What does Galilee mean in the Bible?

Greek / Hebrew Translation Occurance
γαλιλαίας the name of a region of northern Palestine 36
γαλιλαίαν the name of a region of northern Palestine 17
γαλιλαίᾳ the name of a region of northern Palestine 6
בַּגָּלִיל֙ a territory in Naphtali largely occupied by heathen; a circuit of towns around Kedesh-Naphtali 2
γαλιλαία the name of a region of northern Palestine 1
הַגָּלִֽיל a territory in Naphtali largely occupied by heathen; a circuit of towns around Kedesh-Naphtali 1
הַגָּלִ֔ילָה a territory in Naphtali largely occupied by heathen; a circuit of towns around Kedesh-Naphtali 1
גְּלִ֖יל a territory in Naphtali largely occupied by heathen; a circuit of towns around Kedesh-Naphtali 1
בַּגָּלִ֤יל a territory in Naphtali largely occupied by heathen; a circuit of towns around Kedesh-Naphtali 1

Definitions Related to Galilee

G1056


   1 the name of a region of northern Palestine, bounded on the north by Syria, on the west by Sidon, Tyre, Ptolemais and their territories and the promontory of Carmel, on the south by Samaria and on the east by the Jordan.
   It was divided into Upper Galilee and Lower Galilee.
   Additional Information: Galilee = “Circuit”.
   

H1551


   1 a territory in Naphtali largely occupied by heathen; a circuit of towns around Kedesh-Naphtali, in which were situated the 20 towns given by Solomon to Hiram king of Tyre as payment for his work in conveying timber from Lebanon to Jerusalem.
   Additional Information: Galilee = “circuit, district”.
   

Frequency of Galilee (original languages)

Frequency of Galilee (English)

Dictionary

Easton's Bible Dictionary - Galilee, Sea of
(Matthew 4:18 ; 15:29 ), is mentioned in the Bible under three other names.
In the Old Testament it is called the "sea of Chinnereth" (Numbers 34:11 ; Joshua 12:3 ; 13:27 ), as is supposed from its harp-like shape. (2). The "lake of Gennesareth" once by (Luke 5:1 ), from the flat district lying on its west coast.
(John 6:1 ; 21:1 ) calls it the "sea of Tiberias" (q.v.). The modern Arabs retain this name, Bahr Tabariyeh. This lake Isaiah 12 1/2 miles long, and from 4 to 7 1/2 broad. Its surface Isaiah 682 feet below the level of the Mediterranean. Its depth is from 80 to 160 feet. The Jordan enters it 10 1/2 miles below the southern extremity of the Huleh Lake, or about 26 1/2 miles from its source. In this distance of 26 1/2 miles there is a fall in the river of 1,682 feet, or of more than 60 feet to the mile. It Isaiah 27 miles east of the Mediterranean, and about 60 miles north-east of Jerusalem. It is of an oval shape, and abounds in fish.
Its present appearance is thus described: "The utter loneliness and absolute stillness of the scene are exceedingly impressive. It seems as if all nature had gone to rest, languishing under the scorching heat. How different it was in the days of our Lord! Then all was life and bustle along the shores; the cities and villages that thickly studded them resounded with the hum of a busy population; while from hill-side and corn-field came the cheerful cry of shepherd and ploughman. The lake, too, was dotted with dark fishing-boats and spangled with white sails. Now a mournful, solitary silence reigns over sea and shore. The cities are in ruins!"
This sea is chiefly of interest as associated with the public ministry of our Lord. Capernaum, "his own city" ( Matthew 9:1 ), stood on its shores. From among the fishermen who plied their calling on its waters he chose Peter and his brother Andrew, and James and John, to be disciples, and sent them forth to be "fishers of men" (Matthew 4:18,22 ; Mark 1:16-20 ; Luke 5 :: 1-11 ). He stilled its tempest, saying to the storm that swept over it, "Peace, be still" (Matthew 8:23-27 ; Mark 7:31-35 ); and here also he showed himself after his resurrection to his disciples (John 21 ).
"The Sea of Galilee is indeed the cradle of the gospel. The subterranean fires of nature prepared a lake basin, through which a river afterwards ran, keeping its waters always fresh. In this basin a vast quantity of shell-fish swarmed, and multiplied to such an extent that they formed the food of an extraordinary profusion of fish. The great variety and abundance of the fish in the lake attracted to its shores a larger and more varied population than existed elsewhere in Palestine, whereby this secluded district was brought into contact with all parts of the world. And this large and varied population, with access to all nations and countries, attracted the Lord Jesus, and induced him to make this spot the centre of his public ministry."
Easton's Bible Dictionary - Galilee
Circuit. Solomon rewarded Hiram for certain services rendered him by the gift of an upland plain among the mountains of Naphtali. Hiram was dissatisfied with the gift, and called it "the land of Cabul" (q.v.). The Jews called it Galil. It continued long to be occupied by the original inhabitants, and hence came to be called "Galilee of the Gentiles" (Matthew 4:15 ), and also "Upper Galilee," to distinguish it from the extensive addition afterwards made to it toward the south, which was usually called "Lower Galilee." In the time of our Lord, Galilee embraced more than one-third of Western Palestine, extending "from Dan on the north, at the base of Mount Hermon, to the ridges of Carmel and Gilboa on the south, and from the Jordan valley on the east away across the splendid plains of Jezreel and Acre to the shores of the Mediterranean on the west." Palestine was divided into three provinces, Judea, Samaria, and Galilee, which comprehended the whole northern section of the country (Acts 9:31 ), and was the largest of the three. It was the scene of some of the most memorable events of Jewish history. Galilee also was the home of our Lord during at least thirty years of his life. The first three Gospels are chiefly taken up with our Lord's public ministry in this province. "The entire province is encircled with a halo of holy associations connected with the life, works, and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth." "It is noteworthy that of his thirty-two beautiful parables, no less than ninteen were spoken in Galilee. And it is no less remarkable that of his entire thirty-three great miracles, twenty-five were wrought in this province. His first miracle was wrought at the wedding in Cana of Galilee, and his last, after his resurrection, on the shore of Galilee's sea. In Galilee our Lord delivered the Sermon on The Mount, and the discourses on 'The Bread of Life,' on 'Purity,' on 'Forgiveness,' and on 'Humility.' In Galilee he called his first disciples; and there occurred the sublime scene of the Transfiguration" (Porter's Through Samaria).
When the Sanhedrin were about to proceed with some plan for the condemnation of our Lord (John 7:45-52 ), Nicodemus interposed in his behalf. (Compare Deuteronomy 1:16,17 ; 17:8 .) They replied, "Art thou also of Galilee?.... Out of Galilee ariseth no prophet." This saying of theirs was "not historically true, for two prophets at least had arisen from Galilee, Jonah of Gath-hepher, and the greatest of all the prophets, Elijah of Thisbe, and perhaps also Nahum and Hosea. Their contempt for Galilee made them lose sight of historical accuracy" (Alford, Com.).
The Galilean accent differed from that of Jerusalem in being broader and more guttural (Mark 14:70 ).
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Sea of Galilee
The Sea of Galilee is a freshwater lake in northern Palestine. It is approximately twenty kilometres long, twelve kilometres wide, and about two hundred metres below sea level. In Bible times it was known also as the Sea of Chinnereth (Numbers 34:11), the Lake of Gennesaret (Luke 5:1) and the Sea of Tiberias (John 6:1; John 6:16-25; John 21:1). (For details see PALESTINE, sub-heading ‘Upper Jordan and Sea of Galilee’.)
Holman Bible Dictionary - Galilee, Sea of
(Gal' ih lee) Place name meaning, “circle.” A freshwater lake nestled in the hills of northern Palestine. Its surface is nearly 700 feet below the level of the Mediterranean, some thirty miles to the west. The nearby hills of Galilee reach an altitude of 1,500 feet above sea level. To the east are the mountains of Gilead with peaks of more than 3,300 feet. To the north are the snow-covered Lebanon mountains. Fed chiefly by the Jordan River, which originates in the foothills of the Lebanon Mountains, the sea of Galilee is thirteen miles long north and south and eight miles wide at its greatest east-west distance. Because of its location, it is subject to sudden and violent storms which are usually of short duration.
In the Old Testament this sea is called Chinnereth. See Matthew 5:1 ); the Jewish historian Josephus always called it by that name, and so did the author of First Maccabees. Once John called it the “sea of Tiberias” (Matthew 6:1 ).
In the first century the sea of Galilee was of major commercial significance. Most Galilean roads passed by it, and much travel to and from the east crossed the Jordan rift there. Fish was a major food in the area, and the fishing industry flourished because there was no other significant freshwater lake in the region. Capernaum, which played a major role in the ministry of Jesus, was a center of that industry. The other lake towns of importance were Bethsaida, which means “the fishing place”, and Tiberias, a Gentile city constructed by Herod Antipas when Jesus was a young man.
Roger Crook
Holman Bible Dictionary - Galilee
(gal' ih lee) Place name meaning, “circle” or “region.” The northern part of Palestine above the hill country of Ephraim and the hill country of Judah (Joshua 20:7 ). The Septuagint or early Greek translation referred to a king of the nations of Galilee in Joshua 12:23 , though the Hebrew reads, “Gilgal.” Many scholars see the Greek as original (NRSV, REB). This would indicate a leader of a coalition of city-states whom Joshua defeated. Kedesh in Galilee was a city of refuge (Joshua 20:7 ) and a city for the Levites (Joshua 21:32 ). Solomon paid Hiram of Tyre twenty cities of Galilee for the building materials Hiram supplied for the Temple and royal palace (1 Kings 9:11 ), but the cities did not please Hiram, who called them Cabul, meaning, “like nothing” (1 Kings 9:12-13 ). Apparently, Galilee and Tyre bordered on each other. The cities may have been border villages whose ownership the two kings disputed. The Assyrians took the north under Tiglath-pileser in 733 (2 Kings 15:29 ) and divided it into three districts—the western coast or “the way of the sea” with capital at Dor, Galilee with capital at Megiddo, and beyond Jordan or Gilead (Isaiah 9:1 ).
The term “Galilee” apparently was used prior to Israel's conquest, being mentioned in Egyptian records. It was used in Israel but not as a political designation. The tribes of Naphtali, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, and Dan occupied the territory which covered approximately the forty-five-mile stretch between the Litani River in Lebanon and the Valley of Jezreel in Israel north to south and from the Mediterranean Sea to the Jordan River west to east.
In the time of Jesus' Galilee, Herod Antipas governed Galilee and Perea. Jesus devoted most of His earthly ministry to Galilee, being known as the Galilean (Matthew 26:69 ). After the fall of Jerusalem in A.D. 70, Galilee became the major center of Judaism, the Mishnah and Talmud being collected and written there.
Hitchcock's Bible Names - Galilee
Wheel; revolution
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Sea of Galilee
SEA OF GALILEE
i. Names.—The OT name Chinnereth had disappeared, so far as our purpose is concerned, by the time of the Maccabees, and in its place we find a variety of designations. It is then that the familiar name Gennesaret first makes its appearance in the τὸ ὕδωρ Γεννησάρ of 1 Maccabees 11:67. Josephus uses the forms λίμνη Γεννησάρ (BJ iii. x. 1), ὕδατα Γεννήσαρα (Ant. xiii. v. 7), λίμνη Γεννησαρῖτις (Ant. xviii. ii. 1; Vita, 65); Pliny has Gennesara (HN v. 15). In the Targums and other Jewish writings the name of the Sea appears as גְּנֵיסָר or גִּנּוֹסָר, these forms supplementing the Heb. Chinnereth. But though the word Gennesaret was so familiar to contemporary writers, it appears only once in the NT as applied to the Lake, in the ἡ λίμνη Γεννησαρέτ of Luke 5:1. Following close upon this, however, ἡ λίμνη occurs alone in Luke 5:2; Luke 8:22-23; Luke 8:33. The most popular name in the NT is ‘the Sea of Galilee’ (ἡ θάλασσα τῆς Γαλιλαίας), which occurs five times (Matthew 4:18; Matthew 15:29, Mark 1:16; Mark 7:31, John 6:1). The word ‘Sea’ (θάλασσα) stands alone in John 6:17-25, and the form ‘Sea of Tiberias’ (θάλασσα τῆς Τιβεριάδος) occurs in John 6:1; John 21:1. The modern designation, ‘Lake of Tiberias,’ does not occur in the NT. It is found for the first time as λίμνη Τιβερίς in Pausanias (John 21:7).
Many explanations have been offered of the origin of the word Gennesaret. Lightfoot (and others) sought to derive it from the OT Chinnereth, which it was supposed to replace. Such an origin, however, seems very improbable, not only on philological grounds, but because the latter name also remains simply transliterated in the LXX Septuagint as χενέρεθ, and was thus quite familiar to the Hellenistic world. Ritter (Geog. of Pal.) suggests that it is derived from נַּן אוֹצָר or נַּן עשֶׁר ‘garden of treasure,’ which term, of course, he refers to the Plain, deriving thence the name of the adjoining Sea. This process is quite natural, and probably correct, but still we may be permitted to doubt his derivation of the name. G. A. Smith (HGHL [1] 443 n. [2] ) has also noted that the form points to some compound of נַּן ‘garden,’ or נַּי valley; and to us this seems indisputable, so that on the whole we must admit that either the explanation given by Caspari (§ 64), נני סר (‘gardens of the [3] basin’), or that of the older Rabbis (Ber. Rab 98), גני שׂד (‘gardens of the prince’), is most satisfactory. The termination in Gennesaret might then be regarded as the Aramaic determinative form, and compared with Nazareth from Nazara.
With reference to the name ‘Galilee,’ it has been said that it originally designated only that small tract of land given by Solomon to Hiram (1 Kings 9:11), and that the name gradually extended till in the days of the Maccabees it included Zebulun and Naphtali, so that only after this took place could the Sea be known by that name. Furrer (Wanderungen) has also drawn attention to the other names. He asserts that Gennesar or Gennesaritis is characteristic of the 1st cent., being found in Josephus, Pliny, and Strabo, while from the 2nd cent. onwards the official designation became ‘Sea of Tiberias’; and as proof of this statement he cites the Palestinian Talmud. He then ventures to infer that John 21:1 indicates a later date than the rest of the book demands, and at the same time he suggests that John 6:1 has been emended. This reasoning, however, seems inconclusive; for, apart from the fact that the Palestinian Talmud contains much that is old, it seems impossible, in view of the conservatism of the Rabbis, that such a name as ‘Sea of Tiberias’ should be found in their writings, unless it had been in common use for a considerable time. For the history of the district surrounding the Lake see art. Galilee.
ii. Description.—The Lake presents ‘a beautiful sheet of limpid water in a deeply depressed basin’ (BRP [4] 2 ii. 380), its average below sea level being 682½ ft.; but with the season of the year the level may vary to the extent of 10 ft. The rise and fall are dependent on the rainy season on the one hand, and, on the other, on the melting of the snows on Hermon as the spring advances; and it is this latter cause that generally, in conjunction with the later rains, brings about the high level at the time of harvest (Joshua 3:15). But as the heavier rains decrease before the melting of the snow begins, there may have been already a fall of as much as 3 ft. even in March. The Sea is 13 miles long by 7 across at its broadest part—between Mejdel and Kersa; but in the clear Eastern atmosphere it looks much smaller than it really is. From no point on the western shore can it be seen in its whole extent at one time; but from the slopes above Tell Hûm, or from almost any point on the eastern shore, it is all visible. It is not quite oval, but rather pear- or harp-shaped (כִּנּוֹר), narrowing to the southern end. The sea level and the configuration of the shores have not changed to any considerable extent during the past nineteen centuries, so that, in so far as hills and valleys, ravines and slopes to the seashore are concerned, their present description gives a very true conception of what they were in Gospel days. On the west the hills are not so high and generally not so steep as on the eastern side; but they approach more closely to the shore, and are more rugged and stony. On the western side, from a short distance above what was once the western outlet of the Lake into the Jordan, and stretching some 3 miles up the Lake-side, the hills—here somewhat rounded and tame, and with but little that is picturesque in their form—slope down to the water’s edge. Then to the north of this comes a strip (Heb. רקח, which seems to justify the identification of Tiberias with the older Rakkath, Joshua 19:35; Megilla, 5b, 6a; G. A. Smith, HGHL [1] p. 447) about 2½ miles long and ¼ of a mile broad at its widest part, and at the north end of this is the modern town of Tiberias. Passing it, we have another 3 miles of sloping hills, broken about midway by the Wady Abu el-Amîs. At Mejdel we now enter el-Ghuweir, the well-known Plain of Gennesaret. Behind the village to the west is Wady Hamâm, known in the early centuries as בִּקְעַח אַרְבֵּאל, and containing in its cliffs the once famous caves of Arbela (Ant. xiv. xv. 4). This is certainly the wildest and most impressive gorge around the whole Lake. On its south side it bears some resemblance, though on a far grander scale, to the crags around Arthur’s Seat. There is the same perpendicular wall, but here it rises in places to a height of 1500 ft.; and there is also the same mass of broken rocks, making a steep slope to the plain below.
El-Ghuweir curves along the Lake from Mejdel to Khân Minyeh, a distance of 3 miles, and it has a breadth of one mile. In addition to the stream from Wady Hamâm, it is watered by three others from ‘Ain Mudauwarah, Wady Rabadï̀yeh, and Wady Leimôn, and these flow throughout the year. Just behind Khân Minyeh and its fountain ‘Ain et-Tîn at the N.W. corner of the Lake, the rounded hill Tell Oreime slopes down to the water’s edge, ending in a series of sharp rocks—the only place around the Lake where we find anything like a cliff beside the shore. Around the face of Tell Oreime there is a deep rock-cutting now used as a pathway, but in ancient times an aqueduct, as is attested by the discovery of the remains of the old piers of its continuation across the next valley to ‘Ain et-Tâbigha. Remains of masonry show that the water was led eastward as well as westward from the towers built around the springs of et-Tâbigha (Ἑπτάπηγον of Nicephorus), so that there can be little doubt that this is the spring of Capernaum mentioned by Josephus (BJ iii. x. 8). From this point onward to the Jordan the hills again extend down to the shore, but by gentler slopes than even to the south of Tiberias. Between et-Tâbigha and Tell Hûm the shore forms a number of semicircular creeks, which, with the sloping embankment at this point, assume the shape of amphitheatres. Studying the subject on the spot, the present author was convinced that one of these must be the place where the sermon from the boat was preached (Matthew 13:2 etc.). Something peculiar in the tones of our voices induced us to test the acoustic properties of the place, and we found that a speaker on the boat could be heard far up the slope, while the hum and bustle of a crowd on the shore would not disturb him.
After crossing the Jordan we meet with another plain—el-Batiha—corresponding to the one on the west, but somewhat more extensive. It is covered with green grass (Mark 6:39, John 6:10) at nearly all seasons of the year. With a breadth of 1 to 1½ miles, it extends 3 miles along the coast, and then narrows, extending nearly 3 miles more to Kersa, a short distance to the south of which we meet with the only steep place (Matthew 8:32) on the eastern side of the Lake. At this point there is practically no shore, but immediately the eastern rampart of hills—2000 ft. high, now bleak and bare, but showing streaks of green where the springs trickle out between the white sandstone and the black superimposed lava—begins to recede, leaving a plain ¼ to ½ mile broad, and this to the south of Kul at el-Husn widens out into the Ghor or Jordan Valley. At the village of Semakh, the southern end of the Lake forms a beautiful circular bay, which is enclosed by earth walls 16 to 32 ft. in height. There is deep water close in to the shore, and the currents manifestly wear away the rich alluvial soil. In so far as physical changes have taken place, we should expect that the land has suffered losses here, while there may have been slight gains by deposits on the shore of the plains of el-Batiha and el-Ghuweir (Gennesaret). What used to be the western outlet of the Jordan has also become silted up, for it must be remembered that in former times the Jordan flowed out from the two sides of a triangular island, now occupied by the ruins of Kerak—without doubt the remains of the once famous Taricheae (BJ iii. x. 1).
Compared with other lakes, the Sea of Galilee cannot be said to be deep. The maximum depth is from north to south along the course of the Jordan, and here it is 130 to 148 ft. according to the season [6], and except along the shores of the Plain of Gennesaret, deep water is reached all round the Lake within a few yards of the shore. The steep place at Kersa slopes down at once to a depth of 49 ft., and a short distance farther out the sounding gives 102 ft. A mile to the southeast of Tell Hûm the depth is 78 ft., and midway between Tiberias and Kersa it is 114.
One more notable feature of the Lake valley is to be found in the hot springs with which it abounds. The best known of these are at Hammam (cf. Josephus Vita, 16), south of Tiberias (132° to 144°), ‘Ain Bârideh (80°), ‘Ain Mudauwarah (73°), ‘Ain et-Tîn (82°), and ‘Ain et-Tâbigha (73° to 86°). Others certainly exist in the Lake itself. A brackish taste can be perceived at different places, and especially at a point ⅔ across between Tiberias and Kersa, where in the warmer water great shoals of fish are wont to congregate. It was probably the drinking from a spot of this kind that led Strabo (Geog. xvi. 45) to express so bad an opinion of the waters of the Lake (ὕδωρ μοχθηρὸν λιμναῖον). These springs are all more or less sulphurous, and in all the centuries they have been used for medicinal purposes—especially those at Tiberias (BJ ii. xxi. 6). A reference to these in the Talmud shows us the relationship of the Rabbis to the Sabbath, and throws some light on their attacks on Jesus (Luke 13:14 etc.). The use of the means of healing was forbidden on the Sabbath; but these baths, though medicinal, were permitted, because in addition they ministered to indulgence in pleasure and luxury, and that was permitted. (Pesach. 8b).
Complaint has been made by some of the tameness of the scenery around the Lake, and of the want of picturesqueness of the hills; while, on the other hand, Seetzen (Reisen, in loc.) has declared that ‘in the whole land of Palestine there is no district whose natural charms could compare with those of this.’ There can be no doubt that much depends upon the season of the year when the district is first visited, as well as upon the expectations formed. In the present unwooded state, with its uncultivated fields and barren hills often, as at the north end of the Lake, washed down to the bare rock by the rains of centuries, there may be little to attract, especially when the whole country has been blackened by the summer suns and the burning siroccos. But even now the earliest rains change the whole aspect of nature. The hills and the valleys on both shores become clothed in a luxuriant greenness, while, as the season advances, the fresh bursting buds of the olive, the fig, the vine, and the pomegranate, with here and there a palm tree, add variety and pleasantness to the landscape. Very soon, too, the fields are covered with great patches of anemones of varied colours—white, red, purple, and deep dark-blue, interspersed with various species of the lily family and stretches of the dark green-leaved and yellow-flowered mustard, while the watercourses and shores of the Lake are marked out by the red blooms of the oleander with its dark-green and silvery-backed leaves; and on the western shore variety is added by the gigantic reeds of the papyrus, topped by their reddish-brown waving plumes; on the higher grounds, too, every crevice of the rock is shaded by the blossoms of the cyclamen and many another flower of the field. But what must it have been in the year a.d. 27–28? It had been passing through, was indeed still in the period of transition after, the desolations of war, famine, and pestilence; but the worst was now long past, and 20 years of uninterrupted peace and prosperity had made it blossom like the rose. There was nothing in the rule of the tetrarchs Antipas and Philip to discourage perseverance, so that the land was coming more and more under cultivation. It must have been beautiful, indeed, when human industry was developing all its resources and changing the whole scene into a blooming paradise. Nothing can give a better idea of what the whole district was becoming, than the classic passage in which Josephus (BJ iii. x. 8) describes the Plain of Gennesaret in his own day (see art. Gennesaret [7] in vol. i.).
With Josephus’ glowing description the Rabbis are in fullest harmony. Rish Laqish says: ‘If Paradise be in the land of Israel, Beth-Shan is its entrance’ (ביתשאן פיתחה). Again we read: ‘Seven seas,’ spake the Lord God, ‘have I created in the land of Israel, but only one have I chosen for myself, that is the sea of Gennesar’ (Midr. Teh, fol. 4). Siphrê on Deuteronomy 33:23 explains the fulness of the blessing of the Lord as the Plain of Gennesaret. On the hills around the Lake were ‘vines and fruitful fields’ (Meg. 6a). ‘It is easier,’ saith Rabbi Eliezer ben Simon, ‘to nourish a legion of olives in Galilee than to bring up one child in the land of Israel’ (Ber. Rab. c. 20). The oil of the Galilaean hills was more plentiful than any in Palestine (Men. 85b), and the wheat of Chorazin is specially commended (ib. 86a). An illustration of the productiveness of the district, and a parallel to the hundredfold of the parable, may be seen in the enumeration of the products of a single סאה ארבלית ‘half bushel of Arbela’ (Jerus. [8] Peah, vii. 3). The Gentile world also lends its testimony. To the early Fathers the district was τὰ χράτιστα τῆς Γαλιλαίας, ‘the crown of Galilee,’ while in the 3rd cent. C. Julius Solinus (Collectanea, xxxv. 13) says: ‘Lacus Tiberiadis omnibus anteponitur ingenuo aestu et ad sanitatem usu efficaci.’
But the district was not yet reduced to the calm beauty of a prosperous agricultural country. There would still be stretches of woodland remaining, tenanted by birds of brilliant colours and various forms. There would be here and there beautiful oaks, either singly or in groups, that had grown up during the years when the population was small (Baba Bathra v. 1). There would be rocky stretches, especially to the north-east of the Lake, covered with brambles, wild mustard, and coarse grass, or dotted with prickly bushes (nubk), where the wolf, the jackal, the fox, and the hyaena would make their homes, and where the brown serpent and the silvery-breasted poisonous snake would glide about.
The population would not be so dense nor the land so fully cultivated as in the days when Josephus wrote, so that there would be a more equal mingling of the wild beauties of nature with the advancing and taming conquests of agriculture. The landscape, too, was becoming varied by the presence of many buildings. It has been said that ‘the shores of the Lake seem to have borne cities and towns instead of harvests’ (Tristram, Land of Israel, 444); and this, understood in the light of what we have already said, is very true. These would for the most part be constructed of black stone, but varied at times by buildings of white marble, while even the polished granite of Syene helped to break the monotony; and although, on the whole, the majority of the buildings would be dull and sombre, still, in the midst of waving fields of green and gold, the presence of the humble village, and the beach sparkling with the houses and the palaces, the synagogues and the temples of Jewish and Roman inhabitants, would present a scene of great beauty, so that we can well understand how the wild desolations of the pre-Christian century, and the calm and peaceful years that followed the advent of the Messiah, combined to render the district more beautiful when Christ was a citizen of Capernaum than at any other time during its whole history.
iii. Climate.—The climate of the Jordan Valley is in many ways very peculiar. Its low level—the lowest depression in the world—gives it many characteristics which are all its own. The absence of all frost, and the general warmth throughout the whole year, explain to us fully the peculiar open-air life that we meet with in the Gospels. For the most part Christ speaks out of doors. So did the Rabbis of His time. Ben Azzai taught on the shores of Tiberias (Erubin, 29a), and Rabbi Jehudah in the open air (Moed Katon, 16a). In the Gospels the sick are freely carried about (Matthew 4:23, Mark 2:3), are allowed to wait in the crowd (Luke 8:43 f.), and the people are indifferent if the night find them away from home (Matthew 15:32, Mark 8:2-3). The average temperatures of the air (night and day) in January are 37° and 74° respectively, while in June they are 68° and 108°; but in July the thermometer frequently rises many degrees higher. The present writer has seen it at 106° at 6 a.m., and 139° has been recorded on the shore of the Lake at midday in August; and even the soil, the rocks, and the pebbles around the Lake side become so intensely heated that the bather must wait till long after sunset if he would enter the water without the risk of burning his feet. In such conditions, under the fiery glow of the sun and with months of drought, we can well understand that all the grass and herbage are burned up, and so in its present state of naked dreariness, visitors at such a season are naturally disappointed; but in other circumstances, and in days of universal irrigation, the whole scene would be very different (cf. Robinson’s Researches under 19th June). Another noteworthy point is that the temperature of the body may rise much higher in cases of fever, and without serious results, than would be possible in other climates, e.g. a temperature of 110° is not uncommonly recorded. This may explain the expression ‘great fever’ (πυρετῶ̣ μεγάλω̣) of Luke 4:38.
The temperature of the waters of the Lake does not vary so much as might be expected, and is very little lowered even by the melting of the snows on Hermon. This is to be accounted for by the fact that such waters have already passed through Lake Huleh and have also had a considerable course in the upper Jordan. The average to a depth of 30 ft. is 68°, from 30 to 50 ft. it is 62°, and at a greater depth there is a constant temperature of 59° (PEFSt [9] , 1894, pp. 211–220).
Rain.—The average number of rainy days during the year is 60, and the rainfall 22·5 inches. There is no rain during the months of June, July, August, and September. Two-thirds of the rainfall occurs in December, January, and February; the other months having only one to five days on which rain falls, which may mean either now and again, a whole day, or merely slight showers. The degree of humidity is greatest in January, when it stands at 77. It decreases till June, when it is 42; but in August, again, it has risen to 45; while in September it drops as low as 39.
Winds.—From May till October there are often sirocco days. They generally come 3, 7, or 10 at a time, though sometimes the hot wind lasts but one day, and then the day following brings a delightful sensation of coolness, enjoyment, and satisfaction. On the sirocco days the heat on the Lake and in the surrounding region is intensely depressing, but between the visits of the hot wind, westerly breezes blow in summer, and this makes the east side of the Lake pleasant. The western shore, however, south of Mejdel benefits little, as the winds pass over the protecting hills and strike the Sea far out, leaving the air inshore close and stifling. The north end of the Lake does not suffer to the same extent, because to the west of the Plain of Gennesaret the hills are somewhat lower and farther back, and, besides, the wind blows freely down the Valley of Pigeons, and gives the district around Capernaum all that the east side enjoys at such seasons. These westerly winds usually spring up in the afternoon, they become strong as the evening advances, but generally cease about 10 p.m. During the rest of the year the weather is more variable, and the winds blow from different directions. Strong winds sometimes come from the north-east, and when they diverge to the north and come over Hermon the temperature is still more reduced, and a sensation of chill is felt in the atmosphere. This sometimes occurs till well on in May; while, on the other hand, a hot south wind will sometimes blow up the Ghor (Jordan Valley) in April, bringing with it clouds of dust which dim the sunlight and darken the hills, giving one a premature sensation of the summer’s glow.
Storms.—The rainy season is generally introduced by thunderstorms. In October and November, small clouds, scarcely larger than a man’s hand, gather on Tabor, Jebel Jarmuk, and the other hills of Upper Galilee. They grow in size and in threatening aspect, and generally in three days’ time a violent thunderstorm with heavy rains bursts over the valley. This is then usually followed by a time of calm with a clear blue sky overhead. Such storms, but not generally so violent, occur from time to time during the winter, and the rainy season may be closed by something of the same nature. In the beginning of May the sky will be clouded, and there will be one or two days’ rain with or without thunder. Sometimes, however, when the valley has been enjoying the most peaceful calm, it will be affected by storms that have occurred elsewhere. The hills of Upper Galilee may have been hidden in dense mists for a day or two, but nothing has disturbed the peace of the Lake. There have been rains, however, on the high lands only a few hours distant, and these, forming themselves into mountain torrents, have come down, sweeping all before them (Matthew 7:27, Luke 6:49) in their descent, and flooding what but a few minutes earlier had been a dry channel. The present writer has personally watched the Wady Rabadḯyeh and the Wady Leimôn, both of which cross the Plain of Gennesaret, as they became in an incredibly short time changed from little more than dry, stony river-beds to impassable foaming torrents; and, when the hills have been dark with clouds, has heard the warning given to get over these wadys ‘before the stream comes down.’
Storms may occur on the Lake at any season, and there are few places where changes come so suddenly. The experience of Lynch is that of every one who has spent any time here: ‘While pulling about the Lake, a squall swept down one of the ravines, and gave us a convincing proof of how soon the placid sea could assume an angry look’ (p. 164). The storms on the Sea of Galilee are in many ways peculiar, and sometimes the wind seems to blow from various directions at one time, tossing the boat about. This arises from the fact that the winds blow violently down the narrow gorges and strike the Sea at an angle, stirring the waters to a great depth. Many of the storms, too, are quite local in their character. This may be understood by the fact that when a westerly wind is blowing, all may be smooth along the shores to the north and south of Tiberias and for a mile out, but there we may pass in a moment from the region of perfect calm into a gale so violent that the only chance of safety is to run before the wind to the eastern shore. At other times the south end of the Lake may be comparatively peaceful, but, sailing northward, we no sooner reach Mejdel than the wind from Wady el-Hamâm will seize the sail, and, unless it be instantly lowered, overturn the boat. These winds are from the west, but it is generally the wind from the north-east that raises a general storm over the whole Sea. This wind blows right into the Sea from el-Batiha, and from this direction no part is sheltered. The suddenness, too, with which the storms spring up may be illustrated by a storm which came from this direction, and which the present writer observed. A company of visitors were standing on the shore at Tiberias, and, noting the glassy surface of the water and the smallness of the Lake, they expressed doubts as to the possibility of such storms as those described in the Gospels. Almost immediately the wind sprang up. In 20 minutes the sea was w
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Galilee
GALILEE
1. Position . Galilee was the province of Palestine north of Samaria. It was bounded southward by the Carmel range and the southern border of the plain of Esdraelon, whence it stretched eastward by Bethshean (Scythopolis, Beisan) to the Jordan. Eastward it was limited by the Jordan and the western bank of its expansions (the Sea of Galilee and Waters of Merom). Northward and to the north-west it was bounded by Syria and Phœnicia; it reached the sea only in the region round the bay of Acca, and immediately north of it. Its maximum extent therefore was somewhere about 60 miles north to south, and 30 east to west.
2. Name . The name Galilee is of Hebrew origin, and signifies a ‘ring’ or ‘circuit.’ The name is a contraction of a fuller expression, preserved by Isaiah 9:1 , namely, ‘Galilee of the [1] nations.’ This was originally the name of the district at the northern boundary of Israel, which was a frontier surrounded by foreigners on three sides. Thence it spread southward, till already by Isaiah’s time it included the region of the sea, i.e. the Sea of Galilee. Its further extension southward, to include the plain of Esdraelon, took place before the Maccabæan period. The attributive ‘of the nations’ was probably dropped about this time partly for brevity, partly because it was brought into the Jewish State by its conquest by John Hyrcanus, about the end of the 2nd cent. b.c.
3. History . In the tribal partition of the country the territory of Galilee was divided among the septs of Asher, Naphtali, Zebulun, and part of Issachar. In the OT history the tribal designations are generally used when subdivisions of the country are denoted; this is no doubt the reason why the name ‘Galilee,’ which is not a tribal name, occurs so rarely in the Hebrew Scriptures though the passage in Isaiah already quoted, as well as the references to Kedesh and other cities ‘in Galilee’ ( Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 , 1 Kings 9:11 , 2 Kings 15:29 , 1 Chronicles 6:76 ), show that the name was familiar and employed upon occasion. But though some of the most important of the historical events of the early Hebrew history took place within the borders of Galilee, it cannot be said to have had a history of its own till later times.
After the return of the Jews from the Exile, the population was concentrated for the greater part in Judæa, and the northern parts of Palestine were left to the descendants of the settlers established by Assyria. It was not till its conquest, probably by Joho Hyrcanus, that it was once more included in Jewish territory and occupied by Jewish settlers. Under the pressure of Egyptian and Roman invaders the national patriotism developed rapidly, and it became as intensely a Jewish State as Jerusalem itself, notwithstanding the contempt with which the haughty inhabitants of Judæa regarded the northern provincials. Under the Roman domination Galilee was governed as a tetrarchate, held by members of the Herod family. Herod the Great was ruler of Galilee in b.c. 47, and was succeeded by his son Antipas, as tetrarch, in b.c. 4. After the fall of Jerusalem, Galilee became the centre of Rabhinic life. The only ancient remains of Jewish synagogues are to be seen among the ruins of Galilæan cities. Maimonides was buried at Tiberias. But it is as the principal theatre of Christ’s life and work that Galilee commands its greatest interest. Almost the whole of His life, from His settlement as an infant in Nazareth, was spent within its borders. The great majority of the twelve Apostles were also natives of this province.
4. Physical Characteristics . Owing to moisture derived from the Lehanon mountains, Galilee is the best-watered district of Palestine, and abounds in streams and springs, though the actual rainfall is little greater than that of Judæa. The result of this enhanced water supply is seen in the fertility of the soil, which is far greater than anywhere in Southern Palestine. It was famous for oil, wheat, barley, and fruit, as well as cattle. The Sea of Galilee fisheries were also important. The formation of the country is limestone, broken by frequent dykes and outflows of trap and other volcanic rocks. Hot springs at Tiberias and elsewhere, and not infrequent earthquakes, indicate a continuance of volcanic and analogous energies.
5. Population . Galilee in the time of Christ was inhabited by a mixed population. There was the native Jewish element, grafted no doubt on a substratum of the Assyrian settlers and other immigrants, whose intrusion dated from the Israelite Exile with probably yet a lower stratum, stretching back to the days of the Canaanites. Besides these there was the cultivated European class the inhabitants of the Greek cities that surrounded the Sea of Tiberias, and the military representatives of the dominant power of Rome. We have seen that in Judæa the Galilæans were looked down upon. ‘Can any good thing come out of Nazareth?’ ( John 1:46 ) was one proverb. ‘Out of Galilee ariseth no prophet’ ( John 7:52 ) was another, in the face of the fact that Galilee was the home of Deborah, Barak, Ibzan, Tola, Elon, with the prophets Jonah, Elisha, and possibly Hosea. The Galilæans no doubt had provincialisms, such as the confusion of the gutturals in speech, which grated on the sensitive ears of the Judæans, and was one of the indications that betrayed Peter when he endeavoured to deny his discipleship ( Matthew 26:73 ).
R. A. S. Macalister.
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Galilee, Mountain in
GALILEE, MOUNTAIN IN . After our Lord’s resurrection, the eleven disciples went away from Jerusalem ‘into Galilee, unto the mountain where Jesus had appointed them’ ( Matthew 28:16 ). No record or hint indicates to us what mountain is meant. There is no foundation for the theory that it is the Mt. of Olives, whose north point is said to have borne the name ‘Galilee.’
Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Galilee, Sea of
GALILEE, SEA OF
1. Situation , etc. The Sea of Galilee is an expansion of the Jordan, 13 miles long, about 8 miles in maximum breadth; its surface is 680 feet below that of the Mediterranean; its maximum depth is about 150 feet. In shape it is like a pear, the narrow end pointing southward. Like the Dead Sea, it is set deep among hills, which rise on the east side to a height of about 2000 feet. At the emergence of the Jordan, however, the Lake impinges on the plain of the Ghôr.
2. Names . The original name of the Sea seems to have been Chinnereth or Chinneroth , which a hazardous etymology connects with the Heb. kinnôr , ‘harp.’ The name is supposed to be given to the Sea on account of its fancied resemblance to such an instrument. It more probably takes its name from an as yet unrecognized town or district in Naphtali (which bordered the Lake on the west side) referred to in Joshua 11:2 ; Jos 19:35 , 1 Kings 15:20 . By this name it is referred to in assigning the border of the Promised Land ( Numbers 34:11 ), in stating the boundary of the trans-Jordanic tribes ( Deuteronomy 3:12 , Joshua 13:27 ), and in enumerating the kings conquered by Joshua ( Joshua 12:3 ). The Lake is referred to also by the name Gennesar in Josephus (always), and in 1Ma 11:67 (AV [1] ). This name also is of uncertain origin; strong grounds exist for questioning its derivation as a corruption of the earlier appellation. In the Gospels it is referred to under a variety of names: besides such general terms as ‘the lake’ ( Luke 8:22 etc.), or ‘the sea’ ( John 6:16 ), we find Lake of Gennesaret (only in Luke 5:1 ), Sea of Tiberias ( John 21:1 , and also as an explanatory or alternative name in John 6:1 ), but most frequently Sea of Galilee , which seems to have been the normal name. The modern name is Bahr Tubarîya , which is often rendered in English as ‘Lake of Tiberias,’ by which name the Sea is now frequently described (as in Baedeker’s Syria and Palestine ).
3. Importance in NT Times . The Sea in the time of Christ was surrounded by a number of important cities, each of them the centre of a cultured population. Such were Tiberias, Bethsaida, Capernaum, Chorazin, Magdala, and others. The fishing industry was extensive, and where now but a few small boats are to be seen, there evidently were formerly large fleets of fishing vessels. The fishing trade of Galilee was of great importance, and was renowned throughout the world. Owing to the great height of the mountains surrounding the Lake, differences of temperature are produced which give rise to sudden and violent storms. Two such storms are mentioned in the Gospels one in Matthew 8:23 , Mark 4:36 , Luke 8:22 , the other in Matthew 14:22 , Mark 6:46 , John 6:16 . The repetition of the event within the narrow historical limits of the Gospels indicates that such tempests, then as now, were matters of frequent occurrence.
R. A. S. Macalister.
Holman Bible Dictionary - Sea of Galilee
See Galilee, Sea of ; Palestine .
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Galilee, Sea of
(Matthew 4:18; Mark 7:31; John 6:1). So called from its washing the E. side of Galilee. In Luke 5:1 "the sea of Gennesaret," called so from the fertile plain of Gennesurer at its N.W. angle, three and a half miles long by two and a half broad (Matthew 14:34). In Old Testament "the sea of Chinnereth" or Cinneroth, from the town so named on its shore (Joshua 19:35), of which Gennesaret is probably the corruption, though others derive it from gannah , a "garden," and Sarown , a plain between Tabor and the lake. "The sea of Tiberias" is another designation, from the city (John 6:1). All its names were drawn from places on the western side. Now Bahr Tubariyeh (Tiberius, S.W. of the lake). Close to it was "His own city" Capernaum (Matthew 4:13). Nine cities stood on the shores of the lake, of which only two are now inhabited, namely, Magdala, consisting of a few mud huts, and Tiberias, sadly changed from its ancient prosperity.
Silence now reigns where formerly the din of industry was heard. On its shore Jesus called His first disciples (Matthew 4:18; Matthew 9:9; Luke 5:1-11; John 1:43, etc.). The bed of the lake is but a lower section of the great Jordan valley. Its depression is 653 ft. below the level of the Mediterranean, according to Lt. Lynch. Its length is about 13 miles, its breadth is about five or six. The view from the Nazareth road to Tiberias is beautiful. The hills from the eastern side rise apparently out of the water with a uniform slope, to the height of 2,000 ft., destitute of verdure, and shut in the lake; while far to the N. is seen snowy Hermon. The eastern hills, which are flat along the summit, are the wall that supports the table land of Bashan; from which on the N. there is a gradual descent to the valley of the Jordan, and then a rise to a plateau skirting the mountains of upper Galilee.
