a book of one’s lineage, i.e. in which his ancestry or progeny are enumerated.
   2 used of birth, nativity.
   3 of that which follows origin, viz.
   existence, life.
      3a the wheel of life (Jas 3:6), other explain it, the wheel of human origin which as soon as men are born begins to run, i.e. its course of life.
      

G35


   1 one whose descent there is no record of, without Genealogy.
   

Frequency of Genealogy (original languages)

Frequency of Genealogy (English)

Dictionary

1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Christ, Genealogy of
The New Testament has preserved two different genealogies of Our Lord, in Matthew 1; and Luke 3. Saint Matthew's list is divided artificially into three equal parts of 14 names each, with several intentional omissions: from Abraham the father of the chosen people to David the king, to whose family the promise was made (2 Kings 7); David and the royal line after him to the Babylonian captivity; the descendants of the royal line from the captivity to Joseph, the legal father of Our Lord. Saint Luke proceeds in reverse order; he starts from Joseph and goes, beyond Abraham, back to Adam the father of the human race, in accord with the character of his Gospel; and he merely enumerates the names without grouping them according to a thesis or point, as is the case in Saint Matthew. Few names are common to both lists: viz., those between Abraham and David, then Salathiel and Zorobabel after the captivity, and Joseph the foster-father of Christ; the others are absent from Matthew's list, or the persons are different. To account for these differences several explanations have been advanced, but no decisive evidence is extant. Not a few authors hold that Saint Luke gives Mary's genealogy; but this view is more generally considered improbable, so that both lists are taken as giving Joseph's ancestry. Only it must be supposed that at several points, instead of the actual descent, the one or the other of the lists gives the legal relationship based on adoption in some manner. Our Lord was considered to belong to the family of David; this seems to be taken for granted in the New Testament, where we find no difficulty raised against Him on the ground of His descent. The genealogies show His relationship to the royal family of Juda through Joseph, as it was only through the father, legal or natural, that the rights could be transmitted, and Joseph was the legal father of Jesus. To trace Our Lord's ancestry through His mother would not have served the purpose of the Evangelists.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Genealogy
Hebrew "the book of the GENERATIONS," ceepher toledowt (See ADOPTION; GENERATION). Fuller (Pisgah Sight of Palestine, 1650) says on Acts 17:26; "we may see Divinity, the queen, Waited on by three of her principal ladies of honor, namely:
(1) skill in GENEALOGIES, 'of one blood all nations,'
(2) CHRONOLOGY, in the exact computation of 'the times appointed,'
(3) GEOGRAPHY, measuring out to the nations 'the bounds of their habitation.'" History, in ancient times, being based on genealogies, the phrase became a title for a history; so Genesis 2:4, "these are the generations of the heavens and of the earth"; as the history of a man's family is "the book of his generations," so that of the world's productions is "the generations (not the creation, which had been previously described) of the heavens and the earth." "Generations" is the heading of every chief section of Genesis (probably they were original family memoirs preserved and used by Moses under inspiration in writing Genesis).
So Genesis 5:1, "the book of the generations of Adam," wherein his descendants are traced down to Noah; Genesis 6:9, "the generations of Noah," the history of Noah and his sons; Genesis 10:1, "the generations of the sons of Noah," Shem, Ham, and Japhet, the oldest and most precious existing ethnological record; Genesis 11:10-26 "the generations of Shem," Genesis 11:27 "the generations of Terah," Abram's father; Genesis 25:12 "the generations of Ishmael," Ezra 7:1-55 "the generations of Isaac"; Genesis 36:1, "the generations of Esau"; Genesis 37:2, "the generations of Jacob"; Genesis 35:22-26, "the sons of Jacob," etc., repeated Exodus 1:1-5; also Exodus 46:8, a genealogical census of Israel when Jacob came down to Egypt; repeated in Exodus 6:16, etc., probably transcribed from a document, for the first part concerning Reuben and Simeon is quoted though Levi is the only tribe in question.
The promise of Canaan, Israel's separation from the Gentiles, the prophecy of Messiah's descent from Judah, the hereditary priesthood in Aaron's family, and the limitation of ministerial offices to Levi, the promises to David's seed, and the division of Canaan by tribes and families, all combined to make Israel more careful of genealogies than: any other nation. Israel's census was taken early in the wilderness 40 years sojourn, the second month of the second year, "by their generations, after their families, by the house of their fathers" (Numbers 1:2; Numbers 1:20, etc., Numbers 2-3). Again, 38 years later, in the plains of Moab, the names of the families being added (Numbers 26). According to their genealogical divisions they encamped, marched, made offerings, and selected the spies; hereby Achan was detected, and Saul chosen as king; hereby Canaan was allotted.
At the same time we must remember many became incorporated in a tribe or family by marriage, service, or friendship, besides those belonging to it by birth. See BECHER; CALEB, and 1 Chronicles 3:21, for instances. The genealogies refer often to political and territorial divisions, and not strictly to natural descent, so that "sons" of a patriarch are not necessarily restricted to those so by birth. So Manasseh and Ephraim were numbered among Jacob's "sons," though only grandsons (Genesis 48:5). Bela (whose two sons Naaman and Ard are called "sons of Benjamin," Numbers 26:40-41) and Benjamin respecting Genesis 46; Numbers 26; Exodus 6:24 enumerates Assir's son and grandson as heads, with their father, of the Korhites. (See BENJAMIN; BELA.)
In the list (Genesis 46) grandsons (e.g. all Benjamin's ten sons) and great grandson's of Jacob (Hezron and Hamul, grandsons of Judah) are named, born afterward in Egypt and who came into that country in the loins of their fathers, and who there became founders of mishpachowt , i.e. independent families, and were therefore counted grandsons of Jacob as regards the national organization. By comprising Jacob himself with all the founders of tribes and families, the significant number 70 results; seven (expressing God's covenant relation to Israel, made up of three the divine number and four the worldwide extension number) multiplied by ten the seal of completeness; implying that these 70 comprised the whole nation of God (Exodus 1:5; Deuteronomy 10:22). Levi alone was free front foreign admixture. Iddo the seer wrote a book "concerning genealogies" (2 Chronicles 12:15).
Hezekiah took a census of priests and Levites according to genealogies, and apparently from 1 Chronicles 4:41; 1 Chronicles 9:1, a census also of the nation by genealogies; he had a staff of scribes for such purposes (Proverbs 25:1). Genealogies were need in reckoning Reuben and Gad, "in the days of Jotham king of: Judah (perhaps in connection with his wars against Ammon, 2 Chronicles 27:5), and of Jeroboam king of Israel" (1 Chronicles 5:17). Zerubbabel, on the return from Babylon, made it a first care to settle the people according to genealogy. Nehemiah did the same as an essential to his great work, the restoration of the national polity (1 Chronicles 3:19; 1 Chronicles 3:21-24; 1 Chronicles 3:9; compare Nehemiah 7:5; Nehemiah 7:11; Nehemiah 12:1-26), which shows that the genealogical system was continued afterward.
Ezra 2 contains an abstract of the post-captivity census. In New Testament times, when Augustus ordered the registration for taxing, the Jews went severally to the town of their tribe, family, and father; and so Joseph and Mary to Bethlehem, the town of their forefather David (Luke 2). Further traces of genealogies being preserved still appear in the mention of Zacharias as of "the course of Abra," Elizabeth as "of the daughters of Aaron," Anna, daughter of Phanuel, as "of the tribe of Aser." Josephus traces his own descent to the first of the 24 courses of priests, adding "as I have found it recorded in the public tables." He says (c. Apion, 1:7) the priests had to verify the descent of their intended wives from the archives at Jerusalem, and to make new genealogical tables after every war, in order to ascertain what women had been made captives, as such were excluded from marrying priests; the list of high priests for 2,000 years backward was preserved in the archives in his day.
The destruction of Jerusalem by Rome must have involved the loss of these registers, except such partial records of genealogy as remained in a few of the priestly families after the last dispersion. Benjamin of Tudela says that the princes still professed to trace their descent up to David. The present impossibility of verifying the genealogies of the Jews' tribes and families is a divine indication that Christ the antitypical High Priest and the Heir of David's throne having come supersedes the polity of typical priests and kings, which, in ancient times, required the careful preservation of pedigrees. Paul therefore condemns the study of "endless genealogies" (1 Timothy 1:4), though probably he aims also at Gnostic genealogies of spirits.
In interpreting a genealogy it is to be remembered that the list may represent the succession to an inheritance or headship of tribe or family, rather than natural descent. In an Assyrian inscription similarly "Jehu," successor of Omri's race, is called "son of Omri." Again pedigrees are abbreviated so as to specify the generations alone which show from what leading houses the person sprang. The register of Levi in Exodus 6:16-20 gives only two links between Levi and Moses, namely, Kohath and Amram; which has been made an argument for Israel's sojourn in Egypt only half the 430 years specified (Exodus 12:40). But the Kohathites (Numbers 3:27) in Moses' time were divided into four families, Amramites, Jehezarites, Hebronites, and Ussielites, 8,600 men and boys independent of women; the fourth would be Amramites.
Now Moses had only two sons; therefore if Amram his father were the Amram Kohath's father, Moses must have had 2,147 brothers and brothers' sons, which is impossible; therefore between the two Amrams a number of generations must have dropped out. So in Ezra's genealogy (Ezra 7:1-5, compare 1 Chronicles 6:4-15) five descents are omitted between Azariah Meraloth's son and Azariah Johanan's son; and several between Ezra himself and Seraiah, put to death 150 years before Ezra by Nebuchadnezzar. In Exodus 6 the sons of three of Kohath's sons are given, but not of Hebron (though in 2 Chronicles 23 four sons are assigned to him), probably because no family sprang from him as the head.
The object of genealogies was not chronology, but to mark ramifications of tribal and family relationship. Thus, the genealogy of Ruth 4:18-22 makes but four intervening links between Nahshon at the Exodus (Numbers 1:7) and David, namely, Salmon, Boaz, Obed, Jesse; whereas the genealogy of Levi has double that number in the same period, seven between Phinehas and Zadok, and more in Gershon's line (1 Chronicles 6). Therefore some names must have been omitted of David's genealogy. Genealogies are clear measures of time only when complete; and the marks of completeness are, when the mother as well as the father is named, or when historical facts define the relationship, or when a genealogy is confirmed by one or more besides, giving the same number of generations within the same bounds.
Early marriage will in the case of some, as princes, make 30 years too long for a generation. In the descending form of genealogy, when direct heirs failed collateral ones were inserted, and the heir would put his name next after his predecessor though not his father (Ruth 4:18; Ruth 4:1 Chronicles 3). The ascending form appears 1 Chronicles 6:33-43; 1618540748_89. Females were reckoned when rights or possessions were transmitted through them. Corruptions of the text are frequent in genealogies. Christ's descent through David, from Abraham and Adam, is given in an unbroken line of genealogy.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Genealogy of Jesus Christ
Needed, to show that redemption was no afterthought, but designed from the first. Abraham and David in Matthew's Gospel are singled out to prove the fulfillment in Christ of the promises made to Abraham 2,000 years previously, and to David 1,000. The Old Testament begins with "Genesis" ("generation"); so also the New Testament begins with the genesis ("generation," Matthew 1:1) of Jesus Christ. Matthew's Gospel contains, not Joseph's direct ancestors, but the succession of heirs to David's and Solomon's throne. The tracing of Christ's descent through Judah's royal line harmonizes with the kingly aspect of Jesus Christ in Matthew's Gospel. The steps of Joseph's direct parentage did not coincide with those of the succession to the throne. Solomon's line failed, and Nathan's and Neri's succeeded as legal heirs.
Hence the need of two genealogies, one (Matthew) of the succession, the other (Luke) of the parentage. Jeremiah (Jeremiah 22:30) declares Jeconiah, Coniah, or Jehoiachin was to be childless. He cannot therefore have been lineal progenitor of Jesus Christ. It is at this point in the genealogy, i.e. after Jehoiachin, the same names occur in both lists, Salathiel and Zerubbabel taken (in Matthew) from the line of Nathan (Luke) to supply the failure of Jehoiachin's issue. The promise was, Messiah was to be "of the fruit of the loins of David" (Acts 2:30), but to Solomon only that "his throne should be established evermore" (1 Chronicles 17:14). So a double genealogy of Jair is given, one of the inheritance, the other of birth (1 Chronicles 2:4-5; 1 Chronicles 2:21-22; Numbers 32:41). Matthew appropriately, as writing for Jews, gives Christ's legal descent; Luke, for Gentiles, the natural descent.
Matthew downward, from Abraham the father of the Jews (naturally, but of the Gentiles also spiritually: Genesis 17:5; Romans 4:16-17); Luke upward, to Adam, "who was the son of God" and the father of Gentiles and Jews alike. The words "as was supposed" (Luke 3:23) imply that Christ's sonship to Joseph was only a reputed not a real one. Yet He was God's extraordinary gift to Joseph through his proper wife Mary, and the fruit of his marriage to her, not as natural offspring of his body but as supernatural fruit. Hence attention is drawn to Joseph's being "son of David" (Matthew 1:20), "of the house and lineage of David" (Luke 2:4, compare Luke 1:32). Matthew omits three links of the pedigree. "Joram begat Ozias," i.e. Uzziah. But Joram really begat Ahaziah, Ahaziah Jehoash, Jehoash Uzziah. If the two genealogies contained anything false or mutually contradictory, Christ's enemies would have convicted them from the public documents.
Clearly men in that day saw nothing irreconcilable in them. From Abraham to David both agree, thenceforward the names differ. Luke has 42 names from David, Matthew only 27 names. The less number in Matthew is intelligible, if he be only tracing the heir's to the throne; for "the heir of my heir is my heir." So intermediate heirs are omitted without risk of misconception, for spiritual reasons; e.g., Simeon is omitted in Moses' blessing (Deuteronomy 33) on account of his cruelty, Dan in Revelation 7 for his idolatry. The full number is given in Luke, as naming the natural line. Mary must have been of the same tribe and family as Joseph, according to the law (Numbers 36:8). Isaiah 11:1 implies that Messiah was the seed of David by natural as well as legal descent. Probably Matthan of Matthew is the Matthat of Luke, and Jacob and Heli were brothers; and Heli's son Joseph, and Jacob's daughter Mary, first cousins. Joseph, as male heir of his uncle Jacob, who had only one child, Mary, would marry her according to the law (Numbers 36:8).
Thus the genealogy of the inheritance (Matthew's) and that of natural descent (Luke's) would be primarily Joseph's, then Mary's also. The number 14 has some mystic signification (compare Numbers 29:13; 1 Kings 8:65). It is the double of seven the number for completeness; the periods of 14 in Matthew are the sacred three. The period from Abraham to David is that of patriarchs; from David to the Babylonian captivity that of kings; from the captivity to Christ private individuals. The first and second tessaradecade have an illustrious beginning; the third not so, that its ending in Messiah might stand forth pre-eminent above all that went before.
The first is that of promise, beginning with. Abraham and ending with David, the receivers of the promise; the second adumbrates Christ's eternal kingdom through the temporary kingdom of David's line; the third period is that of expectation. On Cainan in Luke's Gospel, (See CAINAN. The name Jehoiakim seemingly has dropped out, Josiah's son and Jeconiah's father; otherwise David would have to be counted twice to make up the second 14. Five females are in Matthew's Gospel: incestuous Tamar, Rahab the Moabitess and a harlot, Ruth, Uriah's wife Bathsheba the object of David's adulterous love, and above all Mary; all extraordinary monuments of God's grace, that chooses out of the vilest to make vessels unto honor, for the bringing forth of the promised Seed, who was to save sinners of every type and race.
King James Dictionary - Genealogy
GENEAL'OGY, n. L. genealogia Gr. race, and discourse Eng. kind.
1. An account or history of the descent of a person or family from an ancestor enumeration of ancestors and their children in the natural order of succession. 2. Pedigree lineage regular descent of a person or family from a progenitor.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Genealogy
GENEALOGY . The genealogies of the OT fall into two classes, national and individual, though the two are sometimes combined, the genealogy of the Individual passing into that of the nation.