The hills on the W., except at Khan Minyeh, where there is a small cliff, are recessed from the shore. On a western recess stands Tiberias. The whole basin betrays its volcanic origin, which also accounts for the warm spring at Tiberius The cliffs are hard porous basalt. The vegetation is tropical; the lotus thorn, palms, indigo, etc. The water is sweet, sparkling and transparent; the fish abundant as of old, many species being those of the Nile, the silurus, mugil, and sparers Galiloeus. Dr. Tristram says: "the shoals of fish Were marvelous, black masses of many hundred yards long, with the black fins projecting out of the water, as thickly as they could pack. There are the European loach, bethel, blenny and cyprinodont; the African chromis, hemichromis, and eellike clarias; and the Asiatic discognathus. The cyprinodonts are viviparous, and the sexual differences marked; they can live in cold water, or hot springs up to 90ø, fresh, brackish, or briny water.
This marks a former connection between these waters and those of N.E. and S.E. Africa, the Nile, the Zambesi, and the great lakes in the interior. The papyrus also, no longer found in the Nile, is found on the shores of the sea of Galilee. As Asia, Africa, and Europe respectively were represented at Christ's cross by the Jews, Simon of Cyrene, and the Romans respectively, so the Asiatic, African, and European fish in the sea of Galilee represent the various races of mankind gathered by the spiritual fishermen into the one gospel net. Only one little boat represents the fleets of fishing vessels that once covered the lake. The fish are now taken with a hand net jerked round the fish by the fisher, usually naked, along the shore (John 21:7); or else crumbs of bread mixed with bichloride of mercury are scattered to poison the fish, and the floating dead bodies are picked up for the Tiberias market (Porter, Handbook, p. 432).
Sudden and violent storms agitate the waters, sweeping down the ravines and gorges converging to the head of the lake, from the vast naked plateau of the Jaulan and the Hauran and mount Hermon in the background. It was such a storm that Jesus stilled by a word, as He had a few hours before rebuked and cast out demons. Mark 4:39, "Peace, be still," Greek "Be silent, be muzzled"; addressing the sea and warring elements as rebel forces; compare Revelation 21:1.
The apostles were trying to reach Bethsaida on the western coast, when the gale from. the S.W. that brought vessels from Tiberias to the N.E. coast (John 6:23) delayed the vessel of the former, until at the fourth watch Jesus came walking over the tempest tossed waves; then followed Peter's temporary walking through faith and sinking through unbelief in the same waters, and his rescue by Jesus; then they immediately reach their desired haven for which they had set out the evening before (Matthew 14:28-29; Matthew 14:33; John 6:17; John 6:21; Mark 6:45).
So impressed were the disciples that "they worshipped Him, saying, Of a truth Thou art the Son of God." Bethsaida Julias, the city of Andrew and Peter, lay on the E. bank of the Jordan where it enters the sea of Galilee on the N. Close by, and on the E. of the river and N.E. of the lake, stretched the "green grass" (Mark 6:39) plain of Batihah, the scene of feeding the 5,000. Gergesa (now Kersa) lay E. of the lake. The Jordan's outlet is at Kerak, the S.W. extremity of the lake. The lake, mirroring heaven in its union of rest and energy, represents Him who best combined the calm repose which reflected His Father's image with energetic labors for God and man.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Galilee (2)
GALILEE
1. Name.—The English form of the name ‘Galilee’ is derived from the Hebrew וָּלִיל (âlîl), Aram. [1] נלילא (Gâlîla or Gelîla), through Gr. Γαλιλαία and Lat. Galilœa. The Heb. word denotes simply a ‘circuit’ or ‘district’, and in Isaiah 9:1 Galilee is called ‘Galilee ((Revised Version margin) ‘the district’) of the nations,’ and in 1 Maccabees 5:15 Γαλιλαία ἀλλοφύλων (‘Galilee of the strangers’). In other passages of the OT it is simply called ‘the district.’
2. History.—When the Hebrew invasion of Palestine took place, the main part of Galilee was allotted to Zebulun, Asher, and Naphtali. According to Judges 1:30-33, Zebulun was not altogether successful in driving out the inhabitant of their portion, while Asher and Naphtali had to be content to settle as best they could among the inhabitants, ‘for they did not drive them out.’ These inhabitants seem to have been Amorites and Hivites from the Lebanon. An account of one (or two) of the battles fought in this country is found in Judges 4-5. In the days of the Monarchy, Galilee always suffered in the Syrian wars. It was ravaged by Ben-hadad (1 Kings 15:20), probably won back by Ahab, taken again by the Aramaeans under Hazael (2 Kings 12:18; 2 Kings 13:22), and recovered by Jeroboam ii. It was also on the high-road of the Assyrian invasion, and was won for Assyria by Tiglath-pileser iii. in 734 (2 Kings 15:29), many of its inhabitants being carried into captivity. From this time up to the end of the 2nd cent. b.c. the population was heathen, with a small number of Jewish settlers, who attached themselves to Jerusalem after the return from the Exile. About the year 164, Simon the brother of Judas Maccabaeus pursued the Syrians to Ptolemais, and on his way back brought the Galilaean Jews and their property to Judaea (1 Maccabees 5:21-23). Some 60 years later the whole state of affairs in Galilee was changed. According to Strabo, on the authority of Timagenes (Josephus Ant. xiii. xi. 3), Aristobulus (b.c. 104–103) conquered much of Galilee, and compelled the inhabitants to be circumcised and live according to Jewish laws. This work had probably been already begun by John Hyrcanus (b.c. 135–105). Herod at his death bequeathed Galilee to Herod Antipas, who succeeded after much opposition in having his legacy confirmed at Rome.
3. Extent.—The amount of territory covered by the name ‘Galilee’ varied in different times. Originally it comprised the hilly and mountainous country to the north of the Plain of Esdraelon or the smaller plain of cl-Buttauf. The boundaries were probably not well defined, but on the north it included Kedesh (Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:32). It was later spoken of in two divisions—Upper and Lower Galilee (cf. Judith 1:8, 1 Maccabees 12:49), and in the Mishna is divided into three parts, these corresponding to the natural divisions of plain, hill-country, and mountain.
The boundaries of Galilee at the time of Christ are thus given by Josephus:
‘Now Phœnice and Syria surround the two Galilees, which are called Upper and Lower Galilee. They are bounded on the W. by the borders of the territory belonging to Ptolemais, and by Carmel, which mountain of old belonged to the Galilaeans, but now to the Tyrians; and next it is Gaba (Jebâta* [2] ), which is called “the city of horsemen,” because those horsemen that were dismissed by Herod the king dwelt therein; they are bounded on the S. by Samaria and Scythopolis, as far as the streams of the Jordan; on the E. by Hippene (the district of Hippos, Sâsiyeh) and Gadaris (the district of Gadara, Umm Keis), and also by Gaulanitis (Jaulân) and the borders of the kingdom of Agrippa; and their N. parts are bounded by Tyre, and the country of the Tyrians. As for what is called Lower Galilee, it extends in length from Tiberias to Chabulon (Kâbûl), and Ptolemais is its neighbour on the coast; and its breadth is from the village called Xaloth (Iksâl), which lies in the great plain, to Bersabe, from which beginning the breadth of Upper Galilee is also taken to the village Baca, which divides the land of the Tyrians from Galilee; its length is also from Meloth (Meiron) to Thella (probably Tell Thala), a village near the Jordan’ (BJ iii. iii. 1).
4. Geography.—The southernmost division of Galilee was Esdraelon (G. A. Smith, HGHL [3] p. 379). It consists of (1) the triangular plain about 200 feet above sea-level, 29 miles long from the foot of Carmel to Jenîn, 15 from Jenîn to Tabor, and 15 from Tabor to the foot of Carmel; (2) the valley of Jezreel (Nahr Jalûd), running down for 12 miles from Jezreel to Bethshean, some 400 feet below sea-level. The Plain of Esdraelon is watered by the Kishon flowing to the Mediterranean; but, as the edges are somewhat higher than the centre, it is often marshy. It played a great part in the history of Palestine (cf. HGHL [3] p. 391 ff.), but has no mention in the story of the Gospels.
On the other hand, the middle division of Galilee, known as Lower Galilee, contains nearly all the important sites of the Gospel record. Nazareth, Capernaum, Shunem, Nain, Cana, etc., are within its borders. It is bounded on the W. by the Plain of Ptolemais, on the S. by the Plains of Esdraelon and Jezreel, on the E. by the Sea of Galilee (though sometimes a part of the country east of the sea was considered Galiliean), and on the N. by a line passing from the N. end of the Sea of Galilee through Ramah to the coast. It consists of four chains of hills running east and west, intercepted by valleys and plains. The hills reach a height of about 1200 feet. The southern chain consists of the Nazareth hills, with Mt. Tabor; the next range contains the Karn Hattin of Crusading fame; the third, the city of Jotapâta; while the fourth consists of the southern slopes of the mountains of Upper Galilee. The central plain of cl-Buttauf is about 500 feet above sea-level, while the coast of the Sea of Galilee is nearly 700 feet below sea-level. The whole country is well watered by streams flowing east or west, and was extremely fertile. The grass of the plains was green, and evergreen oaks grew on the hills. The cornfields gave a plenteous harvest, and pomegranates abounded.
Upper Galilee ranged from the N. boundary of Lower Galilee to the Tyrian boundary, which seems to have been at the time of Christ just south of Kedesh, which according to Josephus was a Tyrian fortress on the borders of Galilee (Ant. xiii. v. 6; BJ ii. xviii. l, iv. ii. 3). It is a land of mountains, where the hills run from 2000 to 4000 feet in height. It too was a fertile land, with thick woods, sycamores, olives, vines, and green pastures by its waters.
5. Roads.—‘Judaea was on the road to nowhere; Galilee is covered with roads to everywhere’ (G. A. Smith, HGHL [3] p. 425). Roads in the East even now are often mere tracks, scarcely recognizable by the Western. They are repaired for great occasions, and soon allowed to fall again into their natural condition. Remains of pavements, however, show that at the time of Christ the Roman genius for road-making had been at work in the district of Galilee. Especially was this the case on the great high-road, the ‘Way of the Sea,’ as it was called in the Middle Ages (from an interpretation of Isaiah 9:1), which crossed the middle of Lower Galilee. The eastern termini of the main roads were the two bridges which crossed the Jordan. These were (1) the bridge about half-way between Merom and the Sea of Galilee, now called the ‘Bridge of Jacob’s Daughters.’ To this came the road from Damascus and the intervening country. Westward from the river the road ran by Safed and Ramah to Ptolemais. From this a branch struck off a few miles west of the river, passed by Arbela (Irbid), and rejoined the highroad near Ramah. Another branch went southwards to the west coast of the Sea of Galilee at Khân Minych, and proceeded to Bethshean, where it joined the road from (2) the bridge a few miles south of the Sea of Galilee, now called the Jisr cl-Mujâmia. Over this bridge came the traffic from Arabia and Gilead. From it one road passed through Bethshean, the Valley of Jezreel, and the Plain of Esdraelon, to the coast of the Mediterranean, and so on to Egypt; another by Cana and Sepphoris to Ptolemais. The main road from the shore of the Sea of Galilee to the highlands went by the Wady cl-Hammâm past Arbela, then between Tabor and the Nazareth hills to Esdraelon. Along these and many other roads flowed a ceaseless stream of traffic, and the fulness of their life is reflected in the parables of Christ (cf. Encyc. Bibl. iv. 5191; HGHL [3] p. 430 f.).
6. Government.—Galilee was a part of the Roman Empire; that is, in the days of Christ it was under the emperors Augustus and Tiberius. Roman garrisons were in towns all round the country. Roman influence was felt everywhere. But the mass of the people had little or nothing to do with the Roman Empire directly. The direct government of the land was in the hands of Herod Antipas, to whom, with the title of ‘tetrarch,’ it was assigned by Augustus after the death of Herod. Antipas was 17 years old at his accession to power, and established his capital at Sepphoris. About the year 22, however, he built a new city on the shore 6f the Sea of Galilee, named it Tiberias in honour of the emperor, and made it his capital. This city was governed after the Greek model by a council of 600, with an Archon and other officers. In these two cities was centred the chief legal administration of affairs in Galilee during the life of Christ. But in Galilee, as elsewhere, the chief details of life were regulated by the Jews’ own religious laws rather than by ordinary civil enactments. The chief authority was the Sanhedrin (see Sanhedrin) at Jerusalem, to which appeals could be made when local doctors differed. The chief local difficulties were usually satisfied by the decisions of local councils (cf. Matthew 10:17), probably associated more or less closely with the local synagogues (see Synagogue).
7. People.—Galilee was a populous country. ‘The cities lie very thick, and the very many villages are everywhere so populous from the richness of the soil, that the very least of them contains more than fifteen thousand inhabitants’ (Josephus BJ iii. iii. 2). In another place Josephus says there were 240 cities and villages in Galilee (Life, 45), and that many of these had strong walls. From each of these to the others must have been a network of tracks and roads in addition to the main roads (see above). and the land was a scene of constant activity. The bracing air of the hills and the activity of everyday life formed a people of energy and vigour. ‘The Galilaeans are inured to war from their infancy, and have been always very numerous; nor has their country ever been destitute of men of courage’ (Josephus BJ iii. iii. 2). Regarded with a certain amount of patronizing contempt by the pure-blooded and more strictly theologically-minded Jews of Jerusalem and its neighbourhood, they still had the religions zeal of country-folk. This zeal was quickened by their pilgrimages to Jerusalem, which made a greater impression on their active minds than on those who were more familiar with the life of the Holy City. At any apparent insult to their religion they were ready to break out in revolt. Before, during, and after the life of Jesus, Galilaean leaders arose and flew to arms in the vain attempt to secure religious autonomy. Yet they differed in many respects from their Judaean brothers. The very technical terms of the market and the details of their religious customs varied from those of the South (cf. Schürer, HJP [7] ii. i. 4). Their pronunciation of the Aramaic language had peculiarities of its own (Matthew 26:73), one of these being the confusion of the guttural sounds. Besides, however, the natural bodily vigour and mental freshness of these highlanders, the most important difference between them and the people of Judaea lay in the different attitude in daily life towards the larger world of the Roman Empire and Hellenistic influence. Knowledge of, at any rate spoken, Greek was to them a necessity of business, and no attempt could be made, as in Jerusalem, to avoid the study of it (cf. Moulton, Prolegomena to Gram, of NT Greek, 1906, p. 8). Many must have been, like Matthew, in Government employ. All were brought into daily contact with Greek and Roman modes of life and thought. It was to this people of larger experience of life and broader ways of thinking that Jesus appealed in the greater part of His earthly ministry, and from it that He chose the men who were first to make His message known to the world. See also art. Sea of Galilee.
Literature.—Artt. ‘Galilee’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible. and ‘Galilaa’ in PRE [8] 3 [9] ; Neubauer, Géog. du Talmud; Guérin, Galilée; Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ; G. A. Smith, HGHL [3] , chs. xx, xxi.
G. W. Thatcher.
Fausset's Bible Dictionary - Galilee
Galilee from galil . "A circle" or "circuit" around Kedesh Naphtali, in which lay the 20 towns given by Solomon to Hiram, king of Tyre, in payment for his having conveyed timber from Lebanon to Jerusalem (Joshua 20:7; 1 Kings 9:11). The northern part of Naphtali (which lay N. of Zebulun) was inhabited by a mixed race of Jews and Gentiles of the bordering Phoenician race (Judges 1:30; 1 Kings 9:11). Tiglath Pileser carried away captive its Israelite population to Assyria; then Esarhaddon colonized it with pagan (2 Kings 15:29; 2 Kings 17:24; Ezra 4:2; Ezra 4:10). Hence called (Isaiah 9:1) "Galilee of the nations," or "Gentiles" (Matthew 4:13; Matthew 4:15-16). During and after the captivity the Gentile element became the preponderating population, and spread widely; and the province included in our Lord's days all the ancient Issachar, Zebulun, Asher, and Naphtali.
The most northerly of the three provinces of Palestine, namely, Galilee, Samaria, Judaea (John 4:3-4; Luke 17:11; Acts 9:31). Galilee's Gentile character caused the southern Jews of purer blood to despise it (John 1:46; John 7:52); but its very darkness was the Lord's reason for vouchsafing to it more of the light of His presence and ministry than to self-satisfied and privileged Judaea. There He first publicly preached, in Nazareth synagogue. From it came His apostles (Acts 1:11; Acts 2:7); foretold in Deuteronomy 33:18-19; Deuteronomy 33:23. Compare on Pentecost Acts 2:7; Psalms 68:27-28. Jerusalem, the theocratic capital, might readily have known Messiah; to compensate less favored Galilee He ministered mostly there. Galilee's debasement made its people feel their need of the Savior, a feeling unknown to the self right. cons Jews (Matthew 9:13).
"The Light to lighten the Gentiles, and the Glory of His people Israel," appropriately ministered on the border land between Israel and the Gentiles, still on Israel's territory, to which He was primarily sent (Matthew 15:24). Places and persons despised of men are honored of God. The region the first to be darkened by the Assyrian invasion was cheered by the prophet's assurance that it should be the first enlightened by Immanuel (1 Corinthians 1:27-29). Its population being the densest of any part of Palestine, and its freedom from priestly and pharisaic prejudice, were additional grounds for its receiving the larger share of His ministry. It was bounded on the W. by the region of Ptolemais (Acre), namely, the plain of Akka to the foot of Carmel. The Jordan, the sea of Galilee, lake Huleh, and the spring at Dan, was the eastern border. The northern boundary reached from Dan westward to Phoenicia (Luke 8:26).
The southern border ran along the base of Carmel and the Samaritan hills to mount Gilboa, then along the valley of Jezreel by Scythopolis (Bethshean) to Jordan. Probably the cleansing of the ten lepers took place near Jenin, the border town of Galilee toward Samaria, near the S. of the sea of Galilee. Jebel Jermuk is the highest mountain, 4,000 ft. above the sea. There were two divisions:
I. Lower Galilee was the whole region from the plain of Akka on the W. to the lake of Galilee on the E., including the rich plain of Esdraelon, the heritage of Issachar, who submitted to servitude, to "tribute," for the sake of the rich plenty that accompanied it (Genesis 49:14-15; Deuteronomy 33:18). "Rejoice Zebulun in thy going out (thy mercantile enterprises by sea and fishing in the lake of Galilee), and Issachar in thy tents (in thy inland prosperity, agriculture and home comforts) they shall suck of the abundance of the seas (the riches of the sea in general, and the purple dye extracted from the murex here) and of treasures hid in the sand" (the sand of these coasts being especially valuable for manufacturing glass, a precious thing anciently: Job 28:17).
"They shall call the people unto the mountain," etc.: Zebulun and Issachar shall offer their wealth at the Lord's appointed mount, and invite Gentile nations to join them (Psalms 22:27-28, etc.). The conversion of the Gentiles, brought in to Israel and Israel's Savior, is herein prophetically typified (compare Isaiah 60:5-6; Isaiah 60:16; Isaiah 66:11-12). Asher "dips his feet in oil," i.e. abounds in olive groves. "Fat bread" and "royal dainties" are his, grain, wine, milk, butter, from his uplands and valleys (Genesis 49:20; Deuteronomy 33:24-25). "Thy shoes iron and brass," i.e. thy hills shall yield these metals (Deuteronomy 8:9). "As thy days (so shall) thy strength (be)," i.e., as thy several days come (throughout life) strength will be given thee," Compare 1 Kings 8:59 margin.
II. Upper Galilee extended from Bersabe on the S. to the village of Baca, bordering on Tyre, and from Meloth on the W. to Thella, near Jordan (Josephus, B. J., 3:3, sec. 1); in fact, the whole mountain range between the upper Jordan and Phoenicia. Its southern border extended from the N.W. of the sea of Galilee to the plain of Akka. This upper Galilee is chiefly meant by "Galilee of the Gentiles." The ravine of the Leonres separates the mountain range of upper Galilee from Lebanon, of which it is a southern prolongation. Safed is the chief town. The scenery is bolder and richer than that of southern Palestine. On the table land of upper Galilee lie the ruins of Kedesh Naphtali (Joshua 20:7).
Bochart, altering the vowel points, translated Genesis 49:21, "Naphtali is a spreading terebinth, which puts forth goodly branches"; for the country of Kedesh Naphtali is a natural park of oaks and terebinths. As Nazareth was the scene of our Lord's childhood, so Capernaum in Galilee was for long the home of His manhood (Matthew 4:13; Matthew 9:1). (See CAPERNAUM.) The three former, or the Synoptic Gospels chiefly present our Lord's ministry in Galilee; the Gospel of John His ministry in Judea. His parables in John and in the three Synoptists correspond to the features of Judaea and Galilee respectively. The vineyard, fig tree, shepherd, and desert where the man fell among thieves, were appropriate in Judaea; the grainfields (Mark 4:28), the merchants and fisheries (Matthew 13:45; Matthew 13:47), and the flowers (Matthew 6:28), suited Galilee.
The Galilean accent and dialect were unique, owing to Gentile admixture (Matthew 26:73). After Herod the Great's death Herod Antipas governed Galilee until six years after Christ's crucifixion. Herod Agrippa, with the title of "king," succeeded. On his death (Acts 12:23) Galilee was joined to the Roman province of Syria. After the fall of Jerusalem Galilee became famed for its rabbis and schools of Jewish learning; and the Sanhedrim or great council was removed to Sepphoris, and then to Tiberias. Rabbi Judah Haqodesh here compiled the Mishna, to which the Gemara was subsequently added. The remains of splendid synagogues in Galilee still attest the prosperity of the Jews from the second to the seventh century.
Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Galilee
Galilee is seldom mentioned in the NT outside the Gospels. The only references are in the early chapters of Acts (Acts 1:11; Acts 5:37; Acts 9:31; Acts 10:37; Acts 13:31). Most of the apostles belonged to this northern province (Acts 1:11; Acts 13:31). Judas, the Leader of an agitation in the days of the enrolment of Quirinius, is described as ‘of Galilee’ (Acts 5:37). After Saul’s conversion, peace descended upon the Christians in Galilee, as well as in Judaea and Samaria (Acts 9:31). Walking in the fear of the Lord and the comfort of the Holy Spirit, their numbers greatly increased.
1. The name.-The name ‘Galilee’ is derived from the Heb. נָּלִיל (Gâlîl), through the Gr. Γαλιλαία and the Lat. Galilœa. The Hebrew word, denoting ‘ring’ or ‘circle,’ was used geographically to describe a ‘circuit’ of towns and villages. As applied to this particular district in north-western Palestine, the form used is either הַנָּלִיל, ‘the district’ (Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:32, 1 Kings 9:11, 2 Kings 15:29, 1 Chronicles 6:76), or נְּלִיל הַנּוֹיִם, ‘district of the nations’ (Isaiah 9:1). Given originally to the highlands on the extreme northern border, this name gradually extended itself southwards over the hill-country till it reached and eventually included the Plain of Esdraelon (G. A. Smith, Historical Geography of the Holy Land (G. A. Smith) 4, pp. 379 and 415). For the most part, however, Esdraelon seems to have been a frontier or arena of battle, rather than an actual part of Galilee.
2. The boundaries.-The natural boundaries of Galilee never agreed with its political frontiers. The naturallimits are Esdraelon, the Mediterranean Sea, the Jordan valley, and the gorge of the river Litany. But the actual borders have shifted from time to time. At the period of widest extension, they may be set down as the Kasimiyeh or Litany gorge on the N., the southern edge of Esdraelon on the S., Phœnicia (which always belonged to Gentiles) on the W., and the Upper Jordan (with its two lakes) on the E. These boundaries, excluding Carmel and the area of the lakes, enclosed a province about 50 miles long by 25 to 35 miles broad-an area of about 1600 square miles. Within these limits lay ‘a region of mountain, hill, and plain, the most diversified and attractive in Palestine’ (Masterman, Studies in Galilee, p. 4).
3. The divisions.-Josephus (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) iii. iii. 1) gives the divisions, in his time, as two, called the Upper Galilee and the Lower. The Mishna (Shebuth ix. 2) states that the province contained ‘the upper, the lower, and the valley.’ The latter are certainly the natural divisions. The mountains separate very clearly into a higher northern and a lower southern group, and the ‘valley’ is the valley of the Upper Jordan.
(a) Upper Galilee is less easily characterized physically than Lower. ‘It appears to the casual observer a confused mass of tumbled mountains, to which not even the map can give an orderly view’ (Masterman, p. 11). It is in reality ‘a series of plateaus, with a double water-parting, and surrounded by hills from 2000 to 4000 feet’ (G. A. Smith, Historical Geography of the Holy Land (G. A. Smith) 4, p. 416). The central point is Jebel Jermak (3934 ft.), the highest mountain in western Palestine. The scantier water supply of Upper Galilee is compensated for by the copiousness of the dew-fall throughout the later summer months.
(b) Lower Galilee is easier to describe. It consists of parallel ranges of hills, all below 2000 ft., running from W. to E., with broad fertile valleys between. The whole region is of great natural fertility, owing to abundance of water, rich volcanic soil, the gentleness of the slopes, and the openness of the plains. The great roads of the province cross this lower hill-country. The dividing-line between Upper and Lower Galilee is the range of mountains running right across the country along the northern edge of the Plain of Rameh.
(c) The Valley consists of the Upper Jordan and its two lakes, Huleh and Gennesaret. The river, taking its rise from springs and streams in the neighbourhood of Banias and Tel-el-Kadi, flows south in a steadily deepening channel, through Huleh, till it empties itself into the Sea of Gennesaret, at a depth of 689 ft. below sea-level. It has fallen to this depth in about 19 miles. Six miles north of the lake, the river is crossed by the ‘Bridge of the daughters of Jacob,’ on the famous Via Maris of the Middle Ages, the principal thoroughfare between Damascus and the Mediterranean ports. The Lake of Galilee could never be sufficiently praised by the Jewish Rabbis. They said that Jahweh had created seven seas, and of these had chosen the Sea of Gennesaret as His special delight. It had rich alluvial plains on the north and south, a belt of populous and flourishing cities round its border, abundance of fish in its depths, and a climate that attracted both workers and pleasure-seekers to its shores. At the beginning of the Christian era, it presented a reproduction in miniature of the rich life and varied activities of the province as a whole.
4. The physical characteristics.-These are principally two: (a) abundance of water, and (b) fertility of soil. As to (a), the words of the ancient promise, ‘for the Lord thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths springing forth in valleys and hills’ (Deuteronomy 8:7), are literally true of Galilee, particularly in its southern half. Large quantities of water are collected during the rainy season among the higher slopes and plateaus, and are thence dispersed by the rivers and streams over the lower-lying tracts, where they become stored in springs and wells. There are the two lakes already mentioned-Huleh, 3½ miles long by 3 miles wide (the Samechonitis of Josephus, but probably not the Waters of Merom of Joshua 11:5; Joshua 11:7 [1]); the Lake of Galilee (Gennesaret), 13 miles long by 8 miles broad at its widest point. Round its shores are the ruins of at least nine ancient cities or towns. These are Chorazin, Capernaum, Magdala, Tiberias, Taricheae, Hippos, Gamala, Gergesa, and Bethsaida. The principal rivers of the province are the Jordan, the Litany, the Kishon, and the Belus. In addition to these lakes and rivers, there are many greater streams and innumerable springs and wells. These waters, together with the copious dews of the summer, give Galilee the advantage over Samaria and set it in marked contrast to Judaea .
As to (b), all authorities unite in celebrating the natural wealth of Galilee, The other half of the promise made to the Hebrews was also true of this highly favoured province. It was ‘a land of wheat and barley, and vines and fig trees and pomegranates; a land of oil olives and honey; a land wherein thou shalt eat bread without scarceness, thou shalt not lack any thing in it’ (Deuteronomy 8:8-9). Josephus bears witness that the soil was universally rich and fruitful, and that it invited even the most slothful to take pains in its cultivation (Jos. Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) iii. iii. 2). Even to-day, when such large tracts lie uncultivated, no part of Palestine is more productive. The chief products were oil, wine, wheat, and fish. ‘In Asher, oil flows like a river,’ said the Rabbis, who also held that it was ‘easier to raise a legion of olive trees in Galilee than to raise one child in Judaea .’ Gischala was the chief place of manufacture. There were also large stores at Jotapata during the Roman War. Considerable quantities were sent to Tyre and to Egypt. Made from the olive trees, the oil was used principally for external application, for illumination, and in connexion with religious ritual. Wine was made in many quarters of the province, the best qualities coming from Sigona; while wheat and other grains were plentifully raised all over Lower Galilee, especially round about Sepphoris and in the fields of the Plain of Gennesaret. The fish, for which the province was always noted in ancient times, was caught in the inland lakes, particularly in the Lake of Galilee. It formed a large part of the food of the lake-side dwellers, and a considerable trade was carried on by the fish-catchers and fish-curers of the large towns on the shore. The best fishing-grounds were, and still are, at el-Bataiha in the north, and in the bay of Tabigha, at the N.W. corner. Taricheae, in the south, was another centre of the industry. In addition to the above-mentioned commodities, Galilee produced flax from which fine linen fabrics were woven, pottery, and a rich dye made from the indigo plant. The prosperity of the province was enhanced by its proximity to the Phœnician ports, and by the network of highways which crossed it in all directions.
5. The inhabitants.-To-day Galilee possesses a remarkably mixed population, and its inhabitants are physically finer than those of the southern provinces (cf. Masterman, pp. 17-20). In apostolic times, the same was true. Along the western and northern borders were the Syrophœnicians (Mark 7:26), or Tyrians (as Josephus calls them), while from the east nomadic Bedouins were continually pressing in upon the lower-lying tracts. But besides these Semitic elements, Greeks and Graecized Syrians were distributed over parts of the land (Masterman, p. 120), and Romans made their influence felt throughout a large area of the province. Only in the more secluded towns among the hills would Jewish life be preserved in its characteristic purity. In spite, however, of the mingling of nationalities, the Galilaeans were thoroughly and patriotically Jewish during the 1st cent. of the Christian era. Wherever a true Jew settled abroad, he kept himself distinct from his neighbours, clinging tenaciously to his religion and to his racial customs. And the same thing happened with the Jew at home, when Gentile immigrants settled within his borders. His contempt for foreigners and foreign ways helped him to keep his own character and traditions intact. The Galilaeans were industrious workers-the bulk of them being cultivators of the soil or tenders of the fruit-trees. They were brave soldiers too, as may be learned from the chronicles of Josephus.
‘The Galilaeans are inured to war from their infancy, and have been always very numerous; nor has their country ever been destitute of men of courage’ (Jos. Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) iii. iii. 2).
There does not seem to be any sufficient ground for the dislike and contempt in which the Galilaeans were held by their religiously stricter brethren of Judaea . Possibly they were less exact in their observance of tradition. But they were devoted to the Law, and their country was well supplied with synagogues, schools, and teachers. If they were less orthodox, from the Pharisaic standpoint, the Messianic hope burned brightly in their souls, and they crowded to the ministry of Jesus. They were certainly more tolerant and open-minded than the Judaea ns, and it was from them that Jesus chose most of the men who were to give His teaching to the world.
The population of Galilee in apostolic times was considerably greater than it is to-day. At the present time, it is estimated to be somewhere about 250,000 (including children), spread over an area of 1341 square miles and inhabiting some 312 towns and villages. This gives 186 to the square mile. Josephus’ figures mean that the population in his day amounted to something like three millions. He speaks of 204 cities and villages (Vita, 45), the smallest of which contained above 15,000 inhabitants (Bellum Judaicum (Josephus) iii. iii. 2). This estimate, in spite of the arguments of Merrill (Galilee in the Time of Christ, pp. 62-67), can hardly be correct. Good reasons have been given for believing that 400,000 is a much more likely figure, which means a population of 440 to the square mile. A village of 1,500 inhabitants is reckoned to be a very large one today, and the largest towns (with the exception of Safed) contain fewer than 15,000 people. See Masterman, pp. 131-134.
6. History and government.-At the partition of west Palestine among the twelve tribes, Galilee fell to the lot of Issachar, Zebulun, Asher, and Naphtali, who did not drive out the original inhabitants. The population, therefore, continued to be a mixed one, and the borders of the province were constantly being pressed upon by foreigners. In 734 b.c., Tiglath-Pileser III. carried away most of the inhabitants, and after this depopulation very few Jews re-settled in the district till the extension of the Jewish State under John Hyrcanus (135-104 b.c.). At this time, or a little later, Galilee became thoroughly judaized. The settlers were placed under the Law, and quickly developed a warm patriotism, which made them ever afterwards zealous and persistent champions of their national rights and traditions. Later on, the province was the principal scene of our Lord’s life and ministry. Later still, it succeeded Judaea as ‘the sanctuary of the race and the home of their theological schools’ (G. A. Smith, Historical Geography of the Holy Land (G. A. Smith) 4, p. 425).
From 4 b.c. to a.d. 39, Herod Antipas was tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea, by appointment of the Roman Emperor. Antipas appears to have been a capable ruler on the whole. Like his father, he was fond of building and embellishing cities. He re-built and fortified Sepphoris, his first capital, and a little later erected a new capital city on the west shore of the lake, calling it Tiberias, after the Emperor whose favour he enjoyed. Having secured the banishment of Antipas in a.d. 39, Herod Agrippa I. received the tetrarchy of Galilee, in addition to the territories of Philip and of Lysanias which he had previously obtained. From Claudius (in a.d. 41) he also obtained Judaea and Samaria, thus establishing dominion over all the land formerly ruled by Herod the Great. After Agrippa’s death, in a.d. 44, Claudius reverted to the method of government by procurator-a change which greatly displeased the Jews as a whole and especially stirred the animosity of the zealots. Under the administration of the new procurators, the people’s patience became exhausted, and in the time of Gessius Florus (a.d. 64-66) the revolt began which ended in the destruction of the Jewish State. In the spring of a.d. 67 Vespasian assembled his army at Ptolemais and began the reduction of Galilee. This was accomplished in the course of the first campaign, despite the courage and persistence of the inhabitants. But it was not till after the lapse of another three years that Jerusalem fell (a.d. 70) and the Jewish State was dissolved.
Though the general administration of Galilaean civil affairs lay (till a.d. 44) with the tetrarchs, the details of daily life were regulated by the Jews’ own religious laws (Dict. of Christ and the Gospels . i. 633). The Sanhedrin at Jerusalem exercised the chief authority, but there were also local ‘councils’ (Matthew 5:22; Matthew 10:17) which had limited jurisdiction. But, throughout the whole period, over all and influencing all, was the firm rule of Rome.
Literature.-articles in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible (5 vols) ii. 98-102 (S. Merrill), Dict. of Christ and the Gospels i. 632-634 (G. W. Thatcher), and Realencyklopädie für protestantische Theologie und Kirche 3 (Guthe); G. A. Smith, Historical Geography of the Holy Land (G. A. Smith) 4, 1897, chs. xx.-xxi.; S. Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ, Boston, 1881, London, 1885; V. Guérin, Description … de la Palestine, pt. iii.: ‘Galilée,’ Paris, 1880; F. Buhl, GAP [2] , Freiburg and Leipzig, 1896, §§ 18-19, 68, 113-123; E. Schürer, History of the Jewish People (Eng. tr. of GJV).] , 1885-91 (index); E. W. G. Masterman, Studies in Galilee, Chicago, 1909; A. Neubauer, La Géog. du Talmud, Paris, 1868, §§ 188-240; SWP [3] i. [4].
A. W. Cooke.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Galilee
(Hebrew: district)
Most northern of the three provinces of Palestine west of the Jordan at the time of Our Lord, comprising in general the territory assigned by Josue to the tribes of Asher, Nephtali, Zabulon, and Issachar. It was the native land of Jesus Christ, the cradle of the Christian Faith, where He began His ministry and performed many of His miracles, and from whence came His Apostles. Joseph and Mary belonged to Nazareth, the chief city in the south, and there Jesus lived the greater part of His life. Galilee's fertility, invigorating climate, forests, vineyards, lakes, rivers, and prosperous cities gave it a varied and attractive aspect.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Galilee, Sea of
A lake in Palestine, about 13 miles long, and 7.5 miles wide, which lies in the Jordan gorge. In the time of Our Lord, vines and fig-trees and thick forests surrounded it, the nearby plains yielded rich harvests twice a year, and many cities were situated on its shores. Today they are barren and desolate, with only a few straggling villages. The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13). There took place the two miraculous draughts of fishes, after the first of which the Apostles were called (Luke 5) and after the second Peter was made Vicar of Jesus Christ on earth (John 21). On another occasion a tax was paid through a miraculous catch (Matthew 17).
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Galilee Porch
A porch or chapel at the entrance of a church, corresponding to the ancient atrium. It is also applied to the nave of a large church or the entrance end of the nave architecturally divided from the rest. One of the finest examples in England is that of Durham cathedral.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Cana of Galilee
The scene of the Lord's first miracle and of His second in Galilee: the native place of Nathanael. John 2:1,11 ; John 4:46 ; John 21:2 . There is nothing in these passages to tell where Cana was situated except that it was in the neighbourhood of Capernaum and on higher ground. It is identified by most with Kefr Kenna, 32 45' N, 35 20' E , but others prefer Kana el Jelil, about 8 miles north of Nazareth, the name of which more resembles Cana.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Galilee
This was a much smaller district in the O.T. than in the N.T., although its area is not very defined. It seems formerly to have included a portion of Naphtali, and perhaps a portion of Asher. 'Kedesh in Galilee,' one of the cities of refuge was in Naphtali. Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 ; 1 Chronicles 6:76 . Solomon gave Hiram twenty cities in Galilee. These are not named, but they would naturally be near to Tyre. When Hiram went to view them he called them the 'land of Cabul,' as if he included them all under the one name of 'Cabul,' worthless. Now there was and is a village of this name on the frontier of Asher, which would seem to indicate that Asher was in the district of Galilee. 1 Kings 9:11-13 . About B.C. 740 Tiglath-pileser carried away captive all the inhabitants of Naphtali, etc. 2 Kings 15:29 . This was doubtless followed by the district being inhabited by foreigners, who, when the captivity of Israel was completed, would be able to spread themselves southward. Hence the term 'Galilee of the Gentiles ,' or nations, which does not occur until Isaiah 9:1 ; the prophecy is quoted in Matthew 4:15 .
In N.T. times Galilee had become a much larger district, including the portions of Asher, Naphtali, Zebulon, and Issachar. It had over 200 towns and villages, and about three million inhabitants in Josephus' time. It was bounded on the south by Samaria, and embraced the whole of the north part of Palestine. It included the towns of Nain, Nazareth, Cana, Tiberias, Magdala, Dalmanutha, Bethsaida, Chorazin, and Capernaum.
It is probable that the Galilaeans had a different manner of pronunciation, or the language spoken in Galilee was not so refined as that spoken at Jerusalem, which led to Peter being detected by his speech. Matthew 26:69,73 ; Mark 14:70 . But the voice of the same Peter, under the power of God, was mighty on the day of Pentecost, though the hearers said "are not all these which speak Galilaeans?" Acts 2:7 . They were surprised to hear such men speak in foreign tongues, the more so because no prophet was ever looked for from thence, nor any good thing from Nazareth. John 1:46 ; John 7:52 . Still in that despised district the Lord spent His youth: thus early was He as One separated from the course of the nation of Israel, a Nazarene; and the principal part of His ministry was among the poor of the flock in that locality; fulfilling thus the will of God and the prophetic word, on which God had caused His people to hope.
Morrish Bible Dictionary - Galilee, Sea of
This was situate about the centre of the district of Galilee on the east. The Jordan enters it on the north, and leaves it on the south. Its waters are about 630 feet below the level of the Mediterranean, and its depth about 156 feet. Its length is about thirteen miles, and its widest part about eight miles. On the east of it was the country of the Gergesenes and the Gadarenes. Chorazin was on its north; Capernaum on its N.W.; then, coming southward, was Bethsaida of Galilee, with the plain of Gennesaret (or Chinnereth) near; then Magdala, Dalmanutha and Tiberias on the west. These places being near accounts for the sea being called the LAKE OF GENNESARET and the SEA OF TIBERIAS and of CHINNERETH.
The Lord crossed the sea several times, and taught from a ship near the shore, and once He walked upon its waters. Storms often arise suddenly, as did the one when the Lord was asleep on a pillow. Mark 4:37-41 ; Luke 8:22-25 .
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Galilee
Galilee (găl'i-lee), circle, circuit. A name in the Old Testament for a small district in the northern mountains of Naphtali, around Kedesh-naphtali, and including 20 towns given by Solomon to Hiram, king of Tyre, Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:32; 1 Kings 9:11; 2 Kings 15:29, and called "Galilee of the nations" in Isaiah 9:1. Devastated during the wars of the Captivity, it was repeopled by strangers. In the time of the Maccabees they probably outnumbered the Jewish population, and gave their new name to a much wider district. In the time of our Lord, Palestine was divided into three provinces, of which Galilee was the most northern. It included the whole region from the plain of Jezreel to the Litany (Leontes) river, being about 50 miles long by 20 to 25 miles wide. The northern part was known as Upper and the southern part as Lower Galilee. These included the territories given to Asher, Naphtali, Zebulun, and Issachar. The country was famed for its fertility, rich pastures, and fine forests. The portion west of the lake was the most beautiful. In the Roman period the population was dense, Josephus estimating it at 2,000,000 or 3,000,000, though that is probably an exaggeration. It had a mixed population of heathens, foreigners, and Jews. The latter, having a strong, if not dominant, influence, were less strict and less acquainted with the Law than their southern Judæan neighbors, by whom they were little esteemed. The noted mountains of Galilee were Carmel, Gilboa, and Tabor; the towns were Nazareth, Cana, Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum. Jesus spent the greater portion of his life and ministry in Galilee. Many of his most remarkable miracles, teachings, and labors were within this province of Galilee. His disciples were chiefly from this region. Acts 1:11. After the fall of Jerusalem, Galilee became the residence of celebrated rabbis and the centre of Jewish schools of learning.
People's Dictionary of the Bible - Galilee Sea of
Galilee, Sea of. Named from the province of Galilee, which bordered on its western side, Matthew 4:18. It was also called the "Sea of Tiberias," from the city of that name, John 6:1, and "Sea of Chinneroth" in the Old Testament. At its northwestern angle was a beautiful and fertile plain called "Gennesaret," and from that it derived the name of "Lake of Gennesaret." Luke 5:1; Numbers 34:11; Joshua 12:3, and Galilee, Joshua 19:35. Its modern name is Bahr Tubarîyeh. Most of our Lord's public life was spent in the environs of this sea. The Sea of Galilee is of an oval shape, about 12 miles long and 6 broad. It is 60 miles northeast of Jerusalem and 27 east of the Mediterranean sea. The river Jordan enters it at its northern end and passes out at its southern end. Its most remarkable feature is its deep depression, being no less than 700 feet below the level of the ocean. The scenery is bleak and monotonous, being surrounded by a high and almost unbroken wall of hills, on account of which it is exposed to frequent sudden and violent storms. The great depression makes the climate of the shores almost tropical. In summer the heat is intense, and even in early spring the air has something of an Egyptian balminess. The water of the lake is sweet, cool, and transparent; and as the beach is everywhere pebbly it has a beautiful sparkling look. It abounds in fish now as in ancient times. There were large fisheries on the lake, and much commerce was carried on upon it. There are only a few small boats now to be found on the lake.