1. National genealogies . These belong to a well-recognized type, by which the relationship of nations, tribes, and families is explained as due to descent from a common ancestor, who is often an ‘eponymous hero,’ invented to account for the name of the nation. The principle was prevalent in Greece (see Grote, Hist . vol. i. ch. iv. etc. and p. 416); e.g. Hellen is the ‘father’ of Dorus, Æolus, and Xuthus, who is in turn the ‘father’ of Ion and Achæus, the existence of the various branches of the Greek races being thus explained. M‘Lennan ( Studies in Ancient History , 2nd series, ix.) gives further examples from Rome (genealogies traced to Numa), Scotland, India, Arabia, and Africa; the Berbers (‘barbarians’) of N. Africa invented an ancestor Berr, and connected him with Noah. The Arabs derived all their subdivisions from Nebaioth or Joktan. The genealogies of Genesis are of the same type. The groundwork of the Priestly narrative (P [1] ) is a series of inter-connected genealogies, each beginning with the formula, ‘These are the generations ( toledôth ) of …’ ( Genesis 2:4 ; Genesis 5:1 ; Genesis 6:9 etc.). The gap between Adam and Noah is filled by a genealogy of 10 generations ( Genesis 5:1-32 ), and in Genesis 10:1-32 the nations of the world, as known to the writer, are traced in a genealogical tree to Noah’s three sons. We find in the list plural or dual names ( e.g. Mizraim, Ludim, Anamim), names of places (Tarshish, Zidon, Ophir) or of nations (the Jebusite, Amorite, etc.). An ‘Eber’ appears as the eponymous ancestor of the Hebrews. Sometimes the names might in form represent either individuals or nations (Asshur, Moab, Edom), but there can in most cases be little doubt that the ancestor has been invented to account for the nation. In later chapters the same method is followed with regard to tribes more or less closely related to Israel; the connexion is explained by deriving them from an ancestor related to Abraham. In Genesis 22:20 the twelve Aramæan tribes are derived from Nahor his brother; in Genesis 25:12 twelve N. Arabian tribes, nearer akin, are traced to Ishmael and Hagar; six others, a step farther removed, to Keturah, his second wife, or concubine ( Genesis 25:1 ). The Edomites, as most nearly related, are derived from Esau (36). The frequent recurrence of the number 12 in these lists is a sign of artificiality. The same principle is applied to Israel itself. The existence of all the twelve sons of Jacob as individuals is on various grounds improbable; they represent tribes, and in many cases their ‘descendants’ are simply individual names coined to account for cities, clans, and subdivisions of the tribes ( Genesis 46:8 , Numbers 26:1-65 ). A good illustration is found in the case of Gilead. In Deuteronomy 3:15 we are told that Moses gave Gilead to Machir, son of Manasseh. In Numbers 26:29 etc. Gilead has become the ‘son’ of Manasseh, and in Judges 11:1 ‘begets’ Jephthah. So among the ‘sons’ of Caleb we find cities of Judah (Hebron, Tappuah, Ziph, Gibea, etc., 1 Chronicles 2:42 ff.), and Kiriath-jearim and Bethlehem are descendants of Hur ( 1 Chronicles 2:51 ). It is indeed obvious that, whether consciously or not, terms of relationship are used in an artificial sense. ‘Father’ often means founder of a city; in Genesis 4:20 it stands for the originator of occupations and professions; members of a guild or clan are its ‘sons.’ The towns of a district are its ‘daughters’ ( Judges 1:27 RVm [2] ).
With regard to the historical value of these genealogies, two remarks may be made. ( a ) The records, though in most cases worthless if regarded as referring to individuals, are of the highest importance as evidence of the movements and history of peoples and clans, and of the beliefs entertained about them. Genesis 10:1-32 gives geographical and ethnographical information of great value. A good example is found in what we learn of Caleb and the Calebites. In the earliest tradition ( Numbers 32:12 , Joshua 14:6 ; Joshua 14:14 ) he is descended from Kenaz, a tribe of Edom, and ‘grandson’ of Esau ( Genesis 36:11 ; Genesis 36:42 ); in 1 Samuel 25:3 ; 1 Samuel 30:14 the Calebite territory is still distinct from Judah. But in 1 Chronicles 2:4 ff. Caleb has become a descendant of Judah. We gather that the Calebites (‘dog-tribe’) were a related but alien clan, which entered into friendly relations with Judah at the time of the conquest of Canaan, and perhaps took the lead in the invasion. Ultimately they coalesced with Judah, and were regarded as pure Israelites. So generally, though no uniform interpretation of the genealogies is possible, a marriage will often point to the incorporation of new elements into the tribe, a birth to a fresh subdivision or migration, or an unfruitful marriage to the disappearance of a clan. Contradictory accounts of an individual in documents of different date may tell us of the history of a tribe at successive periods, as in the case of the Calebites.
( b ) Though the genealogical names usually represent nations, there is, no doubt, in certain cases a personal element as well. The patriarchs and more prominent figures, such as Ishmael and Esau and Caleb, were no doubt individuals, and their history is not entirely figurative. On this point see Driver, Genesis , pp. liv. ff.; also artt. Abraham, and Tribes. We should note that the distinctive feature of the Greek genealogies, which traced national descent from the gods, is absent from the OT. A trace remains in Genesis 6:4 (cf. Luke 3:38 ).
2. Genealogies of individuals . Whatever view be taken of the genealogies of our Lord (see next article), their incorporation in the Gospels proves the importance attached to descent in the NT period; they also show that at that time records were kept which made the construction of such tables a possibility. St. Paul was conscious of his pure pedigree ( Philippians 3:5 ), and in several cases in the NT the name of a person’s tribe is preserved. The hope of being the ancestor of the Messiah, and the natural pride of royal descent, probably caused the records of the house of David to be preserved with great care. In the same way Josephus, in the opening chapter of his Life , sets out his genealogy as vouched for by the public records, though only as far hack as his grandfather Simon. In c. Apion . i. 7, he speaks of the careful preservation of the Priestly genealogies; and the story of Africanus ( ap . Eus. HE i. 7, 13), that Herod the Great destroyed the genealogical records of the Jews in order to conceal his own origin, is at least an indication of the existence of such records and of the value attached to them. The Talmud speaks of professional genealogists, and in the present day many Jews, especially among the priests, treasure long and detailed family trees, showing their pure descent (cf., for an earlier period, Malachi 2:1 Malachi 2:1 , Bar 1:1 , Tob 1:1 ).
There can be no doubt that this careful recording of genealogies received its main impetus in the time of Ezra. It was then that the line between the Jews and other nations became sharply drawn, and stress was laid on purity of descent, whether real or fictitious. After the return from Babylon, it was more important to be able to trace descent from the exiles than to be a native of Judah (Ezra 9:1-15 ). Certain families were excluded from the priesthood for lack of the requisite genealogical records ( Ezra 2:61 , Nehemiah 7:63 ). And in fact practically all the detailed genealogies of individuals as preserved in P [1] , Chronicles, and kindred writings, date from this or a later period. No doubt the injunctions of Deuteronomy 23:3 and the arrangements for a census ( 2 Samuel 24:1-25 ) imply that there was some sort of registration of families before this, and the stage of civilization reached under the monarchy makes it probable that records were kept of royal and important houses. But the genealogical notes which really date from the earlier period rarely go further back than two or three generations, and the later genealogies bear many traces of their artificiality. The names are in many cases late and post-exilic, and there is no evidence outside the genealogies that they were in use at an earlier period. Of the twenty-four courses of the sons of Aaron in 1 Chronicles 24:1 ff., sixteen names are post-exilic. Names of places and clans appear as individuals ( 1 Chronicles 2:18-24 , 1 Chronicles 7:30-40 ). Gaps are filled up by the repetition of the same name in several generations ( e.g. 1 Chronicles 6:4-14 ). At a later time it was usual for a child to be named after his father or kinsman ( Luke 1:59 ; Luke 1:61 ), but there are probably no cases where this is recorded for the pre-exilic period, except in the Chronicler’s lists (see Gray, HPN [4] ). There are numerous discrepancies in the various lists, and there is a strongly marked tendency to ascribe a Levitical descent to all engaged in the service of the sanctuary, e.g. the guilds of singers and porters. So Samuel is made a Levite by the Chronicler ( Luke 6:22 ; Luke 6:33 ), almost certainly wrongly, as his story shows. In the same way the position of clans, such as Caleb and Jerahmeel, which in the early history appear as alien, is legitimized by artificial genealogies ( 1 Chronicles 2:1-55 ). In 1 Chronicles 25:4 the names of the sons of Heman seem to be simply fragments of a hymn or psalm. In 1 Chronicles 6:4 there are, including Aaron, 23 priests from the Exodus to the Captivity an evidently artificial reconstruction; forty years is a generation, and 40×12 = 480 years to the building of the Temple ( 1 Kings 6:1 ), the other 11 priests filling up the period till the Exile, which took place in the eleventh generation after Solomon. Such marks of artificiality, combined with lateness of date, forbid us to regard the lists as entirely historical. No doubt in certain cases the genealogist had family records to work upon, but the form in which our material has reached us makes it almost impossible to disentangle these with any degree of certainty. W. R. Smith ( Kinship and Marriage in Early Arabia , p. 6) gives an interesting parallel to this development of genealogizing activity at a particular period. The Arabian genealogies all date from the reign of Caliph Omar, when circumstances made purity of descent of great importance.
C. W. Emmet.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Genealogy of Jesus Christ
GENEALOGY OF JESUS CHRIST
1. The two genealogies . Both the First and Third Evangelists (here for brevity referred to as Mt. and Lk.) give our Lord’s ancestry, but they differ from one another very largely. Lk. traces back the genealogy to Adam, Mt. to Abraham only. Both lists agree from Abraham to David, except that Aram or Ram in Matthew 1:3 = Arm in Luke 3:33 (best text); but between David and Joseph the lists have only Shealtiel and Zerubbabel, and possibly two other names (see below), in common.
( a ) The Matthæan list from Perez to David is taken almost verbatim from Ruth 4:18-22 LXX [1] (inserting Rahab and Ruth, and calling David ‘the king’), and agrees with 1 Chronicles 2:1-16 ; it then gives the names of the kings to Jechoniah, from 1 Chronicles 3:10-15 , but inserts ‘the [2] of Uriah’ and omits kings Abaziah, Joash, and Amaziah between Joram and Uzziah (= Azariah), and also Jehoiakim son of Josiah and father of Jechoniah (Coniah, Jeremiah 22:24 ) or Jehoiachin ( 2 Chronicles 36:8 ). This last omission may be merely a mistake, for the list is made up of three artificial divisions of fourteen generations each, and Jechoniah appears both at the end of the second and at the beginning of the third division, being counted twice. Perhaps, then, originally Jehoiakim ended the second division, and Jehoiachin began the third, and they became confused owing to the similarity of spelling and were written alike (as in 1 Chronicles 3:15 , Jeremiah 52:31 LXX [1] ); then the synonym Jechoniah was substituted for both. In the third division the names Shealtiel, Zerubbabel (both in Lk. also) are from Ezra 3:2 , 1 Chronicles 3:17 ; 1 Chronicles 3:19 but we notice that in Mt. and Ezra Zerubbabel is called son of Shealtiel, whereas in 1 Ch (except in some MSS of the LXX [1] ) he is his nephew. Both in Mt. and 1 Ch. Shealtiel is called son of Jechoniah. Between Zerubbabel and Joseph the names are perhaps from some traditional list of the heirs of the kings, but some names here also have been omitted, for in Mt. ten generations are spread over nearly 500 years, while Lk. gives nineteen generations for the same period. The Mt. genealogy ends with Matthan, Jacob, Joseph.
( b ) The Lukan list , which inverts the order, beginning at Jesus and ending at Adam, takes the line from Adam to Abraham, from Genesis 5:1-32 ; Genesis 10:21-25 (to Peleg), 1 Chronicles 1:1-27 , but inserts Cainan between Arphaxad and Shelah, as does the LXX [1] in Gn. and 1 Ch.; it practically agrees with Mt. (see above) from Abraham to David, but then gives the line to Shealtiel through David’s son Nathan, making Shealtiel the son of Neri, not of king Jechoniah (see 2 below). The names between Nathan and Shealtiel are not derived from the OT, and those between Zerubbabel and Joseph are otherwise unknown to us, unless, as Plummer supposes ( ICC [6] , ‘St. Luke,’ p. 104,) Joanan ( Luke 3:27 RV [7] ) = Hananiah son of Zerubbabel ( 1 Chronicles 3:19 ) the name Rhesa being really a title (‘Zerubbabel Rhesa’ = ‘Z. the prince’), misunderstood by some copyist before Lk. and Joda ( Luke 3:26 RV [7] ) = Abind ( Matthew 1:18 ) = Hodaviab ( 1 Chronicles 3:24 RV [7] , a descendant of Zerubbabel, not son of Hananiah). Some think that Matthat ( Luke 3:24 ) = Matthan ( Matthew 1:15 ).
2. Reason of the differences . It is not enough merely to say that theories which endeavour to harmonize the four Gospels are failures, and that, as is shown in art. Gospels, 2 ( b ), Mt. and Lk. wrote each without knowing the work of the other. We have to consider why two independent writers, both professing to give our Lord’s genealogy, produced such different lists. Jewish genealogies were frequently artificial; that of Mt. is obviously so; for example, its omissions were apparently made only so as to produce an equality between the three divisions. Burkitt ( Evangelion da-Mepharreshe , ii. 260f.) and Allen ( ICC [6] , ‘St. Matthew,’ p. 2 ff.) think that Mt. compiled his genealogy for the purpose of his Gospel. The details about Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Bathsheba, not to be expected in a genealogy, but suitable for that purpose (see below), and the artificial divisions, seem to point to this view. The object of the Mt. genealogy would be to refute an early Jewish slander that Jesus was born out of wedlock a slander certainly known to Celsus in the 2nd cent. (Origen, c. Cels . i. 28 etc.). In this connexion Burkitt ( l.c. ) shows that Matthew 1:2 are by the same hand as the rest of the Gospel (see also Hawkins, Horæ Synopticæ , p. 4ff.). This view may, however, perhaps be modified a little by the hypothesis that the Mt. list is due to a Christian predecessor of the First Evangelist, perhaps to one of his sources; this modification would allow for the corruption of Jeboiakim and Jeboiachin (above, 1).
In any case, in spite of the argument to the contrary by Bacon in Hastings’ DB [11] ii. 139, we must probably agree with Westcott ( NT in Greek 2 , ii. 141), Barnard (Hastings’ DCG [12] i. 638), Allen, and Burkitt, that the word ‘begat’ in this list expresses legal heirship and not physical descent. The same is true in some cases in 1 Chronicles. Mt. clearly believed in the Virgin Birth, and puts the genealogy immediately before the assertion of it; if physical descent is intended, the genealogy through Joseph is unmeaning. He wishes to prove that Jesus is legally descended from David, and therefore gives the ‘throne succession,’ the list of regal heirs. On the other hand, it may be supposed that Lk. states Jesus’ heirship by giving Joseph’s actual physical descent according to some genealogy preserved in the family. According to this view, Joseph was really the son of Heli ( Luke 3:23 ) but the legal heir of Jacob ( Matthew 1:16 ). It is not difficult to understand why Shealtiel and Zerubbabel appear in both lists. Jechoniah was childless, or at least his heirs died out ( Jeremiah 22:24 ; Jeremiah 22:30 ), and Shealtiel, though called his ‘son’ in 1 Chronicles 3:17 , was probably only his legal heir, being son of Neri ( Luke 3:27 ). This theory is elaborated by Lord A. Hervey, Bishop of Bath and Wells ( The Genealogies of our Lord , 1853, and in Smith’s DB [11] 2 ).
The reason of the insertion of the names of the four women in the Mt. list is not quite obvious. It has been suggested that the object was to show that God accepts penitents and strangers. Burkitt, with more probability, supposes that the mention of the heirs being born out of the direct line or irregularly is intended to prepare us for the still greater irregularity at the last stage, for the Virgin Birth of Jesus ( l.c. p. 260). We note that in the OT Rahab is not said to have been the wife of Salmon as in Matthew 1:5 .
3. Other solutions . ( a ) Africanus, perhaps the earliest writer to discuss Biblical questions in a critical manner ( c [14] . a.d. 220), treats of these genealogies in his Letter to Aristides (Euseb. HE i. 7, vi. 31). He harmonizes them (expressly, however, not as a matter of tradition) on the theory of levirate marriages, supposing that two half-brothers, sons of different fathers, married the same woman, and that the issue of the second marriage was therefore legally accounted to the elder, but physically to the younger brother. It is a difficulty that two, or even three, such marriages must be supposed in the list; and this theory is almost universally rejected by moderns. Africanus bad no doubt that both genealogies were Joseph’s.
Africanus says that Herod the Great destroyed all the Jewish genealogies kept in the archives, so as to hide his own ignoble descent, but that not a few had private records of their own (Euseb. HE i. 7). Here clearly Africanus exaggerates. Josephus says that his own genealogy was given in the public records, and that the priests’ pedigrees, even among Jews of the Dispersion, were carefully preserved ( Life , 1, c. Ap . i. 7). There is no reason why LK. should not have found a genealogy in Joseph’s family. Africanus says that our Lord’s relatives, called desposyni , prided themselves on preserving the memory of their noble descent.
( b ) A more modern theory, expounded by Weiss, but first by Annius of Viterbo ( c [14] . a.d. 1490), is that Mt. gives Joseph’s pedigree, Lk. Mary’s. It is necessary on this theory to render Luke 3:23 thus: ‘being the son (as was supposed) of Joseph [16] of Heli.’ This translations rightly pronounced by Plummer to be incredible ( l.c. p. 103); and a birthright derived through the mother would be ‘quite out of harmony with either Jewish ideas or Gentile ideas.’ The important thing was to state Jesus’ birthright, and the only possible way to do this would be through Joseph.
It must, however, be added that Joseph and Mary were probably near relations. We cannot, indeed, say with Eusebius ( HE i. 7) that they must have been of the same tribe, because ‘intermarriages between different tribes were not permitted.’ He is evidently referring to Numbers 36:6 f., but this relates only to heiresses, who, if they married out of their tribe, would forfeit their inheritance. Mary and Elisabeth were kinswomen, though the latter was descended from Aaron ( Luke 1:5 ; Luke 1:36 ). But it was undoubtedly the belief of the early Christians that Jesus was descended, according to the flesh, from David, and was of the tribe of Judah ( Acts 2:30 ; Acts 13:23 , Romans 1:3 , 2 Timothy 2:8 , Hebrews 7:14 , Revelation 5:5 ; Revelation 22:16 ; cf. Mark 10:47 ; Mark 11:10 ). At the same time it is noteworthy that our Lord did not base His claims on His Davidic descent. In the Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs , an apocryphal work written in its present form c [14] . a.d. 120, we find ( Sym . 7, Gad , 8) the idea that the Lord should ‘raise (one) from Levi as priest and from Judah as king. God and man, an Inference, as Sanday-Headlam remark ( ICC [6] , ‘Romans,’ p. 7), from Luke 1:36 .
4. The Matthæan text . In Matthew 1:16 the reading of almost all Greek MSS, attested by Tertullian, is that of EV [19] , ‘Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus,’ etc. The lately discovered Sinaitic-Syriac palimpsest has ‘Jacob begat Joseph: Joseph, to whom was betrothed Mary the Virgin, begat Jesus.’ This reading is carefully discussed by Prof. Burkitt ( l.c. p. 262 ff.), who thinks that it is not original, but derived from a variant of the ordinary text: ‘Jacob begat Joseph, to whom being betrothed the Virgin Mary bare [20] Jesus’ [21]. On the other hand, it has been suggested that the Sinaitic palimpsest has the original reading of a source of our Mt. which did not believe in the Virgin Birth. If so, it is strange that the First Evangelist should place it in such close juxtaposition to his assertion of that belief. In view, however, of what has been said above, that the word ‘begat’ in Mt. implies only legal heirship, the question has no real doctrinal significance. On purely literary grounds, Prof. Burkitt seems to the present writer to have established his point.
A. J. Maclean.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
This is given in Matthew 1 and Luke 3 . According to the distinctive character of Matthew in which Christ is emphatically the Messiah and Son of David, the genealogy commences with Abraham; whereas in Luke, in which Christ is displayed as the Son of man, the list is traced up to "Adam who was the son of God." Both lists are the same from Abraham to David; then they differ until they reach Salathiel and Zorobabel, which names are in both lists; and then they again differ. The list in Luke is much fuller, having from David to Joseph forty-one names, where Matthew has only twenty-six. Names are omitted from Matthew, and this enables the whole to be brought into the three divisions of 'fourteen generations.' Ozias is placed as the son of Joram, but on consulting 1 Chronicles 3:11,12 (where for Ozias is read Azariah, as also in 2 Kings 14:21 ), it will be seen that three kings are omitted, Ahaziah, Joash, and Amaziah. Such omissions are found in the genealogies in the O.T. In 2 Chronicles 22:9 Ahaziah is called the son of Jehoshaphat; whereas he was his grandson; and by comparing the generations in 1 Chronicles 6:3-15 with Ezra 7:1-5 seven names will be found to be omitted in the latter.
It will be noted that in Matthew the word 'begat' is used, whereas in Luke it is more indefinite. Jesus was 'supposed' or 'accounted' to be the son of Joseph, and 'Joseph was of Heli' without the word 'begat.' Again, it should be noted that by a Jewish law if a man died childless, his brother was to raise up seed to the deceased by his widow, so that a son born thus might be called the legal son of the deceased, whereas he would be the actual or lineal son of his father, the brother of the deceased. The list in Matthew is clearly the royal line; between David and Salathiel twelve kings are given, all of whom are omitted from Luke. Being the royal line it must also be the legal line.
There is more difficulty as to the genealogy in Luke: is it the lineal line of Joseph or Mary? Women are never quoted as forming a line of succession, yet Christ is spoken of as the 'seed' of the woman, Genesis 3:15 ; 'come of woman,' Galatians 4:4 ; 'the seed of Abraham,' Hebrews 2:16 ; 'the seed of David according to flesh,' Romans 1:3 ; 2 Timothy 2:8 ; 'the offspring of David.' Revelation 22:16 . And as the Lord was not really the son of Joseph, these scriptures can only be fulfilled through His mother, who must have been a lineal descendant of David and Abraham. It is better therefore to consider that Luke gives the lineal descent of the Lord through Mary. In accordance with the above it will be seen that Matthew in speaking of the birth of the Lord frequently mentions Joseph, seldom Mary; whereas Luke frequently mentions Mary, but seldom Joseph.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Genealogy
Genealogy. Genealogical lists are found all through the historical books of the Old Testament. One great object in the preservation of these genealogical lists was to note Christ's descent. The first biblical genealogy is that of Cain's descendants, Genesis 4:16-24; then that of Seth. The tenth and eleventh chapters of Genesis are regarded by ethnologists as invaluable, since they contain a history of the dispersion of the nations in prehistoric times. The first eight chapters of 1 Chronicles are devoted to genealogical accounts, beginning with Adam, because, as it is stated, "all Israel were reckoned by genealogies." 1 Chronicles 9:1.
Genealogy of Jesus Christ.—Matthew 1:1-17; Luke 3:23-38. This is the only genealogy given us in the New Testament We have two lists of the human ancestors of Christ: Matthew, writing for Jewish Christians, begins with Abraham; Luke, writing for Gentile Christians, goes back to Adam, the father of all men. John 1:1-18, begins his gospel by setting forth Christ's divine genealogy. The explanation of the differences in these two lists is, 1. One, or perhaps two, levirate marriages in the family of Joseph—i.e., a marriage of a man to the childless widow of his elder brother, the children of the second marriage being reckoned as the legal descendants of the first husband. 2. That Matthew gives the legal or royal genealogy of Joseph, Luke the private line of Joseph. 3. That Matthew gives the genealogy of Joseph, Luke the genealogy of Mary. The Davidic descent of Jesus is a mark of the Messiah, and is clearly taught in the prophecy, and also in Romans 1:3; 2 Timothy 2:8; Hebrews 7:14; John 7:42; Acts 13:23.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Genealogy
This record of families which we call genealogy, is termed in Hebrew Sepher Toledoth; or the book of generations. The Jews were particular to an excess, to record their families; no doubt, with an eye to Christ.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Genealogy of Christ
The New Testament has preserved two different genealogies of Our Lord, in Matthew 1; and Luke 3. Saint Matthew's list is divided artificially into three equal parts of 14 names each, with several intentional omissions: from Abraham the father of the chosen people to David the king, to whose family the promise was made (2 Kings 7); David and the royal line after him to the Babylonian captivity; the descendants of the royal line from the captivity to Joseph, the legal father of Our Lord. Saint Luke proceeds in reverse order; he starts from Joseph and goes, beyond Abraham, back to Adam the father of the human race, in accord with the character of his Gospel; and he merely enumerates the names without grouping them according to a thesis or point, as is the case in Saint Matthew. Few names are common to both lists: viz., those between Abraham and David, then Salathiel and Zorobabel after the captivity, and Joseph the foster-father of Christ; the others are absent from Matthew's list, or the persons are different. To account for these differences several explanations have been advanced, but no decisive evidence is extant. Not a few authors hold that Saint Luke gives Mary's genealogy; but this view is more generally considered improbable, so that both lists are taken as giving Joseph's ancestry. Only it must be supposed that at several points, instead of the actual descent, the one or the other of the lists gives the legal relationship based on adoption in some manner. Our Lord was considered to belong to the family of David; this seems to be taken for granted in the New Testament, where we find no difficulty raised against Him on the ground of His descent. The genealogies show His relationship to the royal family of Juda through Joseph, as it was only through the father, legal or natural, that the rights could be transmitted, and Joseph was the legal father of Jesus. To trace Our Lord's ancestry through His mother would not have served the purpose of the Evangelists.
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Genealogy
γενεολογια , signifies a list of a person's ancestors. The common Hebrew expression for it is Sepher-Toledoth, "the Book of Generations." No nation was ever more careful to preserve their genealogies than the Jews. The sacred writings contain genealogies extended three thousand five hundred years backward. The genealogy of our Saviour is deduced by the evangelists from Adam to Joseph and Mary, through a space of four thousand years and upward. The Jewish priests were obliged to produce an exact genealogy of their families, before they were admitted to exercise their function. Wherever placed, the Jews were particularly careful not to marry below themselves; and to prevent this, they kept tables of genealogy in their several families, the originals of which were lodged at Jerusalem, to be occasionally consulted. These authentic monuments, during all their wars and persecutions, were taken great care of, and from time to time renewed. But, since the last destruction of their city, and the dispersion of the people, their ancient genealogies are lost. But to this the Jews reply, that either Elias, or some other inspired priest or prophet, shall come, and restore their genealogical tables before the Messiah's appearance; a tradition, which they ground on a passage in Nehemiah 7:64-65 , to this effect: the genealogical register of the families of certain priests being lost, they were not able to make out their lineal descent from Aaron; and therefore, "as polluted, were put from the priesthood;" the "Tirshatha said unto them, that they should not eat of the most holy things till there stood up a priest with Urim and Thummim." From hence the Jews conclude, that such a priest will stand up, and restore and complete the genealogies of their families: though others suppose these words to import, that they should never exercise their priesthood any more; and that, "till there shall stand up a priest with Urim and Thummim," amounts to the same as the Roman proverb, ad Graecas calendas, [1] since the Urim and Thummim were now absolutely and for ever lost.
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Genealogy
A record of one's ancestors, either the line of natural descent from father to son, or the line in which, by the laws, the inheritance descended, or that preserved in the public records. Never was a nation more careful to preserve their genealogies than the Hebrews, for on them rested the distinction of tribes, the ownership of lands, and the right to the highest offices and privileges, 1 Chronicles 5:1,17 9:1 2 Chronicles 12:15 Ezra 2:62 . Hence their public tables of genealogies were kept secure amid all vicissitudes. We find in the Bible a record carried on for more than 3,500 years, 1 Chronicles 1:1-54 3:1-24 6:1-81 ; and thus were guarded the proofs that Christ was born according to prophecy of the seed of Abraham, and heir to the throne of his father David, Luke 1:32 2 Timothy 2:8 Hebrews 7:14 . In the evangelists we have the genealogy of Christ for 4,000 years. The two accounts in Matthew 1.1-25 and Luke 3:1-38 , differ from each other; one giving probably the genealogy of Christ's reputed father Joseph, and the other that of his mother Mary. The two lines descend from Solomon and Nathan, David's sons; they unite in Salathiel, and again in Christ. Joseph was the legal father of Christ, and of the same family connections with Mary; so that the Messiah was a descendant of David both by law and "according to the flesh." The discrepancies between the various genealogies may be reconciled in accordance with peculiar Jewish laws. The public records, which Josephus says were scrupulously kept down to his day, perished with the ruin of the Jews as a nation. It is now, therefore, impossible for any pretended Messiah to prove his descent from David.
Melchizedek was "without descent," Hebrews 7:3 , as regards the Jewish race. No sacred records proved his right to be numbered among that people of God. His priesthood was of a different kind from that of Aaron and his sons. Compare Ezra 2:62 .
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Genealogy
In Hebrew the term for genealogy or pedigree is "the book of the generations;" and because the oldest histories were usually drawn up on a genealogical basis, the expression often extended to the whole history, as is the case with the Gospel of St. Matthew, where "the book of the generation of Jesus Christ" includes the whole history contained in that Gospel. The promise of the land of Canaan to the seed of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob successively, and the separation of the Israelites from the Gentile world; the expectation of Messiah as to spring from the tribe of Judah; the exclusively hereditary priesthood of Aaron with its dignity and emoluments; the long succession of kings in the line of David; and the whole division and occupations of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, occupation of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, families and houses of fathers, gave a deeper importance to the science of genealogy among the Jews than perhaps any other nation. When Zerubbabel brought back the captivity from Babylon, one of his first cares seems to have been to take a census of those that returned, and to settle them according to their genealogies. Passing on to the time of the birth of Christ, we have a striking incidental proof of the continuance of the Jewish genealogical economy in the fact that when Augustus ordered the census of the empire to be taken, the Jews in the province of Syria immediately went each one to his own city. The Jewish genealogical records continued to be kept till near the destruction of Jerusalem. But there can be little doubt that the registers of the Jewish tribes and families perished at the destruction of Jerusalem, and not before. It remains to be said that just notions of the nature of the Jewish genealogical records are of great importance with a view to the right interpretation of Scripture. Let it only be remembered that these records have respect to political and territorial divisions as much as to strictly genealogical descent, and it will at once be seen how erroneous a conclusion it may be that all who are called "sons" of such or such a patriarch or chief father must necessarily be his very children. Of any one family or house became extinct, some other would succeed to its place, called after its own chief father. Hence of course a census of any tribe drawn up at a later period would exhibit different divisions from one drawn up at an earlier. The same principle must be borne in mind in interpreting any particular genealogy Again, when a pedigree was abbreviated, it would naturally specify such generations as would indicates from what chief houses the person descended. Females are named in genealogies when there is anything remarkable about them, or when any right or property is transmitted through them. See (Genesis 11:29 ; 22:23 ; 25:1-4 ; 35:22-26 ; Exodus 6:23 ; Numbers 26:33 )
Smith's Bible Dictionary - Genealogy of Jesus Christ
The New Testament gives us the genealogy of but one person, that of our Saviour. This is given because it was important to prove that Jesus fulfilled the prophecies spoken of him. Only as the son and heir of David should he be the Messiah. The following propositions will explain the true construction of these genealogies:--
They are both the genealogies of Joseph, i.e. of Jesus Christ as the reputed and legal son of Joseph and Mary.