The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Galilee
A province in Palestine. Nazareth was a city of Galilee. And as the Lord Jesus was brought up in this city, he was called, by way of reproach, the Galilean. Isaiah, speaking of the gospel, ages before Christ came, pointed to this memorable spot, as comprehensive of all blessings in the advent of Jesus; and Matthew made application of the prophet's words to Christ. "The land of Zebulon, and the land of Naphtali, by the way of the sea beyond Jordan, in Galilee of the nations. The people that walked in darkness have seen a great light: they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death, upon them hath the light shined." (Isaiah 9:1-2; Matthew 4:15-16)
Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Galilee
was one of the most extensive provinces into which the Holy Land was divided. It exceeded Judea in extent, but probably varied in its limits at different times. This province is divided by the rabbins into, 1. The Upper; 2. The Nether; and 3. The Valley. Josephus divides it into only Upper and Lower; and he says that the limits of Galilee were, on the south, Samaria and Scythopolis, unto the flood of Jordan. Galilee contained four tribes, Issachar, Zebulun, Naphtali, and Asher; a part, also, of Dan, and part of Persia, that is, beyond the river. Upper Galilee abounded in mountains. Lower Galilee, which contained the tribes of Zebulun and Asher, was sometimes called the Great Field, "the champaign,"
Deuteronomy 11:30 . The Valley was adjacent to the sea of Tiberias. Josephus describes Galilee as very populous, and containing two hundred and four cities and towns. It was also very rich, and paid two hundred talents in tribute. The natives were brave and good soldiers; but they were seditious, and prone to insolence and rebellion. In the books of Ezra and Nehemiah, the inhabitants of Galilee and Peraea are scarcely mentioned, whether they were Jews returned from Babylon, or a mixture of different nations. The language of these regions differed considerably from that of Judea; as did various customs, in which each followed its own mode. Our Lord so frequently visited Galilee, that he was called a Galilean, Matthew 26:69 . The population of Galilee being very great, he had many opportunities of doing good in this country; and, being there out of the power of the priests at Jerusalem, he seems to have preferred it as his abode. Nazareth and Capernaum were in this division. From such a mixture of people, many provincialisms might be expected. Hence, we find Peter detected by his language, probably by his phraseology, as well as his pronunciation, Mark 14:70 . Upper Galilee had Mount Lebanon and the countries of Tyre and Sidon on the north; the Mediterranean Sea on the west; Abilene, Ituraea, and the country of the Decapolis, on the east; and Lower Galilee on the south. Its principal city was Caesarea Philippi. This part of Galilee, being less inhabited by Jews, was thence called Galilee of the Nations, or of the Gentiles. Lower Galilee had the upper division of the same country to the north; the Mediterranean on the west; the sea of Galilee, or lake of Gennesareth, on the east; and Samaria on the south. Its principal cities were Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, Nazareth, Cana, Capernaum, Nain, Caesarea of Palestine, and Ptolemais. This district was of all others most honoured with the presence of our Saviour. Here he was conceived; here he was brought back by his mother and reputed father, after their return from Egypt; here he lived with them till he was thirty years of age; and, although after his entrance on his public ministry he frequently visited the other provinces, it was here that he chiefly resided. Here, also, he made his first appearance after his resurrection to his Apostles, who were themselves natives of the same country, and were thence called men of Galilee.
GALILEE, Sea of. This inland sea, or more properly lake, which derives its several names, the lake of Tiberias, the sea of Galilee, and the lake of Gennesareth, from the territory which forms its western and south-western border, is computed to be between seventeen and eighteen miles in length, and from five to six in breadth. The mountains on the east come close to its shore, and the country on that side has not a very agreeable aspect: on the west, it has the plain of Tiberias, the high ground of the plain of Hutin, or Hottein, the plain of Gennesareth, and the foot of those hills by which you ascend to the high mountain of Saphet. To the north and south it has a plain country, or valley. There is a current throughout the whole breadth of the lake, even to the shore; and the passage of the Jordan through it is discernible by the smoothness of the surface in that part. Various travellers have given different accounts of its general aspect. According to Captain Mangles, the land about it has no striking features, and the scenery is altogether devoid of character. "It appeared," he says, "to particular disadvantage to us, after those beautiful lakes we had seen in Switzerland; but it becomes a very interesting object when you consider the frequent allusions to it in the Gospel narrative." Dr. Clarke, on the contrary, speaks of the uncommon grandeur of this memorable scenery. "The lake of Gennesareth," he says, "is surrounded by objects well calculated to heighten the solemn impressions made by such recollections, and affords one of the most striking prospects in the Holy Land. Speaking of it comparatively, it may be described as longer and finer than any of our Cumberland and Westmoreland lakes, although perhaps inferior to Loch Lomond. It does not possess the vastness of the lake of Geneva, although it much resembles it in certain points of view. In picturesque beauty, it comes nearest to the lake of Locarno, in Italy, although it is destitute of any thing similar to the islands by which that majestic piece of water is adorned. It is inferior in magnitude, and in the height of its surrounding mountains, to the Lake Asphaltites." Mr. Buckingham may perhaps be considered as having given the most accurate account, and one which reconciles, in some degree, the differing statements above cited, when, speaking of the lake as seen from Tel Hoom, he says, that its appearance is grand, but that the barren aspect of the mountains on each side, and the total absence of wood, give a cast of dulness to the picture: this is increased to melancholy by the dead calm of its waters, and the silence which reigns throughout its whole extent, where not a boat or vessel of any kind is to be found. The situation of the lake, lying, as it were, in a deep basin between the hills which enclose it on all sides, excepting only the narrow entrance and outlets of the Jordan at either end, protects its waters from long-continued tempests: its surface is in general as smooth as that of the Dead Sea. But the same local features render it occasionally subject to whirlwinds, squalls, and sudden gusts from the mountains, of short duration; especially when the strong current formed by the Jordan is opposed by a wind of this description from the south-east, sweeping from the mountains with the force of a hurricane, it may easily be conceived that a boisterous sea must be instantly raised, which the small vessels of the country would be unable to resist. A storm of this description is plainly denoted by the language of the evangelist, in recounting one of our Lord's miracles: "There came down a storm of wind on the lake, and they were filled with water, and were in jeopardy. Then he arose, and rebuked the wind and the raging of the water; and they ceased, and there was a calm,"
Luke 8:23-24 . There were fleets of some force on this lake during the wars of the Jews with the Romans, and very bloody battles were fought between them. Josephus gives a particular account of a naval engagement between the Romans under Vespasian, and the Jews who had revolted during the administration of Agrippa. Titus and Trajan were both present, and Vespasian himself was on board the Roman fleet. The rebel force consisted of an immense multitude, who, as fugitives after the capture of Tarichaea by Titus, had sought refuge on the water. The vessels in which the Romans defeated them were built for the occasion, and yet were larger than the Jewish ships. The victory was followed by so terrible a slaughter of the Jews, that nothing was to be seen, either on the lake or its shores, but the blood and mangled corpses of the slain; and the air was infected by the number of dead bodies. Six thousand five hundred persons are stated to have perished in this naval engagement, and in the battle of Tarichaea, beside twelve hundred who were afterward massacred in cold blood, by order of Vespasian, in the amphitheatre at Tiberias, and a vast number who were given to Agrippa as slaves.
1910 New Catholic Dictionary - Sea of Galilee
A lake in Palestine, about 13 miles long, and 7.5 miles wide, which lies in the Jordan gorge. In the time of Our Lord, vines and fig-trees and thick forests surrounded it, the nearby plains yielded rich harvests twice a year, and many cities were situated on its shores. Today they are barren and desolate, with only a few straggling villages. The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13). There took place the two miraculous draughts of fishes, after the first of which the Apostles were called (Luke 5) and after the second Peter was made Vicar of Jesus Christ on earth (John 21). On another occasion a tax was paid through a miraculous catch (Matthew 17).
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Galilee
In the time of Christ, included all the northern part of Palestine lying west of the Jordan and north of Samaria. Before the exile the name seems to have been applied only to a small tract bordering on the northern limits, 1 Kings 9:11 . Galilee, in the time of Christ, was divided into Upper and Lower, the former lying north of the territory of the tribe of Zebulun, and abounding in mountains; the latter being more level and fertile, and very populous; the whole comprehending the four tribes of Issachar, Zebulun, Naphtali, and Asher. Lower Galilee is aid to have contained four hundred and four towns and villages, of which Josephus mentions Tiberias, Sepphoris, and Gabara, as the principal; though Capernaum and Nazareth are the most frequently mentioned in the New Testament, Mark 1:9 Luke 2:39 John 7:52 , etc. "Galilee of the Gentiles" is supposed to be Upper Galilee, either because it bordered on Tyre and Zidon, or because Phenicians, Syrians, Arabs, and other heathen were numerous among it inhabitants. The Galileans were accounted brave and industrious; though other Jews affected to consider them as not only stupid and unpolished, but also seditious, and therefore proper objects of contempt, Luke 13:1 23:6 John 1:47 7:52 . They appear to have used a peculiar dialect, by which they were easily distinguished from the Jews of Jerusalem, Mark 14:70 . Many of the apostles and first converts to Christianity were men of Galilee, Acts 1:11 2:7 , as well as Christ himself; and the name Galilean was often given as an insult, both to him and his followers. The apostate emperor Julian constantly used it, and in his dying agony and rage cried out, "O Galilean, thou hast conquered!" Our Savior resided here from infancy till he was thirty years of age, and during much of his public ministry; and the cities of his public ministry; and the cities of Nazareth, Nain, Cana, Capernaum, with the whole region of the sea of Galilee, are sacredly endeared to all his people by the words he there spoke, and the wonders he wrought. For the Sea of Galilee, see SEA 3.
Smith's Bible Dictionary - ju'Das of Galilee,
the leader of a popular revolt "in the days of the taxing" (i.e. the census, under the prefecture of P. Sulp. Quirinus, A.D. 6, A.U.C. 759), referred to by Gamaliel in his speech before the Sanhedrin. (Acts 5:37 ) According to Josephus, Judas was a Gaulonite of the city of Gamala, probably taking his name of Galilean from his insurrection having had its rise in Galilee. The Gaulonites, as his followers were called, may be regarded as the doctrinal ancestors of the Zealots and Sicarii of later days.
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Galilee
Galilee was the northern section of Palestine. It was a mountainous region that extended from the Lake of Galilee north to the Lebanon Ranges and west to the coastal plain. The Old Testament barely mentions it by name, since it was not in those days a distinct political territory. When the Old Testament refers to places in Galilee, it usually mentions them according to their location in the tribal areas of the region – Dan, Naphtali, Issachar, Zebulun and Asher (Joshua 20:7; Isaiah 9:1; cf. Matthew 4:12-15).
All Dictionary (29) 1910 New Catholic Dictionary (4) American Tract Society Bible Dictionary (1) Bridgeway Bible Dictionary (2) Easton's Bible Dictionary (2) Fausset's Bible Dictionary (2) Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible (3) Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament (3) Hitchcock's Bible Names (1) Holman Bible Dictionary (3) Morrish Bible Dictionary (3) People's Dictionary of the Bible (2) Smith's Bible Dictionary (1) The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary (1) Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary (1)

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Zebulun, Lot of - In Galilee, to the north of Issachar and south of Asher and Naphtali (Joshua 19:10-16 ), and between the Sea of Galilee and the Mediterranean. According to ancient prophecy this part of Galilee enjoyed a large share of our Lord's public ministry (Isaiah 9:1,2 ; Matthew 4:12-16 )
Galilee, Mountain in - Galilee, MOUNTAIN IN . After our Lord’s resurrection, the eleven disciples went away from Jerusalem ‘into Galilee, unto the mountain where Jesus had appointed them’ ( Matthew 28:16 ). of Olives, whose north point is said to have borne the name ‘Galilee
Galilee - It continued long to be occupied by the original inhabitants, and hence came to be called "Galilee of the Gentiles" (Matthew 4:15 ), and also "Upper Galilee," to distinguish it from the extensive addition afterwards made to it toward the south, which was usually called "Lower Galilee. " In the time of our Lord, Galilee embraced more than one-third of Western Palestine, extending "from Dan on the north, at the base of Mount Hermon, to the ridges of Carmel and Gilboa on the south, and from the Jordan valley on the east away across the splendid plains of Jezreel and Acre to the shores of the Mediterranean on the west. " Palestine was divided into three provinces, Judea, Samaria, and Galilee, which comprehended the whole northern section of the country (Acts 9:31 ), and was the largest of the three. Galilee also was the home of our Lord during at least thirty years of his life. " "It is noteworthy that of his thirty-two beautiful parables, no less than ninteen were spoken in Galilee. His first miracle was wrought at the wedding in Cana of Galilee, and his last, after his resurrection, on the shore of Galilee's sea. In Galilee our Lord delivered the Sermon on The Mount, and the discourses on 'The Bread of Life,' on 'Purity,' on 'Forgiveness,' and on 'Humility. ' In Galilee he called his first disciples; and there occurred the sublime scene of the Transfiguration" (Porter's Through Samaria). ) They replied, "Art thou also of Galilee?. Out of Galilee ariseth no prophet. " This saying of theirs was "not historically true, for two prophets at least had arisen from Galilee, Jonah of Gath-hepher, and the greatest of all the prophets, Elijah of Thisbe, and perhaps also Nahum and Hosea. Their contempt for Galilee made them lose sight of historical accuracy" (Alford, Com
Galilee - The Septuagint or early Greek translation referred to a king of the nations of Galilee in Joshua 12:23 , though the Hebrew reads, “Gilgal. Kedesh in Galilee was a city of refuge (Joshua 20:7 ) and a city for the Levites (Joshua 21:32 ). Solomon paid Hiram of Tyre twenty cities of Galilee for the building materials Hiram supplied for the Temple and royal palace (1 Kings 9:11 ), but the cities did not please Hiram, who called them Cabul, meaning, “like nothing” (1 Kings 9:12-13 ). Apparently, Galilee and Tyre bordered on each other. The Assyrians took the north under Tiglath-pileser in 733 (2 Kings 15:29 ) and divided it into three districts—the western coast or “the way of the sea” with capital at Dor, Galilee with capital at Megiddo, and beyond Jordan or Gilead (Isaiah 9:1 ). ...
The term “Galilee” apparently was used prior to Israel's conquest, being mentioned in Egyptian records. ...
In the time of Jesus' Galilee, Herod Antipas governed Galilee and Perea. Jesus devoted most of His earthly ministry to Galilee, being known as the Galilean (Matthew 26:69 ). 70, Galilee became the major center of Judaism, the Mishnah and Talmud being collected and written there
Chorazin - A town in Galilee, near to Capernaum and Bethsaida, on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee. No traces of its name remain; but Robinson with strong probability locates it at the modern Tell-hum, on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee, three miles northeast of Capernaum
Beth-Arbel - One place of this name lay twenty-five miles southeast of the sea of Galilee. Another was in Galilee, near Magdala
Tiberias, Sea of - See Galilee, SEA OF
Gennesaret, Lake of - See Galilee, SEA OF
Sea of Galilee - See Galilee, Sea of ; Palestine
Galileans - the inhabitants of Galilee, the northern province of Palestine. (Acts 1:11 ) It appears also that the pronunciation of those Jews who resided in Galilee had become peculiar, probably from their contact with their Gentile neighbors
Storm - See Galilee [1], 3; Whirlwind
Tempest - See Galilee [1], 3 ; Whirlwind
Tempest - —See Sea of Galilee, p
Lake of Gennesaret - See Gennesaret, Lake of; Galilee, Sea of
Gennesaret, Lake of - —See Sea of Galilee
Lake of Gennesaret - —See Sea of Galilee
Gennesaret, Lake of - See Galilee [1]...
Gennesaret - (gehn nehss' uh reht) See Galilee, Sea of
Galilee - Galilee (găl'i-lee), circle, circuit. A name in the Old Testament for a small district in the northern mountains of Naphtali, around Kedesh-naphtali, and including 20 towns given by Solomon to Hiram, king of Tyre, Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:32; 1 Kings 9:11; 2 Kings 15:29, and called "Galilee of the nations" in Isaiah 9:1. In the time of our Lord, Palestine was divided into three provinces, of which Galilee was the most northern. The northern part was known as Upper and the southern part as Lower Galilee. The noted mountains of Galilee were Carmel, Gilboa, and Tabor; the towns were Nazareth, Cana, Tiberias, Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaum. Jesus spent the greater portion of his life and ministry in Galilee. Many of his most remarkable miracles, teachings, and labors were within this province of Galilee. After the fall of Jerusalem, Galilee became the residence of celebrated rabbis and the centre of Jewish schools of learning
Chinnereth - It applied both to the Lake of Gennesaret (the Sea of Galilee) and to the small Plain of Gennesaret on the lake’s western shore (Numbers 34:11; Joshua 19:35; Luke 5:1). For fuller details see PALESTINE, sub-heading ‘Upper Jordan and Sea of Galilee
Gennesareth - LAND OF, or GENNESAR, a small district of Galilee, supposed to have been so called from its pleasantness, and extending about four miles along the northwestern shore of the sea of Galilee, or Gennesareth, so called from this same region. This part of Galilee is described by Josephus as possessing a singular fertility, with a delightful temperature of the air, and abounding in the fruits of different climates
Sea (2) - See Galilee, Sea of
Sea (2) - See Galilee, Sea of
Sea (2) - See Galilee, Sea of
Sea (2) - See Galilee, Sea of
Adamah - of the sea of Galilee (Joshua 19:36)
Galilaeans - The inhabitants of Galilee
Cana - Reedy, a town of Galilee, near Capernaum. Others have identified it with Kefr Kenna, which lies on the direct road to the Sea of Galilee, about 5 miles north-east of Nazareth, and 12 in a direct course from Tiberias. It is called "Cana of Galilee," to distinguish it from Cana of Asher (Joshua 19:28 )
Gennesaret - "The land of Gennesaret," Matthew 14:34 Mark 6:53 , was a tract of land some three of four; miles long on the western border of the Sea of Galilee. It was a lovely and exceedingly fertile region; in it probably lay Capernaum and Bethsaida of Galilee, places often visited by our Lord
Galilee - Galilee...
1. Galilee was the province of Palestine north of Samaria. Eastward it was limited by the Jordan and the western bank of its expansions (the Sea of Galilee and Waters of Merom). The name Galilee is of Hebrew origin, and signifies a ‘ring’ or ‘circuit. ’ The name is a contraction of a fuller expression, preserved by Isaiah 9:1 , namely, ‘Galilee of the [1] nations. the Sea of Galilee. In the tribal partition of the country the territory of Galilee was divided among the septs of Asher, Naphtali, Zebulun, and part of Issachar. In the OT history the tribal designations are generally used when subdivisions of the country are denoted; this is no doubt the reason why the name ‘Galilee,’ which is not a tribal name, occurs so rarely in the Hebrew Scriptures though the passage in Isaiah already quoted, as well as the references to Kedesh and other cities ‘in Galilee’ ( Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 , 1 Kings 9:11 , 2 Kings 15:29 , 1 Chronicles 6:76 ), show that the name was familiar and employed upon occasion. But though some of the most important of the historical events of the early Hebrew history took place within the borders of Galilee, it cannot be said to have had a history of its own till later times. Under the Roman domination Galilee was governed as a tetrarchate, held by members of the Herod family. Herod the Great was ruler of Galilee in b. After the fall of Jerusalem, Galilee became the centre of Rabhinic life. But it is as the principal theatre of Christ’s life and work that Galilee commands its greatest interest. Owing to moisture derived from the Lehanon mountains, Galilee is the best-watered district of Palestine, and abounds in streams and springs, though the actual rainfall is little greater than that of Judæa. The Sea of Galilee fisheries were also important. Galilee in the time of Christ was inhabited by a mixed population. ‘Out of Galilee ariseth no prophet’ ( John 7:52 ) was another, in the face of the fact that Galilee was the home of Deborah, Barak, Ibzan, Tola, Elon, with the prophets Jonah, Elisha, and possibly Hosea
Galilee - Galilee from galil . Hence called (Isaiah 9:1) "Galilee of the nations," or "Gentiles" (Matthew 4:13; Matthew 4:15-16). ...
The most northerly of the three provinces of Palestine, namely, Galilee, Samaria, Judaea (John 4:3-4; Luke 17:11; Acts 9:31). Galilee's Gentile character caused the southern Jews of purer blood to despise it (John 1:46; John 7:52); but its very darkness was the Lord's reason for vouchsafing to it more of the light of His presence and ministry than to self-satisfied and privileged Judaea. Jerusalem, the theocratic capital, might readily have known Messiah; to compensate less favored Galilee He ministered mostly there. Galilee's debasement made its people feel their need of the Savior, a feeling unknown to the self right. The Jordan, the sea of Galilee, lake Huleh, and the spring at Dan, was the eastern border. Probably the cleansing of the ten lepers took place near Jenin, the border town of Galilee toward Samaria, near the S. of the sea of Galilee. Lower Galilee was the whole region from the plain of Akka on the W. to the lake of Galilee on the E. "Rejoice Zebulun in thy going out (thy mercantile enterprises by sea and fishing in the lake of Galilee), and Issachar in thy tents (in thy inland prosperity, agriculture and home comforts) they shall suck of the abundance of the seas (the riches of the sea in general, and the purple dye extracted from the murex here) and of treasures hid in the sand" (the sand of these coasts being especially valuable for manufacturing glass, a precious thing anciently: Job 28:17). Upper Galilee extended from Bersabe on the S. of the sea of Galilee to the plain of Akka. This upper Galilee is chiefly meant by "Galilee of the Gentiles. " The ravine of the Leonres separates the mountain range of upper Galilee from Lebanon, of which it is a southern prolongation. On the table land of upper Galilee lie the ruins of Kedesh Naphtali (Joshua 20:7). As Nazareth was the scene of our Lord's childhood, so Capernaum in Galilee was for long the home of His manhood (Matthew 4:13; Judges 1:30). ) The three former, or the Synoptic Gospels chiefly present our Lord's ministry in Galilee; the Gospel of John His ministry in Judea. His parables in John and in the three Synoptists correspond to the features of Judaea and Galilee respectively. The vineyard, fig tree, shepherd, and desert where the man fell among thieves, were appropriate in Judaea; the grainfields (Mark 4:28), the merchants and fisheries (Matthew 13:45; Matthew 13:47), and the flowers (Matthew 6:28), suited Galilee. After Herod the Great's death Herod Antipas governed Galilee until six years after Christ's crucifixion. On his death (Acts 12:23) Galilee was joined to the Roman province of Syria. After the fall of Jerusalem Galilee became famed for its rabbis and schools of Jewish learning; and the Sanhedrim or great council was removed to Sepphoris, and then to Tiberias. The remains of splendid synagogues in Galilee still attest the prosperity of the Jews from the second to the seventh century
Beth-Anath - A town of Naphtali, now the village ‘Ainatha , in the mountains of Upper Galilee
Tiberias - The town of Tiberias was on the western shore of Lake Galilee (also called the Sea of Galilee and the Sea of Tiberias) (John 6:1; John 6:23)
Janoah - A place in northern Galilee, the land of Naphtali, taken by Tiglath Pileser (2 Kings 15:29)
Alilean - ) Of or relating to Galilee. ) A native or inhabitant of Galilee, the northern province of Palestine under the Romans
Jairus - Ruler of a synagogue in Galilee, whose daughter the Lord restored to life
Galilee - Galilee, in the time of Christ, was divided into Upper and Lower, the former lying north of the territory of the tribe of Zebulun, and abounding in mountains; the latter being more level and fertile, and very populous; the whole comprehending the four tribes of Issachar, Zebulun, Naphtali, and Asher. Lower Galilee is aid to have contained four hundred and four towns and villages, of which Josephus mentions Tiberias, Sepphoris, and Gabara, as the principal; though Capernaum and Nazareth are the most frequently mentioned in the New Testament, Mark 1:9 Luke 2:39 John 7:52 , etc. "Galilee of the Gentiles" is supposed to be Upper Galilee, either because it bordered on Tyre and Zidon, or because Phenicians, Syrians, Arabs, and other heathen were numerous among it inhabitants. Many of the apostles and first converts to Christianity were men of Galilee, Acts 1:11 2:7 , as well as Christ himself; and the name Galilean was often given as an insult, both to him and his followers. The apostate emperor Julian constantly used it, and in his dying agony and rage cried out, "O Galilean, thou hast conquered!" Our Savior resided here from infancy till he was thirty years of age, and during much of his public ministry; and the cities of his public ministry; and the cities of Nazareth, Nain, Cana, Capernaum, with the whole region of the sea of Galilee, are sacredly endeared to all his people by the words he there spoke, and the wonders he wrought. For the Sea of Galilee, see SEA 3
Kitron - Knotty, a city of Zebulun (Judges 1:30 ), called also Kattath (Joshua 19:15 ); supposed to be "Cana of Galilee
Galilee (2) - GALILEE...
1. —The English form of the name ‘Galilee’ is derived from the Hebrew וָּלִיל (âlîl), Aram. word denotes simply a ‘circuit’ or ‘district’, and in Isaiah 9:1 Galilee is called ‘Galilee ((Revised Version margin) ‘the district’) of the nations,’ and in 1 Maccabees 5:15 Γαλιλαία ἀλλοφύλων (‘Galilee of the strangers’). —When the Hebrew invasion of Palestine took place, the main part of Galilee was allotted to Zebulun, Asher, and Naphtali. In the days of the Monarchy, Galilee always suffered in the Syrian wars. Some 60 years later the whole state of affairs in Galilee was changed. 104–103) conquered much of Galilee, and compelled the inhabitants to be circumcised and live according to Jewish laws. Herod at his death bequeathed Galilee to Herod Antipas, who succeeded after much opposition in having his legacy confirmed at Rome. —The amount of territory covered by the name ‘Galilee’ varied in different times. It was later spoken of in two divisions—Upper and Lower Galilee (cf. ...
The boundaries of Galilee at the time of Christ are thus given by Josephus:...
‘Now Phœnice and Syria surround the two Galilees, which are called Upper and Lower Galilee. As for what is called Lower Galilee, it extends in length from Tiberias to Chabulon (Kâbûl), and Ptolemais is its neighbour on the coast; and its breadth is from the village called Xaloth (Iksâl), which lies in the great plain, to Bersabe, from which beginning the breadth of Upper Galilee is also taken to the village Baca, which divides the land of the Tyrians from Galilee; its length is also from Meloth (Meiron) to Thella (probably Tell Thala), a village near the Jordan’ (BJ iii. —The southernmost division of Galilee was Esdraelon (G. ...
On the other hand, the middle division of Galilee, known as Lower Galilee, contains nearly all the important sites of the Gospel record. by the Sea of Galilee (though sometimes a part of the country east of the sea was considered Galiliean), and on the N. end of the Sea of Galilee through Ramah to the coast. Tabor; the next range contains the Karn Hattin of Crusading fame; the third, the city of Jotapâta; while the fourth consists of the southern slopes of the mountains of Upper Galilee. The central plain of cl-Buttauf is about 500 feet above sea-level, while the coast of the Sea of Galilee is nearly 700 feet below sea-level. ...
Upper Galilee ranged from the N. boundary of Lower Galilee to the Tyrian boundary, which seems to have been at the time of Christ just south of Kedesh, which according to Josephus was a Tyrian fortress on the borders of Galilee (Ant. —‘Judaea was on the road to nowhere; Galilee is covered with roads to everywhere’ (G. Remains of pavements, however, show that at the time of Christ the Roman genius for road-making had been at work in the district of Galilee. Especially was this the case on the great high-road, the ‘Way of the Sea,’ as it was called in the Middle Ages (from an interpretation of Isaiah 9:1), which crossed the middle of Lower Galilee. These were (1) the bridge about half-way between Merom and the Sea of Galilee, now called the ‘Bridge of Jacob’s Daughters. Another branch went southwards to the west coast of the Sea of Galilee at Khân Minych, and proceeded to Bethshean, where it joined the road from (2) the bridge a few miles south of the Sea of Galilee, now called the Jisr cl-Mujâmia. The main road from the shore of the Sea of Galilee to the highlands went by the Wady cl-Hammâm past Arbela, then between Tabor and the Nazareth hills to Esdraelon. —Galilee was a part of the Roman Empire; that is, in the days of Christ it was under the emperors Augustus and Tiberius. About the year 22, however, he built a new city on the shore 6f the Sea of Galilee, named it Tiberias in honour of the emperor, and made it his capital. In these two cities was centred the chief legal administration of affairs in Galilee during the life of Christ. But in Galilee, as elsewhere, the chief details of life were regulated by the Jews’ own religious laws rather than by ordinary civil enactments. —Galilee was a populous country. In another place Josephus says there were 240 cities and villages in Galilee (Life, 45), and that many of these had strong walls. Sea of Galilee. ‘Galilee’ in Hasting's Dictionary of the Bible. du Talmud; Guérin, Galilée; Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ; G
Sea of Galilee - The Sea of Galilee is a freshwater lake in northern Palestine. (For details see PALESTINE, sub-heading ‘Upper Jordan and Sea of Galilee
Bethabara - There is no clue to the position of Bethabara, except that it was probably in or near Galilee (cf. Identification with a ford named ‘Abârah , about 12 miles south of the outlet of the Sea of Galilee, has with some plausibility been suggested
Harosheth of the Gentiles - a city supposed to be situated near Hazor, in the northern parts of Canaan, called afterward Upper Galilee, or Galilee of the Gentiles, for the same reason that this place probably obtained that title, namely, from being less inhabited by Jews, and being near the great resorts of the Gentiles, Tyre and Sidon
Herodian - ) One of a party among the Jews, composed of partisans of Herod of Galilee
Gal'Ilee - ( Joshua 20:7 ; 1 Kings 9:11 ) In the time of our Lord all Palestine was divided into three provinces, Judea, Samaria and Galilee. The river Jordan, the Sea of Galilee, and the upper Jordan to the fountain at Dan, formed the eastern border; and the northern ran from Dan westward across the mountain ridge till it touched the territory of the Phoenicians. Galilee was divided into two sections, "Lower" and "Upper. " Lower Galilee included the great plain of Esdraelon with its offshoots, which ran down to the Jordan and the Lake of Tiberias, and the whole of the hill country adjoining it on the north to the foot of the mountain range. Upper Galilee embraced the whole mountain range lying between the upper Jordan and Phoenicia. To this region the name "Galilee of the Gentiles" is given in the Old and New Testaments. (Isaiah 9:1 ; Matthew 4:16 ) Galilee was the scene of the greater part of our Lord's private life and public acts. (Galilee in the time of Christ . --It is estimated that of the 1000 square miles in Palestine west of the Jordan, nearly one-third, almost 2000 square miles, belongs to Galilee. Merrill argues for the general correctness of Josephus' estimates, who says there were 204 cities and villages in Galilee, the smallest of which numbered 15,000 inhabitants. Galilee was a region of great natural fertility
Golan - of Galilee, N. Jordan, from the sea of Galilee to its source at Dan and Caesarea Philippi, was its western boundary. The western side, the supporting wall of the plateau, along the sea of Galilee, is steep and rugged
Hanina ben dosa, rabbi - (1century BCE) Mishnaic sage, resident of the Galilee, pupil of Johanan ben Zakkai, and renowned miracle worker
Swan - Mentioned in the list of unclean birds (Leviticus 11:18 ; Deuteronomy 14:16 ), is sometimes met with in the Jordan and the Sea of Galilee
Chin'Nereth, Sea of - (Numbers 34:11 ; Joshua 13:27 ) the inland sea, which is most similarly known to us as the "Lake of Gennesareth" or "Sea of Galilee
Chanina ben dosa - (1century BCE) Mishnaic sage, resident of the Galilee, pupil of Johanan ben Zakkai, and renowned miracle worker
Elkosh - It was probably situated in Galilee, but nothing definite is known of it
Nahum - He was a native of Elkoshai, a village in Galilee
Gennesaret - The plain of Gennesaret has been called, from its fertility and beauty, "the Paradise of Galilee. (See Galilee, SEA OF
ca'na - (place of reeds ) of Galilee, once Cana in Galilee, a village or town not far from Capernaum, memorable as the scene of Christ's first miracle, ( John 2:1,11 ; 4:46 ) as well as of a subsequent one, (John 4:46,54 ) and also as the native place of the apostle Nathanael
Rumah - ” Home of Jehoiakim's mother (2 Kings 23:36 ), possibly identified with khirbet Rumeh near Rimmon in Galilee or with Arumah
Bethsaida - A city of Galilee, near Capernaum. If there were two towns of this name, the first one was in Galilee on the west side of the lake, and 2. Thomson supposes that there was but one Bethsaida, which was built on both sides of the Jordan, and places the site at Abu-Zany, where the Jordan empties into the Lake of Galilee. The eastern city was beautified by Philip the tetrarch, and called Bethsaida Julias (in honor of a daughter of the emperor Augustus), perhaps to distinguish it from the western Bethsaida, in Galilee
Ahlab - Fatness, a town of Asher lying within the unconquered Phoenician border (Judges 1:31 ), north-west of the Sea of Galilee; commonly identified with Giscala, now el-Jish
Rumah - Others identify it with Tell Rumeh, in Galilee, about 6 miles north of Nazareth
Migdal-el - Migdal-el was located in northern Galilee in the vicinity of Iron (Yiron)
Hukkok - of the upper end of the sea of Galilee
en-Hazor - slopes of the mountains of Upper Galilee, W
Golan - It lay east or northeast of the Sea of Galilee, but its site is now lost
Ptolemais - A maritime city of Galilee (Acts 21:7 )
Zebulun - The tribe named for him settled in the area between the Sea of Galilee and Mount Carmel (Joshua 19:10-16 ). Their menu included the delicacies fished from the Sea of Galilee
Nain - ” Village in southwest Galilee where Jesus raised a widow's son (Luke 7:11-15 )
Rak'Kath - ( Joshua 19:35 ) It was on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, not far from the warm baths of Tiberias
Galilean - (gal ih lee' uhn) Person who lived in Galilee. Jesus was identified as being from Galilee (Matthew 26:69 ). On His return to Galilee from Judea and Samaria, Jesus received a warm welcome from the Galileans
Ahlab - The site has been Identified with the later Gush Halab or Giscala , now el-Jîsh in Upper Galilee; but this is, of course, uncertain
Huk'Kok - ( Joshua 19:34 ) It has been recovered in Yakuk , a village in the mountains of Naphtali west of the upper end of the Sea of Galilee
Dalmanu'Tha - a town on the west side of the Sea of Galilee, near Magdala
Lakum - It may be modern khirbet el-Mansurah near the southern end of the Sea of Galilee
Chalphi - Galilee ( 1Ma 11:70 )
Hukkok - of the Sea of Galilee
ja'Irus -
A ruler of a synagogue, probably in some town near the western shore of the Sea of Galilee
Jano'ah - (rest ), a place apparently in the north of Galilee, or the "land of Naphtali," --one of those taken by Tiglath-pileser in his first incursion into Palestine
Decapolis - (Greek: ten cities) ...
A district in Palestine east and south of the Sea of Galilee which took its name from the confederation of ten cities of which it was composed; those of interest are Damascus, Gadara, and Pella
Gir'Gashites - (dwelling on a clayey soil ) , The, one of the nations who were in possession of Canaan east of the Sea of Galilee before the entrance thither of the children of Israel
Bethsaida - ” The home of Andrew, Peter, and Philip (John 1:44 ; John 12:21 ), located on the northeast side of the Sea of Galilee. Some scholars do propose two sites named Bethsaida: The one northeast of the Sea of Galilee, as already discussed; and another, west of the Sea of Galilee, close to Capernaum
Harosheth of the Gentiles - (Judges 4:2 ) or nations, a city near Hazor in Galilee of the Gentiles, or Upper Galilee, in the north of Palestine
Acre - Seaport, Palestine, lying north of Mount Carmel, and west of the mountains of Galilee
Cana - In Galilee
Dalmanutha - The exact situation of this place is uncertain; it lay, however, on the western shore of the sea of Galilee, north of Tiberias
Madon - ” Town in Galilee whose king joined in an unsuccessful alliance against Israel (Joshua 11:1 ; Joshua 12:19 )
Dalmanutha - A town on the sea of Galilee, near Magdala, in R
Kartan - It was located near the Sea of Galilee
Jairus - A ruler of a synagogue in some town near the western shore of the Sea of Galilee
Tishbah - The birthplace of Elijah, 1 Kings 17:1, who is therefore called the Tishbite, probably identical with el-Istib, or Listib, 22 miles in an air-line south of the Sea of Galilee, and ten miles east of the Jordan
Nain - Where Christ performed one of his chief miracles, in raising to life a widow's only son, Luke 7:11-17 , was a small village in Galilee, three miles south by west of Mount Tabor: It is now a petty hamlet, called Nein
Cabul -
A town on the eastern border of Asher (Joshua 19:27 ), probably one of the towns given by Solomon to Hiram; the modern Kabul, some 8 miles east of Accho, on the very borders of Galilee. ...
...
A district in the north-west of Galilee, near to Tyre, containing twenty cities given to Hiram by Solomon as a reward for various services rendered to him in building the temple (1 Kings 9:13 ), and as payment of the six score talents of gold he had borrowed from him
Galilee - Nazareth was a city of Galilee. "The land of Zebulon, and the land of Naphtali, by the way of the sea beyond Jordan, in Galilee of the nations
Galilaean - It was during the trial of Jesus also that Peter was recognized as a Galilaean by the bystanders (Matthew 26:73, Mark 14:70, Luke 22:59; see Galilee, § 7). Some suppose Barabbas to have been arrested in connexion therewith; some would associate it with the revolt of Judas of Galilee (Josephus BJ ii. ...
For characteristics of Galilaeans see Galilee, § 7, ‘People
Galilee Sea of - Galilee, Sea of. Named from the province of Galilee, which bordered on its western side, Matthew 4:18. " Luke 5:1; Numbers 34:11; Joshua 12:3, and Galilee, Joshua 19:35. The Sea of Galilee is of an oval shape, about 12 miles long and 6 broad
Galilee - Josephus divides it into only Upper and Lower; and he says that the limits of Galilee were, on the south, Samaria and Scythopolis, unto the flood of Jordan. Galilee contained four tribes, Issachar, Zebulun, Naphtali, and Asher; a part, also, of Dan, and part of Persia, that is, beyond the river. Upper Galilee abounded in mountains. Lower Galilee, which contained the tribes of Zebulun and Asher, was sometimes called the Great Field, "the champaign,"...
Deuteronomy 11:30 . Josephus describes Galilee as very populous, and containing two hundred and four cities and towns. In the books of Ezra and Nehemiah, the inhabitants of Galilee and Peraea are scarcely mentioned, whether they were Jews returned from Babylon, or a mixture of different nations. Our Lord so frequently visited Galilee, that he was called a Galilean, Matthew 26:69 . The population of Galilee being very great, he had many opportunities of doing good in this country; and, being there out of the power of the priests at Jerusalem, he seems to have preferred it as his abode. Upper Galilee had Mount Lebanon and the countries of Tyre and Sidon on the north; the Mediterranean Sea on the west; Abilene, Ituraea, and the country of the Decapolis, on the east; and Lower Galilee on the south. This part of Galilee, being less inhabited by Jews, was thence called Galilee of the Nations, or of the Gentiles. Lower Galilee had the upper division of the same country to the north; the Mediterranean on the west; the sea of Galilee, or lake of Gennesareth, on the east; and Samaria on the south. Here, also, he made his first appearance after his resurrection to his Apostles, who were themselves natives of the same country, and were thence called men of Galilee. ...
Galilee, Sea of. This inland sea, or more properly lake, which derives its several names, the lake of Tiberias, the sea of Galilee, and the lake of Gennesareth, from the territory which forms its western and south-western border, is computed to be between seventeen and eighteen miles in length, and from five to six in breadth
Galilee - 'Kedesh in Galilee,' one of the cities of refuge was in Naphtali. Solomon gave Hiram twenty cities in Galilee. Now there was and is a village of this name on the frontier of Asher, which would seem to indicate that Asher was in the district of Galilee. Hence the term 'Galilee of the Gentiles ,' or nations, which does not occur until Isaiah 9:1 ; the prophecy is quoted in Matthew 4:15 . times Galilee had become a much larger district, including the portions of Asher, Naphtali, Zebulon, and Issachar. ...
It is probable that the Galilaeans had a different manner of pronunciation, or the language spoken in Galilee was not so refined as that spoken at Jerusalem, which led to Peter being detected by his speech
Nain - A town in Galilee where Christ raised the widow's dead son to life
Kenath - It has been identified with Kunawat, on the slopes of Jebel Hauran (Mount Bashan), 60 miles east from the south end of the Sea of Galilee
Cinneroth - or CINNERETH, a city on the north-western side of the sea of Galilee; which, from it, is frequently called in the Old Testament the sea of Cinneroth: from which word, that of Genesaret, in the New Testament, is conjectured by Dr
Betharbel - " Perhaps identical with the stronghold Arbela in Galilee. of the sea of Galilee, N
Gadarenes - As the Sea of Galilee had various names, so had the inhabitants according as they were associated with different districts in the vicinity. The Gadarenes abode on the east of the Sea of Galilee, where the Lord cured the two demoniacs, though Mark and Luke mention but one
Galilee - Galilee is seldom mentioned in the NT outside the Gospels. Judas, the Leader of an agitation in the days of the enrolment of Quirinius, is described as ‘of Galilee’ (Acts 5:37). After Saul’s conversion, peace descended upon the Christians in Galilee, as well as in Judaea and Samaria (Acts 9:31). -The name ‘Galilee’ is derived from the Heb. For the most part, however, Esdraelon seems to have been a frontier or arena of battle, rather than an actual part of Galilee. -The natural boundaries of Galilee never agreed with its political frontiers. Within these limits lay ‘a region of mountain, hill, and plain, the most diversified and attractive in Palestine’ (Masterman, Studies in Galilee, p. 1) gives the divisions, in his time, as two, called the Upper Galilee and the Lower. ...
(a) Upper Galilee is less easily characterized physically than Lower. The scantier water supply of Upper Galilee is compensated for by the copiousness of the dew-fall throughout the later summer months. ...
(b) Lower Galilee is easier to describe. The dividing-line between Upper and Lower Galilee is the range of mountains running right across the country along the northern edge of the Plain of Rameh. The Lake of Galilee could never be sufficiently praised by the Jewish Rabbis. As to (a), the words of the ancient promise, ‘for the Lord thy God bringeth thee into a good land, a land of brooks of water, of fountains and depths springing forth in valleys and hills’ (Deuteronomy 8:7), are literally true of Galilee, particularly in its southern half. Masterman, Studies in Galilee, p. 3038]'>[1]); the Lake of Galilee (Gennesaret), 13 miles long by 8 miles broad at its widest point. These waters, together with the copious dews of the summer, give Galilee the advantage over Samaria and set it in marked contrast to Judaea . ...