The genealogy of St. Matthew is Joseph's genealogy as legal successor to the throne of David. St. Luke's is Joseph's private Genealogy, exhibiting his real birth as David's son, and thus showing why he was heir to Solomon's crown. The simple principle that one evangelist exhibits that genealogy which contained the successive heir to David's and Solomon's throne, while the other exhibits the paternal stem of him who was the heir, explains all the anomalies of the two pedigrees, their agreements as well as their discrepancies, and the circumstance of there being two at all.
Mary, the mother of Jesus, was in all probability the daughter of Jacob, and first cousin to Joseph her husband. Thus: Matthan or Matthat Father of Jacob, Heli Jacob Father of Mary = Jacob'e heir was (Joseph) Heli Father of Joseph JESUS, called Christ. (Godet, Lange and many others take the ground that Luke gives the genealogy of Mary, rendering (Luke 3:23 ) thus: Jesus "being (as was suppposed ) the son of Joseph, (but in reality) the son of Heli." In this case Mary, as declared in the Targums, was the daughter of Heli, and Heli was the grandfather of Jesus. Mary's name was omitted because "ancient sentiment did not comport with the mention of the mother as the genealogical link." So we often find in the Old Testament the grandson called the son. This view has this greatly in its favor, that it shows that Jesus was not merely the legal but the actual descendant of David; and it would be very strange that in the gospel accounts, where so much is made of Jesus being the son and heir of David and of his kingdom his real descent from David should not be given.--ED.)
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Jesus Christ, Genealogy of
(See JESUS CHRIST.)

Sentence search

Reckon - ” In Aramaic, yâchaś appears in the Targumim for the Hebrew mishpachah (“family”) and toledot (“genealogy or generations”). A similar use is found in Ezra 2:62: “These sought their register among those that were reckoned by Genealogy, but they were not found …” (NASB, “searched among their ancestral registration”). ...
The Septuagint renders yâchaś variously: ogdoekonta (“genealogy … to be reckoned”); arithmos (“member of them; father their Genealogy”); paratoxin (“member throughout the Genealogy”); sunodias (“reckoned by Genealogy”). ...
Yachaś (יַחַשׂ, Strong's #3188), “genealogy. ” This word appears in the infinitive form as a noun to indicate a register or table of Genealogy: “And the number throughout the Genealogy of them that were apt to the war, and to battle was twenty and six thousand men” ( Mattathias -
The son of Amos, in the Genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:25 ). ...
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The son of Semei, in the same Genealogy (Luke 3:26 )
Rhesa - Son of Zerubbabel in Christ's Genealogy (Luke 3:27). "prince," thereby removing a difficulty in reconciling Matthew's with Luke's Genealogy
Enealogies - ) of Genealogy...
Genealogy - Genealogy. The first biblical Genealogy is that of Cain's descendants, Genesis 4:16-24; then that of Seth. ...
Genealogy of Jesus Christ. This is the only Genealogy given us in the New Testament We have two lists of the human ancestors of Christ: Matthew, writing for Jewish Christians, begins with Abraham; Luke, writing for Gentile Christians, goes back to Adam, the father of all men. John 1:1-18, begins his gospel by setting forth Christ's divine Genealogy. That Matthew gives the legal or royal Genealogy of Joseph, Luke the private line of Joseph. That Matthew gives the Genealogy of Joseph, Luke the Genealogy of Mary
Father - See Family, Genealogy, 1
Jared - In the latter passage is given the Genealogy of Cainites, whereas in Genesis 5, is given the Genealogy of Sethites
Register - See Genealogy, 2
Jahdai - Abruptly named in Caleb's Genealogy (1 Chronicles 2:47)
Jorim - —Named in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:29)
Jehosh'Uah, - in the Genealogy of Ephraim
Semei - Mentioned in the Genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:26 )
Sadoc - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:14)
Rhesa - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:27)
Zerah - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:3)
Joanan - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:27)
Joda - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:26)
Jonam - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:30)
Sadoc - Just, mentioned in the Genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:14 )
Mattathias - —Occurs twice in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:25-26
Bethrapha - Obscure name in the Genealogy of Judah
Jorim - Matthat's son in Christ's Genealogy (Luke 3:29)
Bethrapha - ) Son of Eshton in the Genealogy of Judah
Jared - —Father of Enoch, named in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:37)
Josech - —Named in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:26)
Lamech - —Father of Noah, mentioned in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:36
Methuselah - —Mentioned as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:37
Enealogical - ) Of or pertaining to Genealogy; as, a genealogical table; genealogical order
Mat'Than - Son of Eleazar, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Ish'ma - (desolation ), a name in the Genealogy of Judah
Elmo'Dam - (measure ), son of Er, in the Genealogy of Joseph
Nahor - —Grandfather of Abraham, named in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:34
Melchi - —Occurs twice in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:24; Luke 3:28
Rachab - Rahab, a name found in the Genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:5 )
Hazzelelponi - A female name in the Genealogy of Judah ( 1 Chronicles 4:3 )
Reu - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:35, Authorized Version Ragau)
Jehoshaphat - —A king of Judah, named in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:8)
Jotham - —A king of Judah, named in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:9)
Mattatha - —A grandson of David, named in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:31
Semein - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:26, Authorized Version Semei)
Serug - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:35, Authorized Version Saruch)
Azor - Son of Eliakim in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Cosam - Son of Elmodam in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Janna - Son of Joseph in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Heli - Son of Matthat in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Esli - Son of Nagge in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Sadoc - Son of Azor, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Semei - Son of Joseph, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Nagge - Son of Maath, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Maath - Son of Mattathias in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Eliud - Son of Achim in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Elmodam - Son of Er, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Naum - Son of Esli in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Menan - Son of Mattatha, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Neri - Son of Melchi, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Melea - Son of Menan, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Mattatha - Son of Nathan, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus, Luke 3:31
ma'Ath - (small ), son of Mattathias in the Genealogy of Jesus Christ
Jonan - Son of Eliakim in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Jose - Son of Eliezer in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
es'li, - son of Nagge or Naggai, in the Genealogy of Christ
Rhesa - Son of Zorobabel, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Rhesa - Affection, son of Zorobabel, mentioned in the Genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:27 )
Seth - —The patriarch, mentioned as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:38)
Shem - —The patriarch, mentioned as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:36)
Cosam - —A name occurring in the Lukan Genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:28)
Phalec - Son of Heber, mentioned in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Eli'ud - (God his praise ), son of Achim in the Genealogy of Christ
Nathan - —A son of king David, named in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:31
Terah - —Father of Abraham; named as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:34)
Rehoboam - —Son of Solomon, mentioned as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:7)
Jannai - —One of the links in the Lukan Genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:24)
Ezekias - The Greek form of Hezekiah, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Abi'ud - (father of praise ), descendant of Zorobabel in the Genealogy of Jesus Christ
jo'Rim - (whom Jehovah has exalted ), son of Matthat, in the Genealogy of Christ
Peleg - —Mentioned as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:35, Authorized Version Phalec)
Addi - In Jesus' Genealogy
Josiah - —The well-known king of Judah, named in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:10 f
Esrom - Son of Phares in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Rosh - In the Genealogy of ( Genesis 46:21 ) Rosh is reckoned among the sons of Benjamin
jo'se - (another form of JOSES ), son of Eliezer, in the Genealogy of Jesus Christ
Rosh - In the Genealogy of ( Genesis 46:21 ) Rosh is reckoned among the sons of Benjamin
Jesaiah - (See Genealogy OF CHRIST
Bashemath - Called Adah in the Genealogy of Edom (Genesis 36:2-3). Ishmael's daughter; the last of Esau's three wives according to the Edomite Genealogy inserted by Moses (Genesis 36:3-4; Genesis 36:13). Esau's Seirite wife, called Judith daughter of Beeri in the narrative (Genesis 26:34), is called Arolibamah (the name of a district in Idumaea) the Genealogy (Genesis 36:41)
Mele'a - the son of Menan, and ancestor of Joseph in the Genealogy of Jesus Christ
Melea - Fulness, the son of Menan and father of Eliakim, in the Genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:31 )
Jesse - —The father of king David, named in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:5 f
Manasseh (2) - —The well-known king of Judah, mentioned as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy, Matthew 1:10
Shealtiel - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:12, Luke 3:27, Authorized Version both times Salathiel)
Mattathias - Son of Amos, and son of Semei, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Melchi - Son of Janna, and son of Addi, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Job - (persecuted ), the third son of Issachar, ( Genesis 46:13 ) called in another Genealogy JASHUB
Job - (persecuted ), the third son of Issachar, ( Genesis 46:13 ) called in another Genealogy JASHUB
Beth'Rapha - a name which occurs in the Genealogy of Judah as the son of Eshton
Jesse - —The father of king David, named in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:5 f
Perez - —Mentioned as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:3, Luke 3:33, Authorized Version Phares)
Zerubbabel - ’s (Luke 3:27) Genealogy of Jesus
Hezekiah - ) Genealogy of our Lord
Asa - ), named in our Lord’s Genealogy, Matthew 1:7 f
Matthat - Son of Levi, and son of another Levi, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Abiud - Son of Zorobabel, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus, Matthew 1:13 : not mentioned in the Old Testament
ad'di - ( Luke 3:28 ) Son of Cosam, and father of Melchi in our Lord's Genealogy; the third above Salathiel
ar'Nan - In the received Hebrew text "the sons of Arnan" are mentioned in the Genealogy of Zerubbabel
ne'ri, - short form for NERIAH (Jehovah is my lamp ) son of Melchi and father of Salathiel, in the Genealogy of Christ
Shi'Mon - The four sons of Shimon are enumerated in an obscure Genealogy of the tribe of Judah
Jechoniah - as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy
Mel'Chi -
The son of Janna, and ancestor of Joseph in the Genealogy of Jesus Christ
Nagge - This man is in the Genealogy of Christ
Joatham - Son of Ozias in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Jonan - Johanan, in Christ's Genealogy (Luke 3:30); compare, the similar names, as often occurs in a family, Luke 3:26-27
Eber - —The eponymous ancestor of the Hebrews; named in our Lord’s Genealogy as given in Lk
Jan'na - (flourishing ), son of Joseph, and father of Melchi, in the Genealogy of Christ
Addi - Descendant of Cosam in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Mehujael - ]'>[2] ’s Genealogy ( Genesis 5:12 ff
Heli - (See Genealogy OF JESUS CHRIST
Rain - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy, Matthew 1:3 f
Enoch - —There is no mention of the patriarch Enoch in the Gospels except as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:37
Ahaz - Matthew’s Genealogy of our Lord (Matthew 1:9)
Amon - ) mentioned in our Lord’s Genealogy, Matthew 1:10 (Gr
ge'Sham - (filthy ) (sometimes written GESHAN), one of the sons of Judah, in the Genealogy of Judah and family of Caleb
Enoch - —There is no mention of the patriarch Enoch in the Gospels except as a link in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:37
Sithri - ” A son of Uzziel in the Genealogy of Levi (Exodus 6:22 ; “Zithri” KJV)
Levi (2) - The name occurs twice in our Lord’s Genealogy (Luke 3:24; Luke 3:29)
Rhe'sa - (head ), son of Zorobabel in the Genealogy of Christ
jo'Nan - (perhaps a contraction of Johnana, gift or grace of God ), son of Eliakim, in the Genealogy of Christ
Arpachshad - In the New Testament the name Arphaxad appears in Luke's Genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:36 ). This suggests the possibility that the Genealogy in Genesis 10:1 was not intended to be exhaustively complete
Habaiah - They could not prove their Genealogy, and were put from the priesthood
Jah'da-i - (whom Jehovah directs ), a man who appears to be thrust abruptly into the Genealogy of Caleb, as the father of six sons
Matthat - Another link in our Lord’s Genealogy, Luke 3:29
ja'da - (wise ), son of Onam and brother of Shammai, in the Genealogy of the sons of Jerahmeel by his wife Atarah
Sem'ei - (Esther 11:2 ) ...
The father of Mattathias in the Genealogy of Jesus Christ
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - The New Testament gives us the Genealogy of but one person, that of our Saviour. ...
The Genealogy of St. Matthew is Joseph's Genealogy as legal successor to the throne of David. Luke's is Joseph's private Genealogy, exhibiting his real birth as David's son, and thus showing why he was heir to Solomon's crown. The simple principle that one evangelist exhibits that Genealogy which contained the successive heir to David's and Solomon's throne, while the other exhibits the paternal stem of him who was the heir, explains all the anomalies of the two pedigrees, their agreements as well as their discrepancies, and the circumstance of there being two at all. (Godet, Lange and many others take the ground that Luke gives the Genealogy of Mary, rendering (Luke 3:23 ) thus: Jesus "being (as was suppposed ) the son of Joseph, (but in reality) the son of Heli
me'Red - This name occurs in a fragmentary Genealogy in ( 1 Chronicles 4:17,18 ) as that of one of the sons of Ezra
ra'Ham - In the Genealogy of the descendants of Caleb the son of Hezron, ( 1 Chronicles 2:44 ) Raham is described as the son of Shema and father of Jorkoam
jo'Ses -
Son of Eliezer, in the Genealogy of Christ
Cainan - Luke’s Genealogy of our Lord: (1) of the son of Arphaxad (Luke 3:36); (2) of the son of Enos (Luke 3:38)
Arah - In the Genealogy of Asher ( 1 Chronicles 7:39 )
Mattan - The father of Jacob in the Genealogy of Christ
Arni - —An ancestor of Jesus, according to the Genealogy given by St
Mat'That -
son of Levi, in the Genealogy of Christ
Generation - Besides the common acceptation of this word, as signifying race, descent, lineage, it is used for the history and Genealogy of a person, as in Genesis 5:1 , "the book of the generations of Adam," that is, the history of Adam's creation and of his posterity. So in Genesis 2:4 , "The generations of the heavens and of the earth," that is, their Genealogy, so to speak, the history of the creation of heaven and earth; also in Matthew 1:1 , "The book of the generation of Jesus Christ," that is, the Genealogy of Jesus Christ," that is, the Genealogy of Jesus Christ, the history of his descent and life
Methushael - ]'>[2] ’s Genealogy ( Genesis 5:21 ff
Ahishahar - ” A member of tribe of Benjamin (1 Chronicles 7:10 ) but not listed in the Genealogy of 1 Chronicles 8:1
a'Her - The name occurs in the Genealogy of Benjamin
na'um - (consolation ), son of Esli, and father of Amos, in the Genealogy of Christ, ( Luke 3:25 ) about contemporary with the high priesthood of Jason all the reign of Antiochus Epiphanes
Salma - Doubtless one or more links in the Genealogy between Nahshon and Salma, and again between Salma and Boaz, have been passed over, possibly one also between Obed and Jesse. This symmetrical division, as well as the limitation of the whole Genealogy to ten, is evidently intentional, ten being the number sealing the Genealogy as a perfect completed whole
Hammolecheth - ” Sister of Gilead in Genealogy of Manasseh in the unparalleled list of 1 Chronicles 7:18
Naashon - The son of Aminadab, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus Christ
sa'Doc - (Ezra 7:2 ) ...
A descendant of Zerubbabel in the Genealogy of Jesus Christ
Pedigree - ) A line of ancestors; descent; lineage; Genealogy; a register or record of a line of ancestors
a'Chim, - son of Sadoc and father of Eliud in our Lord's Genealogy
Theogony - ) The generation or Genealogy of the gods; that branch of heathen theology which deals with the origin and descent of the deities; also, a poem treating of such genealogies; as, the Theogony of Hesiod
Mattathi'as -
Son of Amos, in the Genealogy of Christ
Heli - The father of Joseph, in the Genealogy of Jesus ( Luke 3:23 )
Shem - (Genesis 6:10) The Genealogy of Shem on account of the promised seed, is more particularly recorded than the other sons of Noah in the Bible
Genealogy - This record of families which we call Genealogy, is termed in Hebrew Sepher Toledoth; or the book of generations
Achim - In Jesus' Genealogy (Matthew 1:14) Achim or Jachin (i
Salathiel - See Genealogy
Descent - ...