As to (b), all authorities unite in celebrating the natural wealth of Galilee, The other half of the promise made to the Hebrews was also true of this highly favoured province. ‘In Asher, oil flows like a river,’ said the Rabbis, who also held that it was ‘easier to raise a legion of olive trees in Galilee than to raise one child in Judaea . Wine was made in many quarters of the province, the best qualities coming from Sigona; while wheat and other grains were plentifully raised all over Lower Galilee, especially round about Sepphoris and in the fields of the Plain of Gennesaret. The fish, for which the province was always noted in ancient times, was caught in the inland lakes, particularly in the Lake of Galilee. In addition to the above-mentioned commodities, Galilee produced flax from which fine linen fabrics were woven, pottery, and a rich dye made from the indigo plant. -To-day Galilee possesses a remarkably mixed population, and its inhabitants are physically finer than those of the southern provinces (cf. ...
The population of Galilee in apostolic times was considerably greater than it is to-day. This estimate, in spite of the arguments of Merrill (Galilee in the Time of Christ, pp. -At the partition of west Palestine among the twelve tribes, Galilee fell to the lot of Issachar, Zebulun, Asher, and Naphtali, who did not drive out the original inhabitants. At this time, or a little later, Galilee became thoroughly judaized. 39, Herod Antipas was tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea, by appointment of the Roman Emperor. received the tetrarchy of Galilee, in addition to the territories of Philip and of Lysanias which he had previously obtained. 67 Vespasian assembled his army at Ptolemais and began the reduction of Galilee. Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ, Boston, 1881, London, 1885; V. Masterman, Studies in Galilee, Chicago, 1909; A
Beatitudes, Mount of - Tradition locates it on the mountain of Karn Hattin in Galilee, near Nazareth and Cana
Mount of Beatitudes - Tradition locates it on the mountain of Karn Hattin in Galilee, near Nazareth and Cana
Merom - Lake Huleh is eleven miles north of the Sea of Galilee
Magadan - (mag' aw dan) A site on the Sea of Galilee (Matthew 15:39 )
Meroz - An unknown place in Galilee, cursed in the song of Deborah and Barak for not joining with them against the foes of Israel, Judges 5:23
el'Kosh - Some think a small village in Galilee is intended
Bethsa'Ida - (house of fish ) of Galilee, ( John 12:21 ) a city which was the native place of Andrew, Peter and Philip, (John 1:44 ; 12:21 ) in the land of Gennesareth, (Mark 6:46 ) comp. The fact is that Bethsaida was a village on both sides of the Jordan as it enters the sea of Galilee on the north, so that the western part of the village was in Galilee and the eastern portion in Gaulonitis, part of the tetrarchy of Philip
Tob, the Land of - A district on the east of Jodan, about 13 miles south-east of the Sea of Galilee, to which Jephthah fled from his brethren (Judges 11:3,5 )
Herod Antipas - Tetrarch of Galilee, put John the Baptist to death after the latter had censured his adulterous union with Herodias, wife of his own half-brother
Antipas, Herod - Tetrarch of Galilee, put John the Baptist to death after the latter had censured his adulterous union with Herodias, wife of his own half-brother
Nathanael - Of Cana in Galilee (John 1:47; John 21:2). Three or four days after the temptation, Jesus when intending to "go forth into Galilee findeth Philip and saith, Follow Me
Tiberias - City on the west of the Sea of Galilee: it was founded by Herod Antipas, and named after the emperor Tiberius. It became the capital of the province of Galilee, and in it were gathered the arts of Greece and the idolatry of Rome
Kedesh-Naphtali - KEDESH-NAPHTALI ( Judges 4:6 ; called also ‘ Kedesh ’ Joshua 12:22 ; Joshua 19:37 , Judges 4:9-11 , 2 Kings 15:29 ; and ‘ Kedesh in Galilee ’ in Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 , 1 Chronicles 6:76 ). ...
The site is the village of Kedes , one of the most picturesque spots in Galilee; to the E
Sea - Thus the sea of Galilee, or of Tiberias, or of Cinnereth, is no other than the lake of Tiberias, or Gennesareth, in Galilee
Bethsaida - A city in Galilee, on the western shore of the lake of Gennesareth, a little north of Capernaum; it was the birthplace of the apostles Philip, Andrew, and Peter, and was often visited by our Lord, Matthew 11:21 ; Mark 6:45 ; 8:22 . It lay on a gentle hill near the Jordan separated from the sea of Galilee by a plain three miles wide, of surpassing fertility, Luke 9:10
Andrew - Among those who responded to the preaching of John the Baptist was Andrew, a fisherman from Galilee. )...
When Jesus later went to Galilee, the two brothers left their fishermen’s work to join him in his work (Matthew 4:18-20)
Cabul - A name given by Hiram king of Tyre to a district in Northern Galilee containing twenty cities, which Solomon gave him for his help in building the temple, 1 Kings 9:13 ; the term implying his dissatisfaction with the gift
Joachim, Saint - Tradition holds that Saint Joachim and Saint Anne were the parents of the Blessed Virgin, although nothing is known of them, except that they lived in Galilee, and later in Jerusalem, where their traditional tomb was rediscovered in 1889
Sepphoris - (ssee foh' rihss) Town in Galilee that served as the capital of that region during most of Jesus' lifetime
Chorazin - They were all near the Sea of Galilee
ar'Gob - In later times it was called Trachonitis, and it is now apparently identified with the Leiah, a very remarkable district south of Damascus and east of the Sea of Galilee
ar'Gob - In later times it was called Trachonitis, and it is now apparently identified with the Leiah, a very remarkable district south of Damascus and east of the Sea of Galilee
Tishbite - " This designation is probably given to the prophet as denoting that his birthplace was Tishbi, a place in Upper Galilee (mentioned in the apocryphal book of Tobit), from which for some reason he migrated into Gilead. It has been identified by some with el-Ishtib, a some place 22 miles due south of the Sea of Galilee, among the mountains of Gilead
Receipt of Custom - The custom or toll referred to consisted of export dues on merchandise, and at Capernaum would pass into the treasury of Herod Antipas, the ruler of Galilee in the time of our Lord. Capernaum was close to the junction of the great north road to Damascus with the road that led eastwards round the northern end of the Lake of Galilee, and the important revenue station situated at this point is what we are to understand by the ‘place of toll’ in the Gospel story
Gaulanitis - It lay to the east of the Lake of Galilee, and included among its towns Bethsaida-Julias (Mark 8:22 ) and Seleucia
Magdala - ” City on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee and center of a prosperous fishing operation
Great, Herod the - He became governor of Galilee and in 40 B
Herod the Great - He became governor of Galilee and in 40 B
Tetrarch - in reference to Herod Antipas, tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea; Philip, tetrarch of Ituraea and Trachonitis; and Lysanias, tetrarch of Abilene
Lake - 1: λίμνη (Strong's #3041 — Noun Feminine — limne — lim'-nay ) "a lake," is used (a) in the Gospels, only by Luke, of the Sea of Galilee, Luke 5:2 ; 8:22,23,33 , called Gennesaret in Luke 5:1 (Matthew and Mark use thalassa, "a sea"); (b) of the "lake" of fire, Revelation 19:20 ; 20:10,14,15 ; 21:8
Chinnereth - Or CINNEROTH, a town on the west shore of the sea of Galilee, Numbers 34:11 Deuteronomy 3:17 Joshua 11:2 19:35 1 Kings 15:20
Galileans - They sprang from one Judas, a native of Gaulam, in upper Galilee, upon the occasion of Augustus appointing the people to be mustered, which they looked upon as an instance of servitude which all true Israelites ought to oppose. As our Saviour and his apostles were of Galilee, they were suspected to be of the sect of the Galileans; and it was on this principle, as St
Harosheth - Others would see Haroseth as a common noun meaning, “woods” and locate it in the woods or forests of Galilee, using some evidence from the earliest Greek translation. This view would read Joshua 12:23 , “king of Goiim in Galilee” (TEV, NRSV) and equate the king with the ruler of the Galilean forests
Jabbok - A pouring out, or a wrestling, one of the streams on the east of Jordan, into which it falls about midway between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, or about 45 miles below the Sea of Galilee
Goiim - The earliest Greek translation reads “king of goiim of Galilee,” a reading many Bible students adopt since the immediate context refers to areas near Galilee and the copyist would easily write Gilgal since it plays such an important role in the early narratives of Joshua. Isaiah 9:1 also refers to Galilee of the nations
Thisbe - Its position is described as being on the right hand (south) of Kedesh-naphtali in Galilee above Asher
Gath-Hepher - Wine-press of the well, a town of Lower Galilee, about 5 miles from Nazareth; the birthplace of Jonah (2 Kings 14:25 ); the same as Gittah-hepher (Joshua 19:13 )
Lakes - See Galilee, SEA OF
Genesareth - (Hebrew: kinnor, a harp) ...
Fertile district of Palestine, on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee (Mark 6), often called the Lake of Genesareth; the scene of the public ministry of Our Lord
Population - The sole information, of any precise and fairly contemporary character, as to the population of Galilee in the days of Jesus, is to be found in Josephus BJ, iii. If Josephus could muster 100,000 warriors from the province, some thirty years after the ministry of Jesus, and if the larger towns, like Scythopolis, included over 30,000 inhabitants, it is probable that the population of Galilee, during the first quarter of the first century, must have exceeded one million, if not two millions, since it included over 200 towns and villages within an area of about 100 square miles. Certainly, the Galilee into which Jesus brought His gospel (Mark 1:14), with its cities like Capernaum (Mark 1:21), its country-towns (Mark 1:38), and country-districts, was no thinly peopled tract. ‘Save in the recorded hours of our Lord’s praying, the history of Galilee has no intervals of silence and loneliness; the noise of a close and busy life is always audible; and to every crisis in the Gospels and in Josephus we see crowds immediately swarm’ (HGHL Joanna - ...
...
The wife of Chuza, the steward of Herod Antipas, tetrarch of Galilee (Luke 8:3 )
Elkosh - Elkesi, a village of Galilee, pointed out to Jerome, with traces of ancient buildings
Mustard - Thomson has seen it there as tall as the horse and his rider, and the ground near the Sea of Galilee is often "gilded over with its yellow flowers
Jiph'Thah-el - Robinson suggests that Jiphthah-el was identical with Jotapata, and that they survive in the modern Jefat , a village in the mountains of Galilee, halfway between the Bay of Accre and the Lake of Gennesareth
Gerasa - Gerasa was a town in Decapolis, south-east of the Sea of Galilee
Bethabara - A site is required within 30 miles of Cana of Galilee; for (John 1:43) "the day following (the events at Bethabara, John 1:28-36) Jesus would go forth into Galilee," and on the third day (John 2) was in Cana. The nearness to Galilee, and the openness of the sides of the river here, leaving a broader space for the crowd seeking baptism, favor the view
Galilee, Sea of - The nearby hills of Galilee reach an altitude of 1,500 feet above sea level. Fed chiefly by the Jordan River, which originates in the foothills of the Lebanon Mountains, the sea of Galilee is thirteen miles long north and south and eight miles wide at its greatest east-west distance. ...
In the first century the sea of Galilee was of major commercial significance
Cabul - The district was "Galilee of the Gentiles" (Isaiah 9:1), i. part of Galilee, only in part occupied by Israel, more completely so after Hiram restored the cities
Galilee, Sea of - This was situate about the centre of the district of Galilee on the east. ; then, coming southward, was Bethsaida of Galilee, with the plain of Gennesaret (or Chinnereth) near; then Magdala, Dalmanutha and Tiberias on the west
me'Rom - (high place ) , The waters of, a lake formed by the river Jordan, about ten miles north of the Sea of Galilee. ( Joshua 11:5,7 ) It is a remarkable fact that though by common consent "the waters of Merom" are identified with the lake thorough which the Jordan runs between Banias and the Sea of Galilee --the Bahr el-Huleh of the modern Arabs-- Yet that identity cannot be proved by any ancient record
Capernaum - A chief city of Galilee in the time of Christ, not mentioned before the captivity in Babylon. It lay on the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee, about five miles from the Jordan and on the frequented route from Damascus to the Mediterranean
Naph'Tali - (In the division of the kingdom Naphtali belonged to the kingdom of Israel, and later was a part of Galilee, bordering on the northwestern pert of the Sea of Galilee, and including Capernaum and Bethsaida
Capernaum - The important town of Capernaum was on the north-west shore of the Sea of Galilee. Jesus seems to have made it the base for his ministry in Galilee, and it became known as his home town (Matthew 4:13; Matthew 9:1; Mark 2:1; Mark 9:33; John 6:24)
Rumah - There was another Rumah in Galilee (Jos Trachonitis - The region of Trachonitis lay to the north-east of Palestine, between Lake Galilee and Damascus
Chinnereth - A city ( Deuteronomy 3:17 , Joshua 11:2 [1] Joshua 19:35 ) which gave its name to the Sea of Chinnereth ( Numbers 34:11 , Joshua 12:3 ; Joshua 13:27 ), the OT designation of the Sea of Galilee
Cana - Its exact location is uncertain, though it was in Galilee
Beth-Arbel - Two places called Arbela exist in Palestine, one (now Irbid ) west of the Sea of Galilee (Jos
go'Lan - It lay east of Galilee and north of Gadaritis [1], and corresponds to the modern province of Jaulan
Jordan - For details see PALESTINE, sub-headings ‘Upper Jordan and Sea of Galilee’ and ‘Jordan Valley and Dead Sea’
Herodian - Apparently they lived in Galilee, where Antipas ruled, and joined the Jerusalem religious authorities in opposing Jesus
Will - ]'>[1] ‘if ye are willing to receive it’); John 1:43 ‘Jesus would go forth into Galilee’ (RV Boar - The Hebrews abhorred swine's flesh, and accordingly none of these animals were reared, except in the district beyond the Sea of Galilee
Mearah - Reland suggests Meroth, the limit of Galilee on the W
Nathanael - Given or gift of God, one of our Lord's disciples, "of Cana in Galilee" (John 21:2 )
Dalmanutha - of the sea of Galilee as what Mark (Mark 8:10) calls "the regions of Dalmanutha
Cormorant - Septuagint katarraktes , which Speaker's Commentary makes the "cormorant," Ρhalacrocorax crabo , often seen in Syria, and occasionally at the sea of Galilee; this the Appendix to Smith's Dict
Custom - The customs were paid on the value of goods, in Galilee and Peræa to the Herods, but in the Roman province of Judæa to the procurator as agent of the Roman government
Cabul - Name given by Hiram king of Tyre to the twenty cities in Galilee given him by Solomon, because he was displeased with them
Gergesenes - A recent explorer finds ruins called Cherza or Gersa, midway on the eastern side of the Sea of Galilee; and this may be the ancient Gergesa
Cana - It was called Cana of Galilee, now Kana-el-Jelil, and lay seven miles north of Nazareth
Gadara - of the Sea of Galilee. This would refer the miracle not to Gadara, which, as noted above, was some distance from the Sea of Galilee, but to a more obscure place represented by the modern Kersa , on its Eastern shore
Sea - THE SEA OF Galilee,Mark 1:16 ; also called the 'Sea of Tiberias,' John 21:1 ; the 'Sea of Chinnereth,' Numbers 34:11 ; Joshua 12:3 ; Joshua 13 :27; the 'Lake of Gennesaret,' Luke 5:1 . See Galilee, SEA OF
Arbela - Josephus makes him pitch his camp at Arbela in Galilee: 1 Mac. On the other hand, Arbela in Galilee survives in the modern Irbil or Irbid , a ruin on the S
Beach - In classical Greek αἰγιαλός usually, though not always, means that part of the seashore on which the tide ebbs and flows, and in the above passages in the Gospels it stands for the sandy or pebbly part of the shore of the Lake of Galilee washed by the waves. The greater part of the western margin of the Lake of Galilee is girdled with a belt of ‘silver strand’ composed of pebbles and sand mingled with delicate white shells
Capernaum - It stood on the sea coast, that is, on the coast of the sea of Galilee, in the borders of Zebulun and Naphtalim, Matthew 4:15 , and consequently toward the upper part of it. As it was a convenient port from Galilee to any place on the other side of the sea, this might be our Lord's inducement to make it the place of his most constant residence
Palestine - By New Testament times the land had been divided into provincial designations, “Judea,” “Samaria,” “Galilee,” and others. Central Hill Country The second strip of land is the mountainous ridge beginning just north of Beer-sheba and extending through all of Judea and Samaria into upper Galilee. Three divisions are evident: Judea, Samaria, Galilee. Roads went in all directions—to Galilee, the Jordan Valley, south to Jerusalem. ...
(3) Galilee North of the Plain of Esdraelon and south of the Leontes River lies the region called Galilee. ” In Isaiah 9:1 , the prophet refers to it as “Galilee of the Gentiles” (NIV). In the day of Jesus, many Gentiles were in Galilee. ...
The region is divided into Upper Galilee and Lower Galilee. Lower Galilee is a land of limestone hills and fertile valleys. Josephus spoke of Galilee as “universally rich and fruitful. ”...
Some of the most important cities of Galilee were on the shore of the Sea of Galilee. ...
The terrain of Upper Galilee is much more rugged than Lower Galilee, an area of deeply fissured and roughly eroded tableland with high peaks and many wadis. In the east, Galilee drops off abruptly to the Jordan, while farther south, near the Sea of Galilee, the slopes become much more gradual and gentle...
3. Over the eleven miles from Hula to the Sea of Galilee, the Jordan drops 926 feet, flowing in part through a narrow canyon. From Galilee to the Dead Sea there is an additional drop of 600 feet. ...
The Sea of Galilee is a significant part of the upper Rift Valley and is formed by a widening of it. It has several names—the Lake of Gennesaret, the Sea of Tiberias, Lake Chinnereth—but it is best known as the Sea of Galilee. ”...
As the Jordan flows south out of the Sea of Galilee, it enters a gorge called the Ghor, or “depression. Although the distance from the lower end of the Sea of Galilee to the upper end of the Dead Sea is only 65 miles, the winding Jordan twists 200 miles to cover that distance. ...
(1) Across from Galilee and north of the Yarmuk River is Bashan (Hauron), an area of rich volcanic soil with rainfall in excess of sixteen inches per year. Similarly, much of the area around the Sea of Galilee experiences temperate conditions, while the Dead Sea region is known for its strings of 100 plus summer days
Magdala - (Hebrew: migdal, tower, fortress) ...
A town in Galilee, 2
Swine - A herd of swine were drowned in the Sea of Galilee (Luke 8:32,33 )
Nain - 20:5, section 1) notices Nain as on the way from Galilee to Jerusalem, the very way Jesus was going
en-Gannim - limit of Galilee, and appears to have been always a flourishing town
Cabul - the name which Hiram, king of Tyre, gave to the twenty cities in the land of Galilee, of which Solomon made him a present, in acknowledgment for the great services in building the temple, 1 Kings 9:31
Gadara - The district of Gadara bordered the Lake of Galilee on its eastern side and extended south into the territory known as Decapolis
Golan - Exile, a city of Bashan (Deuteronomy 4:43 ), one of the three cities of refuge east of Jordan, about 12 miles north-east of the Sea of Galilee (Joshua 20:8 )
Tishbite - Derived from Thisbe in upper Galilee to the S
Nobah - Site is perhaps identical with Kanawat about 60 miles east of the Sea of Galilee
Tiberias - A town in Galilee, on the western shore of the sea of Tiberias
Tiberias - a city situated in a small plain, surrounded by mountains, on the western coast of the sea of Galilee, which, from this city, was also called the sea of Tiberias
Edrei - It is now called Draa, and lies about thirty-five miles east of the outlet of the Sea of Galilee
Nazarene - See Galilee , and NAZARETH
Beth-She'an - It lies in the Ghor or Jordan valley, about twelve miles south of the Sea of Galilee and four miles west of the Jordan
Caesarea Philippi - It was located in northern Galilee, near the source of the Jordan River (Matthew 16:13; Mark 8:27)
Nazareth - A city of Galilee, famous as the home of Jesus during his childhood and youth until he began his public ministry. It was about 14 miles from the Sea of Galilee, and 66 miles north of Jerusalem in a straight line. It was situated in a mountain, Luke 4:29, within the province of Galilee, Mark 1:9, and near Cana, as John 2:1-2; John 2:11 seems to imply
Tibe'Rias, - a city in the time of Christ, on the Sea of Galilee; first mentioned in the New Testament, (John 6:1,23 ; 21:1 ) and then by Josephus, who states that it was built by Herod Antipas, and was named by him in honor of the emperor Tiberius. Tiberias was the capital of Galilee from the time of its origin until the reign of Herod Agrippa II. It is remarkable that the Gospels give us no information that the Saviour who spent so much of his public life in Galilee, ever visited Tiberias
Jordan River - The Jordan Valley proper is a strip approximately 70 miles long between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea. (2) Between Lake Huleh and the Sea of Galilee. On leaving Lake Huleh, the Jordan flows for about ten miles to the Sea of Galilee. (3) From the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea. After leaving the Sea of Galilee the river passes through an especially fertile region. The first part of Jesus' ministry was centered in and around the Sea of Galilee
Kedesh - It has been supposed by some that the Kedesh of the narrative, where Barak assembled his troops, was not the place in Upper Galilee so named, which was 30 miles distant from the plain of Esdraelon, but Kedish, on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, 12 miles from Tabor
Gadarene - It has been identified with modern Um Keis, approximately five miles southeast of the Sea of Galilee. The designation “country of the Gadarenes” evidently applied to an area that extended as far as the shore of Galilee
Jabneel - See Joshua 19:33 ); modern tell en-Naam or khirbet Yemma, west-southwest of the Sea of Galilee and northeast of Mount Tabor
Gergesa - Gerasa, identified with the modern Khersa, "over against Galilee," close to the lake
Merom - ” Place in Galilee where Joshua led Israel to defeat a coalition of Canaanite tribes under king Jabin of Hazor in a surprise attack (Joshua 11:1-7 )
Lotus - The plant is especially abundant around the Sea of Galilee
Cana of Galilee - The scene of the Lord's first miracle and of His second in Galilee: the native place of Nathanael
Chorazin - It was located in Galilee
Zebedee - He was a fisherman in comfortable circumstances, on the west shore of the sea of Galilee, and readily spared his two sons at the call of the Savior, Mark 1:19,20
na'in - (beauty ), a village of Galilee, the gate of which is made illustrious by the raising of the widow's son
Jiphthah, el, Valley of - Now Jefat, in the Galilee mountains, half way between Acre and the lake of Gennesareth; stands at the head of the valley, now the great wady Abilin, which stretches W
Nathanael - (Hebrew: God has given) ...
A disciple of Jesus Christ, from Cana in Galilee (John 21), praised by Our Divine Lord as "an Israelite indeed, in whom there is no guile" (John 1), and enumerated among the Apostles as a witness to the miraculous draught of fishes, after the Resurrection (John 21)
Aphek - A city five miles east of the sea of Galilee, the walls of which fell upon twenty-seven thousand Syrians under Benhadad, after his defeat by the Israelites, 1 Kings 20:26-34
Jacob's Well - A place in Samaria where Jesus stopped to rest as He traveled from Judea to Galilee (John 4:6 )
Weariness - —The one reference to the weariness of our Lord which we find in the Gospels occurs in the account of His journey from Judaea into Galilee
Archelaus - From his known oppressive character Joseph feared to bring back the infant Jesus into his territory, and turned aside to Galilee, which was under the jurisdiction of his brother Antipas
Decapolis - It lay near the Sea of Galilee, probably on both sides of the Jordan
Magdala - It lay near the shore of the Sea of Galilee, at its most westerly point, three miles northwest of Tiberias; in the southern part of a small plain on which stood also Capernaum at the other end, and Dalmanutha in its immediate vicinity, Matthew 15:39 ; Mark 8:10
ju'Das of Galilee, - (Acts 5:37 ) According to Josephus, Judas was a Gaulonite of the city of Gamala, probably taking his name of Galilean from his insurrection having had its rise in Galilee
Arabah - In particular they used the word as a name for that deep, hot and dry valley that ran north-south from the Sea of Galilee to the Gulf of Aqabah (the north-eastern arm of the Red Sea) (Deuteronomy 1:1; Deuteronomy 2:8; Deuteronomy 4:49; Joshua 11:2; Joshua 18:18-19)
Nazareth, Nazarene - ...
Nazareth was located in lower Galilee about halfway between the Sea of Galilee and the Mediterranean Sea. See Galilee
Gal'Ilee, Sea of - So called from the province of Galilee, which bordered on the western side. The Sea of Galilee is of an oval long and six broad. This is very sensibly felt by the traveller in going down from the plains of Galilee
Palestine - Mandate of the British Empire, Asia, comprising the districts of Jerusalem, Jaffa, Gaza, Beersheba, Samaria, Phenicia, and Galilee, administered by a High Commissioner and Commander-in-Chief, assisted by an Executive Council
Magdala - A tower, a town in Galilee, mentioned only in Matthew 15:39
Judea - The province of Judea, as distinguished from Galilee and Samaria, included the territories of the tribes of Judah, Benjamin, Dan, Simeon, and part of Ephraim
Tiberias, Sea of - Called also the Sea of Galilee (q
Cana - City of Galilee, Palestine, near Nazareth, the scene of Our Lord's first miracle (John 2) and His cure of the ruler's son (John 4) and the birthplace of Nathaniel or Saint Bartholomew (John 21)
Cana - Cana of Galilee
Shimron - Others have suggested Marun er-Ras ten miles northwest of modern Safed above the Sea of Chinnereth, that is the Sea of Galilee
Heber - He separated himself ( Judges 4:11 ) from his Bedouin caste of Kenites or nomad smiths, whose wanderings were confined chiefly to the south of Judah, and settled for a time near Kedesh on the plain to the west of the Sea of Galilee
Tetrarch - ) As Archelaus was "ethnarch" over half of Herod the Great's whole kingdom, so Philip and Antipus had divided between them the remaining half, and were each "tetrarch" over the fourth; Herod over Galilee; Philip over Ituraea and Trachonitis; Lysanias over Abilene
Cabul - Region of cities in Galilee Solomon gave Hiram, king of Tyre, as payment for materials and services in building the Temple and the palace
Decapolis - of the Sea of Galilee
Zin - “From the wilderness of Zin to Rehob” in Galilee encompasses almost the whole Promised Land (Numbers 13:21 )
Gennesaret, Land of - bank of the Lake of Galilee, as the feeding of the five thousand had taken place, just before the crossing, on the E
Jab'Bok - ( Joshua 12:2,5 ) and falls into the Jordan on the east about midway between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea
jo-an'na - ) In the first passage she is expressly stated to have been "wife of Chuza, steward of Herod," that is, Antipas, tetrarch of Galilee
Nazareth - The town of Galilee where the Blessed Virgin dwelt and where Christ lived the first 30 years of his life, situated in a hollow plateau between the hills of Lebanon, the ancient town occupying the triangular hillock in the north. The toleration of the Moslems who conquered Galilee in 637 did not last, for thc Crusaders were compelled to leave the town, 1187, and all the Christian buildings were destroyed in 1263
Kedesh - A Canaanite town in eastern Galilee defeated by Joshua (Joshua 12:22 ). It was also called Kedesh in Galilee and given to the Gershonite Levites as one of their cities (Joshua 20:7 ; Joshua 21:32 )
Bethsaida - BETHSAIDA OF Galilee, a town from whence came Philip, Andrew, and Peter, John 1:44 ; John 12:21 ; and against which the Lord pronounced a 'woe' because it had not repented at His mighty works. It was near the shore on the west of the Sea of Galilee, in the same locality as Capernaum and Chorazin: there are ruins in the district, but its exact situation cannot be identified
Galilee, Sea of - Galilee, SEA OF...
1. The Sea of Galilee is an expansion of the Jordan, 13 miles long, about 8 miles in maximum breadth; its surface is 680 feet below that of the Mediterranean; its maximum depth is about 150 feet. ), or ‘the sea’ ( John 6:16 ), we find Lake of Gennesaret (only in Luke 5:1 ), Sea of Tiberias ( John 21:1 , and also as an explanatory or alternative name in John 6:1 ), but most frequently Sea of Galilee , which seems to have been the normal name. The fishing trade of Galilee was of great importance, and was renowned throughout the world
Naphtali, Tribe of - It lay in the north-eastern corner of the land, bounded on the east by the Jordan and the lakes of Merom and Galilee, and on the north it extended far into Coele-Syria, the valley between the two Lebanon ranges. A large number of foreigners settled here among the mountains, and hence it was called "Galilee of the Gentiles" (q. ...
Naphtali is now almost wholly a desert, the towns of Tiberias, on the shore of the Lake of Galilee, and Safed being the only places in it of any importance
Naz'Areth - Merrill, in "Galilee in the Time of Christ" (1881), represents Nazareth in Christ's time as a city (so always called in the New Testament) of 15,000 to 20,000 inhabitants, of some importance and considerable antiquity, and not so insignificant and mean as has been represented. The name of the present village is en-Nazirah the same, therefore, as of old it is formed on a hill or mountain, ( Luke 4:29 ) it is within the limits of the province of Galilee, (Mark 1:9 ) it is near Cana, according to the implication in (John 2:1,2,11 ) a precipice exists in the neighborhood. All the inhabitants of Galilee were looked upon with contempt by the people of Judea because they spoke a ruder dialect, were less cultivated and were more exposed by their position to contact with the heathen
Nahum, Book of - The suggestion (since the 16th century) that Elcese, or Elcesai, was in Assyria, as well as the older theory that it was in Galilee are not very probable
Capharnaum - (Hebrew: Kaphar Nahum, village of Nahum) ...
Town, Galilee, closely associated with Our Lord, and frequently mentioned in the Gospels
Passage - This word also designates the fords of the Jordan to the south of the Sea of Galilee (Judges 12:5,6 ), and a pass or rocky defile (1 Samuel 13:23 ; 14:4 )
Dalmanutha - A place on the west of the Sea of Galilee, mentioned only in Mark 8:10
Galilean - An inhabitant or native of Galilee
Arabah - It denotes the hollow depression through which the Jordan flows from the Lake of Galilee to the Dead Sea
Bridge - of the sea of Galilee
Rehob - Town in the vicinity of Laish in upper Galilee (Numbers 13:21 ; see Beth-Rehob)
Bashan - Though its precise extent cannot be determined with certainty, it was generally east of the Sea of Galilee
Gadara - of the Sea of Galilee, but the town is too far from the sea to have been the scene of the miracle; besides which there is a deep ravine between the ruins of the town and the sea
Cana - Cana of Galilee (kâ'nah)
Salome - Wife of Zebedee, mother of James the elder and John the evangelist, one of those holy women of Galilee who attended our Savior in his journeys and ministered to him, Matthew 20
Custom - In Palestine the Herods of Galilee and Perea received the "custom;" in Judea it was paid to the procurator for the Roman government
Bethsaida - "But it is strange," some one will say, "that John reckons this Bethsaida, or Julias, where he was born, in Galilee, John 12:21 . Should he not know to what province his birthplace belonged?" Philip only governed the eastern districts by the sea of Tiberias; but Galilee was the portion of his brother Antipas. Bethsaida or Julias could therefore not have been built by Philip, as the case is; or it did not belong to Galilee, as John alleges. Julias, however, was situated in Gaulonitis, which district was, for deep political reasons, divided from Galilee; but the ordinary language of the time asserted its own opinion, and still reckoned the Gaulonitish province in Galilee
Kedesh - Kedesh Naphtali, or Kedesh in Galilee (Joshua 19:37), a Levitical city of refuge assigned to the Gershonite Levites (Joshua 20:7). In this direction probably stood Kedesh, at the place now called Kadis, on the shore of the sea of Galilee
Nazareth - ...
Nazareth is situated among the southern ridges of Lebanon, on the steep slope of a hill, about 14 miles from the Sea of Galilee and about 6 west from Mount Tabor. ...
It is supposed from the words of Nathanael in John 1:46 that the city of Nazareth was held in great disrepute, either because, it is said, the people of Galilee were a rude and less cultivated class, and were largely influenced by the Gentiles who mingled with them, or because of their lower type of moral and religious character. Moreover, there does not seem to be any evidence that the inhabitants of Galilee were in any respect inferior, or that a Galilean was held in contempt, in the time of our Lord. Merrill's Galilee in the Time of Christ
Myrtle - It also sheds its fragrance on the sides of Carmel and of Tabor, and fringes the clefts of the Leontes in its course through Galilee
Chinnereth - Lyre, the singular form of the word (Deuteronomy 3:17 ; Joshua 19:35 ), which is also used in the plural form, Chinneroth, the name of a fenced city which stood near the shore of the lake of Galilee, a little to the south of Tiberias
Villages - " In Mark 1:38 "village towns" (komopoleis ) of Galilee
Gennesaret - A small strip of country on the northwest side of the Sea of Galilee
Zebedee - A fisherman of Galilee, the father of the apostles James and John, Matthew 4:21, and the husband of Salome
Jabbok - Now the Zerka, a perennial stream, flowing into the Jordan midway between the sea of Galilee and the Dead sea, about thirty miles from each, after a westerly course of some sixty miles
Gad'Ara, - a strong city situated near the river Hieromax, six miles southeast of the Sea of Galilee, over against Scythopolis and Tiberias, and 16 Roman miles distant from each of those places
Judas - Judas of Galilee, who raised an insurrection in the days of the taxing, A
Herod the Great - 47 Julius Caesar made Antipater, a "wily Idumaean," procurator of Judea, who divided his territories between his four sons, Galilee falling to the lot of Herod, who was afterwards appointed tetrarch of Judea by Mark Antony (B. Of these, Philip had the land east of Jordan, between Caesarea Philippi and Bethabara, Antipas had Galilee and Peraea, while Archelaus had Judea and Samaria
Josephus, Flavius - Josephus' Life focuses primarily upon the six-month period in which he was commander of Jewish forces in the Galilee and refutes the charge made by Justus of Tiberias that Josephus had organized the revolt in the Galilee
Nathanael - Nathanael of Cana in Galilee ( John 21:2 ) appears twice in the Fourth Gospel. (2) Nathanael was one of the seven to whom the risen Lord manifested Himself at the Lake of Galilee ( John 21:2 )
Esdra-e'Lon - "The great plain of Esdraelon" extends across central Palestine from the Mediterranean to the Jordan, separating the mountain ranges of Carmel and Samaria from those of Galilee. Its base on the east extends from Jenin (the ancient Engannim) to the foot of the hills below Nazareth, and is about 15 miles long; the north side, formed by the hills of Galilee, is about 12 miles long; and the south side, formed by the Samaria range, is about 18 miles
Nahum - Some refer this name to a place in Galilee, others to a village on the Tigris
Sea, the - ); (5) the "sea of Galilee," an inland fresh-water lake, and (6) the Dead Sea or "salt sea" (Genesis 14:3 ; Numbers 34:3,12 , etc
Ituraea - It was located northeast of Galilee between the Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon mountains, though its precise boundaries are almost impossible to determine
Judea - Judea, Samaria, and Galilee were generally considered, in Roman times, to be the three main geographical divisions of Palestine
Ships - In our Lord's time fishermen's boats on the Sea of Galilee were called "ships
Magdala - " El Mejdel on the western border of the lake of Galilee, an hour's journey N
Nathanael - ...
Nathanael was from Cana of Galilee (John 21:2 ) and apparently became one of the inner core of disciples who followed Jesus
Zeb'Edee - (my gift ) (Greek form of Zabdi ) a fisherman of Galilee, the father of the apostles James the Great and John ( Matthew 4:21 ) and the husband of Salome
Cana - a town of Galilee, where Jesus performed his first miracle, John 2:1-2 , &c
Pella - (pehl' luh) City just east of the Jordan River and southeast of the Sea of Galilee
Nathan'Ael - (gift of God ), a disciple of Jesus Christ, concerning whom, under that name at least, we learn from Scripture little more than his birthplace, Cana of Galilee, ( John 21:2 ) and his simple, truthful character
Philip - )...
Philip the apostle came from the fishing town of Bethsaida on the shore of Lake Galilee. When Jesus first went to Galilee at the beginning of his ministry, Philip was among the first to respond to his call
Luke, Gospel of Saint - The Gospel contains 24 chapters and maybe divided into: ...
the hidden life (1-2)
preaching of Saint John, baptism, and temptation (3:1 to 4:13)
teaching, miracles, and works of mercy in Galilee and the founding of the Church (4:14 to 9:50)
the "Perean Ministry," work of Jesus outside of Galilee (9:51 to 19:28)
ministry in Jerusalem (19:29 to 21:38)
Passion, Death, Resurrection and Ascension (22-24)
The Biblical Commission, June 26, 1912, declared that the harmonious tradition from the earliest ages, the testimony of ancient writers, the use of the Gospel by the early Church, constitute certain proof that Saint Luke wrote the entire Gospel as contained in our Bibles before the year 70, and that it is a true historical document
Gospel of Saint Luke - The Gospel contains 24 chapters and maybe divided into: ...
the hidden life (1-2)
preaching of Saint John, baptism, and temptation (3:1 to 4:13)
teaching, miracles, and works of mercy in Galilee and the founding of the Church (4:14 to 9:50)
the "Perean Ministry," work of Jesus outside of Galilee (9:51 to 19:28)
ministry in Jerusalem (19:29 to 21:38)
Passion, Death, Resurrection and Ascension (22-24)
The Biblical Commission, June 26, 1912, declared that the harmonious tradition from the earliest ages, the testimony of ancient writers, the use of the Gospel by the early Church, constitute certain proof that Saint Luke wrote the entire Gospel as contained in our Bibles before the year 70, and that it is a true historical document
Gadarenes - A region about Gadara, an important city about 6 miles south-east of the Sea of Galilee, and 16 miles from Tiberias; now called Um Keis. Recent explorations fix it, with some certainty, about midway of the Lake of Galilee, on its eastern side and near Gerasa, or modern Kersa
Philip - the Apostle, was a native of Bethsaida in Galilee. Philip followed him; he was present at the marriage of Cana in Galilee
Mandrake - Speaking of Nazareth, in Galilee, he says, "What I found most remarkable at this village was the great number of mandrakes which grew in a vale below it. These were brought her in the wheat harvest, which in Galilee is in the month of May, about this time, and the mandrake was now in fruit
Fish - (4:18) In Palestine, the Sea of Galilee was and still is remarkable well stored with fish. The latter was probably most used on the Sea of Galilee, as the number of boats kept on it was very considerable
Jesus Christ - He then went to Cana of Galilee, where he worked his first miracle at a wedding. Presently the Baptist was thrown into prison and the Saviour withdrew to Galilee. " Here he called Peter and Andrew and James and John, and made his first tour through Galilee, performing many miracles. Early in the second year of his ministry Jesus went up to Jerusalem to a feast of the Jews, John 5:1, and healed a lame man at the pool of Bethesda, explained the right use of the Sabbath, a subject which he resumed when his disciples were plucking ears of corn on Ms return to Galilee. When he reached the Sea of Galilee multitudes followed him. He appointed the twelve apostles and delivered the Sermon on the Mount, and commenced a second tour in Galilee, during which he delivered the series of parables in Matthew 13:1-58, stilled the storm on Galilee, healed the demoniacs of Gadara, raised the daughter of Jairus, and after other miracles came again to Nazareth, where he was again rejected. He then made a third tour in Galilee, and sent forth the apostles, giving the instructions recorded in Matthew 10:11. After an interval of some months the twelve returned, and with them he retired to the Sea of Galilee, fed the 5000, walked on the water, and delivered his sermon on the bread or life, John 6:1-71, in the synagogue at Capernaum. Then he left Galilee, and having cleansed ten lepers came to Jerusalem at the Feast of Tabernacles
Nathanael - A native of Cana of Galilee, John 21:2
Roe - "Among the gray hills of Galilee it is still 'the roe upon the mountains of Bether,' and I have seen a little troop of gazelles feeding on the Mount of Olives close to Jerusalem itself" (Tristram)
Issachar - The tribe of Issachar occupied territory in the northern part of Palestine, just southwest of the Sea of Galilee (Joshua 19:17-23 )
Decapolis - Ten cities=deka, ten, and polis, a city, a district on the east and south-east of the Sea of Galilee containing "ten cities," which were chiefly inhabited by Greeks
Gaze - ...
Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into ...
heaven? Acts 1 ...