Note: For "descent" (AV in Hebrews 7:3,6 ), see Genealogy (the RV rendering)
Ladan - A name occurring in the Genealogy of Joshua ( 1 Chronicles 7:26 )
Shammai - Brother of Miriam, in an obscure Genealogy of Judah
Abishu'a, - (1 Chronicles 8:4 ) ...
Son of Phinehas, the son of Eleazar, and father of Bukki, in the Genealogy of the high priests
Shup'Pim - In the Genealogy of Benjamin "Shuppim and Huppim, the children of Ir," are reckoned in ( 1 Chronicles 7:12 ) It is the same as Iri the son of Bela the son of Benjamin, so that Shuppim was the great-grandson of Benjamin
Habaiah - The head of a priestly family which returned with Zerubbabel, but, being unable to trace their Genealogy, were not allowed to serve ( Ezra 2:61 ); called in Nehemiah 7:63 Hobaiah , and in 1Es 5:38 Obdia
pe'Let - (liberation ),
A son of Jahdai in an obscure Genealogy
Genesis - The first book of Moses; so called because it contains the Genealogy of the patriarchs
Mahal'Ale-el -
The fourth in descent from Adam, according to the Sethite Genealogy, and son of Cainan
Juda - Son of Joanna, and son of Joseph, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Zorzelleus - A daughter of his, named Augia , is mentioned as married to Addus, the ancestor of a priestly family, who could not trace their Genealogy at the return under Zerubbabel
Achim - —An ancestor of Joseph, according to the Genealogy of our Lord in St
Mat'Tathah -
Son of Nathan and grandson of David, in the Genealogy of Christ
Joanna - Son of Rhesa in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Salathiel - No Genealogy would assign to a king's true son and heir an inferior parentage, whereas a private person's son would naturally be ranked in the king's pedigree on his becoming rightful heir of the throne, therefore Luke's Genealogy must be that of the natural descent, and Salathiel was "son of Neri," descended from Nathan son of David
Genealogies - A linear Genealogy lists one person in each generation, usually father, son, grandson, etc. A segmented Genealogy lists several people of at least the first generation and often of following generations, usually the sons of a father, the children of each son, the children in the next generation, etc. The linear Genealogy seeks to show that the final person listed has a legitimate right to the position or honor the person occupies or claims. A segmented Genealogy shows the relationship between the various individuals or groups named. ...
New Testament Matthew began his Gospel with a Genealogy tracing Jesus' lineage from Abraham through David. Luke also included a Genealogy reaching back to Adam and God (Matthew 3:23-38 ). Hebrews 7:3 ,Hebrews 7:3,7:6 assigns value to the fact that Melchizedek was a priest without Genealogy—a fact that set him apart from the Jewish priesthood
Manahathites - The Genealogy in these two passages is to be interpreted as meaning that the city Manahath , occupied by portions of two sections of the Edomite clan Caleb, came to be reckoned to Judah
Hul - As often in Genealogy lists, 1 Chronicles 1:17 omits the father Shem to emphasize the kinship with Aram
ja'Bez - (1 Chronicles 2:55 ) ...
The name occurs again in the genealogies of Judah, (1 Chronicles 4:9,10 ) in a passage of remarkable detail inserted in a Genealogy again connected with Bethlehem
Neri - Of Nathan's line; but when Jeconiah's issue failed Salathiel succeeded as heir of Solomon's throne, and is therefore reckoned in the Genealogy as Jeconiah's son, as inheriting his status and prerogatives (1 Chronicles 3:17; Matthew 1:12)
Delaiah - Founder of a family whose Genealogy was lost
Mattithiah - ...
...
The son of Amos, and father of Joseph, in the Genealogy of our Lord (Luke 3:25 )
Shaphat - A name in the royal Genealogy of Judah ( 1 Chronicles 3:22 )
Eliphaz - Eliphaz appears in the Edomite Genealogy of Genesis 36:1-43 (and hence 1 Chronicles 1:35 f
Methuselah - ]'>[2] ’s Genealogy, Luke 4:18
Genesis - a canonical book of the Old Testament, so called from the Greek γενεσις , genesis, or generation, because it contains an account of the origin of all visible things, and of the Genealogy of the first patriarchs
Nahshon - His name occurs in the Greek form Naasson in the Genealogy of Christ (Matt, 1:4; Luke 3:32 )
Purana - ) One of a class of sacred Hindoo poetical works in the Sanskrit language which treat of the creation, destruction, and renovation of worlds, the Genealogy and achievements of gods and heroes, the reigns of the Manus, and the transactions of their descendants
ju'da -
Son of Joseph, in the Genealogy of Christ
Buk'ki -
Son of Abishua and father of Uzzi fifth from Aaron in the line of the high priests in (1 Chronicles 6:5 ; 6:5,51 ) (Authorized Version), and in the Genealogy of Ezra
Tobiah - A family which returned from exile, but could not trace their Genealogy ( Ezra 2:60 = Nehemiah 7:62 ); corrupted in 1Es 5:37 to Ban
Meraioth - Meraioth and Ahitub are perhaps transposed in Azariah's Genealogy (1 Chronicles 9:11; Nehemiah 11:11)
Beeri - ) In the narrative where stress is laid on Esau's wife being a Canaanite, her father is called a Hittite; in the Genealogy, where the stress is on Esau's marriage connection with the former holders of mount Seir, he is properly termed a Horite
er - Son of Jose, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Ruth - Her kindness was abundantly rewarded, as she soon after married Boaz, and became the ancestor of the royal family of David, and appears in the Genealogy of Christ
Shealtiel - He was included in the Genealogy of Christ (Matthew 1:12 ; Luke 3:27 )
Chesed - He is obviously here introduced into the Genealogy of the Terahites as the presumptive forefather of the Kasdim or Chaldæans
Tappuah (2) - ) But the continuation of the Genealogy, and Korah being never mentioned as a place, requires Hebron to be a person
Jaddus - A priest whose descendants were unable to trace their Genealogy at the return under Zerub
Mera'Ioth - (1 Chronicles 6:61 ; 7:62 ) It is apparently another Meraioth who comes in between Zadok and Ahitub in the Genealogy of Azariah
i'Shi - ...
In a subsequent Genealogy of Judah we find another Ishi, with a son Zoheth
i'Shi - ...
In a subsequent Genealogy of Judah we find another Ishi, with a son Zoheth
Nah'Shon, - (enchanter ) son of Amminadab, and prince of the children of Judah (as he is styled in the Genealogy of Judah,) ( 1 Chronicles 2:10 ) at the time of the first numbering in the wilderness
Irnahash - 1 Chronicles 4:12 lists it as a personal name in the descendants of Judah, using the device of the “Table of Nations” ( Genesis 10:1 ) and other passages of listing cities by original ancestors in the form of a Genealogy
Ner - The Genealogy here falls thus:...
Abiel
Keilah - One called 'the Garmite,' in the Genealogy of Judah
Ascendant - ) An ancestor, or one who precedes in Genealogy or degrees of kindred; a relative in the ascending line; a progenitor; - opposed to descendant
Hyginus, Bishop of Rome - Pontif ) says that he was a Greek, son of an Athenian philosopher, of unknown Genealogy
ja'Hath - (1 Chronicles 23:10,11 ) ...
A man in the Genealogy of Judah, (1 Chronicles 4:2 ) son of Reaiah ben-Shobal
Genealogy - The Genealogy of our Saviour is deduced by the evangelists from Adam to Joseph and Mary, through a space of four thousand years and upward. The Jewish priests were obliged to produce an exact Genealogy of their families, before they were admitted to exercise their function. Wherever placed, the Jews were particularly careful not to marry below themselves; and to prevent this, they kept tables of Genealogy in their several families, the originals of which were lodged at Jerusalem, to be occasionally consulted
Generation - Beside the common acceptation of this word, as signifying descent, it is used for the history and Genealogy of any individual, as "The book of the generations of Adam," Genesis 5:1 , the history of Adam's creation, and of his posterity. "The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the Son of David," Matthew 1:1 , is the Genealogy of Jesus Christ, and the history of his life
Geharashim - ” A member of the Genealogy of Judah and Caleb in 1 Chronicles 4:14 , a list which often includes place names
Ithra - ) "An Ishmaelite" is the true reading; for why state that he was an "Israelite"? That he was an Ishmaelite would be something exceptional, and fitly mentioned in the Genealogy
bo'az - (Ruth 4:1 ) Boaz is mentioned in the Genealogy of Christ, (Matthew 1:5 ) (B
Cain'an - It seems certain that his name was introduced into the genealogies of the Greek Old Testament in order to bring them into harmony with the Genealogy of Christ in St
Jephunneh - Edomite names occur in Caleb's Genealogy, as Shobal (1 Chronicles 2:50; 1 Chronicles 2:52)
Abiel - Probably in 1 Samuel a link in the Genealogy is omitted, as often elsewhere
Immer - One had charge of the sixteenth course of priestly service, and some returned from exile, two of whom had married strange wives; but there is no Genealogy of their descent from Aaron
Ruth (2) - The object of the writer was to trace the Genealogy of David, and his descent from a Moabitish mother, who had been reduced to extreme poverty
Melchizedek - Scripture tells us nothing of his father or mother, of his Genealogy, his birth, or his death; he stands alone, without predecessor or successor, a royal priest by the appointment of God; and thus he was a type of Jesus Christ, who is "a priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek," and not after the order of Aaron, whose origin, consecration, life, and death, are known, Psalm 110:4 Hebrews 7:1-28 . See Genealogy
Joanna - In Luke 3:27 , the son of Rhesa mentioned in the Genealogy of Jesus
Uriel - A Kohathite Levite, son of Tahath (1 Chronicles 6:24); if the lists proceeded from father to son, without omission of intermediate links in the Genealogy, Uriel would answer to Zephaniah son of Tahath (1 Chronicles 6:36)
Amminadab - Son of Kohath in Genealogy of Levites (1 Chronicles 6:22 ), but this may be copyist's change for Izhar (Exodus 6:18 ,Exodus 6:18,6:21 )
Ruth, Book of - Booz and Ruth were ancestors of David (Matthew 1), of whom a Genealogy is given at the end of the book. As regards the date of composition, the first verse makes it evident that it was written after the times of the Judges; and the Genealogy comes down to the time of David
Africanus, Julius - A letter to Origen, disputing the authenticity of the story of Susanna, is his only complete work extant; another letter of which only fragments exist deals with the Genealogy of Christ
Julius Africanus - A letter to Origen, disputing the authenticity of the story of Susanna, is his only complete work extant; another letter of which only fragments exist deals with the Genealogy of Christ
Isaac - —Named (1) in our Lord’s Genealogy, Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34; (2) in such collocations as ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Matthew 8:11), ‘see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Luke 13:28), ‘the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob’ (Matthew 22:32, Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37)
Generation - Genealogy a series of children or descendants from the same stock
Abiel - That this is the most probable Genealogy is confirmed by Ner being said to be Saul's uncle, 1 Samuel 9:1 ; 1 Samuel 14:50,51 ; though in 1 Chronicles 8:33 ; 1 Chronicles 9:39 , Saul is said to be the son of Kish, the son of Ner
Sextus Julius Africanus - A letter to Origen, disputing the authenticity of the story of Susanna, is his only complete work extant; another letter of which only fragments exist deals with the Genealogy of Christ
Isaac - —Named (1) in our Lord’s Genealogy, Matthew 1:2, Luke 3:34; (2) in such collocations as ‘sit down with Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Matthew 8:11), ‘see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob’ (Luke 13:28), ‘the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob’ (Matthew 22:32, Mark 12:26, Luke 20:37)
Heli - Either Jacob and Heli are variant names of the same person, “son of” means “descendant of” as in other genealogies, or Luke preserved the Genealogy of Mary rather than of Joseph
Sheshbazzar - His Genealogy is not clear, but some believe the Shenazar of 1 Chronicles 3:17 may be Sheshbazzar
Adah - Moses drew the Genealogy from documents of Esau's tribe, without altering them
Heber - Son of Sala in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Seth - From Seth the Genealogy is traced to Noah, and the flood swept away all else
Aholibamah - in the Genealogy different from that it, the history
Rahab - She subsequently married Salmon, a prince of Judah, and became an ancestress of David, and appears in the Genealogy of Christ
Ruth, Book of, - The book of Ruth clearly forms part of the books of Samuel, supplying as it does the essential point of David's Genealogy and early family history, and is no less clearly connected with the book of Judges by its opening verse and the epoch to which the whole book relates
Obadiah - A descendant of Saul ( 1 Chronicles 8:38 ), who lived, to judge from his position in the Genealogy, about b. On the probable genuineness of the Genealogy see G
Genealogy - Zerubbabel, on the return from Babylon, made it a first care to settle the people according to Genealogy. ...
The destruction of Jerusalem by Rome must have involved the loss of these registers, except such partial records of Genealogy as remained in a few of the priestly families after the last dispersion. ...
In interpreting a Genealogy it is to be remembered that the list may represent the succession to an inheritance or headship of tribe or family, rather than natural descent. So in Ezra's Genealogy (Ezra 7:1-5, compare 1 Chronicles 6:4-15) five descents are omitted between Azariah Meraloth's son and Azariah Johanan's son; and several between Ezra himself and Seraiah, put to death 150 years before Ezra by Nebuchadnezzar. Thus, the Genealogy of Exodus 6:24 makes but four intervening links between Nahshon at the Exodus (Numbers 1:7) and David, namely, Salmon, Boaz, Obed, Jesse; whereas the Genealogy of Levi has double that number in the same period, seven between Phinehas and Zadok, and more in Gershon's line (1 Chronicles 6). Therefore some names must have been omitted of David's Genealogy. Genealogies are clear measures of time only when complete; and the marks of completeness are, when the mother as well as the father is named, or when historical facts define the relationship, or when a Genealogy is confirmed by one or more besides, giving the same number of generations within the same bounds. In the descending form of Genealogy, when direct heirs failed collateral ones were inserted, and the heir would put his name next after his predecessor though not his father (Ruth 4:18; Ruth 4:1 Chronicles 3). Christ's descent through David, from Abraham and Adam, is given in an unbroken line of Genealogy
Hezron - This Hezron appears also in the NT in the Genealogy of our Lord ( Matthew 1:3 , Luke 3:33 )
Zerah - Zerah is included in Matthew's Genealogy of Christ, although Perez was the direct ancestor (Joshua 1:3 )
Salathiel - We meet with another Salathiel (Matthew 1:12) and another, (Luke 3:27) though some have thought that this was one and the same person, the branches here uniting in this Genealogy of Christ
Fourteen - ...
Matthew 1:17 (c) This reveals GOD's great accuracy and perfection in controlling the Genealogy of CHRIST
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - Genealogy OF JESUS CHRIST...