GAZE, To view with fixed attention
Gadara - The country of the Gadarenes extended to the Jordan and the Sea of Galilee; and in the part of its bordering on the lake occurred the miracle recorded in Matthew 8:28 9:1 Mark 5:1-20 Luke 8:26-39
Bethsaida - Bethsaida was an important town on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee (Mark 6:45)
Tabor, Mount - Mount Tabor stands apart, clear and distinct, from the rugged elevations grouped around it, except on its western side, where a low narrow ridge connects it with the hills of Galilee. Its apparent isolation, and its noble domelike contour, rising directly from the level of the Plain,, make it the most conspicuous mountain in Lower Galilee. There is no intimation that He passed the momentous hours of this transition period in travel, or that He sought another place in the most densely populated part of Galilee for this crowning manifestation of His Divinity and Messiahship. On the contrary, it is asserted in Mark 9:30 that Jesus ‘passed through Galilee’ after He had healed the spirit-possessed child at the foot of the mountain. ]'>[3] 419; Merrill, Galilee, 54; Robinson, BRP Roads - Skirting the shores of the Sea of Galilee, it crossed the Jordan near Bethsaida, and went over a spur of the Anti-Libanus, and then east by north to Damascus. From Damascus there came another road, a little to the east of the former, which reached almost to the Sea of Galilee, and then, bending southward on the east side of Jordan, passed beyond the Dead Sea. (a) There was one through Samaria connecting Judaea and Galilee. Although the direct road from Jerusalem to Galilee, it was seldom used by the devout Jews, on account of the hatred that existed between them and the Samaritans. The people who live on the main avenues of traffic are usually of a freer spirit and more open mind than those who dwell in the quiet and cultured towns; and for this reason Jesus got a better hearing in Galilee than in the more polished south
Merom, Waters of - 2:20, section 6; 3:3, section 1; Life 37) says, "these kings (under Jabin of Hazor) encamped at Berothe or Meroth, a city the western limit of upper Galilee, not far from Kedes. Huleh is the same as Ulatla, the region between Trachon and Galilee which Herod received from Caesar (Josephus Galilee
Tiberias - shore of the Sea of Galilee, founded by Herod Antipas, and named by him in honour of the Emperor Tiberius. —The ancient city was situated directly on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, and therefore approximately 682 feet below the level of the Mediterranean, at the north end of a narrow rectangular plain about two miles long, which was bounded by a rather steep ridge of hills rising abruptly to the west. Herod had made it the capital of Galilee, removing the seat of government from Sepphoris, the former capital. The city was fortified by Josephus when commander-in-chief of Galilee (c. The view from the city embraces the whole extent of the Sea of Galilee except the S. Schürer speaks of Tiberias as ‘the most beautiful spot in Galilee,’ which, however, is an exaggeration
Andrew - He was afterwards called as an apostle, on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, Matthew 4:18 ; and thenceforth followed Christ to the end, Mark 13:3 John 6:7 12:22
Sermon on the Mount - After spending a night in solemn meditation and prayer in the lonely mountain-range to the west of the Lake of Galilee (Luke 6:12 ), on the following morning our Lord called to him his disciples, and from among them chose twelve, who were to be henceforth trained to be his apostles (Mark 3:14,15 )
Taxing - [1] The second and more important, (Acts 6:37 ) is distinctly associated, in point of time, with the revolt of Judas of Galilee
Aphik - It has been identified with the modern Fik, 6 miles east of the Sea of Galilee, opposite Tiberias
Gerasa - Such a place existed on the east side of the Sea of Galilee
Golan - of the Sea of Galilee
Jabbok - A stream rising about 25 miles east of the north end of the Dead sea, and flowing east, then northward and westward, and finally into the Jordan about midway between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead sea
Nathanael - John 21:2 speaks of Nathanael, of Cana in Galilee, who was with the apostles when they went fishing
Gilead - The mountains of Gilead were part of that ridge of mountains which extend from Mount Lebanon southward, on the east of the Holy land; they gave their name to the whole country which lies on the east of the sea of Galilee, and included the mountainous region called in the New Testament Trachonitis
Peraea - Judaea, Galilee, and Peraea were reckoned by the Jews themselves as the three Jewish provinces. The population of Peraea was, however, never so thoroughly Jewish as that of Judaea, or even of Galilee. In both Galilee and Peraea political vicissitudes had occasioned a large intermingling of Jewish and Gentile elements. 3) says that, while larger than Galilee, it is mostly desert and rough, and much less adapted than that province for the cultivation of fruit. 438) says: ‘From the Zerka (Jabbok) to the Sea of Galilee (ib. —Under the will of Herod the Great, Galilee and Peraea were united for purposes of government under Antipas, and this arrangement was confirmed by Augustus. As these two provinces had but a very short common boundary where Galilee touched the Jordan north of Samaria, it might have seemed more natural to combine Peraea with the regions north of the Yarmuk, or with Samaria. For the same reasons Jews journeying between Galilee and Judaea often preferred to go by way of Peraea, where they were among their own countrymen, rather than pass through Samaria (the more direct route), where they incurred the risk at least of insult (Luke 9:53, John 4:4; John 4:9; cf. 4) Herod left Galilee and Peraea to his son Antipas (Ant. Antipas was therefore in authority in Galilee and Peraea during the whole lifetime of John the Baptist and of Christ
Zebulun - ; and though it did not extend either to the Mediterranean or the Sea of Galilee, they may have pushed forward to both seas. Jacob spoke of their reaching unto Zidon, and the Evangelist says, "Capernaum, which is upon the sea coast [1], in the borders of Zabulon and Nephthalim
na'Hum - The site of Elkosh, his native place, is disputed, some placing it in Galilee, others in Assyria. (McClintock and Strong come to the conclusion that Nahum was a native of Galilee that at the captivity of the ten tribes he escaped into Judah, and prophesied in the reign of Hezekiah, 726-698
Zebulun - ; and though it did not extend either to the Mediterranean or the Sea of Galilee, they may have pushed forward to both seas. Jacob spoke of their reaching unto Zidon, and the Evangelist says, "Capernaum, which is upon the sea coast [1], in the borders of Zabulon and Nephthalim
Jordan - Flowing from the southern extremity of Lake Huleh, here almost on a level with the sea, it flows for 2 miles "through a waste of islets and papyrus," and then for 9 miles through a narrow gorge in a foaming torrent onward to the Sea of Galilee (q. ...
"In the whole valley of the Jordan from the Lake Huleh to the Sea of Galilee there is not a single settled inhabitant. ...
From the Sea of Galilee, at the level of 682 feet below the Mediterranean, the river flows through a long, low plain called "the region of Jordan" (Matthew 3:5 ), and by the modern Arabs the Ghor, or "sunken plain. The whole distance from the southern extremity of the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea is in a straight line about 65 miles, but following the windings of the river about 200 miles, during which it falls 618 feet. ...
There are two considerable affluents which enter the river between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, both from the east
Naphtali - Southward it extended along the Jordan until it reached the point below the Sea of Galilee where the Wady el-Bireh joins the Jordan. Lower Galilee was, however, yet more fertile and beautiful than Upper Galilee. 180) quotes a saying from the Talmud: ‘It is easier to raise a legion of olives in Galilee than to bring up a child in Palestine. 734]'>[4], king of Assyria, and took l jon, and Abel-beth-maacah, and Janoah, and Kedesh, and Hazor, and Gilead, and Galilee, and all the land of Naphtali, and he carried them captive to Assyria’ ( 2 Kings 15:29 )
Antipas - He was tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea during the whole period of our Lord's life on earth (Luke 23:7 )
Tetrarch - ’ In the NT ‘Herod the tetrarch’ is Herod Antipas, son of Herod the Great; he ruled over Galilee and Peræa ( Matthew 14:1 , Luke 3:1 ; Luke 3:19 ; Luke 9:7 , Acts 13:1 ), and is popularly styled ‘king’ ( Mark 6:14 ff
Village - When Josephus tells us that ‘the very least of’ the villages of Galilee ‘contained above 15,000 inhabitants’ ( BJ III
Jabneel - of the lake of Galilee
Nathanael - ) He lived in Galilee and was introduced to Jesus by Philip (John 1:43-45; John 21:2)
Wind - See, further, Sea Of Galilee, p
Forest - Galilee, around Banias, and specially in Gilead between es-Salt and the Jabbok
Jezreel (2) - A triangular plain extending from the Mediterranean to the Jordan, and from the ridge of Carmel to the mountains in Galilee
Magdala - a city on the west side of the sea of Galilee, near Dalmanutha; Jesus, after the miracle of the seven loaves, being said by St
Samaria - The use of the name gradually extended to the entire kingdom or, after the Captivity, to the central region of Palestine between Judea and Galilee
Pekah - The result was, that Damascus was taken by Tiglath-Pileser king of Assyria, and with it all the lands of Israel east of the Jordan and north of the Sea of Galilee, their inhabitants being carried captive
Caesare'a Philip'pi - The spring rises from and the city was built on a limestone terrace in a valley at the base of Mount Hermon 20 miles north of the Sea of Galilee
Sidon (2) - Some from Sidon were in the multitude that thronged Jesus at the Sea of Galilee (Mark 3:8), and Sidon was pronounced more excusable in the day of judgment than the more favoured cities of Jesus’ own country and race (Matthew 11:21 f. ...
Matthew 15:29 And Jesus departed from thence, and came nigh unto the sea of Galilee; and went up into a mountain, and sat down there. ...
Mark 7:31 And again, departing from the coasts of Tyre and Sidon, he came unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the coasts of Decapolis. ’...
And Jesus departed thence, and came nigh unto the sea of Galilee; and he went up into the mountain, and sat there. ...
And again he went out from the borders of Tyre, and came through Sidon unto the sea of Galilee, through the midst of the borders of Decapolis. … And again he went out from the borders of Tyre, and came through Sidon unto the sea of Galilee,’ etc
Lake of Genesareth - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13)
Cormorant - Some think the Hebrew word should be rendered "gannet" (Sula bassana, "the solan goose"); others that it is the "tern" or "sea swallow," which also frequents the coasts of Palestine as well as the Sea of Galilee and the Jordan valley during several months of the year
Bethsaida -
A town in Galilee, on the west side of the sea of Tiberias, in the "land of Gennesaret
Wine-Press - Between Hebron and Beersheba they are found on all the hill slopes; they abound in southern Judea; they are no less common in the many valleys of Carmel; and they are numerous in Galilee
Perea - For this reason Jews travelling between Judea and Galilee often detoured across Jordan and through Perea, rather than go through the territory of the Samaritans
Zebulun - ...
In New Testament times the territory that formerly belonged to Zebulun was part of Galilee and included within it the town of Nazareth
Leopard - The cheetah ( Felix jubata ) is found also in Galilee, and it too may have been included under the Heb
Galilee, Sea of - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13)
Capernaum - of the Sea of Galilee
Salome - Wife of Zebedee; among the "women who followed Jesus from Galilee, ministering unto Him" (Matthew 27:55-56; compare Mark 15:40)
Jabesh - Robinson identifies it with ed-Deir, 23 miles southeast of the Sea of Galilee on the south side of Wady Yabis
Andrew - He belonged to Bethsaida of Galilee ( John 1:44 ), the harbour-town of Capernaum (see Bethsaida), and was a fisherman on the lake in company with Simon ( Matthew 4:18 = Mark 1:16 ), whose home he also shared ( Mark 1:29 )
Aphek - The place where Ahab defeated Benhadad ( 1 Kings 20:26 ; 1 Kings 20:30 ), in the Mîshôr , probably the modern Fîq , or Afîq , on the brow of the plateau, overlooking the Sea of Galilee
Genesareth, Lake of - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13)
Jab'ne-el - ...
One of the landmarks on the boundary of Naphtali, (Joshua 19:33 ) in upper Galilee
Nahum - is supposed to have been a native of Elcosh or Elcosha, a village in Galilee, and to have been of the tribe of Simeon
Cities of Refuge - Kedesh, in Galilee, 1 Chronicles 6:76
Lily - If the former idea be preferred, the flower may be supposed to be the Lilium Chalcedonicum, or scarlet martagon, which is found plentifully in Galilee in spring-time
Chinnereth - The sea or lake otherwise called the Sea of Galilee, Lake of Gennesaret, or Sea of Tiberias
Sea of Galilee - The Sea of Galilee is closely connected with the life of Our Lord: He came and went from one side to another with His disciples, to spread His teaching and perform miracles; commanded the winds and sea, and there came a great calm (Matthew 8); walked on its surface (Matthew 14); and explained the parables (Matthew 13)
Hermon - It is a part of the great Anti-Lebanon Range; at the point where an eastern and lower arm branches off, a little south of the latitude of Damascus, and runs in a southerly direction terminating east of the head of the sea of Galilee
Zacchae'us - He was in the caravan from Galilee which was going to Jerusalem to keep the Passover
Tiberias - 16 22) on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee (called the ‘Sea of Tiberias’ in John 6:1 ; John 21:1 , and in modern Arabic), and named in honour of the Roman Emperor. ...
For the ‘ Sea of Tiberias ,’ see Galilee [2]
Fountain - " Hot springs of volcanic origin are found near the sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea. of the sea of Galilee
Arabah - The entire Jordan Valley running 70 miles from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea, or more precisely the desert areas above the actual Zor or lushly fertile areas on the immediate shore of the Jordan. The desert area or the eastern border of the Jordan River from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea
Tiberias - Capital of Galilee until the time of Herod Agrippa II, who transferred the seat of power again to Sepphoris. On the western shore toward the southern end of the sea of Galilee or Tiberias, as John alone calls the sea. A Jewish idea is that Messiah will emerge from the lake, proceed to Tiberias and Safed, then set His throne on the highest peak in Galilee
Jesus - Herod's cruel jealousy led to Joseph's flight into Egypt with Mary and the infant Jesus, where they tarried till the death of this king (Matthew 2:13-23 ), when they returned and settled in Nazareth, in Lower Galilee (2:23; Compare Luke 4:16 ; John 1:46 , etc. It was almost wholly passed in Galilee. The first six months of this final year were passed in Galilee, and the last six in other parts of the land
Decapolis - On our Lord’s first journey through all Galilee, He was attended by crowds from all parts of Palestine, among whom were persons from Decapolis (Matthew 4:25). The presence of two thousand swine on the eastern shores of the Lake of Galilee would of itself suggest the presence of a Gentile population in that vicinity. When our Lord returned from Tyre and Sidon to the Sea of Galilee, He crossed the upper Jordan and passed south through the district governed by the tetrarch Philip to the eastern shore of the Lake. In order to reach the Sea of Galilee, He went ‘through the midst of the borders of Decapolis’ (Mark 7:31)
Galilee, Sea of - side of Galilee. there is a gradual descent to the valley of the Jordan, and then a rise to a plateau skirting the mountains of upper Galilee. The papyrus also, no longer found in the Nile, is found on the shores of the sea of Galilee. As Asia, Africa, and Europe respectively were represented at Christ's cross by the Jews, Simon of Cyrene, and the Romans respectively, so the Asiatic, African, and European fish in the sea of Galilee represent the various races of mankind gathered by the spiritual fishermen into the one gospel net. bank of the Jordan where it enters the sea of Galilee on the N
Oil - It was very abundant in Galilee
Mount - West of Jordan the mountains stretch from Lebanon far down into Galilee, terminating in Carmel
Everywhere, Every Quarter, Every Side - 1, is translated "everywhere" in Mark 1:28 , RV, of the report throughout Galilee concerning Christ; in Mark 16:20 , of preaching; Luke 9:6 , of healing; Acts 17:30 , of a Divine command for repentance; Acts 28:22 , of disparagement of Christians; 1 Corinthians 4:17 , of apostolic teaching; in Acts 24:3 , it is rendered "in all places
Mark (2) - The public ministry of Christ, his discourses and actions in Galilee, prefaced by an account of his Naphtali - The tribe which bears his name inhabited a territory north of the Sea of Galilee that extend along the northwest side of Jordan beyond Lake Huleh (Joshua 19:32-39 )
Bethany - For a possible Bethany in Galilee, see Bethabara
Gennesaret, Sea of - (See CINNEROTH; Galilee, SEA OF)
Herod Antipas - He succeeded his father in the tetrarchy of Galilee and Peraea
Ship - The ships so often mentioned on the Sea of Galilee in the Gospels were what are now called fishing boats, and were used as such
Tabor - A conspicuous mountain in Galilee, about seven miles east of Nazareth
Sea - if large or if salt or brackish; as, the Caspian Sea; the Sea of Aral; sometimes, a small fresh-water lake; as, the Sea of Galilee
c Sarea-Philippi - Cæsarea-Philippi (sĕs-a-rç'ah-fĭ-lĭp'pî), now called Banias by the Arabs, is a town at the base of Mount Hermon, about 20 miles north of the Sea of Galilee and 45 miles southwest of Damascus
Aphek - It was about six miles east of the Sea of Galilee; now called Fik
Ebal - The mountain commands an extensive view over almost the whole of Galilee, which includes points from Hermon to Jerusalem and from the sea to the Hauran
Nahum - The circumstances of Nahum's life are unknown, except that he was a native of Elkosh, which probably was a village in Galilee
Judaea, Judea - The land was thus divided by Rome, with Samaria in the centre, and Galilee in the north
Nazareth - The ‘city called Nazareth’ (Matthew 2:23), in which Jesus lived from childhood to manhood, lay in a beautiful valley of Southern Galilee, due west of the southern end of the Lake of Galilee, and about midway between that Lake and the Mediterranean. He was never far from the crowds, often (such were Roman oppression and Jewish sedition) the madding crowds of Galilee, and ‘all the rumour of the Empire entered Palestine close to Nazareth’ (G. Selah Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ, 1885, p. Cheyne has tried to conjure ‘the city of Nazareth’ out of existence, leaving the sacred name as a mere synonym of ‘Galilee’ (Encyclopaedia Biblica iii
Nazareth - The ‘city called Nazareth’ (Matthew 2:23), in which Jesus lived from childhood to manhood, lay in a beautiful valley of Southern Galilee, due west of the southern end of the Lake of Galilee, and about midway between that Lake and the Mediterranean. He was never far from the crowds, often (such were Roman oppression and Jewish sedition) the madding crowds of Galilee, and ‘all the rumour of the Empire entered Palestine close to Nazareth’ (G. Selah Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ, 1885, p. Cheyne has tried to conjure ‘the city of Nazareth’ out of existence, leaving the sacred name as a mere synonym of ‘Galilee’ (Encyclopaedia Biblica iii
Argob (2) - of the sea of Galilee; described by Burckhardt, Porter, etc. A striking contrast to Argob is the surrounding plain of the Hauran (Bashan) described as "the plain" (mishor ), a high plateau of rich pasture and tillage, stretching from the sea of Galilee to the Lejah and beyond to the desert, aligned without a stone
Weather - The elevation of the land, dropping from 3,900 feet in upper Galilee to 1,296 feet below sea level at the Dead Sea, provides natural barriers which influence the weather. Thus, the coastal plain and Galilee receive more rain than the central hill country and Negev desert
Fish, Fishing - The Sea of Chinnereth or Galilee was also a fishing center. ...
New Testament During New Testament times commercial fishing businesses were conducted on the Sea of Galilee by fishermen organized in guilds (Luke 5:7 ,Luke 5:7,5:11 ). The risen Lord ate fish with the disciples in Jerusalem (Luke 24:42 ) and by the Sea of Galilee (John 21:13 )
Resurrection of Jesus Christ - They were invited to view the empty tomb, then to go and tell the disciples that Jesus was risen and was going to Galilee. Immediately, the resurrected Christ greeted them, urged them not to be afraid, to go and tell the “brothers” that He would meet them in Galilee. Matthew's final report of Jesus' resurrection is on a mountain in Galilee to His eleven disciples where He gave them the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-20 ). He calmed their fears, told them that Jesus was risen, and that Jesus would meet the disciples in Galilee. In John 21:1 Jesus appeared to seven disciples in Galilee and prepared their breakfast
Terebinth - In almost every locality where it is allowed to attain its full growth 30 to 40 feet high it is associated with a sacred tomb or grove: many such groves are still deeply venerated in Galilee
Fish - Two of the villages on the shores of the Sea of Galilee derived their names from their fisheries, Bethsaida (the "house of fish") on the east and on the west
Jabesh-Gilead - While certainty is elusive, the area in which Jabesh-gilead probably was located is east of the Jordan River about twenty miles south of the Sea of Galilee
Tabor -
Now Jebel et-Tur, a cone-like prominent mountain, 11 miles west of the Sea of Galilee
Baana - Another district supervisor over Asher, the western slopes of Galilee in the north
Aphek - of the sea of Galilee, still on the great road between Damascus, Nabulus, and Jerusalem
Cushion - ) is just the word used by the Sea of Galilee fishermen for the cushion they place in the hinder part of their fishing-boats for the comfort of the passenger to-day
Andrew, Saint - (Greek: manly) ...
Apostle (died 60), born Bethsaida, Galilee; died Patrre, Achaia
Bartholomew - The supposition also acquires additional probability from considering, that Nathanael is particularly mentioned among the Apostles to whom Christ appeared at the sea of Tiberias, after his resurrection; Simon Peter, Thomas, and Nathanael, of Cana in Galilee; the sons of Zebedee, namely, James and John; with two other of his disciples, probably Andrew and Philip, John 21:2
Salome - Returning to Jerusalem, Jesus appeared to them on the way, and said to them, "Be not afraid: go tell my brethren that they go into Galilee, and there shall they see me
Hiram or Huram - He provided timber and stones, together with gold to an immense amount, and received in return large supplies of corn, wine, and oil, with twenty cities in Galilee, 1 Kings 5:1-18 2 Chronicles 2:1-18
Earthquake - So late as 1837 one occurred in the vicinity of the Sea of Galilee, by which about a third part of Tiberias was destroyed, and thousands of people perished there and in the towns near by
ke'Desh - ...
Kedesh; also Kedesh in Galilee; and once, (Judges 4:6 ) Kedesh-naphtali, one of the fortified cities of the tribe of Naphtali, named between Hazor and Edrei, (Joshua 19:37 ) appointed as a city of refuge, and allotted with its "suburbs" to the Gershonite Levites
Pilate - (Galilee and other parts to the north and east were governed by Rome through the sons of Herod the Great. This may have contributed to the hatred that existed between Pilate and Herod Antipas, the governor of Galilee (Luke 23:6-12)
Gentiles - Goim is especially used of Galilee, bordering on and, even in Israelite times, much peopled with the Gilgal (Judges 4:2; Isaiah 9:1. ) (See Galilee
Bethsaida - A place on the shore of the Sea of Galilee, whither Christ went after feeding the five thousand ( Mark 6:45 , cf
Jezreel - The Old Testament uses the name to refer to the entire valley of Jezreel which separates Galilee from Samaria, including the valley of Esdraelon
Gadara - It stood on the summit of a mountain about 6 miles south-east of the Sea of Galilee
Mary Magdalen, Saint - Penitent, called Magdalen probably from a her native town, Magdala, in Galilee, or from the Talmudic expression meaning adulteress
Tribe - Galilee comprised the territories allotted in OT times to the tribes of Zebulun and Naphtali (Matthew 4:13; Matthew 4:15)
Felix, Antonius - 52; but this contradicts Tacitus, who makes Cumanus governor of Galilee and Felix of Samaria simultaneously; and this suits Acts 24:10 (‘many years’)
Fish - Fish are found in enormous numbers in all the inland waters of Palestine, and especially in the Lake of Galilee, Lake Huleh, and the ‘meadow lakes’ of Damascus
Hiram - Solomon gave to Hiram twenty cities in the land of Galilee, but Hiram was not pleased with them: he called them, in Aramaic CABUL,'displeasing or dirty;' and the cities were eventually returned to Solomon
Caesara Philippi - A city on the northeast of the marshy plain of el-Huleh, 120 miles north of Jerusalem, and 20 miles north of the Sea of Galilee, at the "upper source" of the Jordan, and near the base of Mount Hermon
Mount Tabor - -in Galilee
Lily - Anyone who has stood among the wheat fields of Galilee
Chronology of the New Testament - ...
Ministry in Judæa and Galilee
Mount, Mountain - 3); John 4:20 ; (b) of "the Mount of Transfiguration," Matthew 17:1,9 ; Mark 9:2,9 ; Luke 9:28,37 (AV, "hill"); 2 Peter 1:18 ; (c) of "Zion," Hebrews 12:22 ; Revelation 14:1 ; (d) of "Sinai," Acts 7:30,38 ; Galatians 4:24,25 ; Hebrews 8:5 ; 12:20 ; (e) of "the Mount of Olives," Matthew 21:1 ; 24:3 ; Mark 11:1 ; 13:3 ; Luke 19:29,37 ; 22:39 ; John 8:1 ; Acts 1:12 ; (f) of "the hill districts as distinct from the lowlands," especially of the hills above the Sea of Galilee, e
Boar - of the sea of Galilee, some Gadarenes are mentioned as having a herd of 2,000. Pococke saw large herds among the reeds of Jordan, where it flows into the sea of Galilee; and so it is sculptured on Assyrian monuments as among reeds
Judea - Judah thus occupied all the southern portion of Palestine, while the northern part was called Galilee, and the middle Samaria. When the whole country fell into the power of the Romans, the former division into Galilee, Samaria, and Judea seems to have again become current, Luke 2:4 John 4:3,4
Gennesaret, Land of - shore of the Sea of Galilee. shore of the Sea of Galilee; that portion of the plain bordering on Mejdel being called el-Mejdel. Sea of Galilee. —It is usually identified with the little plain situated on the western coast of the Sea of Galilee, and known to the Arabs as el-Ghuweir, ‘little Ghor or hollow. , and extending westward from the Lake only to the base of the rugged uplands of Galilee, its total area is exceedingly small. Its altitude, like that of the Sea of Galilee, is over 650 feet below the level of the Mediterranean. Then, it was a most charming spot—‘the unparalleled garden of God,’ as a certain Rabbi calls it; and ‘the gem of Palestine,’ as Merrill speaks of it (Galilee in the Time of Christ, 33): now, it is, as Thomson says, ‘pre-eminently fruitful in thorns,’ a veritable thicket of oleanders and nubk trees, of gigantic thistles and brambles. Its waters take their rise in the Jarmuk, the highest mountain in Galilee. ...
Besides these waters which drain the region of Galilee immediately west of the Plain of Gennesaret, there are certain fountains in the Plain itself whose waters were used for irrigation: (a) ‘Ain el-Mudauwarah, or ‘Round Fountain,’ situated a little over a mile N. (γ) ‘Ain et-Tabigha, or ‘Fountain of the Ruined Mill,’ formerly supposed to be the scene of the miracle of the feeding of the 5000 (Mark 6:30-44), is another large spring of water—according to Tristram, the largest in Galilee, and about one-half as large as the fountain at Caesarea Philippi. ; Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ, 33, 34, art
Gerasenes, Gergesenes - Many natives in the district surrounding the Sea of Galilee pronounce the Arabic د d and ذ dh like z—thus ‘Gadarenes’ they would pronounce ‘Gazarenes’). How then account for the reading ‘Gadarenes’? Perhaps, as Thomson suggests, the place where the miracle took place, ‘over against Galilee,’ was included within the district of Gadara. ]'>[1] ? There can be here no certainty, but the probability is that Origen was right, and that the true name of the village or town where the miracle occurred, ‘over against Galilee,’ was Gergesa. On the eastern side ‘over against Galilee’ Jesus landed from the boat, and ‘straightway there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit
Ministry - (b) Galilee, however, was the principal scene of His teaching and healing work. The Lake and its cities,—Capernaum with others,—Nazareth, Cana, and other towns and a number of villages, the plains and mountains of populous Galilee shared in the deeds of His busy life. Two certainly, and probably three, separate tours of the whole of Galilee are mentioned: (1) Matthew 4:23, Mark 1:39, Luke 4:44; (2) Luke 8:1; (3) Matthew 9:35, Mark 6:6,—though it is possible that (2) and (3) are the same. (e) Several visits to districts contiguous to Galilee, to the east and north, are mentioned, namely, the visit to Gerasa or Gadara during His Galilaean ministry (Matthew 8:28, Mark 5:1, Luke 8:26), to Decapolis (Mark 7:31), to the unknown Magadan (Matthew 15:39) or Dalmanutha (Mark 8:10), and Caesarea-Philippi (Matthew 16:13, Mark 8:27). Cana of Galilee. ...
First Miracle to Beginning of Work in Galilee. ...
Preceding Events and First Tour in Galilee. Other Cities of Galilee. ...
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Events connected with Second Tour in Galilee. ...
Cities and Villages of Galilee. ...
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Third Tour, and Departure from Galilee. ...
Galilee. Galilee
Forest - Large, naturally-wooded areas, characteristic of the central hill country, the Galilee, and the Bashan
Matthew - He first appears in the gospels as a publican or tax-gatherer near the Sea of Galilee, and the last mention of him is in the list of those who met in the upper room at Jerusalem after the ascension of our Lord
Judaea - Though sometimes (as in Luke 23:5 , and more definitely in Acts 10:37 ; Acts 26:10 ) loosely employed to denote the whole of Western Palestine, the name was properly confined to the southernmost of the three districts into which the Roman province of Western Palestine was divided the other two being Galilee and Samaria
Shechem - Its situation was between Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal, and it lay on the Roman road from Jerusalem to Galilee
After - After I have arisen, I will go before you into Galilee
Zebedee - A fisherman of Galilee; father of James and John
Zaanaim, Plain of - But as the Kedesh meant in Judges 4 is that on the shores of the sea of Galilee, only 16 miles from Tabor the scene of the battle, and within the bounds of Naphtali, the place called Bessum in the plain between this Kedesh and Tabor (identical with Bitzaanaim, and near Adami (Joshua 19:33), now ed Dameh, and Nekeb now Nakib) doubtless corresponds to Zaanaim
Thomas - There can be little doubt that this apostle was a native of Galilee
a'Phek - (1 Kings 20:26 ) It is now found in Fik , at the head of the Wady Fik , six miles east of the Sea of Galilee
Galileans - It happened, when the tax was levied by Quirinus, that one Judas, of Galilee, otherwise called Gaulonites, in company with Zaduk, a Sadducee, publicly taught, that such taxation was repugnant to the law of Moses, according to which the Jews, they maintained, had no king but God
Sea - So the lake of Galilee is called a sea, from the Greek
Zealot - ]'>[2] , and the activity of guerilla bands in Galilee under the leadership of one Ezechias. Galilee was the home of the party, and it naturally included in it men of very different types, from the religious fanatic to the partisan of revolution
Naphtali - Shelucha, "let loose," is cognate to sheluchim, "the apostles," who on Galilee mountains "brought good tidings" of Jesus (Isaiah 52:7). coast of the sea of Galilee, "an earthly paradise" (Josephus, B. Pagan neighbours soon made it and northern Israel "Galilee of the Gentiles
Judas the Galilaean - revolutionists) in Galilee. This discrepancy may be due to a confusion of a Galilaean Gamala with the better-known town of the same name east of Jordan; or to the fact that the activities of Judas were largely confined to Galilee; or to the loose use of the word ‘Galilaean’ to describe a Jew born near Galilee
Jesus Christ - ...
After a short trip to Cana in Galilee where the water was turned into wine Jesus returned to Jerusalem for the Passover of a. Jesus took this as a sign to return to Galilee to begin his own ministry. On the trip back to Galilee, Jesus rather openly declared to the woman at Jacob's well in Samaria some of his challenging, new ideas. ...
Jesus was warmly received upon his arrival in Galilee (John 4:45 ) and everyone praised him as he began to preach the gospel of the kingdom of God (Mark 1:15 ; Luke 4:14-15 ). Jesus' ministry in Galilee and the regions to the north of it are described in some detail by the Gospel writers and, although, in general, it was a time of public acclaim by the people, the clouds of opposition were arising from official quarters in Jerusalem. ...
After an initial rebuff in his hometown of Nazareth, Jesus settled in at Capernaum by the Sea of Galilee, using it as a base of operations for his ministry in Galilee. Matthew summarizes this by saying "Jesus went throughout Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, preaching the good news of the kingdom, and healing every disease and sickness among the people" (4:23). ...
Jesus made at least three major preaching tours through Galilee at this time, as well as two that took him into Gentile territory to the north and east. Fourth, during Jesus' second trip outside of Galilee, he disclosed at Caesarea Philippi and at his transfiguration who he really was and what his ultimate task was to be (Mark 8:27-38 ; 9:2 ). As Jesus' ministry in Galilee was drawing to a close, he was preparing to move south to continue his work in the regions of Perea and Judea. Even while he was in Galilee spies and representatives were being sent from Jerusalem to observe his actions and, perhaps, to find some grounds for legal action against him. While he was in Galilee, he was more or less out of their jurisdiction, but traveling to Jerusalem would provoke open conflict. ...
Jesus traveled throughout Judea and Perea, teaching, preaching, and healing, as he had done in Galilee. After a short trip back north, taking him to the border of Galilee once more, Jesus returned by way of Jericho to Jerusalem for the last time. ...
Other appearances followed over a period of forty days, both in Jerusalem and in Galilee
Capernaum - One of these is described by Sir Charles Wilson as ‘by far the largest spring in Galilee, and estimated to be more than half the size of the celebrated source of the Jordan at Banias’ (Recovery, etc. ...
‘Seen alone there might have been some doubt as to its character, but compared with the number of ruins of the same character which have lately been brought to notice in Galilee, there can be none. But it has to be remembered that these large villages or towns on the Sea of Galilee had each its ‘territory. (a) In John 12:21, the Bethsaida of the Gospels is described as ‘Bethsaida of Galilee,’ whereas Bethsaida Julias was, strictly speaking, in Gaulanitis (BJ ii. On the other hand, (a) there is evidence enough to show that ‘Galilee’ was often loosely used for the country east of Jordan and of the Lake (BJ ii. 1, 6); and the geographer Ptolemaeus speaks of Bethsaida Julias as ‘in Galilee,’ just as St. A comparison with similar buildings elsewhere in Galilee brings out the distinctive features of the ground plan, and the presence of religious emblems seems to render this probable. And it is perhaps after all more probable that elaborate building took place at a time when Galilee had a prince of its own with architectural ambitions, who must have gathered around him a number of skilled artificers at Tiberias. The Herods were all builders; and the period of their rule was probably that in which Galilee enjoyed the greatest material prosperity. 150 onwards the shores of the Sea of Galilee became a stronghold of Rabbinical Judaism
Epiphany, the - Anexamination of the services for the Feast of the Epiphany showsthat the commemoration is really threefold: (1) Our Lord'sManifestation by a star to the Magi; (2) The Manifestation ofthe glorious Trinity at His Baptism, and (3) The Manifestation ofthe glory and Divinity of Christ by His miraculous turning waterinto wine at the marriage in Cana of Galilee; all of which are saidto have happened on the same day, though not in the same year
Andrew - He was of Bethsaida in Galilee (John 1:44 ), and was the brother of Simon Peter (Matthew 4:18 ; 10:2 )
Jabin - of the sea of Galilee, etc
Archelaus - He decided to take Mary and the child Jesus to Galilee when they returned from Egypt rather than go to Judea (Matthew 2:22 )
Aphek - City east of Jordan near the Sea of Galilee where Benhadad led Syria against Israel about 860 but met defeat as a prophet predicted for Israel (1 Kings 20:26-30 )
Aphek - City east of Jordan near the Sea of Galilee where Benhadad led Syria against Israel about 860 but met defeat as a prophet predicted for Israel (1 Kings 20:26-30 )
Mat'Thew - His home was at Capernaum His business was the collection of dues and customs from persons and goods crossing the Sea of Galilee, or passing along the great Damascus road which ran along the shore between Bethsaida, Julius and Capernaum
Nazareth - Now en Nazirah on a hill of Galilee (Mark 1:9), with a precipice nigh (Luke 4:29); near Cane (John 2:1-2; John 2:11). Nazareth bore a bad name even in Galilee (for Nathanael who said "can any good thing come out of Nazareth?" was of Galilee), which itself, because of its half pagan population and rude dialect, was despised by the people of Judea
Jericho - Conder) maintain that the ford east from Jericho cannot be the place, but rather a ford farther north, lying east from Cana of Galilee. The central one of these is the most direct, and was that used by pilgrims going from Galilee to Jerusalem, who took the circuitous route in order to avoid entering Samaria. From this place Jesus could see the pilgrim bands from Galilee going down to Jericho on their way to Jerusalem
New Testament - Death of Herod;...
Archelaus made ethnarch of Judaea, Samaria and Idumaea...
Herod Antipas tetrarch of Peraea and Galilee. Jesus preaches in Galilee Mark 1:14,15 ...
Jesus at the synagogue at Nazareth: cast out of the city. Luke 4:16-30 ...
Jesus visits the towns of Galilee Mark 1:38,39 ...
27 Jesus visits Jerusalem (probably the second Passover )
Herod - At the age of fifteen years, Herod was constituted by his father procurator of Galilee under Hyrcanus II, who was then at the head of the Jewish nation; while his brother Phasael was intrusted with the same authority over Judea. After the death of Herod, half of his kingdom, including Judea, Ideumaea, and Samaria, was given to his son Archelaus, with the title of Ethnarch; while the remaining half was divided between two of his other sons, Herod Antipas and Philip, with the title of Tetrarchs; the former having the regions of Galilee and Perea, and the latter Batanea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis. After the death of his father, he was appointed by Augustus to be tetrarch of Galilee and Perea, that is, the southern part of the country east of the Jordan, Luke 3:1 , whence also the general appellation of king is sometimes given to him, Mark 6:14
Jericho - Conder) maintain that the ford east from Jericho cannot be the place, but rather a ford farther north, lying east from Cana of Galilee. The central one of these is the most direct, and was that used by pilgrims going from Galilee to Jerusalem, who took the circuitous route in order to avoid entering Samaria. From this place Jesus could see the pilgrim bands from Galilee going down to Jericho on their way to Jerusalem
John the Apostle - Youngest of the twelve, probably of Bethsaida upon the sea of Galilee (John 1:44; Luke 5:10), the town of their partners Simon and Andrew. John used to stay in Galilee only during that month. ...
Salome his mother ministered to the Lord "of her substance" (Luke 8:3), and was one of the women who came with Him in His last journey from Galilee to Jerusalem (Luke 23:55; Luke 24:1; Mark 16:1), and after His death bought spices to anoint His body. John probably accompanied Him on His homeward journey to Galilee from Jordan (John 1), and then to Jerusalem (John 2-3), again through Samaria to Galilee (4), and again to Jerusalem (5), for he describes as an eye witness. Then they appear in Galilee (John 21) again associated in their former occupation on the sea of Galilee
Nazarene - 1) A native or inhabitant of Nazareth of Galilee, especially applied to Jesus Christ
Arabah - The name given by the Hebrews to the whole of the great depression from the Sea of Galilee to the Gulf of Akabah
Hermon - It is about 40 miles north of the Sea of Galilee
Hermon - Jesus in His youth must have often seen it from the hill west of Nazareth, and, during His ministry, from the Sea of Galilee
Wine - Thus when Jesus wrought his first miracle in Cana of Galilee, in turning the water into wine; as this set forth the glories of his person and righteousness, it might be truly said the gospel then preached, compared to all former revelations, was keeping the best wine to the last; (John 2:10-12) and hence the gospel itself is called wine on the lees well refined
Gerasa - ]'>[1] ) cannot belong to this place, which is too far away from the Sea of Galilee to suit the story
Caper'Naum - (village of Nahum ) was on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee
John - When he grew up he followed the occupation of a fisherman on the Lake of Galilee. After the resurrection he and Peter again return to the Sea of Galilee, where the Lord reveals himself to them (21:1,7)
Nets - ...
A tax is levied on all fish caught in the Sea of Galilee. See an excellent account of, The Fisheries of Galilee’ in PEFSt Tiberias, Sea of - (See Galilee, SEA or, the local designation. The Gospels - according to Matthew, Mark, and Luke - never use the designation "sea of Tiberias" (still bahr Τubariyeh ), but the local name," sea" or "lake of Galilee," which shows they must have written before that became the universal designation, as it had in the time of John's writing
Rama - of the sea, of Galilee. of the sea of Galilee, on the slope of a lofty hill
Beth-Shemesh - Present scholarship identifies the city with either el-Abeidiyeh, two miles south of Galilee, or khirbet Shemsin, east of Tabor. Beth-shemesh of Naphtali was probably located in central upper Galilee because of its association with Beth-anath (Joshua 19:38 ; Judges 1:33 )
Judas - He is so called both in the NT ( Acts 5:37 ) and in Josephus, though he belonged to Gamala in Gaulanitis on the eastern side of the Lake of Galilee; perhaps because Galilee was the scene of his patriotic enterprise
Jordan - The bridges over the river did not exist in early times, although there are evidences of one near the lake of Galilee in the Roman period, and perhaps in the time of Christ. See Galilee, by S
Miracle - The evangelist John is careful to inform the church, that "the beginning of miracles in Cana of Galilee" was shewn in converting water into wine; as if to say, such are the blessings of the gospel, Our common mercies will be made rich mercies; and the nether springs in Jesus, if for his personal glory, shall become upper springs in Jesus. Here it is, as in Cana of Galilee, Jesus manifesteth forth his glory, and his disciples believe on him
Publican - ...
In Galilee the publicans had to collect, not for the Imperial treasury (as in Judaea), but for Herod Antipas the tetrarch. Matthew (Levi), who was called to be an Apostle from the place of toll (τελώνιον) on the shores of the Lake of Galilee at Capernaum (Matthew 9:9, Mark 2:14, Luke 5:27)
Gentiles (2) - ...
The fact that Jesus did not pass His youth in the religiously exclusive atmosphere of Jerusalem, but in the freer and more liberal surroundings of semi-Gentile Galilee, fits in with the prophetic word of Simeon at the Presentation, and the declarations of His forerunner: He was to be ‘a light to lighten the Gentiles’ (Luke 2:32); and, God was able to raise up to Abraham children (Luke 3:8) who could not boast any natural descent from the patriarch. Matthew, although according to the usual account of his standpoint he had no especially Gentile proclivities, records two important prophetic utterances regarding the Gentiles as being illustrated and fulfilled in his Master’s work: ‘Galilee of the Gentiles; the people which sat in darkness saw great light; and to them which sat in the region and shadow of death light is sprung up’ (Luke 4:15-16), and, ‘In his name shall the Gentiles trust’ (Luke 12:21). ); and, when driven from His native town, He took up His abode in a city of despised Galilee which belonged to that less Jewish portion of it known as ‘Galilee of the Gentiles’ (Matthew 4:15). Moreover, it was in the same Gentile-infected Galilee that the most important part of His ministry was carried on, and He even went into the borders of Tyre and Sidon (Mark 7:24), and also taught and healed those who came to Him from thence, together with those who sought Him from Decapolis (Matthew 4:25), and from Idumaea, and from beyond Jordan (Mark 3:8); nor did He disdain to remain on one occasion for two days among the Samaritans at their request (John 4:40)
je'Sus Christ - When Jesus was ten years old, there was a great insurrection, (Acts 5:37 ) in Galilee. Having been baptized by John early in the winter of 26-27, he spent the larger portion of his year in Judea and about the lower Jordan, till in December he went northward to Galilee through Samaria. 29, was spent in Galilee and norther Palestine, chiefly in the vicinity of the Sea of Galilee. In November, 29, Jesus made his final departure from Galilee, and the rest of his ministry was in Judea and Perea, beyond Jordan, till his crucifixion, April 7, A
Mary - ...
This last-named Mary was one of several women from Galilee who helped look after the needs of Jesus and his disciples. She came from the town of Magdala in Galilee and was known as Mary Magdalene, to distinguish her from the other Marys (Matthew 27:55-56; Luke 8:1-3). ...
At the time God revealed this to Mary, she lived in the town of Nazareth in Galilee, where she was engaged to be married to a local carpenter named Joseph
Isaiah - The Assyrians were invading Galilee and Palestine
Isaias - The Assyrians were invading Galilee and Palestine
Merom - At its southern extremity the plain is similarly traversed by elevated and broken ground, through which, by deep and narrow clefts, the Jordan, after passing through Lake Huleh, makes its rapid descent to the Sea of Galilee
Bethsaida - ) A city of Galilee, W
Rama - ...
...
One of the "fenced cities" of Naphtali (Joshua 19:36 ), on a mountain slope, about seven and a half miles west-south-west of Safed, and 15 miles west of the north end of the Sea of Galilee, the present large and well-built village of Rameh
Nain - the eye ranges over the hills of Lower Galilee, and the rolling breadths of the great plain, to Mt
lo-Debar - ” After Saul and Jonathan had been defeated on Mount Gibeon (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ), Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son (2 Samuel 4:4 ) took refuge with Machir in the city of Lo-Debar (2 Samuel 9:4 )—a city of Gad located in the eastern part of Gilead just south of the Sea of Chinnereth (Galilee)
Capernaum - The two sites most in favour are Tell Hum and Khan Minyeh , both on the north side of the Sea of Galilee, the former about midway between the latter and the mouth of the Jordan
Fish, Fishers, Fishing - The fish in the sea of Galilee was very plentiful, and there was much fishing
Gilead - The district on the east of the Jordan, extending from the river Yarmouk, a little south of the Sea of Galilee, to the north corner of the Dead Sea
Banquet - Jesus accepted an invitation to one of these at Cana in Galilee (John 2:2 ff
Capernaum - A city on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee, Matthew 4:13; comp
lo-Debar - ” After Saul and Jonathan had been defeated on Mount Gibeon (1 Samuel 31:1-13 ), Mephibosheth, Jonathan's lame son (2 Samuel 4:4 ) took refuge with Machir in the city of Lo-Debar (2 Samuel 9:4 )—a city of Gad located in the eastern part of Gilead just south of the Sea of Chinnereth (Galilee)
Gilead - The district on the east of the Jordan, extending from the river Yarmouk, a little south of the Sea of Galilee, to the north corner of the Dead Sea
Mark, Gospel of - Apart from the events in Jerusalem at the time of Jesus’ death and resurrection, most of Jesus’ ministry recorded in Mark took place in Galilee in the north. The story then quickly moves on to deal with Jesus’ ministry in Galilee and other northern regions. ...