1. traces back the Genealogy to Adam, Mt. Genealogy ends with Matthan, Jacob, Joseph. We have to consider why two independent writers, both professing to give our Lord’s Genealogy, produced such different lists. compiled his Genealogy for the purpose of his Gospel. The details about Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Bathsheba, not to be expected in a Genealogy, but suitable for that purpose (see below), and the artificial divisions, seem to point to this view. Genealogy would be to refute an early Jewish slander that Jesus was born out of wedlock a slander certainly known to Celsus in the 2nd cent. clearly believed in the Virgin Birth, and puts the Genealogy immediately before the assertion of it; if physical descent is intended, the Genealogy through Joseph is unmeaning. states Jesus’ heirship by giving Joseph’s actual physical descent according to some Genealogy preserved in the family. Josephus says that his own Genealogy was given in the public records, and that the priests’ pedigrees, even among Jews of the Dispersion, were carefully preserved ( Life , 1, c. should not have found a Genealogy in Joseph’s family
Genealogy - In Hebrew the term for Genealogy or pedigree is "the book of the generations;" and because the oldest histories were usually drawn up on a genealogical basis, the expression often extended to the whole history, as is the case with the Gospel of St. The promise of the land of Canaan to the seed of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob successively, and the separation of the Israelites from the Gentile world; the expectation of Messiah as to spring from the tribe of Judah; the exclusively hereditary priesthood of Aaron with its dignity and emoluments; the long succession of kings in the line of David; and the whole division and occupations of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, occupation of the land upon genealogical principles by the tribes, families and houses of fathers, gave a deeper importance to the science of Genealogy among the Jews than perhaps any other nation. The same principle must be borne in mind in interpreting any particular Genealogy Again, when a pedigree was abbreviated, it would naturally specify such generations as would indicates from what chief houses the person descended
Eliakim - The son of Melea, mentioned in Luke's Genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:30 )
Ophrah - A name in the Genealogy of the tribe of Judah ( 1 Chronicles 4:14 )
Uzzi - Between Abishua and Zadok in the Genealogy, yet never high priest (Josephus Nahor - Nahor's Genealogy shows the link between the Hebrews and other Semitic peoples of the ancient Near East
Tiras - Tiras follows Meshech in the Genealogy, just as the Thracian tribes of Asia Minor adjoined the Moschi toward the W
Generation - See Genealogy OF THE LORD JESUS
Cerinthians - Matthew, to countenance their doctrine of circumcision; but they omitted the Genealogy
Eliezer - The son of Jorim mentioned in the Genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:29 )
Eliashib - " His Genealogy is given (Nehemiah 12:10; Nehemiah 12:22), see Ezra 10:6
Cainan - In the Genealogy of Matthew some names are omitted to make up the three times 'fourteen,' — equalling 6 times 7; so in Luke this name of Cainan may have been added from some list not recorded in the O
Pathros - Originally independent of Egypt, and ruled by its own kings, In the Mosaic Genealogy the Pathros were the inhabitants of Upper Egypt; originally in the Bible view a colony of Mizraites from Lower Egypt (Genesis 10:13-14; 1 Chronicles 1:12)
Levi - Son of Melchi, and son of Simeon, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Nathan - See Genealogy
Ruth, Book of - ...
Ruth is mentioned in Matthew 1:5 , and in her and in Rahab we have a Moabitess and a woman of Canaan in the Genealogy of Christ. The Genealogy reflects no honour on Israel after the flesh
Genealogies - These were the records of generations: 'the Genealogy of their generations ' was reckoned. As the priesthood was restricted to the sons of Aaron, it was essential that they should preserve their Genealogy
Melchizedek - In the omission of the names of his parents and Genealogy, the time of his birth and length of his life, exhibiting an indefinite reign and priesthood, according to the Apostle's exposition, Hebrews 7:5 . ...
The import of this is, that he came not to his office by right of primogeniture, (which implies a Genealogy,) or by the way of succession, but was raised up and immediately called of God to it
Genealogy - In the evangelists we have the Genealogy of Christ for 4,000 years. 1-25 and Luke 3:1-38 , differ from each other; one giving probably the Genealogy of Christ's reputed father Joseph, and the other that of his mother Mary
Midian, Mtdianites - A nomadic tribe or group of tribes, said by an early Genealogy ( Genesis 25:2 ) to be descended from Abraham by Keturah, of which the Kenites (wh. ...
The Genealogy given in Genesis 25:1-4 calls Ephah a son of Midian. This would correspond with the location given in the Genealogy
Cainan - In Luke 3:36-37, second Cainan is introduced in the Genealogy of Shem after the flood, a son of Cainan
Nathan - ...
...
A son of David, by Bathsheba (2 Samuel 5:14 ), whose name appears in the Genealogy of Mary, the mother of our Lord (Luke 3:31 )
Jesse - Jesse's Genealogy is twice given in full in the Old Testament, viz
Derivation - ) The act of tracing origin or descent, as in grammar or Genealogy; as, the derivation of a word from an Aryan root
za'Bad - The chief interest connected with him is in his Genealogy, which is of considerable importance in a chronological point of view
za'Dok - ...
According to the Genealogy of the high priests in (1 Chronicles 6:12 ) there was a second Zadok, son of a second Ahitub son of Amariah, about the time of King Ahaziah. (Nehemiah 3:4,29 ) ...
In (1 Chronicles 9:11 ) and Nehe 11:11 Mention is made, in a Genealogy, of Zadok, the son of Meraioth, the son of Ahitub; but it can hardly be doubtful that Meraioth is inserted by the error of a copyist, and that Zadok the son of Ahitub is meant
Joseph the Husband of Mary - ...
Possibly, however, the Genealogy in Luke is that of Mary, not Joseph. Since the Genealogy preserves only the names of the males, Joseph (according to this theory) would be ‘son’ of Heli only because he was married to Heli’s daughter; that is, he would be Heli’s son-in-law
Descent - ) A step or remove downward in any scale of gradation; a degree in the scale of Genealogy; a generation
Gedor - The Genealogy of Judah in 1 Chronicles 4:1 includes city names among the list of “sons
Family - ) Course of descent; Genealogy; line of ancestors; lineage
Family - Course of descent Genealogy line of ancestors
Elie'Zar - (Ezra 10:18,23,31 ) ...
Son of Jorim, in the Genealogy of Christ
Jes'se - ( Matthew 1:5 ) Jesse's Genealogy is twice given in full in the Old Testament, viz
Azariah - Several others: 1 Chronicles 6:36 = Ezra, 1 Chronicles 9:11; Nehemiah 3:23-24; Nehemiah 8:7; 2 Chronicles 29:12; 2 Chronicles 28:12; compare Jeremiah 43:2; Nehemiah 12:32-33; 1 Chronicles 2:38-39; Azariah whose name proves that the Genealogy in 1 Chronicles 2:36-41 was made in Hezekiah's reign, for Azariah (1 Chronicles 2:38) appears from 2 Chronicles 23:1; 2 Chronicles 24:1, to have been captain when Joash was seven years old, i. After Azariah in that Genealogy are six generations, ending with Elishama; and from Joash to Hezekiah also six; therefore Elishama was contemporary with Hezekiah
Zadok - The Genealogy of Zadok is given in 1 Chronicles 6:3-15 from Aaron through Eleazar on down to Jehozadak of postexilic times (compare Zechariah 6:11 ). The Genealogy mentions a second Zadok seven generations later of whom we know little, but his name emphasizes the fact that standard names do reappear in genealogical lists
Enoch - Chăn ôk ) is the ‘seventh from Adam’ ( Judges 1:14 ) in the Sethite Genealogy of Genesis 5:1-32 (see Genesis 5:18-24 ). In the Cainite Genealogy of Genesis 4:17 ff
Generation - On the plural GENERATIONS, Hebrew toledowt , (See Genealogy. Rawlinson truly terms "the generations (genealogy) of the sons of Noah" "the most authentic record we possess for the affiliation of nations" (Journal of the Asiatic Society, 15:230)
Theology - The word was first used to denote the systems, or rather the heterogeneous fables, of those poets and philosophers who wrote of the Genealogy and exploits of the gods of Greece
Havoth-Jair - ” 1 Chronicles 2:18-23 describes the Genealogy of Caleb and his father Hezron
Heman - As Chronicles in a number of cases confuses the Genealogy of Judah with that of Levi (cf
Zabad - in proof that this Genealogy ends in the time of Hezekiah
Eneration - ) A single step or stage in the succession of natural descent; a rank or remove in Genealogy
Tithe - ...
Note: Hebrews 7:4-9 shows the superiority of the Melchizedek priesthood to the Levitical, in that (1) Abraham, the ancestor of the Levites, paid "tithes" to Melchizedek ( Genesis 14:20 ); (2) Melchizedek, whose Genealogy is outside that of the Levites, took "tithes" of Abraham, the recipient himself of the Divine promises; (3) whereas death is the natural lot of those who receive "tithes," the death of Melchizedek is not recorded; (4) the Levites who received "tithes" virtually paid them through Abraham to Melchizedek
Kohath - From him sprang Moses and Aaron (1 Chronicles 6:2); but (See AMRAM their father is separated from the Amram, Kohath's son, by many omitted links in the Genealogy, for at the Exodus Kohath's posterity numbered 2,750 between 30 and 50 years old (Numbers 4:35-36), and the males young and old 8,600, divided into the Amramites, Izharites, Hebronites, and Uzzielites (Numbers 3:25-27, etc
Nebaioth - see), just as in the Genealogy of Genesis
Tamar - " (Isaiah 55:8) It is a very remarkable circumstance also, that in the Genealogy given by the Evangelist Matthew, under the inspiration of the Holy Ghost, of our Lord Jesus Christ, in the first chapter of his gospel, no mention is made of any women but of this Thamar, Matthew 1:3; of Rachab or Rahab the harlot, Matthew 1:5; Ruth the poor Moabitess, Matthew 1:5; and Bathsheba the wife of Uriah, Matthew 1:6
Melchisedec, Melchizedek - There is no mention of his progenitors, nor of any descendant: "without father, without mother, without Genealogy; having neither beginning of days nor end of life:" being thus a beautiful type of the Son of God, who has been called by God to be "a priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec
Cush - It will be seen by the Genealogy that the descendants of Cush were numerous:-...
CUSH...
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SEBA
Noah - In the Genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:36) he appears in the ninth generation after Adam, as in the OT narrative
Eleazar - Son of Eliud, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Noah - In the Genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:36) he appears in the ninth generation after Adam, as in the OT narrative
Chronicles, Books of the - This has been objected to on the ground of the Genealogy in 1 Chronicles 3:1-24 : it is contended that the number of generations after Zerubbabel in 1 Chronicles 3:19 is so large that the writer must have lived in the days of Alexander the Great, and therefore could not have been contemporary with Ezra. But there is a break in the Genealogy in the middle of 1 Chronicles 3:21 : "the sons of Hananiah; Pelatiah, and Jesaiah" closes one list; and what follows is a separate list, and may have run parallel with the other
Antediluvians - ...
The Bible tells of the antediluvians through narrative and Genealogy. ...
The Genealogy in Genesis 4:1 is framed by two accounts of violence—1) the murder of Abel by Cain and God's promise of seven-fold vengeance on anyone who harmed Cain ( Genesis 4:8-16 ), and Genesis 4:2 ) the war song of Lamech, threatening seventy-seven fold vengeance for any injury (Genesis 4:23-24 )
Naaman - grandson, of Benjamin (Genesis 46:21; Numbers 26:40; 1 Chronicles 8:4); reckoned in the Genesis Genealogy as a "son" because he became head of a distinct family, the Naamites
Descent - A generation a single degree in the scale of Genealogy distance from the common ancestor
Generation - tôlĕdhôth (from yâladh , ‘beget’ or ‘bear children’), which is used in the sense of ( a ) genealogies Genesis 5:1 , figuratively of the account of creation, Genesis 2:4 ; also ( b ) divisions of a tribe , as based on Genealogy; tôlĕdhôth occurs only in the Priestly Code, in Ruth 4:18 , and in 1 Chronicles 3:1-24
Scarlet - Genesis 38:30 (a) Since Pharez is found in the Genealogy of CHRIST, this thread may indicate that Zarah would need the blood to redeem him
Hananiah - This Hananiah is supposed to be the JOANNA of Luke 3:27 in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Urim And Thummim - On the return of the Jews from Babylon some, who claimed to be priests but could not show their Genealogy, were not allowed to eat of the holy things until there should stand up a priest with Urim and Thummim, and an answer be obtained from God
Elea'Zar - (Ezra 8:33 ) ...
The son of Eliud, in the Genealogy of Jesus Christ
Count - For "descent is counted" see Genealogy
Boaz - If the Rahab whom the Israelites saved at the time of Jericho’s destruction is the same Rahab whose name appears in the Genealogy of Jesus, then Boaz was descended from her (Ruth 4:1-645; Ruth 4:18-22; Matthew 1:1; Matthew 1:5)
Shimei, Shimeites - In the Genealogy of Asaph ( 1 Chronicles 6:42 ). The name occurs in the Genealogy of Mordecai ( Esther 2:5 Genealogy of the Lord Jesus - According to the distinctive character of Matthew in which Christ is emphatically the Messiah and Son of David, the Genealogy commences with Abraham; whereas in Luke, in which Christ is displayed as the Son of man, the list is traced up to "Adam who was the son of God. ...
There is more difficulty as to the Genealogy in Luke: is it the lineal line of Joseph or Mary? Women are never quoted as forming a line of succession, yet Christ is spoken of as the 'seed' of the woman, Genesis 3:15 ; 'come of woman,' Galatians 4:4 ; 'the seed of Abraham,' Hebrews 2:16 ; 'the seed of David according to flesh,' Romans 1:3 ; 2 Timothy 2:8 ; 'the offspring of David
Matthew, Saint - Matthew is usually symbolized as a winged man, probably beeause he begins his Gospel with the human Genealogy of Christ
Zerah - He finds a place in the Genealogy of our Lord ( Matthew 1:3 )
Harlot - She is listed in the Genealogy of Jesus (Matthew 1:5 )
Ruth - Matthew in the Genealogy of Christ
Book (2) - In Matthew 1:1 ‘The book of the generation of Jesus Christ’ means simply the record of, or writing about, the Genealogy of Jesus. Matthew meant it to be understood that the Genealogy formed a little roll by itself
Genealogy of Jesus Christ - It is at this point in the Genealogy, i. So a double Genealogy of Jair is given, one of the inheritance, the other of birth (1 Chronicles 2:4-5; 1 Chronicles 2:21-22; Numbers 32:41). ...