From Galilee Jesus appointed twelve apostles whom he could send out to spread the message of his kingdom (3:7-19). ...
Jesus’ ministry from his departure from Galilee to his arrival in Jerusalem dealt with such matters as divorce (10:1-12), children (10:13-16), wealth (10:17-31) and ambition (10:32-45)
City - Galilee, measuring fifty miles north and south, and from twenty-five to thirty-five east and west—about the average size of an English shire—is said by Josephus (BJ iii. Round the Lake of Galilee there were nine cities with not less than 15,000 inhabitants, some of them with considerably more, so that there must have been along its margin an almost unbroken chain of buildings. Everywhere in Galilee there was an intense civic vitality. ...
This density of population passed over the Lake of Galilee to the region eastward. To the north of Galilee again lay the Phœnician cities of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21). The cities of Galilee owed their greatness and importance to commercial or political causes
Jordan - Hermon, it flows almost due south by a most tortuous course, through the two lakes of Huleh and Galilee, following the bottom of a rapidly descending and most remarkable geological fissure, and finally emptying itself into the Dead Sea, which is 1292 feet below the level of the Mediterranean. The Upper Jordan is a convenient designation for that portion of the river between Lake Huleh and the Sea of Galilee. Emerging from Lake Huleh, the river flows placidly for a space of two miles, and then dashes down over a rocky and tortuous bed until it enters the Sea of Galilee, whose altitude is 682 feet below the level of the Mediterranean. The Lower Jordan is an appropriate designation for that portion of the river between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea. It enters the Jordan 5 miles south of the Sea of Galilee. There is another called Jisr el-Mujamîyeh , close by that of the new railroad from Haifa to Damascus, or about 7 miles south of the Sea of Galilee
John, Gospel of Saint - While the first three Gospels are mainly concerned with the human side of the life of Christ and with His ministry in Galilee, Saint John is more intent on showing the Divine side of the Saviour's life and treats especially of His ministry in Judea and Jerusalem
Esdraelon - , "the meadow of the son of Amer") which stretches across Central Palestine from the Jordan to the Mediterraanean, separating the mountain ranges of Carmel and Samaria from those of Galilee, extending about 14 miles from north to south, and 9 miles from east to west
Bethshean - of the sea of Galilee, 4 miles W
Zealot - During this time Rome had systematically conquered Galilee, Perea and Judea
Ituraea - of the Sea of Galilee
Oak - , growing on the eastern sides of Lebanon and the hills of Galilee; its gall-nuts, formed by the puncture of an insect, contain tannin and gallic acid used for dyeing and ink
Gospel of Saint John - While the first three Gospels are mainly concerned with the human side of the life of Christ and with His ministry in Galilee, Saint John is more intent on showing the Divine side of the Saviour's life and treats especially of His ministry in Judea and Jerusalem
Bottle - ...
In the days of our Lord, it is certain that stone, as well as earthen vessels, were known, for we read of such at the marriage in Cana of Galilee
Agrippa - 39 he succeeded him in the territories of Galilee and Peraea
Mary Magdalene - She is really called 'Mary of Magdala,' a town near the Sea of Galilee: her name and her character are not in any way connected with the modern term of 'Magdalen
Nazareth - ...
It is identified with en Nasirah , in Lower Galilee, 32 42' N, 35 18' E
Phenicia - It had also very little extent on the land side, because the Israelites, who possessed all Galilee, confined it to the coast of the Mediterranean Sea
Jonah - son of Amittai, the fifth of the minor prophets, was born at Gathhepher, in Galilee
Luke (2) - 23-38: his temptation, 4:1-13; his discourses, miracles, and transactions in Galilee
Tiberias - A city of Galilee, founded by Herod Antipas, and namely by him in honor of the emperor Tiberius
Tabor - An isolated mountain of Galilee, on the northeastern side of the plain of Esdraelon, an arm of which extends beyond the mountain in the same direction
Gadarenes', Girgesenes', Gerasenes' - The miracle referred to took place, without doubt, near the town of Gergesa, the modern Kersa , close by the eastern shore of the Sea of Galilee, and hence in the country of Gergesenes
Caesarea - The latter was in the hill country of northern Galilee (Matthew 16:13; see CAESAREA PHILIPPI)
Bashan - Bashan was the region lying north of the Yarmuk River and east of the Sea of Galilee, though the name was occasionally used to cover a wider area
Judea - of Samaria (though "beyond Jordan" is vaguely included in it Mark 10:1, and Galilee Luke 23:5)
Capernaum - (cuh puhr' nay um; village of Nahum ) On the northwest shore of the Sea of Galilee about 2 1/2 miles west of the entrance of the Jordan is located the New Testament town of Capernaum. As an economic center in Galilee it was more significant than tradition has often allowed
Cana - Those references place Cana of Galilee on higher ground than Capernaum. ...
Josephus states (Vita, 16) that he resided for a time ‘in a village of Galilee which is named Cana
Nazareth - A city of lower Galilee, about seventy miles north of Jerusalem, in the territory of the tribe of Zebulun. Towards the north, the eye glances over the countless hills of Galilee, and reposes on the majestic and snow-crowned Hermon
Ptolemais - On a coast peculiarly unfriendly to the mariner, the Bay of ‘Akka is one of the few spots where nature has lent its encouragement to the building of a harbour; its importance in history has always been as the port of Galilee and Damascus, of the Hauran and Gilead, while in the days of Western domination the Roman Ptolemais and the Crusading St. Extending from Carmel in the south to the ‘Ladder of Tyre’ in the north, and eastward to the foothills of Galilee, is the great and well-watered ‘Plain of Acre,’ a region which, though sandy and sterile close to the sea, is of rich fertility elsewhere
Jor'Dan - Selah Merrill, in his book "Galilee in the Time of Christ" (1881), says, "Near Tarichaea, just below the point where the Jordan leaves the lake (of Galilee), there was (in Christ's time) a splendid bridge across the river, supported by ten piers
Galilee - Galilee was the northern section of Palestine. It was a mountainous region that extended from the Lake of Galilee north to the Lebanon Ranges and west to the coastal plain. When the Old Testament refers to places in Galilee, it usually mentions them according to their location in the tribal areas of the region – Dan, Naphtali, Issachar, Zebulun and Asher (Matthew 4:12-153; Isaiah 9:1; cf
Mark, Theology of - ...
The messianic ministry of Jesus is focused first in Galilee (1:16-8:26), where Jesus calls disciples, teaches with authority, heals, and casts out unclean spirits, while identifying himself as the Son of Man. ...
The words and works of Jesus during his public ministry in and around Galilee prompt persons to wonder who he is. The story of Jesus in Mark is bracketed between the beginning of his ministry in Galilee where he calls for people to "repent and believe the good news" (1:15), and the end of his ministry in Jerusalem where the centurion at the cross confesses that he is "the Son of God" (15:39). ...
The crowds that are amazed at Jesus' teachings and mighty works (1:22,27; 2:12; 5:20,42; 6:2; 7:37; 9:15; 10:32; 11:18; 12:17) are located almost entirely in Galilee and symbolize the universal character of salvation. The fear and amazement of the women who visit Jesus' tomb, with their subsequent silence about Jesus' promise to meet his disciples in Galilee (16:5-8; Galilee (1:16-8:26), Jerusalem (8:27-13:37), and his passion and resurrection (14:1-16:8). ...
For the extended ministry in Galilee Jesus commissions twelve as apostles who are to be with him, to be sent out to proclaim the good news, and to have the same authority Jesus has over demons (3:13-19). ...
As a preparation for the extension of Jesus' ministry beyond Galilee into the Gentile world the twelve are sent out as before, except this time they are to go in pairs and to live dependently among the people (6:7-12)
Theudas - This incident is said to have taken place some time before the days of Judas of Galilee, who led a revolt at the time of ‘the enrolment. Soon afterwards Fadus’s successor, Alexander, put to death two sons of Judas of Galilee-the Judas who had raised an insurrection when Quirinius made an enrolment of the Jews. Josephus, it will be remembered, after referring to Theudas’s fate, goes on to remark that soon afterwards the sons of Judas of Galilee were put to death
Trial of Jesus - The Jews responded with vehement accusations against Jesus' actions in Judea and Galilee (Luke 23:5 ). When Pilate learned that Jesus was from Galilee, he sent Jesus to Herod Antipas of Galilee who was then in Jerusalem (Luke 23:6-12 )
Naphtali - The tribe descended from him settled in the north of Canaan, and together with the neighbouring tribe of Zebulun occupied much of the region later known as Galilee. This was the region to the north and west of the Sea of Chinnereth (Lake Galilee) where Jesus grew up and where he spent most of the time recorded of him in the New Testament. (For other features of the region see BETHSAIDA; CAPERNAUM; CHINNERETH; Galilee; HAZOR
Martha - Luke does not name it, and he has been charged with placing the incident of the meal in Martha’s house in Galilee. Thus at Luke 9:49-50, recounting what befell in Galilee, he records the Lord’s rebuke of His disciples’ mistaken zeal; then, finding another incident which teaches a like lesson (Luke 9:51-56), he inserts it in this connexion, though it belongs to the last journey to Jerusalem (cf. Then he returns to what befell in Galilee, resuming the narrative of the journey to Jerusalem at Luke 17:11
Matthew (2) - 514), it was common in Galilee for a man to have two names, one strictly Jewish and the other Galilaean. Along the north end of the Sea of Galilee there was a road leading from Damascus to Acre on the Mediterranean, and on that road a customs-office marked the boundary between the territories of Philip the tetrarch and Herod Antipas. See Publican, and Sea of Galilee, § vi
Canaan - During the time of our Savior, it was under the dominion of the last-mentioned people, and was divided into five provinces: Galilee, Samaria, Judea, Peraea, and Idumaea. The lake of Tiberias or Sea of Galilee, and lake Merom. This river, passing through lake Merom and the sea of Galilee, flows south with innumerable windings into the Dead sea. The tableland of Galilee may be nine hundred or one thousand feet above the Mediterranean. In lower Galilee we find the great and beautiful plain of Esdraelon, extending from mount Carmel and Acre on the west to Tabor and Gilboa, and even to the Jordan on the east
Decapolis - These cities were scattered south and east of the Sea of Galilee
Riblah - of the Sea of Galilee, but the exact site is unknown
Mark, Gospel of Saint - " The sixteen chapters are written in the chronological order, with some exceptions, and follow these general divisions: ...
preparation through the preaching of Saint John, the baptism, and temptation (1,2-13)
the preaching and miracles of Jesus in Galilee (1,14, to 9,50)
the journey to Jerusalem for the feast of the Pasch, and the last days of Our Lord's teaching (10-13)
the Passion, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension (14-16)
The Biblical Commission, June 26, 1912, declared that all reasonable doubt that Saint Mark is the author of the second Gospel as now contained in our Bibles, and that the Gospel was written before the year 70 and according to the preaching of Saint Peter, has been removed by the clear evidence of tradition from the earliest ages, as found in the testimony of the Fathers, in the use of the Gospel by early Christians, and its place in ancient codices and versions
Thomas - His doubts were removed, and he was one of the seven who journeyed north to meet the Lord at the Lake of Galilee ( John 21:2 )
Marriage-Feasts - ) To some such marriage-feast Jesus and his five disciples were invited at Cana of Galilee
Matthew - ) As subordinate to the head farmers of the Roman revenues he collected dues at Capernaum on the sea of Galilee, the route by which traffic passed between Damascus and the Phoenician seaports
Disperse, Dispersion - 2, signifies "to scatter abroad," in Matthew 26:31 ; Mark 14:27 , metaphorically of sheep; in Luke 1:51 , of the proud; in John 11:52 , of the "scattering" of the children of God; in Acts 5:37 , of the followers of Judas of Galilee (AV, "were dispersed"); cp
Maacah - of the Sea of Galilee and the Upper Jordan ( Deuteronomy 3:14 , Joshua 12:6 ; Joshua 13:11 ), but its borders cannot now be determined
Hill - above the Sea of Galilee
Carmel - A mountain 12 miles in length that runs from the plain of Esdraelon in Galilee, in a N
Samaria - It had the district of Galilee on the north, and Judaea on the south
Basket - The basket-making industry was located in the neighbourhood of the Sea of Galilee, with headquarters at Scythopolis, and a ready outlet for the manufactured article was found in Damascus (see S
Gad - The northwest point stretched to the Sea of Galilee
Sidon - Many of them also resorted to him in Galilee, Luke 6:17
ra'Mah - Robinson has discovered a Rameh northwest of the Sea of Galilee, about 8 miles east-south-east of Safed
Jezreel - The extensive valley or plain in which the last-named city was situated, in southern Galilee
Judas - He was Simon's son, John 6:71, and is called Iscariot, probably from his birthplace, perhaps from Kerioth in Judah, Joshua 15:25, or from Kartan, or Kartah, in Galilee. Judas of Galilee, a leader of an insurrection "in the days of taxing "—i
Fame - ...
We are told that early in the ministry of Jesus a fame of Him went through Galilee and the surrounding country, including Syria (Matthew 4:24, Luke 4:14). Not only in Galilee, but in all the provinces of Palestine, and in cities of Syria, men talked and speculated regarding a new Figure that was in their midst
Jezreel (1) - THE VALLEY OF JEZREEL (or ESDRAELON, as it is called in Judith 3:9) stretches across the center of Palestine from the Mediterranean to the Jordan, separating Carmel and Samaria's mountain ranges from those of Galilee. The main body is an irregular triangle, its base stretching from Engannim to the hills below Nazareth, about 15 miles: one side formed by the Galilee hills, about 12 miles; the other 18, running on the northern side of the Samaritan range
Mary Magdalene - of the sea of Galilee. She, with the rest of the healed women, accompanied Him in one of His tours "throughout every city and village of Galilee, preaching and showing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God, the twelve being with Him" (Luke 8:1-2-3). In His last journey to Jerusalem again they accompanied Him from Galilee (Matthew 27:55; Mark 15:41; Luke 23:55; Luke 24:10)
Bethabara - ’ And if Bethabara or Bethany is the scene of the Baptism, then it would seem that the site must be looked for in the northern part of the Jordan Valley, since Christ comes hither apparently direct from Galilee (Matthew 3:13, Mark 1:9). of Beisân, and at a distance of four or five miles from the latter place: and he explains the name ‘Bethany’ as equivalent to Batanea, Basanitis, or Bashan, the district immediately east of the Jordan, south and south-east of the Sea of Galilee (see C. The inference, moreover, which has been drawn from John 2:1, that Bethabara or Bethany lay not more than a day’s journey from Cana of Galilee, is precarious
Herod - With the permission of the Romans, Antipater left his son Phasael as Prefect of Jerusalem and his second son, Herod, governor of Galilee. He routed some persistently threatening robber bands in Galilee and gained the esteem of the Romans and even the support of some of the Jews by his decisive action. His final one designated Archelaus to succeed him as king of Judea (Matthew 2:22 ), another son Antipas to be tetrarch (governor) of Galilee and Perea, and another son Philip as tetrarch of the Northeastern Districts. Antipas continued to rule Galilee and Perea and was the one who had John the Baptist put to death (Matthew 14:1-12 ; Mark 6:16-29 ; Luke 9:9 )
Swine - In Rameh in Galilee, for example, considerable herds are kept and pastured in the surrounding fields
Gad - ...
Gad possessed a large district from a little above the north corner of the Dead Sea to near the south corner of the Sea of Galilee, then a very fertile plain suitable for their flocks and herds, including the highlands of Gilead
Bashan-Havoth-Jair - of the sea of Galilee (Matthew 9:18)
Matthew - )...
At the time he first met Jesus, Matthew lived and worked in Capernaum on the shore of the Sea of Galilee (Mark 2:1; Mark 2:13-14)
Tig'Lath-Pile'Ser - probably because Pekah withheld his tribute, and having entered his territories, he "took Ijon, and Abel-beth-maachah and Janoah and Kedesh, and Hazer, and Gilead, and Galilee, and all the land of Naphtali, and carried them captive to Assyria
Jabbok - ) A stream which traverses Gilead, and falls into Jordan midway between the sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea
Trades - Fish) was a most important one, more particularly about the Sea of Galilee; Jesus called several of His disciples from this occupation, Matthew 4:18, Mark 16
Watch - The word in this sense occurs (a) in the account of our Lord’s walking upon the Lake of Galilee, which was ‘at the fourth watch,’ i
Beloved Disciple - While fishing on Galilee, this disciple alone recognized the resurrected Jesus on the shore (John 21:7 )
Census - The other reference is that of Gamaliel's remark about Judas of Galilee, who rose up “in the days of the census” only to later perish (Acts 5:37 NIV)
Capernaum - It stood on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee
Philip - It was in Galilee that the Lord met him; and said to him, 'Follow me
Cleopas - Supposing Cleopas to have been the brother of Joseph, and father of James, &c, Calmet thinks it more probable that as he was a Galilean, he dwelt in some city of Galilee
Esdraelon - Clarke observes, it is by far the largest plain in the Holy Land; extending quite across the country from Mount Carmel and the Mediterranean Sea to the southern extremity of the Sea of Galilee; about thirty miles in length, and twenty in breadth
Naphtali - His limits were extended into upper and lower Galilee, having Jordan to the east, the tribes of Asher and Zebulun to the west, Libanus to the north, and the tribe of Issachar to the south
Publican - In Judea and Galilee there were special circumstances of aggravation
Philip the Apostle - When "wishing (Greek) to go forth into Galilee. ...
In John 12:20-22 Greek proselytes coming to Jerusalem for the Passover, attracted by Philip's Greek name, and his residence in Galilee bordering on the Gentiles, applied to him of the twelve, saying, We would see Jesus
Jordan - The traditional site of Jacob's crossing Jordan (Jisr Benat Yacobe) at his first leaving Beersheba for Padan Aram is a mile and a half from Merom, and six from the sea of Galilee; in those six its descent with roaring cataracts over the basaltic rocks is 1,050 ft. From the sea of Galilee it winds 200 miles in the 60 miles of actual distance to the Dead Sea. below the lake of Galilee) in this distance. ; there out of Galilee the Lord Jesus and Andrew repaired after the baptisms in the S. The plain of the Jordan between the sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea is generally eight miles broad, but at the N
Mary - Mary the mother of James the Little and Joses, one of the women who followed Jesus from Galilee, stood beside the cross, watched the burial, and visited the sepulchre on the Resurrection morning (Matthew 27:55-56 = Mark 15:40-41, Matthew 27:61 = Mark 15:47, Mark 16:1 = Matthew 28:1 = Luke 24:10). —She is first mentioned (Luke 8:2) as one of a company of women who attended Jesus on His second mission through Galilee in the course of the second year of His ministry. the woman of Magdala (Mejdel), a town on the Lake of Galilee, some 3 miles from Capernaum, at the southern end of the Plain of Gennesaret
pe'Ter - It took place on the Sea of Galilee near Capernaum, where the four disciples Peter and Andrew, James and John were fishing. Some time was passed afterward in attendance upon our Lord's public ministrations in Galilee, Decapolis, Peraea and Judea. That reinstitution--an event of the very highest import-took place at the Sea of Galilee
Mary - Mary the mother of James the Little and Joses, one of the women who followed Jesus from Galilee, stood beside the cross, watched the burial, and visited the sepulchre on the Resurrection morning (Matthew 27:55-56 = Mark 15:40-41, Matthew 27:61 = Mark 15:47, Mark 16:1 = Matthew 28:1 = Luke 24:10). —She is first mentioned (Luke 8:2) as one of a company of women who attended Jesus on His second mission through Galilee in the course of the second year of His ministry. the woman of Magdala (Mejdel), a town on the Lake of Galilee, some 3 miles from Capernaum, at the southern end of the Plain of Gennesaret
Gospels - In the first three, called the Synoptic Gospels, from the main outline being the same and the scene of Christ's ministry mainly Galilee, the first aim is prominent. In the fourth, written long after, all is new except the events of passion week and the feeding of the 5,000 (and the storm at sea) recorded to introduce the discourse in Galilean Capernaum (John 6); and the scene is mainly not in Galilee but Judea. His route was through Samaria into Galilee from Ephraim (Luke 9:51; John 11:54) as the starting point, then along the border between Galilee and Samaria into Peraea (Luke 17:11; Luke 13:31), so by Jericho to Bethany and Jerusalem (Birks' Horae Evangel. Matthew, writing for Judea, dwells on facts less known there, Christ's appearing in Galilee, omitting the ascension as known to most of his readers. ...
He also supplies the interval, omitted in them, from the temptation to Jesus' second return to Galilee when His public ministry began, after John was cast into prison. He inserts in this interval Jesus' "earlier" return to Galilee (John 1:43) and visit to Jerusalem (John 2:13) and Judea (John 3:22; John 3:24), before the Baptist's imprisonment. ...
Then, at John 4:3-43, his Gospel coincides with the Synoptists at Christ's second visit to Galilee (Matthew 4:12; Luke 4:14). In John 7:1 he alludes to His 18 months' ministry in Galilee, recorded by them and therefore omitted by him, between the visit to Jerusalem at the feast of tabernacles (John 7:2; John 7:10) and the former visit (John 5:1), for John 6:4 compared with John 7:1 implies Christ omitted attending the Passover occurring in that interval lest the Jews should kill Him before the time
Lily - It is abundant in the district of Galilee; and its fine scarlet flowers render it a very conspicous and showy object, which would naturally attract the attention of the hearers" (Balfour's Plants of the Bible)
Gad - It thus included the whole of the Jordan valley as far north as to the Sea of Galilee, where it narrowed almost to a point
Nazarene - Had the prophets expressly foretold He should be of Nazareth, it would not have been so despised; nor would the Pharisees, who were able from Micah 5 to tell Herod where Messiah's birthplace was - Bethlehem (Matthew 2) - have been so ignorant of the prophecy of His connection with Nazareth as to say, "out of Galilee ariseth no prophet" (John 7:52)
Matthew - His duty was to collect “toll” or “transport” taxes from both local merchants and farmers carrying their goods to market as well as distant caravans passing through Galilee
Arabah - It is in this plain that the Jordan runs, and in which is the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, also called 'the Sea of the Plain
Sychar - However Sychar may have been close to the well; and (Thomson, Land and Book, 31) the present village, Aschar, just above Jacob's well, on the side of Ebal and on the road by which caravans pass from Jerusalem to Damascus, and by which doubtless Jesus passed between Judaea and Galilee, may answer to Sychar
Pekah - But Ahaz at their second inroad applied to Tiglath Pileser, who slew Rezin and carried away the people of Gilead (including the whole territory of Reuben, Gad, and half Manasseh 1 Chronicles 5:26), Galilee, and Naphtali (2 Kings 15:29)
Fish - Fish were plentiful in the Mediterranean Sea and in the Sea of Galilee, but there were none in the Dead Sea, as the water was too salty (Nehemiah 13:16; Matthew 4:18; Luke 5:1-7)
Nain - ]'>[4] 217; Guérin, Galilee, i
Possession (2) - But in John 2:6 where he gives an account of the miracle at the marriage feast in Cana of Galilee, he tells of ‘six water-pots of stone’ (λίθιναι ὑδρίαι), which were clearly ‘pots’ of a very different kind—too large to use at table, or to be portable in the ordinary way
Olive - According to the fellahîn of Galilee, the drupe germinates in the soil only after passing through the alimentary canal of the hooded crow. ...
The young wild olive trees, scattered over the mountains in Galilee, are gathered by the fellahîn and sold for olive plantations
Crowd - The multitude was gathered from Galilee. To John there flocked at the outset of his ministry the people in the neighbourhood, but afterwards the movement reached the north and the inflammable Galilee
Nazarene (2) - Mark 1:9 ‘Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee,’ Luke 2:4 etc. Matthew 21:11 ‘This is Jesus the prophet from Nazareth of Galilee’ (ὁ ἀπὸ Ναζαρὲθ τῆς Γαλιλαίας); cf. This Nazara is really a name of Galilee, and Ναζωραῖος = Galilaean. (‘the land of Zebulun, and the land of Naphtali … Galilee of the Gentiles’) rather than Isaiah 11:1
Mary of Cleophas - She, with the women which came with Jesus from Galilee, "prepared spices and ointments" on the sabbath eve (Luke 23:55-56), and when the sabbath was past "came to see the sepulchre" (Matthew 28:1) and "to anoint Him" with the "sweet spices they had bought" (Mark 16:1), and then "saw the vision of angels which said He was alive" (Luke 24:23)
Exile - carried away captive into Assyria (2 Kings 15:29 ; Compare Isaiah 10:5,6 ) a part of the inhabitants of Galilee and of Gilead (B
Lebanon - ...
The eastern range, or Anti-Lebanon, or "Lebanon towards the sunrising," runs nearly parallel with the western from the plain of Emesa till it connects with the hills of Galilee in the south
Kishon River - and the mountains of Galilee on the N
Judas - Judas of Galilee was one of those who led a revolt against the Romans and died as a result
Sea - , "the Red Sea," Acts 7:36 ; 1 Corinthians 10:1 ; Hebrews 11:29 ; the "sea" of Galilee or Tiberias, Matthew 4:18 ; 15:29 ; Mark 6:48,49 , where the acts of Christ testified to His Deity; John 6:1 ; 21:1 ; in general, e
ox, Oxen, Herd, Cattle - They are most plentiful in Galilee, where the pasturage is better; and a much larger breed, the cows of which give excellent milk, flourishes around Damascus
Nazareth - ...
Nazareth was situated in the hilly country of the northern part of Palestine known as Galilee
Leopard - ...
Another animal of the leopard tribe, the well-known cheeta or hunting-leopard of India (Felis jubatus), is sometimes found in the hills of Galilee and in the neighbourhood of Tabor, but its occurrence is rare
Naphtali - The prophecy seems to say that Zebulun and Nephthalim were beyond the Jordan; but some judge that three districts are alluded to; Zebulun and Nephthalim; the way of the sea beyond the Jordan; and Galilee of the Gentiles
Caves - Josephus tells us of a numerous gang of banditti, who, having infested the country, and being pursued by Herod with his army, retired into certain caverns, almost inaccessible, near Arbela in Galilee, where they were with great difficulty subdued
Mount Olivet - And here my contemplating soul would listen to the angel's words who graced the Lord Jesus's triumph, and still hear, in the ear of faith, their blessed tidings vibrating in the sweetest sound on my ravished senses--"Ye men of Galilee, why stand ye gazing up into heaven? this same Jesus which is taken up from you into heaven, shall so come, in like manner as ye have seen him go into heaven
Peraea - ...
The Mishna recognizes the Peræa the land beyond Jordan as a province of the land of Israel, ranking with Judæa and Galilee on the west
Captivities of the Jews - 740) the trans-Jordanic tribes, ( 1 Chronicles 5:26 ) and the inhabitants of Galilee, (2 Kings 15:29 ) comp
John, Gospel of - John, who wrote after the other evangelists, is to supplement their narratives, which were almost confined to our Lord's life in Galilee
Naaman - This afforded a complete justification of His own action, and was, further, a very pointed rebuke to them if, as seems the case, they were annoyed that He had neglected them for Capernaum, which, situated in that region known as ‘Galilee of the Gentiles,’ might be considered as less a Jewish town than their own
Nakedness - The solitary fisherman when diving from the side of the Lake of Galilee after his cast-net usually divests himself of all clothing
Pilate, Pontius - This only aroused them to more furious clamour, and they cried that he excited the populace "throughout all Jewry, beginning from Galilee. " When Pilate heard of Galilee, he sent the accused to Herod Antipas, who had jurisdiction over that province, thus hoping to escape the difficulty in which he found himself
Anitipas - Herod the Great, in his first will, declared him his successor in the kingdom; but he afterward named his son Archelaus king of Judea, and gave to Antipas only the title of tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea. To Antipas, Augustus gave Galilee and Peraea; and to Philip, Herod's other son, the Batanaea, Trachonitis, and Auranitis, with some other places
Peter - His native town was Bethsaida, on the western coast of the Sea of Galilee, to which also Philip belonged. Here he was brought up by the shores of the Sea of Galilee, and was trained to the occupation of a fisher. When we next meet him it is by the Sea of Galilee (Matthew 4:18-22 ). We next read of our Lord's singular interview with Peter on the shores of the Sea of Galilee, where he thrice asked him, "Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou me?" (John 21:1-19 )
Language of Christ - In Galilee there was a mixture of races; but the name ‘Galilee of the Gentiles’ was a survival of the description of an earlier condition. The strict, orthodox Jews, who were opposed to Hellenism, and compassed sea and land to make one proselyte, would lose no opportunity of re-occupying their fatherland, from Jerusalem in the south to the north of Galilee, and would take with them the ancient customs and the ancestral tongue. Yet the Hebrew of the Jerusalem Pharisee, the language of the Samaritans, the speech of the men of Galilee, and the patois of the borderers, were all Semitic dialects
Discourse - (a) Short occasional discourses: the explanation of the Parable of the Tares, with the short parables that follow (Matthew 13:36-52); the caution against Pharisaic Leaven (Matthew 16:4-12, Mark 8:13-21); remarks about His Church upon Peter’s confession (Matthew 16:13-20, Mark 8:27-30, Luke 9:18-21); the immediately following discourse on His Death and on Self-Denial (Matthew 16:21-28, Mark 9:33-50,9 to Mark 9:1, Luke 9:22-27); talk after the Transfiguration (Matthew 17:9-13, Mark 9:9-13); a second foretelling of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 17:22-23, Mark 9:30-32, Luke 9:43-45); discourses at the Mission and Return of the Seventy (Luke 10:1-24); teaching as to Prayer, with parable of the Friend at Midnight (Luke 11:1-13); parable of the Unjust Steward (Luke 16:1-13); teaching as to Offences, Faith, Service (Luke 17:1-10); third prediction of His Death and Resurrection (Matthew 20:17-19, Mark 10:32-34, Luke 18:31-34); talk about Faith suggested by the Withered Fig-tree (Matthew 21:20-22, Mark 11:20-26); talk following the Washing of the Disciples’ Feet (John 13:12-20); institution of the Lord’s Supper (Matthew 26:26-29, Mark 14:22-25, Luke 22:19-20); after the resurrection, talk with the Two Disciples on the way to Emmaus (Luke 24:17-27); with the Apostles, Thomas absent (Luke 24:36-49, John 20:19-25); talk with some of the Apostles at the Sea of Galilee (John 21:4-23); the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-19). Here we have: the beginning of His ministry (Matthew 4:17, Mark 1:14-15, Luke 4:14-15); the sermon at Nazareth (Luke 4:16-28); the first preaching tour in Galilee (Matthew 4:23-24, Luke 6:17-4948 Luke 4:44); at Capernaum (Mark 2:1-2; Mark 2:13); the second preaching tour in Galilee (Luke 8:1-3); at Nazareth again (Matthew 13:54-58, Mark 6:1-6); the third preaching tour in Galilee (Matthew 9:35-38, Luke 13:1-9); a tour alone after sending out the Twelve (Matthew 11:1); teaching and journeying (Luke 13:10; Luke 13:22, cf
Sea of Galilee - SEA OF Galilee...
i. The most popular name in the NT is ‘the Sea of Galilee’ (ἡ θάλασσα τῆς Γαλιλαίας), which occurs five times (Matthew 4:18; Matthew 15:29, Mark 1:16; Mark 7:31, John 6:1). ...
With reference to the name ‘Galilee,’ it has been said that it originally designated only that small tract of land given by Solomon to Hiram (1 Kings 9:11), and that the name gradually extended till in the days of the Maccabees it included Zebulun and Naphtali, so that only after this took place could the Sea be known by that name. Galilee. ...
Compared with other lakes, the Sea of Galilee cannot be said to be deep. ‘It is easier,’ saith Rabbi Eliezer ben Simon, ‘to nourish a legion of olives in Galilee than to bring up one child in the land of Israel’ (Ber. To the early Fathers the district was τὰ χράτιστα τῆς Γαλιλαίας, ‘the crown of Galilee,’ while in the 3rd cent. In October and November, small clouds, scarcely larger than a man’s hand, gather on Tabor, Jebel Jarmuk, and the other hills of Upper Galilee. The hills of Upper Galilee may have been hidden in dense mists for a day or two, but nothing has disturbed the peace of the Lake. The storms on the Sea of Galilee are in many ways peculiar, and sometimes the wind seems to blow from various directions at one time, tossing the boat about
Ephraim, the Tribe of - It included most of what was afterwards called Samaria as distinguished from Judea and Galilee
Archelaus - Joseph turned to Galilee, where the less cruel brother Antipas reigned
Jesuits - What shall I render unto him for all his revelations and gifts to me? Were there no historical evidence of the truth of Christianity, were there no well-established miracles, still I should believe that the religion propagated by the fishermen of Galilee is divine
Fish - ...
The fish of the Lake of Galilee are mainly identical with those especially found in the Nile
Gadara - of the sea of Galilee over against Tiberius, at 16 miles Roman distance, on a hill beneath which were warm springs called Amatha
James - James was of Bethsaida in Galilee, and left his earthly occupation to follow Christ, Mark 1:29,20
ma'ry the Virgin, - These four occasions are--
The marriage at Cana in Galilee took place in the three months which intervened between the baptism of Christ and the passover of the year 27
Mary - Magdala was an important agricultural, fishing, and trade center of ancient Galilee. This Mary would appear to be part of Jesus' following from Galilee who moved with Him during His itinerant public ministry (compare Mark 15:40-41 )
Jordan - Lieutenant Lynch of the United States navy, who traversed the Jordan in 1848, ascertained that, although the distance from the sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea is but sixty miles in a straight line, it is two hundred miles by the course of the river, which has innumerable curves. The waters of the Jordan are cool and soft, and like the Sea of Galilee, it abounds in fish
Political Conditions - Under the pressure of various palace intrigues, and with a view to separate elements between which at the time there was no possible cohesion, Herod left Judaea to Archelaus, Galilee and Peraea to Antipas, and the north-eastern districts beyond Jordan to Philip. To Philip, with the title of tetrarch, which originally implied the government of a fourth part of a tribe or kingdom, but gradually came to be used of any petty dependent prince, were assigned the comparatively poor districts lying to the east of the Sea of Galilee, and extending northwards as far as Mt. —The title of tetrarch was granted also to Antipas, whose dominions included the two districts of Galilee and Peraea, separated by the confederation of free Greek cities known as the Decapolis. Peraea, east of the Jordan and south-east of Galilee, bore a high reputation for the purity of its Judaism, but politically was of small importance. Custom duties and market tolls were collected by lessees, who paid for the privilege a fixed yearly sum, destined in the case of Judaea for the Imperial treasury, but in that of Galilee for the tetrarch. In this general distress Syria and Palestine shared, though the busy industrial centres in Galilee did not suffer so much as the crowded and unemployed population around Jerusalem
Caesarea Philippi - Situated to the north of the Sea of Galilee on a plateau at the southern foothills of Mount Hermon, it lay in the territory that Philip received from his father, Herod the Great. The decision which led to the retirement into the region of Tyre and Sidon must have been confirmed by His experience on returning to Galilee. His retirement from Galilee is from the people and their religious leaders into more intimate companionship with His disciples, from His popular instruction of the multitudes and beneficent activity in their midst to teach His faithful followers in more secluded intercourse the significance of His own person for the Kingdom He had been proclaiming, and to prepare them for His Passion. ...
The immediate occasion of Jesus’ retirement from Galilee and the change in His method of work are indicated in Mt. Bitter hostility from the religious leaders, failure on the part of the people to understand the character of His work, interested attention from the murderer of John the Baptist,—in the midst of such conditions Jesus withdrew from Galilee, and from His popular preaching activity, to devote Himself to His disciples. Returning to Galilee, He feeds the four thousand, refuses the request of the Pharisees and Sadducees for a sign from heaven, with its evident Messianic implication, warns His disciples against the leaven of the Pharisees and Sadducees (so Matthew 16:6; Mark 8:15 has ‘Pharisees and Herod’), heals a blind man near Bethsaida (Mark 8:22 ff. ), and retires from Galilee for the second time, coming with His disciples into the region of Caesarea Philippi. Moreover, Jesus had not spoken plainly in Galilee of His Messiahship
John, Gospel of - ...
Upon leaving Judea, Jesus met and taught various people in Samaria (4:1-42) and performed a healing miracle in Galilee (4:43-54). After a miracle in Galilee that provided food for a multitude, people wanted to make Jesus king (6:1-21). Some time later he appeared to seven of the disciples at the Sea of Galilee (21:1-14), where he delivered a final challenging message to Peter (21:15-25)
Prudence - When He came from the temptation in the wilderness to take up His mission, hearing that Herod had put John in prison, He departed from Jordan to Galilee (Matthew 4:12). Galilee was within the dominion of Herod Antipas, but it was remote, away from the palace where John was imprisoned, away also from the place where John had baptized, and whither the crowds had come. In Galilee He would be more withdrawn from Herod’s observation
Olves, Mount of - " ...
This mount, or rather mountain range, has four summits or peaks: (1) the "Galilee" peak, so called from a tradition that the angels stood here when they spoke to the disciples (Acts 1:11 ); (2) the "Mount of Ascension," the supposed site of that event, which was, however, somewhere probably nearer Bethany (Luke 24:51,52 ); (3) the "Prophets," from the catacombs on its side, called "the prophets' tombs;" and (4) the "Mount of Corruption," so called because of the "high places" erected there by Solomon for the idolatrous worship of his foreign wives (1 Kings 11:7 ; 2 Kings 23:13 ; Vulg
Esdraelon - (ehss dray' ee lahn) Greek translation of the word Jezreel, indicating the low-lying area separating the mountains of Galilee from the mountains of Samaria
Hiram - A curious episode is recounted in 1 Kings 9:10 ; 1 Kings 9:14 , according to which Solomon gave Hiram ‘twenty cities in the land of Galilee
Felix - procurator of Samaria while Cumanus had Galilee
Nero - This general carried on the war in Galilee and Judea during A
Hazor - Hazor was located in upper Galilee on the site now known as tell el-Qedah, ten miles north of the Sea of Galilee and five miles southwest of Lake Huleh
Zebulun - ...
Zebulun shared in the natural richness and fertility of the rest of Galilee, and the great ‘way of the sea’ (the via maris of the Crusaders) which ran through its territory, and from Acco to Damascus, brought it into touch with the outer world and its products. According to 2 Kings 15:29 , it would appear that the fate of the other tribes of Galilee overtook this tribe in the days of Pekah, when the Assyrian king Tiglath-pileser carried them captive to Assyria
Resurrection of Christ - ...
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To the disciples when fishing at the Sea of Galilee. ...
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To the eleven, and above 500 brethren at once, at an appointed place in Galilee (1 Corinthians 15:6 ; Compare Matthew 28:16-20 )
Samaria, Samaritans - By New Testament times, it became identified with the central region of Palestine, with Galilee to the north and Judea to the south. The animosity was so great that the Jews bypassed Samaria as they traveled between Galilee and Judea
Palestine - Dale, ‘from the preceding history of the Jewish race … Many people seem to suppose that they may approach the subject as if the Lord Jesus Christ had appeared in Spain or in China, instead of in Judaea and Galilee’ (Living Christ and the Four Gospels, 89). The long ranges of Lebanon throw off their southern spurs in Galilee, and the range ends suddenly in the line of steep mountain-side which runs along the northern edge of the Plain of Esdraelon. Hermon is the one great mountain which Anti-Lebanon rises to, standing off to the south, and detached from the continuous range by the deep-cut gorge of the Abana, but sending on the ridge again unbroken, though rugged in outline, past the Sea of Merom on the eastern side, to the shores of the Sea of Galilee. It recalls the fact that Jesus came from the highlands of Galilee, and that He chose to associate many of the most outstanding events of His life with mountains. It is not without significance that Matthew gives as the trysting-place between Jesus and His disciples ‘a mountain of Galilee’ (Matthew 28:16). Galilee was much more open to the wider thought of the time than Judaea, and Jesus was in sympathy rather with the Galilaean than with the Judaean spirit. Towards the Roman power He, in contrast with such revolutionaries as Judas of Galilee, maintained a strictly neutral attitude. ...
His home in Galilee must have given from the first a very different outlook on the Gentile world from any that would have been possible in Jndaea. Far from the centre of Jewish exclusiveness, crossed by great high roads from the sea to the east, and actually inhabited by multitudes of Gentiles from various lands, Galilee was the most open-minded and tolerant part of the land. see) divided Galilee from Judaea by the alien race that is supposed to have originated in a cross between Mesopotamians and Israelites after the first captivity
Herod - Made tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea after the death of his father in 4 b. 23 his intrigues and extravagances had brought him to such straits that he was forced to retire to the Idumaean stronghold of Malatha till be found an asylum with Antipas in Galilee. A year before his death, Claudius allowed Agrippa to exchange the meagre principality of Chalcis for those parts of his father’s dominions, east and north-east of the Sea of Galilee, which had formerly been the tetrarchies of Philip and Lysanias (Batanaea, Gaulonitis, Trachonitis, and Abila)
John the Baptist - ...
The fame of John reached the ears of Jesus in Nazareth (Matthew 3:5 ), and he came from Galilee to Jordan to be baptized of John, on the special ground that it became him to "fulfil all righteousness" (3:15)
Bartholomew - ...
Nathanael was of Cans in Galilee
Judah - Judah formed one small province alongside Samaria, Galilee, and Idumea
Ship - ...
The smaller boats that sailed on the Lake of Galilee were used mainly for fishing or carrying passengers (Matthew 4:21-22; Matthew 8:23-27; Matthew 9:1; Luke 5:2-7; John 6:22-23; John 21:3)
Megiddo - ...
Thus the whole of Sisera's flight was only five or six miles from the scene of his defeat, to the plain Zaanaim (Bitzaanaim, now Bessum) between Tabor and Kedesh of Naphtali by the sea of Galilee (Conder, in Palestine Exploration Quarterly Statement, January 1877, p
Tabor - The southern end of the lake of Galilee lies 12 miles off to the E
Hiram - Solomon also gave Hiram 20 cities in Galilee, which did not satisfy him, and which therefore he called Cabul
Taxes - Judas of Galilee raised a revolt against it (Josephus Boat (2) - Being a small lake, the Sea of Galilee had no ‘ships’; but it had numerous ‘boats’ mostly employed in fishing (termed πλοῖα in the Gospels, also [6] σκάφη in Josephus)
Swine - It was avarice, a contempt of the law of Moses, and a design to supply the neighbouring idolaters with victims, that caused whole herds of swine to be fed on the borders of Galilee
Samaria - In New Testament times Samaria was one of the Roman divisions of Palestine lying between Galilee and Judæa; so that any one who would pass straight from one of these provinces to the other "must needs go through Samaria
Nobleman - The ‘king’ in whose court this officer served was Herod Antipas, tetrarch of Galilee
Transjordan - Bashan, good cattle country as indicated above, was situated roughly east of the Sea of Galilee. Gilead, situated east of that portion of the Jordan which connects the Sea of Galilee with the Dead Sea, produces grapes, olives, vegetables, cereals, and also is mentioned in the Bible as a source of balm (Genesis 37:25 ; Jeremiah 8:22 )
Nahum (2) - "The Elkoshite" (Nahum 1:1), from Elkosh or Elkesi a village of Galilee pointed out to Jerome (Preface in Nahum). Nahum in Elkosh of Galilee was probably among those of northern Israel, after the deportation of the ten tribes, who accepted Hezekiah's earnest invitation to keep the Passover at Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 30)
Nicodemus - Indignantly they ask, "art thou also of Galilee? . out of Galilee hath arisen (Greek) no prophet
Water (2) - In Galilee the water supply is much greater than in Judaea. The chief waters which are referred to in the Gospels are those of the Sea of Galilee and the river Jordan
Matthew, Gospel According to - ...