Thus the Genealogy of the inheritance (Matthew's) and that of natural descent (Luke's) would be primarily Joseph's, then Mary's also
Abijah - Wife of Hezron connected with Genealogy of Caleb in a text whose meaning is not clear (1 Chronicles 2:24 )
Mahalath - ) In Genesis 28:9, the narrative, she is called Mahalath; in Genesis 36:3-4; Genesis 36:10; Genesis 36:13; Genesis 36:17, the Edomite Genealogy, she is called Bashemath
Eliezer - Son of Jorim, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Boaz - In the Genealogy (Ruth 4:18-22) several, at least three, generations must be inserted, as the list there only allows ten generations for 850 years, and only four for the 450 years between Salmon and David
Rahab, Rachab - That such women as Rahab and Thamar should be mentioned in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus shows the divine origin of the list, for man would probably have omitted these names
Melchisedech - Scripture is silent about his lineage, about his birth and death; and in this sense he is "without father, without mother, without Genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life" (Hebrews 7)
Melchizedek - Scripture is silent about his lineage, about his birth and death; and in this sense he is "without father, without mother, without Genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life" (Hebrews 7)
Nathan - In Luke 3:31 the Genealogy of Jesus is traced through Nathan to David
Boaz - Both Gentiles, and yet brought into the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus Christ
Luke (2) - 21, 22; his Genealogy, vs
Nathan - Luke traces Christ's Genealogy to David through Nathan (2 Samuel 3:31); as Matthew gives the succession to the throne, so Luke the parentage of Joseph, Jeconiah's line having failed as he died childless. (See Genealogy
Becher - " The nonappearance of Becher in 1 Chronicles 8:1 and Numbers 26:38 may be due to the difference of the principle of the Genealogy and the failure of the lines of the older heads of houses, as compared with Genesis 46:21; 1 Chronicles 7:6
Lamech - The name apparently of two people in the antediluvian period, the one belonging to the Cainite and the other to the Sethite Genealogy
Harlot - But certain it is, that both, after the flesh, were in the Genealogy of the Lord of life and glory, how strange soever it appears to us
Jubilee - It served to maintain a degree of equality among the Hebrew families; to perpetuate the division of lands and households according to the original tribes, and secure a careful registry of the Genealogy of every family
Christ, Genealogy of - Not a few authors hold that Saint Luke gives Mary's Genealogy; but this view is more generally considered improbable, so that both lists are taken as giving Joseph's ancestry
Biblical Genealogies - For an example of omission of names see the Genealogy of Esdras in 1 Esdras 7, and 1Paralipomenon 6
Ephratah - The identification with Kiriath-jearim could be supported by the Genealogy in 1 Chronicles 2:1 which lists both personal and place names
Genealogies, Biblical - For an example of omission of names see the Genealogy of Esdras in 1 Esdras 7, and 1Paralipomenon 6
Genealogy of Christ - Not a few authors hold that Saint Luke gives Mary's Genealogy; but this view is more generally considered improbable, so that both lists are taken as giving Joseph's ancestry
Obadi'ah - (servant of the Lord ),
A man whose sons are enumerated in the Genealogy of the tribe of Judah
Gospels, the - " And the Genealogy goes no further than Abraham, whereas in Luke it ascends to Adam, agreeing with the scope of that gospel. In this gospel Jesus is presented as Son of man: as observed above, His Genealogy is traced to Adam. There is no Genealogy in John: in the beginning He was with God, and the world was made by Him
Degree - In Genealogy, a certain distance or remove in the line of descent, determining the proximity of blood as a relation in the third or fourth degree
Miraculous Conception - Luke has introduced into the Genealogy of Jesus, Luke 3:23 , and of which, otherwise, it is not possible to give a good account, ων , ως ενομιζετο , υιος ‘Ιωσηφ ; [1] and we can discover a peculiar significancy in an expression of the Apostle Paul, Galatians 4:4 , "God sent forth his Son, made of a woman
Jehoash - He is one of the three kings omitted by (Matthew 1:8 ) in the Genealogy of Christ, the other two being Ahaziah and Amaziah
Joseph - He was of the house and lineage of David, his Genealogy being given in Matthew 1 and perhaps in Luke 3 . Son of Mattathias; son of Juda; and son of Jonan — three in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Ebionites - Matthew, otherwise called the Gospel of the twelve apostles; but they corrupted their copy in abundance of places; and particularly had left out the Genealogy of our Saviour, which was preserved entire in that of the Nazarenes, and even in those used by the Cerinthians
Paganism - The first of these may well be called fabulous, as treating of the theology and Genealogy of their deities, in which they say such things as are unworthy of deity; ascribing to them thefts, murders, adulteries, and all manner of crimes; and therefore this kind of theology is condemned by the wiser sort of heathens as nugatory and scandalous: the writers of this sort of theology were Sancho-niatho, the Phoenician; and of the Grecians, Orpheus, Hesiod, Pherecyde, &c
Azariah - One mentioned in the Genealogy of Ezra
Simeon - Son of Juda, in the Genealogy of the Lord Jesus
Dan (1) - Dan's Genealogy is not given in 1 Chronicles 2-12. Dan, the headquarters of idolatry, may have caused the loss of the Genealogy
Adam in the nt - But further, the same Evangelist who relates the fact of the Virgin-birth, and records that Christ was, in His own proper Person, ‘Son of God’ ( Luke 1:35 ), claims, by the closing words of the Genealogy, that the first man, and hence every human being, is ‘son of God. ’ As Jesus is both human and Divine, so the Genealogy preserves the truth that all mankind partake of this twofold nature
Mark, Gospel by - we have no information as to their Genealogy, so here we have no human Genealogy of the Lord, as is given in Matthew and Luke
Genealogies of Jesus Christ - Matthew’s Genealogy. —The heading is translated in the Revised Version NT 1881, OT 1885 ‘The book of the generation (βίβλος γενέσεως) of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham’: in the margin the alternative rendering is given ‘the Genealogy of Jesus Christ. 258–266), argues with great force that the Genealogy is an integral part of St. Matthew’s Gospel, and that the compiler himself drew it up; but really his arguments apply only to the notes inserted in the Genealogy. ...
This examination compels us to conclude that the Genealogy is essentially and intentionally artificial; the word ‘begat’ (ἐγέννησεν) is not intended necessarily to imply physical birth, but merely marks the descent; the compiler was more interested in the throne-succession than the actual lineage, and used his material to illustrate and enforce his main proposition that Jesus Christ was the son of David and of Abraham, and he joined to the bare pedigree a sort of running commentary of notes. Luke’s Genealogy. Matthew’s Genealogy in the names Zerubbabel and Shealtiel has not been satisfactorily explained; it is, of course, open to any one to assume, without the possibility of either proof or refutation, that Jechoniah was actually childless, and adopted Shealtiel, a descendant of Nathan; but even so the further divergence in the descent from Zerubbabel remains as difficult as ever, for the pedigrees disagree with each other, and with the names given in 1 Chronicles 3:19 ff. ‘Genealogy of Jesus Christ
Genealogy - Genealogy . The genealogies of the OT fall into two classes, national and individual, though the two are sometimes combined, the Genealogy of the Individual passing into that of the nation. The gap between Adam and Noah is filled by a Genealogy of 10 generations ( Genesis 5:1-32 ), and in Genesis 10:1-32 the nations of the world, as known to the writer, are traced in a genealogical tree to Noah’s three sons. In the same way Josephus, in the opening chapter of his Life , sets out his Genealogy as vouched for by the public records, though only as far hack as his grandfather Simon
Japheth - If "younger son" in Genesis 9:24 is Canaan not Ham, the invariable order of the names represents also the order of their ages," Shem, Ham, and Japheth" Shem's Genealogy is put last, being traced from Genesis 10:21 onwards uninterruptedly as the line of Messiah
Nathan - He is in the Genealogy of Jesus Christ (Luke 3:31 )
Ruth - Tamar and Rahab are the other two similar instances in Christ's Genealogy (Genesis 38; Joshua 6:25; Matthew 1:3; Matthew 1:5). The close of Ruth shows it was written not earlier than David's having obtained that prominence as king which made his Genealogy a matter of such interest
Mark, Gospel According to - ...
The characteristics of this Gospel are, (1) the absence of the Genealogy of our Lord, (2) whom he represents as clothed with power, the "lion of the tribe of Judah
Rahab - In Matthew 1:5 Rahab is mentioned in the Genealogy of our Lord
Eli - Compare Eleazar's Genealogy, wherein Eli and Abiathar do not appear (1 Chronicles 6:4-15; Ezra 7:1-5)
Chronicles, the Books of - One Genealogy, indeed, of a later date, namely, Zerubbabel's, was doubtless added by a more recent hand (1 Chronicles 3:22-24) as was Nehemiah 12:10-11-22-23. At 1 Chronicles 9:35 begins Saul's Genealogy, taken from the tables drawn up in Hezekiah's reign (for 14 generations from Jonathan to Azel correspond to the 14 from David to Hezekiah); then the history of (mainly) Judah's kings follows, and of the events down to the end of the book of Ezra, which suit the patriotic purpose of the compiler. The high priests' Genealogy is given in the descending line ending with the captivity, in 1 Chronicles 6:1-15; in Ezra 7:1-5 in the ascending line from Ezra himself to Aaron, abridged by the omission of many links, as the writer had in Chronicles already given a complete register. ...
Messianic prophetic hints occur (1 Chronicles 17:17): "Thou hast regarded me according to the order (law) of the man from above"; and in the Genealogy (1 Chronicles 5:2), "Judah prevailed above his brethren, and of him came the chief ruler," referring to the Messianic prophecy (Genesis 49:8-10, compare 1 Chronicles 28:4)
Adam - From what source the Evangelist drew his Genealogy it is impossible to say. Genealogy of Jesus Christ. Luke closes his Genealogy with the significant words ‘the son of Adam, the son of God’ (τοῦ Ἀδάμ, τοῦ Θεοῦ). Thus the Genealogy, which might at first sight appear to be a useless addition to the Gospel narrative, possesses a lasting spiritual value
Adam - From what source the Evangelist drew his Genealogy it is impossible to say. Genealogy of Jesus Christ. Luke closes his Genealogy with the significant words ‘the son of Adam, the son of God’ (τοῦ Ἀδάμ, τοῦ Θεοῦ). Thus the Genealogy, which might at first sight appear to be a useless addition to the Gospel narrative, possesses a lasting spiritual value
Father - ...
B — 3: ἀπάτωρ (Strong's #540 — Noun Masculine — apator — ap-at'-ore ) "without father" (a, negative, and pater), signifies, in Hebrews 7:3 , with no recorded Genealogy
Hadad - ) "Hadad could hardly have been living after the times of the kings of Israel, to which period those who consider Genesis 36:31-48 an interpolation would assign the Genealogy" (Speaker's Commentary)
Bear - Other nouns built on the verb yalad include yaldah (“girl”; 3 times), yalid (“son” or “slave”; 3 times), yillod (“newborn”; 5 times), walad (“child”; once), ledah (“bringing forth” or “birth”; 4 times), moledet (“offspring, kindred, parentage”; 22 times), and toledot (“descendants, contemporaries, generation, Genealogy, record of the family”; 39 times)
Haggai - Haggai has no Genealogy. The reason for the missing Genealogy is not clear, but it may be that the author wanted to focus on what Haggai said
Gad - ’...
Upon the genetic relations of Gad and Asher the Genealogy throws no light, for the fact that Gad and Asher, as it appears, were names of related divinities of Good Fortune would be sufficient ground for uniting them; but why they should have been brought together under the name of Zilpah is not to be conjectured with any certainty. ...
It appears that Gad, notwithstanding the Genealogy, was a late tribe
Hebron - The second is listed in the Calebite Genealogy (1 Chronicles 2:42-43 )
Matthew, Gospel According to - ) ...
The book is fitly divided into these four parts: ...
Containing the Genealogy, the birth, and the infancy of Jesus (1; 2)
Salmon - —A link in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:4 f
Adam And Eve - Jesus' Genealogy is traced back to Adam (Luke 3:38 )
Gershon, Gershonites - They were subdivided into two groups, the Libnites and the Shimeites ( Numbers 3:21 ; Numbers 26:58 ), each being traced to a ‘son’ of Gershon ( Exodus 6:17 , Numbers 3:18 , 1Ch 6:17 ; 1 Chronicles 6:20 [2])
Martyrology - The martyrology of Ado, monk of Ferriers, in the diocese of Treves, afterwards archbishop of Vienne, is a descendant of the Roman, if we may so call it; for Du Sollier gives its Genealogy thus:...
The martyrology of St
Joseph - His Genealogy is traced in Matthew 1:1-15 , to David, Judah, and Abraham
Genesis, Theology of - Genesis has the following structure:...
Prologue...
Primeval History...
1:1-11:26...
Transition...
Genealogy...
11:27-32...
Threat...
The Abraham Cycle...
12:1-25:11...
Transition...
Genealogy...
24:12-18...
Threat...
The Jacob Cycle...
25:19-35:22b...
Transition...
Genealogy...
35:22c-36:40...
Threat...
The Joseph Cycle...
37:1-46:7...
Transition...
Genealogy...
46:8-27...
Resolution...
Settlement in Egypt...
46:28-50:26...
The "Primeval History" (Genesis 1:1-11:26 ) sets the stage for the whole of the book
Mark, Gospel of - (3) One peculiarity strikes us the moment we open it, --the absence of any Genealogy of our Lord
Johanan - Keil objects to this, and there is probably some omission of names in the Genealogy (compare 1 Kings 4:2)
Virgin Birth - ...
The Genealogy in Matthew 1 in anything like its present form can hardly have formed part of such a document. ) On the other hand, the Genealogy in the Third Gospel (Luke 3:23-38) has a greater appearance of independence, and may have been incorporated by the Evangelist from a written source (cf. It is certainly significant that the Prologue to the Fourth Gospel, Which occupies a similar place to that of the Genealogy in the First Gospel, traces the origin of the Logos, which became incarnate in Christ, to the inner life of God. ...
Again, the Lukan Genealogy, far from discrediting, seems to the present writer to offer a positive argument for the authenticity of the suspected verses. Luke 3:38 thus supports the genuineness of Luke 1:35 (υἱὸς θεοῦ), and the whole Genealogy, viewed in the light of its edifying purpose, guarantees the original character of the alleged interpolation. ...
The fact that υἱὸς θεοῦ in the Genealogy involves the occurrence of υἱός in the physical sense of origin exactly as in Luke 1:35, has an important bearing on the objection noted above, viz
Hezekiah - ...
The Gospel of Matthew lists Hezekiah in the Genealogy of Jesus (Matthew 1:9-10 )
Caleb - This Genealogy (1 Chronicles 2), drawn up in Hezekiah's reign, alone mentions the supposed elder Caleb
Uriah - He is not named in the sacerdotal Genealogy, 1 Chronicles 6:4-15; where a gap occurs between Amariah (1 Chronicles 6:11) and Shallum, father of Hilkiah (1 Chronicles 6:13)
Ruth - A coda (Ruth 4:18-22 ) ties up the story with a family Genealogy
Matthew, the Gospel According to - The Genealogy was necessary in a Gospel for Jews, to show that Jesus' claim to Messiahship accorded with His descent through king David from Abraham, to both of whom the promise of Messiah was given; while its insertion is proof of early date. ...
Christ's Genealogy from Abraham to Joseph through the male line; the succession to the throne, from Abraham through king David to Joseph, 42 generations, with omissions. (See Genealogy. Introduction; Christ's Genealogy, birth; visit of the wise men; flight to Egypt; return to Nazareth; John the Baptist's preparatory ministry; Christ's baptism and consecration to His office by the Holy Spirit, with the Father's declared approval (Matthew 1-3)
Tribes of Israel - ]'>[2] ’s Genealogy (Genesis 29:1-35 ; Genesis 30:1-43 ), is not 12 but 13, and in the following order:...
Leah tribes Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah 4 Bilhah (Rachel) tribes Dan, Naphtali 2 Zilpah (Leah) tribes Gad, Asher 2 Leah tribes Issachar, Zebulun 2 Rachel tribes Joseph = (Manasseh, Ephraim) 2 Benjamin (born in Palestine), Genesis 35:18 1 13 To obtain the number 12 from this scheme it is necessary to omit Levi, or to count Manasseh and Ephraim as one
Prostitution - Rahab, who helped the Israelite spies at Jericho, was a harlot (Joshua 2:1 ; 6:17,22 , 25 ); she figures in the Genealogy of David and Jesus (Matthew 1:5 )
Amalekites - ) The descent of the Amalekites from Amalek, Esau's grandson, is favored also by the consideration that otherwise a people so conspicuous in Israel's history would be without specification of Genealogy, contrary to the analogy of the other nations connected with Israel in the Pentateuch
Generation - This word derived from the same root is much the same as the preceding word Genealogy
Mary - The Genealogy of the Savior through her, in the line of David and Abraham, is preserved in Luke 3:1-38 , to prove that he was born "as concerning the flesh" according to ancient prophecies
Jesus Christ - Respecting his ancestors, see Genealogy
Genesis, the Book of - ...
Philology and ethnology remarkably confirm the oldest extant Genealogy of races in Genesis 10. After the introduction, Genesis consists of successive genealogical histories (toledot ) (See Genealogy)
Joseph - ...
Two Josephs are mentioned in the Genealogy of Jesus (Luke 3:24 ,Luke 3:24,3:30 )
Naphtali - None of these clan-names given here, except Guni, appears again outside of the Genealogy repeated in 1 Chronicles 7:13
Genealogies - ‘Lastly, it becomes a fantastic heresy inside the Church, and sinks into profane frivolity, “Pretended revelations are given as to the names and Genealogy of angels; absurd ascetic rules are laid down as ‘counsels of perfection,’ while daring immorality defaces the actual life” ’ (Plummer, The Pastoral Epp
Age - ...