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The discourses and actions of Christ in Galilee ((4:12-20:16)
Transfiguration, the - ...
The Place The traditional site is Mount Tabor in lower Galilee, but it is not a high mountain (only 1,850 feet) and was probably fortified and inaccessible in Jesus' day
Hittites - In the book of Joshua they always appear as the dominant race to the north of Galilee
Galilee, Sea of - ...
"The Sea of Galilee is indeed the cradle of the gospel
Bed - The cushion or seat at the stern was our Lord's "pillow" on the lake of Galilee (Mark 4:38)
Exorcism - Exorcism is included in the list of wonders Jesus performed at Capernaum and in the Galilee (Mark 1:34 ,Mark 1:34,1:39 )
Gilgal - The earliest Greek translation reads this as “kings of the nations in Galilee,” which many scholars think is the original reading, a copyist of the Hebrew text using the word “Gilgal” since it had become familiar in the earlier chapters of Joshua
Earthquake - The major quake centers in Palestine are Upper Galilee—near the biblical town of Shechem (Nablus)—and near Lydda on the western edge of the Judean mountains
Gilead - as far as the sea of Galilee
Ephphatha - We know that in Galilee and Samaria the gutturals were much neglected, or even interchanged; and they are often ignored in transliterating Semitic words into Greek
Joseph - He lived at Nazareth in Galilee
Captivity - There is nothing in the passage to fix the date, but in 2 Kings 15:29 is another reference to Israel when Tiglath-pileser took Ijon, Abel-beth-maachah, Janoah, Kedesh, and Hazor, which are all in the north on the west of the Jordan; butthen is added Gilead, which is on the east, and this may be intended to embrace the two and a half tribes; then Galilee with all the land of Naphtali is added, which is again in the north on the west
Cananaean - interprets it ‘de vico Chana Galilaeae’; and he has been followed by many scholars in modern times, who have taken the name to be a corruption of Καναῖος, and to mean ‘a man of Cana, probably Cana in Galilee
Mishna - Rabbi Judah, who was at that time rector of the school at Tiberias in Galilee, and president of the sanhedrim at that place, undertook the work
Phoenicia - It should not be forgotten that many Phcenicians had come to Galilee to hear Christ Himself (Mark 3:8), that He returned their visit by going into ‘the borders of Tyre and Sidon’ (Mark 7:24), and that He expressed the conviction that the people of this country could have been more easily moved to repentance than those of the most highly favoured cities of His native land (Matthew 11:21)
Ptolemais - Between it and the hills of Galilee lies the fertile Plain of Acre, six miles in width, watered by the Nahr Namein, the ancient Belus, a river famous for the manufacture-Pliny (HN_ xxxvi
Portion - the ‘parts’ or districts (τὰ μέρη) belonging to Galilee (Matthew 2:22), of Tyre and Sidon (Matthew 15:21), of Caesarea (Matthew 16:13), of Dalmanutha (Mark 8:10)
Olive - Olive trees were so abundant in Galilee that at the siege of Jotapata by Vespasian the Roman army were driven from the ascent of the walls by hot olive oil poured upon them and scalding them underneath their armor
Feasts - Possibly He went up quite regularly three times a year, for the notice that He was in Galilee shortly before the second Passover (John 6:4) does not preclude the possibility of His having gone up a little later. At the first Passover mention is made of His disciples being with Him in Jerusalem (John 2:17; John 2:22), evidently having journeyed from Galilee with the same purpose as Himself, to keep the Feast. Similarly at Tabernacles it is stated that His brethren went up from Galilee to keep the Feast (John 7:10)
Mary - The Gospel speaks nothing more of the Virgin Mary till the marriage at Cana of Galilee, at which she was present with her son Jesus. MARY MAGDALENE, so called, it is probable, from Magdala, a town of Galilee, of which she was a native, or where she had resided during the early part of her life. She attended him in the last journey he made from Galilee to Jerusalem, and was at the foot of the cross with the holy virgin, John 19:25 ; Mark 15:47 ; after which she returned to Jerusalem, to buy and prepare with others certain perfumes, that she might embalm him after the Sabbath was over, which was then about to begin
Poverty (2) - Paul’s care for the Jewish Christians, 1 Corinthians 16:1, Acts 24:17), Galilee was a hive of industry (see Swete, Gospel of St Mark, p. Perhaps it was through his help that Jesus was able to have a small boat constantly in attendance on Him when preaching at the Lake of Galilee (ἵνα πλοιάριον προσκαρτερῇ αὐτῷ, Mark 3:9). ]'>[2] passim; Delitzsch, Artisan Life in the Time of Christ: Vogelstein, Landwirtschaft in Palästina, 1894; Merrill, Galilee in the Time of Christ; for good remarks on the place of poverty in Christ’s teaching, see Harnack, Das Wesen des Christentums (‘Das Evangelium und die Armut’); Expos
John, the Gospel According to - " As he joined Christ early he records facts of His ministry in Galilee and Jerusalem, prior to those in the three synoptists. ) As John, though mainly treating of Jesus' ministry in Judea, yet has occasional notices of that in Galilee (John 1:43-2:13, after the temptation, recorded by the synoptists as following the baptism, John 1:32; namely, the Galilean ministry before John's imprisonment, John 3:24, whereas they begin with it after John's imprisonment: Mark 1:14), so they, though mainly treating of the Galilean ministry, plainly hint at that in Judaea also (Matthew 4:25; Matthew 23:37; Matthew 27:57; Luke 10:38; Luke 13:34; Mark 3:7-8). John 7:1; John 7:9, intimates a transfer of Jesus' ministry to Galilee after the second last Passover (John 6:4-5). ...
It is significant that in the Gospel setting forth the glory of the Son of God the Judaean ministry is prominent, for there is the appointed "throne of the great King"; whereas in the Gospels setting forth the Son of man the scene is "Galilee of the Gentiles
Magdala - With respect to their location, various sites on the south and south-east border of the Lake of Galilee have been suggested, but none of them can be regarded as satisfactory. ...
In the light of all the information attainable at the present time, the probabilities strongly favour the view, which has long been held by eminent writers and explorers, that the district in which these places were located was on the western shore of the Lake of Galilee, and that Magadan represents the village now known as el-Mejdel, the traditional site of the town of Mary Magdalene
Cosmopolitanism - Decapolis was almost entirely Greek; in Galilee there had for long been a large Gentile population; and foreigners as well as proselytes from all parts of the empire found their way to Jerusalem (Acts 2:7; see Schürer, HJP Nazareth - a little city in the tribe of Zebulun, in Lower Galilee, to the west of Tabor, and to the east of Ptolemais. The reputation of the broken pillar, for healing every kind of disease, prevails all over Galilee
Maccabees - Judas called the fighting men of Galilee together at Mizpah, organized them, and at Emmaus surprised and utterly defeated the forces of Gorgias (b. For a year and a half he waged war on his enemies on the east of the Jordan, while his brother Simon brought the Jews scattered throughout Galilee back to Judæa for safety. ’ Of his short reign we know little except that he was regarded as a friend of the Greeks, and conquered and circumcised the Ituræans, who probably lived in Galilee. At this time the final Judaizing of Galilee began (Jos. Alexander carried on still more vigorously the monarchical policy of Aristobulus, and undertook the extension of Judæa by the conquest of the surrounding cities, including those of Upper Galilee
Palestine - See Judæa, Galilee
Lebanon - " The wady et Teim separates the southern part of Antilibanus from Lebanon and also from the Galilee hills
Bashan - ...
The name "Gilead," connected with the history of the patriarch Jacob (1618452728_8), supplanted "Bashan," including Bashan as well as the region originally called "Gilead," After the return from Babylon Bashan was divided into...
(1) Gaulanitis or Jaulan, the most western, on the sea of Galilee, and lake Merom, and rising to a table land 3,000 ft
Arabah - The depression of the surface of the sea of Galilee is 652 feet, that of the Dead Sea 1316 feet, below the surface of the Mediterranean, and so of the Red Sea
Widow - The widow of Nain (Luke 7:11-17), a little town situated a few miles to the south of Mount Tabor in Galilee, to whom our Lord uttered His compassionate ‘Weep not’ just before restoring her only son to life
Camel - This latter is to-day kept in considerable numbers by Turkomans settled in the Jaulan , and long caravans of these magnificent beasts may sometimes be encountered coming across the Jordan into Galilee or on the Jericho-Jerusalem road
Man From Heaven - The people of Jerusalem and some Pharisees know that he is from Galilee but are puzzled by his messianic actions and teachings since the Messiah (they believe) will not come from there (7:26,52)
Games (2) - But in Galilee the children played their immemorial games:...
‘A wedding or a festival,...
A mourning or a funeral,...
As if his whole vocation...
Were endless imitation
John the Apostle - " When with some others he was fishing on the Sea of Galilee, he was the first to recognize the Lord standing on the shore
Ashtaroth - ...
The city is located at modern Tel Ashtarah about 20 miles east of the Sea of Galilee
Chorazin - The place has been identified with Khersa on the eastern shore of the Lake of Galilee, but more probably with Khirbet Kerâzeh, 4 kilometres N
Bartholomew - A person with Isaiah 9:1 in his mind, and convinced that rich blessings would come from Galilee, might nevertheless think that Nazareth was not a likely place to be the dwelling-place of the Messiah
Mark, Gospel of - -- (1) Mark's Gospel is occupied almost entirely with the ministry in Galilee and the events of the passion week
Samaria - One of the three divisions of the Holy Land in the time of our Savior, having Galilee on the north and Judea on the south, the Jordan on the east and the Mediterranean on the west, and occupying parts of the territory assigned at first to Ephraim, Mahasseh, and Issachar, Luke 17:11 John 4:4
Parable - ) For some months Jesus taught in the synagogues and on the seashore of Galilee as he had before taught in Jerusalem, and as yet without a parable
Preaching (2) - states that Jesus came into Galilee preaching the Kingdom of God (Mark 1:14)—the public open-air proclamation; but that He went into a synagogue to teach (Mark 1:21), where after the scripture had been read He would expound it (cf
John the Apostle - The family lived in a town on the shores of Lake Galilee, where James and John worked as fishermen in partnership with another pair of brothers, Peter and Andrew (Matthew 4:18-21; Luke 5:10)
Call, Calling - The only one mentioned as called with a ‘follow me’ is Philip (John 1:43); and it is possible that this is rather an invitation to follow on the journey to Galilee than through life (and death). (2) The Synoptists tell us of the call in Galilee (‘Come ye after me,’ Mark 1:17 || Matthew 4:19; ‘He called them,’ Mark 1:20 || Matthew 4:21) of Peter, Andrew, James, John. Previous acquaintance with these men may have induced Jesus to begin His teaching by the Sea of Galilee [9]. Other members of the disciple circle in Galilee must have been added one by one; some by elective atlinity! Not all volunteers might be repelled like the scribe of Matthew 8:19 || Luke 9:59
Jews - 135AD, they settled in Sepphowis, in Galilee, where the Mishna, a collection of the oral traditions about the Law, was published. From Galilee they migrated to Babylonia, which remained for nearly five centuries the chief center of Jewish life
Caesar - Luke wrote (Luke 3:1): ‘Pontius Pilate being governor of Judaea,’ with the tetrarchs for Galilee, Ituraea, and Abilene, desiring to mark the period in the reign of Tiberius Caesar when ‘the word of God came to John in the wilderness. To Archelaus were assigned Judaea, Samaria, and Idumaea—not as king, but as ethnarch; to Antipas, Galilee and Peraea as tetrarch; Batanaea, Trachonitis, Auranitis, Gaulanitis, and Paneas to Philip, also as tetrarch (Josephus Ant
Census - It was also better known than the other; par excellence it was ‘the census’ because a great tumult arose under Judas of Galilee in connexion with it, which made the occasion famous. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, to the city of David, because he was of the house and family of David, to enrol himself with Mary who was betrothed to him’ (Luke 2:3-5)
Forsaking All - ‘Come after me,’ He said to Simon and Andrew when He called them on the shore of the Lake of Galilee, ‘and I will make you fishers of men. ...
Again, when He was travelling through Galilee on His last journey up to Jerusalem, He was followed by an enthusiastic throng
Luke, Gospel According to - It takes us first to the Jordan valley for our Lord’s Baptism, then to Galilee for His ministry; after that comes a journey to Jerusalem, followed by the Passion. Finally, the lost verses must have contained a journey into Galilee, for such a journey is expressly enjoined on the disciples. All three Synopties adopt this arrangement, except that the final journey into Galilee is omitted by St. But the ministry in Jerusalem which the Synoptists give is assumed to have been unbroken by visits to Galilee, and must therefore merely be adjusted with John 12-20. Mark assigns 360 verses to the ministry in Galilee, which is commonly supposed to have lasted three years, 251 to the ministry in Jerusalem, which lasted about a week. Mark’s account of the ministry in Jerusalem ought to be broken by several visits to Galilee
Peter - " He was a son of Jonas (John, so read the best manuscripts), a brother of Andrew, probably a native of Bethsaida in Galilee
Thom'as - " (John 20:29 ) In the New Testament we hear of Thomas only twice again, once on the Sea of Galilee with the seven disciples, where he is ranked next after Peter, (John 21:2 ) and again in the assemblage of the apostles after the ascension
Zebulun - ; and to Jesus the true Light, ministering most in Galilee, the land of Zebulun and Naphtali, the darkest and most Gentilized part of Palestine
Samaria - ) ...
In the time of Christ, Western Palestine was divided into three provinces, Judea, Samaria, and Galilee
Tyre - The coming of Christianity to Tyre was foreshadowed when many of its inhabitants journeyed to Galilee to see the Prophet of Nazareth, and when He returned their visit (Mark 3:8, Luke 6:17, Mark 7:24, Matthew 15:21)
Tiglath Pileser - and took Ijon, Abel-beth-maachah, Janoah, Kedesh, Hazor, Gilead, Galilee, all the land of Naphtali (compare Isaiah 7; Isaiah 8; Isaiah 9:1, this stroke fell at first 'lightly,' 'afterward more grievously'), and carried them captive to Assyria
Robber - Herod, when quite young, first made his reputation by ruthlessly executing robbers in Galilee (Josephus, Ant
Spies - for a similar union in Galilee, Mark 3:6)
Nahum - Nothing is known of the personal history of this prophet: he is called 'the Elkoshite,' which is supposed to refer to a place named Elkosh in Galilee
Gilead - The name of the territory bounded on the north by Bashan, on the west by the Jordan between the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea, on the east by the desert, and on the south by the territory of Moab
Greece - ...
As Galilee was thickly planted with Greek towns, there can be little doubt that Jesus knew the language, and spoke it when necessary, though it is probable that He commonly used Aramaic, as He came first to ‘the lost tribes of Israel
Herod - Pilate took occasion from our Lord's residence in Galilee to send Jesus to Herod Antipas, Luke 23:6 ff
Manasseh - Being a numerous tribe they had a large possession in the north on the east of the upper Jordan and of the Sea of Galilee
Jacob's Well - The journey of our Lord from Judea into Galilee; the cause of it; his passage through the territory of Samaria; his approach to the metropolis of that country; its name; his arrival at the Amorite field, which terminates the narrow valley of Sichem; the ancient custom of halting at a well; the female employment of drawing water; the disciples sent into the city for food, by which its situation out of the town is so obviously implied; the question of the woman referring to existing prejudices which separated the Jews from the Samaritans; the depth of the well; the oriental allusion contained in the expression, "living water;" the history of the well, and the customs illustrated by it; the worship upon Mount Gerizim:—all these occur within the space of twenty verses; and if to these be added that remarkable circumstance mentioned in the fifty-first verse of the chapter, where it is stated that as he was now going down, his servants met him," his whole route from Cana being a continual descent toward Capernaum, we may consider it as a record, signally confirmed in its veracity by circumstances, which remain in indelible character, to give them evidence, to this day
Mary, the Virgin - of Nazareth in Galilee. The flight to Egypt followed; then the return, at first designed to be back to Bethlehem, but through fear of Archelaus to Nazareth of Galilee, their former home. Two Passovers had elapsed since the marriage in Cana, and He had twice made the circuit of Galilee
Zebedee - Zebulun is not so wild in scenery as Naphtali, nor has it the same variety of climate, being wholly situated in Lower Galilee (M. —As in the rest of Galilee, the Jewish population here had come in during the later days of the Maccabees and the reign of Herod. It was one of the cities rebuilt and fortified by Herod, who made it again the capital of Galilee (Ant
Mark, the Gospel of - In one day, according to Mark, Jesus instructed the multitudes by the sea, traveled across the sea of Galilee and calmed the storm, healed the Gerasene demoniac, crossed the sea again, healed the woman with a hemorrhage, and raised a little girl from the dead (Mark 4:1-6:1 ). After the Baptist fulfilled his role as the forerunner to the Messiah (in a very brief appearance), Jesus began His public ministry in Galilee by preaching the “gospel of God” and collecting a few disciples collecting a few disciples (Mark 1:14-20 ). With these necessary introductions completed, Mark presented the life of Jesus by following a simple geographical scheme: from Galilee to Judea
Peter (2) - —Simon Peter was the son of a man called Jonas (Matthew 16:17) or John (John 1:42), or possibly Jonas John, a fisherman on the Sea of Galilee. He could read and write, and had considerable acquaintance with the Greek tongue as spoken in Galilee. When our Lord began His ministry in Galilee, the two brothers Peter and Andrew were summoned by Him to become, in His own striking language, ‘fishers of men’: and this call was immediately followed by that of two other brothers, their partners in business, James and John (Mark 1:16; Mark 1:20). John is the first to identify the solitary figure on the shore of the Sea of Galilee with the Lord; while Peter is the first to try to reach Him, casting himself into the lake in his eagerness to welcome Him
Egypt - Joseph, however, feared to enter Judaea because of Archelaus, Herod’s son and successor; and in obedience to a second vision directed his course to Galilee, and settled at Nazareth (Matthew 2:22 f. Nothing, however, is said of the actual journey, but a narrative of events ‘in Galilee’ follows, beginning with the fourth year of Christ’s age
Samaria - The pagan pushed into the vacated region, and "Galilee of the Gentiles" ("nations") became an accepted phrase (Isaiah 9:1). Samaria lay between Judaea and Galilee
Shechem (1) - ...
Jesus in His journey from Jerusalem to Galilee rested at it, while "His disciples were gone away into the city to buy meat"; so the well must have lain before, but at some little distance from, the city. Jesus intended on their return to proceed along the plain toward Galilee, without visiting the city Himself, which agrees with the traditional site
Egypt - Joseph, however, feared to enter Judaea because of Archelaus, Herod’s son and successor; and in obedience to a second vision directed his course to Galilee, and settled at Nazareth (Matthew 2:22 f. Nothing, however, is said of the actual journey, but a narrative of events ‘in Galilee’ follows, beginning with the fourth year of Christ’s age
Syria - Casius and Lebanon, and broadens out into the table-land of Galilee, Samaria, and Judaea
Heathen - When Christ came, he preached chiefly in Galilee, where there were multitudes of Gentiles
Desert - This is the basic term for the long rift reaching from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea and on down to the Red Sea
Talmud - The Mishnah (a codification of oral legal teachings on the written law of Moses) was probably written down at Javneh in Galilee at about 220 A
Heir - The numerous towns in Galilee, moreover, had their wants best supplied by numerous petty farms
Wilderness - Not only did Jesus overcome the tempter in the wilderness, but He fed the four thousand in a desolate place east of Lake Galilee (Mark 8:1-9 )
Hair (2) - in winter by the fishermen on the Sea of Galilee
Herod the Great - His father having aided Caesar in his war with Egypt was rewarded by being made procurator of all Judaea, and he made his son Herod, then only fifteen years of age, governor of Galilee
Felix - 54), Cumanus and Felix were contemporaneously procurators, the one of Galilee, the other of Samaria
Sea - ” It can also be used of a fresh water “sea” such as the Sea of Galilee: “… And the border shall descend, and shall reach unto the side of the Sea of Chinnereth eastward” ( Asleep, Sleep - ...
A — 4: ἀφυπνόω (Strong's #879 — Verb — aphupnoo — af-oop-no'-o ) "to fall asleep" (apo, "away"), is used of natural "sleep," Luke 8:23 , of the Lord's falling "asleep" in the boat on the lake of Galilee
Peter - He received his second call, and began to accompany Christ, at the Sea of Galilee near his residence, and thenceforth learned to be a "fisher of men," Matthew 4:18-20 Luke 5:1-11
Herod - At the time of Antipater's elevation, though only 15 (or as other passages of Josephus make probable, 20), he received the government of Galilee and soon afterwards Coelo-Syria. Originally Herod the Great destined him to succeed to the throne, but in his last will made him tetrarch of Galilee and Peraea, which yielded him a yearly revenue of 200 talents. ...
And that he was so comes out in the most incidental and undesigned way, a clear mark of the truth of the narrative: On his lending himself, fox-like, to the Pharisees' design to get Christ out of Galilee into Judea (see Fox) his superstitious fears were too great to admit of his repeating in Christ's case the execution which, to his own torment of conscience, he had perpetrated in John's case; but he was glad of any, means to relieve himself of Christ's presence which "perplexed" him (Luke 13:32). Galilee and Peraea were added to his dominions on the exile of Herod ANTIPAS (see above), whom, notwithstanding the kindnesses he formerly when in difficulties received from him, Agrippa supplanted by intrigues at Rome. Nero added several cities of Galilee and Persea to his kingdom (A
Rivers And Waterways in the Bible - Along the eastern edge of the Huleh Valley, it flows southward into Lake Kinnereth (the Sea of Galilee). Only about eight miles wide and fourteen miles long, the fresh waters of the Galilee and its fishing industry sustained a dense population during most historical periods. At the Galilee's southern end, the Jordan exits and flows 65 miles on to the Dead Sea (about 1,300 feet below sea level). The Yarmuk River joins the Jordan five miles south of the Sea of Galilee. While a number of its small tributaries have their sources in springs at the base of Mount Tabor, in the southern Galilee, and in the extension of the Carmel in the vicinity of Taanach and Megiddo, the Kishon is rarely more than a brook within relatively shallow and narrow banks except during the heavy rains of the winter months
Jesus, Life And Ministry of - First, the God-centered character of His message continued in the proclamation He began in Galilee when He returned home from the desert: “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent ye, and believe the gospel” (Mark 1:1 ;Mark 1:1;15:1 ; compare Matthew 4:17 ). So pressed was He by the crowds that He taught them on one occasion while standing in a boat offshore on the lake of Galilee (Mark 4:1 ). Such an exuberant celebration of divine mercy, whether expressed in Jesus' actions or in the stories He told, must have seemed to religious leaders both in Galilee and Jerusalem a serious lowering of ancient ethical standards and a damaging compromise of the holiness of God
Mount of Olives - As far back as 530 this hill is spoken of as Galilee, and in the Acts of Pilate (about 350) a mountain near Jerusalem called ‘Galilee’ is mentioned, It is said to have first received its name Γαλιλαία because the Galilaeans attending the feasts used to encamp there, or as Saewulf (1102) says, it ‘was called Galilee because the Apostles, who were called Galilaeans, frequently visited there
Joseph - He lived at Nazareth in Galilee (Luke 2:4 ). This is concluded from the fact that Mary only was present at the marriage feast in Cana of Galilee
Peter - Not long after, there was another meeting, this time in Galilee, when Peter became one of the first believers to leave their normal occupations and become active followers of Jesus (Matthew 4:18-22). ...
Peter and Jesus...
The son of a man named John (or Jonah) (Matthew 16:17; John 1:42; John 21:15), Peter came from Bethsaida on the shore of Lake Galilee (John 1:44)
Issachar - The Kedesh in Judges 4:9 is not that of Naphtali 30 miles off, but that on the sea of Galilee 16 miles from Tabor, a place suited for a gathering of the tribes, and within Naphtali's boundaries. ...
Here in Galilee Jesus imparted the spiritual riches, to which the Galilean apostles in due time "called" all "peoples"): Deuteronomy 33:18-19; Matthew 4:13-16
Samaria - one of the three divisions of the Holy Land, having Galilee on the north, Judea on the south, the river Jordan on the east, and the Mediterranean Sea on the west. It took its name from its capital city, Samaria; and formed, together with Galilee and some cantons on the east of Jordan, during the reigns of the kings of Israel and Judah, the kingdom of the former
Capernaum - Capernaum was less conspicuous, and more suited to be the center of the unobtrusive but energetic ministry of Jesus in Galilee
Matthew - On the other hand, it seems to have been common in Galilee for a man to possess two names-a Greek and an Aramaic (cf
Jacob's Well - —On the arrest of John the Baptist by Herod Antipas, Jesus left Judaea and returned with His loosely-attached followers to Galilee (Mark 1:14)
Luke, Gospel of - It is Himself, as He was, a man on the earth — the Person one would have met every day had one lived at that time in Judaea or in Galilee
Mary - The Magdalene, or native of Magdala on the Sea of Galilee
Jonah - Son of Amittai and the prophet of Gath-hepher (in Galilee: cf
Palestine - The plain of Jezreel or Esdraelon on its northern side, separating the Ephraim mountains from those of Galilee, and stretching across from the Mediterranean to the Jordan valley, was the great battlefield of Palestine. Galilee is the northern portion, Samaria the middle, Judaea the southern. of Esdraelon the Galilee hills abound in timber, the land round Tabor is clad in dark oak, forming a contrast to jebel ed Duhy (Little Hermon) and Nazareth's white hills. The Jordan valley divides Galilee, Ephraim, and Judah from Bashan, Gilead, and Moab respectively. The basins of the sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea resemble craters
Announcements of Death - The Pharisees from Jerusalem (Luke 5:17) are now in Galilee watching the movements of Jesus, so as to gain a case against Him. This decision to kill Jesus soon reappears in Galilee (Mark 3:6), and often in Jerusalem during the closing six months of the ministry. When He withdrew from Galilee this last summer, he devoted Himself chiefly to the disciples, and especially to preparing them for His departure. ...
(c) In Galilee Jesus renewed His earnest words about the certainty of His death (Mark 9:31, Matthew 17:22 f. He concealed His presence in Galilee as far as possible (Mark 9:30), but He was very insistent in urging, ‘Let these words sink into your ears: for the Son of Man shall be delivered up into the hands of men’ (Luke 9:44)
Palesti'na - This central lowland, which divides with its broad depression the mountains of Ephraim from the mountains of Galilee is the plain of Esdraelon or Jezreel the great battle-field of Palestine. The northern portion is Galilee; the centre, Samaria; the south, Judea. The low hills which spread down from the mountains of Galilee, and form the barrier between the plains of Akka and Esdraelon, are covered with timber, of moderate size it is true, but of thick, vigorous growth, and pleasant to the eye. Between the lake of Merom and the Sea or Galilee it contracts, and becomes more of an ordinary ravine or glen. From this we descend successively by the peaks of Bashan and upper Galilee, where the oak and pine flourish, to the hills of Judah and Samaria, where the vine and fig tree are at home, to the plains of the seaboard where the palm and banana produce their fruit down to the sultry shores of the Sea, on which we find tropical heat and tropical vegetation
Judea - All traces of its ancient division among the twelve tribes were now abolished, and it was distributed into four provinces; namely, Judea Proper in the south, Galilee in the north, Samaria in the centre, and Peraea on the east of the river Jordan. ...
Samaria, lying between Judea and Galilee, in 32 15' north latitude, extended along the sea coast from Joppa to Dora, and along the river Jordan from the rivulet of Alexandrium to the southern extremity of the sea of Tiberias; comprehending the territory of the tribe of Ephraim, of the half tribe of Manasseh, and part of Issachar. The northern division of the province was thinly inhabited by Jews, and was sometimes called Galilee of the Gentiles; but the southern portion was very populous. Its principal towns were Capernaum, at the northern extremity of the lake of Gennesareth; Bethsaida, a considerable village a few leagues south of Capernaum; Cinnereth, south of Bethsaida, rebuilt by Herod Antipas, and named Tiberias; Tarichaea, a considerable town at the efflux of the river Jordan from the sea of Tiberias, thirty stadia south from the town of Tiberias; Nazareth, two leagues north-west of Mount Tabor, and equally distant from the lake of Gennesareth and the sea coast; Arbela, six miles west of Nazareth; Sepphoris, or Dio-Caesarea, now Sefouri, a large and well fortified town, about five leagues north north-west of Mount Tabor; Zabulon, a strong and populous place, sixty stadia south-east of Ptolemais; Acre, or Accon, seven miles north from the promontory of Carmel, afterward enlarged and called Ptolemais by Ptolemy I, of Egypt, and in the time of the crusades distinguished by the name of Acre, the last city possessed by the Christians in Syria, and was taken and destroyed by the Sultan Serapha, of Egypt, in 1291; Kedes, or Cydissus, a Levitical city at the foot of Mount Panium, twenty miles south-east of Tyre; Dan, originally Laish, on the north boundary of the Holy Land, about thirty miles south- east of Sidon; Paneas, near to Dan, or, according to some, only a different name for the same place, was repaired by Philip, son of Herod the Great, and by him named Caesarea, in honour of Augustus, with the addition of Philippi, to distinguish it from the other town of the same name in Samaria; Jotapata, the strongest town in Galilee, about four leagues north north-east of Dio-Caesarea; and Japha and Gischala, two other fortified places in the same district
John, the Gospel of - In the Synoptics Jesus spends His entire ministry in and around Galilee and makes one trip to Jerusalem, just a week before His death. The Gospel of John features episodes in which individuals are caught between Jesus' call for faith and the Jewish authorities' rejection of His claims (Nicodemus, John 3:1 ; the man at the Pool of Bethesda, John 5:1 ; the crowds in Galilee, John 6:1 ; and the man born blind, John 9:1 )
Apostles - Our Lord, for reasons unknown to us, had determined to set out for Galilee, accompanied by His new disciples. ), baptized at His command when He laboured in Judaea in the vicinity of the Baptist, and accompanied Him through Samaria on His return to Galilee (John 4:1 ff. He wished to influence as many of the inhabitants of Galilee as He could, and there was no better centre from which to approach them than Capernaum. No more suitable position from which to command Galilee could have been chosen. Walking along the shore of the Sea of Galilee, He saw the brothers Simon and Andrew, who were fishermen, engaged in casting their net. He could hardly have been with Jesus from the outset of His career in Galilee
Matthew, the Gospel of - ...
Matthew 28:16-20 is the scene of the resurrected Jesus meeting His disciples on a hill in Galilee. Jesus then went to Galilee of the Gentiles (Matthew 4:15 ) to begin His public ministry. ...
Matthew 19:1-25:46 makes the transition from Galilee to Jerusalem
Samaritan, the Good - —Jesus had bidden His last farewell to Galilee, and was travelling to Jerusalem (Luke 9:51)
Thirst - Early in His public ministry, as He was journeying back from Judaea to Galilee, leaving the former country as a result of Pharisaic hostility, the writer of the Fourth Gospel notices that Jesus suffered the pangs of thirst, and records His request for a drink of water from the Samaritan woman as she came to draw water from ‘Jacob’s spring’ (πηγὴ τοῦ Ἰακώβ, John 4:6)
Hasmonean - Although he expanded his administrative territory to include Galilee, his chaotic one-year reign included conflicting policies of Hellenism and active proselytizing of Gentiles, as well as imprisoning his mother and brothers
Captivity - 738), carried away the trans-Jordanic tribes and the inhabitants of Galilee into Assyria (2 Kings 15:29 ; Isaiah 9:1 )
Ship - Thomson (Land and Book, 401-404) mentions seeing but one rickety boat on the sea of Galilee, which was once covered with fishermen's boats; contrast the fact that Josephus (B
Mark, Gospel by - " Thus the Lord's connection with Israel as Son of David is proclaimed in this gospel, which has been mostly occupied with His labours in Galilee of the Gentiles
Chief, Chiefest, Chiefly - It is translated "chief" in Mark 6:21 , RV, of men of Galilee; in Acts 13:50 , of men in a city; in Acts 28:7 , of the "chief" man in the island of Melita; in Acts 17:4 , of "chief" women in a city; in Acts 28:17 , of Jews; in 1 Timothy 1:15,16 , of a sinner
Nation - When He appeared to His disciples on the mountain in Galilee, He said, ‘All authority hath been given unto me in heaven and on earth: Go ye therefore, and make disciples of all the nations’; and it is significant that He did not say ‘of all men’ but ‘of all the nations’-thus pointing out that the object to be aimed at was national religion, the national confession of His authority (cf
Josephus - He undertook the command of Galilee, where, in spite of the personal hostility of the zealot John of Gischala, he organized the Jewish defence during the winter of 66-67. describes the conquest of Galilee, with its two culminating points, The capture of Jotapata and that of Taricheae; bk. iii) Josephus gives a description of Galilee, and in bk. 100, and here Josephus endeavours to meet the charges with which Justus of Tiberias assailed his conduct during the war in Galilee in a. , with its inaccurate historical sequence, Theudas-Judas of Galilee; and the error is supposed to be explained by Ant
John (the Apostle) - John’s home was in Galilee (probably at Bethsaida), where his father, Zebedee, a man apparently of means (Mark 1:20), was busy as a fisherman on the Lake. At the end of this period Jesus returned by way of Samaria to Galilee. The record of events which shows Jesus performing miracles and preaching in the towns and villages of Galilee is the record of John’s training (see Mark 1:21 to Mark 2:22). In the account of the appearance of the risen Lord in Galilee (John 21:2-7) the ‘sons of Zebedee’ have special mention, and again in the closing scene and words of the Fourth Gospel the impression that he should not die before the Lord’s coming is corrected, and the truthfulness of his witness as given in this Gospel confirmed (John 21:20-24). There is nothing unlikely in this story, unless it be, as Godet suggests, that ‘his own home’ (John 19:27) was in Galilee rather than in the capital, in which case there would be an explanation of the Apostle’s absence at the time of Paul’s first visit to the city (Galatians 1:18-19)
Tiglath-Pileser - Israel, capturing Ijon, Abel-beth-maacah, Janoah, Kedesh, Hazor, Gilead, Galilee, and all the land of Naphtali ( 2 Kings 15:29 )
Thomas - Thomas is named next to Peter among the seven on the sea of Galilee, a proof that he was a fisherman like Peter (John 21:2)
Rebuke - On the sea of Galilee, Jesus is said to have rebuked the wind (Matthew 8:26, Mark 4:39, Luke 8:24)
Leaven - After Jesus' curt statement that no sign will be given to this generation, he and his disciples sail across the Sea of Galilee
Lasciviousness - 154): ‘Here the reference is probably to the dissolute life of the Herodian court, and of the Greek cities of Galilee and the Decapolis; if δόλος characterized the Jew, his Greek neighbour was yet more terribly branded by ἀσέλγεια
Canaan, Land of - To the east of this is the valley in which runs the Jordan with the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea
Carpenter - His first pulpit was the carpenter’s bench, and His first sermons were the implements and utensils He made for the country folk of Galilee
Bethesda - But this, if admitted as an argument of doubt, would go farther than the objectors perhaps intend; since the same cause of objection would equally hold good against the pool of Siloam, the resurrection of Lazarus, several of the sweet and precious discourses of Christ, his miracle of Cana, at Galilee, and very many other blessed relations concerning the Lord Jesus, which are mentioned by none of the other evangelists
Tabor - On the north- west you discern at a distance the Mediterranean, and all round you have the spacious and beautiful plains of Esdraelon and Galilee
Judas Iscariot - The astonishing miracles he saw him perform left no room to doubt of the reality of his Master's pretensions, who had, indeed, himself in private actually accepted the title from his Apostles; and Judas must have been much disappointed when Jesus repeatedly refused the proffered royalty from the people in Galilee, after the miracle of feeding the five thousand, and again after his public procession to Jerusalem
Entry Into Jerusalem - there is a description of the commotion (ἐσείσθη) in the whole city; the question, ‘Who is this?’; the answer, ‘This is the prophet Jesus, he who is from Nazareth of Galilee,’ and the greeting, ‘Hosanna to the Son of David. After the feeding of the 5000 (John 6:14) the multitude recognized Jesus as the prophet that should come into the world, and would have seized Him and made Him a king, but He defeated their purpose; for He could not allow an emotional peasantry, ever ready to flock to the standard of a deliverer, to identify His Kingdom with this world, or His cause with that of a Judas of Galilee. The Messiah was not to come from Galilee but from Bethlehem (Matthew 2:5), was king of the Jews (Matthew 2:2), was to perform miracles (John 7:31), to be a prophet (John 4:29), to appear mysteriously (John 7:27), to be a descendant of David (Matthew 9:27), and to restore again the kingdom to Israel (Acts 1:6)
Peter - He and Andrew were fishermen on the Lake of Galilee ( Matthew 4:18 = Mark 1:18 ) in partnership with Zebedee and his sons ( Luke 5:7 ; Luke 5:11 , Matthew 4:21 ). ...
At the subsequent appearance by the Lake of Galilee (John 21:1-25 ) Peter played a prominent part
Surprise - The storm on the Sea of Galilee (Matthew 8:24) was a surprise to Him even as to His disciples, although His faith was not disturbed as theirs was; so also He knew not that He was sending His disciples into any danger when He dismissed them after the feeding of the five thousand (Matthew 14:22; see the discussion of these two incidents in Adamson’s The Mind in Christ, pp
Ship - Boats on the Sea Of Galilee
Gamaliel - Luke’s narrative, he speaks of a rising under Theudas as taking place before the rising of Judas of Galilee (a
Loneliness - On the other hand, it must be remembered that (a) Jesus was constantly accompanied, at least in Galilee and at the end in Jerusalem, by twelve friends and disciples specially appointed (Matthew 10:2, Mark 3:16, Luke 10:1 imply a larger circle from which to draw); to these we must add a number of women (Luke 8:3; cf
Fox - " And he calls Herod, the tetrarch of Galilee, a fox, Luke 13:32 ; thereby signifying his craft, and the refinements of his policy
Poverty - The Jewish community of Palestine was still mainly agricultural, hut more prosperous under settled government (the Herods and the Romans); while Galilee became a hive of industry, and sustained a large industrial population (an artizan class)
John the Baptist - John was the son of a priest and grew up in Judea in the south of Palestine (Luke 1:5-13; Luke 1:39-41; Luke 1:65; Luke 1:80), whereas Jesus was the son of a carpenter and grew up in Galilee in the north (Luke 1:26; Luke 2:51)
Judea - But in general people thought of Palestine as consisting of three sections, the northern known as Galilee, the central as Samaria and the southern as Judea (John 4:3-4)
Decapolis - The Romans gave the name Decapolis (meaning ‘ten cities’) to an extensive region situated largely south and east of the Sea of Galilee
Tribes of Israel, the - They were located west of the Jordan in the region just south of the Sea of Galilee stretching on down to the Valley of Jezreel. The territory allotted to the tribe of Zebulun was in the north in the region of southern Galilee bounded by Issachar on the south southeast, Naphtali on the east, and Asher on the west (Genesis 49:7 ). During the tribal period the tribe of Naphtali occupied the broad strip of land west of the Jordan in the area of Lake Hula and the Sea of Chinnereth (Galilee)
Education (2) - It was otherwise in Galilee. Jesus had different audiences in Galilee and in Jerusalem
Matthew - Now, the surest way and the shortest way for Matthew to make money in the Galilee of that day was to take sides with Cæsar and to become one of Cæsar's tax-gatherers. He will furnish a country-house for himself up among the hills of Galilee, and he will devote his last days to deeds of devotion and charity
Nazarene - ) "And in the sixth month, the angel Gabriel was sent from God, unto a city of Galilee named Nazareth, to a virgin espoused to a man, whose name was Joseph, of the house of David, and the virgin's name was Mary. " When the band of men and officers from the chief priests came to apprehend Christ in the garden, they enquired after the Lord under the same name, Jesus of Nazareth, (John 18:5) The servant maid in the hall of Pilate spoke of our Lord by the same name; for charging Peter as an accomplice, she said, "And this fellow also was with Jesus of Galilee
Sea - The SEA OF TIBERIAS or of Galilee; the lake of Gennesareth, or of Cimmereth, Numbers 34:11 , is so called from the adjacent country, or from some of the principal cities on its shores. ...
...
"How pleasant to me thy deep blue wave,...
O sea of Galilee,...
For the glorious One who came to save...
Hath often stood by thee
Sychar - SYCHAR (Συχάρ) is mentioned in connexion with the journey of Jesus from Judaea to Galilee recorded in John 4:4 f
River - Among the other streams and mountain torrents in Palestine there are the Kishon, which drains Galilee westward; the Yarmuk and the Jabbok, which carry the waters of Bashan and Gilead into the Jordan; the Leontes and Orontes, which rise in CCEle-Syria and drain the great basin between Lebanon and Anti-Lebanon, and the Euphrates, greatest of All, forming the boundary of Palestine on the N
Scorn - His attitude was defined at a comparatively early stage during the ministry in Northern Galilee, when He gave His definition of moral defilement (Matthew 15:11, Mark 7:15) by saying, ‘Not that which goeth into the mouth defileth the man; but that which proceedeth out of the mouth, this defileth the man
Gad - ...
In 734 the Gadites with their kinsmen of the East Jordan, Galilee and Naphtali, were carried captive by Tiglath-pileser iii
Enthusiasm - We have abundant evidence that He so inspired men in Galilee by His healing, teaching, forgiveness of sins, companionship (Mark 1:27; Mark 1:37; Mark 2:12; Mark 2:19), and attracted many (Mark 3:7; Mark 6:53-56)
Gerizim - Ebal, at the head of the pass leading right through from the river Jordan to the sea, and also at the point where the great north road from Jerusalem to Galilee intersects this pass, has given them a commanding place in the topography of the Holy Land, and has led to their association with important events in the history of Israel
Guest - He was one of the guests at the marriage in Cana of Galilee (John 2:1 ff
Aenon - (d) It appears that both Jesus and John were baptizing in Judaea (John 3:22-23), and their proximity gave occasion to the remarks referred to in John 3:25, and that Jesus left Judaea for Galilee with the intention of getting out of the neighbourhood of John and removing the appearance of rivalry (John 4:1)
Andrew - The actual summons to work came later, when, by the Sea of Galilee, Jesus bade Andrew, along with the same three companions, leave his nets and come after Him (Matthew 4:18 ff
Pilate - Lastly, he thought to discharge himself from pronouncing judgment against him, by sending him to Herod, king of Galilee, Luke 23:7-8
Agrippa - After the death of Claudius, his successor, Nero, who had a great affection for Agrippa, to his other dominions added Julias in Persia, and that part of Galilee to which Tarichaea and Tiberias belonged
jo'Seph - He lived at Nazareth in Galilee
John the Apostle - John was a son of Zebedee, a master-fisherman in good position, plying his craft in one of the towns on the Lake of Galilee, possibly Bethsaida. It is probable that his mother was Salome, one of the women who ‘ministered’ to Christ in Galilee ( Mark 15:41 ), a sister of Mary the mother of Jesus. Two of these were John and his elder brother James, who were with their father in a boat on the Lake of Galilee, mending their nets
Gospels - The Synoptists lay the scene of the ministry almost entirely in Galilee and Peræa; St. , we do faintly trace three stages in the wilderness of Galilee (a brief record), in Galilee (full description), and in Central Palestine as far as Jerusalem and on the other side of Jordan. The rural population of Galilee had to be taught by very slow degrees; but Jerusalem was the home of religious controversy, and its inhabitants were acute reasoners
Chronology of the New Testament - also we see traces of three periods in the ministry: (1) Mark 3:21 to Mark 4:30 , preaching in the wilderness of Judæa and in Nazareth and Galilee, briefly recorded; (2) Mark 4:31 to Mark 9:50 , preaching in Galilee and the North, related at length; (3) 9:51-end, preaching in Central Palestine as far as Jerusalem
Synagogue - Remains, more or less extensive, of Jewish synagogues still survive from the second and third, more doubtfully from the first, centuries of our era, chiefly in Galilee. The larger portion of the area was occupied by benches for the congregation, the worshippers facing southwards, in Galilee at least, towards the holy city
Olives, Mount of - The Latin Christians call the northern part "Viri Galilaei ", being the presumed site of the angels' address to the disciples at the ascension, "ye men of Galilee," etc. Its first name in 1250 was "Galilee" (Perdiccas in Reland Pal
Joy (2) - descriptive of the return of the seventy disciples from their mission in Galilee, we read (Luke 10:17) that they ‘returned with joy, saying, Lord, even the devils are subject unto us in thy name. ...
There is much beauty, as well as truth, in the imaginary description of Renan: ‘He thus traversed Galilee in the midst of a continual feast
Multitude - It was therefore quite distinct from the multitude which had accompanied Jesus at His triumphal entry, and which largely consisted of pilgrims from Galilee coming to the feast. Yet His popularity with the simple-hearted people of Galilee continued until the end, as was shown at His triumphal entry into Jerusalem
Nation (2) - ; Antipas succeeding to Galilee and Peraea; and Archelaus, after a long suit at Rome, obtaining the most important part with an allotted income of 600 talents. But there was often danger in Galilee (Luke 4:29); and infinitely more in the furnace of fanaticism at Jerusalem (Mark 10:32 f
Sanhedrin - The extent of the Sanhedrin’s jurisdiction varied at different times in its history; while, in a certain sense, it exercised civil jurisdiction over all Jewish communities, wherever they existed, during the time of Christ this was restricted to Judæa proper; it was for this reason that it had no judicial authority over Him so long as He remained in Galilee
Tongues, Gift of - And what would strike the pilgrim Jews present was that the speakers at Pentecost were mainly those who themselves spoke an uncouth Aramaic dialect, that of Galilee ( Matthew 26:73 )
Time (2) - the loose phrases ‘in the days of Herod the king,’ Matthew 2:1; and ‘Herod being tetrarch of Galilee,’ Luke 3:1); nor was it easily attainable
Roman Empire - Galilee was still under the Herod's and other princes whose dominions and titles successive emperors changed from time to time
Lebanon - The former range is divided from the mountains of Galilee by the deep chasm made by the Litâni river in its passage seawards
Coming Again - He predicted a meeting with them in Galilee (Matthew 26:32, Mark 14:28), and indicated that though for a little while they should not see Him, yet after a little while again they should see Him (John 14:19; John 16:16)
Food - Fish was the usual food in our Lord's time about the sea of Galilee (Matthew 7:10; John 6:9; John 21:9, etc
James - He was of Bethsaida, in Galilee, and left all to follow Christ
Shechem - The journey of our Lord from Judea into Galilee; the cause of it; his passage through the territory of Samaria; his approach to the metropolis of this country; its name; his arrival at the Amorite field which terminates the narrow valley of Sychem; the ancient custom of halting at a well; the female employment of drawing water; the disciples sent into the city for food, by which its situation out of the town is obviously implied; the question of the woman referring to existing prejudices which separated the Jews from the Samaritans; the depth of the well; the oriental allusion contained in the expression, living water;' the history of the well, and the customs thereby illustrated; the worship upon Mount Gerizim; all these occur within the space of twenty verses
Luke, Gospel of - ...
Luke then gathers together, in one section, material relating to the work Jesus did over a period of about three years, mainly in Galilee
Vespasian - His first aim was to subdue Galilee, and in this campaign the most important phase was the stubborn siege of Jotapata. Among the captives taken was Josephus, the commander of the Jewish forces in Galilee, and the future historian of the war, who was kindly treated by Vespasian. After the capture of Tarichea, Gamala and Gischala were also taken, and the rebellion, so far as Galilee was concerned, was crushed
Palestine - Volcanic rock, the result of ancient eruptions, appears in the Hauran, Galilee (especially in the neighbourhood of Safed), and elsewhere. Countless examples of both exist, the former especially in Galilee, parts of which are abundantly fertile by nature, and would probably repay beyond all expectation a judicious expenditure of capital. After the destruction of Jerusalem many settled in Tiberias, and formed the nucleus of the important Galilæan Rabbinic schools, remains of which are still to be seen in the shape of the synagogues of Galilee
Jews - They divided the land, which now began to be called Palestine, into five provinces, three of which were on the west side of the Jordan, namely, Galilee, Samaria, and Judea, and two on the east side, namely, Trachonitis and Persia; but they suffered them to be governed by their own laws, under the high priest and council of the nation. Herod Antipas, called Herod the Tetrarch, who afterward beheaded John the Baptist, succeeded to Galilee and Peraea; and Philip, to Trachonitis, and to the neighbouring region of Iturea. Herod Antipas was still tetrarch of Galilee, and it was he to whom our Saviour was sent by Pontius Pilate. Fadus was soon succeeded by Tiberius, and he was followed by Alexander Cumanus, Felix, and Festus; but Claudius afterward gave Trachonitis and Abilene to Agrippa, and Nero added a part of Galilee and some other cities
Birth of Christ - She accompanies our Lord amongst the other women in Galilee; she was one of the group of women who had witnessed the Crucifixion, and who afterwards went to the grave on the morning of the first Easter Day; and it may be safely inferred that she was one of the women in the upper room after the Ascension. Luke from the gross geographical blunder which he has been accused of making at the outset of his history, the blunder of confusing Bethlehem-Judah with another Bethlehem in Galilee (see, in relation to this alleged blunder, Knowling, Our Lord’s Virgin Birth and the Criticism of To-day, pp. 25):—...
‘There are two Bethlehems, the second in Galilee, about seven miles west of Nazareth, and it has recently been suggested in the Encyc
Proverbs - § 39); and since, it is argued, the harvest was four months distant, it was in December that Jesus visited Sychar in the course of His journey from Jerusalem to Galilee. The Lake of Galilee abounded in fish, which were pickled and exported far and wide. Galilee was celebrated for its linen manufacture, and the flocks which pastured on the wilderness of Judaea furnished material for a thriving trade in woollen goods
James - to announce His Messiahship, which He did not conceal in Samaria as in Judaea and Galilee: John 4:26; Luke 9:54), because His face was as though He would go to Jerusalem, whereas they expected the Messiah would confirm their anti-Jewish worship in the mount Gerizim temple. They looked for a reigning Messiah, and thought Jesus' miracles were wrought with a view to this end: "depart hence (from obscure Galilee) and go into Judea, that Thy disciples also may see the works that Thou doest, for there is no man that doeth anything in secret and (yet) he himself seeketh to be known openly (which they take for granted He seeks); if Thou do these things, show Thyself to the world
Commission - That mission was limited, both as to area—the towns and villages of Galilee—and to objects—the lost sheep of the house of Israel. Later, seventy disciples were chosen (Luke 10), and sent—also, apparently—to itinerate in Galilee
the Man Who Found Treasure Hid in a Field - There was not a carpenter's shop, nor a village market-place, in all Galilee where such stories of treasure-trove were not continually told. But this was no hoax, this true find in that field of Galilee
Night (2) - ...
‘Save in the recorded hours of our Lord’s praying, the history of Galilee has no intervals of silence and loneliness; the noise of a close and busy life is always audible; and to every crisis in the Gospels and in Josephus we see crowds Immediately swarm’ (G. ’ Even when we know the impression made upon the Western traveller, we cannot tell how Jesus and His disciples, hardened by the bracing uplands of Galilee, endured the cold and the mists of night
Judges, Book of - Archaeology has revealed a pattern of many small, brand-new settlements in large areas of the Central Hill Country of Galilee, Samaria, and Judea
Matthew, Gospel of - He then returned to Galilee, where he began his public ministry and gathered together his first disciples (4:12-25)
Canaan - At the time of the Christian aera, Palestine was divided into five provinces; Judea, Samaria, Galilee, Perea, and Idumea. On the death of Herod, Archelaus, his eldest son, succeeded to the government of Judea, Samaria, and Idumea, with the title of tetrarch; Galilee being assigned to Herod Antipas; and Perea, or the country beyond Jordan, to the third brother, Philip. ...
The hills of Judea frequently rise into mountains; the most considerable of which are those of Lebanon and Hermon, on the north; those which surround the sea of Galilee, and the Dead Sea, also attain a respectable elevation
Mishnah - 70, Yohannan ben Zakkai founded the rabbinic movement at Javneh (Jamnia) in Galilee
Palestine - These four provinces were, (1) Judea, the southern portion of the country; (2) Samaria, the middle province, the northern boundary of which ran along the hills to the south of the plain of Esdraelon; (3) Galilee, the northern province; and (4) Peraea (a Greek name meaning the "opposite country"), the country lying east of the Jordan and the Dead Sea
Ephraim (1) - Ephraim lay near the highways from Egypt and Philistia to Galilee and from Jordan to the sea
John the Baptist - Also, to what extent did John influence the life and ministry of Jesus? Indeed, the ill treatment of John by Herod Antipas may have had a significant impact upon Jesus' early ministry in Galilee and in his final days in Jerusalem
Burial - It is sometimes thought that it was in some such rock-tomb that the demoniac of Gadara had taken up his abode; but more probably it was in one of the tombs ‘built above ground,’ which were ‘much more common in Galilee than has been supposed’ (Wilson, Recovery of Jerusalem, p
Feeding the Multitudes - The Synoptics agree that the place was a desert one on the east side of the Sea of Galilee; and Lk
Matthew, Gospel by - The last scene with the apostles in this gospel is in Galilee, where Jesus had appointed to meet them, thus resuming connection with them as a Jewish remnant
Matthew - He was a native of Galilee; but it is not known in what city of that country he was born, or to what tribe of the people of Israel he belonged
Cloth, Clothing - Quality fabrics were made from plants grown in Galilee and the Jordan valley
Josiah - Josiah exercised a sovereignty over Samaria and Galilee (2 Chronicles 34:6), besides Judah
John the Baptist - end of the lake of Galilee
Samaria, Samaritans - in a very short time a common name for the Northern kingdom (Amos 3:9, Jeremiah 31:5, 2 Chronicles 25:13); but during the Greek period it became limited to the province of Samaria, and so in NT times it is the designation of the district that lies between Galilee and Judaea (John 4:4). 1); and this is confirmed by the fact that Caphar Outheni—now Kefr Adan—4 miles distant, was in Galilee (M. When they spoke of it they reckoned only the three lands,—Judaea, Galilee, and Peraea (M
Matthew, the Gospel According to - For the Jews; to show Jewish, readers (to whom were committed the Old Testament "oracles of God") that Jesus is the Messiah of the Old Testament, fulfilling Old Testament prophecies, as born of a virgin in Bethlehem (Matthew 2:6); fleeing to Egypt and called out of it; heralded by John Baptist (Matthew 3:3); laboring in Galilee of the Gentiles (Matthew 4:14-16); healing (Matthew 8:17); teaching in parables (Matthew 13:14 ff). Temptation; ministry in Galilee; call of disciples (Matthew 4)
Canaan - The Jordan valley, Arabah, now the Ghor, reaches from the sea of Chinneroth, or Galilee, to the S. The fertility improves continually as one goes northward, and the valleys and uplands of Galilee are beautiful, and the slopes of Carmel park-like
Luke, Gospel According to - Plummer divide it thus: Preface, Luke 1:1-4 ; Gospel of the Infancy, Luke 1:5 to Luke 2:52 ; Ministry, mainly in Galilee, Luke 3:1 to Luke 9:60 ; Jourueyings towards Jerusalem, and the Ministry outside Galilee, Luke 9:51 to Luke 19:28 ; the Ministry in Jerusalem in the last days, Luke 19:29 to Luke 21:28 ; the Passion and Resurrection, 22 24
Claudius - Felix received the government of the whole of Judaea , Samaria, Galilee, and Peraea
Wine - 67) shows that Kefr Kana, not; Kana el Jelil, answers to the Cana of Galilee (so called to distinguish it from the better known Cana of Judaea, John 2), the scene of our Lord's first miracle at the marriage
Marriage (i.) - There was no corresponding functionary in Galilee, and so there is no allusion to him in the account of the marriage at Cana
Agriculture - Owing to the wide range of climatic conditions in Palestine, the time of the harvest was not uniform, being earliest in the semi-tropical Jordan valley, and latest in the uplands of Galilee
Sea, the Salt - The depression continuing, the heat and the consequent evaporation increased, until there remained only the present three lakes, Merom, Galilee, and the Dead Sea which depends on evaporation alone for maintaining its level
Abraham - The women of Galilee who ministered to Him of their substance will be brought forward; Martha will be brought forward, and the woman at the well; the owner of the ass's colt, and the owner of the upper room, and the owner of Gethsemane; Simon the Cyrenian also, who helped Him to carry His cross; the soldier also who gave Him some of his vinegar to drink; and Joseph of Arimathea, and Nicodemus, and the women with their spices, and the angel who rolled away the stone. O!-you start up and exclaim: O! if my lot had only been cast in Galilee, or in Samaria, or in Judea, or in Jerusalem! O! you cry, how you envy the men and the women to whom the Father will say, Inasmuch as ye did it to Him, ye did it to Me! But, as you still cry that, this scripture comes up into my mind
John the Baptist - ...
JOHN THE EVANGELIST was a native of Bethsaida, in Galilee, son of Zebedee and Salome, by profession a fisherman. He was also one of those to whom our Saviour appeared at the sea of Galilee; and he was afterward, with the other ten Apostles, a witness of his ascension into heaven, Mark 16:19 ; Luke 24:51
Church - It does not appear, say they, that the primitive churches were national; they were not even provincial; for, though there were many believers and professing Christians in Judea, in Galilee, and Samaria, in Macedonia, in Galatia, and other provinces, yet we never read of a provincial church in any of those places
Land (of Israel) - ...
Three cities of refuge—Kedesh in Galilee, Shechem, and Kirjath Arba (Hebron)were located "in the land" (Deuteronomy 19:1-3 ), but provision was made for three more, two of which were outside the land when the territory was enlarged (Joshua 20:1-9 )
Education - teachers) of the law,’ who, in our Lord’s day, were to be found in ‘every village of Galilee and Judæa’ ( Luke 5:17 RV Pilate - (1) Hearing that He came from Galilee, he sends Him to Herod Antipas , who was at Jerusalem for the feast
Synagogue - About the interesting ruins discovered in recent times of many synagogues in Galilee from the 1st and 2nd centuries, possibly even that of Capernaum, see Schürer, GJV Synagogue (2) - Galilee was studded with synagogues, as the thickness of its population would lead one to expect. It is not improbable that the last-named should be identified with the ruins recently discovered at Tell Hûm—one of eleven groups of ruined synagogues found in Northern Galilee and dating in part from the 1st cent
Roman Law in the nt - Herod Antipas was also popularly called ‘king’ (Mark 6:25, Matthew 14:9), but he was really tetrarch (Matthew 14:1) of Galilee (Luke 3:1, τετρααρχοῦντος) and Peraea (Jos. Power was left to the Sanhedrin in Judaea , and, though that body had no jurisdiction in Galilee and Samaria, local synagogues outside Judaea were allowed by the civil authorities to exercise a good deal of authority over their members (C
Peter - ) Of Bethsaida on the sea of Galilee. Brought up to his father's business as a fisherman on the lake of Galilee
Captivity - of Gilead, Galilee, and all Naphtali (Daniel 1:1-2,2; Isaiah 9:1)
Wilderness (2) - ...
Galilee, and particularly the shores of the Lake of Gennesaret, was at the time of our Lord relatively well peopled: this is proved by the Gospels, and still more explicitly by the testimony of Josephus
Preach, Proclaim - All three Synoptics go on to describe Jesus' first preaching tour in Galilee using "proclaim" (Matthew 4:23 ; Mark 1:39 ; Luke 4:44 )
Judaea - Apart from this exceptional usage, the name ordinarily—as we find it in the NT and the writings of Josephus—is applied to the southernmost of the three districts—Galilee, Samaria, Judaea—into which Western Palestine was divided in the time of Christ
Stone - ...
(c) At Cana of Galilee Jesus ‘manifested his glory’; and there, we might say, He was again beholden to the stones; for the six waterpots by whose aid He wrought His first miracle were waterpots of stone (John 2:6)
Paul's Visit to Jerusalem to See Peter - He had been for thirty years with His mother and His sisters and His brethren in Galilee
Dominion (2) - He would not suffer the people of Galilee to make Him a king (John 6:15)
Herod - At the age of twenty-five he was made by his father governor of Galilee, and distinguished himself by the suppression of a band of robbers, with the execution of their leader, Hezekiah, and several of his comrades
Commerce - Whole grain, meal, flax, nuts, dates, olive oil, fish in the Galilee area, and a variety of animal by-products found their way into every home and paid the taxes imposed by the government
Judaea - Apart from this exceptional usage, the name ordinarily—as we find it in the NT and the writings of Josephus—is applied to the southernmost of the three districts—Galilee, Samaria, Judaea—into which Western Palestine was divided in the time of Christ
Mark, Gospel According to - It is noteworthy that in this account the proclamation of Jesus’ Messiahship in Galilee is very gradual (see art. we read of the ‘Sea’ of Galilee, but St
James And John, the Sons of Zebedee - Luke, in his record of the call to discipleship, has borrowed details from an account of a post-Resurrection appearance to Peter in Galilee. And the natural interpretation of the passage is that Andrew first finds his (own) brother Simon, and next day, when wishing to return home to Galilee, Philip, to whom Jesus says, ‘Follow me
Jesus Christ - The title “Christ” gathers all of the Old Testament prophetic hopes and infuses into them the meaning associated with the proper name Jesus, Man of Galilee—Man of sorrows
Mark, the Gospel According to - Thus, Herod the tetrarch is styled "king"; the "lake' (as Luke 8:22 calls it, for he knew larger sects) is called "the sea of Galilee" (Mark 5:1)
Lazarus - Their unbelief, "could not this man which opened the eyes of the blind (John 9, they allude not to the raising of Jairus' daughter and the widow of Nain's son, which took place in Galilee, but to the miracle which made such a stir in Jerusalem; they never thought of His raising the dead) have caused that even this man should not have died?" made Him "groan again
Nahum - Galilee, which on other grounds is precarious
Samaria - The church in Samaria, enjoying, like those in Judaea and Galilee, a time of peace, was built up and multiplied (Acts 9:31)
Walk (2) - In the same sense: John 7:1, ‘walked in Galilee, for he would not walk in Jewry’; John 10:23 walking in the Temple (‘ut in sua domo,’ Beng
Government - Antipas was ‘tetrarch’ of Galilee and Peræa; Mark’s title of ‘king’ (6:14) is corrected by Matthew and Luke
King, Christ as - ...
After receiving the divine anointing at his baptism (Mark 1:9-11 ), Jesus begins to proclaim the inauguration of the kingdom in Galilee: "The time has come
Docetism - Accordingly, while Basilides had admitted a real birth of the man Jesus, Valentinus at least a seeming birth in which the body elsewhere prepared was ushered into the world, Marcion would own no birth at all, and began his gospel with the sudden announcement that in the 15th year of Tiberius Christ came down (by which we are to understand came down from heaven) to Capernaum, a city of Galilee (Tert
Phoenicia, phNicians - Phœnicia was the strip of coast land between Lebanon and the hills of Galilee and the Mediterranean Sea
Nathanael - But there is a reference to Jacob’s dream (Genesis 28:12), suggested possibly by the place; for Bethel, Mahanaim, and the ford Jabbok all lay close to the route which Christ would take in going from Judaea to Galilee; and in the narrative in Genesis the ascending angels are mentioned first
Teaching of Jesus - on Mark 1:15):...
‘A voice by Jordan’s shore,...
A summons stern and clear:...
Repent! be just, and sin no more!...
God’s judgment draweth near!...
A voice by Galilee,...
A holier voice I hear:...
Love God, thy neighbour love! for see...
God’s mercy draweth near. But the same knowledge was also given less fully and formally, in occasional and piecemeal fashion, in the ‘teaching’ Jesus was wont in His earlier ministry to give at the Sabbath services in synagogues of Galilee, in close connexion with the reading of the Law and its regular exposition (Mark 1:21; Mark 6:2, Luke 4:15; cf
Biblical Theology - ) is cut off by the Romans, who appoint Herod the Great as administrator of Galilee, Judea, and their environs around 38 b. ...
Over a span of some three years Jesus traverses the lands of Galilee, Judea, Samaria, and adjoining districts
John, Theology of - But even though Jesus experiences hostility among the Jewish leaders in Jerusalem, still he discovers receptivity in Galilee (2:11; 4:45; 7:1; etc. ) and at the end of this section, Greeks from Galilee eagerly line up to follow him (12:20-26)
Gospel (2) - Mark sums up that beginning thus: ‘Jesus came into Galilee preaching the gospel of God, and saying, The time is fulfilled and the kingdom of God is at hand; repent ye and believe in the gospel. this sentence occurs twice: ‘Jesus went about in all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all manner of disease and all manner of sickness among the people’ (Matthew 4:23; Matthew 9:35)
John the Baptist - 2)—men from Jerusalem and men from Galilee (John 1:19; John 1:35 ff. ...
It was here, then, in all likelihood, that Jesus met John when He came from Galilee to be baptized of him (Matthew 3:13)
Boyhood - We believe that in Galilee, at least, an almost Western freedom of intercourse between the sexes must be considered in estimating the influences affecting Jewish boyhood. ...
An older boy in districts like Upper Galilee or the hill country of Judaea would find much physical exertion called for by the contour of the country
Peter - Nor does Luke report the special message of the angel to Peter, telling him that he will see the Risen Lord in Galilee (Luke 24:7; cf. According to one tradition, regarded by many scholars as the more reliable, he returned disappointed to Galilee, where he probably intended to resume his work of fishing
Cooking And Heating - Fishing industry also thrived on the Sea of Galilee
John - They were fishermen on the Sea of Galilee and probably lived in Capernaum
the Unprofitable Servant - ACCORDING to some ancient authorities Bartholomew was a nobleman of Galilee before he was a disciple of Christ
Seventy (2) - Josephus appointed seventy rulers of Galilee (BJ ii
the Penitent Thief - But, go back to Barabbas's band as he did, I defy him ever to forget what he had seen and heard down among the cities, and the villages, and the mountain-sides, and the supper-tables of Galilee and Jewry
Pottery in Bible Times - The third period (EB III) includes kraters (large storage or mixing bowls), bowls, pitchers, and stands, first identified at khirbet Kerak (Beth Yerak) at the southern end of the Sea of Galilee, which has a distinctive combination of highly burnished red and black slip
Harmony of the Gospels - ...
2) Jesus' ministry is confined to Galilee until He attended the Passover celebration in Jerusalem where He was crucified
Census - A "taxing" under Cyrenius, governor of Syria, is recorded Luke 2:1; a disturbance caused by one Judas of Galilee "in the days of the taxing" is referred to in Acts 5:37
Heal, Health - To discourage the wonder-seeking excitement in Galilee, he often warned the cured to be silent, and to maintain reserve
Majesty (2) - His followers do not think of Him ‘according to the flesh’ (2 Corinthians 5:16)—as the Prophet of Galilee or the Man of Sorrows
the Unmerciful Servant - When Peter came to Him and said, Lord, how oft shall my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? His Master that moment recalled that Roman procurator to mind whose case had been the conversation and congratulation of all Galilee in years now long past
Houses - Pococke was at Tiberias, in Galilee, he was entertained by the sheik's steward, and with his company supped upon the top of the house for coolness, according to their custom, and lodged there likewise, in a sort of closet of about eight feet square, formed of wicker-work, plastered round toward the bottom, but without any door, each person having his cell
Banquet - Such, we have reason to believe, was the governor of the feast at the marriage in Cana of Galilee, which our Lord honoured with his presence
Presentation - Luke’s mention of the Holy Family returning into Galilee and Nazareth (Luke 2:39) is of the nature of a foreshortening, and does not imply that no event intervened between the Presentation and the journey to the North
Jesus Christ - The serious defect, from the Johannine point of view, is that they represent Galilee as the exclusive scene of the Ministry until shortly before the end, and that they know nothing of a series of visits, extending over two years, which Jesus made to Jerusalem and Judæa in fulfilment of His mission. Herod Antipas and Philip continued to rule as vassal princes, with the title of tetrarchs, over Galilee and Ituræa respectively
Poet - When the Shepherd is smitten, the sheep will be scattered abroad (Matthew 26:31), nevertheless He will ‘go before them into Galilee’ (Mark 16:7), bringing the scattered flock home. The mountain-lands of both the north and south attracted Him, and it is striking to find Him making straight for the highlands of Galilee when His task of life was over (Matthew 28:10-16)
Language of the nt - Jesus and the Apostles would use Aramaic among themselves, and in addressing the people in Judæa or Galilee, but Greek would often he needed in conversation with strangers
Luke, the Gospel According to - The sea of Gennesaret is but a "lake" with him, as having seen more of the world than the Galilee fishermen
Herod - His sons were set up in power, Archelaus over Judæa and Idumæa, Antipas over Galilee and Peræa, Philip over Batanæa, Trachonitis, and Auranitis
Rome And the Roman Empire - 18, Herod Antipas, the son of Herod the Great, built his capital on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee and named it Tiberias after the emperor
Unconscious Faith - He was condemning the contemporary generation in Galilee for its want of faith shown in the repeated demand for a ‘sign
Manliness - ), His denunciations of the Pharisees (Matthew 23), His woes against the cities of Galilee (Matthew 11:20-24), His acts of healing upon the Sabbath, His rebuke to the people of Nazareth (Luke 4:16-30), His statement about the Temple (John 2:18-22), His refusal of a sign to the scribes (Matthew 12:38-42; Matthew 16:1-4, Mark 8:11-12, Luke 11:16 f
the Labourer With the Evil Eye - For the like of this husbandman has never been seen before nor since in Galilee, nor in Jewry, nor in Samaria, nor anywhere else
Cross, Cross-Bearing - Many of the followers of Judas and Simon in Galilee had been crucified (Josephus Ant
the Mother of Zebedee's Children - 'How great they will be, if I can help it,' the heartless creature talked to herself and said: 'What titles they will wear! What power they will exercise! And how all Galilee will hear of it, and how they will all envy Salome!' Till she said: 'Leave it to me, my sons; leave it to me
Disciple (2) - That increase took place when the fame of His teaching and words, as He went through the towns and villages of Galilee, ‘preaching the gospel of the kingdom, healing all manner of disease and all manner of sickness’ (Matthew 9:35), both attracted to Him the attention of the populace, and so excited the resentment of the scribes and Pharisees that they began to take counsel with the Herodians ‘how they might destroy him’ (Mark 3:6)
James the Lord's Brother - And Jesus returned in the power of the Spirit into Galilee
Simon Maccabaeus - It is doubtful whether the name of Canaanite was derived to him from the city Cana in Galilee, or whether it should not be taken according to its signification in the Hebrew, by deriving it from the root kana, "to be zealous," and this is the opinion of some learned men
Ships And Boats - ...
(1) On the Sea of Galilee
Paul as a Believing Man - If He went about all Jewry, and all Galilee, and even crossed over into Syrophenicia, seeking for faith, surely here it is to please Him at last
Meals - The fish of which the disciples partook by the Sea of Galilee was cooked on the charcoal itself
Scribes - But they were to be found elsewhere as well, in Galilee and among the Jews in other lands, wherever the Law and its precepts were held in esteem
James, Epistle of - ’ It has indeed been doubted whether a Jew of his position could have written such good Greek as we find in this Epistle, but we know really very little of the scope of Jewish education; there was every opportunity for intercourse with Greeks in Galilee, and a priori arguments of this nature can at most be only subsidiary
Mary, the Virgin - ’ These two scenes at Cana and Capernaum belong to the beginning of the Ministry, and similarly, almost at its close, we have Christ’s words, during the last journey from Galilee to Jerusalem, in answer to the saying of the woman above mentioned, ‘Yea, rather (μενοῦν), blessed are they that hear the word of God and keep it (Luke 11:28)
the Rich Man And Lazarus - Yes, said Luther, I do think our Lord must have known the rich man and Lazarus in Galilee, or in Samaria, or in Judea
Common Life - His presence and first miracle at the wedding at Cana of Galilee (John 2:1-11)—a miracle which shows His deep sympathy with even trivial human needs—is in itself a consecration of marriage
Peter - But though they both saw and shared in the miraculous draught of fishes on the sea of Galilee, Peter alone remembered his sins, and broke down under them, in the presence of the power and grace of Christ
Disease - The ailment described in the Gospels was probably a form of malarial fever which prevailed in the valleys of Palestine and round the Sea of Galilee
Apostle - ...
After the resurrection of our Saviour, and not long before his ascension, the place of Judas the traitor was supplied by Matthias, supposed by some to have been Nathaniel of Galilee, to whom our Lord had given the distinguishing character of an "Israelite indeed, in whom there was no guile;" and the twelve Apostles, whose number was now completed, received a new commission, of a more extensive nature than the first, to preach the Gospel to all nations, and to be witnesses of Christ, not only in Jerusalem, in all Judea, and in Samaria, but unto the uttermost parts of the earth; and they were qualified for the execution of their office by a plenteous effusion of miraculous powers and spiritual gifts, and particularly the gift of tongues
Obedience (2) - at the marriage in Cana of Galilee (John 2:4)
Solomon - A grant of twenty cities in Galilee was unsatisfactory to Hiram, though he apparently paid for them ( 1 Kings 9:10-14 )
Economic Life - A desolate wilderness region lies near the Dead Sea, while well-watered farm lands are found in the Shephelah plateau (between the coastal plain and the hill country) and in the Galilee area of northern Palestine
Humanity of Christ - He walked laboriously from Judaea to Galilee (John 4:4), but He could suddenly appear upon the surface of the sea in the storm, walking upon the water (Matthew 14:25 ||)
the Man Which Sowed Good Seed in His Field But His Enemy Came And Sowed Tares Among the Wheat - That field in Galilee was a study in malice to our Lord: and there are fields all around us today of the same sickening spectacle
Bride - " The Evangelist Luke gives her the same title: "And Joseph also went up from Galilee unto Bethlehem, to be taxed, with Mary his espoused wife," Luke 2:4-5
Scripture - The Massoretic text of today is the work of a body of scholars living at Tiberias, in Galilee, and at Sora in the Euphrates valley, who added the vowel points
Passover (i.) - In Galilee the whole day was one of rest
Pilate - also who mentions (23:4–12) that when Pilate learned that Jesus was a Galilaean he sent Him to Herod, tetrarch of Galilee, to whose jurisdiction He belonged
Trade And Commerce - bank of the Sea of Galilee
Bible - Finally comes Revelation, answering to Daniel, the prophetic Apocalypse of the Old Testament The first three Gospels are called "the synoptical Gospels," giving a synopsis of Christ's ministry in Galilee; John's gives His ministry in Judea
Matthew, Theology of - Typifying the movement from a national Israel to a transnational church, we can compare the coming of the Gentile magi to Jerusalem (2:1-12) to the departure of the apostles from Jerusalem to Galilee of the Gentiles to carry out the mission of Jesus to "all nations" (28:16-20)
Jerusalem - Jesus is tempted by Satan at the highest point of the temple just prior to the start of his ministry in Galilee (4:9-13)
Gentiles - ...
(3) To His limiting the mission of the Twelve to Galilee and Judaea un His first sending them forth (Matthew 10:5-6), we may apply the words of Isaiah 28:16 : ‘He that believeth shall not make haste
Language of Christ - ’ The theory which Professor Marshall in these articles works out with great ability and skill is that the variant Greek words in parallel passages of the Synoptic Gospels can be traced to one original Aramaic word; and the result of the application of his theory is that the Aramaic Gospel contained, speaking generally, the ministry of Christ in Galilee
Fellowship (2) - FELLOWSHIP...
Neither the word ‘fellowship’ (κοινωνία) nor any equivalent term occurs in the Synoptic Gospels, but the reality in faith, love, and joy is diffused like the fragrance of the flowers of Galilee through that bright spring of the world’s life
Force - When He spoke the words in question His ministry in Galilee was closing in disappointing circumstances
David - in His Services - But when I trace that blessing up to its true source, I find that true and grace-gushing source in Jesus of Nazareth, whom I see growing in grace every day as He goes about in Galilee with David's Psalms never out of His hands
Paul - A nonbiblical story says that Paul's parents migrated from a village in Galilee, but this cannot be verified
Jesus Christ - He did much of his work in the northern part of Palestine known as Galilee (Matthew 4:12; Matthew 4:23), though he met his fiercest opposition in Judea in the south, particularly in Jerusalem, which was the centre of Jewish religious power
Faith - In two incidents on the Sea of Galilee the disciples, when rescued by Jesus, respond with fear and amazement that are identified as a lack of faith (Mark 4:40-41 ) or a hardness of heart (Mark 6:50-52 )
Gospel - ; all aspects are included), ‘Jesus came into Galilee preaching the gospel of God
Living (2) - ...
(2) As applied to the Risen Lord: Luke 24:5 τί ζητεῖτε τὸν ζῶντα μετὰ τῶν νεκρῶν; the angels’ question conveyed a reproof to the women who were come to the place where the dead was laid, bringing the spices which they had prepared: it was like asking them, ‘Where is your faith?’ They had heard the announcement Christ made to the circle of His followers before leaving Galilee, that He would rise again the third day (Luke 24:6-7)
Lord's Supper. (i.) - ...
We infer from the Gospels, (1) that before the close of His ministry in Galilee Jesus had looked forward to His death as the goal of His service (Mark 8:31); (2) that this death was to result in the redemption of the new Israel to which the prerogatives of the old would be transferred (Luke 22:7-8; Mark 12:1-12); (3) that He expected an earthly future for His Kingdom outlasting the earthly Jerusalem, and involving its establishment among the Gentiles (Mark 4:30-32; Mark 12:1-12; Mark 13:10; Mark 13:14 ff
Children - The nobleman’s son at Capernaum, whose healing Jesus wrought as a second sign when He came out of Judaea into Galilee (John 4:46-54), was at least a ‘child’ (παῖς, John 4:51), for so the servants call him in cold sobriety; and probably was a ‘little child’ (John 4:49), although it is, of course, possible that on the lips of the father the diminutive expresses tenderness of affection rather than of age
Christ, Christology - Nahum 1:15), proceeds to remind his hearers of something already familiar to them-the ministry of ‘Jesus the one from Nazareth,’ which began from Galilee after the baptism proclaimed by John
Solomon - Solomon gave him at the end of his great buildings 20 cities in Galilee, with which Hiram was dissatisfied
Antiochus - Jonathan, engaged by so many favours, declared resolutely for Antiochus, or rather for Tryphon, who reigned under the name of this young prince; and on several occasions he attacked the generals of Demetrius, who still, possessed many places beyond Jordan and in Galilee, 1Ma_11:63 , &c; 1Ma_12:24 ; 1Ma_12:34
Organization (2) - There is throughout Galilee and in Jerusalem a vaguely connected number of believers in Jesus
Marriage - Sir 32:1-2 ) is ‘the best man’ ( Sir 3:29 , Judges 14:20 ), the office being unusual in the simple life of Galilee (Edersheim, LT i
Food - In still later times, as is so abundantly testified by the Gospels and Josephus, the Sea of Galilee was the centre of a great fishing industry
Jerusalem - This was the route commonly taken from the north and east of the country—as from Galilee by our Lord, Luke 17:11; Luke 18:35; Luke 19:1; Luke 19:29; Luke 19:37, etc
Atonement (2) - We are therefore entitled to hold that any interpretation of the Christian facts which shifts the focus from Calvary to Bethlehem or Galilee represents a departure from the historic faith, and tends to distort the Christian revelation
Bethlehem - ‘Some said, Shall Christ come out of Galilee? Hath not the Scripture said that Christ cometh of the seed of David, and out of the town of Bethlehem where David was?’ (John 7:41-42)
Jerusalem - The western range is the backbone of western Palestine, including the hills of Galilee, Samaria, Ephraim, Benjamin, and Judah, and passing on into the Sinaitic range ending at Ras Mohammed in the tongue of land between the two arms of the Red Sea
Missions - At the beginning of His work in Galilee He applied to Himself the words of Isaiah (Isaiah 61:1), ‘The spirit of the Lord God is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor, he hath sent me to heal the brokenhearted,’ etc
Fortification And Siegecraft - Among the more famous fortresses of later times may be named as types: the Idumæan fortress of Bethsura, conspicuous in the Maccabæan struggle; Jotapata, the fortress in Galilee associated with the name of the historian Josephus; Machærus, said by Pliny to have been the strongest place in Palestine, next to Jerusalem; and Masada, the scene of the Jews’ last stand against the Romans
Immortality (2) - Teaching appropriate and welcome to the keen-witted and philosophic circles of Athens will fall on dull and inappreciative ears by the waterside or in the fields of Galilee
Animals - Within the last century the Syrian bear has disappeared from the Holy Land, with the last bear being killed in Galilee just before World War II
Animals - Dean Stanley says that the birds most in evidence round the Sea of Galilee are partridges and pigeons
Jesus Christ - Even His own brethren could not understand His withdrawal into Galilee, as, regarding Him like other men, they took it for granted that publicity was His aim (John 7:3-4; contrast John 5:44)
Sanhedrin - As governor of Galilee, Josephus appointed seven judges for each town and a Sanhedrin of seventy for the whole province (Jos
Lord's Day - by the events of the Day of Pentecost, or by the first appearance of the risen Christ in Galilee, or by the selection of the first available time after the Jewish Sabbath, and that the connexion of it with the date of the Resurrection was an afterthought’ (J
Matthew, Gospel According to - His herald John had been fore-announced by Isaiah (Matthew 3:3), and the same prophet had foreseen the Christ’s ministry in Galilee, with Capernaum as His headquarters (Matthew 4:14)
Boyhood of Jesus - Possibly Joseph and Mary joined their fellow-travellers from Galilee, in the belief that the Child, who would know the time and point of departure, was among the younger pilgrims
Day of Judgment - On the whole, however, in view of Jesus’ forecast of the punishment to come upon the Jewish people both to Galilee and in Jerusalem, it seems probable that He did in some precise way correlate the fall of Jerusalem with the eschatological Judgment
John, the Gospel by - Being obliged to withdraw through the jealousy of the Pharisees from Judaea, the Lord on His road to Galilee must needs pass through Samaria, where He meets with a poor empty-hearted woman — empty spite of all her efforts to find satisfaction in sin
Education - The learned circle then moved northwards to Galilee, and Tiberias and Sepphoris became seats of Rabbinical training
Holy Spirit (2) - Luke tells us that Jesus returned from the Jordan ‘in the power of the Spirit’ into Galilee (Luke 4:14), and St
Joram - ...
The course of the Jordan is interrupted twice—first by the Lake of Huleh, a description of which occurs later in the course of the present article, then by the Lake of Tiberias or Sea of Galilee (which see); we have not to examine this here
Dates (2) - For Mark 1:14 (‘Now after that John was put in prison Jesus came into Galilee preaching’) refers to an event, the imprisonment of the Baptist, which was clearly later than
Jews - The Romans under Vespasian invaded the country, and took the cities of Galilee, Chorazen, Bethsaida, Capernaum, &c
Augustus (2) - Luke distinguishes between the going up from Galilee as an act once for all completed (ἀνέβη), and an enrolment begun and having a continuance (ἐπορεὺουτο πἀντες ἀτογράφεσθαι)
Old Testament (ii. Christ as Student And Interpreter of). - There is another of the prophets—in all likelihood a native of Galilee, where our Lord Himself was brought up—who seems to have influenced His thought and teaching not a little, viz
Pharisees (2) - Galilee especially was the home of the more earnest Pharisaic piety, with its severe living and strong Messianic hope
John, Gospel of (ii. Contents) - Such are: the marriage in Cana of Galilee, with which the public ministry opens; the conversation with the Samaritan woman; the healing of the paralytic at the pool of Bethesda; the incident of the man born blind; the raising of Lazarus, which in St
Jerusalem (2) - To the north and south, where the ancient caravan road from Hebron and the Negeb runs towards Samaria and Galilee, it is separated from the main backbone by only shallow and open valleys
Christ in Jewish Literature - He first went to Upper Galilee, and thence to Jerusalem, where he contrived to learn the secret of the Ineffable Name (of God)
Jesus Christ - The spot of Christ's nativity was distant from the place of the abode of his parents, and the region in which he began his ministry was remote from the place of his birth; and another prophecy respecting him was in this manner verified: "In the land of Zebulun and Naphtali, by the way of the sea beyond Jordan, in Galilee of the nations, the people that walked in darkness have seen a great light; they that dwell in the land of the shadow of death, upon them hath the light shined," Isaiah 9:1-2 ; Matthew 4:16
Marcion, a 2nd Century Heretic - Some have supposed that he did not distinguish him from his good God for Marcion's Gospel was said to have commenced: "In the 15th year of Tiberius God came down to Capernaum a city of Galilee and taught on the Sabbath days" (Tert
Originality - ...
There are, Havet thinks, three elements to be taken into account in considering the origin of Christianity, the Hellenic, the Jewish, represented by the Prophets and the Psalms, and a third which he calls the Galilaean, by which he means the sentiments and ideas which developed at first among the turbulent population of Galilee under the misery of the Roman dominion, and then raised up Jesus, and determined His action and destiny, and which gradually spread throughout the great cities of the Roman Empire