A — 2: γενεά (Strong's #1074 — Noun Feminine — genea — ghen-eh-ah' ) connected with ginomai, "to become," primarily signifies "a begetting, or birth;" hence, that which has been begotten, a family; or successive members of a Genealogy, Matthew 1:17 , or of a race of people, possessed of similar characteristics, pursuits, etc
Abraham - It is otherwise in the Genealogy of St. Here the historian records no halting-places in his Genealogy, but carries it back in an uninterrupted chain, of which the patriarch Abraham forms but one link (Luke 3:34), to its ultimate source in God
Abraham - It is otherwise in the Genealogy of St. Here the historian records no halting-places in his Genealogy, but carries it back in an uninterrupted chain, of which the patriarch Abraham forms but one link (Luke 3:34), to its ultimate source in God
Melchizedek - He explains Melchizedek’s name to mean ‘king of righteousness,’ and his title of ‘king of Salem’ to mean ‘king of peace’; and then, arguing from the silence of the record respecting his parentage, birth, and death, describes him as ‘without father, without mother, without Genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life, but made like unto the Son of God,’ and affirms him to have been greater than Abraham, since he blessed him (‘for without any dispute the less is blessed of the better’) and received from him (and through him from his unborn descendants the Levitical priests) a tithe of his spoils ( Hebrews 7:1-16 )
Esther, Theology of - ) Likewise, the mention of Kish (the father of Saul) at the end of Mordecai's Genealogy (2:5) shows that he was descended from the mortal enemy of the Agagites
Mary - ...
In the Genealogy of 1:1-17 there are no less than four women (Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba), all of whom have irregular marital unions
Jesus Christ - Matthew 1:1 established by His Genealogy that Jesus is related to David, is related to Moses, is related to Abraham—one cannot be more integrally related to Israel than that. Luke 3:1 established by His Genealogy that Jesus is vitally related to all humans
Adoption - So Mary, being daughter of Heli, and Joseph her husband being adopted by him on marrying his daughter, an heiress (as appears from her going to Bethlehem to be registered in her pregnancy), Joseph is called in Luke's Genealogy son of Heli
Rahab (1) - ...
Her faith was richly rewarded, she becoming mother of Boaz (Ruth 4:21), an ancestress of Messiah; one of the four women, all foreigners, Thamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Bathsheba, named in Matthew's Genealogy (Matthew 1:5)
Hebrews - Some of them are names of places near the upper reaches of the Euphrates and the Tigris, and the whole Genealogy may be regarded rather as a geographical account of the wanderings of the Hebrews than as a statement of racial affinities
Shem - Scripture in Shem's Genealogy notices four out of the five: Asshur for the Assyrian, Aram for the Syrian or Aramaean, Eber for the Hebrew, and Joktan for the pure Arabic
Mary, the Virgin - (See Genealogy OF JESUS CHRIST. Thus the Genealogy of the inheritance or succession to David's throne (Matthew's) and that of natural descent (Luke's) would be primarily Joseph's, then Mary's also (Psalms 132:11; Luke 1:32; Romans 1:3)
Edom - ” Certain of the tribal groups which ranged this wilderness area south of Judah are listed in the Edomite Genealogy of Genesis 36:1
Syria - The Genealogy given in this passage has been confirmed by a stele, found near Aleppo, dedicated to the god Melqart by Ben-hadad
Nehemiah, Book of - Notice how the priestly Genealogy is carried far down below Nehemiah’s time, as far, in fact, as the reign of Darius the Persian ( Nehemiah 12:22 ), i
Haggai, Theology of - Both Jeconiah—another name for Jehoiachinand Zerubbabel are included in Christ's Genealogy in Matthew 1:12
Ezra - The Genealogy may only intend to assert that Ezra belonged to the high-priestly family (cf
Zephaniah, Theology of - The book perhaps also underscores Zephaniah's piety by showing his Genealogy of four generations going back to Hezekiah (1:1), another godly king of Judah, who was also an ancestor of Josiah
Jericho - ...
The Lord Himself, in whose Genealogy Rahab the harlot is found, here was guest of Zacchaeus the publican, a lucrative office in so rich a city as the Roman Jericho was
Victor, Bishop of Capua - ), in which Victor touches on the difficulties in the Genealogy in St
Reuben - ...
It is worth noticing in this connexion that two of the descendants of Reuben given in the Genealogy of Reuben (Genesis 46:9 etc
Mary - Her Genealogy is given in Luke 3
Cosmopolitanism - Matthew is the narrator of the visit of Wise Men from the East (Matthew 2:1); and if he traces the Genealogy of Christ to Abraham (Matthew 1:2) St
Ammon, Ammonites - The Genealogy which traces their descent from Lot probably signifies that they settled in the land of Lot, or Lotan, called by the Egyptians Ruten, which lay to the east of the Dead Sea and the Jordan
Luke, Gospel of - It includes the preparatory preaching of John the Baptist (3:1-20), the baptism of Jesus (3:21-22), Jesus’ Genealogy (3:23-38) and the devil’s temptation of Jesus in the wilderness (4:1-13)
Nehemiah - " Next he found a register of the Genealogy of those who first returned from Babylon, 42,360, and took the census; see Ezra 2, which is drawn from the same document. ...
Then the heads of the courses of priests, and the corresponding names at the time of the return from Babylon, with a few particulars of the priests' and Levites' Genealogy (Nehemiah 5:19)
Mary, the Virgin - give, not her Genealogy, but Joseph’s. ‘Genealogy of Jesus Christ’ in Smith’s DB Matthew, Gospel of - ...
Summary of contents...
The opening section of Matthew begins with a Genealogy of Jesus (1:1-17), the story of his birth (1:18-25), the escape from Herod (2:1-18) and the subsequent move to Nazareth (2:19-23)
Cain (1) - "It shall come to pass that every one that findeth me shall slay me," words implying that the human race had even then multiplied since Adam's expulsion from Eden, a fact also appearing from Cain having a wife, doubtless one of Adam's descendants; the sacred historian only giving one or two prominent links of the Genealogy, not the sons, much less the daughters, all in full
Sheba - The language and script of Abyssinia, for instance, prove that a Sabæan colony was established there; hence the Genealogy in Genesis 10:7
Matthew, Gospel by - The Genealogy here starts with Abraham, in contrast with that in Luke, which goes back to Adam because in that gospel the Lord is viewed as connected with man, i
Gods - Hesiod has a poem under the title of Θεογονια , that is "The Generation of the Gods," in which he explains their Genealogy and descent, sets forth who was the first and principal, who next descended from him, and what issue each had: the whole making a sort of system of Heathen theology
Luke, Gospel According to - 177), who refers to the Genealogy of Jesus from Adam; the Clementine Homities (2nd cent. on the Baptist and on the Temptation, and also the Genealogy, the miraculous draught of fishes, the anointing by the sinful woman, and some sayings (especially those at Nazareth) peculiar to himself
Priest - "...
The Genealogy, Luke 3, includes many elsewhere priests: Levi, Eliezer, Malchi, Jochanan, Mattathias, Heli (compare Zechariah 12:12). As the priestly succession depended on the sureness of the Genealogy, these genealogies were jealously preserved and referred to in disputed cases (Ezra 2:62; Nehemiah 7:64); the mothers as well as the fathers were named
Chronology of the Old Testament - In the Genealogy of the sons of Adam, for example (Genesis 5:1-32 ), we read how Adam was 130 years old when he begat Seth, Seth 105 years old when he begat Enosh, and so on down to the six hundredth year of Noah’s life, in which the Flood came
Joseph (2) - Joseph son of Mattathias and Joseph son of Jonam are both named in the Genealogy of Jesus given in Lk
Believe - These were reckoned by their Genealogy in their villages, whom David and Samuel the seer did ordain in their set Divorce - Rahab, Ruth, and Christ's Genealogy in Matthew 1:5 )
Ascension of Jesus Christ - Melchizedek blessed Abraham, was king of righteousness and peace, and was without father, mother, Genealogy, beginning of days or end of life (7:1-3)
Elijah - ...
Elijah appeared on the scene without warning, introduction, or Genealogy (1 Kings 17:1 ) to deliver an oracle to Ahab announcing a drought, presumably a punishment for defection to the Baal cult
Sermon on the Mount - His penchant for order is evident in the division of the Genealogy into three parts each with fourteen persons (1:2-17), the five discourses, and the division of the Gospel into two parts (4:17; 16:21); this indicates that he is arranging and editing preexisting material spoken by Jesus on more than one occasion, a suggestion put forth by Calvin and supported recently by Joachim Jeremias
Benjamin - The Genealogy of Kish and Saul, traced to a late date, brings us down to a Kish, father of Mordecai, the savior of the Jewish nation from Haman's intended destruction (Esther 2:5)
Mark, the Gospel According to - Mark's explanations of Jewish customs and names (Jordan is called a "river"; the Pharisees' fasting and customs, Mark 1:5; Mark 2:18; Mark 7:1-4; the Sadducees' tenets, Mark 12:18; the Passover described, Mark 14:1; Mark 14:12) which Jews would not need, and the absence of appeals by himself to Old Testament prophecy, also of the Genealogy and of the term nomos , the Mosaic "law," show he wrote for Gentiles not for Jews
Work - The Cainite Genealogy concludes with the dark portrait of Lamech singing his "song of the sword" (Genesis 4:23-24 ). ...
At the same time, the Sethite Genealogy (chap
Timothy, Epistles to - But, as Philo and others use the word ‘genealogy’ of the primitive history of the Pentateuch, it is now generally allowed that the reference is not to Gnostic speculations but to the legendary history of the Jewish patriarchs
Levites - The Genealogy (Genesis 46:11) goes no further down than Levi's three sons; these too are named in their order of birth, not giving Kohath the prominence which his family had subsequently, He has four clans in Exodus 6:16-25, Gershon and Merari but two each
Mark, the Gospel of - Mark's Gentile audience may explain his omission of the Genealogy of Jesus
James - Matthew’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:16 where the form is Ἰακώβ), we have—
the Man Who Took a Rain of Mustard Seed And Sowed it in His Field - There is a genesis and a Genealogy of things far more joyful to dwell on than that
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - Only when this brief biographical sketch was complete did Luke append His Genealogy (Luke 3:23-38 ), which confirms in passing Jesus' Davidic ancestry (Luke 3:31 ; compare Luke 1:32-33 ), while emphasizing above all His solidarity with the entire human race in its descent from “Adam, which was the son of God” (Luke 3:38 )
Luke, the Gospel According to - the parable of the prodigal son, the tracing of Christ's Genealogy up to Adam the common parent of Jew and Gentile, not only to Abraham, as Matthew
Tongues, Confusion of - The ethnological character of the Genealogy (Genesis 10) appears in such gentilie forms as Ludim, Jebusite, and geographical and local names as Mizraim, Sidon; as also from the formula "after their families, after their tongues, in their countries, and in their nations" (Genesis 10:5; Genesis 10:20; Genesis 10:31)
Gods And Goddesses, Pagan - The name appears especially in the Edomite Genealogy of Genesis 36 and in the history of the two Israelite kingdoms to the downfall of the northern kingdom in 722 b
Jordanis, Historian of the Goths - He carries the Genealogy of the Amali down to Mathasuentha, the granddaughter of Theodoric and widow of Vitigis, who had just married, as he tells us, Germanus brother of Justinian
Matthew, the Gospel of - ...
Matthew 1:1-4:25 opens the Gospel with the royal Genealogy and builds to the proclamation of God in Matthew 3:17 : “This is my beloved Son
Old Testament in the New Testament, the - Matthew begins with an Old Testament Genealogy that makes sense only to those who are familiar with the people and events to which it refers (1:1-17)
Sermon on the Mount - The Genealogy consists of a triad of fourteens (Matthew 1:1-16)
Saul - The names Kish and Ner, Nadab and Abi-nadab, Baal and Mephibosheth, recur in the Genealogy in two generations
Matthew, Theology of - Such is the implication of Matthew's Genealogy (Matthew 1:1-17 )
Gentiles - The native chiefs of Canaan treat Abraham with respect; the Pharaoh who makes Joseph lord of his house calls him ‘a man in whom the spirit of God is’; the daughter of the Pharaoh of the oppression is moved with compassion at the sight of the child Moses, and brings him up as her son; Jethro receives Moses when an exile into his family, guides him in the desert, and instructs him in the art of governing; Rahab and Ruth ‘take refuge under the wings of the God of Israel,’ and their names are in the regal Genealogy; Ittai the Gittite cleaves to David, when almost all have forsaken him; the Queen of Sheba comes to hear the wisdom of Solomon; the Tyrian Hiram supplies him with materials when building the Temple, having been ‘ever a lover of David’; the widow of Zarephath, nearly destitute herself, feeds the famishing Elijah; and Naaman, the Syrian general, confesses his faith in the God of Elisha as the one true God; Ebed-melech, an Ethiopian slave, rescues Jeremiah from death, and is rewarded with a promise of personal immunity from danger; Job, an Arabian shaikh, is the lofty teacher of how ‘to suffer and be strong’; Cyrus the Persian Is the Lord’s anointed, and the deliverer of His people
Hebrews, Epistle to the - The fact is noted that nothing is said of his father, mother, or Genealogy; nothing of his birth or death; he is said to be assimilated to the Son of God, and abides a priest continually
Timothy, First And Second, Theology of - " He "appeared in a body" (1 Timothy 3:16 ) and "descended from David" with a human Genealogy (2 Timothy 2:8 )
Jacob - In the Genealogy those named are the heads of tribes and of famiLies
Bethlehem - With David, the great-grandson of Ruth, there entered the royal element into the Genealogy of Jesus; and Bethlehem has no associations more sacred and tender than its associations with the shepherd king of Israel, unless it be those that link it for ever with God manifest in the flesh
Isidorus Pelusiota, an Eminent Ascetic - He considers that the Genealogy traced through Joseph proves that Mary also sprang from David (i
Old Testament - The truest OT type of Christ was Melchizedek, coming, as He did, from the heavenly sphere, ‘without father, without mother, without Genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life,’ to bear immediate witness to the Divine (Hebrews 7:1 ff
Gnosticism - The view was that from God there emanated a series of beings called ‘aeons,’ each step in the Genealogy meaning a diminution of purity; and the Demiurge was the creation of an aeon far down, indeed the very lowest in the scale
Son of God - ’ (2) The term is applied to the first man, when, in Luke 3, the Genealogy of the Saviour is traced back to Adam, ‘who,’ it is added (Luke 3:38), ‘was the son of God
Psalms - The decalogue has its form determined by number; also the Genealogy in Matthew; so the Lord's prayer, and especially the structure of the Apocalypse
Annunciation, the - Joseph’s Genealogy is given by way of preface
Elijah - In contrast to the detailed Genealogy of Samuel, Elisha, and other prophets, Elijah abruptly appears, like Melchizedek in the patriarchal dispensation, without father or mother named, his exact locality unknown; in order that attention should be wholly fixed on his errand from heaven to overthrow Baal and Asherah (the licentious Venus) worship in Israel
Bible - It may be added, that, in the first book of Chronicles, the Genealogy of the sons of Zerubbabel is carried down for so many generations as must necessarily bring it to the time of Alexander; and consequently this book, or at least this part of it, could not be in the canon in Ezra's days
Gospels, Apocryphal - Epiphanius, Jerome’s contemporary, describes it as beginning with an account of John the Baptist, and commencing without any Genealogy or sections dealing with the infancy of Christ
Joram - —Son of Jehoshaphat, named in our Lord’s Genealogy (Matthew 1:6)
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - On the other hand, the writer of the Fourth Gospel omits the Genealogy and the birth from a virgin, because it could be of no interest to him to prove that Jesus (or rather Joseph) was descended from king David, and the Incarnation of the Logos is a far grander conception than a miraculous birth by the operation of the Holy Ghost; he omits the Baptism of Jesus, of which notwithstanding he shows knowledge, because, again, the true Baptism is the Incarnation of the Logos in Jesus, and also partly, perhaps, because he is anxious to discountenance the Adoptionist views of the Person of Christ which were prevalent at the time when he wrote; he omits the Temptation, because it is no part of his plan to exhibit Jesus as experiencing any temptation or weakness; he omits the Transfiguration, because in his view the whole life of Christ on earth is a manifestation of His glory, not by visible light but to the spiritual eye; he omits the institution of the Eucharist, because he has already given his sacramental doctrine in his discourse about the Bread of Life (John 6:26 ff